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Sample records for high deductible health

  1. Deductibles in health insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriyadis, I.; Öney, Ü. N.

    2009-11-01

    This study is an extension to a simulation study that has been developed to determine ruin probabilities in health insurance. The study concentrates on inpatient and outpatient benefits for customers of varying age bands. Loss distributions are modelled through the Allianz tool pack for different classes of insureds. Premiums at different levels of deductibles are derived in the simulation and ruin probabilities are computed assuming a linear loading on the premium. The increase in the probability of ruin at high levels of the deductible clearly shows the insufficiency of proportional loading in deductible premiums. The PH-transform pricing rule developed by Wang is analyzed as an alternative pricing rule. A simple case, where an insured is assumed to be an exponential utility decision maker while the insurer's pricing rule is a PH-transform is also treated.

  2. Employee choice of a high-deductible health plan across multiple employers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lave, Judith R; Men, Aiju; Day, Brian T; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Yuting

    2011-02-01

    To determine factors associated with selecting a high-deductible health plan (HDHP) rather than a preferred provider plan (PPO) and to examine switching and market segmentation after initial selection. Claims and benefit information for 2005-2007 from nine employers in western Pennsylvania first offering HDHP in 2006. We examined plan growth over time, used logistic regression to determine factors associated with choosing an HDHP, and examined the distribution of healthy and sick members across plan types. We linked employees with their dependents to determine family-level variables. We extracted risk scores, covered charges, employee age, and employee gender from claims data. We determined census-level race, education, and income information. Health status, gender, race, and education influenced the type of individual and family policies chosen. In the second year the HDHP was offered, few employees changed plans. Risk segmentation between HDHPs and PPOs existed, but it did not increase. When given a choice, those who are healthier are more likely to select an HDHP leading to risk segmentation. Risk segmentation did not increase in the second year that HDHPs were offered. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  3. Reliability of a patient survey assessing cost-related changes in health care use among high deductible health plan enrollees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galbraith Alison A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent increases in patient cost-sharing for health care have lent increasing importance to monitoring cost-related changes in health care use. Despite the widespread use of survey questions to measure changes in health care use and related behaviors, scant data exists on the reliability of such questions. Methods We administered a cross-sectional survey to a stratified random sample of families in a New England health plan's high deductible health plan (HDHP with ≥ $500 in annualized out-of-pocket expenditures. Enrollees were asked about their knowledge of their plan, information seeking, behavior change associated with having a deductible, experience of delay in care due in part to cost, and hypothetical delay in care due in part to cost. Initial respondents were mailed a follow-up survey within two weeks of each family returning the original survey. We computed several agreement statistics to measure the test-retest reliability for select questions. We also conducted continuity adjusted chi-square, and McNemar tests in both the original and follow-up samples to measure the degree to which our results could be reproduced. Analyses were stratified by self-reported income. Results The test-retest reliability was moderate for the majority of questions (0.41 - 0.60 and the level of test-retest reliability did not differ substantially across each of the broader domains of questions. The observed proportions of respondents with delayed or foregone pediatric, adult, or any family care were similar when comparing the original and follow-up surveys. In the original survey, respondents in the lower-income group were more likely to delay or forego pediatric care, adult care, or any family care. All of the tests comparing income groups in the follow-up survey produced the same result as in the original survey. Conclusions In this population of HDHP beneficiaries, we found that survey questions concerning plan knowledge, information

  4. Are the healthy behaviors of US high-deductible health plan enrollees driven by people who chose these plans? Smoking as a case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey T Kullgren

    Full Text Available To determine whether negative associations between enrollment in a high-deductible health plan (HDHP and one exemplar unhealthy behavior--daily smoking--are found only among people who chose these plans.Cross-sectional analysis of nationally-representative data.United States from 2007 to 2008.6,941 privately insured non-elderly adult participants in the 2007 Health Tracking Household Survey.Self-reported smoking status.We classified subjects as HDHP or traditional health plan enrollees with employer-sponsored insurance (ESI and no choice of plans, ESI with a choice of plans, or coverage through the non-group market. We used multivariate logistic regression to measure associations between HDHP enrollment and daily smoking within each of the 3 coverage source groups while controlling for potential confounders.HDHP enrollment was associated with lower odds of smoking among individuals with ESI and a choice of plans (AOR 0.55, 95% CI 0.33-0.90 and those with non-group coverage (AOR 0.64, 95% CI 0.34-1.22, though the latter association was not statistically significant. HDHP enrollment was not associated with lower odds of smoking among individuals with ESI and no choice of plans (AOR 1.04, 95% CI 0.69-1.56.HDHP enrollment is associated with lower odds of smoking only among individuals who chose to enroll in an HDHP. Lower rates of unhealthy behaviors among HDHP enrollees may be a reflection of individuals who choose these plans.

  5. Potential determinants of deductible uptake in health insurance: How to increase uptake in The Netherlands?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.P.M. Winssen van (Kayleigh); R.C. van Kleef (Richard); W.P.M.M. van de Ven (Wynand)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIn health insurance, voluntary deductibles are offered to the insured in return for a premium rebate. Previous research has shown that 11 % of the Dutch insured opted for a voluntary deductible (VD) in health insurance in 2014, while the highest VD level was financially profitable for

  6. Health insurance subsidies and deductible choice: Evidence from regional variation in subsidy schemes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Cornel; Schmid, Christian; Boes, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    The extent to which premium subsidies can influence health insurance choices is an open question. In this paper, we explore the regional variation in subsidy schemes in Switzerland, designed as either in-kind or cash transfers, to study their impact on the choice of health insurance deductibles. Using health survey data and a difference-in-differences methodology, we find that in-kind transfers increase the likelihood of choosing a low deductible plan by approximately 4 percentage points (or 7%). Our results indicate that the response to in-kind transfers is strongest among women, middle-aged and unmarried individuals, which we explain by differences in risk-taking behavior, health status, financial constraints, health insurance and financial literacy. We discuss our results in the light of potential extra-marginal effects on the demand for health care services, which are however not supported by our data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Potential determinants of deductible uptake in health insurance: How to increase uptake in The Netherlands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Winssen, K P M; van Kleef, R C; van de Ven, W P M M

    2016-12-01

    In health insurance, voluntary deductibles are offered to the insured in return for a premium rebate. Previous research has shown that 11 % of the Dutch insured opted for a voluntary deductible (VD) in health insurance in 2014, while the highest VD level was financially profitable for almost 50 % of the population in retrospect. To explain this discrepancy, this paper identifies and discusses six potential determinants of the decision to opt for a VD from the behavioral economic literature: loss aversion, risk attitude, ambiguity aversion, debt aversion, omission bias, and liquidity constraints. Based on these determinants, five potential strategies are proposed to increase the number of insured opting for a VD. Presenting the VD as the default option and providing transparent information regarding the VD are the two most promising strategies. If, as a result of these strategies, more insured would opt for a VD, moral hazard would be reduced.

  8. 78 FR 19949 - The $500,000 Deduction Limitation for Remuneration Provided by Certain Health Insurance Providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-02

    ... 26 CFR Part 1 The $500,000 Deduction Limitation for Remuneration Provided by Certain Health Insurance... limitation for remuneration provided by certain health insurance providers under section 162(m)(6) of the Internal Revenue Code (Code). These regulations affect health insurance providers that pay such...

  9. 42 CFR 417.158 - Payroll deductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payroll deductions. 417.158 Section 417.158 Public....158 Payroll deductions. Each employing entity that provides payroll deductions as a means of paying... employee's contribution, if any, to be paid through payroll deductions. [59 FR 49841, Sept. 30, 1994] ...

  10. A voluntary deductible in health insurance: the more years you opt for it, the lower your premium?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.P.M. Winssen van (Kayleigh); R.C. van Kleef (Richard); W.P.M.M. van de Ven (Wynand)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractAdverse selection regarding a voluntary deductible (VD) in health insurance implies that insured only opt for a VD if they expect no (or few) healthcare expenses. This paper investigates two potential strategies to reduce adverse selection: (1) differentiating the premium to the duration

  11. Exploring the Rate and Causes of Inpatient Records Deductions Covered by Iran Health Insurance: The Case of a Public Hospital in Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalda Mousa Zadeh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Today, a major part of health system resources are allocated to hospitals. So, the control of these resources and correct and efficient use of them are the important tasks of management. This study was conducted to determine the deductions of Iran health insurance in the first half of 2014 in a public hospital in Tabriz. Material and Methods: This was a cross sectional study. The study population included records of patients hospitalized in the first half of 2014.  All cases with deduction were selected as sample. Data collection was performed using a researcher-made checklist. Checklist information was collected through records of patients and interview. Then, data were analyzed using Excel software. Results: Most deductions were related to physician visits (61116000 Rials, laboratory (46881797 Rials and surgery commission (26114487 Rials, respectively. Most of the deductions were in October (70613244 Rials and lowest deductions were in February (6838945 Rials. The most important factor of deductions was related to additional request.   Conclusion: According to deduction cases and the most important factor related to it (additional request, It can be concluded that greatest amount of deductions are due to employees' mistakes. In this regard, emphasis on clinical guidelines and physicians’ training is necessary. Negotiations and clarifying the amount of liability of insurance organizations can prevent deductions.

  12. Deductive biocomputing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Shrager

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As biologists increasingly rely upon computational tools, it is imperative that they be able to appropriately apply these tools and clearly understand the methods the tools employ. Such tools must have access to all the relevant data and knowledge and, in some sense, "understand" biology so that they can serve biologists' goals appropriately and "explain" in biological terms how results are computed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe a deduction-based approach to biocomputation that semiautomatically combines knowledge, software, and data to satisfy goals expressed in a high-level biological language. The approach is implemented in an open source web-based biocomputing platform called BioDeducta, which combines SRI's SNARK theorem prover with the BioBike interactive integrated knowledge base. The biologist/user expresses a high-level conjecture, representing a biocomputational goal query, without indicating how this goal is to be achieved. A subject domain theory, represented in SNARK's logical language, transforms the terms in the conjecture into capabilities of the available resources and the background knowledge necessary to link them together. If the subject domain theory enables SNARK to prove the conjecture--that is, to find paths between the goal and BioBike resources--then the resulting proofs represent solutions to the conjecture/query. Such proofs provide provenance for each result, indicating in detail how they were computed. We demonstrate BioDeducta by showing how it can approximately replicate a previously published analysis of genes involved in the adaptation of cyanobacteria to different light niches. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Through the use of automated deduction guided by a biological subject domain theory, this work is a step towards enabling biologists to conveniently and efficiently marshal integrated knowledge, data, and computational tools toward resolving complex biological queries.

  13. HEALTH INFO SANTÉ – REMINDER ANNUAL DEDUCTIBLE AND REIMBURSEMENT CLAIMS HINTS FOR USE

    CERN Multimedia

    CHIS Board

    2000-01-01

    Information from the CHIS Board and the Human Resources Division:Annual deductible and reimbursement claims: hints for useOne should bear in mind that the annual deductible is an amount (currently CHF 100) charged automatically by the Administrator of the scheme for every adult aged 18 and above. This is what happens: The amount is deducted annually for all medical services received over a calendar year.It is triggered by the date of the treatment and neither by the date of the bill nor that of the reimbursement claim.In other words, if you receive medical treatment in December for the first time in a given year, the CHF 100 will be deducted from the claim for that treatment. So, except for urgent cases, it would be better to wait till the following month, thus avoiding one annual deductible.It is also worth remembering that the cost of processing our reimbursement claims - and there were 54, 000 in 1999 - is part of the cost of our insurance.Help keep administrative costs down: do not submit reimbursement cl...

  14. HEALTH INFO SANTE ANNUAL DEDUCTIBLE AND REIMBURSEMENT CLAIMS: HINTS FOR USE

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    Information from the CHIS Board and the Personnel DivisionOne should bear in mind that the annual deductible is an amount (currently CHF 100) charged automatically by the Administrator of the scheme for every adult aged 18 and above. This is what happens: The amount is deducted annually for all medical services received over a calendar year.It is triggered by the date of the treatment and not by the date of the bill nor that of the reimbursement claim.In other words, if you receive medical treatment in December for the first time in a given year, the CHF 100 will be deducted from the claim for that treatment. So, except for urgent cases, it would be better to wait till the following month, thus avoiding one annual deductible.It is also worth remembering that the cost of processing our reimbursement claims - and there were 55, 000 in 1998 - is part of the cost of our insurance.Help keep administrative costs down : do not submit reimbursement claims for amounts less than the annual deductible unless your claims...

  15. Deductive Puzzling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanko, Jeffrey J.

    2010-01-01

    To help fifth- through eighth-grade students develop their deductive reasoning skills, the author used a ten-week supplementary curriculum so that students could answer logic questions. The curriculum, a series of lessons built around language-independent logic puzzles, has been used in classrooms of fifth through eighth grades. In most cases,…

  16. Exploring the Rate and Causes of Deductions Imposed on Social Security and Health Insurance`s Bills Related to Inpatients in Two Hospitals Affiliated with Tabriz University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Rezvanjou

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Annually, a large amount of fees that are paid by hospitals, will not be reimbursed as deductions by health insurance which imposes irreparable financial losses on hospitals. The purpose of this study was to determine the amount of deductions imposed on social security and health insurance`s bills and its causes related to inpatients in two hospitals affiliated with Tabriz University of Medical Sciences. Material and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted in Alavi and Madani hospitals affiliated with Tabriz University of Medical Sciences by using 2015 data.  Researcher-designed checklist was used for data collecting. According to population size, census method and random sampling were used in Alavi and Madani hospitals, respectively. Gathered data were analyzed through descriptive statistics assisted by Excel v.13 software. Results: In the studied hospitals, most of the deductions in the Alavi and Madani hospitals were related to charge of surgeon and angioplasty, respectively. Also, in Alavi Hospital among deductions factors, the most repeated one was extra application in contrary to determined tariffs. In both hospitals, the role of the human factor in cases of error cannot be denied. Extra applications, inaccuracy in registration costs and lack of knowledge of the approved insurance tariffs are the main important factors influential on the deduction. Conclusion: Due to high rates of preventable deductions in both hospitals and being given the multiplicity and variety of services offered at the health centers, establishing income monitoring unit in hospitals and use of experienced staff is inevitable.

  17. The introduction of deductibles for prescription drugs in a national health insurance: Compulsory or voluntary?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.M. Bakker (Frank); R.C.J.A. van Vliet (René)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWe consider a situation of full insurance coverage for prescription drugs where, at a certain point in time, people are given the opportunity to take a deductible in exchange for a lower premium. Four determinants of this premium reduction can be considered: expected out-of-pocket

  18. 42 CFR 408.44 - Deduction from civil service annuities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Deduction from civil service annuities. 408.44... § 408.44 Deduction from civil service annuities. (a) Responsibility for deductions. If an enrollee is... service annuity, the premiums are deducted from that annuity by the Office of Personnel Management (OPM...

  19. Diagrams of natural deductions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popov, S V

    1982-01-01

    The concept of natural deductions was investigated by the author in his analysis of the complexity of deductions in propositional computations (1975). Here some natural deduction systems are considered, and an analytical procedure proposed which results in a deduction diagram for each system. Each diagram takes the form of an orientated, charge graph, features of which can be used to establish the equivalence of classes of deductions. For each of the natural deduction systems considered, a system of equivalent transformation schemes is derived, which is complete with respect to the given definition of equivalence. 2 references.

  20. Conflicting deductions from machining and other tests, concerning flow stress at high strain rates and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, T.H.C.

    1974-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the friction interaction between an En1A chip and a cemented tungsten--titanium carbide cutting tool during turning En1A on a lathe at speeds between 0.25 and 7.5 m s -1 and at feeds of 0.13 and 0.26 mm rev -1 . The mean friction stress has been measured and deductions made from chip shape measurements about the variation of the friction stress over the rake face. Three regimes of continuous chip formation were seen. In the first, the mean friction stress was independent of strain rate and temperature, in the second it depended on temperature and in the third, at the highest cutting speeds, it depended on temperature and feed. In the third regime, softening of the chip material caused by frictional heating limited the friction force, but the softening temperature depended on the heating rate of the chip material. Softening occurred at 700 0 C when the rate of heating from room temperature was 5.4 x 10 5 0 C s -1 and at 1160 0 C when the rate was 1.7 x 10 7 0 C s -1 . (U.S.)

  1. Semiotic labelled deductive systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nossum, R.T. [Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, London (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    We review the class of Semiotic Models put forward by Pospelov, as well as the Labelled Deductive Systems developed by Gabbay, and construct an embedding of Semiotic Models into Labelled Deductive Systems.

  2. MANAGEMENT OF AN ATYPICAL ANKLE SPRAIN PATIENT THROUGH HYPOTHETICO DEDUCTIVE REASONING MODEL OF CLINICAL REASONING IMPLEMENTED BY INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFICATION OF FUNCTIONING DISABILITY AND HEALTH A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Habibur Rahman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Clinical reasoning is a process by which physiotherapists interacted with patients, their family and other health- care professionals. It is the thinking process that professionals tend to apply in clinical practice. Given that novice as well as expert practitioners prefer to go through some steps while they were dealing with unfamiliar cases. This process is known as hypothetico deductive reasoning. This reasoning approach involved the generation of hypothesis based on clinical data and knowledge and testing of hypothesis through further inquiry. We are expert in musculoskeletal physiotherapy treatment and favoring the atypical history of patient we went through step by step from assessment to discharge Methods: A case based study through hypothetico deductive reasoning model of clinical reasoning. The objective of the study was to investigate the physiotherapy management strategies of an atypical ankle sprain patient through hypothetico deductive reasoning which comprised of cue acquisition, hypothesis generation, cue interpretation and hypothesis evaluation by implementing International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF. Results: The patient responded well to treatment as patient reported that 100% swelling decreased, could bear more weight (95% on foot, decrease pain (1 cm on 10 cm VAS scale, improved muscle strength by manual muscle testing by grade V in ankle planter flexors (PF as well as dorsiflexors (DF, invertors as well as evertors and the functional status of patient was improved by 80% according to lower extremity functional scale. Conclusion: Clinical reasoning is an important approach in physiotherapy. It helps the practitioners in decision making and choosing the best alternative options for the well being of patients. We think it is necessary for all practitioners to have sound propositional and non-propositional knowledge in order to provide effective management protocol for patients focusing

  3. Using payroll deduction to shelter individual health insurance from income tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Mark A; Hager, Christie L; Orentlicher, David

    2011-02-01

    To assess the impact of state laws requiring or encouraging employers to establish "section 125" cafeteria plans that shelter employees' premium contributions from tax. Available descriptive statistics, 65 key-informant interviews, and relevant documents in study states and nationally, 2008-2009. Case studies were conducted in Indiana, Massachusetts, and Missouri--three states adopting laws in 2007. Descriptive quantitative information came from insurers, regulators, and surveys of employers. In each state, 15-17 semistructured but open-ended interviews were conducted with insurance agents, insurers, government officials, and third-party administration firms, and 29 informed sources were interviewed from a national perspective or other states. Key informants were selected based on their known or reported experience, in a "snowball" fashion until saturation was reached. Interview notes were coded for systematic analysis. Finally, relevant rulings, brochures, instructions, marketing materials, and other documents were collected and analyzed. Despite the potential for substantial cost savings, use of section 125 plans to purchase individual insurance remained low in these states after 1 or 2 years. Absent a mandate, few employers were strongly motivated to offer these plans in order to retain an adequate workforce, and uncertainty about federal legality deterred doing so. For smaller employers, benefits to owners did not outweigh administrative complexities. Nevertheless, few downsides were found to states mandating or encouraging these plans. In particular, there is little evidence that many employers dropped group coverage as a result. Section 125 plans remain a limited tool for states to reduce the inequitable tax treatment of individually purchased insurance, but a complete remedy requires reform of federal tax law. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  4. THE WORLD OF TAx DEDUCTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei V. Dujov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article a study and methodological foundations of the structure of taxes and fees. Disclosed the concept of elements of tax and duty. Focuses on the nature of the concept of «tax deduction». Provides legal and the author’s interpretation of the term «tax deduction». Examples of application of a tax deduction in the value-added tax and the tax to incomes of physical persons. the conclusions about the multilateral nature of the tax deduction.

  5. The deductive spreadsheet

    CERN Document Server

    Cervesato, Iliano

    2013-01-01

    This book describes recent multidisciplinary research at the confluence of the fields of logic programming, database theory and human-computer interaction. The goal of this effort was to develop the basis of a deductive spreadsheet, a user productivity application that allows users without formal training in computer science to make decisions about generic data in the same simple way they currently use spreadsheets to make decisions about numerical data. The result is an elegant design supported by the most recent developments in the above disciplines.The first half of the book focuses on the

  6. Deductive way of reasoning about the internet AS level topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szabó, Dávid; Kőrösi, Attila; Bíró, József; Gulyás, András

    2015-01-01

    Our current understanding about the AS level topology of the Internet is based on measurements and inductive-type models which set up rules describing the behavior (node and edge dynamics) of the individual ASes and generalize the consequences of these individual actions for the complete AS ecosystem using induction. In this paper we suggest a third, deductive approach in which we have premises for the whole AS system and the consequences of these premises are determined through deductive reasoning. We show that such a deductive approach can give complementary insights into the topological properties of the AS graph. While inductive models can mostly reflect high level statistics (e.g., degree distribution, clustering, diameter), deductive reasoning can identify omnipresent subgraphs and peering likelihood. We also propose a model, called YEAS, incorporating our deductive analytical findings that produces topologies contain both traditional and novel metrics for the AS level Internet. (paper)

  7. Risk preferences over small stakes: Evidence from deductible choice

    OpenAIRE

    Janko Gorter; Paul Schilp

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides new field evidence on risk preferences over small stakes. Using unique population and survey data on deductible choice in Dutch universal health insurance, we find that risk preferences are a dominant factor in decision aking. In fact, our results indicate that risk preferences are both statistically and quantitatively more significant in explaining deductible choice behavior than risk type. This finding contrasts with classical expected utility theory, as it implies risk ...

  8. How to Shop for Health Insurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health insurance kicks in. As a general rule, insurance plans with low premiums have high deductibles, and plans with high premiums ... other plans due to hardship. This type of insurance can have low premiums but very high deductibles. Plans generally cover less ...

  9. Putting Health Back Into Health Insurance Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanasov, Pavel; Baker, Tom

    2014-08-01

    What are the barriers to voluntary take-up of high-deductible plans? We address this question using a large-scale employer survey conducted after an open-enrollment period in which a new high-deductible plan was first introduced. Only 3% of the employees chose this plan, despite the respondents' recognition of its financial advantages. Employees who believed that the high-deductible plan provided access to top physicians in the area were three times more likely to choose it than employees who did not share this belief. A framed field experiment using a similar choice menu showed that displaying additional financial information did not increase high-deductible plan take-up. However, when plans were presented as identical except for the deductible, respondents were highly likely to choose the high-deductible plan, especially in a two-way choice. These results suggest that informing plan choosers about high-deductible plans' health access provisions may affect choice more strongly than focusing on their financial advantages. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Deductive Updating Is Not Bayesian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovits, Henry; Brisson, Janie; de Chantal, Pier-Luc

    2015-01-01

    One of the major debates concerning the nature of inferential reasoning is between counterexample-based theories such as mental model theory and probabilistic theories. This study looks at conclusion updating after the addition of statistical information to examine the hypothesis that deductive reasoning cannot be explained by probabilistic…

  11. Understanding Loss Deductions for Timber

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Greene; Michael Jacobson

    1998-01-01

    Forestland owners whose timber has been destroyed may be eligible to take a deduction for the loss on their federal income tax. The loss must be physical in nature and caused by an identifiable event or combination of events that has run its course. There are two types of losses from natural events. Casualty losses are sudden, unexpected, and unusual - as from a fire...

  12. 26 CFR 1.832-2 - Deductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... companies, other than mutual fire insurance companies described in § 1.831-1, are also allowed a deduction... TAXES Other Insurance Companies § 1.832-2 Deductions. (a) The deductions allowable are specified in... capital losses provided in subchapter P (section 1201 and following), chapter 1 of the Code, insurance...

  13. Uncertain deduction and conditional reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jonathan St B T; Thompson, Valerie A; Over, David E

    2015-01-01

    There has been a paradigm shift in the psychology of deductive reasoning. Many researchers no longer think it is appropriate to ask people to assume premises and decide what necessarily follows, with the results evaluated by binary extensional logic. Most every day and scientific inference is made from more or less confidently held beliefs and not assumptions, and the relevant normative standard is Bayesian probability theory. We argue that the study of "uncertain deduction" should directly ask people to assign probabilities to both premises and conclusions, and report an experiment using this method. We assess this reasoning by two Bayesian metrics: probabilistic validity and coherence according to probability theory. On both measures, participants perform above chance in conditional reasoning, but they do much better when statements are grouped as inferences, rather than evaluated in separate tasks.

  14. The Right for Deducting VAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Sergiu-Bogdan Constantin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Romania must comply with the VAT Directive, the judgments of the Court of Justice of theEuropean Union and the European Court of Human Rights on VAT matter, that includes the matterof VAT deduction. The right to deduct VAT, in principle, cannot be limited for a taxable person andit is an abuse of law made by tax authorities when refusing this right. There are exceptions though,when the substantive and/or formal requirements are not met, the taxable person was involved in aVAT fraud or its supplier incorrectly drawn-up the invoice. The substantive requirements are: thepurchases must be from a taxable person and must be used for taxable activities. The formalrequirements are the obligations relating to accounting, invoicing and tax declarations. If taxauthorities discover a VAT fraud or/and that a VAT liability has not been declared they must takeimmediate measures, impose compliance and collect the corresponding sums from the responsibleperson.

  15. Deductive databases and P systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Gutierrez-Naranjo

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available In computational processes based on backwards chaining, a rule of the type is seen as a procedure which points that the problem can be split into the problems. In classical devices, the subproblems are solved sequentially. In this paper we present some questions that circulated during the Second Brainstorming Week related to the application of the parallelism of P systems to computation based on backwards chaining on the example of inferential deductive process.

  16. [Body condition and metabolic stability as the basis for high milk yield and undisturbed fertility in dairy cows--a contribution for deduction of reference values].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staufenbiel, R; Arndt, G; Schröder, U; Gelfert, C C

    2004-05-01

    The target of this study was to describe the interactions between body condition and various descriptors of yield and fertility. It was aimed to identify an optimal conditional range to be used in herd management which combines high milk yield with acceptable fertility traits and general health. For this purpose, backfat thickness was measured by ultrasound at 46111 dairy cows on 78 different farms and was subsequently related to production variables. Negative energy balance is getting more intense and prolonged with increasing milk yield. However a conditional nadir below 10 mm leads to decreased milk production. To reach a high production level without an increasing incidence of health disorders, conditional nadir should not decline below 13 mm backfat thickness on herd average. Lower value only lead to negligibly higher milk yield but cause a distinctively higher risk of fertility problems and culling. High herd yields do not have to be at expense of reproduction performance and can be achieved without extreme body condition losses. An efficient herd management can offset depression in fertility, which commonly is combined with increasing milk yield. A standard curve for backfat thickness throughout lactation is suggested to be used in dairy herd management.

  17. 26 CFR 1.832-5 - Deductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... companies, other than mutual fire insurance companies described in section 831(a)(3)(A) and the regulations... TAXES Other Insurance Companies § 1.832-5 Deductions. (a) The deductions allowable are specified in... capital losses provided in subchapter P (section 1201 and following), chapter 1 of the Code, insurance...

  18. 34 CFR 32.10 - Deductions process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deductions process. 32.10 Section 32.10 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education SALARY OFFSET TO RECOVER OVERPAYMENTS OF PAY OR ALLOWANCES FROM DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION EMPLOYEES § 32.10 Deductions process. (a) Debts must be collected in...

  19. Deductive systems for BigData integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu BUCEA-MANEA-TONIS

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The globalization is associated with an increased data to be processed from E-commerce transactions. The specialists are looking for different solutions, such as BigData, Hadoop, Datawarehoues, but it seems that the future is the predicative logic implemented through deductive database technology. It has to be done the swift from imperative languages, to not declaratively languages used for the application development. The deductive databases are very useful in the student teaching programs, too. Thus, the article makes a consistent literature review in the field and shows practical examples of using predicative logic in deductive systems, in order to integrate different kind of data types.

  20. 26 CFR 1.108-3 - Intercompany losses and deductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Intercompany losses and deductions. 1.108-3... Intercompany losses and deductions. (a) General rule. This section applies to certain losses and deductions... attributes to which section 108(b) applies, a loss or deduction not yet taken into account under section 267...

  1. Relations between inductive reasoning and deductive reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heit, Evan; Rotello, Caren M

    2010-05-01

    One of the most important open questions in reasoning research is how inductive reasoning and deductive reasoning are related. In an effort to address this question, we applied methods and concepts from memory research. We used 2 experiments to examine the effects of logical validity and premise-conclusion similarity on evaluation of arguments. Experiment 1 showed 2 dissociations: For a common set of arguments, deduction judgments were more affected by validity, and induction judgments were more affected by similarity. Moreover, Experiment 2 showed that fast deduction judgments were like induction judgments-in terms of being more influenced by similarity and less influenced by validity, compared with slow deduction judgments. These novel results pose challenges for a 1-process account of reasoning and are interpreted in terms of a 2-process account of reasoning, which was implemented as a multidimensional signal detection model and applied to receiver operating characteristic data. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  2. Contribution retribution. Health system, CEO must pay excise taxes after pressuring workers to help fund state association's PAC through payroll deductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark

    2004-11-22

    The IRS wants not-for-profit health systems to remember to keep their distance from politics--it's taxing the payroll contributions at one system that went to a state hospital association's PAC. Kenneth Robbins, left, says hospitals should always be conscious of activities that could jeopardize their tax-exempt status. "It's an issue we've been concerned with as long as I can remember," he says.

  3. Deductive multiscale simulation using order parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortoleva, Peter J.

    2017-05-16

    Illustrative embodiments of systems and methods for the deductive multiscale simulation of macromolecules are disclosed. In one illustrative embodiment, a deductive multiscale simulation method may include (i) constructing a set of order parameters that model one or more structural characteristics of a macromolecule, (ii) simulating an ensemble of atomistic configurations for the macromolecule using instantaneous values of the set of order parameters, (iii) simulating thermal-average forces and diffusivities for the ensemble of atomistic configurations, and (iv) evolving the set of order parameters via Langevin dynamics using the thermal-average forces and diffusivities.

  4. Advanced Query Formulation in Deductive Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Timo; Jarvelin, Kalervo

    1992-01-01

    Discusses deductive databases and database management systems (DBMS) and introduces a framework for advanced query formulation for end users. Recursive processing is described, a sample extensional database is presented, query types are explained, and criteria for advanced query formulation from the end user's viewpoint are examined. (31…

  5. 19 CFR 152.105 - Deductive value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... its importation, and any Federal excise tax on, or measured by the value of, the merchandise for which... paragraph (c)(3) of this section, the value added by the processing of the merchandise after importation to...) of this section, deductions made for the value added by that processing will be based on objective...

  6. Relations between Inductive Reasoning and Deductive Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heit, Evan; Rotello, Caren M.

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important open questions in reasoning research is how inductive reasoning and deductive reasoning are related. In an effort to address this question, we applied methods and concepts from memory research. We used 2 experiments to examine the effects of logical validity and premise-conclusion similarity on evaluation of arguments.…

  7. 77 FR 45480 - Deductions for Entertainment Use of Business Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    ... Deductions for Entertainment Use of Business Aircraft AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury... business aircraft for entertainment. These final regulations affect taxpayers that deduct expenses for... section 274 of the Internal Revenue Code (Code) of deductions for the use of business aircraft for...

  8. 22 CFR 512.22 - Deduction from pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Deduction from pay. 512.22 Section 512.22... 1982 Salary Offset § 512.22 Deduction from pay. (a) Deduction by salary offset, from an employee's disposable current pay, shall be subject to the following circumstances: (1) When funds are available, the...

  9. 29 CFR 1450.23 - Deduction from pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deduction from pay. 1450.23 Section 1450.23 Labor... OWED THE UNITED STATES Salary Offset § 1450.23 Deduction from pay. (a) Deduction by salary offset, from an employee's current disposable pay, shall be subject to the following conditions: (1) Ordinarily...

  10. 7 CFR 1000.86 - Deduction for marketing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Deduction for marketing services. 1000.86 Section 1000... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL PROVISIONS OF FEDERAL MILK MARKETING ORDERS Administrative Assessment and Marketing Service Deduction § 1000.86 Deduction for...

  11. 26 CFR 1.642(g)-2 - Deductions included.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... tax purposes. Section 642(g) has no application to deductions for taxes, interest, business expenses... 642(g) is applicable to deductions for interest, business expenses, and other items not accrued at the... administration expenses under section 2053(a)(2). Although deductible under section 2053(a)(3) in determining the...

  12. Consumer's preferences in social health insurance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssens, J.J.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2005-01-01

    Allowing consumers greater choice of health plans is believed to be the key to high quality and low costs in social health insurance. This study investigates consumer preferences (361 persons, response rate 43%) for hypothetical health plans with differed in 12 characteristics (premium, deductibles,

  13. Cost of Capital when Dividends are Deductible

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Velez-Pareja

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Tax savings and the discount rate we use to calculate their value are involved in the calculation of cost of capital. Based on previous findings, we derive a general approach to cash flow valuation that take into account any kind of tax shields related to the financing decision of a firm and any date when they are earned. They can be used to introduce any type of externality that creates value through tax savings not captured by neither the cost of debt nor the cost of equity. This paper develops the formulations for the cost of capital when dividends, interest on equity or monetary correction of equity are deductible as it happens in Brazil. It shows that when properly done most known valuation methods are consistent and give identical results. Also, the paper argues that when dividends are tax deductible, optimal leverage is lower and equity value is higher.

  14. Deductive Synthesis of the Unification Algorithm,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    DEDUCTIVE SYNTHESIS OF THE I - UNIFICATION ALGORITHM Zohar Manna Richard Waldinger I F? Computer Science Department Artificial Intelligence Center...theorem proving," Artificial Intelligence Journal, Vol. 9, No. 1, pp. 1-35. Boyer, R. S. and J S. Moore [Jan. 19751, "Proving theorems about LISP...d’Intelligence Artificielle , U.E.R. de Luminy, Universit6 d’ Aix-Marseille II. Green, C. C. [May 1969], "Application of theorem proving to problem

  15. 26 CFR 20.2053-10 - Deduction for certain foreign death taxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deduction for certain foreign death taxes. 20... § 20.2053-10 Deduction for certain foreign death taxes. (a) General rule. A deduction is allowed the... for foreign death taxes. (b) Condition for allowance of deduction. (1) The deduction is not allowed...

  16. Imaging deductive reasoning and the new paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oaksford, Mike

    2015-01-01

    There has been a great expansion of research into human reasoning at all of Marr’s explanatory levels. There is a tendency for this work to progress within a level largely ignoring the others which can lead to slippage between levels (Chater et al., 2003). It is argued that recent brain imaging research on deductive reasoning—implementational level—has largely ignored the new paradigm in reasoning—computational level (Over, 2009). Consequently, recent imaging results are reviewed with the focus on how they relate to the new paradigm. The imaging results are drawn primarily from a recent meta-analysis by Prado et al. (2011) but further imaging results are also reviewed where relevant. Three main observations are made. First, the main function of the core brain region identified is most likely elaborative, defeasible reasoning not deductive reasoning. Second, the subtraction methodology and the meta-analytic approach may remove all traces of content specific System 1 processes thought to underpin much human reasoning. Third, interpreting the function of the brain regions activated by a task depends on theories of the function that a task engages. When there are multiple interpretations of that function, interpreting what an active brain region is doing is not clear cut. It is concluded that there is a need to more tightly connect brain activation to function, which could be achieved using formalized computational level models and a parametric variation approach. PMID:25774130

  17. 29 CFR 783.45 - Deductions from wages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Deductions from wages. 783.45 Section 783.45 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL... TO EMPLOYEES EMPLOYED AS SEAMEN Computation of Wages and Hours § 783.45 Deductions from wages. Where...

  18. Evaluating the effect of tax deductions on training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oosterbeek, H.; Leuven, E.

    2004-01-01

    Dutch employers can claim an extra tax deduction when they train employees older than age 40. This discontinuity in a firm's training cost is exploited to identify the tax deduction's effects on training participation and of training participation on wages. The results show that the training rate of

  19. 26 CFR 1.179-3 - Carryover of disallowed deduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... deduction are selected by the taxpayer in the year the properties are placed in service. This selection must... no selection is made, the total carryover of disallowed deduction is apportioned equally over the... restaurant business. During 1992, ABC purchases and places in service two items of section 179 property—a...

  20. 26 CFR 1.615-4 - Limitation of amount deductible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 1.615-4 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.615-4 Limitation of amount deductible. (a) Taxable... lease with respect to certain coal lands. A has deducted exploration expenditures under section 615 for...

  1. 25 CFR 163.25 - Forest management deductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... that are paid from funds appropriated for fire suppression or pest control or otherwise offset federal... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Forest management deductions. 163.25 Section 163.25... Forest Management and Operations § 163.25 Forest management deductions. (a) Pursuant to the provisions of...

  2. 5 CFR 831.1003 - Deductions from pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Deductions from pay. 831.1003 Section 831.1003 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) RETIREMENT CSRS Offset § 831.1003 Deductions from pay. (a) Except as otherwise provided in this...

  3. 29 CFR 3.9 - Prohibited payroll deductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Prohibited payroll deductions. 3.9 Section 3.9 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor CONTRACTORS AND SUBCONTRACTORS ON PUBLIC BUILDING OR PUBLIC WORK FINANCED IN WHOLE OR IN PART BY LOANS OR GRANTS FROM THE UNITED STATES § 3.9 Prohibited payroll deductions...

  4. 17 CFR 256.426.5 - Other deductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... deductible before determining total income before interest charges. (b) Records shall be so maintained by...) UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR MUTUAL SERVICE COMPANIES AND SUBSIDIARY SERVICE COMPANIES, PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 1935 Income and Expense Accounts § 256.426.5 Other deductions. (a) This account...

  5. Differential Involvement of Left Prefrontal Cortexin Inductive and Deductive Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Vinod; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2004-01-01

    While inductive and deductive reasoning are considered distinct logical and psychological processes, little is known about their respective neural basis. To address this issue we scanned 16 subjects with fMRI, using an event-related design, while they engaged in inductive and deductive reasoning tasks. Both types of reasoning were characterized by…

  6. 7 CFR 1131.86 - Deduction for marketing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Deduction for marketing services. 1131.86 Section 1131... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE ARIZONA MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Administrative Assessment and Marketing Service Deduction § 1131.86...

  7. 7 CFR 1030.86 - Deduction for marketing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Deduction for marketing services. 1030.86 Section 1030... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE UPPER MIDWEST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Administrative Assessment and Marketing Service Deduction § 1030.86...

  8. 7 CFR 1005.86 - Deduction for marketing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Deduction for marketing services. 1005.86 Section 1005... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE APPALACHIAN MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Administrative Assessment and Marketing Service Deduction § 1005.86...

  9. 7 CFR 1007.86 - Deduction for marketing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Deduction for marketing services. 1007.86 Section 1007... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE SOUTHEAST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Administrative Assessment and Marketing Service Deduction § 1007.86...

  10. 7 CFR 1001.86 - Deduction for marketing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Deduction for marketing services. 1001.86 Section 1001... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE NORTHEAST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Administrative Assessment and Marketing Service Deduction § 1001.86...

  11. 7 CFR 1126.86 - Deduction for marketing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Deduction for marketing services. 1126.86 Section 1126... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE SOUTHWEST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Administrative Assessment and Marketing Service Deduction § 1126.86...

  12. 7 CFR 1032.86 - Deduction for marketing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Deduction for marketing services. 1032.86 Section 1032... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE CENTRAL MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Administrative Assessment and Marketing Service Deduction § 1032.86...

  13. 7 CFR 1006.86 - Deduction for marketing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Deduction for marketing services. 1006.86 Section 1006... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE FLORIDA MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Administrative Assessment and Marketing Service Deduction § 1006.86...

  14. 7 CFR 1124.86 - Deduction for marketing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Deduction for marketing services. 1124.86 Section 1124... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Administrative Assessment and Marketing Service Deduction § 1124.86...

  15. 7 CFR 1033.86 - Deduction for marketing services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Deduction for marketing services. 1033.86 Section 1033... SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MILK IN THE MIDEAST MARKETING AREA Order Regulating Handling Administrative Assessment and Marketing Service Deduction § 1033.86...

  16. Itemised Deductions : A Device to Reduce Tax Evasion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piolatto, A.

    2010-01-01

    Direct incentives and punishments are the most common instruments to fight tax evasion. The theoretical literature disregarded indirect schemes, such as itemised deductions, in which an agent has an interest in that other agents declare their revenue. Itemised deductions provide an incentive for

  17. 20 CFR 226.35 - Deductions from regular annuity rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deductions from regular annuity rate. 226.35... COMPUTING EMPLOYEE, SPOUSE, AND DIVORCED SPOUSE ANNUITIES Computing a Spouse or Divorced Spouse Annuity § 226.35 Deductions from regular annuity rate. The regular annuity rate of the spouse and divorced...

  18. Human Long Jump — A Deductive Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš Jovanović

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a useful application of a generalized approach to the modelling of human and humanoid motion using the deductive approach. It starts with formulating a completely general problem and deriving different real situations as special cases. The concept and the software realization are verified by comparing the results with the ones obtained using “classical” software for one well-known particular problem – biped walking. New applicability and potentials of the proposed method are demonstrated by simulation of a selected example – the long jump. The simulated motion included jumping and landing on the feet (after a jump. Additional analysis is done in the paper regarding the joint torque and joint angle during the jumping. Separate stages of the simulation are defined and explained.

  19. Greek classicism in living structure? Some deductive pathways in animal morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweers, G A

    1985-01-01

    Classical temples in ancient Greece show two deterministic illusionistic principles of architecture, which govern their functional design: geometric proportionalism and a set of illusion-strengthening rules in the proportionalism's "stochastic margin". Animal morphology, in its mechanistic-deductive revival, applies just one architectural principle, which is not always satisfactory. Whether a "Greek Classical" situation occurs in the architecture of living structure is to be investigated by extreme testing with deductive methods. Three deductive methods for explanation of living structure in animal morphology are proposed: the parts, the compromise, and the transformation deduction. The methods are based upon the systems concept for an organism, the flow chart for a functionalistic picture, and the network chart for a structuralistic picture, whereas the "optimal design" serves as the architectural principle for living structure. These methods show clearly the high explanatory power of deductive methods in morphology, but they also make one open end most explicit: neutral issues do exist. Full explanation of living structure asks for three entries: functional design within architectural and transformational constraints. The transformational constraint brings necessarily in a stochastic component: an at random variation being a sort of "free management space". This variation must be a variation from the deterministic principle of the optimal design, since any transformation requires space for plasticity in structure and action, and flexibility in role fulfilling. Nevertheless, finally the question comes up whether for animal structure a similar situation exists as in Greek Classical temples. This means that the at random variation, that is found when the optimal design is used to explain structure, comprises apart from a stochastic part also real deviations being yet another deterministic part. This deterministic part could be a set of rules that governs

  20. 26 CFR 1.274-3 - Disallowance of deduction for gifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disallowance of deduction for gifts. 1.274-3... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Items Not Deductible § 1.274-3 Disallowance of deduction for gifts. (a) In general. No deduction shall be allowed under section 162 or 212 for any expense for a gift made...

  1. 26 CFR 20.2053-9 - Deduction for certain State death taxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deduction for certain State death taxes. 20... § 20.2053-9 Deduction for certain State death taxes. (a) General rule. A deduction is allowed a... death taxes. However, see section 2058 to determine the deductibility of state death taxes by estates to...

  2. 20 CFR 404.1085 - Net operating loss deduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Employment, Wages, Self-Employment, and Self-Employment Income Self-Employment Income § 404.1085 Net operating loss deduction. When determining your net earnings from self-employment...

  3. 46 CFR 69.119 - Spaces deducted from gross tonnage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... equipment plus a two foot maximum working space on each side of the equipment, if available, is deductible.... (ix) Oil skin lockers. (x) Pantries. (xi) Recreation rooms. (xii) Smoking rooms. (xiii) Galleys below...

  4. Offshore decommissioning issues: Deductibility and transferability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parente, Virginia; Ferreira, Doneivan; Moutinho dos Santos, Edmilson; Luczynski, Estanislau

    2006-01-01

    Dealing with the decommissioning of petroleum installations is a relatively new challenge to most producer countries. It is natural to expect that industry's experience in building platforms is much greater than the one of dismantling them. Even if manifold and varied efforts are underway towards establishing international 'best practices' standards in this sector, countries still enjoy rather extensive discretionary power as they practice a particular national style in the regulation of decommissioning activities in their state's jurisdiction. The present paper offers a broad panorama of this discussion, concentrating mainly on two controversial aspects. The first one analyses the ex-ante deductibility of decommissioning costs as they constitute an ex-post expense. The second discussion refers to the assignment of decommissioning responsibility in the case of transfer of exploration and production rights to new lessees during the project's life. Finally the paper applies concepts commonly used in project financing as well as structures generally used in organising pension funds to develop insights into these discussions

  5. Automatic Deduction in Dynamic Geometry using Sage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Botana

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We present a symbolic tool that provides robust algebraic methods to handle automatic deduction tasks for a dynamic geometry construction. The main prototype has been developed as two different worksheets for the open source computer algebra system Sage, corresponding to two different ways of coding a geometric construction. In one worksheet, diagrams constructed with the open source dynamic geometry system GeoGebra are accepted. In this worksheet, Groebner bases are used to either compute the equation of a geometric locus in the case of a locus construction or to determine the truth of a general geometric statement included in the GeoGebra construction as a boolean variable. In the second worksheet, locus constructions coded using the common file format for dynamic geometry developed by the Intergeo project are accepted for computation. The prototype and several examples are provided for testing. Moreover, a third Sage worksheet is presented in which a novel algorithm to eliminate extraneous parts in symbolically computed loci has been implemented. The algorithm, based on a recent work on the Groebner cover of parametric systems, identifies degenerate components and extraneous adherence points in loci, both natural byproducts of general polynomial algebraic methods. Detailed examples are discussed.

  6. Offshore decommissioning issues: deductibility and transferability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parente, V.; Santos, M. dos [University of Sao Paulo (Brazil). Instituto de Electrotecnica; Ferreira, D. [State University of Campinas (Brazil). Dept. of Geology and Natural Resources; Luczynski, E. [Grupo de Estudos e Pesquisas Economico-Energeticas, Belem (Brazil)

    2006-10-15

    Dealing with the decommissioning of petroleum installations is a relatively new challenge to most producer countries. It is natural to expect that industry's experience in building platforms is much greater than the one of dismantling them. Even if manifold and varied efforts are underway towards establishing international ''best practices'' standards in this sector, countries still enjoy rather extensive discretionary power as they practice a particular national style in the regulation of decommissioning activities in their state's jurisdiction. The present paper offers a broad panorama of this discussion, concentrating mainly on two controversial aspects. The first one analyses the ex-ante deductibility of decommissioning costs as they constitute an ex-post expense. The second discussion refers to the assignment of decommissioning responsibility in the case of transfer of exploration and production rights to new lessees during the project's life. Finally the paper applies concepts commonly used in project financing as well as structures generally used in organising pension funds to develop insights into these discussions. (author)

  7. Temporal Deductive Verification of Basic ASM Models

    OpenAIRE

    Daho, Hocine El-Habib; University of Oran; Benhamamouch, Djillali; University of Oran

    2010-01-01

    Abstract State Machines (ASMs, for short) provide a practical new computational model which has been applied in the area of software engineering for systems design and analysis. However, reasoning about ASM models occurs, not within a formal deductive system, but basically in the classical informal proofs style of mathematics. Several formal verification approaches for proving correctness of ASM models have been investigated. In this paper we consider the use of the TLA+logic for the deductive...

  8. Interest Deductibility and the BEPS Action Plan: nihil novi sub sole?

    OpenAIRE

    Traversa, Edoardo

    2013-01-01

    Interest payments between affiliated companies which aim at shifting profit from high to low tax countries are a well-known and frequently used tool in international tax planning. It is therefore not surprising that in the OECD Action Plan on Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS) (Action Plan) considerable attention is given to the measures limiting the deductibility of (excessive) intra-group interest payments.1 The Action Plan does not, however, provide any clear guidance as to which, amo...

  9. Job-based health insurance: costs climb at a moderate pace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton, Gary; DiJulio, Bianca; Whitmore, Heidi; Pickreign, Jeremy; McHugh, Megan; Finder, Benjamin; Osei-Anto, Awo

    2009-01-01

    Each year the Kaiser/HRET Survey of Employer Health Benefits takes a snapshot of the state of employee benefits in the United States, based on interviews with public and private employers. Our findings for 2009 show that families continue to face higher premiums, up about 5 percent from last year, and that cost sharing in the form of deductibles and copayments for office visits is greater as well. Average annual premiums in 2009 were $4,824 for single coverage and $13,375 for family coverage. Enrollment in high-deductible health plans held steady. We offer new insights about health risk assessments and how firms responded to the economic downturn.

  10. Automated Reuse of Scientific Subroutine Libraries through Deductive Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Michael R.; Pressburger, Thomas; VanBaalen, Jeffrey; Roach, Steven

    1997-01-01

    Systematic software construction offers the potential of elevating software engineering from an art-form to an engineering discipline. The desired result is more predictable software development leading to better quality and more maintainable software. However, the overhead costs associated with the formalisms, mathematics, and methods of systematic software construction have largely precluded their adoption in real-world software development. In fact, many mainstream software development organizations, such as Microsoft, still maintain a predominantly oral culture for software development projects; which is far removed from a formalism-based culture for software development. An exception is the limited domain of safety-critical software, where the high-assuiance inherent in systematic software construction justifies the additional cost. We believe that systematic software construction will only be adopted by mainstream software development organization when the overhead costs have been greatly reduced. Two approaches to cost mitigation are reuse (amortizing costs over many applications) and automation. For the last four years, NASA Ames has funded the Amphion project, whose objective is to automate software reuse through techniques from systematic software construction. In particular, deductive program synthesis (i.e., program extraction from proofs) is used to derive a composition of software components (e.g., subroutines) that correctly implements a specification. The construction of reuse libraries of software components is the standard software engineering solution for improving software development productivity and quality.

  11. The application of automated deductive reasoning to power plant diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filshtein, E.L.; Rzasa, P.W.

    1986-01-01

    A module which incorporates the application of deductive reasoning to diagnostics has been developed. This module is a part of a generic diagnostic expert system prototype developed for power plant operations at Combustion Engineering. This paper is one of a series of papers which will describe the activities of the project. Specifically, this paper describes the deductive reasoning module which determines and classifies root cause malfunctions. The concept of 'perfect instruments' is introduced. These instruments are imaginary instruments which bridge the gap between real world inputs and the generic diagnostic shell. The prototype, its application, and future developments are discussed

  12. The Consistent Preferences Approach to Deductive Reasoning in Games

    CERN Document Server

    Asheim, Geir B

    2006-01-01

    "The Consistent Preferences Approach to Deductive Reasoning in Games" presents, applies, and synthesizes what my co-authors and I have called the 'consistent preferences' approach to deductive reasoning in games. Briefly described, this means that the object of the analysis is the ranking by each player of his own strategies, rather than his choice. The ranking can be required to be consistent (in different senses) with his beliefs about the opponent's ranking of her strategies. This can be contrasted to the usual 'rational choice' approach where a player's strategy choice is (in dif

  13. The interplay of deductive and inductive reasoning in psychoanalytic theorizing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanly, Charles

    2014-10-01

    Deductive and inductive reasoning both played an essential part in Freud's construction of psychoanalysis. In this paper, the author explores the happy marriage of empiricism and rationalism in Freud's use of deductive reasoning in the construction of psychoanalytic theory. To do this, the author considers three major amendments Freud made to his theory: (i) infant and childhood sexuality, (ii) the structural theory, and (iii) the theory of signal anxiety. Ultimately, the author argues for, and presents Freud as a proponent of, the epistemological position that he calls critical realism. © 2014 The Psychoanalytic Quarterly, Inc.

  14. You can't buy insurance when the house is on fire. Community rating kills health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnedy, J A

    1994-05-15

    Why does health insurance cost so much? According to the vice president at the insurance company that pioneered high-deductible health insurance to go with medical savings accounts, a big factor is that insurance companies are being asked to solve social problems. Mr Hartnedy offers a solution to America's healthcare-delivery plight that includes empowerment of individuals and preservation of choice.

  15. Advances in natural deduction a celebration of Dag Prawitz's work

    CERN Document Server

    Haeusler, Edward; Paiva, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    This collection of papers celebrating the contributions of Swedish logician Dag Prawitz to Proof Theory, has been assembled from those presented at the Natural Deduction conference organized in Rio de Janeiro to honour his  seminal  research. Dag Prawitz’s work forms the basis of intuitionistic type theory and his inversion principle constitutes the foundation of most modern accounts of proof-theoretic semantics in Logic, Linguistics and  Theoretical Computer Science. The range of contributions includes material on the extension of natural deduction with higher-order rules, as opposed to higher-order connectives, and a paper discussing the application of natural deduction rules to dealing with equality in predicate calculus. The volume continues with a key chapter summarizing work on the extension of the Curry-Howard isomorphism (itself a by-product of the work on natural deduction), via methods of category theory that have been successfully applied to linear logic, as well as many other contributions fr...

  16. 26 CFR 1.617-2 - Limitation on amount deductible.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 1.617-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.617-2 Limitation on amount deductible. (a... 1967, 1968, 1969, and 1970 A had exploration costs of $80,000 all with respect to coal deposits located...

  17. 26 CFR 1.642(f)-1 - Amortization deductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ....642(f)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.642(f)-1 Amortization deductions. An estate... respect to qualified railroad rolling stock as defined in section 184(d), with respect to certified coal...

  18. 18 CFR 367.4350 - Account 435, Extraordinary deductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Account 435, Extraordinary deductions. 367.4350 Section 367.4350 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY ACT OF 2005, FEDERAL POWER ACT AND NATURAL GAS ACT...

  19. Compare and Contrast Inductive and Deductive Research Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soiferman, L. Karen

    2010-01-01

    This discussion paper compares and contrasts "inductive" and "deductive" research approaches as described by Trochim (2006) and Plano Clark and Creswell (2007). It also examines the "exploratory" and "confirmatory" approaches by Onwueghuzie and Leech (2005) with respect to the assumption each holds about the nature of knowledge. The paper starts…

  20. Bounds for phase-shifts and deductions in potential scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sidharth, B.G.

    1979-01-01

    Starting from the radial Schroedinger equation and using the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality, expressions have been derived for bounds for phase-shifts in potential scattering and the deductions are verified in special cases such as the spherically symmetric square-well potential, where exact solutions are already known. (K.B.)

  1. The responsiveness of training participation to tax deductability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leuven, E.; Oosterbeek, H.

    2006-01-01

    To stimulate investment in training by individuals, the Dutch tax system allows a deduction of direct training expenditures from taxable income. This paper investigates to what extent the resulting cost reduction encourages training investments. Two different identification strategies are used. The

  2. Travel Expenses in Connection with Tax-Deductible Education Expenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottiglieri, William A.; Reville, Patrick J.

    2012-01-01

    Trade or business expenses are deductible if they are ordinary and necessary with respect to the trade or business in which they were incurred. Treasury Regulations bring education expenses into this purview but only if they maintain or improve skills already acquired or allow a taxpayer to maintain his current position. Related travel expenses in…

  3. Sherlock Holmes's Methods of Deductive Reasoning Applied to Medical Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Larry

    1985-01-01

    Having patterned the character of Sherlock Holmes after one of his professors, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, himself a physician, incorporated many of the didactic qualities of the 19th century medical diagnostician into the character of Holmes. In this paper I explore Holmes's techniques of deductive reasoning and their basis in 19th and 20th century medical diagnostics. PMID:3887762

  4. Sherlock Holmes' methods of deductive reasoning applied to medical diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, L

    1985-03-01

    Having patterned the character of Sherlock Holmes after one of his professors, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, himself a physician, incorporated many of the didactic qualities of the 19th century medical diagnostician into the character of Holmes. In this paper I explore Holmes's techniques of deductive reasoning and their basis in 19th and 20th century medical diagnostics.

  5. A Generalized Deduction of the Ideal-Solution Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leo, Teresa J.; Perez-del-Notario, Pedro; Raso, Miguel A.

    2006-01-01

    A new general procedure for deriving the Gibbs energy of mixing is developed through general thermodynamic considerations, and the ideal-solution model is obtained as a special particular case of the general one. The deduction of the Gibbs energy of mixing for the ideal-solution model is a rational one and viewed suitable for advanced students who…

  6. Inductive and deductive reasoning in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Janice; Grisham, Jessica R; Hayes, Brett K

    2018-06-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that participants diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) show a selective deficit in inductive reasoning but are equivalent to controls in deductive reasoning. Twenty-five participants with OCD and 25 non-clinical controls made inductive and deductive judgments about a common set of arguments that varied in logical validity and the amount of positive evidence provided (premise sample size). A second inductive reasoning task required participants to make forced-choice decisions and rate the usefulness of diverse evidence or non-diverse evidence for evaluating arguments. No differences in deductive reasoning were found between participants diagnosed with OCD and control participants. Both groups saw that the amount of positive evidence supporting a conclusion was an important guide for evaluating inductive arguments. However, those with OCD showed less sensitivity to premise diversity in inductive reasoning than controls. The findings were similar for both emotionally neutral and OCD-relevant stimuli. The absence of a clinical control group means that it is difficult to know whether the deficit in diversity-based reasoning is specific to those with OCD. People with OCD are impaired in some forms of inductive reasoning (using diverse evidence) but not others (use of sample size). Deductive reasoning appears intact in those with OCD. Difficulties using evidence diversity when reasoning inductively may maintain OCD symptoms through reduced generalization of learned safety information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Conservative Look at Term Deduction Systems with Variable Binding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkink, W.J.; Verhoef, C.

    We set up a formal framework to describe term deduction systems, such as transition system specifications in the style of Plotkin, and conditional term rewriting systems. This framework has the power to express many-sortedness, general binding mechanisms and substitutions, among other notions such

  8. 29 CFR 4.168 - Wage payments-deductions from wages paid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Wage payments-deductions from wages paid. 4.168 Section 4... Standards Compliance with Compensation Standards § 4.168 Wage payments—deductions from wages paid. (a) The wage requirements of the Act will not be met where unauthorized deductions, rebates, or refunds reduce...

  9. 7 CFR 3.81 - Procedures for salary offset: when deductions may begin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for salary offset: when deductions may... Salary Offset § 3.81 Procedures for salary offset: when deductions may begin. (a) Deductions to liquidate... Offset Salary to collect from the employee's current pay. (b) If the employee filed a petition for a...

  10. 20 CFR 361.11 - Procedures for salary offset: When deductions may begin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedures for salary offset: When deductions... § 361.11 Procedures for salary offset: When deductions may begin. (a) Deductions to liquidate an... a debt is completed, offset shall be made from subsequent payments of any nature (e.g., final salary...

  11. Deductive Error Diagnosis and Inductive Error Generalization for Intelligent Tutoring Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, H. Ulrich

    1994-01-01

    Examines the deductive approach to error diagnosis for intelligent tutoring systems. Topics covered include the principles of the deductive approach to diagnosis; domain-specific heuristics to solve the problem of generalizing error patterns; and deductive diagnosis and the hypertext-based learning environment. (Contains 26 references.) (JLB)

  12. 29 CFR 2509.99-1 - Interpretive Bulletin Relating to Payroll Deduction IRAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interpretive Bulletin Relating to Payroll Deduction IRAs... SECURITY ACT OF 1974 § 2509.99-1 Interpretive Bulletin Relating to Payroll Deduction IRAs. (a) Scope. This...), as applied to payroll deduction programs established by employers 1 for the purpose of enabling...

  13. 38 CFR 8.5 - Authorization for deduction of premiums from compensation, retirement pay, or pension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Authorization for deduction of premiums from compensation, retirement pay, or pension. 8.5 Section 8.5 Pensions, Bonuses, and... Authorization for deduction of premiums from compensation, retirement pay, or pension. Deductions from benefits...

  14. 26 CFR 1.941-1 - Special deduction for China Trade Act corporations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES China Trade Act Corporations § 1.941-1 Special deduction for China Trade Act corporations. In addition to the deductions from taxable income otherwise allowed such a corporation, a China Trade Act corporation is, under certain conditions, allowed an additional deduction in...

  15. 26 CFR 1.873-1 - Deductions allowed nonresident alien individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deductions allowed nonresident alien individuals... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Nonresident Aliens and Foreign Corporations § 1.873-1 Deductions allowed nonresident alien individuals. (a) General provisions—(1) Allocation of deductions. In...

  16. 26 CFR 1.167(a)-10 - When depreciation deduction is allowable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false When depreciation deduction is allowable. 1.167... Corporations § 1.167(a)-10 When depreciation deduction is allowable. (a) A taxpayer should deduct the proper depreciation allowance each year and may not increase his depreciation allowances in later years by reason of...

  17. 26 CFR 1.249-1 - Limitation on deduction of bond premium on repurchase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... A issues a callable 20-year convertible bond at face for $1,000 bearing interest at 10 percent per... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitation on deduction of bond premium on... deduction of bond premium on repurchase. (a) Limitation—(1) General rule. No deduction is allowed to the...

  18. Health behaviors of Bydgoszcz high school graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Kostencka

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lifestyle affects the physical, mental, social development, health and learning ability. It seems that there are differences in the health behaviors  of young females and males, however these differences are not well described. The aim of the current study was to assess the lifestyle of eighteen-years old and to compare their health behaviors of young persons according to their gender. The study was conducted among 98 students of high schools in Bydgoszcz (35 females and 68 males. All participants were 18 years old. The questionnaire was prepared especially for the purposes of the study, a part of the questions of this questionnaire was taken from the Canada Fitness Survey. The physical activity, mode of nutrition, use of stimulants, hours of sleep, time spent in front of screens and the level of stress were taken into consideration while assessing the teenagers’ lifestyle. The lifestyle of high school graduates is worrisome. It is characterized by low level of physical activity, irregular nutrition, not enough fruits, vegetables and water consumed. A large group of young people drink alcohol, smoke tobacco and marijuana, sleep too short. Males also spend too many hours in front of a television, computer or other similar device. Differences in the health behaviors of  women and men appear to be significant. The prevalence of alcohol abuse in this group is very high and affects both sexes. The sex differences in the health-promoting behaviors among men and women in this group of adolescents seems to diminish. Observed unhealthy behaviors indicates the urgent need for health education, especially those that educate the student about the value of the person, the value of health, and the development of social skills that underlie personal development. The foremost priority is  risk prevention implementation in primary schools. Further research and continuous monitoring of health behaviors in different age groups  is needed as well as  to

  19. High-performance work systems in health care, part 3: the role of the business case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Paula H; Robbins, Julie; Garman, Andrew N; McAlearney, Ann Scheck

    2012-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests the systematic use of high-performance work practices (HPWPs), or evidence-based management practices, holds promise to improve organizational performance, including improved quality and efficiency, in health care organizations. However, little is understood about the investment required for HPWP implementation, nor the business case for HPWP investment. The aim of this study is to enhance our understanding about organizations' perspectives of the business case for HPWP investment, including reasons for and approaches to evaluating that investment. We used a multicase study approach to explore the business case for HPWPs in U.S. health care organizations. We conducted semistructured interviews with 67 key informants across five sites. All interviews were recorded, transcribed, and subjected to qualitative analysis using both deductive and inductive methods. The organizations in our study did not appear to have explicit financial return expectations for investments in HPWPs. Instead, the HPWP investment was viewed as an important factor contributing to successful execution of the organization's strategic priorities and a means for competitive differentiation in the market. Informants' characterizations of the HPWP investment did not involve financial terms; rather, descriptions of these investments as redeployment of existing resources or a shift of managerial time redirected attention from cost considerations. Evaluation efforts were rare, with organizations using broad organizational metrics to justify HPWP investment or avoiding formal evaluation altogether. Our findings are consistent with prior studies that have found that health care organizations have not systematically evaluated the financial outcomes of their quality-related initiatives or tend to forget formal business case analysis for investments they may perceive as "inevitable." In the absence of a clearly described association between HPWPs and outcomes or some other external

  20. Consumer preferences in social health insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerssens, Jan J; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2005-03-01

    Allowing consumers greater choice of health plans is believed to be the key to high quality and low costs in social health insurance. This study investigates consumer preferences (361 persons, response rate 43%) for hypothetical health plans which differed in 12 characteristics (premium, deductibles, no-claim discount, extension of insurance and financial services, red tape involved, medical help-desk, choice of family physicians and hospitals, dental benefits, physical therapy benefits, benefits for prescription drugs and homeopathy). In 90% the health plan with the most attractive characteristics was preferred, indicating a predominantly rational kind of choice. The most decisive characteristics for preference were: complete dental benefits, followed by zero deductibles, and free choice of hospitals.

  1. Formal verification of Simulink/Stateflow diagrams a deductive approach

    CERN Document Server

    Zhan, Naijun; Zhao, Hengjun

    2017-01-01

    This book presents a state-of-the-art technique for formal verification of continuous-time Simulink/Stateflow diagrams, featuring an expressive hybrid system modelling language, a powerful specification logic and deduction-based verification approach, and some impressive, realistic case studies. Readers will learn the HCSP/HHL-based deductive method and the use of corresponding tools for formal verification of Simulink/Stateflow diagrams. They will also gain some basic ideas about fundamental elements of formal methods such as formal syntax and semantics, and especially the common techniques applied in formal modelling and verification of hybrid systems. By investigating the successful case studies, readers will realize how to apply the pure theory and techniques to real applications, and hopefully will be inspired to start to use the proposed approach, or even develop their own formal methods in their future work.

  2. High-Protein Diets and Renal Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marckmann, Peter; Osther, Palle; Pedersen, Agnes N.

    2015-01-01

    High-protein diets (i.e., protein content of more than 25% of energy or more than 2 g/kg body weight per day) based on meat and dairy products are repeatedly promoted for weight reduction and better health, but the evidence supporting these notions is quite dubious. As described in the present...... in the prevalence of chronic kidney disease in the general population without preexisting kidney disease. Accordingly, we find medical reasons to refrain from promoting high-protein diets, in particular those based on meat and dairy products, until clear-cut evidence for the safety and for the superiority...... review, there is a reason to be concerned about adverse effects of such diets, including glomerular hyperfiltration, hypertensive effects of a concomitant increase in dietary sodium, and an increased risk of nephrolithiasis. These diet-induced physiological consequences might lead to an increase...

  3. Note on Deduction Theorems in contraction-free logics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chvalovský, Karel; Cintula, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 3 (2012), s. 236-243 ISSN 0942-5616 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP202/10/1826 Grant - others:Austrian Science Fund (FWF)(AT) START Y544-N23 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : Local Deduction Theorem * BCI-logic * Substructural logics * Rule of contraction Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.376, year: 2012

  4. Effectiveness of Inductive and Deductive Methods in Teaching Grammar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Akram Alzu’bi

    2015-04-01

    • What is the effect of inductive method on grammar achievement compared with deductive method at elementary stage? To answer the questions of the study, the researcher prepares two programs based on inductive and deductive methods for each level based on its syllabus. The sample consists 180 students; eighty at the 1st year level in English departments at university level and one hundred at the elementary stage. The participants of the study consisted of four assigned sections. Firstly, at the university level, two colleges are randomly selected out of the eighteen faculties of Albalqa' Applied University; two sections are randomly selected; one group is randomly assigned as the 1st experimental group (by using inductive method and the second experimental group (by using deductive method. Similar process is adopted in the case of school students at the elementary stage.  The relevant pre-tests are administered to the students of both groups at each stage (university and school to make sure that the groups are equivalent at the time of starting the experiment. The researcher designs two grammar achievement tests as the instruments of this study (one for the elementary stage and one for university level. The instrument of each stage consists of two achievement tests (pre- test and post-test. At the end of the treatment period, relevant post-tests are administered to the students of both the groups. The results of the study revealed that there were significant statistical differences at (α≤0.09 among the grammar performance means of both groups at both levels due to inductive method. Keywords: Inductive method, Deductive method, Elementary stage, University level, Academic achievement

  5. On the Difference between Traditional and Deductive Fuzzy Logic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Běhounek, Libor

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 159, č. 10 (2008), s. 1153-1164 ISSN 0165-0114 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100300502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : deductive fuzzy logic * fuzzy elements * gradual sets * entropy of fuzzy sets * aggregation * membership degrees * methodology of fuzzy mathematics Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.833, year: 2008

  6. Automated Generation of User Guidance by Combining Computation and Deduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walther Neuper

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Herewith, a fairly old concept is published for the first time and named "Lucas Interpretation". This has been implemented in a prototype, which has been proved useful in educational practice and has gained academic relevance with an emerging generation of educational mathematics assistants (EMA based on Computer Theorem Proving (CTP. Automated Theorem Proving (ATP, i.e. deduction, is the most reliable technology used to check user input. However ATP is inherently weak in automatically generating solutions for arbitrary problems in applied mathematics. This weakness is crucial for EMAs: when ATP checks user input as incorrect and the learner gets stuck then the system should be able to suggest possible next steps. The key idea of Lucas Interpretation is to compute the steps of a calculation following a program written in a novel CTP-based programming language, i.e. computation provides the next steps. User guidance is generated by combining deduction and computation: the latter is performed by a specific language interpreter, which works like a debugger and hands over control to the learner at breakpoints, i.e. tactics generating the steps of calculation. The interpreter also builds up logical contexts providing ATP with the data required for checking user input, thus combining computation and deduction. The paper describes the concepts underlying Lucas Interpretation so that open questions can adequately be addressed, and prerequisites for further work are provided.

  7. Improving high quality, equitable maternal health services in Malawi ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Improving high quality, equitable maternal health services in Malawi (IMCHA) ... In response, the Ministry of Health implemented a Standards-Based Management and Recognition for Reproductive Health initiative to improve ... Total funding.

  8. High Cholesterol and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... professionals High Cholesterol and Complementary Health Practices: What the Science Says Share: February 2013 Dietary Supplements Red Yeast ... to exploring complementary health products and practices in the context of rigorous ... health researchers, and disseminating authoritative information ...

  9. Differential involvement of left prefrontal cortex in inductive and deductive reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Vinod; Dolan, Raymond J

    2004-10-01

    While inductive and deductive reasoning are considered distinct logical and psychological processes, little is known about their respective neural basis. To address this issue we scanned 16 subjects with fMRI, using an event-related design, while they engaged in inductive and deductive reasoning tasks. Both types of reasoning were characterized by activation of left lateral prefrontal and bilateral dorsal frontal, parietal, and occipital cortices. Neural responses unique to each type of reasoning determined from the Reasoning Type (deduction and induction) by Task (reasoning and baseline) interaction indicated greater involvement of left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 44) in deduction than induction, while left dorsolateral (BA 8/9) prefrontal gyrus showed greater activity during induction than deduction. This pattern suggests a dissociation within prefrontal cortex for deductive and inductive reasoning.

  10. High and rising health care costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Paul B

    2008-10-01

    The U.S. is spending a growing share of the GDP on health care, outpacing other industrialized countries. This synthesis examines why costs are higher in the U.S. and what is driving their growth. Key findings include: health care inefficiency, medical technology and health status (particularly obesity) are the primary drivers of rising U.S. health care costs. Health payer systems that reward inefficiencies and preempt competition have impeded productivity gains in the health care sector. The best evidence indicates medical technology accounts for one-half to two-thirds of spending growth. While medical malpractice insurance and defensive medicine contribute to health costs, they are not large enough factors to significantly contribute to a rise in spending. Research is consistent that demographics will not be a significant factor in driving spending despite the aging baby boomers.

  11. Children's and adults' judgments of the certainty of deductive inferences, inductive inferences, and guesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillow, Bradford H; Pearson, Raeanne M; Hecht, Mary; Bremer, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Children and adults rated their own certainty following inductive inferences, deductive inferences, and guesses. Beginning in kindergarten, participants rated deductions as more certain than weak inductions or guesses. Deductions were rated as more certain than strong inductions beginning in Grade 3, and fourth-grade children and adults differentiated strong inductions, weak inductions, and informed guesses from pure guesses. By Grade 3, participants also gave different types of explanations for their deductions and inductions. These results are discussed in relation to children's concepts of cognitive processes, logical reasoning, and epistemological development.

  12. Jelly Views : Extending Relational Database Systems Toward Deductive Database Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Wojnicki

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper regards the Jelly View technology, which provides a new, practical methodology for knowledge decomposition, storage, and retrieval within Relational Database Management Systems (RDBMS. Intensional Knowledge clauses (rules are decomposed and stored in the RDBMS founding reusable components. The results of the rule-based processing are visible as regular views, accessible through SQL. From the end-user point of view the processing capability becomes unlimited (arbitrarily complex queries can be constructed using Intensional Knowledge, while the most external queries are expressed with standard SQL. The RDBMS functionality becomes extended toward that of the Deductive Databases

  13. Independent effects of relevance and arousal on deductive reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caparos, Serge; Blanchette, Isabelle

    2017-08-01

    Emotional content can have either a deleterious or a beneficial impact on logicality. Using standard deductive-reasoning tasks, we tested the hypothesis that the interplay of two factors - personal relevance and arousal - determines the nature of the effect of emotional content on logicality. Arousal was assessed using measures of skin conductance. Personal relevance was manipulated by asking participants to reason about semantic contents linked to an emotional event that they had experienced or not. Findings showed that (1) personal relevance exerts a positive effect on logicality while arousal exerts a negative effect, and that (2) these effects are independent of each other.

  14. What Contributes Most to High Health Care Costs? Health Care Spending in High Resource Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Daryl; Petrilla, Allison; Hallinan, Shawn; Taylor, Donald H; Schabert, Vernon F; Dubois, Robert W

    2016-02-01

    U.S. health care spending nearly doubled in the decade from 2000-2010. Although the pace of increase has moderated recently, the rate of growth of health care costs is expected to be higher than the growth in the economy for the near future. Previous studies have estimated that 5% of patients account for half of all health care costs, while the top 1% of spenders account for over 27% of costs. The distribution of health care expenditures by type of service and the prevalence of particular health conditions for these patients is not clear, and is likely to differ from the overall population. To examine health care spending patterns and what contributes to costs for the top 5% of managed health care users based on total expenditures. This retrospective observational study employed a large administrative claims database analysis of health care claims of managed care enrollees across the full age and care spectrum. Direct health care expenditures were compared during calendar year 2011 by place of service (outpatient, inpatient, and pharmacy), payer type (commercially insured, Medicare Advantage, and Medicaid managed care), and therapy area between the full population and high resource patients (HRP). The mean total expenditure per HRP during calendar year 2011 was $43,104 versus $3,955 per patient for the full population. Treatment of back disorders and osteoarthritis contributed the largest share of expenditures in both HRP and the full study population, while chronic renal failure, heart disease, and some oncology treatments accounted for disproportionately higher expenditures in HRP. The share of overall expenditures attributed to inpatient services was significantly higher for HRP (40.0%) compared with the full population (24.6%), while the share of expenditures attributed to pharmacy (HRP = 18.1%, full = 21.4%) and outpatient services (HRP = 41.9%, full = 54.1%) was reduced. This pattern was observed across payer type. While the use of physician

  15. Deductive and inductive reasoning in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pélissier, Marie-Claude; O'Connor, Kieron P

    2002-03-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that people with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) show an inductive reasoning style distinct from people with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and from participants in a non-anxious (NA) control group. The experimental procedure consisted of administering a range of six deductive and inductive tasks and a probabilistic task in order to compare reasoning processes between groups. Recruitment was in the Montreal area within a French-speaking population. The participants were 12 people with OCD, 12 NA controls and 10 people with GAD. Participants completed a series of written and oral reasoning tasks including the Wason Selection Task, a Bayesian probability task and other inductive tasks, designed by the authors. There were no differences between groups in deductive reasoning. On an inductive "bridging task", the participants with OCD always took longer than the NA control and GAD groups to infer a link between two statements and to elaborate on this possible link. The OCD group alone showed a significant decrease in their degree of conviction about an arbitrary statement after inductively generating reasons to support this statement. Differences in probabilistic reasoning replicated those of previous authors. The results pinpoint the importance of examining inference processes in people with OCD in order to further refine the clinical applications of behavioural-cognitive therapy for this disorder.

  16. 26 CFR 1.170A-1 - Charitable, etc., contributions and gifts; allowance of deduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., and the deduction for, amounts paid to maintain certain students as members of the taxpayer's... money, the amount of the contribution is the fair market value of the property at the time of the... performing donated services is deductible. Similarly, out-of-pocket transportation expenses necessarily...

  17. 26 CFR 1.280C-1 - Disallowance of certain deductions for wage or salary expenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... salary expenses. 1.280C-1 Section 1.280C-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... certain deductions for wage or salary expenses. If an employer elects to claim the targeted jobs credit... deduction for wage or salary expenses paid or incurred in the year the credit is earned by the amount...

  18. Deductive Reasoning to Teach Newton's Law of Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Han Su; Park, Jongwon

    2013-01-01

    Finding out about and then understanding the forces acting on a moving object, based on a description of the change in motion of this object, is an important part of the conceptual understanding of Newton's law of motion. Using Hempel's deductive-normative model for scientific explanation, we developed a deductive explanation task (DET),…

  19. 24 CFR 17.134 - Procedures for salary offset: when deductions may begin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Procedures for salary offset: when deductions may begin. 17.134 Section 17.134 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department... Government Salary Offset Provisions § 17.134 Procedures for salary offset: when deductions may begin. (a...

  20. 37 CFR 251.73 - Deduction of costs of distribution proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... OF CONGRESS COPYRIGHT ARBITRATION ROYALTY PANEL RULES AND PROCEDURES COPYRIGHT ARBITRATION ROYALTY PANEL RULES OF PROCEDURE Royalty Fee Distribution Proceedings § 251.73 Deduction of costs of... distributions of royalty fees are made, deduct the reasonable costs incurred by the Library of Congress and the...

  1. 29 CFR 3.6 - Payroll deductions permissible with the approval of the Secretary of Labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Payroll deductions permissible with the approval of the Secretary of Labor. 3.6 Section 3.6 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor CONTRACTORS AND SUBCONTRACTORS ON....6 Payroll deductions permissible with the approval of the Secretary of Labor. Any contractor or...

  2. 26 CFR 1.111-1 - Recovery of certain items previously deducted or credited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... including deductions with respect to depreciation, depletion, amortization, or amortizable bond premiums... reserve by a taxpayer on the reserve method of treating bad debts, it was not deducted, and it is... of such recovery exclusion, consideration must be given to the effect of net operating loss...

  3. 26 CFR 1.1382-3 - Taxable income of cooperatives; special deductions for exempt farmers' cooperatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... deductions for exempt farmers' cooperatives. 1.1382-3 Section 1.1382-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... Patrons § 1.1382-3 Taxable income of cooperatives; special deductions for exempt farmers' cooperatives. (a) In general. (1) Section 1382(c) provides that in determining the taxable income of a farmers', fruit...

  4. 26 CFR 1.162-25T - Deductions with respect to noncash fringe benefits (temporary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deductions with respect to noncash fringe... Individuals and Corporations § 1.162-25T Deductions with respect to noncash fringe benefits (temporary). (a) Employer. If an employer includes the value of a noncash fringe benefit in an employee's gross income, the...

  5. 26 CFR 1.162-25 - Deductions with respect to noncash fringe benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deductions with respect to noncash fringe... Corporations § 1.162-25 Deductions with respect to noncash fringe benefits. (a) [Reserved] (b) Employee. If an employer provides the use of a vehicle (as defined in § 1.61-21(e)(2)) to an employee as a noncash fringe...

  6. 76 FR 71450 - Deduction for Qualified Film and Television Production Costs; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ... Deduction for Qualified Film and Television Production Costs; Correction AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service... Register on Wednesday, October 19, 2011 (76 FR 64816) relating to deductions for the cost of producing film and television productions. DATES: This correction is effective on November 18, 2011, and is...

  7. 76 FR 64879 - Deduction for Qualified Film and Television Production Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ... Deduction for Qualified Film and Television Production Costs AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... regulations relating to deductions for the costs of producing film and television productions. Those temporary... production costs. (a) * * * (1) * * * (ii) [The text of this proposed amendment to Sec. 1.181- 1(a)(1)(ii) is...

  8. Proof Construction: Adolescent Development from Inductive to Deductive Problem-Solving Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltz, Carol; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Studied 100 adolescents' approaches to problem-solving proofs and reasoning competence tasks. Found that a formal level of reasoning competence is associated with a deductive approach. Results support the notion of a cognitive development progression from an inductive approach to a deductive approach. (ETB)

  9. Modeling the Effects of Argument Length and Validity on Inductive and Deductive Reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotello, Caren M.; Heit, Evan

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to assess models of inductive reasoning and deductive reasoning, the authors, in 3 experiments, examined the effects of argument length and logical validity on evaluation of arguments. In Experiments 1a and 1b, participants were given either induction or deduction instructions for a common set of stimuli. Two distinct effects were…

  10. 26 CFR 1.168(k)-1 - Additional first year depreciation deduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Additional first year depreciation deduction. 1... Corporations § 1.168(k)-1 Additional first year depreciation deduction. (a) Scope and definitions—(1) Scope. This section provides the rules for determining the 30-percent additional first year depreciation...

  11. An analytic tableaux model for Deductive Mastermind empirically tested with a massively used online learning system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gierasimczuk, N.; van der Maas, H.L.J.; Raijmakers, M.E.J.

    2013-01-01

    The paper is concerned with the psychological relevance of a logical model for deductive reasoning. We propose a new way to analyze logical reasoning in a deductive version of the Mastermind game implemented within a popular Dutch online educational learning system (Math Garden). Our main goal is to

  12. Cultural Difference in Stereotype Perceptions and Performances in Nonverbal Deductive Reasoning and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Regine; Niu, Weihua

    2013-01-01

    A total of 182 undergraduate students from China and the United States participated in a study examining the presence of stereotypical perceptions regarding creativity and deductive reasoning abilities, as well as the influence of stereotype on participants' performance on deductive reasoning and creativity in nonverbal form. The results showed…

  13. 26 CFR 20.2056(b)-4 - Marital deduction; valuation of interest passing to surviving spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... surviving spouse. (a) In general. The value, for the purpose of the marital deduction, of any deductible... expenses could include executor commissions and attorney fees (except to the extent of commissions or fees... executor properly makes an election under section 2056(b)(7) to treat as qualified terminable interest...

  14. 38 CFR 8.4 - Deduction of insurance premiums from compensation, retirement pay, or pension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS NATIONAL SERVICE LIFE INSURANCE Premiums § 8.4 Deduction of insurance premiums from compensation, retirement pay, or pension. The insured under a National Service life insurance policy which is not lapsed may authorize the monthly deduction of premiums from disability...

  15. Representation of the deduction with tetravalent logic: realisation of fast inference motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrier, F.

    1987-05-01

    Building automats for surveillance, control or diagnosis, can be done by artificial intelligence. They function according to the formalism of O ordre propositional logic. Deduction modes can then easily be represented in a trivalent logic with both efficiency and concision. One can obtain workable codes with low storage of high speed (env. 5000 rules per second). This leads us to develop and entry langage with extremely simple statement rules which can be learnt by experts in practically no time. Finally in order to generalize this principle and draw rules with multi-choice conclusions, (if... then the motor stops or the pressure goes down), rewriting these processes enable to return to an equivalent system without multi-choice conclusions, providing the same amount of informations with the possibility of deciding. This study has been used on 2 different cases: first it served as a tool to analyse reliability, (OLAF), second to help diagnosis breakdown of pressurized water-reactors [fr

  16. Workplace Financial Wellness Programs Help Employees Manage Health Care Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Cynthia; Smith, Michael C

    Employers and employees are navigating major changes in health insurance benefits, including the move to high-deductible health plans in conjunction with health savings accounts (HSAs). The HSA offers unique benefits that could prove instrumental in helping workers both navigate current health care expenses and build a nest egg for much larger health care costs in retirement. Yet employees often don't understand the HSA and how to best use it. How can employers help employees make wise benefits choices that work for their personal financial circumstances?

  17. Inferential Role and the Ideal of Deductive Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hofweber

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a prima facie strong case for a close connection between the meaning and inferential role of certain expressions, this connection seems seriously threatened by the semantic and logical paradoxes which rely on these inferential roles. Some philosophers have drawn radical conclusions from the paradoxes for the theory of meaning in general, and for which sentences in our language are true. I criticize these overreactions, and instead propose to distinguish two conceptions of inferential role. This distinction is closely tied to two conceptions of deductive logic, and it is the key, I argue, for understanding first the connection between meaning and inferential role, and second what the paradoxes show more generally.

  18. Diagnosing Allergic Contact Dermatitis Through Elimination, Perception, Detection and Deduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongpairoj, Korbkarn; Puangpet, Pailin; Thaiwat, Supitchaya; McFadden, John P

    2017-10-01

    Several authors have commented upon the skills of detection required in making a diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis. Here, we emphasise the search for clues in a systematic manner. We describe four stages as part of a systematic method for diagnosing allergic contact dermatitis. Firstly, elimination (or inclusion) of non-allergic diagnoses. Secondly, perception: the pre-patch test diagnosis and the 'three scenarios' principle. Thirdly, detection: optimising the sensitivity of the patch test process. Fourthly, deduction: diagnosing allergic contact dermatitis by associating the dermatitis with the allergen exposure. We further compare and contrast the pre-patch test history and examination with the markedly different one ('microhistory' and 'microexamination') used after patch testing. The importance of knowledge of contact dermatitis literature is emphasised with a review of recent publications. Finally, we also highlight the use of contact allergy profiling as an investigative tool in the diagnosis of allergic contact dermatitis.

  19. 26 CFR 25.2523(e)-1 - Marital deduction; life estate with power of appointment in donee spouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... satisfied and S is treated as having a general power to appoint 100/250 of the entire interest in the 250... 26 Internal Revenue 14 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Marital deduction; life estate with power of... Deductions § 25.2523(e)-1 Marital deduction; life estate with power of appointment in donee spouse. (a) In...

  20. State trends in premiums and deductibles, 2003-2009: how building on the Affordable Care Act will help stem the tide of rising costs and eroding benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Cathy; Stremikis, Kristof; How, Sabrina K H; Collins, Sara R

    2010-12-01

    Rapidly rising health insurance costs have strained U.S. families and employers in recent years. This issue brief examines data for all states on changes in private employer premiums and deductibles for 2003 and 2009. The analysis finds that premiums for businesses and their employees increased 41 percent across states from 2003 to 2009, while per-person deductibles jumped 77 percent in large as well as small firms. If these trends continue at the rate prior to enactment of the Affordable Care Act, the average premium for family coverage will rise 79 percent by 2020, to more than $23,000. The authors describe how health reform offers the potential to reduce insurance cost growth while improving value and protection. If reforms succeed in slowing premium growth by 1 percentage point annually in all states, by 2020 employers and families together will save $2,323 annually for family coverage, compared with projected trends.

  1. Barriers to health education in adolescents: health care providers' perspectives compared to high school adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedian, Kobra; Shahhosseini, Zohreh

    2015-11-01

    Although adolescence is marked by profound and dynamic changes, it is virtually neglected by health care providers, by society, and even by most parents, teachers, and health professionals. The aim of this study was to investigate barriers to health education in adolescents from health care providers' views compared to teens. The study population consisted of 72 health care providers and 402 high school female students in Northern Iran in 2012. They completed a self-administered questionnaire about their views on barriers to adolescents' health education. It is revealed that the major barrier to adolescents' health education from a health care providers' perspective is "Lack of private room for adolescents' health education", while "Lack of adolescents' interest to content of educational programs" is a significantly greater barrier to health education among adolescents. The results suggest that for adolescent health education, specific strategies should be used in adolescent health promotion programs.

  2. Hyperglycemia (High Blood Glucose)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Cure Your tax-deductible gift today can fund critical diabetes research and support vital diabetes education services ... or other emergency, the medical ID can provide critical information about the person's health status, such as ...

  3. 42 CFR 100.2 - Average cost of a health insurance policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Average cost of a health insurance policy. 100.2... VACCINE INJURY COMPENSATION § 100.2 Average cost of a health insurance policy. For purposes of determining..., less certain deductions. One of the deductions is the average cost of a health insurance policy, as...

  4. Using the deductible for patient channeling: did preferred providers gain patient volume?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Geest, Stéphanie A; Varkevisser, Marco

    2016-06-01

    In market-based health care systems, channeling patients to designated preferred providers can increase payer's bargaining clout, other things being equal. In the unique setting of the new Dutch health care system with regulated competition, this paper evaluates the impact of a 1-year natural experiment with patient channeling on providers' market shares. In 2009 a large regional Dutch health insurer designated preferred providers for two different procedures (cataract surgery and varicose veins treatment) and gave its enrollees a positive financial incentive for choosing them. That is, patients were exempted from paying their deductible when they went to a preferred provider. Using claims data over the period 2007-2009, we apply a difference-in-difference approach to study the impact of this channeling strategy on the allocation of patients across individual providers. Our estimation results show that, in the year of the experiment, preferred providers of varicose veins treatment on average experienced a significant increase in patient volume relative to non-preferred providers. However, for cataract surgery no significant effect is found. Possible explanations for the observed difference between both procedures may be the insurer's selection of preferred providers and the design of the channeling incentive resulting in different expected financial benefits for both patient groups.

  5. Service contract of Renault Kerax 440 truck with deductible and policy limit coverage modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustami, Pasaribu, Udjianna. S.; Husniah, Hennie

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we discuss a service contracts with coverage modification that only offer preventive maintenance and corrective maintenance for Renault Kerax 440 Truck by service contract provider. Corrective maintenance costs is modified with deductible and policy limit during the period of the service contract. Demand for a service contract is only influenced by the price of the service contract, deductible, and policy limit offered by producer to consumer. The main problem in this thesis is determining the price of a service contract, deductible, and policy limit to get maximum profit for producer for each of service contract.

  6. The Possibility of Deduction of Environmental Liabilities in Expropriation for Each Breach of Environmental Rural Property

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Nasser Sefer

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to address the deductibility of environmental liability indemnification of quantum measured in the expropriation of rural property that failed to fulfill its environmental function. The Federal Constitution of 1988, provided for the possibility to expropriate rural property that failed to comply with its social and environmental role. On the subject, the Federal Regional Court of the 1st Region does not signed a single position on this opportunity to deduct the environmental liability, generating as a result, legal uncertainty for landowners and the community itself, being the Institute of Colonization and Agrarian Reform - INCRA the correct deduction.

  7. Aristotle’s Theory of Deduction and Paraconsistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro L. Gomes

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In the Organon Aristotle describes some deductive schemata in which inconsistencies do not entail the trivialization of the logical theory involved. This thesis is corroborated by three different theoretical topics by him discussed, which are presented in this paper. We analyse inference schema used by Aristotle in the Protrepticus and the method of indirect demonstration for categorical syllogisms. Both methods exemplify as Aristotle employs classical reductio ad absurdum strategies. Following, we discuss valid syllogisms from opposite premises (contrary and contradictory studied by the Stagerian in the Analytica Priora (B15. According to him, the following syllogisms are valid from opposite premises, in which small Latin letters stand for terms such as subject and predicate, and capital Latin letters stand for the categorical propositions such as in the traditional notation: (i in the second figure, Eba,Aba ` Eaa (Cesare, Aba, Eba ` Eaa (Camestres, Eba, I ba ` Oaa (Festino, and Aba,Oba ` Oaa (Baroco; (ii in the third one, Eab,Aab ` Oaa (Felapton, Oab,Aab ` Oaa (Bocardo and Eab, Iab ` Oaa (Ferison. Finally, we discuss the passage from the Analytica Posteriora (A11 in which Aristotle states that the Principle of Non-Contradiction is not generally presupposed in all demonstrations (scientific syllogisms, but only in those in which the conclusion must be proved from the Principle; the Stagerian states that if a syllogism of the first figure has the major term consistent, the other terms of the demonstration can be each one separately inconsistent. These results allow us to propose an interpretation of his deductive theory as a broad sense paraconsistent theory. Firstly, we proceed to a hermeneutical analysis, evaluating its logical significance and the interplay of the results with some other points of Aristotle’s philosophy. Secondly, we point to a logical interpretation of the Aristotelian syllogisms from opposite premises in the antilogisms

  8. 29 CFR 541.603 - Effect of improper deductions from salary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATIONS DEFINING AND DELIMITING THE EXEMPTIONS FOR EXECUTIVE, ADMINISTRATIVE, PROFESSIONAL, COMPUTER AND OUTSIDE SALES EMPLOYEES Salary Requirements § 541.603 Effect of improper deductions from salary. (a) An...

  9. The legitimating fact in the transcendental deduction of the categories: on Dieter Henrich's reading of Kant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Klotz

    Full Text Available This article reconstructs the principal moments of Dieter Henrich's work on Immanuel Kant's theoretical philosophy. Henrich seeks to clarify and regain the fundaments of Kant's theory of knowledge - from which his followers, according to him, have distanced themselves - based on the analysis of the "transcendental deduction of the categories". Firstly, Henrich investigates the proof structure of deduction, comparing the first and the second edition of Critique of Pure Reason. Secondly, he investigates, in the Kantian argument, the relationship between the identity principle of self-consciousness and objectivity. Finally, extending the comparison to Critique of Practical Reason, Henrich elucidates the program and methodology in deduction, showing that the idea of a legitimating fact, borrowed from the juridical notion of a deduction, becomes the fundamental element. We analyse the problems raised by the conception of a philosophical argument based on fundamental "facts".

  10. 26 CFR 1.276-1 - Disallowance of deductions for certain indirect contributions to political parties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no deduction shall be allowed for income tax purposes in respect of... entertainment, food, and the ballroom, and all proceeds are paid to the hotel where the function is held, with...

  11. 78 FR 18235 - Treatment of Services Under Section 482; Allocation of Income and Deductions From Intangible...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service 26 CFR Part 1 Treatment of Services Under Section 482; Allocation of Income and Deductions From Intangible Property; Stewardship Expense CFR...; 8:45 am] BILLING CODE 1505-01-D ...

  12. An examination of sleep health, lifestyle and mental health in junior high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hideki; Taira, Kazuhiko; Arakawa, Masashi; Masuda, Atushi; Yamamoto, Yukari; Komoda, Yoko; Kadegaru, Hathuko; Shirakawa, Shuichiro

    2002-06-01

    The factors that influence sleep health and mental health in junior high school students' lifestyles was examined. The proportion of students who replied that they feel bad in the morning, and who do not have breakfast was significantly higher in poor sleepers. The proportion of students who regularly take exercise was significantly lower among poor sleepers. Compared with good sleepers, poor sleepers had a higher number of illnesses and their General Health Questionnaire score was worse. The study's results suggest that sleep health is closely related to both physical and mental health, and that habits such as exercise, and regular sleeping and eating, are important for maintaining and improving students' sleep health.

  13. High-reliability health care: getting there from here.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassin, Mark R; Loeb, Jerod M

    2013-09-01

    Despite serious and widespread efforts to improve the quality of health care, many patients still suffer preventable harm every day. Hospitals find improvement difficult to sustain, and they suffer "project fatigue" because so many problems need attention. No hospitals or health systems have achieved consistent excellence throughout their institutions. High-reliability science is the study of organizations in industries like commercial aviation and nuclear power that operate under hazardous conditions while maintaining safety levels that are far better than those of health care. Adapting and applying the lessons of this science to health care offer the promise of enabling hospitals to reach levels of quality and safety that are comparable to those of the best high-reliability organizations. We combined the Joint Commission's knowledge of health care organizations with knowledge from the published literature and from experts in high-reliability industries and leading safety scholars outside health care. We developed a conceptual and practical framework for assessing hospitals' readiness for and progress toward high reliability. By iterative testing with hospital leaders, we refined the framework and, for each of its fourteen components, defined stages of maturity through which we believe hospitals must pass to reach high reliability. We discovered that the ways that high-reliability organizations generate and maintain high levels of safety cannot be directly applied to today's hospitals. We defined a series of incremental changes that hospitals should undertake to progress toward high reliability. These changes involve the leadership's commitment to achieving zero patient harm, a fully functional culture of safety throughout the organization, and the widespread deployment of highly effective process improvement tools. Hospitals can make substantial progress toward high reliability by undertaking several specific organizational change initiatives. Further research

  14. High-Reliability Health Care: Getting There from Here

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassin, Mark R; Loeb, Jerod M

    2013-01-01

    Context Despite serious and widespread efforts to improve the quality of health care, many patients still suffer preventable harm every day. Hospitals find improvement difficult to sustain, and they suffer “project fatigue” because so many problems need attention. No hospitals or health systems have achieved consistent excellence throughout their institutions. High-reliability science is the study of organizations in industries like commercial aviation and nuclear power that operate under hazardous conditions while maintaining safety levels that are far better than those of health care. Adapting and applying the lessons of this science to health care offer the promise of enabling hospitals to reach levels of quality and safety that are comparable to those of the best high-reliability organizations. Methods We combined the Joint Commission's knowledge of health care organizations with knowledge from the published literature and from experts in high-reliability industries and leading safety scholars outside health care. We developed a conceptual and practical framework for assessing hospitals’ readiness for and progress toward high reliability. By iterative testing with hospital leaders, we refined the framework and, for each of its fourteen components, defined stages of maturity through which we believe hospitals must pass to reach high reliability. Findings We discovered that the ways that high-reliability organizations generate and maintain high levels of safety cannot be directly applied to today's hospitals. We defined a series of incremental changes that hospitals should undertake to progress toward high reliability. These changes involve the leadership's commitment to achieving zero patient harm, a fully functional culture of safety throughout the organization, and the widespread deployment of highly effective process improvement tools. Conclusions Hospitals can make substantial progress toward high reliability by undertaking several specific

  15. Exploring Qualitatively-Derived Concepts: Inductive—Deductive Pitfalls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice M. Morse

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Analytic induction is a sacred tenet of qualitative inquiry. 1 Therefore, when one begins a project focusing on concept of interest (rather than allowing the concepts to emerge from the data per se, how does one maintain a valid approach? When commencing inquiry with a chosen concept or phenomena of interest, rather than with a question from the data per se about what is going on, how does one control deductive tendencies to see what one desires to see and which threaten validity? Difficulties stem from the nature of induction itself – Is analytic induction an impossible operation in qualitative research, as Popper (1963/65 suggests? In this section, we first discuss Popper's concern, followed by a discussion of two major threats that may prevent an inductive approach in qualitative research.2 The first threat is the “pink elephant paradox;? the second is the avoidance of conceptual tunnel vision or, specifically, how does the researcher decontextualize the concept of interest from the surrounding context and thereby avoid the tendency to consider all data to be pertinent to the concept of interest? As we explore each of these pitfalls, and we present methodological strategies to maintain both the integrity of the concept and the integrity of the research.

  16. A system for deduction-based formal verification of workflow-oriented software models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimek Radosław

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The work concerns formal verification of workflow-oriented software models using the deductive approach. The formal correctness of a model’s behaviour is considered. Manually building logical specifications, which are regarded as a set of temporal logic formulas, seems to be a significant obstacle for an inexperienced user when applying the deductive approach. A system, along with its architecture, for deduction-based verification of workflow-oriented models is proposed. The process inference is based on the semantic tableaux method, which has some advantages when compared with traditional deduction strategies. The algorithm for automatic generation of logical specifications is proposed. The generation procedure is based on predefined workflow patterns for BPMN, which is a standard and dominant notation for the modeling of business processes. The main idea behind the approach is to consider patterns, defined in terms of temporal logic, as a kind of (logical primitives which enable the transformation of models to temporal logic formulas constituting a logical specification. Automation of the generation process is crucial for bridging the gap between the intuitiveness of deductive reasoning and the difficulty of its practical application when logical specifications are built manually. This approach has gone some way towards supporting, hopefully enhancing, our understanding of deduction-based formal verification of workflow-oriented models.

  17. The Dimensionality of Reasoning: Inductive and Deductive Inference can be Explained by a Single Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Brett K; Stephens, Rachel G; Ngo, Jeremy; Dunn, John C

    2018-02-01

    Three-experiments examined the number of qualitatively different processing dimensions needed to account for inductive and deductive reasoning. In each study, participants were presented with arguments that varied in logical validity and consistency with background knowledge (believability), and evaluated them according to deductive criteria (whether the conclusion was necessarily true given the premises) or inductive criteria (whether the conclusion was plausible given the premises). We examined factors including working memory load (Experiments 1 and 2), individual working memory capacity (Experiments 1 and 2), and decision time (Experiment 3), which according to dual-processing theories, modulate the contribution of heuristic and analytic processes to reasoning. A number of empirical dissociations were found. Argument validity affected deduction more than induction. Argument believability affected induction more than deduction. Lower working memory capacity reduced sensitivity to argument validity and increased sensitivity to argument believability, especially under induction instructions. Reduced decision time led to decreased sensitivity to argument validity. State-trace analyses of each experiment, however, found that only a single underlying dimension was required to explain patterns of inductive and deductive judgments. These results show that the dissociations, which have traditionally been seen as supporting dual-processing models of reasoning, are consistent with a single-process model that assumes a common evidentiary scale for induction and deduction. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Many Mobile Health Apps Target High-Need, High-Cost Populations, But Gaps Remain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Karandeep; Drouin, Kaitlin; Newmark, Lisa P; Lee, JaeHo; Faxvaag, Arild; Rozenblum, Ronen; Pabo, Erika A; Landman, Adam; Klinger, Elissa; Bates, David W

    2016-12-01

    With rising smartphone ownership, mobile health applications (mHealth apps) have the potential to support high-need, high-cost populations in managing their health. While the number of available mHealth apps has grown substantially, no clear strategy has emerged on how providers should evaluate and recommend such apps to patients. Key stakeholders, including medical professional societies, insurers, and policy makers, have largely avoided formally recommending apps, which forces patients to obtain recommendations from other sources. To help stakeholders overcome barriers to reviewing and recommending apps, we evaluated 137 patient-facing mHealth apps-those intended for use by patients to manage their health-that were highly rated by consumers and recommended by experts and that targeted high-need, high-cost populations. We found that there is a wide variety of apps in the marketplace but that few apps address the needs of the patients who could benefit the most. We also found that consumers' ratings were poor indications of apps' clinical utility or usability and that most apps did not respond appropriately when a user entered potentially dangerous health information. Going forward, data privacy and security will continue to be major concerns in the dissemination of mHealth apps. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  19. Health effects in residents of regions with high background radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    Possible health problems created by high natural levels of background radiation are hard to detect, partly because the health problems involved would exist to some degree irrespective of radiation exposure, partly because other factors affect the incidence of such problems, and partly because the differences between normal background radiation levels and radiation levels found in most high-radiation areas are not extreme. Nevertheless, the need to know about such health effects is evident, and so various studies conducted over the past 30 years have sought to determine whether those effects exist and what they are. Overall, however, the fragmentary and uncertain nature of many of these findings makes it hard to draw firm conclusions about the health risks involved or the desirability of countermeasures. So despite considerable efforts and some progress over the past three decades, the need for a clear quantitative assessment of the consequences is as great as ever

  20. Childhood and Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    From, Ditte-Marie

    During the past decades, the number of overweight and obese individuals has increased throughout the Danish population. This fact has led to a strong political focus on health promotion especially among children and adolescents to prevent further escalation. The prevailing political point of view...... on the matter has deducted the following conclusion: Expansion on the waistline equals expansion on the state budget due to low labour capacity and high costs on social services and health care. Where the food industry finds profit potential in the population’s love for (good) food, the State fears chaos...... and a need to act before the so-called obesity epidemic becomes uncontrollable. Governmental health priorities are reproduced in local council family programmes where children and their parents are offered a chance to gain inspiration and knowledge about a healthier lifestyle and are provided tools to re...

  1. Consumer decision making in the individual health insurance market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquis, M Susan; Buntin, Melinda Beeuwkes; Escarce, José J; Kapur, Kanika; Louis, Thomas A; Yegian, Jill M

    2006-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results from a study of consumer decision making in California's individual health insurance market. We conclude that price subsidies will have only modest effects on participation and that efforts to reduce nonprice barriers might be just as effective. We also find that there is substantial pooling in the individual market and that it increases over time because people who become sick can continue coverage without new underwriting. Finally, we show that people prefer more-generous benefits and that it is difficult to induce people in poor health to enroll in high-deductible health plans.

  2. Research of General Deduction Optimization on PEMFC Manufacturing with Fuzzy Linguistic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-Syung Lan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In control questions, multiquality parameters are the most suitable, as they are everlasting in highly complex misalignment relations; the relationship between the parameter and quality of mutual influence is complex, and often massive redundant operations must be achievable by the test installation. Because the most suitable multiquality parameter is difficult to achieve, this study designates the proton exchange membrane fuel cell as the topic, takes the inlet temperature, inlet pressure, and incoming flow speed as the controlling elements, uses conformity fuzzy meaning analysis and the ideal solution similar order by chance law (TOPSIS, and discusses the parameters to control the influences of the quality goal. As outlet temperature, outlet pressure, pressure drop do not operate after the experiment, this study uses the meaning deduction method and develops a set of the most suitable control mechanisms. The research results show that this study develops a quality decision scheme for a set of meanings by using the misalignment and a high order complexity question. It also penetrates the meaning method, which guarantees that the quality and experimental efficiency may elevate the competitive power of science and technological undertakings development, effectively economize costs, and provide a set of economies and perspectives. The multiqualities are the most suitable control plan which meets the demands of practice.

  3. The impact of Telephonic Health Coaching on Health Outcomes in a High-risk Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Karen L; Jonk, Yvonne; O'Connor, Heidi; Riise, Kirsten Sundgaard; Eisenberg, David M; Kreitzer, Mary Jo

    2013-05-01

    Health coaching is a client-centric process to increase motivation and self-efficacy that supports sustainable lifestyle behavior changes and active management of health conditions. This study describes an intervention offered as a benefit to health plan members and examines health and behavioral outcomes of participants. High-risk health plan enrollees were invited to participate in a telephonic health coaching intervention addressing the whole person and focusing on motivating health behavior changes. Outcomes of self-reported lifestyle behaviors, perceived health, stress levels, quality of life, readiness to make changes, and patient activation levels were reported at baseline and upon program completion. Retrospectively, these data were extracted from administrative and health coaching records of participants during the first 2 full years of the program. Less than 7% of the 114 615 potential candidates self-selected to actively participate in health coaching, those with the highest chronic disease load being the most likely to participate. Of 6940 active participants, 1082 fully completed health inventories, with 570 completing Patient Activation Measure (PAM). The conditions most often represented in the active participants were depression, congestive heart failure, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, osteoporosis, asthma, and low back pain. In 6 months or less, 89% of participants met at least one goal. Significant improvements occurred in stress levels, healthy eating, exercise levels, and physical and emotional health, as well as in readiness to make change and PAM scores. The types of client-selected goals most often met were physical activity, eating habits, stress management, emotional health, sleep, and pain management, resulting in improved overall quality of life regardless of condition. Positive shifts in activation levels and readiness to change suggest that health coaching is an intervention deserving of future prospective research studies to

  4. Advancing organizational health literacy in health care organizations serving high-needs populations: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Nancy L; Wray, Ricardo J; Zellin, Stacie; Gautam, Kanak; Jupka, Keri

    2012-01-01

    Health care organizations, well positioned to address health literacy, are beginning to shift their systems and policies to support health literacy efforts. Organizations can identify barriers, emphasize and leverage their strengths, and initiate activities that promote health literacy-related practices. The current project employed an open-ended approach to conduct a needs assessment of rural federally qualified health center clinics. Using customized assessment tools, the collaborators were then able to determine priorities for changing organizational structures and policies in order to support continued health literacy efforts. Six domains of organizational health literacy were measured with three methods: environmental assessments, patient interviews, and key informant interviews with staff and providers. Subsequent strategic planning was conducted by collaborators from the academic and clinic teams and resulted in a focused, context-appropriate action plan. The needs assessment revealed several gaps in organizational health literacy practices, such as low awareness of health literacy within the organization and variation in perceived values of protocols, interstaff communication, and patient communication. Facilitators included high employee morale and patient satisfaction. The resulting targeted action plan considered the organization's culture as revealed in the interviews, informing a collaborative process well suited to improving organizational structures and systems to support health literacy best practices. The customized needs assessment contributed to an ongoing collaborative process to implement organizational changes that aided in addressing health literacy needs.

  5. What is the role of induction and deduction in reasoning and scientific inquiry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Anton E.

    2005-08-01

    A long-standing and continuing controversy exists regarding the role of induction and deduction in reasoning and in scientific inquiry. Given the inherent difficulty in reconstructing reasoning patterns based on personal and historical accounts, evidence about the nature of human reasoning in scientific inquiry has been sought from a controlled experiment designed to identify the role played by enumerative induction and deduction in cognition as well as from the relatively new field of neural modeling. Both experimental results and the neurological models imply that induction across a limited set of observations plays no role in task performance and in reasoning. Therefore, support has been obtained for Popper's hypothesis that enumerative induction does not exist as a psychological process. Instead, people appear to process information in terms of increasingly abstract cycles of hypothetico-deductive reasoning. Consequently, science instruction should provide students with opportunities to generate and test increasingly complex and abstract hypotheses and theories in a hypothetico-deductive manner. In this way students can be expected to become increasingly conscious of their underlying hypothetico-deductive thought processes, increasingly skilled in their application, and hence increasingly scientifically literate.

  6. Are there reasons to challenge a symbolic computationalist approach in explaining deductive reasoning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiciuc, Lucia E

    2008-06-01

    The majority of the existing theories explaining deductive reasoning could be included in a classic computationalist approach of the cognitive processes. In fact, deductive reasoning could be seen to be the pinnacle of the symbolic computationalism, its last fortress to be defended in the face of new, dynamic, and ecological perspectives over cognition. But are there weak points in that position regarding deductive reasoning? What would be the reasons for which new perspectives could gain in credibility? What could be their most important tenets? The answers given to those questions in the paper include two main points. The first one is that the present empirical data could not sustain unambiguously one view over the other, that they are obtained in artificial experimental conditions, and that there are data that are not easily explainable using the traditional computationalist paradigm. The second one is that approaching the deductive reasoning from dynamic and ecological perspectives could have significant advantages. The most obvious one is the possibility to integrate more easily the research regarding the deductive reasoning with the results obtained in other domains of the psychology (especially in what respects the lower cognitive processes), in artificial intelligence or in neurophysiology. The reasons for that would be that such perspectives, as they are sketched in the paper, would imply, essentially, processes of second-order pattern formation and recognition (as it is the case for perception), embodied cognition, and dynamic processes as the brain ones are.

  7. Health. Nevada Competency-Based Adult High School Diploma Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevada Univ., Las Vegas. Coll. of Education.

    This document is one of ten curriculum guides developed by the Nevada Competency-Based Adult High School Diploma (CBAHSD) Project. This curriculum guide on health is divided into ten topics. The topics included are Nutrition, Reproduction, Menstruation, Contraception, Alcohol Abuse, Tobacco, Immunization, Disease, Accident Prevention, and…

  8. Investigating Primary School Mathematics Teachers’ Deductive Reasoning Ability through Varignon’s Theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jupri, A.

    2017-09-01

    The responsibility to promote the growth of deductive reasoning ability of school students through learning mathematics is in the hand of mathematics teachers and particularly primary school mathematics teachers. However, how we can make sure whether teachers are able to do so. To investigate this issue, we conducted a three-step of an exploratory survey study. First, we designed tasks from the Varignon’s theorem. Second, we administered an individual written test involving twenty master students of primary education program, in which they are prospective of and primary school mathematics teachers. Finally, we address the results in the light of Van Hiele theory. The results showed that participated students lack of deductive reasoning ability in the context of geometry. For further research, we wonder whether the designed tasks are also applicable to assess student deductive reasoning ability if the students have acquired appropriate teaching.

  9. Mental Health Services Utilization and Expenditures Among Children Enrolled in Employer-Sponsored Health Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Angela Wangari; Yuan, Yiyang; Cabral, Howard J

    2017-05-01

    Mental illness in children increases the risk of developing mental health disorders in adulthood, and reduces physical and emotional well-being across the life course. The Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA, 2008) aimed to improve access to mental health treatment by requiring employer-sponsored health plans to include insurance coverage for behavioral health services. Investigators used IBM Watson/Truven Analytics MarketScan claims data (2007-2013) to examine: (1) the distribution of mental illness; (2) trends in utilization and out-of-pocket expenditures; and (3) the overall effect of the MHPAEA on mental health services utilization and out-of-pocket expenditures among privately-insured children aged 3 to 17 with mental health disorders. Multivariate Poisson regression and linear regression modeling techniques were used. Mental health services use for outpatient behavioral health therapy (BHT) was higher in the years after the implementation of the MHPAEA (2010-2013). Specifically, before the MHPAEA implementation, the annual total visits for BHT provided by mental health physicians were 17.1% lower and 2.5% lower for BHT by mental health professionals, compared to years when MHPAEA was in effect. Children covered by consumer-driven and high-deductible plans had significantly higher out-of-pocket expenditures for BHT compared to those enrolled PPOs. Our findings demonstrate increased mental health services use and higher out-of-pocket costs per outpatient visit after implementation of the MHPAEA. As consumer-driven and high-deductible health plans continue to grow, enrollees need to be cognizant of the impact of health insurance benefit designs on health services offered in these plans. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. 26 CFR 301.6682-1 - False information with respect to withholding allowances based on itemized deductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false False information with respect to withholding allowances based on itemized deductions. 301.6682-1 Section 301.6682-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... Amounts § 301.6682-1 False information with respect to withholding allowances based on itemized deductions...

  11. 26 CFR 1.179B-1T - Deduction for capital costs incurred in complying with Environmental Protection Agency sulfur...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deduction for capital costs incurred in... capital costs incurred in complying with Environmental Protection Agency sulfur regulations (temporary... the deduction allowable under section 179B(a) for qualified capital costs paid or incurred by a small...

  12. 26 CFR 1.221-2 - Deduction for interest due and paid on qualified education loans before January 1, 2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Individuals § 1.221-2 Deduction for interest due and paid on qualified education loans before January 1, 2002... interest due and paid by the taxpayer during the taxable year on a qualified education loan. The deduction is allowed only with respect to interest due and paid on a qualified education loan during the first...

  13. 29 CFR 3.5 - Payroll deductions permissible without application to or approval of the Secretary of Labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Payroll deductions permissible without application to or approval of the Secretary of Labor. 3.5 Section 3.5 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor CONTRACTORS AND... STATES § 3.5 Payroll deductions permissible without application to or approval of the Secretary of Labor...

  14. 18 CFR 367.4082 - Account 408.2, Taxes other than income taxes, other income and deductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... ACT OF 2005, FEDERAL POWER ACT AND NATURAL GAS ACT Income Statement Chart of Accounts Service Company Operating Income § 367.4082 Account 408.2, Taxes other than income taxes, other income and deductions. This... other than income taxes, other income and deductions. 367.4082 Section 367.4082 Conservation of Power...

  15. 26 CFR 1.280F-2T - Limitations on recovery deductions and the investment tax credit for certain passenger...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... investment tax credit for certain passenger automobiles (temporary). 1.280F-2T Section 1.280F-2T Internal... TAXES Items Not Deductible § 1.280F-2T Limitations on recovery deductions and the investment tax credit for certain passenger automobiles (temporary). (a) Limitation on amount of investment tax credit—(1...

  16. 18 CFR 367.4112 - Account 411.2, Provision for deferred income taxes-Credit, other income and deductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., Provision for deferred income taxes-Credit, other income and deductions. 367.4112 Section 367.4112... deferred taxes and deferrals of taxes, credit, that relate to other income and deductions. ... Accounts Service Company Operating Income § 367.4112 Account 411.2, Provision for deferred income taxes...

  17. 26 CFR 1.163-3 - Deduction for discount on bond issued on or before May 27, 1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... case of a callable bond, at the earlier call date) over the issue price of the bond (as defined in... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Deduction for discount on bond issued on or... and Corporations § 1.163-3 Deduction for discount on bond issued on or before May 27, 1969. (a...

  18. High Intensity Interval Training for Maximizing Health Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Trine; Aamot, Inger-Lise; Haykowsky, Mark; Rognmo, Øivind

    Regular physical activity and exercise training are important actions to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and maintain health throughout life. There is solid evidence that exercise is an effective preventative strategy against at least 25 medical conditions, including cardiovascular disease, stroke, hypertension, colon and breast cancer, and type 2 diabetes. Traditionally, endurance exercise training (ET) to improve health related outcomes has consisted of low- to moderate ET intensity. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that higher exercise intensities may be superior to moderate intensity for maximizing health outcomes. The primary objective of this review is to discuss how aerobic high-intensity interval training (HIIT) as compared to moderate continuous training may maximize outcomes, and to provide practical advices for successful clinical and home-based HIIT. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Health effects in residents of high background radiation regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    Although the health effects of radiation doses in occupationally exposed persons had received attention, it was not until the 1950s, when the atmospheric atom bomb tests of the United States and the Soviet Union had raised the level of environmental radioactivity, that the long-term effects of low-level radiation dosage became a matter of popular concern throughout the world. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) was created, and the World Health Organization (WHO) appointed an expert committee to provide advice concerning radiation and human health. In its first report, the WHO expert committee identified several areas of high natural radiation where studies of the exposed population might possibly provide information concerning the effects of chromic low-level radiation dosage

  20. Seeing Health Insurance and HealthCare.gov Through the Eyes of Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Charlene A; Asch, David A; Vinoya, Cjloe M; Ford, Carol A; Baker, Tom; Town, Robert; Merchant, Raina M

    2015-08-01

    We describe young adults' perspectives on health insurance and HealthCare.gov, including their attitudes toward health insurance, health insurance literacy, and benefit and plan preferences. We observed young adults aged 19-30 years in Philadelphia from January to March 2014 as they shopped for health insurance on HealthCare.gov. Participants were then interviewed to elicit their perceived advantages and disadvantages of insurance and factors considered important for plan selection. A 1-month follow-up interview assessed participants' plan enrollment decisions and intended use of health insurance. Data were analyzed using qualitative methodology, and salience scores were calculated for free-listing responses. We enrolled 33 highly educated young adults; 27 completed the follow-up interview. The most salient advantages of health insurance for young adults were access to preventive or primary care (salience score .28) and peace of mind (.27). The most salient disadvantage was the financial strain of paying for health insurance (.72). Participants revealed poor health insurance literacy with 48% incorrectly defining deductible and 78% incorrectly defining coinsurance. The most salient factors reported to influence plan selection were deductible (.48) and premium (.45) amounts as well as preventive care (.21) coverage. The most common intended health insurance use was primary care. Eight participants enrolled in HealthCare.gov plans: six selected silver plans, and three qualified for tax credits. Young adults' perspective on health insurance and enrollment via HealthCare.gov can inform strategies to design health insurance plans and communication about these plans in a way that engages and meets the needs of young adult populations. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Some health aspects of high-energy society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, E.

    1975-01-01

    The intensive use of inanimate energy in industrialized or high-energy society has subsidized research, development, and higher education and has brought about changes in nutrition and life-style that have led to great advances in public health and medicine. The emergence of high-energy society, however, has brought with it a new set of health problems, within which the direct effects of measurable pollution may turn out to be more easily dealt with than some of the indirect and hard-to-calculate consequences of high energy use. High-energy society is critically dependent on energy-intensive transport systems, and these systems in turn are dependent upon a continual supply of petroleum products. In the short-term, the aorta of any industrialized nation is its petroleum-supply network. In the longer run, high-energy society faces the depletion and exhaustion of all the nonrenewable resources on which it has fed. Even if technology provides adequate substitute energy systems, high-energy society may deteriorate socially from inability to cope with affluence

  2. Health Food Supplements (Health Food Highly Nutritious From Chlorella And Oil Catfish (Pangasius hypopthalmus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahrul Syahrul

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractThe utilization of microalgae as a food ingredient considered effective, because in addition to alternative food sources also contains nutrients chlorella microalgae in particular is very good for health. This microalgae rich in protein (60.5%, fat (11%, carbohydrates (20.1%, water, dietary fiber, vitamins and minerals Besides these microalgae contain pigments (chlorophyll, tocopherol and the active component (antimicrobial and antioxidants. This is what underlies microalgae is very useful to be used as a source of raw materials of health food supplements. Currently the health food supplements have become a necessity for people to maintain their health in order to remain vibrant. This study aims to produce high nutritious health food supplements from raw material chlorella enriched with fish protein concentrate and oil catfish. The method used in the manufacture of high nutritious health food supplement is a method of microencapsulation with different formulations. The results showed that the best formulations based on the profile of amino acids, fatty acids and standards AAE per day especially essential fatty acids oleic and linoleic is formulation B (chlorella 2%, 1% fish oil and fish protein concentrate 1%.

  3. Controlling Health Care Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessoff, Alan

    2009-01-01

    This article examines issues on health care costs and describes measures taken by public districts to reduce spending. As in most companies in America, health plan designs in public districts are being changed to reflect higher out-of-pocket costs, such as higher deductibles on visits to providers, hospital stays, and prescription drugs. District…

  4. 26 CFR 1.642(h)-2 - Excess deductions on termination of an estate or trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... trust. 1.642(h)-2 Section 1.642(h)-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Estates, Trusts, and Beneficiaries § 1.642(h)-2...)) in excess of gross income, the excess is allowed under section 642(h)(2) as a deduction to the...

  5. 26 CFR 20.2044-1 - Certain property for which marital deduction was previously allowed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... inclusion of property in the decedent-spouse's gross estate under this section, the executor of the spouse's... interest. For example, to establish that a deduction was not taken, the executor may produce a copy of the..., the executor may establish that no return was filed on the original transfer by the decedent because...

  6. 26 CFR 20.2106-2 - Estates of nonresidents not citizens; deductions for expenses, losses, etc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... deductions, the executor should submit a certified copy of the schedule of liabilities, claims against the... schedule was filed, the executor should submit a certified copy of the schedule of these liabilities... schedules were filed, then there should be submitted a written statement of the foreign executor containing...

  7. 26 CFR 1.611-1 - Allowance of deduction for depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Allowance of deduction for depletion. 1.611-1... depletion. (a) Depletion of mines, oil and gas wells, other natural deposits, and timber—(1) In general... mines, oil and gas wells, other natural deposits, and timber, a reasonable allowance for depletion. In...

  8. Deductive Reasoning and Social Anxiety : Evidence for a Fear-confirming Belief Bias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroling, Maartje S.; de Jong, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between belief bias and fear of negative evaluation. Belief bias refers to a bias in deductive reasoning that acts to confirm rather than falsify prior beliefs. Participants (N = 52) with varying levels of fear of negative evaluation completed a belief bias

  9. 76 FR 60721 - Deduction for Qualified Film and Television Production Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... which the costs are paid (for an owner who uses the cash receipts and disbursements method of accounting) or incurred (for an owner who uses an accrual method of accounting). The deduction under section 181... Bernard P. Harvey, Office of Associate Chief Counsel (Income Tax and Accounting). However, other personnel...

  10. 26 CFR 1.691(b)-1 - Allowance of deductions and credit in respect to decedents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Income in Respect of Decedents § 1.691(b)-1..., and taxes described in sections 162, 163, 164, and 212 for which the decedent (or a prior decedent... to pay such obligation, as a deduction by the person who by bequest, devise, or inheritance from the...

  11. 7 CFR 400.136 - Procedures for salary offset; when deductions may begin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for salary offset; when deductions may... Management-Regulations for the 1986 and Succeeding Crop Years § 400.136 Procedures for salary offset; when... amount outlined in the Notice of Intent to collect from the employee's salary, as provided for in § 400...

  12. 38 CFR 1.991 - Procedures for salary offset: when deductions may begin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedures for salary offset: when deductions may begin. 1.991 Section 1.991 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL PROVISIONS Salary Offset Provisions § 1.991 Procedures for salary offset...

  13. 26 CFR 1.825-1 - Unused loss deduction; in general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Mutual Insurance Companies (other Than Life and Certain Marine Insurance Companies and Other Than Fire Or Flood Insurance Companies Which Operate on Basis of Perpetual Policies Or...) provides that the unused loss deduction of a mutual insurance company subject to the tax imposed by section...

  14. Take the "Ow!" Out of Taxes Now: How to Plan for and Increase Your Medical Deductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medisky, Shannon M.

    2009-01-01

    Each year countless taxpayers overpay simply because they're not taking full advantage of medical deductions. Individuals with disabilities are especially at risk. Time and energy spent running around to doctor visits, therapy sessions, and the like can leave little left to spend on preparing taxes. Fortunately, with a little effort year round and…

  15. Student Teachers’ Proof Schemes on Proof Tasks Involving Inequality: Deductive or Inductive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosyidi, A. H.; Kohar, A. W.

    2018-01-01

    Exploring student teachers’ proof ability is crucial as it is important for improving the quality of their learning process and help their future students learn how to construct a proof. Hence, this study aims at exploring at the proof schemes of student teachers in the beginning of their studies. Data were collected from 130 proofs resulted by 65 Indonesian student teachers on two proof tasks involving algebraic inequality. To analyse, the proofs were classified into the refined proof schemes level proposed by Lee (2016) ranging from inductive, which only provides irrelevant inferences, to deductive proofs, which consider addressing formal representation. Findings present several examples of each of Lee’s level on the student teachers’ proofs spanning from irrelevant inferences, novice use of examples or logical reasoning, strategic use examples for reasoning, deductive inferences with major and minor logical coherence, and deductive proof with informal and formal representation. Besides, it was also found that more than half of the students’ proofs coded as inductive schemes, which does not meet the requirement for doing the proof for the proof tasks examined in this study. This study suggests teacher educators in teacher colleges to reform the curriculum regarding proof learning which can accommodate the improvement of student teachers’ proving ability from inductive to deductive proof as well from informal to formal proof.

  16. 26 CFR 1.911-6 - Disallowance of deductions, exclusions, and credits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... related to a class of gross income are personal and family medical expenses, qualified retirement... place of work is in a foreign country, deductible moving expenses will be allocable to foreign earned... received or accrued. This rule applies for all individuals, regardless of their method of accounting. (iii...

  17. NaDeA: A Natural Deduction Assistant with a Formalization in Isabelle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Jørgen; Jensen, Alexander Birch; Schlichtkrull, Anders

    2017-01-01

    We present a new software tool for teaching logic based on natural deduction. Its proof system is formalized in the proof assistant Isabelle such that its definition is very precise. Soundness of the formalization has been proved in Isabelle. The tool is open source software developed in TypeScript...

  18. NaDeA: A Natural Deduction Assistant with a Formalization in Isabelle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villadsen, Jørgen; Jensen, Alexander Birch; Schlichtkrull, Anders

    2015-01-01

    We present a new software tool for teaching logic based on natural deduction. Its proof system is formalized in the proof assistant Isabelle such that its definition is very precise. Soundness of the formalization has been proved in Isabelle. The tool is open source software developed in TypeScript...

  19. Bursar Accounts, Payroll Deduction, and Debt Collection: A Three-Channel Approach to Lost Item Reimbursement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowman, Ann MacKay

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, Penn State Libraries implemented payroll deduction and collection agency programs to gain better control of accounts receivable. The author reports on the implementation processes and first year outcomes of the programs. She recommends careful consideration of several questions before implementing such measures.

  20. Functional Orientation and Practice of Inductive and Deductive Approaches to Grammar Teaching in EFL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵阳

    2011-01-01

    To solve the ambiguous understanding of Grammar Teaching position,based on explicit grammatical knowledge,this paper discusses the grammar position in EFL,compares both its pros and cons between deductive and inductive approaches,and indicates that grammar teaching by either approach alone has disadvantages,should adopt a combination technique.

  1. 26 CFR 1.270-1 - Limitation on deductions allowable to individuals in certain cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cultivates, operates, or manages a farm for gain or profit, either as owner or tenant. An individual who... provisions relating to activities not engaged in for profit applicable to taxable years beginning after... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Items Not Deductible § 1.270-1 Limitation...

  2. 18 CFR 367.4092 - Account 409.2, Income taxes, other income and deductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... POWER ACT AND NATURAL GAS ACT Income Statement Chart of Accounts Service Company Operating Income § 367... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Account 409.2, Income taxes, other income and deductions. 367.4092 Section 367.4092 Conservation of Power and Water Resources...

  3. The direct and immediate link test regarding deduction of input VAT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dennis Ramsdahl; Stensgaard, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    It follows explicitly from the EC VAT Directive that the deduction of input VAT depends on a positive link between on the one hand the incurred expenses and on the other hand the planned or actually completed taxed output transactions. In theory and in practice the deeper nature of this link...

  4. Opinions on Tax Deductions and the Consensus Effect in a Survey-Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, E.C.M.; Nelissen, J.H.M.; Potters, J.J.M.

    2004-01-01

    We present the results of a survey-experiment using a representative sample of the Dutch population in which we relate respondents' opinion about the tax deductibility of mortgages to their estimates about other people's opinion.The experiment employs three treatment variables: monetary incentives,

  5. Are there two processes in reasoning? The dimensionality of inductive and deductive inferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Rachel G; Dunn, John C; Hayes, Brett K

    2018-03-01

    Single-process accounts of reasoning propose that the same cognitive mechanisms underlie inductive and deductive inferences. In contrast, dual-process accounts propose that these inferences depend upon 2 qualitatively different mechanisms. To distinguish between these accounts, we derived a set of single-process and dual-process models based on an overarching signal detection framework. We then used signed difference analysis to test each model against data from an argument evaluation task, in which induction and deduction judgments are elicited for sets of valid and invalid arguments. Three data sets were analyzed: data from Singmann and Klauer (2011), a database of argument evaluation studies, and the results of an experiment designed to test model predictions. Of the large set of testable models, we found that almost all could be rejected, including all 2-dimensional models. The only testable model able to account for all 3 data sets was a model with 1 dimension of argument strength and independent decision criteria for induction and deduction judgments. We conclude that despite the popularity of dual-process accounts, current results from the argument evaluation task are best explained by a single-process account that incorporates separate decision thresholds for inductive and deductive inferences. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. 48 CFR 1352.228-71 - Deductibles under required insurance coverage-cost reimbursement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... insurance coverage-cost reimbursement. 1352.228-71 Section 1352.228-71 Federal Acquisition Regulations... Provisions and Clauses 1352.228-71 Deductibles under required insurance coverage—cost reimbursement. As... Coverage—Cost Reimbursement (APR 2010) (a) The contractor is required to present evidence of the amount of...

  7. Individuality and social influence in groups : Inductive and deductive routes to group identity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postmes, T; Spears, R; Lee, AT; Novak, RJ

    2005-01-01

    A distinction between forms of social identity formation in small interactive groups is investigated. In groups in which a common identity is available or given, norms for individual behavior may be deduced; from group properties (deductive identity). In groups in which interpersonal relations are

  8. Calculating the Weather: Deductive Reasoning and Disciplinary "Telos" in Cleveland Abbe's Rhetorical Transformation of Meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdik, Zoltan P.; Platt, Carrie Anne; Meister, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the rhetorical basis of a major paradigm change in meteorology, from a focus on inductive observation to deductive, mathematical reasoning. Analysis of Cleveland Abbe's "The Physical Basis of Long-Range Weather Forecasts" demonstrates how in his advocacy for a new paradigm, Abbe navigates the tension between piety to tradition…

  9. Interpreting clinical trial results by deductive reasoning: In search of improved trial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbel, Sven; Mihaljević, Slobodan

    2017-10-01

    Clinical trial results are often interpreted by inductive reasoning, in a trial design-limited manner, directed toward modifications of the current clinical practice. Deductive reasoning is an alternative in which results of relevant trials are combined in indisputable premises that lead to a conclusion easily testable in future trials. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  10. 26 CFR 1.642(c)-1 - Unlimited deduction for amounts paid for a charitable purpose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the election was made, (iii) The office of the district director, or the service center, where the....642(c)-1 Unlimited deduction for amounts paid for a charitable purpose. (a) In general. (1) Any part... election, to a related estate, as defined under § 1.645-1(b), for the amount so paid. (2) In determining...

  11. 76 FR 81059 - Guidance Regarding Deduction and Capitalization of Expenditures Related to Tangible Property

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ... and necessary trade or business expenses) and section 263(a) (relating to the capitalization... is not deductible as a business expense. Section 1.162-11(b) of the existing regulations also... court explained that repair and maintenance expenses are incurred for the purpose of keeping property in...

  12. Language Learning of Children with Typical Development Using a Deductive Metalinguistic Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finestack, Lizbeth H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In the current study, the author aimed to determine whether 4- to 6-year-old typically developing children possess requisite problem-solving and language abilities to produce, generalize, and retain a novel verb inflection when taught using an explicit, deductive teaching procedure. Method: Study participants included a cross-sectional…

  13. 26 CFR 20.2053-3 - Deduction for expenses of administering estate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST 16, 1954 Taxable Estate... permitted by § 20.2053-1 even though the deduction, as such, was not claimed on the estate tax return or in... expenses include such expenses as court costs, surrogates' fees, accountants' fees, appraisers' fees, clerk...

  14. 26 CFR 1.162-10T - Questions and answers relating to the deduction of employee benefits under the Tax Reform Act of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... of employee benefits under the Tax Reform Act of 1984; certain limits on amounts deductible... and Corporations § 1.162-10T Questions and answers relating to the deduction of employee benefits... amendment of section 404(b) by the Tax Reform Act of 1984 affect the deduction of employee benefits under...

  15. 26 CFR 1.1400L(b)-1 - Additional first year depreciation deduction for qualified New York Liberty Zone property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Additional first year depreciation deduction for... to Individuals' Title 11 Cases § 1.1400L(b)-1 Additional first year depreciation deduction for...-percent additional first year depreciation deduction allowable under section 1400L(b) for qualified New...

  16. Adverse health effects of high-effort/low-reward conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegrist, J

    1996-01-01

    In addition to the person-environment fit model (J. R. French, R. D. Caplan, & R. V. Harrison, 1982) and the demand-control model (R. A. Karasek & T. Theorell, 1990), a third theoretical concept is proposed to assess adverse health effects of stressful experience at work: the effort-reward imbalance model. The focus of this model is on reciprocity of exchange in occupational life where high-cost/low-gain conditions are considered particularly stressful. Variables measuring low reward in terms of low status control (e.g., lack of promotion prospects, job insecurity) in association with high extrinsic (e.g., work pressure) or intrinsic (personal coping pattern, e.g., high need for control) effort independently predict new cardiovascular events in a prospective study on blue-collar men. Furthermore, these variables partly explain prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, atherogenic lipids) in 2 independent studies. Studying adverse health effects of high-effort/low-reward conditions seems well justified, especially in view of recent developments of the labor market.

  17. Public Health Education: Teaching Epidemiology in High School Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Emily

    2018-03-01

    Epidemiology instruction has expanded at the undergraduate level in part because it increases student critical thinking and scientific literacy, promotes students' perception of public health as both practical and relevant, and empowers students as independent, lifelong learners. Why then are more high schools not adopting epidemiology as a course requirement for students? Although prior iterations of high school epidemiology courses are noteworthy for incorporating active and participatory learning, embedding them into existing and continually shifting curricula is challenging and time-consuming, especially for teachers not trained in the field. It also may be argued that currently available epidemiology teaching resources emphasize content rather than thinking skills and therefore do not optimally promote students' personal engagement with, and in-depth understanding of, the mission and goals of public health. I propose a new framework for high school epidemiology that draws from progressive education ideology, including three critical elements: empowerment, authenticity, and transfer. I provide multiple examples to show how this framework has been used across a wide array of settings to hone epidemiology thinking skills in high school students.

  18. 关于企业所得税扣除的几个问题%Several Issues Concerning Deduction of Enterprise Income Tax

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭珩

    2012-01-01

    本文对企业所得税扣除的概念、分类和意义进行了理论探讨。认为,传统的税前扣除概念不足以涵盖扣除的全部内容,所得税扣除既包括税前扣除,也包括税额扣除。关于扣除的种类,可以划分为税基式扣除与税额式扣除;对人的扣除与对物的扣除;全额扣除、限额扣除和超额扣除;收益性支出扣除和资本性支出扣除;经济性扣除与政策性扣除。关于扣除的意义,本文认为,扣除是所得税原理的必然要求;扣除可以避免侵蚀资本,维持社会简单再生产;扣除可以为企业获取适当利润提供制度保障,使企业扩大再生产成为可能;扣除是政府实现某种宏观调控目标的重要手段;扣除是消除国际重复征税的重要方式。%This paper explores theoretically the concept, category and significance of deduction of enterprise income tax. The author holds that deduction of income tax includes not only deduction before tax but also deduction from tax payable, while traditional concept of deduction before tax cannot cover the entire content. Deduction can be categorized into: deduction from tax base and deduction from tax payable; person-based deductions and object-based deductions; deduction in full amounts, limited deduction and excess deduction; deduction of profitable expenses and deduction of capital expenses; economic deduction and policy-based deduction. For the significance of deduction, this paper holds that deduction is required by the theory of income tax. Deduction can prevent the capital from eroding and maintain the simple reproduction of society. It provides institutional guarantee for enterprise to earn appropriate profit and makes it possible to expand reproduction. Deduction is an important vehicle for the government to achieve the goal of macroeconomic adjustments and controls. It is also an important method to eliminate international double taxation.

  19. The Great Recession and Workers' Health Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Kanghyock

    2018-03-01

    During a recession, cost-sharing of employer-sponsored health benefits could increase to reduce labor costs in the U.S. Using a variation in the severity of recession shocks across industries, I find evidence that the enrollment rate of high deductible health plans (HDHPs) among workers covered by employer-sponsored health benefits increased more among firms in industries that experienced severe recession shocks. As potential mechanisms, I study employer-side and worker-side mechanisms. I find that employers changed health benefit offerings to force or incentivize workers to enroll in HDHPs. But I find little evidence of an increase in workers' demand for HDHPs due to a reduction in income. These results suggest that the HDHP enrollment rate increased during the Great Recession, as employers tried to save costs of offering health benefits. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Health Food Supplements (“Health Food” Highly Nutritious From Chlorella And Oil Catfish (Pangasius hypopthalmus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syahrul Syahrul

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The utilization of microalgae as a food ingredient considered effective, because in addition to alternativefood sources also contains nutrients chlorella microalgae in particular is very good for health. This microalgaerich in protein (60.5%, fat (11%, carbohydrates (20.1%, water, dietary fiber, vitamins and minerals Besidesthese microalgae contain pigments (chlorophyll, tocopherol and the active component (antimicrobial andantioxidants. This is what underlies microalgae is very useful to be used as a source of raw materials ofhealth food supplements. Currently the health food supplements have become a necessity for people tomaintain their health in order to remain vibrant. This study aims to produce high nutritious health foodsupplements from raw material chlorella enriched with fish protein concentrate and oil catfish. The methodused in the manufacture of high nutritious health food supplement is a method of microencapsulation withdifferent formulations. The results showed that the best formulations based on the profile of amino acids,fatty acids and standards AAE per day especially essential fatty acids oleic and linoleic is formulation B(chlorella 2%, 1% fish oil and fish protein concentrate 1%.

  1. Deduction and Analysis of the Interacting Stress Response Pathways of Metal/Radionuclide-reducing Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma

    2010-02-28

    Project Title: Deduction and Analysis of the Interacting Stress Response Pathways of Metal/Radionuclide-reducing Bacteria DOE Grant Number: DE-FG02-06ER64205 Principal Investigator: Jizhong (Joe) Zhou (University of Oklahoma) Key members: Zhili He, Aifen Zhou, Christopher Hemme, Joy Van Nostrand, Ye Deng, and Qichao Tu Collaborators: Terry Hazen, Judy Wall, Adam Arkin, Matthew Fields, Aindrila Mukhopadhyay, and David Stahl Summary Three major objectives have been conducted in the Zhou group at the University of Oklahoma (OU): (i) understanding of gene function, regulation, network and evolution of Desulfovibrio vugaris Hildenborough in response to environmental stresses, (ii) development of metagenomics technologies for microbial community analysis, and (iii) functional characterization of microbial communities with metagenomic approaches. In the past a few years, we characterized four CRP/FNR regulators, sequenced ancestor and evolved D. vulgaris strains, and functionally analyzed those mutated genes identified in salt-adapted strains. Also, a new version of GeoChip 4.0 has been developed, which also includes stress response genes (StressChip), and a random matrix theory-based conceptual framework for identifying functional molecular ecological networks has been developed with the high throughput functional gene array hybridization data as well as pyrosequencing data from 16S rRNA genes. In addition, GeoChip and sequencing technologies as well as network analysis approaches have been used to analyze microbial communities from different habitats. Those studies provide a comprehensive understanding of gene function, regulation, network, and evolution in D. vulgaris, and microbial community diversity, composition and structure as well as their linkages with environmental factors and ecosystem functioning, which has resulted in more than 60 publications.

  2. Applying the lessons of high risk industries to health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, P

    2003-12-01

    High risk industries such as commercial aviation and the oil and gas industry have achieved exemplary safety performance. This paper reviews how they have managed to do that. The primary reasons are the positive attitudes towards safety and the operation of effective formal safety management systems. The safety culture provides an important explanation of why such organisations perform well. An evolutionary model of safety culture is provided in which there is a range of cultures from the pathological through the reactive to the calculative. Later, the proactive culture can evolve towards the generative organisation, an alternative description of the high reliability organisation. The current status of health care is reviewed, arguing that it has a much higher level of accidents and has a reactive culture, lagging behind both high risk industries studied in both attitude and systematic management of patient risks.

  3. Comparing Health Literacy in High School Female Students and Their Mothers Regarding Women’s Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Saeedi Koupai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Methods: the present study is descriptive-analytical with comparative type and the statistical population included 200 secondary female school students and their mothers who were randomly selected. The tool to collect data was a two-part researcher-made questionnaire the first part whereof involved demographic information and the second part includes 41 questions of health literacy about women’s health in 5 aspects of menstruation hygiene, nutrition, breast self-examination, body activity, iron deficiency anemia. Reliability and validity of the questionnaire were confirmed and the data were analyzed via SPSS22 software. Results: there was not observed any significant difference in three aspects of menstruation hygiene, nutrition and breast self-examination between mean scores of two female groups and their mothers according to Mann-Whitney instability test (p>0.05; however, there was a significant difference in the aspects of body activities and iron deficiency anomia (p<0.05. Conclusion: taking the results of the study, high school female students under study and their mothers have average healthy literacy level regarding women’s health. Therefore, considering the fact that the girls receive greatest education in the field of women’s hygiene from their mothers in the adolescence, the necessity of diagnosing limiters of health literacy in the society and specific attention to the mothers’ teaching and including curriculum of health literacy for female students are advised to promote health. Paper Type: Research Article.

  4. How Can Health Information Technologies Contribute to Improve Health Care Services for High-Need Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nøhr, Christian; Botin, Lars; Zhu, Xinxin

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses how health information technologies like tele-care, tele-health and tele-medicine can improve the condition for high-need patients, specifically in relation to access. The paper addresses specifically the values of timeliness and equity and how tele technological solutions can support and enhance these values. The paper introduces to the concept of scaffolding, which constitutes the framework for dynamic, appropriate, caring and embracing approaches for engaging and involving high-need patients that are vulnerable and exposed. A number of specific considerations for designing tele-technologies for high-need patients are derived, and the paper concludes that ethical and epistemological criterions for design are needed in order to meet the needs and requirements of the weak and exposed.

  5. Men: good health and high mortality. Sex differences in health and aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oksuzyan, Anna; Juel, Knud; Vaupel, James W

    2008-01-01

    with women: the so-called male-female health-survival paradox. A number of proposed explanations for this paradox are rooted in biological, social, and psychological interpretations. It is likely to be due to multiple causes that include fundamental biological differences between the sexes such as genetic...... factors, immune system responses, hormones, and disease patterns. Behavioral differences such as risk-taking and reluctance to seek and comply with medical treatment may also play a role. Another consideration is that part of the difference may be due to methodological challenges, such as selective non......-participation and under-reporting of health problems, and delayed seeking of treatment by men. The Nordic countries provide a unique opportunity for such studies, as they have good-quality data in their national health registers, which cover the whole population, and a long tradition of high participation rates...

  6. Oral health status of women with high-risk pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merglova, Vlasta; Hecova, Hana; Stehlikova, Jaroslava; Chaloupka, Pavel

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the oral health status of women with high-risk pregnancies. A case-control study of 142 pregnant women was conducted. The case group included 81 pregnant women with high-risk pregnancies, while 61 women with normal pregnancies served as controls. The following variables were recorded for each woman: age, general health status, DMF, CPITN, and PBI index, amounts of Streptococcus mutans in the saliva and dental treatment needs. The Mann-Whitney test, Kruskal-Wallis test, t-test and chi-squared test were used for statistical analyses. Statistically significant differences were detected between the PBI indices and dental treatment needs of the two groups. Out of the entire study cohort, 77% of the women in the case group and 52% of the women in the control group required dental treatment. In this study, women with complications during pregnancy had severe gingivitis and needed more frequent dental treatment than those in the control group.

  7. Health effects in residents of high background radiation regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.P.; Komarov, E.

    1983-01-01

    Studies carried out in various countries and by the World Health Organization on health effects of exposure of populations to high levels of natural background radiation result in observations of different significance. There are indications of changes in chromosome aberration rate; Down's syndrome has been observed to be possibly related to radiation exposure; malignant neoplasms in bone apparently correspond to high concentrations of 226 Ra in drinking water. Although various researchers have looked for them, effects have not been demonstrated regarding cancer mortality (other than malignant neoplasms involving bone), gross congenital abnormalities, fertility index, growth and development, hereditary disease (other than the possibility of Down's syndrome), infant mortality, longevity, multiple births, sex ratio, or spontaneous abortion rate. On the basis of reported data clear quantitative conception of the risk of low-level radiation from natural sources could not be developed and feasibility studies of further epidemiological programmes should be organized. The possibility of reducing the collective population dose from natural sources could be further explored and a basis for necessary legal action on establishment of standards for possible sources of natural radiation, such as building materials, fertilizers, natural gas and water, might be developed. (author)

  8. Celf – A Logical Framework for Deductive and Concurrent Systems (System Description)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schack-Nielsen, Anders; Schürmann, Carsten

    2008-01-01

    CLF (Concurrent LF) [CPWW02a] is a logical framework for specifying and implementing deductive and concurrent systems from areas, such as programming language theory, security protocol analysis, process algebras, and logics. Celf is an implementation of the CLF type theory that extends the LF type...... ML and compiles with MLton, MLKit, and SML/NJ. The source code and a collection of examples are available from http://www.twelf.org/~celf ....

  9. Rainfall Deduction Method for Estimating Non-Point Source Pollution Load for Watershed

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Ming; Li, Huai-en; KAWAKAMI, Yoji

    2004-01-01

    The water pollution can be divided into point source pollution (PSP) and non-point source pollution (NSP). Since the point source pollution has been controlled, the non-point source pollution is becoming the main pollution source. The prediction of NSP load is being increasingly important in water pollution controlling and planning in watershed. Considering the monitoring data shortage of NPS in China, a practical estimation method of non-point source pollution load --- rainfall deduction met...

  10. TAX DEDUCTION THROUGH ZAKAT: AN EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATION ON MUSLIM IN MALAYSIA

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Al-Mamun; Ahasanul Haque

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the factors which are affecting Muslim consumer's perception towards tax deduction through zakat in Malaysia. A conceptual framework was drawn based on the literature. Six factors were extracted through principal component analysis and SEM was run to test the hypotheses. This research found that halal-haram aspect of Islamic Shariah has a very positive influence on Muslim consumers’ perception towards the tax rebate system. In addition, legal consciousness ...

  11. Insurance Accounts: The Cultural Logics of Health Care Financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Jessica

    2016-03-01

    The financial exuberance that eventually culminated in the recent world economic crisis also ushered in dramatic shifts in how health care is financed, administered, and imagined. Drawing on research conducted in the mid-2000s at a health insurance company in Puerto Rico, this article shows how health care has been financialized in many ways that include: (1) privatizing public services; (2) engineering new insurance products like high deductible plans and health savings accounts; (3) applying financial techniques to premium payments to yield maximum profitability; (4) a managerial focus on shareholder value; and (5) prioritizing mergers and financial speculation. The article argues that financial techniques obfuscate how much health care costs, foster widespread gaming of reimbursement systems that drives up prices, and "unpool" risk by devolving financial and moral responsibility for health care onto individual consumers. © 2015 by the American Anthropological Association.

  12. Mediating the media discourse of health with high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Caetano da Silva

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This research is the result of a completed dissertation held in the Physical Education Post Graduate Program at UFSC, in which goal was to reflect on the media discourse about health and physical activity among young high school students, in Physical Education, from a education intervention. The study was based on methodological elements of action research and was attended by 22 students. The intervention was carried out on the basis of school mediation strategies, along with the teacher who is responsible for the class. As a conclusion, the study indicates that media education can be associated to any knowledge of school culture, in a longitudinal basis, starting from students’ knowledge about the content transmitted by the media and the effort of a media education cannot be overlooked.

  13. Inductive vs. Deductive Grammar Instruction and the Grammatical Performance of EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Behjat

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Learning a foreign language offers a great challenge to students since it involves learning different skills and subskills. Quite a few number of researches have been done so far on the relationship between gender and learning a foreign language. On the other hand, two major approaches in teaching grammar have been offered by language experts, inductive and deductive. The present study examines which method of teaching grammar is more fruitful for Iranian male and female students. For this purpose, 150 freshman students, 110 females and 40 males, majoring in English were selected from all available students at Abadeh and Shiraz Azad universities. All the subjects took the NTC's grammar test prior to the instruction as pre-test. Then, they were divided into two groups and were taught grammar inductively and deductively in each group for one semester. At the end of the instruction, the same test was taken as post-test. The comparison between the students' pre and post-test indicated that there was a significant improvement in their knowledge of grammar. By the way, through a two-way ANOVA, it was found out that males learned grammar better when they were taught inductively and females showed a better performance when they were taught deductively.

  14. A Logical Deduction Based Clause Learning Algorithm for Boolean Satisfiability Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingshan Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Clause learning is the key component of modern SAT solvers, while conflict analysis based on the implication graph is the mainstream technology to generate the learnt clauses. Whenever a clause in the clause database is falsified by the current variable assignments, the SAT solver will try to analyze the reason by using different cuts (i.e., the Unique Implication Points on the implication graph. Those schemes reflect only the conflict on the current search subspace, does not reflect the inherent conflict directly involved in the rest space. In this paper, we propose a new advanced clause learning algorithm based on the conflict analysis and the logical deduction, which reconstructs a linear logical deduction by analyzing the relationship of different decision variables between the backjumping level and the current decision level. The logical deduction result is then added into the clause database as a newly learnt clause. The resulting implementation in Minisat improves the state-of-the-art performance in SAT solving.

  15. Analysis of Tax-deductible Interest Payments for Re-advanceable Canadian Mortgages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseem, Almas; Reesor, Mark

    2011-11-01

    According to Canadian tax law the interest on loans used for investment purposes is tax deductible while interest on personal mortgage loans is not. One way of transforming from non-tax deductible to tax deductible interest expenses is to borrow against home equity to make investments. A re-advanceable mortgage is a product specifically designed to take advantage of this tax discrepancy. Using simulation we study the risk associated with the re-advanceable mortgage strategy to provide a better description of the mortgagor's position. We assume that the mortgagor invests the borrowings secured by home equity into a single risky asset (e.g., stock or mutual fund) whose evolution is described by geometric Brownian motion (GBM). With a re-advanceable mortgage we find that the average mortgage payoff time is less than the original mortgage term. However, there is considerable variation in the payoff times with a significant probability of a payoff time exceeding the original mortgage term. Higher income homeowners enjoy a payoff time distribution with both a lower average and a lower standard deviation than low-income homeowners. Thus this strategy is most beneficial to those with the highest income. We also find this strategy protects the homeowner in the event of job loss. This work is important to lenders, financial planners and homeowners to more fully understand the benefits and risk associated with this strategy.

  16. Ethnic Differences for Public Health Knowledge, Health Advocacy Skills, and Health Information Seeking Among High School Students: Community Agents of Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzke, Cynthia; Rao, Satya; Marquez, Ruben

    2018-03-06

    Although adult health advocacy programs have been examined in communities, little is known about integrated adolescent health advocacy programs in high schools. The purpose of this study was to examine the health advocacy program impact and ethnic differences among high school students. Using a cross-sectional study, high school students participating in the school-based program completed evaluation surveys. The program domains included upstream causes of health, community assets, and public health advocacy. Bivariate analyses were conducted to examine ethnic differences for public health knowledge, health advocacy skills, and health information seeking behaviors. Using thematic analysis, open-ended survey item responses were coded to identify themes for students' perceptions of community health. Non-Hispanic (n = 72) and Hispanic high school students (n = 182) in ten classes reported owning smartphones (95%) and laptops (76%). Most students (72%) reported seeking online health information. Non-Hispanic students reported significantly higher health advocacy skills for speaking with the class about health issues, identifying community services, or creating health awareness at school than Hispanic students. Non-Hispanic students were more likely to seek health information from fathers and television than Hispanic students. Hispanic students were more likely to seek health information from hospital or clinic staff than non-Hispanic students. Emergent themes included health advocacy skills, community awareness, and individual and community health changes. High schools benefit from integrating health advocacy programs into the core curriculum. Adolescents gain important skills to improve their individual health and engage in changing community health.

  17. [Health and exercise: effects of exercise on high blood pressure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, M; Nanri, H; Himeno, E

    1993-09-01

    Many factors, such as genetic, psychological, environmental, and socioeconomical factors, influence the health of individuals. Recently behavioral risks which cause preventable chronic diseases or premature death have been increasing. These risk factors are mainly due to living habits, such as over-eating, less exercise and psychological stress. Physical activity or fitness is reported to be inversely associated with morbidity and mortality from chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular diseases diabetes mellitus, cancer and so on. Hypertension has also been reported to be associated with low physical fitness in cross-sectional studies. We have so far reported a significant blood pressure reduction in mild hypertensive patients who completed mild intensity exercise training in well controlled studies. Exercise seemed to modify the multiple factors that might participate in raising and maintaining high blood pressure. The mechanisms of lowering blood pressure by exercise training are mainly due to a depletion of blood volume or the reduction of both cardiac output and the sympathetic tone. They were supported by the evidence of increased levels of prostaglandin E, dopamine, taurine, and decreased levels of plasma norepinephrine and endogenous ouavain-like substance. In this article, we have reviewed the physiological and biochemical roles of exercise, the effects of exercise on high blood pressure, and the hypotensive mechanism of mild aerobic exercise hypertensive patients.

  18. Acute mental health care according to recent mental health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This is the third of three reports on the follow-up review of mental health care at Helen Joseph Hospital (HJH). The study reviewed existing South African standards for mental health care facilities. Architectural principles and implications for the use of space were deducted from recent legislation. Objectives were to ...

  19. Health care in small prisons: incorporating high-quality standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Jean-Pierre; Casillas, Alejandra; Mary, Gérard; Secretan, Anne-Dominique; Gaspoz, Jean-Michel; Wolff, Hans

    2013-01-01

    In the past, health management in Geneva's six post-trial prisons had been variable and inconsistent. In 2008, the unit of penitentiary medicine of the Geneva University Hospitals was mandated to re-organize and provide health care at all six prison facilities. The specific aim of this paper is to outline the example as a practical solution to some of the common challenges in unifying the structure and process of health services across multiple small facilities, while meeting European prison health and local quality standards. Geneva's post-trial prisons are small and close to one another in geographical proximity - ideal conditions for the construction of a health mobile team (HMT). This multidisciplinary mobile team operated like a community ambulatory care model; it was progressively launched in all prison facilities in Geneva. The authors incorporated an implementation strategy where health providers partnered with prison and community stakeholders in the health delivery model's development and adaption process. The model's strategic initiatives are described along the following areas, in light of other international prison health activity and prior care models: access to a health care professional, equivalence of care, patient consent, confidentiality, humanitarian interventions, and professional competence and independence. From the perspective of the HMT members, the authors provide the "lessons learned" through this experience, especially to providers who are working on prison health services reform and coordination improvement. The paper particularly stresses the importance of partnering with community health stakeholders and prison staff, a key component to the approach.

  20. Health behaviors and mental health of students attending alternative high schools: a review of the research literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karen E; Taliaferro, Lindsay A

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe current knowledge about health-risk behaviors and mental health among alternative high school students. Substance use, diet and/or physical activity, sexual-risk behaviors, mental health, and violence were reviewed. Students were described as marginalized youth facing significant social environmental challenges. Findings from 43 studies published from 1997-2010 suggested a high prevalence of health-risk behaviors among alternative high school students. Very few studies were conducted by nurse researchers. Suggestions for future research include addressing social environmental factors, resiliency, and emotional/mental health outcomes. Alternative high schools offer a venue to conduct research and implement nursing interventions with high-risk, yet resilient, youth. © 2011, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The High-Tech Face of e-Health

    CERN Document Server

    Shiers, Jamie D

    2014-01-01

    This chapter focuses on the current and potential use of e-Infrastructures in the domain of eHealth. It starts by identifying a small number of specific Use Cases and then addresses how these can be optimized—or possibly revolutionized—by the use of state-of-the-art distributing computing infrastructures (DCIs). Specific topics that are addressed include “long-term” data preservation (for the duration of a patient’s life as well as (far) beyond for collective-oriented studies), federation of heterogeneous data sources, provision of redundant and highly accessible data storage and federated identity management. The work draws heavily on the author’s experience in distributed computing infrastructures to address the challenges of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, together with participation in generic e-Infrastructure projects, such as the EGEE project services and EGI. It also benefits from experience in hadron-therapy oriented projects with which CERN has synergies both as an accelerator laborato...

  2. Employee health benefit redesign at the academic health center: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Julie; Weaver, Deirdre C; Splaine, Kevin; Hefner, David S; Kirch, Darrell G; Paz, Harold L

    2013-03-01

    The rapidly escalating cost of health care, including the cost of providing health care benefits, is a significant concern for many employers. In this article, the authors examine a case study of an academic health center that undertook a complete redesign of its health benefit structure to control rising costs, encourage use of its own provider network, and support employee wellness. With the implementation in 2006 of a high-deductible health plan combined with health reimbursement arrangements and wellness incentives, the Penn State Hershey Medical Center (PSHMC) was able to realize significant cost savings and increase use of its own network while maintaining a high level of employee satisfaction. By contracting with a single third-party administrator for its self-insured plan, PSHMC reduced its administrative costs and simplified benefit choices for employees. In addition, indexing employee costs to salary ensured that this change was equitable for all employees, and the shift to a consumer-driven health plan led to greater employee awareness of health care costs. The new health benefit plan's strong focus on employee wellness and preventive health has led to significant increases in the use of preventive health services, including health risk assessments, cancer screenings, and flu shots. PSHMC's experience demonstrates the importance of clear and ongoing communication with employees throughout--before, during, and even after--the process of health benefit redesign.

  3. Hydrologic landscape regionalisation using deductive classification and random forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart C Brown

    Full Text Available Landscape classification and hydrological regionalisation studies are being increasingly used in ecohydrology to aid in the management and research of aquatic resources. We present a methodology for classifying hydrologic landscapes based on spatial environmental variables by employing non-parametric statistics and hybrid image classification. Our approach differed from previous classifications which have required the use of an a priori spatial unit (e.g. a catchment which necessarily results in the loss of variability that is known to exist within those units. The use of a simple statistical approach to identify an appropriate number of classes eliminated the need for large amounts of post-hoc testing with different number of groups, or the selection and justification of an arbitrary number. Using statistical clustering, we identified 23 distinct groups within our training dataset. The use of a hybrid classification employing random forests extended this statistical clustering to an area of approximately 228,000 km2 of south-eastern Australia without the need to rely on catchments, landscape units or stream sections. This extension resulted in a highly accurate regionalisation at both 30-m and 2.5-km resolution, and a less-accurate 10-km classification that would be more appropriate for use at a continental scale. A smaller case study, of an area covering 27,000 km2, demonstrated that the method preserved the intra- and inter-catchment variability that is known to exist in local hydrology, based on previous research. Preliminary analysis linking the regionalisation to streamflow indices is promising suggesting that the method could be used to predict streamflow behaviour in ungauged catchments. Our work therefore simplifies current classification frameworks that are becoming more popular in ecohydrology, while better retaining small-scale variability in hydrology, thus enabling future attempts to explain and visualise broad-scale hydrologic

  4. Health Benefits In 2015: Stable Trends In The Employer Market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claxton, Gary; Rae, Matthew; Panchal, Nirmita; Whitmore, Heidi; Damico, Anthony; Kenward, Kevin; Long, Michelle

    2015-10-01

    The annual Kaiser Family Foundation/Health Research and Educational Trust Employer Health Benefits Survey found that in 2015, average annual premiums (employer and worker contributions combined) were $6,251 for single coverage and $17,545 for family coverage. Both premiums rose 4 percent from 2014, continuing several years of modest growth. The percentage of firms offering health benefits and the percentage of workers covered by their employers' plans remained statistically unchanged from 2014. Eighty-one percent of covered workers were enrolled in a plan with a general annual deductible. Among those workers, the average deductible for single coverage was $1,318. Half of large employers either offered employees the opportunity or required them to complete biometric screening. Of firms that offer an incentive for completing the screening, 20 percent provide employees with incentives or penalties that are tied to meeting those biometric outcomes. The 2015 survey included new questions on financial incentives to complete wellness programs and meet specified biometric outcomes as well as questions about narrow networks and employers' strategies related to the high-cost plan tax and the employer shared-responsibility provisions of the Affordable Care Act. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  5. Proband Mental Health Difficulties and Parental Stress Predict Mental Health in Toddlers at High-Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crea, Katherine; Dissanayake, Cheryl; Hudry, Kristelle

    2016-10-01

    Family-related predictors of mental health problems were investigated among 30 toddlers at familial high-risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and 28 controls followed from age 2- to 3-years. Parents completed the self-report Depression Anxiety Stress Scales and the parent-report Behavior Assessment System for Children. High-risk toddlers were assessed for ASD at 3-years. Parent stress and proband mental health difficulties predicted concurrent toddler mental health difficulties at 2-years, but only baseline proband internalising problems continued to predict toddler internalising problems at 3-years; high-risk status did not confer additional risk. Baseline toddler mental health difficulties robustly predicted later difficulties, while high-risk status and diagnostic outcome conferred no additional risk. A family systems perspective may be useful for understanding toddler mental health difficulties.

  6. Health Education for High School Students in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Jorge, David; Jorge-Estévez, María Dolores; Gutiérrez-Barroso, Josué; de la Rosa-Hormiga, Milagros; Marrero-Morales, María Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Education and training in schools are essential elements in the development and socialization process of children from early childhood. The fact of considering health as a complete physical, mental and social wellbeing (World Health Organization (1848), WHO), and not only as the absence of illness, is closely related to the achievement of optimal…

  7. Health risk behaviours of high school learners and their perceptions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Adolescence spans nearly a decade in which young people may initiate health risk behaviours such as unsafe sexual practices and the use of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs (ATOD use). Most adolescent mortality and morbidity, attributable to such health risk behaviours, are preventable. Managing the ...

  8. On the deduction of chemical reaction pathways from measurements of time series of concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoilov, Michael; Arkin, Adam; Ross, John

    2001-03-01

    We discuss the deduction of reaction pathways in complex chemical systems from measurements of time series of chemical concentrations of reacting species. First we review a technique called correlation metric construction (CMC) and show the construction of a reaction pathway from measurements on a part of glycolysis. Then we present two new improved methods for the analysis of time series of concentrations, entropy metric construction (EMC), and entropy reduction method (ERM), and illustrate (EMC) with calculations on a model reaction system. (c) 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  9. The development of cause analysis system for CPCS trip using the rule-base deduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hee Seok; Kim, Dong Hoon; Seo, Ho Joon; Koo, In Soo; Park, Suk Joon

    1992-01-01

    The Core Protection Calculator System(CPCS) was developed to initiate a Reactor Trip under the circumstance of certain transients by Combustion Engineering Company. The major function of the CPCS is to generate contact outputs for the Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio(DNBR) Trip and Local Power Density(LPD) Trip. But in CPCS the trip causes can not be identified, only trip status is displayed. It may take much time and efforts for plant operator to analyse the trip causes of CPCS. So, the Cause Analysis System for CPCS(CASCPCS) has been developed using the rule-base deduction method to aid the operators in Nuclear Power Plant

  10. The Prevalence of Postgraduate Education in Youth Health Among High School Clinicians and Associated Student Health Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Simon; Farrant, Bridget; Utter, Jennifer; Fleming, Theresa; Bullen, Pat; Peiris-John, Roshini; Clark, Terryann

    2016-11-01

    Despite numerous calls to improve training in adolescent health, there is little known about the prevalence or effectiveness of specialized training in adolescent health. A two-stage random sampling cluster design was used to collect nationally representative data from 8,500 students from 91 high schools. Student data were linked to data from a survey of school health clinicians from participating schools on their level of training in youth health. Multilevel models accounting for demographic characteristics of students were used to estimate the association between nurses and physicians training in youth health and health outcomes among students. Almost all nurses and physicians reported some training in youth health, either having attended lectures or study days in youth health (n = 60, 80%) or completed postgraduate papers in youth health (n = 13, 17.3%). Students in schools where the nurses and physicians had received postgraduate training in youth health were less likely than students from schools with clinicians having attended lectures or study days in youth health to report emotional and behavior difficulties (11.8 vs. 12.7, p = .002) and binge drinking (19.6% vs. 24.9%, p = .03). There were no significant associations between depressive symptoms, suicide risk, cigarette, marijuana, contraception use, or motor vehicle risk behaviors among students and level of training among clinicians in their schools' health service. Postgraduate training in youth health among nurses and physicians in school health services is associated with fewer students reporting mental health difficulties and binge alcohol use. These findings support specialized training in youth health for clinicians working predominantly with young people. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. The Deductions of Freedom/Morality-as-Autonomy and the Categorical Imperative in Groundwork III and Their Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Rudy Hiller

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The first objective of this paper is to present an interpretation of Groundwork III which aims to establish two main points: first, that Kant offers there a theoretically-grounded deduction (in Kantian sense of freedom/morality-as-autonomy; second, that Kant also offers a separate deduction of the categorical imperative. Thus, contrary to what several commentators have claimed, Groundwork III contains a theoretically-grounded double deduction. The second objective of the paper is to examine and criticize in detail one crucial step in these deductions, namely, Kant’s inference from the speculative spontaneity of reason to the noumenal existence of the subject as a free will. I show that Kant himself came to reject this inference in the B edition of the Critique of Pure Reason, and argue that this explains Kant’s rejection, in the Critique of Practical Reason, of the deduction of the moral law he previously offered. Thus, contrary to the “reconciliationist” reading, there is indeed a great reversal in the latter work.

  12. Health literacy profile of high school students based on knowledge, attitude and behavior to health of respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiyawati, W.; Fitriani, A.; Priyandoko, D.

    2018-05-01

    This research aims to describe the high school student’s health literacy profile based on their knowledge, attitude, and behavior to health of respiration. This descriptive study involved 65 participants of senior high school students of Ciamis city. Research instruments for collecting data are test and questionnaires sheets. The data were analyzed using quantitative descriptive analysis. The results showed that student’s health literacy of respiration get mean 109.94, moderate category. Based on the above results, it can be concluded that student’s health literacy of respiration is enough because student’s health literacy are in the moderate category, but it needs to be improved by the classroom learning in accompanied by changing some of the lesser habits in maintaining respiratory health.

  13. Health risk behaviours of high school learners and their perceptions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    their interaction with their GP in dealing with these health risk behaviours. Results: The research .... It also assisted in the layout and phrasing of the final ... The Committee for Research on Human Subjects issued a clearance certificate number ...

  14. High Intensity Interval Training for Maximizing Health Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsen, Trine; Aamot, Inger Lise; Haykowsky, Mark; Rognmo, Øivind

    2017-01-01

    Author's accepted version (post-print). Regular physical activity and exercise training are important actions to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and maintain health throughout life. There is solid evidence that exercise is an effective preventative strategy against at least 25 medical conditions, including cardiovascular disease, stroke, hypertension, colon and breast cancer, and type 2 diabetes. Traditionally, endurance exercise training (ET) to improve health related outcomes has consi...

  15. Gender, Headaches, and Sleep Health in High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, Xue; Radhakrishnan, Varsha; Kang, Lilia; Pecor, Keith

    2016-09-01

    The effects of gender, headaches, and their interaction on sleep health (sleep duration, sleep onset and continuity, and indications of hypersomnolence) have not been well studied. For American adolescents, we contrasted sleep health variables between males (n = 378) and females (n = 372) and between individuals with chronic headaches (n = 102 females and 60 males) and without chronic headaches (n = 270 females and 318 males) using data from surveys. Not all measures of sleep health differed between groups, but the following patterns were observed for the measures that did differ. Females reported shorter sleep durations on school nights (p = 0.001), increased likelihood of sleepiness on school days (p sleep durations on weekends (p = 0.009) and higher hypersomnolence scores (p = 0.009) than individuals without headaches. Interestingly, females with headaches reported worse sleep health than females without headaches for multiple measures. Males with headaches did not differ from males without headaches, except for greater waking at night (p = 0.04). These results are consistent with other studies of gender-based differences in sleep health and emphasize the importance of recognizing the risk of headache in female adolescents and treating that condition to prevent additional sleep health issues.

  16. The effect of high and low assertiveness on locus of control and health problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J M; Stout, J K

    1985-03-01

    The effect of high and low assertiveness on locus of control and health problems was examined with 78 direct-service workers in mental health and mental retardation settings in northeastern Pennsylvania. The direct-service workers completed the Rathus (1973) Assertiveness Schedule, the Rotter (1966) Internal-External Locus of Control Scale, and a health-problems inventory. Highly assertive individuals were found to be more internally controlled and to experience fewer health problems than were individuals low in assertiveness.

  17. Taxation Human Rights – a Concrete Case: the right to the full income tax deduction of expenses with medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Araújo Leonetti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is intended to address aspecific aspect related to the taxation humanrights:  the right to full deduction of expenseswith medicines from the basis for calculat-ing the income tax. After a brief introductionto the topic of taxation human rights a rela-tively new vision in universal law, the articlemakes a foray into the income tax-individual,revisiting its basic concepts and principles. Ispresented, also, a brief history of the IRPF inBrazil, in order to better situate the subject infocus. In the sequel, the article faces the ques-tion about the deductions allowed, on the ba-sis of calculation of the tax. Finally, the articleanalizes the possible inclusion of spending onmedicines among these deductions, conclud-ing that it is an imperative of Fairness and re-spect to the Constitution

  18. Violence Prevention after Columbine: A Survey of High School Mental Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepeau-Hobson, M. Franci; Filaccio, Marylynne; Gottfried, Linda

    2005-01-01

    The authors examined changes in mental health services and violence prevention strategies in public high schools since the shootings at Columbine High School. Surveys were mailed to school mental health professionals at public high schools in Colorado. Respondents included school counselors, school psychologists, school social workers, principals,…

  19. Health Insurance without Single Crossing : Why Healthy People have High Coverage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boone, J.; Schottmuller, C.

    2011-01-01

    Standard insurance models predict that people with high (health) risks have high insurance coverage. It is empirically documented that people with high income have lower health risks and are better insured. We show that income differences between risk types lead to a violation of single crossing in

  20. Optimal Premium as a Function of the Deductible: Customer Analysis and Portfolio Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Thøgersen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An insurance company offers an insurance contract ( p , K , consisting of a premium p and a deductible K. In this paper, we consider the problem of choosing the premium optimally as a function of the deductible. The insurance company is facing a market of N customers, each characterized by their personal claim frequency, α, and risk aversion, β. When a customer is offered an insurance contract, she/he will, based on these characteristics, choose whether or not to insure. The decision process of the customer is analyzed in detail. Since the customer characteristics are unknown to the company, it models them as i.i.d. random variables; A 1 , … , A N for the claim frequencies and B 1 , … , B N for the risk aversions. Depending on the distributions of A i and B i , expressions for the portfolio size n ( p ; K ∈ [ 0 , N ] and average claim frequency α ( p ; K in the portfolio are obtained. Knowing these, the company can choose the premium optimally, mainly by minimizing the ruin probability.

  1. A work-site weight control program using financial incentives collected through payroll deduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forster, J L; Jeffery, R W; Sullivan, S; Snell, M K

    1985-11-01

    In a work-site weight control program using a self-motivational program of financial incentives implemented through payroll deduction, 131 university employees chose weight loss goals (0 to 60 lb) and incentives (+5 to +30) to be deducted from each paycheck for six months. Return of incentive money was contingent on progress toward weight goals. Participants were assigned randomly to one of four protocols, involving group educational sessions v self-instruction only and required v optional attendance at weigh-ins and sessions. Overall, dropout rates (21.4%) and mean weight loss (12.2 lb) were encouraging, especially compared with those of other work-site programs. Weight loss was positively associated with attendance at weigh-ins and educational sessions. However, requiring attendance did not increase program effectiveness and seemed also to discourage enrollment among men. The weight control program was equally effective when offered with professionally led educational sessions or when accompanied by self-instructional materials only.

  2. Flexible High Energy-Conversion Sensing Materials for Structural Health Monitoring, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The applicant is developing flexible highly-efficient piezoelectric materials for use in structural health monitoring (SHM) as contemplated in the solicitation...

  3. How is a categorical imperative possible? : Kant’s deduction of the categorical imperative (GMS, III,4)

    OpenAIRE

    Schönecker, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Kant’s deduction of the categorical imperative is the answer to the following question: “How is a categorical imperative possible?” The answer is given in subsection 4 (Sec. 4) of chapter three of the Groundwork. It is impossible to understand this answer, and hence impossible to understand Kant’s deduction of the moral law, without taking into account the overall context of Groundwork III (GMS III). However, here I can only sketch the overall structure of GMS III, and there...

  4. Behaviors and Knowledge of HealthCorps New York City High School Students: Nutrition, Mental Health, and Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Moonseong; Irvin, Erica; Ostrovsky, Natania; Isasi, Carmen; Blank, Arthur E; Lounsbury, David W; Fredericks, Lynn; Yom, Tiana; Ginsberg, Mindy; Hayes, Shawn; Wylie-Rosett, Judith

    2016-02-01

    HealthCorps provides school wellness programming using curricula to promote changes in nutrition, mental health, and physical activity behaviors. The research objective was to evaluate effects of implementing its curricula on nutrition, mental health, and physical activity knowledge and behavior. Pre- and postsurvey data were collected (N = 2255) during the 2012-2013 academic year from 14 New York City public high schools. An 18-item knowledge questionnaire addressed 3 domains; 26 behavioral items were analyzed by factor analysis to identify 6 behavior domains, breakfast being a seventh 1-item domain. We examined the effects stratified by sex, applying mixed-effects models to take into account clustering effects of schools and participants adjusted for age. The HealthCorps program significantly increased all 3 knowledge domains (p mental health, and physical activity. It also improved several key behavioral domains, which are targets of the 2010 Dietary Guidelines to address obesity in youth. © 2016, American School Health Association.

  5. Health complaints of high school students in the Northern Province ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    their families, and the relationship between the two. ... and also reduce the work of school teachers involved with health and social education. ... sionary woman who has unknowingly been offered human meat from ... adverse effects ..... Where children do not trust their parents or ... Drug user networks, coping strategies,.

  6. Health complaints of high school students in the Northern Province ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The highest reported taboo theme was homosexuality, followed by tattooing or piercing, and abortion. There is a significant positive correlation between health complaints of the students and taboo themes in their families. The findings call for intensified efforts on enlightenment (life skills) programmes designed to ...

  7. The high price of depression: Family members' health conditions and health care costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, G Thomas; Weisner, Constance M; Taillac, Cosette J; Campbell, Cynthia I

    2017-05-01

    To compare the health conditions and health care costs of family members of patients diagnosed with a Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) to family members of patients without an MDD diagnosis. Using electronic health record data, we identified family members (n=201,914) of adult index patients (n=92,399) diagnosed with MDD between 2009 and 2014 and family members (n=187,011) of matched patients without MDD. Diagnoses, health care utilization and costs were extracted for each family member. Logistic regression and multivariate models were used to compare diagnosed health conditions, health services cost, and utilization of MDD and non-MDD family members. Analyses covered the 5years before and after the index patient's MDD diagnosis. MDD family members were more likely than non-MDD family members to be diagnosed with mood disorders, anxiety, substance use disorder, and numerous other conditions. MDD family members had higher health care costs than non-MDD family members in every period analyzed, with the highest difference being in the year before the index patient's MDD diagnosis. Family members of patients with MDD are more likely to have a number of health conditions compared to non-MDD family members, and to have higher health care cost and utilization. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. 26 CFR 20.2056A-1 - Restrictions on allowance of marital deduction if surviving spouse is not a United States citizen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... tax marital deduction is not allowed for property passing to or for the benefit of a surviving spouse..., inheritance, or gift taxes, the amendments made by section 5033 of the Technical and Miscellaneous Revenue Act... inconsistent with the provisions of such treaty relating to estate, inheritance, or gift tax marital deductions...

  9. 26 CFR 1.280F-1T - Limitations on investment tax credit and recovery deductions under section 168 for passenger...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations on investment tax credit and... Limitations on investment tax credit and recovery deductions under section 168 for passenger automobiles and... the amount of investment tax credit determined under section 46(a) and recovery deductions under...

  10. 26 CFR 1.179A-1 - Recapture of deduction for qualified clean-fuel vehicle property and qualified clean-fuel vehicle...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the benefit of the section 179A deduction allowable multiplied by the recapture percentage. The... property. The recapture amount is equal to the benefit of the section 179A deduction allowable multiplied... allowance for depreciation, this increase in basis is recoverable over its remaining recovery period...

  11. Innovative Health Monitoring Techniques for High Temperature Composites

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High temperature composite materials, which include ceramic matrix composites (CMCs), carbon-carbon and polyimide composites, will be essential for future space...

  12. Proband Mental Health Difficulties and Parental Stress Predict Mental Health in Toddlers at High-Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crea, Katherine; Dissanayake, Cheryl; Hudry, Kristelle

    2016-01-01

    Family-related predictors of mental health problems were investigated among 30 toddlers at familial high-risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and 28 controls followed from age 2- to 3-years. Parents completed the self-report Depression Anxiety Stress Scales and the parent-report Behavior Assessment System for Children. High-risk toddlers were…

  13. How to Prevent High Blood Pressure: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spanish Understanding Blood Pressure Readings (American Heart Association) Weightlifting: Bad for Your Blood Pressure? (Mayo Foundation for ... High Blood Pressure High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy Nutrition Quitting Smoking Stress National Institutes of Health The ...

  14. Student Engagement in High-Performing Schools: Relationships to Mental and Physical Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Jerusha O.; Pope, Denise

    2014-01-01

    This chapter examines how the three most common types of engagement found among adolescents attending high-performing high schools relate to indicators of mental and physical health. [This article originally appeared as NSSE Yearbook Vol. 113, No. 1.

  15. [Relationship between four components of assertiveness and mental health among high school students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Asami

    2009-04-01

    This study examines the relationship between four components of assertiveness ("open expression", "control of emotion", "consideration for others" and "self-direction") and mental health. In Study 1, the analysis of interviews with thirteen high school students suggested that some components did not have a positive relationship with mental health. In Study 2, 176 high school students completed a questionnaire which included the UCLA isolation scale, the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) and a scale to measure the four components of assertiveness. The results showed that an excessively high score for "consideration for others" was associated with mental unhealthiness. This component probably has an optimum level to maintain mental health.

  16. High-Risk Health and Credit Behavior among 18- to 25-Year-Old College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Troy; Moore, Monique

    2007-01-01

    The number of students accumulating credit card debt--and the amount of debt itself--on college campuses is increasing. If high-risk credit and health behavior are associated, health behavior interventions might apply to high-risk credit behavior. Objective: The authors' purpose was to examine these possible associations. Participants and Methods:…

  17. Health-Related Quality of Life in Children with High-Functioning Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Marie-Christine; Snider, Laurie; Prelock, Patricia A.; Wood-Dauphinee, Sharon; Kehayia, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The health-related quality of life of school-aged children with high-functioning autism is poorly understood. The objectives of this study were to compare the health-related quality of life of children with high-functioning autism to that of typically developing peers and to compare child-self and parent-proxy reports of health-related quality of…

  18. [Quality management is associated with high quality services in health care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Tenna Hassert; Riis, Allan; Mainz, Jan; Jensen, Anne-Louise Degn

    2013-12-09

    In these years, quality management has been the focus in order to meet high quality services for the patients in Danish health care. This article provides information on quality management and quality improvement and it evaluates its effectiveness in achieving better organizational structures, processes and results in Danish health-care organizations. Our findings generally support that quality management is associated with high quality services in health care.

  19. Health disparities among highly vulnerable populations in the United States: a call to action for medical and oral health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison A. Vanderbilt

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare in the United States (US is burdened with enormous healthcare disparities associated with a variety of factors including insurance status, income, and race. Highly vulnerable populations, classified as those with complex medical problems and/or social needs, are one of the fastest growing segments within the US. Over a decade ago, the US Surgeon General publically challenged the nation to realize the importance of oral health and its relationship to general health and well-being, yet oral health disparities continue to plague the US healthcare system. Interprofessional education and teamwork has been demonstrated to improve patient outcomes and provide benefits to participating health professionals. We propose the implementation of interprofessional education and teamwork as a solution to meet the increasing oral and systemic healthcare demands of highly vulnerable US populations.

  20. Health care expenditure in the Islamic Republic of Iran versus other high spending countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi, Bahman; Soltani, Shahin; Javan-Noughabi, Javad; Faramarzi, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Background: In all countries, health expenditures are a main part of government expenditure, and governments try to find policies and strategies to reduce this expenditure. Overall expenditure index has been raised 30 times during the past 20 years in Iran, while in the health sector, the growth in health expenditures index has been 71 times. The present study aimed at examining health care expenditure in the Islamic Republic of Iran versus other high spending countries. Methods: A comparative panel study was conducted in selected countries with the high mean of health expenditure per capita. Data were collected from the WORLD BANK. Out- of- pocket (OOP), health expenditure per capita, public and private health expenditure, and total health expenditure were compared among the selected counties. Results: Iran has the lowest health expenditure per capita compared to other countries and the USA has the highest health expenditures per capita. In Iran, out- of- pocket expenditure, with more than 50%, was the most cost, while in Luxembourg it was the least cost during 2004 to 2014, with less than 12%. Conclusion: Our findings revealed that politicians and health care executives should find a stable source to finance the health system. Stable sources of financing lead to having a steady trend in health expenditure.

  1. Health behavior and health-related quality of life in patients with a high risk of cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petek Davorina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Health-related quality of life (HRQoL is measuring a patient’s experience of his health status and represents an outcome of medical interventions. Existing data proves that a healthy lifestyle is positively associated with HRQoL in all age groups. Patients with a high risk for cardiovascular disease typically led an unhealthy lifestyle combined with risk diseases. We aimed to analyse these characteristics and their reflection in HRQoL.

  2. Oral Health Behaviour and Social and Health Factors in University Students from 26 Low, Middle and High Income Countries

    OpenAIRE

    Peltzer, Karl; Pengpid, Supa

    2014-01-01

    Poor oral health is still a major burden for populations throughout the world, particularly in developing countries. The aim of this study was investigate oral health behaviour (tooth brushing and dental attendance) and associated factors in low, middle and high income countries. Using anonymous questionnaires, data were collected from 19,560 undergraduate university students (mean age 20.8, SD = 2.8) from 27 universities in 26 countries across Asia, Africa and the Americas. Results indicate...

  3. 26 CFR 1.221-1 - Deduction for interest paid on qualified education loans after December 31, 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Individuals § 1.221-1 Deduction for interest paid on qualified education loans after December 31, 2001. (a) In... interest paid by the taxpayer during the taxable year on a qualified education loan. See paragraph (b)(4... paid on qualified education loans after December 31, 2001, in taxable years ending after December 31...

  4. The Role of Argumentation in Hypothetico-Deductive Reasoning during Problem-Based Learning in Medical Education: A Conceptual Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Hyunjung; Choi, Ikseon

    2018-01-01

    One of the important goals of problem-based learning (PBL) in medical education is to enhance medical students' clinical reasoning--hypothetico-deductive reasoning (HDR) in particular--through small group discussions. However, few studies have focused on explicit strategies for promoting students' HDR during group discussions in PBL. This paper…

  5. 26 CFR 1.269-4 - Power of district director to allocate deduction, credit, or allowance in part.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... evasion or avoidance of Federal income tax for which the acquisition was made. The district director is..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Items Not Deductible § 1.269-4...(a), but only to such extent as he determines will not result in the evasion or avoidance of Federal...

  6. 20 CFR 404.417 - Deductions because of noncovered remunerative activity outside the United States; 45 hour and 7...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... deduction is for an amount equal to the benefit payable to the individual for that month. (2) From May 1983... insured individual's earnings record because of the beneficiary's marriage to the insured individual. (2... required by this paragraph (b) is equal to the wife's, husband's or child's benefit. (4) From January 1985...

  7. 26 CFR 1.163-4 - Deduction for original issue discount on certain obligations issued after May 27, 1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... be includible in the gross income of such taxpayer for such taxable year. (b) Examples. The rules in... Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve. See 12 CFR § 217.4(d). The stated redemption price at... any amount of original issue discount deducted prior to repurchase, or minus any amount of premium...

  8. 18 CFR 367.4102 - Account 410.2, Provision for deferred income taxes, other income and deductions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... COMPANY ACT OF 2005, FEDERAL POWER ACT AND NATURAL GAS ACT Income Statement Chart of Accounts Service Company Operating Income § 367.4102 Account 410.2, Provision for deferred income taxes, other income and..., Provision for deferred income taxes, other income and deductions. 367.4102 Section 367.4102 Conservation of...

  9. 26 CFR 1.170-1 - Charitable, etc., contributions and gifts; allowance of deduction (before amendment by Tax Reform...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... constitute allowable deductions as trade or business expenses rather than as charitable contributions. See... for charitable contributions as trade or business expenses and rules with respect to treatment of... in property of a type which the taxpayer sells in the course of his business, the fair market value...

  10. 26 CFR 1.642(c)-3 - Adjustments and other special rules for determining unlimited charitable contributions deduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... the gross income of the estate for 1972, and N University receives $100,000 from the estate in such... INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES... unlimited charitable contributions deduction. (a) Income in respect of a decedent. For purposes of §§ 1.642...

  11. TAX DEDUCTION THROUGH ZAKAT: AN EMPIRICAL INVESTIGATION ON MUSLIM IN MALAYSIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Al-Mamun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to explore the factors which are affecting Muslim consumer's perception towards tax deduction through zakat in Malaysia. A conceptual framework was drawn based on the literature. Six factors were extracted through principal component analysis and SEM was run to test the hypotheses. This research found that halal-haram aspect of Islamic Shariah has a very positive influence on Muslim consumers’ perception towards the tax rebate system. In addition, legal consciousness and knowledge about tax and zakat have a positive significant impact on Muslim consumers’ perceptions towards this system. Due to the limited literature available on this subject matter, this study offers unique findings that may help in capitalizing the practices in Muslim countries and to understand their consumers’ perception regarding the tax deduction system. In conclusion, zakat institutions in Malaysia will also be better benefitted through this research finding. =========================================== Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk menggali faktor- faktor yang mempengaruhi persepsi para konsumen muslim terkait dengan pengurangan pajak melalui zakat di Malaysia. Suatu kerangka konseptual telah digambarkan berdasarkan literatur. Penelitian ini menemukan bahwa aspek halal- haram dalam Syariah Islami memiliki pengaruh yang sangat positif terhadap persepsi para konsumen muslim terkait dengan sistem pengurangan pajak. Sebagai tambahan, kesadaran hukum dan pengetahuan tentang pajak dan zakat memiliki pengaruh positif yang signifikan pada persepsi konsumen muslim yang terkait dengan sistem ini. Sehubungan dengan terbatasnya literatur yang tersedia terkait dengan masalah ini, penelitian ini menawarkan temuan- temuan yang menarik yang dapat mendukung pengembangan praktik- praktik di negara- negara muslim dan untuk memahami persepsi para konsumennya terkait dengan sistem pengurangan pajak.

  12. Future health physics prospects in high-level nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, D.A.; Mayberry, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    The objective of this presentation is to provide an overview of health physics activities anticipated to be required at a high-level nuclear waste repository and to project the numbers of health physics personnel expected to be required to carry out these activities. Health physics personnel receiving consideration in the projections include the health physics manager, shift supervisors, area supervisors, health physicists, and technologists. Phases of the repository addressed are construction, operation, retrieval, and decommissioning. Specific topics discussed in the process of developing the projections are: (a) the basic features of a geologic repository, (b) the staffing requirements of such a repository, (c) health physics involvement in repository operations, and (d) the anticipated schedule for operation of repositories in the United States. A quantitative assessment of future health physics prospects in high-level nuclear waste management is included

  13. Everyday life innovation potential: when technology has to make sense. Citizens living in high-risk areas for health, using health-promoting technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    2014-01-01

    ) to contribute, along with other health professionals, in dealing with the problem of inequality in health. In this study health promoting technologies for adult citizens living in high risk areas of health, is chosen as one particular area of interest for occupational therapists within the field of health...

  14. Strategies to Promote High School Students' Healthful Food Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Ali; Fredericks, Lynn; Wylie-Rosett, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Studies have suggested that skill-building through hands-on cooking as a nutrition education strategy, is effective to improve overall dietary quality among participants. FamilyCook Productions' "Diet for a Healthy Planet with Teen Battle Chefs(TM)" curriculum using this approach, was piloted in 2008 in a Brooklyn public high school…

  15. The high price of debt: household financial debt and its impact on mental and physical health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Elizabeth; Nandi, Arijit; Adam, Emma K; McDade, Thomas W

    2013-08-01

    Household financial debt in America has risen dramatically in recent years. While there is evidence that debt is associated with adverse psychological health, its relationship with other health outcomes is relatively unknown. We investigate the associations of multiple indices of financial debt with psychological and general health outcomes among 8400 young adult respondents from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health). Our findings show that reporting high financial debt relative to available assets is associated with higher perceived stress and depression, worse self-reported general health, and higher diastolic blood pressure. These associations remain significant when controlling for prior socioeconomic status, psychological and physical health, and other demographic factors. The results suggest that debt is an important socioeconomic determinant of health that should be explored further in social epidemiology research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Global Health Security Demands a Strong International Health Regulations Treaty and Leadership From a Highly Resourced World Health Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkle, Frederick M

    2015-10-01

    If the Ebola tragedy of West Africa has taught us anything, it should be that the 2005 International Health Regulations (IHR) Treaty, which gave unprecedented authority to the World Health Organization (WHO) to provide global public health security during public health emergencies of international concern, has fallen severely short of its original goal. After encouraging successes with the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) pandemic, the intent of the legally binding Treaty to improve the capacity of all countries to detect, assess, notify, and respond to public health threats has shamefully lapsed. Despite the granting of 2-year extensions in 2012 to countries to meet core surveillance and response requirements, less than 20% of countries have complied. Today it is not realistic to expect that these gaps will be solved or narrowed in the foreseeable future by the IHR or the WHO alone under current provisions. The unfortunate failures that culminated in an inadequate response to the Ebola epidemic in West Africa are multifactorial, including funding, staffing, and poor leadership decisions, but all are reversible. A rush by the Global Health Security Agenda partners to fill critical gaps in administrative and operational areas has been crucial in the short term, but questions remain as to the real priorities of the G20 as time elapses and critical gaps in public health protections and infrastructure take precedence over the economic and security needs of the developed world. The response from the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network and foreign medical teams to Ebola proved indispensable to global health security, but both deserve stronger strategic capacity support and institutional status under the WHO leadership granted by the IHR Treaty. Treaties are the most successful means the world has in preventing, preparing for, and controlling epidemics in an increasingly globalized world. Other options are not sustainable. Given the gravity of ongoing

  17. Characterising the extent of misreporting of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes using the Australian Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Karen Louise; Jacobs, Jane Philippa; Allender, Steven; Alston, Laura Veronica; Nichols, Melanie

    2016-08-02

    Measuring and monitoring the true prevalence of risk factors for chronic conditions is essential for evidence-based policy and health service planning. Understanding the prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Australia relies heavily on self-report measures from surveys, such as the triennial National Health Survey. However, international evidence suggests that self-reported data may substantially underestimate actual risk factor prevalence. This study sought to characterise the extent of misreporting in a large, nationally-representative health survey that included objective measures of clinical risk factors for CVD. This study employed a cross-sectional analysis of 7269 adults aged 18 years and over who provided fasting blood samples as part of the 2011-12 Australian Health Survey. Self-reported prevalence of high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes was compared to measured prevalence, and univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses identified socio-demographic characteristics associated with underreporting for each risk factor. Approximately 16 % of the total sample underreported high blood pressure (measured to be at high risk but didn't report a diagnosis), 33 % underreported high cholesterol, and 1.3 % underreported diabetes. Among those measured to be at high risk, 68 % did not report a diagnosis for high blood pressure, nor did 89 % of people with high cholesterol and 29 % of people with high fasting plasma glucose. Younger age was associated with underreporting high blood pressure and high cholesterol, while lower area-level disadvantage and higher income were associated with underreporting diabetes. Underreporting has important implications for CVD risk factor surveillance, policy planning and decisions, and clinical best-practice guidelines. This analysis highlights concerns about the reach of primary prevention efforts in certain groups and implications for patients who may be unaware of their

  18. Characterising the extent of misreporting of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes using the Australian Health Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Louise Peterson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measuring and monitoring the true prevalence of risk factors for chronic conditions is essential for evidence-based policy and health service planning. Understanding the prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD in Australia relies heavily on self-report measures from surveys, such as the triennial National Health Survey. However, international evidence suggests that self-reported data may substantially underestimate actual risk factor prevalence. This study sought to characterise the extent of misreporting in a large, nationally-representative health survey that included objective measures of clinical risk factors for CVD. Methods This study employed a cross-sectional analysis of 7269 adults aged 18 years and over who provided fasting blood samples as part of the 2011–12 Australian Health Survey. Self-reported prevalence of high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes was compared to measured prevalence, and univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses identified socio-demographic characteristics associated with underreporting for each risk factor. Results Approximately 16 % of the total sample underreported high blood pressure (measured to be at high risk but didn’t report a diagnosis, 33 % underreported high cholesterol, and 1.3 % underreported diabetes. Among those measured to be at high risk, 68 % did not report a diagnosis for high blood pressure, nor did 89 % of people with high cholesterol and 29 % of people with high fasting plasma glucose. Younger age was associated with underreporting high blood pressure and high cholesterol, while lower area-level disadvantage and higher income were associated with underreporting diabetes. Conclusions Underreporting has important implications for CVD risk factor surveillance, policy planning and decisions, and clinical best-practice guidelines. This analysis highlights concerns about the reach of primary prevention efforts in certain

  19. Predictors of High eHealth Literacy in Primary Lung Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Robin A; Puts, Martine T E; Papadakos, Janet; Le, Lisa W; Milne, Victoria C; Hope, Andrew J; Catton, Pamela; Giuliani, Meredith E

    2015-12-01

    Lung cancer survivors are likely to have low health literacy which is an independent risk factor for poorer health outcomes. The eHealth literacy in lung cancer survivors has not been reported. The purposes of this study were to determine self-perceived eHealth literacy levels in lung cancer survivors and to explore predictors of higher eHealth literacy. A cross-sectional study was conducted at the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre in Toronto, Canada. Survivors completed a survey that collected demographic, self-perceived eHealth literacy (using the eHealth Literacy Scale), and quality of life information. Tumor and treatment details were extracted from medical records. Demographic data was summarized using descriptive statistics and compared against those with high and low eHealth literacy using Fisher's exact test. Eighty-three survivors were enrolled over 7 months. Median age was 71 years (range 44-89); 41 survivors (49%) were male. Forty-six (55%) survivors had some college education or higher. Most had access to eResources (78%) via computer, Internet, or smartphone. Fifty-seven (69%) scored 5 or greater (7=excellent) on the overall health scale. Twenty-eight (33.7%) perceived themselves to have high eHealth literacy. There was no statistically significant correlation between eHealth literacy groups and age (p=1.00), gender (p=0.82), living situation (p=1.00), overall health (p=1.00), overall quality of life (QoL) (p=1.00), or histology (p=0.74). High eHealth literacy correlated with the level of education received (p=0.003) and access to eResources (p=0.004). The self-perceived eHealth literacy of lung cancer survivors is generally low.

  20. An exploratory study of the health harms and utilisation of health services of frequent legal high users under the interim regulated legal high market in central Auckland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Chris; Prasad, Jitesh; Wong, K C; Rychert, Marta; Graydon-Guy, Thomas

    2016-03-11

    To explore health problems and the accessing of health services by frequent legal high users under an interim regulated legal market in central Auckland. Frequent legal high users (monthly+) were recruited from outside eight randomly-selected, licensed, legal high stores in central Auckland from 23 April-7 May, 2014. Eligible participants were emailed a unique invitation to complete an on-line survey; 105 completed the survey. Twenty-seven percent had suffered mental illness during their lifetimes. Eighty percent used synthetic cannabinoids (SC), and 20% 'party pills'. Forty-seven percent of SC users used daily or more often. Other drugs used included alcohol (80%), cannabis (59%), 'ecstasy' (18%) and methamphetamine (15%). Fifty-eight percent of SC users were classified as SC dependent. The most common problems reported from SC use were: insomnia (29%); 'vomiting/nausea' (25%); 'short temper/agitation' (21%); 'anxiety' (21%); 'strange thoughts' (16%); and 'heart palpitations' (14%). The health services most commonly accessed by SC users were: a 'doctor/GP' (9%); 'counsellor' (9%); 'DrugHelp/MethHelp' websites (7%); 'Alcohol & Drug Helpline' (4%); 'ambulance' (3%); 'A&E' (3%); and hospitalisation (3%). Frequent use of interim licensed SC products was associated with health problems, including dependency. Further research is required to determine the health risks of these products.

  1. Are there differences in oral health and oral health behavior between individuals with high and low dental fear?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuller, A.A.; Willumsen, T.; Holst, D.

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of the relationship between dental fear, use of dental services, and oral health in different age groups in a common population are scarce. Dental fear and its relationships are usually described in individuals with high dental fear only. The purposes of this study were to

  2. Enlightenment and measurement - a way to improve health among high school students

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Jane; Andersen, Lars Bo

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This paper examines the effect of participating in a web-based health programme that promotes personal tracking of high school students' own measurements of a number of health-related parameters. Danish cross-sectional survey data were used to examine the effects of the health programme...... feeling of wellbeing among students, especially those with high BMI levels and poor aerobic fitness. As the schools participated in the health programme on voluntary basis and at a financial cost to themselves, the positive effects of participation found can only be stated to be valid among students from...... on various health measures. Both quantile regression models and standard ordinary least squares (OLS) models were used to explore the correlations between the students' participation in the health programme and their body mass index (BMI), body fat percentage, aerobic fitness, and well-being. Participation...

  3. Danger zone: Men, masculinity and occupational health and safety in high risk occupations

    OpenAIRE

    Stergiou-Kita, Mary; Mansfield, Elizabeth; Bezo, Randy; Colantonio, Angela; Garritano, Enzo; Lafrance, Marc; Lewko, John; Mantis, Steve; Moody, Joel; Power, Nicole; Theberge, Nancy; Westwood, Eleanor; Travers, Krista

    2015-01-01

    The workplace is a key setting where gender issues and organizational structures may influence occupational health and safety practices. The enactment of dominant norms of masculinity in high risk occupations can be particularly problematic, as it exposes men to significant risks for injuries and fatalities. To encourage multi-disciplinary collaborations and advance knowledge in the intersecting areas of gender studies, men’s health, work and workplace health and safety, a national network of...

  4. Association of a Behaviorally Based High School Health Education Curriculum with Increased Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annesi, James J.; Trinity, John; Mareno, Nicole; Walsh, Stephanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing exercise in children and adolescents through academic classes is an understudied area. Potential benefits include associated improvements in health, psychosocial, and quality-of-life factors. A sample of 98 students (M[subscript age] = 14.3) from high school health education classes received six, 40-min lessons incorporating…

  5. Relationships between Sports Team Participation and Health-Risk Behaviors among Alternative High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karen E.; Eisenberg, Marla E.; Bearinger, Linda H.; Fulkerson, Jayne A.; Sieving, Renee E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Evidence suggests that sports team participation differentially relates to health-risk behaviors. Few studies have explored relationships among high-risk youth. Purpose: To examine associations between weekly sports team participation and health-risk behaviors (substance use, sexual risk-taking, violence involvement) among alternative…

  6. School Violence, Social Support and Psychological Health among Taiwanese Junior High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ji-Kang; Wei, Hsi-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This paper examines how peer social support mediates the association between school victimization and student psychological health among junior-high students in an Asian context (Taiwan), and further examines how gender and ethnicity differ in the interrelationships of school violence, peer social support and psychological health.…

  7. Classroom Goal Structures and HIV and Pregnancy Prevention Education in Rural High School Health Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderman, Eric M.; Cupp, Pamela K.; Lane, Derek R.; Zimmerman, Rick; Gray, DeLeon L.; O'Connell, Ann

    2011-01-01

    Over 5,000 adolescents enrolled in required rural high school health courses reported their perceptions of mastery and extrinsic goal structures in their health classrooms. Data were collected from all students at three time points (prior to HIV and pregnancy instruction, 3 months after instruction, and 1 year after instruction). Results indicated…

  8. Mental health first aid training for high school teachers: a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorm, Anthony F; Kitchener, Betty A; Sawyer, Michael G; Scales, Helen; Cvetkovski, Stefan

    2010-06-24

    Mental disorders often have their first onset during adolescence. For this reason, high school teachers are in a good position to provide initial assistance to students who are developing mental health problems. To improve the skills of teachers in this area, a Mental Health First Aid training course was modified to be suitable for high school teachers and evaluated in a cluster randomized trial. The trial was carried out with teachers in South Australian high schools. Teachers at 7 schools received training and those at another 7 were wait-listed for future training. The effects of the training on teachers were evaluated using questionnaires pre- and post-training and at 6 months follow-up. The questionnaires assessed mental health knowledge, stigmatizing attitudes, confidence in providing help to others, help actually provided, school policy and procedures, and teacher mental health. The indirect effects on students were evaluated using questionnaires at pre-training and at follow-up which assessed any mental health help and information received from school staff, and also the mental health of the student. The training increased teachers' knowledge, changed beliefs about treatment to be more like those of mental health professionals, reduced some aspects of stigma, and increased confidence in providing help to students and colleagues. There was an indirect effect on students, who reported receiving more mental health information from school staff. Most of the changes found were sustained 6 months after training. However, no effects were found on teachers' individual support towards students with mental health problems or on student mental health. Mental Health First Aid training has positive effects on teachers' mental health knowledge, attitudes, confidence and some aspects of their behaviour. ACTRN12608000561381.

  9. Mental health first aid training for high school teachers: a cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorm Anthony F

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mental disorders often have their first onset during adolescence. For this reason, high school teachers are in a good position to provide initial assistance to students who are developing mental health problems. To improve the skills of teachers in this area, a Mental Health First Aid training course was modified to be suitable for high school teachers and evaluated in a cluster randomized trial. Methods The trial was carried out with teachers in South Australian high schools. Teachers at 7 schools received training and those at another 7 were wait-listed for future training. The effects of the training on teachers were evaluated using questionnaires pre- and post-training and at 6 months follow-up. The questionnaires assessed mental health knowledge, stigmatizing attitudes, confidence in providing help to others, help actually provided, school policy and procedures, and teacher mental health. The indirect effects on students were evaluated using questionnaires at pre-training and at follow-up which assessed any mental health help and information received from school staff, and also the mental health of the student. Results The training increased teachers' knowledge, changed beliefs about treatment to be more like those of mental health professionals, reduced some aspects of stigma, and increased confidence in providing help to students and colleagues. There was an indirect effect on students, who reported receiving more mental health information from school staff. Most of the changes found were sustained 6 months after training. However, no effects were found on teachers' individual support towards students with mental health problems or on student mental health. Conclusions Mental Health First Aid training has positive effects on teachers' mental health knowledge, attitudes, confidence and some aspects of their behaviour. Trial registration ACTRN12608000561381

  10. Health-related quality of life in children with high-functioning autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potvin, Marie-Christine; Snider, Laurie; Prelock, Patricia A; Wood-Dauphinee, Sharon; Kehayia, Eva

    2015-01-01

    The health-related quality of life of school-aged children with high-functioning autism is poorly understood. The objectives of this study were to compare the health-related quality of life of children with high-functioning autism to that of typically developing peers and to compare child-self and parent-proxy reports of health-related quality of life of children. A cross-sectional study of children with high-functioning autism (n = 30) and peers (n = 31) was conducted using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 Generic Core Scales. Children with high-functioning autism had significantly poorer health-related quality of life than peers whether reported by themselves (p children and parental scores suggested variance in points of view. This study specifically investigated health-related quality of life in children with high-functioning autism as compared to a sample of peers, from the child's perspective. It strengthens earlier findings that children with high-functioning autism experience poorer health-related quality of life than those without this disorder and points to the importance of clinicians working with families to identify areas in a child's life that promote or hinder their sense of well-being. © The Author(s) 2013.

  11. Increased health risk in subjects with high self-reported seasonality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas M Øyane

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Seasonal variations in mood and behaviour, termed seasonality, are commonly reported in the general population. As a part of a large cross-sectional health survey in Hordaland, Norway, we investigated the relationship between seasonality, objective health measurements and health behaviours. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 11,545 subjects between 40-44 years old participated, completing the Global Seasonality Score, measuring seasonality. Waist/hip circumference, BMI and blood pressure were measured, and blood samples were analyzed for total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides and glucose. Subjects also completed a questionnaire on miscellaneous health behaviours (exercise, smoking, alcohol consumption. Hierarchical linear regression analyses were used to investigate associations between seasonality and objective health measurements, while binary logistic regression was used for analysing associations between seasonality and health behaviours. Analyses were adjusted for sociodemographic factors, month of questionnaire completion and sleep duration. Seasonality was positively associated with high waist-hip-ratio, BMI, triglyceride levels, and in men high total cholesterol. Seasonality was negatively associated with HDL cholesterol. In women seasonality was negatively associated with prevalence of exercise and positively associated with daily cigarette smoking. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: High seasonality was associated with objective health risk factors and in women also with health behaviours associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease.

  12. Determinants of Mental Health Care Utilization in a Suicide High-risk Group With Suicidal Ideation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Soo; Lee, Moo-Sik; Hong, Jee-Young

    2016-01-01

    The suicide rate in Korea is increasing every year, and is the highest among the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries. Psychiatric patients in particular have a higher risk of suicide than other patients. This study was performed to evaluate determinants of mental health care utilization among individuals at high risk for suicide. Korea Health Panel data from 2009 to 2011 were used. Subjects were individuals at high risk of suicide who had suicidal ideation, a past history of psychiatric illness, or had utilized outpatient services for a psychiatric disorder associated with suicidal ideation within the past year. The chi-square test and hierarchical logistic regression were used to identify significant determinants of mental health care utilization. The total number of subjects with complete data on the variables in our model was 989. Individuals suffering from three or more chronic diseases used mental health care more frequently. Mental health care utilization was higher in subjects who had middle or high levels of educational attainment, were receiving Medical Aid, or had a large family size. It is important to control risk factors in high-risk groups as part of suicide prevention strategies. The clinical approach, which includes community-based intervention, entails the management of reduction of suicidal risk. Our study identified demographic characteristics that have a significant impact on mental health care utilization and should be considered in the development of suicide prevention strategies. Further studies should examine the effect of mental health care utilization on reducing suicidal ideation.

  13. Evaluation of health and safety impacts of defense high-level waste in geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, E.D.; Kocher, D.C.; Witherspoon, J.P.

    1985-02-01

    Pursuant to the requirement of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 that the President evaluate the use of commercial high-level waste repositories for the disposal of defense high-level wastes, a comparative assessment has been performed of the potential health and safety impacts of disposal of defense wastes in commercial or defense-only repositories. Simplified models were used to make quantitative estimates of both long- and short-term health and safety impacts of several options for defense high-level waste disposal. The results indicate that potential health and safety impacts are not likely to vary significantly among the different disposal options for defense wastes. Estimated long-term health and safety impacts from all defense-waste disposal options are somewhat less than those from commercial waste disposal, while short-term health and safety impacts appear to be insensitive to the differences between defense and commercial wastes. In all cases, potential health and safety impacts are small because of the need to meet stringent standards promulgated by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. We conclude that health and safety impacts should not be a significant factor in the choice of a disposal option for defense high-level wastes. 20 references, 14 tables

  14. Facebook Addiction and Its Relationship with Mental Health among Thai High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanprathet, Nitt; Manwong, Mereerat; Khumsri, Jiraporn; Yingyeun, Rungmanee; Phanasathit, Muthita

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the relationship between Facebook addiction and mental health among high school students. This cross-sectional analytic study was performed among 972 high school students from four provinces associated with high economic prosperity in Thailand: Bangkok, ChiangMai, Ubon Ratchathani and Songkhla, utilizing a multistage cluster sampling technique. Facebook addiction was assessed using the Thai version of the Bergen-Facebook Addiction Scale (Thai-BFAS), while a Thai version ofthe General Health Questionnaire (Thai GHQ-28) was used for mental health evaluation. The relationship between Facebook addiction and mental health was analyzed through multiple logistic regressions. The prevalence of Facebook addiction and abnormal mental health were 41.9% (95% CI; 38.6, 45.2), and 21.9% (95% CI; 19.2, 24.8), respectively. After adjustment for confounding factors (sufficiency of household income, school location, level of education, GPAX learning deficits and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder), the individuals identified as having Facebook addiction were discovered to be at a high risk of developing abnormal general mental health (ORadj = 1.7, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.4), somatic symptoms (OR = 1.2, 95% CI: 0.9, 1.7), anxiety and insomnia (ORadj = 1.3, 95% CI: 0.9, 1.8), social dysfunction (OR = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.1, 2.1) and severe depression (ORadj = 1.5, 95% CI: 1.0, 2.2). Moreover; there were pronounced trends of increasing risk according to the level of Facebook addiction (Ptrend students could be associated with abnormal, general mental health status, somatic symptoms, anxiety & insomnia, social dysfunction, and severe depression. Therefore, it is essential that the relevant authorities educate young people about the mental health impacts linked with Facebook addictive usage and impose appropriate public health policies by screening Facebook addiction and mental health issues in risk groups.

  15. Physical fitness and health indices in children, adolescents and adults with high or low motor competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantell, Marja; Crawford, Susan G; Tish Doyle-Baker, P K

    2008-04-01

    The overall purpose of the study was to examine if individuals with low motor competence achieve age-adequate fitness and health. A group of 149 children, adolescents, and adults with low or high motor competence participated in motor, fitness, and health assessments. Individuals with low motor competence did not differ on their basic physiological health parameters, but they had less optimal levels of overall health and fitness indices than those with high motor competence. As a function of age, musculoskeletal fitness was significantly compromised for the low motor competence group. The metabolic indices suggested that the low motor competence group had significantly higher BMI's compared to the high motor competence group. Motor skills and static balance were significant predictors of the BMI. Exercise intensity differed between children in the low and high motor competence group. The findings suggest that individuals with low motor competence have compromised health-related fitness. In order to discriminate between individuals with high and low motor competence, fitness assessment should include at least back extension, curl ups, and sit and reach. In addition, health-related fitness measurements such as BMI, waist circumference, blood lipid profile and bone mineral density are also recommended.

  16. OGC Geographic Information Service Deductive Semantic Reasoning Based on Description Vocabularies Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIAO Lizhi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As geographic information interoperability and sharing developing, more and more interoperable OGC (open geospatial consortium Web services (OWS are generated and published through the internet. These services can facilitate the integration of different scientific applications by searching, finding, and utilizing the large number of scientific data and Web services. However, these services are widely dispersed and hard to be found and utilized with executive semantic retrieval. This is especially true when considering the weak semantic description of geographic information service data. Focusing on semantic retrieval and reasoning of the distributed OWS resources, a deductive and semantic reasoning method is proposed to describe and search relevant OWS resources. Specifically, ①description words are extracted from OWS metadata file to generate GISe ontology-database and instance-database based on geographic ontology according to basic geographic elements category, ②a description words reduction model is put forward to implement knowledge reduction on GISe instance-database based on rough set theory and generate optimized instances database, ③utilizing GISe ontology-database and optimized instance-database to implement semantic inference and reasoning of geographic searching objects is used as an example to demonstrate the efficiency, feasibility and recall ration of the proposed description-word-based reduction model.

  17. Deductible expenses for effects of the income tax. A business approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Santiváñez Guarniz

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The fiscal charges of the income tax state that if we want to consider an expense as deductible it must fulfill the causality principle, apart from that, they state rules that expenses are necessary to generate income and fulfill the criterion of reasonable expenses, majority among others.Showing that an expense is a necessity is a complicated task that in many cases will force — the person to determine that necessity — to examine internal aspects of the company, as business strategies, internal policies, etc. Apart from the analytical complexity of these topics, there will be the subjective aspect from the point of view of the outside observer.This article pretends to show the difficulty to decide if an expense is necessary or not, through the analysis of a real case where the tax system denies expenses of a taxpayer because they were not considered necessary for that kind of business.

  18. 17 CFR 240.15c3-1e - Deductions for market and credit risk for certain brokers or dealers (Appendix E to 17 CFR 240...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... credit risk for certain brokers or dealers (Appendix E to 17 CFR 240.15c3-1). 240.15c3-1e Section 240....15c3-1(c)(2)(vi) and (c)(2)(vii) and to compute deductions for credit risk pursuant to this Appendix E... the broker or dealer will use to calculate deductions for market and credit risk on those categories...

  19. Natural representation of the deduction; applying to the temporal reasoning for expert systems based on production rules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudin, Patrick

    1990-01-01

    The expert systems development within a real time context, requires both to master the necessary reasoning about the time as well as to master the necessary response time for reasoning. Although rigorous temporal logic formalisms exist, strategies for temporal reasoning are either incomplete or else imply unacceptable response times. The first part presents the logic formalism upon which is based the production system. This formalism contains a three-valued logic system with truth-valued matrix, and a deductive system with a formal system. It does a rigorous work for this no standard logic, where the notions of consistency and completeness can be studied. Its development supports itself on the will to formalise the reasoning used at the elaboration time of the strategies to make them more explicit as the natural deduction method. The second part proposes an extension for the source logic formalism to take explicitly the time into account. The approach proposed through 'TANIS', the prototype of such an expert system shell, using a natural reasoning application is proposed. It allows, at the generation time, the implementation within the expert system, of an adapted deduction strategy to the symbolic temporal reasoning which is complete and ease the determination of the response time. (author) [fr

  20. High-intensity intermittent swimming improves cardiovascular health status for women with mild hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Magni; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup; Lindenskov, Annika

    2014-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that high-intensity swim training improves cardiovascular health status in sedentary premenopausal women with mild hypertension, sixty-two women were randomized into high-intensity (n = 21; HIT), moderate-intensity (n = 21; MOD), and control groups (n = 20; CON). HIT perfor...

  1. Scientific Approach for Optimising Performance, Health and Safety in High-Altitude Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böcker, Michael; Vogy, Joachim; Nolle-Gösser, Tanja

    2008-09-01

    The ESO coordinated study “Optimising Performance, Health and Safety in High-Altitude Observatories” is based on a psychological approach using a questionnaire for data collection and assessment of high-altitude effects. During 2007 and 2008, data from 28 staff and visitors involved in APEX and ALMA were collected and analysed and the first results of the study are summarised. While there is a lot of information about biomedical changes at high altitude, relatively few studies have focussed on psychological changes, for example with respect to performance of mental tasks, safety consciousness and emotions. Both, biomedical and psychological changes are relevant factors in occupational safety and health. The results of the questionnaire on safety, health and performance issues demonstrate that the working conditions at high altitude are less detrimental than expected.

  2. High performance work systems: the gap between policy and practice in health care reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggat, Sandra G; Bartram, Timothy; Stanton, Pauline

    2011-01-01

    Studies of high-performing organisations have consistently reported a positive relationship between high performance work systems (HPWS) and performance outcomes. Although many of these studies have been conducted in manufacturing, similar findings of a positive correlation between aspects of HPWS and improved care delivery and patient outcomes have been reported in international health care studies. The purpose of this paper is to bring together the results from a series of studies conducted within Australian health care organisations. First, the authors seek to demonstrate the link found between high performance work systems and organisational performance, including the perceived quality of patient care. Second, the paper aims to show that the hospitals studied do not have the necessary aspects of HPWS in place and that there has been little consideration of HPWS in health system reform. The paper draws on a series of correlation studies using survey data from hospitals in Australia, supplemented by qualitative data collection and analysis. To demonstrate the link between HPWS and perceived quality of care delivery the authors conducted regression analysis with tests of mediation and moderation to analyse survey responses of 201 nurses in a large regional Australian health service and explored HRM and HPWS in detail in three casestudy organisations. To achieve the second aim, the authors surveyed human resource and other senior managers in all Victorian health sector organisations and reviewed policy documents related to health system reform planned for Australia. The findings suggest that there is a relationship between HPWS and the perceived quality of care that is mediated by human resource management (HRM) outcomes, such as psychological empowerment. It is also found that health care organisations in Australia generally do not have the necessary aspects of HPWS in place, creating a policy and practice gap. Although the chief executive officers of health

  3. Determinants of the demand for health insurance coverage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.P.M. Winssen van (Kayleigh)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractThe health insurance density in the Netherlands is among the highest in the world. This is shown by the fact that, in 2016, only 12 per cent of the Dutch insured opted for a reduction of health insurance coverage in the form of a voluntary deductible, while, at the same time, 84 per

  4. Adverse effect of high migration stress on mental health during pregnancy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecompte, Vanessa; Richard-Fortier, Zoé; Rousseau, Cécile

    2017-02-01

    Despite empirical evidence on the numerous consequences associated with high migration stress and mental health problems during pregnancy, a psychosocial stress assessment is rarely done, leaving it largely unaddressed. This case illustration sheds light on the common multiple risk factors related to migration stress that have to be taken into consideration when addressing perinatal mental health, and highlights the importance of obstetric appointments as a unique opportunity to assess psychosocial stress and mobilize interdisciplinary interventions.

  5. Danger zone: Men, masculinity and occupational health and safety in high risk occupations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiou-Kita, Mary; Mansfield, Elizabeth; Bezo, Randy; Colantonio, Angela; Garritano, Enzo; Lafrance, Marc; Lewko, John; Mantis, Steve; Moody, Joel; Power, Nicole; Theberge, Nancy; Westwood, Eleanor; Travers, Krista

    2015-12-01

    The workplace is a key setting where gender issues and organizational structures may influence occupational health and safety practices. The enactment of dominant norms of masculinity in high risk occupations can be particularly problematic, as it exposes men to significant risks for injuries and fatalities. To encourage multi-disciplinary collaborations and advance knowledge in the intersecting areas of gender studies, men's health, work and workplace health and safety, a national network of thirteen researchers and health and safety stakeholders completed a critical literature review examining the intersection between masculinities and men's workplace health and safety in order to: (i) account for research previously undertaken in this area; (ii) identify themes that may inform our understanding of masculinity and workplace health and safety and; (iii) identify research and practice gaps in relation to men's workplace health and safety. In this paper we present key themes from this review. Recommendations are made regarding: (i) how to define gender; (ii) how to attend to and identify how masculinities may influence workers' identities, perceptions of occupational risks and how institutionalized practices can reinforce norms of masculinity; (iii) the importance of considering how masculinities may intersect with other variables (e.g. historical context, age, class, race, geographical location) and; (iv) the added significance of present-day labour market forces on men's occupational health and safety.

  6. Registered nurses views of caring in coronary care--a deductive and inductive content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ewa K; Sjöström-Strand, Annica; Willman, Ania; Borglin, Gunilla

    2015-12-01

    To extend nurses' descriptions of how they understood caring, as reflected in the findings of an earlier study (i.e. the hierarchical outcome space) and to gain additional understandings and perspectives of nurses' views of caring in relation to a coronary care patient case. Scientific literature from the 1970s-1990s contains descriptions of caring in nursing. In contrast, the contemporary literature on this topic--particularly in the context of coronary care--is very sparse, and the few studies that do contain descriptions rarely do so from the perspective of nurses. Qualitative descriptive study. Twenty-one nurses were interviewed using the stimulated recall interview technique. The data were analysed using deductive and inductive qualitative content analysis. The results of the iterative and integrated content analysis showed that the data mainly reproduced the content of the hierarchical outcome space describing how nurses could understand caring; however, in the outcome space, the relationship broke up (i.e. flipped). The nurses' views of caring could now also be understood as: person-centredness 'lurking' in the shadows; limited 'potential' for safeguarding patients' best interests; counselling as virtually the 'only' nursing intervention; and caring preceded by the 'almighty' context. Their views offered alternative and, at times, contrasting perspectives of caring, thereby adding to our understanding of it. Caring was described as operating somewhere between the nurses caring values and the contextual conditions in which caring occurred. This challenged their ability to sustain caring in accordance with their values and the patients' preferences. To ensure that the essentials of caring are met at all times, nurses need to plan and deliver caring in a systematic way. The use of systematic structures in caring, as the nursing process, can help nurses to work in a person-centred way, while sustaining their professional values. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. [A sexual health study of high school students at the 3 high schools in Kitakyushu City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurugi, Yoko; Yamamoto, Mieko; Matsuda, Shinya

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the actual sexual behavior and attitudes of high school students in Kitakyushu city, Fukuoka and then to develop effective sex education methods for high school students in this region. This study investigated the sexual behavior and attitudes of 1,297 high school students in Kitakyushu by self-administered questionnaire. The differences in their answers by sex, prevalence of sexual intercourse and change in sexual behavior and attitude before and after the sex education lecture were examined. 39.3% of the students had had sexual intercourse and 74.1% answered that they might have sex, if it were with a partner whom they loved. However, they did not have enough knowledge about contraception and sexually transmitted diseases. This result shows that they did not recognize the risks accompanying sexual intercourse. There are significant differences between male and female students in their sexual attitudes. Male students tend to permit premarital sexual intercourse, unfaithfulness, prostitution, hiring a prostitute and abortion. Male students tend to give more approval to the following opinions: both men and women should agree to sexual contact if the partner wants it; men should take the initiative in sexual contact; women should not talk about sex. Many female students answered that women should make their own decisions to have or not to have sex, however a considerable number of female students answered that for their first intercourse, they just agreed with their partner even though they really did not want to do so. After the sex education lecture, the students have more knowledge about contraception and STDs. However, there is no significant difference in their sexual attitudes before and after the lecture. In order to facilitate more desirable and safer sexual behavior among the younger generation, it is not enough to simply give them knowledge about contraception or STDs, etc. To organize more comprehensive sex

  8. Comparing health promotion behaviors of male and female high school students in Southeast of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, Nasibeh; Farokhzadian, Jamileh; Abazari, Faroukh

    2017-11-23

    Background Adolescence is one of the most challenging periods of human life. Many healthy or risky behaviors may be formed during this period and continue to the end of life. The aim of this study was to examine and compare the health promotion behaviors of male and female students in high schools. Methods In this descriptive-comparative study, 609 high school students were selected using multi-stage random sampling method. Data were collected using demographic and health-promoting lifestyle profile (HPLPII) questionnaires. Results The mean of health promotion behaviors was moderate in female (2.43 ± 0.46) and male (2.61 ± 0.45) students. The highest and lowest means in the male students were respectively the dimensions of spiritual growth and health responsibility. Also, the highest and lowest means in the female students were dimensions of interpersonal relationships as well as physical activity and exercise. The status of male health promotion behaviors was significantly more favorable than that of the female (p = 0.001, t = -4.71). The male students had a better situation than female in terms of all the six dimensions of HPLPII, so there was a significant difference between them in the four dimensions of spiritual growth, stress management, physical activity and health responsibility. There was also a significant relationship between the history of physical and mental illness in the past year and the students' health promotion behaviors (p importance of promoting self-care and educational interventions in the aspects such as physical activity and health responsibility of young people in order to improve the health of the community.

  9. Pre-fracture individual characteristics associated with high total health care costs after hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schousboe, J T; Paudel, M L; Taylor, B C; Kats, A M; Virnig, B A; Dowd, B E; Langsetmo, L; Ensrud, K E

    2017-03-01

    Older women with pre-fracture slow walk speed, high body mass index, and/or a high level of multimorbidity have significantly higher health care costs after hip fracture compared to those without those characteristics. Studies to investigate if targeted health care interventions for these individuals can reduce hip fracture costs are warranted. The aim of this study is to estimate the associations of individual pre-fracture characteristics with total health care costs after hip fracture, using Study of Osteoporotic Fractures (SOF) cohort data linked to Medicare claims. Our study population was 738 women age 70 and older enrolled in Medicare Fee for Service (FFS) who experienced an incident hip fracture between January 1, 1992 and December 31, 2009. We assessed pre-fracture individual characteristics at SOF study visits and estimated costs of hospitalizations, skilled nursing facility and inpatient rehabilitation stays, home health care visits, and outpatient utilization from Medicare FFS claims. We used generalized linear models to estimate the associations of predictor variables with total health care costs (2010 US dollars) after hip fracture. Median total health care costs for 1 year after hip fracture were $35,536 (inter-quartile range $24,830 to $50,903). Multivariable-adjusted total health care costs for 1 year after hip fracture were 14 % higher ($5256, 95 % CI $156 to $10,356) in those with walk speed total health care costs after hip fracture in older women. Studies to investigate if targeted health care interventions for these individuals can reduce the costs of hip fractures are warranted.

  10. High Out-of-Pocket Health Spending in Countries With a Mediterranean Connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Grima

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we analyzed healthcare provision and health expenditure across six Mediterranean countries that adopt the National Health System (Beveridge model and that form part of the European Union (EU with the main aim being that of analyzing and comparing out-of-pocket health spending in countries with a European Mediterranean connection. To this end, we considered various economic indicators and statistics to derive commonalities and differences across these countries and also compared trends in these indicators to those observed across the rest of the EU. We then analyzed these findings in light of other data related to the quality of healthcare delivery and the infrastructure of the health system and discussed recent developments in healthcare within each country and the main challenges faced by the respective health systems. The results show that on average, Mediterranean countries spend less on total healthcare expenditure (THE than the EU average, both as a proportion of GDP, as well as in per capita terms. This is primarily driven by lower-than-EU-average public funding of healthcare. The 2008/2009 macro-economic and financial crisis had a significant impact on the countries under review, and explains the persistent reductions in public health spending as part of the austerity measures put in force across sectors. On the flipside, Mediterranean countries have a higher presence of private health providers in total funding, thereby explaining the higher Out-of-Pocket (OOPs health expenditures in these countries relative to the EU-average. With regard to the overall health infrastructure in these countries, we observed that although the supply of physicians is largely in line with the rest of the EU, there is under-supply when it comes to hospital beds. This may be symptomatic of lower government funding. Nonetheless, all countries score highly in the evaluation of the quality of health services, as recorded by international rankings

  11. Determinants of Mental Health Care Utilization in a Suicide High-risk Group With Suicidal Ideation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Soo Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The suicide rate in Korea is increasing every year, and is the highest among the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries. Psychiatric patients in particular have a higher risk of suicide than other patients. This study was performed to evaluate determinants of mental health care utilization among individuals at high risk for suicide. Methods: Korea Health Panel data from 2009 to 2011 were used. Subjects were individuals at high risk of suicide who had suicidal ideation, a past history of psychiatric illness, or had utilized outpatient services for a psychiatric disorder associated with suicidal ideation within the past year. The chi-square test and hierarchical logistic regression were used to identify significant determinants of mental health care utilization. Results: The total number of subjects with complete data on the variables in our model was 989. Individuals suffering from three or more chronic diseases used mental health care more frequently. Mental health care utilization was higher in subjects who had middle or high levels of educational attainment, were receiving Medical Aid, or had a large family size. Conclusions: It is important to control risk factors in high-risk groups as part of suicide prevention strategies. The clinical approach, which includes community-based intervention, entails the management of reduction of suicidal risk. Our study identified demographic characteristics that have a significant impact on mental health care utilization and should be considered in the development of suicide prevention strategies. Further studies should examine the effect of mental health care utilization on reducing suicidal ideation.

  12. Big data in health care: using analytics to identify and manage high-risk and high-cost patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, David W; Saria, Suchi; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Shah, Anand; Escobar, Gabriel

    2014-07-01

    The US health care system is rapidly adopting electronic health records, which will dramatically increase the quantity of clinical data that are available electronically. Simultaneously, rapid progress has been made in clinical analytics--techniques for analyzing large quantities of data and gleaning new insights from that analysis--which is part of what is known as big data. As a result, there are unprecedented opportunities to use big data to reduce the costs of health care in the United States. We present six use cases--that is, key examples--where some of the clearest opportunities exist to reduce costs through the use of big data: high-cost patients, readmissions, triage, decompensation (when a patient's condition worsens), adverse events, and treatment optimization for diseases affecting multiple organ systems. We discuss the types of insights that are likely to emerge from clinical analytics, the types of data needed to obtain such insights, and the infrastructure--analytics, algorithms, registries, assessment scores, monitoring devices, and so forth--that organizations will need to perform the necessary analyses and to implement changes that will improve care while reducing costs. Our findings have policy implications for regulatory oversight, ways to address privacy concerns, and the support of research on analytics. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  13. Comparison of high- versus low-intensity community health worker intervention to promote newborn and child health in Northern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Findley SE

    2013-10-01

    the five prior years (baseline: n = 6,906; follow-up: n = 2,310. The follow-up respondents were grouped by level of intensity of the CHW interventions in their community, with “low” including group activities led only by a trained community volunteer and “high” including the community volunteer activities plus CBSD from a CHW providing one-on-one advice and assistance. t-tests were used to test for significant differences from baseline to follow-up, and F-statistics, which adjust for the stratified cluster design, were used to test for significant differences between the control, low-intensity, and high-intensity intervention groups at follow-up. These analyses focused on changes in newborn and sick child care practices.Results: Anti-tetanus vaccination coverage during pregnancy increased from 69.2% at baseline to 85.7% at follow-up in the intervention areas. Breastfeeding within 24 hours increased from 42.9% to 59.0% in the intervention areas, and more newborns were checked by health workers within 48 hours (from 16.8% at baseline to 26.8% at follow-up in the intervention areas. Newborns were more likely to be checked by trained health personnel, and they received more comprehensive newborn care. Compared to the control communities, more than twice as many women in intervention communities knew to watch for specific newborn danger signs. Compared to the control and low-intensity intervention communities, more mothers in the high-intensity communities learned about the care of sick children from CHWs, with a corresponding decline those seeking advice from family or friends or traditional birth attendants. Significantly fewer mothers did nothing when their child was sick. High-intensity intervention communities experienced the most decline. Those who did nothing for children with fever or cough declined from 35% to 30%, and with diarrhea from 40% to 31%. Use of medications, both traditional and modern, increased from baseline to follow-up, with no

  14. Structural Intervention With School Nurses Increases Receipt of Sexual Health Care Among Male High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittus, Patricia J; Harper, Christopher R; Becasen, Jeffrey S; Donatello, Robin A; Ethier, Kathleen A

    2018-01-01

    Adolescent males are less likely to receive health care and have lower levels of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) knowledge than adolescent females. The purpose of this study was to determine if a school-based structural intervention focused on school nurses increases receipt of condoms and SRH information among male students. Interventions to improve student access to sexual and reproductive health care were implemented in six urban high schools with a matched set of comparison schools. Interventions included working with school nurses to improve access to sexual and reproductive health care, including the provision of condoms and information about pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease prevention and services. Intervention effects were assessed through five cross-sectional yearly surveys, and analyses include data from 13,740 male students. Nurses in intervention schools changed their interactions with male students who visited them for services, such that, among those who reported they went to the school nurse for any reason in the previous year, those in intervention schools reported significant increases in receipt of sexual health services over the course of the study compared with students in comparison schools. Further, these results translated into population-level effects. Among all male students surveyed, those in intervention schools were more likely than those in comparison schools to report increases in receipt of sexual health services from school nurses. With a minimal investment of resources, school nurses can become important sources of SRH information and condoms for male high school students. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Reaching High-Need Youth Populations With Evidence-Based Sexual Health Education in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campa, Mary I; Leff, Sarah Z; Tufts, Margaret

    2018-02-01

    To explore the programmatic reach and experience of high-need adolescents who received sexual health education in 3 distinct implementation settings (targeted-prevention settings, traditional schools, and alternative schools) through a statewide sexual health education program. Data are from youth surveys collected between September 2013 and December 2014 in the California Personal Responsibility Education Program. A sample of high-need participants (n = 747) provided data to examine the impact of implementation setting on reach and program experience. Implementation in targeted-prevention settings was equal to or more effective at providing a positive program experience for high-need participants. More than 5 times as many high-need participants were served in targeted-prevention settings compared with traditional schools. Reaching the same number of high-need participants served in targeted-prevention settings over 15 months would take nearly 7 years of programming in traditional schools. To maximize the reach and experience of high-need youth populations receiving sexual health education, state and local agencies should consider the importance of implementation setting. Targeted resources and efforts should be directed toward high-need young people by expanding beyond traditional school settings.

  16. Lessons from the domestic Ebola response: Improving health care system resilience to high consequence infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Diane; Kirk Sell, Tara; Schoch-Spana, Monica; Shearer, Matthew P; Chandler, Hannah; Thomas, Erin; Rose, Dale A; Carbone, Eric G; Toner, Eric

    2018-05-01

    The domestic response to the West Africa Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic from 2014-2016 provides a unique opportunity to distill lessons learned about health sector planning and operations from those individuals directly involved. This research project aimed to identify and integrate these lessons into an actionable checklist that can improve health sector resilience to future high-consequence infectious disease (HCID) events. Interviews (N = 73) were completed with individuals involved in the domestic EVD response in 4 cities (Atlanta, Dallas, New York, and Omaha), and included individuals who worked in academia, emergency management, government, health care, law, media, and public health during the response. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed qualitatively. Two focus groups were then conducted to expand on themes identified in the interviews. Using these themes, an evidence-informed checklist was developed and vetted for completeness and feasibility by an expert advisory group. Salient themes identified included health care facility issues-specifically identifying assessment and treatment hospitals, isolation and treatment unit layout, waste management, community relations, patient identification, patient isolation, limitations on treatment, laboratories, and research considerations-and health care workforce issues-specifically psychosocial impact, unit staffing, staff training, and proper personal protective equipment. The experiences of those involved in the domestic Ebola response provide critical lessons that can help strengthen resilience of health care systems and improve future responses to HCID events. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. High volume hydraulic fracturing operations: potential impacts on surface water and human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrdjen, Igor; Lee, Jiyoung

    2016-08-01

    High volume, hydraulic fracturing (HVHF) processes, used to extract natural gas and oil from underground shale deposits, pose many potential hazards to the environment and human health. HVHF can negatively affect the environment by contaminating soil, water, and air matrices with potential pollutants. Due to the relatively novel nature of the process, hazards to surface waters and human health are not well known. The purpose of this article is to link the impacts of HVHF operations on surface water integrity, with human health consequences. Surface water contamination risks include: increased structural failure rates of unconventional wells, issues with wastewater treatment, and accidental discharge of contaminated fluids. Human health risks associated with exposure to surface water contaminated with HVHF chemicals include increased cancer risk and turbidity of water, leading to increased pathogen survival time. Future research should focus on modeling contamination spread throughout the environment, and minimizing occupational exposure to harmful chemicals.

  18. Designing HIGH-COST medicine: hospital surveys, health planning, and the paradox of progressive reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Barbara Bridgman

    2010-02-01

    Inspired by social medicine, some progressive US health reforms have paradoxically reinforced a business model of high-cost medical delivery that does not match social needs. In analyzing the financial status of their areas' hospitals, for example, city-wide hospital surveys of the 1910s through 1930s sought to direct capital investments and, in so doing, control competition and markets. The 2 national health planning programs that ran from the mid-1960s to the mid-1980s continued similar strategies of economic organization and management, as did the so-called market reforms that followed. Consequently, these reforms promoted large, extremely specialized, capital-intensive institutions and systems at the expense of less complex (and less costly) primary and chronic care. The current capital crisis may expose the lack of sustainability of such a model and open up new ideas and new ways to build health care designed to meet people's health needs.

  19. Disability and Exposure to High Levels of Adverse Childhood Experiences: Effect on Health and Risk Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Anna; Herrick, Harry; Proescholdbell, Scott; Simmons, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    Health disparities among persons with disabilities have been previously documented. However, there is little research specific to adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) in this population and how ACE exposure affects health outcomes in adulthood. Data from the 2012 North Carolina Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey were analyzed to compare the prevalence of ACEs between adults with and without disabilities and high ACE exposure (3-8 ACEs). Adjusted risk ratios of health risks and perceived poor health by disability status were calculated using predicted marginals. A higher percentage of persons with disabilities (36.5%) than those without disabilities (19.6%) reported high ACE exposure. Among those with high ACE exposure, persons with disabilities were more likely to report several ACE categories, particularly childhood sexual abuse. In adjusted analyses, persons with disabilities had an increased risk of smoking (relative risk [RR] = 1.29; 95% CI, 1.10-1.51), poor physical health (RR = 4.34; 95% CI, 3.08-6.11), poor mental health (RR = 4.69; 95% CI, 3.19-6.87), and doctor-diagnosed depression (RR = 2.16; 95% CI, 1.82-2.56) compared to persons without disabilities. The definition of disability derived from the BRFSS survey does not allow for those with disabilities to be categorized according to physical disabilities versus mental or emotional disabilities. In addition, we were unable to determine the timing of ACE exposure in relation to disability onset. A better understanding of the life course associations between ACEs and disability and the impact of exposure to multiple types of childhood adversity on disability and health is needed to inform research and services specific to this vulnerable population. ©2016 by the North Carolina Institute of Medicine and The Duke Endowment. All rights reserved.

  20. Health approaches in a widely adopted Brazilian high school biology textbook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liziane Martins

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering the long tradition of discussing health in the Brazilian school curriculum, it is important to investigate how this topic is addressed by the textbooks, the main resource used by most schools in the country. In particular, it is relevant to verify if this content is presented in a manner that contributes to the development of the students as active and critical members of the society. We analyze how health is treated in the textbook Biology, by Laurence (2005, which has been the high school Biology textbook most chosen by public school teachers among those certified by the National Program for High School Textbooks (PNLEM/2007, sponsored by the Brazilian Ministry of Education (MEC. We used categorical content analysis techniques, involving the decomposition of the texts into units of analysis, the categories, which were built in this work through analogical regroupings, by using semantic criteria. In order to investigate the treatment given to health, we applied an analytical table to the units of recording, which consist of sentences, paragraphs, and sections of the textbook that discuss contents related to health and disease. This table systematizes eight health indicators, seeking to identify three health approaches: biomedical, behavioral, and socioecological. We found 267 units of recording in the textbook and, based on their analysis, it was possible to categorize the textbook as one in which the biomedical approach prevails. Our findings are consistent with other works that indicate the prevalence of this approach in Brazilian education, and Brazilian and international textbooks. Another important finding of the work is that the behavioral approach does not hold, at least for the analyzed textbook, as a view of health different from the biomedical and socioecological approaches. After all, when the book mentions behaviors and habits of life associated with health, it generally emphasizes biological dimensions, aligning with a

  1. Association of a behaviorally based high school health education curriculum with increased exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annesi, James J; Trinity, John; Mareno, Nicole; Walsh, Stephanie M

    2015-06-01

    Increasing exercise in children and adolescents through academic classes is an understudied area. Potential benefits include associated improvements in health, psychosocial, and quality-of-life factors. A sample of 98 students (M(age) = 14.3) from high school health education classes received six, 40-min lessons incorporating cognitive-behavioral methods to increase exercise over 6 weeks. Significant within-group improvements in exercise, mood, and body satisfaction were found, with slightly larger effect sizes identified for the boys. Increase in exercise was significantly associated with reduced mood distress (β = -.17, p goal setting and self-regulation within high school health education classes may foster increased exercise and associated improvements in mood and body satisfaction. For girls, the positive effects may reinforce one another. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Student Bedtimes, Academic Performance, and Health in a Residential High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wernette, Maliah J; Emory, Jan

    2017-08-01

    Inadequate sleep among adolescents is considered an epidemic in the United States. Late night bedtimes could be an important factor in academic performance and health with consequences continuing throughout adulthood. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships between late night bedtimes, academic performance (grade point average [GPA]), and utilization of health care (school nurse visits) in a residential high school. The data were collected from archival records for one academic semester. The statistical analysis employed the nonparametric Pearson's correlation coefficient ( r) with the standard level of significance (α = .05). Positive and inverse linear relationships were found between bedtime and school nurse visits ( p < .00001) and bedtime and GPA ( p = .007). The findings suggest students' late night bedtimes may be related to increased school nurse visits and lower academic performance. Adolescent late night bedtimes may be an important consideration for academic success and maintaining health in residential high schools.

  3. High Temperatures Health Monitoring of the Condensed Water Height in Steam Pipe Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lih, Shyh-Shiuh; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Lee, Hyeong Jae; Badescu, Mircea; Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart; Takano, Nobuyuki; Ostlund, Patrick; Blosiu, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasonic probes were designed, fabricated and tested for high temperature health monitoring system. The goal of this work was to develop the health monitoring system that can determine the height level of the condensed water through the pipe wall at high temperature up to 250 deg while accounting for the effects of surface perturbation. Among different ultrasonic probe designs, 2.25 MHz probes with air backed configuration provide satisfactory results in terms of sensitivity, receiving reflections from the target through the pipe wall. A series of tests were performed using the air-backed probes under irregular conditions, such as surface perturbation and surface disturbance at elevated temperature, to qualify the developed ultrasonic system. The results demonstrate that the fabricated air-backed probes combined with advanced signal processing techniques offer the capability of health monitoring of steam pipe under various operating conditions.

  4. Oral health behaviour and social and health factors in university students from 26 low, middle and high income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Pengpid, Supa

    2014-11-26

    Poor oral health is still a major burden for populations throughout the world, particularly in developing countries. The aim of this study was investigate oral health behaviour (tooth brushing and dental attendance) and associated factors in low, middle and high income countries. Using anonymous questionnaires, data were collected from 19,560 undergraduate university students (mean age 20.8, SD = 2.8) from 27 universities in 26 countries across Asia, Africa and the Americas. Results indicate that 67.2% of students reported to brush their teeth twice or more times a day, 28.8% about once a day and 4.0% never. Regarding dental check-up visit, 16.3% reported twice a year, 25.6% once a year, 33.9% rarely and 24.3% never. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, being a male, coming from a wealthy or quite well off family background, living in low income or lower middle income, weak beliefs in the importance of regular tooth brushing, depression and PTSD symptoms, tobacco use and frequent gambling, low physical activity, and low daily meal and snacks frequency were associated with inadequate tooth brushing (importance of regular tooth brushing, PTSD symptoms, illicit drug use, low physical activity, and low daily snacks frequency, skipping breakfast and inadequate fruit and vegetables consumption were associated with less than one annual dental care visit. Oral health behaviour among the students was found to be low. Various risk factors identified can be used to guide interventions to improve oral health behaviour among university students.

  5. Oral Health Behaviour and Social and Health Factors in University Students from 26 Low, Middle and High Income Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl Peltzer

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Poor oral health is still a major burden for populations throughout the world, particularly in developing countries. The aim of this study was investigate oral health behaviour (tooth brushing and dental attendance and associated factors in low, middle and high income countries. Using anonymous questionnaires, data were collected from 19,560 undergraduate university students (mean age 20.8, SD = 2.8 from 27 universities in 26 countries across Asia, Africa and the Americas. Results indicate that 67.2% of students reported to brush their teeth twice or more times a day, 28.8% about once a day and 4.0% never. Regarding dental check-up visit, 16.3% reported twice a year, 25.6% once a year, 33.9% rarely and 24.3% never. In a multivariate logistic regression analysis, being a male, coming from a wealthy or quite well off family background, living in low income or lower middle income, weak beliefs in the importance of regular tooth brushing, depression and PTSD symptoms, tobacco use and frequent gambling, low physical activity, and low daily meal and snacks frequency were associated with inadequate tooth brushing (health behaviour among the students was found to be low. Various risk factors identified can be used to guide interventions to improve oral health behaviour among university students.

  6. Application of high-throughput sequencing in understanding human oral microbiome related with health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Hui; Jiang, Wen

    2014-01-01

    The oral microbiome is one of most diversity habitat in the human body and they are closely related with oral health and disease. As the technique developing,, high throughput sequencing has become a popular approach applied for oral microbial analysis. Oral bacterial profiles have been studied to explore the relationship between microbial diversity and oral diseases such as caries and periodontal disease. This review describes the application of high-throughput sequencing for characterizati...

  7. The health of homeless people in high-income countries: descriptive epidemiology, health consequences, and clinical and policy recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazel, Seena; Geddes, John R; Kushel, Margot

    2015-01-01

    In the European Union, more than 400 000 individuals are homeless on any one night and more than 600 000 are homeless in the USA. The causes of homelessness are an interaction between individual and structural factors. Individual factors include poverty, family problems, and mental health and substance misuse problems. The availability of low-cost housing is thought to be the most important structural determinant for homelessness. Homeless people have higher rates of premature mortality than the rest of the population, especially from suicide and unintentional injuries, and an increased prevalence of a range of infectious diseases, mental disorders, and substance misuse. High rates of non-communicable diseases have also been described with evidence of accelerated ageing. Although engagement with health services and adherence to treatments is often compromised, homeless people typically attend the emergency department more often than non-homeless people. We discuss several recommendations to improve the surveillance of morbidity and mortality in homeless people. Programmes focused on high-risk groups, such as individuals leaving prisons, psychiatric hospitals, and the child welfare system, and the introduction of national and state-wide plans that target homeless people are likely to improve outcomes. PMID:25390578

  8. Health-related quality of life of long-term high-grade glioma survivors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosma, Ingeborg; Reijneveld, Jaap C.; Douw, Linda; Vos, Maaike J.; Postma, Tjeerd J.; Aaronson, Neil K.; Muller, Martin; Vandertop, W. Peter; Slotman, Ben J.; Taphoorn, Martin J. B.; Heimans, Jan J.; Klein, Martin

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of long-term to short-term high-grade glioma (HGG) survivors, determine the prognostic value of HRQOL for overall survival, and determine the effect of tumor recurrence on HRQOL for long-term survivors. Following

  9. The Association between Bullying and Psychological Health among Senior High School Students in Ghana, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owusu, Andrew; Hart, Peter; Oliver, Brittney; Kang, Minsoo

    2011-01-01

    Background: School-based bullying, a global challenge, negatively impacts the health and development of both victims and perpetrators. This study examined the relationship between bullying victimization and selected psychological variables among senior high school (SHS) students in Ghana, West Africa. Methods: This study utilized data from the…

  10. The risk ogf high-risk jobs : psychological health consequences in forensic physicians and ambulance workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ploeg, E. van der

    2003-01-01

    The risk of high-risk jobs: Psychological health consequences in forensic doctors and ambulance workers This thesis has shown that forensic physicians and ambulance personnel frequently suffer from psychological complaints as a result of dramatic events and sources of chronic work stress. A

  11. High performance work practices in the health care sector: A dutch case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boselie, J.P.P.E.F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to present an empirical study of the effect of high performance work practices on commitment and citizenship behaviour in the health care sector. The theory suggests that individual employees are willing “to go the extra mile” when they are given the opportunity to develop

  12. High School Health-Education Teachers' Perceptions and Practices Related to Teaching HIV Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Scott W.; Telljohann, Susan K.; Price, James H.; Dake, Joseph A.; Stone, Gregory E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: HIV/AIDS is one of the leading causes of illness and death in the United States with individuals between the ages of 13 and 19 years being especially vulnerable for infection. The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes, perceptions, and instructional practices of high school health teachers toward teaching HIV prevention.…

  13. Conceptualizing High School Students' Mental Health through a Dual-Factor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suldo, Shannon M; Thalji-Raitano, Amanda; Kiefer, Sarah M.; Ferron, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Mental health is increasingly viewed as a complete state of being, consisting of the absence of psychopathology and the presence of positive factors such as subjective well-being (SWB). This cross-sectional study analyzed multimethod and multisource data for 500 high school students (ages 14-18 years, M = 15.27 years, SD = 1.0 years) to examine…

  14. High-intensity interval exercise and cerebrovascular health: curiosity, cause, and consequence

    OpenAIRE

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Cotter, James D; Brassard, Patrice; Bailey, Damian M

    2015-01-01

    Exercise is a uniquely effective and pluripotent medicine against several noncommunicable diseases of westernised lifestyles, including protection against neurodegenerative disorders. High-intensity interval exercise training (HIT) is emerging as an effective alternative to current health-related exercise guidelines. Compared with traditional moderate-intensity continuous exercise training, HIT confers equivalent if not indeed superior metabolic, cardiac, and systemic vascular adaptation. Con...

  15. DISABILITY AND DEPRESSION AMONG HIGH UTILIZERS OF HEALTH-CARE - A LONGITUDINAL ANALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VONKORFF, M; ORMEL, J; KATON, W; LIN, EHB

    We evaluated, among depressed medical patients who are high utilizers of health care, whether improved vs unimproved depression is associated with differences in the course of functional disability. At baseline, 6 months, and 12 months, depression and disability were assessed among a sample of

  16. Integrating mHealth Mobile Applications to Reduce High Risk Drinking among Underage Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemi, Donna M.; Cochran, Allyson R.; Kelly, John F.; Cornelius, Judith B.; Belk, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Objective: College students embrace mobile cell phones (MCPs) as a primary communication and entertainment device. The aim of this study was to investigate college students' perceptions toward using mHealth technology to deliver interventions to prevent high-risk drinking and associated consequences. Design/setting: Four focus group interviews…

  17. The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Implementation of eHealth Enabled Integrated Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijser, Wouter Alexander; Penterman, L; van Montfort, Augustinus P.W.P.; Smits, Jacco Gerardus Wilhelmus Leonardus; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: ‘E-health enabled integrated care’ (eHEIC) has high potential to improve quality of care, widen access and increase efficiency. Experts and scholars increasingly report about difficulties of sustainable eHEIC implementation. These reports indicate in particular ‘human factors’ often

  18. A Collaboration for Health and Physical Education in High-Need Schools and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, Sarah; Beale, Angela; DeMarzo, Jenine

    2009-01-01

    Teacher education programs have a long history of producing excellent health and physical education (HPE) teachers for suburban school districts. But graduates who start their career at high-need schools often feel poorly prepared to face the challenges of low-income school districts, schools, and students. This article is directed primarily to…

  19. A High School Depression and Suicide Prevention Program: A Collaboration between Health Education and Psychological Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moilanen, Donna L.; Bradbury, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Examined a collaboration between health education and psychological services in generating a high school depression and suicide prevention program. The five-component program raised awareness of teen depression and suicide, increased communication about these issues within the school and community, and provided information about available…

  20. Mind the public health leadership gap: the opportunities and challenges of engaging high-profile individuals in the public health agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shickle, Darren; Day, Matthew; Smith, Kevin; Zakariasen, Ken; Moskol, Jacob; Oliver, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Public health leadership has been criticized as being ineffective. The public health profession is relatively small. Critics have argued that there is over-emphasis on technical aspects and insufficient use of the 'community as a source of public health actions'. The paper analyses the resources, motivations and skills utilized by high-profile individuals who have made contributions to the public health agenda. The phenomenon of celebrity diplomacy is critiqued. Two exemplars are discussed: Jamie Oliver and Michael Bloomberg. The risks of involving celebrities are also considered. Leaders for public health demonstrate 'a paradoxical blend of personal humility and professional will' to make the 'right decisions happen'. While they may have ego or self-interest, in this context, at least, they channel their ambition for the public health cause, not themselves. Leaders from outside public health may have no understanding of what public health is nor consider their work as part of a wider public health agenda. It is important to understand why they become leaders for public health. This will inform a strategy for how others may be encouraged to collaborate for public health causes. Some key points for working with high-profile leaders for public health are identified. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Sustainable development at tax-deductible costs or how to assure sustainable development by one’s way of living

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem Adrianus de Bruijn

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that an imperative demand for an existence in harmony with Nature is created when the costs incurred for such an existence can be deducted from taxable income. All reasonable consumers who pay income taxes will then be driven to buy tax-deductible products. Producers will have to satisfy this demand. They will also have to justify their products’ characteristics, which assure sustainable development and to identify the costs which are associated with these qualities. The consumer needs to know which percentage of the purchase price he paid corresponds with the environmental cost free quality of the merchandise, in order for him to deduct the consequent amount from his taxable income. The theory underlying the deductibility of costs of living from taxable income is based on the following three assumptions: The goal of development is constantly determined by the purchases of consumers. Currently, the only goal with which consumers spend their income seems to be the one of consuming more. The recurring ecological crises reveal that it is impossible to continue to consume more of limited resources without eventually exhausting them. One of the functions of the consumer in the economy is to maintain a way of living which assures sustainable development. The principle of efficiency of economy, according to which the efficient place to manage any cost is at the source of the revenues which costs sustain. This paper also presents a practical and feasible application of our ideas. The creation of a way of living qualifies as research if it is achieved within the context of a scientific project with the cooperation of, in particular, academic institutions. Such a project could be operated within the context of the UNECE 1998 Aarhus Convention on Access to Information, Public Participation in Decision-making and Access to Justice in Environmental Matters, signed by Romania on 25 June 1998 and already ratified

  2. IMPACT OF HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT IN LITIGATION CONCERNING ACCESS TO HIGH-COST DRUGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Alicia; Perez Galan, Ana

    2017-01-01

    The impact of health technology assessment (HTA) in the judicialization of the right of health has not been deeply studied in Latin American countries. The purpose of this study is to review the process of judicialization of the access to high cost drugs in Uruguay and assess the impact HTAs have had on this process. The methodology used for this study included a comprehensive literature search in electronic databases, local journals, internal documents developed in the Ministry of Health, as well as conducting interviews with key informants. Judicialization of the access of high cost drugs has been increasing since 2010. The strategy of the Ministry of Health of Uruguay to decrease this problem included the organization of roundtables with judges and other stakeholders on the basis of HTA, the training of defense lawyers in the use and interpretation of HTA, and the participation of a professional who develops HTA in the preparation of the defense arguments. A year after the implementation of this strategy, 25 percent of writs of protection were won by the Ministry of Health. Even though the strategy implemented was effective in reducing the loss of litigations, it was not effective in reducing the growing number of writs of protection. It is essential to address this problem in a broad debate and to promote understanding between the parties.

  3. Amortized deduction as a source of the real financing of industrial modernization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Ivanovich Tatynov

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the process of creating a new concept of the financial mechanism, it is important, in our opinion, to construct a mechanism for depreciation of fixed assets of enterprises, adequate to the goals of the national economy modernization. It seems appropriate to establish a depreciation model which will allow the state to conduct depreciation policy differentiated by branches of the national economy and on specific territories. In addition, depreciation deductibles must be real, that means, they should be accumulated on the accounts and not just be tax exemptions. There are expressions of the Russian economists, that it is possible to ensure the realization of revenues depreciation on special accounts under threat of possible penalties. The solution of this problem, it seems, can be achieved through mandatory enrollment of depreciation amounts into the escrow bank accounts without withdrawing the funds before the expiration of the depreciation period of fixed assets of the owners. The yield on bank deposits in the Russian market, as a rule, does not exceed the Central Bank refinancing rate. Keeping money in the long term on such conditions is not economically feasible - a negative return on these investments is guaranteed, but if the federal government has helped to ensure a nominal rate of return of deposits to 10% (in a given period of time at the expense of its resources, then our proposal could have lost the character of economic voluntarism. If all accrued depreciation (2 348 641 million rubles will be placed on deposit accounts and the credit system of the Russian Federation will provide holders an annual yield of 10% (at the rate of inflation 8.8%, the annual subsidy amount will be 28 183.7 million rubles. In this case, the credit system receives a resource for the issuance of long-term loans. Taking into account the banking margin of 2%, the annual interest on long-term loans could amount (in terms of the current time 10-12% of annual

  4. Relationship between Self-Rated Health and Lifestyle and Food Habits in Japanese High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Osera

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Self-rated health (SRH, a subjective assessment of health status, is extensively used in the field of public health. It is an important and valid measure that is strongly related to morbidity, mortality, longevity and health status. Adolescence is a crucial period for the formation of health status, because health-risk behaviours (e.g., skipping breakfast are often established during this period. In this study, we investigated the relationship of SRH with lifestyle and eating habits in Japanese high school students. In this study, 1296 students aged 16–18 years from 11 high schools in Japan participated. A questionnaire was administered to these participants that included a question on SRH, five questions on demographic characteristics, six questions on lifestyle items (e.g., wake-up time, five questions on miscellaneous health issues (e.g., anorexia, and 25 questions on food habits and attitudes towards food. We examined the differences between self-rated healthy and unhealthy groups using logistic regression analysis adjusted for gender and age. A dichotomy regression analysis was performed using a stepwise elimination method. Of the 1296 respondents, 16.7% reported feeling unhealthy, 57.7% of whom were females. The self-rated healthy group had a higher frequency of eating breakfast (odds ratio (OR: 2.13; confidence interval (CI: 1.07–4.24 and liked home meals to a greater extent (OR: 3.12; CI: 1.27–7.65 than the self-rated unhealthy group. The two groups did not differ significantly in terms of other lifestyle factors or unidentified complaints. Our results suggest that liking home meals during adolescence may lead to the development of good eating habits, i.e., eating breakfast, and better SRH.

  5. Relationship between Self-Rated Health and Lifestyle and Food Habits in Japanese High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osera, Tomoko; Awai, Mitsuyo; Kobayashi, Misako; Tsutie, Setsuko; Kurihara, Nobutaka

    2017-10-18

    Self-rated health (SRH), a subjective assessment of health status, is extensively used in the field of public health. It is an important and valid measure that is strongly related to morbidity, mortality, longevity and health status. Adolescence is a crucial period for the formation of health status, because health-risk behaviours (e.g., skipping breakfast) are often established during this period. In this study, we investigated the relationship of SRH with lifestyle and eating habits in Japanese high school students. In this study, 1296 students aged 16-18 years from 11 high schools in Japan participated. A questionnaire was administered to these participants that included a question on SRH, five questions on demographic characteristics, six questions on lifestyle items (e.g., wake-up time), five questions on miscellaneous health issues (e.g., anorexia), and 25 questions on food habits and attitudes towards food. We examined the differences between self-rated healthy and unhealthy groups using logistic regression analysis adjusted for gender and age. A dichotomy regression analysis was performed using a stepwise elimination method. Of the 1296 respondents, 16.7% reported feeling unhealthy, 57.7% of whom were females. The self-rated healthy group had a higher frequency of eating breakfast (odds ratio (OR): 2.13; confidence interval (CI): 1.07-4.24) and liked home meals to a greater extent (OR: 3.12; CI: 1.27-7.65) than the self-rated unhealthy group. The two groups did not differ significantly in terms of other lifestyle factors or unidentified complaints. Our results suggest that liking home meals during adolescence may lead to the development of good eating habits, i.e., eating breakfast, and better SRH.

  6. Screening for mental health risk in high schools: The development of the Youth RADAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, John R; Rapee, Ronald M

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that as many as 1 in 5 young people will develop a mental health problem in any given year. Early detection and intervention are needed to reduce the impact that these conditions have-both for the young person and for the communities in which they live. This study reports the development of a new instrument aimed at helping identify students at risk of developing mental health difficulties. Rather than asking about the presence of symptoms of mental health conditions, the RADAR screening tool assesses a student's balance of risk and protective factors associated with the development of mental health problems. The RADAR was evaluated with a sample of 838 participants in high school Years 7-12. A robust internal factor structure was revealed using exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Internal consistency was satisfactory for each subscale, ranging from .73 to .90 while the reliability for the total scale was .91. Retest stability, measured over a 12 month period, was found to be strong (r = .72). Convergent validity was demonstrated with reference to standard measures of depression and behavioral problems. It is concluded that the RADAR is a promising measure for helping mental health professionals and educators decide which students may be at risk of developing mental health problems. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Severe obesity and high blood pressure among children, Philadelphia health centers, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, John V; Robbins, Jessica M; Houck, Kevin L; Nobis, Elizabeth A; Inman, Katelyn A; Khan, Khudsiya S; Robbins, Susan W

    2014-04-01

    Child obesity is a major health problem particularly affecting disadvantaged population groups. Severe obesity carries additional health risks for children. In the context of the childhood obesity epidemic, high blood pressure among children is of increasing concern. Chart reviews were carried out to examine the prevalence of severe obesity and its association with high blood pressure measurements among randomly selected patients aged 3 to 17 years who had well-child care visits at 8 public community health centers during 2010. A majority of the 691 patients reviewed were African American (58%); an additional 16% were Hispanic. The prevalence of severe obesity was 7.7% (95% confidence interval = 5.8% to 9.9%) and the prevalence of high blood pressure measurements was 17.5% (95% confidence interval = 14.8% to 20.6%). Patients who were severely obese were more than twice as likely as other children to have high blood pressure values. Severe obesity is associated with substantially increased frequency of high blood pressure measurements in children, and should be investigated further as a potential marker for hypertension in children. Primary care providers should be prepared to diagnose and treat hypertension in severely obese children.

  8. Report on health and environmental effects of electromagnetic fields produced by high and very high voltage lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    In its first part, this report presents some characteristics and properties of electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields, indicates which are the artificial sources of exposure to very low frequency electromagnetic fields, and gives an overview of some investigations and researches on the exposure to magnetic fields. The second part contains a description of the French high and very high voltage network, its role and development. It also discusses the possibility of burying these lines, and outlines the importance of citizen participation. The third part deals with the potential impacts on health; it comments the results of international studies, discusses the problem of electro-hypersensitivity (EHS) and the relationship between electric and magnetic fields and infantile leukaemia. The fourth part deals with the potential impacts on the environment, animals, agriculture

  9. Cost-effectiveness of national health insurance programs in high-income countries: A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Son Nghiem

    Full Text Available National health insurance is now common in most developed countries. This study reviews the evidence and synthesizes the cost-effectiveness information for national health insurance or disability insurance programs across high-income countries.A literature search using health, economics and systematic review electronic databases (PubMed, Embase, Medline, Econlit, RepEc, Cochrane library and Campbell library, was conducted from April to October 2015.Two reviewers independently selected relevant studies by applying screening criteria to the title and keywords fields, followed by a detailed examination of abstracts.Studies were selected for data extraction using a quality assessment form consisting of five questions. Only studies with positive answers to all five screening questions were selected for data extraction. Data were entered into a data extraction form by one reviewer and verified by another.Data on costs and quality of life in control and treatment groups were used to draw distributions for synthesis. We chose the log-normal distribution for both cost and quality-of-life data to reflect non-negative value and high skew. The results were synthesized using a Monte Carlo simulation, with 10,000 repetitions, to estimate the overall cost-effectiveness of national health insurance programs.Four studies from the United States that examined the cost-effectiveness of national health insurance were included in the review. One study examined the effects of medical expenditure, and the remaining studies examined the cost-effectiveness of health insurance reforms. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER ranged from US$23,000 to US$64,000 per QALY. The combined results showed that national health insurance is associated with an average incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of US$51,300 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY. Based on the standard threshold for cost-effectiveness, national insurance programs are cost-effective interventions

  10. Step-Up: Promoting Youth Mental Health and Development in Inner-City High Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea, Stacey; Pardo, Gisselle; Conover, Kelly; Gopalan, Geetha; McKay, Mary

    2012-06-01

    African American and Latino youth who reside in inner-city communities are at heightened risk for compromised mental health, as their neighborhoods are too often associated with serious stressors, including elevated rates of poverty, substance abuse, community violence, as well as scarce youth-supportive resources, and mental health care options. Many aspects of disadvantaged urban contexts have the potential to thwart successful youth development. Adolescents with elevated mental health needs may experience impaired judgment, poor problem-solving skills, and conflictual interpersonal relationships, resulting in unsafe sexual behavior and drug use. However, mental health services are frequently avoided by urban adolescents who could gain substantial benefit from care. Thus, the development of culturally sensitive, contextually relevant and effective services for urban, low-income African American and Latino adolescents is critical. Given the complexity of the mental health and social needs of urban youth, novel approaches to service delivery may need to consider individual (i.e., motivation to succeed in the future), family (i.e., adult support within and outside of the family), and community-level (i.e., work and school opportunities) clinical components. Step-Up, a high school-based mental health service delivery model has been developed to bolster key family, youth and school processes related to youth mental health and positive youth development. Step-Up (1) intervenes with urban minority adolescents across inner-city ecological domains; (2) addresses multiple levels (school, family and community) in order to target youth mental health difficulties; and (3) provides opportunities for increasing youth social problem-solving and life skills. Further, Step-Up integrates existing theory-driven, evidence-based interventions. This article describes Step-Up clinical goals, theoretical influences, as well as components and key features, and presents preliminary data on

  11. Unlicensed driving and other related health risk behaviors: a study of Montana high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Christian L; Laflamme, Lucie; Elling, Berty; Möller, Jette

    2013-05-01

    Health risk behaviors tend to cluster in young people, not least among young drivers. Less is known about the health risk profile of young unlicensed drivers. This study investigates health risk behaviors among young unlicensed drivers compared to both their licensed and driving peers, and their non-driving peers. High school students participating in the Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System in Montana (US) and age-eligible to have a driver's license were studied (n=5985), categorized according to their self-reported car driving and license practice (licensed driving, unlicensed driving, and non-driving). Ten health risk behaviors, of which four were related to car riding/driving, were considered. Multinomial logistic regression was used to compile sex-specific odds ratios (with 95% confidence intervals) of adopting those behaviors using licensed drivers as a reference and adjusting for age and race/ethnicity. Health risk behaviors tended to be more common among unlicensed drivers than other groups, although some behaviors were prevalent in all groups (i.e., alcohol use and lack of seat belt use). As a consequence, for both male and female students, there was a significant association between unlicensed driving and most health risk behaviors, except for being involved in a physical fight and riding with a drinking driver among female students. Young unlicensed drivers are more likely than licensed drivers to adopt several health risk behaviors both in car driving/riding or otherwise, in particular alcohol use and cigarette smoking. This challenges any simplistic approach as unlicensed driving in youth is not an isolated act suggesting public health and traffic safety initiatives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Price-transparency and cost accounting: challenges for health care organizations in the consumer-driven era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilsenrath, Peter; Eakin, Cynthia; Fischer, Katrina

    2015-01-01

    Health care reform is directed toward improving access and quality while containing costs. An essential part of this is improvement of pricing models to more accurately reflect the costs of providing care. Transparent prices that reflect costs are necessary to signal information to consumers and producers. This information is central in a consumer-driven marketplace. The rapid increase in high deductible insurance and other forms of cost sharing incentivizes the search for price information. The organizational ability to measure costs across a cycle of care is an integral component of creating value, and will play a greater role as reimbursements transition to episode-based care, value-based purchasing, and accountable care organization models. This article discusses use of activity-based costing (ABC) to better measure the cost of health care. It describes examples of ABC in health care organizations and discusses impediments to adoption in the United States including cultural and institutional barriers. © The Author(s) 2015.

  13. Health-related quality of life in patients with high-grade gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piil, K; Jakobsen, J; Christensen, Karl Bang

    2015-01-01

    follow-up after 1 year. Scores of Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS), physical activity, anxiety and depression and health-related quality of life (FACT-Br) are obtained. Patients' physical activity level and KPS decrease during the disease- and treatment trajectory. The majority of patients did......The diagnosis of a high-grade glioma usual is followed by functional impairment(s), cognitive decline and an impaired psycho-social well-being. This might well have a significant and negative impact on the health related quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore physical activity...... levels, prevalence and severity of anxiety and depressive symptoms and health-related quality of life among patients with a highgrade glioma. This paper is based on a longitudinal mixed methods study. Patients (n = 30) completed questionnaires at 5 time points from time of diagnosis until the final...

  14. Health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donckt, van der.

    1976-01-01

    The article is a critical review of the work group VI ''health'' in the ''sages report'', the criteria of total body dosis for radionuclides as strontium 90 and iodine 131 are discussed. It emphasizes the lack of adequate solution for the effluents as carbon-14, tritium and iodine 129 as well as for the high radioactivity waste management: the toxicity of plutonium and its cancerous properties are recalled. The risks of accidents in the nuclear facilities and their effect on the population in the proximity of the power plant and the contamination from cooling media are considered as well as sabotage risks. (A.F.)

  15. The Use of Telehealth to Teach Reproductive Health to Female Rural High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoost, Jennie Lee; Starcher, Rachael Whitley; King-Mallory, Rebecca Ann; Hussain, Nafeeza; Hensley, Christina Ann; Gress, Todd William

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the use of telehealth to teach reproductive health to rural areas with high rates of teen pregnancy. Prospective cohort study. Two high schools in rural West Virginia. High school female students who attended telehealth sessions. Teleconferencing equipment connected rural high schools to a distal academic institution. Telehealth sessions included reproductive health and life skills topics. Demographic information, session pre- and post-tests, and 6- month assessment was obtained. Reproductive health knowledge, behavior, and self-efficacy were assessed at intervention and at 6 months, along with Likert scale evaluation of telehealth as an educational tool. Fifty-five students participated in the program with an average age of 16.14 (SD 1.24) years. Only 20% (10/50) of subjects' mothers and 12% (6/50) of subjects' fathers had achieved education beyond high school, and 20% (10/50) of subject's mothers had experienced teen pregnancies (age 18 or younger). Sexual activity was reported among 52% (26/50) of subjects, 4/50 (8%) reported desire to become pregnant within the next year, and 4/50 (8%) reported already pregnant. Thirty-seven students completed the 6-month follow-up survey. Reported condom use increased from 20% (10/50) at baseline to 40% (15/37) at 6 months (P = .04) and hormonal contraception use increased from 22% (11/50) to 38% (14/37) (P = .12). Report of human papillomavirus vaccination increased from 38% (10/26) to 70% (26/37) (P = .001) among all subjects. At 6 months, 91.8% (34/37) reported the use of telehealth was "very effective" as a means to teach the material. Telehealth is an effective tool to teach reproductive health to rural areas. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Reproductive health education and sexual risk among high-risk female adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancheta, Rosedelia; Hynes, Colin; Shrier, Lydia A

    2005-04-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the associations of sources, content, and timing of reproductive health education with cognitive and behavioral sexual risk in a sample of high-risk female adolescents and young adults. Female adolescents and young adults (n=113, median age 17 years) receiving treatment for a sexually transmitted disease (STD) reported sources of reproductive health education, topics covered, and when first formal education occurred. Dependent variables included sexual risk knowledge; condom attitudes, negotiation skills, and use (consistent and at last sex); and number of sexual partners. Most participants reported receiving reproductive health education from both parental (80%) and formal sources (92%). Parents discussed the menstrual cycle (94%) more frequently than other sex education topics, while formal sources focused most on teaching about STDs (91%). Although median age of first formal instruction was 12 years, 26% of girls received their first formal education during or after the year they initiated coitus. Girls with a parental source of education and those receiving formal instruction on pregnancy reported greater ability to negotiate condom use. Girls who received education later in relation to the onset of sexual activity and those with a parental source of education reported more sexual partners. Early reproductive health education and education from both parental and formal sources is associated with reduced sexual risk among high-risk adolescent girls. Interestingly, receiving parental education is also associated with more sexual partners, suggesting that parental educational efforts may be reactive to their daughters' increasing sexual risk behavior. Future research should examine multiple sources of reproductive health education and the timing of education from these sources to enhance understanding the dynamic interactions between reproductive health education and adolescent sexual risk.

  17. Current drinking and health-risk behaviors among male high school students in central Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichainarong Natchaporn

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alcohol drinking is frequently related to behavioral problems, which lead to a number of negative consequences. This study was to evaluate the characteristics of male high school students who drink, the drinking patterns among them, and the associations between current drinking and other health risk behaviors which focused on personal safety, violence-related behaviors, suicide and sexual behaviors. Method A cross-sectional study was conducted to explore current alcohol drinking and health-risk behaviors among male high school students in central Thailand. Five thousand one hundred and eighty four male students were classified into 2 groups according to drinking in the previous 30 days (yes = 631, no = 4,553. Data were collected by self-administered, anonymous questionnaire which consisted of 3 parts: socio-demographic factors, health-risk behaviors and alcohol drinking behavior during the past year from December 2007 to February 2008. Results The results showed that the percent of current drinking was 12.17. Most of them were 15-17 years (50.21%. Socio-demographic factors such as age, educational level, residence, cohabitants, grade point average (GPA, having a part time job and having family members with alcohol/drug problems were significantly associated with alcohol drinking (p Conclusions An increased risk of health-risk behaviors, including driving vehicles after drinking, violence-related behaviors, sad feelings and attempted suicide, and sexual behaviors was higher among drinking students that led to significant health problems. Effective intervention strategies (such as a campaign mentioning the adverse health effects and social consequences to the risk groups, and encouraging parental and community efforts to prevent drinking among adolescents should be implemented to prevent underage drinking and adverse consequences.

  18. Correlation between Health Perception, Body Image, and Eating Habits in High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Ichsan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Mental disorders, including eating disorders, mostly begin during youth. Moreover, negative body image is found to cause unhealthy eating habits in the context of several cross-cultural settings. This study aimed to examine the correlation between health perception and body image with eating habits among high school students. Methods: A structured, anonymous questionnaire was distributed to students of a private high school in Bandung, Indonesia in June-October 2014. The questionnaire included questions about health perception, body image, eating habits, body weight and height, and also other demographic parameters. The school was selected as the study object through purposive sampling, and 140 high school students (72 male and 68 female were ramdomly selected. Results: Male and female did not show considerable differences in health perceptions. Out of 13 statements, 12 statements of male respondents showed better body image than female. While in eating habits statements, female respondents seemed to maintain healthier eating habits than male respondents. No significant correlation was observed between body image and eating habits (r=-0.015, p=0.858. There was significant correlation between health perception and eating habits (r=0.374, p<0.001. Correlation between sex and eating habits was found (p=0.020, there was not significant relationship between eating habits and Body Mass Index (BMI (p=0.368. Conclusions: The negative relationship between body image and eating habits is not significant. However there was a significant positive relationship between health perception and eating habits. Furthermore, there was correlation between sex and eating habits, while the positive relationship between eating habits and BMI was still not found.

  19. Using dual-process theory and analogical transfer to explain facilitation on a hypothetico-deductive reasoning task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Cynthia S; Platt, Richard D; Griggs, Richard A

    2007-07-01

    Using the analogical transfer paradigm, the present study investigated the competing explanations of Girotto and Legrenzi (Psychological Research 51: 129-135, 1993) and Griggs, Platt, Newstead, and Jackson (Thinking and Reasoning 4: 1-14, 1998) for facilitation on the SARS version of the THOG problem, a hypothetico-deductive reasoning task. Girotto and Legrenzi argue that facilitation is based on logical analysis of the task [System 2 reasoning in Evans's (Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7: 454-459, 2003) dual-process account of reasoning] while Griggs et al. maintain that facilitation is due to an attentional heuristic produced by the wording of the problem (System 1 reasoning). If Girotto and Legrenzi are correct, then System 2 reasoning, which is volitional and responsible for deductive reasoning, should be elicited, and participants should comprehend the solution principle of the THOG task and exhibit analogical transfer. However, if Griggs et al. are correct, then System 1 reasoning, which is responsible for heuristic problem solving strategies such as an attentional heuristic, should occur, and participants should not abstract the solution principle and transfer should not occur. Significant facilitation (68 and 82% correct) was only observed for the two SARS source problems, but significant analogical transfer did not occur. This lack of transfer suggests that System 1 reasoning was responsible for the facilitation observed in the SARS problem, supporting Griggs et al.'s attentional heuristic explanation. The present results also underscore the explanatory value of using analogical transfer rather than facilitation as the criterion for problem understanding.

  20. Spectral-ratio radon background correction method in airborne γ-ray spectrometry based on compton scattering deduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Yi; Xiong Shengqing; Zhou Jianxin; Fan Zhengguo; Ge Liangquan

    2014-01-01

    γ-ray released by the radon daughter has severe impact on airborne γ-ray spectrometry. The spectral-ratio method is one of the best mathematical methods for radon background deduction in airborne γ-ray spectrometry. In this paper, an advanced spectral-ratio method was proposed which deducts Compton scattering ray by the fast Fourier transform rather than tripping ratios, the relationship between survey height and correction coefficient of the advanced spectral-ratio radon background correction method was studied, the advanced spectral-ratio radon background correction mathematic model was established, and the ground saturation model calibrating technology for correction coefficient was proposed. As for the advanced spectral-ratio radon background correction method, its applicability and correction efficiency are improved, and the application cost is saved. Furthermore, it can prevent the physical meaning lost and avoid the possible errors caused by matrix computation and mathematical fitting based on spectrum shape which is applied in traditional correction coefficient. (authors)

  1. Dietary health behaviour and beliefs among university students from 26 low, middle and high income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengpid, Supa; Peltzer, Karl

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of six healthy dietary behaviours and associated factors in university students from 26 low, middle and high income countries. In a cross-sectional survey, we used a self-administered questionnaire (largely based on the European Health and Behaviour Survey) among 19503 undergraduate university students (mean age 20.8, Standard deviation=2.8, age range of 16-30 years) from 27 universities in 26 countries. Results indicated that for a total of six healthy dietary behaviours, overall, students scored a mean of 2.8 healthy dietary behaviours. More female than male students indicated healthy dietary behaviours. In multivariate linear regression among men and women, living in an upper middle income or high income country, dieting to lose weight, the high importance of dietary health benefits, high non-organized religious activity, high physical activity and currently a non-tobacco user were associated with the healthy dietary behaviour index. The study found a high prevalence of relatively poor dietary healthy behaviours.

  2. Light-intensity and high-intensity interval training improve cardiometabolic health in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batacan, Romeo B; Duncan, Mitch J; Dalbo, Vincent J; Connolly, Kylie J; Fenning, Andrew S

    2016-09-01

    Physical activity has the potential to reduce cardiometabolic risk factors but evaluation of different intensities of physical activity and the mechanisms behind their health effects still need to be fully established. This study examined the effects of sedentary behaviour, light-intensity training, and high-intensity interval training on biometric indices, glucose and lipid metabolism, inflammatory and oxidative stress markers, and vascular and cardiac function in adult rats. Rats (12 weeks old) were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: control (CTL; no exercise), sedentary (SED; no exercise and housed in small cages to reduce activity), light-intensity trained (LIT; four 30-min exercise bouts/day at 8 m/min separated by 2-h rest period, 5 days/week), and high-intensity interval trained (HIIT, four 2.5-min work bouts/day at 50 m/min separated by 3-min rest periods, 5 days/week). After 12 weeks of intervention, SED had greater visceral fat accumulation (p HIIT demonstrated beneficial changes in body weight, visceral and epididymal fat weight, glucose regulation, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total cholesterol, and mesenteric vessel contractile response compared with the CTL group (p HIIT had significant improvements in systolic blood pressure and endothelium-independent vasodilation to aorta and mesenteric artery compared with the CTL group (p HIIT induce health benefits by improving traditional cardiometabolic risk factors. LIT improves cardiac health while HIIT promotes improvements in vascular health.

  3. Contribution of health motive to cannabis use among high-school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabrol, Henri; Beck, Charline; Laconi, Stéphanie

    2017-01-01

    The Marijuana Motives Measure (MMM), which is derived from a scale measuring alcohol use motives, has been the main instrument used to explore the role of motives in cannabis use and related problems. Two studies attempted to developed specific cannabis use motives but none of them showed a unique association to cannabis use and problems when controlling for MMM motives. The aim of our study was to examine if additional motives contributed to problematic use beyond MMM motives and psychopathological symptoms. Participants were 249 high-school students who completed the Cannabis Use Disorder Identification Test-Revised (CUDIT-R) assessing cannabis use and problematic use, the MMM and a new scale measuring motives derived from clinical experience with adolescents using cannabis (CED motives), and scales measuring anxiety and depressive symptoms and borderline personality traits. Among the 107 participants using cannabis, 39 reached the cut-off score for problematic cannabis use. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses controlling for psychopathological variables showed that only one CED motives, Health (sleep, form, energy, appetite, health), was a significant predictor of both frequency of use and problematic use symptoms. The importance of Health motive may be linked to the role of depressive symptoms and may have implication for treatment. We suggest to add the Health subscale to the MMM and to further study the role of health motive in both use and dependence. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. A Real-World Community Health Worker Care Coordination Model for High-Risk Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Molly A; Perry-Bell, Kenita; Minier, Mark; Glassgow, Anne Elizabeth; Van Voorhees, Benjamin W

    2018-04-01

    Health care systems across the United States are considering community health worker (CHW) services for high-risk patients, despite limited data on how to build and sustain effective CHW programs. We describe the process of providing CHW services to 5,289 at-risk patients within a state-run health system. The program includes 30 CHWs, six care coordinators, the Director of Care Coordination, the Medical Director, a registered nurse, mental health specialists, and legal specialists. CHWs are organized into geographic and specialized teams. All CHWs receive basic training that includes oral and mental health; some receive additional disease-specific training. CHWs develop individualized care coordination plans with patients. The implementation of these plans involves delivery of a wide range of social service and coordination support. The number of CHW contacts is determined by patient risk. CHWs spend about 60% of their time in an office setting. To deliver the program optimally, we had to develop multiple CHW job categories that allow for CHW specialization. We created new technology systems to manage operations. Field issues resulted in program changes to improve service delivery and ensure safety. Our experience serves as a model for how to integrate CHWs into clinical and community systems.

  5. The Association of School Climate, Depression Literacy, and Mental Health Stigma Among High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Lisa; Musci, Rashelle; Stuart, Elizabeth; Ruble, Anne; Beaudry, Mary B; Schweizer, Barbara; Owen, Megan; Goode, Carly; Johnson, Sarah L; Bradshaw, Catherine; Wilcox, Holly; Swartz, Karen

    2017-08-01

    Although school climate is linked with youth educational, socioemotional, behavioral, and health outcomes, there has been limited research on the association between school climate and mental health education efforts. We explored whether school climate was associated with students' depression literacy and mental health stigma beliefs. Data were combined from 2 studies: the Maryland Safe Supportive Schools Project and a randomized controlled trial of the Adolescent Depression Awareness Program. Five high schools participated in both studies, allowing examination of depression literacy and stigma measures from 500 9th and 10th graders. Multilevel models examined the relationship between school-level school climate characteristics and student-level depression literacy and mental health stigma scores. Overall school climate was positively associated with depression literacy (odds ratio [OR] = 2.78, p stigma (Est. = -3.822, p = .001). Subscales of engagement (OR = 5.30, p stigma (Est. = -6.610, p < .001), (Est. = -2.742, p < .001). Positive school climate was associated with greater odds of depression literacy and endorsement of fewer stigmatizing beliefs among students. Our findings raise awareness regarding aspects of the school environment that may facilitate or inhibit students' recognition of depression and subsequent treatment-seeking. © 2017, American School Health Association.

  6. Religiosity and Health Risk Behaviour Among University Students in 26 Low, Middle and High Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, Karl; Pengpid, Supa; Amuleru-Marshall, Omowale; Mufune, Pempelani; Zeid, Alaa Abou

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess religiosity and health risk behaviours among university students from 26 low, middle and high income countries. Using anonymous questionnaires, data were collected from 20,222 undergraduate university students (mean age 20.8, SD = 2. 8) from 27 universities in 26 countries across Asia, Africa and the Americas. Among all students, 41.1 % engaged at least once a week in organized religious activity, 35.8 % practised a non-organized religious activity daily or more than once daily, and more or less two-thirds of the students agreed to the three different statements on intrinsic of subjective religiosity. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, higher reported involvement in organized religious activity was associated with addictive, injury, sexual and oral health risk behaviour, while lower reported involvement in organized religious activity was associated with physical inactivity and oral health risk behaviour. Lower reported involvement in non-organized religious activity was associated with addictive, nutrition risk, injury, sexual and oral health risk behaviour, while higher reported involvement in non-organized religious activity was associated with physical inactivity. Finally, lower reported intrinsic religiosity was associated with addictive and sexual risk behaviour, while higher reported intrinsic religiosity was associated with nutrition risk behaviour, physical inactivity and oral health risk behaviour.

  7. Health Promotion and Preventive Contents Performed During Reproduction System Learning; Observation in Senior High School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuniarti, E.; Fadilah, M.; Darussyamsu, R.; Nurhayati, N.

    2018-04-01

    The higher numbers of cases around sexual behavioral deviance on adolescence are significantly related to their knowledge level about the health of the reproduction system. Thus, teenagers, especially school-aged, have to receive the complete information which emphasizes on recognize promotion and prevention knowledge. This article aims to describe information about health promotion and prevention, which delivered by the teacher in Senior High School learning process on topic reproduction system. The data gained through focused observation using observation sheet and camera recorder. Further, data analyzed descriptively. The result show promotion and preventive approach have been inadequately presented. There are two reasons. Firstly, the promotion and preventive value are not technically requested in the final assessment. The second, the explanation tend to refer to consequences existed in the term of the social and religious norm rather than a scientific basis. It can be concluded suggestion to promote health reproduction and prevent the risk of health reproduction need to be implemented more practice with a scientific explanation which is included in a specific program for adolescence reproductive health improvement.

  8. Heterogeneity of Mental Health Service Utilization and High Mental Health Service Use Among Women Eight Years After Initiating Substance Use Disorder Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Elizabeth; Padwa, Howard; Li, Libo; Lin, Veronique; Hser, Yih-Ing

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine mental health service utilization patterns among women treated for substance use disorders (SUD) and identify factors associated with patterns of high mental health service use. Data were provided by 4447 women treated for SUD in California during 2000-2002 for whom mental health services utilization records were acquired. A latent class model was fitted to women's high use of services (>6 services/year over 8 years). Multinomial logistic regression was used to identify predisposing, enabling, and need factors associated with utilization patterns. In 8 years after initiating SUD treatment, 50% of women utilized mental health services. High use probability was consistently low for most women (76.9%); for others, however, it decreased immediately following SUD treatment and then increased over time (8.7%), increased immediately following SUD treatment and then decreased (9.3%), or remained consistently high (5.1%). Consistently high services use was negatively associated with marriage (OR 0.60, pwomen with co-occurring mental health disorders at SUD treatment entry did not receive any mental health treatment in the subsequent 8 years. Mental health services utilization patterns among women treated for SUD are heterogeneous and dynamic. Understanding factors related to women's utilization patterns may aid efforts to optimize care and ensure appropriate use of mental health services. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Estimating workers' marginal valuation of employer health benefits: would insured workers prefer more health insurance or higher wages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royalty, Anne Beeson

    2008-01-01

    In recent years the cost of health insurance has been increasing much faster than wages. In the face of these rising costs, many employers will have to make difficult decisions about whether to cut back health benefits or to compensate workers with lower wages or lower wage growth. In this paper, we ask the question, "Which do workers value more -- one additional dollar's worth of health benefits or one more dollar in their pockets?" Using a new approach to obtaining estimates of insured workers' marginal valuation of health benefits this paper estimates how much, on average, employees value the marginal dollar paid by employers for their workers' health insurance. We find that insured workers value the marginal health premium dollar at significantly less than the marginal wage dollar. However, workers value insurance generosity very highly. The marginal dollar spent on health insurance that adds an additional dollar's worth of observable dimensions of plan generosity, such as lower deductibles or coverage of additional services, is valued at significantly more than one dollar.

  10. Residential High-Speed Internet Among Those Likely to Benefit From an Online Health Insurance Marketplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreaux, Michel H; Gonzales, Gilbert; Blewett, Lynn; Fried, Brett; Karaca-Mandic, Pinar

    2016-01-01

    Using data from the 2013 American Community Survey, we found that 24.3 million people (about 1 in 4) who were either eligible for Medicaid/Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) or appeared likely to shop for Qualified Health Plan (QHP) lacked residential high-speed Internet. Specifically, 28.6% or 18.9 million people eligible for Medicaid/CHIP and 17.1% or 5.5 million people who appeared likely to shop for a QHP did not have high-speed Internet in the home. For both the Medicaid/CHIP eligible and those likely to shop for a QHP, the proportion of people living in households without Internet varied substantially by race, geography, and other socio-demographic characteristics. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. A student manual for promoting mental health among high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Gigantesco

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES. We describe a school program based on a student manual for promoting mental health and preventing mental illness. METHODS. A preliminary version of the manual was assessed for face validity by two focus groups. The final version was evaluated for acceptability among 253 students in 10 high schools and 1 middle school in Italy. RESULTS. The manual included 18 chapters (or "units" which address skills for enabling students to cope with their daily lives: communication skills, problem-solving, assertive skills, negotiation, stress management, anger management and conflict resolution. The manual was found to have been acceptable by high school students. CONCLUSIONS. The effectiveness of the manual in actually promoting mental health and preventing mental illness is currently being evaluated.

  12. A student manual for promoting mental health among high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigantesco, Antonella; Del Re, Debora; Cascavilla, Isabella

    2013-01-01

    We describe a school program based on a student manual for promoting mental health and preventing mental illness. A preliminary version of the manual was assessed for face validity by two focus groups. The final version was evaluated for acceptability among 253 students in 10 high schools and 1 middle school in Italy. The manual included 18 chapters (or "units") which address skills for enabling students to cope with their daily lives: communication skills, problem-solving, assertive skills, negotiation, stress management, anger management and conflict resolution. The manual was found to have been acceptable by high school students. The effectiveness of the manual in actually promoting mental health and preventing mental illness is currently being evaluated.

  13. Residential High-Speed Internet Among Those Likely to Benefit From an Online Health Insurance Marketplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel H. Boudreaux PhD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using data from the 2013 American Community Survey, we found that 24.3 million people (about 1 in 4 who were either eligible for Medicaid/Children’s Health Inusrance Program (CHIP or appeared likely to shop for Qualified Health Plan (QHP lacked residential high-speed Internet. Specifically, 28.6% or 18.9 million people eligible for Medicaid/CHIP and 17.1% or 5.5 million people who appeared likely to shop for a QHP did not have high-speed Internet in the home. For both the Medicaid/CHIP eligible and those likely to shop for a QHP, the proportion of people living in households without Internet varied substantially by race, geography, and other socio-demographic characteristics.

  14. Only minor additional metabolic health benefits of high as opposed to moderate dose physical exercise in young, moderately overweight men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichkendler, M H; Larsen, Mads Rosenkilde; Auerbach, P L

    2014-01-01

    % in HIGH (P health assessed by questionnaire increased similarly in MOD (P additional health benefits were found when exercising ∼3,800 as opposed to ∼2,000 kcal/week in young moderately overweight men. This finding may have important...... public health implications....

  15. Motivators of and Barriers to Health-Promoting Behaviors among Culturally Diverse Middle and High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wippold, Guillermo M.; Tucker, Carolyn M; Smith, Tasia M.; Rodriguez, Victoria A.; Hayes, Lynda F.; Folger, Austin C.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Youth obesity in the United States is a major health concern. Obesity can be reduced by increasing health-promoting behaviors. Purpose: The goals of the present study were to (1) identify the strongest motivators of and barriers to health-promoting behaviors among a culturally diverse group of middle and high school students and (2)…

  16. Content Analysis of the Science Textbooks of Iranian Junior High School Course in terms of the Components of Health Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolreza Gilavand

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundProviding healthcare for students is one of the primary duties of the states. This study aimed to analyze the contents of the science textbooks of Junior High School course in terms of the components of health education in Iran.Materials and MethodsThis descriptive study was conducted through content analysis. To collect data, a researcher-made check list including: physical health, nutritional health, the environment, environmental health, family health, accidents and safety, mobility, physical education, mental health, prevention of risky behavior, control and prevention of diseases, disabilities, public health and school health, was used. The samples were the science textbooks of Junior High School course (7th, 8th and 9th grades. Analysis unit was all pages of the textbooks (texts, pictures and exercises. Descriptive method (frequency table, percentage, mean and standard deviation [SD] was used to analyze the data and non-parametric Chi-square test was used to investigate the probable significant differences between the components.ResultsThe results showed that the authors of sciences textbooks of Junior High School course have paid most attention to the component of control and prevention of diseases (21.10% and have paid no attention to the component of "mental health". Also, there were significant differences among the components of physical health, family health, the environment and environmental health in terms of to be addressed in the science textbooks of Junior High School (P

  17. Sleep Insufficiency, Sleep Health Problems and Performance in High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ming, Xue; Koransky, Rebecca; Kang, Victor; Buchman, Sarah; Sarris, Christina E.; Wagner, George C.

    2011-01-01

    A survey on sleep schedule, sleep health, school performance and school start times was conducted in 1,941 adolescents. A high level of early and circadian-disadvantaged sleep/wake schedules during weekdays was observed. Shorter sleep duration on weekdays was reported, especially in upper classmen. Complaints of inadequate sleep and sleepiness during weekdays, alarm clock use, and napping were prevalent. Night awakening and prolonged sleep onset were common and associated with poor school per...

  18. Structural health monitoring of high voltage electrical switch ceramic insulators in seismic areas

    OpenAIRE

    REBILLAT, Marc; BARTHES, Clément; MECHBAL, Nazih; MOSALAM, Khalid M.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; High voltage electrical switches are crucial components to restart rapidly the electrical network right after an earthquake. But there currently exists no automatic procedure to check if these ceramic insulators have suffered after an earthquake, and there exists no method to recertify a given switch. To deploy a vibration-based structural health monitoring method on ceramic insulators a large shake table able to generate accelerations up to 3 g was used. The idea unde...

  19. Dating violence and associated health risks among high school students with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Monika; Mouradian, Vera E; McKenna, Maria

    2013-08-01

    Children with disabilities are at a higher risk for various forms of violence including sexual violence, bullying, and physical violence compared to those without disabilities. However there are no studies documenting the prevalence of dating violence amongst a population-based sample of adolescents with disabilities. The purpose of this study is to assess the prevalence of dating violence victimization against high schools students with and without disabilities and to examine associations of dating violence with health risks by disability status among high school girls. Data from the 2009 Massachusetts Youth Health Survey were analyzed in 2011 using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression. Among high school students who had ever been on a date, girls (25.9 %, 95 % CI 19.9-31.5) and boys (9.1 %, 95 % CI 5.8-12.4) with disabilities were more likely than girls (8.8 %, 95 % CI 6.8-10.8) and boys (4.5 %, 95 % CI 3.1-5.8) without disabilities to report dating violence. Multivariate analyses indicated that high school girls with disabilities who experienced dating violence were more likely to report feeling sad or hopeless for 2 weeks or more in the past year, suicide ideation in the past 12 months, and drug use in the past 30 days compared to those with disabilities who did not report dating violence and those without disabilities who reported and did not report dating violence. High school students with disabilities are at a greater risk for dating violence victimization compared to those without disabilities and high school girls with disabilities who experience dating violence are at increased risk for experiencing poor mental health outcomes and substance abuse.

  20. Controversies surrounding high-protein diet intake: satiating effect and kidney and bone health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuenca-Sánchez, Marta; Navas-Carrillo, Diana; Orenes-Piñero, Esteban

    2015-05-01

    Long-term consumption of a high-protein diet could be linked with metabolic and clinical problems, such as loss of bone mass and renal dysfunction. However, although it is well accepted that a high-protein diet may be detrimental to individuals with existing kidney dysfunction, there is little evidence that high protein intake is dangerous for healthy individuals. High-protein meals and foods are thought to have a greater satiating effect than high-carbohydrate or high-fat meals. The effect of high-protein diets on the modulation of satiety involves multiple metabolic pathways. Protein intake induces complex signals, with peptide hormones being released from the gastrointestinal tract and blood amino acids and derived metabolites being released in the blood. Protein intake also stimulates metabolic hormones that communicate information about energy status to the brain. Long-term ingestion of high amounts of protein seems to decrease food intake, body weight, and body adiposity in many well-documented studies. The aim of this article is to provide an extensive overview of the efficacy of high protein consumption in weight loss and maintenance, as well as the potential consequences in human health of long-term intake. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  1. Health and environmental risk-related impacts of actinide burning on high-level waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1992-05-01

    The potential health and environmental risk-related impacts of actinide burning for high-level waste disposal were evaluated. Actinide burning, also called waste partitioning-transmutation, is an advanced method for radioactive waste management based on the idea of destroying the most toxic components in the waste. It consists of two steps: (1) selective removal of the most toxic radionuclides from high-level/spent fuel waste and (2) conversion of those radionuclides into less toxic radioactive materials and/or stable elements. Risk, as used in this report, is defined as the probability of a failure times its consequence. Actinide burning has two potential health and environmental impacts on waste management. Risks and the magnitude of high-consequence repository failure scenarios are decreased by inventory reduction of the long-term radioactivity in the repository. (What does not exist cannot create risk or uncertainty.) Risk may also be reduced by the changes in the waste characteristics, resulting from selection of waste forms after processing, that are superior to spent fuel and which lower the potential of transport of radionuclides from waste form to accessible environment. There are no negative health or environmental impacts to the repository from actinide burning; however, there may be such impacts elsewhere in the fuel cycle

  2. Sexual coercion and health-risk behaviors among urban Chinese high school students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Song

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the association between health-risk behaviors and a history of sexual coercion among urban Chinese high school students. Design: A cross-sectional study was performed among 109,754 high school students who participated in the 2005 Chinese Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Data were analyzed for 5,215 students who had experienced sexual intercourse (1,483 girls, 3,732 boys. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the relationship between sexual coercion and the related covariates, and data were stratified by gender. Results: Of those students who had had sexual intercourse, 40.9% of the females and 29.6% of the males experienced sexual coercion (p<0.01. When analyses controlled for demographic characteristics, in the study sample, that is, students who had sexual intercourse, drug use (odds ratios [OR], 2.44, attempted suicide (OR, 2.30, physical abuse (OR, 1.74, binge drinking (OR, 1.62, verbal abuse (OR, 1.29, experience of being drunk (OR, 0.68, and smoking of cigarettes (OR, 0.52 were related to a history of sexual coercion. Patterns of health-risk behaviors also differed among female and male students who had experienced sexual coercion. Conclusions: Sexual coercion is associated with health-risk behaviors. Initiatives to reduce the harm associated with sexual coercion among high school students are needed.

  3. Surveillane of Middle and High School Mental Health Risk by Student Self-Report Screener

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bridget V Dever

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A 2009 National Academies of Sciences report on child mental health prevention and treatment concluded that screening for mental health risk is an essential component of service delivery. To date, however, there are few practical assessments available or practices in place that measure individual child risk, or risk aggregated at the school or community level. This study examined the utility of a 30-item paper and pencil student self-report screener of behavioral and emotional risk (BER for surveying community risk among 7 schools. Methods: In 2010, 2,222 students in 3 middle and 4 high schools in a medium-sized school district in Georgia were administered the Behavioral and Emotional Screening System Self-Report Child/Adolescent form (BESS Student. The BESS is designed to measure 4 sub-syndromal BER factors for developing mental health disorders: inattention/hyperactivity, internalizing, school problems, and personal adjustment. Analysis of Variance and Chi Square analyses were used to assess the association between adolescent self-reported BER as an indicator of school BER, grade level, child ethnic identification and gender, socioeconomic status, and special education placement status.Results: BESS scores differentiated well between schools for overall BER and special education status, as well as between grade levels, ethnicity, and gender groups. One high school, known by the school administration to have numerous incidents of student behavior problems, had the most deviant 4 BER domain scores of all 7 schools. Girls rated themselves as having a higher prevalence of BER (14% than boys (12%; middle school students reported fewer difficulties than high school students.Conclusion: Middle and high school students were capable of identifying significant differences in their own BER across schools, suggesting that universal mental health risk screening viastudent self-report is potentially useful for identifying aggregated community

  4. High Dietary Protein Intake and Protein-Related Acid Load on Bone Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jay J

    2017-12-01

    Consumption of high-protein diets is increasingly popular due to the benefits of protein on preserving lean mass and controlling appetite and satiety. The paper is to review recent clinical research assessing dietary protein on calcium metabolism and bone health. Epidemiological studies show that long-term, high-protein intake is positively associated with bone mineral density and reduced risk of bone fracture incidence. Short-term interventional studies demonstrate that a high-protein diet does not negatively affect calcium homeostasis. Existing evidence supports that the negative effects of the acid load of protein on urinary calcium excretion are offset by the beneficial skeletal effects of high-protein intake. Future research should focus on the role and the degree of contribution of other dietary and physiological factors, such as intake of fruits and vegetables, in reducing the acid load and further enhancing the anabolic effects of protein on the musculoskeletal system.

  5. Educator Mental Health Literacy: A Programme Evaluation of the Teacher Training Education on the Mental Health & High School Curriculum Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutcher, S.; Wei, Y.; McLuckie, A.; Bullock, L.

    2013-01-01

    Mental disorders make up close to one-third of the global burden of disease experienced during adolescence. Schools can play an important role in the promotion of positive mental health as well as an integral role in the pathways into mental health care for adolescents. In order for schools to effectively address the mental health problems of…

  6. The effect of private health insurance on medical care utilization and self-assessed health in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hullegie, P.G.J.; Klein, T.J.

    2010-01-01

    In Germany, employees are generally obliged to participate in the public health insurance system, where coverage is universal, co-payments and deductibles are moderate, and premia are based on income. However, they may buy private insurance instead if their income exceeds the compulsory insurance

  7. Predisposing, enabling, and need factors associated with high service use in a public mental health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindamer, Laurie A; Liu, Lin; Sommerfeld, David H; Folsom, David P; Hawthorne, William; Garcia, Piedad; Aarons, Gregory A; Jeste, Dilip V

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: (1) To investigate the individual- and system-level characteristics associated with high utilization of acute mental health services according to a widely-used theory of service use-Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Service Use -in individuals enrolled in a large, public-funded mental health system; and (2) To document service utilization by high use consumers prior to a transformation of the service delivery system. We analyzed data from 10,128 individuals receiving care in a large public mental health system from fiscal years 2000-2004. Subjects with information in the database for the index year (fiscal year 2000-2001) and all of the following 3 years were included in this study. Using logistic regression, we identified predisposing, enabling, and need characteristics associated with being categorized as a single-year high use consumer (HU: >3 acute care episodes in a single year) or multiple-year HU (>3 acute care episodes in more than 1 year). Thirteen percent of the sample met the criteria for being a single-year HU and an additional 8% met the definition for multiple-year HU. Although some predisposing factors were significantly associated with an increased likelihood of being classified as a HU (younger age and female gender) relative to non-HUs, the characteristics with the strongest associations with the HU definition, when controlling for all other factors, were enabling and need factors. Homelessness was associated with 115% increase in the odds of ever being classified as a HU compared to those living independently or with family and others. Having insurance was associated with increased odds of being classified as a HU by about 19% relative to non-HUs. Attending four or more outpatient visits was an enabling factor that decreased the chances of being defined as a HU. Need factors, such as having a diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder or other psychotic disorder or having a substance use disorder

  8. Taking a Gamble for High Rewards? Management Perspectives on the Value of Mental Health Peer Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Louise; Roennfeldt, Helena; O'Shea, Peri; Macdonald, Fiona

    2018-04-13

    Mental health peer work is attracting growing interest and provides a potentially impactful method of service user involvement in mental health design and delivery, contributing to mental health reform. The need to effectively support this emerging workforce is consequently increasing. This study aimed to better understand the views of management in relation to peer work and specifically explores the value of peer work from the perspective of management. This qualitative research employed grounded theory methods. There were 29 participants in total, employed in both peer designated and non-peer designated management roles, in not for profit and public health organisations in Queensland, Australia. The value of peer work as described by participants is found to be partially dependent on practical supports and strategies from the organisation. There were high benefits for all facets of the organisation when effective recruitment and ongoing support for peer workers was prioritised and a higher perception of limitations when they were not. Due to some parallels, it may be useful to explore the potential for peer work to be conceptually and/or practically considered as a form of diversity and inclusion employment.

  9. Mental health service use among high school students exposed to interpersonal violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Renee M.; Dunn, Erin C.; Lindsey, Michael; Xuan, Ziming; Zaslavsky, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Violence-exposed youth rarely receive mental health services, even though exposure increases risk for academic and psychosocial problems. This study examines the association between violence exposure and mental health service contact. The four forms of violence exposure were peer, family, sexual, and witnessing. METHODS Data are from 1,534 Boston public high school students who participated in a 2008 self-report survey of violence exposure and its correlates. Multivariate logistic regressions estimated associations between each form of violence with service contact, then examined whether associations persisted when controlling for suicidality and self-injurious behaviors. RESULTS In unadjusted models, violence-exposed students more often reported service contact than their peers. However, in multivariate models, only exposure to family (OR=1.69, CI=1.23–2.31) and sexual violence (OR=2.34, CI=1.29–4.20) were associated with service contact. Associations attenuated when controlling for suicidality and self-injurious behaviors, indicating they were largely explained by self-harm. Sexual violence alone remained associated with mental health service contact in fully adjusted models, but only for girls (OR=3.32, CI=1.30–8.45), suggesting gender-specific pathways. CONCLUSIONS Associations between adolescent violence exposure and mental health service contact vary by form of exposure. Outreach to a broader set of exposed youth may reduce the impact of violence and its consequences for vulnerable students. PMID:25099429

  10. High-intensity interval exercise and cerebrovascular health: curiosity, cause, and consequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Cotter, James D; Brassard, Patrice; Bailey, Damian M

    2015-06-01

    Exercise is a uniquely effective and pluripotent medicine against several noncommunicable diseases of westernised lifestyles, including protection against neurodegenerative disorders. High-intensity interval exercise training (HIT) is emerging as an effective alternative to current health-related exercise guidelines. Compared with traditional moderate-intensity continuous exercise training, HIT confers equivalent if not indeed superior metabolic, cardiac, and systemic vascular adaptation. Consequently, HIT is being promoted as a more time-efficient and practical approach to optimize health thereby reducing the burden of disease associated with physical inactivity. However, no studies to date have examined the impact of HIT on the cerebrovasculature and corresponding implications for cognitive function. This review critiques the implications of HIT for cerebrovascular function, with a focus on the mechanisms and translational impact for patient health and well-being. It also introduces similarly novel interventions currently under investigation as alternative means of accelerating exercise-induced cerebrovascular adaptation. We highlight a need for studies of the mechanisms and thereby also the optimal dose-response strategies to guide exercise prescription, and for studies to explore alternative approaches to optimize exercise outcomes in brain-related health and disease prevention. From a clinical perspective, interventions that selectively target the aging brain have the potential to prevent stroke and associated neurovascular diseases.

  11. Key elements of high-quality practice organisation in primary health care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossland, Lisa; Janamian, Tina; Jackson, Claire L

    2014-08-04

    To identify elements that are integral to high-quality practice and determine considerations relating to high-quality practice organisation in primary care. A narrative systematic review of published and grey literature. Electronic databases (PubMed, CINAHL, the Cochrane Library, Embase, Emerald Insight, PsycInfo, the Primary Health Care Research and Information Service website, Google Scholar) were searched in November 2013 and used to identify articles published in English from 2002 to 2013. Reference lists of included articles were searched for relevant unpublished articles and reports. Data were configured at the study level to allow for the inclusion of findings from a broad range of study types. Ten elements were most often included in the existing organisational assessment tools. A further three elements were identified from an inductive thematic analysis of descriptive articles, and were noted as important considerations in effective quality improvement in primary care settings. Although there are some validated tools available to primary care that identify and build quality, most are single-strategy approaches developed outside health care settings. There are currently no validated organisational improvement tools, designed specifically for primary health care, which combine all elements of practice improvement and whose use does not require extensive external facilitation.

  12. Study on Oxygen Supply Standard for Physical Health of Construction Personnel of High-Altitude Tunnels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Guo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The low atmospheric pressure and low oxygen content in high-altitude environment have great impacts on the functions of human body. Especially for the personnel engaged in complicated physical labor such as tunnel construction, high altitude can cause a series of adverse physiological reactions, which may result in multiple high-altitude diseases and even death in severe cases. Artificial oxygen supply is required to ensure health and safety of construction personnel in hypoxic environments. However, there are no provisions for oxygen supply standard for tunnel construction personnel in high-altitude areas in current tunnel construction specifications. As a result, this paper has theoretically studied the impacts of high-altitude environment on human bodies, analyzed the relationship between labor intensity and oxygen consumption in high-altitude areas and determined the critical oxygen-supply altitude values for tunnel construction based on two different standard evaluation systems, i.e., variation of air density and equivalent PIO2. In addition, it has finally determined the oxygen supply standard for construction personnel in high-altitude areas based on the relationship between construction labor intensity and oxygen consumption.

  13. Characteristics and Health Benefit of Highly Marbled Wagyu and Hanwoo Beef

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Takafumi

    2016-01-01

    This review addresses the characteristics and health benefit of highly marbled Wagyu and Hanwoo beef. Marbling of Wagyu and Hanwoo beef has been increased in Japan and Korea to meet domestic consumer preferences. Wagyu and Hanwoo cattle have high potential of accumulating intramuscular fat (IMF) and producing highly marbled beef. The IMF content varies depending on the feeding of time, finishing diet, and breed type. IMF increases when feeding time is increased. The rate of IMF increase in grain-fed cattle is faster than that in pasture-fed cattle. Fatty acid composition are also different depending on breeds. Highly marbled Wagyu and Hanwoo beef have higher proportions of monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) due to higher concentrations of oleic acid. MUFAs have little effect on total cholesterol. They are heart-healthy dietary fat because they can lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol while increasing high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol. Clinical trials have indicated that highly marbled beef does not increase LDL-cholesterol. This review also emphasizes that high oleic acid beef such as Wagyu and Hanwoo beef might be able to reduce risk factors for cardiovascular disease. PMID:28115881

  14. Turbulent times: effects of turbulence and violence exposure in adolescence on high school completion, health risk behavior, and mental health in young adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton-Jarrett, Renée; Hair, Elizabeth; Zuckerman, Barry

    2013-10-01

    Turbulent social environments are associated with health and developmental risk, yet mechanisms have been understudied. Guided by a life course framework and stress theory, this study examined the association between turbulent life transitions (including frequent residential mobility, school transitions, family structure disruptions, and homelessness) and exposure to violence during adolescence and high school completion, mental health, and health risk behaviors in young adulthood. Participants (n = 4834) from the U.S. National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, 1997 cohort were followed prospectively from age 12-14 years for 10 years. We used structural equation models to investigate pathways between turbulence and cumulative exposure to violence (CEV), and high school completion, mental health, and health risk behaviors, while accounting for early life socio-demographics, family processes, and individual characteristics. Results indicated that turbulence index was associated with cumulative exposure to violence in adolescence. Both turbulence index and cumulative exposure to violence were positively associated with higher health risk behavior, poorer mental health, and inversely associated with high school completion. These findings highlight the importance of considering the cumulative impact of turbulent and adverse social environments when developing interventions to optimize health and developmental trajectory for adolescents transitioning into adulthood. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Asylum seekers, violence and health: a systematic review of research in high-income host countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalt, Anne; Hossain, Mazeda; Kiss, Ligia; Zimmerman, Cathy

    2013-03-01

    We performed a systematic review of literature on violence and related health concerns among asylum seekers in high-income host countries. We extracted data from 23 peer-reviewed studies. Prevalence of torture, variably defined, was above 30% across all studies. Torture history in clinic populations correlated with hunger and posttraumatic stress disorder, although in small, nonrepresentative samples. One study observed that previous exposure to interpersonal violence interacted with longer immigration detention periods, resulting in higher depression scores. Limited evidence suggests that asylum seekers frequently experience violence and health problems, but large-scale studies are needed to inform policies and services for this vulnerable group often at the center of political debate.

  16. Social Anxiety and Mental Health Service Use Among Asian American High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, Chad; Masia Warner, Carrie; Okazaki, Sumie; Ma, Pei-Wen Winnie; Sanchez, Amanda; Esseling, Petra; Lynch, Chelsea

    2015-10-01

    Asian American adults endorse more symptoms of social anxiety (SA) on self-report measures than European Americans, but demonstrate lower prevalence rates of SA disorder in epidemiological studies. These divergent results create ambiguity concerning the mental health needs of Asian Americans. The present study is the first to investigate this issue in adolescents through assessment of self-reported SA in Asian American high school students. Parent and self-ratings of impairment related to SA and self-reported mental health service use for SA were also measured. Asian American students endorsed a greater number of SA symptoms and scored in the clinical range more frequently than other ethnic groups. Also, Asian American and Latino students endorsed more school impairment related to SA than other ethnic groups. No differences in parent-reported impairment or service utilization were identified. Implications for future research and treatment for SA among Asian American adolescents are discussed.

  17. Are Biophilic-Designed Site Office Buildings Linked to Health Benefits and High Performing Occupants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonia Gray

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the first phase of a longitudinal study underway in Australia to ascertain the broad health benefits of specific types of biophilic design for workers in a building site office. A bespoke site design was formulated to include open plan workspace, natural lighting, ventilation, significant plants, prospect and views, recycled materials and use of non-synthetic materials. Initial data in the first three months was gathered from a series of demographic questions and from interviews and observations of site workers. Preliminary data indicates a strong positive effect from incorporating aspects of biophilic design to boost productivity, ameliorate stress, enhance well-being, foster a collaborative work environment and promote workplace satisfaction, thus contributing towards a high performance workspace. The longitudinal study spanning over two years will track human-plant interactions in a biophilic influenced space, whilst also assessing the concomitant cognitive, social, psychological and physical health benefits for workers.

  18. Cross-Cultural Validation of the High Blood Pressure Health Literacy Scale in a Chinese Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qinghua; Huang, Feifei; Liu, Zaoling; Zhang, Na; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Tang, Weiming; Lei, Yang; Dai, Yali; Tang, Songyuan; Zhang, Jingping

    2016-01-01

    Considering the importance of health literacy (HL) for the maximum yield from the hypertension control programs, development of a reliable and valid instrument of hypertension-related HL is critical. This study aimed to translate and validate the High Blood Pressure-Health Literacy Scale (HBP-HLS) into Chinese (C-HBP-HLS) and evaluate its psychometric properties in Chinese context. Between June 2013 and January 2014, a cross-sectional study was conducted among recruited hypertensive patients belonging to the Han and Kazakh-Chinese communities in Urumqi, Xinjiang, China. A pilot sample (n = 242) was selected for the exploratory factor analysis of the translated and modified instrument. Another sample (n = 308) was recruited for the confirmatory factor analysis. C-HBP-HLS consisted of five dimensions (Print Health Literacy, Medication Label, Understanding Ability, Newest Vital Sign Test, and Avoiding Food Allergy) containing 15 items, accounting for 77.7% of the total variance. The 5-factor model demonstrated a good overall fit. The scale-level content validity index was 0.85. Cronbach's alpha of the overall scale was 0.78 and test-retest reliability was 0.96. Education level had a strong positive correlation with the scores for items Q1, Q2, and Q3(r = 0.481, 0.492, 0.475, respectively). Health Literacy scores among Kazakh patients were significantly lower than Han (7.13±7.90 vs. 30.10±13.42, Z = -14.573, P<0.001). C-HBP-HLS demonstrated suitable factor structure and robust psychometric properties for measuring health literacy level among hypertensive patients in China.

  19. The Effectiveness of Guided Induction versus Deductive Instruction on the Development of Complex Spanish "Gustar" Structures: An Analysis of Learning Outcomes and Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerezo, Luis; Caras, Allison; Leow, Ronald P.

    2016-01-01

    Meta-analytic research suggests an edge of explicit over implicit instruction for the development of complex L2 grammatical structures, but the jury is still out as to which type of explicit instruction--"deductive" or "inductive," where rules are respectively provided or elicited--proves more effective. Avoiding this…

  20. 26 CFR 20.2011-2 - Limitation on credit if a deduction for State death taxes is allowed under section 2053(d).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... son with the direction that the son bear the State death taxes on the bequest. The residuary estate... payable out of the residuary estate. The State imposed death taxes of $60,000 on the son's bequest and... Charitable deduction: Gross estate $925,000.00 Expenses, etc $25,000.00 Bequest to son 400,000.00 State death...

  1. 26 CFR 1.280F-3T - Limitations on recovery deductions and the investment tax credit when the business use percentage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... investment tax credit when the business use percentage of listed property is not greater than 50 percent... recovery deductions and the investment tax credit when the business use percentage of listed property is... limitations with respect to the amount allowable as an investment tax credit under section 46(a) and the...

  2. Long-Term Structural Health Monitoring System for a High-Speed Railway Bridge Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lai-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Nanjing Dashengguan Bridge, which serves as the shared corridor crossing Yangtze River for both Beijing-Shanghai high-speed railway and Shanghai-Wuhan-Chengdu railway, is the first 6-track high-speed railway bridge with the longest span throughout the world. In order to ensure safety and detect the performance deterioration during the long-time service of the bridge, a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system has been implemented on this bridge by the application of modern techniques in sensing, testing, computing, and network communication. The SHM system includes various sensors as well as corresponding data acquisition and transmission equipment for automatic data collection. Furthermore, an evaluation system of structural safety has been developed for the real-time condition assessment of this bridge. The mathematical correlation models describing the overall structural behavior of the bridge can be obtained with the support of the health monitoring system, which includes cross-correlation models for accelerations, correlation models between temperature and static strains of steel truss arch, and correlation models between temperature and longitudinal displacements of piers. Some evaluation results using the mean value control chart based on mathematical correlation models are presented in this paper to show the effectiveness of this SHM system in detecting the bridge's abnormal behaviors under the varying environmental conditions such as high-speed trains and environmental temperature. PMID:26451387

  3. [Conceptualization of knowledge management in medium and high complexity health institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboleda-Posada, Gladys I

    2016-06-01

    Objective To identify the familiarization, conceptualization and incorporation of employees of medium and high complexity health institutions in the Valle de Aburrá, Colombia into the strategic knowledge management platform in 2011. Methodology Cross sectional study. The study was carried out by applying surveys to 224 employees to assess knowledge management. The population included staff who working in the Health Providing Institutions (IPS) of high (52) and medium complexity (322) in the Valle de Aburrá in 2011. In both the public and private institutions surveyed, 38.8 % of the respondents said they were not familiar with knowledge management. Among those who had administrative training, the ignorance was less than among care workers. It was also noted that as the level of education increased, knowledge of the concept was greater. A high proportion (65.2 % ) of respondents placed the concept in line with the creation, organization, storage, retrieval, transfer and application of knowledge systematically. 78.7 % of respondents from public institutions said that knowledge management was part of the strategic platform of the institution. 58.3 % from private institutions said the same. Conclusions In general terms the concept of knowledge management is not well conceived or familiar to the staff working in these institutions. The study confirmed a lack of empowerment in the field to promote the development of new ideas and to ensure that they become service innovations or processes that contribute to the development of institutional knowledge.

  4. Long-Term Structural Health Monitoring System for a High-Speed Railway Bridge Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Liang Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanjing Dashengguan Bridge, which serves as the shared corridor crossing Yangtze River for both Beijing-Shanghai high-speed railway and Shanghai-Wuhan-Chengdu railway, is the first 6-track high-speed railway bridge with the longest span throughout the world. In order to ensure safety and detect the performance deterioration during the long-time service of the bridge, a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM system has been implemented on this bridge by the application of modern techniques in sensing, testing, computing, and network communication. The SHM system includes various sensors as well as corresponding data acquisition and transmission equipment for automatic data collection. Furthermore, an evaluation system of structural safety has been developed for the real-time condition assessment of this bridge. The mathematical correlation models describing the overall structural behavior of the bridge can be obtained with the support of the health monitoring system, which includes cross-correlation models for accelerations, correlation models between temperature and static strains of steel truss arch, and correlation models between temperature and longitudinal displacements of piers. Some evaluation results using the mean value control chart based on mathematical correlation models are presented in this paper to show the effectiveness of this SHM system in detecting the bridge’s abnormal behaviors under the varying environmental conditions such as high-speed trains and environmental temperature.

  5. Explaining regional variations in health care utilization between Swiss cantons using panel econometric models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camenzind, Paul A

    2012-03-13

    In spite of a detailed and nation-wide legislation frame, there exist large cantonal disparities in consumed quantities of health care services in Switzerland. In this study, the most important factors of influence causing these regional disparities are determined. The findings can also be productive for discussing the containment of health care consumption in other countries. Based on the literature, relevant factors that cause geographic disparities of quantities and costs in western health care systems are identified. Using a selected set of these factors, individual panel econometric models are calculated to explain the variation of the utilization in each of the six largest health care service groups (general practitioners, specialist doctors, hospital inpatient, hospital outpatient, medication, and nursing homes) in Swiss mandatory health insurance (MHI). The main data source is 'Datenpool santésuisse', a database of Swiss health insurers. For all six health care service groups, significant factors influencing the utilization frequency over time and across cantons are found. A greater supply of service providers tends to have strong interrelations with per capita consumption of MHI services. On the demand side, older populations and higher population densities represent the clearest driving factors. Strategies to contain consumption and costs in health care should include several elements. In the federalist Swiss system, the structure of regional health care supply seems to generate significant effects. However, the extent of driving factors on the demand side (e.g., social deprivation) or financing instruments (e.g., high deductibles) should also be considered.

  6. Energy Savings Modeling and Inspection Guidelines for Commercial Building Federal Tax Deductions for Buildings in 2016 and Later

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deru, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Field-Macumber, Kristin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This document provides guidance for modeling and inspecting energy-efficient property in commercial buildings for certification of the energy and power cost savings related to Section 179D of the Internal Revenue Code (IRC) enacted in Section 1331 of the 2005 Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005, noted in Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Notices 2006-52 (IRS 2006), 2008-40 (IRS 2008) and 2012-26 (IRS 2012), and updated by the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act of 2015. Specifically, Section 179D provides federal tax deductions for energy-efficient property related to a commercial building's envelope; interior lighting; heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC); and service hot water (SHW) systems. This document applies to buildings placed in service on or after January 1, 2016.

  7. Group-theoretical deduction of a dyadic Tamm-Dancoff equation by using a matrix-valued generator coordinate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Seiya; Morita, Hiroyuki; Ohnishi, Hiromasa

    2004-01-01

    The traditional Tamm-Dancoff (TD) method is one of the standard procedures for solving the Schroedinger equation of fermion many-body systems. However, it meets a serious difficulty when an instability occurs in the symmetry-adapted ground state of the independent particle approximation (IPA) and when the stable IPA ground state becomes of broken symmetry. If one uses the stable but broken symmetry IPA ground state as the starting approximation, TD wave functions also become of broken symmetry. On the contrary, if we start from a symmetry-adapted but unstable wave function, the convergence of the TD expansion becomes bad. Thus, the requirements of symmetry and rapid convergence are not in general compatible in the conventional TD expansion of the systems with strong collective correlations. Along the same line as Fukutome's, we give a group-theoretical deduction of a U(n) dyadic TD equation by using a matrix-valued generator coordinate

  8. Adolescent use of school-based health centers and high school dropout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerns, Suzanne E U; Pullmann, Michael D; Walker, Sarah Cusworth; Lyon, Aaron R; Cosgrove, T J; Bruns, Eric J

    2011-07-01

    To determine the association between use of school-based health centers (SBHCs) and school dropout. Quasi-experimental longitudinal analysis of a retrospective student cohort, with SBHC use as the independent variable. We statistically controlled for dropout risk and used propensity score regression adjustment to control for several factors associated with SBHC use. Integrated database from an urban public school district (academic outcomes) and department of public health (SBHC use). District-enrolled students in their first semester of ninth grade in 2005 (N = 3334), followed up through their anticipated on-time graduation semester of 12th grade in 2009. Students were divided into 4 groups: never used (47%); low use (23%); moderate use (20%); and high users (10%). Time to nongraduation (described as dropout). Low to moderate SBHC use (0.125-2.5 visits per semester) was associated with a 33% reduction in dropout compared with non-SBHC users. The high-use group (>2.5 visits per semester) did not have dropout rates that differed from nonusers. For SBHC users who did drop out, dropout occurred approximately 1 semester later than nonusers. Exploratory analyses revealed that the association between SBHC use and prevention of dropout was greatest for higher-risk students. This study found an association between low to moderate SBHC use and reductions in dropout for high school students in an urban school district, especially for students at higher risk for dropout. This study supports the theory that benefits of SBHCs extend beyond managing physical and mental health needs to include academic outcomes.

  9. High school students in a health career promotion program report fewer acts of aggression and violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oscós-Sánchez, Manuel Ángel; Lesser, Janna; Oscós-Flores, L Dolores

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of two school-based programs on the perpetration of nonphysical aggression, physical violence, and intimate partner violence among high-risk secondary school students in an economically disadvantaged and predominantly Latino school district. The intervention program was El Joven Noble, and the control program was the Teen Medical Academy. The study used a repeated-measures quasi-experimental intervention/control design. The participants self-reported the previous 30 days' acts of nonphysical aggression, physical violence, and intimate partner violence at baseline and at 3 and 9 months after enrollment. Program- and grade-level effects at 3 and 9 months were examined using three-factor analyses of covariance models with one factor for repeated measures. The covariate in each of the models was the baseline measure of the dependent outcomes. No significant baseline differences were found between the participants in the intervention (n = 96) and control (n = 127) programs. At 9 months after enrollment in the study, high school students who participated in the Teen Medical Academy reported fewer acts of nonphysical aggression (p violence (p = .002) than high school students who participated in El Joven Noble. Students who participated in the Teen Medical Academy also reported fewer acts of intimate partner violence (p = .02) than students who participated in El Joven Noble. High school students who participated in a health career promotion program reported fewer acts of aggression and violence as compared with high school students who participated in a culturally tailored character development program. Copyright © 2013 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluating the roles of the inferior frontal gyrus and superior parietal lobule in deductive reasoning: an rTMS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujii, Takeo; Sakatani, Kaoru; Masuda, Sayako; Akiyama, Takekazu; Watanabe, Shigeru

    2011-09-15

    This study used off-line repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to examine the roles of the superior parietal lobule (SPL) and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) in a deductive reasoning task. Subjects performed a categorical syllogistic reasoning task involving congruent, incongruent, and abstract trials. Twenty four subjects received magnetic stimulation to the SPL region prior to the task. In the other 24 subjects, TMS was administered to the IFG region before the task. Stimulation lasted for 10min, with an inter-pulse frequency of 1Hz. We found that bilateral SPL (Brodmann area (BA) 7) stimulation disrupted performance on abstract and incongruent reasoning. Left IFG (BA 45) stimulation impaired congruent reasoning performance while paradoxically facilitating incongruent reasoning performance. This resulted in the elimination of the belief-bias. In contrast, right IFG stimulation only impaired incongruent reasoning performance, thus enhancing the belief-bias effect. These findings are largely consistent with the dual-process theory of reasoning, which proposes the existence of two different human reasoning systems: a belief-based heuristic system; and a logic-based analytic system. The present findings suggest that the left language-related IFG (BA 45) may correspond to the heuristic system, while bilateral SPL may underlie the analytic system. The right IFG may play a role in blocking the belief-based heuristic system for solving incongruent reasoning trials. This study could offer an insight about functional roles of distributed brain systems in human deductive reasoning by utilizing the rTMS approach. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. High engagement, high quality: A guiding framework for developing empirically informed asynchronous e-learning programs for health professional educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Peter M; Levett-Jones, Tracey; Morris, Amanda; Carter, Ben; Bennett, Paul N; Kable, Ashley

    2017-03-01

    E-learning involves the transfer of skills and knowledge via technology so that learners can access meaningful and authentic educational materials. While learner engagement is important, in the context of healthcare education, pedagogy must not be sacrificed for edu-tainment style instructional design. Consequently, health professional educators need to be competent in the use of current web-based educational technologies so that learners are able to access relevant and engaging e-learning materials without restriction. The increasing popularity of asynchronous e-learning programs developed for use outside of formal education institutions has made this need more relevant. In these contexts, educators must balance design and functionality to deliver relevant, cost-effective, sustainable, and accessible programs that overcome scheduling and geographic barriers for learners. This paper presents 10 guiding design principles and their application in the development of an e-learning program for general practice nurses focused on behavior change. Consideration of these principles will assist educators to develop high quality, pedagogically sound, engaging, and interactive e-learning resources. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Sleep Insufficiency, Sleep Health Problems and Performance in High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Ming

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A survey on sleep schedule, sleep health, school performance and school start times was conducted in 1,941 adolescents. A high level of early and circadian-disadvantaged sleep/wake schedules during weekdays was observed. Shorter sleep duration on weekdays was reported, especially in upper classmen. Complaints of inadequate sleep and sleepiness during weekdays, alarm clock use, and napping were prevalent. Night awakening and prolonged sleep onset were common and associated with poor school performance. Students with a sleep length of less than 7 hours on both weekdays and weekends exhibited poorer performance, while those who made up this sleep loss on weekends did not. The total number of poor sleep factors in an individual also correlated with poor school performance. Earlier school start times were associated with a perception of poor sleep quality, shorter sleep duration and more sleep health problems. We conclude that sleep inadequacies and sleep health problems were prevalent in this population, especially in those who started school earlier in the morning, and that these poor sleep factors were associated with school performance.

  13. High school students' experiences of bullying and victimization and the association with school health center use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Catherine; Deardorff, Julianna; Lahiff, Maureen; Soleimanpour, Samira; Sakashita, Kimi; Brindis, Claire D

    2015-05-01

    Bullying and victimization are ongoing concerns in schools. School health centers (SHCs) are well situated to support affected students because they provide crisis intervention, mental health care, and broader interventions to improve school climate. This study examined the association between urban adolescents' experiences of school-based bullying and victimization and their use of SHCs. Data was analyzed from 2063 high school students in 5 Northern California school districts using the 2009-2010 California Healthy Kids Survey. Chi-square tests and multivariate logistic regression were used to measure associations. Students who were bullied or victimized at school had significantly higher odds of using the SHCs compared with students who were not, and were also significantly more likely to report confidentiality concerns. The magnitude of associations was largest for Asian/Pacific Islander students, though this was likely due to greater statistical power. African American students reported victimization experiences at approximately the same rate as their peers, but were significantly less likely to indicate they experienced bullying. Findings suggest that SHCs may be an important place to address bullying and victimization at school, but confidentiality concerns are barriers that may be more common among bullied and victimized youth. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  14. Natural Selection on Genes Related to Cardiovascular Health in High-Altitude Adapted Andeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Jacob E; Amaru, Ricardo; Song, Jihyun; Julian, Colleen G; Racimo, Fernando; Cheng, Jade Yu; Guo, Xiuqing; Yao, Jie; Ambale-Venkatesh, Bharath; Lima, João A; Rotter, Jerome I; Stehlik, Josef; Moore, Lorna G; Prchal, Josef T; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2017-11-02

    The increase in red blood cell mass (polycythemia) due to the reduced oxygen availability (hypoxia) of residence at high altitude or other conditions is generally thought to be beneficial in terms of increasing tissue oxygen supply. However, the extreme polycythemia and accompanying increased mortality due to heart failure in chronic mountain sickness most likely reduces fitness. Tibetan highlanders have adapted to high altitude, possibly in part via the selection of genetic variants associated with reduced polycythemic response to hypoxia. In contrast, high-altitude-adapted Quechua- and Aymara-speaking inhabitants of the Andean Altiplano are not protected from high-altitude polycythemia in the same way, yet they exhibit other adaptive features for which the genetic underpinnings remain obscure. Here, we used whole-genome sequencing to scan high-altitude Andeans for signals of selection. The genes showing the strongest evidence of selection-including BRINP3, NOS2, and TBX5-are associated with cardiovascular development and function but are not in the response-to-hypoxia pathway. Using association mapping, we demonstrated that the haplotypes under selection are associated with phenotypic variations related to cardiovascular health. We hypothesize that selection in response to hypoxia in Andeans could have vascular effects and could serve to mitigate the deleterious effects of polycythemia rather than reduce polycythemia itself. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Electrosmog. Effects of high-frequency electromagnetic waves on health. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthes, R.

    1993-01-01

    1) The concept of Electrosmog concerns technically electromagnetic waves and fields of variable frequency and intensity. In our environment, high frequency fields come almost entirely from man-made sources. 2) High frequency electromagnetic fields can cause physical effects either directly or indirectly - eg through conductive materials. Thermal effects are the most prominent. The action of force mediated by the field can cause the loadig of there electric charges in the body. 3) The amount of energy absorbed by a fabric can be calculated from the intensity of the yield and the conductivity of the material. 4) In-vitro studies have suggested that high frequency fields affect the cell membranes and can cause changes in their permeability, enzyme activity and immune responses; although there are no proven results blaming high frequency fields for such mutations, and effects on cell proliferation have not been ascertained. 5) A basic limit of O-4 W/kg has been set internationally for work-related exposure, according to public health considerations, and the limit for the general public is 0.08 W/kg. 6) These basic limits are generally kept as a minimum requirement, and generally exposure is a hot lower. When high frequency equipment is in use nearby, measures must be taken to ensure that sefety limits are upheld and injury avoided, to the eyes in particular. (orig./MG) [de

  16. High prevalence of bronchiectasis in adults. Analysis of CT findings in a health screening program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Hyun-Jung; Moon, Ji-Yong; Choi, Vo-Won; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Sohn, Jang-Won; Yoon, Ho-Joo; Shin, Dong-Ho; Park, Sung-Soo; Kim, Sang-Heon

    2010-01-01

    Bronchiectasis is one of the common chronic respiratory diseases and associated with respiratory morbidity and mortality. However, neither its prevalence nor its etiology is well-defined. We aimed to estimate the prevalence and risk factors of bronchiectasis in adults. In a retrospective study, we analyzed radiologic findings on chest computed tomography (CT) images performed as part of a health-screening program. From January to December 2008, 1,409 (24.6%) of 5,727 participants in the screening program of a health promotion center at a university hospital underwent chest CT scans based on the subject's decision. Bronchiectasis was diagnosed, if there was abnormal bronchial dilatation in any area of both lungs on chest CT. Respiratory symptoms, smoking status, and past medical history were also analyzed to define clinical characteristics and risk factors of bronchiectasis. Of 1,409 patients (aged 23-86 years), who were screened for respiratory diseases using chest CT for one year in a health promotion center, 129 patients (9.1%) were diagnosed with bronchiectasis. The prevalence of bronchiectasis was higher in females than in males (11.5% vs. 7.9%, p=0.022) and increased with age. Respiratory symptoms were reported in 53.7% of subjects. Previous history of tuberculosis (TB) (odds ratio (OR) 4.61, 95% confidence interval (Cl) 2.39-8.88, p=0.001) and age (OR 2.49, 95% Cl 1.56-3.98, p=0.001) were significantly associated with bronchiectasis. This retrospective analysis of chest CT findings in health screening examinees revealed a very high prevalence of bronchiectasis in adults. Previous TB infection is one of the major causes of bronchiectasis. (author)

  17. Applying the High Reliability Health Care Maturity Model to Assess Hospital Performance: A VA Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Jennifer L; Rivard, Peter E; Shin, Marlena H; Rosen, Amy K

    2016-09-01

    The lack of a tool for categorizing and differentiating hospitals according to their high reliability organization (HRO)-related characteristics has hindered progress toward implementing and sustaining evidence-based HRO practices. Hospitals would benefit both from an understanding of the organizational characteristics that support HRO practices and from knowledge about the steps necessary to achieve HRO status to reduce the risk of harm and improve outcomes. The High Reliability Health Care Maturity (HRHCM) model, a model for health care organizations' achievement of high reliability with zero patient harm, incorporates three major domains critical for promoting HROs-Leadership, Safety Culture, and Robust Process Improvement ®. A study was conducted to examine the content validity of the HRHCM model and evaluate whether it can differentiate hospitals' maturity levels for each of the model's components. Staff perceptions of patient safety at six US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals were examined to determine whether all 14 HRHCM components were present and to characterize each hospital's level of organizational maturity. Twelve of the 14 components from the HRHCM model were detected; two additional characteristics emerged that are present in the HRO literature but not represented in the model-teamwork culture and system-focused tools for learning and improvement. Each hospital's level of organizational maturity could be characterized for 9 of the 14 components. The findings suggest the HRHCM model has good content validity and that there is differentiation between hospitals on model components. Additional research is needed to understand how these components can be used to build the infrastructure necessary for reaching high reliability.

  18. [Oral health status of women with normal and high-risk pregnancies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaloupka, P; Korečko, V; Turek, J; Merglová, V

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the oral health status of women with normal pregnancies and those with high-risk pregnancies. A total of 142 women in the third trimester of pregnancy were randomly selected for this study. The pregnant women were divided into two groups: a normal pregnancy group (group F, n = 61) and a high-risk pregnancy group (group R, n = 81). The following variables were recorded for each woman: age, general health status, DMF index, CPITN index, PBI index, amounts of Streptococcus mutans in the saliva and dental treatment needs. The data obtained were analysed statistically. The Mann-Whitney test, Kruskal-Wallis test and chi square test were used, and p-values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. The two-sided t-test was used to compare the two cohorts. Women with high-risk pregnancies showed increased values in all measured indices and tests, but there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups in the DMF index, CPITN index and amounts of Streptococcus mutans present in the saliva. Statistically significant differences were detected between the two groups for the PBI index and dental treatment needs. In group F, the maximum PBI index value was 2.9 in group F and 3.8 in group R. Significant differences were found also in mean PBI values. Out of the entire study cohort, 94 women (66.2%) required dental treatment, including 52% (n = 32) of the women with normal pregnancies and 77% (n = 62) of the women with high-risk pregnancies. This study found that women with complications during pregnancy had severe gingivitis and needed more frequent dental treatment than women with normal pregnancies.

  19. Adolescents Misperceive and Are Influenced By High Status Peers' Health Risk, Deviant, and Adaptive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Sarah W.; Choukas-Bradley, Sophia; Widman, Laura; Giletta, Matteo; Cohen, Geoffrey L.; Prinstein, Mitchell J.

    2015-01-01

    Most peer influence research examines socialization between adolescents and their best friends. Yet, adolescents also are influenced by popular peers, perhaps due to misperceptions of social norms. This research examined the extent to which out-group and in-group adolescents misperceive the frequencies of peers' deviant, health risk, and adaptive behaviors in different reputation-based peer crowds (Study 1) and the prospective associations between perceptions of high status peers' and adolescents' own substance use over 2.5 years (Study 2). Study 1 examined 235 adolescents' reported deviant (vandalism, theft), health risk (substance use, sexual risk), and adaptive (exercise, studying) behavior, and their perceptions of Jocks', Populars', Burnouts', and Brains' engagement in the same behaviors. Peer nominations identified adolescents in each peer crowd. Jocks and Populars were rated as higher status than Brains and Burnouts. Results indicated that peer crowd stereotypes are caricatures. Misperceptions of high status crowds were dramatic, but for many behaviors, no differences between Populars'/Jocks' and others' actual reported behaviors were revealed. Study 2 assessed 166 adolescents' substance use and their perceptions of popular peers' (i.e., peers high in peer perceived popularity) substance use. Parallel process latent growth analyses revealed that higher perceptions of popular peers' substance use in Grade 9 (intercept) significantly predicted steeper increases in adolescents' own substance use from Grade 9 to 11 (slope). Results from both studies, utilizing different methods, offer evidence to suggest that adolescents misperceive high status peers' risk behaviors, and these misperceptions may predict adolescents' own risk behavior engagement. PMID:25365121

  20. Programs to increase high school completion: a community guide systematic health equity review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Robert A; Knopf, John A; Wilson, Sandra Jo; Truman, Benedict I; Milstein, Bobby; Johnson, Robert L; Fielding, Jonathan E; Muntaner, Carles J M; Jones, Camara Phyllis; Fullilove, Mindy T; Moss, Regina Davis; Ueffing, Erin; Hunt, Pete C

    2015-05-01

    High school completion (HSC) is an established predictor of long-term morbidity and mortality. U.S. rates of HSC are substantially lower among students from low-income families and most racial/ethnic minority populations than students from high-income families and the non-Hispanic white population. This systematic review assesses the effectiveness of programs to increase HSC and the potential of these programs to improve lifelong health among at-risk students. A search located a meta-analysis (search period 1985-2010/2011) on the effects of programs to increase HSC or General Educational Development (GED) diploma receipt; the meta-analysis was concordant with Community Guide definitions and methodologic standards. Programs were assessed separately for the general student population (152 studies) and students who were parents or pregnant (15 studies). A search for studies published between 2010 and August 2012 located ten more recent studies, which were assessed for consistency with the meta-analysis. Analyses were conducted in 2013. The review focused on the meta-analysis. Program effectiveness was measured as the increased rate of HSC (or GED receipt) by the intervention group compared with controls. All assessed program types were effective in increasing HSC in the general student population: vocational training, alternative schooling, social-emotional skills training, college-oriented programming, mentoring and counseling, supplemental academic services, school and class restructuring, multiservice packages, attendance monitoring and contingencies, community service, and case management. For students who had children or were pregnant, attendance monitoring and multiservice packages were effective. Ten studies published after the search period for the meta-analysis were consistent with its findings. There is strong evidence that a variety of HSC programs can improve high school or GED completion rates. Because many programs are targeted to high-risk students and

  1. Implementing Health and Safety Policy Changes at the High School Level From a Leadership Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnotta, Kelly D; Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Pitney, William A; Burton, Laura J; Casa, Douglas J

    2016-04-01

    Although consensus statements and recommendations from professional organizations aim to reduce the incidence of injury or sudden death in sport, nothing is mandated at the high school level. This allows states the freedom to create and implement individual policies. An example of a recommended policy is heat acclimatization. Despite its efficacy in reducing sudden death related to heat stroke, very few states follow the recommended guidelines. To retroactively examine why and how 3 states were able to facilitate the successful creation and adoption of heat-acclimatization guidelines. Qualitative study. High school athletic associations in Arkansas, Georgia, and New Jersey. Eight men and 3 women (n = 11; 6 athletic trainers; 2 members of high school athletic associations; 2 parents; 1 physician) participated. Participant recruitment ceased when data saturation was reached. All phone interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. A grounded-theory approach guided analysis and multiple analysts and peer review were used to establish credibility. Each state had a different catalyst to change (student-athlete death, empirical data, proactivity). Recommendations from national governing bodies guided the policy creation. Once the decision to implement change was made, the states displayed 2 similarities: shared leadership and open communication between medical professionals and members of the high school athletic association helped overcome barriers. The initiating factor that spurred the change varied, yet shared leadership and communication fundamentally allowed for successful adoption of the policy. Our participants were influenced by the recommendations from national governing bodies, which align with the institutional change theory. As more states begin to examine and improve their health and safety policies, this information could serve as a valuable resource for athletic trainers in other states and for future health and safety initiatives.

  2. Implementing Health and Safety Policy Changes at the High School Level From a Leadership Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagnotta, Kelly D.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pitney, William A.; Burton, Laura J.; Casa, Douglas J.

    2016-01-01

    Context:  Although consensus statements and recommendations from professional organizations aim to reduce the incidence of injury or sudden death in sport, nothing is mandated at the high school level. This allows states the freedom to create and implement individual policies. An example of a recommended policy is heat acclimatization. Despite its efficacy in reducing sudden death related to heat stroke, very few states follow the recommended guidelines. Objective:  To retroactively examine why and how 3 states were able to facilitate the successful creation and adoption of heat-acclimatization guidelines. Design:  Qualitative study. Setting:  High school athletic associations in Arkansas, Georgia, and New Jersey. Patients or Other Participants:  Eight men and 3 women (n = 11; 6 athletic trainers; 2 members of high school athletic associations; 2 parents; 1 physician) participated. Participant recruitment ceased when data saturation was reached. Data Collection and Analysis:  All phone interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed verbatim. A grounded-theory approach guided analysis and multiple analysts and peer review were used to establish credibility. Results:  Each state had a different catalyst to change (student-athlete death, empirical data, proactivity). Recommendations from national governing bodies guided the policy creation. Once the decision to implement change was made, the states displayed 2 similarities: shared leadership and open communication between medical professionals and members of the high school athletic association helped overcome barriers. Conclusions:  The initiating factor that spurred the change varied, yet shared leadership and communication fundamentally allowed for successful adoption of the policy. Our participants were influenced by the recommendations from national governing bodies, which align with the institutional change theory. As more states begin to examine and improve their health and safety policies

  3. Adolescents misperceive and are influenced by high-status peers' health risk, deviant, and adaptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, Sarah W; Choukas-Bradley, Sophia; Widman, Laura; Giletta, Matteo; Cohen, Geoffrey L; Prinstein, Mitchell J

    2014-12-01

    Most peer influence research examines socialization between adolescents and their best friends. Yet, adolescents also are influenced by popular peers, perhaps due to misperceptions of social norms. This research examined the extent to which out-group and in-group adolescents misperceive the frequencies of peers' deviant, health risk, and adaptive behaviors in different reputation-based peer crowds (Study 1) and the prospective associations between perceptions of high-status peers' and adolescents' own substance use over 2.5 years (Study 2). Study 1 examined 235 adolescents' reported deviant (vandalism, theft), health risk (substance use, sexual risk), and adaptive (exercise, studying) behavior, and their perceptions of jocks', populars', burnouts', and brains' engagement in the same behaviors. Peer nominations identified adolescents in each peer crowd. Jocks and populars were rated as higher status than brains and burnouts. Results indicated that peer crowd stereotypes are caricatures. Misperceptions of high-status crowds were dramatic, but for many behaviors, no differences between populars'/jocks' and others' actual reported behaviors were revealed. Study 2 assessed 166 adolescents' substance use and their perceptions of popular peers' (i.e., peers high in peer perceived popularity) substance use. Parallel process latent growth analyses revealed that higher perceptions of popular peers' substance use in Grade 9 (intercept) significantly predicted steeper increases in adolescents' own substance use from Grade 9 to 11 (slope). Results from both studies, utilizing different methods, offer evidence to suggest that adolescents misperceive high-status peers' risk behaviors, and these misperceptions may predict adolescents' own risk behavior engagement. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. [Relationships between smoking and the health locus of control among junior high school students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yumi; Takagi, Hirofumi; Inaba, Yutaka

    2007-10-01

    To clarify effects of the Health Locus of Control (HLC) on smoking behavior, relationships between smoking and HLC among junior high school students were examined. The subjects of the initial study, conducted in 1991, were public elementary schoolchildren in their 3rd year (11-12 years old). We then investigated the same children again in 1994 and 1997. We here mainly used data for 265 students (136 males and 129 females) obtained in 1997 when they were public junior high school students in their 3rd year (14-15 years old). Questionnaires included items on smoking experience, smoking intention and the Parcel & Meyer's Children's HLC scales. 1. Smoking experience was not associated with the HLC. 2. Concerning smoking intention among boys, the neutral group expressed stronger beliefs in the powerful others HLC in 1994 and 1997 than the positive group. In addition, the positive group expressed weaker beliefs in the powerful others HLC in 1994 than the negative group. 3. Concerning smoking intention among girls, the neutral group expressed stronger belifs in the powerful others HLC in 1997 than the negative group. Smoking experience was not associated with the HLC. However, smoking intention was significantly associated with beliefs in the powerful others HLC. In this regard, the neutral group tended to have strong beliefs in the powerful others HLC suggesting that students in this group might be easily affected by other people in both positive and negative ways. In other words, they must be guided in a good fashion through appropriate health education.

  5. Predictors of smoking among the secondary high school boy students based on the health belief model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Mohammadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Smoking is one of the most important risk factors for health and also health problems, such as heart diseases, especially for young people. This study aimed to investigate the effect of factors related to smoking among the secondary high school students in the city of Marivan (Kurdistan-Iran, in 2015, based on the constructs of health belief model (HBM. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in 470 secondary high school students in Marivan in 2015. The samples were selected by random cluster sampling. A question with four sections was used to collect data (demographic questions, knowledge section, attitude section, and questions related to e constructs of HBM. Results: According to the results, the correlation of smoking was stronger with attitude (r = 0.269 and odds ratio = 0.89 but weaker with perceived barriers (r = 0.101. There was not a significant correlation between smoking behavior and knowledge of the harms of smoking (r = −0.005. Moreover, Cues to action was effective predictor of smoking behavior (r = 0.259. Conclusions: The findings of this study show that the prevalence of smoking in the studied sample is somewhat lower than other regions of Iran, but it should be noted that if no interventions are done to prevent smoking in this age group. The findings of the study also showed that the structure of attitudes, self-efficacy, and Cues to action are the strongest predictors of smoking among students. Albeit, attitude was strongest predictor of smoking that shows the prevalence of smoking can be reduced by focusing in this part. Considering the mean age of participants (16/2 ± 0.25 years, that shows the riskiest period for smoking is 16 years and authorities can make change in policies of cigarette selling only for over 18 years.

  6. Dental Health Status of Junior High Schools Students; Golpaygan City, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabbani D.* PhD,

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aims Decayed, Missing and Filled Teeth (DMFT index plays a key role in health care decisionmaking. According to WHO guideline, DMFT should not be more than 1 in 12-year old children. The role of fluoride intake in tooth and bone health is also well known. This study was carried out to investigate the DMFT index in junior high school students of Golpaygan City, Iran, and its relation the Fluoride concentration of drinking water. Instrument & Methods This descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in all 530 junior high school students of Golpaygan City, Iran, during 2010-11. The DMFT index was determined by educated and trained mouth and teeth health experts. The Fluoride concentration was measured by SPADNS method from 4 different places in 2 different times, May and June (4 samples each. Data were analyzed by statistical descriptive methods and one-way ANOVA test. Findings DMFT was 3.07±2.34 in boys and 3.28±2.56 in girls (p=0.34. There were no significant differences between boys and girls in the averages of decayed (p=0.95, missing (p=0.89 and filled (p=0.13 teeth. There was a significant difference in the DMFT value of the different age groups. There was also a significant difference between the DMFT values according to mothers’ level of education. The average of Fluoride concentration in water samples of 4 different places of the region in 2 period of times was 0.33±0.09mg/l. Conclusion DMFT index in the students of Golpaygan City, Iran, is more than WHO standards.

  7. Federal Contributions to High-Income School Districts: The Use of Tax Deductions for Funding K-12 Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Susannna; Socias, Miguel

    2004-01-01

    The federal role in education finance is commonly seen as compensatory. The federal government gives large sums of money to low-income schools and school districts through programs such as Title 1. Yet, this view of federal aid is based solely on direct educational expenditures. The federal government and state governments also support schools…

  8. Health Care Spending in the United States and Other High-Income Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanicolas, Irene; Woskie, Liana R; Jha, Ashish K

    2018-03-13

    Health care spending in the United States is a major concern and is higher than in other high-income countries, but there is little evidence that efforts to reform US health care delivery have had a meaningful influence on controlling health care spending and costs. To compare potential drivers of spending, such as structural capacity and utilization, in the United States with those of 10 of the highest-income countries (United Kingdom, Canada, Germany, Australia, Japan, Sweden, France, the Netherlands, Switzerland, and Denmark) to gain insight into what the United States can learn from these nations. Analysis of data primarily from 2013-2016 from key international organizations including the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), comparing underlying differences in structural features, types of health care and social spending, and performance between the United States and 10 high-income countries. When data were not available for a given country or more accurate country-level estimates were available from sources other than the OECD, country-specific data sources were used. In 2016, the US spent 17.8% of its gross domestic product on health care, and spending in the other countries ranged from 9.6% (Australia) to 12.4% (Switzerland). The proportion of the population with health insurance was 90% in the US, lower than the other countries (range, 99%-100%), and the US had the highest proportion of private health insurance (55.3%). For some determinants of health such as smoking, the US ranked second lowest of the countries (11.4% of the US population ≥15 years smokes daily; mean of all 11 countries, 16.6%), but the US had the highest percentage of adults who were overweight or obese at 70.1% (range for other countries, 23.8%-63.4%; mean of all 11 countries, 55.6%). Life expectancy in the US was the lowest of the 11 countries at 78.8 years (range for other countries, 80.7-83.9 years; mean of all 11 countries, 81.7 years), and infant

  9. PP033. High blood pressure in pregnancy: an indicator of future health outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooher, J; Chiu, C L; Thornton, C; Lupton, S; O'Loughlin, A; Makris, A; Hennessy, A; Lind, J M; Korda, A; Ogle, R; Horvath, J

    2012-07-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (HDP) remain a leading cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. In Australia approximately 10% of all pregnancies are affected by HDP. There is growing evidence that endothelial damage caused by HDP remains after pregnancy and has long term consequences on maternal health. The aim of our research was to determine the association between HDP and risk of having high blood pressure in later life. Self-reported data regarding a physician's diagnosis of HDP and of high blood pressure later in life were obtained from women recruited from the 45 and Up Study, Australia. Relative risks (converted from odds ratios) and 99% confidence intervals were estimated using logistic regression, adjusting for demographic and lifestyle characteristics. A total of 82,164 women were included in the study, of which 9,845 reported having HDP. Women who had HDP had a significantly increased risk of having high blood pressure later in life compared to women who did not have HDP (adjusted relative risk of 2.05, 99% CI 1.99-2.11, phigh blood pressure 6.3 years (99% CI 5.85-6.66, phigh blood pressure compared to women who have a healthy pregnancy. Women with HDP should be monitored closely in the years following pregnancy for early identification and intervention of high blood pressure. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Use of a screening tool and primary health care gerontology nurse specialist for high-needs older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Anna; Boyd, Michal; Dagley, Lynelle

    2017-02-01

    To describe implementation of an innovative gerontology nurse specialist role within one primary health organisation in Auckland, New Zealand. Quantitative outcomes of the screening tool as well as the nurse specialist assessment will be presented. The intervention involved use of the Brief Risk Identification for Geriatric Health Tool (BRIGHT) to identify high-needs older people with subsequent comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA) performed by the gerontology nurse specialist. A total 384 of the 416 BRIGHTs were completed (92% response rate) and 15% of these were identified as high risk (n = 57). The BRIGHTs for high-risk older people revealed the highest scoring question was 'needing help with housework' (26%). The most frequent intervention by the gerontology nurse specialist was education (30%). The primary health care gerontology nurse specialist model delivers a proactive case finding and specialist gerontology intervention for older people at high risk of functional or health decline.

  11. The mismatch between high effort and low reward in household and family work predicts impaired health among mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperlich, Stefanie; Arnhold-Kerri, Sonja; Siegrist, Johannes; Geyer, Siegfried

    2013-10-01

    So far, Siegrist's model of effort-reward imbalance (ERI) has been tested almost exclusively for paid employment. This article reports results on a newly developed questionnaire measuring ERI in unpaid household and family work. Using data of a population-based sample of 3129 German mothers, logistic regression analyses were performed to test the following three main assumptions: (i) high effort combined with low reward in household and family work increases the risk of poor health; (ii) a high level of overcommitment may enhance the risk of poor health; and (iii) mothers reporting an extrinsic high ERI and a high level of overcommitment have an even higher risk of poor health. ERI was significantly related to self-rated health, somatic complaints and mental health. A high level of overcommitment increased the risk of poor health, whereas ERI and overcommitment combined was associated with the highest risk of poor health. Statistically significant synergy effects of combined exposure of ERI and overcommitment were found for 'anxiety'. With some limitations, all three assumptions underlying the ERI model were confirmed. Thus, we conclude that ERI is applicable to domestic work and may provide an explanatory framework to assess stress experiences in mothers.

  12. Determinants of responsibility for health, spiritual health and interpersonal relationship based on theory of planned behavior in high school girl students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezazadeh, Afsaneh; Solhi, Mahnaz; Azam, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence is a sensitive period of acquiring normal and abnormal habits for all oflife. The study investigates determinants of responsibility for health, spiritual health and interpersonal relations and predictive factors based on the theory of planned behavior in high school girl students in Tabriz. In this Cross-sectional study, 340 students were selected thorough multi-stage sampling. An author-made questionnaire based on standard questionnaires of Health Promotion and Lifestyle II (HPLPII), spiritual health standards (Palutzian & Ellison) and components of the theory of planned behavior (attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and behavioral intention) was used for data collection. The questionnaire was validated in a pilot study. Data were analyzed using SPSS v.15 and descriptive and analytical tests (Chi-square test, Pearson correlation co-efficient and liner regression test in backward method). Students' responsibility for health, spiritual health, interpersonal relationships, and concepts of theory of planned behavior was moderate. We found a significant positive correlation (ptheory of planned behavior. Attitude and perceived behavioral control predicted 35% of intention of behavioral change (pbehavioral control predicted 74% of behavioral change in accountability for health (pbehavioral change in spiritual health (pbehavioral change in interpersonal relationship (pbehavioral intention and its determinants such as perceived behavioral control should be noted in promoting intervention programs.

  13. High-resolution modelling of health impacts from air pollution using the integrated model system EVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Jørgen; Andersen, Mikael S.; Bønløkke, Jakob; Christensen, Jesper H.; Geels, Camilla; Hansen, Kaj M.; Jensen, Steen S.; Ketzel, Matthias; Plejdrup, Marlene S.; Sigsgaard, Torben; Silver, Jeremy D.

    2014-05-01

    A high-resolution assessment of health impacts from air pollution and related external cost has been conducted for Denmark using the integrated EVA model system. The EVA system has been further developed by implementing an air quality model with a 1 km x 1 km resolution covering the whole of Denmark. New developments of the integrated model system will be presented as well as results for health impacts and related external costs over several decades. Furthermore, the sensitivity of health impacts to model resolution will be studied. We have developed an integrated model system EVA (Economic Valuation of Air pollution), based on the impact-pathway chain, to assess the health impacts and health-related economic externalities of air pollution resulting from specific emission sources or sectors. The system is used to support policymaking with respect to emission control. In Brandt et al. (2013a; 2013b), the EVA system was used to assess the impacts in Europe and Denmark from the past, present and future total air pollution levels as well as the contribution from the major anthropogenic emission sectors. The EVA system was applied using the hemispheric chemistry-transport model, the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model (DEHM), with nesting capability for higher resolution over Europe (50 km x 50 km) and Northern Europe (16.7 km x 16.7 km). In this study an Urban Background Model (UBM) has been further developed to cover the whole of Denmark with a 1 km x 1 km resolution and the model has been implemented as a part of the integrated model system, EVA. The EVA system is based on the impact-pathway methodology. The site-specific emissions will result (via atmospheric transport and chemistry) in a concentration distribution, which together with detailed population data, are used to estimate the population-level exposure. Using exposure-response functions and economic valuations, the exposure is transformed into impacts on human health and related external costs. In this study

  14. Position statement: start middle and high schools at 8:30 am or later to promote student health and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevorrow, Tracy; Zhou, Eric S; Dietch, Jessica R; Gonzalez, Brian D

    2018-03-13

    The Society of Behavioral Medicine recommends school officials start middle and high school classes at 8:30 am or later. Such a schedule promotes students' sleep health, resulting in improvements in physical health, psychological well-being, attention and concentration, academic performance, and driving safety. In this position statement, we propose a four-tiered approach to promote later school start times for middle and high schools.

  15. [Survey regarding mental health conditions of high school students and attitudes of students and their teachers toward students' mental health issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Isao; Fujii, Chiyo; Fukuzawa, Ayako

    2013-01-01

    We administered a self-reporting questionnaire survey regarding the mental health conditions of high school students and attitudes of students and their teachers toward students' mental health issues. In addition, we discussed the requirements for high school students' mental health support system. The subjects were 3,312 students and 208 teachers in four Shizuoka prefectural public high schools in 2009. University Personality Inventory (UPI) is usually conducted to assess university students' mental state and is a questionnaire that high school students can answer easily. Therefore, we adopted UPI for this survey. UPI was composed of 56 unhealthy and 4 healthy condition items. High school students completed the UPI and determined the sum of unhealthy condition items; a higher score indicated a poorer mental health status. The average UPI score of all students (n = 3,312) was 12.7 points, and that of females (n = 1,217)was 15.2 points, which was significantly higher than the 11.3 points of males (n = 2,095). Those with scores > or = 30 points (7.5%), which was more than half of the maximum score, were designated as the High Score (HS) group and considered to have poor mental health. Those with scores of > or = 40 (1.4%) seemed to have very poor mental health, and there was concern that they may be suffering from psychosis. Our observations indicated that HS students were likely to avoid seeking help regarding mental health issues, which was especially true for male HS students. The majority of students chose their friends and parents as advisers, but HS students were significantly more likely to choose advisers who were engaged in jobs related to medical work. Students in both the HS and non-HS groups who did not wish to consult anyone else about their mental conditions wanted to be approached by those around them. High school teachers hesitated to intervene with mentally disturbed students and attempted to resolve problems within the school. Thus, it appears

  16. Integration of High-Resolution Laser Displacement Sensors and 3D Printing for Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Wei Chang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel experimental design for complex structural health monitoring (SHM studies achieved by integrating 3D printing technologies, high-resolution laser displacement sensors, and multiscale entropy SHM theory. A seven-story structure with a variety of composite bracing systems was constructed using a dual-material 3D printer. A wireless Bluetooth vibration speaker was used to excite the ground floor of the structure, and high-resolution laser displacement sensors (1-μm resolution were used to monitor the displacement history on different floors. Our results showed that the multiscale entropy SHM method could detect damage on the 3D-printed structures. The results of this study demonstrate that integrating 3D printing technologies and high-resolution laser displacement sensors enables the design of cheap, fast processing, complex, small-scale civil structures for future SHM studies. The novel experimental design proposed in this study provides a suitable platform for investigating the validity and sensitivity of SHM in different composite structures and damage conditions for real life applications in the future.

  17. Integration of High-Resolution Laser Displacement Sensors and 3D Printing for Structural Health Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shu-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Kang; Kuo, Shih-Yu; Huang, Ting-Hsuan

    2017-12-22

    This paper presents a novel experimental design for complex structural health monitoring (SHM) studies achieved by integrating 3D printing technologies, high-resolution laser displacement sensors, and multiscale entropy SHM theory. A seven-story structure with a variety of composite bracing systems was constructed using a dual-material 3D printer. A wireless Bluetooth vibration speaker was used to excite the ground floor of the structure, and high-resolution laser displacement sensors (1-μm resolution) were used to monitor the displacement history on different floors. Our results showed that the multiscale entropy SHM method could detect damage on the 3D-printed structures. The results of this study demonstrate that integrating 3D printing technologies and high-resolution laser displacement sensors enables the design of cheap, fast processing, complex, small-scale civil structures for future SHM studies. The novel experimental design proposed in this study provides a suitable platform for investigating the validity and sensitivity of SHM in different composite structures and damage conditions for real life applications in the future.

  18. Development of a High-Sensitivity Wireless Accelerometer for Structural Health Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li; Fu, Yuguang; Chow, Raymond; Spencer, Billie F; Park, Jong Woong; Mechitov, Kirill

    2018-01-17

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is playing an increasingly important role in ensuring the safety of structures. A shift of SHM research away from traditional wired methods toward the use of wireless smart sensors (WSS) has been motivated by the attractive features of wireless smart sensor networks (WSSN). The progress achieved in Micro Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) technologies and wireless data transmission, has extended the effectiveness and range of applicability of WSSNs. One of the most common sensors employed in SHM strategies is the accelerometer; however, most accelerometers in WSS nodes have inadequate resolution for measurement of the typical accelerations found in many SHM applications. In this study, a high-resolution and low-noise tri-axial digital MEMS accelerometer is incorporated in a next-generation WSS platform, the Xnode. In addition to meeting the acceleration sensing demands of large-scale civil infrastructure applications, this new WSS node provides powerful hardware and a robust software framework to enable edge computing that can deliver actionable information. Hardware and software integration challenges are presented, and the associate resolutions are discussed. The performance of the wireless accelerometer is demonstrated experimentally through comparison with high-sensitivity wired accelerometers. This new high-sensitivity wireless accelerometer will extend the use of WSSN to a broader class of SHM applications.

  19. Development of a High-Sensitivity Wireless Accelerometer for Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li; Fu, Yuguang; Chow, Raymond; Spencer, Billie F.; Park, Jong Woong; Mechitov, Kirill

    2018-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is playing an increasingly important role in ensuring the safety of structures. A shift of SHM research away from traditional wired methods toward the use of wireless smart sensors (WSS) has been motivated by the attractive features of wireless smart sensor networks (WSSN). The progress achieved in Micro Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) technologies and wireless data transmission, has extended the effectiveness and range of applicability of WSSNs. One of the most common sensors employed in SHM strategies is the accelerometer; however, most accelerometers in WSS nodes have inadequate resolution for measurement of the typical accelerations found in many SHM applications. In this study, a high-resolution and low-noise tri-axial digital MEMS accelerometer is incorporated in a next-generation WSS platform, the Xnode. In addition to meeting the acceleration sensing demands of large-scale civil infrastructure applications, this new WSS node provides powerful hardware and a robust software framework to enable edge computing that can deliver actionable information. Hardware and software integration challenges are presented, and the associate resolutions are discussed. The performance of the wireless accelerometer is demonstrated experimentally through comparison with high-sensitivity wired accelerometers. This new high-sensitivity wireless accelerometer will extend the use of WSSN to a broader class of SHM applications. PMID:29342102

  20. High rates of respiratory symptoms and airway disease in mental health inpatients in a tertiary centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Andrew J; Hay, Karen; Chadwick, Alex; Siskind, Dan; Sheridan, Judith

    2018-04-01

    People with severe mental illness (SMI) have a lower life expectancy due in part to a higher prevalence of cardiac and metabolic disease. Less is known of the prevalence of respiratory disease in this group. This cross-sectional, observational study aimed to assess the prevalence of symptoms associated with respiratory disease in patients admitted to an inpatient mental health unit. A convenience sample of 82 inpatients had a structured interview and questionnaire completed. The questionnaire included self-reported diagnoses of common diseases and screening questions designed to detect respiratory disease and sleep disordered breathing. Targeted spirometry was performed on the basis of symptoms and smoking status. Patients reported high rates of respiratory symptoms, including wheezing (38%) and dyspnoea (44%); 52% of patients reported daily tobacco use. Productive cough was significantly associated with tobacco use (P disease (COPD) of whom six did not have a formal diagnosis of COPD previously. People with SMI have high rates of respiratory symptoms with a high prevalence of COPD on spirometry. Half of the COPD cases were not previously diagnosed, suggesting a hidden burden of respiratory disease in patients with SMI. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  1. Federalism, the economic-industrial health care complex and high-cost pharmaceutical assistance in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, Elize Massard; Costa, Nilson do Rosario

    2015-04-01

    Brazil has a relevant, although relatively unknown, special medicines programme that distributes high-cost products, such as drugs needed for cancer treatments. In 2009, the purchase of these medicines became the responsibility of the Brazilian Federal Government. Until then, there were no clear norms regarding the responsibilities, in terms of the management/financing of these medicines, of the Brazilian Federal Government and of the states themselves. This qualitative study analyses the policy process needed to transfer this programme to the central government. The study examines the reports of the Tripartite Commission between 2000 and 2012, and in-depth interviews with eleven key informants were conducted. The study demonstrates that throughout the last decade, institutional changes have been made in regard to the federal management of these programmes (such as recentralisation of the purchasing of medicines). It concludes that these changes can be explained because of the efficiency of the coordinating mechanisms of the Federal Government. These findings reinforce the idea that the Ministry of Health is the main driver of public health policies, and it has opted for the recentralisation of activities as a result of the development project implicit in the agenda of the Industrial and Economic Heal.

  2. Comparison of breath testing with fructose and high fructose corn syrups in health and IBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, S M; Bharucha, A E; Zinsmeister, A R

    2008-05-01

    Although incomplete fructose absorption has been implicated to cause gastrointestinal symptoms, foods containing high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) contain glucose. Glucose increases fructose absorption in healthy subjects. Our hypothesis was that fructose intolerance is less prevalent after HFCS consumption compared to fructose alone in healthy subjects and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Breath hydrogen levels and gastrointestinal symptoms were assessed after 40 g of fructose (12% solution) prepared either in water or as HFCS, administered in double-blind randomized order on 2 days in 20 healthy subjects and 30 patients with IBS. Gastrointestinal symptoms were recorded on 100-mm Visual Analogue Scales. Breath hydrogen excretion was more frequently abnormal (P fructose (68%) than HFCS (26%) in controls and patients. Fructose intolerance (i.e. abnormal breath test and symptoms) was more prevalent after fructose than HFCS in healthy subjects (25% vs. 0%, P = 0.002) and patients (40% vs. 7%, P = 0.062). Scores for several symptoms (e.g. bloating r = 0.35) were correlated (P fructose but not HFCS; in the fructose group, this association did not differ between healthy subjects and patients. Symptoms were not significantly different after fructose compared to HFCS. Fructose intolerance is more prevalent with fructose alone than with HFCS in health and in IBS. The prevalence of fructose intolerance is not significantly different between health and IBS. Current methods for identifying fructose intolerance should be modified to more closely reproduce fructose ingestion in daily life.

  3. Implementation of checklists in health care; learning from high-reliability organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lossius Hans

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Checklists are common in some medical fields, including surgery, intensive care and emergency medicine. They can be an effective tool to improve care processes and reduce mortality and morbidity. Despite the seemingly rapid acceptance and dissemination of the checklist, there are few studies describing the actual process of developing and implementing such tools in health care. The aim of this study is to explore the experiences from checklist development and implementation in a group of non-medical, high reliability organisations (HROs. Method A qualitative study based on key informant interviews and field visits followed by a Delphi approach. Eight informants, each with 10-30 years of checklist experience, were recruited from six different HROs. Results The interviews generated 84 assertions and recommendations for checklist implementation. To achieve checklist acceptance and compliance, there must be a predefined need for which a checklist is considered a well suited solution. The end-users ("sharp-end" are the key stakeholders throughout the development and implementation process. Proximity and ownership must be assured through a thorough and wise process. All informants underlined the importance of short, self-developed, and operationally-suited checklists. Simulation is a valuable and widely used method for training, revision, and validation. Conclusion Checklists have been a cornerstone of safety management in HROs for nearly a century, and are becoming increasingly popular in medicine. Acceptance and compliance are crucial for checklist implementation in health care. Experiences from HROs may provide valuable input to checklist implementation in healthcare.

  4. High Purity Germanium Detector as part of Health Canada's Mobile Nuclear Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stocki, Trevor J.; Bouchard, Claude; Rollings, John; Boudreau, Marc-Oliver; McCutcheon- Wickham, Rory; Bergman, Lauren [Radiation Protection Bureau, Health Canada, AL6302D, 775 Brookfield Road, Ottawa, K1A 0K9 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    In the event of a nuclear emergency on Canadian soil, Health Canada has designed and equipped two Mobile Nuclear Labs (MNLs) which can be deployed near a radiological accident site to provide radiological measurement capabilities. These measurements would help public authorities to make informed decisions for radiation protection recommendations. One of the MNLs has been outfitted with a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector within a lead castle, which can be used for identification as well as quantification of gamma emitting radioisotopes in contaminated soil, water, and other samples. By spring 2014, Health Canada's second MNL will be equipped with a similar detector to increase sample analysis capacity and also provide redundancy if one of the detectors requires maintenance. The Mobile Nuclear Lab (MNL) with the HPGe detector has been successfully deployed in the field for various exercises. One of these field exercises was a dirty bomb scenario where an unknown radioisotope required identification. A second exercise was an inter-comparison between the measurements of spiked soil and water samples, by two field teams and a certified laboratory. A third exercise was the deployment of the MNL as part of a full scale nuclear exercise simulating an emergency at a Canadian nuclear power plant. The lessons learned from these experiences will be discussed. (authors)

  5. Association of Playing High School Football With Cognition and Mental Health Later in Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Sameer K; Hasegawa, Raiden B; Rabinowitz, Amanda R; Whyte, John; Roan, Carol L; Tabatabaei, Andrew; Baiocchi, Michael; Karlawish, Jason H; Master, Christina L; Small, Dylan S

    2017-08-01

    American football is the largest participation sport in US high schools and is a leading cause of concussion among adolescents. Little is known about the long-term cognitive and mental health consequences of exposure to football-related head trauma at the high school level. To estimate the association of playing high school football with cognitive impairment and depression at 65 years of age. A representative sample of male high school students who graduated from high school in Wisconsin in 1957 was studied. In this cohort study using data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, football players were matched between March 1 and July 1, 2017, with controls along several baseline covariates such as adolescent IQ, family background, and educational level. For robustness, 3 versions of the control condition were considered: all controls, those who played a noncollision sport, and those who did not play any sport. Athletic participation in high school football. A composite cognition measure of verbal fluency and memory and attention constructed from results of cognitive assessments administered at 65 years of age. A modified Center for Epidemiological Studies' Depression Scale score was used to measure depression. Secondary outcomes include results of individual cognitive tests, anger, anxiety, hostility, and heavy use of alcohol. Among the 3904 men (mean [SD] age, 64.4 [0.8] years at time of primary outcome measurement) in the study, after matching and model-based covariate adjustment, compared with each control condition, there was no statistically significant harmful association of playing football with a reduced composite cognition score (-0.04 reduction in cognition vs all controls; 97.5% CI, -0.14 to 0.05) or an increased modified Center for Epidemiological Studies' Depression Scale depression score (-1.75 reduction vs all controls; 97.5% CI, -3.24 to -0.26). After adjustment for multiple testing, playing football did not have a significant adverse association with

  6. Sleep health, messaging, headaches, and academic performance in high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecor, Keith; Kang, Lilia; Henderson, Matthew; Yin, Sunny; Radhakrishnan, Varsha; Ming, Xue

    2016-06-01

    We tested for associations of bedtime, sleep duration, instant messaging, and chronic headaches with hypersomnolence and academic performance in a sample of high school students in New Jersey, USA. Students were surveyed anonymously and asked to report their sleep and messaging habits, headache status, and overall grades. We found that greater hypersomnolence was associated with later bedtimes, shorter sleep durations, and the presence of chronic headaches, but not with messaging after lights out. Also, we found that academic performance was lower in students who messaged after lights out, but it was not affected by headache status, bedtime, or sleep duration. These results are consistent with other studies that have demonstrated associations between headaches and hypersomnolence and between instant messaging habits and academic performance. They also add to a growing literature on the relationships among use of electronic devices, sleep health, and academic performance by adolescents. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. High Health Care Utilization Preceding Diagnosis of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Joyce C; Mandell, David S; Knight, Andrea M

    2017-12-01

    Childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with high risk for organ damage, which may be mitigated by early diagnosis and treatment. We characterized health care utilization for youth in the year preceding SLE diagnosis compared to controls. Using Clinformatics ™ DataMart (OptumInsight, Eden Prairie, MN) de-identified administrative data from 2000 to 2013, we identified 682 youth ages 10-24 years with new-onset SLE (≥3 International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9) codes for SLE 710.0, each >30 days apart), and 1,364 age and sex-matched healthy controls. We compared the incidence of ambulatory, emergency, and inpatient visits 12 months before SLE diagnosis, and frequency of primary diagnoses. We examined subject characteristics associated with utilization preceding SLE diagnosis. Youth with SLE had significantly more visits in the year preceding diagnosis than controls across ambulatory (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 2.48, p<0.001), emergency (IRR 3.42, p<0.001) and inpatient settings (IRR 3.02, p<0.001). The most frequent acute care diagnoses and median days to SLE diagnosis were: venous thromboembolism (313, interquartile range (IQR) 18-356), thrombocytopenia (278, IQR 39-354), chest pain (73, IQR 29.5-168), fever (52, IQR 17-166), and acute kidney failure (14, IQR 5-168). Having a psychiatric diagnosis prior to SLE diagnosis was strongly associated with increased utilization across all settings. Youth with SLE have high health care utilization throughout the year preceding SLE diagnosis. Examining variable diagnostic trajectories of youth presenting for acute care preceding SLE diagnosis, and increased attention to psychiatric morbidity may help improve care for youth with new-onset SLE. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  8. Examining gender equity in health policies in a low- (Peru), middle- (Colombia), and high- (Canada) income country in the Americas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Donna E; Dorado, Linda M; Diaz-Granados, Natalia; Rondon, Marta; Saavedra, Javier; Posada-Villa, Jose; Torres, Yolanda

    2009-12-01

    Gender inequities in health prevail in most countries despite ongoing attempts to eliminate them. Assessment of gender-sensitive health policies can be used to identify country specific progress as well as gaps and issues that need to be addressed to meet health equity goals. This study selected and measured the existence of gender-sensitive health policies in a low- (Peru), middle- (Colombia), and high (Canada)-income country in the Americas. Investigators selected 10 of 20 gender-sensitive health policy indicators and found eight to be feasible to measure in all three countries, although the wording and scope varied. The results from this study inform policy makers and program planners who aim to develop, improve, implement, and monitor national gender-sensitive health policies. Future studies should assess the implementation of policy indicators within countries and assess their performance in increasing gender equity.

  9. Families at financial risk due to high ratio of out-of-pocket health care expenditures to total income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Kevin J; Dismuke, Clara E

    2010-05-01

    High out-of-pocket expenditures for health care can put individuals and families at financial risk. Several groups, including racial/ethnic minority groups, the uninsured, rural residents, and those in poorer health are at risk for this increased burden. The analysis utilized 2004-2005 MEPS data. The dependent variables were the out-of-pocket health care spending to total income ratios for total spending, office-based visits, and prescription drugs. Multivariate analyses with instrumental variables controlled for respondent characteristics. Gender, age, rurality, insurance coverage, health status, and health care utilization were all associated with higher out-of-pocket to income ratios. Certain groups, such as women, the elderly, those in poor health, and rural residents, are at a greater financial risk due to their higher out-of-pocket to total income spending ratios. Policymakers must be aware of these increased risks in order to provide adequate resources and targeted interventions to alleviate some of this burden.

  10. Examination of an eHealth literacy scale and a health literacy scale in a population with moderate to high cardiovascular risk: Rasch analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah S Richtering

    Full Text Available Electronic health (eHealth strategies are evolving making it important to have valid scales to assess eHealth and health literacy. Item response theory methods, such as the Rasch measurement model, are increasingly used for the psychometric evaluation of scales. This paper aims to examine the internal construct validity of an eHealth and health literacy scale using Rasch analysis in a population with moderate to high cardiovascular disease risk.The first 397 participants of the CONNECT study completed the electronic health Literacy Scale (eHEALS and the Health Literacy Questionnaire (HLQ. Overall Rasch model fit as well as five key psychometric properties were analysed: unidimensionality, response thresholds, targeting, differential item functioning and internal consistency.The eHEALS had good overall model fit (χ2 = 54.8, p = 0.06, ordered response thresholds, reasonable targeting and good internal consistency (person separation index (PSI 0.90. It did, however, appear to measure two constructs of eHealth literacy. The HLQ subscales (except subscale 5 did not fit the Rasch model (χ2: 18.18-60.60, p: 0.00-0.58 and had suboptimal targeting for most subscales. Subscales 6 to 9 displayed disordered thresholds indicating participants had difficulty distinguishing between response options. All subscales did, nonetheless, demonstrate moderate to good internal consistency (PSI: 0.62-0.82.Rasch analyses demonstrated that the eHEALS has good measures of internal construct validity although it appears to capture different aspects of eHealth literacy (e.g. using eHealth and understanding eHealth. Whilst further studies are required to confirm this finding, it may be necessary for these constructs of the eHEALS to be scored separately. The nine HLQ subscales were shown to measure a single construct of health literacy. However, participants' scores may not represent their actual level of ability, as distinction between response categories was unclear for

  11. Health financing in Africa: overview of a dialogue among high level policy makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambo, Luis Gomes; Kirigia, Joses Muthuri; Ki-Zerbo, Georges

    2011-06-13

    Even though Africa has the highest disease burden compared with other regions, it has the lowest per capita spending on health. In 2007, 27 (51%) out the 53 countries spent less than US$50 per person on health. Almost 30% of the total health expenditure came from governments, 50% from private sources (of which 71% was from out-of-pocket payments by households) and 20% from donors. The purpose of this article is to reflect on the proceedings of the African Union Side Event on Health Financing in the African continent. Methods employed in the session included presentations, panel discussion and open public discussion with ministers of health and finance from the African continent. The current unsatisfactory state of health financing was attributed to lack of clear vision and plan for health financing; lack of national health accounts and other evidence to guide development and implementation of national health financing policies and strategies; low investments in sectors that address social determinants of health; predominance of out-of-pocket spending; underdeveloped prepaid health financing mechanisms; large informal sectors vis-à-vis small formal sectors; and unpredictability and non-alignment of majority of donor funds with national health priorities.Countries need to develop and adopt a comprehensive national health policy and a costed strategic plan; a comprehensive evidence-based health financing strategy; allocate at least 15% of the national budget to health development; use GFATM and PEPFAR funds for health systems strengthening; strengthen intersectoral collaboration to address health determinants; advocate among donors to implement the Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness and its Accra Agenda for Action; ensure universal access to health services for pregnant women, lactating mothers and children aged under five years; strengthen financial management capacities; and develop prepaid health financing systems, especially health insurance to complement tax

  12. Introducing high-cost health care to patients: dentists' accounts of offering dental implant treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernazza, Christopher R; Rousseau, Nikki; Steele, Jimmy G; Ellis, Janice S; Thomason, John Mark; Eastham, Jane; Exley, Catherine

    2015-02-01

    The decision-making process within health care has been widely researched, with shared decision-making, where both patients and clinicians share technical and personal information, often being cited as the ideal model. To date, much of this research has focused on systems where patients receive their care and treatment free at the point of contact (either in government-funded schemes or in insurance-based schemes). Oral health care often involves patients making direct payments for their care and treatment, and less is known about how this payment affects the decision-making process. It is clear that patient characteristics influence decision-making, but previous evidence suggests that clinicians may assume characteristics rather than eliciting them directly. The aim was to explore the influences on how dentists' engaged in the decision-making process surrounding a high-cost item of health care, dental implant treatments (DITs). A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews was undertaken using a purposive sample of primary care dentists (n = 25). Thematic analysis was undertaken to reveal emerging key themes. There were differences in how dentists discussed and offered implants. Dentists made decisions about whether to offer implants based on business factors, professional and legal obligations and whether they perceived the patient to be motivated to have treatment and their ability to pay. There was evidence that assessment of these characteristics was often based on assumptions derived from elements such as the appearance of the patient, the state of the patient's mouth and demographic details. The data suggest that there is a conflict between three elements of acting as a healthcare professional: minimizing provision of unneeded treatment, trying to fully involve patients in shared decisions and acting as a business person with the potential for financial gain. It might be expected that in the context of a high-cost healthcare intervention for which

  13. East Los High: Transmedia Edutainment to Promote the Sexual and Reproductive Health of Young Latina/o Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Latina/o Americans are at high risk for sexually transmitted infections and adolescent pregnancies. Needed urgently are innovative health promotion approaches that are engaging and culturally sensitive. East Los High is a transmedia edutainment program aimed at young Latina/o Americans. It embeds educational messages in entertainment narratives across digital platforms to promote sexual and reproductive health. We employed online analytics tracking (2013–2014), an online viewer survey (2013), and a laboratory experiment (El Paso, TX, 2014) for season 1 program evaluation. We found that East Los High had a wide audience reach, strong viewer engagement, and a positive cognitive, emotional, and social impact on sexual and reproductive health communication and education. Culturally sensitive transmedia edutainment programs are a promising health promotion strategy for minority populations and warrant further investigation. PMID:27077336

  14. Family socioeconomic status, family health, and changes in students' math achievement across high school: A mediational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Ashley Brooke

    2015-09-01

    In response to recent calls to integrate understandings of socioeconomic disparities in health with understandings of socioeconomic disparities in academic achievement, this study tested a mediational model whereby family socioeconomic status predicted gains in academic achievement across high school through its impact on both student and parent health. Data on over 8000 high school students in the U.S. were obtained from wave 1 (2009-2010) and wave 2 (2012) of the High School Longitudinal Study of 2009 (HSLS:09), and structural equation modeling with latent difference scores was used to determine the role of family health problems in mediating the well-established link between family SES and gains in academic achievement. Using both static and dynamic indicators of family SES, support was found for this mediational model. Higher family SES in 9th grade reduced the probability of students and their parents experiencing a serious health problem in high school, thereby promoting growth in academic achievement. In addition, parent and student health problems mediated the effect of changes in family SES across high school on math achievement gains. Results emphasize the importance of considering the dynamic nature of SES and that both student and parent health should be considered in understanding SES-related disparities in academic achievement. This relational process provides new mechanisms for understanding the intergenerational transmission of socioeconomic status and the status attainment process more broadly. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Influencing College and Higher Education Choices in Disadvantaged Hispanic High School Students Through a School-Based Health Club.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harsimran; Matza, Maria; Latham, Christine

    2017-06-01

    Statistics representing professional health care providers do not adequately reflect the shift in the nation's diverse population. Latinos are significantly underrepresented at all levels of appropriate academic programs critical for entry to health profession careers. This project describes the implementation of a student-run, faculty-facilitated Future Nurse and Health Club at a school (with majority Latino students) to emphasize the importance of higher education in health care. Demographic and psychosocial profiles of club members were also developed to understand community needs. The Future Nurse and Health Club was established in partnership with faculty and researchers representing a university-based nursing program, school officials, and community leaders. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected from club members and their parents using a variety of techniques including questionnaires and focus groups. The findings of the study highlighted a variety of student- and parent-related factors including poor lifestyle habits and perceptions of support that could potentially influence Latino high school students' interest and progress in health care-related higher education. A school-based health career club involving active participation of parents and students with support from health care professionals such as academic nursing faculty has the potential to simultaneously raise student interest in health-related careers and health needs of their community.

  16. National trends in the cost of employer health insurance coverage, 2003-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sara R; Radley, David C; Schoen, Cathy; Beutel, Sophie

    2014-12-01

    Looking at trends in private employer-based health insurance from 2003 to 2013, this issue brief finds that premiums for family coverage increased 73 percent over the past decade--faster than median family income. Employees' contributions to their premiums climbed by 93 percent over that time frame. At the same time, deductibles more than doubled in both large and small firms. Workers are thus paying more but getting less protective benefits. However, the study also finds that while premiums continued to rise through 2013, the rate of growth slowed between 2010 and 2013, following implementation of the Affordable Care Act. While families experienced slower growth in premium contributions and deductibles over this period, sluggish growth in median family income means families are paying more in premiums and deductibles as a share of their income than ever before.

  17. Health behaviors and personality in burnout: a third dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama M. Mustafa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The high prevalence of burnout among healthcare professionals warrants a thorough examination aimed at improving the current understanding of its predictors and preventive measures. Cecil et al. have underscored the alarming prevalence of burnout among medical students and assessed its association with demographic, lifestyle, and behavioral factors. Of interest, health behaviors were found to be predictive of burnout. The study suggests certain behaviors (such as high physical activity to be protective, and thus, calls for their establishment early in college life to prevent the development of this professionally-disabling mental state. Although the adoption of advisable health behaviors may independently reduce the risk of burnout, recognition of the existence and influence of closely related factors allows for an enhanced understanding and a greater precision for any conclusions to be made. Personality, through deductive and inductive reasoning, is likely to exert significant influence on both the student's behavior and his/her susceptibility to burnout. Thus, with personality representing – in and of itself – a principal model for prediction of burnout risk, controlling for personality traits when addressing health behaviors’ influence per se on burnout is essential.

  18. Comparative Study of Mental Health of High School Teachers and Educational Counselors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Shakiba

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Teachers have an important effect on mental health and development of students. Teaching and counseling may be stressful jobs. The objective of this study was to compare psychological status of high school teachers and educational counselors measured by the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI.Materials and Method: In a cross-sectional study 60 teachers (20 male and 40 female and 60 educational counselors (20 male and 40 female from high schools of Zahedan city were recruited randomly and asked to complete Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (Iranian short form of MMPI. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and t test.Results: The results showed significant differences between teachers and educational counselors in 6 clinical scales of MMPI so that the teachers had higher scores than educational counselors in D (depression, Pd (psychopathy, Pa (paranoid, Pt (Psychastenia, Sc (schizophrenia and Ma (hypomania scales of MMPI. Mean scores of Male counselors in hysteria and psychopathy were higher than female's scores and also female teachers had higher mean scores in hypochondria, hysteria, paranoid, psychastenia and schizophrenia than male teachers.Conclusion: Although the profiles of both teachers and educational counselors were normal but teachers had higher mean scores than counselors, thus, efforts need to be made to explore possible factors associated to those differences

  19. Academic health centers on the front lines: survival strategies in highly competitive markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, D; Weissman, J S; Griner, P F

    1999-09-01

    The authors describe approaches that five academic health centers (AHCs) have taken to reduce costs, enhance quality, or improve their market positions since the onset of price competition and managed care. The five AHCs, all on the West Coast, were selected for study because they (1) are located in markets that had been highly competitive for the longest time; (2) are committed to all the major missions of AHCs; and (3) own or substantially control their major clinical teaching facilities. The study findings reflect the status of the five AHCs during the fall of 1998. Although some findings may no longer be current (especially in light of ongoing implementation of the Balanced Budget Act of 1997), they still provide insights into the options and opportunities available to many AHCs in highly competitive markets. The authors report on the institutions' financial viability (positive), levels of government support (advantageous), and competition from other AHCs (modest). They outline the study AHCs' survival strategies in three broad areas: increasing revenues via exploiting market niches, reducing costs, and reorganizing to improve internal governance and decision making. They also report how marketplace competition and the strategies the AHCs used to confront it have affected the AHCs' missions. The authors summarize the outstanding lessons that all AHCs can learn from the experiences of the AHCs studied, although adding that AHCs in other parts of the country should use caution in looking to the West Coast AHCs for answers.

  20. Butyrate, neuroepigenetics and the gut microbiome: Can a high fiber diet improve brain health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourassa, Megan W; Alim, Ishraq; Bultman, Scott J; Ratan, Rajiv R

    2016-06-20

    As interest in the gut microbiome has grown in recent years, attention has turned to the impact of our diet on our brain. The benefits of a high fiber diet in the colon have been well documented in epidemiological studies, but its potential impact on the brain has largely been understudied. Here, we will review evidence that butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) produced by bacterial fermentation of fiber in the colon, can improve brain health. Butyrate has been extensively studied as a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor but also functions as a ligand for a subset of G protein-coupled receptors and as an energy metabolite. These diverse modes of action make it well suited for solving the wide array of imbalances frequently encountered in neurological disorders. In this review, we will integrate evidence from the disparate fields of gastroenterology and neuroscience to hypothesize that the metabolism of a high fiber diet in the gut can alter gene expression in the brain to prevent neurodegeneration and promote regeneration. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.