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Sample records for high deposition welding

  1. An investigation on high temperature fatigue properties of tempered nuclear-grade deposited weld metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, X. Y.; Zhu, P.; Yong, Q.; Liu, T. G.; Lu, Y. H.; Zhao, J. C.; Jiang, Y.; Shoji, T.

    2018-02-01

    Effect of tempering on low cycle fatigue (LCF) behaviors of nuclear-grade deposited weld metal was investigated, and The LCF tests were performed at 350 °C with strain amplitudes ranging from 0.2% to 0.6%. The results showed that at a low strain amplitude, deposited weld metal tempered for 1 h had a high fatigue resistance due to high yield strength, while at a high strain amplitude, the one tempered for 24 h had a superior fatigue resistance due to high ductility. Deposited weld metal tempered for 1 h exhibited cyclic hardening at the tested strain amplitudes. Deposited weld metal tempered for 24 h exhibited cyclic hardening at a low strain amplitude but cyclic softening at a high strain amplitude. Existence and decomposition of martensite-austenite (M-A) islands as well as dislocations activities contributed to fatigue property discrepancy among the two tempered deposited weld metal.

  2. Evaluation of Hydrogen Cracking in Weld Metal Deposited using Cellulosic-Coated Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-16

    Cellulosic-coated electrodes (primarily AWS EXX10-type) are traditionally used for "stovepipe" welding of pipelines because they are well suited for deposition of pipeline girth welds and are capable of high deposition rates when welding downhill. De...

  3. The Effect of Nitrogen and Titanium on the Toughness of High Strength Saw Weld Deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-12

    2.3 CCT diagram for typical SAW steel welds [8]. 26 Figure 2.4 Oxygen and nitrogen levels expected from several arc 31 welding processes [10]. Figure...alloyed ferritic weld metal such formation is achieved if the CCT diagram is displaced towards longer times. However, it is worth noting that too large...dilution and cooling rate [5]. In this context, the CCT diagram is often used to denote the transformations that occur in weld metal samples which

  4. Method and device for weld deposit cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barger, J.J.

    1977-01-01

    In order to get weld beads of good quality, uniform thickness and faultless transition regions between neighboring beads in weld deposit cladding of metallic workpoeces, it is proposed to use a device in which the electromagnets are arranged adjacent to th zone of molten welding powder and molten metal besides having got suitable supplies for applying the welding powder, the polarity of the magnets being chosen in such a way that the lines of flux between the poles are counteracting the lines of flux surrounding the electrode band because of the welding current. Several variants of arranging the electrodes are presented in detail. (UWI) [de

  5. Microscopic characterisation of TIG-deposition and -welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Groot, P.

    1992-11-01

    In the framework of the European Fusion Technology Programme austenitic RVS AISI 316LN is considered as candidate material for the First Wall. In this report, among others, tungsten-arc (TIG) welding connections are investigated as a part of the ECN project 1.653. It concerns respectively; the deposition of TIG-electrode-material and the welding connection. The connections are fabricated by the Danish Welding Institute Svejsecentrals in Broendby. This study is supposed to give a welding qualification by microscopic characterisation of a TIG-deposition and a TIG-weld. 3 refs., 33 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Conditions and timescales for welding block-and-ash flow deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, M. J.; Kolzenburg, S.; Russell, J. K.; Campbell, M. E.; Welles, J.; Farquharson, J. I.; Ryan, A.

    2014-12-01

    Welding of pyroclastic deposits to reform a coherent rock mass is a common phenomenon, especially for pumiceous pyroclastic density current deposits (i.e., ignimbrites). However, and despite the pervasive abundance of block-and-ash flow (BAF) deposits in the geological and modern record, instances of strongly welded BAF deposits are few. Here, we present a series of high-temperature (800-900 °C) compaction experiments designed to map the conditions (deposit thickness/stress and temperature/viscosity) and timescales that permit or inhibit the welding of BAF deposits. Our experiments were performed on unconsolidated aggregates (containing an ash and lapilli component) derived from crushed and sieved lava blocks (containing 25% crystals) taken from the well-documented welded BAF deposit at Mount Meager volcano (British Columbia, Canada). The experiments demonstrate that welding efficiency increases with increasing time and temperature. Progressive welding is expressed by increasing axial strain, porosity loss, and bulk density. The rate of change of each of these physical properties reduces as welding progresses. Microstructural analysis of the experimental products shows that the loss of interclast porosity during welding results from the progressive sintering and amalgamation of vitric fragments, and that the pore shape changes from sub-equant pores to stretched lenses sandwiched between vitric and crystal fragments. The coincidence between the microstructure and rock physical properties of the natural and experimental samples highlight that we have successfully reproduced welded BAF in the laboratory. Furthermore, our permeability measurements highlight a hysteresis in the return journey of the "there-and-back-again" volcanic permeability cycle (expressed by an increase in permeability due to vesiculation and fragmentation followed by a decrease due to welding). This hysteresis cannot be described by a single porosity-permeability power law relationship and

  7. Influence of nickel and nitrogen on the structure workability and mechanical properties of weld-deposited high-chromium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasavchikov, V.A.; Solov'eva, L.I.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented of investigation into the effect of austenite-forming elements (nitrogen and nickel) on the structure, mechanical properties and workability durina weld deposition and on the hardness after heat treatment of the Kh32N8M2 alloy forming the sigma-phase. Nitrogen is stated to produce a stronger effect on the improvement of the workability at a minimum decrease in the hardness of the alloy being investigated. Changes in the mechanical properties and workability of the alloy are shown to take place at the expense of changes in the structural components, the austenite quantity in the structure as well as its arrangement and form being the determining factors. The effect of nickel- and nitrogen content on the sigma-phase formation is less noticeable as compared with their effect on austenization. It should be taken into account that in case of nickel and nitrogen alloying an essential part of nitrogen is bound in chromium nitrides, that is why a decrease in the alloy hardness under heat treatment is less noticeable with growing nitrogen concentration

  8. Welding wires for high-tensile steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laz'ko, V.E.; Starova, L.L.; Koval'chuk, V.G.; Maksimovich, T.L.; Labzina, I.E.; Yadrov, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    Strength of welded joints in arc welding of high-tensile steels of mean and high thickness by welding wires is equal to approximately 1300 MPa in thermohardened state and approximately 600 MPa without heat treatment. Sv-15Kh2NMTsRA-VI (EhK44-VI) -Sv-30Kh2NMTsRA-VI (EkK47-VI) welding wires are suggested for welding of medium-carbon alloyed steels. These wires provide monotonous growth of ultimate strength of weld metal in 1250-1900 MPa range with increase of C content in heat-treated state

  9. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic weld deposits in a salt spray environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, J.B. [Institute of Materials Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 202, Taiwan (China); Yu, C.; Shiue, R.K. [Department of Materials Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Tsay, L.W., E-mail: b0186@mail.ntou.edu.tw [Institute of Materials Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 202, Taiwan (China)

    2015-10-15

    ER 308L and 309LMo were utilized as the filler metals for the groove and overlay welds of a 304L stainless steel substrate, which was prepared via a gas tungsten arc-welding process in multiple passes. U-bend and weight-loss tests were conducted by testing the welds in a salt spray containing 10 wt% NaCl at 120 °C. The dissolution of the skeletal structure in the fusion zone (FZ) caused the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the weld. The FZ in the cold-rolled condition showed the longest single crack length in the U-bend tests. Moreover, sensitization treatment at 650 °C for 10 h promoted the formation of numerous fine cracks, which resulted in a high SCC susceptibility. The weight loss of the deposits was consistent with the SCC susceptibility of the welds in a salt spray. The 309LMo deposit was superior to the 308L deposit in the salt spray. - Highlights: • ER 308L and 309LMo were utilized as fillers for the groove and overlay welds of a 304L SS. • U-bend and weight-loss tests in a salt spray containing 10 wt% NaCl at 120 °C were performed. • The dissolution of solidified structure caused the SCC of the welds in a salt spray. • Sensitization treatment increased the weight loss and SCC susceptibility of the deposits. • The weight loss of the weld deposits was related to their SCC susceptibility in a salt spray.

  10. Stress corrosion cracking of austenitic weld deposits in a salt spray environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, J.B.; Yu, C.; Shiue, R.K.; Tsay, L.W.

    2015-01-01

    ER 308L and 309LMo were utilized as the filler metals for the groove and overlay welds of a 304L stainless steel substrate, which was prepared via a gas tungsten arc-welding process in multiple passes. U-bend and weight-loss tests were conducted by testing the welds in a salt spray containing 10 wt% NaCl at 120 °C. The dissolution of the skeletal structure in the fusion zone (FZ) caused the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of the weld. The FZ in the cold-rolled condition showed the longest single crack length in the U-bend tests. Moreover, sensitization treatment at 650 °C for 10 h promoted the formation of numerous fine cracks, which resulted in a high SCC susceptibility. The weight loss of the deposits was consistent with the SCC susceptibility of the welds in a salt spray. The 309LMo deposit was superior to the 308L deposit in the salt spray. - Highlights: • ER 308L and 309LMo were utilized as fillers for the groove and overlay welds of a 304L SS. • U-bend and weight-loss tests in a salt spray containing 10 wt% NaCl at 120 °C were performed. • The dissolution of solidified structure caused the SCC of the welds in a salt spray. • Sensitization treatment increased the weight loss and SCC susceptibility of the deposits. • The weight loss of the weld deposits was related to their SCC susceptibility in a salt spray.

  11. Transport and Deposition of Welding Fume Agglomerates in a Realistic Human Nasal Airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lin; Inthavong, Kiao; Lidén, Göran; Shang, Yidan; Tu, Jiyuan

    2016-07-01

    Welding fume is a complex mixture containing ultra-fine particles in the nanometer range. Rather than being in the form of a singular sphere, due to the high particle concentration, welding fume particles agglomerate into long straight chains, branches, or other forms of compact shapes. Understanding the transport and deposition of these nano-agglomerates in human respiratory systems is of great interest as welding fumes are a known health hazard. The neurotoxin manganese (Mn) is a common element in welding fumes. Particulate Mn, either as soluble salts or oxides, that has deposited on the olfactory mucosa in human nasal airway is transported along the olfactory nerve to the olfactory bulb within the brain. If this Mn is further transported to the basal ganglia of the brain, it could accumulate at the part of the brain that is the focal point of its neurotoxicity. Accounting for various dynamic shape factors due to particle agglomeration, the current computational study is focused on the exposure route, the deposition pattern, and the deposition efficiency of the inhaled welding fume particles in a realistic human nasal cavity. Particular attention is given to the deposition pattern and deposition efficiency of inhaled welding fume agglomerates in the nasal olfactory region. For particles in the nanoscale, molecular diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism. Therefore, Brownian diffusion, hydrodynamic drag, Saffman lift force, and gravitational force are included in the model study. The deposition efficiencies for single spherical particles, two kinds of agglomerates of primary particles, two-dimensional planar and straight chains, are investigated for a range of primary particle sizes and a range of number of primary particles per agglomerate. A small fraction of the inhaled welding fume agglomerates is deposited on the olfactory mucosa, approximately in the range 0.1-1%, and depends on particle size and morphology. The strong size dependence of the deposition

  12. Weld metal microstructures of hardfacing deposits produced by self-shielded flux-cored arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumovic, M.; Monaghan, B.J.; Li, H.; Norrish, J.; Dunne, D.P.

    2015-01-01

    The molten pool weld produced during self-shielded flux-cored arc welding (SSFCAW) is protected from gas porosity arising from oxygen and nitrogen by reaction ('killing') of these gases by aluminium. However, residual Al can result in mixed micro-structures of δ-ferrite, martensite and bainite in hardfacing weld metals produced by SSFCAW and therefore, microstructural control can be an issue for hardfacing weld repair. The effect of the residual Al content on weld metal micro-structure has been examined using thermodynamic modeling and dilatometric analysis. It is concluded that the typical Al content of about 1 wt% promotes δ-ferrite formation at the expense of austenite and its martensitic/bainitic product phase(s), thereby compromising the wear resistance of the hardfacing deposit. This paper also demonstrates how the development of a Schaeffler-type diagram for predicting the weld metal micro-structure can provide guidance on weld filler metal design to produce the optimum microstructure for industrial hardfacing applications.

  13. Hybrid Welding of 45 mm High Strength Steel Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunaziv, Ivan; Frostevarg, Jan; Akselsen, Odd M.; Kaplan, Alexander F.

    Thick section welding has significant importance for oil and gas industry in low temperature regions. Arc welding is usually employed providing suitable quality joints with acceptable toughness at low temperatures with very limited productivity compared to modern high power laser systems. Laser-arc hybrid welding (LAHW) can enhance the productivity by several times due to higher penetration depth from laser beam and combined advantages of both heat sources. LAHW was applied to join 45 mm high strength steel with double-sided technique and application of metal cored wire. The process was captured by high speed camera, allowing process observation in order to identify the relation of the process stability on weld imperfections and efficiency. Among the results, it was found that both arc power and presence of a gap increased penetration depth, and that higher welding speeds cause unstable processing and limits penetration depth. Over a wide range of heat inputs, the welds where found to consist of large amounts of fine-grained acicular ferrite in the upper 60-75% part of welds. At the root filler wire mixing was less and cooling faster, and thus found to have bainitic transformation. Toughness of deposited welds provided acceptable toughness at -50 °C with some scattering.

  14. Development of high productivity pipeline girth welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yapp, David; Liratzis, Theocharis

    2010-01-01

    The trend for increased oil and gas consumption implies a growth of long-distance pipeline installations. Welding is a critical factor in the installation of pipelines, both onshore and offshore, and the rate at which the pipeline can be laid is generally determined by the speed of welding. This has resulted in substantial developments in pipeline welding techniques. Arc welding is still the dominant process used in practice, and forge welding processes have had limited successful application to date, in spite of large investments in process development. Power beam processes have also been investigated in detail and the latest laser systems now show promise for practical application. In recent years the use of high strength steels has substantially reduced the cost of pipeline installation, with X70 and X80 being commonly used. This use of high strength pipeline produced by thermomechanical processing has also been researched. They must all meet three requirments, high productivity, satisfactory weld properties, and weld quality

  15. High quality, high efficiency welding technology for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Shigeyuki; Nagura, Yasumi

    1996-01-01

    For nuclear power plants, it is required to ensure the safety under the high reliability and to attain the high rate of operation. In the manufacture and installation of the machinery and equipment, the welding techniques which become the basis exert large influence to them. For the purpose of improving joint performance and excluding human errors, welding heat input and the number of passes have been reduced, the automation of welding has been advanced, and at present, narrow gap arc welding and high energy density welding such as electron beam welding and laser welding have been put to practical use. Also in the welding of pipings, automatic gas metal arc welding is employed. As for the welding of main machinery and equipment, there are the welding of the joints that constitute pressure boundaries, the build-up welding on the internal surfaces of pressure vessels for separating primary water from them, and the sealing welding of heating tubes and tube plates in steam generators. These weldings are explained. The welding of pipings and the state of development and application of new welding methods are reported. (K.I.)

  16. Creep and rupture behavior of weld-deposited Type 16-8-2 stainless steel at 5930C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, A.L.; Blackburn, L.D.

    1976-03-01

    The creep and rupture behavior of weld-deposited Type 16-8-2 stainless steel at 593 0 C was investigated over the time range from 3.6 x 10 4 s to 2.5 x 10 7 s. Equations relating stress to the time to rupture, the time to the onset of tertiary creep, and the time to produce a given creep strain were obtained. The experimental results indicate that the control of welding parameters (e.g. current, voltage and travel speed) within reasonable ranges can yield weld deposits with consistent time-dependent properties. Limited data suggest that high temperature (1065 0 C) post-weld annealing significantly alters only the flow curve for plastic deformation, while long-term thermal exposure at an intermediate temperature (565 0 C) produces only minor changes in either the plastic deformation or creep behavior of the weld materials

  17. TECHNOLOGICAL ADVANCEMENT OF DEPOSIT WELDING AND GAS LASER CUTTING TO INCREASE THE EFFICIENCY OF THE BIMETALLIC TOOL PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burlachenko Oleg Vasil’evich

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Deposit welding is the application of a layer of metal on the surface of a product using fusion welding. In this paper, we consider the method of improving the technology of gas laser cutting, which makes it possible to achieve a high productivity of manufacturing a bimetallic tool. The present paper is concerned with the advantages of gas laser cutting which allows to consider this particular process of separating materials as highly-productive, low-waste, and advanced method of removing allowances of weld-deposit high-speed steel on the working surfaces of bimetallic tool. Urgency of the use of deposit welding and gas laser cutting to improve the efficiency of production of bimetallic tool is shown. The comparative analysis of gas-laser cutting and other cutting methods is given according to the geometrical parameters of cutting and surface quality. Analysis of the results of experimental studies has confirmed the high technological attractiveness and economic efficiency of manufacturing composite structures of punches and matrices when applying deposit welding of cutting parts with high-speed steels. The cost of dimensional processing of the welded cutting part is reduced by 4 to 6 times, while the manufacturing time is reduced by 6 to 12 times.

  18. Interdiffusion of Polycarbonate in Fused Deposition Modeling Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppala, Jonathan; Forster, Aaron; Satija, Sushil; Jones, Ronald; Migler, Kalman

    2015-03-01

    Fused deposition modeling (FDM), a now common and inexpensive additive manufacturing method, produces 3D objects by extruding molten polymer layer-by-layer. Compared to traditional polymer processing methods (injection, vacuum, and blow molding), FDM parts have inferior mechanical properties, surface finish, and dimensional stability. From a polymer processing point of view the polymer-polymer weld between each layer limits the mechanical strength of the final part. Unlike traditional processing methods, where the polymer is uniformly melted and entangled, FDM welds are typically weaker due to the short time available for polymer interdiffusion and entanglement. To emulate the FDM process thin film bilayers of polycarbonate/d-polycarbonate were annealed using scaled times and temperatures accessible in FDM. Shift factors from Time-Temperature Superposition, measured by small amplitude oscillatory shear, were used to calculate reasonable annealing times (min) at temperatures below the actual extrusion temperature. The extent of interdiffusion was then measured using neutron reflectivity. Analogous specimens were prepared to characterize the mechanical properties. FDM build parameters were then related to interdiffusion between welded layers and mechanical properties. Understating the relationship between build parameters, interdiffusion, and mechanical strength will allow FDM users to print stronger parts in an intelligent manner rather than using trial-and-error and build parameter lock-in.

  19. Weld Metallurgy and Mechanical Properties of High Manganese Ultra-high Strength Steel Dissimilar Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Martin; Lindner, Stefan; Monfort, Damien; Petring, Dirk

    The increasing demand for ultra-high strength steels in vehicle manufacturing leads to the application of new alloys. This poses a challenge on joining especially by fusion welding. A stainless high manganese steel sheet with excellent strength and deformation properties stands in the centre of the development. Similar and dissimilar welds with a metastable austenitic steel and a hot formed martensitic stainless steel were performed. An investigation of the mixing effects on the local microstructure and the hardness delivers the metallurgical features of the welds. Despite of carbon contents above 0.4 wt.% none of the welds have shown cracks. Mechanical properties drawn from tensile tests deliver high breaking forces enabling a high stiffness of the joints. The results show the potential for the application of laser beam welding for joining in assembly of structural parts.

  20. Effect of Post-weld Heat Treatment on the Mechanical Properties of Supermartensitic Stainless Steel Deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zappa, Sebastián; Svoboda, Hernán; Surian, Estela

    2017-02-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steels have good weldability and adequate tensile property, toughness and corrosion resistance. They have been developed as an alternative technology, mainly for oil and gas industries. The final properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit depend on its chemical composition and microstructure: martensite, tempered martensite, ferrite, retained austenite and carbides and/or nitrides. In these steels, the post-weld heat treatments (PWHTs) are usually double tempering ones, to ensure both complete tempering of martensite and high austenite content, to increase toughness and decrease hardness. The aim of this work was to study the effect of post-weld heat treatments (solution treatment with single and double tempering) on the mechanical properties of a supermartensitic stainless steel deposit. An all-weld metal test coupon was welded according to standard ANSI/AWS A5.22-95 using a GMAW supermartensitic stainless steel metal cored wire, under gas shielding. PWHTs were carried out varying the temperature of the first tempering treatment with and without a second tempering one, after solution treatment. All-weld metal chemical composition analysis, metallurgical characterization, hardness and tensile property measurements and Charpy-V tests were carried out. There are several factors which can be affected by the PWHTs, among them austenite content is a significant one. Different austenite contents (0-42%) were found. Microhardness, tensile property and toughness were affected with up to 15% of austenite content, by martensite tempering and carbide precipitation. The second tempering treatment seemed not to have had an important effect on the mechanical properties measured in this work.

  1. Enabling high speed friction stir welding of aluminum tailor welded blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri

    Current welding technologies for production of aluminum tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high-volumes. While friction stir welding (FSW) has traditionally been applied at linear velocities less than one meter per minute, high volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low to moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high speed linear friction stir welding. Therefore, in order to facilitate production of high volume aluminum FSW components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of three meters per minute. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for post-weld formability using a combination of numerical and experimental methods. Evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor-welded blanks, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory scale tests.

  2. Automatic orbital GTAW welding: Highest quality welds for tomorrow's high-performance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henon, B. K.

    1985-01-01

    Automatic orbital gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or TIG welding is certain to play an increasingly prominent role in tomorrow's technology. The welds are of the highest quality and the repeatability of automatic weldings is vastly superior to that of manual welding. Since less heat is applied to the weld during automatic welding than manual welding, there is less change in the metallurgical properties of the parent material. The possibility of accurate control and the cleanliness of the automatic GTAW welding process make it highly suitable to the welding of the more exotic and expensive materials which are now widely used in the aerospace and hydrospace industries. Titanium, stainless steel, Inconel, and Incoloy, as well as, aluminum can all be welded to the highest quality specifications automatically. Automatic orbital GTAW equipment is available for the fusion butt welding of tube-to-tube, as well as, tube to autobuttweld fittings. The same equipment can also be used for the fusion butt welding of up to 6 inch pipe with a wall thickness of up to 0.154 inches.

  3. Brazing, high temperature brazing and diffusion welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Brazing and high temperature brazing is a major joining technology within the economically important fields of energy technology, aerospace and automotive engineering, that play a leading role for technical development everywhere in the world. Moreover diffusion welding has gained a strong position especially in advanced technologies due to its specific advantages. Topics of the conference are: 1. high-temperature brazing in application; 2. basis of brazing technology; 3. brazing of light metals; 4. nondestructive testing; 5. diffusion welding; 6. brazing of hard metals and other hard materials; and 7. ceramic-metal brazing. 28 of 20 lectures and 20 posters were recorded separately for the database ENERGY. (orig./MM) [de

  4. Characterization and Optimization of Ni-WC Composite Weld Matrix Deposited by Plasma-Transferred Arc Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahaei, Ali; Horley, Paul; Merlin, Mattia; Torres-Torres, David; Garagnani, Gian Luca; Praga, Rolando; Vázquez, Felipe J. García; Arizmendi-Morquecho, Ana

    2017-03-01

    This work is dedicated to optimization of carbide particle system in a weld bead deposited by PTAW technique over D2 tool steel with high chromium content. The paper reports partial melting of the original carbide grains of the Ni-based filling powder, and growing of the secondary carbide phase (Cr, Ni)_3W_3C in the form of dendrites with wide branches that enhanced mechanical properties of the weld. The optimization of bead parameters was made with design of experiment methodology complemented by a complex sample characterization including SEM, EDXS, XRD, and nanoindentation measurements. It was shown that the preheat of the substrate to a moderate temperature 523 K (250° C) establishes linear pattern of metal flow in the weld pool, resulting in the most homogeneous distribution of the primary carbides in the microstructure of weld bead.

  5. HIGH FREQUENCY INDUCTION WELDING OF HIGH SILICON STEEL TUBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Miranda Alé

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available High-Si steel is a low cost alternative for the fabrication of tubular structures resistant to atmospheric corrosion. However, the literature has often pointed out that steels presenting a higher Si content and/or a lower Mn/Si ratio have higher susceptibility to defects at the weld bond line during HFIW (High Frequency Induction Welding process, which has been widely used for manufacturing small diameter tubes. In this study the effect of the HFIW conditions on the quality of steel tubes with high-Si content and low Mn/Si ratio is investigated. The quality of welded tubes was determined by flare test and the defects in the bond line were identified by SEM. It has been found that higher welding speeds, V-convergence angles and power input should be applied in welding of high-Si steel, when compared to similar strength C-Mn steel.

  6. Effects of welding parameters on friction stir spot welding of high density polyethylene sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilici, Mustafa Kemal; Yukler, Ahmet Irfan

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: (a) Schematic illustration of the cross section of a friction stir spot weld and (b) Geometry of the weld bonded area, x: nugget thickness and y: the thickness of the upper sheet. Highlights: → Welding parameters affect the FSSW nugget formation and the strength of the joint. → Melting of polyethylene occurred in the vicinity of the tool pin. → The joint that fractures with a pull nugget failure mode has a higher strength. -- Abstract: Friction stir spot welding parameters affect the weld strength of thermoplastics, such as high density polyethylene (HDPE) sheets. The effects of the welding parameters on static strength of friction stir spot welds of high density polyethylene sheets were investigated. For maximizing the weld strength, the selection of welding parameters is very important. In lap-shear tests two fracture modes were observed; cross nugget failure and pull nugget failure. The tool rotational speed, tool plunge depth and dwell time were determined to be important in the joint formation and its strength. The joint which had a better strength fails with a pull nugget failure morphology. Weld cross section image analysis of the joints were done with a video spectral comparator. The plunge rate of the tool was determined to have a negligible effect on friction stir spot welding.

  7. TIG-dressing of High Strength Steel Butt Welded Connections. Part 1 : Weld Toe Geometry and Local Hardness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Es, S.H.J.; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of extensive measurements on weld toe geometry of as-welded and TIG-dressed butt welded connections in high strength steels S460, S690 and very high strength steels S890 and S1100. Descriptions of the measurement techniques and data analysis are presented. Four weld

  8. TIG-dressing of high strength steel butt welded connections - Part 1: weld toe geometry and local hardness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, S.H.J. van; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of extensive measurements on weld toe geometry of as-welded and TIG-dressed butt welded connections in high strength steels S460, S690 and very high strength steels S890 and S1100. Descriptions of the measurement techniques and data analysis are presented. Four weld

  9. High-Speed Friction-Stir Welding to Enable Aluminum Tailor-Welded Blanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carsley, John; Luzanski, Tom; Carlson, Blair; Eisenmenger, Mark; Soulami, Ayoub; Marshall, Dustin; Landino, Brandon; Hartfield-Wunsch, Susan

    2015-05-01

    Current welding technologies for production of aluminum tailor-welded blanks (TWBs) are utilized in low-volume and niche applications, and they have yet to be scaled for the high-volume vehicle market. This study targeted further weight reduction, part reduction, and cost savings by enabling tailor-welded blank technology for aluminum alloys at high volumes. While friction-stir welding (FSW) has been traditionally applied at linear velocities less than 1 m/min, high-volume production applications demand the process be extended to higher velocities more amenable to cost-sensitive production environments. Unfortunately, weld parameters and performance developed and characterized at low-to-moderate welding velocities do not directly translate to high-speed linear FSW. Therefore, to facilitate production of high-volume aluminum FSW components, parameters were developed with a minimum welding velocity of 3 m/min. With an emphasis on weld quality, welded blanks were evaluated for postweld formability using a combination of numerical and experimental methods. An evaluation across scales was ultimately validated by stamping full-size production door inner panels made from dissimilar thickness aluminum TWBs, which provided validation of the numerical and experimental analysis of laboratory-scale tests.

  10. Real weld geometry determining mechanical properties of high power laser welded medium plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sang; Mi, Gaoyang; Yan, Fei; Wang, Chunming; Li, Peigen

    2018-06-01

    Weld width is commonly used as one of main factors to assess joint performances in laser welding. However, it changes significantly through the thickness direction in conditions of medium or thick plates. In this study, high-power autogenous laser welding was conducted on 7 mm thickness 201 stainless steel to elucidate the factor of whole weld transverse shape critically affecting the mechanical properties with the aim of predicting the performance visually through the weld appearance. The results show that single variation of welding parameters could result in great changes of weld pool figures and subsequently weld transverse shapes. All the obtained welds are composed of austenite containing small amount of cellular dendritic δ-Ferrite. The 0.2% proof stresses of Nail- and Peanut-shaped joint reach 458 MPa and 454 MPa, 88.2% and 87.5% of the base material respectively, while that of Wedge-shaped joint only comes to 371 MPa, 71.5% of the base material. The deterioration effect is believed to be caused by the axial grain zone in the weld center. The fatigue strength of joint P is a bit lower than N, but much better than W. Significant deformation incompatibility through the whole thickness and microstructure resistance to crack initiation should be responsible for the poor performance of W-shaped joints.

  11. Microstructural Effects on Hydrogen Delayed Fracture of 600 MPa and 800 MPa grade Deposited Weld Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hee Jae; Lee, Tae Woo; Cho, Kyung Mox; Kang, Namhyun; Yoon, Byung Hyun; Park, Seo Jeong; Chang, Woong Seong

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen-delayed fracture (HDF) was analyzed from the deposited weld metals of 600-MPa and 800-MPa flux-cored arc (FCA) welding wires, and then from the diffusible hydrogen behavior of the weld zone. Two types of deposited weld metal, that is, rutile weld metal and alkali weld metal, were used for each strength level. Constant loading test (CLT) and thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) analysis were conducted on the hydrogen pre-charged specimens electrochemically for 72 h. The effects of microstructures such as acicular ferrite, grain-boundary ferrite, and low-temperature-transformation phase on the time-to failure and amount of diffusible hydrogen were analyzed. The fracture time for hydrogen-purged specimens in the constant loading tests decreased as the grain size of acicular ferrite decreased. The major trapping site for diffusible hydrogen was the grain boundary, as determined by calculating the activation energies for hydrogen detrapping. As the strength was increased and alkali weld metal was used, the resistance to HDF decreased.

  12. Welding with high power fiber lasers - A preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintino, L.; Costa, A.; Miranda, R.; Yapp, D.; Kumar, V.; Kong, C.J.

    2007-01-01

    The new generation of high power fiber lasers presents several benefits for industrial purposes, namely high power with low beam divergence, flexible beam delivery, low maintenance costs, high efficiency and compact size. This paper presents a brief review of the development of high power lasers, and presents initial data on welding of API 5L: X100 pipeline steel with an 8 kW fiber laser. Weld bead geometry was evaluated and transition between conduction and deep penetration welding modes was investigated

  13. Filler metal selection for welding a high nitrogen stainless steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du Toit, Madeleine

    2002-06-01

    Cromanite is a high-strength austenitic stainless steel that contains approximately 19% chromium, 10% manganese, and 0.5% nitrogen. It can be welded successfully, but due to the high nitrogen content of the base metal, precautions have to be taken to ensure sound welds with the desired combination of properties. Although no matching filler metals are currently available, Cromanite can be welded using a range of commercially available stainless steel welding consumables. E307 stainless steel, the filler metal currently recommended for joining Cromanite, produces welds with mechanical properties that are generally inferior to those of the base metal. In wear applications, these lower strength welds would probably be acceptable, but in applications where full use is made of the high strength of Cromanite, welds with matching strength levels would be required. In this investigation, two welding consumables, ER2209 (a duplex austenitic-ferritic stainless steel) and 15CrMn (an austenitic-manganese hardfacing wire), were evaluated as substitutes for E307. When used to join Cromanite, 15CrMn produced welds displaying severe nitrogen-induced porosity, and this consumable is therefore not recommended. ER2209, however, outperformed E307, producing sound porosity-free welds with excellent mechanical properties, including high ductility and strength levels exceeding the minimum limits specified for Cromanite.

  14. Measuring the thickness of austenitic weld deposits on carbon steel walls using a magnetic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, K.

    1988-01-01

    The theoretical background is described of a magnetic method characterized by a marked compensation of the undesirable effect of δ-ferrite content in the deposit, on the accuracy of measuring deposit thickness. A description is also given of the basic types of sensors and the results are summarized of comparing measurements performed on weld deposits of WWER-type reactor pressure vessels. (author). 7 figs., 5 refs

  15. Comparison of Post Weld Treatment of High Strength Steel Welded Joints in Medium Cycle Fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikkel Melters; Mouritsen, Ole Ø.; Hansen, Michael Rygaard

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of three post-weld treatments for fatigue life improvement of welded joints. The objective is to determine the most suitable post-weld treatment for implementation in mass production of certain crane components manufactured from very high-strength steel...... the stress range can exceed the yield-strength of ordinary structural steel, especially when considering positive stress ratios (R > 0). Fatigue experiments and qualitative evaluation of the different post-weld treatments leads to the selection of TIG dressing. The process of implementing TIG dressing...... in mass production and some inherent initial problems are discussed. The treatment of a few critical welds leads to a significant increase in fatigue performance of the entire structure and the possibility for better utilization of very high-strength steel....

  16. High Power Laser Beam Welding of Thick-walled Ferromagnetic Steels with Electromagnetic Weld Pool Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, André; Avilov, Vjaceslav; Gumenyuk, Andrey; Hilgenberg, Kai; Rethmeier, Michael

    The development of modern high power laser systems allows single pass welding of thick-walled components with minimal distortion. Besides the high demands on the joint preparation, the hydrostatic pressure in the melt pool increases with higher plate thicknesses. Reaching or exceeding the Laplace pressure, drop-out or melt sagging are caused. A contactless electromagnetic weld support system was used for laser beam welding of thick ferromagnetic steel plates compensating these effects. An oscillating magnetic field induces eddy currents in the weld pool which generate Lorentz forces counteracting the gravity forces. Hysteresis effects of ferromagnetic steels are considered as well as the loss of magnetization in zones exceeding the Curie temperature. These phenomena reduce the effective Lorentz forces within the weld pool. The successful compensation of the hydrostatic pressure was demonstrated on up to 20 mm thick plates of duplex and mild steel by a variation of the electromagnetic power level and the oscillation frequency.

  17. Microstructural investigation of hardfacing weld deposit obtained from CrB paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, S.; Sarker, B.; Bhattacharya, S.

    1989-01-01

    Hardfacing weld deposits are used as a protective layer on engineering components and tools subjected to different modes of wear. Cheaper iron-based alloys with chromium and carbon or relatively expensive alloys with some niobium or titanium have long been used as standard hardfacing materials. In recent years boron has substituted the costlier alloying elements and the newly developed Fe-B-C alloys have shown encouraging results. The microstructure of the welded hardfacing deposit is one of the most important factors that determine its performance. The amount, size, distribution and hardness of the individual constituents play important roles in imparting the desired properties. Recently Colomonoy sweat on paste containing fine CrB particles (of about 12 μm average size) suspended in an organic binder has been marketed as the new generation hardfacing material. A thin coating of the paste is applied on the component surface, allowed to dry and welded. The welded deposit has been found to offer good wear resistance in many industrial applications. This paper reports the microstructural investigation of the welded deposit obtained from this paste

  18. Optimal welding technology of high strength steel S690QL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusan Arsic

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is presented the detailed procedure for defining the optimal technology for welding the structures made of the high strength steel S690QL. That steel belongs into a group of steels with exceptional mechanical properties. The most prominent properties are the high tensile strength and impact toughness, at room and at elevated temperatures, as well. However, this steel has a negative characteristic - proneness to appearance of cold cracks.  That impedes welding and makes as an imperative to study different aspects of this steel's properties as well as those of eventual filler metal. Selection and defining of the optimal welding technology of this high strength steel is done for the purpose of preserving the favorable mechanical properties once the welded joint is realized; properties of the welded metal and the melting zone, as well as in the heat affected zone, which is the most critical zone of the welded joint.

  19. Effect of the welding parameters on all-weld-metal deposited from AWS E10018-M, E11018-M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surian, E.

    1996-01-01

    Using each one of the electrodes types AWS A5.5-81-M, from standard batches, three-all-weld metal test pieces were prepared (cold, warm and hot) according to the AWS A5.5-81 standard. In order to have three different values for the heat input, the welding parameters were varied, but always having in mind the mentioned standard requirements. The test pieces were used to determine the mechanical properties and to carry out metallographic studies. the results obtained showed that the alloy deposited by the E10018-M electrode is less sensible to heat input variations than that from both E11018-M and E12018-M electrodes. Therefore, to work with these last mentioned electrodes it is necessary to have a strict control and very exact instructions, even more exacting than those established in the AWS a5.5.-81 standard. 9 refs

  20. Ultra high frequency induction welding of powder metal compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavdar, U.; Gulsahin, I.

    2014-10-01

    The application of the iron based Powder Metal (PM) compacts in Ultra High Frequency Induction Welding (UHFIW) were reviewed. These PM compacts are used to produce cogs. This study investigates the methods of joining PM materials enforceability with UHFIW in the industry application. Maximum stress and maximum strain of welded PM compacts were determined by three point bending and strength tests. Microhardness and microstructure of induction welded compacts were determined. (Author)

  1. Ultra high frequency induction welding of powder metal compacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavdar, U.; Gulsahin, I.

    2014-01-01

    The application of the iron based Powder Metal (PM) compacts in Ultra High Frequency Induction Welding (UHFIW) were reviewed. These PM compacts are used to produce cogs. This study investigates the methods of joining PM materials enforceability with UHFIW in the industry application. Maximum stress and maximum strain of welded PM compacts were determined by three point bending and strength tests. Microhardness and microstructure of induction welded compacts were determined. (Author)

  2. Radiation damage in a high Ni weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brumovsky, M.; Kytka, M.; Kopriva, R.

    2015-01-01

    WWER-1000 RPV weld metals are characterized by a high content of nickel, mostly about 1.7 mass % with content of manganese around 0.8 mass % with a very low copper content - about 0.05 mass %. In such material some late blooming phase effect should be observed during irradiation. Such typical weld material was irradiated in the experimental reactor LVR-15 in N RI Rez at the irradiation temperature 290 C degrees and at five neutron fluences from 1.5 to 9.5 *10 23 m -2 (E>1 MeV). Charpy V-notch impact tests, static fracture toughness tests, tensile and hardness measurement were performed to obtain effect of neutron fluence on radiation hardening as well as embrittlement. Neutron fluence dependences of all these property changes have monotonic character but with a high neutron embrittlement exponent around 0.8. Scanning electron microscope of fracture surfaces showed no or very small portion of intercrystalline fracture. Transmission electron microscopy was performed on specimens from all neutron fluences. Only low density of black-dot damage has been observed. It is assumed that most of defect are dislocation loops. The late blooming phase which may be observed from results of mechanical properties are probably below the resolution of the used JEM-2010, i.e. 1.5 nm. (authors)

  3. Effect of Welding Speed on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties due to The Deposition of Reinforcements on Friction Stir Welded Dissimilar Aluminium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baridula Ravinder Reddy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The strength of the welded joint obtained by solid state stir welding process was found to be improved as compared to fusion welding process. The deposition of reinforcements during friction stir welding process can further enhance the strength of the welded joint by locking the movement of grain boundaries. In the present study, the aluminium alloys AA2024 and AA7075 were welded effectively by depositing the multi-walled carbon nanotubes in to the stir zone. The mechanical properties and microstructures were studied by varying the traverse speed at constant rotational speed. The results show that rotating tool pin stirring action and heat input play an important role in controlling the grain size. The carbon nanotubes were found to be distributed uniformly at a welding speed (traverse speed of 80mm/min. This enhanced the mechanical properties of the welded joint. The microstructure and Electron dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX studies indicate that the deposition of carbon nanotubes in the stir zone was influenced by the traverse speed.

  4. Electron beam welding of high-purity copper accelerator cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delis, K.; Haas, H.; Schlebusch, P.; Sigismund, E.

    1986-01-01

    The operating conditions of accelerator cells require high thermal conductivity, low gas release in the ultrahigh vacuum, low content of low-melting metals and an extremely good surface quality. In order to meet these requirements, high-purity copper (OFHC, Grade 1, according to ASTM B 170-82 and extra specifications) is used as structural material. The prefabricated components of the accelerator cells (noses, jackets, flanges) are joined by electron beam welding, the weld seam being assessed on the basis of the same criteria as the base material. The welding procedures required depend, first, on the material and, secondly, on the geometries involved. Therefore experimental welds were made first on standardized specimens in order to study the behaviour of the material during electron beam welding and the influence of parameter variations. The welded joints of the cell design were planned on the basis of these results. Seam configuration, welding procedures and the parameters were optimized on components of original geometry. The experiments have shown that high-quality joints of this grade of copper can be produced by the electron beam welding process, if careful planning and preparation of the seams and adequate containment of the welding pool are assured. (orig.)

  5. Effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded high strength aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Ravisankar, V.; Reddy, G. Madhusudhan

    2007-01-01

    This paper reveals the effect of pulsed current and post weld aging treatment on tensile properties of argon arc welded AA7075 aluminium alloy. This alloy has gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to-weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of high strength aluminium alloy are frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process due to their comparatively easier applicability and better economy. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit coarse columnar grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results inferior weld mechanical properties and poor resistance to hot cracking. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to refine the fusion zone grains by applying pulsed current welding technique. Four different welding techniques have been used to fabricate the joints and they are: (i) continuous current GTAW (CCGTAW), (ii) pulsed current GTAW (PCGTAW), (iii) continuous current GMAW (CCGMAW) and (iv) pulsed current GMAW (PCGMAW) processes. As welded joint strength is much lower than the base metal strength and hence, a simple aging treatment has been given to improve the tensile strength of the joints. Current pulsing leads to relatively finer and more equi-axed grain structure in GTA and GMA welds. In contrast, conventional continuous current welding resulted in predominantly columnar grain structures. Post weld aging treatment is accompanied by an increase in tensile strength and tensile ductility

  6. Residual stress by repair welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mochizuki, Masahito; Toyoda, Masao

    2003-01-01

    Residual stress by repair welds is computed using the thermal elastic-plastic analysis with phase-transformation effect. Coupling phenomena of temperature, microstructure, and stress-strain fields are simulated in the finite-element analysis. Weld bond of a plate butt-welded joint is gouged and then deposited by weld metal in repair process. Heat source is synchronously moved with the deposition of the finite-element as the weld deposition. Microstructure is considered by using CCT diagram and the transformation behavior in the repair weld is also simulated. The effects of initial stress, heat input, and weld length on residual stress distribution are studied from the organic results of numerical analysis. Initial residual stress before repair weld has no influence on the residual stress after repair treatment near weld metal, because the initial stress near weld metal releases due to high temperature of repair weld and then stress by repair weld regenerates. Heat input has an effect for residual stress distribution, for not its magnitude but distribution zone. Weld length should be considered reducing the magnitude of residual stress in the edge of weld bead; short bead induces high tensile residual stress. (author)

  7. THE FORMATION OF BIMETALLIC CONNECTION IN WELDER DEPOSITION UNDER LASER WELDING WITH THE FILLER WIRE FEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Yelistratov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The metallurgical and technological features of welding deposition in a robotic unit with a semiconductor laser are analyzed. The prospects of using beam with low energy density in the spot heating for applying metallic layers using filler wire are shown. 

  8. Development of high frequency tungsten inert gas welding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morisada, Yoshiaki; Fujii, Hidetoshi; Inagaki, Fuminori; Kamai, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A new ultrasonic wave TIG welding method was developed. ► The area of the blowholes decreased to less than about 1/8 in the normal TIG weld. ► The number of blowholes decreased with the decreasing frequency. ► The number of blowholes increased when the frequency was less than 15 kHz. ► The microstructure of the weld was refined by ultrasonic wave. -- Abstract: A new welding method, called high frequency tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding, was developed to decrease blowholes in a weld. A1050 aluminum alloy plates (100 mm l × 50 mm w × 5 mm t ) were welded at a frequency from 10 to 40 kHz. An Ar-1% hydrogen mixture was used as the shielding gas to generate blowholes in the experiments. The welding was performed in the horizontal position so that the blowholes can easily be a problem. For comparison, a normal TIG welding was also performed at 60 Hz. After welding, the distribution of the blowholes in the welds was observed in order to evaluate the effect of the sonic wave. The number of blowholes changed with the frequency. A frequency near 15 kHz is the most suitable to decrease the blowholes. Using this new method, the area of blowholes is decreased to less than about 1/8 of the normal TIG weld. This method is much more effective for decreasing the number of blowholes, compared with an ultrasonic wave vibrator which is directly fixed to the sample.

  9. High throughput semiconductor deposition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, David L.; Ptak, Aaron Joseph; Kuech, Thomas F.; Schulte, Kevin; Simon, John D.

    2017-11-21

    A reactor for growing or depositing semiconductor films or devices. The reactor may be designed for inline production of III-V materials grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). The operating principles of the HVPE reactor can be used to provide a completely or partially inline reactor for many different materials. An exemplary design of the reactor is shown in the attached drawings. In some instances, all or many of the pieces of the reactor formed of quartz, such as welded quartz tubing, while other reactors are made from metal with appropriate corrosion resistant coatings such as quartz or other materials, e.g., corrosion resistant material, or stainless steel tubing or pipes may be used with a corrosion resistant material useful with HVPE-type reactants and gases. Using HVPE in the reactor allows use of lower-cost precursors at higher deposition rates such as in the range of 1 to 5 .mu.m/minute.

  10. Weld Design, Testing, and Assessment Procedures for High Strength Pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    Long-distance high-strength pipelines are increasingly being constructed for the efficient transportation of energy products. While the high-strength linepipe steels and high productivity welding processes are being applied, the procedures employed f...

  11. An experimental study of high-hydrogen welding processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fydrych, Dariusz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents investigation results of determination of the diffusible hydrogen content in deposited metal obtained by means of two most often used methods-the glycerin method and the mercury method. Relation has been defined between results of those methods in the area characteristic of low-hydrogen as well as high-hydrogen welding processes. Relations available in the literature do not include the diffusible hydrogen content in deposited metal greater than 35 ml/100 g. Extending the scope of analysis of the diffusible hydrogen quantity to an 80 ml/100 g level considerably simplifies carrying out the steel weldability assessment with the use of high-hydrogen processes and with welding in water environment.Este trabajo presenta los resultados de una investigación sobre la determinación del contenido de hidrógeno difusible en el material aportado mediante dos métodos: el de la glicerina (el más utilizado y el del mercurio. El contenido de dicho hidrógeno se ha definido a partir de los resultados de esos métodos en una zona con bajo contenido en hidrógeno, así como procesos de soldadura con alto contenido en hidrógeno. No hay datos disponibles en la literatura para contenidos de hidrógeno difusible en metal depositado mayores de 35 ml/100 g. Ampliando el análisis de la cantidad de dicho hidrógeno hasta los 80 ml/100 g, se simplifica considerablemente la realización de ensayos de soldabilidad del acero en procesos de alto contenido en hidrógeno así como en la soldadura en medio acuoso.

  12. Comparison of deposited surface area of airborne ultrafine particles generated from two welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, J F; Albuquerque, P C; Miranda, Rosa M; Santos, Telmo G; Vieira, M T

    2012-09-01

    This article describes work performed on the assessment of the levels of airborne ultrafine particles emitted in two welding processes metal-active gas (MAG) of carbon steel and friction-stir welding (FSW) of aluminium in terms of deposited area in alveolar tract of the lung using a nanoparticle surface area monitor analyser. The obtained results showed the dependence from process parameters on emitted ultrafine particles and clearly demonstrated the presence of ultrafine particles, when compared with background levels. The obtained results showed that the process that results on the lower levels of alveolar-deposited surface area is FSW, unlike MAG. Nevertheless, all the tested processes resulted in important doses of ultrafine particles that are to be deposited in the human lung of exposed workers.

  13. High-Powered, Ultrasonically Assisted Thermal Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert

    2013-01-01

    distance equal to the thickness of the material being welded. The TSW process can be significantly improved by reducing the draw forces. This can be achieved by reducing the friction forces between the weld workpieces and the containment plates. High-power ultrasonic (HPU) vibrations of the containment plates achieve friction reduction in the TSW process. Furthermore, integration of the HPU energy into the TSW stir rod can increase tool life of the stir rod, and can reduce shear forces to which the stir rod is subjected during the welding process. TSW has been used to successfully join 0.500-in (˜13-mm) thick commercially pure (CP) titanium, titanium 6AL- 4V, and titanium 6AL-4V ELI in weld joint lengths up to 9 ft (˜2.75-m) long. In addition, the TSW process was used to fabricate a sub-scale hexagonally shaped gun turret component for the U.S. Navy. The turret is comprised of six 0.5000-in (˜13-mm) thick angled welds. Each angled weld joint was prepared by machining the mating surfaces to 120deg. The angled weld joint was then fixtured using an upper and lower containment plate of the same geometry of the angled weld joint. The weld joint was then stirred by the stir rod as it and the upper and lower containment plates traverse through the angled joint prep.

  14. Microstructure development of welding joints in high Cr ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubushiro, Keiji; Takahashi, Satoshi; Morishima, Keiko [IHI Corporation (Japan). Research Lab.

    2010-07-01

    Creep failure in high Cr ferritic steels welding joints are Type IV failure. Type IV-failure was ruptured in fine grained region of heat affected zone, microstructure and phase transformation process at welding in fine grained region were very important to clarify. Microstructure difference of heat affected zone was investigated in Gr.91, Gr.92, Gr.122 welding joint. The fraction of 60 degree block boundary, packet boundary, random boundary (including prior gamma boundary) length was compared in three ferritic steels by EBSP(Electron Backscatter Diffraction Pattern) analysis. HAZ was almost fully martensite phase in Gr.122 weld joint. On the other hand, HAZ in Gr.91 welding joint were some equiaxial grain and martensite structure. (orig.)

  15. Application of Hard Metal Weld Deposit in the Area of Mixing Organic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Votava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Any machine part is subject to degradation processes. Intensive wear occurs either when two bearing surfaces come into contact or when loose particles rub the function surface of a machine part. Soil processing machines are a good example. A similar process of abrasive wear occurs also in mixing machines or lines for material transport, such as worm-conveyors. The experiment part of this paper analyses hard metal weld deposit dedicated for renovation of abrasive stressed surfaces. In order to prolong the service life of a blade disc in a mixing machine Kreis-Biogas-Dissolver, the technology of hard surfacing by an electric arc was used. Tested hard metal electrodes were applied on a steel tape class 11 373. To eliminate mixing with the base material, weld beads were applied in two layers. Firstly, the weld bead was visually analyzed on a binocular microscope. Further, weld bead as well as the base material was analyzed from the metallographic point of view, whose aim was to identify the structure of weld metal and the origin of microcracks in weld bead. Moreover, there was also measured microhardness of weld metal. Abrasive resistance was tested according to the norm ČSN 01 5084, which is an abrasive cloth test. As in the mixing process also erosion wear occurs, there was also processed a test on a Bond device simulating stress of test samples by loose abrasive particles. The abrading agents were formed by broken stones of 8–16 mm in size. Based on the results of the individual tests, the recommendation of usage hard metal electrodes for prolonging service life of machine parts will be made.

  16. Critical review of welding technology for canisters for disposal of spent fuel and high level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, S.; Allen, C.; Punshon, C.; Threadgill, P.; Gallegillo, M.; Holmes, B.; Nicholas, J.

    2010-03-01

    Nagra is the Swiss national cooperative for the disposal of radioactive waste and is responsible for final disposal of all types of waste produced in Switzerland, which are partitioned into two repository types, one for spent fuel (SF), vitrified high-level waste (HLW) and long-lived intermediate level waste and one for low and intermediate level waste. In the general licences applied for these repositories, documentation has to show that long-term safety can be ensured and that factors for the construction, operation, and closure of the facility have been considered. Nagra has commissioned TWI to carry out a critical review of welding technologies for the sealing of HLW and SF canisters made of carbon steel. In conjunction with a material selection report, the information gained will be used as a preliminary step to provide input to developing design concepts for the canisters. The features to be considered are: a) Suitability of techniques for thickness of weld required; b) Suitability for remote operation, maintenance and set-up; c) Welding speed, weld quality, tolerances and cost; d) Effect of welding process on parent materials properties including microstructure corrosion resistance, distortion and residual stress; e) Potential post-weld treatments to reduce residual stress and enhance corrosion resistance; f) Suitability of inspection techniques for the weld thickness required; g) Impact of welding techniques on the canister design and material selection; h) Critique of emerging technologies which may be suitable in the future. The review of potential welding technologies began with a feasibility study carried out by TWI experts, where the unsuitable processes were rejected. For the remaining processes attention was focused on previous applications for the material and thickness suggested, and especially on safety critical applications such as applied in the nuclear and pressure vessel industry. Once the relevant information was gathered each process was

  17. Innovative electron-beam welding of high-melting metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behr, W.; Reisgen, U.

    2007-01-01

    Since its establishment as nuclear research plant Juelich in the year 1956, the research centre Juelich (FZJ) is concerned with the material processing of special metals. Among those are, above all, the high-melting refractory metals niobium, molybdenum and tungsten. Electron beam welding has always been considered to be an innovative special welding method; in the FZJ, electron beam welding has, moreover, always been adapted to the increasing demands made by research partners and involved manufacturing and design sectors. From the manual equipment technology right up to highly modern multi-beam technique, the technically feasible for fundamental research has, this way, always been realised. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [de

  18. Resistance to wear and microstructure of martensitic welds deposits for recharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualco, Agustin; Svoboda, Hernan G; Surian, Estela S; Vedia, Luis A

    2006-01-01

    This work studied the welding metal for a martensitic steel (alloyed to Cr, Mn, Mo, V and W), deposited with a tubular metal-cored wire with gaseous protection of 82%Ar-18%Co 2 on a low carbon steel using the semi-automatic welding process. Transverse pieces were cut from the welded coupon for microstructural characterization, measurement of hardness profiles, determination of the chemical composition and wear trials. The microstructural characterization was done using optic and scanning electronic microscopes, X-rays diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Vicker microhardness (1 kg.) was measured. The wear trials (metal-metal) were performed in an Amsler machine under pure flow conditions. Different loads were used and the reference material was a SAE 1020 steel. The temperatures for each case were measured and the weight loss curves were defined as a function of the distance run and of the load. After testing the wear surfaces and the debris were measured. The microstructure of the welded deposit mostly consists of martensite and some retained austenite, with a pattern of dendritic segregation, and a hardness on the surface of 612 HVI. A lineal variation between the weight loss and the load applied was obtained as a response to the wear. The following phenomena were observed: abrasion, plastic deformation, oxidation and adhesion to the wear surfaces, as well as a tempering effect in the condition of the biggest load. The wear mechanisms acting on both surfaces were identified (CW)

  19. Today's status of application of high power electron beam welding to heavy electric machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Hisanao; Okuni, Tetsuo; Sejima, Itsuhiko.

    1980-01-01

    The progress in high energy welding is remarkable in recent years, and electron beam welding is now widely used in heavy industries. However, there are number of problems to be solved in the application of high power electron beam welding to ultra thick steel plates (over 100 mm). The following matters are described: the economy of high power electron beam welding; the development of the welding machines; the problems in the actual application; the instances of the welding in a high-pressure spherical gas tank, non-magnetic steel structures and high-precision welded structures; weldor training; etc. For the future rise in the capacities of heavy electric machinery, the high efficiency by high power electron beam welding will be useful. The current status is its applications to the high-precision welding of large structures with 6 m diameter and the high-quality welding of heavy structures with 160 mm thickness. (J.P.N.)

  20. Influence of Cooling Rate in High-Temperature Area on Hardening of Deposited High-Cutting Chrome-Tungsten Metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malushin, N N; Valuev, D V; Valueva, A V; Serikbol, A; Borovikov, I F

    2015-01-01

    The authors study the influence of cooling rate in high-temperature area for thermal cycle of high-cutting chrome-tungsten metal weld deposit on the processes of carbide phase merging and austenite grain growth for the purpose of providing high hardness of deposited metal (HRC 64-66). (paper)

  1. Influence of Cooling Rate in High-Temperature Area on Hardening of Deposited High-Cutting Chrome-Tungsten Metal

    OpenAIRE

    Malushin, N. N.; Valuev, Denis Viktorovich; Valueva, Anna Vladimirovna; Serikbol, A.; Borovikov, I. F.

    2015-01-01

    The authors study the influence of cooling rate in high-temperature area for thermal cycle of high-cutting chrome-tungsten metal weld deposit on the processes of carbide phase merging and austenite grain growth for the purpose of providing high hardness of deposited metal (HRC 64-66).

  2. Effect of welding current and speed on occurrence of humping bead in high-speed GMAW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Ji; Wu Chuansong

    2009-01-01

    The developed mathematical model of humping formation mechanism in high-speed gas metal arc welding (GMAW) is used to analyze the effects of welding current and welding speed on the occurrence of humping bead. It considers both the momentum and heat content of backward flowing molten jet inside weld pool. Three-dimensional geometry of weld pool, the spacing between two adjacent humps and hump height along humping weld bead are calculated under different levels of welding current and welding speed. It shows that wire feeding rate, power intensity and the moment of backward flowing molten jet are the major factors on humping bead formation.

  3. Study on Fatigue Characteristics of High-Strength Steel Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Hong Suk; Yoo, Seung Won; Park, Jong Chan [Hyundai Motor Group, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    High-strength steel has replaced mild steel as the material of choice for truck decks or frames, owing to the growing demand for lightweight vehicles. Although studies on the weld fatigue characteristics of mild steel are available, studies on high-strength steels have been seldom conducted. In this study, firstly, we surveyed a chosen number of approaches and selected the Radaj method, which uses the notch factor approach, as the one suitable for evaluating the fatigue life of commercial vehicles. Secondly, we obtained the S-N curves of HARDOX and ATOS60 steel welds, and the F-N curves of the T-weld and overlapped-weld structures. Thirdly, we acquired a general S-N curve of welded structures made of high-strength steel from the F-N curve, using the notch factor approach. Fourthly, we extracted the weld fatigue characteristics of high-strength steel and incorporated the results in the database of a commercial fatigue program. Finally, we compared the results of the fatigue test and the CAE prediction of the example case, which demonstrated sufficiently good agreement.

  4. Characterization of duplex stainless steel weld metals obtained by hybrid plasma-gas metal arc welding

    OpenAIRE

    Yurtisik,Koray; Tirkes,Suha; Dykhno,Igor; Gur,C. Hakan; Gurbuz,Riza

    2013-01-01

    Despite its high efficiency, autogenous keyhole welding is not well-accepted for duplex stainless steels because it causes excessive ferrite in as-welded duplex microstructure, which leads to a degradation in toughness and corrosion properties of the material. Combining the deep penetration characteristics of plasma arc welding in keyhole mode and metal deposition capability of gas metal arc welding, hybrid plasma - gas metal arc welding process has considered for providing a proper duplex mi...

  5. Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Earl; And Others

    The curriculum guide for welding instruction contains 16 units presented in six sections. Each unit is divided into the following areas, each of which is color coded: terminal objectives, specific objectives, suggested activities, and instructional materials; information sheet; transparency masters; assignment sheet; test; and test answers. The…

  6. High power Nd:YAG laser welding in manufacturing of vacuum vessel of fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokinen, Tommi E-mail: tommi.jokinen@vtt.fi; Kujanpaeae, Veli E-mail: veli.kujanpaa@lut.fi

    2003-09-01

    Laser welding has shown many advantages over traditional welding methods in numerous applications. The advantages are mainly based on very precise and powerful heat source of laser light, which change the phenomena of welding process when compared with traditional welding methods. According to the phenomena of the laser welding, penetration is deeper and thus welding speed is higher. Because of the precise power source and high-welding speed, the heat input to the workpiece is small and distortions are reduced. Also, the shape of laser weld is less critical for distortions than traditional welds. For welding thick sections, the usability of lasers is not so practical than with thin sheets, because with power levels of present Nd:YAG lasers depth of penetration is limited up to about 10 mm by single-pass welding. One way to overcome this limitation is to use multi-pass laser welding, in which narrow gap and filler wire is applied. By this process, thick sections can be welded with smaller heat input and then smaller distortions and the process seems to be very effective comparing 'traditional' welding methods, not only according to the narrower gap. Another way to increase penetration and fill the groove is by using the so-called hybrid process, in which laser and GMAW (gas metal arc welding) are combined. In this paper, 20-mm thick austenitic stainless steel was welded using narrow gap configuration with a multi-pass technique. Two welding procedures were used: Nd:YAG laser welding with filler wire and with addition of GMAW, the hybrid process. In the welding experiments, it was noticed that both processes are feasible for welding thicker sections with good quality and with minimal distortions. Thus, these processes should be considered when the evaluation of the welding process is done for joining vacuum vessel sectors of ITER.

  7. Effect of Mg and Cu on mechanical properties of high-strength welded joints of aluminum alloys obtained by laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annin, B. D.; Fomin, V. M.; Karpov, E. V.; Malikov, A. G.; Orishich, A. M.

    2017-09-01

    Results of experimental investigations of welded joints of high-strength aluminum-lithium alloys of the Al-Cu-Li and Al-Mg-Li systems are reported. The welded joints are obtained by means of laser welding and are subjected to various types of processing for obtaining high-strength welded joints. A microstructural analysis is performed. The phase composition and mechanical properties of the welded joints before and after heat treatment are studied. It is found that combined heat treatment of the welded joint (annealing, quenching, and artificial ageing) increases the joint strength, but appreciably decreases the alloy strength outside the region thermally affected by the welding process.

  8. Correlation Between Microstructure and Low-Temperature Impact Toughness of Simulated Reheated Zones in the Multi-pass Weld Metal of High-Strength Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yongjoon; Park, Gitae; Jeong, Seonghoon; Lee, Changhee

    2018-01-01

    A large fraction of reheated weld metal is formed during multi-pass welding, which significantly affects the mechanical properties (especially toughness) of welded structures. In this study, the low-temperature toughness of the simulated reheated zone in multi-pass weld metal was evaluated and compared to that of the as-deposited zone using microstructural analyses. Two kinds of high-strength steel welds with different hardenabilities were produced by single-pass, bead-in-groove welding, and both welds were thermally cycled to peak temperatures above Ac3 using a Gleeble simulator. When the weld metals were reheated, their toughness deteriorated in response to the increase in the fraction of detrimental microstructural components, i.e., grain boundary ferrite and coalesced bainite in the weld metals with low and high hardenabilities, respectively. In addition, toughness deterioration occurred in conjunction with an increase in the effective grain size, which was attributed to the decrease in nucleation probability of acicular ferrite; the main cause for this decrease changed depending on the hardenability of the weld metal.

  9. Control of microstructure in soldered, brazed, welded, plated, cast or vapor deposited manufactured components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripley, Edward B.; Hallman, Russell L.

    2015-11-10

    Disclosed are methods and systems for controlling of the microstructures of a soldered, brazed, welded, plated, cast, or vapor deposited manufactured component. The systems typically use relatively weak magnetic fields of either constant or varying flux to affect material properties within a manufactured component, typically without modifying the alloy, or changing the chemical composition of materials or altering the time, temperature, or transformation parameters of a manufacturing process. Such systems and processes may be used with components consisting of only materials that are conventionally characterized as be uninfluenced by magnetic forces.

  10. Mechanisms of joint and microstructure formation in high power ultrasonic spot welding 6111 aluminium automotive sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakavos, D.; Prangnell, P.B.

    2010-01-01

    Resistance spot welding (RSW) is difficult to apply to aluminium automotive alloys. High power ultrasonic spot welding (HP-USW) is a new alternative method which is extremely efficient, using ∼2% of the energy of RSW. However, to date there have been few studies of the mechanisms of bond formation and the material interactions that take place with this process. Here, we report on a detailed investigation where we have used X-ray tomography, high resolution SEM, and EBSD, and dissimilar alloy welds, to track the interface position and characterise the stages of weld formation, and microstructure evolution, as a function of welding energy. Under optimum conditions high quality welds are produced, showing few defects. Welding proceeds by the development and spread of microwelds, until extensive plastic deformation occurs within the weld zone, where the temperature reaches ∼380 deg. C. The origin of the weld interface 'flow features' characteristic of HP-USW are discussed.

  11. High Temperature Fatigue Crack Growth Rate Studies in Stainless Steel 316L(N Welds Processed by A-TIG and MP-TIG Welding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Manuel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Welded stainless steel components used in power plants and chemical industries are subjected to mechanical load cycles at elevated temperatures which result in early fatigue failures. The presence of weld makes the component to be liable to failure in view of residual stresses at the weld region or in the neighboring heat affected zone apart from weld defects. Austenitic stainless steels are often welded using Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG process. In case of single pass welding, there is a reduced weld penetration which results in a low depth-to-width ratio of weld bead. If the number of passes is increased (Multi-Pass TIG welding, it results in weld distortion and subsequent residual stress generation. The activated flux TIG welding, a variant of TIG welding developed by E.O. Paton Institute, is found to reduce the limitation of conventional TIG welding, resulting in a higher depth of penetration using a single pass, reduced weld distortion and higher welding speeds. This paper presents the fatigue crack growth rate characteristics at 823 K temperature in type 316LN stainless steel plates joined by conventional multi-pass TIG (MP-TIG and Activated TIG (A-TIG welding process. Fatigue tests were conducted to characterize the crack growth rates of base metal, HAZ and Weld Metal for A-TIG and MP-TIG configurations. Micro structural evaluation of 316LN base metal suggests a primary austenite phase, whereas, A-TIG weld joints show an equiaxed grain distribution along the weld center and complete penetration during welding (Fig. 1. MP-TIG microstructure shows a highly inhomogeneous microstructure, with grain orientation changing along the interface of each pass. This results in tortuous crack growth in case of MP-TIG welded specimens. Scanning electron microscopy studies have helped to better understand the fatigue crack propagation modes during high temperature testing.

  12. Proton-irradiation technology for high-frequency high-current silicon welding diode manufacturing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagov, P B; Drenin, A S; Zinoviev, M A

    2017-01-01

    Different proton irradiation regimes were tested to provide more than 20 kHz-frequency, soft reverse recovery “snap-less” behavior, low forward voltage drop and leakage current for 50 mm diameter 7 kA/400 V welding diode Al/Si/Mo structure. Silicon diode with such parameters is very suitable for high frequency resistance welding machines of new generation for robotic welding. (paper)

  13. Proton-irradiation technology for high-frequency high-current silicon welding diode manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagov, P. B.; Drenin, A. S.; Zinoviev, M. A.

    2017-05-01

    Different proton irradiation regimes were tested to provide more than 20 kHz-frequency, soft reverse recovery “snap-less” behavior, low forward voltage drop and leakage current for 50 mm diameter 7 kA/400 V welding diode Al/Si/Mo structure. Silicon diode with such parameters is very suitable for high frequency resistance welding machines of new generation for robotic welding.

  14. High-strength structural steels; their properties, and the problems encountered during the welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uwer, D.

    1978-01-01

    High-strength structural steels, manufacture, properties. Requirements to be met by the welded joints of high-strength structural steels. Influence of the welding conditions on the mechanical properties in the heat-affected zone. Cold-cracking behaviour of welded joints. Economic efficiency of high-strength structural steels. Applications. (orig.) [de

  15. Feature based Weld-Deposition for Additive Manufacturing of Complex Shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchagnula, Jayaprakash Sharma; Simhambhatla, Suryakumar

    2018-06-01

    Fabricating functional metal parts using Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a leading trend. However, realizing overhanging features has been a challenge due to the lack of support mechanism for metals. Powder-bed fusion techniques like, Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) employ easily-breakable-scaffolds made of the same material to realize the overhangs. However, the same approach is not extendible to deposition processes like laser or arc based direct energy deposition processes. Although it is possible to realize small overhangs by exploiting the inherent overhanging capability of the process or by blinding some small features like holes, the same cannot be extended for more complex geometries. The current work presents a novel approach for realizing complex overhanging features without the need of support structures. This is possible by using higher order kinematics and suitably aligning the overhang with the deposition direction. Feature based non-uniform slicing and non-uniform area-filling are some vital concepts required in realizing the same and are briefly discussed here. This method can be used to fabricate and/or repair fully dense and functional components for various engineering applications. Although this approach has been implemented for weld-deposition based system, the same can be extended to any other direct energy deposition processes also.

  16. Studies on Fusion Welding of High Nitrogen Stainless Steel: Microstructure, Mechanical and corrosion Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    An attempt has been made in the present investigation to weld high nitrogen steel of 5mm thick plates using various process i.e., shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and autogenous electron beam welding (EBW) process. Present work is aimed at studying the microstructural changes and its effects on mechanical properties and corrosion resistance. Microstructure is characterized by optical, scanning electron microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction technique. Vickers hardness, tensile properties, impact toughness and face bend ductility testing of the welds was carried out. Pitting corrosion resistance of welds was determined using potentio-dynamic polarization testing in 3.5%NaCl solution. Results of the present investigation established that SMA welds made using Cr-Mn-N electrode were observed to have a austenite dendritic grain structure in the weld metal and is having poor mechanical properties but good corrosion resistance. GTA welds made using 18Ni (MDN 250) filler wire were observed to have a reverted austenite in martensite matrix of the weld metal and formation of unmixed zone at the fusion boundary which resulted in better mechanical properties and poor corrosion resistance. Fine grains and uniform distribution of delta ferrite in the austenite matrix and narrow width of weld zone are observed in autogeneous electron beam welds. A good combination of mechanical properties and corrosion resistance was achieved for electron beam welds of high nitrogen steel when compared to SMA and GTA welds.

  17. Characterization of the electrochemical behavior of coating by steel welding 308l and in presence of noble metals deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piedras, P.; Arganis J, C. R.

    2014-10-01

    In this work the oxide deposits and noble metals deposit were characterized (Ag and Pt) on a coating of stainless steel 308l that were deposited by the shield metal arc welding (SMAW) on steel A36 by means of scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The extrapolation of Tafel technique was also used to obtain the corrosion potential (Ec) for the pre-rusty steel and for the samples with deposits of Pt and Ag under conditions of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), demonstrating that this parameter diminishes with the presence of this deposits. (Author)

  18. Welding of austenitic stainless steel with a high molybdenum content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liljas, A.; Holmberg, B.

    1984-01-01

    Welding of austenitic steel is discussed. Welding tests of AVESTA 250 SMO (six percent Mo) are reported. Welding without special additives can make the joints susceptible for corrosion in aggressive environments, e.g. sea water. (L.E.)

  19. Microstructure and mechanical properties of friction stir welded and laser welded high entropy alloy CrMnFeCoNi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Min-Gu; Kim, Han-Jin; Kang, Minjung; Madakashira, Phaniraj P.; Park, Eun Soo; Suh, Jin-Yoo; Kim, Dong-Ik; Hong, Sung-Tae; Han, Heung Nam

    2018-01-01

    The high entropy alloy CrMnFeCoNi has been shown to have promising structural properties. For a new alloy to be used in a structural application it should be weldable. In the present study, friction stir welding (FSW) and laser welding (LW) techniques were used to butt weld thin plates of CrMnFeCoNi. The microstructure, chemical homogeneity and mechanical behavior of the welds were characterized and compared with the base metal. The tensile stress-strain behavior of the welded specimens were reasonable when compared with that of the base metal. FSW refined the grain size in the weld region by a factor of ˜14 when compared with the base metal. High-angle annular dark field transmission electron microscopy in combination with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy showed chemical inhomogeneity between dendritic and interdendritic regions in the fusion zone of LW. Large fluctuations in composition (up to 15 at%) did not change the crystal structure in the fusion zone. Hardness measurements were carried out in the weld cross section and discussed in view of the grain size, low angle grain boundaries and twin boundaries in FSW specimens and the dendritic microstructure in LW specimens.

  20. Predicting of bead undercut defects in high-speed gas metal arc welding (GMAW)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-jing XU; Chuan-song WU; De-gang ZOU

    2008-01-01

    In the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process, when the welding speed reaches a certain threshold, there will be an onset of weld bead undercut defects which limit the further increase of the welding speed. Establishing a mathematical model for high-speed GMAW to predict the tendency of bead undercuts is of great significance to pre-vent such defects. Under the action of various forces, the transferred metal from filler wire to the weld pool, and the geometry and dimension of the pool itself decide if the bead undercut occurs or not. The previous model simpli-fied the pool shape too much. In this paper, based on the actual weld pool geometry and dimension calculated from a numerical model, a hydrostatic model for liquid metal surface is used to study the onset of bead undercut defects in the high-speed welding process and the effects of dif-ferent welding parameters on the bead undercut tendency.

  1. Electrophoretic Deposition of Gallium with High Deposition Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanfei Zhang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, electrophoretic deposition (EPD is reported to form gallium thin film with high deposition rate and low cost while avoiding the highly toxic chemicals typically used in electroplating. A maximum deposition rate of ~0.6 μm/min, almost one order of magnitude higher than the typical value reported for electroplating, is obtained when employing a set of proper deposition parameters. The thickness of the film is shown to increase with deposition time when sequential deposition is employed. The concentration of Mg(NO32, the charging salt, is also found to be a critical factor to control the deposition rate. Various gallium micropatterns are obtained by masking the substrate during the process, demonstrating process compatibility with microfabrication. The reported novel approach can potentially be employed in a broad range of applications with Ga as a raw material, including microelectronics, photovoltaic cells, and flexible liquid metal microelectrodes.

  2. Fracture toughness of welded joints of a high strength low alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veiga, S.M.B. da; Bastian, F.L.; Pope, A.M.

    1985-10-01

    The fracture toughness of the different regions of welded joints of a high strength low alloy steel, Niocor 2, was evaluated at different temperatures and compared with the toughness of the base metal. The studied regions were: the weld metal, fusion boundary and heat affected zone. The welding process used was the manual metal arc. It is shown that the weld metal region has the highest toughness values. (Author) [pt

  3. Weldability prediction of high strength steel S960QL after weld thermal cycle simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dunđer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents weld thermal cycle simulation of high strength steel S960QL, and describes influence of cooling time t8/5 on hardness and impact toughness of weld thermal cycle simulated specimens. Furthermore, it presents analysis of characteristic fractions done by electron scanning microscope which can contribute to determination of welding parameters for S960QL steel.

  4. High-productivity laser deposition welding using powder and wire. Final report of the project 'Higher efficiency of thermal coating plants by a combination of energy sources'; Hochproduktives Laser-Auftragschweissen mit Pulver und Draht. Ergebnisbericht zum Verbundvorhaben ''Wirkungsgradsteigerung thermischer Beschichtungsanlagen durch Energiequellenkombination''. SPRAYNERGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowotny, Steffen (ed.)

    2013-05-01

    Excellent precision, maximum mechanical strength and selective properties of the generated coatings and 3D structures caused a breakthrough of laser deposition welding in industrial production. However, the technology is limited by its low deposition rates in those cases where large-surface components are to be coated while laser-typical corrosion and wear resistance characteristics are to be achieved. Examples are, e.g. hydraulic cylinders for offshore applications, tools for petroleum or gas production and mining, or large-scale conveyors. In these cases, modern laser hybrid technologies open up new applications. By effectively combining the laser energy with other energy sources, e.g. inductive heating, autogenic flames or electric resistance, high deposition rates are achieved with excellent coating qualities, which makes the laser process competitive also in the case of large-surface coatings. (orig./AKB) [German] Exzellente Praezision, hoechste mechanische Festigkeit und massgeschneiderte Eigenschaften von Oberflaechenschichten wie auch generativ erzeugten 3D-Strukturen: diese Merkmale haben dem Auftragschweissen mit Laserstrahlen zum Durchbruch in der industriellen Produktion verholfen. Die geringen Auftragraten setzen der Technologie jedoch in jenen Faellen Grenzen, wo es um Flaechenbeschichtungen grosser Bauteile geht, deren Einsatz aber dennoch die lasertypischen Schichteigenschaften hinsichtlich Korrosions- oder Verschleissbestaendigkeit erfordert. Beispiele sind lange Hydraulikzylinder im Offshore-Bereich, Werkzeuge der Oel- und Gasfoerderung und des Bergbaus sowie grosse Foerderschnecken. Hier erweitern moderne Laser-Hybridtechnologien wirkungsvoll die Einsatzmoeglichkeiten. Durch effiziente Kombination der Laserenergie mit anderen Energiequellen in Form induktiver Erwaermung, autogener Flammen oder elektrischem Widerstand werden hohe Auftragraten bei gleichzeitigem Erhalt der besonderen Schichtqualitaet erreicht, die das Laserverfahren auch bei

  5. Weld Bead Geometry of Ni-Based Alloy Deposited by PTA Process for Pipe Conduction of Shale Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echavarria-Figueroa, C.; García-Vázquez, F.; Ruiz-Mondragón, J.; Hernández-García, H. M.; González-González, D.; Vargas, A.

    The transportation of shale gas has the problem that the piping used for the extraction does not resist the erosion generated by the amount of solids causing cracks over the surface and it is necessary to extend the life of the pipelines. Plasma transferred arc (PTA) welded coatings are used to improve the surface properties of mechanical parts. Therefore, in this paper is studied the use of Ni-based filler metal as weld bead deposits on A36 steel substrates by PTA. In order to determine the suitable conditions to ensure coating quality on the substrate a design of experiments (DOE) was determined. Welding current, feed rate, and travel speed were used as input parameters and the dilution percentage as the response variable. The composition and properties of hardfacing or overlay deposited are strongly influenced by the dilution obtained. Control of dilution is important, where typically low dilution is desirable. When the dilution is low, the final deposit composition will be closer to that of the filler metal, and the wear and corrosion resistance of the hardfacing will also be maintained. To evaluate the features on the weld beads/substrate interface a microstructural characterization was performed by using scanning electron microscopy and to evaluate the mechanical properties was carried out hardness test.

  6. The numerical high cycle fatigue damage model of fillet weld joint under weld-induced residual stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Van Do, Vuong

    2018-04-01

    In this study, a development of nonlinear continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model for multiaxial high cycle fatigue is proposed in which the cyclic plasticity constitutive model has been incorporated in the finite element (FE) framework. T-joint FE simulation of fillet welding is implemented to characterize sequentially coupled three-dimensional (3-D) of thermo-mechanical FE formulation and simulate the welding residual stresses. The high cycle fatigue damage model is then taken account into the fillet weld joints under the various cyclic fatigue load types to calculate the fatigue life considering the residual stresses. The fatigue crack initiation and the propagation in the present model estimated for the total fatigue is compared with the experimental results. The FE results illustrated that the proposed high cycle fatigue damage model in this study could become a powerful tool to effectively predict the fatigue life of the welds. Parametric studies in this work are also demonstrated that the welding residual stresses cannot be ignored in the computation of the fatigue life of welded structures.

  7. Wavelength dependency in high power laser cutting and welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havrilla, David; Ziermann, Stephan; Holzer, Marco

    2012-03-01

    Laser cutting and welding have been around for more than 30 years. Within those three decades there has never been a greater variety of high power laser types and wavelengths to choose from than there is today. There are many considerations when choosing the right laser for any given application - capital investment, cost of ownership, footprint, serviceability, along with a myriad of other commercial & economic considerations. However, one of the most fundamental questions that must be asked and answered is this - "what type of laser is best suited for the application?". Manufacturers and users alike are realizing what, in retrospect, may seem obvious - there is no such thing as a universal laser. In many cases there is one laser type and wavelength that clearly provides the highest quality application results. This paper will examine the application fields of high power, high brightness 10.6 & 1 micron laser welding & cutting and will provide guidelines for selecting the laser that is best suited for the application. Processing speed & edge quality serve as key criteria for cutting. Whereas speed, seam quality & spatter ejection provide the paradigm for welding.

  8. Microstructure, mechanical and corrosion behavior of high strength AA7075 aluminium alloy friction stir welds – Effect of post weld heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vijaya Kumar

    2015-12-01

    It was observed that the hardness and strength of weld were observed to be comparatively high in peak aged (T6 condition but the welds showed poor corrosion resistance. The resistance to pitting corrosion was improved and the mechanical properties were maintained by RRA treatment. The resistance to pitting corrosion was improved in RRA condition with the minimum loss of weld strength.

  9. Thermal Stir Welding of High Strength and High Temperature Alloys for Aerospace Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Keystone and MSU team propose to demonstrate the feasibility of solid-state joining high strength and temperature alloys utilizing the Thermal Stir Welding...

  10. Grain structure, texture and mechanical property evolution of automotive aluminium sheet during high power ultrasonic welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddadi, Farid; Tsivoulas, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    High power ultrasonic spot welding (HPUSW) is a joining technique which is performed within less than a second and provides a more energy-efficient alternative to friction stir spot welding (FSSW), which is considered a longer cycle manufacturing process for joining automotive alloys. To date, only a few reports exist on the deformation mechanisms that take place during high power ultrasonic spot welding. In this work, dynamic recrystallization and grain growth were examined using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). HPUSW causes extensive deformation within the weld zone where the temperature increases to 440 °C. An ultra-fine grain structure was observed in a thin band of flat weld interface within a short welding time of 0.10 s. With increasing welding time the interface was displaced and ‘folds’ or ‘crests’ appeared together with shear bands. The weld interface progressively changed from flat to sinusoidal and eventually to a convoluted wave-like pattern when the tool fully penetrated the workpiece, having a wavelength of ~ 1 mm after 0.40 s. Finally, the microstructure and texture varied significantly depending on the location within the weld. Although the texture near the weld interface was relatively weak, a shift was observed with increasing welding time from an initially Cube-dominated texture to one where the typical β-fibre Brass component prevailed. - Highlights: •Lap shear strength of ~2.9 kN was achieved in 0.30 sec welding time. •Temperature approached 440 °C along the weld centreline for the highest welding time. •The texture near the teeth was dominated by Brass, P and S components at optimum condition. •The weld interface showed typical β-fibre deformation texture at optimum condition.

  11. Grain structure, texture and mechanical property evolution of automotive aluminium sheet during high power ultrasonic welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddadi, Farid, E-mail: farid.haddadi@gmail.com [Clemson University–International Center for Automotive Research (CU-ICAR), #347, 4 Research Drive, Greenville, SC 29607 (United States); School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Tsivoulas, Dimitrios, E-mail: dim.tsivoulas@gmail.com [School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Clean Energy/Nuclear Services, Amec Foster Wheeler, 601 Faraday Street, Birchwood Park, Warrington WA3 6GN (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-15

    High power ultrasonic spot welding (HPUSW) is a joining technique which is performed within less than a second and provides a more energy-efficient alternative to friction stir spot welding (FSSW), which is considered a longer cycle manufacturing process for joining automotive alloys. To date, only a few reports exist on the deformation mechanisms that take place during high power ultrasonic spot welding. In this work, dynamic recrystallization and grain growth were examined using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD). HPUSW causes extensive deformation within the weld zone where the temperature increases to 440 °C. An ultra-fine grain structure was observed in a thin band of flat weld interface within a short welding time of 0.10 s. With increasing welding time the interface was displaced and ‘folds’ or ‘crests’ appeared together with shear bands. The weld interface progressively changed from flat to sinusoidal and eventually to a convoluted wave-like pattern when the tool fully penetrated the workpiece, having a wavelength of ~ 1 mm after 0.40 s. Finally, the microstructure and texture varied significantly depending on the location within the weld. Although the texture near the weld interface was relatively weak, a shift was observed with increasing welding time from an initially Cube-dominated texture to one where the typical β-fibre Brass component prevailed. - Highlights: •Lap shear strength of ~2.9 kN was achieved in 0.30 sec welding time. •Temperature approached 440 °C along the weld centreline for the highest welding time. •The texture near the teeth was dominated by Brass, P and S components at optimum condition. •The weld interface showed typical β-fibre deformation texture at optimum condition.

  12. Welding of nickel free high nitrogen stainless steel: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffi Mohammed

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available High nitrogen stainless steel (HNS is a nickel free austenitic stainless steel that is used as a structural component in defence applications for manufacturing battle tanks as a replacement of the existing armour grade steel owing to its low cost, excellent mechanical properties and better corrosion resistance. Conventional fusion welding causes problems like nitrogen desorption, solidification cracking in weld zone, liquation cracking in heat affected zone, nitrogen induced porosity and poor mechanical properties. The above problems can be overcome by proper selection and procedure of joining process. In the present work, an attempt has been made to correlate the microstructural changes with mechanical properties of fusion and solid state welds of high nitrogen steel. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW, gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW, electron beam welding (EBW and friction stir welding (FSW processes were used in the present work. Optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and electron backscatter diffraction were used to characterize microstructural changes. Hardness, tensile and bend tests were performed to evaluate the mechanical properties of welds. The results of the present investigation established that fully austenitic dendritic structure was found in welds of SMAW. Reverted austenite pools in the martensite matrix in weld zone and unmixed zones near the fusion boundary were observed in GTA welds. Discontinuous ferrite network in austenite matrix was observed in electron beam welds. Fine recrystallized austenite grain structure was observed in the nugget zone of friction stir welds. Improved mechanical properties are obtained in friction stir welds when compared to fusion welds. This is attributed to the refined microstructure consisting of equiaxed and homogenous austenite grains.

  13. Hybrid laser-gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of high strength steel gas transmission pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Ian D.; Norfolk, Mark I. [Edison Welding Institute (EWI), Columbus, Ohio (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Hybrid Laser/arc welding process (HLAW) can complete 5G welds, assure weld soundness, material properties, and an acceptable geometric profile. Combining new lasers and pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW-P) has led to important innovations in the HLAW process, increasing travel speed for successful root pass welding. High power Yb fiber lasers allow a 10 kW laser to be built the size of a refrigerator, allowing portability for use on the pipeline right-of-way. The objective was to develop and apply an innovative HLAW system for mechanized welding of high strength, high integrity, pipelines and develop 5G welding procedures for X80 and X100 pipe, including mechanical testing to API 1104. A cost-matched JIP developed a prototype HLAW head based on a commercially available bug and band system (CRC-Evans P450). Under the US Department of Transportation (DOT) project, the subject of this paper, the system was used to advance pipeline girth welding productivity. External hybrid root pass welding achieved full penetration welds with a 4-mm root at a travel speed of 2.3-m/min. Welds were made 'double down' using laser powers up to 10 kW and travel speeds up to 3-m/min. The final objective of the project was to demonstrate the hybrid LBW/GMAW system under simulated field conditions. (author)

  14. Analysis of the effect of dissimilar welding in a high pressure flare stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdi Ezwan Mahmoud; Mohd Harun; Zaifol Samsu; Norasiah Kasim; Zaiton Selamat; Alahuddin, K.H.

    2010-01-01

    A flare stack is an elevated vertical stack found in a natural gas processing plant, used primarily for combusting waste gases released by pressure relief valves. The materials used for our high pressure flare tip are carbon steel (CS) type A516 Gr. 55 for its lower portion, and stainless steel (SS) 310 for its upper portion. Both were combined into a single unit by arc welding (dissimilar welding), with SS310 as a base metal. After 5 years of operations, few mechanical deformations were observed on the flare stack, along with corrosion deposit on the CS portion of the flare. Detailed analysis shows the presence of toe and shrinkage cracks, along with spheroidization of pearlite in the CS. These are caused by factors such as mismatched welding and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) between the metals. These factors helped exacerbate crack initiation and propagation. Based on the evidence collected, it is recommended that the CS A516 be replaced with SS310. (author)

  15. Ultra high frequency induction welding of powder metal compacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çavdar, Uǧur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The application of the iron based Powder Metal (PM compacts in Ultra High Frequency Induction Welding (UHFIW were reviewed. These PM compacts are used to produce cogs. This study investigates the methods of joining PM materials enforceability with UHFIW in the industry application. Maximum stress and maximum strain of welded PM compacts were determined by three point bending and strength tests. Microhardness and microstructure of induction welded compacts were determined.Soldadura por inducción de ultra alta frecuencia de polvos de metal compactados. Se ha realizado un estudio de la aplicación de polvos de metal (PM de base hierro compactados por soldadura por inducción de ultra alta frecuencia (UHFIW. Estos polvos de metal compactados se utilizan para producir engranajes. Este estudio investiga los métodos de uni.n de los materiales de PM con UHFIW en su aplicación en la industria. La máxima tensión y la máxima deformación de los polvos de metal compactados soldados fueron determinadas por flexión en tres puntos y prueba de resistencia. Se determinó la microdureza y la microestructura de los polvos compactados por soldadura por inducción.

  16. Review of high thickness welding analysis using SYSWELD for a fusion grade reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prakash, Ravi, E-mail: prakash@ipr.res.in; Gangradey, Ranjana, E-mail: ranjana@ipr.res.in

    2013-10-15

    Vacuum vessel and Cryostat for a fusion grade machine are massive structures involving fabrication of chambers with high thickness, about thickness up to 60 mm or more, made of special grade steels. Such machines require accurate planning of welding as the distortions and tolerance levels are stringent. Vacuum vessel of ITER has “D” shaped profile and is toroidal double walled huge steel cage of about 6 m width and 19 m diameter, and the Cryostat of 30 m height and width. The huge vacuum chamber will be fabricated in various parts/sectors due to huge size and then welded with countless weld joints to give the final components. High thickness welding of vacuum vessel is considered to be one of the most important elements in building a reactor of fusion grade due to large ineluctable distortions of welded parts after welding process as it is not easy to correct the large deformations after the welding process and finally the corrections are very expensive. The present paper demonstrates results of welding simulation done using SYSWELD software. Simulation results are of review studies of identified welding process like MIG, MAG, NG-TIG, TIG and EBW for welding large structural D shaped vacuum vessel profile as a case study. Simulation has carried out for SS316LN in clamped as well as unclamped condition for a distortion tolerance of ±2 mm with various weld factors and the local–global approach.

  17. Review of high thickness welding analysis using SYSWELD for a fusion grade reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, Ravi; Gangradey, Ranjana

    2013-01-01

    Vacuum vessel and Cryostat for a fusion grade machine are massive structures involving fabrication of chambers with high thickness, about thickness up to 60 mm or more, made of special grade steels. Such machines require accurate planning of welding as the distortions and tolerance levels are stringent. Vacuum vessel of ITER has “D” shaped profile and is toroidal double walled huge steel cage of about 6 m width and 19 m diameter, and the Cryostat of 30 m height and width. The huge vacuum chamber will be fabricated in various parts/sectors due to huge size and then welded with countless weld joints to give the final components. High thickness welding of vacuum vessel is considered to be one of the most important elements in building a reactor of fusion grade due to large ineluctable distortions of welded parts after welding process as it is not easy to correct the large deformations after the welding process and finally the corrections are very expensive. The present paper demonstrates results of welding simulation done using SYSWELD software. Simulation results are of review studies of identified welding process like MIG, MAG, NG-TIG, TIG and EBW for welding large structural D shaped vacuum vessel profile as a case study. Simulation has carried out for SS316LN in clamped as well as unclamped condition for a distortion tolerance of ±2 mm with various weld factors and the local–global approach

  18. Residual stress in a thick section high strength T-butt weld

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, S.V.; Linton, V.M.; Oliver, E.C.

    2008-01-01

    Residual stresses in a structure are generated as a result of the various fabrication and welding processes used to make the component. Being able to quantify these residual stresses is a key step in determining the continuing integrity of a structure in service. In this work, the residual stresses around a high strength, quenched and tempered steel T-butt web to curved plate weld have been measured using neutron strain scanning. The results show that the residual stresses near the weld were dominated by the welding residual stresses, while the stresses further from the weld were dominated by the bending residual stresses. The results suggest that the combination of welding-induced residual stress and significant pre-welding residual stress, as in the case of a thick bent section of plate can significantly alter the residual stress profile from that in a flat plate

  19. The application of imperialist competitive algorithm for optimization of deposition rate in submerged arc welding process using TiO{sub 2} nano particle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghaderi, Mohammad Reza; Eslampanah, Amirhossein; Ghaderi, Kianoosh [Islamic Azad University, Sanandaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aghakhani, Masood [Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    We used a novel optimization algorithm based on the imperialist competitive algorithm (ICA) to optimize the deposition rate in the submerged arc welding (SAW) process. This algorithm offers some advantages such as simplicity, accuracy and time saving. Experiments were conducted based on a five factor, five level rotatable central composite design (RCCD) to collect welding data for deposition rate as a function of welding current, arc voltage, contact tip to plate distance, welding speed and thickness of TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles coated on the plates of mild steel. Furthermore, regression equation for deposition rate was obtained using least squares method. The regression equation as the cost function was optimized using ICA. Ultimately, the levels of input variables to achieve maximum deposition rate were obtained using ICA. Computational results indicate that the proposed algorithm is quite effective and powerful in optimizing the cost function.

  20. The application of imperialist competitive algorithm for optimization of deposition rate in submerged arc welding process using TiO2 nano particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghaderi, Mohammad Reza; Eslampanah, Amirhossein; Ghaderi, Kianoosh; Aghakhani, Masood

    2015-01-01

    We used a novel optimization algorithm based on the imperialist competitive algorithm (ICA) to optimize the deposition rate in the submerged arc welding (SAW) process. This algorithm offers some advantages such as simplicity, accuracy and time saving. Experiments were conducted based on a five factor, five level rotatable central composite design (RCCD) to collect welding data for deposition rate as a function of welding current, arc voltage, contact tip to plate distance, welding speed and thickness of TiO 2 nanoparticles coated on the plates of mild steel. Furthermore, regression equation for deposition rate was obtained using least squares method. The regression equation as the cost function was optimized using ICA. Ultimately, the levels of input variables to achieve maximum deposition rate were obtained using ICA. Computational results indicate that the proposed algorithm is quite effective and powerful in optimizing the cost function.

  1. Secondary hazards of high power laser beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulmeister, K.; Schmitzer, C.; Duftschmid, K.; Liedl, G.; Schroeder, K.; Schuoecker, D.

    1996-01-01

    Hazardous UV-radiation and short-wavelength visible (blue) light is emitted by the high temperature plasma above the welding-keyhole. Ozone and NO x is produced due to UV-induced photodissociation of oxygen and high temperature gas-phase reactions. Spectral measurements of the plasma emission show that the allowed dose for UV-radiation and blue light exposure per work day can be exceeded in as short as a few seconds. Similarly, measurements and models of the ozone and NO x concentration show that the maximum workplace concentrations might be reached quickly if no appropriate exhaust and filter system is installed. (author)

  2. Manufacturing and use of spiral welded pipes for high pressure service : state of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoop, F.M.; Sommer, B. [Salzgitter GroBrohre GmbH, Salzgitter (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    This paper provided details of an improved helical seam 2-step (HTS) manufacturing process used to produce spiral welded large diameter pipes for high pressure transmission pipelines. During the process, pipe forming is combined with continuous tack welding and internal and external submerged arc welding at separate welding stations. The pipe forming unit consists of a 3 roll bending system with an outside roller cage used to guarantee the roundness of the pipe. The converging strip edges of the pipe are joined using a continuous shielded arc tack weld. Tack welding is done automatically with a laser-guided weld head. Run-out angles are adjusted by an automatic gap control system. The formed and tack-welded pipes are then fed to computer-controlled welding stations for final welding, where each pipe is rotated with a precise screw-like motion. The same welding materials used for the helical seam are used for the skelp end welding. The process offers more precise root gap control, as well as improved pipe geometry. Use of the process has also increased production rates and improved weld stability. The dimensions of the spiral-weld pipes are adjustable so that any diameter can be produced from a base material of the same width. The pipes can also be coated externally with fusion-bonded epoxy or 3-layer polyethylene/polypropylene. It was concluded that the process is being further refined to support the use of HTS pipes in high-pressure pipelines. New nondestructive testing techniques used to assess the performance of the line pipes were presented, as well as the results from hot and cold bending tests, field weldability trials, and tests related to the safety of spiral pipes. 16 refs., 2 tabs., 12 figs.

  3. Laser beam welding of new ultra-high strength and supra-ductile steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-high strength and supra-ductile are entering fields of new applications. Those materials are excellent candidates for modern light-weight construction and functional integration. As ultra-high strength steels the stainless martensitic grade 1.4034 and the bainitic steel UNS 53835 are investigated. For the supra-ductile steels stand two high austenitic steels with 18 and 28 % manganese. As there are no processing windows an approach from the metallurgical base on is required. Adjusting the weld microstructure the Q+P and the QT steels require weld heat treatment. The HSD steel is weldable without. Due to their applications the ultra-high strength steels are welded in as-rolled and strengthened condition. Also the reaction of the weld on hot stamping is reflected for the martensitic grades. The supra-ductile steels are welded as solution annealed and work hardened by 50%. The results show the general suitability for laser beam welding.

  4. GMAW (Gas Metal Arc Welding) process development for girth welding of high strength pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajan, Vaidyanath; Daniel, Joe; Quintana, Marie [The Lincoln Electric Company, Cleveland, OH (United States); Chen, Yaoshan [Center for Reliable Energy Systems (CRES), Dublin, OH (United States); Souza, Antonio [Lincoln Electric do Brasil, Guarulhos, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    This paper highlights some of the results and findings from the first phase of a consolidated program co-funded by US Department of Transportation Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) and Pipeline Research Council Inc (PRCI) to develop pipe weld assessment and qualification methods and optimize X 100 pipe welding technologies. One objective of the program is to establish the range of viable welding options for X 100 line pipe, and define the essential variables to provide welding process control for reliable and consistent mechanical performance of the weldments. In this first phase, a series of narrow gap girth welds were made with pulsed gas metal arc welding (GMAW), instrumented with thermocouples in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal to obtain the associated thermal profiles, and instrumented to measure true energy input as opposed to conventional heat input. Results reveal that true heat input is 16%-22% higher than conventional heat input. The thermal profile measurements correlate very well with thermal model predictions using true energy input data, which indicates the viability of treating the latter as an essential variable. Ongoing microstructural and mechanical testing work will enable validation of an integrated thermal-microstructural model being developed for these applications. Outputs from this model will be used to correlate essential welding process variables with weld microstructure and hardness. This will ultimately enable development of a list of essential variables and the ranges needed to ensure mechanical properties are achieved in practice, recommendations for controlling and monitoring these essential variables and test methods suitable for classification of welding consumables. (author)

  5. The effect of post-weld heat treatment temperature on the microstructure of Inconel 625 deposited metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing, Xixue; Di, Xinjie; Wang, Baosen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Post-weld heat treatment effects on microstructure of deposited metal are studied. • Coarsening of γ′ phase at different post-weld heat treatment temperature is revealed. • Formation of δ phase in deposited metal is a bainite-like transformation process. - Abstract: The effect of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) temperatures on the microstructure of Inconel 625 deposited metal (DM) was examined using an optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The transformation mechanism of the γ ″ → δ phase and the grain growth kinetics of the γ′ phase during PWHT were revealed. The results indicate that the microstructure of as-welded DM is composed of columnar grains of different sizes, of which the average grain size is approximately 160 μm. Certain precipitates, such as the dispersed γ′ phase, blocky MC-type carbide and irregular shape Laves phase, precipitate in the microstructure of the as-welded DM. Compared with as-welded DM, the microstructure of DM after PWHT at 650 °C for 4 h shows minimal variation. With an increase in PWHT temperature, a large number of body-centered tetragonal γ ″ phases precipitate at interdendrite regions in the microstructure of DM after PWHT at 750 °C for 4 h. When the PWHT temperature increases to 850 °C, the metastable γ ″ phase directly transforms into a stable δ phase in shear mode, which exhibits a similar chemical composition but a different crystal structure than the γ ″ phase. At 950 °C, the γ ″ phase and the δ phase disappear, whereas certain M 6 C-type carbides precipitate at the grain boundaries. Alloying elements such as Nb, Mo, Si, Al and Fe in the microstructure of as-welded DM exhibit segregation behavior. Due to an increasing PWHT temperature, the segregation behavior constantly weakens with minimal evolution to the temperature of 750 °C. Above this temperature, partition coefficients tend toward 1, and

  6. The effect of post-weld heat treatment temperature on the microstructure of Inconel 625 deposited metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Xixue [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin University, No.92 Weijin Road, Nankai District, Tianjin 300072 (China); Di, Xinjie, E-mail: dixinjie@tju.edu.cn [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Advanced Joining Technology, Tianjin University, No.92 Weijin Road, Nankai District, Tianjin 300072 (China); Wang, Baosen [Baosteel Research Institute, Baoshan Iron and Steel Co., Ltd., Baoshan District, Shanghai 200431 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Post-weld heat treatment effects on microstructure of deposited metal are studied. • Coarsening of γ′ phase at different post-weld heat treatment temperature is revealed. • Formation of δ phase in deposited metal is a bainite-like transformation process. - Abstract: The effect of post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) temperatures on the microstructure of Inconel 625 deposited metal (DM) was examined using an optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The transformation mechanism of the γ{sup ″} → δ phase and the grain growth kinetics of the γ′ phase during PWHT were revealed. The results indicate that the microstructure of as-welded DM is composed of columnar grains of different sizes, of which the average grain size is approximately 160 μm. Certain precipitates, such as the dispersed γ′ phase, blocky MC-type carbide and irregular shape Laves phase, precipitate in the microstructure of the as-welded DM. Compared with as-welded DM, the microstructure of DM after PWHT at 650 °C for 4 h shows minimal variation. With an increase in PWHT temperature, a large number of body-centered tetragonal γ{sup ″} phases precipitate at interdendrite regions in the microstructure of DM after PWHT at 750 °C for 4 h. When the PWHT temperature increases to 850 °C, the metastable γ{sup ″} phase directly transforms into a stable δ phase in shear mode, which exhibits a similar chemical composition but a different crystal structure than the γ{sup ″} phase. At 950 °C, the γ{sup ″} phase and the δ phase disappear, whereas certain M{sub 6}C-type carbides precipitate at the grain boundaries. Alloying elements such as Nb, Mo, Si, Al and Fe in the microstructure of as-welded DM exhibit segregation behavior. Due to an increasing PWHT temperature, the segregation behavior constantly weakens with minimal evolution to the temperature of 750 °C. Above this temperature, partition coefficients

  7. Microstructure, mechanical properties and microtexture of friction stir welded S690QL high yield steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paillard, Pascal [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, UMR 6205, Polytech Nantes, Site de la Chantrerie, BP 50609, 44306 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Bertrand, Emmanuel, E-mail: emmanuel.bertrand@univ-nantes.fr [Institut des Matériaux Jean Rouxel, UMR 6205, Polytech Nantes, Site de la Chantrerie, BP 50609, 44306 Nantes cedex 3 (France); Allart, Marion; Benoit, Alexandre [Institut de Recherche Technologique Jules Verne, Chemin du Chaffault, 44340 Bouguenais (France); Ruckert, Guillaume [DCNS Research, Technocampus Ocean, 5 rue de l' Halbrane, 44340 Bouguenais (France)

    2016-12-15

    Two try-out campaigns of friction stir welding (FSW) were performed with different friction parameters to join S690QL high yield strength steel. The welds were investigated at macroscopic and microscopic scales using optical and electronic microscopy and microhardness mapping. Welds of the second campaign exhibit microstructures and mechanical properties in accordance with requirements for service use. Microtexture measurements were carried out in different zones of welds by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD). It is shown that that texture of the bottom of the weld is similar to that of the base metal, suggesting a diffusion bonding mechanism. Finally, the mechanical properties (tensile strength, resilience, bending) were established on the most promising welds. It is shown that it is possible to weld this high yield strength steel using FSW process with satisfactory geometric, microstructural and mechanical properties. - Highlights: •1000 mm ∗ 400 mm ∗ 8 mm S690QL steel plates are joined by friction stir welding (FSW). •Maximum hardness is reduced by optimization of process parameters. •Various microstructures are formed but no martensite after process optimization. •Texture is modified in mechanically affected zones of the weld. •Texture in the bottom of the weld is preserved, suggesting diffusion bonding.

  8. Underwater welding using remote controlled robots. Development of remote underwater welding technology with a high power YAG laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miwa, Yasuhiro; Sato, Syuuichi; Kojima, Toshio; Owaki, Katsura; Hirose, Naoya

    2002-01-01

    As components in nuclear power plant have been periodically carried out their inspection and repair to keep their integrity, on radioactive liquid wastes storage facility, because of difficulty on their inspection by human beings, some are remained without inspection, and even when capable of inspection, conversion from human works to remote operations is desired from a viewpoint of their operation efficiency upgrading. For response to these needs, some developments on a technology capable of carrying out inspection of their inside at underwater environment and repairing welding with YAG laser by means of remote operation, have been performed. Remote underwater inspection and repair technology is a combination technology of already applied underwater mobile technique (underwater inspection robot) with underwater YAG laser welding technique which is recently at actual using level. Therefore, this technology is composed of an inspection robot and a repair welding robot. And, testing results using the underwater inspection robot and welding test results using the underwater repair welding robot, were enough preferable to obtain forecasting applicable to actual apparatuses. This technology is especially effective for inspection and repair of inside of nuclear fuel cycle apparatuses and relatively high dose apparatuses, and can be thought to be applicable also to large capacity tanks, tanks dealing with harmful matters, underwater structures, and so on, in general industries. (G.K.)

  9. Characterization of Gas Metal Arc Welding welds obtained with new high Cr–Mo ferritic stainless steel filler wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villaret, V.; Deschaux-Beaume, F.; Bordreuil, C.; Fras, G.; Chovet, C.; Petit, B.; Faivre, L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • New metal cored filler wires for welding 444 grade stainless steel are manufactured. • The effect of Nb and Ti minor elements on the fusion zone properties is investigated. • The relation between composition of fusion zone and grain structure is investigated. • Oxidation rates of fusion zones and base metal are compared. • High temperature behavior of the welded samples are studied. - Abstract: Several compositions of metal cored filler wire were manufactured to define the best welding conditions for homogeneous welding, by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) process, of a modified AISI 444 ferritic stainless steel dedicated to automotive exhaust manifold applications. The patented grade is know under APERAM trade name K44X and has been developed to present improved high temperature fatigue properties. All filler wires investigated contained 19% Cr and 1.8% Mo, equivalent to the base metal K44X chemistry, but various titanium and niobium contents. Chemical analyses and microstructural observations of fusion zones revealed the need of a minimum Ti content of 0.15% to obtain a completely equiaxed grain structure. This structure conferred on the fusion zone a good ductility even in the as-welded state at room temperature. Unfortunately, titanium additions decreased the oxidation resistance at 950 °C if no significant Nb complementary alloying was made. The combined high Ti and Nb additions made it possible to obtain for the welded structure, after optimized heat treatment, high temperature tensile strengths and ductility for the fusion zones and assemblies, rather close to those of the base metal. 950 °C aging heat treatment was necessary to restore significantly the ductility of the as welded structure. Both fusion zone and base metal presented rather homogenized properties. Finally, with the optimized composition of the cored filler wire – 0.3 Ti minimum (i.e. 0.15% in the fusion zone) and high Nb complementary additions, the properties

  10. Study of Dynamic Features of Surface Plasma in High-Power Disk Laser Welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Teng; Gao Xiangdong; Seiji, Katayama; Jin, Xiaoli

    2012-01-01

    High-speed photography was used to obtain the dynamic changes in the surface plasma during a high-power disk laser welding process. A color space clustering algorithm to extract the edge information of the surface plasma region was developed in order to improve the accuracy of image processing. With a comparative analysis of the plasma features, i.e., area and height, and the characteristics of the welded seam, the relationship between the surface plasma and the stability of the laser welding process was characterized, which provides a basic understanding for the real-time monitoring of laser welding.

  11. Effect of pulsed current welding on fatigue behaviour of high strength aluminium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balasubramanian, V.; Ravisankar, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2008-01-01

    High strength aluminium alloys (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys) have gathered wide acceptance in the fabrication of light weight structures requiring high strength-to weight ratio, such as transportable bridge girders, military vehicles, road tankers and railway transport systems. The preferred welding processes of high strength aluminium alloy are frequently gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process due to their comparatively easier applicability and better economy. Weld fusion zones typically exhibit coarse columnar grains because of the prevailing thermal conditions during weld metal solidification. This often results inferior weld mechanical properties and poor resistance to hot cracking. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to refine the fusion zone grains by applying pulsed current welding technique. Rolled plates of 6 mm thickness have been used as the base material for preparing single pass welded joints. Single V butt joint configuration has been prepared for joining the plates. The filler metal used for joining the plates is AA 5356 (Al-5Mg (wt%)) grade aluminium alloy. Four different welding techniques have been used to fabricate the joints and they are: (i) continuous current GTAW (CCGTAW), (ii) pulsed current GTAW (PCGTAW), (iii) continuous current GMAW (CCGMAW) and (iv) pulsed current GMAW (PCGMAW) processes. Argon (99.99% pure) has been used as the shielding gas. Fatigue properties of the welded joints have been evaluated by conducting fatigue test using rotary bending fatigue testing machine. Current pulsing leads to relatively finer and more equi-axed grain structure in gas tungsten arc (GTA) and gas metal arc (GMA) welds. In contrast, conventional continuous current welding resulted in predominantly columnar grain structures. Grain refinement is accompanied by an increase in fatigue life and endurance limit

  12. Welding of high-strength stainless steel 03Kh12N10MT for cryogenic engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovit, A.I.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is being given to weld resistance to cold and hot cracking at 93 and 77K and to mechanical properties of welded joints of high-strength stainless steel 03Kh12N10MT, produced under the fluxes AN-17M, AN-18, AN-26, AN-45, ANF-5, 48-OF-6, ANK-45 and ANK-49 in combination with various welding wires. It is shown that welds on 03Kh12N10MT steel meet the requirements only when using 48-OF-6 or ANK-49 flux. It is noted that impact strength of welds at 77K is sufficiently affected by the volume fraction of non-metallic inclusions in weld metal

  13. Comparative study on laser welding and TIG welding of semi-solid high pressure die cast A356 aluminium alloy

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Govender, G

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available components. The low porosity levels in SSM high pressure die castings (HPDC) improves the weldability of these components. The aim of the current research was to perform a comparative study of laser and TIG welding of SSM HPDC aluminium alloy A356. SSM...

  14. Characterization of magnetically impelled arc butt welded T11 tubes for high pressure applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sivasankari

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetically impelled arc butt (MIAB welding is a pressure welding process used for joining of pipes and tubes with an external magnetic field affecting arc rotation along the tube circumference. In this work, MIAB welding of low alloy steel (T11 tubes were carried out to study the microstructural changes occurring in thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ. To qualify the process for the welding applications where pressure could be up to 300 bar, the MIAB welds are studied with variations of arc current and arc rotation time. It is found that TMAZ shows higher hardness than that in base metal and displays higher weld tensile strength and ductility due to bainitic transformation. The effect of arc current on the weld interface is also detailed and is found to be defect free at higher values of arc currents. The results reveal that MIAB welded samples exhibits good structural property correlation for high pressure applications with an added benefit of enhanced productivity at lower cost. The study will enable the use of MIAB welding for high pressure applications in power and defence sectors.

  15. Plasma ARC Welding of High-Performance-Ship Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-05-01

    welding (EBW) and laser beam welding (LBW). Figure 2 shows examples of PAW keyhole welds using a square butt joint with and without filler metal additions...produced by some manufacturers has reliability problems. f) Existing equipment for initiating and closing out the keyhole is not totally satisfactory and...system for establishing and closing out keyhole craters is necessary. Work is being done by several Investigators, but it is not known L whether any system

  16. Three-Sheet Spot Welding of Advanced High-Strength Steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Friis, Kasper Storgaard; Zhang, W.

    2011-01-01

    The automotive industry has introduced the three-layer weld configuration, which represents new challenges compared to normal two-sheet lap welds. The process is further complicated by introducing high-strength steels in the joint. The present article investigates the weldability of thin, low....... The weld mechanisms are analyzed numerically and compared with metallographic analyses showing how the primary bonding mechanism between the thin, low-carbon steel sheet and the thicker sheet of high-strength steel is solid-state bonding, whereas the two high-strength steels are joined by melting, forming...... a weld nugget at their mutual interface. Despite the absence of the typical fusion nugget through the interface between the low-carbon steel and high-strength steel, the weld strengths obtained are acceptable. The failure mechanism in destructive testing is ductile fracture with plug failure....

  17. Welding robot package; Arc yosetsu robot package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishikawa, S. [Yaskawa Electric Corp., Kitakyushu (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    For the conventional high-speed welding robot, the welding current was controlled mainly for reducing the spatters during short circuits and for stabilizing the beads by the periodic short circuits. However, an increase of deposition amount in response to the speed is required for the high-speed welding. Large-current low-spatter welding current region control was added. Units were integrated into a package by which the arc length is kept in short without dispersion of arc length for welding without defects such as undercut and unequal beads. In automobile industry, use of aluminum parts is extended for the light weight. The welding is very difficult, and automation is not so progressing in spite of the poor environment. Buckling of welding wire is easy to occur, and supply of wire is obstructed by the deposition of chipped powders on the torch cable, which stay within the contact chip resulting in the deposition. Dislocation of locus is easy to occur at the corner of rectangular pipe during the welding. By improving these troubles, an aluminum MIG welding robot package has been developed. 13 figs.

  18. High-power laser and arc welding of thorium-doped iridium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.A.; Liu, C.T.

    1980-05-01

    The arc and laser weldabilities of two Ir-0.3% W alloys containing 60 and 200 wt ppM Th have been investigated. The Ir-.03% W alloy containing 200 wt ppM Th is severely prone to hot cracking during gas tungsten-arc welding. Weld metal cracking results from the combined effects of heat-affected zone liquation cracking and solidification cracking. Scanning electron microscopic analysis of the fractured surface revealed patches of low-melting eutectic. The cracking is influenced to a great extent by the fusion zone microstructure and thorium content. The alloy has been welded with a continuous-wave high-power CO 2 laser system with beam power ranging from 5 to 10 kW and welding speeds of 8 to 25 mm/s. Successful laser welds without hot cracking have been obtained in this particular alloy. This is attributable to the highly concentrated heat source available in the laser beam and the refinement in fusion zone microstructure obtained during laser welding. Efforts to refine the fusion zone structure during gas tungsten-arc welding of Ir-0.3 % W alloy containing 60 wt ppM Th were partially successful. Here transverse arc oscillation during gas tungsten-arc welding refines the fusion zone structure to a certain extent. However, microstructural analysis of this alloy's laser welds indicates further refinement in the fusion zone microstructure than in that from the gas tungsten-arc process using arc oscillations. The fusion zone structure of the laser weld is a strong function of welding speed

  19. Fabrication of electroslag welded Magnox fuel transport flasks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuliani, S.S.

    1979-01-01

    The high weld metal deposition rate of the electroslag welding process offers an attractive method of fabricating nuclear fuel transport flasks from 370 mm (14.5in) thick steel plates. The paper describes pre-production trials carried out on full scale corner-section joints to establish that the weld metal meets the exacting mechanical property requirements for the Nuclear Industry. The paper presents results obtained on welds produced using two base metal compositions and two wires, one recommended for submerged-arc and the other for electroslag welding processes. Details of mechanical tests and metallographic examinations are given which led to the selection of the latter type of wire. It was found that while the weld metal deposited by this process may be sensitive to cracking, this can be avoided by careful selection of welding consumables and sound joints can be obtained under production conditions. (author)

  20. SCC growth behavior of stainless steel weld heat-affected zone in hydrogenated high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takuyo; Terachi, Takumi; Miyamoto, Tomoki; Arioka, Koji

    2010-01-01

    It is known that the SCC growth rate of stainless steels in high-temperature water is accelerated by cold-work (CW). The weld heat-affected-zone (HAZ) of stainless steels is also deformed by weld shrinkage. However, only little have been reported on the SCC growth of weld HAZ of SUS316 and SUS304 in hydrogenated high-temperature water. Thus, in this present study, SCC growth experiments were performed using weld HAZ of stainless steels, especially to obtain data on the dependence of SCC growth on (1) temperature and (2) hardness in hydrogenated water at temperatures from 250degC to 340degC. And then, the SCC growth behaviors were compared between weld HAZ and CW stainless steels. The following results have been obtained. Significant SCC growth were observed in weld HAZ (SUS316 and SUS304) in hydrogenated water at 320degC. The SCC growth rates of the HAZ are similar to that of 10% CW non-sensitized SUS316, in accordance with that the hardness of weld HAZ is also similar to that of 10% CW SUS316. Temperature dependency of SCC growth of weld HAZ (SUS316 and SUS304) is also similar to that of 10% CW non-sensitized SUS316. That is, no significant SCC were observed in the weld HAZ (SUS316 and SUS304) in hydrogenated water at 340degC. This suggests that SCC growth behaviors of weld HAZ and CW stainless steels are similar and correlated with the hardness or yield strength of the materials, at least in non-sensitized regions. And the similar temperature dependence between the HAZ and CW stainless steels suggests that the SCC growth behaviors are also attributed to the common mechanism. (author)

  1. Evaluation of the AISI 904L Alloy Weld Overlays Obtained by GMAW and Electro-Slag Welding Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Jorge C. F.; Meira, O. G.; Madalena, F. C. A.; de Souza, L. F. G.; Araujo, L. S.; Mendes, M. C.

    2017-05-01

    The use of superaustenitic stainless steels (SASS) as an overlay replacement for nickel-based alloys can be an interesting alternative for the oil and gas industries, due to its lower cost, when compared to superalloys. Usually, the deposition is made with several welding passes by using conventional arc welding processes, such as gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) or gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. In this respect, electro-slag welding (ESW), which promotes high heat inputs and low dilution of the welds, can also be attractive for this application, as it provides a higher productivity, once only one layer is needed for the deposition of the minimum thickness required. The present work evaluates the behavior of an AISI 904L SASS weld overlay deposited on a carbon steel ASTM A516 Grade 70 by ESW and GMAW processes. Both as-welded and heat-treated conditions were evaluated and compared. A multipass welding by GMAW process with three layers and 48 passes was performed on 12.5 × 200 × 250 mm steel plates with average welding energy of 1.0 kJ/mm. For ESW process, only one layer was deposited on 50 × 400 × 400 mm steel plates with average welding energy of 11.7 kJ/mm. After welding, a post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) at 620 °C for 10 h was performed in half of the steel plate, in order to allow the comparison between this condition and the as-welded one. For both processes, the austenitic microstructure of the weld deposits was characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with electron backscatter diffraction. A low proportion of secondary phases were observed in all conditions, and the PWHT did not promote significant changes on the hardness profile. Martensite for GMAW process and bainite for ESW process were the microstructural constituents observed at the coarse grain heat-affected zone, due to the different cooling rates. For ESW process, no evidences of partially diluted zones were found. As a consequence of the microstructural

  2. The characteristic investigation on narrow-gap TIG weld joint of heavy wall austenitic stainless steel pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Deog Nam; Jung, In Cheol

    2003-01-01

    Although Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW or TIG welding) is considered as high quality and precision welding process, it also has demerit of low melting rate. Narrow-gap TIG welding which has narrow joint width reduces the groove volume remarkably, so it could be shorten the welding time and decrease the overall shrinkage in heavy wall pipe welding. Generally narrow-gap TIG welding is used as orbital welding process, it is important to select the optimum conditions for the automatic control welding. This paper looks at the application and metallurgical properties on narrow-gap TIG welding joint of heavy wall large austenitic stainless steel pipe to determine the deposition efficiency, the resultant shrinkage and fracture toughness. The fracture toughness depends slightly on the welding heat input

  3. Combined PIXE and X-ray SEM studies on time-resolved deposits of welding shop aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barfoot, K.M.; Mitchell, I.V.; Verheyen, F.; Babeliowsky, T.

    1981-01-01

    Time-resolved deposits of welding shop air particulates have been obtained using a streak sampling system. PIXE analysis of these deposits, using 2 MeV protons, typically revealed the presence of a large number of elements, with many in the range Z = 11-30. Strong variations, up to three orders of magnitude, in the concentrations of several elements such as Al, Si and Fe as well as Zn, Na, K and Ca were found. The 2 h sampling resolution normally used was found to be insufficient to follow the short pollution episodes that regularly occur in a welding shop environment and so sampling with a 20 min resolution was used. The variation of elemental concentrations for different sampling times together with information on the physical nature of these air particulates, determined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Si(Li) X-ray detector attachment, are presented. This type of information together with that obtained from the PIXE analysis is of importance industrial hygiene studies. The need to make corrections for partial filter clogging, based on air-flow rate monitoring, is discussed. (orig.)

  4. The mechanical properties of high speed GTAW weld and factors of nonlinear multiple regression model under external transverse magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lin; Chang, Yunlong; Li, Yingmin; He, Youyou

    2013-05-01

    A transverse magnetic field was introduced to the arc plasma in the process of welding stainless steel tubes by high-speed Tungsten Inert Gas Arc Welding (TIG for short) without filler wire. The influence of external magnetic field on welding quality was investigated. 9 sets of parameters were designed by the means of orthogonal experiment. The welding joint tensile strength and form factor of weld were regarded as the main standards of welding quality. A binary quadratic nonlinear regression equation was established with the conditions of magnetic induction and flow rate of Ar gas. The residual standard deviation was calculated to adjust the accuracy of regression model. The results showed that, the regression model was correct and effective in calculating the tensile strength and aspect ratio of weld. Two 3D regression models were designed respectively, and then the impact law of magnetic induction on welding quality was researched.

  5. MAG narrow gap welding - an economic way to minimize welding expenses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kast, W.; Scholz, E.; Weyland, F.

    1982-01-01

    The thicker structural components are, the more important it is to take measures to reduce the volume of the weld. The welding process requiring the smallest possible weld section is the so-called narrow gap process. In submerged arc narrow gap welding as well as in MAG narrow gap welding different variants are imaginable, some of them already in practical use. With regard to efficiency and weld quality an optimum variant of the MAG narrow gap welding process is described. It constitutes a two wire system in which two wire electrodes of 1.2 mm diameter are arranged one behind the other. In order to avoid lack of fusion, the wire guides are slightly pointed towards each groove face. Thus, by inclining the two arcs burning one behind the other in the direction of weld progress, it is achieved that two separately solidifying weld pools and two beads per layer are simultaneously formed. Welding parameters are selected in such a way that a heat input of 16-20 kJ/cm and a deposition rate of 11-16 kgs/h are obtained. In spite of this comparatively high deposition rate, good impact values are found both in the weld and HAZ (largely reduced coarse-grain zone) which is due to an optimum weld build-up. With the available welding equipment the process can be applied to structural members having a thickness of 40-400 mm. The width of gap is 13 mm (root section) with a bevel angle of 1 0 . As filler metal, basic flux-cored wires are used which, depending on the base metal to be welded and the required tensile properties, can be of the Mn-, MnMo-, MnCrMo-, MnNi-, or MnNiMo-alloyed types. (orig.)

  6. Pressure Resistance Welding of High Temperature Metallic Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jerred, N.; Zirker, L.; Charit, I.; Cole, J.; Frary, M.; Butt, D.; Meyer, M.; Murty, K.L.

    2010-01-01

    Pressure Resistance Welding (PRW) is a solid state joining process used for various high temperature metallic materials (Oxide dispersion strengthened alloys of MA957, MA754; martensitic alloy HT-9, tungsten etc.) for advanced nuclear reactor applications. A new PRW machine has been installed at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls for conducting joining research for nuclear applications. The key emphasis has been on understanding processing-microstructure-property relationships. Initial studies have shown that sound joints can be made between dissimilar materials such as MA957 alloy cladding tubes and HT-9 end plugs, and MA754 and HT-9 coupons. Limited burst testing of MA957/HT-9 joints carried out at various pressures up to 400 C has shown encouraging results in that the joint regions do not develop any cracking. Similar joint strength observations have also been made by performing simple bend tests. Detailed microstructural studies using SEM/EBSD tools and fatigue crack growth studies of MA754/HT-9 joints are ongoing.

  7. Use of pre-pulse in laser spot welding of materials with high optical reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mys, Ihor; Geiger, Manfred

    2003-11-01

    Laser micro welding has become a standard manufacturing technique, particularly in industry sectors, such as automotive and aerospace electronics or medical devices, where the requirements for strength, miniaturization and temperature resistance are constantly rising. So far the use of laser micro welding is limited due to the fluctuation of the quality of the welded joints, because the welding results for material with high optical reflection and thermal conductivity, such as copper and copper alloys, depend very strongly on the condition of the material surface. This paper presents investigations on the use of a laser pre-pulse in spot welding of electronic materials with Nd:YAG laser. In order to achieve reproducible joining results two strategies are followed-up. The first one utilizes a reflection-based process control for measuring the reflection during the short pre-pulse. The intensity of the reflected light is used to calculate an appropriated welding pulse power, which corresponds to the measured relative absorption. Adjustment of laser parameters according to the condition of the surface is done in real time before laser main pulse. A second possibility for the stabilization of copper welding is the employment of a short and powerful laser pre-pulse before laser main pulse. This pre-pulse affects the workpiece surface and creates more reproducible absorption conditions for the main pulse, independent from the initial situation on material surface.

  8. Perspective: Highly stable vapor-deposited glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ediger, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    This article describes recent progress in understanding highly stable glasses prepared by physical vapor deposition and provides perspective on further research directions for the field. For a given molecule, vapor-deposited glasses can have higher density and lower enthalpy than any glass that can be prepared by the more traditional route of cooling a liquid, and such glasses also exhibit greatly enhanced kinetic stability. Because vapor-deposited glasses can approach the bottom of the amorphous part of the potential energy landscape, they provide insights into the properties expected for the "ideal glass." Connections between vapor-deposited glasses, liquid-cooled glasses, and deeply supercooled liquids are explored. The generality of stable glass formation for organic molecules is discussed along with the prospects for stable glasses of other types of materials.

  9. Main alloy elements in covered electrodes in terms of the amount of oxygen in weld metal deposits (WMD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Węgrzyn

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available There were investigated properties of WMD, especially metallographic structure, toughness and fatigue strength of welds with various oxygen amount. The connection between the properties of welds with the content of oxygen in WMD were carried out. The research results indicate that it should be limited oxygen content in steel welds. Subsequent researchers could find more precisely the most beneficial oxygen amount in the welds in terms of the amount of acicular ferrite in welds.

  10. High temperature corrosion studies on friction-welded dissimilar metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivazhagan, N.; Singh, Surendra; Prakash, Satya; Reddy, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding the behaviour of weldment at elevated temperatures and especially their corrosion behaviour has become an object of scientific investigation recently. Investigation has been carried out on friction-welded AISI 4140 and AISI 304 under molten salt of Na 2 SO 4 + V 2 O 5 (60%) environment at 500 and 550 deg. C under cyclic condition. The influences of welding parameters on the hot corrosion have been discussed. The resulting oxide scales in the weldment have been characterized systematically using surface analytical techniques. Scale thickness on low alloy steel side was found to be more and was prone to spalling. Weld region has been found to be more prone to degradation than base metals due to inter diffusion of element across the interface and the formation of intermetallic compound

  11. High temperature corrosion studies on friction-welded dissimilar metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arivazhagan, N. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India)]. E-mail: arivadmt@iitr.ernet.in; Singh, Surendra [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Prakash, Satya [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India); Reddy, G.M. [Defense Metallurgical and Research Laboratory, Hyderabad (India)

    2006-07-25

    Understanding the behaviour of weldment at elevated temperatures and especially their corrosion behaviour has become an object of scientific investigation recently. Investigation has been carried out on friction-welded AISI 4140 and AISI 304 under molten salt of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} + V{sub 2}O{sub 5} (60%) environment at 500 and 550 deg. C under cyclic condition. The influences of welding parameters on the hot corrosion have been discussed. The resulting oxide scales in the weldment have been characterized systematically using surface analytical techniques. Scale thickness on low alloy steel side was found to be more and was prone to spalling. Weld region has been found to be more prone to degradation than base metals due to inter diffusion of element across the interface and the formation of intermetallic compound.

  12. Elucidation of Metallic Plume and Spatter Characteristics Based on SVM During High-Power Disk Laser Welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Xiangdong; Liu Guiqian

    2015-01-01

    During deep penetration laser welding, there exist plume (weak plasma) and spatters, which are the results of weld material ejection due to strong laser heating. The characteristics of plume and spatters are related to welding stability and quality. Characteristics of metallic plume and spatters were investigated during high-power disk laser bead-on-plate welding of Type 304 austenitic stainless steel plates at a continuous wave laser power of 10 kW. An ultraviolet and visible sensitive high-speed camera was used to capture the metallic plume and spatter images. Plume area, laser beam path through the plume, swing angle, distance between laser beam focus and plume image centroid, abscissa of plume centroid and spatter numbers are defined as eigenvalues, and the weld bead width was used as a characteristic parameter that reflected welding stability. Welding status was distinguished by SVM (support vector machine) after data normalization and characteristic analysis. Also, PCA (principal components analysis) feature extraction was used to reduce the dimensions of feature space, and PSO (particle swarm optimization) was used to optimize the parameters of SVM. Finally a classification model based on SVM was established to estimate the weld bead width and welding stability. Experimental results show that the established algorithm based on SVM could effectively distinguish the variation of weld bead width, thus providing an experimental example of monitoring high-power disk laser welding quality. (plasma technology)

  13. Effect of Microstructure on Stress Corrosion Cracking Behaviour of High Nitrogen Stainless Steel Gas Tungsten Arc Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Srinivasa Rao, K.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2018-03-01

    Present work is aimed to improve stress corrosion cracking resistance of high nitrogen steel and its welds. An attempt to weld high nitrogen steel of 5 mm thick plate using gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) with three high strength age hardenable fillers i.e., 11-10 PH filler, PH 13- 8Mo and maraging grade of MDN 250 filler is made. Welds were characterized by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Vickers hardness testing of the welds was carried out to study the mechanical behaviour of welds. Potentio-dynamic polarization studies were done to determine pitting corrosion resistance in aerated 3.5% NaCl solution. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) testing was carried out using constant load type machine with applied stress of 50% yield strength and in 45% MgCl2 solution boiling at 155°C. The results of the present investigation established that improvement in resistance to stress corrosion cracking was observed for PH 13- 8Mo GTA welds when compared to 11-10 PH and MDN 250 GTA welds. However, All GTA welds failed in the weld interface region. This may be attributed to relatively lower pitting potential in weld interface which acts as active site and the initiation source of pitting.

  14. A Field Study on the Respiratory Deposition of the Nano-Sized Fraction of Mild and Stainless Steel Welding Fume Metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cena, L G; Chisholm, W P; Keane, M J; Chen, B T

    2015-01-01

    A field study was conducted to estimate the amount of Cr, Mn, and Ni deposited in the respiratory system of 44 welders in two facilities. Each worker wore a nanoparticle respiratory deposition (NRD) sampler during gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of mild and stainless steel and flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) of mild steel. Several welders also wore side-by-side NRD samplers and closed-face filter cassettes for total particulate samples. The NRD sampler estimates the aerosol's nano-fraction deposited in the respiratory system. Mn concentrations for both welding processes ranged 2.8-199 μg/m3; Ni concentrations ranged 10-51 μg/m3; and Cr concentrations ranged 40-105 μg/m3. Cr(VI) concentrations ranged between 0.5-1.3 μg/m3. For the FCAW process the largest concentrations were reported for welders working in pairs. As a consequence this often resulted in workers being exposed to their own welding fumes and to those generated from the welding partner. Overall no correlation was found between air velocity and exposure (R2 = 0.002). The estimated percentage of the nano-fraction of Mn deposited in a mild-steel-welder's respiratory system ranged between 10 and 56%. For stainless steel welding, the NRD samplers collected 59% of the total Mn, 90% of the total Cr, and 64% of the total Ni. These results indicate that most of the Cr and more than half of the Ni and Mn in the fumes were in the fraction smaller than 300 nm.

  15. High Strain Rate Testing of Welded DOP-26 Iridium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneibel, J. H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, R. G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carmichael, C. A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Fox, E. E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ulrich, G. B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, E. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The iridium alloy DOP-26 is used to produce Clad Vent Set cups that protect the radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) which provide electric power for spacecraft and rovers. In a previous study, the tensile properties of DOP-26 were measured over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures and reported in ORNL/TM-2007/81. While that study established the properties of the base material, the fabrication of the heat sources requires welding, and the mechanical properties of welded DOP-26 have not been extensively characterized in the past. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine the mechanical properties of DOP-26 specimens containing a transverse weld in the center of their gage sections. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature, 750, 900, and 1090°C and engineering strain rates of 1×10-3 and 10 s-1. Room temperature testing was performed in air, while testing at elevated temperatures was performed in a vacuum better than 1×10-4 Torr. The welded specimens had a significantly higher yield stress, by up to a factor of ~2, than the non-welded base material. The yield stress did not depend on the strain rate except at 1090°C, where it was slightly higher for the faster strain rate. The ultimate tensile stress, on the other hand, was significantly higher for the faster strain rate at temperatures of 750°C and above. At 750°C and above, the specimens deformed at 1×10-3 s-1 showed pronounced necking resulting sometimes in perfect chisel-edge fracture. The specimens deformed at 10 s-1 exhibited this fracture behavior only at the highest test temperature, 1090°C. Fracture occurred usually in the fusion zone of the weld and was, in most cases, primarily intergranular.

  16. Effect of composition on corrosion resistance of high-alloy austenitic stainless steel weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, P.I.; Gooch, T.G.

    1993-01-01

    The corrosion resistance of stainless steel weld metal in the ranges of 17 to 28% chromium (Cr), 6 to 60% nickel (Ni), 0 to 9% molybdenum (Mo), and 0.0 to 0.37% nitrogen (N) was examined. Critical pitting temperatures were determined in ferric chloride (FeCl 3 ). Passive film breakdown potentials were assessed from potentiodynamic scans in 3% sodium chloride (NaCl) at 50 C. Potentiodynamic and potentiostatic tests were carried out in 30% sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ) ar 25 C, which was representative of chloride-free acid media of low redox potential. Metallographic examination and microanalysis were conducted on the test welds. Because of segregation of alloying elements, weld metal pitting resistance always was lower than that of matching composition base steel. The difference increased with higher Cr, Mo, and N contents. Segregation also reduced resistance to general corrosion in H 2 SO 4 , but the effect relative to the base steel was less marked than with chloride pitting. Segregation of Cr, Mo, and N in fully austenitic deposits decreased as the Ni' eq- Cr' eq ratio increased. Over the compositional range studied, weld metal pitting resistance was dependent mainly on Mo content and segregation. N had less effect than in wrought alloys. Both Mo and N enhanced weld metal corrosion resistance in H 2 SO 4

  17. Welding of nickel free high nitrogen stainless steel: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    OpenAIRE

    Raffi Mohammed; G. Madhusudhan Reddy; K. Srinivasa Rao

    2017-01-01

    High nitrogen stainless steel (HNS) is a nickel free austenitic stainless steel that is used as a structural component in defence applications for manufacturing battle tanks as a replacement of the existing armour grade steel owing to its low cost, excellent mechanical properties and better corrosion resistance. Conventional fusion welding causes problems like nitrogen desorption, solidification cracking in weld zone, liquation cracking in heat affected zone, nitrogen induced porosity and poo...

  18. Real-time monitoring of laser welding of galvanized high strength steel in lap joint configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Fanrong; Ma, Junjie; Carlson, Blair; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2012-10-01

    Two different cases regarding the zinc coating at the lap joint faying surface are selected for studying the influence of zinc vapor on the keyhole dynamics of the weld pool and the final welding quality. One case has the zinc coating fully removed at the faying surface; while the other case retains the zinc coating on the faying surface. It is found that removal of the zinc coating at the faying surface produces a significantly better weld quality as exemplified by a lack of spatters whereas intense spatters are present when the zinc coating is present at the faying surface. Spectroscopy is used to detect the optical spectra emitted from a laser generated plasma plume during the laser welding of galvanized high strength DP980 steel in a lap-joint configuration. A correlation between the electron temperature and defects within the weld bead is identified by using the Boltzmann plot method. The laser weld pool keyhole dynamic behavior affected by a high-pressure zinc vapor generated at the faying surface of galvanized steel lap-joint is monitored in real-time by a high speed charge-coupled device (CCD) camera assisted with a green laser as an illumination source.

  19. Microstructure Characterization of Fiber Laser Welds of S690QL High-Strength Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baoming; Xu, Peiquan; Lu, Fenggui; Gong, Hongying; Cui, Haichao; Liu, Chuangen

    2018-02-01

    The use of fiber laser welding to join S690QL steels has attracted interest in the field of construction and assembly. Herein, 13-mm-thick S690QL welded joints were obtained without filler materials using the fiber laser. The as-welded microstructures and the impact energies of the joints were characterized and measured using electron microscopy in conjunction with high-resolution transmission electron images, X-ray diffraction, and impact tests. The results indicated that a single-sided welding technique could be used to join S690QL steels up to a thickness of 12 mm (fail to fuse the joint in the root) when the laser power is equal to 12 kW (scan speed 1 m/min). Double-side welding technique allows better weld penetration and better control of heat distribution. Observation of the samples showed that the fusion zone exhibited bainitic and martensitic microstructures with increased amounts of martensites (Ms) compared with the base materials. Also, the grains in the fusion zone increased in coarseness as the heat input was increased. The fusion zone exhibited increased hardness (397 HV0.2) while exhibiting a simultaneous decrease in the impact toughness. The maximum impact energy value of 26 J was obtained from the single-side-welded sample, which is greater than those obtained from the double-side-welded samples (maximum of 18 J). Many more dislocations and plastic deformations were found in the fusion zone than the heat-affected zone in the joint, which hardened the joints and lowered the impact toughness. The microstructures characterized by FTEM-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer also exhibited laths of M, as well as stacking faults and dislocations featuring high-density, interfacial structure ledges that occur between the high-angle grain boundaries and the M and bainite.

  20. High-cycle fatigue properties of small-bore socket-welded pipe joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maekawa, Akira; Noda, Michiyasu; Suzuki, Michiaki

    2009-01-01

    Piping and equipment in nuclear power plants are structures including many welded joints. Reliability of welded joints is one of high-priority issues to improve the safety of nuclear power plants. However, occurrence of fatigue failures in small-bore socket-welded pipe joints by high-cycle vibrations is still reported. In this study, fatigue experiments on a socket-welded joint of austenitic stainless steel pipe was conducted under excitation conditions similar to those in actual plants to investigate vibration characteristics and fatigue strength. It was found that the natural frequency of pipe with socket-welded joint gradually decreased as fatigue damage developed, according to the Miner rule for fatigue life evaluation. The results indicate that the fatigue life of the welded pipe joint could be estimated by monitoring the decreasing ratio of the natural frequency of the pipe. The evaluation of decreasing ratio of the natural frequency in addition to fatigue damage evaluation by the Miner rule could enhance the accuracy of fatigue life evaluation. (author)

  1. Silicic, high- to extremely high-grade ignimbrites and associated deposits from the Paraná Magmatic Province, southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchetti, Ana Carolina F.; Nardy, Antonio J. R.; Madeira, José

    2018-04-01

    The Cretaceous trachydacites and dacites of Chapecó type (ATC) and dacites and rhyolites of Palmas type (ATP) make up 2.5% of the 800.000 km3 of volcanic pile in the Paraná Magmatic Province (PMP), emplaced at the onset of Gondwana breakup. Together they cover extensive areas in southern Brazil, overlapping volcanic sequences of tholeiitic basalts and andesites; occasional mafic units are also found within the silicic sequence. In the central region of the PMP silicic volcanism comprises porphyritic ATC-type, trachydacite high-grade ignimbrites (strongly welded) overlying aphyric ATP-type, rhyolite high- to extremely high-grade ignimbrites (strongly welded to lava-like). In the southwestern region strongly welded to lava-like high-grade ignimbrites overlie ATP lava domes, while in the southeast lava domes are found intercalated within the ignimbrite sequence. Characteristics of these ignimbrites are: widespread sheet-like deposits (tens to hundreds of km across); absence of basal breccias and basal fallout layers; ubiquitous horizontal to sub-horizontal sheet jointing; massive, structureless to horizontally banded-laminated rock bodies locally presenting flow folding; thoroughly homogeneous vitrophyres or with flow banding-lamination; phenocryst abundance presenting upward and lateral decrease; welded glass blobs in an 'eutaxitic'-like texture; negligible phenocryst breakage; vitroclastic texture locally preserved; scarcity of lithic fragments. These features, combined with high eruption temperatures (≥ 1000 °C), low water content (≤ 2%) and low viscosities (104-7 Pa s) suggest that the eruptions were characterized by low fountaining, little heat loss during collapse, and high mass fluxes producing extensive deposits.

  2. Creep Strength of Dissimilar Welded Joints Using High B-9Cr Steel for Advanced USC Boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabuchi, Masaaki; Hongo, Hiromichi; Abe, Fujio

    2014-10-01

    The commercialization of a 973 K (700 °C) class pulverized coal power system, advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) pressure power generation, is the target of an ongoing research project initiated in Japan in 2008. In the A-USC boiler, Ni or Ni-Fe base alloys are used for high-temperature parts at 923 K to 973 K (650 °C to 700 °C), and advanced high-Cr ferritic steels are planned to be used at temperatures lower than 923 K (650 °C). In the dissimilar welds between Ni base alloys and high-Cr ferritic steels, Type IV failure in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) is a concern. Thus, the high B-9Cr steel developed at the National Institute for Materials Science, which has improved creep strength in weldments, is a candidate material for the Japanese A-USC boiler. In the present study, creep tests were conducted on the dissimilar welded joints between Ni base alloys and high B-9Cr steels. Microstructures and creep damage in the dissimilar welded joints were investigated. In the HAZ of the high B-9Cr steels, fine-grained microstructures were not formed and the grain size of the base metal was retained. Consequently, the creep rupture life of the dissimilar welded joints using high B-9Cr steel was 5 to 10 times longer than that of the conventional 9Cr steel welded joints at 923 K (650 °C).

  3. High-Speed Friction Stir Welding of AA7075-T6 Sheet: Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, Micro-texture, and Thermal History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyi; Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2018-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a cost-effective and high-quality joining process for aluminum alloys (especially heat-treatable alloys) that is historically operated at lower joining speeds (up to hundreds of millimeters per minute). In this study, we present a microstructural analysis of friction stir welded AA7075-T6 blanks with high welding speeds up to 3 M/min. Textures, microstructures, mechanical properties, and weld quality are analyzed using TEM, EBSD, metallographic imaging, and Vickers hardness. The higher welding speed results in narrower, stronger heat-affected zones (HAZs) and also higher hardness in the nugget zones. The material flow direction in the nugget zone is found to be leaning towards the welding direction as the welding speed increases. Results are coupled with welding parameters and thermal history to aid in the understanding of the complex material flow and texture gradients within the welds in an effort to optimize welding parameters for high-speed processing.

  4. Development and application of high-precision laser welding technology for manufacturing Ti alloy frames of glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. S.; Yang, M. S.; Kim, W. K.; Lee, D. Y.; Kim, J. M.; Leem, B. C.; Shin, J. S.; Lee, D. H.

    1999-12-01

    The research and development efforts of the high precision laser welding technology for manufacturing titanium alloy frames of glasses. For this purpose, laser welding device with the high beam quality is designed and fabricated, which consists of a optical fiber transmission part, a welding monitoring part and a welding controller. The welding nozzle and holding fixtures for manufacturing titanium and shape memory alloy frames of glasses. Titanium and shape memory alloy frames of glasses to be developed were experimentally manufactured by utilizing the laser welding using the optical fiber of GI 400 μm. As a result, the seam welding with the bead width of 0.3 mm or less and the weld penetration of 0.3-0.4mm could be accomplished. The fundamental technology was established through design of welding jigs with a variety of configurations and adequate welding conditions. Also, for the purpose to enable the companies participating in this project to commercialize the developed technology acceleratedly, a training program for the engineers belonging to such companies was conducted along with the technology transfer through joint experiments with the engineers. (author)

  5. SCC growth behavior of stainless steel weld metals in high-temperature water. Influence of corrosion potential, weld type, thermal aging, cold-work and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takuyo; Terachi, Takumi; Miyamoto, Tomoki; Arioka, Koji

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies on crack growth rate measurement in oxygenated high-temperature pure water conditions, such as normal water chemistry in boiling water reactors, using compact tension type specimens have shown that weld stainless steels are susceptible to stress corrosion cracking. However, to our knowledge, there is no crack growth data of weld stainless steels in pressurized water reactor primary water. The principal purpose of this study was to examine the SCC growth behavior of stainless steel weld metals in simulated PWR primary water. A second objective was to examine the effect of (1) corrosion potential, (2) thermal-aging, (3) Mo in alloy and (4) cold-working on SCC growth in hydrogenated and oxygenated water environments at 320degC. In addition, the temperature dependence of SCC growth in simulated PWR primary water was also studied. The results were as follows: (1) No significant SCC growth was observed on all types of stainless steel weld metals: as-welded, aged (400degC x 10 kh) 308L and 316L, in 2.7 ppm-hydrogenated (low-potential) water at 320degC. (2) 20% cold-working markedly accelerated the SCC growth of weld metals in high-potential water at 320degC, but no significant SCC growth was observed in the hydrogenated water, even after 20% cold-working. (3) No significant SCC growth was observed on stainless steel weld metals in low-potential water at 250degC and 340degC. Thus, stainless steel weld metals have excellent SCC resistance in PWR primary water. On the other hand, (4) significant SCC growth was observed on all types of stainless steel weld metals: as-weld, aged (400degC x 10 kh) and 20% cold-worked 308L and 316L, in 8 ppm-oxygenated (high-potential) water at 320degC. (5) No large difference in SCC growth was observed between 316L (Mo) and 308L. (6) No large effect on SCC growth was observed between before and after aging up to 400degC for 10 kh. (7) 20% cold-working markedly accelerated the SCC growth of stainless steel weld metals. (author)

  6. Characterization of duplex stainless steel weld metals obtained by hybrid plasma-gas metal arc welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koray Yurtisik

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Despite its high efficiency, autogenous keyhole welding is not well-accepted for duplex stainless steels because it causes excessive ferrite in as-welded duplex microstructure, which leads to a degradation in toughness and corrosion properties of the material. Combining the deep penetration characteristics of plasma arc welding in keyhole mode and metal deposition capability of gas metal arc welding, hybrid plasma - gas metal arc welding process has considered for providing a proper duplex microstructure without compromising the welding efficiency. 11.1 mm-thick standard duplex stainless steel plates were joined in a single-pass using this novel technique. Same plates were also subjected to conventional gas metal arc and plasma arc welding processes, providing benchmarks for the investigation of the weldability of the material. In the first place, the hybrid welding process enabled us to achieve less heat input compared to gas metal arc welding. Consequently, the precipitation of secondary phases, which are known to be detrimental to the toughness and corrosion resistance of duplex stainless steels, was significantly suppressed in both fusion and heat affected zones. Secondly, contrary to other keyhole techniques, proper cooling time and weld metal chemistry were achieved during the process, facilitating sufficient reconstructive transformation of austenite in the ferrite phase.

  7. Comparison of laser welds in thick section S700 high-strength steel manufactured in flat (1G) and horizontal (2G) positions

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Wei; Liu, Qiang; Francis, John Anthony; Crowther, Dave; Thompson, Alan; Liu, Zhu; Li, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Lack of penetration, undercut and melt sagging are common welding defects for single-pass laser welds in thick plates, particularly when using a traditional 1G welding position (laser directed towards ground). This investigation shows, for the first time, that welding 13 mm thick high-strength S700 steel plates in the 2G position (laser beam perpendicular to the direction of gravity) can mitigate some of the common welding defects including undercut and sagging. A computational fluid dynamic ...

  8. Microstructure-property relationship in microalloyed high-strength steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Lei

    2017-01-01

    High-strength steels are favoured materials in the industry for production of safe and sustainable structures. The main technology used for joining the components of such steel is fusion welding. Steel alloy design concepts combined with advanced processing technologies have been extensively investigated during the development of High-Strength Low-Alloy (HSLA) steels. However, very few studies have addressed the issue of how various alloy designs, even with limited microalloy addition, can influence the properties of high-strength steel welds. In high-strength steel welding practices, the challenges regarding microstructure evolution and the resulting mechanical properties variation, are of great interest. The main focus is the debate regarding the role of microalloy elements on phase transformation and weld performance. Limited Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) softening and limited austenite grain coarsening are significant design essentials, but the primary goal is to ensure excellent toughness and tensile properties in the steel weld. To achieve this purpose, microalloy elements such as Ti, Nb, or V were intentionally added to modern high-strength steels. The focus of this work was to understand the mechanical properties of HSLA steels resulting from differences in alloy design after joining by modern welding processes. To begin, three microalloyed S690QL steels (Nb, Ti, and Ti+V addition) were investigated. Optical microscopy confirmed that similar mixtures of tempered bainite and martensite predominated the parent microstructure in the three steels, different types of coarse microalloy precipitates were also visible. These precipitates were analysed by using a thermodynamic-based software and then identified by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Results of mechanical testing revealed that all three steels performed above the standard toughness and tensile strength values, but with varied yielding phenomena. During the welding operation, each of the three steels

  9. Microstructure-property relationship in microalloyed high-strength steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lei

    2017-04-01

    High-strength steels are favoured materials in the industry for production of safe and sustainable structures. The main technology used for joining the components of such steel is fusion welding. Steel alloy design concepts combined with advanced processing technologies have been extensively investigated during the development of High-Strength Low-Alloy (HSLA) steels. However, very few studies have addressed the issue of how various alloy designs, even with limited microalloy addition, can influence the properties of high-strength steel welds. In high-strength steel welding practices, the challenges regarding microstructure evolution and the resulting mechanical properties variation, are of great interest. The main focus is the debate regarding the role of microalloy elements on phase transformation and weld performance. Limited Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) softening and limited austenite grain coarsening are significant design essentials, but the primary goal is to ensure excellent toughness and tensile properties in the steel weld. To achieve this purpose, microalloy elements such as Ti, Nb, or V were intentionally added to modern high-strength steels. The focus of this work was to understand the mechanical properties of HSLA steels resulting from differences in alloy design after joining by modern welding processes. To begin, three microalloyed S690QL steels (Nb, Ti, and Ti+V addition) were investigated. Optical microscopy confirmed that similar mixtures of tempered bainite and martensite predominated the parent microstructure in the three steels, different types of coarse microalloy precipitates were also visible. These precipitates were analysed by using a thermodynamic-based software and then identified by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Results of mechanical testing revealed that all three steels performed above the standard toughness and tensile strength values, but with varied yielding phenomena. During the welding operation, each of the three steels

  10. Optimized design on condensing tubes high-speed TIG welding technology magnetic control based on genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lin; Chang, Yunlong; Li, Yingmin; Lu, Ming

    2013-05-01

    An orthogonal experiment was conducted by the means of multivariate nonlinear regression equation to adjust the influence of external transverse magnetic field and Ar flow rate on welding quality in the process of welding condenser pipe by high-speed argon tungsten-arc welding (TIG for short). The magnetic induction and flow rate of Ar gas were used as optimum variables, and tensile strength of weld was set to objective function on the base of genetic algorithm theory, and then an optimal design was conducted. According to the request of physical production, the optimum variables were restrained. The genetic algorithm in the MATLAB was used for computing. A comparison between optimum results and experiment parameters was made. The results showed that the optimum technologic parameters could be chosen by the means of genetic algorithm with the conditions of excessive optimum variables in the process of high-speed welding. And optimum technologic parameters of welding coincided with experiment results.

  11. Analysis of Welding Zinc Coated Steel Sheets in Zero Gap Configuration by 3D Simulations and High Speed Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Holger; Kägeler, Christian; Otto, Andreas; Schmidt, Michael

    Welding of zinc coated sheets in zero gap configuration is of eminent interest for the automotive industry. This Laser welding process would enable the automotive industry to build auto bodies with a high durability in a plain manufacturing process. Today good welding results can only be achieved by expensive constructive procedures such as clamping devices to ensure a defined gad. The welding in zero gap configuration is a big challenge because of the vaporised zinc expelled from the interface between the two sheets. To find appropriate welding parameters for influencing the keyhole and melt pool dynamics, a three dimensional simulation and a high speed imaging system for laser keyhole welding have been developed. The obtained results help to understand the process of the melt pool perturbation caused by vaporised zinc.

  12. Effect of Bainitic Microstructure on Ballistic Performance of Armour Steel Weld Metal Using Developed High Ni-Coated Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanick, A. K.; Das, H.; Reddy, G. M.; Ghosh, M.; Nandy, S.; Pal, T. K.

    2018-05-01

    Welding of armour steel has gained significant importance during the past few years as recent civilian and military requirements demand weld metal properties matching with base metal having good ballistic performance along with high strength and toughness at - 40 °C as per specification. The challenge of armour steel welding therefore lies in controlling the weld metal composition which is strongly dependent on welding electrode/consumables, resulting in desired weld microstructure consisting of lower bainite along with retained austenite. The performance of butt-welded armour steel joints produced by the developed electrodes was evaluated using tensile testing, ballistic testing, impact toughness at room temperature and subzero temperature. Microstructures of weld metals are exclusively characterized by x-ray diffraction technique, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscopy with selected area diffraction pattern. Experimental results show that weld metal with relatively lower carbon, higher manganese and lower nickel content was attributed to lower bainite with film type of retained austenite may be considered as a most covetable microstructure for armour steel weld metal.

  13. Effect of Bainitic Microstructure on Ballistic Performance of Armour Steel Weld Metal Using Developed High Ni-Coated Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanick, A. K.; Das, H.; Reddy, G. M.; Ghosh, M.; Nandy, S.; Pal, T. K.

    2018-04-01

    Welding of armour steel has gained significant importance during the past few years as recent civilian and military requirements demand weld metal properties matching with base metal having good ballistic performance along with high strength and toughness at - 40 °C as per specification. The challenge of armour steel welding therefore lies in controlling the weld metal composition which is strongly dependent on welding electrode/consumables, resulting in desired weld microstructure consisting of lower bainite along with retained austenite. The performance of butt-welded armour steel joints produced by the developed electrodes was evaluated using tensile testing, ballistic testing, impact toughness at room temperature and subzero temperature. Microstructures of weld metals are exclusively characterized by x-ray diffraction technique, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscopy with selected area diffraction pattern. Experimental results show that weld metal with relatively lower carbon, higher manganese and lower nickel content was attributed to lower bainite with film type of retained austenite may be considered as a most covetable microstructure for armour steel weld metal.

  14. High power X-ray welding of metal-matrix composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, Richard A.; Goeppner, George A.; Noonan, John R.; Farrell, William J.; Ma, Qing

    1997-12-01

    A method for joining metal-matrix composites (MMCs) by using high power x-rays as a volumetric heat source is provided. The method involves directing an x-ray to the weld line between two adjacent MMCs materials to create an irradiated region or melt zone. The x-rays have a power density greater than about 10{sup 4} watts/cm{sup 2} and provide the volumetric heat required to join the MMC materials. Importantly, the reinforcing material of the metal-matrix composites remains uniformly distributed in the melt zone, and the strength of the MMCs are not diminished. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys. In an alternate embodiment, high power x-rays are used to provide the volumetric heat required to weld metal elements, including metal elements comprised of metal alloys.

  15. High-power Laser Welding of Thick Steel-aluminum Dissimilar Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahdo, Rabi; Springer, André; Pfeifer, Ronny; Kaierle, Stefan; Overmeyer, Ludger

    According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a worldwide reduction of CO2-emissions is indispensable to avoid global warming. Besides the automotive sector, lightweight construction is also of high interest for the maritime industry in order to minimize CO2-emissions. Using aluminum, the weight of ships can be reduced, ensuring lower fuel consumption. Therefore, hybrid joints of steel and aluminum are of great interest to the maritime industry. In order to provide an efficient lap joining process, high-power laser welding of thick steel plates (S355, t = 5 mm) and aluminum plates (EN AW-6082, t = 8 mm) is investigated. As the weld seam quality greatly depends on the amount of intermetallic phases within the joint, optimized process parameters and control are crucial. Using high-power laser welding, a tensile strength of 10 kN was achieved. Based on metallographic analysis, hardness tests, and tensile tests the potential of this joining method is presented.

  16. Studies on microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of high nitrogen stainless steel shielded metal arc welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Raffi; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.; Srinivasa Rao, K.

    2018-03-01

    The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of high nitrogen stainless steel shielded metal arc (SMA) welds made with Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microstructures of the welds were characterized using optical microscopy (OM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) mainly to determine the morphology, phase analysis, grain size and orientation image mapping. Hardness, tensile and ductility bend tests were carried out to determine mechanical properties. Potentio-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance using a GillAC basic electrochemical system. Constant load type testing was carried out to study stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behaviour of welds. The investigation results shown that the selected Cr–Mn–N type electrode resulted in favourable microstructure and completely solidified as single phase coarse austenite. Mechanical properties of SMA welds are found to be inferior when compared to that of base metal and is due to coarse and dendritic structure.

  17. The Characteristics of Welding Joint on Stainless Steel as a Candidate of High Level Waste Canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aisyah; Herlan-Martono

    2000-01-01

    High level waste is the waste generated from reprocessing of the spent fuels. This type of waste is vitrified with borosilicate glass to become waste-glass. This waste glass is contained in a canister made of austenitic stainless steel. The canister material is subjected to be welded during fabrication and utilization. The character of the welding joint that is the function of the electrical current used in the welding process have been studied. The strength of the joint is tested mechanically i.e.: the tensile strength and hardness test. The result shows that the higher the current used in welding process, the better the strength of the joint and as well the tensile strength. The optimum current is 110 A. From the hardness test, it was figured that the length of the HAZ area is 14 mm. The material in HAZ area is the hardest compared to the others, it is due to the appearance of the chrome-carbide. The welding of the canister with such a condition, during fabrication as well as during the utilization of the canister for the container of the high level waste with the PWHT process gives better result. (author)

  18. Local deposition of high-purity Pt nanostructures by combining electron beam induced deposition and atomic layer deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mackus, A.J.M.; Mulders, J.J.L.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.; Kessels, W.M.M.

    2010-01-01

    An approach for direct-write fabrication of high-purity platinum nanostructures has been developed by combining nanoscale lateral patterning by electron beam induced deposition (EBID) with area-selective deposition of high quality material by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Because virtually pure,

  19. High-deposition-rate ceramics synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allendorf, M.D.; Osterheld, T.H.; Outka, D.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    Parallel experimental and computational investigations are conducted in this project to develop validated numerical models of ceramic synthesis processes. Experiments are conducted in the High-Temperature Materials Synthesis Laboratory in Sandia`s Combustion Research Facility. A high-temperature flow reactor that can accommodate small preforms (1-3 cm diameter) generates conditions under which deposition can be observed, with flexibility to vary both deposition temperature (up to 1500 K) and pressure (as low as 10 torr). Both mass spectrometric and laser diagnostic probes are available to provide measurements of gas-phase compositions. Experiments using surface analytical techniques are also applied to characterize important processes occuring on the deposit surface. Computational tools developed through extensive research in the combustion field are employed to simulate the chemically reacting flows present in typical industrial reactors. These include the CHEMKIN and Surface-CHEMKIN suites of codes, which permit facile development of complex reaction mechanisms and vastly simplify the implementation of multi-component transport and thermodynamics. Quantum chemistry codes are also used to estimate thermodynamic and kinetic data for species and reactions for which this information is unavailable.

  20. Low Alloy Steel Structures After Welding with Micro-Jet Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Węgrzyn T.; Piwnik J.; Hadryś D.; Wszołek Ł.

    2017-01-01

    The paper focuses on low alloy steel after innovate welding method with micro-jet cooling. Weld metal deposit (WMD) was carried out for welding and for MIG and MAG welding with micro-jet cooling. This method is very promising mainly due to the high amount of AF (acicular ferrite) and low amount of MAC (self-tempered martensite, retained austenite, carbide) phases in WMD. That structure corresponds with very good mechanical properties, ie. high impact toughness of welds at low temperature. Mic...

  1. The electrogas and electroslag multipass high speed welding of nuclear pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichhorn, F.; Hirsch, P.; Langenbahn, H.W.; Wubbels, B.

    1978-01-01

    High-speed electroslag and electrogas welding of 15 Mn Ni63 steel plates to achieve high strength and toughness joints for reactor pressure vessels are described. Mechanical testing of overheating-resistant, brittle fracture resistant low alloy steels is discussed. (UK)

  2. Status of Closure Welding Technology of Canister for Transportation and Storage of High Level Radioactive Material and Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. J.; Bang, K. S.; Seo, K. S.; Seo, C. S.

    2010-10-01

    Closure seal welding is one of the key technologies in fabricating and handling the canister which is used for transportation and storage of high radioactive material and waste. Simple industrial fabrication processes are used before filling the radioactive waste into the canister. But, automatic and remote processes should be used after filling the radioactive material because the thickness of canister is not sufficient to shield the high radiation from filled material or waste. In order to simplify the welding process the closure structure of canister and the sealing method are investigated and developed properly. Two types of radioactive materials such as vitrified waste and compacted solid waste are produced in nuclear industry. Because the filling method of two types of waste is different, the shapes of closure and opening of canister and welding method is also different. The canister shape and sealing method should be standardized to standardize the handling facilities and inspection process such as leak test after closure welding. In order to improve the productivity of disposal and compatibility of the canister, the structure and shape of canister should be standardized considering the type of waste. Two kind of welding process such as arc welding and resistance welding are reported and used in the field. In the arc welding process GTAW and PAW are considered proper processes for closure welding. The closure seal welding process can be selected by considering material of canister, thickness of body, productivity, and applicable codes and rules. Because the storage time of nuclear waste in canister is very long, at least 20 years, the long-time corrosion at the weld should be estimated including mechanical integrity. Recently, the mitigation of residual stress around weld region, which causes stress corrosion cracking, is also interesting research issue

  3. Study on the high-precision laser welding technology of nuclear fuel elements processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Sung; Yang, M. S.; Kim, W. K.; Lee, D. Y

    2001-01-01

    The proper welding method for appendage of bearing pads and spacers of PHWR nuclear fuel elements is considered important in respect to the soundness of weldments and the improvement of the performance of nuclear fuels during the operation in reactor. The probability of welding defects of the appendage parts is mostly apt to occur and it is connected directly with the safty and life prediction of the nuclear reactor in operation. Recently there has been studied all over the world to develope welding technology by laser in nuclear fuel processing, and the appendage of bearing pads and spacers of PHWR nuclear fuel elements. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the characteristics of the laser welded specimens and make some samples for the appendage of bearing pads of PHWR nuclear fuel elements. This study will be also provide the basic data for the fabrications of the appendage of bearing pads and spacers. Especially the laser welding is supposed to be used in the practical application such as precise materials manufacturing fields. In this respect this technology is not only a basic advanced technology with wide applications but also likely to be used for the development of directly applicable technologies for industries, with high potential benefits derived in the view point of economy and industry.

  4. Study on the high-precision laser welding technology of nuclear fuel elements processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo Sung; Yang, M. S.; Kim, W. K.; Lee, D. Y.

    2001-01-01

    The proper welding method for appendage of bearing pads and spacers of PHWR nuclear fuel elements is considered important in respect to the soundness of weldments and the improvement of the performance of nuclear fuels during the operation in reactor. The probability of welding defects of the appendage parts is mostly apt to occur and it is connected directly with the safty and life prediction of the nuclear reactor in operation. Recently there has been studied all over the world to develope welding technology by laser in nuclear fuel processing, and the appendage of bearing pads and spacers of PHWR nuclear fuel elements. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to investigate the characteristics of the laser welded specimens and make some samples for the appendage of bearing pads of PHWR nuclear fuel elements. This study will be also provide the basic data for the fabrications of the appendage of bearing pads and spacers. Especially the laser welding is supposed to be used in the practical application such as precise materials manufacturing fields. In this respect this technology is not only a basic advanced technology with wide applications but also likely to be used for the development of directly applicable technologies for industries, with high potential benefits derived in the view point of economy and industry

  5. Combined Performance of Polypropylene Fibre and Weld Slag in High Performance Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthi, A.; Karthikeyan, J.

    2017-12-01

    The effect of polypropylene fibre and weld slag on the mechanical properties of High Performance Concrete (HPC) containing silica fume as the mineral admixtures was experimentally verified in this study. Sixteen series of HPC mixtures(70 MPa) were designed with varying fibre fractions and Weld Slag (WS). Fibre added at different proportion (0, 0.1, 0.3 and 0.6%) to the weight of cement. Weld slag was substituted to the fine aggregate (0, 10, 20 and 30%) at volume. The addition of fibre decreases the slump at 5, 9 and 14%, whereas the substitution of weld slag decreases by about 3, 11 and 21% with respect to the control mixture. Mechanical properties like compressive strength, split tensile strength, flexural strength, Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity test (UPV) and bond strength were tested. Durability studies such as Water absorption and Sorptivity test were conducted to check the absorption of water in HPC. Weld slag of 10% and fibre dosage of 0.3% in HPC, attains the maximum strength and hence this combination is most favourable for the structural applications.

  6. Pulse current gas metal arc welding characteristics, control and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, Prakriti Kumar

    2017-01-01

    This monograph is a first-of-its-kind compilation on high deposition pulse current GMAW process. The nine chapters of this monograph may serve as a comprehensive knowledge tool to use advanced welding engineering in prospective applications. The contents of this book will prove useful to the shop floor welding engineer in handling this otherwise critical welding process with confidence. It will also serve to inspire researchers to think critically on more versatile applications of the unique nature of pulse current in GMAW process to develop cutting edge welding technology.

  7. Microstructure and Hardness Distribution of Resistance Welded Advanced High Strength Steels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Richardt; Harthøj, Anders; Friis, Kasper Leth

    2008-01-01

    In this work a low carbon steel and two high strength steels (DP600 and TRIP700) have been resistance lap welded and the hardness profiles were measured by micro hardness indentation of cross sections of the joint. The resulting microstructure of the weld zone of the DP-DP and TRIP-TRIP joints were...... found to consist of a martensitic structure with a significant increase in hardness. Joints of dissimilar materials mixed completely in the melted region forming a new alloy with a hardness profile lying in between the hardness measured in joints of the similar materials. Furthermore the joints were...

  8. Influence of the welding process on martensitic high strength steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Hanus

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the study is martensitic 22MnB5 steels, which are used in the automotive industry. The main purpose of the performed analyses is a study of strength differences in heat affected zones of the spot welding. For the needs of the strength decrease assessment, the critical layer of the heat affected area was experimentally simulated. The aim of the work is to determine the most suitable methodology for evaluating the local changes of the elastic-plastic material response. The aim of this work is to determine the optimal methods for the determination of the yield strength and to find a firming trend in these zones.

  9. Experience of Using Domestic High-Frequency Electric Welding Technology in Surgical Treatment of Patients with Abdominal Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Babiy

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the experience of using electric welding technology of biological tissues with domestic high-frequency electrical generator EC 300 M1 in 176 patients at open and laparoscopic surgery for abdominal pathology. The analysis of findings showed that electric welding of living tissue provides reliable hemostasis, promotes tissue repair after their separation.

  10. Fatigue strength of repaired cracks in welded connections made of very high strength steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akyel, A.

    2017-01-01

    For cyclically loaded structures, fatigue design becomes one of the important design criteria. The state of art shows that with modification of the conventional structural design methodology, the use of very high strength steels may have a positive effect on fatigue strength of welded connections.

  11. Control over Coating Structure during Electromagnetic Welding and Application of HighSpeed Steel Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Kozhuro

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers peculiar features concerning coating formation in the process of electromagnetic welding of high-speed steel powder. The paper reveals how to control coating structure that ensures the required operational properties of working surfaces of machine parts. 

  12. TECHNOLOGICAL ISSUES IN MECHANISED FEED WIG/TIG WELDING SURFACING OF WELDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BURCA Mircea

    2016-09-01

    manual welding tests in the light of using the process for welding surfacing being known that in such applications mechanised operations are recommended whenever possible given the latter strengths i.e. increased productivity and quality deposits. The research also aims at achieving a comparative a study between wire mechanised feed based WIG manual welding and the manual rod entry based manual welding in terms of geometry deposits, deposits aesthetics, operating technique, productivity, etc . In this regard deposits were made by means of two welding procedures, and subsequently welding surfacing was made with the optimum values of the welding parameters in this case.

  13. TIG-dressing of High Strength Butt Welded Connection. Part 2 : Physical Testing and Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Es, S.H.J.; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2014-01-01

    Weld improvement techniques are aimed at reducing the notch effects of welds and generally focus on two aspects: a change of geometry of the weld toe and a change of the weld residual stresses. In this paper, fatigue tests are discussed, performed on butt welded specimens in steel grades ranging

  14. TIG-dressing of high strength butt welded connection - Part 2: physical testing and modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Es, S.H.J. van; Kolstein, M.H.; Pijpers, R.J.M.; Bijlaard, F.S.K.

    2013-01-01

    Weld improvement techniques are aimed at reducing the notch effects of welds and generally focus on two aspects: a change of geometry of the weld toe and a change of the weld residual stresses. In this paper, fatigue tests are discussed, performed on butt welded specimens in steel grades ranging

  15. Microstructure characterization in the weld joint of a high nickel austenitic alloy and Cr18-Ni8 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Na; Li, Yajiang; Wang, Juan [Shandong Univ., Jinan (CN). Key Lab. for Liquid - Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education)

    2012-06-15

    High nickel austenitic alloy, 6 mm thick, and Cr18-Ni8 stainless steel with a thickness of 0.6 mm were joined by pulsed current tungsten inert gas arc welding without filler metal in this work. Metallographic examination, microhardness measurement and electron microprobe analysis were used to reveal microstructural characteristics in the joint. The results indicated that the weld metal consisted of {gamma}-austenite, {delta}-ferrite and carbides without the appearance of martensite. There were dendrite crystals at the edge of the weld metal near the high nickel austenitic alloy and isometric crystals in the center of the weld metal. The microhardness of the weld metal was the highest due to the existence of carbides and its finer structure. Graphite flakes were still embedded in the austenite matrix of the heat-affected zone without the formation of martensite. (orig.)

  16. Developments in welding and joining methods of metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilarczyk, J.

    2007-01-01

    The impact of the welding technology on the economy development. The welding and joining methods review. The particular role of the laser welding and its interesting applications: with filler metal, twin spot laser welding, hybrid welding process, remote welding. The fiber lasers. The high intensity electron beams applications for surface modification. The TIG welding with the use of the active flux. Friction welding, friction stir welding and friction linear welding. (author)

  17. Investigation on dissimilar laser welding of advanced high strength steel sheets for the automotive industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossini, M., E-mail: matteo.rossini@unibz.it [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Spena, P. Russo, E-mail: pasquale.russospena@unibz.it [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Cortese, L., E-mail: luca.cortese@unibz.it [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Matteis, P., E-mail: paolo.matteis@polito.it [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Firrao, D., E-mail: donato.firrao@polito.it [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2015-03-25

    To support the use of advanced high strength steels in car body design and fabrication, an investigation was carried out on dissimilar butt laser welding between TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) steels, Dual Phase (DP) steels, hot stamping boron (22MnB5) steels, and TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels. The base materials and the weldments were fully characterized by means of metallography, microhardness, and tensile tests. Digital image analysis was also used to provide additional information on the local strain field in the joint during the tensile tests. Fractographic examination was finally performed on the fracture surfaces of the tensile samples. The dissimilar joints between the DP, 22MnB5, and TRIP steels exhibit good resistance properties. On the contrary, the dissimilar joints encompassing the TWIP steel exhibit poor mechanical strength and fail along the weld seam by intergranular fracture, probably due to presence of Mn segregations. Therefore, the laser welding of TWIP steel with other advanced high strength steels is not recommended without the use of proper metal fillers. Dissimilar laser welding of DP, TRIP and 22MnB5 combinations, on the contrary, can be a solution to assemble car body parts made of these steel grades.

  18. Surface properties tuning of welding electrode-deposited hardfacings by laser heat treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oláh, Arthur; Croitoru, Catalin; Tierean, Mircea Horia

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, several Cr-Mn-rich hardfacings have been open-arc deposited on S275JR carbon quality structural steel and further submitted to laser treatment at different powers. An overall increase with 34-98% in the average microhardness and wear resistance of the coatings has been obtained, due to the formation of martensite, silicides, as well as simple and complex carbides on the surface of the hardfacings, in comparison with the reference, not submitted to laser thermal treatment. Surface laser treatment of electrode-deposited hardfacings improves their chemical resistance under corrosive saline environments, as determined by the 43% lower amount of leached iron and respectively, 28% lower amount of manganese ions leached in a 10% wt. NaCl aqueous solution, comparing with the reference hardfacings. Laser heat treatment also promotes better compatibility of the hardfacings with water-based paints and oil-based paints and primers, through the relative increasing in the polar component of the surface energy (with up to 65%) which aids both water and filler spreading on the metallic surface.

  19. Welding simulation and fatigue assessment of tubular K-joints in high-strength steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamiri Akhlaghi, F.

    2014-01-01

    Application of newly developed high strength steel hollow sections is increasing in construction industry – especially for bridge structures – due to their satisfactory material properties and fabrication advantages. These sections allow for longer spans, more slender structures. Savings in weight and volume of material compared to traditional steel grades increase sustainability of construction and compensate for part of higher unit cost of material. Nevertheless, use of high strength steels cannot be promoted unless potential fatigue issues are properly addressed. Two fabrication methods are currently available for the planar Warren trusses made of circular hollow sections (CHS): welding the tubes together, or using cast steel nodes and connecting truss members to them by girth welds. Previous research on tubular bridge trusses indicates that the problematic fatigue cracking sites for the first fabrication method are located at weld toes in the gap region of the truss joints. For the second method, cracking occurs at the root of CHS–cast butt welds. Fatigue performance of these two methods were investigated by constant amplitude fatigue testing of two full scale trusses made of steel grade S690QH and with a geometry similar to previous S355J2H investigation. Fatigue lives of K-joints were in agreement with current recommended code values. For CHS–cast welded connections, no visible cracking was observed up to 2£10"6 cycles. Due to the effect of residual stresses, fatigue cracking was observed in compressive joints as well as tensile joints. Indeed, tensile welding residual stresses keep the crack open during all or part of the compressive load cycle. Their distribution and impact on fatigue life of tubular joints has not been fully investigated before for a complex detail such as Tubular K-joint made of high strength steel. Experimental and numerical methods were utilized for assessment of welding residual stresses. Neutron diffraction experiments were

  20. In mold laser welding for high precision polymer based optical components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, N., E-mail: id2694@alunos.uminho.pt, E-mail: pontes@dep.uminho.pt; Pontes, A. J., E-mail: id2694@alunos.uminho.pt, E-mail: pontes@dep.uminho.pt [IPC - Institute for Polymers and Composites, Department of Polymer Engineering, University of Minho, 4800-058 Guimarães (Portugal)

    2014-05-15

    To assemble a complete subsystem as a rear lamp, is necessary to have different machines and to perform several tasks. This necessity obliges the companies to have large structures to support all the assembling process. These huge structures are very costly and have as a consequence the reduction of the competitiveness of the companies. The process presented in this document has the intention of reducing the number of tasks needed to produce the final subsystem/product. To achieve this goal were combined several technologies, as in-mould assembling, laser welding and LEDs (light-emitting diode). One of the advantages of this process was the utilization of only one injection molding machine with three injection units to do all the assembling process. To achieve the main objective, firstly, the rear lamp was designed according to with the legislation of UNECE Vehicle Regulations - 1958 Agreements; Regulation No. 50 -Rev.2 - Position lamps, stop lamps, direction indicators for motorcycles. Posterior several polymeric materials were studied at different levels. Initial were studied several concentrations of carbon nanotubes mixed with PC (polycarbonate). This had the objective of determine, if these materials are suitable to conduct the necessary electric current to turn on the different LEDs. One of the main advantages of this process is the use of the laser transmission welded process. Since, with this welding technology is possible reduce the complexity of the final part. To understand the potentialities of this technology a combination of two materials was studied. The studied showed that all materials presented a high transparency to the laser beam. In terms of weld process, the study showed that the best welding conditions are the lowest velocity, diameter and power. With these studies was possible conclude that this new process is suitable to be implemented at the industrial level.

  1. Low Alloy Steel Structures After Welding with Micro-Jet Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węgrzyn T.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on low alloy steel after innovate welding method with micro-jet cooling. Weld metal deposit (WMD was carried out for welding and for MIG and MAG welding with micro-jet cooling. This method is very promising mainly due to the high amount of AF (acicular ferrite and low amount of MAC (self-tempered martensite, retained austenite, carbide phases in WMD. That structure corresponds with very good mechanical properties, ie. high impact toughness of welds at low temperature. Micro-jet cooling after welding can find serious application in automotive industry very soon. Until that moment only argon, helium and nitrogen were tested as micro-jet gases. In that paper first time various gas mixtures (gas mixtures Ar-CO2 were tested for micro-jet cooling after welding.

  2. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikie, B.L.; Wagg, A.R.; Whittle, M.J.; Yapp, D.

    1976-01-01

    The ultrasonic examination of austenitic stainless steel weld metal has always been regarded as a difficult proposition because of the large and variable ultrasonic attenuations and back scattering obtained from apparently similar weld deposits. The work to be described shows how the existence of a fibre texture within each weld deposit (as a result of epitaxial growth through successive weld beads) produces a systematic variation in the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient and the velocity of sound, depending upon the angle between the ultrasonic beam and the fibre axis. Development work has shown that it is possible to adjust the welding parameters to ensure that the crystallographic texture within each weld is compatible with improved ultrasonic transmission. The application of the results to the inspection of a specific weld in type 316 weld metal is described

  3. Feasibility of underwater welding of highly irradiated in-vessel components of boiling-water reactors: A literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, A.L.

    1997-11-01

    In February 1997, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES), initiated a literature review to assess the state of underwater welding technology. In particular, the objective of this literature review was to evaluate the viability of underwater welding in-vessel components of boiling water reactor (BWR) in-vessel components, especially those components fabricated from stainless steels that are subjected to high neutron fluences. This assessment was requested because of the recent increased level of activity in the commercial nuclear industry to address generic issues concerning the reactor vessel and internals, especially those issues related to repair options. This literature review revealed a preponderance of general information about underwater welding technology, as a result of the active research in this field sponsored by the U.S. Navy and offshore oil and gas industry concerns. However, the literature search yielded only a limited amount of information about underwater welding of components in low-fluence areas of BWR in-vessel environments, and no information at all concerning underwater welding experiences in high-fluence environments. Research reported by the staff of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site and researchers from the DOE fusion reactor program proved more fruitful. This research documented relevant experience concerning welding of stainless steel materials in air environments exposed to high neutron fluences. It also addressed problems with welding highly irradiated materials, and primarily attributed those problems to helium-induced cracking in the material. (Helium is produced from the neutron irradiation of boron, an impurity, and nickel.) The researchers found that the amount of helium-induced cracking could be controlled, or even eliminated, by reducing the heat input into the weld and applying a compressive stress perpendicular to the weld path

  4. Optical design and development of a fiber coupled high-power diode laser system for laser transmission welding of plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Vidal, Eva; Quintana, Iban; Etxarri, Jon; Azkorbebeitia, Urko; Otaduy, Deitze; González, Francisco; Moreno, Fernando

    2012-12-01

    Laser transmission welding (LTW) of thermoplastics is a direct bonding technique already used in different industrial applications sectors such as automobiles, microfluidics, electronics, and biomedicine. LTW evolves localized heating at the interface of two pieces of plastic to be joined. One of the plastic pieces needs to be optically transparent to the laser radiation whereas the other part has to be absorbent, being that the radiation produced by high power diode lasers is a good alternative for this process. As consequence, a tailored laser system has been designed and developed to obtain high quality weld seams with weld widths between 0.7 and 1.4 mm. The developed laser system consists of two diode laser bars (50 W per bar) coupled into an optical fiber using a nonimaging solution: equalization of the beam parameter product (BPP) in the slow and fast axes by a pair of step-mirrors. The power scaling was carried out by means of a multiplexing polarization technique. The analysis of energy balance and beam quality was performed considering ray tracing simulation (ZEMAX) and experimental validation. The welding experiments were conducted on acrylonitrile/butadiene/styrene (ABS), a thermoplastic frequently used in automotive, electronics and aircraft applications, doped with two different concentrations of carbon nanotubes (0.01% and 0.05% CNTs). Quality of the weld seams on ABS was analyzed in terms of the process parameters (welding speed, laser power and clamping pressure) by visual and optical microscope inspections. Mechanical properties of weld seams were analyzed by mechanical shear tests. High quality weld seams were produced in ABS, revealing the potential of the laser developed in this work for a wide range of plastic welding applications.

  5. Welding Over Paint Primer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Kevin S; Liu, Stephen; Olson, David L

    1998-01-01

    .... According to the hydrogen-oxygen and }hydrogen-fluorine equilibrium considerations, an increase in the partial pressure of oxygen or fluorine could decrease the partial pressure of hydrogen within the welding arc. Consequently, a welding consumable that contains chemical ingredients of high oxygen and fluorine potential would be capable of minimizing hydrogen pick-up in the weld pool.

  6. Resistance spot welding of a complicated joint in new advanced high strength steel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joop Pauwelussen; Nick den Uijl

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this article is to investigate resistance spot welding of a complicated welding configuration of three sheets of dissimilar steel sheet materials with shunt welds, using simulations. The configuration used resembles a case study of actual welds in automotive applications. One of the

  7. Microstructural and mechanical behavior of friction welds in a high creep resistance magnesium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinheiro, G.A.; Olea, C.A.W.; dos Santos, J.F.; Kainer, K.U. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH, Institute for Materials Research, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2007-09-15

    Friction weldability of Mg based alloys has been worldwide discussed. Within this context the aim of this study was to investigate rotational friction welding of an Aluminum-Rare Earth based high creep resistance Mg alloy AE42HP from the viewpoint of thermo cycle-microstructure-performance relationships to evaluate the potential use of FW in joining modern Mg-alloys. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Dimensional characteristics of welds performed on AISI 1045 steel by means of the application of high power diode laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Castillo, A.; Pou, J.; Lusquinos, F.; Quintero, F.; Soto, R.; Boutinguiza, M.; Saavedra, M.; Perez-Amor, M.

    2004-01-01

    The named High Power diode Laser (HPDL), emits a beam of optical energy generated by diode stimulation and offers the capability of supplying levels of power up to 6 kW. The objective of this research work was to study the main welding variables and their effects on dimensional characteristics of the beads performed by means of application of this novel laser. The results obtained, show that HPDL, is an energy source able to perform welds on AISI 1045 steel plates under conduction mode, without any kind of mechanized preparation, preheating or post-weld treatment and, without filler metal application. (Author) 16 refs

  9. Investigation of the vapour-plasma plume in the welding of titanium by high-power ytterbium fibre laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bykovskiy, D P; Petrovskii, V N; Uspenskiy, S A [National Research Nuclear University ' MEPhI' (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-31

    The vapour-plasma plume produced in the welding of 6-mm thick VT-23 titanium alloy plates by ytterbium fibre laser radiation of up to 10 kW power is studied in the protective Ar gas medium. High-speed video filming of the vapour-plasma plume is used to visualise the processes occurring during laser welding. The coefficient of inverse bremsstrahlung by the welding plasma plume is calculated from the data of the spectrometric study. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  10. Advanced characterization techniques in understanding the roles of nickel in enhancing strength and toughness of submerged arc welding high strength low alloy steel multiple pass welds in the as-welded condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sham, Kin-Ling

    Striving for higher strength along with higher toughness is a constant goal in material properties. Even though nickel is known as an effective alloying element in improving the resistance of a steel to impact fracture, it is not fully understood how nickel enhances toughness. It was the goal of this work to assist and further the understanding of how nickel enhanced toughness and maintained strength in particular for high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel submerged arc welding multiple pass welds in the as-welded condition. Using advanced analytical techniques such as electron backscatter diffraction, x-ray diffraction, electron microprobe, differential scanning calorimetry, and thermodynamic modeling software, the effect of nickel was studied with nickel varying from one to five wt. pct. in increments of one wt. pct. in a specific HSLA steel submerged arc welding multiple pass weldment. The test matrix of five different nickel compositions in the as-welded and stress-relieved condition was to meet the targeted mechanical properties with a yield strength greater than or equal to 85 ksi, a ultimate tensile strength greater than or equal to 105 ksi, and a nil ductility temperature less than or equal to -140 degrees F. Mechanical testing demonstrated that nickel content of three wt. pct and greater in the as-welded condition fulfilled the targeted mechanical properties. Therefore, one, three, and five wt. pct. nickel in the as-welded condition was further studied to determine the effect of nickel on primary solidification mode, nickel solute segregation, dendrite thickness, phase transformation temperatures, effective ferrite grain size, dislocation density and strain, grain misorientation distribution, and precipitates. From one to five wt. pct nickel content in the as-welded condition, the primary solidification was shown to change from primary delta-ferrite to primary austenite. The nickel partitioning coefficient increased and dendrite/cellular thickness was

  11. Arc Shape Characteristics with Ultra-High-Frequency Pulsed Arc Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingxuan Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Arc plasma possesses a constriction phenomenon with a pulsed current. The constriction is created by the Lorentz force, the radial electromagnetic force during arc welding, which determines the energy distribution of the arc plasma. Welding experiments were carried out with ultra-high-frequency pulsed arc welding (UHFP-AW. Ultra-high-speed camera observations were produced for arc surveillance. Hue-saturation-intensity (HSI image analysis was used to distinguish the regions of the arc plasma that represented the heat energy distribution. The measurement of arc regions indicated that, with an ultra-high-frequency pulsed arc, the constriction was not only within the decreased arc geometry, but also within the constricted arc core region. This can be checked by the ratio of the core region to the total area. The arc core region expanded significantly at 40 kHz at 60 A. A current level of 80 A caused a decrease in the total region of the arc. Meanwhile, the ratio of the core region to the total increased. It can be concluded that arc constriction depends on the increased area of the core region with the pulsed current (>20 kHz.

  12. Effects of Sc and Zr on mechanical property and microstructure of tungsten inert gas and friction stir welded aerospace high strength Al–Zn–Mg alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Ying, E-mail: csudengying@163.com [School of Metallurgy and Environment, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Power Metallurgy, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Peng, Bing [School of Metallurgy and Environment, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Xu, Guofu, E-mail: csuxgf66@csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Power Metallurgy, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Pan, Qinglin; Yin, Zhimin; Ye, Rui [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Hunan, Changsha 410083 (China); Wang, Yingjun; Lu, Liying [Northeast Light Alloy Co. Ltd., Hei Longjiang, Harbin 150060 (China)

    2015-07-15

    New aerospace high strength Al–Zn–Mg and Al–Zn–Mg–0.25Sc–0.10Zr (wt%) alloys were welded by tungsten inert gas (TIG) process using a new Al–6.0Mg–0.25Sc–0.10Zr (wt%) filler material, and friction stir welding (FSW) process, respectively. Mechanical property and microstructure of the welded joints were investigated comparatively by tensile tests and microscopy methods. The results show that Sc and Zr can improve the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of Al–Zn–Mg alloy by 59 MPa (23.3%) and 16 MPa (4.0%) in TIG welded joints, and by 77 MPa (23.8%) and 54 MPa (11.9%) in FSW welded joints, respectively. The ultimate tensile strength and elongation of new Al–Zn–Mg–Sc–Zr alloy FSW welded joint are 506±4 MPa and 6.34±0.2%, respectively, showing superior post welded performance. Mechanical property of welded joint is mainly controlled by its “weakest microstructural zone”. TIG welded Al–Zn–Mg and Al–Zn–Mg–Sc–Zr alloys reinforced with weld bead both failed at fusion boundaries. Secondary Al{sub 3}Sc{sub x}Zr{sub 1−x} particles originally present in parent alloy coarsen during TIG welding process, but they can restrain the grain growth and recrystallization here, thus improving welding performance. For two FSW welded joints, fracture occurred in weld nugget zone. Secondary Al{sub 3}Sc{sub x}Zr{sub 1−x} nano-particles almost can keep unchangeable size (20–40 nm) across the entire FSW welded joint, and thus provide effective Orowan strengthening, grain boundary strengthening and substructure strengthening to strengthen FSW joints. The positive effect from Sc and Zr additions into base metals can be better preserved by FSW process than by TIG welding process.

  13. Effects of Sc and Zr on mechanical property and microstructure of tungsten inert gas and friction stir welded aerospace high strength Al–Zn–Mg alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, Ying; Peng, Bing; Xu, Guofu; Pan, Qinglin; Yin, Zhimin; Ye, Rui; Wang, Yingjun; Lu, Liying

    2015-01-01

    New aerospace high strength Al–Zn–Mg and Al–Zn–Mg–0.25Sc–0.10Zr (wt%) alloys were welded by tungsten inert gas (TIG) process using a new Al–6.0Mg–0.25Sc–0.10Zr (wt%) filler material, and friction stir welding (FSW) process, respectively. Mechanical property and microstructure of the welded joints were investigated comparatively by tensile tests and microscopy methods. The results show that Sc and Zr can improve the yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of Al–Zn–Mg alloy by 59 MPa (23.3%) and 16 MPa (4.0%) in TIG welded joints, and by 77 MPa (23.8%) and 54 MPa (11.9%) in FSW welded joints, respectively. The ultimate tensile strength and elongation of new Al–Zn–Mg–Sc–Zr alloy FSW welded joint are 506±4 MPa and 6.34±0.2%, respectively, showing superior post welded performance. Mechanical property of welded joint is mainly controlled by its “weakest microstructural zone”. TIG welded Al–Zn–Mg and Al–Zn–Mg–Sc–Zr alloys reinforced with weld bead both failed at fusion boundaries. Secondary Al 3 Sc x Zr 1−x particles originally present in parent alloy coarsen during TIG welding process, but they can restrain the grain growth and recrystallization here, thus improving welding performance. For two FSW welded joints, fracture occurred in weld nugget zone. Secondary Al 3 Sc x Zr 1−x nano-particles almost can keep unchangeable size (20–40 nm) across the entire FSW welded joint, and thus provide effective Orowan strengthening, grain boundary strengthening and substructure strengthening to strengthen FSW joints. The positive effect from Sc and Zr additions into base metals can be better preserved by FSW process than by TIG welding process

  14. Use of servo controlled weld head for end closure welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, S.K.; Setty, D.S.; Rameswara Rao, A.; Hemantha Rao, G.V.S.; Jayaraj, R.N. [Nuclear Fuel Complex, Dept. of Atomic Energy, Hyderabad (India)

    2010-07-01

    In the PHWR fuel fabrication line resistance welding processes are used for joining various zirconium based alloy components to fuel tube of similar material. The quality requirement of these welding processes is very stringent and has to meet all the product requirements. At present these welding processes are being carried out by using standard resistance welding machines. In the resistance welding process in addition to current and time, force is one of the critical and important parameter, which influences the weld quality. At present advanced feed back type fast response medium frequency weld controllers are being used. This has upslope/down slope, constant and repetitive weld pattern selection features makes this critical welding process more reliable. Compared to weld controllers, squeeze force application devices are limited and normally standard high response pneumatic cylinders are used in the welding process. With this type of devices the force is constant during welding process and cannot be varied during welding process as per the material deformation characteristics. Similarly due to non-availability of feed back systems in the squeeze force application systems restricts the accuracy and quality of the welding process. In the present paper the influence of squeeze force pattern on the weld quality using advanced feed back type servo based force control system was studied. Different squeeze forces were used during pre and post weld heat periods along with constant force and compared with the weld quality. (author)

  15. Microstructure and pitting corrosion of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffi Mohammed

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work is aimed at studying the microstructure and pitting corrosion behaviour of shielded metal arc welded high nitrogen steel made of Cromang-N electrode. Basis for selecting this electrode is to increase the solubility of nitrogen in weld metal due to high chromium and manganese content. Microscopic studies were carried out using optical microscopy (OM and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM. Energy back scattered diffraction (EBSD method was used to determine the phase analysis, grain size and orientation image mapping. Potentio-dynamic polarization testing was carried out to study the pitting corrosion resistance in aerated 3.5% NaCl environment using a GillAC electrochemical system. The investigation results showed that the selected Cr–Mn–N type electrode resulted in a maximum reduction in delta-ferrite and improvement in pitting corrosion resistance of the weld zone was attributed to the coarse austenite grains owing to the reduction in active sites of the austenite/delta ferrite interface and the decrease in galvanic interaction between austenite and delta-ferrite.

  16. SCC crack propagation behavior in 316L weld metal under high temperature water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakade, Katsuyuki; Hirasaki, Toshifumi; Suzuki, Shunichi; Takamori, Kenro; Kumagai, Katsuhiko; Tanaka, Yoshihiko; Umeoka, Kuniyoshi

    2008-01-01

    Intergranular stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of 316L weld metal is of concern to the BWR plants. PLR pipes in commercial BWR plants have shown SCC in almost HAZ area in high temperature water, whereas, SCC has been arrested around fusion boundary for long time in the actual PLR pipe. The SCC behavior could be characterized in terms of dendrite direction, which was defined as the angle between dendrite growth direction and macro-SCC direction. In this study, the relationship between dendrite growth direction and macro-SCC direction was clearly showed on the fracture surface. The relative large difference of SCC susceptibility of 316L HAZ and weld metal was observed on the fracture surface. In the case of 0 degree, SCC has rapidly propagated into the weld metal parallel to the dendrite structure. In the case of more than 30 degree SCC direction, SCC was arrested around fusion area, and 60 degree SCC was drastically arrested around the fusion area. The large inclined dendrite structure for SCC is highly resistant to SCC. (author)

  17. Method for welding beryllium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O`Leary, R.F.

    1997-04-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs.

  18. Method for welding beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, R.D.; Smith, F.M.; O'Leary, R.F.

    1997-01-01

    A method is provided for joining beryllium pieces which comprises: depositing aluminum alloy on at least one beryllium surface; contacting that beryllium surface with at least one other beryllium surface; and welding the aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces together. The aluminum alloy may be deposited on the beryllium using gas metal arc welding. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be subjected to elevated temperatures and pressures to reduce porosity before welding the pieces together. The aluminum alloy coated beryllium surfaces may be machined into a desired welding joint configuration before welding. The beryllium may be an alloy of beryllium or a beryllium compound. The aluminum alloy may comprise aluminum and silicon. 9 figs

  19. Problems in laser repair welding of polished surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Skumavc

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents problems in laser repair welding of the tools for injection moulding of plastics and light metals. Tools for injection moulding of the car headlamps are highly polished in order to get a desirable quality of the injected part. Different light metals, glasses, elastomers, thermoplastics and thermosetting polymers are injected into the die cavity under high pressures resulting in the surface damages of the tool. Laser welding is the only suitable repair welding technique due to the very limited sputtering during deposition of the filler metal. Overlapping of the welds results in inhomogeneous hardness of the remanufactured surface. Results have shown strong correlation between hardness and surface waviness after final polishing of the repair welded surface.

  20. ICT diagnostic method of beryllium welding quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Lingxia; Wei Kentang; Ye Yunchang

    2002-01-01

    To avoid the interference of high density material for the quality assay of beryllium welding line, a slice by slice scanning method was proposed based upon the research results of the Industrial Computerized Tomography (ICT) diagnostics for weld penetration, weld width, off-centered deviation and weld defects of beryllium-ring welding seam with high density material inside

  1. Development of aluminium viscous damper by high speed MIG welding process; Kosoku MIG yosetsuho ni yoru aluminium sei viscous damper no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hino, H; Hotta, M [Nippon Light Metal Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Maeda, Y; Shimizu, H [Fukoku Co. Ltd., Saitama (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    We have developed a welded aluminum viscous damper to improve the joining strength between the case and the cover of the conventional damper mechanically fastened by adhesion. The distortion of the welded damper was decreased to an acceptable level using the high speed MIG welding process. Sound quality and good appearance were obtained by optimizing the initial speed of the filler wire and by controlling the welding conditions at the starting part and in the lap part. The leakage load and the fatigue limit of the welded damper were 5 and 10 times those of the conventional damper, respectively. 3 refs., 15 figs.

  2. Temporal characterization of plasma cw high-power CO2 laser-matter interaction: contribution to the welding process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Thierry; Kane, M.; Fontaine, Joel

    1997-08-01

    During high-power laser welding, gas ionization occurs above the sample. The resulting plasma ignition threshold is related to ionization potential of metallic vapors from the sample, and shielding gases used in the process. In this work, we have characterized the temporal behavior of the radiation emitted by the plasma during laser welding in order to relate the observed signals to the process parameters.

  3. Tailored Welding Technique for High Strength Al-Cu Alloy for Higher Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biradar, N. S.; Raman, R.

    AA2014 aluminum alloy, with 4.5% Cu as major alloying element, offers highest strength and hardness values in T6 temper and finds extensive use in aircraft primary structures. However, this alloy is difficult to weld by fusion welding because the dendritic structure formed can affect weld properties seriously. Among the welding processes, AC-TIG technique is largely used for welding. As welded yield strength was in the range of 190-195 MPa, using conventional TIG technique. Welding metallurgy of AA2014 was critically reviewed and factors responsible for lower properties were identified. Square-wave AC TIG with Transverse mechanical arc oscillation (TMAO) was postulated to improve the weld strength. A systematic experimentation using 4 mm thick plates produced YS in the range of 230-240 MPa, has been achieved. Through characterization including optical and SEM/EDX was conducted to validate the metallurgical phenomena attributable to improvement in weld properties.

  4. Structural behaviour of a welded superalloy cylinder with internal pressure in a high temperature environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udoguchi, T.; Nakanishi, T.

    1981-01-01

    Steady and cyclic creep tests with internal pressure were performed at temperatures of 800 to 1000 0 C on Hastelloy X cylinders with and without a circumferential Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welding technique. The creep rupture strength of the TIG welded cylinders was much lower than that of the non-welded cylinders whilst creep rupture strength reduction by the TIG technique was not observed in uniaxial creep tests. The reason for the low creep strength of welded cylinders is discussed and it is noted that the creep ductility of weld metal plays an essentially important role. In order to improve the creep strength of the TIG welded cylinder, various welding procedures with assorted weld metals were investigated. Some improvements were obtained by using welding techniques which had either Incoloy 800 or a modified Hastelloy X material as the filler metal. (U.K.)

  5. High temperature corrosion studies on friction welded low alloy steel and stainless steel in air and molten salt environment at 650 oC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivazhagan, N.; Narayanan, S.; Singh, Surendra; Prakash, Satya; Reddy, G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: → Thermogravimetric analysis on friction welded AISI 304 with AISI 4140 exposed in air and molten salt environment. → Comparative study on friction welded AISI 4140 with AISI 304 exposed in air, Na 2 SO 4 -60%V 2 O 5 and NaCl-50%Na 2 SO 4 at 650 o C. → SEM/EDAX, XRD analysis on corroded dissimilar AISI 304 and AISI 4140 materials. -- Abstract: The investigation on high-temperature corrosion resistance of the weldments is necessary for prolonged service lifetime of the components used in corrosive environments. This paper reports on the performance of friction welded low alloy steel AISI 4140 and stainless steel AISI 304 in air as well as molten salt environment of Na 2 SO 4 -60%V 2 O 5 and NaCl-50%Na 2 SO 4 at 650 o C. This paper reports several studies carried out for characterizing the weldments corrosion behavior. Initially thermogravimetric technique was used to establish the kinetics of corrosion. For analyzing the corrosion products, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive analysis and electron probe micro analysis techniques were used. From the results of the experiments, it is observed that the weldments suffered accelerated corrosion in NaCl-Na 2 SO 4 environment and showed spalling/sputtering of the oxide scale. Furthermore, corrosion resistance of weld interface was found to be lower than that of parent metals in molten salt environment. Weight gain kinetics in air oxidation studies reveals a steady-state parabolic rate law while the kinetics with salt deposits displays multi-stage growth rates. Moreover NaCl is the main corrosive species in high temperature corrosion, involving mixtures of NaCl and Na 2 SO 4 which is responsible for formation of internal attack.

  6. Influence of PWHT on Toughness of High Chromium and Nickel Containing Martensitic Stainless Steel Weld Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divya, M.; Das, Chitta Ranjan; Mahadevan, S.; Albert, S. K.; Pandian, R.; Kar, Sujoy Kumar; Bhaduri, A. K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2015-06-01

    Commonly used 12.5Cr-5Ni consumable specified for welding of martensitic stainless steels is compared with newly designed 14.5Cr-5Ni consumable in terms of their suitability for repair welding of 410 and 414 stainless steels by gas tungsten arc welding process. Changes in microstructure and austenite evolution were investigated using optical, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction techniques and Thermo-Calc studies. Microstructure of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed only lath martensite, whereas as-welded 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal revealed delta-ferrite, retained austenite, and lath martensite. Toughness value of as-welded 12.5Cr-5Ni weld metal is found to be significantly higher (216 J) than that of the 14.5Cr-5Ni weld metal (15 J). The welds were subjected to different PWHTs: one at 923 K (650 °C) for 1, 2, 4 hours (single-stage PWHT) and another one at 923 K (650 °C)/4 h followed by 873 K (600 °C)/2 h or 873 K (600 °C)/4 h (two-stage heat treatment). Hardness and impact toughness of the weld metals were measured for these weld metals and correlated with the microstructure. The study demonstrates the importance of avoiding formation of delta-ferrite in the weld metal.

  7. Analysis of Welding Joint on Handling High Level Waste-Glass Canister

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herlan Martono; Aisyah; Wati

    2007-01-01

    The analysis of welding joint of stainless steel austenitic AISI 304 for canister material has been studied. At the handling of waste-glass canister from melter below to interim storage, there is a step of welding of canister lid. Welding quality must be kept in a good condition, in order there is no gas out pass welding pores and canister be able to lift by crane. Two part of stainless steel plate in dimension (200 x 125 x 3) mm was jointed by welding. Welding was conducted by TIG machine with protection gas is argon. Electric current were conducted for welding were 70, 80, 90, 100, 110, 120, 130, and 140 A. Welded plates were cut with dimension according to JIS 3121 standard for tensile strength test. Hardness test in welding zone, HAZ, and plate were conducted by Vickers. Analysis of microstructure by optic microscope. The increasing of electric current at the welding, increasing of tensile strength of welding yields. The best quality welding yields using electric current was 110 A. At the welding with electric current more than 110 A, the electric current influence towards plate quality, so that decreasing of stainless steel plate quality and breaking at the plate. Tensile strength of stainless steel plate welding yields in requirement conditions according to application in canister transportation is 0.24 kg/mm 2 . (author)

  8. High-speed cinematography of gas-tungsten arc welding: theory and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, L.D.; Key, J.F.

    1981-06-01

    High-speed photo-instrumentation theory and application are reviewed, with particular emphasis on high-speed cinematography, for the engineer who has not acquired an extensive background in scientific photography. Camera systems, optics, timing system, lighting, photometric equipment, filters, and camera mounts are covered. Manufacturers and other resource material are listed in the Appendices. The properties and processing of photosensitive materials suitable for high-speed photography are reviewed, and selected film data are presented. Methods are described for both qualitative and quantitative film analysis. This technology is applied to the problem of analyzing plasma dynamics in a gas-tungsten welding arc.

  9. Aluminium alloys welding with high-power Nd:YAG lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Orza, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    Aluminium alloys have good mechanical properties (high strength-to-weight ratio, corrosion resistance) and good workability. their applications are growing up, specially in the transportation industry. Weldability is however poorer than in other materials; recent advances in high power YAG laser are the key to obtain good appearance welds and higher penetration, at industrial production rates. Results of the combination of high power YAG beams with small fiber diameters and specific filler wires are presented. It is also characterized the air bone particulate material, by-product of the laser process: emission rates, size distribution and chemical composition are given for several aluminium alloys. (Author) 6 refs

  10. Medium- and high-pressure gauges and transducers produced by laser welding technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daurelio, Giuseppe; Nenci, Fabio; Cinquepalmi, Massimo; Chita, Giuseppe

    1998-07-01

    Industrial manufacturers produce many types of pressure gauges and transducers according to the applications, for gas or liquid, for high-medium and low pressure ranges. Nowadays the current production technology generally prefers to weld by micro TIG source the metallic corrugated membranes to the gauge or transducer bodies for the products, operating on the low pressure or medium pressure ranges. For the other ones, operating to high pressure range, generally the two components of the transducers are both threaded only and threaded and then circularly welded by micro TIG for the other higher range, till to 1000 bar. In this work the products, operating on the approximately equals 30 divided by 200 bar, are considered. These, when assembled on industrial plants, as an outcome of a non-correct operating sequence, give a 'shifted' electrical signal. This is due to a shift of the 'zero electrical signal' that unbalances the electrical bridge - thin layer sensor - that is the sensitive part of the product. Moreover, for the same problem, often some mechanical settlings of the transducer happen during the first pressure semi-components, with an increasing of the product manufacturing costs. In light of all this, the above referred, in this work the whole transducer has been re-designed according to the specific laser welding technology requirements. On the new product no threaded parts exist but only a circular laser welding with a full penetration depth about 2.5 divided by 3 mm high. Three different alloys have been tested according to the applications and the mechanical properties requested to the transducer. By using a 1.5 KW CO2 laser system many different working parameters have been evaluated for correlating laser parameters to the penetration depths, crown wides, interaction laser-materia times, mechanical and metallurgical properties. Moreover during the laser welding process the measurements of the maximum temperature, reached by the transducer top, has been

  11. A non-destructive evaluation of transverse hydrogen cracking in high strength flux-cored weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sterjovski, Z.; Carr, D. G.; Holdstock, R.; Nolan, D.; Norrish, J.

    2007-01-01

    Transverse hydrogen cracking in high strength weld metal (WM) is a potentially serious problem in thick-sections, especially in highly restrained structures. This paper presents preliminary re suits for which transverse weld metal hydrogen cracking was purposefully generated in 40 mm thick high strength WM to study the effectiveness of various non-destructive testing methods in locating and sizing transverse cracks. Transverse WM hydrogen cracking was intentionally produced by: increasing diffusible hydrogen levels through the introduction of 2% hydrogen in CO 2 shielding gas and minimizing interpass temperature and time; increasing the cracking susceptibility of the micro structure by increasing cooling rate with a large-scale test plate and maintaining an interpass temperature below 70 deg C; increasing stress levels with the use of stiffeners and end welds; and rapid postweld cooling to a temperature lower than 100 deg C. The extent of transverse weld metal hydrogen cracking was evaluated by non-destructive testing (NDT), which included conventional ultrasonic testing, radiography, acoustic emission monitoring and magnetic particle inspection. It was established that conventional ultrasonic testing was the most effective of the NDT techniques used. Acoustic emission monitoring revealed that two different types of emissions emanated from the weld metal and that the majority of emissions occurred within the first 48 hours of welding, although there was some evidence of cracking well after this initial 48 hour period. Larger sized cracks were observed near the transverse stiffeners (and weld ends) where tensile residual stresses (both longitudinal and transverse) were thought to be highest and the micro structure was therefore more susceptible to cracking. Additionally, numerous finer cracks were located in the top third of the plate (in the thickness direction) and on both sides of the weld centre line

  12. Very High Cycle Fatigue Crack Initiation Mechanism in Nugget Zone of AA 7075 Friction Stir Welded Joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Very high cycle fatigue behavior of nugget zone in AA 7075 friction stir welded joint was experimentally investigated using ultrasonic fatigue testing system (20 kHz to clarify the crack initiation mechanism. It was found that the fatigue strength of nugget zone decreased continuously even beyond 107 cycles with no traditional fatigue limits. Fatigue cracks initiated from the welding defects located at the bottom side of the friction stir weld. Moreover, a special semicircular zone could be characterized around the crack initiation site, of which the stress intensity factor approximately equaled the threshold of fatigue crack propagation rate. Finally, a simplified model was proposed to estimate the fatigue life by correlating the welding defect size and applied stress. The predicted results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  13. High Temperature Analysis of Aluminum-Lithium 2195 Alloy to Aid in the Design of Improved Welding Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talia, George E.; Widener, Christian

    1996-01-01

    Aluminum-lithium alloys have extraordinary properties. The addition of lithium to an aluminum alloy decreases its density, while making large increases in its strength and hardness. The down side is that they are unstable at higher temperatures, and are subsequently difficult to weld or even manufacture. Martin Marietta, though, developed an aluminum-lithium alloy 2195 that was reported to have exceptional properties and good weldability. Thus, it was chosen as the alloy for the space shuttles super light external tank. Unfortunately, welding 2195 has turned out to be much more of a challenge than anticipated. Thus, research has been undergone in order to understand the mechanisms that are causing the welding problems. Gas reactions have been observed to be detrimental to weld strength. Water vapor has often been identified as having a significant role in these reactions. Nitrogen, however, has also been shown to have a direct correlation to porosity. These reactions were suspected as being complex and responsible for the two main problems of welding 2195. One, the initial welds of 2195 are much weaker than the parent metal. Second, each subsequent welding pass increases the size and number of cracks and porosity, yielding significant reductions in strength. Consequently, the objective of this research was to characterize the high-temperature reactions of 2195 in order to understand the mechanisms for crack growth and the formation of porosity in welds. In order to accomplish that goal, an optical hot-stage microscope, HSM, was used to observe those reactions as they occurred. Surface reactions of 2195 were observed in a variety of environments, such as air, vacuum, nitrogen and helium. For comparison, some samples of Al-2219 were also observed. Some of the reacted surfaces were then analyzed on a scanning electron microscope, SEM. Additionally, a gas chromatograph was used to analyze the gaseous products of the high temperature reactions.

  14. Characterization of the electrochemical behavior of coating by steel welding 308l and in presence of noble metals deposits; Caracterizacion del comportamiento electroquimico de recubrimiento por soldadura de acero 308L y en presencia de depositos de metales nobles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piedras, P.; Arganis J, C. R., E-mail: pedro.piedras@hotmail.es [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    In this work the oxide deposits and noble metals deposit were characterized (Ag and Pt) on a coating of stainless steel 308l that were deposited by the shield metal arc welding (SMAW) on steel A36 by means of scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The extrapolation of Tafel technique was also used to obtain the corrosion potential (Ec) for the pre-rusty steel and for the samples with deposits of Pt and Ag under conditions of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), demonstrating that this parameter diminishes with the presence of this deposits. (Author)

  15. Life Management of high energy piping girth welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, M.J.; Paterson, S.R.

    1994-01-01

    Life management of high energy piping systems is a synergistic process that combines the collective results from nondestructive examination (NDE), stress analysis, metallurgical replication, and fracture mechanics evaluations. To achieve conclusions with high confidence and reliability, the methodology requires that: (1) all weldments must be appropriately examined to establish initial baseline data and indicate both fabrication and inservice damage, (2) as-found stress analyses must be consistent with field estimated displacements to select sites of maximum in-service damage, and (3) metallurgical replicas must be taken at high stress sites determined as an outcome of a life exhaustion evaluation. The multidiscipline tasks are effectively managed by developing a rational framework incorporating all of the above requirements. Analytical algorithms that estimate linear and nonlinear degradation effects are included in the remaining life predictions. High damage locations are selected based on a life exhaustion calculation. Localized remaining life and reexamination intervals for failures governed by creep and fatigue damage are estimated by metallurgical replica cavitation damage and the service life. Stress-based creep damage identified in metallurgical replicas should correspond to the predicted high damage locations from the life exhaustion calculation. The methodology minimizes future reexamination locations while providing high certainty of monitoring lead-the-fleet damage. This life management program recognizes the aging process in plant equipment. It establishes a continuous process of examinations, evaluations, and decisions to track degradation of the piping system life cycle. Potential problems are identified long before failures occur. Corrective action is taken during scheduled outages to maintain the required level of plant performance

  16. High quality joining techniques: in-process assurance (IPA) welding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaihara, Shoichiro

    1996-01-01

    On July 1, 1995, the Product Liability Law was enforced, and in industrial world, further reliability has been demanded. Recently, accompanying the progress of electronics, the proportion taken by automatic welders and robots increased in welding. By memorizing proper welding conditions, the welding from initial to final passes can be done fully automatically. Also feedback mechanism was equipped to mechanized welders, and the in-process control has become to be feasible. The way of thinking on confirming in process welding quality in arc welding is explained. IPA welding system utilizes the multi-media collecting images and sound, samples the change of welding conditions and the state of arc on a same screen, and monitors the deviation from the range of proper welding conditions. At the time of abnormality, inspector or a computer carries out image diagnosis and welding control, and the system indicates the soundness of welded parts. The basic concept and the flow chart of this system are shown. The experiment of applying the system to arc welding is reported. The correlation of welding phenomena and welding conditions is examined. (K.I.)

  17. High quality joining techniques: in-process assurance (IPA) welding system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaihara, Shoichiro [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    On July 1, 1995, the Product Liability Law was enforced, and in industrial world, further reliability has been demanded. Recently, accompanying the progress of electronics, the proportion taken by automatic welders and robots increased in welding. By memorizing proper welding conditions, the welding from initial to final passes can be done fully automatically. Also feedback mechanism was equipped to mechanized welders, and the in-process control has become to be feasible. The way of thinking on confirming in process welding quality in arc welding is explained. IPA welding system utilizes the multi-media collecting images and sound, samples the change of welding conditions and the state of arc on a same screen, and monitors the deviation from the range of proper welding conditions. At the time of abnormality, inspector or a computer carries out image diagnosis and welding control, and the system indicates the soundness of welded parts. The basic concept and the flow chart of this system are shown. The experiment of applying the system to arc welding is reported. The correlation of welding phenomena and welding conditions is examined. (K.I.)

  18. Method and apparatus for welding workpieces along a seam with the aid of a filler material deposited in the seam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    A method and apparatus for welding a nuclear reactor core barrel in a very precise and controlled manner is given. The power employed to preheat the filler material at its operating level is automatically controlled as a continuous non-linear function of the filler feed speed. (UK)

  19. High temperature strength analysis of welded joint of RAF's by small punch test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, T. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Dept. of Materials Science and Engineeering, Hokkaido (Japan); Komazaki, S.; Kohno, Y. [Muroran Institute of Technology, Muroran (Japan); Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Kohyama, A. [Kyoto Univ., Institute of Advanced Energy (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Nucleation and growth of microvoids and/or small cracks in fine-grained heat affected zone (HAZ) after long-term service operation, which is recognized as Type IV creep damage, has recently been a worldwide issue for high Cr ferritic steels. In our group, a small punch (SP) creep test has been successfully applied to evaluate this damage of low alloy ferritic steel. However, the HAZ of fusion reactor material welded by electron-beam (EB) welding is so narrow that it is not easy to evaluate its mechanical properties by conventional tests including the SP creep test with a plate-type specimen (10 x 10 x 0.5 mm{sup 3}). In this study, the SP creep test using a further miniaturized specimen was developed and applied to the welded joint of reduced activation ferritic steels (RAFs), F82H-IEA (Fe-8Cr-2W-0.2V-0.02Ta), for measuring creep properties of the HAZ. For the SP creep test, TEM disk-type samples (diam. 3.0 x 0.30 mm) were removed from the base metal (BM), weld metal (WM) and HAZ, respectively. The specimen surfaces were polished up to a 0.05 {mu}m alumina powder finish and the specimen's thickness was finally adjusted to 0.25 mm. The SP creep tests were performed at temperatures of 823{approx}973 K and under loads ranging from 20 to 200 N. A constant load was applied to the center of the specimen through the Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} bail (diam. 1.0 mm) using the electric servo motor. The central deflection of the specimen was monitored by measuring the displacement of the compression rod. The tests were carried out in an argon gas atmosphere and the gas was continuously passed through during the test to prevent severe oxidation of the specimen. The differences in SP creep properties such as rupture time and minimum creep rate between the BM, WM and HAZ were discussed in terms of microstructural changes during welding thermal cycles. In addition, the result obtained from the BM was correlated with those of uniaxial creep test

  20. Welding technologies for nuclear machinery and equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro; Yokono, Tomomi.

    1991-01-01

    The main welding methods applied to nuclear machinery and equipment are shielded metal arc welding, submerged arc welding, MAG welding and TIG welding. But in the last 10 years, in order to improve the reliability required for the welding of nuclear machinery and equipment, the welding technologies aiming at the reduction of heat input, the decrease of the number of welding pass and the automatic control of welding factors have been applied for the main purpose of bettering the quality and excluding human errors. The merits and the technology of narrow gap, pulsed MAG welding and melt-through welding are explained. As the automation of TIG welding, image processing type narrow gap, hot wire TIG welding and remote control type automatic TIG welding are described. For the longitudinal welding of active metal sheet products, plasma key-hole welding is applied. Since the concentration of its arc is good, high speed welding with low heat input can be done. For the stainless steel cladding by welding, electroslag welding has become to be employed in place of conventional submerged arc welding. Arc is not generated in the electroslag welding, and the penetration into base metal is small. (K.I.)

  1. Recent Corrosion Research Trends in Weld Joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hwan Tae; Kil, Sang Cheol; Hwang, Woon Suk

    2007-01-01

    The increasing interest in the corrosion properties of weld joints in the corrosive environment is placing stringent demands on the manufacturing techniques and performance requirements, and the manufacture employs the high quality and efficiency welding process to produce welds. Welding plays an important role in the fabrication of chemical plants, nuclear power plant, ship construction, and this has led to an increasing attention to the corrosion resistant weld joints. This paper covers recent technical trends of welding technologies for corrosion resistance properties including the COMPENDEX DB analysis of welding materials, welding process, and welding fabrications

  2. Influence of titanium–boron additions on grain refinement of AA6082 gas tungsten arc welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishore Babu, N.; Talari, Mahesh Kumar; Dayou, Pan; Zheng, Sun; Jun, Wei; SivaPrasad, K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ti in the weld metal resulted in grain refinement due to growth restriction effect. ► Weld metal strength improved due to grain refinement caused by Tibor™ addition. ► Weld metal responded to post-weld ageing treatment due to dilution from base metal. ► Weld metal with AA5356 filler are stronger then AA4043 for all Tibor™ additions. -- Abstract: Grain refinement of weld metal plays a vital role in improving mechanical properties (ductility and toughness) as well as weldability. The present study has investigated the influence of Tibor™ additions on the structure and mechanical properties of AA6082 gas tungsten arc (GTA) weldments. Controlled amounts of Tibor™ grain refiner (containing Ti and B in a ratio of 5:1) were introduced into the molten pool of AA6082 by pre-deposited cast inserts (AA4043 and AA5356) under different welding conditions by GTA welding. Full penetration GTA welds were prepared using alternating current (AC). It was observed that grain size was decreased with increasing amounts of Tibor™. The grain refinement is mainly caused grain nucleation associated with constitutional undercooling during solidification. It has been shown that welds prepared with 5356 cast insert exhibited high strength and ductility when compared with other welds. The observed grain refinement was shown to result in an appreciable increase in fusion zone hardness, strength and ductility.

  3. Fracture toughness of austenitic stainless steel weld metal at 4 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, G.M.

    1984-08-01

    Selection of the welding processess and weld filler metals for fabrication of a large toroidal superconducting magnet is described. Data available in the literature are collected and compared with data generated in this study for three welding processes, shielded metal arc (SMA), gas tungsten arc (GTA), and flux cored arc (FCA) welds had the highest fracture toughness as measured by K/sub Ic/ estimated from J/sub Ic/. The SMA and FCA welds had about the same toughness, below the GTA values but above the average from the literature. The fracture mode for all three processes was typified by ductile dimples. The fracture morphology of the FCA weld specimens was influenced by the solidification substructure, and small particles were found to be nucleation sites for void formation, especially for the GTA welds. All three welding processes were deemed adequate for the intended service and were used to fabricate the large magnet. A trunnion-type turning fixture eliminated the need for welding in the vertical and overhead positions. The GTA process was used for all root passes, and the horizontal welds were filled by the SMA process. Over 80% of the welds were done in the flat position with the FCA process, and its high deposition rate and ease of operation are credited with contributing greatly to the success of the effort

  4. A Preliminary Report on the Strength and Metallography of a Bimetallic Friction Stir Weld Joint Between AA6061 and MIL-DTL-46100E High Hardness Steel Armor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    bimetallic friction stir weld joint between AA6061 and MIL-DTL-46100E High Hardness steel armor. ABSTRACT One half inch thick plates of 6061-T6 aluminum...alloy and High Hardness steel armor (MIL- STD-46100) were successfully joined by the friction stir welding (FSW) process using a tungsten-rhenium...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A preliminary report on the strength and metallography of a bimetallic friction stir weld joint between AA6061 and MIL-DTL

  5. Radiation Tolerance of Controlled Fusion Welds in High Temperature Oxidation Resistant FeCrAl Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gussev, Maxim N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    High temperature oxidation resistant iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) alloys are candidate alloys for nuclear applications due to their exceptional performance during off-normal conditions such as a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) compared to currently deployed zirconium-based claddings [1]. A series of studies have been completed to determine the weldability of the FeCrAl alloy class and investigate the weldment performance in the as-received (non-irradiated) state [2,3]. These initial studies have shown the general effects of composition and microstructure on the weldability of FeCrAl alloys. Given this, limited details on the radiation tolerance of FeCrAl alloys and their weldments exist. Here, the highest priority candidate FeCrAl alloys and their weldments have been investigated after irradiation to enable a better understanding of FeCrAl alloy weldment performance within a high-intensity neutron field. The alloys examined include C35M (Fe-13%Cr-5% Al) and variants with aluminum (+2%) or titanium carbide (+1%) additions. Two different sub-sized tensile geometries, SS-J type and SS-2E (or SS-mini), were neutron irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor to 1.8-1.9 displacements per atom (dpa) in the temperature range of 195°C to 559°C. Post irradiation examination of the candidate alloys was completed and included uniaxial tensile tests coupled with digital image correlation (DIC), scanning electron microscopy-electron back scattered diffraction analysis (SEM-EBSD), and SEM-based fractography. In addition to weldment testing, non-welded parent material was examined as a direct comparison between welded and non-welded specimen performance. Both welded and non-welded specimens showed a high degree of radiation-induced hardening near irradiation temperatures of 200°C, moderate radiation-induced hardening near temperatures of 360°C, and almost no radiation-induced hardening at elevated temperatures near 550°C. Additionally, low-temperature irradiations showed

  6. High-Speed Friction Stir Welding of AA7075-T6 Sheet: Microstructure, Mechanical Properties, Micro-texture, and Thermal History

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jingyi; Upadhyay, Piyush; Hovanski, Yuri; Field, David P.

    2017-11-20

    Friction-stir-welding (FSW) is a cost-effective and high quality joining process for aluminum alloys (especially heat-treatable allo ys) that has been applied successfully in the aerospace industry. However, the full potential of FSW on more cost-sensitive applications is still limited by the production rate, namely the welding speed of the process. The majority of literature evaluating FSW of aluminum alloys is based on welds made in the range of welding speeds around hundreds of millimeters per minute, and only a handful are at a moderate speed of 1 m/min. In this study we present a microstructural analysis of friction stir welded AA7075-T6 blanks with welding speeds up to 3 m/min. Textures, microstructures, mechanical properties, and weld quality are analyzed using TEM, EBSD, metallographic imaging, and Vickers hardness. Results are coupled with welding parameters to aid in the understanding of the complex material flow and texture gradients within the welds in an effort to optimize welding parameters for high speed processing.

  7. High power RF window deposition apparatus, method, and device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Lawrence R.; Lucovsky, Gerald; Zeller, Daniel

    2017-07-04

    A process for forming a coating for an RF window which has improved secondary electron emission and reduced multipactor for high power RF waveguides is formed from a substrate with low loss tangent and desirable mechanical characteristics. The substrate has an RPAO deposition layer applied which oxygenates the surface of the substrate to remove carbon impurities, thereafter has an RPAN deposition layer applied to nitrogen activate the surface of the substrate, after which a TiN deposition layer is applied using Titanium tert-butoxide. The TiN deposition layer is capped with a final RPAN deposition layer of nitridation to reduce the bound oxygen in the TiN deposition layer. The resulting RF window has greatly improved titanium layer adhesion, reduced multipactor, and is able to withstand greater RF power levels than provided by the prior art.

  8. Basic numerical study on gap influence of residual stress and distortion during high-brightness laser butt welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serizawa, Hisashi; Mori, Daiki; Murakawa, Hidekazu

    2013-01-01

    High-brightness laser such as fiber laser or disk laser is expected to minimize the total heat input energy in welding due to its high beam quality, and the welding residual stress and distortion also seem to be reduced as a result. However, the diameter of high-brightness laser beam is less than 0.6 mm and it is difficult to set the beam position to contact face between two parts because in general there would be a gap due to quality of parts. In this study, in order to reveal the effect of gap on the residual stress and the welding distortion during fiber laser welding, the butt welding of two plates were examined through the thermal elastic-plastic analysis with a new gap element. From the result of thermal analyses, it was found that the homogeneous ellipsoid body could be applicable to model the shape of heat source for the fiber laser and the gap width would not influence the penetration shape when the gap width was changed from 0.1 to 0.25 mm. In addition, the elastic-plastic analyses indicated that the transverse shrinkage slightly increased with increasing the gap width, while this shrinkage without gap was much smaller than that with gap. Also, it was revealed that the welding speed largely affects both the welding residual stress and distortion. Moreover, it was found that the residual stress was almost independent of the jig position, while the position of fixtures slightly affected the transverse shrinkage. (author)

  9. Performance of high molybdenum superaustenitic stainless steel welds in harsh chloride environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenvall, P.; Liljas, M.; Wallen, B.

    1996-01-01

    Superaustenitic steels are normally welded with nickel-based alloys as filler materials. To clarify the understanding of weld behavior in superaustenitic stainless steels this paper presents the development history of 6Mo and 7Mo steels, and results of laboratory tests and field tests on welds of UNS S31254 (6Mo) and UNS S32654 (7 Mo) in different types of chloride containing environments. The laboratory tests consisted of the well known ferric chloride test (ASTM G 48 Method A). Shielded metal arc welds, gas tungsten arc welds and submerged arc welds in both grades were tested. The critical pitting temperatures were determined and the locations of the attack were noted. Some specimens were sectioned at the position of the attack followed by studies using light optical microscopy. The critical pitting temperatures of the welds in S31254 and S32654 were at normal levels for both grades, i.e., 40--50 C for S31254 and 60--75 C for S32654. The locations of the attack differed depending on the welding process. In shielded metal arc welds the attack was mostly located in the weld metal. In gas tungsten arc welds the attack was predominantly located next to the fusion line. The field tests showed that the behavior of welds and parent metal of superaustenitic stainless steels, as well as of nickel-based alloys, is much dependent on the corrosive environment. In oxidizing chloride solutions, similar results to those of the ferric chloride test, are observed. However, crevice corrosion in the parent material is at a greater risk than pitting corrosion in the welds. In very oxidizing solutions of low chloride concentrations, welds made of nickel-based fillers may corrode faster than the stainless steel base metal due to transpassive uniform corrosion. The opposite situation exists when active uniform corrosion prevails, i.e., welds made of nickel-based fillers corrode less than the stainless steel parent material

  10. Development of High Heat Input Welding Offshore Steel as Normalized Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wei; Qin, Xiaomei

    The heavy plate used for offshore structure is one of the important strategic products. In recent years, there is an increasing demand for heavy shipbuilding steel plate with excellent weldability in high heat input welding. During the thermal cycle, the microstructure of the heat affected zone (HAZ) of plates was damaged, and this markedly reduced toughness of HAZ. So, how to improve the toughness of HAZ has been a key subject in the fields of steel research. Oxide metallurgy is considered as an effective way to improve toughness of HAZ, because it could be used to retard grain growth by fine particles, which are stable at the high temperature.The high strength steel plate, which satisfies the low temperature specification, has been applied to offshore structure. Excellent properties of the plates and welded joints were obtained by oxide metallurgy technology, latest controlled rolling and accelerated cooling technology using Ultra-Fast Cooling (an on-line accelerated cooling system). The 355MPa-grade high strength steel plates with normalizing condition were obtained, and the steels have excellent weldability with heat input energy of 79 287kJ/cm, and the nil ductility transition (NDT) temperature was -70°C, which can satisfy the construction of offshore structure in cold regions.

  11. Building Quakes: Detection of Weld Fractures in Buildings using High-Frequency Seismic Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, V.; Kohler, M. D.; Heaton, T. H.

    2009-12-01

    Catastrophic fracture of welded beam-column connections in buildings was observed in the Northridge and Kobe earthquakes. Despite the structural importance of such connections, it can be difficult to locate damage in structural members underneath superficial building features. We have developed a novel technique to locate fracturing welds in buildings in real time using high-frequency information from seismograms. Numerical and experimental methods were used to investigate an approach for detecting the brittle fracture of welds of beam-column connections in instrumented steel moment-frame buildings through the use of time-reversed Green’s functions and wave propagation reciprocity. The approach makes use of a prerecorded catalogue of Green’s functions for an instrumented building to detect high-frequency failure events in the building during a later earthquake by screening continuous data for the presence of one or more of the events. This was explored experimentally by comparing structural responses of a small-scale laboratory structure under a variety of loading conditions. Experimentation was conducted on a polyvinyl chloride frame model structure with data recorded at a sample rate of 2000 Hz using piezoelectric accelerometers and a 24-bit digitizer. Green’s functions were obtained by applying impulsive force loads at various locations along the structure with a rubber-tipped force transducer hammer. We performed a blind test using cross-correlation techniques to determine if it was possible to use the catalogue of Green’s functions to pinpoint the absolute times and locations of subsequent, induced failure events in the structure. A finite-element method was used to simulate the response of the model structure to various source mechanisms in order to determine the types of elastic waves that were produced as well as to obtain a general understanding of the structural response to localized loading and fracture.

  12. Development of High Heat Input Welding High Strength Steel Plate for Oil Storage Tank in Xinyu Steel Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hemin; Dong, Fujun; Liu, Xiaolin; Xiong, Xiong

    This essay introduces the developed high-heat input welding quenched and tempered pressure vessel steel 12MnNiVR for oil storage tank by Xinyu Steel, which passed the review by the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Standards Technical Committee in 2009. The review comments that compared to the domestic and foreign similar steel standard, the key technical index of enterprise standard were in advanced level. After the heat input of 100kJ/cm electro-gas welding, welded points were still with excellent low temperature toughness at -20°C. The steel plate may be constructed for oil storage tank, which has been permitted by thickness range from 10 to 40mm, and design temperature among -20°C-100°C. It studied microstructure genetic effects mechanical properties of the steel. Many production practices indicated that the mechanical properties of products and the steel by stress relief heat treatment of steel were excellent, with pretreatment of hot metal, converter refining, external refining, protective casting, TMCP and heat treatment process measurements. The stability of performance and matured technology of Xinyu Steel support the products could completely service the demand of steel constructed for 10-15 million cubic meters large oil storage tank.

  13. Mechanical Properties of Plug Welds after Micro-Jet Cooling

    OpenAIRE

    Hadryś D.

    2016-01-01

    New technology of micro-jet welding could be regarded as a new way to improve mechanical properties of plug welds. The main purpose of that paper was analyzing of mechanical properties of plug welds made by MIG welding method with micro-jet cooling. The main way for it was comparison of plug welds made by MIG welding method with micro-jet cooling and plug welds made by ordinary MIG welding method. It is interesting for steel because higher amount of acicular ferrite (AF) in weld metal deposit...

  14. Laser Beam Welding of Ultra-high Strength Chromium Steel with Martensitic Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Martin; Janzen, Vitalij; Lindner, Stefan; Wagener, Rainer

    A new class of steels is going to be introduced into sheet manufacturing. Stainless ferritic and martensitic steels open up opportunities for sheet metal fabrication including hot stamping. Strengths of up to 2 GPa at fracture elongations of 15% can be attained through this. Welding of these materials, as a result, became a challenge. Energy-reduced welding methods with in-situ heat treatment are required in order to ensure the delicate and complex heat control. Laser beam welding is the joining technique of choice to supply minimum heat input to the fusion process and to apply efficient heat control. For two application cases, tailored blank production in as-rolled condition and welding during assembly in hot stamped condition, welding processes have been developed. The welding suitability is shown through metallurgical investigations of the welds. Crash tests based on the KS-II concept as well as fatigue tests prove the applicability of the joining method.

  15. Research on Microstructure and Properties of Welded Joint of High Strength Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Pengxiao; Li, Yi; Chen, Bo; Ma, Xuejiao; Zhang, Dongya; Tang, Cai

    2018-01-01

    BS960 steel plates were welded by Laser-MAG and MAG. The microstructure and properties of the welded joints were investigated by optical microscope, micro-hardness tester, universal tensile testing machine, impact tester, scanning electron microscope (SEM) and fatigue tester. By a series of experiments, the following results were obtained: The grain size of the coarse grain zone with Laser-MAG welded joint is 20μm, and that with MAG welded joint is about 32μm, both of the fine grain region are composed of fine lath martensite and granular bainite; the width of the heat affected region with Laser-MAG is lower than that with MAG. The strength and impact energy of welded joints with Laser-MAG is higher than that with MAG. The conditioned fatigue limit of welded joint with Laser-MAG is 280MPa; however, the conditioned fatigue limit of welded joint with MAG is 250MPa.

  16. Microstructure and mechanical performance of depositing CuSi3 Cu alloy onto 30CrMnSi steel plate by the novel consumable and non-consumable electrodes indirect arc welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jun; Cao, Jian; Feng, Jicai

    2010-01-01

    A novel consumable and non-consumable electrodes indirect arc welding (CNC-IAW) with low heat input was successfully applied in depositing CuSi 3 Cu alloy onto 30CrMnSi steel plate. The indirect arc was generated between the consumable and non-consumable welding torch. The microstructure of the deposited weld was analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and optical microscopy (OM). The results showed that the dilution ratio of the bead-on-plate weld was controlled no higher than 5% and the deleterious iron picking up was effectively restrained. The deposited metal mainly consisted of ε-Cu solid solution and a small amount of Fe 2 Si phase. In the interfacial zone between the deposited metal and base metal, the thickness of the zone changed from thick to thin and the microstructure changed from complex to simple from the middle to both sides. In the middle of the interfacial zone, the microstructure presented three sub-layers consisting of Fe 3 Si (L)/Fe 3 Si (S) + ε-Cu/α-Fe. In the both sides of the interfacial zone, the microstructure presented single α-Fe layer. The formation mechanism of the interfacial zone could be successfully explained by the formation of the Fe liquid-solid phase zone adjacent to the Fe base metal and the interfusion between Fe and Si. The average compressive shear strength reached 321 MPa and its fracture morphology mainly belonged to ductile fracture.

  17. Nugget Structure Evolution with Rotation Speed for High-Rotation-Speed Friction-Stir-Welded 6061 Aluminum Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H. J.; Wang, M.; Zhu, Z.; Zhang, X.; Yu, T.; Wu, Z. Q.

    2018-03-01

    High-rotation-speed friction stir welding (HRS-FSW) is a promising technique to reduce the welding loads during FSW and thus facilitates the application of FSW for in situ fabrication and repair. In this study, 6061 aluminum alloy was friction stir welded at high-rotation speeds ranging from 3000 to 7000 rpm at a fixed welding speed of 50 mm/min, and the effects of rotation speed on the nugget zone macro- and microstructures were investigated in detail in order to illuminate the process features. Temperature measurements during HRS-FSW indicated that the peak temperature did not increase consistently with rotation speed; instead, it dropped remarkably at 5000 rpm because of the lowering of material shear stress. The nugget size first increased with rotation speed until 5000 rpm and then decreased due to the change of the dominant tool/workpiece contact condition from sticking to sliding. At the rotation speed of 5000 rpm, where the weld material experienced weaker thermal effect and higher-strain-rate plastic deformation, the nugget exhibited relatively small grain size, large textural intensity, and high dislocation density. Consequently, the joint showed superior nugget hardness and simultaneously a slightly low tensile ductility.

  18. Study of the flux effect nature for VVER-1000 RPV welds with high nickel content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuleshova, E.A., E-mail: evgenia-orm@yandex.ru [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Sq.1, 123182, Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University, “MEPhI” (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Kashirskoe Highway 31, 115409, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gurovich, B.A.; Lavrukhina, Z.V.; Maltsev, D.A.; Fedotova, S.V.; Frolov, A.S.; Zhuchkov, G.M. [National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Kurchatov Sq.1, 123182, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    This work extends the research of the basic regularities of segregation processes in the grain boundaries (GB) of VVER-1000 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. The paper considers the influence of irradiation with different fast neutron fluxes on the structure, yield strength and ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (T{sub K}) changes as well as on changes of the share of brittle intergranular fracture and development of segregation processes in the VVER-1000 RPV weld metal (WM). The obtained experimental results allow to separate the contribution of the hardening and non-hardening mechanisms to mechanical properties degradation of material irradiated at the operating temperature. It is shown that the difference in T{sub K} shift in WM irradiated to the same fluence with different fast neutron fluxes is mainly due to the difference in the GB accumulation kinetics of impurities and only to a small extent due to the material hardening. Phosphorus bulk diffusion coefficients were evaluated for the temperature exposure, accelerated irradiation and irradiation within surveillance specimens (SS) using a kinetic model of phosphorus GB accumulation in low-alloyed low-carbon steels under the influence of operational factors. The correlation between the GB segregation level of phosphorus and nickel, and the T{sub K} shift - in WM SS was obtained experimentally and indicates the non-hardening mechanism contribution to the total radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 RPV steels throughout its extended lifetime. - Highlights: • Structural elements in high Ni welds are studied at different irradiation fluxes. • AES study demonstrated different P GB kinetics at different irradiation fluxes. • Hardening and non-hardening mechanism contributions to the flux effect are assessed. • Correlation between ΔT{sub K} and P and Ni GB content is shown for VVER-1000 RPV welds.

  19. Adoption of High Performance Computational (HPC) Modeling Software for Widespread Use in the Manufacture of Welded Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brust, Frederick W. [Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus, Columbus, OH (United States); Punch, Edward F. [Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus, Columbus, OH (United States); Twombly, Elizabeth Kurth [Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus, Columbus, OH (United States); Kalyanam, Suresh [Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus, Columbus, OH (United States); Kennedy, James [Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus, Columbus, OH (United States); Hattery, Garty R. [Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus, Columbus, OH (United States); Dodds, Robert H. [Professional Consulting Services, Inc., Lisle, IL (United States); Mach, Justin C [Caterpillar, Peoria, IL (United States); Chalker, Alan [Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC), Columbus, OH (United States); Nicklas, Jeremy [Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC), Columbus, OH (United States); Gohar, Basil M [Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC), Columbus, OH (United States); Hudak, David [Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC), Columbus, OH (United States)

    2016-12-30

    This report summarizes the final product developed for the US DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase II grant made to Engineering Mechanics Corporation of Columbus (Emc2) between April 16, 2014 and August 31, 2016 titled ‘Adoption of High Performance Computational (HPC) Modeling Software for Widespread Use in the Manufacture of Welded Structures’. Many US companies have moved fabrication and production facilities off shore because of cheaper labor costs. A key aspect in bringing these jobs back to the US is the use of technology to render US-made fabrications more cost-efficient overall with higher quality. One significant advantage that has emerged in the US over the last two decades is the use of virtual design for fabrication of small and large structures in weld fabrication industries. Industries that use virtual design and analysis tools have reduced material part size, developed environmentally-friendly fabrication processes, improved product quality and performance, and reduced manufacturing costs. Indeed, Caterpillar Inc. (CAT), one of the partners in this effort, continues to have a large fabrication presence in the US because of the use of weld fabrication modeling to optimize fabrications by controlling weld residual stresses and distortions and improving fatigue, corrosion, and fracture performance. This report describes Emc2’s DOE SBIR Phase II final results to extend an existing, state-of-the-art software code, Virtual Fabrication Technology (VFT®), currently used to design and model large welded structures prior to fabrication - to a broader range of products with widespread applications for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). VFT® helps control distortion, can minimize and/or control residual stresses, control welding microstructure, and pre-determine welding parameters such as weld-sequencing, pre-bending, thermal-tensioning, etc. VFT® uses material properties, consumable properties, etc. as inputs

  20. Welding hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Welding technology is advancing rapidly in the developed countries and has converted into a science. Welding involving the use of electricity include resistance welding. Welding shops are opened in residential area, which was causing safety hazards, particularly the teenagers and children who eagerly see the welding arc with their naked eyes. There are radiation hazards from ultra violet rays which irritate the skin, eye irritation. Welding arc light of such intensity could damage the eyes. (Orig./A.B.)

  1. Chemical Welding on Semimetallic TiS2 Nanosheets for High-Performance Flexible n-Type Thermoelectric Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan; Wan, Juanyong; Li, Qi; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Jiyang; Wang, Heao; He, Dunren; Li, Xiaorui; Yang, Yaocheng; Huang, Huihui

    2017-12-13

    Solution-based processing of two-dimensional (2D) materials provides the possibility of allowing these materials to be incorporated into large-area thin films, which can translate the interesting fundamental properties of 2D materials into available devices. Here, we report for the first time a novel chemical-welding method to achieve high-performance flexible n-type thermoelectric films using 2D semimetallic TiS 2 nanosheets. We employ chemically exfoliated TiS 2 nanosheets bridged with multivalent cationic metal Al 3+ to cross-link the nearby sheets during the film deposition process. We find that such a treatment can greatly enhance the stability of the film and can improve the power factor by simultaneously increasing the Seebeck coefficient and electrical conductivity. The resulting TiS 2 nanosheet-based flexible film shows a room temperature power factor of ∼216.7 μW m -1 K -2 , which is among the highest chemically exfoliated 2D transition-metal dichalcogenide nanosheet-based films and comparable to the best flexible n-type thermoelectric films, to our knowledge, indicating its potential applications in wearable electronics.

  2. Welding for the CRBRP steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalaris, C.N.; Ring, P.J.; Durand, R.E.; Wright, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    The rationale for selecting weld design, welding procedures and inspection methods was based upon the desire to obtain the highest reliability welds for the CRBRP steam generators. To assure the highest weld reliability, heavy emphasis was placed on the control of material cleanliness and composition substantially exceeding the requirements of the ASME Code for 2-1/4Cr--1Mo. The high tube/tubesheet weld quality was achieved through close material control, an extensive weld development program and the selection of high reliability welding equipment. Shell and nozzle weld fabrication using TIG, MIG, and submerged arc procedures are also being controlled through precise specifications, including preheat and postheat programs, together with radiography and ultrasonic inspection to ascertain the weld quality desired. Details of the tube/tubesheet welding and shell welding are described and results from the weld testing program are discussed

  3. Effect of heat input on dissimilar welds of ultra high strength steel and duplex stainless steel: Microstructural and compositional analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasalloti, H., E-mail: hamed.tasalloti.kashani@student.lut.fi; Kah, P., E-mail: paul.kah@lut.fi; Martikainen, J., E-mail: jukka.martikainen@lut.fi

    2017-01-15

    The effect of heat input on the microstructure and compositional heterogeneity of welds of direct-quenched ultra high strength steel (Optim 960 QC) and duplex stainless steel (UNS S32205) was studied. The dissimilar welds were made using GMAW with a fully austenitic filler wire. In addition to grain coarsening in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the ferritic side, it was found that an increase in heat input correlatively increased the proportional volume of bainitic to martensitic phases. Coarse ferritic grains were observed in the duplex HAZ. Higher heat input, however, had a beneficial effect on the nucleation of austenite in the HAZ. Heat input had a regulatory effect on grain growth within the austenitic weld and more favorable equiaxed austenite was obtained with higher heat input. On the ferritic side of the welds, macrosegregation in the form of a martensitic intermediate zone was observed for all the cooling rates studied. However, on the duplex side, macrosegregation in the fusion boundary was only noticed with higher cooling rates. Microstructural observations and compositional analysis suggest that higher heat input could be beneficial for the structural integrity of the weld despite higher heat input increasing the extent of adverse coarse grains in the HAZ, especially on the ferritic side. - Highlights: •The effect of heat input on dissimilar welds of UHSS and DSS was studied. •Transmutation of the microstructure was discussed in detail. •The influence of heat input on compositional heterogeneity of welds was described. •Higher heat input enhanced bainitic transformation on the ferritic side. •Macrosegregation was affected by the amount of heat input on the DSS side.

  4. In-line process control for laser welding of titanium by high dynamic range ratio pyrometry and plasma spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempe, B.; Taudt, C.; Baselt, T.; Rudek, F.; Maschke, R.; Basan, F.; Hartmann, P.

    2014-02-01

    The production of complex titanium components for various industries using laser welding processes has received growing attention in recent years. It is important to know whether the result of the cohesive joint meets the quality requirements of standardization and ultimately the customer requirements. Erroneous weld seams can have fatal consequences especially in the field of car manufacturing and medicine technology. To meet these requirements, a real-time process control system has been developed which determines the welding quality through a locally resolved temperature profile. By analyzing the resulting weld plasma received data is used to verify the stability of the laser welding process. The determination of the temperature profile is done by the detection of the emitted electromagnetic radiation from the material in a range of 500 nm to 1100 nm. As detectors, special high dynamic range CMOS cameras are used. As the emissivity of titanium depends on the wavelength, the surface and the angle of radiation, measuring the temperature is a problem. To solve these a special pyrometer setting with two cameras is used. That enables the compensation of these effects by calculating the difference between the respective pixels on simultaneously recorded images. Two spectral regions with the same emissivity are detected. Therefore the degree of emission and surface effects are compensated and canceled out of the calculation. Using the spatially resolved temperature distribution the weld geometry can be determined and the laser process can be controlled. The active readjustment of parameters such as laser power, feed rate and inert gas injection increases the quality of the welding process and decreases the number of defective goods.

  5. Mechanical properties and fatigue strength of high manganese non-magnetic steel/carbon steel welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakaji, Eiji; Ikeda, Soichi; Kim, You-Chul; Nakatsuji, Yoshihiro; Horikawa, Kosuke.

    1997-01-01

    The dissimilar materials welded joints of high manganese non-magnetic steel/carbon steel (hereafter referred to as DMW joints), in which weld defects such as hot crack or blowhole are not found, were the good quality. Tensile strength of DMW joints was 10% higher than that of the base metal of carbon steel. In the bend tests, the DMW joints showed the good ductility without crack. Charpy absorbed energy at 0(degC) of the DMW joints was over 120(J) in the bond where it seems to be the lowest. Large hardening or softening was not detected in the heat affected zone. Fatigue strength of the DMW joints is almost the same with that of the welded joints of carbon steel/carbon steel. As the fatigue strength of the DMW joints exceeds the fatigue design standard curve of JSSC for carbon steel welded joints, the DMW joints can be treated the same as the welded joints of carbon steel/carbon steel of which strength is lower than that of high manganese non-magnetic steel, from the viewpoint of the fatigue design. (author)

  6. Fatigue in Welded High-Strength Steel Plate Elements under Stochastic Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerskov, Henning; Petersen, R.I.; Martinez, L. Lopez

    1999-01-01

    The present project is a part of an investigation on fatigue in offshore structures in high-strength steel. The fatigue life of plate elements with welded attachments is studied. The material used has a yield stress of ~ 810-840 MPa, and high weldability and toughness properties. Fatigue test...... series with constant amplitude loading and with various types of stochastic loading have been carried through on test specimens in high-strength steel, and - for a comparison - on test specimens in conventional offshore structural steel with a yield stress of ~ 400-410 MPa.A comparison between constant...... amplitude and variable amplitude fatigue test results shows shorter fatigue lives in variable amplitude loading than should be expected from the linear fatigue damage accumulation formula. Furthermore, in general longer fatigue lives were obtained for the test specimens in high-strength steel than those...

  7. The study of development of welded compact plate heat exchanger for high temperature and pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jae Hong; Lim, Hyug; Kim, Jung Kyu; Cho, Sung Youl; Kwon, Oh Boong

    2009-01-01

    In view of space saving, the design of more compact heat exchangers is relatively important. Also, to meet the demand for saving energy and resources today, manufacturers are trying to enhance efficiency and reduce the size and weight of heat exchangers. Over the past decade, there has been tremendous advancement in the manufacturing technology of high efficiency heat exchangers. This has allowed the use of smaller and high performance heat exchangers. Consequently, the use of smaller and high performance heat exchanger becomes popular in the design of heat exchangers. Welded compact plate heat exchanger is used in high temperature and pressure. In the design of heat exchanger, it is necessary to understand the heat transfer characteristics, so performance data are provided to help design of this type heat exchanger.

  8. Ultrasonic Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabors, Sammy

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed Ultrasonic Stir Welding (USW) to join large pieces of very high-strength metals such as titanium and Inconel. USW, a solid-state weld process, improves current thermal stir welding processes by adding high-power ultrasonic (HPU) energy at 20 kHz frequency. The addition of ultrasonic energy significantly reduces axial, frictional, and shear forces; increases travel rates; and reduces wear on the stir rod, which results in extended stir rod life. The USW process decouples the heating, stirring, and forging elements found in the friction stir welding process allowing for independent control of each process element and, ultimately, greater process control and repeatability. Because of the independent control of USW process elements, closed-loop temperature control can be integrated into the system so that a constant weld nugget temperature can be maintained during welding.

  9. Characterisation of girth pipe weld for primary heat transport system of pressurised heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, P.K.; Vaze, K.K.; Kushwaha, H.S.

    2002-01-01

    The weld and heat affected zone (HAZ) associated with the girth weld are most vulnerable regions of the piping system. The different regions of the weld joint such as the weld metal, HAZ and base metal lead to heterogeneous mechanical and metallurgical properties of the joints. Due to their different metallurgical and mechanical properties, the amounts of damage produced in these regions are different when the component is subjected to service condition. Thus, it is imperative to know the characteristics of these regions of a pipe weld in order to identify the weakest zone for safe designing of high energy piping components. In view of this necessity the present study has been planned to carry out complete characterisation of the weld joint of SA 333 Gr.6 steel pipe, in terms of its metallurgical, mechanical and fracture properties. The mechanical and fracture mechanics properties of the base metal, weld deposit and HAZ have been compared and correlated with reference to their microstructures. Weld joints of SA 333 Gr.6 steel pipe have been prepared by using GTAW root pass and SMAW filling of V-grove as per recommended welding procedure specifications (WPS) conforming to ASME Sec IX commonly used to fabricate nuclear piping system components. The emphasis of the study is to characterise base, weld and HAZ of the pipe weld in terms of chemical, metallurgical, mechanical and fracture mechanics properties. The fracture toughness behaviour of the welds and HAZ has been characterised by J-integral parameters. The fatigue crack growth rate has been characterised by Paris Law. Stretched zone width (SZW) has been measured under SEM to evaluate initiation fracture toughness. The estimated initiation fracture toughness based on SZW and blunting line given by EGF recommendation have been compared. The fracture mechanics properties of base, weld and HAZ has been determined and compared. The fracture mechanics properties of the weld and HAZ have been correlated to their

  10. Methods for protection of high-strength welded stainless steel from corrosion cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashchevskij, V.B.; Gurvich, L.Ya.; Batrakov, V.P.; Kozheurova, N.S.; Molotova, V.A.; Shvarts, M.M.

    1978-01-01

    The efficiency of protection from corrosion cracking under a bending stress of 100 kgf/mm 2 in a salt mist and in a sulphur dioxide atmosphere, of welded joints of steel 08Kh15N5D2T with metallizing, galvanic and varnish coatings and lubricants, and of steel 1Kh15N4AM3 with sealing compounds has been investigated. Metallization of welded joints with aluminium and zinc efficiently increases corrosion resistance in a salt mist. Galvanic coatings of Cd, Zn, and Cr increase the time to cracking in a salt mist from 2-3 to 60-80 days. The protective properties of varnishes under the effect of a salt mist decrease in the following sequence: epoxy-polyamide enamel EP-140, acrylic enamel C-38, silicone enamels KO-834, KO-811, and KO-814. In an atmosphere containing SO 2 0.15 vol.% at 100% relative humidity, the varnishes investigated, with the exception of the inhibited coating XC-596, show lower protective properties than in a salt mist. The high efficiency of protection from corrosion cracking in a salt mist of slots of steel 1Kh15N4AM3 when using organic sealing compounds U4-21 and U5-21, and also slushing lubricants and oils PVK, TsIATIM-201, K17, and AMS3 was established

  11. Mechanical Properties of Plug Welds after Micro-Jet Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadryś D.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available New technology of micro-jet welding could be regarded as a new way to improve mechanical properties of plug welds. The main purpose of that paper was analyzing of mechanical properties of plug welds made by MIG welding method with micro-jet cooling. The main way for it was comparison of plug welds made by MIG welding method with micro-jet cooling and plug welds made by ordinary MIG welding method. It is interesting for steel because higher amount of acicular ferrite (AF in weld metal deposit (WMD is obtained in MIG welding method with micro-jet cooling in relation to ordinary MIG welding method. This article presents the influence of the cooling medium and the number of micro-jet streams on mechanical properties of the welded joint. Mechanical properties were described by force which is necessary to destroy weld joint.

  12. Corrosion Behavior of Metal Active Gas Welded Joints of a High-Strength Steel for Automotive Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Mainã Portella; Mantovani, Gerson Luiz; Vasant Kumar, R.; Antunes, Renato Altobelli

    2017-10-01

    In this work, the corrosion behavior of metal active gas-welded joints of a high-strength steel with tensile yield strength of 900 MPa was investigated. The welded joints were obtained using two different heat inputs. The corrosion behavior has been studied in a 3.5 wt.% NaCl aqueous solution using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and potentiodynamic polarization tests. Optical microscopy images, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive x-ray revealed different microstructural features in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) and the weld metal (WM). Before and after the corrosion process, the sample was evaluated by confocal laser scanning microscopy to measure the depth difference between HAZ and WM. The results showed that the heat input did not play an important role on corrosion behavior of HSLA steel. The anodic and cathodic areas of the welded joints could be associated with depth differences. The HAZ was found to be the anodic area, while the WM was cathodic with respect to the HAZ. The corrosion behavior was related to the amount and orientation nature of carbides in the HAZ. The microstructure of the HAZ consisted of martensite and bainite, whereas acicular ferrite was observed in the weld metal.

  13. Nitrogen And Oxygen Amount In Weld After Welding With Micro-Jet Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węgrzyn T.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Micro-jet cooling after welding was tested only for MIG welding process with argon, helium and nitrogen as a shielded gases. A paper presents a piece of information about nitrogen and oxygen in weld after micro-jet cooling. There are put down information about gases that could be chosen both for MIG/MAG welding and for micro-jet process. There were given main information about influence of various micro-jet gases on metallographic structure of steel welds. Mechanical properties of weld was presented in terms of nitrogen and oxygen amount in WMD (weld metal deposit.

  14. Alloying system for cold-resisting high-tensile welds of maraging steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yushchenko, K.A.; Pustovit, A.I.; Taver, E.I.; Piskarev, M.N.

    1978-01-01

    Studied was the effect of molybdenum (2.2-5%) and chromium (11.3-13.5%) on the structure and properties of welds in steel of the Cr-Ni-Mo-Co-Ti system at heat strengthened condition (hardening, cold treatment, ageing). The welds were made by argon-arc welding process involving a nonconsumable electrode without additives. The welds were tested at temperatures of 20 and -196 deg C. It is pointed out that the welds with a pure martensite structure at -196 deg C have a low ductility and impact strength. To obtain welds having a satisfactory value of impact strength more than 120 kGf/mm 2 at 20 deg C, it is necessary that the metal contains 20...60 % of residual austenite

  15. Effect of welding processes and consumables on fatigue crack growth behaviour of armour grade quenched and tempered steel joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Magudeeswaran

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Quenched and Tempered (Q&T steels are widely used in the construction of military vehicles due to its high strength to weight ratio and high hardness. These steels are prone to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC in the heat affected zone (HAZ after welding. The use of austenitic stainless steel (ASS consumables to weld the above steel was the only available remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase. The use of stainless steel consumables for a non-stainless steel base metal is not economical. Hence, alternate consumables for welding Q&T steels and their vulnerability to HIC need to be explored. Recent studies proved that low hydrogen ferritic steel (LHF consumables can be used to weld Q&T steels, which can give very low hydrogen levels in the weld deposits. The use of ASS and LHF consumables will lead to distinct microstructures in their respective welds. This microstructural heterogeneity will have a drastic influence in the fatigue crack growth resistance of armour grade Q&T steel welds. Hence, in this investigation an attempt has been made to study the influence of welding consumables and welding processes on fatigue crack growth behaviour of armour grade Q&T Steel joints. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW and Flux cored arc welding (FCAW were used for fabrication of joints using ASS and LHF consumables. The joints fabricated by SMAW process using LHF consumable exhibited superior fatigue crack growth resistance than all other joints.

  16. Control of Hydrogen Embrittlement in High Strength Steel Using Special Designed Welding Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    microstructure 4. A low near ambient temperature is reached. • All four factor must be simultaneously present 3 Mitigating HIC and Improving Weld Fatigue...Performance Through Weld Residual Stress Control UNCLASIFIED:DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited. Click to edit Master...title style 4 • Welding of Armor Steels favors all these conditions for HIC • Hydrogen Present in Sufficient Degree – Derived from moisture in the

  17. A control system for uniform bead in fillet arc welding on tack welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Woong; Lee, Jun Young

    2008-01-01

    Positioning a workpiece accurately and preventing weld distortion, tack welding is often adopted before main welding in the construction of welded structures. However, this tack weld deteriorates the final weld bead profile, so that the grinding process is usually performed for a uniform weld bead profile. In this study, a control system for uniform weld bead is proposed for the fillet arc welding on tack welds. The system consists of GMA welding machine, torch manipulator, laser vision sensor for measuring the tack weld size and the database for optimal welding conditions. Experiments have been performed for constructing the database and for evaluating the control capability of the system. It has been shown that the system has the capability to smooth the bead at the high level of quality

  18. Microstructural features of dissimilar welds between 316LN austenitic stainless steel and alloy 800

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sireesha, M.; Sundaresan, S.

    2000-01-01

    For joining type 316LN austenitic stainless steel to modified 9Cr-1Mo steel for power plant application, a trimetallic configuration using an insert piece (such as alloy 800) of intermediate thermal coefficient of expansion (CTE) has been sometimes suggested for bridging the wide gap in CTE between the two steels. Two joints are thus involved and this paper is concerned with the weld between 316LN and alloy 800. These welds were produced using three types of filler materials: austenitic stainless steels corresponding to 316,16Cr-8Ni-2Mo, and the nickel-base Inconel 182 1 . The weld fusion zones and the interfaces with the base materials were characterised in detail using light and transmission electron microscopy. The 316 and Inconel 182 weld metals solidified dendritically, while the 16-8-2(16%Cr-8%Ni-2%Mo) weld metal showed a predominantly cellular substructure. The Inconel weld metal contained a large number of inclusions when deposited from flux-coated electrodes, but was relatively inclusion-free under inert gas-shielded welding. Long-term elevated-temperature aging of the weld metals resulted in embrittling sigma phase precipitation in the austenitic stainless steel weld metals, but the nickel-base welds showed no visible precipitation, demonstrating their superior metallurgical stability for high-temperature service. (orig.)

  19. High throughput salt separation from uranium deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, S.W.; Park, K.M.; Kim, J.G.; Kim, I.T.; Park, S.B., E-mail: swkwon@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst. (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    It is very important to increase the throughput of the salt separation system owing to the high uranium content of spent nuclear fuel and high salt fraction of uranium dendrites in pyroprocessing. Multilayer porous crucible system was proposed to increase a throughput of the salt distiller in this study. An integrated sieve-crucible assembly was also investigated for the practical use of the porous crucible system. The salt evaporation behaviors were compared between the conventional nonporous crucible and the porous crucible. Two step weight reductions took place in the porous crucible, whereas the salt weight reduced only at high temperature by distillation in a nonporous crucible. The first weight reduction in the porous crucible was caused by the liquid salt penetrated out through the perforated crucible during the temperature elevation until the distillation temperature. Multilayer porous crucibles have a benefit to expand the evaporation surface area. (author)

  20. Automatization of welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwabuchi, Masashi; Tomita, Jinji; Nishihara, Katsunori.

    1978-01-01

    Automatization of welding is one of the effective measures for securing high degree of quality of nuclear power equipment, as well as for correspondence to the environment at the site of plant. As the latest ones of the automatic welders practically used for welding of nuclear power apparatuses in factories of Toshiba and IHI, those for pipes and lining tanks are described here. The pipe welder performs the battering welding on the inside of pipe end as the so-called IGSCC countermeasure and the succeeding butt welding through the same controller. The lining tank welder is able to perform simultaneous welding of two parallel weld lines on a large thin plate lining tank. Both types of the welders are demonstrating excellent performance at the shops as well as at the plant site. (author)

  1. EB-welding of the copper canister for the nuclear waste disposal. Final report of the development programme 1994-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aalto, H. [Outokumpu Oy Poricopper, Pori (Finland)

    1998-10-01

    During 1994-1997 Posiva Oy and Outokumpu Poricopper Oy had a joint project Development of EB-welding method for massive copper canister manufacturing. The project was part of the national technology program `Weld 2000` and it was supported financially by Technology Development Centre (TEKES). The spent fuel from Finnish nuclear reactors is planned to be encapsulated in thick-walled copper canisters and placed deep into the bedrock. The thick copper layer of the canister provides a long time corrosion resistance and prevents deposited nuclear fuel from contact with water. The quality requirements of the copper components are high because of the designed long lifetime of the canister. The EB-welding technology has proved to be applicable method for the production of the copper canisters and the EB-welding technique is needed at least when the lids of the copper canister will be closed. There are a number of parameters in EB-welding which affect weldability. However, the effect of the welding parameters and their optimization has not been extensively studied in welding of thick copper sections using conventional high vacuum EB-welding. One aim of this development work was to extensively study effect of welding parameters on weld quality. The final objective was to minimise welding defects in the main weld and optimize slope out procedure in thick copper EB-welding. Welding of 50 mm thick copper sections was optimized using vertical and horizontal EB-welding techniques. As a result two full scale copper lids were welded to a short cylinder successfully. The resulting weld quality with optimised welding parameters was reasonable good. The optimised welding parameters for horizontal and vertical beam can be applied to the longitudinal body welds of the canister. The optimal slope out procedure for the lid closure needs some additional development work. In addition of extensive EB-welding program ultrasonic inspection and creep strength of the weld were studied. According

  2. EB-welding of the copper canister for the nuclear waste disposal. Final report of the development programme 1994-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aalto, H.

    1998-10-01

    During 1994-1997 Posiva Oy and Outokumpu Poricopper Oy had a joint project Development of EB-welding method for massive copper canister manufacturing. The project was part of the national technology program 'Weld 2000' and it was supported financially by Technology Development Centre (TEKES). The spent fuel from Finnish nuclear reactors is planned to be encapsulated in thick-walled copper canisters and placed deep into the bedrock. The thick copper layer of the canister provides a long time corrosion resistance and prevents deposited nuclear fuel from contact with water. The quality requirements of the copper components are high because of the designed long lifetime of the canister. The EB-welding technology has proved to be applicable method for the production of the copper canisters and the EB-welding technique is needed at least when the lids of the copper canister will be closed. There are a number of parameters in EB-welding which affect weldability. However, the effect of the welding parameters and their optimization has not been extensively studied in welding of thick copper sections using conventional high vacuum EB-welding. One aim of this development work was to extensively study effect of welding parameters on weld quality. The final objective was to minimise welding defects in the main weld and optimize slope out procedure in thick copper EB-welding. Welding of 50 mm thick copper sections was optimized using vertical and horizontal EB-welding techniques. As a result two full scale copper lids were welded to a short cylinder successfully. The resulting weld quality with optimised welding parameters was reasonable good. The optimised welding parameters for horizontal and vertical beam can be applied to the longitudinal body welds of the canister. The optimal slope out procedure for the lid closure needs some additional development work. In addition of extensive EB-welding program ultrasonic inspection and creep strength of the weld were studied. According

  3. High-power CW and long-pulse lasers in the green wavelength regime for copper welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pricking, Sebastian; Huber, Rudolf; Klausmann, Konrad; Kaiser, Elke; Stolzenburg, Christian; Killi, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    We report on industrial high-power lasers in the green wavelength regime. By means of a thin disk oscillator and a resonator-internal nonlinear crystal for second harmonic generation we are able to extract up to 8 kW pulse power in the few-millisecond range at a wavelength of 515 nm with a duty cycle of 10%. Careful shaping and stabilization of the polarization and spectral properties leads to a high optical-to-optical efficiency larger than 55%. The beam parameter product is designed and measured to be below 5 mm·mrad which allows the transport by a fiber with a 100 μm core diameter. The fiber and beam guidance optics are adapted to the green wavelength, enabling low transmission losses and stable operation. Application tests show that this laser is perfectly suited for copper welding due to the superior absorption of the green wavelength compared to IR, which allows us to produce weld spots with an unprecedented reproducibility in diameter and welding depth. With an optimized set of parameters we could achieve a splatter-free welding process of copper, which is crucial for welding electronic components. Furthermore, the surface condition does not influence the welding process when the green wavelength is used, which allows to skip any expensive preprocessing steps like tin-coating. With minor changes we could operate the laser in cw mode and achieved up to 1.7 kW of cw power at 515 nm with a beam parameter product of 2.5 mm·mrad. These parameters make the laser perfectly suitable for additional applications such as selective laser melting of copper.

  4. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  5. Creep properties of base metal and welded joint of Hastelloy XR produced for High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor in simulated primary coolant helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Yuji; Tsuji, Hirokazu; Shindo, Masami; Suzuki, Tomio; Tanabe, Tatsuhiko; Mutoh, Isao; Hiraga, Kenjiro

    1999-01-01

    Creep tests of base metal, weld metal and welded joint of Hastelloy XR, which had the same chemical composition as Hastelloy XR produced for an intermediate heat exchanger of the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor, were conducted in simulated primary coolant helium. The weld metal and welded joint showed almost equal to or longer rupture time than the base metal of Hastelloy XR at 850 and 900degC, although they gave shorter rupture time at 950degC under low stress and at 1,000degC. The welded joint of Hastelloy XR ruptured at the base metal region at 850 and 900degC. On the other hand, it ruptured at the weld metal region at 950 and 1,000degC. The steady-state creep rate of weld metal of Hastelloy XR was lower than that of base metal at 850, 900 and 950degC. The creep rupture strengths of base metal, weld metal and welded joint of Hastelloy XR obtained in this study were confirmed to be much higher than the design allowable creep-rupture stress (S R ) of the Design Allowable Limits below 950degC. (author)

  6. Research and Development of Ultra-High Strength X100 Welded Pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuanguo, Zhang; Lei, Zheng; Ping, Hu; Bei, Zhang; Kougen, Wu; Weifeng, Huang

    Ultra-high strength X100 welded pipe can be used in the construction of long distance oil and gas pipeline to improve transmission capacity and reduce operation cost. By using the way of thermo-simulation and pilot rolling, the CCT (Continuous Cooling Transformation) diagram and the relationship between ACC (Accelerated Cooling) parameters, microstructure and mechanical properties were studied for the designed X100 pipeline steel with low carbon, high manganese and niobium micro-alloyed composition in lab. The analysis of CCT diagram indicates that the suitable hardness and microstructure can be obtained in the cooling rate of 20 80°C/sec. The pilot rolling results show that the ACC cooling start temperature below Ar3 phase transformation point is beneficial to increase uniform elongation, and the cooling stop temperature of 150 350°C is helpful to obtain high strength and toughness combination. Based on the research conclusions, the X100 plate and UOE pipe with dimension in O.D.1219×W.T.14.8mm, O.D.1219×W.T.17.8mm, designed for the natural gas transmission pipeline, were trial produced. The manufactured pipe body impact absorbed energy at -10°C is over 250J. The DWTT shear area ratio at 0°C is over 85%. The transverse strength meets the X100 grade requirement, and uniform elongation is over 4%. The X100 plate and UOE pipe with dimension in O.D.711×W.T.20.0mm, O.D.711×W.T.12.5mm, designed for an offshore engineering, were also trial produced. The average impact absorbed energy of pipe body at -30°C is over 200J. The average impact absorbed energy of HAZ (Heat-affected zone) and WM (Welded Seam) at -30°C is over 100J. And the good pipe shapes were obtained

  7. Fatigue strength of welds and welded materials of high-temperature steels resistant to pressurized hydrogen of the type 2.25% Cr/1% Mo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burlat, J.; Cheviet, A.; Million, A.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of the study is to examine systematically the creep strength of welded joints (base material, heat influence zone and welded seam) and of pure welding materials of the type 2 1/4-3% Cr/1% Mo. According to the AD standard rules, the rule which stipulates that the creep strength of welded seams under full stress be calculated with the strength characteristic value reduced by 20% applies to all heat-resistant steels, if no rupture stress values for the welded joints are available. Manufacturers of steel and weld fillers together with the Union of Technical Control Associations (VdTUeV) have prepared a test programme according to which on the one hand welded joints are tested at right angles to their seams, and on the other pure welding material is tested with respect to its creep strength. The development of the testes and their results have been described. The first results are available as VdTUeV material performance sheets, for 2 materials, and as provisional VdTUeV specification sheets, for 3 weld fillers. With the tested materials, it becomes practically feasible to reduce the creep strength of longitudinally welded pressure-bearing components by about 20% of wall thickness. (orig.) [de

  8. Irradiation effects on fracture toughness of two high-copper submerged-arc welds, HSSI series 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Haggag, F.M.; McCabe, D.E.; Iskander, S.K.; Bowman, K.O.; Menke, B.H.

    1992-10-01

    The Fifth Irradiation Series in the Heavy-Section Steel irradiation (HSSI) Program was aimed at obtaining a statistically significant fracture toughness data base on two weldments with high-copper contents to determine the shift and shape of the K lc curve as a consequence of irradiation. The program included irradiated Charpy V-notch impact, tensile, and drop-weight specimens in addition to compact fracture toughness specimens. Compact specimens with thicknesses of 25.4, 50.8, and 101.6 mm [1T C(T), 2T C(T), and 4T C(T), respectively] were irradiated. Additionally, unirradiated 6T C(T) and 8T C(T) specimens with the same K lc measuring capacity as the irradiated specimens were tested. The materials for this irradiation series were two weldments fabricated from special heats of weld wire with copper added to the melt. One lot of Linde 0124 flux was used for all the welds. Copper levels for the two welds are 0.23 and 0.31 wt %, while the nickel contents for both welds are 0.60 wt %. Twelve capsules of specimens were irradiated in the pool-side facility of the Oak Ridge Research Reactor at a nominal temperature of 288 degree C and an average fluence of about 1.5 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (> 1 MeV). This volume, Appendices E and F, contains the load-displacement curves and photographs of the fracture toughness specimens from the 72W weld (0.23 wt % Cu) and the 73 W weld (0.31 wt % Cu), respectively

  9. Electron beam welding of heavy section 3Cr-1.5Mo alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, J.F.; David, S.A.; Nasreldin, A.

    1986-01-01

    Welding of thick section steels is a common practice in the fabrication of pressure vessels for energy systems. The fabrication cost is strongly influenced by the speed at which these large components can be welded. Conventional welding processes such as shielded metal arc (SMA) and submerged arc (SA) are time-consuming and expensive. Hence there is a great need to reduce welding time and the tonnage of weld metal deposited. Electron beam welding (EBW) is a process that potentially could be used to achieve dramatic reduction in the welding time and costs. The penetrating ability of the beam produces welds with high depth-to-width ratios at relatively high travel speeds, making it possible to weld thick sections with one or two passes without filler metals and other consumables. The paper describes a study that was undertaken to investigate the feasibility of using a high power electron beam welding machine to weld heavy section steel. The main emphasis of this work was concentrated on determining the mechanical properties of the resulting weldment, characterizing the microstructure of the various weldment regions, and comparing these results with those from other processes. One of the steels selected for the heavy section electron beam welding study was a new 3 Cr-1.5 Mo-0.1 V alloy. The steel was developed at the AMAX Materials Research Center by Wada and co-workers for high temperature, high pressure hydrogen service as a possible improved replacement for 2-1/4 Cr-1 Mo steels. The excellent strength and toughness of this steel make it a promising candidate for future pressure vessels such as those for coal gasifiers. The work was conducted on 102 mm (4 in.) thick plates of this material in the normalized-and-tempered condition

  10. Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Underwater Dry and Local Dry Cavity Welded Joints of 690 MPa Grade High Strength Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yonghua; Sun, Kun; Cui, Shuwan; Zeng, Min; Yi, Jianglong; Shen, Xiaoqin; Yi, Yaoyong

    2018-01-22

    Q690E high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel plays an important role in offshore structures. In addition, underwater local cavity welding (ULCW) technique was widely used to repair important offshore constructions. However, the high cooling rate of ULCW joints results in bad welding quality compared with underwater dry welding (UDW) joints. Q690E high strength low alloy steels were welded by multi-pass UDW and ULCW techniques, to study the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of underwater welded joints. The microstructure and fracture morphology of welded joints were observed by scanning electron microscope and optical microscope. The elemental distribution in the microstructure was determined with an Electron Probe Microanalyzer. The results indicated that the microstructure of both two welded joints was similar. However, martensite and martensite-austenite components were significantly different with different underwater welding methods such that the micro-hardness of the HAZ and FZ in the ULCW specimen was higher than that of the corresponding regions in UDW joint. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the ULCW specimen are 109 MPa lower and 77 MPa lower, respectively, than those of the UDW joint. The impact toughness of the UDW joint was superior to those of the ULCW joint.

  11. Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Underwater Dry and Local Dry Cavity Welded Joints of 690 MPa Grade High Strength Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kun; Cui, Shuwan; Zeng, Min; Yi, Jianglong; Shen, Xiaoqin; Yi, Yaoyong

    2018-01-01

    Q690E high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel plays an important role in offshore structures. In addition, underwater local cavity welding (ULCW) technique was widely used to repair important offshore constructions. However, the high cooling rate of ULCW joints results in bad welding quality compared with underwater dry welding (UDW) joints. Q690E high strength low alloy steels were welded by multi-pass UDW and ULCW techniques, to study the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of underwater welded joints. The microstructure and fracture morphology of welded joints were observed by scanning electron microscope and optical microscope. The elemental distribution in the microstructure was determined with an Electron Probe Microanalyzer. The results indicated that the microstructure of both two welded joints was similar. However, martensite and martensite-austenite components were significantly different with different underwater welding methods such that the micro-hardness of the HAZ and FZ in the ULCW specimen was higher than that of the corresponding regions in UDW joint. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the ULCW specimen are 109 MPa lower and 77 MPa lower, respectively, than those of the UDW joint. The impact toughness of the UDW joint was superior to those of the ULCW joint. PMID:29361743

  12. Characterization of bond line discontinuities in a high-Mn TWIP steel pipe welded by HF-ERW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gitae; Kim, Bongyoon; Kang, Yongjoon [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, 222, Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Heewoong [RD Team, Husteel, 131 Bugokgongdan-ro, Songak-eup, Dangjin-si, Chungnam 31721 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Changhee, E-mail: chlee@hanyang.ac.kr [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, 222, Wangsimni-ro, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 04763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    In this work, the microstructure and defects in a high-frequency electrical resistance welded (HF-ERW) pipe of high-Mn twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel were characterized. The microstructure of the base metal and the bond line were examined using both optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The features of the bond line were similar to those of conventional steel. Simultaneously, the circumferential ductility was evaluated via a flaring test. It was concluded that the deterioration of the circumferential ductility in a high-Mn TWIP steel pipe was caused by irregular shaped oxide defects and a penetrator that had been formed during welding. Specifically, the penetrator, which is composed of MnO and Mn{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, was found to be the most influential on the circumferential ductility of the welded pipe. The penetrator was analyzed using both an electron probe micro analyzer and transmission electron microscopy, and the formation sequence of the penetrator was evaluated. - Highlights: •This study focused on applying the HF-ERW process to the seam welding of expandable pipe using TWIP steels. •For improvement of the circumferential ductility, deterioration factors were characterized. •Penetrator which would mainly deteriorate the circumferential ductility consisted of round MnO and Mn{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}. •Metallurgical evidence of existing theory regarding the mechanism of defect formation during the HF-ERW was characterized.

  13. High-energy-beam welding of type 316LN stainless steel for cryogenic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siewert, T.A.; Gorni, D.; Kohn, G.

    1988-01-01

    Laser and electron beam welds in 25-mm-thick AISI 316LN specimens containing 0.16 wt.$% N were evaluated for fusion reactor applications and their mechanical properties were compared with those of welds generated by lower productivity processes such as shielded-metal-arc and gas-metal-arc welding. Tensile tests were performed on transverse tensile specimens at 4 K. For both welding processes the fractures occurred in the base metal at a strength level near 950 MPa. This indicated that the weld and heat affected zone had a strength similar to that of the base metal. The 4 K weld fracture toughness was only slightly less than that for the base metal and comparable to the best values achieved with conventional welding processes in 316Ln weld metal. The Charpy V-notch absorbed energies averaged near 70 J at 76 K. Metallographic analysis revealed cellular and fully austenitic solidification with little porosity and no evidence of hot cracking

  14. Automatic welding and cladding in heavy fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altamer, A. de

    1980-01-01

    A description is given of the automatic welding processes used by an Italian fabricator of pressure vessels for petrochemical and nuclear plant. The automatic submerged arc welding, submerged arc strip cladding, pulsed TIG, hot wire TIG and MIG welding processes have proved satisfactory in terms of process reliability, metal deposition rate, and cost effectiveness for low alloy and carbon steels. An example shows sequences required during automatic butt welding, including heat treatments. Factors which govern satisfactory automatic welding include automatic anti-drift rotator device, electrode guidance and bead programming system, the capability of single and dual head operation, flux recovery and slag removal systems, operator environment and controls, maintaining continuity of welding and automatic reverse side grinding. Automatic welding is used for: joining vessel sections; joining tubes to tubeplate; cladding of vessel rings and tubes, dished ends and extruded nozzles; nozzle to shell and butt welds, including narrow gap welding. (author)

  15. High-power sputtering employed for film deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapovalov, V I

    2017-01-01

    The features of high-power magnetron sputtering employed for the films’ deposition are reviewed. The main physical phenomena accompanying high-power sputtering including ion-electron emission, gas rarefaction, ionization of sputtered atoms, self-sputtering, ion sound waves and the impact of the target heating are described. (paper)

  16. Laser beam welding of high strength aluminium-lithium alloys; Laserstrahlschweissen von hochfesten Aluminium-Lithium Legierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enz, Josephin

    2012-07-01

    The present development in aircraft industry determined by the demand for a higher cost-effectiveness. Laser beam welding is one of the most promising joining technologies for the application in the aircraft industry through the considerable reduction of the production costs. Furthermore the weight of an aircraft structure can be reduced by the use of light and high strength aluminium alloys. This paper deals with the development of a process for the laser beam welding of a skin-stringer-joint where the Al-Li-alloy AA2196 is used as stringer material and the Al-Li-alloy AA2198 is used as skin and stringer material. By the use of design of experiments the optimal welding process parameters for different material combinations were determined which will be used for the welding of a 5-stringer panel. Therefore the weld seams of the joints were tested for irregularities and microstructural characteristics. In addition several mechanical tests were performed, which define the quality of the welded joint. Furthermore the influence of the oxide layer and the welding preparation on the welding performance was investigated. (orig.) [German] Die derzeitigen Entwicklungen im Flugzeugbau werden durch die allgemeine Forderung nach einer Steigerung der Wirtschaftlichkeit bestimmt. Das Laserstrahlschweissen ist dabei eines der vielversprechendsten Fuegeverfahren fuer die Anwendung im Flugzeugbau durch das die Herstellungskosten deutlich reduziert werden koennen. Zudem kann durch die Verwendung von leichten und hochfesten Aluminium-Legierungen das Gewicht einer Flugzeugstruktur zusaetzlich reduziert werden. Die vorliegende Arbeit befasst sich mit der Entwicklung eines Prozesses zum Laserstrahlschweissen einer Skin-Stringer-Verbindung aus den Aluminium-Lithium-Legierungen AA2196 (als Stringer-Werkstoff) und AA2198 (als Skin- und Stringer-Werkstoff). Unter Verwendung der statistischen Versuchsplanung wurden die optimalen Einstellungen der Schweissprozessparameter fuer die

  17. Modeling of welded bead profile for rapid prototyping by robotic MAG welding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Yong; ZHU Sheng; WANG Tao; WANG Wanglong

    2009-01-01

    As a deposition technology, robotic metal active gas(MAG) welding has shown new promise for rapid prototyping (RP) of metallic parts. During the process of metal forming using robotic MAG welding, sectional profile of single-pass welded bead is critical to formed accuracy and quality of metal pans. In this paper, the experiments of single-pass welded bead for rapid prototyping using robotic MAG welding were carried out. The effect of some edge detectors on the cross-sectional edge of welded bead was discussed and curve fitting was applied using leat square fitting. Consequently, the mathematical model of welded bead profile was developed. The experimental results show that good shape could be obtained under suitable welding parameters. Canny operawr is suitable to edge detection of welded bead profile, and the mathematical model of welded bead profile developed is approximately parabola.

  18. Microstructure and mechanical characterization of friction stir welded high strength low alloy steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramesh, R., E-mail: rameshsmit@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, PSG College of Technology, Coimbatore 641004, Tamilnadu (India); Dinaharan, I., E-mail: dinaweld2009@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering Science, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park Kingsway Campus, Johannesburg 2006, Gauteng (South Africa); Kumar, Ravi, E-mail: nvrk@iitm.ac.in [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036, Tamilnadu (India); Akinlabi, E.T., E-mail: etakinlabi@uj.ac.za [Department of Mechanical Engineering Science, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park Kingsway Campus, Johannesburg 2006, Gauteng (South Africa)

    2017-02-27

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a promising technique to join HSLA steels without the problems encountered during fusion based welding processes. In the present work, 3 mm thick HSLA plates were successfully welded using FSW. A tool made of tungsten-rhenium alloy was used in this work. The relationship between microstructure and tensile strength was studied under various welding conditions i.e. change in traverse speed (57–97 mm/min). The microstructure of the weld nugget revealed the presence of upper bainite and fine ferrite phases. The amount of upper bainite reduced with increase in traverse speed. EBSD images showed a reducing trend for grain size. The details of hardness, tensile strength and bending test were reported.

  19. High-strength laser welding of aluminum-lithium scandium-doped alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malikov, A. G.; Ivanova, M. Yu.

    2016-11-01

    The work presents the experimental investigation of laser welding of an aluminum alloy (system Al-Mg-Li) and aluminum alloy (system Al-Cu-Li) doped with Sc. The influence of nano-structuring of the surface layer welded joint by cold plastic deformation on the strength properties of the welded joint is determined. It is founded that, regarding the deformation degree over the thickness, the varying value of the welded joint strength is different for these aluminum alloys. The strength of the plastically deformed welded joint, aluminum alloys of the Al-Mg-Li and Al-Cu-Li systems reached 0.95 and 0.6 of the base alloy strength, respectively.

  20. Microstructure and mechanical characterization of friction stir welded high strength low alloy steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramesh, R.; Dinaharan, I.; Kumar, Ravi; Akinlabi, E.T.

    2017-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a promising technique to join HSLA steels without the problems encountered during fusion based welding processes. In the present work, 3 mm thick HSLA plates were successfully welded using FSW. A tool made of tungsten-rhenium alloy was used in this work. The relationship between microstructure and tensile strength was studied under various welding conditions i.e. change in traverse speed (57–97 mm/min). The microstructure of the weld nugget revealed the presence of upper bainite and fine ferrite phases. The amount of upper bainite reduced with increase in traverse speed. EBSD images showed a reducing trend for grain size. The details of hardness, tensile strength and bending test were reported.

  1. Fatigue Assessment of High Strength Steel Welded Joints Under Bending Loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Myeong-Woo; Kim, Yun-Jae; Park, Jun-Hyub

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a fatigue assessment method for vehicle suspension systems having welded geometries was established under a bending loading condition. For the fatigue life estimation of the actual product s welded joints made of different steels, bending fatigue tests were performed on welded specimens with a simplified shape for obtaining the moment-fatigue-life plot. Further, geometry modeling of the simplified welded specimens was conducted. Results of finite element analysis were used to obtain the stress-fatigue-life plot. The analysis results were also used to calculate the stress concentration factors for notch-factor-based fatigue life estimation. The test results were compared with results of the general notch-factor-based fatigue life estimation for improving fatigue assessment. As a result, it was concluded that both the welded fatigue tests and the notch-factor-based fatigue life estimation are necessary for accurate fatigue assessment

  2. Weldability of Advanced High Strength Steels using Ytterbium:Yttrium Aluminium Garnet high power laser for Tailor-Welded Blank applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rajashekhar Shivaram

    Use of a high power Yb:YAG laser is investigated for joining advanced high strength steel materials for use in tailor-welded blank (TWB) applications. TWB's are materials of different chemistry, coating or thicknesses that are joined before metal forming and other operations such as trimming, assembly and painting are carried out. TWB is becoming an important design tool in the automotive industry for reducing weight, improving fuel economy and passenger safety, while reducing the overall costs for the customer. Three advanced high strength steels, TRIP780, DP980 and USIBOR, which have many unique properties that are conducive to achieving these objectives, along with mild steel, are used in this work. The objective of this work is to ensure that high quality welds can be obtained using Yb:YAG lasers which are also becoming popular for metal joining operations, since they produce high quality laser beams that suffer minimal distortion when transported via fiber optic cables. Various power levels and speeds for the laser beam were used during the investigation. Argon gas was consistently used for shielding purposes during the welding process. After the samples were welded, metallographic examination of the fusion and heat-affected zones using optical and scanning electron microscopes were carried out to determine the microstructures as well as weld defects. Optical and scanning electron microscopes were also used to examine the top of welds as well as fracture surfaces. Additionally, cross-weld microhardness evaluations, tensile tests using Instron tester, limited fatigue tests as well as formability evaluations using OSU plane strain evaluation were carried out. The examinations included a 2-factor full factorial design of experiments to determine the impact of coatings on the surface roughness on the top of the welds. Tensile strengths of DP980, TRIP780 and mild steel materials as well as DP980 welded to TRIP780 and mild steel in the rolling direction as well as

  3. Investigation of plasma arc welding as a method for the additive manufacturing of titanium-(6)aluminum-(4)vanadium alloy components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavinoha, Joe N.

    The process of producing near net-shape components by material deposition is known as additive manufacturing. All additive manufacturing processes are based on the addition of material with the main driving forces being cost reduction and flexibility in both manufacturing and product design. With wire metal deposition, metal is deposited as beads side-by-side and layer-by-layer in a desired pattern to build a complete component or add features on a part. There are minimal waste products, low consumables, and an efficient use of energy and feedstock associated with additive manufacturing processes. Titanium and titanium alloys are useful engineering materials that possess an extraordinary combination of properties. Some of the properties that make titanium advantageous for structural applications are its high strength-to-weight ratio, low density, low coefficient of thermal expansion, and good corrosion resistance. The most commonly used titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, is typically used in aerospace applications, pressure vessels, aircraft gas turbine disks, cases and compressor blades, and surgical implants. Because of the high material prices associated with titanium alloys, the production of near net-shape components by additive manufacturing is an attractive option for the manufacturing of Ti-6Al-4V alloy components. In this thesis, the manufacturing of cylindrical Ti-6Al-4V alloy specimens by wire metal deposition utilizing the plasma arc welding process was demonstrated. Plasma arc welding is a cost effective additive manufacturing technique when compared to other current additive manufacturing methods such as laser beam welding and electron beam welding. Plasma arc welding is considered a high-energy-density welding processes which is desirable for the successful welding of titanium. Metal deposition was performed using a constant current plasma arc welding power supply, flow-purged welding chamber, argon shielding and orifice gas, ERTi-5 filler metal, and Ti-6Al

  4. Friction welding of a nickel free high nitrogen steel: influence of forge force on microstructure, mechanical properties and pitting corrosion resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mrityunjoy Hazra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, nickel free high nitrogen austenitic stainless steel specimens were joined by continuous drive friction welding process by varying the amount of forge (upsetting force and keeping other friction welding parameters such as friction force, burn-off, upset time and speed of rotation as constant at appropriate levels. The joint characterization studies include microstructural examination and evaluation of mechanical (micro-hardness, impact toughness and tensile and pitting corrosion behaviour. The integrity of the joint, as determined by the optical microscopy was very high and no crack and area of incomplete bonding were observed. Welds exhibited poor Charpy impact toughness than the parent material. Toughness for friction weld specimens decreased with increase in forge force. The tensile properties of all the welds were almost the same (irrespective of the value of the applied forge force and inferior to those of the parent material. The joints failed in the weld region for all the weld specimens. Weldments exhibited lower pitting corrosion resistance than the parent material and the corrosion resistance of the weld specimens was found to decrease with increase in forge force.

  5. Effect of thermal exposure, forming, and welding on high-temperature, dispersion-strengthened aluminum alloy: Al-8Fe-1V-2Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, J. R.; Gilman, P. S.; Zedalis, M. S.; Skinner, D. J.; Peltier, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The feasibility of applying conventional hot forming and welding methods to high temperature aluminum alloy, Al-8Fe-1V-2Si (FVS812), for structural applications and the effect of thermal exposure on mechanical properties were determined. FVS812 (AA8009) sheet exhibited good hot forming and resistance welding characteristics. It was brake formed to 90 deg bends (0.5T bend radius) at temperatures greater than or equal to 390 C (730 F), indicating the feasibility of fabricating basic shapes, such as angles and zees. Hot forming of simple contoured-flanged parts was demonstrated. Resistance spot welds with good static and fatigue strength at room and elevated temperatures were readily produced. Extended vacuum degassing during billet fabrication reduced porosity in fusion and resistance welds. However, electron beam welding was not possible because of extreme degassing during welding, and gas-tungsten-arc welds were not acceptable because of severely degraded mechanical properties. The FVS812 alloy exhibited excellent high temperature strength stability after thermal exposures up to 315 C (600 F) for 1000 h. Extended billet degassing appeared to generally improve tensile ductility, fatigue strength, and notch toughness. But the effects of billet degassing and thermal exposure on properties need to be further clarified. The manufacture of zee-stiffened, riveted, and resistance-spot-welded compression panels was demonstrated.

  6. Electron beam welding of aluminium components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maajid, Ali; Vadali, S.K.; Maury, D.K.

    2015-01-01

    Aluminium is one of the most widely used materials in industries like transportation, shipbuilding, manufacturing, aerospace, nuclear, etc. The challenges in joining of aluminium are distortion, cleanliness and quality. Main difficulties faced during fusion welding of aluminium components are removal of surface oxide layer, weld porosity, high heat input requirement, distortion, hot cracking, etc. Physical properties of aluminium such as its high thermal conductivity, high coefficient of thermal expansion, no change in colour at high temperature, large difference in the melting points of the metal and its oxide (∼ 1400 °C) compound the difficulties faced during welding. Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW), Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW), Plasma Arc Welding (PAW), etc are generally used in industries for fusion welding of aluminium alloys. However in case of thicker jobs the above processes are not suitable due to requirements of elaborate edge preparation, preheating of jobs, fixturing to prevent distortion, etc. Moreover, precise control over the heat input during welding and weld bead penetration is not possible with above processes. Further, if heat sensitive parts are located near the weld joint then high energy density beam welding process like Electron Beam Welding (EBW) is the best possible choice for aluminium welding.This paper discusses EB welding of aluminium components, typical geometry of components, selection/optimization of welding parameters, problems faced during standardization of welding and process parameters and their remedies etc.

  7. Linear friction welding for constructing and repairing rail for high speed and intercity passenger service rail : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This project developed a solid-state welding process based on linear friction welding (LFW) technology. While resistance flash welding or : thermite techniques are tried and true methods for joining rails and performing partial rail replacement repai...

  8. INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

    1958-10-14

    S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

  9. Multipass autogenous electron beam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.L.; Mustaleski, T.M. Jr.; Watson, L.C.

    1986-01-01

    A multipass, autogenous welding procedure was developed for 7.6 mm (0.3 in.) wall thickness Type 304L stainless steel cylinders. The joint geometry has a 1.5 mm (0.06 in.) root-face width and a rectangular stepped groove that is 0.762 mm (0.03 in.) wide at the top of the root face and extends 1.5 mm in height, terminating into a groove width of 1.27 mm which extends to the outside of the 1.27 mm high weld-boss. One weld pass is made on the root, three passes on the 0.762 mm wide groove and three passes to complete the weld. Multipass, autogenous, electron beam welds maintain the characteristic high depth-to-width ratios and low heat input of single-pass, electron beam welds. The increased part distortion (which is still much less than from arc processes) in multipass weldments is corrected by a preweld machined compensation. Mechanical properties of multipass welds compare well with single-pass welds. The yield strength of welds in aluminum alloy 5083 is approximately the same for single-pass or multipass electron beam and gas, metal-arc welds. The incidence and size of porosity is less in multipass electron beam welding of aluminum as compared to gas, metal-arc welds. The multipass, autogenous, electron beam welding method has proven to be a reliable way to make some difficult welds in multilayer parts or in an instance where inside part temperature or weld underbead must be controlled and weld discontinuities must be minimized

  10. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  11. Resistance seam welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueler, A.W.

    1977-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of the resistance seam welding process are presented. Types of seam welds, types of seam welding machines, seam welding power supplies, resistance seam welding parameters and seam welding characteristics of various metals

  12. Twin-spot laser welding of advanced high-strength multiphase microstructure steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grajcar, Adam; Morawiec, Mateusz; Różański, Maciej; Stano, Sebastian

    2017-07-01

    The study addresses the results concerning the laser welding of TRIP (TRansformation Induced Plasticity) steel using a beam focused at two spots (also referred to as twin-spot laser welding). The analysis involved the effect of variable welding thermal cycles on the properties and microstructure of welded joints. The tests were performed using a linear energy of 0.048 and 0.060 kJ/mm and the laser beam power distribution of 50%:50%, 60%:40% and 70%:30%. The tests also involved welding performed using a linear energy of 0.150 kJ/mm and the laser beam power distribution of 70%:30%. In addition, the research included observations of the microstructure of the fusion zone, heat affected zone and the transition zone using light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The fusion zone was composed of blocky-lath martensite whereas the HAZ (heat-affected zone) was characterised by the lath microstructure containing martensite, bainite and retained austenite. The distribution of twin-spot laser beam power significantly affected the microstructure and hardness profiles of welded joints. The highest hardness (480-505 HV), regardless of welding variants used, was observed in the HAZ.

  13. Mechanical Properties of Laser Beam Welded Ultra-high Strength Chromium Steel with Martensitic Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Martin; Janzen, Vitalij; Lindner, Stefan; Wagener, Rainer

    A new class of steels is going to be introduced into sheet manufacturing. Stainless ferritic and martensitic steels open up opportunities for sheet metal fabrication including hot stamping. A strength of up to 2 GPa at a fracture strain of 15% can be attained. Welding of these materials became apparently a challenge. Energy-reduced welding methods with in-situ heat treatment are required in order to ensure the delicate and complex heat control. Laser beam welding is the joining technique of choice to supply minimum heat input to the fusion process and to apply an efficient heat control. For two application cases, production of tailored blanks in as-rolled condition and welding in assembly in hot stamped conditions, welding processes have been developed. The welding suitability is shown in metallurgical investigations of the welds. Crash tests based on the KSII concept as well as fatigue tests prove the applicability of the joining method. For the case of assembly also joining with deep drawing and manganese boron steel was taken into consideration. The strength of the joint is determined by the weaker partner but can benefit from its ductility.

  14. The reliability of the repair weld joints of aged high temperature components in fossil power boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamura, Hiroyuki [Science Univ. of Tokyo (Japan); Ohtani, Ryuichi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Fujii, Kazuya [Japan Power Engineering and Inspection Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Yokoyama, Tomomitsu; Nishimura, Nobuhiko [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Suzuki, Komei [Japan Steel Works Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-11-01

    It is of fundamental engineering importance to be able to give reliable assessments of the effective service life of the critical components used within fossil power plants, particularly for those operating for prolonged periods. It is common practice for such assessments to have been estimated using destructive tests, typically the stress rupture test, this having been recognized as one of the most reliable evaluation methods available. Its only drawback is that it often does not permit the component to be in use following the sampling of the test specimen without repairing. The current piece of work focuses on the reliability of the repair welds of components for specimens taken from fossil power plants, having been in service for prolonged periods. Several such repairs to welds have been made to an old power boiler, in particular to a superheater header which is fabricated from 2.25Cr-1Mo steel. Under close examination the repairs to the girth weldment showed susceptibilities of weld cracking, similar to that observed in as-manufactured material. Within the repaired region of the welded joint the microstructure, tensile properties and toughness seemed to be unaffected. The hardness attained its minimum value within the heat affected zone, HAZ of the repair weld, overlapping that of original girth weld HAZ. Furthermore, the stress rupture strength achieved its minimum value at the same position taking on the same value as the strength associated with the aged girth welded joint. (orig.)

  15. Electron beam welding fundamentals and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mara, G.L.; Armstrong, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    The electron beam welding process is described and the unique mode of operation and penetration explained by a description of the forces operating within the weld pool. This penetration model is demonstrated by high speed cinematography of the weld pool on several materials. The conditions under which weld defects are formed are discussed and examples are presented. (auth)

  16. Interfacial failure in dissimilar weld joint of high boron 9% chromium steel and nickel-based alloy under high-temperature creep condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsunaga, Tetsuya, E-mail: MATSUNAGA.Tetsuya@nims.go.jp; Hongo, Hiromichi, E-mail: HONGO.Hiromichi@nims.go.jp; Tabuchi, Masaaki, E-mail: TABUCHI.Masaaki@nims.go.jp

    2017-05-17

    The advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) power generation system is expected to become the next-generation base-load power station in Japan. Dissimilar weld joints between high-Cr heat-resistant steels and nickel-based alloys with a nickel-based filler metal (Alloy 82) will need to be adopted for this purpose. However, interfacial failure between the steels and weld metal has been observed under high-temperature creep conditions. Fractography and microstructure observations showed the failure initiated in a brittle manner by an oxide notch at the bottom of the U-groove. The fracture then proceeded along the bond line in a ductile manner with shallow dimples, where micro-Vickers hardness tests showed remarkable softening in the steel next to the bond line. In addition, the steel showed a much larger total elongation and reduction of area than the weld metal at low stresses under long-term creep conditions, leading to mismatch deformation at the interface. According to the results, it can be concluded that the interfacial failure between the 9Cr steels and Alloy 82 weld metal is initiated by an oxide notch and promoted by softening and the difference in the plasticity of the steels and weld metal.

  17. Effects of annealing time on the recovery of Charpy V-notch properties of irradiated high-copper weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Sokolov, M.A.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    One of the options to mitigate the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessels is to thermally anneal them to restore the toughness properties that have been degraded by neutron irradiation. An important issue to be resolved is the effect on the toughness properties of reirradiating a vessel that has been annealed. This paper describes the annealing response of irradiated high-copper submerged-arc weld HSSI 73W. For this study, the weld has been annealed at 454 C (850 F) for lengths of time varying between 1 and 14 days. The Charpy V-notch 41-J (30-ft-lb) transition temperature (TT 41J ) almost fully recovered for the longest period studied, but recovered to a lesser degree for the shorter periods. No significant recovery of the TT 41J was observed for a 7-day anneal at 343 C (650 F). At 454 C for the durations studied, the values of the upper-shelf impact energy of irradiated and annealed weld metal exceeded the values in the unirradiated condition. Similar behavior was observed after aging the unirradiated weld metal at 460 and 490 C for 1 week

  18. Irradiation effects on fracture toughness of two high-copper submerged-arc welds, HSSI Series 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Haggag, F.M.; McCabe, D.E.; Iskander, S.K.; Bowman, K.O.; Menke, B.H.

    1992-10-01

    The Fifth Irradiation Series in the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program obtained a statistically significant fracture toughness data base on two high-copper (0.23 and 0.31 wt %) submerged-arc welds to determine the shift and shape of the K Ic curve as a consequence of irradiation. Compact specimens with thicknesses to 101.6 mm (4 in) in the irradiated condition and 203.2 mm (8 in) in the unirradiated condition were tested, in addition to Charpy impact, tensile, and drop-weight specimens. Irradiations were conducted at a nominal temperature of 288 degree C and an average fluence of 1.5 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (>l MeV). The Charpy 41-J temperature shifts are about the same as the corresponding drop-weight NDT temperature shifts. The irradiated welds exhibited substantial numbers of cleavage pop-ins. Mean curve fits using two-parameter (with fixed intercept) nonlinear and linearized exponential regression analysis revealed that the fracture toughness 100 MPa lg-bullet √m shifts exceeded the Charpy 41-J shifts for both welds. Analyses of curve shape changes indicated decreases in the slopes of the fracture toughness curves, especially for the higher copper weld. Weibull analyses were performed to investigate development of lower bound curves to the data, including the use of a variable K min parameter which affects the curve shape

  19. Specific energy of cold crack initiation in welding low alloy high-strength steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brednev, V.I.; Kasatkin, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    Methods for determination of energy spent on cold crack initiation, when testing welded joint samples by the Implant method, are described. Data on the effect of the steel alloying system, cooling rate of welded joints, content of diffusion hydrogen on the critical specific energy spent on the development of local plastic deformation upto cold crack initiation are presented. The value of specific energy spent on cold crack initiation is shown to be by two-three orders lower than the value of impact strength minimum accessible. The possibility to estimate welded joint resistance to cold crack initiation according to the critical specific energy is established

  20. Corrosion properties of plasma deposited high-alloy steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Voleník, Karel; Pražák, M.; Kalabisová, E.; Kreislová, K.; Neufuss, Karel

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 47, - (2002), s. 243-254 ISSN 0001-7043 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/99/0298 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : plasma deposits, high-alloy steel, polarization curves, corrosion test Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  1. Investigation of fracture in pressurized gas metal arc welded beryllium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiple, C.R.; Merlini, R.J.; Adams, R.O.

    1976-01-01

    Premature failures during proof testing of pressurized-gas-metal-arc (PGMA) welded beryllium assemblies were investigated. The failures were almost entirely within the beryllium (a forming grade, similar to HP-10 or S-240), close to and parallel to the weld interface. The aluminum-silicon weld filler metal deposit was not centered in the weld groove in the failed assemblies, and failure occurred on the side of the weld opposite the bias in the weld deposit. Tensile tests of welded samples demonstrated that the failures were unrelated to residual machining damage from cutting the weld groove, and indicated small lack-of-fusion areas near the weld start to be the most likely origin of the failures. Acoustic emission was monitored during tensile tests of the welds. The majority of acoustic emission was probably from crack propagation through the weld filler metal. Tensile bars cut from the region of the weld start behaved differently; they failed at lower loads and exhibited an acoustic emission behavior believed to be from cracking in the weld metal-beryllium interface. Improvement in the quality of these and similar beryllium welds can therefore most likely be made by centering the weld deposit and reducing the size of the weld start defect. 21 fig

  2. Massive accumulation of highly polluted sedimentary deposits by river damming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palanques, Albert, E-mail: albertp@icm.csic.es [Institute of Marine Sciences (CSIC), Passeig Maritim de la Barceloneta, 37-49, Barcelona 08003 (Spain); Grimalt, Joan [Institute of Environmental Assessment and Water Research (CSIC), Jordi Girona, 18, Barcelona 08034 (Spain); Belzunces, Marc; Estrada, Ferran; Puig, Pere; Guillén, Jorge [Institute of Marine Sciences (CSIC), Passeig Maritim de la Barceloneta, 37-49, Barcelona 08003 (Spain)

    2014-11-01

    Uncontrolled dumping of anthropogenic waste in rivers regulated by dams has created contaminated deposits in reservoirs that have remained unidentified for decades. The Flix Reservoir is located in the Ebro River, the second largest river flowing into the NW Mediterranean, has been affected by residue dumping from a chlor-alkali electrochemical plant for decades. High-resolution seismic profiles, bathymetric data, surficial sediment samples and sediment cores were obtained in the Flix Reservoir to study the characteristics of the deposit accumulated by this dumping. These data were used to reconstruct the waste deposit history. Since the construction of the Flix Dam in 1948, more than 3.6 × 10{sup 5} t of industrial waste has accumulated in the reservoir generating a delta-like deposit formed by three sediment lobes of fine-grained material highly contaminated by Hg, Cd, Zn and Cr (max: 640, 26, 420 and 750 mg kg{sup −1}, respectively). This contamination was associated with the Hg that was used for the cathode in the electrochemical plant from 1949 and with the production of phosphorite derivatives from 1973. After the construction of two large dams only a few kilometres upstream during the 1960s, the solids discharged from the industrial complex became the main sediment source to the Flix Reservoir. The deposit has remained in the reservoir forming a delta that obstructs about 50% of the river water section. Its stability only depended on the flow retention by the Flix Dam. At present, this contaminated waste deposit is being removed from the water reservoir as it is a cause of concern for the environment and for human health downriver. - Highlights: • A delta-like anthropogenic deposit prograded into the reservoir behind the Flix dam. • More than 3.6 × 10{sup 5} t of anthropogenic waste was accumulated in less than 4 decades. • A waste deposit with extreme levels of Hg and Cd was trapped in the Flix Reservoir. • The main pollution was related to

  3. Effect of Heat Input on Geometry of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Bead on Low Carbon Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Manas Kumar; Hazra, Ritesh; Mondal, Ajit; Das, Santanu

    2018-05-01

    Among different weld cladding processes, gas metal arc welding (GMAW) cladding becomes a cost effective, user friendly, versatile method for protecting the surface of relatively lower grade structural steels from corrosion and/or erosion wear by depositing high grade stainless steels onto them. The quality of cladding largely depends upon the bead geometry of the weldment deposited. Weld bead geometry parameters, like bead width, reinforcement height, depth of penetration, and ratios like reinforcement form factor (RFF) and penetration shape factor (PSF) determine the quality of the weld bead geometry. Various process parameters of gas metal arc welding like heat input, current, voltage, arc travel speed, mode of metal transfer, etc. influence formation of bead geometry. In the current experimental investigation, austenite stainless steel (316) weld beads are formed on low alloy structural steel (E350) by GMAW using 100% CO2 as the shielding gas. Different combinations of current, voltage and arc travel speed are chosen so that heat input increases from 0.35 to 0.75 kJ/mm. Nine number of weld beads are deposited and replicated twice. The observations show that weld bead width increases linearly with increase in heat input, whereas reinforcement height and depth of penetration do not increase with increase in heat input. Regression analysis is done to establish the relationship between heat input and different geometrical parameters of weld bead. The regression models developed agrees well with the experimental data. Within the domain of the present experiment, it is observed that at higher heat input, the weld bead gets wider having little change in penetration and reinforcement; therefore, higher heat input may be recommended for austenitic stainless steel cladding on low alloy steel.

  4. Recent progress in the field of automated welding applied to maintenance activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cullafroz, M.

    2004-01-01

    Automated and robot welding has 5 advantages compared to manual welding: -) under some conditions the automated circular welding does not require requalification testing as manual welding does, -) welding heads in robots have a reduced size compared to manual gears so they can enter and treat complex piping, -) by using an adequate viewing system the operator can be more than 10 meters away from the welding site which means that the radiation doses he receives is cut by a factor 1.5 to 2, -) whatever the configuration is, the deposition rate in automated welding stays high, the quality standard is steady and the risk of repairing is low, -) a gain in productivity if adequate equipment is used. In general, automated welding requires a TIG welding process and is applied in maintenance activities to: -) the main primary system and other circuits in stainless austenitic steels, -) the main secondary system and other circuits in low-percentage carbon steels, and -) the closure of spent fuel canisters. An application to the repairing of BWR's pipes is shown. (A.C.)

  5. Confined high-pressure chemical deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Neil F; He, Rongrui; Day, Todd D; Sparks, Justin R; Keshavarzi, Banafsheh; Krishnamurthi, Mahesh; Borhan, Ali; Gopalan, Venkatraman; Peacock, Anna C; Healy, Noel; Sazio, Pier J A; Badding, John V

    2012-01-11

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is one of the most technologically important semiconductors. The challenge in producing it from SiH(4) precursor is to overcome a significant kinetic barrier to decomposition at a low enough temperature to allow for hydrogen incorporation into a deposited film. The use of high precursor concentrations is one possible means to increase reaction rates at low enough temperatures, but in conventional reactors such an approach produces large numbers of homogeneously nucleated particles in the gas phase, rather than the desired heterogeneous deposition on a surface. We report that deposition in confined micro-/nanoreactors overcomes this difficulty, allowing for the use of silane concentrations many orders of magnitude higher than conventionally employed while still realizing well-developed films. a-Si:H micro-/nanowires can be deposited in this way in extreme aspect ratio, small-diameter optical fiber capillary templates. The semiconductor materials deposited have ~0.5 atom% hydrogen with passivated dangling bonds and good electronic properties. They should be suitable for a wide range of photonic and electronic applications such as nonlinear optical fibers and solar cells. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  6. The influence of high heat input and inclusions control for rare earth on welding in low alloy high strength steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Rensheng; Mu, Shukun; Liu, Jingang; Li, Zhanjun

    2017-09-01

    In the current paper, it is analyzed for the influence of high heat input and inclusions control for rare earth on welding in low alloy high strength steel. It is observed for the structure for different heat input of the coarse-grained area. It is finest for the coarse grain with the high heat input of 200 kJ / cm and the coarse grain area with 400 kJ / cm is the largest. The performance with the heat input of 200 kJ / cm for -20 °C V-shaped notch oscillatory power is better than the heat input of 400 kJ / cm. The grain structure is the ferrite and bainite for different holding time. The grain structure for 5s holding time has a grain size of 82.9 μm with heat input of 200 kJ/cm and grain size of 97.9 μm for 10s holding time. For the inclusions for HSLA steel with adding rare earth, they are Al2O3-CaS inclusions in the Al2O3-CaS-CaO ternary phase diagram. At the same time, it can not be found for low melting calcium aluminate inclusions compared to the inclusions for the HSLA steel without rare earth. Most of the size for the inclusions is between 1 ~ 10μm. The overall grain structure is smaller and the welding performance is more excellent for adding rare earth.

  7. Double Fillet Welding of Carbon Steel T-Joint by Double Channel Shielding Gas Metal Arc Welding Method Using Metal Cored Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mert T.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Low carbon steel material and T-joints are frequently used in ship building and steel constructions. Advantages such as high deposition rates, high quality and smooth weld metals and easy automation make cored wires preferable in these industries. In this study, low carbon steel materials with web and flange thicknesses of 6 mm, 8 mm and 10 mm were welded with conventional GMAW and double channel shielding gas metal arc welding (DMAG method to form double fillet T-joints using metal cored wire. The difference between these two methods were characterized by measurements of mean welding parameters, Vickers hardness profiles, weld bead and HAZ geometry of the joints and thermal camera temperature measurements. When weld bead and HAZ geometries are focused, it was seen filler metal molten area increased and base metal molten area decreased in DMAG of low carbon steel. When compared with traditional GMAW, finer and acicular structures in weld metal and more homogenous and smaller grains in HAZ are obtained with double channel shielding gas metal arc welding.

  8. Friction stir weld assisted diffusion bonding of 5754 aluminum alloy to coated high strength steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haghshenas, M.; Abdel-Gwad, A.; Omran, A.M.; Gökçe, B.; Sahraeinejad, S.; Gerlich, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Successful lap joints of Al 5754 sheet to coated DP600 and 22MnB5 steels. • Negligible effect of welding speed on mechanical properties of Al 5754/22MnB5 joints. • Lower strength of Al 5754/22MnB5 joints compared with Al 5754/DP600 joints. - Abstract: In the present paper friction stir-induced diffusion bonding is used for joining sheets of 5754 aluminum alloy to coated high strength steels (DP600 and 22MnB5) by promoting diffusion bonding in an overlap configuration. Mechanical performance and microstructures of joints were analyzed by overlap shear testing, metallography, and X-ray diffraction. Our results show that the strength of joint is dependent upon tool travel speed and the depth of the tool pin relative to the steel surface. The thickness and types of intermetallic compounds formed at the interface play a significant role in achieving a joint with optimum performance. That is, the formation of high aluminum composition intermetallic compounds (i.e. Al 5 Fe 2 ) at the interface of the friction stir lap joint appeared to have a more negative effect on joint strength compared to the presence of high iron composition intermetallic phases (i.e. FeAl). This is in agreement with previously reported findings that FeAl intermetallic can improve the fracture toughness and interface strength in Al/St joints

  9. High Temperature Multilayer Environmental Barrier Coatings Deposited Via Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Bryan James; Zhu, Dongming; Schmitt, Michael P.; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Si-based ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) require environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) in combustion environments to avoid rapid material loss. Candidate EBC materials have use temperatures only marginally above current technology, but the addition of a columnar oxide topcoat can substantially increase the durability. Plasma Spray-Physical Vapor Deposition (PS-PVD) allows application of these multilayer EBCs in a single process. The PS-PVD technique is a unique method that combines conventional thermal spray and vapor phase methods, allowing for tailoring of thin, dense layers or columnar microstructures by varying deposition conditions. Multilayer coatings were deposited on CMC specimens and assessed for durability under high heat flux and load. Coated samples with surface temperatures ranging from 2400-2700F and 10 ksi loads using the high heat flux laser rigs at NASA Glenn. Coating morphology was characterized in the as-sprayed condition and after thermomechanical loading using electron microscopy and the phase structure was tracked using X-ray diffraction.

  10. Mechanical behaviour of Astm A 297 grade Hp joints welded using different processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emygdio, Paulo Roberto Oliveira; Zeemann, Annelise; Almeida, Luiz Henrique de

    1996-01-01

    The influence of different arc welding processes on mechanical behaviour was studied for cast heat resistant stainless steel welded joints, in the as welded conditions. ASTM A 297 grade HP with niobium and niobium/titanium additions were welded following three different welding procedures, using shielded metal arc welding gas tungsten arc welding and plasma arc welding, in six welded joints. The welded joint mechanical behaviour was evaluated by ambient temperature and 870 deg C tensile tests; and creep tests at 900 deg C and 50 MPa. Mechanical test results showed that the welding procedure qualification following welding codes is not suitable for high temperature service applications. (author)

  11. Human biomonitoring of chromium and nickel from an experimental exposure to manual metal arc welding fumes of low and high alloyed steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Jens; Brand, Peter; Schettgen, Thomas; Lenz, Klaus; Purrio, Ellwyn; Reisgen, Uwe; Kraus, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    The uptake and elimination of metals from welding fumes is currently not fully understood. In the Aachen Workplace Simulation Laboratory (AWSL) it is possible to investigate the impact of welding fumes on human subjects under controlled exposure conditions. In this study, the uptake and elimination of chromium or chromium (VI) respectively as well as nickel was studied in subjects after exposure to the emissions of a manual metal arc welding process using low or high alloyed steel. In this present study 12 healthy male non-smokers, who never worked as welders before, were exposed for 6h to welding fumes of a manual metal arc welding process. In a three-fold crossover study design, subjects were exposed in randomized order to either clean air, emissions from welding low alloyed steel, and emissions from welding high alloyed steel. Particle mass concentration of the exposure aerosol was 2.5mg m(-3). The content of chromium and nickel in the air was determined by analysing air filter samples on a high emission scenario. Urine analysis for chromium and nickel was performed before and after exposure using methods of human biomonitoring. There were significantly elevated chromium levels after exposure to welding fumes from high alloyed steel compared to urinary chromium levels before exposure to high alloyed welding fumes, as well as compared to the other exposure scenarios. The mean values increased from 0.27 µg l(-1) to 18.62 µg l(-1). The results were in good agreement with already existing correlations between external and internal exposure (German exposure equivalent for carcinogenic working materials EKA). The variability of urinary chromium levels was high. For urinary nickel no significant changes could be detected at all. Six-hour exposure to 2.5mg m(-3) high alloyed manual metal arc welding fumes lead to elevated urinary chromium levels far higher (7.11-34.16 µg l(-1)) than the German biological exposure reference value (BAR) of 0.6 µg l(-1) directly after

  12. Alternative welding reconditioning solutions without post welding heat treatment of pressure vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicic, D. T.; Rontescu, C.; Bogatu, A. M.; Dijmărescu, M. C.

    2017-08-01

    In pressure vessels, working on high temperature and high pressure may appear some defects, cracks for example, which may lead to failure in operation. When these nonconformities are identified, after certain examination, testing and result interpretation, the decision taken is to repair or to replace the deteriorate component. In the current legislation it’s stipulated that any repair, alteration or modification to an item of pressurised equipment that was originally post-weld heat treated after welding (PWHT) should be post-weld heat treated again after repair, requirement that cannot always be respected. For that reason, worldwide, there were developed various welding repair techniques without PWHT, among we find the Half Bead Technique (HBT) and Controlled Deposition Technique (CDT). The paper presents the experimental results obtained by applying the welding reconditioning techniques HBT and CDT in order to restore as quickly as possible the pressure vessels made of 13CrMo4-5. The effects of these techniques upon the heat affected zone are analysed, the graphics of the hardness variation are drawn and the resulted structures are compared in the two cases.

  13. Development of automatic laser welding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohwaki, Katsura

    2002-01-01

    Laser are a new production tool for high speed and low distortion welding and applications to automatic welding lines are increasing. IHI has long experience of laser processing for the preservation of nuclear power plants, welding of airplane engines and so on. Moreover, YAG laser oscillators and various kinds of hardware have been developed for laser welding and automation. Combining these welding technologies and laser hardware technologies produce the automatic laser welding system. In this paper, the component technologies are described, including combined optics intended to improve welding stability, laser oscillators, monitoring system, seam tracking system and so on. (author)

  14. Welding Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ken

    2009-01-01

    About 95% of all manufactured goods in this country are welded or joined in some way. These welded products range in nature from bicycle handlebars and skyscrapers to bridges and race cars. The author discusses what students need to know about careers for welding technicians--wages, responsibilities, skills needed, career advancement…

  15. Effects of welding and post-weld heat treatments on nanoscale precipitation and mechanical properties of an ultra-high strength steel hardened by NiAl and Cu nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, Z.B.; Luan, J.H.; Guo, W.; Poplawsky, J.D.; Liu, C.T.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of welding and post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) on nanoscale co-precipitation, grain structure, and mechanical properties of an ultra-high strength steel were studied through a combination of atom probe tomography (APT) and mechanical tests. Our results indicate that the welding process dissolves all pre-existing nanoparticles and causes grain coarsening in the fusion zone, resulting in a soft and ductile weld without any cracks in the as-welded condition. A 550 °C PWHT induces fine-scale re-precipitation of NiAl and Cu co-precipitates with high number densities and ultra-fine sizes, leading to a large recovery of strength but a loss of ductility with intergranular failure, whereas a 600 °C PWHT gives rise to coarse-scale re-precipitation of nanoparticles together with the formation of a small amount of reverted austenite, resulting in a great recovery in both strength and ductility. Our analysis indicates that the degree of strength recovery is dependent mainly upon the re-precipitation microstructure of nanoparticles, together with grain size and reversion of austenite, while the ductility recovery is sensitive to the grain-boundary structure. APT reveals that the grain-boundary segregation of Mn and P may be the main reason for the 550 °C embrittlement, and the enhanced ductility at 600 °C is ascribed to a possible reduction of the segregation and reversion of austenite.

  16. A study of weld quality in ultrasonic spot welding of similar and dissimilar metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Sarraf, Z; Lucas, M

    2012-01-01

    Several difficulties are faced in joining thinner sheets of similar and dissimilar materials from fusion welding processes such as resistance welding and laser welding. Ultrasonic metal welding overcomes many of these difficulties by using high frequency vibration and applied pressure to create a solid-state weld. Ultrasonic metal welding is an effective technique in joining small components, such as in wire bonding, but is also capable of joining thicker sheet, depending on the control of welding conditions. This study presents the design, characterisation and test of a lateral-drive ultrasonic metal welding device. The ultrasonic welding horn is modelled using finite element analysis and its vibration behaviour is characterised experimentally to ensure ultrasonic energy is delivered to the weld coupon. The welding stack and fixtures are then designed and mounted on a test machine to allow a series of experiments to be conducted for various welding and ultrasonic parameters. Weld strength is subsequently analysed using tensile-shear tests. Control of the vibration amplitude profile through the weld cycle is used to enhance weld strength and quality, providing an opportunity to reduce part marking. Optical microscopic examination and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were employed to investigate the weld quality. The results show how the weld quality is particularly sensitive to the combination of clamping force and vibration amplitude of the welding tip.

  17. The technology and welding joint properties of hybrid laser-tig welding on thick plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenghai, Zhang; Yifu, Shen; Huijuan, Qiu

    2013-06-01

    The technologies of autogenous laser welding and hybrid laser-TIG welding are used on thick plate of high strength lower alloy structural steel 10CrNiMnMoV in this article. The unique advantages of hybrid laser-TIG welding is summarized by comparing and analyzing the process parameters and welding joints of autogenous laser welding laser welding and hybrid laser-TIG welding. With the optimal process parameters of hybrid welding, the good welding joint without visible flaws can be obtained and its mechanical properties are tested according to industry standards. The results show that the hybrid welding technology has certain advantages and possibility in welding thick plates. It can reduce the demands of laser power, and it is significant for lowering the aspect ratio of weld during hybrid welding, so the gas in the molten pool can rise and escape easily while welding thick plates. Therefore, the pores forming tendency decreases. At the same time, hybrid welding enhances welding speed, and optimizes the energy input. The transition and grain size of the microstructure of hybrid welding joint is better and its hardness is higher than base material. Furthermore, its tensile strength and impact toughness is as good as base material. Consequently, the hybrid welding joint can meet the industry needs completely.

  18. Linear Subpixel Learning Algorithm for Land Cover Classification from WELD using High Performance Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, S.; Kumar, U.; Nemani, R. R.; Kalia, S.; Michaelis, A.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we use a Fully Constrained Least Squares Subpixel Learning Algorithm to unmix global WELD (Web Enabled Landsat Data) to obtain fractions or abundances of substrate (S), vegetation (V) and dark objects (D) classes. Because of the sheer nature of data and compute needs, we leveraged the NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) high performance computing architecture to optimize and scale our algorithm for large-scale processing. Subsequently, the S-V-D abundance maps were characterized into 4 classes namely, forest, farmland, water and urban areas (with NPP-VIIRS - national polar orbiting partnership visible infrared imaging radiometer suite nighttime lights data) over California, USA using Random Forest classifier. Validation of these land cover maps with NLCD (National Land Cover Database) 2011 products and NAFD (North American Forest Dynamics) static forest cover maps showed that an overall classification accuracy of over 91% was achieved, which is a 6% improvement in unmixing based classification relative to per-pixel based classification. As such, abundance maps continue to offer an useful alternative to high-spatial resolution data derived classification maps for forest inventory analysis, multi-class mapping for eco-climatic models and applications, fast multi-temporal trend analysis and for societal and policy-relevant applications needed at the watershed scale.

  19. A high molybdenum stainless steel and its resistance to chloride environments in the welded condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppolecchia, V.D.; Jasner, M.; Rockel, M.B.

    1988-01-01

    Highly alloyed stainless steels, such as 1925 hMo UNS N08925 with 6 percent molybdenum, are finding widespread use in high chloride cooling water and process environments. This alloy has good general corrosion resistance to a variety of chloride environments but it's main attraction is excellent resistance to all forms of localized corrosion. In aggressive chloride environments weldments are generally the area of concern with regard to localized corrosion. Temperature-time-sensitization diagrams are presented that demonstrate the resistance of 1925 hMo weldments to intergranular attack. Immersion tests in 10% ferric chloride substantiate that autogenous tube welds, also have excellent pitting resistance. Various filler metals are compared both electrochemically and in immersion tests. These comparisons reveal that an overalloyed filler metal is required to achieve pitting and crevice corrosion resistance equal or better than that of the base metal. Alloy 625 (UNS NO6625) has been selected. Constant extension rate tests in boiling 62% calcium chloride reveal that 1925 hMo weldments are immune to stress corrosion cracking in this environment which virtually guarantees absence of SCC in seawater regardless of temperature as well as in most commercial chemical environments

  20. Microstructural Characterization of Clad Interface in Welds of Ni-Cr-Mo High Strength Low Alloy Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hong-Eun; Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Ho-Jin; Kim, Keong-Ho [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki-Hyoung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Hee [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    SA508 Gr.4N Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel, in which Ni and Cr contents are higher than in commercial SA508 Gr.3 Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steels, may be a candidate reactor pressure vessel (RPV) material with higher strength and toughness from its tempered martensitic microstructure. The inner surface of the RPV is weld-cladded with stainless steels to prevent corrosion. The goal of this study is to evaluate the microstructural properties of the clad interface between Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel and stainless weldment, and the effects of post weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the properties. The properties of the clad interface were compared with those of commercial Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel. Multi-layer welding of model alloys with ER308L and ER309L stainless steel by the SAW method was performed, and then PWHT was conducted at 610°C for 30 h. The microstructural changes of the clad interface were analyzed using OM, SEM and TEM, and micro-Vickers hardness tests were performed. Before PWHT, the heat affected zone (HAZ) showed higher hardness than base and weld metals due to formation of martensite after welding in both steels. In addition, the hardness of the HAZ in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel was higher than that in Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel due to a comparatively high martensite fraction. The hardness of the HAZ decreased after PWHT in both steels, but the dark region was formed near the fusion line in which the hardness was locally high. In the case of Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel, formation of fine Cr-carbides in the weld region near the fusion line by diffusion of C from the base metal resulted in locally high hardness in the dark region. However, the precipitates of the region in the Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel were similar to that in the base metal, and the hardness in the region was not greatly different from that in the base metal.

  1. Microstructural Characterization of Clad Interface in Welds of Ni-Cr-Mo High Strength Low Alloy Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hong-Eun; Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Ho-Jin; Kim, Keong-Ho; Lee, Ki-Hyoung; Lee, Chang-Hee

    2011-01-01

    SA508 Gr.4N Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel, in which Ni and Cr contents are higher than in commercial SA508 Gr.3 Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steels, may be a candidate reactor pressure vessel (RPV) material with higher strength and toughness from its tempered martensitic microstructure. The inner surface of the RPV is weld-cladded with stainless steels to prevent corrosion. The goal of this study is to evaluate the microstructural properties of the clad interface between Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel and stainless weldment, and the effects of post weld heat treatment (PWHT) on the properties. The properties of the clad interface were compared with those of commercial Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel. Multi-layer welding of model alloys with ER308L and ER309L stainless steel by the SAW method was performed, and then PWHT was conducted at 610°C for 30 h. The microstructural changes of the clad interface were analyzed using OM, SEM and TEM, and micro-Vickers hardness tests were performed. Before PWHT, the heat affected zone (HAZ) showed higher hardness than base and weld metals due to formation of martensite after welding in both steels. In addition, the hardness of the HAZ in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel was higher than that in Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel due to a comparatively high martensite fraction. The hardness of the HAZ decreased after PWHT in both steels, but the dark region was formed near the fusion line in which the hardness was locally high. In the case of Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel, formation of fine Cr-carbides in the weld region near the fusion line by diffusion of C from the base metal resulted in locally high hardness in the dark region. However, the precipitates of the region in the Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel were similar to that in the base metal, and the hardness in the region was not greatly different from that in the base metal.

  2. Control of Porosity and Spatter in Laser Welding of Thick AlMg5 Parts Using High-Speed Imaging and Optical Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei C. Popescu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We report on a feedback mechanism for rapid identification of optimal laser parameters during welding of AlMg5 coupons using real-time monitoring by high-speed imaging. The purpose was to constrain the liquid movement in the groove in order to obtain pore-free welds in this otherwise difficult-to-weld alloy. High-speed imaging of the welding process via an optical microscope allowed for recording at millimeter level, providing new information on liquid-metal dynamics during laser irradiation as well as plausible explanations for spatter occurrence and pores formation. The pore formation and especially the position of these pores had to be controlled in order to weld 3 mm thick samples. By tuning both laser power and pulse duration, pores were aligned on a single line, at the bottom of the weld. A laser pass of reduced power on that side was then sufficient for removing all pores and providing a suitable weld.

  3. Analysis of High-Power Diode Laser Heating Effects on HY-80 Steel for Laser Assisted Friction Stir Welding Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiechec, Maxwell; Baker, Brad; McNelley, Terry; Matthews, Manyalibo; Rubenchik, Alexander; Rotter, Mark; Beach, Ray; Wu, Sheldon

    2017-01-01

    In this research, several conditions of high power diode laser heated HY-80 steel were characterized to determine the viability of using such lasers as a preheating source before friction stir welding in order to reduce frictional forces thereby reducing tool wear and increasing welding speeds. Differences in microstructures within heat affected zones were identified at specific laser powers and traverse speeds. Vickers hardness values were recorded and analyzed to validate the formation of additional martensite in diode laser heated regions of HY-80 steel. Conditions that produced little to no additional martensite were identified and relationships among high power diode laser power, traverse speed, and martensite formation were determined. The development of heat affected zones, change in grain structure, and creation of additional martensite in HY-80 can be prevented through the optimization of laser amperage and transverse speed.

  4. Effects of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Toughness of Flash Butt Welded High-Strength Low-Alloy Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shajan, Nikhil; Arora, Kanwer Singh; Asati, Brajesh; Sharma, Vikram; Shome, Mahadev

    2018-04-01

    Effect of post-weld heat treatment on the weld microstructure, texture, and its correlation to the toughness of flash butt welded joints were investigated. Upon flash butt welding, the α and γ-fiber in the parent material converted to Goss (110)[001], rotated Goss (110)[1 \\bar{1} 0], and rotated cube (001)[1 \\bar{1} 0], (001)[ \\overline{11} 0] textures along the fracture plane. Formation of these detrimental texture components was a result of shear deformation and recrystallization of austenite at temperatures above T nr resulting in a drop of toughness at the weld zone. Inter-critical and sub-critical annealing cycles proved to be less effective in reducing the Goss (110)[001], rotated Goss (110)[1 \\bar{1} 0], and rotated cube (001)[1 \\bar{1} 0], (001)[ \\overline{11} 0] texture components, and therefore, toughness values remained unaffected. Post-weld heat treatment in the austenite phase field at 1000 °C for 5 seconds resulted in the formation of new grains with different orientations leading to a reduction in the texture intensities of both Goss and rotated Goss components and therefore improved weld zone toughness. Prolonged annealing time was found to be ineffective in improving the toughness due to grain growth.

  5. Automatic welding of stainless steel tubing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clautice, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    The use of automatic welding for making girth welds in stainless steel tubing was investigated as well as the reduction in fabrication costs resulting from the elimination of radiographic inspection. Test methodology, materials, and techniques are discussed, and data sheets for individual tests are included. Process variables studied include welding amperes, revolutions per minute, and shielding gas flow. Strip chart recordings, as a definitive method of insuring weld quality, are studied. Test results, determined by both radiographic and visual inspection, are presented and indicate that once optimum welding procedures for specific sizes of tubing are established, and the welding machine operations are certified, then the automatic tube welding process produces good quality welds repeatedly, with a high degree of reliability. Revised specifications for welding tubing using the automatic process and weld visual inspection requirements at the Kennedy Space Center are enumerated.

  6. Assessing mechanical properties of the dissimilar metal welding between P92 steels and alloy 617 at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Hwang, J. H.; Park, Y. S.; Kim, T. M.; Bae, D. H. [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, W. B. [Institute of Mechanical Engineering, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Han, J. W. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Hoseo University, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this study, a new welding technology of dissimilar materials, Cr-based P92 steels and Ni-based Alloy 617 is introduced and demonstrated to investigate its reliability. Firstly, multi-pass dissimilar metal welding between P92 steel and Alloy 617 was performed using DCEN TIG welding technology, buttering welding technique and a narrow gap groove. After welding, in order to understand characteristics of the dissimilar metal welds, metallurgical micro-structures analysis by optical observation and static tensile strength assessment of the dissimilar welded joints were conducted at 700°C.

  7. High cycle fatigue behavior of the IN718/M247 hybrid element fabricated by friction welding at elevated temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Hung Tra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid element has been fabricated by friction welding, joining two superalloys Inconel 718 and Mar-M247. The high cycle fatigue behavior of this welded element was investigated at 500 °C and 700 °C. The fabrication could obtain excellent fatigue strength in which the fracture is located in the base metal Mar-M247 side and takes place outside the welded zone. The behavior of the joint under loadings is discussed through a simulation by the numerical finite element method.

  8. Comparative microscopic study of human and rat lungs after overexposure to welding fume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, James M; Roberts, Jenny R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Mercer, Robert R

    2013-11-01

    Welding is a common industrial process used to join metals and generates complex aerosols of potentially hazardous metal fumes and gases. Most long-time welders experience some type of respiratory disorder during their time of employment. The use of animal models and the ability to control the welding fume exposure in toxicology studies have been helpful in developing a better understanding of how welding fumes affect health. There are no studies that have performed a side-by-side comparison of the pulmonary responses from an animal toxicology welding fume study with the lung responses associated with chronic exposure to welding fume by a career welder. In this study, post-mortem lung tissue was donated from a long-time welder with a well-characterized work background and a history of extensive welding fume exposure. To simulate a long-term welding exposure in an animal model, Sprague-Dawley rats were treated once a week for 28 weeks by intratracheal instillation with 2mg of a stainless steel, hard-surfacing welding fume. Lung tissues from the welder and the welding fume-treated rats were examined by light and electron microscopy. Pathological analysis of lung tissue collected from the welder demonstrated inflammatory cell influx and significant pulmonary injury. The poor and deteriorating lung condition observed in the welder examined in this study was likely due to exposure to very high levels of potentially toxic metal fumes and gases for a significant number of years due to work in confined spaces. The lung toxicity profile for the rats treated with welding fume was similar. For tissue samples from both the welder and treated rats, welding particle accumulations deposited and persisted in lung structures and were easily visualized using light microscopic techniques. Agglomerates of deposited welding particles mostly were observed within lung cells, particularly alveolar macrophages. Analysis of individual particles within the agglomerates showed that these

  9. Fatigue of non-welded pressure vessels made of high strength steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauscher, F.

    2003-01-01

    When using high strength steels for pressure vessels, cyclic fatigue requirements may become decisive for the design. Within a European research project, two typical non-welded types of vessels--gas cylinders as used for gas transportation and hydraulic accumulators with screwed in ends--were investigated. The results of the fatigue analyses and of the testing of these vessels are described here. Special attention is drawn to the evaluation of the stresses in the threads used for threaded in flat ends and rings, because the usual formulae for bolted connections cannot be used. In the case of sharp notches and of threads, the experiments showed that the fatigue calculation gave conservative results. The unexpected failure of the gas cylinders in the cylindrical part and at the onset of the end showed that the fatigue analyses according to prEN13445-3 clause 18 is non-conservative for these surfaces without mechanical preparation, and need special consideration. Based on the investigations, a stress concentration factor for small fabrication notches and a new surface finish factor is proposed

  10. Fatigue of non-welded pressure vessels made of high strength steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauscher, F

    2003-03-01

    When using high strength steels for pressure vessels, cyclic fatigue requirements may become decisive for the design. Within a European research project, two typical non-welded types of vessels--gas cylinders as used for gas transportation and hydraulic accumulators with screwed in ends--were investigated. The results of the fatigue analyses and of the testing of these vessels are described here. Special attention is drawn to the evaluation of the stresses in the threads used for threaded in flat ends and rings, because the usual formulae for bolted connections cannot be used. In the case of sharp notches and of threads, the experiments showed that the fatigue calculation gave conservative results. The unexpected failure of the gas cylinders in the cylindrical part and at the onset of the end showed that the fatigue analyses according to prEN13445-3 clause 18 is non-conservative for these surfaces without mechanical preparation, and need special consideration. Based on the investigations, a stress concentration factor for small fabrication notches and a new surface finish factor is proposed.

  11. On the choice of electromagnetic model for short high-intensity arcs, applied to welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choquet, Isabelle; Shirvan, Alireza Javidi; Nilsson, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    We have considered four different approaches for modelling the electromagnetic fields of high-intensity electric arcs: (i) three-dimensional, (ii) two-dimensional axi-symmetric, (iii) the electric potential formulation and (iv) the magnetic field formulation. The underlying assumptions and the differences between these models are described in detail. Models (i) to (iii) reduce to the same limit for an axi-symmetric configuration with negligible radial current density, contrary to model (iv). Models (i) to (iii) were retained and implemented in the open source CFD software OpenFOAM. The simulation results were first validated against the analytic solution of an infinite electric rod. Perfect agreement was obtained for all the models tested. The electromagnetic models (i) to (iii) were then coupled with thermal fluid mechanics, and applied to axi-symmetric gas tungsten arc welding test cases with short arc (2, 3 and 5 mm) and truncated conical electrode tip. Models (i) and (ii) lead to the same simulation results, but not model (iii). Model (iii) is suited in the specific limit of long axi-symmetric arc with negligible electrode tip effect, i.e. negligible radial current density. For short axi-symmetric arc with significant electrode tip effect, the more general axi-symmetric formulation of model (ii) should instead be used. (paper)

  12. Resistance welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Zhang, Wenqi; Rasmussen, Mogens H.

    2003-01-01

    Resistance welding comprises not only the well known spot welding process but also more complex projection welding operations, where excessive plastic deformation of the weld point may occur. This enables the production of complex geometries and material combinations, which are often not possible...... to weld by traditional spot welding operations. Such joining processes are, however, not simple to develop due to the large number of parameters involved. Development has traditionally been carried out by large experimental investigations, but the development of a numerical programme system has changed...... this enabling prediction of the welding performance in details. The paper describes the programme in short and gives examples on industrial applications. Finally investigations of causes for failure in a complex industrial joint of two dissimilar metals are carried out combining numerical modelling...

  13. Deposition of highly (111)-oriented PZT thin films by using metal organic chemical deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Bu, K H; Choi, D K; Seong, W K; Kim, J D

    1999-01-01

    Lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films have been grown on Pt/Ta/SiNx/Si substrates by using metal organic chemical vapor deposition with Pb(C sub 2 H sub 5) sub 4 , Zr(O-t-C sub 4 H sub 9) sub 4 , and Ti(O-i-C sub 3 H sub 7) sub 4 as source materials and O sub 2 as an oxidizing gas. The Zr fraction in the thin films was controlled by varying the flow rate of the Zr source material. The crystal structure and the electrical properties were investigated as functions of the composition. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that at a certain range of Zr fraction, highly (111)-oriented PZT thin films with no pyrochlore phases were deposited. On the other hand, at low Zr fractions, there were peaks from Pb-oxide phases. At high Zr fractions, peaks from pyrochlore phase were seen. The films also showed good electrical properties, such as a high dielectric constant of more than 1200 and a low coercive voltage of 1.35 V.

  14. Nanostructured high valence silver oxide produced by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellasega, D.; Facibeni, A.; Di Fonzo, F.; Russo, V.; Conti, C.; Ducati, C.; Casari, C.S.; Li Bassi, A.; Bottani, C.E.

    2009-01-01

    Among silver oxides, Ag 4 O 4 , i.e. high valence Ag(I)Ag(III) oxide, is interesting for applications in high energy batteries and for the development of antimicrobial coatings. We here show that ns UV pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in an oxygen containing atmosphere allows the synthesis of pure Ag 4 O 4 nanocrystalline thin films, permitting at the same time to control the morphology of the material at the sub-micrometer scale. Ag 4 O 4 films with a crystalline domain size of the order of tens of nm can be deposited provided the deposition pressure is above a threshold (roughly 4 Pa pure O 2 or 20 Pa synthetic air). The formation of this particular high valence silver oxide is explained in terms of the reactions occurring during the expansion of the ablated species in the reactive atmosphere. In particular, expansion of the PLD plasma plume is accompanied by formation of low stability Ag-O dimers and atomic oxygen, providing reactive species at the substrate where the film grows. Evidence of reactive collisions in the expanding ablation plume is obtained by analysis of the plume visible shape in inert and reactive atmospheres. In addition, we show how the dimensionless deposition parameter L, relating the target-to-substrate distance to the ablation plume maximum expansion length, can be used to classify different growth regimes. It is thus possible to vary the stoichiometry and the morphology of the films, from compact and columnar to foam-like, by controlling both the gas pressure and the target-to-substrate distance

  15. Alloying element effect on the mechanical properties of high-strength stainless steels and welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pustovit, A.I.; Yushchenko, K.A.; Fortunatova, N.N.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental steels containing 11-17% Cr, 3-13% Ni, 0-2% Mo, 0-1% Ti, 1-2% Cu, 0-4% Co, 0-1% He, < 0.03% C and their welded joints have been studied. The ''MRA-1'' program was used to obtain mathematical description (in the form of regression equations) of the effect of alloying elements on strength and plasticity of the steels and the welded joints at 20...-196 deg C. The dependences obtained make it possible to predict the properties of the steels and the joints in a satisfactory agreement with their actual behaviour at 20...-196 deg C

  16. Numerical simulation of TIG welding with filler of steel pieces of high thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmignani, B.; Toselli, G.

    1999-01-01

    The problem of the numerical simulation of welding process with filler, in particular TIG (tungsten inert gas) with cold filler, has been approached with ABAQUS/S code. Reference has been made to some experimental models studied and prepared ad hoc in order to better know the physical phenomena involved in the TIG welding technique and to validate the computation methodologies and results obtained. This numerical simulation has been required in order to assist the fabrication development and QA for TF (toroidal field) coil case, an important component of ITER (international thermonuclear experimental reactor) machine [it

  17. High temperature creep properties and microstructural examinations of P92 welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalck, Charlotte; Giroux, Pierre-Francois [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); MINES ParisTech, UMR CNRS, Evry (France). Centre des Materiaux; Fournier, Benjamin; Barcelo, Francoise; Dalle, France; Ivan, Tournie [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laurent, Forest [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DM2S/LTA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Gourgues-Lorenzon, Anne-Francoise [MINES ParisTech, UMR CNRS, Evry (France). Centre des Materiaux

    2010-07-01

    The present study deals with the creep properties of welded joints made of P92 steels. The purpose is to determine the weakest zone at 550 C under various load levels (160-240 MPa) and to investigate the evolution of the microstructure during creep. The study of the fracture surfaces and the microstructural examination of welded joints prior to and after creep tests allow to investigate damage development. Ductile fracture occurs in the heat affected zone, more precisely, in the intercritical area, together with pronounced necking. Observation of the necking area shows many cavities and cracks. (orig.)

  18. Mechanical and structural characteristics in high temperature of stainless steel welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, S.N.; Carvalho Mota, A.F. de

    1980-01-01

    The mechanical behavior at 600 0 C of weldments made of type 304 stainless as base metal and niobium containing type 347 stainless as weld metal has been investigated. This was done through tensile and creep tests. Heat treatments at 600 0 C and up to 6000 hours permited a simultaneous follow up of the mechanical and microstructural changes. It was observed that the exposure at 600 0 C under load contributes, from the begining, to the strengthening of the weld. This is due to the acceleration of the second phase precipitation hardening. (Author) [pt

  19. Extending the process limits of laser polymer welding with high-brilliance beam sources (recent status and prospects of POLYBRIGHT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olowinsky, A.; Boglea, A.

    2011-03-01

    Plastics play an important role in almost every facet of our lives and constitute a wide variety of products, from everyday products such as food and beverage packaging, over furniture and building materials to high tech products in the automotive, electronics, aerospace, white goods, medical and other sectors [1]. The objective of PolyBright, the European Research project on laser polymer welding, is to provide high speed and flexible laser manufacturing technology and expand the limits of current plastic part assembly. New laser polymer joining processes for optimized thermal management in combination with adapted wavelengths will provide higher quality, high processing speed up to 1 m/s and robust manufacturing processes at lower costs. Key innovations of the PolyBright project are fibre lasers with high powers up to 500 W, high speed scanning and flexible beam manipulation systems for simultaneous welding and high-resolution welding, such as dynamic masks and multi kHz scanning heads. With this initial step, PolyBright will break new paths in processing of advanced plastic products overcoming the quality and speed limitations of conventional plastic part assembly. Completely new concepts for high speed processing, flexibility and quality need to be established in combination with high brilliance lasers and related equipment. PolyBright will thus open new markets for laser systems with a short term potential of over several 100 laser installations per year and a future much larger market share in the still growing plastic market. PolyBright will hence establish a comprehensive and sustainable development activity on new high brilliance lasers that will strengthen the laser system industry.

  20. Microstructure, Mechanical and Corrosion Properties of Friction Stir Welding High Nitrogen Martensitic Stainless Steel 30Cr15Mo1N

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Geng

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available High nitrogen martensitic stainless steel 30Cr15Mo1N plates were successfully welded by friction stir welding (FSW at a tool rotation speed of 300 rpm with a welding speed of 100 mm/min, using W-Re tool. The sound joint with no significant nitrogen loss was successfully produced. Microstructure, mechanical and corrosion properties of an FSW joint were investigated. The results suggest that the grain size of the stir zone (SZ is larger than the base metal (BM and is much larger the case in SZ-top. Some carbides and nitrides rich in chromium were found in BM while not observed in SZ. The martensitic phase in SZ could transform to austenite phase during the FSW process and the higher peak temperature, the greater degree of transformation. The hardness of SZ is significantly lower than that of the BM. An abrupt change of hardness defined as hard zone (HZ was found in the thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ on the advancing side (AS, and the HZ is attributed to a combination result of temperature, deformation, and material flow behavior. The corrosion resistance of SZ is superior to that of BM, which can be attributed to less precipitation and lower angle boundaries (LABs. The corrosion resistance of SZ-bottom is slight higher than that of SZ-top because of the finer grained structure.

  1. Quality improvement of steel cast-welded constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Аркадій Васильович Лоза

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Among the various types of metallurgical equipment there are structures which are welded compounds of a cast base and additional elements produced by casting or any other means. Such structures are called cast-welded constructions. Besides new working properties such constructions appear to be more efficient and provide better durability as compared to the similar structures produced by other industrial means. Meanwhile the advantages of the technology are not used in full. One reason is low quality of the compound products caused by lack of proper preparation of the elements to be welded and poor quality of the welds themselves. In the article the methods of quality production and the maintenance of steel cast-welded constructions have been considered. A ladle of a blast-furnace slag car is used as the subject of investigation and further testing of the mentioned above technologies. The ladle is a cast product. Under operating conditions, the ladle undergoes mechanical and thermal load, which results in deformation of its sides that deflect inside. To prevent the deflection stiffening ribs are welded onto the outer surface of the ladle. However, there may be casting defects in the base metal that could reduce the durability of the welds. It has been proved that welds on the unprepared cast base of the steel product cannot guarantee the combination’s durability and reliability. To prevent the influence of the casting defects it has been recommended to cover the base metal with one more metal layer before welding the elements on. Two-layer surfacing provides best result as the first layer serves for the weld penetration of the casting defects since this layer has a significant share of base metal therefore it is less malleable; the second layer is necessary for making the layer viscous enough. The viscous layer ensures the absence of sharp transition from the deposited metal to the base metal and increases the crack resistance of the weld. In

  2. Twin header bore welded steam generator for pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, R.J.; Hirst, B.

    1979-01-01

    A description is given of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator concept, several examples of which have been in service for up to fourteen years. Details are given of the highly successful service record of this equipment and the features which have been incorporated to minimize corrosion and deposition pockets. The design employs a vertical U tube bundle carried off two horizontal headers to which the tubes are welded by the Foster Wheeler Power Products (FWPP) bore welding process. The factors to be considered in uprating the design to meet the current operating conditions for a 1000 MW unit are discussed. (author)

  3. Galvanic corrosion of beryllium welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.A.; Butt, D.P.; Lillard, R.S.

    1997-01-01

    Beryllium is difficult to weld because it is highly susceptible to cracking. The most commonly used filler metal in beryllium welds is Al-12 wt.% Si. Beryllium has been successfully welded using Al-Si filler metal with more than 30 wt.% Al. This filler creates an aluminum-rich fusion zone with a low melting point that tends to backfill cracks. Drawbacks to adding a filler metal include a reduction in service temperature, a lowering of the tensile strength of the weld, and the possibility for galvanic corrosion to occur at the weld. To evaluate the degree of interaction between Be and Al-Si in an actual weld, sections from a mock beryllium weldment were exposed to 0.1 M Cl - solution. Results indicate that the galvanic couple between Be and the Al-Si weld material results in the cathodic protection of the weld and of the anodic dissolution of the bulk Be material. While the cathodic protection of Al is generally inefficient, the high anodic dissolution rate of the bulk Be during pitting corrosion combined with the insulating properties of the Be oxide afford some protection of the Al-Si weld material. Although dissolution of the Be precipitate in the weld material does occur, no corrosion of the Al-Si matrix was observed

  4. Soldadura (Welding). Spanish Translations for Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohhertz, Durwin

    Thirty transparency masters with Spanish subtitles for key words are provided for a welding/general mechanical repair course. The transparency masters are on such topics as oxyacetylene welding; oxyacetylene welding equipment; welding safety; different types of welds; braze welding; cutting torches; cutting with a torch; protective equipment; arc…

  5. Narrow gap mechanised arc welding in nuclear components manufactured by AREVA NP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peigney, A.

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear components require welds of irreproachable and reproducible quality. Moreover, for a given welding process, productivity requirements lead to reduce the volume of deposited metal and thus to use narrow gap design. In the shop, narrow gap Submerged Arc Welding process (SAW) is currently used on rotating parts in flat position for thicknesses up to 300 mm. Welding is performed with one or two wires in two passes per layer. In Gas Tungsten Arc Welding process (GTAW), multiple applications can be found because this process presents the advantage of allowing welding in all positions. Welding is performed in one or two passes per layer. The process is used in factory and on the nuclear sites for assembling new components but also for replacing components and for repairs. Presently, an increase of productivity of the process is sought through the use of hot wire and/or two wires. Concerning Gas Metal Arc Welding process (GMAW), its use is growing for nuclear components, including narrow gap applications. This process, limited in its applications in the past on account of the defects it generated, draws benefit from the progress of the welding generators. Then it is possible to use this efficient process for high security components such as those of nuclear systems. It is to be noted that the process is applicable in the various welding positions as it is the case for GTAW, while being more efficient than the latter. This paper presents the state of the art in the use of narrow gap mechanised arc welding processes by AREVA NP units. (author) [fr

  6. WELDING TORCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correy, T.B.

    1961-10-01

    A welding torch into which water and inert gas are piped separately for cooling and for providing a suitable gaseous atmosphere is described. A welding electrode is clamped in the torch by a removable collet sleeve and a removable collet head. Replacement of the sleeve and head with larger or smaller sleeve and head permits a larger or smaller welding electrode to be substituted on the torch. (AEC)

  7. Elemental segregation during resistance spot welding of boron containing advanced high strength steels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amirthalingam, M.; Van der Aa, E.M.; Kwakernaak, C.; Hermans, M.J.M.; Richardson, I.M.

    2015-01-01

    The partitioning behaviour of carbon, phosphorous and boron during the solidification of a resistance spot weld pool was studied using experimental simulations and a phase field model. Steels with varying carbon, phosphorous and boron contents were designed and subjected to a range of resistant spot

  8. Welding of a neutron high-flux reactor made of aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinser, P.; Schupp, N.

    1996-01-01

    The HFR300 of the Institute ''Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL)'' at Grenoble was found to be damaged by a number of serious defects which could not be made good by repair work, so that a new reactor had to be installed. Some of the welding tasks performed so far in this installation are explained. (orig./MM) [de

  9. Fiscal 2000 achievement report on development of high-efficiency high-reliability welding technology through improvement on welding techniques; 2000 nendo yosetsu gijutsu no kodoka ni yoru kokoritsu koshinraisei yosetsu gijutsu no kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-04-01

    Efforts are made to develop a welding design support system capable of increasing reliability and enhancing welding efficiency. Activities are conducted in the six fields of (1) the development of welding process simulation models, (2) development of welded section structure simulation models, (3) development of simulation models for predicting welding caused deformation, (4) integration of the models, (5) analysis of the welding phenomenon, and (6) the elucidation of the defect generation mechanism. In field (1), efforts are made to develop an arc plasma model, a molten pool convective heat transportation model, and a welding process model. In the effort to develop an arc plasma model, studies are made about a stationary axisymmetric arc in its steady state and about a constitutive equation and computation algorithm for developing a model in which a tungsten electrode (cathode) and an arc plasma welding pool (anode) are integrated. Furthermore, the simulation outcomes are experimentally verified. Satisfactory models are obtained as far as qualitative properties are concerned. (NEDO)

  10. Numerical analysis of weld pool oscillation in laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jung Ho [Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Farson, Dave F [The Ohio State University, Columbus (United States); Hollis, Kendall; Milewski, John O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Volume of fluid (VOF) numerical simulation was used to investigate melt flow and volumetric oscillation of conduction-mode pulsed laser weld pools. The result is compared to high speed video stream of titanium laser spot welding experiment. The total simulation time is 10ms with the first 5 ms being heating and melting under constant laser irradiation and the remaining 5 ms corresponding to resolidification of the weld pool. During the melting process, the liquid pool did not exhibit periodic oscillation but was continually depressed by the evaporation recoil pressure. After the laser pulse, the weld pool was excited into volumetric oscillation by the release of pressure on its surface and oscillation of the weld pool surface was analyzed. The simulation model suggested adjusting thermal diffusivity to match cooling rate and puddle diameter during solidification which is distinguishable from previous weld pool simulation. The frequency continuously increased from several thousand cycles per second to tens of thousands of cycles per second as the weld pool solidified and its diameter decreased. The result is the first trial of investigation of small weld pool oscillation in laser welding although there have been several reports about arc welding.

  11. Microstructure characteristics and temperature-dependent high cycle fatigue behavior of advanced 9% Cr/CrMoV dissimilarly welded joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qingjun [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Lu, Fenggui, E-mail: Lfg119@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Metallurgy and Materials Processing, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Cui, Haichao [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Ding, Yuming; Liu, Xia [Shanghai Turbine Plant of Shanghai Electric Power Generation Equipment Co. Ltd., Shanghai 200240 (China); Gao, Yulai, E-mail: ylgao@shu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Modern Metallurgy and Materials Processing, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2014-10-06

    Advanced 9% Cr and CrMoV steels chosen as candidate materials are first welded by narrow-gap submerged arc welding (NG-SAW) to fabricate the heavy section rotor. The present work focuses on studying the high-cycle fatigue (HCF) behavior of advanced 9% Cr/CrMoV dissimilarly welded joint at different temperatures. Conditional fatigue strength of this dissimilarly welded joint was obtained by HCF tests at room temperature (RT), 400 °C and 470 °C. It was observed that the failure occurred at the side of CrMoV base metal (BM), weld metal (WM) and heat affected zone (HAZ) of CrMoV side over 5×10{sup 7} cycles for the specimens tested at RT, 400 °C and 470 °C. The detailed microstructures of BMs, WMs and HAZs as well as fracture appearance were observed by optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Precipitation and aggregation of carbides along the grain boundaries were clearly detected with the increase of temperature, which brought a negative effect on the fatigue properties. It is interesting to note that the inclusion size leading to crack initiation became smaller for the HCF test at higher temperature. Therefore, reduction in the inclusion size in a welded joint helps to improve the HCF performance at high temperature.

  12. Microstructure characteristics and temperature-dependent high cycle fatigue behavior of advanced 9% Cr/CrMoV dissimilarly welded joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Qingjun; Lu, Fenggui; Cui, Haichao; Ding, Yuming; Liu, Xia; Gao, Yulai

    2014-01-01

    Advanced 9% Cr and CrMoV steels chosen as candidate materials are first welded by narrow-gap submerged arc welding (NG-SAW) to fabricate the heavy section rotor. The present work focuses on studying the high-cycle fatigue (HCF) behavior of advanced 9% Cr/CrMoV dissimilarly welded joint at different temperatures. Conditional fatigue strength of this dissimilarly welded joint was obtained by HCF tests at room temperature (RT), 400 °C and 470 °C. It was observed that the failure occurred at the side of CrMoV base metal (BM), weld metal (WM) and heat affected zone (HAZ) of CrMoV side over 5×10 7 cycles for the specimens tested at RT, 400 °C and 470 °C. The detailed microstructures of BMs, WMs and HAZs as well as fracture appearance were observed by optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Precipitation and aggregation of carbides along the grain boundaries were clearly detected with the increase of temperature, which brought a negative effect on the fatigue properties. It is interesting to note that the inclusion size leading to crack initiation became smaller for the HCF test at higher temperature. Therefore, reduction in the inclusion size in a welded joint helps to improve the HCF performance at high temperature

  13. Determination of welding parameters for execution of weld overlayer on PWR nuclear reactor nozzles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, Gabriela M.; Lima, Luciana I.; Quinan, Marco A.; Schvartzman, Monica M.

    2009-01-01

    In the PWR reactors, nickel based dissimilar welds have been presented susceptibilities the stress corrosion (S C). For the mitigation the problem a deposition of weld layers on the external surface of the nozzle is an alternative, viewing to provoke the compression of the region subjected to S C. This paper presents a preliminary study on the determination of welding parameters to obtain these welding overlayers. Welding depositions were performed on a test piece welded with nickel 182 alloy, simulating the conditions of a nozzle used in a PWR nuclear power plant. The welding process was the GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding), and a nickel 52 alloy as addition material. The overlayers were performed on the base metals, carbon steel an stainless steel, changing the welding parameters and verifying the the time of each weld filet. After that, the samples were micro structurally characterized. The macro structures and the microstructures obtained through optical microscopy and Vickers microhardness are presented. The preliminary results make evident the good weld quality. However, a small weld parameters influence used in the base material microstructure (carbon steel and stainless steel). The obtained results in this study will be used as reference in the construction of a mock up which will simulate all the conditions of a pressurizer nozzle of PWR reactor

  14. Use of high-power diode lasers for hardening and thermal conduction welding of metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klocke, Fritz; Demmer, Axel; Zaboklicki, A.

    1997-08-01

    CO2 and Nd:YAG high power lasers have become established as machining tools in industrial manufacturing over the last few years. The most important advantages compared to conventional processing techniques lie in the absence of forces introduced by the laser into the workpiece and in the simple arid highly accurate control in terms ofpositioning and timing making the laser a universally applicable, wear-free and extremely flexible tool /1,2/. The laser can be utilised costeffectively in numerous manufacturing processes but there are also further applications for the laser which produce excellent results from a technical point of view, but are not justified in terms of cost. The extensive use of lasers, particularly in small companies and workshops, is hindered by two main reasons: the complexity and size ofthe laser source and plant and the high investment costs /3/. A new generation of lasers, the high power diode lasers (HDL), combines high performance with a compact design, making the laser a cheap and easy to use tool with many applications /3,4,5,6/. In the diode laser, the laser beam is generated by a microelectronic diode which transforms electrical energy directly into laser energy. Diode lasers with low power outputs have, for some time, been making their mark in our everyday lives: they are used in CD players, laser printers and scanners at cash tills. Modern telecommunications would be impossible without these lasers which enable information to be transmitted in the form oflight impulses through optical fibres. They can also be found in compact precision measurement instrumentation - range fmders, interferometers and pollutant analysis devices /3,6/. In the field of material processing, the first applications ofthe laser, such as for soldering, inscribing, surface hardening and plastic or heat conduction welding, will exceed the limits ofthe relatively low performance output currently available. The diode laser has a shorter wavelength than the CO2 and

  15. Welding stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poirier, J.; Barbe, B.; Jolly, N.

    1976-01-01

    The aim is to show how internal stresses are generated and to fix the orders of magnitude. A realistic case, the vertical welding of thick plates free to move one against the other, is described and the deformations and stresses are analyzed. The mathematical model UEDA, which accounts for the elastic modulus, the yield strength and the expansion coefficient of the metal with temperature, is presented. The hypotheses and results given apply only to the instantaneous welding of a welded plate and to a plate welded by a moving electrode [fr

  16. Method for enhanced control of welding processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheaffer, Donald A.; Renzi, Ronald F.; Tung, David M.; Schroder, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    Method and system for producing high quality welds in welding processes, in general, and gas tungsten arc (GTA) welding, in particular by controlling weld penetration. Light emitted from a weld pool is collected from the backside of a workpiece by optical means during welding and transmitted to a digital video camera for further processing, after the emitted light is first passed through a short wavelength pass filter to remove infrared radiation. By filtering out the infrared component of the light emitted from the backside weld pool image, the present invention provides for the accurate determination of the weld pool boundary. Data from the digital camera is fed to an imaging board which focuses on a 100.times.100 pixel portion of the image. The board performs a thresholding operation and provides this information to a digital signal processor to compute the backside weld pool dimensions and area. This information is used by a control system, in a dynamic feedback mode, to automatically adjust appropriate parameters of a welding system, such as the welding current, to control weld penetration and thus, create a uniform weld bead and high quality weld.

  17. High performance emitter for thermionic diode obtained by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faron, R.; Bargues, M.; Durand, J.P.; Gillardeau, J.

    1973-01-01

    Vapor deposition process conditions presently known for tungsten and molybdenum (specifically the range of high temperatures and low pressures) permit the achievement of high performance thermionic emitters when used with an appropriate technology. One example of this uses the following series of successive vapor deposits, the five last vapor deposits constituting the fabrication of the emitting layer: Mo deposit for the formation of the nuclear fuel mechanical support; Mo deposit, which constitutes the sheath of the nuclear fuel; epitaxed Mo--W alloy deposit; epitaxed tungsten deposit; fine-grained tungsten deposit; and tungsten deposit with surface orientation according to plane (110)W. In accordance with vapor deposition techniques previously developed, such a sequence of deposits can easily be achieved with the same equipment, even without having to take out the part during the course of the process. (U.S.)

  18. The possibility of using laser and micro-jet technology in the welding of structural elements of vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Wojciech MAJEWSKI

    2015-01-01

    A paper presents the possibility of laser welding using micro-jet cooling. The effect of micro-jet cooling on microstructure and mechanical properties of the weld metal deposit was carried out. New welding process was analyzed for use in the automotive industry. Studies have confirmed the positive effect of cooling micro-jet cooling both for the MIG welding and laser welding.

  19. Design Optimization and Fatigue Analysis of Laser Stake Welded Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    is ultimately envisioned that laser welding will be as common in the shipyard as other processes such -- as MIG, TIG and SMAW. Laser stake- welding of...input from conventional welding techniques can be detrimental to the polymer matrix composite material. In comparison, the laser welding process allows...more discrete frequencies. In the laser welding process , the photons are targeted on the work piece surface which needs to be welded . Highly

  20. Multispot fiber laser welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schutt Hansen, Klaus

    This dissertation presents work and results achieved in the field of multi beam fiber laser welding. The project has had a practical approach, in which simulations and modelling have been kept at a minimum. Different methods to produce spot patterns with high power single mode fiber lasers have...... been examined and evaluated. It is found that both diamond turned DOE’s in zinc sulphide and multilevel etched DOE’s (Diffractive Optical Elements) in fused silica have a good performance. Welding with multiple beams in a butt joint configuration has been tested. Results are presented, showing it has...... been possible to control the welding width in incremental steps by adding more beams in a row. The laser power was used to independently control the keyhole and consequently the depth of fusion. An example of inline repair of a laser weld in butt joint configuration was examined. Zinc powder was placed...

  1. Application of local vacuum slide sealing electron beam welding procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Shozo; Takano, Genta; Minami, Masaharu; Enami, Koji; Uchikawa, Takashi; Kuri, Shuhei

    1982-01-01

    Electron beam welding process is efficient and is superior in workmanship and its application to the welding of large plate structures is eagerly awaited. However, since electron beam welding is generally performed with the object of welding entirely put in a vacuum chamber, high welding cost becomes a problem. In response to this demand, two kinds of local vacuum slide sealing type electron beam welding machines have been developed. These welding machines are designed to perform welding with only the neighborhood of the weld line put in vacuum, one of which is for longitudinal joints and the other for circumferential joints. The welding machine for circumferential joints has been put to practical use for the welding of nucear fusion reactor vacuum vessels (outside diameter 3.5 m, inside diameter 1.7 m), showing that it is applicable to the welding of large structures. (author)

  2. Deposition and high temperature corrosion in a 10 MW straw

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Hanne Philbert; Frandsen, Flemming; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1998-01-01

    Deposition and corrosion measurements were conducted at a 10 MW wheat straw fired stoker boiler used for combined power and heat production. The plant experiences major problems with deposits on the heat transfer surfaces, and test probes have shown enhanced corrosion due to selective corrosion...... for metal temperatures above 520 C. Deposition measurements carried out at a position equal to the secondary superheater showed deposits rich in potassium and chlorine and to a lesser extent in silicon, calcium, and sulfur. Potassium and chlorine make up 40-80 wt% of the deposits. Mechanisms of deposit...

  3. Gas Shielding Technology for Welding and Brazing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Arthur J.; Gradl, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Welding is a common method that allows two metallic materials to be joined together with high structural integrity. When joints need to be leak-tight, light-weight, or free of contaminant-trapping seams or surface asperities, welding tends to be specified. There are many welding techniques, each with its own advantages and disadvantages. Some of these techniques include Forge Welding, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding, Friction Stir Welding, and Laser Beam Welding to name a few. Whichever technique is used, the objective is a structural joint that meets the requirements of a particular component or assembly. A key practice in producing quality welds is the use of shielding gas. This article discusses various weld techniques, quality of the welds, and importance of shielding gas in each of those techniques. Metallic bonds, or joints, are produced when metals are put into intimate contact. In the solid-state "blacksmith welding" process, now called Forge Welding (FOW), the site to be joined is pounded into intimate contact. The surfaces to be joined usually need to be heated to make it easier to deform the metal. The surfaces are sprinkled with a flux to melt surface oxides and given a concave shape so that surface contamination can be squeezed out of the joint as the surfaces are pounded together; otherwise the surface contamination would be trapped in the joint and would weaken the weld. In solid-state welding processes surface oxides or other contamination are typically squeezed out of the joint in "flash."

  4. Microstructural examination of Zr-2.5%Nb alloy welds made by pulsed Nd:YAG laser and TIG welding technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, R.B.; Varma, P.V.S.; Panakkal, J.P.; Srivastava, D.; Dey, G.K.

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes the weld microstructure of Zr-2.5%Nb alloy material. Bead on plate welds were made using pulsed Nd:YAG laser and TIG welding technique at different parameters. These welds were characterized at macro and microstructural level. Weld pools of Pulsed Laser and TIG welds were not resolved by optical microscopy. SEM too did not reveal much. Orientation imaging microscopy could reveal the presence of fine martensite. It was observed that microstructure is very sensitive to welding parameters. Microhardness studies suggested formation of martensite in the weld pool. It was also observed that laser welds had very sharp weld pool boundary as compared to TIG welds. Variation in microhardness of the weldment is seen and is influenced by overlapping of weld spots causing thermal treatment of previously deposited spots. (author)

  5. Corrosion behavior in high heat input welded heat-affected zone of Ni-free high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Joonoh; Ha, Heon-Young; Lee, Tae-Ho

    2013-01-01

    The pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion behaviors in high heat input welded heat-affected zone (HAZ) of a metastable high-nitrogen Fe–18Cr–10Mn–N austenitic stainless steel were explored through electrochemical tests. The HAZs were simulated using Gleeble simulator with high heat input welding condition of 300 kJ/cm and the peak temperature of the HAZs was changed from 1200 °C to 1350 °C, aiming to examine the effect of δ-ferrite formation on corrosion behavior. The electrochemical test results show that both pitting corrosion resistance and interphase corrosion resistance were seriously deteriorated by δ-ferrite formation in the HAZ and their aspects were different with increasing δ-ferrite fraction. The pitting corrosion resistance was decreased by the formation of Cr-depleted zone along δ-ferrite/austenite (γ) interphase resulting from δ-ferrite formation; however it didn't depend on δ-ferrite fraction. The interphase corrosion resistance depends on the total amount of Cr-depleted zone as well as ferrite area and thus continuously decreased with increasing δ-ferrite fraction. The different effects of δ-ferrite fraction on pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion were carefully discussed in terms of alloying elements partitioning in the HAZ based on thermodynamic consideration. - Highlights: • Corrosion behavior in the weld HAZ of high-nitrogen austenitic alloy was studied. • Cr 2 N particle was not precipitated in high heat input welded HAZ of tested alloy. • Pitting corrosion and interphase corrosion show a different behavior. • Pitting corrosion resistance was affected by whether or not δ-ferrite forms. • Interphase corrosion resistance was affected by the total amount of δ-ferrite

  6. Metallurgical and Mechanical Characterization of High Temperature Titanium Alloys Joined by Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangwar, Kapil Dev

    In the world of joining, riveting and additive manufacturing, weight reduction, and omission of defects (at both macro and micro level) remain of paramount. Therefore, in the wake of ubiquitous fusion welding (FW) and widely accepted approach of riveting using Inconel bolts to resist corrosion at higher temperature, friction stir welding (FSW) has emerged as a novice jewel in friction based additive manufacturing industry. With advancements in automation of welding process and tool material, FSW of materials with higher work hardening such as steel and titanium has also become probable. Process and property relations associated with FSW are inevitable in case of dissimilar titanium alloys, due to presence of heterogeneity (whether atrocious or advantageous) in and around the weld nugget. These process property relationships are needed to be studied and addressed properly in order to optimize the processing window for improved mechanical and metallurgical properties. In this study FSWed similar and dissimilar butt joints of α+β, and near α titanium, alloys have been produced for varying processing conditions in order to study the effect of rotation speed (rpm) and traverse speed (TS; mm-min-1). The aim of this study is to assess the effect of tool geometry, tool rpm, TS on microstructure and mechanical properties of most widely used α+β titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V (Ti-64), standard grain and fine grain in addition to α+β,Ti-5Al-4V (T-54M), standard grain, and near α, Ti-6Al-2Mo-4Zr-2Sn (Ti-6242), standard grain (SG) and fine grain (FG). During FSW, a unique α+β fine-grained microstructure has been formed depending on whether or not the peak temperature in the weld nugget (WN) reached above or below β transus temperature. The resulting microstructure consists of acicular α+β, emanating from the prior β grain boundary as the weld cools off. The changes in the microstructure are observed by optical microscopy (OM). Later, a detailed analysis of material

  7. Properties of welded joints of 2,25Cr-1Mo steel with various carbon content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vornovitskij, I.N.; Brodetskaya, E.Z.; Pozdnyakova, A.S.

    1980-01-01

    Properties of welded joints of 2,25 Cr - 1 Mo steel pipelines with different carbon content are considered. It is shown that application of electrodes developed in some countries for welding permits in many cases to exclude heat treatment of welded joints owing to high ductility of weld deposited metal. To improve the ductility, it is necessary to limit both carbon content down to 0,03-0,06% and detrimental elements (sulfur, phosphorus). Heat affected zone hardness may be increased at the expense of carbon. Weld deposited metal possesses the highest long-term strength at the given test temperature; in this case long-term strength of welded joints and base metal is practically the same. The long-term strength of high-carbon steel is higher at the test temperature of 565 deg C as compared to mean-carbon and low-carbon steels, whose long-term strength is practically equal at this temperature. The long-term strength of high-carbon and mean-carbon steels is practically the same and higher as compared with low-carbon one at the test temperature of 510 deg C

  8. Deposition and characterisation of copper for high density interconnects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCusker, N.

    1999-09-01

    Copper has been deposited by sputtering and investigated for application as high density interconnects, with a view to maximising its performance and reliability. A sputter deposition process using gettering has been developed, which produces consistently pure, low resistivity films. A relationship between film thickness and resistivity has been explained by studying the grain growth process in copper films using atomic force microscopy. The Maydas-Shatzkes model has been used to separate the contributions of grain boundary and surface scattering to thin film resistivity, in copper and gold. Stress and texture in copper film have been studied. Annealing has been used to promote grain growth and texture development. Electromigration has been studied in copper and aluminium interconnects using a multi-line accelerated test set-up. A difference in failure distributions and void morphologies has been explained by an entirely different damage mechanism. The importance of surface/interface migration in electromigration damage of copper lines has been established and explained using a grain boundary-grooving model. A tantalum overlayer was found to extend the lifetime of copper lines. A composite sputtering target has been used to deposit copper/zirconium alloy films. The composition of the alloys was studied by Rutherford backscattering, Auger and secondary neutral mass spectrometry. The alloy films had an improved electromigration lifetime. A surface controlled mechanism is proposed to explain the advantage. A metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) capacitor technique is used to investigate barrier reliability. Tungsten is shown to be an effective diffusion barrier for copper, up to 700 deg. C. (author)

  9. Fundamental Laser Welding Process Investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagger, Claus; Olsen, Flemming Ove

    1998-01-01

    In a number of systematic laboratory investigations the fundamental behavior of the laser welding process was analyzed by the use of normal video (30 Hz), high speed video (100 and 400 Hz) and photo diodes. Sensors were positioned to monitor the welding process from both the top side and the rear...... side of the specimen.Special attention has been given to the dynamic nature of the laser welding process, especially during unstable welding conditions. In one series of experiments, the stability of the process has been varied by changing the gap distance in lap welding. In another series...... video pictures (400 Hz), a clear impact on the seam characteristics has been identified when a hump occurs.Finally, a clear correlation between the position of the focus point, the resultant process type and the corresponding signal intensity and signal variation has been found for sheets welded...

  10. Development of a high power electron beam welding gun with replaceable high voltage feed-through insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, T.K; Mascarenhas, M.; Kandaswamy, E., E-mail: tanmay@barc.gov.in [Power Beam Equipment Design Section, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2014-07-01

    Ceramic to metal sealed feed-through insulators are commonly used in electron beam welding gun. The above feed-through insulators are susceptible to failure, as the brazing joints in them are not always very strong. Failure in one of these feed-through could render the complete gun unusable. This problem has already been faced in BARC, which led to the development of the electron gun with replaceable feed through insulators. A 24 kW Electron Beam Welding (EBW) gun with indigenous designed replaceable insulators is fabricated in BARC. Emphasis during the design of the gun had been to reduce the use of imported components to zero. This paper describes the design and fabrication of this gun and reports various simulations and tests performed. Beam trajectory of the gun is numerically computed and presented. Weld passes were carried out on stainless steel plates show satisfactory penetrations. (author)

  11. WELDING METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell, A.A.; Dunbar, J.V.; Ruffner, J.H.

    1959-09-29

    A semi-automatic method is described for the weld joining of pipes and fittings which utilizes the inert gasshielded consumable electrode electric arc welding technique, comprising laying down the root pass at a first peripheral velocity and thereafter laying down the filler passes over the root pass necessary to complete the weld by revolving the pipes and fittings at a second peripheral velocity different from the first peripheral velocity, maintaining the welding head in a fixed position as to the specific direction of revolution, while the longitudinal axis of the welding head is disposed angularly in the direction of revolution at amounts between twenty minutas and about four degrees from the first position.

  12. Mining the high grade McArthur River uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamieson, B.W.

    2002-01-01

    The McArthur River deposit, discovered in 1988, is recognized as the world's largest, highest grade uranium deposit, with current mineable reserves containing 255 million lb U 3 O 8 at an average grade of 17.33% U 3 O 8 . In addition the project has resources of 228 million pounds U 3 O 8 averaging 12.02% U 3 O 8 . Mining this high-grade ore body presents serious challenges in controlling radiation and in dealing with high water pressures. Experience from the underground exploration programme has provided the information needed to plan the safe mining of the massive Pelite ore zone, which represents the most significant source of ore discovered during the underground drilling programme, with 220 million pounds of U 3 O 8 at an average grade in excess of 17%. Non-entry mining will be used in the high-grade ore zones. Raise boring will be the primary method to safely extract the ore, with all underground development in waste rock to provide radiation shielding. Water will be controlled by grouting and perimeter freezing. The ore cuttings from the raise boring will be ground underground and pumped to surface as slurry, at an average daily production of 150 tonnes. The slurry will be transported to the Key Lake mill and diluted to 4% before processing. The annual production is projected to be 18 million lb U 3 O 8 . The paper focuses on the activities undertaken since discovery, including the initiation of the raise bore mining method utilized to safely mine this high grade ore body. Radiation protection, environmental protection and worker health and safety are discussed in terms of both design and practical implementation. (author)

  13. Reactive Fusion Welding for Ultra-High Temperature Ceramic Composite Joining

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-16

    istribution un lim it ed 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Plasm a and pulsed plasma arc w eld ing (PAW and PPAW) processes w ere used to fusion...were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. 3.4 Microscopy Weldment specimens were cut perpendicular to the welding direction using a manual...Nikon; Epiphot 200; Tokyo, Japan) and scanning electron microscopy (Hitachi; S- 570; Tokyo, Japan). ZrB2 grain sizes in the parent material and heat

  14. Welding of High-Strength Steels for Aircraft and Missile Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1959-10-12

    the aircraft industry for years. The alloys that have been most widely used have been AISI 4130, 4140 , and 4340. However, only the AISI 4340 steel...MARTENSITIC STEELS ................. . .. . . . 6 AISI 4340 and AMS 6434 ..................... ....................... 7 Welding Procedures...metal. A survey of the procedures currently being used is presented. Low-Alloy Martensitic Steels AISI 4340, AMS 6434, XZOO, 300M, and 17-Z2AS all are

  15. High frequency and large deposition of acid fog on high elevation forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Manabu; Matsumura, Ko; Okochi, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    We have collected and analyzed fogwater on the mountainside of Mt. Oyama (1252 m) in the Tanzawa Mountains of Japan and observed the fog event frequency from the base of the mountain with a video camera. The fog event frequency increased with elevation and was observed to be present 46% of the year at the summit. The water deposition via throughfall increased with elevation because of the increase in fogwater interception and was about twice that via rain at the summit, where the air pollutant deposition via throughfall was several times that via rainwater. The dry deposition and the deposition via fogwater were dominant factors in the total ion deposition at high elevation sites. In a fog event, nitric acid, the major acid component on the mountain, is formed during the transport of the air mass from the base of the mountain along the mountainside, where gases including nitric acid deposit and are scavenged by fogwater. Therefore, high acidity caused by nitric acid and relatively low ion strength are observed in the fogwater at high elevation sites.

  16. Effect of weld spacing on microstructure and mechanical properties of CLAM electron beam welding joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Yutao; Huang, Bo, E-mail: aufa0007@163.com; Zhang, Junyu; Zhang, Baoren; Liu, Shaojun; Huang, Qunying

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • The welded joints of CLAM steel with different weld spacings have been fabricated with electron beam welding, and a simplified model of CLAM sheet was proposed. • The microstructure and mechanical properties such as microhardness, impact and tensile were investigated at different welding spacing for both conditions of as-welded and post weld heat treatment (PWHT). • The effect of the welding thermal cycle was significantly when the weld spacings were smaller than 4 mm. • When the weld spacing was small enough, the original microstructures would be fragmented with the high heat input. - Abstract: China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel has been chosen as the primary structural material in the designs of dual function lithium-lead (DFLL) blanket for fusion reactors, China helium cooled ceramic breeder (HCCB) test blanket module (TBM) for ITER and China fusion engineering test reactor (CFETR) blanket. The cooling components of the blankets are designed with high density cooling channels (HDCCs) to remove the high nuclear thermal effectively. Hence, the welding spacing among the channels are small. In this paper, the welded joints of CLAM steel with different weld spacings have been fabricated with electron beam welding (EBW). The weld spacing was designed to be 2 mm, 3 mm, 4 mm, 6 mm and 8 mm. The microstructure and mechanical properties such as microhardness, impact and tensile were investigated at different welding spacing for both conditions of as-welded and post weld heat treatment (PWHT). The PWHT is tempering at 740 °C for 120 min. The results showed that the grain size in the heat affected zone (HAZ) increased with the increasing weld spacing, and the joint with small weld spacing had a better performance after PWHT. This work would give useful guidance to improve the preparation of the cooling components of blanket.

  17. Laser weld process monitoring and control using chromatic filtering of thermal radiation from a weld pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Kim, Min Suk; Baik, Sung Hoon; Chung, Chin Man

    2000-06-01

    The application of high power Nd: YAG lasers for precision welding in industry has been growing quite fast these days in diverse areas such as the automobile, the electronics and the aerospace industries. These diverse applications also require the new developments for the precise control and the reliable process monitoring. Due to the hostile environment in laser welding, a remote monitoring is required. The present development relates in general to weld process monitoring techniques, and more particularly to improved methods and apparatus for real-time monitoring of thermal radiation of a weld pool to monitor a size variation and a focus shift of the weld pool for weld process control, utilizing the chromatic aberration of focusing lens or lenses. The monitoring technique of the size variation and the focus shift of a weld pool is developed by using the chromatic filtering of the thermal radiation from a weld pool. The monitoring of weld pool size variation can also be used to monitor the weld depth in a laser welding. Furthermore, the monitoring of the size variation of a weld pool is independent of the focus shift of a weld pool and the monitoring of the focus shift of a weld pool is independent of the size variation of a weld pool

  18. Laser weld process monitoring and control using chromatic filtering of thermal radiation from a weld pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Cheol Jung; Kim, Min Suk; Baik, Sung Hoon; Chung, Chin Man

    2000-06-01

    The application of high power Nd: YAG lasers for precision welding in industry has been growing quite fast these days in diverse areas such as the automobile, the electronics and the aerospace industries. These diverse applications also require the new developments for the precise control and the reliable process monitoring. Due to the hostile environment in laser welding, a remote monitoring is required. The present development relates in general to weld process monitoring techniques, and more particularly to improved methods and apparatus for real-time monitoring of thermal radiation of a weld pool to monitor a size variation and a focus shift of the weld pool for weld process control, utilizing the chromatic aberration of focusing lens or lenses. The monitoring technique of the size variation and the focus shift of a weld pool is developed by using the chromatic filtering of the thermal radiation from a weld pool. The monitoring of weld pool size variation can also be used to monitor the weld depth in a laser welding. Furthermore, the monitoring of the size variation of a weld pool is independent of the focus shift of a weld pool and the monitoring of the focus shift of a weld pool is independent of the size variation of a weld pool.

  19. Plastic properties of weld after micro-jet cooling

    OpenAIRE

    J. Piwnik; D. Hadryś; G. Skorulski

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: of that paper was analysing main plastic properties of welds made by MIG method with micro-jet cooling. The main reason of it was investigate possibilities of getting better plastic properties of welds made by MIG method with micro-jet cooling than welds made by ordinary welding method. It is possible because higher amount of acicular ferrite (AF) in WMD (weld metal deposit) is obtained in MIG method with micro-jet cooling in relation to ordinary welding method.Design/methodology/app...

  20. Comparison of microstructural and mechanical properties of joints developed by high temperature brazing, GTAW and laser welding methods on AISI 316 L stainless steel for specific applications in nuclear components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesu, Sadu; Saxena, Rajesh; Ravi Kumar, R.; Chaurasia, P.K; Murugan, S.; Venugopal, S.

    2016-01-01

    Fabrication of instrumented irradiation capsule for evaluating the irradiation performance of fuel and structural materials in a nuclear reactor requires development of thin wall joints capable of withstanding high temperature and/or internal pressure. Thin wall joints for high temperature (∼550℃) applications can be made by laser beam welding (LBW), gas tungsten Arc welding (GTAW) and High Temperature Brazing (HLT) method

  1. Studies on CO2-laser Hybrid-Welding of Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Skov; Olsen, Flemming Ove; Bagger, Claus

    2005-01-01

    CO2-laser welding of copper is known to be difficult due to the high heat conductivity of the material and the high reflectivity of copper at the wavelength of the CO2-laser light. THis paper presents a study of laser welding of copper, applying laser hybrid welding. Welding was performed as a hy...

  2. Hybrid laser-TIG welding, laser beam welding and gas tungsten arc welding of AZ31B magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Liming; Wang Jifeng; Song Gang

    2004-01-01

    Welding of AZ31B magnesium alloy was carried out using hybrid laser-TIG (LATIG) welding, laser beam welding (LBW) and gas tungsten arc (TIG) welding. The weldability and microstructure of magnesium AZ31B alloy welded using LATIG, LBW and TIG were investigated by OM and EMPA. The experimental results showed that the welding speed of LATIG was higher than that of TIG, which was caught up with LBW. Besides, the penetration of LATIG doubles that of TIG, and was four times that of LBW. In addition, arc stability was improved in hybrid of laser-TIG welding compared with using the TIG welding alone, especially at high welding speed and under low TIG current. It was found that the heat affect zone of joint was only observed in TIG welding, and the size of grains in it was evidently coarse. In fusion zone, the equiaxed grains exist, whose size was the smallest welded by LBW, and was the largest by TIG welding. It was also found that Mg concentration of the fusion zone was lower than that of the base one by EPMA in three welding processes

  3. Optimisation of welding procedures for duplex and superduplex stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westin, Elin M.

    2014-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are increasingly being replaced by duplex grades that can offer similar corrosion resistance with far higher strength. This increased strength makes it possible to reduce material consumption whilst also decreasing transport and construction costs. Although established welding methods used for austenitic steels can be used for duplex steels, modification of the procedures can lead to improved results. This paper reviews the welding of duplex stainless steel and examines precautions that may be required. The advantages and disadvantages of different welding methods are highlighted and some high productivity solutions are presented. The application of a more efficient process with a high deposition rate (e.g. flux- cored arc welding) can decrease labour costs. Further close control of heat input and interpass temperature can result in more favourable microstructures and final properties. Although welding adversely affects the corrosion resistance of austenitic and duplex stainless steels, particularly the pitting resistance, relative to the parent material, this problem can be minimised by proper backing gas protection and subsequent pickling.

  4. Variant selection of martensites in steel welded joints with low transformation temperature weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Masaru; Yasuda, Hiroyuki Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We examined the variant selection of martensites in the weld metals. ► We also measured the residual stress developed in the butt and box welded joints. ► 24 martensite variants were randomly selected in the butt welded joint. ► High tensile residual stress in the box welded joint led to the strong variant selection. ► We discussed the rule of the variant selection focusing on the residual stress. -- Abstract: Martensitic transformation behavior in steel welded joints with low transformation temperature weld (LTTW) metal was examined focusing on the variant selection of martensites. The butt and box welded joints were prepared with LTTW metals and 980 MPa grade high strength steels. The residual stress of the welded joints, which was measured by a neutron diffraction technique, was effectively reduced by the expansion of the LTTW metals by the martensitic transformation during cooling after the welding process. In the LTTW metals, the retained austenite and martensite phases have the Kurdjumov–Sachs (K–S) orientation relationship. The variant selection of the martensites in the LTTW metals depended strongly on the type of welded joints. In the butt welded joint, 24 K–S variants were almost randomly selected while a few variants were preferentially chosen in the box welded joint. This suggests that the high residual stress developed in the box welded joint accelerated the formation of specific variants during the cooling process, in contrast to the butt welded joint with low residual stress

  5. Impacts of weld residual stresses and fatigue crack growth threshold on crack arrest under high-cycle thermal fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taheri, Said; Julan, Emricka; Tran, Xuan-Van; Robert, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • For crack growth analysis, weld residual stress field must be considered through its SIF in presence of a crack. • Presence of cracks of same depth proves their arrest, where equal depth is because mean stress acts only on crack opening. • Not considering amplitudes under a fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT) does not compensate the lack of FGCT in Paris law. • Propagation rates are close for axisymmetric and circumferential semi-elliptical cracks. - Abstract: High cycle thermal crazing has been observed in some residual heat removal (RHR) systems made of 304 stainless steel in PWR nuclear plants. This paper deals with two types of analyses including logical argumentation and simulation. Crack arrest in networks is demonstrated due to the presence of two cracks of the same depth in the network. This identical depth may be proved assuming that mean stress acts only on crack opening and that cracks are fully open during the load cycle before arrest. Weld residual stresses (WRS) are obtained by an axisymmetric simulation of welding on a tube with a chamfer. Axisymmetric and 3D parametric studies of crack growth on: representative sequences for variable amplitude thermal loading, fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT), permanent mean stress, cyclic counting methods and WRS, are performed with Code-Aster software using XFEM methodology. The following results are obtained on crack depth versus time: the effect of WRS on crack growth cannot be determined by the initial WRS field in absence of crack, but by the associated stress intensity factor. Moreover the relation between crack arrest depth and WRS is analyzed. In the absence of FCGT Paris’s law may give a significant over-estimation of crack depth even if amplitudes of loading smaller than FCGT have not been considered. Appropriate depth versus time may be obtained using different values of FCGT, but axisymmetric simulations do not really show a possibility of arrest for shallow cracks in

  6. Impacts of weld residual stresses and fatigue crack growth threshold on crack arrest under high-cycle thermal fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, Said, E-mail: Said.taheri@edf.fr [EDF-LAB, IMSIA, 7 Boulevard Gaspard Monge, 91120 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Julan, Emricka [EDF-LAB, AMA, 7 Boulevard Gaspard Monge, 91120 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Tran, Xuan-Van [EDF Energy R& D UK Centre/School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Robert, Nicolas [EDF-DPN, UNIE, Strategic Center, Saint Denis (France)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • For crack growth analysis, weld residual stress field must be considered through its SIF in presence of a crack. • Presence of cracks of same depth proves their arrest, where equal depth is because mean stress acts only on crack opening. • Not considering amplitudes under a fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT) does not compensate the lack of FGCT in Paris law. • Propagation rates are close for axisymmetric and circumferential semi-elliptical cracks. - Abstract: High cycle thermal crazing has been observed in some residual heat removal (RHR) systems made of 304 stainless steel in PWR nuclear plants. This paper deals with two types of analyses including logical argumentation and simulation. Crack arrest in networks is demonstrated due to the presence of two cracks of the same depth in the network. This identical depth may be proved assuming that mean stress acts only on crack opening and that cracks are fully open during the load cycle before arrest. Weld residual stresses (WRS) are obtained by an axisymmetric simulation of welding on a tube with a chamfer. Axisymmetric and 3D parametric studies of crack growth on: representative sequences for variable amplitude thermal loading, fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT), permanent mean stress, cyclic counting methods and WRS, are performed with Code-Aster software using XFEM methodology. The following results are obtained on crack depth versus time: the effect of WRS on crack growth cannot be determined by the initial WRS field in absence of crack, but by the associated stress intensity factor. Moreover the relation between crack arrest depth and WRS is analyzed. In the absence of FCGT Paris’s law may give a significant over-estimation of crack depth even if amplitudes of loading smaller than FCGT have not been considered. Appropriate depth versus time may be obtained using different values of FCGT, but axisymmetric simulations do not really show a possibility of arrest for shallow cracks in

  7. Hot wire TIG temper bead welding for nuclear repairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, J.A.; Gilston, P.F.

    1989-08-01

    A preliminary assessment has been carried out to determine the suitability of the hot wire tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process for the repair of thick section, ferritic steel nuclear pressure vessels. The objective has been to identify a hot wire TIG temper bead procedure, suitable for repairs without post weld heat treatment. This procedure involves depositing two weld layers with carefully selected welding parameters such that overlapping thermal cycles produce a refined and tempered heat affected zone, HAZ, microstructure. (author)

  8. Technique for the residual life assessment of high temperature components based on creep-rupture testing on welded miniature specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzillo, A.; Guardamagna, C.; Moscotti, L.; Ranzani, L. [Ente Nazionale per l`Energia Elettrica, Milan (Italy)

    1995-06-01

    Following the present trend in the development of advanced methodologies for residual life assessment of high temperature components operating in power plants, particularly in non destructive methods, a testing technique has been set up at ENEL-CRAM based on creep-rupture testa in an argon on welded miniature specimens. Five experimental systems for creep-rupture tests in an argon atmosphere have been set up which include high accuracy systems, vacuum chambers and exrwnsometer devices. With the aim of establishing and validating the suitability of the experimental methodology, creep-rupture and interrupted creep testing programmes have been performed on miniature specimens (2 mm diameter and 10 mm gauge lenght). On the basis of experience gathered by various European research laboratories, a miniature specimen construction procedure has been developed using a laser welding technique for joining threaded heads to sample material. Low alloy ferritic steels, such as virgin 2.25CrlMo, 0.5Cr 0.5Mo 0.25V, and IN 738 superalloy miniature specimens have been investigated and the results, compared with those from standard specimens, show a regular trend in deformation vs time. Additional efforts to provide guidelines for material sampling from each plant component will be required in order to reduce uncertainties in residual life prediction.

  9. Remote automatic plasma arc-closure welding of a dry-storage canister for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprecace, R.P.; Blankenship, W.P.

    1982-01-01

    A carbon steel storage canister has been designed for the dry encapsulation of spent nuclear fuel assemblies or of logs of vitrified high level radioactive waste. The canister design is in conformance with the requirements of the ASME Code, Section III, Division 1 for a Class 3 vessel. The canisters will be loaded and sealed as part of a completely remote process sequence to be performed in the hot bay of an experimental encapsulation facility at the Nevada Test Site. The final closure to be made is a full penetration butt weld between the canister body, a 12.75-in O.D. x 0.25-in wall pipe, and a mating semiellipsoidal closure lid. Due to a combination of design, application and facility constraints, the closure weld must be made in the 2G position (canister vertical). The plasma arc welding system is described, and the final welding procedure is described and discussed in detail. Several aspects and results of the procedure development activity, which are of both specific and general interest, are highlighted; these include: The critical welding torch features which must be exactly controlled to permit reproducible energy input to, and gas stream interaction with, the weld puddle. A comparison of results using automatic arc voltage control with those obtained using a mechanically fixed initial arc gap. The optimization of a keyhole initiation procedure. A comparison of results using an autogenous keyhole closure procedure with those obtained using a filler metal addition. The sensitivity of the welding process and procedure to variations in joint configuration and dimensions and to variations in base metal chemistry. Finally, the advantages and disadvantages of the plasma arc process for this application are summarized from the current viewpoint, and the applicability of this process to other similar applications is briefly indicated

  10. Upgraded HFIR Fuel Element Welding System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sease, John D.

    2010-01-01

    The welding of aluminum-clad fuel plates into aluminum alloy 6061 side plate tubing is a unique design feature of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel assemblies as 101 full-penetration circumferential gas metal arc welds (GMAW) are required in the fabrication of each assembly. In a HFIR fuel assembly, 540 aluminum-clad fuel plates are assembled into two nested annular fuel elements 610 mm (24-inches) long. The welding process for the HFIR fuel elements was developed in the early 1960 s and about 450 HFIR fuel assemblies have been successfully welded using the GMAW process qualified in the 1960 s. In recent years because of the degradation of the electronic and mechanical components in the old HFIR welding system, reportable defects in plate attachment or adapter welds have been present in almost all completed fuel assemblies. In October 2008, a contract was awarded to AMET, Inc., of Rexburg, Idaho, to replace the old welding equipment with standard commercially available welding components to the maximum extent possible while maintaining the qualified HFIR welding process. The upgraded HFIR welding system represents a major improvement in the welding system used in welding HFIR fuel elements for the previous 40 years. In this upgrade, the new inner GMAW torch is a significant advancement over the original inner GMAW torch previously used. The innovative breakthrough in the new inner welding torch design is the way the direction of the cast in the 0.762 mm (0.030-inch) diameter aluminum weld wire is changed so that the weld wire emerging from the contact tip is straight in the plane perpendicular to the welding direction without creating any significant drag resistance in the feeding of the weld wire.

  11. Nanoparticle layer deposition for highly controlled multilayer formation based on high-coverage monolayers of nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yue; Williams, Mackenzie G.; Miller, Timothy J.; Teplyakov, Andrew V.

    2016-01-01

    This paper establishes a strategy for chemical deposition of functionalized nanoparticles onto solid substrates in a layer-by-layer process based on self-limiting surface chemical reactions leading to complete monolayer formation within the multilayer system without any additional intermediate layers — nanoparticle layer deposition (NPLD). This approach is fundamentally different from previously established traditional layer-by-layer deposition techniques and is conceptually more similar to well-known atomic and molecular layer deposition processes. The NPLD approach uses efficient chemical functionalization of the solid substrate material and complementary functionalization of nanoparticles to produce a nearly 100% coverage of these nanoparticles with the use of “click chemistry”. Following this initial deposition, a second complete monolayer of nanoparticles is deposited using a copper-catalyzed “click reaction” with the azide-terminated silica nanoparticles of a different size. This layer-by-layer growth is demonstrated to produce stable covalently-bound multilayers of nearly perfect structure over macroscopic solid substrates. The formation of stable covalent bonds is confirmed spectroscopically and the stability of the multilayers produced is tested by sonication in a variety of common solvents. The 1-, 2- and 3-layer structures are interrogated by electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy and the thickness of the multilayers formed is fully consistent with that expected for highly efficient monolayer formation with each cycle of growth. This approach can be extended to include a variety of materials deposited in a predesigned sequence on different substrates with a highly conformal filling. - Highlights: • We investigate the formation of high-coverage monolayers of nanoparticles. • We use “click chemistry” to form these monolayers. • We form multiple layers based on the same strategy. • We confirm the formation of covalent bonds

  12. The effect of flux on properties of weld in submerged arc welding with filler metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fattahpour, Iran.

    1984-01-01

    In the submerged-arc welding, the electrode wire is shielded by a blanket of granular fusible material called a flux. This granular material, flux, must ensure the deposition of weld metal of given chemical composition and specified mechanical properties. The flux must also ensure stable burning of the welding arc and contribute to the formation of a dense weld of required shape and size, and free from pores, cracks and slag inclusions. As the deposited molten metal solidifies, the flux must form a slag crust, easily separable from the surface of the weld. This material must be of a certain chemical composition and possess definite physical properties, such as melting point, viscosity, bulk weight. The chemical composition of the flux is chosen, depending on the composition of the welded metal and electrode wire used. (Author)

  13. Particle deposition in low-speed, high-turbulence flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reck, Mads; Larsen, Poul Scheel; Ullum, U.

    2002-01-01

    The experimental and numerical study considers the concentration of airborne particulate contaminants, such as spores of spoilage fungi, and their deposition on a surface, in a petri dish, and on a warm box-shaped product placed in a food-processing environment. Field measurements by standard...... field measurements. Particle deposition is shown to be associated with near-wall coherent structures. Flow reversal, simulated by impulsive start, is shown to give higher deposition rates than steady mean flows. Key word index: Spoilage fungi; spores; food processing plant; deposition flux; large eddy...

  14. Changes of structure and properties in the heat-affected zone during the welding of high-strength aluminium alloys. Gefuege- und Eigenschaftsaenderungen in der Waermeeinflusszone beim Schweissen hochfester Aluminiumlegierungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umgeher, A. (Tyrolitschleifmittelwerke Swarovski KG, Schwaz (Austria)); Cerjak, H. (Technische Univ., Graz (Austria))

    High strength aluminium alloys like AlZnMgCu 1.5 are usually classified as 'non-weldable' alloys. If welding technologies such as TIG-plasma keyhole welding are used, it is possible to weld these alloys successfully. However, the heat input during welding affects the base material adjacent to the fusion zone. The main objective of this investigation was to study the change of microstructure and properties in this heat affected zone (HAZ) of high strength aluminium alloys. The base material was a high strength wrought aluminium alloy AlZnMgCu 1.5 (7075) in the T6 condition. The specimens were welded by TIG-plasma keyhole welding. Additionally, Gleeble welding simulation techniques were used. The specimens were investigated in the 'as welded' condition, 'naturally aged', 'artificially aged', and after a complete post weld heat treatment. The microstructure was investigated using light and electron microscopy. Hardness and electric resistivity measurements and DSC-analysis were made. (orig.)

  15. Crack-arrest tests on two irradiated high-copper welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program Sixth Irradiation Series is to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the shift and shape of the lower-bound curve to crack-arrest toughness data. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 220-mm-thick plate. Crack-arrest specimens fabricated from these welds were irradiated at a nominal temperature of 288 degrees C to an average fluence of 1.9 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (>1 MeV). This is the second report giving the results of the tests on irradiated duplex-type crack-arrest specimens. A previous report gave results of tests on irradiated weld-embrittled-type specimens. Charpy V-notch (CVN) specimens irradiated in the same capsules as the crack-arrest specimens were also tested, and a 41-J transition temperature shift was determined from these specimens. open-quotes Mean close-quote curves of the same form as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) K la curve were fit to the data with only the open-quotes reference temperatureclose quotes as a parameter. The shift between the mean curves agrees well with the 41-J transition temperature shift obtained from the CVN specimen tests. Moreover, the four data points resulting from tests on the duplex crack-arrest specimens of the present study did not make a significant change to mean curve fits to either the previously obtained data or all the data combined

  16. Influence of weld structure on cross-weld creep behavior in P23 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, D.J.; Degnan, C.C. [E.ON Engineering (United Kingdom); Brett, S.J. [RWE npower (United Kingdom); Buchanan, L.W. [Doosan Babcock (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-01

    A thick section pipe weld in low alloy steel P23 has been characterised by cross-weld creep rupture testing at a range of stresses, together with all-weld-metal and parent material testing, under the auspices of the UK High Temperature Power Plant Forum. The results generally show that the weld metal can be weak when tested in the transverse (cross-weld) orientation, and can fail with limited overall ductility by cracking in the zone of refined weld metal beneath the fusion boundary of the superposed weld bead. However, one specimen showed a much superior performance, which could be understood in terms of its locally more creep resistant weld macrostructure. The implications for P23 performance and weld manufacture are discussed. (orig.)

  17. Weldability and weld performance of a special grade Hastelloy-X modified for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, S.; Mutoh, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of weld defects in the electron beam (EB) welding and the tungsten inert gas (TIG) arc welding for Hastelloy-XR, a modified version of Hastelloy-X, are clarified through the bead-on-plate test and the Trans-Varestraint test. Based on the results, weldabilities on EB and TIG weldings for Hastelloy-XR are discussed and found to be almost the same as Hastelloy-X. The creep rupture behaviors of the welded joints are evaluated by employing data on creep properties of the base and the weld metals. According to the evaluation, the creep rupture strength of the EB-welded joint may be superior to that of the TIG-welded joint. The corrosion test in helium containing certain impurities is conducted for the weld metals. There is no significant difference of such corrosion characteristics as weight gain, internal oxidation, depleted zone, and so on between the base and the weld metals. Those are superior to Hastelloy-X

  18. Superheater corrosion in biomass-fired power plants: Investigation of Welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Carlsen, B; Biede, O

    2002-01-01

    -fired Masnedø combined heat and power (CHP) plant to investigate corrosion at temperatures higher than that of the actual plant. The highest steam temperature investigated was 570°C. Various alloys of 12-22% chromium content were welded into this test loop. Their corrosion rates were similar and increased...... condense on superheater components. This gives rise to specific corrosion problems not previously encountered in coal-fired power plants. The type of corrosion attack can be directly ascribed to the composition of the deposit and the metal surface temperature. A test superheater was built into the straw...... with temperature. The mechanism of attack was grain boundary attack as a precursor to selective chromium depletion of the alloy. In addition welds coupling various tubes sections were also investigated. It was seen that there was preferential attack around those welds that had a high nickel content. The welds...

  19. High dietary protein decreases fat deposition induced by high-fat and high-sucrose diet in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaumontet, C.; Even, P.C.; Schwarz, Jessica; Simonin-Foucault, A.; Piedcoq, J.; Fromentin, G.; Tomé, D.; Azzout-Marniche, D.

    2015-01-01

    High-protein diets are known to reduce adiposity in the context of high carbohydrate and Western diets. However, few studies have investigated the specific high-protein effect on lipogenesis induced by a high-sucrose (HS) diet or fat deposition induced by high-fat feeding. We aimed to determine the

  20. ZrN coatings deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purandare, Yashodhan, E-mail: Y.Purandare@shu.ac.uk; Ehiasarian, Arutiun; Hovsepian, Papken [Nanotechnology Centre for PVD Research, Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Santana, Antonio [Ionbond AG Olten, Industriestrasse 211, CH-4600 Olten (Switzerland)

    2014-05-15

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) coatings were deposited on 1 μm finish high speed steel and 316L stainless steel test coupons. Cathodic Arc (CA) and High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS) + Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering (UBM) techniques were utilized to deposit coatings. CA plasmas are known to be rich in metal and gas ions of the depositing species as well as macroparticles (droplets) emitted from the arc sports. Combining HIPIMS technique with UBM in the same deposition process facilitated increased ion bombardment on the depositing species during coating growth maintaining high deposition rate. Prior to coating deposition, substrates were pretreated with Zr{sup +} rich plasma, for both arc deposited and HIPIMS deposited coatings, which led to a very high scratch adhesion value (L{sub C2}) of 100 N. Characterization results revealed the overall thickness of the coatings in the range of 2.5 μm with hardness in the range of 30–40 GPa depending on the deposition technique. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and tribological experiments such as dry sliding wear tests and corrosion studies have been utilized to study the effects of ion bombardment on the structure and properties of these coatings. In all the cases, HIPIMS assisted UBM deposited coating fared equal or better than the arc deposited coatings, the reasons being discussed in this paper. Thus H+U coatings provide a good alternative to arc deposited where smooth, dense coatings are required and macrodroplets cannot be tolerated.

  1. Emission of nanoparticles during friction stir welding (FSW) of aluminium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, J F; Miranda, R M; Santos, T J; Carvalho, P A

    2014-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is now well established as a welding process capable of joining some different types of metallic materials, as it was (1) found to be a reliable and economical way of producing high quality welds, and (2) considered a "clean" welding process that does not involve fusion of metal, as is the case with other traditional welding processes. The aim of this study was to determine whether the emission of particles during FSW in the nanorange of the most commonly used aluminum (Al) alloys, AA 5083 and AA 6082, originated from the Al alloy itself due to friction of the welding tool against the item that was being welded. Another goal was to measure Al alloys in the alveolar deposited surface area during FSW. Nanoparticles dimensions were predominantly in the 40- and 70-nm range. This study demonstrated that microparticles were also emitted during FSW but due to tool wear. However, the biological relevance and toxic manifestations of these microparticles remain to be determined.

  2. Welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Nassir Ibrahim; Azali Muhammad; Ab. Razak Hamzah; Abd. Aziz Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail

    2008-01-01

    For the final chapter of this book, there is basic introduction on welding process. The good radiography must know somehow on welding process so that they can know what kind of welding that must rejected or not. All of the exposure technique that mention in earlier chapter almost applicable in this field because welding process is critical problem if there is no inspection will be done. So, for this chapter, all the discontinuity that usually appeared will be discussed and there is another discontinuity maybe not to important and do not give big impact if found it, do not described here. On top of that, the decision to accept or reject based on code, standard and specification that agreed by both to make sure that decision that agreed is corrected and more meaningful.

  3. Virtual Welded - Joint Design Integrating Advanced Materials and Processing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhishang; Ludewig, Howard W.; Babu, S. Suresh

    2005-06-30

    Virtual Welede-Joint Design, a systematic modeling approach, has been developed in this project to predict the relationship of welding process, microstructure, properties, residual stress, and the ultimate weld fatique strength. This systematic modeling approach was applied in the welding of high strength steel. A special welding wire was developed in this project to introduce compressive residual stress at weld toe. The results from both modeling and experiments demonstrated that more than 10x fatique life improvement can be acheived in high strength steel welds by the combination of compressive residual stress from the special welding wire and the desired weld bead shape from a unique welding process. The results indicate a technology breakthrough in the design of lightweight and high fatique performance welded structures using high strength steels.

  4. MCO closure welding process parameter development and qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANNELL, G.R.

    2003-01-01

    One of the key elements in the SNF process is final closure of the MCO by welding. Fuel is loaded into the MCO (approximately 2 ft. in diameter and 13 ft. long) and a heavy shield plug is inserted into the top, creating a mechanical seal. The plug contains several process ports for various operations, including vacuum drying and inert-gas backfilling of the packaged fuel. When fully processed, the Canister Cover Assembly (CCA) is placed over the shield plug and final closure made by welding. The following reports the effort between the Amer Industrial Technology (AIT) and Fluor Hanford (FH) to develop and qualify the welding process for making the final closure--with primary emphasis on developing a set of robust parameters for deposition of the root pass. Work was carried out in three phases: (1) Initial welding process and equipment selection with subsequent field demonstration testing; (2) Development and qualification of a specific process technique and parameters; and (3) Validation of the process and parameters at the CSB under mock production conditions. This work establishes the process technique and parameters that provide a high level of confidence that acceptable MCO closure welds will be made on a consistent and repeatable basis

  5. Analysis of microstructural variation and mechanical behaviors in submerged arc welded joint of high strength low carbon bainitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Liangyun, E-mail: lly.liangyun@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Qiu, Chunlin; Zhao, Dewen; Gao, Xiuhua; Du, Linxiu [State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2012-12-15

    Microstructural variation in high strength low carbon bainitic steel weldment was investigated in detail by means of optical microscope, transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope equipped with electron backscattered diffraction. The results showed that the welded joint has various microstructures such as acicular ferrite, coarse granular ferrite and fine polygonal ferrite. The martensite-austenite (MA) constituent has a variable structure in each sub-zone, which includes fully martensite and fully retained austenite. Meanwhile, the fine grained heat affected zone has higher content of retained austenite than the welded metal (WM) and coarse grained heat affected zone (CGHAZ). The orientation relationship between retained austenite and product phases in the WM and CGHAZ is close to Kurdjumov-Sachs relationship. However, the polygonal ferrite in the fine grained HAZ has no specific orientation relationship with the neighboring retained austenite. The toughness of the coarse grained region is much lower than that of the WM because the coarse bainite contains many large MA constituents to assist the nucleation of microcracks and coarse cleavage facet lowers the ability to inhibit the crack propagation.

  6. New And Existing Bridge Constructions - Increase of Fatigue Strength of Welded Joints by High Frequency Mechanical Impact Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ummenhofer Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies at KIT prove that high frequency mechanical impact (HFMI treatment is an efficient method for increasing the fatigue strength of welded steel structures. Within different research projects it was found that HFMI-methods can be used successfully for new and existing structures in order to extend the fatigue life. This paper gives an overview of the current status of existing steel bridges in Germany regarding aspects like bridge age distributions and traffic loads. Based on that overview welded joints susceptible to fatigue failure are identified. Using component-like small scale specimens, HFMI-methods were investigated within the objective of implementing an effective application for new and existing structures. Applying the fatigue test data observed, existing design proposals are evaluated and design recommendations for HFMI-treated joints are given. As a result of the research work, a transfer into practice has been realized and different applications are illustrated using the example of bridge constructions made of steel.

  7. Comparative study on the high-temperature tensile and creep properties of Alloy 617 base and weld metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Woo Gon; Hong, Sung Deok; Kim, Yong Wan; Kim, Seon Jin; Park, Jae Young; Ekaputra, I. M. W.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a comparative investigation on the high-temperature tensile and creep properties of Alloy 617 base metal (BM) and weld metal (WM) fabricated by a gas tungsten arc weld process. The WM had higher yield strength and lower ultimate tensile strength than the BM does; however, its elongation was significantly lower than that of the BM. The creep curve of the BM and WM was somewhat different from that of typical heat-resistance steel, and did not show a textbook creep. The WM exhibited a longer creep rupture life, lower creep rate, and lower rupture ductility than the BM. However, as the creep rupture time reached approximately 36,800 h, the creep life of the WM was expected to be almost similar to that of the BM; and after 36,800 h, its creep life was expected to be worse than the BM. Loner creep tests is needed to investigate the long-term creep life of the WM. The creep failure mode of the BM and WM was obviously an intergranular cracking of the cavity formation and growth mechanisms, although it was more evident in the WM. The BM had a more ductile fracture surface than the WM

  8. Development of filler wires for welding of reduced activation ferritic martenstic steel for India's test blanket module of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, G.; Arivazhagan, B.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Weld microstructure produced by RAFMS filler wires are free from delta ferrite. → Cooling rates of by weld thermal cycles influences the presence of delta ferrite. → Weld parameters modified with higher pre heat temperature and high heat input. → PWHT optimized based on correlation of hardness between base and weld metals. → Optimised mechanical properties achieved by proper tempering of the martensite. - Abstract: Indigenous development of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel (RAFMS) has become mandatory to India to participate in the International Thermo-nuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) programme. Optimisation of RAFMS is in an advanced stage for the fabrication of test blanket module (TBM) components. Simultaneously, development of RAFMS filler wires has been undertaken since there is no commercial filler wires are available for fabrication of components using RAFMS. Purpose of this study is to develop filler wires that can be directly used for both tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) and narrow gap tungsten inert gas welding (NG-TIG), which reduces the deposited weld metal volume and heat affected zone (HAZ) width. Further, the filler wires would also be used for hybrid laser welding for thick section joints. In view of meeting all the requirements, a detailed specification was prepared for the development of filler wires for welding of RAFM steel. Meanwhile, autogenous welding trials have been carried out on 2.5 mm thick plates of the RAFM steel using TIG process at various heat inputs with a preheat temperature of 250 deg. C followed by various post weld heat treatments (PWHT). The microstructure of the weld metal in most of the cases showed the presence of some delta-ferrite. Filler wires as per specifications have also been developed with minor variations on the chemistry against the specified values. Welding parameters and PWHT parameters were optimised to qualify the filler wires without the presence of delta-ferrite in

  9. An Investigation into Stress Corrosion Cracking of Dissimilar Metal Welds with 304L Stainless Steel and Alloy 82 in High Temperature Pure Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Tsung-Kuang; Huang, Guan-Ru; Tsai, Chuen-Horng; Wang, Mei-Ya

    For a better understanding toward stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in dissimilar metal welds with 304L stainless steel and Alloy 82, the SCC growth behavior in the transition regions of weld joints was investigated via slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests in 280 oC pure water with a dissolve oxygen level of 300 ppb. Prior to the SSRT tests, samples with dissimilar metal welds were prepared and underwent various pretreatments, including post-weld heat treatment (PWHT), shot peening, solution annealing, and mechanical grinding. In addition to the SSRT tests, measurements of degree of sensitization and micro-hardness on the transition regions of the metal welds were also conducted. According to the test results, the samples having undergone PWHTs exhibited relatively high degrees of sensitization. Distinct decreases in hardness were observed in the heat-affected zones of the base metals in all samples. Furthermore, the fracture planes of all samples after the SSRT tests were located at the stainless steel sides and were in parallel with the fusion lines. Among the treating conditions investigated in this study, a PWHT would pose a detrimental effect on the samples in the aspects of mechanical property and degree of SCC. Solution annealing would lead to the greatest improvement in ductility and SCC retardation, and shot peening would provide the treated samples with a positive improvement in ductility and corrosion retardation, but not to a great extent.

  10. The Effectiveness of Surface Coatings on Preventing Interfacial Reaction During Ultrasonic Welding of Aluminum to Magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panteli, Alexandria; Robson, Joseph D.; Chen, Ying-Chun; Prangnell, Philip B.

    2013-12-01

    High power ultrasonic spot welding (USW) is a solid-state joining process that is advantageous for welding difficult dissimilar material couples, like magnesium to aluminum. USW is also a useful technique for testing methods of controlling interfacial reaction in welding as the interface is not greatly displaced by the process. However, the high strain rate deformation in USW has been found to accelerate intermetallic compound (IMC) formation and a thick Al12Mg17 and Al3Mg2 reaction layer forms after relatively short welding times. In this work, we have investigated the potential of two approaches for reducing the IMC reaction rate in dissimilar Al-Mg ultrasonic welds, both involving coatings on the Mg sheet surface to (i) separate the join line from the weld interface, using a 100- μm-thick Al cold spray coating, and (ii) provide a diffusion barrier layer, using a thin manganese physical vapor deposition (PVD) coating. Both methods were found to reduce the level of reaction and increase the failure energy of the welds, but their effectiveness was limited due to issues with coating attachment and survivability during the welding cycle. The effect of the coatings on the joint's interface microstructure, and the fracture behavior have been investigated in detail. Kinetic modeling has been used to show that the benefit of the cold spray coating can be attributed to the reaction rate reverting to that expected under static conditions. This reduces the IMC growth rate by over 50 pct because at the weld line, the high strain rate dynamic deformation in USW normally enhances diffusion through the IMC layer. In comparison, the thin PVD barrier coating was found to rapidly break up early in USW and become dispersed throughout the deformation layer reducing its effectiveness.

  11. Syllabus in Trade Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    The syllabus outlines material for a course two academic years in length (minimum two and one-half hours daily experience) leading to entry-level occupational ability in several welding trade areas. Fourteen units covering are welding, gas welding, oxyacetylene welding, cutting, nonfusion processes, inert gas shielded-arc welding, welding cast…

  12. Effects of irradiation on crack-arrest toughness of two high-copper welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Nanstad, R.K.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the shift and shape of the lower-bound curve to crack-arrest data. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 220-mm-thick plate. Crack-arrest specimens fabricated from these welds were irradiated at a nominal temperature of 288 degree C to an average fluence of 1.9 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (>1 MeV). A preliminary evaluation of the results shows that the neutron-irradiation induced crack-arrest toughness temperature shift is about the same as the Charpy V-notch impact temperature shift at the 41-J energy level. The shape of the lower-bound curves, (for the range of test temperatures covered), compared to those of the ASME K Ia -curve did not seem to have been altered by irradiation. 10 refs., 9 figs., 7 tabs

  13. Results of crack-arrest tests on two irradiated high-copper welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iskander, S.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Nanstead, R.K.

    1990-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the shift and shape of the lower-bound curve to crack-arrest data. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 220-mm-thick plate. Crack-arrest specimens fabricated from these welds were irradiated at a nominal temperature of 288 degree C to an average fluence of 1.9 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (>1 MeV). Evaluation of the results shows that the neutron-irradiation-induced crack-arrest toughness temperature shift is about the same as the Charpy V-notch impact temperature shift at the 41-J energy level. The shape of the lower-bound curves (for the range of test temperatures covered) did not seem to have been altered by irradiation compared to those of the ASME K Ia curve. 9 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs

  14. Mechanical properties of welded joints of duplex steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawiak, M.; Nowacki, J.

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents the study results of mechanical properties of duplex steels UNS S31803 welded joints as well as duplex and NV A36 steels welded joints. They have ben welded by FCAW method in CO 2 using FCW 2205-H flux-cored wire. The joints have been subjected: tensile tests, impact tests, bending tests, hardness tests and metallographic investigations. The influence of welding parameters and mechanical properties of the joints was appreciated. The welding method assured high tensile strength of the joints (approximately 770 MPa) and high impact strength of the welds (approximately 770 J). All samples were broken outside of welds. (author)

  15. Laser welding engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhieh, N. M.; El Eesawi, M. E.; Hashkel, A. E.

    2007-01-01

    Laser welding was in its early life used mainly for unusual applications where no other welding process would be suitable that was twenty five years ago. Today, laser welding is a fully developed part of the metal working industry, routinely producing welds for common items such as cigarette lighters, which springs, motor/transformer lamination, hermetic seals, battery and pacemaker cans and hybrid circuit packages. Yet very few manufacturing engineering have seriously considers employing lasers in their own operations. Why? There are many reasons, but a main one must be not acquainted with the operation and capabilities of a laser system. Other reasons, such as a relatively high initial cost and a concern about using lasers in the manufacturing environment, also are frequently cited, and the complexity of the component and flexibility of the light delivery system. Laser welding could be used in place of many different standard processes, such as resistance (spot or seam), submerged arc, RF induction, high-frequency resistance, ultrasonic and electronic and electron-beam. while each of these techniques has established an independent function in the manufacturing world, the flexible laser welding approach will operate efficiently and economically in many different applications. Its flexibility will even permit the welding system to be used for other machining function, such as drilling, scribing, sealing and serializing. In this article, we will look at how laser welding works and what benefits it can offer to manufacturing engineers. Some industry observers state that there are already 2,000 laser machine tools being used for cutting, welding and drilling and that the number could reach 30,000 over the next 15 years as manufacturing engineers become more aware of the capabilities of lasers [1). While most laser applications are dedicated to one product or process that involves high-volume, long-run manufacturing, the flexibility of a laser to supply energy to hard

  16. Comparisons of irradiation-induced shifts in fracture toughness, crack arrest toughness, and Charpy impact energy in high-copper welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corwin, W.R.; Nanstad, R.K.; Iskander, S.K.

    1991-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation (HSSI) Program is examining relative shifts and changes in shape of fracture and crack-arrest toughness versus temperature behavior for two high-copper welds. Fracture toughness 100-MPa√m temperature shifts are greater than Charpy 41-J shifts for both welds. Mean curve fits to the fracture toughness data provide mixed results regarding curve shape changes, but curves constructed as lower boundaries indicate lower slopes. Preliminary crack-arrest toughness results indicate that shifts of lower-bound curves are approximately the same as CVN 41-J shifts with no shape changes

  17. Sustainability of Welding Process through Bobbin Friction Stir Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sued, M. K.; Samsuri, S. S. M.; Kassim, M. K. A. M.; Nasir, S. N. N. M.

    2018-03-01

    Welding process is in high demand, which required a competitive technology to be adopted. This is important for sustaining the needs of the joining industries without ignoring the impact of the process to the environment. Friction stir welding (FSW) is stated to be benefitting the environment through low energy consumption, which cannot be achieved through traditional arc welding. However, this is not well documented, especially for bobbin friction stir welding (BFSW). Therefore, an investigation is conducted by measuring current consumption of the machine during the BFSW process. From the measurement, different phases of BFSW welding process and its electrical demand are presented. It is found that in general total energy in BFSW is about 130kW inclusive of all identified process phases. The phase that utilise for joint formation is in weld phase that used the highest total energy of 120kWs. The recorded total energy is still far below the traditional welding technology and the conventional friction stir welding (CFSW) energy demand. This indicates that BFSW technology with its vast benefit able to sustain the joining technology in near future.

  18. High nitrogen deposition in an agricultural ecosystem of Shaanxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ting; Tong, Yan'an; Liu, Xuejun; Xu, Wen; Luo, Xiaosheng; Christie, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition plays an important role in the global N cycle. Data for dry and wet N deposition in agricultural ecosystem of Shaanxi in China is still imperfect; in this study, we continuously measured concentrations and fluxes of dry N deposition from 2010 to 2013 in Yangling district of Shaanxi province and wet N deposition from 2010 to 2012. The average annual concentrations of NH3, NO2, HNO3, particulate ammonium, and nitrate (pNH4 (+) and pNO3 (-)) varied among 3.9-9.1, 6.6-8.0, 1.2-1.4, 3.1-4.3, and 3.3-4.8 μg N m(-3), respectively, with mean values of 6.0, 7.2, 1.3, 3.8, and 4.1 μg N m(-3), respectively, during the entire monitoring period. The annual NH4 (+)-N and NO3 (-)-N concentrations in precipitation ranged 3.9-4.3 and 2.8-3.4 mg N L(-1) with the mean values of 4.1 and 3.3 mg N L(-1). The NH4 (+)-N/NO3 (-)-N ratio in rainfall averaged 1.2. Dry N deposition flux was determined to be 19.2 kg N ha(-1) year(-1) and the wet N deposition flux was 27.2 kg N ha(-1) year(-1). The amount of total atmospheric N deposition (dry plus wet) reached 46.4 kg N ha(-1) year(-1), in which dry deposition accounted 41 %. Gaseous N deposition comprised over 75 % of the dry deposition, and the proportion of oxidized N in dry deposition was equal to the reduced N. Therefore, the results suggest that more stringent regional air pollution control policies are required in the target area and that N deposition is an important nutrient resource from the atmosphere that must be taken into consideration in nutrient management planning of agricultural ecosystems.

  19. Method for depositing high-quality microcrystalline semiconductor materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, Subhendu [Bloomfield Hills, MI; Yang, Chi C [Troy, MI; Yan, Baojie [Rochester Hills, MI

    2011-03-08

    A process for the plasma deposition of a layer of a microcrystalline semiconductor material is carried out by energizing a process gas which includes a precursor of the semiconductor material and a diluent with electromagnetic energy so as to create a plasma therefrom. The plasma deposits a layer of the microcrystalline semiconductor material onto the substrate. The concentration of the diluent in the process gas is varied as a function of the thickness of the layer of microcrystalline semiconductor material which has been deposited. Also disclosed is the use of the process for the preparation of an N-I-P type photovoltaic device.

  20. Sputter deposited titanium disilicide at high substrate temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanielian, M.; Blackstone, S.; Lajos, R.

    1984-08-01

    Titanium disilicide films were sputter deposited from a composite TiSi2.1 target on bare silicon wafers both at room temperature and at 600 °C. The room temperature as-deposited films require a 900 °C sintering step to reduce their resistivity. On the other hand, the as-deposited 600 °C films are fully reacted, polycrystalline, have no oxygen contamination, large grain sizes, and are oxidation resistant. Further annealing of these films at 900 °C produces no changes in their crystal structure, composition, resistivity, or grain size.

  1. Dissimilar joining of galvanized high-strength steel to aluminum alloy in a zero-gap lap joint configuration by two-pass laser welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Junjie; Harooni, Masoud; Carlson, Blair; Kovacevic, Radovan

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Defect-free two-pass laser partially penetrated lap joint of galvanized steel to aluminum was achieved. • The thickness of the Al-rich intermetallic compounds could be controlled by optimal parameters. • The dynamic behavior of the molten pool and keyhole were monitored by a high speed charge-coupled device camera. • The presence of zinc in the intermetallic compounds could improve the strength of the lap joints. - Abstract: A welding procedure based on using two-pass laser scans is introduced for dissimilar joining of overlapped galvanized high-strength dual-phase (DP) steel DP590 to aluminum alloy (AA) 6061 sheets. The first pass is based on a defocused laser spot that scans across the top of the two overlapped sheets and heats the zinc coating at the faying surface to be melted and partially vaporized, while the second pass is executed with a focused laser spot in order to perform the welding. Completely defect-free galvanized steel to aluminum lap joints were obtained by using this two-pass laser welding procedure. An on-line machine vision system was applied to monitor the keyhole dynamics during the laser welding process. An energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was carried out to determine the atomic percent of zinc, aluminum, and iron in the galvanized steel to aluminum lap joints. Mechanical testing and micro-hardness test were conducted to evaluate the mechanical properties of the galvanized steel to aluminum lap joints. The experimental results showed that the lap joint of galvanized steel to aluminum obtained by the two-pass laser welding approach had a higher failure value than those joints obtained when the zinc at the faying surface was mechanically removed under the same welding speed and laser power

  2. Laser beam welding quality monitoring system based in high-speed (10 kHz) uncooled MWIR imaging sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Rodrigo; Vergara, German; Gutiérrez, Raúl; Fernández, Carlos; Villamayor, Víctor; Gómez, Luis; González-Camino, Maria; Baldasano, Arturo; Castro, G.; Arias, R.; Lapido, Y.; Rodríguez, J.; Romero, Pablo

    2015-05-01

    The combination of flexibility, productivity, precision and zero-defect manufacturing in future laser-based equipment are a major challenge that faces this enabling technology. New sensors for online monitoring and real-time control of laserbased processes are necessary for improving products quality and increasing manufacture yields. New approaches to fully automate processes towards zero-defect manufacturing demand smarter heads where lasers, optics, actuators, sensors and electronics will be integrated in a unique compact and affordable device. Many defects arising in laser-based manufacturing processes come from instabilities in the dynamics of the laser process. Temperature and heat dynamics are key parameters to be monitored. Low cost infrared imagers with high-speed of response will constitute the next generation of sensors to be implemented in future monitoring and control systems for laser-based processes, capable to provide simultaneous information about heat dynamics and spatial distribution. This work describes the result of using an innovative low-cost high-speed infrared imager based on the first quantum infrared imager monolithically integrated with Si-CMOS ROIC of the market. The sensor is able to provide low resolution images at frame rates up to 10 KHz in uncooled operation at the same cost as traditional infrared spot detectors. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the new sensor technology, a low-cost camera was assembled on a standard production laser welding head, allowing to register melting pool images at frame rates of 10 kHz. In addition, a specific software was developed for defect detection and classification. Multiple laser welding processes were recorded with the aim to study the performance of the system and its application to the real-time monitoring of laser welding processes. During the experiments, different types of defects were produced and monitored. The classifier was fed with the experimental images obtained. Self

  3. Nondestructive control of residual stresses during welding and recharge processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, J.C.; Fernandez, L.M.; Cruz, C.; Merino, F.; Aragon, B.

    1993-01-01

    In this work, the stress state of material during welding and recharge processes is controlled with the help of Barkhausen effect. The changes, occurred in the longitudinal and transversal stress profile are show during deposition of welding rings. It is proved that the stress state of the base-material depends on the amount of recharge layers, deposited on it

  4. Fracture toughness of stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.

    1985-11-01

    The effects of temperature, composition and weld-process variations on the fracture toughness behavior for Types 308 and 16-8-2 stainless steel (SS) welds were examined using the multiple-specimen J/sub R/-curve procedure. Fracture characteristics were found to be dependent on temperature and weld process but not on filler material. Gas-tungsten-arc (GTA) welds exhibited the highest fracture toughness, a shielded metal-arc (SMA) weld exhibited an intermediate toughness and submerged-arc (SA) welds yielded the lowest toughness. Minimum-expected fracture properties were defined from lower-bound J/sub c/ and tearing modulus values generated here and in previous studies. Fractographic examination revealed that microvoid coalescence was the operative fracture mechanism for all welds. Second phase particles of manganese silicide were found to be detrimental to the ductile fracture behavior because they separated from the matrix during the initial stages of plastic straining. In SA welds, the high density of inclusions resulting from silicon pickup from the flux promoted premature dimple rupture. The weld produced by the SMA process contained substantially less manganese silicide, while GTA welds contained no silicide inclusions. Delta ferrite particles present in all welds were substantially more resistant to local failure than the silicide phase. In welds containing little or no manganese silicide, delta ferrite particles initiated microvoid coalescence but only after extensive plastic straining

  5. The role of plasma induced substrate heating during high rate deposition of microcrystalline solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Donker, M.N.; Schmitz, R.; Appenzeller, W.; Rech, B.; Kessels, W.M.M.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.

    2006-01-01

    A 13.56 MHz parallel plate hydrogen-dild. silane plasma, operated at high pressure and high power, was used to deposit microcryst. silicon solar cells with efficiencies of 6-9% at high deposition rates of 0.4-1.2 nm/s. In this regime new challenges arise regarding temp. control, since the high

  6. Deposition of magnetite particles from high velocity water onto isothermal tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrill, K.A.

    1977-02-01

    The deposition rate of magnetite particles from a high velocity water slurry onto isothermal metal tubes was measured. The effects of velocity (5 to 100 m/s), slurry concentration (200 to 1000 mg Fe/kg H 2 O), temperature (25 0 to 90 0 C), pH (4 to 10 at 25 0 C), and tube material (nickel, Zircaloy-4) on deposition rate were studied. The data are interpreted in terms of two steps in series for deposition: a mass transfer step followed by a deposition or inertial coasting step. Mass transfer of particles through the bulk water phase apparently limits the deposition of particles at high Reynolds number

  7. Friction welding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Ryuichi; Hatanaka, Tatsuo.

    1969-01-01

    A friction welding method for forming a lattice-shaped base and tie plate supporter for fuel elements is disclosed in which a plate formed with a concavity along its edge is pressure welded to a rotating member such as a boss by longitudinally contacting the projecting surfaces remaining on either side of the concavity with the rotating member during the high speed rotation thereof in the presence of an inert gas. Since only the two projecting surfaces of the plate are fused by friction to the rotary member, heat expansion is absorbed by the concavity to prevent distortion; moreover, a two point contact surface assures a stable fitting and promotes the construction of a rigid lattice in which a number of the abovementioned plates are friction welded between rotating members to form any desired complex arrangement. The inert has serves to protect the material quality of the contacting surfaces from air during the welding step. The present invention thus provides a method in which even Zircaloy may be friction welded in place of casting stainless steel in the construction of supporting lattices to thereby enhance neutron economy. (K. J. Owens)

  8. High mobility n-type organic thin-film transistors deposited at room temperature by supersonic molecular beam deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiarella, F., E-mail: fabio.chiarella@spin.cnr.it; Barra, M.; Ciccullo, F.; Cassinese, A. [CNR-SPIN and Physics Department, University of Naples, Piazzale Tecchio 80, I-80125 Naples (Italy); Toccoli, T.; Aversa, L.; Tatti, R.; Verucchi, R. [IMEM-CNR-FBK Division of Trento, Via alla Cascata 56/C, I-38123 Povo (Italy); Iannotta, S. [IMEM-CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, I-43124 Parma (Italy)

    2014-04-07

    In this paper, we report on the fabrication of N,N′-1H,1H-perfluorobutil dicyanoperylenediimide (PDIF-CN{sub 2}) organic thin-film transistors by Supersonic Molecular Beam Deposition. The devices exhibit mobility up to 0.2 cm{sup 2}/V s even if the substrate is kept at room temperature during the organic film growth, exceeding by three orders of magnitude the electrical performance of those grown at the same temperature by conventional Organic Molecular Beam Deposition. The possibility to get high-mobility n-type transistors avoiding thermal treatments during or after the deposition could significantly extend the number of substrates suitable to the fabrication of flexible high-performance complementary circuits by using this compound.

  9. Latest MIG, TIG arc-YAG laser hybrid welding systems for various welding products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishide, Takashi; Tsubota, Shuho; Watanabe, Masao

    2003-03-01

    Laser welding is capable of high-efficiency low-strain welding, and so its applications are started to various products. We have also put the high-power YAG laser of up to 10 kW to practical welding use for various products. On the other hand the weakest point of this laser welding is considered to be strict in the welding gap aiming allowance. In order to solve this problem, we have developed hybrid welding of TIG, MIG arc and YAG laser, taking the most advantages of both the laser and arc welding. Since the electrode is coaxial to the optical axis of the YAG laser in this process, it can be applied to welding of various objects. In the coaxial MIG, TIG-YAG welding, in order to make irradiation positions of the YAG laser beams having been guided in a wire or an electrode focused to the same position, the beam transmitted in fibers is separated to form a space between the separated beams, in which the laser is guided. With this method the beam-irradiating area can be brought near or to the arc-generating point. This enables welding of all directions even for the member of a three-dimensional shape. This time we carried out welding for various materials and have made their welding of up to 1 mm or more in welding groove gap possible. We have realized high-speed 1-pass butt welding of 4m/min in welding speed with the laser power of 3 kW for an aluminum alloy plate of approximately 4 mm thick. For a mild steel plate also we have realized butt welding of 1m/min with 5 kW for 6 mm thick. Further, in welding of stainless steel we have shown its welding possibility, by stabilizing the arc with the YAG laser in the welding atmosphere of pure argon, and shown that this welding is effective in high-efficiency welding of various materials. Here we will report the fundamental welding performances and applications to various objects for the coaxial MIG, TIG-YAG welding we have developed.

  10. Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of 10CrNi3MoV High Strength Steel and Its Undermatched Welds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Liu, Xuesong; Berto, Filippo; Razavi, S M J

    2018-04-24

    The use of high strength steel allows the design of lighter, more slender and simpler structures due to high strength and favorable ductility. Nevertheless, the increase of yield strength does not guarantee the corresponding improvement of fatigue resistance, which becomes a major concern for engineering structure design, especially for the welded joints. The paper presents a comparison of the low cycle fatigue behaviors between 10CrNi3MoV high strength steel and its undermatched weldments. Uniaxial tension tests, Push-pull, strain-controlled fatigue tests were conducted on base metal and weldments in the strain range of 0.2⁻1.2%. The monotonic and cyclic stress-strain curves, stress-life, strain-life and energy-life in terms of these materials were analyzed for fatigue assessment of materials discrepancy. The stress-life results of base metal and undermatched weld metal exhibit cyclic softening behaviors. Furthermore, the shapes of 10CrNi3MoV steel hysteresis loops show a satisfactory Masing-type behavior, while the weld metal shows a non-Masing type behavior. Strain, plastic and total strain energy density amplitudes against the number of reversals to failure results demonstrate that the undermatched weld metal presents a higher resistance to fatigue crack initiation than 10CrNi3MoV high strength steel. Finally, fatigue fracture surfaces of specimens were compared by scanning electron microscopy to identify the differences of crack initiation and the propagation between them.

  11. Ultrasonic inspection of austenitic welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baikie, B.L.; Wagg, A.R.; Whittle, M.J.; Yapp, D.

    1976-01-01

    Optical and X-ray metallography combined with ultrasonic testing by compression waves was used for inspection of stainless steel weld metal produced by three different welding techniques. X-ray diffraction showed that each weld possessed a characteristic fibre textured structure which was shown by optical microscopy to be parallel to columnar grain boundaries. Metallographic evidence suggested that the development of fibre texture is due to the mechanism of competitive growth. From observations made as a result of optical metallographic examination the orientation of the fibre axis could be predicted if the weld geometry and welding procedure were known. Ultrasonic velocity and attenuation measurements as a continuous function of grain orientation, made on cylinders machined from weld samples, showed that attenuation was strongly orientation dependent. It was concluded that the sensitivity of ultrasonic inspection to small defects is unlikely to be as high for austenitic welds as for ferritic even when transmission is improved by modifying the welding procedure to improve the ultrasonic transmission. (U.K.)

  12. Welding abilities of UFG metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morawiński, Łukasz; Chmielewski, Tomasz; Olejnik, Lech; Buffa, Gianluca; Campanella, Davide; Fratini, Livan

    2018-05-01

    Ultrafine Grained (UFG) metals are characterized by an average grain size of welded joints with similar properties to the base of UFG material are crucial for the production of finished engineering components. Conventional welding methods based on local melting of the joined edges cannot be used due to the UFG microstructure degradation caused by the heat occurrence in the heat affected zone. Therefore, the possibility of obtaining UFG materials joints with different shearing plane (SP) positions by means of friction welded processes, which do not exceed the melting temperature during the process, should be investigated. The article focuses on the Linear Friction Welding (LFW) method, which belongs to innovative welding processes based on mixing of the friction-heated material in the solid state. LFW is a welding process used to joint bulk components. In the process, the friction forces work due to the high frequency oscillation and the pressure between the specimens is converted in thermal energy. Character and range of recrystallization can be controlled by changing LFW parameters. Experimental study on the welded UFG 1070 aluminum alloy by means of FLW method, indicates the possibility of reducing the UFG structure degradation in the obtained joint. A laboratory designed LFW machine has been used to weld the specimens with different contact pressure and oscillation frequency.

  13. Numerical simulation of TIG welding with filler of steel pieces of high thickness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmignani, B.; Toselli, G. [ENEA Centro Ricerche Ezio Clementel, Bologna (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1999-07-01

    The problem of the numerical simulation of welding process with filler, in particular TIG (tungsten inert gas) with cold filler, has been approached with ABAQUS/S code. Reference has been made to some experimental models studied and prepared ad hoc in order to better know the physical phenomena involved in the TIG welding technique and to validate the computation methodologies and results obtained. This numerical simulation has been required in order to assist the fabrication development and QA for TF (toroidal field) coil case, an important component of ITER (international thermonuclear experimental reactor) machine. [Italian] Con il codice di analisi termo-strutturale non lineare agli EF, ABAQUS/S, viene affrontato per la prima volta il problema della simulazione numerica di un processo di saldatura con materiale d'apporto, in particolare il processo di saldatura TIG (tungsten inert gas) a filo freddo. Si e' fatto riferimento ad alcuni modelli sperimentali studiati e preparati ad hoc per conoscere meglio e valutare le metodologie di calcolo adottate ed i corrispondenti risultati ottenuti. Questo tipo di simulazione e' stato richiesto per fornire alcune conoscenze preliminari, che potessero essere di aiuto e guida nelle scelte di saldatura da eseguire per la fabbricazione e la quality assurance delle casse che dovranno contenere le bobine per la creazione del campo magnetico toroidale nella macchina ITER (international thermonuclear experiemental reactor) per la fusione nucleare. In questo lavoro, sono presentati, analizzati, discussi e confrontati con le corrispondenti misure sperimentali i primi risultati ottenuti. Sono descritte e discusse anche le difficolta' incontrate, le approssimazioni fatte e la ricerca di procedure di calcolo piu' semplificate.

  14. Droplet deposition measurement with high-speed camera and novel high-speed liquid film sensor with high spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damsohn, M.; Prasser, H.-M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Development of a sensor for time- and space-resolved droplet deposition in annular flow. → Experimental measurement of droplet deposition in horizontal annular flow to compare readings of the sensor with images of a high-speed camera when droplets are depositing unto the liquid film. → Self-adaptive signal filter based on autoregression to separate droplet impacts in the sensor signal from waves of liquid films. - Abstract: A sensor based on the electrical conductance method is presented for the measurement of dynamic liquid films in two-phase flow. The so called liquid film sensor consists of a matrix with 64 x 16 measuring points, a spatial resolution of 3.12 mm and a time resolution of 10 kHz. Experiments in a horizontal co-current air-water film flow were conducted to test the capability of the sensor to detect droplet deposition from the gas core onto the liquid film. The experimental setup is equipped with the liquid film sensor and a high speed camera (HSC) recording the droplet deposition with a sampling rate of 10 kHz simultaneously. In some experiments the recognition of droplet deposition on the sensor is enhanced by marking the droplets with higher electrical conductivity. The comparison between the HSC and the sensor shows, that the sensor captures the droplet deposition above a certain droplet diameter. The impacts of droplet deposition can be filtered from the wavy structures respectively conductivity changes of the liquid film using a filter algorithm based on autoregression. The results will be used to locally measure droplet deposition e.g. in the proximity of spacers in a subchannel geometry.

  15. Numerical simulation of welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jan Langkjær; Thorborg, Jesper

    Aim of project:To analyse and model the transient thermal field from arc welding (SMAW, V-shaped buttweld in 15mm plate) and to some extend the mechanical response due to the thermal field. - To implement this model in a general purpose finite element program such as ABAQUS.The simulation...... stress is also taken into account.Work carried out:With few means it is possible to define a thermal model which describes the thermal field from the welding process in reasonable agreement with reality. Identical results are found with ABAQUS and Rosenthal’s analytical solution of the governing heat...... transfer equation under same conditions. It is relative easy tointroduce boundary conditions such as convection and radiation where not surprisingly the radiation has the greatest influence especially from the high temperature regions in the weld pool and the heat affected zone.Due to the large temperature...

  16. Analysis of Weld Fabrication Flaws in High-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Containers: Experiences from the US Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bullen, Daniel; Apted, Mick

    2002-11-01

    The purpose of this report is to examine key issues regarding the fabrication, closure and defect detection in canisters for radioactive waste disposal in a deep geological repository. As a preliminary step, a review is made of the closure-weld design and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) of the closure seal for the US high-level waste repository programme. This includes statistical analysis of the data obtained by NDE and identification of key areas of investigation where additional data are required. Information from other industrial experiences on closure and flaw detection of metal containers is also reviewed. The canister material and closure methods for the US programme and industrial activities reviewed here differ from those of SKB's KBS-3 reference design. The issues and approaches to issue resolution identified from the US programme and industrial analogues, however, can provide an initial basis for preparing for independent review of SKB's canister closure plans and encapsulation facility

  17. Dependence of fracture toughness of molybdenum laser welds on dendritic spacing and in situ titanium additions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jellison, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    The fracture toughness of molybdenum welds has been improved by in situ gettering of oxygen by means of physically deposited titanium. The addition of titanium suppressed brittle intergranular fracture. Pulsed laser welds (both Nd:YAG and CO 2 ) exhibited superior toughness to that of continuous wave CO 2 laser welds. Also, welds of vacuum arc remelted grades were tougher than those of sintered molybdenum. However, weld toughness could not be correlated with either oxygen or carbon content

  18. Experimental research on the structural characteristics of high organic soft soil in different deposition ages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fei; Lin, Guo-he

    2018-03-01

    High organic soft soil, which is distributed at Ji Lin province in China, has been studied by a lot of scholars. In the paper, structural characteristics with different deposition ages have been researched by experimental tests. Firstly, the characteristics of deposition age, degree of decompositon, high-pressure consolidation and microstructure have been measured by a series of tests. Secondly, structural strengths which were deposited in different ages, have been carried out to test the significant differences of stress-strain relations between remoulded and undisturbed high organic soft soil samples. Results showed that high organic soft soil which is deposited at different ages will influence its structural characteristics.

  19. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of Electron Beam Welded Joints of High Strength S960QL and Weldox 1300 Steel Grades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błacha S.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows the results of metallographic examination and mechanical properties of electron beam welded joints of quenched and tempered S960QL and Weldox 1300 steel grades. The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of producing good quality electron beam welded joints without filler material.

  20. Use of the gapped bead-on-plate test to investigate hydrogen induced cracking of flux cored arc welds of a quenched and tempered steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Liang; Dunne, Druce; Davidson, Len

    2014-01-01

    Gapped bead-on-plate (G-BOP) testing of flux cored arc welds was conducted to assess the susceptibility to hydrogen induced cold cracking (HICC) of weld metal deposited on a high strength quenched and tempered steel. For preheat temperatures higher than 40°C, no weld metal cracking was observed using a shielding gas consisting of argon with 20% carbon dioxide. In contrast, the no-crack condition was not achieved for a shielding gas consisting of argon-5% carbon dioxide for preheat temperatures lower than 100°C. This extraordinary difference in weld metal HICC resistance indicates that, in general, the shielding gas mixture can exert a major influence on weld metal transverse cold cracking behaviour

  1. Enhancing reliability of ultrasonic testing of welds of nuclear power plant equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbinskij, V.G.

    1981-01-01

    Results of investigation of factors influencing the reliability of manual ultrasonic testing of welded joints and weld deposited metal power-generating equipment are presented. Recommendations on the enhancing of reliability are given [ru

  2. Microstructural characterisation of Inconel 718 gas tungsten arc welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ram, G.D.J.; Reddy, A.V.; Rao, K.P.

    2005-01-01

    The presence of Nb-rich, brittle, intermetallic Laves phase in Inconel 718 weld fusion zones is detrimental to weld mechanical properties. In the current work, autogenous bead-on-plate gas tungsten-arc welds were deposited in 2 mm thick IN 718 sheets. The welds were subjected to the following heat treatments: i) direct aging, ii) solution treatment at 980 C followed by aging, and iii) solution treatment at 1080 C followed by aging. Detailed microstructural characterisation was carried out using optical, scanning electron and transmission electron microscopes and electron probe microanalysis. The microstructural features in as-welded and post-weld heat treated conditions are discussed. The results show that post-weld heat treatments alone cannot provide satisfactory solution to the Laves problem in Inconel 718 gas tungsten-arc welds

  3. The effect of aging treatment on the high temperature fatigue strength and fatigue fracture behaviour of friction welded domestic heat resisting steels (SUH3-SUS303)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.Y.; Oh, S.K.; Kim, H.J.

    1981-01-01

    In this study the experiment was carried out as the high temperature rotary bending fatigue testing under the condition of 700 0 C high temperature to the friction welded domestic heat resisting steels, SUH3-SUS303, which were 10 hr., 100 hr. aging heat treated at 700 0 C after solution treatment 1 hr. at 1060 0 C for the purpose of observing the effects of the high temperature fatigue strength and fatigue fracture behaviours as well as with various mechanical properties of welded joints. The results obtained are summarized as follows: 1) Through mechanical tests and microstructural examinations, the determined optimum welding conditions, rotating speed 2420 rpm, heating pressure 8 kg/mm 2 , upsetting pressure 22 kg/mm 2 , the amount of total upset 7 mm (heating time 3 sec and upsetting time 2 sec) were satisfied. 2) The solution treated material SUH3, SUS303 and SUH3-SUS303, have the highest inclination gradiant on S-N curve due to the high temperature fatigue testing for long time at 700 0 C. 3) The optimum aging time of friction welded SUH3-SUS303, has been recognized near the 10 hr. at 700 0 C after the solution treatment of 1 hr. at 1060 0 C. 4) The high temperature fatigue limits of aging treated materials were compared with those of raw material according to the extender of aging time, on 10 hr. aging, fatigue limits were increased by SUH3 75.4%, SUS303 28.5%, friction welded joints SUH3-SUS303 44.2% and 100 hr. aging the rate were 64.9%, 30.4% and 36.6% respectively. 5) The fatigue fractures occurred at the side of the base metal SUS303 of the friction welded joints SUH3-SUS303 and it is difficult to find out fractures at the friction welding interfaces. 6) The cracking mode of SUS303, SUH3-SUS303 is intergranular in any case, but SUH3 is fractured by transgranular cracking. (author)

  4. Investigation of deposition characteristics and properties of high-rate deposited silicon nitride films prepared by atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakiuchi, H.; Nakahama, Y.; Ohmi, H.; Yasutake, K.; Yoshii, K.; Mori, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Silicon nitride (SiN x ) films have been prepared at extremely high deposition rates by the atmospheric pressure plasma chemical vapor deposition (AP-PCVD) technique on Si(001) wafers from gas mixtures containing He, H 2 , SiH 4 and N 2 or NH 3 . A 150 MHz very high frequency (VHF) power supply was used to generate high-density radicals in the atmospheric pressure plasma. Deposition rate, composition and morphology of the SiN x films prepared with various deposition parameters were studied by scanning electron microscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy. Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopy was also used to characterize the structure and the chemical bonding configurations of the films. Furthermore, etching rate with buffered hydrofluoric acid (BHF) solution, refractive index and capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics were measured to evaluate the dielectric properties of the films. It was found that effective passivation of dangling bonds and elimination of excessive hydrogen atoms at the film-growing surface seemed to be the most important factor to form SiN x film with a dense Si-N network. The C-V curve of the optimized film showed good interface properties, although further improvement was necessary for use in the industrial metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) applications

  5. Reduction of Biomechanical and Welding Fume Exposures in Stud Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fethke, Nathan B; Peters, Thomas M; Leonard, Stephanie; Metwali, Mahmoud; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A

    2016-04-01

    The welding of shear stud connectors to structural steel in construction requires a prolonged stooped posture that exposes ironworkers to biomechanical and welding fume hazards. In this study, biomechanical and welding fume exposures during stud welding using conventional methods were compared to exposures associated with use of a prototype system that allowed participants to weld from an upright position. The effect of base material (i.e. bare structural beam versus galvanized decking) on welding fume concentration (particle number and mass), particle size distribution, and particle composition was also explored. Thirty participants completed a series of stud welding simulations in a local apprenticeship training facility. Use of the upright system was associated with substantial reductions in trunk inclination and the activity levels of several muscle groups. Inhalable mass concentrations of welding fume (averaged over ~18 min) when using conventional methods were high (18.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 65.7 mg m(-3) for through deck), with estimated mass concentrations of iron (7.8 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), zinc (0.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), and manganese (0.9 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 1.5 mg m(-3) for through deck) often exceeding the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values (TLVs). Number and mass concentrations were substantially reduced when using the upright system, although the total inhalable mass concentration remained above the TLV when welding through decking. The average diameters of the welding fume particles for both bare beam (31±17 nm) through deck conditions (34±34 nm) and the chemical composition of the particles indicated the presence of metallic nanoparticles. Stud welding exposes ironworkers to potentially high levels of biomechanical loading (primarily to the low back) and welding fume. The upright system used in this study improved exposure

  6. Welding template

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben Venue, R.J. of.

    1976-01-01

    A welding template is described which is used to weld strip material into a cellular grid structure for the accommodation of fuel elements in a nuclear reactor. On a base plate the template carries a multitude of cylindrical pins whose upper half is narrower than the bottom half and only one of which is attached to the base plate. The others are arrested in a hexagonal array by oblong webs clamped together by chuck jaws which can be secured by means of screws. The parts are ground very accurately. The template according to the invention is very easy to make. (UWI) [de

  7. State Skill Standards: Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pointer, Mike; Naylor, Randy; Warden, John; Senek, Gene; Shirley, Charles; Lefcourt, Lew; Munson, Justin; Johnson, Art

    2005-01-01

    The Department of Education has undertaken an ambitious effort to develop statewide occupational skill standards. The standards in this document are for welding programs and are designed to clearly state what the student should know and be able to do upon completion of an advanced high-school program. The writing team determined that any statewide…

  8. Non destructive evaluation of residual stresses in welding and hard-surfacing processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, J.C.; Fernandez, L.M.; Cruz, C.; Aragon, B.; Merino, F.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper transversal and longitudinal stress profiles in welding and hard-surfacing by welding processes are presented. The stresses were measured by RMS of Barkhausen signal. In this work it is shown that in each case the level of stresses is strongly dependent on the number of weld beads of surfacing layers deposited. The subsequent deposition of new weld beads or surfacing layers produces a stress-relieving effect

  9. Hybrid Laser Welding of Large Steel Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrokhi, Farhang

    Manufacturing of large steel structures requires the processing of thick-section steels. Welding is one of the main processes during the manufacturing of such structures and includes a significant part of the production costs. One of the ways to reduce the production costs is to use the hybrid...... laser welding technology instead of the conventional arc welding methods. However, hybrid laser welding is a complicated process that involves several complex physical phenomena that are highly coupled. Understanding of the process is very important for obtaining quality welds in an efficient way....... This thesis investigates two different challenges related to the hybrid laser welding of thick-section steel plates. Employing empirical and analytical approaches, this thesis attempts to provide further knowledge towards obtaining quality welds in the manufacturing of large steel structures....

  10. Strengthening Hadfield steel welds by nitrogen alloying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efstathiou, C.; Sehitoglu, H.

    2009-01-01

    Strengthening Hadfield steel weld repairs by introducing nitrogen into the weld region was proven to be feasible via two welding techniques. The first technique required a pure Hadfield steel filler material to be diffusion treated in a high pressure nitrogen gas environment, and subsequently used during tungsten inert gas welding with a pure argon shielding gas. The second technique used a Hadfield steel filler material, and a 10% nitrogen containing argon shielding gas during tungsten inert gas welding. Both techniques increased the yield strength, the hardening rate, and the ultimate strength of the weld region. Using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Auger spectroscopy, we determined that the increased strength of the weld region resulted from a combination of nitrogen alloying and microstructural refinement

  11. Study on hybrid heat source overlap welding of magnesium alloy AZ31B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, G.L.; Zhou, G.; Yuan, S.Q.

    2009-01-01

    The magnesium alloy AZ31B was overlap welded by hybrid welding (laser-tungsten inert gas arc). According to the hybrid welding interaction principle, a new heat source model, hybrid welding heat source model, was developed with finite element analysis. At the same time, using a high-temperature metallographical microscope, the macro-appearance and microstructure characteristics of the joint after hybrid overlap welding were studied. The results indicate that the hybrid welding was superior to the single tungsten inert gas welding or laser welding on the aspects of improving the utilized efficiency of the arc and enhancing the absorptivity of materials to laser energy. Due to the energy characteristics of hybrid overlap welding the macro-appearance of the joint was cup-shaped, the top weld showed the hybrid welding microstructure, while, the lower weld showed the typical laser welding microstructure

  12. Study on hybrid heat source overlap welding of magnesium alloy AZ31B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, G.L. [Department of Electromechanical Engineering, Tangshan College, Tangshan 063000 (China)], E-mail: guoliliang@sohu.com; Zhou, G. [School of Material Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Yuan, S.Q. [Department of Electromechanical Engineering, Tangshan College, Tangshan 063000 (China)

    2009-01-15

    The magnesium alloy AZ31B was overlap welded by hybrid welding (laser-tungsten inert gas arc). According to the hybrid welding interaction principle, a new heat source model, hybrid welding heat source model, was developed with finite element analysis. At the same time, using a high-temperature metallographical microscope, the macro-appearance and microstructure characteristics of the joint after hybrid overlap welding were studied. The results indicate that the hybrid welding was superior to the single tungsten inert gas welding or laser welding on the aspects of improving the utilized efficiency of the arc and enhancing the absorptivity of materials to laser energy. Due to the energy characteristics of hybrid overlap welding the macro-appearance of the joint was cup-shaped, the top weld showed the hybrid welding microstructure, while, the lower weld showed the typical laser welding microstructure.

  13. Statistical analyses of fracture toughness results for two irradiated high-copper welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanstad, R.K.; McCabe, D.E.; Haggag, F.M.; Bowman, K.O.; Downing, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    The objectives of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program Fifth Irradiation Series were to determine the effects of neutron irradiation on the transition temperature shift and the shape of the K Ic curve described in Sect. 6 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31% were commercially fabricated in 215-mm-thick plates. Charpy V-notch (CVN) impact, tensile, drop-weight, and compact specimens up to 203.2 mm thick [1T, 2T, 4T, 6T, and 8T C(T)] were tested to provide a large data base for unirradiated material. Similar specimens with compacts up to 4T were irradiated at about 288 degrees C to a mean fluence of about 1.5 x 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 (>1 MeV) in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. Both linear-elastic and elastic-plastic fracture mechanics methods were used to analyze all cleavage fracture results and local cleavage instabilities (pop-ins). Evaluation of the results showed that the cleavage fracture toughness values determined at initial pop-ins fall within the same scatter band as the values from failed specimens; thus, they were included in the data base for analysis (all data are designated K Jc )

  14. TIG welding power supply with improved efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Сергій Володимирович Гулаков

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the influence of the DC component of the welding current during TIG (Tungsten Inert Gas welding is discussed. Known methods of DC current cancellation are reviewed, such as capacitor bank or diode/thyristor network insertion in the secondary circuit of the welding transformer. A new method of controlling the magnitude and shape of the TIG welding current is proposed. The idea is to insert a controlled voltage source in the secondary circuit of the welding transformer. This controlled voltage source is realized using a full-bridge voltage source inverter (VSI. VSI control system design issues are discussed. VSI is controlled by a three-level hysteretic current controller, while current reference is generated using lookup table driven by PLL (Phase Locked Loop locked to the mains frequency. Simulation results are shown. The proposed topology of TIG power supply allows to provide magnitude and shape control of the welding current, with the limitation that its DC component must be zero. Thus, some capabilities of professional AC-TIG welders are obtained using substantially lower cost components: VSI built using high-current low voltage MOSFETs with control system based on 32-bit ARM microcontroller. The use of proposed TIG welding power supply will eliminate the DC component of the welding current, improve welding transformer’s power factor and improve welding technology by increasing the welding arc stability

  15. Microstructural and Mechanical Properties of Welded High Strength Steel Plate Using SMAW and SAW Method for LPG Storage Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winarto, Winarto; Riastuti, Rini; Kumeidi, Nur

    2018-03-01

    Indonesian government policy to convert energy consumption for domestic household from kerosene to liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) may lead to the increasing demand for LPG storage tank. LPG storage tank with a large capacity generally used the HSLA steel material of ASTM A516 Grade 70 joined by SMAW or combination between SMAW and SAW method. The heat input can affect the microstructure and mechanical properties of the weld area. The input heat is proportional to the welding current and the arc voltage, but inversely proportional to its welding speed. The result shows that the combination of SMAW-SAW process yield the lower hardness in the HAZ and the fusion zone compared to the singe SMAW process. PWHT mainly applied to reduce residual stress of welded joint. The result shows that PWHT can reduce the hardness in the HAZ and the fusion zone in comparing with the singe SMAW process. The microstructure of weld joint shows a coarser structure in the combined welding process (SMAW-SAW) comparing with the single welding process (SMAW).

  16. Laser patterning and welding of transparent polymers for microfluidic device fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleging, W.; Baldus, O.

    2006-02-01

    CO II-laser-assisted micro-patterning of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) or cyclo-olefin copolymer (COC) has a great potential for the rapid manufacturing of polymeric devices including cutting and structuring. Channel widths of about 50 μm as well as large area patterning of reservoir structures or drilling of vias are established. For this purpose a high quality laser beam is necessary as well as an appropriate beam forming system. In combination with laser transmission welding a fast fabrication of two- and three-dimensional micro-fluidic devices was possible. Welding as well as multilayer welding of transparent polymers was investigated for different polymers such as PMMA, polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF), COC, and polystyrene (PS). The laser transmission welding process is performed with a high-power diode laser (wavelength 940 nm). An absorption layer with a thickness of several nanometers is deposited onto the polymer surfaces. The welding process has been established for the welding of polymeric parts containing microchannels, if the width of the channels is equal or larger than 100μm. For smaller feature sizes the absorption layer is structured by UV-laser radiation in order to get a highly localized welding seam, e.g., for the limitation of thermal penetration and thermal damaging of functional features such as channels, thin walls or temperature-sensitive substances often contained in micro-fluidic devices. This process strategy was investigated for the welding of capillary electrophoresis chips and capillary blood separation chips, including channel widths of 100 μm and 30 μm. Analysis of the thickness of the absorption layer was carried out with optical transmission spectroscopy.

  17. Thermo-mechanical modelling of high temperature crack growth in electron beam welding of a CuCrZr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisniewski, J.

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this research thesis is to find out which crack initiation criteria can be applied in the case of electron beam welding of CuCrZr alloy components. After a literature survey on the high temperature cracking phenomenon, the author describes its microscopic origins and presents the main high temperature crack growth criteria. He reports metallurgical, thermal and mechanical characterizations of the studied alloy performed by optical, scanning electronic and transmission electronic microscopy, crystallographic analysis, residual stress determination using the hole method, mechanical testing at room and high temperature (from room temperature to 1000 C), determination of solidification route and of thermal conductivity, and thermal expansion measurements. He describes electron beam weldability tests performed on the alloy. As these tests are performed on simple geometry samples, they allow the high temperature crack growth to be observed. These experiments are then modelled using two finite element codes, Castem and Calcosoft. Then, after a presentation of the main hypotheses used in these numerical models, the author applies the high temperature crack growth criteria. Results obtained for theses criteria are then analysed and discussed

  18. Friction Stir Welding of Low-Carbon AISI 1006 Steel: Room and High-Temperature Mechanical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shunmugasamy, Vasanth C.; Mansoor, Bilal; Ayoub, Georges; Hamade, Ramsey

    2018-03-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is an ecologically benign solid-state joining process. In this work, FSW of low-carbon AISI 1006 steel was carried out to study the microstructure and mechanical properties of the resulting joints at both room temperature (RT) and 200 °C. In the parameter space investigated here, a rotational tool speed and translation feed combination of 1200 rpm and 60 mm/min produced a defect-free weld with balanced mechanical properties and a superior Vickers microhardness profile compared to all other conditions and to base metal (BM). At faster translation feeds (100 and 150 mm/min), wormhole defects were observed in the weld microstructure and were attributed to higher strain rate experienced by the weld zone. Under tensile loading, welded material exhibited yield strength that was up to 86 and 91% of the BM at RT and 200 °C, respectively. On the other hand, tensile strength of welded material was nearly similar to that of the base metal at both RT and 200 °C. However, at both temperatures the tensile ductility of the welded joints was observed to be significantly lower than the BM. Annealing of the 1200 rpm and 60 mm/min FSW specimen resulted in tensile strength of 102% compared to base material and 47% increase in the strain at failure compared to the as-welded specimen. The Charpy impact values revealed up to 62 and 53% increase in the specific impact energy for the 1200 rpm and 60 mm/min welded joints as compared with the BM.

  19. Simulation of Welding Distortions in Theory and Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birk-Sørensen, Martin; Kierkegaard, Henning

    1997-01-01

    by an optimised welding order. Welding test samples prove that the constraint of the sample and the time between each pass in a multipass weld affect the magnitude of distortion. Experiments with welding specimens in the form of butt-and fillet welds have been carried out. They show angular deflections as well......In the last few years the use of robot welding processes has increased significatnly. The programming of the robots has until now mainly focused on high efficiency, i.e.high torch rate time, and hence, minimising the inefficient "travelling" time. Together with developing high-performance welding...... due to cutting and welding and parlty in the form of dimensional variation due to human factors. Measurements have been made of the production line for assemblies. The measurements show that distortions related to the multirobot welding are a factor which can rather easily be controlled...

  20. FSW of Aluminum Tailor Welded Blanks across Machine Platforms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovanski, Yuri; Upadhyay, Piyush; Carlson, Blair; Szymanski, Robert; Luzanski, Tom; Marshall, Dustin

    2015-02-16

    Development and characterization of friction stir welded aluminum tailor welded blanks was successfully carried out on three separate machine platforms. Each was a commercially available, gantry style, multi-axis machine designed specifically for friction stir welding. Weld parameters were developed to support high volume production of dissimilar thickness aluminum tailor welded blanks at speeds of 3 m/min and greater. Parameters originally developed on an ultra-high stiffness servo driven machine where first transferred to a high stiffness servo-hydraulic friction stir welding machine, and subsequently transferred to a purpose built machine designed to accommodate thin sheet aluminum welding. The inherent beam stiffness, bearing compliance, and control system for each machine were distinctly unique, which posed specific challenges in transferring welding parameters across machine platforms. This work documents the challenges imposed by successfully transferring weld parameters from machine to machine, produced from different manufacturers and with unique control systems and interfaces.

  1. Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Meibian; Jian, Le; Bin, Pingfan; Xing, Mingluan; Lou, Jianlin; Cong, Liming; Zou, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process in an automobile manufacturing factory was investigated using a combination of multiple metrics and a comparison with background particles. The number concentration (NC), lung-deposited surface area concentration (SAC), estimated SAC and mass concentration (MC) of nanoparticles produced from the GMAW process were significantly higher than those of background particles before welding (P < 0.01). A bimodal size distribution by mass for welding particles with two peak values (i.e., 10,000–18,000 and 560–320 nm) and a unimodal size distribution by number with 190.7-nm mode size or 154.9-nm geometric size were observed. Nanoparticles by number comprised 60.7 % of particles, whereas nanoparticles by mass only accounted for 18.2 % of the total particles. The morphology of welding particles was dominated by the formation of chain-like agglomerates of primary particles. The metal composition of these welding particles consisted primarily of Fe, Mn, and Zn. The size distribution, morphology, and elemental compositions of welding particles were significantly different from background particles. Working activities, sampling distances from the source, air velocity, engineering control measures, and background particles in working places had significant influences on concentrations of airborne nanoparticle. In addition, SAC showed a high correlation with NC and a relatively low correlation with MC. These findings indicate that the GMAW process is able to generate significant levels of nanoparticles. It is recommended that a combination of multiple metrics is measured as part of a well-designed sampling strategy for airborne nanoparticles. Key exposure factors, such as particle agglomeration/aggregation, background particles, working activities, temporal and spatial distributions of the particles, air velocity, engineering control measures, should be investigated when measuring workplace

  2. Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Meibian [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Jian, Le [Curtin University of Technology, School of Public Health, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute (Australia); Bin, Pingfan [Wujin District Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Xing, Mingluan [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China); Lou, Jianlin [Zhejiang Academy of Medical Sciences (China); Cong, Liming; Zou, Hua, E-mail: hzou@cdc.zj.cn [Zhejiang Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China)

    2013-11-15

    Workplace exposure to nanoparticles from gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process in an automobile manufacturing factory was investigated using a combination of multiple metrics and a comparison with background particles. The number concentration (NC), lung-deposited surface area concentration (SAC), estimated SAC and mass concentration (MC) of nanoparticles produced from the GMAW process were significantly higher than those of background particles before welding (P < 0.01). A bimodal size distribution by mass for welding particles with two peak values (i.e., 10,000–18,000 and 560–320 nm) and a unimodal size distribution by number with 190.7-nm mode size or 154.9-nm geometric size were observed. Nanoparticles by number comprised 60.7 % of particles, whereas nanoparticles by mass only accounted for 18.2 % of the total particles. The morphology of welding particles was dominated by the formation of chain-like agglomerates of primary particles. The metal composition of these welding particles consisted primarily of Fe, Mn, and Zn. The size distribution, morphology, and elemental compositions of welding particles were significantly different from background particles. Working activities, sampling distances from the source, air velocity, engineering control measures, and background particles in working places had significant influences on concentrations of airborne nanoparticle. In addition, SAC showed a high correlation with NC and a relatively low correlation with MC. These findings indicate that the GMAW process is able to generate significant levels of nanoparticles. It is recommended that a combination of multiple metrics is measured as part of a well-designed sampling strategy for airborne nanoparticles. Key exposure factors, such as particle agglomeration/aggregation, background particles, working activities, temporal and spatial distributions of the particles, air velocity, engineering control measures, should be investigated when measuring workplace

  3. Laser welding of aluminium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Forsman, Tomas

    2000-01-01

    This thesis treats laser welding of aluminium alloys from a practical perspective with elements of mathematical analysis. The theoretical work has in all cases been verified experimentally. The aluminium alloys studied are from the 5xxx and 6xxx groups which are common for example in the automotive industry. Aluminium has many unique physical properties. The properties which more than others have been shown to influence the welding process is its high reflection, high thermal conductivity, lo...

  4. Micro-jet Cooling by Compressed Air after MAG Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węgrzyn T.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The material selected for this investigation was low alloy steel weld metal deposit (WMD after MAG welding with micro-jet cooling. The present investigation was aimed as the following tasks: analyze impact toughness of WMD in terms of micro-jet cooling parameters. Weld metal deposit (WMD was first time carried out for MAG welding with micro-jet cooling of compressed air and gas mixture of argon and air. Until that moment only argon, helium and nitrogen and its gas mixture were tested for micro-jet cooling.

  5. Micro-jet Cooling by Compressed Air after MAG Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Węgrzyn T.; Piwnik J.; Tarasiuk W.; Stanik Z.; Gabrylewski M.

    2016-01-01

    The material selected for this investigation was low alloy steel weld metal deposit (WMD) after MAG welding with micro-jet cooling. The present investigation was aimed as the following tasks: analyze impact toughness of WMD in terms of micro-jet cooling parameters. Weld metal deposit (WMD) was first time carried out for MAG welding with micro-jet cooling of compressed air and gas mixture of argon and air. Until that moment only argon, helium and nitrogen and its gas mixture were tested for mi...

  6. Peening as a stress relieving method for welded joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, M.L.R.

    1984-01-01

    The efficacy of the process of stress relieving by hammer-peening, in heavy plates of low carbon steel is analysed. The effects of peening in the mechanical properties of welded metal deposited by shield metal arc welding, using the electrodes E-6010, E-7018 and E-8018C-2, and the weld metal deposited by submerged arc welding, using the filler metals ENil and EA3, are also analysed. X-ray diffraction was used in order to verify the efficacy of peening as a stress-relieving process. The obtained results and the literature reviewed show that, peening is effective in stress relieving. (author) [pt

  7. High-definition radiography of tube-to-tubesheet welds of steam generator of prototype fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatraman, B.; Sethi, V.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Raj, B.

    1995-01-01

    In the steam generator of the Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR), steam is generated by the transfer of heat from secondary sodium to water. Due to the inherent dangers of sodium-water reaction, the integrity of weld joints separating sodium and water/steam is of paramount importance. This is particularly true and very important for the tube-to-tubesheet joints. This paper discusses the use of projective magnification technique by microfocal radiography for the quality evaluation and optimisation of the welding parameters of such small tube-to-tubesheet welds of the steam generator of PFBR. (author)

  8. Attachment of lead wires to thin film thermocouples mounted on high temperature materials using the parallel gap welding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, Raymond; Kim, Walter S.; Pencil, Eric; Groth, Mary; Danzey, Gerald A.

    1990-01-01

    Parallel gap resistance welding was used to attach lead wires to sputtered thin film sensors. Ranges of optimum welding parameters to produce an acceptable weld were determined. The thin film sensors were Pt13Rh/Pt thermocouples; they were mounted on substrates of MCrAlY-coated superalloys, aluminum oxide, silicon carbide and silicon nitride. The entire sensor system is designed to be used on aircraft engine parts. These sensor systems, including the thin-film-to-lead-wire connectors, were tested to 1000 C.

  9. Thermal deposition of intact tetrairon(III) single-molecule magnets in high-vacuum conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margheriti, Ludovica; Mannini, Matteo; Sorace, Lorenzo; Gorini, Lapo; Gatteschi, Dante; Caneschi, Andrea; Chiappe, Daniele; Moroni, Riccardo; de Mongeot, Francesco Buatier; Cornia, Andrea; Piras, Federica M; Magnani, Agnese; Sessoli, Roberta

    2009-06-01

    A tetrairon(III) single-molecule magnet is deposited using a thermal evaporation technique in high vacuum. The chemical integrity is demonstrated by time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry on a film deposited on Al foil, while superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry and alternating current susceptometry of a film deposited on a kapton substrate show magnetic properties identical to the pristine powder. High-frequency electron paramagnetic resonance spectra confirm the characteristic behavior for a system with S = 5 and a large Ising-type magnetic anisotropy. All these results indicate that the molecules are not damaged during the deposition procedure keeping intact the single-molecule magnet behavior.

  10. Novel Process Revolutionizes Welding Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Glenn Research Center, Delphi Corporation, and the Michigan Research Institute entered into a research project to study the use of Deformation Resistance Welding (DRW) in the construction and repair of stationary structures with multiple geometries and dissimilar materials, such as those NASA might use on the Moon or Mars. Traditional welding technologies are burdened by significant business and engineering challenges, including high costs of equipment and labor, heat-affected zones, limited automation, and inconsistent quality. DRW addresses each of those issues, while drastically reducing welding, manufacturing, and maintenance costs.

  11. Pulsed laser deposition of high Tc superconducting thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.K.; Narayan, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the pulsed laser evaporation (PLE) technique for deposition of thin films characterized by a number of unique properties. Based on the experimental characteristics, a theoretical model is developed which considers the formation and anisotropic three dimensional expansion of the laser generated plasma. This model explains most of the experimental features observed in PLE. We have also employed the PLE technique for in-situ fabrication of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 superconducting thin films on different substrates in the temperature range of 500--650 degrees C. At temperatures below 600 degrees C, a biased interposing ring between the substrate and the target was found to significantly improve the superconducting properties. The minimum ion channeling yields were between 3--3.5% for films deposited on (100) SrTiO 3 and (100) LaAlO 3 substrates

  12. The characteristics of welded joints for air conditioning application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weglowski, M. St.; Weglowska, A.; Miara, D.; Kwiecinski, K.; Błacha, S.; Dworak, J.; Rykala, J.; Pikula, J.; Ziobro, G.; Szafron, A.; Zimierska-Nowak, P.; Richert, M.; Noga, P.

    2017-10-01

    In the paper the results of metallographic examination of welded joints for air-conditioning elements are presented. The European directives 2006/40/EC on the greenhouse gasses elimination demand to stop using traditional refrigerant and to change it to R744 (CO2) medium in air conditioning installation. The R744 refrigerant is environmental friendly medium if compared with standard solution such as R12, R134a or R1234yf and safer for passengers than R1234yf. The non-standard thermodynamic parameters of the R744 which translate into high pressure and high temperature require specific materials to develop the shape and to specify the technology of manufacturing for the particular elements of the conduits and moreover the technologies of joining for the whole structure, which would meet the exploitation requirements of the new air-conditioning system. To produce the test welded joints of stainless steels four different joining technologies were applied: laser welding, plasma welding, electron beam welding as well as high speed rotation welding. This paper describes the influence of the selected welding process on the macrostructure and microstructure of welded joints of AISI 304 and AISI 316L steels. The results indicated that plasma welding laser welding and electron beam welding technologies guaranty the proper quality of welded joints and can be used for the air conditioning application in automotive industry. However, high speed rotation welding not guarantee the good quality of welded joints and cannot be used for above application.

  13. Braze welding of cobalt with a silver–copper filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everett M. Criss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of joining cobalt by braze-welding it with a silver–copper filler was developed in order to better understand the residual stresses in beryllium–aluminum/silicon weldments which are problematic to investigate because of the high toxicity of Be. The base and filler metals of this new welding system were selected to replicate the physical properties, crystal structures, and chemical behavior of the Be–AlSi welds. Welding parameters of this surrogate Co–AgCu system were determined by experimentation combining 4-point bending tests and microscopy. Final welds are 5 pass manual TIG (tungsten inert gas, with He top gas and Ar back gas. Control of the welding process produces welds with full penetration melting of the cobalt base. Microscopy indicates that cracking is minimal, and not through thickness, whereas 4-point bending shows failure is not by base-filler delamination. These welds improve upon the original Be–AlSi welds, which do not possess full penetration, and have considerable porosity. We propose that utilization of our welding methods will increase the strength of the Be–AlSi weldments. The specialized welding techniques developed for this study may be applicable not only for the parent Be–AlSi welds, but to braze welds and welds utilizing brittle materials in general. This concept of surrogacy may prove useful in the study of many different types of exotic welds.

  14. Waste canister closure welding using the inertia friction welding process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, R.F.; Siemens, D.H.; Kuruzar, D.L.

    1986-02-01

    Liquid radioactive waste presently stored in underground tanks is to undergo a vitrifying process which will immobilize it in a solid form. This solid waste will be contained in a stainless steel canister. The canister opening requires a positive seal weld, the properties and thickness of which are at least equal to those of the canister material. This paper describes the inertia friction welding process and a proposed equipment design concept that will provide a positive, reliable, inspectable, and full thickness seal weld while providing easily maintainable equipment, even though the weld is made in a highly contaminated hot cell. All studies and tests performed have shown the concept to be highly feasible. 2 refs., 6 figs

  15. Welding repair of the high-intermediate pressure steam casings made of Cr-Mo and Cr-Mo-V steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazur, Z.; Cristalinas, V.; Kubiak, J.

    1996-01-01

    An analysis of typical failure causes and their location at high-intermediate pressure steam turbine casing, and weldability analysis of the Cr-Mo and Cr-Mo-V steels, is carried out. basing on the steam turbine of 158 MW capacity, the internal high pressure casing failures and development of in situ repair welding technology is described. After repair, the casing was put back into service

  16. Modelling of microstructural creep damage in welded joints of 316L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouche, G.

    2000-01-01

    Welded joints of 316L stainless steel under service conditions at elevated temperature are known to be preferential sites of creep damage, as compared to the base material. This damage results in the formation of cavities and the development of creep cracks which can lead to a premature failure of welded components. The complex two-phase microstructure of 316L welds was simulated by manually filling a mould with longitudinal deposited weld beads. The moulded material was then aged during 2000 hours at 600 deg. C. High resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy was largely used to examine the microstructure of the simulated material before and after ageing. Smooth and notched creep specimens were cut from the mould and tested at 600 deg. C under various stress levels. A comparison of the lifetime versus nominal stress curves for the base and welded materials shows a greater dependence of the welded material to creep phenomena. Observation and EBSD analysis show that damage is preferentially located along the austenite grain boundaries. The stress and strain fields in the notched specimens were calculated by finite element method. A correlation of this field to the observed damage was made in order to propose a predictive law relating the creep damage to the mechanical conditions applied locally. Further mechanical tests and simulation on CT specimens and mode II tubular specimens allowed validating the model under various multiaxial loading conditions. (author)

  17. 10,170 flawless welds

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    The welding of tubes containing the principal current-carrying busbars in the LHC magnets was one of the main activities of the SMACC project. After a year of preparation and another of intense activity in the tunnel, the last weld was completed on Wednesday 14 May. Over 10,170 welds have been inspected and not a single fault has been found.    The welder (above) creates the weld using an orbital welding machine (below) specifically designed for CERN. Each of the eight sectors of the LHC contains around 210 interconnects between the superconducting magnets. Consolidating these interconnections was the SMACC project’s primary objective. One of the last jobs before closing the interconnects is the welding of the M lines: each has a 104 mm diameter and a radial clearance of just 45 mm. In total: 10,170 welds carried out in a single year of activities. A true challenge, which was carried out by a team of 30 highly specialised welders, working under the supervision o...

  18. Study of Gravity Effects on Titanium Laser Welding in the Vertical Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Baohua; Yuan, Zhang; Pu, Haitao; Li, Haigang; Cheng, Hao; Du, Dong; Shan, Jiguo

    2017-09-08

    To obtain satisfactory welds in positional laser beam welding, it is necessary to know how process parameters will influence the quality of welds in different welding positions. In this study, the titanium alloy Ti6Al4V sheets were laser welded in two vertical welding positions (vertical up and vertical down), and the appearance, porosity, strength, and ductility of the laser joints were evaluated. Results show that undercuts of the vertical up welds were greater than that of vertical down welds, while the porosity contents were much higher in vertical down welds than that in vertical up welds. When welding with a higher heat input, the vertical up welding position resulted in poor weld profiles (undercuts and burn-through holes), whereas the vertical down welding position led to excessive porosity contents in welds. Both severe undercut and excessive porosity were detrimental to the tensile properties of the welds. Weld appearance was improved and porosity contents were reduced by using a lower heat input, achieving better weld quality. Therefore, it is suggested that process parameter settings with relatively high laser powers and welding speeds, which can result in lower heat inputs, are used when laser welding the Ti6Al4V titanium alloys vertically.

  19. Fabrication and evaluation of chemically vapor deposited tungsten heat pipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigalupi, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    A network of lithium-filled tungsten heat pipes is being considered as a method of heat extraction from high temperature nuclear reactors. The need for material purity and shape versatility in these applications dictates the use of chemically vapor deposited (CVD) tungsten. Adaptability of CVD tungsten to complex heat pipe designs is shown. Deposition and welding techniques are described. Operation of two lithium-filled CVD tungsten heat pipes above 1800 K is discussed.

  20. An Evaluation on the Residual Stresses Induced by EFR Welding of CEDM Nozzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Ho; Park, Gi Yeol; Kim, Tae Ryong [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, carried out the welding analysis to use the SYSWELD as welding interpretation code based on the reactor upper head nozzle. In this paper, evaluated the residual stress in CEDM nozzle by EFR through the SYSWELD which is the welding interpretation code. The conclusion are same as below. 1) When comparing with Hoop Stress and Axial Stress by J-Groove and EFR, after welding residual stress by EFR is lower than after J-Groove. 2) After EFR, it was confirmed that the tensile stress is reduced after increasing over the point3. The PWSCC of Dissimilar Metal Zone of reactor can degrade the integrity of the main device in nuclear power plant, and according to the power plant stopped for inspection, it can cause an enormous amount of lost sales when the crack is occurred. Various methods have been developed to reduce residual stress to prevent the PWSCC like Weld Overlay (WOL), Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (Msp), Laser Peening, Inlay Weld, etc. Among them, Wol is the most commonly used welding method in nuclear power plant. When performing a Wol, structure rigidity will be increase, and residual stress of welding zone will be changed into compressive stress from the tensile stress. This has the advantage that improved resistance to PWSCC. The most commonly used material in nuclear power plant is Inconel 600. Inconel 600 consist of a Ni-Cr-Fe and it has 14-17% of Cr content, 10% of Fe content and susceptible to PWSCC. The more Cr content is more stronger against PWSCC. Inconel 690 which has 2 times more Cr content than Inconel 600 has very strong resistance to PWSCC than Inconel 600. Embedded Flaw Repair (EFR) has been developed in Westinghouse by 1994. The welding metal with high corrosion resistance is embedded on the surface of component, and could protect cracking part from the PWSCC. It is permanent repair method that isolates the flaw from the environment, eliminating further crack propagation due to PWSCC. EFR method is that at least three layers

  1. WELDABILITY, WELDING METALLURGY, WELDING CHEMISTRY

    OpenAIRE

    Sarjito Jokosisworo

    2012-01-01

    Sambungan las merupakan bagian penting dari stuktur/bangunan yang dilas, dan kunci dari logam induk yang baik adalah kemampuan las (weld ability). Kemampuan las yang baik dan kemudahan dalam fabrikasi dari suatu logam merupakan pertimbangan dalam memilih suatu logam untuk konstruksi.

  2. Development of Alternative Technology to PWHT in Site Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, B. S.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, K. H.; Park, S. D.; Yoon, J. H.; Kim, M. C.; Kim, K. B.; Sung, K. W

    2007-04-15

    ASME Section IX added requirements for qualification when using temper bead welding in the 2004 edition. The temper bead welding techniques which can satisfy the requirements of the Code are needed to use them in the site repair welding. The optimized welding parameters can be obtained when controlling the process to supercritically-reheat and to subcritically-reheat the coarse grain region sequently. The microstructures of SCFGCG obtained from the Gleegle simulated specimens and those of post weld heat treated coarse grain region are compared. The obtained both microstructures showed almost similar patterns. mid bead deposition technique Suggested in this study has a technical concept that the mid beads are deposited between the deposited initial beads repeatedly in a bead layer, which gives a lot of reheating effects on brittle microstructure in HAZ. This newly suggested technique is considered to have more effective tempering effect than the conventional temper bead technique which has concept to deposit one type of beads in a bead layer. The suggested modeling in this study can simulate well the SMAW process. Hence this modeling was used in analyzing the more complicated welding process of multi-layer welding. The modeling was used to analyze the tempering effect on the microstructures of HAZ by considering the patterns of overlapping of the reheating regions under the consequently deposited beads. When considering the crack path in the ever-matched weld metal condition, the interface may have a resistance against the crack propagation. A182 filler and A625 filler were used to make the weld specimens which have different weld metal conditions. The crack directed toward the under-matched weld metal may propagate across the fusion line easier than that of the even-matched weld metal condition.

  3. Development of Alternative Technology to PWHT in Site Welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ho Jin; Lee, B. S.; Jang, J. S.; Kim, K. H.; Park, S. D.; Yoon, J. H.; Kim, M. C.; Kim, K. B.; Sung, K. W.

    2007-04-01

    ASME Section IX added requirements for qualification when using temper bead welding in the 2004 edition. The temper bead welding techniques which can satisfy the requirements of the Code are needed to use them in the site repair welding. The optimized welding parameters can be obtained when controlling the process to supercritically-reheat and to subcritically-reheat the coarse grain region sequently. The microstructures of SCFGCG obtained from the Gleegle simulated specimens and those of post weld heat treated coarse grain region are compared. The obtained both microstructures showed almost similar patterns. mid bead deposition technique Suggested in this study has a technical concept that the mid beads are deposited between the deposited initial beads repeatedly in a bead layer, which gives a lot of reheating effects on brittle microstructure in HAZ. This newly suggested technique is considered to have more effective tempering effect than the conventional temper bead technique which has concept to deposit one type of beads in a bead layer. The suggested modeling in this study can simulate well the SMAW process. Hence this modeling was used in analyzing the more complicated welding process of multi-layer welding. The modeling was used to analyze the tempering effect on the microstructures of HAZ by considering the patterns of overlapping of the reheating regions under the consequently deposited beads. When considering the crack path in the ever-matched weld metal condition, the interface may have a resistance against the crack propagation. A182 filler and A625 filler were used to make the weld specimens which have different weld metal conditions. The crack directed toward the under-matched weld metal may propagate across the fusion line easier than that of the even-matched weld metal condition

  4. The role of nitrogen in improving pitting corrosion resistance of high-alloy austenitic and duplex stainless steel welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilpas, M.; Haenninen, H.

    1999-01-01

    The effects of nitrogen alloyed shielding gas on weld nitrogen content and pitting corrosion resistance of super austenitic (6%Mo) and super duplex stainless steels have been studied with special emphasis on microsegregation behaviour of Cr, Mo and N. The measurements performed with the 6%Mo steel indicate that all these elements segregate interdendritically in the fully austenitic weld metal. With nitrogen addition to the shielding gas the enrichment of nitrogen to the interdendritic regions is more pronounced than to the dendrite cores due to which the pitting corrosion resistance of the dendrite cores increases only marginally. In the super duplex steel welds nitrogen enriches in austenite increasing its pitting corrosion resistance more effectively. In these welds the pitting corrosion resistance of the ferrite phase remains lower. (orig.)

  5. Welding characteristics of 27, 40 and 67 kHz ultrasonic plastic welding systems using fundamental- and higher-resonance frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Hongoh, Misugi; Yoshikuni, Masafumi; Hashii, Hidekazu; Ueoka, Tetsugi

    2004-04-01

    The welding characteristics of 27, 40 and 67 kHz ultrasonic plastic welding systems that are driven at only the fundamental-resonance frequency vibration were compared, and also those of the welding systems that were driven at the fundamental and several higher resonance frequencies simultaneously were studied. At high frequency, welding characteristics can be improved due to the larger vibration loss of plastic materials. For welding of rather thin or small specimens, as the fundamental frequency of these welding systems is higher and the numbers of driven higher frequencies are driven simultaneously, larger welded area and weld strength were obtained.

  6. Development of filler wires for welding of reduced activation ferritic martenstic steel for India's test blanket module of ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, G., E-mail: gsrini@igcar.gov.in [Materials Technology Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamilnadu (India); Arivazhagan, B.; Albert, S.K.; Bhaduri, A.K. [Materials Technology Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamilnadu (India)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > Weld microstructure produced by RAFMS filler wires are free from delta ferrite. > Cooling rates of by weld thermal cycles influences the presence of delta ferrite. > Weld parameters modified with higher pre heat temperature and high heat input. > PWHT optimized based on correlation of hardness between base and weld metals. > Optimised mechanical properties achieved by proper tempering of the martensite. - Abstract: Indigenous development of reduced activation ferritic martensitic steel (RAFMS) has become mandatory to India to participate in the International Thermo-nuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) programme. Optimisation of RAFMS is in an advanced stage for the fabrication of test blanket module (TBM) components. Simultaneously, development of RAFMS filler wires has been undertaken since there is no commercial filler wires are available for fabrication of components using RAFMS. Purpose of this study is to develop filler wires that can be directly used for both tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) and narrow gap tungsten inert gas welding (NG-TIG), which reduces the deposited weld metal volume and heat affected zone (HAZ) width. Further, the filler wires would also be used for hybrid laser welding for thick section joints. In view of meeting all the requirements, a detailed specification was prepared for the development of filler wires for welding of RAFM steel. Meanwhile, autogenous welding trials have been carried out on 2.5 mm thick plates of the RAFM steel using TIG process at various heat inputs with a preheat temperature of 250 deg. C followed by various post weld heat treatments (PWHT). The microstructure of the weld metal in most of the cases showed the presence of some delta-ferrite. Filler wires as per specifications have also been developed with minor variations on the chemistry against the specified values. Welding parameters and PWHT parameters were optimised to qualify the filler wires without the presence of delta-ferrite in the weld

  7. Friction welded closures of waste canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, R.F.

    1987-01-01

    Liquid radioactive waste presently stored in underground tanks is to undergo a vitrifying process which will immobilize it into a solid form. This solid waste will be contained in a stainless steel canister. The canister opening requires a positive-seal weld, the properties and thickness of which must be at least equal to those of the canister material. All studies and tests performed in the work discussed in this paper have the inertia friction welding concept to be highly feasible in this application. This paper describes the decision to investigate the inertia friction welding process, the inertia friction welding process itself, and a proposed equipment design concept. This system would provide a positive, reliable, inspectable, and full-thickness seal weld while utilizing easily maintainable equipment. This high-quality weld can be achieved even in highly contaminated hot cell

  8. Underwater laser beam welding of Alloy 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Takehisa; Tamura, Masataka; Kono, Wataru; Kawano, Shohei; Yoda, Masaki

    2009-01-01

    Stress Corrosion Clacking (SCC) has been reported at Alloy 600 welds between nozzles and safe-end in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) plant. Alloy 690, which has higher chromium content than Alloy 600, has been applied for cladding on Alloy 600 welds for repairing damaged SCC area. Toshiba has developed Underwater Laser Beam Welding technique. This method can be conducted without draining, so that the repairing period and the radiation exposure during the repair can be dramatically decreased. In some old PWRs, high-sulfur stainless steel is used as the materials for this section. It has a high susceptibility of weld cracks. Therefore, the optimum welding condition of Alloy 690 on the high-sulfur stainless steel was investigated with our Underwater Laser Beam Welding unit. Good cladding layer, without any crack, porosity or lack of fusion, could be obtained. (author)

  9. Pulsed magnetic welding application of fast breeder austenitic pins plugging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallizzi, H.; Colombe, G.

    1986-11-01

    For specific nuclear needs, we had to develop pulsed magnetic welding on high resistivity coefficient alloys as austenitic steels. The magnetic force produced by an explosive inductor is transmitted on weld pieces by the use of an aluminium driver. A theoretical work carried out permitted to compare pulsed magnetic welding with explosive welding. With specific recordings, it was possible to study electrical and magnetical behavior during the active welding phase. By means of these informations, we are able to specify and to realize, with the financial help of ANVAR organization, a low impedance high velocity generator permitting to weld with a non destructible inductor. 6 refs [fr

  10. Corrosion resistance of welded joints in 08Kh22N6T and 08Kh21N6M2T steels made with new electrodes