WorldWideScience

Sample records for high dimensional dynamic

  1. Analysing spatially extended high-dimensional dynamics by recurrence plots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marwan, Norbert, E-mail: marwan@pik-potsdam.de [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, 14412 Potsdam (Germany); Kurths, Jürgen [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, 14412 Potsdam (Germany); Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Institut für Physik (Germany); Nizhny Novgorod State University, Department of Control Theory, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Foerster, Saskia [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Section 1.4 Remote Sensing, Telegrafenberg, 14473 Potsdam (Germany)

    2015-05-08

    Recurrence plot based measures of complexity are capable tools for characterizing complex dynamics. In this letter we show the potential of selected recurrence plot measures for the investigation of even high-dimensional dynamics. We apply this method on spatially extended chaos, such as derived from the Lorenz96 model and show that the recurrence plot based measures can qualitatively characterize typical dynamical properties such as chaotic or periodic dynamics. Moreover, we demonstrate its power by analysing satellite image time series of vegetation cover with contrasting dynamics as a spatially extended and potentially high-dimensional example from the real world. - Highlights: • We use recurrence plots for analysing partially extended dynamics. • We investigate the high-dimensional chaos of the Lorenz96 model. • The approach distinguishes different spatio-temporal dynamics. • We use the method for studying vegetation cover time series.

  2. Inference in High-dimensional Dynamic Panel Data Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kock, Anders Bredahl; Tang, Haihan

    We establish oracle inequalities for a version of the Lasso in high-dimensional fixed effects dynamic panel data models. The inequalities are valid for the coefficients of the dynamic and exogenous regressors. Separate oracle inequalities are derived for the fixed effects. Next, we show how one can...

  3. Supporting Dynamic Quantization for High-Dimensional Data Analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzun, Gheorghi; Canahuate, Guadalupe

    2017-05-01

    Similarity searches are at the heart of exploratory data analysis tasks. Distance metrics are typically used to characterize the similarity between data objects represented as feature vectors. However, when the dimensionality of the data increases and the number of features is large, traditional distance metrics fail to distinguish between the closest and furthest data points. Localized distance functions have been proposed as an alternative to traditional distance metrics. These functions only consider dimensions close to query to compute the distance/similarity. Furthermore, in order to enable interactive explorations of high-dimensional data, indexing support for ad-hoc queries is needed. In this work we set up to investigate whether bit-sliced indices can be used for exploratory analytics such as similarity searches and data clustering for high-dimensional big-data. We also propose a novel dynamic quantization called Query dependent Equi-Depth (QED) quantization and show its effectiveness on characterizing high-dimensional similarity. When applying QED we observe improvements in kNN classification accuracy over traditional distance functions. Gheorghi Guzun and Guadalupe Canahuate. 2017. Supporting Dynamic Quantization for High-Dimensional Data Analytics. In Proceedings of Ex-ploreDB'17, Chicago, IL, USA, May 14-19, 2017, 6 pages. https://doi.org/http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/3077331.3077336.

  4. High dimensional model representation method for fuzzy structural dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, S.; Chowdhury, R.; Friswell, M. I.

    2011-03-01

    Uncertainty propagation in multi-parameter complex structures possess significant computational challenges. This paper investigates the possibility of using the High Dimensional Model Representation (HDMR) approach when uncertain system parameters are modeled using fuzzy variables. In particular, the application of HDMR is proposed for fuzzy finite element analysis of linear dynamical systems. The HDMR expansion is an efficient formulation for high-dimensional mapping in complex systems if the higher order variable correlations are weak, thereby permitting the input-output relationship behavior to be captured by the terms of low-order. The computational effort to determine the expansion functions using the α-cut method scales polynomically with the number of variables rather than exponentially. This logic is based on the fundamental assumption underlying the HDMR representation that only low-order correlations among the input variables are likely to have significant impacts upon the outputs for most high-dimensional complex systems. The proposed method is first illustrated for multi-parameter nonlinear mathematical test functions with fuzzy variables. The method is then integrated with a commercial finite element software (ADINA). Modal analysis of a simplified aircraft wing with fuzzy parameters has been used to illustrate the generality of the proposed approach. In the numerical examples, triangular membership functions have been used and the results have been validated against direct Monte Carlo simulations. It is shown that using the proposed HDMR approach, the number of finite element function calls can be reduced without significantly compromising the accuracy.

  5. Applications of Asymptotic Sampling on High Dimensional Structural Dynamic Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sichani, Mahdi Teimouri; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Bucher, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The paper represents application of the asymptotic sampling on various structural models subjected to random excitations. A detailed study on the effect of different distributions of the so-called support points is performed. This study shows that the distribution of the support points has consid...... dimensional reliability problems in structural dynamics.......The paper represents application of the asymptotic sampling on various structural models subjected to random excitations. A detailed study on the effect of different distributions of the so-called support points is performed. This study shows that the distribution of the support points has...... is minimized. Next, the method is applied on different cases of linear and nonlinear systems with a large number of random variables representing the dynamic excitation. The results show that asymptotic sampling is capable of providing good approximations of low failure probability events for very high...

  6. A qualitative numerical study of high dimensional dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, David James

    Since Poincare, the father of modern mathematical dynamical systems, much effort has been exerted to achieve a qualitative understanding of the physical world via a qualitative understanding of the functions we use to model the physical world. In this thesis, we construct a numerical framework suitable for a qualitative, statistical study of dynamical systems using the space of artificial neural networks. We analyze the dynamics along intervals in parameter space, separating the set of neural networks into roughly four regions: the fixed point to the first bifurcation; the route to chaos; the chaotic region; and a transition region between chaos and finite-state neural networks. The study is primarily with respect to high-dimensional dynamical systems. We make the following general conclusions as the dimension of the dynamical system is increased: the probability of the first bifurcation being of type Neimark-Sacker is greater than ninety-percent; the most probable route to chaos is via a cascade of bifurcations of high-period periodic orbits, quasi-periodic orbits, and 2-tori; there exists an interval of parameter space such that hyperbolicity is violated on a countable, Lebesgue measure 0, "increasingly dense" subset; chaos is much more likely to persist with respect to parameter perturbation in the chaotic region of parameter space as the dimension is increased; moreover, as the number of positive Lyapunov exponents is increased, the likelihood that any significant portion of these positive exponents can be perturbed away decreases with increasing dimension. The maximum Kaplan-Yorke dimension and the maximum number of positive Lyapunov exponents increases linearly with dimension. The probability of a dynamical system being chaotic increases exponentially with dimension. The results with respect to the first bifurcation and the route to chaos comment on previous results of Newhouse, Ruelle, Takens, Broer, Chenciner, and Iooss. Moreover, results regarding the high-dimensional

  7. Bayesian Inference of High-Dimensional Dynamical Ocean Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J.; Lermusiaux, P. F. J.; Lolla, S. V. T.; Gupta, A.; Haley, P. J., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    This presentation addresses a holistic set of challenges in high-dimension ocean Bayesian nonlinear estimation: i) predict the probability distribution functions (pdfs) of large nonlinear dynamical systems using stochastic partial differential equations (PDEs); ii) assimilate data using Bayes' law with these pdfs; iii) predict the future data that optimally reduce uncertainties; and (iv) rank the known and learn the new model formulations themselves. Overall, we allow the joint inference of the state, equations, geometry, boundary conditions and initial conditions of dynamical models. Examples are provided for time-dependent fluid and ocean flows, including cavity, double-gyre and Strait flows with jets and eddies. The Bayesian model inference, based on limited observations, is illustrated first by the estimation of obstacle shapes and positions in fluid flows. Next, the Bayesian inference of biogeochemical reaction equations and of their states and parameters is presented, illustrating how PDE-based machine learning can rigorously guide the selection and discovery of complex ecosystem models. Finally, the inference of multiscale bottom gravity current dynamics is illustrated, motivated in part by classic overflows and dense water formation sites and their relevance to climate monitoring and dynamics. This is joint work with our MSEAS group at MIT.

  8. Counting and classifying attractors in high dimensional dynamical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagley, R J; Glass, L

    1996-12-07

    Randomly connected Boolean networks have been used as mathematical models of neural, genetic, and immune systems. A key quantity of such networks is the number of basins of attraction in the state space. The number of basins of attraction changes as a function of the size of the network, its connectivity and its transition rules. In discrete networks, a simple count of the number of attractors does not reveal the combinatorial structure of the attractors. These points are illustrated in a reexamination of dynamics in a class of random Boolean networks considered previously by Kauffman. We also consider comparisons between dynamics in discrete networks and continuous analogues. A continuous analogue of a discrete network may have a different number of attractors for many different reasons. Some attractors in discrete networks may be associated with unstable dynamics, and several different attractors in a discrete network may be associated with a single attractor in the continuous case. Special problems in determining attractors in continuous systems arise when there is aperiodic dynamics associated with quasiperiodicity of deterministic chaos.

  9. Approximate Dynamic Programming Based on High Dimensional Model Representation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pištěk, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 5 (2013), s. 720-737 ISSN 0023-5954 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP102/11/0437 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : approximate dynamic programming * Bellman equation * approximate HDMR minimization * trust region problem Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 0.563, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/AS/pistek-0399560.pdf

  10. Approximating high-dimensional dynamics by barycentric coordinates with linear programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Yoshito, E-mail: yoshito@sat.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Hideyuki [Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan); Department of Mathematical Informatics, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); CREST, JST, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Shiro, Masanori [Department of Mathematical Informatics, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Mathematical Neuroinformatics Group, Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Takahashi, Nozomu; Mas, Paloma [Center for Research in Agricultural Genomics (CRAG), Consorci CSIC-IRTA-UAB-UB, Barcelona 08193 (Spain)

    2015-01-15

    The increasing development of novel methods and techniques facilitates the measurement of high-dimensional time series but challenges our ability for accurate modeling and predictions. The use of a general mathematical model requires the inclusion of many parameters, which are difficult to be fitted for relatively short high-dimensional time series observed. Here, we propose a novel method to accurately model a high-dimensional time series. Our method extends the barycentric coordinates to high-dimensional phase space by employing linear programming, and allowing the approximation errors explicitly. The extension helps to produce free-running time-series predictions that preserve typical topological, dynamical, and/or geometric characteristics of the underlying attractors more accurately than the radial basis function model that is widely used. The method can be broadly applied, from helping to improve weather forecasting, to creating electronic instruments that sound more natural, and to comprehensively understanding complex biological data.

  11. Approximating high-dimensional dynamics by barycentric coordinates with linear programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Yoshito; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Shiro, Masanori; Takahashi, Nozomu; Mas, Paloma

    2015-01-01

    The increasing development of novel methods and techniques facilitates the measurement of high-dimensional time series but challenges our ability for accurate modeling and predictions. The use of a general mathematical model requires the inclusion of many parameters, which are difficult to be fitted for relatively short high-dimensional time series observed. Here, we propose a novel method to accurately model a high-dimensional time series. Our method extends the barycentric coordinates to high-dimensional phase space by employing linear programming, and allowing the approximation errors explicitly. The extension helps to produce free-running time-series predictions that preserve typical topological, dynamical, and/or geometric characteristics of the underlying attractors more accurately than the radial basis function model that is widely used. The method can be broadly applied, from helping to improve weather forecasting, to creating electronic instruments that sound more natural, and to comprehensively understanding complex biological data

  12. Approximating high-dimensional dynamics by barycentric coordinates with linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Yoshito; Shiro, Masanori; Takahashi, Nozomu; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Suzuki, Hideyuki; Mas, Paloma

    2015-01-01

    The increasing development of novel methods and techniques facilitates the measurement of high-dimensional time series but challenges our ability for accurate modeling and predictions. The use of a general mathematical model requires the inclusion of many parameters, which are difficult to be fitted for relatively short high-dimensional time series observed. Here, we propose a novel method to accurately model a high-dimensional time series. Our method extends the barycentric coordinates to high-dimensional phase space by employing linear programming, and allowing the approximation errors explicitly. The extension helps to produce free-running time-series predictions that preserve typical topological, dynamical, and/or geometric characteristics of the underlying attractors more accurately than the radial basis function model that is widely used. The method can be broadly applied, from helping to improve weather forecasting, to creating electronic instruments that sound more natural, and to comprehensively understanding complex biological data.

  13. Ghosts in high dimensional non-linear dynamical systems: The example of the hypercycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardanyes, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Ghost-induced delayed transitions are analyzed in high dimensional non-linear dynamical systems by means of the hypercycle model. The hypercycle is a network of catalytically-coupled self-replicating RNA-like macromolecules, and has been suggested to be involved in the transition from non-living to living matter in the context of earlier prebiotic evolution. It is demonstrated that, in the vicinity of the saddle-node bifurcation for symmetric hypercycles, the persistence time before extinction, T ε , tends to infinity as n→∞ (being n the number of units of the hypercycle), thus suggesting that the increase in the number of hypercycle units involves a longer resilient time before extinction because of the ghost. Furthermore, by means of numerical analysis the dynamics of three large hypercycle networks is also studied, focusing in their extinction dynamics associated to the ghosts. Such networks allow to explore the properties of the ghosts living in high dimensional phase space with n = 5, n = 10 and n = 15 dimensions. These hypercyclic networks, in agreement with other works, are shown to exhibit self-maintained oscillations governed by stable limit cycles. The bifurcation scenarios for these hypercycles are analyzed, as well as the effect of the phase space dimensionality in the delayed transition phenomena and in the scaling properties of the ghosts near bifurcation threshold

  14. Exploring high dimensional data with Butterfly: a novel classification algorithm based on discrete dynamical systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraci, Joseph; Dharsee, Moyez; Nuin, Paulo; Haslehurst, Alexandria; Koti, Madhuri; Feilotter, Harriet E; Evans, Ken

    2014-03-01

    We introduce a novel method for visualizing high dimensional data via a discrete dynamical system. This method provides a 2D representation of the relationship between subjects according to a set of variables without geometric projections, transformed axes or principal components. The algorithm exploits a memory-type mechanism inherent in a certain class of discrete dynamical systems collectively referred to as the chaos game that are closely related to iterative function systems. The goal of the algorithm was to create a human readable representation of high dimensional patient data that was capable of detecting unrevealed subclusters of patients from within anticipated classifications. This provides a mechanism to further pursue a more personalized exploration of pathology when used with medical data. For clustering and classification protocols, the dynamical system portion of the algorithm is designed to come after some feature selection filter and before some model evaluation (e.g. clustering accuracy) protocol. In the version given here, a univariate features selection step is performed (in practice more complex feature selection methods are used), a discrete dynamical system is driven by this reduced set of variables (which results in a set of 2D cluster models), these models are evaluated for their accuracy (according to a user-defined binary classification) and finally a visual representation of the top classification models are returned. Thus, in addition to the visualization component, this methodology can be used for both supervised and unsupervised machine learning as the top performing models are returned in the protocol we describe here. Butterfly, the algorithm we introduce and provide working code for, uses a discrete dynamical system to classify high dimensional data and provide a 2D representation of the relationship between subjects. We report results on three datasets (two in the article; one in the appendix) including a public lung cancer

  15. Adaptive digital fringe projection technique for high dynamic range three-dimensional shape measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui; Gao, Jian; Mei, Qing; He, Yunbo; Liu, Junxiu; Wang, Xingjin

    2016-04-04

    It is a challenge for any optical method to measure objects with a large range of reflectivity variation across the surface. Image saturation results in incorrect intensities in captured fringe pattern images, leading to phase and measurement errors. This paper presents a new adaptive digital fringe projection technique which avoids image saturation and has a high signal to noise ratio (SNR) in the three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement of objects that has a large range of reflectivity variation across the surface. Compared to previous high dynamic range 3-D scan methods using many exposures and fringe pattern projections, which consumes a lot of time, the proposed technique uses only two preliminary steps of fringe pattern projection and image capture to generate the adapted fringe patterns, by adaptively adjusting the pixel-wise intensity of the projected fringe patterns based on the saturated pixels in the captured images of the surface being measured. For the bright regions due to high surface reflectivity and high illumination by the ambient light and surfaces interreflections, the projected intensity is reduced just to be low enough to avoid image saturation. Simultaneously, the maximum intensity of 255 is used for those dark regions with low surface reflectivity to maintain high SNR. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed technique can achieve higher 3-D measurement accuracy across a surface with a large range of reflectivity variation.

  16. Three-dimensional dynamic rupture simulation with a high-order discontinuous Galerkin method on unstructured tetrahedral meshes

    KAUST Repository

    Pelties, Christian

    2012-02-18

    Accurate and efficient numerical methods to simulate dynamic earthquake rupture and wave propagation in complex media and complex fault geometries are needed to address fundamental questions in earthquake dynamics, to integrate seismic and geodetic data into emerging approaches for dynamic source inversion, and to generate realistic physics-based earthquake scenarios for hazard assessment. Modeling of spontaneous earthquake rupture and seismic wave propagation by a high-order discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method combined with an arbitrarily high-order derivatives (ADER) time integration method was introduced in two dimensions by de la Puente et al. (2009). The ADER-DG method enables high accuracy in space and time and discretization by unstructured meshes. Here we extend this method to three-dimensional dynamic rupture problems. The high geometrical flexibility provided by the usage of tetrahedral elements and the lack of spurious mesh reflections in the ADER-DG method allows the refinement of the mesh close to the fault to model the rupture dynamics adequately while concentrating computational resources only where needed. Moreover, ADER-DG does not generate spurious high-frequency perturbations on the fault and hence does not require artificial Kelvin-Voigt damping. We verify our three-dimensional implementation by comparing results of the SCEC TPV3 test problem with two well-established numerical methods, finite differences, and spectral boundary integral. Furthermore, a convergence study is presented to demonstrate the systematic consistency of the method. To illustrate the capabilities of the high-order accurate ADER-DG scheme on unstructured meshes, we simulate an earthquake scenario, inspired by the 1992 Landers earthquake, that includes curved faults, fault branches, and surface topography. Copyright 2012 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Patterns of Stochastic Behavior in Dynamically Unstable High-Dimensional Biochemical Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Rosenfeld

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The question of dynamical stability and stochastic behavior of large biochemical networks is discussed. It is argued that stringent conditions of asymptotic stability have very little chance to materialize in a multidimensional system described by the differential equations of chemical kinetics. The reason is that the criteria of asymptotic stability (Routh- Hurwitz, Lyapunov criteria, Feinberg’s Deficiency Zero theorem would impose the limitations of very high algebraic order on the kinetic rates and stoichiometric coefficients, and there are no natural laws that would guarantee their unconditional validity. Highly nonlinear, dynamically unstable systems, however, are not necessarily doomed to collapse, as a simple Jacobian analysis would suggest. It is possible that their dynamics may assume the form of pseudo-random fluctuations quite similar to a shot noise, and, therefore, their behavior may be described in terms of Langevin and Fokker-Plank equations. We have shown by simulation that the resulting pseudo-stochastic processes obey the heavy-tailed Generalized Pareto Distribution with temporal sequence of pulses forming the set of constituent-specific Poisson processes. Being applied to intracellular dynamics, these properties are naturally associated with burstiness, a well documented phenomenon in the biology of gene expression.

  18. Entanglement dynamics of high-dimensional bipartite field states inside the cavities in dissipative environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahira, Rabia; Ikram, Manzoor; Zubairy, M Suhail [Centre for Quantum Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad (Pakistan); Bougouffa, Smail [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Taibah University, PO Box 30002, Madinah (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-02-14

    We investigate the phenomenon of sudden death of entanglement in a high-dimensional bipartite system subjected to dissipative environments with an arbitrary initial pure entangled state between two fields in the cavities. We find that in a vacuum reservoir, the presence of the state where one or more than one (two) photons in each cavity are present is a necessary condition for the sudden death of entanglement. Otherwise entanglement remains for infinite time and decays asymptotically with the decay of individual qubits. For pure two-qubit entangled states in a thermal environment, we observe that sudden death of entanglement always occurs. The sudden death time of the entangled states is related to the number of photons in the cavities, the temperature of the reservoir and the initial preparation of the entangled states.

  19. Entanglement dynamics of high-dimensional bipartite field states inside the cavities in dissipative environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahira, Rabia; Ikram, Manzoor; Zubairy, M Suhail; Bougouffa, Smail

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the phenomenon of sudden death of entanglement in a high-dimensional bipartite system subjected to dissipative environments with an arbitrary initial pure entangled state between two fields in the cavities. We find that in a vacuum reservoir, the presence of the state where one or more than one (two) photons in each cavity are present is a necessary condition for the sudden death of entanglement. Otherwise entanglement remains for infinite time and decays asymptotically with the decay of individual qubits. For pure two-qubit entangled states in a thermal environment, we observe that sudden death of entanglement always occurs. The sudden death time of the entangled states is related to the number of photons in the cavities, the temperature of the reservoir and the initial preparation of the entangled states.

  20. Clustering high dimensional data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assent, Ira

    2012-01-01

    High-dimensional data, i.e., data described by a large number of attributes, pose specific challenges to clustering. The so-called ‘curse of dimensionality’, coined originally to describe the general increase in complexity of various computational problems as dimensionality increases, is known...... to render traditional clustering algorithms ineffective. The curse of dimensionality, among other effects, means that with increasing number of dimensions, a loss of meaningful differentiation between similar and dissimilar objects is observed. As high-dimensional objects appear almost alike, new approaches...... for clustering are required. Consequently, recent research has focused on developing techniques and clustering algorithms specifically for high-dimensional data. Still, open research issues remain. Clustering is a data mining task devoted to the automatic grouping of data based on mutual similarity. Each cluster...

  1. High spatial resolution three-dimensional mapping of vegetation spectral dynamics using computer vision and hobbyist unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandois, J. P.; Ellis, E. C.

    2013-12-01

    High spatial resolution three-dimensional (3D) measurements of vegetation by remote sensing are advancing ecological research and environmental management. However, substantial economic and logistical costs limit this application, especially for observing phenological dynamics in ecosystem structure and spectral traits. Here we demonstrate a new aerial remote sensing system enabling routine and inexpensive aerial 3D measurements of canopy structure and spectral attributes, with properties similar to those of LIDAR, but with RGB (red-green-blue) spectral attributes for each point, enabling high frequency observations within a single growing season. This 'Ecosynth' methodology applies photogrammetric ''Structure from Motion'' computer vision algorithms to large sets of highly overlapping low altitude (USA. Ecosynth canopy height maps (CHMs) were strong predictors of field-measured tree heights (R2 0.63 to 0.84) and were highly correlated with a LIDAR CHM (R 0.87) acquired 4 days earlier, though Ecosynth-based estimates of aboveground biomass densities included significant errors (31 - 36% of field-based estimates). Repeated scanning of a 0.25 ha forested area at six different times across a 16 month period revealed ecologically significant dynamics in canopy color at different heights and a structural shift upward in canopy density, as demonstrated by changes in vertical height profiles of point density and relative RGB brightness. Changes in canopy relative greenness were highly correlated (R2 = 0.88) with MODIS NDVI time series for the same area and vertical differences in canopy color revealed the early green up of the dominant canopy species, Liriodendron tulipifera, strong evidence that Ecosynth time series measurements capture vegetation structural and spectral dynamics at the spatial scale of individual trees. Observing canopy phenology in 3D at high temporal resolutions represents a breakthrough in forest ecology. Inexpensive user-deployed technologies for

  2. Modeling genome-wide dynamic regulatory network in mouse lungs with influenza infection using high-dimensional ordinary differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuang; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Qiu, Xing; Wu, Hulin

    2014-01-01

    The immune response to viral infection is regulated by an intricate network of many genes and their products. The reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) using mathematical models from time course gene expression data collected after influenza infection is key to our understanding of the mechanisms involved in controlling influenza infection within a host. A five-step pipeline: detection of temporally differentially expressed genes, clustering genes into co-expressed modules, identification of network structure, parameter estimate refinement, and functional enrichment analysis, is developed for reconstructing high-dimensional dynamic GRNs from genome-wide time course gene expression data. Applying the pipeline to the time course gene expression data from influenza-infected mouse lungs, we have identified 20 distinct temporal expression patterns in the differentially expressed genes and constructed a module-based dynamic network using a linear ODE model. Both intra-module and inter-module annotations and regulatory relationships of our inferred network show some interesting findings and are highly consistent with existing knowledge about the immune response in mice after influenza infection. The proposed method is a computationally efficient, data-driven pipeline bridging experimental data, mathematical modeling, and statistical analysis. The application to the influenza infection data elucidates the potentials of our pipeline in providing valuable insights into systematic modeling of complicated biological processes.

  3. Cosmological dynamics of spatially flat Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet models in various dimensions: high-dimensional Λ-term case

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavluchenko, Sergey A. [Universidade Federal do Maranhao (UFMA), Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Fisica, Sao Luis, Maranhao (Brazil)

    2017-08-15

    In this paper we perform a systematic study of spatially flat [(3+D)+1]-dimensional Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet cosmological models with Λ-term. We consider models that topologically are the product of two flat isotropic subspaces with different scale factors. One of these subspaces is three-dimensional and represents our space and the other is D-dimensional and represents extra dimensions. We consider no ansatz of the scale factors, which makes our results quite general. With both Einstein-Hilbert and Gauss-Bonnet contributions in play, D = 3 and the general D ≥ 4 cases have slightly different dynamics due to the different structure of the equations of motion. We analytically study the equations of motion in both cases and describe all possible regimes with special interest on the realistic regimes. Our analysis suggests that the only realistic regime is the transition from high-energy (Gauss-Bonnet) Kasner regime, which is the standard cosmological singularity in that case, to the anisotropic exponential regime with expanding three and contracting extra dimensions. Availability of this regime allows us to put a constraint on the value of Gauss-Bonnet coupling α and the Λ-term - this regime appears in two regions on the (α, Λ) plane: α < 0, Λ > 0, αΛ ≤ -3/2 and α > 0, αΛ ≤ (3D{sup 2} - 7D + 6)/(4D(D-1)), including the entire Λ < 0 region. The obtained bounds are confronted with the restrictions on α and Λ from other considerations, like causality, entropy-to-viscosity ratio in AdS/CFT and others. Joint analysis constrains (α, Λ) even further: α > 0, D ≥ 2 with (3D{sup 2} - 7D + 6)/(4D(D-1)) ≥ αΛ ≥ -(D+2)(D+3)(D{sup 2} + 5D + 12)/(8(D{sup 2} + 3D + 6){sup 2}). (orig.)

  4. High dimensional entanglement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mc

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info McLaren_2012.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 2190 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name McLaren_2012.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 High dimensional... entanglement M. McLAREN1,2, F.S. ROUX1 & A. FORBES1,2,3 1. CSIR National Laser Centre, PO Box 395, Pretoria 0001 2. School of Physics, University of the Stellenbosch, Private Bag X1, 7602, Matieland 3. School of Physics, University of Kwazulu...

  5. Mining High-Dimensional Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Jiong

    With the rapid growth of computational biology and e-commerce applications, high-dimensional data becomes very common. Thus, mining high-dimensional data is an urgent problem of great practical importance. However, there are some unique challenges for mining data of high dimensions, including (1) the curse of dimensionality and more crucial (2) the meaningfulness of the similarity measure in the high dimension space. In this chapter, we present several state-of-art techniques for analyzing high-dimensional data, e.g., frequent pattern mining, clustering, and classification. We will discuss how these methods deal with the challenges of high dimensionality.

  6. hdm: High-dimensional metrics

    OpenAIRE

    Chernozhukov, Victor; Hansen, Christian; Spindler, Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this article the package High-dimensional Metrics (\\texttt{hdm}) is introduced. It is a collection of statistical methods for estimation and quantification of uncertainty in high-dimensional approximately sparse models. It focuses on providing confidence intervals and significance testing for (possibly many) low-dimensional subcomponents of the high-dimensional parameter vector. Efficient estimators and uniformly valid confidence intervals for regression coefficients on target variables (e...

  7. Spin dynamics in high-mobility two-dimensional electron systems embedded in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griesbeck, Michael

    2012-11-22

    Since many years there has been great effort to explore the spin dynamics in low-dimensional electron systems embedded in GaAs/AlGaAs based heterostructures for the purpose of quantum computation and spintronics applications. Advances in technology allow for the design of high quality and well-defined two-dimensional electron systems (2DES), which are perfectly suited for the study of the underlying physics that govern the dynamics of the electron spin system. In this work, spin dynamics in high-mobility 2DES is studied by means of the all-optical time-resolved Kerr/Faraday rotation technique. In (001)-grown 2DES, a strong in-plane spin dephasing anisotropy is studied, resulting from the interference of comparable Rashba and Dresselhaus contributions to the spin-orbit field (SOF). The dependence of this anisotropy on parameters like the confinement length of the 2DES, the sample temperature, as well as the electron density is demonstrated. Furthermore, coherent spin dynamics of an ensemble of ballistically moving electrons is studied without and within an applied weak magnetic field perpendicular to the sample plane, which forces the electrons to move on cyclotron orbits. Finally, strongly anisotropic spin dynamics is investigated in symmetric (110)-grown 2DES, using the resonant spin amplification method. Here, extremely long out-of-plane spin dephasing times can be achieved, in consequence of the special symmetry of the Dresselhaus SOF.

  8. High-speed three-dimensional shape measurement for dynamic scenes using bi-frequency tripolar pulse-width-modulation fringe projection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Chao; Chen, Qian; Gu, Guohua; Feng, Shijie; Feng, Fangxiaoyu; Li, Rubin; Shen, Guochen

    2013-08-01

    This paper introduces a high-speed three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement technique for dynamic scenes by using bi-frequency tripolar pulse-width-modulation (TPWM) fringe projection. Two wrapped phase maps with different wavelengths can be obtained simultaneously by our bi-frequency phase-shifting algorithm. Then the two phase maps are unwrapped using a simple look-up-table based number-theoretical approach. To guarantee the robustness of phase unwrapping as well as the high sinusoidality of projected patterns, TPWM technique is employed to generate ideal fringe patterns with slight defocus. We detailed our technique, including its principle, pattern design, and system setup. Several experiments on dynamic scenes were performed, verifying that our method can achieve a speed of 1250 frames per second for fast, dense, and accurate 3-D measurements.

  9. Three-dimensional dynamics of protostellar evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, T.L.

    1977-06-01

    A three-dimensional finite difference numerical methodology was developed for self-gravitating, rotating gaseous systems. The fully nonlinear equations for time-varying fluid dynamics are solved by high speed computer in a cylindrical coordinate system rotating with an instantaneous angular velocity, selected such that the net angular momentum relative to the rotating frame is zero. The time-dependent adiabatic collapse of gravitationally bound, rotating, protostellar clouds is studied for specified uniform and nonuniform initial conditions. Uniform clouds can form axisymmetric, rotating toroidal configurations. If the thermal pressure is high, nonuniform clouds can also collapse to axisymmetric toroids. For low thermal pressures, however, the collapsing cloud is unstable to initial perturbations. The fragmentation of protostellar clouds is investigated by studying the response of rotating, self-gravitating, equilibrium toroids to non-axisymmetric perturbations. The detailed evolution of the fragmenting toroid depends upon a non-dimensional function of the initial entropy, the total mass in the toroid, the angular velocity of rotation, and the number of perturbation wavelengths around the circumference of the toroid. For low and intermediate entropies, the configuration develops into co-rotating components with spiral streamers. In the spiral regions retrograde vortices are observed in some examples. For high levels of entropy, barred spirals can exist as intermediate states of the fragmentation

  10. Three-dimensional dynamic rupture simulation with a high-order discontinuous Galerkin method on unstructured tetrahedral meshes

    KAUST Repository

    Pelties, Christian; de la Puente, Josep; Ampuero, Jean-Paul; Brietzke, Gilbert B.; Kä ser, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Accurate and efficient numerical methods to simulate dynamic earthquake rupture and wave propagation in complex media and complex fault geometries are needed to address fundamental questions in earthquake dynamics, to integrate seismic and geodetic

  11. Tangent map intermittency as an approximate analysis of intermittency in a high dimensional fully stochastic dynamical system: The Tangled Nature model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Ruelas, Alvaro; Jeldtoft Jensen, Henrik; Piovani, Duccio; Robledo, Alberto

    2016-12-01

    It is well known that low-dimensional nonlinear deterministic maps close to a tangent bifurcation exhibit intermittency and this circumstance has been exploited, e.g., by Procaccia and Schuster [Phys. Rev. A 28, 1210 (1983)], to develop a general theory of 1/f spectra. This suggests it is interesting to study the extent to which the behavior of a high-dimensional stochastic system can be described by such tangent maps. The Tangled Nature (TaNa) Model of evolutionary ecology is an ideal candidate for such a study, a significant model as it is capable of reproducing a broad range of the phenomenology of macroevolution and ecosystems. The TaNa model exhibits strong intermittency reminiscent of punctuated equilibrium and, like the fossil record of mass extinction, the intermittency in the model is found to be non-stationary, a feature typical of many complex systems. We derive a mean-field version for the evolution of the likelihood function controlling the reproduction of species and find a local map close to tangency. This mean-field map, by our own local approximation, is able to describe qualitatively only one episode of the intermittent dynamics of the full TaNa model. To complement this result, we construct a complete nonlinear dynamical system model consisting of successive tangent bifurcations that generates time evolution patterns resembling those of the full TaNa model in macroscopic scales. The switch from one tangent bifurcation to the next in the sequences produced in this model is stochastic in nature, based on criteria obtained from the local mean-field approximation, and capable of imitating the changing set of types of species and total population in the TaNa model. The model combines full deterministic dynamics with instantaneous parameter random jumps at stochastically drawn times. In spite of the limitations of our approach, which entails a drastic collapse of degrees of freedom, the description of a high-dimensional model system in terms of a low-dimensional

  12. Three-dimensional dynamics of protostellar evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, T.L.; Harlow, F.H.

    1978-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite difference numerical methodology has been developed for self-gravitating, rotating gaseous systems. The fully nonlinear equations for time-varying fluid dynamics are solved by high-speed computer in a cylindrical coordinate system rotating with an instantaneous angular velocity. The time-dependent adiabatic collapse of gravitationally bound, rotating, protostellar clouds is studied for specified uniform and nonuniform initial conditions. Uniform clouds can form axisymmetric, rotating toroidal configurations. If the thermal pressure is high, nonuniform clouds can also collapse to axisymmetric ellipsoids. For low thermal pressures, however, the collapsing cloud is unstable to perturbations. The resulting fragmentation of unstable protostellar clouds is investigated by studying the response of rotating, self-gravitating, equilibrium toroids to nonaxisymmetric perturbations. The detailed evolution of the fragmentation toroid depends upon a nondimensional function of the initial entropy, the total mass in the toroid, the angular velocity of rotation, and the number of perturbation wave-lengths around the circumference of the toroid. For low and intermediate entropies, the configuration develops into corotating components with spiral streamers. In the spiral regions retrograde vortices are observed in some examples. For high levels of entropy, barred spirals can exist as intermediate states of the fragmentation

  13. High-dimensional covariance estimation with high-dimensional data

    CERN Document Server

    Pourahmadi, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Methods for estimating sparse and large covariance matrices Covariance and correlation matrices play fundamental roles in every aspect of the analysis of multivariate data collected from a variety of fields including business and economics, health care, engineering, and environmental and physical sciences. High-Dimensional Covariance Estimation provides accessible and comprehensive coverage of the classical and modern approaches for estimating covariance matrices as well as their applications to the rapidly developing areas lying at the intersection of statistics and mac

  14. Three-Dimensional Dynamics of Breakout Afterburner Ion Acceleration Using High-Contrast Short-Pulse Laser and Nanoscale Targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, L.; Albright, B. J.; Bowers, K. J.; Fernandez, J. C.; Jung, D.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2011-01-01

    Breakout afterburner (BOA) laser-ion acceleration has been demonstrated for the first time in the laboratory. In the BOA, an initially solid-density target undergoes relativistically induced transparency, initiating a period of enhanced ion acceleration. First-ever kinetic simulations of the BOA in three dimensions show that the ion beam forms lobes in the direction orthogonal to laser polarization and propagation. Analytic theory presented for the electron dynamics in the laser ponderomotive field explains how azimuthal symmetry breaks even for a symmetric laser intensity profile; these results are consistent with recent experiments at the Trident laser facility.

  15. Some problems of dynamical systems on three dimensional manifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Zhenxie.

    1985-08-01

    It is important to study the dynamical systems on 3-dimensional manifolds, its importance is showing up in its close relation with our life. Because of the complication of topological structure of Dynamical systems on 3-dimensional manifolds, generally speaking, the search for 3-dynamical systems is not easier than 2-dynamical systems. This paper is a summary of the partial result of dynamical systems on 3-dimensional manifolds. (author)

  16. PREFACE: Dynamics of low-dimensional systems Dynamics of low-dimensional systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi, M.; Miret-Artés, S.; Toennies, J. P.

    2012-03-01

    With the development of techniques for high-resolution inelastic helium atom scattering (HAS), electron scattering (EELS) and neutron spin echo spectroscopy, it has become possible, within approximately the last thirty years, to measure the dispersion curves of surface phonons in insulators, semiconductors and metals. In recent years, the advent of new experimental techniques such as 3He spin-echo spectroscopy, scanning inelastic electron tunnel spectroscopy, inelastic x-ray scattering spectroscopy and inelastic photoemission have extended surface phonon spectroscopy to a variety of systems. These include ultra-thin metal films, adsorbates at surface and elementary processes where surface phonons play an important role. Other important directions have been actively pursued in the past decade: the dynamics of stepped surfaces and clusters grown on metal surfaces, due to their relevance in many dynamical and chemical processes at surfaces, including heterogeneous catalysis; clusters; diffusion etc. The role of surface effects in these processes has been conjectured since the early days of surface dynamics, although only now is the availability of ab initio approaches providing those conjectures with a microscopic basis. Last but not least, the investigation of non-adiabatic effects, originating for instance from the hybridization (avoided crossing) of the surface phonons branches with the quasi 1D electron-hole excitation branch, is also a challenging new direction. Furthermore, other elementary oscillations such as surface plasmons are being actively investigated. The aforementioned experimental breakthroughs have been accompanied by advances in the theoretical study of atom-surface interaction. In particular, in the past decade first principles calculations based on density functional perturbation theory have boosted the theoretical study of the dynamics of low-dimensional systems. Phonon dispersion relations of clean surfaces, the dynamics of adsorbates, and the

  17. High-Dimensional Metrics in R

    OpenAIRE

    Chernozhukov, Victor; Hansen, Chris; Spindler, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The package High-dimensional Metrics (\\Rpackage{hdm}) is an evolving collection of statistical methods for estimation and quantification of uncertainty in high-dimensional approximately sparse models. It focuses on providing confidence intervals and significance testing for (possibly many) low-dimensional subcomponents of the high-dimensional parameter vector. Efficient estimators and uniformly valid confidence intervals for regression coefficients on target variables (e.g., treatment or poli...

  18. Blended particle filters for large-dimensional chaotic dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majda, Andrew J.; Qi, Di; Sapsis, Themistoklis P.

    2014-01-01

    A major challenge in contemporary data science is the development of statistically accurate particle filters to capture non-Gaussian features in large-dimensional chaotic dynamical systems. Blended particle filters that capture non-Gaussian features in an adaptively evolving low-dimensional subspace through particles interacting with evolving Gaussian statistics on the remaining portion of phase space are introduced here. These blended particle filters are constructed in this paper through a mathematical formalism involving conditional Gaussian mixtures combined with statistically nonlinear forecast models compatible with this structure developed recently with high skill for uncertainty quantification. Stringent test cases for filtering involving the 40-dimensional Lorenz 96 model with a 5-dimensional adaptive subspace for nonlinear blended filtering in various turbulent regimes with at least nine positive Lyapunov exponents are used here. These cases demonstrate the high skill of the blended particle filter algorithms in capturing both highly non-Gaussian dynamical features as well as crucial nonlinear statistics for accurate filtering in extreme filtering regimes with sparse infrequent high-quality observations. The formalism developed here is also useful for multiscale filtering of turbulent systems and a simple application is sketched below. PMID:24825886

  19. High enthalpy gas dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Rathakrishnan, Ethirajan

    2014-01-01

    This is an introductory level textbook which explains the elements of high temperature and high-speed gas dynamics. written in a clear and easy to follow style, the author covers all the latest developments in the field including basic thermodynamic principles, compressible flow regimes and waves propagation in one volume covers theoretical modeling of High Enthalpy Flows, with particular focus on problems in internal and external gas-dynamic flows, of interest in the fields of rockets propulsion and hypersonic aerodynamics High enthalpy gas dynamics is a compulsory course for aerospace engine

  20. Modeling high dimensional multichannel brain signals

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Lechuan

    2017-03-27

    In this paper, our goal is to model functional and effective (directional) connectivity in network of multichannel brain physiological signals (e.g., electroencephalograms, local field potentials). The primary challenges here are twofold: first, there are major statistical and computational difficulties for modeling and analyzing high dimensional multichannel brain signals; second, there is no set of universally-agreed measures for characterizing connectivity. To model multichannel brain signals, our approach is to fit a vector autoregressive (VAR) model with sufficiently high order so that complex lead-lag temporal dynamics between the channels can be accurately characterized. However, such a model contains a large number of parameters. Thus, we will estimate the high dimensional VAR parameter space by our proposed hybrid LASSLE method (LASSO+LSE) which is imposes regularization on the first step (to control for sparsity) and constrained least squares estimation on the second step (to improve bias and mean-squared error of the estimator). Then to characterize connectivity between channels in a brain network, we will use various measures but put an emphasis on partial directed coherence (PDC) in order to capture directional connectivity between channels. PDC is a directed frequency-specific measure that explains the extent to which the present oscillatory activity in a sender channel influences the future oscillatory activity in a specific receiver channel relative all possible receivers in the network. Using the proposed modeling approach, we have achieved some insights on learning in a rat engaged in a non-spatial memory task.

  1. Modeling high dimensional multichannel brain signals

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Lechuan; Fortin, Norbert; Ombao, Hernando

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, our goal is to model functional and effective (directional) connectivity in network of multichannel brain physiological signals (e.g., electroencephalograms, local field potentials). The primary challenges here are twofold: first, there are major statistical and computational difficulties for modeling and analyzing high dimensional multichannel brain signals; second, there is no set of universally-agreed measures for characterizing connectivity. To model multichannel brain signals, our approach is to fit a vector autoregressive (VAR) model with sufficiently high order so that complex lead-lag temporal dynamics between the channels can be accurately characterized. However, such a model contains a large number of parameters. Thus, we will estimate the high dimensional VAR parameter space by our proposed hybrid LASSLE method (LASSO+LSE) which is imposes regularization on the first step (to control for sparsity) and constrained least squares estimation on the second step (to improve bias and mean-squared error of the estimator). Then to characterize connectivity between channels in a brain network, we will use various measures but put an emphasis on partial directed coherence (PDC) in order to capture directional connectivity between channels. PDC is a directed frequency-specific measure that explains the extent to which the present oscillatory activity in a sender channel influences the future oscillatory activity in a specific receiver channel relative all possible receivers in the network. Using the proposed modeling approach, we have achieved some insights on learning in a rat engaged in a non-spatial memory task.

  2. Multimodal three-dimensional dynamic signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury E. Kozlov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Reliable authentication in mobile applications is among the most important information security challenges. Today, we can hardly imagine a person who would not own a mobile device that connects to the Internet. Mobile devices are being used to store large amounts of confidential information, ranging from personal photos to electronic banking tools. In 2009, colleagues from Rice University together with their collaborators from Motorola, proposed an authentication through in-air gestures. This and subsequent work contributing to the development of the method are reviewed in our introduction. At the moment, there exists a version of the gesture-based authentication software available for Android mobile devices. This software has not become widespread yet. One of likely reasons for that is the insufficient reliability of the method, which involves similar to its earlier analogs the use of only one device. Here we discuss the authentication based on the multimodal three-dimensional dynamic signature (MTDS performed by two independent mobile devices. The MTDS-based authentication technique is an advanced version of in-air gesture authentication. We describe the operation of a prototype of MTDS-based authentication, including the main implemented algorithms, as well as some preliminary results of testing the software. We expect that our method can be used in any mobile application, provided a number of additional improvements discussed in the conclusion are made.

  3. Three-Dimensional Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Modeling of Preferential Flow Dynamics at Fracture Intersections on a High-Performance Computing Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordilla, J.; Bresinsky, L. T.

    2017-12-01

    The physical mechanisms that govern preferential flow dynamics in unsaturated fractured rock formations are complex and not well understood. Fracture intersections may act as an integrator of unsaturated flow, leading to temporal delay, intermittent flow and partitioning dynamics. In this work, a three-dimensional Pairwise-Force Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (PF-SPH) model is being applied in order to simulate gravity-driven multiphase flow at synthetic fracture intersections. SPH, as a meshless Lagrangian method, is particularly suitable for modeling deformable interfaces, such as three-phase contact dynamics of droplets, rivulets and free-surface films. The static and dynamic contact angle can be recognized as the most important parameter of gravity-driven free-surface flow. In SPH, surface tension and adhesion naturally emerges from the implemented pairwise fluid-fluid (sff) and solid-fluid (ssf) interaction force. The model was calibrated to a contact angle of 65°, which corresponds to the wetting properties of water on Poly(methyl methacrylate). The accuracy of the SPH simulations were validated against an analytical solution of Poiseuille flow between two parallel plates and against laboratory experiments. Using the SPH model, the complex flow mode transitions from droplet to rivulet flow of an experimental study were reproduced. Additionally, laboratory dimensionless scaling experiments of water droplets were successfully replicated in SPH. Finally, SPH simulations were used to investigate the partitioning dynamics of single droplets into synthetic horizontal fractures with various apertures (Δdf = 0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5, 4.0 mm) and offsets (Δdoff = -1.5, -1.0, -0.5, 0, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0 mm). Fluid masses were measured in the domains R1, R2 and R3. The perfect conditions of ideally smooth surfaces and the SPH inherent advantage of particle tracking allow the recognition of small scale partitioning mechanisms and its importance for bulk flow

  4. High-Order Weno Simulations of Three-Dimensional Reshocked Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability to Late Times: Dynamics, Dependence on Initial Conditions, and Comparisons to Experimental Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schilling, O; Latini, M

    2010-01-12

    The dynamics of the reshocked multi-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is investigated using 513 x 257{sup 2} three-dimensional ninth-order weighted essentially nonoscillatory shock-capturing simulations. A two-mode initial perturbation with superposed random noise is used to model the Mach 1.5 air/SF{sub 6} Vetter-Sturtevant shock tube experiment. The mass fraction and enstrophy isosurfaces, and density cross-sections are utilized to show the detailed flow structure before, during, and after reshock. It is shown that the mixing layer growth agrees well with the experimentally measured growth rate before and after reshock. The post-reshock growth rate is also in good agreement with the prediction of the Mikaelian model. A parametric study of the sensitivity of the layer growth to the choice of amplitudes of the short and long wavelength initial interfacial perturbation is also presented. Finally, the amplification effects of reshock are quantified using the evolution of the turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent enstrophy spectra, as well as the evolution of the baroclinic enstrophy production, buoyancy production, and shear production terms in the enstrophy and turbulent kinetic transport equations.

  5. OBSERVING LYAPUNOV EXPONENTS OF INFINITE-DIMENSIONAL DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, William; Rivas, Mauricio A; West, James

    2015-12-01

    Can Lyapunov exponents of infinite-dimensional dynamical systems be observed by projecting the dynamics into ℝ N using a 'typical' nonlinear projection map? We answer this question affirmatively by developing embedding theorems for compact invariant sets associated with C 1 maps on Hilbert spaces. Examples of such discrete-time dynamical systems include time- T maps and Poincaré return maps generated by the solution semigroups of evolution partial differential equations. We make every effort to place hypotheses on the projected dynamics rather than on the underlying infinite-dimensional dynamical system. In so doing, we adopt an empirical approach and formulate checkable conditions under which a Lyapunov exponent computed from experimental data will be a Lyapunov exponent of the infinite-dimensional dynamical system under study (provided the nonlinear projection map producing the data is typical in the sense of prevalence).

  6. Lyapunov exponents for infinite dimensional dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhuiris, Nessan Mac Giolla

    1987-01-01

    Classically it was held that solutions to deterministic partial differential equations (i.e., ones with smooth coefficients and boundary data) could become random only through one mechanism, namely by the activation of more and more of the infinite number of degrees of freedom that are available to such a system. It is only recently that researchers have come to suspect that many infinite dimensional nonlinear systems may in fact possess finite dimensional chaotic attractors. Lyapunov exponents provide a tool for probing the nature of these attractors. This paper examines how these exponents might be measured for infinite dimensional systems.

  7. Modeling High-Dimensional Multichannel Brain Signals

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Lechuan; Fortin, Norbert J.; Ombao, Hernando

    2017-01-01

    aspects: first, there are major statistical and computational challenges for modeling and analyzing high-dimensional multichannel brain signals; second, there is no set of universally agreed measures for characterizing connectivity. To model multichannel

  8. Modeling High-Dimensional Multichannel Brain Signals

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Lechuan

    2017-12-12

    Our goal is to model and measure functional and effective (directional) connectivity in multichannel brain physiological signals (e.g., electroencephalograms, local field potentials). The difficulties from analyzing these data mainly come from two aspects: first, there are major statistical and computational challenges for modeling and analyzing high-dimensional multichannel brain signals; second, there is no set of universally agreed measures for characterizing connectivity. To model multichannel brain signals, our approach is to fit a vector autoregressive (VAR) model with potentially high lag order so that complex lead-lag temporal dynamics between the channels can be captured. Estimates of the VAR model will be obtained by our proposed hybrid LASSLE (LASSO + LSE) method which combines regularization (to control for sparsity) and least squares estimation (to improve bias and mean-squared error). Then we employ some measures of connectivity but put an emphasis on partial directed coherence (PDC) which can capture the directional connectivity between channels. PDC is a frequency-specific measure that explains the extent to which the present oscillatory activity in a sender channel influences the future oscillatory activity in a specific receiver channel relative to all possible receivers in the network. The proposed modeling approach provided key insights into potential functional relationships among simultaneously recorded sites during performance of a complex memory task. Specifically, this novel method was successful in quantifying patterns of effective connectivity across electrode locations, and in capturing how these patterns varied across trial epochs and trial types.

  9. Discretization model for nonlinear dynamic analysis of three dimensional structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Y.

    1982-12-01

    A discretization model for nonlinear dynamic analysis of three dimensional structures is presented. The discretization is achieved through a three dimensional spring-mass system and the dynamic response obtained by direct integration of the equations of motion using central diferences. First the viability of the model is verified through the analysis of homogeneous linear structures and then its performance in the analysis of structures subjected to impulsive or impact loads, taking into account both geometrical and physical nonlinearities is evaluated. (Author) [pt

  10. High dimensional neurocomputing growth, appraisal and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tripathi, Bipin Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The book presents a coherent understanding of computational intelligence from the perspective of what is known as "intelligent computing" with high-dimensional parameters. It critically discusses the central issue of high-dimensional neurocomputing, such as quantitative representation of signals, extending the dimensionality of neuron, supervised and unsupervised learning and design of higher order neurons. The strong point of the book is its clarity and ability of the underlying theory to unify our understanding of high-dimensional computing where conventional methods fail. The plenty of application oriented problems are presented for evaluating, monitoring and maintaining the stability of adaptive learning machine. Author has taken care to cover the breadth and depth of the subject, both in the qualitative as well as quantitative way. The book is intended to enlighten the scientific community, ranging from advanced undergraduates to engineers, scientists and seasoned researchers in computational intelligenc...

  11. Dynamic colloidal assembly pathways via low dimensional models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yuguang; Bevan, Michael A., E-mail: mabevan@jhu.edu [Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Thyagarajan, Raghuram; Ford, David M. [Chemical Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States)

    2016-05-28

    Here we construct a low-dimensional Smoluchowski model for electric field mediated colloidal crystallization using Brownian dynamic simulations, which were previously matched to experiments. Diffusion mapping is used to infer dimensionality and confirm the use of two order parameters, one for degree of condensation and one for global crystallinity. Free energy and diffusivity landscapes are obtained as the coefficients of a low-dimensional Smoluchowski equation to capture the thermodynamics and kinetics of microstructure evolution. The resulting low-dimensional model quantitatively captures the dynamics of different assembly pathways between fluid, polycrystal, and single crystals states, in agreement with the full N-dimensional data as characterized by first passage time distributions. Numerical solution of the low-dimensional Smoluchowski equation reveals statistical properties of the dynamic evolution of states vs. applied field amplitude and system size. The low-dimensional Smoluchowski equation and associated landscapes calculated here can serve as models for predictive control of electric field mediated assembly of colloidal ensembles into two-dimensional crystalline objects.

  12. Waiting Time Dynamics in Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Thomas L. C.; Knoester, Jasper

    We review recent work on the waiting time dynamics of coherent two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy. This dynamics can reveal chemical and physical processes that take place on the femto- and picosecond time scale, which is faster than the time scale that may be probed by, for example,

  13. Structures in dynamics finite dimensional deterministic studies

    CERN Document Server

    Broer, HW; van Strien, SJ; Takens, F

    1991-01-01

    The study of non-linear dynamical systems nowadays is an intricate mixture of analysis, geometry, algebra and measure theory and this book takes all aspects into account. Presenting the contents of its authors' graduate courses in non-linear dynamical systems, this volume aims at researchers who wish to be acquainted with the more theoretical and fundamental subjects in non-linear dynamics and is designed to link the popular literature with research papers and monographs. All of the subjects covered in this book are extensively dealt with and presented in a pedagogic

  14. Dynamical class of a two-dimensional plasmonic Dirac system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Érica de Mello

    2015-10-01

    A current goal in plasmonic science and technology is to figure out how to manage the relaxational dynamics of surface plasmons in graphene since its damping constitutes a hinder for the realization of graphene-based plasmonic devices. In this sense we believe it might be of interest to enlarge the knowledge on the dynamical class of two-dimensional plasmonic Dirac systems. According to the recurrence relations method, different systems are said to be dynamically equivalent if they have identical relaxation functions at all times, and such commonality may lead to deep connections between seemingly unrelated physical systems. We employ the recurrence relations approach to obtain relaxation and memory functions of density fluctuations and show that a two-dimensional plasmonic Dirac system at long wavelength and zero temperature belongs to the same dynamical class of standard two-dimensional electron gas and classical harmonic oscillator chain with an impurity mass.

  15. High-field spin dynamics of the one-dimensional spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnetα-bis (N-methylsalicylaldiminato copper) (II) (α-CuNSal)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo, L.J.; Narath, A.; Richards, P.M.; Soos, Z.G.

    1980-01-01

    Proton spin-lattice relaxation rates in the one-dimensional (1D) spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnet α-bis (N-methylsalicylaldiminato) copper (II), α-CuNSal, have been measured in applied fields up to 125 kOe in the temperature range 1-- 4 K. The strong coupling of protons close to the antiferromagnetic (AF) chain serves as a convenient probe to study the dynamics of the AF chain through the field-induced antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic (F) phase transition. The magnetization of the AF chain, as measured by the proton field shift, is in close agreement with calculations by Bonner and Fisher and yields an exchange interaction J/k/sub B/=3.04 +- 0.04 K. The proton relaxation rate has isotropic (hyperfine coupled) and anisotropic (dipolar) components. We identify the isotropic relaxation rate with a creation or destruction of one-spin excitations (magnons) and the anisotropic rate with two-magnon processes. The measured one-magnon relaxation rate shows an enhancement near the critical field for the AF → F transition and a strong decrease of more than four decades as the critical field is exceeded. A no-adjustable-parameter calculation based on the fermion model quantitatively agrees with the measured one-magnon relaxation rate, both above and below the critical field H/sub c/. The enhanced relaxation at H/sub c/ is correctly predicted as a consequence of the divergence of the 1D density of magnon states, where a gap in the spin-wave spectrum exists. Above H/sub c/ a finite magnon lifetime must be included in order to produce a nonzero one-magnon relaxation rate. This is also calculated with no adjustable parameters. The two-magnon relaxation rate also shows a decrease as the critical field is exceeded and the calculated relaxation rate agrees well with experiment at low temperatures, provided, however, that one uses a boson rather than fermion picture

  16. Asymptotically Honest Confidence Regions for High Dimensional

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caner, Mehmet; Kock, Anders Bredahl

    While variable selection and oracle inequalities for the estimation and prediction error have received considerable attention in the literature on high-dimensional models, very little work has been done in the area of testing and construction of confidence bands in high-dimensional models. However...... develop an oracle inequality for the conservative Lasso only assuming the existence of a certain number of moments. This is done by means of the Marcinkiewicz-Zygmund inequality which in our context provides sharper bounds than Nemirovski's inequality. As opposed to van de Geer et al. (2014) we allow...

  17. Analysis of chaos in high-dimensional wind power system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Zhang, Hongli; Fan, Wenhui; Ma, Ping

    2018-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis on the chaos of a high-dimensional wind power system is performed in this study. A high-dimensional wind power system is more complex than most power systems. An 11-dimensional wind power system proposed by Huang, which has not been analyzed in previous studies, is investigated. When the systems are affected by external disturbances including single parameter and periodic disturbance, or its parameters changed, chaotic dynamics of the wind power system is analyzed and chaotic parameters ranges are obtained. Chaos existence is confirmed by calculation and analysis of all state variables' Lyapunov exponents and the state variable sequence diagram. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations show that the wind power system chaos will occur when parameter variations and external disturbances change to a certain degree.

  18. Chaotic dynamics in two-dimensional noninvertible maps

    CERN Document Server

    Mira, Christian; Cathala, Jean-Claude; Gardini, Laura

    1996-01-01

    This book is essentially devoted to complex properties (Phase plane structure and bifurcations) of two-dimensional noninvertible maps, i.e. maps having either a non-unique inverse, or no real inverse, according to the plane point. They constitute models of sets of discrete dynamical systems encountered in Engineering (Control, Signal Processing, Electronics), Physics, Economics, Life Sciences. Compared to the studies made in the one-dimensional case, the two-dimensional situation remained a long time in an underdeveloped state. It is only since these last years that the interest for this resea

  19. Spin dynamics in a two-dimensional quantum gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Poul Lindholm; Gajdacz, Miroslav; Deuretzbacher, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated spin dynamics in a two-dimensional quantum gas. Through spin-changing collisions, two clouds with opposite spin orientations are spontaneously created in a Bose-Einstein condensate. After ballistic expansion, both clouds acquire ring-shaped density distributions with superimp......We have investigated spin dynamics in a two-dimensional quantum gas. Through spin-changing collisions, two clouds with opposite spin orientations are spontaneously created in a Bose-Einstein condensate. After ballistic expansion, both clouds acquire ring-shaped density distributions...

  20. Clustering high dimensional data using RIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aziz, Nazrina [School of Quantitative Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, Universiti Utara Malaysia, 06010 Sintok, Kedah (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    Clustering may simply represent a convenient method for organizing a large data set so that it can easily be understood and information can efficiently be retrieved. However, identifying cluster in high dimensionality data sets is a difficult task because of the curse of dimensionality. Another challenge in clustering is some traditional functions cannot capture the pattern dissimilarity among objects. In this article, we used an alternative dissimilarity measurement called Robust Influence Angle (RIA) in the partitioning method. RIA is developed using eigenstructure of the covariance matrix and robust principal component score. We notice that, it can obtain cluster easily and hence avoid the curse of dimensionality. It is also manage to cluster large data sets with mixed numeric and categorical value.

  1. Three-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haworth, D.C.; O' Rourke, P.J.; Ranganathan, R.

    1998-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is one discipline falling under the broad heading of computer-aided engineering (CAE). CAE, together with computer-aided design (CAD) and computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), comprise a mathematical-based approach to engineering product and process design, analysis and fabrication. In this overview of CFD for the design engineer, our purposes are three-fold: (1) to define the scope of CFD and motivate its utility for engineering, (2) to provide a basic technical foundation for CFD, and (3) to convey how CFD is incorporated into engineering product and process design.

  2. The usefulness of high-resolution three-dimensional dynamic MR imaging with sensitivity encoding for evaluating extrahepatic bile duct cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Kon; Ko, Seog Wan [Chonbuk National University Hospital and Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-15

    We assessed the usefulness of high-resolution 3D dynamic MR imaging with sensitivity encoding (mSENSE) for evaluating bile duct cancer. Twenty-three patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer underwent multiphasic 3D GRE MRI, including two delayed phases without and with mSENSE. The first delayed phases were obtained with volumetric interpolated breath-hold imaging (VIBE) and then the higher in-place resolution images (320 X 168) were obtained using mSENSE. The two delayed phase images were compared quantitatively by measuring the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of liver and tumor, the liver-visceral fat contrast and the tumor-visceral fat contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR); the two delayed phase images were compared qualitatively by evaluating the sharpness of the hepatic vessels and bile duct, the artifacts and the conspicuity of bile duct cancer. The quantitative results with mSENSE image were significantly better than those with conventional VIBE. Though the clarity of the intrahepatic vessels and the intrahepatic bile duct, and the artifacts did not differ significantly between the two images ( {rho} > 0.05), the clarity of the extrahepatic vessels, the extrahepatic bile duct and the bile duct cancer were better on the mSENSE image than on the VIBE ( {rho} < 0.05). The higher in-plane resolution 3D GRE image obtained with mSENSE was of a better image quality than the conventional VIBE images. This technique shows promise for use as a comprehensive exam for assessing bile duct cancer.

  3. The usefulness of high-resolution three-dimensional dynamic MR imaging with sensitivity encoding for evaluating extrahepatic bile duct cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Kon; Ko, Seog Wan

    2006-01-01

    We assessed the usefulness of high-resolution 3D dynamic MR imaging with sensitivity encoding (mSENSE) for evaluating bile duct cancer. Twenty-three patients with extrahepatic bile duct cancer underwent multiphasic 3D GRE MRI, including two delayed phases without and with mSENSE. The first delayed phases were obtained with volumetric interpolated breath-hold imaging (VIBE) and then the higher in-place resolution images (320 X 168) were obtained using mSENSE. The two delayed phase images were compared quantitatively by measuring the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of liver and tumor, the liver-visceral fat contrast and the tumor-visceral fat contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR); the two delayed phase images were compared qualitatively by evaluating the sharpness of the hepatic vessels and bile duct, the artifacts and the conspicuity of bile duct cancer. The quantitative results with mSENSE image were significantly better than those with conventional VIBE. Though the clarity of the intrahepatic vessels and the intrahepatic bile duct, and the artifacts did not differ significantly between the two images ( ρ > 0.05), the clarity of the extrahepatic vessels, the extrahepatic bile duct and the bile duct cancer were better on the mSENSE image than on the VIBE ( ρ < 0.05). The higher in-plane resolution 3D GRE image obtained with mSENSE was of a better image quality than the conventional VIBE images. This technique shows promise for use as a comprehensive exam for assessing bile duct cancer

  4. Highly conducting one-dimensional solids

    CERN Document Server

    Evrard, Roger; Doren, Victor

    1979-01-01

    Although the problem of a metal in one dimension has long been known to solid-state physicists, it was not until the synthesis of real one-dimensional or quasi-one-dimensional systems that this subject began to attract considerable attention. This has been due in part to the search for high­ temperature superconductivity and the possibility of reaching this goal with quasi-one-dimensional substances. A period of intense activity began in 1973 with the report of a measurement of an apparently divergent conduc­ tivity peak in TfF-TCNQ. Since then a great deal has been learned about quasi-one-dimensional conductors. The emphasis now has shifted from trying to find materials of very high conductivity to the many interesting problems of physics and chemistry involved. But many questions remain open and are still under active investigation. This book gives a review of the experimental as well as theoretical progress made in this field over the last years. All the chapters have been written by scientists who have ...

  5. Complex dynamical invariants for two-dimensional complex potentials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Complex dynamical invariants are searched out for two-dimensional complex poten- tials using rationalization method within the framework of an extended complex phase space characterized by x = x1 + ip3, y = x2 + ip4, px = p1 + ix3, py = p2 + ix4. It is found that the cubic oscillator and shifted harmonic oscillator ...

  6. Nonlinear dynamic characterization of two-dimensional materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidovikj, D.; Alijani, F.; Cartamil Bueno, S.J.; van der Zant, H.S.J.; Amabili, M.; Steeneken, P.G.

    2017-01-01

    Owing to their atomic-scale thickness, the resonances of two-dimensional (2D) material membranes show signatures of nonlinearities at forces of only a few picoNewtons. Although the linear dynamics of membranes is well understood, the exact relation between the nonlinear response and the resonator's

  7. Intense field stabilization in circular polarization: Three-dimensional time-dependent dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Dae-Il; Chism, Will

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the stabilization of hydrogen atoms in a circularly polarized laser field. We use a three-dimensional, time-dependent approach to study the quantum dynamics of hydrogen atoms subject to high-intensity, short-wavelength, laser pulses. We find an enhanced survival probability as the field is increased under fixed envelope conditions. We also confirm wave packet behaviors previously seen in two-dimensional time-dependent computations

  8. Dynamic three-dimensional display of common congenital cardiac defects from reconstruction of two-dimensional echocardiographic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, K S; Lin, C C; Liu, W S; Chen, F L

    1996-01-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography had long been a standard diagnostic modality for congenital heart disease. Further attempts of three-dimensional reconstruction using two-dimensional echocardiographic images to visualize stereotypic structure of cardiac lesions have been successful only recently. So far only very few studies have been done to display three-dimensional anatomy of the heart through two-dimensional image acquisition because such complex procedures were involved. This study introduced a recently developed image acquisition and processing system for dynamic three-dimensional visualization of various congenital cardiac lesions. From December 1994 to April 1995, 35 cases were selected in the Echo Laboratory here from about 3000 Echo examinations completed. Each image was acquired on-line with specially designed high resolution image grazmber with EKG and respiratory gating technique. Off-line image processing using a window-architectured interactive software package includes construction of 2-D ehcocardiographic pixel to 3-D "voxel" with conversion of orthogonal to rotatory axial system, interpolation, extraction of region of interest, segmentation, shading and, finally, 3D rendering. Three-dimensional anatomy of various congenital cardiac defects was shown, including four cases with ventricular septal defects, two cases with atrial septal defects, and two cases with aortic stenosis. Dynamic reconstruction of a "beating heart" is recorded as vedio tape with video interface. The potential application of 3D display of the reconstruction from 2D echocardiographic images for the diagnosis of various congenital heart defects has been shown. The 3D display was able to improve the diagnostic ability of echocardiography, and clear-cut display of the various congenital cardiac defects and vavular stenosis could be demonstrated. Reinforcement of current techniques will expand future application of 3D display of conventional 2D images.

  9. Poincare' maps of impulsed oscillators and two-dimensional dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupini, R.; Lenci, S.; Gardini, L.; Urbino Univ.

    1996-01-01

    The Poincare' map of one-dimensional linear oscillators subject to periodic, non-linear and time-delayed impulses is shown to reduce to a family of plane maps with possible non-uniqueness of the inverse. By restricting the analysis to a convenient form of the impulse function, a variety of interesting dynamical behaviours in this family are pointed out, including multistability and homoclinic bifurcations. Critical curves of two-dimensional endomorphisms are used to identify the structure of absorbing areas and their bifurcations

  10. Dynamic characteristics of lead rubber bearings with dynamic two-dimensional test equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohtori, Y.; Ishida, K.; Mazda, T.

    1994-01-01

    Although studies have previously been done on the static mechanical properties of lead rubber bearings, this study aims to grasp the dynamic characteristics of lead rubber bearings from experimental results, using two-dimensional dynamic test equipment which is designed to grasp in detail such dynamic characteristics as deformation capacity and proof stress. This paper describes the results from three types of tests: (1) dynamic mechanical properties tests, (2) cyclic loading tests, and (3) dynamic ultimate tests. Through these tests, it was confirmed that the dynamic characteristics of lead rubber bearings are independent of strain rate

  11. Kantowski-Sachs multidimensional cosmological models and dynamical dimensional reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demianski, M.; Rome Univ.; Golda, Z.A.; Heller, M.; Szydlowski, M.

    1988-01-01

    Einstein's field equations are solved for a multidimensional spacetime (KS) x Tsup(m), where (KS) is a four-dimensional Kantowski-Sachs spacetime and Tsup(m) is an m-dimensional torus. Among all possible vacuum solutions there is a large class of spacetimes in which the macroscopic space expands and the microscopic space contracts to a finite volume. We also consider a non-vacuum case and we explicitly solve the field equations for the matter satisfying the Zel'dovich equation of state. In non-vacuum models, with matter satisfying an equation of state p = γρ, O ≤ γ < 1, at a sufficiently late stage of evolution the microspace always expands and the dynamical dimensional reduction does not occur. (author)

  12. Comparing two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the hypofractionated treatment of high-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yartsev Slav

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To compare two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT in the setting of hypofractionated high-risk prostate cancer treatment. Methods 3DCRT and dIMRT/Helical Tomotherapy(HT planning with 10 CT datasets was undertaken to deliver 68 Gy in 25 fractions (prostate and simultaneously delivering 45 Gy in 25 fractions (pelvic lymph node targets in a single phase. The paradigms of pelvic vessel targeting (iliac vessels with margin are used to target pelvic nodes and conformal normal tissue avoidance (treated soft tissues of the pelvis while limiting dose to identified pelvic critical structures were assessed compared to 3DCRT controls. Both dIMRT/HT and 3DCRT solutions were compared to each other using repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc paired t-tests. Results When compared to conformal pelvic vessel targeting, conformal normal tissue avoidance delivered more homogenous PTV delivery (2/2 t-test comparisons; p dose, 1–3 Gy over 5/10 dose points; p Conclusion dIMRT/HT nodal and pelvic targeting is superior to 3DCRT in dose delivery and critical structure sparing in the setting of hypofractionation for high-risk prostate cancer. The pelvic targeting paradigm is a potential solution to deliver highly conformal pelvic radiation treatment in the setting of nodal location uncertainty in prostate cancer and other pelvic malignancies.

  13. Canonical and symplectic analysis for three dimensional gravity without dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escalante, Alberto, E-mail: aescalan@ifuap.buap.mx [Instituto de Física, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Apartado Postal J-48 72570, Puebla, Pue. (Mexico); Osmart Ochoa-Gutiérrez, H. [Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Apartado postal 1152, 72001 Puebla, Pue. (Mexico)

    2017-03-15

    In this paper a detailed Hamiltonian analysis of three-dimensional gravity without dynamics proposed by V. Hussain is performed. We report the complete structure of the constraints and the Dirac brackets are explicitly computed. In addition, the Faddeev–Jackiw symplectic approach is developed; we report the complete set of Faddeev–Jackiw constraints and the generalized brackets, then we show that the Dirac and the generalized Faddeev–Jackiw brackets coincide to each other. Finally, the similarities and advantages between Faddeev–Jackiw and Dirac’s formalism are briefly discussed. - Highlights: • We report the symplectic analysis for three dimensional gravity without dynamics. • We report the Faddeev–Jackiw constraints. • A pure Dirac’s analysis is performed. • The complete structure of Dirac’s constraints is reported. • We show that symplectic and Dirac’s brackets coincide to each other.

  14. Introduction to high-dimensional statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Giraud, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    Ever-greater computing technologies have given rise to an exponentially growing volume of data. Today massive data sets (with potentially thousands of variables) play an important role in almost every branch of modern human activity, including networks, finance, and genetics. However, analyzing such data has presented a challenge for statisticians and data analysts and has required the development of new statistical methods capable of separating the signal from the noise.Introduction to High-Dimensional Statistics is a concise guide to state-of-the-art models, techniques, and approaches for ha

  15. Estimating High-Dimensional Time Series Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medeiros, Marcelo C.; Mendes, Eduardo F.

    We study the asymptotic properties of the Adaptive LASSO (adaLASSO) in sparse, high-dimensional, linear time-series models. We assume both the number of covariates in the model and candidate variables can increase with the number of observations and the number of candidate variables is, possibly......, larger than the number of observations. We show the adaLASSO consistently chooses the relevant variables as the number of observations increases (model selection consistency), and has the oracle property, even when the errors are non-Gaussian and conditionally heteroskedastic. A simulation study shows...

  16. High dimensional classifiers in the imbalanced case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Britta Anker; Jensen, Jens Ledet

    We consider the binary classification problem in the imbalanced case where the number of samples from the two groups differ. The classification problem is considered in the high dimensional case where the number of variables is much larger than the number of samples, and where the imbalance leads...... to a bias in the classification. A theoretical analysis of the independence classifier reveals the origin of the bias and based on this we suggest two new classifiers that can handle any imbalance ratio. The analytical results are supplemented by a simulation study, where the suggested classifiers in some...

  17. Topology of high-dimensional manifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrell, F T [State University of New York, Binghamton (United States); Goettshe, L [Abdus Salam ICTP, Trieste (Italy); Lueck, W [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Muenster (Germany)

    2002-08-15

    The School on High-Dimensional Manifold Topology took place at the Abdus Salam ICTP, Trieste from 21 May 2001 to 8 June 2001. The focus of the school was on the classification of manifolds and related aspects of K-theory, geometry, and operator theory. The topics covered included: surgery theory, algebraic K- and L-theory, controlled topology, homology manifolds, exotic aspherical manifolds, homeomorphism and diffeomorphism groups, and scalar curvature. The school consisted of 2 weeks of lecture courses and one week of conference. Thwo-part lecture notes volume contains the notes of most of the lecture courses.

  18. Collision dynamics of two-dimensional non-Abelian vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawson, Thomas; Petersen, Timothy C.; Simula, Tapio

    2017-09-01

    We study computationally the collision dynamics of vortices in a two-dimensional spin-2 Bose-Einstein condensate. In contrast to Abelian vortex pairs, which annihilate or pass through each other, we observe non-Abelian vortex pairs to undergo rungihilation—an event that converts the colliding vortices into a rung vortex. The resulting rung defect subsequently decays to another pair of non-Abelian vortices of different type, accompanied by a magnetization reversal.

  19. Dynamic screening and electron dynamics in low-dimensional metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silkin, V.M.; Quijada, M.; Vergniory, M.G.; Alducin, M.; Borisov, A.G.; Diez Muino, R.; Juaristi, J.I.; Sanchez-Portal, D.; Chulkov, E.V.; Echenique, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in the theoretical description of dynamic screening and electron dynamics in metallic media are reviewed. The time-dependent building-up of screening in different situations is addressed. Perturbative and non-perturbative theories are used to study electron dynamics in low-dimensional systems, such as metal clusters, image states, surface states and quantum wells. Modification of the electronic lifetimes due to confinement effects is analyzed as well

  20. Network Reconstruction From High-Dimensional Ordinary Differential Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shizhe; Shojaie, Ali; Witten, Daniela M

    2017-01-01

    We consider the task of learning a dynamical system from high-dimensional time-course data. For instance, we might wish to estimate a gene regulatory network from gene expression data measured at discrete time points. We model the dynamical system nonparametrically as a system of additive ordinary differential equations. Most existing methods for parameter estimation in ordinary differential equations estimate the derivatives from noisy observations. This is known to be challenging and inefficient. We propose a novel approach that does not involve derivative estimation. We show that the proposed method can consistently recover the true network structure even in high dimensions, and we demonstrate empirical improvement over competing approaches. Supplementary materials for this article are available online.

  1. Are low-dimensional dynamics typical in magnetically confined plasmas?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.; Dewar, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Since 1988 there have been many serious attempts to construct low-dimensional dynamical systems that model L-H transitions and associated oscillatory phenomena in magnetically confined plasmas. Such models usually consist of coupled ordinary differential equations in a few dynamical state variables and several parameters that represent physical properties or external controls. The advantages of a unified, low-dimensional approach to modelling plasma behaviour are multifold. Most importantly, the qualitative analysis of nonlinear ODE and algebraic systems is supported by a substantial body of theory. The toolkits of singularity and stability theory are well-developed and accessible, and contain the right tools for the job of charting the state and parameter space. One of the driving forces behind the development of low-dimensional dynamical models is the predictive potential of a parameter map. For example, a model that talks of the shape and extent of hysteresis in the L-H transition would help engineers who are interested in controlling access to H-mode. We can express this problem another way: given the enormous number of variables and parameters that could be varied around a hysteretic regime, it would be cheaper to know in advance which ones actually do influence the quality and quantity of the hysteresis. The quest for a low-dimensional state space that contains the qualitative dynamics of L-H transitions also introduces other problems. We need to identify the essential (few) dynamical variables and the essential (few) independent parameter groups, clarify the mechanisms for the feedback that is modelled by nonlinear terms, and identify symmetries in the physics. Before jumping the gun on these questions the fundamental issue should be addressed of whether a confined plasma, having many important length and time scales, steep gradients, strong anisotropy, and an uncountable multiplicity of states, can indeed exhibit low-dimensional dynamics. In this

  2. Dynamics of an impurity in a one-dimensional lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massel, F; Kantian, A; Giamarchi, T; Daley, A J; Törmä, P

    2013-01-01

    We study the non-equilibrium dynamics of an impurity in a harmonic trap that is kicked with a well-defined quasi-momentum, and interacts with a bath of free fermions or interacting bosons in a one-dimensional lattice configuration. Using numerical and analytical techniques we investigate the full dynamics beyond linear response, which allows us to quantitatively characterize states of the impurity in the bath for different parameter regimes. These vary from a tightly bound molecular state in a strongly interacting limit to a polaron (dressed impurity) and a free particle for weak interactions, with composite behaviour in the intermediate regime. These dynamics and different parameter regimes should be readily realizable in systems of cold atoms in optical lattices. (paper)

  3. Gauge theory for finite-dimensional dynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurfil, Pini

    2007-01-01

    Gauge theory is a well-established concept in quantum physics, electrodynamics, and cosmology. This concept has recently proliferated into new areas, such as mechanics and astrodynamics. In this paper, we discuss a few applications of gauge theory in finite-dimensional dynamical systems. We focus on the concept of rescriptive gauge symmetry, which is, in essence, rescaling of an independent variable. We show that a simple gauge transformation of multiple harmonic oscillators driven by chaotic processes can render an apparently ''disordered'' flow into a regular dynamical process, and that there exists a strong connection between gauge transformations and reduction theory of ordinary differential equations. Throughout the discussion, we demonstrate the main ideas by considering examples from diverse fields, including quantum mechanics, chemistry, rigid-body dynamics, and information theory

  4. REVIEW One-Dimensional Dynamical Modeling of Earthquakes: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeen-Hwa Wang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of the power-law relations of seismicity and earthquake source parameters based on the one-dimensional (1-D Burridge-Knopoff¡¦s (BK dynamical lattice model, especially those studies conducted by Taiwan¡¦s scientists, are reviewed in this article. In general, velocity- and/or state-dependent friction is considered to control faulting. A uniform distribution of breaking strengths (i.e., the static friction strength is taken into account in some studies, and inhomogeneous distributions in others. The scaling relations in these studies include: Omori¡¦s law, the magnitude-frequency or energy-frequency relation, the relation between source duration time and seismic moment, the relation between rupture length and seismic moment, the frequency-length relation, and the source power spectra. The main parameters of the one-dimensional (1-D Burridge-Knopoff¡¦s (BK dynamical lattice model include: the decreasing rate (r of dynamic friction strength with sliding velocity; the type and degree of heterogeneous distribution of the breaking strengths, the stiffness ratio (i.e., the ratio between the stiffness of the coil spring connecting two mass elements and that of the leaf spring linking a mass element and the moving plate; the frictional drop ratio of the minimum dynamic friction strength to the breaking strength; and the maximum breaking strength. For some authors, the distribution of the breaking strengths was considered to be a fractal function. Hence, the fractal dimension of such a distribution is also a significant parameter. Comparison between observed scaling laws and simulation results shows that the 1-D BK dynamical lattice model acceptably approaches fault dynamics.

  5. A low dimensional dynamical system for the wall layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubry, N.; Keefe, L. R.

    1987-01-01

    Low dimensional dynamical systems which model a fully developed turbulent wall layer were derived.The model is based on the optimally fast convergent proper orthogonal decomposition, or Karhunen-Loeve expansion. This decomposition provides a set of eigenfunctions which are derived from the autocorrelation tensor at zero time lag. Via Galerkin projection, low dimensional sets of ordinary differential equations in time, for the coefficients of the expansion, were derived from the Navier-Stokes equations. The energy loss to the unresolved modes was modeled by an eddy viscosity representation, analogous to Heisenberg's spectral model. A set of eigenfunctions and eigenvalues were obtained from direct numerical simulation of a plane channel at a Reynolds number of 6600, based on the mean centerline velocity and the channel width flow and compared with previous work done by Herzog. Using the new eigenvalues and eigenfunctions, a new ten dimensional set of ordinary differential equations were derived using five non-zero cross-stream Fourier modes with a periodic length of 377 wall units. The dynamical system was integrated for a range of the eddy viscosity prameter alpha. This work is encouraging.

  6. Dynamics of vortex interactions in two-dimensional flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Rasmussen, J.; Nielsen, A.H.; Naulin, V.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamics and interaction of like-signed vortex structures in two dimensional flows are investigated by means of direct numerical solutions of the two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations. Two vortices with distributed vorticity merge when their distance relative to their radius, d/R-0l. is below...... a critical value, a(c). Using the Weiss-field, a(c) is estimated for vortex patches. Introducing an effective radius for vortices with distributed vorticity, we find that 3.3 ... is effectively producing small scale structures and the relation to the enstrophy "cascade" in developed 2D turbulence is discussed. The influence of finite viscosity on the merging is also investigated. Additionally, we examine vortex interactions on a finite domain, and discuss the results in connection...

  7. Comparing two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in the hypofractionated treatment of high-risk prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuen, Jasper; Rodrigues, George; Trenka, Kristina; Coad, Terry; Yartsev, Slav; D'Souza, David; Lock, Michael; Bauman, Glenn

    2008-01-01

    To compare two strategies of dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (dIMRT) with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) in the setting of hypofractionated high-risk prostate cancer treatment. 3DCRT and dIMRT/Helical Tomotherapy(HT) planning with 10 CT datasets was undertaken to deliver 68 Gy in 25 fractions (prostate) and simultaneously delivering 45 Gy in 25 fractions (pelvic lymph node targets) in a single phase. The paradigms of pelvic vessel targeting (iliac vessels with margin are used to target pelvic nodes) and conformal normal tissue avoidance (treated soft tissues of the pelvis while limiting dose to identified pelvic critical structures) were assessed compared to 3DCRT controls. Both dIMRT/HT and 3DCRT solutions were compared to each other using repeated measures ANOVA and post-hoc paired t-tests. When compared to conformal pelvic vessel targeting, conformal normal tissue avoidance delivered more homogenous PTV delivery (2/2 t-test comparisons; p < 0.001), similar nodal coverage (8/8 t-test comparisons; p = ns), higher and more homogenous pelvic tissue dose (6/6 t-test comparisons; p < 0.03), at the cost of slightly higher critical structure dose (D dose , 1–3 Gy over 5/10 dose points; p < 0.03). The dIMRT/HT approaches were superior to 3DCRT in sparing organs at risk (22/24 t-test comparisons; p < 0.05). dIMRT/HT nodal and pelvic targeting is superior to 3DCRT in dose delivery and critical structure sparing in the setting of hypofractionation for high-risk prostate cancer. The pelvic targeting paradigm is a potential solution to deliver highly conformal pelvic radiation treatment in the setting of nodal location uncertainty in prostate cancer and other pelvic malignancies

  8. Static and dynamic properties of two-dimensional Coulomb clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ash, Biswarup; Chakrabarti, J; Ghosal, Amit

    2017-10-01

    We study the temperature dependence of static and dynamic responses of Coulomb interacting particles in two-dimensional confinements across the crossover from solid- to liquid-like behaviors. While static correlations that investigate the translational and bond orientational order in the confinements show the footprints of hexatic-like phase at low temperatures, dynamics of the particles slow down considerably in this phase, reminiscent of a supercooled liquid. Using density correlations, we probe long-lived heterogeneities arising from the interplay of the irregularity in the confinement and long-range Coulomb interactions. The relaxation at multiple time scales show stretched-exponential decay of spatial correlations in irregular traps. Temperature dependence of characteristic time scales, depicting the structural relaxation of the system, show striking similarities with those observed for the glassy systems, indicating that some of the key signatures of supercooled liquids emerge in confinements with lower spatial symmetries.

  9. Measuring protein dynamics with ultrafast two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamczyk, Katrin; Candelaresi, Marco; Hunt, Neil T; Robb, Kirsty; Hoskisson, Paul A; Tucker, Nicholas P; Gumiero, Andrea; Walsh, Martin A; Parker, Anthony W

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in the methodology and application of ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy to biomolecular systems are reviewed. A description of the 2D-IR technique and the molecular contributions to the observed spectra are presented followed by a discussion of recent literature relating to the use of 2D-IR and associated approaches for measuring protein dynamics. In particular, these include the use of diatomic ligand groups for measuring haem protein dynamics, isotopic labelling strategies and the use of vibrational probe groups. The final section reports on the current state of the art regarding the use of 2D-IR methods to provide insights into biological reaction mechanisms. (topical review)

  10. Oscillatory Dynamics of One-Dimensional Homogeneous Granular Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starosvetsky, Yuli; Jayaprakash, K. R.; Hasan, Md. Arif; Vakakis, Alexander F.

    The acoustics of the homogeneous granular chains has been studied extensively both numerically and experimentally in the references cited in the previous chapters. This chapter focuses on the oscillatory behavior of finite dimensional homogeneous granular chains. It is well known that normal vibration modes are the building blocks of the vibrations of linear systems due to the applicability of the principle of superposition. One the other hand, nonlinear theory is deprived of such a general superposition principle (although special cases of nonlinear superpositions do exist), but nonlinear normal modes ‒ NNMs still play an important role in the forced and resonance dynamics of these systems. In their basic definition [1], NNMs were defined as time-periodic nonlinear oscillations of discrete or continuous dynamical systems where all coordinates (degrees-of-freedom) oscillate in-unison with the same frequency; further extensions of this definition have been considered to account for NNMs of systems with internal resonances [2]...

  11. Gaussian processes with built-in dimensionality reduction: Applications to high-dimensional uncertainty propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tripathy, Rohit; Bilionis, Ilias; Gonzalez, Marcial

    2016-01-01

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) tasks, such as model calibration, uncertainty propagation, and optimization under uncertainty, typically require several thousand evaluations of the underlying computer codes. To cope with the cost of simulations, one replaces the real response surface with a cheap surrogate based, e.g., on polynomial chaos expansions, neural networks, support vector machines, or Gaussian processes (GP). However, the number of simulations required to learn a generic multivariate response grows exponentially as the input dimension increases. This curse of dimensionality can only be addressed, if the response exhibits some special structure that can be discovered and exploited. A wide range of physical responses exhibit a special structure known as an active subspace (AS). An AS is a linear manifold of the stochastic space characterized by maximal response variation. The idea is that one should first identify this low dimensional manifold, project the high-dimensional input onto it, and then link the projection to the output. If the dimensionality of the AS is low enough, then learning the link function is a much easier problem than the original problem of learning a high-dimensional function. The classic approach to discovering the AS requires gradient information, a fact that severely limits its applicability. Furthermore, and partly because of its reliance to gradients, it is not able to handle noisy observations. The latter is an essential trait if one wants to be able to propagate uncertainty through stochastic simulators, e.g., through molecular dynamics codes. In this work, we develop a probabilistic version of AS which is gradient-free and robust to observational noise. Our approach relies on a novel Gaussian process regression with built-in dimensionality reduction. In particular, the AS is represented as an orthogonal projection matrix that serves as yet another covariance function hyper-parameter to be estimated from the data. To train the

  12. Gaussian processes with built-in dimensionality reduction: Applications to high-dimensional uncertainty propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathy, Rohit; Bilionis, Ilias; Gonzalez, Marcial

    2016-09-01

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) tasks, such as model calibration, uncertainty propagation, and optimization under uncertainty, typically require several thousand evaluations of the underlying computer codes. To cope with the cost of simulations, one replaces the real response surface with a cheap surrogate based, e.g., on polynomial chaos expansions, neural networks, support vector machines, or Gaussian processes (GP). However, the number of simulations required to learn a generic multivariate response grows exponentially as the input dimension increases. This curse of dimensionality can only be addressed, if the response exhibits some special structure that can be discovered and exploited. A wide range of physical responses exhibit a special structure known as an active subspace (AS). An AS is a linear manifold of the stochastic space characterized by maximal response variation. The idea is that one should first identify this low dimensional manifold, project the high-dimensional input onto it, and then link the projection to the output. If the dimensionality of the AS is low enough, then learning the link function is a much easier problem than the original problem of learning a high-dimensional function. The classic approach to discovering the AS requires gradient information, a fact that severely limits its applicability. Furthermore, and partly because of its reliance to gradients, it is not able to handle noisy observations. The latter is an essential trait if one wants to be able to propagate uncertainty through stochastic simulators, e.g., through molecular dynamics codes. In this work, we develop a probabilistic version of AS which is gradient-free and robust to observational noise. Our approach relies on a novel Gaussian process regression with built-in dimensionality reduction. In particular, the AS is represented as an orthogonal projection matrix that serves as yet another covariance function hyper-parameter to be estimated from the data. To train the

  13. Gaussian processes with built-in dimensionality reduction: Applications to high-dimensional uncertainty propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripathy, Rohit, E-mail: rtripath@purdue.edu; Bilionis, Ilias, E-mail: ibilion@purdue.edu; Gonzalez, Marcial, E-mail: marcial-gonzalez@purdue.edu

    2016-09-15

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) tasks, such as model calibration, uncertainty propagation, and optimization under uncertainty, typically require several thousand evaluations of the underlying computer codes. To cope with the cost of simulations, one replaces the real response surface with a cheap surrogate based, e.g., on polynomial chaos expansions, neural networks, support vector machines, or Gaussian processes (GP). However, the number of simulations required to learn a generic multivariate response grows exponentially as the input dimension increases. This curse of dimensionality can only be addressed, if the response exhibits some special structure that can be discovered and exploited. A wide range of physical responses exhibit a special structure known as an active subspace (AS). An AS is a linear manifold of the stochastic space characterized by maximal response variation. The idea is that one should first identify this low dimensional manifold, project the high-dimensional input onto it, and then link the projection to the output. If the dimensionality of the AS is low enough, then learning the link function is a much easier problem than the original problem of learning a high-dimensional function. The classic approach to discovering the AS requires gradient information, a fact that severely limits its applicability. Furthermore, and partly because of its reliance to gradients, it is not able to handle noisy observations. The latter is an essential trait if one wants to be able to propagate uncertainty through stochastic simulators, e.g., through molecular dynamics codes. In this work, we develop a probabilistic version of AS which is gradient-free and robust to observational noise. Our approach relies on a novel Gaussian process regression with built-in dimensionality reduction. In particular, the AS is represented as an orthogonal projection matrix that serves as yet another covariance function hyper-parameter to be estimated from the data. To train the

  14. Dynamic masquerade with morphing three-dimensional skin in cuttlefish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetta, Deanna; Buresch, Kendra; Hanlon, Roger T

    2017-03-01

    Masquerade is a defence tactic in which a prey resembles an inedible or inanimate object thus causing predators to misclassify it. Most masquerade colour patterns are static although some species adopt postures or behaviours to enhance the effect. Dynamic masquerade in which the colour pattern can be changed is rare. Here we report a two-step sensory process that enables an additional novel capability known only in cuttlefish and octopus: morphing three-dimensional physical skin texture that further enhances the optical illusions created by coloured skin patterns. Our experimental design incorporated sequential sensory processes: addition of a three-dimensional rock to the testing arena, which attracted the cuttlefish to settle next to it; then visual processing by the cuttlefish of physical textures on the rock to guide expression of the skin papillae, which can range from fully relaxed (smooth skin) to fully expressed (bumpy skin). When a uniformly white smooth rock was presented, cuttlefish moved to the rock and deployed a uniform body pattern with mostly smooth skin. When a rock with small-scale fragments of contrasting shells was presented, the cuttlefish deployed mottled body patterns with strong papillae expression. These robust and reversible responses indicate a sophisticated visual sensorimotor system for dynamic masquerade. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. Approximate Dynamic Programming Solving the Curses of Dimensionality

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, Warren B

    2011-01-01

    Praise for the First Edition "Finally, a book devoted to dynamic programming and written using the language of operations research (OR)! This beautiful book fills a gap in the libraries of OR specialists and practitioners."-Computing Reviews This new edition showcases a focus on modeling and computation for complex classes of approximate dynamic programming problems Understanding approximate dynamic programming (ADP) is vital in order to develop practical and high-quality solutions to complex industrial problems, particularly when those problems involve making decisions in the presence of unce

  16. Non-equilibrium dynamics of one-dimensional Bose gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langen, T.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the non-equilibrium dynamics of isolated quantum many-body systems is an open problem on vastly different energy, length, and time scales. Examples range from the dynamics of the early universe and heavy-ion collisions to the subtle coherence and transport properties in condensed matter physics. However, realizations of such quantum many-body systems, which are both well isolated from the environment and accessible to experimental study are scarce. This thesis presents a series of experiments with ultracold one-dimensional Bose gases. These gases combine a nearly perfect isolation from the environment with many well-established methods to manipulate and probe their quantum states. This makes them an ideal model system to explore the physics of quantum many body systems out of equilibrium. In the experiments, a well-defined non-equilibrium state is created by splitting a single one-dimensional gas coherently into two parts. The relaxation of this state is probed using matter-wave interferometry. The Observations reveal the emergence of a prethermalized steady state which differs strongly from thermal equilibrium. Such thermal-like states had previously been predicted for a large variety of systems, but never been observed directly. Studying the relaxation process in further detail shows that the thermal correlations of the prethermalized state emerge locally in their final form and propagate through the system in a light-cone-like evolution. This provides first experimental evidence for the local relaxation conjecture, which links relaxation processes in quantum many-body systems to the propagation of correlations. Furthermore, engineering the initial state of the evolution demonstrates that the prethermalized state is described by a generalized Gibbs ensemble, an observation which substantiates the importance of this ensemble as an extension of standard statistical mechanics. Finally, an experiment is presented, where pairs of gases with an atom

  17. High degree-of-freedom dynamic manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Michael P.; Stephens, Benjamin; Abe, Yeuhi; Rizzi, Alfred A.

    2012-06-01

    The creation of high degree of freedom dynamic mobile manipulation techniques and behaviors will allow robots to accomplish difficult tasks in the field. We are investigating the use of the body and legs of legged robots to improve the strength, velocity, and workspace of an integrated manipulator to accomplish dynamic manipulation. This is an especially challenging task, as all of the degrees of freedom are active at all times, the dynamic forces generated are high, and the legged system must maintain robust balance throughout the duration of the tasks. To accomplish this goal, we are utilizing trajectory optimization techniques to generate feasible open-loop behaviors for our 28 dof quadruped robot (BigDog) by planning the trajectories in a 13 dimensional space. Covariance Matrix Adaptation techniques are utilized to optimize for several criteria such as payload capability and task completion speed while also obeying constraints such as torque and velocity limits, kinematic limits, and center of pressure location. These open-loop behaviors are then used to generate feed-forward terms, which are subsequently used online to improve tracking and maintain low controller gains. Some initial results on one of our existing balancing quadruped robots with an additional human-arm-like manipulator are demonstrated on robot hardware, including dynamic lifting and throwing of heavy objects 16.5kg cinder blocks, using motions that resemble a human athlete more than typical robotic motions. Increased payload capacity is accomplished through coordinated body motion.

  18. Rhythmic dynamics and synchronization via dimensionality reduction: application to human gait.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Zhang

    Full Text Available Reliable characterization of locomotor dynamics of human walking is vital to understanding the neuromuscular control of human locomotion and disease diagnosis. However, the inherent oscillation and ubiquity of noise in such non-strictly periodic signals pose great challenges to current methodologies. To this end, we exploit the state-of-the-art technology in pattern recognition and, specifically, dimensionality reduction techniques, and propose to reconstruct and characterize the dynamics accurately on the cycle scale of the signal. This is achieved by deriving a low-dimensional representation of the cycles through global optimization, which effectively preserves the topology of the cycles that are embedded in a high-dimensional Euclidian space. Our approach demonstrates a clear advantage in capturing the intrinsic dynamics and probing the subtle synchronization patterns from uni/bivariate oscillatory signals over traditional methods. Application to human gait data for healthy subjects and diabetics reveals a significant difference in the dynamics of ankle movements and ankle-knee coordination, but not in knee movements. These results indicate that the impaired sensory feedback from the feet due to diabetes does not influence the knee movement in general, and that normal human walking is not critically dependent on the feedback from the peripheral nervous system.

  19. Quantum correlation of high dimensional system in a dephasing environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yinghua; Ke, Qiang; Hu, Juju

    2018-05-01

    For a high dimensional spin-S system embedded in a dephasing environment, we theoretically analyze the time evolutions of quantum correlation and entanglement via Frobenius norm and negativity. The quantum correlation dynamics can be considered as a function of the decoherence parameters, including the ratio between the system oscillator frequency ω0 and the reservoir cutoff frequency ωc , and the different environment temperature. It is shown that the quantum correlation can not only measure nonclassical correlation of the considered system, but also perform a better robustness against the dissipation. In addition, the decoherence presents the non-Markovian features and the quantum correlation freeze phenomenon. The former is much weaker than that in the sub-Ohmic or Ohmic thermal reservoir environment.

  20. Three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry using dynamic vision sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borer, D.; Delbruck, T.; Rösgen, T.

    2017-12-01

    A fast-flow visualization method is presented based on tracking neutrally buoyant soap bubbles with a set of neuromorphic cameras. The "dynamic vision sensors" register only the changes in brightness with very low latency, capturing fast processes at a low data rate. The data consist of a stream of asynchronous events, each encoding the corresponding pixel position, the time instant of the event and the sign of the change in logarithmic intensity. The work uses three such synchronized cameras to perform 3D particle tracking in a medium sized wind tunnel. The data analysis relies on Kalman filters to associate the asynchronous events with individual tracers and to reconstruct the three-dimensional path and velocity based on calibrated sensor information.

  1. Dynamics and Control of Three-Dimensional Perching Maneuver under Dynamic Stall Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feroskhan, Mir Alikhan Bin Mohammad

    Perching is a type of aggressive maneuver performed by the class 'Aves' species to attain precision point landing with a generally short landing distance. Perching capability is desirable on unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) due to its efficient deceleration process that potentially expands the functionality and flight envelope of the aircraft. This dissertation extends the previous works on perching, which is mostly limited to two-dimensional (2D) cases, to its state-of-the-art threedimensional (3D) variety. This dissertation presents the aerodynamic modeling and optimization framework adopted to generate unprecedented variants of the 3D perching maneuver that include the sideslip perching trajectory, which ameliorates the existing 2D perching concept by eliminating the undesirable undershoot and reliance on gravity. The sideslip perching technique methodically utilizes the lateral and longitudinal drag mechanisms through consecutive phases of yawing and pitching-up motion. Since perching maneuver involves high rates of change in the angles of attack and large turn rates, introduction of three internal variables thus becomes necessary for addressing the influence of dynamic stall delay on the UAV's transient post-stall behavior. These variables are then integrated into a static nonlinear aerodynamic model, developed using empirical and analytical methods, and into an optimization framework that generates a trajectory of sideslip perching maneuver, acquiring over 70% velocity reduction. An impact study of the dynamic stall influence on the optimal perching trajectories suggests that consideration of dynamic stall delay is essential due to the significant discrepancies in the corresponding control inputs required. A comparative study between 2D and 3D perching is also conducted to examine the different drag mechanisms employed by 2D and 3D perching respectively. 3D perching is presented as a more efficient deceleration technique with respect to spatial costs and

  2. Statistical mechanics of complex neural systems and high dimensional data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advani, Madhu; Lahiri, Subhaneil; Ganguli, Surya

    2013-01-01

    Recent experimental advances in neuroscience have opened new vistas into the immense complexity of neuronal networks. This proliferation of data challenges us on two parallel fronts. First, how can we form adequate theoretical frameworks for understanding how dynamical network processes cooperate across widely disparate spatiotemporal scales to solve important computational problems? Second, how can we extract meaningful models of neuronal systems from high dimensional datasets? To aid in these challenges, we give a pedagogical review of a collection of ideas and theoretical methods arising at the intersection of statistical physics, computer science and neurobiology. We introduce the interrelated replica and cavity methods, which originated in statistical physics as powerful ways to quantitatively analyze large highly heterogeneous systems of many interacting degrees of freedom. We also introduce the closely related notion of message passing in graphical models, which originated in computer science as a distributed algorithm capable of solving large inference and optimization problems involving many coupled variables. We then show how both the statistical physics and computer science perspectives can be applied in a wide diversity of contexts to problems arising in theoretical neuroscience and data analysis. Along the way we discuss spin glasses, learning theory, illusions of structure in noise, random matrices, dimensionality reduction and compressed sensing, all within the unified formalism of the replica method. Moreover, we review recent conceptual connections between message passing in graphical models, and neural computation and learning. Overall, these ideas illustrate how statistical physics and computer science might provide a lens through which we can uncover emergent computational functions buried deep within the dynamical complexities of neuronal networks. (paper)

  3. Population dynamics at high Reynolds number

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perlekar, P.; Benzi, R.; Nelson, D.R.; Toschi, F.

    2010-01-01

    We study the statistical properties of population dynamics evolving in a realistic two-dimensional compressible turbulent velocity field. We show that the interplay between turbulent dynamics and population growth and saturation leads to quasi-localization and a remarkable reduction in the carrying

  4. Semilogarithmic Nonuniform Vector Quantization of Two-Dimensional Laplacean Source for Small Variance Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Peric

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper high dynamic range nonuniform two-dimensional vector quantization model for Laplacean source was provided. Semilogarithmic A-law compression characteristic was used as radial scalar compression characteristic of two-dimensional vector quantization. Optimal number value of concentric quantization domains (amplitude levels is expressed in the function of parameter A. Exact distortion analysis with obtained closed form expressions is provided. It has been shown that proposed model provides high SQNR values in wide range of variances, and overachieves quality obtained by scalar A-law quantization at same bit rate, so it can be used in various switching and adaptation implementations for realization of high quality signal compression.

  5. Multivariate statistics high-dimensional and large-sample approximations

    CERN Document Server

    Fujikoshi, Yasunori; Shimizu, Ryoichi

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive examination of high-dimensional analysis of multivariate methods and their real-world applications Multivariate Statistics: High-Dimensional and Large-Sample Approximations is the first book of its kind to explore how classical multivariate methods can be revised and used in place of conventional statistical tools. Written by prominent researchers in the field, the book focuses on high-dimensional and large-scale approximations and details the many basic multivariate methods used to achieve high levels of accuracy. The authors begin with a fundamental presentation of the basic

  6. Hierarchical low-rank approximation for high dimensional approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Nouy, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Tensor methods are among the most prominent tools for the numerical solution of high-dimensional problems where functions of multiple variables have to be approximated. Such high-dimensional approximation problems naturally arise in stochastic analysis and uncertainty quantification. In many practical situations, the approximation of high-dimensional functions is made computationally tractable by using rank-structured approximations. In this talk, we present algorithms for the approximation in hierarchical tensor format using statistical methods. Sparse representations in a given tensor format are obtained with adaptive or convex relaxation methods, with a selection of parameters using crossvalidation methods.

  7. Hierarchical low-rank approximation for high dimensional approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Nouy, Anthony

    2016-01-07

    Tensor methods are among the most prominent tools for the numerical solution of high-dimensional problems where functions of multiple variables have to be approximated. Such high-dimensional approximation problems naturally arise in stochastic analysis and uncertainty quantification. In many practical situations, the approximation of high-dimensional functions is made computationally tractable by using rank-structured approximations. In this talk, we present algorithms for the approximation in hierarchical tensor format using statistical methods. Sparse representations in a given tensor format are obtained with adaptive or convex relaxation methods, with a selection of parameters using crossvalidation methods.

  8. Static and dynamic properties of three-dimensional dot-type magnonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksymov, Artur; Spinu, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    The static and dynamic magnetization of three-dimensional magnonic metamaterials has been investigated. By numerical means it was analyzed the impact of space dimensionality on the properties of magnonic crystal with unit cell consisting of four dots. It is find out the possibility of multi-vortex core formation which is related to the increasing of the crystal height by three-dimensional periodicity of single crystal layer. Additionally is provided the analysis of ferromagnetic resonance phenomenon for two-dimensional and three-dimensional structures. For the unsaturated magnetization of three-dimensional crystal the several pronounced resonance frequencies were detected.

  9. Static and dynamic properties of three-dimensional dot-type magnonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maksymov, Artur, E-mail: maxyartur@gmail.com [Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Department of General Physics, Chernivtsi National University, Chernivtsi 58012 (Ukraine); Spinu, Leonard [Advanced Materials Research Institute, University of New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States); Department of Physics, University of New Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148 (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The static and dynamic magnetization of three-dimensional magnonic metamaterials has been investigated. By numerical means it was analyzed the impact of space dimensionality on the properties of magnonic crystal with unit cell consisting of four dots. It is find out the possibility of multi-vortex core formation which is related to the increasing of the crystal height by three-dimensional periodicity of single crystal layer. Additionally is provided the analysis of ferromagnetic resonance phenomenon for two-dimensional and three-dimensional structures. For the unsaturated magnetization of three-dimensional crystal the several pronounced resonance frequencies were detected.

  10. Two dimensional kicked quantum Ising model: dynamical phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pineda, C; Prosen, T; Villaseñor, E

    2014-01-01

    Using an efficient one and two qubit gate simulator operating on graphical processing units, we investigate ergodic properties of a quantum Ising spin 1/2 model on a two-dimensional lattice, which is periodically driven by a δ-pulsed transverse magnetic field. We consider three different dynamical properties: (i) level density, (ii) level spacing distribution of the Floquet quasienergy spectrum, and (iii) time-averaged autocorrelation function of magnetization components. Varying the parameters of the model, we found transitions between ordered (non-ergodic) and quantum chaotic (ergodic) phases, but the transitions between flat and non-flat spectral density do not correspond to transitions between ergodic and non-ergodic local observables. Even more surprisingly, we found good agreement of level spacing distribution with the Wigner surmise of random matrix theory for almost all values of parameters except where the model is essentially non-interacting, even in regions where local observables are not ergodic or where spectral density is non-flat. These findings question the versatility of the interpretation of level spacing distribution in many-body systems and stress the importance of the concept of locality. (paper)

  11. Dynamics of a two-dimensional order-disorder transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahni, P.S.; Dee, G.; Gunton, J.D.; Phani, M.; Lebowitz, J.L.; Kalos, M.

    1981-01-01

    We present results of a Monte Carlo study of the time development of a two-dimensional order-disorder model binary alloy following a quench to low temperature from a disordered, high-temperature state. The behavior is qualitatively quite similar to that seen in a recent study of a three-dimensional system. The structure function exhibits a scaling of the form K 2 (t)S(k,t) = G(k/K(t)) where the moment K(t) decreases with time approximately like t/sup -1/2/. If one interprets this moment as being inversely proportional to the domain size, the characteristic domain growth rate is proportional to t/sup -1/2/. Additional insight into this time evolution is obtained from studying the development of the short-range order, as well as from monitoring the growth of a compact ordered domain embedded in a region of opposite order. All these results are consistent with the picture of domain growth as proposed by Lifshitz and by Cahn and Allen

  12. THE COLORIMETRY WITH A HIGH DIMENSIONAL RESOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. E. Zuikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The developed method of Objects photometric and colorimetric characteristics measurements on the base of digital cameras are described. Application of the initial samples those are realized as the support of the control points on a non-radiant Object or as primary sources on a radiant Object will provide the metrological traceability and also build a conditional scale in each colour channel and expand the dynamic range of measurements by increasing the reliability and accuracy of measurement results.

  13. Full evaporation dynamic headspace in combination with selectable one-dimensional/two-dimensional gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the determination of suspected fragrance allergens in cosmetic products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devos, Christophe; Ochiai, Nobuo; Sasamoto, Kikuo; Sandra, Pat; David, Frank

    2012-09-14

    Suspected fragrance allergens were determined in cosmetic products using a combination of full evaporation-dynamic headspace (FEDHS) with selectable one-dimensional/two-dimensional GC-MS. The full evaporation dynamic headspace approach allows the non-discriminating extraction and injection of both apolar and polar fragrance compounds, without contamination of the analytical system by high molecular weight non-volatile matrix compounds. The method can be applied to all classes of cosmetic samples, including water containing matrices such as shower gels or body creams. In combination with selectable (1)D/(2)D GC-MS, consisting of a dedicated heart-cutting GC-MS configuration using capillary flow technology (CFT) and low thermal mass GC (LTM-GC), a highly flexible and easy-to-use analytical solution is offered. Depending on the complexity of the perfume fraction, analyses can be performed in one-dimensional GC-MS mode or in heart-cutting two-dimensional GC-MS mode, without the need of hardware reconfiguration. The two-dimensional mode with independent temperature control of the first and second dimension column is especially useful to confirm the presence of detected allergen compounds when mass spectral deconvolution is not possible. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A Shell Multi-dimensional Hierarchical Cubing Approach for High-Dimensional Cube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Shuzhi; Zhao, Li; Hu, Kongfa

    The pre-computation of data cubes is critical for improving the response time of OLAP systems and accelerating data mining tasks in large data warehouses. However, as the sizes of data warehouses grow, the time it takes to perform this pre-computation becomes a significant performance bottleneck. In a high dimensional data warehouse, it might not be practical to build all these cuboids and their indices. In this paper, we propose a shell multi-dimensional hierarchical cubing algorithm, based on an extension of the previous minimal cubing approach. This method partitions the high dimensional data cube into low multi-dimensional hierarchical cube. Experimental results show that the proposed method is significantly more efficient than other existing cubing methods.

  15. High concentration agglomerate dynamics at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heine, M C; Pratsinis, S E

    2006-11-21

    The dynamics of agglomerate aerosols are investigated at high solids concentrations that are typical in industrial scale manufacture of fine particles (precursor mole fraction larger than 10 mol %). In particular, formation and growth of fumed silica at such concentrations by chemical reaction, coagulation, and sintering is simulated at nonisothermal conditions and compared to limited experimental data and commercial product specifications. Using recent chemical kinetics for silica formation by SiCl4 hydrolysis and neglecting aerosol polydispersity, the evolution of the diameter of primary particles (specific surface area, SSA), hard- and soft-agglomerates, along with agglomerate effective volume fraction (volume occupied by agglomerate) is investigated. Classic Smoluchowski theory is fundamentally limited for description of soft-agglomerate Brownian coagulation at high solids concentrations. In fact, these high concentrations affect little the primary particle diameter (or SSA) but dominate the soft-agglomerate diameter, structure, and volume fraction, leading to gelation consistent with experimental data. This indicates that restructuring and fragmentation should affect product particle characteristics during high-temperature synthesis of nanostructured particles at high concentrations in aerosol flow reactors.

  16. Improved non-dimensional dynamic influence function method based on tow-domain method for vibration analysis of membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SW Kang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces an improved non-dimensional dynamic influence function method using a sub-domain method for efficiently extracting the eigenvalues and mode shapes of concave membranes with arbitrary shapes. The non-dimensional dynamic influence function method (non-dimensional dynamic influence function method, which was developed by the authors in 1999, gives highly accurate eigenvalues for membranes, plates, and acoustic cavities, compared with the finite element method. However, it needs the inefficient procedure of calculating the singularity of a system matrix in the frequency range of interest for extracting eigenvalues and mode shapes. To overcome the inefficient procedure, this article proposes a practical approach to make the system matrix equation of the concave membrane of interest into a form of algebraic eigenvalue problem. It is shown by several case studies that the proposed method has a good convergence characteristics and yields very accurate eigenvalues, compared with an exact method and finite element method (ANSYS.

  17. Improved non-dimensional dynamic influence function method for vibration analysis of arbitrarily shaped plates with clamped edges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Wook Kang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A new formulation for the non-dimensional dynamic influence function method, which was developed by the authors, is proposed to efficiently extract eigenvalues and mode shapes of clamped plates with arbitrary shapes. Compared with the finite element and boundary element methods, the non-dimensional dynamic influence function method yields highly accurate solutions in eigenvalue analysis problems of plates and membranes including acoustic cavities. However, the non-dimensional dynamic influence function method requires the uneconomic procedure of calculating the singularity of a system matrix in the frequency range of interest for extracting eigenvalues because it produces a non-algebraic eigenvalue problem. This article describes a new approach that reduces the problem of free vibrations of clamped plates to an algebraic eigenvalue problem, the solution of which is straightforward. The validity and efficiency of the proposed method are illustrated through several numerical examples.

  18. Time Series Analysis of the Bacillus subtilis Sporulation Network Reveals Low Dimensional Chaotic Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecca, Paola; Mura, Ivan; Re, Angela; Barker, Gary C; Ihekwaba, Adaoha E C

    2016-01-01

    Chaotic behavior refers to a behavior which, albeit irregular, is generated by an underlying deterministic process. Therefore, a chaotic behavior is potentially controllable. This possibility becomes practically amenable especially when chaos is shown to be low-dimensional, i.e., to be attributable to a small fraction of the total systems components. In this case, indeed, including the major drivers of chaos in a system into the modeling approach allows us to improve predictability of the systems dynamics. Here, we analyzed the numerical simulations of an accurate ordinary differential equation model of the gene network regulating sporulation initiation in Bacillus subtilis to explore whether the non-linearity underlying time series data is due to low-dimensional chaos. Low-dimensional chaos is expectedly common in systems with few degrees of freedom, but rare in systems with many degrees of freedom such as the B. subtilis sporulation network. The estimation of a number of indices, which reflect the chaotic nature of a system, indicates that the dynamics of this network is affected by deterministic chaos. The neat separation between the indices obtained from the time series simulated from the model and those obtained from time series generated by Gaussian white and colored noise confirmed that the B. subtilis sporulation network dynamics is affected by low dimensional chaos rather than by noise. Furthermore, our analysis identifies the principal driver of the networks chaotic dynamics to be sporulation initiation phosphotransferase B (Spo0B). We then analyzed the parameters and the phase space of the system to characterize the instability points of the network dynamics, and, in turn, to identify the ranges of values of Spo0B and of the other drivers of the chaotic dynamics, for which the whole system is highly sensitive to minimal perturbation. In summary, we described an unappreciated source of complexity in the B. subtilis sporulation network by gathering

  19. Dynameomics: a multi-dimensional analysis-optimized database for dynamic protein data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehl, Catherine; Simms, Andrew M; Toofanny, Rudesh D; Daggett, Valerie

    2008-06-01

    The Dynameomics project is our effort to characterize the native-state dynamics and folding/unfolding pathways of representatives of all known protein folds by way of molecular dynamics simulations, as described by Beck et al. (in Protein Eng. Des. Select., the first paper in this series). The data produced by these simulations are highly multidimensional in structure and multi-terabytes in size. Both of these features present significant challenges for storage, retrieval and analysis. For optimal data modeling and flexibility, we needed a platform that supported both multidimensional indices and hierarchical relationships between related types of data and that could be integrated within our data warehouse, as described in the accompanying paper directly preceding this one. For these reasons, we have chosen On-line Analytical Processing (OLAP), a multi-dimensional analysis optimized database, as an analytical platform for these data. OLAP is a mature technology in the financial sector, but it has not been used extensively for scientific analysis. Our project is further more unusual for its focus on the multidimensional and analytical capabilities of OLAP rather than its aggregation capacities. The dimensional data model and hierarchies are very flexible. The query language is concise for complex analysis and rapid data retrieval. OLAP shows great promise for the dynamic protein analysis for bioengineering and biomedical applications. In addition, OLAP may have similar potential for other scientific and engineering applications involving large and complex datasets.

  20. High-dimensional data in economics and their (robust) analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalina, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2017), s. 171-183 ISSN 1452-4864 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-07384S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : econometrics * high-dimensional data * dimensionality reduction * linear regression * classification analysis * robustness Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Business and management http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/SI/kalina-0474076.pdf

  1. High-dimensional Data in Economics and their (Robust) Analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalina, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2017), s. 171-183 ISSN 1452-4864 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-07384S Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA13-01930S Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : econometrics * high-dimensional data * dimensionality reduction * linear regression * classification analysis * robustness Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research OBOR OECD: Statistics and probability

  2. A sparse grid based method for generative dimensionality reduction of high-dimensional data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Bastian; Garcke, Jochen; Griebel, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Generative dimensionality reduction methods play an important role in machine learning applications because they construct an explicit mapping from a low-dimensional space to the high-dimensional data space. We discuss a general framework to describe generative dimensionality reduction methods, where the main focus lies on a regularized principal manifold learning variant. Since most generative dimensionality reduction algorithms exploit the representer theorem for reproducing kernel Hilbert spaces, their computational costs grow at least quadratically in the number n of data. Instead, we introduce a grid-based discretization approach which automatically scales just linearly in n. To circumvent the curse of dimensionality of full tensor product grids, we use the concept of sparse grids. Furthermore, in real-world applications, some embedding directions are usually more important than others and it is reasonable to refine the underlying discretization space only in these directions. To this end, we employ a dimension-adaptive algorithm which is based on the ANOVA (analysis of variance) decomposition of a function. In particular, the reconstruction error is used to measure the quality of an embedding. As an application, the study of large simulation data from an engineering application in the automotive industry (car crash simulation) is performed.

  3. Harnessing high-dimensional hyperentanglement through a biphoton frequency comb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhenda; Zhong, Tian; Shrestha, Sajan; Xu, Xinan; Liang, Junlin; Gong, Yan-Xiao; Bienfang, Joshua C.; Restelli, Alessandro; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.; Wong, Franco N. C.; Wei Wong, Chee

    2015-08-01

    Quantum entanglement is a fundamental resource for secure information processing and communications, and hyperentanglement or high-dimensional entanglement has been separately proposed for its high data capacity and error resilience. The continuous-variable nature of the energy-time entanglement makes it an ideal candidate for efficient high-dimensional coding with minimal limitations. Here, we demonstrate the first simultaneous high-dimensional hyperentanglement using a biphoton frequency comb to harness the full potential in both the energy and time domain. Long-postulated Hong-Ou-Mandel quantum revival is exhibited, with up to 19 time-bins and 96.5% visibilities. We further witness the high-dimensional energy-time entanglement through Franson revivals, observed periodically at integer time-bins, with 97.8% visibility. This qudit state is observed to simultaneously violate the generalized Bell inequality by up to 10.95 standard deviations while observing recurrent Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt S-parameters up to 2.76. Our biphoton frequency comb provides a platform for photon-efficient quantum communications towards the ultimate channel capacity through energy-time-polarization high-dimensional encoding.

  4. High-speed photography of dynamic photoelastic experiment with a highly accurate blasting machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuyama, Kunihisa; Ogata, Yuji; Wada, Yuji; Hashizume, K.

    1995-05-01

    A high accurate blasting machine which could control 1 microsecond(s) was developed. At first, explosion of a bridge wire in an electric detonator was observed and next the detonations of caps were observed with a high speed camera. It is well known that a compressed stress wave reflects at the free face, it propagates to the backward as a tensile stress wave, and cracks grow when the tensile stress becomes the dynamic tensile strength. The behavior of these cracks has been discussed through the observation of the dynamic photoelastic high speed photography and the three dimensional dynamic stress analysis.

  5. Two-dimensional dynamics of elasto-inertial turbulence and its role in polymer drag reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sid, S.; Terrapon, V. E.; Dubief, Y.

    2018-02-01

    turbulence, eventually leading to flow laminarization. A sufficiently high Schmidt number (weakly diffusive polymers) is necessary to allow self-sustained turbulence to settle. Although EIT can withstand a low amount of diffusion and remains in a nonlaminar chaotic state, adding a finite amount of GAD in the system can have an impact on the dynamics and lead to important quantitative changes, even for Schmidt numbers as large as 102. The use of GAD should therefore be avoided in viscoelastic flow simulations.

  6. Full dimensional (15-dimensional) quantum-dynamical simulation of the protonated water dimer. II. Infrared spectrum and vibrational dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendrell, Oriol; Gatti, Fabien; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2007-01-01

    The infrared absorption spectrum of the protonated water dimer (H5O2+) is simulated in full dimensionality (15 dimensional) in the spectral range of 0-4000 cm(-1). The calculations are performed using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) method for propagation of wavepackets. All...

  7. Dirac and Weyl fermion dynamics on two-dimensional surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavalov, A.R.; Sedrakyan, A.G.; Kostov, I.K.

    1986-01-01

    Fermions on 2-dimensional surface, embedded into a 3-dimensional space are investigated. The determinant of induced Dirac operator for the Dirac and Weyl fermions is calculated. The reparametrization-invariant effective action is determined by conformal anomaly (giving Liouville action) and also by Lorentz anomaly leading to Wess-Zumino term, the structure of which at d=3 is determined by the Hopf topological invariant of the S 3 → S 2 map

  8. Linear stability theory as an early warning sign for transitions in high dimensional complex systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piovani, Duccio; Grujić, Jelena; Jensen, Henrik Jeldtoft

    2016-01-01

    We analyse in detail a new approach to the monitoring and forecasting of the onset of transitions in high dimensional complex systems by application to the Tangled Nature model of evolutionary ecology and high dimensional replicator systems with a stochastic element. A high dimensional stability matrix is derived in the mean field approximation to the stochastic dynamics. This allows us to determine the stability spectrum about the observed quasi-stable configurations. From overlap of the instantaneous configuration vector of the full stochastic system with the eigenvectors of the unstable directions of the deterministic mean field approximation, we are able to construct a good early-warning indicator of the transitions occurring intermittently. (paper)

  9. On spectral distribution of high dimensional covariation matrices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinrich, Claudio; Podolskij, Mark

    In this paper we present the asymptotic theory for spectral distributions of high dimensional covariation matrices of Brownian diffusions. More specifically, we consider N-dimensional Itô integrals with time varying matrix-valued integrands. We observe n equidistant high frequency data points...... of the underlying Brownian diffusion and we assume that N/n -> c in (0,oo). We show that under a certain mixed spectral moment condition the spectral distribution of the empirical covariation matrix converges in distribution almost surely. Our proof relies on method of moments and applications of graph theory....

  10. High-dimensional model estimation and model selection

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    I will review concepts and algorithms from high-dimensional statistics for linear model estimation and model selection. I will particularly focus on the so-called p>>n setting where the number of variables p is much larger than the number of samples n. I will focus mostly on regularized statistical estimators that produce sparse models. Important examples include the LASSO and its matrix extension, the Graphical LASSO, and more recent non-convex methods such as the TREX. I will show the applicability of these estimators in a diverse range of scientific applications, such as sparse interaction graph recovery and high-dimensional classification and regression problems in genomics.

  11. Hadron dynamics at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storrow, J.K.

    1977-01-01

    The nine lectures give a very brief introduction to hadron dynamics at high energies. They concentrate on basic concepts such as Regge poles, duality and geometrical ideas, and simple applications of these ideas to the problem of understanding data. To some extent two body phenomenology is emphasized at the expense of multiparticle final states and when the latter have been considered they have concentrated on inclusive reactions. One lecture discussed data on 2-2 reactions in order to provide the motivation for Regge pole theory, then two lectures are devoted to basic concepts. Then duality is introduced and shown to provide reasonable restrictions on a pole model. A lecture is then devoted to discussing geometrical ideas i.e. the t-dependence of data is looked at from an s-channel point of view. The section on two-body phenomenology is then concluded by discussing applications of the above ideas to two reactions-pion-nucleon scattering and np charge exchange scattering. The remaining three lectures are devoted to multiparticle reactions. Exclusive reactions are considered briefly and then the remainder of the course is concerned with inclusive reactions. The concepts of scaling and limiting fragmentation are discussed and Mueller's generalised optical theorem introduced and then applied in various kinematic limits. (author)

  12. High-dimensional quantum cloning and applications to quantum hacking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Frédéric; Fickler, Robert; Boyd, Robert W; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2017-02-01

    Attempts at cloning a quantum system result in the introduction of imperfections in the state of the copies. This is a consequence of the no-cloning theorem, which is a fundamental law of quantum physics and the backbone of security for quantum communications. Although perfect copies are prohibited, a quantum state may be copied with maximal accuracy via various optimal cloning schemes. Optimal quantum cloning, which lies at the border of the physical limit imposed by the no-signaling theorem and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, has been experimentally realized for low-dimensional photonic states. However, an increase in the dimensionality of quantum systems is greatly beneficial to quantum computation and communication protocols. Nonetheless, no experimental demonstration of optimal cloning machines has hitherto been shown for high-dimensional quantum systems. We perform optimal cloning of high-dimensional photonic states by means of the symmetrization method. We show the universality of our technique by conducting cloning of numerous arbitrary input states and fully characterize our cloning machine by performing quantum state tomography on cloned photons. In addition, a cloning attack on a Bennett and Brassard (BB84) quantum key distribution protocol is experimentally demonstrated to reveal the robustness of high-dimensional states in quantum cryptography.

  13. Stable biexcitons in two-dimensional metal-halide perovskites with strong dynamic lattice disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thouin, Félix; Neutzner, Stefanie; Cortecchia, Daniele; Dragomir, Vlad Alexandru; Soci, Cesare; Salim, Teddy; Lam, Yeng Ming; Leonelli, Richard; Petrozza, Annamaria; Kandada, Ajay Ram Srimath; Silva, Carlos

    2018-03-01

    With strongly bound and stable excitons at room temperature, single-layer, two-dimensional organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites are viable semiconductors for light-emitting quantum optoelectronics applications. In such a technological context, it is imperative to comprehensively explore all the factors—chemical, electronic, and structural—that govern strong multiexciton correlations. Here, by means of two-dimensional coherent spectroscopy, we examine excitonic many-body effects in pure, single-layer (PEA) 2PbI4 (PEA = phenylethylammonium). We determine the binding energy of biexcitons—correlated two-electron, two-hole quasiparticles—to be 44 ±5 meV at room temperature. The extraordinarily high values are similar to those reported in other strongly excitonic two-dimensional materials such as transition-metal dichalcogenides. Importantly, we show that this binding energy increases by ˜25 % upon cooling to 5 K. Our work highlights the importance of multiexciton correlations in this class of technologically promising, solution-processable materials, in spite of the strong effects of lattice fluctuations and dynamic disorder.

  14. Sufficient Controllability Condition for Affine Systems with Two-Dimensional Control and Two-Dimensional Zero Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Fetisov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The controllability conditions are well known if we speak about linear stationary systems: a linear stationary system is controllable if and only if the dimension of the state vector is equal to the rank of the controllability matrix. The concept of the controllability matrix is extended to affine systems, but relations between affine systems controllability and properties of this matrix are more complicated. Various controllability conditions are set for affine systems, but they deal as usual either with systems of some special form or with controllability in some small neighborhood of the concerned point. An affine system is known to be controllable if the system is equivalent to a system of a canonical form, which is defined and regular in the whole space of states. In this case, the system is said to be feedback linearizable in the space of states. However there are examples, which illustrate that a system can be controllable even if it is not feedback linearizable in any open subset in the space of states. In this article we deal with such systems.Affine systems with two-dimensional control are considered. The system in question is assumed to be equivalent to a system of a quasicanonical form with two-dimensional zero dynamics which is defined and regular in the whole space of states. Therefore the controllability of the original system is equivalent to the controllability of the received system of a quasicanonical form. In this article the sufficient condition for an available solution of the terminal problem is proven for systems of a quasicanonical form with two-dimensional control and two-dimensional zero dynamics. The condition is valid in the case of an arbitrary time interval and arbitrary initial and finite states of the system. Therefore the controllability condition is set for systems of a quasicanonical form with two-dimensional control and two-dimensional zero dynamics. An example is given which illustrates how the proved

  15. HSM: Heterogeneous Subspace Mining in High Dimensional Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Emmanuel; Assent, Ira; Seidl, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Heterogeneous data, i.e. data with both categorical and continuous values, is common in many databases. However, most data mining algorithms assume either continuous or categorical attributes, but not both. In high dimensional data, phenomena due to the "curse of dimensionality" pose additional...... challenges. Usually, due to locally varying relevance of attributes, patterns do not show across the full set of attributes. In this paper we propose HSM, which defines a new pattern model for heterogeneous high dimensional data. It allows data mining in arbitrary subsets of the attributes that are relevant...... for the respective patterns. Based on this model we propose an efficient algorithm, which is aware of the heterogeneity of the attributes. We extend an indexing structure for continuous attributes such that HSM indexing adapts to different attribute types. In our experiments we show that HSM efficiently mines...

  16. Geometry of quantum dynamics in infinite-dimensional Hilbert space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Janusz; Kuś, Marek; Marmo, Giuseppe; Shulman, Tatiana

    2018-04-01

    We develop a geometric approach to quantum mechanics based on the concept of the Tulczyjew triple. Our approach is genuinely infinite-dimensional, i.e. we do not restrict considerations to finite-dimensional Hilbert spaces, contrary to many other works on the geometry of quantum mechanics, and include a Lagrangian formalism in which self-adjoint (Schrödinger) operators are obtained as Lagrangian submanifolds associated with the Lagrangian. As a byproduct we also obtain results concerning coadjoint orbits of the unitary group in infinite dimensions, embedding of pure states in the unitary group, and self-adjoint extensions of symmetric relations.

  17. Use of dynamic 3-dimensional transvaginal and transrectal ultrasonography to assess posterior pelvic floor dysfunction related to obstructed defecation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad-Regadas, Sthela M; Regadas Filho, Francisco Sergio Pinheiro; Regadas, Francisco Sergio Pinheiro; Rodrigues, Lusmar Veras; de J R Pereira, Jacyara; da S Fernandes, Graziela Olivia; Dealcanfreitas, Iris Daiana; Mendonca Filho, Jose Jader

    2014-02-01

    New ultrasound techniques may complement current diagnostic tools, and combined techniques may help to overcome the limitations of individual techniques for the diagnosis of anorectal dysfunction. A high degree of agreement has been demonstrated between echodefecography (dynamic 3-dimensional anorectal ultrasonography) and conventional defecography. Our aim was to evaluate the ability of a combined approach consisting of dynamic 3-dimensional transvaginal and transrectal ultrasonography by using a 3-dimensional biplane endoprobe to assess posterior pelvic floor dysfunctions related to obstructed defecation syndrome in comparison with echodefecography. This was a prospective, observational cohort study conducted at a tertiary-care hospital. Consecutive female patients with symptoms of obstructed defecation were eligible. Each patient underwent assessment of posterior pelvic floor dysfunctions with a combination of dynamic 3-dimensional transvaginal and transrectal ultrasonography by using a biplane transducer and with echodefecography. Kappa (κ) was calculated as an index of agreement between the techniques. Diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values) of the combined technique in detection of posterior dysfunctions was assessed with echodefecography as the standard for comparison. A total of 33 women were evaluated. Substantial agreement was observed regarding normal relaxation and anismus. In detecting the absence or presence of rectocele, the 2 methods agreed in all cases. Near-perfect agreement was found for rectocele grade I, grade II, and grade III. Perfect agreement was found for entero/sigmoidocele, with near-perfect agreement for rectal intussusception. Using echodefecography as the standard for comparison, we found high diagnostic accuracy of transvaginal and transrectal ultrasonography in the detection of posterior dysfunctions. This combined technique should be compared with other dynamic techniques and

  18. Scaling analyses of the spectral dimension in 3-dimensional causal dynamical triangulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperman, Joshua H.

    2018-05-01

    The spectral dimension measures the dimensionality of a space as witnessed by a diffusing random walker. Within the causal dynamical triangulations approach to the quantization of gravity (Ambjørn et al 2000 Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 347, 2001 Nucl. Phys. B 610 347, 1998 Nucl. Phys. B 536 407), the spectral dimension exhibits novel scale-dependent dynamics: reducing towards a value near 2 on sufficiently small scales, matching closely the topological dimension on intermediate scales, and decaying in the presence of positive curvature on sufficiently large scales (Ambjørn et al 2005 Phys. Rev. Lett. 95 171301, Ambjørn et al 2005 Phys. Rev. D 72 064014, Benedetti and Henson 2009 Phys. Rev. D 80 124036, Cooperman 2014 Phys. Rev. D 90 124053, Cooperman et al 2017 Class. Quantum Grav. 34 115008, Coumbe and Jurkiewicz 2015 J. High Energy Phys. JHEP03(2015)151, Kommu 2012 Class. Quantum Grav. 29 105003). I report the first comprehensive scaling analysis of the small-to-intermediate scale spectral dimension for the test case of the causal dynamical triangulations of 3-dimensional Einstein gravity. I find that the spectral dimension scales trivially with the diffusion constant. I find that the spectral dimension is completely finite in the infinite volume limit, and I argue that its maximal value is exactly consistent with the topological dimension of 3 in this limit. I find that the spectral dimension reduces further towards a value near 2 as this case’s bare coupling approaches its phase transition, and I present evidence against the conjecture that the bare coupling simply sets the overall scale of the quantum geometry (Ambjørn et al 2001 Phys. Rev. D 64 044011). On the basis of these findings, I advance a tentative physical explanation for the dynamical reduction of the spectral dimension observed within causal dynamical triangulations: branched polymeric quantum geometry on sufficiently small scales. My analyses should facilitate attempts to employ the spectral

  19. Quantitative hyperbolicity estimates in one-dimensional dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, S; Kokubu, H; Pilarczyk, P; Luzzatto, S; Mischaikow, K; Oka, H

    2008-01-01

    We develop a rigorous computational method for estimating the Lyapunov exponents in uniformly expanding regions of the phase space for one-dimensional maps. Our method uses rigorous numerics and graph algorithms to provide results that are mathematically meaningful and can be achieved in an efficient way

  20. Alignment dynamics of diffusive scalar gradient in a two-dimensional model flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, M.

    2018-04-01

    The Lagrangian two-dimensional approach of scalar gradient kinematics is revisited accounting for molecular diffusion. Numerical simulations are performed in an analytic, parameterized model flow, which enables considering different regimes of scalar gradient dynamics. Attention is especially focused on the influence of molecular diffusion on Lagrangian statistical orientations and on the dynamics of scalar gradient alignment.

  1. A hybridized K-means clustering approach for high dimensional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology ... Due to incredible growth of high dimensional dataset, conventional data base querying methods are inadequate to extract useful information, so researchers nowadays ... Recently cluster analysis is a popularly used data analysis method in number of areas.

  2. High Dimensional Classification Using Features Annealed Independence Rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianqing; Fan, Yingying

    2008-01-01

    Classification using high-dimensional features arises frequently in many contemporary statistical studies such as tumor classification using microarray or other high-throughput data. The impact of dimensionality on classifications is largely poorly understood. In a seminal paper, Bickel and Levina (2004) show that the Fisher discriminant performs poorly due to diverging spectra and they propose to use the independence rule to overcome the problem. We first demonstrate that even for the independence classification rule, classification using all the features can be as bad as the random guessing due to noise accumulation in estimating population centroids in high-dimensional feature space. In fact, we demonstrate further that almost all linear discriminants can perform as bad as the random guessing. Thus, it is paramountly important to select a subset of important features for high-dimensional classification, resulting in Features Annealed Independence Rules (FAIR). The conditions under which all the important features can be selected by the two-sample t-statistic are established. The choice of the optimal number of features, or equivalently, the threshold value of the test statistics are proposed based on an upper bound of the classification error. Simulation studies and real data analysis support our theoretical results and demonstrate convincingly the advantage of our new classification procedure.

  3. On Robust Information Extraction from High-Dimensional Data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalina, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 1 (2014), s. 131-144 ISSN 1452-4864 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA13-01930S Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : data mining * high-dimensional data * robust econometrics * outliers * machine learning Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  4. Pricing High-Dimensional American Options Using Local Consistency Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berridge, S.J.; Schumacher, J.M.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate a new method for pricing high-dimensional American options. The method is of finite difference type but is also related to Monte Carlo techniques in that it involves a representative sampling of the underlying variables.An approximating Markov chain is built using this sampling and

  5. Irregular grid methods for pricing high-dimensional American options

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berridge, S.J.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis proposes and studies numerical methods for pricing high-dimensional American options; important examples being basket options, Bermudan swaptions and real options. Four new methods are presented and analysed, both in terms of their application to various test problems, and in terms of

  6. The diagnostic value of three-dimensional dynamic contrast-enhanced MR angiography for intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qi; Lu Jianping; Wang Fei; Wang Li; Tian Jianming; Jin Aiguo; Zeng Hao

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To assess the clinical value of three-dimensional dynamic contrast-enhanced MR angiography (3D DCE-MRA) in the detection for intracranial aneurysm. Methods: 3D DCE-MRA was performed in 54 patients highly suspected with intracranial aneurysms. Then conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and feasible endovascular treatment were performed simultaneously. A three-dimensional fast imaging with steady state precession (3D FISP) was used for 3D DCE-MRA(Gd-DTPA dose, 0.2 mmol per kilogram for body weight; acquisition time, 10 seconds). The source images were subtracted from mask images and transferred to computer workstation. All images were subsequently post-processed using three-dimensional reconstruction. 3D DCE-MRA images and DSA images were compared for demonstration of the aneurysm, its neck, and relationship with parent artery, and the usefulness for endovascular treatment was evaluated. Results: There were 39 cases with 45 intracranial aneurysms. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of 3D DCE-MRA were 96%, 73% and 90%, respectively. Aneurysm and its neck depiction at 3D DCE-MRA was significantly better than that at DSA, especially for aneurysms adjacent to the cavernous sinus and near the PICA of vertebral artery. 3D DEC-MRA could guide neurosurgeons to the desired DSA projection, and helped them make plan for interventional or surgical treatment in advance. But the diagnosis should be very carefully made for small aneurysms located in the periphery and the arterial bifurcation. Conclusion: 3D DEC-MRA is a fast, noninvasive and efficient technique for diagnosing intracranial aneurysms. Its three dimensional information is helpful for DSA demonstration and treatment planning. Any uncertain diagnosis requires DSA confirmation

  7. Three-dimensional reactor dynamics code for VVER type nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyrki-Rajamaeki, R. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1995-10-01

    A three-dimensional reactor dynamics computer code has been developed, validated and applied for transient and accident analyses of VVER type nuclear reactors. This code, HEXTRAN, is a part of the reactor physics and dynamics calculation system of the Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT. HEXTRAN models accurately the VVER core with hexagonal fuel assemblies. The code uses advanced mathematical methods in spatial and time discretization of neutronics, heat transfer and the two-phase flow equations of hydraulics. It includes all the experience of VTT from 20 years on the accurate three-dimensional static reactor physics as well as on the one-dimensional reactor dynamics. The dynamic coupling with the thermal hydraulic system code SMABRE also allows the VVER circuit-modelling experience to be included in the analyses. (79 refs.).

  8. Three-dimensional reactor dynamics code for VVER type nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyrki-Rajamaeki, R.

    1995-10-01

    A three-dimensional reactor dynamics computer code has been developed, validated and applied for transient and accident analyses of VVER type nuclear reactors. This code, HEXTRAN, is a part of the reactor physics and dynamics calculation system of the Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT. HEXTRAN models accurately the VVER core with hexagonal fuel assemblies. The code uses advanced mathematical methods in spatial and time discretization of neutronics, heat transfer and the two-phase flow equations of hydraulics. It includes all the experience of VTT from 20 years on the accurate three-dimensional static reactor physics as well as on the one-dimensional reactor dynamics. The dynamic coupling with the thermal hydraulic system code SMABRE also allows the VVER circuit-modelling experience to be included in the analyses. (79 refs.)

  9. Accuracy Assessment for the Three-Dimensional Coordinates by High-Speed Videogrammetric Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianglei Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available High-speed CMOS camera is a new kind of transducer to make the videogrammetric measurement for monitoring the displacement of high-speed shaking table structure. The purpose of this paper is to validate the three-dimensional coordinate accuracy of the shaking table structure acquired from the presented high-speed videogrammetric measuring system. In the paper, all of the key intermediate links are discussed, including the high-speed CMOS videogrammetric measurement system, the layout of the control network, the elliptical target detection, and the accuracy validation of final 3D spatial results. Through the accuracy analysis, the submillimeter accuracy can be made for the final the three-dimensional spatial coordinates which certify that the proposed high-speed videogrammetric technique is a better alternative technique which can replace the traditional transducer technique for monitoring the dynamic response for the shaking table structure.

  10. Asymptotics of empirical eigenstructure for high dimensional spiked covariance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weichen; Fan, Jianqing

    2017-06-01

    We derive the asymptotic distributions of the spiked eigenvalues and eigenvectors under a generalized and unified asymptotic regime, which takes into account the magnitude of spiked eigenvalues, sample size, and dimensionality. This regime allows high dimensionality and diverging eigenvalues and provides new insights into the roles that the leading eigenvalues, sample size, and dimensionality play in principal component analysis. Our results are a natural extension of those in Paul (2007) to a more general setting and solve the rates of convergence problems in Shen et al. (2013). They also reveal the biases of estimating leading eigenvalues and eigenvectors by using principal component analysis, and lead to a new covariance estimator for the approximate factor model, called shrinkage principal orthogonal complement thresholding (S-POET), that corrects the biases. Our results are successfully applied to outstanding problems in estimation of risks of large portfolios and false discovery proportions for dependent test statistics and are illustrated by simulation studies.

  11. From point process observations to collective neural dynamics: Nonlinear Hawkes process GLMs, low-dimensional dynamics and coarse graining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truccolo, Wilson

    2016-11-01

    This review presents a perspective on capturing collective dynamics in recorded neuronal ensembles based on multivariate point process models, inference of low-dimensional dynamics and coarse graining of spatiotemporal measurements. A general probabilistic framework for continuous time point processes reviewed, with an emphasis on multivariate nonlinear Hawkes processes with exogenous inputs. A point process generalized linear model (PP-GLM) framework for the estimation of discrete time multivariate nonlinear Hawkes processes is described. The approach is illustrated with the modeling of collective dynamics in neocortical neuronal ensembles recorded in human and non-human primates, and prediction of single-neuron spiking. A complementary approach to capture collective dynamics based on low-dimensional dynamics ("order parameters") inferred via latent state-space models with point process observations is presented. The approach is illustrated by inferring and decoding low-dimensional dynamics in primate motor cortex during naturalistic reach and grasp movements. Finally, we briefly review hypothesis tests based on conditional inference and spatiotemporal coarse graining for assessing collective dynamics in recorded neuronal ensembles. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Brane dynamics and four-dimensional quantum field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, N.D.; West, P.C.

    1999-01-01

    We review the relation between the classical dynamics of the M-fivebrane and the quantum low energy effective action for N = 2 Yang-Mills theories. We also discuss some outstanding issues in this correspondence. (author)

  13. Approximate dynamic programming solving the curses of dimensionality

    CERN Document Server

    Powell, Warren B

    2007-01-01

    Warren B. Powell, PhD, is Professor of Operations Research and Financial Engineering at Princeton University, where he is founder and Director of CASTLE Laboratory, a research unit that works with industrial partners to test new ideas found in operations research. The recipient of the 2004 INFORMS Fellow Award, Dr. Powell has authored over 100 refereed publications on stochastic optimization, approximate dynamic programming, and dynamic resource management.

  14. Multi spin-flip dynamics: a solution of the one-dimensional Ising model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, I.

    1990-01-01

    The Glauber dynamics of interacting Ising spins (the single spin-flip dynamics) is generalized to p spin-flip dynamics with a simultaneous flip of up to p spins in a single configuration move. The p spin-flip dynamics is studied of the one-dimensional Ising model with uniform nearest-neighbour interaction. For this case, an exact relation is given for the time dependence of magnetization. It was found that the critical slowing down in this model could be avoided when p spin-flip dynamics with p>2 was considered. (author). 17 refs

  15. Genuinely high-dimensional nonlocality optimized by complementary measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, James; Ryu, Junghee; Yoo, Seokwon; Lee, Changhyoup; Bang, Jeongho; Lee, Jinhyoung

    2010-01-01

    Qubits exhibit extreme nonlocality when their state is maximally entangled and this is observed by mutually unbiased local measurements. This criterion does not hold for the Bell inequalities of high-dimensional systems (qudits), recently proposed by Collins-Gisin-Linden-Massar-Popescu and Son-Lee-Kim. Taking an alternative approach, called the quantum-to-classical approach, we derive a series of Bell inequalities for qudits that satisfy the criterion as for the qubits. In the derivation each d-dimensional subsystem is assumed to be measured by one of d possible measurements with d being a prime integer. By applying to two qubits (d=2), we find that a derived inequality is reduced to the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality when the degree of nonlocality is optimized over all the possible states and local observables. Further applying to two and three qutrits (d=3), we find Bell inequalities that are violated for the three-dimensionally entangled states but are not violated by any two-dimensionally entangled states. In other words, the inequalities discriminate three-dimensional (3D) entanglement from two-dimensional (2D) entanglement and in this sense they are genuinely 3D. In addition, for the two qutrits we give a quantitative description of the relations among the three degrees of complementarity, entanglement and nonlocality. It is shown that the degree of complementarity jumps abruptly to very close to its maximum as nonlocality starts appearing. These characteristics imply that complementarity plays a more significant role in the present inequality compared with the previously proposed inequality.

  16. Design and Implementation of High-Performance GIS Dynamic Objects Rendering Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Y.; Wang, S.; Li, R.; Yun, W.; Song, G.

    2017-12-01

    Spatio-temporal dynamic visualization is more vivid than static visualization. It important to use dynamic visualization techniques to reveal the variation process and trend vividly and comprehensively for the geographical phenomenon. To deal with challenges caused by dynamic visualization of both 2D and 3D spatial dynamic targets, especially for different spatial data types require high-performance GIS dynamic objects rendering engine. The main approach for improving the rendering engine with vast dynamic targets relies on key technologies of high-performance GIS, including memory computing, parallel computing, GPU computing and high-performance algorisms. In this study, high-performance GIS dynamic objects rendering engine is designed and implemented for solving the problem based on hybrid accelerative techniques. The high-performance GIS rendering engine contains GPU computing, OpenGL technology, and high-performance algorism with the advantage of 64-bit memory computing. It processes 2D, 3D dynamic target data efficiently and runs smoothly with vast dynamic target data. The prototype system of high-performance GIS dynamic objects rendering engine is developed based SuperMap GIS iObjects. The experiments are designed for large-scale spatial data visualization, the results showed that the high-performance GIS dynamic objects rendering engine have the advantage of high performance. Rendering two-dimensional and three-dimensional dynamic objects achieve 20 times faster on GPU than on CPU.

  17. Confinement and dynamical regulation in two-dimensional convective turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bian, N.H.; Garcia, O.E.

    2003-01-01

    In this work the nature of confinement improvement implied by the self-consistent generation of mean flows in two-dimensional convective turbulence is studied. The confinement variations are linked to two distinct regulation mechanisms which are also shown to be at the origin of low......-frequency bursting in the fluctuation level and the convective heat flux integral, both resulting in a state of large-scale intermittency. The first one involves the control of convective transport by sheared mean flows. This regulation relies on the conservative transfer of kinetic energy from tilted fluctuations...

  18. Real-time high dynamic range laser scanning microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinegoni, C.; Leon Swisher, C.; Fumene Feruglio, P.; Giedt, R. J.; Rousso, D. L.; Stapleton, S.; Weissleder, R.

    2016-04-01

    In conventional confocal/multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, images are typically acquired under ideal settings and after extensive optimization of parameters for a given structure or feature, often resulting in information loss from other image attributes. To overcome the problem of selective data display, we developed a new method that extends the imaging dynamic range in optical microscopy and improves the signal-to-noise ratio. Here we demonstrate how real-time and sequential high dynamic range microscopy facilitates automated three-dimensional neural segmentation. We address reconstruction and segmentation performance on samples with different size, anatomy and complexity. Finally, in vivo real-time high dynamic range imaging is also demonstrated, making the technique particularly relevant for longitudinal imaging in the presence of physiological motion and/or for quantification of in vivo fast tracer kinetics during functional imaging.

  19. Perturbations of dynamics of homogeneous two-dimensional cellular automata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makowiec, D [Gdansk Univ. (Poland)

    1993-04-01

    The probabilistic approach provides a useful tool for understanding the nature of dynamics of cellular automata. It allows not only clarification of different results of the evolution but also gives explanation to the physical meaning of the rules. (author). 11 refs, 4 figs.

  20. Nambu-Poisson reformulation of the finite dimensional dynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baleanu, D.; Makhaldiani, N.

    1998-01-01

    A system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations which in a particular case reduces to Volterra's system is introduced. We found in two simplest cases the complete sets of the integrals of motion using Nambu-Poisson reformulation of the Hamiltonian dynamics. In these cases we have solved the systems by quadratures

  1. Applying recursive numerical integration techniques for solving high dimensional integrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammon, Andreas; Genz, Alan; Hartung, Tobias; Jansen, Karl; Volmer, Julia; Leoevey, Hernan

    2016-11-01

    The error scaling for Markov-Chain Monte Carlo techniques (MCMC) with N samples behaves like 1/√(N). This scaling makes it often very time intensive to reduce the error of computed observables, in particular for applications in lattice QCD. It is therefore highly desirable to have alternative methods at hand which show an improved error scaling. One candidate for such an alternative integration technique is the method of recursive numerical integration (RNI). The basic idea of this method is to use an efficient low-dimensional quadrature rule (usually of Gaussian type) and apply it iteratively to integrate over high-dimensional observables and Boltzmann weights. We present the application of such an algorithm to the topological rotor and the anharmonic oscillator and compare the error scaling to MCMC results. In particular, we demonstrate that the RNI technique shows an error scaling in the number of integration points m that is at least exponential.

  2. High Dimensional Modulation and MIMO Techniques for Access Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binti Othman, Maisara

    Exploration of advanced modulation formats and multiplexing techniques for next generation optical access networks are of interest as promising solutions for delivering multiple services to end-users. This thesis addresses this from two different angles: high dimensionality carrierless...... the capacity per wavelength of the femto-cell network. Bit rate up to 1.59 Gbps with fiber-wireless transmission over 1 m air distance is demonstrated. The results presented in this thesis demonstrate the feasibility of high dimensionality CAP in increasing the number of dimensions and their potentially......) optical access network. 2 X 2 MIMO RoF employing orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) with 5.6 GHz RoF signaling over all-vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (VCSEL) WDM passive optical networks (PONs). We have employed polarization division multiplexing (PDM) to further increase...

  3. Applying recursive numerical integration techniques for solving high dimensional integrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammon, Andreas [IVU Traffic Technologies AG, Berlin (Germany); Genz, Alan [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Mathematics; Hartung, Tobias [King' s College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Mathematics; Jansen, Karl; Volmer, Julia [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Leoevey, Hernan [Humboldt Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Mathematik

    2016-11-15

    The error scaling for Markov-Chain Monte Carlo techniques (MCMC) with N samples behaves like 1/√(N). This scaling makes it often very time intensive to reduce the error of computed observables, in particular for applications in lattice QCD. It is therefore highly desirable to have alternative methods at hand which show an improved error scaling. One candidate for such an alternative integration technique is the method of recursive numerical integration (RNI). The basic idea of this method is to use an efficient low-dimensional quadrature rule (usually of Gaussian type) and apply it iteratively to integrate over high-dimensional observables and Boltzmann weights. We present the application of such an algorithm to the topological rotor and the anharmonic oscillator and compare the error scaling to MCMC results. In particular, we demonstrate that the RNI technique shows an error scaling in the number of integration points m that is at least exponential.

  4. HIGH DIMENSIONAL COVARIANCE MATRIX ESTIMATION IN APPROXIMATE FACTOR MODELS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianqing; Liao, Yuan; Mincheva, Martina

    2011-01-01

    The variance covariance matrix plays a central role in the inferential theories of high dimensional factor models in finance and economics. Popular regularization methods of directly exploiting sparsity are not directly applicable to many financial problems. Classical methods of estimating the covariance matrices are based on the strict factor models, assuming independent idiosyncratic components. This assumption, however, is restrictive in practical applications. By assuming sparse error covariance matrix, we allow the presence of the cross-sectional correlation even after taking out common factors, and it enables us to combine the merits of both methods. We estimate the sparse covariance using the adaptive thresholding technique as in Cai and Liu (2011), taking into account the fact that direct observations of the idiosyncratic components are unavailable. The impact of high dimensionality on the covariance matrix estimation based on the factor structure is then studied.

  5. Quantifying high dimensional entanglement with two mutually unbiased bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Erker

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We derive a framework for quantifying entanglement in multipartite and high dimensional systems using only correlations in two unbiased bases. We furthermore develop such bounds in cases where the second basis is not characterized beyond being unbiased, thus enabling entanglement quantification with minimal assumptions. Furthermore, we show that it is feasible to experimentally implement our method with readily available equipment and even conservative estimates of physical parameters.

  6. Adaptive sampling strategies with high-throughput molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Cecilia

    Despite recent significant hardware and software developments, the complete thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of large macromolecular complexes by molecular simulations still presents significant challenges. The high dimensionality of these systems and the complexity of the associated potential energy surfaces (creating multiple metastable regions connected by high free energy barriers) does not usually allow to adequately sample the relevant regions of their configurational space by means of a single, long Molecular Dynamics (MD) trajectory. Several different approaches have been proposed to tackle this sampling problem. We focus on the development of ensemble simulation strategies, where data from a large number of weakly coupled simulations are integrated to explore the configurational landscape of a complex system more efficiently. Ensemble methods are of increasing interest as the hardware roadmap is now mostly based on increasing core counts, rather than clock speeds. The main challenge in the development of an ensemble approach for efficient sampling is in the design of strategies to adaptively distribute the trajectories over the relevant regions of the systems' configurational space, without using any a priori information on the system global properties. We will discuss the definition of smart adaptive sampling approaches that can redirect computational resources towards unexplored yet relevant regions. Our approaches are based on new developments in dimensionality reduction for high dimensional dynamical systems, and optimal redistribution of resources. NSF CHE-1152344, NSF CHE-1265929, Welch Foundation C-1570.

  7. High-dimensional change-point estimation: Combining filtering with convex optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Soh, Yong Sheng; Chandrasekaran, Venkat

    2017-01-01

    We consider change-point estimation in a sequence of high-dimensional signals given noisy observations. Classical approaches to this problem such as the filtered derivative method are useful for sequences of scalar-valued signals, but they have undesirable scaling behavior in the high-dimensional setting. However, many high-dimensional signals encountered in practice frequently possess latent low-dimensional structure. Motivated by this observation, we propose a technique for high-dimensional...

  8. Dynamical analysis of highly excited molecular spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellman, M.E. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is new methods for analysis of spectra and dynamics of highly excited vibrational states of molecules. In these systems, strong mode coupling and anharmonicity give rise to complicated classical dynamics, and make the simple normal modes analysis unsatisfactory. New methods of spectral analysis, pattern recognition, and assignment are sought using techniques of nonlinear dynamics including bifurcation theory, phase space classification, and quantization of phase space structures. The emphasis is chaotic systems and systems with many degrees of freedom.

  9. The dynamical structure of higher dimensional Chern-Simons theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banados, M.; Garay, L.J.; Henneaux, M.

    1996-01-01

    Higher dimensional Chern-Simons theories, even though constructed along the same topological pattern as in 2+1 dimensions, have been shown recently to have generically a non-vanishing number of degrees of freedom. In this paper, we carry out the complete Dirac Hamiltonian analysis (separation of first and second class constraints and calculation of the Dirac bracket) for a group G x U(1). We also study the algebra of surface charges that arise in the presence of boundaries and show that it is isomorphic to the WZW 4 discussed in the literature. Some applications are then considered. It is shown, in particular, that Chern-Simons gravity in dimensions greater than or equal to five has a propagating torsion. (orig.)

  10. Manifold learning to interpret JET high-dimensional operational space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cannas, B; Fanni, A; Pau, A; Sias, G; Murari, A

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of visualization and exploration of JET high-dimensional operational space is considered. The data come from plasma discharges selected from JET campaigns from C15 (year 2005) up to C27 (year 2009). The aim is to learn the possible manifold structure embedded in the data and to create some representations of the plasma parameters on low-dimensional maps, which are understandable and which preserve the essential properties owned by the original data. A crucial issue for the design of such mappings is the quality of the dataset. This paper reports the details of the criteria used to properly select suitable signals downloaded from JET databases in order to obtain a dataset of reliable observations. Moreover, a statistical analysis is performed to recognize the presence of outliers. Finally data reduction, based on clustering methods, is performed to select a limited and representative number of samples for the operational space mapping. The high-dimensional operational space of JET is mapped using a widely used manifold learning method, the self-organizing maps. The results are compared with other data visualization methods. The obtained maps can be used to identify characteristic regions of the plasma scenario, allowing to discriminate between regions with high risk of disruption and those with low risk of disruption. (paper)

  11. Cortical dynamics of three-dimensional figure-ground perception of two-dimensional pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossberg, S

    1997-07-01

    This article develops the FACADE theory of 3-dimensional (3-D) vision and figure-ground separation to explain data concerning how 2-dimensional pictures give rise to 3-D percepts of occluding and occluded objects. The model describes how geometrical and contrastive properties of a picture can either cooperate or compete when forming the boundaries and surface representation that subserve conscious percepts. Spatially long-range cooperation and spatially short-range competition work together to separate the boundaries of occluding figures from their occluded neighbors. This boundary ownership process is sensitive to image T junctions at which occluded figures contact occluding figures. These boundaries control the filling-in of color within multiple depth-sensitive surface representations. Feedback between surface and boundary representations strengthens consistent boundaries while inhibiting inconsistent ones. Both the boundary and the surface representations of occluded objects may be amodally completed, while the surface representations of unoccluded objects become visible through modal completion. Functional roles for conscious modal and amodal representations in object recognition, spatial attention, and reaching behaviors are discussed. Model interactions are interpreted in terms of visual, temporal, and parietal cortices.

  12. Dynamical properties of magnetized two-dimensional one-component plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Girija S.; Gumbs, Godfrey; Fessatidis, Vassilios

    2018-05-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation are used to examine the effect of a uniform perpendicular magnetic field on a two-dimensional interacting electron system. In this simulation we include the effect of the magnetic field classically through the Lorentz force. Both the Coulomb and the magnetic forces are included directly in the electron dynamics to study their combined effect on the dynamical properties of the 2D system. Results are presented for the velocity autocorrelation function and the diffusion constants in the presence and absence of an external magnetic field. Our simulation results clearly show that the external magnetic field has an effect on the dynamical properties of the system.

  13. Supramolecular 1-D polymerization of DNA origami through a dynamic process at the 2-dimensionally confined air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonamine, Yusuke; Cervantes-Salguero, Keitel; Minami, Kosuke; Kawamata, Ibuki; Nakanishi, Waka; Hill, Jonathan P; Murata, Satoshi; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2016-05-14

    In this study, a Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) system has been utilized for the regulation of polymerization of a DNA origami structure at the air-water interface as a two-dimensionally confined medium, which enables dynamic condensation of DNA origami units through variation of the film area at the macroscopic level (ca. 10-100 cm(2)). DNA origami sheets were conjugated with a cationic lipid (dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide, 2C18N(+)) by electrostatic interaction and the corresponding LB-film was prepared. By applying dynamic pressure variation through compression-expansion processes, the lipid-modified DNA origami sheets underwent anisotropic polymerization forming a one-dimensionally assembled belt-shaped structure of a high aspect ratio although the thickness of the polymerized DNA origami was maintained at the unimolecular level. This approach opens up a new field of mechanical induction of the self-assembly of DNA origami structures.

  14. Hole growth dynamics in a two dimensional Leidenfrost droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raufaste, Christophe; Celestini, Franck; Barzyk, Alexandre; Frisch, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    We studied the behaviors of Leidenfrost droplets confined in a Hele-Shaw cell. These droplets are unstable above a critical size and a hole grows at their center. We experimentally investigate two different systems for which the hole growth dynamics exhibits peculiar features that are driven by capillarity and inertia. We report a first regime characterized by the liquid reorganization from a liquid sheet to a liquid torus with similarities to the burst of micron-thick soap films. In the second regime, the liquid torus expands and thins before fragmentation. Finally, we propose models to account for the experimental results.

  15. Elucidating high-dimensional cancer hallmark annotation via enriched ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shankai; Wong, Ka-Chun

    2017-09-01

    Cancer hallmark annotation is a promising technique that could discover novel knowledge about cancer from the biomedical literature. The automated annotation of cancer hallmarks could reveal relevant cancer transformation processes in the literature or extract the articles that correspond to the cancer hallmark of interest. It acts as a complementary approach that can retrieve knowledge from massive text information, advancing numerous focused studies in cancer research. Nonetheless, the high-dimensional nature of cancer hallmark annotation imposes a unique challenge. To address the curse of dimensionality, we compared multiple cancer hallmark annotation methods on 1580 PubMed abstracts. Based on the insights, a novel approach, UDT-RF, which makes use of ontological features is proposed. It expands the feature space via the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) ontology graph and utilizes novel feature selections for elucidating the high-dimensional cancer hallmark annotation space. To demonstrate its effectiveness, state-of-the-art methods are compared and evaluated by a multitude of performance metrics, revealing the full performance spectrum on the full set of cancer hallmarks. Several case studies are conducted, demonstrating how the proposed approach could reveal novel insights into cancers. https://github.com/cskyan/chmannot. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Reduced order surrogate modelling (ROSM) of high dimensional deterministic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitry, Mina

    Often, computationally expensive engineering simulations can prohibit the engineering design process. As a result, designers may turn to a less computationally demanding approximate, or surrogate, model to facilitate their design process. However, owing to the the curse of dimensionality, classical surrogate models become too computationally expensive for high dimensional data. To address this limitation of classical methods, we develop linear and non-linear Reduced Order Surrogate Modelling (ROSM) techniques. Two algorithms are presented, which are based on a combination of linear/kernel principal component analysis and radial basis functions. These algorithms are applied to subsonic and transonic aerodynamic data, as well as a model for a chemical spill in a channel. The results of this thesis show that ROSM can provide a significant computational benefit over classical surrogate modelling, sometimes at the expense of a minor loss in accuracy.

  17. 3-Dimensional simulations of storm dynamics on Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueso, R.; Sanchez-Lavega, A.

    2000-10-01

    The formation and evolution of convective clouds in the atmosphere of Saturn is investigated using an anelastic three-dimensional time-dependent model with parameterized microphysics. The model is designed to study the development of moist convection on any of the four giant planets and has been previously used to investigate the formation of water convective storms in the jovian atmosphere. The role of water and ammonia in moist convection is investigated with varying deep concentrations. Results imply that most of the convective activity observed at Saturn may occur at the ammonia cloud deck while the formation of water moist convection may happen only when very strong constraints on the lower troposphere are met. Ammonia storms can ascend to the 300 mb level with vertical velocities around 30 ms-1. The seasonal effect on the thermal profile at the upper troposphere may have important effects on the development of ammonia storms. In the cases where water storms can develop they span many scale heights with peak vertical velocities around 160 ms-1 and cloud particles can be transported up to the 150 mb level. These predicted characteristics are similar to the Great White Spots observed in Saturn which, therefore, could be originated at the water cloud base level. This work has been supported by Gobierno Vasco PI 1997-34. R. Hueso acknowledges a PhD fellowship from Gobierno Vasco.

  18. Topological phase transition in the quench dynamics of a one-dimensional Fermi gas

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Pei; Yi, Wei; Xianlong, Gao

    2014-01-01

    We study the quench dynamics of a one-dimensional ultracold Fermi gas in an optical lattice potential with synthetic spin-orbit coupling. At equilibrium, the ground state of the system can undergo a topological phase transition and become a topological superfluid with Majorana edge states. As the interaction is quenched near the topological phase boundary, we identify an interesting dynamical phase transition of the quenched state in the long-time limit, characterized by an abrupt change of t...

  19. Optimal dimensionality reduction of complex dynamics: the chess game as diffusion on a free-energy landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivov, Sergei V

    2011-07-01

    Dimensionality reduction is ubiquitous in the analysis of complex dynamics. The conventional dimensionality reduction techniques, however, focus on reproducing the underlying configuration space, rather than the dynamics itself. The constructed low-dimensional space does not provide a complete and accurate description of the dynamics. Here I describe how to perform dimensionality reduction while preserving the essential properties of the dynamics. The approach is illustrated by analyzing the chess game--the archetype of complex dynamics. A variable that provides complete and accurate description of chess dynamics is constructed. The winning probability is predicted by describing the game as a random walk on the free-energy landscape associated with the variable. The approach suggests a possible way of obtaining a simple yet accurate description of many important complex phenomena. The analysis of the chess game shows that the approach can quantitatively describe the dynamics of processes where human decision-making plays a central role, e.g., financial and social dynamics.

  20. Three-dimensional interactive Molecular Dynamics program for the study of defect dynamics in crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patriarca, M.; Kuronen, A.; Robles, M.; Kaski, K.

    2007-01-01

    The study of crystal defects and the complex processes underlying their formation and time evolution has motivated the development of the program ALINE for interactive molecular dynamics experiments. This program couples a molecular dynamics code to a Graphical User Interface and runs on a UNIX-X11 Window System platform with the MOTIF library, which is contained in many standard Linux releases. ALINE is written in C, thus giving the user the possibility to modify the source code, and, at the same time, provides an effective and user-friendly framework for numerical experiments, in which the main parameters can be interactively varied and the system visualized in various ways. We illustrate the main features of the program through some examples of detection and dynamical tracking of point-defects, linear defects, and planar defects, such as stacking faults in lattice-mismatched heterostructures. Program summaryTitle of program:ALINE Catalogue identifier:ADYJ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYJ_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested: Computers:DEC ALPHA 300, Intel i386 compatible computers, G4 Apple Computers Installations:Laboratory of Computational Engineering, Helsinki University of Technology, Helsinki, Finland Operating systems under which the program has been tested:True64 UNIX, Linux-i386, Mac OS X 10.3 and 10.4 Programming language used:Standard C and MOTIF libraries Memory required to execute with typical data:6 Mbytes but may be larger depending on the system size No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:16 901 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:449 559 Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of physical problem:Some phenomena involving defects take place inside three-dimensional crystals at times which can be hardly predicted. For this reason they are

  1. Two-dimensional FSI simulation of closing dynamics of a tilting disc mechanical heart valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, V; Udaykumar, H S; Herbertson, L H; Deutsch, S; Manning, K B; Chandran, K B

    2010-03-01

    The fluid dynamics during valve closure resulting in high shear flows and large residence times of particles has been implicated in platelet activation and thrombus formation in mechanical heart valves. Our previous studies with bi-leaflet valves have shown that large shear stresses induced in the gap between the leaflet edge and the valve housing results in relatively high platelet activation levels whereas flow between the leaflets results in shed vortices not conducive to platelet damage. In this study we compare the result of closing dynamics of a tilting disc valve with that of a bi-leaflet valve. The two-dimensional fluid-structure interaction analysis of a tilting disc valve closure mechanics is performed with a fixed grid Cartesian mesh flow solver with local mesh refinement, and a Lagrangian particle dynamic analysis for computation of potential for platelet activation. Throughout the simulation the flow remains in the laminar regime and the flow through the gap width is marked by the development of a shear layer which separates from the leaflet downstream of the valve. Zones of re-circulation are observed in the gap between the leaflet edge and the valve housing on the major orifice region of the tilting disc valve and are seen to be migrating towards the minor orifice region. Jet flow is observed at the minor orifice region and a vortex is formed which sheds in the direction of fluid motion as observed in experiments using PIV measurements. The activation parameter computed for the tilting disc valve, at the time of closure was found to be 2.7 times greater than that of the bi-leaflet mechanical valve and was found to be in the vicinity of the minor orifice region mainly due to the migration of vortical structures from the major to the minor orifice region during the leaflet rebound of the closing phase.

  2. A novel two-dimensional dynamic anal ultrasonography technique to assess anismus comparing with three-dimensional echodefecography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad-Regadas, S M; Regadas, F S P; Barreto, R G L; Rodrigues, L V; de Souza, M H L P

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to test two-dimensional dynamic anorectal ultrasonography (2D-DAUS) in the assessment of anismus and compare it with echodefecography (ECD). Fifty consecutive female patients with outlet delay were submitted to 2D and 3D-DAUS, measuring the relaxing or contracting puborectalis muscle angle during straining. The patients were assigned to one of two groups based on ECD findings. Group I consisted of 29 patients without anismus and group II included 21 patients diagnosed with anismus. Subsequently 2D-DAUS images were checked for anismus and compared with ECD findings. Upon straining, the angle produced by the movement of the puborectalis muscle decreased in 26 out of the 29 (89.6%) patients of group I and increased 19 out of the 21 (90.4%) patients of group II. The mean angle during straining differed significantly between group I and group II. The index of agreement between the two scanning modes was 89.6% (26/29) for group I (Kappa: 0.796; CI: 95%; range: 0.51-1.0) and 90.4% (19/21) for group II (Kappa: 0.796; CI: 95%; range: 0.51-1.0). Two-dimensional dynamic anal ultrasonography can be used as an alternative method to assess patients with anismus, although the 3-D modality is more precise to evaluate the PR angle as the sphincters integrity as the whole muscle length is clearly visualized.

  3. Two dimensional finite element modelling for dynamic water diffusion through stratum corneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Perry; Imhof, Robert E

    2012-10-01

    Solvents penetration through in vivo human stratum corneum (SC) has always been an interesting research area for trans-dermal drug delivery studies, and the importance of intercellular routes (diffuse in between corneocytes) and transcellular routes (diffuse through corneocytes) during diffusion is often debatable. In this paper, we have developed a two dimensional finite element model to simulate the dynamic water diffusion through the SC. It is based on the brick-and-mortar model, with brick represents corneocytes and mortar represents lipids, respectively. It simulates the dynamic water diffusion process through the SC from pre-defined initial conditions and boundary conditions. Although the simulation is based on water diffusions, the principles can also be applied to the diffusions of other topical applied substances. The simulation results show that both intercellular routes and transcellular routes are important for water diffusion. Although intercellular routes have higher flux rates, most of the water still diffuse through transcellular routes because of the high cross area ratio of corneocytes and lipids. The diffusion water flux, or trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL), is reversely proportional to corneocyte size, i.e. the larger the corneocyte size, the lower the TEWL, and vice versa. There is also an effect of the SC thickness, external air conditions and diffusion coefficients on the water diffusion through SC on the resulting TEWL. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic High Frequency Axisymmetric Cavity Scars.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt

    2014-10-01

    This report examines the localization of high frequency electromagnetic fi elds in three-dimensional axisymmetric cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This report treats both the case where the opposing sides, or mirrors, are convex, where there are no interior foci, and the case where they are concave, leading to interior foci. The scalar problem is treated fi rst but the approximations required to treat the vector fi eld components are also examined. Particular att ention is focused on the normalization through the electromagnetic energy theorem. Both projections of the fi eld along the scarred orbit as well as point statistics are examined. Statistical comparisons are m ade with a numerical calculation of the scars run with an axisymmetric simulation. This axisymmetric cas eformstheoppositeextreme(wherethetwomirror radii at each end of the ray orbit are equal) from the two -dimensional solution examined previously (where one mirror radius is vastly di ff erent from the other). The enhancement of the fi eldontheorbitaxiscanbe larger here than in the two-dimensional case. Intentionally Left Blank

  5. Dynamic tensile behavior of two-dimensional carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xuan; Li Yulong

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The dynamic tensile behavior of 2D C/SiC composites was experimentally investigated by means of SHTB. Both the fracture surface and bundle fracture surfaces of composites were observed. The strain rate sensitivity of in-bundle interface was concluded as the dominant contributor to the strain rate sensitivity of the tensile strength. Highlights: → The tensile strength increases with strain rate. → The tensile failure strain remains independent of strain rate. → Macro-structural morphology reveals rough fracture surface under dynamic loading. → SEM morphology reveals integrated bundle pull-out under dynamic loading. → Strain rate sensitivity of in-bundle interface leads to that of the tensile strength. - Abstract: An investigation has been undertaken to determine the dynamic and quasi-static tensile behavior of two-dimensional carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix (2D-C/SiC) composites by means of the split Hopkinson tension bar and an electronic universal test machine respectively. The results indicate that the tensile strength of 2D C/SiC composites is increased at high strain rate. Furthermore, coated specimens show not only a 15% improvement in tensile strength but heightened strain rate sensitivity compared with uncoated ones. It is also shown that the tensile failure strain is strain rate insensitive and remains around 0.4%. Optical macrograph of failed specimens under dynamic loading revealed jagged fracture surfaces characterized by delamination and crack deviation, together with obvious fiber pull-out/splitting, in contrast with the smooth fracture surfaces under quasi-static loading. Scanning electron microscopy micrograph of fracture surface under dynamic loading clearly displayed integrated bundle pull-out which implies suppressed in-bundle debonding and enhanced in-bundle interfacial strengthening, in contrast with extensive in-bundle debonding under quasi-static loading. Thus we conclude that, with 2D C

  6. Fusion of multimodal medical images. Application to dynamic tri dimensional study of vertebral column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunie, L.

    1992-12-01

    The object of this thesis is to put in correspondence images coming from different ways. The area of application is biomedical imaging, particularly dynamic imaging in three dimensional calculations of spinal cord. The use of computers allows modeling. Then a study of validation by clinical experimentation on spinal cord proves the efficiency of the simulation

  7. Ultrafast dynamics of confined and localised excitons and biexcitons in low-dimensional semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    1999-01-01

    Coherent optical spectroscopy in the form of nonlinear transient four-wave mixing (TFWM) and linear resonant Rayleigh scattering (RRS) has been applied to investigate the exciton dynamics of low-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures. The dephasing times of excitons are determined from...

  8. Ideal gas approximation for a two-dimensional rarefied gas under Kawasaki dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaudillière, A.; Hollander, den W.Th.F.; Nardi, F.R.; Olivieri, E.; Scoppola, E.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we consider a two-dimensional lattice gas under Kawasaki dynamics, i.e., particles hop around randomly subject to hard-core repulsion and nearest-neighbor attraction. We show that, at fixed temperature and in the limit as the particle density tends to zero, such a gas evolves in a way

  9. Dynamic Three-Dimensional Geometry of the Aortic Valve Apparatus-A Feasibility Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khamooshian, Arash; Amador, Yannis; Hai, Ting; Jeganathan, Jelliffe; Saraf, Maria; Mahmood, Eitezaz; Matyal, Robina; Khabbaz, Kamal R.; Mariani, Massimo; Mahmood, Feroze

    OBJECTIVE: To provide (1) an overview of the aortic valve (AV) apparatus anatomy and nomenclature, and (2) data regarding the normal AV apparatus geometry and dynamism during the cardiac cycle obtained from three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography (3D TEE). DESIGN: Retrospective

  10. Dynamic model of organic pollutant degradation in three dimensional packed bed electrode reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Tianting; Wang, Yan; Yang, Hui; Wang, Tianlei; Cai, Wangfeng

    2018-04-21

    A dynamic model of semi-batch three-dimensional electrode reactor was established based on the limiting current density, Faraday's law, mass balance and a series of assumptions. Semi-batch experiments of phenol degradation were carried out in a three-dimensional electrode reactor packed with activated carbon under different conditions to verify the model. The factors such as the current density, the electrolyte concentration, the initial pH value, the flow rate of organic and the initial organic concentration were examined to know about the pollutant degradation in the three-dimensional electrode reactor. The various concentrations and logarithm of concentration of phenol with time were compared with the dynamic model. It was shown that the calculated data were in good agreement with experimental data in most cases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Generalized reduced rank latent factor regression for high dimensional tensor fields, and neuroimaging-genetic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Chenyang; Nichols, Thomas E; Hua, Xue; Ching, Christopher R K; Rolls, Edmund T; Thompson, Paul M; Feng, Jianfeng

    2017-01-01

    We propose a generalized reduced rank latent factor regression model (GRRLF) for the analysis of tensor field responses and high dimensional covariates. The model is motivated by the need from imaging-genetic studies to identify genetic variants that are associated with brain imaging phenotypes, often in the form of high dimensional tensor fields. GRRLF identifies from the structure in the data the effective dimensionality of the data, and then jointly performs dimension reduction of the covariates, dynamic identification of latent factors, and nonparametric estimation of both covariate and latent response fields. After accounting for the latent and covariate effects, GRLLF performs a nonparametric test on the remaining factor of interest. GRRLF provides a better factorization of the signals compared with common solutions, and is less susceptible to overfitting because it exploits the effective dimensionality. The generality and the flexibility of GRRLF also allow various statistical models to be handled in a unified framework and solutions can be efficiently computed. Within the field of neuroimaging, it improves the sensitivity for weak signals and is a promising alternative to existing approaches. The operation of the framework is demonstrated with both synthetic datasets and a real-world neuroimaging example in which the effects of a set of genes on the structure of the brain at the voxel level were measured, and the results compared favorably with those from existing approaches. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Dynamics of high energy reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, R.D.

    1979-01-01

    During last several years, a new framework to describe strong interaction physics has emerged, i.e. quantum chromodynamics (QCD). It is the simplest field theory which incorporates color-dependent force among quarks. This force is generated by the exchange of colored vector gluons coupled to the quarks in gauge-invariant manner. The theory is closely related to the most successful quantum field theory, QED, and the only but very important difference is the gauge group involved. Although the theory is well defined, precisely what it predicts is not yet clearly known. However, at very high energy or momentum transfer Q, the effective coupling between quarks and gluons decreases toward zero with increasing Q 2 , and the calculation of a process involving high Q 2 is possible by the use of perturbation theory. In this paper, many applications of QCD to the processes involving high momentum transfer are examined. The effective coupling resulting from strong interaction between quarks and gluons, the scale violation in deep inelastic lepton scattering, large mass muon pair production, quark and gluon fragmentation functions, large transverse momentum meson and jet production in hadron-hadron collision, and the search for three-jet events are discussed. (Kako, I.)

  13. High-dimensional cluster analysis with the Masked EM Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Shabnam N.; Goodman, Dan F. M.; Harris, Kenneth D.

    2014-01-01

    Cluster analysis faces two problems in high dimensions: first, the “curse of dimensionality” that can lead to overfitting and poor generalization performance; and second, the sheer time taken for conventional algorithms to process large amounts of high-dimensional data. We describe a solution to these problems, designed for the application of “spike sorting” for next-generation high channel-count neural probes. In this problem, only a small subset of features provide information about the cluster member-ship of any one data vector, but this informative feature subset is not the same for all data points, rendering classical feature selection ineffective. We introduce a “Masked EM” algorithm that allows accurate and time-efficient clustering of up to millions of points in thousands of dimensions. We demonstrate its applicability to synthetic data, and to real-world high-channel-count spike sorting data. PMID:25149694

  14. Semiquantum molecular dynamics simulation of thermal properties and heat transport in low-dimensional nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savin, Alexander V.; Kosevich, Yuriy A.; Cantarero, Andres

    2012-08-01

    We present a detailed description of semiquantum molecular dynamics simulation of stochastic dynamics of a system of interacting particles. Within this approach, the dynamics of the system is described with the use of classical Newtonian equations of motion in which the effects of phonon quantum statistics are introduced through random Langevin-like forces with a specific power spectral density (the color noise). The color noise describes the interaction of the molecular system with the thermostat. We apply this technique to the simulation of thermal properties and heat transport in different low-dimensional nanostructures. We describe the determination of temperature in quantum lattice systems, to which the equipartition limit is not applied. We show that one can determine the temperature of such a system from the measured power spectrum and temperature- and relaxation-rate-independent density of vibrational (phonon) states. We simulate the specific heat and heat transport in carbon nanotubes, as well as the heat transport in molecular nanoribbons with perfect (atomically smooth) and rough (porous) edges, and in nanoribbons with strongly anharmonic periodic interatomic potentials. We show that the effects of quantum statistics of phonons are essential for the carbon nanotube in the whole temperature range T<500K, in which the values of the specific heat and thermal conductivity of the nanotube are considerably less than that obtained within the description based on classical statistics of phonons. This conclusion is also applicable to other carbon-based materials and systems with high Debye temperature like graphene, graphene nanoribbons, fullerene, diamond, diamond nanowires, etc. We show that the existence of rough edges and quantum statistics of phonons change drastically the low-temperature thermal conductivity of the nanoribbon in comparison with that of the nanoribbon with perfect edges and classical phonon dynamics and statistics. The semiquantum molecular

  15. Three-Dimensional Dynamics of Baroclinic Tides Over a Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasenko, Vasiliy; Stashchuk, Nataliya; Nimmo-Smith, W. Alex M.

    2018-02-01

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model is used for the analysis of baroclinic tides over Anton Dohrn Seamount (ADS), in the North Atlantic. The model output is validated against in situ data collected during the 136th cruise of the RRS "James Cook" in May-June 2016. The observational data set includes velocity time series recorded at two moorings as well as temperature, salinity, and velocity profiles collected at 22 hydrological stations. Synthesis of observational and model data enabled the reconstruction of the details of baroclinic tidal dynamics over ADS. It was found that the baroclinic tidal waves are generated in the form of tidal beams radiating from the ADS periphery to its center, focusing tidal energy in a surface layer over the seamount's summit. This energy focusing enhances subsurface water mixing and the local generation of internal waves. The tidal beams interacting with the seasonal pycnocline generate short-scale internal waves radiating from the ADS center. An important ecological outcome from this study concerns the pattern of residual currents generated by tides. The rectified flows over ADS have the form of a pair of dipoles, cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies located at the seamount's periphery. These eddies are potentially an important factor in local larvae dispersion and their escape from ADS.

  16. Dynamical Symmetries of Two-Dimensional Dirac Equation with Screened Coulomb and Isotropic Harmonic Oscillator Potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qing; Hou Yu-Long; Jing Jian; Long Zheng-Wen

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study symmetrical properties of two-dimensional (2D) screened Dirac Hydrogen atom and isotropic harmonic oscillator with scalar and vector potentials of equal magnitude (SVPEM). We find that it is possible for both cases to preserve so(3) and su(2) dynamical symmetries provided certain conditions are satisfied. Interestingly, the conditions for preserving these dynamical symmetries are exactly the same as non-relativistic screened Hydrogen atom and screened isotropic oscillator preserving their dynamical symmetries. Some intuitive explanations are proposed. (general)

  17. Dimensionality crossover in vortex dynamics of magnetically coupled F-S-F hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karapetrov, G; Belkin, A; Iavarone, M; Yefremenko, V; Pearson, J E; Novosad, V; Divan, R; Cambel, V

    2011-01-01

    We report on the vortex dynamics in magnetically coupled F-S-F trilayers extracted from the analysis of the resistance-current isotherms. The superconducting thin film that is conventionally in the 2D vortex limit exhibits quite different behavior when sandwiched between ferromagnetic layers. The value of the dynamic critical exponent strongly increases in the F-S-F case due to screening of the stray vortex field by the adjacent ferromagnetic layers, leading to an effective dimensional crossover in vortex dynamics. Furthermore, the directional pinning by the magnetic stripe domains induces anisotropy in the vortex glass transition temperature and causes metastable avalanche behavior at strong driving currents.

  18. Hawking radiation of a high-dimensional rotating black hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Ren; Zhang, Lichun; Li, Huaifan; Wu, Yueqin [Shanxi Datong University, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, Datong (China)

    2010-01-15

    We extend the classical Damour-Ruffini method and discuss Hawking radiation spectrum of high-dimensional rotating black hole using Tortoise coordinate transformation defined by taking the reaction of the radiation to the spacetime into consideration. Under the condition that the energy and angular momentum are conservative, taking self-gravitation action into account, we derive Hawking radiation spectrums which satisfy unitary principle in quantum mechanics. It is shown that the process that the black hole radiates particles with energy {omega} is a continuous tunneling process. We provide a theoretical basis for further studying the physical mechanism of black-hole radiation. (orig.)

  19. The additive hazards model with high-dimensional regressors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Torben; Scheike, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    This paper considers estimation and prediction in the Aalen additive hazards model in the case where the covariate vector is high-dimensional such as gene expression measurements. Some form of dimension reduction of the covariate space is needed to obtain useful statistical analyses. We study...... model. A standard PLS algorithm can also be constructed, but it turns out that the resulting predictor can only be related to the original covariates via time-dependent coefficients. The methods are applied to a breast cancer data set with gene expression recordings and to the well known primary biliary...

  20. High-dimensional quantum channel estimation using classical light

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mabena, Chemist M

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Mabena_20007_2017.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 960 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Mabena_20007_2017.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 PHYSICAL REVIEW A 96, 053860... (2017) High-dimensional quantum channel estimation using classical light Chemist M. Mabena CSIR National Laser Centre, P.O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001, South Africa and School of Physics, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg 2000, South...

  1. Data analysis in high-dimensional sparse spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    classification techniques for high-dimensional problems are presented: Sparse discriminant analysis, sparse mixture discriminant analysis and orthogonality constrained support vector machines. The first two introduces sparseness to the well known linear and mixture discriminant analysis and thereby provide low...... are applied to classifications of fish species, ear canal impressions used in the hearing aid industry, microbiological fungi species, and various cancerous tissues and healthy tissues. In addition, novel applications of sparse regressions (also called the elastic net) to the medical, concrete, and food...

  2. Dynamics in discrete two-dimensional nonlinear Schrödinger equations in the presence of point defects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter Leth; Gaididei, Yuri Borisovich; Rasmussen, Kim

    1996-01-01

    The dynamics of two-dimensional discrete structures is studied in the framework of the generalized two-dimensional discrete nonlinear Schrodinger equation. The nonlinear coupling in the form of the Ablowitz-Ladik nonlinearity and point impurities is taken into account. The stability properties...... of the stationary solutions are examined. The essential importance of the existence of stable immobile solitons in the two-dimensional dynamics of the traveling pulses is demonstrated. The typical scenario of the two-dimensional quasicollapse of a moving intense pulse represents the formation of standing trapped...... narrow spikes. The influence of the point impurities on this dynamics is also investigated....

  3. High-Dimensional Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization on Heterogeneous Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wachowiak, M P; Sarlo, B B; Foster, A E Lambe

    2014-01-01

    Much work has recently been reported in parallel GPU-based particle swarm optimization (PSO). Motivated by the encouraging results of these investigations, while also recognizing the limitations of GPU-based methods for big problems using a large amount of data, this paper explores the efficacy of employing other types of parallel hardware for PSO. Most commodity systems feature a variety of architectures whose high-performance capabilities can be exploited. In this paper, high-dimensional problems and those that employ a large amount of external data are explored within the context of heterogeneous systems. Large problems are decomposed into constituent components, and analyses are undertaken of which components would benefit from multi-core or GPU parallelism. The current study therefore provides another demonstration that ''supercomputing on a budget'' is possible when subtasks of large problems are run on hardware most suited to these tasks. Experimental results show that large speedups can be achieved on high dimensional, data-intensive problems. Cost functions must first be analysed for parallelization opportunities, and assigned hardware based on the particular task

  4. Photoinduced charge-order melting dynamics in a one-dimensional interacting Holstein model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Sumio

    2017-07-01

    Transient quantum dynamics in an interacting fermion-phonon system are investigated with a focus on a charge order (CO) melting after a short optical-pulse irradiation and the roles of the quantum phonons in the transient dynamics. A spinless-fermion model in a one-dimensional chain coupled with local phonons is analyzed numerically. The infinite time-evolving block decimation algorithm is adopted as a reliable numerical method for one-dimensional quantum many-body systems. Numerical results for the photoinduced CO melting dynamics without phonons are well interpreted by the soliton picture for the CO domains. This interpretation is confirmed by numerical simulation of an artificial local excitation and the classical soliton model. In the case of large phonon frequencies corresponding to the antiadiabatic condition, CO melting is induced by propagations of the polaronic solitons with the renormalized soliton velocity. On the other hand, in the case of small phonon frequencies corresponding to the adiabatic condition, the first stage of the CO melting dynamics occurs due to the energy transfer from the fermionic to phononic systems, and the second stage is brought about by the soliton motions around the bottom of the soliton band. The analyses provide a standard reference for photoinduced CO melting dynamics in one-dimensional many-body quantum systems.

  5. Dynamism or Disorder at High Pressures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angel, R. J.; Bismayer, U.; Marshall, W. G.

    2002-12-01

    Phase transitions in minerals at elevated temperatures typically involve dynamics as a natural consequence of the increase in thermal energy available to the system. Classic examples include quartz, cristobalite, and carbonates in which the high-temperature, high symmetry phase is dynamically disordered. This disorder has important thermodynamic consequences, including displacement and curvature of phase boundaries (e.g. calcite-aragonite). In other minerals such as clinopyroxenes and anorthite feldspar, the dynamic behaviour is restricted to the neighbourhood of the phase transition. The fundamental question is whether increasing pressure generally suppresses such dynamic behaviour (as in anorthite; Angel, 1988), or not. In the latter case it must be included in thermodynamic models of high-pressure phase equilibria and seismological modelling of the mantle; the potential dynamics and softening in stishovite may provide the critical observational constraint on the presence or otherwise of free silica in the lower mantle. We have continued to use the lead phosphate as a prototype ferroelastic in which to understand dynamic behaviour, simply because its dynamics and transition behaviour is far better characterised than any mineral. Furthermore, the phase transition is at a pressure where experimental difficulties do not dominate the experimental results. Our previous neutron diffraction study (Angel et al., 2001) revealed that some disorder, either dynamic or static, is retained in the high-symmetry, high-pressure phase just above the phase transition. New neutron diffraction data on the pure material now suggests that this disorder slowly decreases with increasing pressure until at twice the transition pressure it is ordered. Further data for doped material provides insights into the nature of this disorder. Angel (1988) Amer. Mineral. 73:1114. Angel et al (2001) J PhysC 13: 5353.

  6. An algorithm for engineering regime shifts in one-dimensional dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, James P. L.

    2018-01-01

    Regime shifts are discontinuous transitions between stable attractors hosting a system. They can occur as a result of a loss of stability in an attractor as a bifurcation is approached. In this work, we consider one-dimensional dynamical systems where attractors are stable equilibrium points. Relying on critical slowing down signals related to the stability of an equilibrium point, we present an algorithm for engineering regime shifts such that a system may escape an undesirable attractor into a desirable one. We test the algorithm on synthetic data from a one-dimensional dynamical system with a multitude of stable equilibrium points and also on a model of the population dynamics of spruce budworms in a forest. The algorithm and other ideas discussed here contribute to an important part of the literature on exercising greater control over the sometimes unpredictable nature of nonlinear systems.

  7. Simulations of dimensionally reduced effective theories of high temperature QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Hietanen, Ari

    Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is the theory describing interaction between quarks and gluons. At low temperatures, quarks are confined forming hadrons, e.g. protons and neutrons. However, at extremely high temperatures the hadrons break apart and the matter transforms into plasma of individual quarks and gluons. In this theses the quark gluon plasma (QGP) phase of QCD is studied using lattice techniques in the framework of dimensionally reduced effective theories EQCD and MQCD. Two quantities are in particular interest: the pressure (or grand potential) and the quark number susceptibility. At high temperatures the pressure admits a generalised coupling constant expansion, where some coefficients are non-perturbative. We determine the first such contribution of order g^6 by performing lattice simulations in MQCD. This requires high precision lattice calculations, which we perform with different number of colors N_c to obtain N_c-dependence on the coefficient. The quark number susceptibility is studied by perf...

  8. High-Dimensional Quantum Information Processing with Linear Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Casey A.

    Quantum information processing (QIP) is an interdisciplinary field concerned with the development of computers and information processing systems that utilize quantum mechanical properties of nature to carry out their function. QIP systems have become vastly more practical since the turn of the century. Today, QIP applications span imaging, cryptographic security, computation, and simulation (quantum systems that mimic other quantum systems). Many important strategies improve quantum versions of classical information system hardware, such as single photon detectors and quantum repeaters. Another more abstract strategy engineers high-dimensional quantum state spaces, so that each successful event carries more information than traditional two-level systems allow. Photonic states in particular bring the added advantages of weak environmental coupling and data transmission near the speed of light, allowing for simpler control and lower system design complexity. In this dissertation, numerous novel, scalable designs for practical high-dimensional linear-optical QIP systems are presented. First, a correlated photon imaging scheme using orbital angular momentum (OAM) states to detect rotational symmetries in objects using measurements, as well as building images out of those interactions is reported. Then, a statistical detection method using chains of OAM superpositions distributed according to the Fibonacci sequence is established and expanded upon. It is shown that the approach gives rise to schemes for sorting, detecting, and generating the recursively defined high-dimensional states on which some quantum cryptographic protocols depend. Finally, an ongoing study based on a generalization of the standard optical multiport for applications in quantum computation and simulation is reported upon. The architecture allows photons to reverse momentum inside the device. This in turn enables realistic implementation of controllable linear-optical scattering vertices for

  9. Dynamics of High-Resolution Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sekara, Vedran

    the unprecedented amounts of information collected by mobile phones to gain detailed insight into the dynamics of social systems. This dissertation presents an unparalleled data collection campaign, collecting highly detailed traces for approximately 1000 people over the course of multiple years. The availability...... are we all affected by an ever changing network structure? Answering these questions will enrich our understanding of ourselves, our organizations, and our societies. Yet, mapping the dynamics of social networks has traditionally been an arduous undertaking. Today, however, it is possible to use...... of such dynamic maps allows us to probe the underlying social network and understand how individuals interact and form lasting friendships. More importantly, these highly detailed dynamic maps provide us new perspectives at traditional problems and allow us to quantify and predict human life....

  10. Individual-based models for adaptive diversification in high-dimensional phenotype spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ispolatov, Iaroslav; Madhok, Vaibhav; Doebeli, Michael

    2016-02-07

    Most theories of evolutionary diversification are based on equilibrium assumptions: they are either based on optimality arguments involving static fitness landscapes, or they assume that populations first evolve to an equilibrium state before diversification occurs, as exemplified by the concept of evolutionary branching points in adaptive dynamics theory. Recent results indicate that adaptive dynamics may often not converge to equilibrium points and instead generate complicated trajectories if evolution takes place in high-dimensional phenotype spaces. Even though some analytical results on diversification in complex phenotype spaces are available, to study this problem in general we need to reconstruct individual-based models from the adaptive dynamics generating the non-equilibrium dynamics. Here we first provide a method to construct individual-based models such that they faithfully reproduce the given adaptive dynamics attractor without diversification. We then show that a propensity to diversify can be introduced by adding Gaussian competition terms that generate frequency dependence while still preserving the same adaptive dynamics. For sufficiently strong competition, the disruptive selection generated by frequency-dependence overcomes the directional evolution along the selection gradient and leads to diversification in phenotypic directions that are orthogonal to the selection gradient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Inferring dynamic gene regulatory networks in cardiac differentiation through the integration of multi-dimensional data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wuming; Koyano-Nakagawa, Naoko; Li, Tongbin; Garry, Daniel J

    2015-03-07

    Decoding the temporal control of gene expression patterns is key to the understanding of the complex mechanisms that govern developmental decisions during heart development. High-throughput methods have been employed to systematically study the dynamic and coordinated nature of cardiac differentiation at the global level with multiple dimensions. Therefore, there is a pressing need to develop a systems approach to integrate these data from individual studies and infer the dynamic regulatory networks in an unbiased fashion. We developed a two-step strategy to integrate data from (1) temporal RNA-seq, (2) temporal histone modification ChIP-seq, (3) transcription factor (TF) ChIP-seq and (4) gene perturbation experiments to reconstruct the dynamic network during heart development. First, we trained a logistic regression model to predict the probability (LR score) of any base being bound by 543 TFs with known positional weight matrices. Second, four dimensions of data were combined using a time-varying dynamic Bayesian network model to infer the dynamic networks at four developmental stages in the mouse [mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), mesoderm (MES), cardiac progenitors (CP) and cardiomyocytes (CM)]. Our method not only infers the time-varying networks between different stages of heart development, but it also identifies the TF binding sites associated with promoter or enhancers of downstream genes. The LR scores of experimentally verified ESCs and heart enhancers were significantly higher than random regions (p network inference model identified a region with an elevated LR score approximately -9400 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site of Nkx2-5, which overlapped with a previously reported enhancer region (-9435 to -8922 bp). TFs such as Tead1, Gata4, Msx2, and Tgif1 were predicted to bind to this region and participate in the regulation of Nkx2-5 gene expression. Our model also predicted the key regulatory networks for the ESC-MES, MES-CP and CP

  12. Structural origin of dynamic heterogeneity in three-dimensional colloidal glass formers and its link to crystal nucleation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Takeshi; Tanaka, Hajime

    2010-06-16

    The physical understanding of glass transition remains a major challenge of physics and materials science. Among various glass-forming liquids, a colloidal liquid interacting with hard-core repulsion is now regarded as one of the most ideal model systems. Here we study the structure and dynamics of three-dimensional polydisperse colloidal liquids by Brownian dynamics simulations. We reveal that medium-range crystalline bond orientational order of the hexagonal close packed structure grows in size and lifetime with increasing packing fraction. We show that dynamic heterogeneity may be a direct consequence of this transient structural ordering, which suggests its origin is thermodynamic rather than kinetic. We also reveal that nucleation of crystals preferentially occurs in regions of high medium-range order, reflecting the low crystal-liquid interfacial energy there. These findings may shed new light not only on the fundamental nature of the glass transition, but also the mechanism of crystal nucleation.

  13. Three-dimensional visualization and measurement of water distributions in PEFC by dynamic CT method on neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Michinori; Murakawa, Hideki; Sugimoto, Katsumi; Asano, Hitoshi; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Mochiki, Koh-ichi

    2011-01-01

    Visualization of dynamic three-dimensional water behavior in a PEFC stack was carried out by neutron CT for clarifying water effects on performances of a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell (PEFC) stack. Neutron radiography system at JRR-3 in Japan Atomic Energy Agency was used. An operating stack with three cells based on Japan Automobile Research Institute standard was visualized. A consecutive CT reconstruction method by rotating the fuel stack continuously was developed by using a neutron image intensifier and a C-MOS high speed video camera. The dynamic water behavior in channels in the operating PEFC stack was clearly visualized 15 sec in interval by the developed dynamic neutron CT system. From the CT reconstructed images, evaluation of water amount in each cell was carried out. It was shown that the water distribution in each cell was correlated well with power generation characteristics in each cell. (author)

  14. Scalable Nearest Neighbor Algorithms for High Dimensional Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muja, Marius; Lowe, David G

    2014-11-01

    For many computer vision and machine learning problems, large training sets are key for good performance. However, the most computationally expensive part of many computer vision and machine learning algorithms consists of finding nearest neighbor matches to high dimensional vectors that represent the training data. We propose new algorithms for approximate nearest neighbor matching and evaluate and compare them with previous algorithms. For matching high dimensional features, we find two algorithms to be the most efficient: the randomized k-d forest and a new algorithm proposed in this paper, the priority search k-means tree. We also propose a new algorithm for matching binary features by searching multiple hierarchical clustering trees and show it outperforms methods typically used in the literature. We show that the optimal nearest neighbor algorithm and its parameters depend on the data set characteristics and describe an automated configuration procedure for finding the best algorithm to search a particular data set. In order to scale to very large data sets that would otherwise not fit in the memory of a single machine, we propose a distributed nearest neighbor matching framework that can be used with any of the algorithms described in the paper. All this research has been released as an open source library called fast library for approximate nearest neighbors (FLANN), which has been incorporated into OpenCV and is now one of the most popular libraries for nearest neighbor matching.

  15. High-dimensional single-cell cancer biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irish, Jonathan M; Doxie, Deon B

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells are distinguished from each other and from healthy cells by features that drive clonal evolution and therapy resistance. New advances in high-dimensional flow cytometry make it possible to systematically measure mechanisms of tumor initiation, progression, and therapy resistance on millions of cells from human tumors. Here we describe flow cytometry techniques that enable a "single-cell " view of cancer. High-dimensional techniques like mass cytometry enable multiplexed single-cell analysis of cell identity, clinical biomarkers, signaling network phospho-proteins, transcription factors, and functional readouts of proliferation, cell cycle status, and apoptosis. This capability pairs well with a signaling profiles approach that dissects mechanism by systematically perturbing and measuring many nodes in a signaling network. Single-cell approaches enable study of cellular heterogeneity of primary tissues and turn cell subsets into experimental controls or opportunities for new discovery. Rare populations of stem cells or therapy-resistant cancer cells can be identified and compared to other types of cells within the same sample. In the long term, these techniques will enable tracking of minimal residual disease (MRD) and disease progression. By better understanding biological systems that control development and cell-cell interactions in healthy and diseased contexts, we can learn to program cells to become therapeutic agents or target malignant signaling events to specifically kill cancer cells. Single-cell approaches that provide deep insight into cell signaling and fate decisions will be critical to optimizing the next generation of cancer treatments combining targeted approaches and immunotherapy.

  16. Investigating Recombination and Charge Carrier Dynamics in a One-Dimensional Nanopillared Perovskite Absorber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyeok-Chan; Yang, Wooseok; Lee, Daehee; Ahn, Jihoon; Lee, Eunsong; Ma, Sunihl; Kim, Kyungmi; Yun, Seong-Cheol; Moon, Jooho

    2018-05-22

    Organometal halide perovskite materials have become an exciting research topic as manifested by intense development of thin film solar cells. Although high-performance solar-cell-based planar and mesoscopic configurations have been reported, one-dimensional (1-D) nanostructured perovskite solar cells are rarely investigated despite their expected promising optoelectrical properties, such as enhanced charge transport/extraction. Herein, we have analyzed the 1-D nanostructure effects of organometal halide perovskite (CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3- x Cl x ) on recombination and charge carrier dynamics by utilizing a nanoporous anodized alumina oxide scaffold to fabricate a vertically aligned 1-D nanopillared array with controllable diameters. It was observed that the 1-D perovskite exhibits faster charge transport/extraction characteristics, lower defect density, and lower bulk resistance than the planar counterpart. As the aspect ratio increases in the 1-D structures, in addition, the charge transport/extraction rate is enhanced and the resistance further decreases. However, when the aspect ratio reaches 6.67 (diameter ∼30 nm), the recombination rate is aggravated due to high interface-to-volume ratio-induced defect generation. To obtain the full benefits of 1-D perovskite nanostructuring, our study provides a design rule to choose the appropriate aspect ratio of 1-D perovskite structures for improved photovoltaic and other optoelectrical applications.

  17. Five-dimensional visualization of phase transition in BiNiO3 under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yijin; Wang, Junyue; Yang, Wenge; Azuma, Masaki; Mao, Wendy L.

    2014-01-01

    Colossal negative thermal expansion was recently discovered in BiNiO 3 associated with a low density to high density phase transition under high pressure. The varying proportion of co-existing phases plays a key role in the macroscopic behavior of this material. Here, we utilize a recently developed X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy Tomography method and resolve the mixture of high/low pressure phases as a function of pressure at tens of nanometer resolution taking advantage of the charge transfer during the transition. This five-dimensional (X, Y, Z, energy, and pressure) visualization of the phase boundary provides a high resolution method to study the interface dynamics of high/low pressure phase

  18. Three-Dimensional Numerical Analysis of an Operating Helical Rotor Pump at High Speeds and High Pressures including Cavitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High pressures, high speeds, low noise and miniaturization is the direction of development in hydraulic pump. According to the development trend, an operating helical rotor pump (HRP at high speeds and high pressures has been designed and produced, which rotational speed can reach 12000r/min and outlet pressure is as high as 25MPa. Three-dimensional simulation with and without cavitation inside the HRP is completed by the means of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD in this paper, which contributes to understand the complex fluid flow inside it. Moreover, the influences of the rotational speeds of the HRP with and without cavitation has been simulated at 25MPa.

  19. High Dynamic Range Imaging Using Multiple Exposures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Xinglin; Luo, Haibo; Zhou, Peipei; Zhou, Wei

    2017-06-01

    It is challenging to capture a high-dynamic range (HDR) scene using a low-dynamic range (LDR) camera. This paper presents an approach for improving the dynamic range of cameras by using multiple exposure images of same scene taken under different exposure times. First, the camera response function (CRF) is recovered by solving a high-order polynomial in which only the ratios of the exposures are used. Then, the HDR radiance image is reconstructed by weighted summation of the each radiance maps. After that, a novel local tone mapping (TM) operator is proposed for the display of the HDR radiance image. By solving the high-order polynomial, the CRF can be recovered quickly and easily. Taken the local image feature and characteristic of histogram statics into consideration, the proposed TM operator could preserve the local details efficiently. Experimental result demonstrates the effectiveness of our method. By comparison, the method outperforms other methods in terms of imaging quality.

  20. Class prediction for high-dimensional class-imbalanced data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusa Lara

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goal of class prediction studies is to develop rules to accurately predict the class membership of new samples. The rules are derived using the values of the variables available for each subject: the main characteristic of high-dimensional data is that the number of variables greatly exceeds the number of samples. Frequently the classifiers are developed using class-imbalanced data, i.e., data sets where the number of samples in each class is not equal. Standard classification methods used on class-imbalanced data often produce classifiers that do not accurately predict the minority class; the prediction is biased towards the majority class. In this paper we investigate if the high-dimensionality poses additional challenges when dealing with class-imbalanced prediction. We evaluate the performance of six types of classifiers on class-imbalanced data, using simulated data and a publicly available data set from a breast cancer gene-expression microarray study. We also investigate the effectiveness of some strategies that are available to overcome the effect of class imbalance. Results Our results show that the evaluated classifiers are highly sensitive to class imbalance and that variable selection introduces an additional bias towards classification into the majority class. Most new samples are assigned to the majority class from the training set, unless the difference between the classes is very large. As a consequence, the class-specific predictive accuracies differ considerably. When the class imbalance is not too severe, down-sizing and asymmetric bagging embedding variable selection work well, while over-sampling does not. Variable normalization can further worsen the performance of the classifiers. Conclusions Our results show that matching the prevalence of the classes in training and test set does not guarantee good performance of classifiers and that the problems related to classification with class

  1. High-dimensional quantum cryptography with twisted light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirhosseini, Mohammad; Magaña-Loaiza, Omar S; O’Sullivan, Malcolm N; Rodenburg, Brandon; Malik, Mehul; Boyd, Robert W; Lavery, Martin P J; Padgett, Miles J; Gauthier, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) systems often rely on polarization of light for encoding, thus limiting the amount of information that can be sent per photon and placing tight bounds on the error rates that such a system can tolerate. Here we describe a proof-of-principle experiment that indicates the feasibility of high-dimensional QKD based on the transverse structure of the light field allowing for the transfer of more than 1 bit per photon. Our implementation uses the orbital angular momentum (OAM) of photons and the corresponding mutually unbiased basis of angular position (ANG). Our experiment uses a digital micro-mirror device for the rapid generation of OAM and ANG modes at 4 kHz, and a mode sorter capable of sorting single photons based on their OAM and ANG content with a separation efficiency of 93%. Through the use of a seven-dimensional alphabet encoded in the OAM and ANG bases, we achieve a channel capacity of 2.05 bits per sifted photon. Our experiment demonstrates that, in addition to having an increased information capacity, multilevel QKD systems based on spatial-mode encoding can be more resilient against intercept-resend eavesdropping attacks. (paper)

  2. Fluid dynamics of moving fish in a two-dimensional multiparticle collision dynamics model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reid, Daniel A. P.; Hildenbrandt, H.; Hemelrijk, C. K.; Padding, J.T.

    2012-01-01

    The fluid dynamics of animal locomotion, such as that of an undulating fish, are of great interest to both biologists and engineers. However, experimentally studying these fluid dynamics is difficult and time consuming. Model studies can be of great help because of their simpler and more detailed

  3. Addressing Curse of Dimensionality in Sensitivity Analysis: How Can We Handle High-Dimensional Problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, S.; Haghnegahdar, A.; Razavi, S.

    2016-12-01

    Complex environmental models are now the primary tool to inform decision makers for the current or future management of environmental resources under the climate and environmental changes. These complex models often contain a large number of parameters that need to be determined by a computationally intensive calibration procedure. Sensitivity analysis (SA) is a very useful tool that not only allows for understanding the model behavior, but also helps in reducing the number of calibration parameters by identifying unimportant ones. The issue is that most global sensitivity techniques are highly computationally demanding themselves for generating robust and stable sensitivity metrics over the entire model response surface. Recently, a novel global sensitivity analysis method, Variogram Analysis of Response Surfaces (VARS), is introduced that can efficiently provide a comprehensive assessment of global sensitivity using the Variogram concept. In this work, we aim to evaluate the effectiveness of this highly efficient GSA method in saving computational burden, when applied to systems with extra-large number of input factors ( 100). We use a test function and a hydrological modelling case study to demonstrate the capability of VARS method in reducing problem dimensionality by identifying important vs unimportant input factors.

  4. Study of fission dynamics with the three-dimensional Langevin equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslamizadeh, H. [Persian Gulf University, Department of Physics, Bushehr (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    The dynamics of fission has been studied by solving one- and three-dimensional Langevin equations with dissipation generated through the chaos weighted wall and window friction formula. The average prescission neutron multiplicities, fission probabilities and the mean fission times have been calculated in a broad range of the excitation energy for compound nuclei {sup 210}Po and {sup 224}Th formed in the fusion-fission reactions {sup 4}He+{sup 206}Pb, {sup 16}O+{sup 208}Pb and results compared with the experimental data. The analysis of the results shows that the average prescission neutron multiplicities, fission probabilities and the mean fission times calculated by one- and three-dimensional Langevin equations are different from each other, and also the results obtained based on three-dimensional Langevin equations are in better agreement with the experimental data. (orig.)

  5. Time-history simulation of civil architecture earthquake disaster relief- based on the three-dimensional dynamic finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Bing

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Earthquake action is the main external factor which influences long-term safe operation of civil construction, especially of the high-rise building. Applying time-history method to simulate earthquake response process of civil construction foundation surrounding rock is an effective method for the anti-knock study of civil buildings. Therefore, this paper develops a civil building earthquake disaster three-dimensional dynamic finite element numerical simulation system. The system adopts the explicit central difference method. Strengthening characteristics of materials under high strain rate and damage characteristics of surrounding rock under the action of cyclic loading are considered. Then, dynamic constitutive model of rock mass suitable for civil building aseismic analysis is put forward. At the same time, through the earthquake disaster of time-history simulation of Shenzhen Children’s Palace, reliability and practicability of system program is verified in the analysis of practical engineering problems.

  6. Three-Dimensional Water and Carbon Cycle Modeling at High Spatial-Temporal Resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, C.; Zhuang, Q.

    2017-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems in cryosphere are very sensitive to the global climate change due to the presence of snow covers, mountain glaciers and permafrost, especially when the increase in near surface air temperature is almost twice as large as the global average. However, few studies have investigated the water and carbon cycle dynamics using process-based hydrological and biogeochemistry modeling approach. In this study, we used three-dimensional modeling approach at high spatial-temporal resolutions to investigate the water and carbon cycle dynamics for the Tanana Flats Basin in interior Alaska with emphases on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) dynamics. The results have shown that: (1) lateral flow plays an important role in water and carbon cycle, especially in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) dynamics. (2) approximately 2.0 × 104 kg C yr-1 DOC is exported to the hydrological networks and it compromises 1% and 0.01% of total annual gross primary production (GPP) and total organic carbon stored in soil, respectively. This study has established an operational and flexible framework to investigate and predict the water and carbon cycle dynamics under the changing climate.

  7. Dynamics of interface in three-dimensional anisotropic bistable reaction-diffusion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Zhizhu; Liu, Jing

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical investigation of dynamics of interface (wave front) in three-dimensional (3D) reaction-diffusion (RD) system for bistable media with anisotropy constructed by means of anisotropic surface tension. An equation of motion for the wave front is derived to carry out stability analysis of transverse perturbations, which discloses mechanism of pattern formation such as labyrinthine in 3D bistable media. Particularly, the effects of anisotropy on wave propagation are studied. It was found that, sufficiently strong anisotropy can induce dynamical instabilities and lead to breakup of the wave front. With the fast-inhibitor limit, the bistable system can further be described by a variational dynamics so that the boundary integral method is adopted to study the dynamics of wave fronts.

  8. Three-Dimensional Dynamic Deformation Measurements Using Stereoscopic Imaging and Digital Speckle Photography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prentice, H. J.; Proud, W. G.

    2006-01-01

    A technique has been developed to determine experimentally the three-dimensional displacement field on the rear surface of a dynamically deforming plate. The technique combines speckle analysis with stereoscopy, using a modified angular-lens method: this incorporates split-frame photography and a simple method by which the effective lens separation can be adjusted and calibrated in situ. Whilst several analytical models exist to predict deformation in extended or semi-infinite targets, the non-trivial nature of the wave interactions complicates the generation and development of analytical models for targets of finite depth. By interrogating specimens experimentally to acquire three-dimensional strain data points, both analytical and numerical model predictions can be verified more rigorously. The technique is applied to the quasi-static deformation of a rubber sheet and dynamically to Mild Steel sheets of various thicknesses

  9. Self-diffusion in monodisperse three-dimensional magnetic fluids by molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobroserdova, A.B. [Ural Federal University, Lenin Av. 51, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Kantorovich, S.S., E-mail: alla.dobroserdova@urfu.ru [Ural Federal University, Lenin Av. 51, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); University of Vienna, Sensengasse 8, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-06-01

    In the present work we study the self-diffusion behaviour in the three-dimensional monodisperse magnetic fluids using the Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Density Functional Theory. The peculiarity of computer simulation is to study two different systems: dipolar and soft sphere ones. In the theoretical method, it is important to choose the approximation for the main structures, which are chains. We compare the theoretical results and the computer simulation data for the self-diffusion coefficient as a function of the particle volume fraction and magnetic dipole-dipole interaction parameter and find the qualitative and quantitative agreement to be good. - Highlights: • The paper deals with the study of the self-diffusion in monodisperse three-dimensional magnetic fluids. • The theoretical approach contains the free energy density functional minimization. • Computer simulations are performed by the molecular dynamics method. • We have a good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the theoretical results and computer simulation data.

  10. Non-equilibrium coherence dynamics in one-dimensional Bose gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofferberth, S.; Lesanovsky, Igor; Fischer, B.

    2007-01-01

    Low-dimensional systems provide beautiful examples of many-body quantum physics. For one-dimensional (1D) systems, the Luttinger liquid approach provides insight into universal properties. Much is known of the equilibrium state, both in the weakly and strongly interacting regimes. However......, the coherence factor is observed to approach a non-zero equilibrium value, as predicted by a Bogoliubov approach. This coupled-system decay to finite coherence is the matter wave equivalent of phase-locking two lasers by injection. The non-equilibrium dynamics of superfluids has an important role in a wide...... range of physical systems, such as superconductors, quantum Hall systems, superfluid helium and spin systems. Our experiments studying coherence dynamics show that 1D Bose gases are ideally suited for investigating this class of phenomena....

  11. Three-dimensional display and measurement of cardiac dynamic indexes from MR images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, M.; Matsuo, M.; Yamasaki, K.; Banno, T.; Toriwaki, J.; Yokoi, S.; Oshita, H.

    1986-01-01

    The cardiac dynamic index, to which such variables as cardiac output, ejection fraction, and wall motion contribute, is routinely determined using various modalities such as angiography, radionuclide imaging, US, and x-ray CT. Each of these modalities, however, has some disadvantages in regard to evaluating the cardiac dynamic index. The authors have obtained precise multidirectional projection images of the heart by means of computer graphics and reformatted data of cardiac MR images obtained with cardiac gating. The contiguous coronal MR images of the heart are made at an interimage distance of 5 mm. In each section, five or six cardiac images can be obtained, depending on the systolic or diastolic phase. These images are stored in a computer, and a three-dimensional display of the heart with biocular observation and with multiplex holograms is made possible with computer graphics. Three-dimensional measurement of the cardiac index is now being attempted, including cardiac output, ejection fraction, and wall motion

  12. The Lagrangian and Hamiltonian Analysis of Integrable Infinite-Dimensional Dynamical Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogolubov, Nikolai N. Jr.; Prykarpatsky, Yarema A.; Blackmorte, Denis; Prykarpatsky, Anatoliy K.

    2010-12-01

    The analytical description of Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalisms naturally arising from the invariance structure of given nonlinear dynamical systems on the infinite- dimensional functional manifold is presented. The basic ideas used to formulate the canonical symplectic structure are borrowed from the Cartan's theory of differential systems on associated jet-manifolds. The symmetry structure reduced on the invariant submanifolds of critical points of some nonlocal Euler-Lagrange functional is described thoroughly for both differential and differential-discrete dynamical systems. The Hamiltonian representation for a hierarchy of Lax type equations on a dual space to the Lie algebra of integral-differential operators with matrix coefficients, extended by evolutions for eigenfunctions and adjoint eigenfunctions of the corresponding spectral problems, is obtained via some special Backlund transformation. The connection of this hierarchy with integrable by Lax spatially two-dimensional systems is studied. (author)

  13. Resolving molecular vibronic structure using high-sensitivity two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bizimana, Laurie A.; Brazard, Johanna; Carbery, William P.; Gellen, Tobias; Turner, Daniel B., E-mail: dturner@nyu.edu [Department of Chemistry, New York University, 100 Washington Square East, New York, New York 10003 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy is an emerging technique for resolving structure and ultrafast dynamics of molecules, proteins, semiconductors, and other materials. A current challenge is the quality of kinetics that are examined as a function of waiting time. Inspired by noise-suppression methods of transient absorption, here we incorporate shot-by-shot acquisitions and balanced detection into coherent multidimensional optical spectroscopy. We demonstrate that implementing noise-suppression methods in two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy not only improves the quality of features in individual spectra but also increases the sensitivity to ultrafast time-dependent changes in the spectral features. Measurements on cresyl violet perchlorate are consistent with the vibronic pattern predicted by theoretical models of a highly displaced harmonic oscillator. The noise-suppression methods should benefit research into coherent electronic dynamics, and they can be adapted to multidimensional spectroscopies across the infrared and ultraviolet frequency ranges.

  14. Variance inflation in high dimensional Support Vector Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Trine Julie; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2013-01-01

    Many important machine learning models, supervised and unsupervised, are based on simple Euclidean distance or orthogonal projection in a high dimensional feature space. When estimating such models from small training sets we face the problem that the span of the training data set input vectors...... the case of Support Vector Machines (SVMS) and we propose a non-parametric scheme to restore proper generalizability. We illustrate the algorithm and its ability to restore performance on a wide range of benchmark data sets....... follow a different probability law with less variance. While the problem and basic means to reconstruct and deflate are well understood in unsupervised learning, the case of supervised learning is less well understood. We here investigate the effect of variance inflation in supervised learning including...

  15. Evaluating Clustering in Subspace Projections of High Dimensional Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Emmanuel; Günnemann, Stephan; Assent, Ira

    2009-01-01

    Clustering high dimensional data is an emerging research field. Subspace clustering or projected clustering group similar objects in subspaces, i.e. projections, of the full space. In the past decade, several clustering paradigms have been developed in parallel, without thorough evaluation...... and comparison between these paradigms on a common basis. Conclusive evaluation and comparison is challenged by three major issues. First, there is no ground truth that describes the "true" clusters in real world data. Second, a large variety of evaluation measures have been used that reflect different aspects...... of the clustering result. Finally, in typical publications authors have limited their analysis to their favored paradigm only, while paying other paradigms little or no attention. In this paper, we take a systematic approach to evaluate the major paradigms in a common framework. We study representative clustering...

  16. One dimensional FexCo1-x nanowires; ferromagnetic resonance and magnetization dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehreen Aslam

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Soft magnetic nanowires (NWs are widely used for microwave and mm-wave components. The investigation of magnetization damping behavior of NWs have attracted great interest due to large influence of loss to the device, like integrated microwave device, magnetic sensors, and magnetic random access memory. With increasing operational frequency and degree of integration, the requirements to characterize 1-dimensional NWs become increasingly high. The purpose of this work is to study the magnetization dynamics in FexCo1-x NWs. A series of FexCo1-x (x=0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75, 1 NWs were grown by controlled electro-deposition. By adjusting FexCo1-x concentration (x=0 to 1, the saturation magnetization, increased more than 20%. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR both in field and frequency sweep mode are employed to characterize the NWs in flip-chip geometry. It is observed that FMR field (Hr increases with increase in applied frequency. At a fixed frequency, Fe NWs resonate at a lower field than the Co substituted NWs. FMR field linewidth (ΔH as well as frequency width (Δf are largest for Co NWs and decreased for Fe NWs. Whereas ΔH and Δf decreased further for FexCo1-x nanowires with increasing x.

  17. Coordinated three-dimensional motion of the head and torso by dynamic neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J; Hemami, H

    1998-01-01

    The problem of trajectory tracking control of a three dimensional (3D) model of the human upper torso and head is considered. The torso and the head are modeled as two rigid bodies connected at one point, and the Newton-Euler method is used to derive the nonlinear differential equations that govern the motion of the system. The two-link system is driven by six pairs of muscle like actuators that possess physiologically inspired alpha like and gamma like inputs, and spindle like and Golgi tendon organ like outputs. These outputs are utilized as reflex feedback for stability and stiffness control, in a long loop feedback for the purpose of estimating the state of the system (somesthesis), and as part of the input to the controller. Ideal delays of different duration are included in the feedforward and feedback paths of the system to emulate such delays encountered in physiological systems. Dynamical neural networks are trained to learn effective control of the desired maneuvers of the system. The feasibility of the controller is demonstrated by computer simulation of the successful execution of the desired maneuvers. This work demonstrates the capabilities of neural circuits in controlling highly nonlinear systems with multidelays in their feedforward and feedback paths. The ultimate long range goal of this research is toward understanding the working of the central nervous system in controlling movement. It is an interdisciplinary effort relying on mechanics, biomechanics, neuroscience, system theory, physiology and anatomy, and its short range relevance to rehabilitation must be noted.

  18. Quantum quench dynamics of the attractive one-dimensional Bose gas via the coordinate Bethe ansatz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan C. Zill, Tod M. Wright, Karen V. Kheruntsyan, Thomas Gasenzer, Matthew J. Davis

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We use the coordinate Bethe ansatz to study the Lieb-Liniger model of a one-dimensional gas of bosons on a finite-sized ring interacting via an attractive delta-function potential. We calculate zero-temperature correlation functions for seven particles in the vicinity of the crossover to a localized solitonic state and study the dynamics of a system of four particles quenched to attractive interactions from the ideal-gas ground state. We determine the time evolution of correlation functions, as well as their temporal averages, and discuss the role of bound states in shaping the postquench correlations and relaxation dynamics.

  19. Signatures of chaos and non-integrability in two-dimensional gravity with dynamical boundary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitkevich Maxim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a model of two-dimensional dilaton gravity with a boundary. In the bulk our model coincides with the classically integrable CGHS model; the dynamical boundary cuts of the CGHS strong-coupling region. As a result, classical dynamics in our model reminds that in the spherically-symmetric gravity: wave packets of matter fields either reflect from the boundary or form black holes. We find large integrable sector of multisoliton solutions in this model. At the same time, we argue that the model is globally non-integrable because solutions at the verge of black hole formation display chaotic properties.

  20. Study of journal bearing dynamics using 3-dimensional motion picture graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewe, D. E.; Sosoka, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    Computer generated motion pictures of three dimensional graphics are being used to analyze journal bearings under dynamically loaded conditions. The motion pictures simultaneously present the motion of the journal and the pressures predicted within the fluid film of the bearing as they evolve in time. The correct prediction of these fluid film pressures can be complicated by the development of cavitation within the fluid. The numerical model that is used predicts the formation of the cavitation bubble and its growth, downstream movement, and subsequent collapse. A complete physical picture is created in the motion picture as the journal traverses through the entire dynamic cycle.

  1. The magnetic flux dynamics in the critical state of one-dimensional discrete superconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, S.L.; Nakin, A.V.; Savitskaya, N.E.

    2006-01-01

    We give a theoretical description of avalanche-like dynamics of magnetic flux in the critical state of discrete superconductors using a one-dimensional model of a multijunction SQUID. We show that the system under consideration demonstrates the self-organized criticality. The avalanches of vortices manifest themselves as jumps of the total magnetic flux in the sample. The sizes of these jumps have a power-law distribution. We argue that similarities in the behavior of discrete and usual type-II superconductors allows to extend our results for description of avalanche-like dynamics in type-II superconductors with strong pinning

  2. Non-equilibrium coherence dynamics in one-dimensional Bose gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofferberth, S; Lesanovsky, I; Fischer, B; Schumm, T; Schmiedmayer, J

    2007-09-20

    Low-dimensional systems provide beautiful examples of many-body quantum physics. For one-dimensional (1D) systems, the Luttinger liquid approach provides insight into universal properties. Much is known of the equilibrium state, both in the weakly and strongly interacting regimes. However, it remains a challenge to probe the dynamics by which this equilibrium state is reached. Here we present a direct experimental study of the coherence dynamics in both isolated and coupled degenerate 1D Bose gases. Dynamic splitting is used to create two 1D systems in a phase coherent state. The time evolution of the coherence is revealed through local phase shifts of the subsequently observed interference patterns. Completely isolated 1D Bose gases are observed to exhibit universal sub-exponential coherence decay, in excellent agreement with recent predictions. For two coupled 1D Bose gases, the coherence factor is observed to approach a non-zero equilibrium value, as predicted by a Bogoliubov approach. This coupled-system decay to finite coherence is the matter wave equivalent of phase-locking two lasers by injection. The non-equilibrium dynamics of superfluids has an important role in a wide range of physical systems, such as superconductors, quantum Hall systems, superfluid helium and spin systems. Our experiments studying coherence dynamics show that 1D Bose gases are ideally suited for investigating this class of phenomena.

  3. Cluster dynamics models of irradiation damage accumulation in ferritic iron. II. Effects of reaction dimensionality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohnert, Aaron A.; Wirth, Brian D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2300 (United States)

    2015-04-21

    The black dot damage features which develop in iron at low temperatures exhibit significant mobility during in situ irradiation experiments via a series of discrete, intermittent, long range hops. By incorporating this mobility into cluster dynamics models, the temperature dependence of such damage structures can be explained with a surprising degree of accuracy. Such motion, however, is one dimensional in nature. This aspect of the physics has not been fully considered in prior models. This article describes one dimensional reaction kinetics in the context of cluster dynamics and applies them to the black dot problem. This allows both a more detailed description of the mechanisms by which defects execute irradiation-induced hops while allowing a full examination of the importance of kinetic assumptions in accurately assessing the development of this irradiation microstructure. Results are presented to demonstrate whether one dimensional diffusion alters the dependence of the defect population on factors such as temperature and defect hop length. Finally, the size of interstitial loops that develop is shown to depend on the extent of the reaction volumes between interstitial clusters, as well as the dimensionality of these interactions.

  4. Dimensional measurement of micro parts with high aspect ratio in HIT-UOI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Hong; Cui, Jiwen; Feng, Kunpeng; Li, Junying; Zhao, Shiyuan; Zhang, Haoran; Tan, Jiubin

    2016-11-01

    Micro parts with high aspect ratios have been widely used in different fields including aerospace and defense industries, while the dimensional measurement of these micro parts becomes a challenge in the field of precision measurement and instrument. To deal with this contradiction, several probes for the micro parts precision measurement have been proposed by researchers in Center of Ultra-precision Optoelectronic Instrument (UOI), Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT). In this paper, optical fiber probes with structures of spherical coupling(SC) with double optical fibers, micro focal-length collimation (MFL-collimation) and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) are described in detail. After introducing the sensing principles, both advantages and disadvantages of these probes are analyzed respectively. In order to improve the performances of these probes, several approaches are proposed. A two-dimensional orthogonal path arrangement is propounded to enhance the dimensional measurement ability of MFL-collimation probes, while a high resolution and response speed interrogation method based on differential method is used to improve the accuracy and dynamic characteristics of the FBG probes. The experiments for these special structural fiber probes are given with a focus on the characteristics of these probes, and engineering applications will also be presented to prove the availability of them. In order to improve the accuracy and the instantaneity of the engineering applications, several techniques are used in probe integration. The effectiveness of these fiber probes were therefore verified through both the analysis and experiments.

  5. Exactly integrable two-dimensional dynamical systems related with supersymmetric algebras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leznov, A.N.

    1983-01-01

    A wide class of exactly integrable dynamical systems in two-dimensional space related with superalgebras, which generalize supersymmetric Liouville equation, is constructed. The equations can be interpretated as nonlinearly interacting Bose and Fermi fields belonging within classical limit to even and odd parts of the Grassman space. Explicit expressions for the solutions of the constructed systems are obtained on the basis of standard perturbation theory

  6. Thermal ignition revisited with two-dimensional molecular dynamics: role of fluctuations in activated collisions

    OpenAIRE

    Sirmas, Nick; Radulescu, Matei I.

    2016-01-01

    The problem of thermal ignition in a homogeneous gas is revisited from a molecular dynamics perspective. A two-dimensional model is adopted, which assumes reactive disks of type A and B in a fixed area that react to form type C products if an activation threshold for impact is surpassed. Such a reaction liberates kinetic energy to the product particles, representative of the heat release. The results for the ignition delay are compared with those obtained from the continuum description assumi...

  7. Skyrmion dynamics in single-hole Neel ordered doped two-dimensional antiferromagnets with arbitrary spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, A.R.; Pereira, A.R.; Moura-Melo, W.A.; Pires, A.S.T.

    2008-01-01

    We develop an effective theory to study the skyrmion dynamics in the presence of a hole (removed spins from the lattice) in Neel ordered two-dimensional antiferromagnets with arbitrary spin value S. The general equation of motion for the 'mass center' of this structure is obtained. The frequency of small amplitude oscillations of pinned skyrmions around the defect center is calculated. It is proportional to the hole size and inversely proportional to the square of the skyrmion size

  8. Three-Dimensional Optical Trapping for Cell Isolation Using Tapered Fiber Probe by Dynamic Chemical Etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taguchi, K; Okada, J; Nomura, Y; Tamura, K

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, chemically etched fiber probe was proposed for laser trapping and manipulation of cells. We fabricated tapered fiber probe by dynamic chemical etching technique. Three-Dimensional optical trap of a yeast cell dispersed in water solution could be formed by the fiber tip with 17deg tip. Optical forces were sufficient to move the yeast cell for trapping and manipulation. From these experimental results, it was found that our proposed tapered fiber tip was a promising tool for cell isolation.

  9. Dynamics of Gauge Fields at High Temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, B.J.

    2000-01-01

    An effective description of dynamical Bose fields is provided by the classical (high-temperature) limit of thermal field theory. The main subject of this thesis is to improve the ensuing classical field theory, that is, to include the dominant quantum corrections and to add counter terms for the

  10. Explorations on High Dimensional Landscapes: Spin Glasses and Deep Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagun, Levent

    This thesis deals with understanding the structure of high-dimensional and non-convex energy landscapes. In particular, its focus is on the optimization of two classes of functions: homogeneous polynomials and loss functions that arise in machine learning. In the first part, the notion of complexity of a smooth, real-valued function is studied through its critical points. Existing theoretical results predict that certain random functions that are defined on high dimensional domains have a narrow band of values whose pre-image contains the bulk of its critical points. This section provides empirical evidence for convergence of gradient descent to local minima whose energies are near the predicted threshold justifying the existing asymptotic theory. Moreover, it is empirically shown that a similar phenomenon may hold for deep learning loss functions. Furthermore, there is a comparative analysis of gradient descent and its stochastic version showing that in high dimensional regimes the latter is a mere speedup. The next study focuses on the halting time of an algorithm at a given stopping condition. Given an algorithm, the normalized fluctuations of the halting time follow a distribution that remains unchanged even when the input data is sampled from a new distribution. Two qualitative classes are observed: a Gumbel-like distribution that appears in Google searches, human decision times, and spin glasses and a Gaussian-like distribution that appears in conjugate gradient method, deep learning with MNIST and random input data. Following the universality phenomenon, the Hessian of the loss functions of deep learning is studied. The spectrum is seen to be composed of two parts, the bulk which is concentrated around zero, and the edges which are scattered away from zero. Empirical evidence is presented for the bulk indicating how over-parametrized the system is, and for the edges that depend on the input data. Furthermore, an algorithm is proposed such that it would

  11. On Kubo-Martin-Schwinger states of classical dynamical systems with the infinite-dimensional phase space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arsen'ev, A.A.

    1979-01-01

    Example of a classical dynamical system with the infinite-dimensional phase space, satisfying the analogue of the Kubo-Martin-Schwinger conditions for classical dynamics, is constructed explicitly. Connection between the system constructed and the Fock space dynamics is pointed out

  12. High dynamic range coding imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Renfan; Huang, Yifan; Hou, Guangqi

    2014-10-01

    We present a high dynamic range (HDR) imaging system design scheme based on coded aperture technique. This scheme can help us obtain HDR images which have extended depth of field. We adopt Sparse coding algorithm to design coded patterns. Then we utilize the sensor unit to acquire coded images under different exposure settings. With the guide of the multiple exposure parameters, a series of low dynamic range (LDR) coded images are reconstructed. We use some existing algorithms to fuse and display a HDR image by those LDR images. We build an optical simulation model and get some simulation images to verify the novel system.

  13. High-dimensional statistical inference: From vector to matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Anru

    Statistical inference for sparse signals or low-rank matrices in high-dimensional settings is of significant interest in a range of contemporary applications. It has attracted significant recent attention in many fields including statistics, applied mathematics and electrical engineering. In this thesis, we consider several problems in including sparse signal recovery (compressed sensing under restricted isometry) and low-rank matrix recovery (matrix recovery via rank-one projections and structured matrix completion). The first part of the thesis discusses compressed sensing and affine rank minimization in both noiseless and noisy cases and establishes sharp restricted isometry conditions for sparse signal and low-rank matrix recovery. The analysis relies on a key technical tool which represents points in a polytope by convex combinations of sparse vectors. The technique is elementary while leads to sharp results. It is shown that, in compressed sensing, delta kA 0, delta kA < 1/3 + epsilon, deltak A + thetak,kA < 1 + epsilon, or deltatkA< √(t - 1) / t + epsilon are not sufficient to guarantee the exact recovery of all k-sparse signals for large k. Similar result also holds for matrix recovery. In addition, the conditions delta kA<1/3, deltak A+ thetak,kA<1, delta tkA < √(t - 1)/t and deltarM<1/3, delta rM+ thetar,rM<1, delta trM< √(t - 1)/ t are also shown to be sufficient respectively for stable recovery of approximately sparse signals and low-rank matrices in the noisy case. For the second part of the thesis, we introduce a rank-one projection model for low-rank matrix recovery and propose a constrained nuclear norm minimization method for stable recovery of low-rank matrices in the noisy case. The procedure is adaptive to the rank and robust against small perturbations. Both upper and lower bounds for the estimation accuracy under the Frobenius norm loss are obtained. The proposed estimator is shown to be rate-optimal under certain conditions. The

  14. Approximation of High-Dimensional Rank One Tensors

    KAUST Repository

    Bachmayr, Markus

    2013-11-12

    Many real world problems are high-dimensional in that their solution is a function which depends on many variables or parameters. This presents a computational challenge since traditional numerical techniques are built on model classes for functions based solely on smoothness. It is known that the approximation of smoothness classes of functions suffers from the so-called \\'curse of dimensionality\\'. Avoiding this curse requires new model classes for real world functions that match applications. This has led to the introduction of notions such as sparsity, variable reduction, and reduced modeling. One theme that is particularly common is to assume a tensor structure for the target function. This paper investigates how well a rank one function f(x 1,...,x d)=f 1(x 1)⋯f d(x d), defined on Ω=[0,1]d can be captured through point queries. It is shown that such a rank one function with component functions f j in W∞ r([0,1]) can be captured (in L ∞) to accuracy O(C(d,r)N -r) from N well-chosen point evaluations. The constant C(d,r) scales like d dr. The queries in our algorithms have two ingredients, a set of points built on the results from discrepancy theory and a second adaptive set of queries dependent on the information drawn from the first set. Under the assumption that a point z∈Ω with nonvanishing f(z) is known, the accuracy improves to O(dN -r). © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  15. Design guidelines for high dimensional stability of CFRP optical bench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desnoyers, Nichola; Boucher, Marc-André; Goyette, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    In carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) optomechanical structures, particularly when embodying reflective optics, angular stability is critical. Angular stability or warping stability is greatly affected by moisture absorption and thermal gradients. Unfortunately, it is impossible to achieve the perfect laminate and there will always be manufacturing errors in trying to reach a quasi-iso laminate. Some errors, such as those related to the angular position of each ply and the facesheet parallelism (for a bench) can be easily monitored in order to control the stability more adequately. This paper presents warping experiments and finite-element analyses (FEA) obtained from typical optomechanical sandwich structures. Experiments were done using a thermal vacuum chamber to cycle the structures from -40°C to 50°C. Moisture desorption tests were also performed for a number of specific configurations. The selected composite material for the study is the unidirectional prepreg from Tencate M55J/TC410. M55J is a high modulus fiber and TC410 is a new-generation cyanate ester designed for dimensionally stable optical benches. In the studied cases, the main contributors were found to be: the ply angular errors, laminate in-plane parallelism (between 0° ply direction of both facesheets), fiber volume fraction tolerance and joints. Final results show that some tested configurations demonstrated good warping stability. FEA and measurements are in good agreement despite the fact that some defects or fabrication errors remain unpredictable. Design guidelines to maximize the warping stability by taking into account the main dimensional stability contributors, the bench geometry and the optical mount interface are then proposed.

  16. Approximation of High-Dimensional Rank One Tensors

    KAUST Repository

    Bachmayr, Markus; Dahmen, Wolfgang; DeVore, Ronald; Grasedyck, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Many real world problems are high-dimensional in that their solution is a function which depends on many variables or parameters. This presents a computational challenge since traditional numerical techniques are built on model classes for functions based solely on smoothness. It is known that the approximation of smoothness classes of functions suffers from the so-called 'curse of dimensionality'. Avoiding this curse requires new model classes for real world functions that match applications. This has led to the introduction of notions such as sparsity, variable reduction, and reduced modeling. One theme that is particularly common is to assume a tensor structure for the target function. This paper investigates how well a rank one function f(x 1,...,x d)=f 1(x 1)⋯f d(x d), defined on Ω=[0,1]d can be captured through point queries. It is shown that such a rank one function with component functions f j in W∞ r([0,1]) can be captured (in L ∞) to accuracy O(C(d,r)N -r) from N well-chosen point evaluations. The constant C(d,r) scales like d dr. The queries in our algorithms have two ingredients, a set of points built on the results from discrepancy theory and a second adaptive set of queries dependent on the information drawn from the first set. Under the assumption that a point z∈Ω with nonvanishing f(z) is known, the accuracy improves to O(dN -r). © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  17. TSAR: a program for automatic resonance assignment using 2D cross-sections of high dimensionality, high-resolution spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawadzka-Kazimierczuk, Anna; Kozminski, Wiktor [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Chemistry (Poland); Billeter, Martin, E-mail: martin.billeter@chem.gu.se [University of Gothenburg, Biophysics Group, Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology (Sweden)

    2012-09-15

    While NMR studies of proteins typically aim at structure, dynamics or interactions, resonance assignments represent in almost all cases the initial step of the analysis. With increasing complexity of the NMR spectra, for example due to decreasing extent of ordered structure, this task often becomes both difficult and time-consuming, and the recording of high-dimensional data with high-resolution may be essential. Random sampling of the evolution time space, combined with sparse multidimensional Fourier transform (SMFT), allows for efficient recording of very high dimensional spectra ({>=}4 dimensions) while maintaining high resolution. However, the nature of this data demands for automation of the assignment process. Here we present the program TSAR (Tool for SMFT-based Assignment of Resonances), which exploits all advantages of SMFT input. Moreover, its flexibility allows to process data from any type of experiments that provide sequential connectivities. The algorithm was tested on several protein samples, including a disordered 81-residue fragment of the {delta} subunit of RNA polymerase from Bacillus subtilis containing various repetitive sequences. For our test examples, TSAR achieves a high percentage of assigned residues without any erroneous assignments.

  18. A method of integration of atomistic simulations and continuum mechanics by collecting of dynamical systems with dimensional reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaczmarek, J.

    2002-01-01

    Elementary processes responsible for phenomena in material are frequently related to scale close to atomic one. Therefore atomistic simulations are important for material sciences. On the other hand continuum mechanics is widely applied in mechanics of materials. It seems inevitable that both methods will gradually integrate. A multiscale method of integration of these approaches called collection of dynamical systems with dimensional reduction is introduced in this work. The dimensional reduction procedure realizes transition between various scale models from an elementary dynamical system (EDS) to a reduced dynamical system (RDS). Mappings which transform variables and forces, skeletal dynamical system (SDS) and a set of approximation and identification methods are main components of this procedure. The skeletal dynamical system is a set of dynamical systems parameterized by some constants and has variables related to the dimensionally reduced model. These constants are identified with the aid of solutions of the elementary dynamical system. As a result we obtain a dimensionally reduced dynamical system which describes phenomena in an averaged way in comparison with the EDS. Concept of integration of atomistic simulations with continuum mechanics consists in using a dynamical system describing evolution of atoms as an elementary dynamical system. Then, we introduce a continuum skeletal dynamical system within the dimensional reduction procedure. In order to construct such a system we have to modify a continuum mechanics formulation to some degree. Namely, we formalize scale of averaging for continuum theory and as a result we consider continuum with finite-dimensional fields only. Then, realization of dimensional reduction is possible. A numerical example of realization of the dimensional reduction procedure is shown. We consider a one dimensional chain of atoms interacting by Lennard-Jones potential. Evolution of this system is described by an elementary

  19. Dynamics of the two-dimensional directed Ising model in the paramagnetic phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godrèche, C.; Pleimling, M.

    2014-05-01

    We consider the nonconserved dynamics of the Ising model on the two-dimensional square lattice, where each spin is influenced preferentially by its east and north neighbours. The single-spin flip rates are such that the stationary state is Gibbsian with respect to the usual ferromagnetic Ising Hamiltonian. We show the existence, in the paramagnetic phase, of a dynamical transition between two regimes of violation of the fluctuation-dissipation theorem in the nonequilibrium stationary state: a regime of weak violation where the stationary fluctuation-dissipation ratio is finite, when the asymmetry parameter is less than a threshold value, and a regime of strong violation where this ratio vanishes asymptotically above the threshold. This study suggests that this novel kind of dynamical transition in nonequilibrium stationary states, already found for the directed Ising chain and the spherical model with asymmetric dynamics, might be quite general. In contrast with the latter models, the equal-time correlation function for the two-dimensional directed Ising model depends on the asymmetry.

  20. Progress in high-dimensional percolation and random graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Heydenreich, Markus

    2017-01-01

    This text presents an engaging exposition of the active field of high-dimensional percolation that will likely provide an impetus for future work. With over 90 exercises designed to enhance the reader’s understanding of the material, as well as many open problems, the book is aimed at graduate students and researchers who wish to enter the world of this rich topic.  The text may also be useful in advanced courses and seminars, as well as for reference and individual study. Part I, consisting of 3 chapters, presents a general introduction to percolation, stating the main results, defining the central objects, and proving its main properties. No prior knowledge of percolation is assumed. Part II, consisting of Chapters 4–9, discusses mean-field critical behavior by describing the two main techniques used, namely, differential inequalities and the lace expansion. In Parts I and II, all results are proved, making this the first self-contained text discussing high-dimensiona l percolation.  Part III, consist...

  1. Efficient Smoothed Concomitant Lasso Estimation for High Dimensional Regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Eugene; Fercoq, Olivier; Gramfort, Alexandre; Leclère, Vincent; Salmon, Joseph

    2017-10-01

    In high dimensional settings, sparse structures are crucial for efficiency, both in term of memory, computation and performance. It is customary to consider ℓ 1 penalty to enforce sparsity in such scenarios. Sparsity enforcing methods, the Lasso being a canonical example, are popular candidates to address high dimension. For efficiency, they rely on tuning a parameter trading data fitting versus sparsity. For the Lasso theory to hold this tuning parameter should be proportional to the noise level, yet the latter is often unknown in practice. A possible remedy is to jointly optimize over the regression parameter as well as over the noise level. This has been considered under several names in the literature: Scaled-Lasso, Square-root Lasso, Concomitant Lasso estimation for instance, and could be of interest for uncertainty quantification. In this work, after illustrating numerical difficulties for the Concomitant Lasso formulation, we propose a modification we coined Smoothed Concomitant Lasso, aimed at increasing numerical stability. We propose an efficient and accurate solver leading to a computational cost no more expensive than the one for the Lasso. We leverage on standard ingredients behind the success of fast Lasso solvers: a coordinate descent algorithm, combined with safe screening rules to achieve speed efficiency, by eliminating early irrelevant features.

  2. Tracking Ionic Rearrangements and Interpreting Dynamic Volumetric Changes in Two-Dimensional Metal Carbide Supercapacitors: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kui; Lin, Zifeng; Merlet, Céline; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Miao, Ling; Jiang, Jianjun; Simon, Patrice

    2017-12-06

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation study achieved on two-dimensional (2D) Ti 3 C 2 T x MXenes in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([EMIM] + [TFSI] - ) electrolyte. Our simulations reproduce the different patterns of volumetric change observed experimentally for both the negative and positive electrodes. The analysis of ionic fluxes and structure rearrangements in the 2D material provide an atomic scale insight into the charge and discharge processes in the layer pore and confirm the existence of two different charge-storage mechanisms at the negative and positive electrodes. The ionic number variation and the structure rearrangement contribute to the dynamic volumetric changes of both electrodes: negative electrode expansion and positive electrode contraction. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Optical dynamics in low-dimensional semiconductor heterostructures. Quantum dots and quantum cascade lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Carsten

    2008-07-01

    This work is focused on the optical dynamics of mesoscopic semiconductor heterostructures, using as prototypes zero-dimensional quantum dots and quantum cascade lasers which consist of quasitwo- dimensional quantum wells. Within a density matrix theory, a microscopic many-particle theory is applied to study scattering effects in these structures: the coupling to external as well as local fields, electron-phonon coupling, coupling to impurities, and Coulomb coupling. For both systems, the investigated effects are compared to experimentally observed results obtained during the past years. In quantum dots, the three-dimensional spatial confinement leads to the necessity to consider a quantum kinetic description of the dynamics, resulting in non-Markovian electron-phonon effects. This can be seen in the spectral phonon sidebands due to interaction with acoustic phonons as well as a damping of nonlinear Rabi oscillations which shows a nonmonotonous intensity and pulse duration dependence. An analysis of the inclusion of the self-interaction of the quantum dot shows that no dynamical local field terms appear for the simple two-level model. Considering local fields which have their origin in many quantum dots, consequences for a two-level quantum dot such as a zero-phonon line broadening and an increasing signal in photon echo experiments are found. For the use of quantum dots in an optical spin control scheme, it is found that the dephasing due to the electron-phonon interaction can be dominant in certain regimes. Furthermore, soliton and breather solutions are studied analytically in nonlinear quantum dot ensembles. Generalizing to quasi-two-dimensional structures, the intersubband dynamics of quantum cascade laser structures is investigated. A dynamical theory is considered in which the temporal evolution of the subband populations and the current density as well as the influence of scattering effects is studied. In the nonlinear regime, the scattering dependence and

  4. Slow quench dynamics of a one-dimensional Bose gas confined to an optical lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Jean-Sébastien; Roux, Guillaume; Kollath, Corinna

    2011-05-20

    We analyze the effect of a linear time variation of the interaction strength on a trapped one-dimensional Bose gas confined to an optical lattice. The evolution of different observables such as the experimentally accessible on site particle distribution are studied as a function of the ramp time by using time-dependent numerical techniques. We find that the dynamics of a trapped system typically displays two regimes: For long ramp times, the dynamics is governed by density redistribution, while at short ramp times, local dynamics dominates as the evolution is identical to that of an homogeneous system. In the homogeneous limit, we also discuss the nontrivial scaling of the energy absorbed with the ramp time.

  5. Wavepacket dynamics in one-dimensional system with long-range correlated disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroaki S.

    2018-03-01

    We numerically investigate dynamical property in the one-dimensional tight-binding model with long-range correlated disorder having power spectrum 1 /fα (α: spectrum exponent) generated by Fourier filtering method. For relatively small α MSD) of the initially localized wavepacket shows ballistic spread and localizes as time elapses. It is shown that α-dependence of the dynamical localization length determined by the MSD exhibits a simple scaling law in the localization regime for the relatively weak disorder strength W. Furthermore, scaled MSD by the dynamical localization length almost obeys an universal function from the ballistic to the localization regime in the various combinations of the parameters α and W.

  6. A high-speed computerized tomography image reconstruction using direct two-dimensional Fourier transform method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niki, Noboru; Mizutani, Toshio; Takahashi, Yoshizo; Inouye, Tamon.

    1983-01-01

    The nescessity for developing real-time computerized tomography (CT) aiming at the dynamic observation of organs such as hearts has lately been advocated. It is necessary for its realization to reconstruct the images which are markedly faster than present CTs. Although various reconstructing methods have been proposed so far, the method practically employed at present is the filtered backprojection (FBP) method only, which can give high quality image reconstruction, but takes much computing time. In the past, the two-dimensional Fourier transform (TFT) method was regarded as unsuitable to practical use because the quality of images obtained was not good, in spite of the promising method for high speed reconstruction because of its less computing time. However, since it was revealed that the image quality by TFT method depended greatly on interpolation accuracy in two-dimensional Fourier space, the authors have developed a high-speed calculation algorithm that can obtain high quality images by pursuing the relationship between the image quality and the interpolation method. In this case, radial data sampling points in Fourier space are increased to β-th power of 2 times, and the linear or spline interpolation is used. Comparison of this method with the present FBP method resulted in the conclusion that the image quality is almost the same in practical image matrix, the computational time by TFT method becomes about 1/10 of FBP method, and the memory capacity also reduces by about 20 %. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  7. Dynamical observations on the crack tip zone and stress corrosion of two-dimensional MoS2

    KAUST Repository

    Ly, Thuc Hue; Zhao, Jiong; Cichocka, Magdalena Ola; Li, Lain-Jong; Lee, Young Hee

    2017-01-01

    Whether and how fracture mechanics needs to be modified for small length scales and in systems of reduced dimensionality remains an open debate. Here, employing in situ transmission electron microscopy, atomic structures and dislocation dynamics

  8. On the Zeeman Effect in highly excited atoms: 2. Three-dimensional case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baseia, B.; Medeiros e Silva Filho, J.

    1984-01-01

    A previous result, found in two-dimensional hydrogen-atoms, is extended to the three-dimensional case. A mapping of a four-dimensional space R 4 onto R 3 , that establishes an equivalence between Coulomb and harmonic potentials, is used to show that the exact solution of the Zeeman effect in highly excited atoms, cannot be reached. (Author) [pt

  9. Three-dimensional dynamic magnetic resonance angiography for the evaluation of radiosurgically treated cerebral arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauvrit, Jean-Yves; Oppenheim, Catherine; Naggara, Olivier; Trystram, Denis; Fredy, Daniel; Meder, Jean-Francois; Nataf, Francois; Roux, Francois-Xavier; Munier, Thierry; Pruvo, Jean-Pierre; Leclerc, Xavier

    2006-01-01

    We assessed the value of three-dimensional (3D) dynamic magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) for the follow-up of patients with radiosurgically treated cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Fifty-four patients with cerebral AVMs treated by radiosurgery (RS) were monitored using conventional catheter angiography (CCA) and 3D dynamic MRA with sensitivity encoding based on the parallel imaging. Cerebral AVM was qualitatively classified by two radiologists into one of five categories in terms of residual nidus size and persistence of early draining vein (I, >6 cm; II, 3-6 cm; III, <3 cm; IV, isolated early draining vein; V, complete obliteration). 3D MRA findings showed a good agreement with CCA in 40 cases (κ=0.62). Of 23 nidus detected on CCA, 3D dynamic MRA showed 14 residual nidus. Of 28 occluded nidus on 3D dynamic MRA, 22 nidus were occluded on CCA. The sensitivity and specificity of 3D dynamic MRA for the detection of residual AVM were 81% and 100%. 3D dynamic MRA after RS may therefore be useful in association with MRI and can be repeated as long as opacification of the nidus or early venous drainage persists, one CCA remaining indispensable to affirm the complete occlusion at the end of follow-up. (orig.)

  10. Dynamics in a one-dimensional ferrogel model: relaxation, pairing, shock-wave propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Segun; Menzel, Andreas M; Löwen, Hartmut

    2018-05-23

    Ferrogels are smart soft materials, consisting of a polymeric network and embedded magnetic particles. Novel phenomena, such as the variation of the overall mechanical properties by external magnetic fields, emerge consequently. However, the dynamic behavior of ferrogels remains largely unveiled. In this paper, we consider a one-dimensional chain consisting of magnetic dipoles and elastic springs between them as a simple model for ferrogels. The model is evaluated by corresponding simulations. To probe the dynamics theoretically, we investigate a continuum limit of the energy governing the system and the corresponding equation of motion. We provide general classification scenarios for the dynamics, elucidating the touching/detachment dynamics of the magnetic particles along the chain. In particular, it is verified in certain cases that the long-time relaxation corresponds to solutions of shock-wave propagation, while formations of particle pairs underlie the initial stage of the dynamics. We expect that these results will provide insight into the understanding of the dynamics of more realistic models with randomness in parameters and time-dependent magnetic fields.

  11. Universality and the dynamical space-time dimensionality in the Lorentzian type IIB matrix model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Yuta [KEK Theory Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization,1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Nishimura, Jun [KEK Theory Center, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization,1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Graduate University for Advanced Studies (SOKENDAI),1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Tsuchiya, Asato [Department of Physics, Shizuoka University,836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan)

    2017-03-27

    The type IIB matrix model is one of the most promising candidates for a nonperturbative formulation of superstring theory. In particular, its Lorentzian version was shown to exhibit an interesting real-time dynamics such as the spontaneous breaking of the 9-dimensional rotational symmetry to the 3-dimensional one. This result, however, was obtained after regularizing the original matrix integration by introducing “infrared” cutoffs on the quadratic moments of the Hermitian matrices. In this paper, we generalize the form of the cutoffs in such a way that it involves an arbitrary power (2p) of the matrices. By performing Monte Carlo simulation of a simplified model, we find that the results become independent of p and hence universal for p≳1.3. For p as large as 2.0, however, we find that large-N scaling behaviors do not show up, and we cannot take a sensible large-N limit. Thus we find that there is a certain range of p in which a universal large-N limit can be taken. Within this range of p, the dynamical space-time dimensionality turns out to be (3+1), while for p=2.0, where we cannot take a sensible large-N limit, we observe a (5+1)d structure.

  12. Effect of Zealotry in High-dimensional Opinion Dynamics Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-18

    the several platforms for portable computing to choose from, such as Apple iPad, Amazon Kindle, and Samsung Galaxy Note. A third example is the choice... diverse topologies, Chaos 17, 026111 (2007). [16] S. K. Maity, T. V. Manoj, and A. Mukherjee, Opinion formation in time-varying social networks: The case of

  13. Treatment of dynamical processes in two-dimensional models of the troposphere and stratosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuebbles, D.J.

    1980-07-01

    The physical structure of the troposphere and stratosphere is the result of an intricate interplay among a large number of radiative, chemical, and dynamical processes. Because it is not possible to model the global environment in the laboratory, theoretical models must be relied on, subject to observational verification, to simulate atmospheric processes. Of particular concern in recent years has been the modeling of those processes affecting the structure of ozone and other trace species in the stratosphere and troposphere. Zonally averaged two-dimensional models with spatial resolution in the vertical and meridional directions can provide a much more realistic representation of tracer transport than one-dimensional models, yet are capable of the detailed representation of chemical and radiative processes contained in the one-dimensional models. The purpose of this study is to describe and analyze existing approaches to representing global atmospheric transport processes in two-dimensional models and to discuss possible alternatives to these approaches. A general description of the processes controlling the transport of trace constituents in the troposphere and stratosphere is given

  14. High-resolution liquid patterns via three-dimensional droplet shape control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Rishi; Adera, Solomon; Enright, Ryan; Wang, Evelyn N

    2014-09-25

    Understanding liquid dynamics on surfaces can provide insight into nature's design and enable fine manipulation capability in biological, manufacturing, microfluidic and thermal management applications. Of particular interest is the ability to control the shape of the droplet contact area on the surface, which is typically circular on a smooth homogeneous surface. Here, we show the ability to tailor various droplet contact area shapes ranging from squares, rectangles, hexagons, octagons, to dodecagons via the design of the structure or chemical heterogeneity on the surface. We simultaneously obtain the necessary physical insights to develop a universal model for the three-dimensional droplet shape by characterizing the droplet side and top profiles. Furthermore, arrays of droplets with controlled shapes and high spatial resolution can be achieved using this approach. This liquid-based patterning strategy promises low-cost fabrication of integrated circuits, conductive patterns and bio-microarrays for high-density information storage and miniaturized biochips and biosensors, among others.

  15. Characterization of highly anisotropic three-dimensionally nanostructured surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Generalized ellipsometry, a non-destructive optical characterization technique, is employed to determine geometrical structure parameters and anisotropic dielectric properties of highly spatially coherent three-dimensionally nanostructured thin films grown by glancing angle deposition. The (piecewise) homogeneous biaxial layer model approach is discussed, which can be universally applied to model the optical response of sculptured thin films with different geometries and from diverse materials, and structural parameters as well as effective optical properties of the nanostructured thin films are obtained. Alternative model approaches for slanted columnar thin films, anisotropic effective medium approximations based on the Bruggeman formalism, are presented, which deliver results comparable to the homogeneous biaxial layer approach and in addition provide film constituent volume fraction parameters as well as depolarization or shape factors. Advantages of these ellipsometry models are discussed on the example of metal slanted columnar thin films, which have been conformally coated with a thin passivating oxide layer by atomic layer deposition. Furthermore, the application of an effective medium approximation approach to in-situ growth monitoring of this anisotropic thin film functionalization process is presented. It was found that structural parameters determined with the presented optical model equivalents for slanted columnar thin films agree very well with scanning electron microscope image estimates. - Highlights: • Summary of optical model strategies for sculptured thin films with arbitrary geometries • Application of the rigorous anisotropic Bruggeman effective medium applications • In-situ growth monitoring of atomic layer deposition on biaxial metal slanted columnar thin film

  16. Effects of dependence in high-dimensional multiple testing problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van de Wiel Mark A

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We consider effects of dependence among variables of high-dimensional data in multiple hypothesis testing problems, in particular the False Discovery Rate (FDR control procedures. Recent simulation studies consider only simple correlation structures among variables, which is hardly inspired by real data features. Our aim is to systematically study effects of several network features like sparsity and correlation strength by imposing dependence structures among variables using random correlation matrices. Results We study the robustness against dependence of several FDR procedures that are popular in microarray studies, such as Benjamin-Hochberg FDR, Storey's q-value, SAM and resampling based FDR procedures. False Non-discovery Rates and estimates of the number of null hypotheses are computed from those methods and compared. Our simulation study shows that methods such as SAM and the q-value do not adequately control the FDR to the level claimed under dependence conditions. On the other hand, the adaptive Benjamini-Hochberg procedure seems to be most robust while remaining conservative. Finally, the estimates of the number of true null hypotheses under various dependence conditions are variable. Conclusion We discuss a new method for efficient guided simulation of dependent data, which satisfy imposed network constraints as conditional independence structures. Our simulation set-up allows for a structural study of the effect of dependencies on multiple testing criterions and is useful for testing a potentially new method on π0 or FDR estimation in a dependency context.

  17. Microfluidic engineered high cell density three-dimensional neural cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, D. Kacy; Vukasinovic, Jelena; Glezer, Ari; La Placa, Michelle C.

    2007-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) neural cultures with cells distributed throughout a thick, bioactive protein scaffold may better represent neurobiological phenomena than planar correlates lacking matrix support. Neural cells in vivo interact within a complex, multicellular environment with tightly coupled 3D cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions; however, thick 3D neural cultures at cell densities approaching that of brain rapidly decay, presumably due to diffusion limited interstitial mass transport. To address this issue, we have developed a novel perfusion platform that utilizes forced intercellular convection to enhance mass transport. First, we demonstrated that in thick (>500 µm) 3D neural cultures supported by passive diffusion, cell densities =104 cells mm-3), continuous medium perfusion at 2.0-11.0 µL min-1 improved viability compared to non-perfused cultures (p death and matrix degradation. In perfused cultures, survival was dependent on proximity to the perfusion source at 2.00-6.25 µL min-1 (p 90% viability in both neuronal cultures and neuronal-astrocytic co-cultures. This work demonstrates the utility of forced interstitial convection in improving the survival of high cell density 3D engineered neural constructs and may aid in the development of novel tissue-engineered systems reconstituting 3D cell-cell/cell-matrix interactions.

  18. Inference for High-dimensional Differential Correlation Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, T Tony; Zhang, Anru

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by differential co-expression analysis in genomics, we consider in this paper estimation and testing of high-dimensional differential correlation matrices. An adaptive thresholding procedure is introduced and theoretical guarantees are given. Minimax rate of convergence is established and the proposed estimator is shown to be adaptively rate-optimal over collections of paired correlation matrices with approximately sparse differences. Simulation results show that the procedure significantly outperforms two other natural methods that are based on separate estimation of the individual correlation matrices. The procedure is also illustrated through an analysis of a breast cancer dataset, which provides evidence at the gene co-expression level that several genes, of which a subset has been previously verified, are associated with the breast cancer. Hypothesis testing on the differential correlation matrices is also considered. A test, which is particularly well suited for testing against sparse alternatives, is introduced. In addition, other related problems, including estimation of a single sparse correlation matrix, estimation of the differential covariance matrices, and estimation of the differential cross-correlation matrices, are also discussed.

  19. Bayesian Subset Modeling for High-Dimensional Generalized Linear Models

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Faming

    2013-06-01

    This article presents a new prior setting for high-dimensional generalized linear models, which leads to a Bayesian subset regression (BSR) with the maximum a posteriori model approximately equivalent to the minimum extended Bayesian information criterion model. The consistency of the resulting posterior is established under mild conditions. Further, a variable screening procedure is proposed based on the marginal inclusion probability, which shares the same properties of sure screening and consistency with the existing sure independence screening (SIS) and iterative sure independence screening (ISIS) procedures. However, since the proposed procedure makes use of joint information from all predictors, it generally outperforms SIS and ISIS in real applications. This article also makes extensive comparisons of BSR with the popular penalized likelihood methods, including Lasso, elastic net, SIS, and ISIS. The numerical results indicate that BSR can generally outperform the penalized likelihood methods. The models selected by BSR tend to be sparser and, more importantly, of higher prediction ability. In addition, the performance of the penalized likelihood methods tends to deteriorate as the number of predictors increases, while this is not significant for BSR. Supplementary materials for this article are available online. © 2013 American Statistical Association.

  20. The literary uses of high-dimensional space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Underwood

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Debates over “Big Data” shed more heat than light in the humanities, because the term ascribes new importance to statistical methods without explaining how those methods have changed. What we badly need instead is a conversation about the substantive innovations that have made statistical modeling useful for disciplines where, in the past, it truly wasn’t. These innovations are partly technical, but more fundamentally expressed in what Leo Breiman calls a new “culture” of statistical modeling. Where 20th-century methods often required humanists to squeeze our unstructured texts, sounds, or images into some special-purpose data model, new methods can handle unstructured evidence more directly by modeling it in a high-dimensional space. This opens a range of research opportunities that humanists have barely begun to discuss. To date, topic modeling has received most attention, but in the long run, supervised predictive models may be even more important. I sketch their potential by describing how Jordan Sellers and I have begun to model poetic distinction in the long 19th century—revealing an arc of gradual change much longer than received literary histories would lead us to expect.

  1. Dynamic critical phenomena in two-dimensional fully frustrated Coulomb gas model with disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wei; Luo Mengbo

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic critical phenomena near depinning transition in two-dimensional fully frustrated square lattice Coulomb gas model with disorders was studied using Monte Carlo technique. The ground state of the model system with disorder σ=0.3 is a disordered state. The dependence of charge current density J on electric field E was investigated at low temperatures. The nonlinear J-E behavior near critical depinning field can be described by a scaling function proposed for three-dimensional flux line system [M.B. Luo, X. Hu, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 (2007) 267002]. We evaluated critical exponents and found an Arrhenius creep motion for field region E c /2 c . The scaling law of the depinning transition is also obtained from the scaling function

  2. Dynamical response of local magnons: single impurity limit in one dimensional magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koiller, B.; Rezende, S.M.

    1979-11-01

    The dynamic response of local magnon modes associated with a single impurity spin in one-dimensional ferro and antiferromagnetic insulators is studied theoretically with the use of a Green's function formulation solved exactly, by transfer matrix techniques, for zero temperature. The calculations are applied to the typical 1 - d ferromagnet CsNiF 3 and the antiferromagnet TMMC as functions of the impurity parameters in a way to allow the interpretation of possible future measurements of defect modes in these materials. The theory also explains qualitatively recent measurements in the three dimensional defect antiferromagnets FeF 2 : Mn 2+ , CoF 2 : Mn 2+ and FeF 2 : Co 2+ . (Author) [pt

  3. Polarization dynamics and polarization time of random three-dimensional electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voipio, Timo; Setaelae, Tero; Shevchenko, Andriy; Friberg, Ari T.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the polarization dynamics of random, stationary three-dimensional (3D) electromagnetic fields. For analyzing the time evolution of the instantaneous polarization state, two intensity-normalized polarization autocorrelation functions are introduced, one based on a geometric approach with the Poincare vectors and the other on energy considerations with the Jones vectors. Both approaches lead to the same conclusions on the rate and strength of the polarization dynamics and enable the definition of a polarization time over which the state of polarization remains essentially unchanged. For fields obeying Gaussian statistics, the two correlation functions are shown to be expressible in terms of quantities characterizing partial 3D polarization and electromagnetic coherence. The 3D degree of polarization is found to have the same meaning in the 3D polarization dynamics as the usual two-dimensional (2D) degree of polarization does with planar fields. The formalism is demonstrated with several examples, and it is expected to be useful in applications dealing with polarization fluctuations of 3D light.

  4. Approaches to determining the reliability of a multimodal three-dimensional dynamic signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yury E. Kozlov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The market of modern mobile applications has increasingly strict requirements for the authentication system reliability. This article examines an authentication method using a multimodal three-dimensional dynamic signature (MTDS, that can be used both as a main and additional method of user authentication in mobile applications. It is based on the use of gesture in the air performed by two independent mobile devices as an identifier. The MTDS method has certain advantages over currently used biometric methods, including fingerprint authentication, face recognition and voice recognition. A multimodal three-dimensional dynamic signature allows quickly changing an authentication gesture, as well as concealing the authentication procedure using gestures that do not attract attention. Despite all its advantages, the MTDS method has certain limitations, the main one is building functionally dynamic complex (FDC skills required for accurate repeating an authentication gesture. To correctly create MTDS need to have a system for assessing the reliability of gestures. Approaches to the solution of this task are grouped in this article according to methods of their implementation. Two of the approaches can be implemented only with the use of a server as a centralized MTDS processing center and one approach can be implemented using smartphone's own computing resources. The final part of the article provides data of testing one of these methods on a template performing the MTDS authentication.

  5. Generation of dark solitons and their instability dynamics in two-dimensional condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Gunjan; Rapol, Umakant D.; Nath, Rejish

    2017-04-01

    We analyze numerically the formation and the subsequent dynamics of two-dimensional matter wave dark solitons in a Thomas-Fermi rubidium condensate using various techniques. An initially imprinted sharp phase gradient leads to the dynamical formation of a stationary soliton as well as very shallow gray solitons, whereas a smooth gradient only creates gray solitons. The depth and hence, the velocity of the soliton is provided by the spatial width of the phase gradient, and it also strongly influences the snake-instability dynamics of the two-dimensional solitons. The vortex dipoles stemming from the unstable soliton exhibit rich dynamics. Notably, the annihilation of a vortex dipole via a transient dark lump or a vortexonium state, the exchange of vortices between either a pair of vortex dipoles or a vortex dipole and a single vortex, and so on. For sufficiently large width of the initial phase gradient, the solitons may decay directly into vortexoniums instead of vortex pairs, and also the decay rate is augmented. Later, we discuss alternative techniques to generate dark solitons, which involve a Gaussian potential barrier and time-dependent interactions, both linear and periodic. The properties of the solitons can be controlled by tuning the amplitude or the width of the potential barrier. In the linear case, the number of solitons and their depths are determined by the quench time of the interactions. For the periodic modulation, a transient soliton lattice emerges with its periodicity depending on the modulation frequency, through a wave number selection governed by the local Bogoliubov spectrum. Interestingly, for sufficiently low barrier potential, both Faraday pattern and soliton lattice coexist. The snake instability dynamics of the soliton lattice is characteristically modified if the Faraday pattern is present.

  6. Fluid dynamics of moving fish in a two-dimensional multiparticle collision dynamics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Daniel A. P.; Hildenbrandt, H.; Padding, J. T.; Hemelrijk, C. K.

    2012-02-01

    The fluid dynamics of animal locomotion, such as that of an undulating fish, are of great interest to both biologists and engineers. However, experimentally studying these fluid dynamics is difficult and time consuming. Model studies can be of great help because of their simpler and more detailed analysis. Their insights may guide empirical work. Particularly the recently introduced multiparticle collision dynamics method may be suitable for the study of moving organisms because it is computationally fast, simple to implement, and has a continuous representation of space. As regards the study of hydrodynamics of moving organisms, the method has only been applied at low Reynolds numbers (below 120) for soft, permeable bodies, and static fishlike shapes. In the present paper we use it to study the hydrodynamics of an undulating fish at Reynolds numbers 1100-1500, after confirming its performance for a moving insect wing at Reynolds number 75. We measure (1) drag, thrust, and lift forces, (2) swimming efficiency and spatial structure of the wake, and (3) distribution of forces along the fish body. We confirm the resemblance between the simulated undulating fish and empirical data. In contrast to theoretical predictions, our model shows that for steadily undulating fish, thrust is produced by the rear 2/3 of the body and that the slip ratio U/V (with U the forward swimming speed and V the rearward speed of the body wave) correlates negatively (instead of positively) with the actual Froude efficiency of swimming. Besides, we show that the common practice of modeling individuals while constraining their sideways acceleration causes them to resemble unconstrained fish with a higher tailbeat frequency.

  7. Changes in Dimensionality and Fractal Scaling Suggest Soft-Assembled Dynamics in Human EEG

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiltshire, Travis; Euler, Matthew J.; McKinney, Ty

    2017-01-01

    Humans are high-dimensional, complex systems consisting of many components that must coordinate in order to perform even the simplest of activities. Many behavioral studies, especially in the movement sciences, have advanced the notion of soft-assembly to describe how systems with many components...

  8. Light detection and ranging measurements of wake dynamics. Part II: two-dimensional scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trujillo, Juan-José; Bingöl, Ferhat; Larsen, Gunner Chr.

    2011-01-01

    the instantaneous transversal wake position which is quantitatively compared with the prediction of the Dynamic Wake Meandering model. The results, shown for two 10-min time series, suggest that the conjecture of the wake behaving as a passive tracer is a fair approximation; this corroborates and expands...... the results of one-dimensional measurements already presented in the first part of this paper. Consequently, it is now possible to separate the deterministic and turbulent parts of the wake wind field, thus enabling capturing the wake in the meandering frame of reference. The results correspond, qualitatively...

  9. Structures and Dynamics of Two-Dimensional Dust Lattices with and without Coulomb Molecules in Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Feng; Wang Xue-Jin; Liu Yan-Hong; Ye Mao-Fu; Wang Long

    2010-01-01

    Structures and dynamics of two-dimensional dust lattices with and without Coulomb molecules in plasmas are investigated. The experimental results show that the lattices have the crystal-like hexagonal structures, i.e. most particles have six nearest-neighboring particles. However, the lattice points can be occupied by the individual particles or by a pair of particles called Coulomb molecules. The pair correlation function is used to compare the structures between the lattices with or without the Coulomb molecules. In the experiments, the Coulomb molecules can also decompose and recombine with another individual particle to form a new molecule. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  10. Renormalization group flows in σ-models coupled to two-dimensional dynamical gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penati, S.; Santambrogio, A.; Zanon, D.

    1997-01-01

    We consider a bosonic σ-model coupled to two-dimensional gravity. In the semiclassical limit, c→-∞, we compute the gravity dressing of the β-functions at two-loop order in the matter fields. We find that the corrections due to the presence of dynamical gravity are not expressible simply in terms of a multiplicative factor as previously obtained at the one-loop level. Our result indicates that the critical points of the theory are non-trivially influenced and modified by the induced gravity. (orig.)

  11. Spectroscopy of collective excitations in interacting low-dimensional many-body systems using quench dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsev, Vladimir; Demler, Eugene; Lukin, Mikhail; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2007-11-16

    We study the problem of rapid change of the interaction parameter (quench) in a many-body low-dimensional system. It is shown that, measuring the correlation functions after the quench, the information about a spectrum of collective excitations in a system can be obtained. This observation is supported by analysis of several integrable models and we argue that it is valid for nonintegrable models as well. Our conclusions are supplemented by performing exact numerical simulations on finite systems. We propose that measuring the power spectrum in a dynamically split 1D Bose-Einsten condensate into two coupled condensates can be used as an experimental test of our predictions.

  12. Phase slip process and charge density wave dynamics in a one dimensional conductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habiballah, N.; Zouadi, M.; Arbaoui, A.; Qjani, M.; Dumas, J.

    In this paper, we study the phase slip effect on the charge density wave (CDW) dynamics in a one-dimensional conductor in the weak pinning limit. A considerable enhancement of JCDW is observed in the presence of phase slips. In addition, a spatial dependence of the CDW current density JCDW is also studied showing that a decrease of JCDW with distance from the current contact occurs. The results are discussed in terms the relationship between additional phase slips and the mobility of phase dislocations nucleated at electrical contacts.

  13. Dynamical analysis and simulation of a 2-dimensional disease model with convex incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Pei; Zhang, Wenjing; Wahl, Lindi M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a previously developed 2-dimensional disease model is studied, which can be used for both epidemiologic modeling and in-host disease modeling. The main attention of this paper is focused on various dynamical behaviors of the system, including Hopf and generalized Hopf bifurcations which yield bistability and tristability, Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation, and homoclinic bifurcation. It is shown that the Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation and homoclinic bifurcation provide a new mechanism for generating disease recurrence, that is, cycles of remission and relapse such as the viral blips observed in HIV infection.

  14. Dynamics of toroidal spiral strings around five-dimensional black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igata, Takahisa; Ishihara, Hideki

    2010-01-01

    We examine the separability of the Nambu-Goto equation for test strings in a shape of toroidal spiral in a five-dimensional Kerr-AdS black hole. In particular, for a 'Hopf loop' string which is a special class of the toroidal spiral strings, we show the complete separation of variables occurs in two cases, Kerr background and Kerr-AdS background with equal angular momenta. We also obtain the dynamical solution for the Hopf loop around a black hole and for the general toroidal spiral in Minkowski background.

  15. Competition between abstraction and exchange channels in H + HCN reaction: Full-dimensional quantum dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua, E-mail: hguo@unm.edu [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

    2013-12-14

    Dynamics of the title reaction is investigated on an ab initio based potential energy surface using a full-dimensional quantum wave packet method within the centrifugal sudden approximation. It is shown that the reaction between H and HCN leads to both the hydrogen exchange and hydrogen abstraction channels. The exchange channel has a lower threshold and larger cross section than the abstraction channel. It also has more oscillations due apparently to quantum resonances. Both channels are affected by long-lived resonances supported by potential wells. Comparison with experimental cross sections indicates underestimation of the abstraction barrier height.

  16. Computer experiments on dynamical cloud and space time fluctuations in one-dimensional meta-equilibrium plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouet, J.L.; Feix, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    The test particle picture is a central theory of weakly correlated plasma. While experiments and computer experiments have confirmed the validity of this theory at thermal equilibrium, the extension to meta-equilibrium distributions presents interesting and intriguing points connected to the under or over-population of the tail of these distributions (high velocity) which have not yet been tested. Moreover, the general dynamical Debye cloud (which is a generalization of the static Debye cloud supposing a plasma at thermal equilibrium and a test particle of zero velocity) for any test particle velocity and three typical velocity distributions (equilibrium plus two meta-equilibriums) are presented. The simulations deal with a one-dimensional two-component plasma and, moreover, the relevance of the check for real three-dimensional plasma is outlined. Two kinds of results are presented: the dynamical cloud itself and the more usual density (or energy) fluctuation spectrums. Special attention is paid to the behavior of long wavelengths which needs long systems with very small graininess effects and, consequently, sizable computation efforts. Finally, the divergence or absence of energy in the small wave numbers connected to the excess or lack of fast particles of the two above mentioned meta-equilibrium is exhibited. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  17. Three-dimensional biomechanical properties of human vocal folds: Parameter optimization of a numerical model to match in vitro dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Anxiong; Berry, David A.; Kaltenbacher, Manfred; Döllinger, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The human voice signal originates from the vibrations of the two vocal folds within the larynx. The interactions of several intrinsic laryngeal muscles adduct and shape the vocal folds to facilitate vibration in response to airflow. Three-dimensional vocal fold dynamics are extracted from in vitro hemilarynx experiments and fitted by a numerical three-dimensional-multi-mass-model (3DM) using an optimization procedure. In this work, the 3DM dynamics are optimized over 24 experimental data sets to estimate biomechanical vocal fold properties during phonation. Accuracy of the optimization is verified by low normalized error (0.13 ± 0.02), high correlation (83% ± 2%), and reproducible subglottal pressure values. The optimized, 3DM parameters yielded biomechanical variations in tissue properties along the vocal fold surface, including variations in both the local mass and stiffness of vocal folds. That is, both mass and stiffness increased along the superior-to-inferior direction. These variations were statistically analyzed under different experimental conditions (e.g., an increase in tension as a function of vocal fold elongation and an increase in stiffness and a decrease in mass as a function of glottal airflow). The study showed that physiologically relevant vocal fold tissue properties, which cannot be directly measured during in vivo human phonation, can be captured using this 3D-modeling technique. PMID:22352511

  18. Quality and efficiency in high dimensional Nearest neighbor search

    KAUST Repository

    Tao, Yufei; Yi, Ke; Sheng, Cheng; Kalnis, Panos

    2009-01-01

    Nearest neighbor (NN) search in high dimensional space is an important problem in many applications. Ideally, a practical solution (i) should be implementable in a relational database, and (ii) its query cost should grow sub-linearly with the dataset size, regardless of the data and query distributions. Despite the bulk of NN literature, no solution fulfills both requirements, except locality sensitive hashing (LSH). The existing LSH implementations are either rigorous or adhoc. Rigorous-LSH ensures good quality of query results, but requires expensive space and query cost. Although adhoc-LSH is more efficient, it abandons quality control, i.e., the neighbor it outputs can be arbitrarily bad. As a result, currently no method is able to ensure both quality and efficiency simultaneously in practice. Motivated by this, we propose a new access method called the locality sensitive B-tree (LSB-tree) that enables fast highdimensional NN search with excellent quality. The combination of several LSB-trees leads to a structure called the LSB-forest that ensures the same result quality as rigorous-LSH, but reduces its space and query cost dramatically. The LSB-forest also outperforms adhoc-LSH, even though the latter has no quality guarantee. Besides its appealing theoretical properties, the LSB-tree itself also serves as an effective index that consumes linear space, and supports efficient updates. Our extensive experiments confirm that the LSB-tree is faster than (i) the state of the art of exact NN search by two orders of magnitude, and (ii) the best (linear-space) method of approximate retrieval by an order of magnitude, and at the same time, returns neighbors with much better quality. © 2009 ACM.

  19. Three-dimensional laparoscopy vs 2-dimensional laparoscopy with high-definition technology for abdominal surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fergo, Charlotte; Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This systematic review investigates newer generation 3-dimensional (3D) laparoscopy vs 2-dimensional (2D) laparoscopy in terms of error rating, performance time, and subjective assessment as early comparisons have shown contradictory results due to technological shortcomings. DATA...... Central Register of Controlled Trials database. CONCLUSIONS: Of 643 articles, 13 RCTs were included, of which 2 were clinical trials. Nine of 13 trials (69%) and 10 of 13 trials (77%) found a significant reduction in performance time and error, respectively, with the use of 3D-laparoscopy. Overall, 3D......-laparoscopy was found to be superior or equal to 2D-laparoscopy. All trials featuring subjective evaluation found a superiority of 3D-laparoscopy. More clinical RCTs are still awaited for the convincing results to be reproduced....

  20. Vortex dynamics in two-dimensional Josephson junction arrays with asymmetrically bimodulated potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nie, Qing-Miao; Zhang, Sha-Sha; Chen, Qing-Hu; Zhou, Wei

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of resistively-shunted junction dynamics, we study vortex dynamics in two-dimensional Josephson junction arrays with asymmetrically single and bimodulated periodic pinning potential for the full range of vortex density f. The ratchet effect occurring at a certain range of temperature, current, and f, is observed in our simulation. We explain the microscopic behavior behind this effect by analyzing the vortex distribution and interaction. The reversal of the ratchet effect can be observed at several f values for a small driven current. This effect is stronger when the asymmetric potential is simultaneously introduced in two directions. -- Highlights: ► The ratchet effect in Josephson junction arrays strongly depends on vortex density. ► The reversed ratchet effect can be observed at several f for a small current. ► The interaction between vortices can explain the reversed ratchet effect. ► The ratchet effect is enhanced by injecting the bimodulated asymmetric potential.

  1. Response Functions for the Two-Dimensional Ultracold Fermi Gas: Dynamical BCS Theory and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Ettore; Shi, Hao; Qin, Mingpu; Zhang, Shiwei

    2017-12-01

    Response functions are central objects in physics. They provide crucial information about the behavior of physical systems, and they can be directly compared with scattering experiments involving particles such as neutrons or photons. Calculations of such functions starting from the many-body Hamiltonian of a physical system are challenging and extremely valuable. In this paper, we focus on the two-dimensional (2D) ultracold Fermi atomic gas which has been realized experimentally. We present an application of the dynamical BCS theory to obtain response functions for different regimes of interaction strengths in the 2D gas with zero-range attractive interaction. We also discuss auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) methods for the calculation of imaginary time correlations in these dilute Fermi gas systems. Illustrative results are given and comparisons are made between AFQMC and dynamical BCS theory results to assess the accuracy of the latter.

  2. Quantum dynamics of water dissociative chemisorption on rigid Ni(111): An approximate nine-dimensional treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Bin; Song, Hongwei; Yang, Minghui; Guo, Hua

    2016-01-01

    The quantum dynamics of water dissociative chemisorption on the rigid Ni(111) surface is investigated using a recently developed nine-dimensional potential energy surface. The quantum dynamical model includes explicitly seven degrees of freedom of D 2 O at fixed surface sites, and the final results were obtained with a site-averaging model. The mode specificity in the site-specific results is reported and analyzed. Finally, the approximate sticking probabilities for various vibrationally excited states of D 2 O are obtained considering surface lattice effects and formally all nine degrees of freedom. The comparison with experiment reveals the inaccuracy of the density functional theory and suggests the need to improve the potential energy surface.

  3. Magnetic field line random walk in two-dimensional dynamical turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. F.; Qin, G.; Ma, Q. M.; Song, T.; Yuan, S. B.

    2017-08-01

    The field line random walk (FLRW) of magnetic turbulence is one of the important topics in plasma physics and astrophysics. In this article, by using the field line tracing method, the mean square displacement (MSD) of FLRW is calculated on all possible length scales for pure two-dimensional turbulence with the damping dynamical model. We demonstrate that in order to describe FLRW with the damping dynamical model, a new dimensionless quantity R is needed to be introduced. On different length scales, dimensionless MSD shows different relationships with the dimensionless quantity R. Although the temporal effect affects the MSD of FLRW and even changes regimes of FLRW, it does not affect the relationship between the dimensionless MSD and dimensionless quantity R on all possible length scales.

  4. Ten dimensional SO(10) G.U.T. models with dynamical symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, B.E.; Joshi, G.C.

    1993-01-01

    To date, considerations on SO (10) models within Coset Space Dimensional Reduction (CSDR) have been diagonalized to the standard model or rely upon imaginative applications of Wilson lines so as to avoid the problem of the nonexistence of an intermediate Higgs mechanism. However, there is an alternative approach involving four fermion condensates, breaking symmetries by a dynamical mechanism. Indeed, dynamical symmetry breaking has been the direction taken in some SU(5) models within this framework in order to avoid the problems of electroweak symmetry breaking at the compactification scale. This paper presents realistic models which utilize this mechanism. It is shown that the appropriate fermionic representations can emerge from CSDR and the construction of such condensates within the constraints of this scheme is presented. By introducing discrete symmetries onto the internal manifold a strong breaking of the SO(10) G.U.T. is produced and, more importantly, eliminate Higgs fields of geometrical origin. 31 refs

  5. Controlled chaos: three-dimensional kinematics, fiber histochemistry, and muscle contractile dynamics of autotomized lizard tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, Timothy E; Lipsett, Kathryn R; Syme, Douglas A; Russell, Anthony P

    2013-01-01

    The ability to shed an appendage occurs in both vertebrates and invertebrates, often as a tactic to avoid predation. The tails of lizards, unlike most autotomized body parts of animals, exhibit complex and vigorous movements once disconnected from the body. Despite the near ubiquity of autotomy across groups of lizards and the fact that this is an extraordinary event involving the self-severing of the spinal cord, our understanding of why and how tails move as they do following autotomy is sparse. We herein explore the histochemistry and physiology of the tail muscles of the leopard gecko (Eublepharis macularius), a species that exhibits vigorous and variable tail movements following autotomy. To confirm that the previously studied tail movements of this species are generally representative of geckos and therefore suitable for in-depth muscle studies, we quantified the three-dimensional kinematics of autotomized tails in three additional species. The movements of the tails of all species were generally similar and included jumps, flips, and swings. Our preliminary analyses suggest that some species of gecko exhibit short but high-frequency movements, whereas others exhibit larger-amplitude but lower-frequency movements. We then compared the ATPase and oxidative capacity of muscle fibers and contractile dynamics of isolated muscle bundles from original tails, muscle from regenerate tails, and fast fibers from an upper limb muscle (iliofibularis) of the leopard gecko. Histochemical analysis revealed that more than 90% of the fibers in original and regenerate caudal muscles had high ATPase but possessed a superficial layer of fibers with low ATPase and high oxidative capacity. We found that contraction kinetics, isometric force, work, power output, and the oscillation frequency at which maximum power was generated were lowest in the original tail, followed by the regenerate tail and then the fast fibers of the iliofibularis. Muscle from the original tail exhibited

  6. Quantified Facial Soft-tissue Strain in Animation Measured by Real-time Dynamic 3-Dimensional Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian M. Hsu, MD

    2014-09-01

    Conclusions: This pilot study illustrates that the face can be objectively and quantitatively evaluated using dynamic major strain analysis. The technology of 3-dimensional optical imaging can be used to advance our understanding of facial soft-tissue dynamics and the effects of animation on facial strain over time.

  7. Exploration of High-Dimensional Scalar Function for Nuclear Reactor Safety Analysis and Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Maljovec; Bei Wang; Valerio Pascucci; Peer-Timo Bremer; Michael Pernice; Robert Nourgaliev

    2013-05-01

    The next generation of methodologies for nuclear reactor Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) explicitly accounts for the time element in modeling the probabilistic system evolution and uses numerical simulation tools to account for possible dependencies between failure events. The Monte-Carlo (MC) and the Dynamic Event Tree (DET) approaches belong to this new class of dynamic PRA methodologies. A challenge of dynamic PRA algorithms is the large amount of data they produce which may be difficult to visualize and analyze in order to extract useful information. We present a software tool that is designed to address these goals. We model a large-scale nuclear simulation dataset as a high-dimensional scalar function defined over a discrete sample of the domain. First, we provide structural analysis of such a function at multiple scales and provide insight into the relationship between the input parameters and the output. Second, we enable exploratory analysis for users, where we help the users to differentiate features from noise through multi-scale analysis on an interactive platform, based on domain knowledge and data characterization. Our analysis is performed by exploiting the topological and geometric properties of the domain, building statistical models based on its topological segmentations and providing interactive visual interfaces to facilitate such explorations. We provide a user’s guide to our software tool by highlighting its analysis and visualization capabilities, along with a use case involving dataset from a nuclear reactor safety simulation.

  8. Dynamic high resolution imaging of rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyaoka, R.S.; Lewellen, T.K.; Bice, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    A positron emission tomography with the sensitivity and resolution to do dynamic imaging of rats would be an invaluable tool for biological researchers. In this paper, the authors determine the biological criteria for dynamic positron emission imaging of rats. To be useful, 3 mm isotropic resolution and 2-3 second time binning were necessary characteristics for such a dedicated tomograph. A single plane in which two objects of interest could be imaged simultaneously was considered acceptable. Multi-layered detector designs were evaluated as a possible solution to the dynamic imaging and high resolution imaging requirements. The University of Washington photon history generator was used to generate data to investigate a tomograph's sensitivity to true, scattered and random coincidences for varying detector ring diameters. Intrinsic spatial uniformity advantages of multi-layered detector designs over conventional detector designs were investigated using a Monte Carlo program. As a result, a modular three layered detector prototype is being developed. A module will consist of a layer of five 3.5 mm wide crystals and two layers of six 2.5 mm wide crystals. The authors believe adequate sampling can be achieved with a stationary detector system using these modules. Economical crystal decoding strategies have been investigated and simulations have been run to investigate optimum light channeling methods for block decoding strategies. An analog block decoding method has been proposed and will be experimentally evaluated to determine whether it can provide the desired performance

  9. HEVC for high dynamic range services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Hwan; Zhao, Jie; Misra, Kiran; Segall, Andrew

    2015-09-01

    Displays capable of showing a greater range of luminance values can render content containing high dynamic range information in a way such that the viewers have a more immersive experience. This paper introduces the design aspects of a high dynamic range (HDR) system, and examines the performance of the HDR processing chain in terms of compression efficiency. Specifically it examines the relation between recently introduced Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers (SMPTE) ST 2084 transfer function and the High Efficiency Video Coding (HEVC) standard. SMPTE ST 2084 is designed to cover the full range of an HDR signal from 0 to 10,000 nits, however in many situations the valid signal range of actual video might be smaller than SMPTE ST 2084 supported range. The above restricted signal range results in restricted range of code values for input video data and adversely impacts compression efficiency. In this paper, we propose a code value remapping method that extends the restricted range code values into the full range code values so that the existing standards such as HEVC may better compress the video content. The paper also identifies related non-normative encoder-only changes that are required for remapping method for a fair comparison with anchor. Results are presented comparing the efficiency of the current approach versus the proposed remapping method for HM-16.2.

  10. Using High-Dimensional Image Models to Perform Highly Undetectable Steganography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pevný, Tomáš; Filler, Tomáš; Bas, Patrick

    This paper presents a complete methodology for designing practical and highly-undetectable stegosystems for real digital media. The main design principle is to minimize a suitably-defined distortion by means of efficient coding algorithm. The distortion is defined as a weighted difference of extended state-of-the-art feature vectors already used in steganalysis. This allows us to "preserve" the model used by steganalyst and thus be undetectable even for large payloads. This framework can be efficiently implemented even when the dimensionality of the feature set used by the embedder is larger than 107. The high dimensional model is necessary to avoid known security weaknesses. Although high-dimensional models might be problem in steganalysis, we explain, why they are acceptable in steganography. As an example, we introduce HUGO, a new embedding algorithm for spatial-domain digital images and we contrast its performance with LSB matching. On the BOWS2 image database and in contrast with LSB matching, HUGO allows the embedder to hide 7× longer message with the same level of security level.

  11. Detectors for high resolution dynamic pet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.; Huesman, R.H.

    1983-05-01

    This report reviews the motivation for high spatial resolution in dynamic positron emission tomography of the head and the technical problems in realizing this objective. We present recent progress in using small silicon photodiodes to measure the energy deposited by 511 keV photons in small BGO crystals with an energy resolution of 9.4% full-width at half-maximum. In conjunction with a suitable phototube coupled to a group of crystals, the photodiode signal to noise ratio is sufficient for the identification of individual crystals both for conventional and time-of-flight positron tomography

  12. High dynamic range imaging sensors and architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Darmont, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    Illumination is a crucial element in many applications, matching the luminance of the scene with the operational range of a camera. When luminance cannot be adequately controlled, a high dynamic range (HDR) imaging system may be necessary. These systems are being increasingly used in automotive on-board systems, road traffic monitoring, and other industrial, security, and military applications. This book provides readers with an intermediate discussion of HDR image sensors and techniques for industrial and non-industrial applications. It describes various sensor and pixel architectures capable

  13. Lithium decoration of three dimensional boron-doped graphene frameworks for high-capacity hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yunhui; Meng, Zhaoshun; Liu, Yuzhen; You, Dongsen; Wu, Kai; Lv, Jinchao; Wang, Xuezheng; Deng, Kaiming; Lu, Ruifeng; Rao, Dewei

    2015-01-01

    Based on density functional theory and the first principles molecular dynamics simulations, a three-dimensional B-doped graphene-interconnected framework has been constructed that shows good thermal stability even after metal loading. The average binding energy of adsorbed Li atoms on the proposed material (2.64 eV) is considerably larger than the cohesive energy per atom of bulk Li metal (1.60 eV). This value is ideal for atomically dispersed Li doping in experiments. From grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations, high hydrogen storage capacities of 5.9 wt% and 52.6 g/L in the Li-decorated material are attained at 298 K and 100 bars

  14. Highly mobile charge-transfer excitons in two-dimensional WS2/tetracene heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tong; Yuan, Long; Zhao, Yan; Zhou, Mingwei; Wan, Yan; Mei, Jianguo; Huang, Libai

    2018-01-01

    Charge-transfer (CT) excitons at heterointerfaces play a critical role in light to electricity conversion using organic and nanostructured materials. However, how CT excitons migrate at these interfaces is poorly understood. We investigate the formation and transport of CT excitons in two-dimensional WS2/tetracene van der Waals heterostructures. Electron and hole transfer occurs on the time scale of a few picoseconds, and emission of interlayer CT excitons with a binding energy of ~0.3 eV has been observed. Transport of the CT excitons is directly measured by transient absorption microscopy, revealing coexistence of delocalized and localized states. Trapping-detrapping dynamics between the delocalized and localized states leads to stretched-exponential photoluminescence decay with an average lifetime of ~2 ns. The delocalized CT excitons are remarkably mobile with a diffusion constant of ~1 cm2 s−1. These highly mobile CT excitons could have important implications in achieving efficient charge separation. PMID:29340303

  15. An Unbiased Distance-based Outlier Detection Approach for High-dimensional Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Hoang Vu; Gopalkrishnan, Vivekanand; Assent, Ira

    2011-01-01

    than a global property. Different from existing approaches, it is not grid-based and dimensionality unbiased. Thus, its performance is impervious to grid resolution as well as the curse of dimensionality. In addition, our approach ranks the outliers, allowing users to select the number of desired...... outliers, thus mitigating the issue of high false alarm rate. Extensive empirical studies on real datasets show that our approach efficiently and effectively detects outliers, even in high-dimensional spaces....

  16. Analytical Modeling of Transient Process In Terms of One-Dimensional Problem of Dynamics With Kinematic Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravets Victor V.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional dynamic design of a component characterized by inertia coefficient, elastic coefficient, and coefficient of energy dispersion. The component is affected by external action in the form of time-independent initial kinematic disturbances and varying ones. Mathematical model of component dynamics as well as a new form of analytical representation of transient in terms of one-dimensional problem of kinematic effect is provided. Dynamic design of a component is being carried out according to a theory of modal control.

  17. Dimensionality analysis of multiparticle production at high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilingaryan, A.A.

    1989-01-01

    An algorithm of analysis of multiparticle final states is offered. By the Renyi dimensionalities, which were calculated according to experimental data, though it were hadron distribution over the rapidity intervals or particle distribution in an N-dimensional momentum space, we can judge about the degree of correlation of particles, separate the momentum space projections and areas where the probability measure singularities are observed. The method is tested in a series of calculations with samples of fractal object points and with samples obtained by means of different generators of pseudo- and quasi-random numbers. 27 refs.; 11 figs

  18. Problems of high temperature superconductivity in three-dimensional systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geilikman, B T

    1973-01-01

    A review is given of more recent papers on this subject. These papers have dealt mainly with two-dimensional systems. The present paper extends the treatment to three-dimensional systems, under the following headings: systems with collective electrons of one group and localized electrons of another group (compounds of metals with non-metals-dielectrics, organic substances, undoped semiconductors, molecular crystals); experimental investigations of superconducting compounds of metals with organic compounds, dielectrics, semiconductors, and semi-metals; and systems with two or more groups of collective electrons. Mechanics are considered and models are derived. 86 references.

  19. The Hydrodynamic Study of the Swimming Gliding: a Two-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinho, Daniel A; Barbosa, Tiago M; Rouboa, Abel I; Silva, António J

    2011-09-01

    Nowadays the underwater gliding after the starts and the turns plays a major role in the overall swimming performance. Hence, minimizing hydrodynamic drag during the underwater phases should be a main aim during swimming. Indeed, there are several postures that swimmers can assume during the underwater gliding, although experimental results were not conclusive concerning the best body position to accomplish this aim. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyse the effect in hydrodynamic drag forces of using different body positions during gliding through computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology. For this purpose, two-dimensional models of the human body in steady flow conditions were studied. Two-dimensional virtual models had been created: (i) a prone position with the arms extended at the front of the body; (ii) a prone position with the arms placed alongside the trunk; (iii) a lateral position with the arms extended at the front and; (iv) a dorsal position with the arms extended at the front. The drag forces were computed between speeds of 1.6 m/s and 2 m/s in a two-dimensional Fluent(®) analysis. The positions with the arms extended at the front presented lower drag values than the position with the arms aside the trunk. The lateral position was the one in which the drag was lower and seems to be the one that should be adopted during the gliding after starts and turns.

  20. Dynamical properties and transport coefficients of one-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluids: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhenov, Alexiev M.; Heyes, David M.

    1990-01-01

    The thermodynamics, structure, and transport coefficients, as defined by the Green-Kubo integrals, of the one-dimensional Lennard-Jones fluid are evaluated for a wide range of state points by molecular dynamics computer simulation. These calculations are performed for the first time for thermal conductivity and the viscosity. We observe a transition from hard-rod behavior at low number density to harmonic-spring fluid behavior in the close-packed limit. The self-diffusion coefficient decays with increasing density to a finite limiting value. The thermal conductivity increases with density, tending to ∞ in the close-packed limit. The viscosity in contrast maximizes at intermediate density, tending to zero in the zero density and close-packed limits.

  1. ORBIT : BEAM DYNAMICS CALCULATIONS FOR HIGH - INTENSITY RINGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HOLMES, J.A.; DANILOV, V.; GALAMBOS, J.; SHISHLO, A.; COUSINEAU, S.; CHOU, W.; MICHELOTTI, L.; OSTIGUY, F.; WEI, J.

    2002-01-01

    We are developing a computer code, ORBIT, specifically for beam dynamics calculations in high-intensity rings. Our approach allows detailed simulation of realistic accelerator problems. ORBIT is a particle-in-cell tracking code that transports bunches of interacting particles through a series of nodes representing elements, effects, or diagnostics that occur in the accelerator lattice. At present, ORBIT contains detailed models for strip-foil injection including painting and foil scattering; rf focusing and acceleration; transport through various magnetic elements; longitudinal and transverse impedances; longitudinal, transverse, and three-dimensional space charge forces; collimation and limiting apertures; and the calculation of many useful diagnostic quantities. ORBIT is an object-oriented code, written in C++ and utilizing a scripting interface for the convenience of the user. Ongoing improvements include the addition of a library of accelerator maps, BEAMLINE/MXYZPTLK the introduction of a treatment magnet errors and fringe fields; the conversion of the scripting interface to the standard scripting language, Python; and the parallelization of the computations using MPI. The ORBIT code is an open source, powerful, and convenient tool for studying beam dynamics in high-intensity rings

  2. Dimensionality of heavy metal distribution in waste disposal sites using nonlinear dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modis, Kostas; Komnitsas, Kostas

    2008-01-01

    Mapping of heavy metal contamination in mining and waste disposal sites usually relies on geostatistical approaches and linear stochastic dynamics. The present paper aims to identify, using the Grassberger-Procaccia correlation dimension (CD) algorithm, the existence of a nonlinear deterministic and chaotic dynamic behaviour in the spatial pattern of arsenic, manganese and zinc concentration in a Russian coal waste disposal site. The analysis carried out yielded embedding dimension values ranging between 7 and 8 suggesting thus from a chaotic dynamic perspective that arsenic, manganese and zinc concentration in space is a medium dimensional problem for the regionalized scale considered in this study. This alternative nonlinear dynamics approach may complement conventional geostatistical studies and may be also used for the estimation of risk and the subsequent screening and selection of a feasible remediation scheme in wider mining and waste disposal sites. Finally, the synergistic effect of this study may be further elaborated if additional factors including among others presence of hot spots, density and depth of sampling, mineralogy of wastes and sensitivity of analytical techniques are taken into account

  3. Ground-state and dynamical properties of two-dimensional dipolar Fermi liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abedinpour, Saeed H.; Asgari, Reza; Tanatar, B.; Polini, Marco

    2014-01-01

    We study the ground-state properties of a two-dimensional spin-polarized fluid of dipolar fermions within the Euler–Lagrange Fermi-hypernetted-chain approximation. Our method is based on the solution of a scattering Schrödinger equation for the “pair amplitude” √(g(r)), where g(r) is the pair distribution function. A key ingredient in our theory is the effective pair potential, which includes a bosonic term from Jastrow–Feenberg correlations and a fermionic contribution from kinetic energy and exchange, which is tailored to reproduce the Hartree–Fock limit at weak coupling. Very good agreement with recent results based on quantum Monte Carlo simulations is achieved over a wide range of coupling constants up to the liquid-to-crystal quantum phase transition. Using the fluctuation–dissipation theorem and a static approximation for the effective inter-particle interactions, we calculate the dynamical density–density response function, and furthermore demonstrate that an undamped zero-sound mode exists for any value of the interaction strength, down to infinitesimally weak couplings. -- Highlights: •We have studied the ground state properties of a strongly correlated two-dimensional fluid of dipolar fermions. •We have calculated the effective inter-particle interaction and the dynamical density–density response function. •We have shown that an undamped zero sound mode exists at any value of the interaction strength

  4. Dynamics of infinite-dimensional groups the Ramsey-Dvoretzky-Milman phenomenon

    CERN Document Server

    Pestov, Vladimir

    2006-01-01

    The "infinite-dimensional groups" in the title refer to unitary groups of Hilbert spaces, the infinite symmetric group, groups of homeomorphisms of manifolds, groups of transformations of measure spaces, etc. The book presents an approach to the study of such groups based on ideas from geometric functional analysis and from exploring the interplay between dynamical properties of those groups, combinatorial Ramsey-type theorems, and the phenomenon of concentration of measure. The dynamics of infinite-dimensional groups is very much unlike that of locally compact groups. For instance, every locally compact group acts freely on a suitable compact space (Veech). By contrast, a 1983 result by Gromov and Milman states that whenever the unitary group of a separable Hilbert space continuously acts on a compact space, it has a common fixed point. In the book, this new fast-growing theory is built strictly from well-understood examples up. The book has no close counterpart and is based on recent research articles. At t...

  5. Three-dimensional static and dynamic reactor calculations by the nodal expansion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, B.

    1985-05-01

    This report reviews various method for the calculation of the neutron-flux- and power distribution in an nuclear reactor. The nodal expansion method (NEM) is especially described in much detail. The nodal expansion method solves the diffusion equation. In this method the reactor core is divided into nodes, typically 10 to 20 cm in each direction, and the average flux in each node is calculated. To obtain the coupling between the nodes the local flux inside each node is expressed by use of a polynomial expansion. The expansion is one-dimensional, so inside each node such three expansions occur. To calculate the expansion coefficients it is necessary that the polynomial expansion is a solution to the one-dimensional diffusion equation. When the one-dimensional diffusion equation is established a term with the transversal leakage occur, and this term is expanded after the same polynomials. The resulting equation system with the expansion coefficients as the unknowns is solved with weigthed residual technique. The nodal expansion method is built into a computer program (also called NEM), which is divided into two parts, one part for steady-state calculations and one part for dynamic calculations. It is possible to take advantage of symmetry properties of the reactor core. The program is very flexible with regard to the number of energy groups, the node size, the flux expansion order and the transverse leakage expansion order. The boundary of the core is described by albedos. The program and input to it are described. The program is tested on a number of examples extending from small theoretical one up to realistic reactor cores. Many calculations are done on the wellknown IAEA benchmark case. The calculations have tested the accuracy and the computing time for various node sizes and polynomial expansions. In the dynamic examples various strategies for variation of the time step-length have been tested. (author)

  6. Temporal dynamics of selective attention and conflict resolution during cross-dimensional go-nogo decisions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moschner Carsten

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Decision-making is a fundamental capacity which is crucial to many higher-order psychological functions. We recorded event-related potentials (ERPs during a visual target-identification task that required go-nogo choices. Targets were identified on the basis of cross-dimensional conjunctions of particular colors and forms. Color discriminability was manipulated in three conditions to determine the effects of color distinctiveness on component processes of decision-making. Results Target identification was accompanied by the emergence of prefrontal P2a and P3b. Selection negativity (SN revealed that target-compatible features captured attention more than target-incompatible features, suggesting that intra-dimensional attentional capture was goal-contingent. No changes of cross-dimensional selection priorities were measurable when color discriminability was altered. Peak latencies of the color-related SN provided a chronometric measure of the duration of attention-related neural processing. ERPs recorded over the frontocentral scalp (N2c, P3a revealed that color-overlap distractors, more than form-overlap distractors, required additional late selection. The need for additional response selection induced by color-overlap distractors was severely reduced when color discriminability decreased. Conclusion We propose a simple model of cross-dimensional perceptual decision-making. The temporal synchrony of separate color-related and form-related choices determines whether or not distractor processing includes post-perceptual stages. ERP measures contribute to a comprehensive explanation of the temporal dynamics of component processes of perceptual decision-making.

  7. Matrix correlations for high-dimensional data: The modified RV-coefficient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smilde, A.K.; Kiers, H.A.L.; Bijlsma, S.; Rubingh, C.M.; Erk, M.J. van

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Modern functional genomics generates high-dimensional datasets. It is often convenient to have a single simple number characterizing the relationship between pairs of such high-dimensional datasets in a comprehensive way. Matrix correlations are such numbers and are appealing since they

  8. Construction of high-dimensional neural network potentials using environment-dependent atom pairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, K V Jovan; Artrith, Nongnuch; Behler, Jörg

    2012-05-21

    An accurate determination of the potential energy is the crucial step in computer simulations of chemical processes, but using electronic structure methods on-the-fly in molecular dynamics (MD) is computationally too demanding for many systems. Constructing more efficient interatomic potentials becomes intricate with increasing dimensionality of the potential-energy surface (PES), and for numerous systems the accuracy that can be achieved is still not satisfying and far from the reliability of first-principles calculations. Feed-forward neural networks (NNs) have a very flexible functional form, and in recent years they have been shown to be an accurate tool to construct efficient PESs. High-dimensional NN potentials based on environment-dependent atomic energy contributions have been presented for a number of materials. Still, these potentials may be improved by a more detailed structural description, e.g., in form of atom pairs, which directly reflect the atomic interactions and take the chemical environment into account. We present an implementation of an NN method based on atom pairs, and its accuracy and performance are compared to the atom-based NN approach using two very different systems, the methanol molecule and metallic copper. We find that both types of NN potentials provide an excellent description of both PESs, with the pair-based method yielding a slightly higher accuracy making it a competitive alternative for addressing complex systems in MD simulations.

  9. Neutron Star Population Dynamics. II. Three-dimensional Space Velocities of Young Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, J. M.; Chernoff, David F.

    1998-09-01

    We use astrometric, distance, and spindown data on pulsars to (1) estimate three-dimensional velocity components, birth distances from the Galactic plane, and ages of individual objects; (2) determine the distribution of space velocities and the scale height of pulsar progenitors; (3) test spindown laws for pulsars; (4) test for correlations between space velocities and other pulsar parameters; and (5) place empirical requirements on mechanisms than can produce high-velocity neutron stars. Our approach incorporates measurement errors, uncertainties in distances, deceleration in the Galactic potential, and differential Galactic rotation. We focus on a sample of proper motion measurements of young (case-by-case basis assuming that the actual age equals the conventional spindown age for a braking index n = 3, no torque decay, and birth periods much shorter than present-day periods. Every sample member could have originated within 0.3 kpc of the Galactic plane while still having reasonable present-day peculiar radial velocities. For the 49 object sample, the scale height of the progenitors is ~0.13 kpc, and the three-dimensional velocities are distributed in two components with characteristic speeds of 175+19-24 km s-1 and 700+300-132 km s-1, representing ~86% and ~14% of the population, respectively. The sample velocities are inconsistent with a single-component Gaussian model and are well described by a two-component Gaussian model but do not require models of additional complexity. From the best-fit distribution, we estimate that about 20% of the known pulsars will escape the Galaxy, assuming an escape speed of 500 km s-1. The best-fit, dual-component model, if augmented by an additional, low-velocity (The best three-component models do not show a preference for filling in the probability distribution at speeds intermediate to 175 and 700 km s-1 but are nearly degenerate with the best two-component models. We estimate that the high-velocity tail (>1000 km s-1) may

  10. Dimensional consistency achieved in high-performance synchronizing hubs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, P.; Campos, M.; Torralba, M.

    2013-01-01

    The tolerances of parts produced for the automotive industry are so tight that any small process variation may mean that the product does not fulfill them. As dimensional tolerances decrease, the material properties of parts are expected to be improved. Depending on the dimensional and material requirements of a part, different production routes are available to find robust processes, minimizing cost and maximizing process capability. Dimensional tolerances have been reduced in recent years, and as a result, the double pressing-double sintering production via ( 2 P2S ) has again become an accurate way to meet these increasingly narrow tolerances. In this paper, it is shown that the process parameters of the first sintering have great influence on the following production steps and the dimensions of the final parts. The roles of factors other than density and the second sintering process in defining the final dimensions of product are probed. All trials were done in a production line that produces synchronizer hubs for manual transmissions, allowing the maintenance of stable conditions and control of those parameters that are relevant for the product and process. (Author) 21 refs.

  11. Two dimensional laser induced fluorescence in the gas phase: a spectroscopic tool for studying molecular spectroscopy and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gascooke, Jason R.; Lawrance, Warren D.

    2017-11-01

    Two dimensional laser induced fluorescence (2D-LIF) extends the usual laser induced fluorescence technique by adding a second dimension, the wavelength at which excited states emit, thereby significantly enhancing the information that can be extracted. It allows overlapping absorption features, whether they arise from within the same molecule or from different molecules in a mixture, to be associated with their appropriate "parent" state and/or molecule. While the first gas phase version of the technique was published a decade ago, the technique is in its infancy, having been exploited by only a few groups to date. However, its potential in gas phase spectroscopy and dynamics is significant. In this article we provide an overview of the technique and illustrate its potential with examples, with a focus on those utilising high resolution in the dispersed fluorescence dimension.

  12. Two-dimensional impurity transport calculations for a high recycling divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.N.

    1986-04-01

    Two dimensional analysis of impurity transport in a high recycling divertor shows asymmetric particle fluxes to the divertor plate, low helium pumping efficiency, and high scrapeoff zone shielding for sputtered impurities

  13. Dynamics of face seals for high speed turbomachinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leefe, Simon

    1993-10-01

    Face seals in rocket engine fuel and oxidizer turbopumps have been the subject of intense investigation for over 25 years. While advances have been made in the understanding of thin film lubrication between seal faces, valuable data has been produced on the friction and wear of material pairs in cryogenic environments; pioneering work has been done on the effect of lubricant phase change in seals, and many improvements have been made in mechanical seal design. Relatively superficial attention has been given to the vibrational dynamics of face seals in high-speed turbomachinery. BHR Group Ltd. (formerly BHRA) has recently completed the first stage of a study, commissioned by the European Space Agency, to investigate this area. This has involved the development of a two-dimensional adiabatic, turbulent lubrication model for thick gas film applications, the production of an integrated mathematical model of gas seal vibrational dynamics for thin film applications, implementation in software, the undertaking of an experimental program to validate software against variations in operating conditions and design variables, and suggestions for improved seal design.

  14. Dimensional consistency achieved in high-performance synchronizing hubs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García, P.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The tolerances of parts produced for the automotive industry are so tight that any small process variation may mean that the product does not fulfill them. As dimensional tolerances decrease, the material properties of parts are expected to be improved. Depending on the dimensional and material requirements of a part, different production routes are available to find robust processes, minimizing cost and maximizing process capability. Dimensional tolerances have been reduced in recent years, and as a result, the double pressing-double sintering production via (“2P2S” has again become an accurate way to meet these increasingly narrow tolerances. In this paper, it is shown that the process parameters of the first sintering have great influence on the following production steps and the dimensions of the final parts. The roles of factors other than density and the second sintering process in defining the final dimensions of product are probed. All trials were done in a production line that produces synchronizer hubs for manual transmissions, allowing the maintenance of stable conditions and control of those parameters that are relevant for the product and process.

    Las tolerancias en componentes fabricados para la industria del automóvil son tan estrechas que cualquier modificación en las variables del proceso puede provocar que no se cumplan. Una disminución de las tolerancias dimensionales, puede significar una mejora en las propiedades de las piezas. Dependiendo de los requerimientos dimensionales y del material, distintas rutas de procesado pueden seguirse para encontrar un método de procesado robusto, que minimice costes y maximice la capacidad del proceso. En los últimos años, la tolerancia dimensional se ha ajustado gracias a métodos de procesado como el doble prensado/doble sinterizado (“2P2S”, método de gran precisión para conseguir estrechas tolerancias. En este trabajo, se muestra que los parámetros de procesado

  15. Study of two-dimensional flow by triangular unstructured grid around airfoil with dynamic ground effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haghbin, S.; Farahat, S.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the numerical solution of two-dimensional incompressible viscid flow by triangular unstructured grid around airfoil with dynamic ground effect and by using geometric conservation law (GCL) has been represented. In this analysis, after the mesh generation for physical model, for the purpose of adaption of meshes with physical condition, the mesh adaption method has been used. Also, for increasing the speed of results convergence, the Multigrid method has been applied to the solver of governing equations. Because of the movement of meshes in this analysis, by using a spring simulation, the generated meshes have been moved and in every time step for the purpose of controlling the quality of meshes, by considering the EquiAngle Skew coefficient (EAS) and the volume of each mesh, the meshes that had a large EAS and a volume more than and less than defined maximum and minimum value, have been removed and then regenerated. Also, because the continuity and momentum conservations law were insufficient to work with these moving grids, the geometric conservation law was combined with the other conservation laws and a general equation was obtained for the dynamic meshes. For solving this general equation, the Simple Algorithm has been used. According to the results, the dynamic ground effect causes unsteadiness and also the Lift coefficient is increased vibrationally. And with respect to the type of airfoil, the Drag coefficient can decrease or increase vibrationally. (author)

  16. Coherence and population dynamics of chlorophyll excitations in FCP complex: Two-dimensional spectroscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butkus, Vytautas; Gelzinis, Andrius; Valkunas, Leonas [Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Ave. 9-III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanoriu Ave. 231, 02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Augulis, Ramūnas [Center for Physical Sciences and Technology, Savanoriu Ave. 231, 02300 Vilnius (Lithuania); Gall, Andrew; Robert, Bruno [Institut de Biologie et Technologies de Saclay, Bât 532, Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Büchel, Claudia [Institut für Molekulare Biowissenschaften, Universität Frankfurt, Max-von-Laue-Straße 9, Frankfurt (Germany); Zigmantas, Donatas [Department of Chemical Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 124, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Abramavicius, Darius, E-mail: darius.abramavicius@ff.vu.lt [Department of Theoretical Physics, Faculty of Physics, Vilnius University, Sauletekio Ave. 9-III, 10222 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2015-06-07

    Energy transfer processes and coherent phenomena in the fucoxanthin–chlorophyll protein complex, which is responsible for the light harvesting function in marine algae diatoms, were investigated at 77 K by using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy. Experiments performed on femtosecond and picosecond timescales led to separation of spectral dynamics, witnessing evolutions of coherence and population states of the system in the spectral region of Q{sub y} transitions of chlorophylls a and c. Analysis of the coherence dynamics allowed us to identify chlorophyll (Chl) a and fucoxanthin intramolecular vibrations dominating over the first few picoseconds. Closer inspection of the spectral region of the Q{sub y} transition of Chl c revealed previously not identified, mutually non-interacting chlorophyll c states participating in femtosecond or picosecond energy transfer to the Chl a molecules. Consideration of separated coherent and incoherent dynamics allowed us to hypothesize the vibrations-assisted coherent energy transfer between Chl c and Chl a and the overall spatial arrangement of chlorophyll molecules.

  17. Nonlinear dynamic response of whole pool multiple spent fuel racks subject to three-dimensional excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Y.; Wilson, P.R.; Stevenson, J.D.

    1995-01-01

    The seismic evaluation of submerged free standing spent fuel storage racks is more complicated than most other nuclear structural systems. When subjected to three dimensional (3-D) floor seismic excitations the dynamic responses of racks in a pool are hydro dynamically coupled with each other, with the fuel assemblies water in gaps. The motion behavior of the racks is significantly different from that observed using a 3D single rack mode. Few seismic analyses using 3-D whole pool multiple rack models are available in the literature. I this paper an analysis was performed for twelve racks using potential theory for the fluid-structure interaction, and using a 3-D whole pool multi-rack finite element model developed herein. The analysis includes the potential nonlinear dynamic behavior of the impact of fuel-rack, rack-rack and rack-pool wall, the tilting or uplift and the frictional sliding of rack supports, and the impact of the rack supports to the pool floor. (author). 12 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  18. Inertia-dependent dynamics of three-dimensional vesicles and red blood cells in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zheng Yuan; Wang, Shu Qi; He, Long; Xu, Feng; Bai, Bo Feng

    2013-10-28

    A three-dimensional (3D) simulation study of the effect of inertia on the dynamics of vesicles and red blood cells (RBCs) has not been reported. Here, we developed a 3D model based on the front tracking method to investigate how inertia affects the dynamics of spherical/non-spherical vesicles and biconcave-shaped RBCs with the Reynolds number ranging from 0.1 to 10. The results showed that inertia induced non-spherical vesicles transitioned from tumbling to swinging, which was not observed in previous 2D models. The critical viscosity ratio of inner/outer fluids for the tumbling–swinging transition remarkably increased with an increasing Reynolds number. The deformation of vesicles was greatly enhanced by inertia, and the frequency of tumbling and tank-treading was significantly decreased by inertia. We also found that RBCs can transit from tumbling to steady tank-treading through the swinging regime when the Reynolds number increased from 0.1 to 10. These results indicate that inertia needs to be considered at moderate Reynolds number (Re ~ 1) in the study of blood flow in the human body and the flow of deformable particle suspension in inertial microfluidic devices. The developed 3D model provided new insights into the dynamics of RBCs under shear flow, thus holding great potential to better understand blood flow behaviors under normal/disease conditions.

  19. Study of two-dimensional flow by triangular unstructured grid around airfoil with dynamic ground effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haghbin, S.; Farahat, S. [Sistan and Baluchestan Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Zahedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: sadegh_haghbin@yahoo.com

    2004-07-01

    In this paper, the numerical solution of two-dimensional incompressible viscid flow by triangular unstructured grid around airfoil with dynamic ground effect and by using geometric conservation law (GCL) has been represented. In this analysis, after the mesh generation for physical model, for the purpose of adaption of meshes with physical condition, the mesh adaption method has been used. Also, for increasing the speed of results convergence, the Multigrid method has been applied to the solver of governing equations. Because of the movement of meshes in this analysis, by using a spring simulation, the generated meshes have been moved and in every time step for the purpose of controlling the quality of meshes, by considering the EquiAngle Skew coefficient (EAS) and the volume of each mesh, the meshes that had a large EAS and a volume more than and less than defined maximum and minimum value, have been removed and then regenerated. Also, because the continuity and momentum conservations law were insufficient to work with these moving grids, the geometric conservation law was combined with the other conservation laws and a general equation was obtained for the dynamic meshes. For solving this general equation, the Simple Algorithm has been used. According to the results, the dynamic ground effect causes unsteadiness and also the Lift coefficient is increased vibrationally. And with respect to the type of airfoil, the Drag coefficient can decrease or increase vibrationally. (author)

  20. High Speed Dynamics in Brittle Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiermaier, Stefan

    2015-06-01

    Brittle Materials under High Speed and Shock loading provide a continuous challenge in experimental physics, analysis and numerical modelling, and consequently for engineering design. The dependence of damage and fracture processes on material-inherent length and time scales, the influence of defects, rate-dependent material properties and inertia effects on different scales make their understanding a true multi-scale problem. In addition, it is not uncommon that materials show a transition from ductile to brittle behavior when the loading rate is increased. A particular case is spallation, a brittle tensile failure induced by the interaction of stress waves leading to a sudden change from compressive to tensile loading states that can be invoked in various materials. This contribution highlights typical phenomena occurring when brittle materials are exposed to high loading rates in applications such as blast and impact on protective structures, or meteorite impact on geological materials. A short review on experimental methods that are used for dynamic characterization of brittle materials will be given. A close interaction of experimental analysis and numerical simulation has turned out to be very helpful in analyzing experimental results. For this purpose, adequate numerical methods are required. Cohesive zone models are one possible method for the analysis of brittle failure as long as some degree of tension is present. Their recent successful application for meso-mechanical simulations of concrete in Hopkinson-type spallation tests provides new insight into the dynamic failure process. Failure under compressive loading is a particular challenge for numerical simulations as it involves crushing of material which in turn influences stress states in other parts of a structure. On a continuum scale, it can be modeled using more or less complex plasticity models combined with failure surfaces, as will be demonstrated for ceramics. Models which take microstructural

  1. Dynamic time-dependent analysis and static three-dimensional imaging procedures for computer-assisted CNS studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budinger, T.F.; DeLand, F.H.; Duggan, H.E.; Bouz, J.J.; Hoop, B. Jr.; McLaughlin, W.T.; Weber, P.M.

    1975-01-01

    Two-dimensional computer image-processing techniques have not proved to be of importance in diagnostic nuclear medicine primarily because the radionuclide distribution represents a three-dimensional problem. More recent developments in three-dimensional reconstruction from multiple views or multiple detectors promise to overcome the major limitations in previous work with digital computers. These techniques are now in clinical use for static imaging; however, speed limitations have prevented application to dynamic imaging. The future development of these methods will require innovations in patient positioning and multiple-view devices for either single-gamma or positron annihilation detection

  2. Charge solitons and their dynamical mass in one-dimensional arrays of Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homfeld, Jens; Protopopov, Ivan; Rachel, Stephan; Shnirman, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    We investigate charge transport in one-dimensional arrays of Josephson junctions. In the interesting regime of ''small charge solitons'' (polarons), ΛE J >E C >E J , where Λ is the (electrostatic) screening length, the charge dynamics are strongly influenced by the polaronic effects (i.e., by dressing of a Cooper pair by charge dipoles). In particular, the soliton's mass in this regime scales approximately as E J -2 . We employ two theoretical techniques: the many-body tight-binding approach and the mean-field approach, and the results of the two approaches agree in the regime of ''small charge solitons.'' Renormalization of the soliton's mass could be observed; for example, as enhancement of the persistent current in a ring-shaped array.

  3. Three dimensional computational fluid dynamic analysis of debris transport under emergency cooling water recirculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Woon

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis method on the evaluation of debris transport under emergency recirculation mode after loss of coolant accident of a nuclear power plant. Three dimensional reactor building floor geometrical model is constructed including flow obstacles larger than 6 inches such as mechanical components and equipments and considering various inlet flow paths from the upper reactor building such as break and spray flow. In the modeling of the inlet flows from the upper floors, effect of gravitational force was also reflected. For the precision of the analysis, 3 millions of tetrahedral-shaped meshes were generated. Reference calculation showed physically reasonable results. Sensitivity studies for mesh type and turbulence model showed very similar results to the reference case. This study provides useful information on the application of CFD to the evaluation of debris transport fraction for the design of new emergency sump filters. (orig.)

  4. Dynamics of vacancies in two-dimensional Lennard-Jones crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhenwei; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica

    2015-03-01

    Vacancies represent an important class of crystallographic defects, and their behaviors can be strongly coupled with relevant material properties. We report the rich dynamics of vacancies in two-dimensional Lennard-Jones crystals in several thermodynamic states. Specifically, we numerically observe significantly faster diffusion of the 2-point vacancy with two missing particles in comparison with other types of vacancies; it opens the possibility of doping 2-point vacancies into atomic materials to enhance atomic migration. In addition, the resulting dislocations in the healing of a long vacancy suggest the intimate connection between vacancies and topological defects that may provide an extra dimension in the engineering of defects in extensive crystalline materials for desired properties. We thank the financial support from the U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Office of the Director of Defense Research and Engineering (DDR&E) and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  5. Interaction and dynamics of add-atoms with 2-dimensional structures

    CERN Multimedia

    The interaction and dynamics of add-atoms with graphene, graphene-derivate structures and, later, MoSi$_2$, two-dimensional – single and few – atomic layers will be studied with the Perturbed Angular Correlation – PAC – technique. Graphene is also envisaged as new platform for growing semiconductor nanostructure devices, such as quantum dots and as a particularly powerful catalyst. Understanding nucleation of nanostructures and clusters on graphene and related phases in wet conditions as they are used in chemical methods in research and industry require complementary studies. These systems will therefore be studied systematically using radioactive probe atoms attaching via a transfer media (e.g., water in catalysis process) or being deposited with soft-landing techniques under vacuum and UHV conditions, as put in place at the ASPIC setup at ISOLDE. The hyperfine fields obtained under different environments are expected to reveal basic information on the rich atomic and physical mechanisms associated w...

  6. UAV formation control design with obstacle avoidance in dynamic three-dimensional environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kai; Xia, Yuanqing; Huang, Kaoli

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the artificial potential field method combined with rotational vectors for a general problem of multi-unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) systems tracking a moving target in dynamic three-dimensional environment. An attractive potential field is generated between the leader and the target. It drives the leader to track the target based on the relative position of them. The other UAVs in the formation are controlled to follow the leader by the attractive control force. The repulsive force affects among the UAVs to avoid collisions and distribute the UAVs evenly on the spherical surface whose center is the leader-UAV. Specific orders or positions of the UAVs are not required. The trajectories of avoidance obstacle can be obtained through two kinds of potential field with rotation vectors. Every UAV can choose the optimal trajectory to avoid the obstacle and reconfigure the formation after passing the obstacle. Simulations study on UAV are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of proposed method.

  7. Computational fluid dynamics in three dimensional angiography: Preliminary hemodynamic results of various proximal geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ha Youn; Park, Sung Tae; Bae, Won Kyoung; Goo, Dong Erk [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    We studied the influence of proximal geometry on the results of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). We made five models of different proximal geometry from three dimensional angiography of 63-year-old women with intracranial aneurysm. CFD results were analyzed as peak systolic velocity (PSV) at inlet and outlet as well as flow velocity profile at proximal level of internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm. Modified model of cavernous one with proximal tubing showed faster PSV at outlet than that at inlet. The PSV of outlets of other models were slower than that of inlets. The flow velocity profiles at immediate proximal to ICA aneurysm showed similar patterns in all models, suggesting that proximal vessel geometries could affect CFD results.

  8. Three-Dimensional Dynamic Topology Optimization with Frequency Constraints Using Composite Exponential Function and ICM Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongling Ye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic topology optimization of three-dimensional continuum structures subject to frequency constraints is investigated using Independent Continuous Mapping (ICM design variable fields. The composite exponential function (CEF is selected to be a filter function which recognizes the design variables and to implement the changing process of design variables from “discrete” to “continuous” and back to “discrete.” Explicit formulations of frequency constraints are given based on filter functions, first-order Taylor series expansion. And an improved optimal model is formulated using CEF and the explicit frequency constraints. Dual sequential quadratic programming (DSQP algorithm is used to solve the optimal model. The program is developed on the platform of MSC Patran & Nastran. Finally, numerical examples are given to demonstrate the validity and applicability of the proposed method.

  9. Molecular dynamics of shock waves in one-dimensional chains. II. Thermalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, G.K.; Holian, B.L.; Petschek, R.G.

    1979-01-01

    The thermalization behavior behind a shock front in one-dimensional chains has been studied in a series of molecular-dynamics computer experiments. We have found that a shock wave generated in a chain initially at finite temperature has essentially the same characteristics as in a chain initially at zero temperature. We also find that the final velocity distribution function for particles behind the shock front is not the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution for an equilibrium system of classical particles. For times long after the shock has passed, we propose a nonequilibrium velocity distribution which is based upon behavior in the harmonic and hard-rod limits and agrees with our numerical results. Temperature profiles for both harmonic and anharmonic chains are found to exhibit a long-time tail that decays inversely with time. Finally, we have run a computer experiment to generate what qualitatively resembles solitons in Toda chains by means of shock waves

  10. A multi-dimensional dynamic linear model for monitoring slaughter pig production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dan Børge; Cornou, Cecile; Toft, Nils

    Scientists and farmers still lack an efficient way to unify the large number of different types of data series, which are increasingly being generated in relation to automatic herd monitoring. Such a unifying model should be able to account for the correlations between the various types of data......, feed-and water consumption), measured at different levels of detail (individual pig and double-pen level) and with different observational frequencies (weekly and daily), using series collected for the Danish PigIT project. The presented three-dimensional model serves as a proof of concept......, resulting in a model which could potentially yield more information than can be gained from the individual components separately. Here we present such a model for monitoring slaughter pig production, in the form of a multivariate dynamic linear model. This model unifies three types of data (live weight...

  11. MARKOV GRAPHS OF ONE–DIMENSIONAL DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS AND THEIR DISCRETE ANALOGUES AND THEIR DISCRETE ANALOGUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SERGIY KOZERENKO

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available One feature of the famous Sharkovsky’s theorem is that it can be proved using digraphs of a special type (the so–called Markov graphs. The most general definition assigns a Markov graph to every continuous map from the topological graph to itself. We show that this definition is too broad, i.e. every finite digraph can be viewed as a Markov graph of some one–dimensional dynamical system on a tree. We therefore consider discrete analogues of Markov graphs for vertex maps on combinatorial trees and characterize all maps on trees whose discrete Markov graphs are of the following types: complete, complete bipartite, the disjoint union of cycles, with every arc being a loop.

  12. (2+1)-dimensional quantum gravity as the continuum limit of causal dynamical triangulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedetti, D.; Loll, R.; Zamponi, F.

    2007-01-01

    We perform a nonperturbative sum over geometries in a (2+1)-dimensional quantum gravity model given in terms of causal dynamical triangulations. Inspired by the concept of triangulations of product type introduced previously, we impose an additional notion of order on the discrete, causal geometries. This simplifies the combinatorial problem of counting geometries just enough to enable us to calculate the transfer matrix between boundary states labeled by the area of the spatial universe, as well as the corresponding quantum Hamiltonian of the continuum theory. This is the first time in dimension larger than 2 that a Hamiltonian has been derived from such a model by mainly analytical means, and it opens the way for a better understanding of scaling and renormalization issues

  13. Dynamics of wave packets in two-dimensional random systems with anisotropic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samelsohn, Gregory; Gruzdev, Eugene

    2008-09-01

    A theoretical model is proposed to describe narrowband pulse dynamics in two-dimensional systems with arbitrary correlated disorder. In anisotropic systems with elongated cigarlike inhomogeneities, fast propagation is predicted in the direction across the structure where the wave is exponentially localized and tunneling of evanescent modes plays a dominant role in typical realizations. Along the structure, where the wave is channeled as in a waveguide, the motion of the wave energy is relatively slow. Numerical simulations performed for ultra-wide-band pulses show that even at the initial stage of wave evolution, the radiation diffuses predominantly in the direction along the major axis of the correlation ellipse. Spectral analysis of the results relates the long tail of the wave observed in the transverse direction to a number of frequency domain "lucky shots" associated with the long-living resonant modes localized inside the sample.

  14. Interface between path and orbital angular momentum entanglement for high-dimensional photonic quantum information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickler, Robert; Lapkiewicz, Radek; Huber, Marcus; Lavery, Martin P J; Padgett, Miles J; Zeilinger, Anton

    2014-07-30

    Photonics has become a mature field of quantum information science, where integrated optical circuits offer a way to scale the complexity of the set-up as well as the dimensionality of the quantum state. On photonic chips, paths are the natural way to encode information. To distribute those high-dimensional quantum states over large distances, transverse spatial modes, like orbital angular momentum possessing Laguerre Gauss modes, are favourable as flying information carriers. Here we demonstrate a quantum interface between these two vibrant photonic fields. We create three-dimensional path entanglement between two photons in a nonlinear crystal and use a mode sorter as the quantum interface to transfer the entanglement to the orbital angular momentum degree of freedom. Thus our results show a flexible way to create high-dimensional spatial mode entanglement. Moreover, they pave the way to implement broad complex quantum networks where high-dimensionally entangled states could be distributed over distant photonic chips.

  15. Data-driven forecasting of high-dimensional chaotic systems with long short-term memory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlachas, Pantelis R; Byeon, Wonmin; Wan, Zhong Y; Sapsis, Themistoklis P; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2018-05-01

    We introduce a data-driven forecasting method for high-dimensional chaotic systems using long short-term memory (LSTM) recurrent neural networks. The proposed LSTM neural networks perform inference of high-dimensional dynamical systems in their reduced order space and are shown to be an effective set of nonlinear approximators of their attractor. We demonstrate the forecasting performance of the LSTM and compare it with Gaussian processes (GPs) in time series obtained from the Lorenz 96 system, the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation and a prototype climate model. The LSTM networks outperform the GPs in short-term forecasting accuracy in all applications considered. A hybrid architecture, extending the LSTM with a mean stochastic model (MSM-LSTM), is proposed to ensure convergence to the invariant measure. This novel hybrid method is fully data-driven and extends the forecasting capabilities of LSTM networks.

  16. Development of three-dimensional neoclassical transport simulation code with high performance Fortran on a vector-parallel computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satake, Shinsuke; Okamoto, Masao; Nakajima, Noriyoshi; Takamaru, Hisanori

    2005-11-01

    A neoclassical transport simulation code (FORTEC-3D) applicable to three-dimensional configurations has been developed using High Performance Fortran (HPF). Adoption of computing techniques for parallelization and a hybrid simulation model to the δf Monte-Carlo method transport simulation, including non-local transport effects in three-dimensional configurations, makes it possible to simulate the dynamism of global, non-local transport phenomena with a self-consistent radial electric field within a reasonable computation time. In this paper, development of the transport code using HPF is reported. Optimization techniques in order to achieve both high vectorization and parallelization efficiency, adoption of a parallel random number generator, and also benchmark results, are shown. (author)

  17. Analytic calculation of the dynamical aperture for the two dimensional betatron motion in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagel, J.; Moshammer, H.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper the authors study the on- momentum nonlinear equations of motion for the coupled transverse motion of a single charged particle in a storage ring. The authors seek for the maximum initial linear amplitudes in the two transverse directions x and y which lead to bounded particle motion as t tends to infinity. Although the authors restrict themselves to sextupole fields in this paper, the authors may easily extend the method to any order multipole. The aim of this work is to derive an analytic approximate expression for the dynamical aperture. The authors approach the solutions of x and y by use of a classical secular perturbation theory. Every coefficient of the perturbation series can be expressed as an analytic function of all the lower order coefficients. Although perturbation theory if it is evaluated to certain specific order leads only to an approximation in terms of bounded (trigonometric) functions the authors may derive information about the stability limit by considering the convergency radius of the general perturbation. This is done in the present paper by deriving an approximate analytic expression for the n-th order perturbation contribution of the whole series using only results up to second order. The actual calculations have been performed for the fully two dimensional case but for simplicity the authors shall explain only the one dimensional case of the pure horizontal motion

  18. Simulations of four-dimensional simplicial quantum gravity as dynamical triangulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agishtein, M.E.; Migdal, A.A.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, Four-Dimensional Simplicial Quantum Gravity is simulated using the dynamical triangulation approach. The authors studied simplicial manifolds of spherical topology and found the critical line for the cosmological constant as a function of the gravitational one, separating the phases of opened and closed Universe. When the bare cosmological constant approaches this line from above, the four-volume grows: the authors reached about 5 x 10 4 simplexes, which proved to be sufficient for the statistical limit of infinite volume. However, for the genuine continuum theory of gravity, the parameters of the lattice model should be further adjusted to reach the second order phase transition point, where the correlation length grows to infinity. The authors varied the gravitational constant, and they found the first order phase transition, similar to the one found in three-dimensional model, except in 4D the fluctuations are rather large at the transition point, so that this is close to the second order phase transition. The average curvature in cutoff units is large and positive in one phase (gravity), and small negative in another (antigravity). The authors studied the fractal geometry of both phases, using the heavy particle propagator to define the geodesic map, as well as with the old approach using the shortest lattice paths

  19. Dynamical observations on the crack tip zone and stress corrosion of two-dimensional MoS2

    KAUST Repository

    Ly, Thuc Hue

    2017-01-18

    Whether and how fracture mechanics needs to be modified for small length scales and in systems of reduced dimensionality remains an open debate. Here, employing in situ transmission electron microscopy, atomic structures and dislocation dynamics in the crack tip zone of a propagating crack in two-dimensional (2D) monolayer MoS2 membrane are observed, and atom-to-atom displacement mapping is obtained. The electron beam is used to initiate the crack; during in situ observation of crack propagation the electron beam effect is minimized. The observed high-frequency emission of dislocations is beyond previous understanding of the fracture of brittle MoS2. Strain analysis reveals dislocation emission to be closely associated with the crack propagation path in nanoscale. The critical crack tip plastic zone size of nearly perfect 2D MoS2 is between 2 and 5 nm, although it can grow to 10 nm under corrosive conditions such as ultraviolet light exposure, showing enhanced dislocation activity via defect generation.

  20. Neutron scattering study on the spin dynamics of the two dimensional square lattice antiferromagnet, La2NiO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Kenji; Yamada, Kazuyoshi; Hosoya, Syoichi; Endoh, Yasuo; Omata, Tomoya; Arai, Masatoshi; Taylor, A.

    1993-01-01

    The spin dynamics of an S = 1, two dimensional (2D) square lattice antiferromagnet, La 2 NiO 4 was studied by neutron scattering experiments in wide energy (E N ), the spin wave excitations of La 2 NiO 4 are well described by a classical spin wave theory. The nearest-neighbor-exchange coupling constant, the in-plane and the out-of-plane anisotropy constants at 10 K were determined to be 28.7±0.7 meV, 0.10±0.02 meV and 1.26±0.12 meV, respectively. Above T N , the 2D spin fluctuation was observed over 600 K. The critical slowing down behavior of the fluctuation was observed in the enhancement of the low energy component toward T N . On the other hand, the high energy component is hardly affected by the three dimensional magnetic transition and still exists even at T N as observed in La 2 CuO 4 . The spin correlation length and the static structure factor at the 2D zone center were measured and compared with theoretical calculations for 2D Heisenberg antiferromagnets. (author)

  1. Multigrid for high dimensional elliptic partial differential equations on non-equidistant grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    bin Zubair, H.; Oosterlee, C.E.; Wienands, R.

    2006-01-01

    This work presents techniques, theory and numbers for multigrid in a general d-dimensional setting. The main focus is the multigrid convergence for high-dimensional partial differential equations (PDEs). As a model problem we have chosen the anisotropic diffusion equation, on a unit hypercube. We

  2. Simulations of NLC formation using a microphysical model driven by three-dimensional dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Annekatrin; Becker, Erich; Rapp, Markus; Megner, Linda; Wilms, Henrike

    2014-05-01

    Noctilucent clouds (NLCs) represent an optical phenomenon occurring in the polar summer mesopause region. These clouds have been known since the late 19th century. Current physical understanding of NLCs is based on numerous observational and theoretical studies, in recent years especially observations from satellites and by lidars from ground. Theoretical studies based on numerical models that simulate NLCs with the underlying microphysical processes are uncommon. Up to date no three-dimensional numerical simulations of NLCs exist that take all relevant dynamical scales into account, i.e., from the planetary scale down to gravity waves and turbulence. Rather, modeling is usually restricted to certain flow regimes. In this study we make a more rigorous attempt and simulate NLC formation in the environment of the general circulation of the mesopause region by explicitly including gravity waves motions. For this purpose we couple the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmosphere (CARMA) to gravity-wave resolving dynamical fields simulated beforehand with the Kuehlungsborn Mechanistic Circulation Model (KMCM). In our case, the KMCM is run with a horizontal resolution of T120 which corresponds to a minimum horizontal wavelength of 350 km. This restriction causes the resolved gravity waves to be somewhat biased to larger scales. The simulated general circulation is dynamically controlled by these waves in a self-consitent fashion and provides realistic temperatures and wind-fields for July conditions. Assuming a water vapor mixing ratio profile in agreement with current observations results in reasonable supersaturations of up to 100. In a first step, CARMA is applied to a horizontal section covering the Northern hemisphere. The vertical resolution is 120 levels ranging from 72 to 101 km. In this paper we will present initial results of this coupled dynamical microphysical model focussing on the interaction of waves and turbulent diffusion with NLC-microphysics.

  3. A Fast and High-precision Orientation Algorithm for BeiDou Based on Dimensionality Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHAO Jiaojiao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A fast and high-precision orientation algorithm for BeiDou is proposed by deeply analyzing the constellation characteristics of BeiDou and GEO satellites features.With the advantage of good east-west geometry, the baseline vector candidate values were solved by the GEO satellites observations combined with the dimensionality reduction theory at first.Then, we use the ambiguity function to judge the values in order to obtain the optical baseline vector and get the wide lane integer ambiguities. On this basis, the B1 ambiguities were solved. Finally, the high-precision orientation was estimated by the determinating B1 ambiguities. This new algorithm not only can improve the ill-condition of traditional algorithm, but also can reduce the ambiguity search region to a great extent, thus calculating the integer ambiguities in a single-epoch.The algorithm is simulated by the actual BeiDou ephemeris and the result shows that the method is efficient and fast for orientation. It is capable of very high single-epoch success rate(99.31% and accurate attitude angle (the standard deviation of pitch and heading is respectively 0.07°and 0.13°in a real time and dynamic environment.

  4. High-Dimensional Function Approximation With Neural Networks for Large Volumes of Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andras, Peter

    2018-02-01

    Approximation of high-dimensional functions is a challenge for neural networks due to the curse of dimensionality. Often the data for which the approximated function is defined resides on a low-dimensional manifold and in principle the approximation of the function over this manifold should improve the approximation performance. It has been show that projecting the data manifold into a lower dimensional space, followed by the neural network approximation of the function over this space, provides a more precise approximation of the function than the approximation of the function with neural networks in the original data space. However, if the data volume is very large, the projection into the low-dimensional space has to be based on a limited sample of the data. Here, we investigate the nature of the approximation error of neural networks trained over the projection space. We show that such neural networks should have better approximation performance than neural networks trained on high-dimensional data even if the projection is based on a relatively sparse sample of the data manifold. We also find that it is preferable to use a uniformly distributed sparse sample of the data for the purpose of the generation of the low-dimensional projection. We illustrate these results considering the practical neural network approximation of a set of functions defined on high-dimensional data including real world data as well.

  5. Molecular dynamics in high electric fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apostol, M.; Cune, L.C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • New method for rotation molecular spectra in high electric fields. • Parametric resonances – new features in spectra. • New elementary excitations in polar solids from dipolar interaction (“dipolons”). • Discussion about a possible origin of the ferroelectricity from dipolar interactions. - Abstract: Molecular rotation spectra, generated by the coupling of the molecular electric-dipole moments to an external time-dependent electric field, are discussed in a few particular conditions which can be of some experimental interest. First, the spherical-pendulum molecular model is reviewed, with the aim of introducing an approximate method which consists in the separation of the azimuthal and zenithal motions. Second, rotation spectra are considered in the presence of a static electric field. Two particular cases are analyzed, corresponding to strong and weak fields. In both cases the classical motion of the dipoles consists of rotations and vibrations about equilibrium positions; this motion may exhibit parametric resonances. For strong fields a large macroscopic electric polarization may appear. This situation may be relevant for polar matter (like pyroelectrics, ferroelectrics), or for heavy impurities embedded in a polar solid. The dipolar interaction is analyzed in polar condensed matter, where it is shown that new polarization modes appear for a spontaneous macroscopic electric polarization (these modes are tentatively called “dipolons”); one of the polarization modes is related to parametric resonances. The extension of these considerations to magnetic dipoles is briefly discussed. The treatment is extended to strong electric fields which oscillate with a high frequency, as those provided by high-power lasers. It is shown that the effect of such fields on molecular dynamics is governed by a much weaker, effective, renormalized, static electric field.

  6. Nonlinear Dynamic of Curved Railway Tracks in Three-Dimensional Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Ngamkhanong, C.; Kaewunruen, S.

    2017-12-01

    On curved tracks, high-pitch noise pollution can often be a considerable concern of rail asset owners, commuters, and people living or working along the rail corridor. Inevitably, wheel/rail interface can cause a traveling source of sound and vibration, which spread over a long distance of rail network. The sound and vibration can be in various forms and spectra. The undesirable sound and vibration on curves is often called ‘noise,’ includes flanging and squealing noises. This paper focuses on the squeal noise phenomena on curved tracks located in urban environments. It highlights the effect of curve radii on lateral track dynamics. It is important to note that rail freight curve noises, especially for curve squeals, can be observed almost everywhere and every type of track structures. The most pressing noise appears at sharper curved tracks where excessive lateral wheel/rail dynamics resonate with falling friction states, generating a tonal noise problem, so-call ‘squeal’. Many researchers have carried out measurements and simulations to understand the actual root causes of the squeal noise. Most researchers believe that wheel resonance over falling friction is the main cause, whilst a few others think that dynamic mode coupling of wheel and rail may also cause the squeal. Therefore, this paper is devoted to systems thinking the approach and dynamic assessment in resolving railway curve noise problems. The simulations of railway tracks with different curve radii will be carried out to develop state-of-the-art understanding into lateral track dynamics, including rail dynamics, cant dynamics, gauge dynamics and overall track responses.

  7. Two-dimensional computer simulation of high intensity proton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Lapostolle, Pierre M

    1972-01-01

    A computer program has been developed which simulates the two- dimensional transverse behaviour of a proton beam in a focusing channel. The model is represented by an assembly of a few thousand 'superparticles' acted upon by their own self-consistent electric field and an external focusing force. The evolution of the system is computed stepwise in time by successively solving Poisson's equation and Newton's law of motion. Fast Fourier transform techniques are used for speed in the solution of Poisson's equation, while extensive area weighting is utilized for the accurate evaluation of electric field components. A computer experiment has been performed on the CERN CDC 6600 computer to study the nonlinear behaviour of an intense beam in phase space, showing under certain circumstances a filamentation due to space charge and an apparent emittance growth. (14 refs).

  8. The effects of dynamic and three-dimensional environments on chondrogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Youngmee; Kim, Sang-Heon; Kim, Soo Hyun [Biomaterials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, PO Box 131, Cheonryang, Seoul, 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Ha, E-mail: soohkim@kist.re.k [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 261 Cheomdan-gwagiro, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    Articular cartilage is subjected to complex loading, which plays a major role in its growth, development and maintenance. Previously, we found that mechanical stimuli enhanced the development and function of engineered cartilage tissues in elastic mechano-active poly(lactide-co-caprolactone) (PLCL) scaffolds. In addition, it is well known that the three-dimensional spatial organization of cells and extracellular matrices in hydrogels is crucial to chondrogenesis. This study was conducted to enhance the chondrogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in the hybrid scaffolds of fibrin gels and PLCL scaffolds in dynamic environments by compression. A highly elastic scaffold was fabricated from very elastic PLCL with 85% porosity and a 300-500{mu}m pore size using a gel-pressing method. A mixture of rabbit BMSCs and fibrin gels was then seeded onto the PLCL scaffolds and subjected to continuous compressive deformation of 5% strain at 0.1 Hz for 10 days in a chondrogenic medium containing 10 ng ml{sup -1} TGF-beta{sub 1}. The BMSCs-seeded scaffold constructs were then implanted subcutaneously into nude mice. As a control, the cell-PLCL scaffold constructs were cultured under dynamic conditions or the cell-PLCL/fibrin hybrid scaffold constructs and the cell-PLCL scaffold constructs were cultured under static conditions for 10 days in vitro. The results revealed that cells adhered onto the hybrid scaffolds of fibrin gels and PLCL scaffolds cultured under dynamic conditions. In addition, the accumulation of the extracellular matrix of cell-scaffold constructs, which was increased through mechanical stimulation, showed that chondrogenic differentiation was sustained and enhanced significantly in the stimulated hybrid scaffold constructs. Overall, the results of this study indicate that the proper periodic application of dynamic compression and the three-dimensional environments of the hybrid scaffolds composed of fibrin gels and elastic PLCL can encourage

  9. Dynamics of pre-strained bi-material elastic systems linearized three-dimensional approach

    CERN Document Server

    Akbarov, Surkay D

    2015-01-01

    This book deals with dynamics of pre-stressed or pre-strained bi-material elastic systems consisting of stack of pre-stressed layers, stack of pre-stressed layers and pre-stressed half space (or half plane), stack of pre-stressed layers as well as absolute rigid foundation, pre-stressed compound solid and hollow cylinders and pre-stressed sandwich hollow cylinders. The problems considered in the book relate to the dynamics of a moving and oscillating moving load, forced vibration caused by linearly located or point located time-harmonic forces acting to the foregoing systems. Moreover, a considerable part of the book relate to the problems regarding the near surface, torsional and axisymmetric longitudinal waves propagation and dispersion in the noted above bi-material elastic systems. The book carries out the investigations within the framework of the piecewise homogeneous body model with the use of the Three-Dimensional Linearized Theory of Elastic Waves in Initially Stressed Bodies.

  10. Analytical description of critical dynamics for two-dimensional dissipative nonlinear maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Méndez-Bermúdez, J.A.; Oliveira, Juliano A. de; Leonel, Edson D.

    2016-01-01

    The critical dynamics near the transition from unlimited to limited action diffusion for two families of well known dissipative nonlinear maps, namely the dissipative standard and dissipative discontinuous maps, is characterized by the use of an analytical approach. The approach is applied to explicitly obtain the average squared action as a function of the (discrete) time and the parameters controlling nonlinearity and dissipation. This allows to obtain a set of critical exponents so far obtained numerically in the literature. The theoretical predictions are verified by extensive numerical simulations. We conclude that all possible dynamical cases, independently on the map parameter values and initial conditions, collapse into the universal exponential decay of the properly normalized average squared action as a function of a normalized time. The formalism developed here can be extended to many other different types of mappings therefore making the methodology generic and robust. - Highlights: • We analytically approach scaling properties of a family of two-dimensional dissipative nonlinear maps. • We derive universal scaling functions that were obtained before only approximately. • We predict the unexpected condition where diffusion and dissipation compensate each other exactly. • We find a new universal scaling function that embraces all possible dissipative behaviors.

  11. Dynamics of a two-dimensional discrete-time SIS model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime H. Barrera

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We analyze a two-dimensional discrete-time SIS model with a non-constant total population. Our goal is to determine the interaction between the total population, the susceptible class and the infective class, and the implications this may have for the disease dynamics. Utilizing a constant recruitment rate in the susceptible class, it is possible to assume the existence of an asymptotic limiting equation, which enables us to reduce the system of, two-equations into a single, dynamically equivalent equation. In this case, we are able to demonstrate the global stability of the disease-free and the endemic equilibria when the basic reproductive number (Ro is less than one and greater than one, respectively. When we consider a non-constant recruitment rate, the total population bifurcates as we vary the birth rate and the death rate. Using computer simulations, we observe different behavior among the infective class and the total population, and possibly, the occurrence of a strange attractor.

  12. Dynamics of one-dimensional self-gravitating systems using Hermite-Legendre polynomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Eric I.; Ragan, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The current paradigm for understanding galaxy formation in the Universe depends on the existence of self-gravitating collisionless dark matter. Modelling such dark matter systems has been a major focus of astrophysicists, with much of that effort directed at computational techniques. Not surprisingly, a comprehensive understanding of the evolution of these self-gravitating systems still eludes us, since it involves the collective non-linear dynamics of many particle systems interacting via long-range forces described by the Vlasov equation. As a step towards developing a clearer picture of collisionless self-gravitating relaxation, we analyse the linearized dynamics of isolated one-dimensional systems near thermal equilibrium by expanding their phase-space distribution functions f(x, v) in terms of Hermite functions in the velocity variable, and Legendre functions involving the position variable. This approach produces a picture of phase-space evolution in terms of expansion coefficients, rather than spatial and velocity variables. We obtain equations of motion for the expansion coefficients for both test-particle distributions and self-gravitating linear perturbations of thermal equilibrium. N-body simulations of perturbed equilibria are performed and found to be in excellent agreement with the expansion coefficient approach over a time duration that depends on the size of the expansion series used.

  13. Two-dimensional NMR investigations of the dynamic conformations of phospholipids and liquid crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Mei [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Applied Science and Technology

    1996-05-01

    Two-dimensional 13C, 1H, and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are developed and used to study molecular structure and dynamics in liquid-crystalline systems, primarily phospholipids and nematic liquid crystals. NMR spectroscopy characterizes molecular conformation in terms of orientations and distances of molecular segments. In anisotropically mobile systems, this is achieved by measuring motionally-averaged nuclear dipolar couplings and chemical shift anisotropies. The short-range couplings yield useful bond order parameters, while the long-range interactions constrain the overall conformation. In this work, techniques for probing proton dipolar local fields are further developed to obtain highlyresolved dipolar couplings between protons and rare spins. By exploiting variable-angle sample spinning techniques, orientation-sensitive NMR spectra are resolved according to sitespecific isotropic chemical shifts. Moreover, the signs and magnitudes of various short-range dipolar couplings are obtained. They are used in novel theoretical analyses that provide information about segmental orientations and their distributions. Such information is obtained in a model-independent fashion or with physically reasonable assumptions. The structural investigation of phospholipids is focused on the dynam

  14. Quantitative high dynamic range beam profiling for fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, T. J.; Saunter, C. D.; O’Nions, W.; Girkin, J. M.; Love, G. D.

    2014-01-01

    Modern developmental biology relies on optically sectioning fluorescence microscope techniques to produce non-destructive in vivo images of developing specimens at high resolution in three dimensions. As optimal performance of these techniques is reliant on the three-dimensional (3D) intensity profile of the illumination employed, the ability to directly record and analyze these profiles is of great use to the fluorescence microscopist or instrument builder. Though excitation beam profiles can be measured indirectly using a sample of fluorescent beads and recording the emission along the microscope detection path, we demonstrate an alternative approach where a miniature camera sensor is used directly within the illumination beam. Measurements taken using our approach are solely concerned with the illumination optics as the detection optics are not involved. We present a miniature beam profiling device and high dynamic range flux reconstruction algorithm that together are capable of accurately reproducing quantitative 3D flux maps over a large focal volume. Performance of this beam profiling system is verified within an optical test bench and demonstrated for fluorescence microscopy by profiling the low NA illumination beam of a single plane illumination microscope. The generality and success of this approach showcases a widely flexible beam amplitude diagnostic tool for use within the life sciences

  15. DataHigh: Graphical user interface for visualizing and interacting with high-dimensional neural activity

    OpenAIRE

    Cowley, Benjamin R.; Kaufman, Matthew T.; Churchland, Mark M.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.; Yu, Byron M.

    2012-01-01

    The activity of tens to hundreds of neurons can be succinctly summarized by a smaller number of latent variables extracted using dimensionality reduction methods. These latent variables define a reduced-dimensional space in which we can study how population activity varies over time, across trials, and across experimental conditions. Ideally, we would like to visualize the population activity directly in the reduced-dimensional space, whose optimal dimensionality (as determined from the data)...

  16. Observation of quasiperiodic dynamics in a one-dimensional quantum walk of single photons in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Peng; Qin, Hao; Tang, Bao; Sanders, Barry C.

    2014-05-01

    We realize the quasi-periodic dynamics of a quantum walker over 2.5 quasi-periods by realizing the walker as a single photon passing through a quantum-walk optical-interferometer network. We introduce fully controllable polarization-independent phase shifters in each optical path to realize arbitrary site-dependent phase shifts, and employ large clear-aperture beam displacers, while maintaining high-visibility interference, to enable 10 quantum-walk steps to be reached. By varying the half-wave-plate setting, we control the quantum-coin bias thereby observing a transition from quasi-periodic dynamics to ballistic diffusion.

  17. Rigid-flexible coupling dynamics of three-dimensional hub-beams system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jinyang; Lu Hao

    2007-01-01

    In the previous research of the coupling dynamics of a hub-beam system, coupling between the rotational motion of hub and the torsion deformation of beam is not taken into account since the system undergoes planar motion. Due to the small longitudinal deformation, coupling between the rotational motion of hub and the longitudinal deformation of beam is also neglected. In this paper, rigid-flexible coupling dynamics is extended to a hub-beams system with three-dimensional large overall motion. Not only coupling between the large overall motion and the bending deformation, but also coupling between the large overall motion and the torsional deformation are taken into account. In case of temperature increase, the longitudinal deformation caused by the thermal expansion is significant, such that coupling between the large overall motion and the longitudinal deformation is also investigated. Combining the characteristics of the hybrid coordinate formulation and the absolute nodal coordinate formulation, the system generalized coordinates include the relative nodal displacement and the slope of each beam element with respect to the body-fixed frame of the hub, and the variables related to the spatial large overall motion of the hub and beams. Based on precise strain-displacement relation, the geometric stiffening effect is taken into account, and the rigid-flexible coupling dynamic equations are derived using velocity variational principle. Finite element method is employed for discretization. Simulation of a hub-beams system is used to show the coupling effect between the large overall motion and the torsional deformation as well as the longitudinal deformation. Furthermore, conservation of energy in case of free motion is shown to verify the formulation

  18. Debris flow analysis with a one dimensional dynamic run-out model that incorporates entrained material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Byron Quan; Remaître, Alexandre; van Asch, Theo; Malet, Jean-Philippe; van Westen, Cees

    2010-05-01

    Estimating the magnitude and the intensity of rapid landslides like debris flows is fundamental to evaluate quantitatively the hazard in a specific location. Intensity varies through the travelled course of the flow and can be described by physical features such as deposited volume, velocities, height of the flow, impact forces and pressures. Dynamic run-out models are able to characterize the distribution of the material, its intensity and define the zone where the elements will experience an impact. These models can provide valuable inputs for vulnerability and risk calculations. However, most dynamic run-out models assume a constant volume during the motion of the flow, ignoring the important role of material entrained along its path. Consequently, they neglect that the increase of volume enhances the mobility of the flow and can significantly influence the size of the potential impact area. An appropriate erosion mechanism needs to be established in the analyses of debris flows that will improve the results of dynamic modeling and consequently the quantitative evaluation of risk. The objective is to present and test a simple 1D debris flow model with a material entrainment concept based on limit equilibrium considerations and the generation of excess pore water pressure through undrained loading of the in situ bed material. The debris flow propagation model is based on a one dimensional finite difference solution of a depth-averaged form of the Navier-Stokes equations of fluid motions. The flow is treated as a laminar one phase material, which behavior is controlled by a visco-plastic Coulomb-Bingham rheology. The model parameters are evaluated and the model performance is tested on a debris flow event that occurred in 2003 in the Faucon torrent (Southern French Alps).

  19. Three-dimensional sensing methodology combining stereo vision and phase-measuring profilometry based on dynamic programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunki; Kim, Min Young; Moon, Jeon Il

    2017-12-01

    Phase measuring profilometry and moiré methodology have been widely applied to the three-dimensional shape measurement of target objects, because of their high measuring speed and accuracy. However, these methods suffer from inherent limitations called a correspondence problem, or 2π-ambiguity problem. Although a kind of sensing method to combine well-known stereo vision and phase measuring profilometry (PMP) technique simultaneously has been developed to overcome this problem, it still requires definite improvement for sensing speed and measurement accuracy. We propose a dynamic programming-based stereo PMP method to acquire more reliable depth information and in a relatively small time period. The proposed method efficiently fuses information from two stereo sensors in terms of phase and intensity simultaneously based on a newly defined cost function of dynamic programming. In addition, the important parameters are analyzed at the view point of the 2π-ambiguity problem and measurement accuracy. To analyze the influence of important hardware and software parameters related to the measurement performance and to verify its efficiency, accuracy, and sensing speed, a series of experimental tests were performed with various objects and sensor configurations.

  20. A three-dimensional phase space dynamical model of the Earth's radiation belt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boscher, D. M.; Beutier, T.; Bourdarie, S.

    1996-01-01

    A three dimensional phase space model of the Earth's radiation belt is presented. We have taken into account the magnetic and electric radial diffusions, the pitch angle diffusions due to Coulomb interactions and interactions with the plasmaspheric hiss, and the Coulomb drag. First, a steady state of the belt is presented. Two main maxima are obtained, corresponding to the inner and outer parts of the belt. Then, we have modelled a simple injection at the external boundary. The particle transport seems like what was measured aboard satellites. A high energy particle loss is found, by comparing the model results and the measurements. It remains to be explained

  1. Mitigating the Insider Threat Using High-Dimensional Search and Modeling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Van Den Berg, Eric; Uphadyaya, Shambhu; Ngo, Phi H; Muthukrishnan, Muthu; Palan, Rajago

    2006-01-01

    In this project a system was built aimed at mitigating insider attacks centered around a high-dimensional search engine for correlating the large number of monitoring streams necessary for detecting insider attacks...

  2. Efficient and accurate nearest neighbor and closest pair search in high-dimensional space

    KAUST Repository

    Tao, Yufei; Yi, Ke; Sheng, Cheng; Kalnis, Panos

    2010-01-01

    Nearest Neighbor (NN) search in high-dimensional space is an important problem in many applications. From the database perspective, a good solution needs to have two properties: (i) it can be easily incorporated in a relational database, and (ii

  3. Distribution of high-dimensional entanglement via an intra-city free-space link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinlechner, Fabian; Ecker, Sebastian; Fink, Matthias; Liu, Bo; Bavaresco, Jessica; Huber, Marcus; Scheidl, Thomas; Ursin, Rupert

    2017-07-24

    Quantum entanglement is a fundamental resource in quantum information processing and its distribution between distant parties is a key challenge in quantum communications. Increasing the dimensionality of entanglement has been shown to improve robustness and channel capacities in secure quantum communications. Here we report on the distribution of genuine high-dimensional entanglement via a 1.2-km-long free-space link across Vienna. We exploit hyperentanglement, that is, simultaneous entanglement in polarization and energy-time bases, to encode quantum information, and observe high-visibility interference for successive correlation measurements in each degree of freedom. These visibilities impose lower bounds on entanglement in each subspace individually and certify four-dimensional entanglement for the hyperentangled system. The high-fidelity transmission of high-dimensional entanglement under real-world atmospheric link conditions represents an important step towards long-distance quantum communications with more complex quantum systems and the implementation of advanced quantum experiments with satellite links.

  4. Charge carrier dynamics of methylammonium lead iodide: from PbI₂-rich to low-dimensional broadly emitting perovskites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Johannes R; Flender, Oliver; Scholz, Mirko; Oum, Kawon; Lenzer, Thomas

    2016-04-28

    We provide an investigation of the charge carrier dynamics of the (MAI)(x)(PbI2)(1-x) system in the range x = 0.32-0.90 following the recently published "pseudobinary phase-composition processing diagram" of Song et al. (Chem. Mater., 2015, 27, 4612). The dynamics were studied using ultrafast pump-supercontinuum probe spectroscopy over the pump fluence range 2-50 μJ cm(-2), allowing for a wide variation of the initial carrier density. At high MAI excess (x = 0.90), low-dimensional perovskites (LDPs) are formed, and their luminescence spectra are significantly blue-shifted by ca. 50 nm and broadened compared to the 3D perovskite. The shift is due to quantum confinement effects, and the inhomogeneous broadening arises from different low-dimensional structures (predominantly 2D, but presumably also 1D and 0D). Accurate transient carrier temperatures are extracted from the transient absorption spectra. The regimes of carrier-carrier, carrier-optical phonon and acoustic phonon scattering are clearly distinguished. Perovskites with mole fractions x ≤ 0.71 exhibit extremely fast carrier cooling (ca. 300 fs) at low fluence of 2 μJ cm(-2), however cooling slows down significantly at high fluence of 50 μJ cm(-2) due to the "hot phonon effect" (ca. 2.8 ps). A kinetic analysis of the electron-hole recombination dynamics provides second-order recombination rate constants k2 which decrease from 5.3 to 1.5 × 10(-9) cm(3) s(-1) in the range x = 0.32-0.71. In contrast, recombination in the LDPs (x = 0.90) is more than one order of magnitude faster, 6.4 × 10(-8) cm(3) s(-1), which is related to the confined perovskite structure. Recombination in these LDPs should be however still slow enough for their potential application as efficient broadband emitters or solar light-harvesting materials.

  5. Large-scale Machine Learning in High-dimensional Datasets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Toke Jansen

    Over the last few decades computers have gotten to play an essential role in our daily life, and data is now being collected in various domains at a faster pace than ever before. This dissertation presents research advances in four machine learning fields that all relate to the challenges imposed...... are better at modeling local heterogeneities. In the field of machine learning for neuroimaging, we introduce learning protocols for real-time functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) that allow for dynamic intervention in the human decision process. Specifically, the model exploits the structure of f...

  6. Reduced basis ANOVA methods for partial differential equations with high-dimensional random inputs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Qifeng, E-mail: liaoqf@shanghaitech.edu.cn [School of Information Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, Shanghai 200031 (China); Lin, Guang, E-mail: guanglin@purdue.edu [Department of Mathematics & School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    In this paper we present a reduced basis ANOVA approach for partial deferential equations (PDEs) with random inputs. The ANOVA method combined with stochastic collocation methods provides model reduction in high-dimensional parameter space through decomposing high-dimensional inputs into unions of low-dimensional inputs. In this work, to further reduce the computational cost, we investigate spatial low-rank structures in the ANOVA-collocation method, and develop efficient spatial model reduction techniques using hierarchically generated reduced bases. We present a general mathematical framework of the methodology, validate its accuracy and demonstrate its efficiency with numerical experiments.

  7. Numerical Simulation of the Dynamical Conductivity of One-Dimensional Disordered Systems by MacKinnon’s Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saso, Tetsuro; Kim, C. I.; Kasuya, Tadao

    1983-06-01

    Report is given on a computer simulation of the dynamical conductivity σ(ω) of one-dimensional disordered systems with up to 106 sites by MacKinnon’s method. A comparison is made with the asymptotically exact solution valid for weak disorder by Berezinskii.

  8. A low noise ASIC for two dimensional neutron gas detector with performance of high spatial resolution (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagishi, Hideshi; Toh, Kentaro; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Sakasai, Kaoru; Soyama, Kazuhiko

    2012-02-01

    An ASD-ASIC (Amplifier-Shaper-Discriminator ASIC) with fast response and low noise performances has been designed for two-dimensional position sensitive neutron gas detectors (InSPaD). The InSPaD is a 2D neutron detector system with 3 He gas and provides a high spatial resolution by making distinction between proton and triton particles generated in the gas chamber. The new ASD-ASIC is required to have very low noise, a wide dynamic range, good output linearity and high counting rate. The new ASD-ASIC has been designed by using CMOS and consisted of 64-channel ASDs, a 16-channel multiplexer with LVTTL drivers and sum amplifier system for summing all analog signals. The performances were evaluated by the Spice simulation. It was confirmed that the new ASD-ASIC had very low noise performance, wide dynamic range and fast signal processing functions. (author)

  9. Miniature robust five-dimensional fingertip force/torque sensor with high performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Qiaokang; Huang, Xiuxiang; Li, Zhongyang; Zhang, Dan; Ge, Yunjian

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an innovative design and investigation for a five-dimensional fingertip force/torque sensor with a dual annular diaphragm. This sensor can be applied to a robot hand to measure forces along the X-, Y- and Z-axes (F x , F y and F z ) and moments about the X- and Y-axes (M x and M y ) simultaneously. Particularly, the details of the sensing principle, the structural design and the overload protection mechanism are presented. Afterward, based on the design of experiments approach provided by the software ANSYS®, a finite element analysis and an optimization design are performed. These are performed with the objective of achieving both high sensitivity and stiffness of the sensor. Furthermore, static and dynamic calibrations based on the neural network method are carried out. Finally, an application of the developed sensor on a dexterous robot hand is demonstrated. The results of calibration experiments and the application show that the developed sensor possesses high performance and robustness

  10. Computational Strategies for Dissecting the High-Dimensional Complexity of Adaptive Immune Repertoires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enkelejda Miho

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The adaptive immune system recognizes antigens via an immense array of antigen-binding antibodies and T-cell receptors, the immune repertoire. The interrogation of immune repertoires is of high relevance for understanding the adaptive immune response in disease and infection (e.g., autoimmunity, cancer, HIV. Adaptive immune receptor repertoire sequencing (AIRR-seq has driven the quantitative and molecular-level profiling of immune repertoires, thereby revealing the high-dimensional complexity of the immune receptor sequence landscape. Several methods for the computational and statistical analysis of large-scale AIRR-seq data have been developed to resolve immune repertoire complexity and to understand the dynamics of adaptive immunity. Here, we review the current research on (i diversity, (ii clustering and network, (iii phylogenetic, and (iv machine learning methods applied to dissect, quantify, and compare the architecture, evolution, and specificity of immune repertoires. We summarize outstanding questions in computational immunology and propose future directions for systems immunology toward coupling AIRR-seq with the computational discovery of immunotherapeutics, vaccines, and immunodiagnostics.

  11. Two dimensional simulation of high power laser-surface interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, S.R.; Wilke, M.D.; Green, R.E.L.; Johnson, R.P.; Busch, G.E.

    1998-01-01

    For laser intensities in the range of 10 8 --10 9 W/cm 2 , and pulse lengths of order 10 microsec or longer, the authors have modified the inertial confinement fusion code Lasnex to simulate gaseous and some dense material aspects of the laser-matter interaction. The unique aspect of their treatment consists of an ablation model which defines a dense material-vapor interface and then calculates the mass flow across this interface. The model treats the dense material as a rigid two-dimensional mass and heat reservoir suppressing all hydrodynamic motion in the dense material. The computer simulations and additional post-processors provide predictions for measurements including impulse given to the target, pressures at the target interface, electron temperatures and densities in the vapor-plasma plume region, and emission of radiation from the target. The authors will present an analysis of some relatively well diagnosed experiments which have been useful in developing their modeling. The simulations match experimentally obtained target impulses, pressures at the target surface inside the laser spot, and radiation emission from the target to within about 20%. Hence their simulational technique appears to form a useful basis for further investigation of laser-surface interaction in this intensity, pulse-width range. This work is useful in many technical areas such as materials processing

  12. Multivariate statistical analysis a high-dimensional approach

    CERN Document Server

    Serdobolskii, V

    2000-01-01

    In the last few decades the accumulation of large amounts of in­ formation in numerous applications. has stimtllated an increased in­ terest in multivariate analysis. Computer technologies allow one to use multi-dimensional and multi-parametric models successfully. At the same time, an interest arose in statistical analysis with a de­ ficiency of sample data. Nevertheless, it is difficult to describe the recent state of affairs in applied multivariate methods as satisfactory. Unimprovable (dominating) statistical procedures are still unknown except for a few specific cases. The simplest problem of estimat­ ing the mean vector with minimum quadratic risk is unsolved, even for normal distributions. Commonly used standard linear multivari­ ate procedures based on the inversion of sample covariance matrices can lead to unstable results or provide no solution in dependence of data. Programs included in standard statistical packages cannot process 'multi-collinear data' and there are no theoretical recommen­ ...

  13. THREE-DIMENSIONAL ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION OF HOT JUPITERS ON HIGHLY ECCENTRIC ORBITS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kataria, T.; Showman, A. P.; Lewis, N. K.; Fortney, J. J.; Marley, M. S.; Freedman, R. S.

    2013-01-01

    Of the over 800 exoplanets detected to date, over half are on non-circular orbits, with eccentricities as high as 0.93. Such orbits lead to time-variable stellar heating, which has major implications for the planet's atmospheric dynamical regime. However, little is known about the fundamental dynamical regime of such planetary atmospheres, and how it may influence the observations of these planets. Therefore, we present a systematic study of hot Jupiters on highly eccentric orbits using the SPARC/MITgcm, a model which couples a three-dimensional general circulation model (the MITgcm) with a plane-parallel, two-stream, non-gray radiative transfer model. In our study, we vary the eccentricity and orbit-average stellar flux over a wide range. We demonstrate that the eccentric hot Jupiter regime is qualitatively similar to that of planets on circular orbits; the planets possess a superrotating equatorial jet and exhibit large day-night temperature variations. As in Showman and Polvani, we show that the day-night heating variations induce momentum fluxes equatorward to maintain the superrotating jet throughout its orbit. We find that as the eccentricity and/or stellar flux is increased (corresponding to shorter orbital periods), the superrotating jet strengthens and narrows, due to a smaller Rossby deformation radius. For a select number of model integrations, we generate full-orbit light curves and find that the timing of transit and secondary eclipse viewed from Earth with respect to periapse and apoapse can greatly affect what we see in infrared (IR) light curves; the peak in IR flux can lead or lag secondary eclipse depending on the geometry. For those planets that have large temperature differences from dayside to nightside and rapid rotation rates, we find that the light curves can exhibit 'ringing' as the planet's hottest region rotates in and out of view from Earth. These results can be used to explain future observations of eccentric transiting exoplanets.

  14. Quasiclassical methods for spin-charge coupled dynamics in low-dimensional systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corini, Cosimo

    2009-06-12

    Spintronics is a new field of study whose broad aim is the manipulation of the spin degrees of freedom in solid state systems. One of its main goals is the realization of devices capable of exploiting, besides the charge, the carriers' - and possibly the nuclei's - spin. The presence of spin-orbit coupling in a system enables the spin and charge degrees of freedom to ''communicate'', a favorable situation if one is to realize such devices. More importantly, it offers the opportunity of doing so by relying solely on electric fields, whereas magnetic fields are otherwise required. Eminent examples of versatile systems with built-in and variously tunable spin-orbit interaction are two-dimensional electron - or hole - gases. The study of spin-charge coupled dynamics in such a context faces a large number of open questions, both of the fundamental and of the more practical type. To tackle the problem we rely on the quasiclassical formalism. This is an approximate quantum-field theoretical formulation with a solid microscopic foundation, perfectly suited for describing phenomena at the mesoscopic scale, and bearing a resemblance to standard Boltzmann theory which makes for physical transparency. Originally born to deal with transport in electron-phonon systems, we first generalize it to the case in which spin-orbit coupling is present, and then move on to apply it to specific situations and phenomena. Among these, to the description of the spin Hall effect and of voltage induced spin polarizations in two-dimensional electron gases under a variety of conditions - stationary or time-dependent, in the presence of magnetic and non-magnetic disorder, in the bulk or in confined geometries -, and to the problem of spin relaxation in narrow wires. (orig.)

  15. Quasiclassical methods for spin-charge coupled dynamics in low-dimensional systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corini, Cosimo

    2009-01-01

    Spintronics is a new field of study whose broad aim is the manipulation of the spin degrees of freedom in solid state systems. One of its main goals is the realization of devices capable of exploiting, besides the charge, the carriers' - and possibly the nuclei's - spin. The presence of spin-orbit coupling in a system enables the spin and charge degrees of freedom to ''communicate'', a favorable situation if one is to realize such devices. More importantly, it offers the opportunity of doing so by relying solely on electric fields, whereas magnetic fields are otherwise required. Eminent examples of versatile systems with built-in and variously tunable spin-orbit interaction are two-dimensional electron - or hole - gases. The study of spin-charge coupled dynamics in such a context faces a large number of open questions, both of the fundamental and of the more practical type. To tackle the problem we rely on the quasiclassical formalism. This is an approximate quantum-field theoretical formulation with a solid microscopic foundation, perfectly suited for describing phenomena at the mesoscopic scale, and bearing a resemblance to standard Boltzmann theory which makes for physical transparency. Originally born to deal with transport in electron-phonon systems, we first generalize it to the case in which spin-orbit coupling is present, and then move on to apply it to specific situations and phenomena. Among these, to the description of the spin Hall effect and of voltage induced spin polarizations in two-dimensional electron gases under a variety of conditions - stationary or time-dependent, in the presence of magnetic and non-magnetic disorder, in the bulk or in confined geometries -, and to the problem of spin relaxation in narrow wires. (orig.)

  16. Lumped versus distributed thermoregulatory control: results from a three-dimensional dynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, J; Buse, M; Foegen, A

    1989-01-01

    In this study we use a three-dimensional model of the human thermal system, the spatial grid of which is 0.5 ... 1.0 cm. The model is based on well-known physical heat-transfer equations, and all parameters of the passive system have definite physical values. According to the number of substantially different areas and organs, 54 spatially different values are attributed to each physical parameter. Compatibility of simulation and experiment was achieved solely on the basis of physical considerations and physiological basic data. The equations were solved using a modification of the alternating direction implicit method. On the basis of this complex description of the passive system close to reality, various lumped and distributed parameter control equations were tested for control of metabolic heat production, blood flow and sweat production. The simplest control equations delivering results on closed-loop control compatible with experimental evidence were determined. It was concluded that it is essential to take into account the spatial distribution of heat production, blood flow and sweat production, and that at least for control of shivering, distributed controller gains different from the pattern of distribution of muscle tissue are required. For sweat production this is not so obvious, so that for simulation of sweating control after homogeneous heat load a lumped parameter control may be justified. Based on these conclusions three-dimensional temperature profiles for cold and heat load and the dynamics for changes of the environmental conditions were computed. In view of the exact simulation of the passive system and the compatibility with experimentally attainable variables there is good evidence that those values extrapolated by the simulation are adequately determined. The model may be used both for further analysis of the real thermoregulatory mechanisms and for special applications in environmental and clinical health care.

  17. Dynamics of a Highly Flexible Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lisbeth

    malleability are the subject of this defense. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the dynamics of NCBD have been investigated on timescales ranging from picoseconds to milliseconds using relaxation dispersion experiments, residual dipolar couplings and methyl group deuterium relaxation. From...

  18. High-dimensional orbital angular momentum entanglement concentration based on Laguerre–Gaussian mode selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wuhong; Su, Ming; Wu, Ziwen; Lu, Meng; Huang, Bingwei; Chen, Lixiang

    2013-01-01

    Twisted photons enable the definition of a Hilbert space beyond two dimensions by orbital angular momentum (OAM) eigenstates. Here we propose a feasible entanglement concentration experiment, to enhance the quality of high-dimensional entanglement shared by twisted photon pairs. Our approach is started from the full characterization of entangled spiral bandwidth, and is then based on the careful selection of the Laguerre–Gaussian (LG) modes with specific radial and azimuthal indices p and ℓ. In particular, we demonstrate the possibility of high-dimensional entanglement concentration residing in the OAM subspace of up to 21 dimensions. By means of LabVIEW simulations with spatial light modulators, we show that the Shannon dimensionality could be employed to quantify the quality of the present concentration. Our scheme holds promise in quantum information applications defined in high-dimensional Hilbert space. (letter)

  19. Detection of Subtle Context-Dependent Model Inaccuracies in High-Dimensional Robot Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Juan Pablo; Simmons, Reid; Veloso, Manuela

    2016-12-01

    Autonomous robots often rely on models of their sensing and actions for intelligent decision making. However, when operating in unconstrained environments, the complexity of the world makes it infeasible to create models that are accurate in every situation. This article addresses the problem of using potentially large and high-dimensional sets of robot execution data to detect situations in which a robot model is inaccurate-that is, detecting context-dependent model inaccuracies in a high-dimensional context space. To find inaccuracies tractably, the robot conducts an informed search through low-dimensional projections of execution data to find parametric Regions of Inaccurate Modeling (RIMs). Empirical evidence from two robot domains shows that this approach significantly enhances the detection power of existing RIM-detection algorithms in high-dimensional spaces.

  20. Accelerated Sensitivity Analysis in High-Dimensional Stochastic Reaction Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arampatzis, Georgios; Katsoulakis, Markos A; Pantazis, Yannis

    2015-01-01

    Existing sensitivity analysis approaches are not able to handle efficiently stochastic reaction networks with a large number of parameters and species, which are typical in the modeling and simulation of complex biochemical phenomena. In this paper, a two-step strategy for parametric sensitivity analysis for such systems is proposed, exploiting advantages and synergies between two recently proposed sensitivity analysis methodologies for stochastic dynamics. The first method performs sensitivity analysis of the stochastic dynamics by means of the Fisher Information Matrix on the underlying distribution of the trajectories; the second method is a reduced-variance, finite-difference, gradient-type sensitivity approach relying on stochastic coupling techniques for variance reduction. Here we demonstrate that these two methods can be combined and deployed together by means of a new sensitivity bound which incorporates the variance of the quantity of interest as well as the Fisher Information Matrix estimated from the first method. The first step of the proposed strategy labels sensitivities using the bound and screens out the insensitive parameters in a controlled manner. In the second step of the proposed strategy, a finite-difference method is applied only for the sensitivity estimation of the (potentially) sensitive parameters that have not been screened out in the first step. Results on an epidermal growth factor network with fifty parameters and on a protein homeostasis with eighty parameters demonstrate that the proposed strategy is able to quickly discover and discard the insensitive parameters and in the remaining potentially sensitive parameters it accurately estimates the sensitivities. The new sensitivity strategy can be several times faster than current state-of-the-art approaches that test all parameters, especially in "sloppy" systems. In particular, the computational acceleration is quantified by the ratio between the total number of parameters over the

  1. Accelerated Sensitivity Analysis in High-Dimensional Stochastic Reaction Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Arampatzis

    Full Text Available Existing sensitivity analysis approaches are not able to handle efficiently stochastic reaction networks with a large number of parameters and species, which are typical in the modeling and simulation of complex biochemical phenomena. In this paper, a two-step strategy for parametric sensitivity analysis for such systems is proposed, exploiting advantages and synergies between two recently proposed sensitivity analysis methodologies for stochastic dynamics. The first method performs sensitivity analysis of the stochastic dynamics by means of the Fisher Information Matrix on the underlying distribution of the trajectories; the second method is a reduced-variance, finite-difference, gradient-type sensitivity approach relying on stochastic coupling techniques for variance reduction. Here we demonstrate that these two methods can be combined and deployed together by means of a new sensitivity bound which incorporates the variance of the quantity of interest as well as the Fisher Information Matrix estimated from the first method. The first step of the proposed strategy labels sensitivities using the bound and screens out the insensitive parameters in a controlled manner. In the second step of the proposed strategy, a finite-difference method is applied only for the sensitivity estimation of the (potentially sensitive parameters that have not been screened out in the first step. Results on an epidermal growth factor network with fifty parameters and on a protein homeostasis with eighty parameters demonstrate that the proposed strategy is able to quickly discover and discard the insensitive parameters and in the remaining potentially sensitive parameters it accurately estimates the sensitivities. The new sensitivity strategy can be several times faster than current state-of-the-art approaches that test all parameters, especially in "sloppy" systems. In particular, the computational acceleration is quantified by the ratio between the total number of

  2. 3-Dimensional numerical simulations of the dynamics of the Venusian mesosphere and thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingle, S.; Mueller-Wodarg, I. C.

    2009-12-01

    We present the first results from a new 3-dimensional numerical simulation of the steady state dynamics of the Venusian mesosphere and thermosphere (60-300 km). We have adapted the dynamical core of the Titan thermosphere global circulation model (GCM) [1] to a steady state background atmosphere. Our background atmosphere is derived from a hydrostatic combination of the VTS3 [2] and Venus International Reference Atmosphere (VIRA) [3] empirical models, which are otherwise discontinuous at their 100 km interface. We use 4th order polynomials to link the VTS3 and VIRA thermal profiles and employ hydrostatic balance to derive a consistent density profile. We also present comparisons of our background atmosphere to data from the ESA Venus Express Mission. The thermal structure of the Venusian mesosphere is relatively well documented; however, direct measurements of wind speeds are limited. Venus’ slow rotation results in a negligible Coriolis force. This suggests that the zonal circulation should arise from cyclostrophic balance; where the equatorward component of the centrifugal force balances poleward meridional pressure gradients [4]. The sparseness of direct and in-situ measurements has resulted in the application of cyclostrophic balance to measured thermal profiles to derive wind speeds [5] [6] [7] [8]. However, cyclostrophic balance is only strictly valid at mid latitudes (˜ ± 30-75°) and its applicability to the Venusian mesosphere has not been conclusively demonstrated. Our simulations, by solving the full Navier-Stokes momentum equation, will enable us assess the validity of cyclostrophic balance as a description of mesospheric dynamics. This work is part of an ongoing project to develop the first GCM to encompass the atmosphere from the cloud tops into the thermosphere. When complete, this model will enable self-consistent calculations of the dynamics, energy and composition of the atmosphere. It will thus provide a framework to address many of the

  3. A Hybrid Semi-Supervised Anomaly Detection Model for High-Dimensional Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongchao Song

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Anomaly detection, which aims to identify observations that deviate from a nominal sample, is a challenging task for high-dimensional data. Traditional distance-based anomaly detection methods compute the neighborhood distance between each observation and suffer from the curse of dimensionality in high-dimensional space; for example, the distances between any pair of samples are similar and each sample may perform like an outlier. In this paper, we propose a hybrid semi-supervised anomaly detection model for high-dimensional data that consists of two parts: a deep autoencoder (DAE and an ensemble k-nearest neighbor graphs- (K-NNG- based anomaly detector. Benefiting from the ability of nonlinear mapping, the DAE is first trained to learn the intrinsic features of a high-dimensional dataset to represent the high-dimensional data in a more compact subspace. Several nonparametric KNN-based anomaly detectors are then built from different subsets that are randomly sampled from the whole dataset. The final prediction is made by all the anomaly detectors. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated on several real-life datasets, and the results confirm that the proposed hybrid model improves the detection accuracy and reduces the computational complexity.

  4. Two-Dimensional High Definition Versus Three-Dimensional Endoscopy in Endonasal Skull Base Surgery: A Comparative Preclinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampinelli, Vittorio; Doglietto, Francesco; Mattavelli, Davide; Qiu, Jimmy; Raffetti, Elena; Schreiber, Alberto; Villaret, Andrea Bolzoni; Kucharczyk, Walter; Donato, Francesco; Fontanella, Marco Maria; Nicolai, Piero

    2017-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) endoscopy has been recently introduced in endonasal skull base surgery. Only a relatively limited number of studies have compared it to 2-dimensional, high definition technology. The objective was to compare, in a preclinical setting for endonasal endoscopic surgery, the surgical maneuverability of 2-dimensional, high definition and 3D endoscopy. A group of 68 volunteers, novice and experienced surgeons, were asked to perform 2 tasks, namely simulating grasping and dissection surgical maneuvers, in a model of the nasal cavities. Time to complete the tasks was recorded. A questionnaire to investigate subjective feelings during tasks was filled by each participant. In 25 subjects, the surgeons' movements were continuously tracked by a magnetic-based neuronavigator coupled with dedicated software (ApproachViewer, part of GTx-UHN) and the recorded trajectories were analyzed by comparing jitter, sum of square differences, and funnel index. Total execution time was significantly lower with 3D technology (P < 0.05) in beginners and experts. Questionnaires showed that beginners preferred 3D endoscopy more frequently than experts. A minority (14%) of beginners experienced discomfort with 3D endoscopy. Analysis of jitter showed a trend toward increased effectiveness of surgical maneuvers with 3D endoscopy. Sum of square differences and funnel index analyses documented better values with 3D endoscopy in experts. In a preclinical setting for endonasal skull base surgery, 3D technology appears to confer an advantage in terms of time of execution and precision of surgical maneuvers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Full molecular dynamics simulations of liquid water and carbon tetrachloride for two-dimensional Raman spectroscopy in the frequency domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Ju-Yeon, E-mail: ju8879@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Ito, Hironobu, E-mail: h.ito@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Tanimura, Yoshitaka, E-mail: tanimura@kuchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp

    2016-12-20

    Frequency-domain two-dimensional (2D) Raman signals, which are equivalent to coherent two-dimensional Raman scattering (COTRAS) signals, for liquid water and carbon tetrachloride were calculated using an equilibrium–nonequilibrium hybrid molecular dynamics (MD) simulation algorithm. An appropriate representation of the 2D Raman spectrum obtained from MD simulations provides an easy-to-understand depiction of structural and dynamical properties. We elucidate mechanisms governing the 2D signal profiles involving anharmonic mode–mode coupling and the nonlinearities of the polarizability for the intermolecular and intramolecular vibrational modes. The predicted signal profiles and intensities can be utilized to analyze recently developed single-beam 2D spectra, whose signals are generated from a coherently controlled pulse, allowing the single-beam measurement to be carried out more efficiently. Moreover, the MD simulation results allow us to visualize the molecular structure and dynamics by comparing the accurately calculated spectrum with experimental result.

  6. Coupling constant metamorphosis as an integrability-preserving transformation for general finite-dimensional dynamical systems and ODEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergyeyev, Artur, E-mail: Artur.Sergyeyev@math.slu.cz [Mathematical Institute, Silesian University in Opava, Na Rybníčku 1, 746 01 Opava (Czech Republic)

    2012-06-04

    In the present Letter we extend the multiparameter coupling constant metamorphosis, also known as the generalized Stäckel transform, from Hamiltonian dynamical systems to general finite-dimensional dynamical systems and ODEs. This transform interchanges the values of integrals of motion with the parameters these integrals depend on but leaves the phase space coordinates intact. Sufficient conditions under which the transformation in question preserves integrability and a simple formula relating the solutions of the original system to those of the transformed one are given. -- Highlights: ► We consider the multiparameter coupling constant metamorphosis (MCCM). ► The latter is also known as the generalized Stäckel transform. ► This transform is extended to general (non-Hamiltonian) finite-dimensional dynamical systems. ► The extended transform preserves integrability just as the original MCCM. ► A simple formula for transforming solutions under MCCM is given.

  7. Coupling constant metamorphosis as an integrability-preserving transformation for general finite-dimensional dynamical systems and ODEs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergyeyev, Artur

    2012-01-01

    In the present Letter we extend the multiparameter coupling constant metamorphosis, also known as the generalized Stäckel transform, from Hamiltonian dynamical systems to general finite-dimensional dynamical systems and ODEs. This transform interchanges the values of integrals of motion with the parameters these integrals depend on but leaves the phase space coordinates intact. Sufficient conditions under which the transformation in question preserves integrability and a simple formula relating the solutions of the original system to those of the transformed one are given. -- Highlights: ► We consider the multiparameter coupling constant metamorphosis (MCCM). ► The latter is also known as the generalized Stäckel transform. ► This transform is extended to general (non-Hamiltonian) finite-dimensional dynamical systems. ► The extended transform preserves integrability just as the original MCCM. ► A simple formula for transforming solutions under MCCM is given.

  8. Variable kernel density estimation in high-dimensional feature spaces

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van der Walt, Christiaan M

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Estimating the joint probability density function of a dataset is a central task in many machine learning applications. In this work we address the fundamental problem of kernel bandwidth estimation for variable kernel density estimation in high...

  9. High-resolution two-dimensional and three-dimensional modeling of wire grid polarizers and micropolarizer arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobiev, Dmitry; Ninkov, Zoran

    2017-11-01

    Recent advances in photolithography allowed the fabrication of high-quality wire grid polarizers for the visible and near-infrared regimes. In turn, micropolarizer arrays (MPAs) based on wire grid polarizers have been developed and used to construct compact, versatile imaging polarimeters. However, the contrast and throughput of these polarimeters are significantly worse than one might expect based on the performance of large area wire grid polarizers or MPAs, alone. We investigate the parameters that affect the performance of wire grid polarizers and MPAs, using high-resolution two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3-D) finite-difference time-domain simulations. We pay special attention to numerical errors and other challenges that arise in models of these and other subwavelength optical devices. Our tests show that simulations of these structures in the visible and near-IR begin to converge numerically when the mesh size is smaller than ˜4 nm. The performance of wire grid polarizers is very sensitive to the shape, spacing, and conductivity of the metal wires. Using 3-D simulations of micropolarizer "superpixels," we directly study the cross talk due to diffraction at the edges of each micropolarizer, which decreases the contrast of MPAs to ˜200∶1.

  10. Innovation Rather than Improvement: A Solvable High-Dimensional Model Highlights the Limitations of Scalar Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikhonov, Mikhail; Monasson, Remi

    2018-01-01

    Much of our understanding of ecological and evolutionary mechanisms derives from analysis of low-dimensional models: with few interacting species, or few axes defining "fitness". It is not always clear to what extent the intuition derived from low-dimensional models applies to the complex, high-dimensional reality. For instance, most naturally occurring microbial communities are strikingly diverse, harboring a large number of coexisting species, each of which contributes to shaping the environment of others. Understanding the eco-evolutionary interplay in these systems is an important challenge, and an exciting new domain for statistical physics. Recent work identified a promising new platform for investigating highly diverse ecosystems, based on the classic resource competition model of MacArthur. Here, we describe how the same analytical framework can be used to study evolutionary questions. Our analysis illustrates how, at high dimension, the intuition promoted by a one-dimensional (scalar) notion of fitness can become misleading. Specifically, while the low-dimensional picture emphasizes organism cost or efficiency, we exhibit a regime where cost becomes irrelevant for survival, and link this observation to generic properties of high-dimensional geometry.

  11. Topological phase transition in the quench dynamics of a one-dimensional Fermi gas with spin–orbit coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Pei; Yi, Wei; Xianlong, Gao

    2015-01-01

    We study the quench dynamics of a one-dimensional ultracold Fermi gas with synthetic spin-orbit coupling. At equilibrium, the ground state of the system can undergo a topological phase transition and become a topological superfluid with Majorana edge states. As the interaction is quenched near the topological phase boundary, we identify an interesting dynamical phase transition of the quenched state in the long-time limit, characterized by an abrupt change of the pairing gap at a critical quenched interaction strength. We further demonstrate the topological nature of this dynamical phase transition from edge-state analysis of the quenched states. Our findings provide interesting clues for the understanding of topological phase transitions in dynamical processes, and can be useful for the dynamical detection of Majorana edge states in corresponding systems. (paper)

  12. Topological phase transition in the quench dynamics of a one-dimensional Fermi gas with spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pei; Yi, Wei; Xianlong, Gao

    2015-01-01

    We study the quench dynamics of a one-dimensional ultracold Fermi gas with synthetic spin-orbit coupling. At equilibrium, the ground state of the system can undergo a topological phase transition and become a topological superfluid with Majorana edge states. As the interaction is quenched near the topological phase boundary, we identify an interesting dynamical phase transition of the quenched state in the long-time limit, characterized by an abrupt change of the pairing gap at a critical quenched interaction strength. We further demonstrate the topological nature of this dynamical phase transition from edge-state analysis of the quenched states. Our findings provide interesting clues for the understanding of topological phase transitions in dynamical processes, and can be useful for the dynamical detection of Majorana edge states in corresponding systems.

  13. Research on the optimal dynamical systems of three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations based on weighted residual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, NaiFu; Guan, Hui; Wu, ChuiJie

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the theory of constructing optimal dynamical systems based on weighted residual presented by Wu & Sha is applied to three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations, and the optimal dynamical system modeling equations are derived. Then the multiscale global optimization method based on coarse graining analysis is presented, by which a set of approximate global optimal bases is directly obtained from Navier-Stokes equations and the construction of optimal dynamical systems is realized. The optimal bases show good properties, such as showing the physical properties of complex flows and the turbulent vortex structures, being intrinsic to real physical problem and dynamical systems, and having scaling symmetry in mathematics, etc.. In conclusion, using fewer terms of optimal bases will approach the exact solutions of Navier-Stokes equations, and the dynamical systems based on them show the most optimal behavior.

  14. Pseudo-One-Dimensional Magnonic Crystals for High-Frequency Nanoscale Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Chandrima; Choudhury, Samiran; Sinha, Jaivardhan; Barman, Anjan

    2017-07-01

    The synthetic magnonic crystals (i.e., periodic composites consisting of different magnetic materials) form one fascinating class of emerging research field, which aims to command the process and flow of information by means of spin waves, such as in magnonic waveguides. One of the intriguing features of magnonic crystals is the presence and tunability of band gaps in the spin-wave spectrum, where the high attenuation of the frequency bands can be utilized for frequency-dependent control on the spin waves. However, to find a feasible way of band tuning in terms of a realistic integrated device is still a challenge. Here, we introduce an array of asymmetric saw-tooth-shaped width-modulated nanoscale ferromagnetic waveguides forming a pseudo-one-dimensional magnonic crystal. The frequency dispersion of collective modes measured by the Brillouin light-scattering technique is compared with the band diagram obtained by numerically solving the eigenvalue problem derived from the linearized Landau-Lifshitz magnetic torque equation. We find that the magnonic band-gap width, position, and the slope of dispersion curves are controllable by changing the angle between the spin-wave propagation channel and the magnetic field. The calculated profiles of the dynamic magnetization reveal that the corrugation at the lateral boundary of the waveguide effectively engineers the edge modes, which forms the basis of the interactive control in magnonic circuits. The results represent a prospective direction towards managing the internal field distribution as well as the dispersion properties, which find potential applications in dynamic spin-wave filters and magnonic waveguides in the gigahertz frequency range.

  15. High energy gain in three-dimensional simulations of light sail acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgattoni, A., E-mail: andrea.sgattoni@polimi.it [Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); CNR, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, u.o.s. “Adriano Gozzini,” Pisa (Italy); Sinigardi, S. [CNR, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, u.o.s. “Adriano Gozzini,” Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); INFN sezione di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Macchi, A. [CNR, Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, u.o.s. “Adriano Gozzini,” Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica “Enrico Fermi,” Università di Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2014-08-25

    The dynamics of radiation pressure acceleration in the relativistic light sail regime are analysed by means of large scale, three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell simulations. Differently to other mechanisms, the 3D dynamics leads to faster and higher energy gain than in 1D or 2D geometry. This effect is caused by the local decrease of the target density due to transverse expansion leading to a “lighter sail.” However, the rarefaction of the target leads to an earlier transition to transparency limiting the energy gain. A transverse instability leads to a structured and inhomogeneous ion distribution.

  16. High energy gain in three-dimensional simulations of light sail acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sgattoni, A.; Sinigardi, S.; Macchi, A.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of radiation pressure acceleration in the relativistic light sail regime are analysed by means of large scale, three-dimensional (3D) particle-in-cell simulations. Differently to other mechanisms, the 3D dynamics leads to faster and higher energy gain than in 1D or 2D geometry. This effect is caused by the local decrease of the target density due to transverse expansion leading to a “lighter sail.” However, the rarefaction of the target leads to an earlier transition to transparency limiting the energy gain. A transverse instability leads to a structured and inhomogeneous ion distribution.

  17. Three-Dimensional Model Retrieval Using Dynamic Multi-Descriptor Fusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jau-Ling Shi; Chang-Hsing Lee; Yao-Wen Hou; Po-Ting Yeh

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a dynamic multi-descriptor fusion (DMDF) approach to improving the retrieval accuracy of 3-dimensional (3D) model retrieval systems. First, an independent retrieval list is generated by using each individual descriptor. Second, we propose an automatic relevant/irrelevant models selection (ARMS) approach to selecting the relevant and irrelevant 3D models automatically without any user interaction. A weighted distance, in which the weight associated with each individual descriptor is learnt by using the selected relevant and irrelevant models, is used to measure the similarity between two 3D models. Furthermore, a descriptor-dependent adaptive query point movement (AQPM) approach is employed to update every feature vector. This set of new feature vectors is used to index 3D models in the next search process. Four 3D model databases are used to compare the retrieval accuracy of our proposed DMDF approach with several descriptors as well as some well-known information fusion methods. Experimental results have shown that our proposed DMDF approach provides a promising retrieval result and always yields the best retrieval accuracy.

  18. Validation of Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Prediction of Three-Dimensional Structures of Small Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Koichi; Nakayoshi, Tomoki; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi; Kurimoto, Eiji; Oda, Akifumi

    2017-10-12

    Although various higher-order protein structure prediction methods have been developed, almost all of them were developed based on the three-dimensional (3D) structure information of known proteins. Here we predicted the short protein structures by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in which only Newton's equations of motion were used and 3D structural information of known proteins was not required. To evaluate the ability of MD simulationto predict protein structures, we calculated seven short test protein (10-46 residues) in the denatured state and compared their predicted and experimental structures. The predicted structure for Trp-cage (20 residues) was close to the experimental structure by 200-ns MD simulation. For proteins shorter or longer than Trp-cage, root-mean square deviation values were larger than those for Trp-cage. However, secondary structures could be reproduced by MD simulations for proteins with 10-34 residues. Simulations by replica exchange MD were performed, but the results were similar to those from normal MD simulations. These results suggest that normal MD simulations can roughly predict short protein structures and 200-ns simulations are frequently sufficient for estimating the secondary structures of protein (approximately 20 residues). Structural prediction method using only fundamental physical laws are useful for investigating non-natural proteins, such as primitive proteins and artificial proteins for peptide-based drug delivery systems.

  19. Recursive solution for dynamic response of one-dimensional structures with time-dependent boundary conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abadi, Mohammad Tahaye

    2015-01-01

    A recursive solution method is derived for the transient response of one-dimensional structures subjected to the general form of time dependent boundary conditions. Unlike previous solution methods that assumed the separation of variables, the present method involves formulating and solving the dynamic problems using the summation of two single-argument functions satisfying the motion equation. Based on boundary and initial conditions, a recursive procedure is derived to determine the single-argument functions. Such a procedure is applied to the general form of boundary conditions, and an analytical solution is derived by solving the recursive equation. The present solution method is implemented for base excitation problems, and the results are compared with those of the previous analytical solution and the Finite element (FE) analysis. The FE results converge to the present analytical solution, although considerable error is found in predicting a solution method on the basis of the separation of variables. The present analytical solution predicts the transient response for wave propagation problems in broadband excitation frequencies.

  20. A mixed method Poisson solver for three-dimensional self-gravitating astrophysical fluid dynamical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Comer; Jones, Jim

    1993-01-01

    A key ingredient in the simulation of self-gravitating astrophysical fluid dynamical systems is the gravitational potential and its gradient. This paper focuses on the development of a mixed method multigrid solver of the Poisson equation formulated so that both the potential and the Cartesian components of its gradient are self-consistently and accurately generated. The method achieves this goal by formulating the problem as a system of four equations for the gravitational potential and the three Cartesian components of the gradient and solves them using a distributed relaxation technique combined with conventional full multigrid V-cycles. The method is described, some tests are presented, and the accuracy of the method is assessed. We also describe how the method has been incorporated into our three-dimensional hydrodynamics code and give an example of an application to the collision of two stars. We end with some remarks about the future developments of the method and some of the applications in which it will be used in astrophysics.

  1. Two-dimensional simulation of the thermal stress effect on static and dynamic VDMOS characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alwan, M.; Beydoun, B.; Ketata, K.; Zoaeter, M.

    2005-01-01

    Using a two-dimensional simulator, the effect of the thermal stress on static and dynamic vertical double-diffusion metal oxide semiconductor (VDMOS) characteristics have been investigated. The use of the device under certain thermal stress conditions can produce modifications of its physical and electrical properties. Based on physics and 2D simulations, this paper proposes an analysis of this stress effect observed on the electrical characteristics of the device. Parameters responsible of these modifications are determined. Approximate expressions of the ionization coefficients and breakdown voltage in terms of temperature are proposed. Non-punch-through junction theory is used to express the breakdown voltage and the space charge extension with respect to the impurity concentration and the temperature. The capacitances of the device have been also studied. The effect of the stress on C-V characteristics is observed and analyzed. We notice that the drain-gate, drain-source and gate-source capacitances are shifted due to the degradation of device physical properties versus thermal stress

  2. Recursive solution for dynamic response of one-dimensional structures with time-dependent boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abadi, Mohammad Tahaye [Aerospace Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A recursive solution method is derived for the transient response of one-dimensional structures subjected to the general form of time dependent boundary conditions. Unlike previous solution methods that assumed the separation of variables, the present method involves formulating and solving the dynamic problems using the summation of two single-argument functions satisfying the motion equation. Based on boundary and initial conditions, a recursive procedure is derived to determine the single-argument functions. Such a procedure is applied to the general form of boundary conditions, and an analytical solution is derived by solving the recursive equation. The present solution method is implemented for base excitation problems, and the results are compared with those of the previous analytical solution and the Finite element (FE) analysis. The FE results converge to the present analytical solution, although considerable error is found in predicting a solution method on the basis of the separation of variables. The present analytical solution predicts the transient response for wave propagation problems in broadband excitation frequencies.

  3. Scaling symmetries, conservation laws and action principles in one-dimensional gas dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G M; Zank, G P

    2009-01-01

    Scaling symmetries of the planar, one-dimensional gas dynamic equations with adiabatic index γ are used to obtain Lagrangian and Eulerian conservation laws associated with the symmetries. The known Eulerian symmetry operators for the scaling symmetries are converted to the Lagrangian form, in which the Eulerian spatial position of the fluid element is given in terms of the Lagrangian fluid labels. Conditions for a linear combination of the three scaling symmetries to be a divergence or variational symmetry of the action are established. The corresponding Lagrangian and Eulerian form of the conservation laws are determined by application of Noether's theorem. A nonlocal conservation law associated with the scaling symmetries is obtained by applying a nonlocal symmetry operator to the scaling symmetry-conserved vector. An action principle incorporating known conservation laws using Lagrangian constraints is developed. Noether's theorem for the constrained action principle gives the same formulas for the conserved vector as the classical Noether theorem, except that the Lie symmetry vector field now includes the effects of nonlocal potentials. Noether's theorem for the constrained action principle is used to obtain nonlocal conservation laws. The scaling symmetry conservation laws only apply for special forms of the entropy of the gas.

  4. A novel procedure to assess anismus using three-dimensional dynamic anal ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad-Regadas, S M; Regadas, F S P; Rodrigues, L V; Souza, M H L P; Lima, D M R; Silva, F R S; Filho, F S P R

    2007-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the value of three-dimensional (3D) dynamic endosonography in the assessment of anismus. Sixty-one women submitted to anorectal manometry were enrolled including 40 healthy women and 21 patients with anismus diagnosed by manometry. Patients were submitted to 3D endosonography. Images were acquired at rest and during straining and analysed in axial and midline longitudinal planes. Sphincter integrity was quantified. The angle between the internal edge of the puborectalis with a vertical line according to the anal canal axis was calculated at rest and during straining. The angle increased in 39 of the 40 normal individuals and decreased in all patients with anismus during straining compared with the angle at rest (88.36 degrees ) and straining (98.65 degrees ) in normal individuals. In the anismus group, the angle decreased at rest (90.91 degrees ) and straining (84.89 degrees ). The difference between angle sizes in normal and anismus patients during straining was statistically significant (P anismus confirming the anorectal manometric results.

  5. Final results of the fifth three-dimensional dynamic Atomic Energy Research benchmark problem calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadek, J.

    1999-01-01

    The paper gives a brief survey of the fifth three-dimensional dynamic Atomic Energy Research benchmark calculation results received with the code DYN3D/ATHLET at NRI Rez. This benchmark was defined at the seventh Atomic Energy Research Symposium (Hoernitz near Zittau, 1997). Its initiating event is a symmetrical break of the main steam header at the end of the first fuel cycle and hot shutdown conditions with one stuck out control rod group. The calculations were performed with the externally coupled codes ATHLET Mod.1.1 Cycle C and DYN3DH1.1/M3. The standard WWER-440/213 input deck of ATHLET code was adopted for benchmark purposes and for coupling with the code DYN3D. The first part of paper contains a brief characteristics of NPP input deck and reactor core model. The second part shows the time dependencies of important global and local parameters. In comparison with the results published at the eighth Atomic Energy Research Symposium (Bystrice nad Pernstejnem, 1998), the results published in this paper are based on improved ATHLET descriptions of control and safety systems. (Author)

  6. Dynamics of laser ablative shock waves from one dimensional periodic structured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paturi, Prem Kiran; Chelikani, Leela; Pinnoju, Venkateshwarlu; Acrhem Team

    2015-06-01

    Spatio-temporal evolution of Laser ablative shock waves (LASWs) from one dimensional periodic structured surfaces (1D-PSS) of Aluminum is studied using time resolved defocused shadowgraphy technique. LASWs are generated by focusing 7 ns pulses from second harmonic of Nd:YAG (532 nm, 10 Hz) laser on to 1D-PSS with sinusoidal and triangular modulations of varying periodicity. An expanded He-Ne laser (632.8 nm) is used as probe beam for shadowgraphy. Evolution of ablative shock front (SF) with 1.5 ns temporal resolution is used to measure position of the SF, its nature, density and pressure behind the SF. The effect of surface modulation on the LASW and contact front dynamics was compared to those from a flat surface (FS) of Aluminum. SWs from FS and PSS obeyed Taylor's solution for spherical and planar nature, respectively. The velocity of SF from 1D PSS had a twofold increase compared to the FS. This was further enhanced for structures whose periodicity is of the order of excitation wavelength. Variation of SF properties with varying periodicity over a range of 3.3 μm to 0.55 μm has the potential to tailor shockwaves of required parameters. The work is supported by Defence Research and Developement Organization, India through Grants-in-Aid Program. The periodic surfaces were procured with financial support from BRFST project No. NFP-MAT-A12-04.

  7. A three-dimensional computer code for the nonlinear dynamic response of an HTGR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subudhi, M.; Lasker, L.; Koplik, B.; Curreri, J.; Goradia, H.

    1979-01-01

    A three-dimensional dynamic code has been developed to determine the nonlinear response of an HTGR core. The HTGR core consists of several thousands of hexagonal core blocks. These are arranged in layers stacked together. Each layer contains many core blocks surrounded on their outer periphery by reflector blocks. The entire assembly is contained within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel. Gaps exist between adjacent blocks in any horizontal plane. Each core block in a given layer is connected to the blocks directly above and below it via three dowell pins. The present analytical study is directed towards an investigation of the nonlinear response of the reactor core blocks in the event of a seismic occurrence. The computer code is developed for a specific mathematical model which represents a vertical arrangement of layers of blocks. This comprises a 'block module' of core elements which would be obtained by cutting a cylindrical portion consisting of seven fuel blocks per layer. It is anticipated that a number of such modules properly arranged could represent the entire core. Hence, the predicted response of this module would exhibit the response characteristics of the core. (orig.)

  8. Effects of delayed nonlinear response on wave packet dynamics in one-dimensional generalized Fibonacci chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Jianxin; Zhang, Zhenjun; Tong, Peiqing

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the spreading of an initially localized wave packet in one-dimensional generalized Fibonacci (GF) lattices by solving numerically the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation (DNLSE) with a delayed cubic nonlinear term. It is found that for short delay time, the wave packet is self-trapping in first class of GF lattices, that is, the second moment grows with time, but the corresponding participation number does not grow. However, both the second moment and the participation number grow with time for large delay time. This illuminates that the wave packet is delocalized. For the second class of GF lattices, the dynamic behaviors of wave packet depend on the strength of on-site potential. For a weak on-site potential, the results are similar to the case of the first class. For a strong on-site potential, both the second moment and the participation number does not grow with time in the regime of short delay time. In the regime of large delay time, both the second moment and the participation number exhibit stair-like growth

  9. Three-dimensional computer code for the nonlinear dynamic response of an HTGR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subudhi, M.; Lasker, L.; Koplik, B.; Curreri, J.; Goradia, H.

    1979-01-01

    A three-dimensional dynamic code has been developed to determine the nonlinear response of an HTGR core. The HTGR core consists of several thousands of hexagonal core blocks. These are arranged inlayers stacked together. Each layer contains many core blocks surrounded on their outer periphery by reflector blocks. The entire assembly is contained within a prestressed concrete reactor vessel. Gaps exist between adjacent blocks in any horizontal plane. Each core block in a given layer is connected to the blocks directly above and below it via three dowell pins. The present analystical study is directed towards an invesstigation of the nonlinear response of the reactor core blocks in the event of a seismic occurrence. The computer code is developed for a specific mathemtical model which represents a vertical arrangement of layers of blocks. This comprises a block module of core elements which would be obtained by cutting a cylindrical portion consisting of seven fuel blocks per layer. It is anticipated that a number of such modules properly arranged could represent the entire core. Hence, the predicted response of this module would exhibit the response characteristics of the core

  10. Effects of delayed nonlinear response on wave packet dynamics in one-dimensional generalized Fibonacci chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jianxin; Zhang, Zhenjun [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Tong, Peiqing, E-mail: pqtong@njnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Numerical Simulation of Large Scale Complex Systems, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2013-07-15

    We investigate the spreading of an initially localized wave packet in one-dimensional generalized Fibonacci (GF) lattices by solving numerically the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation (DNLSE) with a delayed cubic nonlinear term. It is found that for short delay time, the wave packet is self-trapping in first class of GF lattices, that is, the second moment grows with time, but the corresponding participation number does not grow. However, both the second moment and the participation number grow with time for large delay time. This illuminates that the wave packet is delocalized. For the second class of GF lattices, the dynamic behaviors of wave packet depend on the strength of on-site potential. For a weak on-site potential, the results are similar to the case of the first class. For a strong on-site potential, both the second moment and the participation number does not grow with time in the regime of short delay time. In the regime of large delay time, both the second moment and the participation number exhibit stair-like growth.

  11. HASE: Framework for efficient high-dimensional association analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.V. Roshchupkin (Gennady); H.H.H. Adams (Hieab); M.W. Vernooij (Meike); A. Hofman (Albert); C.M. van Duijn (Cornelia); M.K. Ikram (Kamran); W.J. Niessen (Wiro)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractHigh-throughput technology can now provide rich information on a person's biological makeup and environmental surroundings. Important discoveries have been made by relating these data to various health outcomes in fields such as genomics, proteomics, and medical imaging. However,

  12. HASE : Framework for efficient high-dimensional association analyses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roshchupkin, G. V.; Adams, H; Vernooij, Meike W.; Hofman, A; Van Duijn, C. M.; Ikram, M. Arfan; Niessen, W.J.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput technology can now provide rich information on a person's biological makeup and environmental surroundings. Important discoveries have been made by relating these data to various health outcomes in fields such as genomics, proteomics, and medical imaging. However,

  13. A Comparison of Machine Learning Methods in a High-Dimensional Classification Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Zekić-Sušac, Marijana; Pfeifer, Sanja; Šarlija, Nataša

    2014-01-01

    Background: Large-dimensional data modelling often relies on variable reduction methods in the pre-processing and in the post-processing stage. However, such a reduction usually provides less information and yields a lower accuracy of the model. Objectives: The aim of this paper is to assess the high-dimensional classification problem of recognizing entrepreneurial intentions of students by machine learning methods. Methods/Approach: Four methods were tested: artificial neural networks, CART ...

  14. Secure data storage by three-dimensional absorbers in highly scattering volume medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matoba, Osamu; Matsuki, Shinichiro; Nitta, Kouichi

    2008-01-01

    A novel data storage in a volume medium with highly scattering coefficient is proposed for data security application. Three-dimensional absorbers are used as data. These absorbers can not be measured by interferometer when the scattering in a volume medium is strong enough. We present a method to reconstruct three-dimensional absorbers and present numerical results to show the effectiveness of the proposed data storage.

  15. Hydrological Dynamics In High Mountain Catchment Areas of Central Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löffler, Jörg; Rößler, Ole

    different altitudinal belts. The local differences of temperature dynamics are illustrated in a map as an example of the low alpine altitudinal belt showing a 4-dimensional characterization (in space and time) of high mountain ecosystem functioning. Hydrological aspects derived from those results are presented showing the large- scaled hydrological dynamics of high mountain catchment basins in central Norway. The results of the process analysis of hydrological dynamics in the central Norwegian high mountains are discussed within the frame of investigations on altitudinal changes of mountain ecosystem structure and functioning (LÖFFLER &WUNDRAM [in print]). The poster illustrates the theoretical and methodological conception, methods and techniques, examples from complex data material as well as general outcomes of the project (RÖßLER [in prep.]. JUNG, G., J. LÖFFLER &D. WUNDRAM (1997): Untersuchungen zur Struktur, Funktion und Dynamik mittelnorwegischer Hochgebirgsökosysteme. Forschungsansatz. Oldenburger Geoökologisches Kolloquium 3: 4-36. Oldenburg. KÖHLER, B., J. LÖFFLER &D. WUNDRAM (1994): Probleme der kleinräumigen Geoökovarianz im mittelnorwegischen Gebirge. Norsk geogr. Tidsskr. 48: 99- 111. LÖFFLER, J. (1997): Großmaßstäbige geoökologische Kartierungen in den Höhenstufen des mittelnorwegischen Gebirges. NORDEN 12: 205-228. Bremen. LÖFFLER, J. (1998): Geoökologische Untersuchungen zur Struktur mittelnorwegischer Hochgebirgsökosysteme. Oldenburger Geoökologische Studien 1. Oldenburg. LÖFFLER, J., O.-D. FINCH, J. NAUJOK &R. PAPE (2001): Möglichkeiten der Integration zoologischer Aspekte in die landschaftsökologische Untersuchung von Hochgebirgen. Methodendiskussion am Beispiel ökologischer Prozesssysteme und Biozönosen. Naturschutz u. Landschaftsplanung 33 (11): 351-357. LÖFFLER, J. &D. WUNDRAM (1997): Klimatische Phänomene in mittelnorwegischen Hochgebirgslandschaften und ihre ökosystemare Bedeutung. Oldenburger Geoökologisches Kolloquium

  16. New ab initio potential surfaces and three-dimensional quantum dynamics for transition state spectroscopy in ozone photodissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Koichi; Morokuma, Keiji; Le Quéré, Frederic; Leforestier, Claude

    1992-04-01

    New ab initio potential energy surfaces (PESs) of the ground and B ( 1B 2) states of ozone have been calculated with the CASSCF-SECI/DZP method to describe the three-dimensional photodissociation process. The dissociation energy of the ground state and the vertical barrier height of the B PES are obtained to be 0.88 and 1.34 eV, respectively, in better agreement with the experimental values than the previous calculation. The photodissociation autocorrelation function, calculated on the new B PES, based on exact three-dimensional quantum dynamics, reproduces well the main recurrence feature extracted from the experimental spectra.

  17. Near equilibrium dynamics and one-dimensional spatial—temporal structures of polar active liquid crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiao-Gang; Wang Qi; Forest, M. Gregory

    2014-01-01

    We systematically explore near equilibrium, flow-driven, and flow-activity coupled dynamics of polar active liquid crystals using a continuum model. Firstly, we re-derive the hydrodynamic model to ensure the thermodynamic laws are obeyed and elastic stresses and forces are consistently accounted. We then carry out a linear stability analysis about constant steady states to study near equilibrium dynamics around the steady states, revealing long-wave instability inherent in this model system and how active parameters in the model affect the instability. We then study model predictions for one-dimensional (1D) spatial—temporal structures of active liquid crystals in a channel subject to physical boundary conditions. We discuss the model prediction in two selected regimes, one is the viscous stress dominated regime, also known as the flow-driven regime, while the other is the full regime, in which all active mechanisms are included. In the viscous stress dominated regime, the polarity vector is driven by the prescribed flow field. Dynamics depend sensitively on the physical boundary condition and the type of the driven flow field. Bulk-dominated temporal periodic states and spatially homogeneous states are possible under weak anchoring conditions while spatially inhomogeneous states exist under strong anchoring conditions. In the full model, flow-orientation interaction generates a host of planar as well as out-of-plane spatial—temporal structures related to the spontaneous flows due to the molecular self-propelled motion. These results provide contact with the recent literature on active nematic suspensions. In addition, symmetry breaking patterns emerge as the additional active viscous stress due to the polarity vector is included in the force balance. The inertia effect is found to limit the long-time survival of spatial structures to those with small wave numbers, i.e., an asymptotic coarsening to long wave structures. A rich set of mechanisms for generating

  18. Quantum optimal control pathways of ozone isomerization dynamics subject to competing dissociation: A two-state one-dimensional model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosaki, Yuzuru; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel

    2014-01-01

    We construct a two-state one-dimensional reaction-path model for ozone open → cyclic isomerization dynamics. The model is based on the intrinsic reaction coordinate connecting the cyclic and open isomers with the O 2 + O asymptote on the ground-state 1 A ′ potential energy surface obtained with the high-level ab initio method. Using this two-state model time-dependent wave packet optimal control simulations are carried out. Two possible pathways are identified along with their respective band-limited optimal control fields; for pathway 1 the wave packet initially associated with the open isomer is first pumped into a shallow well on the excited electronic state potential curve and then driven back to the ground electronic state to form the cyclic isomer, whereas for pathway 2 the corresponding wave packet is excited directly to the primary well of the excited state potential curve. The simulations reveal that the optimal field for pathway 1 produces a final yield of nearly 100% with substantially smaller intensity than that obtained in a previous study [Y. Kurosaki, M. Artamonov, T.-S. Ho, and H. Rabitz, J. Chem. Phys. 131, 044306 (2009)] using a single-state one-dimensional model. Pathway 2, due to its strong coupling to the dissociation channel, is less effective than pathway 1. The simulations also show that nonlinear field effects due to molecular polarizability and hyperpolarizability are small for pathway 1 but could become significant for pathway 2 because much higher field intensity is involved in the latter. The results suggest that a practical control may be feasible with the aid of a few lowly excited electronic states for ozone isomerization

  19. High Speed Water Sterilization Using One-Dimensional Nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Schoen, David T.; Schoen, Alia P.; Hu, Liangbing; Kim, Han Sun; Heilshorn, Sarah C.; Cui, Yi

    2010-01-01

    The removal of bacteria and other organisms from water is an extremely important process, not only for drinking and sanitation but also industrially as biofouling is a commonplace and serious problem. We here present a textile based multiscale device for the high speed electrical sterilization of water using silver nanowires, carbon nanotubes, and cotton. This approach, which combines several materials spanning three very different length scales with simple dying based fabrication, makes a gravity fed device operating at 100000 L/(h m2) which can inactivate >98% of bacteria with only several seconds of total incubation time. This excellent performance is enabled by the use of an electrical mechanism rather than size exclusion, while the very high surface area of the device coupled with large electric field concentrations near the silver nanowire tips allows for effective bacterial inactivation. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  20. High Speed Water Sterilization Using One-Dimensional Nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Schoen, David T.

    2010-09-08

    The removal of bacteria and other organisms from water is an extremely important process, not only for drinking and sanitation but also industrially as biofouling is a commonplace and serious problem. We here present a textile based multiscale device for the high speed electrical sterilization of water using silver nanowires, carbon nanotubes, and cotton. This approach, which combines several materials spanning three very different length scales with simple dying based fabrication, makes a gravity fed device operating at 100000 L/(h m2) which can inactivate >98% of bacteria with only several seconds of total incubation time. This excellent performance is enabled by the use of an electrical mechanism rather than size exclusion, while the very high surface area of the device coupled with large electric field concentrations near the silver nanowire tips allows for effective bacterial inactivation. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  1. One-dimensional model for QCD at high energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iancu, E.; Santana Amaral, J.T. de; Soyez, G.; Triantafyllopoulos, D.N.

    2007-01-01

    We propose a stochastic particle model in (1+1) dimensions, with one dimension corresponding to rapidity and the other one to the transverse size of a dipole in QCD, which mimics high-energy evolution and scattering in QCD in the presence of both saturation and particle-number fluctuations, and hence of pomeron loops. The model evolves via non-linear particle splitting, with a non-local splitting rate which is constrained by boost-invariance and multiple scattering. The splitting rate saturates at high density, so like the gluon emission rate in the JIMWLK evolution. In the mean field approximation obtained by ignoring fluctuations, the model exhibits the hallmarks of the BK equation, namely a BFKL-like evolution at low density, the formation of a traveling wave, and geometric scaling. In the full evolution including fluctuations, the geometric scaling is washed out at high energy and replaced by diffusive scaling. It is likely that the model belongs to the universality class of the reaction-diffusion process. The analysis of the model sheds new light on the pomeron loops equations in QCD and their possible improvements

  2. High dynamic range image acquisition based on multiplex cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hairui; Sun, Huayan; Zhang, Tinghua

    2018-03-01

    High dynamic image is an important technology of photoelectric information acquisition, providing higher dynamic range and more image details, and it can better reflect the real environment, light and color information. Currently, the method of high dynamic range image synthesis based on different exposure image sequences cannot adapt to the dynamic scene. It fails to overcome the effects of moving targets, resulting in the phenomenon of ghost. Therefore, a new high dynamic range image acquisition method based on multiplex cameras system was proposed. Firstly, different exposure images sequences were captured with the camera array, using the method of derivative optical flow based on color gradient to get the deviation between images, and aligned the images. Then, the high dynamic range image fusion weighting function was established by combination of inverse camera response function and deviation between images, and was applied to generated a high dynamic range image. The experiments show that the proposed method can effectively obtain high dynamic images in dynamic scene, and achieves good results.

  3. Three-dimensional reconstruction and modeling of middle ear biomechanics by high-resolution computed tomography and finite element analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Fone; Chen, Peir-Rong; Lee, Wen-Jeng; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Liu, Tien-Chen

    2006-05-01

    To present a systematic and practical approach that uses high-resolution computed tomography to derive models of the middle ear for finite element analysis. This prospective study included 31 subjects with normal hearing and no previous otologic disorders. Temporal bone images obtained from 15 right ears and 16 left ears were used for evaluation and reconstruction. High-resolution computed tomography of temporal bone was performed using simultaneous acquisition of 16 sections with a collimated slice thickness of 0.625 mm. All images were transferred to an Amira visualization system for three-dimensional reconstruction. The created three-dimensional model was translated into two commercial modeling packages, Patran and ANSYS, for finite element analysis. The characteristic dimensions of the model were measured and compared with previously published histologic section data. This result confirms that the geometric model created by the proposed method is accurate except that the tympanic membrane is thicker than when measured by the histologic section method. No obvious difference in the geometrical dimension between right and left ossicles was found (P > .05). The three-dimensional model created by finite element method and predicted umbo and stapes displacements are close to the bounds of the experimental curves of Nishihara's, Huber's, Gan's, and Sun's data across the frequency range of 100 to 8000 Hz. The model includes a description of the geometry of the middle ear components and dynamic equations of vibration. The proposed method is quick, practical, low-cost, and, most importantly, noninvasive as compared with histologic section methods.

  4. A solution for two-dimensional mazes with use of chaotic dynamics in a recurrent neural network model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suemitsu, Yoshikazu; Nara, Shigetoshi

    2004-09-01

    Chaotic dynamics introduced into a neural network model is applied to solving two-dimensional mazes, which are ill-posed problems. A moving object moves from the position at t to t + 1 by simply defined motion function calculated from firing patterns of the neural network model at each time step t. We have embedded several prototype attractors that correspond to the simple motion of the object orienting toward several directions in two-dimensional space in our neural network model. Introducing chaotic dynamics into the network gives outputs sampled from intermediate state points between embedded attractors in a state space, and these dynamics enable the object to move in various directions. System parameter switching between a chaotic and an attractor regime in the state space of the neural network enables the object to move to a set target in a two-dimensional maze. Results of computer simulations show that the success rate for this method over 300 trials is higher than that of random walk. To investigate why the proposed method gives better performance, we calculate and discuss statistical data with respect to dynamical structure.

  5. Depletion interactions in two-dimensional colloid-polymer mixtures: molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soon-Chul; Seong, Baek-Seok; Suh, Soong-Hyuck

    2009-01-01

    The depletion interactions acting between two hard colloids immersed in a bath of polymers, in which the interaction potentials include the soft repulsion/attraction, are extensively studied by using the molecular dynamics simulations. The collision frequencies and collision angle distributions for both incidental and reflection conditions are computed to study the dynamic properties of the colloidal mixtures. The depletion effect induced by the polymer-polymer and colloid-polymer interactions are investigated as well as the size ratio of the colloid and polymer. The simulated results show that the strong depletion interaction between two hard colloids appears for the highly asymmetric hard-disc mixtures. The attractive depletion force at contact becomes deeper and the repulsive barrier becomes wider as the asymmetry in size ratio increases. The strong polymer-polymer attraction leads to the purely attractive depletion interaction between two hard colloids, whereas the purely repulsive depletion interaction is induced by the strong colloid-polymer attraction.

  6. Application of Nondimensional Dynamic Influence Function Method for Eigenmode Analysis of Two-Dimensional Acoustic Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. Kang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper establishes an improved NDIF method for the eigenvalue extraction of two-dimensional acoustic cavities with arbitrary shapes. The NDIF method, which was introduced by the authors in 1999, gives highly accurate eigenvalues despite employing a small number of nodes. However, it needs the inefficient procedure of calculating the singularity of a system matrix in the frequency range of interest for extracting eigenvalues and mode shapes. The paper proposes a practical approach for overcoming the inefficient procedure by making the final system matrix equation of the NDIF method into a form of algebraic eigenvalue problem. The solution quality of the proposed method is investigated by obtaining the eigenvalues and mode shapes of a circular, a rectangular, and an arbitrarily shaped cavity.

  7. Engineering two-photon high-dimensional states through quantum interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingwen; Roux, Filippus S.; Konrad, Thomas; Agnew, Megan; Leach, Jonathan; Forbes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Many protocols in quantum science, for example, linear optical quantum computing, require access to large-scale entangled quantum states. Such systems can be realized through many-particle qubits, but this approach often suffers from scalability problems. An alternative strategy is to consider a lesser number of particles that exist in high-dimensional states. The spatial modes of light are one such candidate that provides access to high-dimensional quantum states, and thus they increase the storage and processing potential of quantum information systems. We demonstrate the controlled engineering of two-photon high-dimensional states entangled in their orbital angular momentum through Hong-Ou-Mandel interference. We prepare a large range of high-dimensional entangled states and implement precise quantum state filtering. We characterize the full quantum state before and after the filter, and are thus able to determine that only the antisymmetric component of the initial state remains. This work paves the way for high-dimensional processing and communication of multiphoton quantum states, for example, in teleportation beyond qubits. PMID:26933685

  8. A Comparison of Methods for Estimating the Determinant of High-Dimensional Covariance Matrix

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Zongliang

    2017-09-27

    The determinant of the covariance matrix for high-dimensional data plays an important role in statistical inference and decision. It has many real applications including statistical tests and information theory. Due to the statistical and computational challenges with high dimensionality, little work has been proposed in the literature for estimating the determinant of high-dimensional covariance matrix. In this paper, we estimate the determinant of the covariance matrix using some recent proposals for estimating high-dimensional covariance matrix. Specifically, we consider a total of eight covariance matrix estimation methods for comparison. Through extensive simulation studies, we explore and summarize some interesting comparison results among all compared methods. We also provide practical guidelines based on the sample size, the dimension, and the correlation of the data set for estimating the determinant of high-dimensional covariance matrix. Finally, from a perspective of the loss function, the comparison study in this paper may also serve as a proxy to assess the performance of the covariance matrix estimation.

  9. A Comparison of Methods for Estimating the Determinant of High-Dimensional Covariance Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zongliang; Dong, Kai; Dai, Wenlin; Tong, Tiejun

    2017-09-21

    The determinant of the covariance matrix for high-dimensional data plays an important role in statistical inference and decision. It has many real applications including statistical tests and information theory. Due to the statistical and computational challenges with high dimensionality, little work has been proposed in the literature for estimating the determinant of high-dimensional covariance matrix. In this paper, we estimate the determinant of the covariance matrix using some recent proposals for estimating high-dimensional covariance matrix. Specifically, we consider a total of eight covariance matrix estimation methods for comparison. Through extensive simulation studies, we explore and summarize some interesting comparison results among all compared methods. We also provide practical guidelines based on the sample size, the dimension, and the correlation of the data set for estimating the determinant of high-dimensional covariance matrix. Finally, from a perspective of the loss function, the comparison study in this paper may also serve as a proxy to assess the performance of the covariance matrix estimation.

  10. A Comparison of Methods for Estimating the Determinant of High-Dimensional Covariance Matrix

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Zongliang; Dong, Kai; Dai, Wenlin; Tong, Tiejun

    2017-01-01

    The determinant of the covariance matrix for high-dimensional data plays an important role in statistical inference and decision. It has many real applications including statistical tests and information theory. Due to the statistical and computational challenges with high dimensionality, little work has been proposed in the literature for estimating the determinant of high-dimensional covariance matrix. In this paper, we estimate the determinant of the covariance matrix using some recent proposals for estimating high-dimensional covariance matrix. Specifically, we consider a total of eight covariance matrix estimation methods for comparison. Through extensive simulation studies, we explore and summarize some interesting comparison results among all compared methods. We also provide practical guidelines based on the sample size, the dimension, and the correlation of the data set for estimating the determinant of high-dimensional covariance matrix. Finally, from a perspective of the loss function, the comparison study in this paper may also serve as a proxy to assess the performance of the covariance matrix estimation.

  11. High Performance Interactive System Dynamics Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, Brian W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Brunhart-Lupo, Nicholas J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gruchalla, Kenny M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Duckworth, Jonathan C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-14

    This brochure describes a system dynamics simulation (SD) framework that supports an end-to-end analysis workflow that is optimized for deployment on ESIF facilities(Peregrine and the Insight Center). It includes (I) parallel and distributed simulation of SD models, (ii) real-time 3D visualization of running simulations, and (iii) comprehensive database-oriented persistence of simulation metadata, inputs, and outputs.

  12. High Performance Interactive System Dynamics Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, Brian W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Brunhart-Lupo, Nicholas J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gruchalla, Kenny M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Duckworth, Jonathan C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-14

    This presentation describes a system dynamics simulation (SD) framework that supports an end-to-end analysis workflow that is optimized for deployment on ESIF facilities(Peregrine and the Insight Center). It includes (I) parallel and distributed simulation of SD models, (ii) real-time 3D visualization of running simulations, and (iii) comprehensive database-oriented persistence of simulation metadata, inputs, and outputs.

  13. Profiling stem cell states in three-dimensional biomaterial niches using high content image informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, Anandika; Brenner, Matthew; Wolujewicz, Paul; Zhang, Zheng; Mao, Yong; Batish, Mona; Kohn, Joachim; Moghe, Prabhas V

    2016-11-01

    materials relies on technologies that can sensitively discern cell response dynamics to biomaterials, while capturing cell-to-cell heterogeneity and preserving cellular native phenotypes. In this study, we illustrate the application of a novel high content image informatics platform to classify emergent human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) phenotypes in a diverse range of 3-D biomaterial scaffolds with high sensitivity and precision, and track cell responses to varied external stimuli. A major in silico innovation is the proposed image profiling technology based on unique three dimensional textural signatures of a mechanoreporter protein within the nuclei of stem cells cultured in 3-D scaffolds. This technology will accelerate the pace of high-fidelity biomaterial screening. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Metallic and highly conducting two-dimensional atomic arrays of sulfur enabled by molybdenum disulfide nanotemplate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shuze; Geng, Xiumei; Han, Yang; Benamara, Mourad; Chen, Liao; Li, Jingxiao; Bilgin, Ismail; Zhu, Hongli

    2017-10-01

    Element sulfur in nature is an insulating solid. While it has been tested that one-dimensional sulfur chain is metallic and conducting, the investigation on two-dimensional sulfur remains elusive. We report that molybdenum disulfide layers are able to serve as the nanotemplate to facilitate the formation of two-dimensional sulfur. Density functional theory calculations suggest that confined in-between layers of molybdenum disulfide, sulfur atoms are able to form two-dimensional triangular arrays that are highly metallic. As a result, these arrays contribute to the high conductivity and metallic phase of the hybrid structures of molybdenum disulfide layers and two-dimensional sulfur arrays. The experimentally measured conductivity of such hybrid structures reaches up to 223 S/m. Multiple experimental results, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transition electron microscope (TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SAED), agree with the computational insights. Due to the excellent conductivity, the current density is linearly proportional to the scan rate until 30,000 mV s-1 without the attendance of conductive additives. Using such hybrid structures as electrode, the two-electrode supercapacitor cells yield a power density of 106 Wh kg-1 and energy density 47.5 Wh kg-1 in ionic liquid electrolytes. Our findings offer new insights into using two-dimensional materials and their Van der Waals heterostructures as nanotemplates to pattern foreign atoms for unprecedented material properties.

  15. Similarity measurement method of high-dimensional data based on normalized net lattice subspace

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wenfa; Wang Gongming; Li Ke; Huang Su

    2017-01-01

    The performance of conventional similarity measurement methods is affected seriously by the curse of dimensionality of high-dimensional data.The reason is that data difference between sparse and noisy dimensionalities occupies a large proportion of the similarity, leading to the dissimilarities between any results.A similarity measurement method of high-dimensional data based on normalized net lattice subspace is proposed.The data range of each dimension is divided into several intervals, and the components in different dimensions are mapped onto the corresponding interval.Only the component in the same or adjacent interval is used to calculate the similarity.To validate this meth-od, three data types are used, and seven common similarity measurement methods are compared. The experimental result indicates that the relative difference of the method is increasing with the di-mensionality and is approximately two or three orders of magnitude higher than the conventional method.In addition, the similarity range of this method in different dimensions is [0, 1], which is fit for similarity analysis after dimensionality reduction.

  16. DataHigh: graphical user interface for visualizing and interacting with high-dimensional neural activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Benjamin R.; Kaufman, Matthew T.; Butler, Zachary S.; Churchland, Mark M.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.; Yu, Byron M.

    2013-12-01

    Objective. Analyzing and interpreting the activity of a heterogeneous population of neurons can be challenging, especially as the number of neurons, experimental trials, and experimental conditions increases. One approach is to extract a set of latent variables that succinctly captures the prominent co-fluctuation patterns across the neural population. A key problem is that the number of latent variables needed to adequately describe the population activity is often greater than 3, thereby preventing direct visualization of the latent space. By visualizing a small number of 2-d projections of the latent space or each latent variable individually, it is easy to miss salient features of the population activity. Approach. To address this limitation, we developed a Matlab graphical user interface (called DataHigh) that allows the user to quickly and smoothly navigate through a continuum of different 2-d projections of the latent space. We also implemented a suite of additional visualization tools (including playing out population activity timecourses as a movie and displaying summary statistics, such as covariance ellipses and average timecourses) and an optional tool for performing dimensionality reduction. Main results. To demonstrate the utility and versatility of DataHigh, we used it to analyze single-trial spike count and single-trial timecourse population activity recorded using a multi-electrode array, as well as trial-averaged population activity recorded using single electrodes. Significance. DataHigh was developed to fulfil a need for visualization in exploratory neural data analysis, which can provide intuition that is critical for building scientific hypotheses and models of population activity.

  17. DataHigh: graphical user interface for visualizing and interacting with high-dimensional neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Benjamin R; Kaufman, Matthew T; Butler, Zachary S; Churchland, Mark M; Ryu, Stephen I; Shenoy, Krishna V; Yu, Byron M

    2013-12-01

    Analyzing and interpreting the activity of a heterogeneous population of neurons can be challenging, especially as the number of neurons, experimental trials, and experimental conditions increases. One approach is to extract a set of latent variables that succinctly captures the prominent co-fluctuation patterns across the neural population. A key problem is that the number of latent variables needed to adequately describe the population activity is often greater than 3, thereby preventing direct visualization of the latent space. By visualizing a small number of 2-d projections of the latent space or each latent variable individually, it is easy to miss salient features of the population activity. To address this limitation, we developed a Matlab graphical user interface (called DataHigh) that allows the user to quickly and smoothly navigate through a continuum of different 2-d projections of the latent space. We also implemented a suite of additional visualization tools (including playing out population activity timecourses as a movie and displaying summary statistics, such as covariance ellipses and average timecourses) and an optional tool for performing dimensionality reduction. To demonstrate the utility and versatility of DataHigh, we used it to analyze single-trial spike count and single-trial timecourse population activity recorded using a multi-electrode array, as well as trial-averaged population activity recorded using single electrodes. DataHigh was developed to fulfil a need for visualization in exploratory neural data analysis, which can provide intuition that is critical for building scientific hypotheses and models of population activity.

  18. DataHigh: Graphical user interface for visualizing and interacting with high-dimensional neural activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Benjamin R.; Kaufman, Matthew T.; Butler, Zachary S.; Churchland, Mark M.; Ryu, Stephen I.; Shenoy, Krishna V.; Yu, Byron M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Analyzing and interpreting the activity of a heterogeneous population of neurons can be challenging, especially as the number of neurons, experimental trials, and experimental conditions increases. One approach is to extract a set of latent variables that succinctly captures the prominent co-fluctuation patterns across the neural population. A key problem is that the number of latent variables needed to adequately describe the population activity is often greater than three, thereby preventing direct visualization of the latent space. By visualizing a small number of 2-d projections of the latent space or each latent variable individually, it is easy to miss salient features of the population activity. Approach To address this limitation, we developed a Matlab graphical user interface (called DataHigh) that allows the user to quickly and smoothly navigate through a continuum of different 2-d projections of the latent space. We also implemented a suite of additional visualization tools (including playing out population activity timecourses as a movie and displaying summary statistics, such as covariance ellipses and average timecourses) and an optional tool for performing dimensionality reduction. Main results To demonstrate the utility and versatility of DataHigh, we used it to analyze single-trial spike count and single-trial timecourse population activity recorded using a multi-electrode array, as well as trial-averaged population activity recorded using single electrodes. Significance DataHigh was developed to fulfill a need for visualization in exploratory neural data analysis, which can provide intuition that is critical for building scientific hypotheses and models of population activity. PMID:24216250

  19. Global communication schemes for the numerical solution of high-dimensional PDEs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hupp, Philipp; Heene, Mario; Jacob, Riko

    2016-01-01

    The numerical treatment of high-dimensional partial differential equations is among the most compute-hungry problems and in urgent need for current and future high-performance computing (HPC) systems. It is thus also facing the grand challenges of exascale computing such as the requirement...

  20. High-Dimensional Intrinsic Interpolation Using Gaussian Process Regression and Diffusion Maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thimmisetty, Charanraj A.; Ghanem, Roger G.; White, Joshua A.; Chen, Xiao

    2017-01-01

    This article considers the challenging task of estimating geologic properties of interest using a suite of proxy measurements. The current work recast this task as a manifold learning problem. In this process, this article introduces a novel regression procedure for intrinsic variables constrained onto a manifold embedded in an ambient space. The procedure is meant to sharpen high-dimensional interpolation by inferring non-linear correlations from the data being interpolated. The proposed approach augments manifold learning procedures with a Gaussian process regression. It first identifies, using diffusion maps, a low-dimensional manifold embedded in an ambient high-dimensional space associated with the data. It relies on the diffusion distance associated with this construction to define a distance function with which the data model is equipped. This distance metric function is then used to compute the correlation structure of a Gaussian process that describes the statistical dependence of quantities of interest in the high-dimensional ambient space. The proposed method is applicable to arbitrarily high-dimensional data sets. Here, it is applied to subsurface characterization using a suite of well log measurements. The predictions obtained in original, principal component, and diffusion space are compared using both qualitative and quantitative metrics. Considerable improvement in the prediction of the geological structural properties is observed with the proposed method.

  1. The dynamics of low-β plasma clouds as simulated by a three-dimensional, electromagnetic particle code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubert, T.; Miller, R.H.; Buneman, O.; Nishikawa, K.I.

    1992-01-01

    The dynamics of low-β plasma clouds moving perpendicular to an ambient magnetic field in vacuum and in a background plasma is simulated by means of a three-dimensional, electromagnetic, and relativistic particle simulation code. The simulations show the formation of the space charge sheaths at the sides of the cloud with the associated polarization electric field which facilitate the cross-field propagation, as well as the sheaths at the front and rear end of the cloud caused by the larger ion Larmor radius, which allows ions to move ahead and lag behind the electrons as they gyrate. Results on the cloud dynamics and electromagnetic radiation include the following: (1) In a background plasma, electron and ion sheaths expand along the magnetic field at the same rate, whereas in vacuum the electron sheath expands much faster than the ion sheath. (2) Sheath electrons are accelerated up to relativistic energies. This result indicates that artificial plasma clouds released in the ionosphere or magnetosphere may generate optical emissions (aurora) as energetic sheath electrons scatter in the upper atmosphere. (3) The expansion of the electron sheaths is analogous to the ejection of high-intensity electron beams from spacecraft. (4) Second-order and higher-order sheaths are formed which extend out into the ambient plasma. (5) Formation of the sheaths and the polarization field reduces the forward momentum of the cloud. (6) The coherent component of the particle gyromotion is damped in time as the particles establish a forward directed drift velocity. (7) The coherent particle gyrations generate electromagnetic radiation

  2. Evaluation of the parameters affecting bone temperature during drilling using a three-dimensional dynamic elastoplastic finite element model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yung-Chuan; Tu, Yuan-Kun; Zhuang, Jun-Yan; Tsai, Yi-Jung; Yen, Cheng-Yo; Hsiao, Chih-Kun

    2017-11-01

    A three-dimensional dynamic elastoplastic finite element model was constructed and experimentally validated and was used to investigate the parameters which influence bone temperature during drilling, including the drill speed, feeding force, drill bit diameter, and bone density. Results showed the proposed three-dimensional dynamic elastoplastic finite element model can effectively simulate the temperature elevation during bone drilling. The bone temperature rise decreased with an increase in feeding force and drill speed, however, increased with the diameter of drill bit or bone density. The temperature distribution is significantly affected by the drilling duration; a lower drilling speed reduced the exposure duration, decreases the region of the thermally affected zone. The constructed model could be applied for analyzing the influence parameters during bone drilling to reduce the risk of thermal necrosis. It may provide important information for the design of drill bits and surgical drilling powers.

  3. Fully Coupled Three-Dimensional Dynamic Response of a Tension-Leg Platform Floating Wind Turbine in Waves and Wind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumari Ramachandran, Gireesh Kumar Vasanta; Bredmose, Henrik; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    , which is a consequence of the wave-induced rotor dynamics. Loads and coupled responses are predicted for a set of load cases with different wave headings. Further, an advanced aero-elastic code, Flex5, is extended for the TLP wind turbine configuration and the response comparison with the simpler model......A dynamic model for a tension-leg platform (TLP) floating offshore wind turbine is proposed. The model includes three-dimensional wind and wave loads and the associated structural response. The total system is formulated using 17 degrees of freedom (DOF), 6 for the platform motions and 11...... for the wind turbine. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic loads have been formulated using a frequency-and direction-dependent spectrum. While wave loads are computed from the wave kinematics using Morison's equation, the aerodynamic loads are modeled by means of unsteady blade-element-momentum (BEM) theory...

  4. Model-based Clustering of High-Dimensional Data in Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouveyron, C.

    2016-05-01

    The nature of data in Astrophysics has changed, as in other scientific fields, in the past decades due to the increase of the measurement capabilities. As a consequence, data are nowadays frequently of high dimensionality and available in mass or stream. Model-based techniques for clustering are popular tools which are renowned for their probabilistic foundations and their flexibility. However, classical model-based techniques show a disappointing behavior in high-dimensional spaces which is mainly due to their dramatical over-parametrization. The recent developments in model-based classification overcome these drawbacks and allow to efficiently classify high-dimensional data, even in the "small n / large p" situation. This work presents a comprehensive review of these recent approaches, including regularization-based techniques, parsimonious modeling, subspace classification methods and classification methods based on variable selection. The use of these model-based methods is also illustrated on real-world classification problems in Astrophysics using R packages.

  5. High-dimensional atom localization via spontaneously generated coherence in a microwave-driven atomic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiping; Chen, Jinyu; Yu, Benli

    2017-02-20

    We investigate the two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) atom localization behaviors via spontaneously generated coherence in a microwave-driven four-level atomic system. Owing to the space-dependent atom-field interaction, it is found that the detecting probability and precision of 2D and 3D atom localization behaviors can be significantly improved via adjusting the system parameters, the phase, amplitude, and initial population distribution. Interestingly, the atom can be localized in volumes that are substantially smaller than a cubic optical wavelength. Our scheme opens a promising way to achieve high-precision and high-efficiency atom localization, which provides some potential applications in high-dimensional atom nanolithography.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling Three-Dimensional Unsteady Turbulent Flow and Excitation Force in Partial Admission Air Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Xie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Air turbines are widely used to convert kinetic energy into power output in power engineering. The unsteady performance of air turbines with partial admission not only influences the aerodynamic performance and thermodynamic efficiency of turbine but also generates strong excitation force on blades to impair the turbine safely operating. Based on three-dimensional viscous compressible Navier-stokes equations, the present study employs RNG (Renormalization group k-ε turbulence model with finite volume discretization on air turbine with partial admission. Numerical models of four different admission rates with full annulus are built and analyzed via CFD (computational fluid dynamics modeling unsteady flows. Results indicate that the unsteady time-averaged isentropic efficiency is lower than the steady isentropic efficiency, and this difference rises as unsteady isentropic efficiency fluctuates stronger when the admission rate is reduced. The rotor axial and tangential forces with time are provided for all four admission rates. The low frequency excitation forces generated by partial admission are extraordinarily higher than the high frequency excitation forces by stator wakes.

  7. Magnetic quantum tunneling: key insights from multi-dimensional high-field EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, J; Yang, E-C; Hendrickson, D N; Hill, S

    2009-08-21

    Multi-dimensional high-field/frequency electron paramagnetic resonance (HFEPR) spectroscopy is performed on single-crystals of the high-symmetry spin S = 4 tetranuclear single-molecule magnet (SMM) [Ni(hmp)(dmb)Cl](4), where hmp(-) is the anion of 2-hydroxymethylpyridine and dmb is 3,3-dimethyl-1-butanol. Measurements performed as a function of the applied magnetic field strength and its orientation within the hard-plane reveal the four-fold behavior associated with the fourth order transverse zero-field splitting (ZFS) interaction, (1/2)B(S + S), within the framework of a rigid spin approximation (with S = 4). This ZFS interaction mixes the m(s) = +/-4 ground states in second order of perturbation, generating a sizeable (12 MHz) tunnel splitting, which explains the fast magnetic quantum tunneling in this SMM. Meanwhile, multi-frequency measurements performed with the field parallel to the easy-axis reveal HFEPR transitions associated with excited spin multiplets (S spin s = 1 Ni(II) ions within the cluster, as well as a characterization of the ZFS within excited states. The combined experimental studies support recent work indicating that the fourth order anisotropy associated with the S = 4 state originates from second order ZFS interactions associated with the individual Ni(II) centers, but only as a result of higher-order processes that occur via S-mixing between the ground state and higher-lying (S spin multiplets. We argue that this S-mixing plays an important role in the low-temperature quantum dynamics associated with many other well known SMMs.

  8. Three dimensional viscoelastic simulation on dynamic evolution of stress field in North China induced by the 1966 Xingtai earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lian-Wang; Lu, Yuan-Zhong; Liu, Jie; Guo, Ruo-Mei

    2001-09-01

    Using three dimensional (3D) viscoelastic finite element method (FEM) we study the dynamic evolution pattern of the coseismic change of Coulomb failure stress and postseismic change, on time scale of hundreds years, of rheological effect induced by the M S=7.2 Xingtai earthquake on March 22, 1966. Then, we simulate the coseismic disturbance in stress field in North China and dynamic change rate on one-year scale caused by the Xingtai earthquake and Tangshan earthquake during 15 years from 1966 to 1980. Finally, we discuss the triggering of a strong earthquake to another future strong earthquake.

  9. Existence and global exponential stability of periodic solutions for n-dimensional neutral dynamic equations on time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing; Li, Yongkun; Zhang, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, by using the existence of the exponential dichotomy of linear dynamic equations on time scales and the theory of calculus on time scales, we study the existence and global exponential stability of periodic solutions for a class of n-dimensional neutral dynamic equations on time scales. We also present an example to illustrate the feasibility of our results. The results of this paper are completely new and complementary to the previously known results even in both the case of differential equations (time scale [Formula: see text]) and the case of difference equations (time scale [Formula: see text]).

  10. Three Dimensional Dynamic Model Based Wind Field Reconstruction from Lidar Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raach, Steffen; Schlipf, David; Haizmann, Florian; Cheng, Po Wen

    2014-01-01

    Using the inflowing horizontal and vertical wind shears for individual pitch controller is a promising method if blade bending measurements are not available. Due to the limited information provided by a lidar system the reconstruction of shears in real-time is a challenging task especially for the horizontal shear in the presence of changing wind direction. The internal model principle has shown to be a promising approach to estimate the shears and directions in 10 minutes averages with real measurement data. The static model based wind vector field reconstruction is extended in this work taking into account a dynamic reconstruction model based on Taylor's Frozen Turbulence Hypothesis. The presented method provides time series over several seconds of the wind speed, shears and direction, which can be directly used in advanced optimal preview control. Therefore, this work is an important step towards the application of preview individual blade pitch control under realistic wind conditions. The method is tested using a turbulent wind field and a detailed lidar simulator. For the simulation, the turbulent wind field structure is flowing towards the lidar system and is continuously misaligned with respect to the horizontal axis of the wind turbine. Taylor's Frozen Turbulence Hypothesis is taken into account to model the wind evolution. For the reconstruction, the structure is discretized into several stages where each stage is reduced to an effective wind speed, superposed with a linear horizontal and vertical wind shear. Previous lidar measurements are shifted using again Taylor's Hypothesis. The wind field reconstruction problem is then formulated as a nonlinear optimization problem, which minimizes the residual between the assumed wind model and the lidar measurements to obtain the misalignment angle and the effective wind speed and the wind shears for each stage. This method shows good results in reconstructing the wind characteristics of a three

  11. Validation of dynamic MLC-controller log files using a two-dimensional diode array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jonathan G.; Dempsey, James F.; Ding Li; Liu, Chihray; Palta, Jatinder R.

    2003-01-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) delivered with multi-leaf collimator (MLC) in the step-and-shoot mode uses multiple static MLC segments to achieve intensity modulation. For typical IMRT treatment plans, significant numbers of segments are delivered with monitor units (MUs) of much less than 10. Verification of the ability of the linear accelerator (linac) to deliver small MU segments accurately is an important step in the IMRT commissioning and quality assurance (QA) process. Recent studies have reported large discrepancies between the intended and delivered segment MUs. These discrepancies could potentially cause large errors in the delivered patient dose. We have undertaken a systematic study to evaluate the accuracy of the dynamic MLC log files, which are created automatically by our commercial MLC workstation after each delivery, in recording the fractional MU delivered in the step-and-shoot mode. Two linac models were evaluated with simple-geometry leaf sequences and delivered with different total MUs and different nominal dose rates. A commercial two-dimensional diode array was used for the measurement. Large discrepancies between the intended and delivered segment MUs were found. The discrepancies were larger for small MU segments at higher dose rate, with some small MU segments completely undelivered. The recorded fractional MUs in the log files were found to agree with what was delivered within the limits of our experimental uncertainty. Our results indicate that it is important to verify the delivery accuracy of small MU segments that could potentially occur in a patient treatment and that the log files are useful in checking the integrity of the linac delivery once validated. Thus validated log files can be used as a QA tool for general IMRT delivery and patient-specific plan verification

  12. The evaluation of three-dimensional dynamic contrast enhanced MR angiography in portal hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Zhuo; Liang Biling; Liu Qingyu; Zhong Jinglian; Ye Ruixin; Ling Yunbiao; Ou Qingjia

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the techniques of three-dimensional dynamic contrast enhanced MR angiography (3D DCE MRA)with normative timing of sequences, enhancive 3D slab thickness and subtraction in portosystemic collaterals. Methods: Before April 2003, 12 patients were performed with 75-90 mm of 3D slab thickness and 3-5 repeated sequences estimated by breath, after April 2003, 18 patients were performed with 150-180 mm of 3D slab thickness and 5 normative repeated sequences respectively at 0, 20, 40, 60 and 90 s. After subtracting selective arterial phase images from subsequent portal venous phase images, two radiologists assessed visualization of portal collaterals independently with a four - point scale for ranking of image quality in maximum intensity projection (MIP) images with and without subtraction. Results: Average scores for image quality in visualization of the portal vein with subtraction were significantly depressed compared with the scores without subtraction (2.53±0.49 versus 2.74±0.31, P<0.05). However, subtraction three dimension-maximum intensity projection (3D-MIP) gave superior visualization of portal collaterals compared with non-subtraction 3D-MIP(2.58±0.30 versus 1.63±0.50). A statistically significant difference (P<0.01) was found between the two groups of esophageal varices. Most of portosystemic shunts demonstrated in the same time as the portal vein at about 20s, but some of collaterals demonstrated in delay time. Conclusion: Subtraction 3D-MIP demonstrates portosystemic collaterals more clearly than non-subtraction; normative timing of sequences ensure against omitting varices displayed late, 3 D slab thickness provides details about paraumbilical vein and retroperitoneal collaterals. (authors)

  13. Integrability and Poisson Structures of Three Dimensional Dynamical Systems and Equations of Hydrodynamic Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumral, Hasan

    Poisson structure of completely integrable 3 dimensional dynamical systems can be defined in terms of an integrable 1-form. We take advantage of this fact and use the theory of foliations in discussing the geometrical structure underlying complete and partial integrability. We show that the Halphen system can be formulated in terms of a flat SL(2,R)-valued connection and belongs to a non-trivial Godbillon-Vey class. On the other hand, for the Euler top and a special case of 3-species Lotka-Volterra equations which are contained in the Halphen system as limiting cases, this structure degenerates into the form of globally integrable bi-Hamiltonian structures. The globally integrable bi-Hamiltonian case is a linear and the sl_2 structure is a quadratic unfolding of an integrable 1-form in 3 + 1 dimensions. We complete the discussion of the Hamiltonian structure of 2-component equations of hydrodynamic type by presenting the Hamiltonian operators for Euler's equation and a continuum limit of Toda lattice. We present further infinite sequences of conserved quantities for shallow water equations and show that their generalizations by Kodama admit bi-Hamiltonian structure. We present a simple way of constructing the second Hamiltonian operators for N-component equations admitting some scaling properties. The Kodama reduction of the dispersionless-Boussinesq equations and the Lax reduction of the Benney moment equations are shown to be equivalent by a symmetry transformation. They can be cast into the form of a triplet of conservation laws which enable us to recognize a non-trivial scaling symmetry. The resulting bi-Hamiltonian structure generates three infinite sequences of conserved densities.

  14. Improving the performance of industrial clarifiers using three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankhadeep Das

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sedimentation is one of the most popular wastewater treatment processes, and is used to separate solid particles from carrier fluid in settling tanks known as clarifiers. The clarifier, as the last major facility in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs, can limit or define the performance of the overall WWTP. This paper presents a novel three-dimensional unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD model to improve the efficiency of an industrial clarifier that had been experiencing underperformance and reduction in wastewater handling capacity. We propose a numerical technique to address the transient process of removing sludge from the floor of clarifiers by using rotating rakes. The CFD model was first applied to analyzing the ramifications of the current clarifier geometry on performance. The results show that the root causes for underperformance are related to the unconventional top side feed design of the clarifier, which leads to significant asymmetry in the flow distribution. The CFD model was next used to investigate various design modifications with the goal of improving the clarifier performance. A few geometry modification ideas such as an inward baffle, dissipating inlets, and a submerged skirt were found to create a more uniform flow distribution in the clarifier, significantly reducing the backflow into the feedwell and the velocity of the flow exiting the feedwell, which helps the solid particles to settle in the clarifier. These three designs were found to reduce the effluent total suspended solids (TSS by more than 80% and thus significantly improve clarifier performance. It is believed that the CFD model developed in this study can become a computationally efficient tool for investigating the performance of industrial clarifiers with complex geometries and rotating rakes.

  15. A dynamic two-dimensional system for measuring volatile organic compound volatilization and movement in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaire, S E; Yates, S R; Ernst, F F; Gan, J

    2002-01-01

    There is an important need to develop instrumentation that allows better understanding of atmospheric emission of toxic volatile compounds associated with soil management. For this purpose, chemical movement and distribution in the soil profile should be simultaneously monitored with its volatilization. A two-dimensional rectangular soil column was constructed and a dynamic sequential volatilization flux chamber was attached to the top of the column. The flux chamber was connected through a manifold valve to a gas chromatograph (GC) for real-time concentration measurement. Gas distribution in the soil profile was sampled with gas-tight syringes at selected times and analyzed with a GC. A pressure transducer was connected to a scanivalve to automatically measure the pressure distribution in the gas phase of the soil profile. The system application was demonstrated by packing the column with a sandy loam in a symmetrical bed-furrow system. A 5-h furrow irrigation was started 24 h after the injection of a soil fumigant, propargyl bromide (3-bromo-1-propyne; 3BP). The experience showed the importance of measuring lateral volatilization variability, pressure distribution in the gas phase, chemical distribution between the different phases (liquid, gas, and sorbed), and the effect of irrigation on the volatilization. Gas movement, volatilization, water infiltration, and distribution of degradation product (Br-) were symmetric around the bed within 10%. The system saves labor cost and time. This versatile system can be modified and used to compare management practices, estimate concentration-time indexes for pest control, study chemical movement, degradation, and emissions, and test mathematical models.

  16. Studying Operation Rules of Cascade Reservoirs Based on Multi-Dimensional Dynamics Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqiang Jiang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although many optimization models and methods are applied to the optimization of reservoir operation at present, the optimal operation decision that is made through these models and methods is just a retrospective review. Due to the limitation of hydrological prediction accuracy, it is practical and feasible to obtain the suboptimal or satisfactory solution by the established operation rules in the actual reservoir operation, especially for the mid- and long-term operation. In order to obtain the optimized sample data with global optimality; and make the extracted operation rules more reasonable and reliable, this paper presents the multi-dimensional dynamic programming model of the optimal joint operation of cascade reservoirs and provides the corresponding recursive equation and the specific solving steps. Taking Li Xianjiang cascade reservoirs as a case study, seven uncertain problems in the whole operation period of the cascade reservoirs are summarized after a detailed analysis to the obtained optimal sample data, and two sub-models are put forward to solve these uncertain problems. Finally, by dividing the whole operation period into four characteristic sections, this paper extracts the operation rules of each reservoir for each section respectively. When compared the simulation results of the extracted operation rules with the conventional joint operation method; the result indicates that the power generation of the obtained rules has a certain degree of improvement both in inspection years and typical years (i.e., wet year; normal year and dry year. So, the rationality and effectiveness of the extracted operation rules are verified by the comparative analysis.

  17. Is a malleable protein necessarily highly dynamic?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Poulsen, Flemming Martin; Teilum, Kaare

    2012-01-01

    core of NCBD in the ligand-free state and in a well-folded complex with the ligand activator for thyroid hormone and retinoid receptors using multiple NMR methods including methyl chemical shifts, coupling constants, and methyl order parameters. From all NMR measures, the aliphatic side chains...... in the hydrophobic core are slightly more dynamic in the free protein than in the complex, but have mobility comparable to the hydrophobic cores of average folded proteins. Urea titration monitored by NMR reveals that all parts of the protein, including the side-chain packing in the hydrophobic core, denatures...

  18. High performance computations using dynamical nucleation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windus, T L; Crosby, L D; Kathmann, S M

    2008-01-01

    Chemists continue to explore the use of very large computations to perform simulations that describe the molecular level physics of critical challenges in science. In this paper, we describe the Dynamical Nucleation Theory Monte Carlo (DNTMC) model - a model for determining molecular scale nucleation rate constants - and its parallel capabilities. The potential for bottlenecks and the challenges to running on future petascale or larger resources are delineated. A 'master-slave' solution is proposed to scale to the petascale and will be developed in the NWChem software. In addition, mathematical and data analysis challenges are described

  19. Application of computer generated color graphic techniques to the processing and display of three dimensional fluid dynamic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. H.; Putt, C. W.; Giamati, C. C.

    1981-01-01

    Color coding techniques used in the processing of remote sensing imagery were adapted and applied to the fluid dynamics problems associated with turbofan mixer nozzles. The computer generated color graphics were found to be useful in reconstructing the measured flow field from low resolution experimental data to give more physical meaning to this information and in scanning and interpreting the large volume of computer generated data from the three dimensional viscous computer code used in the analysis.

  20. Three-dimensional salt dynamics in well-mixed estuaries: influence of estuarine convergence, coriolis, and bathymetry

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Xiaoyan; Kumar, Mohit; Schuttelaars, Henk M.

    2017-01-01

    A semianalytical three-dimensional model is set up to dynamically calculate the coupled water motion and salinity for idealized well-mixed estuaries and prognostically investigate the influence of each physical mechanism on the residual salt transport. As a study case, a schematized estuary with an exponentially converging width and a channel–shoal structure is considered. The temporal correlation between horizontal tidal velocities and tidal salinities is the dominant process for the landwar...

  1. Improvement of a three-dimensional atmospheric dynamic model and examination of its performance over complex terrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Haruyasu; Yamazawa, Hiromi

    1994-11-01

    A three-dimensional atmospheric dynamic model (PHYSIC) was improved and its performance was examined using the meteorological data observed at a coastal area with a complex terrain. To introduce synoptic meteorological conditions into the model, the initial and boundary conditions were improved. By this improvement, the model can predict the temporal change of wind field for more than 24 hours. Moreover, the model successfully simulates the land and sea breeze observed at Shimokita area in the summer of 1992. (author)

  2. Dynamics of two-dimensional vortex system in a strong square pinning array at the second matching field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Qing-Bao [Department of Physics, Lishui University, Lishui 323000 (China); Luo, Meng-Bo, E-mail: Luomengbo@zju.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2013-10-30

    We study the dynamics of a two-dimensional vortex system in a strong square pinning array at the second matching field. Two kinds of depinning behaviors, a continuous depinning transition at weak pinning and a discontinuous one at strong pinning, are found. We show that the two different kinds of vortex depinning transitions can be identified in transport as a function of the pinning strength and temperature. Moreover, interstitial vortex state can be probed from the transport properties of vortices.

  3. Dynamics of the vortex state in high temperature superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapitulnik, A.

    1991-01-01

    The large thermal energy available, the strong anisotropy, and short coherence lengths of high temperature superconductors give rise to new phenomena in the mixed state. The author discusses transport and thermodynamic measurements of high-Tc materials and of model systems. In particular, he uses experiments on two dimensional films to compare and isolate two dimensional effects in the cuprates. By using multilayer systems with similar parameters, he identifies decoupling of the superconducting planes in magnetic fields at temperatures much above the irreversibility line. He shows that if the irreversibility line is to be considered a melting transition line, it implies melting of the solid state into a liquid of three dimensional flux lines. He further uses Monte Carlo simulations to study the structure of the vortex state as well as melting

  4. Generic dynamical phase transition in one-dimensional bulk-driven lattice gases with exclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarescu, Alexandre

    2017-06-01

    Dynamical phase transitions are crucial features of the fluctuations of statistical systems, corresponding to boundaries between qualitatively different mechanisms of maintaining unlikely values of dynamical observables over long periods of time. They manifest themselves in the form of non-analyticities in the large deviation function of those observables. In this paper, we look at bulk-driven exclusion processes with open boundaries. It is known that the standard asymmetric simple exclusion process exhibits a dynamical phase transition in the large deviations of the current of particles flowing through it. That phase transition has been described thanks to specific calculation methods relying on the model being exactly solvable, but more general methods have also been used to describe the extreme large deviations of that current, far from the phase transition. We extend those methods to a large class of models based on the ASEP, where we add arbitrary spatial inhomogeneities in the rates and short-range potentials between the particles. We show that, as for the regular ASEP, the large deviation function of the current scales differently with the size of the system if one considers very high or very low currents, pointing to the existence of a dynamical phase transition between those two regimes: high current large deviations are extensive in the system size, and the typical states associated to them are Coulomb gases, which are highly correlated; low current large deviations do not depend on the system size, and the typical states associated to them are anti-shocks, consistently with a hydrodynamic behaviour. Finally, we illustrate our results numerically on a simple example, and we interpret the transition in terms of the current pushing beyond its maximal hydrodynamic value, as well as relate it to the appearance of Tracy-Widom distributions in the relaxation statistics of such models. , which features invited work from the best early-career researchers working

  5. Water dissociating on rigid Ni(100): A quantum dynamics study on a full-dimensional potential energy surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianhui; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Zhaojun; Shen, Xiangjian; Fu, Bina; Zhang, Dong H.

    2018-04-01

    We constructed a nine-dimensional (9D) potential energy surface (PES) for the dissociative chemisorption of H2O on a rigid Ni(100) surface using the neural network method based on roughly 110 000 energies obtained from extensive density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The resulting PES is accurate and smooth, based on the small fitting errors and the good agreement between the fitted PES and the direct DFT calculations. Time dependent wave packet calculations also showed that the PES is very well converged with respect to the fitting procedure. The dissociation probabilities of H2O initially in the ground rovibrational state from 9D quantum dynamics calculations are quite different from the site-specific results from the seven-dimensional (7D) calculations, indicating the importance of full-dimensional quantum dynamics to quantitatively characterize this gas-surface reaction. It is found that the validity of the site-averaging approximation with exact potential holds well, where the site-averaging dissociation probability over 15 fixed impact sites obtained from 7D quantum dynamics calculations can accurately approximate the 9D dissociation probability for H2O in the ground rovibrational state.

  6. High-dimensional quantum key distribution based on multicore fiber using silicon photonic integrated circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ding, Yunhong; Bacco, Davide; Dalgaard, Kjeld

    2017-01-01

    is intrinsically limited to 1 bit/photon. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, a high-dimensional quantum key distribution protocol based on space division multiplexing in multicore fiber using silicon photonic integrated lightwave circuits. We successfully realized three mutually......-dimensional quantum states, and enables breaking the information efficiency limit of traditional quantum key distribution protocols. In addition, the silicon photonic circuits used in our work integrate variable optical attenuators, highly efficient multicore fiber couplers, and Mach-Zehnder interferometers, enabling...

  7. Scanning three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy using a high-energy microbeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Y.; Hirose, Y.; Seno, Y.

    2016-01-01

    A scanning three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) microscope apparatus with a high-energy microbeam was installed at the BL33XU Toyota beamline at SPring-8. The size of the 50 keV beam focused using Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors was 1.3 μm wide and 1.6 μm high in full width at half maximum. The scanning 3DXRD method was tested for a cold-rolled carbon steel sheet sample. A three-dimensional orientation map with 37 "3 voxels was obtained.

  8. Scanning three-dimensional x-ray diffraction microscopy using a high-energy microbeam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Y., E-mail: y-hayashi@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Hirose, Y.; Seno, Y. [Toyota Central R& D Toyota Central R& D Labs., Inc., 41-1 Nagakute Aichi 480-1192 Japan (Japan)

    2016-07-27

    A scanning three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) microscope apparatus with a high-energy microbeam was installed at the BL33XU Toyota beamline at SPring-8. The size of the 50 keV beam focused using Kirkpatrick-Baez mirrors was 1.3 μm wide and 1.6 μm high in full width at half maximum. The scanning 3DXRD method was tested for a cold-rolled carbon steel sheet sample. A three-dimensional orientation map with 37 {sup 3} voxels was obtained.

  9. Scalable Clustering of High-Dimensional Data Technique Using SPCM with Ant Colony Optimization Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thenmozhi Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clusters of high-dimensional data techniques are emerging, according to data noisy and poor quality challenges. This paper has been developed to cluster data using high-dimensional similarity based PCM (SPCM, with ant colony optimization intelligence which is effective in clustering nonspatial data without getting knowledge about cluster number from the user. The PCM becomes similarity based by using mountain method with it. Though this is efficient clustering, it is checked for optimization using ant colony algorithm with swarm intelligence. Thus the scalable clustering technique is obtained and the evaluation results are checked with synthetic datasets.

  10. The validation and assessment of machine learning: a game of prediction from high-dimensional data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pers, Tune Hannes; Albrechtsen, A; Holst, C

    2009-01-01

    In applied statistics, tools from machine learning are popular for analyzing complex and high-dimensional data. However, few theoretical results are available that could guide to the appropriate machine learning tool in a new application. Initial development of an overall strategy thus often...... the ideas, the game is applied to data from the Nugenob Study where the aim is to predict the fat oxidation capacity based on conventional factors and high-dimensional metabolomics data. Three players have chosen to use support vector machines, LASSO, and random forests, respectively....

  11. Off-fault plasticity in three-dimensional dynamic rupture simulations using a modal Discontinuous Galerkin method on unstructured meshes: Implementation, verification, and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollherr, Stephanie; Gabriel, Alice-Agnes; Uphoff, Carsten

    2018-05-01

    The dynamics and potential size of earthquakes depend crucially on rupture transfers between adjacent fault segments. To accurately describe earthquake source dynamics, numerical models can account for realistic fault geometries and rheologies such as nonlinear inelastic processes off the slip interface. We present implementation, verification, and application of off-fault Drucker-Prager plasticity in the open source software SeisSol (www.seissol.org). SeisSol is based on an arbitrary high-order derivative modal Discontinuous Galerkin (ADER-DG) method using unstructured, tetrahedral meshes specifically suited for complex geometries. Two implementation approaches are detailed, modelling plastic failure either employing sub-elemental quadrature points or switching to nodal basis coefficients. At fine fault discretizations the nodal basis approach is up to 6 times more efficient in terms of computational costs while yielding comparable accuracy. Both methods are verified in community benchmark problems and by three dimensional numerical h- and p-refinement studies with heterogeneous initial stresses. We observe no spectral convergence for on-fault quantities with respect to a given reference solution, but rather discuss a limitation to low-order convergence for heterogeneous 3D dynamic rupture problems. For simulations including plasticity, a high fault resolution may be less crucial than commonly assumed, due to the regularization of peak slip rate and an increase of the minimum cohesive zone width. In large-scale dynamic rupture simulations based on the 1992 Landers earthquake, we observe high rupture complexity including reverse slip, direct branching, and dynamic triggering. The spatio-temporal distribution of rupture transfers are altered distinctively by plastic energy absorption, correlated with locations of geometrical fault complexity. Computational cost increases by 7% when accounting for off-fault plasticity in the demonstrating application. Our results

  12. Highly ordered three-dimensional macroporous carbon spheres for determination of heavy metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Jianming [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Liu, Yang, E-mail: yangl@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Huang, Hui [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Kang, Zhenhui, E-mail: zhkang@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2012-04-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres (MPCSs) were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MPCS was covalently modified by cysteine (MPCS-CO-Cys). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MPCS-CO-Cys was first time used in electrochemical detection of heavy metal ions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heavy metal ions such as Pb{sup 2+} and Cd{sup 2+} can be simultaneously determined. -- Abstract: An effective voltammetric method for detection of trace heavy metal ions using chemically modified highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres electrode surfaces is described. The highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres were prepared by carbonization of glucose in silica crystal bead template, followed by removal of the template. The highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres were covalently modified by cysteine, an amino acid with high affinities towards some heavy metals. The materials were characterized by physical adsorption of nitrogen, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. While the Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize the functional groups on the surface of carbon spheres. High sensitivity was exhibited when this material was used in electrochemical detection (square wave anodic stripping voltammetry) of heavy metal ions due to the porous structure. And the potential application for simultaneous detection of heavy metal ions was also investigated.

  13. Highly ordered three-dimensional macroporous carbon spheres for determination of heavy metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Jianming; Liu, Yang; Huang, Hui; Kang, Zhenhui

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres (MPCSs) were prepared. ► MPCS was covalently modified by cysteine (MPCS–CO–Cys). ► MPCS–CO–Cys was first time used in electrochemical detection of heavy metal ions. ► Heavy metal ions such as Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ can be simultaneously determined. -- Abstract: An effective voltammetric method for detection of trace heavy metal ions using chemically modified highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres electrode surfaces is described. The highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres were prepared by carbonization of glucose in silica crystal bead template, followed by removal of the template. The highly ordered three dimensional macroporous carbon spheres were covalently modified by cysteine, an amino acid with high affinities towards some heavy metals. The materials were characterized by physical adsorption of nitrogen, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy techniques. While the Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was used to characterize the functional groups on the surface of carbon spheres. High sensitivity was exhibited when this material was used in electrochemical detection (square wave anodic stripping voltammetry) of heavy metal ions due to the porous structure. And the potential application for simultaneous detection of heavy metal ions was also investigated.

  14. Reinforcement learning on slow features of high-dimensional input streams.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Legenstein

    Full Text Available Humans and animals are able to learn complex behaviors based on a massive stream of sensory information from different modalities. Early animal studies have identified learning mechanisms that are based on reward and punishment such that animals tend to avoid actions that lead to punishment whereas rewarded actions are reinforced. However, most algorithms for reward-based learning are only applicable if the dimensionality of the state-space is sufficiently small or its structure is sufficiently simple. Therefore, the question arises how the problem of learning on high-dimensional data is solved in the brain. In this article, we propose a biologically plausible generic two-stage learning system that can directly be applied to raw high-dimensional input streams. The system is composed of a hierarchical slow feature analysis (SFA network for preprocessing and a simple neural network on top that is trained based on rewards. We demonstrate by computer simulations that this generic architecture is able to learn quite demanding reinforcement learning tasks on high-dimensional visual input streams in a time that is comparable to the time needed when an explicit highly informative low-dimensional state-space representation is given instead of the high-dimensional visual input. The learning speed of the proposed architecture in a task similar to the Morris water maze task is comparable to that found in experimental studies with rats. This study thus supports the hypothesis that slowness learning is one important unsupervised learning principle utilized in the brain to form efficient state representations for behavioral learning.

  15. Investigating Hydrocarbon Seep Environments with High-Resolution, Three-Dimensional Geographic Visualizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, D. F.; Gharib, J. J.; Mitchell, G. A.

    2015-12-01

    Detailed photographic imagery and bathymetric maps of the seafloor acquired by deep submergence vehicles such as Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUV) and Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROV) are expanding how scientists and the public view and ultimately understand the seafloor and the processes that modify it. Several recently acquired optical and acoustic datasets, collected during ECOGIG (Ecosystem Impacts of Oil and Gas Inputs to the Gulf) and other Gulf of Mexico expeditions using the National Institute for Undersea Science Technology (NIUST) Eagle Ray, and Mola Mola AUVs, have been fused with lower resolution data to create unique three-dimensional geovisualizations. Included in these data are multi-scale and multi-resolution visualizations over hydrocarbon seeps and seep related features. Resolution of the data range from 10s of mm to 10s of m. When multi-resolution data is integrated into a single three-dimensional visual environment, new insights into seafloor and seep processes can be obtained from the intuitive nature of three-dimensional data exploration. We provide examples and demonstrate how integration of multibeam bathymetry, seafloor backscatter data, sub-bottom profiler data, textured photomosaics, and hull-mounted multibeam acoustic midwater imagery are made into a series a three-dimensional geovisualizations of actively seeping sites and associated chemosynthetic communities. From these combined and merged datasets, insights on seep community structure, morphology, ecology, fluid migration dynamics, and process geomorphology can be investigated from new spatial perspectives. Such datasets also promote valuable inter-comparisons of sensor resolution and performance.

  16. Anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactors for high strength wastewater treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ersahin, M.E.; Gimenez Garcia, J.B.; Ozgun, H.; Tao, Y.; Van Lier, J.B.

    2013-01-01

    A laboratory scale external anaerobic dynamic membrane bioreactor (AnDMBR) treating high strength wastewater was operated to assess the effect of gas sparging velocity and organic loading rate on removal efficiency and dynamic membrane (DM) filtration characteristics. An increase in gas sparging

  17. Dynamic Open Inquiry Performances of High-School Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zion, Michal; Sadeh, Irit

    2010-01-01

    In examining open inquiry projects among high-school biology students, we found dynamic inquiry performances expressed in two criteria: "changes occurring during inquiry" and "procedural understanding". Characterizing performances in a dynamic open inquiry project can shed light on both the procedural and epistemological…

  18. Three-dimensional lagrangian approach to the classical relativistic dynamics of directly interacting particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaida, R.P.; Kluchkousky, Ya.B.; Tretyak, V.I.

    1987-01-01

    In the present report the main attention is paid to the interrelations of various three-dimensional approaches and to the relation of the latter to the Fokker-type action formalism; the problem of the correspondence between three-dimensional descriptions and singular Lagrangian formalism will be shortly concerned. The authors start with the three-dimensional Lagrangian formulation of the classical RDIT. The generality of this formalism enables, similarly as in the non-relativistic case, to consider it as a central link explaining naturally a number of features of other three-dimensional approaches, namely Newtonian (based directly on second order equations of motion) and Hamiltonian ones). It is also capable of describing four-dimensional manifestly covariant models using Fokker action integrals and singular Lagrangians

  19. Characterization of discontinuities in high-dimensional stochastic problems on adaptive sparse grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakeman, John D.; Archibald, Richard; Xiu Dongbin

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we present a set of efficient algorithms for detection and identification of discontinuities in high dimensional space. The method is based on extension of polynomial annihilation for discontinuity detection in low dimensions. Compared to the earlier work, the present method poses significant improvements for high dimensional problems. The core of the algorithms relies on adaptive refinement of sparse grids. It is demonstrated that in the commonly encountered cases where a discontinuity resides on a small subset of the dimensions, the present method becomes 'optimal', in the sense that the total number of points required for function evaluations depends linearly on the dimensionality of the space. The details of the algorithms will be presented and various numerical examples are utilized to demonstrate the efficacy of the method.

  20. Non-intrusive low-rank separated approximation of high-dimensional stochastic models

    KAUST Repository

    Doostan, Alireza; Validi, AbdoulAhad; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2013-01-01

    This work proposes a sampling-based (non-intrusive) approach within the context of low-. rank separated representations to tackle the issue of curse-of-dimensionality associated with the solution of models, e.g., PDEs/ODEs, with high-dimensional random inputs. Under some conditions discussed in details, the number of random realizations of the solution, required for a successful approximation, grows linearly with respect to the number of random inputs. The construction of the separated representation is achieved via a regularized alternating least-squares regression, together with an error indicator to estimate model parameters. The computational complexity of such a construction is quadratic in the number of random inputs. The performance of the method is investigated through its application to three numerical examples including two ODE problems with high-dimensional random inputs. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.