WorldWideScience

Sample records for high contact angle

  1. Methodology for high accuracy contact angle measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantarian, A; David, R; Neumann, A W

    2009-12-15

    A new version of axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA) called ADSA-NA (ADSA-no apex) was developed for measuring interfacial properties for drop configurations without an apex. ADSA-NA facilitates contact angle measurements on drops with a capillary protruding into the drop. Thus a much simpler experimental setup, not involving formation of a complete drop from below through a hole in the test surface, may be used. The contact angles of long-chained alkanes on a commercial fluoropolymer, Teflon AF 1600, were measured using the new method. A new numerical scheme was incorporated into the image processing to improve the location of the contact points of the liquid meniscus with the solid substrate to subpixel resolution. The images acquired in the experiments were also analyzed by a different drop shape technique called theoretical image fitting analysis-axisymmetric interfaces (TIFA-AI). The results were compared with literature values obtained by means of the standard ADSA for sessile drops with the apex. Comparison of the results from ADSA-NA with those from TIFA-AI and ADSA reveals that, with different numerical strategies and experimental setups, contact angles can be measured with an accuracy of less than 0.2 degrees. Contact angles and surface tensions measured from drops with no apex, i.e., by means of ADSA-NA and TIFA-AI, were considerably less scattered than those from complete drops with apex. ADSA-NA was also used to explore sources of improvement in contact angle resolution. It was found that using an accurate value of surface tension as an input enhances the accuracy of contact angle measurements.

  2. High contact angle hysteresis of superhydrophobic surfaces: Hydrophobic defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Feng-Ming; Hong, Siang-Jie; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2009-08-01

    A typical superhydrophobic surface is essentially nonadhesive and exhibits very low water contact angle (CA) hysteresis, so-called Lotus effect. However, leaves of some plants such as scallion and garlic with an advancing angle exceeding 150° show very serious CA hysteresis. Although surface roughness and epicuticular wax can explain the very high advancing CA, our analysis indicates that the unusual hydrophobic defect, diallyl disulfide, is the key element responsible for contact line pinning on allium leaves. After smearing diallyl disulfide on an extended polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) film, which is originally absent of CA hysteresis, the surface remains superhydrophobic but becomes highly adhesive.

  3. Contact Angle Goniometer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description:The FTA32 goniometer provides video-based contact angle and surface tension measurement. Contact angles are measured by fitting a mathematical expression...

  4. Fabrication of surfaces with extremely high contact angle hysteresis from polyelectrolyte multilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liming; Wei, Jingjing; Su, Zhaohui

    2011-12-20

    High contact angle hysteresis on polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) ion-paired with hydrophobic perfluorooctanoate anions is reported. Both the bilayer number of PEMs and the ionic strength of deposition solutions have significant influence on contact angle hysteresis: higher ionic strength and greater bilayer number cause increased contact angle hysteresis values. The hysteresis values of ~100° were observed on smooth PEMs and pinning of the receding contact line on hydrophilic defects is implicated as the cause of hysteresis. Surface roughness can be used to further tune the contact angle hysteresis on the PEMs. A surface with extremely high contact angle hysteresis of 156° was fabricated when a PEM was deposited on a rough substrate coated with submicrometer scale silica spheres. It was demonstrated that this extremely high value of contact angle hysteresis resulted from the penetration of water into the rough asperities on the substrate. The same substrate hydrophobized by chemical vapor deposition of 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyltriethoxysilane exhibits high advancing contact angle and low hysteresis.

  5. Contact angle hysteresis explained.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lichao; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2006-07-04

    A view of contact angle hysteresis from the perspectives of the three-phase contact line and of the kinetics of contact line motion is given. Arguments are made that advancing and receding are discrete events that have different activation energies. That hysteresis can be quantified as an activation energy by the changes in interfacial area is argued. That this is an appropriate way of viewing hysteresis is demonstrated with examples.

  6. A highly accurate dynamic contact angle algorithm for drops on inclined surface based on ellipse-fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z N; Wang, S Y

    2015-02-01

    To improve the accuracy in the calculation of dynamic contact angle for drops on the inclined surface, a significant number of numerical drop profiles on the inclined surface with different inclination angles, drop volumes, and contact angles are generated based on the finite difference method, a least-squares ellipse-fitting algorithm is used to calculate the dynamic contact angle. The influences of the above three factors are systematically investigated. The results reveal that the dynamic contact angle errors, including the errors of the left and right contact angles, evaluated by the ellipse-fitting algorithm tend to increase with inclination angle/drop volume/contact angle. If the drop volume and the solid substrate are fixed, the errors of the left and right contact angles increase with inclination angle. After performing a tremendous amount of computation, the critical dimensionless drop volumes corresponding to the critical contact angle error are obtained. Based on the values of the critical volumes, a highly accurate dynamic contact angle algorithm is proposed and fully validated. Within nearly the whole hydrophobicity range, it can decrease the dynamic contact angle error in the inclined plane method to less than a certain value even for different types of liquids.

  7. Low Voltage Electrowetting on Ferroelectric PVDF-HFP Insulator with Highly Tunable Contact Angle Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawane, Yogesh B; Ogale, Satishchandra B; Banpurkar, Arun G

    2016-09-14

    We demonstrate a consistent electrowetting response on ferroelectric poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP) insulator covered with a thin Teflon AF layer. This bilayer exhibits a factor of 3 enhancement in the contact angle modulation compared to that of conventional single-layered Teflon AF dielectric. On the basis of the proposed model the enhancement is attributed to the high value of effective dielectric constant (εeff ≈ 6) of the bilayer. Furthermore, the bilayer dielectric exhibits a hysteresis-free contact angle modulation over many AC voltage cycles. But the contact angle modulation for DC voltage shows a hysteresis because of the field-induced residual polarization in the ferroelectric layer. Finally, we show that a thin bilayer exhibits contact angle modulation of Δθ (U) ≈ 60° at merely 15 V amplitude of AC voltage indicating a potential dielectric for practical low voltage electrowetting applications. A proof of concept confirms electrowetting based rapid mixing of a fluorescent dye in aqueous glycerol solution for 15 V AC signal.

  8. Equilibrium contact angle or the most-stable contact angle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes Ruiz-Cabello, F J; Rodríguez-Valverde, M A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M A

    2014-04-01

    It is well-established that the equilibrium contact angle in a thermodynamic framework is an "unattainable" contact angle. Instead, the most-stable contact angle obtained from mechanical stimuli of the system is indeed experimentally accessible. Monitoring the susceptibility of a sessile drop to a mechanical stimulus enables to identify the most stable drop configuration within the practical range of contact angle hysteresis. Two different stimuli may be used with sessile drops: mechanical vibration and tilting. The most stable drop against vibration should reveal the changeless contact angle but against the gravity force, it should reveal the highest resistance to slide down. After the corresponding mechanical stimulus, once the excited drop configuration is examined, the focus will be on the contact angle of the initial drop configuration. This methodology needs to map significantly the static drop configurations with different stable contact angles. The most-stable contact angle, together with the advancing and receding contact angles, completes the description of physically realizable configurations of a solid-liquid system. Since the most-stable contact angle is energetically significant, it may be used in the Wenzel, Cassie or Cassie-Baxter equations accordingly or for the surface energy evaluation.

  9. Hysteresis during contact angles measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, M Elena; Fuentes, Javier; Cerro, Ramon L; Savage, Michael D

    2010-03-15

    A theory, based on the presence of an adsorbed film in the vicinity of the triple contact line, provides a molecular interpretation of intrinsic hysteresis during the measurement of static contact angles. Static contact angles are measured by placing a sessile drop on top of a flat solid surface. If the solid surface has not been previously in contact with a vapor phase saturated with the molecules of the liquid phase, the solid surface is free of adsorbed liquid molecules. In the absence of an adsorbed film, molecular forces configure an advancing contact angle larger than the static contact angle. After some time, due to an evaporation/adsorption process, the interface of the drop coexists with an adsorbed film of liquid molecules as part of the equilibrium configuration, denoted as the static contact angle. This equilibrium configuration is metastable because the droplet has a larger vapor pressure than the surrounding flat film. As the drop evaporates, the vapor/liquid interface contracts and the apparent contact line moves towards the center of the drop. During this process, the film left behind is thicker than the adsorbed film and molecular attraction results in a receding contact angle, smaller than the equilibrium contact angle.

  10. Enhancing Condensers for Geothermal Systems: the Effect of High Contact Angles on Dropwise Condensation Heat Transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, John M.; Kim, Sunwoo; Kim, Kwang J.

    2009-10-06

    Phase change heat transfer is notorious for increasing the irreversibility of, and therefore decreasing the efficiency of, geothermal power plants. Its significant contribution to the overall irreversibility of the plant makes it the most important source of inefficiency in the process. Recent studies here have shown the promotion of drop wise condensation in the lab by means of increasing the surface energy density of a tube with nanotechnology. The use of nanotechnology has allowed the creation of surface treatments which discourage water from wetting a tube surface during a static test. These surface treatments are unique in that they create high- contact angles on the condensing tube surfaces to promote drop wise condensation.

  11. Contact angle hysteresis on fluoropolymer surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavana, H; Jehnichen, D; Grundke, K; Hair, M L; Neumann, A W

    2007-10-31

    Contact angle hysteresis of liquids with different molecular and geometrical properties on high quality films of four fluoropolymers was studied. A number of different causes are identified for hysteresis. With n-alkanes as probe liquids, contact angle hysteresis is found to be strongly related to the configuration of polymer chains. The largest hysteresis is obtained with amorphous polymers whereas the smallest hysteresis occurs for polymers with ordered molecular chains. This is explained in terms of sorption of liquid by the solid and penetration of liquid into the polymer film. Correlation of contact angle hysteresis with the size of n-alkane molecules supports this conclusion. On the films of two amorphous fluoropolymers with different molecular configurations, contact angle hysteresis of one and the same liquid with "bulky" molecules is shown to be quite different. On the surfaces of Teflon AF 1600, with stiff molecular chains, the receding angles of the probe liquids are independent of contact time between solid and liquid and similar hysteresis is obtained for all the liquids. Retention of liquid molecules on the solid surface is proposed as the most likely cause of hysteresis in these systems. On the other hand, with EGC-1700 films that consist of flexible chains, the receding angles are strongly time-dependent and the hysteresis is large. Contact angle hysteresis increases even further when liquids with strong dipolar intermolecular forces are used. In this case, major reorganization of EGC-1700 chains due to contact with the test liquids is suggested as the cause. The effect of rate of motion of the three-phase line on the advancing and receding contact angles, and therefore contact angle hysteresis, is investigated. For low viscous liquids, contact angles are independent of the drop front velocity up to approximately 10 mm/min. This agrees with the results of an earlier study that showed that the rate-dependence of the contact angles is an issue only

  12. Nanodrop contact angles from molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravipati, Srikanth; Aymard, Benjamin; Yatsyshin, Petr; Galindo, Amparo; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2016-11-01

    The contact angle between three phases being in thermodynamic equilibrium is highly sensitive to the nature of the intermolecular forces as well as to various fluctuation effects. Determining the Young contact angle of a sessile drop sitting on a substrate from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is a highly non-trivial task. Most commonly employed methods for finding droplet contact angles from MD simulation data either require large numbers of particles or are system-dependent. We propose a systematic geometry based methodology for extracting the contact angle from simulated sessile droplets by analysing an appropriately coarse-grained density field. To demonstrate the method, we consider Lennard-Jones (LJ) and SPC/E water nanodroplets of different sizes sitting on planar LJ walls. Our results are in good agreement with Young contact angle values computed employing test-area perturbation method.

  13. Statistical Contact Angle Analyses with the High-Precision Drop Shape Analysis (HPDSA Approach: Basic Principles and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Heib

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface science, which includes the preparation, development and analysis of surfaces and coatings, is essential in both fundamental and applied as well as in engineering and industrial research. Contact angle measurements using sessile drop techniques are commonly used to characterize coated surfaces or surface modifications. Well-defined surfaces structures at both nanoscopic and microscopic level can be achieved but the reliable characterization by means of contact angle measurements and their interpretation often remains an open question. Thus, we focused our research effort on one main problem of surface science community, which is the determination of correct and valid definitions and measurements of contact angles. In this regard, we developed the high-precision drop shape analysis (HPDSA, which involves a complex transformation of images from sessile drop experiments to Cartesian coordinates and opens up the possibility of a physically meaningful contact angle calculation. To fulfill the dire need for a reproducible contact angle determination/definition, we developed three easily adaptable statistical analyses procedures. In the following, the basic principles of HPDSA will be explained and applications of HPDSA will be illustrated. Thereby, the unique potential of this analysis approach will be illustrated by means of selected examples.

  14. A simple method for measuring the superhydrophobic contact angle with high accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yi-Lin; Chang, Yao-Yuan; Wang, Meng-Jiy; Lin, Shi-Yow

    2010-06-01

    A modified selected-plane method for contact angle (θ) measurement is proposed in this study that avoids the difficulty of finding the real contact point and image-distortion effects adjacent to the contact point. This method is particularly suitable for superhydrophobic surfaces. The sessile-drop method coupled with the tangent line is the most popular method to find the contact angle in literature, but it entails unavoidable errors in determining the air-solid base line due to the smoothness problem and substrate tilting. In addition, the tangent-line technique requires finding the actual contact point. The measurement error due to the base line problem becomes more profound for superhydrophobic surfaces. A larger θ deviation results from a more superhydrophobic surface with a fixed base line error. The proposed modified selected-plane method requires only four data points (droplet apex, droplet height, and two interfacial loci close to the air-solid interface), avoiding the problem of the sessile-drop-tangent method in finding the contact point and saving the trouble of the sessile-drop-fitting method for best fitting of the numerous edge points with the theoretical profile. A careful error analysis was performed, and a user-friendly program was provided in this work. This method resulted in an accurate θ measurement and a method that was much improved over the classical selected plane and the sessile-drop-tangent methods. The θ difference between this method and the sessile-drop-fitting method was found to be less than three degrees.

  15. Contact line and contact angle dynamics in superhydrophobic channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junfeng; Kwok, Daniel Y

    2006-05-23

    The dynamics of the wetting and movement of a three-phase contact line confined between two superhydrophobic surfaces were studied using a mean-field free-energy lattice Boltzmann model. Principle features of superhydrophobic surfaces, such as trapped vapor/air between rough microstructures, high contact angles, reduced contact angle hysteresis, and low resistance to fluid flow, were all observed. Movement of the three-phase contact line over a well-patterned superhydrophobic surface displays a periodic stick-jump-slip behavior, while the dynamic contact angle changes accordingly from maximum to minimum. Two regimes were found for the flow velocity as a function of surface roughness and can be related directly to the balance between driving force and flow resistance. This work provides a better understanding of dynamic wetting and fluid flow behaviors over superhydrophobic surfaces and hence could be useful in related applications.

  16. Contact angle and contact angle hysteresis measurements using the capillary bridge technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restagno, Frédéric; Poulard, Christophe; Cohen, Céline; Vagharchakian, Laurianne; Léger, Liliane

    2009-09-15

    A new experimental technique is proposed to easily measure both advancing and receding contact angles of a liquid on a solid surface, with unprecedented accuracy. The technique is based on the analysis of the evolution of a capillary bridge formed between a liquid bath and a solid surface (which needs to be spherical) when the distance between the surface and the liquid bath is slowly varied. The feasibility of the technique is demonstrated using a low-energy perfluorinated surface with two different test liquids (water and hexadecane). A detailed description of both experimental procedures and computational modeling are given, allowing one to determine contact angle values. It is shown that the origin of the high accuracy of this technique relies on the fact that the contact angles are automatically averaged over the whole periphery of the contact. This method appears to be particularly adapted to the characterization of surfaces with very low contact angle hysteresis.

  17. High Yield of GaAs Nanowire Arrays on Si Mediated by the Pinning and Contact Angle of Ga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo-Averchi, Eleonora; Vukajlovic Plestina, Jelena; Tütüncüoglu, Gözde; Matteini, Federico; Dalmau-Mallorquí, Anna; de la Mata, Maria; Rüffer, Daniel; Potts, Heidi A; Arbiol, Jordi; Conesa-Boj, Sonia; Fontcuberta i Morral, Anna

    2015-05-13

    GaAs nanowire arrays on silicon offer great perspectives in the optoelectronics and solar cell industry. To fulfill this potential, gold-free growth in predetermined positions should be achieved. Ga-assisted growth of GaAs nanowires in the form of array has been shown to be challenging and difficult to reproduce. In this work, we provide some of the key elements for obtaining a high yield of GaAs nanowires on patterned Si in a reproducible way: contact angle and pinning of the Ga droplet inside the apertures achieved by the modification of the surface properties of the nanoscale areas exposed to growth. As an example, an amorphous silicon layer between the crystalline substrate and the oxide mask results in a contact angle around 90°, leading to a high yield of vertical nanowires. Another example for tuning the contact angle is anticipated, native oxide with controlled thickness. This work opens new perspectives for the rational and reproducible growth of GaAs nanowire arrays on silicon.

  18. Investigation of drop dynamic contact angle on copper surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlova, Evgenija; Feoktistov, Dmitriy; Kuznetsov, Geniy

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results of the studying the effect of surface roughness, microstructure and flow rate on the dynamic contact angle at spreading of distilled non deaerate water drop on a solid horizontal substrates. Copper substrates with different roughness have been investigated. For each substrate static contact angles depending on volume flow rate have been obtained using shadow system. Increasing the volume flow rate resulted in an increase of the static contact angle. It was found that with increasing surface roughness dynamic contact angle arises. Also difference in formation of the equilibrium contact angle at low and high rates of drop growth has been detected.

  19. Investigation of drop dynamic contact angle on copper surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlova Evgenija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents experimental results of the studying the effect of surface roughness, microstructure and flow rate on the dynamic contact angle at spreading of distilled non deaerate water drop on a solid horizontal substrates. Copper substrates with different roughness have been investigated. For each substrate static contact angles depending on volume flow rate have been obtained using shadow system. Increasing the volume flow rate resulted in an increase of the static contact angle. It was found that with increasing surface roughness dynamic contact angle arises. Also difference in formation of the equilibrium contact angle at low and high rates of drop growth has been detected.

  20. Dynamic contact angle measurements on superhydrophobic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Kavehpour, H. Pirouz; Rothstein, Jonathan P.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the dynamic advancing and receding contact angles of a series of aqueous solutions were measured on a number of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces using a modified Wilhelmy plate technique. Superhydrophobic surfaces are hydrophobic surfaces with micron or nanometer sized surface roughness. These surfaces have very large static advancing contact angles and little static contact angle hysteresis. In this study, the dynamic advancing and dynamic receding contact angles on superhydrophobic surfaces were measured as a function of plate velocity and capillary number. The dynamic contact angles measured on a smooth hydrophobic Teflon surface were found to obey the scaling with capillary number predicted by the Cox-Voinov-Tanner law, θD3 ∝ Ca. The response of the dynamic contact angle on the superhydrophobic surfaces, however, did not follow the same scaling law. The advancing contact angle was found to remain constant at θA = 160∘, independent of capillary number. The dynamic receding contact angle measurements on superhydrophobic surfaces were found to decrease with increasing capillary number; however, the presence of slip on the superhydrophobic surface was found to result in a shift in the onset of dynamic contact angle variation to larger capillary numbers. In addition, a much weaker dependence of the dynamic contact angle on capillary number was observed for some of the superhydrophobic surfaces tested.

  1. A thermodynamic model of contact angle hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makkonen, Lasse

    2017-08-01

    When a three-phase contact line moves along a solid surface, the contact angle no longer corresponds to the static equilibrium angle but is larger when the liquid is advancing and smaller when the liquid is receding. The difference between the advancing and receding contact angles, i.e., the contact angle hysteresis, is of paramount importance in wetting and capillarity. For example, it determines the magnitude of the external force that is required to make a drop slide on a solid surface. Until now, fundamental origin of the contact angle hysteresis has been controversial. Here, this origin is revealed and a quantitative theory is derived. The theory is corroborated by the available experimental data for a large number of solid-liquid combinations. The theory is applied in modelling the contact angle hysteresis on a textured surface, and these results are also in quantitative agreement with the experimental data.

  2. Statistical Contact Angle Analyses with the High-Precision Drop Shape Analysis (HPDSA) Approach: Basic Principles and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Florian Heib; Michael Schmitt

    2016-01-01

    Surface science, which includes the preparation, development and analysis of surfaces and coatings, is essential in both fundamental and applied as well as in engineering and industrial research. Contact angle measurements using sessile drop techniques are commonly used to characterize coated surfaces or surface modifications. Well-defined surfaces structures at both nanoscopic and microscopic level can be achieved but the reliable characterization by means of contact angle measurements and t...

  3. Contact angle measurements under thermodynamic equilibrium conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lages, Carol; Méndez, Eduardo

    2007-08-01

    The precise control of the ambient humidity during contact angle measurements is needed to obtain stable and valid data. For a such purpose, a simple low-cost device was designed, and several modified surfaces relevant to biosensor design were studied. Static contact angle values for these surfaces are lower than advancing contact angles published for ambient conditions, indicating that thermodynamic equilibrium conditions are needed to avoid drop evaporation during the measurements.

  4. Contact angle hysteresis of microbead suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waghmare, Prashant R; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2010-11-16

    Microbead suspensions are often used in microfluidic devices for transporting biomolecules. An experimental investigation on the wettability of microbead suspension is presented in this study. The variation in the surface tension and the equilibrium contact angle with the change in the volume fraction of the microbead is presented here. The surface tension of the microbead suspension is measured with the pendant drop technique, whereas the dynamic contact angle measurements, i.e., advancing and receding contact angles, are measured with the sessile drop technique. An equilibrium contact angle of a suspension with particular volume fraction is determined by computing an average over the measured advancing and receding contact angles. It is observed that the surface tension and the equilibrium contact angle determined from advancing and receding contact angles vary with the magnitude of the microbeads volume fraction in the suspension. A decrease in the surface tension with an increase in the volume fraction of the microbead suspension is observed. The advancement and the recession in contact line for dynamic contact angle measurements are achieved with the motorized dosing mechanism. For microbead suspensions, the advancement of the contact line is faster as compared to the recession of the contact line for the same flow rate. The presence of microbeads assists in the advancement and the recession of the contact line of the suspension. A decrease in the equilibrium contact angles with an increase in the microbead suspension volume fraction is observed. Inclusion of microbeads in the suspension increases the wetting capability for the considered combination of the microbead suspension and substrate. Finally, empirical correlations for the surface tension and the contact angle of the suspension as a function of microbead volume fraction are proposed. Such correlations can readily be used to develop mechanistic models for the capillary transport of microbead

  5. On accurate determination of contact angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.

    1992-01-01

    Methods are proposed that exploit a microgravity environment to obtain highly accurate measurement of contact angle. These methods, which are based on our earlier mathematical results, do not require detailed measurement of a liquid free-surface, as they incorporate discontinuous or nearly-discontinuous behavior of the liquid bulk in certain container geometries. Physical testing is planned in the forthcoming IML-2 space flight and in related preparatory ground-based experiments.

  6. Apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis on liquid infused surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semprebon, Ciro; McHale, Glen; Kusumaatmaja, Halim

    We theoretically investigate the apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis of a droplet placed on a liquid infused surface. We show that the apparent contact angle is not uniquely defined by material parameters, but also has a strong dependence on the relative size between the droplet and its surrounding wetting ridge formed by the infusing liquid. We derive a closed form expression for the contact angle in the limit of vanishing wetting ridge, and compute the correction for small but finite ridge, which corresponds to an effective line tension term. We also predict contact angle hysteresis on liquid infused surfaces generated by the pinning of the contact lines by the surface corrugations. Our analytical expressions for both the apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis can be interpreted as `weighted sums' between the contact angles of the infusing liquid relative to the droplet and surrounding gas phases, where the weighting coefficients are given by ratios of the fluid surface tensions.

  7. Apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis on liquid infused surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semprebon, Ciro; McHale, Glen; Kusumaatmaja, Halim

    2016-12-21

    We theoretically investigate the apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis of a droplet placed on a liquid infused surface. We show that the apparent contact angle is not uniquely defined by material parameters, but also has a dependence on the relative size between the droplet and its surrounding wetting ridge formed by the infusing liquid. We derive a closed form expression for the contact angle in the limit of vanishing wetting ridge, and compute the correction for small but finite ridge, which corresponds to an effective line tension term. We also predict contact angle hysteresis on liquid infused surfaces generated by the pinning of the contact lines by the surface corrugations. Our analytical expressions for both the apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis can be interpreted as 'weighted sums' between the contact angles of the infusing liquid relative to the droplet and surrounding gas phases, where the weighting coefficients are given by ratios of the fluid surface tensions.

  8. Dynamic contact angle analysis of silicone hydrogel contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Michael Leonard; Morgan, Philip Bruce; Kelly, Jeremiah Michael; Maldonado-Codina, Carole

    2011-07-01

    Contact angle measurements are used to infer the clinical wetting characteristics of contact lenses. Such characterization has become more commonplace since the introduction of silicone hydrogel contact lens materials, which have been associated with reduced in vivo wetting due to the inclusion of siloxane-containing components. Using consistent methodology and a single investigator, advancing and receding contact angles were measured for 11 commercially available silicone hydrogel contact lens types with a dynamic captive bubble technique employing customized, fully automated image analysis. Advancing contact angles were found to range between 20° and 72° with the lenses falling into six statistically discrete groupings. Receding contact angles fell within a narrower range, between 17° and 22°, with the lenses segregated into three groups. The relationship between these laboratory measurements and the clinical performance of the lenses requires further investigation.

  9. Reliable measurement of the receding contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Juuso T; Huhtamäki, Tommi; Ikkala, Olli; Ras, Robin H A

    2013-03-26

    Surface wettability is usually evaluated by the contact angle between the perimeter of a water drop and the surface. However, this single measurement is not enough for proper characterization, and the so-called advancing and receding contact angles also need to be measured. Measuring the receding contact angle can be challenging, especially for extremely hydrophobic surfaces. We demonstrate a reliable procedure by using the common needle-in-the-sessile-drop method. Generally, the contact line movement needs to be followed, and true receding movement has to be distinguished from "pseudo-movement" occurring before the receding angle is reached. Depending on the contact angle hysteresis, the initial size of the drop may need to be surprisingly large to achieve a reliable result. Although our motivation for this work was the characterization of superhydrophobic surfaces, we also show that this method works universally ranging from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic surfaces.

  10. Apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis on liquid infused surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Semprebon, Ciro; McHale, Glen; Kusumaatmaja, Halim

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the apparent contact angle and contact angle hysteresis of a droplet placed on a liquid infused surface. We show that the apparent contact angle is not uniquely defined by material parameters, but also has a strong dependence on the relative size between the droplet and its surrounding wetting ridge formed by the infusing liquid. We derive a closed form expression for the contact angle in the limit of vanishing wetting ridge, and compute the correction for small b...

  11. Contact angle and local wetting at contact line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ri; Shan, Yanguang

    2012-11-06

    This theoretical study was motivated by recent experiments and theoretical work that had suggested the dependence of the static contact angle on the local wetting at the triple-phase contact line. We revisit this topic because the static contact angle as a local wetting parameter is still not widely understood and clearly known. To further clarify the relationship of the static contact angle with wetting, two approaches are applied to derive a general equation for the static contact angle of a droplet on a composite surface composed of heterogeneous components. A global approach based on the free surface energy of a thermodynamic system containing the droplet and solid surface shows the static contact angle as a function of local surface chemistry and local wetting state at the contact line. A local approach, in which only local forces acting on the contact line are considered, results in the same equation. The fact that the local approach agrees with the global approach further demonstrates the static contact angle as a local wetting parameter. Additionally, the study also suggests that the wetting described by the Wenzel and Cassie equations is also the local wetting of the contact line rather than the global wetting of the droplet.

  12. Contact-angle hysteresis on super-hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHale, G; Shirtcliffe, N J; Newton, M I

    2004-11-09

    The relationship between perturbations to contact angles on a rough or textured surface and the super-hydrophobic enhancement of the equilibrium contact angle is discussed theoretically. Two models are considered. In the first (Wenzel) case, the super-hydrophobic surface has a very high contact angle and the droplet completely contacts the surface upon which it rests. In the second (Cassie-Baxter) case, the super-hydrophobic surface has a very high contact angle, but the droplet bridges across surface protrusions. The theoretical treatment emphasizes the concept of contact-angle amplification or attenuation and distinguishes between the increases in contact angles due to roughening or texturing surfaces and perturbations to the resulting contact angles. The theory is applied to predicting contact-angle hysteresis on rough surfaces from the hysteresis observable on smooth surfaces and is therefore relevant to predicting roll-off angles for droplets on tilted surfaces. The theory quantitatively predicts a "sticky" surface for Wenzel-type surfaces and a "slippy" surface for Cassie-Baxter-type surfaces.

  13. Contact angle hysteresis, adhesion, and marine biofouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Donald L; Brady, Robert F; Lam, Karen; Schmidt, Dale C; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2004-03-30

    Adhesive and marine biofouling release properties of coatings containing surface-oriented perfluoroalkyl groups were investigated. These coatings were prepared by cross-linking a copolymer of 1H,1H,2H,2H-heptadecafluorodecyl acrylate and acrylic acid with a copolymer of poly(2-isopropenyl-2-oxazoline) and methyl methacrylate at different molar ratios. The relationships between contact angle, contact angle hysteresis, adhesion, and marine biofouling were studied. Adhesion was determined by peel tests using pressure-sensitive adhesives. The chemical nature of the surfaces was studied by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Resistance to marine biofouling of an optimized coating was studied by immersion in seawater and compared to previous, less optimized coatings. The adhesive release properties of the coatings did not correlate well with the surface energies of the coatings estimated from the static and advancing contact angles nor with the amount of fluorine present on the surface. The adhesive properties of the surfaces, however, show a correlation with water receding contact angles and contact angle hysteresis (or wetting hysteresis) resulting from surface penetration and surface reconstruction. Coatings having the best release properties had both the highest cross-link density and the lowest contact angle hysteresis. An optimized coating exhibited unprecedented resistance to marine biofouling. Water contact angle hysteresis appears to correlate with marine biofouling resistance.

  14. Contact angle distribution of particles at fluid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoeyink, Craig; Barman, Sourav; Christopher, Gordon F

    2015-01-27

    Recent measurements have implied a distribution of interfacially adsorbed particles' contact angles; however, it has been impossible to measure statistically significant numbers for these contact angles noninvasively in situ. Using a new microscopy method that allows nanometer-scale resolution of particle's 3D positions on an interface, we have measured the contact angles for thousands of latex particles at an oil/water interface. Furthermore, these measurements are dynamic, allowing the observation of the particle contact angle with high temporal resolution, resulting in hundreds of thousands of individual contact angle measurements. The contact angle has been found to fit a normal distribution with a standard deviation of 19.3°, which is much larger than previously recorded. Furthermore, the technique used allows the effect of measurement error, constrained interfacial diffusion, and particle property variation on the contact angle distribution to be individually evaluated. Because of the ability to measure the contact angle noninvasively, the results provide previously unobtainable, unique data on the dynamics and distribution of the adsorbed particles' contact angle.

  15. Pressure dependence of the contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiyu; Farouk, T; Ward, C A

    2007-06-07

    When a liquid and its vapor contact a smooth, homogeneous surface, Gibbsian thermodynamics indicates that the contact angle depends on the pressure at the three-phase line of an isothermal system. When a recently proposed adsorption isotherm for a solid-vapor interface is combined with the equilibrium conditions and the system is assumed to be in a cylinder where the liquid-vapor interface can be approximated as spherical, the contact-angle-pressure relation can be made explicit. It indicates that a range of contact angles can be observed on a smooth homogeneous surface by changing the pressure at the three-phase line, but it also indicates that the adsorption at the solid-liquid interface is negative, and leads to the prediction that the contact angle increases with pressure. The predicted dependence of the contact angle on pressure is investigated experimentally in a system that has an independent mechanism for determining when thermodynamic equilibrium is reached. The predictions are in agreement with the measurements. The results provide a possible explanation for contact angle hysteresis.

  16. Nanofluid surface wettability through asymptotic contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaei, Saeid; Wen, Dongsheng; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian

    2011-03-15

    This investigation introduces the asymptotic contact angle as a criterion to quantify the surface wettability of nanofluids and determines the variation of solid surface tensions with nanofluid concentration and nanoparticle size. The asymptotic contact angle, which is only a function of gas-liquid-solid physical properties, is independent of droplet size for ideal surfaces and can be obtained by equating the normal component of interfacial force on an axisymmetric droplet to that of a spherical droplet. The technique is illustrated for a series of bismuth telluride nanofluids where the variation of surface wettability is measured and evaluated by asymptotic contact angles as a function of nanoparticle size, concentration, and substrate material. It is found that the variation of nanofluid concentration, nanoparticle size, and substrate modifies both the gas-liquid and solid surface tensions, which consequently affects the force balance at the triple line, the contact angle, and surface wettability.

  17. A microscopic view on contact angle selection

    OpenAIRE

    Snoeijer, Jacco H.; Andreotti, Bruno

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the equilibrium condition for a liquid that partially wets a solid on the level of intermolecular forces. Using a mean field continuum description, we generalize the capillary pressure from variation of the free energy and show at what length scale the equilibrium contact angle is selected. After recovering Young's law for homogeneous substrates, it is shown how hysteresis of the contact angle can be incorporated in a self-consistent fashion. In all cases the liquid-vapor interface...

  18. Contact angle of unset elastomeric impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menees, Timothy S; Radhakrishnan, Rashmi; Ramp, Lance C; Burgess, John O; Lawson, Nathaniel C

    2015-10-01

    Some elastomeric impression materials are hydrophobic, and it is often necessary to take definitive impressions of teeth coated with some saliva. New hydrophilic materials have been developed. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare contact angles of water and saliva on 7 unset elastomeric impression materials at 5 time points from the start of mixing. Two traditional polyvinyl siloxane (PVS) (Aquasil, Take 1), 2 modified PVS (Imprint 4, Panasil), a polyether (Impregum), and 2 hybrid (Identium, EXA'lence) materials were compared. Each material was flattened to 2 mm and a 5 μL drop of distilled water or saliva was dropped on the surface at 25 seconds (t0) after the start of mix. Contact angle measurements were made with a digital microscope at initial contact (t0), t1=2 seconds, t2=5 seconds, t3=50% working time, and t4=95% working time. Data were analyzed with a generalized linear mixed model analysis, and individual 1-way ANOVA and Tukey HSD post hoc tests (α=.05). For water, materials grouped into 3 categories at all time-points: the modified PVS and one hybrid material (Identium) produced the lowest contact angles, the polyether material was intermediate, and the traditional PVS materials and the other hybrid (EXA'lence) produced the highest contact angles. For saliva, Identium, Impregum, and Imprint 4 were in the group with the lowest contact angle at most time points. Modified PVS materials and one of the hybrid materials are more hydrophilic than traditional PVS materials when measured with water. Saliva behaves differently than water in contact angle measurement on unset impression material and produces a lower contact angle on polyether based materials. Copyright © 2015 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. High-precision drop shape analysis (HPDSA) of quasistatic contact angles on silanized silicon wafers with different surface topographies during inclining-plate measurements: Influence of the surface roughness on the contact line dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heib, F.; Hempelmann, R.; Munief, W. M.; Ingebrandt, S.; Fug, F.; Possart, W.; Groß, K.; Schmitt, M.

    2015-07-01

    Contact angles and wetting of solid surfaces are strongly influenced by the physical and chemical properties of the surfaces. These influence quantities are difficult to distinguish from each other if contact angle measurements are performed by measuring only the advancing θa and the receding θr contact angle. In this regard, time-dependent water contact angles are measured on two hydrophobic modified silicon wafers with different physical surface topographies. The first surface is nearly atomically flat while the second surface is patterned (alternating flat and nanoscale rough patterns) which is synthesized by a photolithography and etching procedure. The different surface topographies are characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FTIRRAS) and Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR). The resulting set of contact angle data obtained by the high-precision drop shape analysis approach is further analyzed by a Gompertzian fitting procedure and a statistical counting procedure in dependence on the triple line velocity. The Gompertzian fit is used to analyze overall properties of the surface and dependencies between the motion on the front and the back edge of the droplets. The statistical counting procedure results in the calculation of expectation values E(p) and standard deviations σ(p) for the inclination angle φ, contact angle θ, triple line velocity vel and the covered distance of the triple line dis relative to the first boundary points XB,10. Therefore, sessile drops during the inclination of the sample surface are video recorded and different specific contact angle events in dependence on the acceleration/deceleration of the triple line motion are analyzed. This procedure results in characteristically density distributions in dependence on the surface properties. The used procedures lead to the possibility to investigate influences on contact

  20. Contact angle hysteresis on superhydrophobic stripes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubov, Alexander L; Mourran, Ahmed; Möller, Martin; Vinogradova, Olga I

    2014-08-21

    We study experimentally and discuss quantitatively the contact angle hysteresis on striped superhydrophobic surfaces as a function of a solid fraction, ϕS. It is shown that the receding regime is determined by a longitudinal sliding motion of the deformed contact line. Despite an anisotropy of the texture the receding contact angle remains isotropic, i.e., is practically the same in the longitudinal and transverse directions. The cosine of the receding angle grows nonlinearly with ϕS. To interpret this we develop a theoretical model, which shows that the value of the receding angle depends both on weak defects at smooth solid areas and on the strong defects due to the elastic energy of the deformed contact line, which scales as ϕS(2)lnϕS. The advancing contact angle was found to be anisotropic, except in a dilute regime, and its value is shown to be determined by the rolling motion of the drop. The cosine of the longitudinal advancing angle depends linearly on ϕS, but a satisfactory fit to the data can only be provided if we generalize the Cassie equation to account for weak defects. The cosine of the transverse advancing angle is much smaller and is maximized at ϕS ≃ 0.5. An explanation of its value can be obtained if we invoke an additional energy due to strong defects in this direction, which is shown to be caused by the adhesion of the drop on solid sectors and is proportional to ϕS(2). Finally, the contact angle hysteresis is found to be quite large and generally anisotropic, but it becomes isotropic when ϕS ≤ 0.2.

  1. Tunable contact angle hysteresis on micropatterned surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Debuisson, Damien; Arscott, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Micropatterned surfaces composed of concentric circular defects having a smooth trench-like profile are formed using a photoresist (SU-8). When an evaporating droplet encounters the micropatterned surface an evaporation phase is observed consisting of distinct discontinuities and steps in the droplet wetting contact angle and base radius respectively. The addition of gaps into the circular defects enables tuning of the contact angle hysteresis; the receding contact angle of fluorocarbon coated SU-8 can be tuned between 34.6{\\deg} and 89.1{\\deg} and that of SU-8 surfaces from 5.6{\\deg} to 43.3{\\deg} depending on the gap length. In addition, a model is developed which accurately predicts the observed behavior.

  2. High-precision drop shape analysis (HPDSA) of quasistatic contact angles on silanized silicon wafers with different surface topographies during inclining-plate measurements: Influence of the surface roughness on the contact line dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heib, F., E-mail: f.heib@mx.uni-saarland.de [Department of Physical Chemistry, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Hempelmann, R. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Munief, W.M.; Ingebrandt, S. [Department of Informatics and Microsystem Technology, University of Applied Sciences, Kaiserslautern, 66482 Zweibrücken (Germany); Fug, F.; Possart, W. [Department of Adhesion and Interphases in Polymers, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany); Groß, K.; Schmitt, M. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Highlights: • Analysis of the triple line motion on surfaces with nanoscale surface topographies. • Analysis of the triple line motion is performed in sub-pixel resolution. • A special fitting and statistical approach for contact angle analysis is applied. • The analyses result set of contact angle data which is independent of “user-skills”. • Characteristically density distributions in dependence on the surface properties. - Abstract: Contact angles and wetting of solid surfaces are strongly influenced by the physical and chemical properties of the surfaces. These influence quantities are difficult to distinguish from each other if contact angle measurements are performed by measuring only the advancing θ{sub a} and the receding θ{sub r} contact angle. In this regard, time-dependent water contact angles are measured on two hydrophobic modified silicon wafers with different physical surface topographies. The first surface is nearly atomically flat while the second surface is patterned (alternating flat and nanoscale rough patterns) which is synthesized by a photolithography and etching procedure. The different surface topographies are characterized with atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (FTIRRAS) and Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR). The resulting set of contact angle data obtained by the high-precision drop shape analysis approach is further analyzed by a Gompertzian fitting procedure and a statistical counting procedure in dependence on the triple line velocity. The Gompertzian fit is used to analyze overall properties of the surface and dependencies between the motion on the front and the back edge of the droplets. The statistical counting procedure results in the calculation of expectation values E(p) and standard deviations σ(p) for the inclination angle φ, contact angle θ, triple line velocity vel and the covered distance of the triple

  3. The Contact Angle in Inviscid Fluid Mechanics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P N Shankar; R Kidambi

    2005-05-01

    We show that in general, the specification of a contact angle condition at the contact line in inviscid fluid motions is incompatible with the classical field equations and boundary conditions generally applicable to them. The limited conditions under which such a specification is permissible are derived;however, these include cases where the static meniscus is not flat. In view of this situation, the status of the many `solutions’ in the literature which prescribe a contact angle in potential flows comes into question. We suggest that these solutions which attempt to incorporate a phenomenological, but incompatible, condition are in some, imprecise sense `weak-type solutions’;they satisfy or are likely to satisfy, at least in the limit, the governing equations and boundary conditions everywhere except in the neighbourhood of the contact line. We discuss the implications of the result for the analysis of inviscid flows with free surfaces.

  4. Contact angle hysteresis at the nanometer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmas, Mathieu; Monthioux, Marc; Ondarçuhu, Thierry

    2011-04-01

    Using atomic force microscopy with nonconventional carbon tips, the pinning of a liquid contact line on individual nanometric defects was studied. This mechanism is responsible for the occurrence of the contact angle hysteresis. The presence of weak defects which do not contribute to the hysteresis is evidenced for the first time. The dissipated energy associated with strong defects is also measured down to values in the range of kT, which correspond to defect sizes in the order of 1 nm.

  5. High-precision drop shape analysis on inclining flat surfaces: Introduction and comparison of this special method with commercial contact angle analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Michael; Heib, Florian

    2013-10-01

    Drop shape analysis is one of the most important and frequently used methods to characterise surfaces in the scientific and industrial communities. An especially large number of studies, which use contact angle measurements to analyse surfaces, are characterised by incorrect or misdirected conclusions such as the determination of surface energies from poorly performed contact angle determinations. In particular, the characterisation of surfaces, which leads to correlations between the contact angle and other effects, must be critically validated for some publications. A large number of works exist concerning the theoretical and thermodynamic aspects of two- and tri-phase boundaries. The linkage between theory and experiment is generally performed by an axisymmetric drop shape analysis, that is, simulations of the theoretical drop profiles by numerical integration onto a number of points of the drop meniscus (approximately 20). These methods work very well for axisymmetric profiles such as those obtained by pendant drop measurements, but in the case of a sessile drop onto real surfaces, additional unknown and misunderstood effects on the dependence of the surface must be considered. We present a special experimental and practical investigation as another way to transition from experiment to theory. This procedure was developed to be especially sensitive to small variations in the dependence of the dynamic contact angle on the surface; as a result, this procedure will allow the properties of the surface to be monitored with a higher precession and sensitivity. In this context, water drops onto a 111 silicon wafer are dynamically measured by video recording and by inclining the surface, which results in a sequence of non-axisymmetric drops. The drop profiles are analysed by commercial software and by the developed and presented high-precision drop shape analysis. In addition to the enhanced sensitivity for contact angle determination, this analysis technique, in

  6. High-precision drop shape analysis on inclining flat surfaces: introduction and comparison of this special method with commercial contact angle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Michael; Heib, Florian

    2013-10-07

    Drop shape analysis is one of the most important and frequently used methods to characterise surfaces in the scientific and industrial communities. An especially large number of studies, which use contact angle measurements to analyse surfaces, are characterised by incorrect or misdirected conclusions such as the determination of surface energies from poorly performed contact angle determinations. In particular, the characterisation of surfaces, which leads to correlations between the contact angle and other effects, must be critically validated for some publications. A large number of works exist concerning the theoretical and thermodynamic aspects of two- and tri-phase boundaries. The linkage between theory and experiment is generally performed by an axisymmetric drop shape analysis, that is, simulations of the theoretical drop profiles by numerical integration onto a number of points of the drop meniscus (approximately 20). These methods work very well for axisymmetric profiles such as those obtained by pendant drop measurements, but in the case of a sessile drop onto real surfaces, additional unknown and misunderstood effects on the dependence of the surface must be considered. We present a special experimental and practical investigation as another way to transition from experiment to theory. This procedure was developed to be especially sensitive to small variations in the dependence of the dynamic contact angle on the surface; as a result, this procedure will allow the properties of the surface to be monitored with a higher precession and sensitivity. In this context, water drops onto a 111 silicon wafer are dynamically measured by video recording and by inclining the surface, which results in a sequence of non-axisymmetric drops. The drop profiles are analysed by commercial software and by the developed and presented high-precision drop shape analysis. In addition to the enhanced sensitivity for contact angle determination, this analysis technique, in

  7. Statistical analysis of Contact Angle Hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janardan, Nachiketa; Panchagnula, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of a new statistical approach to determining Contact Angle Hysteresis (CAH) by studying the nature of the triple line. A statistical distribution of local contact angles on a random three-dimensional drop is used as the basis for this approach. Drops with randomly shaped triple lines but of fixed volumes were deposited on a substrate and their triple line shapes were extracted by imaging. Using a solution developed by Prabhala et al. (Langmuir, 2010), the complete three dimensional shape of the sessile drop was generated. A distribution of the local contact angles for several such drops but of the same liquid-substrate pairs is generated. This distribution is a result of several microscopic advancing and receding processes along the triple line. This distribution is used to yield an approximation of the CAH associated with the substrate. This is then compared with measurements of CAH by means of a liquid infusion-withdrawal experiment. Static measurements are shown to be sufficient to measure quasistatic contact angle hysteresis of a substrate. The approach also points towards the relationship between microscopic triple line contortions and CAH.

  8. Contact Angle Effects in Boiling Heat Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Urquiola, Erwin; Fujita, Yasunobu

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports boiling experiments with pure water and surfactant solutions of SDS on horizontal heating surface. The static contact angle, rather than the surface tension value, was found to be the leading factor for the results and probably its prev

  9. Capillary rise with velocity-dependent dynamic contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, M N; Ralston, J; Sedev, R

    2008-11-04

    The classic description of the rate of capillary rise given by the Washburn equation, which assumes that the contact angle preserves the equilibrium value at all times, has been recently questioned in the light of the known experimental dependence of the dynamic contact angle on the velocity of the contact line. For a number of such proposed functions of velocity for the dynamic contact angle, we analyze the resulting dependences of the contact angle and of the time of rise, respectively, on the height of the capillary rise. By applying our results to the particular cases of a high-viscosity silicone oil and water, respectively, in a glass capillary, we show that, in general, strong similarities arise between the various approaches and the classic theory in what concerns the time dependence of the capillary rise, which explains the lack of consistent experimental evidence for deviations in the rate of capillary rise from the Washburn equation. However, for a strong dependency of the contact angle on the velocity in the range of small velocities, as in the case of water on glass, one of the models predicts significant deviations even for the time dependence of the capillary rise. Moreover, our results show that the time or height dependence of the contact angle during the capillary rise can clearly discriminate between the various models.

  10. Experimental Validation of the Invariance of Electrowetting Contact Angle Saturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chevalliot, S.; Dhindsa, M.; Kuiper, S.; Heikenfeld, J.

    2011-01-01

    Basic electrowetting theory predicts that a continued increase in applied voltage will allow contact angle modulation to zero degrees. In practice, the effect of contact angle saturation has always been observed to limit the contact angle modulation, often only down to a contact angle of 60 to 70°.

  11. Measuring static and dynamic contact angles using a liquid needle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanedrin, Raymond; Jin, Ming; Frese, Daniel; Scheithauer, Carsten; Willers, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    The optical determination of static and advancing contact angle is made on drops applied or extended, respectively, onto a substrate through the use of thin solid needles. Although this method has been used extensively, this method of dosing can be time consuming, cumbersome and if not meticulously performed can lead to erroneous contact angle results. Herein, we present an alternative way of applying drops onto substrates using a small liquid jet, which is produced by a liquid pressure dosing system acting as a "liquid needle." A comparative static contact angle study on 14 different surfaces with two different liquids were performed utilizing two different ways of dosing: the conventional solid and a novel liquid needle based technique. We found, for all but one sample, that the obtained results were highly comparable. Observed differences can be explained by the characteristics of either way of dosing. In addition, we used the liquid pressure based dosing system for optical advancing contact angle measurement on two different samples. The liquid needle based method facilitates the expansion of a drop from 0.1 to 22 μL within less than 1.2 seconds, which provided constant contact angle versus drop base diameter curves. The obtained results were highly comparable with dynamic Wilhelmy contact angle measurements.

  12. Constitutive modeling of contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vedantam, Srikanth; Panchagnula, Mahesh V

    2008-05-15

    We introduce a phase field model of wetting of surfaces by sessile drops. The theory uses a two-dimensional non-conserved phase field variable to parametrize the Gibbs free energy of the three-dimensional system. Contact line tension and contact angle hysteresis arise from the gradient term in the free energy and the kinetic coefficient respectively. A significant advantage of this approach is in the constitutive specification of hysteresis. The advancing and receding angles of a surface, the liquid-vapor interfacial energy and three-phase line tension are the only required constitutive inputs to the model. We first simulate hysteresis on a smooth chemically homogeneous surface using this theory. Next we show that it is possible to study heterogeneous surfaces whose component surfaces are themselves hysteretic. We use this theory to examine the wetting of a surface containing a circular heterogeneous island. The contact angle for this case is found to be determined solely by the material properties at the contact line in accord with recent experimental data.

  13. Dynamic contact angle cycling homogenizes heterogeneous surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belibel, R; Barbaud, C; Mora, L

    2016-12-01

    In order to reduce restenosis, the necessity to develop the appropriate coating material of metallic stent is a challenge for biomedicine and scientific research over the past decade. Therefore, biodegradable copolymers of poly((R,S)-3,3 dimethylmalic acid) (PDMMLA) were prepared in order to develop a new coating exhibiting different custom groups in its side chain and being able to carry a drug. This material will be in direct contact with cells and blood. It consists of carboxylic acid and hexylic groups used for hydrophilic and hydrophobic character, respectively. The study of this material wettability and dynamic surface properties is of importance due to the influence of the chemistry and the potential motility of these chemical groups on cell adhesion and polymer kinetic hydrolysis. Cassie theory was used for the theoretical correction of contact angles of these chemical heterogeneous surfaces coatings. Dynamic Surface Analysis was used as practical homogenizer of chemical heterogeneous surfaces by cycling during many cycles in water. In this work, we confirmed that, unlike receding contact angle, advancing contact angle is influenced by the difference of only 10% of acidic groups (%A) in side-chain of polymers. It linearly decreases with increasing acidity percentage. Hysteresis (H) is also a sensitive parameter which is discussed in this paper. Finally, we conclude that cycling provides real information, thus avoiding theoretical Cassie correction. H(10)is the most sensible parameter to %A.

  14. On some relations between advancing, receding and Young's contact angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibowski, Emil

    2007-05-31

    Problems of experimental determination and theoretical verification of equilibrium contact angles are discussed basing on the literature data. A relationship between the advancing and receding contact angles versus the equilibrium contact angle is described and then verified using the literature contact angles determined on paraffin wax and polypropylene. Using the proposed relationship and experimentally determined equilibrium contact angles, obtained by plotting the advancing and receding contact angles versus the contact angle hysteresis or by applying vibration of the system liquid drop/solid surface, it is found that the same value of the surface free energy for paraffin wax is calculated from the contact angles of water and ethylene glycol. However, in the case of polypropylene some inconsistency appears between the equilibrium contact angles of the probe liquid used and the calculated surface free energy. More experimental data of the equilibrium contact angle are needed to verify further the relationship.

  15. Contact angle hysteresis on regular pillar-like hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Li-Jen; Chang, Jeng-Yang

    2008-01-01

    A series of pillar-like patterned silicon wafers with different pillar sizes and spacing are fabricated by photolithography and further modified by a self-assembled fluorosilanated monolayer. The dynamic contact angles of water on these surfaces are carefully measured and found to be consistent with the theoretical predictions of the Cassie model and the Wenzel model. When a water drop is at the Wenzel state, its contact angle hysteresis increases along with an increase in the surface roughness. While the surface roughness is further raised beyond its transition roughness (from the Wenzel state to the Cassie state), the contact angle hysteresis (or receding contact angle) discontinuously drops (or jumps) to a lower (or higher) value. When a water drop is at the Cassie state, its contact angle hysteresis strongly depends on the solid fraction and has nothing to do with the surface roughness. Even for a superhydrophobic surface, the contact angle hysteresis may still exhibit a value as high as 41 degrees for the solid fraction of 0.563.

  16. Picoliter water contact angle measurement on polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Michael; Urquhart, Andrew J; Zelzer, Mischa; Davies, Martyn C; Alexander, Morgan R

    2007-06-19

    Water contact angle measurement is the most common method for determining a material's wettability, and the sessile drop approach is the most frequently used. However, the method is generally limited to macroscopic measurements because the base diameter of the droplet is usually greater than 1 mm. Here we report for the first time on a dosing system to dispense smaller individual droplets with control of the position and investigate whether water contact angles determined from picoliter volume water droplets are comparable with those obtained from the conventional microliter volume water droplets. This investigation was conducted on a group of commonly used polymers. To demonstrate the higher spatial resolution of wettability that can be achieved using picoliter volume water droplets, the wettability of a radial plasma polymer gradient was mapped using a 250 microm interval grid.

  17. Dancing droplets: Contact angle, drag, and confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    When deposited on a clean glass slide, a mixture of water and propylene glycol forms a droplet of given contact angle, when both pure liquids spread. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). The droplet is stabilized by a gradient of surface tension due to evaporation that induces a Marangoni flow from the border to the apex of the droplets. The apparent contact angle of the droplets depends on both their composition and the external humidity as captured by simple models. These droplets present remarkable properties such as lack of a large pinning force. We discuss the drag on these droplets as a function of various parameters. We show theoretical and experimental results of how various confinement geometries change the vapor gradient and the dynamics of droplet attraction.

  18. Fabrication of zero contact angle ultra-super hydrophilic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jothi Prakash, C G; Clement Raj, C; Prasanth, R

    2017-01-05

    Zero contact angle surfaces have been created with the combined effect of nanostructure and UV illumination. The contact angle of titanium surface has been optimized to 3.25°±1°. with nanotubular structures through electrochemical surface modification. The porosity and surface energy of tubular TiO2 layer play critical role over the surface wettability and the hydrophilicity of the surface. The surface free energy has been enhanced from 23.72mJ/m(2) (bare titanium surface) to 87.11mJ/m(2) (nanotubular surface). Similar surface with TiO2 nanoparticles coating shows superhydrophilicity with contact angle up to 5.63°±0.95°. This implies liquid imbibition and surface curvature play a crucial role in surface hydrophilicity. The contact angle has been further reduced to 0°±0.86° by illuminating the surface with UV radiation. Results shows that by tuning the nanotube morphology, highly porous surfaces can be fabricated to reduce contact angle and enhance wettability. This study provides an insight into the inter-relationship between surface structural factors and ultra-superhydrophilic surfaces which can help to optimize thermal hydraulic and self cleaning surfaces.

  19. Magnetically induced decrease in droplet contact angle on nanostructured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qian; Ristenpart, William D; Stroeve, Pieter

    2011-10-04

    We report a magnetic technique for altering the apparent contact angle of aqueous droplets deposited on a nanostructured surface. Polymeric tubes with embedded superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) nanoparticles were prepared via layer-by-layer deposition in the 800 nm diameter pores of polycarbonate track-etched (PCTE) membranes. Etching away the original membrane yields a superparamagnetic film composed of mostly vertical tubes attached to a rigid substrate. We demonstrate that the apparent contact angle of pure water droplets deposited on the nanostructured film is highly sensitive to the ante situm strength of an applied magnetic field, decreasing linearly from 117 ± 1.3° at no applied field to 105 ± 0.4° at an applied field of approximately 500 G. Importantly, this decrease in contact angle did not require an inordinately strong magnetic field: a 15° decrease in contact angle was observed even with a standard alnico bar magnet. We interpret the observed contact angle behavior in terms of magnetically induced conformation changes in the film nanostructure, and we discuss the implications for reversibly switching substrates from hydrophilic to hydrophobic via externally tunable magnetic fields.

  20. Contact angle hysteresis: study by dynamic cycling contact angle measurements and variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry on polyimide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, A; Eichhorn, K-J; Staudinger, U; Sahre, K; Rogalli, M; Stamm, M; Neumann, A W; Grundke, K

    2004-08-03

    The phenomenon of contact angle hysteresis was studied on smooth films of polyimide, a polymer type used in the microelectronic industry, by dynamic cycling contact angle measurements based on axisymmetric drop shape analysis-profile in combination with variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE). It was found that both advancing and receding contact angles became smaller with increasing the number of cycles and are, therefore, not a property of the dry solid alone. The changes of the wetting behavior during these dynamic cycling contact angle measurements are attributed mainly to swelling and/or liquid retention. To reveal the water-induced changes of the polymer film, the polyimide surface was studied before and after the contact with a water droplet by VASE. Both the experimental ellipsometric spectrum for Delta and that for Psi as well as the corresponding simulations show characteristic shifts due to the contact with water. The so-called effective medium approximation was applied to recover information about the thickness and effective optical constants of the polymer layer from the ellipsometrically measured values of Delta and Psi. On the basis of these results, the swelling and retention behavior of the polyimide films in contact with water droplets were discussed.

  1. Studying of the Contact Angle Hysteresis on Various Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kirichenko E. O.; Gatapova E. Ya.

    2016-01-01

    This paper is devoted to investigation of the contact angle hysteresis on various surfaces. It was carried out by two different methods: measuring the advancing and the receding contact angles and measuring the contact angles at water droplet evaporation under isothermal conditions. Data obtained using two methods have been compared. The influence of the contact angle hysteresis on the mode of the drop evaporation has been shown.

  2. Studying of the Contact Angle Hysteresis on Various Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirichenko E. O.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to investigation of the contact angle hysteresis on various surfaces. It was carried out by two different methods: measuring the advancing and the receding contact angles and measuring the contact angles at water droplet evaporation under isothermal conditions. Data obtained using two methods have been compared. The influence of the contact angle hysteresis on the mode of the drop evaporation has been shown.

  3. A Hydrodynamic Model of Dynamic Contact Angle Hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    contact angle hysteresis is developed in terms of the interaction of capillary, viscous, and...used to obtain the equations which describe the contact angle region and thereby to define the dynamic contact angle . The analysis is limited to...velocity dependence of the receding contact angle and of the thickness of the deposited film of the receding interface of a wetting liquid are determined as functions of the capillary, viscous, and disjoining forces.

  4. Origin of dynamic contact angle at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanov, Alex; Likhtman, Alexei

    2016-11-01

    Generation of a dynamic contact angle in the course of wetting is a fundamental phenomenon of nature. Dynamic wetting processes have a direct impact on flows at the nanoscale, and therefore, understanding them is exceptionally important to emerging technologies. Here, we reveal the microscopic mechanism of dynamic contact angle generation, which is demonstrated using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of bead-spring model fluids. It has been shown that the main cause of local contact angle variations is the distribution of microscopic force acting at the contact line region. We were able to retrieve this force with high accuracy to understand its nature and its characteristic physical parameters. It has been directly established that the force distribution can be solely predicted on the basis of a general friction law for liquid flow at solid surfaces first formulated by Thompson & Troian on the basis of molecular dynamics simulations of Lennard-Jones liquids. The relationship with the friction law provides both an explanation of the phenomenon of dynamic contact angle and a methodology for future predictions. The mechanism is intrinsically microscopic, universal, and irreducible and is applicable to a wide range of problems associated with wetting phenomena. Deceased.

  5. Dynamic Contact Angle at the Nanoscale: A Unified View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanov, Alex V; Likhtman, Alexei E

    2016-06-28

    Generation of a dynamic contact angle in the course of wetting is a fundamental phenomenon of nature. Dynamic wetting processes have a direct impact on flows at the nanoscale, and therefore, understanding them is exceptionally important to emerging technologies. Here, we reveal the microscopic mechanism of dynamic contact angle generation. It has been demonstrated using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of bead-spring model fluids that the main cause of local contact angle variations is the distribution of microscopic force acting at the contact line region. We were able to retrieve this elusive force with high accuracy. It has been directly established that the force distribution can be solely predicted on the basis of a general friction law for liquid flow at solid surfaces by Thompson and Troian. The relationship with the friction law provides both an explanation of the phenomenon of dynamic contact angle and a methodology for future predictions. The mechanism is intrinsically microscopic, universal, and irreducible and is applicable to a wide range of problems associated with wetting phenomena.

  6. Development of a Contact Angle Measurement Method Based Upon Geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Su; Pyo, Na Young; Seo, Seung Hee [Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea); Choi, Woo Jin [Suwon University, Suwon (Korea); Kwon, Young Shik [Suwon Science College, Suwon (Korea)

    1998-12-31

    A new way of contact angle measurement is derived based on simple geometrical calculation. Without using complicated contact angle measurement instrument, just measuring the diameter and height of liquid lens made it possible to calculate the contact angle value with a reasonable reliability. To validate the contact angle value obtained by this method, contact angle of the same liquid lens is measured using conventional goniometer and it is verified that two values are nearly same within the limit of observational error. (author). 6 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  7. A robust polynomial fitting approach for contact angle measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atefi, Ehsan; Mann, J Adin; Tavana, Hossein

    2013-05-14

    Polynomial fitting to drop profile offers an alternative to well-established drop shape techniques for contact angle measurements from sessile drops without a need for liquid physical properties. Here, we evaluate the accuracy of contact angles resulting from fitting polynomials of various orders to drop profiles in a Cartesian coordinate system, over a wide range of contact angles. We develop a differentiator mask to automatically find a range of required number of pixels from a drop profile over which a stable contact angle is obtained. The polynomial order that results in the longest stable regime and returns the lowest standard error and the highest correlation coefficient is selected to determine drop contact angles. We find that, unlike previous reports, a single polynomial order cannot be used to accurately estimate a wide range of contact angles and that a larger order polynomial is needed for drops with larger contact angles. Our method returns contact angles with an accuracy of contact angles in a wide range with a fourth-order polynomial. We show that this approach returns dynamic contact angles with less than 0.7° error as compared to ADSA-P, for the solid-liquid systems tested. This new approach is a powerful alternative to drop shape techniques for estimating contact angles of drops regardless of drop symmetry and without a need for liquid properties.

  8. Apparent contact angle of an evaporating drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, S. J. S.

    2012-11-01

    In experiments by Poulard et al. (2005), a sessile drop of perfectly wetting liquid evaporates from a non-heated substrate into an under-saturated mixture of vapour with an inert gas; evaporation is limited by vapour diffusion. The system exhibits an apparent contact angle θ that is a flow property. Under certain conditions, the apparent contact line was stationary relative to the substrate; we predict θ for this case. Observed values of θ are small, allowing lubrication analysis of the liquid film. The liquid and vapour flows are coupled through conditions holding at the phase interface; in particular, vapour partial pressure there is related to the local value of liquid pressure through the Kelvin condition. Because the droplet is shallow, the interfacial conditions can be transferred to the solid-liquid interface at y = 0 . We show that the dimensionless partial pressure p (x , y) and the film thickness h (x) are determined by solving ∇2 p = 0 for y > 0 subject to a matching condition at infinity, and the conditions - p = L hxx +h-3 and (h3px) x + 3py = 0 at y = 0 . The parameter L controls the ratio of Laplace to disjoining pressure. We analyse this b.v.p. for the experimentally-relevant case L --> 0 .

  9. Study of the advancing and receding contact angles: liquid sorption as a cause of contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, C N C; Wu, R; Li, D; Hair, M L; Neumann, A W

    2002-02-25

    Two types of experiments were used to study the behavior of both advancing and receding contact angles, namely the dynamic one-cycle contact angle (DOCA) and the dynamic cycling contact angle (DCCA) experiments. For the preliminary study, DOCA measurements of different liquids on different solids were performed using an automated axisymmetric drop shape analysis-profile (ADSA-P). From these experimental results, four patterns of receding contact angle were observed: (1) time-dependent receding contact angle; (2) constant receding contact angle; (3) 'stick/slip'; (4) no receding contact angle. For the purpose of illustration, results from four different solid surfaces are shown. These solids are: FC-732-coated surface; poly(methyl methacrylate/n-butyl methacrylate) [P(MMA/nBMA)]; poly(lactic acid) (DL-PLA); and poly(lactic/glycolic acid) 50/50 (DL-PLGA 50/50). Since most of the surfaces in our studies exhibit time dependence in the receding contact angle, a more extended study was conducted using only FC-732-coated surfaces to better understand the possible causes of decreasing receding contact angle and contact angle hysteresis. Contact angle measurements of 21 liquids from two homologous series (i.e. n-alkanes and 1-alcohols) and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OCMTS) on FC-732-coated surfaces were performed. It is apparent that the contact angle hysteresis decreases with the chain length of the liquid. It was found that the receding contact angle equals the advancing angle when the alkane molecules are infinitely large. These results strongly suggest that the chain length and size of the liquid molecule could contribute to contact angle hysteresis phenomena. Furthermore, DCCA measurements of six liquids from the two homologous series on FC-732-coated surfaces were performed. With these experimental results, one can construe that the time dependence of contact angle hysteresis on relatively smooth and homogeneous surfaces is mainly caused by liquid retention

  10. As-placed contact angles for sessile drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadmor, Rafael; Yadav, Preeti S

    2008-01-01

    As-placed contact angle is the contact angle a drop adapts as a result of its placement on a surface. As expected, the as-placed contact angle, thetaAP, of a sessile drop on a horizontal surface decreases with the drop size due to the increase in hydrostatic pressure. We present a theoretical prediction for thetaAP which shows that it is a unique function of the advancing contact angle, thetaA, drop size, and material properties (surface tensions and densities). We test our prediction with published and new data. The theory agrees with the experiments. From the relation of the as-placed contact angle to drop size the thermodynamic equilibrium contact angle is also calculated.

  11. Investigation of drop dynamic contact angle on copper surface

    OpenAIRE

    Orlova Evgenija; Feoktistov Dmitriy; Kuznetsov Geniy

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results of the studying the effect of surface roughness, microstructure and flow rate on the dynamic contact angle at spreading of distilled non deaerate water drop on a solid horizontal substrates. Copper substrates with different roughness have been investigated. For each substrate static contact angles depending on volume flow rate have been obtained using shadow system. Increasing the volume flow rate resulted in an increase of the static contact angle. It...

  12. UPPER LIMITS FOR THE CONTACT ANGLES OF LIQUIDS ON SOLIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    available on equilibrium contact angles . These data were obtained under well- controlled and comparable experimental conditions for many liquids on...Earlier systematic studies of the angle of contact (theta) exhibited by drops of liquid on plane solid surfaces of low surface energy have made data...From the parameters defining this straight line, estimates can be made of the limiting contact angles for each liquid.

  13. Dynamic contact angle at nano-scale: a unified view

    OpenAIRE

    Lukyanov, Alex V.; Likhtman, Alexei E.

    2016-01-01

    Generation of dynamic contact angle in the course of wetting is a fundamental phenomenon of nature. Dynamic wetting processes have a direct impact on flows at nano-scale, and therefore their understanding is exceptionally important to emerging technologies. Here, we reveal the microscopic mechanism of dynamic contact angle generation. It has been demonstrated using large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of bead-spring model fluids that the main cause of local contact angle variations is t...

  14. Lightweight autoclavable wide-angle contact lens for vitreous surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalam, K V; Gupta, Shailesh K; Agarwal, Swati

    2007-01-01

    The authors describe an autoclavable, self-stabilizing, lightweight wide-angle contact lens for vitrectomy. The lens has two optical pieces with perforated plastic casing to sustain a high temperature (150 degrees C) for autoclaving. The lens has a 106 degrees static and 127 degrees dynamic field of view. The footplates and reduced weight (2.4 grams) due to the plastic casing allow self-stabilization of the lens. The open lens design.with high temperature resistant plastic prevents fogging during autoclaving and surgery. The autoclavable, self-stabilizing, lightweight wide-angle contact lens allows visualization of the peripheral retina during surgery and faster sterilization by autoclaving between surgeries without the disadvantage of lens fogging.

  15. Can dynamic contact angle be measured using molecular modeling?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malani, Ateeque; Raghavanpillai, Anilkumar; Wysong, Ernest B; Rutledge, Gregory C

    2012-11-02

    A method is presented for determining the dynamic contact angle at the three-phase contact between a solid, a liquid, and a vapor under an applied force, using molecular simulation. The method is demonstrated using a Lennard-Jones fluid in contact with a cylindrical shell of the fcc Lennard-Jones solid. Advancing and receding contact angles and the contact angle hysteresis are reported for the first time by this approach. The increase in force required to wet fully an array of solid cylinders (robustness) with decreasing separation distance between cylinders is evaluated. The dynamic contact angle is characterized by partial slipping of the three phase contact line when a force is applied.

  16. Numerical Simulation of Dynamic Contact Angles and Contact Lines in Multiphase Flows using Level Set Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendota, Premchand

    Many physical phenomena and industrial applications involve multiphase fluid flows and hence it is of high importance to be able to simulate various aspects of these flows accurately. The Dynamic Contact Angles (DCA) and the contact lines at the wall boundaries are a couple of such important aspects. In the past few decades, many mathematical models were developed for predicting the contact angles of the inter-face with the wall boundary under various flow conditions. These models are used to incorporate the physics of DCA and contact line motion in numerical simulations using various interface capturing/tracking techniques. In the current thesis, a simple approach to incorporate the static and dynamic contact angle boundary conditions using the level set method is developed and implemented in multiphase CFD codes, LIT (Level set Interface Tracking) (Herrmann (2008)) and NGA (flow solver) (Desjardins et al (2008)). Various DCA models and associated boundary conditions are reviewed. In addition, numerical aspects such as the occurrence of a stress singularity at the contact lines and grid convergence of macroscopic interface shape are dealt with in the context of the level set approach.

  17. Contact angle hysteresis: a review of fundamentals and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eral, H.B.; Mannetje, 't D.J.C.M.; Oh, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Contact angle hysteresis is an important physical phenomenon. It is omnipresent in nature and also plays a crucial role in various industrial processes. Despite its relevance, there is a lack of consensus on how to incorporate a description of contact angle hysteresis into physical models. To clarif

  18. Dynamic aspects of contact angle measurements on adsorbed protein layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheer, van der At; Smolders, Cees A.

    1978-01-01

    Contact angle measurements using drops of paraffin oil have been performed on polystyrene (PS) substrates, coated with human serum albumin (HSA) or human fibrinogen (HFb), immersed in buffer solution. The contact angle appeared to be time dependent. The final value for HSA-coated substrates was 50°

  19. Study on Surface Wettability of Bamboo by Measurement of Contact Angle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The main objective of this research is to evaluate the wettability of the processed bamboo surfaces. The important surface energy and acid-base properties for processed bamboo have been estimated by using contact angle techniques. According to the results, the change of ages has a positive relation with the contact angles of water on processed bamboo. The contact angles were increased after the bamboo surface treated in high temperature condition and preservation. The different treat methods have a stro...

  20. What is the contact angle of water on graphene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherian, Fereshte; Marcon, Valentina; van der Vegt, Nico F A; Leroy, Frédéric

    2013-02-05

    Although experimental and theoretical studies have addressed the question of the wetting properties of graphene, the actual value of the contact angle of water on an isolated graphene monolayer remains unknown. While recent experimental literature indicates that the contact angle of water on graphite is in the range 90-95°, it has been suggested that the contact angle on graphene may either be as high as 127° or moderately enhanced in comparison with graphite. With the support of classical molecular dynamics simulations using empirical force-fields, we develop an argumentation to show that the value of 127° is an unrealistic estimate and that a value of the order of 95-100° should be expected. Our study establishes a connection between the variation of the work of adhesion of water on graphene-based surfaces and the interaction potential between individual water molecules and these surfaces. We show that a variation of the contact angle from 90° on graphite to 127° on graphene would imply that both of the first two carbon layers of graphite contribute approximately the same interaction energy with water. Such a situation is incompatible with the short-range nature of the interaction between water and this substrate. We also show that the interaction potential energy between water and the graphene-based substrates is the main contribution to the work of adhesion of water with a relative magnitude that is independent of the number of graphene layers. We introduce the idea that the remaining contribution is entropic in nature and is connected to the fluctuations in the water-substrate interaction energy.

  1. Contact angles in the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of wetting

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Q; Kang, Q J; Chen, Q

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we aim to investigate the implementation of contact angles in the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of wetting at a large density ratio. The pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann model [X. Shan and H. Chen, Phys. Rev. E 49, 2941 (1994)] is a popular mesoscopic model for simulating multiphase flows and interfacial dynamics. In this model, the contact angle is usually realized by a fluid-solid interaction. Two widely used fluid-solid interactions: the density-based interaction and the pseudopotential-based interaction, as well as a modified pseudopotential-based interaction formulated in the present paper, are numerically investigated and compared in terms of the achievable contact angles, the maximum and the minimum densities, and the spurious currents. It is found that the pseudopotential-based interaction works well for simulating small static (liquid) contact angles, however, is unable to reproduce static contact angles close to 180 degrees. Meanwhile, it is found that the proposed modif...

  2. The modified Cassie’s equation and contact angle hysteresis

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xianmin

    2012-08-29

    In this paper, we derive a modified Cassie\\'s equation for wetting on chemically patterned surfaces from a homogenization approach. The derivation reveals that effective contact angle is a local average of the static contact angle along the contact line which describes all possible equilibrium states including the local minimum of the free energy of the system. The usual Cassie\\'s state which corresponds to the global minimum is only a special case. We then discuss the contact angle hysteresis on chemically patterned surfaces. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Modeling contact angle hysteresis on chemically patterned and superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumaatmaja, H; Yeomans, J M

    2007-05-22

    We investigate contact angle hysteresis on chemically patterned and superhydrophobic surfaces, as the drop volume is quasistatically increased and decreased. We consider both two (cylindrical drops) and three (spherical drops) dimensions using analytical and numerical approaches to minimize the free energy of the drop. In two dimensions, we find, in agreement with other authors, a slip, jump, stick motion of the contact line. In three dimensions, this behavior persists, but the position and magnitude of the contact line jumps are sensitive to the details of the surface patterning. In two dimensions, we identify analytically the advancing and receding contact angles on the different surfaces, and we use numerical insights to argue that these provide bounds for the three-dimensional cases. We present explicit simulations to show that a simple average over the disorder is not sufficient to predict the details of the contact angle hysteresis and to support an explanation for the low contact angle hysteresis of suspended drops on superhydrophobic surfaces.

  4. Preparation of a durable superhydrophobic membrane by electrospinning poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) mixed with epoxy-siloxane modified SiO2 nanoparticles: a possible route to superhydrophobic surfaces with low water sliding angle and high water contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuai; Li, Yapeng; Fei, Xiaoliang; Sun, Mingda; Zhang, Chaoqun; Li, Yaoxian; Yang, Qingbiao; Hong, Xia

    2011-07-15

    A durable superhydrophobic surface with low water sliding angle (SA) and high water contact angle (CA) was obtained by electrospinning poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) which was mixed with epoxy-siloxane modified SiO(2) nanoparticles. To increase the roughness, modified SiO(2) nanoparticles were introduced into PVDF precursor solution. Then in the electrospinning process, nano-sized SiO(2) particles irregularly inlayed (it could also be regard as self-assembly) in the surface of the micro-sized PVDF mini-islands so as to form a dual-scale structure. This structure was responsible for the superhydrophobicity and self-cleaning property. In addition, epoxy-siloxane copolymer was used to modify the surface of SiO(2) nanoparticles so that the SiO(2) nanoparticles could stick to the surface of the micro-sized PVDF mini-islands. Through the underwater immersion test, the SiO(2) nanoparticles cannot be separated from PVDF easily so as to achieve the effect of durability. We chiefly explore the surface wettability and the relationship between the mass ratio of modified SiO(2) nanoparticles/PVDF and the CA, SA of electrospun mat. As the content of modified SiO(2) nanoparticles increased, the value of CA increased, ranging from 145.6° to 161.2°, and the water SA decreased to 2.17°, apparently indicating that the membrane we fabricated has a perfect effect of superhydrophobicity.

  5. Estimation of Intrinsic Contact Angle of Various Liquids on PTFE by Utilizing Ultrasonic Vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urai, Takuya; Kamai, Masayoshi; Fujii, Hidetoshi

    2016-08-01

    The contact angle measured using the sessile drop method is typically an advancing contact angle, which is often used for the evaluation of wettability. However, the precise measurement of the contact angle on rough substrates has been required for developing various industrial processes. In this study, a new measuring method by achieving the minimum total free energy by ultrasonic vibration (USV) was developed. The new method has been demonstrated for different rough surfaces, droplet volumes, and wettability conditions. The advancing contact angle significantly decreased when the USV is applied, but it immediately increased after stopping the USV. In order to capture the droplet behavior at the beginning and end of the USV, a high-speed camera was used. The contact angle was apparently a receding contact angle after stopping the ultrasonic vibration. Accordingly, the intrinsic contact angle was estimated using the values of the advancing contact angles obtained before applying the ultrasonic vibration and the receding contact angles obtained after stopping the ultrasonic vibration.

  6. Measurement of Critical Contact Angle in a Microgravity Space Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.; Weislogel, M.

    1998-01-01

    Mathematical theory predicts that small changes in container shape or in contact angle can give rise to large shifts of liquid in a microgravity environment. This phenomenon was investigated in the Interface Configuration Experiment on board the USMT,2 Space Shuttle flight. The experiment's "double proboscis" containers were designed to strike a balance between conflicting requirements of sizable volume of liquid shift (for ease of observation) and abruptness of the shift (for accurate determination of critical contact angle). The experimental results support the classical concept of macroscopic contact angle and demonstrate the role of hysteresis in impeding orientation toward equilibrium.

  7. Drop Size Dependence of the Contact Angle of Nanodroplets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Hong-Kai; FANG Hai-Ping

    2005-01-01

    @@ The contact angle of nanosized non-polarized argon sessile droplets on a solid substrate is studied by using molecular dynamics simulations.It is found that the drop size dependence of the contact angle is sensitive to the interaction between the liquid molecules and solid molecules.The contact angle decreases with the decreasing drop size for larger interaction between the liquid molecules and the solid substrate, and vice versa.This observation is consistent with most of the previous theoretical and experimental results.

  8. The impact of contact angle on the biocompatibility of biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Kara L; Jones, Lyndon

    2010-06-01

    Biomaterials may be defined as artificial materials that can mimic, store, or come into close contact with living biological cells or fluids and are becoming increasingly popular in the medical, biomedical, optometric, dental, and pharmaceutical industries. Within the ophthalmic industry, the best example of a biomaterial is a contact lens, which is worn by approximately 125 million people worldwide. For biomaterials to be biocompatible, they cannot illicit any type of unfavorable response when exposed to the tissue they contact. A characteristic that significantly influences this response is that related to surface wettability, which is often determined by measuring the contact angle of the material. This article reviews the impact of contact angle on the biocompatibility of tissue engineering substrates, blood-contacting devices, dental implants, intraocular lenses, and contact lens materials.

  9. Aerial wetting contact angle measurement using confocal microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesna, Jacob W.; Wiedmaier, Bob F.; Wang, Jinlin; Samara, Ayman; Leach, Richard K.; Her, Tsing-Hua; Smith, Stuart T.

    2016-12-01

    A method is presented in which the wetting contact angle of a sessile drop is acquired aerially using confocal techniques to measure the radius and the height of a droplet deposited on a planar surface. The repeatability of this method is typically less than 0.25°, and often less than 0.1°, for droplet diameters less than 1 mm. To evaluate accuracy of this method, an instrument uncertainty budget is developed, which predicts a combined uncertainty of 0.91° for a 1 mm diameter water droplet with a contact angle of 110°. For droplets having diameters less than 1 mm and contact angles between 15° and 160°, these droplets approach spherical shape and their contact angles can be computed analytically with less than 1% error. For larger droplets, gravitational deformation needs to be considered.

  10. Contact angles in the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Luo, K. H.; Kang, Q. J.; Chen, Q.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we investigate the implementation of contact angles in the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of wetting at a large density ratio ρL/ρV=500 . The pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann model [X. Shan and H. Chen, Phys. Rev. E 49, 2941 (1994), 10.1103/PhysRevE.49.2941] is a popular mesoscopic model for simulating multiphase flows and interfacial dynamics. In this model the contact angle is usually realized by a fluid-solid interaction. Two widely used fluid-solid interactions, the density-based interaction and the pseudopotential-based interaction, as well as a modified pseudopotential-based interaction formulated in the present paper are numerically investigated and compared in terms of the achievable contact angles, the maximum and the minimum densities, and the spurious currents. It is found that the pseudopotential-based interaction works well for simulating small static (liquid) contact angles θ static contact angles close to 180∘. Meanwhile, it is found that the proposed modified pseudopotential-based interaction performs better in light of the maximum and the minimum densities and is overall more suitable for simulating large contact angles θ >90∘ as compared with the two other types of fluid-solid interactions. Furthermore, the spurious currents are found to be enlarged when the fluid-solid interaction force is introduced. Increasing the kinematic viscosity ratio between the vapor and liquid phases is shown to be capable of reducing the spurious currents caused by the fluid-solid interactions.

  11. Contact angle of sessile drops in Lennard-Jones systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Stefan; Urbassek, Herbert M; Horsch, Martin; Hasse, Hans

    2014-11-18

    Molecular dynamics simulations are used for studying the contact angle of nanoscale sessile drops on a planar solid wall in a system interacting via the truncated and shifted Lennard-Jones potential. The entire range between total wetting and dewetting is investigated by varying the solid-fluid dispersive interaction energy. The temperature is varied between the triple point and the critical temperature. A correlation is obtained for the contact angle in dependence of the temperature and the dispersive interaction energy. Size effects are studied by varying the number of fluid particles at otherwise constant conditions, using up to 150,000 particles. For particle numbers below 10,000, a decrease of the contact angle is found. This is attributed to a dependence of the solid-liquid surface tension on the droplet size. A convergence to a constant contact angle is observed for larger system sizes. The influence of the wall model is studied by varying the density of the wall. The effective solid-fluid dispersive interaction energy at a contact angle of θ = 90° is found to be independent of temperature and to decrease linearly with the solid density. A correlation is developed that describes the contact angle as a function of the dispersive interaction, the temperature, and the solid density. The density profile of the sessile drop and the surrounding vapor phase is described by a correlation combining a sigmoidal function and an oscillation term.

  12. Modeling liquid bridge between surfaces with contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Amirfazli, A; Tang, T

    2013-03-12

    This paper presents the behaviors of a liquid bridge when being compressed and stretched in a quasi-static fashion between two solid surfaces that have contact angle hysteresis (CAH). A theoretical model is developed to obtain the profiles of the liquid bridge given a specific separation between the surfaces. Different from previous models, both contact lines in the upper and lower surfaces were allowed to move when the contact angles reach their advancing or receding values. When the contact angles are between their advancing and receding values, the contact lines are pinned while the contact angles adjust to accommodate the changes in separation. Effects of CAH on both asymmetric and symmetric liquid bridges were analyzed. The model was shown to be able to correctly predict the behavior of the liquid bridge during a quasi-static compression/stretching loading cycle in experiments. Because of CAH, the liquid bridge can have two different profiles at the same separation during one loading and unloading cycle, and more profiles can be obtained during multiple cycles. The maximum adhesion force generated by the liquid bridge is found to be influenced by the CAH of surfaces. CAH also leads to energy cost during a loading cycle of the liquid bridge. In addition, the minimum separation between the two solid surfaces is shown to affect how the contact radii and angles change on the two surfaces as the liquid bridge is stretched.

  13. Hierarchically structured superoleophobic surfaces with ultralow contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kota, Arun K; Li, Yongxin; Mabry, Joseph M; Tuteja, Anish

    2012-11-14

    Hierarchically structured, superoleophobic surfaces are demonstrated that display one of the lowest contact angle hysteresis values ever reported - even with extremely low-surface-tension liquids such as n-heptane. Consequently, these surfaces allow, for the first time, even ≈2 μL n-heptane droplets to bounce and roll-off at tilt angles. ≤ 2°.

  14. Contact angle hysteresis of a drop spreading over metal surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov Geniy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents experimental data on the contact angle hysteresis of the distilled water drop spreading over the surfaces of non-ferrous metals. The measurements of the advancing and receding contact angles were carried out by method of sitting drop on the horizontal surface during increasing and decreasing drop volume with a syringe pump. It was found that the contact line speed has a great influence on the hysteresis of the polished non-elastic substrates. The mechanism of spreading was described using the balance of the forces from the physical point of view.

  15. Surface properties of dental polymers: measurements of contact angles, roughness and fluoride release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Namen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Earlier studies on some dental materials measured roughness and/or contact angles or fluoride release separately. In the present study, five dental polymers were investigated to ascertain their contact angles, wettability, roughness, and fluoride release in dry or wet conditions. METHODS: Samples for 5 materials were prepared and stored dry or wet in deionized water pH 6.8. Samples were submitted to finishing/polishing procedures, and the measurements in Goniometer, roughness (µm and fluoride analysis RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Except for the Ariston pHc, all the materials displayed high contact angles when measured with water, showing hydrophobic characteristics. Roughness changed the contact angles, especially those of Ariston (α < 0.05. Fluoride did not modify the contact angles, but increased the roughness of the finished material.

  16. Equilibrium contact angles of liquid droplets on ideal rough solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hie Chan; Jacobi, Anthony M

    2011-12-20

    This work proposes a theoretical model for predicting the apparent equilibrium contact angle of a liquid on an ideal rough surface that is homogeneous and has a negligible body force, line tension, or contact angle hysteresis between solid and liquid. The model is derived from the conservation equations and the free-energy minimization theory for the changes of state of liquid droplets. The work of adhesion is expressed as the contact angles in the wetting process of the liquid droplets. Equilibrium contact angles of liquid droplets for rough surfaces are expressed as functions of the area ratios for the solid, liquid, and surrounding gas and the roughness ratio and wetting ratio of the liquid on the solid for the partially and fully wet states. It is found that the ideal critical angle for accentuating the contact angles by the surface roughness is 48°. The present model is compared with existing experimental data and the classical Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter models and agrees with most of the experimental data for various surfaces and liquids better than does the Wenzel model and accounts for trends that the Wenzel model cannot explain.

  17. Determination of the Contact Angle Based on the Casimir Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    2015-01-01

    In several crystal growth processed based on capillarity, a melt comes into contact with a crucible wall at an angle defined as the contact angle. For molten metals and semiconductors, this contact angle is dependent upon both the crucible and melt material and typical values fall in the range 80-170deg. However, on a microscopic scale, there does not exist a precise and sharp contact angle but rather the melt and solid surfaces merge smoothly and continuously over a distance of up to several micrometers. Accurate modeling requires a more advanced treatment of this interaction. The interaction between the melt and solid surfaces can be calculated by considering two forces: a short-range repulsive force and a longer range (up to a few micrometers) Casimir force. The Casimir force between the two bodies of complex geometry is calculated using a retarded temperature Green's function (Matsubara type) for the photon in the medium. The governing equations are cast in the form of a set of boundary integral equations which are then solved numerically for the case of molten Ge on SiO2. The shape of the molten surface approaching the flat solid body is determined, and the contact angle is defined as the angle between the two surfaces at the microscopically asymptotic distance of 1-2 micrometers. The formulation of this model and the results of the numerical calculations will be presented and discussed.

  18. Dynamic contact angles in oil-aqueous polymer solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shareef, Amer; Neogi, P; Bai, Baojun

    2017-01-25

    Polymer flooding is an important process in enhanced oil recovery. The displacement front is unstable when low viscosity brine displaces the heavy crude oil in the reservoir. Water-soluble polymers are added to the brine to increase its viscosity which stabilizes the displacement process. To analyze the displacement process at the micro-level, we have investigated the dynamic contact angles in silicone oil-polymer (polyethylene oxide) solution and for the first time. The dynamic contact angle is the apparent contact angle at the three-phase contact line which governs the capillary pressure, and thus is important for the displacement process. The data show no obvious signs of either shear thinning or elastic behavior, although for some systems with highest elastic effects some unexplained effects on dynamic contact angles are observed that correlate with elastic effects. Overall, dynamic contact angles are explained well using existing models for two Newtonian fluids, when the zero shear viscosity is used for the polymer solution.

  19. Investigation of the Dynamic Contact Angle Using a Direct Numerical Simulation Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Guangpu; Yao, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Hai; Li, Aifen; Shams, Bilal

    2016-11-15

    A large amount of residual oil, which exists as isolated oil slugs, remains trapped in reservoirs after water flooding. Numerous numerical studies are performed to investigate the fundamental flow mechanism of oil slugs to improve flooding efficiency. Dynamic contact angle models are usually introduced to simulate an accurate contact angle and meniscus displacement of oil slugs under a high capillary number. Nevertheless, in the oil slug flow simulation process, it is unnecessary to introduce the dynamic contact angle model because of a negligible change in the meniscus displacement after using the dynamic contact angle model when the capillary number is small. Therefore, a critical capillary number should be introduced to judge whether the dynamic contact model should be incorporated into simulations. In this study, a direct numerical simulation method is employed to simulate the oil slug flow in a capillary tube at the pore scale. The position of the interface between water and the oil slug is determined using the phase-field method. The capacity and accuracy of the model are validated using a classical benchmark: a dynamic capillary filling process. Then, different dynamic contact angle models and the factors that affect the dynamic contact angle are analyzed. The meniscus displacements of oil slugs with a dynamic contact angle and a static contact angle (SCA) are obtained during simulations, and the relative error between them is calculated automatically. The relative error limit has been defined to be 5%, beyond which the dynamic contact angle model needs to be incorporated into the simulation to approach the realistic displacement. Thus, the desired critical capillary number can be determined. A three-dimensional universal chart of critical capillary number, which functions as static contact angle and viscosity ratio, is given to provide a guideline for oil slug simulation. Also, a fitting formula is presented for ease of use.

  20. Water contact angles and hysteresis of polyamide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extrand, C W

    2002-04-01

    The wetting behavior of a series of aliphatic polyamides (PAs) has been examined. PAs with varying amide content and polyethylene (PE) were molded against glass to produce surfaces with similar roughness. After cleaning, chemical composition of the surfaces was verified with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Advancing and receding contact angles were measured from small sessile water drops. Contact angles decreased with amide content while hysteresis increased. Hysteresis arose primarily from molecular interactions between the contact liquid and the solid substrates, rather than moisture absorption, variations in crystallinity, surface deformation, roughness, reorientation of amide groups, or surface contamination. Free energies of hysteresis were calculated from contact angles. For PE, which is composed entirely of nonpolar methylene groups, free energies were equivalent to the strength of dispersive van der Waals bonds. For PAs, free energies corresponded to fractional contributions from the dispersive methylene groups and polar amide groups.

  1. Constraints on Contact Angles for Multiple Phases in Thermodynamic Equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunt, Martin J.

    2001-07-01

    For three or more fluid phases in thermodynamic equilibrium and in contact with a solid surface, the Young equation can be used to find relations between the contact angles for different pairs of fluids. For an n-fluid-phase system, n(n-1)/2 contact angles can be defined, but there are (n-1)(n-2)/2 constraints between them, leaving only n-1 independent values of the contact angle. These constraints are very powerful in limiting and determining possible types of wetting behavior. The consequences are discussed for three- and four-phase flow. They have important applications for the understanding of gas injection processes in petroleum reservoirs. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  2. An algorithm for selecting the most accurate protocol for contact angle measurement by drop shape analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z N

    2014-12-01

    In this study, an error analysis is performed to study real water drop images and the corresponding numerically generated water drop profiles for three widely used static contact angle algorithms: the circle- and ellipse-fitting algorithms and the axisymmetric drop shape analysis-profile (ADSA-P) algorithm. The results demonstrate the accuracy of the numerically generated drop profiles based on the Laplace equation. A significant number of water drop profiles with different volumes, contact angles, and noise levels are generated, and the influences of the three factors on the accuracies of the three algorithms are systematically investigated. The results reveal that the above-mentioned three algorithms are complementary. In fact, the circle- and ellipse-fitting algorithms show low errors and are highly resistant to noise for water drops with small/medium volumes and contact angles, while for water drop with large volumes and contact angles just the ADSA-P algorithm can meet accuracy requirement. However, this algorithm introduces significant errors in the case of small volumes and contact angles because of its high sensitivity to noise. The critical water drop volumes of the circle- and ellipse-fitting algorithms corresponding to a certain contact angle error are obtained through a significant amount of computation. To improve the precision of the static contact angle measurement, a more accurate algorithm based on a combination of the three algorithms is proposed. Following a systematic investigation, the algorithm selection rule is described in detail, while maintaining the advantages of the three algorithms and overcoming their deficiencies. In general, static contact angles over the entire hydrophobicity range can be accurately evaluated using the proposed algorithm. The ease of erroneous judgment in static contact angle measurements is avoided. The proposed algorithm is validated by a static contact angle evaluation of real and numerically generated water drop

  3. Experimental investigation of contact angle, curvature, and contact line motion in dropwise condensation and evaporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, Shripad J; Plawsky, Joel L; Wayner, Peter C

    2003-03-15

    Image-analyzing interferometry is used to measure the apparent contact angle and the curvature of a drop and a meniscus during condensation and evaporation processes in a constrained vapor bubble (CVB) cell. The apparent contact angle is found to be a function of the interfacial mass flux. The interfacial velocity for the drop during condensation and evaporation is a function of the apparent contact angle and the rate of change of radius of curvature. The dependence of velocity on the apparent contact angle is consistent with Tanner's scaling equation. The results support the hypothesis that evaporation/condensation is an important factor in contact line motion. The main purpose of this article is to present the experimental technique and the data. The equilibrium contact angle for the drop is found experimentally to be higher than that for the corner meniscus. The contact angle is a function of the stress field in the fluid. The equilibrium contact angle is related to the thickness of the thin adsorbed film in the microscopic region and depends on the characteristics of the microscopic region. The excess interfacial free energy and temperature jump were used to calculate the equilibrium thickness of the thin adsorbed film in the microscopic region.

  4. Contact angle of a nanodrop on a nanorough solid surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berim, Gersh O; Ruckenstein, Eli

    2015-02-21

    The contact angle of a cylindrical nanodrop on a nanorough solid surface is calculated, for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces, using the density functional theory. The emphasis of the paper is on the dependence of the contact angle on roughness. The roughness is modeled by rectangular pillars of infinite length located on the smooth surface of a substrate, with fluid-pillar interactions different in strength from the fluid-substrate ones. It is shown that for hydrophobic substrates the trend of the contact angle to increase with increasing roughness, which was noted in all previous studies, is not universally valid, but depends on the fluid-pillar interactions, pillar height, interpillar distance, as well as on the size of the drop. For hydrophilic substrate, an unusual kink-like dependence of the contact angle on the nanodrop size is found which is caused by the change in the location of the leading edges of the nanodrop on the surface. It is also shown that the Wenzel and Cassie-Baxter equations can not explain all the peculiarities of the contact angle of a nanodrop on a nanorough surface.

  5. Repulsion-based model for contact angle saturation in electrowetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hassan Abdelmoumen Abdellah; Mohamed, Hany Ahmed; Abdelgawad, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new model for contact angle saturation phenomenon in electrowetting on dielectric systems. This new model attributes contact angle saturation to repulsion between trapped charges on the cap and base surfaces of the droplet in the vicinity of the three-phase contact line, which prevents these surfaces from converging during contact angle reduction. This repulsion-based saturation is similar to repulsion between charges accumulated on the surfaces of conducting droplets which causes the well known Coulombic fission and Taylor cone formation phenomena. In our model, both the droplet and dielectric coating were treated as lossy dielectric media (i.e., having finite electrical conductivities and permittivities) contrary to the more common assumption of a perfectly conducting droplet and perfectly insulating dielectric. We used theoretical analysis and numerical simulations to find actual charge distribution on droplet surface, calculate repulsion energy, and minimize energy of the total system as a function of droplet contact angle. Resulting saturation curves were in good agreement with previously reported experimental results. We used this proposed model to predict effect of changing liquid properties, such as electrical conductivity, and system parameters, such as thickness of the dielectric layer, on the saturation angle, which also matched experimental results.

  6. The Influence of Dynamic Contact Angle on Wetting Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rame, Enrique; Garoff, Steven

    2005-01-01

    When surface tension forces dominate, and regardless of whether the situation is static or dynamic, the contact angle (the angle the interface between two immiscible fluids makes when it contacts a solid) is the key parameter that determines the shape of a fluid-fluid interface. The static contact angle is easy to measure and implement in models predicting static capillary surface shapes and such associated quantities as pressure drops. By contrast, when the interface moves relative to the solid (as in dynamic wetting processes) the dynamic contact angle is not identified unambiguously because it depends on the geometry of the system Consequently, its determination becomes problematic and measurements in one geometry cannot be applied in another for prediction purposes. However, knowing how to measure and use the dynamic contact angle is crucial to determine such dynamics as a microsystem throughput reliably. In this talk we will present experimental and analytical efforts aimed at resolving modeling issues present in dynamic wetting. We will review experiments that show the inadequacy of the usual hydrodynamic model when a fluid-fluid meniscus moves over a solid surface such as the wall of a small tube or duct. We will then present analytical results that show how to parametrize these problems in a predictive manner. We will illustrate these ideas by showing how to implement the method in numerical fluid mechanical calculations.

  7. Drop rebound after impact: the role of the receding contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, C; Villa, F; Bernagozzi, I; Amirfazli, A; Marengo, M

    2013-12-31

    Data from the literature suggest that the rebound of a drop from a surface can be achieved when the wettability is low, i.e., when contact angles, measured at the triple line (solid-liquid-air), are high. However, no clear criterion exists to predict when a drop will rebound from a surface and which is the key wetting parameter to govern drop rebound (e.g., the "equilibrium" contact angle, θeq, the advancing and the receding contact angles, θA and θR, respectively, the contact angle hysteresis, Δθ, or any combination of these parameters). To clarify the conditions for drop rebound, we conducted experimental tests on different dry solid surfaces with variable wettability, from hydrophobic to superhydrophobic surfaces, with advancing contact angles 108° contact angles 89° contact angle is the key wetting parameter that influences drop rebound, along with surface hydrophobicity: for the investigated impact conditions (drop diameter 2.4 contact angles higher than 100°. Also, the drop rebound time decreased by increasing the receding contact angle. It was also shown that in general care must be taken when using statically defined wetting parameters (such as advancing and receding contact angles) to predict the dynamic behavior of a liquid on a solid surface because the dynamics of the phenomenon may affect surface wetting close to the impact point (e.g., as a result of the transition from the Cassie-Baxter to Wenzel state in the case of the so-called superhydrophobic surfaces) and thus affect the drop rebound.

  8. Contact angles in the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of wetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Luo, K H; Kang, Q J; Chen, Q

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we investigate the implementation of contact angles in the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of wetting at a large density ratio ρ_{L}/ρ_{V}=500. The pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann model [X. Shan and H. Chen, Phys. Rev. E 49, 2941 (1994)10.1103/PhysRevE.49.2941] is a popular mesoscopic model for simulating multiphase flows and interfacial dynamics. In this model the contact angle is usually realized by a fluid-solid interaction. Two widely used fluid-solid interactions, the density-based interaction and the pseudopotential-based interaction, as well as a modified pseudopotential-based interaction formulated in the present paper are numerically investigated and compared in terms of the achievable contact angles, the maximum and the minimum densities, and the spurious currents. It is found that the pseudopotential-based interaction works well for simulating small static (liquid) contact angles θstatic contact angles close to 180^{∘}. Meanwhile, it is found that the proposed modified pseudopotential-based interaction performs better in light of the maximum and the minimum densities and is overall more suitable for simulating large contact angles θ>90^{∘} as compared with the two other types of fluid-solid interactions. Furthermore, the spurious currents are found to be enlarged when the fluid-solid interaction force is introduced. Increasing the kinematic viscosity ratio between the vapor and liquid phases is shown to be capable of reducing the spurious currents caused by the fluid-solid interactions.

  9. Determination of the Contact Angle Based on the Casimir Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Volz, Martin P.

    2015-01-01

    On a macroscopic scale, a nonreactive liquid partially covering a homogeneous solid surface will intersect the solid at an angle called the contact angle. For molten metals and semiconductors, the contact angle is materially dependent upon both the solid and liquid and typical values fall in the range 80-170 deg, depending on the crucible material. On a microscopic scale, there does not exist a precise and sharp contact angle but rather the liquid and solid surfaces merge smoothly and continuously. Consider the example of the so called detached Bridgman crystal growth process. In this technique, a small gap is formed between the growing crystal and the crucible. At the crystal/melt interface, a meniscus ring is formed. Its width can be in the range of a few micrometers, approaching a microscopic scale. It then becomes questionable to describe the shape of this meniscus by the contact angle. A more advanced treatment of the interface is needed and here we propose such a refined model. The interaction of the liquid surface with the solid can be calculated by considering two forces: a short-range repulsive force and a longer range (up to a few micrometers) Casimir or van der Waals force.

  10. Drop impact on soft surfaces: beyond the static contact angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioboo, Romain; Voué, Michel; Adão, Helena; Conti, Joséphine; Vaillant, Alexandre; Seveno, David; De Coninck, Joël

    2010-04-06

    The wettability of cross-linked poly(dimethylsiloxane) elastomer films and of octadecyltrichlorosilane self-assembled monolayers with water has been measured and compared using various methods. Contact angle hysteresis values were compared with values reported in the literature. A new method to characterize advancing, receding contact angles, and hysteresis using drop impact have been tested and compared with usual methods. It has been found that for the rigid surfaces the drop impact method is comparable with other methods but that for elastomer surfaces the hysteresis is function of the drop impact velocity which influences the extent of the deformation of the soft surface at the triple line.

  11. Static contact angle in lattice Boltzmann models of immiscible fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latva-Kokko, M; Rothman, Daniel H

    2005-10-01

    We study numerically the capillary rise between two horizontal plates and in a rectangular tube, using a lattice Boltzmann (LB) method. We derive an equation for the static fluid-solid contact angle as a function of the wetting tendency of the walls and test its validity. We show that the generalized Laplace law with two independent radii of curvature is followed in capillary rise in rectangular tubes. Our method removes the history dependence of the fluid-solid contact angle that had been present in earlier LB schemes.

  12. Surface free energy of a solid from contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibowski, Emil

    2003-04-25

    Nature of contact angle hysteresis is discussed basing on the literature data (Colloids Surf. A 189 (2001) 265) of dynamic advancing and receding contact angles of n-alkanes and n-alcohols on a very smooth surface of 1,1,2,-trichloro-1,2,2,-trifluoroethane (FC-732) film deposited on a silicon plate. The authors considered the liquid absorption and/or retention (swelling) processes responsible for the observed hysteresis. In this paper hysteresis is considered to be due to the liquid film left behind the drop during retreating of its contact line. Using the contact angle hysteresis an approach is suggested for evaluation of the solid surface free energy. Molecular spacing and the film structure are discussed to explain the difference in n-alkanes and n-alcohols behaviour as well as to explain the difference between dispersion free energy gamma(s)(d) and total surface free energy gamma(s)(tot) of FC-732, as determined from the advancing contact angles and the hysteresis, respectively.

  13. Investigation of surface porosity measurements and compaction pressure as means to ensure consistent contact angle determinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, René; Borkenfelt, Simon; Allesø, Morten

    2016-01-01

    for a compound is determined by its contact angle to a liquid, which in the present study was measured using the sessile drop method applied to a disc compact of the compound. Precise determination of the contact angle is important should it be used to either rank compounds or selected excipients to e......, however for six out of seven compounds similar results were obtained by applying a standard pressure (866MPa) to the discs in their preparation. The data presented in the present work therefore suggest that a constant high pressure should be sufficient for most compounds when determining the contact angle...

  14. Contact Angle Measurements Using a Simplified Experimental Setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamour, Guillaume; Hamraoui, Ahmed; Buvailo, Andrii; Xing, Yangjun; Keuleyan, Sean; Prakash, Vivek; Eftekhari-Bafrooei, Ali; Borguet, Eric

    2010-01-01

    A basic and affordable experimental apparatus is described that measures the static contact angle of a liquid drop in contact with a solid. The image of the drop is made with a simple digital camera by taking a picture that is magnified by an optical lens. The profile of the drop is then processed with ImageJ free software. The ImageJ contact…

  15. Contact angle adjustment in equation-of-state-based pseudopotential model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Anjie; Li, Longjian; Uddin, Rizwan; Liu, Dong

    2016-05-01

    The single component pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann model has been widely applied in multiphase simulation due to its simplicity and stability. In many studies, it has been claimed that this model can be stable for density ratios larger than 1000. However, the application of the model is still limited to small density ratios when the contact angle is considered. The reason is that the original contact angle adjustment method influences the stability of the model. Moreover, simulation results in the present work show that, by applying the original contact angle adjustment method, the density distribution near the wall is artificially changed, and the contact angle is dependent on the surface tension. Hence, it is very inconvenient to apply this method with a fixed contact angle, and the accuracy of the model cannot be guaranteed. To solve these problems, a contact angle adjustment method based on the geometry analysis is proposed and numerically compared with the original method. Simulation results show that, with our contact angle adjustment method, the stability of the model is highly improved when the density ratio is relatively large, and it is independent of the surface tension.

  16. Measurement errors related to contact angle analysis of hydrogel and silicone hydrogel contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Michael L; Morgan, Philip B; Maldonado-Codina, Carole

    2009-11-01

    This work sought to undertake a comprehensive investigation of the measurement errors associated with contact angle assessment of curved hydrogel contact lens surfaces. The contact angle coefficient of repeatability (COR) associated with three measurement conditions (image analysis COR, intralens COR, and interlens COR) was determined by measuring the contact angles (using both sessile drop and captive bubble methods) for three silicone hydrogel lenses (senofilcon A, balafilcon A, lotrafilcon A) and one conventional hydrogel lens (etafilcon A). Image analysis COR values were about 2 degrees , whereas intralens COR values (95% confidence intervals) ranged from 4.0 degrees (3.3 degrees , 4.7 degrees ) (lotrafilcon A, captive bubble) to 10.2 degrees (8.4 degrees , 12.1 degrees ) (senofilcon A, sessile drop). Interlens COR values ranged from 4.5 degrees (3.7 degrees , 5.2 degrees ) (lotrafilcon A, captive bubble) to 16.5 degrees (13.6 degrees , 19.4 degrees ) (senofilcon A, sessile drop). Measurement error associated with image analysis was shown to be small as an absolute measure, although proportionally more significant for lenses with low contact angle. Sessile drop contact angles were typically less repeatable than captive bubble contact angles. For sessile drop measures, repeatability was poorer with the silicone hydrogel lenses when compared with the conventional hydrogel lens; this phenomenon was not observed for the captive bubble method, suggesting that methodological factors related to the sessile drop technique (such as surface dehydration and blotting) may play a role in the increased variability of contact angle measurements observed with silicone hydrogel contact lenses.

  17. Contact angle hysteresis of non-flattened-top micro/nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Sona; Englezos, Peter; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G

    2014-03-25

    A two-dimensional (2D) thermodynamic model is proposed to predict the contact angle (CA) and contact angle hysteresis (CAH) of different types of surface geometries, particularly those with asperities having nonflattened tops. The model is evaluated by micro/nano sinusoidal and parabolic patterns fabricated by laser ablation. These microstructures are analyzed thermodynamically through the use of the Gibbs free energy to obtain the equilibrium contact angle (CA) and contact angle hysteresis (CAH). The effects of the geometrical details of two types of microstructures on maximizing the superhydrophobicity of the nanopatterned surface are also discussed in an attempt to design surfaces with desired and/or optimum wetting characteristics. The analysis of the various surfaces reveals the important geometrical parameters that may lead to the lotus effect (high CA > 150° and low CAH 150° and high CAH ≫ 10°).

  18. Measurement of contact angle between stainless steel surface and carbon dioxide by pendant drop method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI NianQiang; GUO KaiHua; LIU Jie; LI TingXun

    2008-01-01

    To measure contact angle between CO2 and solid surface,in this study a visual high-pressure vessel has been developed,with a corresponding well-controlled constant temperature system.Pendant drop method is applied to the investigation of the contact angles of CO2 on a stainless steel surface in its own vapor.The image of the pendant drop is recorded by a camera,and a B-Snake method is used to analyze the contour and the contact angle of the droplet.The experimental results have provided a set of well tested data,which show that CO2 has good infiltration into stainless steel surface and the de-veloped method can be used as a standard testing one for measuring the contact angle between high-pressure liquid and solid surface.

  19. Detailed statistical contact angle analyses; "slow moving" drops on inclining silicon-oxide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, M; Groß, K; Grub, J; Heib, F

    2015-06-01

    Contact angle determination by sessile drop technique is essential to characterise surface properties in science and in industry. Different specific angles can be observed on every solid which are correlated with the advancing or the receding of the triple line. Different procedures and definitions for the determination of specific angles exist which are often not comprehensible or reproducible. Therefore one of the most important things in this area is to build standard, reproducible and valid methods for determining advancing/receding contact angles. This contribution introduces novel techniques to analyse dynamic contact angle measurements (sessile drop) in detail which are applicable for axisymmetric and non-axisymmetric drops. Not only the recently presented fit solution by sigmoid function and the independent analysis of the different parameters (inclination, contact angle, velocity of the triple point) but also the dependent analysis will be firstly explained in detail. These approaches lead to contact angle data and different access on specific contact angles which are independent from "user-skills" and subjectivity of the operator. As example the motion behaviour of droplets on flat silicon-oxide surfaces after different surface treatments is dynamically measured by sessile drop technique when inclining the sample plate. The triple points, the inclination angles, the downhill (advancing motion) and the uphill angles (receding motion) obtained by high-precision drop shape analysis are independently and dependently statistically analysed. Due to the small covered distance for the dependent analysis (static to the "slow moving" dynamic contact angle determination. They are characterised by small deviations of the computed values. Additional to the detailed introduction of this novel analytical approaches plus fit solution special motion relations for the drop on inclined surfaces and detailed relations about the reactivity of the freshly cleaned silicon wafer

  20. Ultrasonic estimation of the contact angle of a sessile droplet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quintero, R.; Simonetti, F. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Radiation of energy by large amplitude leaky Rayleigh waves is regarded as one of the key physical mechanisms regulating the actuation and manipulation of droplets in surface acoustic wave (SAW) microfluidic devices. The interaction between a SAW and a droplet is highly complex and is presently the subject of extensive research. This paper investigates the existence of an additional interaction mechanism based on the propagation of quasi-Stoneley waves inside sessile droplets deposited on a solid substrate. In contrast with the leaky Rayleigh wave, the energy of the Stoneley wave is confined within a thin fluid layer in contact with the substrate. The hypothesis is confirmed by three-dimensional finite element simulations and ultrasonic scattering experiments measuring the reflection of Rayleigh waves from droplets of different diameters. Moreover, real-time monitoring of the droplet evaporation process reveals a clear correlation between the droplet contact angle and the spectral information of the reflected Rayleigh signal, thus paving the way for ultrasonic measurements of surface tension.

  1. Dynamic contact angle of water-based titanium oxide nanofluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radiom, Milad; Yang, Chun; Chan, Weng Kong

    2013-06-11

    This paper presents an investigation into spreading dynamics and dynamic contact angle of TiO2-deionized water nanofluids. Two mechanisms of energy dissipation, (1) contact line friction and (2) wedge film viscosity, govern the dynamics of contact line motion. The primary stage of spreading has the contact line friction as the dominant dissipative mechanism. At the secondary stage of spreading, the wedge film viscosity is the dominant dissipative mechanism. A theoretical model based on combination of molecular kinetic theory and hydrodynamic theory which incorporates non-Newtonian viscosity of solutions is used. The model agreement with experimental data is reasonable. Complex interparticle interactions, local pinning of the contact line, and variations in solid-liquid interfacial tension are attributed to errors.

  2. Characterization of treated porcelain surfaces via dynamic contact angle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phoenix, R D; Shen, C

    1995-01-01

    Successful porcelain repair requires conditioning of porcelain surfaces. Conditioning is intended to facilitate wetting by repair materials and improve interfacial bonding. The objective of this investigation was to determine the effects of selected surface treatments upon the wettability of a representative feldspathic porcelain. Dynamic contact angle analysis and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the effects of such treatments. Standardized porcelain specimens were subjected to the following five treatment regimens: (1) control (no treatment); (2) airborne particle abrasion using 50 microns aluminum oxide; (3) etching with ammonium bifluoride gel; (4) etching with acidulated phosphate fluoride gel; and (5) etching with hydrofluoric acid gel. Following treatment, specimens were cleansed and dried. Advancing contact angles were quantified using dynamic contact angle analysis. Mean values and 95% confidence intervals were (in degrees): control, 63.8 +/- 2.7; ammonium bifluoride, 39.4 +/- 2.0; airborne particle abrading, 29.1 +/- 2.9; acidulated phosphate fluoride, 24.9 +/- 1.7; and hydrofluoric acid, 16.5 +/- 1.2. Significant differences were found between all treatment groups (P = .05). Subsequent scanning electron microscopy examination of treated surfaces indicated lesser contact angles were associated with surfaces displaying deeper and wider grooves. Apparently, the resultant increase in surface area produces increased wettability. It is inferred that an increase in surface area may correspond to enhanced resin-porcelain bonding.

  3. Simulation of capillary flow with a dynamic contact angle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Mourik, S; Veldman, AEP; Dreyer, ME

    2005-01-01

    A number of theoretical and empirical dynamic contact angle (DCA) models have been tested in a numerical simulation of liquid reorientation in microgravity for which experimental validation data are available. It is observed that the DCA can have a large influence on liquid dynamics in microgravity.

  4. A "Conveyor Belt" Model for the Dynamic Contact Angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Volpe, C.; Siboni, S.

    2011-01-01

    The familiar Young contact angle measurement of a liquid at equilibrium on a solid is a fundamental aspect of capillary phenomena. But in the real world it is not so easy to observe it. This is due to the roughness and/or heterogeneity of real surfaces, which typically are not perfectly planar and chemically homogeneous. What can be easily…

  5. Drop shape visualization and contact angle measurement on curved surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilizzoni, Manfredo

    2011-12-01

    The shape and contact angles of drops on curved surfaces is experimentally investigated. Image processing, spline fitting and numerical integration are used to extract the drop contour in a number of cross-sections. The three-dimensional surfaces which describe the surface-air and drop-air interfaces can be visualized and a simple procedure to determine the equilibrium contact angle starting from measurements on curved surfaces is proposed. Contact angles on flat surfaces serve as a reference term and a procedure to measure them is proposed. Such procedure is not as accurate as the axisymmetric drop shape analysis algorithms, but it has the advantage of requiring only a side view of the drop-surface couple and no further information. It can therefore be used also for fluids with unknown surface tension and there is no need to measure the drop volume. Examples of application of the proposed techniques for distilled water drops on gemstones confirm that they can be useful for drop shape analysis and contact angle measurement on three-dimensional sculptured surfaces.

  6. Contact angles of wetting and water stability of soil structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodov, V. A.; Yaroslavtseva, N. V.; Yashin, M. A.; Frid, A. S.; Lazarev, V. I.; Tyugai, Z. N.; Milanovskiy, E. Yu.

    2015-06-01

    From the soddy-podzolic soils and typical chernozems of different texture and land use, dry 3-1 mm aggregates were isolated and sieved in water. As a result, water-stable aggregates and water-unstable particles composing dry 3-1 mm aggregates were obtained. These preparations were ground, and contact angles of wetting were determined by the static sessile drop method. The angles varied from 11° to 85°. In most cases, the values of the angles for the water-stable aggregates significantly exceeded those for the water-unstable components. In terms of carbon content in structural units, there was no correlation between these parameters. When analyzing the soil varieties separately, the significant positive correlation between the carbon content and contact angle of aggregates was revealed only for the loamy-clayey typical chernozem. Based on the multivariate analysis of variance, the value of contact wetting angle was shown to be determined by the structural units belonging to water-stable or water-unstable components of macroaggregates and by the land use type. In addition, along with these parameters, the texture has an indirect effect.

  7. Measurement of Capillary Radius and Contact Angle within Porous Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Saitej; Dharmarajan, Ramanathan; Moghaddam, Saeed

    2015-12-01

    The pore radius (i.e., capillary radius) and contact angle determine the capillary pressure generated in a porous medium. The most common method to determine these two parameters is through measurement of the capillary pressure generated by a reference liquid (i.e., a liquid with near-zero contact angle) and a test liquid. The rate of rise technique, commonly used to determine the capillary pressure, results in significant uncertainties. In this study, we utilize a recently developed technique for independently measuring the capillary pressure and permeability to determine the equivalent minimum capillary radii and contact angle of water within micropillar wick structures. In this method, the experimentally measured dryout threshold of a wick structure at different wicking lengths is fit to Darcy's law to extract the maximum capillary pressure generated by the test liquid. The equivalent minimum capillary radii of different wick geometries are determined by measuring the maximum capillary pressures generated using n-hexane as the working fluid. It is found that the equivalent minimum capillary radius is dependent on the diameter of pillars and the spacing between pillars. The equivalent capillary radii of micropillar wicks determined using the new method are found to be up to 7 times greater than the current geometry-based first-order estimates. The contact angle subtended by water at the walls of the micropillars is determined by measuring the capillary pressure generated by water within the arrays and the measured capillary radii for the different geometries. This mean contact angle of water is determined to be 54.7°.

  8. Contact angle hysteresis and pinning at periodic defects in statics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliev, Stanimir; Pesheva, Nina; Nikolayev, Vadim S.

    2014-07-01

    This article deals with the theoretical prediction of the wetting hysteresis on nonideal solid surfaces in terms of the surface heterogeneity parameters. The spatially periodical chemical heterogeneity is considered. We propose precise definitions for both the advancing and the receding contact angles for the Wilhelmy plate geometry. It is well known that in such a system, a multitude of metastable states of the liquid meniscus occurs for each different relative position of the defect pattern on the plate with respect to the liquid level. As usual, the static advancing and receding angles are assumed to be a consequence of the preceding contact line motion in the respective direction. It is shown how to select the appropriate states among all metastable states. Their selection is discussed. The proposed definitions are applicable to both the static and the dynamic contact angles on heterogeneous surfaces. The static advancing and receding angles are calculated for two examples of periodic heterogeneity patterns with sharp borders: the horizontal alternating stripes of a different wettability (studied analytically) and the doubly periodic pattern of circular defects on a homogeneous base (studied numerically). The wetting hysteresis is determined as a function of the defect density and the spatial period. A comparison with the existing results is carried out.

  9. Contact angle hysteresis and pinning at periodic defects in statics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliev, Stanimir; Pesheva, Nina; Nikolayev, Vadim S

    2014-07-01

    This article deals with the theoretical prediction of the wetting hysteresis on nonideal solid surfaces in terms of the surface heterogeneity parameters. The spatially periodical chemical heterogeneity is considered. We propose precise definitions for both the advancing and the receding contact angles for the Wilhelmy plate geometry. It is well known that in such a system, a multitude of metastable states of the liquid meniscus occurs for each different relative position of the defect pattern on the plate with respect to the liquid level. As usual, the static advancing and receding angles are assumed to be a consequence of the preceding contact line motion in the respective direction. It is shown how to select the appropriate states among all metastable states. Their selection is discussed. The proposed definitions are applicable to both the static and the dynamic contact angles on heterogeneous surfaces. The static advancing and receding angles are calculated for two examples of periodic heterogeneity patterns with sharp borders: the horizontal alternating stripes of a different wettability (studied analytically) and the doubly periodic pattern of circular defects on a homogeneous base (studied numerically). The wetting hysteresis is determined as a function of the defect density and the spatial period. A comparison with the existing results is carried out.

  10. Eccentricity effect of micropatterned surface on contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashaninejad, Navid; Chan, Weng Kong; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2012-03-13

    This article experimentally shows that the wetting property of a micropatterned surface is a function of the center-to-center offset distance between successive pillars in a column, referred to here as eccentricity. Studies were conducted on square micropatterns which were fabricated on a silicon wafer with pillar eccentricity ranging from 0 to 6 μm for two different pillar diameters and spacing. Measurement results of the static as well as the dynamic contact angles on these surfaces revealed that the contact angle decreases with increasing eccentricity and increasing relative spacing between the pillars. Furthermore, quantification of the contact angle hysteresis (CAH) shows that, for the case of lower pillar spacing, CAH could increase up to 41%, whereas for the case of higher pillar spacing, this increment was up to 35%, both corresponding to the maximum eccentricity of 6 μm. In general, the maximum obtainable hydrophobicity corresponds to micropillars with zero eccentricity. As the pillar relative spacing decreases, the effect of eccentricity on hydrophobicity becomes more pronounced. The dependence of the wettability conditions of the micropatterned surface on the pillar eccentricity is attributed to the contact line deformation resulting from the changed orientation of the pillars. This finding provides additional insights in design and fabrication of efficient micropatterned surfaces with controlled wetting properties.

  11. A modified captive bubble method for determining advancing and receding contact angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Jian; Shi, Pan; Zhu, Lin; Ding, Jianfu; Chen, Qingmin; Wang, Qingjun

    2014-03-01

    In this work, a modification to the captive bubble method was proposed to test the advancing and receding contact angle. This modification is done by adding a pressure chamber with a pressure control system to the original experimental system equipped with an optical angle mater equipped with a high speed CCD camera, a temperature control system and a computer. A series of samples with highly hydrophilic, hydrophilic, hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces were prepared. The advancing and receding contact angles of these samples with highly hydrophilic, hydrophilic, and hydrophobic surfaces through the new methods was comparable to the result tested by the traditional sessile drop method. It is proved that this method overcomes the limitation of the traditional captive bubble method and the modified captive bubble method allows a smaller error from the test. However, due to the nature of the captive bubble technique, this method is also only suitable for testing the surface with advancing or receding contact angle below 130°.

  12. Unified model for contact angle hysteresis on heterogeneous and superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Rishi; Enright, Ryan; Zhu, Yangying; Adera, Solomon; Wang, Evelyn N

    2012-11-13

    Understanding the complexities associated with contact line dynamics on chemically heterogeneous and superhydrophobic surfaces is important for a wide variety of engineering problems. Despite significant efforts to capture the behavior of a droplet on these surfaces over the past few decades, modeling of the complex dynamics at the three-phase contact line is needed. In this work, we demonstrate that contact line distortion on heterogeneous and superhydrophobic surfaces is the key aspect that needs to be accounted for in the dynamic droplet models. Contact line distortions were visualized and modeled using a thermodynamic approach to develop a unified model for contact angle hysteresis on chemically heterogeneous and superhydrophobic surfaces. On a surface comprised of discrete wetting defects on an interconnected less wetting area, the advancing contact angle was determined to be independent of the defects, while the relative fraction of the distorted contact line with respect to the baseline surface was shown to govern the receding contact angle. This behavior reversed when the relative wettability of the discrete defects and interconnected area was inverted. The developed model showed good agreement with the experimental advancing and receding contact angles, both at low and high solid fractions. The thermodynamic model was further extended to demonstrate its capability to capture droplet shape evolution during liquid addition and removal in our experiments and those in literature. This study offers new insight extending the fundamental understanding of solid-liquid interactions required for design of advanced functional coatings for microfluidics, biological, manufacturing, and heat transfer applications.

  13. Effect of contact angle hysteresis on moving liquid film integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, F. F.; Hsu, Y. Y.

    1972-01-01

    A study was made of the formation and breakdown of a water film moving over solid surfaces (teflon, lucite, stainless steel, and copper). The flow rate associated with film formation was found to be higher than the flow rate at which film breakdown occurred. The difference in the flow rates for film formation and film breakdown was attributed to contact angle hysteresis. Analysis and experiment, which are in good agreement, indicated that film formation and film breakdown are functions of the advancing and receding angles, respectively.

  14. Study of contact angle hysteresis using the Cellular Potts Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, Vahid; D'Souza, Roshan M; Nosonovsky, Michael

    2013-02-28

    We use the Cellular Potts Model (CPM) to study the contact angle (CA) hysteresis in multiphase (solid-liquid-vapour) systems. We simulate a droplet over the tilted patterned surface, and a bubble placed under the surface immersed in liquid. The difference between bubbles and droplets was discussed through their CA hysteresis. Dependency of CA hysteresis on the surface structure and other parameters was also investigated. This analysis allows decoupling of the 1D (pinning of the triple line) and 2D (adhesion hysteresis in the contact area) effects and provides new insight into the nature of CA hysteresis.

  15. Anomalous contact angle hysteresis of a captive bubble: advancing contact line pinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Siang-Jie; Chang, Feng-Ming; Chou, Tung-He; Chan, Seong Heng; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2011-06-07

    Contact angle hysteresis of a sessile drop on a substrate consists of continuous invasion of liquid phase with the advancing angle (θ(a)) and contact line pinning of liquid phase retreat until the receding angle (θ(r)) is reached. Receding pinning is generally attributed to localized defects that are more wettable than the rest of the surface. However, the defect model cannot explain advancing pinning of liquid phase invasion driven by a deflating bubble and continuous retreat of liquid phase driven by the inflating bubble. A simple thermodynamic model based on adhesion hysteresis is proposed to explain anomalous contact angle hysteresis of a captive bubble quantitatively. The adhesion model involves two solid–liquid interfacial tensions (γ(sl) > γ(sl)′). Young’s equation with γ(sl) gives the advancing angle θ(a) while that with γ(sl)′ due to surface rearrangement yields the receding angle θ(r). Our analytical analysis indicates that contact line pinning represents frustration in surface free energy, and the equilibrium shape corresponds to a nondifferential minimum instead of a local minimum. On the basis of our thermodynamic model, Surface Evolver simulations are performed to reproduce both advancing and receding behavior associated with a captive bubble on the acrylic glass.

  16. Wetting dynamics at high values of contact line speed

    OpenAIRE

    Пономарев, К. О.; Феоктистов, Дмитрий Владимирович; Орлова, Евгения Георгиевна

    2015-01-01

    Experimental results analyses of dynamic contact angle change under the conditions of substrate wetting by distilled water at high values of the contact line speed was conducted. Three spreading modes for copper substrates with different roughness were selected: drop formation, spreading and equilibrium contact angle formation. Peculiarity of droplet spreading on superhydrophobic surface is found. It consists in a monotonic increase of the advancing dynamic contact angle. The effect of the dr...

  17. Cleanability evaluation of ceramic glazes with nanometer far-infrared materials using contact angle measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijuan; Liang, Jinsheng; Di, Xingfu; Tang, Qingguo

    2014-05-01

    The cleanability of easy-to-clean ceramic glazes doped with nanometer far-infrared materials was compared with that of some high-quality household ceramic glazes from the market. The cleanability was evaluated by the contact angle measurement using a sessile drop method with a Dataphysics OCA-30 contact angle analyzer. The results showed that the difference of contact angles of water on the glazes before soiling and after cleaning could be used as a parameter for evaluating the cleanability of the glazes. The relationship between cleanability and surface properties, such as surface free energy and surface topography, was investigated. The surface free energy of the samples and their components were calculated using van Oss acid-base approach. By measuring advancing and receding contact angles, the contact angle hysteresis of the ceramic glazes due to the surface topography was investigated. It was shown that the cleanability of ceramic glazes containing nanometer far-infrared materials (NFIM) is better than that of household ceramic glazes from market, due to a higher ratio of electron-acceptor parameter to electron-donor parameter, which led to the effect of water hydration as well as better hydrophilic property and increased smoothness. The contact angle measurement not only accurately evaluates the cleanability of the ceramic glazes, but also has a contribution to the study of cleanability theory. Moreover, this method is simple, convenient and less sample-consumption.

  18. Contact angle hysteresis on textured surfaces with nanowire clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ying-Chih; Chiang, Cheng-Kun; Lu, Yen-Wen

    2013-04-01

    Nanowire arrays with various agglomeration patterns were synthesized by adjusting the solvent evaporation rates. Nanowires with 200 nm diameter and 2-25 microm in length were fabricated from an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) porous template. Various drying treatments were applied to develop nanostructured surfaces with topological differences. Due to surface tension forces, copper nanowires after thermal and evaporative drying treatments agglomerated into clusters, while supercritical drying technique provided excellent bundled-free and vertically-standing nanowire arrays. Although all dried surfaces exhibited hydrophobic nature, the contact angle hysteresis, or the difference between advancing and receding angles, was found to be larger on those surfaces with bundled nanowire clusters. To explain the difference, the wetted solid fraction on each surface was calculated using the Cassie-Baxter model to show that the hysteresis was contributed by liquid/solid contact area on the textured surfaces.

  19. Simulations of contact angle induced pearling for sliding drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Scott; Mayo, Lisa; Moroney, Timothy

    2015-11-01

    Droplets sliding down an incline can develop a corner or a cusp at their rear, or undergo a pearling transition whereby the tail breaks up into a number of smaller satellite droplets. These phenomena have been of interest since the experimental work of. It appears that the experimental investigation of this problem is limited due to the inherent difficulty of minimising contact angle hysteresis, whereby physical or chemical heterogeneities of the substrate cause pinning and distortion of the droplet. By applying a lubrication model with a disjoining pressure term, we investigate these flows numerically in order to further shed light on how certain conditions (such as contact angle) affect the corner-cusp-pearling transition. We acknowledge support from the ARC Linkage Project LP100200476.

  20. Identifying Differences and Similarities in Static and Dynamic Contact Angles between Nanoscale and Microscale Textured Surfaces Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slovin, Mitchell R; Shirts, Michael R

    2015-07-28

    We quantify some of the effects of patterned nanoscale surface texture on static contact angles, dynamic contact angles, and dynamic contact angle hysteresis using molecular dynamics simulations of a moving Lennard-Jones droplet in contact with a solid surface. We observe static contact angles that change with the introduction of surface texture in a manner consistent with theoretical and experimental expectations. However, we find that the introduction of nanoscale surface texture at the length scale of 5-10 times the fluid particle size does not affect dynamic contact angle hysteresis even though it changes both the advancing and receding contact angles significantly. This result differs significantly from microscale experimental results where dynamic contact angle hysteresis decreases with the addition of surface texture due to an increase in the receding contact angle. Instead, we find that molecular-kinetic theory, previously applied only to nonpatterned surfaces, accurately describes dynamic contact angle and dynamic contact angle hysteresis behavior as a function of terminal fluid velocity. Therefore, at length scales of tens of nanometers, the kinetic phenomena such as contact line pinning observed at larger scales become insignificant in comparison to the effects of molecular fluctuations for moving droplets, even though the static properties are essentially scale-invariant. These findings may have implications for the design of highly hierarchical structures with particular wetting properties. We also find that quantitatively determining the trends observed in this article requires the careful selection of system and analysis parameters in order to achieve sufficient accuracy and precision in calculated contact angles. Therefore, we provide a detailed description of our two-surface, circular-fit approach to calculating static and dynamic contact angles on surfaces with nanoscale texturing.

  1. Ultralyophobic oxidized aluminum surfaces exhibiting negligible contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozumi, Atsushi; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2010-02-16

    Ultralyophobic oxidized aluminum surfaces exhibiting negligible contact angle hysteresis for probe liquids were prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of bis((tridecafluoro-1,1,2,2,-tetrahydrooctyl)-dimethylsiloxy)methylsilane (CF(3)(CF(2))(5)CH(2)CH(2)Si(CH(3))(2)O)(2)SiCH(3)H, (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH). Oxidized aluminum surfaces were prepared by photooxidation/cleaning of sputter-coated aluminum on silicon wafers (Si/Al(Al(2)(O(3)))) using oxygen plasma. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) confirmed that this facile CVD method produces a monolayer with a thickness of 1.1 nm on the Si/Al(Al(2)(O(3))) surface without a discernible change in surface morphology. After monolayer deposition, the hydrophilic Si/Al(Al(2)(O(3))) surface became both hydrophobic and oleophobic and exhibited essentially no contact angle hysteresis for water and n-hexadecane (advancing/receding contact angles (theta(A)/theta(R)) = 110 degrees/109 degrees and 52 degrees/50 degrees, respectively). Droplets move very easily on this surface and roll off of slightly tilted surfaces, independently of the contact angle (which is a practical definition of ultralyophobic). A conventional fluoroalkylsilane monolayer was also prepared from 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltrimethoxysilane (CF(3)(CF(2))(7)CH(2)CH(2)Si(OCH(3))(3), R(F)Si(OMe)(3)) for comparison. The theta(A)/theta(R) values for water and n-hexadecane are 121 degrees/106 degrees and 76 degrees/71 degrees, respectively. The larger hysteresis values indicate the "pinning" of probe liquids, even though advancing contact angles are larger than those of the (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH-derived monolayers. The (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH-derived monolayers have excellent hydrolytic stability in water. We propose that the (R(F)Si(Me)(2)O)(2)SiMeH-derived monolayers are flexible and liquidlike and that drops in contact with these surfaces experience very low energy barriers between metastable states, leading to the

  2. Contact angle hysteresis on randomly rough surfaces: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Robert; Neumann, A Wilhelm

    2013-04-09

    Wetting is important in many applications, and the solid surfaces being wet invariably feature some amount of surface roughness. A free energy-based computational simulation is used to study the effect of roughness on wetting and especially contact angle hysteresis. On randomly rough, self-affine surfaces, it is found that hysteresis depends primarily on the value of the Wenzel roughness parameter r, increasing in proportion with r - 1. Micrometer-level roughness causes hysteresis of a few degrees.

  3. Understanding contact angle hysteresis on an ambient solid surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong Jian; Guo, Shuo; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Tong, Penger

    2016-05-01

    We report a systematic study of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) with direct measurement of the capillary force acting on a contact line formed on the surface of a long glass fiber intersecting a liquid-air interface. The glass fiber of diameter 1 -2 μ m and length 100 -200 μ m is glued onto the front end of a rectangular cantilever beam, which is used for atomic force microscopy. From the measured hysteresis loop of the capillary force for 28 different liquids with varying surface tensions and contact angles, we find a universal behavior of the unbalanced capillary force in the advancing and receding directions and the spring constant of a stretched meniscus by the glass fiber. Measurements of the capillary force and its fluctuations suggest that CAH on an ambient solid surface is caused primarily by two types of coexisting and spatially intertwined defects with opposite natures. The contact line is primarily pinned by the relatively nonwetting (repulsive) defects in the advancing direction and by the relatively wetting (attractive) defects in the receding direction. Based on the experimental observations, we propose a "composite model" of CAH and relevant scaling laws, which explain the basic features of the measured hysteresis force loops.

  4. Understanding contact angle hysteresis on an ambient solid surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong Jian; Guo, Shuo; Chen, Hsuan-Yi; Tong, Penger

    2016-05-01

    We report a systematic study of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) with direct measurement of the capillary force acting on a contact line formed on the surface of a long glass fiber intersecting a liquid-air interface. The glass fiber of diameter 1-2μm and length 100-200μm is glued onto the front end of a rectangular cantilever beam, which is used for atomic force microscopy. From the measured hysteresis loop of the capillary force for 28 different liquids with varying surface tensions and contact angles, we find a universal behavior of the unbalanced capillary force in the advancing and receding directions and the spring constant of a stretched meniscus by the glass fiber. Measurements of the capillary force and its fluctuations suggest that CAH on an ambient solid surface is caused primarily by two types of coexisting and spatially intertwined defects with opposite natures. The contact line is primarily pinned by the relatively nonwetting (repulsive) defects in the advancing direction and by the relatively wetting (attractive) defects in the receding direction. Based on the experimental observations, we propose a "composite model" of CAH and relevant scaling laws, which explain the basic features of the measured hysteresis force loops.

  5. Dynamic behavior of polymer surface and the time dependence of contact angle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xinping; CHEN Zhifang; SHEN Zhiquan

    2005-01-01

    Time-dependent contact angles were measured by depositing sessile drops of water on the polymer surfaces and monitoring the drop shape as a function of time. It was found that contact angles decreased sharply with contact time and the equilibrium contact angle was finally attained after a certain time. Values of starting (θs) and equilibrium contact angles (θe) obtained by the sessile drop method depend on polymer properties. The Wilhelmy plate technique was used to measure advancing and receding contact angles. The variations of starting (θs) and equilibrium contact angles (θe), advancing (θa) and receding contact angles (θr) have been studied on the oxidized surface of polymers containing polybutadiene block to explore the cause of time-dependence in contact angle measurement and the meaning of θs and θe. The results showed the linear relationships between starting (θs) and advancing contact angles (θa), the equilibrium (θe) and receding contact angles (θr). The similar relationship was also established between the contact angle hysteresis (θa-θr) and differences (θs-θe) in starting contact angles and equilibrium contact angles. Therefore, time-dependence in contact angle measurement was mainly attributed to the surface reconstruction when water drops were deposited on polymer surfaces. The starting contact angle was contributed by the hydrophobic component on polymer surface and the equilibrium contact angle mainly by the hydrophilic component of polymer. These results not only demonstrated the interdependency between two contact angle measurements, the sessile drop method and the Wilhelmy plate technique, but also provided the experimental evidence to explain the cause of time-dependent contact angle. This may also provide a new method to study dynamic behavior of polymer surface.

  6. The constancy of the contact angle in viscous liquid motions with pinned contact lines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P N Shankar; R Kidambi

    2005-07-01

    Consider motion initiated in a viscous liquid in a smooth walled container. The liquid is initially at rest under uniform pressure from an inert gas of negligible inertia. We show that if the contact line is pinned and the interface is single valued, the contact angle has to remain constant throughout the motion. This is true even for motions of finite amplitude. Some implications of the result are discussed.

  7. Line tension and reduction of apparent contact angle associated with electric double layers

    CERN Document Server

    Dörr, Aaron

    2014-01-01

    The line tension of an electrolyte wetting a non-polar substrate is computed analytically and numerically. The results show that, depending on the value of the apparent contact angle, positive or negative line tension values may be obtained. Furthermore, a significant difference between Young's contact angle and the apparent contact angle measured several Debye lengths remote from the three-phase contact line occurs. When applying the results to water wetting highly charged surfaces, line tension values of the same order of magnitude as found in recent experiments can be achieved. Therefore, the theory presented may contribute to the understanding of line tension measurements and points to the importance of the electrostatic line tension. Being strongly dependent on the interfacial charge density, electrostatic line tension is found to be tunable via the pH value of the involved electrolyte. As a practical consequence, the stability of nanoparticles adsorbed at fluid-fluid interfaces is predicted to be depend...

  8. Wetting angles of rigid contact lens plastics: the effect of contact lens wear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poster, M G; Gelfer, D M; Fernandez, N M

    1986-06-01

    Several adapted rigid contact lens wearers were given duplicates of their present lenses made in different plastics. They were required to wear each material on each eye for a period of four hours. Both the average wetting angle and its range of values for each material was compiled. All lenses tended to give similar average wetting angles but ranges of angles for the PMMA/siloxanyl materials were greater than that for PMMA and GP IITM. Both values should be utilized when evaluating the wettability of a specific material.

  9. [Determination of contact angle of pharmaceutical excipients and regulating effect of surfactants on their wettability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Dong-dong; Li, He-ran; Yang, Bai-xue; Song, Li-na; Liu, Tiao-tiao; Cong, Yu-tang; Li, San-ming

    2015-10-01

    To study the effects of surfactants on wettability of excipients, the contact angles of six types of surfactants on the surface of two common excipients and mixture of three surfactants with excipients were measured using hypsometry method. The results demonstrated that contact angle of water on the surface of excipients was associated with hydrophilcity of excipients. Contact angle was lowered with increase in hydrophilic groups of excipient molecules. The sequence of contact angle from small to large was starch contact angle of excipients, and their abilities to lower contact angle varied. The results of the present study offer a guideline in the formulation design of tablets.

  10. Dynamic contact angles and hysteresis under electrowetting-on-dielectric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Wyatt C; Sen, Prosenjit; Kim, Chang-Jin C J

    2011-08-16

    By designing and implementing a new experimental method, we have measured the dynamic advancing and receding contact angles and the resulting hysteresis of droplets under electrowetting-on-dielectric (EWOD). Measurements were obtained over wide ranges of applied EWOD voltages, or electrowetting numbers (0 ≤ Ew ≤ 0.9), and droplet sliding speeds, or capillary numbers (1.4 × 10(-5) ≤ Ca ≤ 6.9 × 10(-3)). If Ew or Ca is low, dynamic contact angle hysteresis is not affected much by the EWOD voltage or the sliding speed; that is, the hysteresis increases by less than 50% with a 2 order-of-magnitude increase in sliding speed when Ca hysteresis increases with either the EWOD voltage or the sliding speed. Stick-slip oscillations were observed at Ew > 0.4. Data are interpreted with simplified hydrodynamic (Cox-Voinov) and molecular-kinetic theory (MKT) models; the Cox-Voinov model captures the trend of the data, but it yields unreasonable fitting parameters. MKT fitting parameters associated with the advancing contact line are reasonable, but a lack of symmetry indicates that a more intricate model is required.

  11. Effect of surface texturing on superoleophobicity, contact angle hysteresis, and "robustness".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong; Park, Kyoo-Chul; Law, Kock-Yee

    2012-10-23

    was observed. On the other hand, the hexadecane drop is shown to wet the pillar surface and the side wall of the overhang. It then pins at the lower edge of the overhang structure. A plot of the thickness of the overhang as a function of the static, advancing, and receding contact angles and sliding angle of hexadecane reveals that static, advancing, and receding contact angles decrease and sliding angle increases as the thickness of the overhang increases. A larger overhang effect is observed with octane due to its lower surface tension. The robustness of the pillar array surface against external pressure induced wetting and abrasion was modeled. Surface Evolver simulation (with the hexadecane drop) indicates that wetting breakthrough pressure as high as ~70 kPa is achievable with 0.5-μm-diameter pillar array FOTS surfaces. Mechanical modeling shows that bending of the pillars is the key failure by abrasion, which can be avoided with a short pillar structure. The path to fabricate a superoleophobic surface that can withstand the external force equivalent of a gentle cleaning blade (up to ~30 kPa) without wetting and abrasion failure is discussed.

  12. A noise-resistant ADSA-PH algorithm for superhydrophobic surface's static contact angle evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z. N.

    2017-03-01

    The blur around the contact points significantly decreases the evaluated static contact angle for superhydrophobic surface which is clearly presented in the paper. To improve the accuracy in the evaluated static contact angle for superhydrophobic surface, an accurate static contact angle algorithm, namely ADSA-PH (axisymmetric drop shape analysis-profile and height), is proposed. It discards the extracted drop edge points close to the contact points and makes use of the residual points and the drop height to determine the static contact angle. The contact angle errors caused by the blur close to the contact points are significantly reduced. The classical ADSA-P algorithm, the modified selected-plane method and the proposed algorithm are used to evaluate static contact angle. The results validate the proposed algorithm. The accuracy in the evaluated contact angle increases with increasing image resolution. To reduce the error caused by a limitation of image resolution, the minimum allowable image resolutions are presented.

  13. Characterizing the microscopic physics near moving contact lines using dynamic contact angle data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramé, E; Garoff, S; Willson, K R

    2004-09-01

    Directly probing the fluid flow and liquid-vapor interface shape in the microscopic immediate vicinity of the moving contact line can only be accomplished in very specific and isolated cases. Yet this physics is critical to macroscopic dynamic wetting. Here we examine the microscopic (or inner) physics of spreading silicone fluids using data of macroscopic dynamic contact angle versus Capillary number Ca=U mu/sigma. This dynamic contact angle is precisely defined so that it can be related back to the microscopic behavior through detailed theory. Our results indicate that the parameters describing the inner region have a detectable dependence on spreading velocity when this velocity exceeds a critical value. This dependence is not scaled (i.e., the data are not collapsed) by Ca, which suggests that an additional time scale must be present in the model of the inner region.

  14. Measurement and interpretation of contact angles in surface energetics and droplet impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Ilker S.

    In this work, both static and dynamic wettability of various commercially important surfaces have been analyzed. The thesis was structured in two main parts: Use of static contact angles and available surface energy estimation methods for polymeric surfaces and use of liquid droplet impact in analyzing dynamic wettability of surfaces with varying wetting characteristics. In the first section, contact angles formed by drops of various surface energy probe liquids on thin polymer films were measured and analyzed. The surface energy of these polymers was evaluated using the harmonic mean equation method, geometric mean equation method and the Lewis Acid-base method. It was shown that the values of surface energy generated by those three methods depend on the choice of liquids used for the contact angle measurements, except when using a pair of liquids with surface tension polarity within 0.4-1. The results indicated that in order to obtain reliable values of solid surface energy using the harmonic and geometric mean equations, a polar and a non-polar liquid should be used. A recent contact angle hysteresis method was also implemented to estimate surface energy of various polymeric surfaces ranging from highly ordered non-polar and inert polymers to polar polymers. The contact angle hysteresis method using polar liquids as probe liquids yielded consistent surface energy estimation on non-polar surfaces. Dynamic wetting of surfaces with varying wetting properties was studied using contact angle dynamics during impact spreading/recoiling of mm-sized water droplets impacting orthogonally on various surfaces. Hydrodynamics and molecular-kinetic wetting theories were implemented to aid understanding and interpreting dynamic wetting data. The target surfaces were classified as wettable, partially wettable and non-wettable. By correlating the temporal behaviors of apparent (macroscopic) contact angle and contact-line speed the angle vs. speed relationship was established. The

  15. Contact angle hysteresis generated by strong dilute defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyssat, Mathilde; Quéré, David

    2009-03-26

    Water on solid decorated with hydrophobic defects (such as micropillars) often stays at the top of the defects in a so-called fakir state, which explains the superhydrophobicity observed in such case, provided that the density of defects is small enough. Here we show that this situation provides an ideal frame for studying the contact angle hysteresis; the phase below the liquid is "perfect" and slippery (it is air), contrasting with pillars' tops whose edges form strong pining sites for the contact line. This model system thus allows us to study the hysteresis as a function of the density of defects and to compare it to the classical theory by Joanny and de Gennes, which is based on very similar hypothesis.

  16. Contact angle of a hemispherical bubble: an analytical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, M A C; Teixeira, P I C

    2009-10-01

    We have calculated the equilibrium shape of the axially symmetric Plateau border along which a spherical bubble contacts a flat wall, by analytically integrating Laplace's equation in the presence of gravity, in the limit of small Plateau border sizes. This method has the advantage that it provides closed-form expressions for the positions and orientations of the Plateau border surfaces. Results are in very good overall agreement with those obtained from a numerical solution procedure, and are consistent with experimental data. In particular we find that the effect of gravity on Plateau border shape is relatively small for typical bubble sizes, leading to a widening of the Plateau border for sessile bubbles and to a narrowing for pendant bubbles. The contact angle of the bubble is found to depend even more weakly on gravity.

  17. Aerial wetting contact angle measurement using confocal microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Chesna, Jacob W.; Wiedmaier, Bob F.; Wang, Jinlin; Samara, Ayman; Leach, Richard K.; Her, Tsing-Hua; Smith, Stuart T.

    2016-01-01

    A method is presented in which the wetting contact angle of a sessile drop is acquired aerially using confocal techniques to measure the radius and the height of a droplet deposited on a planar surface. The repeatability of this method is typically less than 0.25°, and often less than 0.1°, for droplet diameters less than 1 mm. To evaluate accuracy of this method, an instrument uncertainty budget is developed, which predicts a combined uncertainty of 0.91° for a 1 mm diameter water droplet wi...

  18. Surface nanobubbles: formation and universality of the contact angle

    CERN Document Server

    Weijs, J H; Lohse, D

    2011-01-01

    We study surface nanobubbles using molecular dynamics simulation of ternary (gas, liquid, solid) systems of Lennard-Jones fluids. They form for sufficiently low gas solubility in the liquid, i.e., for large relative gas concentration. For strong enough gas-solid attraction, the surface nanobubble is sitting on a gas layer, which forms in between the liquid and the solid. This gas layer is the reason for the universality of the contact angle, which we calculate from the microscopic parameters. Under the present equilibrium conditions the nanobubbles dissolve within less of a microsecond, consistent with the view that the experimentally found nanobubbles are stabilized by a nonequilibrium mechanism.

  19. Investigation of surface porosity measurements and compaction pressure as means to ensure consistent contact angle determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, René; Borkenfelt, Simon; Allesø, Morten; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov; Beato, Stefania; Holm, Per

    2016-02-10

    Compounds wettability is critical for a number of central processes including disintegration, dispersion, solubilisation and dissolution. It is therefore an important optimisation parameter both in drug discovery but also as guidance for formulation selection and optimisation. Wettability for a compound is determined by its contact angle to a liquid, which in the present study was measured using the sessile drop method applied to a disc compact of the compound. Precise determination of the contact angle is important should it be used to either rank compounds or selected excipients to e.g. increase the wetting from a solid dosage form. Since surface roughness of the compact has been suggested to influence the measurement this study investigated if the surface quality, in terms of surface porosity, had an influence on the measured contact angle. A correlation to surface porosity was observed, however for six out of seven compounds similar results were obtained by applying a standard pressure (866 MPa) to the discs in their preparation. The data presented in the present work therefore suggest that a constant high pressure should be sufficient for most compounds when determining the contact angle. Only for special cases where compounds have poor compressibility would there be a need for a surface-quality-control step before the contact angle determination.

  20. A modified captive bubble method for determining advancing and receding contact angles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xue, Jian; Shi, Pan; Zhu, Lin [Key Laboratory of High Performance Polymer Materials and Technology (Nanjing University), Ministry of Eduction, Nanjing 210093 (China); Ding, Jianfu [Security and Disruptive Technologies, National Research Council Canada, 1200 Montreal Road, Ottawa, K1A 0R6, Ontario (Canada); Chen, Qingmin [Key Laboratory of High Performance Polymer Materials and Technology (Nanjing University), Ministry of Eduction, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wang, Qingjun, E-mail: njuwqj@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of High Performance Polymer Materials and Technology (Nanjing University), Ministry of Eduction, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A modified captive bubble method for determining advancing and receding contact angle is proposed. • We have designed a pressure chamber with a pressure control system to the original experimental. • The modified method overcomes the deviation of the bubble in the traditional captive bubble method. • The modified captive bubble method allows a smaller error from the test. - Abstract: In this work, a modification to the captive bubble method was proposed to test the advancing and receding contact angle. This modification is done by adding a pressure chamber with a pressure control system to the original experimental system equipped with an optical angle mater equipped with a high speed CCD camera, a temperature control system and a computer. A series of samples with highly hydrophilic, hydrophilic, hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces were prepared. The advancing and receding contact angles of these samples with highly hydrophilic, hydrophilic, and hydrophobic surfaces through the new methods was comparable to the result tested by the traditional sessile drop method. It is proved that this method overcomes the limitation of the traditional captive bubble method and the modified captive bubble method allows a smaller error from the test. However, due to the nature of the captive bubble technique, this method is also only suitable for testing the surface with advancing or receding contact angle below 130°.

  1. Slip-stick wetting and large contact angle hysteresis on wrinkled surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowsky, Colton; Torres, Jessica M; Vogt, Bryan D

    2011-02-15

    Wetting on a corrugated surface that is formed via wrinkling of a hard skin layer formed by UV oxidation (UVO) of a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) slab is studied using advancing and receding water contact angle measurements. The amplitude of the wrinkled pattern can be tuned through the pre-strain of the PDMS prior to surface oxidation. These valleys and peaks in the surface topography lead to anisotropic wetting by water droplets. As the droplet advances, the fluid is free to move along the direction parallel to the wrinkles, but the droplet moving orthogonal to the wrinkles encounters energy barriers due to the topography and slip-stick behavior is observed. As the wrinkle amplitude increases, anisotropy in the sessile droplet increases between parallel and perpendicular directions. For the drops receding perpendicular to the wrinkles formed at high strains, the contact angle tends to decrease steadily towards zero as the drop volume decreases, which can result in apparent hysteresis in the contact angle of over 100°. The wrinkled surfaces can exhibit high sessile and advancing contact angles (>115°), but the receding angle in these cases is generally vanishing as the drop is removed. This effect results in micrometer sized drops remaining in the grooves for these highly wrinkled surfaces, while the flat analogous UVO-treated PDMS shows complete removal of all macroscopic water drops under similar conditions. These wetting characteristics should be considered if these wrinkled surfaces are to be utilized in or as microfluidic devices.

  2. Contact angle dependence of the resonant properties of sessile drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, James

    2012-02-01

    A simple optical deflection technique was used to monitor the vibrations of microlitre sessile drops of glycerol/water mixtures with glycerol compositions ranging from 0% to 75%. A photodiode was used to detect time dependent variations in the intensity of laser light reflected from the droplets. The intensity variations were Fourier transformed to obtain information about the resonant properties of the drops (frequency and width of the resonance). These experiments were performed on a range of different substrates where the contact angle formed by the droplets varied between 38±2^o and 160±4^o. The measured resonant frequency values were found to be in agreement with a recently developed theory of vibrations which considers standing wave states along the profile length of the droplet. The widths of the resonances were also compared with theories which predict the influence of substrate effects, surface contamination effects and bulk viscous effects on the damping of capillary waves at the free surface of the droplets. These experiments indicate that the dominant source of damping in sessile liquid droplet is due to bulk viscous effects but that for small contact angles damping due to the droplet/substrate interaction becomes more important.

  3. Capillary Contact Angle in a Completely Wet Groove

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, A. O.; Malijevský, A.; Rascón, C.

    2014-10-01

    We consider the phase equilibria of a fluid confined in a deep capillary groove of width L with identical side walls and a bottom made of a different material. All walls are completely wet by the liquid. Using density functional theory and interfacial models, we show that the meniscus separating liquid and gas phases at two phase capillary coexistence meets the bottom capped end of the groove at a capillary contact angle θcap(L) which depends on the difference between the Hamaker constants. If the bottom wall has a weaker wall-fluid attraction than the side walls, then θcap>0 even though all the isolated walls are themselves completely wet. This alters the capillary condensation transition which is now first order; this would be continuous in a capped capillary made wholly of either type of material. We show that the capillary contact angle θcap(L) vanishes in two limits, corresponding to different capillary wetting transitions. These occur as the width (i) becomes macroscopically large, and (ii) is reduced to a microscopic value determined by the difference in Hamaker constants. This second wetting transition is characterized by large scale fluctuations and essential critical singularities arising from marginal interfacial interactions.

  4. Effect of contact angle hysteresis on the measurement of capillary forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Souza, E J; Gao, L; McCarthy, T J; Arzt, E; Crosby, A J

    2008-02-19

    We conduct experimental investigations of macroscopic capillary forces between two flat rigid substrates characterized by their advancing and receding contact angles with water. Our results exhibit excellent agreement with theoretical predictions obtained by the numerical solution of the capillary equation. On the basis of this comparison, we use the measurements of the capillary force to investigate the phenomenon of contact angle hysteresis. We present examples of force measurements for surfaces that display low, moderate, and high contact angle hysteresis and compare results for a larger variety of substrates. Finally, we show that for the case of water, the role of viscosity is insignificant within the range of force and velocity measured in the present work.

  5. Applying Contact Angle to a 2D Multiphase Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model

    OpenAIRE

    Farrokhpanah, Amirsaman; Samareh, Babak; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    Equilibrium contact angle of liquid drops over horizontal surfaces has been modeled using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). The model is capable of accurate implementation of contact angles to stationary and moving contact lines. In this scheme, the desired value for stationary or dynamic contact angle is used to correct the profile near the triple point. This is achieved by correcting the surface normals near the contact line and also interpolating the drop profile into the boundaries. ...

  6. Statistical contact angle analyses; "slow moving" drops on a horizontal silicon-oxide surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, M; Grub, J; Heib, F

    2015-06-01

    Sessile drop experiments on horizontal surfaces are commonly used to characterise surface properties in science and in industry. The advancing angle and the receding angle are measurable on every solid. Specially on horizontal surfaces even the notions themselves are critically questioned by some authors. Building a standard, reproducible and valid method of measuring and defining specific (advancing/receding) contact angles is an important challenge of surface science. Recently we have developed two/three approaches, by sigmoid fitting, by independent and by dependent statistical analyses, which are practicable for the determination of specific angles/slopes if inclining the sample surface. These approaches lead to contact angle data which are independent on "user-skills" and subjectivity of the operator which is also of urgent need to evaluate dynamic measurements of contact angles. We will show in this contribution that the slightly modified procedures are also applicable to find specific angles for experiments on horizontal surfaces. As an example droplets on a flat freshly cleaned silicon-oxide surface (wafer) are dynamically measured by sessile drop technique while the volume of the liquid is increased/decreased. The triple points, the time, the contact angles during the advancing and the receding of the drop obtained by high-precision drop shape analysis are statistically analysed. As stated in the previous contribution the procedure is called "slow movement" analysis due to the small covered distance and the dominance of data points with low velocity. Even smallest variations in velocity such as the minimal advancing motion during the withdrawing of the liquid are identifiable which confirms the flatness and the chemical homogeneity of the sample surface and the high sensitivity of the presented approaches.

  7. Static and dynamic contact angles of water droplet on a solid surface using molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Seung Do; Ha, Man Yeong; Balachandar, S

    2009-11-01

    The present study investigates the variation of static contact angle of a water droplet in equilibrium with a solid surface in the absence of a body force and the dynamic contact angles of water droplet moving on a solid surface for different characteristic energies using the molecular dynamics simulation. With increasing characteristic energy, the static contact angle in equilibrium with a solid surface in the absence of a body force decreases because the hydrophobic surface changes its characteristics to the hydrophilic surface. In order to consider the effect of moving water droplet on the dynamic contact angles, we apply the constant acceleration to an individual oxygen and hydrogen atom. In the presence of a body force, the water droplet changes its shape with larger advancing contact angle than the receding angle. The dynamic contact angles are compared with the static contact angle in order to see the effect of the presence of a body force.

  8. Potential for tunable static and dynamic contact angle anisotropy on gradient microscale patterned topographies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Christopher J; Schumacher, James F; Brennan, Anthony B

    2009-11-17

    Translationally symmetric topographies can be designed to induce anisotropy of static and dynamic contact angles. The validity of ignoring directionality of topography in contact angle characterization was evaluated using microscale patterned topographies. Seven patterned topographies comprising elongated discontinuous microfeatures oriented along parallel paths and one topography comprising ridges were fabricated in a poly(dimethyl siloxane) elastomer (PDMSe). The static contact angle, advancing contact angle, receding contact angle, contact angle hysteresis, and slip angle were measured using water on each surface at three in-plane perspectives, with respect to the feature orientation. Static and dynamic contact angle anisotropies were investigated on the topographies to evaluate the effect of discontinuities along the feature lengths on the anisotropy that has been shown on channels or ridges in previous reports. Discontinuous feature topographies exhibited a statistically significant anisotropy of 2 degrees-6 degrees between the perpendicular and parallel directions, with respect to the static and dynamic contact angles. The ridges topography exhibited much larger 5 degrees-42 degrees anisotropy in the contact angles. The discontinuities along the feature lengths greatly reduced, but did not eliminate, the anisotropies compared to the ridges. This evidence of contact angle anisotropy indicates a need to identify the orientation of topography, in relation to contact angle measurements. It also implies a need to consider directionality in the design of microfluidic devices and self-cleaning surfaces.

  9. Porous media characterization by the two-liquid method: effect of dynamic contact angle and inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavi, Becky; Marmur, Abraham; Bachmann, Joerg

    2008-03-04

    The validity of using the Lucas-Washburn (LW) equation for porous media characterization by the two-liquid capillary penetration method was tested numerically and experimentally. A cylindrical capillary of known radius and contact angle was used as a model system for the tests. It was found that using the LW equation (i.e., ignoring inertia and dynamic contact angle effects) may lead to very erroneous assessment of the capillary radius and the equilibrium contact angle, for a relatively wide range of capillary radii and equilibrium contact angles. A correct assessment requires the application of a penetration kinetics equation that considers inertia and the dynamic contact angle.

  10. Lattice boltzmann study on the contact angle and contact line dynamics of liquid-vapor interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junfeng; Kwok, Daniel Y

    2004-09-14

    The moving contact line problem of liquid-vapor interfaces was studied using a mean-field free-energy lattice Boltzmann method recently proposed [Phys. Rev. E 2004, 69, 032602]. We have examined the static and dynamic interfacial behaviors by means of the bubble and capillary wave tests and found that both the Laplace equation of capillarity and the dispersion relation were satisfied. Dynamic contact angles followed the general trend of contact line velocity observed experimentally and can be described by Blake's theory. The velocity fields near the interface were also obtained and are in good agreement with fluid mechanics and molecular dynamics studies. Our simulations demonstrated that incorporating interfacial effects into the lattice Boltzmann model can be a valuable and powerful alternative in interfacial studies.

  11. In situ assessment of the contact angles of nanoparticles adsorbed at fluid interfaces by multiple angle of incidence ellipsometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocco, Antonio; Su, Ge; Nobili, Maurizio; In, Martin; Wang, Dayang

    2014-09-28

    Here multiple angle of incidence ellipsometry was successfully applied to in situ assess the contact angle and surface coverage of gold nanoparticles as small as 18 nm, coated with stimuli-responsive polymers, at water-oil and water-air interfaces in the presence of NaCl and NaOH, respectively. The interfacial adsorption of the nanoparticles was found to be very slow and took days to reach a fairly low surface coverage. For water-oil interfaces, in situ nanoparticle contact angles agree with the macroscopic equilibrium contact angles of planar gold surfaces with the same polymer coatings, whilst for water-air interfaces, significant differences have been observed.

  12. Water slippage versus contact angle: a quasiuniversal relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, David M; Sendner, Christian; Horinek, Dominik; Netz, Roland R; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2008-11-28

    Using molecular dynamics simulations of an atomistic water model, we study the interfacial hydrodynamic slippage of water at various hydrophobic surfaces, both organic (silane monolayers) and inorganic (diamondlike and Lennard-Jones models). The measured slip lengths range from nanometers to tens of nanometers. Slip lengths on different surfaces are found to collapse nearly onto a single curve as a function of the static contact angle characterizing the surface wettability, thereby suggesting a quasiuniversal relationship. This dependence is rationalized on the basis of a simple scaling description of the fluid-solid friction at the microscopic level. The link between slippage and water depletion at hydrophobic surfaces is clarified. These results shed light on the controversy over experimental measurements of the slip length at smooth hydrophobic surfaces.

  13. Solute concentration-dependent contact angle hysteresis and evaporation stains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueh-Feng; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2014-07-08

    The presence of nonvolatile solutes in a liquid drop on a solid surface can affect the wetting properties. Depending on the surface-activity of the solutes, the extent of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) can vary with their concentration and the pattern of the evaporation stain is altered accordingly. In this work, four types of concentration-dependent CAH and evaporation stains are identified for a water drop containing polymeric additives on polycarbonate. For polymers without surface-activity such as dextran, advancing and receding contact angles (θa and θr) are independent of solute concentrations, and a concentrated stain is observed in the vicinity of the drop center after complete evaporation. For polymers with weak surface-activity such as poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), both θa and θr are decreased by solute addition, and the stain pattern varies with increasing PEG concentration, including a concentrated stain and a mountain-like island. For polymers with intermediate surface-activity such as sodium polystyrenesulfonate (NaPSS), θa descends slightly, but θr decreases significantly after the addition of a substantial amount of NaPSS, and a ring-like stain pattern is observed. Moreover, the size of the ring stain can be controlled by NaPSS concentration. For polymers with strong surface-activity such as poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP), θa remains essentially a constant, but θr is significantly lowered after the addition of a small amount of PVP, and the typical ring-like stain is seen.

  14. On the role of energy barriers in determining contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, J; Chen, P

    2006-11-30

    The thermodynamic model of contact angles on rough, heterogeneous surfaces developed by Long et al. [J. Long, M.N. Hyder, R.Y.M. Huang and P. Chen, Adv. Colloid Interface Sci. 118 (2005) 173] was employed to study the role of energy barriers in determining contact angle hysteresis. Major energy barriers corresponding to metastable states and minor energy barriers corresponding to secondary metastable states were defined. Distributions of major and/or minor energy barriers as a function of apparent contact angle for various surfaces were obtained. The reproducibility of contact angle measurement, the effect of vibrational energy on contact angle hysteresis and the "stick-slip" phenomenon were discussed. Quantitative relations between contact angles and vibrational energy were obtained. It was found that receding contact angles are normally poorly reproducible for hydrophilic surfaces, but for extremely hydrophobic surfaces, advancing contact angles may have a poor reproducibility. When the vibrational energy available to a system increases, the measured advancing contact angle will decrease while the receding angle will increase until both reach a common value: the system equilibrium angle. This finding not only agrees well with the experimental observations in system equilibrium contact angle measurements, but also lays a theoretical foundation for such measurements. A small vibrational energy may result in a "stick-slip" phenomenon.

  15. A Congruence Theorem for Minimal Surfaces in $S^{5}$ with Constant Contact Angle

    OpenAIRE

    Montes, Rodrigo Ristow; Verderesi, Jose A.

    2006-01-01

    We provide a congruence theorem for minimal surfaces in $S^5$ with constant contact angle using Gauss-Codazzi-Ricci equations. More precisely, we prove that Gauss-Codazzi-Ricci equations for minimal surfaces in $S^5$ with constant contact angle satisfy an equation for the Laplacian of the holomorphic angle. Also, we will give a characterization of flat minimal surfaces in $S^5$ with constant contact angle.

  16. Characteristic lengths at moving contact lines for a perfectly wetting fluid: the influence of speed on the dynamic contact angle

    OpenAIRE

    Eggers, Jens; Stone, Howard A.

    2002-01-01

    It is common to relate the dynamic contact angle $\\theta_d$ to the relative speed between the substrate and the contact line; theory suggests $\\theta_d^3 \\propto U$. In fact, available physical models show that the dynamic angle involves speed logarithmically and in a model dependent manner. Experimental data consistent with this interpretation is cited.

  17. The debate on the dependence of apparent contact angles on drop contact area or three-phase contact line: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbil, H. Yildirim

    2014-12-01

    A sessile drop is an isolated drop which has been deposited on a solid substrate where the wetted area is limited by the three-phase contact line and characterized by contact angle, contact radius and drop height. Although, wetting has been studied using contact angles of drops on solids for more than 200 years, the question remains unanswered: Is wetting of a rough and chemically heterogeneous surface controlled by the interactions within the solid/liquid contact area beneath the droplet or only at the three-phase contact line? After the publications of Pease in 1945, Extrand in 1997, 2003 and Gao and McCarthy in 2007 and 2009, it was proposed that advancing, receding contact angles, and contact angle hysteresis of rough and chemically heterogeneous surfaces are determined by interactions of the liquid and the solid at the three-phase contact line alone and the interfacial area within the contact perimeter is irrelevant. As a consequence of this statement, the well-known Wenzel (1934) and Cassie (1945) equations which were derived using the contact area approach are proposed to be invalid and should be abandoned. A hot debate started in the field of surface science after 2007, between the three-phase contact line and interfacial contact area approach defenders. This paper presents a review of the published articles on contact angles and summarizes the views of the both sides. After presenting a brief history of the contact angles and their measurement methods, we discussed the basic contact angle theory and applications of contact angles on the characterization of flat, rough and micropatterned superhydrophobic surfaces. The weak and strong sides of both three-phase contact line and contact area approaches were discussed in detail and some practical conclusions were drawn.

  18. Contact angle assessment of hydrophobic silica nanoparticles related to the mechanisms of dry water formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forny, Laurent; Saleh, Khashayar; Denoyel, Renaud; Pezron, Isabelle

    2010-02-16

    Dry water is a very convenient way of encapsulating a high amount of aqueous solutions in a powder form made of hydrophobic silica nanoparticles. It was demonstrated in previous studies that both solid and liquid interfacial properties influence the quality of the final product resulting occasionally in mousse formation. To explain this behavior, contact angles of silica nanoparticles have been measured for water and water/ethanol solution by means of liquid intrusion experiments. It was found that the quality of the final product correlates with the contact angle, i.e., contact angle close to 105 degrees leads to mousse formation whereas a slightly higher value of approximately 118 degrees allows dry water formation. The proposed explanation was based on the energy of immersion and adhesion defined as the energy needed for a spherical particle to respectively penetrate into the liquid or attach at the liquid/air interface. Significantly lower energy of immersion calculated for lower contact angle might account for particle penetration into the liquid phase during processing, leading to continuous network aggregation, air entrapment, and finally mousse formation.

  19. Diminution of contact angle hysteresis under the influence of an oscillating force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Ofer

    2014-06-17

    We suggest a simple quantitative model for the diminution of contact angle hysteresis under the influence of an oscillatory force invoked by thermal fluctuations, substrate vibrations, acoustic waves, or oscillating electric fields. Employing force balance rather than the usual description of contact angle hysteresis in terms of Gibbs energy, we highlight that a wetting system, such as a sessile drop or a bubble adhered to a solid substrate, appears at long times to be partially or fully independent of contact angle hysteresis and thus independent of static friction forces, as a result of contact line pinning. We verify this theory by studying several well-known experimental observations such as the approach of an arbitrary contact angle toward the Young contact angle and the apparent decrease (or increase) in an advancing (or a receding) contact angle under the influence of an external oscillating force.

  20. Apparent and Actual Dynamic Contact Angles in Confined Two-Phase Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omori, Takeshi; Kajishima, Takeo

    2016-11-01

    To accurately predict the fluid flow with moving contact lines, it has a crucial importance to use a model for the dynamic contact angle which gives contact angles on the length scale corresponding to the spacial resolution of the fluid solver. The angle which a moving fluid interface forms to a solid surface deviates from an actual (microscopic) dynamic contact angle depending on the distance from the contact line and should be called an apparent (macroscopic) dynamic contact angle. They were, however, often undistinguished especially in the experimental works, on which a number of empirical correlations between a contact angle and a contact line velocity have been proposed. The present study is the first attempt to measure both apparent and actual contact angles from the identical data sets to discuss the difference and the relationship between these two contact angles of difference length scales. The study is conducted by means of numerical simulation, solving the Navier-Stokes equation and the Cahn-Hilliard equation under the generalized Navier boundary condition for the immiscible two-phase flow in channels. The present study also illustrates how the system size and the physical properties of the adjoining fluid affect the apparent and the actual dynamic contact angles. JSPS KAKENHI Grant No. 15K17974.

  1. Adsorption of natural surfactants present in sea waters at surfaces of minerals: contact angle measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Boniewicz-Szmyt

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The wetting properties of solid mineral samples (by contact angles in original surfactant-containing sea water (Gulf of Gdańsk, Baltic were characterised under laboratory conditions on a large set (31 samples of well-classified stones of diverse hydrophobicity using the sessile drop (ADSA-P approach, captive bubble and inclined plate methods. An experimental relation between the static contact angle θeq and stone density ρ was obtained in the form θeq = Bρ + C, where B = 12.23 ± 0.92, C = - (19.17 ± 0.77, and r2 = 0.92. The histogram of θeq distribution for polished stone plates exhibited a multimodal feature indicating that the most abundant solid materials (hydrophilic in nature have contact angles θeq = 7.2, 10.7, 15.7 and 19.2º, which appear to be applicable to unspecified field stones as well. The contact angle, a pH-dependent quantity, appears to be a sensitive measure of stone grain size, e.g. granite. The captive bubble method gives reproducible results in studies of porous and highly hydrophilic surfaces such as stones and wood. The authors consider the adsorption of natural sea water surfactants on stone surfaces to be the process responsible for contact angle hysteresis. In the model, an equation was derived for determining the solid surface free energy from the liquid's surface tension γLV it also enabled the advancing θA and receding θR contact angles of this liquid to be calculated. Measurements of contact angle hysteresis Δθ (=θA - θR with surfactant-containing sea water and distilled water (reference on the same stone surfaces allowed the film pressure ΔΠ (1.22 to 8.80 mJ m-2, solid surface free energy ΔγS (-17.03 to -23.61 mJ m-2 and work done by spreading ΔWS (-1.23 to -11.52 mJ m-2 to be determined. The variability in these parameters is attributed to autophobing, an effect operative on a solid surface covered with an adsorptive layer of surfactants. The wetting behaviour of solid particles is of great

  2. Dynamic contact angle in rim instability of dewetting holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung-Hwan; Newby, Bi-min Zhang

    2006-02-07

    The effects of dynamic contact angle (thetad), between a substrate and the melt of a dewetting polymer thin film, on the evolution of rim instabilities of dewetting holes were reported. Various thetad's were achieved by covering SiOx surfaces with different coverage of octadecyltrichlorosilane. On each surface, the morphology of the dewetting holes was examined in detail as the hole grew to a certain size. Rim instabilities, in terms of undulations in both r and z directions, became more pronounced as thetad increased, under which condition, narrower and higher rims were also observed. Experimentally, atomic force microscopic scans of the rim were used to obtain the rim profile, which was predicted using thetad. The predicted rim profile was used, in combination with the analysis of Rayleigh instability of a cylindrical fluid, to interpret the rim instability. The model captures the basic trend of the rim instability dependency on thetad. The study demonstrates the importance of the substrate properties on the rim instability and the destabilization of polymer thin films during hole growth.

  3. Help from a Hindrance: Using Astigmatism in Round Capillaries To Study Contact Angles and Wetting Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobeika, Nelly; Bouriat, Patrick; Touil, Abdelhafid; Broseta, Daniel; Brown, Ross; Dubessy, Jean

    2017-05-30

    Round glass capillaries are a basic tool in soft-matter science, but often are shunned due to the astigmatism they introduce in micrographs. Here, we show how refraction in a capillary can be a help instead of a hindrance to obtain precise and sensitive information on two important interfacial properties: the contact angle of two immiscible fluids and the presence of thin films on the capillary wall. Understanding optical cusps due to refraction allows direct mesurement of the inner diameter of a capillary at the meniscus, which, with the height of the meniscus cap, determines the contact angle. The meniscus can thus be measured without intrusive additives to enhance visibility, such as dyes or calibrated particles, in uniform, curved, or even tapered capillaries or under demanding conditions not accessible by conventional methods, such as small volumes (μL), high temperatures, or high pressures. We further elicit the conditions for strong internal reflection on the inner capillary wall, involving the wall and fluid refractive indices and the wall thickness, and show how to choose the capillary section to detect thin (submicron) layers on the wall, by the contribution of total internal reflection to the cusps. As examples, we report the following: (i) CO2-water or -brine contact angles at glass interfaces, measured at temperatures and pressures up to 200 °C and 600 bar, revealing an effect apparently so far unreported-the decrease in the water-wet character of glass, due to dissolved salts in brine, is strongly reduced at high temperatures, where contact angles converge toward the values in pure water; (ii) A tenuous gas hydrate layer growing from the water-guest contact line on glass, invisible in transmission microscopy but prominent in the cusps due to total internal reflection.

  4. Facile manipulation of receding contact angles of a substrate by roughening and fluorination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueh-Feng; Wu, Cyuan-Jhang; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2015-11-01

    Contact angle hysteresis plays a paramount role in anti-smudge surfaces. In this study, surface roughness is systematically altered on some polymeric substrates such as polystyrene and poly(methyl methacrylate) by roughening and its effect on contact angle hysteresis is investigated via measuring advancing and receding contact angles of water. The wettability on these substrates is also modified by vapor-phase deposition of perfluorooctyltrichlorosilane, while the surface morphology is kept the same. As surface roughness is increased, the advancing contact angle grows but three types of the receding contact angle (θr) behavior have been identified: (i) monotonic reduction of θr, (ii) monotonic enhancement of θr, and (iii) presence of a minimum of θr. A plausible mechanism based on the stability of air pockets is proposed to explain our experimental findings. The manipulation of receding contact angles can be achieved based on our findings.

  5. Contact Angle Adjustment in Equation of States Based Pseudo-Potential Model

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Anjie; Uddin, Rizwan

    2015-01-01

    Single component pseudo-potential lattice Boltzmann model has been widely applied in multiphase simulation due to its simplicity and stability. In many research, it has been claimed that this model can be stable for density ratios larger than 1000, however, the application of the model is still limited to small density ratios when the contact angle is considered. The reason is that the original contact angle adjustment method influences the stability of the model. Moreover, simulation results in present work show that, by applying the contact angle adjustment method, the density distribution near the wall is artificially changed, and the contact angle is dependent on the surface tension. Hence, it is very inconvenient to apply this method with a fixed contact angle, and the accuracy of the model cannot be guaranteed. To solve these problems, a contact angle adjustment method based on the geometry analysis is proposed and numerically compared with the original method. Simulation results show that, with the new...

  6. A method to measure internal contact angle in opaque systems by magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weiqin; Tian, Ye; Gao, Xuefeng; Jiang, Lei

    2013-07-23

    Internal contact angle is an important parameter for internal wettability characterization. However, due to the limitation of optical imaging, methods available for contact angle measurement are only suitable for transparent or open systems. For most of the practical situations that require contact angle measurement in opaque or enclosed systems, the traditional methods are not effective. Based upon the requirement, a method suitable for contact angle measurement in nontransparent systems is developed by employing MRI technology. In the Article, the method is demonstrated by measuring internal contact angles in opaque cylindrical tubes. It proves that the method also shows great feasibility in transparent situations and opaque capillary systems. By using the method, contact angle in opaque systems could be measured successfully, which is significant in understanding the wetting behaviors in nontransparent systems and calculating interfacial parameters in enclosed systems.

  7. Finite size effects on textured surfaces: recovering contact angles from vagarious drop edges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Anaïs; Rivetti, Marco; Teisseire, Jérémie; Barthel, Etienne

    2014-02-18

    A clue to understand wetting hysteresis on superhydrophobic surfaces is the relation between receding contact angle and surface textures. When the surface textures are large, there is a significant distribution of local contact angles around the drop. As seen from the cross section, the apparent contact angle oscillates as the triple line recedes. Our experiments demonstrate that the origin of these oscillations is a finite size effect. Combining side and bottom views of the drop, we take into account the 3D conformation of the surface near the edge to evaluate an intrinsic contact angle from the oscillations of the apparent contact angle. We find that for drops receding on axisymmetric textures the intrinsic receding contact angle is the minimum value of the oscillation while for a square lattice it is the maximum.

  8. Moment-angle manifolds, intersection of quadrics and higher dimensional contact manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Barreto, Yadira; Verjovsky, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    We construct new examples of contact manifolds in arbitrarily large dimensions. These manifolds which we call quasi moment-angle manifolds, are closely related to the classical moment-angle manifolds.

  9. Contact angle hysteresis of cylindrical drops on chemically heterogeneous striped surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2005-01-01

    Contact angle hysteresis of a macroscopic droplet on a heterogeneous but flat substrate is studied using the interface displacement model. First, the apparent contact angle of a droplet on a heterogeneous surface under the condition of constant volume is considered. By assuming a cylindrical liquid-vapor surface (meniscus) and minimizing the total free energy, we derive an equation for the apparent contact angle, which is similar but different from the well-known Cassie's law. Next, using thi...

  10. An Efficient Algorithm for Contact Angle Estimation in Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Sumith YD

    2015-01-01

    It is important to find contact angle for a liquid to understand its wetting properties, capillarity and surface interaction energy with a surface. The estimation of contact angle from Non Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics (NEMD), where we need to track the changes in contact angle over a period of time is challenging compared to the estimation from a single image from an experimental measurement. Often such molecular simulations involve finite number of molecules above some metallic or non-meta...

  11. Effect of moisture equilibration time and medium on contact angles of bacterial spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschlbeck, Elisabeth; Kulozik, Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    Contact angle measurement of microorganisms is often described in literature, either to investigate their hydrophobic characteristic or the adhesion behavior of cells. However, in some key aspects the preparation methods differ. Thus, it is difficult to compare results and to choose a procedure for repetition of measurements. The aim of this paper is to point out some critical points during microorganism film preparation that can alter the resulting contact angles. Depending on the moisturizing medium and equilibration time, contact angles differ significantly.

  12. Contact angle goniometry on single micron-scale fibers for composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Daniel; Bomholt, Niels; Jeppesen, Jonas Camillus

    2017-01-01

    agreement between con-tact angles for the PMMA/H2O system for fibers with diameters 20–800 um and for sessile drops. The ability of the method to discriminate contact angles for a series of commercial glass fibers against epoxy resin is successfully demonstrated. AFM imaging shows that the surface...... topography of the fibers does not have a simple relationship with the variation in contact angles. Contact angle goniometry by imaging of micron scale fibers appears as a viable alternative to Wilhelmy type measurements and the measurement principle could readily be extended to dynamic wetting experiments....

  13. Effect of contact angle and humidity on evaporation of inkjet-printed colloidal drops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying; Bromberg, Vadim; Gawande, Sailee; Singler, Timothy

    2009-11-01

    Inkjet printing has attracted much attention in recent years due to its ability to dispense precise amounts of functional materials onto targeted areas. Although evidence exists for a multi-stage evaporation of a sessile drop, the actual evaporation behavior of an inkjetted colloidal drop is not well understood. In this study, a novel visualization technique is developed wherein aqueous suspensions of fluorescent particles are inkjetted onto transparent surfaces and the evaporation dynamics are observed in real-time using a high-power microscope. Two influencing parameters, the ambient humidity and substrate wettability, are systematically varied. It has been confirmed that jetted drops follow a pinned, dewetting, and mixed multi-stage evaporation process. The results also show that the relative humidity acts mainly to accelerate or decelerate the process whereas its relationship to contact angle is not as direct. Contact angle hysteresis plays an important role in controlling the initial pinned mode. For lower contact angle substrates, evaporation drives a flow of particles to deposit near the contact line which set the conditions for the dewetting stage that follows. Finally, a diffusion-controlled evaporation model is used to predict the time internals for each evaporation stage. The model agrees well with the experimental data, especially for the dewetting mode.

  14. Dynamic contact angle measurement on materials with an unknown wet perimeter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muster, Tim H

    2004-09-10

    Whilst contact angle measurements obtained using the Wilhelmy balance technique are accurate and reproducible for planar surfaces, their use for characterizing particulate materials is highly dependent upon accurate knowledge of the wet perimeter. This communication suggests that the approach of Pepin et al. [Int. J. Pharm. 152 (1997) 1] for wet perimeter determination using non-polar liquids may lead to erroneous conclusions. Alternative approaches for wet perimeter determination are suggested.

  15. Bubble dynamics atop an oscillating substrate: Interplay of compressibility and contact angle hysteresis

    OpenAIRE

    Fayzrakhmanova, Irina S.; Straube, Arthur V.; Shklyaev, Sergey

    2011-01-01

    We consider a sessile hemispherical bubble sitting on the transversally oscillating bottom of a deep liquid layer and focus on the interplay of the compressibility of the bubble and the contact angle hysteresis. In the presence of contact angle hysteresis, the compressible bubble exhibits two kinds of terminal oscillations: either with the stick-slip motion of the contact line or with the completely immobile contact line. For the stick-slip oscillations, we detect a double resonance, when ...

  16. Application of time-dependent sessile drop contact angles on compacts to characterise the surface energetics of sulfathiazole crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muster, Tim H; Prestidge, Clive A

    2002-03-02

    The time-dependent wetting of sulfathiazole compacts with sessile water drops was evaluated using video microscopy. The influence of sulfathiazole crystalline form, particle size, pre-saturation with water, humidity and compaction pressure on the droplet spreading kinetics and contact angles are reported. The rate and extent of droplet spreading decreased for compact surfaces of high microscopic roughness; this was determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Pre-saturation of powder compacts with water (pre-saturated with sulfathiazole) enhanced droplet spreading and enabled pseudo-equilibrium contact angles to be determined for up to 10 min. Sessile-drop contact angles on both sulfathiazole powder compacts and single crystals are compared with particle contact angles determined by liquid penetration. This study has led to an improved understanding of the influence of physical heterogeneities and the face-specific surface chemistry of individual crystals on the wetting characteristics of pharmaceutical compacts.

  17. Drops down the hill: theoretical study of limiting contact angles and the hysteresis range on a tilted plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasovitski, Boris; Marmur, Abraham

    2005-04-26

    The limiting inclination angle (slip angle), for which a two-dimensional water drop may be at equilibrium on a chemically heterogeneous surface, is exactly calculated for a variety of cases. The main conclusion is that, in the cases studied, the contact angles at the upper and lower contact line do not always simultaneously equal the receding and advancing contact angles, respectively. On a hydrophobic surface, the lowest contact angle (at the upper contact line) tends to be approximately equal to the receding contact angle, while the highest contact angle (at the lower contact line) may be much lower than the advancing contact angle. For hydrophilic surfaces, the opposite is true. These conclusions imply that the hysteresis range cannot in general be measured by analyzing the shape of a drop on an inclined plane. Also, the limiting inclination angle cannot in general be calculated from the classical equation based only on the advancing and receding contact angles.

  18. Applying Contact Angle to a 2D Multiphase Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model

    CERN Document Server

    Farrokhpanah, Amirsaman; Mostaghimi, Javad

    2016-01-01

    Equilibrium contact angle of liquid drops over horizontal surfaces has been modeled using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH). The model is capable of accurate implementation of contact angles to stationary and moving contact lines. In this scheme, the desired value for stationary or dynamic contact angle is used to correct the profile near the triple point. This is achieved by correcting the surface normals near the contact line and also interpolating the drop profile into the boundaries. Simulations show that a close match to the chosen contact angle values can be achieved for both stationary and moving contact lines. This technique has proven to reduce the amount of nonphysical shear stresses near the triple point and to enhance the convergence characteristics of the solver.

  19. Modeling contact angle hysteresis of a liquid droplet sitting on a cosine wave-like pattern surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promraksa, Arwut; Chen, Li-Jen

    2012-10-15

    A liquid droplet sitting on a hydrophobic surface with a cosine wave-like square-array pattern in the Wenzel state is simulated by using the Surface Evolver to determine the contact angle. For a fixed drop volume, multiple metastable states are obtained at two different surface roughnesses. Unusual and non-circular shape of the three-phase contact line of a liquid droplet sitting on the model surface is observed due to corrugation and distortion of the contact line by structure of the roughness. The contact angle varies along the contact line for each metastable state. The maximum and minimum contact angles among the multiple metastable states at a fixed viewing angle correspond to the advancing and the receding contact angles, respectively. It is interesting to observe that the advancing/receding contact angles (and contact angle hysteresis) are a function of viewing angle. In addition, the receding (or advancing) contact angles at different viewing angles are determined at different metastable states. The contact angle of minimum energy among the multiple metastable states is defined as the most stable (equilibrium) contact angle. The Wenzel model is not able to describe the contact angle along the three-phase contact line. The contact angle hysteresis at different drop volumes is determined. The number of the metastable states increases with increasing drop volume. Drop volume effect on the contact angles is also discussed.

  20. Surface mobility and structural transitions of poly(n-alkyl methacrylates) probed by dynamic contact angle measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Van Damme; Hogt, A.H.; Feijen, J.

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic contact angles and contact-angle hysteresis of a series of poly(n-alkyl methacrylates) (PAMA) were investigated using the Wilhelmy plate technique. The mobility of polymer surface chains, segments, and side groups affected the measured contact angles and their hysteresis. A model is presented in which contact-angle hysteresis of PAMA's is explained in terms of the reorientation of polymer chains and segments at the interface of the polymers with water and air. The contact angles obser...

  1. Microscopic and Macroscopic Dynamic Interface Shapes and the Interpretation of Dynamic Contact Angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramé; Garoff

    1996-01-15

    We have studied shapes of dynamic fluid interfaces at distances contact line at capillary numbers (Ca) ranging from 10(-3) to 10(-1). Near the moving contact line where viscous deformation is important, an analysis valid to O(1) in Ca describes the shape of the fluid interface. Static capillarity should describe the interface shape far from the contact line. We have quantitatively determined the extent of the regions described by the analysis with viscous deformation and by a static shape as a function of Ca. We observe a third portion of the interface between the two regions cited above, which is not described by either the analysis with viscous deformation or a static shape. In this third region the interface shape is controlled by viscous and gravitational forces of comparable magnitude. We detect significant viscous deformation even far from the contact line at Ca approximately > 0.01. Our measured dynamic contact angle parameter extracted by fitting the analysis with viscous deformation to the shape near the moving contact line coincides with the contact angle of the static-like shape far from the contact line. We measure and explain the discrepancy between this dynamic contact angle parameter and the apparent contact angles based on meniscus or apex heights. Our observations of viscous effects at large distances from the contact line have implications for dynamic contact angle measurements in capillary tubes.

  2. Contact angle of water on iron ore fines: Measurement and analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang X.B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relative contact angle (θRCA for seven iron ore fines was measured by using Washburn Osmotic Pressure method under laboratory conditions. By choosing cyclohexane as the reference that can perfectly wet iron ore particles, the relative contact angles were measured and varied from 57° to 73°. With the volume % of goethite (φG as the variable, a new model for relative contact angle was developed. The expected relative contact angle for pure goethite is about 56°, while that for goethite free samples is about 77°. Physical properties, such as surface morphology (SMI and pore volume (Vpore can influence the relative contact angle. The φG can be expressed as a function of SMI and VPore. Thus, we inferred that the relative contact angle is a function of φG for the iron ores used. The measured relative contact angles were found to be in good agreement (Radj 2 >0.97 with the calculated ones based on the research from Iveson, et al. (2004. Comparing with the model developed by Iveson et al.(2004, the new model for contact angle proposed in this paper is similar, but more detailed with two meaningful physical parameters. The modification of physicochemical properties on iron ores would be another topic in the further study on granulation.

  3. The bifurcation diagram of drops in a sphere/plane geometry: influence of contact angle hysteresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, de Riëlle; Gorcum, van M.; Semprebon, C.; Duits, M.H.G.; Brinkmann, M.; Mugele, F.

    2014-01-01

    We study liquid drops that are present in a generic geometry, namely the gap in between a sphere and a plane. For the ideal system without contact angle hysteresis, the drop position is solely dependent on the contact angle, drop volume, and sphere/ plane separation distance. Performing a geometric

  4. How to make sticky surfaces slippery: Contact angle hysteresis in electrowetting with alternating voltage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, F.; Mugele, Frieder

    2008-01-01

    Contact angle hysteresis caused by random pinning forces is a major obstacle in moving small quantities of liquid on solid surfaces. Here, we demonstrate that the contact angle hysteresis for sessile drops in electrowetting almost disappears with increasing alternating voltage, whereas for direct vo

  5. Influence of contact angle on slow evaporation in two-dimensional porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chraïbi, H; Prat, M; Chapuis, O

    2009-02-01

    We study numerically the influence of contact angle on slow evaporation in two-dimensional model porous media. For sufficiently low contact angles, the drying pattern is fractal and can be predicted by a simple model combining the invasion percolation model with the computation of the diffusive transport in the gas phase. The overall drying time is minimum in this regime and is independent of contact angle over a large range of contact angles up to the beginning of a transition zone. As the contact angle increases in the transition region, the cooperative smoothing mechanisms of the interface become important and the width of the liquid gas interface fingers that form during the evaporation process increases. The mean overall drying time increases in the transition region up to an upper bound which is reached at a critical contact angle thetac. The increase in the drying time in the transition region is explained in relation with the diffusional screening phenomenon associated with the Laplace equation governing the vapor transport in the gas phase. Above thetac the drying pattern is characterized by a flat traveling front and the mean overall drying time becomes independent of the contact angle. Drying time fluctuations are studied and are found to be important below thetac, i.e., when the pattern is fractal. The fluctuations are of the same order of magnitude regardless of the value of contact angle in this range. The fluctuations are found to die out abruptly at thetac as the liquid gas interface becomes a flat front.

  6. Comparison of different methods to measure contact angles of soil colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jianying; Flury, Markus; Harsh, James B; Zollars, Richard L

    2008-12-15

    We compared five different methods, static sessile drop, dynamic sessile drop, Wilhelmy plate, thin-layer wicking, and column wicking, to determine the contact angle of colloids typical for soils and sediments. The colloids (smectite, kaolinite, illite, goethite, hematite) were chosen to represent 1:1 and 2:1 layered aluminosilicate clays and sesquioxides, and were either obtained in pure form or synthesized in our laboratory. Colloids were deposited as thin films on glass slides, and then used for contact angle measurements using three different test liquids (water, formamide, diiodomethane). The colloidal films could be categorized into three types: (1) films without pores and with polar-liquid interactions (smectite), (2) films with pores and with polar-liquid interactions (kaolinite, illite, goethite), and (3) films without pores and no polar-liquid interactions (hematite). The static and dynamic sessile drop methods yielded the most consistent contact angles. For porous films, the contact angles decreased with time, and we consider the initial contact angle to be the most accurate. The differences in contact angles among the different methods were large and varied considerably: the most consistent contact angles were obtained for kaolinite with water, and illite with diiodomethane (contact angles were within 3 degrees); but mostly the differences ranged from 10 degrees to 40 degrees among the different methods. The thin-layer and column wicking methods were the least consistent methods.

  7. Static contact angle versus volume of distilled water drop on micro patterned surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Batichsheva Kseniya; Feoktistov Dmitriy; Ovchinikov Vladimir; Misyura Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Static contact angle was determined experimentally in the condition of wetting of polished and laser patterned surfaces of stainless steel substrates by distilled water drops with different volumes. In contrast with polished surface, the contact angle was found to depend on drop volume on micro patterned surfaces. In addition, the enhancement of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties was observed on laser patterned surfaces.

  8. Drop shape analysis for determination of dynamic contact angles by double sided elliptical fitting method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nis Korsgaard; Taboryski, Rafael J.

    2017-01-01

    Contact angle measurements are a fast and simple way to measure surface properties and is therefore widely used to measure surface energy and quantify wetting of a solid surface by a liquid substance. In common praxis contact angle measurements are done with sessile drops on a horizontal surface ...

  9. Contact Angles on a Soft Solid: From Young’s Law to Neumann’s Law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchand, A.; Das, S.; Snoeijer, J.H.; Andreotti, B.

    2012-01-01

    The contact angle that a liquid drop makes on a soft substrate does not obey the classical Young’s relation, since the solid is deformed elastically by the action of the capillary forces. The finite elasticity of the solid also renders the contact angles differently from those predicted by Neumann’s

  10. Contact angle hysteresis of cylindrical drops on chemically heterogeneous striped surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamatsu, Masao

    2006-05-15

    Contact angle hysteresis of a macroscopic droplet on a heterogeneous but flat substrate is studied using the interface displacement model. First, the apparent contact angle of a droplet on a heterogeneous surface under the condition of constant volume is considered. By assuming a cylindrical liquid-vapor surface (meniscus) and minimizing the total free energy, we derive an equation for the apparent contact angle, which is similar but different from the well-known Cassie's law. Next, using this modified Cassie's law as a guide to predict the behavior of a droplet on a heterogeneous striped surface, we examine several scenarios of contact angle hysteresis using a periodically striped surface model. By changing the volume of the droplet, we predict a sudden jump of the droplet edge, and a continuous change of the apparent contact angle at the edge of two stripes. Our results suggest that as drop volume is increased (advancing contact lines), the predominant drop configuration observed is the one whose contact angle is large; whereas, decreasing drop volume from a large value (receding contact lines) yields drop configuration that predominantly exhibit the smaller contact angle.

  11. Particle Separation inside a Sessile Droplet with Variable Contact Angle Using Surface Acoustic Waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destgeer, Ghulam; Jung, Jin Ho; Park, Jinsoo; Ahmed, Husnain; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2017-01-03

    A sessile droplet of water carrying polystyrene microparticles of different diameters was uniformly exposed to high frequency surface acoustic waves (SAWs) produced by an interdigitated transducer (IDT). We investigated the concentration behavior of the microparticles as the SAWs generated a strong acoustic streaming flow (ASF) inside the water droplet and exerted a direct acoustic radiation force (ARF) on the suspended particles, the magnitude of which depended upon the particle diameter. As a result of the ARF, the microparticles were concentrated according to their diameters at different positions inside the sessile droplet placed in the path of the SAW, right in front of the IDT. The microparticle concentration behavior changed as the sessile droplet contact angle with the substrate was varied by adding surfactant to the water or by gradually evaporating the water. The positions at which the smaller and larger microparticles were concentrated remained distinguishable, even at very different experimental conditions. The long-term exposure of the droplets to the SAWs was accompanied by the gradual evaporation of the carrier fluid, which dynamically changed the droplet contact angle as well as the concentration of particles. Complete evaporation of the fluid left behind several concentrated yet separated clusters of particles on the substrate surface. The effect of the droplet contact angle on particles' concentration behavior and consequent separation of particles has been uniquely studied in this SAW-based report.

  12. Apparent-contact-angle model at partial wetting and evaporation: Impact of surface forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeček, V.; Nikolayev, V. S.

    2013-01-01

    This theoretical and numerical study deals with evaporation of a fluid wedge in contact with its pure vapor. The model describes a regime where the continuous wetting film is absent and the actual line of the triple gas-liquid-solid contact appears. A constant temperature higher than the saturation temperature is imposed at the solid substrate. The fluid flow is solved in the lubrication approximation. The introduction of the surface forces in the case of the partial wetting is discussed. The apparent contact angle (the gas-liquid interface slope far from the contact line) is studied numerically as a function of the substrate superheating, contact line velocity, and parameters related to the solid-fluid interaction (Young and microscopic contact angles, Hamaker constant, etc.). The dependence of the apparent contact angle on the substrate temperature is in agreement with existing approaches. For water, the apparent contact angle may be 20∘ larger than the Young contact angle for 1 K superheating. The effect of the surface forces on the apparent contact angle is found to be weak.

  13. Simple Hydrostatic Model of Contact Angle Hysteresis of a Sessile Drop on Rough Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛在砂; 杨超; 陈家镛

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenon of hysteresis of contact angle is an important topic subject to a long time of argument.A simple hydrostatic model of sessile drops under the gravity in combination with an ideal surface roughness model is used to interpret the process of drop volume increase or decrease of a planar sessile drop and to shed light on the contact angle hysteresis and its relationship with the solid surface roughness. With this model, the advancing and receding contact angles are conceptually explained in terms of equilibrium contact angle and surface roughness only,without invoking the thermodynamic multiplicity. The model is found to be qualitatively consistent to experimental observations on contact angle hysteresis and it suggests a possible way to approach the hysteresis of three-dimensional sessile drops.

  14. Mechanism of contact angle saturation and an energy-based model for electrowetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Zhao; Zhong-Cheng, Liang

    2016-06-01

    Electrowetting, as a well-known approach to increasing droplet wettability on a solid surface by electrical bias, has broad applications. However, it is limited by contact angle saturation at large voltage. Although several debated hypotheses have been proposed to describe it, the physical origin of contact angle saturation still remains obscure. In this work, the physical factors responsible for the onset of contact angle saturation are explored, and the correlated theoretical models are established to characterize electrowetting behavior. Combination of the proper 3-phase system employed succeeds in dropping the saturating contact angle below 25°, and validates that the contact angle saturation is not a result of device-related imperfection. Project supported by the Fund from the Research Center of Optical Communications Engineering & Technology, Jiangsu Province, China (Grant No. ZSF0402).

  15. Indirect methods to measure wetting and contact angles on spherical convex and concave surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extrand, C W; Moon, Sung In

    2012-05-22

    In this work, a method was developed for indirectly estimating contact angles of sessile liquid drops on convex and concave surfaces. Assuming that drops were sufficiently small that no gravitational distortion occurred, equations were derived to compute intrinsic contact angles from the radius of curvature of the solid surface, the volume of the liquid drop, and its contact diameter. These expressions were tested against experimental data for various liquids on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and polycarbonate (PC) in the form of flat surfaces, spheres, and concave cavities. Intrinsic contact angles estimated indirectly using dimensions and volumes generally agreed with the values measured directly from flat surfaces using the traditional tangent method.

  16. The Effect of Contact Angle on Dynamics of Dry Spots Spreading in a Horizontal Layer of Liquid at Local Heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaitsev D.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of equilibrium contact angle on dynamics of dry spot spreading at disruption of a horizontal water layer heated locally from the substrate was studied using the high-speed Schlieren technique. Different methods of working surface processing were applied; this allowed variations of the equilibrium contact angle from 27±6° to 74±9° without a change in thermal properties of the system. It is found out that substrate wettability significantly affects the propagation velocity of dry spot and its final size. It is also found out that the velocity of contact line propagation is higher in the areas of substrate with a higher temperature.

  17. Estimation of bearing contact angle in-situ by X-ray kinematography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, P. H.; Manders, F.

    1982-01-01

    The mounted, preloaded contact angle of the structural bearings in the assembled design mechanical assembly was measured. A modification of the Turns method is presented, based upon the clarity and definition of moving parts achieved with X-ray technique and cinematic display. Contact angle is estimated by counting the number of bearings passing a given point as a function of number of turns of the shaft. Ball and pitch diameter variations are discussed. Ball train and shaft angle uncertainties are also discussed.

  18. Drop deposition on surfaces with contact-angle hysteresis: Liquid-bridge stability and breakup

    OpenAIRE

    Akbari, Amir; Hill, Reghan J.

    2015-01-01

    We study the stability and breakup of liquid bridges with a free contact line on a surface with contact-angle hysteresis under zero-gravity conditions. Theoretical predictions of the stability limits are validated by experimental measurements. Experiments are conducted in a water-methanol-silicon oil system where the gravity force is offset by buoyancy. We highlight cases where stability is lost during the transition from a pinned-pinned to pinned-free interface when the receding contact angl...

  19. Comparing contact angle measurements and surface tension assessments of solid surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cwikel, Dory; Zhao, Qi; Liu, Chen; Su, Xueju; Marmur, Abraham

    2010-10-05

    Four types of contact angles (receding, most stable, advancing, and "static") were measured by two independent laboratories for a large number of solid surfaces, spanning a large range of surface tensions. It is shown that the most stable contact angle, which is theoretically required for calculating the Young contact angle, is a practical, useful tool for wettability characterization of solid surfaces. In addition, it is shown that the experimentally measured most stable contact angle may not always be approximated by an average angle calculated from the advancing and receding contact angles. The "static" CA is shown in many cases to be very different from the most stable one. The measured contact angles were used for calculating the surface tensions of the solid samples by five methods. Meaningful differences exist among the surface tensions calculated using four previously known methods (Owens-Wendt, Wu, acid-base, and equation of state). A recently developed, Gibbsian-based correlation between interfacial tensions and individual surface tensions was used to calculate the surface tensions of the solid surfaces from the most stable contact angle of water. This calculation yielded in most cases higher values than calculated with the other four methods. On the basis of some low surface energy samples, the higher values appear to be justified.

  20. Stability limits of capillary bridges: How contact angle hysteresis affects morphology transitions of liquid microstructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiter, de Riëlle; Semprebon, C.; Gorcum, van M.; Duits, M.H.G.; Brinkmann, M.; Mugele, F.

    2015-01-01

    The equilibrium shape of a drop in contact with solid surfaces can undergo continuous or discontinuous transitions upon changes in either drop volume or surface energies. In many instances, such transitions involve the motion of the three-phase contact line and are thus sensitive to contact angle hy

  1. Influence of Contact Angle, Growth Angle and Melt Surface Tension on Detached Solidification of InSb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yazhen; Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.

    2000-01-01

    We extended the previous analysis of detached solidification of InSb based on the moving meniscus model. We found that for steady detached solidification to occur in a sealed ampoule in zero gravity, it is necessary for the growth angle to exceed a critical value, the contact angle for the melt on the ampoule wall to exceed a critical value, and the melt-gas surface tension to be below a critical value. These critical values would depend on the material properties and the growth parameters. For the conditions examined here, the sum of the growth angle and the contact angle must exceed approximately 130, which is significantly less than required if both ends of the ampoule are open.

  2. An index for diagnosing infant hip dysplasia using 3-D ultrasound: the acetabular contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabee, Myles G; Hareendranathan, Abhilash Rakkunedeth; Thompson, Richard B; Dulai, Sukhdeep; Jaremko, Jacob L

    2016-06-01

    Developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) is a common condition that is highly treatable in infancy but can lead to the lifelong morbidity of premature osteoarthritis if left untreated. Current diagnostic methods lack reliability, which may be improved by using 3-D ultrasound. Conventional 2-D US assessment of DDH has limitations, including high inter-scan variability. We quantified DDH on 3-D US using the acetabular contact angle (ACA), a property of the 3-D acetabular shape. We assessed ACA reliability and diagnostic utility. We prospectively collected data from January 2013 to December 2014, including 114 hips in 85 children divided into three clinical diagnostic groups: (1) normal, (2) initially borderline but ultimately normal without treatment and (3) dysplastic requiring treatment. Using custom software, two observers each traced acetabula twice on two 3-D US scans of each hip, enabling automated generation of 3-D surface models and ACA calculation. We computed inter-observer and inter-scan variability of repeatability coefficients and generated receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The 3-D US acetabular contact angle was reproduced 95% of the time within 6° in the same scan and within 9° in different scans of the same hip, vs. 9° and 14° for the 2-D US alpha angle (P dysplasia of the hip were 0.954 for ACA and 0.927 for alpha angle. The 3-D US ACA was significantly more reliable than 2-D US alpha angle, and the 3-D US measurement predicted the presence of DDH with slightly higher accuracy. The ACA therefore shows promising initial diagnostic utility. Our findings call for further study of 3-D US in the diagnosis and longer-term follow-up of infant hip dysplasia.

  3. Contact Angle Hysteresis on Graphene Surfaces and Hysteresis-free Behavior on Oil-infused Graphite Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Cyuan-Jhang; Li, Yueh-Feng [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China); Woon, Wei-Yen [Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China); Sheng, Yu-Jane, E-mail: yjsheng@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Tsao, Heng-Kwong, E-mail: hktsao@cc.ncu.edu.tw [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli 320, Taiwan (China)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Contact angle hysteresis(CAH) on four graphitic surfacesisinvestigated. • The hysteresis loopof water drops on the polished graphite sheetshowsparticularly small receding contact angle. • The significant CAH observed on CVD graphene and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite is attributed mainly to adhesion hysteresis. • An oil-infused surface of a graphite sheet is produced by imbibition of hexadecane into its porous structure. • The hysteresis-free property for water drops on such a surface is examined and quantitatively explained. - Abstract: Contact angle hysteresis (CAH) on graphitic surfaces, including chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene, reduced electrophoretic deposition (EPD) graphene, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), and polished graphite sheet, has been investigated. The hysteresis loops of water drops on the first three samples are similar but the receding contact angle is particularly small for the polished graphite sheet.The significant CAH observed on CVD graphene and HOPG associated with atom-scale roughness has to be attributed mainly to adhesion hysteresis (surface relaxation), instead of roughness or defects.The difference of the wetting behavior among those four graphitic samples has been further demonstrated by hexadecane drops. On the surface of HOPG or CVD graphene,the contact line expands continuously with time, indicating total wetting for which the contact angle does not exist and contact line pinning disappears. In contrast, on the surface of reduced EPD graphene, spontaneous spreading is halted by spikes on it and partial wetting with small contact angle (θ≈4°) is obtained. On the surface of polished graphite sheet, the superlipophilicity and porous structure are demonstrated by imbibition and capillary rise of hexadecane. Consequently, an oil-infused graphite surface can be fabricated and the ultralow CAH of water (∆θ≈2°) is achieved.

  4. Phagocytosis and hydrophobicity: a method of calculating contact angles based on the diameter of sessile drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, C; Sunqvist, T

    1981-01-01

    The correlation between the contact angle and degree of phagocytosis of different yeast particles has been investigated. To facilitate the estimation of the contact angle, we have tested the hypothesis that the shape of a small liquid drop put on a flat surface is that of a truncated sphere. By making this approximation it is possible to calculate the contact angle, i.e. the tangent to the drop in the 3-phase liquid/solid/air meeting point, by measuring the drop diameter. Known volumes of saline were put on different surfaces and the diameters of the drops were measured from above. Calculation of the contact angle with drops of different volumes, and comparison between expected and measured height of 10 microl drops, indicated that the assumption that the shape of a drop is that of a truncated sphere is valid. Monolayers of leukocytes was shown to give rise to a contact angle of 17.9 degrees. Particles with a lower contact angle than the phagocytic cells resisted phagocytosis, but opsonization of the particles with normal human serum rendered them susceptible to phagocytosis, conferring a higher contact angle than that of the phagocytic cells.

  5. Simultaneous Soft Sensing of Tissue Contact Angle and Force for Millimeter-scale Medical Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabagi, Veaceslav; Gosline, Andrew; Wood, Robert J; Dupont, Pierre E

    2013-01-01

    A novel robotic sensor is proposed to measure both the contact angle and the force acting between the tip of a surgical robot and soft tissue. The sensor is manufactured using a planar lithography process that generates microchannels that are subsequently filled with a conductive liquid. The planar geometry is then molded onto a hemispherical plastic scaffolding in a geometric configuration enabling estimation of the contact angle (angle between robot tip tangent and tissue surface normal) by the rotation of the sensor around its roll axis. Contact force can also be estimated by monitoring the changes in resistance in each microchannel. Bench top experimental results indicate that, on average, the sensor can estimate the angle of contact to within ±2° and the contact force to within ±5.3 g.

  6. Contact angle and droplet heat transfer during evaporation on structured and smooth surfaces of heated wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misyura, S. Y.

    2017-08-01

    Water evaporation in a wide range of droplet diameters and wall temperatures on the structured and smooth surfaces were studied experimentally. Linear dependence of evaporation rate (dV/dt) on a droplet radius varies when the volume is greater than 40-60 μl. The static contact angles on the structured surface vary with a droplet diameter for high wall superheating. Dependence of the contact angle on diameter for the corrugated surface is defined by a change in both potential energy barrier U and three-phase contact line tension τcl. This energy barrier for the structured wall changes with an increase in the initial droplet diameter and becomes constant for the large droplets. For high wall superheating, the power in the law of evaporation increases from 1 to 1.45 with an increase in the initial droplet diameter. Depending on the droplet radius, number of droplets and heater length, four different characters of evaporation are realized. Complete droplet evaporation time on structured surface is less than smooth wall. Heat transfer coefficient is greater for structured wall than smooth one. When simulating droplet evaporation and heat transfer, it is necessary to take into account free convection of air and vapor.

  7. Measuring contact angle and meniscus shape with a reflected laser beam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibach, T F; Fell, D; Nguyen, H; Butt, H J; Auernhammer, G K

    2014-01-01

    Side-view imaging of the contact angle between an extended planar solid surface and a liquid is problematic. Even when aligning the view perfectly parallel to the contact line, focusing one point of the contact line is not possible. We describe a new measurement technique for determining contact angles with the reflection of a widened laser sheet on a moving contact line. We verified this new technique measuring the contact angle on a cylinder, rotating partially immersed in a liquid. A laser sheet is inclined under an angle φ to the unperturbed liquid surface and is reflected off the meniscus. Collected on a screen, the reflection image contains information to determine the contact angle. When dividing the laser sheet into an array of laser rays by placing a mesh into the beam path, the shape of the meniscus can be reconstructed from the reflection image. We verified the method by measuring the receding contact angle versus speed for aqueous cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide solutions on a smooth hydrophobized as well as on a rough polystyrene surface.

  8. Applicability of Washburn capillary rise for determining contact angles of powders/porous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirdponpattara, Suchata; Phisalaphong, Muenduen; Newby, Bi-min Zhang

    2013-05-01

    The Washburn capillary rise (WCR) technique has been widely utilized for determining contact angles of powders or porous materials; however, there are concerns regarding powder size and powder packing, especially for materials that exhibit large contact angle hysteresis. In this paper, some of these concerns were addressed. Due to the large water contact angle hysteresis on flat nylon 6/6 films, these films were ground into powders of different sizes and then used as model packing materials. The powders were packed in glass tubes to result in various packing structures that affected the penetration (i.e. advancing) rate of the test liquids. While all advancing contact angles obtained from WCR were found to be overestimated, more reasonable values were resulted when relatively large powders (e.g. 500-2000 μm) were used to pack the tubes. With larger powders, the packing contained bigger voids and consequently lead to slower penetration rates of the liquids, hence a relatively smaller advancing contact angle. The smaller advancing contact angle obtained from the slower advancing rate was also observed by using the sessile drop method. To verify the applicability of using large powders (500-2000 μm) for contact angle determination by using WCR, the advancing water contact angles of a bacterial cellulose/alginate composite sponge (BCA) with and without UV/ozone treatment were measured. The results showed that by using relatively large powders, WCR could be applied to obtain a reasonable advancing contact angle and assess the wettability change of complex porous materials.

  9. A refractive tilting-plate technique for measurement of dynamic contact angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedley, Gregory T; Coles, Donald E

    2005-06-01

    The contact angle is a critical parameter in liquid interface dynamics ranging from liquid spreading on a solid surface on earth to liquid motion in partially filled containers in space. A refractive tilting-plate technique employing a scanning laser beam is developed to conduct an experimental study of a moving contact line, with the intention of making accurate measurements of the contact angle. The technique shows promise as an accurate and potentially fully automated means to determine the velocity dependence of the contact angle at the intersection of the interface between two transparent fluids with a transparent solid surface. Ray tracing calculations are included to reinforce the measurement concept. The principal experiments were conducted at speeds ranging from 0.05 to 1.00 mm/s, both advancing and receding, using an immiscible liquid pair (nonane/formamide) in contact with glass. The contact angle was found to depend for practical purposes only on the sign of the velocity and not on its magnitude for the range of velocities studied. Other observations revealed a bimodal behavior of the contact line that depends on which liquid first contacts the glass, with resulting drift in the dynamic contact angle with time.

  10. Wetting properties of AFM probes by means of contact angle measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Zhenhua; Bhushan, Bharat

    2006-09-01

    An atomic force microscopy (AFM) based technique was developed to measure the wetting properties of probe tips. By advancing and receding the AFM tip across the water surface, the meniscus force between the tip and the liquid was measured at the tip-water separation. The water contact angle was determined from the meniscus force. The obtained contact angle results were compared with that by the sessile drop method. It was found that the AFM based technique provided higher contact angle values than the sessile drop method. The mechanisms responsible for the difference are discussed.

  11. Considering Hydrophobicity via Contact Angle Stability of Organic Thiols Measured with a Homemade Goniometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraly, Mark; Ollander, Brooke; Statman, Ariel; Poynor, Adele

    2014-03-01

    When water meets an extended hydrophobic surface, an ultra-thin, low-density depletion layer is expected at the interface. Exactly how the depletion layer changes with change in hydrophobicity is still an open question. An accurate measure of contact angle is essential in determining how water meets a hydrophobic surface. Utilizing a homemade goniometer with ImageJ software we investigate the stability of self-assembled organic thiol monolayers, 1-octadecanethiol (ODT) and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA). We report the changes in contact angle due to exposure to air, water, and ethanol. Other factors that affect contact angles were also considered in our investigation.

  12. How pinning and contact angle hysteresis govern quasi-static liquid drop transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H; Tang, T; Zhao, H; Law, K-Y; Amirfazli, A

    2016-02-21

    This paper presents both experimental and numerical simulations of liquid transfer between two solid surfaces with contact angle hysteresis (CAH). Systematic studies on the role of the advancing contact angle (θa), receding contact angle (θr) and CAH in determining the transfer ratio (volume of the liquid transferred onto the acceptor surface over the total liquid volume) and the maximum adhesion force (Fmax) were performed. The transfer ratio was found to be governed by contact line pinning at the end of the transfer process caused by CAH of surfaces. A map based on θr of the two surfaces was generated to identify the three regimes for liquid transfer: (I) contact line pinning occurs only on the donor surface, (II) contact line pinning occurs on both surfaces, and (III) contact line pinning occurs only on the acceptor surface. With this map, an empirical equation is provided which is able to estimate the transfer ratio by only knowing θr of the two surfaces. The value of Fmax is found to be strongly influenced by the contact line pinning in the early stretching stage. For symmetric liquid bridges between two identical surfaces, Fmax may be determined only by θa, only by θr, or by both θa and θr, depending on the magnitude of the contact angles. For asymmetric bridges, Fmax is found to be affected by the period when contact lines are pinned on both surfaces.

  13. Stability Limits of Capillary Bridges: How Contact Angle Hysteresis Affects Morphology Transitions of Liquid Microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Riëlle; Semprebon, Ciro; van Gorcum, Mathijs; Duits, Michèl H G; Brinkmann, Martin; Mugele, Frieder

    2015-06-12

    The equilibrium shape of a drop in contact with solid surfaces can undergo continuous or discontinuous transitions upon changes in either drop volume or surface energies. In many instances, such transitions involve the motion of the three-phase contact line and are thus sensitive to contact angle hysteresis. Using a combination of electrowetting-based experiments and numerical calculations, we demonstrate for a generic sphere-plate confinement geometry how contact angle hysteresis affects the mechanical stability of competing axisymmetric and nonaxisymmetric drop conformations and qualitatively changes the character of transitions between them.

  14. Superhydrophobic polyethylcyanoacrylate coatings. Contact area with water measured by Raman spectral images, contact angle and Cassie-Baxter model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonugli, L O; dos Santos, M V Puydinger; de Souza, E F; Teschke, O

    2012-12-15

    Apolar fibers wired into a mesh-like microstructure forming a coating with a contact angle larger than 160° and fabricated by polycyanoacrylate polymerization are described. Interconnected fibers with diameters measuring approximately 5 μm are formed by texturized linear or folded nanowires. The structure forming the deposited film occupies ~1.5% of the coating's top geometric area. This value agrees with the water/coating contact area given by the Cassie-Baxter contact-angle model (~1.5%). The spatial distribution of the surface in contact with water was determined by Raman spectral imaging (~1.5%) using the polycyanoacrylate lines and by scanning electron microscopy (~2.0%).

  15. Contact angle dynamics in droplets impacting on flat surfaces with different wetting characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Ilker S.; Megaridis, Constantine M.

    2006-07-01

    An experimental study is presented on contact angle dynamics during spreading/recoiling of mm-sized water droplets impacting orthogonally on various surfaces with We {=} O(0.1)-O(10), Ca {=} O(0.001)-O(0.01), Re {=} O(100)-O(1000), Oh {=} O(0.001) and Bo {=} O(0.1). In this impact regime, inertial, viscous and capillary phenomena act in unison to influence contact angle dynamics. The wetting properties of the target surfaces range from wettable to non-wettable. The experiments feature accelerating and decelerating wetting lines, capillary surface waves in the early impact stages, contact angle hysteresis, and droplet rebound under non-wetting conditions. The objective of the work is to provide insight into the dynamic behaviour of the apparent (macroscopic) contact angle theta and its dependence on contact line velocity V_{scriptsizeCL} at various degrees of surface wetting. By correlating the temporal behaviours of theta and V_{scriptsizeCL}, the angle vs. speed relationship is established for each case examined. The results reveal that surface wettability has a critical influence on dynamic contact angle behaviour. The hydrodynamic wetting theory of Cox (J. Fluid Mech. vol. 357, 1998, p. 249) and the molecular-kinetic theory of wetting by Blake & Haynes (J. Colloid Interface Sci.) vol. 30, 1969, p. 421) are implemented to extract values of the corresponding microscopic wetting parameters required to match the experimentally observed theta vs. V_{scriptsizeCL} data. Application of hydrodynamic theory indicates that in the slow stage of forced spreading the slip length and the microscopic contact angle should be contact line velocity dependent. The hydrodynamic theory performs well during kinematic (fast) spreading, in which solid/liquid interactions are weak. Application of the molecular kinetic theory yields physically reasonable molecular wetting parameters, which, however, vary with impact conditions. The results indicate that even for a single liquid there is

  16. Characterization of the Intrinsic Water Wettability of Graphite Using Contact Angle Measurements: Effect of Defects on Static and Dynamic Contact Angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozbial, Andrew; Trouba, Charlie; Liu, Haitao; Li, Lei

    2017-01-31

    Elucidating the intrinsic water wettability of the graphitic surface has increasingly attracted research interests, triggered by the recent finding that the well-established hydrophobicity of graphitic surfaces actually results from airborne hydrocarbon contamination. Currently, static water contact angle (WCA) is often used to characterize the intrinsic water wettability of graphitic surfaces. In the current paper, we show that because of the existence of defects, static WCA does not necessarily characterize the intrinsic water wettability. Freshly exfoliated graphite of varying qualities, characterized using atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, was studied using static, advancing, and receding WCA measurements. The results showed that graphite of different qualities (i.e., defect density) always has a similar advancing WCA, but it could have very different static and receding WCAs. This finding indicates that defects play an important role in contact angle measurements, and the static contact angle does not always represent the intrinsic water wettability of pristine graphite. On the basis of the experimental results, a qualitative model is proposed to explain the effect of defects on static, advancing, and receding contact angles. The model suggests that the advancing WCA reflects the intrinsic water wettability of pristine (defect-free) graphite. Our results showed that the advancing WCA for pristine graphite is 68.6°, which indicates that graphitic carbon is intrinsically mildly hydrophilic.

  17. The Interpretation of Dynamic Contact Angles Measured by the Wilhelmy Plate Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramé

    1997-01-01

    We present an analysis for properly interpreting apparent dynamic contact angles measured using the Wilhelmy plate method at low capillary numbers, Ca. This analysis removes the ambiguity in current dynamic measurements which interpret data with the same formula as static measurements. We properly account for all forces, including viscous forces, acting on the plate as it moves into or out of a liquid bath. Our main result, valid at O(1) as Ca --> 0, relates the apparent dynamic contact angle to material-dependent, geometry-independent parameters necessary for describing dynamic wetting of a system. The special case of the apparent contact angle = pi/2 was solved to O(Ca). This O(Ca) solution can guide numerical work necessary for higher Ca's and arbitrary values of the apparent contact angle. These results make the Wilhelmy plate a viable method for determining material parameters for dynamic spreading.

  18. An analytical solution for determination of small contact angles from sessile drops of arbitrary size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jeffrey S

    2003-05-15

    An analytical solution to the capillary equation of Young and Laplace is derived that allows determination of the static contact angle based on the volume of a sessile drop and the wetted area of the substrate. This solution does not require numerical integration to determine the drop profile and accounts for surface deformation due to gravitational effects. Calculation of the static contact angle by this method is remarkably simple and accurate when the contact angle is less than 30 degrees. A natural scaling arises in the solution, which provides indication of when a drop is small enough so as to neglect gravitational influences on the surface shape which, for small contact angles, is generally less than 1 microl. The technique described has the simplicity of the spherical cap approximation but remains accurate for any size of sessile drop.

  19. Wettability Control of Gold Surfaces Modified with Benzenethiol Derivatives: Water Contact Angle and Thermal Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatara, Shingo; Kuzumoto, Yasutaka; Kitamura, Masatoshi

    2016-04-01

    The water wettability of Au surfaces has been controlled using various benzenethiol derivatives including 4-methylbenzenethiol, pentafluorobenzenethiol, 4-flubrobenzenethiol, 4-methoxy-benzenethiol, 4-nitrobenzenethiol, and 4-hydroxybenzenethiol. The water contact angle of the Au surface modified with the benzenethiol derivative was found to vary in the wide range of 30.9° to 88.3°. The contact angle of the modified Au films annealed was also measured in order to investigate their thermal stability. The change in the contact angle indicated that the modified surface is stable at temperatures below about 400 K. Meanwhile, the activation energy of desorption from the modified surface was estimated from the change in the contact angle. The modified Au surface was also examined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  20. The rose petal effect and the role of advancing water contact angles for drop confinement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandsberg, Nikolaj Kofoed; Taboryski, Rafael J.

    2017-01-01

    We studied the role of advancing water contact angles on superhydrophobic surfaces that exhibited strong pinning effects as known in nature from rose petals. Textured surfaces were engineered in silicon by lithographical techniques. The textures were comprised of hexagonal microstructures...

  1. Contact angles on a soft solid: from Young's law to Neumann's law

    CERN Document Server

    Marchand, Antonin; Snoeijer, Jacco H; Andreotti, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    The contact angle that a liquid drop makes on a soft substrate does not obey the classical Young's relation, since the solid is deformed elastically by the action of the capillary forces. The finite elasticity of the solid also renders the contact angles different from that predicted by Neumann's law, which applies when the drop is floating on another liquid. Here we derive an elasto-capillary model for contact angles on a soft solid, by coupling a mean-field model for the molecular interactions to elasticity. We demonstrate that the limit of vanishing elastic modulus yields Neumann's law or a slight variation thereof, depending on the force transmission in the solid surface layer. The change in contact angle from the rigid limit (Young) to the soft limit (Neumann) appears when the length scale defined by the ratio of surface tension to elastic modulus $\\gamma/E$ reaches a few molecular sizes.

  2. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of apparent slip and contact angle in hydrophobic micro-channels

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Renliang; Gao, Guohua; Wang, Xinliang; Ding, Weipeng; Gong, Wei

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we applied the Shan-Chen multiphase Lattice Boltzmann method to simulate two different parameters, contact angle (a static parameter) and slip length (a dynamic parameter), and we proposed a relationship between them by fitting those numerical simulation results. By changing the values of the strength of interaction between fluid particles (SIF) and the strength of interaction between fluid and solid surface (SIFS), we simulated a series of contact angles and slip lengths. Our numerical simulation results show that both SIF and SIFS have little effects on the relationship between contact angle and slip length. Using the proposed relationship between slip length and contact angle, we further derived an equation to determine the upper limit of nano-particles' diameter under which drag-reduction can be achieved when using nano-particles adsorbing method.

  3. Nonlocal hydrodynamic influence on the dynamic contact angle: slip models versus experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark C T; Summers, Jonathan L; Shikhmurzaev, Yulii D; Clarke, Andrew; Blake, Terence D

    2006-04-01

    Experiments reported by Blake [Phys. Fluids., 11, 1995 (1999)] suggest that the dynamic contact angle formed between the free surface of a liquid and a moving solid boundary at a fixed contact-line speed depends on the flow field and geometry near the moving contact line. We examine quantitatively whether or not it is possible to attribute this effect to the bending of the free surface due to hydrodynamic stresses acting upon it and hence interpret the results in terms of the so-called "apparent" contact angle. It is shown that this is not the case. Numerical analysis of the problem demonstrates that, at the spatial resolution reported in the experiments, the variations of the "apparent" contact angle (defined in two different ways) caused by variations in the flow field, at a fixed contact-line speed, are too small to account for the observed effect. The results clearly indicate that the actual (macroscopic) dynamic contact angle--i.e., the one used in fluid mechanics as a boundary condition for the equation determining the free surface shape--must be regarded as dependent not only on the contact-line speed but also on the flow field and geometry in the vicinity of the moving contact line.

  4. Nanoscale fluid structure of liquid-solid-vapour contact lines for a wide range of contact angles

    CERN Document Server

    Nold, Andreas; Goddard, Benjamin D; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2015-01-01

    We study the nanoscale behaviour of the density of a simple fluid in the vicinity of an equilibrium contact line for a wide range of Young contact angles between 40 and 135 degrees. Cuts of the density profile at various positions along the contact line are presented, unravelling the apparent step-wise increase of the film height profile observed in contour plots of the density. The density profile is employed to compute the normal pressure acting on the substrate along the contact line. We observe that for the full range of contact angles, the maximal normal pressure cannot solely be predicted by the curvature of the adsorption film height, but is instead softened -- likely by the width of the liquid-vapour interface. Somewhat surprisingly however, the adsorption film height profile can be predicted to a very good accuracy by the Derjaguin-Frumkin disjoining pressure obtained from planar computations, as was first shown in [Nold et al., Phys. Fluids, 26, 072001, 2014] for contact angles less than 90 degrees,...

  5. Contact Angle Hysteresis on Graphene Surfaces and Hysteresis-free Behavior on Oil-infused Graphite Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cyuan-Jhang; Li, Yueh-Feng; Woon, Wei-Yen; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2016-11-01

    Contact angle hysteresis (CAH) on graphitic surfaces, including chemical vapor deposition (CVD) graphene, reduced electrophoretic deposition (EPD) graphene, highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG), and polished graphite sheet, has been investigated. The hysteresis loops of water drops on the first three samples are similar but the receding contact angle is particularly small for the polished graphite sheet.The significant CAH observed on CVD graphene and HOPG associated with atom-scale roughness has to be attributed mainly to adhesion hysteresis (surface relaxation), instead of roughness or defects.The difference of the wetting behavior among those four graphitic samples has been further demonstrated by hexadecane drops. On the surface of HOPG or CVD graphene,the contact line expands continuously with time, indicating total wetting for which the contact angle does not exist and contact line pinning disappears. In contrast, on the surface of reduced EPD graphene, spontaneous spreading is halted by spikes on it and partial wetting with small contact angle (θ≈4°) is obtained. On the surface of polished graphite sheet, the superlipophilicity and porous structure are demonstrated by imbibition and capillary rise of hexadecane. Consequently, an oil-infused graphite surface can be fabricated and the ultralow CAH of water (∆θ≈2°) is achieved.

  6. Surface properties of dental polymers: measurements of contact angles, roughness and fluoride release

    OpenAIRE

    Fátima Namen; João Galan Jr.; José Farias de Oliveira; Rodrigo Derossi Cabreira; Silva Filho,Fernando Costa e; Alex Balduino Souza; Gustavo de Deus

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Earlier studies on some dental materials measured roughness and/or contact angles or fluoride release separately. In the present study, five dental polymers were investigated to ascertain their contact angles, wettability, roughness, and fluoride release in dry or wet conditions. METHODS: Samples for 5 materials were prepared and stored dry or wet in deionized water pH 6.8. Samples were submitted to finishing/polishing procedures, and the measurements in Goniometer, roughness (µm) ...

  7. Static contact angle versus volume of distilled water drop on micro patterned surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batichsheva Kseniya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Static contact angle was determined experimentally in the condition of wetting of polished and laser patterned surfaces of stainless steel substrates by distilled water drops with different volumes. In contrast with polished surface, the contact angle was found to depend on drop volume on micro patterned surfaces. In addition, the enhancement of both hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties was observed on laser patterned surfaces.

  8. Dynamic contact angle of a liquid spreading on an unsaturated wettable porous substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Shikhmurzaev, Y. D.; Sprittles, J. E.

    2012-01-01

    The spreading of an incompressible viscous liquid over an isotropic homogeneous unsaturated porous substrate is considered. It is shown that, unlike the dynamic wetting of an impermeable solid substrate, where the dynamic contact angle has to be specified as a boundary condition in terms of the wetting velocity and other flow characteristics, the `effective' dynamic contact angle on an unsaturated porous substrate is completely determined by the requirement of existence of a solution, i.e. th...

  9. A review of factors that affect contact angle and implications for flotation practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, T T; Bruckard, W J; Koh, P T L; Nguyen, A V

    2009-09-30

    Contact angle and the wetting behaviour of solid particles are influenced by many physical and chemical factors such as surface roughness and heterogeneity as well as particle shape and size. A significant amount of effort has been invested in order to probe the correlation between these factors and surface wettability. Some of the key investigations reported in the literature are reviewed here. It is clear from the papers reviewed that, depending on many experimental conditions such as the size of the surface heterogeneities and asperities, surface cleanliness, and the resolution of measuring equipment and data interpretation, obtaining meaningful contact angle values is extremely difficult and such values are reliant on careful experimental control. Surface wetting behaviour depends on not only surface texture (roughness and particle shape), and surface chemistry (heterogeneity) but also on hydrodynamic conditions in the preparation route. The inability to distinguish the effects of each factor may be due to the interplay and/or overlap of two or more factors in each system. From this review, it was concluded that: Surface geometry (and surface roughness of different scales) can be used to tune the contact angle; with increasing surface roughness the apparent contact angle decreases for hydrophilic materials and increases for hydrophobic materials. For non-ideal surfaces, such as mineral surfaces in the flotation process, kinetics plays a more important role than thermodynamics in dictating wettability. Particle size encountered in flotation (10-200 microm) showed no significant effect on contact angle but has a strong effect on flotation rate constant. There is a lack of a rigid quantitative correlation between factors affecting wetting, wetting behaviour and contact angle on minerals; and hence their implication for flotation process. Specifically, universal correlation of contact angle to flotation recovery is still difficult to predict from first principles

  10. Prediction of static contact angles on the basis of molecular forces and adsorption data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, M. Elena; Savage, Michael D.; Cerro, Ramon L.

    2016-08-01

    At a three-phase contact line, a liquid bulk phase is in contact with and coexists with a very thin layer of adsorbed molecules. This adsorbed film in the immediate vicinity of a liquid wedge modifies the balance of forces between the liquid and solid phases such that, when included in the balance of forces, a quantitative relationship emerges between the adsorbed film thickness and the static contact angle. This relationship permits the prediction of static contact angles from molecular forces and equilibrium adsorption data by means of quantities that are physically meaningful and measurable. For n-alkanes on polytetrafluoroethylene, for which there are experimental data available on adsorption and contact angles, our computations show remarkable agreement with the data. The results obtained are an improvement on previously published calculations—particularly for alkanes with a low number of carbon atoms, for which adsorption is significant.

  11. The estimation of dynamic contact angle of ultra-hydrophobic surfaces using inclined surface and impinging droplet methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasikova Darina

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of industrial technology also brings with optimized surface quality, particularly where there is contact with food. Application ultra-hydrophobic surface significantly reduces the growth of bacteria and facilitates cleaning processes. Testing and evaluation of surface quality are used two methods: impinging droplet and inclined surface method optimized with high speed shadowgraphy, which give information about dynamic contact angle. This article presents the results of research into new methods of measuring ultra-hydrophobic patented technology.

  12. Assessing the accuracy of contact angle measurements for sessile drops on liquid-repellent surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Siddarth; McKinley, Gareth H; Cohen, Robert E

    2011-11-15

    Gravity-induced sagging can amplify variations in goniometric measurements of the contact angles of sessile drops on super-liquid-repellent surfaces. The very large value of the effective contact angle leads to increased optical noise in the drop profile near the solid-liquid free surface and the progressive failure of simple geometric approximations. We demonstrate a systematic approach to determining the effective contact angle of drops on super-repellent surfaces. We use a perturbation solution of the Bashforth-Adams equation to estimate the contact angles of sessile drops of water, ethylene glycol, and diiodomethane on an omniphobic surface using direct measurements of the maximum drop width and height. The results and analysis can be represented in terms of a dimensionless Bond number that depends on the maximum drop width and the capillary length of the liquid to quantify the extent of gravity-induced sagging. Finally, we illustrate the inherent sensitivity of goniometric contact angle measurement techniques to drop dimensions as the apparent contact angle approaches 180°.

  13. Characterization of spreadability of nonaqueous ethylcellulose gel matrices using dynamic contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Keat Theng; Chan, Lai Wah; Heng, Paul W S

    2008-08-01

    This study reports the characterization of spreadability of nonaqueous ethylcellulose (EC) gel matrices intended for topical drug delivery using a newly developed method based on dynamic contact angle. EC solutions were prepared using three grades of EC and propylene glycol dicaprylate/dicaprate. Dynamic contact angles of sessile drops of EC solutions on silicone elastomer were measured using a dynamic contact angle analyzer equipped with axisymmetric drop shape analysis-profile. Roughness of silicone elastomer, viscosity of EC solutions and compressibility of semisolid EC gels were determined by the atomic force microscope, cone-and-plate rheometer and tensile tester, respectively. The silicone elastomer employed as a substrate was demonstrated to have similar hydrophilic/lipophilic properties as the human skin. Spreadability of EC solutions was dependent on EC concentration, polymeric chain length and polydispersity. EC gel spreadability was governed by viscosity and the extent of gel-substrate interaction. From the apparent contact angle values, most EC gel formulations tested were found to be moderately spreadable. Linear correlation observed between spreading parameter and compressibility of EC gel verified the applicability of dynamic contact angle to characterize EC gel spreadability. Thus, the feasibility of employing dynamic contact angle as an alternative technique to measure gel spreadability was demonstrated. The spreadability demonstrated by EC gel would facilitate application on the skin indicating its potential usefulness as a topical dosage form.

  14. Contact angle goniometry on single micron-scale fibers for composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Daniel; Bomholt, Niels; Jeppesen, Jonas Camillus; Simonsen, Adam Cohen

    2017-01-01

    Probing the wetting properties of microfibers by polymer resins is of significant interest for the rational design of composite materials. Here, we demonstrate the measurement of contact angles on wetted micron scale fibers by imaging the fluid meniscus with telecentric optics at a spatial resolution of 4 μm followed by automated image analysis. The meniscus is described as a catenary in the zero gravity approximation and by fitting this to the measured profile, the contact angle is obtained at the intersection between the fluid and the fiber surface. The method is validated by measuring agreement between contact angles for the PMMA/H2O system for fibers with diameters 20-800 μm and for sessile drops. The ability of the method to discriminate contact angles for a series of commercial glass fibers against epoxy resin is successfully demonstrated. AFM imaging shows that the surface topography of the fibers does not have a simple relationship with the variation in contact angles. Contact angle goniometry by imaging of micron scale fibers appears as a viable alternative to Wilhelmy type measurements and the measurement principle could readily be extended to dynamic wetting experiments.

  15. Is a Knowledge of Surface Topology and Contact Angles Enough to Define the Drop Impact Outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavasi, Ileana; Veronesi, Federico; Caldarelli, Aurora; Zani, Maurizio; Raimondo, Mariarosa; Marengo, Marco

    2016-06-28

    It is well known that a superhydrophobic surface may not be able to repel impacting droplets because of the so-called Cassie-to-Wenzel transition. It has been proven that a critical value of the receding contact angle (θR) exists for the complete rebound of water, recently experimentally measured to be 100° for a large range of impact velocities. On the contrary, in the present work, no rebound was observed when low-surface-tension liquids such as hexadecane (σ = 27.5 mN/m at 25 °C) are concerned, even for very low impact velocities and very high values of θR and low contact angle hysteresis. Therefore, the critical threshold of θR ≈ 100° does not sound acceptable for all liquids and for all hydrophobic surfaces. For the same Weber numbers, a Cassie-to-Wenzel state transition occurs after the impact as a result of the easier penetration of low-surface-tension fluids in the surface structure. Hence, a criterion for the drop rebound of low-surface-tension liquids must consider not only the contact angle values with surfaces but also their surface tension and viscosity. This suggests that, even if it is possible to produce surfaces with enhanced static repellence against oils and organics, generally the realization of synthetic materials with self-cleaning and antisticking abilities in dynamic phenomena, such as spray impact, remains an unsolved task. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the chemistry of the surface, the physicochemical interactions with the liquid drops, and the possible wettability gradient of the surface asperity also play important roles in determining the critical Weber number above which impalement occurs. Therefore, the classical numerical simulations of drop impact on dry surfaces are definitively not able to capture the final outcomes of the impact for all possible fluids if the surface topology and chemistry and/or the wettability gradient in the surface structure are not properly reflected.

  16. The apparent contact angle of water droplet on the micro-structured hydrophobic surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The apparent contact angle of Cassie-Baxter state water droplets can be calculated by the existing theoretical formula, but due to the defects of the micro-structured hydrophobic surface and some inevitable tiny disturbances in the experiment, Cassie-Baxter state water droplets will appear partly in Wenzel state, that is, the mixed state water droplets. In this paper, apparent contact angles of Cassie-Baxter state and mixed state water droplets on micro-structured hydrophobic surfaces are compared. The research shows that if the projected area fraction of water-solid F in the Cassie-Baxter formula is replaced by the local projected area fraction of water-solid F′, the apparent contact angles of water droplets in both Cassie-Baxter state and the mixed state can be calculated. Further experimental results indicate that the contact state of water droplets nearby the outermost three-phase contact line plays a more important role in determining the apparent contact angle. This conclusion is significant to the understanding of the apparent contact angle and wetting property.

  17. Surface mobility and structural transitions of poly(n-alkyl methacrylates) probed by dynamic contact angle measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damme, van H.S.; Hogt, A.H.; Feijen, J.

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic contact angles and contact-angle hysteresis of a series of poly(n-alkyl methacrylates) (PAMA) were investigated using the Wilhelmy plate technique. The mobility of polymer surface chains, segments, and side groups affected the measured contact angles and their hysteresis. A model is presente

  18. Experimental evidence of nonlocal hydrodynamic influence on the dynamic contact angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, T. D.; Bracke, M.; Shikhmurzaev, Y. D.

    1999-08-01

    The dynamic contact angle formed when a liquid curtain impinges onto a moving solid is measured for aqueous glycerol solutions in different flow regimes. It is usually assumed that the dynamic contact angle is simply a function of the contact-line speed and the material properties of the contacting media. The new results show that this is not the case. For a given gas/liquid/solid combination and a given contact-line speed, the dynamic contact angle can be varied by varying the flow rate of the liquid and/or the curtain height, that is by varying the flow field near the contact line. The possibility of attributing this effect merely to free-surface bending and interpreting the results in terms of the so-called "apparent" contact angle is discussed and ruled out on the basis of some general qualitative arguments and analysis of the characteristic length scales involved. A probable connection between the observed effect and the physical mechanism of interface disappearance and formation incorporated in a recently developed theory of wetting is discussed.

  19. Contact-angle hysteresis on periodic microtextured surfaces: Strongly corrugated liquid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliev, Stanimir; Pesheva, Nina

    2016-06-01

    We study numerically the shapes of a liquid meniscus in contact with ultrahydrophobic pillar surfaces in Cassie's wetting regime, when the surface is covered with identical and periodically distributed micropillars. Using the full capillary model we obtain the advancing and the receding equilibrium meniscus shapes when the cross-sections of the pillars are both of square and circular shapes, for a broad interval of pillar concentrations. The bending of the liquid interface in the area between the pillars is studied in the framework of the full capillary model and compared to the results of the heterogeneous approximation model. The contact angle hysteresis is obtained when the three-phase contact line is located on one row (block case) or several rows (kink case) of pillars. It is found that the contact angle hysteresis is proportional to the line fraction of the contact line on pillars tops in the block case and to the surface fraction for pillar concentrations 0.1 -0.5 in the kink case. The contact angle hysteresis does not depend on the shape (circular or square) of the pillars cross-section. The expression for the proportionality of the receding contact angle to the line fraction [Raj et al., Langmuir 28, 15777 (2012), 10.1021/la303070s] in the case of block depinning is theoretically substantiated through the capillary force, acting on the solid plate at the meniscus contact line.

  20. Contact-angle hysteresis on periodic microtextured surfaces: Strongly corrugated liquid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliev, Stanimir; Pesheva, Nina

    2016-06-01

    We study numerically the shapes of a liquid meniscus in contact with ultrahydrophobic pillar surfaces in Cassie's wetting regime, when the surface is covered with identical and periodically distributed micropillars. Using the full capillary model we obtain the advancing and the receding equilibrium meniscus shapes when the cross-sections of the pillars are both of square and circular shapes, for a broad interval of pillar concentrations. The bending of the liquid interface in the area between the pillars is studied in the framework of the full capillary model and compared to the results of the heterogeneous approximation model. The contact angle hysteresis is obtained when the three-phase contact line is located on one row (block case) or several rows (kink case) of pillars. It is found that the contact angle hysteresis is proportional to the line fraction of the contact line on pillars tops in the block case and to the surface fraction for pillar concentrations 0.1-0.5 in the kink case. The contact angle hysteresis does not depend on the shape (circular or square) of the pillars cross-section. The expression for the proportionality of the receding contact angle to the line fraction [Raj et al., Langmuir 28, 15777 (2012)LANGD50743-746310.1021/la303070s] in the case of block depinning is theoretically substantiated through the capillary force, acting on the solid plate at the meniscus contact line.

  1. Effects of Evaporation/Condensation on Spreading and Contact Angle of a Volatile Liquid Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.; Singh, Bhim S. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Effects of evaporation/condensation on spreading and contact angle were experimentally studied. A sessile drop of R-113 was tested at different vapor environments to determine the effects of evaporation/condensation on the evolution of contact diameter and contact angle of the drop. Condensation on the drop surface occurs at both the saturated and a nonsaturated vapor environments and promotes the spreading. When the drop is placed in the saturated vapor environment it tends to completely wetting and spreads rapidly. In a nonsaturated vapor environment, the evolution of the sessile drop is divided three stages: condensation-spreading stage, evaporation-retracting stage and rapid contracting stage. In the first stage the drop behaves as in the saturated environment. In the evaporation -retracting stage, the competition between spreading and evaporation of the drop determines the evolution characteristics of the contact diameter and the contact angle. A lower evaporation rate struggles against the spreading power to turn the drop from spreading to retracting with a continuous increase of the contact angle. The drop placed in open air has a much higher evaporation rate. The strong evaporation suppresses the spreading and accelerates the retraction of the drop with a linear decrease of the contact diameter. The contraction of the evaporating drops is gradually accelerated when the contact diameter decreases to 3 min and less till drying up, though the evaporation rate is gradually slowing down.

  2. Effects of dynamic contact angle on liquid infiltration into inclined capillary tubes: (semi)-analytical solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilpert, Markus

    2009-09-01

    In a recent paper, we generalized Washburn's analytical solution for capillary flow in a horizontally oriented tube by accounting for a dynamic contact angle. In this paper, we derive solutions for flow in inclined tubes that account for gravity. We again consider two general models for dynamic contact angle: the uncompensated Young force on the contact line depends on the capillary number in the form of (1) a power law with exponent beta, or (2) a polynomial. A dimensional analysis shows that, aside from the parameters for the model for the uncompensated Young force, the problem is defined through four nondimensional parameters: (1) the advancing equilibrium contact angle, (2) the initial contact angle, (3) a Bond number, and (4) nondimensional liquid pressure at the tube inlet relative to the constant gas pressure. For both contact angle models, we derive analytical solutions for the travel time of the gas-liquid interface as a function of interface velocity. The interface position as a function of travel time can be obtained through numerical integration. For the power law and beta=1 (an approximation of Cox's model for dynamic contact angle), we obtain an analytical solution for travel time as a function of interface position, as Washburn did for constant contact angle. Four different flow scenarios may occur: the interface moves (1) upward and approaches the height of capillary rise, (2) downward with the steady-state velocity, (3) downward while approaching the steady-state velocity from an initially higher velocity, or (4) downward while approaching the steady-state velocity from an initially smaller velocity.

  3. Contact angle determination procedure and detection of an invisible surface film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, G.; Grat, R.

    1990-01-01

    The contact angle value, i.e., the tangent angle of liquid resting on a planar solid surface, is a basic parameter which can be applied to a wide range of applications. The goal is to provide a basic understanding of the contact angle measurement technique and to present a simple illustration that can be applied as a quality control method; namely, detection of a surface contaminant which exists on a surface that appears clean to the unaided eye. The equipment and experimental procedures are detailed.

  4. Change of Dynamic Contact Angle of a Drop Spreading over Copper Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feoktistov D.V.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the comparison between the change of a dynamic contact angle during drop spreading over copper surfaces obtained in the experiment and calculated by using empirical correlations (Bracke et al., Jiang et al., Seebergh et al.. It is found that these correlations are applicable for the case of drop spreading over a smooth surface or over a rough surface into the low capillary number region (2.5·10−7. Dynamic contact angles obtained experimentally increase with increasing capillary number, besides it increases significantly on more rough surfaces. However the calculated values of angles do not depend on Ca.

  5. Static contact angle measurement at different volumes of a drop sitting on non-ferrous metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feoktistov Dmitriy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the experimental study of the effect of the liquid volume on the static contact angle under the condition of the stationary contact line on the rough and polished surfaces of non-ferrous metals. The experiments were carried out using the shadow optical system. Comparison between two methods of drop profile processing was conducted. It was found that in addition to the friction and gravity forces, the structure of the non-ferrous metals significantly influence on the static contact angle during changing the drop volume.

  6. Ternary Free Energy Lattice Boltzmann Model with Tunable Surface Tensions and Contact Angles

    CERN Document Server

    Semprebon, Ciro; Kusumaatmaja, Halim

    2015-01-01

    We present a new ternary free energy lattice Boltzmann model. The distinguishing feature of our model is that we are able to analytically derive and independently vary all fluid-fluid surface tensions and the solid surface contact angles. We carry out a number of benchmark tests: (i) double emulsions and liquid lenses to validate the surface tensions, (ii) ternary fluids in contact with a square well to compare the contact angles against analytical predictions, and (iii) ternary phase separation to verify that the multicomponent fluid dynamics is accurately captured. Additionally we also describe how the model here presented here can be extended to include an arbitrary number of fluid components.

  7. Dilatational viscosity of dilute particle-laden fluid interface at different contact angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishchuk, Sergey V.

    2016-12-01

    We consider a solid spherical particle adsorbed at a flat interface between two immiscible fluids and having arbitrary contact angle at the triple contact line. We derive analytically the flow field corresponding to dilatational surface flow in the case of a large ratio of dynamic shear viscosities of two fluids. Considering a dilute assembly of such particles we calculate numerically the dependence on the contact angle of the effective surface dilatational viscosity particle-laden fluid interface. The effective surface dilatational viscosity is proportional to the size and surface concentration of particles and monotonically increases with the increase in protrusion of particles into the fluid with larger shear viscosity.

  8. Droplet compression and relaxation by a superhydrophobic surface: contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Siang-Jie; Chou, Tung-He; Chan, Seong Heng; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2012-04-03

    In this article, the contact angle hysteresis (CAH) of acrylic glass is experimentally and theoretically studied through the compression-relaxation process of droplets by using a superhydrophobic surface with negligible CAH effect. In contrast to the existing technique in which the volume of the droplet changes during the measurement of CAH, this procedure is carried out at a constant volume of the droplet. By observing the base diameter (BD) and the contact angle (CA) of the droplet during the compression-relaxation process, the wetting behavior of the droplet can be divided into two regimes, the contact line withdrawal and the contact line pinning regimes, depending on the gap thickness (H) at the end of the compression process. During the compression process, both regimes possess similar droplet behavior; the contact line will move outward and the BD will expand while the CA remains at the advancing angle. During the relaxation process, the two regimes are significantly different. In the contact line withdrawal regime, the contact line will withdraw with the CA remaining at the receding angle. In the contact line pinning regime, however, the contact line will be pinned at the final position and the CA will decline to a certain value higher than the receding angle. Furthermore, the advancing pinning behavior can also be realized through a successive compression-relaxation process. On the basis of the liquid-induced defects model, Surface Evolver simulations are performed to reproduce the behavior of the droplet during the compression-relaxation process; both contact line withdrawal and pinning regimes can also be identified. The results of the experiment and simulation agree with each other very well.

  9. Color-gradient lattice Boltzmann model for simulating droplet motion with contact-angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ba, Yan; Liu, Haihu; Sun, Jinju; Zheng, Rongye

    2013-10-01

    Lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is an effective tool for simulating the contact-line motion due to the nature of its microscopic dynamics. In contact-line motion, contact-angle hysteresis is an inherent phenomenon, but it is neglected in most existing color-gradient based LBMs. In this paper, a color-gradient based multiphase LBM is developed to simulate the contact-line motion, particularly with the hysteresis of contact angle involved. In this model, the perturbation operator based on the continuum surface force concept is introduced to model the interfacial tension, and the recoloring operator proposed by Latva-Kokko and Rothman is used to produce phase segregation and resolve the lattice pinning problem. At the solid surface, the color-conserving wetting boundary condition [Hollis et al., IMA J. Appl. Math. 76, 726 (2011)] is applied to improve the accuracy of simulations and suppress spurious currents at the contact line. In particular, we present a numerical algorithm to allow for the effect of the contact-angle hysteresis, in which an iterative procedure is used to determine the dynamic contact angle. Numerical simulations are conducted to verify the developed model, including the droplet partial wetting process and droplet dynamical behavior in a simple shear flow. The obtained results are compared with theoretical solutions and experimental data, indicating that the model is able to predict the equilibrium droplet shape as well as the dynamic process of partial wetting and thus permits accurate prediction of contact-line motion with the consideration of contact-angle hysteresis.

  10. Machine Vision Based Measurement of Dynamic Contact Angles in Microchannel Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Valtteri Heiskanen; Kalle Marjanen; Pasi Kallio

    2008-01-01

    When characterizing flows in miniaturized channels, the determination of the dynamic contact angle is important. By measuring the dynamic contact angle, the flow properties of the flowing liquid and the effect of material properties on the flow can be characterized. A machine vision based system to measure the contact angle of front or rear menisci of a moving liquid plug is described in this article. In this research, transparent flow channels fabricated on thermoplastic polymer and scaled with an adhesive tape are used. The transparency of the channels enables image based monitoring and measurement of flow variables, including the dynamic contact angle. It is shown that the dynamic angle can be measured from a liquid flow in a channel using the image based measurement system. An image processing algorithm has been developed in a MATLAB environment. Im-ages are taken using a CCD camera and the channels are illuminated using a custom made ring light. Two fitting methods, a circle and two parabolas, are experimented and the results are compared in the measurement of the dynamic contact angles.

  11. Inkjet printing of precisely defined features using contact-angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltman, Dan; Smith, Ben; Morris, S J S; Subramanian, Vivek

    2013-06-15

    Motivated by the process of inkjet printing of electronics, we study experimentally and theoretically the processes limiting the printing of sharply defined, equilibrium corners. Using a non-volatile ionic liquid, we inkjet print squares with rounded corners on a substrate of roughened, display-grade glass. We show experimentally that with increasing roughness, corner radius decreases, allowing more precisely defined features to be printed. To interpret these results in terms of contact-angle hysteresis (difference between the advancing and retreating contact angles θA and θR), we implement the following model with the Surface Evolver program. With drop volume fixed, we minimize drop surface energy subject to a prescribed contact line. We identify θA and θR as the minimum and maximum contact angles around the drop perimeter. We find that with decreasing corner fidelity, contact-angle hysteresis also decreases. We are thus able to infer θR from the corner radius of printed features. We conclude that increasing contact-angle hysteresis allows the printing of more precisely defined features.

  12. Dynamic contact angle of a liquid spreading on an unsaturated wettable porous substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Shikhmurzaev, Y D

    2012-01-01

    The spreading of an incompressible viscous liquid over an isotropic homogeneous unsaturated porous substrate is considered. It is shown that, unlike the dynamic wetting of an impermeable solid substrate, where the dynamic contact angle has to be specified as a boundary condition in terms of the wetting velocity and other flow characteristics, the `effective' dynamic contact angle on an unsaturated porous substrate is completely determined by the requirement of existence of a solution, i.e. the absence of a nonintegrable singularity in the spreading fluid's pressure at the `effective' contact line. The obtained velocity dependence of the `effective' contact angle determines the critical point at which a transition to a different flow regime takes place, where the fluid above the substrate stops spreading whereas the wetting front inside it continues to propagate.

  13. Apparent Contact Angle Calculated from a Water Repellent Model with Pinning Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shojiro; Ueno, Kazuyuki

    2017-01-10

    A set of new theoretical equations for apparent contact angles is proposed. The equations are derived from an equilibrium of interfacial tensions of a three-phase contact line pinned at the edges of a fine structure. These equations are validated by comparison with contact-angle measurement results for 2 μL water droplets on poly(methyl methacrylate) microstructured samples with square pillars or holes. The equilibrium contact angles predicted by the new equations reasonably agree with the experimental results. In contrast, the values predicted by the Cassie-Baxter equation or the Wenzel equation do not qualitatively agree with the experimental results in pillar pattern cases because the Cassie-Baxter equation and the Wenzel equation do not account for the pinning effect.

  14. Flow Visualization in Evaporating Liquid Drops and Measurement of Dynamic Contact Angles and Spreading Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Neng-Li; Chao, David F.

    2001-01-01

    A new hybrid optical system, consisting of reflection-refracted shadowgraphy and top-view photography, is used to visualize flow phenomena and simultaneously measure the spreading and instant dynamic contact angle in a volatile-liquid drop on a nontransparent substrate. Thermocapillary convection in the drop, induced by evaporation, and the drop real-time profile data are synchronously recorded by video recording systems. Experimental results obtained from this unique technique clearly reveal that thermocapillary convection strongly affects the spreading process and the characteristics of dynamic contact angle of the drop. Comprehensive information of a sessile drop, including the local contact angle along the periphery, the instability of the three-phase contact line, and the deformation of the drop shape is obtained and analyzed.

  15. Wetting of biopolymer coatings: contact angle kinetics and image analysis investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farris, Stefano; Introzzi, Laura; Biagioni, Paolo; Holz, Torsten; Schiraldi, Alberto; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2011-06-21

    The surface wetting of five biopolymers, used as coating materials for a plastic film, was monitored over a span of 8 min by means of the optical contact angle technique. Because most of the total variation was observed to occur during the first 60 s, we decided to focus on this curtailed temporal window. Initial contact angle values (θ(0)) ranged from ∼91° for chitosan to ∼30° for pullulan. However, the water drop profile began to change immediately following drop deposition for all biocoatings, confirming that the concept of water contact angle equilibrium is not applicable to most biopolymers. First, a three-parameter decay equation [θ(t) = θ(0) exp(kt(n))] was fit to the experimental contact angle data to describe the kinetics of the contact angle change for each biocoating. Interestingly, the k constant correlated well with the contact angle evolution rate and the n exponent seemed to be somehow linked to the physicochemical phenomena underlying the overall kinetics process. Second, to achieve a reliable description of droplet evolution, the contact angle (CA) analysis was coupled with image analysis (IA) through a combined geometric/trigonometric approach. Absorption and spreading were the key factors governing the overall mechanism of surface wetting during the 60 s analysis, although the individual quantification of both phenomena demonstrated that spreading provided the largest contribution for all biopolymers, with the only exception of gelatin, which showed two quasi-equivalent and counterbalancing effects. The possible correlation between these two phenomena and the topography of the biopolymer surfaces are then discussed on the basis of atomic force microscopy analyses.

  16. Contact angle dynamics in droplet impact on flat surfaces: Effect of surface wettability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Ilker

    2005-11-01

    Contact angle dynamics is examined experimentally during spreading/recoiling of mm-sized water droplets impacting orthogonally on various flat surfaces with We = O(0.1)-O(10), Ca = O(0.001)- O(0.01), Oh = O(0.001) and Bo = O(0.1). In this impact regime, inertial, viscous, and capillary phenomena act in unison to influence contact angle dynamics. The wetting properties of the target surfaces range from wettable to non-wettable. The objective of the work is to provide insight into the dynamic behavior of the apparent (macroscopic) contact angle θ and its dependence on contact line velocity VCL at various degrees of surface wetting for droplets impacting with low to moderate Weber numbers. The hydrodynamic wetting theory of Cox (1998) is implemented to relate the microscopic wetting parameters to the observed θ vs. VCL data. It is concluded that Cox's model works well in the fast spreading regime, but proves inadequate for slow spreading where solid/liquid interactions are dominant. In addition, the molecular-kinetic theory of wetting by Blake and Haynes (1969) is tested with good results. This study offers guidance for numerical or analytical studies, which require special attention to the boundary conditions at the contact line, and more specifically the functional dependence of contact angle on contact line speed.

  17. Characteristics of dynamic contact-angle in presence of surface-charge

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Palash V; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-01-01

    We account for the presence of surface charges towards describing variations in the dynamic contact angle of an advancing liquid-gas meniscus. Starting from the thin-film based formalism, we present closed-form analytical expressions relating the dynamic contact-angle with the capillary number (essentially normalized contact-line speed) and other interfacial parameters. Specifically, our analysis presents, within the realm of hydrodynamic paradigm, a connection between the micro- and macro-scale physics at the vicinity of the contact-line region, taking the combined confluence of viscous and capillary forces along with van der Waals and electrostatic interactions. This connection rationalizes the hitherto reported anomalous window of the magnitude of the microscopic length scales required to corroborate experimental data for ionic liquids. Moreover, our analysis shows the possibility of a transition from strong to weak influence of surface charge in a dynamic fashion with contact-line speed along with other e...

  18. Scheme for contact angle and its hysteresis in a multiphase lattice Boltzmann method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Huang, Hai-bo; Lu, Xi-Yun

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a scheme for specifying contact angle and its hysteresis is incorporated into a multiphase lattice Boltzmann method. The scheme is validated through investigations of the dynamic behaviors of a droplet sliding along two kinds of walls: a smooth (ideal) wall and a rough or chemically inhomogeneous (nonideal) wall. For an ideal wall, the wettability of solid substrates is able to be prescribed. For a nonideal wall, arbitrary contact angle hysteresis can be obtained through adjusting advancing and receding angles. Significantly different phenomena can be recovered for the two kinds of walls. For instance, a droplet on an inclined ideal wall under gravity is impossible to stay stationary. However, the droplet on a nonideal wall may be pinned due to contact angle hysteresis. The steady interface shapes of the droplet on an inclined nonideal wall under gravity or in a shear flow quantitatively agree well with the previous numerical studies. Besides, the complex motion of a droplet creeping like an inchworm could be simulated. The scheme is found suitable for the study of contact line problems with and without contact angle hysteresis.

  19. Hysteresis of the Contact Angle of a Meniscus Inside a Capillary with Smooth, Homogeneous Solid Walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchin, Igor V; Starov, Victor M

    2016-05-31

    A theory of contact angle hysteresis of a meniscus inside thin capillaries with smooth, homogeneous solid walls is developed in terms of surface forces (disjoining/conjoining pressure isotherm) using a quasi-equilibrium approach. The disjoining/conjoining pressure isotherm includes electrostatic, intermolecular, and structural components. The values of the static receding θr, advancing θa, and equilibrium θe contact angles in thin capillaries were calculated on the basis of the shape of the disjoining/conjoining pressure isotherm. It was shown that both advancing and receding contact angles depend on the capillary radius. The suggested mechanism of the contact angle hysteresis has a direct experimental confirmation: the process of receding is accompanied by the formation of thick β-films on the capillary walls. The effect of the transition from partial to complete wetting in thin capillaries is predicted and analyzed. This effect takes place in very thin capillaries, when the receding contact angle decreases to zero.

  20. Water Contact Angle Dependence with Hydroxyl Functional Groups on Silica Surfaces under CO2 Sequestration Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cong; Zhang, Ning; Li, Weizhong; Song, Yongchen

    2015-12-15

    Functional groups on silica surfaces under CO2 sequestration conditions are complex due to reactions among supercritical CO2, brine and silica. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the effects of hydroxyl functional groups on wettability. It has been found that wettability shows a strong dependence on functional groups on silica surfaces: silanol number density, space distribution, and deprotonation/protonation degree. For neutral silica surfaces with crystalline structure (Q(3), Q(3)/Q(4), Q(4)), as silanol number density decreases, contact angle increases from 33.5° to 146.7° at 10.5 MPa and 318 K. When Q(3) surface changes to an amorphous structure, water contact angle increases 20°. Water contact angle decreases about 12° when 9% of silanol groups on Q(3) surface are deprotonated. When the deprotonation degree increases to 50%, water contact angle decreases to 0. The dependence of wettability on silica surface functional groups was used to analyze contact angle measurement ambiguity in literature. The composition of silica surfaces is complicated under CO2 sequestration conditions, the results found in this study may help to better understand wettability of CO2/brine/silica system.

  1. Static and dynamic contact angles of evaporating liquids on heated surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajaev, Vladimir S; Gambaryan-Roisman, Tatiana; Stephan, Peter

    2010-02-15

    We studied both static and dynamic values of the apparent contact angle for gravity-driven flow of a volatile liquid down a heated inclined plane. The apparent contact line is modeled as the transition region between the macroscopic film and ultra-thin adsorbed film dominated by disjoining pressure effects. Four commonly used disjoining pressure models are investigated. The static contact angle is shown to increase with heater temperature, in qualitative agreement with experimental observations. The angle is less sensitive to the details of the disjoining pressure curves than in the isothermal regime. A generalization of the classical Frumkin-Derjaguin theory is proposed to explain this observation. The dynamic contact angle follows the Tanner's law remarkably well over a range of evaporation conditions. However, deviations from the predictions based on the Tanner's law are found when interface shape changes rapidly in response to rapid changes of the heater temperature. The Marangoni stresses are shown to result in increase of the values of apparent contact angles.

  2. The effect of contact angle hysteresis on droplet coalescence and mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Michael A; Rothstein, Jonathan P

    2011-11-15

    In this work, droplet coalescence and the subsequent mixing in superhydrophobic surfaces is studied over a range of impact velocities and impact angles. Sanded Teflon surfaces are used as a novel two-dimensional microfluidics platform. These superhydrophobic surfaces exhibit a constant advancing contact angle of θ(A)=150° over a broad range of contact angle hysteresis. As a result, the effect of contact angle hysteresis on droplet coalescence and mixing can be studied. Based on the observed characteristics of coalescence, three different regimes of coalescence are identified as a function of both Weber number and impact angle. These regimes include oscillation dominated, rotation dominated, and mixed dynamics. It is shown that within Weber number ranges achievable in this experiment, hysteresis greatly reduces the deformation of the droplet coalescence process and the subsequent mixing. In head-on collisions, higher hysteresis is found to decrease the frequency at which the resulting dr oscillates. In the case of glancing collisions, where the resulting droplet is found to rotate, higher hysteresis increases the rate of rotation although the overall angular momentum is found to be independent of contact angle hysteresis.

  3. The wetting problem of fluids on solid surfaces: Dynamics of lines and contact angle hysteresis

    OpenAIRE

    Gouin, Henri

    2001-01-01

    8 pages; International audience; In 1805, Young was the first who introduced an expression for contact angle in static, but today, the motion of the contact-line formed at the intersection of two immiscible fluids and a solid is still subject to dispute. By means of the new physical concept of line viscosity, the equations of motions and boundary conditions for fluids in contact on a solid surface together with interface and contact-line are revisited. A new Young-Dupré equation for the dynam...

  4. Hysteresis of Contact Angle of Sessile Droplets on Smooth Homogeneous Solid Substrates via Disjoining/Conjoining Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchin, I; Starov, V

    2015-05-19

    A theory of contact angle hysteresis of liquid droplets on smooth, homogeneous solid substrates is developed in terms of the shape of the disjoining/conjoining pressure isotherm and quasi-equilibrium phenomena. It is shown that all contact angles, θ, in the range θr contact angle θ ≠ θe, correspond to the state of slow "microscopic" advancing or receding motion of the liquid if θe contact angle reaches the critical values θa or θr, correspondingly. The values of the static receding, θr, and static advancing, θa, contact angles in cylindrical capillaries were calculated earlier, based on the shape of disjoining/conjoining pressure isotherm. It is shown now that (i) both advancing and receding contact angles of a droplet on a on smooth, homogeneous solid substrate can be calculated based on shape of disjoining/conjoining pressure isotherm, and (ii) both advancing and receding contact angles depend on the drop volume and are not unique characteristics of the liquid-solid system. The latter is different from advancing/receding contact angles in thin capillaries. It is shown also that the receding contact angle is much closer to the equilibrium contact angle than the advancing contact angle. The latter conclusion is unexpected and is in a contradiction with the commonly accepted view that the advancing contact angle can be taken as the first approximation for the equilibrium contact angle. The dependency of hysteresis contact angles on the drop volume has a direct experimental confirmation.

  5. Analysis of Wetting and Contact Angle Hysteresis on Chemically Patterned Surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Xianmin

    2011-01-01

    Wetting and contact angle hysteresis on chemically patterned surfaces in two dimensionsare analyzed from a stationary phase-field model for immiscible two phase fluids. We first study the sharp-interface limit of the model by the method of matched asymptotic expansions. We then justify the results rigorously by the γ-convergence theory for the related variational problem and study the properties of the limiting minimizers. The results also provide a clear geometric picture of the equilibrium configuration of the interface. This enables us to explicitly calculate the total surface energy for the two phase systems on chemically patterned surfaces with simple geometries, namely the two phase flow in a channel and the drop spreading. By considering the quasi-staticmotion of the interface described by the change of volume (or volume fraction), we can follow the change-of-energy landscape which also reveals the mechanism for the stick-slip motion of the interface and contact angle hysteresis on the chemically patterned surfaces. As the interface passes throughpatterned surfaces, we observe not only stick-slip of the interface and switching of the contact angles but also the hysteresis of contact point and contact angle. Furthermore, as the size of the patternde creases to zero, the stick-slip becomes weaker but the hysteresis becomes stronger in the sense that one observes either the advancing contact angle or the receding contact angle (when the interface ismoving in the opposite direction) without the switching in between. © 2011 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  6. Manipulation of Contact Angles and Interfacial Lengths of Liquid Drops using Electro-Kinetic Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Nolte, D. D.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.

    2014-12-01

    Traditionally, capillary pressure is determined by increasing or decreasing external fluid pressures to change the immiscible fluid saturation in a porous medium. The resulting saturation and interfacial area are then linked to the capillary pressure through constitutive equations. A key question is whether externally measured pressures are sensitive to changes in distributions that arise from internal changes in contact angles. As a first step in addressing this question, we investigated the effect of electro-kinetic manipulation on interfacial area and contact angles for a fixed saturation. An EWOD (electro-wetting on dielectric) technique was used to alter the contact angle of single 10 μL droplets of a 1M KCl-H2O solution. A liquid droplet was placed on a glass cover slip (18 mm x 18 mm) coated with a layer of silver (100 nm in thickness) to act as an electrode and then spin-coated with polyimide (a dielectric). A platinum wire was inserted into the droplet and connected to an AC voltage source. The glass plate electrode was connected to ground. Measurements were made for Vrms voltages between 0 to 300 V at a frequency of 50 Hz. Two CCD cameras were used to image changes in the shape of a droplet. One camera was placed on a microscope to capture a top view of a drop in order to measure changes in areal extent and the perimeter of the drop. The second camera imaged a drop from the side to measure contact angles and side-view areal extent and perimeter. At low voltages, the cosine of the contact angle, θ, after applying voltage was linearly dependent on Vrms2. Several experiments showed that the slope of the low-voltage relationship of cos θ vs Vrms2 remained constant for all trials. As the voltage increased, the contact angle saturated. From the side-view images, the contact angle and interfacial length decreased with increasing voltage. From the top-view images, the drop shape changed from circular to elliptical-to irregular as the voltage increased

  7. Relaxation of contact-line singularities solely by the Kelvin effect and apparent contact angles for isothermal volatile liquids in contact with air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rednikov, Alexey; Colinet, Pierre

    2013-11-01

    The contact (triple) line of a volatile liquid on a flat solid is studied theoretically. Like with a pure-vapor atmosphere [Phys. Rev. E 87, 010401, 2013], but here for isothermal diffusion-limited evaporation/condensation in the presence of an inert gas, we rigorously show that the notorious contact-line singularities (related to motion or phase change itself) can be regularized solely on account of the Kelvin effect (curvature dependence of the saturation conditions). No disjoining pressure, precursor films or Navier slip are in fact needed to this purpose, and nor are they taken into consideration here (``minimalist'' approach). The model applies to both perfect (zero Young's angle) and partial wetting, and is in particular used to study the related issue of evaporation-induced contact angles. Their modification by the contact-line motion (either advancing or receding) is assessed. The formulation is posed for a distinguished immediate vicinity of the contact line (the ``microregion''), the corresponding problem decoupling to leading order, here up to one unknown coefficient, from what actually happens at the macroscale. The lubrication approximation (implying sufficiently small contact angles) is used in the liquid, coupled with the diffusion equation in the gaz phase. Supported by ESA and BELSPO PRODEX and F.R.S.-FNRS.

  8. Contact Stress Analysis for Gears of Different Helix Angle Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patil Santosh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The gear contact stress problem has been a great point of interest for many years, but still an extensive research is required to understand the various parameters affecting this stress. Among such parameters, helix angle is one which has played a crucial role in variation of contact stress. Numerous studies have been carried out on spur gear for contact stress variation. Hence, the present work is an attempt to study the contact stresses among the helical gear pairs, under static conditions, by using a 3D finite element method. The helical gear pairs on which the analysis is carried are 0, 5, 15, 25 degree helical gear sets. The Lagrange multiplier algorithm has been used between the contacting pairs to determine the stresses. The helical gear contact stress is evaluated using FE model and results have also been found at different coefficient of friction, varying from 0.0 to 0.3. The FE results have been further compared with the analytical calculations. The analytical calculations are based upon Hertz and AGMA equations, which are modified to include helix angle. The commercial finite element software was used in the study and it was shown that this approach can be applied to gear design efficiently. The contact stress results have shown a decreasing trend, with increase in helix angle.

  9. A mesoscopic model for microscale hydrodynamics and interfacial phenomena: Slip, films, and contact angle hysteresis

    CERN Document Server

    Colosqui, Carlos E; Papathanasiou, Athanasios G; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G

    2012-01-01

    We present a model based on the lattice Boltzmann equation that is suitable for the simulation of dynamic wetting. The model is capable of exhibiting fundamental interfacial phenomena such as weak adsorption of fluid on the solid substrate and the presence of a thin surface film within which a disjoining pressure acts. Dynamics in this surface film, tightly coupled with hydrodynamics in the fluid bulk, determine macroscopic properties of primary interest: the hydrodynamic slip; the equilibrium contact angle; and the static and dynamic hysteresis of the contact angles. The pseudo- potentials employed for fluid-solid interactions are composed of a repulsive core and an attractive tail that can be independently adjusted. This enables effective modification of the functional form of the disjoining pressure so that one can vary the static and dynamic hysteresis on surfaces that exhibit the same equilibrium contact angle. The modeled solid-fluid interface is diffuse, represented by a wall probability function which...

  10. Modulating contact angle hysteresis to direct fluid droplets along a homogenous surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Mingxiang; Gupta, Rohini; Frechette, Joelle

    2012-02-01

    The shape and motion of drops on surfaces is governed by the balance between the driving and the pinning forces. Here we demonstrate control over the motion of droplets on an inclined surface by exerting control over the contact angle hysteresis. The external modulation of contact angle hysteresis is achieved through a voltage-induced local molecular reorganization within the surface film at the solid-liquid interface. We show that tuning contact angle hysteresis alone is sufficient to direct and deform drops when subjected to a constant external driving force, here gravity, in the absence of a pre-defined surface energy gradient or pattern. We also show that the observed stretching and contraction of the drops mimic the motion of an inchworm. Such reversible manipulation of the pinning forces could be an attractive means to direct drops, especially with the dominance of surface forces at micro-/nanoscale.

  11. Experimental Study on the Effect of Liquid Contact Angle on Bubble Movement under Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanjie, Yang; Li, Shiyou; Yiyong, Huang; Guangyu, Li

    2016-07-01

    The experimental study of bubble dynamics under microgravity has been conducted utilizing the Drop Tower Beijing(NMLC). A pottery sized of 20mm in length, 10mm in width and 1.2mm in height was used as the heater. The fluid was HFE7500 and distilled water. During the experiment under microgravity the nucleate boiling and film boiling were observed. At the same heating power the bubble of HFE7500 whose contact angle is smaller grew faster and bigger, moved quickly on the heating surface, combined into center big bubble by colliding and reached its CHF earlier to film boiling. The bubble of distilled water whose contact angle is bigger didn't move obviously on heating surface, and it transferred from nucleate boiling to film boiling at its original place meanwhile it absorbed smaller bubble around. Key words: microgravity; bubble movement; contact angle; drop tower

  12. Numerical study of droplet motion in a microchannel with different contact angles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ji Young; Son, Gi Hun [Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    The droplet motion in a microchannel with different contact angles, which is applicable to a typical proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), was studied numerically by solving the equations governing the conservation of mass and momentum. The gas-liquid interface or droplet shape was determined by a level set method which was modified to treat the static and dynamic contact angles. The matching conditions at the interface were accurately imposed by incorporating the ghost fluid approach based on a sharp-interface representation. Based on the numerical results, the droplet dynamics including the sliding and detachment of droplets was found to depend significantly on the contact angle. Also, the effects of inlet flow velocity, droplet size and side wall on the droplet motion were investigated

  13. Capillary pressure overshoot for unstable wetting fronts is explained by Hoffman's velocity-dependent contact-angle relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baver, Christine E.; Parlange, J.-Yves; Stoof, Cathelijne R.; DiCarlo, David A.; Wallach, Rony; Durnford, Deanna S.; Steenhuis, Tammo S.

    2014-06-01

    Pore velocity-dependent dynamic contact angles provide a mechanism for explaining the formation of fingers/columns in porous media. To study those dynamic contact angles when gravity is present, rectangular capillary tubes were used to facilitate observation of the complete interface without geometric distortion. Results show that the Hoffman (1975) relationship between dynamic contact angle and water velocity applies to gravity-affected flow fields, and that it (when adjusted for nonzero static contact angles) can be used to model dynamic capillary pressures for unstable wettings fronts in porous media by assuming that (1) pressure at the wetting front is discontinuous, (2) the flow field behind the fingertip is highly heterogeneous, and (3) the front line advances one or a few pores at the time. We demonstrate the utility of the Hoffman relationship for porous media with a published infiltration experiment by calculating the capillary pressure successfully at the unstable wetting front as a function of the flux of water in the finger and the grain size diameter.

  14. Determination of surface heterogeneity of D-mannitol by sessile drop contact angle and finite concentration inverse gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Raimundo; Hinder, Steven J; Watts, John F; Dilworth, Sarah E; Williams, Daryl R; Heng, Jerry Y Y

    2010-03-15

    The sensitivity of two techniques in tracking changes in surface energetics was investigated for a crystalline excipient, D-mannitol. Macroscopic crystals of D-mannitol were grown from saturated water solution by slow cooling, and sessile drop contact angle was employed to measure the anisotropic surface energy. The facet-specific surface energy was consistent with localised hydroxyl group concentrations determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and was also in excellent agreement with the surface energy distribution of the powder form of mannitol measured via a new methodology using inverse gas chromatography (IGC) at finite concentrations. The gamma(SV)(d) was found to vary between 39.5 mJ/m(2) and 44.1 mJ/m(2) for contact angle and between 40 mJ/m(2) and 49 mJ/m(2) for IGC measurements. We report here, a high level of surface heterogeneity on the native mannitol crystal surfaces. When the surfaces of both D-mannitol samples (powder and large single crystals) were modified by dichlorodimethylsilane to induce surface hydrophobicity, both IGC and contact angle revealed a homogeneous surface due to functionalisation of mannitol crystal surface with methyl groups resulting in gamma(SV)(d) of approximately 34 mJ/m(2). It was shown that both IGC and contact angle techniques are able to detect surface chemical variations and detailed surface energetic distribution.

  15. Competitive adsorption of surfactants and hydrophilic silica particles at the oil-water interface: interfacial tension and contact angle studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichot, R; Spyropoulos, F; Norton, I T

    2012-07-01

    The effect of surfactants' type and concentration on the interfacial tension and contact angle in the presence of hydrophilic silica particles was investigated. Silica particles have been shown to have an antagonistic effect on interfacial tension and contact angle in the presence of both W/O and O/W surfactants. Silica particles, combined with W/O surfactant, have no effect on interfacial tension, which is only dictated by the surfactant concentration, while they strongly affect interfacial tension when combined with O/W surfactants. At low O/W surfactant, both particles and surfactant are adsorbed at the interface, modifying the interface structure. At higher concentration, interfacial tension is only dictated by the surfactant. By increasing the surfactant concentration, the contact angle that a drop of aqueous phase assumes on a glass substrate placed in oil media decreases or increases depending on whether the surfactant is of W/O or O/W type, respectively. This is due to the modification of the wettability of the glass by the oil or water induced by the surfactants. Regardless of the surfactant's type, the contact angle profile was dictated by both particles and surfactant at low surfactant concentration, whereas it is dictated by the surfactant only at high concentration.

  16. Fabrication of a silica aerogel and examination of its hydrophobic properties via contact angle and 3M water repellency tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazrouei-Sebdani, Z.; Javazmi, L.; Khoddami, A.; Shams-Ghahfarokhi, F.; Low, T.

    2017-05-01

    Aerogels are dry gels with a very high specific pore volume. Aerogels with increased hydrophobicity have significant potential to expand their use as lightweight materials. Considering its special nanostructure and exceptional properties, this paper focuses on the synthesis and hydrophobic evaluation of a silica aerogel. The structural properties were investigated by measuring density, SEM micrographs, and BET analyses. Also, the hydrophobic evaluation was carried out by measuring 3M water repellency and water/alcohol contact angle. The BET analysis showed successful synthesis of the nanoporous silica aerogel with a pore size of 24 nm and porosity of 89%. The synthesized aerogel showed 3M water repellency of 3 and water contact angle of 129.6°. Also, it is worth-mentioning that as the alcohol content of the drops in 3M water repellency test is increased, the drop contact angle is decreased due to its lower surface tension. Thus, the contact angle reaches the zero at 3M water repellency test number of 4 (water/alcohol 60/40).

  17. Contact angles and wettability of ionic liquids on polar and non-polar surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Matheus M; Kurnia, Kiki A; Sousa, Filipa L; Silva, Nuno J O; Lopes-da-Silva, José A; Coutinho, João A P; Freire, Mara G

    2015-12-21

    Many applications involving ionic liquids (ILs) require the knowledge of their interfacial behaviour, such as wettability and adhesion. In this context, herein, two approaches were combined aiming at understanding the impact of the IL chemical structures on their wettability on both polar and non-polar surfaces, namely: (i) the experimental determination of the contact angles of a broad range of ILs (covering a wide number of anions of variable polarity, cations, and cation alkyl side chain lengths) on polar and non-polar solid substrates (glass, Al-plate, and poly-(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE)); and (ii) the correlation of the experimental contact angles with the cation-anion pair interaction energies generated by the Conductor-like Screening Model for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS). The combined results reveal that the hydrogen-bond basicity of ILs, and thus the IL anion, plays a major role through their wettability on both polar and non-polar surfaces. The increase of the IL hydrogen-bond accepting ability leads to an improved wettability of more polar surfaces (lower contact angles) while the opposite trend is observed on non-polar surfaces. The cation nature and alkyl side chain lengths have however a smaller impact on the wetting ability of ILs. Linear correlations were found between the experimental contact angles and the cation-anion hydrogen-bonding and cation ring energies, estimated using COSMO-RS, suggesting that these features primarily control the wetting ability of ILs. Furthermore, two-descriptor correlations are proposed here to predict the contact angles of a wide variety of ILs on glass, Al-plate, and PTFE surfaces. A new extended list is provided for the contact angles of ILs on three surfaces, which can be used as a priori information to choose appropriate ILs before a given application.

  18. Contact angles and wettability of ionic liquids on polar and non-polar surfaces†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Filipa L.; Silva, Nuno J. O.; Lopes-da-Silva, José A.; Coutinho, João A. P.; Freire, Mara G.

    2016-01-01

    Many applications involving ionic liquids (ILs) require the knowledge of their interfacial behaviour, such as wettability and adhesion. In this context, herein, two approaches were combined aiming at understanding the impact of the IL chemical structures on their wettability on both polar and non-polar surfaces, namely: (i) the experimental determination of the contact angles of a broad range of ILs (covering a wide number of anions of variable polarity, cations, and cation alkyl side chain lengths) on polar and non-polar solid substrates (glass, Al-plate, and poly-(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE)); and (ii) the correlation of the experimental contact angles with the cation–anion pair interaction energies generated by the Conductor-like Screening Model for Real Solvents (COSMO-RS). The combined results reveal that the hydrogen-bond basicity of ILs, and thus the IL anion, plays a major role through their wettability on both polar and non-polar surfaces. The increase of the IL hydrogen-bond accepting ability leads to an improved wettability of more polar surfaces (lower contact angles) while the opposite trend is observed on non-polar surfaces. The cation nature and alkyl side chain lengths have however a smaller impact on the wetting ability of ILs. Linear correlations were found between the experimental contact angles and the cation–anion hydrogen-bonding and cation ring energies, estimated using COSMO-RS, suggesting that these features primarily control the wetting ability of ILs. Furthermore, two-descriptor correlations are proposed here to predict the contact angles of a wide variety of ILs on glass, Al-plate, and PTFE surfaces. A new extended list is provided for the contact angles of ILs on three surfaces, which can be used as a priori information to choose appropriate ILs before a given application. PMID:26554705

  19. Effects of drop size and measuring condition on static contact angle measurement on a superhydrophobic surface with goniometric technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Kwangseok; Kim, Minyoung; Kim, Do Hyun [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jeong Keun [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    It is not a simple task to measure a contact angle of a water drop on a superhydrophobic surface with sessile drop method, because a roll-off angle is very low. Usually contact angle of a water drop on a superhydrophobic surface is measured by fixing a drop with intentional defects on the surface or a needle. We examined the effects of drop size and measuring condition such as the use of a needle or defects on the static contact angle measurement on superhydrophobic surface. Results showed that the contact angles on a superhydrophobic surface remain almost constant within intrinsic measurement errors unless there is a wetting transition during the measurement. We expect that this study will provide a deeper understanding on the nature of the contact angle and convenient measurement of the contact angle on the superhydrophobic surface.

  20. Wettability of supercritical carbon dioxide/water/quartz systems: simultaneous measurement of contact angle and interfacial tension at reservoir conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraji, Soheil; Goual, Lamia; Piri, Mohammad; Plancher, Henry

    2013-06-11

    Injection of carbon dioxide in deep saline aquifers is considered as a method of carbon sequestration. The efficiency of this process is dependent on the fluid-fluid and rock-fluid interactions inside the porous media. For instance, the final storage capacity and total amount of capillary-trapped CO2 inside an aquifer are affected by the interfacial tension between the fluids and the contact angle between the fluids and the rock mineral surface. A thorough study of these parameters and their variations with temperature and pressure will provide a better understanding of the carbon sequestration process and thus improve predictions of the sequestration efficiency. In this study, the controversial concept of wettability alteration of quartz surfaces in the presence of supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) was investigated. A novel apparatus for measuring interfacial tension and contact angle at high temperatures and pressures based on Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis with no-Apex (ADSA-NA) method was developed and validated with a simple system. Densities, interfacial tensions, and dynamic contact angles of CO2/water/quartz systems were determined for a wide range of pressures and temperatures relevant to geological sequestration of CO2 in the subcritical and supercritical states. Image analysis was performed with ADSA-NA method that allows the determination of both interfacial tensions and contact angles with high accuracy. The results show that supercritical CO2 alters the wettability of quartz surface toward less water-wet conditions compared to subcritical CO2. Also we observed an increase in the water advancing contact angles with increasing temperature indicating less water-wet quartz surfaces at higher temperatures.

  1. Motion of liquid drops on surfaces induced by asymmetric vibration: role of contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettu, Srinivas; Chaudhury, Manoj K

    2011-08-16

    Hysteresis of wetting, like the Coulombic friction at solid/solid interface, impedes the motion of a liquid drop on a surface when subjected to an external field. Here, we present a counterintuitive example, where some amount of hysteresis enables a drop to move on a surface when it is subjected to a periodic but asymmetric vibration. Experiments show that a surface either with a negligible or high hysteresis is not conducive to any drop motion. Some finite hysteresis of contact angle is needed to break the periodic symmetry of the forcing function for the drift to occur. These experimental results are consistent with simulations, in which a drop is approximated as a linear harmonic oscillator. The experiment also sheds light on the effect of the drop size on flow reversal, where drops of different sizes move in opposite directions due to the difference in the phase of the oscillation of their center of mass.

  2. Contact angle hysteresis: a different view and a trivial recipe for low hysteresis hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumpfer, Joseph W; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    Contact angle hysteresis is addressed from two perspectives. The first is an analysis of the events that occur during motion of droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces. Hysteresis is discussed in terms of receding contact line pinning and the tensile failure of capillary bridges. The sign of the curvature of the solid surface is implicated as playing a key role. The second is the report of a new method to prepare smooth low hysteresis surfaces. The thermal treatment of oxygen plasma-cleaned silicon wafers with trimethylsilyl-terminated linear poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS - commercial silicone oils) in disposable glass vessels is described. This treatment renders silicon/silica surfaces that contain covalently attached PDMS chains. The grafted layers of nanometre scale thickness are liquid-like (rotationally dynamic at room temperature), decrease activation barriers for contact line motion and minimize water contact angle hysteresis. This simple method requires neither sophisticated techniques nor substantial laboratory skills to perform.

  3. Chemical nano-heterogeneities detection by contact angle hysteresis: theoretical feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittoun, Eyal; Marmur, Abraham

    2010-10-19

    The theoretical feasibility of detecting chemical nanoheterogeneities on solid surfaces by measurement of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) was studied, using simplified models of cylindrical (2D) and axisymmetric (3D) drops on corresponding models of chemically heterogeneous, smooth solid surfaces. This feasibility depends on the ratio between the external energy input to the drop and the energies needed to deform its liquid-gas interface and move the contact line across energy barriers. A ubiquitous source of external energy is building vibrations, since most contact-angle measurements are done in buildings. The energy barriers that oppose the motion of the contact line were numerically calculated for various parameters of the two systems. The variations of the liquid-gas interfacial energy are discussed in terms of orders of magnitude. By comparing these energies, it is concluded that under regular ("barely perceptible") building vibrations CAH measurements may detect chemical heterogeneities at the few nanometers scale.

  4. Drops on soft solids: Free energy and double transition of contact angles

    OpenAIRE

    Lubbers, Luuk A.; Weijs, Joost H.; Botto, Lorenzo; Das, Siddhartha; Andreotti, Bruno; Snoeijer, Jacco H.

    2013-01-01

    The equilibrium shape of liquid drops on elastic substrates is determined by minimising elastic and capillary free energies, focusing on thick incompressible substrates. The problem is governed by three length scales: the size of the drop $R$, the molecular size $a$, and the ratio of surface tension to elastic modulus $\\gamma/E$. We show that the contact angles undergo two transitions upon changing the substrates from rigid to soft. The microscopic wetting angles deviate from Young's law when...

  5. Dissipative particle dynamics simulation of contact angle hysteresis on a patterned solid/air composite surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Bin; Yang, Xiaozhen

    2006-02-28

    We have studied two types of topological substrates--the continuous solid substrates (CSS) and the discontinuous solid substrates (DSS)--by using the dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method for a better understanding of the contact angle hysteresis on two such substrates. After the validation of DPD in the system, we found that DSS has a different distribution of the metastable states from that of CSS and that DSS has relatively larger contact angle hysteresis at lower temperature. Obtained results also show that CSS is more suitable for making an ultrahydrophobic or ultralyophobic surface than DSS from the point of view of dynamic wettability.

  6. A thermodynamic approach for determining the contact angle hysteresis for superhydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W; Amirfazli, A

    2005-12-01

    Contact angle hysteresis (CAH) is critical to superhydrophobicity of a surface. This study proposes a free energy thermodynamic analysis (of a 2-D model surface) that significantly simplifies calculations of free energy barrier associated with CAH phenomena. A microtextured surface with pillar structure, typical of one used in experimental studies, is used as an example. We demonstrate that the predicted CAH and equilibrium contact angles are consistent with experimental observations and predictions of Wenzel's and Cassie's equations, respectively. We also establish a criterion for transition between noncomposite and composite wetting states. The results and methodology presented can potentially be used for designing superhydrophobic surfaces.

  7. Application of the Zisman Critical Surface Tension Technique to Textile Materials Using Contact Angle Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江红; 迟克栋; 吴慧莉

    2001-01-01

    This is the first one that applies the Zisman critical surface tension technique successfully to textile materials. It was accomplished by carefully determination of the contact angle of fabric. The deviation caused by the porous structure of the fabric will be taken into account. To do so, a Jens equation is applied, and the measured contact angles can be corrected. The surface porosity was determined by measurement and approximate calculation, and the chemical composition of the surface was characterized by means of attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared(FTIR/ATR).

  8. Apparent Contact Angle and Triple-Line Tension of a Soap Bubble on a Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João Filipe; Saramago, Benilde; Fortes, Manuel Amaral

    2001-07-15

    The contact angle, θ, of a small bubble on a flat solid substrate was measured as a function of bubble radius, R. The observed deviation of the contact angle from 90 degrees can be accounted for in terms of a negative line tension, tau. The measured values of |tau|/gamma(f), where gamma(f) is the film tension, ranged between 0.15 and 0.6 mm and are proportional to the height, h, of the Plateau border, with |tau| congruent with1.7gamma(f)h. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  9. Efficiency of nonstandard and high contact ratio involute spur gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, N. E.; Loewenthal, S. H.

    1986-01-01

    A power loss prediction was extended to include involute spur gears of nonstandard proportions. The method is used to analyze the effects of modified addendum, tooth thickness, and gear center distance in addition to the parameters previously considered which included gear diameter, pitch, pressure angle, face width, oil viscosity, speed, and torque. Particular emphasis was placed on high contact ratio gearing (contact ratios greater than two). Despite their higher sliding velocities, high contact ratio gears are designed to levels of efficiency comparable to those of conventional gears while retaining their advantages through proper selection of gear geometry.

  10. Contact angle hysteresis and meniscus corrugation on randomly heterogeneous surfaces with mesa-type defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliev, Dimitar; Pesheva, Nina; Iliev, Stanimir

    2013-05-14

    The results of a numerical study of the various characteristics of the static contact of a liquid meniscus with a flat but heterogeneous surface, consisting of two types of homogeneous materials, forming regularly and randomly distributed microscopic defects are presented. The solutions for the meniscus shape are obtained numerically using the full expression of the system free energy functional. The goal is to establish how the magnitude and the limits of the hysteresis interval of the equilibrium contact angle, the Cassie's angle, and the contact line (CL) roughness exponent are related to the parameters, characterizing the heterogeneous surface-the equilibrium contact angles on the two materials and their fractions. We compare the results of different ways of determining the averaged contact angle on heterogeneous surfaces. We study the spread of the CL corrugation along the liquid meniscus. We compare our results with the numerical results, obtained using linearized energy functional, and also with experimental results for the CL roughness exponent. The obtained results support the conclusion that some characteristics depends on the type (regular or random) of the heterogeneity pattern.

  11. Effects of dynamic contact angle on liquid infiltration into horizontal capillary tubes: (semi)-analytical solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilpert, Markus

    2009-09-01

    We generalize Washburn's analytical solution for capillary flow in a horizontally oriented tube by accounting for a dynamic contact angle. We consider two general models for dynamic contact angle: the uncompensated Young force on the contact line depends on the capillary number in the form of either (1) a power law with exponent beta or (2) a power series. By considering the ordinary differential equation (ODE) for the velocity of the gas-liquid interface instead of the ODE for the interface position, we are able to derive new analytical solutions. For both dynamic contact angle models, we derive analytical solutions for the travel time of the gas-liquid interface as a function of interface velocity. The interface position as a function of time can be obtained through numerical integration. For the power law and beta=1 (an approximation of Cox's model for dynamic contact angle), we obtain an analytical solution for both interface position and velocity as a function of time. For the power law and beta=3, we can express the interface velocity as a function of time.

  12. Investigation of a new approach to measuring contact angles for hydrophilic impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kugel, Gerard; Klettke, Thomas; Goldberg, Jeffrey A; Benchimol, Jaques; Perry, Ronald D; Sharma, Shradha

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the initial water contact angles of seven unset impression materials using commercially available equipment, in an effort to determine whether polyether impression materials (Impregum) have lower contact angles and are, therefore, more hydrophilic than VPS impression materials. The hydrophilic properties of unset polyether and VPS impression materials were analyzed with respect to their water contact angle measurements using the commercially available Drop Shape Analysis System DSA 10. Twenty-five data points per second were collected via video analysis. There was no delay from start of measurement and data collection. Data was collected for approximately 12 s. Droplet size was determined on the thickness of canula. If the droplets became too small in volume, the water that evaporated during the measurement was large in comparison to the volume of the droplet. Therefore, 5 microl was chosen as the lowest volume. Five trials were conducted per series for each featured material. Contact angles were calculated using the circle fitting method. Three tests using this technique were designed to control the variables of contact angle measurement with regard to time, the varying amount of fluid in contact with impression material during clinical use, and material thickness. Sample thickness of impression material was controlled by stripping the paste flat on a glass plate using a marking template to ensure a constant film thickness. Tests were conducted in a climatized room at 24 degrees C +/- 1 degree C. Deionized water was used as the fluid. The device was calibrated according to manufacturer's instruction for Young-Laplace fitting prior to the measurements. Results were analyzed using One-Way ANOVA, Tukey test, and t-test, as appropriate. Comparing the fast setting impression materials by One-Way ANOVA and Tukey tests (p water in contact with the impression material, the polyether impression materials showed a

  13. Linking fractional wettability and contact angle dynamics in water repellent soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Sarah; Smith, James

    2016-04-01

    Dynamic soil water repellency has become a highly documented soil phenomenon across a range of environmental conditions and investigated within a range of disciplines. With global climate change at the environmental science fore, there is growing concern and need for accurate quantification of fundamental soil hydraulic properties and model parameterization. In the presence of soil water repellency, however, substantial unknowns remain in terms of characterizing repellency and drawing linkages to fundamental hydraulic parameters. This is often related to the complexity of investigating soil water repellency, which is often a challenging environment because of its spatially and temporally variable nature. To help bridge this gap, this work reports on different approaches using various technologies to explore opportunities that yield greater quantification and parametrization of soil water repellency in natural hydrologic systems at different scales. These approaches include X-ray microtomography (μXCT), Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis (ADSA), Drop Penetration tests (MED/WDPT), and Tension Infiltrometry. This work has shown the strength of conceptually linking contact angle dynamics and fractional wettability as a means to understand the nature of infiltration in water repellent soils and provide a mechanistic foundation upon which repellency can be quantified and related to fundamental hydraulic properties. Contact angle dynamics and fractional wettability are complimentary terminology that appear in the multiphase flow and soil physics literature, but have largely/essentially only been applied in synthetic systems. Their utility in natural environments is potentially significant and conceptually useful since they can readily incorporate existing characterizations while providing greater opportunity for articulating and defining specific behaviours in systems with high spatial and temporal heterogeneity.

  14. Static contact angle measurement at different volumes of a drop sitting on non-ferrous metals

    OpenAIRE

    Feoktistov Dmitriy; Orlova Evgeniya; Batischeva Kseniya; Semenov Andrey

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the experimental study of the effect of the liquid volume on the static contact angle under the condition of the stationary contact line on the rough and polished surfaces of non-ferrous metals. The experiments were carried out using the shadow optical system. Comparison between two methods of drop profile processing was conducted. It was found that in addition to the friction and gravity forces, the structure of the non-ferrous metals significantly influence on the static ...

  15. Liquid-bridge stability and breakup on surfaces with contact-angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Amir; Hill, Reghan J

    2016-08-10

    We study the stability and breakup of liquid bridges with a free contact line on surfaces with contact-angle hysteresis (CAH) under zero-gravity conditions. Non-ideal surfaces exhibit CAH because of surface imperfections, by which the constraints on three-phase contact lines are influenced. Given that interfacial instabilities are constraint-sensitive, understanding how CAH affects the stability and breakup of liquid bridges is crucial for predicting the drop size in contact-drop dispensing. Unlike ideal surfaces on which contact lines are always free irrespective of surface wettability, contact lines may undergo transitions from pinned to free and vice versa during drop deposition on non-ideal surfaces. Here, we experimentally and theoretically examine how stability and breakup are affected by CAH, highlighting cases where stability is lost during a transition from a pinned-pinned (more constrained) to pinned-free (less constrained) interface-rather than a critical state. This provides a practical means of expediting or delaying stability loss. We also demonstrate how the dynamic contact angle can control the contact-line radius following stability loss.

  16. Estimation of contact angle for hydrophobic silica nanoparticles in their hexagonally ordered layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Detrich, Ádám; Nyári, Mária; Volentiru, Emőke; Hórvölgyi, Zoltán, E-mail: zhorvolgyi@mail.bme.hu

    2013-07-15

    Wetting properties of bilayered nanostructured coatings were studied in this work. Coatings were prepared by stratifying a compact silica sol–gel (SG) film and a Langmuir–Blodgett (LB) layer of differently sized (84, 131 and 227 nm) Stöber silica particles onto glass substrates. Joint high temperature annealing of the layers increased the mechanical stability of the particulate film facilitating its further investigations. Regular structure of LB layers allowed us to carry out wetting model investigations. Close-packed arrangement of particles was reinforced by optical measurements. Transmittance spectra of LB films were taken and evaluated by a theoretical model. Resulting effective refractive index and film thickness values indicated a good agreement between the real and the supposed (hexagonally close packed, monodisperse spherical particles) layer structure. It was confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) images, too. Advancing and receding water contact angles (CA) on differently (with mono- and bifunctional chlorosilanes) hydrophobized SG and combined films were measured applying the sessile drop method. SG films showed approximately the same CA-s after different silylation processes without considerable contact angle hysteresis (CAH). In case of combined films ca. 30° higher advancing CA-s were measured at stronger silylation and only the milder silylation resulted in significant CAH. It was explained by the surface heterogeneity of constituent particles. Layers of differently sized particles showed the same wetting properties in all cases in agreement to the Cassie–Baxter equation which was used for the estimation of CA values for the individual silica particles (88–90° and 105–106° depending on the silylation conditions). - Highlights: • Wetting of silica sol–gel films and LB layers of Stöber silica particles was studied. • Close-packed structure of LB layers was justified by optical and FESEM studies. • Only

  17. Apparent contact angles induced by evaporation into air: interferometric measurements and lubrication-type modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colinet, Pierre; Tsoumpas, Yannis; Dehaeck, Sam; Rednikov, Alexey

    2014-11-01

    For volatile liquids, finite contact angles on solid substrates can occur even in the case of perfect wetting, immobile contact lines and ideally smooth surfaces. This is a fluid-dynamic effect due to evaporation typically intensifying towards a small vicinity of the contact line. In the present talk, we first overview recent theoretical results on the subject, where we focus primarily on the case of diffusion-limited evaporation into air. The model is based upon the so-called de Gennes' paradigm, incorporating simultaneously the spreading coefficient and the disjoining pressure in the form of an inverse cubic law. Then we carry out comparison with experimental results for the contact angles of evaporating sessile drops of several perfectly-wetting HFE liquids of different volatility recently obtained by Mach-Zehnder interferometry. The scaling-type theoretical prediction for the apparent contact angle is found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements. Another model based upon the Kelvin effect (curvature dependence of the saturation conditions) is also briefly discussed, an important conceptual feature of which being that contact-line singularities (both evaporation- and motion-induced) can be fully regularized, in contrast with the first model. Support from ESA, BELSPO and FRS-FNRS is gratefully acknowledged.

  18. Role of contact-angle hysteresis for fluid transport in wet granular matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Roman; Semprebon, Ciro; Kadau, Dirk; Herrmann, Hans J; Brinkmann, Martin; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    The stability of sand castles is determined by the structure of wet granulates. Experimental data on the size distribution of fluid pockets are ambiguous with regard to their origin. We discovered that contact-angle hysteresis plays a fundamental role in the equilibrium distribution of bridge volumes, and not geometrical disorder as commonly conjectured. This has substantial consequences on the mechanical properties of wet granular beds, including a history-dependent rheology and lowered strength. Our findings are obtained using a model in which the Laplace pressures, bridge volumes, and contact angles are dynamical variables associated with the contact points. While accounting for contact line pinning, we track the temporal evolution of each bridge. We observe a crossover to a power-law decay of the variance of capillary pressures at late times and a saturation of the variance of bridge volumes to a finite value connected to contact line pinning. Large-scale simulations of liquid transport in the bridge network reveal that the equilibration dynamics at early times is well described by a mean-field model. The spread of final bridge volumes can be directly related to the magnitude of contact-angle hysteresis.

  19. Effect of dynamic contact angle in a volume of fluid (VOF) model for a microfluidic capillary flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashish Saha, Auro; Mitra, Sushanta K

    2009-11-15

    We perform three-dimensional numerical and experimental study of the dynamic contact angle using volume of fluid (VOF) method applied to microfluidic channels with integrated pillars. Initially, we evaluated different dynamic contact angle models (hydrodynamic, molecular kinetic and empirical) for capillary filling of a two-dimensional microchannel using analytical formulation. Further, the models which require a minimum prescription of adjustable parameters are only used for the study of capillary filling of microchannels with integrated pillars using different working fluids such as DI water, ethanol and isopropyl alcohol. Different microchannel geometry with varying diameter/height/spacing were studied for circular pillars. Effect of square pillars and changing the overall number of pillars on the capillary phenomena were also simulated. Our study demonstrated that the dynamic contact angle models modifies the transient response of the meniscus displacement and also the observed trends are model specific for the various microchannel geometries and working fluids. However, the different models have minimal effect on the meniscus profile. Different inlet boundary conditions were applied to observe the effect of grid resolution selected for numerical study on the capillary filling time. A grid dependent dynamic contact angle model which incorporates effective slip in the model was also used to observe the grid convergence of the numerical results. The grid independence was shown to improve marginally by applying the grid dependent dynamic contact angle model. Further we did numerical experiments of capillary filling considering variable surface wettability on the top and bottom walls of the microchannel with alternate hydrophilic-hydrophobic patterns. The meniscus front pinning was noticed for a high wetting contrast between the patterns. Non uniform streamline patterns indicated mixing of the fluid when using patterned walls. Such a microfluidic device with

  20. New Method Developed to Measure Contact Angles of a Sessile Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, David F.; Zhang, Nengli

    2002-01-01

    The spreading of an evaporating liquid on a solid surface occurs in many practical processes and is of importance in a number of practical situations such as painting, textile dyeing, coating, gluing, and thermal engineering. Typical processes involving heat transfer where the contact angle plays an important role are film cooling, boiling, and the heat transfer through heat pipes. The biological phenomenon of cell spreading also is analogous to a drop spreading (ref. 1). In the study of spreading, the dynamic contact angle describes the interfacial properties on solid substrates and, therefore, has been studied by physicists and fluid mechanics investigators. The dynamic contact angle of a spreading nonvolatile liquid drop provides a simple tool in the study of the free-boundary problem, but the study of the spreading of a volatile liquid drop is of more practical interest because the evaporation of common liquids is inevitable in practical processes. The most common method to measure the contact angle, the contact radius, and the height of a sessile drop on a solid surface is to view the drop from its edge through an optical microscope. However, this method gives only local information in the view direction. Zhang and Yang (ref. 2) developed a laser shadowgraphy method to investigate the evaporation of sessile drop on a glass plate. As described here, Zhang and Chao (refs. 3 and 4) improved the method and suggested a new optical arrangement to measure the dynamic contact angle and the instant evaporation rate of a sessile drop with much higher accuracy (less than 1 percent). With this method, any fluid motion in the evaporating drop can be visualized through shadowgraphy without using a tracer, which often affects the field under investigation.

  1. Effect of flow field and geometry on the dynamic contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukyanov, A V; Shikhmurzaev, Y D

    2007-05-01

    A number of recent experiments suggest that, at a given wetting speed, the dynamic contact angle formed by an advancing liquid-gas interface with a solid substrate depends on the flow field and geometry near the moving contact line. In the present work, this effect is investigated in the framework of an earlier developed theory that was based on the fact that dynamic wetting is, by its very name, a process of formation of a new liquid-solid interface (newly "wetted" solid surface) and hence should be considered not as a singular problem but as a particular case from a general class of flows with forming or/and disappearing interfaces. The results demonstrate that, in the flow configuration of curtain coating, where a liquid sheet ("curtain") impinges onto a moving solid substrate, the actual dynamic contact angle indeed depends not only on the wetting speed and material constants of the contacting media, as in the so-called slip models, but also on the inlet velocity of the curtain, its height, and the angle between the falling curtain and the solid surface. In other words, for the same wetting speed the dynamic contact angle can be varied by manipulating the flow field and geometry near the moving contact line. The obtained results have important experimental implications: given that the dynamic contact angle is determined by the values of the surface tensions at the contact line and hence depends on the distributions of the surface parameters along the interfaces, which can be influenced by the flow field, one can use the overall flow conditions and the contact angle as a macroscopic multiparametric signal-response pair that probes the dynamics of the liquid-solid interface. This approach would allow one to investigate experimentally such properties of the interface as, for example, its equation of state and the rheological properties involved in the interface's response to an external torque, and would help to measure its parameters, such as the coefficient of

  2. Effective Floquet Hamiltonian for spin = 1 in magic angle spinning NMR using contact transformation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoj Kumar Pandey; Mangala Sunder Krishnan

    2007-09-01

    Contact transformation is an operator transformation method in time-independent perturbation theory which is used successfully in molecular spectroscopy to obtain an effective Hamiltonian. Floquet theory is used to transform the periodic time-dependent Hamiltonian, to a time-independent Floquet Hamiltonian. In this article contact transformation method has been used to get the analytical representation of Floquet Hamiltonian for quadrupolar nuclei with spin = 1 in the presence of an RF field and first order quadrupolar interaction in magic angle spinning NMR experiments. The eigenvalues of contact transformed Hamiltonian as well as Floquet Hamiltonian have been calculated and a comparison is made between the eigenvalues obtained using the two Hamiltonians.

  3. Nonlocal hydrodynamic influence on the dynamic contact angle: Slip models versus experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, M.C.T.; Summers, J.L.; Shikhmurzaev, Y. D.; Clarke, A.; Blake, T. D.

    2006-01-01

    Experiments reported by Blake et al. [Phys. Fluids. 11, 1995 (1999)] suggest that the dynamic contact angle formed between the free surface of a liquid and a moving solid boundary at a fixed contact-line speed depends on the flow field/geometry near the moving contact line. The present paper examines quantitatively whether or not it is possible to attribute this effect to bending of the free surface due to hydrodynamic stresses acting upon it and hence interpret the results in terms of the so...

  4. On the physically based modeling of surface tension and moving contact lines with dynamic contact angles on the continuum scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, M.; Keller, F.; Säckel, W.; Hirschler, M.; Kunz, P.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.; Nieken, U.

    2016-04-01

    The description of wetting phenomena is a challenging problem on every considerable length-scale. The behavior of interfaces and contact lines on the continuum scale is caused by intermolecular interactions like the Van der Waals forces. Therefore, to describe surface tension and the resulting dynamics of interfaces and contact lines on the continuum scale, appropriate formulations must be developed. While the Continuum Surface Force (CSF) model is well-engineered for the description of interfaces, there is still a lack of treatment of contact lines, which are defined by the intersection of an ending fluid interface and a solid boundary surface. In our approach we use a balance equation for the contact line and extend the Navier-Stokes equations in analogy to the extension of a two-phase interface in the CSF model. Since this model depicts a physically motivated approach on the continuum scale, no fitting parameters are introduced and the deterministic description leads to a dynamical evolution of the system. As verification of our theory, we show a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model and simulate the evolution of droplet shapes and their corresponding contact angles.

  5. Contact angle studies on PDMS surfaces fouled by bovine serum albumin

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Windvoel, VT

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) has a hydrophobic surface, forming a contact angle of around 110º with deionised water. It is due to its hydrophobic nature that the elastomer is prone to bio-fouling, such as non-specific adsorption of biomaterials like...

  6. A reference guide to microbial cell surface hydrophobicity based on contact angles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Mei, HC; Busscher, HJ; Bos, R.R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Acid-base interactions form the origin of the hydrophobicity of microbial cell-surfaces and can be quantitated from contact angle measurements on microbial lawns with water, formamide, methyleneiodide and/or alpha-bromonaphthalene. This review provides a reference guide to microbial cell surface hyd

  7. A simple apparatus for the determining contact angle of water repellent fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. M. Banerji

    1955-04-01

    Full Text Available A simple apparatus for the determination of fabric-water contact angle of water repellent fabrics is described. It is based on the tilting plate principle and the additional advantage that the end point can be sharply ascertained by optical means.

  8. Mesoscopic model for microscale hydrodynamics and interfacial phenomena: slip, films, and contact-angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colosqui, Carlos E; Kavousanakis, Michail E; Papathanasiou, Athanasios G; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G

    2013-01-01

    We present a model based on the lattice Boltzmann equation that is suitable for the simulation of dynamic wetting. The model is capable of exhibiting fundamental interfacial phenomena such as weak adsorption of fluid on the solid substrate and the presence of a thin surface film within which a disjoining pressure acts. Dynamics in this surface film, tightly coupled with hydrodynamics in the fluid bulk, determine macroscopic properties of primary interest: the hydrodynamic slip; the equilibrium contact angle; and the static and dynamic hysteresis of the contact angles. The pseudo-potentials employed for fluid-solid interactions are composed of a repulsive core and an attractive tail that can be independently adjusted. This enables effective modification of the functional form of the disjoining pressure so that one can vary the static and dynamic hysteresis on surfaces that exhibit the same equilibrium contact angle. The modeled fluid-solid interface is diffuse, represented by a wall probability function that ultimately controls the momentum exchange between solid and fluid phases. This approach allows us to effectively vary the slip length for a given wettability (i.e., a given static contact angle) of the solid substrate.

  9. A Langevin model for fluctuating contact angle behaviour parametrised using molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E R; Müller, E A; Craster, R V; Matar, O K

    2016-12-06

    Molecular dynamics simulations are employed to develop a theoretical model to predict the fluid-solid contact angle as a function of wall-sliding speed incorporating thermal fluctuations. A liquid bridge between counter-sliding walls is studied, with liquid-vapour interface-tracking, to explore the impact of wall-sliding speed on contact angle. The behaviour of the macroscopic contact angle varies linearly over a range of capillary numbers beyond which the liquid bridge pinches off, a behaviour supported by experimental results. Nonetheless, the liquid bridge provides an ideal test case to study molecular scale thermal fluctuations, which are shown to be well described by Gaussian distributions. A Langevin model for contact angle is parametrised to incorporate the mean, fluctuation and auto-correlations over a range of sliding speeds and temperatures. The resulting equations can be used as a proxy for the fully-detailed molecular dynamics simulation allowing them to be integrated within a continuum-scale solver.

  10. On canonical cylinder sections for accurate determination of contact angle in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concus, Paul; Finn, Robert; Zabihi, Farhad

    1992-01-01

    Large shifts of liquid arising from small changes in certain container shapes in zero gravity can be used as a basis for accurately determining contact angle. Canonical geometries for this purpose, recently developed mathematically, are investigated here computationally. It is found that the desired nearly-discontinuous behavior can be obtained and that the shifts of liquid have sufficient volume to be readily observed.

  11. Probing Cellular Binding of Dendrofullerene by in-situ Electrochemical Contact Angle Measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU,Jian; ZHANG,Ren-Yun; WU,Chun-Hui; ZHAO,Xue-Yan; ZHENG,Li-Qiang; FU,De-Gang; CHEN,Bao-An; WANG,Xue-Mei

    2008-01-01

    Dendrofullerene (C60DF) is a novel fullerene derivative with potential and promising biomedical applications.In this work, electrochemical/contact angle behavior of C60DF in the cellular system has been explored by in-situ electrochemical contact angle measurement. This measuring system is a newly developed technique which can provide electrochemical and contact angle detection simultaneously. The electrochemical results indicate that dendrofullerene may effectively bind and permeate the tumor cell membrane and then distribute into the cancer cells.Our observations of in-situ electrochemical contact angle measurement also illustrate that the permeation and interaction of C60DF with target cancer cells may lead to some variation of the configurational structure of the relative cell membrane and thus result in the change of hydrophilic/nydrophobic properties of target cellular system. Furthermore, through confocus fluorescence microscopy study we found that, upon application of C60DF, the intracellular accumulation of anticancer drug daunorubicin in leukemia K562 cells could be remarkably enhanced by C60DF.Therefore fullerene derivatives were demonstrated to be a good candidate that can play an important role in improving the intracellular drug uptake in the target cancer cells.

  12. Time-related contact angle measurements with human plasma on biomaterial surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakhorst, G; Van der Mei, HC; Van Oeveren, W; Spijker, HT; Busscher, HJ

    1999-01-01

    Axisymmetric drop shape analysis by profile (ADSA-P) was used to assess in time contact angle changes of human plasma drops placed on four different biomaterials. Results were related with conventional blood compatibility measurements: albumin adsorption, fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion.

  13. Contact angle and detachment energy of shape anisotropic particles at fluid-fluid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjali, Thriveni G; Basavaraj, Madivala G

    2016-09-15

    The three phase contact angle of particles, a measure of its wettability, is an important factor that greatly influences their behaviour at interfaces. It is one of the principal design parameters for potential applications of particles as emulsion/foam stabilizers, functional coatings and other novel materials. In the present work, the effect of size, shape and surface chemistry of particles on their contact angle is investigated using the gel trapping technique, which facilitates the direct visualization of the equilibrium position of particles at interfaces. The contact angle of hematite particles of spherocylindrical, peanut and cuboidal shapes, hematite-silica core-shell and silica shells is reported at a single particle level. The spherocylindrical and peanut shaped particles are always positioned with their major axis parallel to the interface. However, for cuboidal particles at air-water as well as decane-water interfaces, different orientations namely - face-up, edge-up and the vertex-up - are observed. The influence of gravity on the equilibrium position of the colloidal particles at the interface is studied using the hematite-silica core-shell particles and the silica shells. The measured contact angle values are utilized in the calculations of the detachment and surface energies of the hematite particles adsorbed at the interface.

  14. Mesoscopic modeling of a two-phase flow in the presence of boundaries: The contact angle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benzi, R.; Biferale, L.; Sbragaglia, M.; Succi, S.; Toschi, F.

    2006-01-01

    We present a mesoscopic model, based on the Boltzmann equation, for the interaction between a solid wall and a nonideal fluid. We present an analytic derivation of the contact angle in terms of the surface tension between the liquid-gas, the liquid-solid, and the gas-solid phases. We study the depen

  15. Effect of the meniscus contact angle during early regimes of spontaneous imbibition in nanochannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karna, Nabin Kumar; Oyarzua, Elton; Walther, Jens Honore

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale capillarity has been extensively investigated; nevertheless, many fundamental questions remain open. In spontaneous imbibition, the classical Lucas-Washburn equation predicts a singularity as the fluid enters the channel consisting of an anomalous infinite velocity of the capillary meni...... the channels under study. Furthermore, we propose an expression for the time evolution of the dynamic contact angle in nanochannels which, when incorporated into Bosanquet's equation, satisfactorily explains the initial capillary rise....... study, large scale atomistic simulations are conducted to investigate capillary imbibition of water in slit silica nanochannels with heights between 4 and 18 nm. We find that the meniscus contact angle remains constant during the inertial regime and its value depends on the height of the channel. We...... also find that the meniscus velocity computed at the channel entrance is related to the particular value of the meniscus contact angle. Moreover, during the subsequent visco-inertial regime, as the influence of viscosity increases, the meniscus contact angle is found to be time dependent for all...

  16. Effect of the meniscus contact angle during early regimes of spontaneous imbibition in nanochannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karna, Nabin Kumar; Oyarzua, Elton; Walther, Jens H; Zambrano, Harvey A

    2016-11-30

    Nanoscale capillarity has been extensively investigated; nevertheless, many fundamental questions remain open. In spontaneous imbibition, the classical Lucas-Washburn equation predicts a singularity as the fluid enters the channel consisting of an anomalous infinite velocity of the capillary meniscus. Bosanquet's equation overcomes this problem by taking into account fluid inertia predicting an initial imbibition regime with constant velocity. Nevertheless, the initial constant velocity as predicted by Bosanquet's equation is much greater than those observed experimentally. In the present study, large scale atomistic simulations are conducted to investigate capillary imbibition of water in slit silica nanochannels with heights between 4 and 18 nm. We find that the meniscus contact angle remains constant during the inertial regime and its value depends on the height of the channel. We also find that the meniscus velocity computed at the channel entrance is related to the particular value of the meniscus contact angle. Moreover, during the subsequent visco-inertial regime, as the influence of viscosity increases, the meniscus contact angle is found to be time dependent for all the channels under study. Furthermore, we propose an expression for the time evolution of the dynamic contact angle in nanochannels which, when incorporated into Bosanquet's equation, satisfactorily explains the initial capillary rise.

  17. Effect of meniscus contact angle during early regimes of spontaneous capillarity in nanochannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karna, N. K.; Oyarzua, Elton; Walther, J. H.; Zambrano, Harvey

    2016-11-01

    In capillary imbibition, the classical Lucas-Washburn equation predicts a singularity as the fluid enters the channel consisting in an anomalous infinite velocity of the capillary meniscus. The Bosanquet's equation overcomes this problem by taking into account fluid inertia predicting an initial imbibition regime with constant velocity. Nevertheless, the initial constant velocity predicted by Bosanquet's equation is much greater than experimentally observed. In the present study, we conduct atomistic simulations to investigate capillary imbibition of water in silica nanochannels with heights between 4 and 18 nm. We find that the meniscus contact angle remains constant during the inertial regime and its value depends upon the height of the channel. We also find that the meniscus velocity computed at the channel entrance is related to the particular value of the meniscus contact angle. Moreover, after the inertial regime, the meniscus contact angle is found to be time dependent for all the channels under study. We propose an expression for the time evolution of the dynamic contact angle in nanochannels which, when incorporated in Bosanquet's equation, satisfactorily explains the initial capillary rise. We aknowledge financial support from Conicyt project.

  18. Influence of the dynamic contact angle on the characterization of porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martic, G; De Coninck, J; Blake, T D

    2003-07-01

    It has been shown recently that the classical Lucas-Washburn equation, often used to model the dynamics of liquid penetration into porous media, should be modified to take account of the dynamic contact angle between the liquid and the pore. Here we show how neglect of this effect can lead to significant errors in estimation of the effective pore radius.

  19. Measurements of the contact angle of Noa81 photoresist for different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirichenko Ekaterina O.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we study the properties of the surface, obtained by applying Noa 81 photoresist at different temperatures of the substrate. The measurement of free energy was conducted by the Owens, Wendt, Rabel and Kaelble method under isothermal conditions. The paper presents the obtained data on contact angle for different temperatures.

  20. Characterization of polyethersulfone-polyimide hollow fiber membranes by atomic force microscopy and contact angle goniometery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khulbe, K.C.; Feng, C.; Matsuura, T.; Kapantaidakis, G.; Wessling, Matthias; Koops, G.H.

    2003-01-01

    Asymmetric blend polyethersulfone-polyimide (PES-PI) hollow fiber membranes prepared at different air gap and used for gas separation are characterized by atomic force microscopy (inside and out side surfaces) and by measuring the contact angle of out side surface. The outer surface was entirely

  1. Fluid epitaxialization effect on velocity dependence of dynamic contact angle in molecular scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takahiro; Hirata, Yosuke; Kukita, Yutaka

    2010-02-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to investigate the effect of epitaxial ordering of the fluid molecules on the microscopic dynamic contact angle. The simulations were performed in a Couette-flow-like geometry where two immiscible fluids were confined between two parallel walls moving in opposite directions. The extent of ordering was varied by changing the number density of the wall particles. As the ordering becomes more evident, the change in the dynamic contact angle tends to be more sensitive to the increase in the relative velocity of the contact line to the wall. Stress components around the contact line is evaluated in order to examine the stress balance among the hydrodynamic stresses (viscous stress and pressure), the deviation of Young's stress from the static equilibrium condition, and the fluid-wall shear stress induced by the relative motion between them. It is shown that the magnitude of the shear stress on the fluid-wall surface is the primary contribution to the sensitivity of the dynamic contact angle and that the sensitivity is intensified by the fluid ordering near the wall surface.

  2. Simulations of impinging droplets with surfactant-dependent dynamic contact angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Sashikumaar

    2015-11-01

    An arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) finite element scheme for computations of soluble surfactant droplet impingement on a horizontal surface is presented. The numerical scheme solves the time-dependent Navier-Stokes equations for the fluid flow, scalar convection-diffusion equation for the surfactant transport in the bulk phase, and simultaneously, surface evolution equations for the surfactants on the free surface and on the liquid-solid interface. The effects of surfactants on the flow dynamics are included into the model through the surface tension and surfactant-dependent dynamic contact angle. In particular, the dynamic contact angle (θd) of the droplet is defined as a function of the surfactant concentration at the contact line and the equilibrium contact angle (θe0) of the clean surface using the nonlinear equation of state for surface tension. Further, the surface forces are included into the model as surface divergence of the surface stress tensor that allows to incorporate the Marangoni effects without calculating the surface gradient of the surfactant concentration on the free surface. In addition to a mesh convergence study and validation of the numerical results with experiments, the effects of adsorption and desorption surfactant coefficients on the flow dynamics in wetting, partially wetting and non-wetting droplets are studied in detail. It is observed that the effects of surfactants are more in wetting droplets than in the non-wetting droplets. Further, the presence of surfactants at the contact line reduces the equilibrium contact angle further when θe0 is less than 90°, and increases it further when θe0 is greater than 90°. Nevertheless, the presence of surfactants has no effect on the contact angle when θe0 = 90 °. The numerical study clearly demonstrates that the surfactant-dependent contact angle has to be considered, in addition to the Marangoni effect, in order to study the flow dynamics and the equilibrium states of surfactant

  3. Contact angle hysteresis on polymer substrates established with various experimental techniques, its interpretation, and quantitative characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormashenko, Edward; Bormashenko, Yelena; Whyman, Gene; Pogreb, Roman; Musin, Albina; Jager, Rachel; Barkay, Zahava

    2008-04-15

    The effect of contact angle hysteresis (CAH) was studied on various polymer substrates with traditional and new experimental techniques. The new experimental technique presented in the article is based on the slow deformation of the droplet, thus CAH is studied under the constant volume of the drop in contrast to existing techniques when the volume of the drop is changed under the measurement. The energy of hysteresis was calculated in the framework of the improved Extrand approach. The advancing contact angle established with a new technique is in a good agreement with that measured with the needle-syringe method. The receding angles measured with three experimental techniques demonstrated a very significant discrepancy. The force pinning the triple line responsible for hysteresis was calculated.

  4. Explicit analytical solutions for liquid infiltration into capillary tubes: dynamic and constant contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilpert, Markus

    2010-04-01

    We derive new analytical solutions for liquid infiltration into a gas-filled capillary tube, whose inlet is connected to a liquid reservoir held at a constant pressure. We generalize the Lucas-Washburn theory to account for a model for dynamic contact angle that assumes the nonequilibrium Young force to depend linearly on the velocity of the gas-liquid interface. Like Lucas and Washburn, we neglect inertial forces. Using the Lambert function, we derive explicit analytical solutions for the interface position, velocity, and acceleration as a function of time. Consistent with previous work, which used more general models for dynamic contact angle, we can distinguish between five infiltration scenarios: horizontal infiltration, upward infiltration (capillary rise), as well as steady-state, accelerating, and decelerating downward infiltration. We determine the mutually exclusive conditions for the different infiltration scenarios to occur in terms of the nondimensional parameters that define the problem. Moreover, we develop 2D and 3D diagrams that show which parameter combination results in which infiltration scenario. Our analytical solutions are also valid in the limit where the dynamic contact angle becomes constant. For a constant contact angle, accelerating downward infiltration occurs only if the initial interface is not located at the tube inlet but further down the tube. For the special case in which the contact angle is constant, the liquid pressure at the tube inlet is equal to the gas pressure, and the interface is initially located at the tube inlet, our solution for upward infiltration is identical to a solution previously reported in the literature.

  5. X-ray computed microtomography for drop shape analysis and contact angle measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Maurizio; Guilizzoni, Manfredo; Fest-Santini, Stephanie

    2013-11-01

    The interaction between an atomized fluid and a solid surface has a great importance in many fields, both in adiabatic conditions and when heat transfer is involved. To investigate the behavior of many drops in contact with a surface, the first step is to study a single one of them and in that, surface wettability is key parameter. Wettability analyses are usually performed by contact angle measurement, in most cases using the sessile drop or captive bubble techniques. Such techniques require optical acquisition of a side view of the drop or bubble, with a series of drawbacks when conventional optics are used, in particular for not uniform, not planar or rough base surfaces. X-ray micro-computed tomography is therefore used to acquire a 3D scan of a drop gently deposited on a surface, with the aim to reconstruct the drop surface and to perform contact angle measurements on true cross-sections of the drop-surface couple. Comparison with contact angle measurements performed on conventional images is performed. The results evidence that the proposed technique is very promising for surface characterization and to get more accurate and detailed information about wettability characteristics.

  6. Comparison of contact angle hysteresis of different probe liquids on the same solid surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibowski, Emil; Jurak, Malgorzata

    2013-02-01

    Advancing and receding contact angles of water, formamide and diiodomethane were measured on 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) layers deposited on three different solid supports-glass, mica and poly(methyl methacrylate). Up to five statistical monolayers were deposited on the surfaces by spreading DPPC solution. It was found that even on five statistical DPPC monolayers, the hysteresis of a given liquid depends on the kind of solid support. Also on the same solid support the contact angle hysteresis is different for each probe liquid used. The AFM images show that the heights of roughness of the DPPC films cannot be the primary cause of the observed hysteresis because the heights are too small to cause the observed hystereses. It is believed that the hysteresis is due to the liquid film present right behind the three-phase solid surface/liquid drop/gas (vapour) contact line and the presence of Derjaguin pressure. The value of contact angle hysteresis depends on both the solid surface and liquid properties as well as on intermolecular interactions between them.

  7. Changes in water contact angles during the first phase of setting of dental impression materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondon, Matthias; Ziegler, Christiane

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the changes in wettability of dental impression materials during setting. This study compared the properties of the initial water contact of two different dental impression materials and their subsequent development during polymerization. Two dental impression materials (Impregum Penta Soft and Aquasil) with different chemical compositions (polyether and polyvinyl siloxane, respectively) were investigated with respect to their changing wetting properties by time-resolved static contact angle measurements. Ten sets of measurements each were taken over a period of 400 seconds with 150 points of data each; the first pictures were used for further characterization of the initial interaction. With 73 degrees, Impregum Penta Soft exhibited a significantly lower contact angle, which stayed lower during the process of setting, compared to the silicone-based material. The initial interaction of the droplet showed a repulsive interaction of Aquasil with the water droplet. Impregum Penta Soft showed a more hydrophilic behavior during the process of setting compared to Aquasil and can therefore be expected to exhibit better flow properties. The method of time-resolved static contact angle measurements is a well-suited analytic instrument to monitor temporally changing wetting phenomena.

  8. Investigations for an alternative to contact angle measurement after Hexamethyldisilazane deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aßmann, H.; Krause, A.; Maurer, R.; Dankelmann, M.; Specht, M.; Usry, W.; Newcomb, R.

    2015-09-01

    The adhesion promoter Hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) plays a crucial role in i-line lithography. According to HMDS deposition forms, a hydrophobic surface defines upwardly directed, non-polar trimethysilyl groups. This condition is of particular importance for wet chemical development and subsequent wet chemical etching processes, because the defined hydrophobic surface prevents water from creeping beneath the resist mask. Undesirable effects, such as (partial) loss of the resist structure or under etching can be prevented. Currently, a common and suitable method to control the success of HMDS deposition is the contact angle measurement. There, a drop of water is applied to the substrate and the contact angle / wetting angle is measured. As a result, conclusions can be drawn about the HMDS process. Unfortunately, however, this simple to implement measurement method raises some problems. The measurement is extremely dependent on the substrate, wherein the measurement results vary greatly. A possible reason for this is the different surface properties of the wafers which are due to adsorbate films. Typically, a contact angle measurement is performed just after the HMDS deposition. A difference between pre- and post-measurement cannot be determined. A deviation of the contact angle can be caused by either an insufficient HMDS seeding, or just as well by other, unknown surface properties. The studies presented here were performed with the measuring system ChemetriQ 5000 from Qcept Technologies. This measurement system was originally developed for Inspection on non-visible defects on the wafer level. It is able to detect differences of work functions as a result of surface coverage by thin film / adsorbate, materials or residues. The change in the surface work function due to the generated adsorbate layer during the HMDS deposition is determined by the measuring system by means of a difference between pre- and post-measurement.

  9. Contact angles at the water-air interface of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils and clay minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofinskaya, O. A.; Kosterin, A. V.; Kosterina, E. A.

    2016-12-01

    Contact angles at the water-air interface have been measured for triturated preparations of clays and soils in order to assess changes in their hydrophobic properties under the effect of oil hydrocarbons. Tasks have been to determine the dynamics of contact angle under soil wetting conditions and to reveal the effect of chemical removal of organic matter from soils on the hydrophilicity of preparations. The potentialities of static and dynamic drop tests for assessing the hydrophilic-hydrophobic properties of soils have been estimated. Clays (kaolinite, gumbrine, and argillite) have been investigated, as well as plow horizons of soils from the Republic of Tatarstan: heavy loamy leached chernozem, medium loamy dark gray forest soil, and light loamy soddy-calcareous soil. The soils have been contaminated with raw oil and kerosene at rates of 0.1-3 wt %. In the uncontaminated and contaminated chernozem, capillary water capacity has been maintained for 250 days. The contact angles have been found to depend on the degree of dispersion of powdered preparation, the main type of clay minerals in the soil, the presence and amount of oxidation-resistant soil organic matter, and the soil-water contact time. Characteristic parameters of mathematical models for drop behavior on triturated preparations have been calculated. Contamination with hydrocarbons has resulted in a reliable increase in the contact angles of soil preparations. The hydrophobization of soil surface in chernozem is more active than in soils poorer in organic matter. The complete restoration of the hydrophilic properties of soils after hydrocarbon contamination is due to the oxidation of easily oxidizable organic matter at the low content of humus, or to wetting during several months in the absence of the mazut fraction.

  10. An analytical solution for a partially wetting puddle and the location of the static contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elena Diaz, M; Fuentes, Javier; Cerro, Ramon L; Savage, Michael D

    2010-08-01

    A model is formulated for a static puddle on a horizontal substrate taking account of capillarity, gravity and disjoining pressure arising from molecular interactions. There are three regions of interest--the molecular, transition and capillary regions with characteristic film thickness, hm, ht and hc. An analytical solution is presented for the shape of the vapour-liquid interface outside the molecular region where interfacial tension can be assumed constant. This solution is used to shed new light on the static contact angle and, specifically, it is shown that. (i) There is no point in the vapour-liquid interface where the angle of inclination, theta, is identically equal to the static contact angle, theta(o), but the angle at the point of null curvature is the closest with the difference of O(epsilon2) where epsilon2 = ht/hc is a small parameter. (ii) The liquid film is to O(epsilon) a wedge of angle theta(o) extending from a few nanometers to a few micrometers of the contact line. A second analytical solution for the shape of interface within the molecular region reveals that cos theta has a logarithmic variation with film thickness, cos theta=cos theta-ln[1-h2(m)/2h2]. The case, hm = 0, is of special significance since it refers to a unique configuration in which the effect of molecular interactions vanishes, disjoining pressure is everywhere zero and the vapour-liquid interface is now described exactly by the Young-Laplace equation and includes a wedge of angle, theta(o), extending down to the solid substrate.

  11. Effect of contact angle on the orientation, stability, and assembly of dense floating cubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniello, Robert; Khan, Kashan; Donnell, Michael; Rothstein, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, the effect of contact angle, density, and size on the orientation, stability, and assembly of floating cubes was investigated. All the cubes tested were more dense than water. Floatation occurred as a result of capillary stresses induced by deformation of the air-water interface. The advancing contact angle of the bare acrylic cubes was measured to be 85°. The contact angle of the cubes was increased by painting the cubes with a commercially available superhydrophobic paint to reach an advancing contact angle of 150°. Depending on their size, density, and contact angle, the cubes were observed to float in one of three primary orientations: edge up, vertex up, and face up. An experimental apparatus was built such that the sum of the gravitational force, buoyancy force, and capillary forces could be measured using a force transducer as a function of cube position as it was lowered through the air-water interface. Measurements showed that the maximum capillary forces were always experienced for the face up orientation. However, when floatation was possible in the vertex up orientation, it was found to be the most stable cube orientation because it had the lowest center of gravity. A series of theoretical predictions were performed for the cubes floating in each of the three primary orientations to calculate the net force on the cube. The theoretical predictions were found to match the experimental measurements well. A cube stability diagram of cube orientation as a function of cube contact angle and size was prepared from the predictions of theory and found to match the experimental observations quite well. The assembly of cubes floating face up and vertex up were also studied for assemblies of two, three, and many cubes. Cubes floating face up were found to assemble face-to-face and form regular square lattice patterns with no free interface between cubes. Cubes floating vertex up were found to assemble in a variety of different arrangements

  12. A Langevin model for the Dynamic Contact Angle Parameterised Using Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Edward; Muller, Erich; Craster, Richard; Matar, Omar

    2016-11-01

    An understanding of droplet spreading is essential in a diverse range of applications, including coating processes, dip feed reactors, crop spraying and biomedical treatments such as surfactant replacement theory. The default modelling tools for engineering fluid dynamics assume that the continuum hypothesis is valid. The contact line motion is very difficult to capture in this paradigm and requires some form of closure model, often tuned a priori to experiments. Molecular dynamics (MD), by assuming only an inter-molecular potential, reproduces the full detail of the three-phase contact line with no additional modelling assumptions. This provides an ideal test-bed to understand contact line motion. In this talk, MD results for a sheared liquid bridge are presented. The evolution and fluctuations of the dynamic contact angle are paramterised over a range of wall sliding speeds and temperatures. A Langevin model is proposed to reproduce the fluctuations and evolution of the contact angle. Results from this model are compared to molecular simulation data showing excellent agreement. The potential applications of this model, as well as limitation and possible extensions, are discussed. EPSRC UK platform Grant MACIPh (EP/L020564/1).

  13. Contact Angle of Drops Measured on Nontransparent Surfaces and Capillary Flow Visualized

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, David F.; Zhang, Nengli

    2003-01-01

    The spreading of a liquid on a solid surface is important for various practical processes, and contact-angle measurements provide an elegant method to characterize the interfacial properties of the liquid with the solid substrates. The complex physical processes occurring when a liquid contacts a solid play an important role in determining the performance of chemical processes and materials. Applications for these processes are in printing, coating, gluing, textile dyeing, and adhesives and in the pharmaceutical industry, biomedical research, adhesives, flat panel display manufacturing, surfactant chemistry, and thermal engineering.

  14. High-Throughput Contact Flow Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goff, Gaelle C; Lee, Jiseok; Gupta, Ankur; Hill, William Adam; Doyle, Patrick S

    2015-10-01

    High-throughput fabrication of graphically encoded hydrogel microparticles is achieved by combining flow contact lithography in a multichannel microfluidic device and a high capacity 25 mm LED UV source. Production rates of chemically homogeneous particles are improved by two orders of magnitude. Additionally, the custom-built contact lithography instrument provides an affordable solution for patterning complex microstructures on surfaces.

  15. 3D computation of an incipient motion of a sessile drop on a rigid surface with contact angle hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linder, Nicklas; Criscione, Antonio; Roisman, Ilia V.; Marschall, Holger; Tropea, Cameron

    2015-12-01

    Contact line phenomena govern a large number of multiphase flows. A reliable description of the contact line dynamics is therefore essential for prediction of such flows. Well-known difficulties of computation of the wetting phenomena include the mesh dependence of the results caused by flow singularity near the contact line and accurate estimation of its propagating velocity. The present study deals with the computational problem arising from the discontinuity in the dependence of the dynamic contact angle on the propagation velocity, associated with the contact angle hysteresis. The numerical simulations are performed using the volume of fluid method. The boundary conditions in the neighborhood of the contact line are switched depending on the value of the computed current local contact angle between a propagating contact line and a pinning condition. The method is applied to the simulation of the deformation and incipient motion of a shedding drop. The model is validated by comparison of the numerical predictions with experimental data.

  16. Characterization of Time-Dependent Contact Angles for Oleic Acid Mixed Sands with Different Particle Size Fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijewardana, Y. N. S.; Kawamoto, Ken; Komatsu, Toshiko

    2014-01-01

    ) mixed sands representing four different particle size fractions ranging from 0.105 to 0.84 mm. Initial soil-water contact angle (αi), and the time dependence of contact angle were measured by the sessile drop method. Results showed that the αi value for fine and middle sand fractions increased rapidly...

  17. Metastable nanobubbles at the solid-liquid interface due to contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Takashi; Yamada, Yutaka; Ikuta, Tatsuya; Takahashi, Koji; Takata, Yasuyuki

    2015-01-27

    Nanobubbles exist at solid-liquid interfaces between pure water and hydrophobic surfaces with very high stability, lasting in certain cases up to several days. Not only semispherical but also other shapes, such as micropancakes, are known to exist at such interfaces. However, doubt has been raised as to whether or not the nanobubbles are gas-phase entities. In this study, surface nanobubbles at a pure water-highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) interface were investigated by peak force quantitative nanomechanics (PF-QNM). Multiple isolated nanobubbles generated by the solvent-exchange method were present on the terraced areas, avoiding the steps of the HOPG surface. Adjacent nanobubbles coalesced and formed metastable nanobubbles. Coalescence was enhanced by the PF-QNM measurement. We determined that nanobubbles can exist for a long time because of nanoscale contact angle hysteresis at the water-HOPG interface. Moreover, the hydrophilic steps of HOPG were avoided during coalescence, providing evidence that the nanobubbles are truly gas phase.

  18. Contact patterns among high school students

    CERN Document Server

    Fournet, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Face-to-face contacts between individuals contribute to shape social networks and play an important role in determining how infectious diseases can spread within a population. It is thus important to obtain accurate and reliable descriptions of human contact patterns occurring in various day-to-day life contexts. Recent technological advances and the development of wearable sensors able to sense proximity patterns have made it possible to gather data giving access to time-varying contact networks of individuals in specific environments. Here we present and analyze two such data sets describing with high temporal resolution the contact patterns of students in a high school. We define contact matrices describing the contact patterns between students of different classes and show the importance of the class structure. We take advantage of the fact that the two data sets were collected in the same setting during several days in two successive years to perform a longitudinal analysis on two very different timescal...

  19. A Simple Approach for Local Contact Angle Determination on a Heterogeneous Surface

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Jinbo

    2011-05-17

    We report a simple approach for measuring the local contact angle of liquids on a heterogeneous surface consisting of intersected hydrophobic and hydrophilic patch arrays, specifically by employing confocal microscopy and the addition of a very low concentration of Rhodamine-B (RB) (2 × 10 -7 mol/L). Interestingly, RB at that concentration was found to be aggregated at the air-liquid and solid (hydrophobic patch only)-liquid interfaces, which helps us to distinguish the liquid and solid interfaces as well as hydrophobic and hydrophilic patches by their corresponding fluorescent intensities. From the measured local contact angles, the line tension can be easily derived and the value is found to be (-2.06-1.53) × 10-6 J/m. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  20. Measurement of contact angle of copper-bearing shales using the captive bubble method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Szyszka

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the measurement of contact angle of the natural surface of copper-bearing shales immersed in solutions of selected reagents of various concentrations using captive bubble method. It demonstrates that the copper-bearing shales coming from Legnicko-Głogwski Copper Region develop natural hydrophobic properties in surfactant (frother solutions and its hydrophobicity decreases from 82⁰ contact angle in distilled water, 78⁰ in C4E1 solutions, 76⁰ in C4E2 solutions, to 75⁰ in dodecylphenol solutions. These data show that the addition of frother causes a decrease of shale hydrophobicity but it can reduce stability of the thin film between the grain and air bubble. It means that flotation of copperbearing shales in the presence of frother will only be possible provided specific concentrations.

  1. NUMERICAL STUDY OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN APPARENT SLIP LENGTH AND CONTACT ANGLE BY LATTICE BOLTZMANN METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ren-liang; DI Qin-feng; WANG Xin-liang; DING Wei-peng; GONG Wei

    2012-01-01

    The apparent slip between solid wall and liquid is studied by using the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) and the Shan-Chen multiphase model in this paper.With a no-slip bounce-back scheme applied to the interface,flow regimes under different wall wettabilities are investigated.Because of the wall wettability,liquid apparent slip is observed.Slip lengths for different wall wettabilities are found to collapse nearly onto a single curve as a function of the static contact angle,and thereby a relationship between apparent slip length and contact angle is suggested.Our results also show that the wall wettability leads to the formation of a low-density layer between solid wall and liquid,which produced apparent slip in the micro-scale.

  2. Cleaning results of new and fouled nanofiltration membrane characterized by contact angle, updated DSPM, flux and salts rejection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Amoudi, Ahmed [Centre for complex fluids processing, Multidisciplinary Nanotechnology Centre, School of Engineering, University of Wales, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom) and Saline Water Conversion Corporation (SWCC), Saline Water Desalination Research Institute Staff (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: 310981@swan.ac.uk; Williams, Paul [Centre for complex fluids processing, Multidisciplinary Nanotechnology Centre, School of Engineering, University of Wales, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom); Al-Hobaib, A.S. [Institute of Atomic Energy Research, King Abdulaziz City for Science And Technology, P.O. Box 6086, Riyadh 11442 (Saudi Arabia); Lovitt, Robert W. [Centre for complex fluids processing, Multidisciplinary Nanotechnology Centre, School of Engineering, University of Wales, Swansea SA2 8PP (United Kingdom)

    2008-04-30

    In membrane process industries, membrane cleaning is one of the most important concerns from both economical and scientific points of view. Though cleaning is important to recover membrane performance, an inappropriate selection of cleaning agents may result into unsatisfactory cleaning or irreparable membrane. In this study the cleaning performance has been studied with measurements of membrane contact angle, Updated Donnan steric partitioning pore model (UDSPM) and salt rejection as well as flux measurement. Thin film nanofiltration (NF) membranes such as DK, HL and DL provided by GE Osmonics are used in this study. Tests were carried out with virgin DK, HL and DL as well as fouled DK membranes. Several cleaning agents were investigated; some of them were analytical grade such as HCl, NaOH and others such as SDS, mix agents were commercial grade agents that are already in use in commercial plants. Contact angle, DSPM and salt rejection as well as flux of virgin and fouled membranes before and after chemical cleaning were measured and compared. The contact angle measurements with and without chemical cleaning of different virgin and fouled membranes revealed very interesting results which may be used to characterise the membrane surface cleanliness. The contact angle results revealed that the cleaning agents are found to modify membrane surface properties (hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity) of the treated and untreated virgin and fouled membranes. The details of these results were also investigated and are reported in the paper. However, UDSPM method did not give any valuable information about pore size of the untreated and treated NF membranes. The salt rejection level of monovalent and divalent ions before and after cleaning by high and low pH cleaning agents is also investigated and is reported in the paper.

  3. Hysteretic memory in pH-response of water contact angle on poly(acrylic acid) brushes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vivek; Harkin, Adrienne V; Robertson, Megan L; Conrad, Jacinta C

    2016-04-21

    We investigated the pH-dependent response of flat polyacid brushes of varying length and dispersity in the extended brush regime. Our model system consisted of poly(acrylic acid) brushes, which change from hydrophobic and neutral at low pH to hydrophilic and negatively charged at high pH, synthesized on silicon substrates using a grafting-from approach at constant grafting density. We observed three trends in the pH-response: first, the dry brush thickness increased as the pH was increased for brushes above a critical length, and this effect was magnified as the dispersity increased; second, the water contact angle measured at low pH was larger for brushes of greater dispersity; and third, brushes of sufficient dispersity exhibited hysteretic memory behavior in the pH-dependence of the contact angle, in which the contact angle upon increasing and decreasing pH differed. As a consequence, the pKa of the brushes measured upon increasing pH was consistently higher than that measured upon decreasing pH. The observed pH response is consistent with proposed changes in the conformation and charge distribution of the polyelectrolyte brushes that depend on the direction of pH change and the dispersity of the brushes.

  4. The Role of Contact Angle Hysteresis for Fluid Transport in Wet Granular Matter

    OpenAIRE

    Mani, Roman; Semprebon, Ciro; Kadau, Dirk; Herrmann, Hans J.; Brinkmann, Martin; Herminghaus, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    The stability of sand castles is determined by the structure of wet granulates. Experimental data on the size distribution of fluid pockets are ambiguous with regard to their origin. We discovered that contact-angle hysteresis plays a fundamental role in the equilibrium distribution of bridge volumes, and not geometrical disorder as commonly conjectured. This has substantial consequences on the mechanical properties of wet granular beds, including a history-dependent rheology and lowered stre...

  5. Mercury Porosimetry: Contact Angle Hysteresis of Materials with Controlled Pore Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmas, Constantinos; Androutsopoulos, George

    2001-07-01

    Mercury Porosimetry (MP) hysteresis is a commonly observed phenomenon in which mercury retention disguises further the overall hysteresis picture. This article introduces a new interpretation of the MP hysteresis based on the combined effect of pore structure networking and mercury contact angle variation occurring between the mercury penetration and retraction operations. To distinguish the contribution of each factor the following investigations were carried out. Nitrogen sorption (NP) and MP experiments were performed on samples of an anodic aluminum membrane and the results were interpreted in terms of the Corrugated Pore Structure Model (CPSM), i.e., CPSM-Nitrogen and CPSM-Mercury models, respectively. The simulation of the observed hysteresis data using the CPSM model enabled the evaluation of an identical for the two methods intrinsic pore size distribution (PSD) and cumulative surface area in perfect agreement with the respective BET value. Additionally, the CPSM analysis of data resulted in the evaluation of mercury contact angles, i.e., θ(p)=143 degrees and θ(r)=101.7 degrees for the MP penetration and retraction branches of the hysteresis loop, respectively. Moreover, CPSM-Mercury simulations of literature MP hysteresis data, valid for controlled-pore glasses and nuclepore membranes, led to the evaluation of contact angles, i.e., glasses: θ(p)=143 degrees, θ(r)=100.5-107.5 degrees and nuclepore: θ(p)=143 degrees, θ(r)=118- 121 degrees. The latter values are comparable with relevant literature data and approximate those determined for the anodic aluminum membrane. The CPSM model employed herein proved to be a flexible and reliable model for simulating the pertinent hysteresis loops by combining pore networking and contact angle hysteresis phenomena. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  6. Contact angle measurements of a polyphenyl ether to 190 C on M-50 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Contact angle measurements were performed for a polyphenyl ether on steel in nitrogen. A tilting plate and a sessile drop apparatus were used. Surface tension was measured with a maximum bubble pressure apparatus. Critical surface energies of spreading were found to be 30.1 and 31.3 dynes/cm. It was concluded that the polyphenyl ether is inherently autophobic and will not spread on its own surface film.

  7. Classical nucleation theory of immersion freezing: sensitivity of contact angle schemes to thermodynamic and kinetic parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ickes, Luisa; Welti, André; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2017-02-01

    Heterogeneous ice formation by immersion freezing in mixed-phase clouds can be parameterized in general circulation models (GCMs) by classical nucleation theory (CNT). CNT parameterization schemes describe immersion freezing as a stochastic process, including the properties of insoluble aerosol particles in the droplets. There are different ways to parameterize the properties of aerosol particles (i.e., contact angle schemes), which are compiled and tested in this paper. The goal of this study is to find a parameterization scheme for GCMs to describe immersion freezing with the ability to shift and adjust the slope of the freezing curve compared to homogeneous freezing to match experimental data. We showed in a previous publication that the resulting freezing curves from CNT are very sensitive to unconstrained kinetic and thermodynamic parameters in the case of homogeneous freezing. Here we investigate how sensitive the outcome of a parameter estimation for contact angle schemes from experimental data is to unconstrained kinetic and thermodynamic parameters. We demonstrate that the parameters describing the contact angle schemes can mask the uncertainty in thermodynamic and kinetic parameters. Different CNT formulations are fitted to an extensive immersion freezing dataset consisting of size-selected measurements as a function of temperature and time for different mineral dust types, namely kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, microcline (K-feldspar), and Arizona test dust. We investigated how accurate different CNT formulations (with estimated fit parameters for different contact angle schemes) reproduce the measured freezing data, especially the time and particle size dependence of the freezing process. The results are compared to a simplified deterministic freezing scheme. In this context, we evaluated which CNT-based parameterization scheme able to represent particle properties is the best choice to describe immersion freezing in a GCM.

  8. Effect of contact angle on equilibrium saturation during mist filtration in nonwoven and foam media

    OpenAIRE

    Abishek, S.; Mullins, B; King, A.; Kasper, G; Heikamp, W.

    2016-01-01

    Coalescence filtration using knitted, foam or nonwoven fibrous media is the widely applied in the industry for separation and recovery of liquid mists that are generated in many processes, including lubricated machining, compressors and engine crankcases. The dynamics of multi-component/ phase fluid transport and its interaction with the filter surface at the pore-scale and the contact angle dynamics are expected to significantly influence performance and efficiency of filtration processes. M...

  9. Characterization of polyethersulfone-polyimide hollow fiber membranes by atomic force microscopy and contact angle goniometery

    OpenAIRE

    Khulbe, K.C.; Feng, C.; Matsuura, T.; Kapantaidakis, G.; Wessling, Matthias; Koops, G.H.

    2003-01-01

    Asymmetric blend polyethersulfone-polyimide (PES-PI) hollow fiber membranes prepared at different air gap and used for gas separation are characterized by atomic force microscopy (inside and out side surfaces) and by measuring the contact angle of out side surface. The outer surface was entirely different than the inner surface, as expected. On the inner surface nodule aggregates were aligned in rows, may be towards the direction of the bore fluid flow. On the outer surface, alignment of nodu...

  10. Thermodynamic analysis of effects of contact angle on interfacial interactions and its implications for membrane fouling control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianrong; Shen, Liguo; Zhang, Meijia; Hong, Huachang; He, Yiming; Liao, Bao-Qiang; Lin, Hongjun

    2016-02-01

    Concept of hydrophobicity always fails to accurately assess the interfacial interaction and membrane fouling, which calls for reliable parameters for this purpose. In this study, effects of contact angle on interfacial interactions related to membrane fouling were investigated based on thermodynamic analysis. It was found that, total interaction energy between sludge foulants and membrane monotonically decreases and increases with water and glycerol contact angle, respectively, indicating that these two parameters can be reliable indicators predicting total interaction energy and membrane fouling. Membrane roughness decreases interaction strength for over 20 times, and effects of membrane roughness on membrane fouling should consider water and glycerol contact angle on membrane. It was revealed existence of a critical water and glycerol contact angle for a given membrane bioreactor. Meanwhile, diiodomethane contact angle has minor effect on the total interaction, and cannot be regarded as an effective indicator assessing interfacial interactions and membrane fouling.

  11. Changes in contact angle providing evidence for surface alteration in multi-component solid foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, Svenja K.; Hauf, Katharina; Vieira, Josélio; Heinrich, Stefan; Palzer, Stefan

    2015-11-01

    Chocolate blooming, one of the major problems in the confectionery industry, is the formation of visible white spots or a greyish haze on the surface of chocolate products due to large sugar or fat crystals on the surface. This leads to aesthetic changes and deterioration of taste and thus large sales losses for the confectionery industry due to consumer complaints. Chocolate blooming is often related to migration of lipids or sugar molecules to the chocolate surface, where they recrystallize with an associated polymorphic change of crystal structure on the surface. The wetting behaviour from contact angle measurements gives further insight into surface properties and is needed to determine surface energies and to evaluate possible migration mechanisms and preferred pathways. Therefore, an equilibrium contact angle is needed which is not directly accessible and is influenced by surface texture and interaction between solid and test liquid. In this study, the surface of cocoa butter and conventional chocolates was characterized by measuring the contact angle with the sessile drop protocol. The influence of roughness, test liquid and pre-crystallization of the samples as well as the storage temperature were investigated. In case of no pre-crystallization, a change in surface properties due to storage at 20 °C was detected, whereas samples stored at 30 °C showed the same wetting behaviour as fresh samples. This is associated with polymorphic transformation from thermodynamically less stable crystals to more stable configurations.

  12. Dynamic wettability and contact angles of poly(vinylidene fluoride nanofiber membranes grafted with acrylic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Wettability has been recognized as one of the most important properties of fibrous materials for both fundamental and practical applications. In this study, the plasma induced grafting of acrylic acid (AAc was applied to improve the wettability of the electrospun poly(vinylidene fluoride (PVDF nanofiber membranes. The diameter and chemical structure of the modified PVDF nanofibers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR. Nitrogen adsorption based on BET (Brunauer, Emmett and Teller principle was employed to measure the specific surface areas and porosities of the modified nanofiber membrances. The contact angles of the modified membrane were evaluated by drop shape analysis (DSA and the modified Washburn method. The dependence of contact angles on specific surface area and porosity was also discussed in this paper. Water adsorptions were used to evaluate the dynamic wetting behavior of the grafted membranes by a dynamic adsorption apparatus (CDCA100-F. The experimental results revealed that the wettablity of the modified PVDF membrane was significantly affected by both surface and porous contact angles.

  13. Surface free energy and wettability of silyl layers on silicon determined from contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chibowski, Emil J

    2005-05-30

    Using the literature data of the advancing and receding contact angles for water, diiodomethane and hexadecane measured on various hydrophobic silyl layers (mostly monolayers) produced on silicon wafers the apparent surface free energies gamma(s)(tot) were calculated by applying new model of the contact angle hysteresis interpretation. It was found that, for the same silyl layer, the calculated gamma(s)(tot) values to some degree depended on the probe liquid used. Therefore, thus calculated the surface free energies should be considered as apparent ones. Moreover, also the values of the dispersion component gamma(s)(d) of these layers depend on the probe liquid used, but to a less degree. This must be due to the strength of the force field originating from the probe liquid and the spacing between the interacting molecules. The relationships between gamma(s)(tot) and gamma(s)(d) are discussed on the basis of the equations derived. It may be postulated that applying proposed model of the contact angle hysteresis and calculating the apparent total surface free energies and the dispersion contributions better insight into wetting properties of the silyled silicon surface can be achieved.

  14. Use of Atomic Oxygen for Increased Water Contact Angles of Various Polymers for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beger, Lauren; Roberts, Lily; deGroh, Kim; Banks, Bruce

    2007-01-01

    In the low Earth orbit (LEO) space environment, spacecraft surfaces can be altered during atomic oxygen exposure through oxidation and erosion. There can be terrestrial benefits of such interactions, such as the modification of hydrophobic or hydrophilic properties of polymers due to chemical modification and texturing. Such modification of the surface may be useful for biomedical applications. For example, atomic oxygen texturing may increase the hydrophilicity of polymers, such as chlorotrifluoroethylene (Aclar), thus allowing increased adhesion and spreading of cells on textured Petri dishes. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of atomic oxygen exposure on the hydrophilicity of nine different polymers. To determine whether hydrophilicity remains static after atomic oxygen exposure or changes with exposure, the contact angles between the polymer and a water droplet placed on the polymer s surface were measured. The polymers were exposed to atomic oxygen in a radio frequency (RF) plasma asher. Atomic oxygen plasma treatment was found to significantly alter the hydrophilicity of non-fluorinated polymers. Significant decreases in the water contact angle occurred with atomic oxygen exposure. Fluorinated polymers were found to be less sensitive to changes in hydrophilicity for equivalent atomic oxygen exposures, and two of the fluorinated polymers became more hydrophobic. The majority of change in water contact angle of the non-fluorinated polymers was found to occur with very low fluence exposures, indicating potential cell culturing benefit with short treatment time.

  15. Wettability transparency and the quasiuniversal relationship between hydrodynamic slip and contact angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Alvarado, Bladimir; Kumar, Satish; Peterson, G. P.

    2016-02-01

    The universality of the scaling laws that correlate the hydrodynamic slip length and static contact angle was investigated by introducing the concept of the wettability transparency of graphene-coated surfaces. Equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of droplet wettability for Si(111), Si(100), and graphene-coated silicon surfaces were performed to determine the conditions required to obtain similar contact angles between bare and graphene-coated surfaces (wettability transparency). The hydrodynamic slip length was determined by means of equilibrium calculations for silicon and graphene-coated silicon nanochannels. The results indicate that the slip-wettability scaling laws can be used to describe the slip behavior of the bare silicon nanochannels in general terms; however, clear departures from a general universal description were observed for hydrophobic conditions. In addition, a significant difference in the hydrodynamic slippage was observed under wettability transparency conditions. Alternatively, the hydrodynamic boundary condition for silicon and graphene-coated silicon nanochannels was more accurately predicted by observing the density depletion length, posing this parameter as a better alternative than the contact angle to correlate with the slip length.

  16. Liquid withdrawal from capillary tubes: explicit and implicit analytical solution for constant and dynamic contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilpert, Markus

    2010-11-01

    In a preceding paper, we derived analytical solutions for the displacement of a gas by a liquid in horizontal and inclined capillary tubes where the tube inlet is connected to a liquid reservoir of constant pressure. We considered quite general models for the dynamic contact angle and were able to derive implicit equations for the velocity of the gas-liquid interface. These solutions allowed us to identify five different flow scenarios for liquid withdrawal that differed in the direction of flow and the sign of the acceleration of the gas-liquid interface. In this paper, we consider the special case where the dynamic contact angle is determined by a nonequilibrium Young force that depends linearly on the capillary number. Thus we can derive explicit and the more traditional implicit analytical solutions for both the position and the velocity of the gas-liquid interface. We also construct diagrams that allow us to predict which of the five flow scenarios will occur depending on the nondimensional parameters that define the problem. The diagrams can be combined with diagrams previously obtained for infiltration and the entire parameter space subdivided into regions that are associated with either liquid withdrawal, liquid infiltration, or metastable and stable equilibrium states. Our solutions are also valid within the limit where the contact angle is constant.

  17. On the interfacial behavior of ionic liquids: surface tensions and contact angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restolho, José; Mata, José L; Saramago, Benilde

    2009-12-01

    In this work the liquid/vapour and the solid/liquid interfaces of a series of ionic liquids: 1-ethyl-3-methylpyridinium ethyl sulfate, [EMPy][EtSO4], 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate, [EMIM][EtSO4], 1-ethanol-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, [C2OHMIM][BF4], 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, [BMIM][BF4], and 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, [OMIM][BF4], were investigated. The surface tension was measured in a wide temperature range, (298-453) K. The contact angles were determined on substrates of different polarities. Both on the polar (glass) and the non-polar substrates ((poly-(tetrafluoroethylene) and poly-(ethylene)), the liquids with maximum and minimum surface tensions lead, respectively, to the highest and the lowest contact angles. The dispersive, gamma(L)(d), and non-dispersive, gamma(L)(nd), components of the liquid surface tension, gamma(L), were calculated from the contact angles on the non-polar substrates using the Fowkes approach. The polarity fraction, gamma(L)(nd)/gamma(L), was compared with the polarity parameter, k, obtained from the fitting of the surface tension vs. temperature data to the Eötvös equation. Good agreement was found for the extreme cases: [OMIM][BF4] exhibits the lowest polarity and [BMIM][BF4], the highest. When compared with the polarity fractions of standard liquids considered as "polar" liquids, the ionic liquids studied may be considered as moderately polar.

  18. Drops on soft solids: Free energy and double transition of contact angles

    CERN Document Server

    Lubbers, Luuk A; Botto, Lorenzo; Das, Siddhartha; Andreotti, Bruno; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2013-01-01

    The equilibrium shape of liquid drops on elastic substrates is determined by minimising elastic and capillary free energies. The problem is governed by three length scales: the size of the drop $R$, the molecular size $a$, and the ratio of surface tension to elastic modulus $\\gamma/E$. We show that the contact angles undergo two transitions upon changing the substrates from rigid to soft. The microscopic wetting angles deviate from Young's law when $\\gamma/Ea \\gg 1$, while the apparent macroscopic angle only changes in the very soft limit $\\gamma/ER \\gg 1$. Details of the elastic deformations are worked out in the simplifying case where the surface energy of the solid is assumed independent of the elastic strain. The total free energy is found to be lowest on softer substrates, consistent with recent experiments. Finally, we discuss how the variational framework can be generalized to properly account for surface stress.

  19. Understanding properties of engineered catalyst supports using contact angle measurements and X-ray reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amama, Placidus B; Islam, Ahmad E; Saber, Sammy M; Huffman, Daniel R; Maruyama, Benji

    2016-02-01

    There is significant interest in broadening the type of catalyst substrates that support the growth of high-quality carbon nanotube (CNT) carpets. In this study, ion beam bombardment has been utilized to modify catalyst substrates for CNT carpet growth. Using a combination of contact angle measurements (CAMs) and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) for the first time, new correlations between the physicochemical properties of pristine and engineered catalyst substrates and CNT growth behavior have been established. The engineered surfaces obtained after exposure to different degrees of ion beam damage have distinct physicochemical properties (porosity, layer thickness, and acid-base properties). The CAM data were analyzed using the van Oss-Chaudhury-Good model, enabling the determination of the acid-base properties of the substrate surfaces. For the XRR data, a Fourier analysis of the interference patterns enabled extraction of layer thickness, while the atomic density and interfacial roughness were extracted by analyzing the amplitude of the interference oscillations. The dramatic transformation of the substrate from "inactive" to "active" is attributed to a combined effect of substrate porosity or damage depth and Lewis basicity. The results reveal that the efficiency of catalyst substrates can be further improved by increasing the substrate basicity, if the minimum surface porosity is established. This study advances the use of a non-thermochemical approach for catalyst substrate engineering, as well as demonstrates the combined utility of CAM and XRR as a powerful, nondestructive, and reliable tool for rational catalyst design.

  20. Origin of the contact angle hysteresis of water on chemisorbed and physisorbed self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belman, Nataly; Jin, Kejia; Golan, Yuval; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Pesika, Noshir S

    2012-10-16

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are known to form on a variety of substrates either via chemisorption (i.e., through chemical interactions such as a covalent bond) or physisorption (i.e., through physical interactions such as van der Waals forces or "ionic" bonds). We have studied the behavior and effects of water on the structures and surface energies of both chemisorbed octadecanethiol and physisorbed octadecylamine SAMs on GaAs using a number of complementary techniques including "dynamic" contact angle measurements (with important time and rate-dependent effects), AFM, and electron microscopy. We conclude that both molecular overturning and submolecular structural changes occur over different time scales when such SAMs are exposed to water. These results provide new insights into the time-dependent interactions between surfaces and colloids functionalized with SAMs when synthesized in or exposed to high humidity or bulk water or wetted by water. The study has implications for a wide array of phenomena and applications such as adhesion, friction/lubrication and wear (tribology), surfactant-solid surface interactions, the organization of surfactant-coated nanoparticles, etc.

  1. Thin three-dimensional droplets on an oscillating substrate with contact angle hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, J.; Billingham, J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments [P. Brunet, J. Eggers, and R. D. Deegan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 144501 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.144501] have shown that a liquid droplet on an inclined plane can be made to move uphill by sufficiently strong, vertical oscillations. In order to investigate this counterintuitive phenomenon we use a model in which liquid inertia and viscosity are assumed negligible so that the motion of the droplet is dominated by the applied acceleration due to the oscillation of the plate, gravity, and surface tension. We explain how the leading order motion of the droplet can be separated into a spreading mode and a swaying mode. For a linear contact line law, the maximum rise velocity occurs when these modes are in phase. We show that, both with and without contact angle hysteresis, the droplet can climb uphill and also that, for certain contact line laws, the motion of the droplet can produce footprints similar to experimental results. We show that if the two modes are out of phase when there is no contact angle hysteresis, the inclusion of hysteresis can force them into phase. This in turn increases the rise velocity of the droplet and can, in some cases, cause a sliding droplet to climb.

  2. Thin three-dimensional droplets on an oscillating substrate with contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, J; Billingham, J

    2016-01-01

    Recent experiments [P. Brunet, J. Eggers, and R. D. Deegan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 144501 (2007)10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.144501] have shown that a liquid droplet on an inclined plane can be made to move uphill by sufficiently strong, vertical oscillations. In order to investigate this counterintuitive phenomenon we use a model in which liquid inertia and viscosity are assumed negligible so that the motion of the droplet is dominated by the applied acceleration due to the oscillation of the plate, gravity, and surface tension. We explain how the leading order motion of the droplet can be separated into a spreading mode and a swaying mode. For a linear contact line law, the maximum rise velocity occurs when these modes are in phase. We show that, both with and without contact angle hysteresis, the droplet can climb uphill and also that, for certain contact line laws, the motion of the droplet can produce footprints similar to experimental results. We show that if the two modes are out of phase when there is no contact angle hysteresis, the inclusion of hysteresis can force them into phase. This in turn increases the rise velocity of the droplet and can, in some cases, cause a sliding droplet to climb.

  3. Equilibrium gas-liquid-solid contact angle from density-functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the equilibrium of a fluid in contact with a solid boundary through a density-functional theory. Depending on the conditions, the fluid can be in one phase, gas or liquid, or two phases, while the wall induces an external field acting on the fluid particles. We first examine the case of a liquid film in contact with the wall. We construct bifurcation diagrams for the film thickness as a function of the chemical potential. At a specific value of the chemical potential, two equally stable films, a thin one and a thick one, can coexist. As saturation is approached, the thickness of the thick film tends to infinity. This allows the construction of a liquid-gas interface that forms a well defined contact angle with the wall.

  4. Contact angles of liquid drops on super hydrophobic surfaces: understanding the role of flattening of drops by gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extrand, C W; Moon, Sung In

    2010-11-16

    Measurement of contact angles on super hydrophobic surfaces by conventional methods can produce ambiguous results. Experimental difficulties in constructing tangent lines, gravitational distortion or erroneous assumptions regarding the extent of spreading can lead to underestimation of contact angles. Three models were used to estimate drop shape and perceived contact angles on completely nonwetting super hydrophobic surfaces. One of the models employed the classic numerical solutions from Bashforth and Adams. Additionally, two approximate models were derived as part of this work. All three showed significant distortion of microliter-sized drops and similar trends in perceived contact angles. Liquid drops of several microliters are traditionally used in sessile contact angle measurements. Drops of this size are expected to and indeed undergo significant flattening on super hydrophobic surfaces, even if the wetting interactions are minimal. The distortion is more pronounced if the liquid has a lesser surface tension or greater density. For surfaces that are completely nonwetting, underestimation of contact angles can be tens of degrees. Our modeling efforts suggest that accurate contact angle measurements on super hydrophobic surfaces would require very small sessile drops, on the order of hundreds of picoliters.

  5. A new nonlinear dynamic model of the rotor-bearing system considering preload and varying contact angle of the bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuening; Han, Qinkai; Peng, Zhike; Chu, Fulei

    2015-05-01

    A great deal of research work has been done on the dynamic behaviors of the rotor-bearing system. However, the important effects of load and variation of contact angle on the bearing performance have not been focused on sufficiently. In this paper, a five-degree-of-freedom load distribution model is set up considering the bearing preload and the loads due to the rotor imbalance. Utilizing this model, the variation of the bearing contact angle is investigated thoroughly. The comparisons of the obtained contact angle against the results from literature validate that the proposed load distribution model is effective. With this model, the static ball deformations are obtained considering variation of the contact angle. Through resolving the dynamic displacements of the rotor, the dynamic ball deformations could also be obtained. Then the total restoring forces and moments of the bearings could be formulated. By introducing these nonlinear forces and moments into the rotating system, a new dynamic model considering the preload and the variation of contact angle is set up. The present analyses indicate that the bearing contact angle will be changed remarkably with the effect of bearing load. The deflection vibration of the rotor-bearing system will be underestimated without considering the varying contact angle. With the effect of varying contact angle, the ball passage frequency and its combinations with the shaft rotating frequency become more noticeable. The main resonance regions for the rotor-bearing system shift to the lower speed ranges when the variation of contact angle is taken into account.

  6. In situ local contact angle measurement in a CO2-brine-sand system using microfocused X-ray CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Pengfei; Liu, Yu; Wang, Zhe; Liu, Shuyang; Jiang, Lanlan; Chen, Junlin; Song, Yongchen

    2017-03-22

    The wettability of porous media is of major interest in a broad range of natural and engineering applications. The wettability of a fluid on a solid surface is usually evaluated by the contact angle between them. While in situ local contact angle measurements are complicated by the topology of porous media, which can make it difficult to use traditional methods, recent advances in microfocused X-ray computed tomography (micro-CT) and image processing techniques have made it possible to measure contact angles on the scale of the pore sizes in such media. However, The effects of ionic strength, CO2 phase, and flow pattern (drainage or imbibition) on pore-scale contact angle distribution still not clear and has not been reported in detail in previous study. In this study, we employed a micro-CT scanner for in situ investigation of local contact angles in a CO2-brine-sand system under various conditions. The effects of ionic strength, CO2 phase, and flow pattern on the local contact-angle distribution were examined in detail. The results showed that the local contact angles vary over a wide range as a result of the interaction of surface contaminants, roughness, pore topology and capillarity. The wettability of a porous surface could thus slowly weaken with increasing ionic strength, and the average contact angle could significantly increase when gaseous CO2 (gCO2) turns into supercritical CO2 (scCO2). Contact angle hysteresis also occurred between drainage and imbibition procedures, and the hysteresis was more significant under gCO2 condition.

  7. Motion of an isolated liquid plug inside a capillary tube: effect of contact angle hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Vyas; Khandekar, Sameer; Bouamrane, Nathan; Lefevre, Frederic; Bonjour, Jocelyn

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics of a single, small and isolated partially wetting liquid plug (of known length L and wettability), placed at rest inside a long, dry, circular capillary tube ( D = 1.5 mm), and subsequently quasi-statically pushed from one end by applying air pressure, the other end being kept exposed to atmosphere, are reported. The air pressure first overcomes the `static' friction manifested by the three-phase contact line at the advancing and receding menisci, and then, the plug motion gets initiated, eventually leading to a terminal velocity (Ca ~ 2.8 × 10-5), when pressure force balances net frictional resistance due to viscous and surface forces. It is seen that, under steady motion, the curvature profiles of the advancing and receding menisci of liquid plug, respectively, remain the same, independent of the plug length. Steady-state pressure drop is dominated by the contribution due to contact angle hysteresis, which is also independent of the plug length. Increasing the system wettability drastically decreased the contact angle hysteresis and the associated net pressure drop.

  8. Particle contact angles at fluid interfaces: pushing the boundary beyond hard uniform spherical colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanini, Michele; Isa, Lucio

    2016-08-01

    Micro and nanoparticles at fluid interfaces have been attracting increasing interest in the last few decades as building blocks for materials, as mechanical and structural probes for complex interfaces and as models for two-dimensional systems. The three-phase contact angle enters practically all aspects of the particle behavior at the interface: its thermodynamics (binding energy to the interface), dynamics (motion and drag at the interface) and interactions with the interface (adsorption and wetting). Moreover, many interactions among particles at the interface also strongly depend on the contact angle. These concepts have been extensively discussed for non-deformable, homogeneous and mostly spherical particles, but recent progress in particle synthesis and fabrication has instead moved in the direction of producing more complex micro and nanoscale objects, which can be responsive, deformable, heterogenous and/or anisotropic in shape, surface chemistry and material properties. These new particles have a much greater potential for applications and new science, and the study of their behavior at interfaces has only very recently started. In this paper, we critically review the current state of the art of the experimental methods available to measure the contact angle of micro and nanoparticles at fluid interfaces, indicating their strengths and limitations. We then comment on new particle systems that are currently attracting increasing interest in relation to their adsorption and assembly at fluid interfaces and discuss if and which ones of the current techniques are suited to investigate their properties at interfaces. Based on this discussion, we will finally try to indicate a direction in which new experimental methods should develop in the future to tackle the new challenges posed by the novel types of particles that more and more often are used at interfaces.

  9. Utilizing dynamic tensiometry to quantify contact angle hysteresis and wetting state transitions on nonwetting surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleingartner, Justin A; Srinivasan, Siddarth; Mabry, Joseph M; Cohen, Robert E; McKinley, Gareth H

    2013-11-05

    Goniometric techniques traditionally quantify two parameters, the advancing and receding contact angles, that are useful for characterizing the wetting properties of a solid surface; however, dynamic tensiometry, which measures changes in the net force on a surface during the repeated immersion and emersion of a solid into a probe liquid, can provide further insight into the wetting properties of a surface. We detail a framework for analyzing tensiometric results that allows for the determination of wetting hysteresis, wetting state transitions, and characteristic topographical length scales on textured, nonwetting surfaces, in addition to the more traditional measurement of apparent advancing and receding contact angles. Fluorodecyl POSS, a low-surface-energy material, was blended with commercially available poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and then dip- or spray-coated onto glass substrates. These surfaces were probed with a variety of liquids to illustrate the effects of probe liquid surface tension, solid surface chemistry, and surface texture on the apparent contact angles and wetting hysteresis of nonwetting surfaces. Woven meshes were then used as model structured substrates to add a second, larger length scale for the surface texture. When immersed into a probe liquid, these spray-coated mesh surfaces can form a metastable, solid-liquid-air interface on the largest length scale of surface texture. The increasing hydrostatic pressure associated with progressively greater immersion depths disrupts this metastable, composite interface and forces penetration of the probe liquid into the mesh structure. This transition is marked by a sudden change in the wetting hysteresis, which can be systematically probed using spray-coated, woven meshes of varying wire radius and spacing. We also show that dynamic tensiometry can accurately and quantitatively characterize topographical length scales that are present on microtextured surfaces.

  10. A modified Cassie-Baxter relationship to explain contact angle hysteresis and anisotropy on non-wetting textured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Wonjae; Tuteja, Anish; Mabry, Joseph M; Cohen, Robert E; McKinley, Gareth H

    2009-11-01

    The Cassie-Baxter model is widely used to predict the apparent contact angles obtained on composite (solid-liquid-air) superhydrophobic interfaces. However, the validity of this model has been repeatedly challenged by various research groups because of its inherent inability to predict contact angle hysteresis. In our recent work, we have developed robust omniphobic surfaces which repel a wide range of liquids. An interesting corollary of constructing such surfaces is that it becomes possible to directly image the solid-liquid-air triple-phase contact line on a composite interface, using an electron microscope with non-volatile organic liquids or curable polymers. Here, we fabricate a range of model superoleophobic surfaces with controlled surface topography in order to correlate the details of the local texture with the experimentally observed apparent contact angles. Based on these experiments, in conjunction with numerical simulations, we modify the classical Cassie-Baxter relation to include a local differential texture parameter which enables us to quantitatively predict the apparent advancing and receding contact angles, as well as contact angle hysteresis. This quantitative prediction also allows us to provide an a priori estimation of roll-off angles for a given textured substrate. Using this understanding we design model substrates that display extremely small or extremely large roll-off angles, as well as surfaces that demonstrate direction-dependent wettability, through a systematic control of surface topography and connectivity.

  11. Molecular dynamics simulations of the contact angle between water droplets and graphite surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Sergi, Danilo; Ortona, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Wetting is a widespread phenomenon, most prominent in a number of cases, both in nature and technology. Droplets of pure water with initial radius ranging from 20 to 80 [\\AA] spreading on graphitic surfaces are studied by molecular dynamics simulations. The equilibrium contact angle is determined and the transition to the macroscopic limit is discussed using Young equation in its modified form. While the largest droplets are almost perfectly spherical, the profiles of the smallest ones are no more properly described by a circle. For the sake of accuracy, we employ a more general fitting procedure based on local linear regressions. Furthermore, our results reveal that there is a possible transition to the macroscopic limit. The modified Young equation is particularly precise for characteristic lengths (radii and contact-line curvatures) around 40 [\\AA].

  12. Contact angle measurement of molten lead–lithium on silicon carbide surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Ueki, Yoshitaka; Nagai, Keiichi; Kunugi, Tomoaki; Hirabayashi, Masaru; Ara, Kuniaki; Yonemoto, Yukihiro; Hinoki, Tatsuya

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of the contact angles at the different temperatures of a molten lead–lithium eutectic alloy (PbLi) droplet on a silicon carbide (SiC) wall are needed for the research and development both of a magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) and an inertia confinement fusion (ICF) blankets. PbLi coolant/breeder flows in the coolant channel, which is made of the SiC walls, and will experience a flow slip at the wall, called as a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) slip flow. The ICF blanket adopts a molte...

  13. Force of adhesion upon loss of contact angle hysteresis: when a liquid behaves like a solid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Juan V; Castillo, Rolando

    2013-11-27

    The theoretically predicted vanishment of the macroscopic contact angle hysteresis is found experimentally along with a small but finite force of adhesion (F(Ad)≈-0.5 μN) that, unexpectedly, is independent of the history of the preload. Our results agree with the prediction of a model in which the surface tension of the liquid provides the counterpart of the restoring force of an elastic solid, evidencing that the dewetting of a liquid in the absence of strong pinning points is equivalent to the detachment of an elastic solid.

  14. Nanostructured Surface with Tunable Contact Angle Hysteresis for Constructing In Vitro Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Contact angle hysteresis (CAH is an important phenomenon in surface chemistry. In this paper, we fabricated nanostructured substrates and investigated the relationship between roughness and CAH. We demonstrated that by patterning well-tuned CAH in superhydrophobic background, we can pattern droplets with controlled sizes. We further showed that our system could be used in fabricating complex hydrogel architecture, allowing coculture of different types of cells in three-dimensional way. This CAH-based patterning strategy would provide in vitro models for tissue engineering and drug delivery.

  15. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CONTACT ANGLE HYSTERESIS AND WORK OF ADHESION OF OIL DROPLETS ON PERFLUOROMETHACRYLATESTYRENE THIN FILMS

    OpenAIRE

    Özen Cansoy, Elif; Cengiz, Uğur

    2015-01-01

    Water and oil repellencies of flat films are crucial properties of solid materials and some biomimetric surfaces that significantly depend on surface topography and chemical compositions [1,2]. The surface wettability is expressed indirectly by the contact angle (CA) measurements of a specific liquid droplet on these surfaces [1-4]. However, in practical systems, measurement of only equilibrium CA (θe) is not enough to explain polymer surface characteristics, so advancing (θa), receding (θr) ...

  16. Characterizing time-dependent contact angles for sands hydrophobized with oleic and stearic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subedi, S; Kawamoto, K; Jayarathna, L

    2012-01-01

    -frequency precipitation. A potential solution is to alter soil grain surfaces to become water repellent by mixing or coating the soil cover material with hydrophobic agents (HAs). In this study, hydrophobic CBs comprised of sands mixed with environmentally friendly HAs (oleic acid [OA] and stearic acid [SA]) were studied....... Water repellency (WR) characteristics for hydrophobized sand samples with different HA contents and representing different coating methods (mixing in and solvent aided) were measured. Initial contact angles (αi) for OA-coated samples sharply increased with increasing HA content and reached peak values...

  17. Sensitivity enhancement by multiple-contact cross-polarization under magic-angle spinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raya, J.; Hirschinger, J.

    2017-08-01

    Multiple-contact cross-polarization (MC-CP) is applied to powder samples of ferrocene and L-alanine under magic-angle spinning (MAS) conditions. The method is described analytically through the density matrix formalism. The combination of a two-step memory function approach and the Anderson-Weiss approximation is found to be particularly useful to derive approximate analytical solutions for single-contact Hartmann-Hahn CP (HHCP) and MC-CP dynamics under MAS. We show that the MC-CP sequence requiring no pulse-shape optimization yields higher polarizations at short contact times than optimized adiabatic passage through the HH condition CP (APHH-CP) when the MAS frequency is comparable to the heteronuclear dipolar coupling, i.e., when APHH-CP through a single sideband matching condition is impossible or difficult to perform. It is also shown that the MC-CP sideband HH conditions are generally much broader than for single-contact HHCP and that efficient polarization transfer at the centerband HH condition can be reintroduced by rotor-asynchronous multiple equilibrations-re-equilibrations with the proton spin bath. Boundary conditions for the successful use of the MC-CP experiment when relying on spin-lattice relaxation for repolarization are also examined.

  18. Sensitivity enhancement by multiple-contact cross-polarization under magic-angle spinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raya, J; Hirschinger, J

    2017-08-01

    Multiple-contact cross-polarization (MC-CP) is applied to powder samples of ferrocene and l-alanine under magic-angle spinning (MAS) conditions. The method is described analytically through the density matrix formalism. The combination of a two-step memory function approach and the Anderson-Weiss approximation is found to be particularly useful to derive approximate analytical solutions for single-contact Hartmann-Hahn CP (HHCP) and MC-CP dynamics under MAS. We show that the MC-CP sequence requiring no pulse-shape optimization yields higher polarizations at short contact times than optimized adiabatic passage through the HH condition CP (APHH-CP) when the MAS frequency is comparable to the heteronuclear dipolar coupling, i.e., when APHH-CP through a single sideband matching condition is impossible or difficult to perform. It is also shown that the MC-CP sideband HH conditions are generally much broader than for single-contact HHCP and that efficient polarization transfer at the centerband HH condition can be reintroduced by rotor-asynchronous multiple equilibrations-re-equilibrations with the proton spin bath. Boundary conditions for the successful use of the MC-CP experiment when relying on spin-lattice relaxation for repolarization are also examined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Evaluation of touch-sensitive screen tablet terminal button size and spacing accounting for effect of fingertip contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, T; Doi, K; Fujimoto, H

    2015-08-01

    Touch-sensitive screen terminals enabling intuitive operation are used as input interfaces in a wide range of fields. Tablet terminals are one of the most common devices with a touch-sensitive screen. They have a feature of good portability, enabling use under various conditions. On the other hand, they require a GUI designed to prevent decrease of usability under various conditions. For example, the angle of fingertip contact with the display changes according to finger posture during operation and how the case is held. When a human fingertip makes contact with an object, the contact area between the fingertip and contact object increases or decreases as the contact angle changes. A touch-sensitive screen detects positions using the change in capacitance of the area touched by the fingertip; hence, differences in contact area between the touch-sensitive screen and fingertip resulting from different forefinger angles during operation could possibly affect operability. However, this effect has never been studied. We therefore conducted an experiment to investigate the relationship between size/spacing and operability, while taking the effect of fingertip contact angle into account. As a result, we have been able to specify the button size and spacing conditions that enable accurate and fast operation regardless of the forefinger contact angle.

  20. Super-mercuryphobic and hydrophobic diamond surfaces with hierarchical structures: Vanishment of the contact angle hysteresis with mercury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, Juan V., E-mail: escobar@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, PO Box 20-364, DF, México, 01000 (Mexico); Garza, Cristina, E-mail: cgarza@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, PO Box 20-364, DF, México, 01000 (Mexico); Alonso, Juan Carlos, E-mail: alonso@unam.mx [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, PO Box 70-360, DF, México, 04510 (Mexico); Castillo, Rolando, E-mail: rolandoc@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, PO Box 20-364, DF, México, 01000 (Mexico)

    2013-05-15

    Increased roughness is known to enhance the natural wetting properties of surfaces, making them either more hydrophobic or more hydrophilic. In this work we study the wetting properties of water and mercury drops in contact with boron doped diamond films with progressively increased surface roughnesses. We show how thermal oxidation of a microcrystalline film creates pyramids decorated with sub-micron protrusions that turn its naturally mercuryphobic surface into super-mercuryphobic. With this liquid, we observe the vanishment of the contact angle hysteresis that is expected for rough surfaces as the contact angle approaches 180, making small drops of mercury roll along out of the surface at an apparent zero tilt-angle. In contrast, the incorporation of nano-globules on the oxidized surface through a silanization process is necessary to increase the hydrophobic properties of the film for which the contact angle with water reaches 138°. The wetting states that dominate in each case are discussed.

  1. Super-mercuryphobic and hydrophobic diamond surfaces with hierarchical structures: Vanishment of the contact angle hysteresis with mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Juan V.; Garza, Cristina; Alonso, Juan Carlos; Castillo, Rolando

    2013-05-01

    Increased roughness is known to enhance the natural wetting properties of surfaces, making them either more hydrophobic or more hydrophilic. In this work we study the wetting properties of water and mercury drops in contact with boron doped diamond films with progressively increased surface roughnesses. We show how thermal oxidation of a microcrystalline film creates pyramids decorated with sub-micron protrusions that turn its naturally mercuryphobic surface into super-mercuryphobic. With this liquid, we observe the vanishment of the contact angle hysteresis that is expected for rough surfaces as the contact angle approaches 180˚, making small drops of mercury roll along out of the surface at an apparent zero tilt-angle. In contrast, the incorporation of nano-globules on the oxidized surface through a silanization process is necessary to increase the hydrophobic properties of the film for which the contact angle with water reaches 138°. The wetting states that dominate in each case are discussed.

  2. A surface energy analysis of mucoadhesion: contact angle measurements on polycarbophil and pig intestinal mucosa in physiologically relevant fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehr, C M; Bouwstra, J A; Boddé, H E; Junginger, H E

    1992-01-01

    The possible role of surface energy thermodynamics in mucoadhesion was investigated with Polycarbophil and pig intestinal mucosa. In separate experiments, the surface energy parameters of the substrate (mucosa) and the adhesive (polymer film) were determined by contact angle measurements on captive air/octane bubbles in three physiologically relevant test fluids (isotonic saline, artificial gastric fluid, and artificial intestinal fluid). Whereas the swollen Polycarbophil films were relatively hydrophilic as indicated by small water contact angles (22, 23, and 16 degrees), the water contact angles measured on mucosal tissue were significantly larger (61, 48, and 57 degrees). Hence, mucus was found to possess an appreciable hydrophobicity. The measured adhesive performance (force of detachment) between Polycarbophil and pig small intestinal mucosa was highest in nonbuffered saline medium, intermediate in gastric fluid, and minimal in intestinal fluid. In agreement with this trend, the mismatch in surface polarities between substrate and adhesive, calculated from the contact angle data, increased in the same order.

  3. Mixed self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiolates on ultrasmooth gold do not exhibit contact-angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pooja; Ulman, Abraham; Fanfan, Stephanie; Korniakov, Alexander; Loos, Katja

    2005-01-12

    We present the first study of mixed alkanethiolate SAMs on ultrasmooth gold surfaces. By eliminating surface roughness, it became possible, for the first time, to investigate wetting properties as a function of surface chemical composition. In three different surface compositions, it was found that contact-angle hysteresis apparently vanished. This suggests that surface chemical heterogeneity does not contribute to contact-angle hysteresis in mixed SAMs on ultrasmooth gold surfaces.

  4. Liquid transfer between two solid surfaces with the effect of contact angle hysteresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huanchen; Tang, Tian; Amirfazli, Alidad

    2013-11-01

    Drop transfer from one solid surface to another (e.g. due to the approach of a surface from top to a sessile drop resting on a lower surface) is widely observed in many industrial areas, e.g. offset printing. This process is governed by many factors such as the contact angle (CA) and contact angle hysteresis (CAH) of surfaces, viscosity of the liquid and the rate at which the donor and acceptor surfaces are separated. In this work, an experimental apparatus is developed to study the transfer of liquid drop between surfaces, with the particular focus on addressing the effect of the surfaces' CAH when the loading speed is low (transfer is quasi-static). In the experiment, a liquid bridge between the two surfaces is first formed by compression; then stretched to the point of breakage. By using surfaces that have similar CA but dissimilar CAH, the liquid transfer ratio (the amount of liquid transferred to the acceptor surface over the total amount of liquid) is found to be significantly influenced by CAH. In addition, as a result of CAH, the maximum compression of the liquid bridge is found to play an important role in determining the transfer ratio. These findings can be very helpful for the design of surfaces and loading conditions to achieve desired transfer ratios in practice.

  5. Contact angle and surface tension measurements of a five-ring polyphenyl ether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Contact angle measurements were performed for a five-ring polyphenyl ether isomeric mixture on M-50 steel in a dry nitrogen atmosphere. Two different techniques were used: (1) a tilting plate apparatus, and (2) a sessile drop apparatus. Measurements were made for the temperature range 25 to 190 C. Surface tension was measured by a differential maximum bubble pressure technique over the range 23 to 220 C in room air. The critical surface energy of spreading (gamma /sub c/) was determined for the polyphenyl ether by plotting the cosine of the contact angle (theta) versus the surface tension (gamma /sub LV/). The straight line intercept at cosine theta = 1 is defined as gamma (sub c). Gamma (sub c) was found to be 30.1 dyn/cm for the tilting plate technique and 31.3 dyn/cm for the sessile drop technique. These results indicate that the polyphenyl ether is inherently autophobic (i.e., it will not spread on its own surface film until its surface tension is less than gamma /sub c/). This phenomenon is discussed in light of the wettability and wear problems encountered with this fluid.

  6. Investigation of energy dissipation due to contact angle hysteresis in capillary effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athukorallage, Bhagya; Iyer, Ram

    2016-06-01

    Capillary action or Capillarity is the ability of a liquid to flow in narrow spaces without the assistance of, and in opposition to, external forces like gravity. Three effects contribute to capillary action, namely, adhesion of the liquid to the walls of the confining solid; meniscus formation; and low Reynolds number fluid flow. We investigate the dissipation of energy during one cycle of capillary action, when the liquid volume inside a capillary tube first increases and subsequently decreases while assuming quasi-static motion. The quasi-static assumption allows us to focus on the wetting phenomenon of the solid wall by the liquid and the formation of the meniscus. It is well known that the motion of a liquid on an non-ideal surface involves the expenditure of energy due to contact angle hysteresis. In this paper, we derive the equations for the menisci and the flow rules for the change of the contact angles for a liquid column in a capillary tube at a constant temperature and volume by minimizing the Helmholtz free energy using calculus of variations. We describe the numerical solution of these equations and present results from computations for the case of a capillary tube with 1 mm diameter.

  7. Numerical Study of Drop Motion on a Surface with Wettability Gradient and Contact Angle Hysteresis

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Jun-Jie; Wang, Xinzhu

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the motion of a 2-D drop on a surface with given wettability gradient is studied numerically by a hybrid lattice-Boltzmann finite-difference method using the multiple-relaxation-time collision model. We incorporate the geometric wetting boundary condition that allows accurate implementation of a contact angle hysteresis model. The method is first validated through three benchmark tests, including the layered Poiseuille flow with a viscosity contrast, the motion of a liquid column in a channel with specified wettability gradient and the force balance for a static drop attached to a surface with hysteresis subject to a body force. Then, simulations of a drop on a wall with given wettability gradient are performed under different conditions. The effects of the Reynolds number, the viscosity ratio, the wettability gradient, as well as the contact angle hysteresis on the drop motion are investigated in detail. It is found that the capillary number of the drop in steady state is significantly affected...

  8. Hydrophobic/superhydrophobic oxidized metal surfaces showing negligible contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hozumi, Atsushi; Cheng, Dalton F; Yagihashi, Makoto

    2011-01-15

    Dynamic wettability of oxidized metal (aluminum and titanium) surfaces could be tuned by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of 1,3,5,7-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D(4)(H)). This facile CVD method produces not only monomeric layers but also particulate films by changing the CVD temperature, resulting in a marked difference in the final wetting properties. In the samples prepared at 80°C for ~3 days, D(4)(H) layers with thicknesses of ~0.5 nm were formed on the surfaces without discernible change in surface morphology, as evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. After this D(4)(H) monomeric layer formation, the hydrophilic oxidized aluminum and titanium surfaces became hydrophobic (advancing/receding water contact angles (θ(A)/θ(R))=102-104°/99-102°) showing essentially negligible contact angle hysteresis. Performing CVD of D(4)(H) at 180°C for ~1 day produced opaque film with particulate morphologies with diameters in the range of 500 nm to 4 μm observed on the surfaces. This geometric morphology enhanced the surface hydrophobicity (θ(A)/θ(R)=163°/160-161°). Droplets on these negligible-hysteresis surfaces moved very easily without "pinning".

  9. Effects of dynamic contact angle on liquid withdrawal from capillary tubes: (semi)-analytical solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilpert, Markus

    2010-07-15

    The displacement of a gas by a liquid in both horizontal and inclined capillary tubes where the tube inlet is connected to a liquid reservoir of constant pressure can be described by the Lucas-Washburn theory. One can also use the Lucas-Washburn theory to model the reverse flow, that is, liquid withdrawal, even though the latter case has received relatively little attention. In this paper, we derive analytical solutions for the travel time of the gas-liquid interface as a function of interface velocity. The interface position can be obtained by numerically integrating the numerically inverted interface velocity. Therefore we refer to these solutions as (semi)-analytical. We neglect inertial forces. However, we account for a dynamic contact angle where the nondimensional non-equilibrium Young force depends on the capillary number in the form of either a power law or a power series. We explore the entire nondimensional parameter space. The analytical solutions allow us to show that five different liquid withdrawal scenarios may occur that differ in the direction of flow and the sign of the acceleration of the gas-liquid interface: horizontal, upward, steady-state downward, accelerating downward, and decelerating downward flow. In the last case, the liquid is withdrawn from the tube either completely or partially. The (semi)-analytical solutions are also valid within the limit where the contact angle is constant.

  10. Drop size effect on contact angle explained by nonextensive thermodynamics. Young's equation revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letellier, Pierre; Mayaffre, Alain; Turmine, Mireille

    2007-10-15

    We applied the concepts of nonextensive thermodynamics [Turmine et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 108 (2004) 18980], to describe the equilibrium of a liquid drop placed on a solid substrate. This approach provides a consistent formal framework for analyzing the contact angle according to the nature and structure of the substrate, and also the size of the drops. The introduction, for the solid/liquid interface, of the concept of "fuzzy interface" characterized by a thermodynamic dimension, different from 2/3 (surface) allowed description of the case of substrates with ill-defined geometry (such as porous, structured systems, fractal structure systems, etc.) and straightforward explanation of the phenomenon of super hydrophobicity without using a layer of trapped air in possible anfractuosities. The application of the nonextensive thermodynamics relationships, allowed explanation of all the usual behaviors described in the literature (Young, modified Young, Wenzel, Cassie-Baxter) including the case of the composite interfaces made of materials with different natures and spatial structures (smooth, rough, homogeneous and heterogeneous surfaces). We show that the contact angle can vary with the drop volume according to a power law, and this was validated against values published in the literature. This study also has consequences for the relations between "thermodynamic dimension" and "fractal dimension."

  11. Thickness, stability and contact angle of liquid films on and inside nanofibres, nanotubes and nanochannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattia, Davide; Starov, Victor; Semenov, Sergey

    2012-10-15

    While the stability of liquid films on substrates is a classical topic of colloidal science, the availability of nanostructured materials, such as nanotubes, nanofibres and nanochannels, has raised the question of how the stability of liquid films and their wetting behaviour is affected by nanoscale confinement. This paper will present the conditions for the stability of liquid films on and inside cylindrical solid substrates with nanometre scale characteristic dimensions. It is shown that the stability is determined by an effective disjoining/conjoining pressure isotherm which differs from the corresponding disjoining/conjoining pressure isotherm of flat liquid films on flat solid substrates. From the former, the equilibrium contact angles of drops on an outer or inner surface of a cylindrical capillary have been calculated as a function of surface curvature, showing that the expressions for equilibrium contact angles vary for different geometries, in view of the difference in thickness of the film of uniform thickness with which the bulk liquid (drops or menisci) is at equilibrium. These calculations have been extended to the case of glass nanocapillaries and carbon nanotubes, finding good agreement with experimental results in the literature.

  12. Investigation of the contact angles between various molten metals and substrates of niobium and zirconium. Final report. [Sessile drop technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munir, Z.A.

    1977-08-01

    The sessile drop technique was utilized for the determination of the contact angles between droplets of liquid tin, indium, and gallium; and substrates of niobium and zirconium. Contact angles, theta, were measured for various substrate surface roughness and over the temperature range 30 to 650/sup 0/C. Values of theta for all of these systems were found to be greater than 90/sup 0/ i.e., constituting a case of nonwetting between the liquid metals and the substrates. Three characteristic regions of the temperature dependence of contact angles were observed. A steady-state region in which the contact angle is relatively independent of temperature was preceded and followed by regions in which theta decreased rapidly with increasing temperature. For the steady-state or second region, contact angles were found to be independent of time whereas in the third region contact angles showed a decreasing trend with time at constant temperature. In accordance with theoretical predictions for theta greater than 90/sup 0/, increasing roughness of the substrate caused a corresponding increase in theta. Electron microprobe analyses showed that only the Ga--Zr system exhibited evidence of diffusion at the interface. Photographs of the sessile drop of this system over a period of time indicated that the drop had spread over a greater area thus supporting the possibility of a surface diffusion mass-transport process.

  13. Adsorption of modified dextrins to a hydrophobic surface: QCM-D studies, AFM imaging, and dynamic contact angle measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedeva, Iliana G; Fetzer, Renate; Fornasiero, Daniel; Ralston, John; Beattie, David A

    2010-05-15

    The adsorption of three dextrin-based polymers, regular wheat dextrin (Dextrin TY), phenyl succinate dextrin (PS Dextrin), and styrene oxide dextrin (SO Dextrin) on a model hydrophobic surface, consisting of a mixed alkanethiol layer on gold, has been characterized using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). The three polymers exhibited varying affinities and capacity for adsorption on the hydrophobic substrate. Atomic force microscope (AFM) imaging of the polymer layers indicates that all three polymers fully cover the surface. The effect of the three polymers on the static contact angle of the surface was studied using captive bubble contact angle measurements. The three polymers were seen to reduce the receding contact angle by similar amounts (approximately 14°) in spite of having varying adsorbed amounts and differences in adsorbed layer water content. Although no differences were observed in the ability of the polymers to reduce the static contact angle, measurements of the dynamic contact angle between a rising air bubble and the polymer covered substrate yielded stark differences between the polymers, with one polymer (SO Dextrin) slowing the dewetting by an order of magnitude more than the other two polymers. The differences in dewetting behavior correlate with the adsorbed layer characteristics determined by QCM-D and AFM. The role of the dynamic and static contact angle in the performance of a polymer as depressant is discussed.

  14. A new approach to influence contact angle and surface free energy of resin-based dental restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüttermann, Stefan; Trellenkamp, Taina; Bergmann, Nora; Raab, Wolfgang H-M; Ritter, Helmut; Janda, Ralf

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to identify novel delivery systems and active agents which increase the water contact angle and reduce the surface free energy when added to resin-based dental restorative materials. Two delivery systems based on zeolite or novel polymeric hollow beads (Poly-Pore), loaded with two low surface tension active agents (hydroxy functional polydimethylsiloxane and polydimethylsiloxane) or a polymerizable active agent (silicone polyether acrylate) were used to modify commonly formulated experimental dental resin composites. The non-modified resin was used as a standard (ST). Flexural strength, flexural modulus, water sorption, solubility, polymerization shrinkage, surface roughness Ra, contact angle θ, total surface free energy γS, and the apolar γSLW, polar γSAB, Lewis acid γS+ and base γS- components, and the active agents surface tensions γL were determined (Pmaterials had significantly higher θ but significantly lower γS, γSAB and γS- than the ST. A Poly-Pore/polydimethyl siloxane delivery system yielded the highest θ (110.9±3.5°) acceptable physical properties and the lowest values for γSLW and γS-. Among the modified materials the polymerizable materials containing active agents had the lowest γAB and the highest γS+ and γS-. Although not significant, both of the zeolite delivery systems yielded higher γSLW, γS+ and γS- but lower γSAB than the Poly-Pore delivery systems. Poly-Pore based delivery systems highly loaded with low surface tension active agents were found not to influence the physical properties but to significantly increase the water contact angle and thus reduce surface free energy of dental resin composites.

  15. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of contact angle and its hysteresis in two-phase flow with large viscosity difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haihu; Ju, Yaping; Wang, Ningning; Xi, Guang; Zhang, Yonghao

    2015-09-01

    Contact angle hysteresis is an important physical phenomenon omnipresent in nature and various industrial processes, but its effects are not considered in many existing multiphase flow simulations due to modeling complexity. In this work, a multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is developed to simulate the contact-line dynamics with consideration of the contact angle hysteresis for a broad range of kinematic viscosity ratios. In this method, the immiscible two-phase flow is described by a color-fluid model, in which the multiple-relaxation-time collision operator is adopted to increase numerical stability and suppress unphysical spurious currents at the contact line. The contact angle hysteresis is introduced using the strategy proposed by Ding and Spelt [Ding and Spelt, J. Fluid Mech. 599, 341 (2008)JFLSA70022-112010.1017/S0022112008000190], and the geometrical wetting boundary condition is enforced to obtain the desired contact angle. This method is first validated by simulations of static contact angle and dynamic capillary intrusion process on ideal (smooth) surfaces. It is then used to simulate the dynamic behavior of a droplet on a nonideal (inhomogeneous) surface subject to a simple shear flow. When the droplet remains pinned on the surface due to hysteresis, the steady interface shapes of the droplet quantitatively agree well with the previous numerical results. Four typical motion modes of contact points, as observed in a recent study, are qualitatively reproduced with varying advancing and receding contact angles. The viscosity ratio is found to have a notable impact on the droplet deformation, breakup, and hysteresis behavior. Finally, this method is extended to simulate the droplet breakup in a microfluidic T junction, with one half of the wall surface ideal and the other half nonideal. Due to the contact angle hysteresis, the droplet asymmetrically breaks up into two daughter droplets with the smaller one in the nonideal branch channel, and the

  16. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of contact angle and its hysteresis in two-phase flow with large viscosity difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haihu; Ju, Yaping; Wang, Ningning; Xi, Guang; Zhang, Yonghao

    2015-09-01

    Contact angle hysteresis is an important physical phenomenon omnipresent in nature and various industrial processes, but its effects are not considered in many existing multiphase flow simulations due to modeling complexity. In this work, a multiphase lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is developed to simulate the contact-line dynamics with consideration of the contact angle hysteresis for a broad range of kinematic viscosity ratios. In this method, the immiscible two-phase flow is described by a color-fluid model, in which the multiple-relaxation-time collision operator is adopted to increase numerical stability and suppress unphysical spurious currents at the contact line. The contact angle hysteresis is introduced using the strategy proposed by Ding and Spelt [Ding and Spelt, J. Fluid Mech. 599, 341 (2008), 10.1017/S0022112008000190], and the geometrical wetting boundary condition is enforced to obtain the desired contact angle. This method is first validated by simulations of static contact angle and dynamic capillary intrusion process on ideal (smooth) surfaces. It is then used to simulate the dynamic behavior of a droplet on a nonideal (inhomogeneous) surface subject to a simple shear flow. When the droplet remains pinned on the surface due to hysteresis, the steady interface shapes of the droplet quantitatively agree well with the previous numerical results. Four typical motion modes of contact points, as observed in a recent study, are qualitatively reproduced with varying advancing and receding contact angles. The viscosity ratio is found to have a notable impact on the droplet deformation, breakup, and hysteresis behavior. Finally, this method is extended to simulate the droplet breakup in a microfluidic T junction, with one half of the wall surface ideal and the other half nonideal. Due to the contact angle hysteresis, the droplet asymmetrically breaks up into two daughter droplets with the smaller one in the nonideal branch channel, and the behavior of

  17. Evaporation stains: suppressing the coffee-ring effect by contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yueh-Feng; Sheng, Yu-Jane; Tsao, Heng-Kwong

    2013-06-25

    A ring-shaped stain is frequently left on a substrate by a drying drop containing colloids as a result of contact line pinning and outward flow. In this work, however, different patterns are observed for drying drops containing small solutes or polymers on various hydrophilic substrates. Depending on the surface activity of solutes and the contact angle hysteresis (CAH) of substrates, the pattern of the evaporation stain varies, including a concentrated stain, a ringlike deposit, and a combined structure. For small surface-inactive solutes, the concentrated stain is formed on substrates with weak CAH, for example, copper sulfate solution on silica glass. On the contrary, a ringlike deposit is developed on substrates with strong CAH, for example, a copper sulfate solution on graphite. For surface-active solutes, however, the wetting property can be significantly altered and the ringlike stain is always visible, for example, Brij-35 solution on polycarbonate. For a mixture of surface-active and surface-inactive solutes, a combined pattern of a ringlike and concentrated stain can appear. For various polymer solutions on polycarbonate, similar results are observed. Concentrated stains are formed for weak CAH such as sodium polysulfonate, and ring-shaped patterns are developed for strong CAH such as poly(vinyl pyrrolidone). The stain pattern is actually determined by the competition between the time scales associated with contact line retreat and solute precipitation. The suppression of the coffee-ring effect can thus be acquired by the control of CAH.

  18. Spreading dynamics and dynamic contact angle of non-Newtonian fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X D; Lee, D J; Peng, X F; Lai, J Y

    2007-07-17

    The spreading dynamics of power-law fluids, both shear-thinning and shear-thickening fluids, that completely or partially wet solid substrate was investigated theoretically and experimentally. An evolution equation for liquid-film thickness was derived using a lubrication approximation, from which the dynamic contact angle versus the contact line moving velocity relationship was evaluated. In the capillary spreading regime, film thickness h is proportional to xi3/(n+2) (xi is the distance from the contact line), whereas in the gravitational regime, h is proportional to xi1/(n+2), relating to the rheological power exponent n. The derived model fit the experimental data well for a shear-thinning fluid (0.2% w/w xanthan solution) or a shear-thickening fluid (7.5% w/w 10 nm silica in polypropylene glycol) on a completely wetted substrate. The derived model was extended using Hoffmann's proposal for partially wetting fluids. Good agreement was also attained between model predictions and the shear-thinning fluid (1% w/w cmc solution) and shear-thickening fluid (10% w/w 15 nm silica) on partially wetted surfaces.

  19. Experimental investigation of dynamic contact angle and capillary rise in tubes with circular and noncircular cross sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heshmati, Mohammad; Piri, Mohammad

    2014-12-02

    An extensive experimental study of the kinetics of capillary rise in borosilicate glass tubes of different sizes and cross-sectional shapes using various fluid systems and tube tilt angles is presented. The investigation is focused on the direct measurement of dynamic contact angle and its variation with the velocity of the moving meniscus (or capillary number) in capillary rise experiments. We investigated this relationship for different invading fluid densities, viscosities, and surface tensions. For circular tubes, the measured dynamic contact angles were used to obtain rise-versus-time values that agree more closely with their experimental counterparts (also reported in this study) than those predicted by Washburn equation using a fixed value of contact angle. We study the predictive capabilities of four empirical correlations available in the literature for velocity-dependence of dynamic contact angle by comparing their predicted trends against our measured values. We also present measurements of rise in noncircular capillary tubes where rapid advancement of arc menisci in the corners ahead of main terminal meniscus impacts the dynamics of rise. Using the extensive set of experimental data generated in this study, a new general empirical trend is presented for variation of normalized rise with dynamic contact angle that can be used in, for instance, dynamic pore-scale models of flow in porous media to predict multiphase flow behavior.

  20. Contact Angles of Water-repellent Porous Media Inferred by Tensiometer- TDR Probe Measurement Under Controlled Wetting and Drying Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subedi, Shaphal; Komatsu, Ken; Komatsu, Toshiko;

    2013-01-01

    The time dependency of water repellency (WR) in hydrophobic porous media plays a crucial role for water infiltration processes after rainfall and for the long-term performance of capillary barrier systems. The contact angle (CA) of hydrophobic media normally decreases with continuous contact...... equipped with a mini-time domain reflectometry (TDR) coil probe under controlled wetting and drying in a water-repellent volcanic ash soil (VAS) and in sands coated with different hydrophobic agents. The contact angle (CA–SWRC) under imbibition was evaluated based on the inflection points on the water...... retention curves. For both water-repellent VAS and hydrophobized sand samples, the calculated CA–SWRC increased with increasing WR. This was determined from both the water drop penetration time and the initial contact angle (CAi) by the sessile drop method. Calculated CA–SWRC values ranged from 20° to 48...

  1. Effect of chemical heterogeneity of biodegradable polymers on surface energy: A static contact angle analysis of polyester model films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belibel, R.; Avramoglou, T. [INSERM U1148, Laboratory for Vascular Translational Science (LVTS), Institut Galilée, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 99 Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clément, Villetaneuse F-93430 (France); Garcia, A. [CNRS UPR 3407, Laboratoire des Sciences des Procédés et des Matériau, Institut Galilée, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 99 Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clément, Villetaneuse F-93430 (France); Barbaud, C. [INSERM U1148, Laboratory for Vascular Translational Science (LVTS), Institut Galilée, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 99 Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clément, Villetaneuse F-93430 (France); Mora, L., E-mail: Laurence.mora@univ-paris13.fr [INSERM U1148, Laboratory for Vascular Translational Science (LVTS), Institut Galilée, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 99 Avenue Jean-Baptiste Clément, Villetaneuse F-93430 (France)

    2016-02-01

    Biodegradable and bioassimilable poly((R,S)-3,3 dimethylmalic acid) (PDMMLA) derivatives were synthesized and characterized in order to develop a new coating for coronary endoprosthesis enabling the reduction of restenosis. The PDMMLA was chemically modified to form different custom groups in its side chain. Three side groups were chosen: the hexyl group for its hydrophobic nature, the carboxylic acid and alcohol groups for their acid and neutral hydrophilic character, respectively. The sessile drop method was applied to characterize the wettability of biodegradable polymer film coatings. Surface energy and components were calculated. The van Oss approach helped reach not only the dispersive and polar acid–base components of surface energy but also acid and basic components. Surface topography was quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and subnanometer average values of roughness (Ra) were obtained for all the analyzed surfaces. Thus, roughness was considered to have a negligible effect on wettability measurements. In contrast, heterogeneous surfaces had to be corrected by the Cassie–Baxter equation for copolymers (10/90, 20/80 and 30/70). The impact of this correction was quantified for all the wettability parameters. Very high relative corrections (%) were found, reaching 100% for energies and 30% for contact angles. - Highlights: • We develop different polymers with various chemical compositions. • Wettability properties were calculated using Cassie corrected contact angles. • Percentage of acid groups in polymers is directly correlated to acid part of SFE. • Cassie corrections are necessary for heterogeneous polymers.

  2. Study of the resistance of SAMs on aluminium to acidic and basic solutions using dynamic contact angle measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liakos, Ioannis L; Newman, Roger C; McAlpine, Eoghan; Alexander, Morgan R

    2007-01-30

    We report the development of a method to determine the aqueous stability of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) using the Wilhelmy plate dynamic contact angle (DCA) experiment. The DCA is measured in solutions over a range of pH values for alkyl carboxylic and alkyl phosphonic acid SAMs formed on magnetron-sputtered aluminum. The change in DCA on repeated immersion is used as a measure of the degradation of the SAMs by hydrolytic attack. The short and intermediate chain length alkyl acids are not stable in water of neutral pH, whereas molecules with the longest alkyl chains show considerably greater stability in neutral and both high and low pH solutions. The packing density inferred from the DCA and the contact angle hysteresis suggests the C18CO2H monolayer to be slightly less well packed than that of the C18P(=O)(OH)2; this is consistent with related friction force microscopy and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy findings published elsewhere (Foster, T. T.; Alexander, M. R.; Leggett, G. J.; McAlpine, E. Langmuir 2006, 22, 9254-9259). The resistance of the SAMs to acid and alkaline environments is discussed in the context of aluminum oxide solubility, SAM packing density, and the resistance of the interfacial phosphate and carboxylate functionalities to different aqueous conditions.

  3. On the uniqueness of the receding contact angle: effects of substrate roughness and humidity on evaporation of water drops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittoni, Paola G; Lin, Chia-Hui; Yu, Teng-Shiang; Lin, Shi-Yow

    2014-08-12

    Could a unique receding contact angle be indicated for describing the wetting properties of a real gas-liquid-solid system? Could a receding contact angle be defined if the triple line of a sessile drop is not moving at all during the whole measurement process? To what extent is the receding contact angle influenced by the intrinsic properties of the system or the measurement procedures? In order to answer these questions, a systematic investigation was conducted in this study on the effects of substrate roughness and relative humidity on the behavior of pure water drops spreading and evaporating on polycarbonate (PC) surfaces characterized by different morphologies. Dynamic, advancing, and receding contact angles were found to be strongly affected by substrate roughness. Specifically, a receding contact angle could not be measured at all for drops evaporating on the more rugged PC surfaces, since the drops were observed strongly pinning to the substrate almost until their complete disappearance. Substrate roughness and system relative humidity were also found responsible for drastic changes in the depinning time (from ∼10 to ∼60 min). Thus, for measurement observations not sufficiently long, no movement of the triple line could be noted, with, again, the failure to find a receding contact angle. Therefore, to keep using concepts such as the receding contact angle as meaningful specifications of a given gas-liquid-solid system, the imperative to carefully investigate and report the inner characteristics of the system (substrate roughness, topography, impurities, defects, chemical properties, etc.) is pointed out in this study. The necessity of establishing methodological standards (drop size, measurement method, system history, observation interval, relative humidity, etc.) is also suggested.

  4. Method for estimating interfacial tensions and contact angles from sessile and pendant drop shapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, C.; Reed, R.L.

    1983-02-01

    Optimal estimation techniques were developed for measurement of interfacial tensions and contact angles for multiphase microemulsion systems of the following types: (1) lower-phase microemulsion in equilibrium with excess oil, (2) upper-phase microemulsion in equilbrium with excess brine, and (3) middle-phase microemulsion in equilibrium with excess brine and excess oil. The surfactant was the monoethanol amine salt of dodecyl o-xylene sulfonate mixed with a cosolvent of t-amyl alcohol in the ratio 63/67 by vol. The oil was a mixture of 90% paraffinic oil (Isopar M) and 10% heavy aromatic naphtha (by volume), and the brine was various concentrations of NaCl in distilled water. The method is applied to sessile drops, bubbles, and pendant configurations. 21 referernces.

  5. The contact angle for a droplet on homogeneous and spherical concave surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ai-Jun; Lv, Bao-Zhan; Wang, Xiao-Song; Zhou, Long

    2016-03-01

    Wetting of droplets on homogeneous and spherical concave rough surfaces is investigated based on thermodynamics. In this study, neglecting the droplet gravity and the thickness of the precursor film of the liquid-vapor interface, the three-phase system is divided into six parts using Gibbs concept of dividing surface. The system Helmholtz free energy is established based on thermodynamics. Supposing the temperature and chemical potential to be constant, a new generalized Young’s equation of the equilibrium contact angle for a spherical droplet on a spherical concave rough surfaces is obtained including the line tension effects. Under certain conditions, this generalized Young’s equation is the same as the Rusanov’s equation.

  6. Magnetic controllable biorecognition process of doxorubicin detected by electrochemical contact angle measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Zhang, Renyun; Li, Xiaomao; Gutmann, Sebastian; Lv, Gang; Wang, Xuemei

    2007-08-01

    Fe3O4 nanoparticles are the most commonly used magnetic materials with promising applications in biomedical and biochemical engineering. In this study, a novel application of the tetraheptylammonium capped Fe3O4 nanoparticles in controllable biorecognition process of anticancer drug doxorubicin through combination with external static magnetic field has been demonstrated. Our AFM and electrochemical studies illustrate that the presence of the tetraheptylammonium capped Fe3O4 nanoparticles could promote the binding behavior of doxorubicin to DNA. And the results of the electrochemical contact angle measurements indicate that the controllable biomolecular recognition of doxorubicin could be readily achieved by combining these functionalized Fe3O4 nanoparticles with changing the positions of external magnetic field.

  7. The method of contact angle measurements and estimation of work of adhesion in bioleaching of metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matlakowska Renata

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present our method for the measurement of contact angles on the surface of minerals during the bioleaching process because the standard deviation obtained in our measurements achieved unexpectedly low error. Construction of a goniometer connected with a specially prepared computer program allowed us to repeat measurements several times over a short time course, yielding excellent results. After defining points on the outline of the image of a drop and its baseline as well of the first approximation of the outline of the drop, an iterative process is initiated that is aimed at fitting the model of the drop and baseline. In turn, after defining the medium for which measurements were made, the work of adhesion is determined according to Young-Dupré equation. Calculations were made with the use of two methods named the L-M and L-Q methods.

  8. Surface energy of preservative-treated southern yellow pine (Pinus spp.) by contact angle measurement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Jinzhen; Pascal D.Kamdem

    2007-01-01

    In this study,the contact angles of four different reference liquids (including distilled water,diiodomethane,formadide and glycerol) formed on the surfaces of wood,treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) and two other emerging copper-based water-borne systems (commercial names:NW and NS) were measured with sessile drop method.Based on the contact angle data,the surface energy was obtained from the acid-base approach.The total surface energy consisted of Lifshiz-van der Waals parameter and acid-base parameter.Results showed that the NW and CCA treatments made the wood surface more hydrophobic while the NS treatment had the reverse effect on the wood surface mainly owing to the increased penetration of earlywood.By using three liquids,diiodomethane,formamide and distilled water,the total surface energy obtained for untreated earlywood,untreated latewood, CCA-treated earlywood,CCA-treated latewood,NW-treated earlywood,NW-treated latewood,NS-treated earlywood and NS-treated latewood were 43.1,44.5,43.4,45.1,49.4,40.6,46.0 and 40.9 mJ/m2,respectively.The surface energy of CCA-treated wood was almost the same as untreated wood.After NW and NS treatments,the surface energy of both earlywood and latewood changed a little.However,the change was not so obvious as to draw any further conclusion concerning the influence of NW and NS treatments on the surface energy of wood.

  9. Contact angle hysteresis on superhydrophobic surfaces: an ionic liquid probe fluid offers mechanistic insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumpfer, Joseph W; Bian, Pei; Zheng, Peiwen; Gao, Lichao; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2011-03-15

    Silicon/silicon dioxide surfaces containing 3 μm (width) × 6 μm (length) × 40 μm (height) staggered rhombus posts were prepared using photolithography and hydrophobized using a perfluoroalkyl-containing monofunctional silane. These surfaces exhibit water contact angles of θ(A)/θ(R) = 169°/156°. Water drops come to rest on a carefully aligned horizontal sample but roll when the surface is tilted slightly. No visible trail or evidence of water "left behind" at the receding edge of the drop is apparent on surfaces that water drops have rolled on or on samples removed from water through the air-water interface. When dimethylbis(β-hydroxyethyl)ammonium methanesulfonate (N(+)S(-), a nonvolatile ionic liquid) is used as the liquid probe fluid (instead of water), contact angles of θ(A)/θ(R) = 164°/152° are observed and ∼3-μm-diameter sessile drops are visible (by scanning electron microscopy - SEM) on the top of every post of a sample drawn out of this liquid. We interpret the formation of these sessile microdrops as arising from microcapillary bridge failure that occurs during receding events and emphasize that the capillary bridges rupture in primarily a tensile failure mode. Smaller sessile drops could be prepared using mixtures of water and N(+)S(-). Microdroplets of N(+)S(-) were also observed to form selectively at particular features on surfaces containing square holes separated by ridges. This suggests that pinning sites can be identified using microscopy and this ionic liquid probe fluid.

  10. Use of Atomic Oxygen for Increased Water Contact Angles of Various Polymers for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim; Berger, Lauren; Roberts, Lily

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of atomic oxygen (AO) exposure on the hydrophilicity of nine different polymers for biomedical applications. Atomic oxygen treatment can alter the chemistry and morphology of polymer surfaces, which may increase the adhesion and spreading of cells on Petri dishes and enhance implant growth. Therefore, nine different polymers were exposed to atomic oxygen and water-contact angle, or hydrophilicity, was measured after exposure. To determine whether hydrophilicity remains static after initial atomic oxygen exposure, or changes with higher fluence exposures, the contact angles between the polymer and water droplet placed on the polymer s surface were measured versus AO fluence. The polymers were exposed to atomic oxygen in a 100-W, 13.56-MHz radio frequency (RF) plasma asher, and the treatment was found to significantly alter the hydrophilicity of non-fluorinated polymers. Pristine samples were compared with samples that had been exposed to AO at various fluence levels. Minimum and maximum fluences for the ashing trials were set based on the effective AO erosion of a Kapton witness coupon in the asher. The time intervals for ashing were determined by finding the logarithmic values of the minimum and maximum fluences. The difference of these two values was divided by the desired number of intervals (ideally 10). The initial desired fluence was then multiplied by this result (2.37), as was each subsequent desired fluence. The flux in the asher was determined to be approximately 3.0 x 10(exp 15) atoms/sq cm/sec, and each polymer was exposed to a maximum fluence of 5.16 x 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm.

  11. Direct determination of contact angles of model soils in comparison with wettability characterization by capillary rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Flores, Juan Carlos; Bachmann, Jörg; Marmur, Abraham

    2010-03-01

    SummaryAn accurate method to determine contact angles (CA) of soils as a measure of water repellency is still missing. In the present research, we evaluated and compared different methods to determine the CA of dry soil samples. Experiments were made by using a set of porous materials (silt, sand and glass beads) with different levels of water repellency. The CAs were measured with the Capillary Rise Method ( θCRM; liquid penetration into a 3-d system), the Wilhelmy plate method ( θWPM; measurement of capillary forces acting on a plane sample) and the Sessile Drop Method ( θSDM; optical CA analysis of drop contour on a plane sample). Results were compared with the CAs calculated from capillary rise in long vertical columns ( θECR), where liquid profiles of the final capillary rise of water and ethanol, respectively, were used to derive the contact angle under the assumed equilibrium conditions. The results showed the overestimation of the CA by using the well established bi-liquid CRM technique for porous materials, in particular for material with a low degree of water repellency (CA < 40°) and for the finer textured materials. In contrast, a variant of the Wilhelmy plate method, i.e. the cosine-averaged advancing CA and receding CA ( θEWPM), as well as the Sessile Drop CA, θSDM, were close to the ones of θECR. We concluded that θEWPM and θSDM are apparent CA, but nevertheless able to predict the impact of wettability on the final capillary rise which is affected by pore topology as well as by wettability.

  12. Slag melting temperature and contact angle on high carbon containing refractory substrates Temperatura de fusão e ângulo de contato de escórias em substratos de concretos refratários contendo alto teor de carbono

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Luz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work the sessile drop technique was used in order to evaluate the melting temperature of synthetic and industrial slags, and their contact angle as a function of time and temperature on substrates of an Al2O3-SiO2-SiC-C castable containing 10 wt.% of carbon or its matrix. The best experimental conditions for the evaluation of the wetting behavior of refractory castables were attained when 25 x 25 x 10 mm³ matrix substrates and cylindrical slag pellets of 3 mm diameter and 5 mm high were used. This substrate - slag set resulted in contact angle values with good reliability. Small differences between the contact angle behavior on ground and polished matrix surfaces for synthetic slags were also detected. Additionally, industrial slags containing various oxide components, showed high values of contact angles and lower liquid spreading when compared with synthetic slags. This difference can be associated to the interaction liquid-solid at the material interface. Besides that, the wetting experiments were presented as a good alternative for measuring the melting temperatures of slags, as their values are difficult to determine due to the high oxide variety in the industrial slag compositions and the interaction between the slag and the substrate.Neste trabalho a técnica da gota séssil foi usada na avaliação da temperatura de fusão de escórias sintéticas e industriais e de seus ângulos de contato, em função do tempo e da temperatura, sobre substratos de um concreto Al2O3-SiO2-SiC-C que contém 10%-p de carbono ou sobre somente sua matriz. As melhores condições experimentais para a avaliação do comportamento de molhamento dos concretos refratários foram obtidas quando utilizados substratos da matriz de 25 x 25 x 10 mm³ e cilindros das escórias com 3 mm de diâmetro e 5 mm de altura. O uso deste conjunto substrato-escória proporcionou a obtenção de valores de ângulo de contato com boa reprodutibilidade. Pequenas diferen

  13. Shear distortion and failure of capillary bridges. Wetting information beyond contact angle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liming; McCarthy, Thomas J

    2013-06-25

    Water capillary bridges are prepared that span hydrophilic pinning features on parallel opposing smooth, flat, and hydrophobic surfaces. These bridges are distorted by shearing the parallel plates at a low rate. The capillary bridges lengthen and distort to balance Laplace pressure (equilibrate mean curvature) as the features are separated and eventually rupture at a distance that is a function of the liquid volume, the advancing and receding contact angles of the surfaces, the separation between the parallel surfaces, and in particular, the shape and orientation of the hydrophilic pinning features. Two modes of capillary bridge failure are observed: (1) tensile, in which the capillary bridge breaks to form sessile drops on both the upper and lower surfaces, and (2) sessile, in which sessile capillary bridge rupture occurs on one surface to form a puddle (contact-line-distorted sessile drop) on the feature and a retained capillary bridge spanning the hydrophobic surface and the hydrophilic feature on the opposing surface. The shape and orientation of the features control the mode of capillary bridge failure as well as the distribution of water between the two separate sessile drops or the retained capillary bridge and the puddle.

  14. New procedure to measure simultaneously the surface tension and contact angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champmartin, S.; Ambari, A.; Le Pommelec, J. Y.

    2016-05-01

    This paper proposes a new procedure to simultaneously measure the static contact angle and the surface tension of a liquid using a spherical geometry. Unlike the other existing methods, the knowledge of one of both previous parameters and the displacement of the sphere are not mandatory. The technique is based on the measurement of two simple physical quantities: the height of the meniscus formed on a sphere at the very contact with a liquid bath and the resulting vertical force exerted on this object at equilibrium. The meniscus height, whose exact value requires the numerical resolution of the Laplace equation, is often estimated with an approximate 2D model, valid only for very large spheres compared to the capillary length. We develop instead another simplified solution of the Young-Laplace equation based on the work of Ferguson for the meniscus on a cylinder and adapted for the spherical shape. This alternative model, which is less restrictive in terms of the sphere size, is successfully compared to numerical solutions of the complete Young-Laplace equation. It appears to be accurate for sphere radii larger than only two capillary lengths. Finally the feasibility of the method is experimentally tested and validated for three common liquids and two "small" steel spheres.

  15. Synergistic effects of geometry, inertia, and dynamic contact angle on wetting and dewetting of capillaries of varying cross sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiuling; Graber, Ellen R; Wallach, Rony

    2013-04-15

    Understanding the role of geometry, inertia, and dynamic contact angle on wetting and dewetting of capillary tubes has theoretical and practical aspects alike. The specific and synergistic effects of these factors were studied theoretically using a mathematical model that includes inertial and dynamic contact angle terms. After validating the model for capillaries of uniform cross section, the model was extended to capillaries with sinusoidal modulations of the radius, since in practice, capillaries rarely have uniform cross-sections. The height of the meniscus during wetting and dewetting was significantly affected by the relations between the local slope of the capillary surface and the Young contact angle. Non-dimensional variables were defined using viscous effects and gravity as the scaling parameters. Simulations using the dimensionless model showed that the inertial and dynamic contact angle terms can be neglected for narrow capillaries of uniform cross-section but not for uniform, wide cross-section capillaries. Moreover, nonuniformity in cross-sectional area induced hysteresis, deceleration, blocking, and metastable equilibrium locations. An increase in contact angle further amplified the effect of geometry on wetting and dewetting processes. These results enable characterization and modeling of fluid retention and flow in porous structures that inherently consist of capillaries of varying cross section.

  16. Effect of Surface Roughness on Contact Angle Measurement of Nanofluid on Surface of Stainless Steel 304 by Sessile Drop Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajitno, D. H.; Maulana, A.; Syarif, D. G.

    2016-08-01

    Contact angles play an important role in the mass and heat transfer. Stainless steel 304 has been used for nuclear power plan structure material until now. An experiment to measure contact angle of demineralized aqua and nanofluid containing nano particle of zirconia on metal surface of stainless steel 304 with sessile drop method was conducted. The measurement to measure the static contact angle and drop of nano fluid containing nano particle zirconia on stainless steel with different surface roughness was carried out. It was observed that stainless steel 304 was good hydrophylic properties with decreasing surface roughness of stainless steel during drop of aqua demineralized and nano fluid respectively. As a result the contact angle of demineralized aqua is decreased from 97.39 to 78.42 and contact angle of nano fluid from 94.3 to 67.50, respectively with decreasing surface roughness of stainless stee 304. Wettability of nanofluid on surface stainless steel 304 is better than aqua demineralized.

  17. Dynamic contact angles on PTFE surface by aqueous surfactant solution in the absence and presence of electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Rajib Ghosh; Paria, Santanu

    2009-09-15

    This study presents the experimental results on dynamic contact angles of pure surfactants and surfactants with electrolyte solutions on PTFE (Teflon) surface. Dynamic advancing (theta(A)) and receding (theta(R)) contact angles measurements by the Wilhelmy plate technique were carried out for aqueous solution of three different surfactants Triton X-100 (TX-100), sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). The same measurements in the presence of different electrolytes NaCl, Na(2)SO(4), and CaCl(2) for ionic surfactants (SDBS and CTAB) were also carried out to see the change in contact angle and wetting behavior. The presence of electrolytes changes the advancing contact angle as well as wetting properties of hydrophobic solid surface significantly even at very low surfactant concentration. Counter ion valency of the electrolyte is more important in reducing advancing contact angle on hydrophobic PTFE surface at very low concentration of ionic surfactants from CMC. Pure surfactants and ionic surfactants in the presence of electrolytes show a linear relationship between the adhesional tension and surface tension at air-water interface with different slope and intercept.

  18. Dynamic contact angle and spreading rate measurements for the characterization of the effect of dentin surface treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wege, Hartmut Alexander; Aguilar, José Arturo; Rodríguez-Valverde, Miguel Angel; Toledano, Manuel; Osorio, Raquel; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, Miguel Angel

    2003-07-01

    A new methodology capable of providing reliable and reproducible contact angle (theta) data has been employed to study the effect of clinical treatments grinding, acid etching, and deproteinization on medial dentin tissue. It is based on the application of the ADSA-CD algorithm to the determination of low-rate dynamic contact angles, obtained from slowly growing drops, and on contact angle measurement, as well as spreading behavior analysis, during the relaxation of the system (water on treated dentin) after initial drop growth. The theta data obtained were substantially more reproducible than those obtained with classical methods. A net effect of the treatment on theta was found, increasing dentin wettability: theta (polished) >theta (etched) >theta (deproteinized). The spreading rates correlate with the angles and are adequate for the dentin surface characterization. ANOVA and SNK tests show that for advancing contact angles the means corresponding to all treatments are significantly different. In the relaxing phase, mean angle and spreading rates on polished dentin differ significantly from those on etched and deproteinized dentin, but the latter do not differ significantly from each other.

  19. Modeling for dynamic contact angle of ball screw mechanism aimed to structural parameters%面向结构参数的滚珠丝杠副动态接触角建模

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梦奇; 庾辉; 李冬英; 王斌; 张根保

    2016-01-01

    Ball screw mechanism is one of the key parts in mechanical and electronic products especially in precision machineries due to its high transmission efficiency, long service life and high precision, high carrying capacity and positioning accuracy,which is determined by the contact angle formed between nut and screw. Aimed at the current problems in universal and limited application, which resulted from the specific structure parameters, this paper establishes the relationship between contact angle and ball screw’s structure parameters, as well as the model of the dynamic contact angle of ball screw mechanism combined with the geometric parameters of the ball and the raceway between nut and screw.The relationship between force and deformation in ball and raceway is got by using the Hertz contact theory, which is used to solve the stiffness in contact area between screw and nut. The relationship between ball’s rotation and revolution speed and screw’s rotation speed is got by using the raceway control theory, which is used to solve the centrifugal force and gyroscopic moment formed under working conditions. The structural model of the nonlinear equations of contact angle is got, in which the variable includes clearance, nominal diameter, ball diameter, helix angle and ball number. The solving procedure of dynamic contact angle is given based on the Newton-Raphson method. The influence of structure parameters on contact angle of ball screw mechanism under different working conditions is studied through the example analysis, and verified by contrasting the influence of ball screw’s rotational speed on contact angles with a specific structure. The results show that the inner contact angles in screw raceway are always greater than the external angles in nut raceway under working conditions. The inner contact angles increase with the increasing of screw’s rotational speed, and in contrast, the external contact angles decrease. Both the values of inner contact

  20. Wall-bounded multiphase flows of N immiscible incompressible fluids: consistency and contact-angle boundary condition

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, S

    2016-01-01

    We present an effective method for simulating wall-bounded multiphase flows consisting of $N$ ($N\\geqslant 2$) immiscible incompressible fluids with different densities, viscosities and pairwise surface tensions. The N-phase physical formulation is based on a modified thermodynamically consistent phase field model that is more general than in a previous work, and it is developed by considering the reduction consistency if some of the fluid components were absent from the system. We propose an N-phase contact-angle boundary condition that is reduction consistent between $N$ phases and $M$ phases ($2\\leqslant M\\leqslant N-1$). We also present a numerical algorithm for solving the N-phase governing equations together with the contact-angle boundary conditions developed herein. Extensive numerical experiments are presented for several flow problems involving multiple fluid components and solid-wall boundaries to investigate the wettability effects with multiple types of contact angles. In particular, we compare s...

  1. Contact angle and adsorption energies of nanoparticles at the air-liquid interface determined by neutron reflectivity and molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguera, Javier; Ponomarev, Evgeniy; Geue, Thomas; Stellacci, Francesco; Bresme, Fernando; Moglianetti, Mauro

    2015-03-19

    Understanding how nanomaterials interact with interfaces is essential to control their self-assembly as well as their optical, electronic, and catalytic properties. We present here an experimental approach based on neutron reflectivity (NR) that allows the in situ measurement of the contact angles of nanoparticles adsorbed at fluid interfaces. Because our method provides a route to quantify the adsorption and interfacial energies of the nanoparticles in situ, it circumvents problems associated with existing indirect methods, which rely on the transport of the monolayers to substrates for further analysis. We illustrate the method by measuring the contact angle of hydrophilic and hydrophobic gold nanoparticles, coated with perdeuterated octanethiol (d-OT) and with a mixture of d-OT and mercaptohexanol (MHol), respectively. The contact angles were also calculated via atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) computations, showing excellent agreement with the experimental data. Our method opens the route to quantify the adsorption of complex nanoparticle structures adsorbed at fluid interfaces featuring different chemical compositions.

  2. An effective medium approach to predict the apparent contact angle of drops on super-hydrophobic randomly rough surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottiglione, F; Carbone, G

    2015-01-14

    The apparent contact angle of large 2D drops with randomly rough self-affine profiles is numerically investigated. The numerical approach is based upon the assumption of large separation of length scales, i.e. it is assumed that the roughness length scales are much smaller than the drop size, thus making it possible to treat the problem through a mean-field like approach relying on the large-separation of scales. The apparent contact angle at equilibrium is calculated in all wetting regimes from full wetting (Wenzel state) to partial wetting (Cassie state). It was found that for very large values of the roughness Wenzel parameter (r(W) > -1/ cos θ(Y), where θ(Y) is the Young's contact angle), the interface approaches the perfect non-wetting condition and the apparent contact angle is almost equal to 180°. The results are compared with the case of roughness on one single scale (sinusoidal surface) and it is found that, given the same value of the Wenzel roughness parameter rW, the apparent contact angle is much larger for the case of a randomly rough surface, proving that the multi-scale character of randomly rough surfaces is a key factor to enhance superhydrophobicity. Moreover, it is shown that for millimetre-sized drops, the actual drop pressure at static equilibrium weakly affects the wetting regime, which instead seems to be dominated by the roughness parameter. For this reason a methodology to estimate the apparent contact angle is proposed, which relies only upon the micro-scale properties of the rough surface.

  3. The contact angle of wetting of the solid phase of soil before and after chemical modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyugai Zemfira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Wettability of soil affects a wide variety of processes including infiltration, preferential flow and surface runoff. Wettability of surface is usually expressed in terms of contact angle (CA measurement. If the CA between liquid and solid surface is less than 90°, the surface is called hydrophilic, otherwise the surface is called hydrophobic. If the CA of water droplet on hydrophilic surface is in a range of 0-30° this surface is called superhydrophilic. In case of superhydrophobic surfaces the CA exceeds 150° that means that these surfaces are extremely difficult to wet. CA of wetting of mineral soil particles depends on the overlying organic and iron compounds. The object of study is a sample of the humus-accumulative horizon of typical chernozem (Kursk, Russia and two samples (horizons A1, B2 of red ferrallitic soils (Fr. Norfolk, NE Oceania. The soil samples were analyzed for organic carbon, forms of non-silicate iron and hydrophobic-hydrophilic composition of humic substances. CA of wetting was determined in the intact samples and after removal of organic matter (H2O2 treatment, amorphous and crystallized forms of iron. Static contact angles were determined with the sessile drop method using a digital goniometer (Drop Shape Analysis System, DSA100, Krüss GmbH, Hamburg, Germany. The contact angle was calculated by the Young–Laplace method (fitting of Young–Laplace equation to the drop shape. The measurements were repeated 10-15 times for every sample. Oxidation of organic matter (H2O2 treatment causes an increase in the values of CA of wetting (in chernozem from 9.3 to 28,0-29.5º, in ferrallitic soil from 18.0 − 27.3 to 22.4 − 33.4º. CA remained constant for chernozem and slightly decreased in the case of ferrallitic soil, when the removal of amorphous and crystallized forms of iron was performed on samples pretreated with H2O2. CA increase occurs after successive removal of nonsilicate forms of iron from soil samples of

  4. Capillary rise of a non-Newtonian power law liquid: impact of the fluid rheology and dynamic contact angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digilov, Rafael M

    2008-12-02

    The impact of non-Newtonian behavior and the dynamic contact angle on the rise dynamics of a power law liquid in a vertical capillary is studied theoretically and experimentally for quasi-steady-state flow. An analytical solution for the time evolution of the meniscus height is obtained in terms of a Gaussian hypergeometric function, which in the case of a Newtonian liquid reduces to the Lucas-Washburn equation modified by the dynamic contact angle correction. The validity of the solution is checked against experimental data on the rise dynamics of a shear-thinning cmc solution in a glass microcapillary, and excellent agreement is found.

  5. Surface characterization of poly(L-lactic acid)-methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) diblock copolymers by static and dynamic contact angle measurements, FTIR, and ATR-FTIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, O; Doganci, E; Erbil, H Y; Demir, A S

    2008-02-05

    The surface composition and surface free energy properties of two types of amphiphilic and semicrystalline diblock copolymers consisting of poly(L-lactic acid) coupled to (methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (PLLA-MePEG) having differing block lengths of PEG were investigated by using static and dynamic contact angle measurements, transmission Fourier infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and compared with results obtained from PLLA and MePEG homopolymers. The contact angle results were evaluated by using the van Oss-Good method (acid-base method), and it was determined that the Lewis base surface tension coefficient (gamma-) of the copolymers increased with an increase of the PEG molar content at the copolymer surface. This result is in good agreement with the transmission FTIR and ATR-FTIR results but not proportional to them, indicating that the surfaces of the copolymers are highly mobile and that the molecular rearrangement takes place upon contact with a polar liquid drop. The dynamic contact angle measurements showed that the strong acid-base interaction between the oxygen atoms in the copolymer backbone of the relatively more hydrophilic PEG segments with the Lewis acidic groups of the polar and hydrogen-bonding water molecules enabled the surface molecules to restructure (conformational change) at the contact area, so that the PEG segments moved upward, whereas the apolar methyl pendant groups of PLLA segments buried downward.

  6. The effect of drop volume and micropillar shape on the apparent contact angle of ordered microstructured surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afferrante, Luciano; Carbone, Giuseppe

    2014-06-14

    In the present paper, we propose a new theoretical approach to evaluate the shape and apparent contact angle (ACA) of a drop gently deposited on microstructured superhydrophobic surfaces. We exploit the very large separation of scales between the drop size and the features of the micromorphology of the interface to propose a numerical methodology to calculate the apparent contact area and apparent contact angle. In agreement with very recent experiments, calculations show that, in the case of surfaces made of conical micropillars, the ACA may take values very close to 180° not depending on the size of the liquid drop. At large drop volumes, the shape of the drop deviates from the spherical one as a result of the gravity effects, but it is noteworthy that the apparent contact angle does not change at all. Our calculations shows that this holds true also for different pillar shapes, showing that, for any given Young contact angle of the solid constituting the pillars, the ACA is an intrinsic property of the surface microgeometry.

  7. Low-Bond Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis for Surface Tension and Contact Angle Measurements of Sessile Drops

    OpenAIRE

    Stalder, A.F.; Melchior, T.; Müller, M.; Sage, D; T. Blu; Unser, M

    2010-01-01

    A new method based on the Young-Laplace equation for measuring contact angles and surface tensions is presented. In this approach, a first-order perturbation technique helps to analytically solve the Young-Laplace equation according to photographic images of axisymmetric sessile drops. When appropriate, the calculated drop contour is extended by mirror symmetry so that reflection of the drop into substrate allows the detection of position of the contact points. To keep a wide range of applica...

  8. A robust algorithm for the simultaneous parameter estimation of interfacial tension and contact angle from sessile drop profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingle, Nicole M; Harris, Michael T

    2005-06-15

    The pendant and sessile drop profile analysis using the finite element method (PSDA-FEM) is an algorithm which allows simultaneous determination of the interfacial tension (gamma) and contact angle (theta(c)) from sessile drop profiles. The PSDA-FEM algorithm solves the nonlinear second-order spherical coordinate form of the Young-Laplace equation. Thus, the boundary conditions at the drop apex and contact position of the drop with the substrate are required to solve for the drop profile coordinates. The boundary condition at the position where the drop contacts the substrate may be specified as a fixed contact line or fixed contact angle. This paper will focus on the fixed contact angle boundary condition for sessile drops on a substrate and how this boundary condition is used in the PSDA-FEM curve-fitting algorithm. The PSDA-FEM algorithm has been tested using simulated drop shapes with and without the addition of random error to the drop profile coordinates. The random error is varied to simulate the effect of camera resolution on the estimates of gamma and theta(c) values obtained from the curve-fitting algorithm. The error in the experimental values for gamma from sessile drops of water on acrylic and Mazola corn oil on acrylic falls within the predicted range of errors obtained for gamma values from simulated sessile drop profiles with randomized errors that are comparable in magnitude to the resolution of the experimental setup.

  9. The effect of the VOF-CSF static contact angle boundary condition on the dynamics of sliding and bouncing ellipsoidal bubbles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senthilkumar, S., E-mail: sundararaj.senthilkumar2@mail.dcu.ie [School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin (Ireland); Delaure, Y.M.C., E-mail: yan.delaure@dcu.ie [School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Dublin City University, Glasnevin, Dublin (Ireland); Murray, D.B.; Donnelly, B. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: > The static contact angle {theta}{sub c} has a significant effect on the bubble dynamics. > The mean bubble slide velocity is most significantly affected by {theta}{sub c} at low plate inclination. > Increasing {theta}{sub c} stretches the bubble in the direction normal to the plate promoting detachment. > Imposing the contact angle suppresses the liquid film between the bubble and solid surfaces. - Abstract: The static contact angle is the only empiricism introduced in a Volume of Fluid-Continuum Surface Force (VOF-CSF) model of bubbly flow. Although it has previously been shown to have a relatively limited effect on the accuracy of velocity and shape predictions in the case of large gas bubbles sliding under inclined walls (e.g. ), it may have a more determining influence on the numerical prediction of the dynamics of smaller ellipsoidal bubbles which were shown by to bounce repeatedly when sliding under inclined walls at certain wall inclinations. The present paper reports on the influence of surface tension and the static contact angle on the dynamics of an ellipsoidal air bubble of equivalent diameter D{sub e} = 3.4 mm. The bubble Eoetvoes and Morton numbers are Eo = 1.56 and Mo = 2 x 10{sup -11} respectively. The computational results are achieved with a Piecewise Linear Construction (PLIC) of the interface and are reviewed with reference to experimental measurements of bubble velocity and interface shape oscillations recorded using a high speed digital camera. Tests are performed at plate inclination angles {theta} element of {l_brace}10{sup o}, 20{sup o}, 30{sup o}, 45{sup o}{r_brace} to the horizontal and computational models consider three static contact angles {theta}{sub c} element of {l_brace}10{sup o}, 20{sup o}, 30{sup o}{r_brace}. The static contact angle has been found to have a significant effect on the bubble dynamics but to varying degree depending on the plate inclination. It is shown to promote lift off and bouncing when the plate

  10. Infantile nystagmus syndrome: Broadening the high-foveation-quality field with contact lenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Taibbi

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Giovanni Taibbi1,4,5, Zhong I Wang1,3, Louis F Dell’Osso1–31The Daroff-Dell’Osso Ocular Motility Laboratory, Louis Stokes Cleveland Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and CASE Medical School; 2Department of Neurology; 3Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University and University Hospitals Case Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA; 4Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus Unit, San Paolo Hospital, Milan, Italy; 5University of Milan, Milan, ItalyAbstract: We investigated the effects of contact lenses in broadening and improving the high-foveation-quality field in a subject with infantile nystagmus syndrome (INS. A high-speed, digitized video system was used for the eye-movement recording. The subject was asked to fixate a far target at different horizontal gaze angles with contact lenses inserted. Data from the subject while fixating at far without refractive correction and at near (at a convergence angle of 60 PD, were used for comparison. The eXpanded Nystagmus Acuity Function (NAFX was used to evaluate the foveation quality at each gaze angle. Contact lenses broadened the highfoveation-quality range of gaze angles in this subject. The broadening was comparable to that achieved during 60 PD of convergence although the NAFX values were lower. Contact lenses allowed the subject to see “more” (he had a wider range of high-foveation-quality gaze angles and “better” (he had improved foveation at each gaze angle. Instead of being contraindicated by INS, contact lenses emerge as a potentially important therapeutic option. Contact lenses employ afferent feedback via the ophthalmic division of the V cranial nerve to damp INS slow phases over a broadened range of gaze angles. This supports the proprioceptive hypothesis of INS improvement.Keywords: contact lenses, infantile nystagmus, visual function

  11. Zeta potential, contact angles, and AFM imaging of protein conformation adsorbed on hybrid nanocomposite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Ana C; Piedade, Ana P

    2013-08-28

    The sputtering deposition of gold (Au) and poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) was used to prepare a nanocomposite hybrid thin film suitable for protein adsorption while maintaining the native conformation of the biological material. The monolithic PTFE and the nanocomposite PTFE/Au thin films, with Au content up to 1 at %, were co-deposited by r.f. magnetron sputtering using argon as a discharge gas and deposited onto 316L stainless steel substrates, the most commonly used steel in biomaterials. The deposited thin films, before and after bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption, were thoroughly characterized with special emphasis on the surface properties/characteristics by atomic force microscopy (AFM), zeta potential, and static and dynamic contact angle measurements, in order to assess the relationship between structure and conformational changes. The influence of a pre-adsorbed peptide (RGD) was also evaluated. The nanotopographic and chemical changes induced by the presence of gold in the nanocomposite thin films enable RGD bonding, which is critical for the maintenance of the BSA native conformation after adsorption.

  12. Some remarks on the solid surface tension determination from contact angle measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdziennicka, Anna; Szymczyk, Katarzyna; Krawczyk, Joanna; Jańczuk, Bronisław

    2017-05-01

    The measurements of water, formamide and diiodomethane contact angle (θ) on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyethylene (PE), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), nylon 6, quartz and silica were performed. Based on the θ values of these liquids obtained on PTFE, the Lifshitz-van der Waals and acid-base and/or dispersion and polar components of their surface tension (ST) were determined. In turn, the θ values for water, formamide and diiodomethane on PMMA were applied to calculate the electron-acceptor and electron-donor parameters of the Lewis acid-base component of the formamide ST. For this calculation the same values of the electron-acceptor and electron-donor parameters for water ST were used. Taking into account the values of components and parameters of water, formamide and diiodomethane ST obtained by us, van Oss et al. and from the water(formamide)-n-alkane and water-diiodomethane interface tension, the components and parameters of studied solids ST were calculated. To this end different approaches to the interface tension were considered. The obtained values were compared with those in the literature. It was concluded that for determination of solid ST components and parameters, those of water, formamide and diiodomethane ST obtained from the θ measurements on the model solids should be used.

  13. Exploring of protein - protein interactions at the solid - aqueous interface by means of contact angle measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowska, I; Dehaen, W; Radecka, H; Radecki, J

    2016-05-01

    In this article we present the results of the studies on interactions between the VC1 domain of the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products (RAGE) and its ligand, the S100B protein, performed by contact angle measurements. Histidine-tagged (His6) VC1-RAGE domain was covalently bonded to Cu(II) or Ni(II) complexes with dipyrromethene (DPM) self-assembled on gold surface. The method based on the theory of van Oss was used for the purpose of determining the Lifshitz-van der Waals (γ(LW)) component as well as the electron acceptor-electron donor (the Lewis acid-base, γ(+)-γ(-)) parameters of the VC1-RAGE-S100B complex. Moreover, the surface free energies of the interactions between the VC1 domain attached to the surface and the ligand present in the aqueous phase were determined. The specificity of the VC1- RAGE interactions with the ligand studied was also proved.

  14. Dynamic contact angle analysis of protein adsorption on polysaccharide multilayer's films for biomaterial reendothelialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benni, Safiya; Avramoglou, Thierry; Hlawaty, Hanna; Mora, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a major cardiovascular disease. One of the side effects is restenosis. The aim of this work was to study the coating of stents by dextran derivates based polyelectrolyte's multilayer (PEM) films in order to increase endothelialization of injured arterial wall after stent implantation. Films were composed with diethylaminoethyl dextran (DEAE) as polycation and dextran sulphate (DS) as polyanion. One film was composed with 4 bilayers of (DEAE-DS)4 and was labeled D-. The other film was the same as D- but with an added terminal layer of DEAE polycation: (DEAE-DS)4-DEAE (labeled D+). The dynamic adsorption/desorption of proteins on the films were characterized by dynamic contact angle (DCA) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Human endothelial cell (HUVEC) adhesion and proliferation were quantified and correlated to protein adsorption analyzed by DCA for fibronectin, vitronectin, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). Our results showed that the endothelial cell response was optimal for films composed of DS as external layer. Fibronectin was found to be the only protein to exhibit a reversible change in conformation after desorption test. This behavior was only observed for (DEAE-DS)4 films. (DEAE-DS)4 films could enhance HUVEC proliferation in agreement with fibronectin ability to easily change from conformation.

  15. Interfacial phenomena and dynamic contact angle modulation in microcapillary flows subjected to electroosmotic actuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Debapriya; Chakraborty, Suman

    2008-09-02

    The dynamic evolution of an incompressible liquid meniscus inside a microcapillary is investigated, under the combined influences of viscous, capillary, intermolecular, pondermotive, and electroosmotic effects. In the limit of small capillary numbers, an advancing meniscus shape is shown to merge smoothly with the precursor film, using matched asymptotic analysis. A scaling relationship is also established for the dynamic contact angle as a nondimensional function of the capillary number and the applied electrical voltage. The analysis is further generalized by invoking a kinetic slip model for overcoming the constraints of meniscus tip singularity. The kinetic slip model is subsequently utilized to analyze the interfacial dynamics from the perspective of the results obtained from the matched asymptotic analysis. A generalization is achieved in this regard, which may provide a sound basis for controlling the topographical features of a dynamically evolving meniscus in a microcapillary subjected to electrokinetic effects. These results are also in excellent agreement with the experimental findings over a wide range of capillary number values.

  16. Dynamic Contact Angle Analysis of Protein Adsorption on Polysaccharide Multilayer’s Films for Biomaterial Reendothelialization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safiya Benni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a major cardiovascular disease. One of the side effects is restenosis. The aim of this work was to study the coating of stents by dextran derivates based polyelectrolyte’s multilayer (PEM films in order to increase endothelialization of injured arterial wall after stent implantation. Films were composed with diethylaminoethyl dextran (DEAE as polycation and dextran sulphate (DS as polyanion. One film was composed with 4 bilayers of (DEAE-DS4 and was labeled D−. The other film was the same as D− but with an added terminal layer of DEAE polycation: (DEAE-DS4-DEAE (labeled D+. The dynamic adsorption/desorption of proteins on the films were characterized by dynamic contact angle (DCA and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Human endothelial cell (HUVEC adhesion and proliferation were quantified and correlated to protein adsorption analyzed by DCA for fibronectin, vitronectin, and bovine serum albumin (BSA. Our results showed that the endothelial cell response was optimal for films composed of DS as external layer. Fibronectin was found to be the only protein to exhibit a reversible change in conformation after desorption test. This behavior was only observed for (DEAE-DS4 films. (DEAE-DS4 films could enhance HUVEC proliferation in agreement with fibronectin ability to easily change from conformation.

  17. Estimation of the Surface Properties of Styrene-Acrylonitrile Random Copolymers from Contact Angle Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adão; Saramago; Fernandes

    1999-09-01

    The surface free energy per unit area of a solid, gamma(S), is a fundamental property of materials and determines their surface and interfacial behavior in processes like wetting and adhesion. In this study the gamma(S) of a series of styrene-acrylonitrile random copolymers is evaluated. Three different approaches are used to determine the components in which the surface free energy can be decomposed. Using the geometric and the harmonic mean approach, the dispersive, gamma(d), and polar, gamma(p), components of the solid surface free energy were determined and compared to the Lifshitz-van der Waals, gamma(LW), and acid-base, gamma(AB), components using the approach developed by C. J. van Oss et al. (1987, Adv. Colloid Interface Sci. 28, 35). The acid-base approach was also used to evaluate the work of adhesion of the test liquids: water, glycerol, and thiodiglycol. It was found that the contact angles of these liquids follow closely the predictions of Cassie equation. The evaluation of the surface free energy components on one hand and the relative magnitude of the work of adhesion components on the other hand, suggest that below 50% of acrylonitrile the polystyrene repeating units are preferentially at the surface. Above 50% of acrylonitrile the segregation of the low-energy homopolymer at the surface decreases. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  18. Contact angle of copper-bearing shales using the sessile drop and captive bubble methods in the presence of selected frothers

    OpenAIRE

    Danuta Szyszka; Wojciech Szczepański

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the measurement of contact angle of copper-bearing shales. The values of advancing and receding contact angles were determined using the sessile drop and captive bubble methods in the presence of aqueous solutions of acetal and pyridine and distilled water. Both methods demonstrated that the tested substances had only minor impact on the surface hydrophobicity of copper-bearing shales expressed by contact angle. The tests carried out proved that neither acetal nor pyridin...

  19. On the physically based modeling of surface tension and moving contact lines with dynamic contact angles on the continuum scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huber, M.; Keller, F.; Säckel, W.; Hirschler, M.; Kunz, P.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074974424; Nieken, U.

    2016-01-01

    The description of wetting phenomena is a challenging problem on every considerable length-scale. The behavior of interfaces and contact lines on the continuum scale is caused by intermolecular interactions like the Van der Waals forces. Therefore, to describe surface tension and the resulting

  20. On the physically based modeling of surface tension and moving contact lines with dynamic contact angles on the continuum scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huber, M.; Keller, F.; Säckel, W.; Hirschler, M.; Kunz, P.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.; Nieken, U.

    2016-01-01

    The description of wetting phenomena is a challenging problem on every considerable length-scale. The behavior of interfaces and contact lines on the continuum scale is caused by intermolecular interactions like the Van der Waals forces. Therefore, to describe surface tension and the resulting dynam

  1. Effect of Annealing Temperature on the Water Contact Angle of PVD Hard Coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Sen Yang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Various PVD (physical vapor deposition hard coatings including nitrides and metal-doped diamond-like carbons (Me-DLC were applied in plastic injection and die-casting molds to improve wear resistance and reduce sticking. In this study, nitrides hcp-AlN (hexagonal close-packed AlN, Cr2N, (CrAl2N and Me-DLC (Si-DLC and Cr-DLC coatings were prepared using a closed field unbalanced magnetron reactive sputtering system. The coatings were annealed in air for 2 h at various temperatures, after which the anti-sticking properties were assessed using water contact angle (WCA measurements. The as-deposited hcp-AlN, Cr2N and (CrAl2N coatings exhibit hydrophobic behavior and exhibit respective WCAs of 119°, 106° and 101°. The as-deposited Si-DLC and Cr-DLC coatings exhibit hydrophilic behavior and exhibit respective WCAs of 74° and 88°. The annealed Cr2N and (CrAl2N coatings exhibit hydrophobic behavior with higher WCAs, while the annealed hcp-AlN, Si-DLC and Cr-DLC coatings are hydrophilic. The increased WCA of the annealed Cr2N and (CrAl2N coatings is related to their crystal structure and increased roughness. The decreased WCA of the annealed hcp-AlN, Si-DLC and Cr-DLC coatings is related to their crystal structures and has little correlation with roughness.

  2. Measurement on Contact Angles Based on Image Process%接触角的图像处理与检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓辉; 李军建; 杨威; 李建祥

    2011-01-01

    介绍了接触角法测定表面洁净度的基本原理,并针对表面液滴图像的特点,采用图像处理技术测量表面接触角.首先利用中值滤波算法对图像进行预处理;然后利用边缘检测和轮廓跟踪等算法提取液滴的边界曲线;最后采用以多项式作为基函数的最小二乘拟合算法拟合液滴边界曲线,继而求导得到接触角.结果表明,当选用四阶或五阶多项式为拟合函数,拟合采样点选取在60~200个范围内时,该软件测量接触角的精度高于德国KRUSS光学接触角测量仪DSA100的测量精度,且与手动测量接触角的结果相比较,误差值均小于2°.%Basic principlcs of determining the surface cleanliness by the method of contact angle is described. Considering the characteristics of the surface droplet image, the surface′s contact angle is measured based on image processing techniques. Firstly, the median filter algorithm was deployed to preprocess the droplet images; secondly, in order to extract the boundary curve of the droplet, the edge detecting algorithm and the outline tracking algorithm were used; finally, the least squares fitting algorithm was deployed to fit the boundary curve of droplet, hence contact angles were calculated. Experiments show that the contact angle measurement's accuracy was better than that of Germany KRUSS optical contact angle measuring instrument DSA100 when four or five order polynomial fitting function was selected and the fitting sampling points were selected in the range of 60 to 200. The difference between contact angle measurement results proposed and the results of the angle measured by MB-ruler software was less than 2°.

  3. Molecular structure of an alkyl-side-chain polymer-water interface: origins of contact angle hysteresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangwalla, Hasnain; Schwab, Alexander D; Yurdumakan, Betül; Yablon, Dalia G; Yeganeh, Mohsen S; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2004-09-28

    A new and direct approach to verify surface heterogeneity as the microscopic origin of contact-angle hysteresis is demonstrated. IR-visible sum-frequency-generation spectroscopy (SFG) was used to selectively probe the molecules at the interface of an alkyl-side-chain polymer [poly(vinyl n-octadecyl carbamate-co-vinyl acetate)] with water. The spectra indicate that in contact with water, the polymer surface is heterogeneous (having areas of differing surface energies). This evidence of surface heterogeneity supports the hysteresis observed in the advancing and receding contact angles of the polymer surface with water. The same measurements made for the chemically and structurally similar surface of an octadecyltrichlorosilane self-assembled monolayer indicates a homogeneous surface at the water interface. In this case, contact-angle hysteresis measurements implicate surface roughness as the cause of hysteresis. Atomic force microscopy measurements of roughness for these surfaces further support our conclusions. The polymer-water interface was probed using SFG at above-ambient temperatures, and an order-to-disorder transition (ODT) of alkyl side chains at the interface was observed, which closely follows the melting of crystalline side chains in the bulk. This transition explains the increased wettability of the polymer, by water, when the temperature is raised above the bulk melting temperature. Furthermore, the irreversibility of this ODT suggests that the disordered polymer-water interface is the thermodynamic equilibrium state, whereas the before-heating structure of this interface is a kinetically hindered metastable state.

  4. Propagation-of-uncertainty from contact angle and streaming potential measurements to XDLVO model assessments of membrane-colloid interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthu, Satish; Childress, Amy; Brant, Jonathan

    2014-08-15

    Membrane fouling assessed from a fundamental standpoint within the context of the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) model. The DLVO model requires that the properties of the membrane and foulant(s) be quantified. Membrane surface charge (zeta potential) and free energy values are characterized using streaming potential and contact angle measurements, respectively. Comparing theoretical assessments for membrane-colloid interactions between research groups requires that the variability of the measured inputs be established. The impact that such variability in input values on the outcome from interfacial models must be quantified to determine an acceptable variance in inputs. An interlaboratory study was conducted to quantify the variability in streaming potential and contact angle measurements when using standard protocols. The propagation of uncertainty from these errors was evaluated in terms of their impact on the quantitative and qualitative conclusions on extended DLVO (XDLVO) calculated interaction terms. The error introduced into XDLVO calculated values was of the same magnitude as the calculated free energy values at contact and at any given separation distance. For two independent laboratories to draw similar quantitative conclusions regarding membrane-foulant interfacial interactions the standard error in contact angle values must be⩽2.5°, while that for the zeta potential values must be⩽7 mV.

  5. Asymptotic approach in the limit of small contact angles to sessile vapor bubble growth in a superheated environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rednikov, Alexey; Hollander, Nicolas; Hernando Revilla, Marta; Colinet, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    A model of nucleate pool boiling is considered, and more concretely the growth dynamics of a single spherical-cap vapor bubble on a flat superheated substrate in a large volume of an equally superheated liquid. An asymptotic scheme is developed valid in the limit of small contact angles. These are basically supposed to be the evaporation-induced ones and hence finite even in the case of a perfectly wetting liquid implied here. The consideration generally involves four regions: i) microregion, where the contact line singularities are resolved and the evaporation-induced contact angles are established, ii) Cox-Voinov region, iii) foot of the bubble, and iv) macroregion. It is only in the latter region, which remarkably appears to leading order in the form of the exterior of a sphere touching a planar surface in one point (hence a fixed geometry even for variable contact angles), that the full Navier-Stokes and heat equations are to be (numerically) resolved. ESA & BELSPO PRODEX, F.R.S.-FNRS.

  6. Simultaneous measurement of contact angle and surface tension using axisymmetric drop-shape analysis-no apex (ADSA-NA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantarian, A; David, R; Chen, J; Neumann, A W

    2011-04-05

    Axisymmetric drop-shape analysis-no apex (ADSA-NA) is a recent drop-shape method that allows the simultaneous measurement of contact angles and surface tensions of drop configurations without an apex (i.e., a sessile drop with a capillary protruding into the drop). Although ADSA-NA significantly enhanced the accuracy of contact angle and surface tension measurements compared to that of original ADSA using a drop with an apex, it is still not as accurate as a surface tension measurement using a pendant drop suspended from a holder. In this article, the computational and experimental aspects of ADSA-NA were scrutinized to improve the accuracy of the simultaneous measurement of surface tensions and contact angles. It was found that the results are relatively insensitive to different optimization methods and edge detectors. The precision of contact angle measurement was enhanced by improving the location of the contact points of the liquid meniscus with the solid substrate to subpixel resolution. To optimize the experimental design, the capillary was replaced with an inverted sharp-edged pedestal, or holder, to control the drop height and to ensure the axisymmetry of the drops. It was shown that the drop height is the most important experimental parameter affecting the accuracy of the surface tension measurement, and larger drop heights yield lower surface tension errors. It is suggested that a minimum nondimensional drop height (drop height divided by capillary length) of 1.7 is required to reach an error of less than 0.2 mJ/m(2) for the measured surface tension. As an example, the surface tension of water was measured to be 72.46 ± 0.04 at 24 °C by ADSA-NA, compared to 72.39 ± 0.01 mJ/m(2) obtained with pendant drop experiments.

  7. A novel methodology based on contact angle hysteresis approach for surface changes monitoring in model PMMA-Corega Tabs system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorzelski, Stanisław J.; Berezowski, Zdzisław; Rochowski, Paweł; Szurkowski, Janusz

    2012-02-01

    The aim of the paper is to propose a quantitative description of dental surface modifications, resulting from application of Corega and oral cavity liquids, with several surface parameters derived from liquid/solid contact angle measurements. In particular, to predict the long-term effectiveness of denture cleansers in prosthetics, it is necessary to determine surface wettability variations for model dental materials/probe liquid systems related to the contamination effect caused by substances found in the oral cavity. A novel simple low-cost methodology, based on liquid drop contact angle hysteresis CAH approach developed by Chibowski, was adopted to trace solid surface free energy changes in the model PMMA-Corega Tabs interfacial layer. Contact angle and its hysteresis were studied with a sessile drop-inclined plate method in contact with a cleanser (Corega Tabs) and model liquids found in the oral cavity. The apparent solid surface free energy, adsorptive film pressure, work of adhesion and spreading were derived from contact angle hysteresis data for both model solid surfaces (reference) and samples affected by different reactive liquids for a certain time. A time-dependent surface wettability changes of dentures were expressed quantitatively in terms of the corresponding variations of the surface energy parameters which turned out to be unequivocally related to the cleanser exposure time and polarity of the liquids applied to the dental material. The novel methodology appeared to be a useful tool for long term surface characterization of dental materials treated with surfactants-containing liquids capable of forming adhesive layers. The time of optimal use and effectiveness of cleansers are also reflected dynamically in the corresponding variations of the surface wettability parameters. Further studies on a large group of dental surface-probe liquid systems are required to specify the role played by other important factors (liquid polarity, pH and temperature).

  8. Contact angle and adsorption energies of nanoparticles at the air-liquid interface determined by neutron reflectivity and molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reguera, Javier; Ponomarev, Evgeniy; Geue, Thomas; Stellacci, Francesco; Bresme, Fernando; Moglianetti, Mauro

    2015-03-01

    Understanding how nanomaterials interact with interfaces is essential to control their self-assembly as well as their optical, electronic, and catalytic properties. We present here an experimental approach based on neutron reflectivity (NR) that allows the in situ measurement of the contact angles of nanoparticles adsorbed at fluid interfaces. Because our method provides a route to quantify the adsorption and interfacial energies of the nanoparticles in situ, it circumvents problems associated with existing indirect methods, which rely on the transport of the monolayers to substrates for further analysis. We illustrate the method by measuring the contact angle of hydrophilic and hydrophobic gold nanoparticles, coated with perdeuterated octanethiol (d-OT) and with a mixture of d-OT and mercaptohexanol (MHol), respectively. The contact angles were also calculated via atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) computations, showing excellent agreement with the experimental data. Our method opens the route to quantify the adsorption of complex nanoparticle structures adsorbed at fluid interfaces featuring different chemical compositions.Understanding how nanomaterials interact with interfaces is essential to control their self-assembly as well as their optical, electronic, and catalytic properties. We present here an experimental approach based on neutron reflectivity (NR) that allows the in situ measurement of the contact angles of nanoparticles adsorbed at fluid interfaces. Because our method provides a route to quantify the adsorption and interfacial energies of the nanoparticles in situ, it circumvents problems associated with existing indirect methods, which rely on the transport of the monolayers to substrates for further analysis. We illustrate the method by measuring the contact angle of hydrophilic and hydrophobic gold nanoparticles, coated with perdeuterated octanethiol (d-OT) and with a mixture of d-OT and mercaptohexanol (MHol), respectively. The contact angles were

  9. A New Approach to Measure Contact Angle and Evaporation Rate with Flow Visualization in a Sessile Drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nengli; Chao, David F.

    1999-01-01

    The contact angle and the spreading process of sessile droplet are very crucial in many technological processes, such as painting and coating, material processing, film-cooling applications, lubrication, and boiling. Additionally, as it is well known that the surface free energy of polymers cannot be directly, measured for their elastic and viscous restraints. The measurements of liquid contact angle on the polymer surfaces become extremely important to evaluate the surface free energy of polymers through indirect methods linked with the contact angle data. Due to the occurrence of liquid evaporation is inevitable, the effects of evaporation on the contact angle and the spreading become very important for more complete understanding of these processes. It is of interest to note that evaporation can induce Marangoni-Benard convection in sessile drops. However, the impacts of the inside convection on the wetting and spreading processes are not clear. The experimental methods used by previous investigators cannot simultaneously measure the spreading process and visualize the convection inside. Based on the laser shadowgraphic system used by the present author, a very simple optical procedure has been developed to measure the contact angle, the spreading speed, the evaporation rate, and to visualize inside convection of a sessile drop simultaneously. Two CCD cameras were used to synchronously record the real-time diameter of the sessile drop, which is essential for determination of both spreading speed and evaporation rate, and the shadowgraphic image magnified by the sessile drop acting as a thin plano-convex lens. From the shadowgraph, the inside convection of the drop can be observed if any and the image outer diameter, which linked to the drop profile, can be measured. Simple equations have been derived to calculate the drop profile, including the instantaneous contact angle, height, and volume of the sessile drop, as well as the evaporation rate. The influence of

  10. Effects of hysteresis of static contact angle (HSCA) and boundary slip on the hydrodynamics of water striders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Wang, B. S.; Chen, W. Q.; Han, X. Y.; Li, C. F.; Zhang, J. Z.; Yu, K. P.

    2017-02-01

    It is known that contact lines keep relatively still on solids until static contact angles exceed an interval of hysteresis of static contact angle (HSCA), and contact angles keep changing as contact lines relatively slide on the solid. Here, the effects of HSCA and boundary slip were first distinguished on the micro-curvature force (MCF) on the seta. Hence, the total MCF is partitioned into static and dynamic MCFs correspondingly. The static MCF was found proportional to the HSCA and related with the asymmetry of the micro-meniscus near the seta. The dynamic MCF, exerting on the relatively sliding contact line, is aroused by the boundary slip. Based on the Blake-Haynes mechanism, the dynamic MCF was proved important for water walking insects with legs slower than the minimum wave speed 23 cm\\cdot s^{-1}. As insects brush the water by laterally swinging legs backwards, setae on the front side of the leg are pulled and the ones on the back side are pushed to cooperatively propel bodies forward. If they pierce the water surface by vertically swinging legs downwards, setae on the upside of the legs are pulled, and the ones on the downside are pushed to cooperatively obtain a jumping force. Based on the dependency between the slip length and shear rate, the dynamic MCF was found correlated with the leg speed U, as F˜ C1U+C2 U^{2+ɛ}, where C1 and C2 are determined by the dimple depth. Discrete points on this curve could give fitted relations as F˜ Ub (Suter et al., J. Exp. Biol. 200, 2523-2538, 1997). Finally, the axial torque on the inclined and partially submerged seta was found determined by the surface tension, contact angle, HSCA, seta width, and tilt angle. The torque direction coincides with the orientation of the spiral grooves of the seta, which encourages us to surmise it is a mechanical incentive for the formation of the spiral morphology of the setae of water striders.

  11. Edge effect in ohmic contacts on high-resistivity semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzin, Arie

    2016-01-01

    Current increase due to edge effect in ohmic contacts was calculated by finite-element software in three-dimensional devices. The emphasis in this study is on semi-intrinsic (SI) and compensated high resistivity semiconductors. It was found that the enhanced electric field around the contact edges may cause about twofold increase in the total contact current. For contact radii larger than the device thickness and nano scale contacts the impact is considerably reduced. In nanoscale contacts the edge effect does not control the electric field under the entire contact, but rather decreases. The introduction of velocity saturation model has a limited impact, and only in compensated semiconductors.

  12. Application of the critical angle method to refractive index measurement of human skin in vivo under partial contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kenichiro; Ohkubo, Kohji; Ojima, Nobutoshi; Iwata, Kayoko

    2013-03-01

    We adapted the critical angle method for measuring rough surfaces under partial contact to acquire an in vivo skin refractive index (RI). Assuming that the total reflection is the simple sum of reflection from areas that are in contact and reflection from those that are not in contact, the RI can be estimated even for partial contact with a rough surface. We found that cheek skin is sufficiently soft that a sufficiently large area can be in contact and that the critical angle was detectable. The RIs of the cheeks of adult females were measured. The RI range was about 1.51 to 1.53, at a wavelength of 550 nm, without considering systematic errors. The RIs of cheeks are significantly correlated with their conductance, which corresponds to their water content. We determined the relationship between the RI and conductance within the variation of skin under normal conditions; this relationship was theoretically obtained in previous studies. In the present study, a direct in vivo measurement method was developed that enabled us to measure the RI in daily life, although this method contains errors for several reasons, including disregarding absorption.

  13. Contact resistance measurement structures for high frequencies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roy, Deepu; Pijper, Ralf M.T.; Tiemeijer, Luuk F.; Wolters, Robertus A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the interfacial contact impedance offered by the device at its operating frequency range is crucial for accurate modelling and understanding of the device. In this article, a novel modified TLM test-structure has been devised to extract interfacial contact parameters at frequencies upto

  14. THE INFLUENCE OF DROPLET VOLUME AND CONTACT-ANGLE ON LIQUID SURFACE-TENSION MEASUREMENTS BY AXISYMMETRICAL DROP SHAPE ANALYSIS-PROFILE (ADSA-P)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BUSSCHER, HJ

    1991-01-01

    The axisymmetric drop shape analysis-profile (ADSA-P) technique was evaluated with respect to the influence of contact angle and droplet volume. The system was implemented on our standard contact angle measuring apparatus employing a Vidicon video camera and a 512 x 256 pixels framegrabber. For cali

  15. Fluorescence depolarization and contact angle investigation of dynamic and static interfacial tension of liquid crystal display materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintella, Cristina M; Lima, Angelo M V; Gonçalves, Cristiane C; Watanabe, Yuji N; Mammana, Alaide P; Schreiner, Marcos A; Pepe, Iuri; Pizzo, Angela A

    2003-06-01

    Interfacial interactions control two processes empirically known to be critical for molecular anchoring in twisted nematic liquid crystal displays technology (TN-LCDs): surface treatment and filling procedure. Static and dynamical interfacial tensions (Gamma(SL)) between liquids and several substrates with similar roughness were observed respectively by contact angle (theta(c)) of sessile drops and by fluorescence depolarization of thin liquid films flowing at high velocity. Gamma(SL) decreased when glass was coated with tin dioxide and increased with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) deposition. Drops were circular for all substrates except rubbed PVA, where they flowed spontaneously along the rubbing direction, reaching an oblong form that had theta(c) parallel and perpendicular to the rubbing direction respectively greater and smaller than theta(c) for non-rubbed PVA. This is attributed to polar group alignment generating an asymmetric Gamma(SL) distribution with nanometric preferential direction, inducing a capillary-like flow. Polarization and anisotropy maps for high-velocity flow parallel to the PVA rubbing direction showed an increase in the net alignment of molecular domains and a widening of the region where it occurred. This is attributed to preferential anchoring in the downstream direction, instead of in several directions, as for non-rubbed PVA. This explains why filling direction is crucial for TN-LCDs homogeneous behavior.

  16. Measurement of contact angle in a clearance-fit pin-loaded hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, R.; Naik, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    A technique which measures load-contact variation in a clearance-fit, pin-loaded hole is presented in detail. A steel instrumented pin, which activates a make-or-break electrical circuit in the pin-hole contact region, was inserted into one aluminum and one polycarbonate specimen. The resulting load-contact variations are indicated schematically. The ability to accurately determine the arc of contact at any load was crucial to this measurement. It is noted that this simple experimental technique is applicable to both conducting and nonconducting materials.

  17. Effect of visible light on the water contact angles on illuminated oxide semiconductors other than TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rico, V.; Lopez, C.; Borras, A.; Espinos, J.P.; Gonzalez-Elipe, A.R. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla (CSIC-Univ. Sevilla), Avda. Americo Vespucio s/n, 41092 Sevilla (Spain)

    2006-11-06

    Wide band gap semiconductor oxides such as TiO{sub 2}, Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}, ZnO, indium-tin oxide, InTaO{sub 4} or In{sub 2}O{sub 3} are materials with water contact angles in dark between 60{sup o} and 130{sup o}. The present investigation shows that thin films of these oxides become hydrophilic when they are irradiated with ultraviolet light. This finding indicates that the transformation of the wetting properties of illuminated wide band gap oxides is a common phenomenon not restricted to TiO{sub 2}. An additional evidence found for ZnO and InTaO{sub 4} is that the water contact angle decreases by 30{sup o}/40{sup o} when they are irradiated with visible light. (author)

  18. Research on the relation between the contact angle and the interface curvature radius of electrowetting liquid zoom lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cunhua; Liang, Huiqin; Cui, Dongqing; Hong, Xinhua; Wei, Daling; Gao, Changliu

    2011-08-01

    In the ultralight or ultrathin applied domain of zoom lens, the traditional glass / plastic lens is limited for manufacture technology or cost. Therefore, a liquid lens was put forward to solve the problems. The liquid zoom lens has the merits of lower cost, smaller volume, quicker response, lower energy consumption, continuous zoom and higher accuracy. In liquid zoom lens the precise focal length is obtained by the contact angle changing to affect the curvature radius of interface. In our works, the relations of the exerted voltage, the contact angle, the curvature radius and the focal length were researched and accurately calculated. The calculation of the focal length provides an important theoretical basis for instructing the design of liquid zoom lens.

  19. Influence of temperature and pressure on quartz-water-CO₂ contact angle and CO₂-water interfacial tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmadivaleh, Mohammad; Al-Yaseri, Ahmed Z; Iglauer, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    We measured water-CO2 contact angles on a smooth quartz surface (RMS surface roughness ∼40 nm) as a function of pressure and temperature. The advancing water contact angle θ was 0° at 0.1 MPa CO2 pressure and all temperatures tested (296-343 K); θ increased significantly with increasing pressure and temperature (θ=35° at 296 K and θ=56° at 343 K at 20 MPa). A larger θ implies less structural and residual trapping and thus lower CO2 storage capacities at higher pressures and temperatures. Furthermore we did not identify any significant influence of CO2-water equilibration on θ. Moreover, we measured the CO2-water interfacial tension γ and found that γ strongly decreased with increasing pressure up to ∼10 MPa, and then decreased with a smaller slope with further increasing pressure. γ also increased with increasing temperature.

  20. Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method for computation of impinging droplet with soluble surfactants and dynamic contact angle

    CERN Document Server

    Ganesan, Sashikumaar

    2014-01-01

    An arbitrary Lagrangian--Eulerian (ALE) finite element scheme for computations of soluble surfactant droplet impingement on a horizontal surface is presented. The numerical scheme solves the time-dependent Navier--Stokes equations for the fluid flow, scalar convection-diffusion equation for the surfactant transport in the bulk phase, and simultaneously, surface evolution equations for the surfactants on the free surface and on the liquid-solid interface. The effects of surfactants on the flow dynamics are included into the model through the surfactant-dependent surface tension and dynamic contact angle. In particular, the dynamic contact angle of the droplet is defined as a function of surfactants using the nonlinear equation of state for surface tension. Further, the surface forces are included in the model using the Boussinesq-Scriven law that allows to incorporate the Marangoni effects without evaluating the gradients of surfactant concentration on the free surface. In addition to a mesh convergence study ...

  1. Thermo-responsive stick-slip behavior of advancing water contact angle on the surfaces of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-grafted polypropylene membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Wettability of a solid surface is highly important to its practical application,especially for the surface that shows thermoresponsive properties.In this paper,we describe a thermo-responsive stick-slip behavior of water droplets on the surfaces of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)(PNIPAM)-grafted polypropylene membranes.Field emission scanning electron microscope(FESEM) images elucidate that the morphology of PNIPAM-grafted membrane surface is thermo-responsive,i.e.,the surface becomes rougher above the lower critical solution temperature(LCST) of PNIPAM.On the surface of nascent polypropylene membranes,the water droplet shows a smooth motion resulting in advancing and receding water contact angles of 111° and ~65°,respectively.On the PNIPAM-grafted membrane surfaces,the water droplet shows a stick-slip pattern above the LCST,whereas it advances smoothly below the LCST.This phenomenon is reproducible and can be ascribed to the energy barriers enhanced by the shrink of PNIPAM chains above the LCST.We also find that the slip contact angle decreases from 102° to 92° after several stick-slip cycles.This decrease is attributed to the water adsorption on the grafted PNIPAM layer,which is confirmed by the continuous decrease of the receding water contact angle.

  2. Spreading of an inkjet droplet on a solid surface with a controlled contact angle at low Weber and Reynolds numbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Yangsoo; Kim, Chongyoup; Yang, Doo Ho; Ahn, Dong June

    2008-03-18

    Even though the inkjet technology has been recognized as one of the most promising technologies for electronic and bio industries, the full understanding of the dynamics of an inkjet droplet at its operating conditions is still lacking. In this study, the normal impact of water droplets on solid substrates was investigated experimentally. The size of water droplets studied here was 46 microm and was much smaller than the most of the previous studies on drop impact. The Weber number (We) and Reynolds number (Re) were 0.05-2 and 10-100, respectively, and the Ohnesorge number was fixed at 0.017. The wettability of the solid substrate was varied by adsorbing a self-assembled monolayer of octadecyltrichlorosilane followed by the exposure to UV-ozone plasma. The impact scenarios for low We impacts were found to be qualitatively different from the high to moderate We impacts. Neither the development of a thin film and lamella under the traveling sphere nor the entrapment of small bubbles was observed. The dynamics of droplet impact at the conditions studied here is found to proceed under the combined influences of inertia, surface tension, and viscosity without being dominated by one specific mechanism. The maximum spreading factor (beta), the ratio of the diameter of the wetted surface and the drop diameter before impact, was correlated well with the relationship ln beta=0.090 ln We/(fs-cos theta)+0.151 for three decades of We/(fs-cos theta), where theta is the equilibrium contact angle, and fs is the ratio between the surface areas contacting the air and the solid substrate. The result implies that the final shape of the droplet is determined by the surface phenomenon rather than fluid mechanical effects.

  3. Asymmetric and speed-dependent contact angle hysteresis and relaxation of a suddenly stopped moving contact line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Dongshi; Wang, Yong Jian; Charlaix, Elisabeth; Tong, Penger

    We report direct atomic-force-microscope measurements of capillary force hysteresis and relaxation of a circular moving contact line (CL) formed on a long micron-sized hydrophobic fiber intersecting a water-air interface. The measured capillary force hysteresis and CL relaxation show a strong asymmetric speed dependence in the advancing and receding directions. A unified model based on force-assisted barrier-crossing is utilized to find the underlying energy barrier Eb and size λ associated with the defects on the fiber surface. The experiment demonstrates that the pinning (relaxation) and depinning dynamics of the CL can be described by a common microscopic frame-work, and the advancing and receding CLs are influenced by two different sets of relatively wetting and non-wetting defects on the fiber surface. Work supported in part by the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong SAR.

  4. Studies on interfacial tension and contact angle of synthesized surfactant and polymeric from castor oil for enhanced oil recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Keshak; Pal, Nilanjan; Bera, Achinta; Saxena, V. K.; Mandal, Ajay

    2015-10-01

    New synthesized polymeric surfactants have immensely attracted the researchers for further development of chemical enhanced oil recovery method particularly in surfactant flooding. Contact angle and interfacial tension measurement tests are the effective ways to identify proper chemicals/surfactants for enhanced oil recovery by chemical/surfactant flooding. In the present study a new polymeric surfactant was synthesized from pre-synthesized sodium methyl ester sulfonate (surfactant) and acrylamide for application in chemical enhanced oil recovery. The synthesized surfactant and polymeric surfactant were used to measure interfacial tension between their aqueous phase and crude oil phase to investigate the efficiency of the surfactants in reduction of interfacial tension. The synthesized polymeric surfactant has also ability to control the mobility because of its viscous nature in aqueous solution. Contact angles of solid-crude oil-surfactant interface were also measured to study the effect of the synthesized surfactant and polymeric surfactant on wettability alteration mechanism. Synergistic effect was studied by using NaCl and synthesized surfactants on interfacial tension. Dynamic interfacial tensions of the surfactant and polymeric surfactant solutions with crude oil were measured at different NaCl concentrations. Interfacial tension was found to be lowered up to 10-2 to 10-3 mN/m which is effective for oil recovery. Measurement of contact angle indicates the wettability change of the quartz surface. Comparative studies on efficiencies of synthesized sodium methyl ester sulfonate surfactant and polymeric surfactant were also carried out with respect to interfacial tension reduction and contact angle change.

  5. VOF simulations of the contact angle dynamics during the drop spreading: Standard models and a new wetting force model

    OpenAIRE

    Malgarinos, I.; Nikolopoulos, N.; Marengo, M.; Antonini, C.; Gavaises, M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In this study,a novel numerical implementation for the adhesion of liquid droplets impacting normally on solid dry surfaces is presented. The advantage of this new approach, compared to the majority of existing models, is that the dynamic contact angle forming during the surface wetting process is not inserted as a boundary condition, but is derived implicitly by the induced fluid flow characteristics (interface shape) and the adhesion physics of the gas-liquid-surface interfa...

  6. Study on fuel channel behavior following various PT/CT contact angles under late-heatup condition with SBLOCA/LOECC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Eun Kyung; Moon, Bok Jan; Kim, Seoung Rae [Nuclear Engineering Service and Solution Co, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, a sensitivity study according to PT/CT contact angle is presented when pressure tube experience sagging contact. The loss of coolant from broken loop results in core voiding, and low steam flows in the channel which are caused by ECC water leakage assumed are to add the heat from zircaloy-water reaction. At the low steam flow rates, fuel and pressure tube heat up and the pressure tube may balloon or sag into contact with its calandria tube. LOCA with loss of emergency core cooling injection occurs in CANDU, moderator takes a role of an ultimate heat sink. Decay heat is removed to moderator through PT/CT contact. Therefore, behavior of PT/CT contact must account for LOCA/LOECC. The sensitivity of PT/CT sagging contact angle has been studied. The results of sagging contact angle could explain in different ways. In the case of wide sagging contact angle, the result is quite conservative in the aspect of containment as the heat is well-transferred to moderator. it causes the moderator to heat up. On the other hand, the narrow sagging contact angle results fuel heatup and give limiting condition for fuel integrity. As a result of estimation, a proper application of sagging contact angle is required to provide limiting condition for subsequent analysis.

  7. Comparison of the effect of three different irrigants on the contact angle of an epoxy resin sealer with intraradicular dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamta Kaushik

    2015-01-01

    Materials and Methods: Seventy human mandibularfirst premolars were used and 140 longitudinal dentin slices were obtained from them. Each sample was irrigated with of 3% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl, simulating the irrigation used during the chemomechanical preparation and then washed with 10ml of distilled water (DW. The samples were then divided into seven groups of 20 samples each. Group 1:NaOCl + DW, Group 2: QMix + DW, Group 3: 0.1% octenidine hydrochloride + DW, Group 4:Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA + DW + NaOCl + DW, Group 5: EDTA + DW + QMix + DW, Group 6: EDTA + DW + 0.1% Octenidine Hydrochloride + DW, and Group 7(control: DW. The contact angle between AH Plus and the samples was measured using Rame Hart Goniometer followed by statistical analysis of data. Results: Values of contact angle was least when samples were treated with QMix followed by treatment with 0.1% Octenidine Hydrochloride followed by 3% NaOCl. Removal of smear layer reduced contact angles in all cases except when samples were treated with 3% NaOCl. Results were statistically significant when 3% NaOCl was compared to 0.1% Octenidine Hydrochloride and QMix (P = 0.034. Statistically significant difference was seen before and after removal of smear layer for 3% NaOCl and 0.1% Octenidine Hydrochloride. (P = 0.003. Conclusion: Qmix is the irrigant of choice, but 0.1% octenidine hydrochloride may be recommended as a useful irrigant after further research.

  8. An exploration of inter-relationships between contact angle, inverse phase gas chromatography and triboelectric charging data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahfat, N M; Buckton, G; Burrows, R; Ticehurst, M D

    2000-01-01

    Surfaces of pharmaceutical powders have been assessed using contact angle, inverse phase gas chromatography (IGC) and triboelectric (electrostatic) charging techniques. The suitability of the Dynamic Angle Tester (DAT), an instrument based on the sessile drop technique, in determining contact angles and then the surface energy of pharmaceutical powders was assessed. The dispersive components of the surface energy of powders determined from the DAT and IGC method ranked the powders in the same order. The dispersive component values obtained by IGC were, as expected, higher than those from the DAT, due to IGC probing the highest energy sites on the powder surface. IGC and triboelectric studies allow materials to be characterised in terms of their electron donating-accepting tendencies, so inter-relationships between the data from the two techniques were explored. Although the data set was limited, there appeared to be a correlation between the charges developed by the powders on contact with stainless steel and the ratio of the electron-donating to electron-accepting tendencies of the materials as obtained from IGC.

  9. Surface Tension Flows inside Surfactant-Added Poly(dimethylsiloxane Microstructures with Velocity-Dependent Contact Angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh Jian Chen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Filling of liquid samples is realized in a microfluidic device with applications including analytical systems, biomedical devices, and systems for fundamental research. The filling of a disk-shaped polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS microchamber by liquid is analyzed with reference to microstructures with inlets and outlets. The microstructures are fabricated using a PDMS molding process with an SU-8 mold. During the filling, the motion of the gas-liquid interface is determined by the competition among inertia, adhesion, and surface tension. A single ramp model with velocity-dependent contact angles is implemented for the accurate calculation of surface tension forces in a three-dimensional volume-of-fluid based model. The effects of the parameters of this functional form are investigated. The influences of non-dimensional parameters, such as the Reynolds number and the Weber number, both determined by the inlet velocity, on the flow characteristics are also examined. An oxygen-plasma-treated PDMS substrate is utilized, and the microstructure is modified to be hydrophilic. Flow experiments are conducted into both hydrophilic and hydrophobic PDMS microstructures. Under a hydrophobic wall condition, numerical simulations with imposed boundary conditions of static and dynamic contact angles can successfully predict the moving of the meniscus compared with experimental measurements. However, for a hydrophilic wall, accurate agreement between numerical and experimental results is obvious as the dynamic contact angles were implemented.

  10. An Alternative Method to Implement Contact Angle Boundary Condition on Immersed Surfaces for Phase-Field Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Jun-Jie

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an alternative approach to implement the contact angle boundary condition on immersed surfaces for phase-field simulations of two-phase flows using the Cahn-Hilliard equation on a Cartesian mesh. This simple and effective method was inspired by previous works on the geometric formulation of the wetting boundary condition. In two dimensions, by making full use of the hyperbolic tangent profile of the order parameter, we were able to obtain its unknown value at a ghost point from the information at only one point in the fluid. This is in contrast with previous approaches using interpolations involving several points. The special feature allows this method to be easily implemented on immersed surfaces (including curved ones) that cut through the grid lines. It is verified through the study of two examples: (1) the shape of a drop on a circular cylinder with different contact angles; (2) the spreading of a drop on an embedded inclined wall with a given contact angle.

  11. An experimental and computational study of size-dependent contact-angle of dewetted metal nanodroplets below its melting temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeredo, Bruno P.; Yeratapally, Saikumar R.; Kacher, Josh; Ferreira, Placid M.; Sangid, Michael D.

    2016-11-01

    Decorating 1D nanostructures (e.g., wires and tubes) with metal nanoparticles serves as a hierarchical approach to integrate the functionalities of metal oxides, semiconductors, and metals. This paper examines a simple and low-temperature approach to self-assembling gold nanoparticles (Au-np)—a common catalytic material—onto silicon nanowires (SiNWs). A conformal ultra-thin film (i.e., contact angle. Using transmission electron microscopy imaging, it is found that annealing temperature profile has a strong effect on the particle size. Additionally, the contact angle is found to be dependent on particle size and temperature even below the eutectic temperature of the Au-Si alloy. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate potential explanations for such experimental observation. In this temperature regime, the simulations reveal the formation of an amorphous phase at the interface between the catalyst and SiNW that is sensitive to temperature. This amorphous layer increases the adhesion energy at the interface and explains the contact angle dependence on temperature.

  12. Characterization of biomaterials polar interactions in physiological conditions using liquid-liquid contact angle measurements: relation to fibronectin adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velzenberger, Elodie; El Kirat, Karim; Legeay, Gilbert; Nagel, Marie-Danielle; Pezron, Isabelle

    2009-02-01

    Wettability of biomaterials surfaces and protein-coated substrates is generally characterized with the sessile drop technique using polar and apolar liquids. This procedure is often performed in air, which does not reflect the physiological conditions. In this study, liquid/liquid contact angle measurements were carried out to be closer to cell culture conditions. This technique allowed us to evaluate the polar contribution to the work of adhesion between an aqueous medium and four selected biomaterials widely used in tissue culture applications: bacteriological grade polystyrene (PS), tissue culture polystyrene (tPS), poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) film (PolyHEMA), and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose-carboxymethylcellulose bi-layered Petri dish (CEL). The contributions of polar interactions were also estimated on the same biomaterials after fibronectin (Fn) adsorption. The quantity of Fn adsorbed on PS, tPS, PolyHEMA and CEL surfaces was evaluated by using the fluorescein-labeled protein. PolyHEMA and CEL were found to be hydrophilic, tPS was moderately hydrophilic and PS was highly hydrophobic. After Fn adsorption on PS and tPS, a significant increase of the surface polar interaction was observed. On PolyHEMA and CEL, no significant adsorption of Fn was detected and the polar interactions remained unchanged. Finally, an inverse correlation between the polarity of the surfaces and the quantity of adsorbed Fn was established.

  13. Effect of chemical heterogeneity of biodegradable polymers on surface energy: A static contact angle analysis of polyester model films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belibel, R; Avramoglou, T; Garcia, A; Barbaud, C; Mora, L

    2016-02-01

    Biodegradable and bioassimilable poly((R,S)-3,3 dimethylmalic acid) (PDMMLA) derivatives were synthesized and characterized in order to develop a new coating for coronary endoprosthesis enabling the reduction of restenosis. The PDMMLA was chemically modified to form different custom groups in its side chain. Three side groups were chosen: the hexyl group for its hydrophobic nature, the carboxylic acid and alcohol groups for their acid and neutral hydrophilic character, respectively. The sessile drop method was applied to characterize the wettability of biodegradable polymer film coatings. Surface energy and components were calculated. The van Oss approach helped reach not only the dispersive and polar acid-base components of surface energy but also acid and basic components. Surface topography was quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and subnanometer average values of roughness (Ra) were obtained for all the analyzed surfaces. Thus, roughness was considered to have a negligible effect on wettability measurements. In contrast, heterogeneous surfaces had to be corrected by the Cassie-Baxter equation for copolymers (10/90, 20/80 and 30/70). The impact of this correction was quantified for all the wettability parameters. Very high relative corrections (%) were found, reaching 100% for energies and 30% for contact angles.

  14. A model for pattern deposition from an evaporating solution subject to contact angle hysteresis and finite solubility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigelman, Anna; Manor, Ofer

    2016-06-29

    We propose a model for the pattern deposition of the solute from an evaporating drop of a dilute solution on a horizontal substrate. In the model we take into account the three-phase contact angle hysteresis and the deposition of the solute whenever its concentration exceeds the solubility limit. The evaporating drop is governed by a film equation. We show that unless for a very small three-phase contact angle or a very rapid evaporation rate the film adopts a quasi-steady geometry, satisfying the Young-Laplace equation to leading order. The concentration profile is assumed to satisfy an advection diffusion equation subject to the standard Fick's law for the diffusive flux. We further use an integral boundary condition to describe the dynamics of the concentration in the vicinity of the three-phase contact line; we replace an exact geometric description of the vicinity of the contact line, which is usually assumed such that mathematical singularities are avoided, with general insights about the concentration and its flux. We use our model to explore the relationships between a variety of deposition patterns and the governing parameters, show that the model repeats previous findings, and suggest further insights.

  15. Soil-water contact angle of some soils of the Russian Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykova, Galina; Tyugai, Zemfira; Milanovskiy, Evgeny; Shein, Evgeny

    2016-04-01

    INTRODUCTION Soil wettability affects the aggregate water resistance, the movement of moisture and dissolved substances, preferential flows, etc. There are many factors affecting the soil's wettability (the content of organic matter (OM), soil's mineralogical composition, particle size distribution), so it can reflect changes in the soil, including results of human impact. The quantitative characteristic of soil wettability is a contact angle (CA), its measurement is a new and difficult problem because of the complexity, heterogeneity and polydispersity of the object of investigation. The aim of this work is to study soil-water CA of some soils of the Russian Plane. MATERIALS AND METHODS The objects of study were sod-podzolic (Umbric Albeluvisols Abruptic, Eutric Podzoluvisols), grey forest non-podzolised (Greyic Phaeozems Albic, Haplic Greyzems), typical Chernozems (Voronic Chernozems pachic, Haplic Chernozems) - profiles under the forest and the arable land, and the chestnut (Haplic Kastanozems Chromic, Haplic Kastanozems) soils. The CA's determination was performed by a Drop Shape Analyzer DSA100 by the static sessile drop method. For all samples was determined the content of total and organic carbon (OC and TC) by dry combustion in oxygen flow. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION There is CA increasing from 85,1° (5 cm) to 40-45° (deeper, than 45 cm) in the sod-podzolic soil; OC content is changed at the same depths from 1,44 to 0.22%. We can see the similar picture in profiles of chernozems. In the forest profile the highest OC content and CA value are achieved on the surface of profile (6,41% and 78,1°), and by 90 cm these values are 1.9% and 50.2°. In the chernozem under the arable land the OC content is almost two times less and the profile is more wettable (from 50° to 19° at 5 and 100 cm). Corresponding with the OC content, the curve describing changes of CA in the profile of grey forest soil is S-shaped with peaks at 20 and 150 cm (81,3° and 70° respectively

  16. Mandibular advancement surgery in high-angle and low-angle class II patients: different long-term skeletal responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobarak, K A; Espeland, L; Krogstad, O; Lyberg, T

    2001-04-01

    The objective of this cephalometric study was to compare skeletal stability and the time course of postoperative changes in high-angle and low-angle Class II patients after mandibular advancement surgery. The subjects were 61 consecutive mandibular retrognathism patients whose treatment included bilateral sagittal split osteotomy and rigid fixation. The patients were divided according to the preoperative mandibular plane angle; the 20 patients with the lowest mandibular plane angle (20.8 degrees +/- 4.9 degrees ) constituted the low-angle group, while the 20 cases with the highest mandibular plane angle (43.0 degrees +/- 4.0 degrees ) represented the high-angle group. Lateral cephalograms were taken on 6 occasions: immediately before surgery, immediately after surgery, 2 and 6 months after surgery, and 1 and 3 years after surgery. Results dem