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Sample records for high dose neutron

  1. High-dose neutron detector project update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menlove, Howard Olsen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henzlova, Daniela [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-10

    These are the slides for a progress review meeting by the sponsor. This is an update on the high-dose neutron detector project. In summary, improvements in both boron coating and signal amplification have been achieved; improved boron coating materials and procedures have increase efficiency by ~ 30-40% without the corresponding increase in the detector plate area; low dead-time via thin cell design (~ 4 mm gas gaps) and fast amplifiers; prototype PDT 8” pod has been received and testing is in progress; significant improvements in efficiency and stability have been verified; use commercial PDT 10B design and fabrication to obtain a faster path from the research to practical high-dose neutron detector.

  2. High-dose neutron detector project update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menlove, Howard Olsen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henzlova, Daniela [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-10

    These are the slides for a progress review meeting by the sponsor. This is an update on the high-dose neutron detector project. In summary, improvements in both boron coating and signal amplification have been achieved; improved boron coating materials and procedures have increased efficiency by ~ 30-40% without the corresponding increase in the detector plate area; low dead-time via thin cell design (~ 4 mm gas gaps) and fast amplifiers; prototype PDT 8” pod has been received and testing is in progress; significant improvements in efficiency and stability have been verified; use commercial PDT 10B design and fabrication to obtain a faster path from the research to practical high-dose neutron detector.

  3. High-dose neutron detector development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzlova, Daniela [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Menlove, Howard Olsen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-01-14

    The development of advanced sustainable nuclear fuel cycles relying on used nuclear fuel is one of the key programs pursued by the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy to minimize waste generation, limit proliferation risk and maximize energy production using nuclear energy. Safeguarding of advanced nuclear fuel cycles is essential to ensure the safety and security of the nuclear material. Current non-destructive assay (NDA) systems typically employ fission chambers or 3He-based tubes for the measurement of used fuel. Fission chambers are capable of withstanding the high gamma-ray backgrounds; however, they provide very low detection efficiency on the order of 0.01%. To benefit from the additional information provided by correlated neutron counting [1] higher detection efficiencies are required. 3He-based designs allow for higher detection efficiencies; however, at the expense of slow signal rise time characteristics and higher sensitivity to the gamma-ray backgrounds. It is therefore desirable to evaluate and develop technologies with potential to exceed performance parameters of standard fission chamber-based or 3He-based detection systems currently used in the NDA instrumentation.

  4. Cation disorder in high-dose, neutron-irradiated spinel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sickafus, K.E.; Larson, A.C.; Yu, N. [Los Alamos National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this effort is to determine whether MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel is a suitable ceramic for fusion applications. The crystal structures of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel single crystals irradiated to high neutron fluences [>5{times}10{sup 26} n/m{sup 2} (E{sub n}>0.1 MeV)] were examined by neutron diffraction. Crystal structure refinement of the highese dose sample indicated that the average scattering strength of the tetrahedral crystal sites decreased by {approx}20% while increasing by {approx}8% on octahedral sites.

  5. Neutron spectra and dose equivalents calculated in tissue for high-energy radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kry, Stephen F.; Howell, Rebecca M.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Followill, David S. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Boulevard, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    Neutrons are by-products of high-energy radiation therapy and a source of dose to normal tissues. Thus, the presence of neutrons increases a patient's risk of radiation-induced secondary cancer. Although neutrons have been thoroughly studied in air, little research has been focused on neutrons at depths in the patient where radiosensitive structures may exist, resulting in wide variations in neutron dose equivalents between studies. In this study, we characterized properties of neutrons produced during high-energy radiation therapy as a function of their depth in tissue and for different field sizes and different source-to-surface distances (SSD). We used a previously developed Monte Carlo model of an accelerator operated at 18 MV to calculate the neutron fluences, energy spectra, quality factors, and dose equivalents in air and in tissue at depths ranging from 0.1 to 25 cm. In conjunction with the sharply decreasing dose equivalent with increased depth in tissue, the authors found that the neutron energy spectrum changed drastically as a function of depth in tissue. The neutron fluence decreased gradually as the depth increased, while the average neutron energy decreased sharply with increasing depth until a depth of approximately 7.5 cm in tissue, after which it remained nearly constant. There was minimal variation in the quality factor as a function of depth. At a given depth in tissue, the neutron dose equivalent increased slightly with increasing field size and decreasing SSD; however, the percentage depth-dose equivalent curve remained constant outside the primary photon field. Because the neutron dose equivalent, fluence, and energy spectrum changed substantially with depth in tissue, we concluded that when the neutron dose equivalent is being determined at a depth within a patient, the spectrum and quality factor used should be appropriate for depth rather than for in-air conditions. Alternately, an appropriate percent depth-dose equivalent curve

  6. The neutron dose equivalent around high energy medical electron linear accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poje Marina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of neutron dose equivalent was made in four dual energy linear accelerator rooms. Two of the rooms were reconstructed after decommissioning of 60Co units, so the main limitation was the space. The measurements were performed by a nuclear track etched detectors LR-115 associated with the converter (radiator that consist of 10B and with the active neutron detector Thermo BIOREM FHT 742. The detectors were set at several locations to evaluate the neutron ambient dose equivalent and/or neutron dose rate to which medical personnel could be exposed. Also, the neutron dose dependence on collimator aperture was analyzed. The obtained neutron dose rates outside the accelerator rooms were several times smaller than the neutron dose rates inside the accelerator rooms. Nevertheless, the measured neutron dose equivalent was not negligible from the aspect of the personal dosimetry with almost 2 mSv a year per person in the areas occupied by staff (conservative estimation. In rooms with 15 MV accelerators, the neutron exposure to the personnel was significantly lower than in the rooms having 18 MV accelerators installed. It was even more pronounced in the room reconstructed after the 60Co decommissioning. This study confirms that shielding from the neutron radiation should be considered when building vaults for high energy linear accelerators, especially when the space constraints exist.

  7. In-phantom neutron dose distribution for bladder cancer cases treated with high-energy photons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, N. E.; Attalla, E. M.; Ammar, H.; Khalil, W.

    2011-06-01

    This work presents an estimation of the neutron dose distribution for common bladder cancer cases treated with high-energy photons of 15 MV therapy accelerators. Neutron doses were measured in an Alderson phantom, using TLD 700 and 600 thermoluminescence dosimeters, resembling bladder cancer cases treated with high-energy photons from 15 MV LINAC and having a treatment plan using the four-field pelvic box technique. Thermal neutron dose distribution in the target area and the surrounding tissue was estimated. The sensitivity of all detectors for both gamma and neutrons was estimated and used for correction of the TL reading. TLD detectors were irradiated with a Co60 gamma standard source and thermal neutrons at the irradiation facility of the National Institute for Standards (NIS). The TL to dose conversion factor was estimated in terms of both Co60 neutron equivalent dose and thermal neutron dose. The dose distribution of photo-neutrons throughout each target was estimated and presented in three-dimensional charts and isodose curves. The distribution was found to be non-isotropic through the target. It varied from a minimum of 0.23 mSv/h to a maximum of 2.07 mSv/h at 6 cm off-axis. The mean neutron dose equivalent was found to be 0.63 mSv/h, which agrees with other published literature. The estimated average neutron equivalent to the bladder per administered therapeutic dose was found to be 0.39 mSv Gy-1, which is also in good agreement with published literature. As a consequence of a complete therapeutic treatment of 50 Gy high-energy photons at 15 MV, the total thermal neutron equivalent dose to the abdomen was found to be about 0.012 Sv.

  8. The response of various neutron dose meters considering the application at a high energy particle accelerator

    CERN Document Server

    Gutermuth, F; Fehrenbacher, G; Festag, J G

    2003-01-01

    The applicability of several neutron detectors for dose measurements at a neutron field typical for high energy particle accelerators is investigated. The response of four commercially available active neutron dose meters and two passive detectors to neutrons from a sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be(alpha,n) source and to neutrons at the CERN EU high energy reference field was determined experimentally and simulated using the Monte-Carlo code FLUKA. Fluence response functions and dose responses for the different detectors were calculated in the energy range between 1 keV and 10 GeV. The results show that the dose response to the high energy neutron field at CERN of the conventional rem-counters is lower by a factor of 2 to 2.5 if compared to the dose response to a sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am-Be(alpha,n) neutron source. The rem-counters exhibiting an additional layer of lead inside the moderating structure showed dose readings which differ only up to 25%. A thermoluminescent based neutron detector was tested for comparison. Th...

  9. Elastic stability of high dose neutron irradiated spinel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Z.; Chan, S.K. [Argonne National Lab., Chicago, IL (United States); Garner, F.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this effort is to identify ceramic materials that are suitable for fusion reactor applications. Elastic constants (C{sub 11}, C{sub 12}, and C{sub 44}) of spinel (MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}) single crystals irradiated to very high neutron fluences have geen measured by an ultrasonic technique. Although results of a neutron diffraction study show that cation occupation sites are significantly changed in the irradiated samples, no measurable differences occurred in their elastic properties. In order to understand such behavior, the elastic properties of a variety of materials with either normal or inverse spinel structures were studied. The cation valence and cation distribution appear to have little influence on the elastic properties of spinel materials.

  10. Dose conversion coefficients for high-energy photons, electrons, neutrons and protons

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Y; Sato, O; Tanaka, S I; Tsuda, S; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoshizawa, N

    2003-01-01

    In the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 1990 Recommendations, radiation weighting factors were introduced in the place of quality factors, the tissue weighting factors were revised, and effective doses and equivalent doses of each tissues and organs were defined as the protection quantities. Dose conversion coefficients for photons, electrons and neutrons based on new ICRP recommendations were cited in the ICRP Publication 74, but the energy ranges of theses data were limited and there are no data for high energy radiations produced in accelerator facilities. For the purpose of designing the high intensity proton accelerator facilities at JAERI, the dose evaluation code system of high energy radiations based on the HERMES code was developed and the dose conversion coefficients of effective dose were evaluated for photons, neutrons and protons up to 10 GeV, and electrons up to 100 GeV. The dose conversion coefficients of effective dose equivalent were also evaluated using quality fact...

  11. Monitor units are not predictive of neutron dose for high-energy IMRT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hälg Roger A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to the substantial increase in beam-on time of high energy intensity-modulated radiotherapy (>10 MV techniques to deliver the same target dose compared to conventional treatment techniques, an increased dose of scatter radiation, including neutrons, is delivered to the patient. As a consequence, an increase in second malignancies may be expected in the future with the application of intensity-modulated radiotherapy. It is commonly assumed that the neutron dose equivalent scales with the number of monitor units. Methods Measurements of neutron dose equivalent were performed for an open and an intensity-modulated field at four positions: inside and outside of the treatment field at 0.2 cm and 15 cm depth, respectively. Results It was shown that the neutron dose equivalent, which a patient receives during an intensity-modulated radiotherapy treatment, does not scale with the ratio of applied monitor units relative to an open field irradiation. Outside the treatment volume at larger depth 35% less neutron dose equivalent is delivered than expected. Conclusions The predicted increase of second cancer induction rates from intensity-modulated treatment techniques can be overestimated when the neutron dose is simply scaled with monitor units.

  12. Development of Real-Time Measurement of Effective Dose for High Dose Rate Neutron Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Braby, L A; Reece, W D

    2003-01-01

    Studies of the effects of low doses of ionizing radiation require sources of radiation which are well characterized in terms of the dose and the quality of the radiation. One of the best measures of the quality of neutron irradiation is the dose mean lineal energy. At very low dose rates this can be determined by measuring individual energy deposition events, and calculating the dose mean of the event size. However, at the dose rates that are normally required for biology experiments, the individual events can not be separated by radiation detectors. However, the total energy deposited in a specified time interval can be measured. This total energy has a random variation which depends on the size of the individual events, so the dose mean lineal energy can be calculated from the variance of repeated measurements of the energy deposited in a fixed time. We have developed a specialized charge integration circuit for the measurement of the charge produced in a small ion chamber in typical neutron irradiation exp...

  13. High-dose neutron irradiation embrittlement of RAFM steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaganidze, E. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Materialforschung II, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)]. E-mail: ermile.gaganidze@imf.fzk.de; Schneider, H.-C. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Materialforschung II, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Dafferner, B. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Materialforschung II, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Aktaa, J. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Materialforschung II, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2006-09-01

    Neutron irradiation-induced embrittlement of the reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel EUROFER97 was studied under different heat treatment conditions. Irradiation was performed in the Petten High Flux Reactor within the HFR Phase-IIb (SPICE) irradiation project up to 16.3 dpa and at different irradiation temperatures (250-450 deg. C). Several reference RAFM steels (F82H-mod, OPTIFER-Ia, GA3X and MANET-I) were also irradiated at selected temperatures. The impact properties were investigated by instrumented Charpy-V tests with subsize specimens. Embrittlement and hardening of as-delivered EUROFER97 steel are comparable to those of reference steels. Heat treatment of EUROFER97 at a higher austenitizing temperature substantially improves the embrittlement behaviour at low irradiation temperatures. Analysis of embrittlement in terms of the parameter C = {delta}DBTT/{delta}{sigma} indicates hardening-dominated embrittlement at irradiation temperatures below 350 deg. C with 0.17 {<=} C {<=} 0.53 deg. C/MPa. Scattering of C at irradiation temperatures above 400 deg. C indicates no hardening embrittlement.

  14. High-dose neutron irradiation embrittlement of RAFM steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaganidze, E.; Schneider, H.-C.; Dafferner, B.; Aktaa, J.

    2006-09-01

    Neutron irradiation-induced embrittlement of the reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel EUROFER97 was studied under different heat treatment conditions. Irradiation was performed in the Petten High Flux Reactor within the HFR Phase-IIb (SPICE) irradiation project up to 16.3 dpa and at different irradiation temperatures (250-450 °C). Several reference RAFM steels (F82H-mod, OPTIFER-Ia, GA3X and MANET-I) were also irradiated at selected temperatures. The impact properties were investigated by instrumented Charpy-V tests with subsize specimens. Embrittlement and hardening of as-delivered EUROFER97 steel are comparable to those of reference steels. Heat treatment of EUROFER97 at a higher austenitizing temperature substantially improves the embrittlement behaviour at low irradiation temperatures. Analysis of embrittlement in terms of the parameter C = ΔDBTT/Δ σ indicates hardening-dominated embrittlement at irradiation temperatures below 350 °C with 0.17 ⩽ C ⩽ 0.53 °C/MPa. Scattering of C at irradiation temperatures above 400 °C indicates no hardening embrittlement.

  15. Neutron dose measurements with the GSI ball at high-energy accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehrenbacher, G; Gutermuth, F; Kozlova, E; Radon, T; Schuetz, R

    2007-01-01

    A moderator-type neutron monitor containing pairs of TLD 600/700 elements (Harshaw) modified with the addition of a lead layer (GSI ball) for the measurement of the ambient dose equivalent from neutrons at medium- and high-energy accelerators, is introduced in this work. Measurements were performed with the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung (GSI) ball as well as with conventional polyethylene (PE) spheres at the high-energy accelerator SPS at European Organization for Nuclear Research [CERN (CERF)] and in Cave A of the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS at GSI. The measured dose values are compared with dose values derived from calculated neutron spectra folded with dose conversion coefficients. The estimated reading of the spheres calculated by means of the response functions and the neutron spectra is also included in the comparison. The analysis of the measurements shows that the PE/Pb sphere gives an improved estimate on the ambient dose equivalent of the neutron radiation transmitted through shielding of medium- and high-energy accelerators.

  16. Neutron dose per fluence and weighting factors for use at high energy accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cossairt, J.Donald; Vaziri, Kamran; /Fermilab

    2008-07-01

    In June 2007, the United States Department of Energy incorporated revised values of neutron weighting factors into its occupational radiation protection Regulation 10 CFR Part 835 as part of updating its radiation dosimetry system. This has led to a reassessment of neutron radiation fields at high energy proton accelerators such as those at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab). Values of dose per fluence factors appropriate for accelerator radiation fields calculated elsewhere are collated and radiation weighting factors compared. The results of this revision to the dosimetric system are applied to americium-beryllium neutron energy spectra commonly used for instrument calibrations. A set of typical accelerator neutron energy spectra previously measured at Fermilab are reassessed in light of the new dosimetry system. The implications of this revision are found to be of moderate significance.

  17. In-phantom spectra and dose distributions from a high-energy neutron therapy beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benck, S. E-mail: benck@fynu.ucl.ac.be; D' Errico, F.; Denis, J.-M.; Meulders, J.-P.; Nath, R.; Pitcher, E.J

    2002-01-01

    In radiotherapy with external beams, healthy tissues surrounding the target volumes are inevitably irradiated. In the case of neutron therapy, the estimation of dose to the organs surrounding the target volume is particularly challenging, because of the varying contributions from primary and secondary neutrons and photons of different energies. The neutron doses to tissues surrounding the target volume at the Louvain-la-Neuve (LLN) facility were investigated in this work. At LLN, primary neutrons have a broad spectrum with a mean energy of about 30 MeV. The transport of a 10x10 cm{sup 2} beam through a water phantom was simulated by means of the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. Distributions of energy-differential values of neutron fluence, kerma and kerma equivalent were estimated at different locations in a water phantom. The evolution of neutron dose and dose equivalent inside the phantom was deduced. Measurements of absorbed dose and of dose equivalent were then carried out in a water phantom using an ionization chamber and superheated drop detectors (SDDs). On the beam axis, the calculations agreed well with the ionization chamber data, but disagreed significantly from the SDD data due to the detector's under-response to neutrons above 20 MeV. Off the beam axis, the calculated absorbed doses were significantly lower than the ionization chamber readings, since gamma fields were not accounted for. The calculated data are doses from neutron-induced charge particles, and these agreed with the values measured by the photon-insensitive SDDs. When exposed to the degraded spectra off the beam axis, the SDD offered reliable estimates of the neutron dose equivalent.

  18. High-Dose Neutron Detector Development Using 10B Coated Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menlove, Howard Olsen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henzlova, Daniela [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-08

    During FY16 the boron-lined parallel-plate technology was optimized to fully benefit from its fast timing characteristics in order to enhance its high count rate capability. To facilitate high count rate capability, a novel fast amplifier with timing and operating properties matched to the detector characteristics was developed and implemented in the 8” boron plate detector that was purchased from PDT. Each of the 6 sealed-cells was connected to a fast amplifier with corresponding List mode readout from each amplifier. The FY16 work focused on improvements in the boron-10 coating materials and procedures at PDT to significantly improve the neutron detection efficiency. An improvement in the efficiency of a factor of 1.5 was achieved without increasing the metal backing area for the boron coating. This improvement has allowed us to operate the detector in gamma-ray backgrounds that are four orders of magnitude higher than was previously possible while maintaining a relatively high counting efficiency for neutrons. This improvement in the gamma-ray rejection is a key factor in the development of the high dose neutron detector.

  19. Synergies Between ' and Cavity Formation in HT-9 Following High Dose Neutron Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Parish, Chad M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Saleh, Tarik A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eftink, Benjamin P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Candidate cladding materials for advanced nuclear power reactors including fast reactor designs require materials capable of withstanding high dose neutron irradiation at elevated temperatures. One candidate material, HT-9, through various research programs have demonstrated the ability to withstand significant swelling and other radiation-induced degradation mechanisms in the high dose regime (>50 displacements per atom, dpa) at elevated temperatures (>300 C). Here, high efficiency multi-dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) acquisition with the aid of a three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction and modeling technique is used to probe the microstructural features that contribute to the exceptional swelling resistance of HT-9. In particular, the synergies between ' and fine-scale and moderate-scale cavity formation is investigated.

  20. In-phantom spectra and dose distributions from a high-energy neutron therapy beam

    CERN Document Server

    Benck, S; Denis, J M; Meulders, J P; Nath, R; Pitcher, E J

    2002-01-01

    In radiotherapy with external beams, healthy tissues surrounding the target volumes are inevitably irradiated. In the case of neutron therapy, the estimation of dose to the organs surrounding the target volume is particularly challenging, because of the varying contributions from primary and secondary neutrons and photons of different energies. The neutron doses to tissues surrounding the target volume at the Louvain-la-Neuve (LLN) facility were investigated in this work. At LLN, primary neutrons have a broad spectrum with a mean energy of about 30 MeV. The transport of a 10x10 cm sup 2 beam through a water phantom was simulated by means of the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. Distributions of energy-differential values of neutron fluence, kerma and kerma equivalent were estimated at different locations in a water phantom. The evolution of neutron dose and dose equivalent inside the phantom was deduced. Measurements of absorbed dose and of dose equivalent were then carried out in a water phantom using an ionization ch...

  1. Dose measurements around spallation neutron sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragopoulou, M; Stoulos, S; Manolopoulou, M; Krivopustov, M; Zamani, M

    2008-01-01

    Neutron dose measurements and calculations around spallation sources appear to be of great importance in shielding research. Two spallation sources were irradiated by high-energy proton beams delivered by the Nuclotron accelerator (JINR), Dubna. Neutrons produced by the spallation sources were measured by using solid-state nuclear track detectors. In addition, neutron dose was calculated after polyethylene and concrete, using a phenomenological model based on empirical relations applied in high-energy physics. The study provides an analytical and experimental neutron benchmark analysis using the transmission factor and a comparison between the experimental results and calculations.

  2. An investigation of methods for neutron dose measurement in high temperature irradiation fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosako, Toshisou; Sugiura, Nobuyuki [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Kudo, Kazuhiko [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)] [and others

    2000-10-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been conducting the innovative basic research on high temperature since 1994, which is a series of high temperature irradiation studies using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). 'The Task Group for Evaluation of Irradiation Dose under High Temperature Radiation' was founded in the HTTR Utilization Research Committee, which is the promoting body of the innovative basic research. The present report is a summary of investigation which has been made by the Task Group on the present status and subjects of research and development of neutron detectors in high temperature irradiation fields, in view of contributing to high temperature irradiation research using the HTTR. Detectors investigated here in the domestic survey are the following five kinds of in-core detectors: 1) small fission counter, 2) small fission chamber, 3) self-powered detector, 4) activation detector, and 5) optical fiber. In addition, the research and development status in Russia has been investigated. The present report will also be useful as nuclear instrumentation of high temperature gas-cooled reactors. (author)

  3. Active detection of small quantities of shielded highly-enriched uranium using low-dose 60-kev neutron interrogation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Phil; Rowland, Mark; Dietrich, Dan; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Wheeler, Boyd; Nakae, Les; Howard, Doug; Hagmann, Chris; Newby, Jason; Porter, Robert

    2007-08-01

    Active interrogation with low-energy neutrons provides a search technique for highly-enriched uranium concealed in cargo. We describe the technique and show initial results using a low-dose 60-keV neutron beam. This technique produces a clear induced fission signal in the presence of small quantities of 235U. The technique has been validated with low-Z and high-Z cargo materials. The technique uses a forward-directed beam of 60-keV neutrons to induce fission in 235U. Detection of the fast fission neutrons with pulse-shape discriminating scintillators is then the signature for 235U. The beam of neutrons is generated with a 1.93 MeV proton beam impinging on a natural lithium target. The proton beam is produced by a radio-frequency quadrupole LINAC. The 60 keV neutron beam is forward-directed because the 7Li(p, n) reaction is just above threshold for a proton energy of 1.93 MeV.

  4. Neutron dose in and out of 18MV photon fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzati, A O; Studenski, M T

    2017-04-01

    In radiation therapy, neutron contamination is an undesirable side effect of using high energy photons to treat patients. Neutron contamination requires adjustments to the shielding requirements of the linear accelerator vault and contributes to the risk of secondary malignancies in patients by delivering dose outside of the primary treatment field. Using MCNPX, an established Monte Carlo code, manufacturer blueprints, and the most up to date ICRP neutron dose conversion factors, the neutron spectra, neutron/photon dose ratio, and the neutron capture gamma ray dose were calculated at different depths and off axis distances in a tissue equivalent phantom. Results demonstrated that the neutron spectra and dose are dependent on field size, depth in the phantom, and off-axis distance. Simulations showed that because of the low neutron absorption cross section of the linear accelerator head materials, the contribution to overall patient dose from neutrons can be up to 1000 times the photon dose out of the treatment field and is also dependent on field size and depth. Beyond 45cm off-axis, the dependence of the neutron dose on field size is minimal. Neutron capture gamma ray dose is also field size dependent and is at a maximum at a depth of about 7cm. It is important to remember that when treating with high energy photons, the dose from contamination neutrons must be considered as it is much greater than the photon dose.

  5. Evaluation of the fluence to dose conversion coefficients for high energy neutrons using a voxel phantom coupled with the GEANT4 code

    CERN Document Server

    Paganini, S

    2005-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from Galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the male adult voxels phantom MAX, developed in the Nuclear Energy Department of Pernambuco Federal University in Brazil, has been coupled with the Monte Carlo simulation code GEANT4. This toolkit, distributed and upgraded from the international scientific community of CERN/Switzerland, simulates thermal to ultrahigh energy neutrons transport and interactions in the matter. The high energy neutrons are pointed as the component that contribute about 70% of the neutron effective dose that represent the 35% to 60% total dose at aircraft altitude. In this research calculations of conversion coefficients from fluence to effective dose are performed for neutrons of energies from 100 MeV ...

  6. Sequential measurements of environmental neutron energy spectrum and neutron dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunomiya, Tomoya; Nakamura, Takashi; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Terunuma, Kazutaka; Hirabayashi, Naoya; Sato, Youichi; Abe, Sigeru; Rasolonjatovo A.H, Danielle [Tohoku Univ., Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    From April 2001, neutron energy spectra and neutron dose were sequentially measured using 5'' -rem counter and {sup 3}He multi-moderator spectrometer (Boner boll) at Kawauchi-campus of Tohoku University. These data were collected about the relation between the dose level and the solar activities. (author)

  7. High-dose neutron irradiation of Hi-Nicalon Type S silicon carbide composites. Part 2: Mechanical and physical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai, E-mail: katohy@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Nozawa, Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori-ken (Japan); Shih, Chunghao [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ozawa, Kazumi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Rokkasho, Aomori-ken (Japan); Koyanagi, Takaaki; Porter, Wally; Snead, Lance L. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Nuclear-grade silicon carbide (SiC) composite material was examined for mechanical and thermophysical properties following high-dose neutron irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at a temperature range of 573–1073 K. The material was chemical vapor-infiltrated SiC-matrix composite with a two-dimensional satin weave Hi-Nicalon Type S SiC fiber reinforcement and a multilayered pyrocarbon/SiC interphase. Moderate (1073 K) to very severe (573 K) degradation in mechanical properties was found after irradiation to >70 dpa, whereas no evidence was found for progressive evolution in swelling and thermal conductivity. The swelling was found to recover upon annealing beyond the irradiation temperature, indicating the irradiation temperature, but only to a limited extent. The observed strength degradation is attributed primarily to fiber damage for all irradiation temperatures, particularly a combination of severe fiber degradation and likely interphase damage at relatively low irradiation temperatures.

  8. Study of the effect of high dose rate on tissue equivalent proportional counter microdosimetric measurements in mixed photon and neutron fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam; Qashua, N.; Waker, A. J.

    2011-10-01

    This study describes the measurement of lineal energy spectra carried out with a 5.1 cm (2 in.) diameter spherical tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) simulating 2 μm tissue equivalent (TE) site diameter in low energy mixed photon-neutron fields with varying dose rates generated by employing the McMaster University 1.25 MV double stage Tandetron accelerator. The 7Li (p, n) 7Be reaction was employed to generate a variety of mixed fields of photons and low energy neutrons using proton beam energy ranging 1.89-2.56 MeV. The dose rate at a given beam energy was varied by changing the beam current. Dose rates that resulted in dead times as high as 75% were employed to study the effect of dose rate on quality, microdosimetric averages ( y¯F and y¯D), absorbed dose and dose equivalent. We have observed that high dose rates due to both photons and neutrons in a mixed field of radiation result in pile up of pulses and distort the lineal energy spectrum measured under these conditions. The pile up effect and hence the distortion in the lineal energy spectrum becomes prominent with dose rates, which result in dead times larger than 25% for the high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation component. Intense neutron fields, which may amount to 75% dead time, could result in a 50% or even larger increase in the values of the microsdosimetric averages and the neutron quality factor. This study demonstrates moderate dose rates that do not result in dead times of more than 20-25% due to either of the component radiation or due to both components of mixed field radiation generate results that are acceptable for radiation monitoring.

  9. Antiproton radiotherapy: peripheral dose from secondary neutrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahimian, Benjamin P.; DeMarco, John J.; Keyes, Roy

    2009-01-01

    is the normal tissue dose resulting from secondary neutrons produced in the annihilation of antiprotons on the nucleons of the target atoms. Here we present the first organ specific Monte Carlo calculations of normal tissue equivalent neutron dose in antiproton therapy through the use of a segmented CT......-based human phantom. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was employed to quantify the peripheral dose for a cylindrical spread out Bragg peak representing a treatment volume of 1 cm diameter and 1 cm length in the frontal lobe of a segmented whole-body phantom of a 38 year old male. The secondary neutron organ dose...

  10. Neutron absorbed dose in a pacemaker CMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja H, C. G.; Guzman G, K. A.; Valero L, C.; Banuelos F, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Paredes G, L., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-06-15

    The neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose in a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS), has been estimated using Monte Carlo methods. Eventually a person with a pacemaker becomes an oncology patient that must be treated in a linear accelerator. Pacemaker has integrated circuits as CMOS that are sensitive to intense and pulsed radiation fields. Above 7 MV therapeutic beam is contaminated with photoneutrons that could damage the CMOS. Here, the neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose in a CMOS cell was calculated, also the spectra were calculated in two point-like detectors in the room. Neutron spectrum in the CMOS cell shows a small peak between 0.1 to 1 MeV and a larger peak in the thermal region, joined by epithermal neutrons, same features were observed in the point-like detectors. The absorbed dose in the CMOS was 1.522 x 10{sup -17} Gy per neutron emitted by the source. (Author)

  11. Measurements of neutron dose rates with a balloon in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, K; Hiraide, I; Sato, K; Yamagami, T; Nakamura, T; Yabutani, T

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of cosmic-ray neutron dose rates with a balloon in Sanriku, Japan (geographic location: 39 degrees N, 142 degrees E; corresponding geomagnetic latitude: 30 degrees N) were conducted at an altitude from 0.2 to 25 km on 25-26 August 2004 when solar activity was at an average level. Neutron dose rates given as ambient dose equivalent rates (H(10)) were measured with high-sensitive neutron dose equivalent counters and electronic silicon personal dosimeters (EPDs). The neutron dose rates increased with increasing altitude, but they were saturated around 15-20 km and decreased with increasing altitude beyond 20 km. The neutron ambient dose equivalent rate was 1.5 microSv/h(- 1) at 20 km. Measured values were corrected for the deviation of the energy response of the dose equivalent counter from the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficient, and the corrected values were very close to the calculated values with EPCARD. On the other hand, neutron measurements by the EPDs gave about 10 times overestimation because of the high sensitivity to cosmic-ray protons.

  12. Mechanical properties and microstructure of advanced ferritic-martensitic steels used under high dose neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamardin, V. K.; Golovanov, V. N.; Bulanova, T. M.; Povstianko, A. V.; Fedoseev, A. E.; Goncharenko, Yu. D.; Ostrovsky, Z. E.

    Some results of the study of mechanical properties and structure of ferritic-martensitic chromium steels with 13% and 9% chromium, irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor up to different damage doses are presented in this report. Results concerning the behaviour of commercial steels, containing to molybdenum, vanadium and niobium, and developed for the use in fusion reactors, are compared to low-activation steels in which W and Ta replaced Mo and Nb. It is shown that after irradiation to the dose of ˜10 dpa at 400°C 0.1C-9Cr-1W, V, Ta steels are prone to lower embrittlement as deduced from fracture surface observations of tensile specimens. Peculiarities of fine structure and fracture mode, composition and precipitation reactions in steels during irradiation are discussed.

  13. Dose spectra from energetic particles and neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwadron, Nathan; Bancroft, Chris; Bloser, Peter; Legere, Jason; Ryan, James; Smith, Sonya; Spence, Harlan; Mazur, Joe; Zeitlin, Cary

    2013-10-01

    spectra from energetic particles and neutrons (DoSEN) are an early-stage space technology research project that combines two advanced complementary radiation detection concepts with fundamental advantages over traditional dosimetry. DoSEN measures not only the energy but also the charge distribution (including neutrons) of energetic particles that affect human (and robotic) health in a way not presently possible with current dosimeters. For heavy ions and protons, DoSEN provides a direct measurement of the lineal energy transfer (LET) spectra behind shielding material. For LET measurements, DoSEN contains stacks of thin-thick Si detectors similar in design to those used for the Cosmic Ray Telescope for the Effects of Radiation. With LET spectra, we can now directly break down the observed spectrum of radiation into its constituent heavy-ion components and through biologically based quality factors that provide not only doses and dose rates but also dose equivalents, associated rates, and even organ doses. DoSEN also measures neutrons from 10 to 100 MeV, which requires enough sensitive mass to fully absorb recoil particles that the neutrons produce. DoSEN develops the new concept of combining these independent measurements and using the coincidence of LET measurements and neutron detection to significantly reduce backgrounds in each measurement. The background suppression through the use of coincidence allows for significant reductions in size, mass, and power needed to provide measurements of dose, neutron dose, dose equivalents, LET spectra, and organ doses. Thus, we introduce the DoSEN concept: a promising low-mass instrument that detects the full spectrum of energetic particles, heavy ions, and neutrons to determine biological impact of radiation in space.

  14. Neutron dose and energy spectra measurements at Savannah River Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Soldat, K.L.; Haggard, D.L.; Faust, L.G.; Tomeraasen, P.L.

    1987-08-01

    Because some workers have a high potential for significant neutron exposure, the Savannah River Plant (SRP) contracted with Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to verify the accuracy of neutron dosimetry at the plant. Energy spectrum and neutron dose measurements were made at the SRP calibrations laboratory and at several other locations. The energy spectra measurements were made using multisphere or Bonner sphere spectrometers,/sup 3/He spectrometers, and NE-213 liquid scintillator spectrometers. Neutron dose equivalent determinations were made using these instruments and others specifically designed to determine dose equivalent, such as the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). Survey instruments, such as the Eberline PNR-4, and the thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD)-albedo and track etch dosimeters (TEDs) were also used. The TEPC, subjectively judged to provide the most accurate estimation of true dose equivalent, was used as the reference for comparison with other devices. 29 refs., 43 figs., 13 tabs.

  15. Active Detection of Small Quantities of Shielded Highly-Enriched Uranium Using Low-Dose 60-keV Neutron Interrogation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, P; Rowland, M; Dietrich, D; Stoeffl, W; Wheeler, B; Nakae, L; Howard, D; Hagmann, C; Newby, J; Porter, R

    2006-08-16

    Active interrogation with low-energy neutrons provides a search technique for shielded highly-enriched uranium. We describe the technique and show initial results using a low-dose 60 keV neutron beam. This technique produces a clear induced fission signal in the presence of small quantities of {sup 235}U. The technique has been validated with low-Z and high-Z shielding materials. The technique uses a forward-directed beam of 60 keV neutrons to induce fission in {sup 235}U. The induced fission produces fast neutrons which are then detected as the signature for {sup 235}U. The beam of neutrons is generated with a 1.93 MeV proton beam impinging on a natural lithium target. The proton beam is produced by a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) LINAC. The 60 keV neutron beam is forward directed because the {sup 7}Li(p,n) reaction is just at threshold for the proton energy of 1.93 MeV.

  16. The effect of incremental gamma-ray doses and incremental neutron fluences upon the performance of self-biased sup 1 sup 0 B-coated high-purity epitaxial GaAs thermal neutron detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gersch, H K; Simpson, P A

    2002-01-01

    High-purity epitaxial GaAs sup 1 sup 0 B-coated thermal neutron detectors advantageously operate at room temperature without externally applied voltage. Sample detectors were systematically irradiated at fixed grid locations near the core of a 2 MW research reactor to determine their operational neutron dose threshold. Reactor pool locations were assigned so that fast and thermal neutron fluxes to the devices were similar. Neutron fluences ranged between 10 sup 1 sup 1 and 10 sup 1 sup 4 n/cm sup 2. GaAs detectors were exposed to exponential fluences of base ten. Ten detector designs were irradiated and studied, differentiated between p-i-n diodes and Schottky barrier diodes. The irradiated sup 1 sup 0 B-coated detectors were tested for neutron detection sensitivity in a thermalized neutron beam. Little damage was observed for detectors irradiated at neutron fluences of 10 sup 1 sup 2 n/cm sup 2 and below, but signals noticeably degraded at fluences of 10 sup 1 sup 3 n/cm sup 2. Catastrophic damage was appare...

  17. A Directional Dose Equivalent Monitor for Neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Errico, F.; Alberts, W.G.; Curzio, G.; Matzke, M.; Nath, R.; Siebert, B.R.L

    2001-07-01

    A directional dose equivalent monitor is introduced which consists of a 30 cm diameter spherical phantom hosting a superheated drop detector embedded at a depth of 10 mm. The device relies on the similarity between the fluence response of neutron superheated drop detectors based on halocarbon-12 and the quality-factor-weighted kerma factor. This implies that these detectors can be used for in-phantom dosimetry and provide a direct reading of dose equivalent at depth. The directional dose equivalent monitor was characterised experimentally with fast neutron calibrations and numerically with Monte Carlo simulations. The fluence response was determined at angles of 0, 45, 90, 135 and 180 degrees for thermal to 20 MeV neutrons. The response of the device is closely proportional to the fluence-to-directional dose equivalent conversion coefficient, H'{sub F}(10;a,E). Therefore, our monitor is suitable for a direct measurement of neutron directional dose equivalent, H'(10), regardless of angle and energy distribution of the neutron fluence. (author)

  18. Neutron absorbed dose in a pacemaker CMOS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja H, C. G.; Guzman G, K. A.; Valero L, C. Y.; Banuelos F, A.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Paredes G, L., E-mail: candy_borja@hotmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-11-15

    The absorbed dose due to neutrons by a Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) has been estimated using Monte Carlo methods. Eventually a person with a pacemaker becomes a patient that must be treated by radiotherapy with a linear accelerator; the pacemaker has integrated circuits as CMOS that are sensitive to intense and pulsed radiation fields. When the Linac is working in Bremsstrahlung mode an undesirable neutron field is produced due to photoneutron reactions; these neutrons could damage the CMOS putting the patient at risk during the radiotherapy treatment. In order to estimate the neutron dose in the CMOS a Monte Carlo calculation was carried out where a full radiotherapy vault room was modeled with a W-made spherical shell in whose center was located the source term of photoneutrons produced by a Linac head operating in Bremsstrahlung mode at 18 MV. In the calculations a phantom made of tissue equivalent was modeled while a beam of photoneutrons was applied on the phantom prostatic region using a field of 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}. During simulation neutrons were isotropically transported from the Linac head to the phantom chest, here a 1 {theta} x 1 cm{sup 2} cylinder made of polystyrene was modeled as the CMOS, where the neutron spectrum and the absorbed dose were estimated. Main damages to CMOS are by protons produced during neutron collisions protective cover made of H-rich materials, here the neutron spectrum that reach the CMOS was calculated showing a small peak around 0.1 MeV and a larger peak in the thermal region, both connected through epithermal neutrons. (Author)

  19. Comparison of the neutron ambient dose equivalent and ambient absorbed dose calculations with different GEANT4 physics lists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Rosane Moreira; Souza-Santos, Denison

    2017-10-01

    A comparison between neutron physics lists given by GEANT4, is made in the calculation of the ambient dose equivalent, and ambient absorbed dose, per fluence conversion coefficients (H* (10) / ϕ and D* (10) / ϕ) for neutrons in the range of 10-9 MeV to 15 MeV. Physics processes are included for neutrons, photons and charged particles, and calculations are made for neutrons and secondary particles. Results obtained for QBBC, QGSP_BERT, QGSP_BIC and Neutron High Precision physics lists are compared with values published in ICRP 74 and previously published articles. Neutron high precision physics lists showed the best results in the studied energy range.

  20. Applications of Neutron Bubble Dosimeters for Neutron Dose Monitoring in Mixed n-γ Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Bubble dosimeter is a promising technology in the field of neutron dosimetry. It provides real-time monitoring of neutron dose, stable energy response over wide range of neutron energy, and a very low

  1. SU-E-T-611: Photon and Neutron Peripheral Dose Ratio for Low (6 MV) and High (15 MV) Energy for Treatment Selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irazola, L; Sanchez-Doblado, F [Departamento de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Universidad de Seville (Spain); Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Seville (Spain); Terron, J; Ortiz-Seidel, M [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Seville (Spain); Departamento de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Universidad de Seville (Spain); Sanchez-Nieto, B [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Differences between radiotherapy techniques and energies, can offer improvements in tumor coverage and organs at risk preservation. However, a more complete decision should include peripheral doses delivered to the patient. The purpose of this work is the balance of photon and neutron peripheral doses for a prostate case solved with 6 different treatment modalities. Methods: Inverse and Forward IMRT and 3D-CRT in 6 and 15 MV for a Siemens Primus linac, using the same CT data set and contours. The methodology described in [1], was used with the TNRD thermal neutron detector [2] for neutron peripheral dose estimation at 7 relevant organs (colon, esophagus, stomach, liver, lung, thyroid and skin). Photon doses were estimated for these organs by terms of the algorithm proposed in [3]. Plans were optimized with the same restrictions and limited to 30 segments in the Inverse case. Results: A similar photon peripheral dose was found comparing 6 and 15 MV cases with slightly higher values of (1.9 ± 1.6) % in mean, for the 6 MV cases. Neutron presence when using 15 MV, represents an increase in peripheral dose of (18 ± 17) % in average. Due to the higher number of MU used in Inverse IMRT, an increasing of (22 ± 3) % in neutron dose is found related to Forward and 3D-CRT plans. This corresponds to photon doses within 44 and 255 mSv along the organs, for a dose prescription of 68 Gy at the isocenter. Conclusion: Neutron and photon peripheral doses for a prostate treatment planified in 6 different techniques have been analyzed. 6 MV plans are slightly more demanding in terms of photon peripheral doses. Inverse technique in 15 MV has Result to be the most demanding one in terms of total peripheral doses, including neutrons and photons.

  2. Relative biological effectiveness and tolerance dose of fission neutrons in canine skin for a potential combination of neutron capture therapy and fast-neutron therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadosawa, Tsuyoshi; Ohashi, Fumihito; Nishimura, Ryohei; Sasaki, Nobuo; Saito, Isao; Wakabayashi, Hiroaki; Takeuchi, Akira

    2003-10-01

    To investigate the potential efficacy of fission neutrons from a fast-neutron reactor for the treatment of radioresistant tumors, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and tolerance dose of fission neutrons in canine skin were determined. The forelimbs of 34 healthy mongrel dogs received a single dose of fission neutrons (5.6, 6.8, 8.2, 9.6 or 11 Gy) or 137Cs gamma rays (10, 15, 20, 25 or 30 Gy). Based on observations of radiodermatitis for each radiation, the single-fraction RBE of fission neutrons in the sixth month was calculated as approximately 3. The tolerance doses of fission neutrons and gamma rays, defined as the highest doses giving no moist desquamation on the irradiated skin in the recovery phase, were estimated as 7.6 Gy and 20 Gy, respectively. The tolerance dose of 7.6 Gy of fission neutrons included 5.0 Gy of fast neutrons possessing high anti-tumor effects and 1.4 x 10(12) n/cm2 of thermal neutrons, which could be applicable to neutron capture therapy (NCT). The combination of fast-neutron therapy and NCT using a fast-neutron reactor might be useful for the treatment of radioresistant tumors.

  3. SEACAB qualification with Frascati Neutron Generator residual dose measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Töre, Candan, E-mail: c.tore@seaingenieria.es; Ortego, Pedro; Rodriguez, Alain

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We developed a new R2S residual dose methodology SEACAB for TBM shield design. • Combines MCNPX mesh tally and ACAB to compute activation in a fast and simple way. • We qualified SEACAB by comparison with second campaign of FNG “duct experiment”. • Calculated dose and flux compare very well with TUD measurements at 7 decay times. • Presently SEACAB is being used in the calculation of residual dose at ITER port 16. - Abstract: The European fusion technology programme considers two test blanket modules, both helium-cooled, one with lithium ceramic pebbles and beryllium and other with Pb–Li eutectic alloy. The high level of neutron flux required for tritium breeding and the neutron multiplication properties of Be and Pb imply the need for a large neutron attenuation in the associated shielding to meet the shutdown dose requirements. A new SEACAB methodology has been developed to apply the rigorous two-step method with the use of the mesh tally of MCNPX and activation code ACAB and it has been qualified with the results of the 2nd campaign of the “duct-experiment” performed with Frascati Neutron Generator in a block of steel and moderator layers with a central cavity where the residual photon flux and dose were measured.

  4. The evaluation of neutron and gamma ray dose equivalent distributions in patients and the effectiveness of shield materials for high energy photons radiotherapy facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassoun, J; Senhou, N

    2012-04-01

    In this study, the MCNP5 code was used to model radiotherapy room of a medical linear accelerator operating at 18 MV and to evaluate the neutron and the secondary gamma ray fluences, the energy spectra and the dose equivalent distributions inside a liquid tissue-equivalent (TE) phantom. The obtained results were compared with measured data published in the literature. Moreover, the shielding effects of various neutron material shields on the radiotherapy room wall were also investigated. Our simulation results showed that paraffin wax containing boron carbide presents enough effectiveness to reduce both neutron and secondary gamma ray doses.

  5. The evaluation of neutron and gamma ray dose equivalent distributions in patients and the effectiveness of shield materials for high energy photons radiotherapy facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghassoun, J., E-mail: ghassoun@ucam.ac.ma [EPRA, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences Semlalia, PO Box: 2390, 40000 Marrakech (Morocco); Senhou, N. [EPRA, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences Semlalia, PO Box: 2390, 40000 Marrakech (Morocco)

    2012-04-15

    In this study, the MCNP5 code was used to model radiotherapy room of a medical linear accelerator operating at 18 MV and to evaluate the neutron and the secondary gamma ray fluences, the energy spectra and the dose equivalent distributions inside a liquid tissue-equivalent (TE) phantom. The obtained results were compared with measured data published in the literature. Moreover, the shielding effects of various neutron material shields on the radiotherapy room wall were also investigated. Our simulation results showed that paraffin wax containing boron carbide presents enough effectiveness to reduce both neutron and secondary gamma ray doses. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Monte Carlo method has been used to model radiotherapy room of a 18 MV linear accelerator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The neutron and the gamma ray dose equivalent distributions inside a liquid (TE) phantom were evaluated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The radiotherapy room shielding performance has been also investigated.

  6. Measurements of Neutron Energy Spectra and Neutron Dose Equivalent Rates of Workplaces in TQNPC-Ⅲ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Monitoring for neutron doses is one of the important activities for radiation protection. And the information about neutron energy distributions of the measured fields is necessary for the correct

  7. Neutrons in active proton therapy. Parameterization of dose and dose equivalent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Uwe; Haelg, Roger A. [Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Physics; Radiotherapy Hirslanden AG, Aarau (Switzerland); Lomax, Tony [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland). Center for Proton Therapy

    2017-08-01

    One of the essential elements of an epidemiological study to decide if proton therapy may be associated with increased or decreased subsequent malignancies compared to photon therapy is an ability to estimate all doses to non-target tissues, including neutron dose. This work therefore aims to predict for patients using proton pencil beam scanning the spatially localized neutron doses and dose equivalents. The proton pencil beam of Gantry 1 at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) was Monte Carlo simulated using GEANT. Based on the simulated neutron dose and neutron spectra an analytical mechanistic dose model was developed. The pencil beam algorithm used for treatment planning at PSI has been extended using the developed model in order to calculate the neutron component of the delivered dose distribution for each treated patient. The neutron dose was estimated for two patient example cases. The analytical neutron dose model represents the three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulated dose distribution up to 85 cm from the proton pencil beam with a satisfying precision. The root mean square error between Monte Carlo simulation and model is largest for 138 MeV protons and is 19% and 20% for dose and dose equivalent, respectively. The model was successfully integrated into the PSI treatment planning system. In average the neutron dose is increased by 10% or 65% when using 160 MeV or 177 MeV instead of 138 MeV. For the neutron dose equivalent the increase is 8% and 57%. The presented neutron dose calculations allow for estimates of dose that can be used in subsequent epidemiological studies or, should the need arise, to estimate the neutron dose at any point where a subsequent secondary tumour may occur. It was found that the neutron dose to the patient is heavily increased with proton energy.

  8. Neutron dose equivalent rate for heavy ion bombardment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiGui-Sheng; ZhangTian-Mei; 等

    1998-01-01

    The fluence rate distribution of neutrons in the reactionsof 50MeV/u 18O-ion on thick Be,Cu and Au targets have been measured with an activation method of threshold detectors andthe neutron dose equivalent rate distributions at 1m from the tqrgets in intermediate energy heavy ion target area are obtained by using the conversion factors from neutron fluence rate to neutron doseequivalent rate.

  9. Out-of-field doses and neutron dose equivalents for electron beams from modern Varian and Elekta linear accelerators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenas, Carlos E; Nitsch, Paige L; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Howell, Rebecca M; Kry, Stephen F

    2016-07-08

    Out-of-field doses from radiotherapy can cause harmful side effects or eventually lead to secondary cancers. Scattered doses outside the applicator field, neutron source strength values, and neutron dose equivalents have not been broadly investigated for high-energy electron beams. To better understand the extent of these exposures, we measured out-of-field dose characteristics of electron applicators for high-energy electron beams on two Varian 21iXs, a Varian TrueBeam, and an Elekta Versa HD operating at various energy levels. Out-of-field dose profiles and percent depth-dose curves were measured in a Wellhofer water phantom using a Farmer ion chamber. Neutron dose was assessed using a combination of moderator buckets and gold activation foils placed on the treatment couch at various locations in the patient plane on both the Varian 21iX and Elekta Versa HD linear accelerators. Our findings showed that out-of-field electron doses were highest for the highest electron energies. These doses typically decreased with increasing distance from the field edge but showed substantial increases over some distance ranges. The Elekta linear accelerator had higher electron out-of-field doses than the Varian units examined, and the Elekta dose profiles exhibited a second dose peak about 20 to 30 cm from central-axis, which was found to be higher than typical out-of-field doses from photon beams. Electron doses decreased sharply with depth before becoming nearly constant; the dose was found to decrease to a depth of approximately E(MeV)/4 in cm. With respect to neutron dosimetry, Q values and neutron dose equivalents increased with electron beam energy. Neutron contamination from electron beams was found to be much lower than that from photon beams. Even though the neutron dose equivalent for electron beams represented a small portion of neutron doses observed under photon beams, neutron doses from electron beams may need to be considered for special cases.

  10. The dose comparison between the THOR and HFR epithermal neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi-Chun [Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences Department, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Roca, Antoaneta [Institute for Energy, Joint Research Centre, European Commission (Netherlands); Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, Bucuresti-Magurele (Romania); Liu, Yuan-Hao, E-mail: yhl.taiwan@gmail.co [Health Physics Division, Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Pi-En [Health Physics Division, Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Nievaart, Sander [Institute for Energy, Joint Research Centre, European Commission (Netherlands); Liu, Hong-Ming [Health Physics Division, Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, No. 101, Section 2, Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Moss, Ray [Institute for Energy, Joint Research Centre, European Commission (Netherlands); Chou, Wen-Tsae [Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences Department, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Jiang, Shiang-Huei [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)

    2010-12-15

    This study is a part of the beam comparison campaign, inter-center dose comparison, between boron neutron capture therapy facilities at the Tsing Hua Open-pool Reactor and the High Flux Reactor. The clinical information exchange can improve the dosimetry uncertainty for medical physics in a mixed field. The method of paired Mg(Ar) and TE(TE) ionization chambers was used to determine the gamma-ray and neutron dose rates. Furthermore, activation foils, including gold, copper, and manganese, were employed to estimate the thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes. Measurements were performed free in air and also in a PMMA phantom. All the chambers were calibrated using a {sup 60}Co primary standard source at the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan. Spectrum dependent neutron sensitivity of TE(TE) chamber is one of the important parameters to evaluate dose components. The requested neutron spectra were calculated by the Monte Carlo code MCNP. The measured thermal neutron fluxes, gamma-ray and neutron dose rates of the THOR beam in the phantom were 2.6, 2.2, and 2.1 times of the HFR beam at 2.5-cm depth, respectively. The higher thermal neutron flux and neutron and gamma-ray dose rates are due to the higher epithermal neutron beam intensity of the THOR.

  11. High-dose neutron induced radiation swelling simulated by heavy ion irradiation and its microscopic study with positron annihilation technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    70 MeV-carbon-ion irradiation is used to simulate the radiation swelling induced by neutron irradiation of 3.2×1022 n·cm-2 in domestically-made 316 austenitic stainless steels modified by a 20%-cold-working and Ti-adding from room temperature to 802°C. The created swelling is microscopically examined by the positron annihilation lifetime technique. A radiation swelling peak is observed at 580°C and the corresponding void has an average diameter of 0.7nm which is hardly probed by macroscopic methods.

  12. Different dose rate-dependent responses of human melanoma cells and fibroblasts to low dose fast neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionet, Claude; Müller-Barthélémy, Melanie; Marceau, Geoffroy; Denis, Jean-Marc; Averbeck, Dietrich; Gueulette, John; Sapin, Vincent; Pereira, Bruno; Tchirkov, Andrei; Chautard, Emmanuel; Verrelle, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    To analyze the dose rate influence in hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS) of human melanoma cells to very low doses of fast neutrons and to compare to the behaviour of normal human skin fibroblasts. We explored different neutron dose rates as well as possible implication of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), apoptosis, and energy-provider adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) levels during HRS. HRS in melanoma cells appears only at a very low dose rate (VLDR), while a high dose rate (HDR) induces an initial cell-radioresistance (ICRR). HRS does not seem to be due either to DSB or to apoptosis. Both phenomena (HRS and ICRR) appear to be related to ATP availability for triggering cell repair. Fibroblast survival after neutron irradiation is also dose rate-dependent but without HRS. Melanoma cells or fibroblasts exert their own survival behaviour at very low doses of neutrons, suggesting that in some cases there is a differential between cancer and normal cells radiation responses. Only the survival of fibroblasts at HDR fits the linear no-threshold model. This new insight into human cell responses to very low doses of neutrons, concerns natural radiations, surroundings of accelerators, proton-therapy devices, flights at high altitude. Furthermore, ATP inhibitors could increase HRS during high-linear energy transfer (high-LET) irradiation.

  13. TLD determination of neutron dose contribution in medical linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cano, A.; Rivera, T.; Calderon A, J. A. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Villasenor N, L. F. [Hospital General de Mexico, Dr. Balmis No. 148, Col. Doctores, 06726 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Vega C, H. R., E-mail: azorin@xanum.uam.m [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2011-02-15

    The increased use of Linacs with accelerating voltage higher than 10 MV in clinical radiotherapy is producing and increasing demand of accurate dosimetric measurements of the photon induced neutron contamination of the radiotherapy beams, due that the associated Bremsstrahlung X rays may produce neutrons as a result of subsequent photonuclear reactions with the different materials constituting the accelerator head. Thermal neutron fluences can be measured with TLD-600/TLD-700 pairs arranged in both a bare and a cadmium (Cd) foil covered methacry-late box. Neutron response of Tl dosemeters irradiated with two different neutron sources has been investigated. The shape of the glow curve of these TLDs after irradiation in a medical Linac and in a Pu Be neutron source has been studied to verify the contribution of neutrons to an additional dose to staff, patients and the general public, due to photonuclear reactions generating neutrons from medical Linacs. (Author)

  14. Design of an integrating type neutron dose monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanishi, Hirokuni

    2011-07-01

    It is intended that deuterium-deuterium reaction experiments will be performed for the next phase of the large helical device (LHD) at National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Toki, Japan. To protect workers against radiation, the characteristics of the radiation field at the LHD workplace should be evaluated. The neutron fluence at the workplace was calculated by means of the radiation transportation code. Since the neutron energy distribution at the workplace has a wide energy range, from thermal to fast neutrons, a neutron dose monitor had to be especially designed. The author designed an integrating type neutron dose monitor for this purpose. Since this monitor has good responses for dose evaluation in every energy range, it should be able to evaluate the dose at the LHD workplace accurately.

  15. SECONDARY NEUTRON DOSES IN A PROTON THERAPY CENTRE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Saint-Hubert, M; Saldarriaga Vargas, C; Van Hoey, O; Schoonjans, W; De Smet, V; Mathot, G; Stichelbaut, F; Manessi, G; Dinar, N; Aza, E; Cassell, C; Silari, M; Vanhavere, F

    2016-09-01

    The formation of secondary high-energy neutrons in proton therapy can be a concern for radiation protection of staff. In this joint intercomparative study (CERN, SCK•CEN and IBA/IRISIB/ULB), secondary neutron doses were assessed with different detectors in several positions in the Proton Therapy Centre, Essen (Germany). The ambient dose equivalent H(*)(10) was assessed with Berthold LB 6411, WENDI-2, tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and Bonner spheres (BS). The personal dose equivalent Hp(10) was measured with two types of active detectors and with bubble detectors. Using spectral and basic angular information, the reference Hp(10) was estimated. Results concerning staff exposure show H(*)(10) doses between 0.5 and 1 nSv/monitoring unit in a technical room. The LB 6411 showed an underestimation of H(*)(10), while WENDI-2 and TEPC showed good agreement with the BS data. A large overestimation for Hp(10) was observed for the active personal dosemeters, while the bubble detectors showed only a slight overestimation.

  16. An apparatus for the study of high temperature water radiolysis in a nuclear reactor: calibration of dose in a mixed neutron/gamma radiation field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Eric J; Wilson, Paul P H; Anderson, Mark H; Mezyk, Stephen P; Pimblott, Simon M; Bartels, David M

    2007-12-01

    The cooling water of nuclear reactors undergoes radiolytic decomposition induced by gamma, fast electron, and neutron radiation in the core. To model the process, recombination reaction rates and radiolytic yields for the water radical fragments need to be measured at high temperature and pressure. Yields for the action of neutron radiation are particularly hard to determine independently because of the beta/gamma field also present in any reactor. In this paper we report the design of an apparatus intended to measure neutron radiolysis yields as a function of temperature and pressure. A new methodology for separation of neutron and beta/gamma radiolysis yields in a mixed radiation field is proposed and demonstrated.

  17. Dose estimations of fast neutrons from a nuclear reactor by micronuclear yields in onion seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujikawa, K; Endo, S; Itoh, T; Yonezawa, Y; Hoshi, M

    1999-12-01

    Irradiations of onion seedlings with fission neutrons from bare, Pb-moderated, and Fe-moderated 252Cf sources induced micronuclei in the root-tip cells at similar rates. The rate per cGy averaged for the three sources, , was 19 times higher than rate induced by 60Co gamma-rays. When neutron doses, Dn, were estimated from frequencies of micronuclei induced in onion seedlings after exposure to neutron-gamma mixed radiation from a 1 W nuclear reactor, using the reciprocal of as conversion factor, resulting Dn values agreed within 10% with doses measured with paired ionizing chambers. This excellent agreement was achieved by the high sensitivity of the onion system to fast neutrons relative to gamma-rays and the high contribution of fast neutrons to the total dose of mixed radiation in the reactor's field.

  18. Gel dosimeters as useful dose and thermal-fluence detectors in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G.; Valente, M. [Department of Physics of the University and INFN, Via Celoria 16, I-20133 Milan (Italy); Moss, R.L.; Daquino, G.G.; Nievaart, V.A. [Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy, P.O. Box 2, NL-1755ZG Petten, The Netherlands (Netherlands); Mariani, M.; Vanossi, E. [Department of Nuclear Engineering of Polytechnic, CESNEF, Via Ponzio, 34/3 - I-20133 Milan (Italy); Carrara, M. [Medical Physics Department, National Cancer Institute, Via Venezian 1, I-20131, Milan (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    The dosimetry method based on Fricke-Xylenol-Orange-infused gels in form of layers has shown noticeable potentiality for in-phantom or in-free-beam dose and thermal flux profiling and imaging in the high fluxes of thermal or epithermal neutrons utilised for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Gel-dosimeters in form of layers give the possibility not only of obtaining spatial dose distributions but also of achieving measurements of each dose contribution in neutron fields. The discrimination of the various dose components is achieved by means of pixel-to-pixel manipulations of pairs of images obtained with gel-dosimeters having different isotopic composition. It is possible to place large dosimeters, detecting in such a way large dose images, because the layer geometry of dosimeters avoids sensitive variation of neutron transport due to the gel isotopic composition. Some results obtained after the last improvements of the method are reported. (Author)

  19. Analytic estimates of secondary neutron dose in proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anferov, V

    2010-12-21

    Proton beam losses in various components of a treatment nozzle generate secondary neutrons, which bring unwanted out of field dose during treatments. The purpose of this study was to develop an analytic method for estimating neutron dose to a distant organ at risk during proton therapy. Based on radiation shielding calculation methods proposed by Sullivan, we developed an analytical model for converting the proton beam losses in the nozzle components and in the treatment volume into the secondary neutron dose at a point of interest. Using the MCNPx Monte Carlo code, we benchmarked the neutron dose rates generated by the proton beam stopped at various media. The Monte Carlo calculations confirmed the validity of the analytical model for simple beam stop geometry. The analytical model was then applied to neutron dose equivalent measurements performed on double scattering and uniform scanning nozzles at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute (MPRI). Good agreement was obtained between the model predictions and the data measured at MPRI. This work provides a method for estimating analytically the neutron dose equivalent to a distant organ at risk. This method can be used as a tool for optimizing dose delivery techniques in proton therapy.

  20. High power neutron production targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wender, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-06-01

    The author describes issues of concern in the design of targets and associated systems for high power neutron production facilities. The facilities include uses for neutron scattering, accelerator driven transmutation, accelerator production of tritium, short pulse spallation sources, and long pulse spallation sources. Each of these applications requires a source with different design needs and consequently different implementation in practise.

  1. Swelling and microstructure of austenitic stainless steel ChS-68 CW after high dose neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porollo, S.I.; Konobeev, Yu.V. [State Scientific Center of Russian Federation - Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation); Garner, F.A., E-mail: frank.garner@dslextreme.co [Radiation Effects Consulting, 2003 Howell Avenue, Richland, WA 99354 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Austenitic stainless steel ChS-68 serving as fuel pin cladding was irradiated in the 20% cold-worked condition in the BN-600 fast reactor in the range 56-84 dpa. This steel was developed to replace EI-847 which was limited by its insufficient resistance to void swelling. Comparison of swelling between EI-847 and ChS-68 under similar irradiation conditions showed improvement of the latter steel by an extended transient regime of an additional approx10 dpa. Concurrent with swelling was the development of a variety of phases. In the temperature range 430-460 deg. S where the temperature peak of swelling was located, the principal type of phase generated during irradiation was G-phase, with volume fraction increasing linearly with dose to approx0.5% at 84 dpa. While the onset of swelling is concurrent with formation of G-phase, the action of G-phase cannot be confidently ascribed to significant removal from solution of swelling-suppressive elements such as silicon. A plausible mechanism for the higher resistance to void swelling of ChS-68 as compared with EI-847 may be related to an observed higher stability of faulted dislocation loops in ChS-68 that impedes the formation of a glissile dislocation network. The higher level of boron in ChS-68 is thought to be one contributor that might play this role.

  2. Alanine and TLD coupled detectors for fast neutron dose measurements in neutron capture therapy (NCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecilia, A; Baccaro, S; Cemmi, A; Colli, V; Gambarini, G; Rosi, G; Scolari, L

    2004-01-01

    A method was investigated to measure gamma and fast neutron doses in phantoms exposed to an epithermal neutron beam designed for neutron capture therapy (NCT). The gamma dose component was measured by TLD-300 [CaF2:Tm] and the fast neutron dose, mainly due to elastic scattering with hydrogen nuclei, was measured by alanine dosemeters [CH3CH(NH2)COOH]. The gamma and fast neutron doses deposited in alanine dosemeters are very near to those released in tissue, because of the alanine tissue equivalence. Couples of TLD-300 and alanine dosemeters were irradiated in phantoms positioned in the epithermal column of the Tapiro reactor (ENEA-Casaccia RC). The dosemeter response depends on the linear energy transfer (LET) of radiation, hence the precision and reliability of the fast neutron dose values obtained with the proposed method have been investigated. Results showed that the combination of alanine and TLD detectors is a promising method to separate gamma dose and fast neutron dose in NCT.

  3. Neutron dose estimation in a zero power nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triviño, S.; Vedelago, J.; Cantargi, F.; Keil, W.; Figueroa, R.; Mattea, F.; Chautemps, A.; Santibañez, M.; Valente, M.

    2016-10-01

    This work presents the characterization and contribution of neutron and gamma components to the absorbed dose in a zero power nuclear reactor. A dosimetric method based on Fricke gel was implemented to evaluate the separation between dose components in the mixed field. The validation of this proposed method was performed by means of direct measurements of neutron flux in different positions using Au and Mg-Ni activation foils. Monte Carlo simulations were conversely performed using the MCNP main code with a dedicated subroutine to incorporate the exact complete geometry of the nuclear reactor facility. Once nuclear fuel elements were defined, the simulations computed the different contributions to the absorbed dose in specific positions inside the core. Thermal/epithermal contributions of absorbed dose were assessed by means of Fricke gel dosimetry using different isotopic compositions aimed at modifying the sensitivity of the dosimeter for specific dose components. Clear distinctions between gamma and neutron capture dose were obtained. Both Monte Carlo simulations and experimental results provided reliable estimations about neutron flux rate as well as dose rate during the reactor operation. Simulations and experimental results are in good agreement in every positions measured and simulated in the core.

  4. ACDOS3: a further improved neutron dose-rate code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, C.S.

    1982-07-01

    ACD0S3 is a computer code designed primarily to calculate the activities and dose rates produced by neutron activation in a variety of simple geometries. Neutron fluxes, in up to 50 groups and with energies up to 20 MeV, must be supplied as part of the input data. The neutron-source strength must also be supplied, or alternately, the code will compute it from neutral-beam operating parameters in the case where the source is a fusion-reactor injector. ACD0S3 differs from the previous version ACD0S2 in that additional geometries have been added, the neutron cross-section library has been updated, an estimate of the energy deposited by neutron reactions has been provided, and a significant increase in efficiency in reading the data libraries has been incorporated.

  5. High-pressure neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hongwu [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-10

    This lecture will cover progress and prospect of applications of high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques to Earth and materials sciences. I will first introduce general high-pressure research topics and available in-situ high-pressure techniques. Then I'll talk about high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques using two types of pressure cells: fluid-driven and anvil-type cells. Lastly, I will give several case studies using these techniques, particularly, those on hydrogen-bearing materials and magnetic transitions.

  6. Dose monitoring for boron neutron capture therapy using a reactor-based epithermal neutron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaijmakers, C. P. J.; Nottelman, E. L.; Konijnenberg, M. W.; Mijnheer, B. J.

    1996-12-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to determine the variation with time of the relevant beam parameters of a clinical reactor-based epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and (ii) to test a monitoring system for its applicability to monitor the dose delivered to the dose specification point in a patient treated with BNCT. For this purpose two fission chambers covered with Cd and two GM counters were positioned in the beam-shaping collimator assembly of the epithermal neutron beam. The monitor count rates were compared with in-phantom reference measurements of the thermal neutron fluence rate, the gamma-ray dose rate and the fast neutron dose rate, at a constant reactor power, over a period of 2 years. Differences in beam output, defined as the thermal neutron fluence rate at 2 cm depth in a phantom, of up to 15% were observed between various reactor cycles. A decrease in beam output of about 5% was observed in each reactor cycle. An unacceptable decrease of 50% in beam output due to malfunctioning of the beam filter assembly was detected. For safe and accurate treatment of patients, on-line monitoring of the beam is essential. Using the calibrated monitor system, the standard uncertainty in the total dose at depth due to variations with time of the beam output parameters has been reduced to a clinically acceptable value of 1% (one standard deviation).

  7. Measurement of in-phantom neutron flux and gamma dose in Tehran research reactor boron neutron capture therapy beam line

    OpenAIRE

    Elham Bavarnegin; Alireza Sadremomtaz; Hossein Khalafi; Yaser Kasesaz

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Determination of in-phantom quality factors of Tehran research reactor (TRR) boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) beam. Materials and Methods: The doses from thermal neutron reactions with 14N and 10B are calculated by kinetic energy released per unit mass approach, after measuring thermal neutron flux using neutron activation technique. Gamma dose is measured using TLD-700 dosimeter. Results: Different dose components have been measured in a head phantom which has been designed an...

  8. Time-Dependent Neutron and Photon Dose-Field Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooten, Hasani Omar [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2005-08-01

    A unique tool is developed that allows the user to model physical representations of complicated glovebox facilities in two dimensions and determine neutral-particle flux and ambient dose-equivalent fields throughout that geometry. The Pandemonium code, originally designed to determine flux and dose-rates only, is improved to include realistic glovebox geometries, time-dependent source and detector positions, time-dependent shielding thickness calculations, time-integrated doses, a representative criticality accident scenario based on time-dependent reactor kinetics, and more rigorous photon treatment. A primary benefit of this work has been an extensive analysis and improvement of the photon model that is not limited to the application described in this thesis. The photon model has been extended in energy range to 10 MeV to include photons from fission and new photon buildup factors have been included that account for the effects of photon buildup at slant-path thicknesses as a function of angle, where the mean free path thickness has been preserved. The overall system of codes is user-friendly and it is directly applicable to facilities such as the plutonium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, where high-intensity neutron and photon emitters are regularly used. The codes may be used to determine a priori doses for given work scenarios in an effort to supply dose information to process models which will in turn assist decision makers on ensuring as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) compliance. In addition, coupling the computational results of these tools with the process model visualization tools will help to increase worker safety and radiological safety awareness.

  9. Neutron dose calculation at the maze entrance of medical linear accelerator rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcão, R C; Facure, A; Silva, A X

    2007-01-01

    Currently, teletherapy machines of cobalt and caesium are being replaced by linear accelerators. The maximum photon energy in these machines can vary from 4 to 25 MeV, and one of the great advantages of these equipments is that they do not have a radioactive source incorporated. High-energy (E > 10 MV) medical linear accelerators offer several physical advantages over lower energy ones: the skin dose is lower, the beam is more penetrating, and the scattered dose to tissues outside the target volume is smaller. Nevertheless, the contamination of undesirable neutrons in the therapeutic beam, generated by the high-energy photons, has become an additional problem as long as patient protection and occupational doses are concerned. The treatment room walls are shielded to attenuate the primary and secondary X-ray fluence, and this shielding is generally adequate to attenuate the neutrons. However, these neutrons are scattered through the treatment room maze and may result in a radiological problem at the door entrance, a high occupancy area in a radiotherapy facility. In this article, we used MCNP Monte Carlo simulation to calculate neutron doses in the maze of radiotherapy rooms and we suggest an alternative method to the Kersey semi-empirical model of neutron dose calculation at the entrance of mazes. It was found that this new method fits better measured values found in literature, as well as our Monte Carlo simulated ones.

  10. Neutron spectrometry and determination of neutron ambient dose equivalents in different LINAC radiotherapy rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, C., E-mail: carles.domingo@uab.ca [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica. Edifici C, Campus UAB, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Garcia-Fuste, M.J.; Morales, E.; Amgarou, K. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica. Edifici C, Campus UAB, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Terron, J.A. [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena. E- 41009 Sevilla. Spain (Spain); Rosello, J.; Brualla, L. [ERESA, Avda. Tres Cruces s/n. E-46014 Valencia (Spain); Nunez, L. [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital. Puerta de Hierro. E-28222 Majadahonda (Spain); Colmenares, R. [Serv. de Oncologia Radioterapica, Hosp. Ramon y Cajal, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Gomez, F. [Dpto. de Particulas. Univ. de Santiago. E-15782 Santiago de Compostela. Spain (Spain); Hartmann, G.H. [DKFZ E0400 Im Neuenheimer Feld 280. D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany) (Germany); Sanchez-Doblado, F. [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena. E- 41009 Sevilla. Spain (Spain); Dpto. de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica. Universidad de Sevilla. E-41009 Sevilla. Spain (Spain); Fernandez, F. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica. Edifici C, Campus UAB, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear, Justo Dorado 11 E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    A project has been set up to study the effect on a radiotherapy patient of the neutrons produced around the LINAC accelerator head by photonuclear reactions induced by photons above {approx}8 MeV. These neutrons may reach directly the patient, or they may interact with the surrounding materials until they become thermalised, scattering all over the treatment room and affecting the patient as well, contributing to peripheral dose. Spectrometry was performed with a calibrated and validated set of Bonner spheres at a point located at 50 cm from the isocenter, as well as at the place where a digital device for measuring neutrons, based on the upset of SRAM memories induced by thermal neutrons, is located inside the treatment room. Exposures have taken place in six LINAC accelerators with different energies (from 15 to 23 MV) with the aim of relating the spectrometer measurements with the readings of the digital device under various exposure and room geometry conditions. The final purpose of the project is to be able to relate, under any given treatment condition and room geometry, the readings of this digital device to patient neutron effective dose and peripheral dose in organs of interest. This would allow inferring the probability of developing second malignancies as a consequence of the treatment. Results indicate that unit neutron fluence spectra at 50 cm from the isocenter do not depend on accelerator characteristics, while spectra at the place of the digital device are strongly influenced by the treatment room geometry.

  11. A neutron dose detector with REM response to 1 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, R.K.; Krebs, G.F.; Smith, A.R. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Hsu, H.H. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1992-07-01

    The limitation of current remmeters, which do not measure neutron dose equivalents above about 15 MeV, is a serious problem at high-energy accelerator facilities, where a much wider range of neutron energies exist. The purpose of this work was to measure the response of a modified Anderson-Braun (A-B) remmeter to neutron energies up to 1 GeV. The modifications to the standard A-B remmeter were based on the experimental results of Pb(n,xn) reactions.

  12. High-resolution neutron microtomography with noiseless neutron counting detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremsin, A.S., E-mail: ast@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); McPhate, J.B.; Vallerga, J.V.; Siegmund, O.H.W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Feller, W.B. [Nova Scientific Inc., 10 Picker Road, Sturbridge, MA 01566 (United States); Lehmann, E. [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Butler, L.G. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Dawson, M. [Helmholtz Centre Berlin for Materials and Energy (Germany)

    2011-10-01

    The improved collimation and intensity of thermal and cold neutron beamlines combined with recent advances in neutron imaging devices enable high-resolution neutron radiography and microtomography, which can provide information on the internal structure of objects not achievable with conventional X-ray imaging techniques. Neutron detection efficiency, spatial and temporal resolution (important for the studies of dynamic processes) and low background count rate are among the crucial parameters defining the quality of radiographic images and tomographic reconstructions. The unique capabilities of neutron counting detectors with neutron-sensitive microchannel plates (MCPs) and with Timepix CMOS readouts providing high neutron detection efficiency ({approx}70% for cold neutrons), spatial resolutions ranging from 15 to 55 {mu}m and a temporal resolution of {approx}1 {mu}s-combined with the virtual absence of readout noise-make these devices very attractive for high-resolution microtomography. In this paper we demonstrate the capabilities of an MCP-Timepix detection system applied to microtomographic imaging, performed at the ICON cold neutron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute. The high resolution and the absence of readout noise enable accurate reconstruction of texture in a relatively opaque wood sample, differentiation of internal tissues of a fly and imaging of individual {approx}400 {mu}m grains in an organic powder encapsulated in a {approx}700 {mu}m thick metal casing.

  13. A Compact High-Energy Neutron Spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, F D; Buffler, A; Dangendorf, V; Herbert, M S; Jones, D T L; Nchodu, M R; Nolte, R; Smit, F D

    2007-01-01

    A compact liquid organic neutron spectrometer (CLONS) based on a single NE213 liquid scintillator (5 cm diam. x 5 cm) is described. The spectrometer is designed to measure neutron fluence spectra over the energy range 2-200 MeV and is suitable for use in neutron fields having any type of time structure. Neutron fluence spectra are obtained from measurements of two-parameter distributions (counts versus pulse height and pulse shape) using the Bayesian unfolding code MAXED. Calibration and test measurements made using a pulsed neutron beam with a continuous energy spectrum are described and the application of the spectrometer to radiation dose measurements is discussed.

  14. Prediction analysis of dose equivalent responses of neutron dosemeters used at a MOX fuel facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, N; Yoshida, T; Takada, C

    2011-07-01

    To predict how accurately neutron dosemeters can measure the neutron dose equivalent (rate) in MOX fuel fabrication facility work environments, the dose equivalent responses of neutron dosemeters were calculated by the spectral folding method. The dosemeters selected included two types of personal dosemeter, namely a thermoluminescent albedo neutron dosemeter and an electronic neutron dosemeter, three moderator-based neutron survey meters, and one special instrument called an H(p)(10) monitor. The calculations revealed the energy dependences of the responses expected within the entire range of neutron spectral variations observed in neutron fields at workplaces.

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of the neutron spectral fluence and dose equivalent for use in shielding a proton therapy vault

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuanshui; Newhauser, Wayne; Klein, Eric; Low, Daniel

    2009-11-01

    Neutron production is of principal concern when designing proton therapy vault shielding. Conventionally, neutron calculations are based on analytical methods, which do not accurately consider beam shaping components and nozzle shielding. The goal of this study was to calculate, using Monte Carlo modeling, the neutron spectral fluence and neutron dose equivalent generated by a realistic proton therapy nozzle and evaluate how these data could be used in shielding calculations. We modeled a contemporary passive scattering proton therapy nozzle in detail with the MCNPX simulation code. The neutron spectral fluence and dose equivalent at various locations in the treatment room were calculated and compared to those obtained from a thick iron target bombarded by parallel proton beams, the simplified geometry on which analytical methods are based. The neutron spectral fluence distributions were similar for both methods, with deeply penetrating high-energy neutrons (E > 10 MeV) being most prevalent along the beam central axis, and low-energy neutrons predominating the neutron spectral fluence in the lateral region. However, unlike the inverse square falloff used in conventional analytical methods, this study shows that the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose in the treatment room decreased with distance approximately following a power law, with an exponent of about -1.63 in the lateral region and -1.73 in the downstream region. Based on the simulated data according to the detailed nozzle modeling, we developed an empirical equation to estimate the neutron dose equivalent at any location and distance in the treatment vault, e.g. for cases in which detailed Monte Carlo modeling is not feasible. We applied the simulated neutron spectral fluence and dose equivalent to a shielding calculation as an example.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of the neutron spectral fluence and dose equivalent for use in shielding a proton therapy vault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yuanshui; Newhauser, Wayne; Klein, Eric; Low, Daniel

    2009-11-21

    Neutron production is of principal concern when designing proton therapy vault shielding. Conventionally, neutron calculations are based on analytical methods, which do not accurately consider beam shaping components and nozzle shielding. The goal of this study was to calculate, using Monte Carlo modeling, the neutron spectral fluence and neutron dose equivalent generated by a realistic proton therapy nozzle and evaluate how these data could be used in shielding calculations. We modeled a contemporary passive scattering proton therapy nozzle in detail with the MCNPX simulation code. The neutron spectral fluence and dose equivalent at various locations in the treatment room were calculated and compared to those obtained from a thick iron target bombarded by parallel proton beams, the simplified geometry on which analytical methods are based. The neutron spectral fluence distributions were similar for both methods, with deeply penetrating high-energy neutrons (E > 10 MeV) being most prevalent along the beam central axis, and low-energy neutrons predominating the neutron spectral fluence in the lateral region. However, unlike the inverse square falloff used in conventional analytical methods, this study shows that the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose in the treatment room decreased with distance approximately following a power law, with an exponent of about -1.63 in the lateral region and -1.73 in the downstream region. Based on the simulated data according to the detailed nozzle modeling, we developed an empirical equation to estimate the neutron dose equivalent at any location and distance in the treatment vault, e.g. for cases in which detailed Monte Carlo modeling is not feasible. We applied the simulated neutron spectral fluence and dose equivalent to a shielding calculation as an example.

  17. High precision thermal neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radeka, V.; Schaknowski, N.A.; Smith, G.C.; Yu, B. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Two-dimensional position sensitive detectors are indispensable in neutron diffraction experiments for determination of molecular and crystal structures in biology, solid-state physics and polymer chemistry. Some performance characteristics of these detectors are elementary and obvious, such as the position resolution, number of resolution elements, neutron detection efficiency, counting rate and sensitivity to gamma-ray background. High performance detectors are distinguished by more subtle characteristics such as the stability of the response (efficiency) versus position, stability of the recorded neutron positions, dynamic range, blooming or halo effects. While relatively few of them are needed around the world, these high performance devices are sophisticated and fairly complex, their development requires very specialized efforts. In this context, we describe here a program of detector development, based on {sup 3}He filled proportional chambers, which has been underway for some years at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Fundamental approaches and practical considerations are outlined that have resulted in a series of high performance detectors with the best known position resolution, position stability, uniformity of response and reliability over time, for devices of this type.

  18. The three dimensional map of dose components in a head phantom for boron neutron capture therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bavarnegin Elham; Sadremomtaz Alireza; Khalafi Hossein

    2013-01-01

    The in-phantom measurement of physical dose distribution and construction of a convenient phantom is very important for boron neutron capture therapy planning validation. In this study we have simulated a head phantom, suggested for construction in boron neutron capture therapy facilities, and calculated all relevant dose components inside of it using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. A “generic” epithermal neutron beam with a broad neutron spectrum, similar to beams used for neutron capture ...

  19. Monte Carlo modeling of proton therapy installations: a global experimental method to validate secondary neutron dose calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, J; Martinetti, F; Sayah, R; Lacoste, V; Donadille, L; Trompier, F; Nauraye, C; De Marzi, L; Vabre, I; Delacroix, S; Hérault, J; Clairand, I

    2014-06-07

    Monte Carlo calculations are increasingly used to assess stray radiation dose to healthy organs of proton therapy patients and estimate the risk of secondary cancer. Among the secondary particles, neutrons are of primary concern due to their high relative biological effectiveness. The validation of Monte Carlo simulations for out-of-field neutron doses remains however a major challenge to the community. Therefore this work focused on developing a global experimental approach to test the reliability of the MCNPX models of two proton therapy installations operating at 75 and 178 MeV for ocular and intracranial tumor treatments, respectively. The method consists of comparing Monte Carlo calculations against experimental measurements of: (a) neutron spectrometry inside the treatment room, (b) neutron ambient dose equivalent at several points within the treatment room, (c) secondary organ-specific neutron doses inside the Rando-Alderson anthropomorphic phantom. Results have proven that Monte Carlo models correctly reproduce secondary neutrons within the two proton therapy treatment rooms. Sensitive differences between experimental measurements and simulations were nonetheless observed especially with the highest beam energy. The study demonstrated the need for improved measurement tools, especially at the high neutron energy range, and more accurate physical models and cross sections within the Monte Carlo code to correctly assess secondary neutron doses in proton therapy applications.

  20. Monte Carlo modeling of proton therapy installations: a global experimental method to validate secondary neutron dose calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, J.; Martinetti, F.; Sayah, R.; Lacoste, V.; Donadille, L.; Trompier, F.; Nauraye, C.; De Marzi, L.; Vabre, I.; Delacroix, S.; Hérault, J.; Clairand, I.

    2014-06-01

    Monte Carlo calculations are increasingly used to assess stray radiation dose to healthy organs of proton therapy patients and estimate the risk of secondary cancer. Among the secondary particles, neutrons are of primary concern due to their high relative biological effectiveness. The validation of Monte Carlo simulations for out-of-field neutron doses remains however a major challenge to the community. Therefore this work focused on developing a global experimental approach to test the reliability of the MCNPX models of two proton therapy installations operating at 75 and 178 MeV for ocular and intracranial tumor treatments, respectively. The method consists of comparing Monte Carlo calculations against experimental measurements of: (a) neutron spectrometry inside the treatment room, (b) neutron ambient dose equivalent at several points within the treatment room, (c) secondary organ-specific neutron doses inside the Rando-Alderson anthropomorphic phantom. Results have proven that Monte Carlo models correctly reproduce secondary neutrons within the two proton therapy treatment rooms. Sensitive differences between experimental measurements and simulations were nonetheless observed especially with the highest beam energy. The study demonstrated the need for improved measurement tools, especially at the high neutron energy range, and more accurate physical models and cross sections within the Monte Carlo code to correctly assess secondary neutron doses in proton therapy applications.

  1. Effect of high-energy neutrons on MuGFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilchytska, V.; Alvarado, J.; Collaert, N.; Rooyakers, R.; Militaru, O.; Berger, G.; Flandre, D.

    2010-02-01

    This paper investigates, for the first time, the influence of high-energy neutrons on Multiple-Gate FETs (MuGFETs) with various gate lengths and fin widths. Neutron-induced degradation is addressed through the variation of major device parameters such as threshold voltage, subthreshold slope, maximum transconductance and DIBL. We demonstrate that high-energy neutrons result in total-dose effects largely similar to those caused by γ- and proton-irradiations. It is shown that, contrarily to the generally-believed immunity to irradiation, very short-channel MuGFETs can become extremely sensitive to the total-dose effect. The possible reasons of such length-dependent neutron-induced degradation are discussed and finally related to gate edges.

  2. Experimental investigations of the neutron contamination in high-energy photon fields at medical linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunckhorst, Elin

    2009-02-26

    The scope of this thesis was to develop a device for the detection of the photoneutron dose inside the high-energy photon field. The photoneutron contamination of a Siemens PRIMUS linear accelerator was investigated in detail in its 15 MV photon mode. The experimental examinations were performed with three ionisation chambers (a tissue equivalent chamber, a magnesium chamber and a {sup 10}B-coated magnesium chamber) and two types of thermoluminescence detectors (enriched with {sup 6}Li and {sup 7}Li, respectively). The detectors have different sensitivities to photons and neutrons and their combination allows the dose separation in a mixed neutron/photon field. The application of the ionisation chamber system, as well as the present TLD system for photoneutron detection in high-energy photon beams is a new approach. The TLD neutron sensitivity was found to be too low for a measurement inside the open photon field and the further investigation focused on the ionisation chambers. The three ionisation chambers were calibrated at different photon and neutron sources and a the borated magnesium chamber showed a very high response to thermal neutrons. For a cross check of the calibration, the three chambers were also used for dose separation of a boron neutron capture therapy beam where the exact determination of the thermal neutron dose is essential. Very accurate results were achieved for the thermal neutron dose component. At the linear accelerator the chamber system was reduced to a paired chamber system utilising the two magnesium chambers, since the fast neutron component was to small to be separated. The neutron calibration of the three chambers could not be applied, instead a conversion of measured thermal neutron signal by the borated chamber to Monte Carlo simulated total neutron dose was performed. Measurements for open fields in solid water and liquid water were performed with the paired chamber system. In larger depths the neutron dose could be determined

  3. Evaluating secondary neutron doses of a refined shielded design for a medical cyclotron using the TLD approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jye-Bin; Tseng, Hsien-Chun; Liu, Wen-Shan; Lin, Ding-Bang; Hsieh, Teng-San; Chen, Chien-Yi

    2013-11-01

    An increasing number of cyclotrons at medical centers in Taiwan have been installed to generate radiopharmaceutical products. An operating cyclotron generates immense amounts of secondary neutrons from reactions such the 18O(p, n)18F, used in the production of FDG. This intense radiation can be hazardous to public health, particularly to medical personnel. To increase the yield of 18F-FDG from 4200 GBq in 2005 to 48,600 GBq in 2011, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital (CSMUH) has prolonged irradiation time without changing the target or target current to meet requirements regarding the production 18F. The CSMUH has redesigned the CTI Radioisotope Delivery System shield. The lack of data for a possible secondary neutron doses has increased due to newly designed cyclotron rooms. This work aims to evaluate secondary neutron doses at a CTI cyclotron center using a thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD-600). Two-dimensional neutron doses were mapped and indicated that neutron doses were high as neutrons leaked through self-shielded blocks and through the L-shaped concrete shield in vault rooms. These neutron doses varied markedly among locations close to the H218O target. The Monte Carlo simulation and minimum detectable dose are also discussed and demonstrated the reliability of using the TLD-600 approach. Findings can be adopted by medical centers to identify radioactive hot spots and develop radiation protection.

  4. Measurements of the attenuation of neutron and gamma doses in ordinary and ilmenite concrete shields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megahid, R.M.; Makarious, A.S.; El-Kolaly, M.A. (Atomic Energy Establishment, Inshas (Egypt). Reactor and Neutron Physics Dept.)

    1980-01-01

    Measurements have been carried out to study the attenuation of neutron and gamma-doses in ordinary and ilmenite concrete shields of densities 2.3 and 4.6 gt. cm/sup -3/ respectively. The attenuation of thermal neutron doses emitted directly from the reactor core and the secondary gamma doses produced from the absorption of these neutrons were evaluated. Measurements were performed using a reactor beam from one of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor. The neutron and gamma doses were monitored be means of Li/sub 2/ B/sub 4/ O/sub 7/: Mn and liF-7 teflon thermoluminescent dosimeters. The measured data give the value of the relative intensities between neutron and gamma doses obtained in these two types of concrete. The contribution of thermal neutrons emitted directly from the reactor core and the secondary gamma from the radiative capture of these neutrons were evaluated.

  5. Energy spectrum measurement and dose rate estimation of natural neutrons in Tibet region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建华; 徐勇军; 刘森林; 汪传高

    2015-01-01

    In this work, natural neutron spectra at nine sites in Tibet region were measured using a multi-sphere neutron spectrometer. The altitude-dependence of the spectra total fluence rate and ambient dose equivalent rate were analyzed. From the normalized natural neutron spectra at different altitudes, the spectrum fractions for neutrons of greater than 0.1 MeV do not differ obviously, while those of the thermal neutrons differ greatly from each other. The total fluence rate, effective dose rate and the ambient dose equivalent rate varied with the altitude according to an exponential law.

  6. Experimental verification of improved depth-dose distribution using hyper-thermal neutron incidence in neutron capture therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru

    2001-01-01

    We have proposed the utilization of `hyper-thermal neutrons' for neutron capture therapy (NCT) from the viewpoint of the improvement in the dose distribution in a human body. In order to verify the improved depth-dose distribution due to hyper-thermal neutron incidence, two experiments were carried out using a test-type hyper-thermal neutron generator at a thermal neutron irradiation field in Kyoto University Reactor (KUR), which is actually utilized for NCT clinical irradiation. From the free-in-air experiment for the spectrum-shift characteristics, it was confirmed that the hyper-thermal neutrons of approximately 860 K at maximum could be obtained by the generator. From the phantom experiment, the improvement effect and the controllability for the depth-dose distribution were confirmed. For example, it was found that the relative neutron depth-dose distribution was about 1 cm improved with the 860 K hyper-thermal neutron incidence, compared to the normal thermal neutron incidence.

  7. Experimental verification of improved depth-dose distribution using hyper-thermal neutron incidence in neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Y; Kobayashi, T

    2001-01-01

    We have proposed the utilization of 'hyper-thermal neutrons' for neutron capture therapy (NCT) from the viewpoint of the improvement in the dose distribution in a human body. In order to verify the improved depth-dose distribution due to hyper-thermal neutron incidence, two experiments were carried out using a test-type hyper-thermal neutron generator at a thermal neutron irradiation field in Kyoto University Reactor (KUR), which is actually utilized for NCT clinical irradiation. From the free-in-air experiment for the spectrum-shift characteristics, it was confirmed that the hyper-thermal neutrons of approximately 860 K at maximum could be obtained by the generator. From the phantom experiment, the improvement effect and the controllability for the depth-dose distribution were confirmed. For example, it was found that the relative neutron depth-dose distribution was about 1 cm improved with the 860 K hyper-thermal neutron incidence, compared to the normal thermal neutron incidence.

  8. A coupled deterministic/stochastic method for computing neutron capture therapy dose rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Thomas Richard

    Neutron capture therapy (NCT) is an experimental method of treating brain tumors and other cancers by: (1) injecting or infusing the patient with a tumor-seeking, neutron target-labeled drug; and (2) irradiating the patient in an intense epithermal neutron fluence. The nuclear reaction between the neutrons and the target nuclei (e.g. sp{10}B(n,alpha)sp7Lirbrack releases energy in the form of high-LET (i.e. energy deposited within the range of a cell diameter) reaction particles which selectively kill the tumor cell. The efficacy of NCT is partly dependent on the delivery of maximum thermal neutron fluence to the tumor and the minimization of radiation dose to healthy tissue. Since the filtered neutron source (e.g. research reactor) usually provides a broad energy spectrum of highly-penetrating neutron and gamma-photon radiation, detailed transport calculations are necessary in order to plan treatments that use optimal treatment facility configurations and patient positioning. Current computational methods for NCT use either discrete ordinates calculation or, more often, Monte Carlo simulation to predict neutron fluences in the vicinity of the tumor. These methods do not, however, accurately calculate the transport of radiation throughout the entire facility or the deposition of dose in all the various parts of the body due to shortcomings of using either method alone. A computational method, specifically designed for NCT problems, has been adapted from the MASH methodology and couples a forward discrete ordinates (Ssb{n}) calculation with an adjoint Monte Carlo run to predict the dose at any point within the patient. The transport from the source through the filter/collimator is performed with a forward DORT run, and this is then coupled to adjoint MORSE results at a selected coupling parallelepiped which surrounds human phantom. Another routine was written to allow the user to generate the MORSE models at various angles and positions within the treatment room. The

  9. The high intensity neutron source FRANZ

    CERN Document Server

    Lederer, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    The Frankfurt neutron source of Stern Gerlach Zentrum FRANZ is currently under construction at the University of Frankfurt. At FRANZ, a high intensity neutron beam in the keV energy region will be produced by bombarding a $^7$Li target with a proton beam of several mA. These unprecedented high neutron fluxes will allow a number of neutron induced cross section measurements for the first time. Measurements can be performed by the time-of-flight and by the activation technique.

  10. Neutron dose measurements of Varian and Elekta linacs by TLD600 and TLD700 dosimeters and comparison with MCNP calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedaie, Hassan Ali; Darestani, Hoda; Banaee, Nooshin; Shagholi, Negin; Mohammadi, Kheirollah; Shahvar, Arjang; Bayat, Esmaeel

    2014-01-01

    High-energy linacs produce secondary particles such as neutrons (photoneutron production). The neutrons have the important role during treatment with high energy photons in terms of protection and dose escalation. In this work, neutron dose equivalents of 18 MV Varian and Elekta accelerators are measured by thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) 600 and TLD700 detectors and compared with the Monte Carlo calculations. For neutron and photon dose discrimination, first TLDs were calibrated separately by gamma and neutron doses. Gamma calibration was carried out in two procedures; by standard 60Co source and by 18 MV linac photon beam. For neutron calibration by (241)Am-Be source, irradiations were performed in several different time intervals. The Varian and Elekta linac heads and the phantom were simulated by the MCNPX code (v. 2.5). Neutron dose equivalent was calculated in the central axis, on the phantom surface and depths of 1, 2, 3.3, 4, 5, and 6 cm. The maximum photoneutron dose equivalents which calculated by the MCNPX code were 7.06 and 2.37 mSv.Gy(-1) for Varian and Elekta accelerators, respectively, in comparison with 50 and 44 mSv.Gy(-1) achieved by TLDs. All the results showed more photoneutron production in Varian accelerator compared to Elekta. According to the results, it seems that TLD600 and TLD700 pairs are not suitable dosimeters for neutron dosimetry inside the linac field due to high photon flux, while MCNPX code is an appropriate alternative for studying photoneutron production.

  11. A new method of measuring a large pulsed neutron fluence or dose exploiting the die-away of thermalized neutrons in a polyethylene moderator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, J. W.; Lowe, T.; Mason, R. S.; White, G.

    2010-01-01

    Computer simulations of the response to very short pulses of neutron and gamma radiation of a spherical polyethylene moderator with a central thermal neutron counter and a new, fast, active restore amplifier system have been carried out. A large neutron burst produces count rates in the detector that are too high to measure initially but when the exponential decay of the count rate falls below about 50 k per sec then counting can start. If the counts are recorded in contiguous time intervals (of 60 μs in this case) and the time is measured at which the measured count in an interval falls to 1 or 2 then the size of the initial burst can be calculated. It is shown that it should be possible to measure pulsed neutron ambient dose equivalent H*(10) or dose equivalent rate from about 2 nSv up to about 100 μSv per burst, or 7.2 N μSv s h -1 to 360 N mSv s h -1, where N is the number of neutron bursts per second. The calculations show that a gamma burst of about 10 μGy can be tolerated without affecting the measurement of the largest neutron bursts. This extends our earlier estimate of the maximum dose that can be measured for pulsed neutrons by more than 10 k. This method could also be used to measure the neutron fluence or dose from a single unplanned event such as a beam dump on an accelerator or a criticality incident from fissile material. Although the method described is new it is based on a combination of proven techniques.

  12. Hardening electronic devices against very high total dose radiation environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, B.; Shedd, W.; Roosild, S.; Dolan, R.

    1972-01-01

    The possibilities and limitations of hardening silicon semiconductor devices to the high neutron and gamma radiation levels and greater than 10 to the eighth power rads required for the NERVA nuclear engine development are discussed. A comparison is made of the high dose neutron and gamma hardening potential of bipolar, metal insulator semiconductors and junction field effect transistors. Experimental data is presented on device degradation for the high neutron and gamma doses. Previous data and comparisons indicate that the JFET is much more immune to the combined neutron displacement and gamma ionizing effects than other transistor types. Experimental evidence is also presented which indicates that p channel MOS devices may be able to meet the requirements.

  13. Measurement of neutron dose equivalent to proton therapy patients outside of the proton radiation field

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, X; Köhler, A; Newhauser, W D

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of neutron dose equivalent values and neutron spectral fluences close to but outside of the therapeutic proton radiation field are presented. The neutron spectral fluences were determined at five locations with Bonner sphere measurements and established by unfolding techniques. More than 50 additional neutron dose equivalent values were measured with LiI and BF sub 3 thermal neutron detectors surrounded by a 25 cm polyethylene moderating sphere. For a large-field treatment, typical values of neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic proton absorbed dose, H/D, at 50 cm distance from isocenter, range from 1 mSv/Gy (at 0 deg.with respect to the proton beam axis) to 5 mSv/Gy (at 90 deg.). Experiments reveal that H/D varies significantly with the treatment technique, e.g., patient orientation, proton beam energy, and range-modulation. The relative uncertainty in H/D values is approximately 40% (one standard deviation).

  14. Neutron production from flattening filter free high energy medical linac: A Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najem, M. A.; Abolaban, F. A.; Podolyák, Z.; Spyrou, N. M.

    2015-11-01

    One of the problems arising from using a conventional linac at high energy (>8 MV) is the production of neutrons. One way to reduce neutron production is to remove the flattening filter (FF). The main purpose of this work was to study the effect of FF removal on neutron fluence and neutron dose equivalent inside the treatment room at different photon beam energies. Several simulations based on Monte Carlo techniques were carried out in order to calculate the neutron fluence at different locations in the treatment room from different linac energies with and without a FF. In addition, a step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiotherapy (SnS IMRT) for prostate cancer was modelled using the 15 MV photon beam with and without a FF on a water phantom to calculate the neutron dose received in a full treatment. The results obtained show a significant drop-off in neutrons fluence and dose equivalent when the FF was removed. For example, the neutron fluence was decreased by 54%, 76% and 75% for 10, 15 and 18 MV, respectively. This can decrease the neutron dose to the patient as well as reduce the shielding cost of the treatment room. The neutron dose equivalent of the SnS IMRT for prostate cancer was reduced significantly by 71.3% when the FF was removed. It can be concluded that the flattening filter removal from the head of the linac could reduce the risk of causing secondary cancers and the shielding cost of radiotherapy treatment rooms.

  15. Evaluation of the neutron spectrum and dose assessment around the venus reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coeck, Michèle; Vermeersch, Fernand; Vanhavere, Filip

    2005-01-01

    An assessment of the neutron field near the VENUS reactor is made in order to evaluate the neutron dose to the operators, particularly in an area near the reactor shielding and in the control room. Therefore, a full MCNPX model of the shielding geometry was developed. The source term used in the simulation is derived from a criticality calculation done beforehand. Calculations are compared to routine neutron dose rate measurements and show good agreement. The MCNPX model developed easily allows core adaptations in order to evaluate the effect of future core configuration on the neutron dose to the operators.

  16. High Brightness Neutron Source for Radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremer, J. T.; Piestrup, Melvin, A.; Gary, Charles, K.; Harris, Jack, L. Williams, David, J.; Jones, Glenn, E.; Vainionpaa, J. , H.; Fuller, Michael, J.; Rothbart, George, H.; Kwan, J., W.; Ludewigt, B., A.; Gough, R.., A..; Reijonen, Jani; Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-12-08

    This research and development program was designed to improve nondestructive evaluation of large mechanical objects by providing both fast and thermal neutron sources for radiography. Neutron radiography permits inspection inside objects that x-rays cannot penetrate and permits imaging of corrosion and cracks in low-density materials. Discovering of fatigue cracks and corrosion in piping without the necessity of insulation removal is possible. Neutron radiography sources can provide for the nondestructive testing interests of commercial and military aircraft, public utilities and petrochemical organizations. Three neutron prototype neutron generators were designed and fabricated based on original research done at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The research and development of these generators was successfully continued by LBNL and Adelphi Technology Inc. under this STTR. The original design goals of high neutron yield and generator robustness have been achieved, using new technology developed under this grant. In one prototype generator, the fast neutron yield and brightness was roughly 10 times larger than previously marketed neutron generators using the same deuterium-deuterium reaction. In another generator, we integrate a moderator with a fast neutron source, resulting in a high brightness thermal neutron generator. The moderator acts as both conventional moderator and mechanical and electrical support structure for the generator and effectively mimics a nuclear reactor. In addition to the new prototype generators, an entirely new plasma ion source for neutron production was developed. First developed by LBNL, this source uses a spiral antenna to more efficiently couple the RF radiation into the plasma, reducing the required gas pressure so that the generator head can be completely sealed, permitting the possible use of tritium gas. This also permits the generator to use the deuterium-tritium reaction to produce 14-MeV neutrons with increases

  17. Development of a dual phantom technique for measuring the fast neutron component of dose in boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori, E-mail: yosakura@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Tanaka, Hiroki; Kondo, Natsuko; Kinashi, Yuko; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Ono, Koji; Maruhashi, Akira [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Asashironishi 2-1010, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Research and development of various accelerator-based irradiation systems for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is underway throughout the world. Many of these systems are nearing or have started clinical trials. Before the start of treatment with BNCT, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for the fast neutrons (over 10 keV) incident to the irradiation field must be estimated. Measurements of RBE are typically performed by biological experiments with a phantom. Although the dose deposition due to secondary gamma rays is dominant, the relative contributions of thermal neutrons (below 0.5 eV) and fast neutrons are virtually equivalent under typical irradiation conditions in a water and/or acrylic phantom. Uniform contributions to the dose deposited from thermal and fast neutrons are based in part on relatively inaccurate dose information for fast neutrons. This study sought to improve the accuracy in the dose estimation for fast neutrons by using two phantoms made of different materials in which the dose components can be separated according to differences in the interaction cross sections. The development of a “dual phantom technique” for measuring the fast neutron component of dose is reported. Methods: One phantom was filled with pure water. The other phantom was filled with a water solution of lithium hydroxide (LiOH) capitalizing on the absorbing characteristics of lithium-6 (Li-6) for thermal neutrons. Monte Carlo simulations were used to determine the ideal mixing ratio of Li-6 in LiOH solution. Changes in the depth dose distributions for each respective dose component along the central beam axis were used to assess the LiOH concentration at the 0, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 wt. % levels. Simulations were also performed with the phantom filled with 10 wt. % {sup 6}LiOH solution for 95%-enriched Li-6. A phantom was constructed containing 10 wt. % {sup 6}LiOH solution based on the simulation results. Experimental characterization of the

  18. Secondary neutron doses received by paediatric patients during intracranial proton therapy treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayah, R; Farah, J; Donadille, L; Hérault, J; Delacroix, S; De Marzi, L; De Oliveira, A; Vabre, I; Stichelbaut, F; Lee, C; Bolch, W E; Clairand, I

    2014-06-01

    This paper's goal is to assess secondary neutron doses received by paediatric patients treated for intracranial tumours using a 178 MeV proton beam. The MCNPX Monte Carlo model of the proton therapy facility, previously validated through experimental measurements for both proton and neutron dosimetry, was used. First, absorbed dose was calculated for organs located outside the clinical target volume using a series of hybrid computational phantoms for different ages and considering a realistic treatment plan. In general, secondary neutron dose was found to decrease as the distance to the treatment field increases and as the patient age increases. In addition, secondary neutron doses were studied as a function of the beam incidence. Next, neutron equivalent dose was assessed using organ-specific energy-dependent radiation weighting factors determined from Monte Carlo simulations of neutron spectra at each organ. The equivalent dose was found to reach a maximum value of ∼155 mSv at the level of the breasts for a delivery of 49 proton Gy to an intracranial tumour of a one-year-old female patient. Finally, a thorough comparison of the calculation results with published data demonstrated the dependence of neutron dose on the treatment configuration and proved the need for facility-specific and treatment-dependent neutron dose calculations.

  19. Neutron spectrum and dose-equivalent in shuttle flights during solar maximum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keith, J.E.; Badhwar, G.D.; Lindstrom, D.J. (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Houston, TX (United States). Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center)

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents unambiguous measurements of the spectrum of neutrons found in spacecraft during spaceflight. The neutron spectrum was measured from thermal energies to about 10 MeV using a completely passive system of metal foils as neutron detectors. These foils were exposed to the neutron flux bare, covered by thermal neutron absorbers (Gd) and inside moderators (Bonner spheres). This set of detectors was flown on three U.S. Space Shuttle flights, STS-28, STS-36 and STS-31, during the solar maximum. We show that the measurements of the radioactivity of these foils lead to a differential neutron energy spectrum in all three flights that can be represented by a power law, J(E){approx equal}E{sup -0.765} neutrons cm{sup -2} day {sup -1} MeV{sup -1}. We also show that the measurements are even better represented by a linear combination of the terrestrial neutron albedo and a spectrum of neutrons locally produced in a aluminium by protons, computed by a previous author. We use both approximations to the neutron spectrum to produce a worst case and most probable case for the neutron spectra and the resulting dose-equivalents, computed using ICRP-51 neutron fluence-dose conversion tables. We compare these to the skin dose-equivalents due to charged particles during the same flights. (author).

  20. Neutron dose equivalent rate in intermediate energy heavy ion target area

    CERN Document Server

    Li Gui Sheng; Li Zong Wei; Su You Wu; Zhang Shu Mi

    2000-01-01

    The fluence rate distributions of neutrons emitted in the reactions of 50 MeV/u sup 1 sup 8 O-ion on thick Be, Cu, Au targets were measured with an activation method of threshold detectors and the neutron dose equivalent rate distributions at 1 m from the targets in intermediate energy heavy ion target area were obtained using the conversion coefficients for neutron fluence rate to ambient dose equivalent rate.

  1. Dose evaluation of boron neutron capture synovectomy using the THOR epithermal neutron beam: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jay [Department of Radiological Technology, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taiwan (China); Chang, S-J [Health Physics Division, Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Atomic Energy Council, Taiwan (China); Chuang, K-S [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing-Hua University, Taiwan (China); Hsueh, Y-W [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Taiwan (China); Yeh, K-C [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National Tsing-Hua University, Taiwan (China); Wang, J-N [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing-Hua University, Taiwan (China); Tsai, W-P [Division of Rheumatology, Immunology and Allergy, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan (China)

    2007-03-21

    Rheumatoid arthritis is one of the most common epidemic diseases in the world. For some patients, the treatment with steroids or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is not effective, thus necessitating physical removal of the inflamed synovium. Alternative approaches other than surgery will provide appropriate disease control and improve the patient's quality of life. In this research, we evaluated the feasibility of conducting boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS) with the Tsing Hua open-pool reactor (THOR) as a neutron source. Monte Carlo simulations were performed with arthritic joint models and uncertainties were within 5%. The collimator, reflector and boron concentration were optimized to reduce the treatment time and normal tissue doses. For the knee joint, polyethylene with 40%-enriched Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} was used as the collimator material, and a rear reflector of 15 cm thick graphite and side reflector of 10 cm thick graphite were chosen. The optimized treatment time was 5.4 min for the parallel-opposed irradiation. For the finger joint, polymethyl methacrylate was used as the reflector material. The treatment time can be reduced to 3.1 min, while skin and bone doses can be effectively reduced by approximately 9% compared with treatment using the graphite reflector. We conclude that using THOR as a treatment modality for BNCS could be a feasible alternative in clinical practice.

  2. Calculation of neutron fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients using GEANT4; Calculo de coeficientes de fluencia de neutrons para equivalente de dose individual utilizando o GEANT4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Rosane M.; Santos, Denison de S.; Queiroz Filho, Pedro P. de; Mauricio, CLaudia L.P.; Silva, Livia K. da; Pessanha, Paula R., E-mail: rosanemribeiro@oi.com.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients provide the basis for the calculation of area and personal monitors. Recently, the ICRP has started a revision of these coefficients, including new Monte Carlo codes for benchmarking. So far, little information is available about neutron transport below 10 MeV in tissue-equivalent (TE) material performed with Monte Carlo GEANT4 code. The objective of this work is to calculate neutron fluence to personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients, H{sub p} (10)/Φ, with GEANT4 code. The incidence of monoenergetic neutrons was simulated as an expanded and aligned field, with energies ranging between thermal neutrons to 10 MeV on the ICRU slab of dimension 30 x 30 x 15 cm{sup 3}, composed of 76.2% of oxygen, 10.1% of hydrogen, 11.1% of carbon and 2.6% of nitrogen. For all incident energy, a cylindrical sensitive volume is placed at a depth of 10 mm, in the largest surface of the slab (30 x 30 cm{sup 2}). Physic process are included for neutrons, photons and charged particles, and calculations are made for neutrons and secondary particles which reach the sensitive volume. Results obtained are thus compared with values published in ICRP 74. Neutron fluence in the sensitive volume was calculated for benchmarking. The Monte Carlo GEANT4 code was found to be appropriate to calculate neutron doses at energies below 10 MeV correctly. (author)

  3. Implementation of an Analytical Model for Leakage Neutron Equivalent Dose in a Proton Radiotherapy Planning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eley, John [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, 6767 Bertner Ave., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Newhauser, Wayne, E-mail: newhauser@lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Homann, Kenneth; Howell, Rebecca [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, 1515 Holcombe Blvd., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas, 6767 Bertner Ave., Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Schneider, Christopher [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Tower Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Durante, Marco; Bert, Christoph [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, Darmstadt 64291 (Germany)

    2015-03-11

    Equivalent dose from neutrons produced during proton radiotherapy increases the predicted risk of radiogenic late effects. However, out-of-field neutron dose is not taken into account by commercial proton radiotherapy treatment planning systems. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an analytical model to calculate leakage neutron equivalent dose in a treatment planning system. Passive scattering proton treatment plans were created for a water phantom and for a patient. For both the phantom and patient, the neutron equivalent doses were small but non-negligible and extended far beyond the therapeutic field. The time required for neutron equivalent dose calculation was 1.6 times longer than that required for proton dose calculation, with a total calculation time of less than 1 h on one processor for both treatment plans. Our results demonstrate that it is feasible to predict neutron equivalent dose distributions using an analytical dose algorithm for individual patients with irregular surfaces and internal tissue heterogeneities. Eventually, personalized estimates of neutron equivalent dose to organs far from the treatment field may guide clinicians to create treatment plans that reduce the risk of late effects.

  4. Techniques in high pressure neutron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Klotz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Drawing on the author's practical work from the last 20 years, Techniques in High Pressure Neutron Scattering is one of the first books to gather recent methods that allow neutron scattering well beyond 10 GPa. The author shows how neutron scattering has to be adapted to the pressure range and type of measurement.Suitable for both newcomers and experienced high pressure scientists and engineers, the book describes various solutions spanning two to three orders of magnitude in pressure that have emerged in the past three decades. Many engineering concepts are illustrated through examples of rea

  5. Neutron and gamma ray total dose rate determination using anisn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, E.; Ashoub, N.; Elkady, A.

    1994-07-01

    The National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control is in the process of acquiring a computer software library based mainly on internationally widely used computer codes. These codes are to be used as basic tools in safety analysis and radiation control and risk assessment. A complementary part of this activity is to validate the computer codes and set standard procedures with the limits of confidence for the different areas of applications of the one or the other code or set of codes. The present work has been then initiated in order to develop a standard shielding calculating procedure to be applied for the different applications of interest to the center, namely: shielding of nuclear installations, such as the ET-RR-1 reactor, the gamma unit, nuclear accelerator, radiotherapy units; shielding of nuclear sources (mainly neutron and gamma sources); shielding of transportation containers. In developing such a standard method, the sources of error to the final results (i.e. the dose rate and dose rate distribution) have to been identified and the error to be quantified. Through applying the developed procedure to benchmark PWR shielding problems, and to documented results for fission sources in water and concrete, the levels of confidence of the procedure in different application areas have been set.

  6. Neutron and gamma ray total dose rate determination using ANISN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin, E.; Elkady, A. [Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo (Egypt). National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control; Ashoub, N. [Nuclear Research Center, Cairo (Egypt)

    1994-07-01

    The National Center for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control is in the process of acquiring a computer software library based mainly on internationally widely used computer codes. These codes are to be used as basic tools in safety analysis and radiation control and risk assessment. A complementary part of this activity is to validate the computer codes and set standard procedures with the limits of confidence for the different areas of applications of the one or the other code or set of codes. The present work has been then initiated in order to develop a standard shielding calculating procedure to be applied for the different applications of interest to the center, namely: shielding of nuclear installations, such as the ET-RR-1 reactor, the gamma unit, nuclear accelerator, radiotherapy units; shielding of nuclear sources (mainly neutron and gamma sources); shielding of transportation containers. In developing such a standard method, the sources of error to the final results (i.e. the dose rate and dose rate distribution) have to be identified and the error to be quantified. Through applying the developed procedure to benchmark PWR shielding problems, and to documented results for fission sources in water and concrete, the levels of confidence of the procedure in different application areas have been set. (author).

  7. Effects of dose and dose protraction on embryotoxicity of 14.1 MeV neutron irradiation in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckman, D.A.; Buck, S.J. [Alfred I. duPont Institute, Wilmington, DE (United States)]|[Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Solomon, H.M. [SmithKline and Beecham Pharmaceuticals, King of Prussia, PA (United States); Gorson, R.O. [Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mills, R.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Brent, R.L. [Alfred I. duPont Institute, Wilmington, DE (United States)]|[Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The embryotoxic effects of neutron radiation on rodent embryos are documented, but there is disagreement about the dose-response relationship and the impact of protracting the dose. Pregnant rats were exposed to total absorbed doses of 0.15 to 1.50 Gy 14.1 MeV neutrons on day 9.5 after conception, coincident with the most sensitive stage of embryonic development for the induction of major congenital malformations. In general terms, the incidence of embryotoxic effects increased with increasing total absorbed dose. However, the dose-response relationship differed depending on the parameter of embryotoxicity chosen, namely, intrauterine death, malformations or very low body weight. In a second study, embryos were exposed to a single embryotoxic absorbed dose (0.75 Gy) administered at a range of dose rates, from 0.10 to 0.50 Gy/h. The results offer no evidence that protraction of this selected dose significantly increased or decreased the incidence or pattern of embryotoxicity of the neutron exposure used in this study. The results do not support the hypothesis of a linear dose-response relationship for the effects of prenatal neutron irradiation that contribute to embryotoxicity for total absorbed doses of 0.15 to 1.50 Gy. 23 refs., 8 tabs.

  8. Determination of radionuclides induced by fast neutrons from the JCO criticality accident in Tokai-mura, Japan for estimating neutron doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, S; Imanaka, T; Takada, J; Mitsugashira, T; Nakanishi, T; Seki, R; Kondo, M; Sasaki, K I; Saito, T; Yamaguchi, Y; Furukawa, M

    2001-09-01

    A criticality accident occurred at a uranium conversion facility in Tokai-mura, Japan on September 30, 1999, and fission neutrons were continuously emitted for about 20 hours. Materials of stainless steel or iron, and chemical reagents were collected at places between 2 m and 270 m from the criticality accident site on October 25 and 26, 1999, November 27, 1999 and February 11, 2000. Neutron-induced radionuclides. such as 54Mn and 58Co, in the materials exposed to fast neutrons from the accident were measured to estimate the neutron fluences and energy distributions. Highly sensitive y-ray spectrometry with a well-type Ge detector was performed after radiochemical separation of Mn and Co from the materials. An instrumental neutron activation analysis was mainly applied for determinations of the target elements and chemical yields. The concentrations of 54Mn and 58Co in a mesh screen of stainless steel collected at a location 2.0 m from the accident site were determined. The total number of fission events was evaluated to be 2.5 x 10(18) by Monte-Carlo calculations of neutron transfer by considering the observed values of 54Mn and 58Co. The results presented here are fundamental to estimate the neutron doses at various distances.

  9. Improvement of dose distribution by central beam shielding in boron neutron capture therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Ono, Koji

    2007-12-01

    Since boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) with epithermal neutron beams started at the Kyoto University Reactor (KUR) in June 2002, nearly 200 BNCT treatments have been carried out. The epithermal neutron irradiation significantly improves the dose distribution, compared with the previous irradiation mainly using thermal neutrons. However, the treatable depth limit still remains. One effective technique to improve the limit is the central shield method. Simulations were performed for the incident neutron energies and the annular components of the neutron source. It was clear that thermal neutron flux distribution could be improved by decreasing the lower energy neutron component and the inner annular component of the incident beam. It was found that a central shield of 4-6 cm diameter and 10 mm thickness is effective for the 12 cm diameter irradiation field. In BNCT at KUR, the depth dose distribution can be much improved by the central shield method, resulting in a relative increase of the dose at 8 cm depth by about 30%. In addition to the depth dose distribution, the depth dose profile is also improved. As the dose rate in the central area is reduced by the additional shielding, the necessary irradiation time, however, increases by about 30% compared to normal treatment.

  10. Development of high-intensity deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-trittium neutron sources and neutron filters for medical and industrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeke, Jerome Maurice

    This thesis consists of three main parts. The first part is related to boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), the second part to boron neutron capture synovectomy (BNCS), and the third part to the neutron generator development. A monoenergetic neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the most suitable neutron energy for treatment of shallow and deep-seated brain tumors in the context of BNCT. Two figures-of-merit---the absorbed skin dose and the absorbed tumor dose at a given depth in the brain---are used to measure the neutron beam quality. Based on the results of this study, moderators, reflectors and delimiters are designed and optimized to moderate the high-energy neutrons from the fusion reactions D-D and D-T down to a suitable energy spectrum. Two different computational models have been used to study the dose distribution in the brain. A monoenergetic neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the optimal neutron energy for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Two figures-of-merit are used to measure the neutron beam quality, the ratio of the synovium absorbed dose to the skin absorbed dose, and the ratio of the synovium absorbed dose to the bone absorbed dose. It was found that thermal neutron beams are optimal for treatment. Computation of the dose distribution in the knee requires the simulation of particle transport from the neutron source to the knee phantom through the moderator. The third part describes the development of high-intensity D-D and D-T neutron generators. Thick target neutron yield computations have been performed to estimate the neutron yield of titanium and scandium targets. With an average deuteron beam current of 1 A and an energy of 120 keV, a neutron production of about 1014 n/s can be estimated for a tritiated target. In mixed deuteron/triton beam operation, a beam current of 2 A at 150 keV is required for the same neutron output. Despite this lower neutron production, this mode of operation is

  11. Prediction of in-phantom dose distribution using in-air neutron beam characteristics for BNCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbeke, Jerome M.

    1999-12-14

    A monoenergetic neutron beam simulation study is carried out to determine the optimal neutron energy range for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis using radiation synovectomy. The goal of the treatment is the ablation of diseased synovial membranes in joints, such as knees and fingers. This study focuses on human knee joints. Two figures-of-merit are used to measure the neutron beam quality, the ratio of the synovium absorbed dose to the skin absorbed dose, and the ratio of the synovium absorbed dose to the bone absorbed dose. It was found that (a) thermal neutron beams are optimal for treatment, (b) similar absorbed dose rates and therapeutic ratios are obtained with monodirectional and isotropic neutron beams. Computation of the dose distribution in a human knee requires the simulation of particle transport from the neutron source to the knee phantom through the moderator. A method was developed to predict the dose distribution in a knee phantom from any neutron and photon beam spectra incident on the knee. This method was revealed to be reasonably accurate and enabled one to reduce by a factor of 10 the particle transport simulation time by modeling the moderator only.

  12. High-resolution neutron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikerov, V.I. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Zhitnik, I.A. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Ignat`ev, A.P. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Isakov, A.I. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Korneev, V.V. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Krutov, V.V. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuzin, S.V. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Oparin, S.N. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Pertsov, A.A. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Podolyak, E.R. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sobel`man, I.I. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tindo, I.P. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tukarev, B.A. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Inst., RAN, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    A neutron tomography technique with a coordinate resolution of several tens of micrometers has been developed. Our results indicate that the technique resolves details with dimensions less than 100 {mu}m and measures a linear attenuation of less than {approx} 0.1 cm{sup -1}. Tomograms can be reconstructed using incomplete data. Limits on the resolution of the restored pattern are analyzed, and ways to improve the sensitivity of the technique are discussed. (orig.).

  13. Effects of filters and wedges on skin sparing and gamma/neutron dose ratios in neutron teletherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smathers, J; Graves, R; Almond, P; Otte, V; Grant, W

    1980-01-01

    The effects of skin sparing and the gamma/neutron dose ratios in the clinical situations presently in use at the TAMVEC neutron teletherapy facility are not appreciably affected by the presence of filters and/or wedges. It is also shown that if skin sparing is lost due to close proximity of a hydrogenous scattering source, it can be restored by the use of thin lead filters.

  14. Neutron and high speed photogrammetric arcjet diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, P.A.E.; Rogers, J.D.; Fowler, P.H.; Deininger, W.D.; Taylor, A.D.

    1989-01-01

    Two methods for real time internal diagnostics of arcjet engines are described. One method uses cold, thermal, or epithermal neutrons. Cold neutrons are used to detect the presence and location of hydrogenous propellants. Thermal neutrons are used to delineate the edge contours of anode and cathode surfaces and to measure stress/strain. Epithermal neutrons are used to measure temperatures on arcjet surfaces, bulk material temperatures, and point temperatures in bulk materials. It is found that this method, with an exposure time of 10 min, produces at temperature accuracy for W or Re of + or - 2.5 C. The other method uses visible-light high-speed photogrammetry to obtain images of the transient behavior of the arc during start-up and to relate this behavior to electrial supply characteristics such as voltage, current, and ripple.

  15. Investigation of dose distribution in mixed neutron-gamma field of boron neutron capture therapy using N isopropylacrylamide gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bavarmegin, Elham; Sadremomtaz, Alireza [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalafi, Hossein; Kasesaz, Yaser [Dept. of Physics, University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khajeali, Azim [Medical Education Research Center, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    Gel dosimeters have unique advantages in comparison with other dosimeters. Until now, these gels have been used in different radiotherapy techniques as a reliable dosimetric tool. Because dose distribution measurement is an important factor for appropriate treatment planning in different radiotherapy techniques, in this study, we evaluated the ability of the N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) polymer gel to record the dose distribution resulting from the mixed neutron-gamma field of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this regard, a head phantom containing NIPAM gel was irradiated using the Tehran Research Reactor BNCT beam line, and then by a magnetic resonance scanner. Eventually, the R2 maps were obtained in different slices of the phantom by analyzing T2-weighted images. The results show that NIPAM gel has a suitable potential for recording three-dimensional dose distribution in mixed neutron-gamma field dosimetry.

  16. Investigation of Dose Distribution in Mixed Neutron-Gamma Field of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy using N-Isopropylacrylamide Gel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Bavarnegin

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Gel dosimeters have unique advantages in comparison with other dosimeters. Until now, these gels have been used in different radiotherapy techniques as a reliable dosimetric tool. Because dose distribution measurement is an important factor for appropriate treatment planning in different radiotherapy techniques, in this study, we evaluated the ability of the N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM polymer gel to record the dose distribution resulting from the mixed neutron-gamma field of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT. In this regard, a head phantom containing NIPAM gel was irradiated using the Tehran Research Reactor BNCT beam line, and then by a magnetic resonance scanner. Eventually, the R2 maps were obtained in different slices of the phantom by analyzing T2-weighted images. The results show that NIPAM gel has a suitable potential for recording three-dimensional dose distribution in mixed neutron-gamma field dosimetry.

  17. Measurement of neutron dose equivalent outside and inside of the treatment vault of GRID therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xudong; Charlton, Michael A.; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony Y.; Li, Ying; Papanikolaou, Nikos [University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the neutron and photon dose equivalent rates at the treatment vault entrance (H{sub n,D} and H{sub G}), and to study the secondary radiation to the patient in GRID therapy. The radiation activation on the grid was studied.Methods: A Varian Clinac 23EX accelerator was working at 18 MV mode with a grid manufactured by .decimal, Inc. The H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} were measured using an Andersson–Braun neutron REM meter, and a Geiger Müller counter. The radiation activation on the grid was measured after the irradiation with an ion chamber γ-ray survey meter. The secondary radiation dose equivalent to patient was evaluated by etched track detectors and OSL detectors on a RANDO{sup ®} phantom.Results: Within the measurement uncertainty, there is no significant difference between the H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} with and without a grid. However, the neutron dose equivalent to the patient with the grid is, on average, 35.3% lower than that without the grid when using the same field size and the same amount of monitor unit. The photon dose equivalent to the patient with the grid is, on average, 44.9% lower. The measured average half-life of the radiation activation in the grid is 12.0 (±0.9) min. The activation can be categorized into a fast decay component and a slow decay component with half-lives of 3.4 (±1.6) min and 15.3 (±4.0) min, respectively. There was no detectable radioactive contamination found on the surface of the grid through a wipe test.Conclusions: This work indicates that there is no significant change of the H{sub n,D} and H{sub G} in GRID therapy, compared with a conventional external beam therapy. However, the neutron and scattered photon dose equivalent to the patient decrease dramatically with the grid and can be clinical irrelevant. Meanwhile, the users of a grid should be aware of the possible high dose to the radiation worker from the radiation activation on the surface of the grid. A delay in handling the grid after the beam

  18. In-phantom dose mapping in neutron capture therapy by means of solid state detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccaro, S.; Cemmi, A.; Colombi, C.; Fiocca, M.; Gambarini, G.; Lietti, B.; Rosi, G.

    2004-01-01

    A method has been developed, based on thermoluminescent dosimeters and alanine, aimed at measuring the absorbed dose in tissue-equivalent phantoms exposed to an epithermal neutron beam suitable for neutron capture therapy (NCT), separating the contributions due to the various secondary radiations generated by neutrons. Exposures have been made at the TAPIRO nuclear reactor (ENEA, Italy), in the epithermal column properly designed and set up for experiments on boron NCT.

  19. Design of an improved neutron dose equivalent dosimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Brushwood, J M; Spyrou, N M

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the design and development of a new active area neutron dosimeter. The design incorporates a traditional central detector with a moderator/filter arrangement and a number of outer PIN type photodiodes sensitised to thermal neutrons by the application of a lithium fluoride converter. The outer thermal detectors allow the determination of the neutron radiation field characteristics. The experimental programme has demonstrated that such an arrangement is capable of discriminating between various neutron fields and the usefulness of MCNP4b as a design tool.

  20. Scintillating Fiber Technology for a High Neutron Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Evgeny; Adams, James, Jr.; Christl, Mark; Norwood, Joseph; Watts, John

    2014-01-01

    Develop a compact low-power neutron spectrometer that uniquely identifies neutrons in the mixed radiation field expected on crewed deep-space missions. Secondary neutrons are generated by cosmic rays striking heavy crewed spacecraft as well as lunar and planetary surfaces1,2. It has been shown that secondary neutrons can account for up to 50% if the total dose-equivalent received by the crew.

  1. Criticality prompt gamma and neutron dose equations validated by Monte Carlo analyses and compared to known criticality accident doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochhalter, Eugene

    The United States (US) Department of Energy [DOE] and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission [NRC] have provided the nuclear industry with requirements, goals, and objectives for the preparation of safety analysis and the finalization of that safety analysis in the form of a documented safety analysis (DSA) and technical safety requirements (TSRs). The deterministic guidance provided by the NRC in Regulatory Guide (RG) 3.33 for calculating the prompt gamma and neutron doses from a criticality has a number of potential issues associated with the semi-empirical equations, which make these equations potentially out dated. The NRC guidance for estimating the prompt gamma and neutron doses to a facility worker due to an accidental criticality was withdrawn without newer deterministic guidance being issued. This research project determined the original basis for the RG prompt gamma and neutron equations, evaluated the potential issues associated with the RG 3.33 prompt gamma and neutron equations, and modified the RG 3.33 point source prompt gamma and neutron equations to calculate the doses for the selected set of criticality accidents. The criticality accidents addressed by this dissertation include: 1. U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241 point source criticality, 2. U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241 sphere source criticality, 3. Uranyl nitrate and plutonium nitrate solutions in a cylindrical process vessel and 4. Low level waste in 55-gallon and 30-gallon drums. The prompt gamma and neutron equation doses (RG 3.33/3.34/3.35) are compared to actual nuclear industry criticality accident worker doses to assess the conservatism of the RG equations. Finally, the RG 3.33 prompt gamma and neutron dose equations are compared to MCNP5 results to investigate consistency with respect to the modified prompt gamma and neutron dose equations and the representative dose estimates for each of the criticality configurations (point source, spherical source, and cylindrical source). Knowledge and accurate

  2. Occupational doses due to photoneutrons in medical linear accelerators rooms; Doses ocupacionais devido a neutrons em salas de aceleradores lineares de uso medico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soares, Alessandro Facure Neves de Salles

    2006-04-15

    Medical linear accelerators, with maximum photon energies above 10 MeV, are becoming of common use in Brazil. Although desirable in the therapeutic point of view, the increase in photon energies causes the generation of undesired neutrons, which are produced through nuclear reactions between photons and the high Z target nuclei of the materials that constitute the accelerator head. In this work, MCNP simulation was undertaken to examine the neutron equivalent doses around the accelerators head and at the entrance of medical linear accelerators treatment rooms, some of them licensed in Brazil by the National Regulatory Agency (CNEN). The simulated neutron dose equivalents varied between 2 e 26 {mu} Sv/Gy{sub RX}, and the results were compared with calculations performed with the use of some semi-empirical equations found in literature. It was found that the semi-empirical equations underestimate the simulated neutron doses in the majority of the cases, if compared to the simulated values, suggesting that these equations must be revised, due to the increasing number of high energy machines in the country. (author)

  3. Mutations induced in Tradescantia by small doses of X-rays and neutrons - Analysis of dose-response curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, A. H.; Underbrink, A. G.; Rossi, H. H.

    1972-01-01

    Dose-response curves for pink somatic mutations in Tradescantia stamen hairs were analyzed after neutron and X-ray irradiation with doses ranging from a fraction of a rad to the region of saturation. The dose-effect relation for neutrons indicates a linear dependence from 0.01 to 8 rads; between 0.25 and 5 rads, a linear dependence is indicated for X-rays also. As a consequence the relative biological effectiveness reaches a constant value (about 50) at low doses. The observations are in good agreement with the predictions of the theory of dual radiation action and support its interpretation of the effects of radiation on higher organisms. The doubling dose of X-rays was found to be nearly 1 rad.

  4. High-Energy Neutrons from the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, S.; Feldman, W. C.; Lawrence, D. J.; Elphic, R. E.; Gasnault, O.; dUston, C.; Lucey, P. G.

    1999-01-01

    Galactic cosmic rays that impact the lunar soil produce neutrons with energies from fractions of eV's to about 100 MeV. The high-energy band from 0.6 to 8.0 MeV is referred as the "fast neutron" band, which is measured by Lunar Prospector (LP) Gamma Ray Spectrometer. Fast neutrons play an important role in neutron spectroscopy that may be summarized as follows: Fast neutrons define the total neutron input to the moderating process toward low-energy populations, so that epithermal and thermal neutron leakage currents must be normalized to the leakage of fast neutrons; they allow the determination of the burial depth of H, a measure necessary to understand characteristics of water deposits; they provide information on the surface content in heavy elements, such as Ti and Fe; and they provide a direct insight into the evaporation process. As discussed hereafter, fast neutrons may yield information on other oxides, such as Si02. missing data. Mare have numerous features, that are resolved in fast neutrons. For instance, the region extending northwest of Aristarchus (23.7 deg N, 47.4 W) is clearly separated from Montes Harbinger (27.0N, 41.0W) by a high-emission channel, and Mare Vaporum (13.3 N, 3.6 E) is separated from Sinus Aestuun (10.9N, 8.8W) by a low-emission area. We present a new technique to extract information on soil composition from the fast-neutron measurements. The analysis is applied to the central mare region. There are two steps for the development of the technique. 1. For the first step, which has been fully completed, we assume that variations of fast-neutron counting rates are due solely to TiO. and FeO. Upon this assumption, we correlate Clementine Spectral Reflectance Fe and Ti oxide maps with fast measurements. Above 16.5% of FeO, effects of Ti02 variations show in LP data. Below 6.5% of FeO, Fe cannot be discriminated; this is the region of most highland terrains. Under assumption of only two oxides to modulate the signal, we show that fast

  5. A high-throughput neutron spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stampfl, Anton; Noakes, Terry; Bartsch, Friedl; Bertinshaw, Joel; Veliscek-Carolan, Jessica; Nateghi, Ebrahim; Raeside, Tyler; Yethiraj, Mohana; Danilkin, Sergey; Kearley, Gordon

    2010-03-01

    A cross-disciplinary high-throughput neutron spectrometer is currently under construction at OPAL, ANSTO's open pool light-water research reactor. The spectrometer is based on the design of a Be-filter spectrometer (FANS) that is operating at the National Institute of Standards research reactor in the USA. The ANSTO filter-spectrometer will be switched in and out with another neutron spectrometer, the triple-axis spectrometer, Taipan. Thus two distinct types of neutron spectrometers will be accessible: one specialised to perform phonon dispersion analysis and the other, the filter-spectrometer, designed specifically to measure vibrational density of states. A summary of the design will be given along with a detailed ray-tracing analysis. Some preliminary results will be presented from the spectrometer.

  6. Neutron dose rate for {sup 252} Cf AT source in medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes, L.; Balcazar, M. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Azorin, J. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Francois, J.L. [FI-UNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    The AAPM TG-43 modified protocol was used for the calculation of the neutron dose rate of {sup 252}Cf sources for two tissue substitute materials, five normal tissues and six tumours. The {sup 252}Cf AT source model was simulated using the Monte Carlo MCNPX code in spherical geometry for the following factors: a) neutron air kerma strength conversion factor, b) dose rate constant, c) radial dose function, d) geometry factor, e) anisotropy function and f) neutron dose rate. The calculated dose rate in water at 1 cm and 90 degrees from the source long axis, using the Watt fission spectrum, was D{sub n}(r{sub 0}, {theta}{sub 0})= 1.9160 cGy/h-{mu}g. When this value is compared with Rivard et al. calculation using MCNP4B code, 1.8730 cGy/h-{mu}g, a difference of 2.30% is obtained. The results for the reference neutron dose rate in other media show how small variations in the elemental composition between the tissues and malignant tumours, produce variations in the neutron dose rate up to 12.25%. (Author)

  7. The alanine detector in BNCT dosimetry: Dose response in thermal and epithermal neutron fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, T., E-mail: schmito@uni-mainz.de [Institute for nuclear chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Mainz D-55128 (Germany); Bassler, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, Aarhus C, Aarhus 8000 (Denmark); Blaickner, M. [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Vienna A-1220 (Austria); Ziegner, M. [AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Vienna A-1220, Austria and TU Wien, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna A-1020 (Austria); Hsiao, M. C. [Insitute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Liu, Y. H. [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Koivunoro, H. [Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, POB 64, FI-00014, Finland and HUS Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, FI-00029 HUS (Finland); Auterinen, I.; Serén, T.; Kotiluoto, P. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland); Palmans, H. [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Teddington TW11 0LW, United Kingdom and Medical Physics Group, EBG MedAustron GmbH, Wiener Neustadt A-2700 (Austria); Sharpe, P. [National Physical Laboratory, Acoustics and Ionising Radiation Division, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Langguth, P. [Department of Pharmacy and Toxicology, University of Mainz, Mainz D-55128 (Germany); Hampel, G. [Institut für Kernchemie, Johannes Gutenberg-Universität, Mainz D-55128 (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: The response of alanine solid state dosimeters to ionizing radiation strongly depends on particle type and energy. Due to nuclear interactions, neutron fields usually also consist of secondary particles such as photons and protons of diverse energies. Various experiments have been carried out in three different neutron beams to explore the alanine dose response behavior and to validate model predictions. Additionally, application in medical neutron fields for boron neutron capture therapy is discussed. Methods: Alanine detectors have been irradiated in the thermal neutron field of the research reactor TRIGA Mainz, Germany, in five experimental conditions, generating different secondary particle spectra. Further irradiations have been made in the epithermal neutron beams at the research reactors FiR 1 in Helsinki, Finland, and Tsing Hua open pool reactor in HsinChu, Taiwan ROC. Readout has been performed with electron spin resonance spectrometry with reference to an absorbed dose standard in a {sup 60}Co gamma ray beam. Absorbed doses and dose components have been calculated using the Monte Carlo codes FLUKA and MCNP. The relative effectiveness (RE), linking absorbed dose and detector response, has been calculated using the Hansen and Olsen alanine response model. Results: The measured dose response of the alanine detector in the different experiments has been evaluated and compared to model predictions. Therefore, a relative effectiveness has been calculated for each dose component, accounting for its dependence on particle type and energy. Agreement within 5% between model and measurement has been achieved for most irradiated detectors. Significant differences have been observed in response behavior between thermal and epithermal neutron fields, especially regarding dose composition and depth dose curves. The calculated dose components could be verified with the experimental results in the different primary and secondary particle fields. Conclusions: The

  8. The three dimensional map of dose components in a head phantom for boron neutron capture therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bavarnegin Elham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The in-phantom measurement of physical dose distribution and construction of a convenient phantom is very important for boron neutron capture therapy planning validation. In this study we have simulated a head phantom, suggested for construction in boron neutron capture therapy facilities, and calculated all relevant dose components inside of it using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. A “generic” epithermal neutron beam with a broad neutron spectrum, similar to beams used for neutron capture therapy clinical trials, was used. The calculated distributions of all relevant dose components in brain tissue equivalent were compared with those in water. The results show that water is a suitable dosimetry material and that the simulated head phantom is a suitable design for producing accurate three-dimensional maps of dose components at enough points inside of the phantom for boron neutron capture therapy dosimetry measurements and the use of these dose maps in beam development and benchmarking of computer-based treatment codes.

  9. Measurements of gamma dose and thermal neutron fluence in phantoms exposed to a BNCT epithermal beam with TLD-700.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambarini, G; Magni, D; Regazzoni, V; Borroni, M; Carrara, M; Pignoli, E; Burian, J; Marek, M; Klupak, V; Viererbl, L

    2014-10-01

    Gamma dose and thermal neutron fluence in a phantom exposed to an epithermal neutron beam for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) can be measured by means of a single thermoluminescence dosemeter (TLD-700). The method exploits the shape of the glow curve (GC) and requires the gamma-calibration GC (to obtain gamma dose) and the thermal-neutron-calibration GC (to obtain neutron fluence). The method is applicable for BNCT dosimetry in case of epithermal neutron beams from a reactor because, in most irradiation configurations, thermal neutrons give a not negligible contribution to the TLD-700 GC. The thermal neutron calibration is not simple, because of the impossibility of having thermal neutron fields without gamma contamination, but a calibration method is here proposed, strictly bound to the method itself of dose separation.

  10. A high-resolution neutron spectra unfolding method using the Genetic Algorithm technique

    CERN Document Server

    Mukherjee, B

    2002-01-01

    The Bonner sphere spectrometers (BSS) are commonly used to determine the neutron spectra within various nuclear facilities. Sophisticated mathematical tools are used to unfold the neutron energy distribution from the output data of the BSS. This paper highlights a novel high-resolution neutron spectra-unfolding method using the Genetic Algorithm (GA) technique. The GA imitates the biological evolution process prevailing in the nature to solve complex optimisation problems. The GA method was utilised to evaluate the neutron energy distribution, average energy, fluence and equivalent dose rates at important work places of a DIDO class research reactor and a high-energy superconducting heavy ion cyclotron. The spectrometer was calibrated with a sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am/Be (alpha,n) neutron standard source. The results of the GA method agreed satisfactorily with the results obtained by using the well-known BUNKI neutron spectra unfolding code.

  11. Superconducting High Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hau, Ionel Dragos [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Superconducting high resolution fast-neutron calorimetric spectrometers based on 6LiF and TiB{sub 2} absorbers have been developed. These novel cryogenic spectrometers measure the temperature rise produced in exothermal (n, α) reactions with fast neutrons in 6Li and 10B-loaded materials with heat capacity C operating at temperatures T close to 0.1 K. Temperature variations on the order of 0.5 mK are measured with a Mo/Cu thin film multilayer operated in the transition region between its superconducting and its normal state. The advantage of calorimetry for high resolution spectroscopy is due to the small phonon excitation energies kBT on the order of μeV that serve as signal carriers, resulting in an energy resolution ΔE ~ (kBT2C)1/2, which can be well below 10 keV. An energy resolution of 5.5 keV has been obtained with a Mo/Cu superconducting sensor and a TiB2 absorber using thermal neutrons from a 252Cf neutron source. This resolution is sufficient to observe the effect of recoil nuclei broadening in neutron spectra, which has been related to the lifetime of the first excited state in 7Li. Fast-neutron spectra obtained with a 6Li-enriched LiF absorber show an energy resolution of 16 keV FWHM, and a response in agreement with the 6Li(n, α)3H reaction cross section and Monte Carlo simulations for energies up to several MeV. The energy resolution of order of a few keV makes this novel instrument applicable to fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy based on the unique elemental signature provided by the neutron absorption and scattering resonances. The optimization of the energy resolution based on analytical and numerical models of the detector response is discussed in the context of these applications.

  12. Calculation of Ambient (H*(10)) and Personal (Hp(10)) Dose Equivalent from a 252Cf Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traub, Richard J.

    2010-03-26

    The purpose of this calculation is to calculate the neutron dose factors for the Sr-Cf-3000 neutron source that is located in the 318 low scatter room (LSR). The dose factors were based on the dose conversion factors published in ICRP-21 Appendix 6, and the Ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) and Personal dose equivalent (Hp(10)) dose factors published in ICRP Publication 74.

  13. Gamma/neutron dose evaluation using Fricke gel and alanine gel dosimeters to be applied in boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangueira, T F; Silva, C F; Coelho, P R P; Campos, L L

    2010-01-01

    Gel dosimetry has been studied mainly for medical applications. The radiation induced ferric ions concentration can be measured by different techniques to be related with the absorbed dose. Aiming to assess gamma/thermal neutrons dose from research reactors, Fricke gel and alanine gel solutions produced at IPEN using 300 bloom gelatin were mixed with Na(2)B(4)O(7) salt, and the mixtures were irradiated at the beam hole #3 of the IEA-R1 research reactor, (BH#3) adapted to BNCT studies, and the dose-response was evaluated using spectrophotometry technique.

  14. Dose Determination using alanine detectors in a Mixed Neutron and Gamma Field for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of Liver Malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, T.; Blaickner, M.; Ziegner, M.

    2011-01-01

    be suitable for measurements in mixed neutron and gamma fields. Materials and Methods Two experiments have been carried out in the thermal column of the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Mainz. Alanine dosimeters have been irradiated in a phantom and in liver tissue. Results For the interpretation......, in combination with flux measurements and Monte Carlo calculations with FLUKA, suggest that it is possible to establish a system for monitoring the dose in a mixed neutron and gamma field for BNCT and other applications in radiotherapy....

  15. SU-E-T-568: Neutron Dose Survey of a Compact Single Room Proton Machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y; Prusator, M; Islam, M; Johnson, D; Ahmad, S [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To ensure acceptable radiation limits are maintained for those working at and near the machine during its operation, a comprehensive radiation survey was performed prior to the clinical release of Mevion S250 compact proton machine at Stephenson Oklahoma Cancer Center. Methods: The Mevion S250 proton therapy system consists of the following: a superconducting cyclotron to accelerate the proton particles, a passive double scattering system for beam shaping, and paired orthogonal x-ray imaging systems for patient setup and verification via a 6D robotic couch. All equipment is housed within a single vault of compact design. Two beam delivery applicators are available for patient treatment, offering field sizes of as great as 14 cm and 25 cm in diameter, respectively. Typical clinical dose rates are between 1 and 2 Gy/min with a fixed beam energy of 250 MeV. The large applicator (25 cm in diameter) was used in conjunction with a custom cut brass aperture to create a 20 cm x 20 cm field size at beam isocenter. A 30 cm − 30 cm − 35 cm high density plastic phantom was placed in the beam path to mimic the conditions creating patient scatter. Measurements integrated-ambient-neutron-dose-equivalence were made with a SWENDII detector. Gantry angles of 0, 90 and 180 degrees, with a maximum dose rate of 150 MU/min (for large applicator) and beam configuration of option 1 (range 25 cm and 20 cm modulation), were selected as testing conditions. At each point of interest, the highest reading was recorded at 30 cm from the barrier surface. Results: The highest neutron dose was estimated to be 0.085 mSv/year at the console area. Conclusion: All controlled areas are under 5 mSv/year and the uncontrolled areas are under 1 mSv/year. The radiation protection provided by the proton vault is of sufficient quality.

  16. Radiological Shielding Design for the Neutron High-Resolution Backscattering Spectrometer EMU at the OPAL Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersez, Tunay; Esposto, Fernando; Souza, Nicolas R. de

    2017-09-01

    The shielding for the neutron high-resolution backscattering spectrometer (EMU) located at the OPAL reactor (ANSTO) was designed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 5-1.60. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies, such as the neutron pre-monochromator bunker with sliding cylindrical block shields to accommodate a range of neutron take-off angles, and in the experimental area - shielding of neutron focusing guides, choppers, flight tube, backscattering monochromator, and additional shielding elements inside the Scattering Tank. These shielding assemblies meet safety and engineering requirements and cost constraints. The neutron dose rates around the EMU instrument were reduced to < 0.5 µSv/h and the gamma dose rates to a safe working level of ≤ 3 µSv/h.

  17. Antiproton Radiotherapy Peripheral Dose from Secondary Neutrons produced in the Annihilation of Antiprotons in the Target

    CERN Document Server

    Fahimian, Benjamin P; Keyes, Roy; Bassler, Niels; Iwamoto, Keisuke S; Zankl, Maria; Holzscheiter, Michael H

    2009-01-01

    The AD-4/ACE collaboration studies the biological effects of antiprotons with respect to a possible use of antiprotons in cancer therapy. In vitro experiments performed by the collaboration have shown an enhanced biological effectiveness for antiprotons relative to protons. One concern is the normal tissue dose resulting from secondary neutrons produced in the annihilation of antiprotons on the nucleons of the target atoms. Here we present the first organ specific Monte Carlo calculations of normal tissue equivalent neutron dose in antiproton therapy through the use of a segmented CT-based human phantom. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was employed to quantify the peripheral dose for a cylindrical spread out Bragg peak representing a treatment volume of 1 cm diameter and 1 cm length in the frontal lobe of a segmented whole-body phantom of a 38 year old male. The secondary neutron organ dose was tallied as a function of energy and organ.

  18. Characterization of the neutron irradiation system for use in the Low-Dose-Rate Irradiation Facility at Sandia National Laboratories.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Manuel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this work was to characterize the neutron irradiation system consisting of americium-241 beryllium (241AmBe) neutron sources placed in a polyethylene shielding for use at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Low Dose Rate Irradiation Facility (LDRIF). With a total activity of 0.3 TBq (9 Ci), the source consisted of three recycled 241AmBe sources of different activities that had been combined into a single source. The source in its polyethylene shielding will be used in neutron irradiation testing of components. The characterization of the source-shielding system was necessary to evaluate the radiation environment for future experiments. Characterization of the source was also necessary because the documentation for the three component sources and their relative alignment within the Special Form Capsule (SFC) was inadequate. The system consisting of the source and shielding was modeled using Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code (MCNP). The model was validated by benchmarking it against measurements using multiple techniques. To characterize the radiation fields over the full spatial geometry of the irradiation system, it was necessary to use a number of instruments of varying sensitivities. First, the computed photon radiography assisted in determining orientation of the component sources. With the capsule properly oriented inside the shielding, the neutron spectra were measured using a variety of techniques. A N-probe Microspec and a neutron Bubble Dosimeter Spectrometer (BDS) set were used to characterize the neutron spectra/field in several locations. In the third technique, neutron foil activation was used to ascertain the neutron spectra. A high purity germanium (HPGe) detector was used to characterize the photon spectrum. The experimentally measured spectra and the MCNP results compared well. Once the MCNP model was validated to an adequate level of confidence, parametric analyses was performed on the model to optimize for potential

  19. Neutron-photon mixed field dosimetry by TLD-700 glow curve analysis and its implementation in dose monitoring for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boggio, E. F.; Longhino, J. M. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Departamento de Fisica de Reactores y Radiaciones / CNEA, Av. E. Bustillo Km 9.5, R8402AGP San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Andres, P. A., E-mail: efboggio@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Division Proteccion Radiologica / CNEA, Av. E. Bustillo Km 9.5, R8402AGP San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2015-10-15

    BNCT is a cancerous cells selective, non-conventional radiotherapy modality to treat malignant tumors such as glioblastoma, melanoma and recurrent head and neck cancer. It consists of a two-step procedure: first, the patient is injected with a tumor localizing drug containing a non-radioactive isotope (Boron-10) with high slow neutron capture cross-section. In a second step, the patient is irradiated with neutrons, which are absorbed by the Boron-10 agent with the subsequently nuclear reaction B- 10(n,a)Li-7, thereby resulting in dose at cellular level due to the high-Let particles. The neutron fields suitable for BNCT are characterized by high neutron fluxes and low gamma dose. Determination of each component is not an easy task, especially when the volume of measurement is quite small or inaccessible for a miniature ionization chamber, for example. A method of measuring the photon and slow neutron dose(mainly by N-14 and B-10) from the glow curve (GC) analysis of a single {sup 7}LiF thermoluminescence detector is evaluated. This method was suggested by the group headed by Dr. Grazia Gambarini. The dosemeters used were TLD-600 ({sup 6}LiF:Mg,Ti with 95.6% {sup 6}Li) and TLD-700 ({sup 7}LiF:Mg,Ti with 99.9% {sup 7}LiF) from Harshaw. Photon dose measurement using the GC analysis method with TLD-700 in mixed fields requires the relation of the two main peaks of a TLD-600 GC shape obtained from an exposition to the same neutron field, and a photon calibrated GC with TLD-700. The requirements for slow neutron dose measurements are similar. In order to properly apply the GC analysis method at the Ra-6 Research Reactor BNCT facility, measurements were carried out in a standard water phantom, fully characterized on the BNCT beam by conventional techniques (activation detectors and paired ionization chambers technique). Next, the method was implemented in whole body dose monitoring of a patient undergoing a BNCT treatment, using a Bo MAb (Bottle Manikin Absorption) phantom

  20. Assessment of individual organ doses in a realistic human phantom from neutron and gamma stimulated spectroscopy of the breast and liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belley, Matthew D. [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham 27705, North Carolina (United States); Segars, William Paul; Kapadia, Anuj J., E-mail: anuj.kapadia@duke.edu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina and Department of Radiology, Carl E. Ravin Advanced Imaging Laboratories, Duke University Medical Center, Durham 27710, North Carolina (United States)

    2014-06-15

    scans. Conclusions: Neutron and gamma irradiation of a primary target organ was found to impart the majority of the total dose to the primary target organ (and other large organs) within the beam plane and considerably lower dose to proximal organs outside of the beam. These results also indicate that despite the use of a highly scattering particle such as a neutron, the dose from neutron stimulated emission computed tomography scans is on par with other clinical imaging techniques such as x-ray computed tomography (x-ray CT). Given the high nonuniformity in the dose across an organ during the neutron scan, care must be taken when computing average doses from neutron irradiations. The effective doses from neutron scanning were found to be comparable to x-ray CT. Further technique modifications are needed to reduce the effective dose levels from the gamma scans.

  1. High-energy neutron dosimetry with superheated drop detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Errico, F.; Agosteo, S.; Sannikov, A.V.; Silari, M

    2002-07-01

    A systematic analysis of the response of dichlorodifluoromethane superheated drop detectors was performed in the 46-133 MeV energy range. Experiments with quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams were performed at the Universite Catholique de Leuvain-la-Neuve, Belgium and the Svedberg Laboratory, Sweden, while tests in a broad field were performed at CERN. To determine the response of the detectors to the high-energy beams, the spectra of incident neutrons were folded over functions modelled after the cross sections for the production of heavy ions from the detector elements. The cross sections for fluorine and chlorine were produced in this work by means of the Monte Carlo high-energy transport code HADRON based on the cascade exciton model of nuclear interactions. The new response data permit the interpretation of measurements at high-energy accelerators and on high-altitude commercial flights, where a 30-50% under-response had been consistently recorded with respect to neutron dose equivalent. The introduction of a 1 cm lead shell around the detectors effectively compensates most of the response defect. (author)

  2. Defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masashi Shimada; M. Hara; T. Otsuka; Y. Oya; Y. Hatano

    2014-05-01

    Accurately estimating tritium retention in plasma facing components (PFCs) and minimizing its uncertainty are key safety issues for licensing future fusion power reactors. D-T fusion reactions produce 14.1 MeV neutrons that activate PFCs and create radiation defects throughout the bulk of the material of these components. Recent studies show that tritium migrates and is trapped in bulk (>> 10 µm) tungsten beyond the detection range of nuclear reaction analysis technique [1-2], and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) technique becomes the only established diagnostic that can reveal hydrogen isotope behavior in in bulk (>> 10 µm) tungsten. Radiation damage and its recovery mechanisms in neutron-irradiated tungsten are still poorly understood, and neutron-irradiation data of tungsten is very limited. In this paper, systematic investigations with repeated plasma exposures and thermal desorption are performed to study defect annealing and thermal desorption of deuterium in low dose neutron-irradiated tungsten. Three tungsten samples (99.99 at. % purity from A.L.M.T. Co., Japan) irradiated at High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory were exposed to high flux (ion flux of (0.5-1.0)x1022 m-2s-1 and ion fluence of 1x1026 m-2) deuterium plasma at three different temperatures (100, 200, and 500 °C) in Tritium Plasma Experiment at Idaho National Laboratory. Subsequently, thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was performed with a ramp rate of 10 °C/min up to 900 °C, and the samples were annealed at 900 °C for 0.5 hour. These procedures were repeated three (for 100 and 200 °C samples) and four (for 500 °C sample) times to uncover damage recovery mechanisms and its effects on deuterium behavior. The results show that deuterium retention decreases approximately 90, 75, and 66 % for 100, 200, and 500 °C, respectively after each annealing. When subjected to the same TDS recipe, the desorption temperature shifts from 800 °C to 600 °C after 1st annealing

  3. Controllability of depth dose distribution for neutron capture therapy at the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of Kyoto University Research Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kobayashi, Tooru

    2002-10-01

    The updating construction of the Heavy Water Neutron Irradiation Facility of the Kyoto University Research Reactor has been performed from November 1995 to March 1996 mainly for the improvement in neutron capture therapy. On the performance, the neutron irradiation modes with the variable energy spectra from almost pure thermal to epi-thermal neutrons became available by the control of the heavy-water thickness in the spectrum shifter and by the open-and-close of the cadmium and boral thermal neutron filters. The depth distributions of thermal, epi-thermal and fast neutron fluxes were measured by activation method using gold and indium, and the depth distributions of gamma-ray absorbed dose rate were measured using thermo-luminescent dosimeter of beryllium oxide for the several irradiation modes. From these measured data, the controllability of the depth dose distribution using the spectrum shifter and the thermal neutron filters was confirmed.

  4. Defect evolution in single crystalline tungsten following low temperature and low dose neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-03-01

    The tungsten plasma-facing components of fusion reactors will experience an extreme environment including high temperature, intense particle fluxes of gas atoms, high-energy neutron irradiation, and significant cyclic stress loading. Irradiation-induced defect accumulation resulting in severe thermo-mechanical property degradation is expected. For this reason, and because of the lack of relevant fusion neutron sources, the fundamentals of tungsten radiation damage must be understood through coordinated mixed-spectrum fission reactor irradiation experiments and modeling. In this study, high-purity (110) single-crystal tungsten was examined by positron annihilation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy following low-temperature (∼90 °C) and low-dose (0.006 and 0.03 dpa) mixed-spectrum neutron irradiation and subsequent isochronal annealing at 400, 500, 650, 800, 1000, 1150, and 1300 °C. The results provide insights into microstructural and defect evolution, thus identifying the mechanisms of different annealing behavior. Following 1 h annealing, ex situ characterization of vacancy defects using positron lifetime spectroscopy and coincidence Doppler broadening was performed. The vacancy cluster size distributions indicated intense vacancy clustering at 400 °C with significant damage recovery around 1000 °C. Coincidence Doppler broadening measurements confirm the trend of the vacancy defect evolution, and the S-W plots indicate that only a single type of vacancy cluster is present. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy observations at selected annealing conditions provide supplemental information on dislocation loop populations and visible void formation. This microstructural information is consistent with the measured irradiation-induced hardening at each annealing stage, providing insight into tungsten hardening and embrittlement due to irradiation-induced matrix defects.

  5. Measurements of thermal- and slow-neutron dose distributions in ordinary concrete shield using a reactor neutron beam of different energy ranges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megahid, R.M.; Makarious, A.S.; El-Kolaly, M.A.; Afifi, Y.A.

    1980-01-01

    Experimental studies on the distribution and attenuation of thermal and slow neutron doses in ordinary concrete shield have been carried-out. A collimated beam of reactor neutrons emitted from one of the horizontal channels of the ET-RR-1 reactor was used. Measurements were performed using, a direct beam, cadmium filtered beam and boron carbide filtered beam. The neutron doses were measured using thermolumin-escent Li/sub 2/B/sub 4/O/sub 7/ detectors. The measured data have been analyzed and a group of attenuation curves were given for beams of reactor neutrons of different energy. These curves show that cadmium and boron carbide filters tend to decrease the neutron doses specially at the beginning of penetration. The data were transformed to that which would be obtained using neutron sources of different geometries.

  6. Albedo Neutron Dosimetry in a Deep Geological Disposal Repository for High-Level Nuclear Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Bo; Becker, Frank

    2016-06-24

    Albedo neutron dosemeter is the German official personal neutron dosemeter in mixed radiation fields where neutrons contribute to personal dose. In deep geological repositories for high-level nuclear waste, where neutrons can dominate the radiation field, it is of interest to investigate the performance of albedo neutron dosemeter in such facilities. In this study, the deep geological repository is represented by a shielding cask loaded with spent nuclear fuel placed inside a rock salt emplacement drift. Due to the backscattering of neutrons in the drift, issues concerning calibration of the dosemeter arise. Field-specific calibration of the albedo neutron dosemeter was hence performed with Monte Carlo simulations. In order to assess the applicability of the albedo neutron dosemeter in a deep geological repository over a long time scale, spent nuclear fuel with different ages of 50, 100 and 500 years were investigated. It was found out, that the neutron radiation field in a deep geological repository can be assigned to the application area 'N1' of the albedo neutron dosemeter, which is typical in reactors and accelerators with heavy shielding.

  7. Extension of CASCADE.04 to estimate neutron fluence and dose rates and its validation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    H Kumawat; V Kumar; P Srinivasan

    2009-03-01

    Capability to compute neutron dose rate is introduced for the first time in the new version of the CASCADE.04 code. Two different methods, `track length estimator' and `collision estimator' are adapted for the estimation of neutron fluence rate needed to calculate the ambient dose rate. For the validation of the methods, neutron dose rates are experimentally measured at different locations of a 5Ci Am–Be source, shielded in Howitzer-type system and these results are compared with those estimated using (i) modified CASCADE.04.d and (ii) MCNP4A codes and it is found that the agreement is good. The paper presents details of modification and results of the comparative study.

  8. Determination of the [gamma]-ray dose in an epithermal neutron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raaijmakers, C.P.J.; Konijnenberg, M.W.; Mijnheer, B.J. (Netherlands Cancer Inst., Amsterdam (Netherlands)); Stecher-Rasmussen, F.; Verhagen, H. (Netherlands Energy Research Foundation, Petten (Netherlands))

    1993-01-01

    Neutron beams used for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) are always accompanied by photons. These two irradiation components have different relative biological effectiveness. Therefore it is necessary to determine the neutron and photon absorbed dose in the mixed field separately. All gamma-ray detectors however are also sensitive for neutrons. In this work preliminary results are presented using TLD-700 chips, a Mg(Ar) ionisation chamber and a GM-counter to determine the gamm-ray component in a mixed beam of gamma-rays and neutrons. The results show a good agreement between the GM-counter and the ionisation chamber, indicating a small realtive neutron sensitivity (k[sub u]) for these detectors. The sensitivity of TLD-700 for thermal neutrons however gives rise to a detector response for which a correction is necessary. The uncertainty however in the relative gamma-ray sensitivity (h[sub u]) of the detectors is at this moment too large to determine accurate values of the relative neutron sensitivities. (orig.).

  9. Measurement of the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray induced neutrons aboard an ER-2 high-altitude airplane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhagen, P; Reginatto, M; Kniss, T; Wilson, J W; Singleterry, R C; Jones, I W; Van Steveninck, W

    2002-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial aircraft flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) project, an international collaboration of 15 laboratories, made simultaneous radiation measurements with 14 instruments on five flights of a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The primary AIR instrument was a highly sensitive extended-energy multisphere neutron spectrometer with lead and steel shells placed within the moderators of two of its 14 detectors to enhance response at high energies. Detector responses were calculated for neutrons and charged hadrons at energies up to 100 GeV using MCNPX. Neutron spectra were unfolded from the measured count rates using the new MAXED code. We have measured the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum (thermal to >10 GeV), total neutron fluence rate, and neutron effective dose and dose equivalent rates and their dependence on altitude and geomagnetic cutoff. The measured cosmic-ray neutron spectra have almost no thermal neutrons, a large "evaporation" peak near 1 MeV and a second broad peak near 100 MeV which contributes about 69% of the neutron effective dose. At high altitude, geomagnetic latitude has very little effect on the shape of the spectrum, but it is the dominant variable affecting neutron fluence rate, which was eight times higher at the northernmost measurement location than it was at the southernmost. The shape of the spectrum varied only slightly with altitude from 21 km down to 12 km (56-201 g cm-2 atmospheric depth), but was significantly different on the ground. In all cases, ambient dose equivalent was greater than effective dose for cosmic-ray neutrons.

  10. Evaluation of energy response of neutron rem monitor applied to high-energy accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakane, Yoshihiro; Harada, Yasunori; Sakamoto, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2003-03-01

    A neutron rem monitor was newly developed for applying to the high-intensity proton accelerator facility (J-PARC) that is under construction as a joint project between the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization. To measure the dose rate accurately for wide energy range of neutrons from thermal to high-energy region, the neutron rem monitor was fabricated by adding a lead breeder layer to a conventional neutron rem monitor. The energy response of the monitor was evaluated by using neutron transport calculations for the energy range from thermal to 150 MeV. For verifying the results, the response was measured at neutron fields for the energy range from thermal to 65 MeV. The comparisons between the energy response and dose conversion coefficients show that the newly developed neutron rem monitor has a good performance in energy response up to 150 MeV, suggesting that the present study offered prospects of a practical fabrication of the rem monitor applicable to the high intensity proton accelerator facility. (author)

  11. Measurementof photo-neutron dose from an 18-MV medical linac using a foil activation method in view of radiation protection of patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuecel, Haluk; Kolbasi, Asuman; Yueksel, Alptug Oezer [Ankara University, Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Ankara (Turkmenistan); Cobanbas, Ibrahim; Kaya, Vildan [Sueleyman Demirel University, School of Medicine, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Isparta (Turkmenistan)

    2016-04-15

    High-energy linear accelerators are increasingly used in the medical field. However, the unwanted photo-neutrons can also be contributed to the dose delivered to the patients during their treatments. In this study, neutron fluxes were measured in a solid water phantom placed at the isocenter 1-m distance from the head of an 18-MV linac using the foil activation method. The produced activities were measured with a calibrated well-type Ge detector. From the measured fluxes, the total neutron fluence was found to be (1.17 ± 0.06) X 10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2} per Gy at the phantom surface in a 20 X 20 cm{sup 2} X-ray field size. The maximum photo-neutron dose was measured to be 0.67 ± 0.04 mSv/Gy at d{sub max} = 5 cm depth in the phantom at isocenter. The present results are compared with those obtained for different field sizes of 10 X 10cm{sup 2}, 15 X 15cm{sup 2}, and 20 X 20cm{sup 2} from 10-, 15-, and 18-MV linacs. Additionally, ambient neutron dose equivalents were determined at different locations in the room and they were found to be negligibly low. The results indicate that the photo-neutron dose at the patient position is not a negligible fraction of the therapeutic photon dose. Thus, there is a need for reduction of the contaminated neutron dose by taking some additional measures, for instance, neutron absorbing-protective materials might be used as aprons during the treatment.

  12. Dose profile modeling of Idaho National Laboratory's active neutron interrogation laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichester, D L; Seabury, E H; Zabriskie, J M; Wharton, J; Caffrey, A J

    2009-06-01

    A new laboratory has been commissioned at Idaho National Laboratory for performing active neutron interrogation research and development. The facility is designed to provide radiation shielding for deuterium-tritium (DT) fusion (14.1 MeV) neutron generators (2 x 10(8) n/s), deuterium-deuterium (DD) fusion (2.5 MeV) neutron generators (1 x 10(7) n/s), and (252)Cf spontaneous fission neutron sources (6.96 x 10(7) n/s, 30 microg). Shielding at the laboratory is comprised of modular concrete shield blocks 0.76 m thick with tongue-in-groove features to prevent radiation streaming, arranged into one small and one large test vault. The larger vault is designed to allow operation of the DT generator and has walls 3.8m tall, an entrance maze, and a fully integrated electrical interlock system; the smaller test vault is designed for (252)Cf and DD neutron sources and has walls 1.9 m tall and a simple entrance maze. Both analytical calculations and numerical simulations were used in the design process for the building to assess the performance of the shielding walls and to ensure external dose rates are within required facility limits. Dose rate contour plots have been generated for the facility to visualize the effectiveness of the shield walls and entrance mazes and to illustrate the spatial profile of the radiation dose field above the facility and the effects of skyshine around the vaults.

  13. Dose estimation for internal organs during boron neutron capture therapy for body-trunk tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Y; Tanaka, H; Suzuki, M; Masunaga, S; Kinashi, Y; Kondo, N; Ono, K; Maruhashi, A

    2014-06-01

    Radiation doses during boron neutron capture therapy for body-trunk tumors were estimated for various internal organs, using data from patients treated at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute. Dose-volume histograms were constructed for tissues of the lung, liver, kidney, pancreas, and bowel. For pleural mesothelioma, the target total dose to the normal lung tissues on the diseased side is 5Gy-Eq in average for the whole lung. It was confirmed that the dose to the liver should be carefully considered in cases of right lung disease.

  14. Semiconductor High-Level Dosimeters Used in the SLAC Mixed Gamma and Neutron Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, S

    2003-01-01

    As part of an exploration of Semiconductor High-Level Dosimetry (SHLD) in the accelerator radiation fields, the response of SHLD system, composed of dual MOSFETs, wide-base PIN diode, and a microprocessor-controlled reader, was calibrated in photon (Co-60) and neutron (Bare-reactor) fields. The response curves for the MOSFET and the PIN diode were determined. The neutron sensitivity of the PIN diode is about a factor of 2200 times higher than its photon sensitivity. Therefore, the PIN diode can be used to measure the neutron dose and virtually ignore the photon dose contribution. The MOSFET can be used to estimate the photon dose after subtracting the ionizing effect of the neutrons. The SHLD was used in the SLAC mixed field to measure the photon and neutron doses around a copper beam dump. The photon measurements near the copper dump agreed reasonably with the FLUKA Monte Carlo calculations. The neutron measurements agreed with FLUKA calculations to within a factor of two.

  15. Evaluation of energy responses for neutron dose-equivalent meters made in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saegusa, J. E-mail: saegusa@popsvr.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Yoshizawa, M.; Tanimura, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Yamano, T.; Nakaoka, H

    2004-01-01

    Energy responses of three types of Japanese neutron dose-equivalent (DE) meters were evaluated by Monte Carlo simulations and measurements. The energy responses were evaluated for thermal neutrons, monoenergetic neutrons with energies up to 15.2 MeV, and also for neutrons from such radionuclide sources as {sup 252}Cf and {sup 241}Am-Be. The calculated results were corroborated with the measured ones. The angular dependence of the response and the DE response were also evaluated. As a result, reliable energy responses were obtained by careful simulations of the proportional counter, moderator and absorber of the DE meters. Furthermore, the relationship between pressure of counting gas and response of the DE meter was discussed. By using the obtained responses, relations between predicted readings of the DE meters and true DE values were studied for various workplace spectra.

  16. Design and optimization of a beam shaping assembly for BNCT based on D-T neutron generator and dose evaluation using a simulated head phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, Fatemeh S; Masoudi, S Farhad

    2012-12-01

    A feasibility study was conducted to design a beam shaping assembly for BNCT based on D-T neutron generator. The optimization of this configuration has been realized in different steps. This proposed system consists of metallic uranium as neutron multiplier, TiF(3) and Al(2)O(3) as moderators, Pb as reflector, Ni as shield and Li-Poly as collimator to guide neutrons toward the patient position. The in-air parameters recommended by IAEA were assessed for this proposed configuration without using any filters which enables us to have a high epithermal neutron flux at the beam port. Also a simulated Snyder head phantom was used to evaluate dose profiles due to the irradiation of designed beam. The dose evaluation results and depth-dose curves show that the neutron beam designed in this work is effective for deep-seated brain tumor treatments even with D-T neutron generator with a neutron yield of 2.4×10(12) n/s. The Monte Carlo Code MCNP-4C is used in order to perform these calculations.

  17. The influence of low dose neutron irradiation on the thermal conductivity of Allcomp carbon foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burchell, Timothy D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Porter, Wallace D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McDuffee, Joel Lee [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory was contracted via a Work for Others Agreement with Allcomp Inc. (NFE-14-05011-MSOF: Carbon Foam for Beam Stop Applications ) to determine the influence of low irradiation dose on the thermal conductivity of Allcomp Carbon Foam. Samples (6 mm dia. x 5 mm thick) were successfully irradiated in a rabbit capsule in a hydraulic tube in the target region of the High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The specimens were irradiated at Tirr = 747.5 C to a neutron damage dose of 0.2 dpa. There is a small dimensional and volume shrinkage and the mass and density appear reduced (we would expect density to increase as volume reduces at constant mass). The small changes in density, dimensions or volume are not of concern. At 0.2 dpa the irradiation shrinkage rate difference between the glassy carbon skeleton and the CVD coating was not sufficient to cause a large enough irradiation-induced strain to create any mechanical degradation. Similarly differential thermal expansion was not a problem. It appears that only the thermal conductivity was affected by 0.2 dpa. For the intended application conditions, i.e. @ 400 C and 0 DPA (start- up) the foam thermal conductivity is about 57 W/m.K and at 700 C and 0.2 DPA (end of life) the foam thermal conductivity is approx. 30.7 W/m.K. The room temp thermal conductivity drops from 100-120 W/m.K to approximately 30 W/m.K after 0.2 dpa of neutron irradiation.

  18. Measurement of neutron dose with an organic liquid scintillator coupled with a spectrum weight function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, E.; Endo, A.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yoshizawa, M.; Nakamura, T.; Shiomi, T

    2002-07-01

    A dose evaluation method for neutrons in the energy range of a few MeV to 100 MeV has been developed using a spectrum weight function (G-function), which is applied to an organic liquid scintillator of 12.7 cm in diameter and 12.7 cm in length. The G-function that converts the pulse height spectrum of the scintillator into the ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), was calculated by an unfolding method using successive approximation of the response function of the scintillator and the ambient dose equivalent per unit neutron fluence (H*(10) conversion coefficients) of ICRP 74. To verify the response function of the scintillator and the value of H*(10) evaluated by the G-function, pulse height spectra of the scintillator were measured in some different neutron fields, which have continuous energy, monoenergetic and quasi-monoenergetic spectra. Values of H*(10) estimated using the G-function and pulse height spectra of the scintillator were compared with those calculated using neutron energy spectra. These doses agreed with each other. From the results, it was concluded that H*(10) can be evaluated directly from the pulse height spectrum of the scintillator by applying the G-function proposed in this study. (author)

  19. Shielding design and dose assessment for accelerator based neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, W B; Yanch, J C

    1995-05-01

    Preparations are ongoing to test the viability and usefulness of an accelerator source of epithermal neutrons for ultimate use in a clinical environment. This feasibility study is to be conducted in a shielded room located on the Massachusetts Institute of Technology campus and will not involve patient irradiations. The accelerator production of neutrons is based on the 7Li(p, n)7Be reaction, and a maximum proton beam current of 4 mA at an energy of 2.5 MeV is anticipated. The resultant 3.58 x 10(12) neutrons s-1 have a maximum energy of 800 keV and will be substantially moderated. This paper describes the Monte Carlo methods used to estimate the neutron and photon dose rates in a variety of locations in the vicinity of the accelerator, as well as the shielding configuration required when the device is run at maximum current. Results indicate that the highest absorbed dose rate to which any individual will be exposed is 3 microSv h-1 (0.3 mrem h-1). The highest possible yearly dose is 0.2 microSv (2 x 10(-2) mrem) to the general public or 0.9 mSv (90 mrem) to a radiation worker in close proximity to the accelerator facility. The shielding necessary to achieve these dose levels is also discussed.

  20. Monte Carlo calculation of skyshine'' neutron dose from ALS (Advanced Light Source)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moin-Vasiri, M.

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics on skyshine'' neutron dose from ALS: Sources of radiation; ALS modeling for skyshine calculations; MORSE Monte-Carlo; Implementation of MORSE; Results of skyshine calculations from storage ring; and Comparison of MORSE shielding calculations.

  1. Neutron detection in a high gamma-ray background with EJ-301 and EJ-309 liquid scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevanato, L., E-mail: luca.stevanato@pd.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Universita di Padova, Fisica ' Galileo Galilei' , Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Cester, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Universita di Padova, Fisica ' Galileo Galilei' , Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Nebbia, G. [INFN Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Viesti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia dell' Universita di Padova, Fisica ' Galileo Galilei' , Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy)

    2012-10-21

    Using a fast digitizer, the neutron-gamma discrimination capability of the new liquid scintillator EJ-309 is compared with that obtained using standard EJ-301. Moreover the capability of both the scintillation detectors to identify a weak neutron source in a high gamma-ray background is demonstrated. The probability of neutron detection is PD=95% at 95% confidence level for a gamma-ray background corresponding to a dose rate of 100 {mu}Sv/h.

  2. Response functions for computing absorbed dose to skeletal tissues from neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahadori, Amir A; Johnson, Perry; Bolch, Wesley E [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Jokisch, Derek W [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Francis Marion University, Florence, SC (United States); Eckerman, Keith F, E-mail: wbolch@ufl.edu [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2011-11-07

    Spongiosa in the adult human skeleton consists of three tissues-active marrow (AM), inactive marrow (IM) and trabecularized mineral bone (TB). AM is considered to be the target tissue for assessment of both long-term leukemia risk and acute marrow toxicity following radiation exposure. The total shallow marrow (TM{sub 50}), defined as all tissues lying within the first 50 {mu}m of the bone surfaces, is considered to be the radiation target tissue of relevance for radiogenic bone cancer induction. For irradiation by sources external to the body, kerma to homogeneous spongiosa has been used as a surrogate for absorbed dose to both of these tissues, as direct dose calculations are not possible using computational phantoms with homogenized spongiosa. Recent micro-CT imaging of a 40 year old male cadaver has allowed for the accurate modeling of the fine microscopic structure of spongiosa in many regions of the adult skeleton (Hough et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 2309-46). This microstructure, along with associated masses and tissue compositions, was used to compute specific absorbed fraction (SAF) values for protons originating in axial and appendicular bone sites (Jokisch et al 2011 Phys. Med. Biol. 56 6857-72). These proton SAFs, bone masses, tissue compositions and proton production cross sections, were subsequently used to construct neutron dose-response functions (DRFs) for both AM and TM{sub 50} targets in each bone of the reference adult male. Kerma conditions were assumed for other resultant charged particles. For comparison, AM, TM{sub 50} and spongiosa kerma coefficients were also calculated. At low incident neutron energies, AM kerma coefficients for neutrons correlate well with values of the AM DRF, while total marrow (TM) kerma coefficients correlate well with values of the TM{sub 50} DRF. At high incident neutron energies, all kerma coefficients and DRFs tend to converge as charged-particle equilibrium is established across the bone site. In the range of

  3. ACDOS2: an improved neutron-induced dose rate code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagache, J.C.

    1981-06-01

    To calculate the expected dose rate from fusion reactors as a function of geometry, composition, and time after shutdown a computer code, ACDOS2, was written, which utilizes up-to-date libraries of cross-sections and radioisotope decay data. ACDOS2 is in ANSI FORTRAN IV, in order to make it readily adaptable elsewhere.

  4. High efficiency proportional neutron detector with solid liner internal structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisner, Roger Allen; Holcomb, David Eugene; Brown, Gilbert M.

    2014-08-05

    A tube-style neutron detector, a panel-style neutron detector incorporating a plurality of tube-style neutron detectors, and a panel-style neutron detector including a plurality of anode wires are provided. A plurality of channels is provided in a neutron detector such that each channel has an inner surface of a coating layer including a neutron-absorbing material. A wire anode is provided at end of each channel so that electrons generated by a charged daughter particle generated by a neutron are collected to detect a neutron-matter interaction. Moderator units can be incorporated into a neutron detector to provide improved detection efficiencies and/or to determine neutron energy spectrum. Gas-based proportional response from the neutron detectors can be employed for special nuclear material (SNM) detection. This neutron detector can provide similar performance to .sup.3He-based detectors without requiring .sup.3He and without containing toxic, flammable, or high-pressure materials.

  5. Pharmacokinetically guided dosing of (high-dose) chemotherapeutic agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Attema-de Jonge, M.E. (Milly Ellen)

    2004-01-01

    Due to variation in drug distribution, metabolism and elimination processes between patients, systemic exposure to chemotherapeutic agents may be highly variable from patient to patient after administration of similar doses. This pharmacokinetic variability may explain in part the large variability

  6. Neutron/gamma dose separation by the multiple-ion-chamber technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetsch, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    Many mixed n/..gamma.. dosimetry systems rely on two dosimeters, one composed of a tissue-equivalent material and the other made from a non-hydrogenous material. The paired chamber technique works well in fields of neutron radiation nearly identical in spectral composition to that in which the dosimeters were calibrated. However, this technique is drastically compromised in phantom due to the degradation of the neutron spectrum. The three-dosimeter technique allows for the fall-off in neutron sensitivity of the two non-hydrogenous dosimeters. Precise and physically meaningful results were obtained with this technique with a D-T source in air and in phantom and with simultaneous D-T neutron and /sup 60/Co gamma ray irradiation in air. The MORSE-CG coupled n/..gamma.. three-dimensional Monte Carlo code was employed to calculate neutron and gamma doses in a water phantom. Gamma doses calculated in phantom with this code were generally lower than corresponding ion chamber measurements. This can be explained by the departure of irradiation conditions from ideal narrow-beam geometry. 97 references.

  7. 中子剂量测量及估算方法%The measurement and calculation method for neutron dose

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向剑; 戴光复; 苑淑渝; 丁艳秋; 张良安

    2008-01-01

    Company with the development of science,the neutron is used more and more widely,for example,neutron therapy cancer,neutron logging,neutron photograph and so on.The most wide application on medical treatment with neutron is boron neutron capture therapy.But it also brings some problems when it is in use.When the operator perform with the neutron,it may receive neutron irradiation.So the measurement and calculation for neutron dose become important.At home the research of neutron dose need to be advanced research.So the measurement and calculation method of neutron dose are conformed and summarized in this article for advance research.%随着科技的发展,中子在许多行业得到越来越广泛的应用,在医疗上应用最广泛的是硼中子俘获治疗.但在使用中子辐射的过程中,操作人员可能会受到中子辐射,因此中子剂量的测量和估算问题也就变得重要起来.目前,国内关于中子剂量的研究在有些方面还不是很深人,因此对中子剂量的测量和估算方法进行了归纳和阐述.

  8. Neutron effective dose calculation behind concrete shielding of charged particle accelerators with energy up to 100 MeV

    CERN Document Server

    Alejnikov, V E; Krylov, A R

    2002-01-01

    Calculation data of neutron effective dose behind concrete shielding with thickness up to 3 meters is presented. The calculations have been performed by the Monte Carlo and phenomenological methods for monoenergetic neutrons with energy from 5 to 100 MeV as well as for neutron spectra produced by protons with energies of 30 and 72 MeV in thick targets. Comparison between calculations of neutron effective dose behind shielding using phenomenological approach and those by the Monte Carlo method normally shows agreement to within a factor of better than two, i.e. estimation of shielding thickness by those methods shall not exceed one half value layer of neutron effective dose attenuation in shielding. It amounts from 10 to 30 cm of concrete shielding for neutron energies and thickness of shields under consideration

  9. High Sensitive Neutron-Detection by Using a Self-Activation of Iodine-Containing Scintillators for the Photo-Neutron Monitoring around X-ray Radiotherapy Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohtomi, Akihiro; Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Honda, Soichiro; Kurihara, Ryosuke; Fukunaga, Junichi; Umezu, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Yasuhiko; Ohga, Saiji; Nakamura, Katsumasa

    A novel method for evaluating the neutron dose-equivalent as well as neutron fluence around high-energy X-ray radiotherapy machines has been proposed and examined by using the self-activation of a CsI scintillator. Several filtering conditions were used to extract energy information of the neutron field. The shapes of neutron energy spectra were assumed to be practically unchanged at each three energy regions (thermal, epi-thermal and fast regions) for different irradiations around an X-ray linac whose acceleration potential was fixed to be a certain value. In order to know the actual neutron energy spectrum, an unfolding process was carried out for saturated activities of 128I generated inside the CsI scintillator under different filtering conditions; the response function matrix for each filtering condition was calculated by a Monte Carlo simulation. As the result, neutron dose-equivalent was estimated to be 0.14 (mSv/Gy) at 30 cm from the isocenter of linac. It has been revealed that fast neutron component dominated the total dose-equivalent.

  10. Reproducibility of neutron activated Sm-153 oral dose formulations intended for human administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeong, C.H. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Blackshaw, P.E. [Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham NG7 2UH (United Kingdom); Ng, K.H.; Abdullah, B.J.J. [Department of Biomedical Imaging, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Blaauw, M. [Reactor Institute Delft, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, 2628 CJ Delft (Netherlands); Dansereau, R.J. [Procter and Gamble Pharmaceuticals, 8700 Mason-Montgomery Rd, Mason (United States); Perkins, A.C., E-mail: alan.perkins@nottingham.ac.uk [Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, Nottingham NG7 2UH (United Kingdom); Radiological and Imaging Sciences and Nottingham Digestive Diseases Biomedical Research Unit, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH (United Kingdom)

    2011-09-15

    Neutron activation of Sm-152 offers a method of radiolabeling for the in vivo study of oral dose formulations by gamma scintigraphy. Reproducibility measurements are needed to ensure the robustness of clinical studies. 204 enteric-coated guaifenesin core tablets (10 mg of Sm{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were irradiated by thermal neutrons to achieve 1 MBq at 48 h. Administered activities were 0.86{+-}0.03 MBq. Good reproducibility (CV=3.5%) was observed over 24 weeks ensuring that volunteer doses were within the dose reference level of 0.8 mSv. - Highlights: > 204 enteric-coated guaifenesin core tablets were irradiated by thermal neutrons. > Activity measured at 48 h after irradiation was 1.01{+-}0.03 MBq. > Activity administered per subject was 0.88{+-}0.03 MBq. > Good reproducibility (CV=3.5%) of Sm-153 radioactivity was obtained. > Effective doses to volunteers were within dose reference level of 0.8 mSv.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of depth dose distribution in several organic models for boron neutron capture therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T.

    2007-09-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are performed to evaluate depth-dose distributions for possible treatment of cancers by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The ICRU computational model of ADAM & EVA was used as a phantom to simulate tumors at a depth of 5 cm in central regions of the lungs, liver and pancreas. Tumors of the prostate and osteosarcoma were also centered at the depth of 4.5 and 2.5 cm in the phantom models. The epithermal neutron beam from a research reactor was the primary neutron source for the MCNP calculation of the depth-dose distributions in those cancer models. For brain tumor irradiations, the whole-body dose was also evaluated. The MCNP simulations suggested that a lethal dose of 50 Gy to the tumors can be achieved without reaching the tolerance dose of 25 Gy to normal tissue. The whole-body phantom calculations also showed that the BNCT could be applied for brain tumors without significant damage to whole-body organs.

  12. Monte Carlo study of neutron-ambient dose equivalent to patient in treatment room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, A; Afarideh, H; Abbasi Davani, F; Ghergherehchi, M; Arbabi, A

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents an analytical method for the calculation of the neutron ambient dose equivalent H* (10) regarding patients, whereby the different concrete types that are used in the surrounding walls of the treatment room are considered. This work has been performed according to a detailed simulation of the Varian 2300C/D linear accelerator head that is operated at 18MV, and silver activation counter as a neutron detector, for which the Monte Carlo MCNPX 2.6 code is used, with and without the treatment room walls. The results show that, when compared to the neutrons that leak from the LINAC, both the scattered and thermal neutrons are the major factors that comprise the out-of field neutron dose. The scattering factors for the limonite-steel, magnetite-steel, and ordinary concretes have been calculated as 0.91±0.09, 1.08±0.10, and 0.371±0.01, respectively, while the corresponding thermal factors are 34.22±3.84, 23.44±1.62, and 52.28±1.99, respectively (both the scattering and thermal factors are for the isocenter region); moreover, the treatment room is composed of magnetite-steel and limonite-steel concretes, so the neutron doses to the patient are 1.79 times and 1.62 times greater than that from an ordinary concrete composition. The results also confirm that the scattering and thermal factors do not depend on the details of the chosen linear accelerator head model. It is anticipated that the results of the present work will be of great interest to the manufacturers of medical linear accelerators.

  13. Measurement of neutron energy spectra and neutron dose rates from {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction induced on thin LiF target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atanackovic, Jovica, E-mail: atanacjz@gmail.com [Ontario Power Generation, Whitby, ON, Canada L1N 9E3 (Canada); Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Canada K0J 1J0 (Canada); Matysiak, Witold [University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, FL 32206 (United States); Dubeau, Jacques; Witharana, Sampath [DETEC, Gatineau, QC, Canada J8T 4J1 (Canada); Waker, Anthony [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa, ON, Canada L1H 7K4 (Canada)

    2015-02-21

    The measurements of neutron energy spectra and neutron dose rates were performed using the KN Van de Graaff accelerator, located at the McMaster University Accelerator Laboratory (MAL). Protons were accelerated on the thin lithium fluoride (LiF) target and produced mono-energetic neutrons which were measured using three different spectrometers: Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS), Nested Neutron Spectrometer (NNS), and Rotational Proton Recoil Spectrometer (ROSPEC). The purpose of this work is (1) measurement and quantification of low energy accelerator neutron fields in terms of neutron fluence and dose, (2) comparison of results obtained by three different instruments, (3) comparison of measurements with Monte Carlo simulations based on theoretical neutron yields from {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be nuclear reaction, and (4) comparison of results obtained using different neutron spectral unfolding methods. The nominal thickness of the LiF target used in the experiment was 50μg/cm{sup 2}, which corresponds to the linear thickness of 0.19μm and results in approximately 6 keV energy loss for the proton energies used in the experiment (2.2, 2.3, 2.4 and 2.5 MeV). For each of the proton energies, neutron fluence per incident proton charge was measured and several dosimetric quantities of interest in radiation protection were derived. In addition, theoretical neutron yield calculations together with the results of Monte Carlo (MCNP) modeling of the neutron spectra are reported. Consistent neutron fluence spectra were obtained with three detectors and good agreement was observed between theoretically calculated and measured neutron fluences and derived dosimetric quantities for investigated proton energies at 2.3, 2.4 and 2.5 MeV. In the case of 2.2 MeV, some plausibly explainable discrepancies were observed.

  14. Biological shielding assessment and dose rate calculation for a neutron inspection portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donzella, A.; Bonomi, G.; Giroletti, E.; Zenoni, A.

    2012-04-01

    With reference to the prototype of neutron inspection portal built and successfully tested in the Rijeka seaport (Croatia) within the EURITRACK (EURopean Illicit Trafficking Countermeasures Kit) project, an assessment of the biological shielding in different set-up configurations of a future portal has been calculated with MCNP Monte Carlo code in the frame of the Eritr@C (European Riposte against Illicit TR@ffiCking) project. In the configurations analyzed the compliance with the dose limits for workers and the population stated by the European legislation is provided by appropriate shielding of the neutron sources and by the delimitation of a controlled area.

  15. Neutron Dose measurement in the carbon ion therapy area at HIRFL (IMP) as 12C ions with energies from 165 to 350MeV/u

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Jun-Kui; Yan, Wei-Wei; Su, You-Wu; Li, Zong-Qiang; Wang, Mao; Pang, Cheng-Guo; Xu, Chong

    2016-01-01

    The neutron dose distributions on observation distances and on observation angles were measured using a Wendi-II neutron dose-meter at the deep tumor therapy terminal at HIRFL (Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou) as 12C ions with energies from 165 to 350 MeV/u bombarding on thick solid water targets with different thickness according to the ion energies. The experimental results were compared with those calculated by FLUKA code. It is found that the experimental data was in good agreement with the calculated results. The neutron energy spectra were also studied by using the FLUKA code. The results are valuable for the shielding design of high energy heavy ion medical machines and for the individual dose assessment.

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of the secondary neutron ambient and effective dose equivalent rates from surface to suborbital altitudes and low Earth orbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jaby, Samy; Richardson, Richard B

    2015-07-01

    Occupational exposures from ionizing radiation are currently regulated for airline travel (Earth orbit (∼300-400 km). Aircrew typically receive between 1 and 6 mSv of occupational dose annually, while aboard the International Space Station, the area radiation dose equivalent measured over just 168 days was 106 mSv at solar minimum conditions. It is anticipated that space tourism vehicles will reach suborbital altitudes of approximately 100 km and, therefore, the annual occupational dose to flight crew during repeated transits is expected to fall somewhere between those observed for aircrew and astronauts. Unfortunately, measurements of the radiation environment at the high altitudes reached by suborbital vehicles are sparse, and modelling efforts have been similarly limited. In this paper, preliminary MCNPX radiation transport code simulations are developed of the secondary neutron flux profile in air from surface altitudes up to low Earth orbit at solar minimum conditions and excluding the effects of spacecraft shielding. These secondary neutrons are produced by galactic cosmic radiation interacting with Earth's atmosphere and are among the sources of radiation that can pose a health risk. Associated estimates of the operational neutron ambient dose equivalent, used for radiation protection purposes, and the neutron effective dose equivalent that is typically used for estimates of stochastic health risks, are provided in air. Simulations show that the neutron radiation dose rates received at suborbital altitudes are comparable to those experienced by aircrew flying at 7 to 14 km. We also show that the total neutron dose rate tails off beyond the Pfotzer maximum on ascension from surface up to low Earth orbit.

  17. Feasibility Study of Neutron Dose for Real Time Image Guided Proton Therapy: A Monte Carlo Study

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Jin Sung; Kim, Daehyun; Shin, EunHyuk; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungkoo; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Ju, Sanggyu; Chung, Yoonsun; Jung, Sang Hoon; Han, Youngyih

    2015-01-01

    Two full rotating gantry with different nozzles (Multipurpose nozzle with MLC, Scanning Dedicated nozzle) with conventional cyclotron system is installed and under commissioning for various proton treatment options at Samsung Medical Center in Korea. The purpose of this study is to investigate neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose, H/D, to x-ray imaging equipment under various treatment conditions with monte carlo simulation. At first, we investigated H/D with the various modifications of the beam line devices (Scattering, Scanning, Multi-leaf collimator, Aperture, Compensator) at isocenter, 20, 40, 60 cm distance from isocenter and compared with other research groups. Next, we investigated the neutron dose at x-ray equipments used for real time imaging with various treatment conditions. Our investigation showed the 0.07 ~ 0.19 mSv/Gy at x-ray imaging equipments according to various treatment options and intestingly 50% neutron dose reduction effect of flat panel detector was observed due to multi- lea...

  18. Analysis for Radiation and Shielding Dose in Plasma Focus Neutron Source Using FLUKA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, M. J.; Amrollahi, R.; Habibi, M.

    2012-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been performed for the attenuation of neutron radiation produced at Plasma focus (PF) devices through various shielding design. At the test site it will be fired with deuterium and tritium (D-T) fusion resulting in a yield of about 1013 fusion neutrons of 14 MeV. This poses a radiological hazard to scientists and personnel operating the device. The goal of this paper was to evaluate various shielding options under consideration for the PF operating with D-T fusion. Shields of varying neutrons-shielding effectiveness were investigated using concrete, polyethylene, paraffin and borated materials. The most effective shield, a labyrinth structure, allowed almost 1,176 shots per year while keeping personnel under 20 mSV of dose. The most expensive shield that used, square shield with 100 cm concrete thickness on the walls and Borated paraffin along with borated polyethylene added outside the concrete allowed almost 15,000 shot per year.

  19. Characterization of high-energy quasi-monoenergetic neutron energy spectra and ambient dose equivalents of 80-389 MeV 7Li(p,n) reactions using a time-of-flight method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Yosuke; Hagiwara, Masayuki; Satoh, Daiki; Araki, Shouhei; Yashima, Hiroshi; Sato, Tatsuhiko; Masuda, Akihiko; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Nakao, Noriaki; Shima, Tatsushi; Kin, Tadahiro; Watanabe, Yukinobu; Iwase, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    We completed a series of measurements on mono-energetic neutron energy spectra of the 7Li(p,n) reaction with 80-389-MeV protons in the 100-m time-of-flight (TOF) tunnel at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics cyclotron facility. For that purpose, we measured neutron energy spectra of the 80-, 100- and 296-MeV proton incident reactions, which had not been investigated in our previous studies. The neutron peak intensity was 0.9-1.1×1010 neutrons/sr/μC in the incident proton energy region of 80-389 MeV, and it was almost independent of the incident proton energy. The contribution of peak intensity of the spectrum to the total intensity integrated with energies above 3 MeV varied between 0.38 and 0.48 in the incident proton energy range of 80-389 MeV. To consider the correction required to derive a response in the peak region from the measured total responses of neutron monitors in the 100-m TOF tunnel, we proposed the subtraction method using energy spectra between 0° and 25°. The normalizing factor k against 25° neutron fluence to equalize it to 0° neutron fluence in the continuum region ranges from 0.74 to 1.02 depending on the incident proton energy and angle measured. Even without the TOF method, the subtraction method with the k factor almost decreases the response in the continuum region of a neutron spectrum against the total response of neutron monitors.

  20. Dose conversion coefficients for Chinese reference adult male and female voxel phantoms from idealized neutron exposures

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Huan; Qiu, Rui; Yang, Yue; Pan, Yu-Xi; Liu, Li-Ye

    2015-01-01

    A new set of fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients based on the Chinese reference adult voxel phantoms CRAM and CRAF are presented for six idealized external neutron exposures from 10-8 MeV to 20 MeV. The voxel phantoms CRAM and CRAF were adjusted from the previous phantoms CNMAN and CNWM respectively, and the masses of individual organs have been adjusted to the Chinese reference data. The calculation of organ-absorbed doses and effective doses were performed with the Monte Carlo transport code MCNPX. The resulting dose conversion coefficients were compared with those published in ICRP Publication 116, which represents the reference Caucasian. The organ-absorbed dose conversion coefficients of most organs are in good agreement with the results in ICRP Publication 116, however, obvious discrepancies are observed for some organs and certain geometries. For neutrons with energies above 2 MeV, the effective dose conversion coefficients of Chinese reference adult are almost identical to those of ICRP Publicatio...

  1. A new design of a highly segmented neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrbeck, Magdalena [Universitaet Koblenz-Landau, Institut fuer Integrierte Naturwissenschaften - Physik, 56070 Koblenz (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    Since neutrons carry no electric charge and therefore do not interact with matter by means of the Coulomb force, the detection of neutrons is particularly challenging. Progress in the development of neutron detectors is of great importance for neutron physics due to the poor data situation compared to experiments with protons. Disadvantages of previously used neutron detectors are their low detection efficiency and counting rate capability. The neutron detection efficiency of about 1 %/cm for typical plastic scintillators necessitates a high detector volume and the counting rate capability of applied photomultipliers of about 1 MHz limits the number of detectable events. Both the detector volume and the number of applied photomultipliers are mainly restricted by the available budget. A new design of a scintillation-based neutron detector is presented. Replacement of conventional photomultiplier tubes by low-prized silicon photon counters and usage of standardized components allow the development of a detector with a high volume and a high segmentation. Due to the planned volume of (0.96 m){sup 3} a detection efficiency close to 100 % can be achieved, at the same time the counting rate load on each photon counter can be kept low because of the high segmentation with single modules with a squared diameter of 2 cm. The neutron detector will be integrated into the experimental setup of the A1 collaboration at MAMI, Mainz, and will e.g. enable precise determination of the neutron's form factors.

  2. Enhancement of neutron radiation dose by the addition of sulphur-33 atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porras, I [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear (formerly Fisica Moderna), Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)], E-mail: porras@ugr.es

    2008-04-07

    The use of neutrons in radiotherapy allows the possibility of producing nuclear reactions in a specific target inserted in the medium. {sup 10}B is being used to induce reactions (n, {alpha}), a technique called boron neutron capture therapy. I have studied the possibility of inducing a similar reaction using the nucleus of {sup 33}S, for which the reaction cross section presents resonances for keV neutrons, the highest peak occurring at 13.5 keV. Here shown, by means of Monte Carlo simulation of point-like sources of neutrons in this energy range, is an enhancement effect on the absorbed dose in water by the addition of {sup 33}S atoms. In addition to this, as the range of the alpha particle is of the order of a mammalian cell size, the energy deposition via this reaction results mainly inside the cells adjacent to the interaction site. The main conclusion of the present work is that the insertion of these sulphur atoms in tumoral cells would enhance the effect of neutron irradiation in the keV range. (letter to the editor)

  3. High-Energy Neutron Backgrounds for Underground Dark Matter Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Yu [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Direct dark matter detection experiments usually have excellent capability to distinguish nuclear recoils, expected interactions with Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) dark matter, and electronic recoils, so that they can efficiently reject background events such as gamma-rays and charged particles. However, both WIMPs and neutrons can induce nuclear recoils. Neutrons are then the most crucial background for direct dark matter detection. It is important to understand and account for all sources of neutron backgrounds when claiming a discovery of dark matter detection or reporting limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross section. One type of neutron background that is not well understood is the cosmogenic neutrons from muons interacting with the underground cavern rock and materials surrounding a dark matter detector. The Neutron Multiplicity Meter (NMM) is a water Cherenkov detector capable of measuring the cosmogenic neutron flux at the Soudan Underground Laboratory, which has an overburden of 2090 meters water equivalent. The NMM consists of two 2.2-tonne gadolinium-doped water tanks situated atop a 20-tonne lead target. It detects a high-energy (>~ 50 MeV) neutron via moderation and capture of the multiple secondary neutrons released when the former interacts in the lead target. The multiplicity of secondary neutrons for the high-energy neutron provides a benchmark for comparison to the current Monte Carlo predictions. Combining with the Monte Carlo simulation, the muon-induced high-energy neutron flux above 50 MeV is measured to be (1.3 ± 0.2) ~ 10-9 cm-2s-1, in reasonable agreement with the model prediction. The measured multiplicity spectrum agrees well with that of Monte Carlo simulation for multiplicity below 10, but shows an excess of approximately a factor of three over Monte Carlo prediction for multiplicities ~ 10 - 20. In an effort to reduce neutron backgrounds for the dark matter experiment SuperCDMS SNO- LAB, an active neutron veto was developed

  4. Design of a transportable high efficiency fast neutron spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roecker, C., E-mail: calebroecker@berkeley.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N.S. [Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Cabrera-Palmer, B. [Radiation and Nuclear Detection Systems, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Dazeley, S. [Nuclear and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Gerling, M.; Marleau, P.; Sweany, M.D. [Radiation and Nuclear Detection Systems, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Vetter, K. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-08-01

    A transportable fast neutron detection system has been designed and constructed for measuring neutron energy spectra and flux ranging from tens to hundreds of MeV. The transportability of the spectrometer reduces the detector-related systematic bias between different neutron spectra and flux measurements, which allows for the comparison of measurements above or below ground. The spectrometer will measure neutron fluxes that are of prohibitively low intensity compared to the site-specific background rates targeted by other transportable fast neutron detection systems. To measure low intensity high-energy neutron fluxes, a conventional capture-gating technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 20 MeV and a novel multiplicity technique is used for measuring neutron energies above 100 MeV. The spectrometer is composed of two Gd containing plastic scintillator detectors arranged around a lead spallation target. To calibrate and characterize the position dependent response of the spectrometer, a Monte Carlo model was developed and used in conjunction with experimental data from gamma ray sources. Multiplicity event identification algorithms were developed and used with a Cf-252 neutron multiplicity source to validate the Monte Carlo model Gd concentration and secondary neutron capture efficiency. The validated Monte Carlo model was used to predict an effective area for the multiplicity and capture gating analyses. For incident neutron energies between 100 MeV and 1000 MeV with an isotropic angular distribution, the multiplicity analysis predicted an effective area of 500 cm{sup 2} rising to 5000 cm{sup 2}. For neutron energies above 20 MeV, the capture-gating analysis predicted an effective area between 1800 cm{sup 2} and 2500 cm{sup 2}. The multiplicity mode was found to be sensitive to the incident neutron angular distribution.

  5. Gadolinium loaded plastic scintillators for high efficiency neutron detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovechkina, Lena; Riley, Kent; Miller, Stuart; Bell, Zane; Nagarkar, Vivek

    2009-08-01

    Gadolinium has the highest thermal neutron absorption cross section of any naturally occurring element, and emits conversion electrons as well as atomic X-rays in over 50% of its neutron captures, which makes it a useful dopant in scintillators for detecting thermal neutrons. Gadolinium isopropoxide was studied as a possible dopant for styrene-based plastic scintillators as a convenient and inexpensive method to produce high-efficiency thermal neutron detectors. Plastic scintillators with gadolinium weight concentrations of up to 3% were transparent, uniform and defect-free and were characterized with spectral measurements performed under x-ray and neutron irradiation. The new material has the same characteristic emission of styrene with a maximum at approximately 425 nm, and a light output of 76% relative to the undoped plastic. A 13 mm thick sample containing 0.5% gadolinium by weight detected 46% of incident thermal neutrons, which makes this an attractive material for a variety of applications.

  6. Correlation of clinical outcome to the estimated radiation dose from Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadha, M. [Beth Israel Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    A phase I/II trial delivering a single fraction of BNCT using p-Boronophenylalanine-Fructose and epithermal neutrons at the the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor was initiated in September 1994. The primary endpiont of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a given BNCT dose. The clinical outcome of the disease was a secondary endpoint of the study. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the correlation of the clinical outcome of patients to the estimated radiation dose from BNCT.

  7. Correlation of clinical outcome to the estimated radiation dose from Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadha, M. [Beth Israel Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    A phase I/II trial delivering a single fraction of BNCT using p-Boronophenylalanine-Fructose and epithermal neutrons at the the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor was initiated in September 1994. The primary endpiont of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a given BNCT dose. The clinical outcome of the disease was a secondary endpoint of the study. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the correlation of the clinical outcome of patients to the estimated radiation dose from BNCT.

  8. Evaluation of target photon dose mixed in mono-energetic neutron fields using {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanimura, Y., E-mail: tanimura.yoshihiko@jaea.go.j [Department of Radiation Protection, Nuclear Science and Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Tsutsumi, M.; Saegusa, J.; Shikaze, Y.; Yoshizawa, M. [Department of Radiation Protection, Nuclear Science and Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    Target photons mixed in the 144, 250 and 565 keV mono-energetic neutron calibration fields were measured using a cylindrical NaI(Tl) detector with 7.62 cm both in diameter and in length. The ambient dose equivalent H*(10) of the photons was evaluated by applying the 'G(E) function' to the measured pulse height spectrum. Neutrons induce photons by nuclear reactions in the NaI(Tl) detector and affect the pulse height spectrum. In order to eliminate the influence of these neutron events, the time-of-flight technique was applied with operating the accelerator in the pulse mode. The ratios by the ambient dose equivalent H*(10) of the photons to the 144, 250 and 565 keV neutrons were evaluated to be 3.3%, 4.7% and 0.9%, respectively. Although high energy photons ranging from 6 to 7 MeV are emitted by the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}{gamma}){sup 16}O reactions, the dose of the target photons is low enough to calibrate neutron dosemeters except for ones with high sensitivity to the photons.

  9. Secondary radiation dose during high-energy total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janiszewska, M.; Raczkowski, M. [Lower Silesian Oncology Center, Medical Physics Department, Wroclaw (Poland); Polaczek-Grelik, K. [University of Silesia, Medical Physics Department, Katowice (Poland); Szafron, B.; Konefal, A.; Zipper, W. [University of Silesia, Department of Nuclear Physics and Its Applications, Katowice (Poland)

    2014-05-15

    The goal of this work was to assess the additional dose from secondary neutrons and γ-rays generated during total body irradiation (TBI) using a medical linac X-ray beam. Nuclear reactions that occur in the accelerator construction during emission of high-energy beams in teleradiotherapy are the source of secondary radiation. Induced activity is dependent on the half-lives of the generated radionuclides, whereas neutron flux accompanies the treatment process only. The TBI procedure using a 18 MV beam (Clinac 2100) was considered. Lateral and anterior-posterior/posterior-anterior fractions were investigated during delivery of 2 Gy of therapeutic dose. Neutron and photon flux densities were measured using neutron activation analysis (NAA) and semiconductor spectrometry. The secondary dose was estimated applying the fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients. The main contribution to the secondary dose is associated with fast neutrons. The main sources of γ-radiation are the following: {sup 56}Mn in the stainless steel and {sup 187}W of the collimation system as well as positron emitters, activated via (n,γ) and (γ,n) processes, respectively. In addition to 12 Gy of therapeutic dose, the patient could receive 57.43 mSv in the studied conditions, including 4.63 μSv from activated radionuclides. Neutron dose is mainly influenced by the time of beam emission. However, it is moderated by long source-surface distances (SSD) and application of plexiglass plates covering the patient body during treatment. Secondary radiation gives the whole body a dose, which should be taken into consideration especially when one fraction of irradiation does not cover the whole body at once. (orig.) [German] Die zusaetzliche Dosis durch sekundaere Neutronen- und γ-Strahlung waehrend der Ganzkoerperbestrahlung mit Roentgenstrahlung aus medizinischen Linearbeschleunigern wurde abgeschaetzt. Bei der Emission hochenergetischer Strahlen zur Teletherapie finden hauptsaechlich im Beschleuniger

  10. Gyrotron-driven high current ECR ion source for boron-neutron capture therapy neutron generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalyga, V.; Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S.; Sidorov, A.; Maslennikova, A.; Volovecky, A.; Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Tarvainen, O.

    2014-12-01

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a perspective treatment method for radiation resistant tumors. Unfortunately its development is strongly held back by a several physical and medical problems. Neutron sources for BNCT currently are limited to nuclear reactors and accelerators. For wide spread of BNCT investigations more compact and cheap neutron source would be much more preferable. In present paper an approach for compact D-D neutron generator creation based on a high current ECR ion source is suggested. Results on dense proton beams production are presented. A possibility of ion beams formation with current density up to 600 mA/cm2 is demonstrated. Estimations based on obtained experimental results show that neutron target bombarded by such deuteron beams would theoretically yield a neutron flux density up to 6·1010 cm-2/s. Thus, neutron generator based on a high-current deuteron ECR source with a powerful plasma heating by gyrotron radiation could fulfill the BNCT requirements significantly lower price, smaller size and ease of operation in comparison with existing reactors and accelerators.

  11. Gyrotron-driven high current ECR ion source for boron-neutron capture therapy neutron generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skalyga, V., E-mail: skalyga.vadim@gmail.com [Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, 46 Ul’yanova st., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN), 23 Gagarina st., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S. [Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, 46 Ul’yanova st., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Sidorov, A. [Institute of Applied Physics, RAS, 46 Ul’yanova st., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN), 23 Gagarina st., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Maslennikova, A. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN), 23 Gagarina st., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Nizhny Novgorod State Medical Academy, 10/1 Minina Sq., 603005 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Volovecky, A. [Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN), 23 Gagarina st., 603950 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Kalvas, T.; Koivisto, H.; Tarvainen, O. [University of Jyvaskyla, Department of Physics, PO Box 35 (YFL), 40500 Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2014-12-21

    Boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a perspective treatment method for radiation resistant tumors. Unfortunately its development is strongly held back by a several physical and medical problems. Neutron sources for BNCT currently are limited to nuclear reactors and accelerators. For wide spread of BNCT investigations more compact and cheap neutron source would be much more preferable. In present paper an approach for compact D–D neutron generator creation based on a high current ECR ion source is suggested. Results on dense proton beams production are presented. A possibility of ion beams formation with current density up to 600 mA/cm{sup 2} is demonstrated. Estimations based on obtained experimental results show that neutron target bombarded by such deuteron beams would theoretically yield a neutron flux density up to 6·10{sup 10} cm{sup −2}/s. Thus, neutron generator based on a high-current deuteron ECR source with a powerful plasma heating by gyrotron radiation could fulfill the BNCT requirements significantly lower price, smaller size and ease of operation in comparison with existing reactors and accelerators.

  12. Influence of dose rate on the transformation of Syrian hamster embryo cells by fission-spectrum neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, C.A.; Sedita, B.A.; Hill, C.K.; Elkind, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    Several explanations for this neutron dose-rate effect have been proposed, but further investigation is necessary to determine the mechanisms involved. In all cell transformation studies to date the immortalized, aneuploid 10T1/2 cell-line has been used. These cells may be premalignant; thus their response characteristics and, in particular, the nature of the transformation event, might differ from that in a normal, fibroblast cell. One reason for the present study was to determine whether the low-dose-rate effect of fission neutrons could be demonstrated in normal cells. If so, a normal cell system, which would more closely resemble a normal in vivo system, could be used for mechanistic studies. We chose Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) fibroblasts which are normal, diploid cells with a limited life span in culture. Upon exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation, the fraction of the cells that are transformed can be identified in a standard 8--10 day colony assay by examining their clonal morphology. Transformed cells form colonies with a dense, criss-crossed or piled-up structure. A high percentage of the transformed colonies can be further propagated and will acquire additional neoplastic characteristics; i.e., anchorage independence, immortality, altered proteolytic activity, karyotype alterations, and finally, tumorigenicity.

  13. RBE values and repair characteristics for colo-rectal injury after caesium 137 gamma-ray and neutron irradiation. II. Fractionation up to ten doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, N H; Denekamp, J

    1984-07-01

    Early and late colo-rectal damage in mice have been assessed after 137Cs gamma irradiation and 3 MeV neutrons given as 1,2,5 or 10 fractions. Damage was measured by early changes in body weight, the late production of short faecal pellets and the pattern of lethality after irradiation. The data have been analysed in terms of the time course of expression of damage, fractionation effects and the RBE for neutrons over a wide range of doses per fraction (0.5-12.5 Gy neutrons, 3.5-33.5 Gy gamma rays). An initial epithelial denudation led to an early loss of weight, maximal at 11-17 days after irradiation. A dose-dependent weight reduction persisted over the animals' life-time. Deaths after localised pelvic gamma irradiation were progressive with no sharp demarcation between early or late phases of injury. The time course for lethality was qualitatively similar after neutrons. Beyond six months the rectum became constricted by fibrosis and a higher proportion of small faecal pellets was observed. At 6-15 months relatively shallow dose-response curves were obtained for this change. The sparing effect of fractionation was marked for the gamma-irradiated mice and almost absent after neutrons. A very high repair increment (11 Gy) was seen with two gamma-ray fractions of 20 Gy. At lower doses per fraction the proportion of each gamma-ray fraction recovered was 50-69% for all assays, i.e., similar to that for other normal tissues. There was a slight enhancement in the sparing effect for the late compared with the early assays over the lower dose range. The RBE was strongly dependent on dose per fraction because of the lack of reparable damage after neutrons. The RBE for both early and late effects was 5.0 at a neutron dose per fraction of 1 Gy. Extrapolation of the RBE data to lower doses, using the linear quadratic model, predicts a higher RBE for late (7.4-12.7) than for early damage (5.7-8.5) if gamma-ray doses below 5 Gy are used.

  14. mBAND analysis of chromosome aberrations in human epithelial cells induced by gamma-rays and secondary neutrons of low dose rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M; Gersey, B; Saganti, P B; Wilkins, R; Cucinotta, F A; Wu, H

    2010-08-14

    Human risks from chronic exposures to both low- and high-LET radiation are of intensive research interest in recent years. In the present study, human epithelial cells were exposed in vitro to gamma-rays at a dose rate of 17 mGy/h or secondary neutrons of 25 mGy/h. The secondary neutrons have a broad energy spectrum that simulates the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude, as well as the environment inside spacecrafts like the Russian MIR station and the International Space Station (ISS). Chromosome aberrations in the exposed cells were analyzed using the multicolor banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique with chromosome 3 painted in 23 colored bands that allows identification of both inter- and intrachromosome exchanges including inversions. Comparison of present dose responses between gamma-rays and neutron irradiations for the fraction of cells with damaged chromosome 3 yielded a relative biological effectiveness (RBE) value of 26+/-4 for the secondary neutrons. Our results also revealed that secondary neutrons of low dose rate induced a higher fraction of intrachromosome exchanges than gamma-rays, but the fractions of inversions observed between these two radiation types were indistinguishable. Similar to the previous findings after acute radiation exposures, most of the inversions observed in the present study were accompanied by other aberrations. The fractions of complex type aberrations and of unrejoined chromosomal breakages were also found to be higher in the neutron-exposed cells than after gamma-rays. We further analyzed the location of the breaks involved in chromosome aberrations along chromosome 3, and observed hot spots after gamma-ray, but not neutron, exposures.

  15. An assessment of the secondary neutron dose in the passive scattering proton beam facility of the national cancer center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sang Eun [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Gyuseong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Se Byeong [Proton Therapy Center, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to assess the additional neutron effective dose during passive scattering proton therapy. Monte Carlo code (Monte Carlo N-Particle 6) simulation was conducted based on a precise modeling of the National Cancer Center's proton therapy facility. A three-dimensional neutron effective dose profile of the interior of the treatment room was acquired via a computer simulation of the 217.8-MeV proton beam. Measurements were taken with a 3He neutron detector to support the simulation results, which were lower than the simulation results by 16% on average. The secondary photon dose was about 0.8% of the neutron dose. The dominant neutron source was deduced based on flux calculation. The secondary neutron effective dose per proton absorbed dose ranged from 4.942 ± 0.031 mSv/Gy at the end of the field to 0.324 ± 0.006 mSv/Gy at 150 cm in axial distance.

  16. Characterization of neutron yield and x-ray spectra of a High Flux Neutron Generator (HFNG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnamani, Nnaemeka; HFNG Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The High Flux Neutron Generator (HFNG) is a DD plasma-based source, with a self-loading target intended for fundamental science and engineering applications, including 40 Ar/39 Ar geochronology, neutron cross section measurements, and radiation hardness testing of electronics. Our first estimate of the neutron yield, based on the population of the 4.486 hour 115 In isomer gave a neutron yield of the order 108 n/sec; optimization is ongoing to achieve the design target of 1011 n/sec. Preliminary x-ray spectra showed prominent energy peaks which are likely due to atomic line-emission from back-streaming electrons accelerated up to 100 keV impinging on various components of the HFNG chamber. Our x-ray and neutron diagnostics will aid us as we continue to evolve the design to suppress back-streaming electrons, necessary to achieve higher plasma beam currents, and thus higher neutron flux. This talk will focus on the characterization of the neutron yield and x-ray spectra during our tests. A collimation system is being installed near one of the chamber ports for improved observation of the x-ray spectra. This work is supported by NSF Grant No. EAR-0960138, U.S. DOE LBNL Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231, U.S. DOE LLNL Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and the UC Office of the President Award 12-LR-238745.

  17. Organ and Effective Dose Coefficients for Cranial and Caudal Irradiation Geometries: Neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veinot, K. G.; Eckerman, K. F.; Hertel, N. E.; Hiller, M. M.

    2017-09-01

    With the introduction of new recommendations by ICRP Publication 103, the methodology for determining the protection quantity, effective dose, has been modified. The modifications include changes to the defined organs and tissues, the associated tissue weighting factors, radiation weighting factors, and the introduction of reference sex-specific computational phantoms (ICRP Publication 110). Computations of equivalent doses in organs and tissues are now performed in both the male and female phantoms and the sex-averaged values used to determine the effective dose. Dose coefficients based on the ICRP 103 recommendations were reported in ICRP Publication 116, the revision of ICRP Publication 74 and ICRU Publication 57. The coefficients were determined for the following irradiation geometries: anterior-posterior (AP), posterior-anterior (PA), right and left lateral (RLAT and LLAT), rotational (ROT), and isotropic (ISO). In this work, the methodology of ICRP Publication 116 was used to compute dose coefficients for neutron irradiation of the body with parallel beams directed upward from below the feet (caudal) and directed downward from above the head (cranial). These geometries may be encountered in the workplace from personnel standing on contaminated surfaces or volumes and from overhead sources. Calculations of organ and tissue absorbed doses for caudal and cranial exposures to neutrons ranging in energy from 10-9 MeV to 10 GeV have been performed using the MCNP6 radiation transport code and the adult reference voxel phantoms of ICRP Publication 110. At lower energies the effective dose per particle fluence for cranial and caudal exposures is less than AP orientations while above about 30 MeV the cranial and caudal values are greater.

  18. Effect of diameter of nanoparticles and capture cross-section library on macroscopic dose enhancement in boron neutron capture therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhood, Bagher

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study is evaluation of the effect of diameter of 10B nanoparticles and various neutron capture cross-section libraries on macroscopic dose enhancement in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Material and methods MCNPX Monte Carlo code was used for simulation of a 252Cf source, a soft tissue phantom and a tumor containing 10B nanoparticles. Using 252Cf as a neutron source, macroscopic dose enhancement factor (MDEF) and total dose rate in tumor in the presence of 100, 200, and 500 ppm of 10B nanoparticles with 25 nm, 50 nm, and 100 nm diameters were calculated. Additionally, the effect of ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, and CENDL neutron capture cross-section libraries on MDEF was evaluated. Results There is not a linear relationship between the average MDEF value and nanoparticles’ diameter but the average MDEF grows with increased concentration of 10B nanoparticles. There is an increasing trend for average MDEF with the tumor distance. The average MDEF values were obtained the same for various neutron capture cross-section libraries. The maximum and minimum doses that effect on the total dose in tumor were neutron and secondary photon doses, respectively. Furthermore, the boron capture related dose component reduced in some extent with increase of diameter of 10B nanoparticles. Conclusions Based on the results of this study, it can be concluded that from physical point of view, various nanoparticle diameters have no dominant effect on average MDEF value in tumor. Furthermore, it is concluded that various neutron capture cross-section libraries are resulted to the same macroscopic dose enhancements. However, it is predicted that taking into account the biological effects for various nanoparticle diameters will result in different dose enhancements. PMID:25834582

  19. Integrated doses calculation in evacuation scenarios of the neutron generator facility at Missouri S&T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manish K.; Alajo, Ayodeji B.

    2016-08-01

    Any source of ionizing radiations could lead to considerable dose acquisition to individuals in a nuclear facility. Evacuation may be required when elevated levels of radiation is detected within a facility. In this situation, individuals are more likely to take the closest exit. This may not be the most expedient decision as it may lead to higher dose acquisition. The strategy followed in preventing large dose acquisitions should be predicated on the path that offers least dose acquisition. In this work, the neutron generator facility at Missouri University of Science and Technology was analyzed. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was used to model the entire floor of the generator's building. The simulated dose rates in the hallways were used to estimate the integrated doses for different paths leading to exits. It was shown that shortest path did not always lead to minimum dose acquisition and the approach was successful in predicting the expedient path as opposed to the approach of taking the nearest exit.

  20. Integrated doses calculation in evacuation scenarios of the neutron generator facility at Missouri S&T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Manish K.; Alajo, Ayodeji B., E-mail: alajoa@mst.edu

    2016-08-11

    Any source of ionizing radiations could lead to considerable dose acquisition to individuals in a nuclear facility. Evacuation may be required when elevated levels of radiation is detected within a facility. In this situation, individuals are more likely to take the closest exit. This may not be the most expedient decision as it may lead to higher dose acquisition. The strategy followed in preventing large dose acquisitions should be predicated on the path that offers least dose acquisition. In this work, the neutron generator facility at Missouri University of Science and Technology was analyzed. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was used to model the entire floor of the generator's building. The simulated dose rates in the hallways were used to estimate the integrated doses for different paths leading to exits. It was shown that shortest path did not always lead to minimum dose acquisition and the approach was successful in predicting the expedient path as opposed to the approach of taking the nearest exit.

  1. Feasibility study of the neutron dose for real-time image-guided proton therapy: A Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Sung; Shin, Jung Suk; Kim, Daehyun; Shin, Eunhyuk; Chung, Kwangzoo; Cho, Sungkoo; Ahn, Sung Hwan; Ju, Sanggyu; Chung, Yoonsun; Jung, Sang Hoon; Han, Youngyih

    2015-07-01

    Two full rotating gantries with different nozzles (multipurpose nozzle with MLC, scanning dedicated nozzle) for a conventional cyclotron system are installed and being commissioned for various proton treatment options at Samsung Medical Center in Korea. The purpose of this study is to use Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose, H/D, for X-ray imaging equipment under various treatment conditions. At first, we investigated the H/D for various modifications of the beamline devices (scattering, scanning, multi-leaf collimator, aperture, compensator) at the isocenter and at 20, 40 and 60 cm distances from the isocenter, and we compared our results with those of other research groups. Next, we investigated the neutron dose at the X-ray equipment used for real-time imaging under various treatment conditions. Our investigation showed doses of 0.07 ~ 0.19 mSv/Gy at the X-ray imaging equipment, depending on the treatment option and interestingly, the 50% neutron dose reduction was observed due to multileaf collimator during proton scanning treatment with the multipurpose nozzle. In future studies, we plan to measure the neutron dose experimentally and to validate the simulation data for X-ray imaging equipment for use as an additional neutron dose reduction method.

  2. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makowska, Malgorzata G.; Kuhn, Luise Theil; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen

    2015-01-01

    High material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible w...

  3. Comparison of out-of-field photon doses in 6 MV IMRT and neutron doses in proton therapy for adult and pediatric patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athar, Basit S.; Bednarz, Bryan; Seco, Joao; Hancox, Cindy; Paganetti, Harald

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess lateral out-of-field doses in 6 MV IMRT (intensity modulated radiation therapy) and compare them with secondary neutron equivalent dose contributions in proton therapy. We simulated out-of-field photon doses to various organs as a function of distance, patient's age, gender and treatment volumes based on 3, 6, 9 cm field diameters in the head and neck and spine region. The out-of-field photon doses to organs near the field edge were found to be in the range of 2, 5 and 10 mSv Gy-1 for 3 cm, 6 cm and 9 cm diameter IMRT fields, respectively, within 5 cm of the field edge. Statistical uncertainties calculated in organ doses vary from 0.2% to 40% depending on the organ location and the organ volume. Next, a comparison was made with previously calculated neutron equivalent doses from proton therapy using identical field arrangements. For example, out-of-field doses for IMRT to lung and uterus (organs close to the 3 cm diameter spinal field) were computed to be 0.63 and 0.62 mSv Gy-1, respectively. These numbers are found to be a factor of 2 smaller than the corresponding out-of-field doses for proton therapy, which were estimated to be 1.6 and 1.7 mSv Gy-1 (RBE), respectively. However, as the distance to the field edge increases beyond approximately 25 cm the neutron equivalent dose from proton therapy was found to be a factor of 2-3 smaller than the out-of-field photon dose from IMRT. We have also analyzed the neutron equivalent doses from an ideal scanned proton therapy (assuming not significant amount of absorbers in the treatment head). Out-of-field doses were found to be an order of magnitude smaller compared to out-of-field doses in IMRT or passive scattered proton therapy. In conclusion, there seem to be three geometrical areas when comparing the out-of-target dose from IMRT and (passive scattered) proton treatments. Close to the target (in-field, not analyzed here) protons offer a distinct advantage due to the lower

  4. Evaluation of neutron doses beyond of primary shielding of rooms housing clinical linear accelerators; Avaliacao das doses de neutrons alem das barreiras primarias de salas que abrigam aceleradores lineares clinicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezende, Gabriel Fonseca da Silva

    2011-07-01

    The growing need to build radiotherapy rooms in places with lack of available space leads to the necessity of unconventional solutions for the shielding projects. In most cases, adding metals to the primary barriers is the best way to shield the rooms properly. However, when photons with energies equal to or great than 10 MeV interact with nuclei of materials with high atomic number, neutrons are ejected and can result in a problem of radioprotection both inside and outside the room. Currently, the only empirical formula existing in the literature to assess the dose equivalent due to neutrons beyond the laminated barriers works only under very specific conditions, and a validation of this formula had not yet been done. In this work, the Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to verify the validity of the above formula for cases of primary barriers containing lead or iron sheets in rooms that house linear accelerators with 10, 15 and 18 MV. Moreover, such a code was used to evaluate the coefficient of neutron production and tenth-value layer for neutrons in concrete, both parameters that directly influence the equation studied. The study results showed that over 90% of the values compared between the formula and the simulations present discrepancies above 100%, which led to conclude that the formula from the literature produces values that do not match the reality. In addition, there were inconsistencies in the parameters that make up the formula, leading to a need to review this formula in order to build a new model that will better represent the real case. (author)

  5. SU-E-T-567: Neutron Dose Equivalent Evaluation for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy with Apertures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, C [Massachusetts General Hospotal and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China); Schuemann, J; Moteabbed, M; Paganetti, H [Massachusetts General Hospotal and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the neutron contamination from the aperture in pencil beam scanning during proton therapy. Methods: A Monte Carlo based proton therapy research platform TOPAS and the UF-series hybrid pediatric phantoms were used to perform this study. First, pencil beam scanning (PBS) treatment pediatric plans with average spot size of 10 mm at iso-center were created and optimized for three patients with and without apertures. Then, the plans were imported into TOPAS. A scripting method was developed to automatically replace the patient CT with a whole body phantom positioned according to the original plan iso-center. The neutron dose equivalent was calculated using organ specific quality factors for two phantoms resembling a 4- and 14-years old patient. Results: The neutron dose equivalent generated by the apertures in PBS is 4–10% of the total neutron dose equivalent for organs near the target, while roughly 40% for organs far from the target. Compared to the neutron dose equivalent caused by PBS without aperture, the results show that the neutron dose equivalent with aperture is reduced in the organs near the target, and moderately increased for those organs located further from the target. This is due to the reduction of the proton dose around the edge of the CTV, which causes fewer neutrons generated in the patient. Conclusion: Clinically, for pediatric patients, one might consider adding an aperture to get a more conformal treatment plan if the spot size is too large. This work shows the somewhat surprising fact that adding an aperture for beam scanning for facilities with large spot sizes reduces instead of increases a potential neutron background in regions near target. Changran Geng is supported by the Chinese Scholarship Council (CSC) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11475087)

  6. Successful Application of Neutron Bubble Detectors in Neutron Dose Monitoring for Primus-M Election Linear Accelerators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>Neutrons produced by 10 MeV medical electronic linear accelerators used for radiotherapy treatments may be harmful for medical personnel and patients. These neutrons are generated by the photon-induced

  7. DESIGN DEVELOPMENT OF A PASSIVE NEUTRON DOSEMETER FOR THE USE AT HIGH-ENERGY ACCELERATORS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Alexey; Fehrenbacher, Georg; Radon, Torsten

    2016-09-01

    For the radiation survey at intermediate and high-energy accelerators, there is a need for a neutron dosemeter which provides reliable readings of the neutron dose in a wide energy range for continuous and pulsed radiation. The objective of this development is to find a dosemeter that fulfils the necessary requirements and can be reliably used to prove that the radiation levels in areas around accelerators are in accordance with the limits of the respective radiation protection legislation. A simple layout with small dimensions and light weight as well as the usage of common materials to lower the production costs is to be achieved.

  8. The effect of a paraffin screen on the neutron dose at the maze door of a 15 MV linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krmar, M; Nikolić, D; Kuzmanović, A; Kuzmanović, Z; Ganezer, K

    2013-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of a paraffin screen located at various positions in the maze on the neutron dose equivalent at the maze door. The neutron dose equivalent was measured at the maze door of a room containing a 15 MV linear accelerator for x-ray therapy. Measurements were performed for several positions of the paraffin screen covering only 27.5% of the cross-sectional area of the maze. The neutron dose equivalent was also measured at all screen positions. Two simple models of the neutron source were considered in which the first assumed that the source was the cross-sectional area at the inner entrance of the maze, radiating neutrons in an isotropic manner. In the second model the reduction in the neutron dose equivalent at the maze door due to the paraffin screen was considered to be a function of the mean values of the neutron fluence and energy at the screen. The results of this study indicate that the equivalent dose at the maze door was reduced by a factor of 3 through the use of a paraffin screen that was placed inside the maze. It was also determined that the contributions to the dosage from areas that were not covered by the paraffin screen as viewed from the dosimeter, were 2.5 times higher than the contributions from the covered areas. This study also concluded that the contributions of the maze walls, ceiling, and floor to the total neutron dose equivalent were an order of magnitude lower than those from the surface at the far end of the maze. This study demonstrated that a paraffin screen could be used to reduce the neutron dose equivalent at the maze door by a factor of 3. This paper also found that the reduction of the neutron dose equivalent was a linear function of the area covered by the maze screen and that the decrease in the dose at the maze door could be modeled as an exponential function of the product φ·E at the screen.

  9. The effect of a paraffin screen on the neutron dose at the maze door of a 15 MV linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krmar, M.; Kuzmanović, A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad 21000 (Serbia); Nikolić, D. [National Institute for Nanotechnology, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2M9 (Canada); Kuzmanović, Z. [International Medical Centers, Banja Luka 78000, Republika Srpska, Bosnia and Herzegovina (Bosnia and Herzegowina); Ganezer, K. [Physics Department, California State University Dominguez Hills, Carson, California 90747 (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of a paraffin screen located at various positions in the maze on the neutron dose equivalent at the maze door.Methods: The neutron dose equivalent was measured at the maze door of a room containing a 15 MV linear accelerator for x-ray therapy. Measurements were performed for several positions of the paraffin screen covering only 27.5% of the cross-sectional area of the maze. The neutron dose equivalent was also measured at all screen positions. Two simple models of the neutron source were considered in which the first assumed that the source was the cross-sectional area at the inner entrance of the maze, radiating neutrons in an isotropic manner. In the second model the reduction in the neutron dose equivalent at the maze door due to the paraffin screen was considered to be a function of the mean values of the neutron fluence and energy at the screen.Results: The results of this study indicate that the equivalent dose at the maze door was reduced by a factor of 3 through the use of a paraffin screen that was placed inside the maze. It was also determined that the contributions to the dosage from areas that were not covered by the paraffin screen as viewed from the dosimeter, were 2.5 times higher than the contributions from the covered areas. This study also concluded that the contributions of the maze walls, ceiling, and floor to the total neutron dose equivalent were an order of magnitude lower than those from the surface at the far end of the maze.Conclusions: This study demonstrated that a paraffin screen could be used to reduce the neutron dose equivalent at the maze door by a factor of 3. This paper also found that the reduction of the neutron dose equivalent was a linear function of the area covered by the maze screen and that the decrease in the dose at the maze door could be modeled as an exponential function of the product φ·E at the screen.

  10. Measurement of photoneutron dose produced by wedge filters of a high energy linac using polycarbonate films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Seyed Mehdi; Hashemi-Malayeri, Bijan; Raisali, Gholamreza; Shokrani, Parvaneh; Sharafi, Ali Akbar; Torkzadeh, Falamarz

    2008-05-01

    Radiotherapy represents the most widely spread technique to control and treat cancer. To increase the treatment efficiency, high energy linacs are used. However, applying high energy photon beams leads to a non-negligible dose of neutrons contaminating therapeutic beams. In addition, using conventional linacs necessitates applying wedge filters in some clinical conditions. However, there is not enough information on the effect of these filters on the photoneutrons produced. The aim of this study was to investigate the change of photoneutron dose equivalent due to the use of linac wedge filters. A high energy (18 MV) linear accelerator (Elekta SL 75/25) was studied. Polycarbonate films were used to measure the dose equivalent of photoneutrons. After electrochemical etching of the films, the neutron dose equivalent was calculated using Hp(10) factor, and its variation on the patient plane at 0, 5, 10, 50 and 100 cm from the center of the X-ray beam was determined. By increasing the distance from the center of the X-ray beam towards the periphery, the photoneutron dose equivalent decreased rapidly for the open and wedged fields. Increasing of the field size increased the photoneutron dose equivalent. The use of wedge filter increased the proportion of the neutron dose equivalent. The increase can be accounted for by the selective absorption of the high energy photons by the wedge filter.

  11. A Monte Carlo model for out-of-field dose calculation from high-energy photon therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kry, Stephen F; Titt, Uwe; Followill, David; Pönisch, Falk; Vassiliev, Oleg N; White, R Allen; Stovall, Marilyn; Salehpour, Mohammad

    2007-09-01

    As cancer therapy becomes more efficacious and patients survive longer, the potential for late effects increases, including effects induced by radiation dose delivered away from the treatment site. This out-of-field radiation is of particular concern with high-energy radiotherapy, as neutrons are produced in the accelerator head. We recently developed an accurate Monte Carlo model of a Varian 2100 accelerator using MCNPX for calculating the dose away from the treatment field resulting from low-energy therapy. In this study, we expanded and validated our Monte Carlo model for high-energy (18 MV) photon therapy, including both photons and neutrons. Simulated out-of-field photon doses were compared with measurements made with thermoluminescent dosimeters in an acrylic phantom up to 55 cm from the central axis. Simulated neutron fluences and energy spectra were compared with measurements using moderated gold foil activation in moderators and data from the literature. The average local difference between the calculated and measured photon dose was 17%, including doses as low as 0.01% of the central axis dose. The out-of-field photon dose varied substantially with field size and distance from the edge of the field but varied little with depth in the phantom, except at depths shallower than 3 cm, where the dose sharply increased. On average, the difference between the simulated and measured neutron fluences was 19% and good agreement was observed with the neutron spectra. The neutron dose equivalent varied little with field size or distance from the central axis but decreased with depth in the phantom. Neutrons were the dominant component of the out-of-field dose equivalent for shallow depths and large distances from the edge of the treatment field. This Monte Carlo model is useful to both physicists and clinicians when evaluating out-of-field doses and associated potential risks.

  12. Gantry orientation effect on the neutron and capture gamma ray dose equivalent at the maze entrance door in radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghiasi Hosein

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the effect of gantry orientation on the photoneutron and capture gamma dose calculations for maze entrance door was evaluated. A typical radiation therapy room made of ordinary concrete was simulated using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. Gantry rotation was simulated at eight different angles around the isocenter. Both neutron and capture gamma dose vary considerably with gantry angle. The ratios of the maximum to the minimum values for neutron and capture gamma dose equivalents were 1.9 and 1.4, respectively. On the other hand, comparison of the Monte Carlo calculated mean value over all orientations with Monte Carlo calculated neutron and gamma dose showed that the Wu-McGinley method differed by 5% and 2%, respectively. However, for more conservative shielding calculations, factors of 1.6 and 1.3 should be applied to the calculated neutron and capture gamma doses at downward irradiation. Finally, it can be concluded that the gantry angle influences neutron and capture gamma dose at the maze entrance door and it should be taken into account in shielding considerations.

  13. Dose-incidence relationships for exencephalia, anophthalmia and prenatal mortality in mouse embryos irradiated with fission neutrons or 250 kV X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedberg, W.; Faulkner, D.N.; Neas, B.R.; Hanneman, G.D.; Darden, E.B. Jr.; Deal, R.B. Jr.; Parker, D.E.

    1987-08-01

    Groups of pregnant mice were irradiated at selected times between 10.00 hours on gestation day 7 and 16.00 hours on day 8. Each group received 0.39 Gy of neutrons or 1.60 Gy of X-rays, or was sham irradiated. We identified a period of high susceptibility of the embryos to radiation-induced exencephalia, anophthalmia and prenatal mortality early in gestation day 8. Dose-incidence relationships in this period were investigated with 0.19-0.48 Gy of neutrons and with 0.40-2.00 Gy of X-rays.

  14. Analysis of the ambient dose variation due to cosmic rays in Daejeon by using a neutron monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun Ho; Kang, Jeongsoo; Jang, Doh-Yun; Son, Jae Bum; Kim, Yong-Kyun; Kim, Sung Joong

    2013-12-01

    The Basic Atomic Energy Research Institute of Hanyang University in Korea has constructed a cosmic-ray detection system that is presently being operated. In this study, the impact of cosmic-rays on 18-tube NM64-type neutron monitor installed in Daejeon was confirmed for the first time. In order to evaluate the reliability of the neutron monitor, we predicted the count rates from the neutron flux by using the Excel-based Program for calculating Atmospheric Cosmic-ray Spectrum (EXPACS); these predictions were then compared with experimental results. The predictions agree well with the results, with differences no greater than 3.95%. Also, changes in the neutron ambient dose equivalent rate from cosmic rays due to different environmental conditions were analyzed using EXPACS; the results obtained were compared with those of previous studies and were thus, confirmed to be reliable, suggesting that the detection system is suitable for making the relevant measurements. That detection system was then used to evaluate the neutron ambient dose equivalent rate for various environmental conditions in Daejeon. Finally, a conversion coefficient, defined as the ratio of counts from the neutron monitor to the neutron ambient dose equivalent, was obtained and included considerations of the impacts of geological factors and of meteorological factors of relative humidity and atmospheric depth. The derived formula fit the source data with an adjusted coefficient of determination ( R 2) of 0.9894 and a root-mean-square error of 1.7056 × 10-10, equivalent to about 1%. This confirmed satisfactory accuracy and reliability of the formula, thereby showing this methodology to be legitimate for use in evaluating the neutron ambient dose equivalent by using the Daejeon neutron monitor.

  15. Photonuclear dose calculations for high-energy photon beams from Siemens and Varian linacs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibani, Omar; Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie

    2003-08-01

    The dose from photon-induced nuclear particles (neutrons, protons, and alpha particles) generated by high-energy photon beams from medical linacs is investigated. Monte Carlo calculations using the MCNPX code are performed for three different photon beams from two different machines: Siemens 18 MV, Varian 15 MV, and Varian 18 MV. The linac head components are simulated in detail. The dose distributions from photons, neutrons, protons, and alpha particles are calculated in a tissue-equivalent phantom. Neutrons are generated in both the linac head and the phantom. This study includes (a) field size effects, (b) off-axis dose profiles, (c) neutron contribution from the linac head, (d) dose contribution from capture gamma rays, (e) phantom heterogeneity effects, and (f) effects of primary electron energy shift. Results are presented in terms of absolute dose distributions and also in terms of DER (dose equivalent ratio). The DER is the maximum dose from the particle (neutron, proton, or alpha) divided by the maximum photon dose, multiplied by the particle quality factor and the modulation scaling factor. The total DER including neutrons, protons, and alphas is about 0.66 cSv/Gy for the Siemens 18 MV beam (10 cm x 10 cm). The neutron DER decreases with decreasing field size while the proton (or alpha) DER does not vary significantly except for the 1 cm x 1 cm field. Both Varian beams (15 and 18 MV) produce more neutrons, protons, and alphas particles than the Siemens 18 MV beam. This is mainly due to their higher primary electron energies: 15 and 18.3 MeV, respectively, vs 14 MeV for the Siemens 18 MV beam. For all beams, neutrons contribute more than 75% of the total DER, except for the 1 cm x 1 cm field (approximately 50%). The total DER is 1.52 and 2.86 cSv/Gy for the 15 and 18 MV Varian beams (10 cm x 10 cm), respectively. Media with relatively high-Z elements like bone may increase the dose from heavy charged particles by a factor 4. The total DER is sensitive to

  16. Evaluation of neutron dose and gamma dose at thermal facility of Peruvian research reactor RP-10; Evaluacion de la dosis gamma y de neutrones en la facilidad termica del reactor peruano de investigacion RP-10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Javier; Miranda, Hector; Aparicio, Claudia; Lazaro, Gerardo [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN), Lima (Peru). Dept. de Calculo, Analisis y Seguridad (CASE)]. E-mail: hmcmiranda@hotmail.com; jjgb76@yahoo.com; caparicio@scientist.com; glazaro@ipen.gob.pe; Zuniga, Agustin [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN), Lima (Peru). Direccion General de Instalaciones (DGI)]. E-mail: azuniga@ipen.gob.pe

    2005-07-01

    One of main lines of work in the Peruvian nuclear reactor RP-10, is a complex systems simulation by mean of Monte Carlo technique, oriented in particular to characterization of irradiation facilities. In this work it is presented the comparison of experimental measurements, based in measure of thermal, epithermal and fast neutron flux distribution, neutron dose and gamma dose at thermal facility of RP-10, with the MCNP4B compute code, being observed a good agreement between both results. The neutron flux measures were carried out by irradiation of gold, indium and nickel metallic monitors; then it were measured the activities using a gamma spectrometry chain based on a hyperpure germanium (HPGe) detector. With these results the neutron dose was determined, and it was also measured, using a equipment based on a boron trifluoride detector (BF3, NRC-RemRad). A device based on Geiger Mueller detector (FAG-FH40FE) was used for the gamma dose rate measurement. Finally there were measured both gamma and neutron dose rate using TLD-600 and TLD-700 thermoluminescent dosimeters, which were previously characterized. (author)

  17. Recent developments on micrometric fission chambers for high neutron fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Letourneau, A. [Irfu, Service de Physique Nucleaire, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bringer, O.; Dupont, E.; Marie, F.; Panebianco, S.; Toussaint, J. C.; Veyssiere, C. [Irfu, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Chabod, S. [LPSC, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3 (France); Breaud, S.; Oriol, L. [DEN/DER/SPEX, CEA-Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durances (France)

    2009-07-01

    With the development of innovative nuclear systems and new generation neutron sources, the nuclear instrumentation should be adapted. Since several years, we developed microscopic fission chambers to study the transmutation of minor actinides in high thermal-neutron fluxes. The recent developments done to fulfill the drastic conditions of irradiations are described in this paper together with the feedback from the measurements. Two installations were used: the HFR of the ILL for its highest thermal neutron flux of the world and the MEGAPIE target which was the first 1 MW liquid Pb-Bi spallation target in the world. (authors)

  18. High-power liquid-lithium target prototype for accelerator-based boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfon, S; Paul, M; Arenshtam, A; Berkovits, D; Bisyakoev, M; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Hazenshprung, N; Kijel, D; Nagler, A; Silverman, I

    2011-12-01

    A prototype of a compact Liquid-Lithium Target (LiLiT), which will possibly constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) in hospitals, was built. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear Research Center (SNRC). The liquid-lithium target will produce neutrons through the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated using a high-intensity proton beam (>10 kW), necessary for sufficient neutron flux. In off-line circulation tests, the liquid-lithium loop generated a stable lithium jet at high velocity, on a concave supporting wall; the concept will first be tested using a high-power electron beam impinging on the lithium jet. High intensity proton beam irradiation (1.91-2.5 MeV, 2-4 mA) will take place at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF) superconducting linear accelerator currently in construction at SNRC. Radiological risks due to the (7)Be produced in the reaction were studied and will be handled through a proper design, including a cold trap and appropriate shielding. A moderator/reflector assembly is planned according to a Monte Carlo simulation, to create a neutron spectrum and intensity maximally effective to the treatment and to reduce prompt gamma radiation dose risks.

  19. Photo neutron dose equivalent rate in 15 MV X-ray beam from a Siemens Primus Linac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ghasemi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fast and thermal neutron fluence rates from a 15 MV X-ray beams of a Siemens Primus Linac were measured using bare and moderated BF 3 proportional counter inside the treatment room at different locations. Fluence rate values were converted to dose equivalent rate (DER utilizing conversion factors of American Association of Physicist in Medicine′s (AAPM report number 19. For thermal neutrons, maximum and minimum DERs were 3.46 × 10 -6 (3 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size and 8.36 × 10 -8 Sv/min (in maze, 40 × 40 field size, respectively. For fast neutrons, maximum DERs using 9" and 3" moderators were 1.6 × 10 -5 and 1.74 × 10 -5 Sv/min (2 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size, respectively. By changing the field size, the variation in thermal neutron DER was more than the fast neutron DER and the changes in fast neutron DER were not significant in the bunker except inside the radiation field. This study showed that at all points and distances, by decreasing field size of the beam, thermal and fast neutron DER increases and the number of thermal neutrons is more than fast neutrons.

  20. Photo neutron dose equivalent rate in 15 MV X-ray beam from a Siemens Primus Linac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemi, A; Pourfallah, T Allahverdi; Akbari, M R; Babapour, H; Shahidi, M

    2015-01-01

    Fast and thermal neutron fluence rates from a 15 MV X-ray beams of a Siemens Primus Linac were measured using bare and moderated BF3 proportional counter inside the treatment room at different locations. Fluence rate values were converted to dose equivalent rate (DER) utilizing conversion factors of American Association of Physicist in Medicine's (AAPM) report number 19. For thermal neutrons, maximum and minimum DERs were 3.46 × 10(-6) (3 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size) and 8.36 × 10(-8) Sv/min (in maze, 40 × 40 field size), respectively. For fast neutrons, maximum DERs using 9" and 3" moderators were 1.6 × 10(-5) and 1.74 × 10(-5) Sv/min (2 m from isocenter in +Y direction, 0 × 0 field size), respectively. By changing the field size, the variation in thermal neutron DER was more than the fast neutron DER and the changes in fast neutron DER were not significant in the bunker except inside the radiation field. This study showed that at all points and distances, by decreasing field size of the beam, thermal and fast neutron DER increases and the number of thermal neutrons is more than fast neutrons.

  1. Study of the relative dose-response of BANG-3® polymer gel dosimeters in epithermal neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uusi-Simola, J.; Savolainen, S.; Kangasmäki, A.; Heikkinen, S.; Perkiö, J.; Abo Ramadan, U.; Seppälä, T.; Karila, J.; Serén, T.; Kotiluoto, P.; Sorvari, P.; Auterinen, I.

    2003-09-01

    Polymer gels have been reported as a new, potential tool for dosimetry in mixed neutron-gamma radiation fields. In this work, BANG-3 (MGS Research Inc.) gel vials from three production batches were irradiated with 6 MV photons of a Varian Clinac 2100 C linear accelerator and with the epithermal neutron beam of the Finnish boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) facility at the FiR 1 nuclear reactor. The gel is tissue equivalent in main elemental composition and density and its T2 relaxation time is dependent on the absorbed dose. The T2 relaxation time map of the irradiated gel vials was measured with a 1.5 T magnetic resonance (MR) scanner using spin echo sequence. The absorbed doses of neutron irradiation were calculated using DORT computer code, and the accuracy of the calculational model was verified by measuring gamma ray dose rate with thermoluminescent dosimeters and 55Mn(n,gamma) activation reaction rate with activation detectors. The response of the BANG-3 gel dosimeter for total absorbed dose in the neutron irradiation was linear, and the magnitude of the response relative to the response in the photon irradiation was observed to vary between different gel batches. The results support the potential of polymer gels in BNCT dosimetry, especially for the verification of two- or three-dimensional dose distributions.

  2. High yield neutron generators using the DD reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vainionpaa, J. H.; Harris, J. L.; Piestrup, M. A.; Gary, C. K.; Williams, D. L.; Apodaca, M. D.; Cremer, J. T. [Adelphi technology, 2003 E. Bayshore Rd. 94061, Redwood City, CA (United States); Ji, Qing; Ludewigt, B. A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Jones, G. [G and J Enterprise, 1258 Quary Ln, Suite F, Pleasanton California 94566 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    A product line of high yield neutron generators has been developed at Adelphi technology inc. The generators use the D-D fusion reaction and are driven by an ion beam supplied by a microwave ion source. Yields of up to 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} n/s have been achieved, which are comparable to those obtained using the more efficient D-T reaction. The microwave-driven plasma uses the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) to produce a high plasma density for high current and high atomic ion species. These generators have an actively pumped vacuum system that allows operation at reduced pressure in the target chamber, increasing the overall system reliability. Since no radioactive tritium is used, the generators can be easily serviced, and components can be easily replaced, providing essentially an unlimited lifetime. Fast neutron source size can be adjusted by selecting the aperture and target geometries according to customer specifications. Pulsed and continuous operation has been demonstrated. Minimum pulse lengths of 50 {mu}s have been achieved. Since the generators are easily serviceable, they offer a long lifetime neutron generator for laboratories and commercial systems requiring continuous operation. Several of the generators have been enclosed in radiation shielding/moderator structures designed for customer specifications. These generators have been proven to be useful for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), neutron activation analysis (NAA) and fast neutron radiography. Thus these generators make excellent fast, epithermal and thermal neutron sources for laboratories and industrial applications that require neutrons with safe operation, small footprint, low cost and small regulatory burden.

  3. High yield neutron generators using the DD reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainionpaa, J. H.; Harris, J. L.; Piestrup, M. A.; Gary, C. K.; Williams, D. L.; Apodaca, M. D.; Cremer, J. T.; Ji, Qing; Ludewigt, B. A.; Jones, G.

    2013-04-01

    A product line of high yield neutron generators has been developed at Adelphi technology inc. The generators use the D-D fusion reaction and are driven by an ion beam supplied by a microwave ion source. Yields of up to 5 × 109 n/s have been achieved, which are comparable to those obtained using the more efficient D-T reaction. The microwave-driven plasma uses the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) to produce a high plasma density for high current and high atomic ion species. These generators have an actively pumped vacuum system that allows operation at reduced pressure in the target chamber, increasing the overall system reliability. Since no radioactive tritium is used, the generators can be easily serviced, and components can be easily replaced, providing essentially an unlimited lifetime. Fast neutron source size can be adjusted by selecting the aperture and target geometries according to customer specifications. Pulsed and continuous operation has been demonstrated. Minimum pulse lengths of 50 μs have been achieved. Since the generators are easily serviceable, they offer a long lifetime neutron generator for laboratories and commercial systems requiring continuous operation. Several of the generators have been enclosed in radiation shielding/moderator structures designed for customer specifications. These generators have been proven to be useful for prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA), neutron activation analysis (NAA) and fast neutron radiography. Thus these generators make excellent fast, epithermal and thermal neutron sources for laboratories and industrial applications that require neutrons with safe operation, small footprint, low cost and small regulatory burden.

  4. Determination of the neutron and photon dose equivalent at work places in nuclear facilities of Sweden. An SSI - EURADOS comparison exercise. Part 2: Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartlett, D. [National Radiological Protection Board, Chilton (United Kingdom); Drake, P. [Vattenfall AB, Vaeroebacka (Sweden); Lindborg, L. [Swedish Radiation Protection Inst., Stockholm (Sweden); Klein, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany); Schmitz, Th. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Tichy, M

    1999-06-01

    Various mixed neutron-photon fields at workplaces in the containment of pressurised water reactors and in the vicinity of transport containers with spent fuel elements were investigated with spectrometers and dosimeters. The spectral neutron fluences evaluated from measurements with multisphere systems were recommended to be used for the calculation of dosimetric reference values for comparison with the readings of the dosemeters applied simultaneously. It turned out that most of the moderator based area dosemeters overestimated, while the TEPC systems generally underestimated the ambient dose equivalent (DE) values of the rather soft neutron fields encountered at these workplaces. The discrepancies can, however, be explained on the basis of energy dependent responses of the instruments used. The ambient DE values obtained with recently developed area dosemeters based on superheated drop detectors and with track etch based personal dosemeters on phantoms, however, were in satisfying agreement with the reference data. Sets of personal dosemeters simultaneously irradiated on a phantom allowed to roughly estimate the directional dependence of the neutron fluence. Hence, personal and limiting dose equivalent quantities could also be calculated. The personal and ambient DE values were always conservative estimates of the limiting quantities. Unexpectedly, discrepancies were observed for photon DE data measured with GM counters and TEPC systems. The up to 50 % higher readings of the GM counters may be explained by a considerable contribution of high energy photons to the total photon dose equivalent, but photon spectrometry is necessary for final clarification.

  5. Overview of recent experimental works on high energy neutron shielding

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, T; Yashima, H; Yonai, S

    2004-01-01

    Several experiments on high energy neutron shielding have recently been performed using medium to high energy accelerators of energies above 20 MeV. Below 100 MeV, the benchmark experiments have been done using 25 and 35 MeV p-Li quasi-monoenergetic neutrons at the Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, Japan, 43 and 68 MeV p-Li quasi-monoenergetic neutrons at the Azimuthally Varying Field (AVF) cyclotron facility, TIARA of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Above 100 MeV, the neutron shielding experiments have been done using 800 MeV protons at ISIS, Rutherford Appleton laboratory (RAL), England, 400 MeV/nucleon carbon ions at the heavy ion medical accelerator facility, HIMAC of National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Japan, 500 MeV protons at the spallation neutron source facility, KEK spallation neutron source facility (KENS) of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Japan, 500 MeV protons at the accelerator facility, TRIUMF, Canada, 1.6 to 24 G...

  6. Measurement of the energy spectrum of cosmic-ray induced neutrons aboard an ER-2 high-altitude airplane

    CERN Document Server

    Goldhagen, P E; Kniss, T; Reginatto, M; Singleterry, R C; Van Steveninck, W; Wilson, J W

    2002-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial aircraft flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the atmospheric ionizing radiation (AIR) project, an international collaboration of 15 laboratories, made simultaneous radiation measurements with 14 instruments on five flights of a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The primary AIR instrument was a highly sensitive extended-energy multisphere neutron spectrometer with lead and steel shells placed within the moderators of two of its 14 detectors to enhance response at high energies. Detector responses were calculated for neutrons and charged hadrons at energies up to 100 GeV using MCNPX. Neutron spectra were unfolded from the measured count rates using the new MAXED code. We have measured the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum (t...

  7. High frame-rate neutron radiography of dynamic events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossi, R.H.; Robinson, A.H.; Barton, J.P.

    1981-11-20

    A system has been developed to perform neutron radiographic analysis of dynamic events having a duration of several milliseconds. The system has been operated in the range of 2000 to 10,000 frames/second. Synchronization has provided high-speed-motion neutron radiographs for evaluation of the firing cycle of 7.62 mm munition rounds within a steel rifle barrel. The system has also been used to demonstrate the ability to produce neutron radiographic movies of two-phase flow. The equipment uses the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor capable of pulsing to 3000 MW peak power, a neutron beam collimator, a scintillator neutron conversion screen coupled to an image intensifier, and a 16 mm high speed movie camera. The peak neutron flux incident at the object position is approximately 4 x 10/sup 11/ n/cm/sup 2/s with a pulse, full width at half maximum, of 9 ms. Special studies have been performed on the scintillator conversion screens and on the effects of statistical limitations on the image quality. Modulation transfer function analysis has been used to assist in the evaluation of the system performance.

  8. Measurement of the Ratio of High Energy Neutron in the Pulse Nuclear Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MAO; Guo-shu; DING; You-qian; YANG; Lei; MA; Peng; YU; Zhen-hua

    2012-01-01

    <正>In the production of radioisotopes and neutron activation analysis, the fast neutron densities are very important to estimate the yields of the radioisotopes. In order to determine the fast neutron flux ratio, different foils are used to measure the thermal neutron flux and the fast neutron flux. In this paper 238U was used as only a monitor to measure the ratio of high energy neutron (>6 MeV). By measuring the

  9. Neutron dosimetry; Dosimetria de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fratin, Luciano

    1993-12-31

    A neutron irradiation facility was designed and built in order to establish a procedure for calibrating neutron monitors and dosemeters. A 185 GBq {sup 241} Am Be source of known is used as a reference source. The irradiation facility using this source in the air provides neutron dose rates between 9 nSv s{sup -1} and 0,5 {sup {mu}}Sv s{sup -1}. A calibrated 50 nSv s{sup -1} thermal neutron field is obtained by using a specially designed paraffin block in conjunction with the {sup 241} Am Be source. A Bonner multisphere spectrometer was calibrated, using a procedure based on three methods proposed by international standards. The unfold {sup 241} Am Be neutron spectrum was determined from the Bonner spheres data and resulted in a good agreement with expected values for fluence rate, dose rate and mean energy. A dosimetric system based on the electrochemical etching of CR-39 was developed for personal dosimetry. The dosemeter badge using a (n,{alpha}) converter, the etching chamber and high frequency power supply were designed and built specially for this project. The electrochemical etching (ECE) parameters used were: a 6N KOH solution, 59 deg C, 20 kV{sub pp} cm{sup -1}, 2,0 kHz, 3 hours of ECE for thermal and intermediate neutrons and 6 hours for fast neutrons. The calibration factors for thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined for this personal dosemeter. The sensitivities determined for the developed dosimetric system were (1,46{+-} 0,09) 10{sup 4} tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for thermal neutrons, (9{+-}3) 10{sup 2} tracks cm{sup -2} mSV{sup -1} for intermediate neutrons and (26{+-}4) tracks cm{sup -2} mSv{sup -1} for fast neutrons. The lower and upper limits of detection were respectively 0,002 mSv and 0,6 mSv for thermal neutrons, 0,04 mSv and 8 mSv for intermediate neutrons and 1 mSv and 12 mSv for fast neutrons. In view of the 1990`s ICRP recommendations, it is possible to conclude that the personal dosemeter described in this work is

  10. High-fidelity MCNP modeling of a D-T neutron generator for active interrogation of special nuclear material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katalenich, Jeff; Flaska, Marek; Pozzi, Sara A.; Hartman, Michael R.

    2011-10-01

    Fast and robust methods for interrogation of special nuclear material (SNM) are of interest to many agencies and institutions in the United States. It is well known that passive interrogation methods are typically sufficient for plutonium identification because of a relatively high neutron production rate from 240Pu [1]. On the other hand, identification of shielded uranium requires active methods using neutron or photon sources [2]. Deuterium-deuterium (2.45 MeV) and deuterium-tritium (14.1 MeV) neutron-generator sources have been previously tested and proven to be relatively reliable instruments for active interrogation of nuclear materials [3,4]. In addition, the newest generators of this type are small enough for applications requiring portable interrogation systems. Active interrogation techniques using high-energy neutrons are being investigated as a method to detect hidden SNM in shielded containers [4,5]. Due to the thickness of some containers, penetrating radiation such as high-energy neutrons can provide a potential means of probing shielded SNM. In an effort to develop the capability to assess the signal seen from various forms of shielded nuclear materials, the University of Michigan Neutron Science Laboratory's D-T neutron generator and its shielding were accurately modeled in MCNP. The generator, while operating at nominal power, produces approximately 1×10 10 neutrons/s, a source intensity which requires a large amount of shielding to minimize the dose rates around the generator. For this reason, the existing shielding completely encompasses the generator and does not include beam ports. Therefore, several MCNP simulations were performed to estimate the yield of uncollided 14.1-MeV neutrons from the generator for active interrogation experiments. Beam port diameters of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm were modeled to assess the resulting neutron fluxes. The neutron flux outside the beam ports was estimated to be approximately 2×10 4 n/cm 2 s.

  11. 适合新型便携式高能中子剂量仪的模拟电路系统设计%Design of an Analog Circuit System for a New Portable Dose Detectors Used for High-Energy Neutrons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜强; 洪兵; 李桃生; 董良; 刘辉兰

    2013-01-01

    介绍了一种适合于便携式二元慢化型高能中子剂量仪的模拟电路系统的设计解决方案。该方案采用低噪声结型场效应管和高性能运算放大器构成具有暗电流消除功能的电荷灵敏前置放大器。前置放大器信号经极零相消后由一级二阶S-K滤波器和低通滤波器成型放大为满足后续电路需求的准高斯信号,然后经过甄别电路和单稳态成型电路把模拟脉冲变成固定宽度的数字脉冲,以便于后续数字电路的进一步处理。由Multisim电路仿真软件仿真结果和实际电路测试结果可知,在计数率从0.1~20 kHz范围内,该方案完全满足便携式二元慢化型高能中子剂量仪的信号处理要求。%It presents a solution of an analog circuit system for a kind of portable Dual -Moderated Dose Detec-tors for High-Energy Neutrons .Using low-noise JFET and high -performance operational amplifier , a kind of charge-sensitive preamplifier with the function of dark current cancellation was set up .Signal from the pre-amplifier was processed by an analog system made up with pole -zero cancellation circuit , second order S -K filter and low-pass filter circuit to form a signal with quasi -Gaussian shape and enough amplitude , which met with the demands of subsequent digitalization circuit .The digitalization circuit was formed by a pulse amplitude discriminator , based on the Schmitt trigger , and a mono -stable trigger and the signal would become a fixed width of digital pulses , which could be read and processed by MCU -cored data acquisition system .Both re-sults from the simulation of EDA software ( Multisim) and the actual circuit test indicated that this design whol-ly met the signal-processing requirements of Dual -Moderated Dose Detectors for High -Energy Neutrons in the count rate range from 0.1~20 kHz.

  12. High Energy Telescope With Neutron Detection Capabilities (HETn)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, A.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Böhm, E.; Böttcher, s.; Connell, J. J.; Dröge, W.; Hassler, D. M.; Heber, B.; Lopate, C.; McKibben, R. B.; Steigies, C. T.

    2007-01-01

    The High-Energy Telescope with neutron detection capabilities (HETn) for the Solar Orbiter will measure and resolve energetic charged particles, in particular electrons, proton, and heavy ions up to Fe including selected isotopes up to energies equivalen to the penetration depth of 100 MeV protons. The full active anti-coincidence encloses detectors sensitive to 1-30 MeV neutrons and 0.5-5 MeV X-/gamma-rays. The sensor consists of the angle-detecting inclined sensors (ADIS) solid-state detector detector telescope utilizing a shared calorimeter for total energy and X-/gamma-ray measurement. A separate plastic detector provides sensitivity to neutrons via the recoil process. HETn will open a new window on solar eruptive events with its neutron detection capability and allows determination of high-energy close to the Sun. Timing and spectral information on neutral particles (neutrons and X-/gamma rays ), on relativistic electrons and high-energy heavy ions will provide new insights into the processes which accelerate particles to high energies at the sun and into transport processes between the source and the spacecraft in the near-Sun environment.

  13. High Intensity Accelerator and Neutron Source in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xialing; Wei, J.; Loong, Chun

    2011-06-01

    High intensity Accelerator is being studied all over world for numerous applications, which includes the waste transmutation, spallation neutron source and material irradiation facilities. The R/D activities of the technology of High intensity accelerator are also developed in China for some year, and have some good facilities around China. This paper will reports the status of some high intensity accelerators and neutron source in China, which including ADS/RFQ; CARR; CSNS; PKUNIFTY & CPHS. This paper will emphatically report the Compact Pulsed Hadron Source (CPHS) led by the Department of Engineering Physics of Tsinghua University in Beijing, China.

  14. A high-rate detection system to study parity violation with polarized epithermal neutrons at LANSCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudson, J.N.; Bowman, J.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Crawford, B.E. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)]|[Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory, Durham, NC (United States)

    1995-07-01

    We describe an apparatus for studies of parity violation in neutron-nucleus scattering. This experiment requires longitudinally polarized neutrons from the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center over the energy-range from 1 to 1000 eV, the ability to reverse the neutron spin without otherwise affecting the apparatus, the ability to detect neutrons at rates up to 500 MHz, and an appropriate data acquisition system. We will discuss the neutron polarizer, fast neutron spin reverser, detector for transmitted neutrons, and high rate data acquisition system.

  15. Neutron resonance transmission spectroscopy with high spatial and energy resolution at the J-PARC pulsed neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremsin, A.S., E-mail: ast@ssl.berkeley.edu [University of California at Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Shinohara, T.; Kai, T.; Ooi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2–4 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Kamiyama, T.; Kiyanagi, Y.; Shiota, Y. [Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8 Kita-ku, Sapporo-shi, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); McPhate, J.B.; Vallerga, J.V.; Siegmund, O.H.W. [University of California at Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Feller, W.B. [NOVA Scientific, Inc., 10 Picker Rd., Sturbridge, MA 01566 (United States)

    2014-05-11

    The sharp variation of neutron attenuation at certain energies specific to particular nuclides (the lower range being from ∼1 eV up to ∼1 keV), can be exploited for the remote mapping of element and/or isotope distributions, as well as temperature probing, within relatively thick samples. Intense pulsed neutron beam-lines at spallation sources combined with a high spatial, high-timing resolution neutron counting detector, provide a unique opportunity to measure neutron transmission spectra through the time-of-flight technique. We present the results of experiments where spatially resolved neutron resonances were measured, at energies up to 50 keV. These experiments were performed with the intense flux low background NOBORU neutron beamline at the J-PARC neutron source and the high timing resolution (∼20 ns at epithermal neutron energies) and spatial resolution (∼55 µm) neutron counting detector using microchannel plates coupled to a Timepix electronic readout. Simultaneous element-specific imaging was carried out for several materials, at a spatial resolution of ∼150 µm. The high timing resolution of our detector combined with the low background beamline, also enabled characterization of the neutron pulse itself – specifically its pulse width, which varies with neutron energy. The results of our measurements are in good agreement with the predicted results for the double pulse structure of the J-PARC facility, which provides two 100 ns-wide proton pulses separated by 600 ns, broadened by the neutron energy moderation process. Thermal neutron radiography can be conducted simultaneously with resonance transmission spectroscopy, and can reveal the internal structure of the samples. The transmission spectra measured in our experiments demonstrate the feasibility of mapping elemental distributions using this non-destructive technique, for those elements (and in certain cases, specific isotopes), which have resonance energies below a few keV, and with lower

  16. Interaction between the biological effects of high- and low-LET radiation dose components in a mixed field exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mason, Anna J.; Giusti, Valerio; Green, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    The relative biological effectiveness of two epithermal neutron sources, a reactor based source at Studsvik, Sweden, and a proton accelerator-based source in Birmingham, UK, was studied in relation to the proportional absorbed dose distribution as a function of neutron energy. Evidence for any in...... interactions between the effects of biological damage induced by high- and low-linear energy transfer (LET) dose components, in this 'mixed field' irradiation, was also examined......The relative biological effectiveness of two epithermal neutron sources, a reactor based source at Studsvik, Sweden, and a proton accelerator-based source in Birmingham, UK, was studied in relation to the proportional absorbed dose distribution as a function of neutron energy. Evidence for any...

  17. Personal dose equivalent conversion coefficients for neutron fluence over the energy range of 20 to 250 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mclean, Thomas D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Justus, Alan L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gadd, S Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olsher, Richard H [RP-2; Devine, Robert T [RP-2

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed to extend existing neutron personal dose equivalent fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients to an energy of 250 MeV. Presently, conversion coefficients, H(p,slab)(10,alpha)/Phi, are given by ICRP-74 and ICRU-57 for a range of angles of radiation incidence (alpha = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60 and 75 degrees ) in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. Standard practice has been to base operational dose quantity calculations <20 MeV on the kerma approximation, which assumes that charged particle secondaries are locally deposited, or at least that charged particle equilibrium exists within the tally cell volume. However, with increasing neutron energy the kerma approximation may no longer be valid for some energetic secondaries such as protons. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX was used for all absorbed dose calculations. Transport models and collision-based energy deposition tallies were used for neutron energies >20 MeV. Both light and heavy ions (HIs) (carbon, nitrogen and oxygen recoil nuclei) were transported down to a lower energy limit (1 keV for light ions and 5 MeV for HIs). Track energy below the limit was assumed to be locally deposited. For neutron tracks <20 MeV, kerma factors were used to obtain absorbed dose. Results are presented for a discrete set of angles of incidence on an ICRU tissue slab phantom.

  18. A parametric model to describe neutron spectra around high-energy electron accelerators and its application in neutron spectrometry with Bonner Spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedogni, Roberto; Pelliccioni, Maurizio; Esposito, Adolfo

    2010-03-01

    Due to the increased interest of the scientific community in the applications of synchrotron light, there is an increasing demand of high-energy electron facilities, testified by the construction of several new facilities worldwide. The radiation protection around such facilities requires accurate experimental methods to determine the dose due to prompt radiation fields. Neutron fields, in particular, are the most complex to measure, because they extend in energy from thermal (10 -8 MeV) up to hundreds MeV and because the responses of dosemeters and survey meters usually have large energy dependence. The Bonner Spheres Spectrometer (BSS) is in practice the only instrument able to respond over the whole energy range of interest, and for this reason it is frequently used to derive neutron spectra and dosimetric quantities in accelerator workplaces. Nevertheless, complex unfolding algorithms are needed to derive the neutron spectra from the experimental BSS data. This paper presents a parametric model specially developed for the unfolding of the experimental data measured with BSS around high-energy electron accelerators. The work consists of the following stages: (1) Generation with the FLUKA code, of a set of neutron spectra representing the radiation environment around accelerators with different electron energies; (2) formulation of a parametric model able to describe these spectra, with particular attention to the high-energy component (>10 MeV), which may be responsible for a large part of the dose in workplaces; and (3) implementation of this model in an existing unfolding code.

  19. High-Dose Phenobarbital for Ohtahara Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Oral high-dose phenobarbital therapy was effective in the control of tonic spasms in a 1 month-old-infant with early infantile epileptic encephalopathy with suppression bursts (Ohtahara syndrome treated at Tokyo Metropolitan Hachioji Children’s Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.

  20. [Hopes of high dose-rate radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouillade, Charles; Favaudon, Vincent; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Romeo, Paul-Henri; Bourhis, Jean; Verrelle, Pierre; Devauchelle, Patrick; Patriarca, Annalisa; Heinrich, Sophie; Mazal, Alejandro; Dutreix, Marie

    2017-04-01

    In this review, we present the synthesis of the newly acquired knowledge concerning high dose-rate irradiations and the hopes that these new radiotherapy modalities give rise to. The results were presented at a recent symposium on the subject. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. Novel Large Area High Resolution Neutron Detector for the Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L

    2009-05-22

    Neutron scattering is a powerful technique that is critically important for materials science and structural biology applications. The knowledge gained from past developments has resulted in far-reaching advances in engineering, pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, to name a few. New facilities for neutron generation at much higher flux, such as the SNS at Oak Ridge, TN, will greatly enhance the capabilities of neutron scattering, with benefits that extend to many fields and include, for example, development of improved drug therapies and materials that are stronger, longer-lasting, and more impact-resistant. In order to fully realize this enhanced potential, however, higher neutron rates must be met with improved detection capabilities, particularly higher count rate capability in large size detectors, while maintaining practicality. We have developed a neutron detector with the technical and economic advantages to accomplish this goal. This new detector has a large sensitive area, offers 3D spatial resolution, high sensitivity and high count rate capability, and it is economical and practical to produce. The proposed detector technology is based on B-10 thin film conversion of neutrons in long straw-like gas detectors. A stack of many such detectors, each 1 meter in length, and 4 mm in diameter, has a stopping power that exceeds that of He-3 gas, contained at practical pressures within an area detector. With simple electronic readout methods, straw detector arrays can provide spatial resolution of 4 mm FWHM or better, and since an array detector of such form consists of several thousand individual elements per square meter, count rates in a 1 m^2 detector can reach 2?10^7 cps. Moreover, each individual event can be timetagged with a time resolution of less than 0.1 ?sec, allowing accurate identification of neutron energy by time of flight. Considering basic elemental cost, this novel neutron imaging detector can be commercially produced economically

  2. High Energy Neutron Induced Gamma Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D A; Johnson, M; Navratil, P

    2007-09-28

    N Division has an interest in improving the physics and accuracy of the gamma data it provides to its customers. It was asked to look into major gamma producing reactions for 14 MeV incident neutrons for several low-Z materials and determine whether LLNL's processed data files faithfully represent the current state of experimental and theoretical knowledge for these reactions. To address this, we surveyed the evaluations of the requested materials, made recommendations for the next ENDL release and noted isotopes that will require further experimental study. This process uncovered several major problems in our translation and processing of the ENDF formatted evaluations, most of which have been resolved.

  3. Neutron-gamma flux and dose calculations in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brovchenko Mariya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with Monte Carlo simulations, aiming to determine the neutron and gamma responses outside the vessel and in the basemat of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR. The model is based on the Tihange-I Belgian nuclear reactor. With a large set of information and measurements available, this reactor has the advantage to be easily modelled and allows validation based on the experimental measurements. Power distribution calculations were therefore performed with the MCNP code at IRSN and compared to the available in-core measurements. Results showed a good agreement between calculated and measured values over the whole core. In this paper, the methods and hypotheses used for the particle transport simulation from the fission distribution in the core to the detectors outside the vessel of the reactor are also summarized. The results of the simulations are presented including the neutron and gamma doses and flux energy spectra. MCNP6 computational results comparing JEFF3.1 and ENDF-B/VII.1 nuclear data evaluations and sensitivity of the results to some model parameters are presented.

  4. Simple high-pressure cell for neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Wei; Broholm, C.; Trevino, S. F.

    1995-02-01

    A high-pressure cell, capable of 8 kbar, is developed for neutron scattering. It can be used with ILL type orange cryostats to obtain a temperature as low as 1.5 K. The simple seal design described here can easily be adopted to other high-pressure applications.

  5. Dose conversion coefficients for neutron exposure to the lens of the human eye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manger, Ryan P [ORNL; Bellamy, Michael B [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for the lens of the human eye have been calculated for neutron exposure at energies from 1 x 10{sup -9} to 20 MeV and several standard orientations: anterior-to-posterior, rotational and right lateral. MCNPX version 2.6.0, a Monte Carlo-based particle transport package, was used to determine the energy deposited in the lens of the eye. The human eyeball model was updated by partitioning the lens into sensitive and insensitive volumes as the anterior portion (sensitive volume) of the lens being more radiosensitive and prone to cataract formation. The updated eye model was used with the adult UF-ORNL mathematical phantom in the MCNPX transport calculations.

  6. High Dose Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor Enhances Survival and Hematopoietic Reconstruction in Canines Irradiated by 2.3 Gy Mixed Fission Neutron and Gamma Ray%大剂量粒细胞集落刺激因子对2.3Gy中子γ射线混合照射比格犬存活和造血重建的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李明; 柳晓兰; 赵振虎; 王欣茹; 从玉文; 罗庆良; 余祖胤; 邢爽; 欧红玲; 熊国林; 谢玲; 赵燕芳; 韩阿如娜; 善亚君

    2011-01-01

    This study was purposed to evaluate the effects of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor(rhG-CSF)on hematopoietic reconstruction and survival in beagles exposed to mixed fission neutron and γ-ray.13 beagles were unilaterally exposed to single dose of 2.3 Gy 90% neutrons.The experiments were divided into 3 groups:irradiation control group(no any treatment,n=4),supportive care group(n=5)and rhG-CSF plus supportive care group(n=4,abbreviated as rhG-CSF group)in which the beagles were subcutaneously injected with 200 μg/kg of rhG-CSF early at half an hour and 24 hours post-irradiation respectively.The results showed that 2.3 Gy 90% neutron irradiation induced a severe acute radiation sickness of bone marrow type.The administration of rhG-CSF increased the survival rate from 60% in supportive care group to 100%.Twice injection of rhG-CSF in the first 24 hours reduced duration of neutropenia,enhanced neutrophil nadir and promoted neutrophil recovery when compared with control cohort administered clinical support.The number of colony-forming cells(CFU-GM,CFU-E,and BFU-E)in peripheral blood of rhG-CSF treated canines increased 2-to 5-fold relative to those of the supportive care group on day 3.All canines treated with rhG-CSF achieved hematopoietic reconstruction as evidenced by the pathological section of sternum while severe shortage of hemopoietic cells remained in the cohorts given supportive care alone.It is concluded that the combination of supportive care and high-dose rhG-CSF can accelerate hematopoietic recovery and enhance survival of dogs exposed to 2.3 Gy mixed neutron and gamma ray

  7. The neutron dose equivalent evaluation and shielding at the maze entrance of a Varian Clinac 23EX treatment room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xudong; Esquivel, Carlos; Nes, Elena; Shi Chengyu; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Charlton, Michael [University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States); South Texas Accelerated Research Therapeutics (START) Center for Cancer Care, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States); University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas 78229 (United States)

    2011-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the neutron and photon dose equivalent rate (H{sub n,D} and H{sub G}) at the outer maze entrance and the adjacent treatment console area after the installation of a Varian Clinac 23EX accelerator with a higher beam energy than its predecessor. The evaluation was based on measurements and comparison with several empirical calculations. The effectiveness of borated polyethylene (BPE) boards, as a maze wall lining material, on neutron dose and photon dose reduction is also reported. Methods: A single energy Varian 6 MV photon linear accelerator (linac) was replaced with a Varian Clinac 23EX accelerator capable of producing 18 MV photons in a vault originally designed for the former accelerator. In order to evaluate and redesign the shielding of the vault, the neutron dose equivalent H{sub n,D} was measured using an Andersson-Braun neutron Rem meter and the photon dose equivalent H{sub G} was measured using a Geiger Mueller and an ion chamber {gamma}-ray survey meter at the outer maze entrance. The measurement data were compared to semiempirical calculations such as the Kersey method, the modified Kersey method, and a newly proposed method by Falcao et al. Additional measurements were taken after BPE boards were installed on the maze walls as a neutron absorption lining material. Results: With the gantry head tilted close to the inner maze entrance and with the jaws closed, both neutron dose equivalent and photon dose equivalent reached their maximum. Compared to the measurement results, the Kersey method overestimates the neutron dose equivalent H{sub n,D} by about two to four times (calculation/measurement ratio{approx_equal}2.4-3.8). Falcao's method largely overestimates the H{sub n,D} (calculation/measurement ratio{approx_equal}3.9-5.5). The modified Kersey method has a calculation to measurement ratio about 0.6-0.9. The photon dose equivalent calculation including McGinley's capture gamma dose equivalent equation estimates about 77

  8. Material issues relating to high power spallation neutron sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futakawa, M.

    2015-02-01

    Innovative researches using neutrons are being performed at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF) at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), in which a mercury target system is installed for MW-class pulse spallation neutron sources. In order to produce neutrons by the spallation reaction, proton beams are injected into the mercury target. At the moment, when the intense proton beam hits the target, pressure waves are generated in mercury because of the abrupt heat deposition. The pressure waves interact with the target vessel, leading to negative pressure that may cause cavitation along the vessel wall, i.e. on the interface between liquid and solid metals. On the other hand, the structural materials are subjected to irradiation damage due to protons and neutrons, very high cycle fatigue damages and so-called "liquid metal embrittlement". That is, the structural materials must be said to be exposed to the extremely severe environments. In the paper, research and development relating to the material issues in the high power spallation neutron sources that has been performed so far at J-PARC is summarized.

  9. Thin film CdTe based neutron detectors with high thermal neutron efficiency and gamma rejection for security applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.; Murphy, J. W.; Kim, J.; Rozhdestvenskyy, S.; Mejia, I.; Park, H.; Allee, D. R.; Quevedo-Lopez, M.; Gnade, B.

    2016-12-01

    Solid-state neutron detectors offer an alternative to 3He based detectors, but suffer from limited neutron efficiencies that make their use in security applications impractical. Solid-state neutron detectors based on single crystal silicon also have relatively high gamma-ray efficiencies that lead to false positives. Thin film polycrystalline CdTe based detectors require less complex processing with significantly lower gamma-ray efficiencies. Advanced geometries can also be implemented to achieve high thermal neutron efficiencies competitive with silicon based technology. This study evaluates these strategies by simulation and experimentation and demonstrates an approach to achieve >10% intrinsic efficiency with <10-6 gamma-ray efficiency.

  10. Response of neutron dosemeters in radiation protection environments: an investigation of techniques to improve estimates of dose equivalent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naismith, O.F.; Thomas, D.J. [National Physical Lab., Teddington (United Kingdom); Siebert, B.R.L. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany)

    1997-09-01

    The response of practicable neutron dosemeters for routine use generally does not match the conversion function from fluence for radiation protection quantities such as the ambient dose equivalent. As a consequence, significant errors may be encountered when monitoring in a neutron energy spectrum different from that in which the dosemeter was calibrated, which is almost inevitably the case. A database of neutron energy spectra, detector response functions, and dosimetric conversion factors has been developed, and has been used to investigate the extent of this problem. The paper examines various ways of improving dosemeter response by `ranking` spectra and deriving correction factors based upon this ordering. In the case of area monitoring, a combination of two responses (e.g. a rem meter and TEPC) may serve to improve the measurement of dose equivalent. (author).

  11. Optimum design of a moderator system based on dose calculation for an accelerator driven Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, R; Hiraga, F; Kiyanagi, Y

    2014-06-01

    An accelerator based BNCT has been desired because of its therapeutic convenience. However, optimal design of a neutron moderator system is still one of the issues. Therefore, detailed studies on materials consisting of the moderator system are necessary to obtain the optimal condition. In this study, the epithermal neutron flux and the RBE dose have been calculated as the indicators to look for optimal materials for the filter and the moderator. As a result, it was found that a combination of MgF2 moderator with Fe filter gave best performance, and the moderator system gave a dose ratio greater than 3 and an epithermal neutron flux over 1.0×10(9)cm(-2)s(-1).

  12. Evaluation of the spectrometric and dose characteristics of neutron fields inside the Russian segment of the ISS by fission detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shurshakov, V. A.; Vorob'ev, I. B.; Nikolaev, V. A.; Lyagushin, V. I.; Akatov, Yu. A.; Kushin, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    The results of measuring the dose and the energy spectrum of neutrons inside the Russian segment of the International Space Station (ISS) from March 21 until November 10, 2002 are presented. Statistically reliable results of measurement are obtained by using thorium- and uranium-based fission detectors with cadmium and boron filters. The kits of the detectors with filters have been arranged in three compartments within assembled passive detectors in the BRADOS space experiment. The ambient dose rate H* = 139 μSv day and an energy spectrum of neutrons in the range of 10-2-104 MeV is obtained as average for the ISS compartments and is compared with the measurements carried out inside the compartments of the MIR space station. Recommendations on how to improve the procedure for using the fission detectors to measure the characteristics of neutron fields inside the compartments of space stations are formulated.

  13. Study on spatial resolution of micromegas as a neutron detector under condition of high neutron flux and γ ray background

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wen-Xin; ZHANG Yi; WANG Ji-Jin; HU Bi-Tao

    2009-01-01

    In this paper Micromegas has been designed to detect neutrons. The simulation of the spatial reso-lution of Micromegas as neutron detector is carried out by GEANT4 toolkit. The neutron track reconstruction method based on the time coincidence technology is employed in the present work. The influence of the flux of incident 14 MeV neutron and high gamma background on the spatial resolution is carefully studied. Our results show that the spatial resolution of the detector is sensitive to the neutron flux, but insensitive to the intensity of γ background if the neutron track reconstruction method proposed by our group is used. The γ insensitivity makes it possible for us to use the Micromegas detector under condition which has high γ-rays background.

  14. First observation of trapped high-field seeking ultracold neutron spin states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daum, M., E-mail: manfred.daum@psi.ch [PSI, Paul-Scherrer-Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); TUM, Physik-Department Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Excellence Cluster Universe, Munich (Germany); Department of Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4714 (United States); Fierlinger, P. [TUM, Physik-Department Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Excellence Cluster Universe, Munich (Germany); Franke, B. [PSI, Paul-Scherrer-Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); TUM, Physik-Department Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Excellence Cluster Universe, Munich (Germany); Geltenbort, P. [ILL, Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble (France); Goeltl, L. [PSI, Paul-Scherrer-Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Gutsmiedl, E. [TUM, Physik-Department Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Excellence Cluster Universe, Munich (Germany); Karch, J. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Kessler, G. [TUM, Physik-Department Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Excellence Cluster Universe, Munich (Germany); Kirch, K. [PSI, Paul-Scherrer-Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); IPP, Institut f. Teilchenphysik, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Koch, H.-C.; Kraft, A.; Lauer, T. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Lauss, B. [PSI, Paul-Scherrer-Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Pierre, E. [LPC, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, ENSICAEN-CNRS/IN2P3, Caen (France); Pignol, G. [LPSC, Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie, UJF-CNRS/IN2P3-INPG, Grenoble (France); Reggiani, D.; Schmidt-Wellenburg, P. [PSI, Paul-Scherrer-Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Sobolev, Yu.; Zechlau, T. [Institut fuer Physik, Johannes-Gutenberg-Universitaet, Mainz (Germany); Zsigmond, G. [PSI, Paul-Scherrer-Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2011-10-25

    Ultracold neutrons were stored in a volume, using a magnetic dipole field shutter. Radial confinement was provided by material walls. Low-field seeking neutrons were axially confined above the magnetic field. High-field seeking neutrons are trapped inside the magnetic field. They can systematically shift the measured neutron lifetime to lower values in experiments with magnetic confinement.

  15. Comparison of Out-Of-Field Neutron Equivalent Doses in Scanning Carbon and Proton Therapies for Cranial Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Athar, B.; Henker, K.; Jäkel, O.

    Purpose: The purpose of this analysis is to compare the secondary neutron lateral doses from scanning carbon and proton beam therapies. Method and Materials: We simulated secondary neutron doses for out-of-field organs in an 11-year old male patient. Scanned carbon and proton beams were simulated...... separately using Monte Carlo techniques. We have used circular aperture field of 6 cm in diameter as a representative field. The tumor was assumed to be in the cranium. The range and modulation width for both carbon and proton beams were set to 15 cm and 10 cm, respectively. Results: In carbon therapy......, absorbed neutron doses to tonsils and pharynx close to the field-edge were found to be 5x10-4 mSv/GyE and 4x10-4 mSv/GyE, respectively. Whereas, neutron equivalent doses to tonsils and pharynx were estimated to be 0.57mSv/GyE and 0.55 mSv/GyE in scanned proton therapy, respectively. In heavy ion carbon...

  16. Comparison of Out-Of-Field Neutron Equivalent Doses in Scanning Carbon and Proton Therapies for Cranial Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Athar, B.; Henker, K.; Jäkel, O.;

    Purpose: The purpose of this analysis is to compare the secondary neutron lateral doses from scanning carbon and proton beam therapies. Method and Materials: We simulated secondary neutron doses for out-of-field organs in an 11-year old male patient. Scanned carbon and proton beams were simulated...... separately using Monte Carlo techniques. We have used circular aperture field of 6 cm in diameter as a representative field. The tumor was assumed to be in the cranium. The range and modulation width for both carbon and proton beams were set to 15 cm and 10 cm, respectively. Results: In carbon therapy......, absorbed neutron doses to tonsils and pharynx close to the field-edge were found to be 5x10-4 mSv/GyE and 4x10-4 mSv/GyE, respectively. Whereas, neutron equivalent doses to tonsils and pharynx were estimated to be 0.57mSv/GyE and 0.55 mSv/GyE in scanned proton therapy, respectively. In heavy ion carbon...

  17. Characterization of Neutron and Gamma Dose in the Irradiation Cell of Texas A and M University Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevan, Latha; Reece, Warren D. [Nuclear Science Center, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Chirayath, Sunil S. [Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Aghara, Sukesh [Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, Texas (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code was used to develop a three dimensional computational model of the Texas A and M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR) operating against the irradiation (dry cell) at steady state thermal power of 1 MW. The geometry of the NSCR core and the dry cell were modeled in detail. NSCR is used for a wide variety of experiments that utilizes the dry cell for neutron as well as gamma irradiation of samples. Information on the neutron and gamma radiation environment inside the dry cell is required to facilitate irradiation of samples. This paper presents the computed neutron flux, neutron and gamma dose rate, and foil reaction rates in the dry cell, obtained through MCNP5 simulations of the NSCR core. The neutron flux was measured using foil activation method and the reaction rates obtained from {sup 197}Au(n,{gamma}){sup 198}Au and {sup 54}Fe(n,p){sup 54}Mn were compared with the model and they showed agreement within {approx} 20%. The gamma dose rate at selected locations inside the dry cell was measured using radiochromic films and the results indicate slightly higher dose rates than predicted from the model. This is because the model calculated only prompt gamma dose rates during reactor operation while the radiochromic films measured gammas from activation products and fission product decayed gammas. The model was also used to calculate the neutron energy spectra for the energy range from 0.001 eV- 20 MeV. (authors)

  18. Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.; Kamenev, K. V. [Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Sokolov, D. A.; Huxley, A. D. [SUPA, Centre for Science at Extreme Conditions and School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements typically require two orders of magnitude longer data collection times and larger sample sizes than neutron diffraction studies. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on pressurised samples are particularly challenging since standard high-pressure apparatus restricts sample volume, attenuates the incident and scattered beams, and contributes background scattering. Here, we present the design of a large volume two-layered piston-cylinder pressure cell with optimised transmission for inelastic neutron scattering experiments. The design and the materials selected for the construction of the cell enable its safe use to a pressure of 1.8 GPa with a sample volume in excess of 400 mm{sup 3}. The design of the piston seal eliminates the need for a sample container, thus providing a larger sample volume and reduced absorption. The integrated electrical plug with a manganin pressure gauge offers an accurate measurement of pressure over the whole range of operational temperatures. The performance of the cell is demonstrated by an inelastic neutron scattering study of UGe{sub 2}.

  19. Large volume high-pressure cell for inelastic neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Sokolov, D. A.; Huxley, A. D.; Kamenev, K. V.

    2011-07-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements typically require two orders of magnitude longer data collection times and larger sample sizes than neutron diffraction studies. Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on pressurised samples are particularly challenging since standard high-pressure apparatus restricts sample volume, attenuates the incident and scattered beams, and contributes background scattering. Here, we present the design of a large volume two-layered piston-cylinder pressure cell with optimised transmission for inelastic neutron scattering experiments. The design and the materials selected for the construction of the cell enable its safe use to a pressure of 1.8 GPa with a sample volume in excess of 400 mm3. The design of the piston seal eliminates the need for a sample container, thus providing a larger sample volume and reduced absorption. The integrated electrical plug with a manganin pressure gauge offers an accurate measurement of pressure over the whole range of operational temperatures. The performance of the cell is demonstrated by an inelastic neutron scattering study of UGe2.

  20. Using anisotropies in prompt fission neutron coincidences to assess the neutron multiplication of highly multiplying subcritical plutonium assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, J. M.; Mattingly, J.

    2016-07-01

    There is a significant and well-known anisotropy between the prompt neutrons emitted from a single fission event; these neutrons are most likely to be observed at angles near 0° or 180° relative to each other. However, the propagation of this anisotropy through different generations of a fission chain reaction has not been previously studied. We have measured this anisotropy in neutron-neutron coincidences from a subcritical highly-multiplying assembly of plutonium metal. The assembly was a 4.5 kg α-phase plutonium metal sphere composed of 94% 239Pu and 6% 240Pu by mass. Data were collected using two EJ-309 liquid scintillators and two EJ-299 plastic scintillators. The angular distribution of neutron-neutron coincidences was measured at 90° and 180° and found to be largely isotropic. Simulations were performed using MCNPX-PoliMi of similar plutonium metal spheres of varying sizes and a correlation between the neutron multiplication of the assembly and the anisotropy of neutron-neutron coincidences was observed. In principle, this correlation could be used to assess the neutron multiplication of an unknown assembly.

  1. Properties of neutron-rich hafnium high-spin isomers

    CERN Document Server

    Tungate, G; Walker, P M; Neyens, G; Billowes, J; Flanagan, K; Koester, U H; Litvinov, Y

    It is proposed to study highly-excited multi-quasiparticle isomers in neutron-rich hafnium (Z=72) isotopes. Long half-lives have already been measured for such isomers in the storage ring at GSI, ensuring their accessibility with ISOL production. The present proposal focuses on:\\\\ (i) an on-line experiment to measure isomer properties in $^{183}$Hf and $^{184}$Hf, and\\\\ (ii) an off-line molecular breakup test using REXTRAP, to provide Hf$^{+}$ beams for future laser spectroscopy and greater sensitivity for the future study of more neutron-rich isotopes.

  2. Intense neutron source: high-voltage power supply specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riedel, A.A.

    1980-08-01

    This report explains the need for and sets forth the electrical, mechanical and safety specifications for a high-voltage power supply to be used with the intense neutron source. It contains sufficient information for a supplier to bid on such a power supply.

  3. Investigation of Acrylic Acid at High Pressure using Neutron Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnston, Blair F.; Marshall, William G.; Parsons, Simon

    2014-01-01

    This article details the exploration of perdeuterated acrylic acid at high pressure using neutron diffraction. The structural changes that occur in acrylic acid-d4 are followed via diffraction and rationalised using the Pixel method. Acrylic acid undergoes a reconstructive phase transition to a n...

  4. Investigation of Methacrylic Acid at High Pressure Using Neutron Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marshall, William G.; Urquhart, Andrew; Oswald, Iain D. H.

    2015-01-01

    This article shows that pressure can be a low-intensity route to the synthesis of polymethacrylic acid. The exploration of perdeuterated methacrylic acid at high pressure using neutron diffraction reveals that methacrylic acid exhibits two polymorphic phase transformations at relatively low press...

  5. High-dose erythropoietin for tissue protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anton; Lundby, Carsten; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The discovery of potential anti-apoptotic and cytoprotective effects of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) has led to clinical trials investigating the use of high-dose, short-term rHuEPO therapy for tissue protection in conditions such as stroke and myocardial infarction....... Experimental studies have been favourable, but the clinical efficacy has yet to be validated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We have reviewed clinical studies regarding the use of high-dose, short-term rHuEPO therapy for tissue protection in humans with the purpose to detail the safety and efficacy of r...... no effect of rHuEPO therapy on measures of tissue protection. Five trials including 1025 patients reported safety concerns in the form of increased mortality or adverse event rates. No studies reported reduced mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence is sparse to support a tissue-protective benefit of r...

  6. Comparison between steel and lead shieldings for radiotherapy rooms regarding neutron doses to patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, M.G.; Rebello, W.F.; Andrade, E.R.; Medeiros, M.P.C.; Mendes, R.M.S.; Braga, K.L.; Gomes, R.G., E-mail: eng.cavaliere@gmail.com, E-mail: ggrprojetos@gmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Secao de Engenharia Nuclear; Silva, A.X., E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The NCRP Report No. 151, Structural Shielding Design and Evaluation for Megavoltage X- and Gamma-Ray Radiotherapy Facilities, considers, in shielding calculations for radiotherapy rooms, the use of lead and/or steel to be applied on bunker walls. The NCRP Report calculations were performed foreseeing a better protection of people outside the radiotherapy room. However, contribution of lead and steel to patient dose should be taken into account for radioprotection purposes. This work presents calculations performed by MCNPX code in analyzing the Ambient Dose Equivalent due to neutron, H *(10){sub n}, within a radiotherapy room, in the patients area, considering the use of additional shielding of 1 TVL of lead or 1 TVL of steel, positioned at the inner faces of walls and ceiling of a bunker. The head of the linear accelerator Varian 2100/2300 C/D was modeled working at 18MeV, with 5 x 5 cm{sup 2}, 10 x 10 cm{sup 2}, 20 x 20 cm{sup 2}, 30 x 30 cm{sup 2} and 40 x 40 cm{sup 2} openings for jaws and MLC and operating in eight gantry's angles. This study shows that the use of lead generates an average value of H *(10){sub n} at patients area, 8.02% higher than the expected when using steel. Further studies should be performed based on experimental data for comparison with those from MCNPX simulation. (author)

  7. SU-E-T-108: Development of a Novel Clinical Neutron Dose Monitor for Proton Therapy Based On Twin TLD500 Chips in a Small PE Moderator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hentschel, R; Mukherjee, B [Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum Essen (WPE)gGmbH, Essen (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: In proton therapy, it could be desirable to measure out-of-field fast neutron doses at critical locations near and outside the patient body. Methods: The working principle of a novel clinical neutron dose monitor is verified by MCNPX simulation. The device is based on a small PE moderator of just 5.5cm side length for easy handling covered with a thermal neutron suppression layer. In the simulation, a polystyrene phantom is bombarded with a standard proton beam. The secondary thermal neutron flux produced inside the moderator by the impinging fast neutrons from the treatment volume is estimated by pairs of α-Al2O3:C (TLD500) chips which are evaluated offline after the treatment either by TL or OSL methods. The first chip is wrapped with 0.5mm natural Gadolinium foil converting the thermal neutrons to gammas via (n,γ) reaction. The second chip is wrapped with a dummy material. The chip centers have a distance of 2cm from each other. Results: The simulation shows that the difference of gamma doses in the TLD500 chips is correlated to the mean fast neutron dose delivered to the moderator material. Different outer shielding materials have been studied. 0.5mm Cadmium shielding is preferred for cost reasons and convenience. Replacement of PE moderator material by other materials like lead or iron at any place is unfavorable. The spatial orientation of the moderator cube is uncritical. Using variance reduction techniques like splitting/Russian roulette, the TLD500 gamma dose simulation give positive differences up to distances of 0.5m from the treatment volume. Conclusion: Applicability and basic layout of a novel clinical neutron dose monitor are demonstrated. The monitor measures PE neutron doses at locations outside the patient body up to distances of 0.5m from the treatment volume. Tissue neutron doses may be calculated using neutron kerma factors.

  8. Low-temperature low-dose neutron irradiation effects on Brush Wellman S65-C and Kawechi Berylco P0 beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, L.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The mechanical property results for two high quality beryllium materials subjected to low temperature, low dose neutron irradiation in water moderated reactors are presented. Materials chosen were the S65-C ITER candidate material produced by Brush Wellman, and Kawecki Berylco Industries P0 beryllium. Both materials were processed by vacuum hot pressing. Mini sheet tensile and thermal diffusivity specimens were irradiated in the temperature range of {approximately}100--275 C from a fast (E > 0.1 MeV) neutron dose of 0.05 to 1.0 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. As expected from earlier work on beryllium, both materials underwent significant embrittlement with corresponding reduction in ductility and increased strength. Both thermal diffusivity and volumetric expansion were measured and found to be negligible in this temperature and fluence range. Of significance from this work is that while both materials rapidly embrittle at these ITER relevant irradiation conditions, some ductility (>1--2%) remains, which contrasts with a body of earlier work including recent work on the Brush-Wellman S65-C material irradiated to slightly higher neutron fluence.

  9. Electron Scattering From High-Momentum Neutrons in Deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.V. Klimenko; S.E. Kuhn

    2005-10-12

    We report results from an experiment measuring the semi-inclusive reaction D(e,e'p{sub s}) where the proton p{sub s} is moving at a large angle relative to the momentum transfer. If we assume that the proton was a spectator to the reaction taking place on the neutron in deuterium, the initial state of that neutron can be inferred. This method, known as spectator tagging, can be used to study electron scattering from high-momentum (off-shell) neutrons in deuterium. The data were taken with a 5.765 GeV electron beam on a deuterium target in Jefferson Laboratory's Hall B, using the CLAS detector. A reduced cross section was extracted for different values of final-state missing mass W*, backward proton momentum {rvec p}{sub s} and momentum transfer Q{sup 2}. The data are compared to a simple PWIA spectator model. A strong enhancement in the data observed at transverse kinematics is not reproduced by the PWIA model. This enhancement can likely be associated with the contribution of final state interactions (FSI) that were not incorporated into the model. A ''bound neutron structure function'' F{sub 2n}{sup eff} was extracted as a function of W* and the scaling variable x* at extreme backward kinematics, where effects of FSI appear to be smaller. For p{sub s} > 400 MeV/c, where the neutron is far off-shell, the model overestimates the value of F{sub 2n}{sup eff} in the region of x* between 0.25 and 0.6. A modification of the bound neutron structure function is one of possible effects that can cause the observed deviation.

  10. DIANE, a simulation code for the interaction of neutrons with living tissues. Application to low doses of fast neutrons on human tumoral cells; DIANE, un code de simulation de l'interaction des neutrons avec la matiere vivante. Applications aux faibles doses de neutrons rapides sur des cellules tumorales humaines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nenot, M.L

    2003-07-15

    Our work deals with the irradiation of cells and living tissues by 14 MeV neutrons at very low doses (a few 10{sup -2} Gy). Such experiments require an accurate knowledge of the values of neutron dose rates and fluences at the level of cell cultures. We have performed measurements of fluence rates through an activation method applied to gold and copper foils. The fluence rate is deduced from the gamma rays emitted by the irradiated foils. Neutron doses and dose rates have been measured through varied methods: PIN diodes, ionization tissue equivalent chambers, and Geiger-Mueller counters. We have designed the DIANE code to simulate the impact of energetic neutrons on cells. This code can be used with isolated cells or macroscopic tissues, it takes into account the roles of the ionisation electrons produced by recoil nuclei entering the cell. This point is all the more important since recent works have highlighted the impact of very low energy electrons on DNA. (A.C.)

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of depth-dose distribution in several organic models for boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, T. [Atomic Energy Research Laboratory, Musashi Institute of Technology, 971 Ozenji, Asao-ku, Kawasaki-shi 215 0013 (Japan)], E-mail: mtetsuo@atom.musashi-tech.ac.jp

    2007-09-21

    Monte Carlo simulations are performed to evaluate depth-dose distributions for possible treatment of cancers by boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). The ICRU computational model of ADAM and EVA was used as a phantom to simulate tumors at a depth of 5 cm in central regions of the lungs, liver and pancreas. Tumors of the prostate and osteosarcoma were also centered at the depth of 4.5 and 2.5 cm in the phantom models. The epithermal neutron beam from a research reactor was the primary neutron source for the MCNP calculation of the depth-dose distributions in those cancer models. For brain tumor irradiations, the whole-body dose was also evaluated. The MCNP simulations suggested that a lethal dose of 50 Gy to the tumors can be achieved without reaching the tolerance dose of 25 Gy to normal tissue. The whole-body phantom calculations also showed that the BNCT could be applied for brain tumors without significant damage to whole-body organs.

  12. RBE values for colo-rectal injury after caesium 137 gamma-ray and neutron irradiation. 1. Single doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, N.H.A.; Denekamp, J.; Maughan, R.L. (Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (UK). Gray Lab.)

    1983-04-01

    Colo-rectal damage in mice has been assessed after caesium ..gamma.. irradiation and 3 MeV neutrons given as single doses. Several assays were used, including body weight changes, faecal deformity and lethality. Dose response curves were constructed for each assay at times ranging from 10 days to 16 months after irradiation. An initial loss of weight at 10-20 days was presumably related to epithelial denudation, but a dose-dependent weight reduction (compared with controls) persisted over the animals' life span. Mice died progressively after localised pelvic ..gamma.. irradiation; there was no sharp demarcation between an early and late phase of lethal injury. Death resulted from intestinal stricture or stenosis. The time course for lethality was qualitatively different after neutron irradiation, with little progression of damage between 5 and 11 months. Faecal deformity was detectable as a higher proportion of small pellets when the rectum became constricted by fibrosis. No significant faecal deformity was observed before 6 months after which time dose response curves could be obtained. The RBE for early damage (assessed at 1-3 months) was 2.2-2.7, falling to 1.7-1.9 for late damage (determined at 10-15 months) over the range of neutron doses of 7.5-12 Gy.

  13. Dynamics of elements in soil treated with increasing doses sewage sludge for instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Helder de; Mortatti, Jefferson; Vendramini, Diego; Lopes, Renato A.; Nolasco, Murilo M. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Isotopos Estaveis]. E-mail: helder@cena.usp.br; Sarries, Gabriel A. [Escola Superior de Agricultura ' Luiz de Queiroz' (ESALQ/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Exatas]. E-mail: gabriel@carpa.ciagri.usp.br; Furlan, Adriana [UNESP, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias e Ciencias Exatas. Dept. de Petrologia e Metalogenia]. E-mail: adriana_furlangumiere@yahoo.com.br

    2007-07-01

    In this work the dynamics of the elements was analyzed The, Br, Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, Hf, La, In the, Sb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Th, U, Yb and Zn in a profile of a red-yellow latossolo, in the depths of 0-5, 5-10, 10-30 and 30-50 cm, and dose of the biosolid of 0, 25, 124 and 375 t ha{sup -1}, of the station of treatment of sewer of Barueri, Sao Paulo. The experiment was carried out in areas of 3,05 m{sup 2} in the times of 2,2; 4,0; 6,6; 14,3 and 21 months. For analysis of the elementary composition, it was used of the analysis technique by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The experiment was submitted under normal tropical conditions in a forest station in Itatinga, Sao Paulo, of the University of Sao Paulo. For better details, the factors depth, doses and times statistical analyses of the results of the elementary composition of the soil samples were made. For all the biossolid doses conditioned with polymeric and applied in the soil, the composition of 17 of the 18 elements in the soil were not altered, with exception for Cr in the studied times. The elements As, Br, Ce, Co, Fe, Hf, La, Sm, Ta, Th, U and Yb presented higher levels in the deepest layers of soil; already the elements Cr, In the, Sb and Zn presented higher concentrations in the superficial layers. (author)

  14. High pressure gas vessels for neutron scattering experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Done, R; Evans, B E; Bowden, Z A

    2010-01-01

    The combination of high pressure techniques with neutron scattering proves to be a powerful tool for studying the phase transitions and physical properties of solids in terms of inter-atomic distances. In our report we are going to review a high pressure technique based on a gas medium compression. This technique covers the pressure range up to ~0.7GPa (in special cases 1.4GPa) and typically uses compressed helium gas as the pressure medium. We are going to look briefly at scientific areas where high pressure gas vessels are intensively used in neutron scattering experiments. After that we are going to describe the current situation in high pressure gas technology; specifically looking at materials of construction, designs of seals and pressure vessels and the equipment used for generating high pressure gas.

  15. Measurement of cosmic-ray neutron dose onboard a polar route flight from New York to Seoul.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Hiroshi; Lee, Jaejin; Yajima, Kazuaki; Hwang, Jung A; Sakai, Kazuo

    2011-07-01

    Exposure to cosmic radiation in operation of a jet aircraft is considered to be a part of the occupational exposure. Cosmic radiation doses received in aviation are generally evaluated by numerical model simulations. The precision of the model calculation should be verified by measurements. From the viewpoint of radiological protection, neutrons are the most contributing radiation component and have to be precisely measured. Neutron measurements were thus performed in a long-haul flight using a relatively new transportable neutron monitor (WENDI-II) which responds fairly well to the cosmic-ray neutrons. The in-flight measurement was carried out on 5-6 November 2009 on a polar route flight from New York/John F. Kennedy airport to Seoul/Incheon airport. The flying time was ~14 h. The observations obtained as 1 cm ambient dose equivalent were compared with model calculations using a computer program developed by the authors for the calculation of aviation route doses 'JISCARD EX'. Good agreements between the measured and calculated values were observed over the polar route where the geomagnetic cut-off rigidity is the lowest.

  16. An Analytical Model of Leakage Neutron Equivalent Dose for Passively-Scattered Proton Radiotherapy and Validation with Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Christopher; Newhauser, Wayne, E-mail: newhauser@lsu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, 202 Nicholson Hall, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, 4950 Essen Lane, Baton Rouge, LA 70809 (United States); Farah, Jad [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, Service de Dosimétrie Externe, BP-17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2015-05-18

    Exposure to stray neutrons increases the risk of second cancer development after proton therapy. Previously reported analytical models of this exposure were difficult to configure and had not been investigated below 100 MeV proton energy. The purposes of this study were to test an analytical model of neutron equivalent dose per therapeutic absorbed dose (H/D) at 75 MeV and to improve the model by reducing the number of configuration parameters and making it continuous in proton energy from 100 to 250 MeV. To develop the analytical model, we used previously published H/D values in water from Monte Carlo simulations of a general-purpose beamline for proton energies from 100 to 250 MeV. We also configured and tested the model on in-air neutron equivalent doses measured for a 75 MeV ocular beamline. Predicted H/D values from the analytical model and Monte Carlo agreed well from 100 to 250 MeV (10% average difference). Predicted H/D values from the analytical model also agreed well with measurements at 75 MeV (15% average difference). The results indicate that analytical models can give fast, reliable calculations of neutron exposure after proton therapy. This ability is absent in treatment planning systems but vital to second cancer risk estimation.

  17. Dose-response curve for blood exposed to gamma-neutron mixed field by conventional cytogenetic method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Jose Odinilson de C.; Souza, Priscilla L.G.; Santos, Joelan A.L.; Vilela, Eudice C.; Lima, Fabiana F., E-mail: jodinilson@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: fflima@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: jasantos@cnen.gov.b [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Calixto, Merilane S.; Santos, Neide, E-mail: santos_neide@yahoo.com.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Genetica

    2009-07-01

    There is increasing concern about airline crew members (about one million worldwide) are exposed to measurable neutrons doses. Historically, cytogenetic biodosimetry assays have been based on quantifying asymmetrical chromosome alterations (dicentrics, centric rings and acentric fragments) in mytogen-stimulated T-lymphocytes in their first mitosis after radiation exposure. Increased levels of chromosome damage in peripheral blood lymphocytes are a sensitive indicator of radiation exposure and they are routinely exploited for assessing radiation absorbed dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Since radiological accidents are not common, not all nations feel that it is economically justified to maintain biodosimetry competence. However, dependable access to biological dosimetry capabilities is completely critical in event of an accident. In this paper the dose-response curve was measured for the induction of chromosomal alterations in peripheral blood lymphocytes after chronic exposure in vitro to neutron-gamma mixes field. Blood was obtained from one healthy donor and exposed to two neutron-gamma mixed field from sources {sup 241}AmBe (20 Ci) at the Neutron Calibration Laboratory (NCL-CRCN/NE-PE-Brazil). The evaluated absorbed doses were 0.2 Gy; 1.0 Gy and 2.5 Gy. The dicentric chromosomes were observed at metaphase, following colcemid accumulation and 1000 well-spread metaphase figures were analyzed for the presence of dicentrics by two experienced scorers after painted by giemsa 5%. Our preliminary results showed a linear dependence between radiations absorbed dose and dicentric chromosomes frequencies. Dose-response curve described in this paper will contribute to the construction of calibration curve that will be used in our laboratory for biological dosimetry. (author)

  18. Evaluation of dose equivalent by the electronic personal dosemeter for neutron 'Saphydose-N' at different workplaces of nuclear facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Q; Lahaye, T

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of measurements made with the electronic personal neutron Saphydose-N during the four campaigns of the European contract EVIDOS (EValuation of Individual DOSimetry in mixed neutron and photon radiation fields). These measurements were performed at Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) in France (C0), at the Krümmel Nuclear Power Plant in Germany (C1), at the VENUS Research Reactor and the Belgonucléaire fuel processing plant in Belgium (C2) and at the Ringhals Nuclear Power Plant in Sweden (C3). The results for Saphydose-N are compared with reference values for dose equivalent.

  19. Electron Scattering From a High-Momentum Neutron in Deuterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klimenko, Alexei [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2004-05-01

    The deuterium nucleus is a system of two nucleons (proton and neutron) bound together. The configuration of the system is described by a quantum-mechanical wave function and the state of the nucleons at a given time is not know a priori. However, by detecting a backward going proton of moderate momentum in coincidence with a reaction taking place on the neutron in deuterium, the initial state of that neutron can be inferred if we assume that the proton was a spectator to the reaction. This method, known as spectator tagging, was used to study the electron scattering from high-momentum neutrons in deuterium. The data were taken with a 5.765 GeV polarized electron beam on a deuterium target in Jefferson Laboratory's Hall B, using the CLAS detector. The accumulated data cover a wide kinematic range, reaching values of the invariant mass of the unobserved final state W* up to 3 GeV. A data sample of approximately 5 - 105 events, with protons detected at large scattering angles (as high as 136 degrees) in coincidence with the forward electrons, was selected. The product of the neutron structure function with the initial nucleon momentum distribution F2n. S was extracted for different values of W*, backward proton momenta ps and momentum transfer Q2. The data were compared to a calculation based on the spectator approximation and using the free nucleon form factors and structure functions. A strong enhancement in the data, not reproduced by the model, was observed at cos(thetapq) > -0.3 (where theta{sub pq} is the proton scattering angle relative to the direction of the momentum transfer) and can be associated with the contribution of final state interactions (FSI) that were not incorporated into the model. The bound nucleon structure function F2n was studied in the region cos(thetapq) < -0.3 as a function of W* and scaling variable x*. At high spectator proton momenta the struck neutron is

  20. Report on MPACT Deliverable M3FT-16LA040106035 (High Dose Evaluation of Improved PDT Detector Pod)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menlove, Howard Olsen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henzlova, Daniela [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-18

    This report provides the results for the initial high gamma dose tests for the boron-10 plate detector that was fabricated by PDT, Inc. under contract to LANL The specifications for the detector were developed using MCNP code simulations and prior experimental tests at LANL. The goal in the development was to provide high neutron detection efficiency together with gamma-ray resistance at very high gamma dose levels that are characteristic of the electrochemical fuel processing activity.

  1. EURISOL Multi-MW Target Station - MAFF Configuration - Neutron Fluxes, Fission Rates, Dose Rates and Activation

    CERN Document Server

    Luis, R; Goncalves, I. F; Vaz, P; Kadi, Y; Kharoua, C; Rocca, R; Bermudez, J; Tecchio, L; Negoita, F; Ene, D; David, J.C

    The EURISOL (The EURopean Isotope Separation On-Line Radioactive Ion Beam) project aims atproducing high intensity radioactive ion beams produced by neutron-induced fission on fissile targets(235U) surrounding a liquid mercury converter. A proton beam of 1GeV and 4MW impinges on theconverter, generating, by spallation reactions, high neutron fluxes that induce fission in thesurrounding fissile targets.In this work the state-of-the-art Monte Carlo codes MCNPX and FLUKA were used to assess theneutronics performance of the system, which geometry, inspired in the MAFF concept, allows aversatile manipulation of the fission targets. The first objective of the study was to optimize thegeometry and the materials used in the fuel and reflector elements of the system, in order to achievethe highest possible fission rates. Indeed, it is shown that the appropriate combination of fission targetmaterial and surrounding reflector material leads to the aimed value of 1015 fissions/s per fissiontarget. The second part of this...

  2. Amphotericin B for cryptococcal meningitis in HIV positive patients: Low dose versus high dose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeshwari S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the safety and efficacy of low dose vs high dose of amphotericin B in cryptococcal meningitis associated with HIV infection. Materials and Methods: Retrospective data of patients admitted with clinical diagnosis with or without microbiological evidence of cryptococcal meningitis was collected from Jan 2000-Mar 2006. Patients′ details were collected in a proforma which included patient′s age, weight, signs and symptoms of disease and microbiological report (blood and CSF analysis. Data also included coexisting disease; concomitant medications taken along with amphotericin B. Adverse drug reactions which occurred during the period of treatment were recorded. Patients were grouped as low dose group and high dose group depending on the dose of amphotericin B given for the treatment of cryptococcal meningitis. Patients who received amphotericin B at doses of 0.33 to 0.64 mg/kg body weight per day were categorized under low dose group and patients who received amphotericin B at doses of 0.7 to 1.1 mg/kg/day were categorized under high dose group. All data were pooled and analyzed between the groups using chi square test. Result: Total number of patients included in the study were 38, 26 in the low dose group and 12 in the high dose group. In the low dose group, 20 were males and six were females, in the high dose group eight were males and four were females. The commonest underlying diseases were tuberculosis (17 in low dose group, nine in high dose group, Pneumocystis carinii (jeroveci pneumonia (16 in low dose group, seven in high dose group and oral candidiasis (eight in low dose group, seven in high dose group, Toxoplasmosis (three in low dose group, one in high dose group, hypertension (1 in group A and diabetes mellitus (1 in group B. Concomitant medication received along with amphotericin B for coexisting diseases in both the groups were antitubercular therapy, cotrimoxazole, antiviral therapy and premedications such as

  3. High dose insulin in toxic cardiogenic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holger, Joel S; Engebretsen, Kristin M; Marini, John J

    2009-04-01

    To report the successful use of high dose insulin (HDI) in previously unreported insulin dosing ranges in a patient with severe myocardial toxicity due to an amitriptyline and citalopram overdose. A 65-year-old female presented in respiratory arrest, which was followed by bradycardic pulseless electrical activity after ingesting multiple medications. After a prolonged resuscitation, the patient was maintained only on infusions of norepinephrine (40 mcg/min), vasopressin (4 units/h), insulin (80 units/h), and sodium bicarbonate. Due to a deteriorating clinical condition and limited prognosis, the insulin infusion was titrated incrementally upwards to 600 units/h (6 units/kg/h) over a 5 h time period while simultaneously completely weaning off both vasopressors. She developed brisk pulses and warm extremities, and her cardiac output nearly tripled. After 2 days of stabilization the insulin was slowly tapered, and the patient recovered. HDI as a single cardiovascular agent significantly improved clinical and cardiovascular parameters after the failure of vasopressor therapy in severe cardiovascular toxicity. Higher doses of insulin than previously recommended may be needed in toxic poisonings when severe myocardial depression is present.

  4. Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed Los Alamos High-Energy Secondary Neutrons: M-BAND Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute a significant fraction to the dose equivalent radiation measurement in crew members and passengers of commercial aviation travel as well as astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's 30L beam line (4FP30L-A/ICE House) is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecrafts like the MIR and the International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams with an entrance dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr, and studied the induction of chromosome aberrations that were identified with multicolor-banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of inter-chromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra-chromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Compared to our previous results with gamma-rays and 600 MeV/nucleon Fe ions of high dose rate at NSRL (NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory), the neutron data from the LANSCE experiments showed significantly higher frequency of chromosome aberrations. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by interchromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both

  5. Measurements of the neutron dose and energy spectrum on the International Space Station during expeditions ISS-16 to ISS-21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M B; Akatov, Yu; Andrews, H R; Arkhangelsky, V; Chernykh, I V; Ing, H; Khoshooniy, N; Lewis, B J; Machrafi, R; Nikolaev, I; Romanenko, R Y; Shurshakov, V; Thirsk, R B; Tomi, L

    2013-01-01

    As part of the international Matroshka-R and Radi-N experiments, bubble detectors have been used on board the ISS in order to characterise the neutron dose and the energy spectrum of neutrons. Experiments using bubble dosemeters inside a tissue-equivalent phantom were performed during the ISS-16, ISS-18 and ISS-19 expeditions. During the ISS-20 and ISS-21 missions, the bubble dosemeters were supplemented by a bubble-detector spectrometer, a set of six detectors that was used to determine the neutron energy spectrum at various locations inside the ISS. The temperature-compensated spectrometer set used is the first to be developed specifically for space applications and its development is described in this paper. Results of the dose measurements indicate that the dose received at two different depths inside the phantom is not significantly different, suggesting that bubble detectors worn by a person provide an accurate reading of the dose received inside the body. The energy spectra measured using the spectrometer are in good agreement with previous measurements and do not show a strong dependence on the precise location inside the station. To aid the understanding of the bubble-detector response to charged particles in the space environment, calculations have been performed using a Monte-Carlo code, together with data collected on the ISS. These calculations indicate that charged particles contribute space.

  6. Finite element modelling of the effect of temperature and neutron dose on the fracture behaviour of nuclear reactor graphite bricks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadsworth, M.; Kyaw, S.T., E-mail: si.kyaw@nottingham.ac.uk; Sun, W.

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Effects of irradiation on fracture behaviours of graphite bricks are analysed. • Two irradiation conditions chosen are irradiation temperature and neutron dose. • The crack initiates around the keyway fillet of the brick for every study. • Higher temperature and higher neutron dose accelerate crack initiation time. • Turnaround point of hoop strain indicates the crack initiation time. - Abstract: Graphite moderator bricks used within many UK gas-cooled nuclear reactors undergo harsh temperature and radiation gradients. They cause changes in material properties of graphite over extended periods of time. Consequently, models have been developed in order to understand and predict the complex stresses formed within the brick by these processes. In this paper the effect of irradiation temperature and neutron dose on the fracture characteristics, crack initiation and crack growth are investigated. A finite element (FE) mechanical constitutive model is implemented in combination with the damage model to simulate crack growth within the graphite brick. The damage model is based on a linear traction–separation cohesive model in conjunction with the extended finite element method for arbitrary crack initiation and propagation. Results obtained have showed that cracks initiate in the vicinity of the keyway fillet of the graphite brick and initiation time accelerates with higher temperatures and doses.

  7. Investigation on contribution of neutron monitor data to estimation of aviation doses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kákona, M.; Ploc, O.; Kyselová, D.; Kubančák, J.; Langer, R.; Kudela, K.

    2016-11-01

    Recently, many efforts have appeared to routinely measure radiation exposure (RE) of aircraft crew due to cosmic rays (CR). On the other hand real-time CR data measured with the ground based neutron monitors (NMs) are collected worldwide and available online. This is an opportunity for comparison of long-term observations of RE at altitudes of about 10 km, where composition and energy spectra of secondary particles differ from those on the ground, with the data from NMs. Our contribution presents examples of such type of comparison. Analysis of the silicon spectrometer Liulin measurements aboard aircraft is presented over the period May-September 2005 and compared with data from a single NM at middle latitude. While extreme solar driven events observed by NMs have clearly shown an impact on dosimetric characteristics as measured on the airplanes, the transient short time effects in CR of smaller amplitude have been not studied extensively in relation to RE. For the period May-September 2005, when aircraft data become available and several Forbush decreases (FDs) are observed on the ground, a small improvement in the correlation between the dose measured and multiple linear regression fit based on two key parameters (altitude and geomagnetic cut-off rigidity), is obtained, if the CR intensity at a single NM is added into the scheme.

  8. High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R. [and others

    1998-05-01

    In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

  9. HIGH STRENGTH CONTROL RODS FOR NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustman, B.; Losco, E.F.; Cohen, I.

    1961-07-11

    Nuclear reactor control rods comprised of highly compressed and sintered finely divided metal alloy panticles and fine metal oxide panticles substantially uniformly distributed theretbrough are described. The metal alloy consists essentially of silver, indium, cadmium, tin, and aluminum, the amount of each being present in centain percentages by weight. The oxide particles are metal oxides of the metal alloy composition, the amount of oxygen being present in certain percentages by weight and all the oxygen present being substantially in the form of metal oxide. This control rod is characterized by its high strength and resistance to creep at elevated temperatures.

  10. High energy fast neutrons from the Harwell variable energy cyclotron. I. Physical characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodhead, D T; Berry, R J; Bance, D A; Gray, P; Stedeford, J B

    1977-10-01

    A high energy fast neutron beam potentially suitable for radiotherapy was built at the Harwell variable energy cyclotron. The beam line is described and results are given of physical measurements on the fast neutron beams produced by 42 MeV deuterons on thick (4 mm) and thin (2 mm) beryllium targets. With 20 muA beam current the entrance dose rate in a phantom 150 cm from the target was about 130 rad min-1 with the thick target and about 60 rad min-1 with the thin target. Therefore, it is possible to use both the thin target and the relatively large target-skin distance of 150 cm to improve depth dose for radiotherapy or radiobiology. With this arrangement the dose rate decreased to 50% at depths in the phantom of 11.3-15.4 cm, depending on the field size. The use of primarily hydrogenous materials for shielding and collimation provided beam edge definition similar to that of 60Co teletherapy units, and off-axis radiation levels of approximately 1% which compare favorably with 14 MeV deuteron-tritium generators. The copper backing of the thin target became highly radioactive and an alterative material may be preferable. Biologic characteristics of the beam are described in a companion paper.

  11. High-spin structure of neutron-rich Dy isotopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Ansari; H L Yadav; M Kaushik; U R Jakhar

    2003-06-01

    In view of recent experimental progress on production and spectroscopy of neutron-rich isotopes of Dy with mass number = 166 and 168, we have made theoretical investigations on the structure of high spin states of 164-170Dy isotopes in the cranked Hartree–Fock–Bogoliubov (CHFB) theory employing a pairing+quadrupole+hexadecapole model interaction. With the increase of neutron number the rotation alignment of the proton orbitals dominates the structure at high spins, which is clearly reflected in the spin dependence of the rotational g-factors. A particularly striking feature is the difference in the spin-dependent properties of 166Dy as compared to that of 164Dy.

  12. Progress on the realization of a new GEM based neutron diagnostic concept for high flux neutron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croci, G.; Rebai, M.; Cazzaniga, C.; Palma, M. Dalla; Grosso, G.; Muraro, A.; Murtas, F.; Claps, G.; Pasqualotto, R.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Tollin, M.; Cavenago, M.; Gorini, G.

    2014-08-01

    Fusion reactors will need high flux neutron detectors to diagnose the deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium. A candidate detection technique is the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM). New GEM based detectors are being developed for application to a neutral deuterium beam test facility. The proposed detection system is called Close-contact Neutron Emission Surface Mapping (CNESM). The diagnostic aims at providing the map of the neutron emission due to interaction of the deuterium beam with the deuterons implanted in the beam dump surface. This is done by placing a detector in close contact, right behind the dump. CNESM uses nGEM detectors, i.e. GEM detectors equipped with a cathode that also serves as neutron-proton converter foil. After the realization and test of several small area prototypes, a full size prototype has been realized and tested with laboratory sources. Test on neutron beams are foreseen for the next months.

  13. Progress on the realization of a new GEM based neutron diagnostic concept for high flux neutron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croci, G.; Tardocchi, M. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, Milano, Italy and INFN, Sez. di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Rebai, M.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy and INFN, Sez. di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Cazzaniga, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); Palma, M. Dalla; Pasqualotto, R.; Tollin, M. [Consorzio RFX - Associazione Euratom-Enea sulla Fusione, Padova (Italy); Grosso, G.; Muraro, A. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, Milano (Italy); Murtas, F.; Claps, G. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Cavenago, M. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Padova) (Italy)

    2014-08-21

    Fusion reactors will need high flux neutron detectors to diagnose the deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium. A candidate detection technique is the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM). New GEM based detectors are being developed for application to a neutral deuterium beam test facility. The proposed detection system is called Close-contact Neutron Emission Surface Mapping (CNESM). The diagnostic aims at providing the map of the neutron emission due to interaction of the deuterium beam with the deuterons implanted in the beam dump surface. This is done by placing a detector in close contact, right behind the dump. CNESM uses nGEM detectors, i.e. GEM detectors equipped with a cathode that also serves as neutron-proton converter foil. After the realization and test of several small area prototypes, a full size prototype has been realized and tested with laboratory sources. Test on neutron beams are foreseen for the next months.

  14. International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) neutron source term simulation and neutronics analyses of the high flux test module

    CERN Document Server

    Simakov, S P; Heinzel, V; Moellendorff, U V

    2002-01-01

    The report describes the new results of the development work performed at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe on the neutronics of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). An important step forward has been done in the simulation of neutron production of the deuteron-lithium source using the Li(d,xn) reaction cross sections from evaluated data files. The developed Monte Carlo routine and d-Li reaction data newly evaluated at INPE Obninsk have been verified against available experimental data on the differential neutron yield from deuteron-bombarded thick lithium targets. With the modified neutron source three-dimensional distributions of neutron and photon fluxes, displacement and gas production rates and nuclear heating inside the high flux test module (HFTM) were calculated. In order to estimate the uncertainty resulting from the evaluated data, two independent libraries, recently released by INPE and LANL, have been used in the transport calculations. The proposal to use a reflector around ...

  15. Spallation neutron source and other high intensity froton sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiren Chou

    2003-02-06

    This lecture is an introduction to the design of a spallation neutron source and other high intensity proton sources. It discusses two different approaches: linac-based and synchrotron-based. The requirements and design concepts of each approach are presented. The advantages and disadvantages are compared. A brief review of existing machines and those under construction and proposed is also given. An R&D program is included in an appendix.

  16. Neutron measurements around a beam dump bombarded by high energy protons and lead ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosteo, S.; Birattari, C.; Foglio Para, A.; Silari, M.; Ulrici, L.

    2001-02-01

    Measurements of the spectral fluence and the ambient dose equivalent of secondary neutrons produced by 250 GeV/ c protons and 158 GeV/ c per nucleon lead ions were performed at CERN around a thick beam dump. The experimental results obtained with protons were compared with calculations performed with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code. As the available Monte Carlo codes do not transport particles with mass larger than one atomic mass unit, it is shown that for high energy heavy ions, estimates can be carried out by scaling the result of a Monte Carlo calculation for protons by the projectile mass number.

  17. Demonstration of a high-intensity neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfon, S; Arenshtam, A; Kijel, D; Paul, M; Weissman, L; Berkovits, D; Eliyahu, I; Feinberg, G; Kreisel, A; Mardor, I; Shimel, G; Shor, A; Silverman, I; Tessler, M

    2015-12-01

    A free surface liquid-lithium jet target is operating routinely at Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility (SARAF), bombarded with a ~1.91 MeV, ~1.2 mA continuous-wave narrow proton beam. The experiments demonstrate the liquid lithium target (LiLiT) capability to constitute an intense source of epithermal neutrons, for Accelerator based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The target dissipates extremely high ion beam power densities (>3 kW/cm(2), >0.5 MW/cm(3)) for long periods of time, while maintaining stable conditions and localized residual activity. LiLiT generates ~3×10(10) n/s, which is more than one order of magnitude larger than conventional (7)Li(p,n)-based near threshold neutron sources. A shield and moderator assembly for BNCT, with LiLiT irradiated with protons at 1.91 MeV, was designed based on Monte Carlo (MCNP) simulations of BNCT-doses produced in a phantom. According to these simulations it was found that a ~15 mA near threshold proton current will apply the therapeutic doses in ~1h treatment duration. According to our present results, such high current beams can be dissipated in a liquid-lithium target, hence the target design is readily applicable for accelerator-based BNCT.

  18. A Balloon-borne Measurement of High Latitude Atmospheric Neutrons Using a LiCAF Neutron Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kole, Merlin; Fukuda, Kentaro; Ishizu, Sumito; Jackson, Miranda; Kamae, Tune; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Kawano, Takafumi; Kiss, Mózsi; Moretti, Elena; Salinas, Maria Fernanda Muñoz; Pearce, Mark; Rydström, Stefan; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    PoGOLino is a scintillator-based neutron detector. Its main purpose is to provide data on the neutron flux in the upper stratosphere at high latitudes at thermal and nonthermal energies for the PoGOLite instrument. PoGOLite is a balloon borne hard X-ray polarimeter for which the main source of background stems from high energy neutrons. No measurements of the neutron environment for the planned flight latitude and altitude exist. Furthermore this neutron environment changes with altitude, latitude and solar activity, three variables that will vary throughout the PoGOLite flight. PoGOLino was developed to study the neutron environment and the influences from these three variables upon it. PoGOLino consists of two Europium doped Lithium Calcium Aluminium Fluoride (Eu:LiCAF) scintillators, each of which is sandwiched between 2 Bismuth Germanium Oxide (BGO) scintillating crystals, which serve to veto signals produced by gamma-rays and charged particles. This allows the neutron flux to be measured even in high rad...

  19. Angular and dose dependence of CR-39 neutron response for shape-selected tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Tam, N C; Lakosi, L

    1999-01-01

    A shape selection method corresponding to an energy discrimination was used to eliminate unwanted events disturbing evaluation of CR-39 detectors in detecting tracks induced by particles both of perpendicular and oblique incidence. The angular dependence of the response was examined, detecting fast neutrons from sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf with shape selection technique at various angles and distances. Also, the CR-39 track detectors with the sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf source were exposed to high gamma-intensity of a sup 6 sup 0 Co irradiation facility in the range 0.1 to 4.5 kGy, similar to the exposures inside spent fuel assemblies. Using the two functions the lower limit of burnup could be determined by the method.

  20. Dose equivalent measurements in mixed and time varying radiation fields around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, S

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of ambient dose equivalent in stray radiation fields behind the shielding of high-energy accelerators are a challenging task. Several radiation components (photons, neutrons, charged particles, muons, etc.), spanning a wide range of energies, contribute to the total dose equivalent. The radiation fields are produced by beam losses interacting with structural material during the acceleration or at the ejection to experimental areas or other accelerators. The particle beam is usually not continuous but separated in "bunches" or pulses, which further complicates dose measurements at high-energy accelerators. An ideal dosimeter for operational radiation protection should measure dose equivalent for any composition of radiation components in the entire energy range even when the field is strongly pulsed. The objective of this work was to find out if an ionisation chamber operated as a "recombination chamber" and a TEPC instrument using the variance-covariance method ("Sievert Instrument") are capable ...

  1. Dose equivalent measurements in mixed and time varying radiation fields around high-energy accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, S

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of ambient dose equivalent in stray radiation fields behind the shielding of high-energy accelerators are a challenging task. Several radiation components (photons, neutrons, charged particles, muons, etc.), spanning a wide range of energies, contribute to the total dose equivalent. The radiation fields are produced by beam losses interacting with structural material during the acceleration or at the ejection to experimental areas or other accelerators. The particle beam is usually not continuous but separated in "bunches" or pulses, which further complicates dose measurements at high-energy accelerators. An ideal dosimeter for operational radiation protection should measure dose equivalent for any composition of radiation components in the entire energy range even when the field is strongly pulsed. The objective of this work was to find out if an ionisation chamber operated as a "recombination chamber" and a TEPC instrument using the variance-covariance method ("Sievert Instrument") are capable ...

  2. Managing NIF safety equipment in a high neutron and gamma radiation environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datte, Philip; Eckart, Mark; Jackson, Mark; Khater, Hesham; Manuel, Stacie; Newton, Mark

    2013-06-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192 laser beam facility that supports the Inertial Confinement Fusion program. During the ignition experimental campaign, the NIF is expected to perform shots with varying fusion yield producing 14 MeV neutrons up to 20 MJ or 7.1 × 10(18) neutrons per shot and a maximum annual yield of 1,200 MJ. Several infrastructure support systems will be exposed to varying high yield shots over the facility's 30-y life span. In response to this potential exposure, analysis and testing of several facility safety systems have been conducted. A detailed MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code) model has been developed for the NIF facility, and it includes most of the major structures inside the Target Bay. The model has been used in the simulation of expected neutron and gamma fluences throughout the Target Bay. Radiation susceptible components were identified and tested to fluences greater than 10(13) (n cm(-2)) for 14 MeV neutrons and γ-ray equivalent. The testing includes component irradiation using a 60Co gamma source and accelerator-based irradiation using 4- and 14- MeV neutron sources. The subsystem implementation in the facility is based on the fluence estimates after shielding and survivability guidelines derived from the dose maps and component tests results. This paper reports on the evaluation and implementation of mitigations for several infrastructure safety support systems, including video, oxygen monitoring, pressure monitors, water sensing systems, and access control interfaces found at the NIF.

  3. Development of a computational model for the calculation of neutron dose equivalent in laminated primary barriers of radiotherapy rooms; Desenvolvimento de um modelo computacional para calculo do equivalente de dose de neutrons em barreiras primarias laminadas de salas de radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezende, Gabriel Fonseca da Silva

    2015-06-01

    Many radiotherapy centers acquire 15 and 18 MV linear accelerators to perform more effective treatments for deep tumors. However, the acquisition of these equipment must be accompanied by an additional care in shielding planning of the rooms that will house them. In cases where space is restricted, it is common to find primary barriers made of concrete and metal. The drawback of this type of barrier is the photoneutron emission when high energy photons (e.g. 15 and 18 MV spectra) interact with the metallic material of the barrier. The emission of these particles constitutes a problem of radiation protection inside and outside of radiotherapy rooms, which should be properly assessed. A recent work has shown that the current model underestimate the dose of neutrons outside the treatment rooms. In this work, a computational model for the aforementioned problem was created from Monte Carlo Simulations and Artificial Intelligence. The developed model was composed by three neural networks, each being formed of a pair of material and spectrum: Pb18, Pb15 and Fe18. In a direct comparison with the McGinley method, the Pb18 network exhibited the best responses for approximately 78% of the cases tested; the Pb15 network showed better results for 100% of the tested cases, while the Fe18 network produced better answers to 94% of the tested cases. Thus, the computational model composed by the three networks has shown more consistent results than McGinley method. (author)

  4. Development of a phoswich detector for neutron dose rate measurements in the Earth's atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doensdorf, Esther Miriam

    2014-04-30

    The Earth is constantly exposed to a stream of energetic particles from outer space. Through the interaction of this radiation with the Earth's magnetosphere and atmosphere a complex radiation field is formed which varies with the location inside the Earth's atmosphere. This radiation field consists of charged and uncharged particles leading to the constant exposure of human beings to radiation. As this ionizing radiation can be harmful for humans, it is necessary to perform dose rate measurements in different altitudes in the Earth's atmosphere. Due to their higher biological effectiveness the exposure to neutrons is more harmful than the exposure to γ-rays and charged particles, which is why the determination of neutron dose rates is the focus of this work. In this work the prototype of a Phoswich detector called PING (Phoswich Instrument for Neutrons and Gammas) is developed to determine dose rates caused by neutrons in the Earth's atmosphere and to distinguish these from γ-rays. The instrument is composed of two different scintillators optically coupled to each other and read out by one common photomultiplier tube. The scintillator package consists of an inner plastic scintillator made of the material BC-412 and a surrounding anti-coincidence made of sodium doped caesium iodide (CsI(Na)). In this work the instrument is calibrated, tested and flown and a procedure for a pulse shape analysis for this instrument is developed. With this analysis it is possible to distinguish pulses from the plastic scintillator and pulses from the CsI(Na). The pulses from the plastic scintillator are mainly due to the interaction of neutrons but there is an energy-dependent contribution of γ-rays to these events. Measurements performed on board an airplane show that the dose rates measured with the developed detector are in the same order of magnitude as results of other instruments. During measurements on board stratospheric balloons the altitude dependence

  5. Analysis of dose-LET distribution in the human body irradiated by high energy hadrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T; Tsuda, S; Sakamoto, Y; Yamaguchi, Y; Niita, K

    2003-01-01

    For the purposes of radiological protection, it is important to analyse profiles of the particle field inside a human body irradiated by high energy hadrons, since they can produce a variety of secondary particles which play an important role in the energy deposition process, and characterise their radiation qualities. Therefore Monte Carlo calculations were performed to evaluate dose distributions in terms of the linear energy transfer of ionising particles (dose-LET distribution) using a newly developed particle transport code (Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System, PHITS) for incidences of neutrons, protons and pions with energies from 100 MeV to 200 GeV. Based on these calculations, it was found that more than 80% and 90% of the total deposition energies are attributed to ionisation by particles with LET below 10 keV microm(-1) for the irradiations of neutrons and the charged particles, respectively.

  6. High resolution neutron imaging capabilities at BOA beamline at Paul Scherrer Institut

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremsin, A.S., E-mail: ast@ssl.berkeley.edu [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Morgano, M.; Panzner, T.; Lehmann, E.; Filgers, U. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Vallerga, J.V.; McPhate, J.B.; Siegmund, O.H.W. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Feller, W.B. [NOVA Scientific, Inc., 10 Picker Rd., Sturbridge, MA 01566 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The cold neutron spectrum of the Beamline for neutron Optics and other Applications (BOA) at Paul Scherrer Institut enables high contrast neutron imaging because neutron cross sections for many materials increase with neutron wavelength. However, for many neutron imaging applications, spatial resolution can be as important as contrast. In this paper the neutron transmission imaging capabilities of an MCP/Timepix detector installed at the BOA beamline are presented, demonstrating the possibilities for studying sub-20 µm features in various samples. In addition to conventional neutron radiography and microtomography, the high degree of neutron polarization at the BOA beamline can be very attractive for imaging of magnetic fields, as demonstrated by our measurements. We also show that a collimated cold neutron beamline combined with a high resolution detector can produce image artifacts, (e.g. edge enhancements) due to neutron refraction and scattering. The results of our experiments indicate that the BOA beamline is a valuable addition to neutron imaging facilities, providing improved and sometimes unique capabilities for non-destructive studies with cold neutrons.

  7. High yield neutron generator based on a high-current gasdynamic electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skalyga, V.; Sidorov, A. [Institute of Applied Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanova St., Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN), 23 Gagarina St., Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Izotov, I.; Golubev, S.; Razin, S. [Institute of Applied Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanova St., Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Strelkov, A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Joliot-Curie 6, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Tarvainen, O.; Koivisto, H.; Kalvas, T. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, Jyväskylä (Finland)

    2015-09-07

    In present paper, an approach for high yield compact D-D neutron generator based on a high current gasdynamic electron cyclotron resonance ion source is suggested. Results on dense pulsed deuteron beam production with current up to 500 mA and current density up to 750 mA/cm{sup 2} are demonstrated. Neutron yield from D{sub 2}O and TiD{sub 2} targets was measured in case of its bombardment by pulsed 300 mA D{sup +} beam with 45 keV energy. Neutron yield density at target surface of 10{sup 9} s{sup −1} cm{sup −2} was detected with a system of two {sup 3}He proportional counters. Estimations based on obtained experimental results show that neutron yield from a high quality TiD{sub 2} target bombarded by D{sup +} beam demonstrated in present work accelerated to 100 keV could reach 6 × 10{sup 10} s{sup −1} cm{sup −2}. It is discussed that compact neutron generator with such characteristics could be perspective for a number of applications like boron neutron capture therapy, security systems based on neutron scanning, and neutronography.

  8. Optimal moderator materials at various proton energies considering photon dose rate after irradiation for an accelerator-driven ⁹Be(p, n) boron neutron capture therapy neutron source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Y; Hiraga, F; Kiyanagi, Y

    2015-12-01

    We evaluated the accelerator beam power and the neutron-induced radioactivity of (9)Be(p, n) boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) neutron sources having a MgF2, CaF2, or AlF3 moderator and driven by protons with energy from 8 MeV to 30 MeV. The optimal moderator materials were found to be MgF2 for proton energies less than 10 MeV because of lower required accelerator beam power and CaF2 for higher proton energies because of lower photon dose rate at the treatment position after neutron irradiation.

  9. The application of high dose food irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruyn, I. De [Atomic Energy Corporation of South Africa LTD, Building 2000, P.O. Box 582, Pretoria 0001, (South Africa)

    1997-12-31

    During the 1950`s to end 1970`s the United States Army developed the basic methodology to produce shelf stable irradiated meat, seafood and poultry products. These products are normally packed without gravy, sauce or brine, as liquid is not required to sterilize the product as in the canning process. This leads to the distinctive `dried cooked` taste normally associated with roasts opposed to the casserole taste usually associated with tinned meats. The meats are cooked, chilled, portioned, vacuum packed and irradiated to the required minimum dose of 25 to 45 kGy (depending on the product) at a temperature of between -20 and -40 Centigrade to ensure absolute sterility even under tropical conditions. The product is packaged in a high quality four layer laminate pouch and will therefore not rust or burst even under adverse weather conditions. The product can be guaranteed for more than two years as long as the integrity of the packaging is maintained. (Author)

  10. Pilot study for the implantation of a high-energy neutrons field; Estudo piloto para a implantacao de um campo de neutrons de alta energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Jose Julio de O.; Mendes, Adriane C.; Federico, Claudio A.; Passaro, Angelo; Gaspar, Felipe de B., E-mail: jjfilos@hotmail.com, E-mail: adriane@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: claudiofederico@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: angelo@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: fbgaspar@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Pazianotto, Mauricio T., E-mail: mpazianotto@gmail.com [Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica (ITA/DCTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In this work a theoretical study is presented for the implementation of a high-energy neutron field (14.1 MeV) produced by a neutron generator type DT (deuterium-tritium), to be installed in the premises of the Laboratorio de Radiacoes Ionizantes (LRI) of the Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAv). This evaluation was performed by means of computer simulation by Monte Carlo method, using the computer code MCNP5 (Monte Carlo N-Particle). The neutron spectra were simulated computationally for pre-selected points of the installation, allowing to estimate the beam quality in the positions provided for use of the direct beam. These simulations also allow assist the basement of a project to install the consistent D-T generator with the guidelines for radiation protection and radiation safety standards determined by the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), by estimating the dose rates provided in accessible points to Individuals Occupationally Exposed (IOE) in the facility. The computational determination of spectra, fluxes and doses produced in different positions previously selected within and outside the laboratory, will serve as guidance from previous studies for the future installation of this generator in the physical facilities of the LRI.

  11. The 12B counter: an active dosemeter for high-energy neutrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuschner, A

    2005-01-01

    High-energy accelerators can produce strong time-structured radiation fields. Such dose shots are generated at linear machines with low duty cycles as well as at circular machines when complete fills are instantaneously lost. The main dose component behind thick shielding is due to high-energy neutrons occurring at that time structure. Dosemeters based on Geiger-Mueller tubes or proportional counters fail here completely. The 12B counter, a novel dosemeter made of a plastic scintillator using carbon activation for event-like exposure, has been introduced. High-energy neutrons activate the carbon nuclei by three inelastic reactions. The decay patterns with half-lives between 20 ms and 20 min can be exploited depending on the time structure of the radiation field. The response of the 12B counter was measured along with some other dosemeters, both active and passive, in the radiation field behind the lateral concrete shielding of a 7.5 GeV proton transfer line.

  12. Electron Scattering From High-Momentum Neutrons in Deuterium

    CERN Document Server

    Klimenko, A V; Ambrozewicz, P; Anghinolo, M; Asryan, G; Avakian, H; Bagdasaryan, H; Baillie, N; Ball, J P; Baltzell, N A; Barrow, S; Batourine, V; Battaglieri, M; Bedlinskiy, I; Bektasoglu, M; Bellis, M; Benmouna, N; Biselli, A S; Bltmann, S; Boiarinov, S; Bouchigny, S; Bradford, R; Branford, D; Brooks, W K; Burkert, V D; Butuceanu, C; Calarco, J R; Careccia, S L; Carman, D S; Cazes, A; Chen, S; Cole, P L; Coltharp, P; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Cummings, J P; Dashyan, N B; De Sanctis, E; De Vita, R; Degtyarenko, P V; Denizli, H; Dennis, L; Dharmawardane, K V; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Donnelly, J; Doughty, D; Dugger, M; Dytman, S; Dzyubak, O P; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Eugenio, P; Fatemi, R; Fedotov, G; Fersch, R G; Feuerbach, R J; Funsten, H; Garçon, M; Gavalian, G; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K L; Girod, F X; Goetz, J T; Gonenc, A; Gordon, C I O; Gothe, R W; Grioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Guler, N; Guo, L; Gyurjyan, V; Hadjidakis, C; Hakobyan, R S; Hardie, J; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hleiqawi, I; Holtrop, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ilieva, Y; Ireland, D G; Ishkhanov, B S; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Jo, H S; Joo, K; Jüngst, H G; Kellie, J D; Khandaker, M; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Kossov, M; Kramer, L H; Kubarovski, V; Kuhn, S E; Kuleshov, S V; Kühn, J; Lachniet, J; Laget, J M; Langheinrich, J; Lawrence, D; Li, J; Livingston, K; McAleer, S; McKinnon, B; McNabb, J W C; Mecking, B A; Mehrabyan, S S; Melone, J J; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Mibe, T; Mikhailov, K; Minehart, R C; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Mokeev, V; Morand, L; Morrow, S A; Mutchler, G S; Müller, J; Nadel-Turonski, P; Napolitano, J; Nasseripour, R; Niccolai, S; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Niczyporuk, B B; Niyazov, R A; Nozar, M; O'Rielly, G V; Osipenko, M; Ostrovidov, A I; Park, K; Pasyuk, E; Paterson, C; Pierce, J; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O I; Pozdniakov, S; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Prok, Y; Protopopescu, D; Raue, B A; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rosner, G; Rossi, P; Sabatie, F; Salgado, C; Santoro, J P; Sapunenko, V; Schumacher, R A; Serov, V S; Sharabyan, Yu G; Skabelin, A V; Smith, E S; Smith, L C; Sober, D I; Stavinsky, A V; Stepanyan, S; Stokes, B E; Stoler, P; Strauch, S; Taiuti, M; Tedeschi, D J; Thoma, U; Tkabladze, A; Tkachenko, S I; Todor, L; Tur, C; Ungaro, M; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A V; Weinstein, L B; Weygand, D P; Williams, M; Wolin, E; Wood, M H; Yegneswaran, A; Zana, L; Zhang, J; Zhao, B

    2006-01-01

    We report results from an experiment measuring the semi-inclusive reaction $d(e,e'p_s)$ where the proton $p_s$ is moving at a large angle relative to the momentum transfer. If we assume that the proton was a spectator to the reaction taking place on the neutron in deuterium, the initial state of that neutron can be inferred. This method, known as spectator tagging, can be used to study electron scattering from high-momentum (off-shell) neutrons in deuterium. The data were taken with a 5.765 GeV electron beam on a deuterium target in Jefferson Laboratory's Hall B, using the CLAS detector. A reduced cross section was extracted for different values of final-state missing mass $W^{*}$, backward proton momentum $\\vec{p}_{s}$ and momentum transfer $Q^{2}$. The data are compared to a simple PWIA spectator model. A strong enhancement in the data observed at transverse kinematics is not reproduced by the PWIA model. This enhancement can likely be associated with the contribution of final state interactions (FSI) that ...

  13. A high resolution, low background fast neutron spectrometer

    CERN Document Server

    Abdurashitov, J N; Kalikhov, A V; Matushko, V L; Shikhin, A A; Yants, V E; Zaborskaia, O S; Adams, J M; Nico, J S; Thompson, A K

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the possibility to create a spectrometer of full absorption based on liquid scintillator doped with enriched sup 6 Li. Of specific interest, the spectrometer will have energy resolution estimated to lie in the range 5-10% for 14 MeV neutrons. It will be sensitive to fluxes from 10 sup - sup 4 to 10 sup 6 cm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 above a threshold of 1 MeV in a gamma-background of up to 10 sup 4 s sup - sup 1. The detector's efficiency will be determined by the volume of the scintillator only (approx 3 l) and is estimated to be 0.2-10%. The main reason for the poor resolution of an organic scintillator based spectrometer of full absorption is a non-linear light-yield of the scintillator for recoil protons. The neutron energy is occasionally distributed among recoil protons, and due to non-linear light-yield the total amount of light from all recoil protons ambiguously determines the initial neutron energy. The high-energy resolution will be achieved by compensation of the non-linear light-yield ...

  14. Neutron damage tests of a highly segmented germanium crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, T.J. [Physics Department, University of Richmond, Richmond, VA 23173 (United States); Physics Department, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7JL (United Kingdom); Beausang, C.W. [Physics Department, University of Richmond, Richmond, VA 23173 (United States)], E-mail: cbeausan@richmond.edu; Lee, I.Y.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Gros, S.; Cromaz, M.; Clark, R.M.; Fallon, P.; Jeppesen, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Allmond, J.M. [Physics Department, University of Richmond, Richmond, VA 23173 (United States)

    2009-07-21

    To evaluate the effect of neutron damage on the performance of highly segmented germanium detectors the P3 prototype detector for the GRETINA array was subjected to a neutron flux of {approx}3x10{sup 9} n/cm{sup 2} over a period of 5 days. During the irradiation, the resolution (full-width half-maximum (FWHM)) of the 1332 keV {sup 60}Co photopeak increased from {approx}1.8 to {approx}6.0 keV while the full-width at tenth maximum (FWTM) increased from {approx}4 keV to more than 12 keV. Following the irradiation the detector was successfully annealed and the energy resolution returned to pre-irradiation values. All detector segments were fully functional before and after the annealing and following multiple room-temperature cycles. A comparison of digitized pulse shapes in the damaged and annealed detector indicates that the effect of extreme neutron damage (FWHM=6 keV) on the position resolution is on the order of {approx}1.7 mm while for 3 keV resolution the position resolution degrades by {approx}0.5 mm.

  15. Shielding evaluation of a medical linear accelerator vault in preparation for installing a high-dose rate 252Cf remote afterloader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melhus, C S; Rivard, M J; Kurkomelis, J; Liddle, C B; Massé, F X

    2005-01-01

    In support of the effort to begin high-dose rate 252Cf brachytherapy treatments at Tufts-New England Medical Center, the shielding capabilities of a clinical accelerator vault against the neutron and photon emissions from a 1.124 mg 252Cf source were examined. Outside the clinical accelerator vault, the fast neutron dose equivalent rate was below the lower limit of detection of a CR-39 etched track detector and below 0.14 +/- 0.02 muSv h(-1) with a proportional counter, which is consistent, within the uncertainties, with natural background. The photon dose equivalent rate was also measured to be below background levels (0.1 muSv h(-1)) using an ionisation chamber and an optically stimulated luminescence dosemeter. A Monte Carlo simulation of neutron transport through the accelerator vault was performed to validate measured values and determine the thermal-energy to low-energy neutron component. Monte Carlo results showed that the dose equivalent rate from fast neutrons was reduced by a factor of 100,000 after attenuation through the vault wall, and the thermal-energy neutron dose equivalent rate would be an additional factor of 1000 below that of the fast neutrons. Based on these findings, the shielding installed in this facility is sufficient for the use of at least 5.0 mg of 252Cf.

  16. Using anisotropies in prompt fission neutron coincidences to assess the neutron multiplication of highly multiplying subcritical plutonium assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, J.M., E-mail: jonathan_mueller@ncsu.edu; Mattingly, J.

    2016-07-21

    There is a significant and well-known anisotropy between the prompt neutrons emitted from a single fission event; these neutrons are most likely to be observed at angles near 0° or 180° relative to each other. However, the propagation of this anisotropy through different generations of a fission chain reaction has not been previously studied. We have measured this anisotropy in neutron–neutron coincidences from a subcritical highly-multiplying assembly of plutonium metal. The assembly was a 4.5 kg α-phase plutonium metal sphere composed of 94% {sup 239}Pu and 6% {sup 240}Pu by mass. Data were collected using two EJ-309 liquid scintillators and two EJ-299 plastic scintillators. The angular distribution of neutron–neutron coincidences was measured at 90° and 180° and found to be largely isotropic. Simulations were performed using MCNPX-PoliMi of similar plutonium metal spheres of varying sizes and a correlation between the neutron multiplication of the assembly and the anisotropy of neutron–neutron coincidences was observed. In principle, this correlation could be used to assess the neutron multiplication of an unknown assembly.

  17. Evaluation of Rectal Dose During High-Dose-Rate Intracavitary Brachytherapy for Cervical Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sha, Rajib Lochan [Department of Radiation Physics, Indo-American Cancer Institute and Research Centre, Hyderabad (India); Department of Physics, Osmania University, Hyderabad (India); Reddy, Palreddy Yadagiri [Department of Physics, Osmania University, Hyderabad (India); Rao, Ramakrishna [Department of Radiation Physics, MNJ Institute of Oncology and Regional Cancer Center, Hyderabad (India); Muralidhar, Kanaparthy R. [Department of Radiation Physics, Indo-American Cancer Institute and Research Centre, Hyderabad (India); Kudchadker, Rajat J., E-mail: rkudchad@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2011-01-01

    High-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy (HDR-ICBT) for carcinoma of the uterine cervix often results in high doses being delivered to surrounding organs at risk (OARs) such as the rectum and bladder. Therefore, it is important to accurately determine and closely monitor the dose delivered to these OARs. In this study, we measured the dose delivered to the rectum by intracavitary applications and compared this measured dose to the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements rectal reference point dose calculated by the treatment planning system (TPS). To measure the dose, we inserted a miniature (0.1 cm{sup 3}) ionization chamber into the rectum of 86 patients undergoing radiation therapy for cervical carcinoma. The response of the miniature chamber modified by 3 thin lead marker rings for identification purposes during imaging was also characterized. The difference between the TPS-calculated maximum dose and the measured dose was <5% in 52 patients, 5-10% in 26 patients, and 10-14% in 8 patients. The TPS-calculated maximum dose was typically higher than the measured dose. Our study indicates that it is possible to measure the rectal dose for cervical carcinoma patients undergoing HDR-ICBT. We also conclude that the dose delivered to the rectum can be reasonably predicted by the TPS-calculated dose.

  18. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makowska, Małgorzata G., E-mail: malg@dtu.dk [Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde 4000 (Denmark); European Spallation Source ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Theil Kuhn, Luise; Cleemann, Lars N. [Department of Energy Conversion and Storage, Technical University of Denmark, Roskilde 4000 (Denmark); Lauridsen, Erik M. [Xnovo Technology ApS, Galoche Alle 15, Køge 4600 (Denmark); Bilheux, Hassina Z.; Molaison, Jamie J.; Santodonato, Louis J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Tremsin, Anton S. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Grosse, Mirco [Institute for Applied Material Research, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe DE-76021 (Germany); Morgano, Manuel [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI CH-5232 (Switzerland); Kabra, Saurabh [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Strobl, Markus [European Spallation Source ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2015-12-15

    High material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible with any other technique. This paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 °C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging with diffraction measurements. Design, special features, and specification of the furnace are described. In addition, examples of experiments successfully performed at various neutron facilities with the furnace, as well as examples of possible applications are presented. This covers a broad field of research from fundamental to technological investigations of various types of materials and components.

  19. Formation of austenite in high Cr ferritic/martensitic steels by high fluence neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z.; Faulkner, R. G.; Morgan, T. S.

    2008-12-01

    High Cr ferritic/martensitic steels are leading candidates for structural components of future fusion reactors and new generation fission reactors due to their excellent swelling resistance and thermal properties. A commercial grade 12%CrMoVNb ferritic/martensitic stainless steel in the form of parent plate and off-normal weld materials was fast neutron irradiated up to 33 dpa (1.1 × 10 -6 dpa/s) at 400 °C and 28 dpa (1.7 × 10 -6 dpa/s) at 465 °C, respectively. TEM investigation shows that the fully martensitic weld metal transformed to a duplex austenite/ferrite structure due to high fluence neutron irradiation, the austenite was heavily voided (˜15 vol.%) and the ferrite was relatively void-free; whilst no austenite phases were detected in plate steel. Thermodynamic and phase equilibria software MTDATA has been employed for the first time to investigate neutron irradiation-induced phase transformations. The neutron irradiation effect is introduced by adding additional Gibbs free energy into the system. This additional energy is produced by high energy neutron irradiation and can be estimated from the increased dislocation loop density caused by irradiation. Modelling results show that neutron irradiation reduces the ferrite/austenite transformation temperature, especially for high Ni weld metal. The calculated results exhibit good agreement with experimental observation.

  20. Formation of austenite in high Cr ferritic/martensitic steels by high fluence neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z. [IPTME, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3U (United Kingdom)], E-mail: zheng.lu@lboro.ac.uk; Faulkner, R.G.; Morgan, T.S. [IPTME, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3U (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-01

    High Cr ferritic/martensitic steels are leading candidates for structural components of future fusion reactors and new generation fission reactors due to their excellent swelling resistance and thermal properties. A commercial grade 12%CrMoVNb ferritic/martensitic stainless steel in the form of parent plate and off-normal weld materials was fast neutron irradiated up to 33 dpa (1.1 x 10{sup -6} dpa/s) at 400 deg. C and 28 dpa (1.7 x 10{sup -6} dpa/s) at 465 deg. C, respectively. TEM investigation shows that the fully martensitic weld metal transformed to a duplex austenite/ferrite structure due to high fluence neutron irradiation, the austenite was heavily voided ({approx}15 vol.%) and the ferrite was relatively void-free; whilst no austenite phases were detected in plate steel. Thermodynamic and phase equilibria software MTDATA has been employed for the first time to investigate neutron irradiation-induced phase transformations. The neutron irradiation effect is introduced by adding additional Gibbs free energy into the system. This additional energy is produced by high energy neutron irradiation and can be estimated from the increased dislocation loop density caused by irradiation. Modelling results show that neutron irradiation reduces the ferrite/austenite transformation temperature, especially for high Ni weld metal. The calculated results exhibit good agreement with experimental observation.

  1. Radiolytic yield of ozone in air for low dose neutron and x-ray/gamma-ray radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J.; Su, S.; Blakeley, R. E.; Koonath, P.; Hecht, A. A.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation ionizes surrounding air and produces molecular species, and these localized effects may be used as a signature of, and for quantification of, radiation. Low-level ozone production measurements from radioactive sources have been performed in this work to understand radiation chemical yields at low doses. The University of New Mexico AGN-201 M reactor was used as a tunable radiation source. Ozone levels were compared between reactor-on and reactor-off conditions, and differences (0.61 to 0.73 ppb) well below background levels were measured. Simulations were performed to determine the dose rate distribution and average dose rate to the air sample within the reactor, giving 35 mGy of mixed photon and neutron dose. A radiation chemical yield for ozone of 6.5±0.8 molecules/100 eV was found by a variance weighted average of the data. The different contributions of photons and neutrons to radiolytic ozone production are discussed.

  2. ACDOS1: a computer code to calculate dose rates from neutron activation of neutral beamlines and other fusion-reactor components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keney, G.S.

    1981-08-01

    A computer code has been written to calculate neutron induced activation of neutral-beam injector components and the corresponding dose rates as a function of geometry, component composition, and time after shutdown. The code, ACDOS1, was written in FORTRAN IV to calculate both activity and dose rates for up to 30 target nuclides and 50 neutron groups. Sufficient versatility has also been incorporated into the code to make it applicable to a variety of general activation problems due to neutrons of energy less than 20 MeV.

  3. Neutron Dose and Sub-Kelvin Resistance of the Tardigrade: Ramazzottius Varieoranatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletetschka, G.; Horikawa, D.; Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Chervenak, J.

    2010-04-01

    Tardigrades have never been exposed to neutron/gamma radiation. They were also never cooled down to temperatures less than 1 K. We will show the survival data of these conditions and discuss the survival mechanisms.

  4. High-level neutron coincidence counter maintenance manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swansen, J.; Collinsworth, P.

    1983-05-01

    High-level neutron coincidence counter operational (field) calibration and usage is well known. This manual makes explicit basic (shop) check-out, calibration, and testing of new units and is a guide for repair of failed in-service units. Operational criteria for the major electronic functions are detailed, as are adjustments and calibration procedures, and recurrent mechanical/electromechanical problems are addressed. Some system tests are included for quality assurance. Data on nonstandard large-scale integrated (circuit) components and a schematic set are also included.

  5. Design for a focusing high-resolution neutron crystal diffractometer

    CERN Document Server

    Ionita, I; Popovici, M; Popa, N C

    1999-01-01

    A new concept of high-resolution focusing configuration begins to be accepted as an alternative solution to the existing conventional configurations. Among the earliest work performed in this direction is that performed at the Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti. These results are presented below. The experimentally determined resolution properties for two focusing configurations obtained at TRIGA reactor Pitesti and at VVRS reactor Bucharest are given in order to be compared with those obtained for the conventional ones. The principles to get focusing in crystal neutron diffractometry are presented. The main characteristics for a focusing instrument are given. (author)

  6. Dose distributions in a human head phantom for neutron capture therapy using moderated neutrons from the 2.5 MeV proton-7Li reaction or from fission of 235U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Kenichi; Kobayashi, Tooru; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Endo, Satoru; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2001-10-01

    The feasibility of neutron capture therapy (NCT) using an accelerator-based neutron source of the 7Li(p,n) reaction produced by 2.5 MeV protons was investigated by comparing the neutron beam tailored by both the Hiroshima University radiological research accelerator (HIRRAC) and the heavy water neutron irradiation facility in the Kyoto University reactor (KUR-HWNIF) from the viewpoint of the contamination dose ratios of the fast neutrons and the gamma rays. These contamination ratios to the boron dose were estimated in a water phantom of 20 cm diameter and 20 cm length to simulate a human head, with experiments by the same techniques for NCT in KUR-HWNIF and/or the simulation calculations by the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code system version 4B (MCNP-4B). It was found that the 7Li(p,n) neutrons produced by 2.5 MeV protons combined with 20, 25 or 30 cm thick D2O moderators of 20 cm diameter could make irradiation fields for NCT with depth-dose characteristics similar to those from the epithermal neutron beam at the KUR-HWNIF.

  7. Dose distributions in a human head phantom for neutron capture therapy using moderated neutrons from the 2.5 MeV proton-{sup 7}Li reaction or from fission of {sup 235}U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Kenichi [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto (Japan); Kobayashi, Tooru; Sakurai, Yoshinori [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Sennan-gun, Osaka (Japan); Nakagawa, Yoshinobu [National Kagawa Children' s Hospital, Zentsuji-cho, Zentsuji, Kagawa (Japan); Endo, Satoru [Department of Applied Nuclear Physics, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan); Hoshi, Masaharu [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    The feasibility of neutron capture therapy (NCT) using an accelerator-based neutron source of the {sup 7}Li(p,n) reaction produced by 2.5 MeV protons was investigated by comparing the neutron beam tailored by both the Hiroshima University radiological research accelerator (HIRRAC) and the heavy water neutron irradiation facility in the Kyoto University reactor (KUR-HWNIF) from the viewpoint of the contamination dose ratios of the fast neutrons and the gamma rays. These contamination ratios to the boron dose were estimated in a water phantom of 20 cm diameter and 20 cm length to simulate a human head, with experiments by the same techniques for NCT in KUR-HWNIF and/or the simulation calculations by the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code system version 4B (MCNP-4B). It was found that the {sup 7}Li(p,n) neutrons produced by 2.5 MeV protons combined with 20, 25 or 30 cm thick D{sub 2}O moderators of 20 cm diameter could make irradiation fields for NCT with depth-dose characteristics similar to those from the epithermal neutron beam at the KUR-HWNIF. (author)

  8. EURISOL-DS multi-MW target unit: Neutronics performance and shielding assessment, dose rate and material activation calculations for the MAFF configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Romanets, Y; Kadi, Y; Luis, R; Goncalves, I F; Tecchio, L; Kharoua, C; Vaz, P; Ene, D; David, J C; Rocca, R; Negoita, F

    2010-01-01

    One of the objectives of the EURISOL (EURopean Isotope Separation On-Line Radioactive Ion Beam) Design Study consisted of providing a safe and reliable facility layout and design for the following operational parameters and characteristics: (a) a 4 MW proton beam of 1 GeV energy impinging on a mercury target (the converter); (b) high neutron fluxes (similar to 3 x 10(16) neutrons/s) generated by spallation reactions of the protons impinging in the converter and (c) fission rate on fissile U-235 targets in excess of 10(15) fissions/s. In this work, the state-of-the-art Monte Carlo codes MCNPX (Pelowitz, 2005) and FLUKA (Vlachoudis, 2009; Ferrari et al., 2008) were used to characterize the neutronics performance and to perform the shielding assessment (Herrera-Martinez and Kadi, 2006; Cornell, 2003) of the EURISOLTarget Unit and to provide estimations of dose rate and activation of different components, in view of the radiation safety assessment of the facility. Dosimetry and activation calculations were perfor...

  9. Dosimetry methods in boron neutron capture therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G.; Artuso, E.; Felisi, M.; Regazzoni, V.; Giove, D. [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Department of Physics, Via Festa del Patrono 7, 20122 Milano (Italy); Agosteo, S.; Barcaglioni, L. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milano (Italy); Campi, F.; Garlati, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Energy Department, Piazza Leonardo Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); De Errico, F. [Universita degli Studi di Pisa, Department of Civil and Industrial Engineering, Lungamo Pacinotti 43, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Borroni, M.; Carrara, M. [Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Medical Physics Unit, Via Venezian 1, 20133 Milano (Italy); Burian, J.; Klupak, V.; Viererbl, L.; Marek, M. [Research Centre Rez, Department of Neutron Physics, 250-68 Husinec-Rez (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-15

    Dosimetry studies have been carried out at thermal and epithermal columns of Lvr-15 research reactor for investigating the spatial distribution of gamma dose, fast neutron dose and thermal neutron fluence. Two different dosimetry methods, both based on solid state detectors, have been studied and applied and the accuracy and consistency of the results have been inspected. One method is based on Fricke gel dosimeters that are dilute water solutions and have good tissue equivalence for neutrons and also for all the secondary radiations produced by neutron interactions in tissue or water phantoms. Fricke gel dosimeters give the possibility of separating the various dose contributions, i.e. the gamma dose, the fast neutron dose and the dose due to charged particles generated during thermal neutron reactions by isotopes having high cross section, like 10-B. From this last dose, thermal neutron fluence can be obtained by means of the kerma factor. The second method is based on thermoluminescence dosimeters. In particular, the developed method draw advantage from the different heights of the peaks of the glow curve of such phosphors when irradiated with photons or with thermal neutrons. The results show that satisfactory results can be obtained with simple methods, in spite of the complexity of the subject. However, the more suitable dosimeters and principally their utilization and analysis modalities are different for the various neutron beams, mainly depending on the relative intensities of the three components of the neutron field, in particular are different for thermal and epithermal columns. (Author)

  10. Estimation of the contribution of neutrons to the equivalent dose for personnel occupationally exposed and public in medical facilities: X-ray with energy equal or greater than 10MV; Estimacion de la contribucion por neutrones a la dosis equivalente para personal ocupacionalmente expuesto y publico en instalaciones de uso medico: rayos X de energia igual y/o superior a 10MV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Alfonso Mayer; Jimenez, Roberto Ortega; Sanchez, Mario A. Reyes, E-mail: amgesfm@hotmail.com, E-mail: rojimenez@cnsns.gob.mx [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS), Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Moranchel y Mejia, Mario, E-mail: mmoranchel@ipn.mx [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (ESFM/IPN), Mexico, D.F. (Mexico). Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas. Departamento de lngenieria Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    In Mexico the use of electron accelerators for treating cancerous tumors had grown enormously in the last decade. When the treatments are carried out with X-ray beam energy below 10 MV the design of the shielding of the radioactive facility is determined by analyzing the interaction of X-rays, which have a direct impact and dispersion, with materials of the facility. However, when it makes use of X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV the neutrons presence is imminent due to their generation by the interaction of the primary beam X-ray with materials head of the accelerator and of the table of treatment, mainly. In these cases, the design and calculation of shielding considers the generation of high-energy neutrons which contribute the equivalent dose that public and Occupationally Staff Exposed (POE) will receive in the areas surrounding the facility radioactive. However, very few measurements have been performed to determine the actual contribution to the neutron dose equivalent received by POE and public during working hours. This paper presents an estimate of the actual contribution of the neutron dose equivalent received by public and POE facilities in various radioactive medical use, considering many factors. To this end, measurements were made of the equivalent dose by using a neutron monitor in areas surrounding different radioactive installations (of Mexico) which used electron accelerators medical use during treatment with X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV. The results are presented after a statistical analysis of a wide range of measures in order to estimate more reliability real contribution of the neutron dose equivalent for POE and the public. (author)

  11. Estimation of the contribution by neutrons to the equivalent dose for exposed occupationally personnel and people in medical use facilities: X rays of equal or superior energy to 10 MV; Estimacion de la contribucion por neutrones a la dosis equivalente para personal ocupacionalmente expuesto y publico en instalaciones de uso medico: rayos X de energia igual y/o superior a 10 MV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega J, R.; Reyes S, M. A. [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias, Dr. Jose Ma. Barragan 779, Col. Narvarte, 03020 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Moranchel y R, M., E-mail: rojimenez@cnsns.gob.mx [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Av. Instituto Politecnico Nacional s/n, U. P. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edif. 9, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    In Mexico the use of electron accelerators for treating cancerous tumors had grown enormously in the last decade. When the treatments are carried out with X-ray beam energy below 10 MV the design of the shielding of the radioactive facility is determined by analyzing the interaction of X-rays, which have a direct impact and dispersion, with materials of the facility. However, when it makes use of X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV the neutrons presence is imminent due to their generation by the interaction of the primary beam X-ray with materials head of the accelerator and of the table of treatment, mainly. In these cases, the design and calculation of shielding considers the generation of high-energy neutrons which contribute the equivalent dose that public and occupationally staff exposed (POE) will receive in the areas surrounding the facility radioactive. However, very few measurements have been performed to determine the actual contribution to the neutron dose equivalent received by POE and public during working hours. This paper presents and estimate of the actual contribution of the neutron dose equivalent received by public and POE facilities in various radioactive medical use, considering many factors. To this end, measurements were made of the equivalent dose by using a neutron monitor in areas surrounding different radioactive installations (of Mexico) which used electron accelerators medical use during treatment with X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV. The results are presented after a statistical analysis of a wide range of measures in order to estimate more reliability real contribution of the neutron dose equivalent for POE and the public. (author)

  12. High-Dose Statins Boost Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... atorvastatin (Lipitor) or 20 to 40 mg of rosuvastatin (Crestor) daily. Examples of moderate doses include 10 to ... of Lipitor and 5 to 10 mg of Crestor, the study reported. Unlike some previous studies, this ...

  13. Low-Dose-Rate Californium-252 Neutron Intracavitary Afterloading Radiotherapy Combined With Conformal Radiotherapy for Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Min [Department of Oncology, Armed Police Hospital of Hangzhou, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Xu Hongde [Cancer Center, Armed Police Hospital of Hangzhou, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Pan Songdan; Lin Shan; Yue Jianhua [Department of Oncology, Armed Police Hospital of Hangzhou, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China); Liu Jianren, E-mail: liujianren0571@hotmail.com [Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province (China)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To study the efficacy of low-dose-rate californium-252 ({sup 252}Cf) neutron intracavitary afterloading radiotherapy (RT) combined with external pelvic RT for treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The records of 96 patients treated for cervical cancer from 2006 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. For patients with tumors {<=}4 cm in diameter, external beam radiation was performed (1.8 Gy/day, five times/week) until the dose reached 20 Gy, and then {sup 252}Cf neutron intracavitary afterloading RT (once/week) was begun, and the frequency of external beam radiation was changed to four times/week. For patients with tumors >4 cm, {sup 252}Cf RT was performed one to two times before whole-pelvis external beam radiation. The tumor-eliminating dose was determined by using the depth limit of 5 mm below the mucosa as the reference point. In all patients, the total dose of the external beam radiation ranged from 46.8 to 50 Gy. For {sup 252}Cf RT, the dose delivered to point A was 6 Gy/fraction, once per week, for a total of seven times, and the total dose was 42 Gy. Results: The mean {+-} SD patient age was 54.7 {+-} 13.7 years. Six patients had disease assessed at stage IB, 13 patients had stage IIA, 49 patients had stage IIB, 3 patients had stage IIIA, 24 patients had stage IIIB, and 1 patient had stage IVA. All patients obtained complete tumor regression (CR). The mean {+-} SD time to CR was 23.5 {+-} 3.4 days. Vaginal bleeding was fully controlled in 80 patients within 1 to 8 days. The mean {+-} SD follow-up period was 27.6 {+-} 12.7 months (range, 6-48 months). Five patients died due to recurrence or metastasis. The 3-year survival and disease-free recurrence rates were 89.6% and 87.5 %, respectively. Nine patients experienced mild radiation proctitis, and 4 patients developed radiocystitis. Conclusions: Low-dose-rate {sup 252}Cf neutron RT combined with external pelvic RT is effective for treating cervical cancer, with a low incidence of

  14. Biological dose estimation for accidental supra-high dose gamma-ray exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y., E-mail: yingchen29@yahoo.com.cn [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, 27 Taiping Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China); Yan, X.K. [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, 27 Taiping Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China); Department of Radiation Safety, Beijing Institute of Nuclear and Chemical Safety, 14 Guan-cun, Dongcheng District, Beijing 100077 (China); Du, J.; Wang, Z.D.; Zhang, X.Q.; Zeng, F.G.; Zhou, P.K. [Department of Radiation Toxicology and Oncology, Beijing Institute of Radiation Medicine, 27 Taiping Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100850 (China)

    2011-09-15

    To correctly estimate the biological dose of victims accidentally exposed to a very high dose of {sup 60}Co gamma-ray, a new dose-effect curve of chromosomal dicentrics/multicentrics and rings in the supra-high dose range was established. Peripheral blood from two healthy men was irradiated in vitro with doses of {sup 60}Co gamma-rays ranging from 6 to 22 Gy at a dose rate of 2.0 Gy/min. Lymphocytes were concentrated, cultured and harvested at 52 h, 68 h and 72 h. The numbers of dic + r were counted. The dose-effect curves were established and validated using comparisons with doses from the Tokai-mura accident and were then applied to two victims of supra-high dose exposure accident. The results indicated that there were no significant differences in chromosome aberration frequency among the different culture times from 52 h to 72 h. The 6-22 Gy dose-effect curve was fitted to a linear quadratic model Y = -2.269 + 0.776D - 7.868 x l0{sup -3}D{sup 2}. Using this mathematic model, the dose estimates were similar to data from Tokai-mura which were estimated by PCC ring. Whole body average doses of 9.7 Gy and 18.1 Gy for two victims in the Jining accident were satisfactorily given. We established and successfully applied a new dose-effect curve of chromosomal dicentrics plus ring (dic + r) after 6-22 Gy {gamma}-irradiation from a supra-high dose {sup 60}Co gamma-ray accident.

  15. Elastic properties of {alpha}-iron at high temperatures by high-pressure neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klotz, S; Cornelius, A L; Philippe, J [IMPMC, Universite P and M Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, C115, 75252 Paris (France); Straessle, Th; Pomjakushin, V, E-mail: Stefan.Klotz@impmc.upmc.fr [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2011-02-09

    We present high pressure-high temperature neutron diffraction data of {alpha}-iron in the 0-8 GPa and 300-550 K range. We find the isochors of {alpha}-iron strictly parallel to those of {epsilon}-iron, except at high P/T when the {alpha}-{gamma}-{epsilon} triple point to the non-magnetic {gamma}- and {epsilon}-phases is approached. This gives evidence for magnetoelastic effects in {alpha}-iron at high P/T. The measurements have been made possible by the use of a cell which enables neutron diffraction by external heating in the 0-10 GPa range and to at least 550 K. The technique should have numerous applications in research on condensed matter using neutrons.

  16. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, N A; Vogt, A J; Derendorf, K S; Johnson, M L; Rustan, G E; Quirinale, D G; Kreyssig, A; Lokshin, K A; Neuefeind, J C; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A I; Egami, T; Kelton, K F

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (∼100 mg).

  17. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, N. A.; Vogt, A. J.; Derendorf, K. S.; Johnson, M. L.; Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Kreyssig, A.; Lokshin, K. A.; Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke; Wang, Xun-Li; Goldman, A. I.; Egami, T.; Kelton, K. F.

    2016-01-01

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr64Ni36 measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (˜100 mg).

  18. Electrostatic levitation facility optimized for neutron diffraction studies of high temperature liquids at a spallation neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauro, N. A., E-mail: namauro@noctrl.edu [Department of Physics, North Central College, Naperville, Illinois 60540 (United States); Vogt, A. J. [Instrument and Source Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Derendorf, K. S. [Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States); Johnson, M. L.; Kelton, K. F. [Department of Physics and Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Washington University, 1 Brookings Drive, St. Louis, Missouri 63130 (United States); Rustan, G. E.; Quirinale, D. G.; Goldman, A. I. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Kreyssig, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Lokshin, K. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Quantum Condensed Matter Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Neuefeind, J. C.; An, Ke [Chemical and Engineering Materials Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Wang, Xun-Li [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, 83 Tat Chee Ave., Kowloon (Hong Kong); Egami, T. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    Neutron diffraction studies of metallic liquids provide valuable information about inherent topological and chemical ordering on multiple length scales as well as insight into dynamical processes at the level of a few atoms. However, there exist very few facilities in the world that allow such studies to be made of reactive metallic liquids in a containerless environment, and these are designed for use at reactor-based neutron sources. We present an electrostatic levitation facility, NESL (for Neutron ElectroStatic Levitator), which takes advantage of the enhanced capabilities and increased neutron flux available at spallation neutron sources (SNSs). NESL enables high quality elastic and inelastic neutron scattering experiments to be made of reactive metallic and other liquids in the equilibrium and supercooled temperature regime. The apparatus is comprised of a high vacuum chamber, external and internal neutron collimation optics, and a sample exchange mechanism that allows up to 30 samples to be processed between chamber openings. Two heating lasers allow excellent sample temperature homogeneity, even for samples approaching 500 mg, and an automated temperature control system allows isothermal measurements to be conducted for times approaching 2 h in the liquid state, with variations in the average sample temperature of less than 0.5%. To demonstrate the capabilities of the facility for elastic scattering studies of liquids, a high quality total structure factor for Zr{sub 64}Ni{sub 36} measured slightly above the liquidus temperature is presented from experiments conducted on the nanoscale-ordered materials diffractometer (NOMAD) beam line at the SNS after only 30 min of acquisition time for a small sample (∼100 mg)

  19. Thick activation detectors for neutron spectrometry using different unfolding methods: sensitivity analysis and dose calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medkour Ishak-Boushaki, Ghania, E-mail: gmedkour@yahoo.com [Laboratoire SNIRM-Faculte de Physique, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, BP 32 El-Alia BabEzzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Boukeffoussa, Khelifa [Laboratoire SNIRM-Faculte de Physique, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, BP 32 El-Alia BabEzzouar, Algiers (Algeria); Idiri, Zahir [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 02 Boulevard Frantz-Fanon, BP 399, Algiers (Algeria); Allab, Malika [Laboratoire SNIRM-Faculte de Physique, Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, BP 32 El-Alia BabEzzouar, Algiers (Algeria)

    2012-03-15

    This paper discusses the use of threshold detectors of extended sizes for low intensity neutron fields' characterization. The detectors were tested by the measurement of the neutron spectrum of an {sup 241}Am-Be source. Integral quantities characterizing the neutron field, required for radiological protection, have been derived by unfolding the measured data. A good agreement is achieved between the obtained results and those deduced using Bonner spheres. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the results to the deconvolution procedure is given. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low intensity neutron fields' characterization using thick threshold detectors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low activity {sup 241}Am-Be neutron source spectrum measurement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Integral quantities required for radiological protection have been derived. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results are in good agreement with those deduced using Bonner spheres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The results are not very sensitive to the chosen deconvolution procedure.

  20. Measurement of natural background neutron

    CERN Document Server

    Li Jain, Ping; Tang Jin Hua; Tang, E S; Xie Yan Fong

    1982-01-01

    A high sensitive neutron monitor is described. It has an approximate counting rate of 20 cpm for natural background neutrons. The pulse amplitude resolution, sensitivity and direction dependence of the monitor were determined. This monitor has been used for natural background measurement in Beijing area. The yearly average dose is given and compared with the results of KEK and CERN.

  1. Diagnostic assessment to estimate and minimize neutron dose rates received by occupationally exposed individuals at cyclotron facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reina, L.C. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Caixa Postal 68550, Cidade Universitaria, CEP: 21941-906 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: reina@ien.gov.br; Silva, A.X. [PEN/COPPE-DNC/Escola Politecnica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Cidade Universitaria, CEP: 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Suita, J.C.; Souza, M.I.S. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Caixa Postal 68550, Cidade Universitaria, CEP: 21941-906 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Facure, A. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear Rua General Severiano, 90-Botafogo, CEP: 22290-901 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Silva, J.C.P.; Furlanetto, J.A.D. [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Caixa Postal 68550, Cidade Universitaria, CEP: 21941-906 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Rebello, W. [Instituto Militar de Engenharia, Ministerio da Defesa Praca General Tiburcio, 80-Praia Vermelha, CEP: 22290-270 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2010-03-15

    Since 2003, radiopharmaceuticals for medical diagnostic purposes have been produced at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, in Brazil, using two cyclotron accelerators - CV-28 and RDS111. As a result of the ever increasing production, a diagnostic assessment to reduce neutron dose rates received by occupationally exposed individuals during irradiation processes has been developed. The purpose of this work is to present this assessment, which is currently being applied to both the Fluorine and Iodine targets of CV-28 and RDS111 cyclotron accelerators.

  2. The transit dose component of high dose rate brachytherapy: Direct measurements and clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastin, K.T.; Podgorsak, M.B.; Thomadsen, B.R. (Univ. of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics, Madison, WI (United States))

    1993-07-15

    The purpose was to measure the transit dose produced by a moving high dose rate brachytherapy source and assess its clinical significance. The doses produced from source movement during Ir-192 HDR afterloading were measured using calibrated thermoluminescent dosimeter rods. Transit doses at distances of 0.5-4.0 cm from an endobronchial applicator were measured using a Lucite phantom accommodating 1 x 1 x 6 mm thermoluminescent rods. Surface transit dose measurements were made using esophageal and endobronchial catheters, a gynecologic tandem, and an interstitial needle. No difference was detected in thermoluminescent dosimeter rod responses to 4 MV and Ir-192 spectra (427 nC/Gy) in a range of dose between 2 and 300 cGy. The transit dose at 0.5 cm from an endobronchial catheter was 0.31 cGy/(Curie-fraction) and followed an inverse square fall-off with increasing distance. Surface transit doses ranged from 0.38 cGy/(Curie-fraction) for an esophageal catheter to 1.03 cGy/(Curie-fraction) for an endobronchial catheter. Source velocity is dependent on the interdwell distance and varies between 220-452 mm/sec. A numeric algorithm was developed to calculate total transit dose, and was based on a dynamic point approximation for the moving high dose rate source. This algorithm reliably predicted the empirical transit doses and demonstrated that total transit dose is dependent on source velocity, number of fractions, and source activity. Surface transit doses are dependent on applicator diameter and wall material and thickness. Total transit doses within or outside the desired treatment volume are typically <100 cGy, but may exceed 200 cGy when using a large number of fractions with a high activity source. 9 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. High Field Pulsed Magnets for Neutron Scattering at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granroth, G. E.; Lee, J.; Fogh, E.; Christensen, N. B.; Toft-Petersen, R.; Nojiri, H.

    2015-03-01

    A High Field Pulsed Magnet (HFPM) setup, is in use at the Spallation Nuetron Source(SNS), Oak Ridge National Laboratory. With this device, we recently measured the high field magnetic spin structure of LiNiPO4. The results of this study will be highlighted as an example of possible measurements that can be performed with this device. To further extend the HFPM capabilities at SNS, we have learned to design and wind these coils in house. This contribution will summarize the magnet coil design optimization procedure. Specifically by varying the geometry of the multi-layer coil, we arrive at a design that balances the maximum field strength, neutron scattering angle, and the field homogeneity for a specific set of parameters. We will show that a 6.3kJ capacitor bank, can provide a magnetic field as high as 30T for a maximum scattering angle around 40° with homogeneity of +/- 4 % in a 2mm diameter spherical volume. We will also compare the calculations to measurements from a recently wound test coil. This work was supported in part by the Lab Directors' Research and Development Fund of ORNL.

  4. Neutron Spectra, Fluence and Dose Rates from Bare and Moderated Cf-252 Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radev, Radoslav P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-04-01

    A new, stronger 252Cf source (serial number SR-CF-3050-OR) was obtained from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in 2014 to supplement the existing 252Cf sources which had significantly decayed. A new instrument positioning track system was designed and installed by Hopewell Designs, Inc. in 2011. The neutron field from the new, stronger 252Cf source in the modified calibration environment needed to be characterized as well as the modified neutron fields produced by the new source and seven different neutron moderators. Comprehensive information about our 252Cf source, its origin, production, and isotopic content and decay characteristics needed to be compiled as well. This technical report is intended to address these issues.

  5. High dose radiotherapy for pituitary tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mead, K.W. (Queensland Radium Inst., Herston (Australia))

    1981-11-01

    The results of treatment of 120 pituitary tumours are presented. Based on this experience operable chromophobe adenomas are now treated with 5,000 rads in 4 weeks and inoperable ones receive an additional central dose to 7,500 rads. Pituitary Cushing's tumours are given 10,000 rads in 5 weeks using small fields and acromegalics 5,000 rads to the whole sella and 7,500 to its lower half. The absence of complications at these dose levels is attributed to the use of small fields and the precise application of treatment.

  6. Neutron techniques. [for study of high-energy particles produced in large solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Glenn M., Jr.; Dunphy, Philip P.; Chupp, Edward L.; Evenson, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Three experimental methods are described which hold the most promise for improved energy resolution, time resolution and sensitivity in the detection of solar neutrons on satellites and/or long duration balloon flights: the neutron calorimeter, the solar neutron track chamber, and the solar neutron decay proton detector. The characteristics of the three methods as to energy range, energy resolution, time resolution, detection efficiency, and physical properties are delineated. Earlier techniques to measure the intensity of high-energy cosmic-ray neutrons at the top of the atmosphere and to search for solar neutrons are described. The past three decades of detector development has now reached the point where it is possible to make comprehensive and detailed measurements of solar neutrons on future space missions.

  7. Development of a compact neutron source by a high voltage ring electrode discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masayuki; Shuhei Nezu Team; Akihiro Takeuchi Team

    2016-10-01

    Neutron is one of the particles in atomic nucleus. Neutron beam has many physical characteristics as follows; (a) the transmittance in a matter is high and (b) the interaction with atomic nuclei is dominant. For these reasons, the development of the neutron beam source is expected in many engineering and medical applications. However, it is still under development, because there is no compact neutron beam source. The purpose of this research is to develop the compact neutron beam source. The neutron is generated by using the inertial electrostatic confinement fusion. In this experiment, a ring-shaped electrode (cathode) is used for the convergence of the deuterium nucleus. To product the neutron by a D-D nuclear reaction, it is necessary to apply a high voltage into the glow discharge plasma. The neutron production rate is approximately 105 n/s under the condition that the cathode voltage is -15kV and discharge current is 10 mA. The neutron production rate increases with increasing the ring cathode voltage or discharge current. It will be possible to increase the number of neutrons by the stabilizing of the high voltage and high current discharge.

  8. A SHORTCUT FORMULA FOR THE 230-MeV PROTON-INDUCED NEUTRON DOSE EQUIVALENT IN CONCRETE AFTER A METAL SHIELD, DERIVED FROM MONTE CARLO SIMULATIONS WITH MCNPX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taal, A; van der Kooij, A; Okx, W J C

    2016-11-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were performed with MCNPX to determine the neutron dose equivalent in thick concrete after a metal shield, a double-layered shielding configuration. In the simulations, a 230-MeV proton beam impinging on a copper target was used to produce the neutrons. For forward angles up to 30° with respect to the proton beam, it is found that the neutron dose equivalent in thick concrete after a metal layer can be expressed in a single formula. This single formula being the neutron dose equivalent formula for a single thick concrete shield enhanced with an additional exponential term. The exponent of this additional exponential term is related to the relative macroscopic neutron removal cross section of the metal with respect to the concrete. The single formula found fits MCNPX data for the neutron dose equivalent in thick concrete after layers of metal ranging from beryllium to lead. First attempts were made to make this shortcut formula applicable to alloys and compounds of metals. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Unexpected Windy Weather Around a Highly Magnetized Neutron Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, George A.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Kargaltsev, Oleg; Gill, Ramandeep; Granot, Jonathan; Watts, Anna; Gelfand, Joseph; Baring, Matthew G.; Kust Harding, Alice; Pavlov, George G.; van der Horst, Alexander; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Gögüs, Ersin; Lin, Lin; Roberts, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    Magnetars and rotation-powered pulsars (RPPs) historically represented two distinct subclasses of neutron stars. Magnetars are slowly-rotating (~2-12 s), isolated neutron stars (NSs) with super-strong magnetic fields, B~10^13-10^15 G. RPPs, on the other hand, are rapidly-rotating (~0.01-0.3~s), isolated NSs with surface dipole magnetic field in the range ~10^11-10^13 G. Most pulsars possess a large rotational energy loss rate that powers a relativistic magnetized particle wind, often seen as a pulsar wind nebula (PWN; the Crab PWN being the most famous). There has not yet been convincing evidence for a wind nebula around magnetars, most likely due to their low rotational energy loss rate. Here, we report the study of new deep X-ray observations of the peculiar extended emission around the magnetar Swift J1834.9-0846. Our new results strongly support a wind nebula as the nature of the extended emission, thus, establishing Swift J1834.9-0846 as the first magnetar to possess a surrounding nebula. This implies that wind nebulae are no longer exclusive to RPPs and, along with recent discoveries in the field, further narrow the gaps between these two sub-populations of isolated NSs. The physical properties of this wind nebula, however, show peculiarities, especially its high radiative efficiency of about 10%, only shared with two other known very young RPPs, the Crab and its twin.

  10. Determination of the survival curve of the cell irradiated with low dose rate neutrons; Determinacao da curva de sobrevivencia de celulas irradiadas com neutrons a baixa taxa de dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Bruno M.; Freitas, Marcelo H.A. de; Campos, Tarcisio P.R. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Silva, Luciana M.; Dias, Consuelo L.F. [Fundacao Ezequiel Dias, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Pesquisa. Lab. de Bioquimica

    2000-07-01

    The effect of the radiation in tissue and cells are a theme of extreme importance and that is receiving large attention more and more now. This work purposes to evaluate the deleterious effects of the neutrons radiation at low dose rate in lineages of human cancerous cells through the analysis of survival curves. Deleterious effects due to radiation of low dose rate (3.8 mSv/hr) were observed in cells of the lineage HeLa S3. Previous studies, in lineage HN5 of tongue carcinoma, showed survive level to 0.2Sv of 80%, compatible to the value of 88,57% 0.4 Sv obtained for HeLa S3. In a close future, with the molecular biology characterization of a great number or possibly all cancer types (that will be accelerated largely with the conclusion of the human genome project), studies like this, can be much more specific, and could determine the efficiency of the neutrons or any other radiation type for each one of those types. Those data would have of great value for the medicine and they would help to plan the treatments better. (author)

  11. Mechanical properties of SiC composites neutron irradiated under light water reactor relevant temperature and dose conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyanagi, Takaaki; Katoh, Yutai

    2017-10-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) fiber-reinforced SiC matrix (SiC/SiC) composites are being actively investigated for use in accident-tolerant core structures of light water reactors (LWRs). Owing to the limited number of irradiation studies previously conducted at LWR-coolant temperature, this study examined SiC/SiC composites following neutron irradiation at 230-340 °C to 2.0 and 11.8 dpa in the High Flux Isotope Reactor. The investigated materials were chemical vapor infiltrated (CVI) SiC/SiC composites with three different reinforcement fibers. The fiber materials were monolayer pyrolytic carbon (PyC) -coated Hi-Nicalon™ Type-S (HNS), Tyranno™ SA3 (SA3), and SCS-Ultra™ (SCS) SiC fibers. The irradiation resistance of these composites was investigated based on flexural behavior, dynamic Young's modulus, swelling, and microstructures. There was no notable mechanical properties degradation of the irradiated HNS and SA3 SiC/SiC composites except for reduction of the Young's moduli by up to 18%. The microstructural stability of these composites supported the absence of degradation. In addition, no progressive swelling from 2.0 to 11.8 dpa was confirmed for these composites. On the other hand, the SCS composite showed significant mechanical degradation associated with cracking within the fiber. This study determined that SiC/SiC composites with HNS or SA3 SiC/SiC fibers, a PyC interphase, and a CVI SiC matrix retain their properties beyond the lifetime dose for LWR fuel cladding at the relevant temperature.

  12. Relative safety profiles of high dose statin regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Escobar

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Carlos Escobar, Rocio Echarri, Vivencio BarriosDepartment of Cardiology, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Recent clinical trials recommend achieving a low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level of <100 mg/dl in high-risk and <70 mg/dl in very high risk patients. To attain these goals, however, many patients will need statins at high doses. The most frequent side effects related to the use of statins, myopathy, rhabdomyolysis, and increased levels of transaminases, are unusual. Although low and moderate doses show a favourable profile, there is concern about the tolerability of higher doses. During recent years, numerous trials to analyze the efficacy and tolerability of high doses of statins have been published. This paper updates the published data on the safety of statins at high doses.Keywords: statins, high doses, tolerability, liver, muscle

  13. Statistical behavior of high doses in medical radiodiagnosis; Comportamento estatistico das altas doses em radiodiagnostico medico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza, Adriana Elisa, E-mail: adrianaebarboza@gmail.com, E-mail: elisa@bolsista.ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This work has as main purpose statistically estimating occupational exposure in medical diagnostic radiology in cases of high doses recorded in 2011 at national level. For statistical survey of this study, doses of 372 IOE's diagnostic radiology in different Brazilian states were evaluated. Data were extracted from the work of monograph (Research Methodology Of High Doses In Medical Radiodiagnostic) that contains the database's information Sector Management doses of IRD/CNEN-RJ, Brazil. The identification of these states allows the Sanitary Surveillance (VISA) responsible, becomes aware of events and work with programs to reduce these events. (author)

  14. High-Resolution Fast-Neutron Spectrometry for Arms Control and Treaty Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David L. Chichester; James T. Johnson; Edward H. Seabury

    2012-07-01

    Many nondestructive nuclear analysis techniques have been developed to support the measurement needs of arms control and treaty verification, including gross photon and neutron counting, low- and high-resolution gamma spectrometry, time-correlated neutron measurements, and photon and neutron imaging. One notable measurement technique that has not been extensively studied to date for these applications is high-resolution fast-neutron spectrometry (HRFNS). Applied for arms control and treaty verification, HRFNS has the potential to serve as a complimentary measurement approach to these other techniques by providing a means to either qualitatively or quantitatively determine the composition and thickness of non-nuclear materials surrounding neutron-emitting materials. The technique uses the normally-occurring neutrons present in arms control and treaty verification objects of interest as an internal source of neutrons for performing active-interrogation transmission measurements. Most low-Z nuclei of interest for arms control and treaty verification, including 9Be, 12C, 14N, and 16O, possess fast-neutron resonance features in their absorption cross sections in the 0.5- to 5-MeV energy range. Measuring the selective removal of source neutrons over this energy range, assuming for example a fission-spectrum starting distribution, may be used to estimate the stoichiometric composition of intervening materials between the neutron source and detector. At a simpler level, determination of the emitted fast-neutron spectrum may be used for fingerprinting 'known' assemblies for later use in template-matching tests. As with photon spectrometry, automated analysis of fast-neutron spectra may be performed to support decision making and reporting systems protected behind information barriers. This paper will report recent work at Idaho National Laboratory to explore the feasibility of using HRFNS for arms control and treaty verification applications, including simulations

  15. A multi-DSP system for the neutron high resolution Fourier diffractometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozdov, V.A.; Butenko, V.A.; Prikhodko, V.I. [Joint Inst. of Nuclear Research, Moscow (Russian Federation). Frank Lab. of Neutron Physics

    1998-08-01

    The multi-DSP data acquisition system for neutron time-of-flight spectrum measurements requiring fast real-time data processing is designed and is operated at the neutron High Resolution Fourier Diffractometer (HRFD). The use of high performance DSPs and front-end electronics based on flexible PLDs allows increasing of the efficiency of neutron diffractometers with a Fourier chopper and a multi-element detector system by the method of electronic time-focusing.

  16. Enhancement of the sterile neutrinos yield at high matter density and at increasing the medium neutronization

    CERN Document Server

    Khruschov, V V; Nadyozhin, D K; Fomichev, S V

    2014-01-01

    The relative yields of active and sterile neutrinos in the matter with a high density and different degree of neutronization are calculated. A significant increase in the proportion of sterile neutrinos produced in superdense matter when approaching the medium neutronization degree to value of two is found. The results obtained can be used in the calculations of the neutrino fluxes for media with a high density and different neutronization degrees in astrophysical processes such as the formation of protoneutron core of a supernova.

  17. Measurements of neutron effective doses and attenuation lengths for shielding materials at the heavy-ion medical accelerator in Chiba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumamoto, Yoshikazu; Noda, Yutaka; Sato, Yukio; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Murakami, Takeshi

    2005-05-01

    The effective doses and attenuation lengths for concrete and iron were measured for the design of heavy ion facilities. Neutrons were produced through the reaction of copper, carbon, and lead bombarded by carbon ions at 230 and 400 MeV.A, neon ions at 400 and 600 MeV.A, and silicon ions at 600 and 800 MeV.A. The detectors used were a Linus and a Andersson-Braun-type rem counter and a detector based on the activation of a plastic scintillator. Representative effective dose rates (in units of 10(-8) microSv h(-1) pps(-1) at 1 m from the incident target surface, where pps means particles per second) and the attenuation lengths (in units of m) were 9.4 x 10(4), 0.46 for carbon ions at 230 MeV.A; 8.9 x 10(5), 0.48 for carbon ions at 400 MeV.A; 9.3 x 10(5), 0.48 for neon ions at 400 MeV.A; 3.8 x 10(6), 0.50 for neon ions at 600 MeV.A; 3.9 x 10(6), 0.50 for silicon ions at 600 MeV.A; and 1.1 x 10(7), 0.51 for silicon ions at 800 MeV.A. The attenuation provided by an iron plate approximately 20 cm thick (nearly equal to the attenuation length) corresponded to that of a 50-cm block of concrete in the present energy range. Miscellaneous results, such as the angular distributions of the neutron effective dose, narrow beam attenuation experiments, decay of gamma-ray doses after the bombardment of targets, doses around an irradiation room, order effects in the multi-layer (concrete and iron) shielding, the doses from different targets, the doses measured with a scintillator activation detector, the gamma-ray doses out of walls and the ratio of the response between the Andersson-Braun-type and the Linus rem counters are also reported.

  18. How to polarise all neutrons in one beam: a high performance polariser and neutron transport system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, D. Martin; Bentley, P. M.; Pappas, C.

    2016-09-01

    Polarised neutron beams are used in disciplines as diverse as magnetism,soft matter or biology. However, most of these applications often suffer from low flux also because the existing neutron polarising methods imply the filtering of one of the spin states, with a transmission of 50% at maximum. With the purpose of using all neutrons that are usually discarded, we propose a system that splits them according to their polarisation, flips them to match the spin direction, and then focuses them at the sample. Monte Carlo (MC) simulations show that this is achievable over a wide wavelength range and with an outstanding performance at the price of a more divergent neutron beam at the sample position.

  19. Neutron dosimetry for low dose rate Cf-252 AT sources and adherence to recent clinical dosimetry protocol for brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, M.J.; Wierzbicki, J.G.; Van den Heuvel, F. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Martin, R.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

    1997-12-01

    In 1995, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 43 (AAPM TG-43) published a protocol obsoleting all mixed-field radiation dosimetry for Cf-252. Recommendations for a new brachytherapy dosimetry formalism made by this Task Group favor quantification of source strength in terms of air kerma rather than apparent Curies or other radiation units. Additionally, representation of this dosimetry data in terms of radial dose functions, anisotropy functions, geometric factors, and dose rate constants are in an angular and radial (spherical) coordinate system as recommended, rather than the along-away dosimetry data (Cartesian coordinate system) currently available. This paper presents the initial results of calculated neutron dosimetry in a water phantom for a Cf-252 applicator tube (AT) type medical source soon available from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  20. Characterization of the high-energy neutron beam of the PRISMA beamline using a diamond detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Frost, C. D.; Minniti, T.; Schooneveld, E.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Tardocchi, M.; Rebai, M.; Gorini, G.

    2016-07-01

    The high-energy neutron component (En > 10 MeV) of the neutron spectrum of PRISMA, a beam-line at the ISIS spallation source, has been characterized for the first time. Neutron measurements using a Single-crystal Diamond Detector at a short-pulse source are obtained by a combination of pulse height and time of flight analysis. An XY scan provides a 2D map of the high-energy neutron beam which has a diameter of about 40 mm. The high neutron flux, that has been found to be (3.8 ± 0.7) · 105 cm-2s-1 for En > 10 MeV in the centre, opens up for a possible application of the beam-line as a high-energy neutron irradiation position. Results are of interest for the development of the ChipIR beam-line, which will feature an atmospheric-like neutron spectrum for chip irradiation experiment. Furthermore, these results demonstrate that diamond detectors can be used at spallation sources to investigate the transport of high-energy neutrons down instruments which is of interest in general to designers as high-energy neutrons are a source of background in thermal beamlines.

  1. RBE values and repair characteristics for colo-rectal injury after caesium 137 gamma-ray and neutron irradiation. 2. Fractionation up to ten doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, N.H.A.; Denekamp, J. (Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood (UK). Gray Lab.)

    1984-07-01

    Early and late colo-rectal damage in mice have been assessed after /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. irradiation and 3 MeV neutrons given as 1, 2, 5 or 10 fractions. Damage was measured by early changes in body weight, the late production of short faecal pellets and the pattern of lethality after irradiation. The data have been analysed in terms of the time course of expression of damage, fractionation effects and the RBE for neutrons over a wide range of doses per fraction (0.5-12.5 Gy neutrons, 3.5-33.5 Gy ..gamma.. rays). The RBE was strongly dependent on dose per fraction because of the lack of reparable damage after neutrons. The RBE for both early and late effects was 5.0 at a neutron dose per fraction of 1 Gy. Extrapolation of the RBE data to lower doses, using the linear quadratic model, predicts a higher RBE for late (7.4-12.7) than for early damage (5.7-8.5) if ..gamma..-ray doses below 5 Gy are used.

  2. Investigating quartz optically stimulated luminescence dose-response curves at high doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowick, Sally E., E-mail: lowick@geo.unibe.c [Institut fuer Geologie, Universitaet Bern, Baltzerstrasse 1-3, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Preusser, Frank [Institut fuer Geologie, Universitaet Bern, Baltzerstrasse 1-3, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Wintle, Ann G. [Institute of Geography and Earth Sciences, Aberystwyth University, AberystwythSY23 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    Despite the general expectation that optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) growth should be described by a simple saturating exponential function, an additional high dose component is often reported in the dose response of quartz. Although often reported as linear, it appears that this response is the early expression of a second saturating exponential. While some studies using equivalent doses that fall in this high dose region have produced ages that correlate well with independent dating, others report that it results in unreliable age determinations. Two fine grain sedimentary quartz samples that display such a response were used to investigate the origin of this additional high dose component: three experiments were conducted to examine their dose-response up to >1000 Gy. The high dose rates provided by laboratory irradiation were found not to induce a sensitivity change in the response to a subsequent test dose, with the latter not being significantly different from those generated following naturally acquired doses. The relative percentage contributions of the fast and medium OSL components remained fixed throughout the dose-response curve, suggesting that the electron traps that give rise to the initial OSL do not change with dose. An attempt was made to investigate a change in luminescence centre recombination probability by monitoring the depletion of the '325 {sup o}C' thermoluminescence (TL) during the optical stimulation that would result in depletion of the OSL signal. The emissions measured through both the conventional ultraviolet (UV), and a longer wavelength violet/blue (VB) window, displayed similar relative growth with dose, although it was not possible to resolve the origin of the VB emissions. No evidence was found to indicate whether the additional component at high doses occurs naturally or is a product of laboratory treatment. However, it appears that these samples display an increased sensitivity of quartz OSL to high doses

  3. Evaluation of neutron doses received at different organs in radiotherapy treatments using the UAB PADC based dosemeters in an anthropomorphic phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, C., E-mail: carles.domingo@uab.ca [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica, Edifici C, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Garcia-Fuste, M.J.; Morales, E.; Amgarou, K.; Castelo, J. [Grup de Fisica de les Radiacions, Departament de Fisica, Edifici C, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, E-08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Sanchez-Doblado, F. [Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Servicio de Radiofisica, Sevilla (Spain); Departamento de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain)

    2009-10-15

    The NEUTOR project was set up to study radiotherapy patient exposures to the neutrons produced around the LINAC accelerator head by photon radiation above approx8 MeV. These neutrons may reach the patient directly, or they may interact with the surrounding materials until they become thermalised, scattering all over the treatment room and affecting the patient as well. A miniaturised version of the UAB PADC based neutron dosemeter is used, together with thermoluminescence Li-6/Li-7 pairs, in several positions inside an anthropomorphic female phantom to determine doses received by the patient at several organs or tissues. Irradiations were made at a 15 MV LINAC (Hospital Universitario Virgen de la Macarena, Sevilla, Spain), an 18 MV LINAC (Hospital General Universitario de Valencia, Spain) and a 23 MV LINAC (Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Germany). Preliminary patient dose maps obtained from the UAB PADC dosemeter measurements (considering an average calibration factor for all neutron energies) are reported in this work.

  4. Effect of the energy dependence of response of neutron personal dosemeters routinely used in the UK on the accuracy of dose estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Tanner, R J; Thomas, D J

    2002-01-01

    A large set of neutron energy distributions have been classified by workplace to provide a guide to the neutron fields to which workers in particular industries are likely to be exposed. These have been combined (folded) with the results of a major programme of neutron personal dosemeter response function measurements, to provide results for the systematic errors that those dosemeters would give in workplaces. Data for neutron doses recorded for UK classified workers have been taken from the CIDI tables, and related to the results from the folding process. It has hence been possible to draw conclusions about the probable systematic errors that result from the use of the currently available neutron personal dosemeters, which have inherent problems associated with their energy dependence of response.

  5. Development of computerized dose planning system and applicator for high dose rate remote afterloading irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, T. J. [Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea); Kim, S. W. [Fatima Hospital, Taegu (Korea); Kim, O. B.; Lee, H. J.; Won, C. H. [Keimyung Univ., Taegu (Korea); Yoon, S. M. [Dong-a Univ., Pusan (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    To design and fabricate of the high dose rate source and applicators which are tandem, ovoids and colpostat for OB/Gyn brachytherapy includes the computerized dose planning system. Designed the high dose rate Ir-192 source with nuclide atomic power irradiation and investigated the dose characteristics of fabricated brachysource. We performed the effect of self-absorption and determining the gamma constant and output factor and determined the apparent activity of designed source. he automated computer planning system provided the 2D distribution and 3D includes analysis programs. Created the high dose rate source Ir-192, 10 Ci(370GBq). The effective attenuation factor from the self-absorption and source wall was examined to 0.55 of the activity of bare source and this factor is useful for determination of the apparent activity and gamma constant 4.69 Rcm{sup 2}/mCi-hr. Fabricated the colpostat was investigated the dose distributions of frontal, axial and sagittal plane in intra-cavitary radiation therapy for cervical cancer. The reduce dose at bladder and rectum area was found about 20 % of original dose. The computerized brachytherapy planning system provides the 2-dimensional isodose and 3-D include the dose-volume histogram(DVH) with graphic-user-interface mode. emoted afterloading device was built for experiment of created Ir-192 source with film dosimetry within {+-}1 mm discrepancy. 34 refs., 25 figs., 11 tabs. (Author)

  6. Dose point kernel for boron-11 decay and the cellular S values in boron neutron capture therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yunzhi; Geng, JinPeng; Gao, Song; Bao, Shanglian

    2006-12-01

    The study of the radiobiology of boron neutron capture therapy is based on the cellular level dosimetry of boron-10's thermal neutron capture reaction 10B(n,alpha)7Li, in which one 1.47 MeV helium-4 ion and one 0.84 MeV lithium-7 ion are spawned. Because of the chemical preference of boron-10 carrier molecules, the dose is heterogeneously distributed in cells. In the present work, the (scaled) dose point kernel of boron-11 decay, called 11B-DPK, was calculated by GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation code. The DPK curve drops suddenly at the radius of 4.26 microm, the continuous slowing down approximation (CSDA) range of a lithium-7 ion. Then, after a slight ascending, the curve decreases to near zero when the radius goes beyond 8.20 microm, which is the CSDA range of a 1.47 MeV helium-4 ion. With the DPK data, S values for nuclei and cells with the boron-10 on the cell surface are calculated for different combinations of cell and nucleus sizes. The S value for a cell radius of 10 microm and a nucleus radius of 5 microm is slightly larger than the value published by Tung et al. [Appl. Radiat. Isot. 61, 739-743 (2004)]. This result is potentially more accurate than the published value since it includes the contribution of a lithium-7 ion as well as the alpha particle.

  7. Three new nondestructive evaluation tools based on high flux neutron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubbard, C.R.; Raine, D.; Peascoe, R.; Wright, M. [and others

    1997-03-01

    Nondestructive evaluation methods and systems based on specific attributes of neutron interactions with materials are being developed. The special attributes of neutrons are low attenuation in most engineering materials, strong interaction with low Z elements, and epithermal neutron absorption resonances. The three methods under development at ORNL include neutron based tomography and radiography; through thickness, nondestructive texture mapping; and internal, noninvasive temperature measurement. All three techniques require high flux sources such as the High Flux Isotope Reactor, a steady state source, or the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator, a pulsed neutron source. Neutrons are quite penetrating in most engineering materials and thus can be useful to detect internal flaws and features. Hydrogen atoms, such as in a hydrocarbon fuel, lubricant, or a metal hydride, are relatively opaque to neutron transmission and thus neutron based tomography/radiography is ideal to image their presence. Texture, the nonrandom orientation of crystalline grains within materials, can be mapped nondestructively using neutron diffraction methods. Epithermal neutron resonance absorption is being studied as a noncontacting temperature sensor. This paper highlights the underlying physics of the methods, progress in development, and the potential benefits for science and industry of the three facilities.

  8. Dose-Dependent Pattern of Inducible mRNA Expression of PIG3 Gene in Normal Human Lymphoblastoid Cells by Thermal Neutron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA; Nan-ru; SUI; Li; WANG; Xiao; KONG; Fu-quan; LIU; Xiao-dan; ZHOU; Ping-kun

    2012-01-01

    <正>Using the thermal neutron produced by the hospital neutron irradiator, AHH-1 cell was irradiated at the various dose, 0, 0.5, 2, 4, 6 and 8 Gy, respectively. After irradiation, cells were collected at 2, 6, 12, 24 and 48 h post-irradiation, and then cell cycle distribution was tested using flow cytometry, as well as PIG3 mRNA expression level was detected using real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR detection.

  9. Dose-response relationship of dicentric chromosomes in human lymphocytes obtained for the fission neutron therapy facility MEDAPP at the research reactor FRM II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, E; Wagner, F M; Romm, H; Walsh, L; Roos, H

    2009-02-01

    The biological effectiveness of neutrons from the neutron therapy facility MEDAPP (mean neutron energy 1.9 MeV) at the new research reactor FRM II at Garching, Germany, has been analyzed, at different depths in a polyethylene phantom. Whole blood samples were exposed to the MEDAPP beam in special irradiation chambers to total doses of 0.14-3.52 Gy at 2-cm depth, and 0.18-3.04 Gy at 6-cm depth of the phantom. The neutron and gamma-ray absorbed dose rates were measured to be 0.55 Gy min(-1) and 0.27 Gy min(-1) at 2-cm depth, while they were 0.28 and 0.25 Gy min(-1) at 6-cm depth. Although the irradiation conditions at the MEDAPP beam and the RENT beam of the former FRM I research reactor were not identical, neutrons from both facilities gave a similar linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for dicentric chromosomes at a depth of 2 cm. Different dose-response curves for dicentrics were obtained for the MEDAPP beam at 2 and 6 cm depth, suggesting a significantly lower biological effectiveness of the radiation with increasing depth. No obvious differences in the dose-response curves for dicentric chromosomes estimated under interactive or additive prediction between neutrons or gamma-rays and the experimentally obtained dose-response curves could be determined. Relative to (60)Co gamma-rays, the values for the relative biological effectiveness at the MEDAPP beam decrease from 5.9 at 0.14 Gy to 1.6 at 3.52 Gy at 2-cm depth, and from 4.1 at 0.18 Gy to 1.5 at 3.04 Gy at 6-cm depth. Using the best possible conditions of consistency, i.e., using blood samples from the same donor and the same measurement techniques for about two decades, avoiding the inter-individual variations in sensitivity or the differences in methodology usually associated with inter-laboratory comparisons, a linear-quadratic dose-response relationship for the mixed neutron and gamma-ray MEDAPP field as well as for its fission neutron part was obtained. Therefore, the debate on whether the fission-neutron

  10. High-quality single crystals for neutron experiments

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Geetha Balakrishnan

    2008-10-01

    To make headway on any problem in physics, high-quality single crystals are required. In this talk, special emphasis will be placed on the crystal growth of various oxides (superconductors and magnetic materials), borides and carbides using the image furnaces at Warwick. The floating zone method of crystal growth used in these furnaces produces crystals of superior quality, circumventing many of the problems associated with, for example, flux growth from the melt. This method enables the growth of large volumes of crystal, a prerequisite especially for experiments using neutron beams. Some examples of experimental results from crystals grown at Warwick, selected from numerous in-house studies and our collaborative research projects with other UK and international groups will be discussed.

  11. Torsional oscillations of neutron stars with highly tangled magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Sotani, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    To determine the frequencies of magnetic oscillations in the neutron stars with highly tangled magnetic fields, we derive the perturbation equations. We assume that the field strength of the global magnetic structure is so small that such fields are negligible compared with the tangled fields, which may still be far from a realistic configuration. Then, we systematically examine the spectra of the magnetic oscillations, as varying the magnetic field strength and stellar mass. The frequencies without crust elasticity are completely proportional to the strength of magnetic field, whose proportionality constant depends strongly on the stellar mass. On the other hand, the oscillation spectra with crust elasticity become more complicated, where the frequencies even for weak magnetic fields are different from the crustal torsional oscillations without magnetic fields. For discussing the spectra, the critical field strength can play an important role, which is determined in such a way that the shear velocity is equi...

  12. Analysis of the neutron component at high altitude mountains using active and passive measurement devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajek, M. E-mail: mhajek@ati.ac.at; Berger, T.; Schoener, W.; Vana, N

    2002-01-01

    The European Council directive 96/29/Euratom requires dosimetric precautions if the effective dose exceeds 1 mSv/a. On an average, this value is exceeded by aircrew members. Roughly half of the radiation exposure at flight altitudes is caused by cosmic ray-induced neutrons. Active ({sup 6}LiI(Eu)-scintillator) and passive (TLDs) Bonner sphere spectrometers were used to determine the neutron energy spectra atop Mt. Sonnblick (3105 m) and Mt. Kitzsteinhorn (3029 m). Further measurements in a mixed radiation field at CERN as well as in a proton beam of 62 MeV at Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, confirmed that not only neutrons but also charged particles contribute to the readings of active detectors, whereas TLD-600 and TLD-700 in pair allow the determination of the thermal neutron flux. Unfolding of the detector data obtained atop both mountains shows two relative maxima around 1 MeV and 85 MeV, which have to be considered for the assessment of the biologically relevant dose equivalent. By convoluting the spectra with appropriate conversion functions the neutron dose equivalent rate was determined to be 150{+-}15 nSv/h. The total dose equivalent rate determined by the HTR-method was 210{+-}15 nSv/h. The results are in good agreement with LET-spectrometer and Sievert counter measurements carried out simultaneously.

  13. Improvement of dose distribution in phantom by using epithermal neutron source based on the Be(p,n) reaction using a 30 MeV proton cyclotron accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, H; Sakurai, Y; Suzuki, M; Takata, T; Masunaga, S; Kinashi, Y; Kashino, G; Liu, Y; Mitsumoto, T; Yajima, S; Tsutsui, H; Takada, M; Maruhashi, A; Ono, K

    2009-07-01

    In order to generate epithermal neutrons for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), we proposed the method of filtering and moderating fast neutrons, which are emitted from the reaction between a beryllium target and 30 MeV protons accelerated by a cyclotron, using an optimum moderator system composed of iron, lead, aluminum, calcium fluoride, and enriched (6)LiF ceramic filter. At present, the epithermal-neutron source is under construction since June 2008 at Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute. This system consists of a cyclotron to supply a proton beam of about 1 mA at 30 MeV, a beam transport system, a beam scanner system for heat reduction on the beryllium target, a target cooling system, a beam shaping assembly, and an irradiation bed for patients. In this article, an overview of the cyclotron-based neutron source (CBNS) and the properties of the treatment neutron beam optimized by using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code are presented. The distribution of the RBE (relative biological effectiveness) dose in a phantom shows that, assuming a (10)B concentration of 13 ppm for normal tissue, this beam could be employed to treat a patient with an irradiation time less than 30 min and a dose less than 12.5 Gy-eq to normal tissue. The CBNS might be an alternative to the reactor-based neutron sources for BNCT treatments.

  14. Fertility of Tall Girls Treated with High-Dose Estrogen, a Dose-Response Relationship

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, A. E. J.; Drop, S. L. S.; Laven, J. S. E.; Boot, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    Context: High-dose estrogen treatment to reduce final height of tall girls increases their risk for infertility in later life. Objective: The aim was to study the effect of estrogen dose on fertility outcome of these women. Design/Setting: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of university hosp

  15. SU-E-T-594: Out-Of-Field Neutron and Gamma Dose Estimated Using TLD-600/700 Pairs in the Wobbling Proton Therapy System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y [College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, Y [College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Medical Physics Research Center, Institute for Radiological Research, Chang Gung University / Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, H [College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Tsai, H [College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Medical Physics Research Center, Institute for Radiological Research, Chang Gung University / Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Healthy Aging Research Center, Chang Gung University, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Secondary fast neutrons and gamma rays are mainly produced due to the interaction of the primary proton beam with the beam delivery nozzle. These secondary radiation dose to patients and radiation workers are unwanted. The purpose of this study is to estimate the neutron and gamma dose equivalent out of the treatment volume during the wobbling proton therapy system. Methods: Two types of thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeters, TLD-600 ({sup 6}LiF: Mg, Ti) and TLD-700 ({sup 7}LiF: Mg, Ti) were used in this study. They were calibrated in the standard neutron and gamma sources at National Standards Laboratory. Annealing procedure is 400°C for 1 hour, 100°C for 2 hours and spontaneously cooling down to the room temperature in a programmable oven. Two-peak method (a kind of glow curve analysis technique) was used to evaluate the TL response corresponding to the neutron and gamma dose. The TLD pairs were placed outside the treatment field at the neutron-gamma mixed field with 190-MeV proton beam produced by the wobbling system through the polyethylene plate phantom. The results of TLD measurement were compared to the Monte Carlo simulation. Results: The initial experiment results of calculated dose equivalents are 0.63, 0.38, 0.21 and 0.13 mSv per Gy outside the field at the distance of 50, 100, 150 and 200 cm. Conclusion: The TLD-600 and TLD-700 pairs are convenient to estimate neutron and gamma dosimetry during proton therapy. However, an accurate and suitable glow curve analysis technique is necessary. During the wobbling system proton therapy, our results showed that the neutron and gamma doses outside the treatment field are noticeable. This study was supported by the grants from the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CMRPD1C0682)

  16. SPHERES, J\\"ulich's High-Flux Neutron Backscattering Spectrometer at FRM II

    CERN Document Server

    Wuttke, Joachim; Drochner, Matthias; Kämmerling, Hans; Kayser, Franz-Joseph; Pardo, Luis Carlos; Prager, Michael; Ossovyi, Vladimir; Schneider, Gerald J; Schneider, Harald; Staringer, Simon; Richter, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    SPHERES (SPectrometer with High Energy RESolution) is a third-generation neutron backscattering spectrometer, located at the 20 MW German neutron source FRM II and operated by the J\\"ulich Centre for Neutron Science. It offers an energy resolution (fwhm) better than 0.65 micro-eV, a dynamic range of +-31 micro-eV, and a signal-to-noise ratio of up to 1750:1.

  17. High-Power Linac for the Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rej, D. J.

    2002-04-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) will be the world’s most intense source of neutrons for fundamental science and industrial applications. Design and construction of this facility, located at Oak Ridge, is a joint venture between six DOE laboratories. Construction began in 1999 and is currently ahead of the scheduled 2006 completion date. Injecting a high-power, pulsed proton beam into a mercury target produces neutrons. In this talk, we review the physics requirements, design, and status of the construction of the 1-GeV, 1.4-MW average power RF linac for SNS. The accelerator consists of a drift tube linac (DTL), a coupled-cavity linac (CCL), and a superconducting rf (SRF) linac. The phase and quadrupole settings are set to avoid structure and parametric resonances, with coherent resonances posing minimal risk for emittance growth. The DTL is 37 m long and accelerates the ions to 87 MeV. The CCL is 55 m long and accelerates the ions to 186 MeV. The rf structure design and stability for both the DTL and CCL have been validated with scale models. The SRF linac has a modular design to accelerate ions to 1000 MeV, with a straightforward upgrade to 1.3 GeV at a later date. 3D particle-in-cell simulations of beam dynamics are performed to validate performance. The accelerator utilizes 93 MW of pulsed power operating continuously at 60-Hz with an 8factor. Approximately one hundred 402.5 or 805-MHz klystrons, with outputs between 0.55 and 5 MW, are used. The klystrons are powered by a novel converter-modulator that takes advantage of recent advances in IGBT switch plate assemblies and low-loss material cores for boost transformer. Beam diagnostics include position, phase, profile, and current monitors. They are designed to enable accurate beam steering and matching, and to minimize beam loss that would lead to activation and prevent hands-on maintenance.

  18. Design of a High Intensity Neutron Source for Neutron-Induced Fission Yield Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Lantz, M; Jokinen, A; Kolhinen, V S; Mattera, A; Penttilä, H; Pomp, S; Rakopoulos, V; Rinta-Antila, S; Solders, A

    2013-01-01

    The upgraded IGISOL facility with JYFLTRAP, at the accelerator laboratory of the University of Jyv\\"askyl\\"a, has been supplied with a new cyclotron which will provide protons of the order of 100 {\\mu}A with up to 30 MeV energy, or deuterons with half the energy and intensity. This makes it an ideal place for measurements of neutron-induced fission products from various actinides, in view of proposed future nuclear fuel cycles. The groups at Uppsala University and University of Jyv\\"askyl\\"a are working on the design of a neutron converter that will be used as neutron source in fission yield studies. The design is based on simulations with Monte Carlo codes and a benchmark measurement that was recently performed at The Svedberg Laboratory in Uppsala. In order to obtain a competitive count rate the fission targets will be placed very close to the neutron converter. The goal is to have a flexible design that will enable the use of neutron fields with different energy distributions. In the present paper, some co...

  19. Relevance of high-dose chemotherapy in solid tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieboer, P; de Vries, EGE; Mulder, NH; van der Graaf, WTA

    2005-01-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem in the treatment of solid tumours. Based on a steep dose-response relationship for especially alkylating agents on tumour cell survival, high-dose chemotherapy was considered of interest for the treatment of solid tumours. Results of phase 1 and 2 studies with high

  20. Pharmacogenetics and Pharmacokinetics in high-dose alkylating chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekhart, G.C. (Corine)

    2008-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy in combination with peripheral blood progenitor cell transplantation has been developed as a possible curative treatment modality in several solid tumours. A frequently used high-dose regimen in the Netherlands is the CTC regimen, which is a 4-day course of cyclophosphamide, t

  1. Concrete shielding of neutron radiations of plasma focus and dose examination by FLUKA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, M. J.; Amrollahi, R.; Habibi, M.

    2013-07-01

    Plasma Focus (PF) is among those devices which are used in plasma investigations, but this device produces some dangerous radiations after each shot, which generate a hazardous area for the operators of this device; therefore, it is better for the operators to stay away as much as possible from the area, where plasma focus has been placed. In this paper FLUKA Monte Carlo simulation has been used to calculate radiations produced by a 4 kJ Amirkabir plasma focus device through different concrete shielding concepts with various thicknesses (square, labyrinth and cave concepts). The neutron yield of Amirkabir plasma focus at varying deuterium pressure (3-9 torr) and two charging voltages (11.5 and 13.5 kV) is (2.25 ± 0.2) × 108 neutrons/shot and (2.88 ± 0.29) × 108 neutrons/shot of 2.45 MeV, respectively. The most influential shield for the plasma focus device among these geometries is the labyrinth concept on four sides and the top with 20 cm concrete.

  2. Ten years of personnel neutron dosimetry with Albedo dosemeters in the Netherlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draaisma, F.S.; Verhagen, H.W

    2002-07-01

    Since 1987, the dosimetry service of the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation has been certified by the Dutch government to perform personal dosimetry, using thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs). Performing neutron personal dosimetry requires a rather large investment in readers, TLDs and personnel to operate the service. About 800 persons are subjected to routine neutron monitoring in the Netherlands and their annual neutron doses are a relatively small fraction (less than 10%) of the annual H{sub p}(10). In general, the measured neutron dose values are low (on average 93% of the users receive an annual neutron dose <0.2 mSv). The collective annual (neutron) dose has tended to decrease since 1992, but incidentally high doses have been observed. Leaving these incidents out, the average collective annual neutron doses for the different users of neutron sources are about the same. (author)

  3. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buban, James P; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM.

  4. LiF crystals as high spatial resolution neutron imaging detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubayashi, M., E-mail: matsubayashi.masahito@jaea.go.jp [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirane 2-4, Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Faenov, A.; Pikuz, T. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures of Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhorskaja Street 13/19, Moscow (Russian Federation); Fukuda, Y. [Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Kato, Y. [The Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan); Yasuda, R.; Iikura, H.; Nojima, T.; Sakai, T. [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirane 2-4, Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

    2011-09-21

    Neutron imaging by color center formation in LiF crystals was applied to a sensitivity indicator (SI) as a standard samples for neutron radiography. The SI was exposed to a 5 mm pinhole-collimated thermal neutron beam with an LiF crystal and a neutron imaging plate (NIP) for 120 min in the JRR-3M thermal neutron radiography facility. The image in the LiF crystal was read out using a laser confocal microscope. All gaps were clearly observed in images for both the LiF crystal and the NIP. The experimental results showed that LiF crystals have excellent characteristics as neutron imaging detectors in areas such as high spatial resolution.

  5. Dose evaluation from multiple detector outputs using convex optimisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Makoto; Iimoto, Takeshi; Kosako, Toshiso

    2011-07-01

    A dose evaluation using multiple radiation detectors can be improved by the convex optimisation method. It enables flexible dose evaluation corresponding to the actual radiation energy spectrum. An application to the neutron ambient dose equivalent evaluation is investigated using a mixed-gas proportional counter. The convex derives the certain neutron ambient dose with certain width corresponding to the true neutron energy spectrum. The range of the evaluated dose is comparable to the error of conventional neutron dose measurement equipments. An application to the neutron individual dose equivalent measurement is also investigated. Convexes of particular dosemeter combinations evaluate the individual dose equivalent better than the dose evaluation of a single dosemeter. The combinations of dosemeters with high orthogonality of their response characteristics tend to provide a good suitability for dose evaluation.

  6. High dose brachytherapy in pediatric oncology; Braquiterapia com alta taxa de dose em oncologia pediatrica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrigno, Robson; Codjaian, Osanna Esther; Novaes, Paulo Eduardo R.S.; Trippe, Nivaldo [Fundacao Antonio Prudente, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Hospital A.C. Camargo. Dept. de Radioterapia

    1995-05-01

    Brachytherapy is a kind of radiotherapy that has been used in the multidisciplinary approach of some pediatric tumors, such as soft tissue sarcomas of the extremities, head and neck and urogenital tract. Recent technological advances in this area lead to development of computerized high dose rate remote afterloading brachytherapy. This type of treatment has some advantages compared to low dose rate brachytherapy traditionally used. This article describes not only the characteristics and advantages of this kind of treatment, but also the preliminary results of the first seven children treated with high dose rate at the Hospital A.C.Camargo. (author) 10 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Active neutron and gamma-ray imaging of highly enriched uranium for treaty verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Michael C; Polack, J Kyle; Ruch, Marc L; Marcath, Matthew J; Clarke, Shaun D; Pozzi, Sara A

    2017-08-11

    The detection and characterization of highly enriched uranium (HEU) presents a large challenge in the non-proliferation field. HEU has a low neutron emission rate and most gamma rays are low energy and easily shielded. To address this challenge, an instrument known as the dual-particle imager (DPI) was used with a portable deuterium-tritium (DT) neutron generator to detect neutrons and gamma rays from induced fission in HEU. We evaluated system response using a 13.7-kg HEU sphere in several configurations with no moderation, high-density polyethylene (HDPE) moderation, and tungsten moderation. A hollow tungsten sphere was interrogated to evaluate the response to a possible hoax item. First, localization capabilities were demonstrated by reconstructing neutron and gamma-ray images. Once localized, additional properties such as fast neutron energy spectra and time-dependent neutron count rates were attributed to the items. For the interrogated configurations containing HEU, the reconstructed neutron spectra resembled Watt spectra, which gave confidence that the interrogated items were undergoing induced fission. The time-dependent neutron count rate was also compared for each configuration and shown to be dependent on the neutron multiplication of the item. This result showed that the DPI is a viable tool for localizing and confirming fissile mass and multiplication.

  8. Dose calculation in biological samples in a mixed neutron-gamma field at the TRIGA reactor of the University of Mainz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Tobias; Blaickner, Matthias; Schütz, Christian; Wiehl, Norbert; Kratz, Jens V; Bassler, Niels; Holzscheiter, Michael H; Palmans, Hugo; Sharpe, Peter; Otto, Gerd; Hampel, Gabriele

    2010-10-01

    To establish Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for non-resectable liver metastases and for in vitro experiments at the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Mainz, Germany, it is necessary to have a reliable dose monitoring system. The in vitro experiments are used to determine the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of liver and cancer cells in our mixed neutron and gamma field. We work with alanine detectors in combination with Monte Carlo simulations, where we can measure and characterize the dose. To verify our calculations we perform neutron flux measurements using gold foil activation and pin-diodes. Material and methods. When L-α-alanine is irradiated with ionizing radiation, it forms a stable radical which can be detected by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The value of the ESR signal correlates to the amount of absorbed dose. The dose for each pellet is calculated using FLUKA, a multipurpose Monte Carlo transport code. The pin-diode is augmented by a lithium fluoride foil. This foil converts the neutrons into alpha and tritium particles which are products of the (7)Li(n,α)(3)H-reaction. These particles are detected by the diode and their amount correlates to the neutron fluence directly. Results and discussion. Gold foil activation and the pin-diode are reliable fluence measurement systems for the TRIGA reactor, Mainz. Alanine dosimetry of the photon field and charged particle field from secondary reactions can in principle be carried out in combination with MC-calculations for mixed radiation fields and the Hansen & Olsen alanine detector response model. With the acquired data about the background dose and charged particle spectrum, and with the acquired information of the neutron flux, we are capable of calculating the dose to the tissue. Conclusion. Monte Carlo simulation of the mixed neutron and gamma field of the TRIGA Mainz is possible in order to characterize the neutron behavior in the thermal column. Currently we also

  9. Accelerated Irradiations for High Dose Microstructures in Fast Reactor Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Zhijie [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-03-31

    The objective of this project is to determine the extent to which high dose rate, self-ion irradiation can be used as an accelerated irradiation tool to understand microstructure evolution at high doses and temperatures relevant to advanced fast reactors. We will accomplish the goal by evaluating phase stability and swelling of F-M alloys relevant to SFR systems at very high dose by combining experiment and modeling in an effort to obtain a quantitative description of the processes at high and low damage rates.

  10. L-Phenylalanine preloading reduces the (10)B(n, α)(7)Li dose to the normal brain by inhibiting the uptake of boronophenylalanine in boron neutron capture therapy for brain tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tsubasa; Tanaka, Hiroki; Fukutani, Satoshi; Suzuki, Minoru; Hiraoka, Masahiro; Ono, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a cellular-level particle radiation therapy that combines the selective delivery of boron compounds to tumour tissue with neutron irradiation. Previously, high doses of one of the boron compounds used for BNCT, L-BPA, were found to reduce the boron-derived irradiation dose to the central nervous system. However, injection with a high dose of L-BPA is not feasible in clinical settings. We aimed to find an alternative method to improve the therapeutic efficacy of this therapy. We examined the effects of oral preloading with various analogues of L-BPA in a xenograft tumour model and found that high-dose L-phenylalanine reduced the accumulation of L-BPA in the normal brain relative to tumour tissue. As a result, the maximum irradiation dose in the normal brain was 19.2% lower in the L-phenylalanine group relative to the control group. This study provides a simple strategy to improve the therapeutic efficacy of conventional boron compounds for BNCT for brain tumours and the possibility to widen the indication of BNCT to various kinds of other tumours.

  11. Estimation of dependence between mean of fractionation of photons and neutrons dose and intensity of post-irradiation reaction of mouse large intestine; Ocena zaleznosci pomiedzy sposobem frakcjonowania dawki fotonow i neutronow a nasileniem popromiennego odczynu jelita grubego myszy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasinska, A. [Oncology Center, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    % for early and 63% for late effects. In case of neutrons F{sub r} was 3% for early- and 16% for late - measured biological effects. The differences in effectivity of radiation with various LPE effect confirm WSB values calculated on the base of {alpha} and {beta} coefficients and LQ model. WSB values were higher and more dependent on amount of fractionated dose for late effects. WSB for late reaction and low fraction dose (0.25 Gy of photons) was 9.6 and for early irradiation effects was 6.3. On the level of high fraction dose (25 Gy of photons) there was inverted dependence. WSB for early effects was higher (2.5) in comparison with late irradiation effects (1.8). Application of mathematical model for measuring of quantity of units responsible for intestine regeneration (tissue rescuing units - TRU) showed various K number for early reaction and do not confirmed big radiosensitivity of this tissue. Also for late response low radiosensitivity was confirmed. Histological investigation showed that target cells for early reaction are epithelial crypt cells, however for late reaction there are fibrocytis and myocytes

  12. Peripheral dose from neutrons and photons in the radiation treatment of pelvic tumors with conventional technique or VMAT. A review; Periphere Neutronen- und Photonendosis bei der Radiotherapie von Tumoren des Beckens mit konventioneller Technik oder VMAT. Eine Literaturuebersicht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, P. [Medizinische Univ. Graz (Austria). Comprehensive Cancer Center

    2015-07-01

    Peripheral neutron and photon doses from external beam radiation therapy are associated with the risk of carcinogenesis in organs distant to the treated volume. In the irradiation of tumors and target volumes in the pelvis with convention photon-radiotherapy beams with high nominal energies (above 15 MeV) are typically used. During the last years volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) techniques have gained a wide-spread use for pelvic treatments. The beam-energies that are primarily used in VMAT are below 10 MeV. Therefore, a reduction in peripheral dose due to the absence of neutrons can be expected when VMAT is utilized. On the other hand the number of monitor units is increased in increased in VMAT, as compared to conventional unmodulated fields, by a factor of two to three. This leads to an increase in transmission dose from the machine's treatment head, such that the potential benefit might be outbalanced. The question, whether the increasing use of VMAT might lead to a reduction of peripheral dose, is the subject of several studies. Those studies use either measurements in phantom settings or Monte-Carlo simulations. A systematic review of the literature shows diverging, and sometimes even contradictory, findings. Therefore, the issue of peripheral dose and the risk for secondary malignancies requires further investigation. In our opinion, the focus should be put on measurements and simulations, but also on modelling of dose-response correlations.

  13. Characterization of extended range Bonner Sphere Spectrometers in the CERF high-energy broad neutron field at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosteo, S.; Bedogni, R.; Caresana, M.; Charitonidis, N.; Chiti, M.; Esposito, A.; Ferrarini, M.; Severino, C.; Silari, M.

    2012-12-01

    The accurate determination of the ambient dose equivalent in the mixed neutron-photon fields encountered around high-energy particle accelerators still represents a challenging task. The main complexity arises from the extreme variability of the neutron energy, which spans over 10 orders of magnitude or more. Operational survey instruments, which response function attempts to mimic the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficient up to GeV neutrons, are available on the market, but their response is not fully reliable over the entire energy range. Extended range rem counters (ERRC) do not require the exact knowledge of the energy distribution of the neutron field and the calibration can be done with a source spectrum. If the actual neutron field has an energy distribution different from the calibration spectrum, the measurement is affected by an added uncertainty related to the partial overlap of the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion curve and the response function. For this reason their operational use should always be preceded by an "in-field" calibration, i.e. a calibration made against a reference instrument exposed in the same field where the survey-meter will be employed. In practice the extended-range Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (ERBSS) is the only device which can serve as reference instrument in these fields, because of its wide energy range and the possibility to assess the neutron fluence and the ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) values with the appropriate accuracy. Nevertheless, the experience gained by a number of experimental groups suggests that mandatory conditions for obtaining accurate results in workplaces are: (1) the use of a well-established response matrix, thus implying validation campaigns in reference monochromatic neutrons fields, (2) the expert and critical use of suitable unfolding codes, and (3) the performance test of the whole system (experimental set-up, elaboration and unfolding procedures) in a well

  14. Spallation Neutron Source High Power RF Installation and Commissioning Progress

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, Michael P; Bradley, Joseph T; Fuja, Ray E; Gurd, Pamela; Hardek, Thomas; Kang, Yoon W; Rees, Daniel; Roybal, William; Young, Karen A

    2005-01-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) linac will provide a 1 GeV proton beam for injection into the accumulator ring. In the normal conducting (NC) section of this linac, the Radio Frequency Quadupole (RFQ) and six drift tube linac (DTL) tanks are powered by seven 2.5 MW, 402.5 MHz klystrons and the four coupled cavity linac (CCL) cavities are powered by four 5.0 MW, 805 MHz klystrons. Eighty-one 550 kW, 805 MHz klystrons each drive a single cavity in the superconducting (SC) section of the linac. The high power radio frequency (HPRF) equipment was specified and procured by LANL and tested before delivery to ensure a smooth transition from installation to commissioning. Installation of RF equipment to support klystron operation in the 350-meter long klystron gallery started in June 2002. The final klystron was set in place in September 2004. Presently, all RF stations have been installed and high power testing has been completed. This paper reviews the progression of the installation and testing of the HPRF Sys...

  15. Preliminary Analysis of the Multisphere Neutron Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldhagen, P.; Kniss, T.; Wilson, J. W.; Singleterry, R. C.; Jones, I. W.; VanSteveninck, W.

    2003-01-01

    Crews working on present-day jet aircraft are a large occupationally exposed group with a relatively high average effective dose from galactic cosmic radiation. Crews of future high-speed commercial aircraft flying at higher altitudes would be even more exposed. To help reduce the significant uncertainties in calculations of such exposures, the Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR) Project, an international collaboration of 15 laboratories, made simultaneous radiation measurements with 14 instruments on five flights of a NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The primary AIR instrument was a highly sensitive extended-energy multisphere neutron spectrometer with lead and steel shells placed within the moderators of two of its 14 detectors to enhance response at high energies. Detector responses were calculated for neutrons and charged hadrons at energies up to 100 GeV using MCNPX. Neutron spectra were unfolded from the measured count rates using the new MAXED code. We have measured the cosmic-ray neutron spectrum (thermal to greater than 10 GeV), total neutron fluence rate, and neutron effective dose and dose equivalent rates and their dependence on altitude and geomagnetic cutoff. The measured cosmic-ray neutron spectra have almost no thermal neutrons, a large "evaporation" peak near 1 MeV and a second broad peak near 100 MeV which contributes about 69% of the neutron effective dose. At high altitude, geomagnetic latitude has very little effect on the shape of the spectrum, but it is the dominant variable affecting neutron fluence rate, which was 8 times higher at the northernmost measurement location than it was at the southernmost. The shape of the spectrum varied only slightly with altitude from 21 km down to 12 km (56 - 201 grams per square centimeter atmospheric depth), but was significantly different on the ground. In all cases, ambient dose equivalent was greater than effective dose for cosmic-ray neutrons.

  16. Modeling of ground albedo neutrons to investigate seasonal cosmic ray-induced neutron variations measured at high-altitude stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, G.; Pazianotto, M. T.; Federico, C. A.

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates seasonal cosmic ray-induced neutron variations measured over a long-term period (from 2011 to 2016) in both the high-altitude stations located in medium geomagnetic latitude and Antarctica (Pic-du-Midi and Concordia, respectively). To reinforce analysis, modeling based on ground albedo neutrons simulations of extensive air showers and the solar modulation potential was performed. Because the local environment is well known and stable over time in Antarctica, data were used to validate the modeling approach. A modeled scene representative to the Pic-du-Midi was simulated with GEANT4 for various hydrogen properties (composition, density, and wet level) and snow thickness. The orders of magnitudes of calculated thermal fluence rates are consistent with measurements obtained during summers and winters. These variations are dominant in the thermal domain (i.e., En 20 MeV) is weakly impacted. The role of hydrogen content on ground albedo neutron generation was investigated with GEANT4 simulations. These investigations focused to mountain environment; nevertheless, they demonstrate the complexity of the local influences on neutron fluence rates.

  17. High-efficiency neutron detectors and methods of making same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Klann, Raymond

    2007-01-16

    Neutron detectors, advanced detector process techniques and advanced compound film designs have greatly increased neutron-detection efficiency. One embodiment of the detectors utilizes a semiconductor wafer with a matrix of spaced cavities filled with one or more types of neutron reactive material such as 10B or 6LiF. The cavities are etched into both the front and back surfaces of the device such that the cavities from one side surround the cavities from the other side. The cavities may be etched via holes or etched slots or trenches. In another embodiment, the cavities are different-sized and the smaller cavities extend into the wafer from the lower surfaces of the larger cavities. In a third embodiment, multiple layers of different neutron-responsive material are formed on one or more sides of the wafer. The new devices operate at room temperature, are compact, rugged, and reliable in design.

  18. High-efficiency neutron detectors and methods of making same

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Klann, Raymond

    2007-01-16

    Neutron detectors, advanced detector process techniques and advanced compound film designs have greatly increased neutron-detection efficiency. One embodiment of the detectors utilizes a semiconductor wafer with a matrix of spaced cavities filled with one or more types of neutron reactive material such as 10B or 6LiF. The cavities are etched into both the front and back surfaces of the device such that the cavities from one side surround the cavities from the other side. The cavities may be etched via holes or etched slots or trenches. In another embodiment, the cavities are different-sized and the smaller cavities extend into the wafer from the lower surfaces of the larger cavities. In a third embodiment, multiple layers of different neutron-responsive material are formed on one or more sides of the wafer. The new devices operate at room temperature, are compact, rugged, and reliable in design.

  19. RADIATION DOSE MEASUREMENTS FOR HIGH-INTENSITY LASER INTERACTIONS WITH SOLID TARGETS AT SLAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, T; Bauer, J; Cimeno, M; Ferrari, A; Galtier, E; Granados, E; Lee, H J; Liu, J; Nagler, B; Prinz, A; Rokni, S; Tran, H; Woods, M

    2016-12-01

    A systematic study of photon and neutron radiation doses generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions is underway at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. These laser-solid experiments are being performed using a 25 TW (up to 1 J in 40 fs) femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source's (LCLS) Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) facility. Radiation measurements were performed with passive and active detectors deployed at various locations inside and outside the target chamber. Results from radiation dose measurements for laser-solid experiments at SLAC MEC in 2014 with peak intensity between 10(18) and 7.1 × 10(19) W cm(-2) are presented.

  20. Radiation Dose Measurement for High-Intensity Laser Interactions with Solid Targets at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Taiee [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-09-25

    A systematic study of photon and neutron radiation doses generated in high-intensity laser-solid interactions is underway at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. We found that these laser-solid experiments are being performed using a 25 TW (up to 1 J in 40 fs) femtosecond pulsed Ti:sapphire laser at the Linac Coherent Light Source’s (LCLS) Matter in Extreme Conditions (MEC) facility. Additionally, radiation measurements were performed with passive and active detectors deployed at various locations inside and outside the target chamber. Results from radiation dose measurements for laser-solid experiments at SLAC MEC in 2014 with peak intensity between 1018 to 7.1x1019 W/cm2 are presented.

  1. High-resolution neutron radiography with microchannel plates: Proof-of-principle experiments at PSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremsin, A. S.; McPhate, J. B.; Vallerga, J. V.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Hull, J. S.; Feller, W. B.; Lehmann, E.

    2009-06-01

    With the appearance of highly collimated and intense neutron beamlines, the resolution of radiographic experiments is often limited by the parameters of the neutron imaging detector. Neutron-sensitive microchannel plates (MCPs) proved to be very efficient for conversion of a thermal or cold neutron into an electron pulse of up to 10 6 electrons preserving location of the neutron absorption within ˜15 μm. In this paper, we present the results of preliminary measurements performed with neutron-sensitive MCPs coupled with a Medipix2/Timepix active pixel sensor. A set of test objects was imaged at both thermal and cold neutron imaging beamlines of Paul Scherrer Institute. The spatial resolution of the detector operating at high counting rate mode was confirmed to be limited by the 55 μm pixel size of the Medipix2 readout. At the same time, event centroiding applied to the charge values measured with Timepix readout allowed individual neutron counting with spatial resolution on the scale of MCP pore spacing (11 μm in the present measurements). The ongoing improvement of the speed of the readout electronics should eliminate the low counting rate limitation of the latter high-resolution imaging.

  2. High-dose dosimetry using natural silicate minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmo, Lucas S. do; Mendes, Leticia, E-mail: isatiro@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Watanabe, Shigueo; Rao, Gundu; Lucas, Natasha; Sato, Karina, E-mail: lacifid@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica. Departamento de Fisica Nuclear; Barbosa, Renata F., E-mail: profcelta@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Santos, SP (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias do Mar

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, certain natural silicate minerals such as aquamarine (AB), morganite (PB), goshenite (WB), white jadeite (JW), green jadeite (JG), pink tourmaline (PT) and two varieties of jadeite-like quartz, denoted here by JQ1 and JQ2, were investigated using the thermoluminescence technique to evaluate their potential for use as very-high- and high-dose dosimeters. These minerals respond to high doses of γ-rays of up to 1000 kGy and often to very high doses of up to 3000 kGy. The TL response of these minerals may be considered to be satisfactory for applications in high-dose dosimetry. Investigations of electron paramagnetic resonance and optically stimulated luminescence dosimetry are in progress. (author)

  3. A High Intensity Linac for the National Spallation Neutron Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, A.; Bhatia, T.; Billen, J.; Schrage, D.; Kurennoy, S.; Krawczyk, F.; Lynch, M.; Nath, S.; Shafer, R.; Takeda, H.; Tallerico, P.; Wangler, T.; Wood, R.; Young, L.; Grand, P.; McKenzie-Wilson, R.

    1997-05-01

    The National Spallation Neutron Source to be constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, requires a linac capable of delivering up to 5 MW of beam power to an accumulator ring with a nominal 6.2% duty factor and an energy of 1 GeV. Los Alamos, responsible for the linac design, has developed an appropriate room-temperature linac that consists of a drift-tube section from 2.5 to 20 MeV, a coupled-cavity drift-tube section to 100 MeV, and a coupled-cavity section to 1 GeV. The initial scenario requires an average 1.1-mA beam current with a corresponding 28 mA peak current and a 1.2-Mhz chopped time structure corresponding to the ring period. Upgrade to a 4.4 mA average current requires funneling with a peak current of 112 mA in the high-energy sections. Further parameters are presented along with beam dynamics and structure choices and mechanical and rf engineering considerations.

  4. Impact of surface curvature on dose delivery in intraoperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Moonseong; Wang, Zhou; Malhotra, Harish K; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2009-01-01

    In intraoperative high-dose-rate (IOHDR) brachytherapy, a 2-dimensional (2D) geometry is typically used for treatment planning. The assumption of planar geometry may cause serious errors in dose delivery for target surfaces that are, in reality, curved. A study to evaluate the magnitude of these errors in clinical practice was undertaken. Cylindrical phantoms with 6 radii (range: 1.35-12.5 cm) were used to simulate curved treatment geometries. Treatment plans were developed for various planar geometries and were delivered to the cylindrical phantoms using catheters inserted into Freiburg applicators of varying dimension. Dose distributions were measured using radiographic film. In comparison to the treatment plan (for a planar geometry), the doses delivered to prescription points were higher on the concave side of the geometry, up to 15% for the phantom with the smallest radius. On the convex side of the applicator, delivered doses were up to 10% lower for small treated areas (5 catheters). Our measurements have shown inaccuracy in dose delivery when the original planar treatment plan is delivered with a curved applicator. Dose delivery errors arising from the use of planar treatment plans with curved applicators may be significant.

  5. High-Dose Vitamin D May Not Curb Kids' Colds

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167275.html High-Dose Vitamin D May Not Curb Kids' Colds Study seems ... 18, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- When it comes to vitamin supplements, more is not always better, according to ...

  6. Patient-specific dose calculation methods for high-dose-rate iridium-192 brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Emily S.

    In high-dose-rate 192Ir brachytherapy, the radiation dose received by the patient is calculated according to the AAPM Task Group 43 (TG-43) formalism. This table-based dose superposition method uses dosimetry parameters derived with the radioactive 192Ir source centered in a water phantom. It neglects the dose perturbations caused by inhomogeneities, such as the patient anatomy, applicators, shielding, and radiographic contrast solution. In this work, we evaluated the dosimetric characteristics of a shielded rectal applicator with an endocavitary balloon injected with contrast solution. The dose distributions around this applicator were calculated by the GEANT4 Monte Carlo (MC) code and measured by ionization chamber and GAFCHROMIC EBT film. A patient-specific dose calculation study was then carried out for 40 rectal treatment plans. The PTRAN_CT MC code was used to calculate the dose based on computed tomography (CT) images. This study involved the development of BrachyGUI, an integrated treatment planning tool that can process DICOM-RT data and create PTRAN_CT input initialization files. BrachyGUI also comes with dose calculation and evaluation capabilities. We proposed a novel scatter correction method to account for the reduction in backscatter radiation near tissue-air interfaces. The first step requires calculating the doses contributed by primary and scattered photons separately, assuming a full scatter environment. The scatter dose in the patient is subsequently adjusted using a factor derived by MC calculations, which depends on the distances between the point of interest, the 192Ir source, and the body contour. The method was validated for multicatheter breast brachytherapy, in which the target and skin doses for 18 patient plans agreed with PTRAN_CT calculations better than 1%. Finally, we developed a CT-based analytical dose calculation method. It corrects for the photon attenuation and scatter based upon the radiological paths determined by ray tracing

  7. The high-dose and high-temperature monitors of reactor irradiation based on insulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Stepanov

    2015-10-01

    It has been experimentally shown that the use of Al2O3 single crystals and BN ceramics provides means of monitoring the temperature of irradiation from 370 to 1900 K. The temperature is derived from measurements of the optical absorption or X-ray diffraction line shifts after post-radiation annealing of the monitors. We discuss the applicability of (a the optical absorption and F-center luminescence spectroscopies of irradiated Al2O3 single crystals for gamma dose evaluation and (b the isotopic analysis of irradiated BN ceramics for neutron dose evaluation.

  8. Measuring neutron spectra in radiotherapy using the nested neutron spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maglieri, Robert, E-mail: robert.maglieri@mail.mcgill.ca; Evans, Michael; Seuntjens, Jan; Kildea, John [Medical Physics Unit, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H4A 3J1 (Canada); Licea, Angel [Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5S9 (Canada)

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Out-of-field neutron doses resulting from photonuclear interactions in the head of a linear accelerator pose an iatrogenic risk to patients and an occupational risk to personnel during radiotherapy. To quantify neutron production, in-room measurements have traditionally been carried out using Bonner sphere systems (BSS) with activation foils and TLDs. In this work, a recently developed active detector, the nested neutron spectrometer (NNS), was tested in radiotherapy bunkers. Methods: The NNS is designed for easy handling and is more practical than the traditional BSS. Operated in current-mode, the problem of pulse pileup due to high dose-rates is overcome by measuring current, similar to an ionization chamber. In a bunker housing a Varian Clinac 21EX, the performance of the NNS was evaluated in terms of reproducibility, linearity, and dose-rate effects. Using a custom maximum-likelihood expectation–maximization algorithm, measured neutron spectra at various locations inside the bunker were then compared to Monte Carlo simulations of an identical setup. In terms of dose, neutron ambient dose equivalents were calculated from the measured spectra and compared to bubble detector neutron dose equivalent measurements. Results: The NNS-measured spectra for neutrons at various locations in a treatment room were found to be consistent with expectations for both relative shape and absolute magnitude. Neutron fluence-rate decreased with distance from the source and the shape of the spectrum changed from a dominant fast neutron peak near the Linac head to a dominant thermal neutron peak in the moderating conditions of the maze. Monte Carlo data and NNS-measured spectra agreed within 30% at all locations except in the maze where the deviation was a maximum of 40%. Neutron ambient dose equivalents calculated from the authors’ measured spectra were consistent (one standard deviation) with bubble detector measurements in the treatment room. Conclusions: The NNS may

  9. Irradiation effects in 6H-SiC induced by neutron and heavy ions: Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution XRD analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaofei; Zhou, Wei; Feng, Qijie; Zheng, Jian; Liu, Xiankun; Tang, Bin; Li, Jiangbo; Xue, Jianming; Peng, Shuming

    2016-09-01

    Irradiation effects of neutron and 3 MeV C+, Si+ in 6H-SiC were investigated by Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution XRD. The total disorder values of neutron irradiated SiC agree well with that of samples irradiated by ions at the same doses respectively. On the other hand, high-resolution XRD results shows that the lattice strain rate caused by neutron irradiation is 6.8%/dpa, while it is only 2.6%/dpa and 4.2%/dpa for Si+ and C+ irradiations respectively. Our results illustrate that the total disorder in neutron irradiated SiC can be accurately simulated by MeV Si+ or C+ irradiations at the same dose, but for the lattice strain and strain-related properties like surface hardness, the depth profile of irradiation damages induced by energetic ions must be considered. This research will contribute to a better understanding of the difference in irradiation effects between neutron and heavy ions.

  10. High-dose vs low-dose oxytocin for labor augmentation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shu-Qin; Luo, Zhong-Cheng; Qi, Hui-Ping; Xu, Hairong; Fraser, William D

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to estimate the efficacy and safety of high-dose vs low-dose oxytocin for labor augmentation on the risk of cesarean section and on indicators of maternal and neonatal morbidity. We searched PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for randomized clinical trials published until January 2010. Ten randomized clinical trials, including 5423 women, met the inclusion criteria. High-dose oxytocin was associated with a moderate decrease in the risk of cesarean section (relative risk [RR], 0.85; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75-0.97), a small increase in spontaneous vaginal delivery (RR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.02-1.12), and a decrease in labor duration (mean difference: -1.54 hours, 95% CI, -2.44 to -0.64). While hyperstimulation was increased with high-dose oxytocin (RR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.49-2.45), there was no evidence of an increase in maternal or neonatal morbidity. We conclude that high-dose oxytocin for labor augmentation is associated with a decrease in cesarean section and shortened labor. Copyright © 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. High-speed neutron radiography for monitoring the water absorption by capillarity in porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnudde, Veerle; Dierick, Manuel; Vlassenbroeck, Jelle; Masschaele, Bert; Lehmann, Eberhard; Jacobs, Patric; Van Hoorebeke, Luc

    2008-01-01

    Fluid flow through porous natural building stones is of great importance when studying their weathering processes. Many traditional experiments based on mass changes are available for studying liquid transport in porous stones, such as the determination of the water absorption coefficient by capillarity. Because thermal neutrons experience a strong attenuation by hydrogen, neutron radiography is a suitable technique for the study of water absorption by capillarity in porous stones. However, image contrast can be impaired because hydrogen mainly scatters neutrons rather than absorbing them, resulting in a blurred image. Capillarity results obtained by neutron radiography and by the European Standard 1925 for the determination of the water absorption coefficient by capillarity for natural building stones with a variable porosity were compared. It is illustrated that high-speed neutron radiography can be a useful research tool for the visualization of internal fluid flow inside inorganic building materials such as limestones and sandstones.

  12. High-accuracy determination of the neutron flux at n{sub T}OF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbagallo, M.; Colonna, N.; Mastromarco, M.; Meaze, M.; Tagliente, G.; Variale, V. [Sezione di Bari, INFN, Bari (Italy); Guerrero, C.; Andriamonje, S.; Boccone, V.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Cerutti, F.; Chin, M.; Ferrari, A.; Kadi, Y.; Losito, R.; Versaci, R.; Vlachoudis, V. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Tsinganis, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), Athens (Greece); Tarrio, D.; Duran, I.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Paradela, C. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago (Spain); Altstadt, S.; Goebel, K.; Langer, C.; Reifarth, R.; Schmidt, S.; Weigand, M. [Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt (Germany); Andrzejewski, J.; Marganiec, J.; Perkowski, J. [Uniwersytet Lodzki, Lodz (Poland); Audouin, L.; Leong, L.S.; Tassan-Got, L. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique/IN2P3 - IPN, Orsay (France); Becares, V.; Cano-Ott, D.; Garcia, A.R.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Martinez, T.; Mendoza, E. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.; Kroll, J.; Valenta, S. [Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Belloni, F.; Fraval, K.; Gunsing, F.; Lampoudis, C.; Papaevangelou, T. [Commissariata l' Energie Atomique (CEA) Saclay - Irfu, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Berthoumieux, E.; Chiaveri, E. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Commissariata l' Energie Atomique (CEA) Saclay - Irfu, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Billowes, J.; Ware, T.; Wright, T. [University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Bosnar, D.; Zugec, P. [University of Zagreb, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Zagreb (Croatia); Calvino, F.; Cortes, G.; Gomez-Hornillos, M.B.; Riego, A. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Carrapico, C.; Goncalves, I.F.; Sarmento, R.; Vaz, P. [Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Cortes-Giraldo, M.A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J.M.; Sabate-Gilarte, M. [Universidad de Sevilla, Sevilla (Spain); Diakaki, M.; Karadimos, D.; Kokkoris, M.; Vlastou, R. [National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), Athens (Greece); Domingo-Pardo, C.; Giubrone, G.; Tain, J.L. [CSIC-Universidad de Valencia, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Valencia (Spain); Dressler, R.; Kivel, N.; Schumann, D.; Steinegger, P. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Dzysiuk, N.; Mastinu, P.F. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Rome (Italy); Eleftheriadis, C.; Manousos, A. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece); Ganesan, S.; Gurusamy, P.; Saxena, A. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Mumbai (IN); Griesmayer, E.; Jericha, E.; Leeb, H. [Technische Universitaet Wien, Atominstitut, Wien (AT); Hernandez-Prieto, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (CH); Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona (ES); Jenkins, D.G.; Vermeulen, M.J. [University of York, Heslington, York (GB); Kaeppeler, F. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Campus Nord, Karlsruhe (DE); Koehler, P. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge (US); Lederer, C. [Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt (DE); University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Vienna (AT); Massimi, C.; Mingrone, F.; Vannini, G. [Universita di Bologna (IT); INFN, Sezione di Bologna, Dipartimento di Fisica, Bologna (IT); Mengoni, A.; Ventura, A. [Agenzia nazionale per le nuove tecnologie, l' energia e lo sviluppo economico sostenibile (ENEA), Bologna (IT); Milazzo, P.M. [Sezione di Trieste, INFN, Trieste (IT); Mirea, M. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH, Bucharest - Magurele (RO); Mondalaers, W.; Plompen, A.; Schillebeeckx, P. [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, European Commission JRC, Geel (BE); Pavlik, A.; Wallner, A. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Vienna (AT); Rauscher, T. [University of Basel, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Basel (CH); Roman, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (CH); Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering - IFIN HH, Bucharest - Magurele (RO); Rubbia, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (CH); Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso dell' INFN, Assergi (AQ) (IT); Weiss, C. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (CH); Johann-Wolfgang-Goethe Universitaet, Frankfurt (DE)

    2013-12-15

    The neutron flux of the n{sub T}OF facility at CERN was measured, after installation of the new spallation target, with four different systems based on three neutron-converting reactions, which represent accepted cross sections standards in different energy regions. A careful comparison and combination of the different measurements allowed us to reach an unprecedented accuracy on the energy dependence of the neutron flux in the very wide range (thermal to 1 GeV) that characterizes the n{sub T}OF neutron beam. This is a pre-requisite for the high accuracy of cross section measurements at n{sub T}OF. An unexpected anomaly in the neutron-induced fission cross section of {sup 235}U is observed in the energy region between 10 and 30keV, hinting at a possible overestimation of this important cross section, well above currently assigned uncertainties. (orig.)

  13. Design and Characterisation of Metallic Glassy Alloys of High Neutron Shielding Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khong, J. C.; Daisenberger, D.; Burca, G.; Kockelmann, W.; Tremsin, A. S.; Mi, J.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports the design, making and characterisation of a series of Fe-based bulk metallic glass alloys with the aim of achieving the combined properties of high neutron absorption capability and sufficient glass forming ability. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction and pair distribution function methods were used to characterise the crystalline or amorphous states of the samples. Neutron transmission and macroscopic attenuation coefficients of the designed alloys were measured using energy resolved neutron imaging method and the very recently developed microchannel plate detector. The study found that the newly designed alloy (Fe48Cr15Mo14C15B6Gd2 with a glass forming ability of Ø5.8 mm) has the highest neutron absorption capability among all Fe-based bulk metallic glasses so far reported. It is a promising material for neutron shielding applications.

  14. Development of high-energy neutron imaging for use in NDE applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietrich, F; Hall, J; Logan, C; Schmid, G

    1999-06-01

    We are currently developing a high-energy (10 - 15 MeV) neutron imaging system for use in NDE applications. Our goal is to develop an imaging system capable of detecting cubic-mm-scale voids or other structural defects in heavily-shielded low-Z materials within thick sealed objects. The system will be relatively compact (suitable for use in a small laboratory) and capable of acquiring tomographic image data sets. The design of a prototype imaging detector and multi-axis staging system will be discussed and selected results from recent imaging experiments will be presented. The development of an intense, accelerator-driven neutron source suitable for use with the imaging system will also be discussed. Keywords: neutron imaging, neutron radiography, computed tomography, non-destructive inspection, neutron sources

  15. A research plan based on high intensity proton accelerator Neutron Science Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizumoto, Motoharu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    A plan called Neutron Science Research Center (NSRC) has been proposed in JAERI. The center is a complex composed of research facilities based on a proton linac with an energy of 1.5GeV and an average current of 10mA. The research facilities will consist of Thermal/Cold Neutron Facility, Neutron Irradiation Facility, Neutron Physics Facility, OMEGA/Nuclear Energy Facility, Spallation RI Beam Facility, Meson/Muon Facility and Medium Energy Experiment Facility, where high intensity proton beam and secondary particle beams such as neutron, pion, muon and unstable radio isotope (RI) beams generated from the proton beam will be utilized for innovative researches in the fields on nuclear engineering and basic sciences. (author)

  16. A high-field adiabatic fast passage ultracold neutron spin flipper for the UCNA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holley, A. T.; Pattie, R. W.; Young, A. R. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Broussard, L. J. [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Davis, J. L.; Ito, T. M.; Lyles, J. T. M.; Makela, M.; Morris, C. L.; Mortensen, R.; Saunders, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Hickerson, K.; Mendenhall, M. P. [W. K. Kellogg Radiation Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Liu, C.-Y. [Department of Physics, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States); Mammei, R. R. [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Rios, R. [Department of Physics, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho 83209 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    The UCNA collaboration is making a precision measurement of the {beta} asymmetry (A) in free neutron decay using polarized ultracold neutrons (UCN). A critical component of this experiment is an adiabatic fast passage neutron spin flipper capable of efficient operation in ambient magnetic fields on the order of 1 T. The requirement that it operate in a high field necessitated the construction of a free neutron spin flipper based, for the first time, on a birdcage resonator. The design, construction, and initial testing of this spin flipper prior to its use in the first measurement of A with UCN during the 2007 run cycle of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's 800 MeV proton accelerator is detailed. These studies determined the flipping efficiency of the device, averaged over the UCN spectrum present at the location of the spin flipper, to be {epsilon}=0.9985(4).

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of a very high resolution thermal neutron detector composed of glass scintillator microfibers

    CERN Document Server

    Yushou, Song; Zhang, Xiaodong; Hayward, Jason P

    2016-01-01

    In order to develop a high spatial resolution (micron level) thermal neutron detector, a detector assembly composed of cerium doped lithium glass microfibers, each with a diameter of 1\\,$\\mu$m, is proposed, where the neutron absorption location is reconstructed from the observed charged particle products that result from neutron absorption. To suppress the cross talk of the scintillation light, each scintillating fiber is surrounded by air-filled glass capillaries with the same diameter as the fiber. This pattern is repeated to form a bulk microfiber detector. On one end, the surface of the detector is painted with a thin optical reflector to increase the light collection efficiency at the other end. Then the scintillation light emitted by any neutron interaction is transmitted to one end, magnified, and recorded by an intensified CCD camera. A simulation based on the Geant4 toolkit was developed to model this detector. All the relevant physics processes including neutron interaction, scintillation, and optic...

  18. Neutron irradiation effects on AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Ling; Zhang Jin-Cheng; Xue Jun-Shuai; Ma Xiao-Hua; Zhang Wei; Bi Zhi-Wei; Zhang Yue; Hao Yue

    2012-01-01

    AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were exposed to 1 MeV neutron irradiation at a neutron fluence of 1 × 1015 cm-2.The dc characteristics of the devices,such as the drain saturation current and the maximum transconductance,decreased after neutron irradiation. The gate leakage currents increased obviously after neutron irradiation.However,the rf characteristics,such as the cut-off frequency and the maximum frequency,were hardly affected by neutron irradiation.The AlGaN/GaN heterojunctions have been employed for the better understanding of the degradation mechanism.It is shown in the Hall measurements and capacitance-voltage tests that the mobility and concentration of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) decreased after neutron irradiation.There was no evidence of the full-width at half-maximum of X-ray diffraction (XRD) rocking curve changing after irradiation,so the dislocation was not influenced by neutron irradiation.It is concluded that the point defects induced in AlGaN and GaN by neutron irradiation are the dominant mechanisms responsible for performance degradations of AlGaN/GaN HEMT devices.

  19. Simulation experiments for gamma-ray mapping of planetary surfaces: Scattering of high-energy neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brueckner, J.; Englert, P.; Reedy, R. C.; Waenke, H.

    1986-01-01

    The concentration and distribution of certain elements in surface layers of planetary objects specify constraints on models of their origin and evolution. This information can be obtained by means of remote sensing gamma-ray spectroscopy, as planned for a number of future space missions, i.e., Mars, Moon, asteroids, and comets. To investigate the gamma-rays made by interactions of neutrons with matter, thin targets of different composition were placed between a neutron-source and a high-resolution germanium spectrometer. Gamma-rays in the range of 0.1 to 8 MeV were accumulated. In one set of experiments a 14-MeV neutron generator using the T(d,n) reaction as neutron-source was placed in a small room. Scattering in surrounding walls produced a spectrum of neutron energies from 14 MeV down to thermal. This complex neutron-source induced mainly neutron-capture lines and only a few scattering lines. As a result of the set-up, there was a considerable background of discrete lines from surrounding materials. A similar situation exists under planetary exploration conditions: gamma-rays are induced in the planetary surface as well as in the spacecraft. To investigate the contribution of neutrons with higher energies, an experiment for the measurement of prompt gamma radiation was set up at the end of a beam-line of an isochronous cyclotron.

  20. Radiation Parameters of High Dose Rate Iridium -192 Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    A lack of physical data for high dose rate (HDR) Ir-192 sources has necessitated the use of basic radiation parameters measured with low dose rate (LDR) Ir-192 seeds and ribbons in HDR dosimetry calculations. A rigorous examination of the radiation parameters of several HDR Ir-192 sources has shown that this extension of physical data from LDR to HDR Ir-192 may be inaccurate. Uncertainty in any of the basic radiation parameters used in dosimetry calculations compromises the accuracy of the calculated dose distribution and the subsequent dose delivery. Dose errors of up to 0.3%, 6%, and 2% can result from the use of currently accepted values for the half-life, exposure rate constant, and dose buildup effect, respectively. Since an accuracy of 5% in the delivered dose is essential to prevent severe complications or tumor regrowth, the use of basic physical constants with uncertainties approaching 6% is unacceptable. A systematic evaluation of the pertinent radiation parameters contributes to a reduction in the overall uncertainty in HDR Ir-192 dose delivery. Moreover, the results of the studies described in this thesis contribute significantly to the establishment of standardized numerical values to be used in HDR Ir-192 dosimetry calculations.

  1. High-{ital j} Neutron Excitations Outside {sup 136}Xe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talwar, R.; Kay, B. P.; Mitchell, A. J.; Adachi, S.; Entwisle, J. P.; Fujita, Y.; Gey, G.; Noji, S.; Ong, H. J.; Schiffer, J. P.; Tamii, A

    2017-08-17

    The nu 0h(9/2) and nu 0i(13/2) strength at Xe-137, a single neutron outside the N = 82 shell closure, has been determined using the Xe-136(alpha, He-3)Xe-137 reaction carried out at 100 MeV. We confirm the recent observation of the second 13/2(+) state and reassess previous data on the 9/2(-) states, obtaining spectroscopic factors. These new data provide additional constraints on predictions of the same single-neutron excitations at Sn-133.

  2. Neutron and fission yields from high-energy deuterons in infinite /sup 238/U targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canfield, E.

    1965-06-28

    Early work on the interaction of high energy deuterons with large /sup 238/U targets is reexamined and current theoretical study is discussed. Results of fission and neutron yield calculations are compared with experiment. (SDF)

  3. Test of high density UC targets development at Gatchina for neutron rich radioactive beam facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Lhersonneau, G; Lanchais, A; Rizzi, V; Tecchio, L.B; Bajeat, O; Essabaa, S; Lau, C; Cheikh Mhamed, M; Roussière, B; Barzakh, A.E; Fedorov, D.V; lonan, A.M; lvanov, V.S; Mezilev, K.A; Moroz, F.V; Orlov, S.YU; Panteleevc, V.N; Volkovc, YU.M; Dubois, M; Eléon, C; Gaubert, G; Jardin, P; Leroy, R; Saint Laurent, M.G; Villari, A.C.C; Stroe, L; 10.1016/j.nimb.2008.05.033

    2008-01-01

    Production of on-line mass separator neutron rich isotopes using fission induced by 1 GeV protons on high density uranium carbide has been investigate and results compared with the low density targets yields.

  4. 人体对中子剂量吸收差异的 MC 模拟%The MC Simulations of Difference Neutron Dose Uptake for the People

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁逸仙; 庹先国; 刘明哲; 张金钊

    2013-01-01

    通过分析核临界事故中实际情况,使用MCNP5程序建立不同的人体模型(儿童,成年人,男性,女性),通过计算在受中子照射时,人体内不同器官的中子剂量,分析出了不同年龄及不同性别人群间何种器官存在吸收剂量差异,并计算出了不同年龄及不同性别人群的有效吸收剂量,最后得出,儿童较成人有效剂量较多,男性较女性有效剂量较多,为实际工作提供了参考依据。%In the paper , by analyzing the situation in the nuclear criticality accident , using MCNP5 to establish the human body model (children, adults, men, women), through calculated the human body's neutron dose at different organs for different ages and different gender groups .Pointed out different kinds of organ absorbed dif-ferent dose and calculated the effective absorbed dose of different age and gender groups , the conclusion is that children will absorb more neutron dose than adults , men will absorb more neutron dose than women , this can be a reference for practice work .

  5. Effects of fractionated doses of fast neutrons or photons on the canine brain: evaluation by computerized tomography and evoked response recording

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, E.W.; Davis, D.O.; Gaskill, J.W.; Deye, J.A.; Fisher, M.P.; Sloan, G.E.; Rogers, C.C.

    1980-12-01

    The use of fast neutrons in the treatment of cancer necessitates a knowledge of the normal tissue responses. This study was designed to compare the late effects of fractionated doses of fast neutrons with fractionated doses of photons on canine brains by evoked response recording and viewing computerized tomograms (CT). A relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 4 was obtained for normal brain tissue assessed by mortality and onset of neurologic symptoms. Every three months post-irradiation, visual and sensory evoked responses were recorded. Changes over time appeared to be minimal; however, computerized tomographs showed marked brain shrinkage. A method of quantitating cerebrospinal fluid and parenchymal volumes from scans is described and future use of these CT ratios to generate dose response curves and RBE values is postulated.

  6. Low-level measuring techniques for neutrons: High accuracy neutron source strength determination and fluence rate measurement at an underground laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimbal, Andreas; Degering, Detlev; Reginatto, Marcel; Schuhmacher, Helmut; Wiegel, Burkhard; Zuber, Kai

    2013-08-01

    We report on measuring techniques for neutrons that have been developed at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), the German National Metrology Institute. PTB has characterized radioactive sources used in the BOREXINO and XENON100 experiments. For the BOREXINO experiment, a 228Th gamma radiation source was required which would not emit more than 10 neutrons per second. The determination of the neutron emission rate of this specially designed 228Th source was challenging due to the low neutron emission rate and because the ratio of neutron to gamma radiation was expected to be extremely low, of the order of 10-6. For the XENON100 detector, PTB carried out a high accuracy measurement of the neutron emission rate of an AmBe source. PTB has also done measurements in underground laboratories. A two month measurement campaign with a set of 3He-filled proportional counters was carried out in PTB's former UDO underground laboratory at the Asse salt mine. The aim of the campaign was to determine the intrinsic background of detectors, which is needed for the analysis of data taken in lowintensity neutron fields. At a later time, PTB did a preliminary measurement of the neutron fluence rate at the underground laboratory Felsenkeller operated by VKTA. By taking into account data from UDO, Felsenkeller, and detector calibrations made at the PTB facility, it was possible to estimate the neutron fluence rate at the Felsenkeller underground laboratory.

  7. A dosimetry study of deuterium-deuterium neutron generator-based in vivo neutron activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowers, Daniel A.

    A neutron irradiation cavity for in vivo Neutron Activation Analysis (IVNAA) to detect manganese, aluminum, and other potentially toxic elements in human hand bone has been designed and its dosimetric specifications measured. The neutron source is a customized deuterium-deuterium neutron generator which produces neutrons at 2.45 MeV by the fusion reaction 2H(d, n)3He at a calculated flux of 7 x 108 +/-30% s-1. A moderator/reflector/shielding (5 cm high density polyethylene (HDPE), 5.3 cm graphite & 5.7 cm borated HDPE) assembly has been designed and built to maximize the thermal neutron flux inside the hand irradiation cavity and to reduce the extremity dose and effective dose to the human subject. Lead sheets are used to attenuate bremsstrahlung x rays and activation gammas. A Monte Carlo simulation (MCNP6) was used to model the system and calculate extremity dose. The extremity dose was measured with neutron and photon sensitive film badges and Fuji electronic pocket dosimeter (EPD). The neutron ambient dose outside the shielding was measured by Fuji NSN3, and photon dose by a Bicron MicroREM scintillator. Neutron extremity dose was calculated to be 32.3 mSv using MCNP6 simulations given a 10 min IVNAA measurement of manganese. Measurements by EPD and film badge indicate hand dose to be 31.7 +/- 0.8 mSv for neutron and 4.2 +/- 0.2 mSv for photon for 10 mins; whole body effective dose was calculated conservatively to be 0.052 mSv. Experimental values closely match values obtained from MCNP6 simulations. These are acceptable doses to apply the technology for a manganese toxicity study in a human population.

  8. Dose calculation in biological samples in a mixed neutron-gamma field at the TRIGA reactor of the University of Mainz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitz, T.; Blaickner, M.; Schütz, C.

    2010-01-01

    To establish Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for non-resectable liver metastases and for in vitro experiments at the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Mainz, Germany, it is necessary to have a reliable dose monitoring system. The in vitro experiments are used to determine the relative...... to the neutron fluence directly. Results and discussion. Gold foil activation and the pin-diode are reliable fluence measurement systems for the TRIGA reactor, Mainz. Alanine dosimetry of the photon field and charged particle field from secondary reactions can in principle be carried out in combination with MC...

  9. Neutron Diffraction Investigation of MnAs under High Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, A.F; Fjellvag, H; Lebech, Bente

    1984-01-01

    Powdered MnAs has been investigated by neutron diffraction in a pressure cryostat, at hydrostatic pressures up to 13 kbar and temperatures down to 4.2 K. It has been found that in the orthorhombic MnP type structure, which under pressure is retained at low temperature, a spiral magnetic structure...

  10. Neutron-proton elastic scattering at high energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleem, M.; Fazal-e-Aleem (Punjab Univ., Lahore (Pakistan). Dept. of Physics)

    1980-09-06

    The most recent measurements of the differential and total cross sections of neutron-proton elastic scattering from 70 to 400 GeV/c have been explained by using rho as a simple pole and pomeron as a dipole. The predictions are also made regarding the energy dependence of dip and bump structure in angular distribution.

  11. Calcium carbonate as a possible dosimeter for high irradiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negron M, A.; Ramos B, S.; Camargo R, C. [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Uribe, R. M. [Kent State University, College of Technology, Kent OH (United States); Gomez V, V. [UNAM, Instituto de Quimica, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Kobayashi, K., E-mail: negron@nucleares.unam.mx [Yokohama National University (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this work is to analyze the interactions of 5 MeV electron beam radiation and a 290 MeV/u Carbon beam with calcium carbonate (powder) at 298 K and at different irradiation doses, for the potential use of calcium carbonate as a high-dose dosimeter. The irradiation doses with the electron beam were from 0.015 to 9 MGy, and with Carbon beam from 1.5 kGy to 8 kGy. High-energy radiation induces the formation of free radicals in solid calcium carbonate that can be detected and measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). An increase of the EPR response for some of the free radicals produced in the sample was observed as a function of the irradiation dose. The response of one of the radicals decreased with the dose. These measurements are reproducible; the preparation of the sample is simple and inexpensive; and the signal is stable for several months. The response curves show that the dosimeter tends to saturate at 10 MGy. Based on these properties, we propose this chemical compound as a high-dose dosimeter, mainly for electron irradiation. (author)

  12. Comparison of whole-body phantom designs to estimate organ equivalent neutron doses for secondary cancer risk assessment in proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moteabbed, Maryam; Geyer, Amy; Drenkhahn, Robert; Bolch, Wesley E; Paganetti, Harald

    2012-01-21

    Secondary neutron fluence created during proton therapy can be a significant source of radiation exposure in organs distant from the treatment site, especially in pediatric patients. Various published studies have used computational phantoms to estimate neutron equivalent doses in proton therapy. In these simulations, whole-body patient representations were applied considering either generic whole-body phantoms or generic age- and gender-dependent phantoms. No studies to date have reported using patient-specific geometry information. The purpose of this study was to estimate the effects of patient–phantom matching when using computational pediatric phantoms. To achieve this goal, three sets of phantoms, including different ages and genders, were compared to the patients' whole-body CT. These sets consisted of pediatric age specific reference, age-adjusted reference and anatomically sculpted phantoms. The neutron equivalent dose for a subset of out-of-field organs was calculated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo toolkit, where proton fields were used to irradiate the cranium and the spine of all phantoms and the CT-segmented patient models. The maximum neutron equivalent dose per treatment absorbed dose was calculated and found to be on the order of 0 to 5 mSv Gy(-1). The relative dose difference between each phantom and their respective CT-segmented patient model for most organs showed a dependence on how close the phantom and patient heights were matched. The weight matching was found to have much smaller impact on the dose accuracy except for very heavy patients. Analysis of relative dose difference with respect to height difference suggested that phantom sculpting has a positive effect in terms of dose accuracy as long as the patient is close to the 50th percentile height and weight. Otherwise, the benefit of sculpting was masked by inherent uncertainties, i.e. variations in organ shapes, sizes and locations.Other sources of uncertainty included errors associated

  13. Scientific Advancements and Technological Developments of High P-T Neutron Diffraction at LANSCE, Los Alamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Daemen, L. L.; Zhang, J.

    2003-12-01

    In-situ high P-T neutron diffraction experiments provide unique opportunities to study the crystal structure, hydrogen bonding, magnetism, and thermal parameters of light elements (eg. H, Li, B) and heavy elements (eg. Ta, U, Pu,), that are virtually impossible to determine with x-ray diffraction techniques. For example, thermoelasticity and Debye-Waller factor as function of pressure and temperature can be derived using in-situ high P-T neutron diffraction techniques. These applications can also be extended to a much broader spectrum of scientific problems. For instance, puzzles in Earth science such as the carbon cycle and the role of hydrous minerals for water exchange between lithosphere and biosphere can be directly addressed. Moreover, by introducing in-situ shear, texture of metals and minerals accompanied with phase transitions at high P-T conditions can also be studied by high P-T neutron diffraction. We have successfully conducted high P-T neutron diffraction experiments at LANSCE and achieved simultaneous high pressures and temperatures of 10 GPa and 1500 K. With an average 3-6 hours of data collection, the diffraction data are of sufficiently high quality for the determination of structural parameters and thermal vibrations. We have studied hydrous mineral (MgOD), perovskite (K.15,Na.85)MgF3, clathrate hydrates (CH4-, CO2-, and H2-), metals (Mo, Al, Zr), and amorphous materials (carbon black, BMG). The aim of our research is to accurately map bond lengths, bond angles, neighboring atomic environments, and phase stability in P-T-X space. Studies based on high-pressure neutron diffraction are important for multi-disciplinary science and we welcome researchers from all fields to use this advanced technique. We have developed a 500-ton toroidal press, TAP-98, to conduct simultaneous high P-T neutron diffraction experiments inside of HIPPO (High-Pressure and Preferred-Orientation diffractometer). We have also developed a large gem-crystal anvil cell, ZAP-01

  14. Neutron-capture Cl-36, Ca-41, Ar-36, and Sm-150 in large chondrites: Evidence for high fluences of thermalized neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, D. D.; Nyquist, L. E.; Bansal, B. M.; Garrison, D. H.; Wiesmann, H.; Herzog, G. F.; Albrecht, A. A.; Vogt, S.; Klein, J.

    1995-01-01

    We have measured significant concentrations of Cl-36, Ca-41, Ar-36 from decay of Cl-36, and Sm-150 produced from the capture of thermalized neutrons in the large Chico L6 chondrite. Activities of Cl-36 and Ca-41, corrected for a high-energy spallogenic component and a terrestrial age of approximately 50 ka, give average neutron-capture production rates of 208 atoms/min/g-Cl and 1525 atoms/min/kg-Ca, which correspond to thermal neutron (n) fluxes of 6.2 n/sq cm/s and 4.3 n/sq cm/s, respectively. If sustained for the approximately 65 Ma single-stage, cosmic ray exposure age of Chico, these values correspond to thermal neutron fluences of approximately 1.3 x 10(exp 16) and 0.8 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm for Cl-36 and Ca-41, respectively. Stepwise temperature extraction of Ar in Chico impact melt shows Ar-36/Ar-38 ratios as large as approximately 9. The correlation of high Ar-36/Ar-38 with high Cl/Ca phases in neutron-irradiated Chico indicates that the excess Ar-36 above that expected from spallation is due to decay of neutron-produced Cl-36. Excess Ar-36 in Chico requires a thermal neutron fluence of 0.9-1.7 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm. Decreases in Sm-149/Sm-152 due to neutron-capture by Sm-149 correlate with increases in Sm-150/Sm-152 for three samples of Chico, and one of the Torino H-chondrite. The 0.08% decrease in Sm-149 shown by Chico corresponds to a neutron fluence of 1.23 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm. This fluence derived from Sm considers capture of epithermal neutrons and effects of chemical composition on the neutron energy distribution. Excess Ar-36 identified in the Arapahoe, Bruderheim, and Torino chondrites and the Shallowater aubrite suggest exposure to neutron fluences of approximately 0.2-0.2 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm. Depletion of Sm-149 in Torino and the LEW86010 angrite suggest neutron fluences of 0.8 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm and 0.25 x 10(exp 16) n/sq cm, respectively. Neutron fluences of approximately 10(exp 16) n/sq cm in Chico are almost as large as those previously

  15. Mechanical Performance of Ferritic Martensitic Steels for High Dose Applications in Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderoglu, Osman; Byun, Thak Sang; Toloczko, Mychailo; Maloy, Stuart A.

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels are considered for core applications and pressure vessels in Generation IV reactors as well as first walls and blankets for fusion reactors. There are significant scientific data on testing and industrial experience in making this class of alloys worldwide. This experience makes F/M steels an attractive candidate. In this article, tensile behavior, fracture toughness and impact property, and creep behavior of the F/M steels under neutron irradiations to high doses with a focus on high Cr content (8 to 12) are reviewed. Tensile properties are very sensitive to irradiation temperature. Increase in yield and tensile strength (hardening) is accompanied with a loss of ductility and starts at very low doses under irradiation. The degradation of mechanical properties is most pronounced at reactor environment, the stress exponent is expected to be approximately one and the steady state creep rate in the absence of swelling is usually better than austenitic stainless steels both in terms of the creep rate and the temperature sensitivity of creep. In short, F/M steels show excellent promise for high dose applications in nuclear reactors.

  16. A diamond 14 MeV neutron energy spectrometer with high energy resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimaoka, Takehiro, E-mail: t.shimaoka@eng.hokudai.ac.jp; Kaneko, Junichi H.; Tsubota, Masakatsu; Shimmyo, Hiroaki [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Ochiai, Kentaro [Fusion Research and Development Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Chayahara, Akiyoshi; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Shikata, Shin-ichi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Watanabe, Hideyuki [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Isobe, Mitsutaka; Osakabe, Masaki [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6, Oroshi-cho, Toki-City, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    A self-standing single-crystal chemical vapor deposited diamond was obtained using lift-off method. It was fabricated into a radiation detector and response function measurements for 14 MeV neutrons were taken at the fusion neutronics source. 1.5% of high energy resolution was obtained by using the {sup 12}C(n, α){sup 9}Be reaction at an angle of 100° with the deuteron beam line. The intrinsic energy resolution, excluding energy spreading caused by neutron scattering, slowing in the target and circuit noises was 0.79%, which was also the best resolution of the diamond detector ever reported.

  17. A magnetic trap for high-field seeking neutron spin states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Th. Brenner

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A first experimental demonstration of a new type of magnetic trap for ultra-cold neutrons is presented. High-field seeking spin-states are trapped in a potential formed by the magnetic field of a straight wire and a repulsive coating on the wire surface. Life-times of the trapped neutrons of 60 s could be observed. This configuration can in principle be used to form bound states of the wave function on the surface of the wire to probe new forces at short distances. Further applications include the use as a guide and selector for perfectly polarized neutrons.

  18. A magnetic trap for high-field seeking neutron spin states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenner, Th. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Chesnevskaya, S. [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Fierlinger, P., E-mail: peter.fierlinger@tum.de [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Geltenbort, P. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Gutsmiedl, E. [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Lauer, T. [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Rezai, K. [University of California at Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rothe, J. [Physik Department, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Zechlau, T. [Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Zou, R. [University of California at Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-02-04

    A first experimental demonstration of a new type of magnetic trap for ultra-cold neutrons is presented. High-field seeking spin-states are trapped in a potential formed by the magnetic field of a straight wire and a repulsive coating on the wire surface. Life-times of the trapped neutrons of 60 s could be observed. This configuration can in principle be used to form bound states of the wave function on the surface of the wire to probe new forces at short distances. Further applications include the use as a guide and selector for perfectly polarized neutrons.

  19. On the solar cycle variation in the barometer coefficients of high latitude neutron monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusunose, M.; Ogita, N.

    1985-01-01

    Evaluation of barometer coefficients of neutron monitors located at high latitudes has been performed by using the results of the spherical harmonic analysis based on the records from around twenty stations for twelve years from January 1966 to December 1977. The average of data at eight stations, where continuous records are available for twelve years, show that the absolute value of barometer coefficient is in positive correlation with the cosmic ray neutron intensity. The variation rate of the barometer coefficient to the cosmic ray neutron intensity is influenced by the changes in the cutoff rigidity and in the primary spectrum.

  20. Neutron induced bystander effect among zebrafish embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, C. Y. P.; Kong, E. Y.; Kobayashi, A.; Suya, N.; Uchihori, Y.; Cheng, S. H.; Konishi, T.; Yu, K. N.

    2015-12-01

    The present paper reported the first-ever observation of neutron induced bystander effect (NIBE) using zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos as the in vivo model. The neutron exposure in the present work was provided by the Neutron exposure Accelerator System for Biological Effect Experiments (NASBEE) facility at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba, Japan. Two different strategies were employed to induce NIBE, namely, through directly partnering and through medium transfer. Both results agreed with a neutron-dose window (20-50 mGy) which could induce NIBE. The lower dose limit corresponded to the threshold amount of neutron-induced damages to trigger significant bystander signals, while the upper limit corresponded to the onset of gamma-ray hormesis which could mitigate the neutron-induced damages and thereby suppress the bystander signals. Failures to observe NIBE in previous studies were due to using neutron doses outside the dose-window. Strategies to enhance the chance of observing NIBE included (1) use of a mono-energetic high-energy (e.g., between 100 keV and 2 MeV) neutron source, and (2) use of a neutron source with a small gamma-ray contamination. It appeared that the NASBEE facility used in the present study fulfilled both conditions, and was thus ideal for triggering NIBE.

  1. Measurements of the high energy neutron component of cosmic radiation fields in aircraft using etched track dosemeters

    CERN Document Server

    Bartlett, D T; Tanner, R J; Steele, J D

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of the complex cosmic radiation field in aircraft at altitude are made with a passive survey meter comprising routine-use thermoluminescent detectors and etched track detectors. The energy dependence of response of the etched track detectors used to determine the neutron component has been characterized, partly, up to a neutron energy of 180 MeV. The neutron detectors are routinely calibrated in the CERN EC Ref.Field. The 15% determination level for total dose equivalent is 100 mu Sv. The evidence is that the passive survey meter provides a reliable determination of route dose. (41 refs).

  2. Spectra and neutron dose of an 18 MV Linac using two geometric models of the head; Espectros y dosis por neutrones de un Linac de 18 MV usando dos modelos geometricos del cabezal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, M. T.; Pino, F.; Barros, H.; Sajo-Bohus, L. [Universidad Simon Bolivar, Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Sartenejas, Baruta 1080-A, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Davila, J. [Fisica Medica C. A., Av. Francisco de Miranda s/n, Los Palos Grandes, 1060 Miranda (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Salcedo, E. [Centro Medico Docente La Trinidad, Av. de El Haltillo, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas, Zac. (Mexico); Benites R, J. L., E-mail: mariate9590@gmail.com [Centro de Cancerologia de Nayarit, Servicio de Seguridad Radiologica, Calz. de la Cruz 118 Sur, 63000 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Using the Monte Carlo method, by MCNP5 code, simulations were performed with different source terms and 2 geometric models of the head to obtain spectra in energy, flow and doses of photo-neutrons at different positions on the stretcher and in the radiotherapy room. The simplest model was a spherical shell of tungsten; the second was the complete model of a heterogeneous head of an accelerator Varian ix. In both models Tosi function was used as a source term. In addition, for the second model Sheikh-Bagheri distribution was used for photons and photo-neutrons were generated. Also in both models the radiotherapy room of Gurve group of the Teaching Medical Center La Trinidad was included, which is equipped with an accelerator Varian Clinic 2100. In this Center passive detectors PADC (Cr-39) were irradiated with neutron converters, with 18 MeV photons radiation. The measured neutron flow was compared with that obtained with Monte Carlo calculations. The Monte Carlo flows are similar to those measured at the isocenter. The simplest model underestimates the neutron flow compared with the calculated flows with the heterogeneous model of the head. (Author)

  3. SU-E-T-543: Measurement of Neutron Activation From Different High Energy Varian Linear Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thatcher, T; Madsen, S; Sudowe, R [University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Meigooni, A Soleimani [University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Linear accelerators producing photons above 10 MeV may induce photonuclear reactions in high Z components of the accelerator. These liberated neutrons can then activate the structural components of the accelerator and other materials in the beam path through neutron capture reactions. The induced activity within the accelerator may contribute to additional dose to both patients and personnel. This project seeks to determine the total activity and activity per activated isotope following irradiation in different Varian accelerators at energies above 10 MeV. Methods: A Varian 21IX accelerator was used to irradiate a 30 cm × 30 cm × 20 cm solid water phantom with 15 MV x-rays. The phantom was placed at an SSD of 100 cm and at the center of a 20 cm × 20 cm field. Activation induced gamma spectra were acquired over a 5 minute interval after 1 and 15 minutes from completion of the irradiation. All measurements were made using a CANBERRA Falcon 5000 Portable HPGe detector. The majority of measurements were made in scattering geometry with the detector situated at 90° to the incident beam, 30 cm from the side of the phantom and approximately 10 cm from the top. A 5 minute background count was acquired and automatically subtracted from all subsequent measurements. Photon spectra were acquired for both open and MLC fields. Results: Based on spectral signatures, nuclides have been identified and their activities calculated for both open and MLC fields. Preliminary analyses suggest that activities from the activation products in the microcurie range. Conclusion: Activation isotopes have been identified and their relative activities determined. These activities are only gross estimates since efficiencies have not been determined for this source-detector geometry. Current efforts are focused on accurate determination of detector efficiencies using Monte Carlo calculations.

  4. Design of a high-flux epithermal neutron beam using 235U fission plates at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H B; Brugger, R M; Rorer, D C; Tichler, P R; Hu, J P

    1994-10-01

    Beams of epithermal neutrons are being used in the development of boron neutron capture therapy for cancer. This report describes a design study in which 235U fission plates and moderators are used to produce an epithermal neutron beam with higher intensity and better quality than the beam currently in use at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Monte Carlo calculations are used to predict the neutron and gamma fluxes and absorbed doses produced by the proposed design. Neutron flux measurements at the present epithermal treatment facility (ETF) were made to verify and compare with the computed results where feasible. The calculations indicate that an epithermal neutron beam produced by a fission-plate converter could have an epithermal neutron intensity of 1.2 x 10(10) n/cm2.s and a fast neutron dose per epithermal neutron of 2.8 x 10(-11) cGy.cm2/nepi plus being forward directed. This beam would be built into the beam shutter of the ETF at the BMRR. The feasibility of remodeling the facility is discussed.

  5. Measurement of photoneutron doses in and out of high-energy X-ray beam of a SATURNE-20 medical linear accelerator by ECE polycarbonate detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sohrabi, M

    1999-01-01

    Photoneutron contaminations in and out of high energy X-ray beams of the medical linear accelerator SATURNE 20 (CGR) of the Radiotherapy Department of Omeed Hospital in Isfahan, Iran, have been determined using 250 mu m polycarbonate (PC) dosimeters, in strips or in sheets, processed by electrochemical etching (ECE) using specially designed ECE chambers to etch larger sheets. A two dimensional or topographical distribution of neutron contamination was also determined in a full size beam. The neutron dose equivalents (Hn) in the beam of 18 MV X-rays at 80 cm FSD were determined to be linear functions of X-ray dose equivalents (Hx) up to 1400 cSv. The distribution of the Hn at different X-ray doses showed bell-shape profiles with maxima at the isocenter. The ratios of dose equivalents of neutrons to those of X-rays increased as the field size increased having values of 0.22%, 0.28%, 0.31% and 0.37% for field sizes of 10x10, 20x20, 30x30, and 40x40 cm sup 2 respectively. Although such neutron dose equivalents ca...

  6. Spectroscopic gamma camera for use in high dose environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yuichiro; Takahashi, Isao; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Okada, Koichi; Nagumo, Yasushi; Fujishima, Yasutake; Kometani, Yutaka; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2016-06-01

    We developed a pinhole gamma camera to measure distributions of radioactive material contaminants and to identify radionuclides in extraordinarily high dose regions (1000 mSv/h). The developed gamma camera is characterized by: (1) tolerance for high dose rate environments; (2) high spatial and spectral resolution for identifying unknown contaminating sources; and (3) good usability for being carried on a robot and remotely controlled. These are achieved by using a compact pixelated detector module with CdTe semiconductors, efficient shielding, and a fine resolution pinhole collimator. The gamma camera weighs less than 100 kg, and its field of view is an 8 m square in the case of a distance of 10 m and its image is divided into 256 (16×16) pixels. From the laboratory test, we found the energy resolution at the 662 keV photopeak was 2.3% FWHM, which is enough to identify the radionuclides. We found that the count rate per background dose rate was 220 cps h/mSv and the maximum count rate was 300 kcps, so the maximum dose rate of the environment where the gamma camera can be operated was calculated as 1400 mSv/h. We investigated the reactor building of Unit 1 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant using the gamma camera and could identify the unknown contaminating source in the dose rate environment that was as high as 659 mSv/h.

  7. Spectroscopic gamma camera for use in high dose environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Yuichiro, E-mail: yuichiro.ueno.bv@hitachi.com [Research and Development Group, Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1221 (Japan); Takahashi, Isao; Ishitsu, Takafumi; Tadokoro, Takahiro; Okada, Koichi; Nagumo, Yasushi [Research and Development Group, Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-1221 (Japan); Fujishima, Yasutake; Kometani, Yutaka [Hitachi Works, Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd., Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Suzuki, Yasuhiko [Measuring Systems Engineering Dept., Hitachi Aloka Medical, Ltd., Ome-shi, Tokyo (Japan); Umegaki, Kikuo [Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo-shi, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2016-06-21

    We developed a pinhole gamma camera to measure distributions of radioactive material contaminants and to identify radionuclides in extraordinarily high dose regions (1000 mSv/h). The developed gamma camera is characterized by: (1) tolerance for high dose rate environments; (2) high spatial and spectral resolution for identifying unknown contaminating sources; and (3) good usability for being carried on a robot and remotely controlled. These are achieved by using a compact pixelated detector module with CdTe semiconductors, efficient shielding, and a fine resolution pinhole collimator. The gamma camera weighs less than 100 kg, and its field of view is an 8 m square in the case of a distance of 10 m and its image is divided into 256 (16×16) pixels. From the laboratory test, we found the energy resolution at the 662 keV photopeak was 2.3% FWHM, which is enough to identify the radionuclides. We found that the count rate per background dose rate was 220 cps h/mSv and the maximum count rate was 300 kcps, so the maximum dose rate of the environment where the gamma camera can be operated was calculated as 1400 mSv/h. We investigated the reactor building of Unit 1 at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant using the gamma camera and could identify the unknown contaminating source in the dose rate environment that was as high as 659 mSv/h.

  8. Measurements of neutrons produced by high-energy muons at the Boulby Underground Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Araújo, H M; Bungau, C; Carson, M J; Chagani, H; Daw, E; Edwards, B; Ghag, C; Korolkova, E V; Kudryavtsev, V A; Lightfoot, P K; Lindote, A; Liubarsky, I; Lüscher, R; Majewski, P; Mavrokoridis, K; McMillan, J E; Murphy, A St J; Paling, S M; da Cunha, J Pinto; Preece, R M; Robinson, M; Smith, N J T; Smith, P F; Spooner, N J C; Sumner, T J; Walker, R J; Wang, H; White, J

    2008-01-01

    We present the first measurements of the muon-induced neutron flux at the Boulby Underground Laboratory. The experiment was carried out with an 0.73 tonne liquid scintillator that also served as an anticoincidence system for the ZEPLIN-II direct dark matter search. The experimental method exploited the delayed coincidences between high-energy muon signals and gamma-rays from radiative neutron capture on hydrogen or other elements. The muon-induced neutron rate, defined as the average number of detected neutrons per detected muon, was measured as $0.079 \\pm 0.003$ (stat.) neutrons/muon using neutron-capture signals above 0.55 MeV in a time window of 40-190 $\\mu$s after the muon trigger. Accurate Monte Carlo simulations of the neutron production, transport and detection in a precisely modeled laboratory and experimental setup using the GEANT4 toolkit gave a result 1.8 times higher than the measured value. The difference greatly exceeds all statistical and systematic uncertainties. As the vast majority of neutro...

  9. Development of high sensitivity 4H-SiC detectors for fission neutron pulse shape measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Jiang, Yong; Li, Meng; Zeng, Lina; Li, Junjie; Gao, Hui; Zou, Dehui; Bai, Zhongxiong; Ye, Cenming; Liang, Wenfeng; Dai, Shaofeng; Lu, Yi; Rong, Ru; Du, Jinfeng; Fan, Xiaoqiang

    2017-08-01

    4H-silicon carbide (4H-SiC) detectors are well suited for measurements of fission neutron pulse shape for their compact size, excellent radiation resistance, and hydrogen free composition. The aim of this study is to improve the 4H-SiC detector's sensitivity to fission neutron pulses. 4H-SiC detectors with varied epilayer thicknesses are fabricated and then tested in the pulsed neutron field of the Chinese Fast Burst Reactor II (CFBR II). The sensitivity of the 4H-SiC detector to the CFBR II neutron pulse is increased by 139.8%, with the enlargement of epilayer thickness from 20 μm to 120 μm. By employing the proton-recoil method, the sensitivity of the 4H-SiC detector to the CFBR II neutron pulse is further increased by 11.6%. With enhanced sensitivity to fission neutron pulses, 4H-SiC detectors are promising devices for high intensity neutron pulse measurements.

  10. Low-cost fabrication of high efficiency solid-state neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jia-Woei; Huang, Kuan-Chih; Weltz, Adam; English, Erik; Hella, Mona M.; Dahal, Rajendra; Lu, James J.-Q.; Danon, Yaron; Bhat, Ishwara B.

    2016-05-01

    The development of high-efficiency solid state thermal neutron detectors at low cost is critical for a wide range of civilian and defense applications. The use of present neutron detector system for personal radiation detection is limited by the cost, size, weight and power requirements. Chip scale solid state neutron detectors based on silicon technology would provide significant benefits in terms of cost, volume, and allow for wafer level integration with charge preamplifiers and readout electronics. In this paper, anisotropic wet etching of (110) silicon wafers was used to replace deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) to produce microstructured neutron detectors with lower cost and compatibility with mass production. Deep trenches were etched by 30 wt% KOH at 85°C with a highest etch ratio of (110) to (111). A trench-microstructure thermal neutron detector described by the aforementioned processes was fabricated and characterized. The detector—which has a continuous p+-n junction diode—was filled with enriched boron (99% of 10B) as a neutron converter material. The device showed a leakage current of ~ 6.7 × 10-6 A/cm2 at -1V and thermal neutron detection efficiency of ~16.3%. The detector uses custom built charge pre-amplifier, a shaping amplifier, and an analogto- digital converter (ADC) for data acquisition.

  11. In-situ SEOP polarizer and initial tests on a high flux neutron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babcock, E., E-mail: e.babcock@fz-juelich.d [Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France); Jeulich Centre for Neutron Science, Garching (Germany); Boag, S. [ISIS, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 QX (United Kingdom); Andersen, K.H.; Becker, M. [Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France); Beecham, C. [ISIS, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 QX (United Kingdom); Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France); Bordenave, F.; Chastagnier, J. [Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France); Chen, W.C. [NIST Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Chung, R. [Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France); Chupp, T.E. [FOCUS, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Elmore, S. [ISIS, Chilton, Didcot, OX11 QX (United Kingdom); Fouilloux, P. [Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France); Gentile, T.R. [NIST Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Jullien, D.; Lelievre-Berna, E.; Mouveau, P.; Petoukhov, A.; Revert, M.; Soldner, T. [Institut Laue Langevin, Grenoble (France)

    2009-09-01

    Polarized {sup 3}He has shown its unique characteristics in many areas of polarized neutron scattering, its ability to polarize neutrons at short wavelengths, accept wide-angle and divergent beams and low backgrounds enable new classes of experiments. While polarized {sup 3}He is not a steady state solution as commonly applied, the benefits have been shown to offset the drawbacks of polarizing and refreshing the polarization in the neutron spin filter cells. As an extension of this work, in-situ polarization using the spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP) method was explored as a means to construct a system which could be used to polarize {sup 3}He in the state used for an effective neutron spin filter to constant polarization while on the neutron beam. An in-situ SEOP polarizer was constructed. This device utilized many devices and principles developed for neutron spin filters which are polarized off the beam line using either SEOP or metastability exchange optical pumping (MEOP) under the same research program. As a collimation of this work effects of extremely high neutron capture flux density >1x10{sup 10}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} incident on the in-situ polarizer were explored.

  12. Neutron Damage and MAX Phase Ternary Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsoum, Michael [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hoffman, Elizabeth [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Sindelar, Robert [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Garcua-Duaz, Brenda [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Kohse, Gordon [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-06-17

    The Demands of Gen IV nuclear power plants for long service life under neutron radiation at high temperature are severe. Advanced materials that would withstand high temperatures (up to 1000+ C) to high doses in a neutron field would be ideal for reactor internal structures and would add to the long service life and reliability of the reactors. The objective of this work is to investigate the response of a new class of machinable, conductive, layered, ternary transition metal carbides and nitrides - the so-called MAX phases - to low and moderate neutron dose levels.

  13. Analysis of the neutron component at high altitude mountains using active and passive measurement devices

    CERN Document Server

    Hajek, M; Schoener, W; Vana, N

    2002-01-01

    The European Council directive 96/29/Euratom requires dosimetric precautions if the effective dose exceeds 1 mSv/a. On an average, this value is exceeded by aircrew members. Roughly half of the radiation exposure at flight altitudes is caused by cosmic ray-induced neutrons. Active ( sup 6 LiI(Eu)-scintillator) and passive (TLDs) Bonner sphere spectrometers were used to determine the neutron energy spectra atop Mt. Sonnblick (3105 m) and Mt. Kitzsteinhorn (3029 m). Further measurements in a mixed radiation field at CERN as well as in a proton beam of 62 MeV at Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, confirmed that not only neutrons but also charged particles contribute to the readings of active detectors, whereas TLD-600 and TLD-700 in pair allow the determination of the thermal neutron flux. Unfolding of the detector data obtained atop both mountains shows two relative maxima around 1 MeV and 85 MeV, which have to be considered for the assessment of the biologically relevant dose equivalent. By convoluting the ...

  14. New estimation method of neutron skyshine for a high-energy particle accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Joo-Hee; Jung, Nam-Suk; Lee, Hee-Seock; Ko, Seung-Kook

    2016-09-01

    A skyshine is the dominant component of the prompt radiation at off-site. Several experimental studies have been done to estimate the neutron skyshine at a few accelerator facilities. In this work, the neutron transports from a source place to off-site location were simulated using the Monte Carlo codes, FLUKA and PHITS. The transport paths were classified as skyshine, direct (transport), groundshine and multiple-shine to understand the contribution of each path and to develop a general evaluation method. The effect of each path was estimated in the view of the dose at far locations. The neutron dose was calculated using the neutron energy spectra obtained from each detector placed up to a maximum of 1 km from the accelerator. The highest altitude of the sky region in this simulation was set as 2 km from the floor of the accelerator facility. The initial model of this study was the 10 GeV electron accelerator, PAL-XFEL. Different compositions and densities of air, soil and ordinary concrete were applied in this calculation, and their dependences were reviewed. The estimation method used in this study was compared with the well-known methods suggested by Rindi, Stevenson and Stepleton, and also with the simple code, SHINE3. The results obtained using this method agreed well with those using Rindi's formula.

  15. Bioassay for neutron-dose estimations of three patients in the JCO criticality accident in Tokai-mura by measuring beta-ray emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, H; Miyamoto, K; Yukawa, M; Nishimura, Y; Watanabe, Y; Kim, H S; Fuma, S; Kuroda, N; Kouno, F; Joshima, H; Hirama, T; Akashi, M

    2001-09-01

    The measurement of beta-emitters in biological samples (hair, urine and bone) from three patients in the JCO criticality accident was performed to assess the neutron dose to individuals. The result of the measurements of 32P in hair and urine collected immediately after the accident showed that sufficient 32P activities had been induced in the hair by fast neutrons and in the urine by thermal neutrons to know the severity of the exposure to the individuals and to the position. From the measurement of 32P and 45Ca in bone from various anatomical parts of two patients who died 82 and 210 days after the accident, it was suggested that the distribution of the induced beta-emitters activities could prove the position and posture of the patients at the moment of exposure.

  16. Limitations of the TG-43 formalism for skin high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granero, Domingo, E-mail: dgranero@eresa.com [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, 46014 Valencia (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Vijande, Javier [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100, Spain and IFIC (UV-CSIC), Paterna 46980 (Spain); Ballester, Facundo [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In skin high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, sources are located outside, in contact with, or implanted at some depth below the skin surface. Most treatment planning systems use the TG-43 formalism, which is based on single-source dose superposition within an infinite water medium without accounting for the true geometry in which conditions for scattered radiation are altered by the presence of air. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric limitations of the TG-43 formalism in HDR skin brachytherapy and the potential clinical impact. Methods: Dose rate distributions of typical configurations used in skin brachytherapy were obtained: a 5 cm × 5 cm superficial mould; a source inside a catheter located at the skin surface with and without backscatter bolus; and a typical interstitial implant consisting of an HDR source in a catheter located at a depth of 0.5 cm. Commercially available HDR{sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir sources and a hypothetical {sup 169}Yb source were considered. The Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to estimate dose rate distributions for the configurations considered. These results were then compared to those obtained with the TG-43 dose calculation formalism. In particular, the influence of adding bolus material over the implant was studied. Results: For a 5 cm × 5 cm{sup 192}Ir superficial mould and 0.5 cm prescription depth, dose differences in comparison to the TG-43 method were about −3%. When the source was positioned at the skin surface, dose differences were smaller than −1% for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir, yet −3% for {sup 169}Yb. For the interstitial implant, dose differences at the skin surface were −7% for {sup 60}Co, −0.6% for {sup 192}Ir, and −2.5% for {sup 169}Yb. Conclusions: This study indicates the following: (i) for the superficial mould, no bolus is needed; (ii) when the source is in contact with the skin surface, no bolus is needed for either {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir. For