WorldWideScience

Sample records for high core electron

  1. Effects of Electron Screening on Electron Capture Rates in High Density Presupernova Core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋广飞; 彭秋和; 邹志刚

    2003-01-01

    Considering that the electron capture rate can be greatly reduced by the electron screening effect in the regime of high temperature and high density, we calculate the effect of electron screening on the electron capture rate for two important elements 56Ni and 55Co in the high density condition of a pre-supernova star. The effect of electron screening is so effective that the electron capture rate may be reduced to about 20%.

  2. Attosecond pulses at kiloelectronvolt photon energies from high-order harmonic generation with core electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Buth, Christian; Ullrich, Joachim; Keitel, Christoph H; Hatsagortsyan, Karen Z

    2013-01-01

    High-order harmonic generation (HHG) in simultaneous intense near-infrared (NIR) laser light and brilliant x rays above an inner-shell absorption edge is examined. A tightly bound inner-shell electron is transferred into the continuum. Then, NIR light takes over and drives the liberated electron through the continuum until it eventually returns to the cation leading in some cases to recombination and emission of a high-harmonic photon that is upshifted by the x-ray photon energy. We develop a theory of this scenario and apply it to 1s electrons of neon atoms. The boosted high-harmonic light is used to generate a single attosecond pulse in the kiloelectronvolt regime. Prospects for nonlinear x-ray physics and HHG-based spectroscopy involving core orbitals are discussed.

  3. High mass-resolution electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core-excited organic molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Tokushima, T; Senba, Y; Yoshida, H; Hiraya, A

    2001-01-01

    Total electron-ion-ion coincidence measurements on core excited organic molecules have been carried out with high mass resolution by using multimode (reflectron/linear) time-of-flight mass analyzer. From the ion correlation spectra of core excited CH sub 3 OH and CD sub 3 OH, the reaction pathway to form H sub 3 sup + (D sub 3 sup +) is identified as the elimination of three H (D) atoms from the methyl group, not as the inter-group (-CH sub 3 and -OH) interactions. In a PEPIPICO spectrum of acetylacetone (CH sub 3 COCH sub 2 COCH sub 3) measured by using a reflectron TOF, correlations between ions up to mass number 70 with one-mass resolution was recorded.

  4. High-performance polyimide nanocomposites with core-shell AgNWs@BN for electronic packagings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongcun; Liu, Feng

    2016-08-01

    The increasing density of electronic devices underscores the need for efficient thermal management. Silver nanowires (AgNWs), as one-dimensional nanostructures, possess a high aspect ratio and intrinsic thermal conductivity. However, high electrical conductivity of AgNWs limits their application for electronic packaging. We synthesized boron nitride-coated silver nanowires (AgNWs@BN) using a flexible and fast method followed by incorporation into synthetic polyimide (PI) for enhanced thermal conductivity and dielectric properties of nanocomposites. The thinner boron nitride intermediate nanolayer on AgNWs not only alleviated the mismatch between AgNWs and PI but also enhanced their interfacial interaction. Hence, the maximum thermal conductivity of an AgNWs@BN/PI composite with a filler loading up to 20% volume was increased to 4.33 W/m K, which is an enhancement by nearly 23.3 times compared with that of the PI matrix. The relative permittivity and dielectric loss were about 9.89 and 0.015 at 1 MHz, respectively. Compared with AgNWs@SiO2/PI and Ag@BN/PI composites, boron nitride-coated core-shell structures effectively increased the thermal conductivity and reduced the permittivity of nanocomposites. The relative mechanism was studied and discussed. This study enables the identification of appropriate modifier fillers for polymer matrix nanocomposites.

  5. High-performance polyimide nanocomposites with core-shell AgNWs@BN for electronic packagings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yongcun; Liu, Feng, E-mail: liufeng@nwpu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an Shaanxi 710072 (China)

    2016-08-22

    The increasing density of electronic devices underscores the need for efficient thermal management. Silver nanowires (AgNWs), as one-dimensional nanostructures, possess a high aspect ratio and intrinsic thermal conductivity. However, high electrical conductivity of AgNWs limits their application for electronic packaging. We synthesized boron nitride-coated silver nanowires (AgNWs@BN) using a flexible and fast method followed by incorporation into synthetic polyimide (PI) for enhanced thermal conductivity and dielectric properties of nanocomposites. The thinner boron nitride intermediate nanolayer on AgNWs not only alleviated the mismatch between AgNWs and PI but also enhanced their interfacial interaction. Hence, the maximum thermal conductivity of an AgNWs@BN/PI composite with a filler loading up to 20% volume was increased to 4.33 W/m K, which is an enhancement by nearly 23.3 times compared with that of the PI matrix. The relative permittivity and dielectric loss were about 9.89 and 0.015 at 1 MHz, respectively. Compared with AgNWs@SiO{sub 2}/PI and Ag@BN/PI composites, boron nitride-coated core-shell structures effectively increased the thermal conductivity and reduced the permittivity of nanocomposites. The relative mechanism was studied and discussed. This study enables the identification of appropriate modifier fillers for polymer matrix nanocomposites.

  6. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F.; Arellano-Jiménez, M. Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T.; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-04-01

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Formation of amyloid-β plaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles.

  7. High-resolution analytical imaging and electron holography of magnetite particles in amyloid cores of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ponce, Arturo; Collingwood, Joanna F; Arellano-Jiménez, M Josefina; Zhu, Xiongwei; Rogers, Jack T; Betancourt, Israel; José-Yacamán, Miguel; Perry, George

    2016-04-28

    Abnormal accumulation of brain metals is a key feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Formation of amyloid-β plaque cores (APC) is related to interactions with biometals, especially Fe, Cu and Zn, but their particular structural associations and roles remain unclear. Using an integrative set of advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, including spherical aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (Cs-STEM), nano-beam electron diffraction, electron holography and analytical spectroscopy techniques (EDX and EELS), we demonstrate that Fe in APC is present as iron oxide (Fe3O4) magnetite nanoparticles. Here we show that Fe was accumulated primarily as nanostructured particles within APC, whereas Cu and Zn were distributed through the amyloid fibers. Remarkably, these highly organized crystalline magnetite nanostructures directly bound into fibrillar Aβ showed characteristic superparamagnetic responses with saturated magnetization with circular contours, as observed for the first time by off-axis electron holography of nanometer scale particles.

  8. Guiding and collimating the fast electrons by using a low-density-core target with buried high density layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chong; Wan, Feng; Hou, Ya-Juan; Jia, Mo-Ran; Sang, Hai-Bo; Xie, Bai-Song; Liu, Shi-Bing

    2017-02-01

    A low-density-core target with buried high density layers is proposed to improve the transport of fast electrons and involved problems are investigated by using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. It is demonstrated that this target can collimate the fast electrons efficiently and lead to a better beam quality. The enhancement is attributed to the weakening of the two stream instability and the better collimation by the self-generated multilayer megagauss magnetic field as well as the baroclinic magnetic field. Comparing this to that without buried high density layers, the energy flux of fast electrons is increased by a factor of about 1.8 and has a narrower transverse distribution in space. Besides, the dependence of the efficiency on the target parameters is examined, and the optimal target parameters are also obtained. Such a target can be useful to many applications, such as fast ignition in inertial fusion.

  9. Core-electron effect in state-selective electron capture collisions of highly charged ions with alkali-metal atom targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascale, J. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. de Recherche sur l`Etat Condense, les Atomes et les Molecules; Jacquet, E. [Caen Univ., 14 (France). Lab. de Spectroscopie Atomique

    1994-12-31

    We study both experimentally and theoretically the influence of the projectile core electrons on the single electron capture process, in medium-energy collisions of partially stripped ions with ground-state alkali-metal atom targets. The effect is clearly demonstrated in the final nl-distributions of the capture electron in Ar{sup 8+} - and Kr{sup 8+} - Li(2s) collisions, by comparisons of experimental data with three-body classical trajectory Monte-Carlo (CTMC) calculations performed for these ions, and also for Ne{sup 8+} and O{sup 8+}. The effect manifests itself by a significant population of low l-values which does not show up in the case of fully or nearly fully stripped ions; it is strongly energy dependent and vanishes at high energies. The CTMC calculations show also a clear influence of the core electrons on the m-distribution of a given final n-level. (authors). 15 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. ELECTRON-CAPTURE AND β-DECAY RATES FOR sd-SHELL NUCLEI IN STELLAR ENVIRONMENTS RELEVANT TO HIGH-DENSITY O–NE–MG CORES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Toshio [Department of Physics and Graduate School of Integrated Basic Sciences, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Toki, Hiroshi [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Nomoto, Ken’ichi, E-mail: suzuki@phys.chs.nihon-u.ac.jp [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2016-02-01

    Electron-capture and β-decay rates for nuclear pairs in the sd-shell are evaluated at high densities and high temperatures relevant to the final evolution of electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg cores of stars with initial masses of 8–10 M{sub ⊙}. Electron capture induces a rapid contraction of the electron-degenerate O–Ne–Mg core. The outcome of rapid contraction depends on the evolutionary changes in the central density and temperature, which are determined by the competing processes of contraction, cooling, and heating. The fate of the stars is determined by these competitions, whether they end up with electron-capture supernovae or Fe core-collapse supernovae. Since the competing processes are induced by electron capture and β-decay, the accurate weak rates are crucially important. The rates are obtained for pairs with A = 20, 23, 24, 25, and 27 by shell-model calculations in the sd-shell with the USDB Hamiltonian. Effects of Coulomb corrections on the rates are evaluated. The rates for pairs with A = 23 and 25 are important for nuclear Urca processes that determine the cooling rate of the O–Ne–Mg core, while those for pairs with A = 20 and 24 are important for the core contraction and heat generation rates in the core. We provide these nuclear rates at stellar environments in tables with fine enough meshes at various densities and temperatures for studies of astrophysical processes sensitive to the rates. In particular, the accurate rate tables are crucially important for the final fates of not only O–Ne–Mg cores but also a wider range of stars, such as C–O cores of lower-mass stars.

  11. Relativistic frozen core potential scheme with relaxation of core electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Yuya; Seino, Junji; Hayami, Masao; Nakai, Hiromi

    2016-10-01

    This letter proposes a relaxation scheme for core electrons based on the frozen core potential method at the infinite-order Douglas-Kroll-Hess level, called FCP-CR. The core electrons are self-consistently relaxed using frozen molecular valence potentials after the valence SCF calculation is performed. The efficiency of FCP-CR is confirmed by calculations of gold clusters. Furthermore, FCP-CR reproduces the results of the all-electron method for the energies of coinage metal dimers and the core ionization energies and core level shifts of vinyl acetate and three tungsten complexes at the Hartree-Fock and/or symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction levels.

  12. Electron capture and beta-decay rates for sd-shell nuclei in stellar environments relevant to high density O-Ne-Mg cores

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Toshio; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2015-01-01

    Electron capture and beta-decay rates for nuclear pairs in sd-shell are evaluated at high densities and high temperatures relevant to the final evolution of electron-degenerate O-Ne-Mg cores of stars with the initial masses of 8-10 solar mass. Electron capture induces a rapid contraction of the electron-degenerate O-Ne-Mg core. The outcome of rapid contraction depends on the evolutionary changes in the central density and temperature, which are determined by the competing processes of contraction, cooling, and heating. The fate of the stars are determined by these competitions, whether they end up with electron-capture supernovae or Fe core-collapse supernovae. Since the competing processes are induced by electron capture and beta-decay, the accurate weak rates are crucially important. The rates are obtained for pairs with A=20, 23, 24, 25 and 27 by shell-model calculations in sd-shell with the USDB Hamiltonian. Effects of Coulomb corrections on the rates are evaluated. The rates for pairs with A=23 and 25 ar...

  13. The role of symmetry in the theory of inelastic high-energy electron scattering and its application to atomic-resolution core-loss imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, C

    2015-04-01

    The inelastic scattering of a high-energy electron in a solid constitutes a bipartite quantum system with an intrinsically large number of excitations, posing a considerable challenge for theorists. It is demonstrated how and why the utilization of symmetries, or approximate symmetries, can lead to significant improvements in both the description of the scattering physics and the efficiency of numerical computations. These ideas are explored thoroughly for the case of core-loss excitations, where it is shown that the coupled angular momentum basis leads to dramatic improvements over the bases employed in previous work. The resulting gains in efficiency are demonstrated explicitly for K-, L- and M-shell excitations, including such excitations in the context of atomic-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope. The utilization of other symmetries is also discussed.

  14. The role of symmetry in the theory of inelastic high-energy electron scattering and its application to atomic-resolution core-loss imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, C., E-mail: c.dwyer@fz-juelich.de [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons, Jülich D-52425 (Germany); Peter Grünberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Jülich, Jülich D-52425 (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    The inelastic scattering of a high-energy electron in a solid constitutes a bipartite quantum system with an intrinsically large number of excitations, posing a considerable challenge for theorists. It is demonstrated how and why the utilization of symmetries, or approximate symmetries, can lead to significant improvements in both the description of the scattering physics and the efficiency of numerical computations. These ideas are explored thoroughly for the case of core-loss excitations, where it is shown that the coupled angular momentum basis leads to dramatic improvements over the bases employed in previous work. The resulting gains in efficiency are demonstrated explicitly for K-, L- and M-shell excitations, including such excitations in the context of atomic-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope. The utilization of other symmetries is also discussed. - Highlights: • It is explained how and why symmetry improves the efficiency of inelastic scattering calculations in general. • This includes approximate symmetries, which are often easier to specify. • Specific examples are given for core-loss scattering in STEM. • The utilization of approximate symmetries associated with ELNES, the detector geometry, and the energy loss are also discussed.

  15. Positron annihilation with core and valence electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Green, D G

    2015-01-01

    $\\gamma$-ray spectra for positron annihilation with the core and valence electrons of the noble gas atoms Ar, Kr and Xe is calculated within the framework of diagrammatic many-body theory. The effect of positron-atom and short-range positron-electron correlations on the annihilation process is examined in detail. Short-range correlations, which are described through non-local corrections to the vertex of the annihilation amplitude, are found to significantly enhance the spectra for annihilation on the core orbitals. For Ar, Kr and Xe, the core contributions to the annihilation rate are found to be 0.55\\%, 1.5\\% and 2.2\\% respectively, their small values reflecting the difficulty for the positron to probe distances close to the nucleus. Importantly however, the core subshells have a broad momentum distribution and markedly contribute to the annihilation spectra at Doppler energy shifts $\\gtrsim3$\\,keV, and even dominate the spectra of Kr and Xe at shifts $\\gtrsim5$\\,keV. Their inclusion brings the theoretical ...

  16. Encoding the core electrons with graph concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogliani, Lionello

    2004-01-01

    The core electron problem of atoms in chemical graph studies has always been considered as a minor problem. Usually, chemical graphs had to encode just a small set of second row atoms, i.e., C, N, O, and F, thus, graph and, in some cases, pseudograph concepts were enough to "graph" encode the molecules at hand. Molecular connectivity theory, together with its side-branch the electrotopological state, introduced two "ad hoc" algorithms for the core electrons of higher-row atoms based, mainly, on quantum concepts alike. Recently, complete graphs, and, especially, odd complete graphs have been introduced to encode the core electrons of higher-row atoms. By the aid of these types of graphs a double-valued algorithm has been proposed for the valence delta, deltav, of any type of atoms of the periodic table with a principal quantum number n > or =2. The new algorithm is centered on an invariant suggested by the hand-shaking theorem, and the values it gives rise to parallel in some way the values derived by the aid of the two old "quantum" algorithms. A thorough comparative analysis of the newly proposed algorithms has been undertaken for atoms of the group 1A-7A of the periodic table. This comparative study includes the electronegativity, the size of the atoms, the first ionization energy, and the electron affinity. The given algorithm has also been tested with sequential complete graphs, while the even complete graphs give rise to conceptual difficulties. QSAR/QSPR studies do not show a clear-cut preference for any of the two values the algorithm gives rise to, even if recent results seem to prefer one of the two values.

  17. Surface and Core Electronic Structure of Oxidized Silicon Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor A. Nama

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ab initio restricted Hartree-Fock method within the framework of large unit cell formalism is used to simulate silicon nanocrystals between 216 and 1000 atoms (1.6–2.65 nm in diameter that include Bravais and primitive cell multiples. The investigated properties include core and oxidized surface properties. Results revealed that electronic properties converge to some limit as the size of the nanocrystal increases. Increasing the size of the core of a nanocrystal resulted in an increase of the energy gap, valence band width, and cohesive energy. The lattice constant of the core and oxidized surface parts shows a decreasing trend as the nanocrystal increases in a size that converges to 5.28 Ǻ in a good agreement with the experiment. Surface and core convergence to the same lattice constant reflects good adherence of oxide layer at the surface. The core density of states shows highly degenerate states that split at the oxygenated (001-(1×1 surface due to symmetry breaking. The nanocrystal surface shows smaller gap and higher valence and conduction bands when compared to the core part, due to oxygen surface atoms and reduced structural symmetry. The smaller surface energy gap shows that energy gap of the nanocrystal is controlled by the surface part. Unlike the core part, the surface part shows a descending energy gap that proves its obedience to quantum confinement effects. Nanocrystal geometry proved to have some influence on all electronic properties including the energy gap.

  18. Molecular double core-hole electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Tashiro, Motomichi; Fukuzawa, Hironobu; Ueda, Kiyoshi; Buth, Christian; Kryzhevoi, Nikolai V; Cederbaum, Lorenz S

    2010-01-01

    We explore the potential of double core hole electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis in terms of x-ray two-photon photoelectron spectroscopy (XTPPS). The creation of deep single and double core vacancies induces significant reorganization of valence electrons. The corresponding relaxation energies and the interatomic relaxation energies are evaluated by CASSCF calculations. We propose a method how to experimentally extract these quantities by the measurement of single and double core-hole ionization potentials (IPs and DIPs). The influence of the chemical environment on these DIPs is also discussed for states with two holes at the same atomic site and states with two holes at two different atomic sites. Electron density difference between the ground and double core-hole states clearly shows the relaxations accompanying the double core-hole ionization. The effect is also compared with the sensitivity of single core hole ionization potentials (IPs) arising in single core hole electron spectroscopy. We have ...

  19. High energy electron cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkhomchuk, V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1997-09-01

    High energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. The questions of using electron cooling with and without a magnetic field are presented for discussion at this workshop. The electron cooling method was suggested by G. Budker in the middle sixties. The original idea of the electron cooling was published in 1966. The design activities for the NAP-M project was started in November 1971 and the first run using a proton beam occurred in September 1973. The first experiment with both electron and proton beams was started in May 1974. In this experiment good result was achieved very close to theoretical prediction for a usual two component plasma heat exchange.

  20. High Efficiency Solar Furnace Core Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — It is proposed to develop a high efficiency solar furnace core that greatly lessens the heat losses from the furnace core, either greatly reducing the amount of...

  1. Crystallization in Earth's Core after High-Temperature Core Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, K.; Morard, G.; Hernlund, J. W.; Helffrich, G. R.; Ozawa, H.

    2015-12-01

    Recent core formation models based on the metal-silicate partitioning of siderophile elements suggest that the Earth's core was formed by metal segregation at high pressure and high temperature in a deep magma ocean. It is also thought that the simultaneous solubility of silicon and oxygen in liquid iron are strongly enhanced at high pressure and high temperature, such that at the end of accretion the core was rich in both silicon and oxygen. Here we performed crystallization experiments on the Fe-Si binary and Fe-Si-O ternary systems up to core pressure in a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell. The starting material for the latter was a homogeneous mixture of fine-grain Fe-Si and SiO2 (sustain without extreme degrees of secular cooling. However, even for modest degrees of joint Si-O incorporation into the early core, the buoyancy released by crystallization of SiO2 is sufficient to overcome thermal stratification and sustain the geodynamo.

  2. Magnet-in-the-Semiconductor Nanomaterials: High Electron Mobility in All-Inorganic Arrays of FePt/CdSe and FePt/CdS Core-Shell Heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jae Sung; Lee, Jong-Soo; Shevchenko, Elena V; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2013-06-06

    We report a colloidal synthesis and electrical and magnetotransport properties of multifunctional "magnet-in-the-semiconductor" nanostructures composed of FePt core and CdSe or CdS shell. Thin films of all-inorganic FePt/CdSe and FePt/CdS core-shell nanostructures capped with In2Se4(2-) molecular chalcogenide (MCC) ligands exhibited n-type charge transport with high field-effect electron mobility of 3.4 and 0.02 cm(2)/V·s, respectively. These nanostructures also showed a negative magnetoresistance characteristic for spin-dependent tunneling. We discuss the mechanism of charge transport and gating in the arrays of metal/semiconductor core-shell nanostructures.

  3. High-power electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Kapitsa, Petr Leonidovich

    1966-01-01

    High-Power Electronics, Volume 2 presents the electronic processes in devices of the magnetron type and electromagnetic oscillations in different systems. This book explores the problems of electronic energetics.Organized into 11 chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the motion of electrons in a flat model of the magnetron, taking into account the in-phase wave and the reverse wave. This text then examines the processes of transmission of electromagnetic waves of various polarization and the wave reflection from grids made of periodically distributed infinite metal conductors. Other

  4. Alkylenesulfanyl-bridged bithienyl cores for simultaneous tuning of electronic, filming, and thermal properties of oligothiophenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navacchia, Maria Luisa; Melucci, Manuela; Favaretto, Laura; Zanelli, Alberto; Gazzano, Massimo; Bongini, Alessandro; Barbarella, Giovanna

    2008-09-04

    DPY and DPE alkylenesulfanyl-bridged bithienyls were prepared by a highly effective ring-closing reaction via arylalkylsulfonium intermediate and used as inner cores in oligothiophenes. HOMO-LUMO energy levels, conformational flexibility, and intrinsic asymmetry of the cores are reflected in the electronic, film-forming, and thermal properties of the corresponding oligomers.

  5. Electron energy spectrum in core-shell elliptic quantum wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.Holovatsky

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The electron energy spectrum in core-shell elliptic quantum wire and elliptic semiconductor nanotubes are investigated within the effective mass approximation. The solution of Schrodinger equation based on the Mathieu functions is obtained in elliptic coordinates. The dependencies of the electron size quantization spectrum on the size and shape of the core-shell nanowire and nanotube are calculated. It is shown that the ellipticity of a quantum wire leads to break of degeneration of quasiparticle energy spectrum. The dependences of the energy of odd and even electron states on the ratio between semiaxes are of a nonmonotonous character. The anticrosing effects are observed at the dependencies of electron energy spectrum on the transversal size of the core-shell nanowire.

  6. STRETCHY ELECTRONICS. Hierarchically buckled sheath-core fibers for superelastic electronics, sensors, and muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z F; Fang, S; Moura, F A; Ding, J N; Jiang, N; Di, J; Zhang, M; Lepró, X; Galvão, D S; Haines, C S; Yuan, N Y; Yin, S G; Lee, D W; Wang, R; Wang, H Y; Lv, W; Dong, C; Zhang, R C; Chen, M J; Yin, Q; Chong, Y T; Zhang, R; Wang, X; Lima, M D; Ovalle-Robles, R; Qian, D; Lu, H; Baughman, R H

    2015-07-24

    Superelastic conducting fibers with improved properties and functionalities are needed for diverse applications. Here we report the fabrication of highly stretchable (up to 1320%) sheath-core conducting fibers created by wrapping carbon nanotube sheets oriented in the fiber direction on stretched rubber fiber cores. The resulting structure exhibited distinct short- and long-period sheath buckling that occurred reversibly out of phase in the axial and belt directions, enabling a resistance change of less than 5% for a 1000% stretch. By including other rubber and carbon nanotube sheath layers, we demonstrated strain sensors generating an 860% capacitance change and electrically powered torsional muscles operating reversibly by a coupled tension-to-torsion actuation mechanism. Using theory, we quantitatively explain the complementary effects of an increase in muscle length and a large positive Poisson's ratio on torsional actuation and electronic properties.

  7. Highly efficient perovskite solar cells based on a nanostructured WO3-TiO2 core-shell electron transporting material

    KAUST Repository

    Mahmood, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    Until recently, only mesoporous TiO2 and ZnO were successfully demonstrated as electron transport layers (ETL) alongside the reports of ZrO2 and Al2O3 as scaffold materials in organometal halide perovskite solar cells, largely owing to ease of processing and to high power conversion efficiency. In this article, we explore tungsten trioxide (WO3)-based nanostructured and porous ETL materials directly grown hydrothermally with different morphologies such as nanoparticles, nanorods and nanosheet arrays. The nanostructure morphology strongly influences the photocurrent and efficiency in organometal halide perovskite solar cells. We find that the perovskite solar cells based on WO3 nanosheet arrays yield significantly enhanced photovoltaic performance as compared to nanoparticles and nanorod arrays due to good perovskite absorber infiltration in the porous scaffold and more rapid carrier transport. We further demonstrate that treating the WO3 nanostructures with an aqueous solution of TiCl4 reduces charge recombination at the perovskite/WO3 interface, resulting in the highest power conversion efficiency of 11.24% for devices based on WO3 nanosheet arrays. The successful demonstration of alternative ETL materials and nanostructures based on WO3 will open up new opportunities in the development of highly efficient perovskite solar cells. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  8. High Availability Electronics Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, R.S.; /SLAC

    2006-12-13

    Availability modeling of the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC) predicts unacceptably low uptime with current electronics systems designs. High Availability (HA) analysis is being used as a guideline for all major machine systems including sources, utilities, cryogenics, magnets, power supplies, instrumentation and controls. R&D teams are seeking to achieve total machine high availability with nominal impact on system cost. The focus of this paper is the investigation of commercial standard HA architectures and packaging for Accelerator Controls and Instrumentation. Application of HA design principles to power systems and detector instrumentation are also discussed.

  9. Hollow Electron Beam Collimation for HL-LHC - Effects on the Beam Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitterer, M. [Fermilab; Stancari, G. [Fermilab; Valishev, A. [Fermilab; Bruce, R. [CERN; Papotti, G [CERN; Redaelli, S. [CERN; Valentino, G. [Malta U.; Valentino, G. [CERN; Valuch, D. [CERN; Xu, C. [CERN

    2017-06-13

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is currently one of the most promising concepts for active halo control in the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). To ensure the successful operation of the hollow beam collimator the unwanted effects on the beam core, which might arise from the operation with a pulsed electron beam, must be minimized. This paper gives a summary of the effect of hollow electron lenses on the beam core in terms of sources, provides estimates for HL-LHC and discusses the possible mitigation methods.

  10. Hollow Electron Beam Collimation for HL-LHC - Effects on the Beam Core

    CERN Document Server

    Fitterer, M; Valishev, A; Bruce, R; Papotti, G; Redaelli, S; Valentino, G; Valentino, G; Valuch, D; Xu, C

    2017-01-01

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is currently one of the most promising concepts for active halo control in the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). To ensure the successful operation of the hollow beam collimator the unwanted effects on the beam core, which might arise from the operation with a pulsed electron beam, must be minimized. This paper gives a summary of the effect of hollow electron lenses on the beam core in terms of sources, provides estimates for HL-LHC and discusses the possible mitigation methods.

  11. Investigation of intravalence, core-valence and core-core electron correlation effects in polonium atomic structure calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinet, Pascal

    2014-09-01

    A detailed investigation of the atomic structure and radiative parameters involving the lowest states within the 6p4, 6p36d, 6p37s, 6p37p and 6p37d configurations of neutral polonium is reported in the present paper. Using different physical models based on the pseudo-relativistic Hartree-Fock approach, the influence of intravalence, core-valence and core-core electron correlation on the atomic parameters is discussed in detail. This work allowed us to fix the spectroscopic designation of some experimental level energy values and to provide for the first time a set of reliable oscillator strengths corresponding to 31 Po I spectral lines in the wavelength region from 175 to 987 nm.

  12. Error Analysis of High Frequency Core Loss Measurement for Low-Permeability Low-Loss Magnetic Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niroumand, Farideh Javidi; Nymand, Morten

    2016-01-01

    in magnetic cores is B-H loop measurement where two windings are placed on the core under test. However, this method is highly vulnerable to phase shift error, especially for low-permeability, low-loss cores. Due to soft saturation and very low core loss, low-permeability low-loss magnetic cores are favorable....... The analysis has been validated by experimental measurements for relatively low-loss magnetic cores with different permeability values.......Magnetic components significantly contribute to the dissipated loss in power electronic converters. Measuring the true value of dissipated power in these components is highly desirable, since it can be used to verify the optimum design of these components. The common approach for measuring the loss...

  13. Effects of electron correlations on transport properties of iron at Earth's core conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Cohen, R E; Haule, K

    2015-01-29

    Earth's magnetic field has been thought to arise from thermal convection of molten iron alloy in the outer core, but recent density functional theory calculations have suggested that the conductivity of iron is too high to support thermal convection, resulting in the investigation of chemically driven convection. These calculations for resistivity were based on electron-phonon scattering. Here we apply self-consistent density functional theory plus dynamical mean-field theory (DFT + DMFT) to iron and find that at high temperatures electron-electron scattering is comparable to the electron-phonon scattering, bringing theory into agreement with experiments and solving the transport problem in Earth's core. The conventional thermal dynamo picture is safe. We find that electron-electron scattering of d electrons is important at high temperatures in transition metals, in contrast to textbook analyses since Mott, and that 4s electron contributions to transport are negligible, in contrast to numerous models used for over fifty years. The DFT+DMFT method should be applicable to other high-temperature systems where electron correlations are important.

  14. Synthesis and morphology of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanoparticles produced by high pressure gas condensation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xing, Lijuan; ten Brink, Gert H.; Chen, Bin; Schmidt, Franz P.; Haberfehlner, Georg; Hofer, Ferdinand; Kooi, Bart J.; Palasantzas, Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Core-shell structured Fe nanoparticles (NPs) produced by high pressure magnetron sputtering gas condensation were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, electron diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), tomographic reconstruction, and Wulff shape construction

  15. Flux profile scanners for scattered high-energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, R. S.; Decowski, P.; Arroyo, C.; Breuer, M.; Celli, J.; Chudakov, E.; Kumar, K. S.; Olson, M.; Peterson, G. A.; Pope, K.; Ricci, J.; Savage, J.; Souder, P. A.

    2005-11-01

    The paper describes the design and performance of flux integrating Cherenkov scanners with air-core reflecting light guides used in a high-energy, high-flux electron scattering experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The scanners were highly radiation resistant and provided a good signal to background ratio leading to very good spatial resolution of the scattered electron flux profile scans.

  16. DFT calculation of core-electron binding energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahata, Yuji; Chong, Delano P. E-mail: chong@chem.ubc.ca

    2003-11-01

    A total of 59 core-electron binding energies (CEBEs) were studied with the Amsterdam Density Functional Program (ADF) program and compared with the observed values. The results indicate that a polarized triple-zeta basis set of Slater-type orbitals is adequate for routine assessment of the performance of each method of computation. With such a basis set, seven density functionals were tested. In addition, the performance of 21 energy density functionals were computed from the density calculated with the statistical average of orbital potentials (SAOP). Among all the choices tested, the best density functional for core-electron binding energies of C to F turns out to be the combination of Perdew-Wang (1986) functional for exchange and the Perdew-Wang (1991) functional for correlation, confirming earlier studies based on contracted Gaussian-type orbitals. For this best functional, five Slater-type orbital basis sets were examined, ranging from polarized double-zeta quality to the largest set available in the ADF package. For the best functional with the best basis set, the average absolute deviation (AAD) of the calculated value from experiment is only 0.16 eV.

  17. Electron-ion relaxation in a dense plasma. [supernovae core physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littleton, J. E.; Buchler, J.-R.

    1974-01-01

    The microscopic physics of the thermonuclear runaway in highly degenerate carbon-oxygen cores is investigated to determine if and how a detonation wave is generated. An expression for the electron-ion relaxation time is derived under the assumption of large degeneracy and extreme relativity of the electrons in a two-temperature plasma. Since the nuclear burning time proves to be several orders of magnitude shorter than the relaxation time, it is concluded that in studying the structure of the detonation wave the electrons and ions must be treated as separate fluids.

  18. Experimental core electron density of cubic boron nitride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Nanna; Bindzus, Niels; Bjerg, Lasse

    candidate because of its many similarities with diamond: bonding pattern in the extended network structure, hardness, and the quality of the crystallites.3 However, some degree ionic interaction is a part of the bonding in boron nitride, which is not present in diamond. By investigating the core density...... beyond multipolar modeling of the valence density. As was recently shown in a benchmark study of diamond by Bindzus et al.1 The next step is to investigate more complicated chemical bonding motives, to determine the effect of bonding on the core density. Cubic boron nitride2 lends itself as a perfect...... in boron nitride we may obtain a deeper understanding of the effect of bonding on the total density. We report here a thorough investigation of the charge density of cubic boron nitride with a detailed modelling of the inner atom charge density. By combining high resolution powder X-ray diffraction data...

  19. Scattering of emission lines in galaxy cluster cores: measuring electron temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Khedekar, S; Sazonov, S; Sunyaev, R; Emsellem, E

    2014-01-01

    The central galaxies of some clusters can be strong emitters in the Ly$\\alpha$ and H$\\alpha$ lines. This emission may arise either from the cool/warm gas located in the cool core of the cluster or from the bright AGN within the central galaxy. The luminosities of such lines can be as high as $10^{42} - 10^{44}$ erg/s. This emission originating from the core of the cluster will get Thomson scattered by hot electrons of the intra-cluster medium (ICM) with an optical depth $\\sim$ 0.01 giving rise to very broad ($\\Delta \\lambda / \\lambda \\sim$ 15%) features in the scattered spectrum. We discuss the possibility of measuring the electron density and temperature using information on the flux and width of the highly broadened line features.

  20. Control of Electron Beam Using Strong Magnetic Field for Efficient Core Heating in Fast Ignition

    CERN Document Server

    Johzaki, T; Sentoku, Y; Sunahara, A; Nagatomo, H; Sakagami, H; Mima, K; Fujioka, S; Shiraga, H

    2014-01-01

    For enhancing the core heating efficiency in electron-driven fast ignition, we proposed the fast electron beam guiding using externally applied longitudinal magnetic fields. Based on the PIC simulations for the FIREX-class experiments, we demonstrated the sufficient beam guiding performance in the collisional dense plasma by kT-class external magnetic fields for the case with moderate mirror ratio (~<10 ). Boring of the mirror field was found through the formation of magnetic pipe structure due to the resistive effects, which indicates a possibility of beam guiding in high mirror field for higher laser intensity and/or longer pulse duration.

  1. Theoretical study of core-loss electron energy-loss spectroscopy at graphene nanoribbon edges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, N.; Hasnip, P. J.; Probert, M. I. J.; Yuan, J.

    2015-08-01

    A systematic study of simulated atomic-resolution electronic energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) for different graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) is presented. The results of ab initio studies of carbon 1s core-loss EELS on GNRs with different ribbon edge structures and different hydrogen terminations show that theoretical core-loss EELS can distinguish key structural features at the atomic scale. In addition, the combination of polarized core-loss EELS with symmetry resolved electronic partial density of states calculations can be used to identify the origins of all the primary features in the spectra. For example, the nature of the GNR edge structure (armchair, zigzag, etc) can be identified, along with the degree of hydrogenation. Hence it is possible to use the combination of ab initio calculations with high resolution, high energy transmission core-loss EELS experiments to determine the local atomic arrangement and chemical bonding states (i.e. a structural fingerprint) in GNRs, which is essential for future practical applications of graphene.

  2. Theoretical study of core-loss electron energy-loss spectroscopy at graphene nanoribbon edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, N; Hasnip, P J; Probert, M I J; Yuan, J

    2015-08-01

    A systematic study of simulated atomic-resolution electronic energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) for different graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) is presented. The results of ab initio studies of carbon [Formula: see text] core-loss EELS on GNRs with different ribbon edge structures and different hydrogen terminations show that theoretical core-loss EELS can distinguish key structural features at the atomic scale. In addition, the combination of polarized core-loss EELS with symmetry resolved electronic partial density of states calculations can be used to identify the origins of all the primary features in the spectra. For example, the nature of the GNR edge structure (armchair, zigzag, etc) can be identified, along with the degree of hydrogenation. Hence it is possible to use the combination of ab initio calculations with high resolution, high energy transmission core-loss EELS experiments to determine the local atomic arrangement and chemical bonding states (i.e. a structural fingerprint) in GNRs, which is essential for future practical applications of graphene.

  3. High intensity polarized electron sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, C.K.

    1980-10-01

    The status of the polarized electron source development program at SLAC will be reviewed. Emission currents of 60 A, corresponding to a space charge limited current density of 180 A/cm/sup 2/, have been obtained from GaAs photocathodes. Electron beam polarization 20% greater than that obtainable from GaAs cathodes has been observed from multilayer GaAs-GaAlAs structures. Work in progress to produce high beam polarization from II-IV-V/sub 2/ chalcopyrite photocathodes will also be described.

  4. Core-shell nanowire based electrical surface fastener used for room-temperature electronic packaging bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Ju, Yang; Hosoi, Atsushi

    2014-03-01

    With the ongoing miniaturization in electronic packaging, the traditional solders suffer from severe performance degradation. In addition, the high temperature required in the traditional solder reflow process may damage electronic elements. Therefore, there is an increasing urgent need for a new kind of nontoxic solder that can afford good mechanical stress and electrical contact at low temperature. This paper presents a method of fabricating nanowire surface fastener for the application of microelectronic packaging bonding at room temperature. This surface fastener consists of copper core and polystyrene shell nanowire arrays. It showed an adhesive strength of ˜24 N/cm2 and an electrical resistance of ˜0.41 × 10-2 Ω·cm2. This kind of nanowire surface fastener may enable the exploration of wide range applications, involving assembly of components in the electronic packaging.

  5. Dynamical core polarization of two-active-electron systems in strong laser fields

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Zengxiu

    2013-01-01

    The ionization of two-active-electron systems by intense laser fields is investigated theoretically. In comparison with time-dependent Hartree-Fock and exact two electron simulation, we show that the ionization rate is overestimated in SAE approximation. A modified single-active-electron model is formulated by taking into account of the dynamical core polarization. Applying the new approach to Ca atoms, it is found that the polarization of the core can be considered instantaneous and the large polarizability of the cation suppresses the ionization by 50% while the photoelectron cut-off energy increases slightly. The existed tunneling ionization formulation can be corrected analytically by considering core polarization.

  6. High-voltage air-core pulse transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohwein, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    General types of air core pulse transformers designed for high voltage pulse generation and energy transfer applications are discussed with special emphasis on pulse charging systems which operate up to the multi-megavolt range. The design, operation, dielectric materials, and performance are described. It is concluded that high voltage air core pulse transformers are best suited to applications outside the normal ranges of conventional magnetic core transformers. In general these include charge transfer at high power levels and fast pulse generation with comparatively low energy. When properly designed and constructed, they are capable of delivering high energy transfer efficiency and have demonstrated superior high voltage endurance. The principal disadvantage of high voltage air core transformers is that they are not generally available from commercial sources. Consequently, the potential user must become thoroughly familiar with all aspects of design, fabrication and system application before he can produce a high performance transformer system. (LCL)

  7. High-resolution gamma ray attenuation density measurements on mining exploration drill cores, including cut cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, P.-S.; Bourke, A.

    2017-01-01

    Physical property measurements are increasingly important in mining exploration. For density determinations on rocks, one method applicable on exploration drill cores relies on gamma ray attenuation. This non-destructive method is ideal because each measurement takes only 10 s, making it suitable for high-resolution logging. However calibration has been problematic. In this paper we present new empirical, site-specific correction equations for whole NQ and BQ cores. The corrections force back the gamma densities to the "true" values established by the immersion method. For the NQ core caliber, the density range extends to high values (massive pyrite, 5 g/cm3) and the correction is thought to be very robust. We also present additional empirical correction factors for cut cores which take into account the missing material. These "cut core correction factors", which are not site-specific, were established by making gamma density measurements on truncated aluminum cylinders of various residual thicknesses. Finally we show two examples of application for the Abitibi Greenstone Belt in Canada. The gamma ray attenuation measurement system is part of a multi-sensor core logger which also determines magnetic susceptibility, geochemistry and mineralogy on rock cores, and performs line-scan imaging.

  8. Simulating earth core using high energy lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, M.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.; Brambrink, E.; Nourou, A.; Ravasio, A.; Wei, H. G.; Vinci, T.; Mazevet, S.; Occelli, F.; Morard, G.; Guyot, F.; De Resseguier, T.; Lescoute, E.

    2010-06-01

    The melting curve and equation of state of iron and iron alloys at the inner core boundary (330 GPa, about 5000 K) are still unknown. This severally limits current modelling of earth constitution and dynamics. In this paper, recent numerical and experimental studies performed using laser generated isentropic ramp compression on iron and aluminium samples are presented. On the experimental side, direct laser ramp compression was achieved on iron. Time-resolved measurements were compared to hydrodynamic computations accounting for the polymorphic phase transformations. Before studying iron that presents a solid-solid phase transition along the isentropic path, we studied the time evolution of the atomic structure of aluminium using molecular dynamics simulations at the same length and time scales as the experiment. Like many metals, aluminium presents an elasto-plastic phase transition and we studied, using this microscopic approach, the effect of plasticity on the backward integration technique used to extract equation of state information from the experimental VISAR signal.

  9. A Massive, Prestellar Clump Hosting no High-Mass Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanhueza, P.; Jackson, J. M.; Zhang, Q.; Foster, J.; Guzmán, A.

    2015-12-01

    We observed a high-mass, prestellar clump in dust continuum with SMA (3.5″) and in NH3 line emission with JVLA (2″). We find no core with sufficient mass to form high-mass stars at the current evolutionary stage. In order to form high-mass stars, the embedded cores need to accrete a significant amount of mass over time which is consistent with some models of high-mass star formation. We also find that the gas in the cores is transonic or mildly supersonic. The embedded cores are sub-virialized, which is inconsistent with some models of high-mass star formation unless strong magnetic fields of ˜1 mG are present.

  10. The "Core Concepts Plus" Paradigm for Creating an Electronic Textbook for Introductory Business and Economic Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, M. Ryan

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a flexible paradigm for creating an electronic "Core Concepts Plus" textbook (CCP-text) for a course in Introductory Business and Economic Statistics (IBES). In general terms, "core concepts" constitute the intersection of IBES course material taught by all IBES professors at the author's university. The…

  11. The "Core Concepts Plus" Paradigm for Creating an Electronic Textbook for Introductory Business and Economic Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, M. Ryan

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a flexible paradigm for creating an electronic "Core Concepts Plus" textbook (CCP-text) for a course in Introductory Business and Economic Statistics (IBES). In general terms, "core concepts" constitute the intersection of IBES course material taught by all IBES professors at the author's university. The…

  12. Hollow-core fibers for high power pulse delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Lyngsø, Jens K.; Jakobsen, Christian;

    2016-01-01

    We investigate hollow-core fibers for fiber delivery of high power ultrashort laser pulses. We use numerical techniques to design an anti-resonant hollow-core fiber having one layer of non-touching tubes to determine which structures offer the best optical properties for the delivery of high power...... picosecond pulses. A novel fiber with 7 tubes and a core of 30 mu m was fabricated and it is here described and characterized, showing remarkable low loss, low bend loss, and good mode quality. Its optical properties are compared to both a 10 mu m and a 18 mu m core diameter photonic band gap hollow......-core fiber. The three fibers are characterized experimentally for the delivery of 22 picosecond pulses at 1032nm. We demonstrate flexible, diffraction limited beam delivery with output average powers in excess of 70W. (C) 2016 Optical Society of America...

  13. A comparison of geochemical core scanning methods on high-grade metamorphic COSC-1 cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Ulrich; Hierold, Johannes; Meima, Jeannette; Rammlmair, Dieter; Kollaske, Tina

    2016-04-01

    Micro-XRF core scanning of marine and lacustrine sediment cores provides geochemical data for many elements and has become a standard tool in paleoclimate and environmental studies. In contrast, such investigations are unusual on crystalline cores due to limitations such as crystal lattice reflections. We tested micro-XRF scanning on gneisses and mylonites of the COSC-1 ICDP project in the Swedish Caledonides. The data obtained was compared with new high-resolution half-split core surface mapping using an ED-XRF instrument (50 μm res.) and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) core scanner (200 μm res.). In addition, an assessment was made with whole-core box oversight XRF scanning (Minalyze AB) with 10 cm resolution. High-grade metamorphic rocks including metasedimentary leucocratic gneisses and intercalated mica-rich mylonites of the lower Seve Nappe drilled during COSC-1 have been investigated to compare scanning methods. All data sets show a clear compositional step between gneiss and mylonite indicating a metasedimentary mixed layer origin (sandy to clayey) of the source rocks with extremely limited metasomatic exchange. Micro-XRF profiles are in full accord with high-resolution mapping data but cannot reproduce the detailed structural information provided by mapping data. LIBS data include light elements such as Li that are not measurable with XRF methods and confirm a sharp non-metasomatic transition between gneisses and mylonite. The whole-core box XRF scans are extremely useful to scan the 2500 m of cored material in a short time compared with other methods, and the data is very helpful, for example, for geochemical reconstructing of lithologies.

  14. Highly Stretchable and Transparent Supercapacitor by Ag-Au Core-Shell Nanowire Network with High Electrochemical Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Habeom; Hong, Sukjoon; Lee, Jinhwan; Suh, Young Duk; Kwon, Jinhyeong; Moon, Hyunjin; Kim, Hyeonseok; Yeo, Junyeob; Ko, Seung Hwan

    2016-06-22

    Stretchable and transparent electronics have steadily attracted huge attention in wearable devices. Although Ag nanowire is the one of the most promising candidates for transparent and stretchable electronics, its electrochemical instability has forbidden its application to the development of electrochemical energy devices such as supercapacitors. Here, we introduce a highly stretchable and transparent supercapacitor based on electrochemically stable Ag-Au core-shell nanowire percolation network electrode. We developed a simple solution process to synthesize the Ag-Au core-shell nanowire with excellent electrical conductivity as well as greatly enhanced chemical and electrochemical stabilities compared to pristine Ag nanowire. The proposed core-shell nanowire-based supercapacitor still possesses fine optical transmittance and outstanding mechanical stability up to 60% strain. The Ag-Au core-shell nanowire can be a strong candidate for future wearable electrochemical energy devices.

  15. A Formative Program Evaluation of Electronic Clinical Tracking System Documentation to Meet National Core Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lynette S; Branstetter, M Laurie

    2016-09-01

    Electronic clinical tracking systems are used in many educational institutions of higher learning to document advanced practice registered nursing students' clinical experiences. Students' clinical experiences are constructed according to the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties core competencies. These competencies form a basis for evaluation of advanced practice registered nursing programs. However, no previous studies have evaluated the use of electronic clinical tracking systems to validate students' clinical experiences in meeting national core competencies. Medatrax, an electronic clinical tracking system, is evaluated using a formative program evaluation approach to determine if students' clinical documentations meet Family/Across the Lifespan Nurse Practitioner Competencies in a midsouthern family nurse practitioner program. This formative program evaluation supports the use of an electronic clinical tracking system in facilitating accreditation and program outcome goals. The significance of this study is that it provides novel evidence to support the use of an electronic clinical tracking system to assist a midsouthern school of nursing in meeting national core competencies.

  16. The Electron Temperature and Anisotropy in the Solar Wind. Comparison of the Core and Halo Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrard, V.; Lazar, M.; Poedts, S.; Štverák, Š.; Maksimovic, M.; Trávníček, P. M.

    2016-08-01

    Estimating the temperature of solar wind particles and their anisotropies is particularly important for understanding the origin of their deviations from thermal equilibrium and the effects this has. In the absence of energetic events, the velocity distribution of electrons reveals a dual structure with a thermal (Maxwellian) core and a suprathermal (kappa) halo. This article presents a detailed observational analysis of these two components, providing estimations of their temperatures and temperature anisotropies, and decoding any potential interdependence that their properties may indicate. The dataset used in this study includes more than 120 000 of the distributions measured by three missions in the ecliptic within an extended range of heliocentric distances from 0.3 to over 4 AU. The core temperature is found to decrease with the radial distance, while the halo temperature slightly increases, clarifying an apparent contradiction in previous observational analyses and providing valuable clues about the temperature of the kappa-distributed populations. For low values of the power-index kappa, these two components manifest a clear tendency to deviate from isotropy in the same direction, which seems to confirm the existence of mechanisms with similar effects on both components, e.g., the solar wind expansion, or the particle heating by the fluctuations. However, the existence of plasma states with anticorrelated anisotropies of the core and halo populations and the increase in their number for high values of the power-index kappa suggest a dynamic interplay of these components, mediated, most probably, by the anisotropy-driven instabilities.

  17. Development of high current electron beam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Sun Kook [and others

    1997-05-01

    A high-current electron beam generator has been developed. The energy and the average current of the electron beam are 2 MeV and 50 mA, respectively. The electron beam generator is composed of an electron gun, RF acceleration cavities, a 260-kW RF generator, electron beam optics components, and control system, etc. The electron beam generator will be used for the development of a millimeter-wave free-electron laser and a high average power infrared free-electron laser. The machine will also be used as a user facility in nuclear industry, environment industry, semiconductor industry, chemical industry, etc. (author). 15 tabs., 85 figs.

  18. Dynamic Effects in Core Electron Impact Excitation of Lanthanum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuroh, Kofi

    2000-05-01

    Experimental data of inelastic electron scattering exciting inner3d-shell of metallic lanthanum show strong dependence on the projectile electron energy.^1 Calculations based on an atomic physics description of the triply ionized free atom are made. The large spin-orbit coupling constant of the 3d-hole leads to an approximate jK-coupling. The resulting excitation strength is formulated in terms of the Born approximation including resonant contributions. The intensity is folded with a Lorentzian broadening with full width at half maximum (FWHM) parameter Γ. This parameter is considered to be dependent on the projectile electron energy so that the dynamic effects found in experimental electron-energy-loss-spectra (EELS) may be addressed. The systematic variation of the relative intensities of the spin-orbit doublet structures with exciation energy found in experiment is generally accounted for as Γ is varied from the experimentally measured values of 0.7eV - 0.5eV and beyond^2 ^1J. Kanski and G. Wendin, Phys. Rev.B24, 1981 (4977). ^2K. Nuroh, Physica Scripta 61, 2000(in press).

  19. Projections for measuring the size of the solar core with neutrino-electron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Jonathan H

    2016-01-01

    We quantify the amount of data needed in order to measure the size of the solar core with future experiments looking at elastic scattering between electrons and solar neutrinos. The directions of the electrons immediately after scattering are strongly correlated with the incident directions of the neutrinos, however this is degraded significantly by the subsequent scattering of these electrons in the detector medium. We generate distributions of such electrons for different sizes of the solar core, and use a maximum likelihood analysis to make projections for future experimental sensitivity. We find that after approximately 5 years of data-taking an experiment the size of Hyper Kamiokande could measure the solar core radius with an uncertainty of 20% of the total solar radius at 95% confidence, and could exclude the scenario where the neutrinos are produced throughout the entire sun at 3 $\\sigma$.

  20. Protein film voltammetry and co-factor electron transfer dynamics in spinach photosystem II core complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun; Magdaong, Nikki; Frank, Harry A; Rusling, James F

    2014-05-01

    Direct protein film voltammetry (PFV) was used to investigate the redox properties of the photosystem II (PSII) core complex from spinach. The complex was isolated using an improved protocol not used previously for PFV. The PSII core complex had high oxygen-evolving capacity and was incorporated into thin lipid and polyion films. Three well-defined reversible pairs of reduction and oxidation voltammetry peaks were observed at 4 °C in the dark. Results were similar in both types of films, indicating that the environment of the PSII-bound cofactors was not influenced by film type. Based on comparison with various control samples including Mn-depleted PSII, peaks were assigned to chlorophyll a (Chl a) (Em = -0.47 V, all vs. NHE, at pH 6), quinones (-0.12 V), and the manganese (Mn) cluster (Em = 0.18 V). PFV of purified iron heme protein cytochrome b-559 (Cyt b-559), a component of PSII, gave a partly reversible peak pair at 0.004 V that did not have a potential similar to any peaks observed from the intact PSII core complex. The closest peak in PSII to 0.004 V is the 0.18 V peak that was found to be associated with a two-electron process, and thus is inconsistent with iron heme protein voltammetry. The -0.47 V peak had a peak potential and peak potential-pH dependence similar to that found for purified Chl a incorporated into DMPC films. The midpoint potentials reported here may differ to various extents from previously reported redox titration data due to the influence of electrode double-layer effects. Heterogeneous electron transfer (hET) rate constants were estimated by theoretical fitting and digital simulations for the -0.47 and 0.18 V peaks. Data for the Chl a peaks were best fit to a one-electron model, while the peak assigned to the Mn cluster was best fit by a two-electron/one-proton model.

  1. High-energy electron diffraction and microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, L M; Whelan, M J

    2011-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to high energy electron diffraction and elastic and inelastic scattering of high energy electrons, with particular emphasis on applications to modern electron microscopy. Starting from a survey of fundamental phenomena, the authors introduce the most important concepts underlying modern understanding of high energy electron diffraction. Dynamical diffraction in transmission (THEED) and reflection (RHEED) geometries is treated using ageneral matrix theory, where computer programs and worked examples are provided to illustrate the concepts and to f

  2. Doping GaP Core-Shell Nanowire pn-Junctions: A Study by Off-Axis Electron Holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdi, Sadegh; Berg, Alexander; Borgström, Magnus T; Kasama, Takeshi; Beleggia, Marco; Samuelson, Lars; Wagner, Jakob B

    2015-06-10

    The doping process in GaP core-shell nanowire pn-junctions using different precursors is evaluated by mapping the nanowires' electrostatic potential distribution by means of off-axis electron holography. Three precursors, triethyltin (TESn), ditertiarybutylselenide, and silane are investigated for n-type doping of nanowire shells; among them, TESn is shown to be the most efficient precursor. Off-axis electron holography reveals higher electrostatic potentials in the regions of nanowire cores grown by the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism (axial growth) than the regions grown parasitically by the vapor-solid (VS) mechanism (radial growth), attributed to different incorporation efficiency between VLS and VS of unintentional p-type carbon doping originating from the trimethylgallium precursor. This study shows that off-axis electron holography of doped nanowires is unique in terms of the ability to map the electrostatic potential and thereby the active dopant distribution with high spatial resolution.

  3. High-resolution electron microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Spence, John C H

    2013-01-01

    This new fourth edition of the standard text on atomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) retains previous material on the fundamentals of electron optics and aberration correction, linear imaging theory (including wave aberrations to fifth order) with partial coherence, and multiple-scattering theory. Also preserved are updated earlier sections on practical methods, with detailed step-by-step accounts of the procedures needed to obtain the highest quality images of atoms and molecules using a modern TEM or STEM electron microscope. Applications sections have been updated - these include the semiconductor industry, superconductor research, solid state chemistry and nanoscience, and metallurgy, mineralogy, condensed matter physics, materials science and material on cryo-electron microscopy for structural biology. New or expanded sections have been added on electron holography, aberration correction, field-emission guns, imaging filters, super-resolution methods, Ptychography, Ronchigrams, tomogr...

  4. Electron energy deposition to the fusion target core for fast ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W M; Sheng, Z M; Li, Y T; Hao, B; Zhang, J [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, CAS, Beijing 100190 (China); Norreys, P A; Sherlock, M; Trines, R; Robinson, A P L, E-mail: hbwwml@aphy.iphy.ac.e, E-mail: tzmsheng@sjtu.edu.c [Central Laser Facility, CCLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2010-08-01

    Heating of the target core for fast ignition by electron beams is investigated by two-dimensional collisional particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that the electron beams emitted from the core surface with the initial energy of 1.4MeV, 2.4MeV, and 4.2MeV can heat most efficiently the core with {rho}r = 0.75g/cm{sup 2}, 1.5g/cm{sup 2}, and 3g/cm{sup 2}, respectively, when taking {rho} = 300g/cm{sup 3}, where {rho} and r are the mass density and radius of the core, respectively.

  5. Stellar electron capture rates on neutron-rich nuclei and their impact on core-collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Raduta, Ad R; Oertel, M

    2016-01-01

    During the late stages of gravitational core-collapse of massive stars, extreme isospin asymmetries are reached within the core. Due to the lack of microscopic calculations of electron capture (EC) rates for all relevant nuclei, in general simple analytic parameterizations are employed. We study here several extensions of these parameterizations, allowing for a temperature, electron density and isospin dependence as well as for odd-even effects. The latter extra degrees of freedom considerably improve the agreement with large scale microscopic rate calculations. We find, in particular, that the isospin dependence leads to a significant reduction of the global EC rates during core collapse with respect to fiducial results, where rates optimized on calculations of stable $fp$-shell nuclei are used. Our results indicate that systematic microscopic calculations and experimental measurements in the $N\\approx 50$ neutron rich region are desirable for realistic simulations of the core-collapse.

  6. The Sensitivity of Core-Collapse Supernovae to Nuclear Electron Capture

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Chris; Zegers, Remco G T; Grubb, Thomas; Austin, Sam M

    2015-01-01

    A weak-rate library aimed at investigating the sensitivity of astrophysical environments to variations of electron-capture rates on medium-heavy nuclei has been developed. With this library, the sensitivity of the core-collapse and early post-bounce phases of core-collapse supernovae to nuclear electron-capture is examined by systematically and statistically varying electron-capture rates of individual nuclei. The rates are adjusted by factors consistent with uncertainties indicated by comparing theoretical rates to those deduced from charge-exchange and $\\beta$-decay measurements. To ensure a model independent assessment, sensitivity studies across a comprehensive set of progenitors and equations of state are performed. In our systematic study, we find a +16/-4 % range in the mass of the inner-core at the time of shock formation and a $\\pm$20% range of peak {\

  7. Core level excitations—A fingerprint of structural and electronic properties of epitaxial silicene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedlein, R., E-mail: friedl@jaist.ac.jp; Fleurence, A.; Aoyagi, K.; Yamada-Takamura, Y. [School of Materials Science, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST), 1-1, Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa 923-1292 (Japan); Jong, M. P. de; Van Bui, H.; Wiggers, F. B. [MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Yoshimoto, S.; Koitaya, T.; Shimizu, S.; Noritake, H.; Mukai, K.; Yoshinobu, J. [The Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)

    2014-05-14

    From the analysis of high-resolution Si 2p photoelectron and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra, we show that core level excitations of epitaxial silicene on ZrB{sub 2}(0001) thin films are characteristically different from those of sp{sup 3}-hybridized silicon. In particular, it is revealed that the lower Si 2p binding energies and the low onset in the NEXAFS spectra as well as the occurrence of satellite features in the core level spectra are attributed to the screening by low-energy valence electrons and interband transitions between π bands, respectively. The analysis of observed Si 2p intensities related to chemically distinct Si atoms indicates the presence of at least one previously unidentified component. The presence of this component suggests that the observation of stress-related stripe domains in scanning tunnelling microscopy images is intrinsically linked to the relaxation of Si atoms away from energetically unfavourable positions.

  8. HOLLOW ELECTRON BEAM COLLIMATION FOR HL-LHC - EFFECT ON THE BEAM CORE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitterer, M. [Fermilab; Stancari, G. [Fermilab; Valishev, A. [Fermilab; Bruce, R. [CERN; Papadopoulou, S. [CERN; Papotti, G. [CERN; Pellegrini, D. [CERN; Pellegrini, S. [CERN; Valuch, D. [CERN; Wagner, J. F. [CERN

    2016-10-05

    Collimation with hollow electron beams or lenses (HEL) is currently one of the most promising concepts for active halo control in HL-LHC. In previous studies it has been shown that the halo can be efficiently removed with a hollow electron lens. Equally important as an efficient removal of the halo, is also to demonstrate that the core stays unperturbed. In this paper, we present a summary of the experiment at the LHC and simulations in view of the effect of the HEL on the beam core in case of a pulsed operation.

  9. Multifunctional Electronics Core Substrate Configurable Electronics Functionality with Stacked Silicon and Multi-Chip Modules Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A custom multifunctional core substrate scheme comprised of next generation polyimide, ceramic and/or silicon materials will be designed to integrate new 2.5D and...

  10. Fast Electronics in High-Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weigand, Clyde

    1958-08-08

    A brief review of fast electronics is given, leading up to the present state of the art. Cherenkov counters in high-energy physics are discussed, including an example of a velocity-selecting Cherenkov counter. An electronic device to aid in aligning external beams from high-energy accelerators is described. A scintillation-counter matrix to identify bubble chamber tracks is discussed. Some remarks on the future development of electronics in high-energy physics experiments are included.

  11. Highly Birefringent Photonic Crystal Fibers BUsing Asymmetric Core Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Chun-Liu; Lu Chao; Yan Min; Wang Xiaoyan; Lou Junjun; Li Qin; Zhou Xiaoqun; Cai Qing; P.R.Chaudhuri

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate a highly birefringent photonic crystal fiber by utilizing the asymmetric core design. Based on spectral measurements of the polarization mode interfering, we estimate that the fiber has a beat length of about 0.33 mm at 1545 nm.

  12. Core Physics of Pebble Bed High Temperature Nuclear Reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auwerda, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    To more accurately predict the temperature distribution inside the reactor core of pebble bed type high temperature reactors, in this thesis we investigated the stochastic properties of randomly stacked beds and the effects of the non-homogeneity of these beds on the neutronics and thermal-hydraulic

  13. Role of density gradient driven trapped electron mode turbulence in the H-mode inner core with electron heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, D. R.; Burrell, K. H.; Guttenfelder, W.; Rhodes, T. L.; Dimits, A. M.; Bravenec, R.; Grierson, B. A.; Holland, C.; Lohr, J.; Marinoni, A.; McKee, G. R.; Petty, C. C.; Rost, J. C.; Schmitz, L.; Wang, G.; Zemedkun, S.; Zeng, L.

    2016-05-01

    A series of DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] low torque quiescent H-mode experiments show that density gradient driven trapped electron mode (DGTEM) turbulence dominates the inner core of H-mode plasmas during strong electron cyclotron heating (ECH). Adding 3.4 MW ECH doubles Te/Ti from 0.5 to 1.0, which halves the linear DGTEM critical density gradient, locally reducing density peaking, while transport in all channels displays extreme stiffness in the density gradient. This suggests that fusion α-heating may degrade inner core confinement in H-mode plasmas with moderate density peaking and low collisionality, with equal electron and ion temperatures, key conditions expected in burning plasmas. Gyrokinetic simulations using GYRO [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] (and GENE [Jenko et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000)]) closely match not only particle, energy, and momentum fluxes but also density fluctuation spectra from Doppler backscattering (DBS), with and without ECH. Inner core DBS density fluctuations display discrete frequencies with adjacent toroidal mode numbers, which we identify as DGTEMs. GS2 [Dorland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 5579 (2000)] predictions show the DGTEM can be suppressed, to avoid degradation with electron heating, by broadening the current density profile to attain q0>qmin>1 .

  14. Electronic structure and intersubband magnetoabsorption spectra of CdSe/CdS core-shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wen

    2016-10-01

    The electronic structures of CdSe/CdS core-shell nanowires are calculated based on the effective-mass theory, and it is found that the hole states in CdSe/CdS core-shell nanowires are strongly mixed, which are very different from the hole states in CdSe or CdS nanowires. In addition, we find the three highest hole states at the Γ point are almost localized in the CdSe core and the energies of the hole states in CdSe/CdS core-shell nanowires can be enhanced greatly when the core radius Rc increases and the total radius R is fixed. The degenerate hole states are split by the magnetic field, and the split energies will increase when |Jh | increases from 1/2 to 7/2, while they are almost not influenced by the change of the core radius Rc. The absorption spectra of CdSe/CdS core-shell nanowires at the Γ point are also studied in the magnetic field when the temperature T is considered, and we find there are only two peaks will arise if the core radius Rc and the temperature T increase. The intensity of each optical absorption can be considerably enhanced by increasing the core radius Rc when the temperature T is fixed, it is due to the increase of their optical transition matrix element. Meanwhile, the intensity of each optical absorption can be decreased when the temperature T increases and the core radius Rc is fixed, and this is because the Fermi-Dirac distribution function of the corresponding hole states will increase as the increase of the temperature T.

  15. DESIGN AND CONTROL OF SOAP-FREE HYDROPHILIC-HYDROPHOBIC CORE-SHELL LATEX PARTICLES WITH HIGH CARBOXYL CONTENT IN THE CORE OF THE PARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-jiao Ji; Yi-ming Jiang; Bo-tian Li; Wei Deng; Cheng-you Kan

    2012-01-01

    Soap-free hydrophilic-hydrophobic core-shell latex particles with high carboxyl content in the core of the particles were synthesized via the seeded emulsion polymerization using methyl methacrylate (MMA),butyl acrylate (BA),methacrylic acid (MAA),styrene (St) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as monomers,and the influences of MMA content used in the core preparation on polymerization,particle size and morphology were investigated by transmission electron microscopy,dynamic light scattering and conductometric titration.The results showed that the seeded emulsion polymerization could be carried out smoothly using "starved monomer feeding process" when MAA content in the core preparation was equal to or less than 24 wt%,and the encapsulating efficiency of the hydrophilic P(MMA-BA-MAA-EGDMA) core with the hydrophobic PSt shell decreased with the increase in MAA content.When an interlayer of P(MMA-MAA-St) with moderate polarity was inserted between the P(MMA-BA-MAA-EGDMA) core and the PSt shell,well designed soap-free hydrophilic-hydrophobic core-shell latex particles with 24 wt% MAA content in the core preparation were obtained.

  16. Electronic Properties of Strained Si/Ge Core-Shell Nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Xihong

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the electronic properties of strained Si/Ge core-shell nanowires along the [110] direction using first principles calculations based on density-functional theory. The diameter of the studied core-shell wire is up to 5 nm. We found the band gap of the core-shell wire is smaller than that of both pure Si and Ge wires with the same diameter. This reduced band gap is ascribed to the intrinsic strain between Ge and Si layers, which partially counters the quantum confinement effect. The external strain is further applied to the nanowires for tuning the band structure and band gap. By applying sufficient tensile strain, we found the band gap of Si-core/Ge-shell nanowire with diameter larger than ~3 nm experiences a transition from direct to indirect gap.

  17. Electronic Structure Calculations and Adaptation Scheme in Multi-core Computing Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seshagiri, Lakshminarasimhan; Sosonkina, Masha; Zhang, Zhao

    2009-05-20

    Multi-core processing environments have become the norm in the generic computing environment and are being considered for adding an extra dimension to the execution of any application. The T2 Niagara processor is a very unique environment where it consists of eight cores having a capability of running eight threads simultaneously in each of the cores. Applications like General Atomic and Molecular Electronic Structure (GAMESS), used for ab-initio molecular quantum chemistry calculations, can be good indicators of the performance of such machines and would be a guideline for both hardware designers and application programmers. In this paper we try to benchmark the GAMESS performance on a T2 Niagara processor for a couple of molecules. We also show the suitability of using a middleware based adaptation algorithm on GAMESS on such a multi-core environment.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of highly-ordered ZnO/PbS core/shell heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y. F.; Zhou, G. H.; Ding, H. Y.; Liu, A. H.; Lin, Y. B.; Dong, Y. W.

    2011-11-01

    The strategy to manipulate nanoscale building blocks into well-organized heterostructures is very important to both material synthesis and nanodevice applications. In this work, highly-ordered ZnO/PbS core/shell nanowire arrays were fabricated by a facile and low temperature chemical route. Large area and well-aligned ZnO nanowire arrays were firstly fabricated on conductive glass substrates, and then the synthesis of ZnO/ZnS and ZnO/PbS core/shell nanowire arrays were realized by a chemical conversion method. The morphology, structure, and composition of the obtained nanostructures were confirmed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray diffraction measurements. The optical properties of the synthesized nanostructures were investigated by micro-Raman and photoluminescence spectroscopy. In the synthesized ZnO/PbS core/shell nanowire arrays, the ZnO cores can provide direct conduction pathways for electron transport and PbS shells possess superior photoelectric performance. Therefore, the obtained ZnO/PbS core/shell nanostructures may have potential application in photovoltaic devices.

  19. Performance of High-frequency High-flux Magnetic Cores at Cryogenic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Scott S.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik E.; Patterson, Richard L.

    2002-01-01

    Three magnetic powder cores and one ferrite core, which are commonly used in inductor and transformer design for switch mode power supplies, were selected for investigation at cryogenic temperatures. The powder cores are Molypermalloy Core (MPC), High Flux Core (HFC), and Kool Mu Core (KMC). The performance of four inductors utilizing these cores has been evaluated as a function of temperature from 20 C to -180 C. All cores were wound with the same wire type and gauge to obtain equal values of inductance at room temperature. Each inductor was evaluated in terms of its inductance, quality (Q) factor, resistance, and dynamic hysteresis characteristics (B-H loop) as a function of temperature and frequency. Both sinusoidal and square wave excitations were used in these investigations. Measured data obtained on the inductance showed that both the MPC and the HFC cores maintain a constant inductance value, whereas with the KMC and ferrite core hold a steady value in inductance with frequency but decrease as temperature is decreased. All cores exhibited dependency, with varying degrees, in their quality factor and resistance on test frequency and temperature. Except for the ferrite, all cores exhibited good stability in the investigated properties with temperature as well as frequency. Details of the experimental procedures and test results are presented and discussed in the paper.

  20. High perveance electron gun for the electron cooling system

    CERN Document Server

    Korotaev, Yu V; Petrov, A; Sidorin, A; Smirnov, A; Syresin, E M; Titkova, I

    2000-01-01

    The cooling time in the electron cooling system is inversely proportional to the beam current. To obtain high current of the electron beam the control electrode of the gun is provided with a positive potential and an electrostatic trap for secondary electrons appears inside the electron gun. This leads to a decrease in the gun perveance. To avoid this problem, the adiabatic high perveance electron gun with the clearing control electrode is designed in JINR (J. Bosser, Y. Korotaev, I. Meshkov, E. Syresin et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 391 (1996) 103. Yu. Korotaev, I. Meshkov, A. Sidorin, A. Smirnov, E. Syresin, The generation of electron beams with perveance of 3-6 mu A/V sup 3 sup / sup 2 , Proceedings of SCHEF'99). The clearing control electrode has a transverse electric field, which clears secondary electrons. Computer simulations of the potential map were made with RELAX3D computer code (C.J. Kost, F.W. Jones, RELAX3D User's Guide and References Manual).

  1. Diffractive imaging of transient electronic core-shell structures in a nanoplasma

    CERN Document Server

    Rupp, Daniela; Adolph, Marcus; Gorkhover, Tais; Krikunova, Maria; Müller, Jan-Phillipe; Müller, Maria; Oelze, Tim; Ovcharenko, Yevheniy; Sauppe, Mario; Schorb, Sebastian; Wolter, David; Harmand, Marion; Treusch, Rolf; Bostedt, Christoph; Möller, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    We have recorded the coherent diffraction images of individual xenon clusters using intense extreme ultraviolet free-electron laser pulses tuned to atomic and ionic resonances in order to elucidate the influence of light induced electronic changes on the diffraction pattern. The data show the emergence of a transient core-shell structure within the otherwise homogeneous sample. Simulations indicate that ionization and nanoplasma formation result in a cluster shell with strongly altered refraction. The presented resonant scattering approach enables the imaging of ultrafast electron dynamics with unprecedented spatial resolution on their natural time scale.

  2. Electron-ion coincidence spectrometer for studies on decay dynamics of core-excited molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneyasu, T. [UVSOR Facility, Institute for Molecular Science, Nishigonaka 38, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)], E-mail: kaneyasu@ims.ac.jp; Hikosaka, Y.; Shigemasa, E. [UVSOR Facility, Institute for Molecular Science, Nishigonaka 38, Myodaiji, Okazaki 444-8585 (Japan)

    2007-05-15

    We have developed an Auger electron-ion coincidence spectrometer to measure energy- and angular-correlations among the particles ejected on decay of core-excited/ionized molecules. The apparatus consists of a double toroidal electron analyzer and a three-dimensional ion momentum spectrometer, both of which are terminated by time- and position-sensitive detectors. For extracting the ions into the ion momentum spectrometer, a pulsed electric field is applied to the interaction region, according to each Auger electron observation. To evaluate the performance of the ion momentum spectrometer, momentum vectors of fragment ions produced through the dissociation from the selected molecular ion states following N{sub 2} core photoionization have been observed. The momentum, energy and angular resolutions achieved by the spectrometer have been estimated from the events associated with the formation of N{sub 2}{sup 2+} and with the pair formation of N{sup +}+{sup N+}.

  3. Electronic properties of [core+exo]-type gold clusters: factors affecting the unique optical transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shichibu, Yukatsu; Konishi, Katsuaki

    2013-06-03

    Unusual visible absorption properties of [core+exo]-type Au6 (1), Au8 (2), and Au11 (3) clusters were studied from experimental and theoretical aspects, based on previously determined crystal structures. Unlike conventional core-only clusters having no exo gold atoms, these nonspherical clusters all showed an isolated visible absorption band in solution. Density functional theory (DFT) studies on corresponding nonphenyl models (1'-3') revealed that they had similar electronic structures with discrete highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) bands. The theoretical spectra generated by time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations agreed well with the experimentally measured properties of 1-3, allowing assignment of the characteristic visible bands to HOMO-LUMO transitions. The calculated HOMO-LUMO transition energies increased in the order Au11 exo gold atom, with the HOMO → LUMO transition occurring in the core → exo direction. The HOMO/LUMO distribution patterns of 1' and 3' were similar to each other but were markedly different from that of 2', which has longer core-to-exo distances. These findings showed that not only nuclearity (size) but also geometric structures have profound effects on electronic properties and optical transitions of the [core+exo]-type clusters.

  4. High-temperature photoluminescence of CdSe/CdS core/shell nanoheterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diroll, Benjamin T; Murray, Christopher B

    2014-06-24

    The steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence properties of CdSe/CdS heterostructures are studied as a function of temperature from 300 to 600 K. The emission properties of samples are found to behave similarly to bulk CdSe, with the samples maintaining high color purity and a slightly contracting band gap at elevated temperature. Photoluminescence from CdSe/CdS samples is maintained with high stability over prolonged illumination and multiple heating and cooling cycles. Structures synthesized with variation in the core and the shell dimensions show that the preservation of emission intensity at high temperature depends strongly on the microscopic structure of the samples. For samples synthesized by seeded growth, the size of the CdSe core is highly correlated with the fraction of preserved sample photoluminescence intensity at high temperature. Temperature-dependent lifetime data suggest that the core structure predicts the stability of photoluminescence at elevated temperatures by controlling the radiative rate. The rate of electron capture, for which the volume fraction of the core is a structural proxy, underpins the ability for radiative processes to compete with thermally induced nonradiative decay pathways. Heterostructures synthesized below 200 °C using highly reactive organometallic precursors show markedly lower thermal stability than samples prepared by seeded growth at 360 °C, suggesting that the temperature of nanocrystal synthesis has direct consequences for the thermal stability of photoluminescence.

  5. Subshell fitting of relativistic atomic core electron densities for use in QTAIM analyses of ECP-based wave functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Todd A; Frisch, Michael J

    2011-11-17

    Scalar-relativistic, all-electron density functional theory (DFT) calculations were done for free, neutral atoms of all elements of the periodic table using the universal Gaussian basis set. Each core, closed-subshell contribution to a total atomic electron density distribution was separately fitted to a spherical electron density function: a linear combination of s-type Gaussian functions. The resulting core subshell electron densities are useful for systematically and compactly approximating total core electron densities of atoms in molecules, for any atomic core defined in terms of closed subshells. When used to augment the electron density from a wave function based on a calculation using effective core potentials (ECPs) in the Hamiltonian, the atomic core electron densities are sufficient to restore the otherwise-absent electron density maxima at the nuclear positions and eliminate spurious critical points in the neighborhood of the atom, thus enabling quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analyses to be done in the neighborhoods of atoms for which ECPs were used. Comparison of results from QTAIM analyses with all-electron, relativistic and nonrelativistic molecular wave functions validates the use of the atomic core electron densities for augmenting electron densities from ECP-based wave functions. For an atom in a molecule for which a small-core or medium-core ECPs is used, simply representing the core using a simplistic, tightly localized electron density function is actually sufficient to obtain a correct electron density topology and perform QTAIM analyses to obtain at least semiquantitatively meaningful results, but this is often not true when a large-core ECP is used. Comparison of QTAIM results from augmenting ECP-based molecular wave functions with the realistic atomic core electron densities presented here versus augmenting with the limiting case of tight core densities may be useful for diagnosing the reliability of large-core ECP models in

  6. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  7. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...... intersect. Routes for unicast sessions are agnostic to other sessions and setup beforehand, CORE will then discover and exploit intersecting routes. Our approach allows the inter-session regions to leverage RLNC to compensate for losses or failures in the overhearing or transmitting process. Thus, we...... increase the benefits of XORing by exploiting the underlying RLNC structure of individual flows. This goes beyond providing additional reliability to each individual session and beyond exploiting coding opportunistically. Our numerical results show that CORE outperforms both forwarding and COPE...

  8. High Resolution Continuous Flow Analysis System for Polar Ice Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmayr, Remi; Azuma, Kumiko; Yamada, Hironobu; Kjær, Helle Astrid; Vallelonga, Paul; Azuma, Nobuhiko; Takata, Morimasa

    2014-05-01

    In the last decades, Continuous Flow Analysis (CFA) technology for ice core analyses has been developed to reconstruct the past changes of the climate system 1), 2). Compared with traditional analyses of discrete samples, a CFA system offers much faster and higher depth resolution analyses. It also generates a decontaminated sample stream without time-consuming sample processing procedure by using the inner area of an ice-core sample.. The CFA system that we have been developing is currently able to continuously measure stable water isotopes 3) and electrolytic conductivity, as well as to collect discrete samples for the both inner and outer areas with variable depth resolutions. Chemistry analyses4) and methane-gas analysis 5) are planned to be added using the continuous water stream system 5). In order to optimize the resolution of the current system with minimal sample volumes necessary for different analyses, our CFA system typically melts an ice core at 1.6 cm/min. Instead of using a wire position encoder with typical 1mm positioning resolution 6), we decided to use a high-accuracy CCD Laser displacement sensor (LKG-G505, Keyence). At the 1.6 cm/min melt rate, the positioning resolution was increased to 0.27mm. Also, the mixing volume that occurs in our open split debubbler is regulated using its weight. The overflow pumping rate is smoothly PID controlled to maintain the weight as low as possible, while keeping a safety buffer of water to avoid air bubbles downstream. To evaluate the system's depth-resolution, we will present the preliminary data of electrolytic conductivity obtained by melting 12 bags of the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM) ice core. The samples correspond to different climate intervals (Greenland Stadial 21, 22, Greenland Stadial 5, Greenland Interstadial 5, Greenland Interstadial 7, Greenland Stadial 8). We will present results for the Greenland Stadial -8, whose depths and ages are between 1723.7 and 1724.8 meters, and 35.520 to

  9. Selectivity of peptide bond dissociation on excitation of a core electron: Effects of a phenyl group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Cheng; Chen, Jien-Lian; Hu, Wei-Ping; Lin, Yi-Shiue; Lin, Huei-Ru; Lee, Tsai-Yun; Lee, Yuan T.; Ni, Chi-Kung; Liu, Chen-Lin

    2016-09-01

    The selective dissociation of a peptide bond upon excitation of a core electron in acetanilide and N-benzylacetamide was investigated. The total-ion-yield near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectra were recorded and compared with the predictions from time-dependent density functional theory. The branching ratios for the dissociation of a peptide bond are observed as 16-34% which is quite significant. This study explores the core-excitation, the X-ray photodissociation pathways, and the theoretical explanation of the NEXAFS spectra of organic molecules containing both a peptide bond and a phenyl group.

  10. High Impact Technology Compact Combustion (HITCC) Compact Core Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    the CO and CO2 net reaction rates from the FGM. This, in turn, provides another benefit . That is, the source term in YC is not just now dependent on...AFRL-RQ-WP-TR-2016-0010 HIGH IMPACT TECHNOLOGY COMPACT COMBUSTION (HITCC) COMPACT CORE TECHNOLOGIES Andrew W. Caswell Combustion...information exchange, and its publication does not constitute the Government’s approval or disapproval of its ideas or findings. *Disseminated

  11. Cu-Ag core-shell nanoparticles with enhanced oxidation stability for printed electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changsoo; Kim, Na Rae; Koo, Jahyun; Lee, Yung Jong; Lee, Hyuck Mo

    2015-11-13

    In this work, we synthesized uniform Cu-Ag core-shell nanoparticles using a facile two-step process that consists of thermal decomposition and galvanic displacement methods. The core-shell structure of these nanoparticles was confirmed through characterization using transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Furthermore, we investigated the oxidation stability of the Cu-Ag core-shell nanoparticles in detail. Both qualitative and quantitative x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses confirm that the Cu-Ag core-shell nanoparticles have considerably higher oxidation stability than Cu nanoparticles. Finally, we formulated a conductive ink using the synthesized nanoparticles and coated it onto glass substrates. Following the sintering process, we compared the resistivity of the Cu-Ag core-shell nanoparticles with that of the Cu nanoparticles. The results of this study clearly show that the Cu-Ag core-shell nanoparticles can potentially be used as an alternative to Ag nanoparticles because of their superior oxidation stability and electrical properties.

  12. Cu-Ag core-shell nanoparticles with enhanced oxidation stability for printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Changsoo; Kim, Na Rae; Koo, Jahyun; Jong Lee, Yung; Lee, Hyuck Mo

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we synthesized uniform Cu-Ag core-shell nanoparticles using a facile two-step process that consists of thermal decomposition and galvanic displacement methods. The core-shell structure of these nanoparticles was confirmed through characterization using transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and x-ray diffraction. Furthermore, we investigated the oxidation stability of the Cu-Ag core-shell nanoparticles in detail. Both qualitative and quantitative x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses confirm that the Cu-Ag core-shell nanoparticles have considerably higher oxidation stability than Cu nanoparticles. Finally, we formulated a conductive ink using the synthesized nanoparticles and coated it onto glass substrates. Following the sintering process, we compared the resistivity of the Cu-Ag core-shell nanoparticles with that of the Cu nanoparticles. The results of this study clearly show that the Cu-Ag core-shell nanoparticles can potentially be used as an alternative to Ag nanoparticles because of their superior oxidation stability and electrical properties.

  13. Optics of high-performance electron microscopes*

    OpenAIRE

    H H Rose

    2016-01-01

    During recent years, the theory of charged particle optics together with advances in fabrication tolerances and experimental techniques has lead to very significant advances in high-performance electron microscopes. Here, we will describe which theoretical tools, inventions and designs have driven this development. We cover the basic theory of higher-order electron optics and of image formation in electron microscopes. This leads to a description of different methods to correct aberrations by...

  14. High performance 3D printed electronics using electroless plated copper

    OpenAIRE

    Jin Rong Jian; Taeil Kim; Jae Sung Park; Jiacheng Wang; Woo Soo Kim

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents design and performance validation of 3D printed electronic components, 3D toroidal air-core inductors, fabricated by multi-material based Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) 3D printing technology and electroless copper plating. Designs of toroidal inductor is investigated with different core shapes and winding numbers; circular and half-circular cores with 10 and 13 turns of windings...

  15. Diffraction data of core-shell nanoparticles from an X-ray free electron laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuanxuan; Chiu, Chun-Ya; Wang, Hsiang-Ju; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Botha, Sabine; Shoeman, Robert L; Lawrence, Robert M; Kupitz, Christopher; Kirian, Richard; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Nelson, Garrett; Messerschmidt, Marc; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J; Hartmann, Elisabeth; Jafarpour, Aliakbar; Foucar, Lutz M; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry; Liang, Mengning; Menzel, Andreas; Wang, Fenglin; Basu, Shibom; Fromme, Raimund; Doak, R Bruce; Fromme, Petra; Weierstall, Uwe; Huang, Michael H; Spence, John C H; Schlichting, Ilme; Hogue, Brenda G; Liu, Haiguang

    2017-04-11

    X-ray free-electron lasers provide novel opportunities to conduct single particle analysis on nanoscale particles. Coherent diffractive imaging experiments were performed at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), SLAC National Laboratory, exposing single inorganic core-shell nanoparticles to femtosecond hard-X-ray pulses. Each facetted nanoparticle consisted of a crystalline gold core and a differently shaped palladium shell. Scattered intensities were observed up to about 7 nm resolution. Analysis of the scattering patterns revealed the size distribution of the samples, which is consistent with that obtained from direct real-space imaging by electron microscopy. Scattering patterns resulting from single particles were selected and compiled into a dataset which can be valuable for algorithm developments in single particle scattering research.

  16. Shell effect on the electron and hole reorganization energy of core-shell II-VI nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xianhui; Wang, Xinqin; Yang, Fang; Cui, Yingqi; Yang, Mingli

    2017-09-01

    Density functional theory calculations were performed to study the effect of shell encapsulation on the geometrical and electronic properties of pure and hybrid core-shell CdSe nanoclusters. The CdSe cores are distorted by the shells, and the shells exhibit distinct surface activity from the cores, which leads to remarkable changes in their electron transition behaviors. Although the electron and hole reorganization energies, which are related to the formation and recombination of electron-hole pairs, vary in a complicated way, their itemized contributions, potentials of electron extraction, ionization and affinity, and hole extraction (HEP), are dependent on the cluster size, shell composition and/or solvent. Our calculations suggest that the behaviors of charge carriers, free electrons and holes, in the semiconductor core-shell nanoclusters can be modulated by selecting appropriate cluster size and controlling the chemical composition of the shells.

  17. Projections for Measuring the Size of the Solar Core with Neutrino-Electron Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jonathan H.

    2016-11-01

    We quantify the amount of data needed in order to measure the size and position of the 8B neutrino production region within the solar core, for experiments looking at elastic scattering between electrons and solar neutrinos. The directions of the electrons immediately after scattering are strongly correlated with the incident directions of the neutrinos; however, this is degraded significantly by the subsequent scattering of these electrons in the detector medium. We generate distributions of such electrons for different neutrino production profiles, and use a maximum likelihood analysis to make projections for future experimental sensitivity. We find that with approximately 20 years worth of data the Super Kamiokande experiment could constrain the central radius of the shell in which 8B neutrinos are produced to be less than 0.22 of the total solar radius at 95% confidence.

  18. Radiative emission of neutrino pair from nucleus and inner core electrons in heavy atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshimura, M

    2013-01-01

    Radiative emission of neutrino pair (RENP) from atomic states is a new tool to experimentally investigate undetermined neutrino parameters such as the smallest neutrino mass, the nature of neutrino masses (Majorana vs Dirac), and their CP properties. We study effects of neutrino pair emission either from nucleus or from inner core electrons in which the zero-th component of quark or electron vector current gives rise to large coupling. Both the overall rate and the spectral shape of photon energy are given for a few cases of interesting target atoms. Calculated rates exceed those of previously considered target atoms by many orders of magnitudes.

  19. Improving access to information – defining core electronic resources for research and wellbeing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristiina Hormia-Poutanen

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Research and innovation are listed as the key success factors for the future development of Finnish prosperity and the Finnish economy. The Finnish libraries have developed a scenario to support this vision. University, polytechnic and research institute libraries as well as public libraries have defined the core electronic resources necessary to improve access to information in Finland. The primary aim of this work has been to provide information and justification for central funding for electronic resources to support the national goals. The secondary aim is to help with the reallocation of existing central funds to better support access to information.

  20. Electron cyclotron heating and core intrinsic rotation reversal in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassie, J. S. de, E-mail: degrassie@fusion.gat.com [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States); Boedo, J. A. [University of California, San Diego, San Diego, CA 94550 (United States); Grierson, B. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    2015-12-10

    The effect of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) on the intrinsic rotation profile in DIII-D is shown experimentally. Former DIII-D experiments have shown that ECH tends to cause an interior reduction in the normally co-Ip directed intrinsic rotation profile, and this core rotation can be fully reversed to the opposite direction. This effect is due to a turbulent rearrangement of the interior rotation profile. Here, we show results that there is more than one mechanism causing this. We compare two low density L-mode discharges where the only operational difference is the location of the ECH deposition. At low ECH power, comparable to the Ohmic power, the primary change is in the q-profile accompanied by a reversal of the core intrinsic rotation direction for the more off-axis deposition. The change in the shear of the q-profile fits well with a recent theoretical prediction for this rotation reversal. At higher ECH power, the primary change is in the core electron temperature, Te, accompanied by a hollowing of the rotation profile near the magnetic axis. This effect appears to be due to the change in electron collisionality, consistent with another theoretical, gyrokinetic prediction. The variety of phenomena that could allow ECH to modify the intrinsic rotation profile give some expectation that regions of large velocity shear in the interior could be generated, with the possibility of triggering internal transport barriers.

  1. Time-efficient simulations of tight-binding electronic structures with Intel Xeon PhiTM many-core processors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hoon; Jeong, Yosang; Kang, Ji-Hoon; Cho, Kyu Nam

    2016-12-01

    Modelling of multi-million atomic semiconductor structures is important as it not only predicts properties of physically realizable novel materials, but can accelerate advanced device designs. This work elaborates a new Technology-Computer-Aided-Design (TCAD) tool for nanoelectronics modelling, which uses a sp3d5s∗ tight-binding approach to describe multi-million atomic structures, and simulate electronic structures with high performance computing (HPC), including atomic effects such as alloy and dopant disorders. Being named as Quantum simulation tool for Advanced Nanoscale Devices (Q-AND), the tool shows nice scalability on traditional multi-core HPC clusters implying the strong capability of large-scale electronic structure simulations, particularly with remarkable performance enhancement on latest clusters of Intel Xeon PhiTM coprocessors. A review of the recent modelling study conducted to understand an experimental work of highly phosphorus-doped silicon nanowires, is presented to demonstrate the utility of Q-AND. Having been developed via Intel Parallel Computing Center project, Q-AND will be open to public to establish a sound framework of nanoelectronics modelling with advanced HPC clusters of a many-core base. With details of the development methodology and exemplary study of dopant electronics, this work will present a practical guideline for TCAD development to researchers in the field of computational nanoelectronics.

  2. High Angular Resolution Observations of Four Candidate BLAST High-Mass Starless Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Olmi, Luca; Chapin, Edward L; Gibb, Andrew; Hofner, Peter; Martin, Peter G; Poventud, Carlos M

    2010-01-01

    We discuss high-angular resolution observations of ammonia toward four candidate high-mass starless cores (HMSCs). The cores were identified by the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope (BLAST) during its 2005 survey of the Vulpecula region where 60 compact sources were detected simultaneously at 250, 350, and 500 micron. Four of these cores, with no IRAS-PSC or MSX counterparts, were observed with the NRAO Very Large Array (VLA) in the NH3(1,1) and (2,2) spectral lines. Our observations indicate that the four cores are cold (Tk <~ 14K) and show a filamentary and/or clumpy structure. They also show a significant velocity substructure within ~1km/s. The four BLAST cores appear to be colder and more quiescent than other previously observed HMSC candidates, suggesting an earlier stage of evolution.

  3. Detailed microscopic calculation of stellar electron and positron capture rates on $^{24}$Mg for O+Ne+Mg core simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Nabi, Jameel-Un

    2014-01-01

    Few white dwarfs, located in binary systems, may acquire sufficiently high mass accretion rates resulting in the burning of carbon and oxygen under nondegenerate conditions forming a O+Ne+Mg core. These O+Ne+Mg cores are gravitationally less bound than more massive progenitor stars and can release more energy due to the nuclear burning. They are also amongst the probable candidates for low entropy r-process sites. Recent observations of subluminous Type II-P supernovae (e.g., 2005cs, 2003gd, 1999br, 1997D) were able to rekindle the interest in 8 -- 10 M$_{\\odot}$ which develop O+Ne+Mg cores. Microscopic calculations of capture rates on $^{24}$Mg, which may contribute significantly to the collapse of O+Ne+Mg cores, using shell model and proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation (pn-QRPA) theory, were performed earlier and comparisons made. Simulators, however, may require these capture rates on a fine scale. For the first time a detailed microscopic calculation of the electron and positron captur...

  4. Quantitative determination of vortex core dimensions in head‑to‑head domain walls using off‑axis electron holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junginger, F; Klaui, M; Backes, D

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a complete three-dimensional characterization of vortex core spin structures, which is important for future magnetic data storage based on vortex cores in disks and in wires. Using electron holography to examine vortices in patterned Permalloy devices we have quantitativ......In this paper, we present a complete three-dimensional characterization of vortex core spin structures, which is important for future magnetic data storage based on vortex cores in disks and in wires. Using electron holography to examine vortices in patterned Permalloy devices we have...

  5. System Study: High-Pressure Core Spray 1998–2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure core spray (HPCS) at 8 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCS results.

  6. System Study: High-Pressure Core Spray 1998–2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, John Alton [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Risk Assessment and Management Services Dept.

    2015-01-31

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure core spray (HPCS) at eight U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2013 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10-year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCS results.

  7. System Study: High-Pressure Core Spray 1998-2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, John Alton [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Risk Assessment and Management Services Dept.

    2015-12-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the high-pressure core spray (HPCS) at eight U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2014 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing or decreasing trends were identified in the HPCS results.

  8. Core design and optimization of high performance low sodium void 1000 MWe heterogeneous oxide LMFBR cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthold, W.P.; Orechwa, Y.; Su, S.F.; Beitel, J.C.; Turski, R.; Lam, P.S.K.; Fuller, E.L.

    1979-01-01

    Radially heterogeneous core configurations are effective means to reduce sodium void reactivity. In general, radially heterogeneous cores can be designed as tightly or loosely coupled cores with center core or center blanket arrangements. Core height, number of core regions and number of fuel pins per assembly are additional variables in an optimization of basic heterogeneous core configurations. An extensive study was carried out to optimize the core configurations for 1000 MWe LMFBRs. All cores were subject to a common set of nuclear, mechanical, and thermal-hydraulic design assumptions. They were restrained by an upper sodium void reactivity limit of $2.50 and a doubling time of approximately 15 to 18 years. The screening and optimization procedures employed lead to two core layouts which were both tightly coupled. A complete nuclear analysis of these two cores (derived from a loosely coupled configuration/derived from a tightly coupled configuration) determined the fissile inventories (4268.4/4213.4 kg at BOEC), burnups (83.90/100.7 MWd/t peak), reactivity swings (0.49/1.8% ..delta..k total), power and flux distributions for different control insertion patterns, the breeding performance (15.7/15.3 yrs CSDT), the safety parameters, such as sodium void reactivity ($2.38/$2.23 at EOEC), isothermal Doppler coefficients for both sodium-in (45.6/46.1 T dk/dT x 10/sup -4/ core at EOEC) and sodium-out conditions (28.6/28.2 T dk/dT x 10/sup -4/ core at EOEC), and the transient behavior which shows very little space-dependence during a 60 cent reactivity step insertion.

  9. High Performance Ethernet Packet Processor Core for Next Generation Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Jitendra Nayaka

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available As the demand for high speed Internet significantly increasing to meet the requirement of large datatransfers, real-time communication and High Definition ( HD multimedia transfer over IP, the IP basednetwork products architecture must evolve and change. Application specific processors require highperformance, low power and high degree of programmability is the limitation in many general processorbased applications. This paper describes the design of Ethernet packet processor for system-on-chip (SoCwhich performs all core packet processing functions, including segmentation and reassembly, packetizationclassification, route and queue management which will speedup switching/routing performance making itmore suitable for Next Generation Networks (NGN. Ethernet packet processor design can be configuredfor use with multiple projects targeted to a FPGA device the system is designed to support 1/10/20/40/100Gigabit links with a speed and performance advantage. VHDL has been used to implement and simulatedthe required functions in FPGA.

  10. Facile fabrication of core-shell ZnO/Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 nanorods: Enhanced photoluminescence through electron charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Shengfei; Gao, Hongli; Deng, Yuan; Wang, Yao; Qu, Shengchun

    2016-01-01

    Surface decoration techniques are emerging as promising strategy to improve the optical properties of the ZnO based materials. The core-shell ZnO/Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 nanorods were grown on a FTO substrate through a facile hydrothermal and magnetron sputtering combined approach. The microstructure of the core-shell nanorod arrays were investigated by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), a field emission Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HTEM). The optical properties of the core-shell nanorod arrays were investigated through the diffuse reflectance absorption spectra and photoluminescence emission. The visible light absorption and especially the photoluminescence emission of the ZnO nanorods are enhanced markedly with the Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 grains coating the ZnO nanorods through the electron charge.

  11. Transmission electron microscopy and ab initio calculations to relate interfacial intermixing and the magnetism of core/shell nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, C.-C.; Hsiao, C.-H.; Ouyang, Chuenhou, E-mail: houyang@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Skoropata, E.; Lierop, J. van [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada)

    2015-05-07

    Significant efforts towards understanding bi-magnetic core-shell nanoparticles are underway currently as they provide a pathway towards properties unavailable with single-phased systems. Recently, we have demonstrated that the magnetism of γ-Fe2O3/CoO core-shell nanoparticles, in particular, at high temperatures, originates essentially from an interfacial doped iron-oxide layer that is formed by the migration of Co{sup 2+} from the CoO shell into the surface layers of the γ-Fe2O3 core [Skoropata et al., Phys. Rev. B 89, 024410 (2014)]. To examine directly the nature of the intermixed layer, we have used high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and first-principles calculations to examine the impact of the core-shell intermixing at the atomic level. By analyzing the HRTEM images and energy dispersive spectra, the level and nature of intermixing was confirmed, mainly as doping of Co into the octahedral site vacancies of γ-Fe2O3. The average Co doping depths for different processing temperatures (150 °C and 235 °C) were 0.56 nm and 0.78 nm (determined to within 5% through simulation), respectively, establishing that the amount of core-shell intermixing can be altered purposefully with an appropriate change in synthesis conditions. Through first-principles calculations, we find that the intermixing phase of γ-Fe2O3 with Co doping is ferromagnetic, with even higher magnetization as compared to that of pure γ-Fe2O3. In addition, we show that Co doping into different octahedral sites can cause different magnetizations. This was reflected in a change in overall nanoparticle magnetization, where we observed a 25% reduction in magnetization for the 235 °C versus the 150 °C sample, despite a thicker intermixed layer.

  12. Deep Trek High Temperature Electronics Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce Ohme

    2007-07-31

    This report summarizes technical progress achieved during the cooperative research agreement between Honeywell and U.S. Department of Energy to develop high-temperature electronics. Objects of this development included Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) wafer process development for high temperature, supporting design tools and libraries, and high temperature integrated circuit component development including FPGA, EEPROM, high-resolution A-to-D converter, and a precision amplifier.

  13. High temperature power electronics for space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Baumann, Eric D.; Myers, Ira T.; Overton, Eric

    1991-01-01

    A high temperature electronics program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on dielectric and insulating materials research, development and testing of high temperature power components, and integration of the developed components and devices into a demonstrable 200 C power system, such as inverter. An overview of the program and a description of the in-house high temperature facilities along with experimental data obtained on high temperature materials are presented.

  14. Holographic generation of highly twisted electron beams

    CERN Document Server

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Mafakheri, Erfan; Frabboni, Stefano; Karimi, Ebrahim; Boyd, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    Free electrons can possess an intrinsic orbital angular momentum, similar to those in an electron cloud, upon free-space propagation. The wavefront corresponding to the electron's wavefunction forms a helical structure with a number of twists given by the \\emph{angular speed}. Beams with a high number of twists are of particular interest because they carry a high magnetic moment about the propagation axis. Among several different techniques, electron holography seems to be a promising approach to shape a \\emph{conventional} electron beam into a helical form with large values of angular momentum. Here, we propose and manufacture a nano-fabricated phase hologram for generating a beam of this kind with an orbital angular momentum up to 200$\\hbar$. Based on a novel technique the value of orbital angular momentum of the generated beam are measured, then compared with simulations. Our work, apart from the technological achievements, may lead to a way of generating electron beams with a high quanta of magnetic momen...

  15. A design study of sodium cooled metal fuel core for high outlet-temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamadate, Megumi; Mizuno, Tomoyasu; Sugino, Kazuteru [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    2003-03-01

    A design study of sodium cooled metal fuel core was performed. The new core concept studied here has low radial power peaking by applying three regions core configuration with different diameters of fuel pins and the same enrichment of plutonium. The core reveals constant radial power distribution during nominal power operation, which gives the advantage of low cladding maximum temperature or high core outlet temperature with a cladding limit temperature. The core thermal hydraulic design shows that a core outlet temperature as high as that of the oxide fuel core is feasible even in the application of metal fuel pins, which have a lower cladding limit temperature than oxide fuel pins. The core concept is possible to have additional attractiveness such as high breeding ratio, high burnup, and long-term operation cycle due to its high internal conversion ratio. (author)

  16. High-density multicore fiber with heterogeneous core arrangement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amma, Y.; Sasaki, Y.; Takenaga, K.;

    2015-01-01

    A 30-core fiber with heterogeneous cores that achieved large spatial multiplicity and low crosstalk of less than −40 dB at 100 km was demonstrated. The correlation lengths were estimated to be more than 1 m.......A 30-core fiber with heterogeneous cores that achieved large spatial multiplicity and low crosstalk of less than −40 dB at 100 km was demonstrated. The correlation lengths were estimated to be more than 1 m....

  17. Role of Density Gradient Driven Trapped Electron Modes in the H-Mode Inner Core with Electron Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, D.

    2015-11-01

    We present new experiments and nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations showing that density gradient driven TEM (DGTEM) turbulence dominates the inner core of H-Mode plasmas during strong electron heating. Thus α-heating may degrade inner core confinement in H-Mode plasmas with moderate density peaking. These DIII-D low torque quiescent H-mode experiments were designed to study DGTEM turbulence. Gyrokinetic simulations using GYRO (and GENE) closely match not only particle, energy, and momentum fluxes, but also density fluctuation spectra, with and without ECH. Adding 3.4 MW ECH doubles Te /Ti from 0.5 to 1.0, which halves the linear TEM critical density gradient, locally flattening the density profile. Density fluctuations from Doppler backscattering (DBS) intensify near ρ = 0.3 during ECH, displaying a band of coherent fluctuations with adjacent toroidal mode numbers. GYRO closely reproduces the DBS spectrum and its change in shape and intensity with ECH, identifying these as coherent TEMs. Prior to ECH, parallel flow shear lowers the effective nonlinear DGTEM critical density gradient 50%, but is negligible during ECH, when transport displays extreme stiffness in the density gradient. GS2 predictions show the DGTEM can be suppressed, to avoid degradation with electron heating, by broadening the current density profile to attain q0 >qmin > 1 . A related experiment in the same regime varied the electron temperature gradient in the outer half-radius (ρ ~ 0 . 65) using ECH, revealing spatially coherent 2D mode structures in the Te fluctuations measured by ECE imaging. Fourier analysis with modulated ECH finds a threshold in Te profile stiffness. Supported by the US DOE under DE-FC02-08ER54966 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  18. Influence of permanent dipole and dynamic core-electron polarization on tunneling ionization of polar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Van-Hung; Zhao, Song-Feng; Le, Van-Hoang; Le, Anh-Thu

    2017-02-01

    We present a detailed theoretical investigation on strong-field ionization of polar (CO and NO) as well as nonpolar molecules (N2, O2, and CO2). Our results indicate that accounting for the Stark correction in the molecular tunneling ionization theory leads to overall fairly good agreements with numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Furthermore, we show that the effect of dynamic core-electron polarization, in general, has a weak influence on the angle-dependent ionization probability. However, in the case of CO we confirm the recent finding by B. Zhang, J. Yuan, and Z. Zhao [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 163001 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.163001] that accounting for dynamic core-polarization is crucial to achieving an overall good agreement with experiments.

  19. Three-dimensional core-shell ferromagnetic nanowires grown by focused electron beam induced deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablo-Navarro, Javier; Magén, César; María de Teresa, José

    2016-07-01

    Functional nanostructured materials often rely on the combination of more than one material to confer the desired functionality or an enhanced performance of the device. Here we report the procedure to create nanoscale heterostructured materials in the form of core-shell nanowires by focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) technologies. In our case, three-dimensional (3D) nanowires (nanostructures to demonstrate that the morphology of the shell is conserved during Pt coating, the surface oxidation is suppressed or confined to the Pt layer, and the average magnetization of the core is strengthened up to 30%. The proposed approach paves the way to the fabrication of 3D FEBID nanostructures based on the smart alternate deposition of two or more materials combining different physical properties or added functionalities.

  20. High-Temperature Passive Power Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    In many future NASA missions - such as deep-space exploration, the National AeroSpace Plane, minisatellites, integrated engine electronics, and ion or arcjet thrusters - high-power electrical components and systems must operate reliably and efficiently in high-temperature environments. The high-temperature power electronics program at the NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on dielectric and insulating material research, the development and characterization of high-temperature components, and the integration of the developed components into a demonstrable 200 C power system - such as an inverter. NASA Lewis has developed high-temperature power components through collaborative efforts with the Air Force Wright Laboratory, Northrop Grumman, and the University of Wisconsin. Ceramic and film capacitors, molypermalloy powder inductors, and a coaxially wound transformer were designed, developed, and evaluated for high-temperature operation.

  1. Relativistic contributions to single and double core electron ionization energies of noble gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, J; Norman, P; Aksela, H; Agren, H

    2011-08-07

    We have performed relativistic calculations of single and double core 1s hole states of the noble gas atoms in order to explore the relativistic corrections and their additivity to the ionization potentials. Our study unravels the interplay of progression of relaxation, dominating in the single and double ionization potentials of the light elements, versus relativistic one-electron effects and quantum electrodynamic effects, which dominate toward the heavy end. The degree of direct relative additivity of the relativistic corrections for the single electron ionization potentials to the double electron ionization potentials is found to gradually improve toward the heavy elements. The Dirac-Coulomb Hamiltonian is found to predict a scaling ratio of ∼4 for the relaxation induced relativistic energies between double and single ionization. Z-scaling of the computed quantities were obtained by fitting to power law. The effects of nuclear size and form were also investigated and found to be small. The results indicate that accurate predictions of double core hole ionization potentials can now be made for elements across the full periodic table.

  2. Optics of high-performance electron microscopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, H H

    2008-01-01

    During recent years, the theory of charged particle optics together with advances in fabrication tolerances and experimental techniques has lead to very significant advances in high-performance electron microscopes. Here, we will describe which theoretical tools, inventions and designs have driven this development. We cover the basic theory of higher-order electron optics and of image formation in electron microscopes. This leads to a description of different methods to correct aberrations by multipole fields and to a discussion of the most advanced design that take advantage of these techniques. The theory of electron mirrors is developed and it is shown how this can be used to correct aberrations and to design energy filters. Finally, different types of energy filters are described.

  3. Core level excitations — A fingerprint of structural and electronic properties of epitaxial silicene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friedlein, R.; Fleurence, A.; Aoyagi, K.; Jong, de M.P.; Van Bui, H.; Wiggers, F.B.; Yoshimoto, S.; Koitaya, T.; Shimizu, S.; Noritake, H.; Mukai, K.; Yoshinobu, J.; Yamada-Takamura, Y.

    2014-01-01

    From the analysis of high-resolution Si 2p photoelectron and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra, we show that core level excitations of epitaxial silicene on ZrB2(0001) thin films are characteristically different from those of sp 3-hybridized silicon. In particular, it is rev

  4. Development of high quality electron beam accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kando, Masaki; Dewa, Hideki; Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kondo, Shuji; Hosokai, Tomonao; Kanazawa, Shuhei; Yokoyama, Takashi; Nakajima, Kazuhisa [Advanced Photon Research Center, Kansai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Kizu, Kyoto (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    A design study on a high quality electron beam accelerator is described. This accelerator will be used for second generation experiments of laser wakefield acceleration, short x-ray generation, and other experiments of interaction of high intensity laser with an electron beam at Advanced Photon Research Center, Kansai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The system consists of a photocathode rf gun and a race-track microtron (RTM). To combine these two components, injection and extraction beamlines are designed employing transfer matrix and compute codes. A present status of the accelerator system is also presented. (author)

  5. Core Community Specifications for Electron Microprobe Operating Systems: Software, Quality Control, and Data Management Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournelle, John; Carpenter, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Modem electron microprobe systems have become increasingly sophisticated. These systems utilize either UNIX or PC computer systems for measurement, automation, and data reduction. These systems have undergone major improvements in processing, storage, display, and communications, due to increased capabilities of hardware and software. Instrument specifications are typically utilized at the time of purchase and concentrate on hardware performance. The microanalysis community includes analysts, researchers, software developers, and manufacturers, who could benefit from exchange of ideas and the ultimate development of core community specifications (CCS) for hardware and software components of microprobe instrumentation and operating systems.

  6. Smart micelle@polydopamine core-shell nanoparticles for highly effective chemo-photothermal combination therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruirui; Su, Shishuai; Hu, Kelei; Shao, Leihou; Deng, Xiongwei; Sheng, Wang; Wu, Yan

    2015-11-01

    In this investigation, we have designed and synthesized a novel core-shell polymer nanoparticle system for highly effective chemo-photothermal combination therapy. A nanoscale DSPE-PEG micelle encapsulating doxorubicin (Dox-M) was designed as a core, and then modified by a polydopamine (PDA) shell for photothermal therapy and bortezomib (Btz) administration (Dox-M@PDA-Btz). The facile conjugation of Btz to the catechol-containing PDA shell can form a reversible pH-sensitive boronic acid-catechol conjugate to create a stimuli-responsive drug carrier system. As expected, the micelle@PDA core-shell nanoparticles exhibited satisfactory photothermal efficiency, which has potential for thermal ablation of malignant tissues. In addition, on account of the PDA modification, both Dox and Btz release processes were pH-dependent and NIR-dependent. Both in vitro and in vivo studies illustrated that the Dox-M@PDA-Btz nanoparticles coupled with laser irradiation could enhance the cytotoxicity, and thus combinational therapy efficacy was achieved when integrating Dox, Btz, and PDA into a single nanoplatform. Altogether, our current study indicated that the micelle@polydopamine core-shell nanoparticles could be applied for NIR/pH-responsive sustained-release and synergized chemo-photothermal therapy for breast cancer.In this investigation, we have designed and synthesized a novel core-shell polymer nanoparticle system for highly effective chemo-photothermal combination therapy. A nanoscale DSPE-PEG micelle encapsulating doxorubicin (Dox-M) was designed as a core, and then modified by a polydopamine (PDA) shell for photothermal therapy and bortezomib (Btz) administration (Dox-M@PDA-Btz). The facile conjugation of Btz to the catechol-containing PDA shell can form a reversible pH-sensitive boronic acid-catechol conjugate to create a stimuli-responsive drug carrier system. As expected, the micelle@PDA core-shell nanoparticles exhibited satisfactory photothermal efficiency, which has

  7. Core surface flow modelling from high-resolution secular variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holme, R.; Olsen, Nils

    2006-01-01

    -flux hypothesis, but the spectrum of the SV implies that a conclusive test of frozen-flux is not possible. We parametrize the effects of diffusion as an expected misfit in the flow prediction due to departure from the frozen-flux hypothesis; at low spherical harmonic degrees, this contribution dominates...... the expected departure of the SV predictions from flow to the observed SV, while at high degrees the SV model uncertainty is dominant. We construct fine-scale core surface flows to model the SV. Flow non-uniqueness is a serious problem because the flows are sufficiently small scale to allow flow around non......-series of magnetic data and better parametrization of the external magnetic field....

  8. Decal Electronics: Printable Packaged with 3D Printing High-Performance Flexible CMOS Electronic Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Sevilla, Galo T.

    2016-10-14

    High-performance complementary metal oxide semiconductor electronics are flexed, packaged using 3D printing as decal electronics, and then printed in roll-to-roll fashion for highly manufacturable printed flexible high-performance electronic systems.

  9. Flexible core masking technique for beam halo measurements with high dynamic range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egberts, J [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Saupfercheckweg 1, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Welsch, C P, E-mail: Carsten.Welsch@quasar-group.co [Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Science and Innovation Campus, WA4 4AD Warrington (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-15

    A thorough understanding of halo formation and its possible control is highly desirable for essentially all particle accelerators. Particles outside the beam core are not only lost for further experiments, they are also likely to hit the beam pipe, and activate this, as well as accelerator and experimental components in close proximity, which makes work on the accelerator costly and time consuming. Well established techniques for transverse beam profile measurements of electron or high energy hadron beams are the observation of synchrotron radiation, optical transition radiation or the like. A particular challenge, however, is the detection of particles in the tail regions of the beam distribution in close proximity of the very intense beam core. Results from laboratory measurements on two different devices are presented that might form the technical base of a future beam halo monitor: the novel SpectraCam XDR camera system which has an intrinsically high dynamic range due to its unique pixel design, and a flexible masking technique based on a DMD micro mirror array which allows for a fast mask generation to blank out the central core.

  10. The future of high resolution electron microscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D Van Dyck

    2000-01-01

    The state of the art and the future in quantitative high resolution electron microscopy are discussed in the framework of parameter estimation. Reconstruction methods are then to be considered as direct methods to yield a starting structure for further refinement. With the increasing flexibility of the instruments, computer aided experimental strategy will become important.

  11. High Performance Electronics on Flexible Silicon

    KAUST Repository

    Sevilla, Galo T.

    2016-09-01

    Over the last few years, flexible electronic systems have gained increased attention from researchers around the world because of their potential to create new applications such as flexible displays, flexible energy harvesters, artificial skin, and health monitoring systems that cannot be integrated with conventional wafer based complementary metal oxide semiconductor processes. Most of the current efforts to create flexible high performance devices are based on the use of organic semiconductors. However, inherent material\\'s limitations make them unsuitable for big data processing and high speed communications. The objective of my doctoral dissertation is to develop integration processes that allow the transformation of rigid high performance electronics into flexible ones while maintaining their performance and cost. In this work, two different techniques to transform inorganic complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor electronics into flexible ones have been developed using industry compatible processes. Furthermore, these techniques were used to realize flexible discrete devices and circuits which include metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors, the first demonstration of flexible Fin-field-effect-transistors, and metal-oxide-semiconductors-based circuits. Finally, this thesis presents a new technique to package, integrate, and interconnect flexible high performance electronics using low cost additive manufacturing techniques such as 3D printing and inkjet printing. This thesis contains in depth studies on electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties of the fabricated devices.

  12. First principles design of a core bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goparaju, Geetha; Fry, Bryan A.; Chobot, Sarah E.; Wiedman, Gregory; Moser, Christopher C.; Leslie Dutton, P.; Discher, Bohdana M.

    2016-05-01

    Here we describe the design, Escherichia coli expression and characterization of a simplified, adaptable and functionally transparent single chain 4-α-helix transmembrane protein frame that binds multiple heme and light activatable porphyrins. Such man-made cofactor-binding oxidoreductases, designed from first principles with minimal reference to natural protein sequences, are known as maquettes. This design is an adaptable frame aiming to uncover core engineering principles governing bioenergetic transmembrane electron-transfer function and recapitulate protein archetypes proposed to represent the origins of photosynthesis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics — the design and engineering of electronic transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  13. Observation of electron interference in GaAs/InAs core/shell nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guel, Oender; Bloemers, Christian; Rieger, Torsten; Lepsa, Mihail I.; Lueth, Hans; Gruetzmacher, Detlev [Peter Gruenberg Institut (PGI-9), Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Schaepers, Thomas [Peter Gruenberg Institut (PGI-9), Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany); JARA-Fundamentals of Future Information Technology, 52074 Aachen (Germany); II. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Electron and spin interference in mesoscopic semiconductor systems is of fundamental interest for future spin- and quantum-based information technology. In this context, bottom-up device approaches such as templated self-assembled nanowires are particularly interesting. Here we report on electron wave interference in GaAs/InAs core/shell nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Magnetotransport measurements were performed at 1.8 K and at magnetic fields up to 10 T. Additionally, gate voltage dependence of magnetotransport characteristics is investigated. Conductance oscillations are observed as a function of the magnetic field as well as the gate voltage. Fourier analysis of data suggests periodicity both in magnetic field and gate voltage. Further, phase-coherent transport properties of these nanowires are unravelled by applying the magnetic field in different orientations as well as by temperature dependent measurements.

  14. Distributions of hafnia and titania cores in EUV metal resists evaluated by scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriumi, Minoru; Sato, Yuta; Koshino, Masanori; Suenaga, Kazu; Itani, Toshiro

    2016-11-01

    The morphologies of hafnia (HfO x ) and titania (TiO x ) cores and their distributions in metal resists for EUV lithography were characterized at the atomic level by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). The HfO x cores show a higher affinity to organic components, such as methacrylic acid and benzoic acid, than the TiO x cores, and the same core-shell state as in a solution is almost completely maintained in the HfO x resist film. Furthermore, it was found that the surface modification of the TiO x cores by silylation is effective for preventing their aggregation and improves the postcoating delay (PCD) of the resist.

  15. Engineered core-shell nanofibers for electron transport study in dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabdan, Y.; Ronasi, A.; Coulibaly, P.; Moniruddin, M.; Nuraje, N.

    2017-06-01

    In this study, a unique approach was developed to synthesize 1-D core-shell nanofibers of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and TiO2 using combination of coaxial electrospinning and sol-gel technique. Diameters of the fabricated core-shell single wall carbon nanotube-TiO2 (SWCNT-TiO2) and multi wall carbon nanotube-TiO2 (MWCNT-TiO2) nano-composite fibers were between 50-100nm. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) were applied to confirm encapsulation of carbon nanotube (CNT) in the core-shell structure. Electron transport properties of both SWCNT-TiO2 and MWCNT-TiO2 in the Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were studied for the first time. It was found that SWCNT-TiO2 based DSSC provided higher short circuit current relative to MWCNT-TiO2, which was explained by I-V and bode plots. These findings were further illustrated by semi-conductive properties of SWCNT.

  16. Electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of liquid Fe alloys at high P and T, and heat flux in Earth's core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koker, Nico; Steinle-Neumann, Gerd; Vlcek, Vojtech

    2012-03-13

    Earth's magnetic field is sustained by magnetohydrodynamic convection within the metallic liquid core. In a thermally advecting core, the fraction of heat available to drive the geodynamo is reduced by heat conducted along the core geotherm, which depends sensitively on the thermal conductivity of liquid iron and its alloys with candidate light elements. The thermal conductivity for Earth's core is very poorly constrained, with current estimates based on a set of scaling relations that were not previously tested at high pressures. We perform first-principles electronic structure computations to determine the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity for Fe, Fe-Si, and Fe-O liquid alloys. Computed resistivity agrees very well with existing shock compression measurements and shows strong dependence on light element concentration and type. Thermal conductivity at pressure and temperature conditions characteristic of Earth's core is higher than previous extrapolations. Conductive heat flux near the core-mantle boundary is comparable to estimates of the total heat flux from the core but decreases with depth, so that thermally driven flow would be constrained to greater depths in the absence of an inner core.

  17. Electronic structure of edge dislocation of core-doped Ti in Fe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DANG Hongli; WANG Chongyu; SHU Xiaolin

    2004-01-01

    The electronic structure of an edge dislocation doped Ti lying in the (001) plane with Burgers Vector along [100] direction in body-centered cubic iron is investigated using the first principles discrete variational method (DVM) based on the density-functional theory. The binding energy, impurity formation energy, interatomic energy, Mulliken orbital populations and charge density difference are presented in this paper. By calculating the binding energy of the clean dislocation system and the Ti-doped system, it is found that the binding energy of Ti-doped dislocation system is lower than that of the clean dislocation system, which implies that the Ti-doped dislocation system is more stable than the clean dislocation system. The calculated result of the impurity formation energy predicts the trapping effect of dislocation core for Ti, which shows that Ti atom prefers to occupy the place at the dislocation core. The calculated results of the interatomic energy and the difference charge density of dislocation doped Ti system indicate that the stronger bonding formed between the Ti impurity and its neighbor Fe atoms will affect the mechanical property of edge dislocation. Considering the influence of Ti on the electronic structure and the energies, we can predict that the trace Ti in transition metal Fe with dislocation defect can give a significant contribution to the solid solution hardening effects and will influence the mechanical property of materials.

  18. Bipartite electronic superstructures in the vortex core of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machida, T.; Kohsaka, Y.; Matsuoka, K.; Iwaya, K.; Hanaguri, T.; Tamegai, T.

    2016-05-01

    The central issue in the physics of cuprate superconductivity is the mutual relationship among superconductivity, pseudogap and broken-spatial-symmetry states. A magnetic field B suppresses superconductivity, providing an opportunity to investigate the competition among these states. Although various B-induced electronic superstructures have been reported, their energy, spatial and momentum-space structures are unclear. Here, we show using spectroscopic-imaging scanning tunnelling microscopy on Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ that there are two distinct B-induced electronic superstructures, both being localized in the vortex core but appearing at different energies. In the low-energy range where the nodal Bogoliubov quasiparticles are well-defined, we observe the so-called vortex checkerboard that we identify as the B-enhanced quasiparticle interference pattern. By contrast, in the high-energy region where the pseudogap develops, the broken-spatial-symmetry patterns that pre-exist at B=0 T is locally enhanced in the vortex core. This evidences the competition between superconductivity and the broken-spatial-symmetry state that is associated with the pseudogap.

  19. Effects of electron-withdrawing group and electron-donating core combinations on physical properties and photovoltaic performance in D-pi-A star-shaped small molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luponosov, Yuriy N.; Min, Jie; Solodukhin, Alexander N.; Kozlov, Oleg V.; Obrezkova, Marina A.; Peregudova, Svetlana M.; Ameri, Tayebeh; Chvalun, Sergei N.; Pshenichnikov, Maxim S.; Brabec, Christoph J.; Ponomarenko, Sergei A.

    2016-01-01

    The first representatives of star-shaped molecules having 3-alkylrhodanine (alkyl-Rh) electron-withdrawing groups, linked through bithiophene pi-spacer with electron-donating either triphenylamine (TPA) or tris(2-methoxyphenyl)amine (m-TPA) core were synthesized. The physical properties and photovol

  20. Core size determination and structural characterization of intravenous iron complexes by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yong; Petrochenko, Peter; Chen, Lynn; Wong, Sook Yee; Absar, Mohammad; Choi, Stephanie; Zheng, Jiwen

    2016-05-30

    Understanding physicochemical properties of intravenous (IV) iron drug products is essential to ensure the manufacturing process is consistent and streamlined. The history of physicochemical characterization of IV iron complex formulations stretches over several decades, with disparities in iron core size and particle morphology as the major source of debate. One of the main reasons for this controversy is room temperature sample preparation artifacts, which affect accurate determination of size, shape and agglomeration/aggregation of nanoscale iron particles. The present study is first to report the ultra-fine iron core structures of four IV iron complex formulations, sodium ferric gluconate, iron sucrose, low molecular weight iron dextran and ferumoxytol, using a cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) preservation technique, as opposed to the conventional room temperature (RT-TEM) technique. Our results show that room temperature preparation causes nanoparticle aggregation and deformation, while cryo-TEM preserves IV iron colloidal suspension in their native frozen-hydrated and undiluted state. In contrast to the current consensus in literature, all four IV iron colloids exhibit a similar morphology of their iron oxide cores with a spherical shape, narrow size distribution and an average size of 2nm. Moreover, out of the four tested formulations, ferumoxytol exhibits a cluster-like community of several iron carbohydrate particles which likely accounts for its large hydrodynamic size of 25nm, measured with dynamic light scattering. Our findings outline a suitable method for identifying colloidal nanoparticle core size in the native state, which is increasingly important for manufacturing and design control of complex drug formulations, such as IV iron drug products.

  1. Searching for Cool Core Clusters at High redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Joana S; Tozzi, Paolo; Boehringer, Hans; Ettori, Stefano; Bignamini, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the detection of Cool Cores (CCs) in the distant galaxy cluster population, with the purpose of measuring the CC fraction out to redshift 0.7 0.7, and should also be related with the shorter age of distant clusters, implying less time to develop a cool core.

  2. High energy electron beams for ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turman, B.N.; Glass, S.J.; Halbleib, J.A.; Helmich, D.R.; Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Clifford, J.R. [Titan Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Joining of structural ceramics is possible using high melting point metals such as Mo and Pt that are heated with a high energy electron beam, with the potential for high temperature joining. A 10 MeV electron beam can penetrate through 1 cm of ceramic, offering the possibility of buried interface joining. Because of transient heating and the lower heat capacity of the metal relative to the ceramic, a pulsed high power beam has the potential for melting the metal without decomposing or melting the ceramic. We have demonstrated the feasibility of the process with a series of 10 MeV, 1 kW electron beam experiments. Shear strengths up to 28 MPa have been measured. This strength is comparable to that reported in the literature for bonding silicon nitride to molybdenum with copper-silver-titanium braze, but weaker than that reported for Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} with gold-nickel braze. The bonding mechanism appears to be a thin silicide layer.

  3. Development and implementation of theoretical methods for the description of electronically core-excited states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenzel, Jan

    2016-03-23

    -cc-series, a mean error of -0.23% ±0.12% for core-excitation energies can be identified at the CVS-ADC(2)-x level for carbon, nitrogen and oxygen K-edge excitations, whereas CVS-ADC(3) exhibits errors of 0.61% ± 0.32%. This is due to fortuitous error compensation of basis set truncation, electron correlation, orbital relaxation and neglect of relativistic effects at the CVS-ADC(2)-x level. Transition moments and spectral features, as well as static dipole moments, are excellently described with both CVS-ADC(2)-x and CVS-ADC(3). Especially the 6-311++G** basis set provides an excellent ratio of accuracy to computational time. Another important topic is the description of orbital relaxation effects. In the scope of this thesis, I show, how these effects are included indirectly within the CVS-ADC approaches. For this purpose, two different descriptors are used, i.e. electron promotion numbers and the amount of doubly excited amplitudes. Furthermore, with the help of detachment/attachment (D/A) densities, which can be constructed via the CVS-ISR approach, relaxation effects can be visualized. For this purpose, the (D/A) densities are compared with hole/electron (h/e) densities based on the transition density matrix. With this knowledge, the X-ray absorption spectra of medium-sized molecules and radicals from the fields of organic electronics and biology are investigated and analyzed. On the basis of these studies, the restricted and unrestricted versions of CVS-ADC(2)-x in combination with the 6-311++G** basis set exhibit mean errors of core-excitation energies around 0.1%, compared to experimental values. Additionally, core-excited state characters are analyzed with the help of state densities obtained via the CVS-ISR approach or the transition density matrix. To demonstrate the computational savings as a function of the size of the core space, several systems are investigated. CVS-ADC(3) calculations take about 8-10 times longer than CVS-ADC(2)-x calculations and since the

  4. High performance multi-core iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia: microwave synthesis, and the role of core-to-core interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Andujar, C.; Ortega, D.; Southern, P.; PankhurstJoint Last Authors., Q. A.; Thanh, N. T. K.

    2015-01-01

    The adoption of magnetic hyperthermia as either a stand-alone or adjunct therapy for cancer is still far from being optimised due to the variable performance found in many iron oxide nanoparticle systems, including commercially available formulations. Herein, we present a reproducible and potentially scalable microwave-based method to make stable citric acid coated multi-core iron oxide nanoparticles, with exceptional magnetic heating parameters, viz. intrinsic loss parameters (ILPs) of up to 4.1 nH m2 kg-1, 35% better than the best commercial equivalents. We also probe the core-to-core magnetic interactions in the particles via remanence-derived Henkel and ΔM plots. These reveal a monotonic dependence of the ILP on the magnetic interaction field Hint, and show that the interactions are demagnetising in nature, and act to hinder the magnetic heating mechanism.The adoption of magnetic hyperthermia as either a stand-alone or adjunct therapy for cancer is still far from being optimised due to the variable performance found in many iron oxide nanoparticle systems, including commercially available formulations. Herein, we present a reproducible and potentially scalable microwave-based method to make stable citric acid coated multi-core iron oxide nanoparticles, with exceptional magnetic heating parameters, viz. intrinsic loss parameters (ILPs) of up to 4.1 nH m2 kg-1, 35% better than the best commercial equivalents. We also probe the core-to-core magnetic interactions in the particles via remanence-derived Henkel and ΔM plots. These reveal a monotonic dependence of the ILP on the magnetic interaction field Hint, and show that the interactions are demagnetising in nature, and act to hinder the magnetic heating mechanism. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Reproducibility studies and additional characterisation data including SQUID Magnetometry, TEM, ATR-FTIR, XRD and Mossbauer spectroscopy. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06239f

  5. Ultra-High-Contrast Laser Acceleration of Relativistic Electrons in Solid Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higginson, Drew Pitney [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The cone-guided fast ignition approach to Inertial Con nement Fusion requires laser-accelerated relativistic electrons to deposit kilojoules of energy within an imploded fuel core to initiate fusion burn. One obstacle to coupling electron energy into the core is the ablation of material, known as preplasma, by laser energy proceeding nanoseconds prior to the main pulse. This causes the laser-absorption surface to be pushed back hundreds of microns from the initial target surface; thus increasing the distance that electrons must travel to reach the imploded core. Previous experiments have shown an order of magnitude decrease in coupling into surrogate targets when intentionally increasing the amount of preplasma. Additionally, for electrons to deposit energy within the core, they should have kinetic energies on the order of a few MeV, as less energetic electrons will be stopped prior to the core and more energetic electrons will pass through the core without depositing much energy. Thus a quantitative understanding of the electron energy spectrum and how it responds to varied laser parameters is paramount for fast ignition. For the rst time, this dissertation quantitatively investigates the acceleration of electrons using an ultra-high-contrast laser. Ultra-high-contrast lasers reduce the laser energy that reaches the target prior to the main pulse; drastically reducing the amount of preplasma. Experiments were performed in a cone-wire geometry relevant to fast ignition. These experiments irradiated the inner-tip of a Au cone with the laser and observed electrons that passed through a Cu wire attached to the outer-tip of the cone. The total emission of K x-rays is used as a diagnostic to infer the electron energy coupled into the wire. Imaging the x-ray emission allowed an e ective path-length of electrons within the wire to be determined, which constrained the electron energy spectrum. Experiments were carried out on the ultra-high-contrast Trident laser at Los

  6. Highly integrated electronics for the star TPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, A.A.; Bieser, F.; Hearn, W.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Millaud, J.; Noggle, T.; Rai, G.; Ritter, H.G.; Wieman, H. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The concept for the STAR TPC front-end electronics is presented and the progress toward the development of a fully integrated solution is described. It is the goal of the R+D program to develop the complete electronics chain for the STAR central TPC detector at RHIC. It is obvious that solutions chosen e.g. for ALEPH are not adequate for the 150000 channels that need to be instrumented for readout. It will be necessary to perform all the signal processing, digitization and multiplexing directly on the detector in order to reduce per channel cost and the amount of cabling necessary to read out the information. We follow the approach chosen by the EOS TPC project, where the readout electronics on the detector consists of an integrated preamplifier, a hybrid shaping amplifier, an integrated switched capacitor array and a highly multiplexed ADC. The STAR electronics will be further integrated so that approximately 16 channels of the preamplifier, the shaper, the analog store and the ADC will be contained in two integrated circuits located directly on the pad plane.

  7. Highly integrated electronics for the star TPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur, A.A.; Bieser, F.; Hearn, W.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Millaud, J.; Noggle, T.; Rai, G.; Ritter, H.G.; Wieman, H. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The concept for the STAR TPC front-end electronics is presented and the progress toward the development of a fully integrated solution is described. It is the goal of the R+D program to develop the complete electronics chain for the STAR central TPC detector at RHIC. It is obvious that solutions chosen e.g. for ALEPH are not adequate for the 150000 channels that need to be instrumented for readout. It will be necessary to perform all the signal processing, digitization and multiplexing directly on the detector in order to reduce per channel cost and the amount of cabling necessary to read out the information. We follow the approach chosen by the EOS TPC project, where the readout electronics on the detector consists of an integrated preamplifier, a hybrid shaping amplifier, an integrated switched capacitor array and a highly multiplexed ADC. The STAR electronics will be further integrated so that approximately 16 channels of the preamplifier, the shaper, the analog store and the ADC will be contained in two integrated circuits located directly on the pad plane.

  8. Multiple low-turbulence starless cores associated with intermediate- to high-mass star formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuther, H.; Henning, Th.

    2009-09-01

    larger than for example in the Pipe nebula) implying relatively small Jeans-lengths that are consistent with the observed core separations of the order 5000 AU. Environmental reasons potentially determining these values are discussed. Conclusions: These observations show that multiple low- to intermediate-mass low-turbulence starless cores can exist in the proximity of more turbulent active intermediate- to high-mass star-forming regions. While masses and levels of turbulence are consistent with low-mass starless core regions, other parameters like the densities or Jeans-lengths differ considerably. This may be due to environmental effects. The quest for high-mass starless cores prior to any star formation activity remains open. Plateau de Bure maps as FITS are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/503/859

  9. Molecular cores of the high-latitude cloud MBM 40

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chol Minh, Y. C. Young; Kim, Hyun-Goo; Lee, Youngung; Park, Hyeran; Kim, Kwang-Tae; Park, Yong-Sun; Joon Kim, Sang

    2003-11-01

    Towards the high-latitude cloud MBM 40, we identify 3 dense molecular cores of M˜0.2-0.5 M ⊙, and sizes of ˜0.2 pc in diameter embedded in the H I cloud of ˜8 M ⊙ which is observed to be extended along the northeast-southwest direction. The molecular cloud is located almost perpendicularly to the H I emission. We confirm the previous result of Magnani et al. that MBM 40 is not a site for new star formations. We found a very poor correlation between the H I and the IRAS 100 μm emissions, but the CO (1-0) and 100 μm emissions show a better correlation of WCO/ I100=1±0.2 K km s -1 (MJy sr -1) -1. This ratio is larger by a factor of ≥5 than in dense dark clouds, which may indicate that the CO is less depleted in MBM 40 than in dense dark clouds.

  10. Development of High-frequency Soft Magnetic Materials for Power Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Jun-chang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The new requirements of high-frequency magnetic properties are put forward for electronic components with the rapid development of power electronics industry and the use of new electromagnetic materials. The properties of magnetic core, which is the key unit of electronic components, determine the performance of electronic components directly. Therefore, it's necessary to study the high-frequency soft magnetic materials. In this paper, the development history of four types of soft magnetic materials was reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of each kind of soft magnetic materials and future development trends were pointed out. The emphases were placed on the popular soft magnetic composite materials in recent years. The tendency is to develop high-frequency soft magnetic composite materials with the particle size controllable, uniform coating layer on the core and a mass production method from laboratory to industrialization.

  11. Electronic Current Transducer (ECT) for high voltage dc lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, J. M.; Peters, P. H., Jr.; Summerayes, H. R., Jr.; Carlson, G. J.; Itani, A. M.

    1980-02-01

    The development of a bipolar electronic current transducer (ECT) for measuring the current in a high voltage dc (HVDC) power line at line potential is discussed. The design and construction of a free standing ECT for use on a 400 kV line having a nominal line current of 2000 A is described. Line current is measured by a 0.0001 ohm shunt whose voltage output is sampled by a 14 bit digital data link. The high voltage interface between line and ground is traversed by optical fibers which carry digital light signals as far as 300 m to a control room where the digital signal is converted back to an analog representation of the shunt voltage. Two redundant electronic and optical data links are used in the prototype. Power to operate digital and optical electronics and temperature controlling heaters at the line is supplied by a resistively and capacitively graded 10 stage cascade of ferrite core transformers located inside the hollow, SF6 filled, porcelain support insulator. The cascade is driven by a silicon controlled rectifier inverter which supplies about 100 W of power at 30 kHz.

  12. Highly efficient fluorescence sensing with hollow core photonic crystal fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Smolka, Stephan; Barth, Michael; Benson, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    We investigate hollow core photonic crystal fibers for ultra-sensitive fluorescence detection by selectively infiltrating the central hole with fluorophores. Dye concentrations down to 10(-9) M can be detected using only nanoliter sample volumes.

  13. Structure and mechanism of the formation of core-shell nanoparticles obtained through a one-step gas-phase synthesis by electron beam evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoev, Andrey V; Bardakhanov, Sergey P; Schreiber, Makoto; Bazarova, Dashima G; Romanov, Nikolai A; Baldanov, Boris B; Radnaev, Bair R; Syzrantsev, Viacheslav V

    2015-01-01

    The structure of core-shell Cu@silica and Ag@Si nanoparticles obtained in one-step through evaporation of elemental precursors by a high-powered electron beam are investigated. The structure of the core and shell of the particles are investigated in order to elucidate their mechanisms of formation and factors affecting the synthesis. It is proposed that the formation of Cu@silica particles is mainly driven by surface tension differences between Cu and Si while the formation of Ag@Si particles is mainly driven by differences in the vapour concentration of the two components.

  14. Gamma ray heating rates due to chromium isotopes in stellar core during late stages of high mass stars (>10M⊙

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabi Jameel-Un

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma ray heating rates are thought to play a crucial role during the pre-supernova stage of high mass stars. Gamma ray heating rates, due to β±-decay and electron (positron capture on chromium isotopes, are calculated using proton-neutron quasiparticle random phase approximation theory. The electron capture significantly affects the lepton fraction (Ye and accelerates the core contraction. The gamma rays emitted as a result of weak processes heat the core and tend to hinder the cooling and contraction due to electron capture and neutrino emission. The emitted gamma rays tend to produce enormous entropy and set the convection to play its role at this stage. The gamma heating rates, on 50-60Cr, are calculated for the density range 10 < ρ (g.cm-3 < 1011 and temperature range 107 < T (K < 3.0×1010.

  15. High thermal stability of core-shell structures dominated by negative interface energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong-Fu; Zhao, Ning; Jin, Bo; Zhao, Ming; Jiang, Qing

    2017-03-29

    Nanoscale core/shell structures are of interest in catalysis due to their superior catalytic properties. Here we investigated the thermal stability of the coherent core-shell structures in a thermodynamic way by considering the impact from the core with the bulk melting point Tm(∞) lower or higher than the shell. When a low-Tm(∞) core is adopted, core-shell melting induced by the melting depression of the core does not occur upon heating because of the superheating, although the melting depression of the core can be triggered ultimately by the preferential melting of the high-Tm(∞) shell for small cores. The superheating of the core is contributed by the negative solid-solid interface energy, while the depression is originated from the positive solid-liquid interface energy. Owing to the presence of the negative interface energy, moreover, the low-Tm(∞)-core structure possesses a low difference in thermal expansion between the core and the shell, high activation energy of outward atomic diffusion from the core to shell, and low heat capacity. This result is beneficial for the core-shell structure design for its application in catalysis.

  16. Sensitivity Analysis of Core Neutronic Parameters in Electron Accelerator-driven Subcritical Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marziye Ebrahimkhani

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Calculation of the core neutronic parameters is one of the key components in all nuclear reactors. In this research, the energy spectrum and spatial distribution of the neutron flux in a uranium target have been calculated. In addition, sensitivity of the core neutronic parameters in accelerator-driven subcritical advanced liquid metal reactors, such as electron beam energy (Ee and source multiplication coefficient (ks, has been investigated. A Monte Carlo code (MCNPX_2.6 has been used to calculate neutronic parameters such as effective multiplication coefficient (keff, net neutron multiplication (M, neutron yield (Yn/e, energy constant gain (G0, energy gain (G, importance of neutron source (φ∗, axial and radial distributions of neutron flux, and power peaking factor (Pmax/Pave in two axial and radial directions of the reactor core for four fuel loading patterns. According to the results, safety margin and accelerator current (Ie have been decreased in the highest case of ks, but G and φ∗ have increased by 88.9% and 21.6%, respectively. In addition, for LP1 loading pattern, with increasing Ee from 100 MeV up to 1 GeV, Yn/e and G improved by 91.09% and 10.21%, and Ie and Pacc decreased by 91.05% and 10.57%, respectively. The results indicate that placement of the Np–Pu assemblies on the periphery allows for a consistent keff because the Np–Pu assemblies experience less burn-up.

  17. Highly efficient fluorescence sensing with hollow core photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smolka, Stephan; Barth, Michael; Benson, Oliver

    2008-01-01

    We investigate hollow core photonic crystal fibers for ultra-sensitive fluorescence detection by selectively infiltrating the central hole with fluorophores. Dye concentrations down to 10(-9) M can be detected using only nanoliter sample volumes.......We investigate hollow core photonic crystal fibers for ultra-sensitive fluorescence detection by selectively infiltrating the central hole with fluorophores. Dye concentrations down to 10(-9) M can be detected using only nanoliter sample volumes....

  18. Core-level electronic properties of nanostructured NiO coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacin, S. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Gutierrez, A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: a.gutierrez@uam.es; Preda, I.; Hernandez-Velez, M. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Sanz, R. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Jimenez, J.A. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CSIC, Av. Gregorio del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Soriano, L. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-10-31

    Nanostructured NiO films with different thicknesses were grown on nanoporous alumina membrane substrates by reactive evaporation of Ni in an oxygen atmosphere. The reactive deposition process was assisted by a low energy oxygen ion-beam in order to increase the NiO input into the pores. Surface morphology and structure of the films were analyzed by SEM and XPS. SEM observations reveal a well adhered film of NiO on the substrate. This film appears to be uniform and presents a rather irregular nanostructured morphology, built of NiO clusters with sizes ranging between 5 and 30 nm. The core-level electronic properties of this nanostructured NiO film result to be similar to those of an ultrathin film about one monolayer thick. This behaviour can be explained by the large surface to volume ratio of both systems.

  19. Wearable Electricity Generators Fabricated Utilizing Transparent Electronic Textiles Based on Polyester/Ag Nanowires/Graphene Core-Shell Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chaoxing; Kim, Tae Whan; Li, Fushan; Guo, Tailiang

    2016-07-26

    The technological realization of wearable triboelectric generators is attractive because of their promising applications in wearable self-powered intelligent systems. However, the low electrical conductivity, the low electrical stability, and the low compatibility of current electronic textiles (e-textiles) and clothing restrict the comfortable and aesthetic integration of wearable generators into human clothing. Here, we present high-performance, transparent, smart e-textiles that employ commercial textiles coated with silver nanowire/graphene sheets fabricated by using a scalable, environmentally friendly, full-solution process. The smart e-textiles show superb and stable conduction of below 20 Ω/square as well as excellent flexibility, stretchability, foldability, and washability. In addition, wearable electricity-generating textiles, in which the e-textiles act as electrodes as well as wearable substrates, are presented. Because of the high compatibility of smart e-textiles and clothing, the electricity-generating textiles can be easily integrated into a glove to harvest the mechanical energy induced by the motion of the fingers. The effective output power generated by a single generator due to that motion reached as high as 7 nW/cm(2). The successful demonstration of the electricity-generating glove suggests a promising future for polyester/Ag nanowire/graphene core-shell nanocomposite-based smart e-textiles for real wearable electronic systems and self-powered clothing.

  20. High-throughput methods for electron crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokes, David L; Ubarretxena-Belandia, Iban; Gonen, Tamir; Engel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins play a tremendously important role in cell physiology and serve as a target for an increasing number of drugs. Structural information is key to understanding their function and for developing new strategies for combating disease. However, the complex physical chemistry associated with membrane proteins has made them more difficult to study than their soluble cousins. Electron crystallography has historically been a successful method for solving membrane protein structures and has the advantage of providing a native lipid environment for these proteins. Specifically, when membrane proteins form two-dimensional arrays within a lipid bilayer, electron microscopy can be used to collect images and diffraction and the corresponding data can be combined to produce a three-dimensional reconstruction, which under favorable conditions can extend to atomic resolution. Like X-ray crystallography, the quality of the structures are very much dependent on the order and size of the crystals. However, unlike X-ray crystallography, high-throughput methods for screening crystallization trials for electron crystallography are not in general use. In this chapter, we describe two alternative methods for high-throughput screening of membrane protein crystallization within the lipid bilayer. The first method relies on the conventional use of dialysis for removing detergent and thus reconstituting the bilayer; an array of dialysis wells in the standard 96-well format allows the use of a liquid-handling robot and greatly increases throughput. The second method relies on titration of cyclodextrin as a chelating agent for detergent; a specialized pipetting robot has been designed not only to add cyclodextrin in a systematic way, but to use light scattering to monitor the reconstitution process. In addition, the use of liquid-handling robots for making negatively stained grids and methods for automatically imaging samples in the electron microscope are described.

  1. Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

  2. A high brightness electron beam for Free Electron Lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerle, van Bartholomeus Mathias

    1997-01-01

    In a free electron laser, coherent radiation is generated by letting an electron beam propagate through an alternating magnetic field. The magnetic field is created by a linear array of magnets, which is called an undulator or a wiggler. The wavelength of the laser radiation depends on the amplitude

  3. High-resolution XAS/XES analyzing electronic structures of catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Sa, Jacinto

    2014-01-01

    Photon-in-photon-out core level spectroscopy is an emerging approach to characterize the electronic structure of catalysts and enzymes, and it is either installed or planned for intense synchrotron beam lines and X-ray free electron lasers. This type of spectroscopy requires high-energy resolution spectroscopy not only for the incoming X-ray beam but also, in most applications, for the detection of the outgoing photons. Thus, the use of high-resolution X-ray crystal spectrometers whose resolving power ?E/E is typically about 10-4, is mandatory.High-Resolution XAS/XES: Analyzing Electronic Stru

  4. Influence of core property on multi-electron process in slow collisions of isocharged sequence ions with neon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Rong-Chun; Yu De-Yang; Shao Cao-Jie; Ruan Fang-Fang; Cai Xiao-Hong

    2010-01-01

    Influence of core property on multi-electron process in the collisions of q=6-9 and 11 isocharged sequence ions with Ne is investigated in the keV/u region.The cross-section ratios of double-,triple-,quadruple-and total multi-electron processes to the single electron capture process as well as the partial ratios of different reaction channels to the relevant multi-electron process are measured by using position-sensitive and time-of-flight techniques.The experimental data axe compared with the theoretical predictions including the extended classical over-barrier model,the molecular Columbic barrier model and the semi-empirical scaling law.Results show a core effect on multi-electron process of isocharge ions colliding with Neon,which is consistent with the results of Helium we obtained previously.

  5. Core-shell diode array for high performance particle detectors and imaging sensors: status of the development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, G.; Hübner, U.; Dellith, J.; Dellith, A.; Stolz, R.; Plentz, J.; Andrä, G.

    2017-02-01

    We propose a novel high performance radiation detector and imaging sensor by a ground-breaking core-shell diode array design. This novel core-shell diode array are expected to have superior performance respect to ultrahigh radiation hardness, high sensitivity, low power consumption, fast signal response and high spatial resolution simultaneously. These properties are highly desired in fundamental research such as high energy physics (HEP) at CERN, astronomy and future x-ray based protein crystallography at x-ray free electron laser (XFEL) etc.. This kind of detectors will provide solutions for these fundamental research fields currently limited by instrumentations. In this work, we report our progress on the development of core-shell diode array for the applications as high performance imaging sensors and particle detectors. We mainly present our results in the preparation of high aspect ratio regular silicon rods by metal assisted wet chemical etching technique. Nearly 200 μm deep and 2 μm width channels with high aspect ratio have been etched into silicon. This result will open many applications not only for the core-shell diode array, but also for a high density integration of 3D microelectronics devices.

  6. Efficient electronic structure calculation for molecular ionization dynamics at high x-ray intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajiang Hao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We present the implementation of an electronic-structure approach dedicated to ionization dynamics of molecules interacting with x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL pulses. In our scheme, molecular orbitals for molecular core-hole states are represented by linear combination of numerical atomic orbitals that are solutions of corresponding atomic core-hole states. We demonstrate that our scheme efficiently calculates all possible multiple-hole configurations of molecules formed during XFEL pulses. The present method is suitable to investigate x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics and accompanying nuclear dynamics, providing essential information on the chemical dynamics relevant for high-intensity x-ray imaging.

  7. Efficient electronic structure calculation for molecular ionization dynamics at high x-ray intensity

    CERN Document Server

    Hao, Yajiang; Hanasaki, Kota; Son, Sang-Kil; Santra, Robin

    2015-01-01

    We present the implementation of an electronic-structure approach dedicated to ionization dynamics of molecules interacting with x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses. In our scheme, molecular orbitals for molecular core-hole states are represented by linear combination of numerical atomic orbitals that are solutions of corresponding atomic core-hole states. We demonstrate that our scheme efficiently calculates all possible multiple-hole configurations of molecules formed during XFEL pulses. The present method is suitable to investigate x-ray multiphoton multiple ionization dynamics and accompanying nuclear dynamics, providing essential information on the chemical dynamics relevant for high-intensity x-ray imaging.

  8. Observations of L1521F: a highly evolved starless core

    CERN Document Server

    Crapsi, A; Walmsley, C M; Tafalla, M; Lee, C W; Bourke, T L; Myers, P C

    2004-01-01

    We observed the pre-stellar core L1521F in dust emission at 1.2mm and in two transitions each of N2H+, N2D+, C18O, and C17O in order to increase the sample of well studied centrally concentrated and chemically evolved starless cores, likely on the verge of star formation, and to determine the initial conditions for low--mass star formation in the Taurus Molecular Cloud. We derived in this object a molecular hydrogen number density n(H2) ~ 10^6 cm-3 and a CO depletion factor, integrated along the line of sight, fD ~ 15 in the central 20'', similar to the pre-stellar core L1544. However, the N(N2D+)/N(N2H+) column density ratio is ~0.1, a factor of about 2 lower than that found in L1544. The observed relation between the deuterium fractionation and the integrated CO depletion factor across the core can be reproduced by chemical models if N2H+ is slightly (factor of ~2 in fractional abundance) depleted in the central 3000 AU. The N2H+ and N2D+ linewidths in the core center are ~0.3 km/s, significantly larger tha...

  9. Modeling of high-speed electronic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Kudrya

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The theme of this publication is the modeling of electronic tools that operate in the frequency range from zero to terahertz and higher. Application of new concepts and technologies, including biotechnology and nanotechnology in the development of monolithic integrated circuits led to a backlog of technologies of projecting from technologies and experimental research and manufacturing. The aim of this work is to develop algorithms for analysis, reflecting not only topological as well as morphological properties of the object, that is designing within the framework of accounting EMI communicational  transmission of energy and information in the volume of the monolithic integrated circuit. Basic steps for constructing the algorithm. The object of design is presented in the form of basic elements, which can be combined with a communication structure. The object of design is presented in the form of basic elements, which can be combined with a communication structure. There are three types of matrix equations: component; component - communication structure; communication structure. Systems of equations are reduced to standardized descriptors of mathematical model by which to understand current of poles and voltage arcs whole set of basic elements. In this way obtained mathematical model that can be implemented in CAD nano and micro technology electronics. Conclusions. Mathematical models of analysis of high-speed digital and analog electronic means. The algorithm allows morphological optimization is to minimize the adverse effects outside the system of electromagnetic interaction between the components and communicator.

  10. Microfabricated high-throughput electronic particle detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, D. K.; Requa, M. V.; Cleland, A. N.

    2007-10-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and use of a radio frequency reflectometer integrated with a microfluidic system, applied to the very high-throughput measurement of micron-scale particles, passing in a microfluidic channel through the sensor region. The device operates as a microfabricated Coulter counter [U.S. Patent No. 2656508 (1953)], similar to a design we have described previously, but here with significantly improved electrode geometry as well as including electronic tuning of the reflectometer; the two improvements yielding an improvement by more than a factor of 10 in the signal to noise and in the diametric discrimination of single particles. We demonstrate the high-throughput discrimination of polystyrene beads with diameters in the 4-10μm range, achieving diametric resolutions comparable to the intrinsic spread of diameters in the bead distribution, at rates in excess of 15×106beads/h.

  11. Radio imaging of core-dominated high redshift quasars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthel, Peter D.; Vestergaard, Marianne; Lonsdale, Colin J.

    1999-01-01

    VLA imaging at kiloparsec-scale resolution of sixteen core-dominated radio-loud QSOs is presented. Many objects appear to display variable radio emission and their radio morphologies are significantly smaller than those of steep-spectrum quasars, consistent with these objects being observed...

  12. Core/shell Fe3O4/BiOI nanoparticles with high photocatalytic activity and stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Liyun; Wang, Shuling; Zhao, Lixin; Zhao, Shuguo

    2016-11-01

    Core/shell Fe3O4/BiOI nanoparticles with BiOI sheath have been synthesized by a solvothermal reaction method and were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with an energy dispersive spectrum (EDS), high-resolution TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Their photocatalytic activities were evaluated by methylene blue (MB) under the simulated solar light. The results indicate that the spherical Fe3O4 particles were coated with BiOI sheath when the sample were synthesized at 160 °C with ethylene glycol and deionized water, forming a core/shell structure. The degradation rate of MB assisted with the core/shell Fe3O4/BiOI catalysts reached 98 % after 40-min irradiation. The catalytic performance enhancement of the core/shell Fe3O4/BiOI catalysts mainly attributes to the band structure that can improve the generation efficiency, separation and transfer process of the photo-induced electron-hole pairs and decrease their recombination. The magnetic Fe3O4 core not only contributes to the efficient separation of electron and holes, but also helps catalysts be collected conveniently using a magnet for reuse. After five repeated trials, the degradation rate of MB still maintains over 90 % and the saturated magnetization of the catalysts remains 51.5 emu/g, which indicate that the core/shell Fe3O4/BiOI nanoparticles have excellent photocatalytic stability and are recyclable for decomposing organic pollutants under visible light irradiation.

  13. New core-substituted with electron-donating group 1,8-naphthalimides towards optoelectronic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schab-Balcerzak, Ewa, E-mail: eschab-balcerzak@cmpw-pan.edu.pl [Centre of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Polish Academy of Sciences, 34 M. Curie-Sklodowska Street, 41-819 Zabrze (Poland); Institute of Chemistry, University of Silesian, 9 Szkolna Street, 40-006 Katowice (Poland); Siwy, Mariola [Centre of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Polish Academy of Sciences, 34 M. Curie-Sklodowska Street, 41-819 Zabrze (Poland); Filapek, Michal; Kula, Slawomir; Malecki, Grzegorz [Institute of Chemistry, University of Silesian, 9 Szkolna Street, 40-006 Katowice (Poland); Laba, Katarzyna; Lapkowski, Mieczyslaw [Centre of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Polish Academy of Sciences, 34 M. Curie-Sklodowska Street, 41-819 Zabrze (Poland); Faculty of Chemistry, Silesian University of Technology, 9 Strzody Steet, 44-100 Gliwice (Poland); Janeczek, Henryk; Domanski, Marian [Centre of Polymer and Carbon Materials, Polish Academy of Sciences, 34 M. Curie-Sklodowska Street, 41-819 Zabrze (Poland)

    2015-10-15

    New 1,8-naphthalimides with thiophene or bithiophene structure attached by an imine linkage to naphthalene core were synthesized. The structures of obtained compounds were characterized by FTIR, {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis and for elected compounds by HRMS (ESI) spectrometry. Thermal, optical and electrochemical properties of obtained 1,8-naphthalimides were investigated. Most of them exhibited glass-forming properties with glass transition temperatures in the range of 73–278 °C. Optical properties of the prepared compounds were examined by UV–vis and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. They emitted light in chloroform solution with emission maximum at ca. 500 nm with the highest quantum yield of fluorescence around 0.46 and green one in NMP solution. In blend with PMMA blue emission was observed with the highest quantum yield of fluorescence around 0.24. All compounds are electrochemically active, and undergo reversible reduction and irreversible or quasi-reversible oxidation process as was found in cyclic and differential pulse voltammetry (CV and DPV) studies. They showed electrochemical band gaps in the range 2.28–2.68 eV. Additionally, the electronic properties, that is, orbital energies and resulting energy gap were calculated by density functional theory (DFT). Additionally, selected compounds were preliminary tested as electroluminescence materials in devices with structure ITO/PVK:NI blend/Al. - Highlights: • We obtained new core substituted 1,8-naphthalimides. • They emitted light in CHCl{sub 3} with the largest PL quantum yield measure for these compounds of 0.46. • They emitted blue light in a blend with PMMA with the largest Φ{sub f} 0.24 measured for these compounds. • Their electrochemical energy band gap was in the range of 2.28–2.68 eV. • Preliminary investigations showed that green electroluminescence was observed.

  14. Towards highly stable polymer electronics (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolka, Mark; Nasrallah, Iyad; Broch, Katharina; Sadhanala, Aditya; Hurhangee, Michael; McCulloch, Iain; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2016-11-01

    Due to their ease of processing, organic semiconductors are promising candidates for applications in high performance flexible displays and fast organic electronic circuitry. Recently, a lot of advances have been made on organic semiconductors exhibiting surprisingly high performance and carrier mobilities exceeding those of amorphous silicon. However, there remain significant concerns about their operational and environmental stability, particularly in the context of applications that require a very high level of threshold voltage stability, such as active-matrix addressing of organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays. Here, we report a novel technique for dramatically improving the operational stress stability, performance and uniformity of high mobility polymer field-effect transistors by the addition of specific small molecule additives to the polymer semiconductor film. We demonstrate for the first time polymer FETs that exhibit stable threshold voltages with threshold voltage shifts of less than 1V when subjected to a constant current operational stress for 1 day under conditions that are representative for applications in OLED active matrix displays. The approach constitutes in our view a technological breakthrough; it also makes the device characteristics independent of the atmosphere in which it is operated, causes a significant reduction in contact resistance and significantly improves device uniformity. We will discuss in detail the microscopic mechanism by which the molecular additives lead to this significant improvement in device performance and stability.

  15. Engineering high-performance Pd core-MgO porous shell nanocatalysts via heterogeneous gas-phase synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vidyadhar; Cassidy, Cathal; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Aranishi, Kengo; Kumar, Sushant; Lal, Chhagan; Gspan, Christian; Grogger, Werner; Sowwan, Mukhles

    2015-08-28

    We report on the design and synthesis of high performance catalytic nanoparticles with a robust geometry via magnetron-sputter inert-gas condensation. Sputtering of Pd and Mg from two independent neighbouring targets enabled heterogeneous condensation and growth of nanoparticles with controlled Pd core-MgO porous shell structure. The thickness of the shell and the number of cores within each nanoparticle could be tailored by adjusting the respective sputtering powers. The nanoparticles were directly deposited on glassy carbon electrodes, and their catalytic activity towards methanol oxidation was examined by cyclic voltammetry. The measurements indicated that the catalytic activity was superior to conventional bare Pd nanoparticles. As confirmed by electron microscopy imaging and supported by density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, we attribute the improved catalytic performance primarily to inhibition of Pd core sintering during the catalytic process by the metal-oxide shell.

  16. Role of many body shake-up in core-valence-valence electron emission from single wall carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindona, A; Pisarra, M; Maletta, S; Commisso, M; Riccardi, P; Bonanno, A; Barone, P; Falcone, G

    2011-10-01

    Auger core-valence-valence transitions from single wall Carbon nanotubes are studied using a tight-binding calculational scheme with nearest neighbor overlap, hopping interactions, and a double-zeta basis set. The resulting Hamiltonian approximates the unperturbed pi and sigma bands of the nanomaterials coupled with the free electron states outside the solid and the core-hole. As a first step, the Fermi's golden rule is applied to determine the so called one-electron spectrum of emitted electrons from different tubes, in which either the neutralizing or the ejected electrons, in the initial state, lie within nearest neighboring atomic sites to the core-hole. Many-body corrections are effectively modeled using a broadening function, which accounts for dynamic screening effects involving the initial and final states. Particular attention is paid to the asymmetric component of the broadening function, responsible for the shake-up of pi electrons. Finally, the Cini-Sawatzky distortion function is used to describe the final state effect of the hole-hole interaction. A quantitative estimation of the interplay of shake-up processes is proposed by adjusting the asymmetric parameters of the broadening function to reproduce measurements of Auger electrons ejected from bundles of single wall Carbon nanotubes.

  17. High-power picosecond pulse delivery through hollow core photonic band gap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Johansen, Mette Marie; Lyngsø, Jens Kristian;

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated robust and bend insensitive fiber delivery of high power pulsed laser with diffraction limited beam quality for two different kind of hollow core photonic band gap fibers......We demonstrated robust and bend insensitive fiber delivery of high power pulsed laser with diffraction limited beam quality for two different kind of hollow core photonic band gap fibers...

  18. Sintered powder cores of high Bs and low coreloss Fe84.3Si4B8P3Cu0.7 nano-crystalline alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nano-crystalline Fe-rich Fe84.3Si4B8P3Cu0.7 alloy ribbon with saturation magnetic flux density (Bs close to Si-steel exhibits much lower core loss (Wt than Si-Steels. Low glass forming ability of this alloy limits fabrication of magnetic cores only to stack/wound types. Here, we report on fabrication, structural, thermal and magnetic properties of bulk Fe84.3Si4B8P3Cu0.7 cores. Partially crystallized ribbons (obtained after salt-bath annealing treatment were crushed into powdered form (by ball milling, and were compacted to high-density (∼88% bulk cores by spark plasma sintering (SPS. Nano-crystalline structure (consisting of α-Fe grain in remaining amorphous matrix similar to wound ribbon cores is preserved in the compacted cores. At 50 Hz, cores sintered at Ts = 680 K show Wt 1 kHz. A trade-off between porosity and electrical resistivity is necessary to get low Wt at higher f. In the f range of ∼1 to 100 kHz, we have shown that the cores mixed with SiO2 exhibit much lower Wt than Fe-powder cores, non-oriented Si-steel sheets and commercially available sintered cores. We believe our core material is very promising to make power electronics/electrical devices much more energy-efficient.

  19. Search for methylamine in high mass hot cores

    CERN Document Server

    Ligterink, N F W; van Dishoeck, E F

    2015-01-01

    We aim to detect methylamine, CH$_{3}$NH$_{2}$, in a variety of hot cores and use it as a test for the importance of photon-induced chemistry in ice mantles and mobility of radicals. Specifically, CH$_3$NH$_2$ cannot be formed from atom addition to CO whereas other NH$_2$-containing molecules such as formamide, NH$_2$CHO, can. Submillimeter spectra of several massive hot core regions were taken with the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. Abundances are determined with the rotational diagram method where possible. Methylamine is not detected, giving upper limit column densities between 1.9 $-$ 6.4 $\\times$ 10$^{16}$ cm$^{-2}$ for source sizes corresponding to the 100 K envelope radius. Combined with previously obtained JCMT data analyzed in the same way, abundance ratios of CH$_{3}$NH$_{2}$, NH$_{2}$CHO and CH$_{3}$CN with respect to each other and to CH$_{3}$OH are determined. These ratios are compared with Sagittarius B2 observations, where all species are detected, and to hot core models. The observed ratios su...

  20. Improved methods for high resolution electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, J.R.

    1987-04-01

    Existing methods of making support films for high resolution transmission electron microscopy are investigated and novel methods are developed. Existing methods of fabricating fenestrated, metal reinforced specimen supports (microgrids) are evaluated for their potential to reduce beam induced movement of monolamellar crystals of C/sub 44/H/sub 90/ paraffin supported on thin carbon films. Improved methods of producing hydrophobic carbon films by vacuum evaporation, and improved methods of depositing well ordered monolamellar paraffin crystals on carbon films are developed. A novel technique for vacuum evaporation of metals is described which is used to reinforce microgrids. A technique is also developed to bond thin carbon films to microgrids with a polymer bonding agent. Unique biochemical methods are described to accomplish site specific covalent modification of membrane proteins. Protocols are given which covalently convert the carboxy terminus of papain cleaved bacteriorhodopsin to a free thiol. 53 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

  1. High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMT). Selected Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    would tend to compensate for this polarization charge and form a two-dimensional electron gas 2DEG.3 High performance AlInN/ GaN HEMT structures grown...profile across an Al0.85In0.15N /AlN / GaN HEMT structure. The position of the 2DEG has been located experimentally. The HEMT heterostructure was grown in...Al0.85In0.15N /AlN / GaN HEMT structure taken on the 1010 zone axis and the corresponding EDXS line profile are shown in Fig. 2. Abrupt Al0.85In0.15N /AlN and

  2. Catching the electron in action in real space inside a Ge-Si core-shell nanowire transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaishi, Meghnath; Pati, Ranjit

    2017-09-21

    Catching the electron in action in real space inside a semiconductor Ge-Si core-shell nanowire field effect transistor (FET), which has been demonstrated (J. Xiang, W. Lu, Y. Hu, Y. Wu, H. Yan and C. M. Lieber, Nature, 2006, 441, 489) to outperform the state-of-the-art metal oxide semiconductor FET, is central to gaining unfathomable access into the origin of its functionality. Here, using a quantum transport approach that does not make any assumptions on electronic structure, charge, and potential profile of the device, we unravel the most probable tunneling pathway for electrons in a Ge-Si core-shell nanowire FET with orbital level spatial resolution, which demonstrates gate bias induced decoupling of electron transport between the core and the shell region. Our calculation yields excellent transistor characteristics as noticed in the experiment. Upon increasing the gate bias beyond a threshold value, we observe a rapid drop in drain current resulting in a gate bias driven negative differential resistance behavior and switching in the sign of trans-conductance. We attribute this anomalous behavior in drain current to the gate bias induced modification of the carrier transport pathway from the Ge core to the Si shell region of the nanowire channel. A new experiment involving a four probe junction is proposed to confirm our prediction on gate bias induced decoupling.

  3. The measurement of electrostatic potentials in core/shell GaN nanowires using off-axis electron holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yazdi, Sadegh; Kasama, Takeshi; Ciechonski, R;

    2013-01-01

    Core-shell GaN nanowires are expected to be building blocks of future light emitting devices. Here we apply off-axis electron holography to map the electrostatic potential distributions in such nanowires. To access the cross-section of selected individual nanowires, focused ion beam (FIB) milling...

  4. High-performance core-shell PdPt@Pt/C catalysts via decorating PdPt alloy cores with Pt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan-Ni; Liao, Shi-Jun; Liang, Zhen-Xing; Yang, Li-Jun; Wang, Rong-Fang

    A core-shell structured low-Pt catalyst, PdPt@Pt/C, with high performance towards both methanol anodic oxidation and oxygen cathodic reduction, as well as in a single hydrogen/air fuel cell, is prepared by a novel two-step colloidal approach. For the anodic oxidation of methanol, the catalyst shows three times higher activity than commercial Tanaka 50 wt% Pt/C catalyst; furthermore, the ratio of forward current I f to backward current I b is high up to 1.04, whereas for general platinum catalysts the ratio is only ca. 0.70, indicating that this PdPt@Pt/C catalyst has high activity towards methanol anodic oxidation and good tolerance to the intermediates of methanol oxidation. The catalyst is characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The core-shell structure of the catalyst is revealed by XRD and TEM, and is also supported by underpotential deposition of hydrogen (UPDH). The high performance of the PdPt@Pt/C catalyst may make it a promising and competitive low-Pt catalyst for hydrogen fueled polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) or direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications.

  5. Shear softening of Earth's inner core indicated by its high Poisson's ratio and elastic anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhongqing

    2016-01-01

    Earth's inner core exhibits an unusually high Poisson's ratio and noticeable elastic anisotropy. The mechanisms responsible for these features are critical for understanding the evolution of the Earth but remain unclear. This study indicates that once the correct formula for the shear modulus is used, shear softening can simultaneously explain the high Poisson's ratio and strong anisotropy of the inner core. Body-centred-cubic (bcc) iron shows shear instability at the pressures found in the inner-core and can be dynamically stabilized by temperature and light elements. It is very likely that some combinations of light elements stabilize the bcc iron alloy under inner-core conditions. Such a bcc phase would exhibit significant shear softening and match the geophysical constraints of the inner core. Identifying which light elements and what concentrations of these elements stabilize the bcc phase will provide critical information on the light elements of the inner core.

  6. Production of Integrated Automotive Part in High Pressure Diecasting Process Using Salt Core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ki-Bae Kim; Hyun-Kwang Seok; Jun-Su Kim

    2004-01-01

    A new concept of salt core, a melting temperature of which is lower than the solidus temperature of cast alloy,was introduced to produce an integrated casting part having a complicated inner shape or requiring under-cut in high pressure die casting or squeeze casting process. A salt core, named a fusible core in this paper because the salt core can be easily extracted just as holding at a temperature under a solidus temperature of a casting alloy, was developed and applied to produce a fuel control part for automotive GDI engine in high pressure diecasting machine. A different salt material of a lower melting temperature than that of A1 alloy was mixed with a different ceramic particulate to improve a thermo-physical property of fusible core. The thermo-physical property of the fusible core was measured and a weight faction of the ceramic particulate was optimized. The selected core materials were poured in metallic mold by gravity to produce a fusible core for a fuel control part for automotive GDI engine. The fuel control part, which the fusible core was included inside, was successful to fabricate in a conventional diecasting machine with no melting of fusible core during casting.

  7. Low Temperature Photoluminescence (PL) from High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT RDMR-WD-14-55 LOW TEMPERATURE PHOTOLUMINESCENCE (PL) FROM HIGH ELECTRON MOBILITY TRANSISTORS (HEMTS...DATE March 2015 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Final 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Low Temperature Photoluminescence (PL) From High Electron...temperature Photoluminescence (PL) from High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) structures that have been modified by proton irradiation. The samples are

  8. Triple layered core-shell structure with surface fluorinated ZnO-carbon nanotube composites and its electron emission properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. Y.; Chua, Daniel H. C.

    2013-01-01

    Core-shelled structures such as zinc oxide (ZnO) on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) give rise to interesting material properties. In this work, a triple-layered core-shell-shell structure is presented where the effects of fluorine (F) incorporation on the outmost shell of the ZnO-CNT structure are studied. The samples prepared ranged from a short 2 min to a 30 min immersion in carbon tetraflouride (CF4) plasma. In addition, its effects on the electron emission properties also studied and it is shown that the plasma immersions create thinner field emitters with sharp tiny wrinkles giving rise to more electron emission sites and higher enhancement factor. In addition, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements showed that F ions replace O in ZnO coatings during immersion process, thus increasing the electrical conductivity and shifts the Fermi level of ZnO upwards. Both physical and electronic effects further contribute to a lower threshold field.

  9. High temperature oxidation of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanowires composed of iron nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajewski, M; Brzozka, K; Lin, W S; Lin, H M; Tokarczyk, M; Borysiuk, J; Kowalski, G; Wasik, D

    2016-02-07

    This work describes an oxidation process of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanowires at temperatures between 100 °C and 800 °C. The studied nanomaterial was synthesized through a simple chemical reduction of iron trichloride in an external magnetic field under a constant flow of argon. The electron microscopy investigations allowed determining that the as-prepared nanowires were composed of self-assembled iron nanoparticles which were covered by a 3 nm thick oxide shell and separated from each other by a thin interface layer. Both these layers exhibited an amorphous or highly-disordered character which was traced by means of transmission electron microscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The thermal oxidation was carried out under a constant flow of argon which contained the traces of oxygen. The first stage of process was related to slow transformations of amorphous Fe and amorphous iron oxides into crystalline phases and disappearance of interfaces between iron nanoparticles forming the studied nanomaterial (range: 25-300 °C). After that, the crystalline iron core and iron oxide shell became oxidized and signals for different compositions of iron oxide sheath were observed (range: 300-800 °C) using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and Mössbauer spectroscopy. According to the thermal gravimetric analysis, the nanowires heated up to 800 °C under argon atmosphere gained 37% of mass with respect to their initial weight. The structure of the studied nanomaterial oxidized at 800 °C was mainly composed of α-Fe2O3 (∼ 93%). Moreover, iron nanowires treated above 600 °C lost their wire-like shape due to their shrinkage and collapse caused by the void coalescence.

  10. Electron-electron interactions in graphene field-induced quantum dots in a high magnetic field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlof, A.; Shylau, Artsem; Zozoulenko, I. V.

    2015-01-01

    We study the effect of electron-electron interaction in graphene quantum dots defined by an external electrostatic potential and a high magnetic field. To account for the electron-electron interaction, we use the Thomas-Fermi approximation and find that electron screening causes the formation...... of compressible strips in the potential profile and the electron density. We numerically solve the Dirac equations describing the electron dynamics in quantum dots, and we demonstrate that compressible strips lead to the appearance of plateaus in the electron energies as a function of the magnetic field. Finally...

  11. ELEC-2005: Electronics in High Energy Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2004-01-01

    ELEC-2005 is a new course series on modern electronics, given by CERN physicists and engineers in the format of the successful ELEC-2002 course series, and within the framework of the 2005 Technical Training Programme. This comprehensive course series is designed for people who are not electronics specialists, for example physicists, engineers and technicians working at or visiting the laboratory, who use or will use electronics in their present or future activities, in particular in the context of the LHC accelerator and experiments. ELEC-2005 will composed of four Terms throughout the year: Winter Term: Introduction to electronics in HEP (January-February, 6 lectures) Spring Term: Integrated circuits and VLSI technology for physics (March, 6 lectures) Summer Term: System electronics for physics: Issues (May, 7 lectures) Winter Term: Electronics applications in HEP experiments (November-December, 10 lectures) Lectures within each Term will take place on Tuesdays and Thursdays, from 10:00 to 12:30. The...

  12. Nanocrystalline core material for high-performance common mode inductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roc'h, Anne; Leferink, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Modern power electronic semiconductors are switching very fast to reduce heat dissipation. Due to parasitic capacitances in the system, for instance, in a motor driven by an adjustable speed electrical power drive system, common mode currents are developed creating electromagnetic interference. The

  13. Nanocrystalline core material for high-performance common mode inductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roc'h, A.; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    Modern power electronic semiconductors are switching very fast to reduce heat dissipation. Due to parasitic capacitances in the system, for instance, in a motor driven by an adjustable speed electrical power drive system, common mode currents are developed creating electromagnetic interference. The

  14. Analysis of High Temperature Reactor Control Rod Worth for the Initial and Full Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktajianto, Hammam; Setiawati, Evi; Anam, Khoirul; Sugito, Heri

    2017-01-01

    Control rod is one important component in a nuclear reactor. In nuclear reactor operations the control rod functions to shut down the reactor. This research analyses ten control rods worth of HTR (High Temperature Reactor) at initial and full core. The HTR in this research adopts HTR-10 China and HTR- of pebble bed. Core calculations are performed by using MCNPX code after modelling the entire parts of core in condition of ten control rods fully withdrawn, all control rods in with 20 cm ranges of depth and the use of one control rod. Pebble bed and moderator balls are distributed in the core zone using a Body Centred Cubic (BCC) lattice by ratio of 57:43. The research results are obtained that the use of one control rod will decrease the reactor criticality of 2.04±0.12 %Δk/k at initial core and 1.57±0.10 %Δk/k at full core. The deeper control rods are in, the lesser criticality of reactor is with reactivity of ten control rods of 16.41±0.11 %Δk/k at initial core and 15.43±0.11 %Δk/k at full core. The results show that the use of ten control rods at full core will keep achieving subcritical condition even though the reactivity is smaller than reactivity at initial core.

  15. Technique for continuous high-resolution analysis of trace substances in firn and ice cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roethlisberger, R.; Bigler, M.; Hutterli, M.; Sommer, S.; Stauffer, B.; Junghans, H.G.; Wagenbach, D.

    2000-01-15

    The very successful application of a CFA (Continuous flow analysis) system in the GRIP project (Greenland Ice Core Project) for high-resolution ammonium, calcium, hydrogen peroxide, and formaldehyde measurements along a deep ice core led to further development of this analysis technique. The authors included methods for continuous analysis technique. The authors included methods for continuous analysis of sodium, nitrate, sulfate, and electrolytical conductivity, while the existing methods have been improved. The melting device has been optimized to allow the simultaneous analysis of eight components. Furthermore, a new melter was developed for analyzing firn cores. The system has been used in the frame of the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica (EPICA) for in-situ analysis of several firn cores from Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, and for the new ice core drilled at Dome C, Antarctica.

  16. Electrochemical One-Electron Oxidation of Low-Generation Polyamidoamine-Type Dendrimers with a 1,4-Phenylenediamine Core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerich, Ole; Hansen, Thomas; Thorvildsen, Asbjørn

    2009-01-01

    A series of polyamidoamine (PAMAM)-type dendrimers with a 1,4-phenylenediamine (PD) core is prepared from PD by procedures including Michael addition of methyl acrylate followed by aminolysis with 1,2-ethanediamine. Their one-electron oxidation potentials are determined by differential pulse...... caused by interactions between the positive charge centered at the core and the neighboring ester or amide dipoles. The relative ease of oxidation of TMePD and the lowest members of the series of the dendrimers can be reproduced theoretically only when solvation was included in the calculations. The DPV...

  17. Synthesis, spectral characterization, electron microscopic study and thermogravimetric analysis of a phosphorus containing dendrimer with diphenylsilanediol as core unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Dadapeer

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A phosphorus containing dendrimer with a diphenylsilanediol core was synthesized using a divergent method. Several types of reactions were performed on dendrons of several sizes, either at the level of the core or the surface. The giant Schiff’s base macro molecule possesses 12 imine bonds and 8 hydroxy groups on the terminal phenyl groups. The structures of the intermediate compounds were confirmed by IR, GCMS and 31P NMR. The final compound was characterized by 1H, 13C, 31P NMR, MALDI-TOF MS and CHN analysis. Scanning electron microscopic and thermogravimetric analysis/differential scanning calorimetric studies were also performed on the final dendritic molecule.

  18. Synthesis and morphology of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanoparticles produced by high pressure gas condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lijuan; ten Brink, Gert H.; Chen, Bin; Schmidt, Franz P.; Haberfehlner, Georg; Hofer, Ferdinand; Kooi, Bart J.; Palasantzas, George

    2016-05-01

    Core-shell structured Fe nanoparticles (NPs) produced by high pressure magnetron sputtering gas condensation were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, electron diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), tomographic reconstruction, and Wulff shape construction analysis. The core-shell structure, which is composed of an Fe core surrounded by a maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and/or magnetite (Fe3O4) shell, was confirmed by fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis combined with EELS. It was found that the particle size and shape strongly depend on the gas environment. Moreover, extensive analysis showed that NPs with a size between 10-20 nm possess a truncated cubic morphology, which is confined by the 6 {100} planes that are truncated by the 12 {110} planes at different degrees. For NPs larger than 20 nm, the rhombic dodecahedron defined by the 12 {110} planes is the predominant crystal shape, while truncated rhombic dodecahedrons, as well as non-truncated and truncated cubic NPs, were also observed. The NPs without truncation showed a characteristic inward relaxation indicating that besides thermodynamics kinetics also plays a crucial role during particle growth.

  19. Synthesis and morphology of iron-iron oxide core-shell nanoparticles produced by high pressure gas condensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lijuan; Ten Brink, Gert H; Chen, Bin; Schmidt, Franz P; Haberfehlner, Georg; Hofer, Ferdinand; Kooi, Bart J; Palasantzas, George

    2016-05-27

    Core-shell structured Fe nanoparticles (NPs) produced by high pressure magnetron sputtering gas condensation were studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques, electron diffraction, electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), tomographic reconstruction, and Wulff shape construction analysis. The core-shell structure, which is composed of an Fe core surrounded by a maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) and/or magnetite (Fe3O4) shell, was confirmed by fast Fourier transform (FFT) analysis combined with EELS. It was found that the particle size and shape strongly depend on the gas environment. Moreover, extensive analysis showed that NPs with a size between 10-20 nm possess a truncated cubic morphology, which is confined by the 6 {100} planes that are truncated by the 12 {110} planes at different degrees. For NPs larger than 20 nm, the rhombic dodecahedron defined by the 12 {110} planes is the predominant crystal shape, while truncated rhombic dodecahedrons, as well as non-truncated and truncated cubic NPs, were also observed. The NPs without truncation showed a characteristic inward relaxation indicating that besides thermodynamics kinetics also plays a crucial role during particle growth.

  20. Using high resolution tritium profiles to quantify the effects of melt on two Spitsbergen ice cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, L.G.; Streurman, H.J.; Isaksson, E.; Helsen, M.M.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; Martma, T.; Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Meijer, H.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ice cores from small ice caps provide valuable climatic information, additional to that of Greenland and Antarctica. However, their integrity is usually compromised by summer meltwater percolation. To determine to what extent this can affect such ice cores, we performed high-resolution tritium measu

  1. Alkaline Earth Core Level Photoemission Spectroscopy of High-Temperature Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines photoemission measurements of the alkaline Earth core levels of high-temperature superconductors and related materials, models that seek to explain the large negative shifts observed relative to the corresponding alkaline Earth metals, and the effect of lattice site disorder on the core level spectra and the presence or absence of intrinsic surface peaks.

  2. Alkaline Earth Core Level Photoemission Spectroscopy of High-Temperature Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasquez, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper examines photoemission measurements of the alkaline Earth core levels of high-temperature superconductors and related materials, models that seek to explain the large negative shifts observed relative to the corresponding alkaline Earth metals, and the effect of lattice site disorder on the core level spectra and the presence or absence of intrinsic surface peaks.

  3. Exact solutions of the high dimensional hard-core Fermi-Hubbard model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘峰; 戴连荣

    2001-01-01

    A simple algebraic approach to exact solutions of the hard-core Fermi-Hubbard model is proposed. Excitation energies and the corresponding wavefunctions of the hard-core Fermi-Hubbard model with nearest neighbor hopping cases in high dimension are obtained by using this method, which manifests that the model is exactly solvable in any dimension.

  4. Using high resolution tritium profiles to quantify the effects of melt on two Spitsbergen ice cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, L.G.; Streurman, H.J.; Isaksson, E.; Helsen, M.M.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; Martma, T.; Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Meijer, H.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ice cores from small ice caps provide valuable climatic information, additional to that of Greenland and Antarctica. However, their integrity is usually compromised by summer meltwater percolation. To determine to what extent this can affect such ice cores, we performed high-resolution tritium measu

  5. Using high resolution tritium profiles to quantify the effects of melt on two Spitsbergen ice cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wel, L.G.; Streurman, H.J.; Isaksson, E.; Helsen, M.M.; van de Wal, R.S.W.; Martma, T.; Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Meijer, H.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ice cores from small ice caps provide valuable climatic information, additional to that of Greenland and Antarctica. However, their integrity is usually compromised by summer meltwater percolation. To determine to what extent this can affect such ice cores, we performed high-resolution tritium

  6. Effect of magnetic field on quantum state energies of an electron confined in the core of a double walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Khurshed A.; Bhat, Bashir Mohi Ud Din

    2016-10-01

    In this paper we report the effect of external magnetic field and core radius on the excited quantum state energies of an electron confined in the core of a double walled carbon nanotube. The goal is accomplished by using Wentzel-Kramers-Brillioun (WKB) approximation method within the effective mass approximation and confinement potential. All numerical analysis were carried out in a strong confinement regime. The results show that the electron energy increases with the increase in external magnetic field at a given core radii. The electron energy is also found to increase as the core radius of the CNT decreases and for core radius a > 5 nm the energy becomes almost zero. The effect of magnetic field on the excited state energies of the confined electron is more evident for smaller core radius acarbon nanotube quantum dot devices [1].

  7. Electronic phase separation and high temperature superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kivelson, S.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Emery, V.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-01-11

    The authors review the extensive evidence from model calculations that neutral holes in an antiferromagnet separate into hole-rich and hole-poor phases. All known solvable limits of models of holes in a Heisenberg antiferromagnet exhibit this behavior. The authors show that when the phase separation is frustrated by the introduction of long-range Coulomb interactions, the typical consequence is either a modulated (charge density wave) state or a superconducting phase. The authors then review some of the strong experimental evidence supporting an electronically-driven phase separation of the holes in the cuprate superconductors and the related Ni oxides. Finally, the authors argue that frustrated phase separation in these materials can account for many of the anomalous normal state properties of the high temperature superconductors and provide the mechanism of superconductivity. In particular, it is shown that the T-linear resistivity of the normal state is a paraconductivity associated with a novel composite pairing, although the ordered superconducting state is more conventional.

  8. A High Temperature-Tolerant and Radiation-Resistant In-Core Neutron Sensor for Advanced Reactors. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Lei [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Miller, Don [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2015-01-23

    The objectives of this project are to develop a small and reliable gallium nitride (GaN) neutron sensor that is capable of withstanding high neutron fluence and high temperature, isolating gamma background, and operating in a wide dynamic range. The first objective will be the understanding of the fundamental materials properties and electronic response of a GaN semiconductor materials and device in an environment of high temperature and intense neutron field. To achieve such goal, an in-situ study of electronic properties of GaN device such as I-V, leakage current, and charge collection efficiency (CCE) in high temperature using an external neutron beam will be designed and implemented. We will also perform in-core irradiation of GaN up to the highest yet fast neutron fluence and an off-line performance evaluation.

  9. XUV-initiated high harmonic generation: driving inner valence electrons using below-threshold-energy XUV light

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, A C

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme for resolving the contribution of inner- and outer-valence electrons in XUV-initiated high-harmonic generation in neon. By probing the atom with a low energy (below the 2s ionisation threshold) ultrashort XUV pulse, the 2p electron is steered away from the core, while the 2s electron is enabled to describe recollision trajectories. By selectively suppressing the 2p recollision trajectories we can resolve the contribution of the 2s electron to the high-harmonic spectrum. We apply the classical trajectory model to account for the contribution of the 2s electron, which allows for an intuitive understanding of the process.

  10. Highly birefringent suspended-core photonic microcells for refractive-index sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chao [Department of Electrical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong (China); The Hong Kong Polytechnic University Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen 518057 (China); Jin, Wa; Ma, Jun; Jin, Wei, E-mail: eewjin@polyu.edu.hk; Yang, Fan; Ho, Hoi Lut [Department of Electrical Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong (China); Liao, Changrui; Wang, Yiping [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Devices and Systems of Ministry of Education/Guangdong Province, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China)

    2014-08-11

    An in-line photonic microcell with a highly birefringent suspended microfiber core is fabricated by locally heating and pressurizing selected air-holes of an endless single mode photonic crystal fiber. The microfiber core has rhombus-like cross-sectional geometry and could achieve a high birefringence of up to 10{sup −2}. The microfiber core is fixed at the center of the microcell by thin struts attached to an outer jacket tube, which protects and isolates the microfiber from environmental contaminations. Highly sensitive and robust refractive index sensors based on such microcells are experimentally demonstrated.

  11. Electron clouds in high energy hadron accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Fedor

    2013-08-29

    The formation of electron clouds in accelerators operating with positrons and positively charge ions is a well-known problem. Depending on the parameters of the beam the electron cloud manifests itself differently. In this thesis the electron cloud phenomenon is studied for the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) conditions, and for the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS-100 as a part of the FAIR complex in Darmstadt, Germany. Under the FAIR conditions the extensive use of slow extraction will be made. After the acceleration the beam will be debunched and continuously extracted to the experimental area. During this process, residual gas electrons can accumulate in the electric field of the beam. If this accumulation is not prevented, then at some point the beam can become unstable. Under the SPS and LHC conditions the beam is always bunched. The accumulation of electron cloud happens due to secondary electron emission. At the time when this thesis was being written the electron cloud was known to limit the maximum intensity of the two machines. During the operation with 25 ns bunch spacing, the electron cloud was causing significant beam quality deterioration. At moderate intensities below the instability threshold the electron cloud was responsible for the bunch energy loss. In the framework of this thesis it was found that the instability thresholds of the coasting beams with similar space charge tune shifts, emittances and energies are identical. First of their kind simulations of the effect of Coulomb collisions on electron cloud density in coasting beams were performed. It was found that for any hadron coasting beam one can choose vacuum conditions that will limit the accumulation of the electron cloud below the instability threshold. We call such conditions the ''good'' vacuum regime. In application to SIS-100 the design pressure 10{sup -12} mbar corresponds to the good vacuum regime. The transition to the bad vacuum

  12. Analytical electron microscopy of W-core β-SiC fibers for use in an SiC-based composite material for fusion applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toplišek, Tea; Gec, Medeja; Iveković, Aljaž; Novak, Saša; Kobe, Spomenka; Dražić, Goran

    2013-08-01

    In this work, the interactions between tungsten (W) and silicon carbide (SiC) in Sigma SiC fibers at high temperatures were characterized using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. These fibers could have the potential for use in fusion-related applications owing to their high thermal conductivity compared with pure SiC-based fibers. The as-received fibers were composed of a 100-μm-thick shell of radially textured β-SiC grains and a 15-μm-thick tungsten core, composed of a few hundreds of nm-sized elongated tungsten grains. The interfaces between the tungsten and the SiC and the SiC and the outer coatings were sharp and smooth. After heat treatment at 1,600°C for 3 h in Ar, the tungsten core reacted with SiC to form a rough interface surface. Inside the core, W₅Si₃, W₃Si, and W₂C phases were detected using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron-diffraction techniques. The mechanical properties of the fibers deteriorate after the heat treatment.

  13. High performance flexible electronics for biomedical devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvatore, Giovanni A; Munzenrieder, Niko; Zysset, Christoph; Kinkeldei, Thomas; Petti, Luisa; Troster, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Plastic electronics is soft, deformable and lightweight and it is suitable for the realization of devices which can form an intimate interface with the body, be implanted or integrated into textile for wearable and biomedical applications. Here, we present flexible electronics based on amorphous oxide semiconductors (a-IGZO) whose performance can achieve MHz frequency even when bent around hair. We developed an assembly technique to integrate complex electronic functionalities into textile while preserving the softness of the garment. All this and further developments can open up new opportunities in health monitoring, biotechnology and telemedicine.

  14. High performance carbon nanotube-Si core-shell wires with a rationally structured core for lithium ion battery anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yu; Zhang, Qing; Lu, Congxiang; Xiao, Qizhen; Wang, Xinghui; Tay, Beng Kang

    2013-02-21

    Core-shell Si nanowires are very promising anode materials. Here, we synthesize vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with relatively large diameters and large inter-wire spacing as core wires and demonstrate a CNT-Si core-shell wire composite as a lithium ion battery (LIB) anode. Owing to the rationally engineered core structure, the composite shows good capacity retention and rate performance. The excellent performance is superior to most core-shell nanowires previously reported.

  15. Physisorption-induced electron scattering on the surface of carbon-metal core-shell nanowire arrays for hydrogen sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yick, S.; Yajadda, M. M. A.; Bendavid, A.; Han, Z. J.; Ostrikov, K.

    2013-06-01

    Palladium is sputtered on multi-walled carbon nanotube forests to form carbon-metal core-shell nanowire arrays. These hybrid nanostructures exhibited resistive responses when exposed to hydrogen with an excellent baseline recovery at room temperature. The magnitude of the response is shown to be tuneable by an applied voltage. Unlike the charge-transfer mechanism commonly attributed to Pd nanoparticle-decorated carbon nanotubes, this demonstrates that the hydrogen response mechanism of the multi-walled carbon nanotube-Pd core-shell nanostructure is due to the increase in electron scattering induced by physisorption of hydrogen. These hybrid core-shell nanostructures are promising for gas detection in hydrogen storage applications.

  16. POTENTIAL: A Highly Adaptive Core of Parallel Database System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文继荣; 陈红; 王珊

    2000-01-01

    POTENTIAL is a virtual database machine based on general computing platforms, especially parallel computing platforms. It provides a complete solution to high-performance database systems by a 'virtual processor + virtual data bus + virtual memory' architecture. Virtual processors manage all CPU resources in the system, on which various operations are running. Virtual data bus is responsible for the management of datatransmission between associated operations, which forms the hinges of the entire system. Virtual memory provides efficient data storage and buffering mechanisms that conform to data reference behaviors in database systems. The architecture of POTENTIAL is very clear and has many good features,including high efficiency, high scalability, high extensibility, high portability, etc.

  17. Highly sensitive fiber-optic accelerometer by grating inscription in specific core dip fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Qiangzhou; Guo, Tuan; Bao, Weijia; Shao, Zhihua; Peng, Gang-Ding; Qiao, Xueguang

    2017-09-19

    A highly sensitive fiber-optic accelerometer based on detecting the power output of resonances from the core dip is demonstrated. The sensing probe comprises a compact structure, hereby a short section of specific core (with a significant core dip) fiber stub containing a straight fiber Bragg grating is spliced to another single-mode fiber via a core self-alignment process. The femtosecond laser side-illumination technique was utilized to ensure that the grating inscription region is precisely positioned and compact in size. Two well-defined core resonances were achieved in reflection: one originates from the core dip and the other originates from fiber core. The key point is that only one of these two reflective resonances exhibits a high sensitivity to fiber bend (and vibration), whereas the other is immune to it. For low frequency (core mode reflection. Moreover, the sensor simultaneously provides an inherent power reference to eliminate unwanted power fluctuations from the light source and transmission lines, thus providing a means of evaluating weak seismic wave at low frequency.

  18. Doppler effect in fluorine K-Auger line produced in electron-induced core ionization of SF6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, S; Singh, R K; Shanker, R

    2006-01-21

    An experimental evidence is reported on the observation of the Doppler effect in fluorine K-Auger line emitted from a core-ionized SF6 molecule under an impact of 16 keV electrons. The emitting source of the Auger line is found to acquire a kinetic energy of 4.7+/-0.3 keV. We propose that such large energy is released from the Coulomb repulsion taking place between F+ and SF5+ fragment ions under influence of an intense focusing field of the incident electrons. In the presence of the Coulomb field of these ions, the Auger line obtains a polarization P = 76%+/-7%.

  19. High Count Rate Electron Probe Microanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Joseph D.; Herrington, Charles

    2002-01-01

    Reducing the measurement uncertainty of quantitative analyses made using electron probe microanalyzers (EPMA) requires a careful study of the individual uncertainties from each definable step of the measurement. Those steps include measuring the incident electron beam current and voltage, knowing the angle between the electron beam and the sample (takeoff angle), collecting the emitted x rays from the sample, comparing the emitted x-ray flux to known standards (to determine the k-ratio) and transformation of the k-ratio to concentration using algorithms which includes, as a minimum, the atomic number, absorption, and fluorescence corrections. This paper discusses the collection and counting of the emitted x rays, which are diffracted into the gas flow or sealed proportional x-ray detectors. The representation of the uncertainty in the number of collected x rays collected reduces as the number of counts increase. The uncertainty of the collected signal is fully described by Poisson statistics. Increasing the number of x rays collected involves either counting longer or at a higher counting rate. Counting longer means the analysis time increases and may become excessive to get to the desired uncertainty. Instrument drift also becomes an issue. Counting at higher rates has its limitations, which are a function of the detector physics and the detecting electronics. Since the beginning of EPMA analysis, analog electronics have been used to amplify and discriminate the x-ray induced ionizations within the proportional counter. This paper will discuss the use of digital electronics for this purpose. These electronics are similar to that used for energy dispersive analysis of x rays with either Si(Li) or Ge(Li) detectors except that the shaping time constants are much smaller. PMID:27446749

  20. Photonic-Networks-on-Chip for High Performance Radiation Survivable Multi-Core Processor Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    TR-14-7 Photonic-Networks-on-Chip for High Performance Radiation Survivable Multi-Core Processor Systems Approved for public release...Networks-on-Chip for High Performance Radiation Survivable Multi-Core Processor Systems DTRA01-03-D-0026 Prof. Luke Lester and Prof. Ganesh...release; distribution is unlimited. The University of New Mexico has undertaken a study to determine the effects of radiation on Quantum Dot Photonic

  1. Multi-core Fibers in Submarine Networks for High-Capacity Undersea Transmission Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nooruzzaman, Md; Morioka, Toshio

    2017-01-01

    Application of multi-core fibers in undersea networks for high-capacity submarine transmission systems is studied. It is demonstrated how different architectures of submerged branching unit affect network component counts in long-haul undersea transmission systems......Application of multi-core fibers in undersea networks for high-capacity submarine transmission systems is studied. It is demonstrated how different architectures of submerged branching unit affect network component counts in long-haul undersea transmission systems...

  2. HIGH-CURRENT ERL-BASED ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEN-ZVI, I.

    2005-09-18

    The design of an electron cooler must take into account both electron beam dynamics issues as well as the electron cooling physics. Research towards high-energy electron cooling of RHIC is in its 3rd year at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The luminosity upgrade of RHIC calls for electron cooling of various stored ion beams, such as 100 GeV/A gold ions at collision energies. The necessary electron energy of 54 MeV is clearly out of reach for DC accelerator system of any kind. The high energy also necessitates a bunched beam, with a high electron bunch charge, low emittance and small energy spread. The Collider-Accelerator Department adopted the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) for generating the high-current, high-energy and high-quality electron beam. The RHIC electron cooler ERL will use four Superconducting RF (SRF) 5-cell cavities, designed to operate at ampere-class average currents with high bunch charges. The electron source will be a superconducting, 705.75 MHz laser-photocathode RF gun, followed up by a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). An R&D ERL is under construction to demonstrate the ERL at the unprecedented average current of 0.5 amperes. Beam dynamics performance and luminosity enhancement are described for the case of magnetized and non-magnetized electron cooling of RHIC.

  3. Core-shell amorphous silicon-carbon nanoparticles for high performance anodes in lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sourice, Julien; Bordes, Arnaud; Boulineau, Adrien; Alper, John P.; Franger, Sylvain; Quinsac, Axelle; Habert, Aurélie; Leconte, Yann; De Vito, Eric; Porcher, Willy; Reynaud, Cécile; Herlin-Boime, Nathalie; Haon, Cédric

    2016-10-01

    Core-shell silicon-carbon nanoparticles are attractive candidates as active material to increase the capacity of Li-ion batteries while mitigating the detrimental effects of volume expansion upon lithiation. However crystalline silicon suffers from amorphization upon the first charge/discharge cycle and improved stability is expected in starting with amorphous silicon. Here we report the synthesis, in a single-step process, of amorphous silicon nanoparticles coated with a carbon shell (a-Si@C), via a two-stage laser pyrolysis where decomposition of silane and ethylene are conducted in two successive reaction zones. Control of experimental conditions mitigates silicon core crystallization as well as formation of silicon carbide. Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy show a carbon shell about 1 nm in thickness, which prevents detrimental oxidation of the a-Si cores. Cyclic voltammetry demonstrates that the core-shell composite reaches its maximal lithiation during the first sweep, thanks to its amorphous core. After 500 charge/discharge cycles, it retains a capacity of 1250 mAh.g-1 at a C/5 rate and 800 mAh.g-1 at 2C, with an outstanding coulombic efficiency of 99.95%. Moreover, post-mortem observations show an electrode volume expansion of less than 20% and preservation of the nanostructuration.

  4. Development of a new academic digital library: a study of usage data of a core medical electronic journal collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Barbara S; Klatt, Carolyn; Nagy, Suzanne P

    2009-04-01

    The current study evaluates the results of a previously reported method for creating a core medical electronic journal collection for a new medical school library, validates the core collection created specifically to meet the needs of the new school, and identifies strategies for making cost-effective e-journal selection decisions. Usage data were extracted for four e-journal packages (Blackwell-Synergy, Cell Press, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, and ScienceDirect). Usage was correlated with weighted point values assigned to a core list of journal titles, and each package was evaluated for relevancy and cost-effectiveness to the Florida State University College of Medicine (FSU COM) population. The results indicated that the development of the core list was a valid method for creating a new twenty-first century, community-based medical school library. Thirty-seven journals are identified for addition to the FSU COM core list based on use by the COM, and areas of overlapping research interests between the university and the COM are identified based on use of specific journals by each population. The collection development approach that evolved at the FSU COM library was useful during the initial stages of identifying and evaluating journal selections and in assessing the relative value of a particular journal package for the FSU COM after the school was established.

  5. Characterizing black carbon in rain and ice cores using coupled tangential flow filtration and transmission electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ellis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Antarctic ice cores have been used to study the history of black carbon (BC, but little is known with regards to the physical and chemical characteristics of these particles in the remote atmosphere. Characterization remains limited by ultra-trace concentrations in ice core samples and the lack of adequate methods to isolate the particles unaltered from the melt water. To investigate the physical and chemical characteristics of these particles, we have developed a tangential flow filtration (TFF method combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Tests using ultrapure water and polystyrene latex particle standards resulted in excellent blanks and significant particle recovery. This approach has been applied to melt water from Antarctic ice cores as well as tropical rain from Darwin, Australia with successful results: TEM analysis revealed a variety of BC particle morphologies, insoluble coatings, and the attachment of BC to mineral dust particles. The TFF-based concentration of these particles has proven to give excellent results for TEM studies of BC particles in Antarctic ice cores and can be used for future studies of insoluble aerosols in rainwater and ice core samples.

  6. Synthesis of LiFePO4@carbon nanotube core-shell nanowires with a high-energy efficient method for superior lithium ion battery cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guiling; Ma, Zhipeng; Shao, Guangjie; Kong, Lingxue; Gao, Weimin

    2015-09-01

    A high-energy efficient method is developed for the synthesis of LiFePO4@CNT core-shell nanowire structures. The method consists of two steps: liquid deposition approach to prepare FePO4@CNT core-shell nanowires and solvothermal lithiation to obtain the LiFePO4@CNT core-shell nanowires at a low temperature. The solution phase method can be easily scaled up for commercial application. The performance of the materials produced by this method is evaluated in Li ion batteries. The one-dimensional LiFePO4@CNT nanowires offer a stable and efficient backbone for electron transport. The LiFePO4@CNT core-shell nanowires exhibit a high capacity of 132.8 mAh g-1 at a rate of 0.2C, as well as high rate capability (64.4 mAh g-1 at 20C) for Li ion storage.

  7. Packaging Technology for SiC High Temperature Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Spry, David J.; Meredith, Roger D.; Nakley, Leah M.; Beheim, Glenn M.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2017-01-01

    High-temperature environment operable sensors and electronics are required for long-term exploration of Venus and distributed control of next generation aeronautical engines. Various silicon carbide (SiC) high temperature sensors, actuators, and electronics have been demonstrated at and above 500 C. A compatible packaging system is essential for long-term testing and application of high temperature electronics and sensors in relevant environments. This talk will discuss a ceramic packaging system developed for high temperature electronics, and related testing results of SiC integrated circuits at 500 C facilitated by this high temperature packaging system, including the most recent progress.

  8. Electron beam damage in high temperature polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S. (Dayton Univ., OH (USA). Research Inst.); Adams, W.W. (Air Force Materials Lab., Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Electron microscopic studies of polymers are limited due to beam damage. Two concerns are the damage mechanism in a particular material, and the maximum dose for a material before damage effects are observed. From the knowledge of the dose required for damage to the polymer structure, optimum parameters for electron microscopy imaging can be determined. In the present study, electron beam damage of polymers has been quantified by monitoring changes in the diffraction intensity as a function of electron dose. The beam damage characteristics of the following polymers were studied: poly(p-phenylene benzobisthiazole) (PBZT); poly(p-phenylene benzobisoxazole) (PBO); poly(benzoxazole) (ABPBO); poly(benzimidazole) (ABPBI); poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide) (PPTA); and poly(aryl ether ether ketone) (PEEK). Previously published literature results on polyethylene (PE), polyoxymethylene (POM), nylon-6, poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO), PBZT, PPTA, PPX, iPS, poly(butylene terephthalate) (PBT), and poly(phenylene sulphide) (PPS) were reviewed. This study demonstrates the strong dependence of the electron beam resistivity of a polymer on its thermal stability/melt temperature. (author).

  9. High performance 3D printed electronics using electroless plated copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Jin Rong; Kim, Taeil; Park, Jae Sung; Wang, Jiacheng; Kim, Woo Soo

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents design and performance validation of 3D printed electronic components, 3D toroidal air-core inductors, fabricated by multi-material based Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM) 3D printing technology and electroless copper plating. Designs of toroidal inductor is investigated with different core shapes and winding numbers; circular and half-circular cores with 10 and 13 turns of windings. Electroless plated copper thin film ensures 3D printed toroidal plastic structures to possess inductive behaviors. The inductance is demonstrated reliably with an applied source frequency from 100 kHz to 2 MHz as designs vary. An RL circuit is utilized to test the fabricated inductors' phase-leading characteristics with corresponding phase angle changes.

  10. High performance 3D printed electronics using electroless plated copper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Rong Jian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents design and performance validation of 3D printed electronic components, 3D toroidal air-core inductors, fabricated by multi-material based Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM 3D printing technology and electroless copper plating. Designs of toroidal inductor is investigated with different core shapes and winding numbers; circular and half-circular cores with 10 and 13 turns of windings. Electroless plated copper thin film ensures 3D printed toroidal plastic structures to possess inductive behaviors. The inductance is demonstrated reliably with an applied source frequency from 100 kHz to 2 MHz as designs vary. An RL circuit is utilized to test the fabricated inductors’ phase-leading characteristics with corresponding phase angle changes.

  11. Highly efficient photocatalytic performance of graphene-ZnO quasi-shell-core composite material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Yuyu; Chen, Zhuoyuan; Li, Weibing; Hou, Baorong

    2013-12-11

    In the present paper, the graphene-ZnO composite with quasi-shell-core structure was successfully prepared using a one-step wet chemical method. The photocatalytic Rhodamine B degradation property and the photoelectrochemical performance of the graphene-ZnO quasi-shell-core composite are dependent on the amount of graphene oxide that is added. When the amount of graphene oxide added is 10 mg, the graphene-ZnO quasi-shell-core composite possesses the optimal photocatalytic degradation efficiency and the best photoelectrochemical performance. An efficient interfacial electric field is established on the interface between the graphene and ZnO, which significantly improves the separation efficiency of the photogenerated electron-hole pairs and thus dramatically increases its photoelectrochemical performance. In addition to the excellent photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical properties, the electron migration ability of the grephene-ZnO quasi-shell-core composite is significantly enhanced due to the graphene coating on ZnO surface; therefore, this material has great potential for application as a substrate material to accept electrons in dye solar cell and in narrow bandgap semiconductor quantum dot sensitized solar cells.

  12. Design of low-loss and highly birefringent hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, P. J.; Williams, D. P.; Sabert, H.; Mangan, B. J.; Bird, D. M.; Birks, T. A.; Knight, J. C.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2006-08-01

    A practical hollow-core photonic crystal fiber design suitable for attaining low-loss propagation is analyzed. The geometry involves a number of localized elliptical features positioned on the glass ring that surrounds the air core and separates the core and cladding regions. The size of each feature is tuned so that the composite core-surround geometry is antiresonant within the cladding band gap, thus minimizing the guided mode field intensity both within the fiber material and at material / air interfaces. A birefringent design, which involves a 2-fold symmetric arrangement of the features on the core-surround ring, gives rise to wavelength ranges where the effective index difference between the polarization modes is larger than 10-4. At such high birefringence levels, one of the polarization modes retains favorable field exclusion characteristics, thus enabling low-loss propagation of this polarization channel.

  13. Annular core for Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, R.F.; Baxter, A.M.; Stansfield, O.M.; Vollman, R.E.

    1987-08-01

    The active core of the 350 MW(t) MHTGR is annular in configuration, shaped to provide a large external surface-to-volume ratio for the transport of heat radially to the reactor vessel in case of a loss of coolant flow. For a given fuel temperature limit, the annular core provides approximately 40% greater power output over a typical cylindrical configuration. The reactor core is made up of columns of hexagonal blocks, each 793-mm high and 360-mm wide. The active core is 3.5 m in o.d., 1.65 m in i.d., and 7.93-m tall. Fuel elements contain TRISO-coated microspheres of 19.8% enriched uranium oxycarbide and of fertile thorium oxide. The core is controlled by 30 control rods which enter the inner and outer side reflectors from above.

  14. Annular core for the Modular High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, R.F.; Baxter, A.M.; Stansfield, O.M.; Vollman, R.E.

    The active core of the 350 MW(t) MHTGR is annular in configuration, shaped to provide a large external surface-to-volume ratio for the transport of heat radially to the reactor vessel in case of a loss of coolant flow. For a given fuel temperature limit, the annular core provides approximately 40% greater power output over a typical cylindrical configuration. The reactor core is made up to columns of hexagonal blocks, each 793 mm high and 360 mm wide. The active core is 3.5 m in outside diameter, 1.65 m in inside diameter, and 7.93 m tall. Fuel elements contain TRISO-coated microspheres of 19.8% enriched uranium oxycarbide and of fertile thorium oxide. The core is controlled by 30 control rods which enter the inner and outer side reflectors from above.

  15. Experimental and Analytic Study on the Core Bypass Flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Schultz

    2012-04-01

    Core bypass flow has been one of key issues in the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design for securing core thermal margins and achieving target temperatures at the core exit. The bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core occurs through the control element holes and the radial and axial gaps between the graphite blocks for manufacturing and refueling tolerances. These gaps vary with the core life cycles because of the irradiation swelling/shrinkage characteristic of the graphite blocks such as fuel and reflector blocks, which are main components of a core's structure. Thus, the core bypass flow occurs in a complicated multidimensional way. The accurate prediction of this bypass flow and counter-measures to minimize it are thus of major importance in assuring core thermal margins and securing higher core efficiency. Even with this importance, there has not been much effort in quantifying and accurately modeling the effect of the core bypass flow. The main objectives of this project were to generate experimental data for validating the software to be used to calculate the bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core, validate thermofluid analysis tools and their model improvements, and identify and assess measures for reducing the bypass flow. To achieve these objectives, tasks were defined to (1) design and construct experiments to generate validation data for software analysis tools, (2) determine the experimental conditions and define the measurement requirements and techniques, (3) generate and analyze the experimental data, (4) validate and improve the thermofluid analysis tools, and (5) identify measures to control the bypass flow and assess its performance in the experiment.

  16. Effects of Pelvic and Core Strength Training on High School Cross-Country Race Times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Anne W; Goedeke, Maggie K; Cunningham, Saengchoy R; Rockwell, Derek E; Lehecka, Bryan J; Manske, Robert C; Smith, Barbara S

    2017-08-01

    Clark, AW, Goedeke, MK, Cunningham, SR, Rockwell, DE, Lehecka, BJ, Manske, RC, and Smith, BS. Effects of pelvic and core strength training on high school cross-country race times. J Strength Cond Res 31(8): 2289-2295, 2017-There is only limited research examining the effect of pelvic and core strength training on running performance. Pelvic and core muscle fatigue is believed to contribute to excess motion along frontal and transverse planes which decreases efficiency in normal sagittal plane running motions. The purpose of this study was to determine whether adding a 6-week pelvic and core strengthening program resulted in decreased race times in high school cross-country runners. Thirty-five high school cross-country runners (14-19 years old) from 2 high schools were randomly assigned to a strengthening group (experimental) or a nonstrengthening group (control). All participants completed 4 standardized isometric strength tests for hip abductors, adductors, extensors, and core musculature in a test-retest design. The experimental group performed a 6-week pelvic and core strengthening program along with their normal training. Participants in the control group performed their normal training without additional pelvic and core strengthening. Baseline, 3-week, and 6-week race times were collected using a repeated measures design. No significant interaction between experimental and control groups regarding decreasing race times and increasing pelvic and core musculature strength occurred over the 6-week study period. Both groups increased strength and decreased overall race times. Clinically significant findings reveal a 6-week pelvic and core stability strengthening program 3 times a week in addition to coach led team training may help decrease race times.

  17. Core-multishell globular oxidation in a new TiAlNbCr alloy at high temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, S Q; Qu, S J; Feng, A H; Feng, C; Shen, J; Chen, D L

    2017-06-14

    Oxidation resistance is one of key properties of titanium aluminide (TiAl) based alloys for high-temperature applications such as in advanced aero-engines and gas turbines. A new TiAlNbCr alloy with micro-addition of yttrium has been developed, but its oxidation behavior is unknown. To provide some fundamental insights, high-temperature oxidation characteristics of this alloy are examined via scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, and X-ray diffraction. We show that distinctive core-multishell globular oxidation and "daisy" flower-like oxidation occur exclusively around Y2O3 particles. Globular oxides exhibit multi-layered Y2O3/TiO2/Al2O3-rich/TiO2-rich shell structures from the inside to outside. Flower-like inner oxides consist of core Y2O3 particles surrounded by divergent Al2O3 and oxygen-rich α2-Ti3Al in the near-scale substrate. As the scale-substrate interface moves inward, the inner oxide structures suffer deeper oxidation and transform into the globular oxide structures. Our results demonstrate that the unique oxidation characteristics and the understanding of formation mechanisms pave the way for the exploration and development of advanced oxidation-resistant TiAl-based materials.

  18. High frequency, high temperature specific core loss and dynamic B-H hysteresis loop characteristics of soft magnetic alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieserman, W. R.; Schwarze, G. E.; Niedra, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Limited experimental data exists for the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loops for soft magnetic materials for the combined conditions of high frequency and high temperature. This experimental study investigates the specific core loss and dynamic B-H loop characteristics of Supermalloy and Metglas 2605SC over the frequency range of 1 to 50 kHz and temperature range of 23 to 300 C under sinusoidal voltage excitation. The experimental setup used to conduct the investigation is described. The effects of the maximum magnetic flux density, frequency, and temperature on the specific core loss and on the size and shape of the B-H loops are examined.

  19. Electron Capture in Collisions of Slow Highly Charged Ions with an Atom and a Molecule: Processes and Fragmentation Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Husson

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract : Processes involved in slow collisions between highly charged ions (HCI and neutral targets are presented. First, the mechanisms responsible for double electron capture are discussed. We show that, while the electron-nucleus interaction is expected to be dominant at projectile velocities of about 0.5 a.u., the electron-electron interaction plays a decisive role during the collision and gains importance when the projectile velocity decreases. This interaction has also to be invoked in the capture of core electrons by HCI. Finally, the molecular fragmentation of H2 following the impact of HCI is studied.

  20. Durable polydopamine-coated porous sulfur core-shell cathode for high performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuanfu; Xu, Hui; Bai, Zhaowen; Huang, Baoling; Su, Jingyang; Chen, Guohua

    2015-12-01

    Lithium-sulfur batteries show fascinating potential for advanced energy system due to their high specific capacity, low-cost, and environmental benignity. However, their wide applications have been plagued by low coulombic efficiency, fast capacity fading and poor rate performance. Herein, a facile method for preparation of S@PDA (PDA = polydopamine) composites with core-shell structure and good electrochemical performance as well as the First-Principles calculations on the interactions of PDA and polysulfides are reported. Taking the advantages of the core-shell structure with porous sulfur core, the high mechanical flexibility of PDA for accommodating the volumetric variation during the discharge/charge processes, the good lithium ion conductivity and the strong chemical interactions between the nitrogen/oxygen atoms with lone electron pair and lithium polysulfides for alleviating their dissolution, the S@PDA composites exhibit high discharge capacities at different current densities (1048 and 869 mAh g-1 at 0.2 and 0.8 A g-1, respectively) and excellent capacity retention capability. A capacity decay as low as 0.021% per cycle and an average coulombic efficiency of 98.5% is observed over a long-term cycling of 890 cycles at 0.8 A g-1. The S@PDA electrode has great potential as a low-cost cathode in high energy Li-S batteries.

  1. Highly regenerable carbon-Fe3O4 core-satellite nanospheres as oxygen reduction electrocatalyst and magnetic adsorbent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenqiang; Liu, Minmin; Cai, Chao; Zhou, Haijun; Liu, Rui

    2017-02-01

    We present the synthesis and multifunctional utilization of core-satellite carbon-Fe3O4 nanoparticles to serve as the enabling platform for a range of applications including oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and magnetic adsorbent. Starting from polydopamine (PDA) nanoparticles and Fe(NO3)3, carbon-Fe3O4 core-satellite nanospheres are synthesized through successive steps of impregnation, ammoniation and carbonization. The synergistic combination of Fe3O4 and N-doped carbon endows the nanocomposite with high electrochemical activity in ORR and mainly four electrons transferred in reaction process. Furthermore, carbon-Fe3O4 nanoparticles used as magnetic adsorbent exhibit the efficient removal of Rhodamine B from an aqueous solution. The recovery and reuse of the adsorbent is demonstrated 5 times without any detectible loss in activity.

  2. Lateral distribution of high energy hadrons and gamma ray in air shower cores observed with emulsion chambers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matano, T.; Machida, M.; Kawasumi, N.; Tsushima, I.; Honda, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Navia, C. E.; Matinic, N.; Aquirre, C.

    1985-01-01

    A high energy event of a bundle of electrons, gamma rays and hadronic gamma rays in an air shower core were observed. The bundles were detected with an emulsion chamber with thickness of 15 cm lead. This air shower is estimated to be initiated with a proton with energy around 10 to the 17th power to 10 to the 18th power eV at an altitude of around 100 gmc/2. Lateral distributions of the electromagnetic component with energy above 2 TeV and also the hadronic component of energy above 6 TeV of this air shower core were determined. Particles in the bundle are produced with process of the development of the nuclear cascade, the primary energy of each interaction in the cascade which produces these particles is unknown. To know the primary energy dependence of transverse momentum, the average products of energy and distance for various average energies of secondary particles are studied.

  3. Hollow Ag@Pd core-shell nanotubes as highly active catalysts for the electro-oxidation of formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuanyuan; Lu, Yizhong; Han, Dongxue; Zhang, Qixian; Niu, Li

    2012-03-16

    Ag nanowires are prepared as templates by a polyol reduction process. Then Ag nanotubes coated with a thin layer of Pd are synthesized through sequential reduction accompanied with the galvanic displacement reaction. The products show a hollow core-shell nanotubular structure, as demonstrated by detailed characterizations. The Ag@Pd can significantly improve the electrocatalytic activity towards the electro-oxidation of formic acid and enhance the stability of the Pd component. It is proposed that the enhanced electrochemically active surface area and modulated electron structure of Pd by Ag are responsible for the improvement of electrocatalytic activity and durability. The results obtained in this work are different from those previous reports, in which alloy walls with hollow interiors are usually formed. This work provides a new and simple method for synthesizing novel bimetallic core-shell structure with a hollow interior, which can be applied as high-performance catalysts for the electro-oxidation of formic acid.

  4. Hollow Ag@Pd core-shell nanotubes as highly active catalysts for the electro-oxidation of formic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuanyuan; Lu, Yizhong; Han, Dongxue; Zhang, Qixian; Niu, Li

    2012-03-01

    Ag nanowires are prepared as templates by a polyol reduction process. Then Ag nanotubes coated with a thin layer of Pd are synthesized through sequential reduction accompanied with the galvanic displacement reaction. The products show a hollow core-shell nanotubular structure, as demonstrated by detailed characterizations. The Ag@Pd can significantly improve the electrocatalytic activity towards the electro-oxidation of formic acid and enhance the stability of the Pd component. It is proposed that the enhanced electrochemically active surface area and modulated electron structure of Pd by Ag are responsible for the improvement of electrocatalytic activity and durability. The results obtained in this work are different from those previous reports, in which alloy walls with hollow interiors are usually formed. This work provides a new and simple method for synthesizing novel bimetallic core-shell structure with a hollow interior, which can be applied as high-performance catalysts for the electro-oxidation of formic acid.

  5. The High Latitude D Region During Electron Precipitation Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, J. K.; Collis, P. N.; Korth, A.

    1984-01-01

    The fluxes of energetic electrons entering the high-latitude atmosphere during auroral radio absorption events and their effect on the electron density in the auroral D region are discussed. An attempt was made to calculate the radio absorption during precipitation events from the fluxes of energetic electrons measured at geosynchronous orbit, and then to consider the use of absorption measurements to indicate the magnetospheric particle fluxes, the production rates, and electron densities in the D region.

  6. High latitude D region during electron precipitation events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargreaves, J.K.; Collis, P.N.; Korth, A.

    1984-05-01

    The fluxes of energetic electrons entering the high-latitude atmosphere during auroral radio absorption events and their effect on the electron density in the auroral D region are discussed. An attempt was made to calculate the radio absorption during precipitation events from the fluxes of energetic electrons measured at geosynchronous orbit, and then to consider the use of absorption measurements to indicate the magnetospheric particle fluxes, the production rates, and electron densities in the D region.

  7. High resolution measurements of the electron scattering for applications in electron microscopy and Monte-Carlo simulations of electron scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, D

    2000-01-01

    scanning electron microscope is examined. By means of the scattering at mono-crystalline samples the influence of channeling (anomalous absorption and transmission) on backscattered electron spectra is shown. Captions are given in English language. This work presents high resolution measurements of the energy and complete angular distribution of the scattering of 20 keV electrons (energy resolution 0.55%). The examinations include take-off angles close to the target surface and non-perpendicular incidences of electrons partly for the first time. The results are of interest for the understanding of fundamental scattering processes, the interpretation of signals and new detector systems in electron microscopy and electron spectroscopy. Furthermore, they are used for the verification of electron scattering models and simulations. The applied compact electrostatic spectrometers with spherical and toroidal geometries are characterized and compared. High resolution spectra are obtained by deconvolution of the measu...

  8. High Efficiency Transverse D. C. Electron Beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    resolution of 6,\\ per channel and a spectral range ;md) the eierg2s axis at the bottomn The same relatis e scale oif near]l\\ I(XX) A. We vere also able to...I LI .i OOj)l Iii uolco Htome Ag 1,cric10Oi WI 1I1- ipip TAYl :NI;IO 1Impl omOmI)ItIil,0yI MIpeJaiOCT Ira -w im (AIU IIIII :3 BrII I FlITIC fill IN... scaling gas discharge law PD -- (’can be used to guide the design of these electron gulls. , where C is a constanit -t(i 2 Electron Ieam plasma formed b

  9. High temperature electronics and instrumentation seminar proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veneruso, A.F.; Arnold, C.; Simpson, R.S. (eds.)

    1980-05-01

    This seminar was tailored to address the needs of the borehole logging industry and to stimulate the development and application of this technology, for logging geothermal, hot oil and gas, and steam injection wells. The technical sessions covered the following topics: hybrid circuits, electronic devices, transducers, cables and connectors, materials, mechanical tools and thermal protection. Thirty-eight papers are included. Separate entries were prepared for each one. (MHR)

  10. High temperature electronics and instrumentation seminar proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veneruso, A.F.; Arnold, C.; Simpson, R.S. (eds.)

    1980-05-01

    This seminar was tailored to address the needs of the borehole logging industry and to stimulate the development and application of this technology, for logging geothermal, hot oil and gas, and steam injection wells. The technical sessions covered the following topics: hybrid circuits, electronic devices, transducers, cables and connectors, materials, mechanical tools and thermal protection. Thirty-eight papers are included. Separate entries were prepared for each one. (MHR)

  11. Cu-Ni core-shell nanoparticles: structure, stability, electronic, and magnetic properties: a spin-polarized density functional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Wang, Xinyan; Liu, Jianlan; Yang, Yanhui

    2017-02-01

    Bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles (CSNPs) have attracted great interest not only because of their superior stability, selectivity, and catalytic activity but also due to their tunable properties achieved by changing the morphology, sequence, and sizes of both core and shell. In this study, the structure, stability, charge transfer, electronic, and magnetic properties of 13-atom and 55-atom Cu and Cu-Ni CSNPs were investigated using the density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The results show that Ni@Cu CSNPs with a Cu surface shell are more energetically favorable than Cu@Ni CSNPs with a Ni surface shell. Interestingly, three-shell Ni@Cu12@Ni42 is more stable than two-shell Cu13@Ni42, while two-shell Ni13@Cu42 is more stable than three-shell Cu@Ni12@Cu42. Analysis of Bader charge illustrates that the charge transfer increases from Cu core to Ni shell in Cu@Ni NPs, while it decreases from Ni core to Cu shell in Ni@Cu NPs. Furthermore, the charge transfer results that d-band states have larger shift toward the Fermi level for the Ni@Cu CSNPs with Cu surface shell, while the Cu@Ni CSNPs with Ni surface shell have similar d-band state curves and d-band centers with the monometallic Ni NPs. In addition, the Cu-Ni CSNPs possess higher magnetic moment when the Ni atoms aggregated at core region of CSNPs, while having lower magnetic moment when the Ni atoms segregate on surface region. The change of the Cu atom location in CSNPs has a weak effect on the total magnetic moment. Our findings provide useful insights for the design of bimetallic core-shell catalysts.

  12. The use of CORE model by metacognitive skill approach in developing characters junior high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Dahlia; Yaniawati, Poppy; Kusumah, Yaya Sukjaya

    2017-08-01

    This study aims to analyze the character of students who obtain CORE learning model using metacognitive approach. The method in this study is qualitative research and quantitative research design (Mixed Method Design) with concurrent embedded strategy. The research was conducted on two groups: an experimental group and the control group. An experimental group consists of students who had CORE model learning using metacognitive approach while the control group consists of students taught by conventional learning. The study was conducted the object this research is the seventh grader students in one the public junior high schools in Bandung. Based on this research, it is known that the characters of the students in the CORE model learning through metacognitive approach is: honest, hard work, curious, conscientious, creative and communicative. Overall it can be concluded that CORE model learning is good for developing characters of a junior high school student.

  13. Multi-Core Technology for and Fault Tolerant High-Performance Spacecraft Computer Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Peter M.; Haulsen, Ivo; Van Kampenhout, J. Reinier; Pletner, Samuel

    2012-08-01

    The current architectural trends in the field of multi-core processors can provide an enormous increase in processing power by exploiting the parallelism available in many applications. In particular because of their high energy efficiency, it is obvious that multi-core processor-based systems will also be used in future space missions. In this paper we present the system architecture of a powerful optical sensor system based on the eight core multi-core processor P4080 from Freescale. The fault tolerant structure and the highly effective FDIR concepts implemented on different hardware and software levels of the system are described in detail. The space application scenario and thus the main requirements for the sensor system have been defined by a complex tracking sensor application for autonomous landing or docking manoeuvres.

  14. Hollow-core photonic crystal fibre for high power laser beam delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingying; Wang; Meshaal; Alharbi; Thomas; D.Bradley; Coralie; Fourcade-Dutin; Benot; Debord; Benot; Beaudou; Frdric; Ger??me; Fetah; Benabid

    2013-01-01

    We review the use of hollow-core photonic crystal fibre(HC-PCF)for high power laser beam delivery.A comparison of bandgap HC-PCF with Kagome-lattice HC-PCF on the geometry,guidance mechanism,and optical properties shows that the Kagome-type HC-PCF is an ideal host for high power laser beam transportation because of its large core size,low attenuation,broadband transmission,single-mode guidance,low dispersion and the ultra-low optical overlap between the core-guided modes and the silica core-surround.The power handling capability of Kagome-type HC-PCF is further experimentally demonstrated by millijoule nanosecond laser spark ignition and~100μJ sub-picosecond laser pulse transportation and compression.

  15. Three-dimensional fabrication and characterisation of core-shell nano-columns using electron beam patterning of Ge-doped SiO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gontard, Lionel C.; Jinschek, Joerg R.; Ou, Haiyan;

    2012-01-01

    A focused electron beam in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is used to create arrays of core-shell structures in a specimen of amorphous SiO2 doped with Ge. The same electron microscope is then used to measure the changes that occurred in the specimen in three dimensions using e...

  16. Modification of magicity towards the dripline and its impact on electron-capture rates for stellar core-collapse

    CERN Document Server

    Raduta, Ad R; Oertel, M

    2015-01-01

    The importance of microphysical inputs from laboratory nuclear experiments and theoretical nuclear structure calculations in the understanding of the core collapse dynamics, and the subsequent supernova explosion, is largely recognized in the recent literature. In this work, we analyze the impact of the masses of very neutron rich nuclei on the matter composition during collapse, and the corresponding electron capture rate. To this aim, we introduce an empirical modification of the popular Duflo-Zuker mass model to account for possible shell quenching far from stability, and study the effect of the quenching on the average electron capture rate. We show that the preeminence of the $N=50$ and $N=82$ closed shells in the collapse dynamics is considerably decreased if the shell gaps are reduced in the region of $^{78}$Ni and beyond. As a consequence, local modifications of the overall electron capture rate up to 30\\% can be expected, with integrated values strongly dependent on the stiffness of magicity quenchin...

  17. Highly efficient method for production of radioactive silver seed cores for brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Roberta Mansini; de Souza, Carla Daruich; Rostelato, Maria Elisa Chuery Martins; Araki, Koiti

    2017-02-01

    A simple and highly efficient (shorter reaction time and almost no rework) method for production of iodine based radioactive silver seed cores for brachytherapy is described. The method allows almost quantitative deposition of iodine-131 on dozens of silver substrates at once, with even distribution of activity per core and insignificant amounts of liquid and solid radioactive wastes, allowing the fabrication of cheaper radioactive iodine seeds for brachytherapy.

  18. ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEI,J.; MACEK,R.J.

    2002-04-14

    One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures.

  19. Synthesis of CeO2-based core/shell nanoparticles with high oxygen storage capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzunoglu, Aytekin; Kose, Dursun Ali; Stanciu, Lia A.

    2017-07-01

    Ceria plays a key role in various applications including sensing and catalysis owing to its high oxygen storage capacity (OSC). The aim of this work is to prepare novel MO x /CeO2 (M: Zr, Ti, Cu) metal oxide systems with core/shell structures using a facile two-step chemical precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and N2 adsorption methods. The OSC property of the samples was evaluated using TGA analysis conducted at 600 °C under reductive (5% H2/Ar) and oxidative (synthetic air) environments. The OSCs of the samples were found to be 130, 253, and 2098 µmol-O2/g for ZrO2/CeO2, TiO2/CeO2, and CuO/CeO2, respectively. Effects of heat treatment on the physical and redox properties of the samples were also evaluated. In this regard, the samples were exposed to 500 °C for 5 h under ambient environment. It was observed that the heat treatment induced the formation of mixed metal oxide alloys and the BET surface area of the samples diminished significantly. The OSC of the samples, however, did not experience any significant chance, which was attributed to the compensation of the loss in the surface area by the alloy formation after the heat treatment.

  20. High-performance ZnCo₂O₄@CeO2₂₄ core@shell microspheres for catalytic CO oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fan; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Dapeng; Zhen, Jiangman; Li, Junqi; Wang, Yinghui; Zhang, Hongjie

    2014-12-24

    In this paper, we report a self-assembly method to synthesize high-quality ZnCo2O4@CeO2 core@shell microspheres with tunable CeO2 thickness. ZnCo2O4 spheres were first synthesized as the core, followed by a controlled CeO2 shell coating process. The thickness of CeO2 shell could be easily tuned by varying the feeding molar ratio of Ce/Co. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) images and scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) image have identified the core@shell structure of these samples. In CO oxidation tests these ZnCo2O4@CeO2 core@shell microspheres exhibited promising catalytic performance, and the catalytic activity of the best sample is even close to the traditional noble metal-CeO2 system, attaining 100% CO conversion at a relatively low temperature of 200 °C. Cycling tests confirm their good stability of these core@shell microspheres besides activity. Their high catalytic performance should be attributed to the core@shell structure formation, and moreover further H2-temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) results revealed the possible synergistic effects between the two components of ZnCo2O4 and CeO2.

  1. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pikin, Alexander; Alessi, James G.; Beebe, Edward N.; Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm2 and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  2. Suppression of Electron Thermal Conduction in High $\\beta$ Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Roberg-Clark, G T; Reynolds, C S; Swisdak, M

    2016-01-01

    Electron heat conduction is explored with particle-in-cell simulations and analytic modeling in a high $\\beta$ system relevant to galaxy clusters. Linear wave theory reveals that whistler waves are driven unstable by electron heat flux even when the heat flux is weak. The resonant interaction of electrons with these waves plays a critical role in controlling the impact of the waves on the heat flux. In a 1D model only electrons moving opposite in direction to the heat flux resonate with the waves and electron heat flux is only modestly reduced. In a 2D system transverse whistlers also resonate with electrons propagating in the direction of the heat flux and resonant overlap leads to strong suppression of electron heat flux. The results suggest that electron heat conduction might be strongly suppressed in galaxy clusters.

  3. Influence of core NA on Thermal-Induced Mode Instabilities in High Power Fiber Amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Tao, Rumao; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Liu, Zejin

    2015-01-01

    We report on the influence of core NA on thermal-induced mode instabilities (MI) in high power fiber amplifiers. Influence of core NA and V-parameter on MI has been investigated numerically. It shows that core NA has larger influence on MI for fibers with smaller core-cladding-ratio, and the influence of core NA on threshold is more obvious when the amplifiers are pumped at 915nm. The dependence of threshold on V-parameter revealed that the threshold increases linearly as V-parameter decreases when V-parameter is larger than 3.5, and the threshold shows exponentially increase as V-parameter decreases when V-parameter is less than 3.5. We also discussed the effect of linewidth on MI, which indicates that the influence of linewidth can be neglected for linewidth smaller than 1nm when the fiber core NA is smaller than 0.07 and fiber length is shorter than 20m. Fiber amplifiers with different core NA were experimentally analyzed, which agreed with the theoretical predictions.

  4. Guided wave propagation in a honeycomb composite sandwich structure in presence of a high density core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikdar, Shirsendu; Banerjee, Sauvik

    2016-09-01

    A coordinated theoretical, numerical and experimental study is carried out in an effort to interpret the characteristics of propagating guided Lamb wave modes in presence of a high-density (HD) core region in a honeycomb composite sandwich structure (HCSS). Initially, a two-dimensional (2D) semi-analytical model based on the global matrix method is used to study the response and dispersion characteristics of the HCSS with a soft core. Due to the complex structural characteristics, the study of guided wave (GW) propagation in HCSS with HD-core region inherently poses many challenges. Therefore, a numerical simulation of GW propagation in the HCSS with and without the HD-core region is carried out, using surface-bonded piezoelectric wafer transducer (PWT) network. From the numerical results, it is observed that the presence of HD-core significantly decreases both the group velocity and the amplitude of the received GW signal. Laboratory experiments are then conducted in order to verify the theoretical and numerical results. A good agreement between the theoretical, numerical and experimental results is observed in all the cases studied. An extensive parametric study is also carried out for a range of HD-core sizes and densities in order to study the effect due to the change in size and density of the HD zone on the characteristics of propagating GW modes. It is found that the amplitudes and group velocities of the GW modes decrease with the increase in HD-core width and density.

  5. Runaway electron dynamics in tokamak plasmas with high impurity content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Solís, J. R.; Loarte, A.; Lehnen, M.

    2015-09-01

    The dynamics of high energy runaway electrons is analyzed for plasmas with high impurity content. It is shown that modified collision terms are required in order to account for the collisions of the relativistic runaway electrons with partially stripped impurity ions, including the effect of the collisions with free and bound electrons, as well as the scattering by the full nuclear and the electron-shielded ion charge. The effect of the impurities on the avalanche runaway growth rate is discussed. The results are applied, for illustration, to the interpretation of the runaway electron behavior during disruptions, where large amounts of impurities are expected, particularly during disruption mitigation by massive gas injection. The consequences for the electron synchrotron radiation losses and the resulting runaway electron dynamics are also analyzed.

  6. Electronic Delivery of High School Courses: Status, Trends and Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, William R.

    All 16 Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) states have high school students receiving courses electronically, according to a recent SREB survey of state departments of education. Courses are delivered electronically to high school students in the SREB region primarily through three methods: satellite, compressed video, and the Web. Although…

  7. Electron Spin Pairing in High-Tc Superconductors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭卫; 韩汝珊

    2001-01-01

    An electron pairing theory based on effective electron spin coupling mediated by antiferromagnetically correlated local moments is presented to account for high-Tc phenomena. We show that Kondo scattering and the suppression of the antiferromagnetic superexchange between Cu2+ moments lead to local triplet pairing, the mechanism underlying high-Tc superconductivity.

  8. Coring and High-Resolution Imaging of the Permian-Triassic Boundary in Deltadalen, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planke, Sverre

    2016-04-01

    The Permian-Triassic extinction was likely triggered by the voluminous igneous activity of the Siberian Traps. There are, however, limited information available about the effects of the Siberian Traps volcanism in Permian to Triassic sedimentary successions outside Siberia. We drilled two boreholes across the Permian-Triassic boundary (PTB) in Deltadalen, Svalbard, in August 2014, to better document the extinction event and environmental changes in the sedimentary succession in this region. Even though the PTB event is studied in several outcrops to varying degree if scrutiny on Svalbard, a scientific core is important for understanding the details of the PTB event, as outcrops may not permit studies at the appropriate levels of resolution, exposure or confidence. The Deltadalen site was chosen as an optimal drilling location after field work in the Isfjorden area in 2013 and early 2014. The almost 100 m deep holes were fully cored and penetrated the Triassic Vikinghøgda Formation (about 85 m recovered) and the Permian Kapp Starostin Formation (about 15 m). The main lithologies include Permian chert-rich green glauconitic sandstones and Triassic mudstones. A 10 m thick sedimentary reference outcrop section across the PTB was further logged and sampled in a nearby river valley. A comprehensive core analysis program is now underway. High-resolution XRF, MST and hyperspectral core scanning has been completed along the entire core surface, while high-resolution CT scanning has been carried out for whole core sections. The DD-1 core has subsequently been split, photographed, described, and sampled for geochemical, micropaleontological, petrological and magnetic analyses. Almost 10 bentonite layers have furthermore been sampled for volcanological and geochronological studies. Our goal is that the cores will become an important future reference section of the PTB in Svalbard and the high-Arctic, and help constrain the extent of the regional effects of explosive volcanism

  9. Core and Refueling Design Studies for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL; Cisneros, Anselmo T [ORNL; Kelly, Ryan P [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a central generating station type [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). The overall goal of the AHTR development program is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of FHRs as low-cost, large-size power producers while maintaining full passive safety. This report presents the current status of ongoing design studies of the core, in-vessel structures, and refueling options for the AHTR. The AHTR design remains at the notional level of maturity as important material, structural, neutronic, and hydraulic issues remain to be addressed. The present design space exploration, however, indicates that reasonable options exist for the AHTR core, primary heat transport path, and fuel cycle provided that materials and systems technologies develop as anticipated. An illustration of the current AHTR core, reactor vessel, and nearby structures is shown in Fig. ES1. The AHTR core design concept is based upon 252 hexagonal, plate fuel assemblies configured to form a roughly cylindrical core. The core has a fueled height of 5.5 m with 25 cm of reflector above and below the core. The fuel assembly hexagons are {approx}45 cm across the flats. Each fuel assembly contains 18 plates that are 23.9 cm wide and 2.55 cm thick. The reactor vessel has an exterior diameter of 10.48 m and a height of 17.7 m. A row of replaceable graphite reflector prismatic blocks surrounds the core radially. A more complete reactor configuration description is provided in Section 2 of this report. The AHTR core design space exploration was performed under a set of constraints. Only low enrichment (<20%) uranium fuel was considered. The coated particle fuel and matrix materials were derived from those being developed and demonstrated under the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) advanced gas reactor program. The coated particle volumetric packing fraction was restricted to at most 40%. The pressure

  10. Heat transfer in high density electronics packaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to get an insight into the thermal characteristic and to evaluate the thermal reliability of the "System in Packaging"(SIP), a new solution of electronics packaging, a heat transfer model of SIP was developed to predict the heat dissipation capacity and to investigate the effect of different factors on the temperature distribution in the electronics. The affecting parameters under consideration include the thermophysical properties of the substrates, the coefficient of convection heat transfer, the thickness of the chip, and the density of power dissipation. ALGOR, a kind of finite element analysis software,was used to do the model simulation. Based on the sinulation and analysis of the heat conduction and convection resistance, criteria for the thermal design were established and possible measurement for enhancing power dissipation was provided, The results show that the heat transfer model provides a new and effective way to the thermal design and thermal analysis of SIP and to the mechanical analysis for the further investigation of SIP.

  11. The Electron Temperature and Anisotropy in the Solar Wind. I. Comparison of the Core and Halo Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Pierrard, V; Poedts, S; Stverak, S; Maksimovic, M; Travnicek, P M

    2016-01-01

    Estimating the temperature of the solar wind particles and their anisotropies is particularly important for understanding the origin of these deviations from thermal equilibrium as well as their effects. In the absence of energetic events the velocity distribution of electrons reveal a dual structure with a thermal (Maxwellian) core and a suprathermal (Kappa) halo. This paper presents a detailed observational analysis of these two components, providing estimations of their temperatures and temperature anisotropies and decoding any potential interdependence that their properties may indicate. The data set used in this study includes more than 120$\\,$000 the events detected by three missions in the ecliptic within an extended range of heliocentric distances from 0.3 to over 4~AU. The anti-correlation found for the core and halo temperatures is consistent with the radial evolution of the Kappa model, clarifying an apparent contradiction in previous observational analysis and providing valuable clues about the te...

  12. A Comparative Study on the Selected Area Electron Diffraction Pattern of Fe Oxide/Au Core-shell Structured Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qianghua LU; Kailun YAO; Dong XI; Zuli LIU; Xiaoping LUO; Qin NING

    2007-01-01

    The selected area electron diffraction (SAED) pattern of magnetic iron oxide core/gold shell nanoparticles has been studied. For the composite particles with mean size less than 10 nm, their SAED pattern is found to be different from either the pattern of pure Fe oxide nanoparticles or that of pure Au particles. Based on the fact that the ring diameters of these composite particles fit the characteristic relation for the fcc structure, the Au atoms on surfaces of the concerned particles are supposed to pack in a way more tightly than they usually do in pure Au nanoparticles. The driving force for this is the coherency strain which enables the shell material at the heterostructured interface to adapt the lattice parameters of the core.

  13. HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING BASED ON REALISTIC SIX-DIMENSIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FEDOTOV,A.; BEN-ZVI, I.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The high-energy electron cooling system for RHIC-II is unique compared to standard coolers. It requires bunched electron beam. Electron bunches are produced by an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL), and cooling is planned without longitudinal magnetic field. To address unique features of the RHIC cooler, a generalized treatment of cooling force was introduced in BETACOOE code which allows us to calculate friction force for an arbitrary distribution of electrons. Simulations for RHIC cooler based on electron distribution from ERL are presented.

  14. A high current, high gradient, laser excited, pulsed electron gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batchelor, K.; Farrell, J.P.; Dudnikova, G. [Brookhaven Technology Group, Inc., Stony Brook, NY (United States); Ben-Zvi, I.; Srinivasan-Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Yakimenko, V. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1998-06-01

    This paper describes a pulsed electron gun that can be used as an FEL, as an injector for electron linear accelerators or for rf power generation. It comprises a 1 to 5 MeV, 1 to 2 ns pulsed power supply feeding a single diode, photoexcited acceleration gap. Beam quality of a {approximately}1nC charge in {approximately}1 GV/m field was studied. Computations of the beam parameters as a function of electrode configuration and peak electron current are presented together with descriptions of the power supply, laser and beam diagnostics systems.

  15. Development of High Power Electron Beam Measuring and Analyzing System for Microwave Vacuum Electron Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, C. J.; Wu, X. L.; Li, Q. S.; Li, C. S.

    The measurement and analysis of high power electron beam during its formation and transmission are the basic scientific problems and key techniques for the development of high performance microwave vacuum electron devices, which are widely used in the fields of military weapon, microwave system and scientific instruments. In this paper, the dynamic parameters measurement and analysis system being built in Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IECAS) recently are introduced. The instrument are designed to determine the cross-section, the current density, and the energy resolution of the high power electron beam during its formation and transmission process, which are available both for the electron gun and the electron optics system respectively. Then the three dimension trajectory images of the electron beam can be rebuilt and display with computer controlled data acquisition and processing system easily. Thus, much more complicated structures are considered and solved completely to achieve its detection and analysis, such as big chamber with 10-6 Pa high vacuum system, the controlled detector movement system in axis direction with distance of 600 mm inside the vacuum chamber, the electron beam energy analysis system with high resolution of 0.5%, and the electron beam cross-section and density detector using the YAG: Ce crystal and CCD imaging system et al. At present, the key parts of the instrument have been finished, the cross-section experiment of the electron beam have been performed successfully. Hereafter, the instrument will be used to measure and analyze the electron beam with the electron gun and electron optics system for the single beam and multiple beam klystron, gyrotron, sheet beam device, and traveling wave tube etc. thoroughly.

  16. Spectral shape variation of interstellar electrons at high energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, L. C.

    1985-01-01

    The high energy electron spectrum analysis has shown that the electron intensity inside the H2 cloud region, or in a spiral arm, should be much lower than that outside it and the observed electron energy spectrum should flatten again at about 1 TeV. In the framework of the leady box model the recently established rigidity dependence of the escape pathlength of cosmic rays would predict a high energy electron spectrum which is flatter than the observed one. This divergence is explained by assuming that the leaky box model can only apply to cosmic ray heavy nuclei, and light nuclei and electrons in cosmic rays may have different behaviors in the interstellar propagation. Therefore, the measured data on high energy electrons should be analyzed based on the proposed nonuniform galactic disk (NUGD) mode.

  17. Nuclear quantum and electronic exchange-correlation effects on the high pressure phase diagram of lithium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Raymond; Morales, Miguel; Bonev, Stanimir

    Lithium at ambient conditions is the simplest alkali metal and exhibits textbook nearly-free electron character. However, increased core/valence electron overlap under compression leads to surprisingly complex behavior. Dense lithium is known to posses a maximum in the melting line, a metal to semiconductor phase transition around 80GPa, reemergent metallicity around 120GPa, and low coordination solid and liquid phases. In addition to its complex electronic structure at high pressure, the atomic mass of lithium is low enough that nuclear quantum effects could have a nontrivial impact on its phase diagram. Through a combination of density functional theory based path-integral and classical molecular dynamics simulations, we have investigated the impact of both nuclear quantum effects and anharmonicity on the melting line and solid phase boundaries. Additionally, we have determined the robustness of previously predicted tetrahedral clustering in the dense liquid to the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects and approximate treatment of electronic exchange-correlation effects.

  18. A highly efficient multi-core algorithm for clustering extremely large datasets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kraus Johann M

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, the demand for computational power in computational biology has increased due to rapidly growing data sets from microarray and other high-throughput technologies. This demand is likely to increase. Standard algorithms for analyzing data, such as cluster algorithms, need to be parallelized for fast processing. Unfortunately, most approaches for parallelizing algorithms largely rely on network communication protocols connecting and requiring multiple computers. One answer to this problem is to utilize the intrinsic capabilities in current multi-core hardware to distribute the tasks among the different cores of one computer. Results We introduce a multi-core parallelization of the k-means and k-modes cluster algorithms based on the design principles of transactional memory for clustering gene expression microarray type data and categorial SNP data. Our new shared memory parallel algorithms show to be highly efficient. We demonstrate their computational power and show their utility in cluster stability and sensitivity analysis employing repeated runs with slightly changed parameters. Computation speed of our Java based algorithm was increased by a factor of 10 for large data sets while preserving computational accuracy compared to single-core implementations and a recently published network based parallelization. Conclusions Most desktop computers and even notebooks provide at least dual-core processors. Our multi-core algorithms show that using modern algorithmic concepts, parallelization makes it possible to perform even such laborious tasks as cluster sensitivity and cluster number estimation on the laboratory computer.

  19. Massive quiescent cores in Orion. IV. Their supercritical state revealed by high resolution ammonia maps

    CERN Document Server

    Li, D; Zhang, Q; Chen, W

    2012-01-01

    We present combined VLA and GBT images of \\ammonia\\ inversion transitions (1,1) and (2,2) toward OMC2 and OMC3. We focus on the relatively quiescent Orion cores, which are away from the Trapezium cluster and have no sign of massive protostars nor evolved star formation, such as IRAS source, water maser, and methanol maser. The 5\\arcsec\\ angular resolution and $0.6 \\rm{}km s^{-1}$ velocity resolution of these data enable us to study the thermal and dynamic state of these cores at $\\sim{}0.02 \\rm{}pc$ scales, comparable to or smaller than those of the current dust continuum surveys. We measure temperatures for a total of 30 cores, with average masses and radii of $11 \\Ms$ and $0.039 \\rm{}pc$, respectively. Compared to other Gould Belt dense cores, the Orion cores have an unusually high gravitational-to-inetic energy ratio (virial mass ratio $R_{vir} > >1$), resembling results for other clouds forming high--mass stars. This results from Orion cores having velocity dispersions similar to those in, e.g., Perseus a...

  20. A highly heterogeneous 3D PWR core benchmark: deterministic and Monte Carlo method comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaboulay, J.-C.; Damian, F.; Douce, S.; Lopez, F.; Guenaut, C.; Aggery, A.; Poinot-Salanon, C.

    2014-06-01

    Physical analyses of the LWR potential performances with regards to the fuel utilization require an important part of the work dedicated to the validation of the deterministic models used for theses analyses. Advances in both codes and computer technology give the opportunity to perform the validation of these models on complex 3D core configurations closed to the physical situations encountered (both steady-state and transient configurations). In this paper, we used the Monte Carlo Transport code TRIPOLI-4®; to describe a whole 3D large-scale and highly-heterogeneous LWR core. The aim of this study is to validate the deterministic CRONOS2 code to Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-4®; in a relevant PWR core configuration. As a consequence, a 3D pin by pin model with a consistent number of volumes (4.3 millions) and media (around 23,000) is established to precisely characterize the core at equilibrium cycle, namely using a refined burn-up and moderator density maps. The configuration selected for this analysis is a very heterogeneous PWR high conversion core with fissile (MOX fuel) and fertile zones (depleted uranium). Furthermore, a tight pitch lattice is selcted (to increase conversion of 238U in 239Pu) that leads to harder neutron spectrum compared to standard PWR assembly. In these conditions two main subjects will be discussed: the Monte Carlo variance calculation and the assessment of the diffusion operator with two energy groups for the core calculation.

  1. Ultra-high resolution electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Mark P.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Pennycook, Stephen J.

    2017-02-01

    The last two decades have seen dramatic advances in the resolution of the electron microscope brought about by the successful correction of lens aberrations that previously limited resolution for most of its history. We briefly review these advances, the achievement of sub-Ångstrom resolution and the ability to identify individual atoms, their bonding configurations and even their dynamics and diffusion pathways. We then present a review of the basic physics of electron scattering, lens aberrations and their correction, and an approximate imaging theory for thin crystals which provides physical insight into the various different imaging modes. Then we proceed to describe a more exact imaging theory starting from Yoshioka’s formulation and covering full image simulation methods using Bloch waves, the multislice formulation and the frozen phonon/quantum excitation of phonons models. Delocalization of inelastic scattering has become an important limiting factor at atomic resolution. We therefore discuss this issue extensively, showing how the full-width-half-maximum is the appropriate measure for predicting image contrast, but the diameter containing 50% of the excitation is an important measure of the range of the interaction. These two measures can differ by a factor of 5, are not a simple function of binding energy, and full image simulations are required to match to experiment. The Z-dependence of annular dark field images is also discussed extensively, both for single atoms and for crystals, and we show that temporal incoherence must be included accurately if atomic species are to be identified through matching experimental intensities to simulations. Finally we mention a few promising directions for future investigation.

  2. Electronic DC transformer with high power density

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavlovský, M.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the possibilities of increasing the power density of high-power dc-dc converters with galvanic isolation. Three cornerstones for reaching high power densities are identified as: size reduction of passive components, reduction of losses particularly in active components

  3. High permeability and low loss of Ni-Zn-Fe ferrite/metal composite cores in high frequency region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Satoshi; Mitsuoka, Takeshi; Sonehara, Makoto; Sato, Toshiro; Matsushita, Nobuhiro

    2017-05-01

    A Ni-Zn-Fe ferrite was deposited on the surface of Fe-Si and three kinds of Fe-Si-Cr powders as an insulating material using an ultrasonic-enhanced ferrite plating method. All ferrite-coated powders exhibited a high magnetization of about 180 emu/g derived from their soft magnetic metal and ferrite composition. The three different ferrite-coated Fe-Si-Cr cores annealed at 973 K exhibited a constant permeability μ' of 55-60 in the frequency range up to 50 MHz owing to the insulating effect of the ferrite layer. In contrast, the permeability μ' of the ferrite-coated Fe-3.5Si mass % core decreased in the MHz range. The Cr component acted as a passive layer that made it possible to maintain the Ni-Zn-Fe ferrite layer after annealing. The core loss of the ferrite-coated Fe-3.5Si-4.5Cr mass % core was 448 kW/m3 at 100 kHz and 50 mT, which was half of that observed for the Fe-3.5Si-4.5Cr core without ferrite layer. Additionally, the eddy-current loss of the ferrite-coated Fe-3.5Si-4.5Cr core was strongly decreased compared with the non-coated Fe-3.5Si-4.5Cr core owing to the insulating properties of the ferrite layer.

  4. Polymer Magnetic Composite Core Based Microcoils and Microtransformers for Very High Frequency Power Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravana Guru Mariappan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a rapid prototyping and a cost effective fabrication process on batch fabricated wafer-level micro inductive components with polymer magnetic composite (PMC cores. The new PMC cores provide a possibility to bridge the gap between the non-magnetic and magnetic core inductive devices in terms of both the operating frequency and electrical performance. An optimized fabrication process of molding, casting, and demolding which uses teflon for the molding tool is presented. High permeability NiFeZn powder was mixed with Araldite epoxy to form high resistive PMC cores. Cylindrical PMC cores having a footprint of 0.79 mm 2 were fabricated with varying percentage of the magnetic powder on FR4 substrates. The core influence on the electrical performance of the inductive elements is discussed. Inductor chips having a solenoidal coil as well as transformer chips with primary and secondary coils wound around each other have been fabricated and evaluated. A core with 65% powder equipped with a solenoid made out of 25 µm thick insulated Au wire having 30 turns, yielded a constant inductance value of 2 µH up to the frequency of 50 MHz and a peak quality factor of 13. A 1:1 transformer with similar PMC core and solenoidal coils having 10 turns yielded a maximum efficiency of 84% and a coupling factor of 96%. In order to protect the solenoids and to increase the mechanical robustness and handling of the chips, a novel process was developed to encapsulate the components with an epoxy based magnetic composite. The effect on the electrical performance through the magnetic composite encapsulation is reported as well.

  5. High School Teachers' Perspectives on the English Language Arts Common Core State Standards: An Exploratory Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajayi, Lasisi

    2016-01-01

    This was an exploratory study that examined high school teachers' perspectives about their early experiences with the English language arts Common Core State Standards. The sources of data for the study included a survey and structured interviews. Twenty-three high school ELA teachers from one unified school district in Southern California…

  6. Environmental Science for All? Considering Environmental Science for Inclusion in the High School Core Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelson, Daniel C.

    2007-01-01

    With the dramatic growth of environmental science as an elective in high schools over the last decade, educators have the opportunity to realistically consider the possibility of incorporating environmental science into the core high school curriculum. Environmental science has several characteristics that make it a candidate for the core…

  7. High-resolution, continuous method for measurement of acidity in ice cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasteris, Daniel R; McConnell, Joseph R; Edwards, Ross

    2012-02-07

    The acid content of ice core samples provides information regarding the history of volcanism, biogenic activity, windblown dust, forest fires, and pollution-induced acid rain. A continuous ice core analysis allows for collection of high-resolution data in a very efficient manner, but this technique has not been readily applied to the measurement of pH and acidity in ice cores. The difficulty arises because the sample is highly undersaturated with respect to carbon dioxide (CO(2)) immediately after melting, making it difficult to maintain stable concentrations of dissolved carbon dioxide and carbonic acid (H(2)CO(3)). Here, we present a solution to this problem in the form of a small flow-through bubbling chamber that is supplied with a known concentration of CO(2). The bubbling action allows for quick equilibration while the small size of the chamber limits sample mixing in order to maintain high resolution. Thorough error analysis provides a measurement uncertainty of ±0.20 μM or ±5% of the acidity value, whichever is greater, and the T95 signal response time is determined to be 1.25 min. The performance of the technique is further evaluated with data from a 63-year ice core from northwest Greenland for which all major ion species were also measured. The measured acidity closely matches the acidity derived from a charge balance calculation, indicating that all of the analytes were measured accurately. The performance specifications that we provide are applicable to ice cores with low concentrations of alkaline dust (ice cores that are collected. To date, the method has not been evaluated with samples containing high alkaline dust concentrations, such as Greenland cores from the last glacial period, where measurement could be made difficult by memory effects as particles coat the internal surfaces of the sample stream.

  8. Core-Shell Diamond as a Support for Solid-Phase Extraction and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, Gaurav; Jensen, David S.; Wiest, Landon A.; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Lee, Milton L.; Shutthanandan, V.; Linford, Matthew R.

    2010-06-01

    We report the formation of core-shell diamond particles for solid phase extraction (SPE) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) made by layer-by-layer (LbL) deposition. Their synthesis begins with the amine functionalization of microdiamond by its immersion in an aqueous solution of a primary amine-containing polymer (polyallylamine (PAAm)). The amine-terminated microdiamond is then immersed in an aqueous suspension of nanodiamond, which leads to adsorption of the nanodiamond. Alternating (self-limiting) immersions in the solutions of the amine-containing polymer and the suspension of nanodiamond are continued until the desired number of nanodiamond layers is formed around the microdiamond. Finally, the core-shell particles are cross-linked with 1,2,5,6-diepoxycyclooctane or reacted with 1,2-epoxyoctadecane. Layer-by-layer deposition of PAAm and nanodiamond is also studied on planar Si/SiO2 surfaces, which were characterized by SEM, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). Core-shell particles are characterized by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFT), environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), and Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET) surface area and pore size measurements. Larger (ca. 50 μm) core-shell diamond particles have much higher surface areas, and analyte loading capacities in SPE than nonporous solid diamond particles. Smaller (ca. 3 μm), normal and reversed phase, core-shell diamond particles have been used for HPLC, with 36,300 plates per meter for mesitylene in a separation of benzene and alkyl benzenes on a C18 adsorbent, and 54,800 plates per meter for diazinon in a similar separation of two pesticides.

  9. Three-dimensional fabrication and characterisation of core-shell nano-columns using electron beam patterning of Ge-doped SiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gontard, Lionel C. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla (CSIC), 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Jinschek, Joerg R. [FEI Europe, Achtseweg Noord 5, 5600 KA Eindhoven (Netherlands); Ou Haiyan [Department of Photonics, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kongens Lyngby (Denmark); Verbeeck, Jo [EMAT, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E. [Ernst Ruska-Centre for Microscopy and Spectroscopy with Electrons and Peter Gruenberg Institute, Forschungszentrum Juelich, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2012-06-25

    A focused electron beam in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is used to create arrays of core-shell structures in a specimen of amorphous SiO{sub 2} doped with Ge. The same electron microscope is then used to measure the changes that occurred in the specimen in three dimensions using electron tomography. The results show that transformations in insulators that have been subjected to intense irradiation using charged particles can be studied directly in three dimensions. The fabricated structures include core-shell nano-columns, sputtered regions, voids, and clusters.

  10. High Power Spark Delivery System Using Hollow Core Kagome Lattice Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciprian Dumitrache

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the use of the recently developed hollow core kagome lattice fibers for delivery of high power laser pulses. Compared to other photonic crystal fibers (PCFs, the hollow core kagome fibers have larger core diameter (~50 µm, which allows for higher energy coupling in the fiber while also maintaining high beam quality at the output (M2 = 1.25. We have conducted a study of the maximum deliverable energy versus laser pulse duration using a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm. Pulse energies as high as 30 mJ were transmitted for 30 ns pulse durations. This represents, to our knowledge; the highest laser pulse energy delivered using PCFs. Two fiber damage mechanisms were identified as damage at the fiber input and damage within the bulk of the fiber. Finally, we have demonstrated fiber delivered laser ignition on a single-cylinder gasoline direct injection engine.

  11. Optimization of Shielded PCB Air-Core Toroids for High-Efficiency DC-DC Converters

    CERN Document Server

    Orlandi, S; Buso, S; Michelis, S; Fuentes, C A; Kayal, M; Faccio, F; Spiazzi, G

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the design of optimized printed circuit board (PCB) air-core toroids for high-frequency dc-dc converters with strict requirements in terms of volume and noise. The effect of several design parameters on the overall inductor volume, on dc and ac winding resistance, and on the radiated noise will be investigated. PCB toroids are compared to standard air-core solenoids and other state-of-the-art air-core toroids both theoretically and experimentally: at first, using ANSOFT Maxwell and ANSOFT Q3D simulation tools, and subsequently, with laboratory measurements (irradiated noise, efficiency, and frequency response) on several prototypes. These very flexible and rather easy to manufacture inductors appear very attractive for compact high-frequency dc-dc converters where high efficiency, low volume, and low noise are of primary concern.

  12. Ultrafast hydrothermal synthesis of high quality magnetic core phenol-formaldehyde shell composite microspheres using the microwave method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Li-Jun; Xu, Shuai; Ma, Wan-Fu; Li, Dian; Zhang, Yu-Ting; Guo, Jia; Hu, Jack J; Wang, Chang-Chun

    2012-07-17

    An ultrafast, facile, and efficient microwave hydrothermal approach was designed to fabricate magnetic Fe(3)O(4)/phenol-formaldehyde (PF) core-shell microspheres for the first time. The structure of the Fe(3)O(4)/PF core-shell microspheres could be well controlled by the in situ polycondensation of phenol and formaldehyde with magnetic Fe(3)O(4) clusters as the seeds in an aqueous solution without any surfactants. The effect of synthetic parameters, such as the feeding amounts of phenol, the dosages of formaldehyde, the reaction temperatures, and the microwave heating time, on the morphologies and sizes of the Fe(3)O(4)/PF microspheres were investigated in details. The phenol-formaldehyde shell is found to be evenly coated on Fe(3)O(4) clusters within 10 min of the irradiation. The as-prepared microspheres were highly uniform in morphology, and the method was found to allow the shell thickness to be finely controlled in the range of 10-200 nm. The properties of the composite microspheres were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), thermogravimetic analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The as-prepared Fe(3)O(4)/PF microspheres were monodisperse and highly dispersible in water, ethanol, N,N-dimethyformamide, and acetone, a beneficial quality for the further functionalization and applications of the Fe(3)O(4)/PF microspheres.

  13. Engineering of high performance supercapacitor electrode based on Fe-Ni/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NiO core/shell hybrid nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Ashutosh K., E-mail: ashuvishen@gmail.com, E-mail: aksingh@bose.res.in; Mandal, Kalyan [Department of Condensed Matter Physics and Material Sciences, S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Block JD, Sector III, Salt Lake City, Kolkata 700098 (India)

    2015-03-14

    The present work reports on fabrication and supercapacitor applications of a core/shell Fe-Ni/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NiO hybrid nanostructures (HNs) electrode. The core/shell Fe-Ni/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NiO hybrid nanostructures have been fabricated through a two step method (nanowire fabrication and their controlled oxidation). The 1D hybrid nanostructure consists of highly porous shell layer (redox active materials NiO and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and the conductive core (FeNi nanowire). Thus, the highly porous shell layer allows facile electrolyte diffusion as well as faster redox reaction kinetics; whereas the conductive FeNi nanowire core provides the proficient express way for electrons to travel to the current collector, which helps in the superior electrochemical performance. The core/shell Fe-Ni/Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-NiO hybrid nanostructures electrode based supercapacitor shows very good electrochemical performances in terms of high specific capacitance nearly 1415 F g{sup −1} at a current density of 2.5 A g{sup −1}, excellent cycling stability and rate capability. The high quality electrochemical performance of core/shell hybrid nanostructures electrode shows its potential as an alternative electrode for forthcoming supercapacitor devices.

  14. A Tale of Two Electrons: Correlation at High Density

    CERN Document Server

    Loos, Pierre-François

    2010-01-01

    We review our recent progress in the determination of the high-density correlation energy $\\Ec$ in two-electron systems. Several two-electron systems are considered, such as the well known helium-like ions (helium), and the Hooke's law atom (hookium). We also present results regarding two electrons on the surface of a sphere (spherium), and two electrons trapped in a spherical box (ballium). We also show that, in the large-dimension limit, the high-density correlation energy of two opposite-spin electrons interacting {\\em via} a Coulomb potential is given by $\\Ec \\sim -1/(8D^2)$ for any radial external potential $V(r)$, where $D$ is the dimensionality of the space. This result explains the similarity of $\\Ec$ in the previous two-electron systems for $D=3$.

  15. Highly efficient electron vortex beams generated by nanofabricated phase holograms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grillo, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.grillo@nano.cnr.it [CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); CNR-IMEM Parco Area delle Scienze 37/A, I-43124 Parma (Italy); Carlo Gazzadi, Gian [CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Karimi, Ebrahim [CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Mafakheri, Erfan [Dipartimento di Fisica Informatica e Matematica, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Boyd, Robert W. [Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, 150 Louis Pasteur, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Frabboni, Stefano [CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Centro S3, Via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica Informatica e Matematica, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via G Campi 213/a, I-41125 Modena (Italy)

    2014-01-27

    We propose an improved type of holographic-plate suitable for the shaping of electron beams. The plate is fabricated by a focused ion beam on a silicon nitride membrane and introduces a controllable phase shift to the electron wavefunction. We adopted the optimal blazed-profile design for the phase hologram, which results in the generation of highly efficient (25%) electron vortex beams. This approach paves the route towards applications in nano-scale imaging and materials science.

  16. TOPICAL REVIEW: Optics of high-performance electron microscopes

    OpenAIRE

    H H Rose

    2008-01-01

    During recent years, the theory of charged particle optics together with advances in fabrication tolerances and experimental techniques has lead to very significant advances in high-performance electron microscopes. Here, we will describe which theoretical tools, inventions and designs have driven this development. We cover the basic theory of higher-order electron optics and of image formation in electron microscopes. This leads to a description of different methods to correct aberrations by...

  17. High permeability cores to optimize the stimulation of deeply located brain regions using transcranial magnetic stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvador, R; Miranda, P C [Institute of Biophysics and Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Sciences, University of Lisbon, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Roth, Y [Advanced Technology Center, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Zangen, A [Neurobiology Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)], E-mail: rnsalvador@fc.ul.pt

    2009-05-21

    Efficient stimulation of deeply located brain regions with transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) poses many challenges, arising from the fact that the induced field decays rapidly and becomes less focal with depth. We propose a new method to improve the efficiency of TMS of deep brain regions that combines high permeability cores, to increase focality and field intensity, with a coil specifically designed to induce a field that decays slowly with increasing depth. The performance of the proposed design was investigated using the finite element method to determine the total electric field induced by this coil/core arrangement on a realistically shaped homogeneous head model. The calculations show that the inclusion of the cores increases the field's magnitude by as much as 25% while also decreasing the field's decay with depth along specific directions. The focality, as measured by the area where the field's norm is greater than 1/{radical}2 of its maximum value, is also improved by as much as 15% with some core arrangements. The coil's inductance is not significantly increased by the cores. These results show that the presence of the cores might make this specially designed coil even more suited for the effective stimulation of deep brain regions.

  18. Optimization of High-Resolution Continuous Flow Analysis for Transient Climate Signals in Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigler, Matthias; Svensson, Anders; Kettner, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    Over the past two decades, continuous flow analysis (CFA) systems have been refined and widely used to measure aerosol constituents in polar and alpine ice cores in very high-depth resolution. Here we present a newly designed system consisting of sodium, ammonium, dust particles, and electrolytic...... meltwater conductivity detection modules. The system is optimized for high- resolution determination of transient signals in thin layers of deep polar ice cores. Based on standard measurements and by comparing sections of early Holocene and glacial ice from Greenland, we find that the new system features...

  19. Properties of the electron cloud in a high-energy positron and electron storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Harkay

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Low-energy, background electrons are ubiquitous in high-energy particle accelerators. Under certain conditions, interactions between this electron cloud and the high-energy beam can give rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade the accelerator performance. These effects range from vacuum degradation to collective beam instabilities and emittance blowup. Although electron-cloud effects were first observed two decades ago in a few proton storage rings, they have in recent years been widely observed and intensely studied in positron and proton rings. Electron-cloud diagnostics developed at the Advanced Photon Source enabled for the first time detailed, direct characterization of the electron-cloud properties in a positron and electron storage ring. From in situ measurements of the electron flux and energy distribution at the vacuum chamber wall, electron-cloud production mechanisms and details of the beam-cloud interaction can be inferred. A significant longitudinal variation of the electron cloud is also observed, due primarily to geometrical details of the vacuum chamber. Such experimental data can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters in modeling efforts, leading ultimately to greater confidence in predicting electron-cloud effects in future accelerators.

  20. First high-temperature electronics products survey 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Normann, Randy Allen

    2006-04-01

    On April 4-5, 2005, a High-Temperature Electronics Products Workshop was held. This workshop engaged a number of governmental and private industry organizations sharing a common interest in the development of commercially available, high-temperature electronics. One of the outcomes of this meeting was an agreement to conduct an industry survey of high-temperature applications. This report covers the basic results of this survey.

  1. Superlinear scaling in master-slave quantum chemical calculations using in-core storage of two-electron integrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossgård, Eirik; Ruud, Kenneth

    2006-02-01

    We describe the implementation of a parallel, in-core, integral-direct Hartree-Fock and density functional theory code for the efficient calculation of Hartree-Fock wave functions and density functional theory. The algorithm is based on a parallel master-slave algorithm, and the two-electron integrals calculated by a slave are stored in available local memory. To ensure the greatest computational savings, the master node keeps track of all integral batches stored on the different slaves. The code can reuse undifferentiated two-electron integrals both in the wave function optimization and in the evaluation of second-, third-, and fourth-order molecular properties. Superlinear scaling is achieved in a series of test examples, with speedups of up to 55 achieved for calculations run on medium-sized molecules on 16 processors with respect to the time used on a single processor.

  2. Bighorn Basin Coring Project (BBCP): High-Resolution Continental Records of Early Paleogene Hyperthermals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clyde, W.; Wing, S.; Gingerich, P.

    2012-04-01

    Hyperthermals like the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) are transient global warming events associated with large negative carbon isotope excursions (CIEs) that may serve as analogs to present-day climate change. Determining the causes and effects of hyperthermals is important for understanding the long-term carbon cycle and its effects on other parts of the Earth system. Most detailed stratigraphic records of hyperthermals come from marine sediment cores (e.g. IODP) with relatively few well-resolved continental stratigraphic records available. The Bighorn Basin is an intermontane basin that formed during the Laramide orogeny and experienced rapid subsidence and aggradational fluvial deposition from the early Paleocene through the early Eocene (~65-50 million years ago). It preserves the most complete early Paleogene continental sequence in the world and includes an approximately 40-meter-thick PETM interval During the summer of 2011, over 900 meters of core were recovered as part of the Bighorn Basin Coring Project (BBCP). Two 6.2-cm diameter overlapping cores were drilled at each of three sites. Two of the sites (Basin Substation and Polecat Bench) target the PETM in different environments, and the third site (Gilmore Hill) targets the younger and smaller hyperthermals known as ETM2 and H2. The BBCP cores make it possible to develop high-resolution (circa 1000-year) proxy records of climate change, carbon cycling, and biotic change from unweathered material to investigate the response of a terrestrial depositional and ecological system to extreme global warming events. The coring localities are also distributed along a transect from the margin to the axis of the basin to compare the tectonic and depositional effects on the hyperthermal records. Down-hole logs, multi-sensor core logs (magnetic susceptibility and color reflectance), visual core descriptions, and preliminary isotopic samples will be evaluated, with special emphasis on correlation to previous

  3. Electronic effects in emission of core/shell CdSe/ZnS quantum dots conjugated to anti-Interleukin 10 antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintos Vazquez, A.L. [ESIME—Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D. F. 07738, México (Mexico); Torchynska, T.V., E-mail: ttorch@esfm.ipn.mx [ESFM–Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D. F. 07738, México (Mexico); Casas Espinola, J.L. [ESFM–Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D. F. 07738, México (Mexico); Jaramillo Gómez, J.A.; Douda, J. [UPIITA–Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D. F. 07320, México (Mexico)

    2013-11-15

    The paper presents a comparative study of the photoluminescence (PL) and Raman scattering spectra of the core–shell CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) in nonconjugated states and after the conjugation to anti-Interleukin 10 antibodies (anti-IL10). All optical measurements are performed on the dried droplets of the original solution of nonconjugated and bioconjugated QDs located on the Si substrate. CdSe/ZnS QDs with emission at 605 and 655 nm have been used. PL spectra of nonconjugated QDs are characterized by one Gaussian shape PL band related to the exciton emission in the CdSe core. PL spectra of bioconjugated QDs have changed essentially: the core PL band shifts into the high energy spectral range (“blue” sift) and becomes asymmetric. Additionally two new PL bands appear. A set of physical reasons has been proposed for the “blue” shift explanation for the core PL band in bioconjugated QDs. Then Raman scattering spectra have been studied with the aim to analyze the impact of elastic strains or the oxidation process at the QD bioconjugation. The variation of PL spectra versus excitation light intensities has been studied to analyze the exciton emission via excited states in QDs. Finally the PL spectrum transformation for the core emission in bioconjugated QDs has been attributed to the electronic quantum confined effects stimulated by the electric charges of bioconjugated antibodies. -- Highlights: • The conjugation of CdSe/ZnS QDs to anti-Interleukin 10 antibodies has been studied. • PL shift to high energy is detected in bioconjugated CdSe/ZnS QDs. • The PL energy shift in bioconjugated QDs is stimulated by antibody electric charges. • The reasons of PL energy shift in bioconjugated QDs have been discussed.

  4. Molecular potentials and wave function mapping by high-resolution electron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimberg, Victor, E-mail: victor.kimberg@pks.mpi.de [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Nöthnitzer Straße 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Miron, Catalin, E-mail: miron@synchrotron-soleil.fr [Synchrotron SOLEIL, l’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, BP 48, FR-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Some studies related to the vibrational wave functions mapping phenomenon are reviewed. • The core-excited vibrational wave functions were mapped using dissociative and bound final states. • High-resolution experimental data is accompanied by ab initio calculations. • The mapping phenomenon allows one to extract constants of the molecular potentials. • The mapping techniques are general and can be applied for the study of many systems. - Abstract: The recent development of high brightness 3{sup rd} generation soft X-ray sources and high energy resolution electron spectrometers made it possible to accurately trace quantum phenomena associated to the vibrational dynamics in core-excited molecules. The present paper reviews the recent results on mapping of vibrational wave functions and molecular potentials based on electron spectroscopy. We discuss and compare the mapping phenomena in various systems, stressing the advantages of the resonant X-ray scattering for studying of the nuclear dynamics and spectroscopic constants of small molecules. The experimental results discussed in the paper are most often accompanied by state-of-the-art ab initio calculations allowing for a deeper understanding of the quantum effects. Besides its fundamental interest, the vibrational wave function mapping is shown to be useful for the analysis of core- and valence-excited molecular states based on the reflection principle.

  5. High-Power Electron Accelerators for Space (and other) Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lewellen, John W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-23

    This is a presentation on high-power electron accelerators for space and other applications. The main points covered are: electron beams for space applications, new designs of RF accelerators, high-power high-electron mobility transistors (HEMT) testing, and Li-ion battery design. In summary, the authors have considered a concept of 1-MeV electron accelerator that can operate up to several seconds. This concept can be extended to higher energy to produce higher beam power. Going to higher beam energy requires adding more cavities and solid-state HEMT RF power devices. The commercial HEMT have been tested for frequency response and RF output power (up to 420 W). Finally, the authors are testing these HEMT into a resonant load and planning for an electron beam test in FY17.

  6. Dynamics of Electron Injection in SnO2/TiO2 Core/Shell Electrodes for Water-Splitting Dye-Sensitized Photoelectrochemical Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCool, Nicholas S; Swierk, John R; Nemes, Coleen T; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2016-08-01

    Water-splitting dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells (WS-DSPECs) rely on photoinduced charge separation at a dye/semiconductor interface to supply electrons and holes for water splitting. To improve the efficiency of charge separation and reduce charge recombination in these devices, it is possible to use core/shell structures in which photoinduced electron transfer occurs stepwise through a series of progressively more positive acceptor states. Here, we use steady-state emission studies and time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy to follow the dynamics of electron injection from a photoexcited ruthenium polypyridyl dye as a function of the TiO2 shell thickness on SnO2 nanoparticles. Electron injection proceeds directly into the SnO2 core when the thickness of the TiO2 shell is less than 5 Å. For thicker shells, electrons are injected into the TiO2 shell and trapped, and are then released into the SnO2 core on a time scale of hundreds of picoseconds. As the TiO2 shell increases in thickness, the probability of electron trapping in nonmobile states within the shell increases. Conduction band electrons in the TiO2 shell and the SnO2 core can be differentiated on the basis of their mobility. These observations help explain the observation of an optimum shell thickness for core/shell water-splitting electrodes.

  7. High energy electron-positron physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, Ahmed

    1988-01-01

    With the termination of the physics program at PETRA, and with the start of TRISTAN and the SLC and later LEP, an era of e+e- physics has come to an end and a new one begins. The field is changing from a field of few specialists, to becoming one of the mainstream efforts of the high energy community. It seems appropriate at this moment to summarize what has been learned over the past years, in a way most useful to any high energy physicists, in particular to newcomers in the e+e- field. This is the purpose of the book. This book should be used as a reference for future workers in the field of

  8. High-speed cineradiography using electronic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Jacob P.; Fry, David A.; Gaskill, William E.; Henderson, R. L.; Crawford, Ted R.; Carey, N. E.

    1993-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has constructed and is now operating a cineradiography system for imaging and evaluation of ballistic interaction events at the 1200 meter range of the Terminal Effects Research and Analysis (TERA) Group at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. Cineradiography is part of a complete firing, tracking, and analysis system at the range. The cine system consists of flash x-ray sources illuminating a one-half meter by two meter fast phosphor screen which is viewed by gated-intensified high resolution still video cameras via turning mirrors. The entire system is armored to protect against events containing up to 13.5 kg of high explosive. Digital images are available for immediate display and processing. The system is capable of frame rates up to 105/sec for up to five total images.

  9. High speed cineradiography using electronic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, J. P.; Fry, D. A.; Gaskill, W. E.; Henderson, R. L.; Crawford, T. R.; Carey, N. E.

    1992-12-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has constructed and is now operating a cineradiography system for imaging and evaluation of ballistic interaction events at the 1200 meter range of the Terminal Effects Research and Analysis (TERA) Group at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. Cineradiography is part of a complete firing, tracking, and analysis system at the range. The cine system consists of flash x-ray sources illuminating a one-half meter by two meter fast phosphor screen which is viewed by gated-intensified high resolution still video cameras via turning mirrors. The entire system is armored to protect against events containing up to 13.5 kg of high explosive. Digital images are available for immediate display and processing. The system is capable of frame rates up to 10(exp 5)/sec for up to five total images.

  10. High-power picosecond pulse delivery through hollow core photonic band gap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Johansen, Mette Marie; Lyngsø, Jens Kristian

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated robust and bend insensitive fiber delivery of high power laser with diffraction limited beam quality for two different kinds of hollow core band gap fibers. The light source for this experiment consists of ytterbium-doped double clad fiber aeroGAIN-ROD-PM85 in a high power amplifier...... threshold for a 19-cell hollow core photonic bandgap fiber exceeded the maximum power provided by the light source and up to 76W average output power was demonstrated for a 1m fiber. In both cases, no special attention was needed to mitigate bend sensitivity. The fibers were coiled on 8 centimeters radius...... spools and even lower bending radii were present. In addition, stimulated rotational Raman scattering arising from nitrogen molecules was measured through a 42m long 19 cell hollow core fiber. © (2016) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract...

  11. Optimization of high-resolution continuous flow analysis for transient climate signals in ice cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Matthias; Svensson, Anders; Kettner, Ernesto; Vallelonga, Paul; Nielsen, Maibritt E; Steffensen, Jørgen Peder

    2011-05-15

    Over the past two decades, continuous flow analysis (CFA) systems have been refined and widely used to measure aerosol constituents in polar and alpine ice cores in very high-depth resolution. Here we present a newly designed system consisting of sodium, ammonium, dust particles, and electrolytic meltwater conductivity detection modules. The system is optimized for high-resolution determination of transient signals in thin layers of deep polar ice cores. Based on standard measurements and by comparing sections of early Holocene and glacial ice from Greenland, we find that the new system features a depth resolution in the ice of a few millimeters which is considerably better than other CFA systems. Thus, the new system can resolve ice strata down to 10 mm thickness and has the potential of identifying annual layers in both Greenland and Antarctic ice cores throughout the last glacial cycle.

  12. Synthesis of ZnO core spike particles as composite fillers with a high throughput method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wille, Sebastian; Koschine, Toenjes; Chluba, Christoph; Freitag, Stefan; Mishra, Yogendra Kumar; Adelung, Rainer [Funktionale Nanomaterialien, CAU Kiel (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    ZnO core spike particles are typically micro particles covered with nanoscopic spikes. They show advanced properties compared to conventional fillers like roundish particles and short fibers. An example is a very strong mechanical interlocking behaviors. This property together with its hardness makes this material very interesting for compounds with enhanced mechanical properties. In addition ZnO has very interesting electric and electronic properties, which make the range of possible applications for composites containing ZnO core spike particles very wide. In order to use ZnO core spike particles as filler for bulk materials, considerable amounts are necessary. A problem during the oxidation based synthesis of such particles using Zn-powder as source material is the separation of the single Zn-particles, which is necessary for oxygen supply, for avoiding sinter processes and allowing the nanoscopic spikes to grow. We introduce simple processing routes found as solution for this problem. Large amounts of microscopic Zn-powder can be converted to ZnO core spike particles with a total size from nanometers up to a couple of micrometers. Furthermore by changing the growth parameters it is also possible to modify the particle shape.

  13. Nanoscale Phase-Separated Structure in Core-Shell Nanoparticles of SiO2-Si1-xGexO2 Glass Revealed by Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Yugo; Yonezawa, Kazuhiro

    2017-09-05

    SiO2-based optical fibers are indispensable components of modern information communication technologies. It has recently become increasingly important to establish a technique for visualizing the nanoscale phase-separated structure inside SiO2-GeO2 glass nanoparticles during the manufacturing of SiO2-GeO2 fibers. This is because the rapidly increasing price of Ge has made it necessary to improve the Ge yield by clarifying the detailed mechanism of Ge diffusion into SiO2. However, direct observation of the internal nanostructure of glass particles has been extremely difficult, mainly due to electrostatic charging and the damage induced by electron and X-ray irradiation. In the present study, we used state-of-the-art scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) to examine cross-sectional samples of SiO2-GeO2 particles embedded in an epoxy resin, which were fabricated using a broad Ar ion beam and a focused Ga ion beam. These advanced techniques enabled us to observe the internal phase-separated structure of the nanoparticles. We have for the first time clearly determined the SiO2-Si1-xGexO2 core-shell structure of such particles, the element distribution, the degree of crystallinity, and the quantitative chemical composition of microscopic regions, and we discuss the formation mechanism for the observed structure. The proposed imaging protocol is highly promising for studying the internal structure of various core-shell nanoparticles, which affects their catalytic, optical, and electronic properties.

  14. Evaluation of high-energy brachytherapy source electronic disequilibrium and dose from emitted electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballester, Facundo; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Melhus, Christopher S.; Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain) and IFIC, CSIC-University of Valencia, C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain); Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, Avenida Tres Cruces, 2, E-46014 Valencia (Spain); Department of Radiation Oncology, La Fe University Hospital, Avenida Campanar 21, E-46009 Valencia (Spain); Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2009-09-15

    Purpose: The region of electronic disequilibrium near photon-emitting brachytherapy sources of high-energy radionuclides ({sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, and {sup 169}Yb) and contributions to total dose from emitted electrons were studied using the GEANT4 and PENELOPE Monte Carlo codes. Methods: Hypothetical sources with active and capsule materials mimicking those of actual sources but with spherical shape were examined. Dose contributions due to source photons, x rays, and bremsstrahlung; source {beta}{sup -}, Auger electrons, and internal conversion electrons; and water collisional kerma were scored. To determine if conclusions obtained for electronic equilibrium conditions and electron dose contribution to total dose for the representative spherical sources could be applied to actual sources, the {sup 192}Ir mHDR-v2 source model (Nucletron B.V., Veenendaal, The Netherlands) was simulated for comparison to spherical source results and to published data. Results: Electronic equilibrium within 1% is reached for {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, and {sup 169}Yb at distances greater than 7, 3.5, 2, and 1 mm from the source center, respectively, in agreement with other published studies. At 1 mm from the source center, the electron contributions to total dose are 1.9% and 9.4% for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir, respectively. Electron emissions become important (i.e., >0.5%) within 3.3 mm of {sup 60}Co and 1.7 mm of {sup 192}Ir sources, yet are negligible over all distances for {sup 137}Cs and {sup 169}Yb. Electronic equilibrium conditions along the transversal source axis for the mHDR-v2 source are comparable to those of the spherical sources while electron dose to total dose contribution are quite different. Conclusions: Electronic equilibrium conditions obtained for spherical sources could be generalized to actual sources while electron contribution to total dose depends strongly on source dimensions, material composition, and electron spectra.

  15. High-Resolution Conversion Electron Spectroscopy of Valence Electron Configurations (CESVEC) in Solids

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    First measurements with the Zurich $\\beta$-spectrometer on sources from ISOLDE have demonstrated that high resolution spectroscopy of conversion electrons from valence shells is feasible.\\\\ \\\\ This makes possible a novel type of electron spectroscopy (CESVEC) on valence-electron configurations of tracer elements in solids. Thus the density of occupied electron states of impurities in solids has been measured for the first time. Such data constitute a stringent test of state-of-the-art calculations of impurity properties. Based on these results, we are conducting a systematic investigation of impurities in group IV and III-V semiconductors.

  16. Photoelectron spectroscopy at a free-electron laser. Investigation of space-charge effects in angle-resolved and core-level spectroscopy and realizaton of a time-resolved core-level photoemission experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marczynski-Buehlow, Martin

    2012-01-30

    The free-electron laser (FEL) in Hamburg (FLASH) is a very interesting light source with which to perform photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) experiments. Its special characteristics include highly intense photon pulses (up to 100 J/pulse), a photon energy range of 30 eV to 1500 eV, transverse coherence as well as pulse durations of some ten femtoseconds. Especially in terms of time-resolved PES (TRPES), the deeper lying core levels can be reached with photon energies up to 1500 eV with acceptable intensity now and, therefore, element-specific, time-resolved core-level PES (XPS) is feasible at FLASH. During the work of this thesis various experimental setups were constructed in order to realize angle-resolved (ARPES), core-level (XPS) as well as time-resolved PES experiments at the plane grating monochromator beamline PG2 at FLASH. Existing as well as newly developed systems for online monitoring of FEL pulse intensities and generating spatial and temporal overlap of FEL and optical laser pulses for time-resolved experiments are successfully integrated into the experimental setup for PES. In order to understand space-charge effects (SCEs) in PES and, therefore, being able to handle those effects in future experiments using highly intense and pulsed photon sources, the origin of energetic broadenings and shifts in photoelectron spectra are studied by means of a molecular dynamic N-body simulation using a modified Treecode Algorithm for sufficiently fast and accurate calculations. It turned out that the most influencing parameter is the ''linear electron density'' - the ratio of the number of photoelectrons to the diameter of the illuminated spot on the sample. Furthermore, the simulations could reproduce the observations described in the literature fairly well. Some rules of thumb for XPS and ARPES measurements could be deduced from the simulations. Experimentally, SCEs are investigated by means of ARPES as well as XPS measurements as a function of

  17. Thermally Stable Nanocatalyst for High Temperature Reactions: Pt-Mesoporous Silica Core-Shell Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, Sang Hoon; Park, J.Y.; Tsung, C.-K.; Yamada, Y.; Yang, P.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2008-10-25

    Recent advances in colloidal synthesis enabled the precise control of size, shape and composition of catalytic metal nanoparticles, allowing their use as model catalysts for systematic investigations of the atomic-scale properties affecting catalytic activity and selectivity. The organic capping agents stabilizing colloidal nanoparticles, however, often limit their application in high-temperature catalytic reactions. Here we report the design of a high-temperature stable model catalytic system that consists of Pt metal core coated with a mesoporous silica shell (Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2}). While inorganic silica shells encaged the Pt cores up to 750 C in air, the mesopores directly accessible to Pt cores made the Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} nanoparticles as catalytically active as bare Pt metal for ethylene hydrogenation and CO oxidation. The high thermal stability of Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} nanoparticles permitted high-temperature CO oxidation studies, including ignition behavior, which was not possible for bare Pt nanoparticles because of their deformation or aggregation. The results suggest that the Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are excellent nanocatalytic systems for high-temperature catalytic reactions or surface chemical processes, and the design concept employed in the Pt{at}mSiO{sub 2} core-shell catalyst can be extended to other metal-metal oxide compositions.

  18. An accelerating high-latitude jet in Earth’s core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livermore, Philip W.; Hollerbach, Rainer; Finlay, Christopher C.

    2017-01-01

    Observations of the change in Earth’s magnetic field--the secular variation--provide information about the motion of liquid metal within the core that is responsible for the magnetic field’s generation. High-resolution observations from the European Space Agency’s Swarm satellite mission show intense field change at high latitude, localized in a distinctive circular daisy-chain configuration centred on the north geographic pole. Here we show that this feature can be explained by a localized, non-axisymmetric, westward jet of 420 km width on the tangent cylinder, the cylinder of fluid within the core that is aligned with the rotation axis and tangent to the solid inner core. We find that the jet has increased in magnitude by a factor of three over the period 2000-2016 to about 40 km yr-1, and is now much stronger than typical large-scale flows inferred for the core. We suggest that the current accelerating phase may be part of a longer-term fluctuation of the jet causing both eastward and westward movement of magnetic features over historical periods, and may contribute to recent changes in torsional-wave activity and the rotation direction of the inner core.

  19. High-pressure metallization of FeO and implications for the earth's core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittle, Elise; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1986-01-01

    The phase diagram of FeO has been experimentally determined to pressures of 155 GPa and temperatures of 4000 K using shock-wave and diamond-cell techniques. A metallic phase of FeO is observed at pressures greater than 70 GPa and temperatures exceeding 1000 K. The metallization of FeO at high pressures implies that oxygen can be present as the light alloying element of the earth's outer core, in accord with the geochemical predictions of Ringwood (1977 and 1979). The high pressures necessary for this metallization suggest that the core has acquired its composition well after the initial stages of the earth's accretion. Direct experimental observations at elevated pressures and temperatures indicate that core-forming alloy can react chemically with oxides such as those forming the mantle. The core and mantle may never have reached complete chemical equilibrium, however. If this is the case, the core-mantle boundary is likely to be a zone of active chemical reactions.

  20. Microbunched electron cooling for high-energy hadron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, D

    2013-08-23

    Electron and stochastic cooling are proven methods for cooling low-energy hadron beams, but at present there is no way of cooling hadrons as they near the TeV scale. In the 1980s, Derbenev suggested that electron instabilities, such as free-electron lasers, could create collective space charge fields strong enough to correct the hadron energies. This Letter presents a variation on Derbenev's electron cooling scheme using the microbunching instability as the amplifier. The large bandwidth of the instability allows for faster cooling of high-density beams. A simple analytical model illustrates the cooling mechanism, and simulations show cooling rates for realistic parameters of the Large Hadron Collider.

  1. Electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of liquid Fe alloys at high P and T, and heat flux in Earth’s core

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Koker, Nico; Steinle-Neumann, Gerd; Vlček, Vojtěch

    2012-01-01

    Earth’s magnetic field is sustained by magnetohydrodynamic convection within the metallic liquid core. In a thermally advecting core, the fraction of heat available to drive the geodynamo is reduced by heat conducted along the core geotherm, which depends sensitively on the thermal conductivity of liquid iron and its alloys with candidate light elements. The thermal conductivity for Earth’s core is very poorly constrained, with current estimates based on a set of scaling relations that were not previously tested at high pressures. We perform first-principles electronic structure computations to determine the thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity for Fe, Fe–Si, and Fe–O liquid alloys. Computed resistivity agrees very well with existing shock compression measurements and shows strong dependence on light element concentration and type. Thermal conductivity at pressure and temperature conditions characteristic of Earth’s core is higher than previous extrapolations. Conductive heat flux near the core–mantle boundary is comparable to estimates of the total heat flux from the core but decreases with depth, so that thermally driven flow would be constrained to greater depths in the absence of an inner core. PMID:22375035

  2. Effect of pulsed hollow electron-lens operation on the proton beam core in LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Fitterer, Miriam; Valishev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Collimation with hollow electron beams is currently one of the most promising concepts for active halo control in the HL-LHC. In order to further increase the diffusion rates for a fast halo removal as e.g. desired before the squeeze, the electron lens (e-lens) can be operated in pulsed mode. In case of profile imperfections in the electron beam the pulsing of the e-lens induces noise on the proton beam which can, depending on the frequency content and strength, lead to emittance growth. In order to study the sensitivity to the pulsing pattern and the amplitude, a beam study (machine development MD) at the LHC has been proposed for August 2016 and we present in this note the preparatory simulations and estimates.

  3. Core-shell structured titanium-nitrogen alloys with high strength, high thermal stability and good plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y S; Zhao, Y H; Zhang, W; Lu, J W; Hu, J J; Huo, W T; Zhang, P X

    2017-01-06

    Multifunctional materials with more than two good properties are widely required in modern industries. However, some properties are often trade-off with each other by single microstructural designation. For example, nanostructured materials have high strength, but low ductility and thermal stability. Here by means of spark plasma sintering (SPS) of nitrided Ti particles, we synthesized bulk core-shell structured Ti alloys with isolated soft coarse-grained Ti cores and hard Ti-N solid solution shells. The core-shell Ti alloys exhibit a high yield strength (~1.4 GPa) comparable to that of nanostructured states and high thermal stability (over 1100 °C, 0.71 of melting temperature), contributed by the hard Ti-N shells, as well as a good plasticity (fracture plasticity of 12%) due to the soft Ti cores. Our results demonstrate that this core-shell structure offers a design pathway towards an advanced material with enhancing strength-plasticity-thermal stability synergy.

  4. Core-shell structured titanium-nitrogen alloys with high strength, high thermal stability and good plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. S.; Zhao, Y. H.; Zhang, W.; Lu, J. W.; Hu, J. J.; Huo, W. T.; Zhang, P. X.

    2017-01-01

    Multifunctional materials with more than two good properties are widely required in modern industries. However, some properties are often trade-off with each other by single microstructural designation. For example, nanostructured materials have high strength, but low ductility and thermal stability. Here by means of spark plasma sintering (SPS) of nitrided Ti particles, we synthesized bulk core-shell structured Ti alloys with isolated soft coarse-grained Ti cores and hard Ti-N solid solution shells. The core-shell Ti alloys exhibit a high yield strength (~1.4 GPa) comparable to that of nanostructured states and high thermal stability (over 1100 °C, 0.71 of melting temperature), contributed by the hard Ti-N shells, as well as a good plasticity (fracture plasticity of 12%) due to the soft Ti cores. Our results demonstrate that this core-shell structure offers a design pathway towards an advanced material with enhancing strength-plasticity-thermal stability synergy.

  5. Correlative Fluorescence and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Labelled Core Fucosylated Glycans Using Cryosections Mounted on Carbon-Patterned Glass Slides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancová, Marie; Nebesářová, Jana

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is co-localization of N-glycans with fucose attached to N-acetylglucosamine in α1,3 linkage, that belong to immunogenic carbohydrate epitopes in humans, and N-glycans with α1,6-core fucose typical for mammalian type of N-linked glycosylation. Both glycan epitopes were labelled in cryosections of salivary glands isolated from the tick Ixodes ricinus. Salivary glands secrete during feeding many bioactive molecules and influence both successful feeding and transmission of tick-borne pathogens. For accurate and reliable localization of labelled glycans in both fluorescence and scanning electron microscopes, we used carbon imprints of finder or indexed EM grids on glass slides. We discuss if the topographical images can provide information about labelled structures, the working setting of the field-emission scanning electron microscope and the influence of the detector selection (a below-the-lens Autrata improved YAG detector of back-scattered electrons; in-lens and conventional Everhart-Thornley detectors of secondary electrons) on the imaging of gold nanoparticles, quantum dots and osmium-stained membranes.

  6. Correlative Fluorescence and Scanning Electron Microscopy of Labelled Core Fucosylated Glycans Using Cryosections Mounted on Carbon-Patterned Glass Slides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Vancová

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is co-localization of N-glycans with fucose attached to N-acetylglucosamine in α1,3 linkage, that belong to immunogenic carbohydrate epitopes in humans, and N-glycans with α1,6-core fucose typical for mammalian type of N-linked glycosylation. Both glycan epitopes were labelled in cryosections of salivary glands isolated from the tick Ixodes ricinus. Salivary glands secrete during feeding many bioactive molecules and influence both successful feeding and transmission of tick-borne pathogens. For accurate and reliable localization of labelled glycans in both fluorescence and scanning electron microscopes, we used carbon imprints of finder or indexed EM grids on glass slides. We discuss if the topographical images can provide information about labelled structures, the working setting of the field-emission scanning electron microscope and the influence of the detector selection (a below-the-lens Autrata improved YAG detector of back-scattered electrons; in-lens and conventional Everhart-Thornley detectors of secondary electrons on the imaging of gold nanoparticles, quantum dots and osmium-stained membranes.

  7. Massive Infrared-Quiet Dense Cores: Unveiling the Initial Conditions of High-Mass Star Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Motte, Frédérique; Schneider, N; Schilke, P; Menten, K M

    2008-01-01

    As Pr. Th. Henning said at the conference, cold precursors of high-mass stars are now "hot topics". We here propose some observational criteria to identify massive infrared-quiet dense cores which can host the high-mass analogs of Class 0 protostars and pre-stellar condensations. We also show how far-infrared to millimeter imaging surveys of entire complexes forming OB stars are starting to unveil the initial conditions of high-mass star formation.

  8. ZnO/Pt core-shell nanorods on the cotton threads with high enhanced photocatalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Yu-Cheng, E-mail: ychang0127@gmail.com; Guo, Jin-You

    2016-09-01

    The ZnO nanorods have been grown on the cotton threads with ZnO seed layer by an aqueous chemical growth method at the low reaction temperature. The ZnO nanorods can provide a good geometric structure to deposit Pt nanoparticles with uniform size by a facile ion sputtering method. The photocatalytic activity of the different lengths of cotton threads with ZnO nanorods were evaluated in the photocatalytic degradation of rhodamine 6G by a 10 W UV light irradiation. The ZnO/Pt core-shell nanorods revealed much higher photodegradation efficiency than ZnO nanorods or commercial TiO{sub 2} nanopowders, which improved the separation of photogenerated electrons and holes. Furthermore, the reusability test can demonstrated that the ZnO/Pt core-shell nanorods on the cotton threads still maintained high photocatalytic activity over five cycles. The ZnO/Pt core-shell nanorods provide a facile, low cost, high surface-to-volume ratio, high photocatalytic efficiency, and high reusability, which shall be also promising in the decomposition of environment pollutants and reusing of wastewater treatment. - Highlights: • ZnO nanorods have been grown on the cotton threads by an ACG method. • ZnO NRs can be used to deposit Pt NPs with uniform size by ion sputtering method. • ZnO/Pt NRs exhibit high photocatalytic efficiency and reusability. • ZnO/Pt NRs shall be exhibited excellent potential for surface-related applications.

  9. Hydrazide functionalized core-shell magnetic nanocomposites for highly specific enrichment of N-glycopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liting; Yu, Meng; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Changchun; Lu, Haojie

    2014-05-28

    In view of the biological significance of glycosylation for human health, profiling of glycoproteome from complex biological samples is highly inclined toward the discovery of disease biomarkers and clinical diagnosis. Nevertheless, because of the existence of glycopeptides at relatively low abundances compared with nonglycosylated peptides and glycan microheterogeneity, glycopeptides need to be highly selectively enriched from complex biological samples for mass spectrometry analysis. Herein, a new type of hydrazide functionalized core-shell magnetic nanocomposite has been synthesized for highly specific enrichment of N-glycopeptides. The nanocomposites with both the magnetic core and the polymer shell hanging high density of hydrazide groups were prepared by first functionalization of the magnetic core with polymethacrylic acid by reflux precipitation polymerization to obtain the Fe3O4@poly(methacrylic acid) (Fe3O4@PMAA) and then modification of the surface of Fe3O4@PMAA with adipic acid dihydrazide (ADH) to obtain Fe3O4@poly(methacrylic hydrazide) (Fe3O4@PMAH). The abundant hydrazide groups toward highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides and the magnetic core make it suitable for large-scale, high-throughput, and automated sample processing. In addition, the hydrophilic polymer surface can provide low nonspecific adsorption of other peptides. Compared to commercially available hydrazide resin, Fe3O4@PMAH improved more than 5 times the signal-to-noise ratio of standard glycopeptides. Finally, this nanocomposite was applied in the profiling of N-glycoproteome from the colorectal cancer patient serum. In total, 175 unique glycopeptides and 181 glycosylation sites corresponding to 63 unique glycoproteins were identified in three repeated experiments, with the specificities of the enriched glycopeptides and corresponding glycoproteins of 69.6% and 80.9%, respectively. Because of all these attractive features, we believe that this novel hydrazide functionalized

  10. PROGRESS OF HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FEDOTOV,A.V.

    2007-09-10

    The fundamental questions about QCD which can be directly answered at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) call for large integrated luminosities. The major goal of RHIC-I1 upgrade is to achieve a 10 fold increase in luminosity of Au ions at the top energy of 100 GeV/nucleon. Such a boost in luminosity for RHIC-II is achievable with implementation of high-energy electron cooling. The design of the higher-energy cooler for RHIC-II recently adopted a non-magnetized approach which requires a low temperature electron beam. Such electron beams will be produced with a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). Detailed simulations of the electron cooling process and numerical simulations of the electron beam transport including the cooling section were performed. An intensive R&D of various elements of the design is presently underway. Here, we summarize progress in these electron cooling efforts.

  11. Radial Distribution of Electron Spectra from High-Energy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.

    1998-01-01

    The average track model describes the response of physical and biological systems using radial dose distribution as the key physical descriptor. We report on an extension of this model to describe the average distribution of electron spectra as a function of radial distance from an ion. We present calculations of these spectra for ions of identical linear energy transfer (LET), but dissimilar charge and velocity to evaluate the differences in electron spectra from these ions. To illustrate the usefulness of the radial electron spectra for describing effects that are not described by electron dose, we consider the evaluation of the indirect events in microdosimetric distributions for ions. We show that folding our average electron spectra model with experimentally determined frequency distributions for photons or electrons provides a good representation of radial event spectra from high-energy ions in 0.5-2 micrometer sites.

  12. Technical Training: ELEC-2005: Electronics in High Energy Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    Monique Duval

    2005-01-01

    CERN Technical Training 2005: Learning for the LHC! ELEC-2005: Electronics in High Energy Physics - Spring Term ELEC-2005 is a new course series on modern electronics, given by CERN physicists and engineers within the framework of the 2005 Technical Training Programme, in an extended format of the successful ELEC-2002 course series. This comprehensive course series is designed for people who are not electronics specialists, for example physicists, engineers and technicians working at or visiting the laboratory, who use or will use electronics in their present or future activities, in particular in the context of the LHC accelerator and experiments. ELEC-2005 is composed of four Terms: the Winter Term, Introduction to electronics in HEP, already took place; the next three Terms will run throughout the year: Spring Term: Integrated circuits and VLSI technology for physics (March, 6 lectures) - now open for registration Summer Term: System electronics for physics: Issues (May, 7 lectures) Autumn Term: Ele...

  13. Scale Law of the High Power Free Electron Laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The scale law and design procedure of the high power FEL are discussed. It is pointed out that theextraction efficiency, which is the critical factor of the output power besides the power of the electron

  14. Digital data storage of core image using high resolution full color core scanner; Kokaizodo full color scanner wo mochiita core image no digital ka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, W.; Ujo, S.; Osato, K.; Takasugi, S. [Geothermal Energy Research and Development Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    This paper reports on digitization of core images by using a new type core scanner system. This system consists of a core scanner unit (equipped with a CCD camera), a personal computer and ancillary devices. This is a modification of the old type system, with measurable core length made to 100 cm/3 scans, and resolution enhanced to 5100 pixels/m (1024 pixels/m in the old type). The camera was changed to that of a color specification, and the A/D conversion was improved to 24-bit full color. As a result of carrying out a detail reproduction test on digital images of this core scanner, it was found that objects can be identified at a level of about the size of pixels constituting the image in the case when the best contrast is obtained between the objects and the background, and that in an evaluation test on visibility of concaves and convexes on core surface, reproducibility is not very good in large concaves and convexes. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Core Competencies and the Prevention of High-Risk Sexual Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Vignetta Eugenia; Blum, Robert Wm.

    2008-01-01

    Adolescent sexual risk-taking behavior has numerous individual, family, community, and societal consequences. In an effort to contribute to the research and propose new directions, this chapter applies the core competencies framework to the prevention of high-risk sexual behavior. It describes the magnitude of the problem, summarizes explanatory…

  16. Common Core Standards for High School English Language Arts: A Quick-Start Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, John; Frazee, Dana; Ryan, Susan

    2012-01-01

    High school teachers and leaders with responsibility for English language arts (ELA) need this handy guide to successfully implement the Common Core in their respective grade levels. Getting a copy for every staff member ensures they know: (1) How grades 11-12 ELA content differs from and builds upon 9-10 standards; (2) How the four strands…

  17. Assessing Critical Thinking in Middle and High Schools: Meeting the Common Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stobaugh, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    This practical, very effective resource helps middle and high school teachers and curriculum leaders develop the skills to design instructional tasks and assessments that engage students in higher-level critical thinking, as recommended by the Common Core State Standards. Real examples of formative and summative assessments from a variety of…

  18. Label-free biosensing with high sensitivity in dual-core microstructured polymer optical fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markos, Christos; Yuan, Wu; Vlachos, Kyriakos

    2011-01-01

    We present experimentally feasible designs of a dual-core microstructured polymer optical fiber (mPOF), which can act as a highly sensitive, label-free, and selective biosensor. An immobilized antigen sensing layer on the walls of the holes in the mPOF provides the ability to selectively capture...

  19. A multi-core fiber based interferometer for high temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Song; Huang, Bo; Shu, Xuewen

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we have verified and implemented a Mach–Zehnder interferometer based on seven-core fiber for high temperature sensing application. This proposed structure is based on a multi-mode-multi-core-multi-mode fiber structure sandwiched by a single mode fiber. Between the single-mode and multi-core fiber, a 3 mm long multi-mode fiber is formed for lead-in and lead-out light. The basic operation principle of this device is the use of multi-core modes, single-mode and multi-mode interference coupling is also utilized. Experimental results indicate that this interferometer sensor is capable of accurate measurements of temperatures up to 800 °C, and the temperature sensitivity of the proposed sensor is as high as 170.2 pm/°C, which is much higher than the current existing MZI based temperature sensors (109 pm/°C). This type of sensor is promising for practical high temperature applications due to its advantages including high sensitivity, simple fabrication process, low cost and compactness.

  20. Extremely High-Birefringent Asymmetric Slotted-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber in THz Regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Raonaqul; Habib, Selim; Hasanuzzaman, G.K.M.

    2015-01-01

    of the circular cladding confines most of the power in the fiber-core. The fiber structure reported in this letter exhibits simultaneously ultrahigh modal birefringence of 7.5 × 10−2 and a very low effective absorption loss of 0.07 cm−1 for y-polarization mode at an operating frequency of 1 THz. It is highly...

  1. Application and electronic structure of high-permittivity dielectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perevalov, Timofei V; Gritsenko, Vladimir A [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2010-09-07

    Major applications of high-permittivity dielectric materials in silicon devices are reviewed. The basics and software implementations of the electron density functional method are considered. Results of first-principle calculations of the electronic structure are analyzed for the three most important and promising high-permittivity dielectrics, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, HfO{sub 2}, and TiO{sub 2}. (reviews of topical problems)

  2. Is the electron radiation length constant at high energies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, H D; Uggerhøj, U I; Biino, C; Ballestrero, S; Mangiarotti, A; Sona, P; Ketel, T J; Vilakazi, Z Z

    2003-07-04

    Experimental results for the radiative energy loss of 149, 207, and 287 GeV electrons in a thin Ir target are presented. From the data we conclude that at high energies the radiation length increases in accordance with the Landau-Pomeranchuk-Migdal (LPM) theory and thus electrons become more penetrating the higher the energy. The increase of the radiation length as a result of the LPM effect has a significant impact on the behavior of high-energy electromagnetic showers.

  3. Optical Thermal Characterization Enables High-Performance Electronics Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-02-01

    NREL developed a modeling and experimental strategy to characterize thermal performance of materials. The technique provides critical data on thermal properties with relevance for electronics packaging applications. Thermal contact resistance and bulk thermal conductivity were characterized for new high-performance materials such as thermoplastics, boron-nitride nanosheets, copper nanowires, and atomically bonded layers. The technique is an important tool for developing designs and materials that enable power electronics packaging with small footprint, high power density, and low cost for numerous applications.

  4. A High-Resolution Continuous Flow Analysis System for Polar Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dallmayr, Remi; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Kjær, Helle Astrid;

    2016-01-01

    of Polar Research (NIPR) in Tokyo. The system allows the continuous analysis of stable water isotopes and electrical conductivity, as well as the collection of discrete samples from both inner and outer parts of the core. This CFA system was designed to have sufficiently high temporal resolution to detect......In recent decades, the development of continuous flow analysis (CFA) technology for ice core analysis has enabled greater sample throughput and greater depth resolution compared with the classic discrete sampling technique. We developed the first Japanese CFA system at the National Institute...

  5. High resolution optically stimulated luminescence dating of a sediment core from the southwestern Sea of Okhotsk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugisaki, S.; Buylaert, J. P.; Murray, A. S.;

    2012-01-01

    in application to a 19 m marine sediment core (MR0604-PC04A) taken from the southwestern Sea of Okhotsk, immediately to the north of Hokkaido, Japan. Fine-grained quartz (4 to 11 mu m) was chosen as the dosimeter, and a single-aliquot regenerative-dose protocol was used for the determination of equivalent dose...... (D-e), with stimulation by both infrared and blue light. The suitability of the measurement procedure was confirmed using dose recovery tests. A high resolution record (similar to 2 OSL ages/m) identified clear sedimentation rate changes down the core. The OSL ages are significantly dependent...

  6. High-resolution Greenland Ice Core data show abrupt climate change happens in few years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Jørgen Peder; Andersen, Katrine Krogh; Bigler, Matthias

    2008-01-01

    The last two abrupt warmings at the onset of our present warm interglacial period, interrupted by the Younger Dryas cooling event, were investigated at high temporal resolution from the North Greenland Ice Core Project ice core. The deuterium excess, a proxy of Greenland precipitation moisture......, reflecting the wetting of Asian deserts. A northern shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone could be the trigger of these abrupt shifts of Northern Hemisphere atmospheric circulation, resulting in changes of 2 to 4 kelvin in Greenland moisture source temperature from one year to the next....

  7. Stimulated Raman scattering modes in highly elliptical-core optical fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兆民; 顾春明; 林景全; 郑学彦

    1996-01-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) transmission modes in highly elliptical-core optical fiber of three different structures are experimentally researched.The measuring setup,SRS spectrum and photographs of Stokes modes are given.The observed phenomena are completely different from those on circular-core graded-index optical fiber.The beam sizes of SRS remain constant and SRS light transmits with the characteristics of higher-order.mode.In addition,the experimental results are theoretically explained with fiber-optical dispersion theory and SRS phase matching conditions.Experimental results and theoretical analyses are in good agreement.

  8. A High-Resolution Continuous Flow Analysis System for Polar Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dallmayr, Remi; Goto-Azuma, Kumiko; Kjær, Helle Astrid

    2016-01-01

    of Polar Research (NIPR) in Tokyo. The system allows the continuous analysis of stable water isotopes and electrical conductivity, as well as the collection of discrete samples from both inner and outer parts of the core. This CFA system was designed to have sufficiently high temporal resolution to detect...... signals of abrupt climate change in deep polar ice cores. To test its performance, we used the system to analyze different climate intervals in ice drilled at the NEEM (North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling) site, Greenland. The quality of our continuous measurement of stable water isotopes has been...

  9. Optimization of High-Resolution Continuous Flow Analysis for Transient Climate Signals in Ice Cores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigler, Matthias; Svensson, Anders; Kettner, Ernesto

    2011-01-01

    meltwater conductivity detection modules. The system is optimized for high- resolution determination of transient signals in thin layers of deep polar ice cores. Based on standard measurements and by comparing sections of early Holocene and glacial ice from Greenland, we find that the new system features...... a depth resolution in the ice of a few millimeters which is considerably better than other CFA systems. Thus, the new system can resolve ice strata down to 10 mm thickness and has the potential of identifying annual layers in both Greenland and Antarctic ice cores throughout the last glacial cycle....

  10. High harmonic terahertz confocal gyrotron with nonuniform electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Wenjie; Guan, Xiaotong; Yan, Yang [THz Research Center, School of Physical Electronics, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2016-01-15

    The harmonic confocal gyrotron with nonuniform electron beam is proposed in this paper in order to develop compact and high power terahertz radiation source. A 0.56 THz third harmonic confocal gyrotron with a dual arc section nonuniform electron beam has been designed and investigated. The studies show that confocal cavity has extremely low mode density, and has great advantage to operate at high harmonic. Nonuniform electron beam is an approach to improve output power and interaction efficiency of confocal gyrotron. A dual arc beam magnetron injection gun for designed confocal gyrotron has been developed and presented in this paper.

  11. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buban, James P; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM.

  12. High speed, high resolution, and continuous chemical analysis of ice cores using a melter and ion chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole-Dai, Jihong; Budner, Drew M; Ferris, Dave G

    2006-11-01

    Measurement of trace chemical impurities in ice cores contributes to the reconstruction of records of the atmospheric environment and of the climate system. Ion chromatography (IC) is an effective analytical technique for ionic species in ice cores but has been used on discretely prepared ice samples, resulting in extensive and slow sample preparation and potential for contamination. A new technique has been developed that utilizes IC as the online detection technique in a melter-based continuous flow system for quantitative determination of major ionic chemical impurities. The system, called CFA-IC for continuous flow analysis with ion chromatography detection, consists of an ice core melter, several ion chromatographs, and an interface that distributes meltwater to the IC instruments. The CFA-IC technique combines the accuracy, precision, and ease of use of IC measurement with the enhanced speed and depth resolution of continuous melting systems and is capable of virtually continuous, high-speed and high-resolution chemical analysis of long ice cores. The new technique and operating procedures have been tested and validated with the analysis of over 100 m of ice cores from Antarctica. The current CFA-IC system provides an all-major-ion analysis speed of up to 8 m a day at a depth resolution of approximately 2 cm.

  13. Theoretical Study of Molecular Electronic and Rotational Coherences by High-Harmonic Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Song Bin; Kraus, Peter M; Wörner, Hans Jakob; Rohringer, Nina

    2015-01-01

    The detection of electron motion and electronic wavepacket dynamics is one of the core goals of attosecond science. Recently, choosing the nitric oxide (NO) molecule as an example, we have introduced and demonstrated a new experimental approach to measure coupled valence electronic and rotational wavepackets using high-harmonic generation (HHG) spectroscopy [Kraus et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 243005 (2013)]. A short outline of the theory to describe the combination of the pump and HHG probe process was published together with an extensive discussion of experimental results [Baykusheva et al., Faraday Discuss 171, 113 (2014)]. The comparison of theory and experiment showed good agreement on a quantitative level. Here, we present the generalized theory in detail, which is based on a generalized density matrix approach that describes the pump process and the subsequent probing of the wavepackets by a semiclassical quantitative rescattering approach. An in-depth analysis of the different Raman scattering contrib...

  14. High-Performance Organic Solar Cells Based on a Non-Fullerene Acceptor with a Spiro Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hua; Sun, Po; Zhang, Cong; Yang, Yingguo; Gao, Xingyu; Chen, Fei; Xu, Zongxiang; Chen, Zhi-Kuan; Huang, Wei

    2017-01-26

    Derived from perylenediimide (PDI) building blocks, 3D PDI molecules are considered as a type of promising structure to overcome molecular aggregation, thus improving the performance of organic solar cells. Herein, we report a novel PDI-based derivative, SCPDT-PDI4 , with four PDI units connected to a unique spiro core. Attributed to this novel molecular design, SCPDT-PDI4 exhibits a rigid 3D structure, in which the aggregation tendency of PDI chromophores could be effectively attenuated. Additionally, strong intramolecular charge transfer and high charge mobility are achieved due to the well-conjugated structure and electron-rich property of SCPDT. Therefore, fullerene-free organic solar cells based on SCPDT-PDI4 and PTB7-Th achieve a remarkable high efficiency of 7.11 %. Such an excellent result demonstrates the opportunity of SCPDT to be a promising building block for non-fullerene acceptors.

  15. A Facile Route to the Preparation of Highly Uniform ZnO@TiO2 Core-Shell Nanorod Arrays with Enhanced Photocatalytic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Design and synthesis of ZnO@TiO2 core-shell nanorod arrays as promising photocatalysts have been widely reported. However, it remains a challenge to develop a low-temperature, low-cost, and environmentally friendly method to prepare ZnO@TiO2 core-shell nanorod arrays over a large area for future device applications. Here, a facile, green, and efficient route is designed to prepare the ZnO@TiO2 nanorod arrays with a highly uniform core-shell structure over a large area on Zn wafer via a vapor-thermal method at relatively low temperature. The growth mechanism is proposed as a layer-by-layer assembly. The photocatalytic decomposition reaction of methylene blue (MB reveals that the ZnO@TiO2 core-shell nanorod arrays have excellent photocatalytic activities when compared with the performance of the ZnO nanorod arrays. The improved photocatalytic activity could be attributed to the core-shell structure, which can effectively reduce the recombination rate of electron-hole pairs, significantly increase the optical absorption range, and offer a high density of surface active catalytic sites for the decomposition of organic pollutants. In addition, it is very easy to separate or recover ZnO@TiO2 core-shell nanorod array catalysts when they are used in water purification processes.

  16. π-Core tailoring for new high performance thieno(bis)imide based n-type molecular semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durso, Margherita; Gentili, Denis; Bettini, Cristian; Zanelli, Alberto; Cavallini, Massimiliano; De Angelis, Filippo; Grazia Lobello, Maria; Biondo, Viviana; Muccini, Michele; Capelli, Raffaella; Melucci, Manuela

    2013-05-14

    The synthesis and characterization of two thieno(bis)imide based n-type semiconductors with electron mobilities of up to 0.3 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) are described. The relationships between the electronic features of the π-inner core and the functional properties of the new materials are also discussed.

  17. High Level Analysis, Design and Validation of Distributed Mobile Systems with CoreASM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahbod, R.; Glässer, U.; Jackson, P. J.; Vajihollahi, M.

    System design is a creative activity calling for abstract models that facilitate reasoning about the key system attributes (desired requirements and resulting properties) so as to ensure these attributes are properly established prior to actually building a system. We explore here the practical side of using the abstract state machine (ASM) formalism in combination with the CoreASM open source tool environment for high-level design and experimental validation of complex distributed systems. Emphasizing the early phases of the design process, a guiding principle is to support freedom of experimentation by minimizing the need for encoding. CoreASM has been developed and tested building on a broad scope of applications, spanning computational criminology, maritime surveillance and situation analysis. We critically reexamine here the CoreASM project in light of three different application scenarios.

  18. Highly non-linear solid core photonic crystal fiber with one nano hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangwar, Rahul Kumar; Bhardwaj, Vanita; Singh, Vinod Kumar

    2015-08-01

    The numerical study of newly designed solid core photonic crystal fiber (SCPCF) having three hexagonal air hole rings in cladding region and one small nano hole at the center are presented. By using full vectorial finite element method (FV-FEM), we analyses the optical properties like effective area, nonlinearity and confinement loss of the proposed PCF. Results show that the change in core diameter controls the effective area, nonlinearity and confinement loss. A low effective area (3.34 µm2), high nonlinearity (36.34 W-1km-1) and low confinement loss (0.00106 dB/km) are achieved at the communication wavelength 1.55 µm for the SCPCF having core air hole diameter 0.10 µm, cladding air holes diameter 1.00 µm and pitch 2.50 µm. This type of PCF is very useful in non-linear applications such as supercontinuum generation, four wave mixing, second harmonic generation etc.

  19. An improved continuous flow analysis system for high-resolution field measurements on ice cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Patrik R; Federer, Urs; Hutterli, Manuel A; Bigler, Matthias; Schüpbach, Simon; Ruth, Urs; Schmitt, Jochen; Stocker, Thomas F

    2008-11-01

    Continuous flow analysis (CFA) is a well-established method to obtain information about impurity contents in ice cores as indicators of past changes in the climate system. A section of an ice core is continuously melted on a melter head supplying a sample water flow which is analyzed online. This provides high depth and time resolution of the ice core records and very efficient sample decontamination as only the inner part of the ice sample is analyzed. Here we present an improved CFA system which has been totally redesigned in view of a significantly enhanced overall efficiency and flexibility, signal quality, compactness, and ease of use. These are critical requirements especially for operations of CFA during field campaigns, e.g., in Antarctica or Greenland. Furthermore, a novel deviceto measure the total air content in the ice was developed. Subsequently, the air bubbles are now extracted continuously from the sample water flow for subsequent gas measurements.

  20. Electron Interference in Hall Effect Measurements on GaAs/InAs Core/Shell Nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Fabian; Zellekens, Patrick; Lepsa, Mihail; Rieger, Torsten; Grützmacher, Detlev; Lüth, Hans; Schäpers, Thomas

    2017-01-11

    We present low-temperature magnetotransport measurements on GaAs/InAs core/shell nanowires contacted by regular source-drain leads as well as laterally attached Hall contacts, which only touch parts of the nanowire sidewalls. Low-temperature measurements between source and drain contacts show typical phase coherent effects, such as universal conductance fluctuations in a magnetic field aligned perpendicularly to the nanowire axis as well as Aharonov-Bohm-type oscillations in a parallel aligned magnetic field. However, the signal between the Hall contacts shows a Hall voltage buildup, when the magnetic field is turned perpendicular to the nanowire axis while current is driven through the wire using the source-drain contacts. At low temperatures, the phase coherent effects measured between source and drain leads are superimposed on the Hall voltage, which can be explained by nonlocal probing of large segments of the nanowire. In addition, the Aharonov-Bohm-type oscillations are also observed in the magnetoconductance at magnetic fields aligned parallel to the nanowire axis, using the laterally contacted leads. This measurement geometry hereby directly corresponds to classical Aharonov-Bohm experiments using planar quantum rings. In addition, the Hall voltage is used to characterize the nanowires in terms of charge carrier concentration and mobility, using temperature- and gate-dependent measurements as well as measurements in tilted magnetic fields. The GaAs/InAs core/shell nanowire used in combination with laterally attached contacts is therefore the ideal system to three-dimensionally combine quantum ring experiments using the cross-sectional plane and Hall experiments using the axial nanowire plane.

  1. Investigation on the Core Bypass Flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Yassin

    2013-10-22

    Uncertainties associated with the core bypass flow are some of the key issues that directly influence the coolant mass flow distribution and magnitude, and thus the operational core temperature profiles, in the very high-temperature reactor (VHTR). Designers will attempt to configure the core geometry so the core cooling flow rate magnitude and distribution conform to the design values. The objective of this project is to study the bypass flow both experimentally and computationally. Researchers will develop experimental data using state-of-the-art particle image velocimetry in a small test facility. The team will attempt to obtain full field temperature distribution using racks of thermocouples. The experimental data are intended to benchmark computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes by providing detailed information. These experimental data are urgently needed for validation of the CFD codes. The following are the project tasks: • Construct a small-scale bench-top experiment to resemble the bypass flow between the graphite blocks, varying parameters to address their impact on bypass flow. Wall roughness of the graphite block walls, spacing between the blocks, and temperature of the blocks are some of the parameters to be tested. • Perform CFD to evaluate pre- and post-test calculations and turbulence models, including sensitivity studies to achieve high accuracy. • Develop the state-of-the art large eddy simulation (LES) using appropriate subgrid modeling. • Develop models to be used in systems thermal hydraulics codes to account and estimate the bypass flows. These computer programs include, among others, RELAP3D, MELCOR, GAMMA, and GAS-NET. Actual core bypass flow rate may vary considerably from the design value. Although the uncertainty of the bypass flow rate is not known, some sources have stated that the bypass flow rates in the Fort St. Vrain reactor were between 8 and 25 percent of the total reactor mass flow rate. If bypass flow rates are on the

  2. Free Electrons to Molecular Bonds and Back: Closing the Energetic Oxygen Reduction (ORR)-Oxygen Evolution (OER) Cycle Using Core-Shell Nanoelectrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Peter

    2016-11-15

    Nanomaterial science and electrocatalytic science have entered a successful "nanoelectrochemical" symbiosis, in which novel nanomaterials offer new frontiers for studies on electrocatalytic charge transfer, while electrocatalytic processes give meaning and often practical importance to novel nanomaterial concepts. Examples of this fruitful symbiosis are dealloyed core-shell nanoparticle electrocatalysts, which often exhibit enhanced kinetic charge transfer rates at greatly improved atom-efficiency. As such, they represent ideal electrocatalyst architectures for the acidic oxygen reduction reaction to water (ORR) and the acidic oxygen evolution reaction from water (OER) that require scarce Pt- and Ir-based catalysts. Together, these two reactions constitute the "O-cycle", a key elemental process loop in the field of electrochemical energy interconversion between electricity (free electrons) and molecular bonds (H2O/O2), realized in the combination of water electrolyzers and hydrogen/oxygen fuel cells. In this Account, we describe our recent efforts to design, synthesize, understand, and test noble metal-poor dealloyed Pt and Ir core-shell nanoparticles for deployment in acidic polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) electrolyzers and PEM fuel cells. Spherical dealloyed Pt core-shell particles, derived from PtNi3 precursor alloys, showed favorable ORR activity. More detailed size-activity correlation studies further revealed that the 6-8 nm diameter range is a most desirable initial particle size range in order to maximize the particle Ni content after ORR testing and to preserve performance stability. Similarly, dealloyed and oxidized IrOx core-shell particles derived from Ni-rich Ir-Ni precursor particles proved highly efficient oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalysts in acidic conditions. In addition to the noble metal savings in the particle cores, the Pt core-shell particles are believed to benefit in terms of their mass-based electrochemical kinetics from surface

  3. Highly efficient biosensors by using well-ordered ZnO/ZnS core/shell nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarish, Samar; Xu, Yang; Wang, Zhijie; Mate, Faten; Al-Haddad, Ahmed; Wang, Wenxin; Lei, Yong

    2017-10-06

    We have studied the fabrication of highly efficient glucose sensors using well-ordered heterogeneous ZnO/ZnS core/shell nanotube arrays (CSNAs). The modified electrodes exhibit a superior electrochemical response towards ferrocyanide/ferricyanide and in glucose sensing. Further, the fabricated glucose biosensor exhibited good performance over an acceptable linear range from 2.39 × 10(-5) to 2.66 × 10(-4) mM, with a sensitivity of 188.34 mA mM(-1) cm(-2), which is higher than that of the ZnO nanotube array counterpart. A low limit of detection was realized (24 μM), which is good compared with electrodes based on conventional structures. In addition, the enhanced direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase indicates the fast electron transfer of ZnO/ZnS CSNA electrodes, with a heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (K s) of 1.69 s(-1). The fast electron transfer is attributed to the high conductivity of the modified electrodes. The presented ZnS shell can facilitate the construction of future sensors and enhance the ZnO surface in a biological environment.

  4. Highly efficient biosensors by using well-ordered ZnO/ZnS core/shell nanotube arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarish, Samar; Xu, Yang; Wang, Zhijie; Mate, Faten; Al-Haddad, Ahmed; Wang, Wenxin; Lei, Yong

    2017-10-01

    We have studied the fabrication of highly efficient glucose sensors using well-ordered heterogeneous ZnO/ZnS core/shell nanotube arrays (CSNAs). The modified electrodes exhibit a superior electrochemical response towards ferrocyanide/ferricyanide and in glucose sensing. Further, the fabricated glucose biosensor exhibited good performance over an acceptable linear range from 2.39 × 10‑5 to 2.66 × 10‑4 mM, with a sensitivity of 188.34 mA mM‑1 cm‑2, which is higher than that of the ZnO nanotube array counterpart. A low limit of detection was realized (24 μM), which is good compared with electrodes based on conventional structures. In addition, the enhanced direct electrochemistry of glucose oxidase indicates the fast electron transfer of ZnO/ZnS CSNA electrodes, with a heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (K s) of 1.69 s‑1. The fast electron transfer is attributed to the high conductivity of the modified electrodes. The presented ZnS shell can facilitate the construction of future sensors and enhance the ZnO surface in a biological environment.

  5. Exfoliated BN shell-based high-frequency magnetic core-shell materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Patel, Ketan; Ren, Shenqiang

    2017-09-14

    The miniaturization of electric machines demands high frequency magnetic materials with large magnetic-flux density and low energy loss to achieve a decreased dimension of high rotational speed motors. Herein, we report a solution-processed high frequency magnetic composite (containing a nanometal FeCo core and a boron nitride (BN) shell) that simultaneously exhibits high electrical resistivity and magnetic permeability. The frequency dependent complex initial permeability and the mechanical robustness of nanocomposites are intensely dependent on the content of BN insulating phase. The results shown here suggest that insulating magnetic nanocomposites have potential for application in next-generation high-frequency electric machines with large electrical resistivity and permeability.

  6. New Nanocrystalline Core Performance Versus Finemet(Registered) for High-power Inductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    electric ground vehicle systems. The design and development of compact, high-power, and high- temperature inductors for a 150 kW...002 nanocrystalline core material is compared. 1. INTRODUCTION Hybrid- electric vehicles (HEV) and their supporting technological advancements have... Electr . Conf., 1258-1263. Urciuoli, D. and C. W. Tipton, 2006: Development of a 90 kW Bi-Directional DC-DC Converter for Power Dense Applications, Proc. of 21st IEEE Appl. Power Electr . Conf., 1375-1378.

  7. Heterogeneous Earth Accretion and Incomplete Metal-Silicate Reequilibration at High Pressure During Core Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubie, D. C.; Mann, U.; Frost, D. J.; Kegler, P.; Holzheid, A.; Palme, H.

    2007-12-01

    We present a new model of core formation, based on the partitioning of siderophile elements, that involves accreting the Earth through a series of collisions with smaller bodies that had already differentiated at low pressure. Each impact results in a magma ocean in which the core of the impactor reequilibrates with silicate liquid at high pressure before merging with the Earth's protocore. The oxygen contents of the chondritic compositions of the proto-Earth and impactors can be varied. The compositions of coexisting metal and silicate are determined through mass balance combined with partitioning equations for Ni, FeO, Si and other siderophile elements. The oxygen fugacity is fixed by the partitioning of FeO and is a function of P, T and bulk oxygen content. An important constraint for core formation is that core-mantle partition coefficients for Ni and Co must both converge to values of 23-28. Based on a recent study of the partitioning of Ni and Co over a wide P-T range (Kegler et al., EPSL, submitted) together with other published data, this constraint is not satisfied by a single- stage core formation model at any conditions because the partition coefficients converge at values that are much too low. In the present multi-stage model, the correct values can be reached if only part of each impactor core reequilibrates with silicate liquid in the magma ocean (as proposed by previous models based on Hf-W isotope studies). Physically, this would mean that impactor cores fail to emulsify completely as they sink through the magma ocean. Incorporating other elements (e.g. V and Cr) in the model requires, in addition, that the bulk composition of the impactors changes during accretion from reduced (FeO-poor) to oxidised FeO-rich). Then, with the resulting increase in fO2, incomplete reequilibration of the cores during the final 20-30% of Earth accretion is required to satisfy the Ni-Co constraint. In addition, this model enables the concentrations of O and Si in the

  8. Fast Frontend Electronics for high luminosity particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cardinali, M; Bondy, M I Ferretti; Hoek, M; Lauth, W; Rosner, C; Sfienti, C; Thiel, M

    2015-01-01

    Future experiments of nuclear and particle physics are moving towards the high luminosity regime, in order to access suppressed processes like rare B decays or exotic charmonium resonances. In this scenario, high rate capability is a key requirement for electronics instrumentation, together with excellent timing resolution for precise event reconstruction. The development of dedicated FrontEnd Electronics (FEE) for detectors has become increasingly challenging. A current trend in R&D is towards multipurpose FEE which can be easily adapted to a great variety of detectors, without impairing the required high performance. We report on high-precision timing solutions which utilise high-bandwidth preamplifiers and fast discriminators providing Time-over-Threshold information, which can be used for charge measurements or walk corrections thus improving the obtainable timing resolution. The output signal are LVDS and can be directly fed into a multi-hit TDC readout. The performance of the electronics was investi...

  9. Gate field induced switching of electronic current in Si-Ge Core-Shell nanowire quantum dots: A first principles study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungana, Kamal B.; Jaishi, Meghnath; Pati, Ranjit

    Core-shell nanowires are formed by varying the radial composition of the nanowires. One of the most widely studied core-shell nanowire groups in recent years is the Si-Ge and Ge-Si core-shell nanowires. Compared to their pristine counterparts, they are reported to have superior electronic properties. For example, the scaled ON state current value in a Ge-Si core-shell nanowire field effect transistor (FET) is reported to be three to four times higher than that observed in state-of-the-art-metal oxide semiconductor FET (MOSFET) (Nature, 441, 489 (2006)). Here, we study the transport properties of the pristine Si and Si-Ge core-shell nanowire quantum dots of similar dimension to understand the superior performance of Si-Ge core-shell nanowire field effect transistor. Our calculations yield excellent gate field induced switching behavior in current for both pristine Si and Si-Ge core-shell hetero-structure nanowire quantum dots. The threshold gate bias for ON/OFF switching in the Si-Ge core-shell nanowire is found to be much smaller than that found in the pristine Si nanowire. A single particle many-body Green's function approach in conjunction with density functional theory is employed to calculate the electronic current.

  10. High harmonic generation in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckl, O. H.; Baer, C. R. E.; Kränkel, C.; Marchese, S. V.; Schapper, F.; Holler, M.; Südmeyer, T.; Robinson, J. S.; Tisch, J. W. G.; Couny, F.; Light, P.; Benabid, F.; Keller, U.

    2009-10-01

    High harmonic generation (HHG) of intense infrared laser radiation (Ferray et al., J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 21:L31, 1988; McPherson et al., J. Opt. Soc. Am. B 4:595, 1987) enables coherent vacuum-UV (VUV) to soft-X-ray sources. In the usual setup, energetic femtosecond laser pulses are strongly focused into a gas jet, restricting the interaction length to the Rayleigh range of the focus. The average photon flux is limited by the low conversion efficiency and the low average power of the complex laser amplifier systems (Keller, Nature 424:831, 2003; Südmeyer et al., Nat. Photonics 2:599, 2008; Röser et al., Opt. Lett. 30:2754, 2005; Eidam et al., IEEE J. Sel. Top. Quantum Electron. 15:187, 2009) which typically operate at kilohertz repetition rates. This represents a severe limitation for many experiments using the harmonic radiation in fields such as metrology or high-resolution imaging. Driving HHG with novel high-power diode-pumped multi-megahertz laser systems has the potential to significantly increase the average photon flux. However, the higher average power comes at the expense of lower pulse energies because the repetition rate is increased by more than a thousand times, and efficient HHG is not possible in the usual geometry. So far, two promising techniques for HHG at lower pulse energies were developed: external build-up cavities (Gohle et al., Nature 436:234, 2005; Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94:193, 2005) and resonant field enhancement in nanostructured targets (Kim et al., Nature 453:757, 2008). Here we present a third technique, which has advantages in terms of ease of HHG light extraction, transverse beam quality, and the possibility to substantially increase conversion efficiency by phase-matching (Paul et al., Nature 421:51, 2003; Ren et al., Opt. Express 16:17052, 2008; Serebryannikov et al., Phys. Rev. E (Stat. Nonlinear Soft Matter Phys.) 70:66611, 2004; Serebryannikov et al., Opt. Lett. 33:977, 2008; Zhang et al., Nat. Phys. 3

  11. High-harmonic generation enhanced by dynamical electron correlation

    CERN Document Server

    Tikhomirov, Iliya; Ishikawa, Kenichi L

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically study multielectron effects in high-harmonic generation (HHG), using all-electron first-principles simulations for a one-dimensional (1D) model atom. In addition to usual plateau and cutoff (from a cation in the present case, since the neutral is immediately ionized), we find a prominent resonance peak far above the plateau and a second plateau extended beyond the first cutoff. These features originate from the dication response enhanced by orders of magnitude due to the action of the Coulomb force from the rescattering electron, and, hence, are a clear manifestation of electron correlation. Although the present simulations are done in 1D, the physical mechanism underlying the dramatic enhancement is expected to hold also for three-dimensional real systems. This will provide new possibilities to explore dynamical electron correlation in intense laser fields using HHG, which is usually considered to be of single-electron nature in most cases.

  12. Laboratory design for high-performance electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Keefe, Michael A.; Turner, John H.; Hetherington, Crispin J.D.; Cullis, A.G.; Carragher, Bridget; Jenkins, Ron; Milgrim, Julie; Milligan,Ronald A.; Potter, Clinton S.; Allard, Lawrence F.; Blom, Douglas A.; Degenhardt, Lynn; Sides, William H.

    2004-04-23

    Proliferation of electron microscopes with field emission guns, imaging filters and hardware spherical aberration correctors (giving higher spatial and energy resolution) has resulted in the need to construct special laboratories. As resolutions improve, transmission electron microscopes (TEMs) and scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEMs) become more sensitive to ambient conditions. State-of-the-art electron microscopes require state-of-the-art environments, and this means careful design and implementation of microscope sites, from the microscope room to the building that surrounds it. Laboratories have been constructed to house high-sensitive instruments with resolutions ranging down to sub-Angstrom levels; we present the various design philosophies used for some of these laboratories and our experiences with them. Four facilities are described: the National Center for Electron Microscopy OAM Laboratory at LBNL; the FEGTEM Facility at the University of Sheffield; the Center for Integrative Molecular Biosciences at TSRI; and the Advanced Microscopy Laboratory at ORNL.

  13. Electron Capture and Beta-Decay Rates for the Collapse of O+Ne+Mg Cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Lam Yi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We present a new set of electron (e− capture and β-decay rates that improves previous calculations by Takahara et al. and Oda et al. by: (a incorporation of recent charge-exchange and β-decay data, (b contributions of forbidden transitions, and (c inclusion of e− screening corrections. The experimental nuclear input is supplemented by theoretical data based on large-scale shell model calculations in the full sd-shell space using the USDB interaction. The impact of these new rates on the late-stage stellar evolution of 8.8M⊙ star is demonstrated.

  14. Physical and chemical structure of dense cores in regions of high mass star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Zinchenko, A I; Caselli, P; Johansson, L E B; Malafeev, S; Turner, B; Zinchenko, Igor; Pirogov, Lev; Caselli, Paola; Johansson, Lars E.B.; Malafeev, Sergey; Turner, Barry

    2005-01-01

    We found that in regions of high mass star formation the CS emission correlates well with the dust continuum emission and is therefore a good tracer of the total mass while the N$_2$H$^+$ distribution is frequently very different. This is opposite to their typical behavior in low-mass cores where freeze-out plays a crucial role in the chemistry. The behavior of other high density tracers varies from source to source but most of them are closer to CS. Radial density profiles in massive cores are fitted by power laws with indices about -1.6, as derived from the dust continuum emission. The radial temperature dependence on intermediate scales is close to the theoretically expected one for a centrally heated optically thin cloud. The velocity dispersion either remains constant or decreases from the core center to the edge. Several cores including those without known embedded IR sources show signs of infall motions. They can represent the earliest phases of massive protostars. There are implicit arguments in favor...

  15. An accelerating high-latitude jet in Earth’s core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    W. Livermore, Philip; Hollerbach, Rainer; Finlay, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Observations of the change in Earth’s magnetic field—the secular variation—provide information about the motion of liquid metal within the core that is responsible for the magnetic field’s generation. High-resolution observations from the European Space Agency’s Swarm satellite mission show intense...... field change at high latitude, localized in a distinctive circular daisy-chain configuration centred on the north geographic pole. Here we show that this feature can be explained by a localized, non-axisymmetric, westward jet of 420 km width on the tangent cylinder, the cylinder of fluid within the core...... that is aligned with the rotation axis and tangent to the solid inner core. We find that the jet has increased in magnitude by a factor of three over the period 2000–2016 to about 40 km yr−1, and is now much stronger than typical large-scale flows inferred for the core. We suggest that the current accelerating...

  16. V-groove all-fiber core-cladding intermodal interferometer for high-temperature sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhen; Geng, Youfu; Li, Xuejin; Tan, Xiaoling; Gao, Rong

    2015-01-10

    Novel V-groove all-fiber core-cladding intermodal interferometers fabricated by CO2 laser irradiation on a standard single-mode fiber are described. The high-order cladding modes are excited due to the special V-groove structure. The interferometers are classified as Mach-Zehnder and Michelson type based on the way they are structured. Benefiting from the large difference of thermal coefficients of the core and high-order cladding modes, both types receive high temperature sensitivity by monitoring the wavelength shift of the interference spectrum, and their responses to temperature are similar. Compared with the Mach-Zehnder interferometer, the Michelson interferometer is more compact and more flexible in application.

  17. Comparative analysis of core heat transport of JET high density H-mode plasmas in carbon wall and ITER-like wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Tae; Romanelli, M.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Koskela, T.; Conboy, J.; Giroud, C.; Maddison, G.; Joffrin, E.; contributors, JET

    2015-06-01

    A consistent deterioration of global confinement in H-mode experiments has been observed in JET [1] following the replacement of all carbon plasma facing components (PFCs) with an all metal (‘ITER-like’) wall (ILW). This has been correlated to the observed degradation of the pedestal confinement, as lower electron temperature (Te) values are routinely measured at the top of the edge barrier region. A comparative investigation of core heat transport in JET-ILW and JET-CW (carbon wall) discharges has been performed, to assess whether core confinement has also been affected by the wall change. The results presented here have been obtained by analysing a set of discharges consisting of high density JET-ILW H-mode plasmas and comparing them against their counterpart discharges in JET-CW having similar global operational parameters. The set contains 10 baseline ({βN}=1.5∼ 2 ) discharge-pairs with 2.7 T toroidal magnetic field, 2.5 MA plasma current, and 14 to 17 MW of neutral beam injection (NBI) heating. Based on a Te profile analysis using high resolution Thomson scattering (HRTS) data, the Te profile peaking (i.e. core Te (ρ = 0.3) / edge Te (ρ = 0.7)) is found to be similar, and weakly dependent on edge Te, for both JET-ILW and JET-CW discharges. When ILW discharges are seeded with N2, core and edge Te both increase to maintain a similar peaking factor. The change in core confinement is addressed with interpretative TRANSP simulations. It is found that JET-ILW H-mode plasmas have higher NBI power deposition to electrons and lower NBI power deposition to ions as compared to the JET-CW counterparts. This is an effect of the lower electron temperature at the top of the pedestal. As a result, the core electron energy confinement time is reduced in JET-ILW discharges, but the core ion energy confinement time is not decreased. Overall, the core energy confinement is found to be the same in the JET-ILW discharges compared to the JET-CW counterparts.

  18. Electron capture by highly charged ions from surfaces and gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, F.

    2008-01-11

    In this study highly charged ions produced in Electron Beam Ion Traps are used to investigate electron capture from surfaces and gases. The experiments with gas targets focus on spectroscopic measurements of the K-shell x-rays emitted at the end of radiative cascades following electron capture into Rydberg states of Ar{sup 17+} and Ar{sup 18+} ions as a function of collision energy. The ions are extracted from an Electron Beam Ion Trap at an energy of 2 keVu{sup -1}, charge-selected and then decelerated down to 5 eVu{sup -1} for interaction with an argon gas target. For decreasing collision energies a shift to electron capture into low orbital angular momentum capture states is observed. Comparative measurements of the K-shell x-ray emission following electron capture by Ar{sup 17+} and Ar{sup 18+} ions from background gas in the trap are made and a discrepancy in the results compared with those from the extraction experiments is found. Possible explanations are discussed. For the investigation of electron capture from surfaces, highly charged ions are extracted from an Electron Beam Ion Trap at energies of 2 to 3 keVu{sup -1}, charge-selected and directed onto targets comprising arrays of nanoscale apertures in silicon nitride membranes. The highly charged ions implemented are Ar{sup 16+} and Xe{sup 44+} and the aperture targets are formed by focused ion beam drilling in combination with ion beam assisted thin film deposition, achieving hole diameters of 50 to 300 nm and aspect ratios of 1:5 to 3:2. After transport through the nanoscale apertures the ions pass through an electrostatic charge state analyzer and are detected. The percentage of electron capture from the aperture walls is found to be much lower than model predictions and the results are discussed in terms of a capillary guiding mechanism. (orig.)

  19. First test of BNL electron beam ion source with high current density electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pikin, Alexander, E-mail: pikin@bnl.gov; Alessi, James G., E-mail: pikin@bnl.gov; Beebe, Edward N., E-mail: pikin@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Shornikov, Andrey; Mertzig, Robert; Wenander, Fredrik; Scrivens, Richard [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2015-01-09

    A new electron gun with electrostatic compression has been installed at the Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) Test Stand at BNL. This is a collaborative effort by BNL and CERN teams with a common goal to study an EBIS with electron beam current up to 10 A, current density up to 10,000 A/cm{sup 2} and energy more than 50 keV. Intensive and pure beams of heavy highly charged ions with mass-to-charge ratio < 4.5 are requested by many heavy ion research facilities including NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at BNL and HIE-ISOLDE at CERN. With a multiampere electron gun, the EBIS should be capable of delivering highly charged ions for both RHIC facility applications at BNL and for ISOLDE experiments at CERN. Details of the electron gun simulations and design, and the Test EBIS electrostatic and magnetostatic structures with the new electron gun are presented. The experimental results of the electron beam transmission are given.

  20. High dielectric constant ceramics for ion-electron sources

    CERN Document Server

    Boscolo, I

    2002-01-01

    Ferroelectric disks, coated with proper electrodes, can easily produce a dense plasma cloud when excited with a high-voltage pulse. This plasma can be a source of either electrons or ions depending on the sign of the extracting field set in front of the disk. We present the behavior of the disks operating at high frequency as emitters of both electrons and ions in two experimental configurations: (a) without and (b) with two screening grids. These two screening grids are inserted when the plasma must be confined within the cathode region. The system is capable of providing ion pulses of a few hundred milliamperes, whose length can range from a hundred nanoseconds to dozen microseconds. The electron pulses of energetic electrons have typically an amplitude higher than a couple of amperes. Tests at MHz repetition rate were positive as for stable operation.

  1. High-Power Electron Accelerators for Space (and other) Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Dinh Cong [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lewellen, John W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-23

    This is a presentation on high-power electron accelerators for space and other applications. The main points covered are: electron beams for space applications, new designs of RF accelerators, high-power HEMT testing, and battery design. In summary, we have considered a concept of 1-MeV electron accelerator that can operate up to several seconds. This concept can be extended to higher energy to produce higher beam power. Going to higher beam energy requires adding more cavities and solid-state HEMT RF power devices. The commercial HEMT have been tested for frequency response and RF output power (up to 420 W). And finally, we are testing these HEMT into a resonant load and planning for an electron beam test in FY17.

  2. Proposal to detect an emission of unusual super-high energy electrons in electron storage rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-peng Qian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available According to an extended Lorentz–Einstein mass formula taken into the uncertainty principle, it is predicted that the electron beams passing accelerating electric field should with a small probability generate abnormal super-high energy electrons which are much higher than the beam energy. Author’s preliminary experiment result at electron storage ring has hinted these signs, so suggests to more strictly detect this unusual phenomenon, and thus to test the extended mass formula as well as a more perfect special relativity.

  3. Electronically controlled heat sink for high-power laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrovec, John

    2009-05-01

    We report on a novel electronically controlled active heat sink for high-power laser diodes offering unparalleled capacity in high-heat flux handling and temperature control. The heat sink receives diode waste heat at high flux and transfers it at reduced flux to environment, coolant fluid, heat pipe, or structure. Thermal conductance of the heat sink is electronically adjustable, allowing for precise control of diode temperature and the diode light wavelength. When pumping solid-state or alkaline vapor lasers, diode wavelength can be precisely temperature-tuned to the gain medium absorption features. This paper presents the heat sink physics, engineering design, and performance modeling.

  4. An optical remote controlled high voltage dome for electron microscopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruan, S. [The Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Kapp, O.H. [The Department of Radiology and the Enrico Fermi Institute, The University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    1995-08-01

    A low cost high voltage dome has been completed for an electron microscope with a thermal emission tip as electron source. Two fibers are used to provide communication across the high electrical field zone between the computer and the dome. This system provides a reliable method to operate the dome circuitry (floating at high voltage) and ensures the safety of both the computer system and the operator. Because of the application of ``dummy`` serial data transfer, the least number of fibers and associated components are used, providing a relatively low-cost solution to this problem. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}.

  5. Mercuric iodide dosimeter response to high energy electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewinger, E.; Nissenbaum, J.; Schieber, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    Mercuric iodide solid state dosimeter response to high energy electron beams of up to 35 MeV is reported. High sensitivity of up to 1.5 V/cGy was observed with a 200 V external bias, as well as several mV/cGy, with no external bias for small volume (approx. 10 mm/sup 3/) detectors. The physical characteristics of the detector response are discussed, showing the feasibility of mercuric iodide as a reliable dosimeter for high energy electron beams.

  6. Electron Acceleration by High Power Radio Waves in the Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Paul

    2012-10-01

    At the highest ERP of the High Altitude Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska, high frequency (HF) electromagnetic (EM) waves in the ionosphere produce artificial aurora and electron-ion plasma layers. Using HAARP, electrons are accelerated by high power electrostatic (ES) waves to energies >100 times the thermal temperature of the ambient plasma. These ES waves are driven by decay of the pump EM wave tuned to plasma resonances. The most efficient acceleration process occurs near the harmonics of the electron cyclotron frequency in earth's magnetic field. Mode conversion plays a role in transforming the ES waves into EM signals that are recorded with ground receivers. These diagnostic waves, called stimulated EM emissions (SEE), show unique resonant signatures of the strongest electron acceleration. This SEE also provides clues about the ES waves responsible for electron acceleration. The electron gas is accelerated by high frequency modes including Langmuir (electron plasma), upper hybrid, and electron Bernstein waves. All of these waves have been identified in the scattered EM spectra as downshifted sidebands of the EM pump frequency. Parametric decay is responsible low frequency companion modes such as ion acoustic, lower hybrid, and ion Bernstein waves. The temporal evolution of the scattered EM spectrum indicates development of field aligned irregularities that aid the mode conversion process. The onset of certain spectral features is strongly correlated with glow plasma discharge structures that are both visible with the unaided eye and detectable using radio backscatter techniques at HF and UHF frequencies. The primary goals are to understand natural plasma layers, to study basic plasma physics in a unique ``laboratory with walls,'' and to create artificial plasma structures that can aid radio communications.

  7. High resolution inelastic electron scattering and nuclear structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, H. B.; Heisenberg, J. H.

    Thanks to the improved characteristics of the experimental set-up electron scattering has become an excellent tool to study the structure of the nucleus. After describing globally how the nuclear structure enters in the formalism of (e,e') reactions and how the high experimental resolution is obtained, several examples of the use of electron scattering for the study of specific nuclear structure questions are discussed.

  8. Gradient B drift transport of high current electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.R.; Backstrom, R.C.; Halbleib, J.A.; Quintenz, J.P.; Wright, T.P.

    1984-12-01

    A 1-MeV, 200-kA electron beam was transported 89 cm in a low pressure background gas via gradient B drift in the 1/r azimuthal magnetic field of a current carrying wire. The electron drift velocity was measured and found to be in good agreement with theory. Measurements of x-ray production in the target indicated high transport efficiency.

  9. Photons shedding light on electron capture by highly charged ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Romke Anne

    1990-01-01

    In this thesis charge transfer is studied in collisions of highly charged ions (Aq+) with neutral particles (B). Because the electron is captured resonantly (i.e. without its binding energy) by the ion, a limited number of highly excited states (characterized by the quantum numbers nlm) is preferent

  10. High power electronics package: from modeling to implementation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, C.A.; Kregting, R.; Ye, H.; Driel, W. van; Gielen, A.W.J.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2011-01-01

    Power electronics, such as high power RF components and high power LEDs, requires the combination of robust and reliable package structures, materials, and processes to guarantee their functional performance and lifetime. We started with the thermal and thermal-mechanical modeling of such component

  11. Photons shedding light on electron capture by highly charged ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Romke Anne

    1990-01-01

    In this thesis charge transfer is studied in collisions of highly charged ions (Aq+) with neutral particles (B). Because the electron is captured resonantly (i.e. without its binding energy) by the ion, a limited number of highly excited states (characterized by the quantum numbers nlm) is

  12. Evaluation of the Start-Up Core Physics Tests at Japan's High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (Annular Core Loadings)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Nozomu Fujimoto; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Atsushi Zukeran

    2010-03-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a 30 MWth, graphite-moderated, helium-cooled reactor that was constructed with the objectives to establish and upgrade the technological basis for advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) as well as to conduct various irradiation tests for innovative high-temperature research. The core size of the HTTR represents about one-half of that of future HTGRs, and the high excess reactivity of the HTTR, necessary for compensation of temperature, xenon, and burnup effects during power operations, is similar to that of future HTGRs. During the start-up core physics tests of the HTTR, various annular cores were formed to provide experimental data for verification of design codes for future HTGRs. The Japanese government approved construction of the HTTR in the 1989 fiscal year budget; construction began at the Oarai Research and Development Center in March 1991 and was completed May 1996. Fuel loading began July 1, 1998, from the core periphery. The first criticality was attained with an annular core on November 10, 1998 at 14:18, followed by a series of start-up core physics tests until a fully-loaded core was developed on December 16, 1998. Criticality tests were carried out into January 1999. The first full power operation with an average core outlet temperature of 850ºC was completed on December 7, 2001, and operational licensing of the HTTR was approved on March 6, 2002. The HTTR attained high temperature operation at 950 ºC in April 19, 2004. After a series of safety demonstration tests, it will be used as the heat source in a hydrogen production system by 2015. Hot zero-power critical, rise-to-power, irradiation, and safety demonstration testing , have also been performed with the HTTR, representing additional means for computational validation efforts. Power tests were performed in steps from 0 to 30 MW, with various tests performed at each step to confirm

  13. High Efficiency Electron-Laser Interactions in Tapered Helical Undulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duris, Joseph Patrick

    Efficient coupling of relativistic electron beams with high power radiation lies at the heart of advanced accelerator and light source research and development. The inverse free electron laser is a stable accelerator capable of harnessing very high intensity laser electric fields to efficiently transfer large powers from lasers to electron beams. In this dissertation, we first present the theoretical framework to describe the interaction, and then apply our improved understanding of the IFEL to the design and numerical study of meter-long, GeV IFELs for compact light sources. The central experimental work of the dissertation is the UCLA BNL helical inverse free electron laser experiment at the Accelerator Test Facility in Brookhaven National Laboratory which used a strongly tapered 54cm long, helical, permanent magnet undulator and a several hundred GW CO2 laser to accelerate electrons from 52 to 106MeV, setting new records for inverse free electron laser energy gain (54MeV) and average accelerating gradient (100MeV/m). The undulator design and fabrication as well as experimental diagnostics are presented. In order to improve the stability and quality of the accelerated electron beam, we redesigned the undulator for a slightly reduced output energy by modifying the magnet gap throughout the undulator, and we used this modified undulator to demonstrated capture of >25% of the injected beam without prebunching. In the study of heavily loaded GeV inverse free electron lasers, we show that a majority of the power may be transferred from a laser to the accelerated electron beam. Reversing the process to decelerate high power electron beams, a mechanism we refer to as tapering enhanced stimulated superradiant amplification, offers a clear path to high power light sources. We present studies of radiation production for a wide range of wavelengths (10mum, 13nm, and 0.3nm) using this method and discuss the design for a deceleration experiment using the same undulator used

  14. Two-component relativistic density-functional calculations of the dimers of the halogens from bromine through element 117 using effective core potential and all-electron methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitin, Alexander V; van Wüllen, Christoph

    2006-02-14

    A two-component quasirelativistic Hamiltonian based on spin-dependent effective core potentials is used to calculate ionization energies and electron affinities of the heavy halogen atom bromine through the superheavy element 117 (eka-astatine) as well as spectroscopic constants of the homonuclear dimers of these atoms. We describe a two-component Hartree-Fock and density-functional program that treats spin-orbit coupling self-consistently within the orbital optimization procedure. A comparison with results from high-order Douglas-Kroll calculations--for the superheavy systems also with zeroth-order regular approximation and four-component Dirac results--demonstrates the validity of the pseudopotential approximation. The density-functional (but not the Hartree-Fock) results show very satisfactory agreement with theoretical coupled cluster as well as experimental data where available, such that the theoretical results can serve as an estimate for the hitherto unknown properties of astatine, element 117, and their dimers.

  15. Frontend electronics for high-precision single photo-electron timing using FPGA-TDCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardinali, M., E-mail: cardinal@kph.uni-mainz.de [Institut für Kernphysik, Johannes Gutenberg-University Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Helmholtz Institut Mainz, Mainz (Germany); Dzyhgadlo, R.; Gerhardt, A.; Götzen, K.; Hohler, R.; Kalicy, G.; Kumawat, H.; Lehmann, D.; Lewandowski, B.; Patsyuk, M.; Peters, K.; Schepers, G.; Schmitt, L.; Schwarz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Traxler, M.; Ugur, C.; Zühlsdorf, M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Dodokhov, V.Kh. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Britting, A. [Friedrich Alexander-University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen (Germany); and others

    2014-12-01

    The next generation of high-luminosity experiments requires excellent particle identification detectors which calls for Imaging Cherenkov counters with fast electronics to cope with the expected hit rates. A Barrel DIRC will be used in the central region of the Target Spectrometer of the planned PANDA experiment at FAIR. A single photo-electron timing resolution of better than 100 ps is required by the Barrel DIRC to disentangle the complicated patterns created on the image plane. R and D studies have been performed to provide a design based on the TRB3 readout using FPGA-TDCs with a precision better than 20 ps RMS and custom frontend electronics with high-bandwidth pre-amplifiers and fast discriminators. The discriminators also provide time-over-threshold information thus enabling walk corrections to improve the timing resolution. Two types of frontend electronics cards optimised for reading out 64-channel PHOTONIS Planacon MCP-PMTs were tested: one based on the NINO ASIC and the other, called PADIWA, on FPGA discriminators. Promising results were obtained in a full characterisation using a fast laser setup and in a test experiment at MAMI, Mainz, with a small scale DIRC prototype. - Highlights: • Frontend electronics for Cherenkov detectors have been developed. • FPGA-TDCs have been used for high precision timing. • Time over threshold has been utilised for walk correction. • Single photo-electron timing resolution less than 100 ps has been achieved.

  16. Atomistic Tight-Binding Theory of Electron-Hole Exchange Interaction in Morphological Evolution of CdSe/ZnS Core/Shell Nanodisk to CdSe/ZnS Core/Shell Nanorod

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Worasak Sukkabot

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the atomistic tight-binding theory (TB and a configuration interaction (CI description, the electron-hole exchange interaction in the morphological transformation of CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanodisk to CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanorod is described with the aim of understanding the impact of the structural shapes on the change of the electron-hole exchange interaction. Normally, the ground hole states confined in typical CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals are of heavy hole-like character. However, the atomistic tight-binding theory shows that a transition of the ground hole states from heavy hole-like to light hole-like contribution with the increasing aspect ratios of the CdSe/ZnS core/shell nanostructures is recognized. According to the change in the ground-state hole characters, the electron-hole exchange interaction is also significantly altered. To do so, optical band gaps, ground-state electron character, ground-state hole character, oscillation strengths, ground-state coulomb energies, ground-state exchange energies, and dark-bright (DB excitonic splitting (stoke shift are numerically demonstrated. These atomistic computations obviously show the sensitivity with the aspect ratios. Finally, the alteration in the hole character has a prominent effect on dark-bright (DB excitonic splitting.

  17. Characterization of ferritin core on redox reactions as a nanocomposite for electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Kwang Min [Center for Bio-Artificial Muscle and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Watt, Richard K.; Watt, Gerald D. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT 84602 (United States); Choi, Sang H. [Advanced Materials and Processing Branch, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA 23681 (United States); Kim, Hyug-Han [Department of Chemistry, School of Advanced Science, Dankook University, Chonan 330-180 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun I. [Center for Bio-Artificial Muscle and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon Jeong, E-mail: sjk@hanyang.ac.k [Center for Bio-Artificial Muscle and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-01

    The kinetics of the change in mass related to the release from and deposition onto the cavities of a ferritin in the SWCNT nanocomposite by electrochemical redox reactions, and the effects of the SWCNT on the kinetics of the variation in mass of the ferritin nanocomposite were characterized using an electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance. The change in mass of reconstituted ferritin in the SWCNT nanocomposite shows reversible variation and stability of the ferritin/SWCNT nanocomposite on redox reactions was confirmed by using a coreless apoferritin and a Fe{sup 2+} chelating agent. The ferritin/SWCNT nanocomposite is a good candidate for applications based on electron transfer, such as biosensor, biobatteries and electrodes for biofuel cell.

  18. Improvement in dynamic balance and core endurance after a 6-week core-stability-training program in high school track and field athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrey, Michelle A; Mitzel, Jonathan G

    2013-11-01

    Core training specifically for track and field athletes is vague, and it is not clear how it affects dynamic balance and core-endurance measures. To determine the effects of a 6-week core-stabilization-training program for high school track and field athletes on dynamic balance and core endurance. Test-retest. High school in north central West Virginia. Thirteen healthy high school student athletes from 1 track and field team volunteered for the study. Subjects completed pretesting 1 wk before data collection. They completed a 6-wk core-stabilization program designed specifically for track and field athletes. The program consisted of 3 levels with 6 exercises per level and lasted for 30 min each session 3 times per week. Subjects progressed to the next level at 2-wk intervals. After 6 wk, posttesting was conducted The subjects were evaluated using the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) for posteromedial (PM), medial (M), and anteromedial (AM) directions; abdominal-fatigue test (AFT); back-extensor test (BET); and side-bridge test (SBT) for the right and left sides. Posttest results significantly improved for all 3 directions of the SEBT (PM, M, and AM), AFT, BET, right SBT, and left SBT. Effect size was large for all variables except for PM and AM, where a moderate effect was noted. Minimal-detectable-change scores exceeded the error of the measurements for all dependent variables. After the 6-wk core-stabilization-training program, measures of the SEBT, AFT, BET, and SBT improved, thus advocating the use of this core-stabilization-training program for track and field athletes.

  19. Shocks and Cool Cores: An ALMA View of Massive Galaxy Cluster Formation at High Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Kaustuv

    2017-07-01

    These slides present some recent results on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect imaging of galaxy cluster substructures. The advantage of SZ imaging at high redshifts or in the low density cluster outskirts is already well-known. Now with ALMA a combination of superior angular resolution and high sensitivity is available. One example is the first ALMA measurement of a merger shock at z=0.9 in the famous El Gordo galaxy cluster. Here comparison between SZ, X-ray and radio data enabled us to put constraints on the shock Mach number and magnetic field strength for a high-z radio relic. Second example is the ALMA SZ imaging of the core region of z=1.4 galaxy cluster XMMU J2235.2-2557. Here ALMA data provide an accurate measurement of the thermal pressure near the cluster center, and from a joint SZ/X-ray analysis we find clear evidence for a reduced core temperature. This result indicate that a cool core establishes itself early enough in the cluster formation history while the gas accumulation is still continuing. The above two ALMA measurements are among several other recent SZ results that shed light on the formation process of massive clusters at high redshifts.

  20. Thermodynamics of electron transfer in oxygenic photosynthetic reaction centers: volume change, enthalpy, and entropy of electron-transfer reactions in manganese-depleted photosystem II core complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, J M; Boichenko, V A; Diner, B A; Mauzerall, D

    2001-06-19

    We have previously reported the thermodynamic data of electron transfer in photosystem I using pulsed time-resolved photoacoustics [Hou et al. (2001) Biochemistry 40, 7109-7116]. In the present work, using preparations of purified manganese-depleted photosystem II (PS II) core complexes from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, we have measured the DeltaV, DeltaH, and estimated TDeltaS of electron transfer on the time scale of 1 micros. At pH 6.0, the volume contraction of PS II was determined to be -9 +/- 1 A3. The thermal efficiency was found to be 52 +/- 5%, which corresponds to an enthalpy change of -0.9 +/- 0.1 eV for the formation of the state P680+Q(A-) from P680*. An unexpected volume expansion on pulse saturation of PS II was observed, which is reversible in the dark. At pH 9.0, the volume contraction, the thermal efficiency, and the enthalpy change were -3.4 +/- 0.5 A3, 37 +/- 7%, and -1.15 +/- 0.13 eV, respectively. The DeltaV of PS II, smaller than that of PS I and bacterial centers, is assigned to electrostriction and analyzed using the Drude-Nernst equation. To explain the small DeltaV for the formation of P680+Q(A-) or Y(Z*)Q(A-), we propose that fast proton transfer into a polar region is involved in this reaction. Taking the free energy of charge separation of PS II as the difference between the energy of the excited-state P680* and the difference in the redox potentials of the donor and acceptor, the apparent entropy change (TDeltaS) for charge separation of PS II is calculated to be negative, -0.1 +/- 0.1 eV at pH 6.0 (P680+Q(A-)) and -0.2 +/- 0.15 eV at pH 9.0 (Y(Z*)Q(A-)). The thermodynamic properties of electron transfer in PS II core reaction centers thus differ considerably from those of bacterial and PS I reaction centers, which have DeltaV of approximately -27 A3, DeltaH of approximately -0.4 eV, and TDeltaS of approximately +0.4 eV.

  1. Highly Sensitive Liquid Core Temperature Sensor Based on Multimode Interference Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Fuentes-Fuentes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A novel fiber optic temperature sensor based on a liquid-core multimode interference device is demonstrated. The advantage of such structure is that the thermo-optic coefficient (TOC of the liquid is at least one order of magnitude larger than that of silica and this, combined with the fact that the TOC of silica and the liquid have opposite signs, provides a liquid-core multimode fiber (MMF highly sensitive to temperature. Since the refractive index of the liquid can be easily modified, this allows us to control the modal properties of the liquid-core MMF at will and the sensor sensitivity can be easily tuned by selecting the refractive index of the liquid in the core of the device. The maximum sensitivity measured in our experiments is 20 nm/°C in the low-temperature regime up to 60 °C. To the best of our knowledge, to date, this is the largest sensitivity reported for fiber-based MMI temperature sensors.

  2. Density Profiles in Molecular Cloud Cores Associated with High-Mass Star-Forming Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Pirogov, Lev E

    2009-01-01

    Radial density profiles for the sample of dense cores associated with high-mass star-forming regions from southern hemisphere have been derived using the data of observations in continuum at 250 GHz. Radial density profiles for the inner regions of 16 cores (at distances $\\la 0.2-0.8$ pc from the center) are close on average to the $\\rho\\propto r^{-\\alpha}$ dependence, where $\\alpha=1.6\\pm 0.3$. In the outer regions density drops steeper. An analysis with various hydrostatic models showed that the modified Bonnor-Ebert model, which describes turbulent sphere confined by external pressure, is preferable compared with the logotrope and polytrope models practically in all cases. With a help of the Bonnor-Ebert model, estimates of central density in a core, non-thermal velocity dispersion and core size are obtained. The comparison of central densities with the densities derived earlier from the CS modeling reveals differences in several cases. The reasons of such differences are probably connected with the presen...

  3. The Theoretical Connotation and Systematic Essence of Core Competence of Agricultural High-tech Enterprises

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Six representative interpretations about the core competence of the corporate proposed by the researchers both at home and abroad from different perspectives are introduced,which includes "Resource theory","Capacity theory","Integration theory of assets and mechanism","Theory of consumer surplus","Theory of institutions and systems" and "Theory of innovation". It is pointed out that although these interpretations play an active role in enriching the theory of core competence,it still faces the problems to further deepen these interpretations:the first problem is how to give a precise definition;the second is about its extension;the third is on the logical and practical relationship between the production mechanism and its sustainable competitive advantages;the fourth is the problems in the production process and the corresponding management. Both the systematic essence and features of core competence are introduced:the first is the system self-organization process produced within the corporate;the second is the interaction between corporate system and environment;it needs a growing and evolution process. This paper briefly describes the essence of core competence of agricultural high-tech corporate,introduces its five features including systematicness,integration,non-imitation,ductility and non-equilibrium,and finally explains its component parts,mainly including corporate culture system,technological innovation system,human resource system,management capability system,corporate production and marketing system,financial capability system and adaptability system.

  4. High-power picosecond pulse delivery through hollow core photonic band gap fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Johansen, Mette M.; Lyngsø, Jens K.; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bang, Ole; Alkeskjold, Thomas T.

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrated robust and bend insensitive fiber delivery of high power laser with diffraction limited beam quality for two different kinds of hollow core band gap fibers. The light source for this experiment consists of ytterbium-doped double clad fiber aeroGAIN-ROD-PM85 in a high power amplifier setup. It provided 22ps pulses with a maximum average power of 95W, 40MHz repetition rate at 1032nm (~2.4μJ pulse energy), with M2 bend sensitivity. The fibers were coiled on 8 centimeters radius spools and even lower bending radii were present. In addition, stimulated rotational Raman scattering arising from nitrogen molecules was measured through a 42m long 19 cell hollow core fiber.

  5. Polydopamine and MnO2 core-shell composites for high-performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ding; Tao, Haisheng; Zhu, Xuezhen; Li, Maoguo

    2017-10-01

    Polydopamine and MnO2 core-shell composites (PDA@MnO2) for high-performance supercapacitors had been successfully synthesized by a facile and fast method. The morphology, crystalline phase and chemical composition of PDA@MnO2 composites are characterized using SEM, TEM, XRD, EDS and XPS. The performance of PDA@MnO2 composites are further investigated by cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 1 M Na2SO4 electrolyte. The PDA@MnO2 core-shell nanostructure composites exhibit a high capacitance of 193 F g-1 at the current density of 1A g-1 and retained over 81.2% of its initial capacitance after 2500 cycles of charge-discharge at 2 A g-1. The results manifest that the PDA@MnO2 composites can be potentially applied in supercapacitors.

  6. Virus-templated self-assembled single-walled carbon nanotubes for highly efficient electron collection in photovoltaic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Xiangnan; Yi, Hyunjung; Ham, Moon-Ho; Qi, Jifa; Yun, Dong Soo; Ladewski, Rebecca; Strano, Michael S; Hammond, Paula T; Belcher, Angela M

    2011-04-24

    The performance of photovoltaic devices could be improved by using rationally designed nanocomposites with high electron mobility to efficiently collect photo-generated electrons. Single-walled carbon nanotubes exhibit very high electron mobility, but the incorporation of such nanotubes into nanocomposites to create efficient photovoltaic devices is challenging. Here, we report the synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotube-TiO(2) nanocrystal core-shell nanocomposites using a genetically engineered M13 virus as a template. By using the nanocomposites as photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells, we demonstrate that even small fractions of nanotubes improve the power conversion efficiency by increasing the electron collection efficiency. We also show that both the electronic type and degree of bundling of the nanotubes in the nanotube/TiO(2) complex are critical factors in determining device performance. With our approach, we achieve a power conversion efficiency in the dye-sensitized solar cells of 10.6%.

  7. High-Current Energy-Recovering Electron Linacs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolitsa Merminga; David Douglas; Geoffrey Krafft

    2003-12-01

    The use of energy recovery provides a potentially powerful new paradigm for generation of the charged particle beams used in synchrotron radiation sources, high-energy electron cooling devices, electron-ion colliders, and other applications in photon science and nuclear and high-energy physics. Energy-recovering electron linear accelerators (called energy-recovering linacs, or ERLs) share many characteristics with ordinary linacs, as their six-dimensional beam phase space is largely determined by electron source properties. However, in common with classic storage rings, ERLs possess a high average-current-carrying capability enabled by the energy recovery process, and thus promise similar efficiencies. The authors discuss the concept of energy recovery and its technical challenges and describe the Jefferson Lab (JLab) Infrared Demonstration Free-Electron Laser (IR Demo FEL), originally driven by a 3548-MeV, 5-mA superconducting radiofrequency (srf) ERL, which provided the most substantial demonstration of energy recovery to date: a beam of 250 kW average power. They present an overview of envisioned ERL applications and a development path to achieving the required performance. They use experimental data obtained at the JLab IR Demo FEL and recent experimental results from CEBAF-ERL GeV-scale, comparatively low-current energy-recovery demonstration at JLab to evaluate the feasibility of the new applications of high-current ERLs, as well as ERLs' limitations and ultimate performance.

  8. High electron beam dosimetry using ZrO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueza M, F.; Rivera M, T. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, IPN, Av. Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin N, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Garcia H, M. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, UNAM, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2009-10-15

    This paper reports the experimental results of studying the thermoluminescent (Tl) properties of ZrO{sub 2} powder embedded in polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE) exposed to high energy electron beam from linear accelerators (Linac). Structural and morphological characteristics were also reported. Irradiations were conducted using high energy electrons beams in the range from 2 to 18 MeV. Pellets of ZrO{sub 2}+PTFE were produced using polycrystalline powder grown by the precipitation method. These pellets presented a Tl glow curve exhibiting an intense glow peak centered at around 235 C. Tl response as a function of high electron absorbed dose was linear in the range from 2 to 30 Gy. Repeatability determined by exposing a set of pellets repeatedly to the same electron absorbed dose was 0.5%. Fading along 30 days was about 50%. Then, results obtained in this study suggest than ZrO{sub 2}+PTFE pellets could be used for high energy electron beam dosimetry provided fading correction is accounted for. (Author)

  9. High current precision long pulse electron beam position monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, S D; Fessenden, T J; Holmes, C

    2000-01-01

    Precision high current long pulse electron beam position monitoring has typically experienced problems with high Q sensors, sensors damped to the point of lack of precision, or sensors that interact substantially with any beam halo thus obscuring the desired signal. As part of the effort to develop a multi-axis electron beam transport system using transverse electromagnetic stripline kicker technology, it is necessary to precisely determine the position and extent of long high energy beams for accurate beam position control (6 - 40 MeV, 1 - 4 kA, 2 μs beam pulse, sub millimeter beam position accuracy.) The kicker positioning system utilizes shot-to-shot adjustments for reduction of relatively slow (< 20 MHz) motion of the beam centroid. The electron beams passing through the diagnostic systems have the potential for large halo effects that tend to corrupt position measurements.

  10. Synthesis and properties of Pr-substituted MgZn ferrites for core materials and high frequency applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhtar, Muhammad Waqas; Irfan, Muhammad [Department of Physics, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Ishtiaq; Ali, Ihsan [Department of Physics, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan); Akhtar, Majid Niaz [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Khan, Muhammad Azhar [Department of Physics, Islamia University, Bahawalpur (Pakistan); Abbas, Ghazanfar [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Rana, M.U. [Center of Excellence in Solid State Physics, University of the Punjab, Lahore (Pakistan); Ali, Akbar [Department of Basic Sciences, Riphah International University, Islamabad-44000 (Pakistan); Ahmad, Mukhtar, E-mail: ahmadmr25@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2015-05-01

    A series of single phase spinel ferrites having chemical formula Mg{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Pr{sub x}Fe{sub 2−x}O{sub 4} (x=0.00, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20, 0.25) were prepared using the sol–gel technique after sintering at 700 °C. The thermal decomposition behavior of an as prepared powder was investigated by means of DTA/TGA analyses. The sintered powders were then characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscope, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscope and vibrating sample magnetometer. X-ray diffraction patterns confirm the single phase spinel structure of prepared ferrites without the presence of any impurity phase. The value of lattice parameter (a) increases with the increase of Pr contents (x) into the spinel lattice. The grain size estimated from electron microscope images is in the range of 2.75–5.4 µm which confirms the spinel crystalline nature of the investigated samples. The saturation magnetization (M{sub s}) decreases whereas coercivity (H{sub c}) increases with the increase of Pr contents (x). The measured parameters suggest that these materials are favorable for high frequency applications and as core materials. - Highlights: • Pr-substituted spinel ferrites synthesized by autocombustion route have been investigated. • The average grain size was in the range of 2.75–5.4 µm estimated by SEM technique. • The (M{sub s}) decreases whereas (H{sub c}) increases with the increase of Pr contents (x). • These parameters are favorable for high frequency applications and as core materials.

  11. Applications of Silicon Carbide for High Temperature Electronics and Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Virgil B.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is a wide bandgap material that shows great promise in high-power and high temperature electronics applications because of its high thermal conductivity and high breakdown electrical field. The excellent physical and electronic properties of SiC allows the fabrication of devices that can operate at higher temperatures and power levels than devices produced from either silicon or GaAs. Although modern electronics depends primarily upon silicon based devices, this material is not capable of handling may special requirements. Devices which operate at high speeds, at high power levels and are to be used in extreme environments at high temperatures and high radiation levels need other materials with wider bandgaps than that of silicon. Many space and terrestrial applications also have a requirement for wide bandgap materials. SiC also has great potential for high power and frequency operation due to a high saturated drift velocity. The wide bandgap allows for unique optoelectronic applications, that include blue light emitting diodes and ultraviolet photodetectors. New areas involving gas sensing and telecommunications offer significant promise. Overall, the properties of SiC make it one of the best prospects for extending the capabilities and operational regimes of the current semiconductor device technology.

  12. STM studies of the electronic structure of vortex cores in Bi(2)Sr(2)CaCu(2)O(8+delta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan; Hudson; Gupta; Ng; Eisaki; Uchida; Davis

    2000-08-14

    We report on low temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies of the electronic structure of vortex cores in Bi 2Sr 2CaCu 2O (8+delta). At the vortex core center, an enhanced density of states is observed at energies near Omega = +/-7 meV. Spectroscopic imaging at these energies reveals an exponential decay of these "core states" with a decay length of 22+/-3 A. The fourfold symmetry sometimes predicted for d-wave vortices is not seen in spectroscopic vortex images. A locally nodeless order parameter induced by the magnetic field may be consistent with these measurements.

  13. High Pressure Melting of Iron with Nonmetals Sulfur, Carbon, Oxygen, and Hydrogen: Implications for Planetary Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Antonio Salvatore

    The earth's core consists of a solid metallic center surrounded by a liquid metallic outer layer. Understanding the compositions of the inner and outer cores allows us to better understand the dynamics of the earth's core, as well as the dynamics of the cores of other terrestrial planets and moons. The density and size of the earth's core indicate that it is approximately 90% metallic, predominantly iron, with about 10% light elements. Iron meteorites, believed to be the remnants of planetary cores, provide further constraints on the composition of the earth's core, indicating a composition of 86% iron, 4% nickel, and 10% light elements. Any potential candidate for the major light element core component must meet two criteria: first, it must have high cosmic abundances and second, it must be compatible with Fe. Given these two constraints there are five plausible elements that could be the major light element in the core: H, O, C, S, and Si. Of these five possible candidates this thesis focuses on S and C as well exploring the effect of minor amounts of O and H on the eutectic temperature in a Fe-FeS core. We look at two specific aspects of the Fe-FeS system: first, the shape of the liquidus as a function of pressure, second, a possible cause for the reported variations in the eutectic temperature, which draws on the effect of H and O. Finally we look at the effect of S and C on partitioning behavior of Ni, Pt, Re,Co, Os and W between cohenite and metallic liquid. We are interested in constraining the shape of the Fe-FeS liquidus because as a planet with a S-enriched core cools, the thermal and compositional evolution of its core is constrained by this liquidus. In Chapter 1 I present an equation that allows for calculation of the temperature along the liquidus as a function of pressure and composition for Fe-rich compositions and pressures from 1 bar to 10 GPa. One particularly interesting feature of the Fe --rich side of the Fe-FeS eutectic is the sigmoidal shape

  14. Revisiting twin-core fiber sensors for high-temperature measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rugeland, Patrik; Margulis, Walter

    2012-09-01

    A twin-core fiber Michelson interferometer is evaluated as a high-temperature sensor. Although linear and reproducible operation up to 300°C is obtained, at higher temperatures (700°C) the refractive index shifts plastically and hysteresis is observed, rendering an untreated sensor head unusable. The shift is shown to be greatly reduced by an annealing process of the fiber for 10 h at 900°C, with which the linear response is preserved.

  15. Facile synthesis of highly efficient one-dimensional plasmonic photocatalysts through Ag@Cu₂O core-shell heteronanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Jinyan; Li, Zhen; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Shanqing; Wang, Lianzhou; Dou, Shixue

    2014-09-24

    A novel class of one-dimensional (1D) plasmonic Ag@Cu2O core-shell heteronanowires have been synthesized at room temperature for photocatalysis application. The morphology, size, crystal structure and composition of the products were investigated by XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS, and UV-vis instruments. It was found the reaction time and the amount of Ag nanowires play crucial roles in the formation of well-defined 1D Ag@Cu2O core-shell heteronanowires. The resultant 1D Ag@Cu2O NWs exhibit much higher photocatalytic activity toward degradation of organic contaminants than Ag@Cu2O core-shell nanoparticles or pure Cu2O nanospheres under solar light irradiation. The drastic enhancement in photocatalytic activity could be attributed to the surface plasmon resonance and the electron sink effect of the Ag NW cores, and the unique 1D core-shell nanostructure.

  16. High-resolution electron microscopy of advanced materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, T.E.; Kung, H.H.; Sickafus, K.E.; Gray, G.T. III; Field, R.D.; Smith, J.F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Materials Science and Technology Div.

    1997-11-01

    This final report chronicles a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The High-Resolution Electron Microscopy Facility has doubled in size and tripled in quality since the beginning of the three-year period. The facility now includes a field-emission scanning electron microscope, a 100 kV field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM), a 300 kV field-emission high-resolution transmission electron microscope (FE-HRTEM), and a 300 kV analytical transmission electron microscope. A new orientation imaging microscope is being installed. X-ray energy dispersive spectrometers for chemical analysis are available on all four microscopes; parallel electron energy loss spectrometers are operational on the FE-STEM and FE-HRTEM. These systems enable evaluation of local atomic bonding, as well as chemical composition in nanometer-scale regions. The FE-HRTEM has a point-to-point resolution of 1.6 {angstrom}, but the resolution can be pushed to its information limit of 1 {angstrom} by computer reconstruction of a focal series of images. HRTEM has been used to image the atomic structure of defects such as dislocations, grain boundaries, and interfaces in a variety of materials from superconductors and ferroelectrics to structural ceramics and intermetallics.

  17. Preliminary investigations on high energy electron beam tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baertling, Yves; Hoppe, Dietrich; Hampel, Uwe

    2010-12-15

    In computed tomography (CT) cross-sectional images of the attenuation distribution within a slice are created by scanning radiographic projections of an object with a rotating X-ray source detector compound and subsequent reconstruction of the images from these projection data on a computer. CT can be made very fast by employing a scanned electron beam instead of a mechanically moving X-ray source. Now this principle was extended towards high-energy electron beam tomography with an electrostatic accelerator. Therefore a dedicated experimental campaign was planned and carried out at the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics (BINP), Novosibirsk. There we investigated the capabilities of BINP's accelerators as an electron beam generating and scanning unit of a potential high-energy electron beam tomography device. The setup based on a 1 MeV ELV-6 (BINP) electron accelerator and a single detector. Besides tomographic measurements with different phantoms, further experiments were carried out concerning the focal spot size and repeat accuracy of the electron beam as well as the detector's response time and signal to noise ratio. (orig.)

  18. High yield, single droplet electrode arrays for nanoscale printed electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caironi, Mario; Gili, Enrico; Sakanoue, Tomo; Cheng, Xiaoyang; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2010-03-23

    In this work we demonstrate two building blocks of a scalable manufacturing technology for nanoscale electronic devices based on direct-write printing: an architecture for high-yield printing of electrode gaps with 100 nm dimension and a low-temperature silver complex ink for integration of organic materials with high conductivity metal interconnects. We use single printed droplets that are made to dewet slowly from each other to allow reliable, high yield patterning even in the presence of certain surface defects.

  19. Electron Cyclotron Current Drive at High Electron Temperature on DIII-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, C. C.; Austin, M. E.; Harvey, R. W.; Lohr, J.; Luce, T. C.; Makowski, M. A.; Prater, R.

    2007-09-01

    Experiments on DIII-D have measured the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency for co- and counter-injection in low density plasmas with radiation temperatures from electron cyclotron emission (ECE) above 20 keV. The radiation temperature is generally higher than the Thomson scattering temperature, indicating that there is a significant population of non-thermal electrons. The experimental ECCD profile measured with motional Stark effect (MSE) polarimetry is found to agree with quasi-linear theory except for the highest power density cases (QEC/ne2≫1). Radial transport of the energetic electrons with diffusion coefficients of ˜0.4 m2/s is needed to model the broadened ECCD profile at high power density.

  20. Electron correlation effect on radiative decay processes of the core-excited states of Be-like ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sang, Cuicui, E-mail: sangcc@126.com [Department of Physics, Qinghai Normal University, Xining 810001 (China); Li, Kaikai [College of Forensic Science, People' s Public Security University of China, Beijing 100038 (China); Sun, Yan; Hu, Feng [School of Mathematic and Physical Science, Xuzhou Institute of Technology, Xuzhou 221400, Jiangsu (China)

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • Radiative rates of the states 1s2s{sup 2}2p and 1s2p{sup 3} with Z = 8–54 are studied. • Electron correlation effect on the radiative transition rates is studied. • Forbidden transitions are explored. - Abstract: Energy levels and the radiative decay processes of the core-excited configurations 1s2s{sup 2}2p and 1s2p{sup 3} of Be-like ions with Z = 8–54 are studied. Electron correlation effect on the energy levels and the radiative transition rates are studied in detail. Except for E1 radiative transition rates, the E2, M1 and M2 forbidden transitions are also explored. Further relativistic corrections from the Breit interaction, quantum electrodynamics and the finite nuclear size are included in the calculations to make the results more precise. Good agreement is found between our results and other theoretical data.

  1. Fluorene- and benzofluorene-cored oligomers as low threshold and high gain amplifying media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazlauskas, Karolis, E-mail: karolis.kazlauskas@ff.vu.lt; Kreiza, Gediminas; Bobrovas, Olegas; Adomėnienė, Ona; Adomėnas, Povilas; Juršėnas, Saulius [Institute of Applied Research, Vilnius University, Saulėtekio 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania); Jankauskas, Vygintas [Department of Solid State Electronics, Vilnius University, Saulėtekio 9-III, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2015-07-27

    Deliberate control of intermolecular interactions in fluorene- and benzofluorene-cored oligomers was attempted via introduction of different-length alkyl moieties to attain high emission amplification and low amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) threshold at high oligomer concentrations. Containing fluorenyl peripheral groups decorated with different-length alkyl moieties, the oligomers were found to express weak concentration quenching of emission, yet excellent carrier drift mobilities (close to 10{sup −2} cm{sup 2}/V/s) in the amorphous films. Owing to the larger radiative decay rates (>1.0 × 10{sup 9 }s{sup −1}) and smaller concentration quenching, fluorene-cored oligomers exhibited down to one order of magnitude lower ASE thresholds at higher concentrations as compared to those of benzofluorene counterparts. The lowest threshold (300 W/cm{sup 2}) obtained for the fluorene-cored oligomers at the concentration of 50 wt % in polymer matrix is among the lowest reported for solution-processed amorphous films in ambient conditions, what makes the oligomers promising for lasing application. Great potential in emission amplification was confirmed by high maximum net gain (77 cm{sup −1}) revealed for these compounds. Although the photostability of the oligomers was affected by photo-oxidation, it was found to be comparable to that of various organic lasing materials including some commercial laser dyes evaluated under similar excitation conditions.

  2. TOPICAL REVIEW: Optics of high-performance electron microscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H H Rose

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available During recent years, the theory of charged particle optics together with advances in fabrication tolerances and experimental techniques has lead to very significant advances in high-performance electron microscopes. Here, we will describe which theoretical tools, inventions and designs have driven this development. We cover the basic theory of higher-order electron optics and of image formation in electron microscopes. This leads to a description of different methods to correct aberrations by multipole fields and to a discussion of the most advanced design that take advantage of these techniques. The theory of electron mirrors is developed and it is shown how this can be used to correct aberrations and to design energy filters. Finally, different types of energy filters are described

  3. High Temperature Electron Localization in dense He Gas

    CERN Document Server

    Borghesani, A F

    2002-01-01

    We report new accurate mesasurements of the mobility of excess electrons in high density Helium gas in extended ranges of temperature $[(26\\leq T\\leq 77) K ]$ and density $[ (0.05\\leq N\\leq 12.0) {atoms} \\cdot {nm}^{-3}]$ to ascertain the effect of temperature on the formation and dynamics of localized electron states. The main result of the experiment is that the formation of localized states essentially depends on the relative balance of fluid dilation energy, repulsive electron-atom interaction energy, and thermal energy. As a consequence, the onset of localization depends on the medium disorder through gas temperature and density. It appears that the transition from delocalized to localized states shifts to larger densities as the temperature is increased. This behavior can be understood in terms of a simple model of electron self-trapping in a spherically symmetric square well.

  4. Electron-phonon interaction in high temperature superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Khosroabadi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available   We explore the important role of the strong electron-phonon interaction in high temperature superconductivity through the study of the results of some important experiments, such as inelastic neutron and X-ray scattering, angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy, and isotope effects. We also present our computational results of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the Ag Raman modes, and the ionic displacement dependence of the electronic band structure by density functional theory. It is clearly evident that the role of phonons in the mechanism behind the high-temperature superconducting state should be seriously considered.

  5. ZPR-6 assembly 7 high {sup 240}Pu core experiments : a fast reactor core with mixed (Pu,U)-oxide fuel and a centeral high{sup 240}Pu zone.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lell, R. M.; Morman, J. A.; Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-02-23

    ZPR-6 Assembly 7 (ZPR-6/7) encompasses a series of experiments performed at the ZPR-6 facility at Argonne National Laboratory in 1970 and 1971 as part of the Demonstration Reactor Benchmark Program (Reference 1). Assembly 7 simulated a large sodium-cooled LMFBR with mixed oxide fuel, depleted uranium radial and axial blankets, and a core H/D near unity. ZPR-6/7 was designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods, so configurations in the Assembly 7 program were as simple as possible in terms of geometry and composition. ZPR-6/7 had a very uniform core assembled from small plates of depleted uranium, sodium, iron oxide, U{sub 3}O{sub 8} and Pu-U-Mo alloy loaded into stainless steel drawers. The steel drawers were placed in square stainless steel tubes in the two halves of a split table machine. ZPR-6/7 had a simple, symmetric core unit cell whose neutronic characteristics were dominated by plutonium and {sup 238}U. The core was surrounded by thick radial and axial regions of depleted uranium to simulate radial and axial blankets and to isolate the core from the surrounding room. The ZPR-6/7 program encompassed 139 separate core loadings which include the initial approach to critical and all subsequent core loading changes required to perform specific experiments and measurements. In this context a loading refers to a particular configuration of fueled drawers, radial blanket drawers and experimental equipment (if present) in the matrix of steel tubes. Two principal core configurations were established. The uniform core (Loadings 1-84) had a relatively uniform core composition. The high {sup 240}Pu core (Loadings 85-139) was a variant on the uniform core. The plutonium in the Pu-U-Mo fuel plates in the uniform core contains 11% {sup 240}Pu. In the high {sup 240}Pu core, all Pu-U-Mo plates in the inner core region (central 61 matrix locations per half of the split table machine) were replaced by Pu-U-Mo plates containing 27% {sup 240}Pu in the plutonium

  6. JT-60U Thomson scattering system with multiple ruby laser and high spatial resolution for high electron temperature plasma measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Hidetoshi; Naito, Osamu; Yamashita, Osamu; Kitamura, Shigeru; Hatae, Takaki; Nagashima, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1996-11-01

    This article describes the design and operation of a 60 spatial channel Thomson scattering system as of 1996 with multiple ruby lasers to measure the electron temperature T{sub e} and density n{sub e} profiles of the JT-60U plasmas. The wide spectral range (403-683 nm) of the spectrometer and newly developed two-dimensional detector (high repetition photodiode array) has enabled this system to measure the high electron temperature plasma (5 keV or more) formed at the plasma core during negative magnetic shear discharge with high precision and reliability. The high spatial resolution (8 mm) have provided the precise measurement of steep electron temperature and density gradients formed at the plasma edge and in the scrape-off layer during H-mode discharge. The multilaser operation with the minimum time interval of 2 ms has provided an essential tool for the transient phenomenon measurement like the formation process of edge transport barrier during L- to H-mode transition and internal transport barrier during discharge with negative magnetic shear, the relaxation process of pellet injected plasma and so on. Measurement examples of recent JT-60U T{sub e} and n{sub e} profiles are also presented. (author)

  7. Reconstruction of TiO2/MnO2-C nanotube/nanoflake core/shell arrays as high-performance supercapacitor electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qinqin; Zheng, Cun; Chi, Hongzhong; Zhang, Jun; Ji, Zhenguo

    2017-02-01

    Construction of electrodes with fast reaction kinetics is of great importance for achieving advanced supercapacitors. Herein we report a facile combined synthetic strategy with atomic layer deposition (ALD) and electrodeposition to rationally fabricate nanotube/nanoflake core/shell arrays. ALD-TiO2 nanotubes are used as the skeleton core for assembly of electrodeposited MnO2-C nanoflake shells forming a core/shell structure. Highly porous architecture and good electrical conductivity are combined in this unique core/shell structure, resulting in fast ion/electron transfer. In tests of electrochemical performance, the TiO2/MnO2-C core/shell arrays are characterized as cathode for asymmetric supecapacitors and exhibit high specific capacitance (880 F g-1 at 2.5 A g-1), excellent rate properties (735 F g-1 at 30 A g-1) and good long-term cycling stability (94.3% capacitance retention after 20 000 cycles). The proposed electrode construction strategy is favorable for fabrication of other advanced supercapacitor electrodes.

  8. Visualizing fast electron energy transport into laser-compressed high-density fast-ignition targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrott, L. C.; Wei, M. S.; McGuffey, C.; Solodov, A. A.; Theobald, W.; Qiao, B.; Stoeckl, C.; Betti, R.; Chen, H.; Delettrez, J.; Döppner, T.; Giraldez, E. M.; Glebov, V. Y.; Habara, H.; Iwawaki, T.; Key, M. H.; Luo, R. W.; Marshall, F. J.; McLean, H. S.; Mileham, C.; Patel, P. K.; Santos, J. J.; Sawada, H.; Stephens, R. B.; Yabuuchi, T.; Beg, F. N.

    2016-05-01

    Recent progress in kilojoule-scale high-intensity lasers has opened up new areas of research in radiography, laboratory astrophysics, high-energy-density physics, and fast-ignition (FI) laser fusion. FI requires efficient heating of pre-compressed high-density fuel by an intense relativistic electron beam produced from laser-matter interaction. Understanding the details of electron beam generation and transport is crucial for FI. Here we report on the first visualization of fast electron spatial energy deposition in a laser-compressed cone-in-shell FI target, facilitated by doping the shell with copper and imaging the K-shell radiation. Multi-scale simulations accompanying the experiments clearly show the location of fast electrons and reveal key parameters affecting energy coupling. The approach provides a more direct way to infer energy coupling and guide experimental designs that significantly improve the laser-to-core coupling to 7%. Our findings lay the groundwork for further improving efficiency, with 15% energy coupling predicted in FI experiments using an existing megajoule-scale laser driver.

  9. High-efficiency acceleration of an electron beam in a plasma wakefield accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litos, M; Adli, E; An, W; Clarke, C I; Clayton, C E; Corde, S; Delahaye, J P; England, R J; Fisher, A S; Frederico, J; Gessner, S; Green, S Z; Hogan, M J; Joshi, C; Lu, W; Marsh, K A; Mori, W B; Muggli, P; Vafaei-Najafabadi, N; Walz, D; White, G; Wu, Z; Yakimenko, V; Yocky, G

    2014-11-06

    High-efficiency acceleration of charged particle beams at high gradients of energy gain per unit length is necessary to achieve an affordable and compact high-energy collider. The plasma wakefield accelerator is one concept being developed for this purpose. In plasma wakefield acceleration, a charge-density wake with high accelerating fields is driven by the passage of an ultra-relativistic bunch of charged particles (the drive bunch) through a plasma. If a second bunch of relativistic electrons (the trailing bunch) with sufficient charge follows in the wake of the drive bunch at an appropriate distance, it can be efficiently accelerated to high energy. Previous experiments using just a single 42-gigaelectronvolt drive bunch have accelerated electrons with a continuous energy spectrum and a maximum energy of up to 85 gigaelectronvolts from the tail of the same bunch in less than a metre of plasma. However, the total charge of these accelerated electrons was insufficient to extract a substantial amount of energy from the wake. Here we report high-efficiency acceleration of a discrete trailing bunch of electrons that contains sufficient charge to extract a substantial amount of energy from the high-gradient, nonlinear plasma wakefield accelerator. Specifically, we show the acceleration of about 74 picocoulombs of charge contained in the core of the trailing bunch in an accelerating gradient of about 4.4 gigavolts per metre. These core particles gain about 1.6 gigaelectronvolts of energy per particle, with a final energy spread as low as 0.7 per cent (2.0 per cent on average), and an energy-transfer efficiency from the wake to the bunch that can exceed 30 per cent (17.7 per cent on average). This acceleration of a distinct bunch of electrons containing a substantial charge and having a small energy spread with both a high accelerating gradient and a high energy-transfer efficiency represents a milestone in the development of plasma wakefield acceleration into a

  10. High luminosity electron-hadron collider eRHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ptitsyn, V.; Aschenauer, E.; Bai, M.; Beebe-Wang, J.; Belomestnykh, S.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, M..; Calaga, R.; Chang, X.; Fedotov, A.; Gassner, D.; Hammons, L.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; He, P.; Hao, Y.; Jackson, W.; Jain, A.; Johnson, E.C.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Luo, Y.; Mahler, G.; McIntyre, G.; Meng, W.; Minty, M.; Parker, B.; Pikin, A.; Rao, T.; Roser, T.; Skaritka, J.; Sheehy, B.; Skaritka, J.; Tepikian, S.; Than, Y.; Trbojevic, D.; Tsoupas, N.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.; Webb, S.; Wu, Q.; Xu, W.; Pozdeyev, E.; Tsentalovich, E.

    2011-03-28

    We present the design of a future high-energy high-luminosity electron-hadron collider at RHIC called eRHIC. We plan on adding 20 (potentially 30) GeV energy recovery linacs to accelerate and to collide polarized and unpolarized electrons with hadrons in RHIC. The center-of-mass energy of eRHIC will range from 30 to 200 GeV. The luminosity exceeding 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} can be achieved in eRHIC using the low-beta interaction region with a 10 mrad crab crossing. We report on the progress of important eRHIC R&D such as the high-current polarized electron source, the coherent electron cooling, ERL test facility and the compact magnets for recirculation passes. A natural staging scenario of step-by-step increases of the electron beam energy by building-up of eRHIC's SRF linacs is presented.

  11. Analysis about the Influence of Clay Core Wall Structure towards the Slope Stability of High Embankment Dam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As the main part of the anti-seepage system, core wall is a key point in the design of high em-bankment dam. The dam slope stability is a major factor for the type of core wall. But it is still unclear what effects the core wall structure might have on the slope stability. Based on practical projects of high embankment dam in Nuozhadu, Lianghekou and Shuangjiangkou, this paper analyzes safety factors and dangerous slip sur-faces of dam slopes of high embankment dams in both straight and slanting core wall structures and compares the influences of different core wall structures on the slope stability of high embankment dam through numerical calculations. The safety margin of the embankment dam of straight core wall is larger than that of slanting core wall in the operating condition of the reservoir water level’s drawdown. Compared with that of the straight core wall scheme, the position of the dangerous slip surface of the downstream dam slope is closer to the dam crest in the slanting core wall scheme.

  12. Outflow Detection in a 70 μm Dark High-Mass Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Siyi; Beuther, Henrik; Zhang, Qizhou; Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Zhang, Zhiyu; Wang, Ke; Qiu, Keping

    2016-09-01

    We present observations toward a high-mass (\\gt 40 {M}⊙ ), low-luminosity (\\lt 10 {L}⊙ ) 70 μ {{m}} dark molecular core G28.34 S-A at 3.4 mm, using the IRAM 30 m telescope and the NOEMA interferometer. We report the detection of {SiO} J=2\\to 1 line emission, which is spatially resolved in this source at a linear resolution of ˜0.1 pc, while the 3.4 mm continuum image does not resolve any internal sub-structures. The SiO emission exhibits two W-E oriented lobes centering on the continuum peak. Corresponding to the redshifted and blueshifted gas with velocities up to 40 {km} {{{s}}}-1 relative to the quiescent cloud, these lobes clearly indicate the presence of a strong bipolar outflow from this 70 μ {{m}} dark core, a source previously considered as one of the best candidates of “starless” core. Our SiO detection is consistent with ALMA archival data of {SiO} J=5\\to 4, whose high-velocity blueshifted gas reveals a more compact lobe spatially closer to the dust center. This outflow indicates that the central source may be in an early evolutionary stage of forming a high-mass protostar. We also find that the low-velocity components (in the range of {{Vlsr}}-5+3 {km} {{{s}}}-1) have an extended, NW-SE oriented distribution. Discussing the possible accretion scenarios of the outflow-powering young stellar object, we argue that molecular line emission and the molecular outflows may provide a better indication of the accretion history of the forming young stellar object, than snapshot observations of the present bolometric luminosity. This is particularly significant for cases of episodic accretion, which may occur during the collapse of the parent molecular core.

  13. Electron beam treatment of exhaust gas with high NOx concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licki, Janusz; Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Pawelec, Andrzej; Zimek, Zbigniew; Witman, Sylwia

    2014-05-01

    Simulated exhaust gases with a high NOx concentration, ranging from 200 to 1700 ppmv, were irradiated by an electron beam from an accelerator. In the first part of this study, only exhaust gases were treated. Low NOx removal efficiencies were obtained for high NOx concentrations, even with high irradiation doses applied. In the second part of study, gaseous ammonia or/and vapor ethanol were added to the exhaust gas before its inlet to the plasma reactor. These additions significantly enhanced the NOx removal efficiency. The synergistic effect of high SO2 concentration on NOx removal was observed. The combination of electron beam treatment with the introduction of the above additions and with the performance of irradiation under optimal parameters ensured high NOx removal efficiency without the application of a solid-state catalyst.

  14. Laser acceleration of electrons to giga-electron-volt energies using highly charged ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, S X; Starace, Anthony F

    2006-06-01

    The recent proposal to use highly charged ions as sources of electrons for laser acceleration [S. X. Hu and A. F. Starace, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 245003 (2002)] is investigated here in detail by means of three-dimensional, relativistic Monte Carlo simulations for a variety of system parameters, such as laser pulse duration, ionic charge state, and laser focusing spot size. Realistic laser focusing effects--e.g., the existence of longitudinal laser field components-are taken into account. Results of spatial averaging over the laser focus are also presented. These numerical simulations show that the proposed scheme for laser acceleration of electrons from highly charged ions is feasible with current or near-future experimental conditions and that electrons with GeV energies can be obtained in such experiments.

  15. Microwave beatwave excitation of electron plasma wave and high energy electron production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yatsuzuka, M.; Obata, K.; Nobuhara, S. [Himeji Inst. of Tech., Hyogo (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    Two X-band microwave beams with a slightly different frequency and the maximum output power of 50 kW are injected into a target plasma antiparallel to each other through a standard horn. The resonant excitation of an electron plasma wave is observed when the difference in frequency between counterstreaming microwaves is equal to the electron plasma frequency. The excited wave propagates in the same direction as the higher-frequency microwave with a wave length which satisfies the resonance condition of wave number. The wave amplitude grows with an increase in incident microwave power, and reaches the density perturbation {delta}n/n{sub 0} of approximately 3.2 % at the incident microwave power of 40 kW and beat frequency of 600 MHz. A small amount of high-energy electrons with the speed of 27 eV are observed in the high-power region of incident microwave. (author)

  16. High resolution X-ray CT for advanced electronics packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppermann, M.; Zerna, T.

    2017-02-01

    Advanced electronics packaging is a challenge for non-destructive Testing (NDT). More, smaller and mostly hidden interconnects dominate modern electronics components and systems. To solve the demands of customers to get products with a high functionality by low volume, weight and price (e.g. mobile phones, personal medical monitoring systems) often the designers use System-in-Package solutions (SiP). The non-destructive testing of such devices is a big challenge. So our paper will impart fundamentals and applications for non-destructive evaluation of inner structures of electronics packaging for quality assurance and reliability investigations with a focus on X-ray methods, especially on high resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT).

  17. ROLE OF DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTERS IN HIGH BRIGHTNESS ELECTRON SOURCES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAO, T.; BEN-ZVI, I.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-09-20

    In this paper we explore the possibility of using diamond secondary emitter in a high average current electron injector to amplify the current from the photocathode and to isolate the cathode and the injector from each other to increase the life time of the cathode and preserve the performance of the injector. Secondary electron yield of 225 and current density of 0.8 a/cm{sup 2} have been measured in the transmission mode from type 2 a natural diamond. Although the diamond will be heated during normal operation in the injector, calculations indicate that by cryogenically cooling the diamond, the temperature gradient along the diamond can be maintained within the acceptable range. The electron energy and temporal distributions are expected to be narrow from this device resulting in high brightness beams. Plans are underway to measure the SEY in emission mode, fabricate photocathode-diamond capsule and test diamond and capsule in superconducting RF injector.

  18. Ab initio effective core potentials including relativistic effects and their application to the electronic structure calculations of heavy atoms and molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y.S.

    1977-11-01

    The effects of the 4f shell of electrons and the relativity of valence electrons are compared. The effect of 4f shell (lanthanide contraction) is estimated from the numerical Hartree-Fock (HF) calculations of pseudo-atoms corresponding to Hf, Re, Au, Hg, Tl, Pb and Bi without 4f electrons and with atomic numbers reduced by 14. The relativistic effect estimated from the numerical Dirac-Hartree-Fock (DHF) calculations of those atoms is comparable in the magnitude with that of the 4f shell of electrons. Both are larger for 6s than for 5d or 6p electrons. The various relativistic effects on valence electrons are discussed in detail to determine the proper level of the approximation for the valence electron calculations of systems with heavy elements. An effective core potential system has been developed for heavy atoms in which relativistic effects are included in the effective potentials.

  19. Outflow detection in a 70 $\\mu$m dark high-mass core

    CERN Document Server

    Feng, S; Zhang, Q; Liu, H B; Zhang, Z; Wang, K; Qiu, K

    2016-01-01

    We present observations towards a high-mass ($\\rm >40\\,M_{\\odot}$), low luminosity ($\\rm <10\\,L_{\\odot}$) $\\rm 70\\,\\mu$m dark molecular core G 28.34 S-A at 3.4 mm, using the IRAM 30 m telescope and the NOEMA interferometer. We report the detection of $\\rm SiO$ $J=\\rm 2\\rightarrow1$ line emission, which is spatially resolved in this source at a linear resolution of $\\sim$0.1 pc, while the 3.4 mm continuum image does not resolve any internal sub-structures. The SiO emission exhibits two W-E oriented lobes centring on the continuum peak. Corresponding to the red-shifted and blue-shifted gas with velocities up to $\\rm 40\\,km\\,s^{-1}$ relative to the quiescent cloud, these lobes clearly indicate the presence of a strong bipolar outflow from this $\\rm 70\\,\\mu$m dark core, a source previously considered as one of the best candidates of "starless" core. Our SiO detection is consistent with ALMA archival data of $\\rm SiO$ $J=\\rm 5\\rightarrow4$, whose high-velocity blue-shifted gas reveals a more compact lobe spatia...

  20. High quality interconnected core/shell ZnO nanorod architectures grown by pulsed laser deposition on ZnO-seeded Si substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inguva, Saikumar; Vijayaraghavan, Rajani K.; McGlynn, Enda; Mosnier, Jean-Paul

    2017-01-01

    We report the production of vertically aligned and interconnected ZnO core/shell nanorods using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) in a continuous two-step growth process. X-ray diffraction studies showed wurtzite structure and c-axis orientation with a high degree of verticality. Scanning electron microscopy showed a characteristic interconnection morphology between the nanorod tips uniformly present over the entire sample surface area, while transmission electron microscopy revealed crystalline core/amorphous shell architecture. Strong bands at 98.7 cm-1 and 437.2 cm-1 (wurtzite ZnO low and high non-polar E2 modes) were the main features of the nanorod Raman spectra, again showing the high sample quality. Low-temperature PL data exhibited strong I6 emission and structured green band showing high optical quality. Electrical studies indicated n-type material with ohmic behaviour. The results are discussed in the context of the advantages offered by interconnected architectures of core/shell ZnO nanostructures for various applications.

  1. Density-dependent electron transport and precise modeling of GaN high electron mobility transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajaj, Sanyam, E-mail: bajaj.10@osu.edu; Shoron, Omor F.; Park, Pil Sung; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Akyol, Fatih; Hung, Ting-Hsiang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Reza, Shahed; Chumbes, Eduardo M. [Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems, Andover, Massachusetts 01810 (United States); Khurgin, Jacob [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Rajan, Siddharth [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Material Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-10-12

    We report on the direct measurement of two-dimensional sheet charge density dependence of electron transport in AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs). Pulsed IV measurements established increasing electron velocities with decreasing sheet charge densities, resulting in saturation velocity of 1.9 × 10{sup 7 }cm/s at a low sheet charge density of 7.8 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2}. An optical phonon emission-based electron velocity model for GaN is also presented. It accommodates stimulated longitudinal optical (LO) phonon emission which clamps the electron velocity with strong electron-phonon interaction and long LO phonon lifetime in GaN. A comparison with the measured density-dependent saturation velocity shows that it captures the dependence rather well. Finally, the experimental result is applied in TCAD-based device simulator to predict DC and small signal characteristics of a reported GaN HEMT. Good agreement between the simulated and reported experimental results validated the measurement presented in this report and established accurate modeling of GaN HEMTs.

  2. High Sensitivity Refractive Index Sensor Based on Dual-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber with Hexagonal Lattice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyang Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A refractive index sensor based on dual-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF with hexagonal lattice is proposed. The effects of geometrical parameters of the PCF on performances of the sensor are investigated by using the finite element method (FEM. Two fiber cores are separated by two air holes filled with the analyte whose refractive index is in the range of 1.33–1.41. Numerical simulation results show that the highest sensitivity can be up to 22,983 nm/RIU(refractive index unit when the analyte refractive index is 1.41. The lowest sensitivity can reach to 21,679 nm/RIU when the analyte refractive index is 1.33. The sensor we proposed has significant advantages in the field of biomolecule detection as it provides a wide-range of detection with high sensitivity.

  3. High Sensitivity Refractive Index Sensor Based on Dual-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber with Hexagonal Lattice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haiyang; Yan, Xin; Li, Shuguang; An, Guowen; Zhang, Xuenan

    2016-10-08

    A refractive index sensor based on dual-core photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with hexagonal lattice is proposed. The effects of geometrical parameters of the PCF on performances of the sensor are investigated by using the finite element method (FEM). Two fiber cores are separated by two air holes filled with the analyte whose refractive index is in the range of 1.33-1.41. Numerical simulation results show that the highest sensitivity can be up to 22,983 nm/RIU(refractive index unit) when the analyte refractive index is 1.41. The lowest sensitivity can reach to 21,679 nm/RIU when the analyte refractive index is 1.33. The sensor we proposed has significant advantages in the field of biomolecule detection as it provides a wide-range of detection with high sensitivity.

  4. Accident source terms for boiling water reactors with high burnup cores.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Powers, Dana Auburn; Leonard, Mark Thomas

    2007-11-01

    The primary objective of this report is to provide the technical basis for development of recommendations for updates to the NUREG-1465 Source Term for BWRs that will extend its applicability to accidents involving high burnup (HBU) cores. However, a secondary objective is to re-examine the fundamental characteristics of the prescription for fission product release to containment described by NUREG-1465. This secondary objective is motivated by an interest to understand the extent to which research into the release and behaviors of radionuclides under accident conditions has altered best-estimate calculations of the integral response of BWRs to severe core damage sequences and the resulting radiological source terms to containment. This report, therefore, documents specific results of fission product source term analyses that will form the basis for the HBU supplement to NUREG-1465. However, commentary is also provided on observed differences between the composite results of the source term calculations performed here and those reflected NUREG-1465 itself.

  5. Novel photoswitchable dielectric properties on nanomaterials of electronic core-shell γ-FeOx@Au@fullerosomes for GHz frequency applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Su, Chefu; Yu, Tzuyang; Tan, Loon-Seng; Hu, Bin; Urbas, Augustine; Chiang, Long Y.

    2016-03-01

    -FeOx@AuNPs. Surface-stabilized 2 in a core-shell structure was found to be capable of photoinducing the surface plasmonic resonance (SPR) effect by white LED light. The accumulated SPR energy was subsequently transferred to the partially bilayered C60(>DPAF-C9) fullerosomic membrane layer in a near-field (~1.5 nm) region without producing radiation heat. Since the monostatic SAR signal is dielectric property-dependent, we used these measurements to provide evidence of derived reflectivity changes on a surface coated with 2 at 0.5-4.0 GHz upon illumination of LED white light. We found that a high, >99%, efficiency of response amplification in image amplitude can be achieved. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07363d

  6. High-Temperature Gas Sensor Array (Electronic Nose) Demonstrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2002-01-01

    The ability to measure emissions from aeronautic engines and in commercial applications such as automotive emission control and chemical process monitoring is a necessary first step if one is going to actively control those emissions. One single sensor will not give all the information necessary to determine the chemical composition of a high-temperature, harsh environment. Rather, an array of gas sensor arrays--in effect, a high-temperature electronic "nose"--is necessary to characterize the chemical constituents of a diverse, high-temperature environment, such as an emissions stream. The signals produced by this nose could be analyzed to determine the constituents of the emission stream. Although commercial electronic noses for near-room temperature applications exist, they often depend significantly on lower temperature materials or only one sensor type. A separate development effort necessary for a high-temperature electronic nose is being undertaken by the NASA Glenn Research Center, Case Western Reserve University, Ohio State University, and Makel Engineering, Inc. The sensors are specially designed for hightemperature environments. A first-generation high-temperature electronic nose has been demonstrated on a modified automotive engine. This nose sensor array was composed of sensors designed for hightemperature environments fabricated using microelectromechanical-systems- (MEMS-) based technology. The array included a tin-oxide-based sensor doped for nitrogen oxide (NOx) sensitivity, a SiC-based hydrocarbon (CxHy) sensor, and an oxygen sensor (O2). These sensors operate on different principles--resistor, diode, and electrochemical cell, respectively--and each sensor has very different responses to the individual gases in the environment. A picture showing the sensor head for the array is shown in the photograph on the left and the sensors installed in the engine are shown in the photograph on the right. Electronics are interfaced with the sensors for

  7. Low-loss electron beam transport in a high-power, electrostatic free-electron maser

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valentini, M.; van der Geer, C. A. J.; Verhoeven, A. G. A.; van der Wiel, M. J.; Urbanus, W. H.

    1997-01-01

    At the FOM Institute for Plasma Physics ''Rijnhuizen'', The Netherlands, the commissioning of a high-power, electrostatic free-electron maser is in progress. The design target is the generation of 1 MW microwave power in the frequency range 130-260 GHz. The foreseen application o

  8. Interface control of electronic and optical properties in IV-VI and II-VI core/shell colloidal quantum dots: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Youngjin; Shapiro, Arthur; Isarov, Maya; Rubin-Brusilovski, Anna; Safran, Aron; Budniak, Adam K; Horani, Faris; Dehnel, Joanna; Sashchiuk, Aldona; Lifshitz, Efrat

    2017-01-17

    Semiconductor colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) have attracted vast scientific and technological interest throughout the past three decades, due to the unique tuneability of their optoelectronic properties by variation of size and composition. However, the nanoscale size brings about a large surface-to-bulk volume ratio, where exterior surfaces have a pronounced influence on the chemical stability and on the physical properties of the semiconductor. Therefore, numerous approaches have been developed to gain efficient surface passivation, including a coverage by organic or inorganic molecular surfactants as well as the formation of core/shell heterostructures (a semiconductor core epitaxially covered by another semiconductor shell). This review focuses on special designs of core/shell heterostructures from the IV-VI and II-VI semiconductor compounds, and on synthetic approaches and characterization of the optical properties. Experimental observations revealed the formation of core/shell structures with type-I or quasi-type-II band alignment between the core and shell constituents. Theoretical calculations of the electronic band structures, which were also confirmed by experimental work, exposed surplus electronic tuning (beyond the radial diameter) with adaptation of the composition and control of the interface properties. The studies also considered strain effects that are created between two different semiconductors. It was disclosed experimentally and theoretically that the strain can be released via the formation of alloys at the core-shell interface. Overall, the core/shell and core/alloyed-shell heterostructures showed enhancement in luminescence quantum efficiency with respect to that of pure cores, extended lifetime, uniformity in size and in many cases good chemical sustainability under ambient conditions.

  9. The hydrated electron and its reactions at high temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hilbert; Sehested, Knud

    1986-01-01

    The spectrum of the hydrated electron was determined in the temperature range 5-300 "C by using strongly alkaline solutions and high hydrogen pressure. At temperatures up to about 150 "C the temperature coefficients of E, and AE1/2 are -2.8 X and 2 X lo4 eV K-', respectively. E,, is the energy ma...

  10. Structure Identification in High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopic Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Kling, Jens; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2014-01-01

    A connection between microscopic structure and macroscopic properties is expected for almost all material systems. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy is a technique offering insight into the atomic structure, but the analysis of large image series can be time consuming. The present ...

  11. High Energy Electron Reconstruction in the BeamCal

    CERN Document Server

    Sailer, Andre

    2016-01-01

    This note discusses methods of particle reconstruction in the forward region detectors of future e+ e− linear colliders such as ILC or CLIC. At the nominal luminosity the innermost electromagnetic calorimeters undergo high particle fluxes from the beam-induced background. In this prospect, different methods of the background simulation and signal electron reconstruction are described.

  12. High energy electron processing of icy regoliths on Saturn's moons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaible, Micah; Johnson, Robert E.

    2015-11-01

    A unique space weathering phenomenon has been identified on several icy Saturnian moons. Cassini revealed anomalous lens shaped regions in both optical and thermal wavelengths, colloquially known as the 'PacMan' feature, which are centered on the leading hemispheres and approximately symmetric about the equators. In particular, the Cassini InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) measurements of thermal emission in the mid-IR showed that surface temperature variations during a diurnal cycle were smaller inside the anomalous regions. The locations of the anomalies were shown to closely match the expected deposition profile of high energy (~ MeV) electrons moving counter rotational to the moons, suggesting an energetic source to drive their formation. However, the mechanisms by which thermal conductivity enhancement occur lack quantitative comparison with theoretical and experimental results.Electron interactions with the grains can excite molecules, which, if near enough to an intergrain contact, can cause atoms or molecules to migrate into the contact region, thus increasing the contact volume or 'sintering' the grains. Sintering improves the thermal contact between grains, leading to increased effective thermal conductivity of the regolith. Equations previously developed to describe material behavior in nuclear reactor were used to estimate the timescale for the energetic electrons to increase the contact volume sufficiently to describe the enhanced thermal conductivity of the anomalous regions. In order to properly constrain the sintering calculations, the unique electron energy distribution measured in the vicinity of each of the moons was used in the calculations, and molecular dynamics simulations of excited electrons in water ice were carried out to determine the length scale for an average electron excitation or ionization event. This length scale determines the distance from the primary reaction at which electrons can still be mobilized to move into the contact region

  13. High mobility, printable, and solution-processed graphene electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Ang, Priscilla Kailian; Wang, Ziqian; Tang, Ai Ling Lena; Thong, John T L; Loh, Kian Ping

    2010-01-01

    The ability to print graphene sheets onto large scale, flexible substrates holds promise for large scale, transparent electronics on flexible substrates. Solution processable graphene sheets derived from graphite can form stable dispersions in solutions and are amenable to bulk scale processing and ink jet printing. However, the electrical conductivity and carrier mobilities of this material are usually reported to be orders of magnitude poorer than that of the mechanically cleaved counterpart due to its higher density of defects, which restricts its use in electronics. Here, we show that by optimizing several key factors in processing, we are able to fabricate high mobility graphene films derived from large sized graphene oxide sheets, which paves the way for all-carbon post-CMOS electronics. All-carbon source-drain channel electronics fabricated from such films exhibit significantly improved transport characteristics, with carrier mobilities of 365 cm(2)/(V.s) for hole and 281 cm(2)/(V.s) for electron, measured in air at room temperature. In particular, intrinsic mobility as high as 5000 cm(2)/(V.s) can be obtained from such solution-processed graphene films when ionic screening is applied to nullify the Coulombic scattering by charged impurities.

  14. High electronic couplings of single mesitylene molecular junctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Komoto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on an experimental analysis of the charge transport properties of single mesitylene (1,3,5-trimethylbenzene molecular junctions. The electronic conductance and the current–voltage characteristics of mesitylene molecules wired into Au electrodes were measured by a scanning tunnelling microscopy-based break-junction method at room temperature in a liquid environment. We found the molecular junctions exhibited two distinct conductance states with high conductance values of ca. 10−1G0 and of more than 10−3G0 (G0 = 2e2/h in the electronic conductance measurements. We further performed a statistical analysis of the current–voltage characteristics of the molecular junctions in the two states. Within a single channel resonant tunnelling model, we obtained electronic couplings in the molecular junctions by fitting the current–voltage characteristics to the single channel model. The origin of the high conductance was attributed to experimentally obtained large electronic couplings of the direct π-bonded molecular junctions (ca. 0.15 eV. Based on analysis of the stretch length of the molecular junctions and the large electronic couplings obtained from the I–V analysis, we proposed two structural models, in which (i mesitylene binds to the Au electrode perpendicular to the charge transport direction and (ii mesitylene has tilted from the perpendicular orientation.

  15. Weak Coupling Electron-Phonon for High Tc Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbe, J.

    1989-01-01

    Our opinion is that, in the high Tc copper oxides, the electronic correlations are not large enough to allow the localization of the electrons of the half-filled d-p sub-band. Thus, we treat them as itinerant electrons, in a bidimensional structure. And we show that, contrary to a widely held opinion, the electron-phonon interaction can induce high Tc superconductivity in these compounds, even in the weak coupling limit. This is due to the fact that, because of the bidimensionality, the electronic density of states is sharply peaked in the neighbourhood of the Fermi energy. A small coupling between nearest neighbouring CuO2 planes is sufficient to prevent a very large reduction of Tc by the critical fluctuations. The calculated isotope effect is much smaller than usually in the BCS theory. And, in our weak coupling theory, the antiferromagnetic (AF) phase is much more rapidly destabilized by dopping or internal charge transfer than the superconducting phase, which takes place when the AF phase has vanished.

  16. High electronic couplings of single mesitylene molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoto, Yuki; Fujii, Shintaro; Nishino, Tomoaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    We report on an experimental analysis of the charge transport properties of single mesitylene (1,3,5-trimethylbenzene) molecular junctions. The electronic conductance and the current-voltage characteristics of mesitylene molecules wired into Au electrodes were measured by a scanning tunnelling microscopy-based break-junction method at room temperature in a liquid environment. We found the molecular junctions exhibited two distinct conductance states with high conductance values of ca. 10(-1) G 0 and of more than 10(-3) G 0 (G 0 = 2e (2)/h) in the electronic conductance measurements. We further performed a statistical analysis of the current-voltage characteristics of the molecular junctions in the two states. Within a single channel resonant tunnelling model, we obtained electronic couplings in the molecular junctions by fitting the current-voltage characteristics to the single channel model. The origin of the high conductance was attributed to experimentally obtained large electronic couplings of the direct π-bonded molecular junctions (ca. 0.15 eV). Based on analysis of the stretch length of the molecular junctions and the large electronic couplings obtained from the I-V analysis, we proposed two structural models, in which (i) mesitylene binds to the Au electrode perpendicular to the charge transport direction and (ii) mesitylene has tilted from the perpendicular orientation.

  17. High-efficiency and mechano-/photo- bi-catalysis of piezoelectric-ZnO@ photoelectric-TiO2 core-shell nanofibers for dye decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Huilin; Wu, Zheng; Jia, Yanmin; Xu, Xiaoli; Xia, Yuntao; Han, Zichen; Wang, Yu

    2017-09-01

    A mechano-/photo- bi-catalyst of piezoelectric-ZnO@photoelectric-TiO2 core-shell nanofibers was hydrothermally synthesized for Methyl Orange (10 mg L(-1)) decomposition. The mechano-/photo- bi-catalysis in ZnO@TiO2 is superior to mechano- or photo-catalysis in decomposing Methyl Orange, which is mainly attributed to the synergy effect of the piezoelectric-ZnO core's mechano-catalysis and the thin photoelectric TiO2 shell's photo-catalysis. The heterostructure of the piezoelectric-ZnO@photoelectric-TiO2 core-shell interface, being helpful to reduce electron-hole pair recombination and to separate the piezoelectrically-/photoelectric ally- induced electrons and holes, may also make a great contribution to the enhanced catalysis performance. The mechano-/photo-bi-catalysis in ZnO@TiO2 core-shell nanofibers possesses the advantages of high efficiency, non-toxicity and tractability and is potential in utilizing mechanical/solar energy to deal with dye wastewater. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Core-shell gold J-aggregate nanoparticles for highly efficient strong coupling applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoumessi Lekeufack, Diane; Brioude, Arnaud; Coleman, Anthony W.; Miele, Philippe; Bellessa, Joel; De Zeng, Li; Stadelmann, Pierre

    2010-06-01

    We have developed a straightforward synthetic route to prepare core-shell systems based on gold nanoparticles (NPs) surrounded with J-aggregates molecules. This synthesis allows the direct and efficient coating, at room temperature, of pretreated citrate-stabilized gold NPs with 5, 5', 6, 6'-tetrachloro-1-1'-diethyl-3, 3'-di (4-sulfobutyl)-benzimidazolocarbocyanine (TDBC), without supplementary adding of salts and bases during the synthesis. As the size of gold particle is tunable, the precise optimization of the strong coupling between the electronic transitions of organic components (TDBC) and the plasmon modes of the gold NPs is achieved corresponding to a Rabi energy of 220 meV, a value not yet obtained in such a system.

  19. Highly Confined Electronic and Ionic Conduction in Oxide Heterostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini

    2015-01-01

    . “Enhancement of the chemical stability in confined δ-Bi2O3”. Nature Materials (2015) doi:10.1038/nmat4266 [2] Y. Z. Chen et al. “A high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas at the spinel/perovskite interface of γ-Al2O3/SrTiO3”. Nature Commun. 4, 1371 (2013) [3] Y. Z. Chen et al. “Creation of High Mobility Two...

  20. The Physics and Applications of High Brightness Electron Beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Luigi; Rosenzweig, J.; Serafini, Luca

    2007-09-01

    Plenary sessions. RF deflector based sub-Ps beam diagnostics: application to FEL and advanced accelerators / D. Alesini. Production of fermtosecond pulses and micron beam spots for high brightness electron beam applications / S.G. Anderson ... [et al.]. Wakefields of sub-picosecond electron bunches / K.L.F. Bane. Diamond secondary emitter / I. Ben-Zvi ... [et al.]. Parametric optimization for an X-ray free electron laser with a laser wiggler / R. Bonifacio, N. Piovella and M.M. Cola. Needle cathodes for high-brightness beams / C.H. Boulware ... [et al.]. Non linear evolution of short pulses in FEL cascaded undulators and the FEL harmonic cascade / L. Giannessi and P. Musumeci. High brightness laser induced multi-meV electron/proton sources / D. Giulietti ... [et al.]. Emittance limitation of a conditioned beam in a strong focusing FEL undulator / Z. Huang, G. Stupakov and S. Reiche. Scaled models: space-charge dominated electron storage rings / R.A. Kishek ... [et al.]. High brightness beam applications: energy recovered linacs / G.A. Krafft. Maximizing brightness in photoinjectors / C. Limborg-Deprey and H. Tomizawa. Ultracold electron sources / O.J. Luiten ... [et al.]. Scaling laws of structure-based optical accelerators / A. Mizrahi, V. Karagodsky and L. Schächter. High brightness beams-applications to free-electron lasers / S. Reiche. Conception of photo-injectors for the CTF3 experiment / R. Roux. Superconducting RF photoinjectors: an overview / J. Sekutowicz. Status and perspectives of photo injector developments for high brightness beams / F. Stephan. Results from the UCLA/FNLP underdense plasma lens experiment / M.C. Thompson ... [et al.]. Medical application of multi-beam compton scattering monochromatic tunable hard X-ray source / M. Uesaka ... [et al.]. Design of a 2 kA, 30 fs RF-photoinjector for waterbag compression / S.B. Van Der Geer, O.J. Luiten and M.J. De Loos. Proposal for a high-brightness pulsed electron source / M. Zolotorev ... [et al

  1. Quantitative high resolution electron microscopy of grain boundaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, G.H., King, W.E., Cohen, D., Carter, C.B.

    1996-12-12

    The {Sigma}11 (113)/[1{bar 1}0] symmetric tilt grain boundary has been characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The method by which the images are prepared for analysis is described. The statistics of the image data have been found to follow a normal distribution. The electron-optical imaging parameters used to acquire the image have been determined by nonlinear least-square image simulation optimization within the perfect crystal region of the micrograph. A similar image simulation optimization procedure is used to determine the atom positions which provide the best match between the experimental image and the image simulation.

  2. High-Power Microwave Switch Employing Electron Beam Triggering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, Jay L

    2012-09-19

    A high-power active microwave pulse compressor is described that modulates the quality factor Q of the energy storage cavity by a new means involving mode conversion controlled by a triggered electron-beam discharge through a switch cavity. The electron beam is emitted from a diamond-coated molybdenum cathode. This report describes the principle of operation, the design of the switch, the configuration used for the test, and the experimental results. The pulse compressor produced output pulses with 140 - 165 MW peak power, power gain of 16 - 20, and pulse duration of 16 - 20 ns at a frequency of 11.43 GHz.

  3. High-pressure effects on intramolecular electron transfer compounds

    CERN Document Server

    He Li Ming; Li Hong; Zhang Bao Wen; Li Yi; Yang Guo Qiang

    2002-01-01

    We explore the effect of pressure on the fluorescence spectra of the intramolecular electron transfer compound N-(1-pyrenylmethyl), N-methyl-4-methoxyaniline (Py-Am) and its model version, with poly(methyl methacrylate) blended in, at high pressure up to 7 GPa. The emission properties of Py-Am and pyrene show distinct difference with the increase of pressure. This difference indicates the strength of the charge transfer interaction resulting from the adjusting of the conformation of Py-Am with increase of pressure. The relationship between the electronic state of the molecule and pressure is discussed.

  4. Weissenberg reflection high-energy electron diffraction for surface crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abukawa, Tadashi; Yamazaki, Tomoyuki; Yajima, Kentaro; Yoshimura, Koji

    2006-12-15

    The principle of a Weissenberg camera is applied to surface crystallographic analysis by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. By removing inelastic electrons and measuring hundreds of patterns as a function of sample rotation angle phi, kinematical analysis can be performed over a large volume of reciprocal space. The data set is equivalent to a three-dimensional stack of Weissenberg photographs. The method is applied to analysis of an Si(111)-square root of 3 x square root of 3-Ag surface, and the structural data obtained are in excellent agreement with the known atomic structure.

  5. Adapting High Brightness Relativistic Electron Beams for Ultrafast Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoby, Cheyne Matthew

    This thesis explores the use of ultrashort bunches generated by a radiofrequency electron photoinjector driven by a femtosecond laser. Rf photoinjector technology has been developed to generate ultra high brightness beams for advanced accelerators and to drive advanced light source applications. The extremely good quality of the beams generated by this source has played a key role in the development of 4th generation light sources such as the Linac Coherent Light Source, thus opening the way to studies of materials science and biological systems with high temporal and spatial resolution. At the Pegasus Photoinjector Lab, we have developed the application of a BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6-cell rf photoinjector as a tool for ultrafast science in its own right. It is the aim of this work to explore the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, give descriptions of the novel ultrafast diagnostics developed to be able to characterize the electron bunch and synchronize it with a pump laser, and share some of the scientific results that were obtained with this technology at the UCLA Pegasus laboratory. This dissertation explains the requirements of the drive laser source and describes the principles of rf photoinjector design and operation necessary to produce electron bunches with an rms longitudinal length < 100 femtoseconds containing 107 - 108 electrons per bunch. In this condition, when the laser intensity is sufficiently high, multiphoton photoemission is demonstrated to be more efficient in terms of charge yield than single photon photoemission. When a short laser pulse hits the cathode the resulting beam dynamics are dominated by a strong space charge driven longitudinal expansion which leads to the creation of a nearly ideal uniformly filled ellipsoidal distribution. These beam distributions are characterized by linear space charge forces and hence by high peak brightness and small transverse emittances. This regime of operation of the RF photoinjector is also termed the

  6. High quality electron beams from a laser wakefield accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiggins, S M; Issac, R C; Welsh, G H; Brunetti, E; Shanks, R P; Anania, M P; Cipiccia, S; Manahan, G G; Aniculaesei, C; Ersfeld, B; Islam, M R; Burgess, R T L; Vieux, G; Jaroszynski, D A [SUPA, Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Gillespie, W A [SUPA, Division of Electronic Engineering and Physics, University of Dundee, Dundee (United Kingdom); MacLeod, A M [School of Computing and Creative Technologies, University of Abertay Dundee, Dundee (United Kingdom); Van der Geer, S B; De Loos, M J, E-mail: m.wiggins@phys.strath.ac.u [Pulsar Physics, Burghstraat 47, 5614 BC Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    High quality electron beams have been produced in a laser-plasma accelerator driven by femtosecond laser pulses with a peak power of 26 TW. Electrons are produced with an energy up to 150 MeV from the 2 mm gas jet accelerator and the measured rms relative energy spread is less than 1%. Shot-to-shot stability in the central energy is 3%. Pepper-pot measurements have shown that the normalized transverse emittance is {approx}1{pi} mm mrad while the beam charge is in the range 2-10 pC. The generation of high quality electron beams is understood from simulations accounting for beam loading of the wakefield accelerating structure. Experiments and self-consistent simulations indicate that the beam peak current is several kiloamperes. Efficient transportation of the beam through an undulator is simulated and progress is being made towards the realization of a compact, high peak brilliance free-electron laser operating in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray wavelength ranges.

  7. Sourcebook on high-temperature electronics and instrumentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veneruso, A.F. (ed.)

    1981-10-01

    This sourcebook summarizes the high-temperature characteristics of a number of commercially available electronic components and materials required in geothermal well-logging instruments that must operate to 275/sup 0/C. The sourcebook is written to provide a starting place for instrument designers, who need to know the high-temperature electronic products that are available and the design and performance limitations of these products. The electronic component information given includes the standard repertoire of passive devices such as resistors, capacitors, and magnetics; the active devices and integrated circuits sections emphasize silicon semiconductor JFETs and CMOS circuits; and, to complete the electronics, interconnections and packaging of hybrid microelectronics are described. Thermal insulation and refrigeration alternatives are also presented in the sourcebook. Finally, instrument housing materials and high-temperature cables and cablehead connectors are listed. This information was compiled as part of the Geothermal Logging Instrumentation Development Program that Sandia National Laboratories conducted for the US Department of Energy's Divison of Geothermal Energy from 1976 to 1981.

  8. Unexpected High Brightness Temperature 140 PC from the Core in the Jet of 3C 120

    CERN Document Server

    Roca-Sogorb, Mar; Agudo, Ivan; Marscher, Alan P; Jorstad, Svetlana G

    2009-01-01

    We present 1.7, 5, 15, 22 and 43 GHz polarimetric multi--epoch VLBA observations of the radio galaxy 3C 120. The higher frequency observations reveal a new component, not visible before April 2007, located 80 mas from the core (which corresponds to a deprojected distance of 140 pc), with a brightness temperature about 600 times higher than expected at such distances. This component (hereafter C80) is observed to remain stationary and to undergo small changes in its brightness temperature during more than two years of observations. A combination of jet bending, significant flow acceleration, and a very strong shock --for such large distance from the core-- may explain the unusually high Tb of C80, but it seems very unlikely that this corresponds to the usual shock that emerges from the core and travels downstream to the location of C80. It appears that some other intrinsic process in the jet, capable of providing a local burst in particle and/or magnetic field energy, may be responsible for the enhanced bright...

  9. Highly non-linear solid core photonic crystal fiber with one nano hole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangwar, Rahul Kumar, E-mail: rahul0889@gmail.com; Bhardwaj, Vanita, E-mail: bhardwajphy12@gmail.com; Singh, Vinod Kumar, E-mail: singh.vk.ap@ismdhanbad.co.in [Department of Applied Physics, Indian School of Mines, Dhanbad, Jharkhand (India)

    2015-08-28

    The numerical study of newly designed solid core photonic crystal fiber (SCPCF) having three hexagonal air hole rings in cladding region and one small nano hole at the center are presented. By using full vectorial finite element method (FV-FEM), we analyses the optical properties like effective area, nonlinearity and confinement loss of the proposed PCF. Results show that the change in core diameter controls the effective area, nonlinearity and confinement loss. A low effective area (3.34 µm{sup 2}), high nonlinearity (36.34 W{sup −1}km{sup −1}) and low confinement loss (0.00106 dB/km) are achieved at the communication wavelength 1.55 µm for the SCPCF having core air hole diameter 0.10 µm, cladding air holes diameter 1.00 µm and pitch 2.50 µm. This type of PCF is very useful in non-linear applications such as supercontinuum generation, four wave mixing, second harmonic generation etc.

  10. Fast switching thyristor applied in nanosecond-pulse high-voltage generator with closed transformer core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lee; Bao, Chaobing; Feng, Xibo; Liu, Yunlong; Fochan, Lin

    2013-02-01

    For a compact and reliable nanosecond-pulse high-voltage generator (NPHVG), the specification parameter selection and potential usage of fast controllable state-solid switches have an important bearing on the optimal design. The NPHVG with closed transformer core and fast switching thyristor (FST) was studied in this paper. According to the analysis of T-type circuit, the expressions for the voltages and currents of the primary and secondary windings on the transformer core of NPHVG were deduced, and the theoretical maximum analysis was performed. For NPHVG, the rise-rate of turn-on current (di/dt) across a FST may exceed its transient rating. Both mean and maximum values of di/dt were determined by the leakage inductances of the transformer, and the difference is 1.57 times. The optimum winding ratio is helpful to getting higher voltage output with lower specification FST, especially when the primary and secondary capacitances have been established. The oscillation period analysis can be effectively used to estimate the equivalent leakage inductance. When the core saturation effect was considered, the maximum di/dt estimated from the oscillating period of the primary current is more accurate than one from the oscillating period of the secondary voltage. Although increasing the leakage inductance of NPHVG can decrease di/dt across FST, it may reduce the output peak voltage of the NPHVG.

  11. Earth's core-mantle boundary - Results of experiments at high pressures and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knittle, Elise; Jeanloz, Raymond

    1991-01-01

    Laboratory experiments document that liquid iron reacts chemically with silicates at high pressures (above 2.4 x 10 to the 10th Pa) and temperatures. In particular, (Mg,Fe)SiO3 perovskite, the most abundant mineral of earth's lower mantle, is expected to react with liquid iron to produce metallic alloys (FeO and FeSi) and nonmetallic silicates (SiO2 stishovite and MgSiO3 perovskite) at the pressures of the core-mantle boundary, 14 x 10 to the 10th Pa. The experimental observations, in conjunction with seismological data, suggest that the lowermost 200 to 300 km of earth's mantle, the D-double-prime layer, may be an extremely heterogeneous region as a result of chemical reactions between the silicate mantle and the liquid iron alloy of earth's core. The combined thermal-chemical-electrical boundary layer resulting from such reactions offers a plausible explanation for the complex behavior of seismic waves near the core-mantle boundary and could influence earth's magnetic field observed at the surface.

  12. Interpreting H2O isotope variations in high-altitude ice cores using a cyclone model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdsworth, Gerald

    2008-04-01

    Vertical profiles of isotope (δ18O or δD) values versus altitude (z) from sea level to high altitude provide a link to cyclones, which impact most ice core sites. Cyclonic structure variations cause anomalous variations in ice core δ time series which may obscure the basic temperature signal. Only one site (Mount Logan, Yukon) provides a complete δ versus z profile generated solely from data. At other sites, such a profile has to be constructed by supplementing field data. This requires using the so-called isotopic or δ thermometer which relates δ to a reference temperature (T). The construction of gapped sections of δ versus z curves requires assuming a typical atmospheric lapse rate (dT/dz), where T is air temperature, and using the slope (dδ/dT) of a site-derived δ thermometer to calculate dδ/dz. Using a three-layer model of a cyclone, examples are given to show geometrically how changes in the thickness of the middle, mixed layer leads to the appearance of anomalous δ values in time series (producing decalibration of the δ thermometer there). The results indicate that restrictions apply to the use of the δ thermometer in ice core paleothermometry, according to site altitude, regional meteorology, and climate state.

  13. Using high-resolution tritium profiles to quantify the effects of melt on two Spitsbergen ice cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, L.G. van der; Streurman, H.J.; Isaksson, E.; Helsen, M.M.; Wal, R.S.W. van de; Martma, T.; Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Meijer, H.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ice cores from small ice caps provide valuable climatic information, additional to that of Greenland and Antarctica. However, their integrity is usually compromised by summer meltwater percolation. To determine to what extent this can affect such ice cores, we performed high-resolution tritium measu

  14. Using high-resolution tritium profiles to quantify the effects of melt on two Spitsbergen ice cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, L.G. van der; Streurman, H.J.; Isaksson, E.; Helsen, M.M.; Wal, R.S.W. van de; Martma, T.; Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Meijer, H.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ice cores from small ice caps provide valuable climatic information, additional to that of Greenland and Antarctica. However, their integrity is usually compromised by summer meltwater percolation. To determine to what extent this can affect such ice cores, we performed high-resolution tritium measu

  15. Using high-resolution tritium profiles to quantify the effects of melt on two Spitsbergen ice cores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wel, L.G. van der; Streurman, H.J.; Isaksson, E.; Helsen, M.M.; Wal, R.S.W. van de; Martma, T.; Pohjola, V.A.; Moore, J.C.; Meijer, H.A.J.

    2011-01-01

    Ice cores from small ice caps provide valuable climatic information, additional to that of Greenland and Antarctica. However, their integrity is usually compromised by summer meltwater percolation. To determine to what extent this can affect such ice cores, we performed high-resolution tritium

  16. In-situ studies on phase transformations under electron irradiation in a high voltage electron microscope

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Banerjee

    2003-06-01

    High voltage electron microscopy (HVEM), using electron energies adequate for causing displacements of atoms from lattice sites, is a very effective technique for studying mechanisms of solid state phase transformations and for charting the path of phase evolution in real time. This has been demonstrated in studies on chemical ordering in nickel–molybdenum alloys and on the $\\beta \\to \\omega$ displacement ordering in zirconium-niobium alloys. The enhanced diffusivity due to electron irradiation makes it possible to explore a sequence of phase evolution at low enough temperatures where even some first-order transformations are driven by free energy (G) instabilities with respect to the relevant order parameter $(\\eta)$. Specific issues addressed in these studies are reviewed in this paper.

  17. Development of High Performance Electron Beam Switching System for Swiss Free Electron Laser at PSI

    CERN Document Server

    Paraliev, M

    2012-01-01

    A compact X-ray Free Electron Laser (SwissFEL) is under development at the Paul Scherrer Institute. To increase facility efficiency the main linac will operate in two electron bunch mode. The two bunches are separated in time by 28 ns and sent to two undulator lines. The combination of two beam lines should produce short X-ray pulses covering wavelength range from 1 to 70 {\\AA} with submicron position stability. To separate the two bunches, a novel electron beam switching system is being developed. The total deflection is achieved with a combination of high Q-factor resonant deflector magnet, followed by a DC septum magnet. The shot-to-shot deflection stability of the entire switching system should be <+/-10 ppm in amplitude and +/-100 ps in time, values which present severe measurement difficulties. Deflection magnets requirements, development and results of the kicker prototype are presented.

  18. High frequency conductivity of hot electrons in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amekpewu, M.; Mensah, S. Y.; Musah, R.; Mensah, N. G.; Abukari, S. S.; Dompreh, K. A.

    2016-05-01

    High frequency conductivity of hot electrons in undoped single walled achiral Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) under the influence of ac-dc driven fields was considered. We investigated semi-classically Boltzmann's transport equation with and without the presence of the hot electrons' source by deriving the current densities in CNTs. Plots of the normalized current density versus frequency of ac-field revealed an increase in both the minimum and maximum peaks of normalized current density at lower frequencies as a result of a strong injection of hot electrons. The applied ac-field plays a twofold role of suppressing the space-charge instability in CNTs and simultaneously pumping an energy for lower frequency generation and amplification of THz radiations. These have enormous promising applications in very different areas of science and technology.

  19. Highly Accurate Measurement of the Electron Orbital Magnetic Moment

    CERN Document Server

    Awobode, A M

    2015-01-01

    We propose to accurately determine the orbital magnetic moment of the electron by measuring, in a Magneto-Optical or Ion trap, the ratio of the Lande g-factors in two atomic states. From the measurement of (gJ1/gJ2), the quantity A, which depends on the corrections to the electron g-factors can be extracted, if the states are LS coupled. Given that highly accurate values of the correction to the spin g-factor are currently available, accurate values of the correction to the orbital g-factor may also be determined. At present, (-1.8 +/- 0.4) x 10-4 has been determined as a correction to the electron orbital g-factor, by using earlier measurements of the ratio gJ1/gJ2, made on the Indium 2P1/2 and 2P3/2 states.

  20. Grad-B drift transport of high current electron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.R.; Backstrom, R.C.; Halbleib, J.A.; Wright, T.P.

    1983-01-01

    Grad-B transport, bunching and focusing of relativistic electron beams has been proposed as a method of increasing the power delivered to an ICF target by an order of magnitude. Recent experiments have demonstrated the efficient transport of high current electron beams over 1.0 m distances in the 1/r azimuthal magnetic field of a current-carrying wire. The electron drift velocity was measured as a function of wire current and found to be in good agreement with theory. Measurements of x-ray production in a tantalum target were used as a diagnostic tool to study transport efficiency. A theoretical model of the experiment was developed to calculate bremsstrahlung production in the target, assuming 100 percent transport efficiency. This model predicted radial x-ray dose profiles in the experimental converter assembly which were in good agreement with the measurements.

  1. Polarization of radiation of electrons in highly turbulent magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosekin, A. Yu.; Kelner, S. R.; Aharonian, F. A.

    2016-09-01

    We study the polarization properties of the jitter and synchrotron radiation produced by electrons in highly turbulent anisotropic magnetic fields. The net polarization is provided by the geometry of the magnetic field the directions of which are parallel to a certain plane. Such conditions may appear in the relativistic shocks during the amplification of the magnetic field through the so-called Weibel instability. While the polarization properties of the jitter radiation allows extraction of direct information on the turbulence spectrum as well as the geometry of magnetic field, the polarization of the synchrotron radiation reflects the distribution of the magnetic field over its strength. For the isotropic distribution of monoenergetic electrons, we found that the degree of polarization of the synchrotron radiation is larger than the polarization of the jitter radiation. For the power-law energy distribution of electrons the relation between the degree of polarization of synchrotron and jitter radiation depends on the spectral index of the distribution.

  2. Polarization of radiation of electrons in highly turbulent magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Prosekin, A Yu; Aharonian, F A

    2016-01-01

    We study the polarization properties of the jitter and synchrotron radiation produced by electrons in highly turbulent anisotropic magnetic fields. The net polarization is provided by the geometry of the magnetic field the directions of which are parallel to a certain plane. Such conditions may appear in the relativistic shocks during the amplification of the magnetic field through the so-called Weibel instability. While the polarization properties of the jitter radiation allows extraction of direct information on the turbulence spectrum as well as the geometry of magnetic field, the polarization of the synchrotron radiation reflects the distribution of the magnetic field over its strength. For the isotropic distribution of monoenergetic electrons, we found that the degree of polarization of the synchrotron radiation is larger than the polarization of the jitter radiation. For the power-law energy distribution of electrons the relation between the degree of polarization of synchrotron and jitter radiation dep...

  3. Comparison of High Resolution Negative Electron Beam Resists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Bilenberg; Schøler, Mikkel; Shi, Peixiong

    2006-01-01

    Four high resolution negative electron beam resists are compared: TEBN-1 from Tokuyama Corp. Japan, ma-N 2401XP and mr-L 6000AXP from microresist technology GmbH Germany, and SU-8 2000 series from MicroChem Corp., USA. Narrow linewidth high density patterns are defined by 100 kV electron beam...... lithography, and the pattern is transferred into silicon by a highly anisotropic SF6/O-2/CHF3 based reactive ion etch process with a selectivity between silicon and the investigated resists of approximately 2.20 nm half-pitch lines and 10 nm lines with a pitch down to 60 nm are written and transferred...

  4. Signature of electron-phonon interaction in high temperature superconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Ashokan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The theory of thermal conductivity of high temperature superconductors (HTS based on electron and phonon line width (life times formulation is developed with Quantum dynamical approach of Green's function. The frequency line width is observed as an extremely sensitive quantity in the transport phenomena of HTS as a collection of large number of scattering processes. The role of resonance scattering and electron-phonon interaction processes is found to be most prominent near critical temperature. The theory successfully explains the spectacular behaviour of high Tc superconductors in the vicinity of transition temperature. A successful agreement between theory and experiment has been obtained by analyzing the thermal conductivity data for the sample La1.8Sr0.2CuO4 in the temperature range 0 − 200K. The theory is equally and successfully applicable to all other high Tc superconductors.

  5. Combining RAFT polymerization and thiol-ene click reaction for core-shell structured polymer@BaTiO3 nanodielectrics with high dielectric constant, low dielectric loss, and high energy storage capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke; Huang, Xingyi; Zhu, Ming; Xie, Liyuan; Tanaka, Toshikatsu; Jiang, Pingkai

    2014-02-12

    Nanodielectric materials with high dielectric constant, low dielectric loss, and high energy storage capability are highly desirable in modern electric and electronics industries. It has been proved that the preparation of core-shell structured dielectric polymer nanocomposites via "grafting from" method is an effective approach to these materials. However, by using this approach, the deep understanding of the structure-dielectric property relationship of the core-shell structured nanodielectrics has been limited because of the lack of detailed information (e.g., molecular weight, grafting density) about the macromolecules grafted onto the nanoparticle surfaces. In this work, by the combination of reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization and thiol-ene click reaction, two types of core-shell structured polymer@BaTiO3 (polymer@BT) nanocomposites with high dielectric constant and low dielectric loss were successfully prepared via a "grafting to" method. Compared with the "grafting from" method, this "grafting to" method has two merits: the molecular weight of the polymer chains in the shell layer can be easily controlled and the grafting density can be tailored by changing the molecular weight of the grafting polymer. Moreover, a clear insight into the relationship among the dielectric properties and energy storage capability of the core-shell structured polymer@BT nanocomposites, the molecular weight of the polymer chains, and the grafting density of the core-shell structured nanoparticles was achieved. The study provides new insights into the design and preparation of nanodielectric materials with desirable dielectric properties.

  6. Potassium-bearing Iron-Nickel Sulfides in Nature and High-Pressure Experiments: Geochemical Consequences of Potassium in the Earth's Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshav, S.; Corgne, A.; McDonough, W. F.; Fei, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Introduction: Potassium (K) as a large ion lithophile element has dominantly been concentrated in the Earth s crust and the mantle through differentiation, and in the form of K-40 contributes to the planet s heat budget. However, whether or not K also enters core-forming phases, has been debated for over three decades. Arguments favoring entry of K in the core are based on: (1) K-sulfide (with Fe, Ni, Cu, Na, and Cl; djerfisherite) found in highly reduced enstatite chondrites (or aubrites, enstatite achondrites); (2) demonstration that K, owing to an s-d electronic switch at high-pressure, exhibits transition- element like character, (3) solubility of measurable K in Fe-Ni-S liquids at high pressure, temperature conditions, and (4) models of cooling of the core that seem to require, besides convection, some form of radioactivity, and thus lending support to the experimental work. In this contribution, we assess the effect of sequestering K in the core, as it is perhaps an element that is a key to reconciling geochemistry, paleomagnetism, accretion, and thermal evolution models for the planet.

  7. High temperature UF6 RF plasma experiments applicable to uranium plasma core reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was conducted using a 1.2 MW RF induction heater facility to aid in developing the technology necessary for designing a self critical fissioning uranium plasma core reactor. Pure, high temperature uranium hexafluoride (UF6) was injected into an argon fluid mechanically confined, steady state, RF heated plasma while employing different exhaust systems and diagnostic techniques to simulate and investigate some potential characteristics of uranium plasma core nuclear reactors. The development of techniques and equipment for fluid mechanical confinement of RF heated uranium plasmas with a high density of uranium vapor within the plasma, while simultaneously minimizing deposition of uranium and uranium compounds on the test chamber peripheral wall, endwall surfaces, and primary exhaust ducts, is discussed. The material tests and handling techniques suitable for use with high temperature, high pressure, gaseous UF6 are described and the development of complementary diagnostic instrumentation and measurement techniques to characterize the uranium plasma, effluent exhaust gases, and residue deposited on the test chamber and exhaust system components is reported.

  8. A High-Throughput Biological Calorimetry Core: Steps to Startup, Run, and Maintain a Multiuser Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yennawar, Neela H; Fecko, Julia A; Showalter, Scott A; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2016-01-01

    Many labs have conventional calorimeters where denaturation and binding experiments are setup and run one at a time. While these systems are highly informative to biopolymer folding and ligand interaction, they require considerable manual intervention for cleaning and setup. As such, the throughput for such setups is limited typically to a few runs a day. With a large number of experimental parameters to explore including different buffers, macromolecule concentrations, temperatures, ligands, mutants, controls, replicates, and instrument tests, the need for high-throughput automated calorimeters is on the rise. Lower sample volume requirements and reduced user intervention time compared to the manual instruments have improved turnover of calorimetry experiments in a high-throughput format where 25 or more runs can be conducted per day. The cost and efforts to maintain high-throughput equipment typically demands that these instruments be housed in a multiuser core facility. We describe here the steps taken to successfully start and run an automated biological calorimetry facility at Pennsylvania State University. Scientists from various departments at Penn State including Chemistry, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Bioengineering, Biology, Food Science, and Chemical Engineering are benefiting from this core facility. Samples studied include proteins, nucleic acids, sugars, lipids, synthetic polymers, small molecules, natural products, and virus capsids. This facility has led to higher throughput of data, which has been leveraged into grant support, attracting new faculty hire and has led to some exciting publications. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. High Efficiency, High Temperature Foam Core Heat Exchanger for Fission Surface Power Systems, Phase II Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fission-based power systems with power levels of 30 to ≥100 kWe will be needed for planetary surface bases. Development of high temperature, high efficiency...

  10. Runaway electrons preionized diffuse discharges at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, Victor F.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Sorokin, Dmitry A.

    2010-09-01

    Breakdown of the gaps with a non-uniform electric field filled with nitrogen and air as well as with other gases under high-voltage nanosecond pulses was investigated. It is shown that conditions of obtaining a diffuse discharge without a source of additional ionization are extended at the voltage pulse duration decreasing. A volume discharge is formed due to the gap pre-ionization by runaway electrons and X-ray quanta. At a negative polarity of the electrode with a small radius of curvature, a volume (diffuse) discharge formation is determined by pre-ionization with runaway electrons which are generated due to the electric field amplification near the cathode and in the gap. At a positive polarity of the electrode with a small radius of curvature, the X-ray radiation, generated at the runaway electrons braking at the anode and in the gap, is of great importance in a volume discharge formation. A runaway electrons preionized diffuse discharge (REP DD) has two characteristic stages. In the first stage, the ionization wave overlaps the gap during a fraction of a second. The discharge current is determined by the conductivity current in the dense plasma of the ionization wave and the displacement current in the remaining part of the gap. The second stage of the discharge can be related to the anomalous glow discharge with a high specific input power. During the second stage, the gap voltage decreases and the cathode spots formed as a result of explosive electron emission can participate in the electron emission from the cathode. At the increase of the voltage pulse duration and specific input power, the REP DD transforms into a spark discharge form. A REP DD is easily realized in various gases and at different pressures; see [1] and references in [1]. At pressure decrease was obtained the anode electrons beam current to rise (up to ~2 kA/cm2 in helium). At the REP DD, the anode is influenced by the plasma of a dense nanosecond discharge with the specific input power

  11. Patterning of high mobility electron gases at complex oxide interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Felix; Prawiroatmodjo, G. E. D. K.; von Soosten, Merlin

    2015-01-01

    Oxide interfaces provide an opportunity for electronics. However, patterning of electron gases at complex oxide interfaces is challenging. In particular, patterning of complex oxides while preserving a high electron mobility remains underexplored and inhibits the study of quantum mechanical effects...... where extended electron mean free paths are paramount. This letter presents an effective patterning strategy of both the amorphous-LaAlO3/SrTiO3 (a-LAO/STO) and modulation-doped amorphous-LaAlO3/La7/8Sr1/8MnO3/SrTiO3 (a-LAO/LSM/STO) oxide interfaces. Our patterning is based on selective wet etching...... of amorphous-LSM (a-LSM) thin films, which acts as a hard mask during subsequent depositions. Strikingly, the patterned modulation-doped interface shows electron mobilities up to ∼8 700 cm2/V s at 2 K, which is among the highest reported values for patterned conducting complex oxide interfaces that usually...

  12. Modelling of Equilibrium Between Mantle and Core: Refractory, Volatile, and Highly Siderophile Elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righter, K.; Danielson, L.; Pando, K.; Shofner, G.; Lee, C. -T.

    2013-01-01

    Siderophile elements have been used to constrain conditions of core formation and differentiation for the Earth, Mars and other differentiated bodies [1]. Recent models for the Earth have concluded that the mantle and core did not fully equilibrate and the siderophile element contents of the mantle can only be explained under conditions where the oxygen fugacity changes from low to high during accretion and the mantle and core do not fully equilibrate [2,3]. However these conclusions go against several physical and chemical constraints. First, calculations suggest that even with the composition of accreting material changing from reduced to oxidized over time, the fO2 defined by metal-silicate equilibrium does not change substantially, only by approximately 1 logfO2 unit [4]. An increase of more than 2 logfO2 units in mantle oxidation are required in models of [2,3]. Secondly, calculations also show that metallic impacting material will become deformed and sheared during accretion to a large body, such that it becomes emulsified to a fine scale that allows equilibrium at nearly all conditions except for possibly the length scale for giant impacts [5] (contrary to conclusions of [6]). Using new data for D(Mo) metal/silicate at high pressures, together with updated partitioning expressions for many other elements, we will show that metal-silicate equilibrium across a long span of Earth s accretion history may explain the concentrations of many siderophile elements in Earth's mantle. The modeling includes refractory elements Ni, Co, Mo, and W, as well as highly siderophile elements Au, Pd and Pt, and volatile elements Cd, In, Bi, Sb, Ge and As.

  13. High performance protection circuit for power electronics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudoran, Cristian D.; Dǎdârlat, Dorin N.; Toşa, Nicoleta; Mişan, Ioan

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we present a high performance protection circuit designed for the power electronics applications where the load currents can increase rapidly and exceed the maximum allowed values, like in the case of high frequency induction heating inverters or high frequency plasma generators. The protection circuit is based on a microcontroller and can be adapted for use on single-phase or three-phase power systems. Its versatility comes from the fact that the circuit can communicate with the protected system, having the role of a "sensor" or it can interrupt the power supply for protection, in this case functioning as an external, independent protection circuit.

  14. High performance protection circuit for power electronics applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tudoran, Cristian D., E-mail: cristian.tudoran@itim-cj.ro; Dădârlat, Dorin N.; Toşa, Nicoleta; Mişan, Ioan [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 67-103 Donat, PO 5 Box 700, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    In this paper we present a high performance protection circuit designed for the power electronics applications where the load currents can increase rapidly and exceed the maximum allowed values, like in the case of high frequency induction heating inverters or high frequency plasma generators. The protection circuit is based on a microcontroller and can be adapted for use on single-phase or three-phase power systems. Its versatility comes from the fact that the circuit can communicate with the protected system, having the role of a “sensor” or it can interrupt the power supply for protection, in this case functioning as an external, independent protection circuit.

  15. High efficiency digital cooler electronics for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkconnell, C. S.; Luong, T. T.; Shaw, L. S.; Murphy, J. B.; Moody, E. A.; Lisiecki, A. L.; Ellis, M. J.

    2014-06-01

    Closed-cycle cryogenic refrigerators, or cryocoolers, are an enabling technology for a wide range of aerospace applications, mostly related to infrared (IR) sensors. While the industry focus has tended to be on the mechanical cryocooler thermo mechanical unit (TMU) alone, implementation on a platform necessarily consists of the combination of the TMU and a mating set of command and control electronics. For some applications the cryocooler electronics (CCE) are technologically simple and low cost relative to the TMU, but this is not always the case. The relative cost and complexity of the CCE for a space-borne application can easily exceed that of the TMU, primarily due to the technical constraints and cost impacts introduced by the typical space radiation hardness and reliability requirements. High end tactical IR sensor applications also challenge the state of the art in cryocooler electronics, such as those for which temperature setpoint and frequency must be adjustable, or those where an informative telemetry set must be supported, etc. Generally speaking for both space and tactical applications, it is often the CCE that limits the rated lifetime and reliability of the cryocooler system. A family of high end digital cryocooler electronics has been developed to address these needs. These electronics are readily scalable from 10W to 500W output capacity; experimental performance data for nominally 25W and 100W variants are presented. The combination of a FPGA-based controller and dual H-bridge motor drive architectures yields high efficiency (>92% typical) and precision temperature control (+/- 30 mK typical) for a wide range of Stirling-class mechanical cryocooler types and vendors. This paper focuses on recent testing with the AIM INFRAROT-MODULE GmbH (AIM) SX030 and AIM SF100 cryocoolers.

  16. Electron Beam Cured Epoxy Resin Composites for High Temperature Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Christopher J.; Dorsey, George F.; Havens, Stephen J.; Lopata, Vincent J.; Meador, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam curing of Polymer Matrix Composites (PMC's) is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process that has been demonstrated to be a cost effective and advantageous alternative to conventional thermal curing. Advantages of electron beam curing include: reduced manufacturing costs; significantly reduced curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvement in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance the electron beam curing of PMC technology. Over the last several years a significant amount of effort within the CRADA has been devoted to the development and optimization of resin systems and PMCs that match the performance of thermal cured composites. This highly successful materials development effort has resulted in a board family of high performance, electron beam curable cationic epoxy resin systems possessing a wide range of excellent processing and property profiles. Hundreds of resin systems, both toughened and untoughened, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility have been developed and evaluated in the CRADA program.

  17. Designing high frequency ac inductors using ferrite and Molypermalloy Powder Cores (MPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, W. T.; Wagner, A. P.

    1985-01-01

    The major considerations in the design of high frequency ac inductors are reviewed. Two methods for designing the inductor: the area product method and the core geometry method, are presented. The two major effects of the inductor air gap, fringing flux power loss and increase of inductance, are discussed. Equations for the inductor design and a step-by-step design procedure are given. The use of a lumped air gap or a distributed air gap are discussed and a comparison of the losses resulting from these gaps, together with experimental results are presented.

  18. Nonlinear optics in Xe-filled hollow-core PCF in high pressure and supercritical regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Azhar, M; Travers, J C; Russell, P St J

    2013-01-01

    Supercritical Xe at 293 K offers a Kerr nonlinearity that can exceed that of fused silica while being free of Raman scattering. It also has a much higher optical damage threshold and a transparency window that extends from the UV to the infrared. We report the observation of nonlinear phenomena, such as self-phase modulation, in hollow-core photonic crystal fiber filled with supercritical Xe. In the subcritical regime, intermodal four-wave-mixing resulted in the generation of UV light in the HE12 mode. The normal dispersion of the fiber at high pressures means that spectral broadening can clearly obtained without influence from soliton effects or material damage.

  19. Highly tunable large core single-mode liquid crystal photonic bandgap fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alkeskjold, Thomas Tanggaard; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard;

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate a highly tunable photonic bandgap fiber, which has a large-core diameter of 25 mu m and an effective mode area of 440 mu m(2). The tunability is achieved by infiltrating the air holes of a photonic crystal fiber with an optimized liquid-crystal mixture having a large temperature...... gradient of the refractive indices at room temperature. A bandgap tuning sensitivity of 27 nm/degrees C is achieved at room temperature. The insertion loss is estimated to be less than 0.5 dB and caused mainly by coupling loss between the index-guided mode and the bandgap-guided mode. (c) 2006 Optical...

  20. Highly tuneable hole quantum dots in Ge-Si core-shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauns, Matthias; Ridderbos, Joost; Li, Ang; van der Wiel, Wilfred G.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.; Zwanenburg, Floris A.

    2016-10-01

    We define single quantum dots of lengths varying from 60 nm up to nearly half a micron in Ge-Si core-shell nanowires. The charging energies scale inversely with the quantum dot length between 18 and 4 meV. Subsequently, we split up a long dot into a double quantum dot with a separate control over the tunnel couplings and the electrochemical potential of each dot. Both single and double quantum dot configurations prove to be very stable and show excellent control over the electrostatic environment of the dots, making this system a highly versatile platform for spin-based quantum computing.