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Sample records for high cooling rates

  1. The Effect of Cooling Rate on the Microstructure of High Pressure Die Casting Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Ian R.

    The current research project explored the effect that heat extraction has on the micro-constituents of the A380 and Silafont 36 high pressure die casting (HPDC) alloys. Phase evolution and distribution, SDAS measurements, and the alpha and beta iron-bearing phases were all examined as a function of heat extraction. Literature was found to be limited on the quantification of the micro-constituents of these two alloys as a function of cooling rate. Different cooling rate apparatuses were used to manipulate the alloys via heat extraction. Magma simulations of the mold were run and Pandat thermodynamic calculations determined the solidus and liquidus of the alloys based on composition. Statistical testing was done on the SDAS measurements. The A380 alpha and beta phase were measured along with the SDAS to create quantitative correlation. Beginning with the A380 microstructure, the FCC-Al, beta/alpha phase, and the Al-Cu phases appeared in the slow and fast cooled sample confirmed by visual and EDS analysis. Cooling rate has the ability to refine microstructure and distribute phases more effectively at higher heat extraction rates but heat extraction rates cannot eliminate the type of phases formed and their specific morphology within the A380 alloy seen at lower cooling rates. The reason is due to the similar phases in fast and slow cooled samples. Higher heat extraction rates can however form unpredicted phase with chemical compositions not usually seen. The reason is due to unique phases with Cu/Zn/Mg found in the A380. The beta phase composition contains Al-Si-Fe and the alpha phase composition contained Al-Si-Fe-Mn. Manganese was also seen to substitute for the Fe to create the Mn-alpha phase with the A380 alloy. The Al-Cu phase appears to have used the iron-bearing phases as nucleation spot thus confirming its phase order to be after that of the FCC, Al-Si eutectic, and iron bearing phases. All confirmed by EDS and visual analysis. The Al-FCC, Alpha-Mn, Al

  2. Effect of cooling rate on structural and electromagnetic properties of high-carbon ferrochrome powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jian-ping [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024, Shanxi (China); Chen, Jin, E-mail: chenjin_ty@126.com [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024, Shanxi (China); Hao, Jiu-jiu; Guo, Li-na [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024, Shanxi (China); Liu, Jin-ying [The 12th Institute of China Electronics Technology Group Corporation, Beijing 100016 (China)

    2016-03-01

    The structural and electromagnetic properties of high-carbon ferrochrome powders (HCFCP) obtained at different cooling rates were respectively investigated by means of optical microscope, X-ray diffractometer, electron probe as well as the vector network analyzer in the frequency range of 1–18 GHz. The results show that the cell structure of main phase, (Cr,Fe){sub 7}C{sub 3}, transforms from hexagonal to orthogonal with the improvement of cooling rate. Meanwhile the mass ratio of Cr to Fe in (Cr,Fe){sub 7}C{sub 3} gradually declines, while that for CrFe goes up. Both the real part and the imaginary part of relative complex permittivity of HCFCP are in an increasing order with cooling rate rising in most frequencies. For comparison, the relative complex permeability presents an opposite changing tendency. The peaks of the imaginary part of relative complex permeability appearing in low and high frequencies are attributed to nature resonance. The reflection loss of HCFCP gradually decreases as cooling rate reduces and frequency enhances. At 2.45 GHz, the algebraic sum of dielectric loss factor and magnetic loss factor increases first and then decreases in the temperature extent from 298 K to 1273 K. - Highlights: • The changes of phases in structure and composition are found as cooling rate rises. • The relation between dielectric property and covalent bond is preliminarily studied. • The forming factor of peaks in the imaginary part of permeability is determined. • The reflection loss is analyzed basing on morphology features of particle. • The effect of temperature on loss factor is discussed from 298 K to 1273 K.

  3. The Relationship between Dendrite Arm Spacing and Cooling Rate of Al-Si Casting Alloys in High Pressure Die Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Jae-Ik; Kim, Cheol-Woo; Kim, Young-Chan; Choi, Se-Weon; Kang, Chang-Seog

    The effects of cooling rate on the solidification behavior of Al-8.5%Si-3%Cu and Al-11%Si-3%Cu alloys were studied during high pressure die casting (HPDC). The HPDC experiment was conducted by using the dies with 3 steps for 3 different cooling rates. Because of the high in both melt temperature and pressure, it was difficult to obtain the temperature profile directly from HPDC specimen. Therefore, in this study, cylindrical bar castings with different diameter were poured to acquire the cooling curves at the solidification range of 15°C/s up to 100°C/s and then the microstructures were compared to estimate the cooling rate in HPDC. The solidification characteristics including liquidus/solidus temperature and dendrite arm spacing of each alloy and each cooling rate was analyzed and the results showed strong proportional relationship between dendrite arm spacing and cooling rate in HPDC. The results were also compared with the actual die casting specimens and MAGMA simulation.

  4. Effect of Cooling Rate on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties in SA508 Gr4N High Strength Low Alloy Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Minchul; Park, Sanggyu; Choi, Kwonjae; Lee, Bongsang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The microstructure of Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel is a mixture of tempered martensite and tempered lower bainite and that of Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel is predominantly tempered upper bainite. Higher strength and toughness steels are very attractive as an eligible RPV steel, so several researchers have studied to use the Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel for the NPP application. Because of the thickness of reactor vessel, there are large differences in austenitizing cooling rates between the surface and the center locations of thickness in RPV. Because the cooling rates after austenitization determine the microstructure, it would affect the mechanical properties in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel, and it may lead to inhomogeneous characteristics when the commercial scale of RPV is fabricated. In order to apply the Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel to RPV, it is necessary to evaluate the changes of microstructure and mechanical properties with varying phase fractions in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel. In this study, the effects of martensite and bainite fractions on mechanical properties in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel were examined by controlling the cooling rate after austenitization. First of all, continuous cooling transformation(CCT) diagram was established from the dilatometric analyses. Then, the phase fractions at each cooling rate were quantitatively evaluated. Finally, the mechanical properties were correlated with the phase fraction, especially fraction of martensite in Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel.

  5. Effectiveness of eugenol sedation to reduce the metabolic rates of cool and warm water fish at high loading densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupp, Aaron R.; Hartleb, Christopher F.; Fredricks, Kim T.; Gaikowski, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    Effects of eugenol (AQUI-S®20E, 10% active eugenol) sedation on cool water, yellow perch Perca flavescens (Mitchill), and warm water, Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus L. fish metabolic rates were assessed. Both species were exposed to 0, 10, 20 and 30 mg L−1 eugenol using static respirometry. In 17°C water and loading densities of 60, 120 and 240 g L−1, yellow perch controls (0 mg L−1 eugenol) had metabolic rates of 329.6–400.0 mg O2 kg−1 h−1, while yellow perch exposed to 20 and 30 mg L−1 eugenol had significantly reduced metabolic rates of 258.4–325.6 and 189.1–271.0 mg O2 kg−1 h−1 respectively. Nile tilapia exposed to 30 mg L−1 eugenol had a significantly reduced metabolic rate (424.5 ± 42.3 mg O2 kg−1 h−1) relative to the 0 mg L−1 eugenol control (546.6 ± 53.5 mg O2 kg−1 h−1) at a loading density of 120 g L−1 in 22°C water. No significant differences in metabolic rates for Nile tilapia were found at 240 or 360 g L−1 loading densities when exposed to eugenol. Results suggest that eugenol sedation may benefit yellow perch welfare at high densities (e.g. live transport) due to a reduction in metabolic rates, while further research is needed to assess the benefits of eugenol sedation on Nile tilapia at high loading densities.

  6. Crystal Phases Formed in a CaO-Fe2O3 System Under a High Cooling Rate in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwaya, Yoshiaki

    2017-10-01

    A CaO-Fe2O3 system is a fundamental binary system for the iron ore sintering process. Although the basic reactions have been investigated since the 1960s, melting and solidification caused by the combustion of coke results in an unstable state owing to extreme temperature variations. In this study, using a hot thermocouple method, samples of 10 pct CaO-90 pct Fe2O3 and 20 pct CaO-80 pct Fe2O3 were melted on a thermocouple and quenched with several techniques. The obtained samples were precisely examined by XRD. It was found that the sample containing 10 pct CaO-90 pct Fe2O3 changed to 10 pct CaO-13 pct FeO-77 pct Fe2O3 under an oxygen partial pressure ( P_{{{O}2 }} ) of 0.21 during melting. For the 10 pct CaO sample, the crystal phases found at a low cooling rate (509 K/s) were WFss, C4WF8 (C: CaO, W: FeO, F: Fe2O3), and C2W4F9. When the sample composition was 20 pct CaO, the precipitated crystal phases were C4WF4, C4F7, and C4WF8. On the other hand, the crystal phases for high cooling rates (1590 and 7900 K/s) with 10 pct CaO were WFss (solid solution of WF and F), F, and C2W4F9. The formation of the equilibrium phases WFss, F, C4WF4, and C4WF8 can be understood by examining the isothermal section of the phase diagrams, while the unstable phases C2W4F9 and C4F7 are discussed on the basis of the reactions under an equilibrium state.

  7. Crystal Phases Formed in a CaO-Fe2O3 System Under a High Cooling Rate in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwaya, Yoshiaki

    2017-12-01

    A CaO-Fe2O3 system is a fundamental binary system for the iron ore sintering process. Although the basic reactions have been investigated since the 1960s, melting and solidification caused by the combustion of coke results in an unstable state owing to extreme temperature variations. In this study, using a hot thermocouple method, samples of 10 pct CaO-90 pct Fe2O3 and 20 pct CaO-80 pct Fe2O3 were melted on a thermocouple and quenched with several techniques. The obtained samples were precisely examined by XRD. It was found that the sample containing 10 pct CaO-90 pct Fe2O3 changed to 10 pct CaO-13 pct FeO-77 pct Fe2O3 under an oxygen partial pressure ( P_{{{O}2 }} ) of 0.21 during melting. For the 10 pct CaO sample, the crystal phases found at a low cooling rate (509 K/s) were WFss, C4WF8 (C: CaO, W: FeO, F: Fe2O3), and C2W4F9. When the sample composition was 20 pct CaO, the precipitated crystal phases were C4WF4, C4F7, and C4WF8. On the other hand, the crystal phases for high cooling rates (1590 and 7900 K/s) with 10 pct CaO were WFss (solid solution of WF and F), F, and C2W4F9. The formation of the equilibrium phases WFss, F, C4WF4, and C4WF8 can be understood by examining the isothermal section of the phase diagrams, while the unstable phases C2W4F9 and C4F7 are discussed on the basis of the reactions under an equilibrium state.

  8. Cryopreservation: Vitrification and Controlled Rate Cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Charles J

    2017-01-01

    Cryopreservation is the application of low temperatures to preserve the structural and functional integrity of cells and tissues. Conventional cooling protocols allow ice to form and solute concentrations to rise during the cryopreservation process. The damage caused by the rise in solute concentration can be mitigated by the use of compounds known as cryoprotectants. Such compounds protect cells from the consequences of slow cooling injury, allowing them to be cooled at cooling rates which avoid the lethal effects of intracellular ice. An alternative to conventional cooling is vitrification. Vitrification methods incorporate cryoprotectants at sufficiently high concentrations to prevent ice crystallization so that the system forms an amorphous glass thus avoiding the damaging effects caused by conventional slow cooling. However, vitrification too can impose damaging consequences on cells as the cryoprotectant concentrations required to vitrify cells at lower cooling rates are potentially, and often, harmful. While these concentrations can be lowered to nontoxic levels, if the cells are ultra-rapidly cooled, the resulting metastable system can lead to damage through devitrification and growth of ice during subsequent storage and rewarming if not appropriately handled.The commercial and clinical application of stem cells requires robust and reproducible cryopreservation protocols and appropriate long-term, low-temperature storage conditions to provide reliable master and working cell banks. Though current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) compliant methods for the derivation and banking of clinical grade pluripotent stem cells exist and stem cell lines suitable for clinical applications are available, current cryopreservation protocols, whether for vitrification or conventional slow freezing, remain suboptimal. Apart from the resultant loss of valuable product that suboptimal cryopreservation engenders, there is a danger that such processes will impose a selective

  9. Effect of Cooling Rate on Microstructure and Centerline Segregation of a High-Strength Steel for Shipbuilding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qibin; Liu, Zhenyu; Wang, Guodong

    Ultra-fast cooling (UFC) has been increasingly applied in industry, but accompanying with great changes of rolling strategy. It is therefore of importance to evaluate the characteristics of steels produced by UFC as compared to those processed by conventional accelerated cooling (ACQ. The present study examines the microstructure through thickness and centerline segregation of solute elements between UFC and ACC steels, both of which were rolled at a final rolling temperature at around non-recrystallized temperature. UFC steel showed the pronounced microstructural transition from lath-type bainite with Widmanstätten ferrite at subsurface to acicular ferrite in an average size of 5 µm dispersed with degenerate pearlite in the interior. In contrast, ACC steel had the homogeneous microstructure through the thickness, which was distinguished with coarser polygonal ferrite grains and pearlite nodules. Moreover, the centerline segregation was significantly suppressed by applying UFC at a higher cooling rate of 40 K/s compared to 17K/s for ACC steel. The significant differences in the microstructure and centerline segregation caused by various cooling rate is discussed from the view of γ→α transformation.

  10. Cooling Rates of Lunar Volcanic Glass Beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, Hejiu; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Zhang, Youxue; Peslier, Anne; Lange, Rebecca; Dingwell, Donald; Neal, Clive

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the Apollo 15 green and Apollo 17 orange glass beads are of volcanic origin. The diffusion profiles of volatiles in these glass beads are believed to be due to degassing during eruption (Saal et al., 2008). The degree of degassing depends on the initial temperature and cooling rate. Therefore, the estimations of volatiles in parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits depend on melt cooling rates. Furthermore, lunar glass beads may have cooled in volcanic environments on the moon. Therefore, the cooling rates may be used to assess the atmospheric condition in an early moon, when volcanic activities were common. The cooling rates of glasses can be inferred from direct heat capacity measurements on the glasses themselves (Wilding et al., 1995, 1996a,b). This method does not require knowledge of glass cooling environments and has been applied to calculate the cooling rates of natural silicate glasses formed in different terrestrial environments. We have carried out heat capacity measurements on hand-picked lunar glass beads using a Netzsch DSC 404C Pegasus differential scanning calorimeter at University of Munich. Our preliminary results suggest that the cooling rate of Apollo 17 orange glass beads may be 12 K/min, based on the correlation between temperature of the heat capacity curve peak in the glass transition range and glass cooling rate. The results imply that the parental magmas of lunar pyroclastic deposits may have contained more water initially than the early estimations (Saal et al., 2008), which used higher cooling rates, 60-180 K/min in the modeling. Furthermore, lunar volcanic glass beads could have been cooled in a hot gaseous medium released from volcanic eruptions, not during free flight. Therefore, our results may shed light on atmospheric condition in an early moon.

  11. In-situ characterization of laser-powder interaction and cooling rates through high-speed imaging of powder bed fusion additive manufacturing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scipioni Bertoli, Umberto; Guss, Gabe; Wu, Sheldon; Matthews, Manyalibo J.; Schoenung, Julie M.

    2017-12-01

    Detailed understanding of the complex melt pool physics plays a vital role in predicting optimal processing regimes in laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing. In this work, we use high framerate video recording of Selective Laser Melting (SLM) to provide useful insight on the laser-powder interaction and melt pool evolution of 316 L powder layers, while also serving as a novel instrument to quantify cooling rates of the melt pool. The experiment was performed using two powder types – one gas- and one water-atomized – to further clarify how morphological and chemical differences between these two feedstock materials influence the laser melting process. Finally, experimentally determined cooling rates are compared with values obtained through computer simulation, and the relationship between cooling rate and grain cell size is compared with data previously published in the literature.

  12. The appearance of erythrocyte membrane elevations Effects of cooling rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goekoop, J.G.; Spies, F.; Wisse, D.M.; Vries, E. de; Verkleij, A.J.; Kempen, G.M.J. van

    Low cooling rates during the freezing procedure of normal human blood reveals red cell membrane elevations in freeze-etch electron microscopy. When high cooling rate is applied, these morphological changes are present, if the blood samples are quenched from 5 °C. The number of elevations is

  13. Turbine airfoil cooling system with cooling systems using high and low pressure cooling fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jan H.; Messmann, Stephen John; Scribner, Carmen Andrew

    2017-10-25

    A turbine airfoil cooling system including a low pressure cooling system and a high pressure cooling system for a turbine airfoil of a gas turbine engine is disclosed. In at least one embodiment, the low pressure cooling system may be an ambient air cooling system, and the high pressure cooling system may be a compressor bleed air cooling system. In at least one embodiment, the compressor bleed air cooling system in communication with a high pressure subsystem that may be a snubber cooling system positioned within a snubber. A delivery system including a movable air supply tube may be used to separate the low and high pressure cooling subsystems. The delivery system may enable high pressure cooling air to be passed to the snubber cooling system separate from low pressure cooling fluid supplied by the low pressure cooling system to other portions of the turbine airfoil cooling system.

  14. Microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of a novel FeCrNiBSi advanced high-strength steel: Slow, accelerated and fast casting cooling rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Askari-Paykani, Mohsen; Shahverdi, Hamid Reza, E-mail: shahverdi@modares.ac.ir; Miresmaeili, Reza

    2016-06-21

    In the current work, three different solidification routes and a two-step heat treatment process were applied to a novel FeCrNiBSi alloy system to introduce a new candidate for advanced high-strength steels. The evolution of the microstructure after solidification, heat treatment, and tensile deformation was characterized using optical and electron microscopy techniques, as well as hardness and room temperature uniaxial tensile tests. The effects of the different solidification routes and heat treatment parameters on the deformation and fracture mechanisms of this steel are discussed. Grain refinement, precipitation hardening, and solid solution as a result of the fast casting cooling rate led to an increase in strength at improved ductility. This result can be explained partly by the less severe stress/strain partitioning at the matrix grain/M{sub 2}B interfaces and better interface cohesion. Moreover, the stress/strain partitioning characteristics between the matrix grains and M{sub 2}B led to a higher initial strain hardening rate. The fast casting cooling rate further promoted ductile fracture mechanisms, which is a result of increased cleavage fracture stress. The higher casting cooling rate and two-step heat treatment resulted in a strong increase in formability index, from 8 GPa% to 24 GPa%, at which the mechanical properties occupy the TRIP envelope. Heat treatment of the fast-cooling specimens led to a small reduction in yield and tensile strength and 22% total elongation percentage improvement (from 10% to 32%).

  15. Microbunched electron cooling for high-energy hadron beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, D

    2013-08-23

    Electron and stochastic cooling are proven methods for cooling low-energy hadron beams, but at present there is no way of cooling hadrons as they near the TeV scale. In the 1980s, Derbenev suggested that electron instabilities, such as free-electron lasers, could create collective space charge fields strong enough to correct the hadron energies. This Letter presents a variation on Derbenev's electron cooling scheme using the microbunching instability as the amplifier. The large bandwidth of the instability allows for faster cooling of high-density beams. A simple analytical model illustrates the cooling mechanism, and simulations show cooling rates for realistic parameters of the Large Hadron Collider.

  16. Metallographic cooling rates of L-group ordinary chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Marvin E.; Mcsween, Harry Y., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Shock metamorphism appears to be a ubiquitous feature in L-group ordinary chondrites. Brecciation and heterogeneous melting obscure much of the early history of this meteorite group and have caused confusion as to whether L chondrites have undergone thermal metamorphism within onion-shell or rubble-pile parent bodies. Employing the most recent shock criteria, we have examined 55 Antarctic and 24 non-Antarctic L chondrites in order to identify those which have been least affected by post-accretional shock. Six low-shock samples (those with shock grade less than S4) of petrographic types L3-L5 were selected from both populations and metallographic cooling rates were obtained following the technique of Willis and Goldstein. All non-Antarctic L6 chondrites inspected were too heavily shocked to be included in this group. However, 4 shocked L6 chondrites were analyzed in order to determine what effects shock may impose on metallographic cooling rates. Metallographic cooling rates were derived by analyzing the cores of taenite grains and then measuring the distance to the nearest grain edge. Taenites were identified using backscatter imaging on a Cameca SX-50 electron microprobe. Using backscatter we were able to locate homogeneous, rust-free, nearly spherical grains. M-shaped profiles taken from grain traverses were also used to help locate the central portions of selected grains. All points which contained phosphorus above detection limits were discarded. Plots of cooling-rate data are summarized and data from the high-shock samples are presented. The lack of coherency of cooling rates for individual samples is indicative of heterogeneous cooling following shock. The data confirms the statement expressed by numerous workers that extreme care must be taken when selecting samples of L chondrites for cooling-rate studies. Data for the 6 non-Antarctic low-shock samples are also presented. The samples display a general trend in cooling rates. The lowest metamorphic grade

  17. Cryogenic cooling for high power laser amplifiers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perin J.P.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Using DPSSL (Diode Pumped Solid State Lasers as pumping technology, PW-class lasers with enhanced repetition rates are developed. Each of the Yb YAG amplifiers will be diode-pumped at a wavelength of 940 nm. This is a prerequisite for achieving high repetition rates (light amplification duration 1 millisecond and repetition rate 10 Hz. The efficiency of DPSSL is inversely proportional to the temperature, for this reason the slab amplifier have to be cooled at a temperature in the range of 100 K–170 K with a heat flux of 1 MW*m−2. This paper describes the thermo-mechanical analysis for the design of the amplification laser head, presents a preliminary proposal for the required cryogenic cooling system and finally outlines the gain of cryogenic operation for the efficiency of high pulsed laser.

  18. Design and demonstration of heat pipe cooling for NASP and evaluation of heating methods at high heating rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    An evaluation of two heating methods for demonstration of NASP leading edge heat pipe technology was conducted. The heating methods were and rf induction heated plasma jet and direct rf induction. Tests were conducted to determine coupling from the argon plasma jet on a surface physically similar to a heat pipe. A molybdenum tipped calorimeter was fabricated and installed in an rf induction heated plasma jet for the test. The calorimetric measurements indicated a maximum power coupling of approximately 500 W/cm{sup 2} with the rf plasma jet. The effect of change in gas composition on the heating rate was investigated using helium. An alternative to the plasma heating of a heat pipe tip, an rf concentrator was evaluated for coupling to the hemispherical tip of a heat pipe. A refractory metal heat pipe was designed, fabricated, and tested for the evaluation. The heat pipe was designed for operation at 1400 to 1900 K with power input to 1000 W/cm{sup 2} over a hemispherical nose tip. Power input of 800 W/cm{sup 2} was demonstrated using the rf concentrator. 2 refs., 13 figs.

  19. Cooled membrane for high sensitivity gas sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ruifen; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2014-04-18

    A novel sample preparation method that combines the advantages of high surface area geometry and cold surface effect was proposed to achieve high sensitivity gas sampling. To accomplish this goal, a device that enables the membrane to be cooled down was developed for sampling, and a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer was used for separation and quantification analysis. Method development included investigation of the effect of membrane temperature, membrane size, gas flow rate and humidity. Results showed that high sensitivity for equilibrium sampling, such as limonene sampling in the current study could be achieved by either cooling down the membrane and/or using a large volume extraction phase. On the other hand, for pre-equilibrium extraction, in which the extracted amount was mainly determined by membrane surface area and diffusion coefficient, high sensitivity could be obtained by using thinner membranes with a larger surface and/or a higher sampling flow rate. In addition, humidity showed no significant influence on extraction efficiency, due to the absorption property of the liquid extraction phase. Next, the limit of detection (LOD) was found, and the reproducibility of the developed cooled membrane gas sampling method was evaluated. Results showed that LODs with a membrane diameter of 19mm at room temperature sampling were 9.2ng/L, 0.12ng/L, 0.10ng/L for limonene, cinnamaldehyde and 2-pentadecanone, respectively. Intra- and inter-membrane sampling reproducibility revealed RSD% lower than 8% and 13%, respectively. Results uniformly demonstrated that the proposed cooled membrane device could serve as an alternative powerful tool for future gas sampling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Effectiveness of hand cooling and a cooling jacket on post-exercise cooling rates in hyperthermic athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroni, Tessa; Dawson, Brian; Barnett, Kimberley; Guelfi, Kym; Brade, Carly; Naylor, Louise; Brydges, Chris; Wallman, Karen

    2018-01-24

    This study compared the effects of a hand cooling glove (∼16°C water temperature; subatmospheric pressure of -40 mmHg) and a cooling jacket (CJ) on post-exercise cooling rates (gastrointestinal core temperature, Tc; skin temperature, Tsk) and cognitive performance (the Stroop Colour-Word test). Twelve male athletes performed four trials (within subjects, counterbalanced design) involving cycling at a workload equivalent to 75% ⩒O 2 max in heat (35.7 ± 0.2°C, 49.2 ± 2.6% RH) until a Tc of 39°C or exhaustion occurred. A 30-min cooling period (in 22.3 ± 0.3°C, 42.1 ± 3.6% RH) followed, where participants adopted either one-hand cooling (1H), two-hand cooling (2H), wore a CJ or no cooling (NC). No significant differences were seen in Tc and Tsk cooling rates between trials; however, moderate effect sizes (d = 0.50-0.76) suggested Tc cooling rates to be faster for 1H, 2H and CJ compared to NC after 5 min; 1H and CJ compared to NC after 10 min and for CJ to be faster than 2H at 25-30 min. Reaction times on the cognitive test were similar between all trials after the 30 min cooling/no-cooling period (p > .05). In conclusion, Tc cooling rates were faster with 1H and CJ during the first 10 min compared to NC, with minimal benefit associated with 2H cooling. Reaction time responses were not impacted by the use of the glove(s) or CJ.

  1. Highly efficient electrocaloric cooling with electrostatic actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rujun; Zhang, Ziyang; Tong, Kwing; Huber, David; Kornbluh, Roy; Ju, Yongho Sungtaek; Pei, Qibing

    2017-09-01

    Solid-state refrigeration offers potential advantages over traditional cooling systems, but few devices offer high specific cooling power with a high coefficient of performance (COP) and the ability to be applied directly to surfaces. We developed a cooling device with a high intrinsic thermodynamic efficiency using a flexible electrocaloric (EC) polymer film and an electrostatic actuation mechanism. Reversible electrostatic forces reduce parasitic power consumption and allow efficient heat transfer through good thermal contacts with the heat source or heat sink. The EC device produced a specific cooling power of 2.8 watts per gram and a COP of 13. The new cooling device is more efficient and compact than existing surface-conformable solid-state cooling technologies, opening a path to using the technology for a variety of practical applications.

  2. Structure formation in sugar containing pectin gels - influence of tartaric acid content (pH) and cooling rate on the gelation of high-methoxylated pectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, H; Kern, K; Wilde, R; Berthold, A; Einhorn-Stoll, U; Drusch, S

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was the application of a recently published method, using structuring parameters calculated from dG'/dt, for the characterisation of the pectin sugar acid gelation process. The influence of cooling rate and pH on structure formation of HM pectin gels containing 65 wt.% sucrose were investigated. The results show that the structure formation process as well as the properties of the final gels strongly depended on both parameters. With increasing cooling rates from 0.5 to 1.0 K/min the initial structuring temperature slightly decreased and the maximum structuring velocity increased. The lower the cooling rates, the firmer and more elastic were the final gels. With increasing acid content (decreasing pH from 2.5-2.0) the initial structuring temperatures were nearly constant. The final gel properties varied visibly but not systematically. Gels with the lowest and highest pH were less elastic and weaker compared to those with medium acid concentrations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of cooling rate on crystallization in an aluminophosphosilicate melt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, S. J.; Zhang, Yanfei; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2011-01-01

    The effect of cooling rate on spontaneous crystallization behavior of an alumino-phospho-silicate melt is studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and viscometry. The cooling rates of 160, 2100 and 12000 K/s are attained by subjecting...

  4. Influence of Cooling Rate on Microsegregation Behavior of Magnesium Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Imran Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of cooling rate on microstructure and microsegregation of three commercially important magnesium alloys was investigated using Wedge (V-shaped castings of AZ91D, AM60B, and AE44 alloys. Thermocouples were distributed to measure the cooling rate at six different locations of the wedge casts. Solute redistribution profiles were drawn based on the chemical composition analysis obtained by EDS/WDS analysis. Microstructural and morphological features such as dendrite arm spacing and secondary phase particle size were analyzed using both optical and scanning electron microscopes. Dendritic arm spacing and secondary phase particle size showed an increasing trend with decreasing cooling rate for the three alloys. Area percentage of secondary phase particles decreased with decreasing cooling rate for AE44 alloy. The trend was different for AZ91D and AM60B alloys, for both alloys, area percentage of β-Mg17Al12 increased with decreasing cooling rate up to location 4 and then decreased slightly. The tendency for microsegregation was more severe at slower cooling rates, possibly due to prolonged back diffusion. At slower cooling rate, the minimum concentration of aluminum at the dendritic core was lower compared to faster cooled locations. The segregation deviation parameter and the partition coefficient were calculated from the experimentally obtained data.

  5. Helium-cooled high temperature reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trauger, D.B.

    1985-01-01

    Experience with several helium cooled reactors has been favorable, and two commercial plants are now operating. Both of these units are of the High Temperature Graphite Gas Cooled concept, one in the United States and the other in the Federal Republic of Germany. The initial helium charge for a reactor of the 1000 MW(e) size is modest, approx.15,000 kg.

  6. High Performance Torso Cooling Garment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conger, Bruce; Makinen, Janice

    2016-01-01

    The concept proposed in this paper is to improve thermal efficiencies of the liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG) in the torso area, which could facilitate removal of LCVG tubing from the arms and legs, thereby increasing suited crew member mobility. EVA space suit mobility in micro-gravity is challenging, and it becomes even more challenging in the gravity of Mars. By using shaped water tubes that greatly increase the contact area with the skin in the torso region of the body, the heat transfer efficiency can be increased. This increase in efficiency could provide the required liquid cooling via torso tubing only; no arm or leg LCVG tubing would be required. Benefits of this approach include increased crewmember mobility, enhanced evaporation cooling, increased comfort during Mars EVA tasks, and easing of the overly dry condition in the helmet associated with the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) ventilation loop currently under development. This report describes analysis and test activities performed to evaluate the potential improvements to the thermal performance of the LCVG. Analyses evaluated potential tube shapes for improving the thermal performance of the LCVG. The analysis results fed into the selection of flat flow strips to improve thermal contact with the skin of the suited test subject. Testing of small segments was performed to compare thermal performance of the tubing approach of the current LCVG to the flat flow strips proposed as the new concept. Results of the testing is presented along with recommendations for future development of this new concept.

  7. EFFECT OF COOLING RATES ON THE MICROSTRUCTURE AND ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B eutectic prepared under various cooling rates had been investigated using differential thermal analysis (DTA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). It was observed that for ...

  8. Progress toward high energy electron cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergei Nagaitsev

    2001-07-20

    All electron cooling systems in operation to date can be classified as low energy systems. The electron beam kinetic energy in such a system is limited to about 0.6-1 MeV by the use of a conventional commercial Cockcroft-Walton high-voltage power supply. This, in turn, bounds the maximum ion kinetic energy, accessible for cooling with today's standard technology, to about 2 GeV/nucleon (about a factor of 2-3 times higher than the electron systems in operation today). Electron cooling systems with kinetic energies above 1 MeV could provide economically justifiable improvements in the performance of many existing and proposed accelerator complexes, such as RHIC, Tevatron and HERA. This paper reviews the status of the development of the technology needed for high energy electron cooling.

  9. Melting and crystallization of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate: effect of heating/cooling rates on phase transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renate Maria Ramos Wellen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWe studied the crystallization and melting phenomena of poly (3- hydroxybutyrate (PHB, a biodegradable and biocompatible semi-crystalline thermoplastic, obtained from renewable resources. Its high crystallinity motivated several studies on crystallization and melting behavior, and also on ways to increase the amorphous polymer fraction. The effect of heating and cooling rates on the crystallization and melting of commercial PHB was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. Several rates, ranging from 2.5 to 20 °C min–1, were used to study the phase changes during heating/cooling/reheating cycles. The results showed that PHB partially crystallizes from the melt during the cooling cycle and partially cold crystallizes on reheating, and that the relative amount of polymer crystallizing in each stage strongly depends on the cooling rate. The melt and cold crystallization temperatures, as well as the rates of phase change, depend strongly on the cooling and heating rates.

  10. Injection molding of ceramic filled polypropylene: The effect of thermal conductivity and cooling rate on crystallinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suplicz, A.; Szabo, F.; Kovacs, J.G., E-mail: kovacs@pt.bme.hu

    2013-12-20

    Highlights: • BN, talc and TiO{sub 2} in 30 vol% were compounded with polypropylene matrix. • According to the DSC measurements, the fillers are good nucleating agents. • The thermal conductivity of the fillers influences the cooling rate of the melt. • The higher the cooling rate is, the lower the crystallinity in the polymer matrix. - Abstract: Three different nano- and micro-sized ceramic powders (boron-nitride (BN), talc and titanium-dioxide (TiO{sub 2})) in 30 vol% have been compounded with a polypropylene (PP) matrix. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) shows that the particles are dispersed smoothly in the matrix and larger aggregates cannot be discovered. The cooling gradients and the cooling rate in the injection-molded samples were estimated with numerical simulations and finite element analysis software. It was proved with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) measurements that the cooling rate has significant influence on the crystallinity of the compounds. At a low cooling rate BN works as a nucleating agent so the crystallinity of the compound is higher than that of unfilled PP. On the other hand, at a high cooling rate, the crystallinity of the compound is lower than that of unfilled PP because of its higher thermal conductivity. The higher the thermal conductivity is, the higher the real cooling rate in the material, which influences the crystallization kinetics significantly.

  11. The influence of cooling rate on the ferrite content of stainless steel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, J.W.; Allen, S.M.; Eagar, T.W.

    1989-03-24

    Electron-beam surface melting was used to rapidly solidify a series of high-purity 59% Fe-Ni-Cr alloys at cooling rates between 7 /degree/C/s and 7.5 /times/ 10/sup 6/ /degree/C/s. The primary solidification mode was identified in each of the resolidified melts using optical metallography; the residual ferrite content was measured using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The cooling rate was shown to dramatically alter the residual ferrite content of these alloys through its influence on the amount of solute redistribution that occurs during solidification and through its subsequent influence on the extent of the solid-state transformation of ferrite. The results show that the solidification mode, cooling rate, and specific alloy composition are equally important, interrelated factors in the prediction of the residual ferrite. The residual ferrite content of primary-austenite solidified alloys decreases with increasing cooling rate whereas the residual ferrite content of primary-ferrite solidified alloys increases with increasing cooling rate. Exceptions to this general behavior occur when: ferrite transforms to austenite by a massive transformation in fully-ferritic-solidified alloys and an alloy changes its mode of solidification from primary-ferrite at low cooling rates to primary-austenite at high cooling rates. 12 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Solute partitioning under continuous cooling conditions as a cooling rate indicator. [in lunar rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onorato, P. I. K.; Hopper, R. W.; Yinnon, H.; Uhlmann, D. R.; Taylor, L. A.; Garrison, J. R.; Hunter, R.

    1981-01-01

    A model of solute partitioning in a finite body under conditions of continuous cooling is developed for the determination of cooling rates from concentration profile data, and applied to the partitioning of zirconium between ilmenite and ulvospinel in the Apollo 15 Elbow Crater rocks. Partitioning in a layered composite solid is described numerically in terms of concentration profiles and diffusion coefficients which are functions of time and temperature, respectively; a program based on the model can be used to calculate concentration profiles for various assumed cooling rates given the diffusion coefficients in the two phases and the equilibrium partitioning ratio over a range of temperatures. In the case of the Elbow Rock gabbros, the cooling rates are calculated from measured concentration ratios 10 microns from the interphase boundaries under the assumptions of uniform and equilibrium initial conditions at various starting temperatures. It is shown that the specimens could not have had uniform concentrations profiles at the previously suggested initial temperature of 1350 K. It is concluded that even under conditions where the initial temperature, grain sizes and solute diffusion coefficients are not well characterized, the model can be used to estimate the cooling rate of a grain assemblage to within an order of magnitude.

  13. Controlled rate cooling of fungi using a stirling cycle freezer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Matthew J; Kasulyte-Creasey, Daiva; Kermode, Anthony; San, Shwe Phue; Buddie, Alan G

    2014-01-01

    The use of a Stirling cycle freezer for cryopreservation is considered to have significant advantages over traditional methodologies including N2 free operation, application of low cooling rates, reduction of sample contamination risks and control of ice nucleation. The study assesses the suitability of an 'N2-free' Stirling Cycle controlled rate freezer for fungi cryopreservation. In total, 77 fungi representing a broad taxonomic coverage were cooled using the N2 free cooler following a cooling rate of -1 degrees C min(-1). Of these, 15 strains were also cryopreserved using a traditional 'N2 gas chamber' controlled rate cooler and a comparison of culture morphology and genomic stability against non-cryopreserved starter cultures was undertaken. In total of 75 fungi survived cryopreservation, only a recalcitrant Basidiomycete and filamentous Chromist failed to survive. No changes were detected in genomic profile after preservation, suggesting that genomic function is not adversely compromised as a result of using 'N2 free' cooling. The results demonstrate the potential of 'N2-free' cooling for the routine cryopreservation of fungi in Biological Resource Centres.

  14. Experimental evaluation of cooling efficiency of the high performance cooling device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemec, Patrik, E-mail: patrik.nemec@fstroj.uniza.sk; Malcho, Milan, E-mail: milan.malcho@fstroj.uniza.sk [University of Žilina, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Power Engineering, Univerzitna 1, 010 26 Žilina (Slovakia)

    2016-06-30

    This work deal with experimental evaluation of cooling efficiency of cooling device capable transfer high heat fluxes from electric elements to the surrounding. The work contain description of cooling device, working principle of cooling device, construction of cooling device. Experimental part describe the measuring method of device cooling efficiency evaluation. The work results are presented in graphic visualization of temperature dependence of the contact area surface between cooling device evaporator and electronic components on the loaded heat of electronic components in range from 250 to 740 W and temperature dependence of the loop thermosiphon condenser surface on the loaded heat of electronic components in range from 250 to 740 W.

  15. Effect of cooling rate on the microstructure and mechanical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... attributed to the presence of manganese. In addition, variation in cooling rate led to increase in strength but severely affected percentage elongation albeit in an acceptable limit of 6%. This effect is discussed in the light of degree of banding of strips and microstructural constituents generated during heat treatment of steel ...

  16. MEASURING THE EVOLUTIONARY RATE OF COOLING OF ZZ Ceti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukadam, Anjum S.; Fraser, Oliver; Riecken, T. S.; Kronberg, M. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Bischoff-Kim, Agnes [Georgia College and State University, Milledgeville, GA 31061 (United States); Corsico, A. H. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata (Argentina); Montgomery, M. H.; Winget, D. E.; Hermes, J. J.; Winget, K. I.; Falcon, Ross E.; Reaves, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78759 (United States); Kepler, S. O.; Romero, A. D. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre 91501-970, RS (Brazil); Chandler, D. W. [Meyer Observatory, Central Texas Astronomical Society, 3409 Whispering Oaks, Temple, TX 76504 (United States); Kuehne, J. W. [McDonald Observatory, Fort Davis, TX 79734 (United States); Sullivan, D. J. [Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington (New Zealand); Von Hippel, T. [Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, 600 South Clyde Morris Boulevard, Daytona Beach, FL 32114 (United States); Mullally, F. [SETI Institute, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 244-30, Moffet Field, CA 94035 (United States); Shipman, H. [Delaware Asteroseismic Research Center, Mt. Cuba Observatory, Greenville, DE 19807 (United States); and others

    2013-07-01

    We have finally measured the evolutionary rate of cooling of the pulsating hydrogen atmosphere (DA) white dwarf ZZ Ceti (Ross 548), as reflected by the drift rate of the 213.13260694 s period. Using 41 yr of time-series photometry from 1970 November to 2012 January, we determine the rate of change of this period with time to be dP/dt = (5.2 {+-} 1.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1} employing the O - C method and (5.45 {+-} 0.79) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1} using a direct nonlinear least squares fit to the entire lightcurve. We adopt the dP/dt obtained from the nonlinear least squares program as our final determination, but augment the corresponding uncertainty to a more realistic value, ultimately arriving at the measurement of dP/dt = (5.5 {+-} 1.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1}. After correcting for proper motion, the evolutionary rate of cooling of ZZ Ceti is computed to be (3.3 {+-} 1.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1}. This value is consistent within uncertainties with the measurement of (4.19 {+-} 0.73) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1} for another similar pulsating DA white dwarf, G 117-B15A. Measuring the cooling rate of ZZ Ceti helps us refine our stellar structure and evolutionary models, as cooling depends mainly on the core composition and stellar mass. Calibrating white dwarf cooling curves with this measurement will reduce the theoretical uncertainties involved in white dwarf cosmochronometry. Should the 213.13 s period be trapped in the hydrogen envelope, then our determination of its drift rate compared to the expected evolutionary rate suggests an additional source of stellar cooling. Attributing the excess cooling to the emission of axions imposes a constraint on the mass of the hypothetical axion particle.

  17. Hybrid Cooling Loop Technology for Robust High Heat Flux Cooling Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. proposes to develop a hybrid cooling loop technology for space thermal control. The proposed technology combines the high heat...

  18. Effect of Cooling Rate on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Eutectoid Steel Under Cyclic Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maji, Soma; Subhani, Amir Raza; Show, Bijay Kumar; Maity, Joydeep

    2017-07-01

    A systematic study has been carried out to ascertain the effect of cooling rate on structure and mechanical properties of eutectoid steel subjected to a novel incomplete austenitization-based cyclic heat treatment process up to 4 cycles. Each cycle consists of a short-duration holding (6 min) at 775 °C (above A1) followed by cooling at different rates (furnace cooling, forced air cooling and ice-brine quenching). Microstructure and properties are found to be strongly dependent on cooling rate. In pearlitic transformation regime, lamellar disintegration completes in 61 h and 48 min for cyclic furnace cooling. This leads to a spheroidized structure possessing a lower hardness and strength than that obtained in as-received annealed condition. On contrary, lamellar disintegration does not occur for cyclic forced air cooling with high air flow rate (78 m3 h-1). Rather, a novel microstructure consisting of submicroscopic cementite particles in a `interweaved pearlite' matrix is developed after 4 cycles. This provides an enhancement in hardness (395 HV), yield strength (473 MPa) and UTS (830 MPa) along with retention of a reasonable ductility (%Elongation = 19) as compared to as-received annealed condition (hardness = 222 HV, YS = 358 MPa, UTS = 740 MPa, %Elongation = 21).

  19. Effect of Cooling Rate on the Dendrite Coherency Point During Solidification of Al2024 Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoncheh, M. H.; Shabestari, S. G.

    2015-03-01

    Most research related to dendrite coherency point (DCP) has been done on cast aluminum alloys and at a low cooling rate condition. In this research, the DCP of a wrought aluminum alloy is calculated in the range of high cooling rates used in the direct-chill casting process. The two-thermocouple thermal analysis technique was used to determine the DCP of Al2024 alloy. The aim of this work is to investigate the effect of different cooling rates on the dendrite coherency characteristics of Al2024. The cooling rates used in the present study range from 0.4 to 17.5 °C s-1. Also, the effect of 1.2 wt pct Al-5Ti-1B grain refiner on the DCP was studied. To calculate the solid fraction at dendrite coherency, solid fraction versus time is plotted based on Newtonian technique. The results show that by increasing the cooling rate, both time and temperature of dendrite coherency are decreased. Also, by adding the Al-5Ti-1B master alloy, dendrite coherency temperature is reduced and dendrite impingement is postponed. To reduce casting defects occurring during equiaxed solidification, e.g., macrosegregation, porosities, and hot tearing, these two operations which lead to postpone the transition from mass to inter-dendritic feeding, or dendrite coherency, can be useful. By increasing the cooling rate, solid fraction at dendrite coherency increases initially and then decreases at higher cooling rates. Presence of grain refiner leads to increasing of solid fraction at DCP. Thus, by delaying the dendrite coherency and increasing the solid fraction at DCP, semi-solid forming can be performed on parts with higher solid fraction and less shrinkage. Microstructural evaluation was carried out to present the correlation between the cooling rate and solid fraction in 2024 aluminum alloy.

  20. Effect of Cooling Rates on Shape and Crystal Size Distributions of Mefenamic Acid Polymorph in Ethyl Acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudalip, S. K. Abdul; Adam, F.; Parveen, J.; Abu Bakar, M. R.; Amran, N.; Sulaiman, S. Z.; Che Man, R.; Arshad, Z. I. Mohd; Shaarani, S. Md.

    2017-06-01

    This study investigate the effect of cooling rates on mefenamic acid crystallisation in ethyl acetate. The cooling rate was varied from 0.2 to 5 °C/min. The in-line conductivity system and turbidity system were employed to detect the onset of the crystallization process. The crystals produced were analysed using optical microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). It was found that the crystals produced at different cooling rates were needle-like and exhibit polymorphic form type I. However, the aspect ratio and crystal size distributions were varied with the increased of cooling rate. A high crystals aspect ratio and narrower CSD (100-900 μm) was obtained at cooling rate of 0.5 °C/min. Thus, can be suggested as the most suitable cooling rate for crystallization of mefenamic acid in ethyl acetate.

  1. Cooling performance of a water-cooling panel system for modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, Shoji; Suzuki, Kunihiko; Inagaki, Yoshiyuki; Sudo, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1995-12-31

    Experiments on a water cooling panel system were performed to investigate its heat removal performance and the temperature distribution of components for a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). The analytical code THANPACST2 was applied to analyze the experimental results to verify the validity of the analytical method and the model.

  2. The influence of cooling rate on the microstructure of stainless steel alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, J.W.

    1988-09-01

    The emergence of high energy density welding, laser surface modification and rapid solidification as commonly used metallurgical processing techniques has greatly increased the range of cooling rates that can be accessed during the solidification of metals and alloys. The microstructures which develop during these rapid cooling conditions may be significantly different from those which develop during low cooling rate conditions as the result of access to new metastable phases with the additional kinetic limitations that accompany rapid solidification. This investigation explores the influence of cooling rate on a series of seven ternary alloys which span the line of two-fold saturation in the Fe-Ni-Cr system. High speed electron beam surface melting was used to resolidify these alloys at scan speeds up to 5 m/s. The resulting cooling rates were estimated from dendrite arm spacing measurements and were confirmed by heat flow modeling to vary from 7 /times/ 10/sup 0/ /degree/C/s to 8 /times/ 10/sup 6/ /degree/C/s. The microstructures that developed from each solidification condition were examined using optical metallography, electron microprobe analysis, scanning electron microscopy and a vibrating sample magnetometer. These results were used to create diagrams to predict the primary mode of solidification, the ferrite content and the complex microstructural morphologies which develop as a function of interface velocity and composition. 158 refs., 90 figs., 45 tabs.

  3. Heating and cooling rates and their etTects upon heart rate in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1988-03-16

    Mar 16, 1988 ... have investigated aspects of thermoregulation, but the results obtained are contradictory, and no heart rate measurements were done. The purpose of this study was to investigate the heating and cooling rates of the angulate tortoise, Chersina angulata, in the eastern Cape Province,. South Africa.

  4. Heating and cooling rates and their effects upon heart rate in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... rates increase with increasing body temperature, and for all body temperatures heart rates were greater during heating than during cooling. This suggests that the cardiovascular system plays a role in the heat exchange of the tortoises, but further study is required to completely understand the thermoregulatory process.

  5. Probing polymer crystallization at processing-relevant cooling rates with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavallo, Dario, E-mail: Dario.cavallo@unige.it [University of Genoa, Dept. of Chemistry and Industrial Chemistry, Via Dodecaneso 31, 16146 Genoa (Italy); Portale, Giuseppe [ESRF, Dubble CRG, Netherlands Organization of Scientific Research (NWO), 38043 Grenoble (France); Androsch, René [Martin-Luther-University Halle-Wittenberg, Center of Engineering Sciences, D-06099 Halle/S. (Germany)

    2015-12-17

    Processing of polymeric materials to produce any kind of goods, from films to complex objects, involves application of flow fields on the polymer melt, accompanied or followed by its rapid cooling. Typically, polymers solidify at cooling rates which span over a wide range, from a few to hundreds of °C/s. A novel method to probe polymer crystallization at processing-relevant cooling rates is proposed. Using a custom-built quenching device, thin polymer films are ballistically cooled from the melt at rates between approximately 10 and 200 °C/s. Thanks to highly brilliant synchrotron radiation and to state-of-the-art X-ray detectors, the crystallization process is followed in real-time, recording about 20 wide angle X-ray diffraction patterns per second while monitoring the instantaneous sample temperature. The method is applied to a series of industrially relevant polymers, such as isotactic polypropylene, its copolymers and virgin and nucleated polyamide-6. Their crystallization behaviour during rapid cooling is discussed, with particular attention to the occurrence of polymorphism, which deeply impact material’s properties.

  6. Capturing high temperature protein conformations for low-temperature study using ultra-fast cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, David; Atakisi, Hakan; Thorne, Robert

    protocols for cooling biomolecular crystals for x-ray cryocrystallography are poorly controlled, leading to crystal-to-crystal and within-crystal non-isomorphism. Furthermore, cooling times below the protein-solvent glass transition of .1 s provide ample time for biological temperature conformations to depopulate and shift. To address these issues, methods and apparatus for cooling biomolecular crystals at rates approaching 100,000 K/s have been developed. These cooling rates are sufficient to eliminate ice formation on cooling without use of cryoprotectants, and to quench additional high-temperature conformations for low-temperature study. Time scales for conformational relaxation can be characterized using variable cooling rates. Possible extension of these methods to maximize conformational quenching will be discussed.

  7. Sensitivity analysis of radiative heating and cooling rates in planetary atmospheres: general linearization and adjoint approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustinov, E. A.

    2002-01-01

    Radiative heating and cooling provide primary source and ultimate sink of energy driving lower planetary atmospheres. Evaluating the sensitivities of atmospheric dynamics models on these primary atmospheric parameters requires knowing how heating and cooling rates depend on these same parameters. We discuss two approaches that make it possible to directly compute the sensitivities of heating and cooling rates in parallel with evaluation of heating and cooling rates themselves.

  8. Secular Cooling Rates of the Mantle : Various Influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, E.; van den Berg, A. P.; Yuen, D. A.

    2002-12-01

    The history of secular cooling of the mantle is an old important issue, which has been attacked for many years using temperature-dependent viscosity as the primary agent (Tozer, 1972. Phys. Earth Planet. Int., 6, 182-197). In this work we have ventured to look at the impact of variable thermal conductivity on the secular cooling rates predicted by models using just temperature-dependent viscosity. We have found the following salient results. (1) A delayed secular cooling is found as in the constant viscosity models (van den Berg and Yuen, 2002, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 199, 403-413, van den Berg et al., 2002, Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 129, 359-375). We have applied an exponential temperature and pressure dependent viscosity model, using thermal viscosity contrast up to 3000 and fixed presssure viscosity contrast of 100 for this verification. (2) A purely depth-dependent thermal conductivity k(P) cannot catch the destructive effect of temperature dependent conductivity on the negative thermal buoynacy of cold downwellings, driving the convective circulation. These k(P) models also lack feedback physics between time-dependent internal heating and variable thermal conductivity k(T,P), thus stressing the need to use k(T,P) whenever there is a strong source of heat present. (3) Large-differences occur between predictions from 2-D numerical models based on Partial Differential Equations (PDE) and averaged parameterized convection models, formulated using an Ordinary Differential Equation (ODE), within the framework of integrating the nonlinear ODE for the volume average temperature. The ODE results for this comparison are computed using the time series of volume average quantities (viscosity, conductivity) obtained from the 2-D PDE results. The comparison shows that the 1-2 Gyr delay in secular cooling, characteristic for full convection PDE models, is not reproduced in the ODE results from parameterized convection models. The temperature dependence of the ice thermal

  9. Laser Cooled High-Power Fiber Amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Nemova, Galina

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical model for laser cooled continuous-wave fiber amplifier is presented. The amplification process takes place in the Tm3+-doped core of the fluoride ZBLAN (ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF) glass fiber. The cooling process takes place in the Yb3+:ZBLAN fiber cladding. It is shown that for each value of the pump power and the amplified signal there is a distribution of the concentration of the Tm3+ along the length of the fiber amplifier, which provides its athermal operation. The influence ...

  10. Numerical model of crustal accretion and cooling rates of fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Machetel

    2013-10-01

    crystallization range that is characteristic of the high temperature areas in the model (i.e. the near-mid-oceanic-ridge axis. The second temperature range corresponds to areas in the model where the motion is mainly laminar and the vertical temperature profiles are closer to conductive. Thus, this situation results in less discriminating efficiency among the crustal accretion modes since the thermal and dynamic properties that are described are common to all the crustal accretion modes far from the ridge axis. The results show that numerical modeling of thermo-mechanical properties of the lower crusts may bring useful information to characterize the ridge accretion structure, hydrothermal cooling and thermal state at the fast-spreading ridges and may open discussions with petrological cooling rate results.

  11. Thermal Balance in Dense Molecular Clouds: Radiative Cooling Rates and Emission-Line Luminosities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, David A.; Lepp, Stephen; Melnick, Gary J.

    1995-01-01

    We consider the radiative cooling of fully shielded molecular astrophysical gas over a wide range of temperatures ( 10 K line strengths that contribute to the total radiative cooling rate, and we have obtained example spectra for the submillimeter emission expected from molecular cloud cores. Many of the important cooling lines will be detectable using the Infrared Space Observatory and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite.

  12. Improving Cooling Rate During Solidification by Eliminating the Metal-Mold Interfacial Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Long; Zhang, Wei; Ji, Yanliang; Huang, Yujin; Li, Jianguo

    2015-07-01

    A new solidification process called non-interfacial-gap permanent-mold casting (NIGPMC) is proposed to improve the cooling rate by eliminating the metal-mold interfacial gap. High-Cr steel ingots were prepared by this process and conventional permanent-mold casing (CPMC) separately. Comparing with CPMC, the primary dendrite arm spacing obtained by NIGPMC is greatly refined. It is demonstrated that the NIGPMC is a promising pathway to refine the microstructure of the large ingot.

  13. Evaluation of Cooling Rate Effects on the Mechanical Properties of Die Cast Magnesium Alloy AM60

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi, P.; Fan, Y.; Anaraki, H. B.; Banerjee, A.; Sadayappan, K.; Wood, J. T.

    2016-10-01

    With the increased application of magnesium high-pressure die castings (HPDC), it is necessary to better understand process-structure-mechanical properties. In the case of HPDC, ductility and yield strength strongly depend on porosity, grain size, and the skin thickness. In this contribution, a new method is developed which employs knowledge of local cooling rates to predict the grain size and the skin thickness of HPDC magnesium components. The centreline cooling curve, together with the die temperature, and the thermodynamic properties of the alloy are then used as inputs to compute the solution to the Stefan problem of a moving phase boundary, thereby providing the through-thickness cooling curves at each chosen location of the casting. The local cooling rate is used to calculate the resulting grain size and skin thickness via established relationships. The prediction of skin thickness and average grain size of skin region determined from this method compares quite well with the experimental results. Due to the presence of externally solidified grains, this method underestimates the grain size value in the core region, as compared to the experiment. Finally, we predict the locally varying yield strength using a modified Hall-Petch equation.

  14. The first high resolution image of coronal gas in a starbursting cool core cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sean

    2017-08-01

    Galaxy clusters represent a unique laboratory for directly observing gas cooling and feedback due to their high masses and correspondingly high gas densities and temperatures. Cooling of X-ray gas observed in 1/3 of clusters, known as cool-core clusters, should fuel star formation at prodigious rates, but such high levels of star formation are rarely observed. Feedback from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is a leading explanation for the lack of star formation in most cool clusters, and AGN power is sufficient to offset gas cooling on average. Nevertheless, some cool core clusters exhibit massive starbursts indicating that our understanding of cooling and feedback is incomplete. Observations of 10^5 K coronal gas in cool core clusters through OVI emission offers a sensitive means of testing our understanding of cooling and feedback because OVI emission is a dominant coolant and sensitive tracer of shocked gas. Recently, Hayes et al. 2016 demonstrated that synthetic narrow-band imaging of OVI emission is possible through subtraction of long-pass filters with the ACS+SBC for targets at z=0.23-0.29. Here, we propose to use this exciting new technique to directly image coronal OVI emitting gas at high resolution in Abell 1835, a prototypical starbursting cool-core cluster at z=0.252. Abell 1835 hosts a strong cooling core, massive starburst, radio AGN, and at z=0.252, it offers a unique opportunity to directly image OVI at hi-res in the UV with ACS+SBC. With just 15 orbits of ACS+SBC imaging, the proposed observations will complete the existing rich multi-wavelength dataset available for Abell 1835 to provide new insights into cooling and feedback in clusters.

  15. Low Temperature Heating and High Temperature Cooling in Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kazanci, Ongun Berk

    , a single-family house designed for plus-energy targets and equipped with a radiant water-based floor heating and cooling system was studied by means of full-scale measurements, dynamic building simulations and thermodynamic evaluation tools. Thermal indoor environment and energy performance of the house......A heating and cooling system could be divided into three parts: terminal units (emission system), distribution system, and heating and cooling plant (generation system). The choice of terminal unit directly affects the energy performance, and the indoor environment in that space. Therefore......, a holistic system evaluation is necessary to ensure an optimal indoor environment for the occupants and to achieve energy efficiency simultaneously. Low temperature heating and high temperature cooling systems are one of the possible approaches to heat or cool indoor spaces in buildings. In this thesis...

  16. Effect of cooling rate on mechanical properties of carbon fibre fabric and polypropylene composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joon Seok; Kim, Jong Won

    2017-09-01

    In this study, thermoplastic composites were fabricated using carbon fibre fabric and polypropylene. The effects of the cooling rate, which is a process parameter, on the mechanical properties of the composites were investigated. The degree of crystallinity, tensile properties, flexural properties, drop-weight impact, interlaminar fracture toughness, and fracture surface of the fabricated composites were investigated for composites prepared at cooling rates of 0.6, 1.1, 3.2, and 7.1 °C min-1. The increase in the cooling rate during composite fabrication was found to decrease the stiffness of the composite because the degree of crystallinity of the matrix decreased. In addition, the tensile and flexural properties were somewhat reduced, but the energy absorption and fracture toughness were significantly increased owing to the increased ductility. Therefore, the results of this study can be applied to material-design scenarios in which the tensile and flexural properties are somewhat reduced, but high damage tolerance is required in composite material.

  17. Influence of cooling rate on microstructure formation during rapid solidification of binary TiAl alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenel, C., E-mail: Christoph.Kenel@empa.ch; Leinenbach, C.

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Rapid solidification studies with varying cooling rates were realized for Ti–Al. • Experiments were combined with finite element simulations of heat transfer. • The resulting microstructure of Ti–Al alloys is strongly dependent on the Al content. • The microstructure and phase transformation behavior can be predicted. • The method allows alloy development for processes involving rapid solidification. - Abstract: Titanium aluminides as structural intermetallics are possible candidates for a potential weight reduction and increased performance of high temperature components. A method for the characterization of the microstructure formation in rapidly solidified alloys was developed and applied for binary Ti–(44–48)Al (at.%). The results show a strong dependency of the microstructure on the Al content at cooling rates between 6 ⋅ 10{sup 2} and 1.5 ⋅ 10{sup 4} K s{sup −1}. The formation of α → α{sub 2} ordering, lamellar α{sub 2} + γ colonies and interdendritic TiAl γ-phase were observed, depending on the Al amount. Based on thermodynamic calculations the observed microstructure can be explained using the CALPHAD approach taking into account the non-equilibrium conditions. The presented method provides a useful tool for alloy development for processing techniques involving rapid solidification with varying cooling rates.

  18. Low temperature heating and high temperature cooling embedded water based surface heating and cooling systems

    CERN Document Server

    Babiak, Jan; Petras, Dusan

    2009-01-01

    This Guidebook describes the systems that use water as heat-carrier and when the heat exchange within the conditioned space is more than 50% radiant. Embedded systems insulated from the main building structure (floor, wall and ceiling) are used in all types of buildings and work with heat carriers at low temperatures for heating and relatively high temperature for cooling.

  19. Impact of irrigation flow rate and intrapericardial fluid on cooled-tip epicardial radiofrequency ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryana, Arash; O'Neill, Padraig Gearoid; Pujara, Deep K; Singh, Steve K; Bowers, Mark R; Allen, Shelley L; d'Avila, André

    2016-08-01

    The optimal irrigation flow rate (IFR) during epicardial radiofrequency (RF) ablation has not been established. This study specifically examined the impact of IFR and intrapericardial fluid (IPF) accumulation during epicardial RF ablation. Altogether, 452 ex vivo RF applications (10 g for 60 seconds) delivered to the epicardial surface of bovine myocardium using 3 open-irrigated ablation catheters (ThermoCool SmartTouch, ThermoCool SmartTouch-SF, and FlexAbility) and 50 in vivo RF applications delivered (ThermoCool SmartTouch-SF) in 4 healthy adult swine in the presence or absence of IPF were examined. Ex vivo, RF was delivered at low (≤3 mL/min), reduced (5-7 mL/min), and high (≥10 mL/min) IFRs using intermediate (25-35 W) and high (35-45 W) power. In vivo, applications were delivered (at 9.3 ± 2.2 g for 60 seconds at 39 W) using reduced (5 mL/min) and high (15 mL/min) IFRs. Ex vivo, surface lesion diameter inversely correlated with IFR, whereas maximum lesion diameter and depth did not differ. While steam pops occurred more frequently at low IFR using high power (ThermoCool SmartTouch and ThermoCool SmartTouch-SF), tissue disruption was rare and did not vary with IFR. In vivo, charring/steam pop was not detected. Although there were no discernible differences in lesion size with IFR, surface lesion diameter, maximum diameter, depth, and volume were all smaller in the presence of IPF at both IFRs. Cooled-tip epicardial RF ablation created using reduced IFRs (5-7 mL/min) yields lesion sizes similar to those created using high IFRs (≥10 mL/min) without an increase in steam pop/tissue disruption, whereas the presence of IPF significantly reduces the lesion size. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermal shock resistance behavior of a functionally graded ceramic: Effects of finite cooling rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihe Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a semi-analytical model to explore the effects of cooling rate on the thermal shock resistance behavior of a functionally graded ceramic (FGC plate with a periodic array of edge cracks. The FGC is assumed to be a thermally heterogeneous material with constant elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio. The cooling rate applied at the FGC surface is modeled using a linear ramp function. An integral equation method and a closed form asymptotic temperature solution are employed to compute the thermal stress intensity factor (TSIF. The thermal shock residual strength and critical thermal shock of the FGC plate are obtained using the SIF criterion. Thermal shock simulations for an Al2O3/Si3N4 FGC indicate that a finite cooling rate leads to a significantly higher critical thermal shock than that under the sudden cooling condition. The residual strength, however, is relatively insensitive to the cooling rate.

  1. PROGRESS OF HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FEDOTOV,A.V.

    2007-09-10

    The fundamental questions about QCD which can be directly answered at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) call for large integrated luminosities. The major goal of RHIC-I1 upgrade is to achieve a 10 fold increase in luminosity of Au ions at the top energy of 100 GeV/nucleon. Such a boost in luminosity for RHIC-II is achievable with implementation of high-energy electron cooling. The design of the higher-energy cooler for RHIC-II recently adopted a non-magnetized approach which requires a low temperature electron beam. Such electron beams will be produced with a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). Detailed simulations of the electron cooling process and numerical simulations of the electron beam transport including the cooling section were performed. An intensive R&D of various elements of the design is presently underway. Here, we summarize progress in these electron cooling efforts.

  2. COMPARISON OF COOLING SCHEMES FOR HIGH HEAT FLUX COMPONENTS COOLING IN FUSION REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phani Kumar Domalapally

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Some components of the fusion reactor receives high heat fluxes either during the startup and shutdown or during the operation of the machine. This paper analyzes different ways of enhancing heat transfer using helium and water for cooling of these high heat flux components and then conclusions are drawn to decide the best choice of coolant, for usage in near and long term applications.

  3. A passive cooling system proposal for multifunction and high-power displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tari, Ilker

    2013-03-01

    Flat panel displays are conventionally cooled by internal natural convection, which constrains the possible rate of heat transfer from the panel. On one hand, during the last few years, the power consumption and the related cooling requirement for 1080p displays have decreased mostly due to energy savings by the switch to LED backlighting and more efficient electronics. However, on the other hand, the required cooling rate recently started to increase with new directions in the industry such as 3D displays, and ultra-high-resolution displays (recent 4K announcements and planned introduction of 8K). In addition to these trends in display technology itself, there is also a trend to integrate consumer entertainment products into displays with the ultimate goal of designing a multifunction device replacing the TV, the media player, the PC, the game console and the sound system. Considering the increasing power requirement for higher fidelity in video processing, these multifunction devices tend to generate very high heat fluxes, which are impossible to dissipate with internal natural convection. In order to overcome this obstacle, instead of active cooling with forced convection that comes with drawbacks of noise, additional power consumption, and reduced reliability, a passive cooling system relying on external natural convection and radiation is proposed here. The proposed cooling system consists of a heat spreader flat heat pipe and aluminum plate-finned heat sink with anodized surfaces. For this system, the possible maximum heat dissipation rates from the standard size panels (in 26-70 inch range) are estimated by using our recently obtained heat transfer correlations for the natural convection from aluminum plate-finned heat sinks together with the surface-to-surface radiation. With the use of the proposed passive cooling system, the possibility of dissipating very high heat rates is demonstrated, hinting a promising green alternative to active cooling.

  4. HIGH-CURRENT ERL-BASED ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEN-ZVI, I.

    2005-09-18

    The design of an electron cooler must take into account both electron beam dynamics issues as well as the electron cooling physics. Research towards high-energy electron cooling of RHIC is in its 3rd year at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The luminosity upgrade of RHIC calls for electron cooling of various stored ion beams, such as 100 GeV/A gold ions at collision energies. The necessary electron energy of 54 MeV is clearly out of reach for DC accelerator system of any kind. The high energy also necessitates a bunched beam, with a high electron bunch charge, low emittance and small energy spread. The Collider-Accelerator Department adopted the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) for generating the high-current, high-energy and high-quality electron beam. The RHIC electron cooler ERL will use four Superconducting RF (SRF) 5-cell cavities, designed to operate at ampere-class average currents with high bunch charges. The electron source will be a superconducting, 705.75 MHz laser-photocathode RF gun, followed up by a superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL). An R&D ERL is under construction to demonstrate the ERL at the unprecedented average current of 0.5 amperes. Beam dynamics performance and luminosity enhancement are described for the case of magnetized and non-magnetized electron cooling of RHIC.

  5. Crystallization history of lunar picritic basalt sample 12002 - Phase-equilibria and cooling-rate studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, D.; Kirkpatrick, R. J.; Longhi, J.; Hays, J. F.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental crystallization of a lunar picrite composition (sample 12002) at controlled linear cooling rates produces systematic changes in the temperature at which crystalline phases appear, in the texture, and in crystal morphology as a function of cooling rate. Phases crystallize in the order olivine, chromium spinel, pyroxene, plagioclase, and ilmenite during equilibrium crystallization, but ilmenite and plagioclase reverse their order of appearance and silica crystallizes in the groundmass during controlled cooling experiments. The partition of iron and magnesium between olivine and liquid is independent of cooling rate, temperature, and pressure. Comparison of the olivine nucleation densities in the lunar sample and in the experiments indicates that the sample began cooling at about 1 deg C/hr. Pyroxene size, chemistry, and growth instability spacings, as well as groundmass coarseness, all suggest that the cooling rate subsequently decreased by as much as a factor of 10 or more. The porphyritic texture of this sample, then, is produced at a decreasing, rather than a discontinuously increasing, cooling rate.

  6. Effects of solidification cooling rate on the corrosion resistance of Mg–Zn–Ca alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debao Liu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to investigate the effect of solidification cooling rate on the corrosion resistance of an Mg–Zn–Ca alloy developed for biomedical applications. A wedge shaped copper mould was used to obtain different solidification cooling rates. Electrochemical and immersion tests were employed to measure the corrosion resistance of Mg–Zn–Ca alloy. It was found that increasing cooling rate resulted in a significant improvement in the corrosion resistance of the Mg–Zn–Ca alloy. The findings were explained in terms of solidification behaviour in association with the change in solubility of the alloying elements, microstructural homogeneity and refinement and chemical homogeneity as well as the increased cooling rates.

  7. Effect of cooling rate on the microstructure and hardness of austenitic stainless steel welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, A. [ISEC - IPC, Quinta da Nora, Coimbra (Portugal); Loureiro, A. [DEM - FCTUC, Polo II, Coimbra (Portugal)

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this work is to study the effect of the cooling rate on the microstructure and hardness of the melted material of welds in steels AISI 304 and AISI 316L. The increase of weld heat input, consequently the decrease in the cooling rate, produces only a smooth increase of the ferrite content and a small decrease of hardness in the melted material of autogeneous TIG welds. (orig.)

  8. Effect of Cooling Rate on the Mechanical Strength of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Thermoplastic Sheets in Press Forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuno, D.; Yoneyama, T.; Kawamoto, K.; Okamoto, M.

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to elucidate the effect of the cooling rate of the carbon fiber-reinforced thermoplastic (CFRTP) sheets on the mechanical property in the press forming within 1 min cycle time. In order to pay attention only to the compression stage after the deformation stage in press forming, a flat sheet of dimensions 200 mm × 100 mm × 3 mm was produced. It was fabricated by stacking 15 CFRTP sheets of 0.2-mm-thick plain woven fabric impregnated with PA6, preheating them to 280 °C and pressing them at 5 MPa using a die cooled from near the melting temperature of PA6 with various cooling rates. Cooling rate of -26 °C/s with pressure holding time (defined in this study as the period that the pressure sensor detects high pressure) of 7 s and that of -4.4 °C/s with pressure holding time of 18 s gave a flexural strength of 536 and 733 MPa, respectively. It was found that the cooling rate during pressure holding is related to the mechanical property of press-formed CFRTP part.

  9. Influence of cooling rate on microstructure of Ti-Nb alloy for orthopedic implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afonso, C.R.M. [State University of Campinas (Unicamp), Department of Materials Engineering (Dema/FEM), CP 6122, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Aleixo, G.T. [State University of Campinas (Unicamp), Department of Materials Engineering (Dema/FEM), CP 6122, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Ramirez, A.J. [LME - Electron Microscopy Lab, LNLS - Brazilian Laboratory of Synchrotron Light, CP 6192, CEP 13084-971, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Caram, R. [State University of Campinas (Unicamp), Department of Materials Engineering (Dema/FEM), CP 6122, CEP 13083-970, Campinas-SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: rcaram@fem.unicamp.br

    2007-05-16

    Beta titanium alloys form one of the most versatile group of materials with respect to processing, microstructure and mechanical properties, mainly in applications as biomaterials. Development of new Ti-based alloys for implant application involves more biocompatible metallic alloying elements, such as Nb, Ta, Zr and Mo. Heat treatment of Ti alloys plays an important role in determining microstructure. The aim of this work is the analysis of microstructure and phases formed during water quenching of {beta} Ti-20Nb alloy through different cooling rates. Ti-20Nb alloy was swaged at 780-860 deg. C and then machined as a cylinder. Cylindrical sample was treated within the {beta} field and then water quenched from the bottom imposing different cooling rates through the sample. Samples from different regions (cooling rates) were characterized by using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Vickers microhardness. XRD results showed the increase of {beta}/{alpha} phases peak intensity ratio increase with decreasing of cooling rate. As the distance from the bottom (water source) of Ti-20Nb sample decreases, the imposed cooling rate increases, the volume of {alpha} martensite acicular phase increases and the size decreases with diminishing of {alpha} phase quantity. The lowest elastic modulus E = 74 GPa was found for water quenched sample under a cooling rate of 160 K/s.

  10. Effect of cooling rate on the phase structure and magnetic properties of Fe{sub 26.7}Co{sub 28.5}Ni{sub 28.5}Si{sub 4.6}B{sub 8.7}P{sub 3} high entropy alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Ran; Sun, Huan; Chen, Chen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Han, Zhenhua [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Xi’an University of Technology, Xi’an 710068 (China); Li, Fushan, E-mail: fsli@zzu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • High entropy alloy with amorphous phase and FCC solid solution phase are successfully developed respectively. • The amorphous phase exhibits better soft magnetic properties than that of the solid solution phase. • The BCC phase transformed into FCC phase, and then into BCC phase was found in this HEA. - Abstract: The effect of cooling rate on phase structure and magnetic properties of the Fe{sub 26.7}Co{sub 28.5}Ni{sub 28.5}Si{sub 4.6}B{sub 8.7}P{sub 3} high entropy alloy (HEA) was investigated. The HEA forms into amorphous phase by melt spinning method at high cooling rate and FCC solid solution phase at low cooling rate. The soft magnetic properties of the amorphous phase (saturation magnetization B{sub s} of 1.07T and coercivity H{sub c} of 4 A/m) are better than that of the solid solution phase (B{sub s} of 1.0 T and H{sub c} of 168 A/m). In order to study the phase evolution of the present HEA, anneal experiments were conducted. It is found that crystallization products of amorphous phase are solid solution phase which constitute much of FCC and a small amount of BCC. BCC phase transforms into FCC phase, and then into BCC phase with the increase of annealing temperature.

  11. Hybrid Cooling Loop Technology for Robust High Heat Flux Cooling Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Cooling Technologies, Inc. (ACT) proposes to develop a hybrid cooling loop and cold plate technology for space systems thermal management. The proposed...

  12. CFD Model Development and validation for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Yassin [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Corradini, Michael; Tokuhiro, Akira; Wei, Thomas Y.C.

    2014-07-14

    The Reactor Cavity Cooling Systems (RCCS) is a passive safety system that will be incorporated in the VTHR design. The system was designed to remove the heat from the reactor cavity and maintain the temperature of structures and concrete walls under desired limits during normal operation (steady-state) and accident scenarios. A small scale (1:23) water-cooled experimental facility was scaled, designed, and constructed in order to study the complex thermohydraulic phenomena taking place in the RCCS during steady-state and transient conditions. The facility represents a portion of the reactor vessel with nine stainless steel coolant risers and utilizes water as coolant. The facility was equipped with instrumentation to measure temperatures and flow rates and a general verification was completed during the shakedown. A model of the experimental facility was prepared using RELAP5-3D and simulations were performed to validate the scaling procedure. The experimental data produced during the steady-state run were compared with the simulation results obtained using RELAP5-3D. The overall behavior of the facility met the expectations. The facility capabilities were confirmed to be very promising in performing additional experimental tests, including flow visualization, and produce data for code validation.

  13. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Laboratory; Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Laboratory; Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Laboratory; Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Laboratory; Kinsey, James Carl [Idaho National Laboratory; Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Laboratory; Kumar, Akansha [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-04-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200 MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technological readiness level, licensing approach and costs.

  14. Effect of cooling rates and Zr addition on the microstructure and corrosion behaviors of the Mg–Zn–Gd alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinyang; Jia, Peng; Xu, Shumin; Lou, Gui; Zhou, Guorong; Zhao, Degang; Teng, Xinying

    2018-01-01

    The grain size of Mg96Zn1Gd3 alloys was refined by increasing cooling rate and adding Zr refiner. At the cooling rate of 122.8 K s‑1, the primary dendrite spacing decreased from 12.5 to 6.4 μm with the Zr addition in Mg96Zn1Gd3 alloy casting into a copper mold. At the 0.3 K s‑1, the long-period stacking ordered structure phase (LPSO) only was formed in Mg96Zn1Gd3 alloy casting into a sand mold. The research concerned on mechanical properties showed that hardness of Mg95.8Zn1Gd3Zr0.2 alloy was increased from 82.7 to 121.1 HBW with the increase of the cooling rate. About the high temperature performance, the melt temperature of the second phase was 882 K, and it was not changed with the Zr addition and the change of cooling rates. However, the excellent corrosion resistance corresponded to the large grain size was changed by the formation of the LPSO phase in Mg96Zn1Gd3 alloy.

  15. Calculation of Radioactivity and Dose Rate of Activated Corrosion Products in Water-Cooled Fusion Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyu Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In water-cooled reactor, the dominant radioactive source term under normal operation is activated corrosion products (ACPs, which have an important impact on reactor inspection and maintenance. A three-node transport model of ACPs was introduced into the new version of ACPs source term code CATE in this paper, which makes CATE capable of theoretically simulating the variation and the distribution of ACPs in a water-cooled reactor and suitable for more operating conditions. For code testing, MIT PWR coolant chemistry loop was simulated, and the calculation results from CATE are close to the experimental results from MIT, which means CATE is available and credible on ACPs analysis of water-cooled reactor. Then ACPs in the blanket cooling loop of water-cooled fusion reactor ITER under construction were analyzed using CATE and the results showed that the major contributors are the short-life nuclides, especially Mn-56. At last a point kernel integration code ARShield was coupled with CATE, and the dose rate around ITER blanket cooling loop was calculated. Results showed that after shutting down the reactor only for 8 days, the dose rate decreased nearly one order of magnitude, which was caused by the rapid decay of the short-life ACPs.

  16. High levitation pressures with cage-cooled superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. [Energy Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Komori, Mochimitsu [Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Iizuka, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    We present an analysis of and experimental results from a levitational system comprising a stationary, bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS) and a levitated component (rotor) that consists of a cylindrical permanent magnet surrounded by an annular HTS. The rotor is cooled below the critical temperature of the HTS while surrounded by a ferromagnetic cage. When the ferromagnetic cage is removed, the flux from the permanent magnet is essentially excluded from the interior of the HTS. When brought into proximity with the HTS stator, the cage-cooled rotor experiences a levitational force. The levitational force may be calculated by applying magnetic circuit theory. Such calculations indicate that for a sufficiently high critical current density, the levitational pressure may exceed that between the permanent magnet and its mirror image. We constructed a rotor from an NdFeB permanent magnet and YBCO bulk HTS with a critical current density of {approx}5 kA cm{sup -2}. A soft ferromagnetic steel cage was constructed in segments. The critical current density of the stator HTS was also {approx}5 kA cm{sup -2}. Experimental results obtained with the cage-cooled rotor and stationary HTS show a significant increase in force over that of an equivalent PM rotor and stationary HTS. (author)

  17. Effect of particulate thermophoresis in reducing the fouling rate advantages of effusion-cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Rosner, D. E.

    1984-01-01

    To predict small-particle diffusional mass transfer (deposition), including particle thermophoresis, transpiration cooling, and variable properties, the coupled ordinary differential equations governing self-similar laminar boundary layers are solved numerically. Under typical combustion turbine conditions, although diffusional deposition rates can be dramatically reduced by transpiration cooling (e.g., by some 5-decades for mainstream submicron particles corresponding to a Schmidt number of about 100 and a wall transpiration-cooled to Tw/Te = 0.8), actual deposition rate reductions will be smaller than previously expected (by about 1 decade for particles with Sc of about 100), owing to thermophoretic particle drift caused by the colder wall. Such microdroplets, small enough to behave like heavy molecules in combustion systems, are often important because they can cause adherence of the much larger ash particles which inertially impact on the same surface.

  18. Investigation on the Effect of Cooling Rate on Hot Tearing Susceptibility of Al2024 Alloy Using Thermal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabestari, S. G.; Ghoncheh, M. H.

    2015-12-01

    Effect of different cooling rates and Al-5Ti-1B grain refiner on hot tearing susceptibility of Al2024 alloy were studied using thermal analysis. Influence of cooling rates on microsegregation, and the amount of gas and shrinkage porosities was investigated. The cooling rates used in the present study range from 0.4 to 17.5 K s-1. To evaluate the hot tearing susceptibility, Clyne and Davies' criterion is used. To calculate solid fraction during solidification, solid fraction vs time is plotted based on Newtonian technique via thermal analysis. The results show that the hot tearing susceptibility reduces initially by increasing the cooling rate and then increases at higher cooling rates. Hot tearing susceptibility is decreased by grain refinement. Solidification characteristics of Al2024 e.g., microsegregation, gas, and shrinkage porosities are decreased by increasing cooling rate.

  19. The Solidification Behavior of AA2618 Aluminum Alloy and the Influence of Cooling Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yulin; Liu, Ming; Luo, Lei; Wang, Jijie; Liu, Chunzhong

    2014-01-01

    In AA2618 aluminum alloy, the iron- and nickel-rich intermetallics formed during solidification are of great effect on the mechanical properties of the alloy at both room temperature and elevated temperatures. However, the solidification behavior of the alloy and the formation mechanism of the intermetallics during solidification of the alloy are not clear. This research fills the gap and contributes to understanding the intermetallic of the alloy. The results showed that cooling rate was of great influence on the formation of the intermetallics. Under the condition of slow cooling, the as-cast microstructures of the alloy were complex with many coarse eutectic compounds including Al9FeNi, Al7(CuNi)5, Si, Al2Cu and Al2CuMg. The phase Al9FeNi was the dominant intermetallic compound, which precipitated at the earlier stage of the solidification by eutectic reaction L → α-Al + Al9FeNi. Increasing the cooling rate would suppress the formation of the coarse eutectic intermetallics. Under the condition of near-rapid cooling, the as-cast microstructures of the alloy consisted of metastable intermetallics Al9FeNi and Al2Cu; the equilibrium eutectic compounds were suppressed. This research concluded that intermetallics could be refined to a great extent by near-rapid cooling. PMID:28788281

  20. The Solidification Behavior of AA2618 Aluminum Alloy and the Influence of Cooling Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yulin; Liu, Ming; Luo, Lei; Wang, Jijie; Liu, Chunzhong

    2014-12-09

    In AA2618 aluminum alloy, the iron- and nickel-rich intermetallics formed during solidification are of great effect on the mechanical properties of the alloy at both room temperature and elevated temperatures. However, the solidification behavior of the alloy and the formation mechanism of the intermetallics during solidification of the alloy are not clear. This research fills the gap and contributes to understanding the intermetallic of the alloy. The results showed that cooling rate was of great influence on the formation of the intermetallics. Under the condition of slow cooling, the as-cast microstructures of the alloy were complex with many coarse eutectic compounds including Al₉FeNi, Al₇(CuNi)₅, Si, Al₂Cu and Al₂CuMg. The phase Al₉FeNi was the dominant intermetallic compound, which precipitated at the earlier stage of the solidification by eutectic reaction L → α-Al + Al₉FeNi. Increasing the cooling rate would suppress the formation of the coarse eutectic intermetallics. Under the condition of near-rapid cooling, the as-cast microstructures of the alloy consisted of metastable intermetallics Al₉FeNi and Al₂Cu; the equilibrium eutectic compounds were suppressed. This research concluded that intermetallics could be refined to a great extent by near-rapid cooling.

  1. The effects of concentration and heating-cooling rate on rheological properties of Plantago lanceolata seed mucilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesarinejad, Mohammad Ali; Sami Jokandan, Maryam; Mohammadifar, Mohammad Amin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, the effect of concentration (0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2%) and heating-cooling rate (1, 5 and 10 °C min−1) on the rheological properties of Plantago lanceolata seed mucilage (PLSM) solutions were investigated. It was observed that the gum dispersions exhibited viscoelastic properties under...... information. The results revealed that PLSM had high total sugar content (87.35%), and it is likely an arabinoxylomannan-type polysaccharide....

  2. The Formation and Physical Origin of Highly Ionized Cooling Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoloi, Rongmon; Wagner, Alexander Y.; Heckman, Timothy M.; Norman, Colin A.

    2017-10-01

    We present a simple model that explains the origin of warm, diffuse gas seen primarily as highly ionized absorption-line systems in the spectra of background sources. We predict the observed column densities of several highly ionized transitions such as O vi, O vii, Ne viii, N v, and Mg x, and we present a unified comparison of the model predictions with absorption lines seen in the Milky Way disk, Milky Way halo, starburst galaxies, the circumgalactic medium, and the intergalactic medium at low and high redshifts. We show that diffuse gas seen in such diverse environments can be simultaneously explained by a simple model of radiatively cooling gas. We show that most such absorption-line systems are consistent with being collisionally ionized, and we estimate the maximum-likelihood temperature of the gas in each observation. This model satisfactorily explains why O vi is regularly observed around star-forming low-z L* galaxies, and why N v is rarely seen around the same galaxies. We further present some consequences of this model in quantifying the dynamics of the cooling gas around galaxies and predict the shock velocities associated with such flows. A unique strength of this model is that while it has only one free (but physically well-constrained) parameter, it nevertheless successfully reproduces the available data on O vi absorbers in the interstellar, circumgalactic, intragroup, and intergalactic media, as well as the available data on other absorption lines from highly ionized species.

  3. Pink-Beam, Highly-Accurate Compact Water Cooled Slits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Jayne, Richard; Waterman, Dave; Caletka, Dave; Steadman, Paul; Dhesi, Sarnjeet

    2007-01-01

    Advanced Design Consulting, Inc. (ADC) has designed accurate compact slits for applications where high precision is required. The system consists of vertical and horizontal slit mechanisms, a vacuum vessel which houses them, water cooling lines with vacuum guards connected to the individual blades, stepper motors with linear encoders, limit (home position) switches and electrical connections including internal wiring for a drain current measurement system. The total slit size is adjustable from 0 to 15 mm both vertically and horizontally. Each of the four blades are individually controlled and motorized. In this paper, a summary of the design and Finite Element Analysis of the system are presented.

  4. Active cooling of pulse compression diffraction gratings for high energy, high average power ultrafast lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, David A; Rosso, Paul A; Nguyen, Hoang T; Aasen, Michael D; Britten, Jerald A; Haefner, Constantin

    2016-12-26

    Laser energy absorption and subsequent heat removal from diffraction gratings in chirped pulse compressors poses a significant challenge in high repetition rate, high peak power laser development. In order to understand the average power limitations, we have modeled the time-resolved thermo-mechanical properties of current and advanced diffraction gratings. We have also developed and demonstrated a technique of actively cooling Petawatt scale, gold compressor gratings to operate at 600W of average power - a 15x increase over the highest average power petawatt laser currently in operation. Combining this technique with low absorption multilayer dielectric gratings developed in our group would enable pulse compressors for petawatt peak power lasers operating at average powers well above 40kW.

  5. Electron cooling of highly charged ions in penning traps; Elektronenkuehlung hochgeladener Ionen in Penningfallen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moellers, B.

    2007-02-08

    For many high precision experiments with highly charged ions in ion traps it is necessary to work with low energy ions. One possibility to slow ions down to a very low energy in a trap is electron cooling, a method, which is already successfully used in storage rings to produce ion beams with high phase space density. Fast ions and a cold electron plasma are inserted into a Penning trap. The ions lose their energy due to Coulomb interaction with the electrons while they cross the plasma, the electrons are heated. The cooling time is the time, which is needed to cool an ion from a given initial energy to a low final energy. To calculate cooling times it is necessary to solve coupled differential equations for the ion energy and electron temperature. In a Penning trap the strong external magnetic field constitutes a theoretical challenge, as it influences the energy loss of the ions in an electron plasma, which can no longer be calculated analytically. In former estimates of cooling times this influence is neglected. But simulations show a dramatic decrease of the energy loss in the presence of a strong magnetic field, so it is necessary to investigate the effect of the magnetic field on the cooling times. This work presents a model to calculate cooling times, which includes both the magnetic field and the trap geometry. In a first step a simplified model without the external trap potential is developed. The energy loss of the ions in the magnetized electron plasma is calculated by an analytic approximation, which requires a numerical solution of integrals. With this model the dependence of the cooling time on different parameters like electron and ion density, magnetic field and the angle between ion velocity and magnetic field is studied for fully ionized uranium. In addition the influence of the electron heating is discussed. Another important topic in this context is the recombination between ions and electrons. The simplified model for cooling times allows to

  6. Influence of cooling rate and tempering on precipitation and hardness of vanadium microalloyed steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenduez, S. [Karabuek Technical Education Faculty, Zonguldak Karaelmas University, 78200 Karabuek (Turkey)]. E-mail: sgunduz@hotmail.com; Cochrane, R.C. [Department of Materials, School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: mtlrcc@ecu-01.novell.leeds.ac.uk

    2005-07-01

    In the present work precipitate distributions in a C-Mn-Al-V-N microalloyed steel and hardness were examined for as-received, heat-treated and heat-treated and tempered samples. Examination of as-received and heat-treated samples from the vanadium microalloyed steels using transmission electron microscopy revealed quite different precipitate distributions. The type and sizes of the precipitate particles and also hardness of the steel samples were markedly affected as the austenitisation time and cooling rates were changed. Tempering steel samples after air cooling produced fine matrix precipitates which are closely spaced, obstruct moving dislocations and hence make the steel harder.

  7. Effect of cooling rate on shear bond strength of veneering porcelain to a zirconia ceramic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komine, Futoshi; Saito, Ayako; Kobayashi, Kazuhisa; Koizuka, Mai; Koizumi, Hiroyasu; Matsumura, Hideo

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of cooling rates after firing procedures of veneering porcelain on shear bond strength between veneering porcelain and a zirconium dioxide (zirconia; ZrO₂) ceramic material. A total of 48 ZrO₂ disks were divided equally into three groups. Two veneering porcelains that are recommended for ZrO₂ material - Cerabien ZR (CZR), IPS e.max Ceram (EMX) - and one that is recommended for metal ceramics - Super Porcelain AAA (AAA) were assessed. Each group was then further divided into two subgroups (n = 8) according to cooling time (0 or 4 min) after porcelain firing. Specimens were fabricated by veneering the porcelain on the ZrO₂ disks, after which shear bond testing was conducted. Bond strength differed significantly by cooling time in ZrO₂-AAA (P veneering porcelain to a zirconia material depending on porcelain material used.

  8. Influence of cryogenic cooling rate on mechanical properties of tool steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazor, G.; Ladizhensky, I.; Shapiro, A.

    2017-09-01

    The effect of the rapid cryogenic treatment on hardness and wear resistance of several kinds of tool steel was examined. Two ways of cryogenic cooling were evaluated: direct immersion of the metallic samples into liquid nitrogen and three-stage rapid cryogenic cooling (1 - precooling in LN2 to -20°C, 2 - formation on the sample of a frost layer from air by natural humidity, 3 - second cooling of the frost-covered sample in LN2 to -195.7°C). Material in “as is” conditions and after a preliminary heat treatment (850°C) were used as the reference points. The HV microhardness and the wear rate under dry abrasive friction were evaluated. Despite the very different types of the examined metals’ nature, microstructure, and hardening mechanisms, the rapid cryogenic cooling improves both the hardness and the wear resistance values. For all investigated metals rapid cryogenic cooling assisted with the frost layer produces the best results.

  9. High-albedo materials for reducing building cooling energy use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taha, H.; Sailor, D.; Akbari, H.

    1992-01-01

    One simple and effective way to mitigate urban heat islands, i.e., the higher temperatures in cities compared to those of the surrounds, and their negative impacts on cooling energy consumption is to use high-albedo materials on major urban surfaces such as rooftops, streets, sidewalks, school yards, and the exposed surfaces of parking lots. High-albedo materials can save cooling energy use by directly reducing the heat gain through a building's envelope (direct effect) and also by lowering the urban air temperature in the neighborhood of the building (indirect effect). This project is an attempt to address high-albedo materials for buildings and to perform measurements of roof coatings. We search for existing methods and materials to implement fighter colors on major building and urban surfaces. Their cost effectiveness are examined and the possible related technical, maintenance, and environmental problems are identified. We develop a method for measuring albedo in the field by studying the instrumentation aspects of such measurements. The surface temperature impacts of various albedo/materials in the actual outdoor environment are studied by measuring the surface temperatures of a variety of materials tested on an actual roof. We also generate an albedo database for several urban surfaces to serve as a reference for future use. The results indicate that high-albedo materials can have a large impact on the surface temperature regime. On clear sunny days, when the solar noon surface temperatures of conventional roofing materials were about 40{degrees}C (72{degrees}F) warmer than air, the surface temperature of high-albedo coatings were only about 5{degrees}C warmer than air. In the morning and in the late afternoon, the high-albedo materials were as cool as the air itself. While conventional roofing materials warm up by an average 0.055{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}), the high-albedo surfaces warm up by an average 0.015{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}).

  10. High-albedo materials for reducing building cooling energy use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taha, H.; Sailor, D.; Akbari, H.

    1992-01-01

    One simple and effective way to mitigate urban heat islands, i.e., the higher temperatures in cities compared to those of the surrounds, and their negative impacts on cooling energy consumption is to use high-albedo materials on major urban surfaces such as rooftops, streets, sidewalks, school yards, and the exposed surfaces of parking lots. High-albedo materials can save cooling energy use by directly reducing the heat gain through a building`s envelope (direct effect) and also by lowering the urban air temperature in the neighborhood of the building (indirect effect). This project is an attempt to address high-albedo materials for buildings and to perform measurements of roof coatings. We search for existing methods and materials to implement fighter colors on major building and urban surfaces. Their cost effectiveness are examined and the possible related technical, maintenance, and environmental problems are identified. We develop a method for measuring albedo in the field by studying the instrumentation aspects of such measurements. The surface temperature impacts of various albedo/materials in the actual outdoor environment are studied by measuring the surface temperatures of a variety of materials tested on an actual roof. We also generate an albedo database for several urban surfaces to serve as a reference for future use. The results indicate that high-albedo materials can have a large impact on the surface temperature regime. On clear sunny days, when the solar noon surface temperatures of conventional roofing materials were about 40{degrees}C (72{degrees}F) warmer than air, the surface temperature of high-albedo coatings were only about 5{degrees}C warmer than air. In the morning and in the late afternoon, the high-albedo materials were as cool as the air itself. While conventional roofing materials warm up by an average 0.055{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}), the high-albedo surfaces warm up by an average 0.015{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}).

  11. High perveance electron gun for the electron cooling system

    CERN Document Server

    Korotaev, Yu V; Petrov, A; Sidorin, A; Smirnov, A; Syresin, E M; Titkova, I

    2000-01-01

    The cooling time in the electron cooling system is inversely proportional to the beam current. To obtain high current of the electron beam the control electrode of the gun is provided with a positive potential and an electrostatic trap for secondary electrons appears inside the electron gun. This leads to a decrease in the gun perveance. To avoid this problem, the adiabatic high perveance electron gun with the clearing control electrode is designed in JINR (J. Bosser, Y. Korotaev, I. Meshkov, E. Syresin et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 391 (1996) 103. Yu. Korotaev, I. Meshkov, A. Sidorin, A. Smirnov, E. Syresin, The generation of electron beams with perveance of 3-6 mu A/V sup 3 sup / sup 2 , Proceedings of SCHEF'99). The clearing control electrode has a transverse electric field, which clears secondary electrons. Computer simulations of the potential map were made with RELAX3D computer code (C.J. Kost, F.W. Jones, RELAX3D User's Guide and References Manual).

  12. Final Cooling For a High-luminosity High-Energy Lepton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuffer, D.; Sayed, H.; Hart, T.; Summers, D.

    2015-05-01

    The final cooling system for a high-energy high-luminosity heavy lepton collider requires reduction of the transverse emittance εt by an order of magnitude to ~0.00003 m (rms, N), while allowing longitudinal emittance εL to increase to ~0.1m. In the present baseline approach, this is obtained by transverse cooling of low-energy muons within a sequence of high-field solenoids with low-frequency rf systems. Recent studies of such systems are presented. Since the final cooling steps are mostly emittance exchange, a variant form of that final system can be obtained by a round to flat transform in x-y, with transverse slicing of the enlarged flat transverse dimension followed by longitudinal recombination of the sliced bunchlets. Other variants are discussed. More explicit emittance exchange can greatly reduce the cost of a final cooling system.

  13. Use of a temperature-initiated passive cooling system (TIPACS) for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Conklin, J.; Reich, W.J.

    1994-04-01

    A new type of passive cooling system has been invented (Forsberg 1993): the Temperature-Initiated Passive Cooling System (TIPACS). The characteristics of the TIPACS potentially match requirements for an improved reactor-cavity-cooling system (RCCS) for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). This report is an initial evaluation of the TIPACS for the MHTGR with a Rankines (steam) power conversion cycle. Limited evaluations were made of applying the TIPACS to MHTGRs with reactor pressure vessel temperatures up to 450 C. These temperatures may occur in designs of Brayton cycle (gas turbine) and process heat MHTGRs. The report is structured as follows. Section 2 describes the containment cooling issues associated with the MHTGR and the requirements for such a cooling system. Section 3 describes TIPACS in nonmathematical terms. Section 4 describes TIPACS`s heat-removal capabilities. Section 5 analyzes the operation of the temperature-control mechanism that determines under what conditions the TIPACS rejects heat to the environment. Section 6 addresses other design and operational issues. Section 7 identifies uncertainties, and Section 8 provides conclusions. The appendixes provide the detailed data and models used in the analysis.

  14. Analysis of Precooling Injection Transient of Steam Generator for High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available After a postulated design basis accident leads high temperature gas cooled reactor to emergency shutdown, steam generator still remains with high temperature level and needs to be cooled down by a precooling before reactor restarts with clearing of fault. For the large difference of coolant temperature between inlet and outlet of steam generator in normal operation, the temperature distribution on the components of steam generator is very complicated. Therefore, the temperature descending rate of the components in steam generator needs to be limited to avoid the potential damage during the precooling stage. In this paper, a pebble-bed high temperature gas cooled reactor is modeled by thermal-hydraulic system analysis code and several postulated precooling injection transients are simulated and compared to evaluate their effects, which will provide support for the precooling design. The analysis results show that enough precooling injection is necessary to satisfy the precooling requirements, and larger mass flow rate of precooling water injection will accelerate the precooling process. The temperature decrease of steam generator is related to the precooling injection scenarios, and the maximal mass flow rate of the precooling injection should be limited to avoid the excessively quick temperature change of the structures in steam generator.

  15. Influence of cooling rate on residual stress profile in veneering ceramic: measurement by hole-drilling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainjot, Amélie K; Schajer, Gary S; Vanheusden, Alain J; Sadoun, Michaël J

    2011-09-01

    The manufacture of dental crowns and bridges generates residual stresses within the veneering ceramic and framework during the cooling process. Residual stress is an important factor that control the mechanical behavior of restorations. Knowing the stress distribution within the veneering ceramic as a function of depth can help the understanding of failures, particularly chipping, a well-known problem with Yttria-tetragonal-zirconia-polycrystal based fixed partial dentures. The objective of this study is to investigate the cooling rate dependence of the stress profile in veneering ceramic layered on metal and zirconia frameworks. The hole-drilling method, often used for engineering measurements, was adapted for use with veneering ceramic. The stress profile was measured in bilayered disc samples 20 mm in diameter, with a 0.7 mm thick metal or Yttria-tetragonal-zirconia-polycrystal framework and a 1.5mm thick veneering ceramic. Three different cooling procedures were investigated. The magnitude of the stresses in the surface of the veneering ceramic was found to increase with cooling rate, while the interior stresses decreased. At the surface, compressive stresses were observed in all samples. In the interior, compressive stresses were observed in metal samples and tensile in zirconia samples. Cooling rate influences the magnitude of residual stresses. These can significantly influence the mechanical behavior of metal-and zirconia-based bilayered systems. The framework material influenced the nature of the interior stresses, with zirconia samples showing a less favorable stress profile than metal. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. High Powered Tests of Dielectric Loaded High Pressure RF Cavities for Use in Muon Cooling Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Bowring, Daniel [Fermilab; Kochemirovskiy, Alexey [Chicago U.; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Peterson, David [Fermilab; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Torun, Yagmur [IIT, Chicago; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Bright muon sources require six dimensional cooling to achieve acceptable luminosities. Ionization cooling is the only known method able to do so within the muon lifetime. One proposed cooling channel, the Helical Cooling Channel, utilizes gas filled radio frequency cavities to both mitigate RF breakdown in the presence of strong, external magnetic fields, and provide the cooling medium. Engineering constraints on the diameter of the magnets within which these cavities operate dictate the radius of the cavities be decreased at their nominal operating frequency. To accomplish this, one may load the cavities with a larger dielectric material. Alumina of purities ranging from 96 to 99.8% was tested in a high pressure RF test cell at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The results of breakdown studies with pure nitrogen gas, and oxygen-doped nitrogen gas indicate the peak surface electric field on the alumina ranges between 10 and 15 MV/m. How these results affect the design of a prototype cooling channel cavity will be discussed.

  17. Influence of cooling rate on structural and magnetic properties of (Fe78Nb8B141-xTbx alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ziółkowski

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the presented work we are focused on the influence of cooling rate on structural and magnetic properties of (Fe78Nb8B141-xTbx (x = 0.08, 0.1, 0.12 nanocrystalline bulk alloys. The samples were fabricated using the vacuum suction technique with different cooling rates controlled by different sample diameters (from 0.5 to 1.5 mm. The increased Nb content leads to the formation of specific microstructure and allows obtaining ultra-high coercive alloys just after casting without any additional treatment. The coercivity exceeds 8.6 T at the room temperature in case of optimal chemical and preparation conditions (x = 0.12, d = 0.5 mm and 5.6 T for x = 0.1. The impact of Tb content as well as the cooling rate on magnetic and structural (XRD, SEM, MFM properties is widely discussed in the context of reduction of rare earths in the RE-based permanent magnets.

  18. Mechanical response of local rapid cooling by spray water on constrained steel frame structure at high temperature in fire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Yunchun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Locally rapid cooling of spray water had strong impact on high temperature steel structure. When temperature of beam reached 600°C and cooling rate was more than 20°C/s, the maximum axial tension could reach more than 5 times of the originally compressive force. The compressive bending moment at joint of beam-to-column changed to tensile bending moment, and the maximum bending moment could reach above 4 times as that when heated. After rapid cooling by spray water, deflection at mid-span increased slightly.

  19. Long-term stability of global erosion rates and weathering during late-Cenozoic cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willenbring, Jane K; von Blanckenburg, Friedhelm

    2010-05-13

    Over geologic timescales, CO(2) is emitted from the Earth's interior and is removed from the atmosphere by silicate rock weathering and organic carbon burial. This balance is thought to have stabilized greenhouse conditions within a range that ensured habitable conditions. Changes in this balance have been attributed to changes in topographic relief, where varying rates of continental rock weathering and erosion are superimposed on fluctuations in organic carbon burial. Geological strata provide an indirect yet imperfectly preserved record of this change through changing rates of sedimentation. Widespread observations of a recent (0-5-Myr) fourfold increase in global sedimentation rates require a global mechanism to explain them. Accelerated uplift and global cooling have been given as possible causes, but because of the links between rates of erosion and the correlated rate of weathering, an increase in the drawdown of CO(2) that is predicted to follow may be the cause of global climate change instead. However, globally, rates of uplift cannot increase everywhere in the way that apparent sedimentation rates do. Moreover, proxy records of past atmospheric CO(2) provide no evidence for this large reduction in recent CO(2) concentrations. Here we question whether this increase in global weathering and erosion actually occurred and whether the apparent increase in the sedimentation rate is due to observational biases in the sedimentary record. As evidence, we recast the ocean dissolved (10)Be/(9)Be isotope system as a weathering proxy spanning the past approximately 12 Myr (ref. 14). This proxy indicates stable weathering fluxes during the late-Cenozoic era. The sum of these observations shows neither clear evidence for increased erosion nor clear evidence for a pulse in weathered material to the ocean. We conclude that processes different from an increase in denudation caused Cenozoic global cooling, and that global cooling had no profound effect on spatially and

  20. Cooling System for the Merit High-Power Target Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Silva, P; Pezzeti, M; Pavlov, O; Pirotte, O; Metselaar, J; Efthymiopoulos, I; Fabich, A; Lettry, J; Kirk, H G; McDonald, K T; Titus, P; Bennett, J R J

    2010-01-01

    MERIT is a proof-of-principle experiment of a target station suitable as source for future muon colliders or neutrino factories. When installed at the CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research) PS (Proton Synchrotron)complex fast-extracted high-intensity proton beams intercepted a free mercury jet inside a normal-conducting, pulsed 15-T capture solenoid magnet cooled with liquid nitrogen. Up to 25 MJ of Joule heat was dissipated in the magnet during a pulse. The fully automated, remotely controlled cryogenic system of novel design permitted the transfer of nitrogen by the sole means of differential pressures inside the vessels. This fast cycling system permitted several hundred tests in less than three weeks during the 2007 data taking campaign.

  1. Influence of cooling rates and addition of Equex pasta on cooled and frozen-thawed semen of generic gray (Canis lupus) and Mexican gray wolves (C. l. baileyi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zindl, C; Asa, C S; Günzel-Apel, A-R

    2006-10-01

    A current priority for the preservation of the endangered Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) is the development of a sperm-based genome resource bank for subsequent use in artificial insemination. To optimize the quality of cryopreserved sperm, the procedures involved in processing semen before and during freezing need to be improved. The aim of this study were to examine the effects of: (i) different cooling periods before freezing and (ii) addition of Equex pasta (Minitüb, Tübingen, Germany) on the characteristics of sperm from the generic gray wolf and the Mexican gray wolf after cooling and cryopreservation. For Mexican wolf sperm, cooling for 0.5 and 1.0 h had a less detrimental effect on cell morphology than cooling for 2.5 h, whereas the slower cooling rate (2.5 h) had a less detrimental effect on functional parameters and seemed to cause less damage to plasma membrane and acrosome integrity than 0.5 and 1.0 h. For the generic gray wolf, cooling semen for 2.5 h had less detrimental effect on plasma membrane integrity and viability; together with the 0.5 h cooling time, it yielded the highest percentages of intact acrosomes. As previously shown in the domestic dog, Equex pasta had no beneficial effect on sperm characteristics in either wolf species.

  2. The effect of ultrasound irradiation on the convective heat transfer rate during immersion cooling of a stationary sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Hossein; Sun, Da-Wen; Zhang, Zhihang

    2012-11-01

    It has been proven that ultrasound irradiation can enhance the rate of heat transfer processes. The objective of this work was to study the heat transfer phenomenon, mainly the heat exchange at the surface, as affected by ultrasound irradiation around a stationary copper sphere (k=386W m(-1)K(-1), C(p)=384J kg(-1)K(-1), ρ=8660kg m(-3)) during cooling. The sphere (0.01m in diameter) was immersed in an ethylene glycol-water mixture (-10°C) in an ultrasonic cooling system that included a refrigerated circulator, a flow meter, an ultrasound generator and an ultrasonic bath. The temperature of the sphere was recorded using a data logger equipped with a T-type thermocouple in the center of the sphere. The temperature of the cooling medium was also monitored by four thermocouples situated at different places in the bath. The sphere was located at different positions (0.02, 0.04 and 0.06m) above the transducer surface of the bath calculated considering the center of the sphere as the center of the reference system and was exposed to different intensities of ultrasound (0, 120, 190, 450, 890, 1800, 2800, 3400 and 4100W m(-2)) during cooling. The frequency of the ultrasound was 25kHz. It was demonstrated that ultrasound irradiation can increase the rate of heat transfer significantly, resulting in considerably shorter cooling times. Higher intensities caused higher cooling rates, and Nu values were increased from about 23-27 to 25-108 depending on the intensity of ultrasound and the position of the sphere. However, high intensities of ultrasound led to the generation of heat at the surface of the sphere, thus limiting the lowest final temperature achieved. An analytical solution was developed considering the heat generation and was fitted to the experimental data with R(2) values in the range of 0.910-0.998. Visual observations revealed that both cavitation and acoustic streaming were important for heat transfer phenomenon. Cavitation clouds at the surface of the sphere

  3. Influence of several methodological factors on the growth of Clostridium perfringens in cooling rate challenge studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah; Juneja, Vijay; Schaffner, Donald W

    2004-06-01

    Proper temperature control is essential in preventing Clostridium perfringens food poisoning. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service cooling guidelines offer two options for the cooling of meat products: follow a standard time-temperature schedule or validate that alternative cooling regimens result in no more than a 1-log CFU/g increase of C. perfringens and no growth of Clostridium botulinum. The latter option requires laboratory challenge studies to validate the efficacy of a given cooling process. Accordingly, the objective of this study was to investigate the role of several methodological variables that might be encountered during typical C. perfringens challenge studies. Variables studied included plastic bag type (Whirlpak or Spiral Biotech), sealing method (Multivac or FoodSaver), initial spore inoculum size (1 to approximately 3 log CFU/g), and growth environment (ground beef or Trypticase-peptone-glucose-yeast extract [TPGY] broth). The major factors that affected growth were sample bag type and growth environment. Samples incubated in Whirlpak bags showed significantly less growth than those incubated in Spiral Biotech bags, which was likely due to the former bag's greater oxygen permeability. C. perfringens spores showed shorter germination, outgrowth, and lag times and C. perfringens cells showed faster growth rates in ground beef compared with TPGY broth. No significant difference was observed between two different sealing methods. Initial spore inoculum levels in the range studied had no significant effect on final C. perfringens cell concentration.

  4. Study of the Al-Si-X system by different cooling rates and heat treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Suarez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The solidification behavior of the Al-12.6% Si (A1, the hypereutectic Al-20%Si (A2 and the Al-20%Si-1.5% Fe-0.5%Mn (A3 (in wt. (% alloys, at different cooling rates is reported and discussed. The cooling rates ranged between 0.93 °C/s and 190 °C/s when cast in sand and copper wedge-shaped molds, respectively. A spheroidization heat treatment was carried out to the alloys in the as-cast condition at 540 °C for 11 hours and quench in water with a subsequent heat treatment at 170 °C for 5 hours with the purpose of improving the mechanical properties. The samples were characterized by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and mechanically by tensile test, in order to evaluate the response of the heat treatment on the different starting microstructures and mechanical properties. It was found that alloys cooled at rates greater than 10.8 °C/s had a smaller particle size and better distribution, also showed a greater response to spheroidization heat treatment of all silicon (Si phases. The spheroidization heat treatment caused an increase in the ultimate tensile stress (UTS and elongation when compared with the alloys in the as-cast condition. The highest UTS value of 174 MPa was obtained for the (A1 alloy.

  5. Cooling Rate Study of Nickel-Rich Material During Thermal Treatment and Quench

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Fransua; Murguia, Silvia Briseno (Editor)

    2016-01-01

    To investigate quench cracking that results from water quenching after heat treatment of binary and Ni-rich material, cooling rates of specimens were measured during quenching and hardness post-thermal treatment. For specific applications binary Ni-Ti is customarily thermally treated and quenched to attain desired mechanical properties and hardness. However, one problem emerging from this method is thermal cracking, either during the heat treatment process or during the specimen's application. This can result in material and equipment failure as well as financial losses. The objective of the study is to investigate the internal cooling rate of 60-NiTi during quenching and determine possible factors causing thermal cracking. Cubic (1 in.3) samples of both material were heat treated in air at 1000 deg C for 2 hrs and quenched in room temperature water using two methods: (1) dropped in the water and (2) agitated in the water. Hardness of the two fore-mentioned methods was measured post heat treatment. Results indicate that the quenching method had an effect on cooling rate during quenching but hardness was observed to be essentially the same through the thickness of the samples.

  6. Thermal Disk Winds in X-Ray Binaries: Realistic Heating and Cooling Rates Give Rise to Slow, but Massive, Outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginbottom, N.; Proga, D.; Knigge, C.; Long, K. S.

    2017-02-01

    A number of X-ray binaries exhibit clear evidence for the presence of disk winds in the high/soft state. A promising driving mechanism for these outflows is mass loss driven by the thermal expansion of X-ray heated material in the outer disk atmosphere. Higginbottom & Proga recently demonstrated that the properties of thermally driven winds depend critically on the shape of the thermal equilibrium curve, since this determines the thermal stability of the irradiated material. For a given spectral energy distribution, the thermal equilibrium curve depends on an exact balance between the various heating and cooling mechanisms at work. Most previous work on thermally driven disk winds relied on an analytical approximation to these rates. Here, we use the photoionization code cloudy to generate realistic heating and cooling rates which we then use in a 2.5D hydrodynamic model computed in ZEUS to simulate thermal winds in a typical black hole X-ray binary. We find that these heating and cooling rates produce a significantly more complex thermal equilibrium curve, with dramatically different stability properties. The resulting flow, calculated in the optically thin limit, is qualitatively different from flows calculated using approximate analytical rates. Specifically, our thermal disk wind is much denser and slower, with a mass-loss rate that is a factor of two higher and characteristic velocities that are a factor of three lower. The low velocity of the flow—{v}\\max ≃ 200 km s-1—may be difficult to reconcile with observations. However, the high mass-loss rate—15 × the accretion rate—is promising, since it has the potential to destabilize the disk. Thermally driven disk winds may therefore provide a mechanism for state changes.

  7. Wedge Absorbers for Final Cooling for a High-Energy High-Luminosity Lepton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuffer, David [Fermilab; Mohayai, Tanaz [IIT, Chicago (main); Snopok, Pavel [IIT, Chicago; Summers, Don [Mississippi U.

    2016-06-01

    A high-energy high-luminosity muon collider scenario requires a "final cooling" system that reduces transverse emittance to ~25 microns (normalized) while allowing longitudinal emittance increase. Ionization cooling using high-field solenoids (or Li Lens) can reduce transverse emittances to ~100 microns in readily achievable configurations, confirmed by simulation. Passing these muon beams at ~100 MeV/c through cm-sized diamond wedges can reduce transverse emittances to ~25 microns, while increasing longitudinal emittance by a factor of ~5. Implementation will require optical matching of the exiting beam into downstream acceleration systems.

  8. Assessment of external heat transfer coefficient during oocyte vitrification in liquid and slush nitrogen using numerical simulations to determine cooling rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M V; Sansinena, M; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2012-01-01

    In oocyte vitrification, plunging directly into liquid nitrogen favor film boiling and strong nitrogen vaporization. A survey of literature values of heat transfer coefficients (h) for film boiling of small metal objects with different geometries plunged in liquid nitrogen revealed values between 125 to 1000 W per per square m per K. These h values were used in a numerical simulation of cooling rates of two oocyte vitrification devices (open-pulled straw and Cryotop), plunged in liquid and slush nitrogen conditions. Heat conduction equation with convective boundary condition was considered a linear mathematical problem and was solved using the finite element method applying the variational formulation. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to simulate the cooling process of the systems. Predicted cooling rates for OPS and Cryotop when cooled at -196 degree C (liquid nitrogen) or -207 degree C (average for slush nitrogen) for heat transfer coefficients estimated to be representative of film boiling, indicated lowering the cooling temperature produces only a maximum 10 percent increase in cooling rates; confirming the main benefit of plunging in slush over liquid nitrogen does not arise from their temperature difference. Numerical simulations also demonstrated that a hypothetical four-fold increase in the cooling rate of vitrification devices when plunging in slush nitrogen would be explained by an increase in heat transfer coefficient. This improvement in heat transfer (i.e., high cooling rates) in slush nitrogen is attributed to less or null film boiling when a sample is placed in slush (mixture of liquid and solid nitrogen) because it first melts the solid nitrogen before causing the liquid to boil and form a film.

  9. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project.

  10. Tolerance of brown bear spermatozoa to conditions of pre-freezing cooling rate and equilibration time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Urueña, E; Alvarez, M; Gomes-Alves, S; Martínez-Rodríguez, C; Borragan, S; Anel-López, L; de Paz, P; Anel, L

    2014-06-01

    Specific protocols for the cryopreservation of endangered Cantabrian brown bear spermatozoa are critical to create a genetic resource bank. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of cooling rates and equilibration time before freezing on post-thawed brown bear spermatozoa quality. Electroejaculates from 11 mature bears were extended to 100 × 10(6) spermatozoa/mL in a TES-Tris-Fructose-based extender, cryopreserved following performance of the respective cooling/equilibration protocol each sample was assigned to, and stored at -196 °C for further assessment. Before freezing, after thawing, and after 1 hour's incubation post-thawing at 37 °C (thermal stress test), the quality of the samples was assessed for motility by computer-assisted semen analysis, and for viability (SYBR-14/propidium iodide), acrosomal status (peanut agglutinin-fluorescein isothiocyanate /propidium iodide), and sperm chromatin stability (SCSA) by flow cytometry. In experiment 1, three cooling rates (0.25 °C/min, 1 °C/min, and 4 °C/min) to 5 °C were assessed. After thawing, total motility (%TM) was higher and percentage of damaged acrosomes (%dACR) was lower (P bear sperm. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Relationship between cooling rate and microsegregation in bottom-chilled directionally solidified ductile irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang W.S.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the relationship between cooling rate and microsegregation of directionally solidified ductile iron. The unidirectional heat transfer system used in this research is made up of a copper mold kept chilled by circulating water and embedded in the bottom of Furan sand mold. Thermocouples are connected to the computer measuring system to record the cooling curves of the castings at a distance of 0, 30, 60 and 90 mm from the chilled copper mold surface. Alloys including Mn, Cr, Cu, Ni and Ti were added to the specimens. Electron microprobe analysis (EPMA was employed to examine distribution of elements between the dendrite arms and nodular graphite. Results show that unidirectional heat transfer affects directly the solidification mode and microstructure of the casting. The cooling curves reveal that local solidification time increases with increasing distance from the chilled copper mold surface. Different solidification rates with corresponding microstructure and element segregation were observed in the same unidirectionally solidified casting. Local solidification time was closely related to element segregation. The effective segregation coefficient (Keff calculated using the Scheil equation was found to vary, according to the stage of solidification. The actual segregation characteristics of complex alloys generally follow the Scheil equation.

  12. Hardening by cooling rate control and post-firing heat treatment in Pd-Ag-Sn alloy for bonding porcelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Young-Jun; Seol, Hyo-Joung; Cho, Mi-Hyang; Kim, Hyung-Il; Kwon, Yong Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the hardening effect by controlling the cooling rate during the porcelain firing process and performing an additional post-firing heat treatment in a Pd-Ag-Sn alloy. The most effective cooling rate for alloy hardening was determined by cooling the specimens at various cooling rates after oxidation treatment. A subsequent porcelain firing simulation followed by cooling at the selected cooling rate was performed. A post-firing heat treatment was then done at 600°C in a porcelain furnace. The hardening mechanism was characterized by a hardness test, X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Alloy softening occurred during the porcelain firing process followed by cooling at a controlled cooling rate. A post-firing heat treatment allowed apparent precipitation hardening. It is advisable to perform a postfiring heat treatment at 600°C in a porcelain furnace by annealing metal substructure after porcelain fusing.

  13. Influence of cooling rate and antimony addition content on graphite morphology and mechanical properties of a ductile iron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Zhe

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cooling rate and inoculation practice can greatly affect the graphite morphology of ductile irons. In the present research, the effects of the cooling rate and antimony addition on the graphite morphology and mechanical properties of ductile irons have been studied. Three ductile iron castings were prepared through solidification under cooling conditions S (slow, M (medium and F (fast. The cooling rates around the equilibrium eutectic temperature (1,150 ℃ for these cooling conditions (S, M and F were set at 0.21 ℃·min-1, 0.32 ℃·min-1 and 0.37 ℃·min-1, respectively. In addition, four ductile iron castings were prepared by adding 0.01%, 0.02%, 0.03% and 0.04% (by weight antimony, respectively under the slow cooling condition. The results show that the nodularity index, tensile strength and hardness of the ductile iron castings without antimony addition are all improved with the increase of cooling rate, while the ductile iron casting solidified under the medium cooling rate possesses the largest number of graphite nodules. Furthermore, for the four antimony containing castings, the graphite morphology and tensile strength are also improved by the antimony additions, and the effect of antimony addition is intensified when the addition increases from 0.01% to 0.03%. Moreover, the rare earth elements (REE/antimony ratio of 2 appears to be the most effective for fine nodular graphite formation in ductile iron.

  14. Helium release rates and ODH calculations from RHIC magnet cooling line failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liaw, C.J.; Than, Y.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2011-03-28

    A catastrophic failure of the magnet cooling lines, similar to the LHC superconducting bus failure incident, could discharge cold helium into the RHIC tunnel and cause an Oxygen Deficiency Hazard (ODH) problem. A SINDA/FLUINT{reg_sign} model, which simulated the 4.5K/4 atm helium flowing through the magnet cooling system distribution lines, then through a line break into the insulating vacuum volumes and discharging via the reliefs into the RHIC tunnel, had been developed. Arc flash energy deposition and heat load from the ambient temperature cryostat surfaces are included in the simulations. Three typical areas: the sextant arc, the Triplet/DX/D0 magnets, and the injection area, had been analyzed. Results, including helium discharge rates, helium inventory loss, and the resulting oxygen concentration in the RHIC tunnel area, are reported. Good agreement had been achieved when comparing the simulation results, a RHIC sector depressurization test measurement, and some simple analytical calculations.

  15. Cooling curve analysis in binary Al-Cu alloys: Part II- Effect of Cooling Rate and Grain Refinement on The Thermal and Thermodynamic Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Dehnavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Al-Cu alloys have been widely used in aerospace, automobile, and airplane applications. Generally Al–Ti and Al–Ti–B master alloys are added to the aluminium alloys for grain refinement. The cooling curve analysis (CCA has been used extensively in metal casting industry to predict microstructure constituents, grain refinement and to calculate the latent heat of solidification. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of cooling rate and grain refinement on the thermal and thermodynamic characteristics of Al-Cu alloys by cooling curve analysis. To do this, Al-Cu alloys containing 3.7, and 4.8 wt.% Cu were melted and solidified with 0.04, 0.19, 0.42, and 1.08 K/s cooling rates. The temperature of the samples was recorded using a K thermocouple and a data acquisition system connected to a PC. Some samples were Grain refined by Al-5Ti-1B to see the effect of grain refinement on the aforementioned properties. The results show that, in a well refined alloy, nucleation will occur in a shorter time, and a undercooling approximately decreases to zero. The other results show that, with considering the cooling rate being around 0.1 °C/s, the Newtonian method is efficient in calculating the latent heat of solidification.

  16. Comparison of heat transfer in liquid and slush nitrogen by numerical simulation of cooling rates for French straws used for sperm cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansinena, M; Santos, M V; Zaritzky, N; Chirife, J

    2012-05-01

    Slush nitrogen (SN(2)) is a mixture of solid nitrogen and liquid nitrogen, with an average temperature of -207 °C. To investigate whether plunging a French plastic straw (commonly used for sperm cryopreservation) in SN(2) substantially increases cooling rates with respect to liquid nitrogen (LN(2)), a numerical simulation of the heat conduction equation with convective boundary condition was used to predict cooling rates. Calculations performed using heat transfer coefficients in the range of film boiling confirmed the main benefit of plunging a straw in slush over LN(2) did not arise from their temperature difference (-207 vs. -196 °C), but rather from an increase in the external heat transfer coefficient. Numerical simulations using high heat transfer (h) coefficients (assumed to prevail in SN(2)) suggested that plunging in SN(2) would increase cooling rates of French straw. This increase of cooling rates was attributed to a less or null film boiling responsible for low heat transfer coefficients in liquid nitrogen when the straw is placed in the solid-liquid mixture or slush. In addition, predicted cooling rates of French straws in SN(2) tended to level-off for high h values, suggesting heat transfer was dictated by heat conduction within the liquid filled plastic straw. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of the Cooling Rate on the Plasticity of Pd40.5Ni40.5P19 Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Qiu, Sheng-Bao; Shao, Yang; Yao, Ke-Fu

    2011-11-01

    We prepare Pd40.5Ni40.5P19 glassy samples with purified ingots by copper mold casting at a high cooling rate and by water quenching at a low cooling rate. Both of them exhibit different supercooled liquid regions and multiple glass transition characteristics in their differential scanning calorimetric curves. The plasticity of the glassy sample prepared by copper mold casting is about 5% while that prepared by water quenching is almost zero (0.2%), indicating that cooling rate has influenced the plasticity of glassy alloys. By using high resolution TEM image analysis, it is revealed that there exist characteristic regions with different contrasts in the full glassy samples. The characteristic size is about 20-40 nm for the glassy sample prepared by water quenching and 2-4 nm for the one prepared by copper mold casting. The large difference in the plasticity of the glassy samples prepared by different cooling rates is believed to be related to the difference in the size of the characteristic nanoscale structures. The results indicate that adjusting cooling rate in preparation of glassy samples could modify the thermal and mechanical properties of the glassy alloys.

  18. Final Cooling for a High-Energy High-Luminosity Lepton Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neuffer, David [Fermilab; Sayed, H. [Brookhaven; Hart, T. [Mississippi U.; Summers, D. [Mississippi U.

    2015-12-03

    A high-energy muon collider scenario require a “final cooling” system that reduces transverse emittance by a factor of ~10 while allowing longitudinal emittance increase. The baseline approach has low-energy transverse cooling within high-field solenoids, with strong longitudinal heating. This approach and its recent simulation are discussed. Alternative approaches which more explicitly include emittance exchange are also presented. Round-to-flat beam transform, transverse slicing, and longitudinal bunch coalescence are possible components of an alternative approach. Wedge-based emittance exchange could provide much of the required transverse cooling with longitudinal heating. Li-lens and quadrupole focusing systems could also provide much of the required final cooling.

  19. High energy resolution and high count rate gamma spectrometry measurement of primary coolant of generation 4 sodium-cooled fast reactor; Spectrometrie gamma haute resolution et hauts taux de comptage sur primaire de reacteur de type generation 4 au sodium liquide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulon, R.

    2010-11-10

    Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors are under development for the fourth generation of nuclear reactor. Breeders reactors could gives solutions for the need of energy and the preservation of uranium resources. An other purpose is the radioactive wastes production reduction by transmutation and the control of non-proliferation using a closed-cycle. These thesis shows safety and profit advantages that could be obtained by a new generation of gamma spectrometry system for SFR. Now, the high count rate abilities, allow us to study new methods of accurate power measurement and fast clad failure detection. Simulations have been done and an experimental test has been performed at the French Phenix SFR of the CEA Marcoule showing promising results for these new measurements. (author) [French] Les reacteurs a neutrons rapides refroidis au sodium sont en developpement en vue d'assurer une quatrieme generation de reacteurs repondant a la demande energetique, tout en assurant la preservation des ressources d'uranium par un fonctionnement en surgenerateur. L'objectif de la filiere est egalement d'ameliorer la gestion de la radiotoxicite des dechets produits par transmutation des actinides mineurs et de controler la non-proliferation par un fonctionnement en cycle ferme. Une instrumentation de surveillance et de controle de ce type de reacteur a ete etudiee dans cette these. La spectrometrie gamma de nouvelle generation permet, par les hauts taux de traitement aujourd'hui accessibles, d'envisager de nouvelles approches pour suivre avec une precision accrue la puissance neutronique et de detecter plus precocement des ruptures de gaine combustible. Des simulations numeriques ont ete realisees et une campagne d'essai a ete menee a bien sur le reacteur Phenix de Marcoule. Des perspectives prometteuses ont ete mises en exergue pour ces deux problematiques

  20. The Effect of Cooling Rate on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Zr-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihong Fu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to shed some insights on the effect of cooling rate on the microstructure and mechanical properties for glass-forming alloys. A crystalline gradient was observed in the microstructure of 12 mm diameter Zr51Al9.96Ni14.34Cu24.9 (Zr51 alloy sample from the edge to center due to uneven cooling rates. Microhardness results indicate that the lower the cooling rate, the higher the hardness for the studied alloy.

  1. Modular Spray-Cooled Assemblies for High Heat Fluxes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA SBIR Phase II project will produce a flight suitable test bench based on a modular spray-cooled assembly that considers NASA power and mass budgets and can...

  2. Effect of Glaze Cooling Rate on Mechanical Properties of Conventional and Pressed Porcelain on Zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhini, Diogo; Rocha, Cibele Oliveira de Melo; Medeiros, Igor Studart; Fonseca, Renata Garcia; Adabo, Gelson Luis

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize a conventional and a pressed porcelain for zirconia core as to biaxial flexural strength (BFS), apparent fracture toughness (FT) and microstructure composition, and to investigate the effect of glaze cooling rate on the BFS of the zirconia/porcelain bilayers. Monolayers of conventional porcelain Vita VM9 and pressed porcelain Vita PM9 (n=15) (12 mm diameter x 1.2 mm thick) were prepared for the BFS test (MPa). Apparent fracture toughness (MPa.m1/2) was measured by indentation technique (n=15). t-Student test was performed for statistical analysis. Scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction were used to analyze the porcelain's microstructure. For the BFS of bilayers, zirconia discs (12 mm diameter x 1 mm thick) (Vita In-Ceram YZ) were veneered with the two porcelains (1 mm thick). After the glaze firing simulation, the specimens were submitted to fast or slow cooling (n=15). Apparent fracture toughness (MPa.m1/2) was measured on the porcelain surface of bilayers (n=15) and residual stress was calculated. Two-way ANOVA (porcelain and cooling method) was used for the bilayer analysis (a=0.05). Vita PM9 monolayer exhibited significantly higher BFS (pporcelains. For bilayer specimens, the two-way ANOVA for BFS was significant for the porcelain variable only (pporcelain seems to be mechanically more effective for zirconia veneering.

  3. Clast Selection and Metallographic Cooling Rates: Initial Results on Type 1A and 2A Mesosiderites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baecker, B.; Cohen, B. A.; Rubin, A. E.; Frasl, B.; Corrigan, C. M.

    2017-01-01

    We initiated a comprehensive study on selected clasts and metal of mesosiderites using SEM, electron microprobe and the complete suite of noble gases. Here we report initial results on the petrography of selected clasts and metallographic cooling rates using the central Ni method used in sev-eral publications. We focus on the approach of selecting grains in least recrystallized mesosiderites. Hence, especially (lithic) clasts in type 1A, 1B, 2A and 2B are the first choice. They provide highest primitive-ness and least annealing/metamorphism. All grains selected should be in close proximity to each other. Lithic clasts in mesosiderites are of high interest be-cause of their igneous texture and similarity to eucrites and howardite petrography. We find pyrox-enes (px) and plagioclase (plag) attached to each other which implies a common formation history. It will be interesting to see differences and similarities in their noble gas inventory (CRE ages, trapped components and closure temperature). In addition, we will investi-gate variations of the lithic clasts toward similar grains in the thick sections which are not igneous. Plag grains are the best bases for noble gas measurements con-cerning He to Ar and Ar-Ar dating since it delivers im-portant target elements. We focus on plag grains in close contact to olivine (olv) / px grains to assess weth-er both grains show noble gas patterns being similar or different. Phosphate grains are suitable for Kr and Xe measurements since they yield REE abundances (tar-get elements).

  4. Heat-stop structure design with high cooling efficiency for large ground-based solar telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yangyi; Gu, Naiting; Rao, Changhui; Li, Cheng

    2015-07-20

    A heat-stop is one of the most important thermal control devices for a large ground-based solar telescope. For controlling the internal seeing effect, the temperature difference between the heat-stop and the ambient environment needs to be reduced, and a heat-stop with high cooling efficiency is required. In this paper, a novel design concept for the heat-stop, in which a multichannel loop cooling system is utilized to obtain higher cooling efficiency, is proposed. To validate the design, we analyze and compare the cooling efficiency for the multichannel and existing single-channel loop cooling system under the same conditions. Comparative results show that the new design obviously enhances the cooling efficiency of the heat-stop, and the novel design based on the multichannel loop cooling system is obviously better than the existing design by increasing the thermal transfer coefficient.

  5. Survival of mouse embryos after vitrification depending on the cooling rate of the cryoprotectant solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hredzák, R; Ostró, A; Zdilová, Viera; Maracek, I; Kacmárik, J

    2006-03-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the relationship between the rate of cooling of eight-cell mouse embryos to the temperature of liquid nitrogen (-196 degrees C) and their developmental capacity after thawing on the basis of their ability to leave the zona pellucida ('hatching') during in vitro culturing. Eight-cell embryos were obtained from superovulated female mice and divided into three experimental and one control group. Embryos from the experimental groups were cryopreserved by the vitrification method using ethylene glycol as cryoprotectant. The vitrification protocols used in the study differed in the rate of cooling of the cryoprotectant solution. Embryos from the first group were frozen in conventional 0.25-ml plastic straws, those from the second group in pipetting 'tips', and embryos from the third group, placed in vitrification solution, were introduced dropwise directly into liquid nitrogen. The control group of embryos was cultured in vitro without freezing in a culturing medium in an environment consisting of 95% air and 5% CO2. The developmental capacity of thawed embryos was assessed on the basis of their ability to leave the zona pellucida ('hatching') after three days of in vitro culturing. In the control group 95.1% of embryos 'hatched'. A significantly higher number of embryos that 'hatched' after thawing was observed in the group introduced dropwise directly into liquid nitrogen (60.0%) compared to the group frozen in pipetting 'tips' (37.9%). The group frozen in straws yielded significantly the lowest proportion of 'hatching' embryos (8.1%). These results showed that increasing cooling rates during vitrification of embryos improved their survival.

  6. Effects of the cooling rate on the shear behavior of continuous glass fiber/impact polypropylene composites (GF-IPP)

    KAUST Repository

    Wafai, Husam

    2016-09-20

    Fiber-reinforced composites with improved dissipation of energy during impact loading have recently been developed based on a polypropylene copolymer commonly called impact polypropylene (IPP). Composites made of IPP reinforced with glass fibers (GF) are particularly attractive to the automotive industry due to their low cost and good impact resistance. In such composites, the cooling rate varies depending on processing techniques and manufacturing choices. Here, we study the effects of the cooling rate of GF-IPP composites on shear behavior, which is critical in impact applications, using [±45]s monotonic and cyclic (load/unload) tensile specimens. The specimens were manufactured under a wide range of cooling rates (3 °C/min, 22 °C/min, 500–1000 °C/min). Mainly dominated by the properties of the matrix, the global shear behavior of GF-IPP composites differed considerably with respect to the cooling rate. However, the performance of the fiber-matrix interface (chemically modified) appeared to be unaffected by the range of cooling rates used in this study. We found that the cooling rate has a minor effect on the rate of damage accumulation, while it strongly modifies the shear-activated rate-dependant viscoelastic behavior. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd

  7. Effect of Cooling Rate on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Cu/Al Bimetal Fabricated by Compound Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoping; Wang, Qudong; Zhang, Li; Ye, Bing; Jiang, Haiyan; Ding, Wenjiang

    2018-02-01

    Cu/Al bimetal was fabricated successfully by compound casting at different cooling rates in the range from 0.8 K/s to 1.83 K/s (0.8 °C/s to 1.83 °C/s). Interfacial cooling curve, microstructure evolution, bonding strength, and interfacial formation mechanism of Cu/Al bimetal were investigated simultaneously. Results show that the transition zone consists of the intermetallic compounds (IMCs) and the remelting zone. The IMCs are identified as Al4Cu9, AlCu, and Al2Cu, types of which are not affected by the cooling rate. The cooling rate primarily influences the thickness of IMCs, the microstructure of the remelting zone, and the morphology of the remelting zone/Al interface. The Cu/Al bimetal produced at the cooling rate of 1.02 K/s (1.02 °C/s) has relatively higher bonding strength than those at the cooling rates of 0.8 K/s and 1.83 K/s (0.8 °C/s and 1.83 °C/s). Shear fracture primarily occurs on the hard brittle IMCs rather than on the remelting zone. Based on the cooling curve and diffusion analysis, a new bonding mechanism of Cu/Al bimetal is proposed.

  8. The Effect of Cooling Rate on the Apparent Bond Strength of Porcelain-Metal Couples,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-03-06

    IADR Program and Abstracts 53:742, 1974. 10. Dykema, R. W., Johnston, J. F., and Cunningham, D. M.: The veneered gold crown. The Dental Clinics of...AD-A097 492 ARMY INST OF DENTAL RESEARCH WASHINGTON DC F/G 11/2 THE EFFECT OF COOLING RATE ON THE APPARENT BOND STRENGTH OF POR-’ETC(U) MAR 81 J...porcelain- metal couples John W. Guinn, III, B.S., D.D.S. William H. Griswold, B.S., D.D.S. Stanley G. Vermilyea, B.S.,D.M.D., M.S. U.S. Army Dental

  9. The effects of radiant cooling versus convective cooling on human eye tear film stability and blinking rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Linette; Uth, Simon C.; Bolashikov, Zhecho Dimitrov

    2014-01-01

    The effect of indoor temperature, radiant and convective cooling on tear film stability and eye blink frequency was examined. 24 human subjects were exposed to the non-uniform environment generated by localised chilled beam and a chilled ceiling combined with overhead mixing ventilation. The subj......The effect of indoor temperature, radiant and convective cooling on tear film stability and eye blink frequency was examined. 24 human subjects were exposed to the non-uniform environment generated by localised chilled beam and a chilled ceiling combined with overhead mixing ventilation....... The subjects participated in four two-hour experiments. The room air temperature was kept at 26 °C or 28 °C. Tear film samples were collected after 30 min of acclimatisation and at the end of the exposures. Eye blinking frequency was analysed for the first and last 15 min of each exposure. The tear film...

  10. Effect of cooling rate on microstructural formation and hardness of 30CrNi3Mo steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Z.X. [Tianjin University, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin (China); Tianjin University of Commerce, School of Mechanical Engineering, Tianjin (China); Liu, Y.C.; Yu, L.M.; Gao, Z.M. [Tianjin University, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Composite and Functional Materials, Tianjin (China)

    2009-06-15

    The variation of microstructural formation and the hardness of the 30CrNi3Mo steel were systematically explored as a function of applied cooling rates in the range of 1-500 C/min. According to the measured Rockwell hardness results, four characteristic stages could be separated as different ranges of cooling rates, which corresponds well with the microstructural evolution observed. With the applied cooling rate increasing, the transformed structure evolves from granular bainite, lower bainite, self-tempered martensite, to finally martensite without self-tempering. Among them, the self-tempered martensite, obtained in the transformed specimens cooled with rates of 25-80 C/min, exhibits the highest hardness values due to the precipitation of fine carbides within it. (orig.)

  11. Thermal studies of a high gradient quadrupole magnet cooled with pressurized, stagnant superfluid

    CERN Document Server

    Chiesa, L; Kerby, J S; Lamm, M J; Novitski, I; Orris, D; Ozelis, J P; Peterson, Thomas J; Tartaglia, M; Zlobin, A V

    2001-01-01

    A 2-m long superconducting model of an LHC Interaction Region quadrupole magnet was wound with stabrite coated cable. The resulting low interstrand resistance and high AC losses presented the opportunity to measure magnet quench performance in superfluid as a function of helium temperature and heat deposition in the coil. Our motivation was to duplicate the high radiation heat loads predicted for the inner triplet quadrupoles at LHC and study the coil cooling conditions in the magnet. At the Magnet Test Facility in Fermilab's Technical Division, the magnet quench performance was tested as a function of bulk helium temperature and current ramp rate near the planned high luminosity interaction region field gradient of 205 T/m. AC loss measurements provided a correlation between current ramp rate and heat deposition in the coil. Analysis indicates that the results are consistent with there being little participation of superfluid helium in the small channels inside the inner layer in the heat removal from the co...

  12. Influence of cooling rate on crystallization, structure and mechanical properties of MCMgAl6Zn1 alloy

    OpenAIRE

    L.A. Dobrzański; M. Król; T. Tański

    2010-01-01

    This work presents an influence of cooling rate on crystallization process, structure and mechanical properties of MCMgAl6Zn1 castmagnesium alloy. The experiments were performed using the novel Universal Metallurgical Simulator and Analyzer Platform. Theapparatus enabled recording the temperature during refrigerate magnesium alloy with three different cooling rates, i.e. 0.6, 1.2 and2.4°C/s and calculate a first derivative. Based on first derivative results, nucleation temperature, beginning ...

  13. Parametrization of the average ionization and radiative cooling rates of carbon plasmas in a wide range of density and temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Gil de la Fe, Juan Miguel; Rodriguez Perez, Rafael; Florido, Ricardo; Garcia Rubiano, Jesus; Mendoza, M. A.; Nuez, A. de la; Espinosa, G.; Martel Escobar, Carlos; Mínguez Torres, Emilio

    2013-01-01

    In this work we present an analysis of the influence of the thermodynamic regime on the monochromatic emissivity, the radiative power loss and the radiative cooling rate for optically thin carbon plasmas over a wide range of electron temperature and density assuming steady state situations. Furthermore, we propose analytical expressions depending on the electron density and temperature for the average ionization and cooling rate based on polynomial fittings which are valid for the whole range...

  14. Effect of cooling rate during solidification on the hard phases of M23C6-type of cast CoCrMo alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Alvarez-Vera

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Microstructural morphology of CoCrMo alloy by control of the cooling rate during the solidification was investigated. Samples were obtained using both an induction furnace for slow cooling rate and electric arc furnace for fast cooling rate. Microstructural characterizations were performed with metallographic techniques. It was found that the difference between the formation temperature of hard secondary phases of M23C6-type carbides determine the reduction of carbide size by increasing the cooling rate.

  15. Beam Test of a Dielectric Loaded High Pressure RF Cavity for Use in Muon Cooling Channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [IIT, Chicago; Bowring, Daniel [Fermilab; Kochemirovskiy, Alexey [Chicago U.; Moretti, Alfred [Fermilab; Peterson, David [Fermilab; Tollestrup, Alvin [Fermilab; Torun, Yagmur [IIT, Chicago; Yonehara, Katsuya [Fermilab

    2016-06-01

    Bright muon sources require six dimensional cooling to achieve acceptable luminosities. Ionization cooling is the only known method able to do so within the muon lifetime. One proposed cooling channel, the Helical Cooling Channel, utilizes gas filled radio frequency cavities to both mitigate RF breakdown in the presence of strong, external magnetic fields, and provide the cooling medium. Engineering constraints on the diameter of the magnets within which these cavities operate dictate the radius of the cavities be decreased at their nominal operating frequency. To accomplish this, one may load the cavities with a larger dielectric material. A 99.5% alumina ring was inserted in a high pressure RF test cell and subjected to an intense proton beam at the MuCool Test Area at Fermilab. The results of the performance of this dielectric loaded high pressure RF cavity will be presented.

  16. Determination of critical cooling rates in metallic glass forming alloy libraries through laser spike annealing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordeenithikasem, Punnathat; Liu, Jingbei; Kube, Sebastian A; Li, Yanglin; Ma, Tianxing; Scanley, B Ellen; Broadbridge, Christine C; Vlassak, Joost J; Singer, Jonathan P; Schroers, Jan

    2017-08-02

    The glass forming ability (GFA) of metallic glasses (MGs) is quantified by the critical cooling rate (R C ). Despite its key role in MG research, experimental challenges have limited measured R C to a minute fraction of known glass formers. We present a combinatorial approach to directly measure R C for large compositional ranges. This is realized through the use of compositionally-graded alloy libraries, which were photo-thermally heated by scanning laser spike annealing of an absorbing layer, then melted and cooled at various rates. Coupled with X-ray diffraction mapping, GFA is determined from direct R C measurements. We exemplify this technique for the Au-Cu-Si system, where we identify Au 56 Cu 27 Si 17 as the alloy with the highest GFA. In general, this method enables measurements of R C over large compositional areas, which is powerful for materials discovery and, when correlating with chemistry and other properties, for a deeper understanding of MG formation.

  17. Weakly doped InP layers prepared by liquid phase epitaxy using a modulated cooling rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukovskyi, R.; Mykhashchuk, Y.; Kost, Y.; Krukovskyi, S.; Saldan, I.

    2017-04-01

    Epitaxial structures based on InP are widely used to manufacture a number of devices such as microwave transistors, light-emitting diodes, lasers and Gunn diodes. However, their temporary instability caused by heterogeneity of resistivity along the layer thickness and the influence of various external or internal factors prompts the need for the development of a new reliable technology for their preparation. Weak doping by Yb, Al and Sn together with modulation of the cooling rate applied to prepare InP epitaxial layers is suggested to be adopted within the liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) method. The experimental results confirm the optimized conditions created to get a uniform electron concentration in the active n-InP layer. A sharp profile of electron concentration in the n+-InP(substrate)/n-InP/n+-InP epitaxial structure was observed experimentally at the proposed modulated cooling rate of 0.3 °С-1.5 °С min-1. The proposed technological method can be used to control the electrical and physical properties of InP epitaxial layers to be used in Gunn diodes.

  18. An improved thermoregulatory model for cooling garment applications with transient metabolic rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westin, Johan K.

    Current state-of-the-art thermoregulatory models do not predict body temperatures with the accuracies that are required for the development of automatic cooling control in liquid cooling garment (LCG) systems. Automatic cooling control would be beneficial in a variety of space, aviation, military, and industrial environments for optimizing cooling efficiency, for making LCGs as portable and practical as possible, for alleviating the individual from manual cooling control, and for improving thermal comfort and cognitive performance. In this study, we adopt the Fiala thermoregulatory model, which has previously demonstrated state-of-the-art predictive abilities in air environments, for use in LCG environments. We validate the numerical formulation with analytical solutions to the bioheat equation, and find our model to be accurate and stable with a variety of different grid configurations. We then compare the thermoregulatory model's tissue temperature predictions with experimental data where individuals, equipped with an LCG, exercise according to a 700 W rectangular type activity schedule. The root mean square (RMS) deviation between the model response and the mean experimental group response is 0.16°C for the rectal temperature and 0.70°C for the mean skin temperature, which is within state-of-the-art variations. However, with a mean absolute body heat storage error 3¯ BHS of 9.7 W˙h, the model fails to satisfy the +/-6.5 W˙h accuracy that is required for the automatic LCG cooling control development. In order to improve model predictions, we modify the blood flow dynamics of the thermoregulatory model. Instead of using step responses to changing requirements, we introduce exponential responses to the muscle blood flow and the vasoconstriction command. We find that such modifications have an insignificant effect on temperature predictions. However, a new vasoconstriction dependency, i.e. the rate of change of hypothalamus temperature weighted by the

  19. Rotational Laser Cooling of MgH+ Ions and Rotational Rate Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anders Kragh; Staanum, Peter; Højbjerre, Klaus

    blackbody radiation field. To undertake such modelling, we will carry out measurements of a series of transition rates between rotational states in the vibronic ground state at room temperature. The measurements will be performed by the same Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Dissociation (REMPD) process used......A method of laser cooling vibrationally and translationally cold trapped MgH+ ions to the rotational ground state using optical pumping was recently demonstrated in our group [1]. This method relies on the 293 K blackbody radiation to redistribute population among the rotational states, while...... exciting a single rovibrational transition within the X1Σ+ electronic ground state for optical pumping into the rovibrational ground state. To model the expected rotational state distributions after the application of the laser beam, one has to know the various rotational transitions rates in the present...

  20. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Options Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Preliminary scoping calculations are being performed for a 100 MWt gas-cooled test reactor. The initial design uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to identify some reactor design features to investigate further. Current status of the effort is described.

  1. Optimization Tool for Direct Water Cooling System of High Power IGBT Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    . One of the most important activities in the thermal management and reliability improvement is the cooling system design. As industries are developing smaller power devices with higher power densities, optimized design of cooling systems with minimum thermal resistance and pressure drop become...... important issue for thermal design engineers. This paper aims to present a user friendly optimization tool for direct water cooling system of a high power module which enables the cooling system designer to identify the optimized solution depending on customer load profiles and available pump power. CFD...

  2. High-strain, high-strain-rate deformation of tantalum and tantalum-tungsten alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Vecchio, K.

    1994-01-01

    Under certain high strain rate conditions, plastic deformation can be assumed to be adiabatic, and a significant temperature increase can occur at large strains. In this study, tantalum and tantalum-tungsten alloys were subjected to high shear strains at high strain rate using a specially-designed stepped specimen in a Hopkinson bar. Upon completion of the deformation, the region is cooled to below one-half of the temperature achieved due to the adiabatic heating in less than one millisecond....

  3. Stochastic Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

  4. Magnetic cooling from fundamentals to high efficiency refrigeration

    CERN Document Server

    Gutfleisch, Oliver

    2018-01-01

    This new publication is the first up-to-date resource on this exciting research area. As one of the few green, energy efficient technologies, magnetic cooling is experiencing a surge in interest and this book brings together the latest research from physics, materials science, engineering and chemistry. In the process of being commercialized, large organisations are working on bringing a suitable product to market utilising this technology.

  5. High Performance Mars Liquid Cooling and Ventilation Garment Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrier, Douglas; Clayton, Ronald; Whitlock, David; Conger, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    EVA space suit mobility in micro-gravity is enough of a challenge and in the gravity of Mars, improvements in mobility will enable the suited crew member to efficiently complete EVA objectives. The idea proposed is to improve thermal efficiencies of the liquid cooling and ventilation garment (LCVG) in the torso area in order to free up the arms and legs by removing the liquid tubes currently used in the ISS EVA suit in the limbs. By using shaped water tubes that greatly increase the contact area with the skin in the torso region of the body, the heat transfer efficiency can be increased to provide the entire liquid cooling requirement and increase mobility by freeing up the arms and legs. Additional potential benefits of this approach include reduced LCVG mass, enhanced evaporation cooling, increased comfort during Mars EVA tasks, and easing of the overly dry condition in the helmet associated with the Advanced Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) ventilation loop currently under development.

  6. High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Papers and working group summaries presented at the High Resolution, High Frame Rate Video (HHV) Workshop are compiled. HHV system is intended for future use on the Space Shuttle and Space Station Freedom. The Workshop was held for the dual purpose of: (1) allowing potential scientific users to assess the utility of the proposed system for monitoring microgravity science experiments; and (2) letting technical experts from industry recommend improvements to the proposed near-term HHV system. The following topics are covered: (1) State of the art in the video system performance; (2) Development plan for the HHV system; (3) Advanced technology for image gathering, coding, and processing; (4) Data compression applied to HHV; (5) Data transmission networks; and (6) Results of the users' requirements survey conducted by NASA.

  7. Enthalpy Relaxation of a DGEBA Epoxy as a function of Time, Temperature, and Cooling Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, Caitlyn M.; McCoy, John D.; Kropka, Jamie M.

    2015-03-01

    Enthalpy relaxation resulting from physical aging of a DGEBA epoxy, Epon 828, cross-linked with an amine curative, Jeffamine T-403, was studied for two isothermal aging temperatures at sequential aging times up to two weeks. Results were analyzed using the peak shift method to obtain the relaxation parameters β, δ (H*), and χ. The individual effects of cooling rate from the equilibrated state, aging time, and aging temperature were isolated to understand the initial state of the glassy epoxy and its evolution during physical aging. [Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Design and Comparative Analysis of a Retrofitted Liquid Cooling System for High-Power Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Paine

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an in-depth system-level experimental analysis comparing air-cooled and liquid-cooled commercial off-the-shelf (COTS electric motors. Typically, liquid-cooled electric motors are reserved for large, expensive, high-end applications where the design of the motor’s electromagnetic components are closely coupled to its cooling system. By applying liquid cooling to a pre-existing motor design, this work helps bring the performance advantages of liquid cooling to smaller scale and lower cost applications. Prior work in this area gives little insight to designers of such systems. Conversely, this work aims to improve the understanding of liquid-cooled COTS motors by reporting empirically-observed factors of improvement for motor current, torque, output power and system efficiency. These measurements are obtained using a new liquid-cooled motor housing design that improves the ease of maintenance and component reuse compared to existing work. It is confirmed that datasheet motor thermal properties may serve as a reasonable guide for anticipating continuous torque performance, but may over-specify continuous power output. For the motor used in this test, continuous torque output is increased by a factor of 2.58, matching to within 9% of expected datasheet values. Continuous power output is increased by a factor of two with only 2.2% reduced efficiency compared to air-cooling.

  9. Joint Cooling does not Hinder Athletic Performance during High-intensity Intermittent Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H; Lee, D; Choi, H-M; Park, J

    2016-07-01

    We examined the effects of ankle and knee joint cooling on 20-m sprint times and maximal vertical jump heights during high-intensity intermittent exercise. 21 healthy collegiate male basketball (n=14) and handball players (n=7) underwent 3 experimental sessions. Each session consisted of four 15-min quarters of high-intensity intermittent exercises including various intensities of 20-m shuttle running and jumping. A 20-min bilateral joint cooling (ankle, knee, or control-no cooling: in a counterbalanced order) was applied before quarters 1 and 3. After joint cooling, no warm-up activity other than the exercise protocol was given. The 20-m sprint times and maximal vertical jump heights in each experimental session were recorded at baseline (prior to quarter-1) and during each quarter. To test joint cooling effects over time, we performed 3×5 mixed model ANOVAs. Neither ankle nor knee joint cooling changed 20-m sprint times (F8,280=1.45; p=0.18) or maximal vertical jump heights (F8,280=0.76; p=0.64). However, a trend was observed in which joint cooling immediately decreased (quarters 1 and 3) but active warm-up for approximately 20 min improved 20-min sprint times (quarters 2 and 4). Our study suggests that athletic performance such as sprinting and jumping are not altered by joint cooling applied prior to or during high-intensity intermittent exercise. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Transient analysis of nuclear graphite oxidation for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Wei, E-mail: wxu12@mails.tsinghua.edu.cn; Shi, Lei; Zheng, Yanhua

    2016-09-15

    Graphite is widely used as moderator, reflector and structural materials in the high temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble-bed modular (HTR-PM). In normal operating conditions or water/air ingress accident, the nuclear graphite in the reactor may be oxidized by air or steam. Oxidation behavior of nuclear graphite IG-110 which is used as the structural materials and reflector of HTR-PM is mainly researched in this paper. To investigate the penetration depth of oxygen in IG-110, this paper developed the one dimensional spherical oxidation model. In the oxidation model, the equations considered graphite porosity variation with the graphite weight loss. The effect of weight loss on the effective diffusion coefficient and the oxidation rate was also considered in this model. Based on this theoretical model, this paper obtained the relative concentration and local weight loss ratio profile in graphite. In addition, the local effective diffusion coefficient and oxidation rate in the graphite were also investigated.

  11. Tuning the Mechanical and Antimicrobial Performance of a Cu-Based Metallic Glass Composite through Cooling Rate Control and Annealing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Villapún

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of cooling rate on the wear and antimicrobial performance of a Cu52Z41Al7 (at. % bulk metallic glass (BMG composite was studied and the results compared to those of the annealed sample (850 °C for 48 h and to pure copper. The aim of this basic research is to explore the potential use of the material in preventing the spread of infections. The cooling rate is controlled by changing the mould diameter (2 mm and 3 mm upon suction casting and controlling the mould temperature (chiller on and off. For the highest cooling rate conditions CuZr is formed but CuZr2 starts to crystallise as the cooling rate decreases, resulting in an increase in the wear resistance and brittleness, as measured by scratch tests. A decrease in the cooling rate also increases the antimicrobial performance, as shown by different methodologies (European, American and Japanese standards. Annealing leads to the formation of new intermetallic phases (Cu10Zr7 and Cu2ZrAl resulting in maximum scratch hardness and antimicrobial performance. However, the annealed sample corrodes during the antimicrobial tests (within 1 h of contact with broth. The antibacterial activity of copper was proved to be higher than that of any of the other materials tested but it exhibits very poor wear properties. Cu-rich BMG composites with optimised microstructure would be preferable for some applications where the durability requirements are higher than the antimicrobial needs.

  12. High density, optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, v-groove monolithic laser diode array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Barry L.

    1998-01-01

    An optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser diode array achieves stacking pitches to 33 bars/cm by mounting laser diodes into V-shaped grooves. This design will deliver>4kW/cm2 of directional pulsed laser power. This optically corrected, micro-channel cooled, high density laser is usable in all solid state laser systems which require efficient, directional, narrow bandwidth, high optical power density pump sources.

  13. The impact of humidity on evaporative cooling in small desert birds exposed to high air temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerson, Alexander R; Smith, Eric Krabbe; Smit, Ben; McKechnie, Andrew E; Wolf, Blair O

    2014-01-01

    Environmental temperatures that exceed body temperature (Tb) force endothermic animals to rely solely on evaporative cooling to dissipate heat. However, evaporative heat dissipation can be drastically reduced by environmental humidity, imposing a thermoregulatory challenge. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of humidity on the thermoregulation of desert birds and to compare the sensitivity of cutaneous and respiratory evaporation to reduced vapor density gradients. Rates of evaporative water loss, metabolic rate, and Tb were measured in birds exposed to humidities ranging from ∼2 to 30 g H2O m(-3) (0%-100% relative humidity at 30°C) at air temperatures between 44° and 56°C. In sociable weavers, a species that dissipates heat primarily through panting, rates of evaporative water loss were inhibited by as much as 36% by high humidity at 48°C, and these birds showed a high degree of hyperthermia. At lower temperatures (40°-44°C), evaporative water loss was largely unaffected by humidity in this species. In Namaqua doves, which primarily use cutaneous evaporation, increasing humidity reduced rates of evaporative water loss, but overall rates of water loss were lower than those observed in sociable weavers. Our data suggest that cutaneous evaporation is more efficient than panting, requiring less water to maintain Tb at a given temperature, but panting appears less sensitive to humidity over the air temperature range investigated here.

  14. Effect of thawing time, cooling rate and boron nutrition on freezing point of the primordial shoot in norway spruce buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räisänen, Mikko; Repo, Tapani; Lehto, Tarja

    2006-04-01

    Effects of cooling rates on bud frost hardiness have been studied but there is little information on bud responses to thawing. Since the cell wall pore size has been found to increase with boron (B) deficiency, B deficiency may affect the supercooling ability of buds in winter. The effects of duration of thawing time and rate of cooling on bud frost hardiness of Norway spruce (Picea abies) were studied in a B fertilization trial in February 2003 and March 2005. Frost hardiness of apical buds was determined by differential thermal analysis (DTA) and visual scoring of damage. In 2003, the freezing point of primordial shoots of buds (T(f)), i.e. the low-temperature exotherm (LTE), was, on average, -39 degrees C when buds were thawed for less than 3 h and the T(f) increased to -21 degrees C after 18 h of thawing. During the first 4 h of thawing, the rate of dehardening was 6 degrees C h(-1). In 2005, buds dehardened linearly from -39 degrees C to -35 degrees C at a rate of 0.7 degrees C h(-1). In 2003, different cooling rates of 1-5 degrees C h(-1) had a minor effect on T(f) but in 2005 with slow cooling rates T(f) decreased. In both samplings, at cooling rates of 2 and 1 degrees C h(-1), T(f) was slightly higher in B-fertilized than in non-fertilized trees. By contrast, at very short thawing times in 2003, T(f) was somewhat lower in B-fertilized trees. There was little evidence of reduced frost hardiness in trees with low B status. This study showed that buds deharden rapidly when exposed to above-freezing temperatures in winter, but if cooled again they reharden more slowly. According to this study, rapid dehardening of buds has to be taken into account in assessments of frost hardiness.

  15. Effects of Heating and Cooling Rates on Phase Transformations in 10 Wt Pct Ni Steel and Their Application to Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, Erin J.; Jain, Divya; DuPont, John N.; Seidman, David N.

    2017-10-01

    10 wt pct Ni steel is a high-strength steel that possesses good ballistic resistance from the deformation induced transformation of austenite to martensite, known as the transformation-induced-plasticity effect. The effects of rapid heating and cooling rates associated with welding thermal cycles on the phase transformations and microstructures, specifically in the heat-affected zone, were determined using dilatometry, microhardness, and microstructural characterization. Heating rate experiments demonstrate that the Ac3 temperature is dependent on heating rate, varying from 1094 K (821 °C) at a heating rate of 1 °C/s to 1324 K (1051 °C) at a heating rate of 1830 °C/s. A continuous cooling transformation diagram produced for 10 wt pct Ni steel reveals that martensite will form over a wide range of cooling rates, which reflects a very high hardenability of this alloy. These results were applied to a single pass, autogenous, gas tungsten arc weld. The diffusion of nickel from regions of austenite to martensite during the welding thermal cycle manifests itself in a muddled, rod-like lath martensitic microstructure. The results of these studies show that the nickel enrichment of the austenite in 10 wt pct Ni steel plays a critical role in phase transformations during welding.

  16. Effects of Heating and Cooling Rates on Phase Transformations in 10 Wt Pct Ni Steel and Their Application to Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, Erin J.; Jain, Divya; DuPont, John N.; Seidman, David N.

    2017-12-01

    10 wt pct Ni steel is a high-strength steel that possesses good ballistic resistance from the deformation induced transformation of austenite to martensite, known as the transformation-induced-plasticity effect. The effects of rapid heating and cooling rates associated with welding thermal cycles on the phase transformations and microstructures, specifically in the heat-affected zone, were determined using dilatometry, microhardness, and microstructural characterization. Heating rate experiments demonstrate that the Ac3 temperature is dependent on heating rate, varying from 1094 K (821 °C) at a heating rate of 1 °C/s to 1324 K (1051 °C) at a heating rate of 1830 °C/s. A continuous cooling transformation diagram produced for 10 wt pct Ni steel reveals that martensite will form over a wide range of cooling rates, which reflects a very high hardenability of this alloy. These results were applied to a single pass, autogenous, gas tungsten arc weld. The diffusion of nickel from regions of austenite to martensite during the welding thermal cycle manifests itself in a muddled, rod-like lath martensitic microstructure. The results of these studies show that the nickel enrichment of the austenite in 10 wt pct Ni steel plays a critical role in phase transformations during welding.

  17. Influence of cooling rate on crystallization, structure and mechanical properties of MCMgAl6Zn1 alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.A. Dobrzański

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an influence of cooling rate on crystallization process, structure and mechanical properties of MCMgAl6Zn1 castmagnesium alloy. The experiments were performed using the novel Universal Metallurgical Simulator and Analyzer Platform. Theapparatus enabled recording the temperature during refrigerate magnesium alloy with three different cooling rates, i.e. 0.6, 1.2 and2.4°C/s and calculate a first derivative. Based on first derivative results, nucleation temperature, beginning of nucleation of eutecticand solidus temperature were described. It was fund that the formation temperatures of various thermal parameters, mechanicalproperties (hardness and ultimate compressive strength and grain size are shifting with an increasing cooling rate.

  18. Effect of cooling rate on properties of plasma nitrided AISI 1010 steel

    OpenAIRE

    ALVES Jr, Clodomiro; Lima, José de Anchieta; HAJEK, VACLAV; Cunha, João Batista Marimon; Santos,Carlos Alberto

    2007-01-01

    In this work, AISI 1010 steel samples were plasma nitrided into 20% N 2 100 Pa and 400 Pa for N 2 and H 2 , respectively), temperatures of 500 and 580 °C, during 2 h. Three different procedures for cooling were accomplished after nitriding. In the first procedure the cooling occurred naturally, that is, the sample was kept on substrate holder. In the second one the sample was pulled off and cooling in a cold surface. Finally, in the third cooling process the sample was...

  19. Influence of veneering porcelain thickness and cooling rate on residual stresses in zirconia molar crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amleh, Basil; Neil Waddell, J; Lyons, Karl; Swain, Michael V

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of increasing veneering porcelain thickness in clinically representative zirconia molar crowns on the residual stresses under fast and slow cooling protocols. Six veneered zirconia copings (Procera, Nobel Biocare AB, Gothenburg, Sweden) based on a mandibular molar form, were divided into 3 groups with flattened cusp heights that were 1mm, 2mm, or 3mm. Half the samples were fast cooled during final glazing; the other half were slow cooled. Vickers indentation technique was used to determine surface residual stresses. Normality distribution within each sample was done using Kolmogorov-Smirnov & Shapiro-Wilk tests, and one-way ANOVA tests used to test for significance between various cusp heights within each group. Independent t-tests used to evaluate significance between each cusp height group with regards to cooling. Compressive stresses were recorded with fast cooling, while tensile stresses with slow cooling. The highest residual compressive stresses were recorded on the fast cooled 1mm cusps which was significantly higher than the 2 and 3mm fast cooled crowns (Pveneering porcelain thickness increased in the fast cooled group (Pveneering porcelain thickness compared to the basic flat plate model. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. CTE-Matched, Liquid-Cooled, High Thermal Conductivity Heat Sink Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the development of a CTE-matched, liquid-cooled, high thermal conductivity heat sink for use in spacecraft thermal management applications. The material...

  1. Investigation of Micro Hardness, Cooling Rate and Microstructure of ATIG Welded samples of Al-SiC composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pichumani Sivachidambaram

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated TIG welding has been performed on Al – 8% SiC composite 5mm plate with various fluxes such as Al2O3, MnO2, CaO, MgO, SiO2 & TiO2, to study & analyze the Microstructure, Micro hardness and cooling rate. Correlation study between micro hardness, microstructure and cooling rate for Constant Current TIG welding and Activated TIG welding on Al-SiC composite are also carried out to analyze the relation between the effect of cooling rate on microstructure & the effect of microstructure on micro hardness. The experimental results of ATIG welding on Al-SiC composite shows fine grain weld microstructure on ATIG – SiO2 & ATIG – TiO2, which results in higher micro hardness. Micro hardness values are taken in different locations of weld surface at 1mm, 2mm & 3mm below the weld surface and the same is also observed along the weld zone to heat affected zone upto 12mm for the center of the weldment. Minimum micro hardness values found in ATIG – MnO2, ATIG – CaO & ATIG – MgO are due to intermediate micro structure between coarse and fine in heat affected zone. ATIG – Al2O3 weld zone & heat affected zone and heat affected zone of ATIG – MnO2, ATIG – CaO & ATIG – MgO shows coarse microstructure leading to reduction in micro hardness value. Cooling rate for the different CCTIG & ATIG welding are recorded and correlation between the micro structures are studied. Coarse micro structure in weld zone and heat affected zone have least cooling rate whereas fine micro structure in weld zone resulted at higher cooling rate. Heat affected zone strongly depends on temperature gradient between the weld center and weldment’s heat affected zone.

  2. Heart rate variability in sleeping preterm neonates exposed to cool and warm thermal conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwan Stéphan-Blanchard

    Full Text Available Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS remains the main cause of postneonatal infant death. Thermal stress is a major risk factor and makes infants more vulnerable to SIDS. Although it has been suggested that thermal stress could lead to SIDS by disrupting autonomic functions, clinical and physiopathological data on this hypothesis are scarce. We evaluated the influence of ambient temperature on autonomic nervous activity during sleep in thirty-four preterm neonates (mean ± SD gestational age: 31.4±1.5 weeks, postmenstrual age: 36.2±0.9 weeks. Heart rate variability was assessed as a function of the sleep stage at three different ambient temperatures (thermoneutrality and warm and cool thermal conditions. An elevated ambient temperature was associated with a higher basal heart rate and lower short- and long-term variability in all sleep stages, together with higher sympathetic activity and lower parasympathetic activity. Our study results showed that modification of the ambient temperature led to significant changes in autonomic nervous system control in sleeping preterm neonates. The latter changes are very similar to those observed in infants at risk of SIDS. Our findings may provide greater insight into the thermally-induced disease mechanisms related to SIDS and may help improve prevention strategies.

  3. Oxygen Handling and Cooling Options in High Temperature Electrolysis Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar S. Sohal; J. Stephen Herring

    2008-07-01

    Idaho National Laboratory is working on a project to generate hydrogen by high temperature electrolysis (HTE). In such an HTE system, safety precautions need to be taken to handle high temperature oxygen at ~830°C. This report is aimed at addressing oxygen handling in a HTE plant.. Though oxygen itself is not flammable, most engineering material, including many gases and liquids, will burn in the presence of oxygen under some favorable physicochemical conditions. At present, an absolute set of rules does not exist that can cover all aspects of oxygen system design, material selection, and operating practices to avoid subtle hazards related to oxygen. Because most materials, including metals, will burn in an oxygen-enriched environment, hazards are always present when using oxygen. Most materials will ignite in an oxygen-enriched environment at a temperature lower than that in air, and once ignited, combustion rates are greater in the oxygen-enriched environment. Even many metals, if ignited, burn violently in an oxygen-enriched environment. However, these hazards do not preclude the operations and systems involving oxygen. Oxygen can be safely handled and used if all the materials in a system are not flammable in the end-use environment or if ignition sources are identified and controlled. In fact, the incidence of oxygen system fires is reported to be low with a probability of about one in a million. This report is a practical guideline and tutorial for the safe operation and handling of gaseous oxygen in high temperature electrolysis system. The intent is to provide safe, practical guidance that permits the accomplishment of experimental operations at INL, while being restrictive enough to prevent personnel endangerment and to provide reasonable facility protection. Adequate guidelines are provided to govern various aspects of oxygen handling associated with high temperature electrolysis system to generate hydrogen. The intent here is to present acceptable

  4. HIGH-ENERGY ELECTRON COOLING BASED ON REALISTIC SIX-DIMENSIONAL DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FEDOTOV,A.; BEN-ZVI, I.; ET AL.

    2007-06-25

    The high-energy electron cooling system for RHIC-II is unique compared to standard coolers. It requires bunched electron beam. Electron bunches are produced by an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL), and cooling is planned without longitudinal magnetic field. To address unique features of the RHIC cooler, a generalized treatment of cooling force was introduced in BETACOOE code which allows us to calculate friction force for an arbitrary distribution of electrons. Simulations for RHIC cooler based on electron distribution from ERL are presented.

  5. Role of intracellular freezing in the death of cells cooled at supraoptimal rates. [Preservation of erythrocytes, bone marrow cells, and yeasts by freezing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazur, P.

    1976-01-01

    Cooling velocity is one of the major factors that determines whether viable cells can be frozen to temperatures that permit indefinite storage. Cooling either too slowly or too rapidly tends to be damaging. Optimum cooling rates are reported for mouse marrow stem cells, yeast, and human red cells.

  6. Evidence of refilled chamber gas pressure enhancing cooling rate during melt spinning of a Zr50Cu40Al10 alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-wang Yang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the refilled gas pressure on the glass forming behaviour of one of the best ternary glass forming alloys Zr50Cu40Al10 was studied for the melt spinning process. The amorphicity of as-quenched ribbons was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The refilled chamber atmospheric pressure is crucial to the cooling rate of melt spinning. At high vacuum, at pressure less than 0.0001 atm, fully crystalline fragments are obtained. Monolithic amorphous ribbons were only obtained at a gas pressure of 0.1 atm or higher. The extended contact length between thecribbons and the copper wheel contributes to the high cooling rate of melt spinning. Higher chamber gas pressure leads to more turbulence of liquid metal beneath the nozzle; therefore, lower pressure is preferable at practical melt spinning processes once glass forming conditions are fulfilled.

  7. Influence of Cooling Rate on Phase Formationin Spray-Formed H13 Tool Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. M. Mchugh; Y. Lin; Y. Zhou; E. J. Lavernia

    2006-04-01

    Spray forming is an effective way to process many tool steels into near-net-shape molds, dies and related tooling. The general approach involves depositing atomized droplets onto a refractory pattern in order to image the pattern’s features. The pattern is removed and the die is fitted into a standard holding fixture. This approach results in significant cost and lead-time savings compared to conventional machining, Spray-formed dies perform well in many industrial forming operations, oftentimes exhibiting extended die life over conventional dies. Care must be exercised when spray forming tool steel dies to minimize porosity and control the nature and distribution of phases and residual stresses. Selection of post-deposition heat treatment is important to tailor the die’s properties (hardness, strength, impact energy, etc.) for a particular application. This paper examines how the cooling rate and other processing parameters during spray processing and heat treatment of H13 tool steel influence phase formation. Results of case studies on spray-formed die performance in forging, extrusion and die casting, conducted by industry during production runs, will be described.

  8. A highly efficient Francis turbine designed for energy recovery in cooling towers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daqing Zhou

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In China, cooling water entering cooling towers still retains surplus pressure between 39,240 and 147,150 Pa. In order to utilize this wasted energy, it is suggested that the surplus water energy can be harnessed to drive a type of hydroturbine installed in the inner platform of cooling tower and make the fan rotate via its coupled shafts. However, conventional hydroturbines are not suited for this job because of their low efficiency or unmatched rotating speed with that of the fan under the operating conditions of cooling towers. In this article, according to the requirements of turbine work environment in cooling towers, a new type of hydroturbine, Francis turbine with ultra-low specific speed (ns  = 50 m.kW, was designed to replace the fan motor in a cooling tower. Primarily, the shape, position, and number of runner blades were designed and optimized through theoretical analyses and computational fluid dynamics simulations. Additionally, metal elliptical volute and single-row ring guide vanes were applied to scale down the structural dimensions. Finally, the optimal scheme of the new Francis turbine was proven to have a high efficiency of 88% and good operation stability through testing of a physical model and can achieve the goal of harvesting renewable energy in the cooling tower.

  9. Optimization Tool for Direct Water Cooling System of High Power IGBT Modules

    OpenAIRE

    Bahman, Amir Sajjad; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    Thermal management of power electronic devices is essential for reliable system performance especially at high power levels. Since even the most efficient electronic circuit becomes hot because of ohmic losses, it is clear that cooling is needed in electronics and even more as the power increases. One of the most important activities in the thermal management and reliability improvement is the cooling system design. As industries are developing smaller power devices with higher power densitie...

  10. Dimensioning of automated regenerative cooling: Setting of high-end experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Taddeo, L; Gascoin, Nicolas; Fedioun, I; Chetehouna, K; Lamoot, L; Fau, G

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Regenerative cooling is a hot topic as it contributes to energy saving and energy conversion, for example within high speed propulsion or chemical plants frameworks. Considering the use of this technology in fuel-cooled hypersonic structures, the propellant duality in terms of functions (coolant and fuel) makes the thermal and combustion management to be quite challenging. Dynamics of the system must be studied in order to develop regulation and control strategies whic...

  11. Regional variations in subsidence rate of lithospheric plates: implication for thermal cooling models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lago, Bernard; Cazenave, Anny; Marty, Jean-Charles

    Although simple thermal models of lithospheric cooling predict to first order the general behaviour of observed seafloor depth with increasing age, important regional variations in seafloor subsidence, in the range 250-400 m Ma1/2, are reported for several lithospheric plates. Such variations cannot be accounted for by classical cooling models unless implausible variations in asthenospheric temperature of ˜550°C are assumed. Here we present an alternative cooling model, which assumes that at the ridge axis the temperature may deviate from the mean asthenospheric temperature. Such a model satisfactorily explains the data provided that the temperature deviation is ±100°C only.

  12. Effects of system size and cooling rate on the structure and properties of sodium borosilicate glasses from molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lu; Du, Jincheng

    2018-01-14

    Borosilicate glasses form an important glass forming system in both glass science and technologies. The structure and property changes of borosilicate glasses as a function of thermal history in terms of cooling rate during glass formation and simulation system sizes used in classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were investigated with recently developed composition dependent partial charge potentials. Short and medium range structural features such as boron coordination, Si and B Qn distributions, and ring size distributions were analyzed to elucidate the effects of cooling rate and simulation system size on these structure features and selected glass properties such as glass transition temperature, vibration density of states, and mechanical properties. Neutron structure factors, neutron broadened pair distribution functions, and vibrational density of states were calculated and compared with results from experiments as well as ab initio calculations to validate the structure models. The results clearly indicate that both cooling rate and system size play an important role on the structures of these glasses, mainly by affecting the 3B and 4B distributions and consequently properties of the glasses. It was also found that different structure features and properties converge at different sizes or cooling rates; thus convergence tests are needed in simulations of the borosilicate glasses depending on the targeted properties. The results also shed light on the complex thermal history dependence on structure and properties in borosilicate glasses and the protocols in MD simulations of these and other glass materials.

  13. Star Formation Rates in Cooling Flow Clusters: A UV Pilot Study with Archival XMM-Newton Optical Monitor Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, A. K.; Mushotzky, R.

    2005-12-01

    We have analyzed XMM-Newton Optical Monitor UV (180-400 nm) data for a sample of 33 galaxies. Thirty are cluster member galaxies, and nine are central cluster galaxies (CCGs) in cooling flow clusters having mass deposition rates between 8 and 525 Msolar yr-1. By comparing the ratio of UV to 2MASS J-band fluxes, we find a significant UV excess in many, but not all, cooling flow CCGs, consistent with several previous studies based on optical imaging data (McNamara & O'Connell Cardiel et al.; Crawford et al.). This UV excess is a direct indication of the presence of young massive stars and, therefore, recent star formation. Using the Starburst99 model of continuous star formation over a 900 Myr period, we derive star formation rates of 0.2-219 Msolar yr-1 for the cooling flow sample. For two-thirds of this sample, it is possible to equate Chandra/XMM cooling flow mass deposition rates with UV-inferred star formation rates, for a combination of starburst lifetime and IMF slope. This is a pilot study of the well-populated XMM UV cluster archive, and a more extensive follow-up study is currently underway.

  14. Effects of system size and cooling rate on the structure and properties of sodium borosilicate glasses from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lu; Du, Jincheng

    2018-01-01

    Borosilicate glasses form an important glass forming system in both glass science and technologies. The structure and property changes of borosilicate glasses as a function of thermal history in terms of cooling rate during glass formation and simulation system sizes used in classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were investigated with recently developed composition dependent partial charge potentials. Short and medium range structural features such as boron coordination, Si and B Qn distributions, and ring size distributions were analyzed to elucidate the effects of cooling rate and simulation system size on these structure features and selected glass properties such as glass transition temperature, vibration density of states, and mechanical properties. Neutron structure factors, neutron broadened pair distribution functions, and vibrational density of states were calculated and compared with results from experiments as well as ab initio calculations to validate the structure models. The results clearly indicate that both cooling rate and system size play an important role on the structures of these glasses, mainly by affecting the 3B and 4B distributions and consequently properties of the glasses. It was also found that different structure features and properties converge at different sizes or cooling rates; thus convergence tests are needed in simulations of the borosilicate glasses depending on the targeted properties. The results also shed light on the complex thermal history dependence on structure and properties in borosilicate glasses and the protocols in MD simulations of these and other glass materials.

  15. Background and anthropogenic radionuclide derived dose rates to freshwater ecosystem - Nuclear power plant cooling pond - Reference organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedveckaite, T., E-mail: tatjana@cablenet.lt [Institute of Physics of the Center of Physical Science and Technology, Savanoriu av, 231, LT-02300, Vilnius (Lithuania); Filistovic, V. [Institute of Physics of the Center of Physical Science and Technology, Savanoriu av, 231, LT-02300, Vilnius (Lithuania); Marciulioniene, D. [Institute of Botany, Zaliuju ezeru 49, LT-08406, Vilnius (Lithuania); Prokoptchuk, N.; Plukiene, R.; Gudelis, A.; Remeikis, V. [Institute of Physics of the Center of Physical Science and Technology, Savanoriu av, 231, LT-02300, Vilnius (Lithuania); Yankovich, T. [AREVA Resources Canada Inc., P.O. Box 9204, 817-45th Street West, Saskatoon, SK S7K 3X5 (Canada); Beresford, N.-A. [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Av., Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4AP (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-15

    The radiological assessment of non-human biota to demonstrate protection is now accepted by a number of international and national bodies. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a scientific basis to assess and evaluate exposure of biota to ionizing radiation. Radionuclides from the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (Lithuania) were discharged into Lake Druksiai cooling pond. Additional radionuclide migration and recharge to this lake from a hypothetical near-surface, low-level radioactive waste disposal, to be situated 1.5 km from the lake, had been simulated using RESRAD-OFFSITE code. This paper uses ERICA Integrated Approach with associated tools and databases to compare the radiological dose to freshwater reference organisms. Based on these data, it can be concluded that background dose rates to non-human biota in Lake Druksiai far exceed those attributable to anthropogenic radionuclides. With respect the fishery and corresponding annual committed effective human dose as a result of this fish consumption Lake Druksiai continues to be a high-productivity water body with intensive angling and possible commercial fishing. - Highlights: > Dose rates to the reference organisms are lower than expected from the background radioactivity. > Pelagic fish part of adult human annual committed effective dose would be as small as a few {mu}Sv y{sup -1}. > With respect the fishery Lake Druksiai continues to be a high-productivity water body.

  16. Design of conduction cooling system for a high current HTS DC reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Van Quan; Kim, Taekue; Le Tat, Thang; Sung, Haejin; Choi, Jongho; Kim, Kwangmin; Hwang, Chul-Sang; Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun

    2017-07-01

    A DC reactor using a high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnet reduces the reactor’s size, weight, flux leakage, and electrical losses. An HTS magnet needs cryogenic cooling to achieve and maintain its superconducting state. There are two methods for doing this: one is pool boiling and the other is conduction cooling. The conduction cooling method is more effective than the pool boiling method in terms of smaller size and lighter weight. This paper discusses a design of conduction cooling system for a high current, high temperature superconducting DC reactor. Dimensions of the conduction cooling system parts including HTS magnets, bobbin structures, current leads, support bars, and thermal exchangers were calculated and drawn using a 3D CAD program. A finite element method model was built for determining the optimal design parameters and analyzing the thermo-mechanical characteristics. The operating current and inductance of the reactor magnet were 1,500 A, 400 mH, respectively. The thermal load of the HTS DC reactor was analyzed for determining the cooling capacity of the cryo-cooler. The study results can be effectively utilized for the design and fabrication of a commercial HTS DC reactor.

  17. Short-term cooling increases serum triglycerides and small high-density lipoprotein levels in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeke, Geerte; Nahon, Kimberly J; Bakker, Leontine E H; Norkauer, Sabine S C; Dinnes, Donna L M; Kockx, Maaike; Lichtenstein, Laeticia; Drettwan, Diana; Reifel-Miller, Anne; Coskun, Tamer; Pagel, Philipp; Romijn, Fred P H T M; Cobbaert, Christa M; Jazet, Ingrid M; Martinez, Laurent O; Kritharides, Leonard; Berbée, Jimmy F P; Boon, Mariëtte R; Rensen, Patrick C N

    Cold exposure and β3-adrenergic receptor agonism, which both activate brown adipose tissue, markedly influence lipoprotein metabolism by enhancing lipoprotein lipase-mediated catabolism of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and increasing plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels and functionality in mice. However, the effect of short-term cooling on human lipid and lipoprotein metabolism remained largely elusive. The objective was to assess the effect of short-term cooling on the serum lipoprotein profile and HDL functionality in men. Body mass index-matched young, lean men were exposed to a personalized cooling protocol for 2 hours. Before and after cooling, serum samples were collected for analysis of lipids and lipoprotein composition by (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance. Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1)-mediated cholesterol efflux capacity of HDL was measured using [(3)H]cholesterol-loaded ABCA1-transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells. Short-term cooling increased serum levels of free fatty acids, triglycerides, and cholesterol. Cooling increased the concentration of large very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) particles accompanied by increased mean size of VLDL particles. In addition, cooling enhanced the concentration of small LDL and small HDL particles as well as the cholesterol levels within these particles. The increase in small HDL was accompanied by increased ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux in vitro. Our data show that short-term cooling increases the concentration of large VLDL particles and increases the generation of small LDL and HDL particles. We interpret that cooling increases VLDL production and turnover, which results in formation of surface remnants that form small HDL particles that attract cellular cholesterol. Copyright © 2017 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Modification of n-Si Characteristics by Annealing and Cooling at Different Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhi K. Salih

    2003-01-01

    for samples annealed at lower than 550°C. For samples annealed at higher temperatures, quenching gave better dark-current density vs. potential plots. SEM measurements showed parallel results to these findings. Enhanced surface textures were observed for slowly cooled wafers from temperatures below 550°C. Samples quenched from temperatures above 550°C showed better surfaces than slowly cooled counterparts.

  19. The efect of cooling rate on the properties of alloyed cast-iron sizing roll

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jelić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Directional heat transfer was investigated by temperature measurements in the casting and in the mould using thermocouples. Measurements were performed in operating conditions during pouring, solidification, and cooling of the casting. Total measurement time was 35,5 hours. After cutting, specimens were extracted for metallographic and hardness testing. Test results provided confirmation of directional heat transfer (directional cooling that would ensure acquirement of a desired casting structure and mechanical properties.

  20. Large Eddy simulation of flat plate film cooling at high blowing ratio using open FOAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baagherzadeh Hushmandi, Narmin

    2017-12-01

    In this work, numerical analysis was performed to predict the behaviour of high Reynolds number turbulent cross-flows used in film cooling applications. The geometry included one row of three discrete coolant holes inclined at 30 degrees to the main flow. In the computational model, the width of the channel was cut into one sixth and symmetry boundaries were applied in the centreline of the coolant hole and along the line of symmetry between two adjacent holes. One of the main factors that affect the performance of film cooling is the blowing ratio of coolant to the main flow. A blowing ratio equal to two was chosen in this study. Analysis showed that the common practice CFD models that employ RANS equations together with turbulence modelling under predict the film cooling effectiveness up to a factor of four. However, LES method showed better agreement of film cooling effectiveness both in tendency and absolute values compared with experimental results.

  1. Tropical seaways played a more important role than high latitude seaways in Cenozoic cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zhang

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Following the Early Eocene climatic optimum (EECO, ~55–50 Ma, climate deteriorated and gradually changed the earth from a greenhouse into an icehouse, with major cooling events at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary (∼34 Ma and the Middle Miocene (∼15 Ma. It is believed that the opening of the Drake Passage had a marked impact on the cooling at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary. Based on an Early Eocene simulation, we study the sensitivity of climate and ocean circulation to tectonic events such as the closing of the West Siberian Seaway, the deepening of the Arctic-Atlantic Seaway, the opening of the Drake Passage, and the constriction of the Tethys and Central American seaways. The opening of the Drake Passage, together with the closing of the West Siberian Seaway and the deepening of the Arctic-Atlantic Seaway, weakened the Southern Ocean Deep Water (SODW dominated ocean circulation and led to a weak cooling at high latitudes, thus contributing to the observed Early Cenozoic cooling. However, the later constriction of the Tethys and Central American Seaways is shown to give a strong cooling at southern high latitudes. This cooling was related to the transition of ocean circulation from a SODW-dominated mode to the modern-like ocean circulation dominated by North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW.

  2. Cooling rate dependence of simulated ${\\rm Cu_{64.5}Zr_{35.5}}$ metallic glass structure

    CERN Document Server

    Ryltsev, R E; Chtchelkatchev, N M

    2016-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations with embedded atom model potential, we study structural evolution of ${\\rm Cu_{64.5}Zr_{35.5}}$ alloy during the cooling in a wide range of cooling rates $\\gamma\\in(1.5\\cdot 10^{9},10^{13})$ K/s. Investigating short- and medium-range order, we show that structure of ${\\rm Cu_{64.5}Zr_{35.5}}$ metallic glass essentially depends on cooling rate. In particular, a decrease of the cooling rate leads to a increase of abundances of both the icosahedral-like clusters and Frank-Kasper Z16 polyhedra. The amounts of these clusters in the glassy state drastically increase at the $\\gamma_{\\rm min}=1.5\\cdot 10^{9}$ K/s. Analysing the structure of the glass at $\\gamma_{\\rm min}$, we observe the formation of nano-sized crystalline grain of ${\\rm Cu_2Zr}$ intermetallic compound with the structure of ${\\rm Cu_2Mg}$ Laves phase. The structure of this compound is isomorphous with that for ${\\rm Cu_5Zr}$ intermetallic compound. Both crystal lattices consist of two type of clusters: Cu-centered...

  3. Autism's 'Worryingly' High Suicide Rates Spur Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165946.html Autism's 'Worryingly' High Suicide Rates Spur Conference Signs of ... News) -- High rates of suicide among people with autism are drawing specialists to a conference this week ...

  4. Development of a reliable low-cost controlled cooling rate instrument for the cryopreservation of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Zhiquan; Kang, Xianjiang; Chen, Hsiuhung; Zhou, Xiaoming; Purtteman, Jester; Yadock, David; Heimfeld, Shelly; Gao, Dayong

    2010-04-01

    An optimal cooling rate is one of the critical factors influencing the survival of cells during cryopreservation. We describe a novel device, called the box-in-box, that has been developed for optimal cryopreservation of human hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). This work presents the design of the device, a mathematical formulation describing the expected temperature histories of samples during the freezing process, along with actual experimental results of thermal profile tests. In experiments, when the box-in-box device was transferred from room temperature to a -80 degrees C freezer, a cooling rate of -1 to -3.5 degrees C/min, which has been widely used for the cryopreservation of HSC, was achieved. In order to evaluate this device further, HSC cryopreservation was compared between the box-in-box device and a commercially available controlled-rate freezer (CryoMed). The experimental data, including total cell population and CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cell recovery rates, viability and cell culture colony assays, showed that the box-in-box worked as well as the CryoMed instrument. There was no significant difference in either survival rate or the culture/colony outcome between the two devices. The box-in-box device can work as a cheap, durable, reliable and maintenance-free instrument for the cryopreservation of HSC. This concept of a box-in-box may also be adapted to other cooling rates to support cryopreservation of a wide variety of tissues and cells.

  5. Effect of Cooling Rate on Precipitation Behavior and Micromechanical Properties of Ferrite in V-N Alloyed Steel During a Simulated Thermomechanical Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Fu-Ming; Yang, Zhan-Bing; Li, Chang-Rong

    2017-12-01

    The effect of the cooling rate after finish deformation at 1223 K (950 °C) on the microstructural evolution, V(C,N) precipitation, and micromechanical properties of ferrite in high-N V-alloyed building steel was comparatively investigated using a Gleeble-1500 thermomechanical simulator. Metallographic analysis shows that polygonal ferrite (PF) and pearlite (P) were dominant microconstituents at cooling rates ranging from 0.5 K/s to 3 K/s (0.5 °C/s to 3 °C/s). As the cooling rate increased within this range, the average ferrite grain size decreased from 6.1 ± 0.30 to 4.4 ± 0.25 μm. Besides, the sheet spacing of interphase precipitated V(C,N) particles decreased from 64.0 to 78.7 to 21.9 to 24.5 nm, and the average size of randomly precipitated particles was refined from 8.2 ± 3.24 to 6.3 ± 2.18 nm. The number density of precipitates with a size below and above 10 nm decreased, and the total number density decreased from 2482 ± 430 to 1699 ± 142 μm-2. Moreover, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observation revealed that there exists a coherent interface between the nanoscaled V(C,N) particle and the ferrite matrix. This interface lowered the nucleation energy barrier and promoted the V(C,N) particle precipitation in the ferrite matrix. Nanoindentation measurements indicated that the ferrite phase became softer, and the corresponding value of nanohardness and Young's modulus decreased as the cooling rate increased, which was caused predominantly by the decrease in precipitation hardening due to the lower number density of V(C,N) precipitates.

  6. High bit rate BPSK receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio-Marti, J. A.; Sieiro, J. J.; Lopez-Villegas, J. M.

    2005-06-01

    This work presents a simple differentially BPSK receiver front-end using a novel schema without the need of an explicit carrier recovery system. The main principle of operation is the conversion of the incoming BPSK signal into an ASK signal having the same modulation pattern. Two versions of the system have been designed. One is intended to work at the 433.92 MHz ISM band and the other at 2 GHz frequency band. Accordingly, two prototypes of the system core, the BPSK to ASK converter circuit, have been implemented and tested. First a hybrid version for the low frequency operation and, second a multi chip module (MCM) for the 2 GHz frequency band. The system performance has been evaluated using Agilent Technologies Advanced Design System (ADS) platform. The ability to jointly perform system, circuit and EM simulations and co-simulations is the main advantage of this design tool. Obtained results indicate that modulation rates up to 20 Mbits/s for the hybrid version and up to 80 Mbits/s for the MCM version can be reached.

  7. Rugged passively cooled high power laser fiber optic connectors and methods of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinzler, Charles C.; Gray, William C.; Fraze, Jason D.; Faircloth, Brian O.; Zediker, Mark S.; McKay, Ryan P.

    2016-06-07

    There are provided high power laser connectors and couplers and methods that are capable of providing high laser power without the need for active cooling to remote, harsh and difficult to access locations and under difficult and harsh conditions and to manage and mitigate the adverse effects of back reflections.

  8. Single phase forced convection cooling of high power leds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozdemir, M.Z.; Chestakov, D.; Frijns, A.J.H.

    2011-01-01

    LEDs are strong candidates for future illumination applications dueto their much lower consumption of energy compared to conventional lighting options. One of key problems in development of LEDs is successful thermal management during illumination. Therefore, current research ongoing related to high

  9. Influence of the quenching rate and step-wise cooling temperatures on microstructural and tensile properties of PER72 ® Ni-based superalloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Baillif Paul

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The PER72® grade is used as a wrought engine turbine disk, which is a critical high temperature component. During the heat treatment process, residual stresses are generated during the quench, which may lead to irreversible damages on the workpiece. The aim of this study is to better understand the mechanisms involved in the residual stress generation. Therefore, the influence of quenching conditions on the high temperature tensile properties and the multi-scale microstructure evolutions are investigated after cooling. PER72® specimens are annealed above the solvus temperature, directly on the servo-hydraulic testing machine. Three quenching rates are used: 30 ∘C/min, 120 ∘C/min, and 300 ∘C/min. For each condition, the cooling is interrupted at 1000 ∘C, 850 ∘C, 600 ∘C and 20 ∘C to perform isothermal tensile test. Specimens are post-mortem analysed. On one hand the fracture surface is investigated using SEM. On the other hand the microstructure evolution was observed and quantified at different scales using SEM directly on the bulk or after the chemical extraction of precipitation. The precipitation size and volume fraction statistics, X-Ray diffraction for the crystallography and composition of the different phases are investigated. It was shown that the testing temperature does not significantly influence the γ′ distribution of particles. Conversely, the γ′ precipitation is strongly influenced by the cooling rate. Notably, the average size, the distance between particles as well as the number density of γ′ precipitates are significantly modified by the cooling rate. Changes in tensile properties are related to microstructural.

  10. A slow cooling rate of indomethacin melt spatially confined in microcontainers increases the physical stability of the amorphous drug without influencing its biorelevant dissolution behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line Hagner; Keller, Stephan Sylvest; Boisen, Anja

    2013-01-01

    /min, whereas cracks and an uneven surface were observed when cooling at rates of 23 and 36 K/min. The uneven surface is hypothesised to be the main reason for the lower physical stability, as the cracks could act as nucleation sites for crystal growth. The rate of cooling was not seen to have any effect...

  11. Influence of cooling rate on the structure and mechanical properties of G17CrMoV5 – 10 cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Golański

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research on the influence of cooling rate on the structure and properties of G17CrMoV5 – 10 (L17HMF cast steel. The material for research was a section taken out from an outer cylinder of a steam turbine body after about 250 000 hours of operation at the temperature of 535°C and pressure 9 MPa. The investigated cast steel was subjected to heat treatment which consisted in cooling at the rates corresponding to the processes, such as: bainitic hardening, normalizing and full annealing. Tempering after the process of cooling from austenitizing temperature was carried out at the temperatures of: 700, 720 and 740°C. Performed research has proved that structures obtained after bainitic hardening and normalizing are characterized by a large strength margin which allows to apply high temperatures of tempering. It has been shown that the cast steel of bainitic structure, with similar mechanical properties as the cast steel of bainitic – ferritic structure, is characterized by almost twice as high impact energy. Full annealing and tempering of the examined cast steel ensures only the required impact strength, with mechanical properties comparable to those after service.

  12. Conduction cooled high temperature superconducting dipole magnet for accelerator applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zangenberg, N.; Nielsen, G.; Hauge, N.

    2012-01-01

    A 3T proof-of-principle dipole magnet for accelerator applications, based on 2nd generation high temperature superconducting tape was designed, built, and tested by a consortium under the lead of Danfysik. The magnet was designed to have a straight, circular bore with a good field region of radius...... = 25 mm, and a magnetic length of 250 mm. A total length of 2.5 km YBCO-based copper stabilized conductor supplied by SuperPower Inc., NY, USA, was isolated with 0.025 mm of epoxy and subsequently wound into 14 saddle coils and 4 racetrack coils with a cosine theta like configuration. The coils were......-liquid free operation of an HTS accelerator magnet was demonstrated. The cold mass support design permits magnet orientation under arbitrary angles. Careful choice of materials in terms of magnetic, heat conducting and mechanical properties resulted in a robust and compact solution which opens up...

  13. Systematic Uncertainties in High-Rate Germanium Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, Andrew J.; Fast, James E.; Fulsom, Bryan G.; Pitts, William K.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wood, Lynn S.

    2016-10-06

    For many nuclear material safeguards inspections, spectroscopic gamma detectors are required which can achieve high event rates (in excess of 10^6 s^-1) while maintaining very good energy resolution for discrimination of neighboring gamma signatures in complex backgrounds. Such spectra can be useful for non-destructive assay (NDA) of spent nuclear fuel with long cooling times, which contains many potentially useful low-rate gamma lines, e.g., Cs-134, in the presence of a few dominating gamma lines, such as Cs-137. Detectors in use typically sacrifice energy resolution for count rate, e.g., LaBr3, or visa versa, e.g., CdZnTe. In contrast, we anticipate that beginning with a detector with high energy resolution, e.g., high-purity germanium (HPGe), and adapting the data acquisition for high throughput will be able to achieve the goals of the ideal detector. In this work, we present quantification of Cs-134 and Cs-137 activities, useful for fuel burn-up quantification, in fuel that has been cooling for 22.3 years. A segmented, planar HPGe detector is used for this inspection, which has been adapted for a high-rate throughput in excess of 500k counts/s. Using a very-high-statistic spectrum of 2.4*10^11 counts, isotope activities can be determined with very low statistical uncertainty. However, it is determined that systematic uncertainties dominate in such a data set, e.g., the uncertainty in the pulse line shape. This spectrum offers a unique opportunity to quantify this uncertainty and subsequently determine required counting times for given precision on values of interest.

  14. Hydrogen film cooling of a small hydrogen-oxygen thrust chamber and its effect on erosion rates of various ablative materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannum, N.; Roberts, W. E.; Russell, L. M.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted to determine what arrangement of film-coolant-injection orifices should be used to decrease the erosion rates of small, high temperature, high pressure ablative thrust chambers without incurring a large penalty in combustion performance. All of the film cooling was supplied through holes in a ring between the outer row of injector elements and the chamber wall. The best arrangement, which had twice the number of holes as there were outer row injection elements, was also the simplest. The performance penalties, presented as a reduction in characteristic exhaust velocity efficiency, were 0.8 and 2.8 percentage points for the 10 and 20 percent cooling flows, respectively, The best film-coolant injector was then used to obtain erosion rates for 19 ablative materials. The throat erosion rate was reduced by a factor of 2.5 with a 10 percent coolant flow. Only the more expensive silica phenolic materials had low enough erosion rates to be considered for use in the nozzle throat. However, some of the cheaper materials might qualify for use in other areas of small nozzles with large throat diameters where the higher erosion rates are more acceptable.

  15. Effects of cooling rate on vermicular graphite percentage in a brake drum produced by one-step cored wire injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-shuang Feng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this research, a vermicular graphite cast iron brake drum was produced by cored wire injection in a one-step method. Silica sand and low-density alumina-silicate ceramic were used as molding materials in order to investigate the effect of cooling rate on percentage of vermicular graphite and mechanical properties of the brake drum casting. Several thermocouples were inserted into the casting in the desired positions to measure the temperature change. By means of one-step cored wire injection, the two residual concentrations of Mg and RE were effectively controlled in the ranges of 0.013%-0.017% and 0.019%-0.025%, respectively, which are crucial for the production of vermicular graphite cast iron and the formation of vermicular graphite. In addition, the cooling rate had a significant effect on the vermicular graphite percentage. In the case of the silica mold brake drum casting, there was an obvious difference in the cooling rate with the wall change, leading to a change in vermicular graphite percentage from 70.8% to 90%. In the low-density alumina-silicate ceramic mold casting, no obvious change in temperature was detected by the thermocouples and the percentage of the vermicular graphite was stable at 85%. Therefore, the vermicular graphite cast iron brake drum with a better combination of mechanical properties could be obtained.

  16. Licensing topical report: interpretation of general design criteria for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orvis, D.D.; Raabe, P.H.

    1980-01-01

    This Licensing Topical Report presents a set of General Design Criteria (GDC) which is proposed for applicability to licensing of graphite-moderated, high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs). Modifications as necessary to reflect HTGR characteristics and design practices have been made to the GDC derived for applicability to light-water-cooled reactors and presented in Appendix A of Part 50, Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, including the Introduction, Definitions, and Criteria. It is concluded that the proposed set of GDC affords a better basis for design and licensing of HTGRs.

  17. Soldering on silicon for microfluidic channels for cooling the high-energy physics detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Tahnon Al Ali, Kaltham

    2013-01-01

    Micro-channel cooling has been introduced as an important technique for cooling the electronics in the high-energy physics particle detectors. The silicon-etched microchannels containing the cooling fluids are connected to tubes that are made of metals at the ports. Those connections are made by soldering different metal components on the silicon. This report starts with a brief introduction of the metal semiconductor interface. It then discusses the problems that encounter soldering on silicon and the solutions that are present along with some examples. The importance of not using chemical flux in soldering and the preferred environment for soldering process is also examined. Moreover, the difference between soldering and brazing in addition to a recent example of brazing is provided.

  18. Integration of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors into Industrial Process Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee Nelson

    2011-09-01

    This report is a summary of analyses performed by the NGNP project to determine whether it is technically and economically feasible to integrate high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) technology into industrial processes. To avoid an overly optimistic environmental and economic baseline for comparing nuclear integrated and conventional processes, a conservative approach was used for the assumptions and calculations.

  19. Power cycle assessment of nuclear high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Herranz, L.E.; Linares, J.I.; Moratilla, B.Y.

    2009-01-01

    Power cycle assessment of nuclear high temperature gas-cooled reactors correspondance: Corresponding author. Tel.: +34 91 346 62 36; fax: +34 91 346 62 33. (Herranz, L.E.) (Herranz, L.E.) Unit of Nuclear Safety Research (CIEMAT) Avda. Complutense--> , 22 - 28040 Madrid - Spain--> - (Herranz, L.E.) Unit of Nuclear Safety Research (CIEMAT) Avda. Complutense--> , 22 - 28040 Madrid - Spain--...

  20. Effect of Cooling Rate on the Longitudinal Modulus of Cu3Sn Phase of Ag-Sn-Cu Amalgam Alloy (Part II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Rusli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Effects of cooling rate (at the time of solidification on the elastic constants of Cu3Sn phase of Ag-Sn-Cu dental amalgam alloy were studied. In this study, three types of alloys were made, with the composition Cu-38-37 wt% Sn by means of casting, where each alloy was subjected to different cooling rate, such as cooling on the air (AC, air blown (AB, and quenched in the water (WQ. X-ray diffraction, metallography, and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy studies of three alloys indicated the existence of Cu3Sn phase. Determination of the modulus of elasticity of Cu3Sn (ε phase was carried out by the measurement of longitudinal and transversal waves velocity using ultrasonic technique. The result shows that Cu3Sn (ε phase on AC gives higher modulus of elasticity values than those of Cu3Sn (ε on AB and WQ. The high modulus of elasticity value will produce a strong Ag-Sn-Cu dental amalagam alloy.

  1. A GTA Welding Cooling Rate Analysis on Stainless Steel and Aluminum Using Inverse Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisan dos Santos Magalhaes

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an analysis of the thermal influence of the heat transfer by convection and radiation during GTA (gas tungsten arc welding process. The authors’ in-house C++ previously-developed code was modified to calculate the amount of heat transfer by convection and radiation. In this software, an iterative Broydon-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS inverse method was applied to estimate the amount of heat delivered to the plate when the appropriate sensitivity criteria were defined. The methodology was validated by accomplishing lab-controlled experiments on stainless steel AISI 304L and aluminum 6065 T5 plates. Due to some experimental singularities, the forced thermal convection induced by the electromagnetic field and thermal-capillary force were disregarded. Significant examples of these singularities are the relatively small weld bead when compared to the sample size and the reduced time of the welding process. In order to evaluate the local Nusselt number, empirical correlations for flat plates were used. The thermal emission was a dominant cooling effect on the aluminum cooling. However, it did not present the same behavior as the stainless steel samples. The study found that the heat losses by convection and radiation of the weld pool do not affect the cooling process significantly.

  2. Cooling rate and size effects on the medium-range structure of multicomponent oxide glasses simulated by molecular dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tilocca, Antonio [Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-09-21

    A set of molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the effect of cooling rate and system size on the medium-range structure of melt-derived multicomponent silicate glasses, represented by the quaternary 45S5 Bioglass composition. Given the significant impact of the glass degradation on applications of these materials in biomedicine and nuclear waste disposal, bulk structural features which directly affect the glass dissolution process are of particular interest. Connectivity of the silicate matrix, ion clustering and nanosegregation, distribution of ring and chain structural patterns represent critical features in this context, which can be directly extracted from the models. A key issue is represented by the effect of the computational approach on the corresponding glass models, especially in light of recent indications questioning the suitability of conventional MD approaches (that is, involving melt-and-quench of systems containing ∼10{sup 3} atoms at cooling rates of 5-10 K/ps) when applied to model these glasses. The analysis presented here compares MD models obtained with conventional and nonconventional cooling rates and system sizes, highlighting the trend and range of convergence of specific structural features in the medium range. The present results show that time-consuming computational approaches involving much lower cooling rates and/or significantly larger system sizes are in most cases not necessary in order to obtain a reliable description of the medium-range structure of multicomponent glasses. We identify the convergence range for specific properties and use them to discuss models of several glass compositions for which a possible influence of cooling-rate or size effects had been previously hypothesized. The trends highlighted here represent an important reference to obtain reliable models of multicomponent glasses and extract converged medium-range structural features which affect the glass degradation and thus their

  3. A dynamic model of an innovative high-temperature solar heating and cooling system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buonomano Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new simulation model of a novel solar heating and cooling system based on innovative high temperature flat plate evacuated solar thermal collector is presented. The system configuration includes: flat-plate evacuated solar collectors, a double-stage LiBr-H2O absorption chiller, gas-fired auxiliary heater, a closed loop cooling tower, pumps, heat exchangers, storage tanks, valves, mixers and controllers. The novelty of this study lies in the utilization of flat-plate stationary solar collectors, manufactured by TVP Solar, rather than concentrating ones (typically adopted for driving double-stage absorption chillers. Such devices show ultra-high thermal efficiencies, even at very high (about 200°C operating temperatures, thanks to the high vacuum insulation. Aim of the paper is to analyse the energy and economic feasibility of such novel technology, by including it in a prototypal solar heating and cooling system. For this purpose, the solar heating and cooling system design and performance were analysed by means of a purposely developed dynamic simulation model, implemented in TRNSYS. A suitable case study is also presented. Here, the simulated plant is conceived for the space heating and cooling and the domestic hot water production of a small building, whose energy needs are fulfilled through a real installation (settled also for experimental purposes built up close to Naples (South Italy. Simulation results show that the investigated system is able to reach high thermal efficiencies and very good energy performance. Finally, the economic analysis shows results comparable to those achieved through similar renewable energy systems.

  4. Effect of Cooling Rates on the Transformation Behavior and Mechanical Properties of a Ni-Rich NiTi Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coan, Stephen; Shamimi, Ali; Duerig, T. W.

    2017-10-01

    Slightly nickel-rich Ni-Ti alloys (typically 50.5-51% atomic percent nickel) are commonly used to produce devices that are superelastic at body temperature. This excess nickel can be tolerated in the NiTi matrix when its temperature is above the solvus of about 600 °C, but will precipitate out during lower temperatures. Recent work has been done on exploring the effect lower temperatures have on the material properties of NiTi. Findings showed that properties begin to change at temperatures as low as 100 °C. It is because of these results that it was deemed important to better understand what may be happening during the quenching process itself. Through running a combination of DSC and tensile tests on samples cooled at varying rates, it was found that the cooling rate has an effect on properties when heat treated above a specific temperature. Understanding how quickly the alloy must be cooled to fully retain the supersaturated NiTi matrix is important to optimizing processes and anticipating material properties after a heat treatment.

  5. Effect of Cooling Rates on the Transformation Behavior and Mechanical Properties of a Ni-Rich NiTi Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coan, Stephen; Shamimi, Ali; Duerig, T. W.

    2017-12-01

    Slightly nickel-rich Ni-Ti alloys (typically 50.5-51% atomic percent nickel) are commonly used to produce devices that are superelastic at body temperature. This excess nickel can be tolerated in the NiTi matrix when its temperature is above the solvus of about 600 °C, but will precipitate out during lower temperatures. Recent work has been done on exploring the effect lower temperatures have on the material properties of NiTi. Findings showed that properties begin to change at temperatures as low as 100 °C. It is because of these results that it was deemed important to better understand what may be happening during the quenching process itself. Through running a combination of DSC and tensile tests on samples cooled at varying rates, it was found that the cooling rate has an effect on properties when heat treated above a specific temperature. Understanding how quickly the alloy must be cooled to fully retain the supersaturated NiTi matrix is important to optimizing processes and anticipating material properties after a heat treatment.

  6. High Cooling Water Temperature Effects on Design and Operational Safety of NPPs in the Gulf Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Byung Koo [Khalifa Univ., Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Jeong, Yong Hoon [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The Arabian Gulf region has one of the highest ocean temperatures, reaching above 35 degrees and ambient temperatures over 50 degrees in the summer. Two nuclear power plants (NPP) are being introduced in the region for the first time, one at Bushehr (1,000 MWe PWR plant from Russia), and a much larger one at Barakah (4Χ1,400 MWe PWR from Korea). Both plants take seawater from the Gulf for condenser cooling, having to modify the secondary/tertiary side cooling systems design by increasing the heat transfer surface area from the country of origin. This paper analyses the secondary side of a typical PWR plant operating under the Rankine cycle with a simplified thermal-hydraulic model. Parametric study of ocean cooling temperatures is conducted to estimate thermal efficiency variations and its associated design changes for the secondary side. Operational safety is reviewed to deliver rated power output with acceptable safety margins in line with technical specifications, mainly in the auxiliary systems together with the cooling water temperature. Impact on the Gulf seawater as the ultimate heat sink is considered negligible, affecting only the adjacent water near the NPP site, when compared to the solar radiation on the sea surface.

  7. HIGH COOLING WATER TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON DESIGN AND OPERATIONAL SAFETY OF NPPS IN THE GULF REGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BYUNG KOO KIM

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Arabian Gulf region has one of the highest ocean temperatures, reaching above 35 degrees and ambient temperatures over 50 degrees in the summer. Two nuclear power plants (NPP are being introduced in the region for the first time, one at Bushehr (1,000 MWe PWR plant from Russia, and a much larger one at Barakah (4X1,400 MWe PWR from Korea. Both plants take seawater from the Gulf for condenser cooling, having to modify the secondary/tertiary side cooling systems design by increasing the heat transfer surface area from the country of origin. This paper analyses the secondary side of a typical PWR plant operating under the Rankine cycle with a simplified thermal-hydraulic model. Parametric study of ocean cooling temperatures is conducted to estimate thermal efficiency variations and its associated design changes for the secondary side. Operational safety is reviewed to deliver rated power output with acceptable safety margins in line with technical specifications, mainly in the auxiliary systems together with the cooling water temperature. Impact on the Gulf seawater as the ultimate heat sink is considered negligible, affecting only the adjacent water near the NPP site, when compared to the solar radiation on the sea surface.

  8. Severe water ingress accident analysis for a Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Zuoyi [Inst. of Nuclear Energy Technology Tsinghua Univ., Beijing, BJ (China); Scherer, Winfried

    1997-12-31

    This paper analyzes the severe water ingress accidents in the SIEMENS 200MW Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR-Module) under the assumption of no active safety protection systems in order to find the safety margin of the current HTR-Module design. A water, steam and helium multi-phase cavity model is originally developed and implemented in the DSNP simulation system. The developed DSNP system is used to simulate the primary circuit of HTR-Module power plant. The comparisons of the models with the TINTE calculations validate the current simulation. After analyzing the effects of blower separation on water droplets, the wall heat storage, etc., it is found that the maximum H{sub 2}O density increase rate in the reactor core is smaller than 0.3 kg/(m{sup 3}s). The liquid water vaporization in the steam generator and H{sub 2}O transport from the steam generator to the reactor core reduces the impulse of the H{sub 2}O in the reactor core. The nuclear reactivity increase caused by the water ingress leads to a fast power excursion, which, however, is inherently counterbalanced by negative feedback effects. Concerning the integrity of the fuel elements, the safety relevant temperature limit of 1600degC was not reached in any case. (author)

  9. Fracture Toughness in Transition Temperature Region with Cooling Rate for SA508 Gr. 4N Model Alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ki Hyoung; Park, Sang Gyu; Wee, Dang Moon [KIAST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Chul; Lee, Bong Sang [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    Materials for reactor pressure vessel (RPV), which is the key component in the determination of the life span and safety margin of reactors, are required to have enough mechanical properties to endure the high pressure inside the reactor. Various studies have focused on improving mechanical properties by the controlling the heat treatment process of commercial RPV steel, SA508 Gr.3 Mn-Mo-Ni low alloy steel. On the other hand, some researches for identifying new material with high strength and toughness for larger capacity and longer lifetime of reactor are being conducted. SA508 Gr.4N Ni-Cr-Mo low alloy steel may be a candidate RPV material due to its excellent mechanical properties from its tempered martensitic microstructure. Wallin observed that the temperature dependency of fracture toughness is not sensitive to the chemical composition, heat treatment, and irradiation for ferritic steels. This result led to the concept of a universal shape in the median toughness-temperature curve for all 'ferritic steels'. Recently, some researches showed that F/M steel composed of the tempered martensitic microstructure has steeper temperature dependency of the measured fracture toughness than the prediction in the master curve. We also focused on the steep transition properties of SA508 Gr.4N low alloy steel with tempered martensitic structure in previous research. However, it has not yet confirmed whether that the transition properties including temperature dependency vary with phase fraction of tempered martensite. In this study, the effect of fraction of tempered martensite on the fracture toughness transition behavior in SA508 Gr.4N was assessed by controlling cooling rate after austenitization. The relationship between phase fraction and the fracture toughness variation with temperature in the transition region was analyzed. Also, the tendencies were compared with the prediction in the sta

  10. Heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) for high-speed aircraft propulsion. Phase 2 (feasibility) final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R.A.; Merrigan, M.A.; Elder, M.G.; Sena, J.T.; Keddy, E.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Silverstein, C.C. [CCS Associates, Bethel Park, PA (United States)

    1994-03-25

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos), and CCS Associates are conducting the Heat Pipe Radiation Cooling (HPRC) for High-Speed Aircraft Propulsion program to determine the advantages and demonstrate the feasibility of using high-temperature heat pipes to cool hypersonic engine components. This innovative approach involves using heat pipes to transport heat away from the combustor, nozzle, or inlet regions, and to reject it to the environment by thermal radiation from adjacent external surfaces. HPRC is viewed as an alternative (or complementary) cooling technique to the use of pumped cryogenic or endothermic fuels to provide regenerative fuel or air cooling of the hot surfaces. The HPRC program has been conducted through two phases, an applications phase and a feasibility phase. The applications program (Phase 1) included concept and assessment analyses using hypersonic engine data obtained from US engine company contacts. The applications phase culminated with planning for experimental verification of the HPRC concept to be pursued in a feasibility program. The feasibility program (Phase 2), recently completed and summarized in this report, involved both analytical and experimental studies.

  11. Experimental Study on Active Cooling Systems Used for Thermal Management of High-Power Multichip Light-Emitting Diodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Kaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to develop suitable cooling systems for high-power multichip LEDs. To this end, three different active cooling systems were investigated to control the heat generated by the powering of high-power multichip LEDs in two different configurations (30 and 2 × 15 W. The following cooling systems were used in the study: an integrated multi-fin heat sink design with a fan, a cooling system with a thermoelectric cooler (TEC, and a heat pipe cooling device. According to the results, all three systems were observed to be sufficient for cooling high-power LEDs. Furthermore, it was observed that the integrated multifin heat sink design with a fan was the most efficient cooling system for a 30 W high-power multichip LED. The cooling system with a TEC and 46 W input power was the most efficient cooling system for 2 × 15 W high-power multichip LEDs.

  12. The modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor: A cost/risk competitive nuclear option

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotschall, H.L. (Gas-Cooled Reactor Associates, San Diego, CA (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The business risks of nuclear plant ownership are identified as a constraint on the expanded use of nuclear power. Such risks stem from the exacting demands placed on owner/operator organizations of current plants to demonstrate ongoing compliance with safety regulations and the resulting high costs for operation and maintenance. This paper describes the Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) design, competitive economics, and approach to reducing the business risks of nuclear plant ownership.

  13. Thermosyphon Method for Cooling the Rotor Blades of High-Temperature Steam Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogomolov Alexander R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The design scheme of closed two-phase thermosyphon were suggested that can provide standard thermal operation of blades of high-temperature steam turbine. The method for thermosyphon calculation is developed. The example of thermal calculation was implemented, it showed that to cool the steam turbine blades at their heating by high-temperature steam, the heat can be removed in the rear part of the blades by air with the temperature of about 440°C.

  14. Design aspects of the Chinese modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor HTR-PM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Zuoyi [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Wu Zongxin [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Sun Yuliang [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li Fu [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)]. E-mail: lifu@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2006-03-15

    The modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) has distinct advantages in terms of inherent safety, economics potential, high efficiency, potential usage for hydrogen production, etc. The Chinese design of the MHTGR, named as high-temperature gas-cooled reactor-pebble bed module (HTR-PM), based on the technology and experience of the HTR-10, is currently in the conceptual phase. The HTR-PM demonstration plant is planned to be finished by 2012. The main philosophy of the HTR-PM project can be pinned down as: (1) safety, (2) standardization, (3) economy, and (4) proven technology. The work in the categories of marketing, organization, project and technology is done in predefined order. The biggest challenge for the HTR-PM is to ensure its economical viability while maintaining its inherent safety. A design of a 450 MWth annular pebble bed core connected with steam turbine is aimed for and presented in this paper.

  15. High power testing of water-cooled waveguide for ITER-like ECH transmission lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. P.; Doane, J. L.; Grunloh, H. J.; O'Neill, R. C.; Ikeda, R.; Oda, Y.; Takahashi, K.; Sakamoto, K.

    2017-05-01

    The results of high power testing of new water-cooled ECH waveguide components for ITER are presented. The components are a precision-coupled 4.2 m waveguide assembly, a short expansion joint, and water-cooled waveguide for gyrotron commissioning. The testing was conducted at the QST Naka Fusion Institute using gyrotron pulses of 450 kW at 170 GHz for 300 s. Analysis shows that the power absorbed per unit length for the various waveguide components are dependent on location in the transmission line with respect to high order mode generators, such as miter bends. Additionally, larger-than-expected reflections from the load led to high absorption levels in the transmission line.

  16. Cooling Effect of Water Injection on a High-Temperature Supersonic Jet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The high temperature and high pressure supersonic jet is one of the key problems in the design of solid rocket motors. To reduce the jet temperature and noise, cooling water is typically injected into the exhaust plume. Numerical simulations for the gas-liquid multiphase flow field with mixture multiphase model were developed and a series of experiments were carried out. By introducing the energy source terms caused by the vaporization of liquid water into the energy equation, a coupling solution was developed to calculate the multiphase flow field. The temperature data predictions agreed well with the experimental results. When water was injected into the plume, the high temperature core region area was reduced, and the temperature on the head face was much lower than that without water. The relationship between the reduction of temperature on the bottom plate and the momentum ratio is developed, which can be used to predict the cooling effect of water injection in many cases.

  17. Mesoscale climatic simulation of surface air temperature cooling by highly reflective greenhouses in SE Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campra, Pablo; Millstein, Dev

    2013-01-01

    A long-term local cooling trend in surface air temperature has been monitored at the largest concentration of reflective greenhouses in the world, at the Province of Almeria, SE Spain, associated with a dramatic increase in surface albedo in the area. The availability of reliable long-term climatic field data at this site offers a unique opportunity to test the skill of mesoscale meteorological models describing and predicting the impacts of land use change on local climate. Using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model, we have run a sensitivity experiment to simulate the impact of the observed surface albedo change on monthly and annual surface air temperatures. The model output showed a mean annual cooling of 0.25 °C associated with a 0.09 albedo increase, and a reduction of 22.8 W m(-2) of net incoming solar radiation at surface. Mean reduction of summer daily maximum temperatures was 0.49 °C, with the largest single-day decrease equal to 1.3 °C. WRF output was evaluated and compared with observations. A mean annual warm bias (MBE) of 0.42 °C was estimated. High correlation coefficients (R(2) > 0.9) were found between modeled and observed values. This study has particular interest in the assessment of the potential for urban temperature cooling by cool roofs deployment projects, as well as in the evaluation of mesoscale climatic models performance.

  18. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  19. Production of bovine cloned embryos with donor cells frozen at a slow cooling rate in a conventional freezer (20 C)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, L.; Gomez, M.C.; Jenkins, J.A.; Leibo, S.P.; Wirtu, G.; Dresser, B.L.; Pope, C.E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Usually, fibroblasts are frozen in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO, 10% v/v) at a cooling rate of 1 C/min in a low-temperature (80 C) freezer (LTF) before storage in liquid nitrogen (LN2); however, a LTF is not always available. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate apoptosis and viability of bovine fibroblasts frozen in a LTF or conventional freezer (CF; 20 C) and their subsequent ability for development to blastocyst stage after fusion with enucleated bovine oocytes. Percentages of live cells frozen in LTF (49.5%) and CF (50.6%) were similar, but significantly less than non-frozen control (88%). In both CF and LTF, percentages of live apoptotic cells exposed to LN2 after freezing were lower (4% and 5%, respectively) as compared with unexposed cells (10% and 18%, respectively). Cells frozen in a CF had fewer cell doublings/24 h (0.45) and required more days (9.1) to reach 100% confluence at the first passage (P) after thawing and plating as compared with cells frozen in a LTF (0.96 and 4.0 days, respectively). Hypoploidy at P12 was higher than at P4 in cells frozen in either a CF (37.5% vs. 19.2%) or in a LTF (30.0% vs. 15.4%). A second-generation cryo-solution reduced the incidence of necrosis (29.4%) at 0 h after thawing as compared with that of a first generation cryo-solution (DMEM + DMSO, 60.2%). The percentage of apoptosis in live cells was affected by cooling rate (CF = 1.9% vs. LFT = 0.7%). Development of bovine cloned embryos to the blastocyst stage was not affected by cooling rate or freezer type. ?? 2009 Cambridge University Press.

  20. Net Reaction Rate and Neutrino Cooling Rate for the Urca Process in Departure from Chemical Equilibrium in the Crust of Fast-accreting Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Hua; Huang, Xi; Zheng, Xiao-Ping

    We discuss the effect of compression on Urca shells in the ocean and crust of accreting neutron stars, especially in superbursting sources. We find that Urca shells may be deviated from chemical equilibrium in neutron stars which accrete at several tenths of the local Eddington accretion rate. The deviation depends on the energy threshold of the parent and daughter nuclei, the transition strength, the temperature, and the local accretion rate. In a typical crust model of accreting neutron stars, the chemical departures range from a few tenths of kBT to tens of kBT for various Urca pairs. If the Urca shell can exist in crusts of accreting neutron stars, compression may enhance the net neutrino cooling rate by a factor of about 1-2 relative to the neutrino emissivity in chemical equilibrium. For some cases, such as Urca pairs with small energy thresholds and/or weak transition strength, the large chemical departure may result in net heating rather than cooling, although the released heat can be small. Strong Urca pairs in the deep crust are hard to be deviated even in neutron stars accreting at the local Eddington accretion rate.

  1. High-Rate Receiver Design Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose an initial architectural and preliminary hardware design study for a high-rate receiver capable of decoding modulation suites specified by CCSDS 413.0-G-1...

  2. INFLUENCE OF THE COOLING RATE AND THE BLEND RATIO ON THE PHYSICAL STABILTIY OF CO-AMORPHOUS NAPROXEN/INDOMETHACIN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beyer, Andreas; Grohganz, Holger; Löbmann, Korbinian

    2016-01-01

    and the blend ratio play major roles with regard to the resulting physical stability. Therefore, in the present study, co-amorphous naproxen-indomethacin (NAP/IND) was prepared by melt-quenching at three different cooling rates and at ten different NAP/IND blend ratios. The samples were analyzed using XRPD...... the optimal naproxen molar fraction led to significant recrystallization during storage. Either naproxen or γ-indomethacin recrystallized until a naproxen molar fraction of about 0.6 in the residual co-amorphous phase was reached again. In conclusion, the physical stability of co-amorphous NAP/IND may...

  3. Research of new packaging and cooling technique for high power fiber laser used pump coupler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Wei; Si, Xu; Lin, Ya-jun; Xu, Cheng-lin; Ma, Yun-liang; Xiao, Chun

    2015-10-01

    This article analyzes the advantages and disadvantages of a packaging structure for pump coupler, where common heat conduction material is used. In this study, the possibility of using new technology of thermal conductivity is discussed. We also proposes a solution that make the function and effect of package more uniform. A serial of experiments are done for research the cooling effect and the working reliability of the fiber combiners and couplers. Experiment proves that after improved method of package, the cooling speed increases significantly comparing the sample with old type of package technique. The technique discussed in this paper will make the high power fiber laser working long time with steady power output and high efficiency.

  4. High-g launch testing of a low-cost un-cooled LWIR imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiffany, Jason; Brown, F. Christophe; Manning, Kyle; Kellermeyer, William; King, Don; Drewry, David

    2014-06-01

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and smart munitions require low-cost IR sensors that fit within very small volumes, yet offer acceptable performance and landing/launch survivability. The LWIR band provides unique contrast for specific applications in both UAVs and smart munitions, with smart munitions presenting an additional challenge of high g-loads during launch. These high g-loads are not typically a design target of low-cost, un-cooled commercial off the shelf (COTS) LWIR sensors. This work addresses the challenges of adapting a COTS un-cooled LWIR imager for launch survivability. The sensor was modeled for mechanical stability and weaknesses identified. Modifications were made to improve launch survivability and multiple units were tested. Data is presented on the optical performance as measured through the modulation transfer function (MTF) both before and after launches for multiple locations across the lens.

  5. The Sterilization Effect of Cooperative Treatment of High Voltage Electrostatic Field and Variable Frequency Pulsed Electromagnetic Field on Heterotrophic Bacteria in Circulating Cooling Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuetong; Liu, Zhian; Zhao, Judong

    2018-01-01

    Compared to other treatment of industrial circulating cooling water in the field of industrial water treatment, high-voltage electrostatic field and variable frequency pulsed electromagnetic field co-sterilization technology, an advanced technology, is widely used because of its special characteristics--low energy consumption, nonpoisonous and environmentally friendly. In order to get a better cooling water sterilization effect under the premise of not polluting the environment, some experiments about sterilization of heterotrophic bacteria in industrial circulating cooling water by cooperative treatment of high voltage electrostatic field and variable frequency pulsed electromagnetic field were carried out. The comparison experiment on the sterilization effect of high-voltage electrostatic field and variable frequency pulsed electromagnetic field co-sterilization on heterotrophic bacteria in industrial circulating cooling water was carried out by change electric field strength and pulse frequency. The results show that the bactericidal rate is selective to the frequency and output voltage, and the heterotrophic bacterium can only kill under the condition of sweep frequency range and output voltage. When the voltage of the high voltage power supply is 4000V, the pulse frequency is 1000Hz and the water temperature is 30°C, the sterilization rate is 48.7%, the sterilization rate is over 90%. Results of this study have important guiding significance for future application of magnetic field sterilization.

  6. Application of optical fibers for optical diagnostics in high temperature gas cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikama, T.; Narui, M. [Oarai Branch, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Kakuta, T. [Tokai Research Establishment, JAERI, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Ishihara, M.; Sagawa, T.; Arai, T. [Oarai Research Establishment, JAERI, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    Visibility of a core region of a high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) is very poor in general with its solid graphite moderator. Realization of optical diagnostics will improve safety and maintenance of the HTGR considerably. The applicability of fused silica core optical fibers for optical diagnostics in a core of the High Temperature Testing Reactor (HTTR) of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been studied in the present research. Optical diagnostics are also expected to play crucial roles in advanced research planned in the HTTR. Optical transmission of the optical fibers was found not to degrade for several hundred hours at 1070K in air and helium environments in the wavelength range of 350-1800nm. In general. the optical fibers were found to be heat-resistant. To study radiation effects, the optical fibers were irradiated in Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). where the fast neutron(E>1MeV) flux was up to 1.5x10{sup 18}n/m{sup 2}s and the gamma-ray dose rate was up to about 5W/g for iron. The estimated fast neutron flux and the gamma-ray dose rate would be in the order of 10{sup 16}n/m{sup 2} and about 0.1W/g for iron, respectively in the HTTR. In general, optical transmission loss increased substantially with a small irradiation dose in the visible wave length range, although some developed fibers showed better radiation resistance. Good optical transmissivity was kept in the infrared region with absorption rate of less than a few dB/m. Radioluminescence and thermoluminescence from sapphire and silica could be observed with optical fibers under irradiation. Cherenkov radiation was observed in the wavelength range of 600-1800nm, whose intensity was temperature-independent. Black-body radiation was dominant in the wavelength longer than 1200nm at elevated temperatures. The results showed that the silica core optical fibers could be used as an image guide as well as monitors for radiation dosimetry and for monitoring core

  7. Thermal-hydraulic code selection for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komen, E.M.J.; Bogaard, J.P.A. van den

    1995-06-01

    In order to study the transient thermal-hydraulic system behaviour of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors, the thermal-hydraulic computer codes RELAP5, MELCOR, THATCH, MORECA, and VSOP are considered at the Netherlands Energy Research Foundation ECN. This report presents the selection of the most appropriate codes. To cover the range of relevant accidents, a suite of three codes is recommended for analyses of HTR-M and MHTGR reactors. (orig.).

  8. Coupling of Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with Supercritical Rankine Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Shutang Zhu; Ying Tang; Kun Xiao; Zuoyi Zhang

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents investigations on the possible combination of modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) technology with the supercritical (SC) steam turbine technology and the prospective deployments of the MHTGR SC power plant. Energy conversion efficiency of steam turbine cycle can be improved by increasing the main steam pressure and temperature. Investigations on SC water reactor (SCWR) reveal that the development of SCWR power plants still needs further research and develop...

  9. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  10. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design: Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinsey, J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200-MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched uranium oxycarbide fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technology readiness level, licensing approach, and costs of the test reactor point design.

  11. Reference modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Plant: Concept description report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-10-01

    This report provides a summary description of the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) concept and interim results of assessments of costs, safety, constructibility, operability, maintainability, and availability. Conceptual design of this concept was initiated in October 1985 and is scheduled for completion in 1987. Participating industrial contractors are Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI), Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC), GA Technologies, Inc. (GA), General Electric Co. (GE), and Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E).

  12. Cooling rates of LL, L and H chondrites and constraints on the duration of peak thermal conditions: Diffusion kinetic modeling and implications for fragmentation of asteroids and impact resetting of petrologic types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Jibamitra; Tirone, Massimiliano; Domanik, Kenneth

    2016-11-01

    We have carried out detailed thermometric and cooling history studies of several LL-, L- and H-chondrites of petrologic types 5 and 6. Among the selected samples, the low-temperature cooling of St. Séverin (LL6) has been constrained in an earlier study by thermochronological data to an average rate of ∼2.6 °C/My below 500 °C. However, numerical simulations of the development of Fe-Mg profiles in Opx-Cpx pairs using this cooling rate grossly misfit the measured compositional profiles. Satisfactory simulation of the latter and low temperature thermochronological constraints requires a two-stage cooling model with a cooling rate of ∼50-200 °C/ky from the peak metamorphic temperature of ∼875 °C down to 450 °C, and then transitioning to very slow cooling with an average rate of ∼2.6 °C/My. Similar rapid high temperature cooling rates (200-600 °C/ky) are also required to successfully model the compositional profiles in the Opx-Cpx pairs in the other samples of L5, L6 chondrites. For the H-chondrite samples, the low temperature cooling rates were determined earlier to be 10-20 °C/My by metallographic method. As in St. Séverin, these cooling rates grossly misfit the compositional profiles in the Opx-Cpx pairs. Modeling of these profiles requires very rapid cooling, ∼200-400 °C/ky, from the peak temperatures (∼810-830 °C), transitioning to the metallographic rates at ∼450-500 °C. We interpret the rapid high temperature cooling rates to the exposure of the samples to surface or near surface conditions as a result of fragmentation of the parent body by asteroidal impacts. Using the thermochronological data, the timing of the presumed impact is constrained to be ∼4555-4560 My before present for St. Séverin. We also deduced similar two stage cooling models in earlier studies of H-chondrites and mesosiderites that could be explained, using the available geochronological data, by impact induced fragmentation at around the same time. Diffusion kinetic

  13. Numerical simulation of the heat transfer at cooling a high-temperature metal cylinder by a flow of a gas-liquid medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, S. S.; Lipanov, A. M.; Karpov, A. I.

    2017-10-01

    The numerical modeling results for the heat transfer during cooling a metal cylinder by a gas-liquid medium flow in an annular channel are presented. The results are obtained on the basis of the mathematical model of the conjugate heat transfer of the gas-liquid flow and the metal cylinder in a two-dimensional nonstationary formulation accounting for the axisymmetry of the cooling medium flow relative to the cylinder longitudinal axis. To solve the system of differential equations the control volume approach is used. The flow field parameters are calculated by the SIMPLE algorithm. To solve iteratively the systems of linear algebraic equations the Gauss-Seidel method with under-relaxation is used. The results of the numerical simulation are verified by comparing the results of the numerical simulation with the results of the field experiment. The calculation results for the heat transfer parameters at cooling the high-temperature metal cylinder by the gas-liquid flow are obtained with accounting for evaporation. The values of the rate of cooling the cylinder by the laminar flow of the cooling medium are determined. The temperature change intensity for the metal cylinder is analyzed depending on the initial velocity of the liquid flow and the time of the cooling process.

  14. The influence of cooling rate and Fe/Cr content on the evolution of Fe-rich compounds in a secondary Al-Si-Cu diecasting alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabrizi, A.; Timelli, G.

    2016-03-01

    This study investigates the morphological evolution of primary α-Al(Fe,Mn,Cr)Si phase in a secondary Al-Si-Cu alloy with respect to the initial Fe and Cr contents as well as to the cooling rate. The solidification experiments have been designed in order to cover a wide range of cooling rates, and the Fe and Cr contents have been varied over two levels. Metallographic and image analysis techniques have been used to quantitatively examine the microstructural changes occurring at different experimental conditions. The morphological evolution of the α-Fe phase has been also analysed by observing deep etched samples. By changing the cooling rate, α-Al15(Fe,Mn,Cr)3Si2 dodecahedron crystals, as well as Chinese- script, branched structures and dendrites form, while primary coarse β-Al5(Fe,Mn)Si needles appear in the alloy with the highest Fe content at low cooling rates.

  15. High temperature heat pumps for industrial cooling; Hoejtemperatur varmepumper til industriel koeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasmussen, Lars; Nielsen, Jacob [Advansor A/S, Aarhus (Denmark); Kronborg, H. [Cronborg, Holstebro (Denmark); Skouenborg, K. [Jensens Koekken, Struer (Denmark)

    2013-03-15

    This report deals with theoretical analysis of various types of integration of heat pumps in the industry, as well as a demonstration plant that serves the project's practical execution. The report describes the system integration between heat pumps and existing industrial cooling systems. Ammonia plants in industry are estimated to have an allocation of 85%, which is why only an analysis of this type of installation as surplus heat supplier is included in this report. In contrast, heat pumps with both CO{sub 2} and Isobutane as the refrigerant are analysed, since these are the interesting coolants for generating high temperature heat. It can be seen through the project that the combination of heat pump with existing cooling installations may produce favorable situations where the efficiency of the heat pump is extremely high while at the same time electricity and water consumption for the cooling system is reduced. The analysis reflects that CO{sub 2} is preferred over Isobutane in the cases where a high level of temperature boost is desired, whereas Isobutane is preferable at low level of temperature boost. In the demonstration project, the report shows that the heat pump alone has a COP of 4.1, while the achieved COP is 5.5 when by considering the system as a whole. In addition to increased performance the solution profits by having a reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions of 81 tons/year and a saving of 470,000 DKK/year. (LN)

  16. Cooling of High Heat Flux Flat Surface with Nanofluid Assisted Convective Loop: Experimental Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arya Amir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Experimental investigation was conducted on the thermal performance and pressure drop of a convective cooling loop working with ZnO aqueous nanofluids. The loop was used to cool a flat heater connected to an AC autotransformer. Influence of different operating parameters, such as fluid flow rate and mass concentration of nanofluid on surface temperature of heater, pressure drop, friction factor and overall heat transfer coefficient was investigated and briefly discussed. Results of this study showed that, despite a penalty for pressure drop, ZnO/water nanofluid was a promising coolant for cooling the micro-electronic devices and chipsets. It was also found that there is an optimum for concentration of nanofluid so that the heat transfer coefficient is maximum, which was wt. % = 0.3 for ZnO/water used in this research. In addition, presence of nanoparticles enhanced the friction factor and pressure drop as well; however, it is not very significant in comparison with those of registered for the base fluid.

  17. Thermal and hydrodynamic studies for micro-channel cooling for large area silicon sensors in high energy physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaschel, Nils; Ariza, Dario; Díez, Sergio; Gerboles, Marta; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Jorda, Xavier; Mas, Roser; Quirion, David; Tackmann, Kerstin; Ullan, Miguel

    2017-08-01

    Micro-channel cooling initially aiming at small-sized high-power integrated circuits is being transferred to the field of high energy physics. Today's prospects of micro-fabricating silicon opens a door to a more direct cooling of detector modules. The challenge in high energy physics is to save material in the detector construction and to cool large areas. In this paper, we are investigating micro-channel cooling as a candidate for a future cooling system for silicon detectors in a generic research and development approach. The work presented in this paper includes the production and the hydrodynamic and thermal testing of a micro-channel equipped prototype optimized to achieve a homogeneous flow distribution. Furthermore, the device was simulated using finite element methods.

  18. High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Projected Markets and Scoping Economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Demick

    2010-08-01

    The NGNP Project has the objective of developing the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology to supply high temperature process heat to industrial processes as a substitute for burning of fossil fuels, such as natural gas. Applications of the HTGR technology that have been evaluated by the NGNP Project for supply of process heat include supply of electricity, steam and high-temperature gas to a wide range of industrial processes, and production of hydrogen and oxygen for use in petrochemical, refining, coal to liquid fuels, chemical, and fertilizer plants.

  19. Effect of soda lime flux on evaluation of the critical cooling rate of Pd82Si18 amorphous ribbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xutong Wang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Herein, we propose an experimental method based on the Barandiaran–Colmenero relation for evaluating the critical cooling rate (Rc of Pd82Si18 amorphous ribbon. In this method, to determine the inherent Rc of glass ribbon, heterogeneous nucleation is suppressed during the differential scanning calorimeter measurement process by adding soda lime flux. The Rc values of Pd82Si18 amorphous ribbon were determined before and after soda lime treatment. The experimental results indicate that the Rc values of the treated and non-treated ribbon are 10.27 and 148.39 K/s, respectively. The Rc value of the treated sample is in good agreement with a previous experimental result. Johnson’s relation gives Rc = 22.86 K/s, which confirms the validity of the present results. The results indicate that soda lime flux greatly suppresses heterogeneous nucleation during the measurement process and the inherent Rc of Pd82Si18 is revised. This method provides a new way for evaluating the critical cooling rate by suppressing heterogeneous nucleation.

  20. Effects of Intermittent Neck Cooling During Repeated Bouts of High-Intensity Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Galpin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this investigation was to determine the influence of intermittent neck cooling during exercise bouts designed to mimic combat sport competitions. Participants (n = 13, age = 25.3 ± 5.0 year height = 176.9 ± 7.5 cm, mass = 79.3 ± 9.0 kg, body fat = 11.8% ± 3.1% performed three trials on a cycle ergometer. Each trial consisted of two, 5-min high-intensity exercise (HEX intervals (HEX1 and HEX2—20 s at 50% peak power, followed by 15 s of rest, and a time to exhaustion (TTE test. One-minute rest intervals were given between each round (RI1 and RI2, during which researchers treated the participant’s posterior neck with either (1 wet-ice (ICE; (2 menthol spray (SPRAY; or (3 no treatment (CON. Neck (TNECK and chest (TCHEST skin temperatures were significantly lower following RI1 with ICE (vs. SPRAY. Thermal sensation decreased with ICE compared to CON following RI1, RI2, TTE, and a 2-min recovery. Rating of perceived exertion was also lower with ICE following HEX2 (vs. CON and after RI2 (vs. SPRAY. Treatment did not influence TTE (68.9 ± 18.9s. The ability of intermittent ICE to attenuate neck and chest skin temperature rises during the initial HEX stages likely explains why participants felt cooler and less exerted during equivalent HEX bouts. These data suggest intermittent ICE improves perceptual stress during short, repeated bouts of vigorous exercise.

  1. The influence of cooling rate on the accuracy of normoxic polymer gel dosimeters

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeDeene, Y.; Pittomvils, G.; Visalatchi, S.

    2007-05-01

    Polymer gel dosimeters offer a wide range of applications in the three-dimensional verification of complex radiation dose distributions such as in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). With the release of polymer gel dosimeters that can be fabricated in normal atmospheric ('normoxic') conditions, the gel manufacturing process has been significantly simplified. Gel dosimeters are calibrated by use of a series of calibration vials irradiated with known doses or by use of a calibration phantom with a known dose distribution. The overall accuracy of the polymer gel dosimeters is determined by different dosimetric properties. In this study, we show the influence of the temperature history during storage of the gel dosimeter on the dose response curve for two gel dosimeters using the monomers acrylamide/N,N'-methylene-bis-acrylamide (nPAG) and methacrylic acid (nMAG) respectively and bis[tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium]sulphate (THP) as antioxidant in both gel dosimeters. This study reveals that differences in temperature history after fabrication of normoxic polymer gel dosimeters may compromise the dosimetric accuracy. It was found that the acrylamide based gel dosimeter (nPAG) is less dependent on the post-manufacture temperature history than the methacrylic acid based gel dosimeter (nMAG). The importance of an equal temperature history for the gel dosimeter and calibration vials is emphasized by this study. A reproducibility study has also been performed on the nPAG gel dosimeter when additional efforts are made to control the temperature changes upon cooling.

  2. Perspectives on understanding and verifying the safety terrain of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Donald E., E-mail: donald@carlsonperin.net [11221 Empire Lane, Rockville, MD 20852 (United States); Ball, Sydney J., E-mail: beckysyd@comcast.net [100 Greywood Place, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    The passive safety characteristics of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are conceptually well known and are largely supported by insights from past and ongoing research. This paper offers perspectives on selected issues in areas where further analysis and testing achievable within existing research and demonstration programs could help address residual uncertainties and better support the analysis of safety performance and the regulatory assessment of defense in depth. Areas considered include the evaluation of normal and anomalous core operating conditions and the analysis of accidents involving loss of forced cooling, coolant depressurization, air ingress, moisture ingress, and reactivity events. In addition to discussing associated uncertainties and potential measures to address them, this paper also proposes supplemental “safety terrain” studies that would use realistic assessments of postulated extreme event sequences to establish a more comprehensive understanding of the inherent behaviors and ultimate safety capabilities of modular HTGRs.

  3. Monte Carlo Analysis of the Battery-Type High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grodzki, Marcin; Darnowski, Piotr; Niewiński, Grzegorz

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents a neutronic analysis of the battery-type 20 MWth high-temperature gas cooled reactor. The developed reactor model is based on the publicly available data being an `early design' variant of the U-battery. The investigated core is a battery type small modular reactor, graphite moderated, uranium fueled, prismatic, helium cooled high-temperature gas cooled reactor with graphite reflector. The two core alternative designs were investigated. The first has a central reflector and 30×4 prismatic fuel blocks and the second has no central reflector and 37×4 blocks. The SERPENT Monte Carlo reactor physics computer code, with ENDF and JEFF nuclear data libraries, was applied. Several nuclear design static criticality calculations were performed and compared with available reference results. The analysis covered the single assembly models and full core simulations for two geometry models: homogenous and heterogenous (explicit). A sensitivity analysis of the reflector graphite density was performed. An acceptable agreement between calculations and reference design was obtained. All calculations were performed for the fresh core state.

  4. Monte Carlo Analysis of the Battery-Type High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grodzki Marcin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a neutronic analysis of the battery-type 20 MWth high-temperature gas cooled reactor. The developed reactor model is based on the publicly available data being an ‘early design’ variant of the U-battery. The investigated core is a battery type small modular reactor, graphite moderated, uranium fueled, prismatic, helium cooled high-temperature gas cooled reactor with graphite reflector. The two core alternative designs were investigated. The first has a central reflector and 30×4 prismatic fuel blocks and the second has no central reflector and 37×4 blocks. The SERPENT Monte Carlo reactor physics computer code, with ENDF and JEFF nuclear data libraries, was applied. Several nuclear design static criticality calculations were performed and compared with available reference results. The analysis covered the single assembly models and full core simulations for two geometry models: homogenous and heterogenous (explicit. A sensitivity analysis of the reflector graphite density was performed. An acceptable agreement between calculations and reference design was obtained. All calculations were performed for the fresh core state.

  5. Cooling capacity of high porosity open-cell metal foams as passive cryogenic radiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Tisha; Ghosh, Indranil

    2017-06-01

    This work presents an innovative avenue for employment of high porosity open-cell metal foams as extended heat transfer surfaces in passive cryogenic radiators. Metal foams are known for being light in weight and possess high surface area density. In contrast to a solid surface, porosity of metal foams makes it feasible for penetration of radiation thereby resulting in higher radiatively interactive surface area. Two 20 PPI metal foams made of copper and aluminum with 94.9% and 90.3% porosity respectively have been chosen for this study. A laboratory-scale test rig measures the radiative cooling capacity of metal foams in vacuum (10-6 mbar) subjected to liquid nitrogen environment. Heat load to the foam has been provided by means of convective fluid loop. Simultaneously, a theoretical model based on radiation-conduction fin analysis has been developed to predict the foam cooling capacity at a specified temperature. The required radiation heat transfer coefficient has been obtained from a previous experiment wherein the foam samples are freely suspended in similar conditions but with no heat load. Lastly, performance of the foams under study has been expressed in terms of a commonly used performance parameter (surface area/cooling capacity) for passive cryogenic radiators.

  6. Statistical correlations for thermophysical properties of Supercritical Argon (SCAR) used in cooling of futuristic High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalsia, Mohit [School of Mechanical Engineering, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, 144 401 (India); Dondapati, Raja Sekhar, E-mail: drsekhar@ieee.org [School of Mechanical Engineering, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara, 144 401 (India); Usurumarti, Preeti Rao [Department of Mechanical Engineering, PVK Institute of Technology, Anantpur, 515 001 (India)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • The developed correlations can be integrated into thermohydraulic analysis of HTS cables. • This work also explains the phenomenon of flow with less pumping power and maximum heat transfer in HTS cables. • Pumping power required to circulate the SCAR for cooling of HTS cables would be significantly lower. • For Hg-based high temperature superconductors (T{sub c} > 134 K), SCAR found to be a suitable coolant. - Abstract: High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cables are emerging as an alternative to conventional cables in efficient power transmission. However, these HTS cables require cooling below the critical temperature of superconductors used to transmit larger currents. With the invention of high temperature superconductors whose critical temperatures are up to 134 K (Hg based), it is a great challenge to identify a suitable coolant which can carry away the heating load on the superconductors. In order to accomplish such challenge, an attempt has been made in the present work to propose supercritical Argon (SCAR) as the alternative to cool the HTS cables. Further, a statistical correlation has been developed for the thermophysical properties such as density, viscosity, specific heat and thermal conductivity of SCAR. In addition, the accuracy of developed correlations is established with the help of few statistical parameters and validated with standard database available in the literature. These temperature dependent accurate correlations are useful in predicting the pressure drop and heat transfer behaviour in HTS cables using numerical or computational techniques. In recent times, with the sophistication of computer technology, solving of various complex transport equations along with the turbulence models became popular and hence the developed correlations would benefit the technological community. It is observed that, a decrease in pressure, density and viscosity are found to be decreasing whereas the thermal conductivity and specific

  7. Spatial variations in cooling rate in the mantle section of the Samail ophiolite in Oman: Implications for formation of lithosphere at mid-ocean ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dygert, Nick; Kelemen, Peter B.; Liang, Yan

    2017-05-01

    To understand how the mantle cools beneath mid-ocean ridge spreading centers, we applied a REE-in-two-pyroxene thermometer and major element thermometers to peridotites from the Wadi Tayin massif in the southern part of the Samail ophiolite in the Sultanate of Oman, which represent more than 10 km of structural depth beneath the paleo-Moho. Closure temperatures for REEs in pyroxenes deduced from the REE-in-two-pyroxene thermometer (TREE) decrease smoothly and systematically with depth in the section, from >1300 °C near the crust to <1100 °C near the metamorphic sole, consistent with previously observed, similar variations in mineral thermometers with lower cooling temperatures. Estimated cooling rates decrease from ∼0.3 °C/y just below the crust-mantle transition zone (MTZ) to ∼10-3 °C/y at a depth of six km below the MTZ. Cooling rates derived from Ca-in-olivine thermometry also decrease moving deeper into the section. These variations in cooling rate are most consistent with conductive cooling of the mantle beneath a cold overlying crust. In turn, this suggests that hydrothermal circulation extended to the MTZ near the axis of the fast-spreading ridge where the igneous crust of the Samail ophiolite formed. These observations are consistent with the Sheeted Sills model for accretion of lower oceanic crust, and with previous work demonstrating very rapid cooling rates in the crust of the Wadi Tayin massif. Our observations, combined with previous results, suggest that efficient hydrothermal circulation beneath fast spreading centers cools the uppermost mantle from magmatic temperatures to <1000 °C as quickly as tectonic exhumation at amagmatic spreading centers. In contrast, thermometers sensitive to cooling over lower temperature intervals indicate that the Wadi Tayin peridotites cooled more slowly than tectonically exhumed peridotites sampled near the seafloor along mid-ocean ridges. Hydrothermal cooling of the crust may have waned, so that the crust

  8. Thrombus Formation at High Shear Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casa, Lauren D C; Ku, David N

    2017-06-21

    The final common pathway in myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke is occlusion of blood flow from a thrombus forming under high shear rates in arteries. A high-shear thrombus forms rapidly and is distinct from the slow formation of coagulation that occurs in stagnant blood. Thrombosis at high shear rates depends primarily on the long protein von Willebrand factor (vWF) and platelets, with hemodynamics playing an important role in each stage of thrombus formation, including vWF binding, platelet adhesion, platelet activation, and rapid thrombus growth. The prediction of high-shear thrombosis is a major area of biofluid mechanics in which point-of-care testing and computational modeling are promising future directions for clinically relevant research. Further research in this area will enable identification of patients at high risk for arterial thrombosis, improve prevention and treatment based on shear-dependent biological mechanisms, and improve blood-contacting device design to reduce thrombosis risk.

  9. Stacking with Stochastic Cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Caspers, Friedhelm

    2004-01-01

    Accumulation of large stacks of antiprotons or ions with the aid of stochastic cooling is more delicate than cooling a constant intensity beam. Basically the difficulty stems from the fact that the optimized gain and the cooling rate are inversely proportional to the number of particles seen by the cooling system. Therefore, to maintain fast stacking, the newly injected batch has to be strongly protected from the Schottky noise of the stack. Vice versa the stack has to be efficiently shielded against the high gain cooling system for the injected beam. In the antiproton accumulators with stacking ratios up to 105, the problem is solved by radial separation of the injection and the stack orbits in a region of large dispersion. An array of several tapered cooling systems with a matched gain profile provides a continuous particle flux towards the high-density stack core. Shielding of the different systems from each other is obtained both through the spatial separation and via the revolution frequencies (filters)....

  10. High-latitude cooling associated with landscape changes from North American boreal forest fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Rogers

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Fires in the boreal forests of North America are generally stand-replacing, killing the majority of trees and initiating succession that may last over a century. Functional variation during succession can affect local surface energy budgets and, potentially, regional climate. Burn area across Alaska and Canada has increased in the last few decades and is projected to be substantially higher by the end of the 21st century because of a warmer climate with longer growing seasons. Here we simulated changes in forest composition due to altered burn area using a stochastic model of fire occurrence, historical fire data from national inventories, and succession trajectories derived from remote sensing. When coupled to an Earth system model, younger vegetation from increased burning cooled the high-latitude atmosphere, primarily in the winter and spring, with noticeable feedbacks from the ocean and sea ice. Results from multiple scenarios suggest that a doubling of burn area would cool the surface by 0.23 ± 0.09 °C across boreal North America during winter and spring months (December through May. This could provide a negative feedback to winter warming on the order of 3–5% for a doubling, and 14–23% for a quadrupling, of burn area. Maximum cooling occurs in the areas of greatest burning, and between February and April when albedo changes are largest and solar insolation is moderate. Further work is needed to integrate all the climate drivers from boreal forest fires, including aerosols and greenhouse gasses.

  11. Multimode laser cooling and ultra-high sensitivity force sensing with nanowires

    CERN Document Server

    Hosseini, Mahdi; Slatyer, Harri J; Buchler, Ben C; Lam, Ping Koy

    2015-01-01

    Photo-induced forces can be used to manipulate and cool the mechanical motion of oscillators. When the oscillator is used as a force sensor, such as in atomic force microscopy, active feedback is an enticing route to enhancing measurement performance. Here, we show broadband multimode cooling of $-23$ dB down to a temperature of $8 \\pm 1$~K in the stationary regime. Through the use of periodic quiescence feedback cooling, we show improved signal-to-noise ratios for the measurement of transient signals. We compare the performance of real feedback to numerical post-processing of data and show that both methods produce similar improvements to the signal-to-noise ratio of force measurements. We achieved a room temperature force measurement sensitivity of $< 2\\times10^{-16}$ N with integration time of less than $0.1$ ms. The high precision and fast force microscopy results presented will potentially benefit applications in biosensing, molecular metrology, subsurface imaging and accelerometry.

  12. Slow cooling and highly efficient extraction of hot carriers in colloidal perovskite nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingjie; Bhaumik, Saikat; Goh, Teck Wee; Kumar, Muduli Subas; Yantara, Natalia; Grätzel, Michael; Mhaisalkar, Subodh; Mathews, Nripan; Sum, Tze Chien

    2017-02-08

    Hot-carrier solar cells can overcome the Schottky-Queisser limit by harvesting excess energy from hot carriers. Inorganic semiconductor nanocrystals are considered prime candidates. However, hot-carrier harvesting is compromised by competitive relaxation pathways (for example, intraband Auger process and defects) that overwhelm their phonon bottlenecks. Here we show colloidal halide perovskite nanocrystals transcend these limitations and exhibit around two orders slower hot-carrier cooling times and around four times larger hot-carrier temperatures than their bulk-film counterparts. Under low pump excitation, hot-carrier cooling mediated by a phonon bottleneck is surprisingly slower in smaller nanocrystals (contrasting with conventional nanocrystals). At high pump fluence, Auger heating dominates hot-carrier cooling, which is slower in larger nanocrystals (hitherto unobserved in conventional nanocrystals). Importantly, we demonstrate efficient room temperature hot-electrons extraction (up to ∼83%) by an energy-selective electron acceptor layer within 1 ps from surface-treated perovskite NCs thin films. These insights enable fresh approaches for extremely thin absorber and concentrator-type hot-carrier solar cells.

  13. Evaluation of Hole Quality in Hardened Steel with High-Speed Drilling Using Different Cooling Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lincoln Cardoso Brandão

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This work evaluates the hole quality on AISI H13 hardened steel using high-speed drilling. Specimens were machined with new and worn out drills with 8.6 mm diameter and (TiAlN coating. Two levels of cutting speed and three levels of cooling/lubrication systems (flooded, minimum lubrication quantity, and dry were used. The hole quality is evaluated on surface roughness (Ra parameter, diameter error, circularity, and cylindricity error. A statistical analysis of the results shows that the cooling/lubrication system significantly affects the hole quality for all measured variables. This analysis indicates that dry machining produces the worst results. Higher cutting speeds not only prove beneficial to diameter error and circularity errors, but also show no significant difference on surface roughness and cylindricity errors. The effects of the interaction between the cooling/lubrication systems, tool wear, and cutting speed indicate that only cylindricity error is influenced. Thus, the conclusion is that the best hole quality is produced with a higher cutting speed using flooded or minimum lubrication quantity independent of drill wear.

  14. Experimental study on the double-evaporator thermosiphon for cooling HTS (high temperature superconductor) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Junghyun; Ko, Junseok; Kim, Youngkwon; Jeong, Sangkwon; Sung, Taehyun; Han, Younghee; Lee, Jeong-Phil; Jung, Seyong

    2009-08-01

    A cryogenic thermosiphons is an efficient heat transfer device between a cryocooler and a thermal load that is to be cooled. This paper presents an idea of thermosiphon which contains two vertically-separated evaporators. This unique configuration of the thermosiphon is suitable for the purpose of cooling simultaneously two superconducting bearings of the HTS (high temperature superconducting) flywheel system at the same temperature. A so-called double-evaporator thermosiphon was designed, fabricated and tested using nitrogen as the working fluid under sub-atmospheric pressure condition. The interior thermal condition of the double-evaporator thermosiphon was examined in detail during its cool-down process according to the internal thermal states. The double-evaporator thermosiphon has operated successfully at steady-state operation under sub-atmospheric pressure. At the heat flow of 10.6 W, the total temperature difference of the thermosiphon was only 1.59 K and the temperature difference between the evaporators was 0.64 K. The temperature difference of two evaporators is attributed to the conductive thermal resistance of the adiabatic section between the evaporators. The method to reduce this temperature difference has been investigated and presented in this paper. The proper area selection of condenser, evaporator 1, and evaporator 2 was studied by using thermal resistance model to optimize the performance of a thermosiphon. The superior heat transfer characteristic of the double-evaporator thermosiphon without involving any cryogenic pump can be a great potential advantage for cooling HTS bulk modules that are separated vertically.

  15. High Strain Rate Characterisation of Composite Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Rasmus Normann Wilken

    -reinforced polymers, were considered, and it was first shown that the loading history controls equilibrium process. Then the High-speed servo-hydraulic test machine was analysed in terms its ability to create a state of constant strain rate in the specimen. The invertible inertial forces in the load train prevented...... a linear elastic specimen to reach a state of constant strain rate before fracture. This was in contrast to ductile materials, which are widely tested with for the High-speed servohydraulic test machine. The development of the analysis and the interpretation of the results, were based on the experience...... from designing and constructing a high-speed servo-hydraulic test machine and by performing a comprehensive test series. The difficulties encountered in the test work could be addressed with the developed analysis. The conclusion was that the High-speed servo-hydraulic test machine is less suited...

  16. High resolution measurement of the glycolytic rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla X Bittner

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The glycolytic rate is sensitive to physiological activity, hormones, stress, aging and malignant transformation. Standard techniques to measure the glycolytic rate are based on radioactive isotopes, are not able to resolve single cells and have poor temporal resolution, limitations that hamper the study of energy metabolism in the brain and other organs. A new method is described in this article, which makes use of a recently-developed FRET glucose nanosensor to measure the rate of glycolysis in single cells with high temporal resolution. Used in cultured astrocytes, the method showed for the first time that glycolysis can be activated within seconds by a combination of glutamate and K+, supporting a role for astrocytes in neurometabolic and neurovascular coupling in the brain. It was also possible to make a direct comparison of metabolism in neurons and astrocytes lying in close proximity, paving the way to a high-resolution characterization of brain energy metabolism. Single-cell glycolytic rates were also measured in fibroblasts, adipocytes, myoblasts and tumor cells, showing higher rates for undifferentiated cells and significant metabolic heterogeneity within cell types. This method should facilitate the investigation of tissue metabolism at the single-cell level and is readily adaptable for high-throughput analysis.

  17. An Advanced Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Concept Using Uranium-Free Metallic Fuels for Maximizing TRU Burning Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuseong You

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we designed and analyzed advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor cores using uranium-free metallic fuels for maximizing burning rate of transuranics (TRU nuclides from PWR spent fuels. It is well known that the removal of fertile nuclides such as 238U from fuels in liquid metal cooled fast reactor leads to the degradation of important safety parameters such as the Doppler coefficient, coolant void worth, and delayed neutron fraction. To resolve the degradation of the Doppler coefficient, we considered adding resonant nuclides to the uranium-free metallic fuels. The analysis results showed that the cores using uranium-free fuels loaded with tungsten instead of uranium have a significantly lower burnup reactivity swing and more negative Doppler coefficients than the core using uranium-free fuels without resonant nuclides. In addition, we considered the use of axially central B4C absorber region and moderator rods to further improve safety parameters such as sodium void worth, burnup reactivity swing, and the Doppler coefficient. The results of the analysis showed that the final design core can consume ~353 kg per cycle and satisfies self-controllability under unprotected accidents. The fuel cycle analysis showed that the PWR–SFR coupling fuel cycle option drastically reduces the amount of waste going to repository and the SFR burner can consume the amount of TRUs discharged from 3.72 PWRs generating the same electricity.

  18. Statistical correlations for thermophysical properties of Supercritical Argon (SCAR) used in cooling of futuristic High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalsia, Mohit; Dondapati, Raja Sekhar; Usurumarti, Preeti Rao

    2017-05-01

    High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cables are emerging as an alternative to conventional cables in efficient power transmission. However, these HTS cables require cooling below the critical temperature of superconductors used to transmit larger currents. With the invention of high temperature superconductors whose critical temperatures are up to 134 K (Hg based), it is a great challenge to identify a suitable coolant which can carry away the heating load on the superconductors. In order to accomplish such challenge, an attempt has been made in the present work to propose supercritical Argon (SCAR) as the alternative to cool the HTS cables. Further, a statistical correlation has been developed for the thermophysical properties such as density, viscosity, specific heat and thermal conductivity of SCAR. In addition, the accuracy of developed correlations is established with the help of few statistical parameters and validated with standard database available in the literature. These temperature dependent accurate correlations are useful in predicting the pressure drop and heat transfer behaviour in HTS cables using numerical or computational techniques. In recent times, with the sophistication of computer technology, solving of various complex transport equations along with the turbulence models became popular and hence the developed correlations would benefit the technological community. It is observed that, a decrease in pressure, density and viscosity are found to be decreasing whereas the thermal conductivity and specific heat increase significantly. It can be concluded that higher heat transfer rate and lower pumping power can be achieved with SCAR as coolant in the HTS cables.

  19. Laboratory and Field Test of Movable Conduction-Cooled High-Temperature SMES for Power System Stability Enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Jiakun; Wen, J.; Wang, S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper introduces the first movable conduction-cooled high temperature superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system developed in China. The SMES is rated at 380 V / 35 kJ / 7 kW, consisting of the high temperature magnet confined in a dewar, the cryogenic unit, the converter......, the monitoring and control unit, and the container, etc. The proposed SMES can be loaded onto a truck to move to a desired location and put into operation with easy connection. Laboratory and field tests have been carried out to investigate the operational characteristics and to demonstrate the SMES......’ effectiveness on improvements of system voltage stability and on the oscillation damping. Test results indicate that the SMES system has the features of fast response and four-quadrant power operation. The accessories for the movability of the SEMS system are well designed. The system is feasible to be used...

  20. High Rate Performing Li-ion Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-09

    permeable to lithium ions and efficient in transferring the electrons into/from the LVP surface to the corresponding current collector. a) b) c) d) e...PO4)3/C for High Rate Lithium-ion Battery Applications”, Lee Hwang Sheng, Nail Suleimanov, Vishwanathan Ramar, Mangayarkarasi Murugan, Kuppan

  1. Concomitant chemoradiotherapy with high dose rate brachytherapy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: This study aims to report the incidence of treatment-induced acute toxicities, local control and survival of patients with cervix cancer treated by external beam radiotherapy (EBR) and high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy concomitant with weekly Cisplatin chemotherapy. Methods: Forty patients with FIGO Stages IB2 ...

  2. Porous nuclear fuel element for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L [Albuquerque, NM; Williams, Brian E [Pacoima, CA; Benander, Robert E [Pacoima, CA

    2011-03-01

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  3. Porous nuclear fuel element with internal skeleton for high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youchison, Dennis L.; Williams, Brian E.; Benander, Robert E.

    2013-09-03

    Porous nuclear fuel elements for use in advanced high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors (HTGR's), and to processes for fabricating them. Advanced uranium bi-carbide, uranium tri-carbide and uranium carbonitride nuclear fuels can be used. These fuels have high melting temperatures, high thermal conductivity, and high resistance to erosion by hot hydrogen gas. Tri-carbide fuels, such as (U,Zr,Nb)C, can be fabricated using chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) to simultaneously deposit each of the three separate carbides, e.g., UC, ZrC, and NbC in a single CVI step. By using CVI, the nuclear fuel may be deposited inside of a highly porous skeletal structure made of, for example, reticulated vitreous carbon foam.

  4. Radionuclides in primary coolant of a fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor during normal operation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Guo-Qing; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Hai-Qing; Zhu, Xing-Wang; Peng, Chao; Cai, Jun; He, Zhao-Zhong; Chen, Kun

    2017-01-01

    The release of fission products from coated particle fuel to primary coolant, as well as the activation of coolant and impurities, were analysed for a fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR...

  5. Influence of Cooling on the Glycolysis Rate and Development of PSE (Pale, Soft, Exudative Meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayka Reghiany Pedrão

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate pH values fall rate in chicken breast meat under commercial refrigeration processing conditions and the development of PSE (pale, soft, exudative meat. Broiler breast samples from the Cobb breed, both genders, at 47 days of age (n = 100 were taken from refrigerated carcasses (RS immersed in water and ice in a tank chilled at 0°C (±2. pH and temperature (T values were recorded at several periods throughout refrigeration in comparison to samples left at room T as control (CS. The ultimate pH (pHu value of 5.86 for RS carcasses were only reached at 11°C after 8.35 h post mortem (PM while, for CS samples, pHu value was 5.94 at 22°C after 4.08 h PM. Thus, under commercial refrigeration conditions, the glycolysis rate was retarded by over 4.0 h PM and the breast meat color was affected. At 24.02 h PM, PSE meat incidence was 30% while for CS, meat remained dark and PSE meat was not detected. Results show retardation in the glycolysis rate and PSE meat development was promoted by the refrigeration treatment when compared with samples stored at processing room temperature.

  6. High strain rate behaviour of polypropylene microfoams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez A.B.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Microcellular materials such as polypropylene foams are often used in protective applications and passive safety for packaging (electronic components, aeronautical structures, food, etc. or personal safety (helmets, knee-pads, etc.. In such applications the foams which are used are often designed to absorb the maximum energy and are generally subjected to severe loadings involving high strain rates. The manufacture process to obtain polymeric microcellular foams is based on the polymer saturation with a supercritical gas, at high temperature and pressure. This method presents several advantages over the conventional injection moulding techniques which make it industrially feasible. However, the effect of processing conditions such as blowing agent, concentration and microfoaming time and/or temperature on the microstructure of the resulting microcellular polymer (density, cell size and geometry is not yet set up. The compressive mechanical behaviour of several microcellular polypropylene foams has been investigated over a wide range of strain rates (0.001 to 3000 s−1 in order to show the effects of the processing parameters and strain rate on the mechanical properties. High strain rate tests were performed using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus (SHPB. Polypropylene and polyethylene-ethylene block copolymer foams of various densities were considered.

  7. High strain rate behaviour of polypropylene microfoams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-del Río, T.; Garrido, M. A.; Rodríguez, J.; Arencón, D.; Martínez, A. B.

    2012-08-01

    Microcellular materials such as polypropylene foams are often used in protective applications and passive safety for packaging (electronic components, aeronautical structures, food, etc.) or personal safety (helmets, knee-pads, etc.). In such applications the foams which are used are often designed to absorb the maximum energy and are generally subjected to severe loadings involving high strain rates. The manufacture process to obtain polymeric microcellular foams is based on the polymer saturation with a supercritical gas, at high temperature and pressure. This method presents several advantages over the conventional injection moulding techniques which make it industrially feasible. However, the effect of processing conditions such as blowing agent, concentration and microfoaming time and/or temperature on the microstructure of the resulting microcellular polymer (density, cell size and geometry) is not yet set up. The compressive mechanical behaviour of several microcellular polypropylene foams has been investigated over a wide range of strain rates (0.001 to 3000 s-1) in order to show the effects of the processing parameters and strain rate on the mechanical properties. High strain rate tests were performed using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar apparatus (SHPB). Polypropylene and polyethylene-ethylene block copolymer foams of various densities were considered.

  8. High-throughput search for caloric materials: the CaloriCool approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarkevich, N. A.; Johnson, D. D.; Pecharsky, V. K.

    2018-01-01

    The high-throughput search paradigm adopted by the newly established caloric materials consortium—CaloriCool®—with the goal to substantially accelerate discovery and design of novel caloric materials is briefly discussed. We begin with describing material selection criteria based on known properties, which are then followed by heuristic fast estimates, ab initio calculations, all of which has been implemented in a set of automated computational tools and measurements. We also demonstrate how theoretical and computational methods serve as a guide for experimental efforts by considering a representative example from the field of magnetocaloric materials.

  9. Commercialization of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors in the world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Hitoshi; Okamoto, Futoshi; Ohhashi, Kazutaka [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    The construction programs of the commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactors have been activated extraordinarily all over the world. This paper gives an overview of the three major programs, the South African PBMR project (US utility Exelon announced recently their plan to import PBMRs), the international GT-MHR project (by US DOE, General Atomics, MINATOM of Russian Federation, FRAMATOME ANP, Fuji Electric) and Chinese HTR-PM project. And the reasons why the utilities selected small modular HTGRs as next generation reactors, the superior characteristics of the small modular HTGRs for power generation plant and prospects of them are summarized and discussed. (author)

  10. Assessment of Water Ingress Accidents in a Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Z.; Dong, Y; Scherer, W

    2005-01-01

    Severe water ingress accidents in the 200-MW HTR-module were assessed to determine the safety margins of modular pebble-bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTR-module). The 200-MW HTR-module was designed by Siemens under the criteria that no active safety protection systems were necessary because of its inherent safe nature. For simulating the behavior of the HTR-module during severe water ingress accidents, a water, steam, and helium multiphase cavity model was developed and implemente...

  11. High-Temperature Air-Cooled Power Electronics Thermal Design: Annual Progress Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waye, Scot [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Power electronics that use high-temperature devices pose a challenge for thermal management. With the devices running at higher temperatures and having a smaller footprint, the heat fluxes increase from previous power electronic designs. This project overview presents an approach to examine and design thermal management strategies through cooling technologies to keep devices within temperature limits, dissipate the heat generated by the devices and protect electrical interconnects and other components for inverter, converter, and charger applications. This analysis, validation, and demonstration intends to take a multi-scale approach over the device, module, and system levels to reduce size, weight, and cost.

  12. Feasibility study of a cryogenically cooled window for high-power gyrotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haste, G.R.; Kimrey, H.D.; Prosise, J.D.

    1986-07-01

    Single-crystal sapphire is currently in use as the material for output windows in high-power microwave tubes, particularly gyrotrons. These windows are currently being cooled by fluorocarbon fluids at near-room temperatures. There are, however, several advantages in operating the window at very low temperatures: less absorption and consequent heating of the window, greater material strength, improved resistance to crack formation, greater thermal conductivity, and reduced thermal expansion. Operation at cryogenic temperatures is shown to be feasible. The output power, which is currently limited by window constraints, could be increased by an order of magnitude or more.

  13. KEY DESIGN REQUIREMENTS FOR THE HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR NUCLEAR HEAT SUPPLY SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.E. Demick

    2010-09-01

    Key requirements that affect the design of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor nuclear heat supply system (HTGR-NHSS) as the NGNP Project progresses through the design, licensing, construction and testing of the first of a kind HTGR based plant are summarized. These requirements derive from pre-conceptual design development completed to-date by HTGR Suppliers, collaboration with potential end users of the HTGR technology to identify energy needs, evaluation of integration of the HTGR technology with industrial processes and recommendations of the NGNP Project Senior Advisory Group.

  14. Evaluation of proposed German safety criteria for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barsell, A.W.

    1980-05-01

    This work reviews proposed safety criteria prepared by the German Bundesministerium des Innern (BMI) for future licensing of gas-cooled high-temperature reactor (HTR) concepts in the Federal Republic of Germany. Comparison is made with US General Design Criteria (GDCs) in 10CFR50 Appendix A and with German light water reactor (LWR) criteria. Implications for the HTR design relative to the US design and safety approach are indicated. Both inherent characteristics and design features of the steam cycle, gas turbine, and process heat concepts are taken into account as well as generic design options such as a pebble bed or prismatic core.

  15. Effect of cryoprotectants and cooling rates on fertility potential of sperm in the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii (De Man).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentina Claudet, P; Narasimman, Selvakumar; Natesan, Munuswamy

    2016-08-01

    This study evaluates freezing protocol with suitable cryoprotectants and their effects on the fertility potential of sperm in the cryopreserved spermatophores of Macrobrachium rosenbergii. Spermatophores, collected using electroejaculation, were suspended in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), propylene glycol (PG), methanol, glycerol and ethylene glycol (EG) at different concentrations (10, 15 & 20% v/v), prepared in sterile-filtered pond water. Based on the cryoprotectant toxicity assay, DMSO and PG were used individually as well as in combination with three freezing protocols (i.e. -1.5, -3 and -5°C/min and to final temperature of -39°C) and plunged into liquid nitrogen at -196°C. After 90 days of storage (-196°C) thawing was done at 35°C in a water bath for 1min. Results showed that fresh and cryopreserved spermatophores held for 90 days registered sperm viability of 91.4±2.9% and 50.4±1.9% respectively. Further, fertility potential of sperm was assessed based on acrosome reactivity using calcium ionophore (A23187). Observations indicated that cryopreserved sperm registered 28.3±2.2% of acrosome reactivity compared to freshly collected spermatophores (85.3±2.5%). Thus, one-step slow cooling rate of -1.5°C/min between 27°C and -39°C stored in liquid nitrogen at -196°C with DMSO (10%)+PG (10%) seems to be amenable for cryopreservation of spermatophores, compared to other cooling rates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of hot plastic deformation and cooling rate on martensite and bainite start temperatures in 22MnB5 steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikravesh, M., E-mail: nikravesh@yahoo.com [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Shahid Bahonar University, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Naderi, M. [Department of Mining and Metallurgy, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Akbari, G.H. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Shahid Bahonar University, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-04-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduction of cooling rate, can cause to increase or decrease M{sub s} and M{sub f}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 40% hot plastic deformation hindered the martensitic transformation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hot plastic deformation, caused to decrease M{sub f} and M{sub s}, while B{sub s} increased. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The critical cooling rate increased 40 Degree-Sign C/s due to apply 40% hot deformation. - Abstract: During hot stamping process, hot forming, cooling and phase transformations are performed in a single step. As a matter of fact, multifunctional phenomena happen and affect each other. Among these phenomena, martensitic and bainitic transformations have the greatest importance. In the current research, the start temperatures of martensite and bainite of 22MnB5 boron steel have been measured in undeformed and 40% deformed conditions, and in various cooling rates from 0.4 Degree-Sign C/s to 100 Degree-Sign C/s by means of deformation dilatometer. It is concluded that, reduction of cooling rate, could bring about an increase or decrease in M{sub s} and M{sub f}, depending on other phases formation before martensite. Also, hot plastic deformation, hindered the martensitic transformation and decreased M{sub f} and M{sub s} especially at lower cooling rates, while B{sub s} increased. Furthermore, the critical cooling rate, increased about 40 Degree-Sign C/s by applying 40% hot plastic deformation.

  17. Implications for Metallographic Cooling Rates, Derived from Fine-Scale Analytical Traverses Across Kamacite, Taenite, and Tetrataenite in the Butler Iron Meteorite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. H.; Ross, D. K.; Chabot, N. L.; Keller, L. P.

    2016-01-01

    The "M-shaped" Ni concentrations across Widmanstatten patterns in iron meteorites, mesosiderites, and ordinary chondrites are commonly used to calculate cooling rates. As Ni-poor kamacite exolves from Ni-rich taenite, Ni concentrations build up at the kamacite-taenite interface because of the sluggish diffusivity of Ni. Quantitative knowledge of experimentally-determined Ni diffusivities, coupled with the shape of the M-profile, have been used to allow calculation of cooling rates that pertained at low temperatures, less than or equal to 500 C. However, determining Ni metallographic cooling rates are challenging, due to the sluggish diffusivity of Ni at low temperatures. There are three potential difficulties in using Ni cooling rates at low temperatures: (i) Ni diffusivities are typically extrapolated from higher-temperature measurements; (ii) Phase changes occur at low temperatures that may be difficult to take into account; and (iii) It appears that Ge in kamacite and taenite has continued to equilibrate (or attempted to equilibrate) at temperatures below those that formed the M-shaped Ni profile. Combining Ni measurements with those of other elements has the potential to provide a way to confirm or challenge Ni-determined cooling rates, as well as provide insight into the partitioning behaviors of elements during the cooling of iron meteorites. Despite these benefits, studies that examine elemental profiles of Ni along with other elements in iron meteorites are limited, often due to the low concentration levels of the other elements and associated analytical challenges. The Butler iron meteorite provides a good opportunity to conduct a multi-element analytical study, due to the higher concentration levels of key elements in addition to Fe and Ni. In this work, we perform combined analysis for six elements in the Butler iron to determine the relative behaviors of these elements during the evolution of iron meteorites, with implications for metallographic cooling

  18. Influence of Cooling on the Glycolysis Rate and Development of PSE (Pale, Soft, Exudative) Meat

    OpenAIRE

    Mayka Reghiany Pedrão; Talita Kato; Adriana Lourenço Soares; Elza Iouko Ida; Fábio Augusto Garcia Coró; Moises Grespan; Fernanda Paião; Massami Shimokomaki

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate pH values fall rate in chicken breast meat under commercial refrigeration processing conditions and the development of PSE (pale, soft, exudative) meat. Broiler breast samples from the Cobb breed, both genders, at 47 days of age (n = 100) were taken from refrigerated carcasses (RS) immersed in water and ice in a tank chilled at 0°C (±2). pH and temperature (T) values were recorded at several periods throughout refrigeration in comparison to samples left at...

  19. Giant increase in cross-magnetic-field transport rate as an electron-positron plasma cools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, F. F.; Ordonez, C. A.

    2017-10-01

    An electron-positron plasma in thermal equilibrium within a uniform magnetic field is studied using a classical trajectory Monte Carlo simulation. The cross-magnetic-field single-particle diffusion coefficient is evaluated as a function of the magnetic field strength and plasma temperature. The transport rate is found to increase by many orders of magnitude as the plasma temperature is lowered, for a magnetic field strength of 1 T. The sharp dependence on temperature is due to electrons and positrons becoming temporarily correlated and drifting across the magnetic field before dissociating.

  20. High-Rate Capable Floating Strip Micromegas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bender, Michael; Biebel, Otmar; Danger, Helge; Flierl, Bernhard; Hertenberger, Ralf; Lösel, Philipp; Moll, Samuel; Parodi, Katia; Rinaldi, Ilaria; Ruschke, Alexander; Zibell, André

    2016-04-01

    We report on the optimization of discharge insensitive floating strip Micromegas (MICRO-MEsh GASeous) detectors, fit for use in high-energy muon spectrometers. The suitability of these detectors for particle tracking is shown in high-background environments and at very high particle fluxes up to 60 MHz/cm2. Measurement and simulation of the microscopic discharge behavior have demonstrated the excellent discharge tolerance. A floating strip Micromegas with an active area of 48 cm × 50 cm with 1920 copper anode strips exhibits in 120 GeV pion beams a spatial resolution of 50 μm at detection efficiencies above 95%. Pulse height, spatial resolution and detection efficiency are homogeneous over the detector. Reconstruction of particle track inclination in a single detector plane is discussed, optimum angular resolutions below 5° are observed. Systematic deviations of this μTPC-method are fully understood. The reconstruction capabilities for minimum ionizing muons are investigated in a 6.4 cm × 6.4 cm floating strip Micromegas under intense background irradiation of the whole active area with 20 MeV protons at a rate of 550 kHz. The spatial resolution for muons is not distorted by space charge effects. A 6.4 cm × 6.4 cm floating strip Micromegas doublet with low material budget is investigated in highly ionizing proton and carbon ion beams at particle rates between 2 MHz and 2 GHz. Stable operation up to the highest rates is observed, spatial resolution, detection efficiencies, the multi-hit and high-rate capability are discussed.

  1. Design of Helium Brayton Cycle for Small Modular High Temperature Gas cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Yoon Han; Lee, Je Kyoung; Lee, Jeong Ik [Korea Advanced Institue of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The small modular reactor (SMR) is gaining a lot of interest recently. Not only it can achieve better passive safety, but also it can be potentially utilized for the diverse applications to respond to the increasing global energy demands. As a part of the SMR development effort, SM-HTGR (Small Modular-High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor), a 20MWth reactor is under development by the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) for the complete passive safety, desalination and industrial process heat application. The Helium Brayton cycle is considered as a promising candidate for the SM-HTGR power conversion. The advantages of Helium Brayton cycles are: 1) helium is an inert gas that does not interact with structure material. 2) helium is chemically stable that helium Brayton cycle can be utilized under the high temperature circumstance. 3) higher thermal efficiency is achievable under higher outlet temperature range. Moreover, high temperature advantage can be utilized (reinforced) by diverting part of the heat for industrial process heat. This paper will discuss the progress on the helium power conversion cycle operating condition optimization by studying the sensitivity of the maximum pressure, pressure ratio and the component cooling on the total cycle efficiency

  2. Water-cooled hard-soldered kilowatt laser diode arrays operating at high duty cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumel, Genady; Karni, Yoram; Oppenhaim, Jacob; Berk, Yuri; Shamay, Moshe; Tessler, Renana; Cohen, Shalom; Risemberg, Shlomo

    2010-04-01

    High brightness laser diode arrays are increasingly found in defense applications either as efficient optical pumps or as direct energy sources. In many instances, duty cycles of 10- 20 % are required, together with precise optical collimation. System requirements are not always compatible with the use of microchannel based cooling, notwithstanding their remarkable efficiency. Simpler but effective solutions, which will not involve high fluid pressure drops as well as deionized water, are needed. The designer is faced with a number of challenges: effective heat removal, minimization of the built- in and operational stresses as well as precise and accurate fast axis collimation. In this article, we report on a novel laser diode array which includes an integral tap water cooling system. Robustness is achieved by all around hard solder bonding of passivated 940nm laser bars. Far field mapping of the beam, after accurate fast axis collimation will be presented. It will be shown that the design of water cooling channels , proper selection of package materials, careful design of fatigue sensitive parts and active collimation technique allow for long life time and reliability, while not compromising the laser diode array efficiency, optical power density ,brightness and compactness. Main performance characteristics are 150W/bar peak optical power, 10% duty cycle and more than 50% wall plug efficiency with less than 1° fast axis divergence. Lifetime of 0.5 Gshots with less than 10% power degradation has been proved. Additionally, the devices have successfully survived harsh environmental conditions such as thermal cycling of the coolant temperature and mechanical shocks.

  3. Dynamic behavior of radiant cooling system based on capillary tubes in walls made of high performance concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikeska, Tomás; Svendsen, Svend

    2015-01-01

    using cooling water for the radiant cooling system with a temperature only about 4K lower than the temperature of the room air. The relatively high speed reaction of the designed system is a result of the slim construction of the sandwich wall elements made of high performance concrete. (C) 2015...... the small amount of fresh air required by standards to provide a healthy indoor environment.This paper reports on experimental analyses evaluating the dynamic behavior of a test room equipped with a radiant cooling system composed of plastic capillary tubes integrated into the inner layer of sandwich wall...... elements made of high performance concrete. The influence of the radiant cooling system on the indoor climate of the test room in terms of the air, surface and operative temperatures and velocities was investigated.The results show that the temperature of the room air can be kept in a comfortable range...

  4. Development of Modular Spray-Cooled Assemblies for High Heat Fluxes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA SBIR project will develop modular spray-cooled assemblies that satisfy NASA power and mass budgets and can be scaled to cool multiple heat sources...

  5. Effect of Ultra-Fast Cooling on Microstructure and Properties of High Strength Steel for Shipbuilding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cheng; Ye, Qibin; Yan, Ling

    The effect of ultra-fast cooling(UFC) and conventional accelerated cooling(AcC) on the mechanical properties and microstructure of controlled rolled AH32 grade steel plates on industrial scale were compared using tensile test, Charpy impact test, welding thermal simulation, and microscopic analysis. The results show that the properties of the plate produced by UFC are improved considerably comparing to that by AcC. The yield strength is increased with 54 MPa without deterioration in the ductility and the impact energy is improved to more than 260 J at -60 °C with much lower ductile-to-brittle transition temperature(DBTT). The ferrite grain size is refined to ASTM No. 11.5 in the UFC steel with uniform microstructure throughout the thickness direction, while that of the AcC steel is ASTM No. 9.5. The analysis of nucleation kinetics of α-ferrite indicates that the microstructure is refined due to the increased nucleation rate of α-ferrite by much lower γ→α transition temperature through the UFC process. The Hall-Petch effect is quantified for the improvement of the strength and toughness of the UFC steel attributed to the grain refinement.

  6. High Strain Rate and Shock-Induced Deformation in Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravelo, Ramon

    2012-02-01

    Large-scale non-equilibrium molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are now commonly used to study material deformation at high strain rates (10^9-10^12 s-1). They can provide detailed information-- such as defect morphology, dislocation densities, and temperature and stress profiles, unavailable or hard to measure experimentally. Computational studies of shock-induced plasticity and melting in fcc and bcc single, mono-crystal metals, exhibit generic characteristics: high elastic limits, large directional anisotropies in the yield stress and pre-melting much below the equilibrium melt temperature for shock wave propagation along specific crystallographic directions. These generic features in the response of single crystals subjected to high strain rates of deformation can be explained from the changes in the energy landscape of the uniaxially compressed crystal lattice. For time scales relevant to dynamic shock loading, the directional-dependence of the yield strength in single crystals is shown to be due to the onset of instabilities in elastic-wave propagation velocities. The elastic-plastic transition threshold can accurately be predicted by a wave-propagation stability analysis. These strain-induced instabilities create incipient defect structures, which can be quite different from the ones, which characterize the long-time, asymptotic state of the compressed solid. With increase compression and strain rate, plastic deformation via extended defects gives way to amorphization associated with the loss in shear rigidity along specific deformation paths. The hot amorphous or (super-cooled liquid) metal re-crystallizes at rates, which depend on the temperature difference between the amorphous solid and the equilibrium melt line. This plastic-amorphous transition threshold can be computed from shear-waves stability analyses. Examples from selected fcc and bcc metals will be presented employing semi-empirical potentials of the embedded atom method (EAM) type as well as

  7. Durability of high-albedo roof coatings and implications for cooling energy savings. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bretz, S.E.; Akbari, H.

    1994-06-01

    Twenty-six spot albedo measurements of roofs were made using a calibrated pyranometer. The roofs were surfaced with either an acrylic elastomeric coating, a polymer coating with an acrylic base, or a cementitious coating. Some of the roofs` albedos were measured before and after washing to determine whether the albedo decrease was permanent. Data indicated that most of the albedo degradation occurred within the first year, and even within the first two months. On one roof, 70% of one year`s albedo degradation occurred in the first two months. After the first year, the degradation slowed, with data indicating small losses in albedo after the second year. Measurements of seasonal cooling energy savings by Akbari et al. (1993) included the effects of over two months of albedo degradation. We estimated {approximately}20% loss in cooling-energy savings after the first year because of dirt accumulation. For most of the roofs we cleaned, the albedo was restored to within 90% of its initial value. Although washing is effective at restoring albedo, the increase in energy savings is temporary and labor costs are significant in comparison to savings. By our calculations, it is not cost-effective to hire someone to clean a high-albedo roof only to achieve energy savings. Thus, it would be useful to develop and identify dirt-resistant high-albedo coatings.

  8. Preliminary Neutronic Study of D2O-cooled High Conversion PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a preliminary neutronics analysis of tight-pitch D2O-cooled high-conversion PWRs loaded with MOX fuel aiming at high Pu conversion and negative void coefficient. SCALE6.1 has been exclusively utilized for this study. The analyses are performed in two separate parts. The first part of this paper investigates the performance of axial and internal blankets and seeks break-even or near-breeder core even without the presence of radial blankets. The second part of this paper performs sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of integral parameters (keff and void coefficient) for selected systems in order to analyze the characters of this high-conversion PWR from different aspects.

  9. THATCH: A computer code for modelling thermal networks of high- temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroeger, P.G.; Kennett, R.J.; Colman, J.; Ginsberg, T. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1991-10-01

    This report documents the THATCH code, which can be used to model general thermal and flow networks of solids and coolant channels in two-dimensional r-z geometries. The main application of THATCH is to model reactor thermo-hydraulic transients in High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs). The available modules simulate pressurized or depressurized core heatup transients, heat transfer to general exterior sinks or to specific passive Reactor Cavity Cooling Systems, which can be air or water-cooled. Graphite oxidation during air or water ingress can be modelled, including the effects of added combustion products to the gas flow and the additional chemical energy release. A point kinetics model is available for analyzing reactivity excursions; for instance due to water ingress, and also for hypothetical no-scram scenarios. For most HTGR transients, which generally range over hours, a user-selected nodalization of the core in r-z geometry is used. However, a separate model of heat transfer in the symmetry element of each fuel element is also available for very rapid transients. This model can be applied coupled to the traditional coarser r-z nodalization. This report described the mathematical models used in the code and the method of solution. It describes the code and its various sub-elements. Details of the input data and file usage, with file formats, is given for the code, as well as for several preprocessing and postprocessing options. The THATCH model of the currently applicable 350 MW{sub th} reactor is described. Input data for four sample cases are given with output available in fiche form. Installation requirements and code limitations, as well as the most common error indications are listed. 31 refs., 23 figs., 32 tabs.

  10. Theoretical prediction of the effect of heat transfer parameters on cooling rates of liquid-filled plastic straws used for cryopreservation of spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansinen, M; Santos, M V; Zaritzky, N; Baez, R; Chirife, J

    2010-01-01

    Heat transfer plays a key role in cryopreservation of liquid semen in plastic straws. The effect of several parameters on the cooling rate of a liquid-filled polypropylene straw when plunged into liquid nitrogen was investigated using a theoretical model. The geometry of the straw containing the liquid was assimilated as two concentric finite cylinders of different materials: the fluid and the straw; the unsteady-state heat conduction equation for concentric cylinders was numerically solved. Parameters studied include external (convection) heat transfer coefficient (h), the thermal properties of straw manufacturing material and wall thickness. It was concluded that the single most important parameter affecting the cooling rate of a liquid column contained in a straw is the external heat transfer coefficient in LN2. Consequently, in order to attain maximum cooling rates, conditions have to be designed to obtain the highest possible heat transfer coefficient when the plastic straw is plunged in liquid nitrogen.

  11. Thermophoretically enhanced mass transport rates to solid and transpiration-cooled walls across turbulent (law-of-the-wall) boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, Suleyman A.; Rosner, Daniel E.

    1985-01-01

    Convective-diffusion mass transfer rate predictions are made for both solid wall and transpiration-cooled 'law-of-the-wall' nonisothermal turbulent boundary layers (TBLs), including the mechanism of thermophoresis, i.e., small particle mass transport 'down a temperature gradient'. The present calculations are confined to low mass-loading situations but span the entire particle size range from vapor molecules to particles near the onset of inertial ('eddy') impaction. It is shown that, when Sc is much greater than 1, thermophoresis greatly increases particle deposition rates to internally cooled solid walls, but only partially offsets the appreciable reduction in deposition rates associated with dust-free gas-transpiration-cooled surfaces. Thus, efficient particle sampling from hot dusty gases can be carried out using transpiration 'shielded' probe surfaces.

  12. High strain rate deformation of layered nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Hwang; Veysset, David; Singer, Jonathan P.; Retsch, Markus; Saini, Gagan; Pezeril, Thomas; Nelson, Keith A.; Thomas, Edwin L.

    2012-11-01

    Insight into the mechanical behaviour of nanomaterials under the extreme condition of very high deformation rates and to very large strains is needed to provide improved understanding for the development of new protective materials. Applications include protection against bullets for body armour, micrometeorites for satellites, and high-speed particle impact for jet engine turbine blades. Here we use a microscopic ballistic test to report the responses of periodic glassy-rubbery layered block-copolymer nanostructures to impact from hypervelocity micron-sized silica spheres. Entire deformation fields are experimentally visualized at an exceptionally high resolution (below 10 nm) and we discover how the microstructure dissipates the impact energy via layer kinking, layer compression, extreme chain conformational flattening, domain fragmentation and segmental mixing to form a liquid phase. Orientation-dependent experiments show that the dissipation can be enhanced by 30% by proper orientation of the layers.

  13. Application of Gamma code coupled with turbomachinery models for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Oh

    2008-02-01

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 9000C and operational fuel temperatures above 12500C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR’s higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of a toxic gas, CO, and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. GAMMA code is being developed to implement turbomachinery models in the power conversion unit (PCU) and ultimately models associated with the hydrogen plant. Some preliminary results will be described in this paper.

  14. Critical evaluation of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors applicable to coal conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiewak, I.; Jones, J.E. Jr.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; DeStefano, J.R.; Delene, J.G.

    1975-12-01

    A critical review is presented of the technology and costs of very high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTRs) applicable to nuclear coal conversion. Coal conversion processes suitable for coupling to reactors are described. Vendor concepts of the VHTR are summarized. The materials requirements as a function of process temperature in the range 1400 to 2000/sup 0/F are analyzed. Components, environmental and safety factors, economics and nuclear fuel cycles are reviewed. It is concluded that process heat supply in the range 1400 to 1500/sup 0/F could be developed with a high degree of assurance. Process heat at 1600/sup 0/F would require considerably more materials development. While temperatures up to 2000/sup 0/F appear to be attainable, considerably more research and risk were involved. A demonstration plant would be required as a step in the commercialization of the VHTR.

  15. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Projected Markets and Preliminary Economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Demick

    2011-08-01

    This paper summarizes the potential market for process heat produced by a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), the environmental benefits reduced CO2 emissions will have on these markets, and the typical economics of projects using these applications. It gives examples of HTGR technological applications to industrial processes in the typical co-generation supply of process heat and electricity, the conversion of coal to transportation fuels and chemical process feedstock, and the production of ammonia as a feedstock for the production of ammonia derivatives, including fertilizer. It also demonstrates how uncertainties in capital costs and financial factors affect the economics of HTGR technology by analyzing the use of HTGR technology in the application of HTGR and high temperature steam electrolysis processes to produce hydrogen.

  16. Concept Design for a High Temperature Helium Brayton Cycle with Interstage Heating and Cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vernon, Milton E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pickard, Paul S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The primary metric for the viability of these next generation nuclear power plants will be the cost of generated electricity. One important component in achieving these objectives is the development of power conversion technologies that maximize the electrical power output of these advanced reactors for a given thermal power. More efficient power conversion systems can directly reduce the cost of nuclear generated electricity and therefore advanced power conversion cycle research is an important area of investigation for the Generation IV Program. Brayton cycles using inert or other gas working fluids, have the potential to take advantage of the higher outlet temperature range of Generation IV systems and allow substantial increases in nuclear power conversion efficiency, and potentially reductions in power conversion system capital costs compared to the steam Rankine cycle used in current light water reactors. For the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), Helium Brayton cycles which can operate in the 900 to 950 C range have been the focus of power conversion research. Previous Generation IV studies examined several options for He Brayton cycles that could increase efficiency with acceptable capital cost implications. At these high outlet temperatures, Interstage Heating and Cooling (IHC) was shown to provide significant efficiency improvement (a few to 12%) but required increased system complexity and therefore had potential for increased costs. These scoping studies identified the potential for increased efficiency, but a more detailed analysis of the turbomachinery and heat exchanger sizes and costs was needed to determine whether this approach could be cost effective. The purpose of this study is to examine the turbomachinery and heat exchanger implications of interstage heating and cooling configurations. In general, this analysis illustrates that these engineering considerations introduce new constraints to the design of IHC systems that may require

  17. Experimental verification of corrosive vapor deposition rate theory in high velocity burner rigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokoglu, S. A.; Santoro, G. J.

    1986-01-01

    The ability to predict deposition rates is required to facilitate modelling of high temperature corrosion by fused salt condensates in turbine engines. A corrosive salt vapor deposition theory based on multicomponent chemically frozen boundary layers (CFBL) has been successfully verified by high velocity burner rig experiments. The experiments involved internally air-impingement cooled, both rotating full and stationary segmented cylindrical collectors located in the crossflow of sodium-seeded combustion gases. Excellent agreement is found between the CFBL theory an the experimental measurements for both the absolute amounts of Na2SO4 deposition rates and the behavior of deposition rate with respect to collector temperature, mass flowrate (velocity) and Na concentration.

  18. STEADY-STATE HEAT REJECTION RATES FOR A COAXIAL BOREHOLE HEAT EXCHANGER DURING PASSIVE AND ACTIVE COOLING DETERMINED WITH THE NOVEL STEP THERMAL RESPONSE TEST METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Macenić

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available At three locations in Zagreb, classical and extended thermal response test (TRT was conducted on installed coaxial heat exchangers. With classic TR test, thermogeological properties of the ground and thermal resistance of the borehole were determined at each location. It is seen that thermal conductivity of the ground varies, due to difference in geological profile of the sites. In addition, experimental research of steady-state thermal response step test (SSTRST was carried out to determine heat rejection rates for passive and active cooling in steady state regime. Results showed that heat rejection rate is only between 8-11 W/m, which indicates that coaxial system is not suitable for passive cooling demands. Furthermore, the heat pump in passive cooling mode uses additional plate heat exchanger where there is additional temperature drop of working fluid by approximately 1,5 °C. Therefore, steady-state rejection rate for passive cooling is even lower for a real case project. Coaxial heat exchanger should be always designed for an active cooling regime with an operation of a heat pump compressor in a classical vapour compression refrigeration cycle.

  19. Not cool with cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blain, Barry

    2010-09-01

    I confess that I may have missed the point of Roland Ennos's article "Urban cool" (August pp22-25), which describes methods of cooling cities by mitigating and reversing the effect of solar heating and includes an illustration of "evapotranspiration" in, of all places, Greater Manchester.

  20. Effects of Cooling Fluid Flow Rate on the Critical Heat Flux and Flow Stability in the Plate Fuel Type 2 MW TRIGA Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. P. Rahardjo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The conversion program of the 2 MW TRIGA reactor in Bandung consisted of the replacement of cylindrical fuel (produced by General Atomic with plate fuel (produced by BATAN. The replacement led into the change of core cooling process from upward natural convection type to downward forced convection type, and resulted in different thermohydraulic safety criteria, such as critical heat flux (CHF limit, boiling limit, and cooling fluid flow stability. In this paper, a thermohydraulic safety analysis of the converted TRIGA reactor is presented by considering the Dynamic Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR criterion, Onset Nucleate Boiling Ratio (ONBR limit, and cooling fluid flow stability at various cooling fluid flow rate.The numerical analyses were performed using the HEATHYD program on the hottest channels of reactor core.The combination of heat transfer and fluid flow analysis were conducted for reactor operation at 2 MW with 20 fuel element bundles and four control rod bundles. Incoming fluid flow to the cooling channel was fixed at 44.5 °C temperature and 1.9970 bar pressure, and its flow rate was varied from 1.25 to 3.5 m3/h. By inputting these values, as well as the total power of fuel elements per bundle, the wall temperature distribution of the plate fuel element, cooling fluid temperature distribution, and pressure losses in the channels were obtained for the analysis of CHF limit, boiling limit, and flow stability. It was shown that no boiling occurred for the cooling fluid flow rate range of 2.4 to 3.5 m3/h, and even at the cooling fluid flow rate of 1.25 m3/h where some bubbles occurred, the DNBR was higher than the critical limit (more than 23 while the flow stability criterion in some channels were slightly less than 1 (unstable. At the cooling fluid flow rate of 1.4 m3/h, however, the flow became stable in all channel.

  1. Transient heat transfer behavior of water spray evaporative cooling on a stainless steel cylinder with structured surface for safety design application in high temperature scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Hong, Wang; Xun, Zhu; Song, Sihong; Sajid, Muhammad

    2017-02-01

    High heat transfer performance of spray cooling on structured surface might be an additional measure to increase the safety of an installation against any threat caused by rapid increase in the temperature. The purpose of present experimental study is to explore heat transfer performance of structured surface under different spray conditions and surface temperatures. Two cylindrical stainless steel samples were used, one with pyramid pins structured surface and other with smooth surface. Surface heat flux of 3.60, 3.46, 3.93 and 4.91 MW/m2 are estimated for sample initial average temperature of 600, 700, 800 and 900 °C, respectively for an inlet pressure of 1.0 MPa. A maximum cooling rate of 507 °C/s was estimated for an inlet pressure of 0.7 MPa at 900 °C for structured surface while for smooth surface maximum cooling rate of 356 °C/s was attained at 1.0 MPa for 700 °C. Structured surface performed better to exchange heat during spray cooling at initial sample temperature of 900 °C with a relative increase in surface heat flux by factor of 1.9, 1.56, 1.66 and 1.74 relative to smooth surface, for inlet pressure of 0.4, 0.7, 1.0 and 1.3 MPa, respectively. For smooth surface, a decreasing trend in estimated heat flux is observed, when initial sample temperature was increased from 600 to 900 °C. Temperature-based function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Limited published work is available about the application of structured surface spray cooling techniques for safety of stainless steel structures at very high temperature scenario such as nuclear safety vessel and liquid natural gas storage tanks.

  2. The development of high cooling power and low ultimate temperature superfluid Stirling refrigerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Ashok B.

    The superfluid Stirling refrigerator (SSR) is a recuperative Stirling cycle refrigerator which provides cooling to below 2 K by using a liquid 3He-4He mixture as the working fluid. In 1990, Kotsubo and Swift demonstrated the first SSR, and by 1995, Brisson and Swift had developed an experimental prototype capable of reaching a low temperature of 296 mK. The goal of this thesis was to improve these capabilities by developing a better understanding of the SSR and building SSR's with higher cooling powers and lower ultimate temperatures. This thesis contains four main parts. In the first part, a numerical analysis demonstrates that the optimal design and ultimate performance of a recuperative Stirling refrigerator is fundamentally different from that of a standard regenerative Stirling refrigerator due to a mass flow imbalance within the recuperator. The analysis also shows that high efficiency recuperators remain a key to SSR performance. Due to a quantum effect called Kapitza resistance, the only realistic and economical method of creating higher efficiency recuperators for use with an SSR is to construct the heat exchangers from very thin (12 μm - 25 μm thick) plastic films. The second part of this thesis involves the design and construction of these recuperators. This research resulted in Kapton heat exchangers which are leaktight to superfluid helium and capable of surviving repeated thermal cycling. In the third part of this thesis, two different single stage SSR's are operated to test whether the plastic recuperators would actually improve SSR performance. Operating from a high temperature of 1.0 K and with 1.5% and 3.0% 3He-4He mixtures, these SSR's achieved a low temperature of 291 mK and delivered net cooling powers of 3705 μW at 750 mK, 977 μW at 500 mK, and 409 μW at 400 mK. Finally, this thesis describes the operation of three versions of a two stage SSR. Unfortunately, due to experimental difficulties, the merits of a two stage SSR were not

  3. Application of ANFIS for modeling of microhardness of high strength low alloy (HSLA steels in continuous cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Khalaj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some results of the research connected with the development of new approach based on the Adaptive Network-based Fuzzy Inference Systems (ANFIS of predicting the Vickers microhardness of the phase constituents occurring in five steel samples after continuous cooling. The independent variables in the model are chemical compositions, initial austenite grain size and cooling rate over the temperature range of the occurrence of phase transformations. To construct these models, 114 different experimental data were gathered from the literature. The data used in the ANFIS model is arranged in a format of twelve input parameters that cover the chemical compositions, initial austenite grain size and cooling rate, and output parameter which is Vickers microhardness. In this model, the training and testing results in the ANFIS systems have shown strong potential for prediction of effects of chemical compositions and heat treatments on hardness of microalloyed steels.

  4. Comparison of waste heat driven and electrically driven cooling systems for a high ambient temperature, off-grid application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Christopher P.

    Forward army bases in off-grid locations with high temperatures require power and cooling capacity. Each gallon of fuel providing electrical power passes through a complex network, introducing issues of safety and reliability if this network is interrupted. Instead of using an engine and an electrically powered cooling system, a more efficient combined heat and power (CHP) configuration with a smaller engine and LiBr/Water absorption system (AS) powered by waste heat could be used. These two configurations were simulated in both steady state and transient conditions, in ambient temperatures up to 52°C, providing up to 3 kW of non-cooling electricity, and 5.3 kW of cooling. Unlike conventional AS's which crystallize at high temperatures and use bulky cooling towers, the proposed AS's avoid crystallization and have air-cooled HXs for portability. For the hottest transient week, the results showed fuel savings of 34-37%, weight reduction of 11-19%, and a volumetric footprint 3-10% smaller.

  5. High dose rate brachytherapy for oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    YamazakI, Hideya; Yoshida, Ken; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Shimizutani, Kimishige; Furukawa, Souhei; Koizumi, Masahiko; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Brachytherapy results in better dose distribution compared with other treatments because of steep dose reduction in the surrounding normal tissues. Excellent local control rates and acceptable side effects have been demonstrated with brachytherapy as a sole treatment modality, a postoperative method, and a method of reirradiation. Low-dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy has been employed worldwide for its superior outcome. With the advent of technology, high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy has enabled health care providers to avoid radiation exposure. This therapy has been used for treating many types of cancer such as gynecological cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer. However, LDR and pulsed-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapies have been mainstays for head and neck cancer. HDR brachytherapy has not become widely used in the radiotherapy community for treating head and neck cancer because of lack of experience and biological concerns. On the other hand, because HDR brachytherapy is less time-consuming, treatment can occasionally be administered on an outpatient basis. For the convenience and safety of patients and medical staff, HDR brachytherapy should be explored. To enhance the role of this therapy in treatment of head and neck lesions, we have reviewed its outcomes with oral cancer, including Phase I/II to Phase III studies, evaluating this technique in terms of safety and efficacy. In particular, our studies have shown that superficial tumors can be treated using a non-invasive mold technique on an outpatient basis without adverse reactions. The next generation of image-guided brachytherapy using HDR has been discussed. In conclusion, although concrete evidence is yet to be produced with a sophisticated study in a reproducible manner, HDR brachytherapy remains an important option for treatment of oral cancer. PMID:23179377

  6. Near-ground cooling efficacies of trees and high-albedo surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinson, Ronnen Michael [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    Daytime summer urban heat islands arise when the prevalence of dark-colored surfaces and lack of vegetation make a city warmer than neighboring countryside. Two frequentlyproposed summer heat island mitigation measures are to plant trees and to increase the albedo (solar reflectivity) of ground surfaces. This dissertation examines the effects of these measures on the surface temperature of an object near the ground, and on solar heating of air near the ground. Near-ground objects include people, vehicles, and buildings. The variation of the surface temperature of a near-ground object with ground albedo indicates that a rise in ground albedo will cool a near-ground object only if the object’s albedo exceeds a critical value. This critical value of object albedo depends on wind speed, object geometry, and the height of the atmospheric thermal boundary layer. It ranges from 0.15 to 0.37 for a person. If an object has typical albedo of 0.3, increasing the ground albedo by 0.25 perturbs the object’s surface temperature by -1 to +2 K. Comparing a tree’s canopy-to-air convection to the reduction in ground-to-air convection induced by tree shading of the ground indicates that the presence of a tree can either increase or decrease solar heating of ground-level air. The tree’s net effect depends on the extent to which solar heating of the canopy is dissipated by evaporation, and on the fraction of air heated by the canopy that flows downward and mixes with the ground-level air. A two-month lysimeter (plant-weighing) experiment was conducted to measure instantaneous rates of water loss from a tree under various conditions of weather and soil-moisture. Calculations of canopy-to-air convection and the reduction of ground-to-air convection based on this data indicate that canopy-induced heating would negate shadowinduced cooling if approximately 45% of the canopy-heated air mixed with ground level air. This critical fraction is comparable to typical downward mixing

  7. Evaporative Cooling Availability in Water Based Sensible Cooling Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Costelloe, Ben; Finn, Donal

    2001-01-01

    Recent developments have prompted a review of evaporative cooling technology as an effective means of cooling modern deep plan buildings. Prominent among these developments is the success of high temperature sensible cooling systems, such as chilled ceilings, which require a supply of cooling water at 14 to 18°C. Crucial to the success of evaporative cooling technology, as a significant means of cooling in modern applications, is the ability to generate cooling water, in an indirect circuit, ...

  8. High data-rate atom interferometers through high recapture efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Grant; Rakholia, Akash Vrijal; McGuinness, Hayden

    2015-01-27

    An inertial sensing system includes a magneto-optical trap (MOT) that traps atoms within a specified trapping region. The system also includes a cooling laser that cools the trapped atoms so that the atoms remain within the specified region for a specified amount of time. The system further includes a light-pulse atom interferometer (LPAI) that performs an interferometric interrogation of the atoms to determine phase changes in the atoms. The system includes a controller that controls the timing of MOT and cooling laser operations, and controls the timing of interferometric operations to substantially recapture the atoms in the specified trapping region. The system includes a processor that determines the amount inertial movement of the inertial sensing system based on the determined phase changes in the atoms. Also, a method of inertial sensing using this inertial sensing system includes recapture of atoms within the MOT following interferometric interrogation by the LPAI.

  9. Fluoride-Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) for Power and Process Heat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, Charles [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hu, Lin-wen [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Peterson, Per [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-01-21

    In 2011 the U.S. Department of Energy through its Nuclear Energy University Program (NEUP) awarded a 3- year integrated research project (IRP) to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and its partners at the University of California at Berkeley (UCB) and the University of Wisconsin at Madison (UW). The IRP included Westinghouse Electric Company and an advisory panel chaired by Regis Matzie that provided advice as the project progressed. The first sentence of the proposal stated the goals: The objective of this Integrated Research Project (IRP) is to develop a path forward to a commercially viable salt-cooled solid-fuel high-temperature reactor with superior economic, safety, waste, nonproliferation, and physical security characteristics compared to light-water reactors. This report summarizes major results of this research.

  10. Using Wireless Sensor Networks to Achieve Intelligent Monitoring for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghai Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR can incorporate wireless sensor network (WSN technology to improve safety and economic competitiveness. WSN has great potential in monitoring the equipment and processes within nuclear power plants (NPPs. This technology not only reduces the cost of regular monitoring but also enables intelligent monitoring. In intelligent monitoring, large sets of heterogeneous data collected by the WSN can be used to optimize the operation and maintenance of the HTGR. In this paper, WSN-based intelligent monitoring schemes that are specific for applications of HTGR are proposed. Three major concerns regarding wireless technology in HTGR are addressed: wireless devices interference, cybersecurity of wireless networks, and wireless standards selected for wireless platform. To process nonlinear and non-Gaussian data obtained by WSN for fault diagnosis, novel algorithms combining Kernel Entropy Component Analysis (KECA and support vector machine (SVM are developed.

  11. Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor Technology Development and Demonstration Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Pointer, William David [ORNL; Robb, Kevin R [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL

    2013-11-01

    Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactors (FHRs) are an emerging reactor class with potentially advantageous performance characteristics, and fully passive safety. This roadmap describes the principal remaining FHR technology challenges and the development path needed to address the challenges. This roadmap also provides an integrated overview of the current status of the broad set of technologies necessary to design, evaluate, license, construct, operate, and maintain FHRs. First-generation FHRs will not require any technology breakthroughs, but do require significant concept development, system integration, and technology maturation. FHRs are currently entering early phase engineering development. As such, this roadmap is not as technically detailed or specific as would be the case for a more mature reactor class. The higher cost of fuel and coolant, the lack of an approved licensing framework, the lack of qualified, salt-compatible structural materials, and the potential for tritium release into the environment are the most obvious issues that remain to be resolved.

  12. High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) graphite pebble fuel: Review of technologies for reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcwilliams, A. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-08

    This report reviews literature on reprocessing high temperature gas-cooled reactor graphite fuel components. A basic review of the various fuel components used in the pebble bed type reactors is provided along with a survey of synthesis methods for the fabrication of the fuel components. Several disposal options are considered for the graphite pebble fuel elements including the storage of intact pebbles, volume reduction by separating the graphite from fuel kernels, and complete processing of the pebbles for waste storage. Existing methods for graphite removal are presented and generally consist of mechanical separation techniques such as crushing and grinding chemical techniques through the use of acid digestion and oxidation. Potential methods for reprocessing the graphite pebbles include improvements to existing methods and novel technologies that have not previously been investigated for nuclear graphite waste applications. The best overall method will be dependent on the desired final waste form and needs to factor in the technical efficiency, political concerns, cost, and implementation.

  13. Fabrication of cermet bearings for the control system of a high temperature lithium cooled nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacobucci, H. G.; Heestand, R. L.; Kizer, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    The techniques used to fabricate cermet bearings for the fueled control drums of a liquid metal cooled reference-design reactor concept are presented. The bearings were designed for operation in lithium for as long as 5 years at temperatures to 1205 C. Two sets of bearings were fabricated from a hafnium carbide - 8-wt. % molybdenum - 2-wt. % niobium carbide cermet, and two sets were fabricated from a hafnium nitride - 10-wt. % tungsten cermet. Procedures were developed for synthesizing the material in high purity inert-atmosphere glove boxes to minimize oxygen content in order to enhance corrosion resistance. Techniques were developed for pressing cylindrical billets to conserve materials and to reduce machining requirements. Finishing was accomplished by a combination of diamond grinding, electrodischarge machining, and diamond lapping. Samples were characterized in respect to composition, impurity level, lattice parameter, microstructure and density.

  14. Experimental Analysis of Concrete Strength at High Temperatures and after Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Klingsch

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the cement industry has been criticized for emitting large amounts of carbon dioxide; hence it is developing environment-friendly cement, e.g., blended, supersulfated slag cement (SSC. This paper presents an experimental analysis of the compressive strength development of concrete made from blended cement in comparison to ordinary cement at high temperature. Three different types of cement were used during these tests, an ordinary portland cement (CEM I, a portland limestone cement (CEM II-A-LL and a new, supersulfated slag cement (SSC. The compressive strength development for a full thermal cycle, including cooling down phase, was investigated on concrete cylinders. It is shown that the SSC concrete specimens perform similar to ordinary cement specimens. 

  15. Cooling of electrically insulated high voltage electrodes down to 30 mK

    CERN Document Server

    Eisel, T; Burghart, G; Feigl, S; Haug, F; Koettig, T

    2011-01-01

    AEgIS [1] is an antimatter experiment, using high voltage electrodes at 100 mK. In this work two possible principles to cool these electrodes with a dilution refrigerator are described: the Rod and the Sandwich. The metallic Rod is electrically insulated by a ceramic and connects a single electrode directly with a heat exchanger placed in the mixing chamber. The Sandwich consists of an elec-trically insulating sapphire plate, at both sides covered with indium. The total thermal resistivities of the Rod and of different Sandwich samples are measured between (30 and 130) mK. The lowest resistivity of the Sandwich is achieved with indium vapour deposited on polished sapphire (26 cm2K4/W at 30 mK). The resistivity of the Rod is significantly lower (0.5 cm2K4/W at 30 mK).

  16. Cool roofs with high solar reflectance for the welfare of dairy farming animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santunione, G.; Libbra, A.; Muscio, A.

    2017-01-01

    Ensuring livestock welfare in dairy farming promotes the production capacity of the animals in terms of both quantity and quality. In welfare conditions, the animals can produce at their full potential. For the dairy cattle the most debilitating period of the year is summer, when the stress arising from overheating induces physiological alterations that compromise the animals’ productivity. In this study, the summer discomfort of dairy animals is primarily quantified and the production loss is quantified versus the Temperature Humidity Index (THI), which correlates the values of temperature and relative humidity to the thermal stress. In order to reduce or eliminate such thermal stress, it is then proposed to coat the roof of the stables with a paint having high solar reflectance and thermal emittance, that is a cool roof product. This type of roofing solution can considerably limit the overheating of stables caused by solar radiation, thus providing a positive impact on the animals’ welfare and improving significantly their productivity in summer.

  17. High-energy, high-rate materials processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, H. L.; Bourell, D. L.; Eliezer, Z.; Persad, C.; Weldon, W.

    1987-12-01

    The increasingly available range of pulsed-power, high energy kinetic storage devices, such as low-inductance pulse-forming networks, compulsators, and homopolar generators, is presently considered as a basis for industrial high energy/high rate (HEHR) processing to accomplish shock hardening, drilling, rapid surface alloying and melting, welding and cutting, transformation hardening, and cladding and surface melting in metallic materials. Time-temperature-transformation concepts furnish the basis for a fundamental understanding of the potential advantages of this direct pulsed power processing. Attention is given to the HEHR processing of a refractory molybdenum alloy, a nickel-base metallic glass, tungsten, titanium aluminides, and metal-matrix composites.

  18. Turbine airfoil with an internal cooling system having vortex forming turbulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Pang

    2014-12-30

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and having at least one cooling system is disclosed. At least a portion of the cooling system may include one or more cooling channels having a plurality of turbulators protruding from an inner surface and positioned generally nonorthogonal and nonparallel to a longitudinal axis of the airfoil cooling channel. The configuration of turbulators may create a higher internal convective cooling potential for the blade cooling passage, thereby generating a high rate of internal convective heat transfer and attendant improvement in overall cooling performance. This translates into a reduction in cooling fluid demand and better turbine performance.

  19. Potential of shading devices and glazing configurations on cooling energy savings for high-rise office buildings in hot-humid climates: The case of Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Khin Kiet Lau

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Rapid growing of energy use has raised critical concerns over energy supply difficulties and negative environmental impacts globally and among ASEAN countries. Malaysia is experiencing a high average annual energy demand growth rate of approximately 2.3% which large portion of that energy is used by office buildings. Under the hot-humid climatic conditions in Malaysia, high-rise office buildings with large or fully glazed façades are facing a major problem of overheating due to high solar radiation through the glazed façades. This has caused high cooling energy requirements. The aim of this study is to investigate the potential of three types of shading devices on cooling energy savings when applied at different façade orientations. The aim also extends to investigations on different cooling energy savings when shading devices are applied on façade glazing with different configurations and thermal performances. This was done through a case study of a high-rise office building in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia using IES (VE building thermal simulation software. Twenty simulation building models were applied with different shading devices at different façade orientations and with high and low performance façade glazing. The simulation results indicate that high-rise office buildings in Malaysia use approximately 45.9% of total building energy for cooling purposes. The results also suggest that use of various shading devices on low-e double glazed façades will result between 1.0% and 3.4% annual cooling energy savings, depending on the types of shading devices and façade orientations. The estimated annual cooling energy savings increase to between 5.0% and 9.9% when the shading devices are applied to all orientations of low-e double glazed façades. The estimated annual cooling energy savings further increase to between 5.6% and 10.4% when the façade glazing is replaced by single clear glazing. This study recommends prioritizing shading devices on

  20. Depletion Analysis of Modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor Loaded with LEU/Thorium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonat Sen; Gilles Youinou

    2013-02-01

    Thorium based fuel has been considered as an option to uranium-based fuel, based on considerations of resource utilization (Thorium is more widely available when compared to Uranium). The fertile isotope of Thorium (Th-232) can be converted to fissile isotope U-233 by neutron capture during the operation of a suitable nuclear reactor such as High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR). However, the fertile Thorium needs a fissile supporter to start and maintain the conversion process such as U-235 or Pu-239. This report presents the results of a study that analyzed the thorium utilization in a prismatic HTGR, namely Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) that was designed by General Atomics (GA). The collected for the modeling of this design come from Chapter 4 of MHTGR Preliminary Safety Information Document that GA sent to Department of Energy (DOE) on 1995. Both full core and unit cell models were used to perform this analysis using SCALE 6.1 and Serpent 1.1.18. Because of the long mean free paths (and migration lengths) of neutrons in HTRs, using a unit cell to represent a whole core can be non-trivial. The sizes of these cells were set to match the spectral index between unit cell and full core domains. It was found that for the purposes of this study an adjusted unit cell model is adequate. Discharge isotopics and one-group cross-sections were delivered to the transmutation analysis team. This report provides documentation for these calculations

  1. Effect of cooling condition on chemical vapor deposition synthesis of graphene on copper catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dong Soo; Kim, Keun Soo; Kim, Hyeongkeun; Kim, Yena; Kim, TaeYoung; Rhy, Se-hyun; Yang, Cheol-Min; Yoon, Dae Ho; Yang, Woo Seok

    2014-11-26

    Here, we show that chemical vapor deposition growth of graphene on copper foil is strongly affected by the cooling conditions. Variation of cooling conditions such as cooling rate and hydrocarbon concentration in the cooling step has yielded graphene islands with different sizes, density of nuclei, and growth rates. The nucleation site density on Cu substrate is greatly reduced when the fast cooling condition was applied, while continuing methane flow during the cooling step also influences the nucleation and growth rate. Raman spectra indicate that the graphene synthesized under fast cooling condition and methane flow on cool-down exhibit superior quality of graphene. Further studies suggest that careful control of the cooling rate and CH4 gas flow on the cooling step yield a high quality of graphene.

  2. Gender-specific cold responses induce a similar body-cooling rate but different neuroendocrine and immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solianik, Rima; Skurvydas, Albertas; Vitkauskienė, Astra; Brazaitis, Marius

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated whether there are any gender differences in body-heating strategies during cold stress and whether the immune and neuroendocrine responses to physiological stress differ between men and women. Thirty-two participants (18 men and 14 women) were exposed to acute cold stress by immersion to the manubrium level in 14 °C water. The cold stress continued until rectal temperature (TRE) reached 35.5 °C or for a maximum of 170 min. The responses to cold stress of various indicators of body temperature, insulation, metabolism, shivering, stress, and endocrine and immune function were compared between men and women. During cold stress, TRE and muscle and mean skin temperatures decreased in all subjects (Pcold strain did not differ between men and women, but men exhibited larger changes in the indicators of neuroendocrine (epinephrine level) and in immune (tumor necrosis factor-α level) responses (both Pcold stress, whereas women exhibited a greater insulative response. Despite the similar experience of cold strain in men and women, the neuroendocrine and immune responses were larger in men. Contrary to our expectations, the cooling rate was similar in men and women. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Particle-in-cell studies of fast-ion slowing-down rates in cool tenuous magnetized plasma using LSP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Eugene S.; Kolmes, Elijah; Cohen, Samuel A.; Welch, Dale R.; Rognlien, Tom; Cohen, Bruce; Meier, Eric

    2017-10-01

    We present particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of fast-ion slowing down rates in cool, weakly-magnetized plasma (where ρe vth , e) using the fully electromagnetic PIC code LSP. These simulations use explicit algorithms, resolving ρe and λDe spatially and the electron cyclotron and plasma frequencies temporally. Scaling studies of the slowing-down time, τsd, versus fast-ion charge and background plasma density are in good agreement with unmagnetized slowing-down theory; a small anisotropy is observed between τsd in the perpendicular- and parallel-field directions. Furthermore, scaling of the fast-ion charge is confirmed as a viable way to reduce the required computational time for each simulation. The implications of slowing down processes in this regime are described for one magnetic-confinement fusion concept, the small field-reversed configuration device. This work was supported, in part, by DOE Contract Number DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  4. Operation of high rate microstrip gas chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Barr, A J; Bouclier, Roger; Capéans-Garrido, M; Dominik, Wojciech; Manzin, G; Million, Gilbert; Hoch, M; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sauli, Fabio; Sharma, A

    1996-01-01

    We describe recent measurements carried out in well controlled and reproducible conditions to help understanding the factors affecting the short and long term behaviour of Microstrip Gas Chambers. Special care has been taken concerning the gas purity and choice of materials used in the system and for the detectors construction. Detectors built on glasses with surface resistivity in the range $10^{13}-10^{15} \\Omega/\\Box$ have shown satisfactory performance as they do not show charging-up process at high rate and stand the large doses required for the future high luminosity experiments (~10 mC·cm-1·yr-1). Concerning the lifetime measurements, it has been observed that chambers manufactured on high-resistivity glass are far more susceptible of suffering ageing than detectors made on low resistivity, electron-conducting supports, independently of the metal used for the artwork (chromium or gold) at least in clean gas conditions. The successfully operation in the laboratory of detectors manufactured on diamond-...

  5. Pebble Fuel Handling and Reactivity Control for Salt-Cooled High Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Per [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Greenspan, Ehud [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2015-02-09

    This report documents the work completed on the X-PREX facility under NEUP Project 11- 3172. This project seeks to demonstrate the viability of pebble fuel handling and reactivity control for fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactors (FHRs). The research results also improve the understanding of pebble motion in helium-cooled reactors, as well as the general, fundamental understanding of low-velocity granular flows. Successful use of pebble fuels in with salt coolants would bring major benefits for high-temperature reactor technology. Pebble fuels enable on-line refueling and operation with low excess reactivity, and thus simpler reactivity control and improved fuel utilization. If fixed fuel designs are used, the power density of salt- cooled reactors is limited to 10 MW/m3 to obtain adequate duration between refueling, but pebble fuels allow power densities in the range of 20 to 30 MW/m3. This can be compared to the typical modular helium reactor power density of 5 MW/m3. Pebble fuels also permit radial zoning in annular cores and use of thorium or graphite pebble blankets to reduce neutron fluences to outer radial reflectors and increase total power production. Combined with high power conversion efficiency, compact low-pressure primary and containment systems, and unique safety characteristics including very large thermal margins (>500°C) to fuel damage during transients and accidents, salt-cooled pebble fuel cores offer the potential to meet the major goals of the Advanced Reactor Concepts Development program to provide electricity at lower cost than light water reactors with improved safety and system performance.This report presents the facility description, experimental results, and supporting simulation methods of the new X-Ray Pebble Recirculation Experiment (X-PREX), which is now operational and being used to collect data on the behavior of slow dense granular flows relevant to pebble bed reactor core designs. The X

  6. Effects of different casting mould cooling rates on microstructure and properties of sand-cast Al-7.5Si-4Cu alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Guanglei

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, Al-7.5Si-4Cu alloy melt modified by Al-10Sr, RE and Al-5Ti-B master alloys was poured into multi-step moulds made from three moulding sands, including quartz, alumina and chromite, to investigate comparatively the effects of different cooling rates of the casting mould on the alloy's microstructures and mechanical properties. The results show that with an increase in wall thickness, the cooling rate decreases, the dendrite arm spacing (DAS increases significantly and the mechanical properties decrease steadily. The elongation is more sensitive to the cooling rate than the tensile strength. No obvious trend of the effect of wall thickness on hardness of the alloy was found. When the cooling rate is at its greatest, the microstructures and mechanical properties are the best when using chromite sand. The improvement of the properties is mainly attributed to the decrease of the DAS, the grain refinement and the metamorphic effect. Each of the three has a strong impact on the microstructures. Furthermore, a series of fitting models was established based on the data of the DAS to predict the mechanical properties of the multivariate sand-cast Al-7.5Si-4Cu alloy.

  7. Efficient ground-state cooling of an ion in a large room-temperature linear Paul trap with a sub-Hertz heating rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Gregers; Miroshnychenko, Yevhen; Drewsen, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate efficient resolved sideband laser cooling (99±1% ground-state population) of a single 40Ca+ ion in a large linear Paul trap (electrode spacing of 7 mm) operated at an rf drive frequency of just 3.7 MHz. For ion oscillation frequencies in the range 280–585 kHz, heating rates below o...

  8. Influence of cooling rate on growth of Bacillus cereus from spore inocula in cooked rice, beans, pasta, and combination products containing meat or poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to assess the ability of B. cereus spores to germinate and grow in order to determine a safe cooling rate for cooked rice, beans, and pasta, rice/chicken (4:1), rice/chicken/vegetables (3:1:1), rice/beef (4:1), and rice/beef/vegetables (3:1:1). Samples were inoculate...

  9. Experimental Investigation on Thermoresistance between AlN, Bi-2223 and OFHC in High Tc- Direct Cooling Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H. L.; Rao, R. S.; Wang, J.

    2014-12-01

    In the development of high temperature superconducting (HTS) direct cooling technology, the high electric insulation high heat conducting AlN has become one of the important components. The thermal contact resistance between AlN, Bi-2223 and OFHC is investigated by experiment with a G-M cryocooler as the source of cooling. The heat conductivity of AlN is measured between 29 and 160 K temperatures. When the temperature on the interface layer side of Bi-2223 is 55 K, under the action of the contact pressure of 0.5469 MPa, the thermal contact resistance between AlN and Bi-2223 is 38.86 times to the thermal conduction resistance of a 10 mm thick AlN pad. Baced on micro-nanocryogenics, it is proposed that the thermal contact resistance is one of the crucial techniques to be attacked in HTS direct cooling technology.

  10. Shocks and Cool Cores: An ALMA View of Massive Galaxy Cluster Formation at High Redshifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Kaustuv

    2017-07-01

    These slides present some recent results on the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect imaging of galaxy cluster substructures. The advantage of SZ imaging at high redshifts or in the low density cluster outskirts is already well-known. Now with ALMA a combination of superior angular resolution and high sensitivity is available. One example is the first ALMA measurement of a merger shock at z=0.9 in the famous El Gordo galaxy cluster. Here comparison between SZ, X-ray and radio data enabled us to put constraints on the shock Mach number and magnetic field strength for a high-z radio relic. Second example is the ALMA SZ imaging of the core region of z=1.4 galaxy cluster XMMU J2235.2-2557. Here ALMA data provide an accurate measurement of the thermal pressure near the cluster center, and from a joint SZ/X-ray analysis we find clear evidence for a reduced core temperature. This result indicate that a cool core establishes itself early enough in the cluster formation history while the gas accumulation is still continuing. The above two ALMA measurements are among several other recent SZ results that shed light on the formation process of massive clusters at high redshifts.

  11. Transport studies of high-Z elements in neon edge radiation cooled discharges in TEXTOR-94

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapp, J.; Tokar, M. Z.; Konen, L.; Koslowski, H. R.; Bertschinger, G.; Brix, M.; Claassen, H.; R. Jaspers,; KramerFlecken, A.; Ohya, K.; Philipps, V.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Samm, U.; Tanabe, T.; Telesca, G.; Unterberg, B.; Van Oost, G.

    1997-01-01

    High-Z materials as tungsten are intended to be used in future fusion reactors due to their low sputtering rates and high melting points. In this context the important question is whether the use of high-Z materials is compatible with the concept of a cold radiative boundary. To investigate the

  12. Upgrade Strategy for ALICE at High Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Musa, L

    2012-01-01

    The longterm goal of the ALICE experiment is to provide a precise characterization of the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP) state. Such a determination of its properties including initial temperature, degrees of freedom, speed of sound, and in general, transport coefficients would be a major achievement. This would go a long way towards a better understanding of QCD as a genuine multi-particle theory. To achieve this goal, high statistics measurements are required, which will give access also to the very rare physics channels needed to understand the dynamics of this condensed phase of QCD. The general upgrade strategy for the ALICE central barrel is conceived to deal with this challenge with expected Pb-Pb interaction rates of up to 50 kHz, that would provide an accumulated sample of the order of 10 nb^-1 in the period 2019-2023. In this document we sketch the modifications/replacements needed in all ALICE central barrel detectors and online systems (Trigger, DAQ and HLT) for high luminosity running. As the ALICE for...

  13. High Data Rate Architecture (HiDRA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hylton, Alan; Raible, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    high-rate laser terminals. These must interface with the existing, aging data infrastructure. The High Data Rate Architecture (HiDRA) project is designed to provide networked store, carry, and forward capability to optimize data flow through both the existing radio frequency (RF) and new laser communications terminal. The networking capability is realized through the Delay Tolerant Networking (DTN) protocol, and is used for scheduling data movement as well as optimizing the performance of existing RF channels. HiDRA is realized as a distributed FPGA memory and interface controller that is itself controlled by a local computer running DTN software. Thus HiDRA is applicable to other arenas seeking to employ next-generation communications technologies, e.g. deep space. In this paper, we describe HiDRA and its far-reaching research implications.

  14. Influence of thrust belt geometry and shortening rate on thermochronometer cooling ages: Insights from thermokinematic and erosion modeling of the Bhutan Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Nadine; Ehlers, Todd A.

    2015-06-01

    Advancements in thermochronology and numerical modeling offer the potential to associate the age of thermochronometric samples to both exhumational and deformational processes. However, understanding how these components are related in compressional systems requires linking the geometry and magnitude of fault slip to the distribution and amount of erosion. To address this, we apply a 2-D thermokinematic model to a forward modeled balanced cross section to quantify the cooling history in fold-thrust belt settings. The restored cross section provides a kinematic path of rocks and structures necessary to reproduce the surface geology. By assigning ages to displacement amounts, we produced a range of potential velocity vectors used to calculate heat transport, erosion, and rock cooling. We test the predicted ages against a suite of previously published thermochronometric data from the Bhutan Himalaya to explore the utility of the data to constrain the timing, rate, and geometry of fault motion as well as variations in the exhumation rate. We evaluate the cooling history associated with a constant rate of shortening of 18 mm/yr, rates that are 2.0, 1.5, 0.75, and 0.5 times the constant rate, and rates that vary with time to determine which kinematic history best matches the measured cooling ages. The combination of relatively old apatite fission track and zircon (U-Th)/He measured ages and younger (15-9 Ma) 40Ar/39Ar ages from white mica is best matched with faster rates (relative to constant rates) between 11.5 and 8 Ma and slower than constant rates from 17 to 11.5 Ma and 8 Ma to present.

  15. An Analysis of Methanol and Hydrogen Production via High-Temperature Electrolysis Using the Sodium Cooled Advanced Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton; Richard D. Boardman; Robert S. Cherry; Wesley R. Deason; Michael G. McKellar

    2014-03-01

    Integration of an advanced, sodium-cooled fast spectrum reactor into nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) architectures is the focus of the present study. A techno-economic evaluation of several conceptual system designs was performed for the integration of a sodium-cooled Advanced Fast Reactor (AFR) with the electric grid in conjunction with wind-generated electricity. Cases in which excess thermal and electrical energy would be reapportioned within an integrated energy system to a chemical plant are presented. The process applications evaluated include hydrogen production via high temperature steam electrolysis and methanol production via steam methane reforming to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen which feed a methanol synthesis reactor. Three power cycles were considered for integration with the AFR, including subcritical and supercritical Rankine cycles and a modified supercritical carbon dioxide modified Brayton cycle. The thermal efficiencies of all of the modeled power conversions units were greater than 40%. A thermal efficiency of 42% was adopted in economic studies because two of the cycles either performed at that level or could potentially do so (subcritical Rankine and S-CO2 Brayton). Each of the evaluated hybrid architectures would be technically feasible but would demonstrate a different internal rate of return (IRR) as a function of multiple parameters; all evaluated configurations showed a positive IRR. As expected, integration of an AFR with a chemical plant increases the IRR when “must-take” wind-generated electricity is added to the energy system. Additional dynamic system analyses are recommended to draw detailed conclusions on the feasibility and economic benefits associated with AFR-hybrid energy system operation.

  16. Highly porous activated carbon based adsorption cooling system employing difluoromethane and a mixture of pentafluoroethane and difluoromethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askalany, Ahmed A.; Saha, Bidyut B.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a simulation for a low-grade thermally powered two-beds adsorption cooling system employing HFC-32 and a mixture of HFC-32 and HFC-125 (HFC-410a) with activated carbon of type Maxsorb III. The present simulation model adopts experimentally measured adsorption isotherms, adsorption kinetics and isosteric heat of adsorption data. Effect of operating conditions (mass flow rate of hot water, driving heat source temperature and evaporator temperature) on the system performance has been studied in detail. The simulation results showed that the system could be powered by low-grade heat source temperature (below 85 °C). AC/HFC-32 and AC/HFC-410a adsorption cooling cycles achieved close specific cooling power and coefficient of performance values of 0.15 kW/kg and 0.3, respectively at a regeneration temperature of 90 °C along with evaporator temperature of 10 °C. The investigated semi continuous adsorption cooling system could produce a cooling power of 9 kW.

  17. Physically-Based Power-Level Control for Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhe

    2012-10-01

    Because of its strong inherent safety, the modular high temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (MHTGR) has been regarded as the central part of the next generation nuclear plants (NGNPs). Power-level control is one of the key techniques which provide safe, stable and efficient operation for the MHTGRs. The physically-based regulation theory is definitely a promising trend of modern control theory and provides a control design method that can suppress the unstable part of the system dynamics and remain the stable part. Usually, the control law designed by the physically-based control theory has a simple form and high performance. Stimulated by this, a novel nonlinear dynamic output feedback power-level control is established in this paper for the MHTGR based upon its own dynamic features. This newly-built control strategy guarantees the globally asymptotic stability and provides a satisfactory transient performance through properly adjusting the feedback gains. Simulation results not only verify the correctness of the theoretical results but also illustrate the high control performance.

  18. High gradient tests of an 88 MHz RF cavity for muon cooling

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, C; Gerigk, F; Marques-Balula, J; Vretenar, M

    2006-01-01

    The scheme for a Muon Cooling channel developed at CERN in the frame of Neutrino Factory studies foresees the use of 44 and 88 MHz cavities operating at a real-estate gradient as high as 4 MV/m. To assess the feasibility of this scheme, including high-gradient operation at relatively low frequency and the production and handling of high RF peak powers, a test stand was assembled at CERN. It included an 88 MHz resonator reconstructed from a 114 MHz cavity previously used for lepton acceleration in the PS, a 2.5 MW final amplifier made out of an old linac unit improved and down-scaled in frequency, and a PS spare amplifier used as driver stage. After only 160 hours of conditioning the cavity passed the 4 MV/m level, with local peak surface field in the gap exceeding 25 MV/m (2.4 times the Kilpatrick limit). The gradient was limited by the amplifier power, the maximum RF peak output power achieved during the tests being 2.65 MW. This paper presents the results of the tests, including an analysis of field emissio...

  19. Considerations of Alloy N for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs) are a promising new class of thermal-spectrum nuclear reactors. The reactor structural materials must possess high-temperature strength and chemical compatibility with the liquid fluoride salt as well as with a power cycle fluid such as supercritical water while remaining resistant to residual air within the containment. Alloy N was developed for use with liquid fluoride salts and it possesses adequate strength and chemical compatibility up to about 700 C. A distinctive property of FHRs is that their maximum allowable coolant temperature is restricted by their structural alloy maximum service temperature. As the reactor thermal efficiency directly increases with the maximum coolant temperature, higher temperature resistant alloys are strongly desired. This paper reviews the current status of Alloy N and its relevance to FHRs including its design principles, development history, high temperature strength, environmental resistance, metallurgical stability, component manufacturability, ASME codification status, and reactor service requirements. The review will identify issues and provide guidance for improving the alloy properties or implementing engineering solutions.

  20. Photocathodes for High Repetition Rate Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Zvi, Ilan [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy. Center for Accelerator Science and Education

    2014-04-20

    This proposal brought together teams at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Stony Brook University (SBU) to study photocathodes for high repetition rate light sources such as Free Electron Lasers (FEL) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERL). Below details the Principal Investigators and contact information. Each PI submits separately for a budget through his corresponding institute. The work done under this grant comprises a comprehensive program on critical aspects of the production of the electron beams needed for future user facilities. Our program pioneered in situ and in operando diagnostics for alkali antimonide growth. The focus is on development of photocathodes for high repetition rate Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs), including testing SRF photoguns, both normal-­conducting and superconducting. Teams from BNL, LBNL and Stony Brook University (SBU) led this research, and coordinated their work over a range of topics. The work leveraged a robust infrastructure of existing facilities and the support was used for carrying out the research at these facilities. The program concentrated in three areas: a) Physics and chemistry of alkali-­antimonide cathodes (BNL – LBNL) b) Development and testing of a diamond amplifier for photocathodes (SBU -­ BNL) c) Tests of both cathodes in superconducting RF photoguns (SBU) and copper RF photoguns (LBNL) Our work made extensive use of synchrotron radiation materials science techniques, such as powder-­ and single-­crystal diffraction, x-­ray fluorescence, EXAFS and variable energy XPS. BNL and LBNL have many complementary facilities at the two light sources associated with these laboratories (NSLS and ALS, respectively); use of these will be a major thrust of our program and bring our understanding of these complex materials to a new level. In addition, CHESS at Cornell will be used to continue seamlessly throughout the NSLS dark period and

  1. Tuning the helicity of self-assembled structure of a sugar-based organogelator by the proper choice of cooling rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Jiaxi; Liu, Anhua; Guan, Yan; Zheng, Jia; Shen, Zhihao; Wan, Xinhua

    2010-03-02

    A novel sugar-appended low-molecular-mass gelator, 4''-butoxy-4-hydroxy-p-terphenyl-beta-D-glucoside (BHTG), was synthesized. It formed thermally reversible gels in a variety of aqueous and organic solvents. Three-dimensional networks made up of helical ribbons were observed in the mixture of H(2)O/1,4-dioxane (40/60 v/v). The handedness of the ribbons depended on the rate of gel formation. Fast-cooling process led to right-handed ribbons, while slow-cooling process led to left-handed ones. A combinatory analyses of microscopic, spectroscopic, and diffraction techniques revealed that BHTG formed a twisted interdigitated bilayer structure with a d spacing of 3.1 nm in gels through a kinetically controlled nucleation-growth process. There were two kinds of molecular orientations of BHTG in the nuclei, clockwise and anticlockwise, which dictated the growth of ribbons. One was metastable and formed first during the cooling process of gel formation. It was able to gradually transform into the more stable latter one with further decreasing temperature. Fast-cooling process did not leave enough time for the nuclei to evolve from metastable to stable state and the ribbons grown from them exhibited right-handedness. However, the metastable nuclei transformed into the stable one when cooled slowly and directed the molecules of BHTG to grow into left-handed aggregates.

  2. A readout unit for high rate applications

    CERN Document Server

    Toledo, J; Domínguez, D; Guirao-Elias, A; Müller, H

    2002-01-01

    The LHCb readout unit (RU) is a custom entry stage to the readout network of a data-acquisition or trigger system. It performs subevent building from multiple link inputs toward a readout network via a PCI network interface or alternatively toward a high-speed link, via an S-link interface. Incoming event fragments are derandomized, buffered and assembled into single subevents. This process is based on a low- overhead framing convention and matching of equal event numbers. Programmable logic is used both in the input and output stages of the RU module, which may be configured either as a data-link multiplexer or as entry stage to a readout or trigger network. All FPGAs are interconnected via the PCI bus, which is hosted by a networked microprocessor card. Its main tasks are remote FPGA configuration and initialization of the PCI cards. The RU hardware architecture has been optimized for a throughput of up to 200 MB/s at a 1 MHz trigger rate, as required by the most demanding application, the LHCb level-1 trig...

  3. Cooling of High-Power LED Lamp Using a Commercial Paraffin Wax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmywaczyk, J.; Zbińkowski, P.; Smogór, H.; Olejnik, A.; Koniorczyk, P.

    2017-03-01

    Commercial paraffin wax used by Bolsius Nederland B.V. for manufacturing various kinds of candles was applied as a phase-change material (PCM) for cooling a 28 W high-power light emitting diode (LED) panel during its operation. The main problem arising during operation of an LED is thermal management. According to the manufacturer's datasheet specifications (BioSolution Ltd. www.biosolution.pl, the operating temperature range for the LED street lamp UL28W is (-30 {°}C) to (+40 {°}C). The object of the present study was an LED panel containing 28 pieces of high-power 1W LEDs connected in series (4 LEDs in each of the 7 rows) mounted on an aluminum plate of dimensions 80 mm by 135 mm. The tested aluminum plate was placed in a block made of aluminum with a hollow compartment containing Bolsius paraffin wax of density 914 kg\\cdot m^{-3} at room temperature. Temperatures were recorded using K-type thermocouples at selected locations of the tested LED panel for several values of the power supplied to it, while utilizing PCM and without it. As the manufacturer of Bolsius wax candles does not provide any data on the thermal properties of the material used, it was necessary to carry out micro-calorimetric research. Thermophysical properties of the paraffin wax such as the apparent specific heat, enthalpy of phase transition and temperature of phase change transition during heating and cooling were determined using the Netzsch DSC 214 Polyma. The Netzsch TG 209F3 Tarsus was used for TG/DTG measurements. DSC investigations revealed the following thermal transitions taking place during the first heating: solid-solid transition (onset 30.4 {°}C, peak at 40.9 {°}C), solid-liquid transition (onset 47.7 {°}C, peak at 54.9 {°}C, end at 58.3 {°}C), latent heat of energy storage 201 J\\cdot g^{-1}, apparent specific heat corresponding to peak at 41.5 {°}C (5.498 J\\cdot g^{-1}\\cdot K^{-1}). DTG investigations revealed that the decomposition of paraffin wax is a two

  4. Full Coverage Shaped Hole Film Cooling in an Accelerating Boundary Layer with High Free-Stream Turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ames, Forrest E. [University of North Dakota; Kingery, Joseph E. [University of North Dakota

    2015-06-17

    Full coverage shaped-hole film cooling and downstream heat transfer measurements have been acquired in the accelerating flows over a large cylindrical leading edge test surface. The shaped holes had an 8° lateral expansion angled at 30° to the surface with spanwise and streamwise spacings of 3 diameters. Measurements were conducted at four blowing ratios, two Reynolds numbers and six well documented turbulence conditions. Film cooling measurements were acquired over a four to one range in blowing ratio at the lower Reynolds number and at the two lower blowing ratios for the higher Reynolds number. The film cooling measurements were acquired at a coolant to free-stream density ratio of approximately 1.04. The flows were subjected to a low turbulence condition (Tu = 0.7%), two levels of turbulence for a smaller sized grid (Tu = 3.5%, and 7.9%), one turbulence level for a larger grid (8.1%), and two levels of turbulence generated using a mock aero-combustor (Tu = 9.3% and 13.7%). Turbulence level is shown to have a significant influence in mixing away film cooling coverage progressively as the flow develops in the streamwise direction. Effectiveness levels for the aero-combustor turbulence condition are reduced to as low as 20% of low turbulence values by the furthest downstream region. The film cooling discharge is located close to the leading edge with very thin and accelerating upstream boundary layers. Film cooling data at the lower Reynolds number, show that transitional flows have significantly improved effectiveness levels compared with turbulent flows. Downstream effectiveness levels are very similar to slot film cooling data taken at the same coolant flow rates over the same cylindrical test surface. However, slots perform significantly better in the near discharge region. These data are expected to be very useful in grounding computational predictions of full coverage shaped hole film cooling with elevated turbulence levels and acceleration. IR

  5. HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE FLOWSHEETS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorensek, M.

    2011-07-06

    Two hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process flowsheets intended for use with high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are presented. The flowsheets were developed for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program, and couple a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer for the SO2-depolarized electrolysis step with a silicon carbide bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step. One presumes an HTGR reactor outlet temperature (ROT) of 950 C, the other 750 C. Performance was improved (over earlier flowsheets) by assuming that use of a more acid-tolerant PEM, like acid-doped poly[2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole] (PBI), instead of Nafion{reg_sign}, would allow higher anolyte acid concentrations. Lower ROT was accommodated by adding a direct contact exchange/quench column upstream from the bayonet reactor and dropping the decomposition pressure. Aspen Plus was used to develop material and energy balances. A net thermal efficiency of 44.0% to 47.6%, higher heating value basis is projected for the 950 C case, dropping to 39.9% for the 750 C case.

  6. Coupling of Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with Supercritical Rankine Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shutang Zhu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents investigations on the possible combination of modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR technology with the supercritical (SC steam turbine technology and the prospective deployments of the MHTGR SC power plant. Energy conversion efficiency of steam turbine cycle can be improved by increasing the main steam pressure and temperature. Investigations on SC water reactor (SCWR reveal that the development of SCWR power plants still needs further research and development. The MHTGR SC plant coupling the existing technologies of current MHTGR module design with operation experiences of SC FPP will achieve high cycle efficiency in addition to its inherent safety. The standard once-reheat SC steam turbine cycle and the once-reheat steam cycle with life-steam have been studied and corresponding parameters were computed. Efficiencies of thermodynamic processes of MHTGR SC plants were analyzed, while comparisons were made between an MHTGR SC plant and a designed advanced passive PWR - AP1000. It was shown that the net plant efficiency of an MHTGR SC plant can reach 45% or above, 30% higher than that of AP1000 (35% net efficiency. Furthermore, an MHTGR SC plant has higher environmental competitiveness without emission of greenhouse gases and other pollutants.

  7. Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Safety Basis and Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Petti; Jim Kinsey; Dave Alberstein

    2014-01-01

    Various international efforts are underway to assess the safety of advanced nuclear reactor designs. For example, the International Atomic Energy Agency has recently held its first Consultancy Meeting on a new cooperative research program on high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) safety. Furthermore, the Generation IV International Forum Reactor Safety Working Group has recently developed a methodology, called the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology, for use in Generation IV advanced reactor technology development, design, and design review. A risk and safety assessment white paper is under development with respect to the Very High Temperature Reactor to pilot the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology and to demonstrate its validity and feasibility. To support such efforts, this information paper on the modular HTGR safety basis and approach has been prepared. The paper provides a summary level introduction to HTGR history, public safety objectives, inherent and passive safety features, radionuclide release barriers, functional safety approach, and risk-informed safety approach. The information in this paper is intended to further the understanding of the modular HTGR safety approach. The paper gives those involved in the assessment of advanced reactor designs an opportunity to assess an advanced design that has already received extensive review by regulatory authorities and to judge the utility of recently proposed new methods for advanced reactor safety assessment such as the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology.

  8. Pebble Bed Reactors Design Optimization Methods and their Application to the Pebble Bed Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR)

    OpenAIRE

    Cisneros, Anselmo Tomas

    2013-01-01

    The Fluoride salt cooled High temperature Reactor (FHR) is a class of advanced nuclear reactors that combine the robust coated particle fuel form from high temperature gas cooled reactors, direct reactor auxillary cooling system (DRACS) passive decay removal of liquid metal fast reactors, and the transparent, high volumetric heat capacitance liquid fluoride salt working fluids - flibe (33%7Li2F-67%BeF) - from molten salt reactors. This combination of fuel and coolant enables FHRs to operate i...

  9. Cooling High Heat Flux Micro-Electronic Systems using Refrigerants in High Aspect Ratio Multi-Microchannel Evaporators

    OpenAIRE

    Costa-Patry, Etienne

    2011-01-01

    Improving the energy efficiency of cooling systems can contribute to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases. Currently, most microelectronic applications are air-cooled. Switching to two-phase cooling systems would decrease power consumption and allow for the reuse of the extracted heat. For this type of application, multi-microchannel evaporators are thought to be well adapted. However, such devices have not been tested for a wide range of operating...

  10. High strength alloys for high temperature service in liquid-salt cooled energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, David E.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F.

    2017-01-10

    An essentially cobalt-free alloy consists essentially of, in terms of weight percent: 6.3 to 7.2 Cr, 0.5 to 2 Al, 0 to 5 Fe, 0.7 to 0.8 Mn, 9 to 12.5 Mo, 0 to 6 Ta, 0.75 to 3.5 Ti, 0.01 to 0.25 Nb, 0.2 to 0.6 W, 0.02 to 0.04 C, 0 to 0.001 B, 0.0001 to 0.002 N, balance Ni. The alloy is characterized by a .gamma.' microstructural component in the range of 3 to 17.6 weight percent of the total composition. The alloy is further characterized by, at 850.degree. C., a yield strength of at least 60 Ksi, a tensile strength of at least 70 Ksi, a creep rupture life at 12 Ksi of at least 700 hours, and a corrosion rate, expressed in weight loss [g/(cm.sup.2sec)]10.sup.-11 during a 1000 hour immersion in liquid FLiNaK at 850.degree. C., in the range of 5.5 to 17.

  11. High strength alloys for high temperature service in liquid-salt cooled energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David E.; Muralidharan, Govindarajan; Wilson, Dane F.

    2017-01-10

    An essentially cobalt-free alloy consists essentially of, in terms of weight percent: 6.3 to 7.2 Cr, 0.5 to 2 Al, 0 to 5 Fe, 0.7 to 0.8 Mn, 9 to 12.5 Mo, 0 to 6 Ta, 0.75 to 3.5 Ti, 0.01 to 0.25 Nb, 0.2 to 0.6 W, 0.02 to 0.04 C, 0 to 0.001 B, 0.0001 to 0.002 N, balance Ni. The alloy is characterized by a .gamma.' microstructural component in the range of 3 to 17.6 weight percent of the total composition. The alloy is further characterized by, at 850.degree. C., a yield strength of at least 60 Ksi, a tensile strength of at least 70 Ksi, a creep rupture life at 12 Ksi of at least 700 hours, and a corrosion rate, expressed in weight loss [g/(cm.sup.2sec)]10.sup.-11 during a 1000 hour immersion in liquid FLiNaK at 850.degree. C., in the range of 5.5 to 17.

  12. High voltage high repetition rate pulse using Marx topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakki, A.; Kashapov, N.

    2015-06-01

    The paper describes Marx topology using MOSFET transistors. Marx circuit with 10 stages has been done, to obtain pulses about 5.5KV amplitude, and the width of the pulses was about 30μsec with a high repetition rate (PPS > 100), Vdc = 535VDC is the input voltage for supplying the Marx circuit. Two Ferrite ring core transformers were used to control the MOSFET transistors of the Marx circuit (the first transformer to control the charging MOSFET transistors, the second transformer to control the discharging MOSFET transistors).

  13. Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schult; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; James R. Wolf; Brian Woods

    2012-02-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

  14. High mitogenomic evolutionary rates and time dependency.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Subramanian, S.; Denver, D.R.; Millar, C.D.; Heupink, T.; Aschrafi, A.; Emslie, S.D.; Baroni, C.; Lambert, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    Using entire modern and ancient mitochondrial genomes of Adelie penguins (Pygoscelis adeliae) that are up to 44000 years old, we show that the rates of evolution of the mitochondrial genome are two to six times greater than those estimated from phylogenetic comparisons. Although the rate of

  15. Vortex Diode Analysis and Testing for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Elkassabgi, Yousri M. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; De Leon, Gerardo I. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Fetterly, Caitlin N. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Ramos, Jorge A. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Cunningham, Richard Burns [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-02-01

    Fluidic diodes are presently being considered for use in several fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor designs. A fluidic diode is a passive device that acts as a leaky check valve. These devices are installed in emergency heat removal systems that are designed to passively remove reactor decay heat using natural circulation. The direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) uses DRACS salt-to-salt heat exchangers (DHXs) that operate in a path parallel to the core flow. Because of this geometry, under normal operating conditions some flow bypasses the core and flows through the DHX. A flow diode, operating in reverse direction, is-used to minimize this flow when the primary coolant pumps are in operation, while allowing forward flow through the DHX under natural circulation conditions. The DRACSs reject the core decay heat to the environment under loss-of-flow accident conditions and as such are a reactor safety feature. Fluidic diodes have not previously been used in an operating reactor system, and therefore their characteristics must be quantified to ensure successful operation. This report parametrically examines multiple design parameters of a vortex-type fluidic diode to determine the size of diode needed to reject a particular amount of decay heat. Additional calculations were performed to size a scaled diode that could be tested in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Salt Flow Loop. These parametric studies have shown that a 152.4 mm diode could be used as a test article in that facility. A design for this diode is developed, and changes to the loop that will be necessary to test the diode are discussed. Initial testing of a scaled flow diode has been carried out in a water loop. The 150 mm diode design discussed above was modified to improve performance, and the final design tested was a 171.45 mm diameter vortex diode. The results of this testing indicate that diodicities of about 20 can be obtained for diodes of this size. Experimental

  16. High power beam dump project for the accelerator prototype LIPAc: cooling design and analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parro Albeniz, M.

    2015-07-01

    In the nuclear fusion field running in parallel to ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) as one of the complementary activities headed towards solving the technological barriers, IFMIF (International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility) project aims to provide an irradiation facility to qualify advanced materials resistant to extreme conditions like the ones expected in future fusion reactors like DEMO (DEMOnstration Power Plant). IFMIF consists of two constant wave deuteron accelerators delivering a 125 mA and 40 MeV beam each that will collide on a lithium target producing an intense neutron fluence (1017 neutrons/s) with a similar spectra to that of fusion neutrons [1], [2]. This neutron flux is employed to irradiate the different material candidates to be employed in the future fusion reactors, and the samples examined after irradiation at the so called post-irradiative facilities. As a first step in such an ambitious project, an engineering validation and engineering design activity phase called IFMIF-EVEDA (Engineering Validation and Engineering Design Activities) is presently going on. One of the activities consists on the construction and operation of an accelerator prototype named LIPAc (Linear IFMIF Prototype Accelerator). It is a high intensity deuteron accelerator identical to the low energy part of the IFMIF accelerators. The LIPAc components, which will be installed in Japan, are delivered by different european countries. The accelerator supplies a 9 MeV constant wave beam of deuterons with a power of 1.125 MW, which after being characterized by different instruments has to be stopped safely. For such task a beam dump to absorb the beam energy and take it to a heat sink is needed. Spain has the compromise of delivering such device and CIEMAT (Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas Medioambientales y Tecnológicas) is responsible for such task. The central piece of the beam dump, where the ion beam is stopped, is a copper cone with

  17. Operation and Control Simulation of a Modular High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Nuclear Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haipeng; Huang, Xiaojin; Zhang, Liangju

    2008-08-01

    Issues in the operation and control of the multi-modular nuclear power plant are complicated. The high temperature gas cooled reactor pebble-bed module (HTR-PM) plant with two-module will be built as a demonstration plant in China. To investigate the operation and control characteristics of the plant, a simplified dynamic model is developed and mathematically formulated based upon the fundamental conversation of mass, energy and momentum. The model is implemented in a personal computer to simulate the power increase process of the HTR-PM operation. The open loop operation with no controller is first simulated and the results show that the essential parameter steam temperature varies drastically with time, which is not allowable in the normal operation. According to the preliminary control strategy of the HTR-PM, a simple steam temperature controller is proposed. The controller is of Proportional-type with a time lag. The closed loop operation with a steam temperature controller is then implemented and the simulation results show that the steam temperature and also other parameters are all well controlled in the allowable range.

  18. Nonlinear Adaptive Power-Level Control for Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhe

    2013-04-01

    After the Fukushima nuclear accident, much more attention has to be drawn on the safety issues. The improvement of safety has already become the focus of the developing trend of the nuclear energy systems. Due to the inherent safety feature and the potential economic competitiveness, the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR) has been seen as the central part of the next generation of nuclear plant (NGNP). Power-level control is one of the key techniques that guarantee the safe, stable and efficient operation for nuclear reactors. Since the MHTGR dynamics has the features of strong nonlinearity and uncertainty, in order to improve the operation performance, it is meaningful to develop the nonlinear adaptive power-level control law for the MHTGR. Based on using the natural dynamic features beneficial to system stabilization, a novel nonlinear adaptive power-level control is given for the MHTGR in this paper. It is theoretically proved that this newly-built controller does not only provide globally asymptotic closed-loop stability but is also adaptive to the system uncertainty. This control law is then applied to the power-level regulation of the pebble-bed MHTGR of the HTR-PM power plant. Numerical simulation results show the feasibility of this control law and the relationship between the performance and controller parameters.

  19. Utilization of heat of modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ide, A. [Fuji Electric, Tokyo (Japan). Nuclear Power Promotion Dept.; Takenaka, Y. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Tokyo (Japan). Nuclear Systems Div.; Maeda, S. [Ube Industries, Yamaguchi (Japan). Machinery Dept.

    1996-07-01

    The demand for energy is increasing worldwide along with increases in population and rises in the standard of living. If the needed energy is supplied only by fossil fuels, environmental problems will impose limits on human activities. Recognizing that more than 60% of the energy consumed in Japan is non-electrical energy, FAPIG organized the HTR-HUC Working Group to study methods of using heat from high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTR) to mitigate environmental and energy resource problems, and to contribute to the steady supply and effective use of energy. The authors chose three types of model plants to study: (1) a cogeneration plant which can be built with existing technology; (2) a coal gasification plant which can accelerate the clean use of coal and contribute to a stable supply of energy and the preservation of the environment; and (3) a hydrogen production plant whose hydrogen will release people from their dependence on fossil energy. For each of the above plants, a system outline and basic plan as well as costs, resultant social effects, management methods of the operating company and technical issues are studied.

  20. Sensitivity studies of modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor postulated accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, Syd [Nuclear Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6010 (United States)]. E-mail: sjb@ornl.gov

    2006-03-15

    The results of various accident scenario simulations for the two major modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) variants (prismatic and pebble bed cores) are presented. Sensitivity studies can help to quantify the uncertainty ranges of the predicted outcomes for variations in some of the more crucial system parameters, as well as for occurrences of equipment and/or operator failures or errors. In addition, sensitivity studies can guide further efforts in improving the design and determining where more (or less) R and D is appropriate. Both of the modular HTGR designs studied - the 400-MW(t) pebble bed modular reactor (PBMR, pebble) and the 600-MW(t) gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GT-MHR, prismatic) - show excellent accident prevention and mitigation capabilities because of their inherent passive safety features. The large thermal margins between operating and 'potential damage' temperatures, along with the typically very slow accident response times (approximate days to reach peak temperatures), tend to reduce concerns about uncertainties in the simulation models, the initiating events, and the equipment and operator responses.

  1. Hubble space telescope high-resolution imaging of Kepler small and cool exoplanet host stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilliland, Ronald L.; Cartier, Kimberly M. S.; Wright, Jason T. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, and Center for Exoplanets and Habitable Worlds, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Adams, Elisabeth R. [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 East Fort Lowell, Suite 106, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute/Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kalas, Paul, E-mail: gillil@stsci.edu [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution imaging is an important tool for follow-up study of exoplanet candidates found via transit detection with the Kepler mission. We discuss here Hubble Space Telescope imaging with the WFC3 of 23 stars that host particularly interesting Kepler planet candidates based on their small size and cool equilibrium temperature estimates. Results include detections, exclusion of background stars that could be a source of false positives for the transits, and detection of physically associated companions in a number of cases providing dilution measures necessary for planet parameter refinement. For six Kepler objects of interest, we find that there is ambiguity regarding which star hosts the transiting planet(s), with potentially strong implications for planetary characteristics. Our sample is evenly distributed in G, K, and M spectral types. Albeit with a small sample size, we find that physically associated binaries are more common than expected at each spectral type, reaching a factor of 10 frequency excess in M. We document the program detection sensitivities, detections, and deliverables to the Kepler follow-up program archive.

  2. Secondary flows in the cooling channels of the high-performance light-water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurien, E.; Wintterle, Th. [Stuttgart Univ., Institute for Nuclear Technolgy and Energy Systems (IKE) (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The new design of a High-Performance Light-Water Reactor (HPLWR) involves a three-pass core with an evaporator region, where the compressed water is heated above the pseudo-critical temperature, and two superheater regions. Due to the strong dependency of the supercritical water density on the temperature significant mass transfer between neighboring cooling channels is expected if the temperature is unevenly distributed across the fuel element. An inter-channel flow is then superimposed to the secondary flow vortices induced by the non-isotropy of turbulence. In order to gain insight into the resulting flow patterns as well as into temperature and density distributions within the various subchannels of the fuel element CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) calculations for the 1/8 fuel element are performed. For simplicity adiabatic boundary conditions at the moderator box and the fuel element box are assumed. Our investigation confirms earlier results obtained by subchannel analysis that the axial mass flux is significantly reduced in the corner subchannel of this fuel element resulting in a net mass flux towards the neighboring subchannels. Our results provide a first estimation of the magnitude of the secondary flows in the pseudo-critical region of a supercritical light-water reactor. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that CFD is an efficient tool for investigations of flow patterns within nuclear reactor fuel elements. (authors)

  3. High Temperature Fission Chamber for He- and FLiBe-cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, Zane W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Giuliano, Dominic R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holcomb, David Eugene [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Lance, Michael J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, Roger G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Warmack, Robert J. Bruce [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wilson, Dane F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, Mark J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We have evaluated candidate technologies for in-core fission chambers for high-temperature reactors to monitor power level via measurements of neutron flux from start-up through full power at up to 800°C. This research is important because there are no commercially available instruments capable of operating above 550 °C. Component materials and processes were investigated for fission chambers suitable for operation at 800 °C in reactors cooled by molten fluoride salt (FLiBe) or flowing He, with an emphasis placed on sensitivity (≥ 1 cps/nv), service lifetime (2 years at full power), and resistance to direct immersion in FLiBe. The latter gives the instrument the ability to survive accidents involving breach of a thimble. The device is envisioned to be a two-gap, three-electrode instrument constructed from concentric nickel-plated alumina cylinders and using a noble gas–nitrogen fill-gas. We report the results of measurements and calculations of the response of fill gasses, impurity migration in nickel alloy, brazing of the alumina insulator, and thermodynamic calculations.

  4. Preliminary Demonstration Reactor Point Design for the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualls, A. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Betzler, Benjamin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carbajo, Juan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Greenwood, Michael Scott [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hale, Richard Edward [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrell, Jerry W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Development of the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor (FHR) Demonstration Reactor (DR) is a necessary intermediate step to enable commercial FHR deployment through disruptive and rapid technology development and demonstration. The FHR DR will utilize known, mature technology to close remaining gaps to commercial viability. Lower risk technologies are included in the initial FHR DR design to ensure that the reactor can be built, licensed, and operated within an acceptable budget and schedule. These technologies include tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel, replaceable core structural material, the use of that same material for the primary and intermediate loops, and tube-and-shell heat exchangers. This report provides an update on the development of the FHR DR. At this writing, the core neutronics and thermal hydraulics have been developed and analyzed. The mechanical design details are still under development and are described to their current level of fidelity. It is anticipated that the FHR DR can be operational within 10 years because of the use of low-risk, near-term technology options.

  5. Magnetocaloric properties and critical behavior of high relative cooling power FeNiB nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhary, V. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Energy Research Institute @NTU, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 637553 (Singapore); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Maheswar Repaka, D. V.; Chaturvedi, A.; Ramanujan, R. V., E-mail: ramanujan@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Sridhar, I. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2014-10-28

    Low cost magnetocaloric nanomaterials have attracted considerable attention for energy efficient applications. We report a very high relative cooling power (RCP) in a study of the magnetocaloric effect in quenched FeNiB nanoparticles. RCP increases from 89.8 to 640 J kg{sup −1} for a field change of 1 and 5 T, respectively, these values are the largest for rare earth free iron based magnetocaloric nanomaterials. To investigate the magnetocaloric behavior around the Curie temperature (T{sub C}), the critical behavior of these quenched nanoparticles was studied. Detailed analysis of the magnetic phase transition using the modified Arrott plot, Kouvel-Fisher method, and critical isotherm plots yields critical exponents of β = 0.364, γ = 1.319, δ = 4.623, and α = −0.055, which are close to the theoretical exponents obtained from the 3D-Heisenberg model. Our results indicate that these FeNiB nanoparticles are potential candidates for magnetocaloric fluid based heat pumps and low grade waste heat recovery.

  6. Cooling of electrically insulated high voltage electrodes down to 30 mK: Dynamic measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Eisel, T; Burghart, G; Feigl, S; Haug, F; Koettig, T

    2011-01-01

    AEgIS [1] is an antimatter experiment, using high voltage electrodes at 100 mK. Two possible principles to cool these electrodes with a dilution refrigerator are investigated: the Rod and the Sandwich. Both designs are described in detail in [2]. The Sandwich design is discussed in the present work. It consists of an electrically insulating sapphire plate covered with indium on both sides. Dynamic measurements are performed in order to estimate the influence of time depending heat loads on different Sandwich designs. From these data the Sandwich’s thermal diffusivity is derived and compared to previous measurements using a static heat load. The lowest resistivity of the Sandwich is achieved with an indium vapor deposition onto polished sapphire (26 cm2K4/W at 30 mK). The same sandwich shows the best, i.e. highest thermal diffusivity (0.23 mm2/s at 70 mK). However, the results of the static and the dynamic measurements show some interesting and contrary tendencies.

  7. Validation of SCALE for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Kelly, Ryan P [ORNL; Sunny, Eva E [ORNL

    2012-08-01

    This report documents verification and validation studies carried out to assess the performance of the SCALE code system methods and nuclear data for modeling and analysis of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) configurations. Validation data were available from the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhE Handbook), prepared by the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project, for two different HTGR designs: prismatic and pebble bed. SCALE models have been developed for HTTR, a prismatic fuel design reactor operated in Japan and HTR-10, a pebble bed reactor operated in China. The models were based on benchmark specifications included in the 2009, 2010, and 2011 releases of the IRPhE Handbook. SCALE models for the HTR-PROTEUS pebble bed configuration at the PROTEUS critical facility in Switzerland have also been developed, based on benchmark specifications included in a 2009 IRPhE draft benchmark. The development of the SCALE models has involved a series of investigations to identify particular issues associated with modeling the physics of HTGRs and to understand and quantify the effect of particular modeling assumptions on calculation-to-experiment comparisons.

  8. An Analysis of Testing Requirements for Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL

    2009-11-01

    This report provides guidance on the component testing necessary during the next phase of fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) development. In particular, the report identifies and describes the reactor component performance and reliability requirements, provides an overview of what information is necessary to provide assurance that components will adequately achieve the requirements, and then provides guidance on how the required performance information can efficiently be obtained. The report includes a system description of a representative test scale FHR reactor. The reactor parameters presented in this report should only be considered as placeholder values until an FHR test scale reactor design is completed. The report focus is bounded at the interface between and the reactor primary coolant salt and the fuel and the gas supply and return to the Brayton cycle power conversion system. The analysis is limited to component level testing and does not address system level testing issues. Further, the report is oriented as a bottom-up testing requirements analysis as opposed to a having a top-down facility description focus.

  9. High Pressure Gas Filled RF Cavity Beam Test at the Fermilab MuCool Test Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freemire, Ben [Illinois Inst. of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The high energy physics community is continually looking to push the limits with respect to the energy and luminosity of particle accelerators. In the realm of leptons, only electron colliders have been built to date. Compared to hadrons, electrons lose a large amount of energy when accelerated in a ring through synchrotron radiation. A solution to this problem is to build long, straight accelerators for electrons, which has been done with great success. With a new generation of lepton colliders being conceived, building longer, more powerful accelerators is not the most enticing option. Muons have been proposed as an alternative particle to electrons. Muons lose less energy to synchrotron radiation and a Muon Collider can provide luminosity within a much smaller energy range than a comparable electron collider. This allows a circular collider to be built with higher attainable energy than any present electron collider. As part of the accelerator, but separate from the collider, it would also be possible to allow the muons to decay to study neutrinos. The possibility of a high energy, high luminosity muon collider and an abundant, precise source of neutrinos is an attractive one. The technological challenges of building a muon accelerator are many and diverse. Because the muon is an unstable particle, a muon beam must be cooled and accelerated to the desired energy within a short amount of time. This requirement places strict requisites on the type of acceleration and focusing that can be used. Muons are generated as tertiary beams with a huge phase space, so strong magnetic fields are required to capture and focus them. Radio frequency (RF) cavities are needed to capture, bunch and accelerate the muons. Unfortunately, traditional vacuum RF cavities have been shown to break down in the magnetic fields necessary for capture and focusing.

  10. Safety and efficacy of low fluence, high repetition rate versus high fluence, low repetition rate 810-nm diode laser for axillary hair removal in Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenhai; Liu, Chengyi; Chen, Zhou; Cai, Lin; Zhou, Cheng; Xu, Qianxi; Li, Houmin; Zhang, Jianzhong

    2016-11-01

    High-fluence diode lasers with contact cooling have emerged as the gold standard to remove unwanted hair. Lowering the energy should result in less pain and could theoretically affect the efficacy of the therapy. To compare the safety and efficacy of a low fluence high repetition rate 810-nm diode laser to those of a high fluence, low repetition rate diode laser for permanent axillary hair removal in Chinese women. Ninety-two Chinese women received four axillae laser hair removal treatments at 4-week intervals using the low fluence, high repetition rate 810-nm diode laser in super hair removal (SHR) mode on one side and the high fluence, low repetition rate diode laser in hair removal (HR) mode on the other side. Hair counts were done at each follow-up visit and 6-month follow-up after the final laser treatment using a "Hi Quality Hair Analysis Program System"; the immediate pain score after each treatment session was recorded by a visual analog scale. The overall median reduction of hair was 90.2% with the 810-nm diode laser in SHR mode and 87% with the same laser in HR mode at 6-month follow-up. The median pain scores in SHR mode and in HR mode were 2.75 and 6.75, respectively. Low fluence, high repetition rate diode laser can efficiently remove unwanted hair but also significantly improve tolerability and reduce adverse events during the course of treatment.

  11. Palm-based diacylglycerol fat dry fractionation: effect of crystallisation temperature, cooling rate and agitation speed on physical and chemical properties of fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razam Ab Latip

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Fractionation which separates the olein (liquid and stearin (solid fractions of oil is used to modify the physicochemical properties of fats in order to extend its applications. Studies showed that the properties of fractionated end products can be affected by fractionation processing conditions. In the present study, dry fractionation of palm-based diacylglycerol (PDAG was performed at different: cooling rates (0.05, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5 and 3.0°C/min, end-crystallisation temperatures (30, 35, 40, 45 and 50°C and agitation speeds (30, 50, 70, 90 and 110 rpm to determine the effect of these parameters on the properties and yield of the solid and liquid portions. To determine the physicochemical properties of olein and stearin fraction: Iodine value (IV, fatty acid composition (FAC, acylglycerol composition, slip melting point (SMP, solid fat content (SFC, thermal behaviour tests were carried out. Fractionation of PDAG fat changes the chemical composition of liquid and solid fractions. In terms of FAC, the major fatty acid in olein and stearin fractions were oleic (C18:1 and palmitic (C16:0 respectively. Acylglycerol composition showed that olein and stearin fractions is concentrated with TAG and DAG respectively. Crystallization temperature, cooling rate and agitation speed does not affect the IV, SFC, melting and cooling properties of the stearin fraction. The stearin fraction was only affected by cooling rate which changes its SMP. On the other hand, olein fraction was affected by crystallization temperature and cooling rate but not agitation speed which caused changes in IV, SMP, SFC, melting and crystallization behavior. Increase in both the crystallization temperature and cooling rate caused a reduction of IV, increment of the SFC, SMP, melting and crystallization behaviour of olein fraction and vice versa. The fractionated stearin part melted above 65°C while the olein melted at 40°C. SMP in olein fraction also reduced to a range of

  12. Approaches to experimental validation of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belov, S.E. [Joint Stock Company ' Afrikantov OKB Mechanical Engineering' , Burnakovsky Proezd, 15, Nizhny Novgorod 603074 (Russian Federation); Borovkov, M.N., E-mail: borovkov@okbm.nnov.ru [Joint Stock Company ' Afrikantov OKB Mechanical Engineering' , Burnakovsky Proezd, 15, Nizhny Novgorod 603074 (Russian Federation); Golovko, V.F.; Dmitrieva, I.V.; Drumov, I.V.; Znamensky, D.S.; Kodochigov, N.G. [Joint Stock Company ' Afrikantov OKB Mechanical Engineering' , Burnakovsky Proezd, 15, Nizhny Novgorod 603074 (Russian Federation); Baxi, C.B.; Shenoy, A.; Telengator, A. [General Atomics, 3550 General Atomics Court, CA (United States); Razvi, J., E-mail: Junaid.Razvi@ga.com [General Atomics, 3550 General Atomics Court, CA (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Computational and experimental investigations of thermal and hydrodynamic characteristics for the equipment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vibroacoustic investigations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Studies of the electromagnetic suspension system on GT-MHR turbo machine rotor models. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental investigations of the catcher bearings design. - Abstract: The special feature of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) is stressed operating conditions for equipment due to high temperature of the primary circuit helium, up to 950 Degree-Sign C, as well as acoustic and hydrodynamic loads upon the gas path elements. Therefore, great significance is given to reproduction of real operation conditions in tests. Experimental investigation of full-size nuclear power plant (NPP) primary circuit components is not practically feasible because costly test facilities will have to be developed for the power of up to hundreds of megawatts. Under such conditions, the only possible process to validate designs under development is representative tests of smaller scale models and fragmentary models. At the same time, in order to take in to validated account the effect of various physical factors, it is necessary to ensure reproduction of both individual processes and integrated tests incorporating needed integrated investigations. Presented are approaches to experimental validation of thermohydraulic and vibroacoustic characteristics for main equipment components and primary circuit path elements under standard loading conditions, which take account of their operation in the HTGR. Within the framework of the of modular helium reactor project, including a turbo machine in the primary circuit, a new and difficult problem is creation of multiple-bearing flexible vertical rotor. Presented are approaches to analytical and experimental validation of the rotor electromagnetic bearings, catcher bearings, flexible rotor

  13. Sustainability of thorium-uranium in pebble-bed fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Guifeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability of thorium fuel in a Pebble-Bed Fluoride salt-cooled High temperature Reactor (PB-FHR is investigated to find the feasible region of high discharge burnup and negative Flibe (2LiF-BeF2 salt Temperature Reactivity Coefficient (TRC. Dispersion fuel or pellet fuel with SiC cladding and SiC matrix is used to replace the tristructural-isotropic (TRISO coated particle system for increasing fuel loading and decreasing excessive moderation. To analyze the neutronic characteristics, an equilibrium calculation method of thorium fuel self-sustainability is developed. We have compared two refueling schemes (mixing flow pattern and directional flow pattern and two kinds of reflector materials (SiC and graphite. This method found that the feasible region of breeding and negative Flibe TRC is between 20 vol% and 62 vol% fuel loading in the fuel. A discharge burnup could be achieved up to about 200 MWd/kgHM. The case with directional flow pattern and SiC reflector showed superior burnup characteristics but the worst radial power peak factor, while the case with mixing flow pattern and SiC reflector, which was the best tradeoff between discharge burnup and radial power peak factor, could provide burnup of 140 MWd/kgHM and about 1.4 radial power peak factor with 50 vol% dispersion fuel. In addition, Flibe salt displays good neutron properties as a coolant of quasi-fast reactors due to the strong 9Be(n,2n reaction and low neutron absorption of 6Li (even at 1000 ppm in fast spectrum. Preliminary thermal hydraulic calculation shows good safety margin. The greatest challenge of this reactor may be the decades irradiation time of the pebble fuel.

  14. Options for treating high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel for repository disposal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lotts, A.L.; Bond, W.D.; Forsberg, C.W.; Glass, R.W.; Harrington, F.E.; Micheals, G.E.; Notz, K.J.; Wymer, R.G.

    1992-02-01

    This report describes the options that can reasonably be considered for disposal of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel in a repository. The options include whole-block disposal, disposal with removal of graphite (either mechanically or by burning), and reprocessing of spent fuel to separate the fuel and fission products. The report summarizes what is known about the options without extensively projecting or analyzing actual performance of waste forms in a repository. The report also summarizes the processes involved in convert spent HTGR fuel into the various waste forms and projects relative schedules and costs for deployment of the various options. Fort St. Vrain Reactor fuel, which utilizes highly-enriched {sup 235}U (plus thorium) and is contained in a prismatic graphite block geometry, was used as the baseline for evaluation, but the major conclusions would not be significantly different for low- or medium-enriched {sup 235}U (without thorium) or for the German pebble-bed fuel. Future US HTGRs will be based on the Fort St. Vrain (FSV) fuel form. The whole block appears to be a satisfactory waste form for disposal in a repository and may perform better than light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. From the standpoint of process cost and schedule (not considering repository cost or value of fuel that might be recycled), the options are ranked as follows in order of increased cost and longer schedule to perform the option: (1) whole block, (2a) physical separation, (2b) chemical separation, and (3) complete chemical processing.

  15. Steady and dynamic shear rheological behavior of semi dilute Alyssum homolocarpum seed gum solutions: influence of concentration, temperature and heating-cooling rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaeddini, Behzad; Koocheki, Arash; Mohammadzadeh Milani, Jafar; Razavi, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Ghanbarzadeh, Babak

    2017-10-30

    Alyssum homolocarpum seed gum (AHSG) solution exhibits high viscosity at low shear rates and has anionic features. However there is no information regarding the flow and dynamic properties of this gum in semi-dilute solutions. The present study aimed to investigate the dynamic and steady shear behavior of AHSG in the semi-dilute region. The viscosity profile demonestrated a shear thinning behavior at all temperatures and concentrations. An increase in the AHSG concentration was acompanied by an increase in the pseudoplasticity degree, whereas, by increasing the temperature, the pseudoplasticity of AHSG decreased. At low gum concentration, solutions had more viscosity dependence on temperature. The mechanical spectra obtained from the frequency sweep experiment demonstrated viscoelastic properties for gum solutions. AHSG solutions showed typical weak gel-like behavior, revealing G' greater than G' within the experimental range of frequency (Hz), with slight frequency dependency. The influence of temperature on viscoelastic properties of AHSG solutions was studied during both heating (5-85 °C) and cooling (85-5 °C) processes. The complex viscosity of AHSG was greater compared to the apparent viscosity, indicating the disruption of AHSG network structure under continuous shear rates and deviation from the Cox-Merz rule. During the initial heating, the storage modulus showed a decreasing trend and, with a further increase in temperature, the magnitude of storage modulus increased. The influence of temperature on the storage modulus was considerable when a higher heating rate was applied. AHSG can be applied as a thickening and stabilizing agents in food products that require good stability against temperature. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  16. Cooling rate effects on the microstructure, solid content, and rheological properties of organogels of amides derived from stearic and (R)-12-hydroxystearic acid in vegetable oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro-Vazquez, Jorge F; Morales-Rueda, Juan; Torres-Martínez, Adriana; Charó-Alonso, Miriam A; Mallia, V Ajay; Weiss, Richard G

    2013-06-25

    Using safflower oil as the liquid phase, we investigated the organogelation properties of stearic acid (SA), (R)-12-hydroxystearic acid (HSA), and different primary and secondary amides synthesized from SA and HSA. The objective was to establish the relationship between the gelator's molecular structure, solid content, and gels' microstructure that determines the rheological properties of organogels developed at two cooling rates, 1 and 20 °C/min. The results showed that the presence of a 12-OH group in the gelator molecule makes its crystallization kinetics cooling rate dependent and modifies its crystallization behavior. Thus, SA crystallizes as large platelets, while HSA crystallizes as fibers forming gels with higher solid content, particularly at 20 °C/min. The addition to HSA of a primary or a secondary amide bonded with an alkyl group resulted in gelator molecules that crystallized as fibrillar spherulites at both cooling rates. Independent of the cooling rate, gels of HSA and its amide derivatives showed thixotropic behavior. The rheological properties of the amide's organogels depend on a balance between hydrogen-bonding sites and the alkyl chain length bonded to the amide group. However, it might also be associated with the effect that the gelators' molecular weight has on crystal growth and its consequence on fiber interpenetration among vicinal spherulites. These results were compared with those obtained with candelilla wax (CW), a well-known edible gelling additive used by the food industry. CW organogels had higher elasticity than HSA gels but lower than the gels formed by amides. Additionally, CW gels showed similar or even higher thixotropic behavior than HSA and the amide's gels. These remarkable rheological properties resulted from the microstructural organization of CW organogels. We concluded that microstructure has a more important role determining the organogels' rheology than the solid content. The fitting models developed to describe the

  17. Characterization of a high performance ultra-thin heat pipe cooling module for mobile hand held electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed, Mohammad Shahed; Saito, Yuji; Mashiko, Koichi; Mochizuki, Masataka

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, heat pipes have been widely used in various hand held mobile electronic devices such as smart phones, tablet PCs, digital cameras. With the development of technology these devices have different user friendly features and applications; which require very high clock speeds of the processor. In general, a high clock speed generates a lot of heat, which needs to be spreaded or removed to eliminate the hot spot on the processor surface. However, it is a challenging task to achieve proper cooling of such electronic devices mentioned above because of their confined spaces and concentrated heat sources. Regarding this challenge, we introduced an ultra-thin heat pipe; this heat pipe consists of a special fiber wick structure named as "Center Fiber Wick" which can provide sufficient vapor space on the both sides of the wick structure. We also developed a cooling module that uses this kind of ultra-thin heat pipe to eliminate the hot spot issue. This cooling module consists of an ultra-thin heat pipe and a metal plate. By changing the width, the flattened thickness and the effective length of the ultra-thin heat pipe, several experiments have been conducted to characterize the thermal properties of the developed cooling module. In addition, other experiments were also conducted to determine the effects of changes in the number of heat pipes in a single module. Characterization and comparison of the module have also been conducted both experimentally and theoretically.

  18. Characterization of a high performance ultra-thin heat pipe cooling module for mobile hand held electronic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamed, Mohammad Shahed; Saito, Yuji; Mashiko, Koichi; Mochizuki, Masataka

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, heat pipes have been widely used in various hand held mobile electronic devices such as smart phones, tablet PCs, digital cameras. With the development of technology these devices have different user friendly features and applications; which require very high clock speeds of the processor. In general, a high clock speed generates a lot of heat, which needs to be spreaded or removed to eliminate the hot spot on the processor surface. However, it is a challenging task to achieve proper cooling of such electronic devices mentioned above because of their confined spaces and concentrated heat sources. Regarding this challenge, we introduced an ultra-thin heat pipe; this heat pipe consists of a special fiber wick structure named as "Center Fiber Wick" which can provide sufficient vapor space on the both sides of the wick structure. We also developed a cooling module that uses this kind of ultra-thin heat pipe to eliminate the hot spot issue. This cooling module consists of an ultra-thin heat pipe and a metal plate. By changing the width, the flattened thickness and the effective length of the ultra-thin heat pipe, several experiments have been conducted to characterize the thermal properties of the developed cooling module. In addition, other experiments were also conducted to determine the effects of changes in the number of heat pipes in a single module. Characterization and comparison of the module have also been conducted both experimentally and theoretically.

  19. Analysis of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer Model for the Pebble Bed High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    S. Yamoah; E.H.K. Akaho; Nana G.A. Ayensu; M. Asamoah

    2012-01-01

    The pebble bed type high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor is a promising option for next generation reactor technology and has the potential to provide high efficiency and cost effective electricity generation. The reactor unit heat transfer poses a challenge due to the complexity associated with the thermalflow design. Therefore to reliably simulate the flow and heat transport of the pebble bed modular reactor necessitates a heat transfer model that deals with radiation as well as ther...

  20. Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Demonstration Reactor Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qualls, A. L. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Brown, Nicholas R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Betzler, Benjamin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Carbajo, Juan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hale, Richard Edward [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harrison, Thomas J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrell, Jerry W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wysocki, Aaron J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-02-01

    The fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR) demonstration reactor (DR) is a concept for a salt-cooled reactor with 100 megawatts of thermal output (MWt). It would use tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel within prismatic graphite blocks. FLiBe (2 LiF-BeF2) is the reference primary coolant. The FHR DR is designed to be small, simple, and affordable. Development of the FHR DR is a necessary intermediate step to enable near-term commercial FHRs. Lower risk technologies are purposely included in the initial FHR DR design to ensure that the reactor can be built, licensed, and operated within an acceptable budget and schedule. These technologies include TRISO particle fuel, replaceable core structural material, the use of that same material for the primary and intermediate loops, and tube-and-shell primary-to-intermediate heat exchangers. Several preconceptual and conceptual design efforts that have been conducted on FHR concepts bear a significant influence on the FHR DR design. Specific designs include the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) advanced high-temperature reactor (AHTR) with 3400/1500 MWt/megawatts of electric output (MWe), as well as a 125 MWt small modular AHTR (SmAHTR) from ORNL. Other important examples are the Mk1 pebble bed FHR (PB-FHR) concept from the University of California, Berkeley (UCB), and an FHR test reactor design developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The MIT FHR test reactor is based on a prismatic fuel platform and is directly relevant to the present FHR DR design effort. These FHR concepts are based on reasonable assumptions for credible commercial prototypes. The FHR DR concept also directly benefits from the operating experience of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE), as well as the detailed design efforts for a large molten salt reactor concept and its breeder variant, the Molten Salt Breeder Reactor. The FHR DR technology is most representative of the 3400 MWt AHTR

  1. An infrared high rate video imager for various space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedhem, Hâkan; Koschny, Detlef

    2010-05-01

    Modern spacecraft with high data transmission capabilities have opened up the possibility to fly video rate imagers in space. Several fields concerned with observations of transient phenomena can benefit significantly from imaging at video frame rate. Some applications are observations and characterization of bolides/meteors, sprites, lightning, volcanic eruptions, and impacts on airless bodies. Applications can be found both on low and high Earth orbiting spacecraft as well as on planetary and lunar orbiters. The optimum wavelength range varies depending on the application but we will focus here on the near infrared, partly since it allows exploration of a new field and partly because it, in many cases, allows operation both during day and night. Such an instrument has to our knowledge never flown in space so far. The only sensors of a similar kind fly on US defense satellites for monitoring launches of ballistic missiles. The data from these sensors, however, is largely inaccessible to scientists. We have developed a bread-board version of such an instrument, the SPOSH-IR. The instrument is based on an earlier technology development - SPOSH - a Smart Panoramic Optical Sensor Head, for operation in the visible range, but with the sensor replace by a cooled IR detector and new optics. The instrument is using a Sofradir 320x256 pixel HgCdTe detector array with 30µm pixel size, mounted directly on top of a four stage thermoelectric Peltier cooler. The detector-cooler combination is integrated into an evacuated closed package with a glass window on its front side. The detector has a sensitive range between 0.8 and 2.5 µm. The optical part is a seven lens design with a focal length of 6 mm and a FOV 90deg by 72 deg optimized for use at SWIR. The detector operates at 200K while the optics operates at ambient temperature. The optics and electronics for the bread-board has been designed and built by Jena-Optronik, Jena, Germany. This talk will present the design and the

  2. Neutronic analysis stochastic distribution of fuel particles in Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Wei

    The Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) is a promising candidate for Generation IV designs due to its inherent safety, efficiency, and its proliferation-resistant and waste minimizing fuel cycle. A number of these advantages stem from its unique fuel design, consisting of a stochastic mixture of tiny (0.78mm diameter) microspheres with multiple coatings. However, the microsphere fuel regions represent point absorbers for resonance energy neutrons, resulting in the "double heterogeneity" for particle fuel. Special care must be taken to analyze this fuel in order to predict the spatial and spectral dependence of the neutron population in a steady-state reactor configuration. The challenges are considerable and resist brute force computation: there are over 1010 microspheres in a typical reactor configuration, with no hope of identifying individual microspheres in this stochastic mixture. Moreover, when individual microspheres "deplete" (e.g., burn the fissile isotope U-235 or transmute the fertile isotope U-238 (eventually) to Pu-239), the stochastic time-dependent nature of the depletion compounds the difficulty posed by the stochastic spatial mixture of the fuel, resulting in a prohibitive computational challenge. The goal of this research is to develop a methodology to analyze particle fuel randomly distributed in the reactor, accounting for the kernel absorptions as well as the stochastic depletion of the fuel mixture. This Ph.D. dissertation will address these challenges by developing a methodology for analyzing particle fuel that will be accurate enough to properly model stochastic particle fuel in both static and time-dependent configurations and yet be efficient enough to be used for routine analyses. This effort includes creation of a new physical model, development of a simulation algorithm, and application to real reactor configurations.

  3. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS OF THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James; Bayless, Paul; Strydom, Gerhard; Kumar, Akansha; Gougar, Hans

    2016-11-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis is an indispensable element of any substantial attempt in reactor simulation validation. The quantification of uncertainties in nuclear engineering has grown more important and the IAEA Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on High-Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) initiated in 2012 aims to investigate the various uncertainty quantification methodologies for this type of reactors. The first phase of the CRP is dedicated to the estimation of cell and lattice model uncertainties due to the neutron cross sections co-variances. Phase II is oriented towards the investigation of propagated uncertainties from the lattice to the coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics core calculations. Nominal results for the prismatic single block (Ex.I-2a) and super cell models (Ex.I-2c) have been obtained using the SCALE 6.1.3 two-dimensional lattice code NEWT coupled to the TRITON sequence for cross section generation. In this work, the TRITON/NEWT-flux-weighted cross sections obtained for Ex.I-2a and various models of Ex.I-2c is utilized to perform a sensitivity analysis of the MHTGR-350 core power densities and eigenvalues. The core solutions are obtained with the INL coupled code PHISICS/RELAP5-3D, utilizing a fixed-temperature feedback for Ex. II-1a.. It is observed that the core power density does not vary significantly in shape, but the magnitude of these variations increases as the moderator-to-fuel ratio increases in the super cell lattice models.

  4. Liquid-cooled Ti:Sapphire thin disk amplifiers for high average power 100-TW systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagymihaly, R S; Cao, H; Papp, D; Hajas, G; Kalashnikov, M; Osvay, K; Chvykov, V

    2017-03-20

    In this work, numerical heat transfer simulations of direct water-cooled gain modules for thin disk (TD) Ti:Sapphire (Ti:Sa) power amplifiers are presented. By using the TD technique in combination with the extraction during pumping (EDP) method 100-TW class amplifiers operating around 300 W average power could be reached in the future. Single and double-sided cooling arrangements were investigated for several coolant flow velocities. Simulations which upscale the gain module for multiple kilowatts of average power were also performed for large aperture Ti:Sa disks and for multiple disks with several coolant channels.

  5. Exergoeconomic optimization of coaxial tube evaporators for cooling of high pressure gaseous hydrogen during vehicle fuelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jonas Kjær; Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard; Markussen, Wiebke Brix

    2014-01-01

    Gaseous hydrogen as an automotive fuel is reaching the point of commercial introduction. Development of hydrogen fuelling stations considering an acceptable fuelling time by cooling the hydrogen to -40 C has started. This paper presents a design study of coaxial tube ammonia evaporators for three...... different concepts of hydrogen cooling, one onestage and two two-stage processes. An exergoeconomic optimization is imposed to all three concepts to minimize the total cost. A numerical heat transfer model is developed in Engineer Equation Solver, using heat transfer and pressure drop correlations from...

  6. Using a Potassium Acetate Solution for Cooling High Pressure Hydrogen in a Prototype Heat Exchanger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard; Abel, M.; Rokni, Masoud

    2011-01-01

    A statement of intent assures more than 100.000 hydrogen vehicles will enter the market by 2015. A uniform approach for filling the vehicles has been developed and it states that cooling of the hydrogen is needed. For this purpose a test refrigeration facility was build. As the hydrogen...... was the most accurate of the methods compared. At low mass flows the calculated result was larger than the measured and at large mass flows the calculated results was lower than the measured. The used approach gives a reasonably accurate calculation for further investigations of cooling hydrogen....

  7. Development of the active magnetic regenerative refrigerator operating between 77 K and 20 K with the conduction cooled high temperature superconducting magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Inmyong; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2017-12-01

    The experimental investigation of an active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) operating between 77 K and 20 K is discussed in this paper, with detailed energy transfer analysis. A multi-layered active magnetic regenerator (AMR) is used, which consists of four different rare earth intermetallic compounds in the form of irregular powder. Numerical simulation confirms that the AMR can attain its target operating temperature range. Magnetic field alternation throughout the AMR is generated by a high temperature superconducting (HTS) magnet. The HTS magnet is cooled by a two stage Gifford-McMahon (GM) cryocooler. Helium gas was employed as a working fluid and its oscillating flow in the AMR is controlled in accordance with the magnetic field variation. The AMR is divided into two stages and each stage has a different mass flow rate as needed to achieve the desired cooling performance. The temperature variation of the AMR during the experiment is monitored by temperature sensors installed inside the AMR. The experimental results show that the AMRR is capable of achieving no-load temperature of 25.4 K while the warm end temperature is 77 K. The performance of the AMRR is analyzed by observing internal temperature variations at cyclic steady state. Furthermore, numerical estimation of the cooling capacity and the temperature variation of the AMR are examined and compared with the experimental results.

  8. DESIGN CHARACTERISTICS OF THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY HIGH-[TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James; Bayless, Paul; Strydom, Gerhard; Kumar, Akansha; Gougar, Hans

    2016-11-01

    A point design for a graphite-moderated, high-temperature, gas-cooled test reactor (HTG TR) has been developed by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) as part of a United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) initiative to explore and potentially expand the existing U.S. test reactor capabilities. This paper provides a summary of the design and its main attributes. The 200 MW HTG TR is a thermal-neutron spectrum reactor composed of hexagonal prismatic fuel and graphite reflector blocks. Twelve fuel columns (96 fuel blocks total and 6.34 m active core height) are arranged in two hexagonal rings to form a relatively compact, high-power density, annular core sandwiched between inner, outer, top, and bottom graphite reflectors. The HTG-TR is designed to operate at 7 MPa with a coolant inlet/outlet temperature of 325°C/650°C, and utilizes TRISO particle fuel from the DOE AGR Program with 425 ?m uranium oxycarbide (UCO) kernels and an enrichment of 15.5 wt% 235U. The primary mission of the HTG TR is material irradiation and therefore the core has been specifically designed and optimized to provide the highest possible thermal and fast neutron fluxes. The highest thermal neutron flux (3.90E+14 n/cm2s) occurs in the outer reflector, and the maximum fast flux levels (1.17E+14 n/cm2s) are produced in the central reflector column where most of the graphite has been removed. Due to high core temperatures under accident conditions, all the irradiation test facilities have been located in the inner and outer reflectors where fast flux levels decline. The core features a large number of irradiation positions with large test volumes and long test lengths, ideal for thermal neutron irradiation of large test articles. The total available test volume is more than 1100 liters. Up to four test loop facilities can be accommodated with pressure tube boundaries to isolate test articles and test fluids (e.g., liquid metal, liquid salt, light water) from the helium primary coolant system.

  9. Convergence of the Critical Cooling Rate for Protoplanetary Disk Fragmentation Achieved: The Key Role of Numerical Dissipation of Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hongping; Mayer, Lucio; Meru, Farzana

    2017-09-01

    We carry out simulations of gravitationally unstable disks using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) and the novel Lagrangian meshless finite mass (MFM) scheme in the GIZMO code. Our aim is to understand the cause of the nonconvergence of the cooling boundary for fragmentation reported in the literature. We run SPH simulations with two different artificial viscosity implementations and compare them with MFM, which does not employ any artificial viscosity. With MFM we demonstrate convergence of the critical cooling timescale for fragmentation at {β }{crit}≈ 3. Nonconvergence persists in SPH codes. We show how the nonconvergence problem is caused by artificial fragmentation triggered by excessive dissipation of angular momentum in domains with large velocity derivatives. With increased resolution, such domains become more prominent. Vorticity lags behind density, due to numerical viscous dissipation in these regions, promoting collapse with longer cooling times. Such effect is shown to be dominant over the competing tendency of artificial viscosity to diminish with increasing resolution. When the initial conditions are first relaxed for several orbits, the flow is more regular, with lower shear and vorticity in nonaxisymmetric regions, aiding convergence. Yet MFM is the only method that converges exactly. Our findings are of general interest, as numerical dissipation via artificial viscosity or advection errors can also occur in grid-based codes. Indeed, for the FARGO code values of {β }{crit} significantly higher than our converged estimate have been reported in the literature. Finally, we discuss implications for giant planet formation via disk instability.

  10. Drowning of a barrier coastline under rapid rates of relative sea-level rise during the 8.2 ka cooling event: Cause or coincidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellett, C.; Hodgson, D. M.; Lang, A.; Mauz, B.; Plater, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Examples where barrier landforms and deposits are preserved offshore of a highstand shoreline are rare on contemporary continental shelves, and in the rock record. Therefore, understanding of the conditions required for preservation and the sedimentary processes-response to such factors is limited and heavily dependent on simulation models. Here, an integrated dataset of multibeam bathymetry and 2D seismic reflection profiles has uncovered an exceptionally well preserved drowned barrier complex at Hastings Bank, on the English Channel continental shelf, offshore of southeast England. Mapping of nine seismic stratigraphic units calibrated with lithological information from multiple vibrocores has enabled the interpretation of fluvial, shoreface, barrier, washover fan, back-barrier and tidal environments of deposition. Stratigraphic architecture is used as the basis for landscape evolution reconstructions that reveal phases of barrier progradation, degradation and retreat. Optical Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating of shoreface and beach deposits revealed ages in the range of 8.4 ± 0.2 ka and 7.8 ± 0.2 ka. These ages indicate the barrier developed under rapid rates of early Holocene sea-level rise and more specifically, correlate to the time period surrounding the 8.2 ka cooling event and associated sea-level 'jump'. To preserve a barrier beach including the barrier foreshore under such rapid rates of relative sea-level rise, sediment supply would have to be sufficient to keep pace to prevent the shoreline responding through continuous reworking, i.e. rollover. Further, the rate of transgression is conditioned by inherited topography with higher rates of retreat, and hence greater potential for drowning, expected across the shallowly dipping substrate. Using Hastings Bank as an example, it has also been demonstrated that the morphodynamic state of the barrier complex in terms of its ability to respond dynamically to relative sea-level rise, conditions its

  11. High frame rate synthetic aperture duplex imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stuart, Matthias Bo; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev; Pihl, Michael Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Conventional color flow images are limited in velocity range and can either show the high velocities in systole or be optimized for the lower diastolic velocities. The full dynamics of the flow is, thus, hard to visualize. The dynamic range can be significantly increased by employing synthetic ap...

  12. New cooling regulation technology of secondary cooling station in DCS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Xuan; Yan, Jun-wei; Zhu, Dong-sheng; Liu, Fei-long; Lei, Jun-xi [The Key Lab of Enhanced Heat Transfer and Energy Conservation of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical and Energy Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Liang, Lie-quan [The Key Lab of E-Commerce Market Application Technology of Guangdong Province, Guangdong University of Business Studies, Guangzhou 510320 (China)

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, a kind of new control technology of secondary cooling station (constant flow rate/variable temperature difference) in district cooling system (DCS) is proposed in view of serial consequences including low efficiency and high operating cost caused by low temperature of supply water in DCS. This technology has been applied in DCS of Guangzhou University City. The result has already indicated that such technology can increase the supply and return temperatures of buildings, return water temperature of primary side in the plate heat exchanger unit, moreover, the efficiency of both the chiller and the whole system are improved significantly. (author)

  13. Effect of a Cooling Step Treatment on a High-Voltage GaN LED During ICP Dry Etching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Sheng; Hsiao, Sheng-Yu; Tseng, Chun-Lung; Shen, Ching-Hsing; Chiang, Jung-Sheng

    2017-02-01

    In this study, a lower dislocation density for a GaN surface and a reduced current path are observed at the interface of a SiO2 isolation sidewall, using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. This is grown using a 3-min cooling step treatment during inductivity coupled plasma dry etching. The lower forward voltage is measured, the leakage current decreases from 53nA to 32nA, and the maximum output power increases from 354.8 W to 357.2 W for an input current of 30 mA. The microstructure and the optoelectronic properties of high-voltage light-emitting-diodes is proven to be affected by the cooling step treatment, which allows enough time to release the thermal energy of the SiO2 isolation well.

  14. High readmission rate after heart valve surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sibilitz, K L; Berg, S K; Thygesen, Lau Caspar

    2015-01-01

    age (hazard ratio (95% CI): 1.3 (1.0-1.6)), male sex (1.2 (1.0-1.5)), mitral valve surgery (1.3 (1.0-1.6)), and infective endocarditis after surgery (1.8 (1.1-3.0), p: 0.01) predicted readmission, whereas higher age (2.3 (1.0-5.4)), higher comorbidity score (3.2 (1.8-6.0)), and infective endocarditis......BACKGROUND: After heart valve surgery, knowledge on long-term self-reported health status and readmission is lacking. Thus, the optimal strategy for out-patient management after surgery remains unclear. METHODS: Using a nationwide survey with linkage to Danish registers with one year follow-up, we...... included all adults 6-12 months after heart valve surgery irrespective of valve procedure, during Jan-June 2011 (n = 867). Participants completed a questionnaire regarding health-status (n = 742), and answers were compared with age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Readmission rates and mortality were...

  15. Analysis of the gas diffusion process during a hypothetical air ingress accident in a modular high temperature gas cooled reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Z.; Gerwin, Helmut; Scherer, Winfried

    1993-01-01

    In order to simulate the diffusion process during a hypothetical air ingress accident in a modular high temperature gas cooled reactor, a one-dimensional coupled diffusion-convection model has been established. In this analysis it is shown first, that experiments performed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) have been recalculated successfully, thus validating the new model. Applying this model to the NACOK facility, now under construction at the Institute for Safety Researc...

  16. Water-ingress analysis for the 200 MWe pebble-bed modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Yanhua, E-mail: zhengyh@mail.tsinghua.edu.c [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Shi Lei; Wang Yan [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-10-15

    Water ingress into the primary circuit is generally recognized as one of the severe accidents with potential hazard to the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor adopting steam-turbine cycle, which will cause a positive reactivity introduction, as well as the chemical corrosion of graphite fuel elements and reflector structure material. Besides, increase of the primary pressure may result in the opening of the safety valves, consequently leading the release of radioactive isotopes and flammable water gas. The analysis of such a kind of important and particular accident is significant to verify the inherent safety characteristics of the modular HTR plants. Based on the preliminary design of the 200 MWe high temperature gas-cooled reactor pebble-bed modular (HTR-PM), the design basis accident of a double-ended guillotine break of one heating tube and the beyond design basis accident of a large break of the main steam collection plate have been analyzed by using TINTE code, which is a special transient analysis program for high temperature gas-cooled reactors. Some safety relevant concerns, such as the fuel temperature, the primary loop pressure, the graphite corrosion, the water gas releasing amount, as well as the natural convection influence on the condition of failing to close the blower flaps, have been studied in detail. The calculation results indicate that even under some severe hypothetical postulates, the HTR-PM is able to keep the inherent safeties of the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor and has a relatively good natural plant response, which will not result in environmental radiation hazard.

  17. Low-Drift Coherent Population Trapping Clock Based on Laser-Cooled Atoms and High-Coherence Excitation Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaochi; Ivanov, Eugene; Yudin, Valeriy I.; Kitching, John; Donley, Elizabeth A.

    2017-11-01

    A compact cold-atom coherent population trapping clock in which laser-cooled atoms are interrogated with highly coherent coherent population trapping fields under free fall is presented. The system achieves fractional frequency instability at the level of 3 ×10-13 on the time scale of an hour. The clock may lend itself to portable applications since the atoms typically fall only 1.6 mm during the typical interrogation period of 18 ms.

  18. Issues concerning high current lower energy electron beams required for ion cooling between EBIS LINAC and booster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hershcovitch,A.

    2009-03-01

    Some issues, regarding a low energy high current electron beam that will be needed for electron beam cooling to reduce momentum of gold ions exiting the EBIS LINAC before injection into the booster, are examined. Options for propagating such an electron beam, as well as the effect of neutralizing background plasma on electron and ion beam parameters are calculated. Computations and some experimental data indicate that none of these issues is a show stopper.

  19. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology development program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Bartine, D.E.; Sanders, J.P.

    1983-06-01

    During 1982 the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) Technology Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) continued to develop experimental data required for the design and licensing of cogeneration HTGRs. The program involves fuels and materials development (including metals, graphite, ceramic, and concrete materials), HTGR chemistry studies, structural component development and testing, reactor physics and shielding studies, performance testing of the reactor core support structure, and HTGR application and evaluation studies.

  20. Groundmass crystallisation and cooling rates of lava-like ignimbrites: the Grey's Landing ignimbrite, southern Idaho, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, B. S.; Cordonnier, B.; Rowe, M. C.; Szymanowski, D.; Bachmann, O.; Andrews, G. D. M.

    2015-10-01

    Constraining magmatic and eruptive processes is key to understanding how volcanoes operate. However, reconstructing eruptive and pre-eruptive processes requires the ability to see through any post-eruptive modification of the deposit. The well-preserved Grey's Landing ignimbrite from the central Snake River Plain provides an opportunity to systematically investigate the post-eruptive processes occurring through a single deposit sheet. Despite overall compositional homogeneity in both bulk and glass compositions, the Grey's Landing ignimbrite does preserve differences in the abundance of Li in plagioclase crystals which are strongly associated with the host lithology. Li abundances in plagioclase from the quickly cooled upper and basal vitrophyres are typically low (average 5 ppm, n = 262) while plagioclase from the microcrystalline interior of the deposit has higher Li contents (average 33 ppm, n = 773). Given that no other trace elemental parameter in plagioclase varies, we interpret the variability in Li to reflect a post-depositional process. Groundmass crystallisation of a rhyolite like Grey's Landing requires ˜50 % crystallisation of sanidine and variable amounts of a silica-rich phase (quartz, tridymite, cristobalite) and plagioclase to satisfy mass balance. We suggest the low affinity of Li for sanidine causes migration of groundmass Li into plagioclase during crystallisation. Even within the microcrystalline interior of the deposit, the morphology of the groundmass varies. The more marginal, finer-grained regions are dominated by cristobalite as the SiO2-rich phase while tridymite and quartz are additionally found in the more slowly cooled, coarser-grained portions of thick sections of the ignimbrite. Numerical models of cooling and crystallisation tested against field observations indicate that the groundmass crystallisation occurred relatively rapidly following emplacement (a maximum of a few years where the ignimbrite is thickest). These numerical

  1. Sustained large stimulation of soil heterotrophic respiration rate and its temperature sensitivity by soil warming in a cool-temperate forested peatland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maricar Aguilos

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a soil warming experiment in a cool-temperate forested peatland in northern Japan during the snow-free seasons of 2007–2011, to determine whether the soil warming would change the heterotrophic respiration rate and its temperature sensitivity. We elevated the soil temperature by 3°C at 5-cm depth by using overhead infrared heaters and continuously measured hourly soil CO2 fluxes with a 15-channel automated chamber system. The 15 chambers were divided into three groups each with five replications for the control, unwarmed-trenched and warmed-trenched treatments. Soil warming enhanced heterotrophic respiration by 82% (mean of four seasons (2008–2011 observation±SD, 6.84±2.22 µmol C m−2 s−1 as compared to the unwarmed-trenched treatment (3.76±0.98 µmol C m−2 s−1. The sustained enhancement of heterotrophic respiration with soil warming suggests that global warming will accelerate the loss of carbon substantially more from forested peatlands than from other upland forest soils. Soil warming likewise enhanced temperature sensitivity slightly (Q 10, 3.1±0.08 and 3.3±0.06 in the four-season average in unwarmed- and warmed-trenched treatments, respectively, and significant effect was observed in 2009 (p<0.001 and 2010 (p<0.01. However, there was no significant difference in the basal respiration rate at 10°C (R 10, 2.2±0.52 and 2.8±1.2 µmol C m−2 s−1 between treatments, although the values tended to be high by warming throughout the study period. These results suggest that global warming will enhance not only the heterotrophic respiration rate itself but also its Q 10 in forests with high substrate availability and without severe water stress, and predictions for such ecosystems obtained by using models assuming no change in Q 10 are likely to underestimate the carbon release from the soil to the atmosphere in a future warmer environment.

  2. High data rate optical transceiver terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, E. S.

    1973-01-01

    The objectives of this study were: (1) to design a 400 Mbps optical transceiver terminal to operate from a high-altitude balloon-borne platform in order to permit the quantitative evaluation of a space-qualifiable optical communications system design, (2) to design an atmospheric propagation experiment to operate in conjunction with the terminal to measure the degrading effects of the atmosphere on the links, and (3) to design typical optical communications experiments for space-borne laboratories in the 1980-1990 time frame. As a result of the study, a transceiver package has been configured for demonstration flights during late 1974. The transceiver contains a 400 Mbps transmitter, a 400 Mbps receiver, and acquisition and tracking receivers. The transmitter is a Nd:YAG, 200 Mhz, mode-locked, CW, diode-pumped laser operating at 1.06 um requiring 50 mW for 6 db margin. It will be designed to implement Pulse Quaternary Modulation (PQM). The 400 Mbps receiver utilizes a Dynamic Crossed-Field Photomultiplier (DCFP) detector. The acquisition receiver is a Quadrant Photomultiplier Tube (QPMT) and receives a 400 Mbps signal chopped at 0.1 Mhz.

  3. Boundary model-based reference control of blower cooled high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans-Christian Becker; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    Fuel cells have, by design, a limited effective life time, which depends on how they are operated. The general consent is that operation of the fuel cell at the extreme of the operational range, or operation of the fuel cell without sufficient reactants (a.k.a. starvation), will lower the effective...... life time of a fuel cell significantly. On air cooled HTPEMFCs, the blower, which supplies the fuel cell with oxygen for the chemical process, also functions as the cooling system. This makes the blower bi-functional and as a result a higher supply of oxygen is often available, hence changes...... in the fuel cell output can be optimised by the knowledge of how much oxygen is supplied to the fuel cell at any given time, without reducing the effective life time of a fuel cell by starvation....

  4. Cryopreservation of boar semen. II: Effect of cooling rate and duration of freezing point plateau on boar semen frozen in mini- and maxi-straws and plastic bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bwanga, C O; Einarsson, S; Rodriguez-Martinez, H

    1991-01-01

    The post-thaw motility and the acrosome integrity of semen from 4 boars frozen with a programmable freezing machine, in mini (0.25 ml) and maxi (5 ml) plastic straws and in 10 x 5 cm Teflon FEP-plastic bags (0.12 mm thick, 5 ml), were compared. The freezing of the semen was monitored by way of thermo-couples placed in the straws and the bags. Three freezing programmes were used, namely A: from +5 degrees C, at a rate of 3 degrees C/min, to -6 degrees C, held for 1 min at -6 degrees C, and followed by a cooling rate of 20 degrees C/min to -100 degrees C; B: a similar curve except that there was no holding time at -6 degrees C and that the cooling rate was 30 degrees C/min, and C: from +5 degrees C to -100 degrees C, with a cooling rate of 35 degrees C/min, followed by storage in liquid N2. Despite the freezing curve assayed, both the mini-straws and the bags depicted much shorter freezing point plateaus as compared to the maxi-straws. Post-thaw sperm motility as well as the amount of normal apical ridges were equally significantly higher when semen was frozen in mini-straws or in bags than in maxi-straws. Significant differences in these post-thawing parameters were obtained between the freezing curves used. The stepwise freezing procedure A appeared as the best alternative for boar semen, considering this in vitro evaluation.

  5. Magnetization of the joint-free high temperature superconductor (RE)Ba2Cu3Ox coil by field cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yali; Wang, Yawei; Li, Jianwei; Jin, Zhijian

    2017-09-01

    Joint-free (RE)Ba2Cu3Ox (REBCO) coil based on `wind-and-flip' technique has been developed to generate a persistent magnetic field without power supply. This paper is to study the magnetization characteristics of the joint-free REBCO coil by field cooling, in order to trap higher field. A joint-free pancake coil is wound by REBCO tapes and the field cooling magnetization test is performed on it. An approximate numerical model based on H-formulation is built for this coil to analyze its magnetization behavior, which is validated by the experimental results Analysis show that a persistent direct current is induced in the coil during the field cooling operation, which generates the trapped field. The induced current of the joint-free coil shows an intrinsic non-uniform distribution among turns. Increasing the magnetization field and critical current of REBCO conductors can considerably increase the trapped field. But the trapping factor (the rate of trapped field to background magnetization field) reaches a maximum value (60 % for the test coil). This maximum value is an intrinsic characteristics for a fabricated coil, which only depends on the coil's geometry structure. With a same usage of REBCO tapes, the trapping factor can be improved significantly by optimizing the coil structure to multiple pancakes, and it can approach 100 %.

  6. Magnetization of the joint-free high temperature superconductor (REBa2Cu3Ox coil by field cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yali Zheng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Joint-free (REBa2Cu3Ox (REBCO coil based on ‘wind-and-flip’ technique has been developed to generate a persistent magnetic field without power supply. This paper is to study the magnetization characteristics of the joint-free REBCO coil by field cooling, in order to trap higher field. A joint-free pancake coil is wound by REBCO tapes and the field cooling magnetization test is performed on it. An approximate numerical model based on H-formulation is built for this coil to analyze its magnetization behavior, which is validated by the experimental results Analysis show that a persistent direct current is induced in the coil during the field cooling operation, which generates the trapped field. The induced current of the joint-free coil shows an intrinsic non-uniform distribution among turns. Increasing the magnetization field and critical current of REBCO conductors can considerably increase the trapped field. But the trapping factor (the rate of trapped field to background magnetization field reaches a maximum value (60 % for the test coil. This maximum value is an intrinsic characteristics for a fabricated coil, which only depends on the coil’s geometry structure. With a same usage of REBCO tapes, the trapping factor can be improved significantly by optimizing the coil structure to multiple pancakes, and it can approach 100 %.

  7. REACTOR COOLING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  8. Boost Converter Fed High Performance BLDC Drive for Solar PV Array Powered Air Cooling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shobha Rani Depuru

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the utilization of a DC-DC boost converter as a mediator between a Solar Photovoltaic (SPV array and the Voltage Source Inverters (VSI in an SPV array powered air cooling system to attain maximum efficiency. The boost converter, over the various common DC-DC converters, offers many advantages in SPV based applications. Further, two Brushless DC (BLDC motors are employed in the proposed air cooling system: one to run the centrifugal water pump and the other to run a fan-blower. Employing a BLDC motor is found to be the best option because of its top efficiency, supreme reliability and better performance over a wide range of speeds. The air cooling system is developed and simulated using the MATLAB/Simulink environment considering the steady state variation in the solar irradiance. Further, the efficiency of BLDC drive system is compared with a conventional Permanent Magnet DC (PMDC motor drive system and from the simulated results it is found that the proposed system performs better.

  9. Effects of heating and cooling rate on transformation behaviors in weld heat affected zone of low carbon steel; Teitanso koban no yosetsu netsu eikyobu no hentai kyodo ni oyobosu kanetsu reikyaku sokudo no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanetsuki, Y.; Katsumata, M. [Kobe Steel, Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1998-01-25

    Discussions were given on effects of welding heat cycles on transformation behaviors in a weld heat affected zone (HAZ). Test pieces are low-carbon fine ferrite pearlite organization steel sheets, which have been treated with a thermomechanical control process (TMCP). The heat cycling was experimented at a maximum temperature of 1350 degC by using a high-frequency heating coil, heating rates from 0.15 to 200 degC/s, cooling rates from 10 to 80 degC/s at an elevated temperature region (higher than 900 degC), and transformation regions (lower than 900 degC) from 0.5 to 6 degC. A transformation curve in actual welding heat cycling was interpreted from these results. Shear-type inverse transformation (from ferrite to austenite) occurs in a rate region corresponding to the heating rate realized during welding. Austenite containing internal stress and a lower structure formed by this inverse transformation accelerates transformation into grain boundary ferrite (GBF) and acerous ferrite (AF). On the other hand, slow cooling in the elevated temperature region releases the internal stress, restores the lower structure, and suppresses the GBF and AF transformation. The GBF tends to precipitate pearlite in adjacent regions and deteriorates the HAZ tenacity. 17 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The Effect of Minimum Wage Rates on High School Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, John Robert; Hamrock, Caitlin

    2010-01-01

    Does increasing the minimum wage reduce the high school completion rate? Previous research has suffered from (1. narrow time horizons, (2. potentially inadequate measures of states' high school completion rates, and (3. potentially inadequate measures of minimum wage rates. Overcoming each of these limitations, we analyze the impact of changes in…

  11. Coulomb crystals in a cryogenic Paul trap for sympathetic cooling of molecular ions and highly charged ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windberger, A.; Schwarz, M.; Versolato, O. O.; Baumann, T.; Bekker, H.; Schmöger, L.; Hansen, A. K.; Gingell, A. D.; Klosowski, L.; Kristensen, S.; Schmidt, P. O.; Ullrich, J.; Drewsen, M.; Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.

    2013-03-01

    Electron beam ion traps used for spectroscopy of highly charged ions (HCI) produce a deep trapping potential leading to high temperatures of the stored ions, and thus limiting the achievable spectral resolution. A novel device at the Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik, the Cryogenic linear Paul Trap Experiment (CryPTEx), attached to an electron beam ion trap, provides a new experimental platform to overcome these limitations. The trap assembly operates at a temperature of 4 K and offers optical access for quantum manipulation and imaging of the trapped ions. Since forbidden optical transitions in HCI do not support direct laser cooling, sympathetic cooling with Coulomb crystals of singly charged ions such as Be+ or Mg+ will be applied in order to reach the natural linewidth of optical forbidden transitions in HCI of interest. With the added advantage of long ion trapping times resulting from residual gas pressures of H2 at 4 K below 10-15 mbar, CryPTEx has been commissioned in collaboration with the Ion Trap Group in Århus using rovibrationally cooled MgH+ ions. Strong suppression of the black body radiation at the trap center, ion storage times of about 28 hours, and largely enhanced population of the rovibrational ground state were achieved.

  12. Analysis on Cooling Effect of Crushed-Rocks Embankment of Qinghai-Tibet High-Grade Road

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongqing Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the cooling effect of the crushed-rocks embankment, the permeability and the inertial resistance coefficient were measured by the wind tunnel test of spheres with a diameter of 20 cm, and then the stabilities of the closed crushed-rocks embankment with the wide pavement, the closed crushed-rocks embankment with the narrow pavement, and the duct-ventilated and closed crushed-rocks embankment were calculated. In the next 50 years, assuming that the temperature in Qinghai-Tibet plateau will rise by 2.6°C condition, the cooling effects of these three special high-grade embankment structures were studied. The test results and the numerical calculation results show that the relationship between pressure gradient and seepage velocity in the spheres layer diverges completely from Darcy’s law, and it shows a nice quadratic nonlinear relationship. Stabilities of those two closed crushed-rock embankments without the duct-ventilated structure could be destroyed because of the high permafrost temperature under embankments. The duct-ventilated and closed crushed-rocks embankment can cool down the permafrost effectively and raise the permafrost table and ensure the long-term thermal stability of permafrost under road.

  13. Options for a high heat flux enabled helium cooled first wall for DEMO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbeiter, Frederik, E-mail: f.arbe@kit.edu; Chen, Yuming; Ghidersa, Bradut-Eugen; Klein, Christine; Neuberger, Heiko; Ruck, Sebastian; Schlindwein, Georg; Schwab, Florian; Weth, Axel von der

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Design challenges for helium cooled first wall reviewed and otimization approaches explored. • Application of enhanced heat transfer surfaces to the First Wall cooling channels. • Demonstrated a design point for 1 MW/m{sup 2} with temperatures <550 °C and acceptable stresses. • Feasibility of several manufacturing processes for ribbed surfaces is shown. - Abstract: Helium is considered as coolant in the plasma facing first wall of several blanket concepts for DEMO fusion reactors, due to the favorable properties of flexible temperature range, chemical inertness, no activation, comparatively low effort to remove tritium from the gas and no chemical corrosion. Existing blanket designs have shown the ability to use helium cooled first walls with heat flux densities of 0.5 MW/m{sup 2}. Average steady state heat loads coming from the plasma for current EU DEMO concepts are expected in the range of 0.3 MW/m{sup 2}. The definition of peak values is still ongoing and depends on the chosen first wall shape, magnetic configuration and assumptions on the fraction of radiated power and power fall off lengths in the scrape off layer of the plasma. Peak steady state values could reach and excess 1 MW/m{sup 2}. Higher short-term transient loads are expected. Design optimization approaches including heat transfer enhancement, local heat transfer tuning and shape optimization of the channel cross section are discussed. Design points to enable a helium cooled first wall capable to sustain heat flux densities of 1 MW/m{sup 2} at an average shell temperature lower than 500 °C are developed based on experimentally validated heat transfer coefficients of structured channel surfaces. The required pumping power is in the range of 3–5% of the collected thermal power. The FEM stress analyses show code-acceptable stress intensities. Several manufacturing methods enabling the application of the suggested heat transfer enhanced first wall channels are explored. An

  14. High regression rate, high density hybrid fuels Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR program will investigate high energy density novel nanofuels combined with high density binders for use with an N2O oxidizer. Terves has developed...

  15. Experimental characterization of fatigue strength in butt welded joint considering the geometry and the effect of cooling rate of the weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzola, Nelson; Hernández, Edgar

    2017-05-01

    In this work the experimental characterization of fatigue strength in butt welded joints considering the geometry and the post-weld cooling cycle was performed. ASTM A-36 structural steel was used as the base metal for the shielded metal arc welding process, with welding electrode E6013. Two experimental factors were established: weld bead geometry and the post-weld cooling rate. Two levels for each factor, the welding reinforcement (1 and 3 mm), and the rate of cooling, slow (quiet air) and fast (immersion in water) are evaluated respectively. For the uniaxial fatigue tests, 8 samples were selected for each treatment for a total of 32 specimens. The mechanical and fractomechanical properties of fusion zone, heat affected zone and base metal in relation to the analysis of failure mechanisms were analysed. The fatigue crack growth rates were estimated based on the counting of microstrations. Furthermore, experimental tests, such as uniaxial tension, microindentation hardness, Charpy impact and metallographic analysis, were made to know the influence of the experimental factors in the fatigue strength. On this research, about the 78.13% of the samples obtained a resistance higher than the recommended one by class FAT 100. The results showed that the geometry of the joint is the factor of greatest influence on fatigue strength for butt welded joints; the greater the weld reinforcement the lower the fatigue strength of the joint. Although it is also important to consider other geometric factors of less impact as it is the weld toe radius and the welding chord width.

  16. Effects of cooling rate and Al on MnS formation in medium-carbon non-quenched and tempered steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Meng-long; Wang, Fu-ming; Li, Chang-rong; Yang, Zhan-bing; Meng, Qing-yong; Tao, Su-fen

    2015-06-01

    The effect of Al on the morphology of MnS in medium-carbon non-quenched and tempered steel was investigated at three different cooling rates of 0.24, 0.43, and 200°C·s-1. The formation mechanisms of three types of MnS were elucidated based on phase diagram information combined with crystal growth models. The morphology of MnS is governed by the precipitation mode and the growth conditions. A monotectic reaction and subsequent fast solidification lead to globular Type I MnS. Type II MnS inclusions with different morphological characteristics form as a result of a eutectic reaction followed by the growth in the Fe matrix. Type III MnS presents a divorced eutectic morphology. At the cooling rate of 0.24°C·s-1, the precipitation of dispersed Type III MnS is significantly enhanced by the addition of 0.044wt% acid-soluble Al (Als), while Type II MnS clusters prefer to form in steels with either 0.034wt% or 0.052wt% Als. At the relatively higher cooling rates of 200°C·s-1 and 0.43°C·s-1, the formation of Type I and Type II MnS inclusions is promoted, and the influence of Al is negligible. The results of this work are expected to be employed in practice to improve the mechanical properties of non-quenched and tempered steels.

  17. Production of bovine cloned embryos with donor cells frozen at a slow cooling rate in a conventional freezer (-20 degrees C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón, Liliana; Gómez, Martha C; Jenkins, Jill A; Leibo, Stanley P; Wirtu, Gemechu; Dresser, Betsy L; Pope, C Earle

    2009-11-01

    SummaryUsually, fibroblasts are frozen in dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO, 10% v/v) at a cooling rate of 1 degrees C/min in a low-temperature (-80 degrees C) freezer (LTF) before storage in liquid nitrogen (LN2); however, a LTF is not always available. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate apoptosis and viability of bovine fibroblasts frozen in a LTF or conventional freezer (CF; -20 degrees C) and their subsequent ability for development to blastocyst stage after fusion with enucleated bovine oocytes. Percentages of live cells frozen in LTF (49.5%) and CF (50.6%) were similar, but significantly less than non-frozen control (88%). In both CF and LTF, percentages of live apoptotic cells exposed to LN2 after freezing were lower (4% and 5%, respectively) as compared with unexposed cells (10% and 18%, respectively). Cells frozen in a CF had fewer cell doublings/24 h (0.45) and required more days (9.1) to reach 100% confluence at the first passage (P) after thawing and plating as compared with cells frozen in a LTF (0.96 and 4.0 days, respectively). Hypoploidy at P12 was higher than at P4 in cells frozen in either a CF (37.5% vs. 19.2%) or in a LTF (30.0% vs. 15.4%). A second-generation cryo-solution reduced the incidence of necrosis (29.4%) at 0 h after thawing as compared with that of a first generation cryo-solution (DMEM + DMSO, 60.2%). The percentage of apoptosis in live cells was affected by cooling rate (CF = 1.9% vs. LFT = 0.7%). Development of bovine cloned embryos to the blastocyst stage was not affected by cooling rate or freezer type.

  18. Heat pipe cooling system of high-power three-level explosion-proof inverter based on the loss calculation and finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan

    2017-07-01

    The special using condition of high-power three-level explosion-proof inverter limits its cooling system within heat pipe and water-cooled cooling systems. How to calculate these two systems quantitatively to provide references for engineering application becomes one of the critical problems. In this paper, the principle of three-level explosion-proof was introduced first, and the power-loss generation theory was described and deduced into equations. Secondly, the heat pipe cooling system theory calculation was conducted based on the power losses of power devices, and the whole cooling system model was built by using finite element analysis. Finally, the temperature rise experiment was carried out on a 1 MW high-power three-level explosion-proof inverter, and the results proved the feasibility of this theory and its accuracy of analysis.

  19. The influence of the cooling rate of a 2PbO . SiO2 melt on the constitution of silicate anions

    OpenAIRE

    Götz, J; Hoebbel, Dagobert; Wieker, Wolfgang

    1980-01-01

    The kinetics of crystallization in a 2Pbo · SiO2 melt have been investigated. A TTT-diagram was constructed, which describes the kinetic parameters for the formation of crystalline phases in the system. By means of silicate anion analysis the relationship between the cooling rates of the melt and the structure of silicate units in solid 2PbO · SiO2 has been studied. Substantial differences in the thermal treatment of the melt lead to alterations of the silicate anion constitution, which cause...

  20. Numerical simulation of severe water ingress accidents in a modular high temperature gas cooled reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Zuoyi; Scherer, W.

    1996-01-01

    This report analyzes reverse water ingress accidents in the SIEMENS 200 MW Modular Pebble-Bed High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR-MODULE) under the assumption of no active safety protection systems in order to find the safety margins of the current HTR-MODULE design and to realize a catastrophe-free nuclear technology. A water, steam and helium multi-phase cavity model is developed and implemented in the DSNP simulation system. The DSNP system is then used to simulate the primary and secondary circuit of a HTR-MODULE power plant. Comparisons of the model with experiments and with TINTE calculations serve as validation of the simulation. The analysis of the primary circuit tries to answer the question how fast the water enters the reactor core. It was found that the maximum H{sub 2}O concentration increase in the reactor core is smaller than 0.3 kg/(m{sup 3}s). The liquid water vaporization in the steam generator and H{sub 2}O transport from the steam generator to the reactor core reduce the ingress velocity of the H{sub 2}O into the reactor core. In order to answer the question how much water enters the primary circuit, the full cavitation of the feed water pumps is analyzed. It is found that if the secondary circuit is depressurized enough, the feed water pumps will be inherently stopped by the full cavitation. This limits the water to be pumped from the deaerator to the steam generator. A comprehensive simulation of the MODUL-HTR power plant then shows that the H{sub 2}O inventory in the primary circuit can be limited to about 3000 kg. The nuclear reactivity increase caused by the water ingress leads to a fast power excursion, which, however, is inherently counterbalanced by negative feedback effects. Concerning the integrity of the fuel elements, the safety relevant temperature limit of 1600 C was not reached in any case. (orig.) [Deutsch] Dieser Bericht analysiert schwere Wassereinbruch-Stoerfaelle im 200 MW modularen Kugelhaufen-Hochtemperaturreaktor (HTR

  1. High strength and heat resistant chromium steels for sodium-cooled fast reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamal, S.; Grandy, C.; Farmer, M.; Brunsvold, A.

    2004-12-22

    This report provides the results of a preliminary phase of a project supporting the Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Technology Initiative at ANL. The project targets the Generation IV nuclear energy systems, particularly the area of reducing the cost of sodium-cooled fast-reactors by utilizing innovative materials. The main goal of the project is to provide the nuclear heat exchanger designers a simplified means to quantify the cost advantages of the recently developed high strength and heat resistant ferritic steels with 9 to 13% chromium content. The emphasis in the preliminary phase is on two steels that show distinctive advantages and have been proposed as candidate materials for heat exchangers and also for reactor vessels and near-core components of Gen IV reactors. These steels are the 12Cr-2W (HCM12A) and 9Cr-1MoVNb (modified 9Cr-1Mo). When these steels are in tube form, they are referred to in ASTM Standards as T122 and T91, respectively. A simple thermal-hydraulics analytical model of a counter-flow, shell-and-tube, once-through type superheated steam generator is developed to determine the required tube length and tube wall temperature profile. The single-tube model calculations are then extended to cover the following design criteria: (i) ratio of the tube stress due to water/steam pressure to the ASME B&PV Code allowable stress, (ii) ratio of the strain due to through-tube-wall temperature differences to the material fatigue limit, (iii) overall differential thermal expansion between the tube and shell, and (iv) total amount of tube material required for the specified heat exchanger thermal power. Calculations were done for a 292 MW steam generator design with 2200 tubes and a steam exit condition of 457 C and 16 MPa. The calculations were performed with the tubes made of the two advanced ferritic steels, 12Cr-2W and 9Cr-1MoVNb, and of the most commonly used steel, 2 1/4Cr-1Mo. Compared to the 2 1/4Cr-1Mo results, the 12Cr-2W tubes required 29% less

  2. Microgravity experiments on boiling and applications: research activity of advanced high heat flux cooling technology for electronic devices in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Koichi; Kawamura, Hiroshi

    2004-11-01

    Research and development on advanced high heat flux cooling technology for electronic devices has been carried out as the Project of Fundamental Technology Development for Energy Conservation, promoted by the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan (NEDO). Based on the microgravity experiments on boiling heat transfer, the following useful results have obtained for the cooling of electronic devices. In subcooled flow boiling in a small channel, heat flux increases considerably more than the ordinary critical heat flux with microbubble emission in transition boiling, and dry out of the heating surface is disturbed. Successful enhancement of heat transfer is achieved by a capillary effect from grooved surface dual subchannels on the liquid supply. The critical heat flux increases 30-40 percent more than for ordinary subchannels. A self-wetting mechanism has been proposed, following investigation of bubble behavior in pool boiling of binary mixtures under microgravity. Ideas and a new concept have been proposed for the design of future cooling system in power electronics.

  3. Research on the Compatibility of the Cooling Unit in an Automotive Exhaust-based Thermoelectric Generator and Engine Cooling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y. D.; Liu, X.; Chen, S.; Xing, H. B.; Su, C. Q.

    2014-06-01

    The temperature difference between the hot and cold sides of thermoelectric modules is a key factor affecting the conversion efficiency of an automotive exhaust-based thermoelectric generator (TEG). In the work discussed in this paper the compatibility of TEG cooling unit and engine cooling system was studied on the basis of the heat transfer characteristics of the TEG. A new engine-cooling system in which a TEG cooling unit was inserted was simulated at high power and high vehicle speed, and at high power and low vehicle speed, to obtain temperatures and flow rates of critical inlets and outlets. The results show that coolant temperature exceeds its boiling point at high power and low vehicle speed, so the new system cannot meet cooling requirements under these conditions. Measures for improvement to optimize the cooling system are proposed, and provide a basis for future research.

  4. Development status and operational features of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkleblack, R.K.

    1976-04-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the maturity of HTR-technology and to look out for possible technical problems, concerning introduction of large HTR power plants into the market. Further state and problems of introducing and closing the thorium fuel cycle is presented and judged. Finally, the state of development of advanced HTR-concepts for electricity production, the direct cycle HTR with helium turbine, and the gas-cooled fast breeder is discussed. In preparing the study, both HTR concepts with spherical and block-type fuel elements have been considered.

  5. Performance of semi-transportation-cooled liner in high-temperature-rise combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wear, J. D.; Trout, A. M.; Smith, J. M.

    1981-01-01

    Results from tests with the Lamilloy combustor liner are compared with results obtained from a conventionally designed, film cooled, step-louver liner. Operation of the Lamilloy liner with counterrotating swirl combustor fuel modules with mixing venturis was possible to a fuel-air ratio of 0.065 without obtaining excessive liner metal temperatures. At the 0.065 fuel-air condition the average liner metal temperature was 140 K and the maximum local temperature 280 K above the inlet air temperature. Combustion efficiency, pattern factor, and smoke data are discussed.

  6. High-Rate Strong-Signal Quantum Cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Horace P.

    1996-01-01

    Several quantum cryptosystems utilizing different kinds of nonclassical lights, which can accommodate high intensity fields and high data rate, are described. However, they are all sensitive to loss and both the high rate and the strong-signal character rapidly disappear. A squeezed light homodyne detection scheme is proposed which, with present-day technology, leads to more than two orders of magnitude data rate improvement over other current experimental systems for moderate loss.

  7. Heart rate reveals torpor at high body temperatures in lowland tropical free-tailed bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, M Teague; Rikker, Sebastian; Wikelski, Martin; Ter Maat, Andries; Pollock, Henry S; Dechmann, Dina K N

    2017-12-01

    Reduction in metabolic rate and body temperature is a common strategy for small endotherms to save energy. The daily reduction in metabolic rate and heterothermy, or torpor, is particularly pronounced in regions with a large variation in daily ambient temperature. This applies most strongly in temperate bat species (order Chiroptera), but it is less clear how tropical bats save energy if ambient temperatures remain high. However, many subtropical and tropical species use some daily heterothermy on cool days. We recorded the heart rate and the body temperature of free-ranging Pallas' mastiff bats ( Molossus molossus ) in Gamboa, Panamá, and showed that these individuals have low field metabolic rates across a wide range of body temperatures that conform to high ambient temperature. Importantly, low metabolic rates in controlled respirometry trials were best predicted by heart rate, and not body temperature . Molossus molossus enter torpor-like states characterized by low metabolic rate and heart rates at body temperatures of 32°C, and thermoconform across a range of temperatures. Flexible metabolic strategies may be far more common in tropical endotherms than currently known.

  8. Modern precise high-power water-cooling systems for press quenching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Patejuk

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Demand for extrusions in transport applications is increasing rapidly. The extrusions must be strong, light, crashworthy and may have to undergo hydroforming. This implies low wall thicknesses (1-2½ mm in strong alloys that need very fast quenching to obtain the required T4 temper. Crashworth iness – the ability to absorb a lot of energy in crushing deformation – demands very uniform properties throughout the section, and so does hydroforming. Various systems of water or air/water jets, with and without scanning, with and withoutarrangements for precisely aiming the jets, have proved effective for less difficult alloys in wall thicknesses down to 3 mm. These areunsuitable for the new types of transport extrusions, either inducing physical distortion or non-uniform mechanical properties. A novelcooling system that satisfies the new requirements uses laminar water jets of 50-250 μm diameter in a densely packed array of up to10/cm2. These are arranged in modules whose position and direction of aim can be adjusted relative to the part of the extrusion they cool,assuring linear cooling of all parts of the section at up to 500 K/s. The array of modules is very compact and not expensive. A sophisticated system of water microfiltration ensures that the fine nozzles do not become blocked.

  9. State of Art Report for the Bypass and Cross Flows in Prismatic Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Ji Su; Kim, Min Hwan

    2010-01-15

    The horizontal and vertical gaps between the adjacent fuel blocks occurs significantly in the prismatic modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor core due to the thermal expansion, irradiation expansion/shrinking, and fuel block column bowing by pressure and gravity during the plant operation, in addition to the initial manufacture/design tolerance of fuel/reflector blocks. The coolant leakage of helium gas occurs through the gaps. These bypass and cross flows highly impact on the effective core cooling flow rate. This report describes the technical state of the bypass and cross flow study, based on ten reference papers, reviewing and summarizing four classified contents in the viewpoints of 'The reactor core fluctuation data for the first identification of the importance of the bypass and cross flow', 'The cross flow test and evaluation data', 'The flow test and evaluation data of the seal mechanism to prevent the leakage flow', and 'The reactor core thermal-fluid analysis and evaluation dat000.

  10. Highly efficient resistive plate chambers for high rate environment

    CERN Document Server

    Cwiok, M; Górski, M; Królikowski, J

    1999-01-01

    The full scale prototype of an inverted double gap RPC module for ME-1/1 station of the CMS detector was tested in the gamma irradiation facility at the CERN SPS muon beam. The chamber made of medium resistivity bakelite and filled with "green gas" mixture of C /sub 2/H/sub 2/F/sub 4//iso-butane/SF/sub 6/ has wide efficiency plateau and good timing properties when operated in avalanche mode under continuous irradiation with strong /sup 137/Cs source for rates up to about 5 kHz/cm/sup 2//gap. (10 refs).

  11. High rate flame synthesis of highly crystalline iron oxide nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merchan-Merchan, W.; Saveliev, A. V.; Taylor, A. M.

    2008-03-01

    Single-step flame synthesis of iron oxide nanorods is performed using iron probes inserted into an opposed-flow methane oxy-flame. The high temperature reacting environment of the flame tends to convert elemental iron into a high density layer of iron oxide nanorods. The diameters of the iron oxide nanorods vary from 10 to 100 nm with a typical length of a few microns. The structural characterization performed shows that nanorods possess a highly ordered crystalline structure with parameters corresponding to cubic magnetite (Fe3O4) with the [100] direction oriented along the nanorod axis. Structural variations of straight nanorods such as bends, and T-branched and Y-branched shapes are frequently observed within the nanomaterials formed, opening pathways for synthesis of multidimensional, interconnected networks.

  12. Development of gas cooled reactors and experimental setup of high temperature helium loop for in-pile operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miletić, Marija, E-mail: marija_miletic@live.com [Czech Technical University in Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Fukač, Rostislav, E-mail: fuk@cvrez.cz [Research Centre Rez Ltd., Rez (Czech Republic); Pioro, Igor, E-mail: Igor.Pioro@uoit.ca [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa (Canada); Dragunov, Alexey, E-mail: Alexey.Dragunov@uoit.ca [University of Ontario Institute of Technology, Oshawa (Canada)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Gas as a coolant in Gen-IV reactors, history and development. • Main physical parameters comparison of gas coolants: carbon dioxide, helium, hydrogen with water. • Forced convection in turbulent pipe flow. • Gas cooled fast reactor concept comparisons to very high temperature reactor concept. • High temperature helium loop: concept, development, mechanism, design and constraints. - Abstract: Rapidly increasing energy and electricity demands, global concerns over the climate changes and strong dependence on foreign fossil fuel supplies are powerfully influencing greater use of nuclear power. In order to establish the viability of next-generation reactor concepts to meet tomorrow's needs for clean and reliable energy production the fundamental research and development issues need to be addressed for the Generation-IV nuclear-energy systems. Generation-IV reactor concepts are being developed to use more advanced materials, coolants and higher burn-ups fuels, while keeping a nuclear reactor safe and reliable. One of the six Generation-IV concepts is a very high temperature reactor (VHTR). The VHTR concept uses a graphite-moderated core with a once-through uranium fuel cycle, using high temperature helium as the coolant. Because helium is naturally inert and single-phase, the helium-cooled reactor can operate at much higher temperatures, leading to higher efficiency. Current VHTR concepts will use fuels such as uranium dioxide, uranium carbide, or uranium oxycarbide. Since some of these fuels are new in nuclear industry and due to their unknown properties and behavior within VHTR conditions it is very important to address these issues by investigate their characteristics within conditions close to those in VHTRs. This research can be performed in a research reactor with in-pile helium loop designed and constructed in Research Center Rez Ltd. One of the topics analyzed in this article are also physical characteristic and benefits of gas

  13. Effect of fuel burnup and cross sections on modular HTGR (High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor) reactivity coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefler, W.; Baxter, A.; Mathews, D.

    1987-12-01

    The temperature dependence of the reactivity coefficient in a prismatic block Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) design is examined and found to be large and negative. Temperature coefficient results obtained with the ENDF/B-V data library were almost the same as results obtained with the earlier versions of the ENDF/B data library usually used at GA Technologies Inc., in spite of a significant eigenvalue increase with the ENDF/B-V data. The effects of fuel burnup and arbitrarily assumed cross section variations were examined and tabulated.

  14. Testing of actively cooled mock-ups in several high heat flux facilities-An International Round Robin Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedig, M. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM Association, B-NM, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)]. E-mail: m.roedig@fz-juelich.de; Bobin-Vastra, I. [AREVA Centre Technique de Framatome, Porte Magenta, BP181, 71205 Le Creusot Cedex (France); Cox, S. [JET, UKAEA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Escourbiac, F. [CEA-DRFC, Cadarache, 13115 St. Paul lez Durance (France); Gervash, A. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation); Kapoustina, A. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM Association, B-NM, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kuehnlein, W. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, EURATOM Association, B-NM, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kuznetsov, V. [Efremov Institute, St. Petersburg 196641 (Russian Federation); Merola, M. [EFDA Close Support Unit, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Nygren, R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1129 (United States); Youchison, D.L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185-1129 (United States)

    2005-11-15

    Several electron beam and ion beam facilities are involved in high heat flux testing of plasma-facing components for next step fusion devices. Up to a certain degree, these machines are comparable, but differences concern, e.g. beam generation, beam sweeping, calibration techniques and diagnostics. In order to get an information if tests in the different facilities are really comparable, a set of actively cooled CFC monoblocks has been heated in four electron beam and one ion beam facility at comparable power densities. The temperature response during these loadings has been registered and used as a criteria for assessment.

  15. High-resolution mid-infrared spectroscopy of buffer-gas-cooled methyltrioxorhenium molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Tokunaga, Sean; Tarbutt, M; Darquié, B

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate cryogenic buffer-gas cooling of gas-phase methyltrioxorhenium (MTO). This molecule is closely related to chiral organometallic molecules where the parity-violating energy differences between enantiomers may be measurable. The molecules are produced with a rotational temperature of approximately 6~K by laser ablation of an MTO pellet inside a cryogenic helium buffer gas cell. Facilitated by the low temperature, we demonstrate absorption spectroscopy of the 10.2~$\\mu$m antisymmetric Re=O stretching mode of MTO with a resolution of 8~MHz and a frequency accuracy of 30~MHz. We partially resolve the hyperfine structure and measure the nuclear quadrupole coupling of the excited vibrational state.

  16. The Jet-Cooled High-Resolution IR Spectrum of Formic Acid Cyclic Dimer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goubet, Manuel; Bteich, Sabath; Huet, Therese R.; Pirali, Olivier; Asselin, Pierre; Soulard, Pascale; Jabri, Atef; Roy, P.; Georges, Robert

    2017-06-01

    As the simplest carboxylic acid, formic acid (FA) is an excellent model molecule to investigate the general properties of carboxylic acids. FA is also an atmospherically and astrophysically relevant molecule. It is well known that its dimeric form is predominant in the gas phase at temperatures below 423 K. The cyclic conformation of the dimer (FACD) is an elementary system to be understood for the concerted hydrogen transfer through equivalent hydrogen bonds, an essential process within biomolecules. The IR range is a crucial spectral region, particularly the far-IR, as it gives a direct access to the intermolecular vibrational modes involved in this process. Moreover, due to its centrosymmetric conformation, the FACD exhibits no pure rotation spectrum and, due to spectral line congestion and Doppler broadening, IR bands cannot be rotationally resolved at room temperature. So far, only parts of the ν_{5}-GS band (C-O stretch) have been observed under jet-cooled conditions using laser techniques. We present here six rotationally resolved IR bands of FACD recorded under jet-cooled conditions using the Jet-AILES apparatus and the QCL spectrometer at MONARIS, including the far-IR ν_{24}-GS band (intermolecular in-plane bending). Splitting due to vibration-rotation-tunneling motions are clearly observed. A full spectral analysis is in progress starting from the GS constants obtained by Goroya et al. and with the support of electronic structure calculations. T. Miyazawa and K. S. Pitzer, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 81, 74, 1959 R. Georges, M. Freytes, D. Hurtmans, I. Kleiner, J. Vander Auwera, M. Herman, Chem. Phys. 305, 187, 2004 M. Ortlieb and M. Havenith, J. Phys. Chem. A 111, 7355, 2007; K. G. Goroya, Y. Zhu, P. Sun and C. Duan, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 164311, 2014 This work is supported by the CaPPA project (Chemical and Physical Properties of the Atmosphere) ANR-11-LABX-0005-01

  17. Design of conformal cooling layers with self-supporting lattices for additively manufactured tooling

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Hadley Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Additively manufactured (AM) conformal cooling channels are currently the state of the art for high performing tooling with reduced cycle times. This paper introduces the concept of conformal cooling layers which challenges the status quo in providing higher heat transfer rates that also provide less variation in tooling temperatures.\\ud \\ud The cooling layers are filled with self-supporting repeatable unit cells that form a lattice throughout the cooling layers. The lattices increase fluid v...

  18. Microstructure and Property of Mn-Nb-B Low Carbon Bainite High Strength Steel Under Ultra-fast Cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WANG Bing-xing

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Using the Mn-Nb-B low carbon bainite high strength steel with the reducing production technology as the research target, the deformation behavior and phase transformation behavior were studied by the thermal simulation testing machine. Combining with the characteristics of the medium and heavy plate production line, the controlled rolling and controlled cooling technology based on ultra-fast cooling were designed to produce low cost high strength construction machinery steel with superior comprehensive mechanical properties. The strengthening mechanisms such as grain refinement strengthening, precipitation strengthening are effective to produce the Mn-Nb-B low carbon bainite high strength steel. The yield strength and tensile strength of the product reach to 678MPa and 756 MPa respectively, the elongation A50 is 33% and the impact energy at -20℃ is 261J. The microstructure of the steel is composed of granular bainite, acicular ferrite and lath bainite. A large number of fine, point, granular M/A constituents and dislocation structures dispersively distributed inside the matrix, and also tiny and dispersed (Nb,Ti (C,N precipitates are observed by transmission electron microscopy.

  19. Pre-Conceptual Design of a Fluoride-Salt-Cooled Small Modular Advanced High Temperature Reactor (SmAHTR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Sherrell R [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Carbajo, Juan J [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Cisneros, Anselmo T [ORNL; Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL; Corwin, William R [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Bradley, Eric Craig [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Pappano, Peter J [ORNL; Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL

    2011-02-01

    This document presents the results of a study conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory during 2010 to explore the feasibility of small modular fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactors (FHRs). A preliminary reactor system concept, SmATHR (for Small modular Advanced High Temperature Reactor) is described, along with an integrated high-temperature thermal energy storage or salt vault system. The SmAHTR is a 125 MWt, integral primary, liquid salt cooled, coated particle-graphite fueled, low-pressure system operating at 700 C. The system employs passive decay heat removal and two-out-of-three , 50% capacity, subsystem redundancy for critical functions. The reactor vessel is sufficiently small to be transportable on standard commercial tractor-trailer transport vehicles. Initial transient analyses indicated the transition from normal reactor operations to passive decay heat removal is accomplished in a manner that preserves robust safety margins at all times during the transient. Numerous trade studies and trade-space considerations are discussed, along with the resultant initial system concept. The current concept is not optimized. Work remains to more completely define the overall system with particular emphasis on refining the final fuel/core configuration, salt vault configuration, and integrated system dynamics and safety behavior.

  20. Cooperation on Improved Isotopic Identification and Analysis Software for Portable, Electrically Cooled High-Resolution Gamma Spectrometry Systems Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreyer, Jonathan G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wang, Tzu-Fang [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vo, Duc T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Funk, Pierre F. [Inst. for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Weber, Anne-Laure [Inst. for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN), Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2017-07-20

    Under a 2006 agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE) of the United States of America and the Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN) of France, the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) within DOE and IRSN initiated a collaboration to improve isotopic identification and analysis of nuclear material [i.e., plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U)]. The specific aim of the collaborative project was to develop new versions of two types of isotopic identification and analysis software: (1) the fixed-energy response-function analysis for multiple energies (FRAM) codes and (2) multi-group analysis (MGA) codes. The project is entitled Action Sheet 4 – Cooperation on Improved Isotopic Identification and Analysis Software for Portable, Electrically Cooled, High-Resolution Gamma Spectrometry Systems (Action Sheet 4). FRAM and MGA/U235HI are software codes used to analyze isotopic ratios of U and Pu. FRAM is an application that uses parameter sets for the analysis of U or Pu. MGA and U235HI are two separate applications that analyze Pu or U, respectively. They have traditionally been used by safeguards practitioners to analyze gamma spectra acquired with high-resolution gamma spectrometry (HRGS) systems that are cooled by liquid nitrogen. However, it was discovered that these analysis programs were not as accurate when used on spectra acquired with a newer generation of more portable, electrically cooled HRGS (ECHRGS) systems. In response to this need, DOE/NNSA and IRSN collaborated to update the FRAM and U235HI codes to improve their performance with newer ECHRGS systems. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) performed this work for DOE/NNSA.

  1. Miniature High Stability High Temperature Space Rated Blackbody Radiance Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. A.; Beswick, A. G.

    1987-09-01

    This paper presents the design and test performance of a conical cavity type blackbody radiance source that will meet the requirements of the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) on the NASA Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite program (UARS). Since a radiance source meeting the requirements of this experiment was unavailable in the commercial market, a development effort was undertaken by the HALOE Project. The blackbody radiance source operates in vacuum at 1300 K + 0.5 K over any 15-minute interval, uses less than 7.5 watts of power, maintains a 49°C outer case temperature, and fits within the 2.5 x 2.5 x 3.0 inch envelope allocated inside the HALOE instrument. Also, the unit operates in air, during ground testing of the HALOE instrument, where it uses 17 watts of power with an outer case temperature of 66°C. The thrust of this design effort was to minimize the heat losses, in order to keep the power usage under 7.5 watts, and to minimize the amount of silica in the materials. Silica in the presence of the platinum heater winding used in this design would cause the platinum to erode, changing the operating temperature set-point. The design required the development of fabrication techniques which would provide very small, close tolerance parts from extremely difficult-to-machine materials. Also, a space rated ceramic core and unique, low thermal conductance, ceramic-to-metal joint was developed, tested and incorporated in this design. The completed flight qualification hardware has undergone performance, environmental and life testing. The design configuration and test results are discussed in detail in this paper.

  2. Preparation of cold Mg{sup +}ion clouds for sympathetic cooling of highly charged ions at SPECTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazan, Radu Mircea

    2012-02-15

    The bound electrons in hydrogen-like or lithium-like heavy ions experience extremely strong electric and magnetic fields in the surrounding of the nucleus. Laser spectroscopy of the ground-state hyperfine splitting in the lead region provides a sensitive tool to test strong-field quantum electro dynamics (QED), especially in the magnetic sector. Previous measurements on hydrogen-like systems performed in an electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) or at the experimental storage ring (ESR) were experimentally limited in accuracy due to statistics, the large Doppler broadening and the ion energy. The full potential of the QED test can only be exploited if measurements for hydrogen- and lithium-like ions are performed with accuracy improved by 2-3 orders of magnitude. Therefore, the new Penning trap setup SPECTRAP - dedicated for laser spectroscopy on trapped and cooled highly charged ions - is currently commissioned at GSI Darmstadt. Heavy highly charged ions will be delivered to this trap by the HITRAP facility in the future. SPECTRAP is a cylindrical Penning trap with axial access for external ion injection and radial optical access mounted inside a cold-bore superconducting Helmholtz-type split-coil magnet. To reach the targeted accuracy in laser spectroscopy, an efficient and fast cooling process for the highly charged ions must be employed. This can be realized by sympathetic cooling with a cloud of laser-cooled light ions. Within this thesis work, a laser system and an ion source for the production of such a {sup 24}Mg{sup +} ion cloud was developed and commissioned at SPECTRAP. An all-solid-state laser system for the generation of 279.6 nm light was designed and built. It consists of a fiber laser at 1118.5 nm followed by frequency quadrupling using two successive second-harmonic generation stages with actively stabilized ring resonators and nonlinear crystals. The laser system can deliver more than 15 mW of UV laser power under optimal conditions and requires little

  3. Research on rapid-cooling press hardening process and its effect for formability of ultra high strength steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, L.; Hu, P.; Zhao, X.; Shi, D. Y.; Dai, M. H.; Yu, H. Y.; Chang, Y.

    2013-05-01

    In this study, a new rapid-cooling process in press hardening based on theoretical analysis, experimental test and optimal formability simulation were investigated for improving formability and obdurability of 22MnB5 boron steel. A series of non-isothermal flow behaviors in different plastic strain rates from 0.001s-1 to 0.1s-1 was investigated by thermal-mechanical uniaxial tensile tests. Furthermore, martensite transformation measurement was also involved in the temperature range from 600° to 800°. According to an interrelated Norton-Hoff constitutive model was developed to describe the complicated thermal-mechanical-phase transformation couple model, a typical deep drawing box used to simulate formability so as to compare with actual press hardening experiments used by the self-developed multi-field coupled static-explicit FE software KMAS and dynamic-explicit commercial software LS-DYNA respectively. The results showed the rapid-cooling process indicate the validity and efficiency of meeting the forming performance characteristics and the optimal process which temperature range from 650°C˜700°C can contribute to improve formability of press hardening manufacture.

  4. Preliminary Neutronics Design and Analysis of D2O Cooled High Conversion PWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

    2012-09-01

    This report presents a neutronics analysis of tight-pitch D2O-cooled PWRs loaded with MOX fuel and focuses essentially on the Pu breeding potential of such reactors as well as on an important safety parameter, the void coefficient, which has to be negative. It is well known that fast reactors have a better neutron economy and are better suited than thermal reactors to breed fissile material from neutron capture in fertile material. Such fast reactors (e.g. sodium-cooled reactors) usually rely on technologies that are very different from those of existing water-cooled reactors and are probably more expensive. This report investigates another possibility to obtain a fast neutron reactor while still relying mostly on a PWR technology by: (1) Tightening the lattice pitch to reduce the water-to-fuel volume ratio compared to that of a standard PWR. Water-to-fuel volume ratios of between 0.45 and 1 have been considered in this study while a value of about 2 is typical of standard PWRs, (2) Using D2O instead of H2O as a coolant. Indeed, because of its different neutron physics properties, the use of D2O hardens the neutron spectrum to an extent impossible with H2O when used in a tight-pitch lattice. The neutron spectra thus obtained are not as fast as those in sodium-cooled reactor but they can still be characterized as fast compared to that of standard PWR neutron spectra. In the phase space investigated in this study we did not find any configurations that would have, at the same time, a positive Pu mass balance (more Pu at the end than at the beginning of the irradiation) and a negative void coefficient. At this stage, the use of radial blankets has only been briefly addressed whereas the impact of axial blankets has been well defined. For example, with a D2O-to-fuel volume ratio of 0.45 and a core driver height of about 60 cm, the fissile Pu mass balance between the fresh fuel and the irradiated fuel (50 GWd/t) would be about -7.5% (i.e. there are 7.5% fewer fissile Pu

  5. Comprehensive Assessment of the Potential for Efficient District Heating and Cooling and for High-Efficient Cogeneration in Austria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Büchele

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with the EU Energy Efficiency Directive all Member States have to develop a comprehensive assessment of the potential for high-efficient CHP and efficient district heating and cooling by the end of 2015. This paper describes the approach and methodology used to determine the district heating potentials for Austria. In a first step actual and future heating and cooling demand in the building sector is evaluated using the techno-economic bottom-up model Invert/EE-Lab. Relevant infrastructure probably existing in 2025 is investigated and included into the analysis. Technical potentials for efficient technologies are calculated. After a classification of relevant regions into main and secondary regions a country-level cost-benefit-analysis is performed. The results indicate that there is a reasonable additional potential for district heating by the year 2025 under our central scenario assumptions and within sensitivity scenarios. Only in scenarios with high CO2-price or low gas price, CHP is an economically efficient solution to supply district heat.

  6. Epidermal protection with cryogen spray cooling during high fluence pulsed dye laser irradiation: an ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnell, J W; Nelson, J S; Torres, J H; Anvari, B

    2000-01-01

    Higher laser fluences than currently used in therapy (5-10 J/cm(2)) are expected to result in more effective treatment of port wine stain (PWS) birthmarks. However, higher incident fluences increase the risk of epidermal damage caused by absorption of light by melanin. Cryogen spray cooling offers an effective method to reduce epidermal injury during laser irradiation. The objective of this study was to determine whether high laser incident fluences (15-30 J/cm(2)) could be used while still protecting the epidermis in ex vivo human skin samples. Non-PWS skin from a human cadaver was irradiated with a Candela ScleroPlus Laser (lambda = 585 nm; pulse duration = 1.5 msec) by using various incident fluences (8-30 J/cm(2)) without and with cryogen spray cooling (refrigerant R-134a; spurt durations: 40-250 msec). Assessment of epidermal damage was based on histologic analysis. Relatively short spurt durations (40-100 msec) protected the epidermis for laser incident fluences comparable to current therapeutic levels (8-10 J/cm(2)). However, longer spurt durations (100-250 msec) increased the fluence threshold for epidermal damage by a factor of three (up to 30 J/cm(2)) in these ex vivo samples. Results of this ex vivo study show that epidermal protection from high laser incident fluences can be achieved by increasing the cryogen spurt duration immediately before pulsed laser exposure. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Image Enhancement for High frame-rate Neutron Radiography

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Y; Ito, D.

    2015-01-01

    High frame rate neutron radiography has been utilized to investigate two-phase flow in a metallic duct. However, images obtained by high frame-rate neutron radiography suffered from severe statistical noise due to its short exposure time. In this study, a spatio-temporal filter was applied to reduce the noise in the sequence images obtained by high frame-rate neutron radiography. Experiments were performed at the B4-port of the Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, which has a thermal...

  8. Optical cooling and trapping highly magnetic atoms: The benefits of a spontaneous spin polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Dreon, Davide; Bouazza, Chayma; Maineult, Wilfried; Dalibard, Jean; Nascimbene, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    From the study of long-range-interacting systems to the simulation of gauge fields, open-shell Lanthanide atoms with their large magnetic moment and narrow optical transitions open novel directions in the field of ultracold quantum gases. As for other atomic species, the magneto-optical trap (MOT) is the working horse of experiments but its operation is challenging, due to the large electronic spin of the atoms. Here we present an experimental study of narrow-line Dysprosium MOTs. We show that the combination of radiation pressure and gravitational forces leads to a spontaneous polarization of the electronic spin. The spin composition is measured using a Stern-Gerlach separation of spin levels, revealing that the gas becomes almost fully spin-polarized for large laser frequency detunings. In this regime, we reach the optimal operation of the MOT, with samples of typically $3\\times 10^8$ atoms at a temperature of 20$\\,\\mu$K. The spin polarization reduces the complexity of the radiative cooling description, whi...

  9. Preliminary Study on the High Efficiency Supercritical Pressure Water-Cooled Reactor for Electricity Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Yoon Yeong; Park, Jong Kyun; Cho, Bong Hyun and others

    2006-01-15

    This research has been performed to introduce a concept of supercritical pressure water cooled reactor(SCWR) in Korea The area of research includes core conceptual design, evaluation of candidate fuel, fluid systems conceptual design with mechanical consideration, preparation of safety analysis code, and construction of supercritical pressure heat transfer test facility, SPHINX, and preliminary test. As a result of the research, a set of tools for the reactor core design has been developed and the conceptual core design with solid moderator was proposed. The direct thermodynamic cycle has been studied to find a optimum design. The safety analysis code has also been adapted to supercritical pressure condition. A supercritical pressure CO2 heat transfer test facility has been constructed and preliminary test proved the facility works as expected. The result of this project will be good basis for the participation in the international collaboration under GIF GEN-IV program and next 5-year mid and long term nuclear research program of MOST. The heat transfer test loop, SPHINX, completed as a result of this project may be used for the power cycle study as well as further heat transfer study for the various geometries.

  10. THR-TH: a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor core thermal hydraulics code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondy, D.R.

    1984-07-01

    The ORNL version of PEBBLE, the (RZ) pebble bed thermal hydraulics code, has been extended for application to a prismatic gas cooled reactor core. The supplemental treatment is of one-dimensional coolant flow in up to a three-dimensional core description. Power density data from a neutronics and exposure calculation are used as the basic information for the thermal hydraulics calculation of heat removal. Two-dimensional neutronics results may be expanded for a three-dimensional hydraulics calculation. The geometric description for the hydraulics problem is the same as used by the neutronics code. A two-dimensional thermal cell model is used to predict temperatures in the fuel channel. The capability is available in the local BOLD VENTURE computation system for reactor core analysis with capability to account for the effect of temperature feedback by nuclear cross section correlation. Some enhancements have also been added to the original code to add pebble bed modeling flexibility and to generate useful auxiliary results. For example, an estimate is made of the distribution of fuel temperatures based on average and extreme conditions regularly calculated at a number of locations.

  11. Near-ground cooling efficacies of trees and high-albedo surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levinson, Ronnen M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1997-05-01

    Daytime summer urban heat islands arise when the prevalence of dark-colored surfaces and lack of vegetation make a city warmer than neighboring countryside. Two frequently-proposed summer heat island mitigation measures are to plant trees and to increase the albedo (solar reflectivity) of ground surfaces. This dissertation examines the effects of these measures on the surface temperature of an object near the ground, and on solar heating of air near the ground. Near-ground objects include people, vehicles, and buildings. The variation of the surface temperature of a near-ground object with ground albedo indicates that a rise in ground albedo will cool a near-ground object only if the object`s albedo exceeds a critical value. This critical value of object albedo depends on wind speed, object geometry, and the height of the atmospheric thermal boundary layer. It ranges from 0.15 to 0.37 for a person. If an object has typical albedo of 0.3, increasing the ground albedo by.

  12. Electron Cooling Study for MEIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Zhang [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Douglas, David R. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Derbenev, Yaroslav S. [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States); Zhang, Yuhong [Jefferson Lab., Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Electron cooling of the ion beams is one critical R&D to achieve high luminosities in JLab's MEIC proposal. In the present MEIC design, a multi-staged cooling scheme is adapted, which includes DC electron cooling in the booster ring and bunched beam electron cooling in the collider ring at both the injection energy and the collision energy. We explored the feasibility of using both magnetized and non-magnetized electron beam for cooling, and concluded that a magnetized electron beam is necessary. Electron cooling simulation results for the newly updated MEIC design is also presented.

  13. Development of safety analysis codes and experimental validation for a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Oh

    2006-03-01

    The very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) is envisioned as a single- or dual-purpose reactor for electricity and hydrogen generation. The concept has average coolant temperatures above 9000C and operational fuel temperatures above 12500C. The concept provides the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperature to support process heat applications, such as coal gasification, desalination or cogenerative processes, the VHTR’s higher temperatures allow broader applications, including thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the very high temperatures of this reactor concept can be detrimental to safety if a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) occurs. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air will enter the core through the break by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structure and fuel. The oxidation will accelerate heatup of the reactor core and the release of toxic gasses (CO and CO2) and fission products. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. Prior to the start of this Korean/United States collaboration, no computer codes were available that had been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably simulate a LOCA in the VHTR. Therefore, we have worked for the past three years on developing and validating advanced computational methods for simulating LOCAs in a VHTR. Research Objectives As described above, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release in the VHTR. The objectives of this Korean/United States collaboration were to develop and validate advanced computational methods for VHTR safety analysis. The methods that have been developed are now

  14. Development of Safety Analysis Codes and Experimental Validation for a Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, H. Oh, PhD; Cliff Davis; Richard Moore

    2004-11-01

    The very high temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTGRs) are those concepts that have average coolant temperatures above 900 degrees C or operational fuel temperatures above 1250 degrees C. These concepts provide the potential for increased energy conversion efficiency and for high-temperature process heat application in addition to power generation and nuclear hydrogen generation. While all the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) concepts have sufficiently high temperatures to support process heat applications, such as desalination and cogeneration, the VHTGR's higher temperatures are suitable for particular applications such as thermochemical hydrogen production. However, the high temperature operation can be detrimental to safety following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) initiated by pipe breaks caused by seismic or other events. Following the loss of coolant through the break and coolant depressurization, air from the containment will enter the core by molecular diffusion and ultimately by natural convection, leading to oxidation of the in-core graphite structures and fuel. The oxidation will release heat and accelerate the heatup of the reactor core. Thus, without any effective countermeasures, a pipe break may lead to significant fuel damage and fission product release. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has investigated this event for the past three years for the HTGR. However, the computer codes used, and in fact none of the world's computer codes, have been sufficiently developed and validated to reliably predict this event. New code development, improvement of the existing codes, and experimental validation are imperative to narrow the uncertaninty in the predictions of this type of accident. The objectives of this Korean/United States collaboration are to develop advanced computational methods for VHTGR safety analysis codes and to validate these computer codes.

  15. Ventilative Cooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Per Kvols; Kolokotroni, Maria

    -of-the-art of ventilative cooling potentials and limitations, its consideration in current energy performance regulations, available building components and control strategies and analysis methods and tools. In addition, the report provides twenty six examples of operational buildings using ventilative cooling ranging from...

  16. Transit dose calculation in high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Transit doses around a high dose rate 192Ir brachytherapy source were calculated using Sievert Integral at positions where the moving source was located exactly between two adjacent dwell positions. The correspond-ing transit dose rates were obtained by using energy absorption coefficients. Discrete step sizes of 0.25 ...

  17. Rural and Urban High School Dropout Rates: Are They Different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeffrey L.; Kostandini, Genti; Mykerezi, Elton

    2012-01-01

    This study estimates the high school dropout rate in rural and urban areas, the determinants of dropping out, and whether the differences in graduation rates have changed over time. We use geocoded data from two nationally representative panel household surveys (NLSY 97 and NLSY 79) and a novel methodology that corrects for biases in graduation…

  18. Pedalling rate affects endurance performance during high-intensity cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Steen; Hansen, Ernst Albin; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study into high-intensity cycling was to: (1) test the hypothesis that endurance time is longest at a freely chosen pedalling rate (FCPR), compared to pedalling rates 25% lower (FCPR-25) and higher (FCPR+25) than FCPR, and (2) investigate how physiological variables, such as m...

  19. High Count Rate Single Photon Counting Detector Array Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An optical communications receiver requires efficient and high-rate photon-counting capability so that the information from every photon, received at the aperture,...

  20. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V17.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  1. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  2. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V12.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  3. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V8.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  4. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V10.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  5. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  6. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V13.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  7. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V9.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  8. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V3.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  9. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V7.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  10. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V4.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  11. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V11.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  12. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V14.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  13. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V5.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  14. CASSINI HIGH RATE DETECTOR V6.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Rate Detector (HRD) from the University of Chicago is an independent part of the CDA instrument on the Cassini Orbiter that measures the dust flux and...

  15. High Burn Rate Hybrid Fuel for Improved Grain Design Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A novel type of fuel providing high burning rate for hybrid rocket applications is proposed. This fuel maintains a hydrodynamically rough surface to...

  16. Improvement of Cooling Technology through Atmosphere Gas Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renard, Michel; Dosogne, Edgaar; Crutzen, Jean Pierre; Raick, Jean Mare [DREVER INTERNATIONAL S.A., Liege (Belgium); Ji, Ma Jia; Jun, Lv; Zhi, Ma Bing [SHOUGANG Cold Rolling Mill Headquarter, Beijin (China)

    2009-12-15

    The production of advanced high strength steels requires the improvement of cooling technology. The use of high cooling rates allows relatively low levels of expensive alloying additions to ensure sufficient hardenability. In classical annealing and hot-dip galvanizing lines a mixing station is used to provide atmosphere gas containing 3-5% hydrogen and 97-95% nitrogen in the various sections of the furnace, including the rapid cooling section. Heat exchange enhancement in this cooling section can be insured by the increased hydrogen concentration. Driver international developed a patented improvement of cooling technology based on the following features: pure hydrogen gas is injected only in the rapid cooling section whereas the different sections of the furnace are supplied with pure nitrogen gas: the control of flows through atmosphere gas management allows to get high hydrogen concentration in cooling section and low hydrogen content in the other furnace zones. This cooling technology development insures higher cooling rates without additional expensive hydrogen gas consumption and without the use of complex sealing equipment between zones. In addition reduction in electrical energy consumption is obtained. This atmosphere control development can be combined with geometrical design improvements in order to get optimised cooling technology providing high cooling rates as well as reduced strip vibration amplitudes. Extensive validation of theoretical research has been conducted on industrial lines. New lines as well as existing lines, with limited modifications, can be equipped with this new development. Up to now this technology has successfully been implemented on 6 existing and 7 new lines in Europe and Asia.

  17. Cool-water Eocene-Oligocene carbonate sedimentation on a paleobathymetric high, Kangaroo Island, southern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Noel P.; Matenaar, Joanne; Bone, Yvonne

    2016-07-01

    The Kingscote Limestone is a thin, biofragmental 41 m thick Paleogene subtropical to cool-temperate carbonate interpreted to have accumulated in a seaway developed between a series of mid-shelf islands. It is a pivotal section that allows interpretation of a region in which there is little exposure of early Cenozoic shelf sediments. Sedimentation occurred on part of the shelf along the northern margin of an extensive Eocene embayment that evolved into a narrow Oligocene ocean following collapse of the Tasman Gateway. Eocene strata are subtropical echinoid-rich floatstones with conspicuous bryozoans, and mollusks, together with large and small benthic foraminifers. Numerous echinoid rudstone storm deposits punctuate the succession. Correlation with coeval Eocene strata across southern Australia supports a regional facies model wherein inner neritic biosiliceous spiculitic sediments passed outboard into calcareous facies. The silica was derived from land covered by a thriving subtropical forest and attendant deep weathering. Oligocene rocks are distinctively cooler cyclic cross-bedded bryozoan rudstones and floatstones with a similar benthic biota but dominated by bryozoans and containing no large benthic foraminifers. These deposits are interpreted as flood-dominated tidal subaqueous dunes that formed in a flood-tide dominated inter-island strait. Omission surfaces at the top of the Eocene and at the top of most Oligocene cycles are Fe-stained hardgrounds that underwent extensive multigeneration seafloor and meteoric diagenesis prior to deposition of the next cycle. Cycles in the Kingscote Limestone, although mostly m-scale and compositionally distinct are similar to those across the region and point to a recurring cycle motif controlled by icehouse eustasy and local paleogeography.

  18. Comparative evaluation of pebble-bed and prismatic fueled high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, P.R.; Bartine, D.E.

    1981-01-01

    A comparative evaluation has been performed of the HTGR and the Federal Republic of Germany's Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) for potential commercial applications in the US. The evaluation considered two reactor sizes (1000 and 3000 MW(t)) and three process applications (steam cycle, direct cycle, and process heat, with outlet coolant temperatures of 750, 850, and 950/sup 0/C, respectively). The primary criterion for the comparison was the levelized (15-year) cost of producing electricity or process heat. Emphasis was placed on the cost impact of differences between the prismatic-type HTGR core, which requires periodic refuelings during reactor shutdowns, and the pebble bed PBR core, which is refueled continuously during reactor operations. Detailed studies of key technical issues using reference HTGR and PBR designs revealed that two cost components contributing to the levelized power costs are higher for the PBR: capital costs and operation and maintenance costs. A third cost component, associated with nonavailability penalties, tended to be higher for the PBR except for the process heat application, for which there is a large uncertainty in the HTGR nonavailability penalty at the 950/sup 0/C outlet coolant temperature. A fourth cost component, fuel cycle costs, is lower for the PBR, but not sufficiently lower to offset the capital cost component. Thus the HTGR appears to be slightly superior to the PBR in economic performance. Because of the advanced development of the HTGR concept, large HTGRs could also be commercialized in the US with lower R and D costs and shorter lead times than could large PBRs. It is recommended that the US gas-cooled thermal reactor program continue giving primary support to the HTGR, while also maintaining its cooperative PBR program with FRG.

  19. High power laser source for atom cooling based on reliable telecoms technology with all fibre frequency stabilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Thomas; Farries, Mark

    2017-02-01

    Cold atom interferometers are emerging as important tools for metrology. Designed into gravimeters they can measure extremely small changes in the local gravitational field strength and be used for underground surveying to detect buried utilities, mineshafts and sinkholes prior to civil works. To create a cold atom interferometer narrow linewidth, frequency stabilised lasers are required to cool the atoms and to setup and measure the atom interferometer. These lasers are commonly either GaAs diodes, Ti Sapphire lasers or frequency doubled InGaAsP diodes and fibre lasers. The InGaAsP DFB lasers are attractive because they are very reliable, mass-produced, frequency controlled by injection current and simply amplified to high powers with fibre amplifiers. In this paper a laser system suitable for Rb atom cooling, based on a 1560nm DFB laser and erbium doped fibre amplifier, is described. The laser output is frequency doubled with fibre coupled periodically poled LiNbO3 to a wavelength of 780nm. The output power exceeds 1 W at 780nm. The laser is stabilised at 1560nm against a fibre Bragg resonator that is passively temperature compensated. Frequency tuning over a range of 1 GHz is achieved by locking the laser to sidebands of the resonator that are generated by a phase modulator. This laser design is attractive for field deployable rugged systems because it uses all fibre coupled components with long term proven reliability.

  20. High-Throughput Sequencing of Viable Microbial Communities in Raw Pork Subjected to a Fast Cooling Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Che, You; Qi, Yan; Liang, Peixin; Song, Cunjiang

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of the fast cooling process on the microbiological community in chilled fresh pork during storage. We established a culture-independent method to study viable microbes in raw pork. Tray-packaged fresh pork and chilled fresh pork were completely spoiled after 18 and 49 d in aseptic bags at 4 °C, respectively. 16S/18S ribosomal RNAs were reverse transcribed to cDNA to characterize the activity of viable bacteria/fungi in the 2 types of pork. Both cDNA and total DNA were analyzed by high-throughput sequencing, which revealed that viable Bacteroides sp. were the most active genus in rotten pork, although viable Myroides sp. and Pseudomonas sp. were also active. Moreover, viable fungi were only detected in chilled fresh pork. The sequencing results revealed that the fast cooling process could suppress the growth of microbes present initially in the raw meat to extend its shelf life. Our results also suggested that fungi associated with pork spoilage could not grow well in aseptic tray-packaged conditions. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  1. High-cooling-efficiency cryogenic quadrupole ion trap and UV-UV hole burning spectroscopy of protonated tyrosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiuchi, Shun-ichi; Wako, Hiromichi; Kato, Daichi; Fujii, Masaaki

    2017-02-01

    The cooling efficiency of a cryogenic three-dimensional quadrupole ion trap (QIT) is drastically improved by using copper electrodes instead of conventional stainless-steel ones. The temperature of trapped ions (protonated tyrosine TyrH+) was estimated based on the ultraviolet (UV) photo-dissociation spectra. The UV spectrum of TryH+ shows almost no hot bands, and thus the high cooling efficiency of the copper ion trap was proven. The temperature was also estimated by simulating the observed band contour in the UV spectra, which is determined by the population in the rotationally excited levels. From the simulations, the temperature of TryH+ was estimated to be ∼13 K, while that in the stainless-steel QIT was 45-50 K. In addition, to demonstrate the advantage of the copper QIT, UV-UV hole burning (HB) spectra, i.e. conformation-selected UV spectra, were measured. It was confirmed that four different conformers, A∼D, coexist in the ultra-cold protonated tyrosine. By comparing with the calculated Franck-Condon spectra, their structural assignments were discussed, including the orientation of the OH group.

  2. Novel thermal management system using boiling cooling for high-powered lithium-ion battery packs for hybrid electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zareer, Maan; Dincer, Ibrahim; Rosen, Marc A.

    2017-09-01

    A thermal management system is necessary to control the operating temperature of the lithium ion batteries in battery packs for electrical and hybrid electrical vehicles. This paper proposes a new battery thermal management system based on one type of phase change material for the battery packs in hybrid electrical vehicles and develops a three dimensional electrochemical thermal model. The temperature distributions of the batteries are investigated under various operating conditions for comparative evaluations. The proposed system boils liquid propane to remove the heat generated by the batteries, and the propane vapor is used to cool the part of the battery that is not covered with liquid propane. The effect on the thermal behavior of the battery pack of the height of the liquid propane inside the battery pack, relative to the height of the battery, is analyzed. The results show that the propane based thermal management system provides good cooling control of the temperature of the batteries under high and continuous charge and discharge cycles at 7.5C.

  3. Quantum Communication with a High-Rate Entangled Photon Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathaniel C.; Chaffee, Dalton W.; Lekki, John D.; Wilson, Jeffrey D.

    2016-01-01

    A high generation rate photon-pair source using a dual element periodically-poled potassium titanyl phosphate (PP KTP) waveguide is described. The photon-pair source features a high pair generation rate, a compact power-efficient package, and continuous wave (CW) or pulsed operation. Characterization and test results are presented. Details and preliminary results of a laboratory free-space QKD experiment with the B92 protocol are also presented.

  4. Effects of short immersion time and cooling rates of copperizing process to the evolution of microstructures and copper behavior in the dead mild steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatimurti, Wikan; Sutarsis, Cunika, Aprida Ulya

    2017-01-01

    In a dead mild steel with maximum carbon content of 0.15%, carbon does not contribute much to its strength. By adding copper as an alloying element, a balance between strength and ductility could be obtained through grain refining, solid solution, or Cu precipitation. This research aimed to analyse the changes in microstructures and copper behaviour on AISI 1006, including the phases formed, composition, and Cu dispersion. The addition of cooper was done by immersing steel into molten copper or so we called, copperizing using the principles of diffusion. Specimens were cut with 6 × 3 × 0.3 cm measurement then preheated to 900°C and melting the copper at 1100°C. Subsequently, the immersion of the specimens into molten copper varied to 5 and 7 minutes, and also varying the cooling rate to annealing, normalizing, and quenching. A series of test being conduct were optical microscope test, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), optical emission spectroscopy (OES), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the longer the immersion time and slower cooling rate, the more Cu diffused causing smaller grain size with the highest Cu diffused recorded was 0.277% in the copperized AISI 1006 steel with 7 minutes of immersion and was annealed. The grain size reduced to 23041.5404 µm2. The annealed specimens show ferrite phase, the normalized ones show polygonal ferrite phase, while the quenched ones show granular bainite phase. The phase formed is single phase Cu. In addition, the normalized and quenched specimens show that Cu dissolved in Fe crystal forming solid solution.

  5. A rate-dependent Hosford-Coulomb model for predicting ductile fracture at high strain rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcadet Stephane J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Hosford-Coulomb model incorporates the important effect of the Lode angle parameter in addition to the stress triaxiality to predict the initiation of ductile fracture. A strain-rate dependent extension of the Hosford-Coulomb model is presented to describe the results from low, intermediate and high strain rate fracture experiments on advanced high strength steels (DP590 and TRIP780. The model predictions agree well with the experimental observation of an increase in ductility as function of strain rate for stress states ranging from uniaxial to equi-biaxial tension.

  6. High strain rate response of rabbit femur bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shunmugasamy, Vasanth Chakravarthy; Gupta, Nikhil; Coelho, Paulo G

    2010-11-16

    Strain rate dependence of the mechanical response of hard tissues has led to a keen interest in their dynamic properties. The current study attempts to understand the high strain rate characteristics of rabbit femur bones. The testing was conducted using a split-Hopkinson pressure bar equipped with a high speed imaging system to capture the fracture patterns. The bones were also characterized under quasi-static compression to enable comparison with the high strain rate results. The quasi-static compressive moduli of the epiphyseal and diaphyseal regions were measured to be in the range of 2-3 and 5-7GPa, respectively. Under high strain rate loading conditions the modulus is observed to increase with strain rate and attains values as high as 15GPa for epiphyseal and 30GPa for diaphyseal regions of the femur. The strength at high strain rate was measured to be about twice the quasi-static strength value. A large number of small cracks initiated on the specimen surface close to the incident bar. Coalescence of crack branches leading to fewer large cracks resulted in specimen fragmentation. In comparison, the quasi-static failure was due to shear cracking. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Heating and cooling processes in disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woitke, Peter

    2015-09-01

    This chapter summarises current theoretical concepts and methods to determine the gas temperature structure in protoplanetary disks by balancing all relevant heating and cooling rates. The processes considered are non-LTE line heating/cooling based on the escape probability method, photo-ionisation heating and recombination cooling, free-free heating/cooling, dust thermal accommodation and high-energy heating processes such as X-ray and cosmic ray heating, dust photoelectric and PAH heating, a number of particular follow-up heating processes starting with the UV excitation of H2, and the release of binding energy in exothermal reactions. The resulting thermal structure of protoplanetary disks is described and discussed. 10th Lecture from Summer School "Protoplanetary Disks: Theory and Modelling Meet Observations"

  8. Performance of high flow rate samplers for respirable particle collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taekhee; Kim, Seung Won; Chisholm, William P; Slaven, James; Harper, Martin

    2010-08-01

    The American Conference of Governmental Industrial hygienists (ACGIH) lowered the threshold limit value (TLV) for respirable crystalline silica (RCS) exposure from 0.05 to 0.025 mg m(-3) in 2006. For a working environment with an airborne dust concentration near this lowered TLV, the sample collected with current standard respirable aerosol samplers might not provide enough RCS for quantitative analysis. Adopting high flow rate sampling devices for respirable dust containing silica may provide a sufficient amount of RCS to be above the limit of quantification even for samples collected for less than full shift. The performances of three high flow rate respirable samplers (CIP10-R, GK2.69, and FSP10) have been evaluated in this study. Eleven different sizes of monodisperse aerosols of ammonium fluorescein were generated with a vibrating orifice aerosol generator in a calm air chamber in order to determine the sampling efficiency of each sampler. Aluminum oxide particles generated by a fluidized bed aerosol generator were used to test (i) the uniformity of a modified calm air chamber, (ii) the effect of loading on the sampling efficiency, and (iii) the performance of dust collection compared to lower flow rate cyclones in common use in the USA (10-mm nylon and Higgins-Dewell cyclones). The coefficient of variation for eight simultaneous samples in the modified calm air chamber ranged from 1.9 to 6.1% for triplicate measures of three different aerosols. The 50% cutoff size ((50)d(ae)) of the high flow rate samplers operated at the flow rates recommended by manufacturers were determined as 4.7, 4.1, and 4.8 microm for CIP10-R, GK2.69, and FSP10, respectively. The mass concentration ratio of the high flow rate samplers to the low flow rate cyclones decreased with decreasing mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) and high flow rate samplers collected more dust than low flow rate samplers by a range of 2-11 times based on gravimetric analysis. Dust loading inside the

  9. Cryogenic generator cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckels, P. W.; Fagan, T. J.; Parker, J. H., Jr.; Long, L. J.; Shestak, E. J.; Calfo, R. M.; Hannon, W. F.; Brown, D. B.; Barkell, J. W.; Patterson, A.

    The concept for a hydrogen cooled aluminum cryogenic generator was presented by Schlicher and Oberly in 1985. Following their lead, this paper describes the thermal design of a high voltage dc, multimegawatt generator of high power density. The rotor and stator are cooled by saturated liquid and supercritical hydrogen, respectively. The brushless exciter on the same shaft is also cooled by liquid hydrogen. Component development testing is well under way and some of the test results concerning the thermohydraulic performance of the conductors are reported. The aluminum cryogenic generator's characteristics are attractive for hydrogen economy applications.

  10. Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Leroy Omar; Smith, Raub Warfield

    2002-01-01

    In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

  11. Stretching of red blood cells at high strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, J. E.; Ristenpart, W. D.

    2017-10-01

    Most work on the mechanical behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) in flow has focused on simple shear flows. Relatively little work has examined RBC deformations in the physiologically important extensional flow that occurs at the entrance to a constriction. In particular, previous work suggests that RBCs rapidly stretch out and then retract upon entering the constriction, but to date no model predicts this behavior for the extremely high strain rates typically experienced there. In this Rapid Communication, we use high speed video to perform systematic measurements of the dynamic stretching behavior of RBCs as they enter a microfluidic constriction. We demonstrate that both the Kelvin-Voigt and Skalak viscoelastic models capture the observed stretching dynamics, up to strain rates as high as 2000 s-1. The results indicate that the effective elastic modulus of the RBC membrane at these strain rates is an order of magnitude larger than moduli measured by micropipette aspiration or other low strain rate techniques.

  12. Solidification at the High and Low Rate Extreme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meco, Halim [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-12-19

    The microstructures formed upon solidification are strongly influenced by the imposed growth rates on an alloy system. Depending on the characteristics of the solidification process, a wide range of growth rates is accessible. The prevailing solidification mechanisms, and thus the final microstructure of the alloy, are governed by these imposed growth rates. At the high rate extreme, for instance, one can have access to novel microstructures that are unattainable at low growth rates. While the low growth rates can be utilized for the study of the intrinsic growth behavior of a certain phase growing from the melt. Although the length scales associated with certain processes, such as capillarity, and the diffusion of heat and solute, are different at low and high rate extremes, the phenomena that govern the selection of a certain microstructural length scale or a growth mode are the same. Consequently, one can analyze the solidification phenomena at both high and low rates by using the same governing principles. In this study, we examined the microstructural control at both low and high extremes. For the high rate extreme, the formation of crystalline products and factors that control the microstructure during rapid solidification by free-jet melt spinning are examined in Fe-Si-B system. Particular attention was given to the behavior of the melt pool at different quench-wheel speeds. Since the solidification process takes place within the melt-pool that forms on the rotating quench-wheel, we examined the influence of melt-pool dynamics on nucleation and growth of crystalline solidification products and glass formation. High-speed imaging of the melt-pool, analysis of ribbon microstructure, and measurement of ribbon geometry and surface character all indicate upper and lower limits for melt-spinning rates for which nucleation can be avoided, and fully amorphous ribbons can be achieved. Comparison of the relevant time scales reveals that surface-controlled melt

  13. Non-Laser Cooling Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilico, Laurent

    We first review trapped ion radiative cooling and show that it is only efficient for high frequency oscillating particles in Penning traps. We then describe in detail resistive cooling and explain in the frame of an exercice why and how thermal equilibrium with the resistor is reached. We finally discuss buffer gas cooling in Paul traps.

  14. Vaporization Would Cool Primary Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Miyake, Robert N.

    1991-01-01

    Temperature of discharging high-power-density primary battery maintained below specified level by evaporation of suitable liquid from jacket surrounding battery, according to proposal. Pressure-relief valve regulates pressure and boiling temperature of liquid. Less material needed in cooling by vaporization than in cooling by melting. Technique used to cool batteries in situations in which engineering constraints on volume, mass, and location prevent attachment of cooling fins, heat pipes, or like.

  15. Metallurgical applications of shock wave and high strain rate phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murr, L.E.; Staudhammer, K.P.; Meyers, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on the impact testing of metals. Topics considered at the conference included dynamic consolidation, the analysis of dislocation kinetics across shocks, high-strain-rate deformation, adiabatic shear band phenomena, dynamic fracture, explosive metal working, shock synthesis and the property modification of materials, and novel concepts and applications of high pressure.

  16. High flow rate microsieve for bio medical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijn, C.J.M.; Nijdam, W.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    1995-01-01

    A new composite filtration membrane having a thin filtration or sieving layer has been developed. This filtration membrane with a high pore density and a narrow pore size distribution on a macro porous support shows good separation behaviour and a high flow rate. Because of the construction method,

  17. Authoritative School Climate and High School Dropout Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yuane; Konold, Timothy R.; Cornell, Dewey

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the association between school-wide measures of an authoritative school climate and high school dropout rates in a statewide sample of 315 high schools. Regression models at the school level of analysis used teacher and student measures of disciplinary structure, student support, and academic expectations to predict overall high…

  18. Performance of the Ultra-High Rate Germanium (UHRGe) System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dion, Michael P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rodriguez, Douglas C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); VanDevender, Brent A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wood, Lynn S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wright, Michael E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    This report describes the final performance achieved with the detector system developed for the Ultra High Rate Germanium (UHRGe) project. The system performance has been evaluated at low, moderate and high rates and includes the performance of real-time analysis algorithms running in the FPGA of the data acquisition system. This performance is compared to that of offline analyses of streaming waveform data collected with the same data acquisition system the performance of a commercial Multi-Channel Analyzer designed for high-resolution spectroscopy applications, the Canberra LYNX.

  19. Breakdown Limit Studies in High Rate Gaseous Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Ivaniouchenkov, Yu; Peskov, Vladimir; Ramsey, B D

    1998-01-01

    We report results from a systematic study of breakdown limits for novel high rate gaseous detectors: MICROMEGAS, CAT and GEM, together with more conventional devices such as thin-gap parallel-mesh chambers and high-rate wire chambers. It was found that for all these detectors, the maximum achievable gain, before breakdown appears, drops dramatically with incident flux, and is sometimes inversely proportional to it. Further, in the presence of alpha particles, typical of the backgrounds in high-energy experiments, additional gain drops of 1-2 orders of magnitude were observed for many detectors. It was found that breakdowns at high rates occur through what we have termed an "accumulative" mechanism, which does not seem to have been previously reported in the literature. Results of these studies may help in choosing the optimum detector for given experimental conditions.

  20. Static Mixer for Heat Transfer Enhancement for Mold Cooling Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Rodolfo; Barbosa, Raul; Lee, Kye-Hwan; Park, Younggil

    Injection molding is the process by which a material is melted in a barrel and then it is injected through a nozzle in the mold cavity. When it cools down, the material solidifies into the shape of the cavity. Typical injection mold has cooling channels to maintain constant mold temperature during injection molding process. Even and constant temperature throughout the mold are very critical for a part quality and productivity. Conformal cooling improves the quality and productivity of injection molding process through the implementation of cooling channels that ``conform'' to the shape of the molded part. Recent years, the use of conformal cooling increases with advance of 3D printing technology such as Selective Laser Melting (SLM). Although it maximizes cooling, material and dimension limitations make SLM methods highly expensive. An alternative is the addition of static mixers in the molds with integrated cooling channels. A static mixer is a motionless mixing device that enhances heat transfer by producing improved flow mixing in the pipeline. In this study, the performance of the cooling channels will be evaluated with and without static mixers, by measuring temperature, pressure drop, and flow rate. The following question is addressed: Can a static mixer effectively enhance heat transfer for mold cooling application processes? This will provide insight on the development of design methods and guidelines that can be used to increase cooling efficiency at a lower cost.