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Sample records for high consequence event

  1. Consequence Prioritization Process for Potential High Consequence Events (HCE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, Sarah G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-10-31

    This document describes the process for Consequence Prioritization, the first phase of the Consequence-Driven Cyber-Informed Engineering (CCE) framework. The primary goal of Consequence Prioritization is to identify potential disruptive events that would significantly inhibit an organization’s ability to provide the critical services and functions deemed fundamental to their business mission. These disruptive events, defined as High Consequence Events (HCE), include both events that have occurred or could be realized through an attack of critical infrastructure owner assets. While other efforts have been initiated to identify and mitigate disruptive events at the national security level, such as Presidential Policy Directive 41 (PPD-41), this process is intended to be used by individual organizations to evaluate events that fall below the threshold for a national security. Described another way, Consequence Prioritization considers threats greater than those addressable by standard cyber-hygiene and includes the consideration of events that go beyond a traditional continuity of operations (COOP) perspective. Finally, Consequence Prioritization is most successful when organizations adopt a multi-disciplinary approach, engaging both cyber security and engineering expertise, as in-depth engineering perspectives are required to recognize and characterize and mitigate HCEs. Figure 1 provides a high-level overview of the prioritization process.

  2. Financial system loss as an example of high consequence, high frequency events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGovern, D.E.

    1996-07-01

    Much work has been devoted to high consequence events with low frequency of occurrence. Characteristic of these events are bridge failure (such as that of the Tacoma Narrows), building failure (such as the collapse of a walkway at a Kansas City hotel), or compromise of a major chemical containment system (such as at Bhopal, India). Such events, although rare, have an extreme personal, societal, and financial impact. An interesting variation is demonstrated by financial losses due to fraud and abuse in the money management system. The impact can be huge, entailing very high aggregate costs, but these are a result of the contribution of many small attacks and not the result of a single (or few) massive events. Public awareness is raised through publicized events such as the junk bond fraud perpetrated by Milikin or gross mismanagement in the failure of the Barings Bank through unsupervised trading activities by Leeson in Singapore. These event,s although seemingly large (financial losses may be on the order of several billion dollars), are but small contributors to the estimated $114 billion loss to all types of financial fraud in 1993. This paper explores the magnitude of financial system losses and identifies new areas for analysis of high consequence events including the potential effect of malevolent intent.

  3. An examination of the consequences in high consequence operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spray, S.D.; Cooper, J.A.

    1996-06-01

    Traditional definitions of risk partition concern into the probability of occurrence and the consequence of the event. Most safety analyses focus on probabilistic assessment of an occurrence and the amount of some measurable result of the event, but the real meaning of the ``consequence`` partition is usually afforded less attention. In particular, acceptable social consequence (consequence accepted by the public) frequently differs significantly from the metrics commonly proposed by risk analysts. This paper addresses some of the important system development issues associated with consequences, focusing on ``high consequence operations safety.``

  4. Managing and understanding risk perception of surface leaks from CCS sites: risk assessment for emerging technologies and low-probability, high-consequence events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, C. M.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) has been suggested by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change as a partial solution to the greenhouse gas emissions problem. As CCS has become mainstream, researchers have raised multiple risk assessment issues typical of emerging technologies. In our research, we examine issues occuring when stored carbon dioxide (CO2) migrates to the near-surface or surface. We believe that both the public misperception and the physical reality of potential environmental, health, and commercial impacts of leak events from such subsurface sites have prevented widespread adoption of CCS. This paper is presented in three parts; the first is an evaluation of the systemic risk of a CCS site CO2 leak and models indicating potential likelihood of a leakage event. As the likelihood of a CCS site leak is stochastic and nonlinear, we present several Bayesian simulations for leak events based on research done with other low-probability, high-consequence gaseous pollutant releases. Though we found a large, acute leak to be exceptionally rare, we demonstrate potential for a localized, chronic leak at a CCS site. To that end, we present the second piece of this paper. Using a combination of spatio-temporal models and reaction-path models, we demonstrate the interplay between leak migrations, material interactions, and atmospheric dispersion for leaks of various duration and volume. These leak-event scenarios have implications for human, environmental, and economic health; they also have a significant impact on implementation support. Public acceptance of CCS is essential for a national low-carbon future, and this is what we address in the final part of this paper. We demonstrate that CCS remains unknown to the general public in the United States. Despite its unknown state, we provide survey findings -analyzed in Slovic and Weber's 2002 framework - that show a high unknown, high dread risk perception of leaks from a CCS site. Secondary findings are a

  5. Low-Probability High-Consequence (LPHC) Failure Events in Geologic Carbon Sequestration Pipelines and Wells: Framework for LPHC Risk Assessment Incorporating Spatial Variability of Risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenburg, Curtis M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Budnitz, Robert J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    If Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage (CCS) is to be effective in mitigating climate change, it will need to be carried out on a very large scale. This will involve many thousands of miles of dedicated high-pressure pipelines in order to transport many millions of tonnes of CO2 annually, with the CO2 delivered to many thousands of wells that will inject the CO2 underground. The new CCS infrastructure could rival in size the current U.S. upstream natural gas pipeline and well infrastructure. This new infrastructure entails hazards for life, health, animals, the environment, and natural resources. Pipelines are known to rupture due to corrosion, from external forces such as impacts by vehicles or digging equipment, by defects in construction, or from the failure of valves and seals. Similarly, wells are vulnerable to catastrophic failure due to corrosion, cement degradation, or operational mistakes. While most accidents involving pipelines and wells will be minor, there is the inevitable possibility of accidents with very high consequences, especially to public health. The most important consequence of concern is CO2 release to the environment in concentrations sufficient to cause death by asphyxiation to nearby populations. Such accidents are thought to be very unlikely, but of course they cannot be excluded, even if major engineering effort is devoted (as it will be) to keeping their probability low and their consequences minimized. This project has developed a methodology for analyzing the risks of these rare but high-consequence accidents, using a step-by-step probabilistic methodology. A key difference between risks for pipelines and wells is that the former are spatially distributed along the pipe whereas the latter are confined to the vicinity of the well. Otherwise, the methodology we develop for risk assessment of pipeline and well failures is similar and provides an analysis both of the annual probabilities of

  6. Consequence management, recovery & restoration after a contamination event.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Craig R.; James, Scott Carlton; Roberts, Jesse Daniel

    2005-10-01

    The fate of contaminants after a dispersal event is a major concern, and waterways may be particularly sensitive to such an incident. Contaminants could be introduced directly into a water system (municipal or general) or indirectly (Radiological Dispersal Device) from aerial dispersion, precipitation, or improper clean-up techniques that may wash contamination into storm water drains, sewer systems, rivers, lakes, and reservoirs. Most radiological, chemical, and biological contaminants have an affinity for sediments and organic matter in the water system. If contaminated soils enter waterways, a plume of contaminated sediments could be left behind, subject to remobilization during the next storm event. Or, contaminants could remain in place, thus damaging local ecosystems. Suitable planning and deployment of resources to manage such a scenario could considerably mitigate the severity of the event. First responses must be prearranged so that clean-up efforts do not increase dispersal and exacerbate the problem. Interactions between the sediment, contaminant, and water cycle are exceedingly complex and poorly understood. This research focused on the development of a risk-based model that predicts the fate of introduced contaminants in surface water systems. Achieving this goal requires integrating sediment transport with contaminant chemical reactions (sorption and desorption) and surface water hydrodynamics. Sandia leveraged its existing state-of-the-art capabilities in sediment transport measurement techniques, hydrochemistry, high performance computing, and performance assessment modeling in an effort to accomplish this task. In addition, the basis for the physical hydrodynamics is calculated with the EPA sponsored, public domain model, Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). The results of this effort will enable systems analysis and numerical simulation that allow the user to determine both short term and long-term consequences of contamination of waterways

  7. Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Avoid the Consequences of High Blood Pressure Infographic Updated:Oct 31,2016 View a downloadable version of this infographic High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP • Know Your ...

  8. Software development methodology for high consequence systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baca, L.S.; Bouchard, J.F.; Collins, E.W.; Eisenhour, M.; Neidigk, D.D.; Shortencarier, M.J.; Trellue, P.A.

    1997-10-01

    This document describes a Software Development Methodology for High Consequence Systems. A High Consequence System is a system whose failure could lead to serious injury, loss of life, destruction of valuable resources, unauthorized use, damaged reputation or loss of credibility or compromise of protected information. This methodology can be scaled for use in projects of any size and complexity and does not prescribe any specific software engineering technology. Tasks are described that ensure software is developed in a controlled environment. The effort needed to complete the tasks will vary according to the size, complexity, and risks of the project. The emphasis of this methodology is on obtaining the desired attributes for each individual High Consequence System.

  9. Low-Incidence, High-Consequence Pathogens

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-21

    Dr. Stephan Monroe, a deputy director at CDC, discusses the impact of low-incidence, high-consequence pathogens globally.  Created: 2/21/2014 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 2/26/2014.

  10. Assuring quality in high-consequence engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, Marcey L.; Kolb, Rachel R.

    2014-03-01

    In high-consequence engineering organizations, such as Sandia, quality assurance may be heavily dependent on staff competency. Competency-dependent quality assurance models are at risk when the environment changes, as it has with increasing attrition rates, budget and schedule cuts, and competing program priorities. Risks in Sandia's competency-dependent culture can be mitigated through changes to hiring, training, and customer engagement approaches to manage people, partners, and products. Sandia's technical quality engineering organization has been able to mitigate corporate-level risks by driving changes that benefit all departments, and in doing so has assured Sandia's commitment to excellence in high-consequence engineering and national service.

  11. Cutoff latitude variation during solar proton events: Causes and consequences

    CERN Document Server

    Tyssøy, H Nesse

    2016-01-01

    To accurately quantify the effect of solar proton events (SPEs) on the atmosphere requires a good estimate of the particle energy deposition in the middle atmosphere (60- 100 km) and how the energy is distributed globally. Protons in the energy range 1-20MeV, depositing their energy in the middle atmosphere, are subject to more complex dynamics with strong day-night asymmetries compared to higher-energy particles. Our study targets six SPEs from 2003 to 2012. By using measurements from the Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector on all available Polar Orbit Environment Satellites (POES), we show that in the main phase of geomagnetic storms the dayside cutoff latitudes are pushed poleward, while the nightside cutoff latitudes have the opposite response, resulting in strong day-night asymmetries in the energy deposition. These features cannot bemeasured by the frequently used Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES). Assuming that the protons impact the polar atmosphere homogeneously above a...

  12. Observable consequences of event-by-event fluctuations of HBT radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plumberg, Christopher; Heinz, Ulrich

    2016-12-01

    We explore the effects of event-by-event fluctuations of Hanbury Brown-Twiss (HBT) radii and show how they can be observed experimentally. The relation of measured HBT radii extracted from ensemble-averaged correlation functions to the mean of their event-by-event probability distribution is clarified. We propose a method to experimentally determine the mean and variance of this distribution and test it on an ensemble of fluctuating events generated with the viscous hydrodynamic code VISH2+1. Using the same code, the sensitivity of the mean and variance of the HBT radii to the specific QGP shear viscosity η / s is studied. We report sensitivity of the mean pion HBT radii and their variances to the temperature dependence of η / s near the quark-hadron transition at a level similar (10-20%) to that which was previously observed for elliptic and quadrangular flow of charged hadrons [1].

  13. Hydro-Meteocean Nature of some Extreme Flood Events and Some Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diez, J. Javier

    2013-04-01

    The Santa Irene flood event, at the end of October 1982, is one of the most dramatically widely reported flood events in Spain. Its renown is mainly due to the collapse of the Tous dam, but its main message is to be the paradigm of the incidence of the maritime/littoral weather and its temporal sea level rise on the coastal plains inland floods. Looking at damages the paper analyzes the adapted measures from the point of view of the aims of the FP7 SMARTeST Project related to the Flood Resilience improvement in urban areas through looking for Technologies, Systems and Tools an appropriate "road to de market". The event, as frequently, was due to a meteorological phenomenon known as "gota fría" (cold drop), a relatively frequent and intense rainy phenomenon on the Iberian Peninsula, particularly on the Spanish east to southeast inlands and coasts. There are some circumstances that can easily come together to unleash the cold drop there: cold and dry polar air masses coming onto the whole Iberian Peninsula and the north of Africa, high sea water temperatures, and low atmospheric pressure (cyclone) areas in the western Mediterranean basin; these circumstances are quite common during the autumn season there, and, as it happens, in other places around the world (East/Southeast Africa). Their occurrence, however shows a great space-temporal variability (in a similar way to hurricanes, on Caribbean and western North-Atlantic areas, or to typhoons do). As a matter of fact, all of these equivalent though different phenomena may have different magnitude each time. This paper describes the results of a detailed analysis and reflection about this cold drop phenomenon as a whole, on the generation of its rains and on the different natures and consequences of its flood. This paper explains also the ways in which the maritime weather in front of the basin and the consequent sea level govern floods on the lowest zone of any hydrographical basin, showing that event as a real

  14. Gender as a moderator of the relationship between preparty motives and event-level consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napper, Lucy E; Kenney, Shannon R; Montes, Kevin S; Lewis, Leslie J; LaBrie, Joseph W

    2015-06-01

    Prepartying is often associated with increased alcohol consumption and negative alcohol-related consequences among college students. General drinking motives are often only weakly related to preparty alcohol use, and few studies have examined the associations between preparty-specific drinking motives and alcohol-related consequences that occur during or after a preparty event. The current study utilizes event-level data to address this gap in the literature by examining the relationship between four types of preparty motives (prepartying to relax or loosen up, to increase control over alcohol use, to meet a dating partner, and to address concerns that alcohol may not be available later) and alcohol consequences as a function of gender. Participants (N=952) reported on their most recent preparty event in the past month. After controlling for general drinking motives, all four preparty motives predicted greater event-level consequences for both males and females. Further, prepartying to increase control over alcohol consumed was associated with greater consequences for males as compared to females. The findings are consistent with research suggesting that preparty specific motives may further our understanding of prepartying outcomes over and above the use of general drinking motive measures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Characteristics of the extreme rainfall event and consequent flash floods in W Slovenia in September 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rusjan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available During a weather front that passed over large parts of Slovenia on 18.9.2007, extreme rainfall events were triggered causing several severe flash floods with six casualties. Out of 210 municipalities in Slovenia, 60 were reporting flood damages, and the total economic flood damage was later estimated at close to 200 million Euro; highest damage was claimed by Železniki municipality in NW Slovenia. The main purpose of the study presented in this paper was to put together available meteorological and hydrological data in order to get better insight into temporal and spatial dynamics and variability of the flash flood event along the Selška Sora River flowing through the town of Železniki. The weather forecast by the Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia (ARSO lead to early warning of floodings but has underestimated rainfall amounts by a factor of 2. Also meteorological radar underestimated ground rainfall as much as by 50%. During that day, in many rainfall gauging stations operated by ARSO in the area under investigation, extreme rainfall amounts were measured, e.g. 303 mm in 24 h or 157 mm in 2 h. Some of the measured rainfall amounts were the highest registered amounts in Slovenia so far. Statistical analysis using Gumble distribution was performed and rainfall return periods were estimated. When assessing rainfall return periods, a question of the sampling error as a consequence of short rainfall records used was raised. Furthermore, measured rainfall data were used to reconstruct hydrographs on selected water stations along the Selška Sora River. The cumulative areal precipitation for the Selška Sora River catchment upstream of Železniki amounted to 219 mm, while the modeled effective precipitation used to simulate the hydrograph peak was only 57 mm. The modeled direct runoff coefficient therefore amounts to 0.26. Surprisingly low value is mainly caused by the applied unit hydrograph method that seeks to meet the peak

  16. Prevalence and consequences of substance use among high school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Drug and Alcohol Studies ... Further, cannabis was used in selected high schools, and its abuse prevalence was greater in urban private schools, ... enhanced sexual activity, with increased risks for negative consequences.

  17. RESEARCH OF EXISTENCE OF RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN VARIABLES BY THE METHOD OF CONDITION-CONSEQUENCE DECOMPOSITION OF EVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Dron'

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In the work an algorithm for establishing the existence of relationship between arbitrary socio-economic variables is given. The algorithm is based on the condition-consequence decomposition of events. It involves the construction of event-model and the using two classifications – types of interdependencies between events and types of relationships between their attributes.

  18. Integration of human reliability analysis into the high consequence process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houghton, F.K.; Morzinski, J.

    1998-12-01

    When performing a hazards analysis (HA) for a high consequence process, human error often plays a significant role in the hazards analysis. In order to integrate human error into the hazards analysis, a human reliability analysis (HRA) is performed. Human reliability is the probability that a person will correctly perform a system-required activity in a required time period and will perform no extraneous activity that will affect the correct performance. Even though human error is a very complex subject that can only approximately be addressed in risk assessment, an attempt must be made to estimate the effect of human errors. The HRA provides data that can be incorporated in the hazard analysis event. This paper will discuss the integration of HRA into a HA for the disassembly of a high explosive component. The process was designed to use a retaining fixture to hold the high explosive in place during a rotation of the component. This tool was designed as a redundant safety feature to help prevent a drop of the explosive. This paper will use the retaining fixture to demonstrate the following HRA methodology`s phases. The first phase is to perform a task analysis. The second phase is the identification of the potential human, both cognitive and psychomotor, functions performed by the worker. During the last phase the human errors are quantified. In reality, the HRA process is an iterative process in which the stages overlap and information gathered in one stage may be used to refine a previous stage. The rationale for the decision to use or not use the retaining fixture and the role the HRA played in the decision will be discussed.

  19. Semester and event-specific motives for alcohol use during Spring Break: associated protective strategies and negative consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, Megan E; Lewis, Melissa A; Lee, Christine M; Maggs, Jennifer L

    2013-04-01

    Motives surrounding alcohol use behavior are important for understanding college student drinking. However, no previous research has addressed how motives for and against drinking during specific events associated with high-risk drinking, such as Spring Break, may differ from motives for and against drinking during the regular semester. Further, we examine the extent to which semester and Spring Break motives are associated with alcohol use, protective behavioral strategies (PBS), and consequences. Participants were college students (N=261; 55% women) who provided data both immediately prior to (Wave 1) and after (Wave 2) Spring Break. Fun/Social motives for drinking were greater for Spring Break, and Driving motives against drinking were lower for Spring Break, compared to semester drinking. Relax and Image motives for drinking and Physical/Behavioral motives for not drinking during Spring Break did not differ from semester motives. Spring Break motives for and against drinking were associated with total drinks, maximum drinks, PBS, and experienced negative consequences during Spring Break. Students' specific motives regarding drinking during Spring Break predict high-risk drinking and may be utilized in creating salient event-specific interventions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Consequences of a simulated rapid ocean acidification event for benthic ecosystem processes and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Fiona; Widdicombe, Stephen; McNeill, C Louise; Solan, Martin

    2013-08-30

    Whilst the biological consequences of long-term, gradual changes in acidity associated with the oceanic uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) are increasingly studied, the potential effects of rapid acidification associated with a failure of sub-seabed carbon storage infrastructure have received less attention. This study investigates the effects of severe short-term (8days) exposure to acidified seawater on infaunal mediation of ecosystem processes (bioirrigation and sediment particle redistribution) and functioning (nutrient concentrations). Following acidification, individuals of Amphiura filiformis exhibited emergent behaviour typical of a stress response, which resulted in altered bioturbation, but limited changes in nutrient cycling. Under acidified conditions, A. filiformis moved to shallower depths within the sediment and the variability in occupancy depth reduced considerably. This study indicated that rapid acidification events may not be lethal to benthic invertebrates, but may result in behavioural changes that could have longer-term implications for species survival, ecosystem structure and functioning.

  1. Modeling a Civil Event Case Study for Consequence Management Using the IMPRINT Forces Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacy, Marc; Gosakan, Mala; Eckdahl, Angela; Miller, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    A critical challenge in the Consequence Management (CM) domain is the appropriate allocation of necessary and skilled military and civilian personnel and materiel resources in unexpected emergencies. To aid this process we used the Forces module in the Improved Performance Research Integration Tool (IMPRINT). This module enables analysts to enter personnel and equipment capabilities, prioritized schedules and numbers available, along with unexpected emergency requirements in order to assess force response requirements. Using a suspected terrorist threat on a college campus, we developed a test case model which exercised the capabilities of the module, including the scope and scale of operations. The model incorporates data from multiple sources, including daily schedules and frequency of events such as fire calls. Our preliminary results indicate that the model can predict potential decreases in civilian emergency response coverage due to an involved unplanned incident requiring significant portions of police, fire and civil responses teams.

  2. Knowledge base about earthquakes as a tool to minimize strong events consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolova, Nina; Bonnin, Jean; Larionov, Valery; Ugarov, Alexander; Kijko, Andrzej

    2017-04-01

    The paper describes the structure and content of the knowledge base on physical and socio-economical consequences of damaging earthquakes, which may be used for calibration of near real-time loss assessment systems based on simulation models for shaking intensity, damage to buildings and casualties estimates. Such calibration allows to compensate some factors which influence on reliability of expected damage and loss assessment in "emergency" mode. The knowledge base contains the description of past earthquakes' consequences for the area under study. It also includes the current distribution of built environment and population at the time of event occurrence. Computer simulation of the recorded in knowledge base events allow to determine the sets of regional calibration coefficients, including rating of seismological surveys, peculiarities of shaking intensity attenuation and changes in building stock and population distribution, in order to provide minimum error of damaging earthquakes loss estimations in "emergency" mode. References 1. Larionov, V., Frolova, N: Peculiarities of seismic vulnerability estimations. In: Natural Hazards in Russia, volume 6: Natural Risks Assessment and Management, Publishing House "Kruk", Moscow, 120-131, 2003. 2. Frolova, N., Larionov, V., Bonnin, J.: Data Bases Used In Worlwide Systems For Earthquake Loss Estimation In Emergency Mode: Wenchuan Earthquake. In Proc. TIEMS2010 Conference, Beijing, China, 2010. 3. Frolova N. I., Larionov V. I., Bonnin J., Sushchev S. P., Ugarov A. N., Kozlov M. A. Loss Caused by Earthquakes: Rapid Estimates. Natural Hazards Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol.84, ISSN 0921-030, Nat Hazards DOI 10.1007/s11069-016-2653

  3. Biogeographical consequences of Cenozoic tectonic events within East Asian margins: a case study of Hynobius biogeography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    Full Text Available Few studies have explored the role of Cenozoic tectonic evolution in shaping patterns and processes of extant animal distributions within East Asian margins. We select Hynobius salamanders (Amphibia: Hynobiidae as a model to examine biogeographical consequences of Cenozoic tectonic events within East Asian margins. First, we use GenBank molecular data to reconstruct phylogenetic interrelationships of Hynobius by bayesian and maximum likelihood analyses. Second, we estimate the divergence time using the bayesian relaxed clock approach and infer dispersal/vicariance histories under the 'dispersal-extinction-cladogenesis' model. Finally, we test whether evolutionary history and biogeographical processes of Hynobius should coincide with the predictions of two major hypotheses (the 'vicariance'/'out of southwestern Japan' hypothesis. The resulting phylogeny confirmed Hynobius as a monophyletic group, which could be divided into nine major clades associated with six geographical areas. Our results show that: (1 the most recent common ancestor of Hynobius was distributed in southwestern Japan and Hokkaido Island, (2 a sister taxon relationship between Hynobius retardatus and all remaining species was the results of a vicariance event between Hokkaido Island and southwestern Japan in the Middle Eocene, (3 ancestral Hynobius in southwestern Japan dispersed into the Taiwan Island, central China, 'Korean Peninsula and northeastern China' as well as northeastern Honshu during the Late Eocene-Late Miocene. Our findings suggest that Cenozoic tectonic evolution plays an important role in shaping disjunctive distributions of extant Hynobius within East Asian margins.

  4. High-frequency lunar teleseismic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Y.; Dorman, J.; Duennebier, F.; Ewing, M.; Lammlein, D.; Latham, G.

    1974-01-01

    A small number of seismic signals, including some of the strongest observed to date, have been identified as representing a fourth principal category of natural lunar seismic events with characteristics distinct from those produced by normal meteoroid impacts, deep moonquakes, and thermal moonquakes. These signals are much richer in high frequencies than other events observed at comparable distances, and display relatively impulsive P- and S-wave beginnings, indicating negligible seismic-wave scattering near the source. Source depths of these events may range between 0 and perhaps 300 km. These and other characteristics could represent either (1) meteoroids impacting upon outcrops of competent lunar crystal rock, (2) rare impacting objects that penetrate to competent rock below a scattering zone, or (3) shallow tectonic moonquakes.

  5. Characteristics and Consequences of Non-apneic Respiratory Events During Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankari, Abdulghani; Pranathiageswaran, Sukanya; Maresh, Scott; Hosni, Arwa Mohammad; Badr, M Safwan

    2017-01-01

    Current scoring criteria of non-apneic events (ie, hypopnea) require the presence of oxyhemoglobin desaturation and/or arousal. However, other sleep study parameters may help to identify abnormal respiratory events (REs) and assist in making more accurate diagnosis. To investigate whether non-apneic REs without desaturation or cortical arousal are associated with respiratory and cardiac consequences. Thirteen participants with sleep disturbances (snoring and/or excessive day time sleepiness), were screened using attended in laboratory polysomnography (PSG) while monitoring pressure and airflow via a nasal mask with an attached pneumotach. To separate the contribution of the upper airway resistance (RUA) and total pulmonary resistance (RL), supraglottic and esophageal pressures were measured using Millar pressure catheters. RL and RUA were calculated during baseline and hypopneas. RL was defined as the resistive pressure divided by the maximal flow during inspiration and expiration. Hypopnea was defined 30% decrease in flow with 3% desaturation and/or cortical arousal. REs was defined as 30% decrease in the flow without desaturation and/or cortical arousal. In eight subjects continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was titrated to optimal pressure. R-R interval (RRI) was defined as consecutive beat-to-beat intervals on single lead electrocardiograph (ECG) during baseline, RE/hypopnea and on optimal CPAP. REs associated with increased expiratory RUA (14.6 ± 11.3 vs. 7.5 ± 4.5 cmH2O L-1 s-1; p Optimal CPAP decreased expiratory RUA (4.0 ± 2.5 vs. 7.5 ± 4.5 cmH2O L-1 s-1; p sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) when non-apneic REs were accounted for in symptomatic patients (p Optimal CPAP and the reduction of resistive load are associated with the normalization of heart rate indicating potential clinical benefit.

  6. An ATLAS high mass dijet event

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Experiment

    2014-01-01

    A high mass dijet event: two high-pT jets with invariant mass 2.8 TeV. A track pT cut of 2.5 GeV has been applied for the display. 1st jet (ordered by pT): pT = 310 GeV, y = -2.0, φ = -0.2 2nd jet: pT = 280 GeV, y = 2.5, φ = 2.9 3rd jet: pT = 14 GeV, y = -0.9, φ = -1.0 Jet momenta are calibrated according to the "EM+JES" scheme. Event collected on 5 August 2010.

  7. Proceedings of the High Consequence Operations Safety Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    Many organizations face high consequence safety situations where unwanted stimuli due to accidents, catastrophes, or inadvertent human actions can cause disasters. In order to improve interaction among such organizations and to build on each others` experience, preventive approaches, and assessment techniques, the High Consequence Operations Safety Symposium was held July 12--14, 1994 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The symposium was conceived by Dick Schwoebel, Director of the SNL Surety Assessment Center. Stan Spray, Manager of the SNL System Studies Department, planned strategy and made many of the decisions necessary to bring the concept to fruition on a short time scale. Angela Campos and about 60 people worked on the nearly limitless implementation and administrative details. The initial symposium (future symposia are planned) was structured around 21 plenary presentations in five methodology-oriented sessions, along with a welcome address, a keynote address, and a banquet address. Poster papers addressing the individual session themes were available before and after the plenary sessions and during breaks.

  8. ATLAS event containing two high energy photons

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS

    2011-01-01

    An event where two energetic photons ("gammas") are produced in a proton-proton collision in ATLAS. Many events of this type are produced by well-understood Standard Model processes ("backgrounds") which do not involve Higgs particles. A small excess of events of this type with similar masses could indicate evidence for Higgs particle production, but any specific event is most likely to be from the background.

  9. Terrestrial Consequences of Spectral and Temporal Variability in Ionizing Photon Events

    CERN Document Server

    Ejzak, L M; Melott, A L; Thomas, B C; Ejzak, Larissa M.; Medvedev, Mikhail V.; Melott, Adrian L.; Thomas, Brian C.

    2006-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) directed at Earth from a few kpc may have damaged the biosphere. However, GRBs are highly variable in spectra and duration. Recent observations indicate that short (~0.1 s) burst GRBs, which have harder spectra, are sufficiently abundant at low redshift that they may offer an additional significant effect. A much longer timescale is associated with shock breakout luminosity observed in the soft X-ray (~10^3 s) and UV (~10^5 s) emission. Here we generalize our atmospheric computations to include a broad range of peak photon energies and investigate the effect of burst duration while holding total fluence and other parameters constant. The results can be used to estimate the probable impact of various kinds of ionizing events (such as short GRBs, X-ray flashes, supernovae) upon the Earths atmosphere. The ultimate intensity of atmospheric effects varies only slightly with burst duration from 10^-1 s to 10^8 s. Longer durations produce delayed onset of effects. Thus, the effect of many ast...

  10. Jet fire consequence modeling for high-pressure gas pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccorullo, Ivano; Russo, Paola

    2016-12-01

    A simple and reliable approach for sizing the hazard area potentially affected by a jet fire as consequence of the failure of high-pressure pipeline is proposed. A release rate model, taking pipeline operation properties and source release properties into account, is coupled with SLAB dispersion model and point source radiation model to calculate the hazard distance. The hazard distance is set beyond the distance at which a low chance of fatality can occur to people exposed and a wooden structure is not expected to burn due to radiation heat of jet fire. The comparison between three gases with different physico-chemical properties (i.e. natural gas, hydrogen, ethylene) is shown. The influence of pipeline operating parameters, such as: pressure, pipeline diameter and length, hole size, on the hazard area for the three gases is evaluated. Finally, a simple correlation is proposed for calculating the hazard distance as function of these parameters.

  11. Analysis and modeling of a hail event consequences on a building portfolio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolet, Pierrick; Voumard, Jérémie; Choffet, Marc; Demierre, Jonathan; Imhof, Markus; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2014-05-01

    North-West Switzerland has been affected by a severe Hail Storm in July 2011, which was especially intense in the Canton of Aargau. The damage cost of this event is around EUR 105 Million only for the Canton of Aargau, which corresponds to half of the mean annual consolidated damage cost of the last 20 years for the 19 Cantons (over 26) with a public insurance. The aim of this project is to benefit from the collected insurance data to better understand and estimate the risk of such event. In a first step, a simple hail event simulator, which has been developed for a previous hail episode, is modified. The geometric properties of the storm is derived from the maximum intensity radar image by means of a set of 2D Gaussians instead of using 1D Gaussians on profiles, as it was the case in the previous version. The tool is then tested on this new event in order to establish its ability to give a fast damage estimation based on the radar image and buildings value and location. The geometrical properties are used in a further step to generate random outcomes with similar characteristics, which are combined with a vulnerability curve and an event frequency to estimate the risk. The vulnerability curve comes from a 2009 event and is improved with data from this event, whereas the frequency for the Canton is estimated from insurance records. In addition to this regional risk analysis, this contribution aims at studying the relation of the buildings orientation with the damage rate. Indeed, it is expected that the orientation of the roof influences the aging of the material by controlling the frequency and amplitude of thaw-freeze cycles, changing then the vulnerability over time. This part is established by calculating the hours of sunshine, which are used to derive the material temperatures. This information is then compared with insurance claims. A last part proposes a model to study the hail impact on a building, by modeling the different equipment on each facade of the

  12. Excess length of stay and economic consequences of adverse events in Dutch hospital patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogervorst-Schilp, J.; Langelaan, M.; Spreeuwenberg, P.; Bruijne, M.C. de; Wagner, C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: To investigate the average and extrapolated excess length of stay and direct costs of adverse events (AEs) and preventable AEs in Dutch hospitals, and to evaluate patient characteristics associated with excess length of stay and costs. Methods: Data of a large retrospective patient recor

  13. A Statistical Study of Distant Consequences of Large Solar Energetic Events

    CERN Document Server

    Schrijver, Carolus J

    2015-01-01

    Large solar flares and eruptions may influence remote regions through perturbations in the outer-atmospheric magnetic field, leading to causally related events outside of the primary or triggering eruptions that are referred to as "sympathetic events." We quantify the occurrence of sympathetic events using the full-disk observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory associated with all flares of GOES class M5 or larger from 01 May 2010 through 31 December 2014. Using a superposed-epoch analysis, we find an increase in the rate of flares, filament eruptions, and substantial sprays and surges more than 20 degrees away from the primary flares within the first four hours at a significance of 1.8 standard deviations. We also find that the rate of distant events drops by two standard deviations, or a factor of 1.2, when comparing intervals between 4 hours and 24 hours before and after the start times of the primary large flares. We discuss the evidence for the concluding hyp...

  14. Reduced infant birthweight consequent upon maternal exposure to severe life events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khashan, Ali; McNamee, R.; Pedersen, Marianne Giørtz

    2008-01-01

    ). There was a significant association between maternal exposure to death of a relative and risk of a baby weighing below the 10th percentile (adjusted relative risk (RR) = 1.17, 95% CI = 1.13, 1.22) and 5th percentile (adjusted RR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.15, 1.29). CONCLUSIONS: Mothers exposed to severe life events before......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between maternal exposure to severe life events and fetal growth (birthweight and small for gestational age). Stress has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. METHODS: Mothers of 1.38 million singleton live births in Denmark between January 1......, 1979 and December 31, 2002 were linked to information on their spouses, parents, siblings, and older children. Exposure was defined as death or serious illness in a relative during pregnancy or in the 6 months before conception. Linear regression was used to examine the effect of exposure...

  15. Positive and negative perceived consequences of first intercourse among middle and high school students in Puebla, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilenko, Sara A; Espinosa-Hernández, Graciela; Halgunseth, Linda C

    2016-01-01

    Relatively little is known about young people's interpretations of sexual behaviour in Latin America. In this study, we examine the most commonly perceived consequences of first sexual intercourse among Mexican middle and high school students, how perceived consequences differ by gender, and factors that may predict experiencing more positive or negative consequences. Sexually active Mexican students aged 12-19 years (n = 268) reported whether they had experienced each of 19 consequences following first intercourse. Both positive consequences, such as physical satisfaction and closeness to partner, and negative consequences, such as worry about STDs and pregnancy, were common. Sex with a non-relationship partner was associated with fewer positive and more negative consequences, with the effect for positive consequences being stronger for young women. Pressure to have sex was associated with fewer positive consequences of first intercourse, and pressure to remain a virgin was associated with more positive and negative consequences. These findings suggest that young people often report mixed feelings about their first sexual intercourse and that relationship context and sexual socialisation influence their perceptions of the event.

  16. Reduced infant birthweight consequent upon maternal exposure to severe life events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khashan, Ali; McNamee, R.; Pedersen, Marianne Giørtz

    2008-01-01

    conception or during pregnancy have babies with significantly lower birthweight. If this association is causal, the potential mechanisms of stress-related effects on birthweight include changes in lifestyle due to the exposure and stress-related dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis during......OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between maternal exposure to severe life events and fetal growth (birthweight and small for gestational age). Stress has been associated with adverse pregnancy outcome. METHODS: Mothers of 1.38 million singleton live births in Denmark between January 1......, 1979 and December 31, 2002 were linked to information on their spouses, parents, siblings, and older children. Exposure was defined as death or serious illness in a relative during pregnancy or in the 6 months before conception. Linear regression was used to examine the effect of exposure...

  17. Proactive Disciplinary Consequences in Three Illinois High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golomb, Sara R.

    2010-01-01

    Disciplinary codes of conduct guide administrators when determining the consequences for student misconduct. The codes of conduct commonly found in schools rely on exclusionary measures that have been associated with negative student outcomes and controversy but little is being done to provide positive model for these written policies. Schools…

  18. Rates and genomic consequences of spontaneous mutational events in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrider, Daniel R; Houle, David; Lynch, Michael; Hahn, Matthew W

    2013-08-01

    Because spontaneous mutation is the source of all genetic diversity, measuring mutation rates can reveal how natural selection drives patterns of variation within and between species. We sequenced eight genomes produced by a mutation-accumulation experiment in Drosophila melanogaster. Our analysis reveals that point mutation and small indel rates vary significantly between the two different genetic backgrounds examined. We also find evidence that ∼2% of mutational events affect multiple closely spaced nucleotides. Unlike previous similar experiments, we were able to estimate genome-wide rates of large deletions and tandem duplications. These results suggest that, at least in inbred lines like those examined here, mutational pressures may result in net growth rather than contraction of the Drosophila genome. By comparing our mutation rate estimates to polymorphism data, we are able to estimate the fraction of new mutations that are eliminated by purifying selection. These results suggest that ∼99% of duplications and deletions are deleterious--making them 10 times more likely to be removed by selection than nonsynonymous mutations. Our results illuminate not only the rates of new small- and large-scale mutations, but also the selective forces that they encounter once they arise.

  19. Tropical Cyclones' influence on the ocean: from event scale processes to climate scale consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, E. M.; Lengaigne, M.; Vialard, J.; Madec, G.; Emanuel, K.

    2013-12-01

    Strong winds associated with Tropical Cyclones (TCs) trigger intense mixing in the upper ocean. The associated sub-surface warming has been suggested to substantially modify the ocean heat budget. A 1/2° global ocean model experiment that realistically samples the ocean response to more than 3,000 TCs over the last 30 years is used to investigate the processes induced by TCs at the local scale and their impact on the ocean at the climate scale. Vertical mixing is the dominant process explaining surface cooling close to the TCs' track. This process has received the largest attention from previous studies investigating the climatic importance of TC-ocean interaction, but surface cooling is increasingly due to heat fluxes as we consider larger space scales. Vertical mixing does induce an enhanced ocean heat uptake (OHU) consistent with previous estimates. However, two processes have to be taken into account when evaluating the importance of this OHU for climate: 1) about 1/3 of the ocean heat uptake is in fact used to compensate ocean heat loss by enhanced surface fluxes due to TCs, 2) most of the remaining heat injected into the ocean during TC seasons is re-entrained by the deepening of the mixed layer in fall and winter. As a consequence, the main TCs' climatological impact is to reduce the amplitude of surface temperature seasonal cycle more than to modify the ocean heat transport. (a) Composite time series of TC-induced total surface flux anomalies within 600 km of TC-tracks. Ocean heat extracted=TC-induced heat fluxes to the atmosphere during TCs passage. Ocean heat uptake=heat input from the atmosphere needed to dissipate the cold wake. Ocean heat release=subsurface anomalies re-emerging during the next winter. Ocean Heat Transport=part of these subsurface anomalies transported laterally before re-emerging. (b) Total heat uptake by the ocean (OHU) in the wake of TCs and its partition into various components

  20. International biosecurity symposium : securing high consequence pathogens and toxins : symposium summary.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-06-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Office of Nonproliferation Policy sponsored an international biosecurity symposium at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The event, entitled 'Securing High Consequence Pathogens and Toxins', took place from February 1 to February 6, 2004 and was hosted by Dr. Reynolds M. Salerno, Principal Member of the Technical Staff and Program Manager of the Biosecurity program at Sandia. Over 60 bioscience and policy experts from 14 countries gathered to discuss biosecurity, a strategy aimed at preventing the theft and sabotage of dangerous pathogens and toxins from bioscience facilities. Presentations delivered during the symposium were interspersed with targeted discussions that elucidated, among other things, the need for subsequent regional workshops on biosecurity, and a desire for additional work toward developing international biosecurity guidelines.

  1. A New Method to Generate the Complete Set of Unique Signals for Application in High Consequence System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Shun-yi; CHEN Wen-yuan; ZHANG Wei-ping; FENG Min-hua; LI Sheng-yong

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposed a new method to generate the complete sets of unique signals. It contains sequences comparing, improved exhaustive searches and ranking method. Characters of this new method are complete set;higher effective ;independent of certain mathematical constraints. And also some 24 bi-valued events sets generated by this method were discussed and these set are now used in our high consequence system.

  2. High-Energy Solar Particle Events in Cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, N.; Makela, P.; Yashiro, S.; Xie, H.; Akiyama, S.; Thakur, N.

    2015-01-01

    The Sun is already in the declining phase of cycle 24, but the paucity of high-energy solar energetic particle (SEP) events continues with only two ground level enhancement (GLE) events as of March 31, 2015. In an attempt to understand this, we considered all the large SEP events of cycle 24 that occurred until the end of 2014. We compared the properties of the associated CMEs with those in cycle 23. We found that the CME speeds in the sky plane were similar, but almost all those cycle-24 CMEs were halos. A significant fraction of (16%) of the frontside SEP events were associated with eruptive prominence events. CMEs associated with filament eruption events accelerate slowly and attain peak speeds beyond the typical GLE release heights. When we considered only western hemispheric events that had good connectivity to the CME nose, there were only 8 events that could be considered as GLE candidates. One turned out to be the first GLE event of cycle 24 (2012 May 17). In two events, the CMEs were very fast (>2000 km/s) but they were launched into a tenuous medium (high Alfven speed). In the remaining five events, the speeds were well below the typical GLE CME speed (2000 km/s). Furthermore, the CMEs attained their peak speeds beyond the typical heights where GLE particles are released. We conclude that several factors contribute to the low rate of high-energy SEP events in cycle 24: (i) reduced efficiency of shock acceleration (weak heliospheric magnetic field), (ii) poor latitudinal and longitudinal connectivity), and (iii) variation in local ambient conditions (e.g., high Alfven speed).

  3. High-energy solar particle events in cycle 24

    CERN Document Server

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji; Xie, Hong; Akiyama, Sachiko; Thakur, Neeharika

    2015-01-01

    The Sun is already in the declining phase of cycle 24, but the paucity of high-energy solar energetic particle (SEP) events continues with only two ground level enhancement (GLE) events as of March 31, 2015. In an attempt to understand this, we considered all the large SEP events of cycle 24 that occurred until the end of 2014. We compared the properties of the associated CMEs with those in cycle 23. We found that the CME speeds in the sky plane were similar, but almost all those cycle-24 CMEs were halos. A significant fraction of (16%) of the frontside SEP events were associated with eruptive prominence events. CMEs associated with filament eruption events accelerate slowly and attain peak speeds beyond the typical GLE release heights. When we considered only western hemispheric events that had good connectivity to the CME nose, there were only 8 events that could be considered as GLE candidates. One turned out to be the first GLE event of cycle 24 (2012 May 17). In two events, the CMEs were very fast (>2000...

  4. Consequences of high-frequency operation on EUV source efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sizyuk, Tatyana

    2017-08-01

    A potential problem of future extreme ultraviolet (EUV) sources, required for high volume manufacture regimes, can be related to the contamination of the chamber environment by products of preceding laser pulse/droplet interactions. Implementation of high, 100 kHz and higher, repetition rate of EUV sources using Sn droplets ignited with laser pulses can cause high accumulation of tin in the chamber in the form of vapor, fine mist, or fragmented clusters. In this work, the effects of the residual tin accumulation in the EUV chamber in dependence on laser parameters and mitigation system efficiency were studied. The effect of various pressures of tin vapor on the CO2 and Nd:YAG laser beam propagation and on the size, the intensity, and the resulting efficiency of the EUV sources was analyzed. The HEIGHTS 3D package was used for this analysis to study the effect of residual background pressure and spatial distribution on EUV photon emission and collection. It was found that background pressure in the range of 1-5 Pa does not significantly influence the EUV source produced by CO2 lasers. A larger volume with this pressure condition, however, can reduce the efficiency of the source. However, an optimized volume of mix with proper density could increase the efficiency of the sources produced by CO2 lasers.

  5. High plasma uric acid concentration: causes and consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Oliveira Erick

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High plasma uric acid (UA is a precipitating factor for gout and renal calculi as well as a strong risk factor for Metabolic Syndrome and cardiovascular disease. The main causes for higher plasma UA are either lower excretion, higher synthesis or both. Higher waist circumference and the BMI are associated with higher insulin resistance and leptin production, and both reduce uric acid excretion. The synthesis of fatty acids (tryglicerides in the liver is associated with the de novo synthesis of purine, accelerating UA production. The role played by diet on hyperuricemia has not yet been fully clarified, but high intake of fructose-rich industrialized food and high alcohol intake (particularly beer seem to influence uricemia. It is not known whether UA would be a causal factor or an antioxidant protective response. Most authors do not consider the UA as a risk factor, but presenting antioxidant function. UA contributes to > 50% of the antioxidant capacity of the blood. There is still no consensus if UA is a protective or a risk factor, however, it seems that acute elevation is a protective factor, whereas chronic elevation a risk for disease.

  6. High Tc as a consequence of structure deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djajic, R.P. (Faculty of Technical Sciences, Univ. of Novi Sad (Yugoslavia)); Tosic, B.S.; Setrajcic, J.P. (Inst. of Physics, Univ. of Novi Sad (Yugoslavia)); Mirjanic, D.L. (Faculty of Tech., Univ. of Banja Luka (Yugoslavia))

    1991-12-01

    Based on the experimental fact that doped perovskite structures behave as a system of energetically independent thin layers we developed a theoretical model for a single layer behaviour. It was shown that electron and phonon spectra are functions of azimuthal angle which in turn gives the specific relations for Tc which on the other hand differs significantly from the corresponding value in the BCS theory. The crucial fact, which allows the solution of this equation with high Tc, is the electron-electron interaction constant which in a thin doped layer is for an order or two orders of magnitude greater than the same interaction constant in the ideal infinite structure. (orig.).

  7. A probabilistic consequence assessment for a very high temperature reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joeun; Kim, Jintae; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2017-02-15

    Currently, fossil fuel is globally running out. If current trends continue, crude oil will be depleted in 20 years and natural gas in 40 years. In addition, the use of fossil resource has increased emissions of green gas such as carbon dioxide. Therefore, there has been a strong demand in recent years for producing large amounts of hydrogen as an alternative energy [1]. To generate hydrogen energy, very high temperature more than 900 C is required but this level is not easy to reach. Because a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), one of next generation reactor, is able to make the temperature, it is regarded as a solution of the problem. Also, VHTR has an excellent safety in comparison with existing and other next generation reactors. Especially, a passive system, Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS), is adopted to get rid of radiant heat in case of accidents. To achieve variety requirements of new designed-reactors, however, it needs to develop new methodologies and definitions different with existing method. At the same time, an application of probability safety assessment (PSA) has been proposed to ensure the safety of next generation NPPs. For this, risk-informed designs of structures have to be developed and verified. Particularly, the passive system requires to be evaluated for its reliability. The objective of this study is to improve safety of VIITR by conducting risk profile.

  8. Evolutionary consequences of a large duplication event in Trypanosoma brucei: Chromosomes 4 and 8 are partial duplicons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Andrew P

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene order along the genome sequence of the human parasite Trypanosoma brucei provides evidence for a 0.5 Mb duplication, comprising the 3' regions of chromosomes 4 and 8. Here, the principal aim was to examine the contribution made by this duplication event to the T. brucei genome sequence, emphasising the consequences for gene content and the evolutionary change subsequently experienced by paralogous gene copies. The duplicated region may be browsed online at http://www.genedb.org/genedb/tryp/48dup_image.jsp Results Comparisons of trypanosomatid genomes demonstrated widespread gene loss from each duplicon, but also showed that 47% of duplicated genes were retained on both chromosomes as paralogous loci. Secreted and surface-expressed genes were over-represented among retained paralogs, reflecting a bias towards important factors at the host-parasite interface, and consistent with a dosage-balance hypothesis. Genetic divergence in both coding and regulatory regions of retained paralogs was bimodal, with a deficit in moderately divergent paralogs; in particular, non-coding sequences were either conserved or entirely remodelled. The conserved paralogs included examples of remarkable sequence conservation, but also considerable divergence of both coding and regulatory regions. Sequence divergence typically displayed strong negative selection; but several features, such as asymmetric evolutionary rates, positively-selected codons and other non-neutral substitutions, suggested that divergence of some paralogs was driven by functional change. The absence of orthologs to retained paralogs in T. congolense indicated that the duplication event was specific to T. brucei. Conclusion The duplication of this chromosomal region doubled the dosage of many genes. Rather than creating 'more of the same', these results show that paralogs were structurally modified according to various evolutionary trajectories. The retention of paralogs, and

  9. Mechanisms of Evolution in High-Consequence Drug Resistance Plasmids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susu He

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The dissemination of resistance among bacteria has been facilitated by the fact that resistance genes are usually located on a diverse and evolving set of transmissible plasmids. However, the mechanisms generating diversity and enabling adaptation within highly successful resistance plasmids have remained obscure, despite their profound clinical significance. To understand these mechanisms, we have performed a detailed analysis of the mobilome (the entire mobile genetic element content of a set of previously sequenced carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE from the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center. This analysis revealed that plasmid reorganizations occurring in the natural context of colonization of human hosts were overwhelmingly driven by genetic rearrangements carried out by replicative transposons working in concert with the process of homologous recombination. A more complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms and evolutionary forces driving rearrangements in resistance plasmids may lead to fundamentally new strategies to address the problem of antibiotic resistance.

  10. Experimental consequences of quantum critical points at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, D. C.; Rodière, P.; Núñez, M.; Garbarino, G.; Sulpice, A.; Marcus, J.; Gay, F.; Continentino, M. A.; Núñez-Regueiro, M.

    2015-11-01

    We study the C r1 -xR ex phase diagram finding that its phase transition temperature towards an antiferromagnetic order TN follows a quantum [(xc-x ) /xc ] ψ law, with ψ =1 /2 , from the quantum critical point (QCP) at xc=0.25 up to TN≈600 K . We compare this system to others in order to understand why this elemental material is affected by the QCP up to such unusually high temperatures. We determine a general criterion for the crossover, as a function of an external parameter such as concentration, from the region controlled solely by thermal fluctuations to that where quantum effects become observable. The properties of materials with low coherence lengths will thus be altered far away from the QCP.

  11. Statistical Surrogate Models for Estimating Probability of High-Consequence Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, R.; Constantine, P.; Boslough, M.

    2011-12-01

    We have posed the climate change problem in a framework similar to that used in safety engineering, by acknowledging that probabilistic risk assessments focused on low-probability, high-consequence climate events are perhaps more appropriate than studies focused simply on best estimates. To properly explore the tails of the distribution requires extensive sampling, which is not possible with existing coupled atmospheric models due to the high computational cost of each simulation. We have developed specialized statistical surrogate models (SSMs) that can be used to make predictions about the tails of the associated probability distributions. A SSM is different than a deterministic surrogate model in that it represents each climate variable of interest as a space/time random field, that is, a random variable for every fixed location in the atmosphere at all times. The SSM can be calibrated to available spatial and temporal data from existing climate databases, or to a collection of outputs from general circulation models. Because of its reduced size and complexity, the realization of a large number of independent model outputs from a SSM becomes computationally straightforward, so that quantifying the risk associated with low-probability, high-consequence climate events becomes feasible. A Bayesian framework was also developed to provide quantitative measures of confidence, via Bayesian credible intervals, to assess these risks. To illustrate the use of the SSM, we considered two collections of NCAR CCSM 3.0 output data. The first collection corresponds to average December surface temperature for years 1990-1999 based on a collection of 8 different model runs obtained from the Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison (PCMDI). We calibrated the surrogate model to the available model data and make various point predictions. We also analyzed average precipitation rate in June, July, and August over a 54-year period assuming a cyclic Y2K ocean model. We

  12. Achieving High Resolution Timer Events in Virtualized Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Blazej; Chydzinski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Virtual Machine Monitors (VMM) have become popular in different application areas. Some applications may require to generate the timer events with high resolution and precision. This however may be challenging due to the complexity of VMMs. In this paper we focus on the timer functionality provided by five different VMMs-Xen, KVM, Qemu, VirtualBox and VMWare. Firstly, we evaluate resolutions and precisions of their timer events. Apparently, provided resolutions and precisions are far too low for some applications (e.g. networking applications with the quality of service). Then, using Xen virtualization we demonstrate the improved timer design that greatly enhances both the resolution and precision of achieved timer events.

  13. The High Latitude D Region During Electron Precipitation Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargreaves, J. K.; Collis, P. N.; Korth, A.

    1984-01-01

    The fluxes of energetic electrons entering the high-latitude atmosphere during auroral radio absorption events and their effect on the electron density in the auroral D region are discussed. An attempt was made to calculate the radio absorption during precipitation events from the fluxes of energetic electrons measured at geosynchronous orbit, and then to consider the use of absorption measurements to indicate the magnetospheric particle fluxes, the production rates, and electron densities in the D region.

  14. High latitude D region during electron precipitation events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargreaves, J.K.; Collis, P.N.; Korth, A.

    1984-05-01

    The fluxes of energetic electrons entering the high-latitude atmosphere during auroral radio absorption events and their effect on the electron density in the auroral D region are discussed. An attempt was made to calculate the radio absorption during precipitation events from the fluxes of energetic electrons measured at geosynchronous orbit, and then to consider the use of absorption measurements to indicate the magnetospheric particle fluxes, the production rates, and electron densities in the D region.

  15. High-Resolution Structural Monitoring of Ionospheric Absorption Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    figure 1, taken from observations by the 30 MHz riometer operating at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ) facility in Alaska...1200 UTC and persisting for the next two days. Figure 3 shows two records from the HAARP 30 MHz riometer, pasted together to cover 20 November 2003...absorption event seen by HAARP 30 MHz riometer. Figure 2: Electron depletion event 8 observed by HEO-3 satellite on 20 November 2003. Figure 3

  16. Estimating regional long-term economic consequences of natural hazards - a case study of the 2005 flood event in Tyrol (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfurtscheller, C.; Lochner, B.; Brucker, A.

    2012-04-01

    The interaction of relief-driven alpine natural processes with the anthropogenic sphere often leads to natural disasters which significantly impact on remote alpine economies. When evaluating the effects of such events for future risk prevention strategies, it is essential to assess indirect losses. While the economic measurement of direct effects - the physical impact on structures and infrastructure - seems fairly manageable, less is known about the dimensions of indirect effects, especially on a local and regional scale within the Alps. The lack of standardized terminology, empirical data and methods to estimate indirect economic effects currently hampers profound decision support. In our study of the 2005 flood event in Tyrol, we surveyed companies from all sectors of the economy to identify the main drivers of indirect effects and interrupted economic flows. In collaboration with the Federal State administration, we extrapolate the total regional economic effects of this catastrophic event. Using quantitative and qualitative methods, we established and analysed a data pool of questionnaire and interview results as well as direct loss data. We mainly focus on the decrease in value creation and the negative impacts on tourism. We observed that disrupted traffic networks can have a highly negative impact, especially for the tourism sector in lateral alpine valleys. Within a month, turnover fell by approximately EUR 3.3 million in the investigated area. In the short run (until August 2006), the shortfall in touristic revenues in the Paznaun valley aggregated to approx. EUR 5.3 million. We observed that overnight stays rebound very quickly so that long-term effects are marginal. In addition, we tried to identify possible economical losers as well as winners of severe hazard impacts. In response to such flood events, high investments are made to improve disaster and risk management. Nearly 70% of the respondents specified the (re)construction sector and similar

  17. An ATLAS event with a high mass dijet system

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Experiment

    2014-01-01

    Event with a high mass dijet system: the invariant mass of the two highest-pT jets is 2.55 TeV. The highest pT jet has a pT of 420 GeV, and an eta of -1.51, the second leading jet has pT of 320 GeV and an eta of 2.32. Jet momenta are calibrated according to the "EM+JES" scheme. No other jets are found with pT above 20 GeV. Event collected on 4 July 2010.

  18. A highly asymmetric dijet event of the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Experiment

    2014-01-01

    A highly asymmetric dijet event, with one jet with ET > 100 GeV and no evident recoiling jet, and with high energy calorimeter cell deposits distributed over a wide azimuthal region. Only tracks with pT > 2.6 GeV are shown, and only calorimeter energy deposits with cell energy ET > 700 MeV in the electromagnetic calorimeter, and E > 1 GeV in the hadronic calorimeter.

  19. A database of high-impact weather events in Greece: a descriptive impact analysis for the period 2001–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Papagiannaki

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces the development of a database of high-impact weather events that occurred in Greece since 2001. The selected events are related to the occurrence of floods, flash floods, hail, snow/frost, tornados, windstorms, heat waves and lightning with adverse consequences (excluding those related to agriculture. The database includes, among others, the geographical distribution of the recorded events, relevant meteorological data, a brief description of the induced impacts and references in the press. This paper further offers an extensive analysis of the temporal and spatial distribution of high-impact weather events for the period 2001–2011, taking into account the intensity of weather conditions and the consequent impact on the society. Analysis of the monthly distribution of high-impact weather events showed that they are more frequent during October and November. More than 80 people lost their lives, half of which due to flash floods. In what concerns the spatial distribution of high-impact weather events, among the 51 prefectures of the country, Attica, Thessaloniki, Elia and Halkidiki were the most frequently affected areas, mainly by flash floods. Significant was also the share of tornados in Elia, of windstorms in Attica, of lightning and hail events in Halkidiki and of snow/frost events in Thessaloniki.

  20. Morphology of High-Multiplicity Events in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Naselsky, P; Christensen, P R; Damgaard, P H; Frejsel, A; Gaardhøje, J J; Hansen, A; Hansen, M; Kim, J; Verkhodanov, O; Wiedemann, U A

    2012-01-01

    We discuss opportunities that may arise from subjecting high-multiplicity events in relativistic heavy ion collisions to an analysis similar to the one used in cosmology for the study of fluctuations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). To this end, we discuss examples of how pertinent features of heavy ion collisions including global characteristics, signatures of collective flow and event-wise fluctuations are visually represented in a Mollweide projection commonly used in CMB analysis, and how they are statistically analyzed in an expansion over spherical harmonic functions. If applied to the characterization of purely azimuthal dependent phenomena such as collective flow, the expansion coefficients of spherical harmonics are seen to contain redundancies compared to the set of harmonic flow coefficients commonly used in heavy ion collisions. Our exploratory study indicates, however, that these redundancies may offer novel opportunities for a detailed characterization of those event-wise fluctuations t...

  1. Achieving High Resolution Timer Events in Virtualized Environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blazej Adamczyk

    Full Text Available Virtual Machine Monitors (VMM have become popular in different application areas. Some applications may require to generate the timer events with high resolution and precision. This however may be challenging due to the complexity of VMMs. In this paper we focus on the timer functionality provided by five different VMMs-Xen, KVM, Qemu, VirtualBox and VMWare. Firstly, we evaluate resolutions and precisions of their timer events. Apparently, provided resolutions and precisions are far too low for some applications (e.g. networking applications with the quality of service. Then, using Xen virtualization we demonstrate the improved timer design that greatly enhances both the resolution and precision of achieved timer events.

  2. THE IMPORTANCE OF AFFECT TO BUILD CONSUMER TRUST IN HIGH-CONSEQUENCES EXCHANGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mellina da Silva Terres

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article investigates the importance of affect displayed by service provider to build consumer trust in high consequence exchanges. High-consequence exchanges are difficult situations in which the choices present a dilemma that can cause stress and severe emotional reactions (KAHN; LUCE, 2003. In this specific case, trust based on affect seems to become important; mainly because consumers may not have ability to evaluate the cognitive aspects of the situation, and moreover, a medical services failure can be highly problematic or even fatal (LEISEN; HYMAN, 2004. On the other hand, in low-consequence choices, we are predicting that cognition will be more important than affect in building trust. In this kind of situation, patients are more self-confident, less sensitive, and don’t perceive a high probability of loss (KUNREUTHER et al., 2002, and therefore focuses more on the rational outcomes.

  3. Awareness of Consequence of High School Students on Loss of Bio-Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasot, Nazim; Özbas, Serap

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the egoistic, altruistic and biospheric awareness of the consequence of high school students regarding the loss of bio-diversity, then comparing the results on the basis of some independent variables (gender, class and family income). The research data were collected from 884 ninth and tenth grade high school…

  4. 49 CFR 195.452 - Pipeline integrity management in high consequence areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... as to fall within the definition in § 195.450 of a high population area or other populated area, the... protection history; (iv) Product transported; (v) Operating stress level; (vi) Existing or projected... failure would affect the high consequence area, such as location of the water intake. (h) What...

  5. High resolution simulations of extreme weather event in south Sardinia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessy, C.

    2010-05-01

    In the last decade, like most region of Mediterranean Europe, Sardinia has experienced severe precipitation events generating flash floods resulting in loss of lives and large economic damage. A numerical meteorological operational set-up is applied in the local weather service with the aim to improve the operational short range weather forecast of the Service with particular attention to intense, mostly rare and potentially severe, events. On the early hours of 22 October 2008 an intense and almost stationary mesoscale convective system interested particularly the south of Sardinia, heavy precipitation caused a flash flood with fatalities and numerous property damages. The event was particularly intense: about 400 mm of rain in 12 hours (a peak of 150 mm in an hour) were misured by the regional network of weather stations and these values appear extremely meaningfulls since those are about seven times the climatological monthly rainfall for that area and nearly the climatological annual rainfall. With the aim to improve significantly quantitative precipitation forecasting, it was evaluated a different set-up of a high resolution convection resolving model (MM5) initialised with different initial and boundary conditions (ECMWF and NCAR). In this paper it is discussed the meteorological system related to the mentioned event by using different numerical weather models (GCM and LAM) combined with conventional data, radar Doppler and Meteosat images. Preliminary results say that a different set-up of a non hydrostatic model can forecast severe convection events in advance of about one day and produce more realistic rainfall than that current operational and also improve the weather forecasts to respect the ECMWF-GCM. So it could drive an operational alert system in order to limit the risks associated with heavy precipitation events.

  6. A review of research and methods for producing high-consequence software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, E.; Dalton, L.; Peercy, D.; Pollock, G.; Sicking, C.

    1994-12-31

    The development of software for use in high-consequence systems mandates rigorous (formal) processes, methods, and techniques to improve the safety characteristics of those systems. This paper provides a brief overview of current research and practices in high-consequence software, including applied design methods. Some of the practices that are discussed include: fault tree analysis, failure mode effects analysis, petri nets, both hardware and software interlocks, n-version programming, Independent Vulnerability Analyses, and watchdogs. Techniques that offer improvement in the dependability of software in high-consequence systems applications are identified and discussed. Limitations of these techniques are also explored. Research in formal methods, the cleanroom process, and reliability models are reviewed. In addition, current work by several leading researchers as well as approaches being used by leading practitioners are examined.

  7. Short-term changes in a microplankton community in the Chukchi Sea during autumn: consequences of a strong wind event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Naoya; Matsuno, Kohei; Ichinomiya, Mutsuo; Yamaguchi, Atsushi; Nishino, Shigeto; Onodera, Jonaotaro; Inoue, Jun; Kikuchi, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies indicate an increase in atmospheric turbulence in the Chukchi Sea due to the recent drastic sea-ice reduction during summer months. The importance of the effects of this atmospheric turbulence on the marine ecosystem in this region, however, is not fully understood. To evaluate the effects of atmospheric turbulence on the marine ecosystem, high-frequency sampling (daily) from five layers of the microplankton community between 0 and 30 m at a fixed station in the Chukchi Sea from 10 through 25 September 2013 was conducted. During the study period, a strong wind event (SWE) was observed on 18 and 19 September. The abundance of microplankton was 2.6 to 17.6 cells mL-1, with a maximum abundance being reported at 20 m on 22 September, while diatoms were the most dominant taxa throughout the study period. The abundance of diatoms, dinoflagellates and ciliates ranged between 1.6 and 14.1, 0.5 and 2.4 and 0.1 and 2.8 cells mL-1, respectively. Diatoms belonging to 7 genera consisting of 35 species (Cylindrotheca closterium and Leptocylindrus danicus were dominant), dinoflagellates belonging to 7 genera consisting of 25 species (Prorocentrum balticum and Gymnodinium spp. were dominant) and ciliates belonging to 7 genera consisting of 8 species (Strobilidium spp. and Strombidium spp. were dominant) were identified. Within the microplankton species, there were 11 species with abundances that increased after the SWE, while there was no species with an abundance that decreased following the SWE. It is conjectured that atmospheric turbulences, such as that of an SWE, may supply sufficient nutrients to the surface layer that subsequently enhance the small bloom under the weak stratification of the Chukchi Sea Shelf during the autumn months. After the bloom, the dominant diatom community then shifts from centric-dominated to one where centric/pennate are more equal in abundance.

  8. Boundary Layer Ventilation Processes During a High Pressure Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, S. L.; Dacre, H. F.; Belcher, S. E.

    2006-12-01

    It is often assumed that ventilation of the atmospheric boundary layer is weak during high pressure events. But is this always true? Here we investigate the processes responsible for ventilation of the atmospheric boundary layer during a high pressure event that occured on the 9 May 2005 using the UK Met Office Unifed Model. Pollution sources are represented by the constant emission of a passive tracer everywhere over land. The ventilation processes observed include a sea breeze circulation, turbulent mixing across the top of the boundary layer followed by large-scale ascent, and shallow convection. Vertical distributions of tracer are validated with AMPEP (Aircraft Measurement of chemical Processing Export fluxes of Pollutants over the UK) CO aircraft measurements and are shown to agree impressively well. Budget calculations of tracers are performed in order to determine the relative importance of these ventilation processes. The sea breeze circulation was found to ventilate 26% of the boundary layer tracer by sunset of which 2% was above 2km. A combination of the sea breeze circulation and turbulent mixing ventilated 46% of the boundary layer tracer, of which 10% was above 2km. Finally, the sea breeze circulation, turbulent mixing and shallow convection processes together ventilated 52% of the tracer into the free troposphere, of which 26% was above 2km. Hence this study shows that signicant ventilation of the boundary layer can occur during high pressure events; turbulent mixing and convection processes can double the amount of pollution ventilated from the boundary layer.

  9. Risk factors for acute chemical releases with public health consequences: Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance in the U.S., 1996–2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaye Wendy E

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Releases of hazardous materials can cause substantial morbidity and mortality. To reduce and prevent the public health consequences (victims or evacuations from uncontrolled or illegally released hazardous substances, a more comprehensive analysis is needed to determine risk factors for hazardous materials incidents. Methods Hazardous Substances Emergency Events Surveillance (HSEES data from 1996 through 2001 were analyzed using bivariate and multiple logistic regression. Fixed-facility and transportation-related events were analyzed separately. Results For fixed-facility events, 2,327 (8% resulted in at least one victim and 2,844 (10% involved ordered evacuations. For transportation-related events, 759 (8% resulted in at least one victim, and 405 (4% caused evacuation orders. Fire and/or explosion were the strongest risk factors for events involving either victims or evacuations. Stratified analysis of fixed-facility events involving victims showed a strong association for acid releases in the agriculture, forestry, and fisheries industry. Chlorine releases in fixed-facility events resulted in victims and evacuations in more industry categories than any other substance. Conclusions Outreach efforts should focus on preventing and preparing for fires and explosions, acid releases in the agricultural industry, and chlorine releases in fixed facilities.

  10. Plastic Instabilities and Their Consequences in Steels and Other High Strength Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    rate yes Superalloys * Alloy 600 quasi-static no Rend 41 quasi-static no Steels * HY80 quasi-static no ultra-soft5 no low temperatures no AISI 4340...AD-A240 976 ([f) A Final Technical Report Contract No. N00014-88-K-0111 S PLASTIC INSTABILITIES AND THEIR CONSEQUENCES IN STEELS AND OTHER HIGH...PLASTIC INSTABILITIES AND THEIR CONSEQUENCES IN STEELS AND OTHER HIGH STRENGTH ALLOYS Submitted to: Office of Naval Research 800 North Quincy Street

  11. Microlensing by Multiple Planets in High Magnification Events

    CERN Document Server

    Gaudi, B S; Sackett, P D; Sackett, Penny D.

    1998-01-01

    Microlensing is increasingly gaining recognition as a powerful method for the detection and characterization of extra-solar planetary systems. Naively, one might expect that the probability of detecting the influence of more than one planet on any single microlensing light curve would be small. Recently, however, Griest & Safizadeh (1998) have shown that, for a subset of events, those with minimum impact parameter $u_{min} \\lsim 0.1$ (high magnification events), the detection probability is nearly 100% for Jovian mass planets with projected separations in the range 0.6--1.6 of the primary Einstein ring radius $R_E$, and remains substantial outside this zone. In this Letter, we point out that this result implies that, regardless of orientation, all Jovian mass planets with separations near 0.6--1.6$R_E$ dramatically affect the central region of the magnification pattern, and thus have a significant probability of being detected (or ruled out) in high magnification events. The probability, averaged over all...

  12. Short-term changes in a microplankton community in the Chukchi Sea during autumn: consequences of a strong wind event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yokoi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An increase in atmospheric turbulence in the Chukchi Sea due to the recent drastic sea-ice reduction during summer months has been reported. The importance of the effects of this atmospheric turbulence on the marine ecosystem in this region, however, is not fully understood. To evaluate the effects of atmospheric turbulence on the marine ecosystem, high-frequency sampling (daily from five layers of the microplankton community between 0 and 30 m at a fixed station in the Chukchi Sea from 10 through 25 September 2013 was conducted. During the study period, a strong wind event (SWE was observed on 18 and 19 September. The abundance of microplankton was 2.6 to 17.6 cells mL−1, with a maximum abundance reported at 20 m on 22 September, while diatoms were the most dominant taxa throughout the study period. The abundances of diatoms, dinoflagellates and ciliates ranged between 1.6 and 14.1, 0.5 and 2.4 cells mL−1 and 0.1 and 2.8 cells mL−1, respectively. Diatoms belonging to seven genera consisting of 35 species (Cylindrotheca closterium and Leptocylindrus danicus were dominant, dinoflagellates belonging to seven genera consisting of 25 species (Prorocentrum balticum and Gymnodinium spp. were dominant and ciliates belonging to seven genera consisting of eight species (Strobilidium spp. and Strombidium spp. were dominant were identified. Within the microplankton species, there were 11 species whose abundance increased after the SWE, while there was no species whose abundance decreased following the SWE. It is conjectured that atmospheric turbulences, such as that of an SWE, may supply sufficient nutrients to the surface layer that then enhance the small bloom under the weak stratification of the Chukchi Sea shelf during the autumn months. After the bloom, the dominant diatom community then shifts from a centric diatom to a pennate diatom, thus suggesting that an SWE accelerates the seasonal succession of the microplankton community from summer to

  13. Household Consequences of High Fertility in Pakistan. World Bank Discussion Paper Series No. 111.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Susan Hill; And Others

    The theory and evidence of the consequences of high fertility in Pakistan are reviewed in this paper. Several data sets are analyzed to examine the effects of the number of children on school participation and labor participation in urban Pakistan. Other data are utilized to examine the effects of children on savings in urban and rural areas.…

  14. 49 CFR 192.905 - How does an operator identify a high consequence area?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SAFETY TRANSPORTATION OF NATURAL AND OTHER GAS BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Gas... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false How does an operator identify a high consequence area? 192.905 Section 192.905 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued...

  15. Key drivers and economic consequences of high-end climate scenarios: uncertainties and risks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halsnæs, Kirsten; Kaspersen, Per Skougaard; Drews, Martin

    2015-01-01

    of extreme events and damage costs is developed and applied to a case study of urban flooding for the medium sized Danish city of Odense. Moving from our current climate to higher atmospheric greenhouse gas (GHG) concentrations including a 2°, 4°, and a high-end 6°C scenario implies that the frequency...... of extreme events increase beyond scaling, and in combination with economic assumptions we find a very wide range of risk estimates for urban precipitation events. A sensitivity analysis addresses 32 combinations of climate scenarios, damage cost curve approaches, and economic assumptions, including risk...... in determining the risks of extreme climate events and, thereby, of the level of cost-effective adaptation seen from the society’s point of view....

  16. High resolution modelling of extreme precipitation events in urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemerink, Martijn; Volp, Nicolette; Schuurmans, Wytze; Deckers, Dave

    2015-04-01

    The present day society needs to adjust to the effects of climate change. More extreme weather conditions are expected, which can lead to longer periods of drought, but also to more extreme precipitation events. Urban water systems are not designed for such extreme events. Most sewer systems are not able to drain the excessive storm water, causing urban flooding. This leads to high economic damage. In order to take appropriate measures against extreme urban storms, detailed knowledge about the behaviour of the urban water system above and below the streets is required. To investigate the behaviour of urban water systems during extreme precipitation events new assessment tools are necessary. These tools should provide a detailed and integral description of the flow in the full domain of overland runoff, sewer flow, surface water flow and groundwater flow. We developed a new assessment tool, called 3Di, which provides detailed insight in the urban water system. This tool is based on a new numerical methodology that can accurately deal with the interaction between overland runoff, sewer flow and surface water flow. A one-dimensional model for the sewer system and open channel flow is fully coupled to a two-dimensional depth-averaged model that simulates the overland flow. The tool uses a subgrid-based approach in order to take high resolution information of the sewer system and of the terrain into account [1, 2]. The combination of using the high resolution information and the subgrid based approach results in an accurate and efficient modelling tool. It is now possible to simulate entire urban water systems using extreme high resolution (0.5m x 0.5m) terrain data in combination with a detailed sewer and surface water network representation. The new tool has been tested in several Dutch cities, such as Rotterdam, Amsterdam and The Hague. We will present the results of an extreme precipitation event in the city of Schiedam (The Netherlands). This city deals with

  17. Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor V. Karyakin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The 9th ARRCN Symposium 2015 was held during 21st–25th October 2015 at the Novotel Hotel, Chumphon, Thailand, one of the most favored travel destinations in Asia. The 10th ARRCN Symposium 2017 will be held during October 2017 in the Davao, Philippines. International Symposium on the Montagu's Harrier (Circus pygargus «The Montagu's Harrier in Europe. Status. Threats. Protection», organized by the environmental organization «Landesbund für Vogelschutz in Bayern e.V.» (LBV was held on November 20-22, 2015 in Germany. The location of this event was the city of Wurzburg in Bavaria.

  18. Warmer and wetter winters: characteristics and implications of an extreme weather event in the High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Brage B.; Isaksen, Ketil; Benestad, Rasmus E.; Kohler, Jack; Pedersen, Åshild Ø.; Loe, Leif E.; Coulson, Stephen J.; Larsen, Jan Otto; Varpe, Øystein

    2014-11-01

    One predicted consequence of global warming is an increased frequency of extreme weather events, such as heat waves, droughts, or heavy rainfalls. In parts of the Arctic, extreme warm spells and heavy rain-on-snow (ROS) events in winter are already more frequent. How these weather events impact snow-pack and permafrost characteristics is rarely documented empirically, and the implications for wildlife and society are hence far from understood. Here we characterize and document the effects of an extreme warm spell and ROS event that occurred in High Arctic Svalbard in January-February 2012, during the polar night. In this normally cold semi-desert environment, we recorded above-zero temperatures (up to 7 °C) across the entire archipelago and record-breaking precipitation, with up to 98 mm rainfall in one day (return period of >500 years prior to this event) and 272 mm over the two-week long warm spell. These precipitation amounts are equivalent to 25 and 70% respectively of the mean annual total precipitation. The extreme event caused significant increase in permafrost temperatures down to at least 5 m depth, induced slush avalanches with resultant damage to infrastructure, and left a significant ground-ice cover (˜5-20 cm thick basal ice). The ground-ice not only affected inhabitants by closing roads and airports as well as reducing mobility and thereby tourism income, but it also led to high starvation-induced mortality in all monitored populations of the wild reindeer by blocking access to the winter food source. Based on empirical-statistical downscaling of global climate models run under the moderate RCP4.5 emission scenario, we predict strong future warming with average mid-winter temperatures even approaching 0 °C, suggesting increased frequency of ROS. This will have far-reaching implications for Arctic ecosystems and societies through the changes in snow-pack and permafrost properties.

  19. Summary of Aqua, Aura, and Terra High Interest Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Lauri

    2015-01-01

    Single-obs tracking Sparsely tracked objects are an unfortunate reality of CARA operations Terra vs. 32081: new track with bad data was included in OD solution for secondary object and risk became high CARA and JSpOC discussed tracking and OSAs threw out the bad data. Event no longer presented high risk based on new OD Improvement: CARA now sends JSpOC a flag indicating when a single obs is included, so OSAs can evaluate if manual update to OD is required. Missing ASW OCMsAura vs. 87178, TCA: 317 at 08:04 UTC. Post-maneuver risk (conjunction was identified in OO results)CARA confirmed with JSpOC that ASW OCMs should have been received in addition to OO OCMsJSpOC corrected the manual error in their script that prevented the data from being delivered to CARAJSpOC QAd their other scripts to ensure this error did not exist in other places.

  20. Using Cloud Technology to Support Monitoring During High Profile Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Megan; Adighibe, Enyinnaya; Lombardo, Joseph; Loschen, Wayne; Stewart, Miles; Vernon, Michael O.

    2013-01-01

    Objective In May 2012, thousands of protesters, descended on Chicago during the NATO Summit to voice their concern about social and economic inequality. Given the increased numbers of international and domestic visitors to the Windy City and the tension surrounding protesting during the summit, increased monitoring for health events within the city and Chicago metropolitan region was advised. This project represents the first use of cloud technology to support monitoring for a high profile event. Introduction Hospital emergency departments in Cook and surrounding counties currently send data to the Cook County Department of Public Health (CCDPH) instance of ESSENCE on CCDPH servers. The cloud instance of ESSENCE has been enhanced to receive and export all meaningful use data elements in the meaningful use format. The NATO summit provided the opportunity for a demonstration project to assess the ability of an Amazon GovCloud instance of ESSENCE to ingest and process meaningful use data, and to export meaningful use surveillance data to the Cook County Locker in BioSense 2.0. Methods In the three weeks leading up to the NATO Summit, HL7 data extracts were sent to BioSense 2.0 and a data feed was established to the Amazon GovCloud instance of ESSENCE. Queries specific to anticipated health events associated with the summit such as injuries, tear gas exposure, and general exposure, were developed. Several features of the cloud instance of ESSENCE enhanced the ability of CCDPH staff epidemiologists to conduct analyses, including the sharing capabilities of queries and the myESSENCE dashboard feature. The sharing capabilities within the cloud instance of ESSENCE allowed queries to be easily shared with multiple staff epidemiologists and across health jurisdictions. The myESSENCE dashboard feature was used to create dashboards of surveillance results, including time series graphs, maps, and records of interest for relevant queries, that were shared with public health

  1. Actin evolution in ciliates (Protist, Alveolata) is characterized by high diversity and three duplication events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zhenzhen; Huang, Lijuan; Yang, Ran; Lin, Xiaofeng; Song, Weibo

    2016-03-01

    Ciliates possess two distinct nuclear genomes and unique genomic features, including highly fragmented chromosomes and extensive chromosomal rearrangements. Recent transcriptomic surveys have revealed that ciliates have several multi-copy genes providing an ideal template to study gene family evolution. Nonetheless, this process remains little studied in ciliated protozoa and consequently, the evolutionary patterns that govern it are not well understood. In this study, we focused on obtaining fine-scale information relative to ciliate species divergence for the first time. A total of 230 actin gene sequences were derived from this study, among which 217 were from four closely related Pseudokeronopsis species and 13 from other hypotrichous ciliates. Our investigation shows that: (1) At least three duplication events occurred in ciliates: diversification of three actin genes (Actin I, II, III) happened after the divergence of ciliate classes but before that of subclasses. And several recent and genus-specific duplications were followed within Actin I (Sterkiella, Oxytricha, Uroleptus, etc.), Actin II (Sterkiella), respectively. (2) Within the genus Pseudokeronopsis, Actin I gene duplication events happened after P. carnea and P. erythrina diverged. In contrast, in the morphologically similar species P. flava and P. rubra, the duplication event preceded diversification of the two species. The Actin II gene duplication events preceded divergence of the genus Pseudokeronopsis. (3) Phylogenetic analyses revealed that actin is suitable for resolving ciliate classes, but may not be used to infer lower taxon relationships.

  2. Classification of microseismic events in high stress zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO An-ye; DOU Lin-ming; YAN Ru-ling; JIANG Heng; LU Cai-ping; DU Tao-tao; LU Zhen-yu

    2009-01-01

    For the purpose of having a better understanding of failure mechanisms of rock fracturing in mines, the equivalent point source models of tensile, shear and explosive seismic events were established, and the relationship between far-field seismic dis-placements of the waves and the corresponding equivalent forces were analyzed as well. Based on the results of a microseismic monitoring carried out in the mining progress of 9202 working face under the upper remnant coal pillar in Sanhejian Mine, the waveform features of the seismic events associated with different failure modes were further analyzed. The results show that the signals corresponding to different failure mechanisms have different radiation patterns of the seismic displacements, and different characteristics in waveform features, such as dominant frequency, energy released, the ratio of S- to P-wave energy, and so on. In addition, the rock burst happened in the high stress zone is mainly the result of the strong shear fracturing in the mining process. The results of this study have significantly improved the understanding of the characteristics of the failures associated with under-ground mining, and will greatly benefit the prevention and control of rock burst hazards in burst-prone mines.

  3. Genetic consequences of a century of protection: serial founder events and survival of the little spotted kiwi (Apteryx owenii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramstad, Kristina M; Colbourne, Rogan M; Robertson, Hugh A; Allendorf, Fred W; Daugherty, Charles H

    2013-07-07

    We present the outcome of a century of post-bottleneck isolation of a long-lived species, the little spotted kiwi (Apteryx owenii, LSK) and demonstrate that profound genetic consequences can result from protecting few individuals in isolation. LSK were saved from extinction by translocation of five birds from South Island, New Zealand to Kapiti Island 100 years ago. The Kapiti population now numbers some 1200 birds and provides founders for new populations. We used 15 microsatellite loci to compare genetic variation among Kapiti LSK and the populations of Red Mercury, Tiritiri Matangi and Long Islands that were founded with birds from Kapiti. Two LSK native to D'Urville Island were also placed on Long Island. We found extremely low genetic variation and signatures of acute and recent genetic bottleneck effects in all four populations, indicating that LSK have survived multiple genetic bottlenecks. The Long Island population appears to have arisen from a single mating pair from Kapiti, suggesting there is no genetic contribution from D'Urville birds among extant LSK. The Ne/NC ratio of Kapiti Island LSK (0.03) is exceptionally low for terrestrial vertebrates and suggests that genetic diversity might still be eroding in this population, despite its large census size.

  4. Does Alcohol Use Mediate the Association between Consequences Experienced in High School and Consequences Experienced during the First Semester of College?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romosz, Ann Marie; Quigley, Brian M.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 80% of college students drink alcohol; almost half of these students reporting that they drink to get drunk and over 22% engage in heavy episodic drinking. Heavy alcohol consumption during the transition from high school to college is associated with negative personal and academic consequences. Sixty-seven freshmen volunteered to…

  5. Mobilisation or dilution? Nitrate response of karst springs to high rainfall events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Huebsch

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate (NO3- contamination of groundwater associated with agronomic activity is of major concern in many countries. Where agriculture, thin free draining soils and karst aquifers coincide, groundwater is highly vulnerable to nitrate contamination. As residence times and denitrification potential in such systems are typically low, nitrate can discharge to surface waters unabated. However, such systems also react quickest to agricultural management changes that aim to improve water quality. In response to storm events, nitrate concentrations can alter significantly, i.e., rapidly decreasing or increasing concentrations. The current study examines the response of a specific karst spring situated on a grassland farm in south Ireland to rainfall events utilising high-resolution nitrate and discharge data together with on-farm borehole groundwater fluctuation data. Specifically, the objectives of the study are to formulate a scientific hypothesis of possible scenarios relating to nitrate responses during storm events, and to verify this hypothesis using additional case studies from the literature. This elucidates the controlling key factors that lead to mobilisation and/or dilution of nitrate concentrations during storm events. These were land use, hydrological condition and karstification, which in combination can lead to differential responses of mobilised and/or diluted nitrate concentrations. Furthermore, the results indicate that nitrate response in karst is strongly dependent on nutrient source, whether mobilisation and/or dilution occur and the pathway taken. This will have consequences for the delivery of nitrate to a surface water receptor. The current study improves our understanding of nitrate responses in karst systems and therefore can guide environmental modellers, policy makers and drinking water managers with respect to the regulations of the European Union (EU Water Framework Directive (WFD. In future, more research should focus on

  6. Mobilisation or dilution? Nitrate response of karst springs to high rainfall events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebsch, M.; Fenton, O.; Horan, B.; Hennessy, D.; Richards, K. G.; Jordan, P.; Goldscheider, N.; Butscher, C.; Blum, P.

    2014-11-01

    Nitrate (NO3-) contamination of groundwater associated with agronomic activity is of major concern in many countries. Where agriculture, thin free draining soils and karst aquifers coincide, groundwater is highly vulnerable to nitrate contamination. As residence times and denitrification potential in such systems are typically low, nitrate can discharge to surface waters unabated. However, such systems also react quickest to agricultural management changes that aim to improve water quality. In response to storm events, nitrate concentrations can alter significantly, i.e. rapidly decreasing or increasing concentrations. The current study examines the response of a specific karst spring situated on a grassland farm in South Ireland to rainfall events utilising high-resolution nitrate and discharge data together with on-farm borehole groundwater fluctuation data. Specifically, the objectives of the study are to formulate a scientific hypothesis of possible scenarios relating to nitrate responses during storm events, and to verify this hypothesis using additional case studies from the literature. This elucidates the controlling key factors that lead to mobilisation and/or dilution of nitrate concentrations during storm events. These were land use, hydrological condition and karstification, which in combination can lead to differential responses of mobilised and/or diluted nitrate concentrations. Furthermore, the results indicate that nitrate response in karst is strongly dependent on nutrient source, whether mobilisation and/or dilution occur and on the pathway taken. This will have consequences for the delivery of nitrate to a surface water receptor. The current study improves our understanding of nitrate responses in karst systems and therefore can guide environmental modellers, policy makers and drinking water managers with respect to the regulations of the European Union (EU) Water Framework Directive (WFD). In future, more research should focus on the high

  7. High frame-rate neutron radiography of dynamic events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossi, R.H.; Robinson, A.H.; Barton, J.P.

    1981-11-20

    A system has been developed to perform neutron radiographic analysis of dynamic events having a duration of several milliseconds. The system has been operated in the range of 2000 to 10,000 frames/second. Synchronization has provided high-speed-motion neutron radiographs for evaluation of the firing cycle of 7.62 mm munition rounds within a steel rifle barrel. The system has also been used to demonstrate the ability to produce neutron radiographic movies of two-phase flow. The equipment uses the Oregon State University TRIGA reactor capable of pulsing to 3000 MW peak power, a neutron beam collimator, a scintillator neutron conversion screen coupled to an image intensifier, and a 16 mm high speed movie camera. The peak neutron flux incident at the object position is approximately 4 x 10/sup 11/ n/cm/sup 2/s with a pulse, full width at half maximum, of 9 ms. Special studies have been performed on the scintillator conversion screens and on the effects of statistical limitations on the image quality. Modulation transfer function analysis has been used to assist in the evaluation of the system performance.

  8. ATLAS proton-proton event containing two high energy photons

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    An event where two energetic photons ("gammas") are produced in a proton-proton collision in ATLAS. Many events of this type are produced by well-understood Standard Model processes ("backgrounds") which do not involve Higgs particles. A small excess of events of this type with similar masses could indicate evidence for Higgs particle production, but any specific event is most likely to be from the background. The photons are indicated, in the different projections and views, by the clusters of energy shown in yellow.

  9. Global situational awareness and early warning of high-consequence climate change.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.; Carr, Martin J.; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

    2009-08-01

    Global monitoring systems that have high spatial and temporal resolution, with long observational baselines, are needed to provide situational awareness of the Earth's climate system. Continuous monitoring is required for early warning of high-consequence climate change and to help anticipate and minimize the threat. Global climate has changed abruptly in the past and will almost certainly do so again, even in the absence of anthropogenic interference. It is possible that the Earth's climate could change dramatically and suddenly within a few years. An unexpected loss of climate stability would be equivalent to the failure of an engineered system on a grand scale, and would affect billions of people by causing agricultural, economic, and environmental collapses that would cascade throughout the world. The probability of such an abrupt change happening in the near future may be small, but it is nonzero. Because the consequences would be catastrophic, we argue that the problem should be treated with science-informed engineering conservatism, which focuses on various ways a system can fail and emphasizes inspection and early detection. Such an approach will require high-fidelity continuous global monitoring, informed by scientific modeling.

  10. Single event effects in high-energy accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Alía, Rubén; Brugger, Markus; Danzeca, Salvatore; Cerutti, Francesco; de Carvalho Saraiva, Joao Pedro; Denz, Reiner; Ferrari, Alfredo; Foro, Lionel L.; Peronnard, Paul; Røed, Ketil; Secondo, Raffaello; Steckert, Jens; Thurel, Yves; Toccafondo, Iacocpo; Uznanski, Slawosz

    2017-03-01

    The radiation environment encountered at high-energy hadron accelerators strongly differs from the environment relevant for space applications. The mixed-field expected at modern accelerators is composed of charged and neutral hadrons (protons, pions, kaons and neutrons), photons, electrons, positrons and muons, ranging from very low (thermal) energies up to the TeV range. This complex field, which is extensively simulated by Monte Carlo codes (e.g. FLUKA) is due to beam losses in the experimental areas, distributed along the machine (e.g. collimation points) and deriving from the interaction with the residual gas inside the beam pipe. The resulting intensity, energy distribution and proportion of the different particles largely depends on the distance and angle with respect to the interaction point as well as the amount of installed shielding material. Electronics operating in the vicinity of the accelerator will therefore be subject to both cumulative damage from radiation (total ionizing dose, displacement damage) as well as single event effects which can seriously compromise the operation of the machine. This, combined with the extensive use of commercial-off-the-shelf components due to budget, performance and availability reasons, results in the need to carefully characterize the response of the devices and systems to representative radiation conditions.

  11. The single event upset environment for avionics at high latitude

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sims, A.J.; Dyer, C.S.; Peerless, C.L. (Defence Research Agency, Farnborough (United Kingdom). Space and Communications Dept.); Johansson, K.; Pettersson, H. (SAAB Military Aircraft, Linkoeping (Sweden)); Farren, J. (AEA Technology, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom). Harwell Lab.)

    1994-12-01

    Modern avionic systems for civil and military applications are becoming increasingly reliant upon embedded microprocessors and associated memory devices. The phenomenon of single event upset (SEU) is well known in space systems and designers have generally been careful to use SEU tolerant devices or to implement error detection and correction (EDAC) techniques where appropriate. In the past, avionics designers have had no reason to consider SEU effects but is clear that the more prevalent use of memory devices combined with increasing levels of IC integration will make SEU mitigation an important design consideration for future avionic systems. To this end, it is necessary to work towards producing models of the avionics SEU environment which will permit system designers to choose components and EDAC techniques which are based on predictions of SEU rates correct to much better than an order of magnitude. Measurements of the high latitude SEU environment at avionics altitude have been made on board a commercial airliner. Results are compared with models of primary and secondary cosmic rays and atmospheric neutrons. Ground based SEU tests of static RAMs are used to predict rates in flight.

  12. Simulation studies of muon-produced background events deep underground and consequences for double beta decay experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massarczyk, Ralph; Majorana Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Cosmic radiation creates a significant background for low count rate experiments. The Majorana demonstrator experiment is located at the Sanford Underground Research Facility at a depth of 4850ft below the surface but it can still be penetrated by cosmic muons with initial energies above the TeV range. The interaction of muons with the rock, the shielding material in the lab and the detector itself can produce showers of secondary particles, like fast neutrons, which are able to travel through shielding material and can produce high-energy γ-rays via capture or inelastic scattering. The energy deposition of these γ rays in the detector can overlap with energy region of interest for the neutrino-less double beta decay. Recent studies for cosmic muons penetrating the Majorana demonstrator are made with the Geant4 code. The results of these simulations will be presented in this talk and an overview of the interaction of the shower particles with the detector, shielding and veto system will be given. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, the Particle Astrophysics Program of the National Science Foundation, and the Sanford Underground Research Facility. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program.

  13. Particle production in very high-energy cosmic-ray emulsion chamber events usual and unusual events

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, G; Salles, C; Costa, C G S; Halzen, F; Salles, C

    1995-01-01

    We show that a simple scaling model of very forward particle production, consistent with accelerator and air shower data, can describe all features of the very high-energy interactions recorded with emulsion chambers. This is somewhat surprising after numerous claims that the same data implied large scaling violations or new dynamics. Interestingly, we cannot describe some of the Centauro events, suggesting that these events are anomalous independently of their well-advertised unusual features such as the absence of neutral secondaries.

  14. Generating High-Energy Events with Comets, Asteroids, and Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stefano, Rosanne

    2015-08-01

    Many stellar remnants are likely to harbor systems of planetoids: comets, asteroids, and planets. Planetoids also travel freely through interstellar space. A combination of processes can therefore lead to tidal disruption events or collisions between planetoids and compact objects. These collisions can produce events that release a great deal of energy over a short time, and they are potentially detectable, even in external galaxies, by wide-field gamma-ray, X-ray, and optical surveys. We discuss the signatures and the possibility that these events could produce Type Ia supernovae.

  15. Burden and consequences of child maltreatment in high-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Ruth; Widom, Cathy Spatz; Browne, Kevin; Fergusson, David; Webb, Elspeth; Janson, Staffan

    2009-01-03

    Child maltreatment remains a major public-health and social-welfare problem in high-income countries. Every year, about 4-16% of children are physically abused and one in ten is neglected or psychologically abused. During childhood, between 5% and 10% of girls and up to 5% of boys are exposed to penetrative sexual abuse, and up to three times this number are exposed to any type of sexual abuse. However, official rates for substantiated child maltreatment indicate less than a tenth of this burden. Exposure to multiple types and repeated episodes of maltreatment is associated with increased risks of severe maltreatment and psychological consequences. Child maltreatment substantially contributes to child mortality and morbidity and has longlasting effects on mental health, drug and alcohol misuse (especially in girls), risky sexual behaviour, obesity, and criminal behaviour, which persist into adulthood. Neglect is at least as damaging as physical or sexual abuse in the long term but has received the least scientific and public attention. The high burden and serious and long-term consequences of child maltreatment warrant increased investment in preventive and therapeutic strategies from early childhood.

  16. Indirect consequences of extreme weather and climate events and their associations with physical health in coastal Bangladesh: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Beier

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bangladesh is one of the countries in the world which is most prone to natural disasters. The overall situation is expected to worsen, since extreme weather and climate events (EWCE are likely to increase in both frequency and intensity. Indirect consequences caused in the events’ aftermath widen the range of possible adverse health outcomes. Objective: To assess the association of indirect consequences of EWCE and physical health. Design: We used recent cross-sectional self-reported data from 16 coastal villages in Bangladesh. A total of 980 households were surveyed using a structured questionnaire. The outcome of physical health was categorized into three groups, reflecting the severity of reported diseases by the respective source of treatment as a proxy variable (hospital/clinic for severe disease, other source/no treatment for moderate disease, and no disease. The final statistical analysis was conducted using multinomial logistic regression. Results: Severe diseases were significantly associated with drinking water from open sources [odds ratio (OR: 4.26, 95% confidence interval (CI: 2.25–8.09] and tube wells (OR: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.43–4.01, moderate harm by river erosion (OR: 6.24, 95% CI: 2.76–14.11, food scarcity (OR: 1.98, 95% CI: 1.16–3.40, and the perception of increased employment problems (OR: 2.19, 95% CI: 1.18–4.07. Moderate diseases were significantly associated with moderate harm by river erosion (OR: 2.65, 95% CI: 1.28–5.48 and fully experienced food scarcity (OR: 1.75, 95% CI: 1.16–2.63. For both categories, women and the elderly had higher chances for diseases. Conclusions: Indirect consequences of EWCE were found to be associated with adverse health outcomes. Basic needs such as drinking water, food production, and employment opportunities are particularly likely to become threatened by EWCE and, thus, may lead to a higher likelihood of ill-health. Intervention strategies should concentrate on

  17. Indirect consequences of extreme weather and climate events and their associations with physical health in coastal Bangladesh: a cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Dominik; Brzoska, Patrick; Khan, Mobarak Hossain

    2015-01-01

    Background Bangladesh is one of the countries in the world which is most prone to natural disasters. The overall situation is expected to worsen, since extreme weather and climate events (EWCE) are likely to increase in both frequency and intensity. Indirect consequences caused in the events’ aftermath widen the range of possible adverse health outcomes. Objective To assess the association of indirect consequences of EWCE and physical health. Design We used recent cross-sectional self-reported data from 16 coastal villages in Bangladesh. A total of 980 households were surveyed using a structured questionnaire. The outcome of physical health was categorized into three groups, reflecting the severity of reported diseases by the respective source of treatment as a proxy variable (hospital/clinic for severe disease, other source/no treatment for moderate disease, and no disease). The final statistical analysis was conducted using multinomial logistic regression. Results Severe diseases were significantly associated with drinking water from open sources [odds ratio (OR): 4.26, 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.25–8.09] and tube wells (OR: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.43–4.01), moderate harm by river erosion (OR: 6.24, 95% CI: 2.76–14.11), food scarcity (OR: 1.98, 95% CI: 1.16–3.40), and the perception of increased employment problems (OR: 2.19, 95% CI: 1.18–4.07). Moderate diseases were significantly associated with moderate harm by river erosion (OR: 2.65, 95% CI: 1.28–5.48) and fully experienced food scarcity (OR: 1.75, 95% CI: 1.16–2.63). For both categories, women and the elderly had higher chances for diseases. Conclusions Indirect consequences of EWCE were found to be associated with adverse health outcomes. Basic needs such as drinking water, food production, and employment opportunities are particularly likely to become threatened by EWCE and, thus, may lead to a higher likelihood of ill-health. Intervention strategies should concentrate on protection and

  18. Climatic consequences of very high carbon dioxide levels in the earth's early atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, James F.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    1986-01-01

    The possible consequences of very high carbon dioxide concentrations in the earth's early atmosphere have been investigated with a radiative-convective climate model. The early atmosphere would apparently have been stable against the onset of a runaway greenhouse (that is, the complete evaporation of the oceans) for carbon dioxide pressures up to at least 100 bars. A 10- to 20-bar carbon dioxide atmosphere, such as may have existed during the first several hundred million years of the earth's history, would have had a surface temperature of approximately 85 to 110 C. The early stratosphere should have been dry, thereby precluding the possibility of an oxygenic prebiotic atmosphere caused by photodissociation of water vapor followed by escape of hydrogen to space. Earth's present atmosphere also appears to be stable against a carbon dioxide-induced runaway greenhouse.

  19. Risk management & organizational uncertainty implications for the assessment of high consequence organizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, C.T.

    1995-02-23

    Post hoc analyses have demonstrated clearly that macro-system, organizational processes have played important roles in such major catastrophes as Three Mile Island, Bhopal, Exxon Valdez, Chernobyl, and Piper Alpha. How can managers of such high-consequence organizations as nuclear power plants and nuclear explosives handling facilities be sure that similar macro-system processes are not operating in their plants? To date, macro-system effects have not been integrated into risk assessments. Part of the reason for not using macro-system analyses to assess risk may be the impression that standard organizational measurement tools do not provide hard data that can be managed effectively. In this paper, I argue that organizational dimensions, like those in ISO 9000, can be quantified and integrated into standard risk assessments.

  20. Climatic consequences of very high carbon dioxide levels in the earth's early atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, James F.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    1986-01-01

    The possible consequences of very high carbon dioxide concentrations in the earth's early atmosphere have been investigated with a radiative-convective climate model. The early atmosphere would apparently have been stable against the onset of a runaway greenhouse (that is, the complete evaporation of the oceans) for carbon dioxide pressures up to at least 100 bars. A 10- to 20-bar carbon dioxide atmosphere, such as may have existed during the first several hundred million years of the earth's history, would have had a surface temperature of approximately 85 to 110 C. The early stratosphere should have been dry, thereby precluding the possibility of an oxygenic prebiotic atmosphere caused by photodissociation of water vapor followed by escape of hydrogen to space. Earth's present atmosphere also appears to be stable against a carbon dioxide-induced runaway greenhouse.

  1. Particle production in very-high-energy cosmic-ray emulsion chamber events: Usual and unusual events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, C. G. S.; Halzen, F.; Salles, C.

    1995-10-01

    We show that a simple scaling model of very forward particle production, consistent with accelerator and air shower data, can describe the overall features of the very-high-energy interactions recorded with emulsion chambers. The rapidity and transverse momentum distribution of the secondaries are quantitatively reproduced. This is somewhat surprising after numerous claims that the same data implied large scaling violations or new dynamics. Interestingly, we cannot describe some of the Centauro events, suggesting that these events are anomalous independently of their well-advertised unusual features such as the absence of neutral secondaries.

  2. Consequences of high-$x$ proton size fluctuations in small collision systems at RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    McGlinchey, D; Perepelitsa, D V

    2016-01-01

    Recent measurements of jet production rates at large transverse momentum ($p_T$) in the collisions of small projectiles with large nuclei at RHIC and the LHC indicate that they have an unexpected relationship with estimates of the collision centrality. One compelling interpretation of the data is that it captures an $x_p$-dependent decrease in the average interaction strength of the nucleon in the projectile undergoing a hard scattering. A weakly interacting or "shrinking" nucleon in the projectile strikes fewer nucleons in the nucleus, resulting in a particular pattern of centrality-dependent modifications to high-$p_T$ processes. We describe a simple one-parameter geometric implementation of this picture within a modified Monte Carlo Glauber model tuned to $d$$+$Au jet data, and explore two of its major consequences. First, the model predicts a particular projectile-species dependence to the centrality dependence at high-$x_p$, opposite to that expected from an energy loss effect. Second, we find that some ...

  3. Short-term herbivory has long-term consequences in warmed and ambient high Arctic tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Chelsea J.; Cutting, Helen; Alatalo, Juha; Cooper, Elisabeth

    2017-02-01

    Climate change is occurring across the world, with effects varying by ecosystem and region but already occurring quickly in high-latitude and high-altitude regions. Biotic interactions are important in determining ecosystem response to such changes, but few studies have been long-term in nature, especially in the High Arctic. Mesic tundra plots on Svalbard, Norway, were subjected to grazing at two different intensities by captive Barnacle geese from 2003–2005, in a factorial design with warming by Open Top Chambers. Warming manipulations were continued through 2014, when we measured vegetation structure and composition as well as growth and reproduction of three dominant species in the mesic meadow. Significantly more dead vascular plant material was found in warmed compared to ambient plots, regardless of grazing history, but in contrast to many short-term experiments no difference in the amount of living material was found. This has strong implications for nutrient and carbon cycling and could feed back into community productivity. Dominant species showed increased flowering in warmed plots, especially in those plots where grazing had been applied. However, this added sexual reproduction did not translate to substantial shifts in vegetative cover. Forbs and rushes increased slightly in warmed plots regardless of grazing, while the dominant shrub, Salix polaris, generally declined with effects dependent on grazing, and the evergreen shrub Dryas octopetala declined with previous intensive grazing. There were no treatment effects on community diversity or evenness. Thus despite no changes in total live abundance, a typical short-term response to environmental conditions, we found pronounced changes in dead biomass indicating that tundra ecosystem processes respond to medium- to long-term changes in conditions caused by 12 seasons of summer warming. We suggest that while high arctic tundra plant communities are fairly resistant to current levels of climate warming

  4. Physically-based modelling of high magnitude torrent events with uncertainty quantification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing-Yuen Chow, Candace; Ramirez, Jorge; Zimmermann, Markus; Keiler, Margreth

    2017-04-01

    High magnitude torrent events are associated with the rapid propagation of vast quantities of water and available sediment downslope where human settlements may be established. Assessing the vulnerability of built structures to these events is a part of consequence analysis, where hazard intensity is related to the degree of loss sustained. The specific contribution of the presented work describes a procedure simulate these damaging events by applying physically-based modelling and to include uncertainty information about the simulated results. This is a first step in the development of vulnerability curves based on several intensity parameters (i.e. maximum velocity, sediment deposition depth and impact pressure). The investigation process begins with the collection, organization and interpretation of detailed post-event documentation and photograph-based observation data of affected structures in three sites that exemplify the impact of highly destructive mudflows and flood occurrences on settlements in Switzerland. Hazard intensity proxies are then simulated with the physically-based FLO-2D model (O'Brien et al., 1993). Prior to modelling, global sensitivity analysis is conducted to support a better understanding of model behaviour, parameterization and the quantification of uncertainties (Song et al., 2015). The inclusion of information describing the degree of confidence in the simulated results supports the credibility of vulnerability curves developed with the modelled data. First, key parameters are identified and selected based on literature review. Truncated a priori ranges of parameter values were then defined by expert solicitation. Local sensitivity analysis is performed based on manual calibration to provide an understanding of the parameters relevant to the case studies of interest. Finally, automated parameter estimation is performed to comprehensively search for optimal parameter combinations and associated values, which are evaluated using the

  5. High-intensity interval exercise and cerebrovascular health: curiosity, cause, and consequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Samuel J E; Cotter, James D; Brassard, Patrice; Bailey, Damian M

    2015-06-01

    Exercise is a uniquely effective and pluripotent medicine against several noncommunicable diseases of westernised lifestyles, including protection against neurodegenerative disorders. High-intensity interval exercise training (HIT) is emerging as an effective alternative to current health-related exercise guidelines. Compared with traditional moderate-intensity continuous exercise training, HIT confers equivalent if not indeed superior metabolic, cardiac, and systemic vascular adaptation. Consequently, HIT is being promoted as a more time-efficient and practical approach to optimize health thereby reducing the burden of disease associated with physical inactivity. However, no studies to date have examined the impact of HIT on the cerebrovasculature and corresponding implications for cognitive function. This review critiques the implications of HIT for cerebrovascular function, with a focus on the mechanisms and translational impact for patient health and well-being. It also introduces similarly novel interventions currently under investigation as alternative means of accelerating exercise-induced cerebrovascular adaptation. We highlight a need for studies of the mechanisms and thereby also the optimal dose-response strategies to guide exercise prescription, and for studies to explore alternative approaches to optimize exercise outcomes in brain-related health and disease prevention. From a clinical perspective, interventions that selectively target the aging brain have the potential to prevent stroke and associated neurovascular diseases.

  6. Cry me a river: identifying the behavioral consequences of extremely high-stakes interpersonal deception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Brinke, Leanne; Porter, Stephen

    2012-12-01

    Deception evolved as a fundamental aspect of human social interaction. Numerous studies have examined behavioral cues to deception, but most have involved inconsequential lies and unmotivated liars in a laboratory context. We conducted the most comprehensive study to date of the behavioral consequences of extremely high-stakes, real-life deception--relative to comparable real-life sincere displays--via 3 communication channels: speech, body language, and emotional facial expressions. Televised footage of a large international sample of individuals (N = 78) emotionally pleading to the public for the return of a missing relative was meticulously coded frame-by-frame (30 frames/s for a total of 74,731 frames). About half of the pleaders eventually were convicted of killing the missing person on the basis of overwhelming evidence. Failed attempts to simulate sadness and leakage of happiness revealed deceptive pleaders' covert emotions. Liars used fewer words but more tentative words than truth-tellers, likely relating to increased cognitive load and psychological distancing. Further, each of these cues explained unique variance in predicting pleader sincerity.

  7. Surety of human elements of high consequence systems: An organic model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FORSYTHE,JAMES C.; WENNER,CAREN A.

    2000-04-25

    Despite extensive safety analysis and application of safety measures, there is a frequent lament, ``Why do we continue to have accidents?'' Two breakdowns are prevalent in risk management and prevention. First, accidents result from human actions that engineers, analysts and management never envisioned and second, controls, intended to preclude/mitigate accident sequences, prove inadequate. This paper addresses the first breakdown, the inability to anticipate scenarios involving human action/inaction. The failure of controls has been addressed in a previous publication (Forsythe and Grose, 1998). Specifically, this paper presents an approach referred to as surety. The objective of this approach is to provide high levels of assurance in situations where potential system failure paths cannot be fully characterized. With regard to human elements of complex systems, traditional approaches to human reliability are not sufficient to attain surety. Consequently, an Organic Model has been developed to account for the organic properties exhibited by engineered systems that result from human involvement in those systems.

  8. Azimuthal angular correlations in high transverse momentum dijet events

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The azimuthal angle correlation between the two jets with the largest transverse momenta in inclusive 2-jet topologies, close to the back-to-back configuration, is measured for several regions of the leading jet transverse momentum. Measurements of the same observable requiring the presence of extra jets are also presented. The analysis is based on proton-proton collision data collected with the CMS experiment at a center-of-mass energy of $13~\\mathrm{TeV}$ corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $35.9~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$. The results are compared to predictions using Monte Carlo event generators which combine perturbative QCD calculations up to next-to-leading-order accuracy with contributions from parton showers, hadronization, and multiparton interactions.

  9. Aggressive Students and High School Dropout: An Event History Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive students often struggle in multiple domains of their school functioning and are at increased risk for high school dropout. Research has identified a variety of warning flags which are strong predictors of high school dropout. While it is known that aggressive students exhibit many of these warning flags, there is little research which…

  10. Lasting consequences of traumatic events on behavioral and skeletal parameters in a mouse model for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongrun Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD is an anxiety disorder that not only affects mental health, but may also affect bone health. However, there have been no studies to examine the direct relationship between PTSD and bone. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We employed electric shocks in mice to simulate traumatic events that cause PTSD. We also injected the anxiogenic drug FG-7142 prior to electric shocks. Electric shocks created lasting conditioned fear memory in all mice. In young mice, electric shocks elicited not only behavioral response but also skeletal response, and injection of FG-7142 appeared to increase both types of response. For example in behavioral response within the first week, mice shocked alone froze an average of 6.2 sec in 10 sec tests, and mice injected with FG-7142 froze 7.6 sec, both significantly different (P<0.05 from control mice, which only froze 1.3 sec. In skeletal response at week 2, shocks alone reduced 6% bone mineral content (BMC in total body (P = 0.06, while shocks with FG-7142 injection reduced not only 11% BMC (P<0.05 but also 6% bone mineral density (BMD (P<0.05. In addition, FG-7142 injection also caused significant reductions of BMC in specific bones such as femur, lumbar vertebra, and tibia at week 3. Strong negative correlations (R(2 = -0.56, P<0.05 and regression (y = 0.2527-0.0037 * x, P<0.01 between freezing behavior and total body BMC in young mice indicated that increased contextual PTSD-like behavior was associated with reduced bone mass acquisition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This is the first study to document evidence that traumatic events induce lasting consequences on both behavior and skeletal growth, and electric shocks coupled with injection of anxiogenic FG-7142 in young mice can be used as a model to study the effect of PTSD-like symptoms on bone development.

  11. High-impact hydrologic events and atmospheric rivers in California: An investigation using the NCEI Storm Events Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Allison M.; Skelly, Klint T.; Cordeira, Jason M.

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric rivers (ARs) are long, narrow corridors of enhanced integrated water vapor and integrated vapor transport that can result in high-impact hydrologic events (HIHEs) including floods, flash floods, and debris flows. This study examined the relationship between HIHEs and ARs in California for 10 water years by using the National Centers for Environmental Information Storm Events Database and a catalog of landfalling ARs provided by Rutz et al. Results illustrated that HIHEs related to floods and debris flows are commonly associated with ARs during the cold season across Northern California, whereas HIHEs related to flash floods are commonly not associated with ARs during the warm season across Southern California. Composite analyses illustrated that HIHEs associated with landfalling ARs are associated with synoptic-scale flow patterns that support southwesterly water vapor flux that aligns favorably with California coastal topography to maximize upslope flow and orographic precipitation.

  12. High Resolution, Long - Slit Spectroscopy of VY CMa: The Evidence for Localized High Mass Loss Events

    CERN Document Server

    Humphreys, R M; Ruch, G; Wallerstein, G; Humphreys, Roberta M.; Davidson, Kris; Ruch, Gerald; Wallerstein, George

    2004-01-01

    High spatial and spectral resolution spectroscopy of the OH/IR supergiant VY CMa and its circumstellar ejecta reveals evidence for high mass loss events from localized regions on the star occurring over the past 1000 years. The reflected absorption lines and the extremely strong K I emission lines show a complex pattern of velocities in the ejecta. We show that the large, dusty NW arc, expanding at 50 km/sec with respect to the embedded star, is kinematically distinct from the surrounding nebulosity and was ejected about 400 years ago. Other large, more filamentary loops were probably expelled as much as 800 to 1000 years ago while knots and small arcs close to the star resulted from more recent events 100 to 200 years ago. The more diffuse, uniformly distributed gas and dust is surprisingly stationary with little or no velocity relative to the star. This is not what we would expect for the circumstellar material from an evolved red supergiant with a long history of mass loss. We therefore suggest that the hi...

  13. Test of Antonovsky's postulate: high sense of coherence helps people avoid negative life events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochwälder, Jacek

    2015-04-01

    This study tested Antonovsky's postulate that a high sense of coherence (SOC) helps people avoid negative life events. It was assumed that negative life events that were uncontrollable would not show this effect, while those events that potentially could be controlled would show a significant relationship with SOC. 1,012 female nurses (M age=46.9 yr.; SD=8.9) participated in this longitudinal study and were divided into groups with low, moderate, and high SOC. Sixteen negative life events were categorized into uncontrollable and controllable events, with the controllable events divided into three sub-categories. Five one-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs) for independent measures followed up with post hoc tests were performed, with the number of experienced events in a given category by each participant (at Time 2) as the dependent variable and the three SOC groups (formed at Time 1) as the independent variable. The results indicated that the high SOC group reported fewer controllable negative life events, while there was no significant relationship between the SOC level and uncontrollable negative life events. The findings support the postulate in Antonovsky's model, with the distinction between controllable and uncontrollable negative life events.

  14. A high-speed DAQ framework for future high-level trigger and event building clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselle, M.; Ardila Perez, L. E.; Balzer, M.; Dritschler, T.; Kopmann, A.; Mohr, H.; Rota, L.; Vogelgesang, M.; Weber, M.

    2017-03-01

    Modern data acquisition and trigger systems require a throughput of several GB/s and latencies of the order of microseconds. To satisfy such requirements, a heterogeneous readout system based on FPGA readout cards and GPU-based computing nodes coupled by InfiniBand has been developed. The incoming data from the back-end electronics is delivered directly into the internal memory of GPUs through a dedicated peer-to-peer PCIe communication. High performance DMA engines have been developed for direct communication between FPGAs and GPUs using "DirectGMA (AMD)" and "GPUDirect (NVIDIA)" technologies. The proposed infrastructure is a candidate for future generations of event building clusters, high-level trigger filter farms and low-level trigger system. In this paper the heterogeneous FPGA-GPU architecture will be presented and its performance be discussed.

  15. Consequences of hydrological events on the delivery of suspended sediment and associated radionuclides from the Rhone River to the Mediterranean Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eyrolle, Frederique; Antonelli, Christelle; Ferrand, Emmanuelle [IRSN, Saint Paul Lez Durance (France). Pole Radioprotection environnement, dechets et crise, PRP-ENV, Service d' Etude et de Surveillance de la Radioactivite dans l' Environnement; Raimbault, Patrick [Institut Mediterraneen d' Oceanologie, OSU Pytheas, Marseille (France); Aubert, Dominique [CEFREM, Univ. de Perpignan Via Domitia CNRS UMR, Perpignan (France); Jacquet, Stephanie; Radakovitch, Olivier; Raccasi, Guillaume [Aix-Marseille Univ.-CNR-IRD-College de France, Aix en Provence (France); Charmasson, Sabine [IRSN, La Seyne sur mer (France). Pole Radioprotection, environnement, dechets et crise, PRP-ENV, Service d' Etude et de Surveillance de la Radioactivite dans l' Environnement; Gurriaran, Rodolfo [IRSN, Orsay (France). Pole Radioprotection, environnement, dechets et crise, PRP-ENV, Service de Traitement des echantillos et de Metrologie pour l' Environnement

    2012-10-15

    Almost 20 nuclear reactors are situated along the Rhone valley, representing Europe's largest concentration of nuclear power plants. The fate of suspended sediments and natural and artificial particle-bound radionuclides in relation to extreme hydrological events was assessed at the lower course of the Rhone River, which provides the main source of water and sediment inputs to the northwestern Mediterranean Sea. We sampled water at a high frequency over the period 2001-2008 and measured suspended particulate matter (SPM) loads and particle-bound natural and artificial radionuclide concentrations at the SORA observatory station in Arles, France. We monitored various hydrological events (either natural or anthropogenic origin) and characterize their influence on concentrations and fluxes. The relationship between SPM concentration and the very wide range of water discharges did not differ significantly from previous periods, indicating no significant shift in the average sediment delivery over the last 20 years. Unexpected hydrological events of anthropogenic origin, in particular those associated with flushing of reservoirs that are generally not captured by sampling strategies, were recorded and were shown to transfer significant additional sediment and associated contaminants towards the marine environment. Concentrations of anthropogenic radionuclides associated with sediment (i.e., {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 110m}Ag, and Pu isotopes) varied over two to three orders of magnitude during periods of low and moderate flow due to variations in the liquid release from nuclear facilities. Except for Pu isotopes, the concentrations of the various particle-bound radionuclides generally showed a decreasing trend with increasing discharge, revealing the geochemical or anthropogenic background values, and providing a useful flood fingerprint for this large fluvial system before its entry into the marine environment. Our approach produced key data on the

  16. Forecasting extreme wave events in moderate and high sea states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Anne Karin; Reistad, Magnar; Bitner-Gregersen, Elzbieta Maria

    2013-04-01

    Empirical studies on measurements have not yet come to conclusive relations between occurrence of rogue waves and - parameters which could be forecasted . Theoretical and tank experiments have demonstrated that high spectral peakedness and low spectral width combined (high Benjamin-Feir instability index, Onorato et al., 2006) give higher probability of rogue wave occurrence. Directional spread seems to reduce the probability of occurrence of rogue waves in these studies. Many years of experience with forecasting and discussions with people working in ocean environment indicate that rogue waves may as well occur in crossing seas. This was also indicated in a study in the Maxwave project (Toffoli et al., 2003) and the EXTREME SEAS project (Toffoli et al., 2011). We have here experimented with some indexes describing both high BFI and crossing seas and run the WAM model for some North Sea storm cases. Wave distributions measured at Ekofisk are analysed in the different cases. References • Onorato, M., Osborne, A., Serio, M., Cavaleri, L., Brandini, C., and Stansberg, C.: Extreme waves, modulational instability and second order theory: wave flume experiments on irregular waves,Europ. J. Mech. B/Fluids, 25, 586-601, 2006. • Toffoli, A., Lefevre, J.M., Monbaliu, J., Savina, H., and Bitner-Gregersen, E., "Freak Waves:Clues for Prediction in Ship Accidents?", Proc. ISOPE'2003 Conf. Hawai, USA, 2003. • Toffoli A., Bitner-Gregersen E. M., Osborne A. R., Serio M. Monbaliu J., Onorato M. (2011) Extreme Waves in Random Crossing Seas: Laboratory Experiments and Numerical Simulations. Geophys. Res. Lett., Vol. 38, L06605, 5 pp. doi: 10.1029/2011.

  17. [Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a consequence of the interaction between an individual genetic susceptibility, a traumatogenic event and a social context].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auxéméry, Y

    2012-10-01

    pharmacological and a psychotherapeutic treatment even if recommendations are rare. A posttraumatic stress disorder is never just a coincidence. The different stages of the evolution and the establishment of a PTSD are the expression of an interaction between the outside and the inner self. Despite a known progression of the posttraumatic stress disorder, this deleterious evolution is far from being a foregone conclusion. On the contrary, several levels of prevention are possible at each stage of its structuration to propose treatments to subjects who are vulnerable and/or present symptoms. No neurobiological study has yet found a biological marker, which would apparently and inevitably destine a subject to structure, a posttraumatic stress disorder in reaction to a stress. Conversely, the psychopathological study finds afterwards that a particular subject has necessarily built a traumatic repetition syndrome according to the concordance of significant data relative to his/her history. The event strikes a repression or an anterior biographical deadlock and of which the thematic questions the fundamentals of human culture in its emancipation with nature, like the question of death and its consequences: bereavement, parentality, transgenerational transmission and organicity often linked to the illness. A therapeutic proposal constitutes an environmental factor par excellence which can be either protective or deleterious. If the traumatic repetition syndrome has been known since Antiquity, the birth of PTSD has followed the chronology of the DSM according to the sociopolitical contexts encountered. A PTSD does not occur by chance: the conditions of possibility of the trauma are established by genetic and psychological determinants interactively integrated at the heart of a social context. After the increase in a psychotraumatic interest in international publications since the 1980s, a fight against over-victimisation seems to be setting in. The advances in genetic and neuroimaging

  18. Flare vs. Shock Acceleration of High-energy Protons in Solar Energetic Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliver, E. W.

    2016-12-01

    Recent studies have presented evidence for a significant to dominant role for a flare-resident acceleration process for high-energy protons in large (“gradual”) solar energetic particle (SEP) events, contrary to the more generally held view that such protons are primarily accelerated at shock waves driven by coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The new support for this flare-centric view is provided by correlations between the sizes of X-ray and/or microwave bursts and associated SEP events. For one such study that considered >100 MeV proton events, we present evidence based on CME speeds and widths, shock associations, and electron-to-proton ratios that indicates that events omitted from that investigation’s analysis should have been included. Inclusion of these outlying events reverses the study’s qualitative result and supports shock acceleration of >100 MeV protons. Examination of the ratios of 0.5 MeV electron intensities to >100 MeV proton intensities for the Grechnev et al. event sample provides additional support for shock acceleration of high-energy protons. Simply scaling up a classic “impulsive” SEP event to produce a large >100 MeV proton event implies the existence of prompt 0.5 MeV electron events that are approximately two orders of magnitude larger than are observed. While classic “impulsive” SEP events attributed to flares have high electron-to-proton ratios (≳5 × 105) due to a near absence of >100 MeV protons, large poorly connected (≥W120) gradual SEP events, attributed to widespread shock acceleration, have electron-to-proton ratios of ˜2 × 103, similar to those of comparably sized well-connected (W20-W90) SEP events.

  19. LHC collision event at CMS showing two high energy photons (CMS Higgs search)

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    11sec animation of a Higgs->GammaGamma candidate in CMS. Real CMS proton-proton collision events in which two high energy photons (dashed orange lines and towers) are observed. The event shows characteristics expected from the decay of a Higgs boson but is also consistent with background Standard Model physics processes.

  20. LHC collision event at CMS showing four high energy electrons (CMS Higgs search)

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    11sec animation of a Higgs->ZZ->4e candidate in CMS. Real CMS proton-proton collision events in which 4 high energy electrons (orange lines and towers) are observed. The event shows characteristics expected from the decay of a Higgs boson but is also consistent with background Standard Model physics processes.

  1. Cultural Terms for Communication Events among Some American High School Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Leslie A.; Goldsmith, Daena

    1990-01-01

    Examines the natural language descriptions employed by American high school adolescents in talking about the kinds of communication events they experience in everyday life. Finds that adolescents describe communication events through use of setting, participant, speech act, and purpose marker terms. Differentiates nine basic clusters of…

  2. LHC collision event at CMS showing four high energy muons (CMS Higgs search)

    CERN Multimedia

    CMS Collaboration

    2011-01-01

    11sec animation of a Higgs->ZZ->4mu candidate being created CMS . Real CMS proton-proton collision events in which 4 high energy muons (light blue lines) are observed. The event shows characteristics expected from the decay of a Higgs boson but is also consistent with background Standard Model physics processes.

  3. Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy lepton and photon at the Tevatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loginov, Andrey Borisovich [State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation. Inst. for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-01-01

    We present results of a search for the anomalous production of events containing a high-transverse momentum charged lepton (ℓ, either e or μ) and photon (γ), accompanied by missing transverse energy (ET), and/or additional leptons and photons, and jets (X). We use the same kinematic selection criteria as in a previous CDF search, but with a substantially larger data set, 305 pb-1, a p$\\bar{p}$ collision energy of 1.96 TeV, and the upgraded CDF II detector. We find 42 ℓγET events versus a standard model expectation of 37.3 ± 5.4 events. The level of excess observed in Run I, 16 events with an expectation of 7.6 ± 0.7 events (corresponding to a 2.7 σ effect), is not supported by the new data. In the signature of ℓℓγ + X we observe 31 events versus an expectation of 23.0 ± 2.7 events. In this sample we find no events with an extra photon or ET and so find no events like the one eeγγ ET event observed in Run I.

  4. Temporal and spatial variations of high-impact weather events in China during 1959-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Wen, Kangmin; Cui, Linli

    2017-07-01

    The variation and trend in the frequency and duration of four types of high-impact weather (HIW) events were examined using daily surface climate data and linear regression method, and results show that for both the frequency and the duration, the trends of hot weather events were not significant in most parts of China, though for the China as a whole, they had increased with rates of 0.4 days and 0.1 spells of hot weather per decade respectively. The frequency of cold weather events had decreased significantly in most parts of China, particularly in northern, northeastern, and western China, where it increased at rates of 2-8 days per decade in most stations, but the duration of cold weather events were not significant in most parts of China. The frequency of gale weather events had decreased in almost all of China, with a rate of 3.7 days per decade for the China as a whole, and the duration of gale weather events had decreased mainly in northeastern and northern China, western Xinjiang, southwestern Sichuan, and some coastal areas of Liaoning, Shandong, Zhejiang, and Fujian. The frequency of rainstorm weather events was not significant in most parts of China, and the duration of rainstorm weather events was not significant in the whole of China. With global climate change, there would be an increase in the hot and rainstorm weather events, so mitigation/adaptation strategies for such weather events are essential for local government and social public.

  5. Medical costs associated with cardiovascular events among high-risk patients with hyperlipidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonafede MM

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Machaon M Bonafede,1 Barbara H Johnson,1 Akshara Richhariya,2 Shravanthi R Gandra2 1Outcomes Research, Truven Health Analytics, Cambridge, MA, USA; 2Global Health Economics, Amgen, Thousand Oaks, CA, USA Objectives: This study descriptively examined acute and longer term direct medical costs associated with a major cardiovascular (CV event among high-risk coronary heart disease risk-equivalent (CHD-RE patients. It also gives a firsthand look at fatal versus nonfatal CV events. Methods: The MarketScan® Commercial Claims and Encounters Database was used to identify adults with a CV event in 2006–2012 with hyperlipidemia or lipid-lowering therapy use in the 18 months prior to one of the following inpatient CV events: myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, unstable angina, transient ischemic attack, percutaneous coronary intervention, or coronary artery bypass graft (CABG. Patients were required to have a preindex diagnosis of at least one of the following: peripheral arterial disease, abdominal aortic aneurysm, carotid artery disease, or diabetes. A subset analysis was conducted with patients with data linkable to the Social Security Administration Master Death File. Direct medical costs were reported for each quarter following a CV event, for up to 36 months after the first CV event. Results: In total, 38,609 CHD-RE patients were included, mean age 57 years, 31% female. CABG, myocardial infarction, and percutaneous coronary intervention were the most frequent and most expensive first CV events, accounting for >75% of all first CV events with mean first quarter costs ranging from $17,454 (nonfatal transient ischemic attack to $125,690 (fatal CABG. Overall, 15% of those with a first CV event went on to have a second event during the 36-month study period with mean first quarter nonfatal and fatal costs similar to first event levels. Third CV events were rare, happening in less than 3% of patients. Conclusion: CV events among CHD-RE patients were

  6. CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF THE SCHOOL IN HIGH SCHOOL DROPOUT: CASE UNIVERSIDAD AUTÓNOMA DE SINALOA

    OpenAIRE

    Rosalva Ruiz-Ramírez; José Luis García-Cué; María Antonia Pérez-Olvera

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation has the objective to establish the personal, economic and social causes and consequences that create school desertion of high school in Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa (UAS). The investigation took place in the high school located in the municipality of El Fuerte, Sinaloa, in the academic unit (UA) of San Blas and its extensions The Constancia and The Higueras of the Natoches in 2013. A mixed approach was used to analyze qualitative and quantitative information; the...

  7. Method for critical software event execution reliability in high integrity software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidd, M.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on a method called SEER, which provides a high level of confidence that critical software driven event execution sequences faithfully exceute in the face of transient computer architecture failures in both normal and abnormal operating environments.

  8. The Schedule of Racist Events: A Measure of Racial Discrimination and a Study of Its Negative Physical and Mental Health Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrine, Hope; Klonoff, Elizabeth A.

    1996-01-01

    Presents Schedule of Racist Events (SRE), questionnaire for assessing frequency of racial discrimination in lives of blacks. SRE, an 18-item self-report inventory, assesses frequency of specific racist events in past year and in one's entire life, and measures to what extent this discrimination was stressful. Responses (n=153) reveal racism is…

  9. Air Shower Events of High-Energy Cosmic Rays Measured at Seoul, South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Wooram; Shin, Jae-Ik; Kim, Hongki; Lee, Seulgi; Lim, Sunin; Nam, Sinwoo; Yang, Jongmann; Cheon, Byunggu; Bang, Hyungchan; Kwon, Youngjoon

    2011-09-01

    The COsmic ray Research and Education Array (COREA) collaboration has installed an array of six detector stations at two high schools in and near Seoul, Korea for measurement of air-shower events from high-energy cosmic rays. Three stations are installed at each site, where each station consists of four plastic scintillation detectors covering an area of 2m2. In this presentation, we report the currenst status of the COREA project, describing the experimental equipment and measurement of coincident events.

  10. Constructing An Event Based Aerosol Product Under High Aerosol Loading Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, R. C.; Shi, Y.; Mattoo, S.; Remer, L. A.; Zhang, J.

    2016-12-01

    High aerosol loading events, such as the Indonesia's forest fire in Fall 2015 or the persistent wintertime haze near Beijing, gain tremendous interests due to their large impact on regional visibility and air quality. Understanding the optical properties of these events and further being able to simulate and predict these events are beneficial. However, it is a great challenge to consistently identify and then retrieve aerosol optical depth (AOD) from passive sensors during heavy aerosol events. Some reasons include:1). large differences between optical properties of high-loading aerosols and those under normal conditions, 2) spectral signals of optically thick aerosols can be mistaken with surface depending on aerosol types, and 3) Extremely optically thick aerosol plumes can also be misidentified as clouds due to its high optical thickness. Thus, even under clear-sky conditions, the global distribution of extreme aerosol events is not well captured in datasets such as the MODIS Dark-Target (DT) aerosol product. In this study, with the synthetic use of OMI Aerosol Index, MODIS cloud product, and operational DT product, the heavy smoke events over the seven sea region are identified and retrieved over the dry season. An event based aerosol product that would compensate the standard "global" aerosol retrieval will be created and evaluated. The impact of missing high AOD retrievals on the regional aerosol climatology will be studied using this newly developed research product.

  11. Extreme climatic events: impacts of drought and high temperature on physiological processes in agronomically important plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urs eFeller

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Climate models predict more frequent and more severe extreme events (e.g. heat waves, extended drought periods, flooding in many regions for the next decades. The impact of adverse environmental conditions on crop plants is ecologically and economically relevant. This review is focused on drought and heat effects on physiological status and productivity of agronomically important plants. Stomatal opening represents an important regulatory mechanism during drought and heat stress since it influences simultaneously water loss via transpiration and CO2 diffusion into the leaf apoplast which further is utilized in photosynthesis. Along with the reversible short-term control of stomatal opening, stomata and leaf epidermis may produce waxy deposits and irreversibly down-regulate the stomatal conductance and non-stomatal transpiration. As a consequence photosynthesis will be negatively affected. Rubisco activase - a key enzyme in keeping the Calvin cycle functional – is heat-sensitive and may become a limiting factor at elevated temperature. The accumulated reactive oxygen species during stress represent an additional challenge under unfavorable conditions. Drought and heat cause accumulation of free amino acids which are partially converted into compatible solutes such as proline. This is accompanied by lower rates of both nitrate reduction and de novo amino acid biosynthesis. Protective proteins (e.g. dehydrins, chaperones, antioxidant enzymes or the key enzyme for proline biosynthesis play an important role in leaves and may be present at higher levels under water deprivation or high temperatures. On the whole plant level, effects on long-distance translocation of solutes via xylem and phloem and on leaf senescence (e.g. anticipated, accelerated or delayed senescence are important. The factors mentioned above are relevant for the overall performance of crops under drought and heat and must be considered for genotype selection and breeding programs.

  12. Probability, consequences, and mitigation for lightning strikes of Hanford high level waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zach, J.J.

    1996-06-05

    The purpose of this report is to summarize selected lightning issues concerning the Hanford Waste Tanks. These issues include the probability of a lightning discharge striking the area immediately adjacent to a tank including a riser, the consequences of significant energy deposition from a lightning strike in a tank, and mitigating actions that have been or are being taken. The major conclusion of this report is that the probability of a lightning strike deposition sufficient energy in a tank to cause an effect on employees or the public is unlikely;but there are insufficient, quantitative data on the tanks and waste to prove that. Protection, such as grounding of risers and air terminals on existing light poles, is recommended.

  13. Probability, consequences, and mitigation for lightning strikes to Hanford site high-level waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zach, J.J.

    1996-08-01

    The purpose of this report is to summarize selected lightning issues concerning the Hanford Waste Tanks. These issues include the probability of lightning discharge striking the area immediately adjacent to a tank including a riser, the consequences of significant energy deposition from a lightning strike in a tank, and mitigating actions that have been or are being taken. The major conclusion of this report is that the probability of a lightning strike depositing sufficient energy in a tank to cause an effect on employees or the public is unlikely;but there are insufficient, quantitative data on the tanks and waste to prove that. Protection, such as grounding of risers and air terminals on existing light poles, is recommended.

  14. Transformations, transport, and potential unintended consequences of high sulfur inputs to Napa Valley vineyards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinckley, Eve-Lyn S; Matson, Pamela A

    2011-08-23

    Unintended anthropogenic deposition of sulfur (S) to forest ecosystems has a range of negative consequences, identified through decades of research. There has been far less study of purposeful S use in agricultural systems around the world, including the application of elemental sulfur (S(0)) as a quick-reacting fungicide to prevent damage to crops. Here we report results from a three-year study of the transformations and flows of applied S(0) in soils, vegetation, and hydrologic export pathways of Napa Valley, CA vineyards, documenting that all applied S is lost from the vineyard ecosystem on an annual basis. We found that S(0) oxidizes rapidly to sulfate ( ) on the soil surface where it then accumulates over the course of the growing season. Leaf and grape tissues accounted for only 7-13% of applied S whereas dormant season cover crops accounted for 4-10% of applications. Soil S inventories were largely and ester-bonded sulfates; they decreased from 1,623 ± 354 kg ha(-1) during the dry growing season to 981 ± 526 kg ha(-1) (0-0.5 m) during the dormant wet season. Nearly all S applied to the vineyard soils is transported offsite in dissolved oxidized forms during dormant season rainstorms. Thus, the residence time of reactive S is brief in these systems, and largely driven by hydrology. Our results provide new insight into how S use in vineyards constitutes a substantial perturbation of the S cycle in Northern California winegrowing regions and points to the unintended consequences that agricultural S use may have at larger scales.

  15. Framework for modeling high-impact, low-frequency power grid events to support risk-informed decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veeramany, Arun; Unwin, Stephen D.; Coles, Garill A.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; Millard, David W.; Yao, Juan; Glantz, Cliff S.; Gourisetti, Sri N. G.

    2016-06-25

    Natural and man-made hazardous events resulting in loss of grid infrastructure assets challenge the security and resilience of the electric power grid. However, the planning and allocation of appropriate contingency resources for such events requires an understanding of their likelihood and the extent of their potential impact. Where these events are of low likelihood, a risk-informed perspective on planning can be difficult, as the statistical basis needed to directly estimate the probabilities and consequences of their occurrence does not exist. Because risk-informed decisions rely on such knowledge, a basis for modeling the risk associated with high-impact, low-frequency events (HILFs) is essential. Insights from such a model indicate where resources are most rationally and effectively expended. A risk-informed realization of designing and maintaining a grid resilient to HILFs will demand consideration of a spectrum of hazards/threats to infrastructure integrity, an understanding of their likelihoods of occurrence, treatment of the fragilities of critical assets to the stressors induced by such events, and through modeling grid network topology, the extent of damage associated with these scenarios. The model resulting from integration of these elements will allow sensitivity assessments based on optional risk management strategies, such as alternative pooling, staging and logistic strategies, and emergency contingency planning. This study is focused on the development of an end-to-end HILF risk-assessment framework. Such a framework is intended to provide the conceptual and overarching technical basis for the development of HILF risk models that can inform decision-makers across numerous stakeholder groups in directing resources optimally towards the management of risks to operational continuity.

  16. CAUSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF THE SCHOOL IN HIGH SCHOOL DROPOUT: CASE UNIVERSIDAD AUTÓNOMA DE SINALOA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalva Ruiz-Ramírez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation has the objective to establish the personal, economic and social causes and consequences that create school desertion of high school in Universidad Autónoma de Sinaloa (UAS. The investigation took place in the high school located in the municipality of El Fuerte, Sinaloa, in the academic unit (UA of San Blas and its extensions The Constancia and The Higueras of the Natoches in 2013. A mixed approach was used to analyze qualitative and quantitative information; the studied population was 18 women and 17 men deserters of the school cycle 2011-2012, ten teachers, four directors and twenty non-deserting students. In the results one can see that the principal factor for school desertion was the personnel to be married and not approving classes. The main consequence was economic, highlighting that the poverty cycle is hard to break.

  17. Optimization of high count rate event counting detector with Microchannel Plates and quad Timepix readout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tremsin, A.S., E-mail: ast@ssl.berkeley.edu; Vallerga, J.V.; McPhate, J.B.; Siegmund, O.H.W.

    2015-07-01

    Many high resolution event counting devices process one event at a time and cannot register simultaneous events. In this article a frame-based readout event counting detector consisting of a pair of Microchannel Plates and a quad Timepix readout is described. More than 10{sup 4} simultaneous events can be detected with a spatial resolution of ~55 µm, while >10{sup 3} simultaneous events can be detected with <10 µm spatial resolution when event centroiding is implemented. The fast readout electronics is capable of processing >1200 frames/sec, while the global count rate of the detector can exceed 5×10{sup 8} particles/s when no timing information on every particle is required. For the first generation Timepix readout, the timing resolution is limited by the Timepix clock to 10–20 ns. Optimization of the MCP gain, rear field voltage and Timepix threshold levels are crucial for the device performance and that is the main subject of this article. These devices can be very attractive for applications where the photon/electron/ion/neutron counting with high spatial and temporal resolution is required, such as energy resolved neutron imaging, Time of Flight experiments in lidar applications, experiments on photoelectron spectroscopy and many others.

  18. High-Performance Monitoring Architecture for Large-Scale Distributed Systems Using Event Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maly, K.

    1998-01-01

    Monitoring is an essential process to observe and improve the reliability and the performance of large-scale distributed (LSD) systems. In an LSD environment, a large number of events is generated by the system components during its execution or interaction with external objects (e.g. users or processes). Monitoring such events is necessary for observing the run-time behavior of LSD systems and providing status information required for debugging, tuning and managing such applications. However, correlated events are generated concurrently and could be distributed in various locations in the applications environment which complicates the management decisions process and thereby makes monitoring LSD systems an intricate task. We propose a scalable high-performance monitoring architecture for LSD systems to detect and classify interesting local and global events and disseminate the monitoring information to the corresponding end- points management applications such as debugging and reactive control tools to improve the application performance and reliability. A large volume of events may be generated due to the extensive demands of the monitoring applications and the high interaction of LSD systems. The monitoring architecture employs a high-performance event filtering mechanism to efficiently process the large volume of event traffic generated by LSD systems and minimize the intrusiveness of the monitoring process by reducing the event traffic flow in the system and distributing the monitoring computation. Our architecture also supports dynamic and flexible reconfiguration of the monitoring mechanism via its Instrumentation and subscription components. As a case study, we show how our monitoring architecture can be utilized to improve the reliability and the performance of the Interactive Remote Instruction (IRI) system which is a large-scale distributed system for collaborative distance learning. The filtering mechanism represents an Intrinsic component integrated

  19. Occurrence of weak, sub-micron, tropospheric aerosol events at high Arctic latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, N. T.; Pancrati, O.; Baibakov, K.; Eloranta, E.; Batchelor, R. L.; Freemantle, J.; McArthur, L. J. B.; Strong, K.; Lindenmaier, R.

    2008-07-01

    Numerous fine mode (sub-micron) aerosol optical events were observed during the summer of 2007 at the High Arctic atmospheric observatory (PEARL) located at Eureka, Nunavut, Canada. Half of these events could be traced to forest fires in southern and eastern Russia and the Northwest Territories of Canada. The most notable findings were that (a) a combination of ground-based measurements (passive sunphotometry, high spectral resolution lidar) could be employed to determine that weak (near sub-visual) fine mode events had occurred, and (b) this data combined with remote sensing imagery products (MODIS, OMI-AI, FLAMBE fire sources), Fourier transform spectroscopy and back trajectories could be employed to identify the smoke events.

  20. Event reconstruction performance of the ALICE High Level Trigger for p + p collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, M; Alt, T; Appelshauser, H; Arend, A; Becker, B; Bottger, S; Breitner, T; Busching, H; Cicalo, C; Chattopadhyay, S; Cleymans, J; Das, I; Djuvsland, O; Erdal, H; Fearick, R; Gorbunov, S; Haaland, O S; Hille, P T; Kalcher, S; Kanaki, K; Kebschull, U; Kisel, I; Kretz, M; Lara, C; Lindal, S; Lindenstruth, V; Masoodi, A A; Ovrebekk, G; Panse, R; Peschek, J; Ploskon, M; Pocheptsov, T; Rascanu, T; Ronchetti, F; Rohr, D; Rohrich, D; Skaali, B; Steinbeck, T; Szostak, A; Thader, J; Tveter, T S; Ullaland, K; Vilakazi, Z; Weis, R; Zelnicek, P

    2011-01-01

    The ALICE High Level Trigger comprises a large computing cluster, dedicated interfaces and software applications. It allows on-line event reconstruction of the full data stream of the ALICE experiment at up to 25 GByte/s. The commissioning campaign has passed an important phase since the startup of the Large Hadron Collider in November 2009. The system has been transferred into continuous operation with focus on the event reconstruction and first simple trigger applications. The paper reports for t he first time on the achieved event reconstruction performance in the ALICE central barrel region.

  1. DOES YOUR EVENT LOG FIT THE HIGH-LEVEL PROCESS MODEL?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Begicheva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Process mining is a relatively new field of computer science, which deals with process discovery and analysis based on event logs. In this paper we consider the problem of models and event logs conformance checking. Conformance checking is intensively studied in the frame of process mining research, but only models and event logs of the same granularity were considered in the literature. Here we present and justify the method of checking conformance between a high-level model (e.g. built by an expert and a low-level log (generated by a system.The article is published in the author’s wording.

  2. A method for critical software event execution reliability in high assurance systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kidd, M.E.C.

    1997-03-01

    This paper presents a method for Critical Software Event Execution Reliability (Critical SEER). The Critical SEER method is intended for high assurance software that operates in an environment where transient upsets could occur, causing a disturbance of the critical software event execution order, which could cause safety or security hazards. The method has a finite automata based module that watches (hence SEER) and tracks the critical events and ensures they occur in the proper order or else a fail safe state is forced. This method is applied during the analysis, design and implementation phases of software engineering.

  3. Drinking motives moderate the impact of pre-drinking on heavy drinking on a given evening and related adverse consequences--an event-level study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntsche, Emmanuel; Labhart, Florian

    2013-10-01

    To test whether (i) drinking motives predict the frequency of pre-drinking (i.e. alcohol consumption before going out); (ii) drinking motives predict HDGE (heavy drinking on a given evening: 4+ for women, 5+ for men) and related adverse consequences (hangover, injuries, blackouts, etc.), even when pre-drinking is accounted for, and (iii) drinking motives moderate the impact of pre-drinking on HDGE and consequences. Using the internet-based cellphone-optimized assessment technique (ICAT), participants completed a series of cellphone questionnaires every Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening over 5 weeks. French-speaking Switzerland. A total of 183 young adults [53% female, mean age (standard deviation) = 23.1 (3.1)] who completed 7828 questionnaires on 1441 evenings. Drinking motives assessed at baseline, alcohol consumption assessed at 8 p.m., 9 p.m., 10 p.m., 11 p.m. and midnight and consequences assessed at 11 a.m. the next day. Gender-separate multi-level models revealed that pre-drinking predicted HDGE (men: B = 2.17, P motives were found to predict HDGE (B = 0.48, P motives had the same effect (HDGE: B = 0.73, P motives among women (B = 0.54, P motive dimension predicted the frequency of pre-drinking, while coping and conformity motives moderated the impact of pre-drinking on HDGE (men, conformity: B = -1.57, P < 0.05) and its consequences (men, coping: B = -0.46, P < 0.01; women, coping: B = 0.76, P < 0.05). Among young adults in Switzerland, heavy weekend drinking and the related consequences seem to result from the combination of pre-drinking, level of negative reinforcement drinking for women and positive reinforcement drinking for men. © 2013 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  4. Study by MOA of extra-solar planets in gravitational microlensing events of high magnification

    OpenAIRE

    Bond, I. A.; Rattenbury, N. J.; Skuljan, J.; Abe, F.; Dodd, R. J.; Hearnshaw, J. B.; Honda, M.; Jugaku, J.; Kilmartin, P. M.; Marles, A.; Masuda, K.; Matsubara, Y.; Muraki, Y.(Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Japan); Nakamura, T.; Nankivell, G.

    2001-01-01

    A search for extra-solar planets was carried out in three gravitational microlensing events of high magnification, MACHO 98-BLG-35, MACHO 99-LMC-2, and OGLE 00-BUL-12. Photometry was derived from observational images by the MOA and OGLE groups using an image subtraction technique. For MACHO 98-BLG-35, additional photometry derived from the MPS and PLANET groups was included. Planetary modeling of the three events was carried out in a super-cluster computing environment. The estimated probabil...

  5. Crossing historical and sedimentary archives to reconstruct an extreme flood event calendar in high alpine areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, B.; Giguet-Covex, C.; Arnaud, F.; Allignol, F.; Legaz, A.; Melo, A.

    2010-09-01

    Torrential flood hazard is expected to increase in the context of global warming. However, long time-series of climate and gauge data at high-elevation sites are too sparse to assess reliably recurrence times of such events in high mountain areas. Historical documents are an alternative which provide valuable information. However, historic archives are by nature subjective and variable in quality owing to hazard perception and vulnerability according to the banks land-use throughout time. To overcome these limits, natural archives may be used as complementary records. Among the various natural archives lake sediments have the advantage to be continuous records in which particular events are preserved such as earthquakes and especially flood events. Furthermore an objective magnitude of these events can be assessed from the thickness of noteworthy event-triggered deposits. However if the recognition of major event-triggered deposits can be simple, a high-resolution dating of these events is more difficult over the historical period due to a lack of chronological markers. In this paper, we present a sediment record study of a French high alpine lake where an important effort was undertaken to date precisely 56 flood events over the last three centuries from the use of historical archives. The caesium and the lead were measured to detect the fallouts of the Chernobyl accident (1986), the atmospheric nuclear weapons tests (1955-1963) and the use of leaded gasoline which culminated in the 70's. In parallel local and regional historical archives were going through in order to correlate the thickest sediment deposits triggered by major floods and earthquakes with their potential triggering historic events. Thus we were able to associate 12 historic flood and 4 earthquake dates to particular sediment deposits. The resulting flood calendar is very well-constrained thanks to 19 chronological marks over the last 270 years, i.e. one mark by 14 years. This method permitted so

  6. The subthalamic nucleus keeps you high on emotion: behavioral consequences of its inactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yann ePelloux

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The subthalamic nucleus (STN belongs to the basal ganglia and is the current target for the surgical treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Parkinson’s Disease (PD and obsessive compulsive disorders, but also a proposed site for the treatment of addiction. It is therefore very important to understand its functions in order to anticipate and prevent possible side-effects in the patients. Although the involvement of the STN is well documented in motor, cognitive and motivational processes, less is known regarding emotional processes. Here we have investigated the direct consequences of STN inactivation by excitotoxic lesions on emotional processing and reinforcement in the rat. We have used various behavioral procedures to assess affect for neutral, positive and negative reinforcers in STN lesioned rats. STN lesions reduced affective responses for positive (sweet solutions and negative (electric foot shock, Lithium Chloride-induced sickness reinforcers while they had no effect on responses for a more neutral reinforcer (novelty induced place preference. Furthermore, when given the choice between saccharine, a sweet but non caloric solution, and glucose, a more bland but caloric solution, in contrast to sham animals that preferred saccharine, STN lesioned animals preferred glucose over saccharine. Taken altogether these results reveal that STN plays a critical role in emotional processing. These results, in line with some clinical observations in PD patients subjected to STN surgery, suggest possible emotional side-effects of treatments targeting the STN. They also suggest that the increased motivation for sucrose previously reported cannot be due to increased pleasure, but could be responsible for the decreased motivation for cocaine reported after STN inactivation.

  7. Managing Errors to Reduce Accidents in High Consequence Networked Information Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganter, J.H.

    1999-02-01

    Computers have always helped to amplify and propagate errors made by people. The emergence of Networked Information Systems (NISs), which allow people and systems to quickly interact worldwide, has made understanding and minimizing human error more critical. This paper applies concepts from system safety to analyze how hazards (from hackers to power disruptions) penetrate NIS defenses (e.g., firewalls and operating systems) to cause accidents. Such events usually result from both active, easily identified failures and more subtle latent conditions that have resided in the system for long periods. Both active failures and latent conditions result from human errors. We classify these into several types (slips, lapses, mistakes, etc.) and provide NIS examples of how they occur. Next we examine error minimization throughout the NIS lifecycle, from design through operation to reengineering. At each stage, steps can be taken to minimize the occurrence and effects of human errors. These include defensive design philosophies, architectural patterns to guide developers, and collaborative design that incorporates operational experiences and surprises into design efforts. We conclude by looking at three aspects of NISs that will cause continuing challenges in error and accident management: immaturity of the industry, limited risk perception, and resource tradeoffs.

  8. Loss of genetic diversity as a consequence of selection in response to high pCO 2

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, Melanie M.; Makukhov, April D.; Pespeni, Melissa H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Standing genetic variation may allow for rapid evolutionary response to the geologically unprecedented changes in global conditions. However, there is little known about the consequences of such rapid evolutionary change. Here, we measure genetic responses to experimental low and high pCO 2 levels in purple sea urchin larvae, Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We found greater loss of nucleotide diversity in high pCO 2 levels (18.61%; 900 μatm) compared to low pCO 2 levels (10.12%; 400 μ...

  9. Extreme hydrological events and the influence of reservoirs in a highly regulated river basin of northeastern Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Vicente-Serrano

    2017-08-01

    New hydrological insights: Results reveal a general reduction in the occurrence of extreme precipitation events in the Segre basin from 1950 to 2013, which corresponded to a general reduction in high flows measured at various gauged stations across the basin. While this study demonstrates spatial differences in the decrease of streamflow between the headwaters and the lower parts of the basin, mainly associated with changes in river regulation, there was no reduction in the frequency of the extraordinary floods. Changes in water management practices in the basin have significantly impacted the frequency, duration, and severity of hydrological droughts downstream of the main dams, as a consequence of the intense water regulation to meet water demands for irrigation and livestock farms. Nonetheless, the hydrological response of the headwaters to these droughts differed markedly from that of the lower areas of the basin.

  10. Study of event-by-event fluctuations in the charged particle ratio in high energy heavy-ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou Dai Mei; Liu Zhi Yi; Lu Zhong Dao; Sá Ben-Hao

    2002-01-01

    Using a hadron and string cascade model, JPCIAE, and the corresponding Monte Carlo event generator, the behavior of the charged particle ratio event-by-event fluctuations in subsystem depending on energy, centrality, resonance decay and rapidity interval was investigated for Pb+Pb collisions at SPS and ALICE energies, and for Au+Au collisions at RHIC energies. The model results of charged particle ratio event-by-event fluctuations as a function of the rapidity interval in Pb+Pb collisions at SPS energies were comparable with the preliminary NA49 data. It turned out that the charged particle ratio fluctuation has no strong energy, centrality, resonance decay and rapidity interval dependences. (13 refs).

  11. TANAMI counterparts to IceCube high-energy neutrino events

    CERN Document Server

    Krauß, Felicia; Baxter, Claire; Kadler, Matthias; Mannheim, Karl; Ojha, Roopesh; Gräfe, Christina; Müller, Cornelia; Wilms, Joern; Carpenter, Bryce; Schulz, Robert; TANAMI, on behalf of the

    2015-01-01

    Since the discovery of a neutrino flux in excess of the atmospheric background by the IceCube Collaboration, searches for the astrophysical sources have been ongoing. Due to the steeply falling background towards higher energies, the PeV events detected in three years of IceCube data are the most likely ones to be of extraterrestrial origin. Even excluding the PeV events detected so far, the neutrino flux is well above the atmospheric background, so it is likely that a number of sub-PeV events originate from the same astrophysical sources that produce the PeV events. We study the high-energy properties of AGN that are positionally coincident with the neutrino events from three years of IceCube data and show the results for event number 4. IC 4 is a event with a low angular error (7.1$^\\circ$) and a large deposited energy of 165 TeV. We use multiwavelength data, including Fermi/LAT and X-ray data, to construct broadband spectra and present parametrizations of the broadband spectral energy distributions with lo...

  12. EMBRYONIC VASCULAR DISRUPTION ADVERSE OUTCOMES: LINKING HIGH THROUGHPUT SIGNALING SIGNATURES WITH FUNCTIONAL CONSEQUENCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embryonic vascular disruption is an important adverse outcome pathway (AOP) given the knowledge that chemical disruption of early cardiovascular system development leads to broad prenatal defects. High throughput screening (HTS) assays provide potential building blocks for AOP d...

  13. Relations between Strong High-Frequency Microwave Bursts and Proton Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grechnev, Victor V.; Meshalkina, Nataliya S.; Chertok, Ilya M.; Kiselev, Valentin I.

    2013-12-01

    Proceeding from close association between solar eruptions, flares, shock waves, and CMEs, we analyze relations between bursts at 35 GHz recorded with the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters during 1990-2012, on the one hand, and solar energetic particle (SEP) events, on the other hand. Most west to moderately east solar events with strong bursts at 35 GHz produced near-Earth proton enhancements of J (E > 100 MeV) > 1 pfu. The strongest and hardest of those caused ground-level enhancements. There is a general, although scattered, correspondence between proton enhancements and peak fluxes at 35 GHz, especially pronounced if the 35 GHz flux exceeds 104 sfu and the microwave peak frequency is high. These properties indicate emission from numerous high-energy electrons in very strong magnetic fields suggesting a high rate of energy release in the flare-CME formation process. Flaring above the sunspot umbrae appears to be typical of such events. Irrespective of the origin of SEPs, these circumstances demonstrate significant diagnostic potential of high-frequency microwave bursts and sunspot-associated flares for space weather forecasting. Strong prolonged bursts at 35 GHz promptly alert to hazardous SEP events with hard spectra. A few exceptional events with moderate bursts at 35 GHz and strong proton fluxes look challenging, and should be investigated.

  14. Framework for Modeling High-Impact, Low-Frequency Power Grid Events to Support Risk-Informed Decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veeramany, Arun; Unwin, Stephen D.; Coles, Garill A.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; Millard, W. David; Yao, Juan; Glantz, Clifford S.; Gourisetti, Sri Nikhil Gup

    2015-12-03

    Natural and man-made hazardous events resulting in loss of grid infrastructure assets challenge the electric power grid’s security and resilience. However, the planning and allocation of appropriate contingency resources for such events requires an understanding of their likelihood and the extent of their potential impact. Where these events are of low likelihood, a risk-informed perspective on planning can be problematic as there exists an insufficient statistical basis to directly estimate the probabilities and consequences of their occurrence. Since risk-informed decisions rely on such knowledge, a basis for modeling the risk associated with high-impact low frequency events (HILFs) is essential. Insights from such a model can inform where resources are most rationally and effectively expended. The present effort is focused on development of a HILF risk assessment framework. Such a framework is intended to provide the conceptual and overarching technical basis for the development of HILF risk models that can inform decision makers across numerous stakeholder sectors. The North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) 2014 Standard TPL-001-4 considers severe events for transmission reliability planning, but does not address events of such severity that they have the potential to fail a substantial fraction of grid assets over a region, such as geomagnetic disturbances (GMD), extreme seismic events, and coordinated cyber-physical attacks. These are beyond current planning guidelines. As noted, the risks associated with such events cannot be statistically estimated based on historic experience; however, there does exist a stable of risk modeling techniques for rare events that have proven of value across a wide range of engineering application domains. There is an active and growing interest in evaluating the value of risk management techniques in the State transmission planning and emergency response communities, some of this interest in the context of

  15. Observation of High Iron Charge States at Low Energies in Solar Energetic Particle Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Z.; Möbius, E.; Klecker, B.; Bochsler, P.; Connell, J. J.; Kartavykh, Y. Y.; Mason, G. M.; Popecki, M. A.

    2014-04-01

    The ionic charge states of solar energetic particles (SEPs) provide direct information about the source plasma, the acceleration environment, and their transport. Recent studies report that both gradual and impulsive SEP events show mean iron charge states langQ Ferang ~ 10-14 at low energies E nuc-1, consistent with their origin from typical corona material at temperatures 1-2 MK. Observed increases of langQ Ferang up to 20 at energies 0.1-0.5 MeV nuc-1 in impulsive SEPs are attributed to stripping during acceleration. However, Q Fe > 16 is occasionally found in the solar wind, particularly coming from active regions, in contrast to the exclusively reported langQ Ferang = 14 throughout the entire SEPICA and STOF energy range have been identified. Four of the nine events are impulsive events identified through velocity dispersion that are consistent with source temperatures >=2 MK up to ~4 MK. The other five events show evidence of interplanetary acceleration. Four of them involve re-acceleration of impulsive material, whose original energy dependent charge states appear re-distributed to varying extent bringing higher charge states to lower energy. One event, which shows flat but elevated langQ Ferang ~ 14.2 over the entire energy range, can be associated with interplanetary acceleration of high temperature material. This event may exemplify a rare situation when a second shock plows through high temperature coronal mass ejection material.

  16. Synoptic typing of high ozone events in Arizona (2011-2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jessica

    This thesis examines the synoptic characteristics associated with ozone exceedance events in Arizona during the time period of 2011 to 2013. Finding explanations and sources to the ground level ozone in this state is crucial to maintaining the state's adherence to federal air quality regulations. This analysis utilizes ambient ozone concentration data, surface meteorological conditions, upper air analyses, and HYSPLIT modeling to analyze the synoptic characteristics of ozone events. Based on these data and analyses, five categories were determined to be associated with these events. The five categories all exhibit distinct upper air patterns and surface conditions conducive to the formation of ozone, as well as distinct potential transport pathways of ozone from different nearby regions. These findings indicate that ozone events in Arizona can be linked to synoptic-scale patterns and potential regional transport of ozone. These results can be useful in the forecasting of high ozone pollution and influential on the legislative reduction of ozone pollution.

  17. Permissive and Non-permissive Hypercapnia: Mechanisms of Action and Consequences of High Carbon Dioxide Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briva, Arturo; Lecuona, Emilia; Sznajder, Jacob I.

    2013-01-01

    Acute lung injury is a disease with high mortality, which affects a large numbers of patients whose treatment continues to be debated. It has recently been postulated that hypercapnia can attenuate the inflammatory response during lung injury, which would assign it a specific role within lung protection strategies during mechanical ventilation. In this paper, we review current evidence on the role that high levels of CO2 in the blood play in lung injury. We conclude that, although there are reports that show benefits, the most recent evidence suggests that hypercapnia can be harmful and can contribute to worsening lung damage. PMID:20303638

  18. Experimental Consequences of Mottness in High-Temperature Copper-Oxide Superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Shiladitya

    2009-01-01

    It has been more than two decades since the copper-oxide high temperature superconductors were discovered. However, building a satisfactory theoretical framework to study these compounds still remains one of the major challenges in condensed matter physics. In addition to the mechanism of superconductivity, understanding the properties of the…

  19. Portal hypertension in children: High-risk varices, primary prophylaxis and consequences of bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duché, Mathieu; Ducot, Béatrice; Ackermann, Oanez; Guérin, Florent; Jacquemin, Emmanuel; Bernard, Olivier

    2017-02-01

    Primary prophylaxis of bleeding is debated for children with portal hypertension because of the limited number of studies on its safety and efficacy, the lack of a known endoscopic pattern carrying a high-risk of bleeding for all causes, and the assumption that the mortality of a first bleed is low. We report our experience with these issues. From 1989 to 2014, we managed 1300 children with portal hypertension. Endoscopic features were recorded; high-risk varices were defined as: grade 3 esophageal varices, grade 2 varices with red wale markings, or gastric varices. Two hundred forty-six children bled spontaneously and 182 underwent primary prophylaxis. The results of primary prophylaxis were reviewed as well as bleed-free survival, overall survival and life-threatening complications of bleeding. High-risk varices were found in 96% of children who bled spontaneously and in 11% of children who did not bleed without primary prophylaxis (phypertension. Life-threatening complications of bleeding were recorded in 19% of children with cirrhosis and high-risk varices who bled spontaneously. Ten-year probabilities of bleed-free survival after primary prophylaxis in children with high-risk varices were 96% and 72% for non-cirrhotic causes and cirrhosis respectively. Ten-year probabilities of overall survival after primary prophylaxis were 100% and 93% in children with non-cirrhotic causes and cirrhosis respectively. In children with portal hypertension, bleeding is linked to the high-risk endoscopic pattern reported here. Primary prophylaxis of bleeding based on this pattern is fairly effective and safe. In children with liver disease, the risk of bleeding from varices in the esophagus is linked to their large size, the presence of congestion on their surface and their expansion into the stomach but not to the child's age nor to the cause of portal hypertension. Prevention of the first bleed in children with high-risk varices can be achieved by surgery or endoscopic

  20. Study of readout architectures for triggerless high event rate detectors at CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Kulis, S

    2011-01-01

    In this work possible readout architectures for future detectors at CLIC are discussed. These detectors will need a triggerless readout electronics with amplitude and time reconstruction and they may operate with very high event rates (≥ 1 hits / channel / bunch train of 156 ns). The main subject of this study, both theoretical and experimental, is a readout based on the deconvolution principle. The basic principle, the performance, the advantages and limitations of this technique are discussed. In the case of extremely high event rates (> 4 hits / channel / bunch train) a readout based on a gated integrator and correlated double sampling is proposed.

  1. Optimal Blood Pressure Goals in Patients With Hypertension at High Risk for Cardiovascular Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronow, Wilbert S

    2016-01-01

    Existing epidemiologic and clinical trial data suggest that the blood pressure in patients with hypertension at high risk for cardiovascular events because of coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, stroke, or heart failure should be reduced to blood pressure be reduced to 140-145 mm Hg if tolerated in patients aged 80 years and older. Studies from patients with coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, stroke, and heart failure will be discussed that support a blood pressure goal of high risk for cardiovascular events.

  2. High-speed event detector for embedded nanopore bio-systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yiyun; Magierowski, Sebastian; Ghafar-Zadeh, Ebrahim; Wang, Chengjie

    2015-08-01

    Biological measurements of microscopic phenomena often deal with discrete-event signals. The ability to automatically carry out such measurements at high-speed in a miniature embedded system is desirable but compromised by high-frequency noise along with practical constraints on filter quality and sampler resolution. This paper presents a real-time event-detection method in the context of nanopore sensing that helps to mitigate these drawbacks and allows accurate signal processing in an embedded system. Simulations show at least a 10× improvement over existing on-line detection methods.

  3. High-velocity Hα Absorption Events in B8 Ia - A2 Ia Supergiant Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Nancy D.; Markova, N.; Rother, S. J.

    2009-12-01

    Late B- and early A-type supergiants are notorious for the time variability of their Hα line profiles, but the physical cause of the variations is poorly understood. Usually, the line is filled in by emission, and the blue absorption wing does not extend to the terminal wind speed, which is roughly defined by the blue edges of the ultraviolet resonance lines. On rare occasions, however, the blue wing of Hα goes strongly into absorption over a wide velocity range, from the photospheric velocity almost all the way to the terminal wind speed. This phenomenon was first described by Kaufer et al. (1996, A&A, 314, 599), who denoted it by the term, "High-Velocity Absorption Event." In this report, high-resolution spectra from Ritter Observatory will be combined with published spectra to examine the temporal recurrence behavior and strength distribution of high-velocity absorption events and their incidence as a function of stellar parameters for the available sample of stars. All B8- and A0-type, Ia-class, stars in the sample that have been sufficiently well observed, as well as one A2-type star, show the events. However, there is some evidence that hyperluminous stars (luminosity class Ia+) do not show the events. In one of the most extensively observed stars in the sample (Rigel, B8 Ia), there is no clear periodicity in the recurrence times of the events. In addition to the strong events discovered by Kaufer et al. (1996), there is a broad distribution of more frequent, weaker events. Ritter Observatory receives operating support from the National Science Foundation Program for Research and Education with Small Telescopes (PREST) award AST-0440784.

  4. High Risk Behaviors in Marine Mammals: Linking Behavioral Responses to Anthropogenic Disturbance to Biological Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    attributes of each species that are associated with susceptibility to acoustically mediated disturbance and tissue damage. Furthermore, by identifying high... mediated trauma, 1) tissue/whole animal/physiological exercise assessments to determine the impact of behavioral and environmental challenges to the...susceptibility to acoustically mediated disturbance and tissue damage. This will subsequently allow us to achieve our overall goal of enabling Navy personnel

  5. Chemical interferences when using high gradient magnetic separation for phosphate removal: consequences for lake restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vicente, I; Merino-Martos, A; Guerrero, F; Amores, V; de Vicente, J

    2011-09-15

    A promising method for lake restoration is the treatment of lake inlets through the specific adsorption of phosphate (P) on strongly magnetizable particles (Fe) and their subsequent removal using in-flow high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) techniques. In this work, we report an extensive investigation on the chemical interferences affecting P removal efficiencies in natural waters from 20 Mediterranean ponds and reservoirs. A set of three treatments were considered based on different Fe particles/P concentration ratios. High P removal efficiencies (>80%) were found in freshwater lakes (conductivities<600 μ S cm(-1)). However, a significant reduction in P removal was observed for extremely high mineralized waters. Correlation analysis showed that major cations (Mg(2+), Na(+) and K(+)) and anions (SO(4)(2-) and Cl(-)) played an essential role in P removal efficiency. Comparison between different treatments have shown that when increasing P and Fe concentrations at the same rate or when increasing Fe concentrations for a fixed P concentration, there exist systematic reductions in the slope of the regression lines relating P removal efficiency and the concentration of different chemical variables. These results evidence a general reduction in the chemical competition between P and other ions for adsorption sites on Fe particles. Additional analyses also revealed a reduction in water color, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and reactive silicate (Si) concentrations with the addition of Fe microparticles.

  6. Star Formation and Exoplanetary Systems in the National Science Olympiad Astronomy Event for High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komacek, Thaddeus D.; Young, Donna; Schroeder, Dustin M.; Van Hecke, Mark A.

    2014-11-01

    Science Olympiad is one of the nation’s largest secondary school science competitions, reaching over 240,000 students on more than 6,000 teams. The competition covers various aspects of science and technology, exposing students to a variety of career options in STEM. 9 of Science Olympiad’s 46 events (with 23 for both middle and high school) have a focus on Earth and Space Science, including process skills and knowledge of a variety of subjects, including: Astrophysics, Planetary Sciences, Oceanography, Meteorology, Remote Sensing, and Geologic Mapping, among others. The Astronomy event is held for students from 9th - 12th grade, and covers topics based upon stellar evolution and/or galactic astronomy. For the 2014-2015 competition season, Astronomy will focus on star formation and exoplanets in concert with stellar evolution, bringing recent and groundbreaking research to light for young potential astronomers and planetary scientists. The event tests students on their “understanding of the basic concepts of mathematics and physics relating to stellar evolution and star and planet formation,” including qualitative responses, DS9 image analysis, and quantitative problem solving. We invite any members of the exoplanet and star formation communities that are interested in developing event materials to contact the National event supervisors, Donna Young (donna@aavso.org) and Tad Komacek (tkomacek@lpl.arizona.edu). We also encourage you to contact your local regional or state Science Olympiad tournament directors to help supervise events and run competitions in your area.

  7. Major Solar Eruptions and High Energy Particle Events during Solar Cycle 24

    CERN Document Server

    Gopalswamy, N; Akiyama, S; Makela, P; Yashiro, S

    2014-01-01

    We report on a study of all major solar eruptions that occurred on the front-side of the Sun during the rise to peak phase of cycle 24 (first 62 months) in order to understand the key factors affecting the occurrence of large solar energetic particle events (SEPs) and the ground levels enhancement (GLE) events. The eruptions involve major flares with soft X-ray peak flux >/= 5.0 x10-5 Wm-2 (i.e., flare size >/= M5.0) and accompanying coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The selection criterion was based on the fact that the only front-side GLE in cycle 24 (GLE 71) had a flare size of M5.1. Only ~37% of the major eruptions from the western hemisphere resulted in large SEP events. Almost the same number of large SEP events was produced in weaker eruptions (flare size events. On the other hand, the CME speed is a better indicator of SEP and GLE events because it is consistently high supporting the shock acceleration mechanism for SEP...

  8. The consequences of high cigarette excise taxes for low-income smokers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew C Farrelly

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To illustrate the burden of high cigarette excise taxes on low-income smokers. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using data from the New York and national Adult Tobacco Surveys from 2010-2011, we estimated how smoking prevalence, daily cigarette consumption, and share of annual income spent on cigarettes vary by annual income (less than $30,000; $30,000-$59,999; and more than $60,000. The 2010-2011 sample includes 7,536 adults and 1,294 smokers from New York and 3,777 adults and 748 smokers nationally. Overall, smoking prevalence is lower in New York (16.1% than nationally (22.2% and is strongly associated with income in New York and nationally (P<.001. Smoking prevalence ranges from 12.2% to 33.7% nationally and from 10.1% to 24.3% from the highest to lowest income group. In 2010-2011, the lowest income group spent 23.6% of annual household income on cigarettes in New York (up from 11.6% in 2003-2004 and 14.2% nationally. Daily cigarette consumption is not related to income. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although high cigarette taxes are an effective method for reducing cigarette smoking, they can impose a significant financial burden on low-income smokers.

  9. Effects of strength training on muscle fiber types and size; consequences for athletes training for high-intensity sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J L; Aagaard, P

    2010-01-01

    of the muscle and finally how will this affect the performance of the athlete. In addition, the review will deal with muscle hypertrophy and how it develops with strength training. Overall, it is not the purpose of this review to give a comprehensive up-date of the area, but to pin-point a few issues from which...... way into almost all sports in which high intense work is conducted. In this review we will focus on a few selected aspects and consequences of strength training; namely what effects do strength training have of muscle fiber type composition, and how may these effects change the contractile properties...

  10. Consequences of bursty star formation on galaxy observables at high redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Domínguez, Alberto; Brooks, Alyson M; Christensen, Charlotte R; Bruzual, Gustavo; Stark, Daniel P; Alavi, Anahita

    2014-01-01

    The star formation histories (SFHs) of dwarf galaxies are thought to be bursty, with large -- order of magnitude -- changes in the star formation rate on timescales similar to O-star lifetimes. As a result, the standard interpretations of many galaxy observables (which assume a slowly varying SFH) are often incorrect. Here we use the SFHs from hydro-dynamical simulations to investigate the effects of bursty SFHs on sample selection and interpretation of observables and make predictions to confirm such SFHs in future surveys. First, because dwarf galaxies' star formation rates change rapidly, the mass-to-light ratio is also changing rapidly in both the ionizing continuum and, to a lesser extent, the non-ionizing UV continuum. Therefore, flux limited surveys are highly biased toward selecting galaxies in the burst phase and very deep observations are required to detect all dwarf galaxies at a given stellar mass. Second, we show that a $\\log_{10}[\

  11. High CO₂ and marine animal behaviour: potential mechanisms and ecological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briffa, Mark; de la Haye, Kate; Munday, Philip L

    2012-08-01

    Exposure to pollution and environmental change can alter the behaviour of aquatic animals and here we review recent evidence that exposure to elevated CO₂ and reduced sea water pH alters the behaviour of tropical reef fish and hermit crabs. Three main routes through which behaviour might be altered are discussed; elevated metabolic load, 'info-disruption' and avoidance behaviour away from polluted locations. There is clear experimental evidence that exposure to high CO₂ disrupts the ability to find settlement sites and shelters, the ability to detect predators and the ability to detect prey and food. In marine vertebrates and marine crustaceans behavioural change appears to occur via info-disruption. In hermit crabs and other crustaceans impairment of performance capacities might also play a role. We discuss the implications for such behavioural changes in terms of potential impacts at the levels of population health and ecosystem services, and consider future directions for research.

  12. Uremic anorexia: a consequence of persistently high brain serotonin levels? The tryptophan/serotonin disorder hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, A; Selgas, R; Codoceo, R; Bajo, A

    2000-01-01

    Anorexia is a frequent part of uremic syndrome, contributing to malnutrition in dialysis patients. Many factors have been suggested as responsible for uremic anorexia. In this paper we formulate a new hypothesis to explain the appetite disorders in dialysis patients: "the tryptophan/serotonin disorder hypothesis." We review current knowledge of normal hunger-satiety cycle control and the disorders described in uremic patients. There are four phases in food intake regulation: (1) the gastric phase, during which food induces satiety through gastric distention and satiety peptide release; (2) the post absorptive phase, during which circulating compounds, including glucose and amino acids, cause satiety by hepatic receptors via the vagus nerve; (3) the hepatic phase, during which adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration is the main stimulus inducing hunger or satiety, with cytokines inhibiting ATP production; and (4) the central phase, during which appetite is regulated through peripheral (circulating plasma substances and neurotransmitters) and brain stimuli. Brain serotonin is the final target for peripheral mechanisms controlling appetite. High brain serotonin levels and a lower serotonin/dopamine ratio cause anorexia. Plasma and brain amino acid concentrations are recognized factors involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and appetite control. Tryptophan is the substrate of serotonin synthesis. High plasma levels of anorectics such as tryptophan (plasma and brain), cholecystokinin, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1, and leptin, and deficiencies of nitric oxide and neuropeptide Y have been described in uremia; all increase intracerebral serotonin. We suggest that brain serotonin hyperproduction due to a uremic-dependent excess of tryptophan may be the final common pathway involved in the genesis of uremic anorexia. Various methods of ameliorating anorexia by decreasing the central effects of serotonin are proposed.

  13. Using Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) to Study Sex Events Among Very High-Risk Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Tyler B; Kahler, Christopher W; Monti, Peter M

    2016-10-01

    MSM continue to represent the largest share of new HIV infections in the United States each year due to high infectivity associated with unprotected anal sex. Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) has the potential to provide a unique view of how high-risk sexual events occur in the real world and can impart detailed information about aspects of decision-making, antecedents, and consequences that accompany these events. EMA may also produce more accurate data on sexual behavior by assessing it soon after its occurrence. We conducted a study involving 12 high-risk MSM to explore the acceptability and feasibility of a 30 day, intensive EMA procedure. Results suggest this intensive assessment strategy was both acceptable and feasible to participants. All participants provided response rates to various assessments that approached or were in excess of their targets: 81.0 % of experience sampling assessments and 93.1 % of daily diary assessments were completed. However, comparing EMA reports with a Timeline Followback (TLFB) of the same 30 day period suggested that participants reported fewer sexual risk events on the TLFB compared to EMA, and reported a number of discrepancies about specific behaviors and partner characteristics across the two methods. Overall, results support the acceptability, feasibility, and utility of using EMA to understand sexual risk events among high-risk MSM. Findings also suggest that EMA and other intensive longitudinal assessment approaches could yield more accurate data about sex events.

  14. A high performance real-time plasma control and event detection DSP based VME system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, A.P. E-mail: pinto@ci.uc.pt; Correia, Carlos; Varandas, Carlos

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes the digital signal processors module of a high performance system, specially designed for real-time plasma control and event detection on the next generation fusion experiments with long duration discharges. The system is composed of a commercial CPU board and several on-site developed intelligent modules inserted in the same VME crate.

  15. Earliest Memories and Recent Memories of Highly Salient Events--Are They Similar?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Carole; Fowler, Tania; Brandeau, Katherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Four- to 11-year-old children were interviewed about 2 different sorts of memories in the same home visit: recent memories of highly salient and stressful events--namely, injuries serious enough to require hospital emergency room treatment--and their earliest memories. Injury memories were scored for amount of unique information, completeness…

  16. Did cultural and artistic education in the Netherlands increase student participation in high cultural events?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damen, M.-L.; van Klaveren, C.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines whether Cultural and Artistic Education that was implemented by the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science in 1999 caused students to participate more in high cultural events. A unique feature of the intervention was that students were free to choose the type of cultura

  17. On the value of aiming high: the causes and consequences of ambition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Timothy A; Kammeyer-Mueller, John D

    2012-07-01

    Ambition is a commonly mentioned but poorly understood concept in social science research. We sought to contribute to understanding of the concept by developing and testing a model in which ambition is a middle-level trait (Cantor, 1990)-predicted by more distal characteristics but, due to its teleological nature, more proximally situated to predict career success. A 7-decade longitudinal sample of 717 high-ability individuals from the Terman life-cycle study (Terman, Sears, Cronbach, & Sears, 1989) was used in the current study. Results indicated that ambition was predicted by individual differences-conscientiousness, extraversion, neuroticism, and general mental ability-and a socioeconomic background variable: parents' occupational prestige. Ambition, in turn, was positively related to educational attainment, occupation prestige, and income. Ambition had significant total effects with all of the endogenous variables except mortality. Overall, the results support the thesis that ambition is a middle-level trait-related to but distinct from more distal individual difference variables-that has meaningful effects on career success.

  18. SIM and PALM: high-resolution microscopy methods and their consequences for cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krampert, Gerhard; Kleppe, Ingo; Kalkbrenner, Thomas; Weisshart, Klaus; Wolleschensky, Ralf; Kempe, Michael

    2010-04-01

    The diffraction limit in traditional fluorescence microscopy (approximately 200 and 600 nanometers in lateral and axial directions, respectively) has restricted the applications in bio-medical research. However, over the last 10 years various techniques have emerged to overcome this limit. Each of these techniques has its own characteristics that influence its application in biology. This paper will show how two of the techniques, Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) and PhotoActivated Localization Microscopy (PALM), complement each other in imaging of biological samples beyond the resolution of classical widefield fluorescence microscopy. As a reference the properties of two well known standard imaging techniques in this field, confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (LSM) and Total Internal Reflection (TIRF) microscopy, are compared to the properties of the two high resolution techniques. Combined SIM/PALM imaging allows the extremely accurate localization of individual molecules within the context of various fluorescent structures already resolved in 3D with a resolution of up to 100nm using SIM. Such a combined system provides the biologist with an unprecedented view of the sub-cellular organization of life.

  19. Consequences of brief exposure to high concentrations of carbon monoxide in conscious rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zengfa; Januszkiewicz, Adolph J; Mayorga, Maria A; Coleman, Gary D; Morrissette, Craig R

    2005-12-01

    Exposure to high-concentration carbon monoxide (CO) is of concern in military operations. Experimentally, the physiologic manifestations of a brief exposure to elevated levels of CO have not been fully described. This study investigated the development of acute CO poisoning in conscious male Sprague-Dawley rats (220-380 g). Animals were randomly grouped (n = 6) and exposed to either air or 1 of 6 CO concentrations (1000, 3000, 6000, 10,000, 12,000, or 24,000 ppm) in a continuous air/CO dynamic exposure chamber for 5 min. Respiration was recorded prior to and during exposures. Mixed blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and pH were measured before and immediately after exposure. Before exposure the mean baselines of respiratory minute volumes (RMVs) were 312.6 +/- 43.9, 275.2 +/- 40.8, and 302.3 +/- 39.1 ml/min for the 10,000, 12,000 and 24,000 ppm groups, respectively. In the last minute of exposure RMVs were 118.9 +/- 23.7, 62.1 +/- 10.4, and 22.0 +/- 15.1% (p 82%. Blood pH was unaltered and no death occurred in rats exposed to CO at concentrations 10,000 ppm for brief periods as short as 5 min may change RMV, resulting in acute respiratory failure, acidemia, and even death.

  20. Behavioral and cellular consequences of high-electrode count Utah Arrays chronically implanted in rat sciatic nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wark, H. A. C.; Mathews, K. S.; Normann, R. A.; Fernandez, E.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Before peripheral nerve electrodes can be used for the restoration of sensory and motor functions in patients with neurological disorders, the behavioral and histological consequences of these devices must be investigated. These indices of biocompatibility can be defined in terms of desired functional outcomes; for example, a device may be considered for use as a therapeutic intervention if the implanted subject retains functional neurons post-implantation even in the presence of a foreign body response. The consequences of an indwelling device may remain localized to cellular responses at the device-tissue interface, such as fibrotic encapsulation of the device, or they may affect the animal more globally, such as impacting behavioral or sensorimotor functions. The objective of this study was to investigate the overall consequences of implantation of high-electrode count intrafascicular peripheral nerve arrays, High Density Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (HD-USEAs; 25 electrodes mm-2). Approach. HD-USEAs were implanted in rat sciatic nerves for one and two month periods. We monitored wheel running, noxious sensory paw withdrawal reflexes, footprints, nerve morphology and macrophage presence at the tissue-device interface. In addition, we used a novel approach to contain the arrays in actively behaving animals that consisted of an organic nerve wrap. A total of 500 electrodes were implanted across all ten animals. Main results. The results demonstrated that chronic implantation (⩽8 weeks) of HD-USEAs into peripheral nerves can evoke behavioral deficits that recover over time. Morphology of the nerve distal to the implantation site showed variable signs of nerve fiber degeneration and regeneration. Cytology adjacent to the device-tissue interface also showed a variable response, with some electrodes having many macrophages surrounding the electrodes, while other electrodes had few or no macrophages present. This variability was also seen along the length

  1. Causes and consequences of mid–21st-century rapid ice loss events simulated by the Rossby centre regional atmosphere-ocean model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Paquin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Recent observations and modelling studies suggest that the Arctic climate is undergoing important transition. One manifestation of this change is seen in the rapid sea-ice cover decrease as experienced in 2007 and 2012. Although most numerical climate models cannot adequately reproduce the recent changes, some models produce similar Rapid Ice Loss Events (RILEs during the mid–21st-century. This study presents an analysis of four specific RILEs clustered around 2040 in three transient climate projections performed with the coupled Rossby Centre regional Atmosphere-Ocean model (RCAO. The analysis shows that long-term thinning causes increased vulnerability of the Arctic Ocean sea-ice cover. In the Atlantic sector, pre-conditioning (thinning of sea ice combined with anomalous atmospheric and oceanic heat transport causes large ice loss, while in the Pacific sector of the Arctic Ocean sea-ice albedo feedback appears important, particularly along the retreating sea-ice margin. Although maximum sea-ice loss occurs in the autumn, response in surface air temperature occurs in early winter, caused by strong increase in ocean-atmosphere surface energy fluxes, mainly the turbulent fluxes. Synchronicity of the events around 2040 in the projections is caused by a strong large-scale atmospheric circulation anomaly at the Atlantic lateral boundary of the regional model. The limited impact on land is caused by vertical propagation of the surface heat anomaly rather than horizontal, caused by the absence of low-level temperature inversion over the ocean.

  2. High Background Ozone Events in the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria Area: Effects from Central American Fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, R.; Wang, S. C.; Yang, S.; Wang, Y.; Talbot, R. W.

    2016-12-01

    The policy-relevant background (PRB) ozone is defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as the surface ozone mixing ratio that would occur over the U.S. without North American anthropogenic emission influences. PRB ozone over the Houston-Galveston-Brazoria (HGB) area may be affected by foreign sources due to its unique geographical location and meteorology. Our monitoring data revealed several high ozone events over HGB area which might be caused by Central American fire during the years of 2013-2015. To qualify the effects from Central American fire, we estimated the US, Central American and worldwide background over HGB area during those events using the GEOS-Chem global 3-D model. Anomalies in fire emissions leading to high PRB ozone were mapped through spatiotemporal sampling of the Fire INventory from NCAR (FINN) along background trajectories of air masses affecting the HGB area prior to and during the selected high PRB ozone days. Daily HGB PRB ozone estimated by researchers at the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) was used as the data source to validate model results. Results showed that contribution of emission from Central American to HGB PRB ozone could be tripled during fire events compared to non-impacted fire days. Besides fire emissions from Central American, different types of meteorological events (e.g., cold fronts and thunderstorms) and high local photochemical production (e.g., heat waves and stagnation) are also found associated with high PRB ozone in HGB area during these events. Thus we imply that synthetic contribution from foreign sources and local meteorology to HGB PRB ozone warrants further investigated.

  3. CMS High Level Trigger for boosted $t\\bar{t}$ events

    CERN Document Server

    Celli, Federico

    2016-01-01

    In this work we studied the efficiency of a new CMS high level trigger path for boosted topology $t\\bar{t}$ events, available during the 2016 LHC run at 13 TeV. We found out that this trigger was affected by a prescale factor bug that did not allow us to register about 18.4% of candidate $t\\bar{t}$ events, leading to an apparent loss in the trigger efficiency. This work has also pointed out that as soon as this issue is solved we will be able to use the new trigger path with good performances, increasing the statistics in future measurements.

  4. Phenomenon of energy concentration in high-energy family events of cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Wang He; Dai Zhi Qiang; Xue Liang; Feng Cun Feng; Zhang Xue Yao; Li Jin; Zhang Nai Jian; He Mao; Wang Cheng Rui; Ren Jing Ru; Lu Sui Ling

    2002-01-01

    The phenomenon of energy concentration in high-energy family events of cosmic rays is studied by comparing the results of family events of total visible energies 100-400 TeV observed in the Kanbala emulsion chamber experiment with the Monte Carlo simulation data. The simulation is made by the program CORSIKA in which QGSJET is applied as the hadronic interaction model, and the chemical composition of primary cosmic rays is obtained from the rigidity-cut model and the extrapolation of new results of direct measurements. This shows that the whole distribution tendency of the rate of energy concentration of simulated family events is basically consistent with that of the experiment

  5. High-energy heavy ion testing of VLSI devices for single event upsets and latch up

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S B Umesh; S R Kulkarni; R Sandhya; G R Joshi; R Damle; M Ravindra

    2005-08-01

    Several very large scale integrated (VLSI) devices which are not available in radiation hardened version are still required to be used in spacecraft systems. Thus these components need to be tested for highenergy heavy ion irradiation to find out their tolerance and suitability in specific space applications. This paper describes the high-energy heavy ion radiation testing of VLSI devices for single event upset (SEU) and single event latch up (SEL). The experimental set up employed to produce low flux of heavy ions viz. silicon (Si), and silver (Ag), for studying single event effects (SEE) is briefly described. The heavy ion testing of a few VLSI devices is performed in the general purpose scattering chamber of the Pelletron facility, available at Nuclear Science Centre, New Delhi. The test results with respect to SEU and SEL are discussed.

  6. Phenomenon of Energy Concentration in High-Energy Family Events of Cosmic Rays

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王河; 王永刚; 戴志强; 薛良; 冯存峰; 张学尧; 李金玉; 张乃健; 何瑁; 王承瑞; 任敬儒; 陆穗苓

    2002-01-01

    The phenomenon of energy concentration in high-energy family events of cosmic rays is studied by comparing the results of family events of total visible energies 100-400 TeV observed in the Kanbala emulsion chamber experiment with the Monte Carlo simulation data. The simulation is made by the program CORSIKA in which QGSJET is applied as the hadronic interaction model, and the chemical composition of primary cosmic rays is obtained from the rigidity-cut model and the extrapolation of new results of direct measurements. This shows that the whole distribution tendency of the rate of energy concentration of simulated family events is basically consistent with that of the experiment.

  7. Effects of strength training on muscle fiber types and size; consequences for athletes training for high-intensity sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, J L; Aagaard, P

    2010-01-01

    Training toward improving performance in sports involving high intense exercise can and is done in many different ways based on a mixture of tradition in the specific sport, coaches' experience and scientific recommendations. Strength training is a form of training that now-a-days have found its...... way into almost all sports in which high intense work is conducted. In this review we will focus on a few selected aspects and consequences of strength training; namely what effects do strength training have of muscle fiber type composition, and how may these effects change the contractile properties...... of the muscle and finally how will this affect the performance of the athlete. In addition, the review will deal with muscle hypertrophy and how it develops with strength training. Overall, it is not the purpose of this review to give a comprehensive up-date of the area, but to pin-point a few issues from which...

  8. Characteristic Paths of Extratropical Cyclones that Cause High Wind Events in the Northeast United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, J. F.; Rieder, H. E.; Lee, D.; Kushnir, Y.

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzes the association between wintertime high wind events (HWEs) in the northeast United States US and extratropical cyclones. Sustained wind maxima in the Daily Summary Data from the National Climatic Data Center's Integrated Surface Database are analyzed for 1979-2012. For each station, a Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) is fit to the upper tail of the daily maximum wind speed data, and probabilistic return levels at intervals of 1, 3 and 5-years are derived from the GPD fit. At each interval, wind events meeting the return level criteria are termed HWEs. The HWEs occurring on the same day are grouped into multi-station events allowing the association with extratropical cyclones, which are tracked in the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecast ERA-Interim reanalysis. Using hierarchical clustering analysis, this study finds that the HWEs are most often associated with cyclones travelling from southwest to northeast, usually originating west of the Appalachian Mountains. The results show that a storm approaching from the southwest is four times more likely to cause strong surface winds than a Nor'easter. A series of sensitivity analyses confirms the robustness of this result. Next, the relationship between the strength of the wind events and the corresponding storm minimum sea level pressure is analyzed. No robust relationship between these quantities is found for strong wind events. Nevertheless, subsequent analysis shows that a relationship between deeper storms and stronger winds emerges if the analysis is extended to the entire set of wintertime storms.

  9. Empagliflozin and Cerebrovascular Events in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus at High Cardiovascular Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinman, Bernard; Inzucchi, Silvio E; Lachin, John M; Wanner, Christoph; Fitchett, David; Kohler, Sven; Mattheus, Michaela; Woerle, Hans J; Broedl, Uli C; Johansen, Odd Erik; Albers, Gregory W; Diener, Hans Christoph

    2017-05-01

    In the EMPA-REG OUTCOME trial (Empagliflozin Cardiovascular Outcome Event Trial in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients), empagliflozin added to standard of care in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high cardiovascular risk reduced the risk of 3-point major adverse cardiovascular events, driven by a reduction in cardiovascular mortality, with no significant difference between empagliflozin and placebo in risk of myocardial infarction or stroke. In a modified intent-to-treat analysis, the hazard ratio for stroke was 1.18 (95% confidence interval, 0.89-1.56; P=0.26). We further investigated cerebrovascular events. Patients were randomized to empagliflozin 10 mg, empagliflozin 25 mg, or placebo; 7020 patients were treated. Median observation time was 3.1 years. The numeric difference in stroke between empagliflozin and placebo in the modified intent-to-treat analysis was primarily because of 18 patients in the empagliflozin group with a first event >90 days after last intake of study drug (versus 3 on placebo). In a sensitivity analysis based on events during treatment or ≤90 days after last dose of drug, the hazard ratio for stroke with empagliflozin versus placebo was 1.08 (95% confidence interval, 0.81-1.45; P=0.60). There were no differences in risk of recurrent, fatal, or disabling strokes, or transient ischemic attack, with empagliflozin versus placebo. Patients with the largest increases in hematocrit or largest decreases in systolic blood pressure did not have an increased risk of stroke. In patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high cardiovascular risk, there was no significant difference in the risk of cerebrovascular events with empagliflozin versus placebo. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT01131676. © 2017 The Authors.

  10. Were West Antarctic Ice Sheet grounding events in the Ross Sea a consequence of East Antarctic Ice Sheet expansion during the middle Miocene?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bart, Philip J.

    2003-11-01

    Seismic correlation of glacial unconformities from the Ross Sea outer continental shelf to chronostratigraphic control at DSDP sites 272 and 273 indicates that at least two West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) expansions occurred during the early part of the middle Miocene (i.e. well before completion of continental-scale expansion of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet (EAIS) inferred from δ 18O and eustatic shifts). Therefore, if the volume of the EAIS was indeed relatively low, and if the Ross Sea age model is valid, then these WAIS expansions/contractions were not a direct consequence of EAIS expansion over the Transantarctic Mountains onto West Antarctica. An in-situ development of the WAIS during the middle Miocene suggests that either West Antarctic land elevations were above sea level and/or that air and water temperatures were sufficiently cold to support a marine-based ice sheet. Additional chronostratigraphic and lithologic data are needed from Antarctic margins to test these speculations.

  11. Determinants of the Price of High-Tech Metals: An Event Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanner, Markus, E-mail: markus.wanner@mrm.uni-augsburg.de; Gaugler, Tobias; Gleich, Benedikt; Rathgeber, Andreas [University of Augsburg, Institute for Materials Resource Management (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    The growing demand for high-tech products has resulted in strong growth in demand for certain minor metals. In combination with production concentrated in China, this caused strong and unpredicted price movements in recent years. As a result, manufacturing companies have to cope with additional risks. However, the detailed reasons for the price development are only partially understood. Therefore, we analyzed empirically which determinants can be assigned to price movements and performed an event study on the high-tech metals neodymium, indium, and gallium. Based on our dataset of news items, we were able to find coinciding events to almost 90% of all price jumps (recall). We showed that if any information about these events occurred with a probability of over 50% there would also be a price jump within 10 days (precision). However, the classical set of price determinants has to be extended for these specific markets, as we found unorthodox factors like holidays or weather that may be indicators for price movements. Therefore, we hope that our study supports industry for instance in performing more informed short-term planning of metals purchasing based on information about specific events.

  12. On the angular distribution of IceCube high-energy events

    CERN Document Server

    Marcos, R de la Fuente

    2015-01-01

    The detection of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos of extraterrestrial origin by the IceCube neutrino observatory in Antarctica has opened a unique window to the cosmos that may help to probe both the distant Universe and our cosmic backyard. The arrival directions of these high-energy events have been interpreted as uniformly distributed on the celestial sphere. Here, we revisit the topic of the putative isotropic angular distribution of these events applying Monte Carlo techniques to investigate a possible anisotropy. A modest evidence for anisotropy is found. An excess of events appears projected towards a section of the Local Void, where the density of galaxies with radial velocities below 3000 km/s is rather low, suggesting that this particular group of somewhat clustered sources are located either very close to the Milky Way or perhaps beyond 40 Mpc. The results of further analyses of the subsample of southern hemisphere events favour an origin at cosmological distances with the arrival directions of ...

  13. Pre-sowing Seed Treatments in Direct-seeded Early Rice: Consequences for Emergence, Seedling Growth and Associated Metabolic Events under Chilling Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weiqin; Chen, Qian; Hussain, Saddam; Mei, Junhao; Dong, Huanglin; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang; Cui, Kehui; Nie, Lixiao

    2016-01-19

    Double direct-seeding for double rice cropping is a simplified, labor saving, and efficient cropping system to improve multiple-crop index and total rice production in central China. However, poor crop establishment of direct-seeded early rice due to chilling stress is the main obstacle to wide spread of this system. A series of experiments were conducted to unravel the effects of pre-sowing seed treatments on emergence, seedling growth and associated metabolic events of direct-seeded early rice under chilling stress. Two seed priming treatments and two seed coating treatments were used in all the experiments. A non-treated control treatment was also maintained for comparison. In both the field and growth chamber studies, seed priming with selenium or salicylic acid significantly enhanced the emergence and seedling growth of rice compared with non-treated control. Nevertheless, such positive effects were not apparent for seed coating treatments. Better emergence and vigorous seedling growth of rice after seed priming was associated with enhanced α-amylase activity, higher soluble sugars contents, and greater respiration rate in primed rice seedlings under chilling stress. Taking together, these findings may provide new avenues for understanding and advancing priming-induced chilling tolerance in direct-seeded early rice in double rice cropping system.

  14. Mitigating the consequences of extreme events on strategic facilities: evaluation of volcanic and seismic risk affecting the Caspian oil and gas pipelines in the Republic of Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquarè, F A; Tormey, D; Vezzoli, L; Okrostsvaridze, A; Tutberidze, B

    2011-07-01

    In this work we identify and quantify new seismic and volcanic risks threatening the strategic Caspian oil and gas pipelines through the Republic of Georgia, in the vicinity of the recent Abuli Samsari Volcanic Ridge, and evaluate risk reduction measures, mitigation measures, and monitoring. As regards seismic risk, we identified a major, NW-SE trending strike-slip fault; based on the analysis of fault planes along this major transcurrent structure, an about N-S trend of the maximum, horizontal compressive stress (σ1) was determined, which is in good agreement with data instrumentally derived after the 1986, M 5.6 Paravani earthquake and its aftershock. Particularly notable is the strong alignment of volcanic vents along an about N-S trend that suggests a magma rising controlled by the about N-S-directed σ1. The original pipeline design included mitigation measures for seismic risk and other geohazards, including burial of the pipeline for its entire length, increased wall thickness, block valve spacing near recognized hazards, and monitoring of known landslide hazards. However, the design did not consider volcanic risk or the specific seismic hazards revealed by this study. The result of our analysis is that the Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan (BTC) oil pipeline, as well as the Baku-Tbilisi-Erzerum South Caucasian natural gas pipeline (SCP) were designed in such a way that they significantly reduce the risk posed by the newly-identified geohazards in the vicinity of the Abuli-Samsari Ridge. No new measures are recommended for the pipeline itself as a result of this study. However, since the consequences of long-term shut-down would be very damaging to the economies of Western Europe, we conclude that the regionally significant BTC and SCP warrant greater protections, described in the final section of or work. The overall objective of our effort is to present the results in a matrix framework that allows the technical information to be used further in the decision

  15. Actual directions in study of ecological consequences of a highly toxic 1,1-dimethylhydrazine-based rocket fuel spills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bulat Kenessov

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper represents a review of the actual directions in study of ecological consequences of highly toxic 1,1-dimethylhydrazine-based rocket fuel spills. Recent results on study of processes of transformation of 1,1-dimethylhydrazine, identification of its main metabolites and development of analytical methods for their determination are generalized. Modern analytical methods of determination of 1,1-dimethylhydrazine and its transformation products in environmental samples are characterized. It is shown that in recent years, through the use of most modern methods of physical chemical analysis and sample preparation, works in this direction made significant progress and contributed to the development of studies in adjacent areas. A character of distribution of transformation products in soils of fall places of first stages of rocket-carriers is described and the available methods for their remediation are characterized.

  16. ARTUS - A Framework for Event-based Data Analysis in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Joram; Friese, Raphael; Haitz, Dominik; Hauth, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Quast, Günter; Sieber, Georg

    2015-01-01

    ARTUS is an event-based data-processing framework for high energy physics experiments. It is designed for large-scale data analysis in a collaborative environment. The architecture design choices take into account typical challenges and are based on experiences with similar applications. The structure of the framework and its advantages are described. An example use case and performance measurements are presented. The framework is well-tested and successfully used by several analysis groups.

  17. A Simulation of an Event Building Network for the CMS High Energy Physics Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aziz, S; Brigljevic, V; Bruno, G; Cano, E; Csilling, A; Cittolin, S; Erhan, S; Gigi, D; Glege, F; Gulmini, M; Gutleber, J; Jacobs, C; Kozlovszky, M; Larsen, H; Litmaath, M; Magrans, I; Maron, G; Meijers, F; Meschi, E; Murray, S; O'Dell, V; Oh, A; Orsini, L; Pollet, L; Racz, A; Samyn, D; Scharff-Hansen, P; Sphicas, P; Schwick, C; Suzuki, I; Toniolo, N; Zangrando, L

    2003-01-01

    A simulation of the event building network of the Data Acquisition System of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN has been developed. The simulation of this highly complex system allows the validation of the system design and the optimization of its performance. The correctness of the simulation model is verified using measurements from test set-ups and a forecast for the full-scale system is made.

  18. Affective and behavioral changes following exposure to traumatic events: the moderating effect of religiosity on avoidance behavior among students studying under a high level of terror event exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korn, Liat; Zukerman, Gil

    2011-12-01

    The goals of this study were to examine the development of affective and behavioral changes following exposure to traumatic events among Israeli students studying under a high level of terror event exposure and to assess the effects of religiosity on those changes development. A questionnaire was administered to 770 students in the Ariel University Center in Judea and Samaria. Higher levels of terror exposure were associated with higher levels of avoidance behavior, subjective feelings of insecurity, and emotional distress. Higher religiosity moderated avoidance behavior, even when controlling for the level of objective exposure to terror events exposure, but had no influence on subjective sense of insecurity, or the level of emotional distress. These findings suggest that religiosity moderates behavioral changes development after traumatic event exposure mainly by reducing avoidance behavior.

  19. Relations between strong high-frequency microwave bursts and proton events

    CERN Document Server

    Grechnev, V; Chertok, I; Kiselev, V

    2013-01-01

    Proceeding from close association between solar eruptions, flares, shock waves, and CMEs, we analyze relations between bursts at 35 GHz recorded with the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters during 1990-2012, on the one hand, and solar energetic particle (SEP) events, on the other hand. Most west to moderately east solar events with strong bursts at 35 GHz produced near-Earth proton enhancements of J(E > 100 MeV) > 1 pfu. The strongest and hardest those caused ground level enhancements. There is a general, although scattered, correspondence between proton enhancements and peak fluxes at 35 GHz, especially pronounced if the 35 GHz flux exceeds 10^4 sfu and the microwave peak frequency is high. These properties indicate emission from numerous high-energy electrons in very strong magnetic fields suggesting a high rate of energy release in the flare-CME formation process. Flaring above the sunspot umbrae appears to be typical of such events. Irrespective of the origin of SEPs, these circumstances demonstrate significant d...

  20. Complex Event Detection on High-Density RFID Event Streams%高密度RFID事件流上的复杂事件检测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐传飞; 林树宽; 乔建忠; 于戈

    2012-01-01

    由于高密度事件流具有实时性和海量性特点,应用已有的复杂事件检测技术处理时,存在时间效率不高、占用内存空间较大等不足.针对这些问题,提出了一种基于哈希链表结构的复杂事件检测算法.该算法设计有效的哈希映射分类来保存中间结果,加快了匹配过程,同时,提出高效的更新机制及时删除内存中过期的数据.针对常见的事件流的乱序现象,对原有自动机处理机制进行了改进.实验和分析证明,复杂事件流检测方法具有理论上的可行性和操作上的高效性与正确性.%The high-density event stream contains mass events which arrive in real time.Existing complex event detection techniques are inefficient and more memory is needed when processing high-density event streams.In order to solve these problems,a new complex event detection algorithm based on Hash structure was proposed.The effective Hash mapping structure is designed in the algorithm to store intermediate data,which improves detection efficiency.Besides,updating mechanism to delete efficiently the overdue events from the memory was also proposed.Furthermore,auto deal mechanism was improved so as to detect complex events over out of order event streams.The feasibility,efficiency and correctness of our algorithms are demonstrated by the theoretical analysis and experiments.

  1. Communicating Low-Probability High-Consequence Risk, Uncertainty and Expert Confidence: Induced Seismicity of Deep Geothermal Energy and Shale Gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblauch, Theresa A K; Stauffacher, Michael; Trutnevyte, Evelina

    2017-08-10

    Subsurface energy activities entail the risk of induced seismicity including low-probability high-consequence (LPHC) events. For designing respective risk communication, the scientific literature lacks empirical evidence of how the public reacts to different written risk communication formats about such LPHC events and to related uncertainty or expert confidence. This study presents findings from an online experiment (N = 590) that empirically tested the public's responses to risk communication about induced seismicity and to different technology frames, namely deep geothermal energy (DGE) and shale gas (between-subject design). Three incrementally different formats of written risk communication were tested: (i) qualitative, (ii) qualitative and quantitative, and (iii) qualitative and quantitative with risk comparison. Respondents found the latter two the easiest to understand, the most exact, and liked them the most. Adding uncertainty and expert confidence statements made the risk communication less clear, less easy to understand and increased concern. Above all, the technology for which risks are communicated and its acceptance mattered strongly: respondents in the shale gas condition found the identical risk communication less trustworthy and more concerning than in the DGE conditions. They also liked the risk communication overall less. For practitioners in DGE or shale gas projects, the study shows that the public would appreciate efforts in describing LPHC risks with numbers and optionally risk comparisons. However, there seems to be a trade-off between aiming for transparency by disclosing uncertainty and limited expert confidence, and thereby decreasing clarity and increasing concern in the view of the public. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  2. Measles outbreaks in high schools closely associated with sporting events in Niigata, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Asami; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Sakai, Takatugu; Sato, Maki; Shobugawa, Yugo; Saito, Reiko

    2007-08-01

    Due to high vaccine coverage in Niigata, we had no outbreaks of measles from 1997 to 2003 but an opportunity to study the role of sporting events in the propagation of an epidemic was experienced in the spring of the latter year. Mandatory measles case reports were requested from all high schools in Niigata, which covered a school year, date of onset, club activity, vaccination status, and hospitalization. With national marathon and kendo (Japanese fencing) meetings for high school students, measles outbreaks occurred at 27 high schools with 192 patients (186 students and 6 teachers) in Niigata. Of 64 unvaccinated patients, 14 (21.9%) were hospitalized and 6 (6.2%) of 97 vaccinated patients. Mostly single cases were encountered at high schools in which index cases had a vaccination history, whereas at a high school in which index cases had no vaccination history, the total number of cases per school increased, mostly within more than 3 cases (p<0.05). We conclude that sporting events, even if outdoors, might be a risk factor for measles infections. Appropriate actions to control outbreaks should be performed promptly in collaboration with related personnel and institutions.

  3. The value of crossdating to retain high-frequency variability, climate signals, and extreme events in environmental proxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Bryan A; Griffin, Daniel; van der Sleen, Peter; Wanamaker, Alan D; Speer, James H; Frank, David C; Stahle, David W; Pederson, Neil; Copenheaver, Carolyn A; Trouet, Valerie; Griffin, Shelly; Gillanders, Bronwyn M

    2016-07-01

    High-resolution biogenic and geologic proxies in which one increment or layer is formed per year are crucial to describing natural ranges of environmental variability in Earth's physical and biological systems. However, dating controls are necessary to ensure temporal precision and accuracy; simple counts cannot ensure that all layers are placed correctly in time. Originally developed for tree-ring data, crossdating is the only such procedure that ensures all increments have been assigned the correct calendar year of formation. Here, we use growth-increment data from two tree species, two marine bivalve species, and a marine fish species to illustrate sensitivity of environmental signals to modest dating error rates. When falsely added or missed increments are induced at one and five percent rates, errors propagate back through time and eliminate high-frequency variability, climate signals, and evidence of extreme events while incorrectly dating and distorting major disturbances or other low-frequency processes. Our consecutive Monte Carlo experiments show that inaccuracies begin to accumulate in as little as two decades and can remove all but decadal-scale processes after as little as two centuries. Real-world scenarios may have even greater consequence in the absence of crossdating. Given this sensitivity to signal loss, the fundamental tenets of crossdating must be applied to fully resolve environmental signals, a point we underscore as the frontiers of growth-increment analysis continue to expand into tropical, freshwater, and marine environments. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Simulation of High Impact Rainfall Events Over Southeastern Hilly Region of Bangladesh Using MM5 Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. N. Ahasan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulation of high impact rainfall events over southeastern hilly region of Bangladesh has been carried out using Fifth-Generation PSU/NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5 conducting two historical rainfall events, namely, 21 June, 2004 and 11 July, 2004. These extraordinary rainfall events were localized over the Rangamati region and recorded 304 mm and 337 mm rainfall on 21 June, 2004 and 11 July, 2004, respectively, over Rangamati within a span of 24 h. The model performance was evaluated by examining the different predicted and derived parameters. It is found that the seasonal monsoon trough has northerly position compared to normal and pass through Bangladesh extending up to northeast India for both cases. The heat low was found to be intense (996 hPa with strong north-south pressure gradient (12–15 hPa. The analysis of the geopotential height field at 200 hPa shows that the Tibetan high is shifted towards south by 7-8° latitudes with axis along 22–25°N for both cases. The analysis of the wind field shows that the areas of high impact rainfall exhibit strong convergence of low level monsoon circulation (~19–58 knots. The strong southwesterlies were found to exist up to 500 hPa level in both cases. The lower troposphere (925–500 hPa was characterized by the strong vertical wind shear (~9–18 ms−1 and high relative vorticity (~20–40 × 10−5 s−1. The analysis also shows that the areas of high impact rainfall events and neighbourhoods are characterized by strong low level convergence and upper level divergence. The strong southwesterly flow causes transportation of large amount of moisture from the Bay of Bengal towards Bangladesh, especially over the areas of Rangamati and neighbourhoods. The high percentage of relative humidity extends up to the upper troposphere along a narrow vertical column. Model produced details structure of the spatial patterns of rainfall over Bangladesh reasonably well though there are some

  5. High resolution genome wide binding event finding and motif discovery reveals transcription factor spatial binding constraints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchun Guo

    Full Text Available An essential component of genome function is the syntax of genomic regulatory elements that determine how diverse transcription factors interact to orchestrate a program of regulatory control. A precise characterization of in vivo spacing constraints between key transcription factors would reveal key aspects of this genomic regulatory language. To discover novel transcription factor spatial binding constraints in vivo, we developed a new integrative computational method, genome wide event finding and motif discovery (GEM. GEM resolves ChIP data into explanatory motifs and binding events at high spatial resolution by linking binding event discovery and motif discovery with positional priors in the context of a generative probabilistic model of ChIP data and genome sequence. GEM analysis of 63 transcription factors in 214 ENCODE human ChIP-Seq experiments recovers more known factor motifs than other contemporary methods, and discovers six new motifs for factors with unknown binding specificity. GEM's adaptive learning of binding-event read distributions allows it to further improve upon previous methods for processing ChIP-Seq and ChIP-exo data to yield unsurpassed spatial resolution and discovery of closely spaced binding events of the same factor. In a systematic analysis of in vivo sequence-specific transcription factor binding using GEM, we have found hundreds of spatial binding constraints between factors. GEM found 37 examples of factor binding constraints in mouse ES cells, including strong distance-specific constraints between Klf4 and other key regulatory factors. In human ENCODE data, GEM found 390 examples of spatially constrained pair-wise binding, including such novel pairs as c-Fos:c-Jun/USF1, CTCF/Egr1, and HNF4A/FOXA1. The discovery of new factor-factor spatial constraints in ChIP data is significant because it proposes testable models for regulatory factor interactions that will help elucidate genome function and the

  6. High resolution genome wide binding event finding and motif discovery reveals transcription factor spatial binding constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuchun; Mahony, Shaun; Gifford, David K

    2012-01-01

    An essential component of genome function is the syntax of genomic regulatory elements that determine how diverse transcription factors interact to orchestrate a program of regulatory control. A precise characterization of in vivo spacing constraints between key transcription factors would reveal key aspects of this genomic regulatory language. To discover novel transcription factor spatial binding constraints in vivo, we developed a new integrative computational method, genome wide event finding and motif discovery (GEM). GEM resolves ChIP data into explanatory motifs and binding events at high spatial resolution by linking binding event discovery and motif discovery with positional priors in the context of a generative probabilistic model of ChIP data and genome sequence. GEM analysis of 63 transcription factors in 214 ENCODE human ChIP-Seq experiments recovers more known factor motifs than other contemporary methods, and discovers six new motifs for factors with unknown binding specificity. GEM's adaptive learning of binding-event read distributions allows it to further improve upon previous methods for processing ChIP-Seq and ChIP-exo data to yield unsurpassed spatial resolution and discovery of closely spaced binding events of the same factor. In a systematic analysis of in vivo sequence-specific transcription factor binding using GEM, we have found hundreds of spatial binding constraints between factors. GEM found 37 examples of factor binding constraints in mouse ES cells, including strong distance-specific constraints between Klf4 and other key regulatory factors. In human ENCODE data, GEM found 390 examples of spatially constrained pair-wise binding, including such novel pairs as c-Fos:c-Jun/USF1, CTCF/Egr1, and HNF4A/FOXA1. The discovery of new factor-factor spatial constraints in ChIP data is significant because it proposes testable models for regulatory factor interactions that will help elucidate genome function and the implementation of combinatorial

  7. Investigating the Impact of Off-Nominal Events on High-Density "Green" Arrivals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callatine, Todd J.; Cabrall, Christopher; Kupfer, Michael; Martin, Lynne; Mercer, Joey; Palmer, Everett A.

    2012-01-01

    Trajectory-based controller tools developed to support a schedule-based terminal-area air traffic management (ATM) concept have been shown effective for enabling green arrivals along Area Navigation (RNAV) routes in moderately high-density traffic conditions. A recent human-in-the-loop simulation investigated the robustness of the concept and tools to off-nominal events events that lead to situations in which runway arrival schedules require adjustments and controllers can no longer use speed control alone to impose the necessary delays. Study participants included a terminal-area Traffic Management Supervisor responsible for adjusting the schedules. Sector-controller participants could issue alternate RNAV transition routes to absorb large delays. The study also included real-time winds/wind-forecast changes. The results indicate that arrival spacing accuracy, schedule conformance, and tool usage and usefulness are similar to that observed in simulations of nominal operations. However, the time and effort required to recover from an off-nominal event is highly context-sensitive, and impacted by the required schedule adjustments and control methods available for managing the evolving situation. The research suggests ways to bolster the off-nominal recovery process, and highlights challenges related to using human-in-the-loop simulation to investigate the safety and robustness of advanced ATM concepts.

  8. High precision locations of long-period events at La Fossa Crater (Vulcano Island, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Rapisarda

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the last eruption in 1888-90, the volcanic activity on Vulcano Island (Aeolian Archipelago, Italy has been limited to fumarolic degassing. Fumaroles are mainly concentred at the active cone of La Fossa in the northern sector of the island and are periodically characterized by increases in temperature as well as in the amount of both CO2 and He. Seismic background activity at Vulcano is dominated by micro-seismicity originating at shallow depth (<1-1.5 km under La Fossa cone. This seismicity is related to geothermal system processes and comprises long period (LP events. LPs are generally considered as the resonance of a fluid-filled volume in response to a trigger. We analyzed LP events recorded during an anomalous degassing period (August-October 2006 applying a high precision technique to define the shape of the trigger source. Absolute and high precision locations suggest that LP events recorded at Vulcano during 2006 were produced by a shallow focal zone ca. 200 m long, 40 m wide and N30-40E oriented. Their occurrence is linked to magmatic fluid inputs that by modifying the hydrothermal system cause excitation of a fluid-filled cavity.

  9. Inefficient highly eccentric accretion and the low luminosity of stellar tidal disruption events

    CERN Document Server

    Svirski, Gilad; Krolik, Julian

    2015-01-01

    Models for tidal disruption events (TDEs) in which a supermassive black hole disrupts a star commonly assume that the highly eccentric streams of bound stellar debris promptly form a circular accretion disk at the pericenter scale. However, the bolometric peak luminosity of most TDE candidates, $\\sim10^{44}\\,\\rm{erg\\,s^{-1}}$, implies that we observe only $\\sim1\\%$ of the energy expected from accretion. Moreover, recent numerical simulations (Shiokawa et al. 2015) have shown that dissipation via hydrodynamical shocks is insufficient to circularize debris orbits on the pericenter scale, and the debris flow retains its initial semi-major axis scale throughout the first $\\sim10$ orbits of the event. Motivated by these numerical results, Piran et al. (2015) suggested that the observed optical TDE emission is powered by shocks at the apocenter between freshly infalling material and earlier-arriving matter. This model explains the small radiated energy, the low temperature, and the large radius implied by the obser...

  10. High-Energy-Physics Event Generation with PYTHIA 6.1

    CERN Document Server

    Sjöstrand, Torbjörn; Friberg, C; Lönnblad, L; Miu, G; Mrenna, S; Norrbin, E

    2001-01-01

    PYTHIA version 6 represents a merger of the PYTHIA 5, JETSET 7 and SPYTHIA programs, with many improvements. It can be used to generate high-energy-physics `events', i.e. sets of outgoing particles produced in the interactions between two incoming particles. The objective is to provide as accurate as possible a representation of event properties in a wide range of reactions. The underlying physics is not understood well enough to give an exact description; the programs therefore contain a combination of analytical results and various models. The emphasis in this article is on new aspects, but a few words of general introduction are included. Further documentation is available on the web.

  11. High-molecular-weight adiponectin does not predict cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanowska, Katarzyna; Aso, Yoshimasa; Mittermayer, Friedrich; Inukai, Toshihiko; Brix, Johanna; Schernthaner, Guntram

    2009-04-01

    Low circulating high-molecular-weight (HMW) adiponectin might be associated with increased cardiovascular risk. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between HMW adiponectin and cardiovascular events in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with an adverse cardiovascular risk profile. The investigation took place in a specialized outpatient clinic for metabolic diseases and included 147 patients with T2DM following a cross-sectional and a prospective study protocol. Ninety patients had macrovascular disease at baseline defined as preexisting coronary artery disease, previous stroke, or peripheral artery disease. HMW adiponectin measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (Fujirebio, Tokyo, Japan) and routine clinical parameters were determined in all patients at baseline. The occurrence of new cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, stroke, and all-cause mortality) during the follow-up period was evaluated. No significant correlations between traditional cardiovascular risk markers and HMW adiponectin could be detected. HMW adiponectin did not differ between subjects with and without macrovascular disease at baseline (3.5 [interquartile range [IQR]: 2.2-5.7] mg/L vs 4.0 [IQR: 2.5-7.1] mg/L). During a follow-up of 19.3 (IQR: 16-25) months, 61 endpoints (41 myocardial infarctions, 10 strokes, and 10 deaths) were observed. A 1-standard-deviation increment of log-transformed HMW adiponectin was not significantly associated with the occurrence of cardiovascular events (Adjusted hazard ratio [HR]: 0.95; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.58-1.54; P = 0.835). In conclusion, HMW adiponectin was not related to present macrovascular disease and is not associated with future cardiovascular events in high-risk patients with T2DM. It is unlikely that HMW adiponectin has significant vasoprotective effects in these patients.

  12. Chemical regulation of alpine headwater streams during a storm event (Bogong High Plains, Victoria, Australia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karis, Terry; Silvester, Ewen; Rees, Gavin

    2016-11-01

    The headwater streams originating in the Australian Alps are the highest water yielding landscape in South-Eastern Australia and are projected to be impacted by climate change through longer dry periods and more episodic rainfall. In this work we studied the major ion and DOC responses of three alpine peatlands (and the broader catchment containing these systems) to a high intensity (summer) storm event. Despite the high volume of rainfall, major ions in stream waters remained strongly chemostatic throughout the event. This was particularly the case for Ca2+ and Mg2+, as well as the alkalinity by association, and suggests that chemical regulation of these particular cations occurs through rapid equilibration processes. DOC concentrations increased during the storm pulse, leading to a shift in alkalinity partitioning from bicarbonate to organic anions and a decrease in pH, mediated by the CO2 saturation levels in the stream water. Our results suggest that alkalinity generation (Ca2+ and Mg2+ acquisition) and partitioning (DOC export) are decoupled processes that may respond differently to repeat storm events depending on the capacity of these systems to provide these constituents. Under extreme case scenarios depletion of DOC (at constant alkalinity) would lead to a smaller pH dip during a storm pulse, while depletion of alkalinity would lead to a larger pH dip, with buffering controlled by free acid. We have not identified the mechanism for the chemostasis of Ca2+ and Mg2+ (and therefore alkalinity) in this work, but this will be critical to understanding the capacity of these peatlands to respond to repeat and more intense storm events.

  13. Measuring the Energy Release of Low Amplitude Impact of High Explosive Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straight, J. W.; Idar, D. J.; Smith, L.; Osborn, M. A.; Viramontes, L. E.; Chavez, P. J.

    2004-07-01

    Predicting the degree of violence of high explosive (HE) reactions for a given event is desirable for risk assessments and a goal for computational models. Historically, different types of low amplitude impact tests on HE specimens have been performed to determine the critical impact-velocity threshold for high explosive violent reactions (HEVR). Additionally, the energy release relative to a steady-state detonation is also desirable for assessing the potential outcome of an accidental event. Traditionally, blast gauge measurements have been used to measure the overpressure of the HEVR event at a defined distance. This paper summarizes the use of this active technique coupled with a passive technique to derive average energy release curves for Modified Steven tests. A classic ballistic pendulum design was employed with the traditional blast gauge method. Calibration of the ballistic pendulum involved three elements. First, two mechanical measurements were related to the actual peak swing of the pendulum. Second, the general nature of the swing versus energy release curve was estimated. Two different approaches were used to estimate the momenta as a function of HE energy release using the Gurney relationships for an unsymmetrical sandwich. Finally, both techniques were simultaneously benchmarked with PBX 9501 calibration charges. Test results demonstrate the utility of using coupled diagnostic methods for low amplitude insult testing. Each set of data was fit to derive a working curve for the determination of the average energy release for HEVR event based on mass relative to a steady-state detonation. These tests results and working curve derivations are presented.

  14. Dissemination of a highly virulent pathogen: tracking the early events that define infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo J Gonzalez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The series of events that occurs immediately after pathogen entrance into the body is largely speculative. Key aspects of these events are pathogen dissemination and pathogen interactions with the immune response as the invader moves into deeper tissues. We sought to define major events that occur early during infection of a highly virulent pathogen. To this end, we tracked early dissemination of Yersinia pestis, a highly pathogenic bacterium that causes bubonic plague in mammals. Specifically, we addressed two fundamental questions: (1 do the bacteria encounter barriers in disseminating to draining lymph nodes (LN, and (2 what mechanism does this nonmotile bacterium use to reach the LN compartment, as the prevailing model predicts trafficking in association with host cells. Infection was followed through microscopy imaging in addition to assessing bacterial population dynamics during dissemination from the skin. We found and characterized an unexpected bottleneck that severely restricts bacterial dissemination to LNs. The bacteria that do not pass through this bottleneck are confined to the skin, where large numbers of neutrophils arrive and efficiently control bacterial proliferation. Notably, bottleneck formation is route dependent, as it is abrogated after subcutaneous inoculation. Using a combination of approaches, including microscopy imaging, we tested the prevailing model of bacterial dissemination from the skin into LNs and found no evidence of involvement of migrating phagocytes in dissemination. Thus, early stages of infection are defined by a bottleneck that restricts bacterial dissemination and by neutrophil-dependent control of bacterial proliferation in the skin. Furthermore, and as opposed to current models, our data indicate an intracellular stage is not required by Y. pestis to disseminate from the skin to draining LNs. Because our findings address events that occur during early encounters of pathogen with the immune response

  15. Dominance of statistical fluctuation in the factorial-moment study of chaos in low multiplicity events of high energy collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘连寿; 傅菁华; 吴元芳

    2000-01-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulation it is shown that in low multiplicity events the single-event factorial moments are saturated by the statistical fluctuations. The diversification of the event-space moments Cp, q of single-event moments with the diminishing of phase space scale, called "erraticity", observed in experiment can readily be reproduced by a flat probability distribution with only statistical fluctuations and therefore it has nothing to do with chaos as suggested. The possibility of studying chaos in high multiplicity events using erraticity analysis is discussed.

  16. EEE - Extreme Energy Events: an astroparticle physics experiment in Italian High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbrescia, M.; Avanzini, C.; Baldini, L.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Batignani, G.; Bencivenni, G.; Bossini, E.; Bressan, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cicalò, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Coccia, E.; Corvaglia, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Pasquale, S.; Di Giovanni, A.; D'Incecco, M.; Dreucci, M.; Fabbri, F. L.; Fattibene, E.; Ferrarov, A.; Forster, R.; Frolov, V.; Galeotti, P.; Garbini, M.; Gemme, G.; Gnesi, I.; Grazzi, S.; Gustavino, C.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; La Rocca, P.; Maggiora, A.; Maron, G.; Mazziotta, M. N.; Miozzi, S.; Noferini, F.; Nozzoli, F.; Panareo, M.; Panetta, M. P.; Paoletti, R.; Perasso, L.; Pilo, F.; Piragino, G.; Riggi, F.; Righini, G. C.; Rodriguez Rodriguez, A.; Sartorelli, G.; Scapparone, E.; Schioppa, M.; Scribano, A.; Selvi, M.; Serci, S.; Siddi, E.; Squarcia, S.; Taiuti, M.; Terreni, G.; Vistoli, M. C.; Votano, L.; Williams, M. C. S.; Zani, S.; Zichichi, A.; Zuyeuski, R.

    2016-05-01

    The Extreme Energy Events project (EEE) is aimed to study Extensive Air Showers (EAS) from primary cosmic rays of more than 1018 eV energy detecting the ground secondary muon component using an array of telescopes with high spatial and time resolution. The second goal of the EEE project is to involve High School teachers and students in this advanced research work and to initiate them in scientific culture: to reach both purposes the telescopes are located inside High School buildings and the detector construction, assembling and monitoring - together with data taking and analysis - are done by researchers from scientific institutions in close collaboration with them. At present there are 42 telescopes in just as many High Schools scattered all over Italy, islands included, plus two at CERN and three in INFN units. We report here some preliminary physics results from the first two common data taking periods together with the outreach impact of the project.

  17. Thiazolidinediones and Cardiovascular Events In High-Risk Patients with Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaya, Fadia T.; Lu, Zhiqiang; Sohn, Kyongsei; Weir, Matthew R.

    2009-01-01

    Context. The use of thiazolidinediones (TZDs) in patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus appears to be associated with an increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI) compared with placebo or other oral antidiabetic drug regimens. Objective. We conducted a study to investigate whether there was a difference in the risk of acute MI and hemorrhagic and non-hemorrhagic stroke between specific TZDs, namely rosiglitazone maleate (Avandia) and pioglitazone (Actos), and other oral antidiabetic agents in a high-risk, largely underrepresented and largely minority Medicaid population. Study Design, Setting, and Patients. We analyzed patient encounter data using propensity-scoring methods and logistic regression to compare the risk of cardiovascular (CV) events in patients with type-2 diabetes in a high-risk population. Main Outcome Measures. Outcomes were identified through International Classification of Disease (ICD-9) codes 410–411 for acute MI; 430–438 for stroke; and revenue (emergency department) codes 450–459 in the case of MI. Results. Using retrospective medical encounter and prescription data analyses, we found that rosiglitazone, compared with other oral antidiabetic agents, was associated with an increased rate of CV events by 20% in a high-risk cohort of diabetic patients. Neither pioglitazone nor the TZD drug class as a whole was associated with an increased CV risk. Conclusion. Rosiglitazone was associated with a significant increase in CV events (MI and stroke) among high-risk patients with type-2 diabetes, whereas pioglitazone was not. We recommend further research to capture risk factors that were not observed in our encounter data. PMID:20140111

  18. Economic consequences of mastitis and withdrawal of milk with high somatic cell count in Swedish dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, C; Ostergaard, S; Emanuelson, U; Andersson, H; Berglund, B; Strandberg, E

    2010-10-01

    The main aim was to assess the impact of mastitis on technical and economic results of a dairy herd under current Swedish farming conditions. The second aim was to investigate the effects obtained by withdrawing milk with high somatic cell count (SCC). A dynamic and stochastic simulation model, SimHerd, was used to study the effects of mastitis in a herd with 150 cows. Results given the initial incidence of mastitis (32 and 33 clinical and subclinical cases per 100 cow-years, respectively) were studied, together with the consequences of reducing or increasing the incidence of mastitis by 50%, modelling no clinical mastitis (CM) while keeping the incidence of subclinical mastitis (SCM) constant and vice versa. Six different strategies to withdraw milk with high SCC were compared. The decision to withdraw milk was based on herd-level information in three scenarios: withdrawal was initiated when the predicted bulk tank SCC exceeded 220 000, 200 000 or 180 000 cells/ml, and on cow-level information in three scenarios: withdrawal was initiated when the predicted SCC in an individual cow's milk exceeded 1 000 000, 750 000 or 500 000 cells/ml. The accuracy with which SCC was measured and predicted was assumed to affect the profitability of withdrawing milk with high SCC and this was investigated by applying high, low or no uncertainty to true SCC. The yearly avoidable cost of mastitis was estimated at €8235, assuming that the initial incidence of mastitis could be reduced by 50%. This cost corresponded to 5% of the herd net return given the initial incidence of mastitis. Expressed per cow-year, the avoidable cost of mastitis was €55. The costs per case of CM and SCM were estimated at €278 and €60, respectively. Withdrawing milk with high SCC was never profitable because this generated a substantial amount of milk withdrawal that was not offset by a sufficient increase in the average price per delivered kg milk. It had the most negative impact on net return when

  19. Observation of Single Isolated Electrons of High Transverse Momentum in Events with Missing Transverse Energy at the CERN pp Collider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, M.; Kofoed-Hansen, O.

    1983-01-01

    We report the results of a search for single isolated electrons of high transverse momentum at the CERN collider. Above 15 GeV/c, four events are found having large missing transverse energy along a direction opposite in azimuth to that of the high-pT electron. Both the configuration of the events...

  20. Initiation of a major calving event captured by high-resolution UAV photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouvet, Guillaume; Abe, Takahiro; Funk, Martin; Seguinot, Julien; Sugiyama, Shin; Weidmann, Yvo

    2016-04-01

    During the summer 2015 field campaign on Bowdoin glacier (Northwest Greenland), the camera inboard a UAV captured the initiation of a major calving event with 7 centimetre accuracy. Two UAV flights were operated prior to and during the opening of a large crack that formed about 100 metre upstream from the calving front, propagated laterally over more than a kilometre and eventually lead to calving. The post-processing of the resulting aerial images by structure-from-motion and feature-tracking techniques allowed us to infer surface velocity fields before and during crack opening. Detailed analysis of maximum principal stresses computed from both velocity fields indicate that the event was triggered by high vertical shear stresses between a lateral band of slow flow where the glacier is solidly anchored to shallow bedrock, and a central band of fast flow where the glacier is nearly floating due to deeper bedrock. We estimate that the observed event contributed by 5 to 10% to the annual mass loss by calving.

  1. Quantifying braided river morphodynamics through a sequence of high-flow events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. D.; Brasington, J.; Vericat, D.; Hicks, D. M.

    2012-04-01

    Quantifying braided river morphology and morphological change is a key task for understanding braided river behaviour. In the last decade, developments in geomatics technologies and associated data processing toolboxes have transformed the potential for producing precise, reach-scale topographic datasets. Moreover, since fast data acquisition rates enable surveys to be undertaken at frequencies that are commensurate with individual flood events, it is now possible to map morphological change for sequences of high-flow events over considerable spatial extents. The application of high-resolution remote sensing technologies to monitor braided river dynamics thus has the potential to provide considerable insight into the relationships between forcing discharges, sediment transport and morphological evolution. In this paper we present a set of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) that have been produced by monitoring the evolution of a 2.5 x 0.7 km braided study area of the Rees River, New Zealand, through a sequence of ten high-flow events over an eight-month period. We then use the morphological approach to produce a sediment budget for the study area. The morphological evolution of the Rees River braided study area was monitored after each storm event using a combination of two remote sensing methodologies. First, dry areas of the braidplain were surveyed using a Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS) mounted on an Argo Amphibious All Terrain Vehicle. Second, since the TLS was not water penetrating, bathymetry was mapped using an empirically calibrated optical method, based on non-metric vertical aerial photos acquired from a helicopter and an acoustic depth survey along primary anabranches. The resulting data were fused together to produce high quality DEMs, with sub-cm and sub-decimetre vertical standard deviations of error for the TLS and optical-empirical bathymetric components respectively. The resulting set of DEMs enabled the quantification of morphological change through

  2. Nitrogen accumulation and partitioning in a High Arctic tundra ecosystem from extreme atmospheric N deposition events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Sonal; Blaud, Aimeric; Osborn, A Mark; Press, Malcolm C; Phoenix, Gareth K

    2016-06-01

    Arctic ecosystems are threatened by pollution from recently detected extreme atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition events in which up to 90% of the annual N deposition can occur in just a few days. We undertook the first assessment of the fate of N from extreme deposition in High Arctic tundra and are presenting the results from the whole ecosystem (15)N labelling experiment. In 2010, we simulated N depositions at rates of 0, 0.04, 0.4 and 1.2 g Nm(-2)yr(-1), applied as (15)NH4(15)NO3 in Svalbard (79(°)N), during the summer. Separate applications of (15)NO3(-) and (15)NH4(+) were also made to determine the importance of N form in their retention. More than 95% of the total (15)N applied was recovered after one growing season (~90% after two), demonstrating a considerable capacity of Arctic tundra to retain N from these deposition events. Important sinks for the deposited N, regardless of its application rate or form, were non-vascular plants>vascular plants>organic soil>litter>mineral soil, suggesting that non-vascular plants could be the primary component of this ecosystem to undergo measurable changes due to N enrichment from extreme deposition events. Substantial retention of N by soil microbial biomass (70% and 39% of (15)N in organic and mineral horizon, respectively) during the initial partitioning demonstrated their capacity to act as effective buffers for N leaching. Between the two N forms, vascular plants (Salix polaris) in particular showed difference in their N recovery, incorporating four times greater (15)NO3(-) than (15)NH4(+), suggesting deposition rich in nitrate will impact them more. Overall, these findings show that despite the deposition rates being extreme in statistical terms, biologically they do not exceed the capacity of tundra to sequester pollutant N during the growing season. Therefore, current and future extreme events may represent a major source of eutrophication.

  3. High dose rates obtained outside ISS in June 2015 during SEP event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dachev, T P; Tomov, B T; Matviichuk, Yu N; Dimitrov, Pl G; Bankov, N G

    2016-06-01

    The R3DR2 instrument performed measurements in the European Space Agency (ESA) EXPOSE-R2 platform outside the Russian "Zvezda" module of the International Space Station (ISS) in the period 24 October 2014-11 January 2016. It is the Liulin-type deposited energy spectrometer (DES) (Dachev et al., 2015a). Took place in November 2014, this was the first attempt to monitor a small solar energetic particle (SEP) event outside ISS using the Liulin-type DES (Dachev et al., 2015d). In this study, we describe the dosimetric characteristics of the largest SEP event, observed on 22 June 2015 with the R3DR2 instrument outside ISS. The main finding of this study is that SEP protons with a minimum energy of approximately 7MeV at the surface of the R3DR2 detector produced high dose rates, reaching >5000µGyh(-1), while the inner radiation belt maximum dose was at the level of 2200µGyh(-1). If a virtual external vehicle activity (EVA) was performed in the same period of the SEP maximum on 22 June 2015, the doses obtained in the skin of cosmonauts/astronauts can reach 2.84mGy after 6.5h, which is similar to the average absorbed dose inside ISS for 15days (Reitz et al., 2005). A comparison with other extreme events measured with Liulin-type instruments shows that SEPs similar to that observed on 22 June 2015 could be one of the most dangerous events for the cosmonauts/astronauts involved in EVA. Copyright © 2016 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Propensity and Risk Assessment for Solar Particle Events: Consideration of Integral Fluence at High Proton Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee; Hayat, Matthew J.; Feiveson, alan H.; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2008-01-01

    For future space missions with longer duration, exposure to large solar particle events (SPEs) with high energy levels is the major concern during extra-vehicular activities (EVAs) on the lunar and Mars surface. The expected SPE propensity for large proton fluence was estimated from a non-homogeneous Poisson model using the historical database for measurements of protons with energy > 30 MeV, Phi(sub 30). The database includes a continuous data set for the past 5 solar cycles. The resultant SPE risk analysis for a specific mission period was made including the 95% confidence level. In addition to total particle intensity of SPE, the detailed energy spectra of protons especially at high energy levels were recognized as extremely important parameter for the risk assessment, since there remains a significant cancer risks from those energetic particles for large events. Using all the recorded proton fluence of SPEs for energies >60 and >100 MeV, Phi(sub 60) and Phi(sub 100), respectively, the expected propensities of SPEs abundant with high energy protons were estimated from the same non-homogeneous Poisson model and the representative cancer risk was analyzed. The dependencies of risk with different energy spectra, for e.g. between soft and hard SPEs, were evaluated. Finally, we describe approaches to improve radiation protection of astronauts and optimize mission planning for future space missions.

  5. Radiation Fields in High Energy Accelerators and their impact on Single Event Effects

    CERN Document Server

    García Alía, Rubén; Wrobel, Frédéric; Brugger, Markus

    Including calculation models and measurements for a variety of electronic components and their concerned radiation environments, this thesis describes the complex radiation field present in the surrounding of a high-energy hadron accelerator and assesses the risks related to it in terms of Single Event Effects (SEE). It is shown that this poses not only a serious threat to the respective operation of modern accelerators but also highlights the impact on other high-energy radiation environments such as those for ground and avionics applications. Different LHC-like radiation environments are described in terms of their hadron composition and energy spectra. They are compared with other environments relevant for electronic component operation such as the ground-level, avionics or proton belt. The main characteristic of the high-energy accelerator radiation field is its mixed nature, both in terms of hadron types and energy interval. The threat to electronics ranges from neutrons of thermal energies to GeV hadron...

  6. Intrauterine growth retardation - small events, big consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Syed R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Intrauterine growth retardation refers to a rate of growth of a fetus that is less than normal for the growth potential of a fetus (for that particular gestational age. As one of the leading causes of perinatal mortality and morbidity, intrauterine growth retardation has immense implications for the short term and long term growth of children. It is an important public health concern in the developing countries. Health statistics encompassing parameters for maternal and child health in the Indian subcontinent have shown improvement in the past few years but they are still far from perfect. Maternal health, education and empowerment bears a strong influence on perinatal outcomes including intrauterine growth retardation and should be the primary focus of any stratagem targeted at reducing the incidence of intrauterine growth retardation. A concerted liaison of various medical and social disciplines is imperative in this regard.

  7. Cretaceous oceanic anoxic events: causes and consequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlanger, S.O.; Jenkyns, H.C.

    2007-01-01

    Organic carbon-rich sediments are globally developed in pelagic sedimentary sequences of Aptian-Albian and Cenomanian-Turonian age. They formed in a variety of paleo-bathymetric settings including oceanic plateaus and basins, continental margins and shelf seas. The widespread nature of these

  8. Ionospheric response to sudden stratospheric warming events at low and high solar activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Tzu-Wei; Fuller-Rowell, Tim; Wang, Houjun; Akmaev, Rashid; Wu, Fei

    2014-09-01

    The sensitivity of the ionospheric response to a sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) event has been examined under conditions of low and high solar activity through simulations using the whole atmosphere model (WAM) and the global ionosphere plasmasphere model (GIP). During non-SSW conditions, simulated daytime mean vertical drifts at the magnetic equator show similar solar activity dependence as an empirical model. Model results of ionospheric total electron content (TEC) and equatorial vertical drift for the January 2009 major SSW, which occurred at very low solar activity conditions, show reasonable agreement with observations. The simulations demonstrate that the E region dynamo is capable of creating the semidiurnal variation of vertical drift. WAM and GIP were also run at high solar activity conditions, using the same lower atmosphere conditions as present in the January 2009 SSW event. The simulations indicate that the amplitude and phase of migrating tides in the dynamo region during the event have similar magnitudes for both solar flux conditions. However, comparing the ionospheric responses to a major SSW under low and high solar activity periods, it was found that the changes in the ionospheric vertical drifts and relative changes in TEC decreased with increasing solar activity. The simulations indicate that the F region dynamo becomes more important throughout the daytime and contributes to the upward drift in the afternoon during the event when the solar activity is higher. Our test simulations also confirm that the increase of the ionospheric conductivity associated with increasing solar activity is responsible for the decrease of vertical drift changes during an SSW. In particular, first, the increase in F region conductivity allows the closure of E region currents through the F region, reducing the polarization electric field before noon. Second, the F region dynamo contributes an upward drift postnoon, maintaining upward drifts till after sunset

  9. Nitrogen accumulation and partitioning in a High Arctic tundra ecosystem from extreme atmospheric N deposition events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Sonal, E-mail: S.Choudhary@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Management School, University of Sheffield, Conduit Road, Sheffield S10 1FL (United Kingdom); Blaud, Aimeric [Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Osborn, A. Mark [Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, PO Box 71, Bundoora, VIC 3083 (Australia); Press, Malcolm C. [School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, M15 6BH (United Kingdom); Phoenix, Gareth K. [Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-01

    Arctic ecosystems are threatened by pollution from recently detected extreme atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition events in which up to 90% of the annual N deposition can occur in just a few days. We undertook the first assessment of the fate of N from extreme deposition in High Arctic tundra and are presenting the results from the whole ecosystem {sup 15}N labelling experiment. In 2010, we simulated N depositions at rates of 0, 0.04, 0.4 and 1.2 g N m{sup −2} yr{sup −1}, applied as {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup 15}NO{sub 3} in Svalbard (79{sup °}N), during the summer. Separate applications of {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup −} and {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} were also made to determine the importance of N form in their retention. More than 95% of the total {sup 15}N applied was recovered after one growing season (~ 90% after two), demonstrating a considerable capacity of Arctic tundra to retain N from these deposition events. Important sinks for the deposited N, regardless of its application rate or form, were non-vascular plants > vascular plants > organic soil > litter > mineral soil, suggesting that non-vascular plants could be the primary component of this ecosystem to undergo measurable changes due to N enrichment from extreme deposition events. Substantial retention of N by soil microbial biomass (70% and 39% of {sup 15}N in organic and mineral horizon, respectively) during the initial partitioning demonstrated their capacity to act as effective buffers for N leaching. Between the two N forms, vascular plants (Salix polaris) in particular showed difference in their N recovery, incorporating four times greater {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup −} than {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +}, suggesting deposition rich in nitrate will impact them more. Overall, these findings show that despite the deposition rates being extreme in statistical terms, biologically they do not exceed the capacity of tundra to sequester pollutant N during the growing season. Therefore, current and future extreme events

  10. Retrospective Analysis of Recent Flood Events With Persistent High Surface Runoff From Hydrological Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, S.; Hakeem, K. Abdul; Raju, P. V.; Rao, V. V.; Yadav, A.; Diwakar, P. G.; Dadhwal, V. K.

    2014-11-01

    Floods are one of the most common and widespread disasters in India, with an estimated 40Mha of land prone to this natural disaster (National Flood Commission, India). Significant loss of property, infrastructure, livestock, public utilities resulting in large economic losses due to floods are recurrent every year in many parts of India. Flood forecasting and early warning is widely recognized and adopted as non-structural measure to lower the damages caused by the flood events. Estimating the rainfall excess that results into excessive river flow is preliminary effort in riverine flood estimation. Flood forecasting models are in general, are event based and do not fully account for successive and persistent excessive surface runoff conditions. Successive high rainfall events result in saturated soil moisture conditions, favourable for high surface runoff conditions. The present study is to explore the usefulness of hydrological model derived surface runoff, running on continuous times-step, to relate to the occurrence of flood inundation due to persistent and successive high surface runoff conditions. Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC), a macro-scale hydrological model, was used to simulate daily runoff at systematic grid level incorporating daily meteorological data and land cover data. VIC is a physically based, semi-distributed macroscale hydrological model that represents surface and subsurface hydrologic process on spatially distributed grid cell. It explicitly represents sub-grid heterogeneity in land cover classes, taking their phenological changes into account. In this study, the model was setup for entire India using geo-spatial data available from multiple sources (NRSC, NBSS&LUP, NOAA, and IMD) and was calibrated with river discharge data from CWC at selected river basins. Using the grid-wise surface runoff estimates from the model, an algorithm was developed through a set of thresholds of successive high runoff values in order to identify grids

  11. Adverse respiratory events after general anesthesia in patients at high risk of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xará, Daniela; Mendonça, Júlia; Pereira, Helder; Santos, Alice; Abelha, Fernando José

    2015-01-01

    Patients with STOP-BANG score >3 have a high risk of Obstructive sleep apnea. The aim of this study was to evaluate early postoperative respiratory complications in adults with STOP-BANG score >3 after general anesthesia. This is a prospective double cohort study matching 59 pairs of adult patients with STOP-BANG score >3 (high risk of obstructive sleep apnea) and patients with STOP-BANG score <3 (low risk of obstructive sleep apnea), similar with respect to gender, age and type of surgery, admitted after elective surgery in the Post-Anaesthesia Care Unit in May 2011. Primary outcome was the development of adverse respiratory events. Demographics data, perioperative variables, and postoperative length of stay in the Post-Anesthesia Care Unit and in hospital were recorded. The Mann-Whitney test, the chi-square test and the Fisher exact test were used for comparisons. Subjects in both pairs of study subjects had a median age of 56 years, including 25% males, and 59% were submitted to intra-abdominal surgery. High risk of obstructive sleep apnea patients had a higher median body mass index (31 versus 24kg/m(2), p<0.001) and had more frequently co-morbidities, including hypertension (58% versus 24%, p<0.001), dyslipidemia (46% versus 17%, p<0.001) and insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (17% versus 2%, p=0.004). These patients were submitted more frequently to bariatric surgery (20% versus 2%, p=0.002). Patients with high risk of obstructive sleep apnea had more frequently adverse respiratory events (39% versus 10%, p<0.001), mild to moderate desaturation (15% versus 0%, p=0.001) and inability to breathe deeply (34% versus 9%, p=0.001). After general anesthesia high risk of obstructive sleep apnea patients had an increased incidence of postoperative respiratory complications. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. [Adverse respiratory events after general anesthesia in patients at high risk of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xará, Daniela; Mendonça, Júlia; Pereira, Helder; Santos, Alice; Abelha, Fernando José

    2015-01-01

    Patients with STOP-BANG score >3 have a high risk of Obstructive sleep apnea. The aim of this study was to evaluate early postoperative respiratory complications in adults with STOP-BANG score >3 after general anesthesia. This is a prospective double cohort study matching 59 pairs of adult patients with STOP-BANG score >3 (high risk of obstructive sleep apnea) and patients with STOP-BANG score <3 (low risk of obstructive sleep apnea), similar with respect to gender, age and type of surgery, admitted after elective surgery in the Post-Anaesthesia Care Unit in May 2011. Primary outcome was the development of adverse respiratory events. Demographics data, perioperative variables, and postoperative length of stay in the Post-Anesthesia Care Unit and in hospital were recorded. The Mann-Whitney test, the chi-square test and the Fisher exact test were used for comparisons. Subjects in both pairs of study subjects had a median age of 56 years, including 25% males, and 59% were submitted to intra-abdominal surgery. High risk of obstructive sleep apnea patients had a higher median body mass index (31 versus 24kg/m(2), p<0.001) and had more frequently co-morbidities, including hypertension (58% versus 24%, p<0.001), dyslipidemia (46% versus 17%, p<0.001) and insulin-treated diabetes mellitus (17% versus 2%, p=0.004). These patients were submitted more frequently to bariatric surgery (20% versus 2%, p=0.002). Patients with high risk of obstructive sleep apnea had more frequently adverse respiratory events (39% versus 10%, p<0.001), mild to moderate desaturation (15% versus 0%, p=0.001) and inability to breathe deeply (34% versus 9%, p=0.001). After general anesthesia high risk of obstructive sleep apnea patients had an increased incidence of postoperative respiratory complications. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. 'HESPERIA' HORIZON 2020 project: High Energy Solar Particle Events foRecastIng and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandraki, Olga; Klein, Karl-Ludwig; Vainio, Rami; Agueda, Neus; Nunez, Marlon; Heber, Bernd; Buetikofer, Rolf; Sarlanis, Christos; Crosby, Norma; Bindi, Veronica; Murphy, Ronald; Tyka, Allan J.; Rodriguez, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) are of prime interest for fundamental astrophysics. However, due to their high energies they are a space weather concern for technology in space as well as human space exploration calling for reliable tools with predictive capabilities. The two-year EU HORIZON 2020 project HESPERIA (High Energy Solar Particle Events foRecastIng and Analysis, http://www.hesperia-space.eu/) will produce two novel operational SEP forecasting tools based upon proven concepts (UMASEP, REleASE). At the same time the project will advance our understanding of the physical mechanisms that result into high-energy SEP events through the systematic exploitation of the high-energy gamma-ray observations of the FERMI mission and other novel published datasets (PAMELA, AMS), together with in situ SEP measurements near 1 AU. By using multi-frequency observations and performing simulations, the project will address the chain of processes from particle acceleration in the corona, particle transport in the magnetically complex corona and interplanetary space to their detection near 1 AU. Furthermore, HESPERIA will explore the possibility of incorporating the derived results into future innovative space weather services. Publicly available software to invert neutron monitor observations of relativistic SEPs to physical parameters, giving information on the high-energy processes occurring at or near the Sun during solar eruptions, will be provided for the first time. The results of this inversion software will complement the space-borne measurements at adjacent higher energies. In order to achieve these goals HESPERIA will exploit already existing large datasets that are stored into databases built under EU FP7 projects NMDB and SEPServer. The structure of the HESPERIA project, its main objectives and forecasting operational tools, as well as the added value to SEP research will be presented and discussed. Acknowledgement: This project has received funding from the

  14. Characterization of an ultraviolet imaging detector with high event rate ROIC (HEROIC) readout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nell, Nicholas; France, Kevin; Harwit, Alex; Bradley, Scott; Franka, Steve; Freymiller, Ed; Ebbets, Dennis

    2016-07-01

    We present characterization results from a photon counting imaging detector consisting of one microchannel plate (MCP) and an array of two readout integrated circuits (ROIC) that record photon position. The ROICs used in the position readout are the high event rate ROIC (HEROIC) devices designed to handle event rates up to 1 MHz per pixel, recently developed by the Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation in collaboration with the University of Colorado. An opaque cesium iodide (CsI) photocathode sensitive in the far-ultraviolet (FUV; 122-200 nm), is deposited on the upper surface of the MCP. The detector is characterized in a chamber developed by CU Boulder that is capable of illumination with vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) monochromatic light and measurement of absolute ux with a calibrated photodiode. Testing includes investigation of the effects of adjustment of internal settings of the HEROIC devices including charge threshold, gain, and amplifier bias. The detector response to high count rates is tested. We report initial results including background, uniformity, and quantum detection efficiency (QDE) as a function of wavelength.

  15. Coincidence of a high-fluence blazar outburst with a PeV-energy neutrino event

    CERN Document Server

    Kadler, M; Mannheim, K; Ojha, R; Müller, C; Schulz, R; Anton, G; Baumgartner, W; Beuchert, T; Buson, S; Carpenter, B; Eberl, T; Edwards, P G; Glawion, D Eisenacher; Elsässer, D; Gehrels, N; Gräfe, C; Hase, H; Horiuchi, S; James, C W; Kappes, A; Katz, U; Kreikenbohm, A; Kreter, M; Kreykenbohm, I; Langejahn, M; Leiter, K; Litzinger, E; Longo, F; Lovell, J E J; McEnery, J; Phillips, C; Plötz, C; Quick, J; Ros, E; Stecker, F W; Steinbring, T; Stevens, J; Thompson, D J; Trüstedt, J; Tzioumis, A K; Wilms, J; Zensus, J A

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of extraterrestrial very-high-energy neutrinos by the IceCube collaboration has launched a quest for the identification of their astrophysical sources. Gamma-ray blazars have been predicted to yield a cumulative neutrino signal exceeding the atmospheric background above energies of 100 TeV, assuming that both the neutrinos and the gamma-ray photons are produced by accelerated protons in relativistic jets. Since the background spectrum falls steeply with increasing energy, the individual events with the clearest signature of being of an extraterrestrial origin are those at PeV energies. Inside the large positional-uncertainty fields of the first two PeV neutrinos detected by IceCube, the integrated emission of the blazar population has a sufficiently high electromagnetic flux to explain the detected IceCube events, but fluences of individual objects are too low to make an unambiguous source association. Here, we report that a major outburst of the blazar PKS B1424-418 occurred in temporal and pos...

  16. Extreme Energy Events Project: Construction of the detectors and installation in Italian High Schools

    CERN Document Server

    Abbrescia, M; An, S; Antolini, R; Badalà, A; Baldini Ferroli, R; Bencivenni, G; Blanco, F; Bressan, E; Chiavassa, A; Chiri, C; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; Coccia, E; De Pasquale, S; Di Giovanni, A; D’Incecco, M; Fabbri, F L; Frolov, V; Garbini, M; Gustavino, C; Hatzifotiadou, D; Imponente, G; Kim, J; La Rocca, P; Librizzi, F; Maggiora, A; Menghetti, H; Miozzi, S; Moro, R; Panareo, M; Pappalardo, G S; Piragino, G; Riggi, F; Romano, F; Sartorelli, G; Sbarra, C; Selvi, M; Serci, S; Williams, C; Zuyeuski, R

    2008-01-01

    The EEE Project, conceived by its leader Antonino Zichichi, aims to detect Extreme Energy Events of cosmic rays with an array of muon telescopes distributed over the Italian territory. The Project involves Italian High Schools in order to introduce young people to Physics, also countervailing the recent crisis of university scientific classes inscriptions. The detectors for the EEE telescopes are Multigap Resistive Plate Chambers (MRPC) and have been constructed by teams of High School students who went in shift at the CERN laboratories. The mechanics and the electronics were developed by groups of researchers from CERN, the Italian Centro Fermi and INFN. The first group of schools of the EEE Project has inaugurated their telescopes recently. A status report of the Project and the preliminary results are presented.

  17. MYBPC3's alternate ending: consequences and therapeutic implications of a highly prevalent 25 bp deletion mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuster, Diederik W. D.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is the most common form of inherited cardiac disease and the leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young people. HCM is caused by mutations in genes encoding contractile proteins. Cardiac myosin binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) is a thick filament contractile protein that regulates sarcomere organization and cardiac contractility. About 200 different mutations in the cMyBP-C gene (MYBPC3) have thus far been reported as causing HCM. Among them, a 25 base pair deletion in the branch point of intron 32 of MYBPC3 is widespread, particularly in South Asia, where it affects ≈4% of South Asian descendants worldwide. This polymorphic mutation results in skipping of exon 33 and a reading frame shift, which, in turn, replaces the last 65 amino acids of the C-terminal C10 domain of cMyBP-C (cMyBP-CC10mut) with a novel sequence of 58 residues. Carriers of the 25 base pair deletion mutation are at increased risk of developing cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Because of the high prevalence of this mutation in certain populations, genetic screening of at-risk groups might be beneficial. Scientifically, the functional consequences of C-terminal mutations and the precise mechanisms leading to HCM should be defined using induced pluripotent stem cells and engineered heart tissue in vitro, or mouse models in vivo. Most importantly, therapeutic strategies that include pharmacology, gene repair and gene therapy should be developed to prevent the adverse clinical effects of cMyBP-CC10mut. This review article aims to examine the effects of cMyBP-CC10mut on cardiac function, emphasizing the need for the development of genetic testing and expanded therapeutic strategies. PMID:24327208

  18. Influence of an extreme high water event on survival, reproduction, and distribution of snail kites in Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennetts, R.E.; Kitchens, W.M.; Dreitz, V.J.

    2002-01-01

    Hydrology frequently has been reported as the environmental variable having the greatest influence on Florida snail kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis) populations. Although drought has received the most attention, high-water conditions also have been reported to affect kites. Years of high water generally have been reported to be favorable for nesting, although prolonged high water may be detrimental to sustaining suitable habitat. During 1994 and 1995, southern Florida experienced an extreme high water event. This event enabled us to compare survival, nesting success, number of young per successful nest, and spatial distribution of nesting before, during, and after the event. We found no evidence of an effect (either negative or positive) on survival of adult kites. In contrast, juvenile kites experienced the highest survival during the event, although our data suggest greater annual variability than can be explained by the event alone. We found no evidence of an effect of the high water event on nest success or number of young per successful nest. Nest success was highest during the event in the southern portion of the range but was quite similar to other years, both before and after the event. Our data do indicate a substantial shift in the spatial distribution of nesting birds. During the event, nesting activity shifted to higher elevations (i.e., shallower water) in the major nesting areas of the Everglades region. Nesting also occurred in Big Cypress National Preserve during the event, which is typically too dry to support nesting kites. Thus, our data indicate a potential short-term benefit of increased juvenile survival and an expansion of nesting habitat. However, the deterioration of habitat quality from prolonged high water precludes any recommendation for such conditions to be maintained for extended periods. ?? 2002, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  19. Event-based prospective memory deficits in individuals with high depressive symptomatology: problems controlling attentional resources?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanqi Ryan; Loft, Shayne; Weinborn, Michael; Maybery, Murray T

    2014-01-01

    Depression has been found to be related to neurocognitive deficits in areas important to successful prospective memory (PM) performance, including executive function, attention, and retrospective memory. However, research specific to depression and PM has produced a mixed pattern of results. The current study further examined the task conditions in which event-based PM deficits may emerge in individuals with high depressive symptomatology (HDS) relative to individuals with low depressive symptomatology (LDS) and the capacity of HDS individuals to allocate attentional resources to event-based PM tasks. Sixty-four participants (32 HDS, 32 LDS) were required to make a PM response when target words were presented during an ongoing lexical decision task. When the importance of the ongoing task was emphasized, response time costs to the ongoing task, and PM accuracy, did not differ between the HDS and LDS groups. This finding is consistent with previous research demonstrating that event-based PM task accuracy is not always impaired by depression, even when the PM task is resource demanding. When the importance of the PM task was emphasized, costs to the ongoing task further increased for both groups, indicating an increased allocation of attentional resources to the PM task. Crucially, while a corresponding improvement in PM accuracy was observed in the LDS group when the importance of the PM task was emphasized, this was not true for the HDS group. The lack of improved PM accuracy in the HDS group compared with the LDS group despite evidence of increased cognitive resources allocated to PM tasks may have been due to inefficiency in the application of the allocated attention, a dimension likely related to executive function difficulties in depression. Qualitatively different resource allocation patterns may underlie PM monitoring in HDS versus LDS individuals.

  20. Detection and Attribution of Simulated Climatic Extreme Events and Impacts: High Sensitivity to Bias Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippel, S.; Otto, F. E. L.; Forkel, M.; Allen, M. R.; Guillod, B. P.; Heimann, M.; Reichstein, M.; Seneviratne, S. I.; Kirsten, T.; Mahecha, M. D.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding, quantifying and attributing the impacts of climatic extreme events and variability is crucial for societal adaptation in a changing climate. However, climate model simulations generated for this purpose typically exhibit pronounced biases in their output that hinders any straightforward assessment of impacts. To overcome this issue, various bias correction strategies are routinely used to alleviate climate model deficiencies most of which have been criticized for physical inconsistency and the non-preservation of the multivariate correlation structure. We assess how biases and their correction affect the quantification and attribution of simulated extremes and variability in i) climatological variables and ii) impacts on ecosystem functioning as simulated by a terrestrial biosphere model. Our study demonstrates that assessments of simulated climatic extreme events and impacts in the terrestrial biosphere are highly sensitive to bias correction schemes with major implications for the detection and attribution of these events. We introduce a novel ensemble-based resampling scheme based on a large regional climate model ensemble generated by the distributed weather@home setup[1], which fully preserves the physical consistency and multivariate correlation structure of the model output. We use extreme value statistics to show that this procedure considerably improves the representation of climatic extremes and variability. Subsequently, biosphere-atmosphere carbon fluxes are simulated using a terrestrial ecosystem model (LPJ-GSI) to further demonstrate the sensitivity of ecosystem impacts to the methodology of bias correcting climate model output. We find that uncertainties arising from bias correction schemes are comparable in magnitude to model structural and parameter uncertainties. The present study consists of a first attempt to alleviate climate model biases in a physically consistent way and demonstrates that this yields improved simulations of

  1. Modelado del transformador para eventos de alta frecuencia ;Transformer model for high frequency events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Adriana – Galván Sanchez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available La función de un transformador es cambiar el nivel de tensión a través de un acoplamiento magnético.Debido a su construcción física, su representación como un circuito y su modelo matemático son muycomplejos. El comportamiento electromagnético del transformador, al igual que todos los elementos de lared eléctrica de potencia, depende de la frecuencia involucrada. Por esta razón cuando se tienenfenómenos de alta frecuencia su modelo debe ser muy detallado para que reproduzca el comportamientodel estado transitorio. En este trabajo se analiza cómo se pasa de un modelo muy simple, a un modelo muydetallado para hacer simulación de eventos de alta frecuencia. Los eventos que se simulan son la operaciónde un interruptor por una falla en el sistema y el impacto de una descarga atmosférica sobre la línea detransmisión a una distancia de 5 km de una subestación de potencia.The transformer’s function is to change the voltage level through a magnetic coupling. Due to its physicalconstruction, its representation as a circuit and its mathematical model are very complex. Theelectromagnetic behavior and all the elements in the power network depend on the involved frequency. So,for high frequency events, its model needs to be very detailed to reproduce the electromagnetic transientbehavior. This work analyzes how to pass from a simple model to a very detailed model to simulated highfrequency events. The simulated events are the switch operation due to a fault in the system and the impactof an atmospheric discharge (direct stroke in the transmission line, five km far away from the substation.

  2. Custom database development and biomarker discovery methods for MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry-based identification of high-consequence bacterial pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracz, Dobryan M; Tyler, Andrea D; Cunningham, Ian; Antonation, Kym S; Corbett, Cindi R

    2017-03-01

    A high-quality custom database of MALDI-TOF mass spectral profiles was developed with the goal of improving clinical diagnostic identification of high-consequence bacterial pathogens. A biomarker discovery method is presented for identifying and evaluating MALDI-TOF MS spectra to potentially differentiate biothreat bacteria from less-pathogenic near-neighbour species.

  3. Teleconnection between the North Indian Ocean high swell events and meteorological conditions over the Southern Indian Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remya, P. G.; Vishnu, S.; Praveen Kumar, B.; Balakrishnan Nair, T. M.; Rohith, B.

    2016-10-01

    The link between North Indian Ocean (NIO) high swell events and the meteorological conditions over the Southern Indian Ocean (SIO) is explored in this article, using a combination of in situ measurements and model simulations for the year 2005. High waves, without any sign in the local winds, sometimes cause severe flooding events along the south-west coast of India, locally known as the Kallakkadal events and cause major societal problems along the coasts. In situ observations report 10 high swell events in NIO during 2005. Our study confirms that these events are caused by the swells propagating from south of 30°S. In all cases, 3-5 days prior to the high swell events in NIO, we observed a severe low pressure system, called the Cut-Off Low (COL) in the Southern Ocean. These COLs are quasistationary in nature, providing strong (˜25 ms-1) and long duration (˜3 days) surface winds over a large fetch; essential conditions for the generation of long-period swells. The intense equator ward winds associated with COLs in the SIO trigger the generation of high waves, which propagate to NIO as swells. Furthermore, these swells cause high wave activity and sometimes Kallakkadal events along the NIO coastal regions, depending on the local topography, angle of incidence, and tidal conditions. Our study shows that such natural hazards along the NIO coasts can be forecasted at least 2 days in advance if the meteorological conditions of the SIO are properly monitored.

  4. Choice & Consequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Azam

    between cause and effect in complex systems complicates decision making. To address this issue, we examine the central role that data-driven decision making could play in critical domains such as sustainability or medical treatment. We developed systems for exploratory data analysis and data visualization...... of data analysis and instructional interface design, to both simulation systems and decision support interfaces. We hope that projects such as these will help people to understand the link between their choices and the consequences of their decisions....

  5. Choice & Consequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Azam

    between cause and effect in complex systems complicates decision making. To address this issue, we examine the central role that data-driven decision making could play in critical domains such as sustainability or medical treatment. We developed systems for exploratory data analysis and data visualization...... of data analysis and instructional interface design, to both simulation systems and decision support interfaces. We hope that projects such as these will help people to understand the link between their choices and the consequences of their decisions....

  6. An analysis of high-impact, low-predictive skill severe weather events in the northeast U.S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Matthew T.

    An objective evaluation of Storm Prediction Center slight risk convective outlooks, as well as a method to identify high-impact severe weather events with poor-predictive skill are presented in this study. The objectives are to assess severe weather forecast skill over the northeast U.S. relative to the continental U.S., build a climatology of high-impact, low-predictive skill events between 1980--2013, and investigate the dynamic and thermodynamic differences between severe weather events with low-predictive skill and high-predictive skill over the northeast U.S. Severe storm reports of hail, wind, and tornadoes are used to calculate skill scores including probability of detection (POD), false alarm ratio (FAR) and threat scores (TS) for each convective outlook. Low predictive skill events are binned into low POD (type 1) and high FAR (type 2) categories to assess temporal variability of low-predictive skill events. Type 1 events were found to occur in every year of the dataset with an average of 6 events per year. Type 2 events occur less frequently and are more common in the earlier half of the study period. An event-centered composite analysis is performed on the low-predictive skill database using the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Climate Forecast System Reanalysis 0.5° gridded dataset to analyze the dynamic and thermodynamic conditions prior to high-impact severe weather events with varying predictive skill. Deep-layer vertical shear between 1000--500 hPa is found to be a significant discriminator in slight risk forecast skill where high-impact events with less than 31-kt shear have lower threat scores than high-impact events with higher shear values. Case study analysis of type 1 events suggests the environment over which severe weather occurs is characterized by high downdraft convective available potential energy, steep low-level lapse rates, and high lifting condensation level heights that contribute to an elevated risk of severe wind.

  7. Composition and meteorological changes associated with a strong stratospheric intrusion event in the Canadian High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaoyi; Strong, Kimberly; Conway, Stephanie; Tarasick, David; Osman, Mohammed; Richter, Andreas; Blechschmidt, Anne; Manney, Gloria

    2015-04-01

    Stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE) provides a mechanism for trace gas transport between the lower stratosphere and the troposphere. Intense downward stratospheric intrusions may significantly affect the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere. Most STE events occur in tropical and mid-latitude regions, with less known about STE in the polar regions. In this work, we present an observation and modelling study of a strong stratospheric intrusion in the high Arctic (Eureka, 80°N) in March 2013, which led to an increase of total ozone and BrO columns observed by both ground-based and satellite instruments. The meteorological conditions for this event were similar to those observed for STEs associated with cold fronts. Before the cold front arrived at Eureka, the surface temperature first increased from -25.3°C (25 March 13:00 UTC) to -14.5°C (27 March 20:00 UTC) and then dropped to -36.4°C (29 March 6:00 UTC) after the front passed by. Meanwhile, the ground-level pressure decreased from 103.8 kPa to 101.8 kPa, then rose back to 102.6 kPa. Ozonesonde data (27 March 23:15 UTC) showed unusually high ozone (>100 ppbv) above ~3 km altitude, while the relative humidity profile indicated that the airmass was of stratospheric origin (very low relative humidity). The thermal tropopause height was ~9 km, based on a uniform lapse rate of 3.9 K/km from surface to 9 km. From ECMWF Interim data, the airmass with high relative potential vorticity (4 pvu) extended down to 3 km. In addition, HYSPLIT model ensemble back-trajectories show a clear Rossby wave signature in the upper troposphere during this event, which could explain the intrusion. However, there are no strong downwelling layers along the trajectories, which indicates that the intrusion may have occurred close to Eureka. Trace gas composition data from three ground-based spectrometers and the GOME-2 satellite instrument are presented in this work. Ozone vertical column densities (VCDs) measured by two Zenith

  8. Flavor Composition of the High-Energy Neutrino Events in IceCube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Olga; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; Vincent, Aaron C.

    2014-08-01

    The IceCube experiment has recently reported the observation of 28 high-energy (>30 TeV) neutrino events, separated into 21 showers and 7 muon tracks, consistent with an extraterrestrial origin. In this Letter, we compute the compatibility of such an observation with possible combinations of neutrino flavors with relative proportion (αe∶αμ∶ατ)⊕. Although the 7∶21 track-to-shower ratio is naively favored for the canonical (1∶1∶1)⊕ at Earth, this is not true once the atmospheric muon and neutrino backgrounds are properly accounted for. We find that, for an astrophysical neutrino E-2 energy spectrum, (1∶1∶1)⊕ at Earth is disfavored at 81% C.L. If this proportion does not change, 6 more years of data would be needed to exclude (1∶1∶1)⊕ at Earth at 3σ C.L. Indeed, with the recently released 3-yr data, that flavor composition is excluded at 92% C.L. The best fit is obtained for (1∶0∶0)⊕ at Earth, which cannot be achieved from any flavor ratio at sources with averaged oscillations during propagation. If confirmed, this result would suggest either a misunderstanding of the expected background events or a misidentification of tracks as showers, or even more compellingly, some exotic physics which deviates from the standard scenario.

  9. Verification of ensemble forecasts of Mediterranean high-impact weather events against satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Chaboureau

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Ensemble forecasts at kilometre scale of two severe storms over the Mediterranean region are verified against satellite observations. In complement to assessing the forecasts against ground-based measurements, brightness temperature (BT images are computed from forecast fields and directly compared to BTs observed from satellite. The so-called model-to-satellite approach is very effective in identifying systematic errors in the prediction of cloud cover for BTs in the infrared window and in verifying the forecasted convective activity with BTs in the microwave range. This approach is combined with the calculation of meteorological scores for an objective evaluation of ensemble forecasts. The application of the approach is shown in the context of two Mediterranean case studies, a tropical-like storm and a heavy precipitating event. Assessment of cloud cover and convective activity using satellite observations in the infrared (10.8 μm and microwave regions (183–191 GHz provides results consistent with other traditional methods using rainfall measurements. In addition, for the tropical-like storm, differences among forecasts occur much earlier in terms of cloud cover and deep convective activity than they do in terms of deepening and track. Further, the underdispersion of the ensemble forecasts of the two high-impact weather events is easily identified with satellite diagnostics. This suggests that such an approach could be a useful method for verifying ensemble forecasts, particularly in data-sparse regions.

  10. A Nuclear Interaction Model for Understanding Results of Single Event Testing with High Energy Protons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culpepper, William X.; ONeill, Pat; Nicholson, Leonard L.

    2000-01-01

    An internuclear cascade and evaporation model has been adapted to estimate the LET spectrum generated during testing with 200 MeV protons. The model-generated heavy ion LET spectrum is compared to the heavy ion LET spectrum seen on orbit. This comparison is the basis for predicting single event failure rates from heavy ions using results from a single proton test. Of equal importance, this spectra comparison also establishes an estimate of the risk of encountering a failure mode on orbit that was not detected during proton testing. Verification of the general results of the model is presented based on experiments, individual part test results, and flight data. Acceptance of this model and its estimate of remaining risk opens the hardware verification philosophy to the consideration of radiation testing with high energy protons at the board and box level instead of the more standard method of individual part testing with low energy heavy ions.

  11. Survey of TES high albedo events in Mars' northern polar craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, J.C.; Nielson, S.K.; Titus, T.N.

    2007-01-01

    Following the work exploring Korolev Crater (Armstrong et al., 2005) for evidence of crater interior ice deposits, we have conducted a survey of Thermal Emission Spectroscopy (TES) temperature and albedo measurements for Mars' northern polar craters larger than 10 km. Specifically, we identify a class of craters that exhibits brightening in their interiors during a solar longitude, Ls, of 60 to 120 degrees, roughly depending on latitude. These craters vary in size, latitude, and morphology, but appear to have a specific regional association on the surface that correlates with the distribution of subsurface hydrogen (interpreted as water ice) previously observed on Mars. We suggest that these craters, like Korolev, exhibit seasonal high albedo frost events that indicate subsurface water ice within the craters. A detailed study of these craters may provide insight in the geographical distribution of the ice and context for future polar missions. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Detection and analysis of high-temperature events in the BIRD mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhukov, B.; Briess, K.; Lorenz, E.; Oertel, D.; Skrbek, W. [DLR, Berlin (Germany). Inst. of Space Sensor Technology & Planetary Exploration

    2005-01-01

    The primary mission objective of a new small Bi-spectral InfraRed Detection (BIRD) satellite is detection and quantitative analysis of high-temperature events like fires and volcanoes. An absence of saturation in the BIRD infrared channels makes it possible to improve false alarm rejection as well as to retrieve quantitative characteristics of hot targets, including their effective fire temperature, area and the radiative energy release. Examples are given of detection and analysis of wild and coal seam fires, of volcanic activity as well as of oil fires in Iraq. The smallest fires detected by BIRD, which were verified on ground, had an area of 12 m{sup 2} at daytime and 4 m{sup 2} at night.

  13. Single-event upset studies of a high-speed digital optical data link

    CERN Document Server

    Andrieux, M L; Dinkespiler, B; Evans, G; Gallin-Martel, L; Pearce, M; Rethore, F; Stroynowski, R; Ye, J

    2001-01-01

    The results from a series of neutron and photon irradiation tests of a high-speed digital optical data link based on a commercial serialiser and a vertical cavity surface emitting laser are described, the link was developed as a candidate for the front-end readout of the ATLAS electromagnetic calorimeter. The components at the emitting end of the link were unaffected by neutron and photon irradiation levels exceeding those expected during 10 years of LHC running. However, the link suffered from Single-Event upsets (SEUs) when irradiated with energetic neutrons. A very general method based on the burst generation rate (BGR) model has been developed and is used to extrapolate the error rate observed during tests to that expected at the LHC. A model-independent extrapolation was used to check the BGR approach and the results were consistent once systematic errors were taken into account. (21 refs).

  14. High-Resolution Mapping of Crossover and Non-crossover Recombination Events by Whole-Genome Re-sequencing of an Avian Pedigree.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linnéa Smeds

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Recombination is an engine of genetic diversity and therefore constitutes a key process in evolutionary biology and genetics. While the outcome of crossover recombination can readily be detected as shuffled alleles by following the inheritance of markers in pedigreed families, the more precise location of both crossover and non-crossover recombination events has been difficult to pinpoint. As a consequence, we lack a detailed portrait of the recombination landscape for most organisms and knowledge on how this landscape impacts on sequence evolution at a local scale. To localize recombination events with high resolution in an avian system, we performed whole-genome re-sequencing at high coverage of a complete three-generation collared flycatcher pedigree. We identified 325 crossovers at a median resolution of 1.4 kb, with 86% of the events localized to <10 kb intervals. Observed crossover rates were in excellent agreement with data from linkage mapping, were 52% higher in male (3.56 cM/Mb than in female meiosis (2.28 cM/Mb, and increased towards chromosome ends in male but not female meiosis. Crossover events were non-randomly distributed in the genome with several distinct hot-spots and a concentration to genic regions, with the highest density in promoters and CpG islands. We further identified 267 non-crossovers, whose location was significantly associated with crossover locations. We detected a significant transmission bias (0.18 in favour of 'strong' (G, C over 'weak' (A, T alleles at non-crossover events, providing direct evidence for the process of GC-biased gene conversion in an avian system. The approach taken in this study should be applicable to any species and would thereby help to provide a more comprehensive portray of the recombination landscape across organism groups.

  15. Projected changes to high temperature events for Canada based on a regional climate model ensemble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Dae Il; Sushama, Laxmi; Diro, Gulilat Tefera; Khaliq, M. Naveed; Beltrami, Hugo; Caya, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Extreme hot spells can have significant impacts on human society and ecosystems, and therefore it is important to assess how these extreme events will evolve in a changing climate. In this study, the impact of climate change on hot days, hot spells, and heat waves, over 10 climatic regions covering Canada, based on 11 regional climate model (RCM) simulations from the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program for the June to August summer period is presented. These simulations were produced with six RCMs driven by four Atmosphere-Ocean General Circulation Models (AOGCM), for the A2 emission scenario, for the current 1970-1999 and future 2040-2069 periods. Two types of hot days, namely HD-1 and HD-2, defined respectively as days with only daily maximum temperature (Tmax) and both Tmax and daily minimum temperature (Tmin) exceeding their respective thresholds (i.e., period-of-record 90th percentile of Tmax and Tmin values), are considered in the study. Analogous to these hot days, two types of hot spells, namely HS-1 and HS-2, are identified as spells of consecutive HD-1 and HD-2 type hot days. In the study, heat waves are defined as periods of three or more consecutive days, with Tmax above 32 °C threshold. Results suggest future increases in the number of both types of hot days and hot spell events for the 10 climatic regions considered. However, the projected changes show high spatial variability and are highly dependent on the RCM and driving AOGCM combination. Extreme hot spell events such as HS-2 type hot spells of longer duration are expected to experience relatively larger increases compared to hot spells of moderate duration, implying considerable heat related environmental and health risks. Regionally, the Great Lakes, West Coast, Northern Plains, and Maritimes regions are found to be more affected due to increases in the frequency and severity of hot spells and/or heat wave characteristics, requiring more in depth studies for these regions

  16. Upper mesospheric lunar tides over middle and high latitudes during sudden stratospheric warming events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, J. L.; Hoffmann, P.; Pedatella, N. M.; Matthias, V.; Stober, G.

    2015-04-01

    In recent years there have been a series of reported ground- and satellite-based observations of lunar tide signatures in the equatorial and low latitude ionosphere/thermosphere around sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) events. This lower atmosphere/ionosphere coupling has been suggested to be via the E region dynamo. In this work we present the results of analyzing 6 years of hourly upper mesospheric winds from specular meteor radars over a midlatitude (54°N) station and a high latitude (69°N) station. Instead of correlating our results with typical definitions of SSWs, we use the definition of polar vortex weaking (PVW) used by Zhang and Forbes. This definition provides a better representation of the strength in middle atmospheric dynamics that should be responsible for the waves propagating to the E region. We have performed a wave decomposition on hourly wind data in 21 day segments, shifted by 1 day. In addition to the radar wind data, the analysis has been applied to simulations from Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model Extended version and the thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere electrodynamics general circulation model. Our results indicate that the semidiurnal lunar tide (M2) enhances in northern hemispheric winter months, over both middle and high latitudes. The time and magnitude of M2 are highly correlated with the time and associated zonal wind of PVW. At middle/high latitudes, M2 in the upper mesosphere occurs after/before the PVW. At both latitudes, the maximum amplitude of M2 is directly proportional to the strength of PVW westward wind. We have found that M2 amplitudes could be comparable to semidiurnal solar tide amplitudes, particularly around PVW and equinoxes. Besides these general results, we have also found peculiarities in some events, particularly at high latitudes. These peculiarities point to the need of considering the longitudinal features of the polar stratosphere and the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere regions. For

  17. Elliptical Accretion and Low Luminosity from High Accretion Rate Stellar Tidal Disruption Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirski, Gilad; Piran, Tsvi; Krolik, Julian

    2017-01-01

    Models for tidal disruption events (TDEs) in which a supermassive black hole disrupts a star commonly assume that the highly eccentric streams of bound stellar debris promptly form a circular accretion disk at the pericenter scale. However, the bolometric peak luminosity of most TDE candidates, ˜ 10^{44} {erg s^{-1}}, implies that we observe only ˜1% of the energy expected from radiatively efficient accretion. Even the energy that must be lost to circularize the returning tidal flow is larger than the observed energy. Recently, Piran et al. (2015) suggested that the observed optical TDE emission is powered by shocks at the apocenter between freshly infalling material and earlier arriving matter. This model explains the small radiated energy, the low temperature, and the large radius implied by the observations as well as the t-5/3 light curve. However the question of the system's low bolometric efficiency remains unanswered. We suggest that the high orbital energy and low angular momentum of the flow make it possible for magnetic stresses to reduce the matter's already small angular momentum to the point at which it can fall ballistically into the SMBH before circularization. As a result, the efficiency is only ˜1-10% of a standard accretion disk's efficiency. Thus, the intrinsically high eccentricity of the tidal debris naturally explains why most TDE candidates are fainter than expected.

  18. Combination of various data analysis techniques for efficient track reconstruction in very high multiplicity events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siklér, Ferenc

    2017-08-01

    A novel combination of established data analysis techniques for reconstructing charged-particles in high energy collisions is proposed. It uses all information available in a collision event while keeping competing choices open as long as possible. Suitable track candidates are selected by transforming measured hits to a binned, three- or four-dimensional, track parameter space. It is accomplished by the use of templates taking advantage of the translational and rotational symmetries of the detectors. Track candidates and their corresponding hits, the nodes, form a usually highly connected network, a bipartite graph, where we allow for multiple hit to track assignments, edges. In order to get a manageable problem, the graph is cut into very many minigraphs by removing a few of its vulnerable components, edges and nodes. Finally the hits are distributed among the track candidates by exploring a deterministic decision tree. A depth-limited search is performed maximizing the number of hits on tracks, and minimizing the sum of track-fit χ2. Simplified but realistic models of LHC silicon trackers including the relevant physics processes are used to test and study the performance (efficiency, purity, timing) of the proposed method in the case of single or many simultaneous proton-proton collisions (high pileup), and for single heavy-ion collisions at the highest available energies.

  19. Angular correlation between IceCube high-energy starting events and starburst sources

    CERN Document Server

    Moharana, Reetanjali

    2016-01-01

    Starburst galaxies and star-forming regions in the Milkyway, with high rate of supernova activities, are candidate sources of high-energy neutrinos. Using a gamma-ray selected sample of these sources we perform statistical analysis of their angular correlation with the four-year sample of high-energy starting events (HESE), detected by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. We find that the two samples (starburst galaxies and local star-forming regions) are correlated with cosmic neutrinos at $\\sim (2-3)\\sigma$ (pre-trial) significance level, when the full HESE sample with deposited energy $\\gtrsim 20$~TeV is considered. However when we consider the HESE sample with deposited energy $\\gtrsim 60$~TeV, which is almost free of atmospheric neutrino and muon backgrounds, the significance of correlation decreased drastically. We perform a similar study for Galactic sources in the 2FHL catalog as well, obtaining $\\sim (2-3)\\sigma$ (pre-trial) correlation, however the significance of correlation increases with higher cuto...

  20. SENTINEL EVENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Robida

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Objective of the article is a two year statistics on sentinel events in hospitals. Results of a survey on sentinel events and the attitude of hospital leaders and staff are also included. Some recommendations regarding patient safety and the handling of sentinel events are given.Methods. In March 2002 the Ministry of Health introduce a voluntary reporting system on sentinel events in Slovenian hospitals. Sentinel events were analyzed according to the place the event, its content, and root causes. To show results of the first year, a conference for hospital directors and medical directors was organized. A survey was conducted among the participants with the purpose of gathering information about their view on sentinel events. One hundred questionnaires were distributed.Results. Sentinel events. There were 14 reports of sentinel events in the first year and 7 in the second. In 4 cases reports were received only after written reminders were sent to the responsible persons, in one case no reports were obtained. There were 14 deaths, 5 of these were in-hospital suicides, 6 were due to an adverse event, 3 were unexplained. Events not leading to death were a suicide attempt, a wrong side surgery, a paraplegia after spinal anaesthesia, a fall with a femoral neck fracture, a damage of the spleen in the event of pleural space drainage, inadvertent embolization with absolute alcohol into a femoral artery and a physical attack on a physician by a patient. Analysis of root causes of sentinel events showed that in most cases processes were inadequate.Survey. One quarter of those surveyed did not know about the sentinel events reporting system. 16% were having actual problems when reporting events and 47% beleived that there was an attempt to blame individuals. Obstacles in reporting events openly were fear of consequences, moral shame, fear of public disclosure of names of participants in the event and exposure in mass media. The majority of

  1. Hydrologic-Hydraulic Modeling of Fluvial Sediment Transport During a Storm Event in a Highly Managed Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressan, F.; Mantilla, R.

    2014-12-01

    Sediment movement along the main stem of a watershed is strongly affected by the sediment supply and the channel morphology. Anthropogenic interventions tend to alter the hydraulic conveyance and consequently modify the sediment regime of the main stem. This connection between channel hydraulics and sediment transport is often overlooked in hydrologic models where simplified methods are used for flow and sediment routing. In this study, we adopt a hydrologic-hydraulic modeling approach to quantify the fluvial sediment transport along the main stem of a watershed during a storm event. The hydrologic model CUENCAS is implemented to estimate the sub-hourly hydrographs of the major tributaries of the watershed. The simulated hydrographs are used as boundary conditions for the depth-averaged two-dimensional hydraulic model FESMWS to simulate the propagation of the flood wave along the main stem. The corresponding sub-hourly, unsteady non-equilibrium sediment transport along the main stem is also simulated with FESWMS. This procedure is applied to a highly managed agricultural watershed of Iowa. The study site has a catchment area of 70 Km2 with soils that are silty clay loams. The land-use is mostly row crop, but in the past decade a large portion of the watershed was converted to native prairie. The main stem is a meandering stream with a length of 15 Km and ten major tributaries contribute to its flow. Several sections of the main stem have been heavily channelized and straightened since the 1930s. Different grain size distributions and sediment boundary conditions are investigated to discern the effects of land-use changes and channelization on the sediment regime along the main stem. The simulations are able to capture the typical hysteresis between flow and sediment transport. The results indicate that the in-stream sediment transport rate is in general higher in the channelized sections and depends, to a certain extent, on the degree of straightening.

  2. Adverse events among high-risk participants in a home-based walking study: a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holleman Robert G

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For high-risk individuals and their healthcare providers, finding the right balance between promoting physical activity and minimizing the risk of adverse events can be difficult. More information on the prevalence and influence of adverse events is needed to improve providers' ability to prescribe effective and safe exercise programs for their patients. Methods This study describes the type and severity of adverse events reported by participants with cardiovascular disease or at-risk for cardiovascular disease that occurred during an unsupervised, home-based walking study. This multi-site, randomized controlled trial tested the feasibility of a diet and lifestyle activity intervention over 1.5 years. At month 13, 274 eligible participants (male veterans were recruited who were ambulatory, BMI > 28, and reporting one or more cardiovascular disease risk factors. All participants attended five, face-to-face dietitian-delivered counseling sessions during the six-month intervention. Participants were randomized to three study arms: 1 time-based walking goals, 2 simple pedometer-based walking goals, and 3 enhanced pedometer-based walking goals with Internet-mediated feedback. Two physicians verified adverse event symptom coding. Results Enrolled participants had an average of five medical comorbidities. During 1110 person months of observation, 87 of 274 participants reported 121 adverse events. One serious study-related adverse event (atrial fibrillation was reported; the individual resumed study participation within three days. Non-serious, study related adverse events made up 12% of all symptoms – predominantly minor musculoskeletal events. Serious, non-study related adverse events represented 32% of all symptoms while non-serious, non-study related adverse events made up 56% of symptoms. Cardiovascular disease events represented over half of the non-study related adverse event symptoms followed by musculoskeletal complaints

  3. Subcascade formation and defect cluster size scaling in high-energy collision events in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, A.; Sand, A. E.; Nordlund, K.; Luneville, L.; Simeone, D.; Dudarev, S. L.

    2016-07-01

    It has been recently established that the size of the defects created under ion irradiation follows a scaling law (Sand A. E. et al., EPL, 103 (2013) 46003; Yi X. et al., EPL, 110 (2015) 36001). A critical constraint associated with its application to phenomena occurring over a broad range of irradiation conditions is the limitation on the energy of incident particles. Incident neutrons or ions, with energies exceeding a certain energy threshold, produce a complex hierarchy of collision subcascade events, which impedes the use of the defect cluster size scaling law derived for an individual low-energy cascade. By analyzing the statistics of subcascade sizes and energies, we show that defect clustering above threshold energies can be described by a product of two scaling laws, one for the sizes of subcascades and the other for the sizes of defect clusters formed in subcascades. The statistics of subcascade sizes exhibits a transition at a threshold energy, where the subcascade morphology changes from a single domain below the energy threshold, to several or many sub-domains above the threshold. The number of sub-domains then increases in proportion to the primary knock-on atom energy. The model has been validated against direct molecular-dynamics simulations and applied to W, Fe, Be, Zr and sixteen other metals, enabling the prediction of full statistics of defect cluster sizes with no limitation on the energy of cascade events. We find that populations of defect clusters produced by the fragmented high-energy cascades are dominated by individual Frenkel pairs and relatively small defect clusters, whereas the lower-energy non-fragmented cascades produce a greater proportion of large defect clusters.

  4. The associated charged particle multiplicity of high-p/sub T/ pi /sup 0/ and single-photon events

    CERN Document Server

    Diakonou, M; Albrow, M G; Almehed, S; Benary, O; Bøggild, H; Botner, O; Cnops, A M; Cockerill, D J A; Dagan, S; Dahl-Jensen, Erik; Dahl-Jensen, I; Damgaard, G; Fabjan, Christian Wolfgang; Filippas-Tassos, A; Fokitis, E; Fowler, E C; Hallgren, A; Hansen, K H; Henning, S; Hood, D M; Hooper, J; Jarlskog, G; Karpathopoulos, S; Killian, T; Kourkoumelis, C; Kreisler, M; Lissauer, D; Lörstad, B; Ludlam, T; Mannelli, I; McCubbin, N A; Melin, A; Mjörnmark, U; Møller, R; Molzon, W; Mouzourakis, P; Nielsen, B S; Nielsen, S O; Nilsson, A; Oren, Y; Palmer, R B; Rahm, David Charles; Rehak, P; Resvanis, L K; Rosselt, L; Schistad, B; Stumer, I; Svensson, L; von Dardel, Guy F; Willis, W J

    1980-01-01

    The associated charged particle multiplicities of high-p/sub T/ pi /sup 0/ and single-photon events were measured at the CERN intersecting storage rings using lead/liquid-argon calorimeters and a scintillation counter array placed around the intersection region. The average multiplicity on the trigger side for the single-photon events was found to be significantly lower than that for the pi /sup 0/ events. The away-side multiplicity for both pi /sup 0/ and single- photon events increases with the trigger particle p/sub T/, but, at a fixed p/sub T/, the direct photon sample was found to have a slightly lower average multiplicity. The differences in the event structure can be explained if a large fraction of the single photons are produced via qg to gamma q constituent scattering. (16 refs).

  5. The consequences of "Culture's consequences"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Fabienne; Loloma Froholdt, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    , but it may also have unintentional outcomes. It may lead to a deterministic view of other cultures, thereby reinforcing prejudices and underestimating other forms of differences; it risks blinding the participants of the specific context of a given communicative situation. The article opens with a critical...... review of the theory of Geert Hofstede, the most renowned representative of this theoretical approach. The practical consequences of using such a concept of culture is then analysed by means of a critical review of an article applying Hofstede to cross-cultural crews in seafaring. Finally, alternative...... views on culture are presented. The aim of the article is, rather than to promote any specific theory, to reflect about diverse perspectives of cultural sense-making in cross-cultural encounters. Udgivelsesdato: Oktober...

  6. High--cadence observations of spicular-type events on the Sun

    CERN Document Server

    Shetye, J; Scullion, E; Nelson, C J; Kuridze, D; Henriques, V; Woeger, F; Ray, T

    2016-01-01

    Chromospheric observations taken at high cadence and high spatial resolution show a range of spicule like features, including Type I, Type II (as well as RBEs and RREs) and those which seem to appear within a few seconds, which if interpreted as flows would imply mass flow velocities in excess of 1000 km/s. This article seeks to quantify and study rapidly appearing spicular type events. We also compare the MOMFBD and speckle reconstruction techniques in order to understand if such spicules are more favourably observed using a particular technique. We use spectral imaging observations taken with the CRISP on the Swedish 1 m Solar Telescope. Data was sampled at multiple positions within the Halpha line profile for both an ondisk and limb location. The data is host to numerous rapidly appearing features which are observed at different locations within the Halpha line profile. The feature's durations vary between 10 and 20 s and lengths around 3500 km. Sometimes, a time delay in their appearance between the blue ...

  7. High cardiovascular event rates occur within the first weeks of starting hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckardt, Kai-Uwe; Gillespie, Iain A; Kronenberg, Florian; Richards, Sharon; Stenvinkel, Peter; Anker, Stefan D; Wheeler, David C; de Francisco, Angel L; Marcelli, Daniele; Froissart, Marc; Floege, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    Early mortality is high in hemodialysis (HD) patients, but little is known about early cardiovascular event (CVE) rates after HD initiation. To study this we analyzed data in the AROii cohort of incident HD patients from over 300 European Fresenius Medical Care dialysis centers. Weekly rates of a composite of CVEs during the first year and monthly rates of the composite and its constituents (coronary artery, cerebrovascular, peripheral arterial, congestive heart failure, and sudden cardiac death) during the first 2 years after HD initiation were assessed. Of 6308 patients that started dialysis within 7 days, 1449 patients experienced 2405 CVEs over the next 2 years. The first-year CVE rate (30.2/100 person-years; 95% CI, 28.7-31.7) greatly exceeded the second-year rate (19.4/100; 95% CI, 18.1-20.8). Composite CVEs were highest during the first week with increased risk compared with the second year, persisting until the fifth month. Except for sudden cardiac death, temporal patterns of rates for all CVE categories were very similar, with highest rates during the first month and a high-risk period extending to 4 months. Higher or lower cumulative weekly dialysis dose, lower blood flow, and lower net ultrafiltration during dialysis were associated with CVE during the high-risk period, but not during the post high-risk period. Thus, the incidence of CVE in the first weeks after HD initiation is much higher than during subsequent periods which raises concerns that HD initiation may trigger CVEs.

  8. High mass photon pairs in ℓ +ℓ -γγ events at LEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriani, O.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Ahlen, S.; Alcaraz, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alverson, G.; Alviggi, M. G.; Ambrosi, G.; An, Q.; Anderhub, H.; Anderson, A. L.; Andreev, V. P.; Antonov, L.; Antreasyan, D.; Arce, P.; Arefiev, A.; Atamanchuk, A.; Azemoon, T.; Aziz, T.; Baba, P. V. K. S.; Bagnaia, P.; Bakken, J. A.; Baksay, L.; Ball, R. C.; Banerjee, S.; Bao, J.; Barillère, R.; Barone, L.; Baschirotto, A.; Battiston, R.; Bay, A.; Becattini, F.; Becker, U.; Behner, F.; Behrens, J.; Bencze, Gy. L.; Berdugo, J.; Berges, P.; Bertucci, B.; Betev, B. L.; Biasini, M.; Biland, A.; Bilei, G. M.; Bizzarri, R.; Blaising, J. J.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bock, R.; Böhm, A.; Borgia, B.; Boseti, M.; Bourilkov, D.; Bourquin, M.; Boutigny, D.; Bouwens, B.; Brambilla, E.; Branson, J. G.; Brock, I. C.; Brooks, M.; Bujak, A.; Burger, J. D.; Burger, W. J.; Busenitz, J.; Cai, X. D.; Capell, M.; Caria, M.; Carlino, G.; Cartacci, A. M.; Castello, R.; Cerrada, M.; Cesaroni, F.; Chang, Y. H.; Chaturvedi, U. K.; Chemarin, M.; Chen, A.; Chena, C.; Chen, G. M.; H. F., Chen; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Chen, W. Y.; Chiefari, G.; Chien, C. Y.; Choi, M. T.; Chung, S.; Civinini, C.; Clare, I.; Clare, R.; Coan, T. E.; Cohn, H. O.; Coignet, G.; Colino, N.; Contin, A.; Cui, X. T.; Cui, X. Y.; Dai, T. S.; D'Alessandro, R.; de Asmundis, R.; Degré, A.; Deiters, K.; Dénes, E.; Denes, P.; DeNotaristefani, F.; Dhina, M.; DiBitonto, D.; Diemoz, M.; Dimitrov, H. R.; Dionisi, C.; Djambazov, L.; Dova, M. T.; Drago, E.; Driever, T.; Duchesneau, D.; Duinker, P.; Duran, I.; Easo, S.; El Mamouni, H.; Engler, A.; Eppling, F. J.; Erné, F. C.; Extermann, P.; Fabbretti, R.; Fabre, M.; Falciano, S.; Fan, S. J.; Fackler, O.; Fay, J.; Felcini, M.; Ferguson, T.; Fernandez, D.; Fernandez, G.; Ferroni, F.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fiandrini, E.; Field, J.; Filthaut, F.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisher, P. H.; Forconi, G.; Foreman, T.; Freudenreich, K.; Friebel, W.; Fukushima, M.; Gailloud, M.; Galaktionov, Yu.; Gallo, E.; Ganguli, S. N.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gele, D.; Gentile, S.; Goldfarb, S.; Gong, Z. F.; Gonzalez, E.; Gougas, A.; Goujon, D.; Gratta, G.; Gruenewald, M.; Gu, C.; Guanziroli, M.; Guo, J. K.; Gupta, V. K.; Gurtu, A.; Gustafson, H. R.; Gutay, L. J.; Hangarter, K.; Hasan, A.; Hauschildt, D.; He, C. F.; He, J. T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebert, M.; Herten, G.; Hervé, A.; Hilgers, K.; Hofer, H.; Hoorani, H.; Hu, G.; Hu, G. Q.; Ille, B.; Ilyas, M. M.; Innocente, V.; Janssen, H.; Jezequel, S.; Jin, B. N.; Kasser, A.; Khan, R. A.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Kapinos, P.; Kapustinsky, J. S.; Karyotakis, Y.; Kaur, M.; Khokhar, S.; Kienzle-Focacci, M. N.; Kim, J. K.; Kim, S. C.; Kinnison, W. W.; Kirkby, D.; Kirsch, S.; Kittel, W.; Klimentov, A.; König, A. C.; Koffeman, E.; Kornadt, O.; Koutsenko, V.; Koulbardis, A.; Kraemer, R. W.; Kramer, T.; Krastev, V. R.; Krenz, W.; Krivshich, A.; Kuijten, H.; Kumar, K. S.; Kunin, A.; Landi, G.; Lanske, D.; Lanzano, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Le Coultre, P.; Lee, D. M.; Leedom, I.; Leggett, C.; Le Goff, J. M.; Leiste, R.; Lenti, M.; Leonardi, E.; Leytens, X.; Li, C.; Li, H. T.; Li, P. J.; Liao, J. Y.; Lin, W. T.; Lin, Z. Y.; Linde, F. L.; Lindemann, B.; Lista, L.; Liu, Y.; Lohmann, W.; Longo, E.; Lu, Y. S.; Lubbers, J. M.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Luci, C.; Luckey, D.; Ludovici, L.; Luminari, L.; Lustermann, W.; Ma, J. M.; Ma, W. G.; MacDermott, M.; Malhotra, P. K.; Malik, R.; Malinin, A.; Maña, C.; Maolinbay, M.; Marchesini, P.; Marion, F.; Marin, A.; Martin, J. P.; Martinez-Laso, L.; Marzano, F.; Massaro, G. G. G.; Mazumdar, K.; McBride, P.; McMahon, T.; McNally, D.; Merk, M.; Merola, L.; Meschini, M.; Metzger, W. J.; Mi, Y.; Mills, G. B.; Mir, Y.; Mirabelli, G.; Mnich, J.; Möller, M.; Monteleoni, B.; Morand, R.; Morganti, S.; Moulai, N. E.; Mount, R.; Müller, S.; Nadtochy, A.; Nagy, E.; Napolitano, M.; Newman, H.; Neyer, C.; Niaz, M. A.; Nippe, A.; Nowak, H.; Organtini, G.; Pandoulas, D.; Paoletti, S.; Paolucci, P.; Pascala, G.; Passaleva, G.; Patricelli, S.; Paul, T.; Pauluzzi, M.; Paus, C.; Pauss, F.; Pei, Y. J.; Pensotti, S.; Perret-Gallix, D.; Perrier, J.; Pevsner, A.; Piccolo, D.; Pieri, M.; Piroué, P. A.; Plasil, F.; Plyaskin, V.; Pohl, M.; Pojidaev, V.; Postema, H.; Qi, Z. D.; Qian, J. M.; Qureshi, K. N.; Raghavan, R.; Rahal-Callot, G.; Rancoita, P. G.; Rattaggi, M.; Raven, G.; Razis, P.; Read, K.; Ren, D.; Ren, Z.; Rescigno, M.; Reucroft, S.; Ricker, A.; Riemann, S.; Riemers, W.; Rind, O.; Rizvi, H. A.; Rodriguez, F. J.; Röhner, M.; Röhner, S.; Romero, L.; Rose, J.; Rosier-Lees, S.; Rosmalen, R.; Rosselet, Ph.; Rubbia, A.; Rubio, J. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Sachwitz, M.; Sajan, E.; Salicio, J.; Salicio, J. M.; Sanders, G. S.; Santocchia, A.; Sarakinos, M. S.; Sartorelli, G.; Sassowsky, M.; Sauvage, G.; Schegelsky, V.; Schmitz, D.; Schmitz, P.; Schneegans, M.; Schopper, H.; Schotanus, D. J.; Shotkin, S.; Schreiber, H. J.; Shukla, J.; Schulte, R.; Schulte, S.; Schultze, K.; Schwenke, J.; Schwering, G.; Sciacca, C.; Scott, I.; Sehgal, R.; Seiler, P. G.; Sens, J. C.; Servoli, L.; Sheer, I.; Shen, D. Z.; Shevchenko, S.; Shi, X. R.; Shumilov, E.; Shoutko, V.; Son, D.; Sopczak, A.; Spartiotis, C.; Spickermann, T.; Spillantini, P.; Starosta, R.; Steuer, M.; Stickland, D. P.; Sticozzi, F.; Stone, H.; Strauch, K.; Stringfellow, B. C.; Sudhakar, K.; Sultanov, G.; Sun, L. Z.; Suter, H.; Swain, J. D.; Syed, A. A.; Tang, X. W.; Taylor, L.; Terzi, G.; Ting, Samuel C. C.; Ting, S. M.; Tonutti, M.; Tonwar, S. C.; Tóth, J.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tully, C.; Tung, K. L.; Ulbricht, J.; Urbán, L.; Uwer, U.; Valente, E.; Van de Walle, R. T.; Vetlitsky, I.; Viertel, G.; Vikas, P.; Vikas, U.; Vivargent, M.; Vogel, H.; Vogt, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Vorobyov, A. A.; Vuilleumier, L.; Wadhwa, M.; Wallraff, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, C. R.; Wang, G. H.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y. F.; Wang, Z. M.; Weber, A.; Weber, J.; Weill, R.; Wenaus, T. J.; Wenninger, J.; White, M.; Willmott, C.; Wittgenstein, F.; Wright, D.; Wu, S. X.; Wysłouch, B.; Xie, Y. Y.; Xu, J. G.; Xu, Z. Z.; Xue, Z. L.; Yan, D. S.; Yang, B. Z.; Yang, C. G.; Yang, G.; Ye, C. H.; Ye, J. B.; Ye, Q.; Yeh, S. C.; Yin, Z. W.; You, J. M.; Yunus, N.; Yzerman, M.; Zaccardelli, C.; Zemp, P.; Zeng, M.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, D. H.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, G. J.; Zhou, J. F.; Zhu, R. Y.; Zichichi, A.; van der Zwaan, B. C. C.; L3 Collaboration

    1992-12-01

    From the analysis of the reactions e +e -→ l+l-( nγ) ( l= e, μ, τ) we observe four events, one e +e -γγ and three μ+μ-γγ, with the invariant mass of the photon pairs close to 60 GeV. These events were selected from a data sample collected in the L3 detector corresponding to 950 000 produced Z 0's. More data are necessary to ascertain the origin of these events.

  9. High prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in patients with previous cerebrovascular or coronary event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, Jesper; Wiinberg, Niels; Joergensen, Bjarne S

    2010-01-01

    The presence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in patients with other manifestations of cardiovascular disease identifies a population at increased risk of complications both during acute coronary events and on a long-term basis and possibly a population in whom secondary prevention of cardiov...... of cardiovascular events should be addressed aggressively. The present study was aimed at providing a valid estimate on the prevalence of PAD in patients attending their general practitioner and having previously suffered a cardio- or cerebrovascular event....

  10. COBRAT Project: Long duration balloons for the study of high energy phenomena and consequences for stratospheric chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Berthet, Gwenaël; Catoire, Valéry

    2010-01-01

    The study of the Transient Luminous Events (TLE) and of the Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGF) will be performed soon by the satellite instruments TARANIS (CNES) and ASIM (ESA, onboard the International Space Station). In complement to these measurements, observations are proposed to be conducted...

  11. COBRAT Project: Long duration balloons for the study of high energy phenomena and consequences for stratospheric chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Berthet, Gwenaël; Catoire, Valéry

    2010-01-01

    The study of the Transient Luminous Events (TLE) and of the Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGF) will be performed soon by the satellite instruments TARANIS (CNES) and ASIM (ESA, onboard the International Space Station). In complement to these measurements, observations are proposed to be conducted...

  12. OGLE-2016-BLG-0596Lb: High-Mass Planet From High-Magnification Pure-Survey Microlensing Event

    CERN Document Server

    Mróz, P; Udalski, A; Poleski, R; Skowron, J; Szymański, M K; Soszyński, I; Pietrukowicz, P; Kozłowski, S; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, Ł; Pawlak, M; Albrow, M D; Cha, S -M; Chung, S -J; Jung, Y K; Kim, D -J; Kim, S -L; Lee, C -U; Lee, Y; Park, B -G; Pogge, R W; Ryu, Y -H; Shin, I -G; Yee, J C; Zhu, W; Gould, A

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of a high mass-ratio planet $q=0.012$, i.e., 13 times higher than the Jupiter/Sun ratio. The host mass is not presently measured but can be determined or strongly constrained from adaptive optics imaging. The planet was discovered in a small archival study of high-magnification events in pure-survey microlensing data, which was unbiased by the presence of anomalies. The fact that it was previously unnoticed may indicate that more such planets lie in archival data and could be discovered by similar systematic study. In order to understand the transition from predominantly survey+followup to predominately survey-only planet detections, we conduct the first analysis of these detections in the observational $(s,q)$ plane. Here $s$ is projected separation in units of the Einstein radius. We find some evidence that survey+followup is relatively more sensitive to planets near the Einstein ring, but that there is no statistical difference in sensitivity by mass ratio.

  13. Statistical-noise reduction in correlation analysis of high-energy nuclear collisions with event-mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Ray, R L

    2016-01-01

    The error propagation and statistical-noise reduction method of Reid and Trainor for two-point correlation applications in high-energy collisions is extended to include particle-pair references constructed by mixing two particles from all event-pair combinations within event subsets of arbitrary size. The Reid-Trainor method is also applied to other particle-pair mixing algorithms commonly used in correlation analysis of particle production from high-energy nuclear collisions. The statistical-noise reduction, inherent in the Reid-Trainor event-mixing procedure, is shown to occur for these other event-mixing algorithms as well. Monte Carlo simulation results are presented which verify the predicted degree of noise reduction. In each case the final errors are determined by the bin-wise particle-pair number, rather than by the bin-wise single-particle count.

  14. Pattern recognition of $^{136}$Xe double beta decay events and background discrimination in a high pressure Xenon TPC

    CERN Document Server

    Cebrian, S; Gomez, H; Herrera, D C; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Luzon, G; Segui, L; Tomas, A

    2013-01-01

    High pressure gas detectors offer advantages for the detection of rare events, where background reduction is crucial. For the neutrinoless double beta decay of 136Xe a high pressure xenon gas Time Projection Chamber (TPC) combines a good energy resolution and a detailed topological information of each event. The ionization topology of the double beta decay event of 136Xe in gaseous xenon has a characteristic shape defined by the two straggling electron tracks ending up in two higher ionization charge density blobs. With a properly pixelized readout, this topological information is invaluable to perform powerful background discrimination. In this study we carry out detailed simulations of the signal topology, as well as the competing topologies from gamma events that typically compose the background at these energies. We define observables based on graph theory concepts and develop automated discrimination algorithms which reduce the background level in around three orders of magnitude while keeping signal eff...

  15. Statistical-noise reduction in correlation analysis of high-energy nuclear collisions with event-mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, R.L., E-mail: ray@physics.utexas.edu; Bhattarai, P.

    2016-06-11

    The error propagation and statistical-noise reduction method of Reid and Trainor for two-point correlation applications in high-energy collisions is extended to include particle-pair references constructed by mixing two particles from all event-pair combinations within event subsets of arbitrary size. The Reid–Trainor method is also applied to other particle-pair mixing algorithms commonly used in correlation analysis of particle production from high-energy nuclear collisions. The statistical-noise reduction, inherent in the Reid–Trainor event-mixing procedure, is shown to occur for these other event-mixing algorithms as well. Monte Carlo simulation results are presented which verify the predicted degree of noise reduction. In each case the final errors are determined by the bin-wise particle-pair number, rather than by the bin-wise single-particle count.

  16. Ion-ion coincidence imaging at high event rate using an in-vacuum pixel detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jingming; Furch, Federico J.; Durá, Judith; Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John; Schulz, Claus Peter; Rouzée, Arnaud; Vrakking, Marc J. J.

    2017-07-01

    A new ion-ion coincidence imaging spectrometer based on a pixelated complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector has been developed for the investigation of molecular ionization and fragmentation processes in strong laser fields. Used as a part of a velocity map imaging spectrometer, the detection system is comprised of a set of microchannel plates and a Timepix detector. A fast time-to-digital converter (TDC) is used to enhance the ion time-of-flight resolution by correlating timestamps registered separately by the Timepix detector and the TDC. In addition, sub-pixel spatial resolution (algorithm. This performance is achieved while retaining a high event rate (104 per s). The spectrometer was characterized and used in a proof-of-principle experiment on strong field dissociative double ionization of carbon dioxide molecules (CO2), using a 400 kHz repetition rate laser system. The experimental results demonstrate that the spectrometer can detect multiple ions in coincidence, making it a valuable tool for studying the fragmentation dynamics of molecules in strong laser fields.

  17. Time evolution of atmospheric particle number concentration during high-intensity pyrotechnic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Javier; Yubero, Eduardo; Nicolás, Jose F.; Caballero, Sandra; Galindo, Nuria

    2014-10-01

    The Mascletàs are high-intensity pyrotechnic events, typical of eastern Spanish festivals, in which thousands of firecrackers are burnt at ground level in an intense, short-time (festival in Alicante (southeastern Spain). Peak concentrations and dilution times observed throughout the Mascletàs have been compared to those measured when conventional aerial fireworks were launched 2 km away from the monitoring site. The impact of the Mascletàs on the total number concentration of particles larger than 0.3 μm was higher (maximum ˜2·104 cm-3) than that of fireworks (maximum ˜2·103 cm-3). The effect of fireworks depended on whether the dominant meteorological conditions favoured the transport of the plume to the measurement location. However, the time required for particle concentrations to return to background levels is longer and more variable for firework displays (minutes to hours) than for the Mascletàs (<25 min).

  18. Ionosphere data assimilation capabilities for representing the high-latitude geomagnetic storm event in September 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomentsev, Dmitry; Jacobsen, Knut Stanley; Khattatov, Boris; Khattatov, Vyacheslav; Cherniak, Yakov; Titov, Anton

    2014-12-01

    Severe geomagnetic storms have a strong impact on space communication and satellite navigation systems. Forecasting the appearance of geomagnetically induced disturbances in the ionosphere is one of the urgent goals of the space weather community. The challenge is that the processes governing the distribution of the crucial ionospheric parameters have a rather poor quantitative description, and the models, built using the empirical parameterizations, have limited capabilities for operational purposes. On the other hand, data assimilation techniques are becoming more and more popular for nowcasting the state of the large-scale geophysical systems. We present an example of an ionospheric data assimilation system performance assessment during a strong geomagnetic event, which took place on 26 September 2011. The first-principle model has assimilated slant total electron content measurements from a dense network of ground stations, provided by the Norwegian Mapping Authority. The results have shown satisfactory agreement with independent data and demonstrate that the assimilation model is accurate to about 2-4 total electron content units and can be used for operational purposes in high-latitude regions. The operational system performance assessment is the subject of future work.

  19. High-energy Neutrino Flares from X-Ray Bright and Dark Tidal Disruption Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senno, Nicholas; Murase, Kohta; Mészáros, Peter

    2017-03-01

    X-ray and γ-ray observations by the Swift satellite revealed that a fraction of tidal disruption events (TDEs) have relativistic jets. Jetted TDEs have been considered to be potential sources of very-high-energy cosmic-rays and neutrinos. In this work, using semi-analytical methods, we calculate neutrino spectra of X-ray bright TDEs with powerful jets and dark TDEs with possible choked jets, respectively. We estimate their neutrino fluxes and find that non-detection would give us an upper limit on the baryon loading of the jet luminosity contained in cosmic-rays ξ cr ≲ 20–50 for Sw J1644+57. We show that X-ray bright TDEs make a sub-dominant (≲5%–10%) contribution to IceCube’s diffuse neutrino flux, and study possible contributions of X-ray dark TDEs given that particles are accelerated in choked jets or disk winds. We discuss future prospects for multi-messenger searches of the brightest TDEs.

  20. Early spring, severe frost events, and drought induce rapid carbon loss in high elevation meadows.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Arnold

    Full Text Available By the end of the 20th century, the onset of spring in the Sierra Nevada mountain range of California has been occurring on average three weeks earlier than historic records. Superimposed on this trend is an increase in the presence of highly anomalous "extreme" years, where spring arrives either significantly late or early. The timing of the onset of continuous snowpack coupled to the date at which the snowmelt season is initiated play an important role in the development and sustainability of mountain ecosystems. In this study, we assess the impact of extreme winter precipitation variation on aboveground net primary productivity and soil respiration over three years (2011 to 2013. We found that the duration of snow cover, particularly the timing of the onset of a continuous snowpack and presence of early spring frost events contributed to a dramatic change in ecosystem processes. We found an average 100% increase in soil respiration in 2012 and 2103, compared to 2011, and an average 39% decline in aboveground net primary productivity observed over the same time period. The overall growing season length increased by 57 days in 2012 and 61 days in 2013. These results demonstrate the dependency of these keystone ecosystems on a stable climate and indicate that even small changes in climate can potentially alter their resiliency.

  1. Large surface radiative forcing from surface-based ice crystal events measured in the High Arctic at Eureka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lesins

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Ice crystals, also known as diamond dust, are suspended in the boundary layer air under clear sky conditions during most of the Arctic winter in Northern Canada. Occasionally ice crystal events can produce significantly thick layers with optical depths in excess of 2.0 even in the absence of liquid water clouds. Four case studies of high optical depth ice crystal events at Eureka in the Nunavut Territory of Canada during the winter of 2006–2007 are presented. They show that the measured ice crystal surface infrared downward radiative forcing ranged from 8 to 36 W m−2 in the wavelength band from 5.6 to 20 μm for visible optical depths ranging from 0.2 to 1.7. MODIS infrared and visible images and the operational radiosonde wind profile were used to show that these high optical depth events were caused by surface snow being blown off 600 to 800 m high mountain ridges about 20 to 30 km North-West of Eureka and advected by the winds towards Eureka as they settled towards the ground within the highly stable boundary layer. This work presents the first study that demonstrates the important role that surrounding topography plays in determining the occurrence of high optical depth ice crystal events and points to a new source of boundary layer ice crystal events distinct from the classical diamond dust phenomenon.

  2. Sensitivity of the IceCube detector for ultra-high energy electron neutrino events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voigt, Bernhard

    2008-07-16

    IceCube is a neutrino telescope currently under construction in the glacial ice at South Pole. At the moment half of the detector is installed, when completed it will instrument 1 km{sup 3} of ice providing a unique experimental setup to detect high energy neutrinos from astrophysical sources. In this work the sensitivity of the complete IceCube detector for a diffuse electron-neutrino flux is analyzed, with a focus on energies above 1 PeV. Emphasis is put on the correct simulation of the energy deposit of electromagnetic cascades from charged-current electron-neutrino interactions. Since existing parameterizations lack the description of suppression effects at high energies, a simulation of the energy deposit of electromagnetic cascades with energies above 1 PeV is developed, including cross sections which account for the LPM suppression of bremsstrahlung and pair creation. An attempt is made to reconstruct the direction of these elongated showers. The analysis presented here makes use of the full charge waveform recorded with the data acquisition system of the IceCube detector. It introduces new methods to discriminate efficiently between the background of atmospheric muons, including muon bundles, and cascade signal events from electron-neutrino interactions. Within one year of operation of the complete detector a sensitivity of 1.5.10{sup -8}E{sup -2} GeVs{sup -1}sr{sup -1}cm{sup -2} is reached, which is valid for a diffuse electron neutrino flux proportional to E{sup -2} in the energy range from 16 TeV to 13 PeV. Sensitivity is defined as the upper limit that could be set in absence of a signal at 90% confidence level. Including all neutrino flavors in this analysis, an improvement of at least one order of magnitude is expected, reaching the anticipated performance of a diffuse muon analysis. (orig.)

  3. Consequences of a Possible Di-Gamma Resonace at TRISTAN

    OpenAIRE

    Hagiwara, K.; Matsumoto, S.; Tanaka, M.

    1993-01-01

    If high mass di-gamma events observed at LEP are due to the production of a di-gamma resonance via its leptonic coupling, its consequences can be observed at TRISTAN. We find that a predicted $Z$ decay branching rate is too small to account for the observed events if the resonance spin is zero, due to a strong cancellation in the decay amplitudes. Such a cancellation is absent if the resonance has a spin two. We study the consequences of a tensor production in the processes $e^+e^- \\to e^+e^-...

  4. Traumatic Life Events and Psychopathology in a High Risk, Ethnically Diverse Sample of Young Children: A Person-Centered Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Melissa J; Sulik, Michael J; Lieberman, Alicia F

    2016-07-01

    Studies of the association between traumatic experiences and psychopathology in early childhood have primarily focused on specific types of events (e.g., sexual abuse) or aggregated different types of events without differentiating among them. We extend this body of work by investigating patterns of traumatic event exposure in a high-risk, ethnically diverse sample of children ages 3-6 (N = 211; 51 % female) and relating these different patterns to parents' reports of child externalizing, internalizing, and post-traumatic stress symptomatology. Using latent class analysis, which divides a heterogeneous population into homogenous subpopulations, we identified three patterns of traumatic events based on parents' responses to an interview-based assessment of trauma exposure in young children: (1) severe exposure, characterized by a combination of family violence and victimization; (2) witnessing family violence without victimization; and (3) moderate exposure, characterized by an absence of family violence but a moderate probability of other events. The severe exposure class exhibited elevated internalizing and post-traumatic stress symptoms relative to the witness to violence and moderate exposure classes, controlling for average number of traumatic events. Results highlight the need for differentiation between profiles of traumatic life event exposure and the potential for person-centered methods to complement the cumulative risk perspective.

  5. Source geometry from exceptionally high resolution long period event observations at Mt Etna during the 2008 eruption

    CERN Document Server

    De Barros, Louis; Lokmer, Ivan; Saccorotti, Gilberto; Zucarello, Luciano; O'Brien, Gareth; Métaxian, Jean-Philippe; Patanè, Domenico; 10.1029/2009GL041273

    2010-01-01

    During the second half of June, 2008, 50 broadband seismic stations were deployed on Mt Etna volcano in close proximity to the summit, allowing us to observe seismic activity with exceptionally high resolution. 129 long period events (LP) with dominant frequencies ranging between 0.3 and 1.2 Hz, were extracted from this dataset. These events form two families of similar waveforms with different temporal distributions. Event locations are performed by cross-correlating signals for all pairs of stations in a two-step scheme. In the first step, the absolute location of the centre of the clusters was found. In the second step, all events are located using this position. The hypocentres are found at shallow depths (20 to 700 m deep) below the summit craters. The very high location resolution allows us to detect the temporal migration of the events along a dike-like structure and 2 pipe shaped bodies, yielding an unprecedented view of some elements of the shallow plumbing system at Mount Etna. These events do not s...

  6. ATLAS High Level Calorimeter Trigger Software Performance for Cosmic Ray Events

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira Damazio, Denis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS detector is undergoing intense commissioning effort with cosmic rays preparing for the first LHC collisions next spring. Combined runs with all of the ATLAS subsystems are being taken in order to evaluate the detector performance. This is an unique opportunity also for the trigger system to be studied with different detector operation modes, such as different event rates and detector configuration. The ATLAS trigger starts with a hardware based system which tries to identify detector regions where interesting physics objects may be found (eg: large energy depositions in the calorimeter system). An approved event will be further processed by more complex software algorithms at the second level where detailed features are extracted (full detector granularity data for small portions of the detector is available). Events accepted at this level will be further processed at the so-called event filter level. Full detector data at full granularity is available for offline like processing with complete calib...

  7. High Resolution Imagery of Buck Island Coral Reef Systems Prior to and During Suspected Bleaching Events

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is a collection of imagery of Buck Island coral reef systems. They are pairs of imagery where one image was acquired during a suspected bleaching event....

  8. High cardiovascular event rates in patients with asymptomatic carotid stenosis: the REACH Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aichner, F T; Topakian, R; Alberts, M J

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Data on current cardiovascular event rates in patients with asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis (ACAS) are sparse. We compared the 1-year outcomes of patients with ACAS > or =70% versus patients without ACAS in an international, prospective cohort of outpatients.......26%, P = 0.04), cardiovascular death (2.29% vs. 1.52%, P = 0.002), the composite end-point cardiovascular death/myocardial infarction/stroke (6.03% vs. 4.29%, P events (1.41% vs. 0.81%, P = 0.002). In patients with ACAS, Cox regression analyses identified history of cerebrovascular...... ischaemic events as most important predictor of future stroke (HR 3.21, 95% CI 1.82-5.65, P events. Stroke was powerfully predicted by prior cerebrovascular...

  9. On the detectability of a predicted mesolensing event associated with the high proper motion star VB 10

    CERN Document Server

    Lepine, Sebastien

    2011-01-01

    Extrapolation of the astrometric motion of the nearby low-mass star VB 10 indicates that sometime in late December 2011 or early January 2012, the star will approach to within short angular distance of a background point source. Based on astrometric uncertainties, we estimate a 1 in 2 chance that the distance of closest approach rho_{min} will be less than 100 mas, a 1 in 5 chance that rho_{min} 0.3 AU) orbit, this planet could pass closer to the background source up to several weeks preceding or following the primary event, and produce a secondary event of significantly higher magnification (tens of percent or higher). The secondary events have timescales of several days but detectable, high-magnification peaks lasting only about 5-10 hours. We argue that an intensive, multi-site monitoring campaign using 1-meter class telescopes would be required to detect secondary events due to orbiting planets.

  10. High-energy Neutrino follow-up search of Gravitational Wave Event GW150914 with ANTARES and IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Adrián-Martínez, S; André, M; Anton, G; Ardid, M; Aubert, J -J; Avgitas, T; Baret, B; Barrios-Martí, J; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bormuth, R; Bouwhuis, M C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Carr, J; Celli, S; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Coleiro, A; Coniglione, R; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Deschamps, A; De Bonis, G; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Drouhin, D; Eberl, T; Bojaddaini, I El; Elsässer, D; Enzenhöfer, A; Fehn, K; Felis, I; Fusco, L A; Galatà, S; Gay, P; Geißelsöder, S; Geyer, K; Giordano, V; Gleixner, A; Glotin, H; Gracia-Ruiz, R; Graf, K; Hallmann, S; van Haren, H; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Hößl, J; Hofestädt, J; Hugon, C; Illuminati, G; James, C W; de Jong, M; Jongen, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Katz, U; Kießling, D; Kouchner, A; Kreter, M; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lachaud, C; Lahmann, R; Lefèvre, D; Leonora, E; Loucatos, S; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Marinelli, A; Martínez-Mora, J A; Mathieu, A; Melis, K; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Moussa, A; Mueller, C; Nezri, E; Păvălaş, G E; Pellegrino, C; Perrina, C; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Racca, C; Riccobene, G; Roensch, K; Saldaña, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sanguineti, M; Sapienza, P; Schnabel, J; Schüssler, F; Seitz, T; Sieger, C; Spurio, M; Stolarczyk, Th; Sánchez-Losa, A; Taiuti, M; Trovato, A; Tselengidou, M; Turpin, D; T\\, C; Vallage, B; Vallée, C; Van Elewyck, V; Vivolo, D; Wagner, S; Wilms, J; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J; :,; Aartsen, M G; Abraham, K; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Ansseau, I; Archinger, M; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Beiser, E; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Börner, M; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Buzinsky, N; Casey, J; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Clark, K; Classen, L; Coenders, S; Collin, G H; Conrad, J M; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; Rosendo, E del Pino; Dembinski, H; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de Wasseige, G; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; di Lorenzo, V; Dujmovic, H; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eberhardt, B; Ehrhardt, T; Eichmann, B; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fahey, S; Fazely, A R; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Flis, S; Fösig, C -C; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gaior, R; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Ghorbani, K; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glagla, M; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Góra, D; Grant, D; Griffith, Z; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hansen, E; Hansmann, B; Hansmann, T; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hignight, J; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Holzapfel, K; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huber, M; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; In, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Japaridze, G S; Jeong, M; Jero, K; Jones, B J P; Jurkovic, M; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kemp, J; Kheirandish, A; Kim, M; Kintscher, T; Kiryluk, J; Klein, S R; Kohnen, G; Koirala, R; Kolanoski, H; Konietz, R; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Krückl, G; Kunnen, J; Kunwar, S; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lanfranchi, J L; Larson, M J; Lennarz, D; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leuner, J; Lu, L; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Mahn, K B M; Mandelartz, M; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meier, M; Meli, A; Menne, T; Merino, G; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Neer, G; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Pollmann, A Obertacke; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Pandya, H; Pankova, D V; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Quinnan, M; Raab, C; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Reimann, R; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Richter, S; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ryckbosch, D; Sabbatini, L; Sander, H -G; Sandrock, A; Sandroos, J; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schimp, M; Schlunder, P; Schmidt, T; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schumacher, L; Seckel, D; Seunarine, S; Soldin, D; Song, M; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stahlberg, M; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Steuer, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Sutherland, M; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tatar, J; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Turcati, A; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; Vandenbroucke, J; van Eijndhoven, N; Vanheule, S; van Santen, J; Veenkamp, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallace, A; Wallraff, M; Wandkowsky, N; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Wille, L; Williams, D R; Wills, L; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Xu, Y; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zoll, M; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Bell, A S; Bell, C J; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Bustillo, J Calderón; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Diaz, J Casanueva; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Baiardi, L Cerboni; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Canton, T Dal; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R T; De Rosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Castro, J M Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J -M; Isi, M; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacqmin, T; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, C; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Luo, J; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magee, R M; Mageswaran, M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, M; Neunzert, A; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Reyes, S D; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schönbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Setyawati, Y; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepańczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, %S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2016-01-01

    We present the high-energy-neutrino follow-up observations of the first gravitational wave transient GW150914 observed by the Advanced LIGO detectors on Sept. 14th, 2015. We search for coincident neutrino candidates within the data recorded by the IceCube and ANTARES neutrino detectors. A possible joint detection could be used in targeted electromagnetic follow-up observations, given the significantly better angular resolution of neutrino events compared to gravitational waves. We find no neutrino candidates in both temporal and spatial coincidence with the gravitational wave event. Within 500 s of the gravitational wave event, the number of neutrino candidates detected by IceCube and ANTARES were three and zero, respectively. This is consistent with the expected atmospheric background, and none of the neutrino candidates were directionally coincident with GW150914. We use this non-detection to constrain neutrino emission from the gravitational-wave event.

  11. High-energy neutrino follow-up search of gravitational wave event GW150914 with ANTARES and IceCube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Avgitas, T.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Capone, A.; Caramete, L.; Carr, J.; Celli, S.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Coleiro, A.; Coniglione, R.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Creusot, A.; Deschamps, A.; De Bonis, G.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; El Bojaddaini, I.; Elsässer, D.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Fehn, K.; Felis, I.; Fusco, L. A.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geißelsöder, S.; Geyer, K.; Giordano, V.; Gleixner, A.; Glotin, H.; Gracia-Ruiz, R.; Graf, K.; Hallmann, S.; van Haren, H.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Hößl, J.; Hofestädt, J.; Hugon, C.; Illuminati, G.; James, C. W.; de Jong, M.; Jongen, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Katz, U.; Kießling, D.; Kouchner, A.; Kreter, M.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lachaud, C.; Lahmann, R.; Lefèvre, D.; Leonora, E.; Loucatos, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Marinelli, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Mathieu, A.; Melis, K.; Michael, T.; Migliozzi, P.; Moussa, A.; Mueller, C.; Nezri, E.; Pǎvǎlaş, G. E.; Pellegrino, C.; Perrina, C.; Piattelli, P.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Racca, C.; Riccobene, G.; Roensch, K.; Saldaña, M.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Sanguineti, M.; Sapienza, P.; Schnabel, J.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Sieger, C.; Spurio, M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Taiuti, M.; Trovato, A.; Tselengidou, M.; Turpin, D.; Tönnis, C.; Vallage, B.; Vallée, C.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vivolo, D.; Wagner, S.; Wilms, J.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.; Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Anton, G.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Beiser, E.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Collin, G. H.; Conrad, J. M.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; del Pino Rosendo, E.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; di Lorenzo, V.; Dujmovic, H.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C.-C.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glagla, M.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, B.; Hansmann, T.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jones, B. J. P.; Jurkovic, M.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Katz, U.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kim, M.; Kintscher, T.; Kiryluk, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kunwar, S.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lennarz, D.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mandelartz, M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meier, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Richter, S.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.

    2016-06-01

    We present the high-energy-neutrino follow-up observations of the first gravitational wave transient GW150914 observed by the Advanced LIGO detectors on September 14, 2015. We search for coincident neutrino candidates within the data recorded by the IceCube and Antares neutrino detectors. A possible joint detection could be used in targeted electromagnetic follow-up observations, given the significantly better angular resolution of neutrino events compared to gravitational waves. We find no neutrino candidates in both temporal and spatial coincidence with the gravitational wave event. Within ±500 s of the gravitational wave event, the number of neutrino candidates detected by IceCube and Antares were three and zero, respectively. This is consistent with the expected atmospheric background, and none of the neutrino candidates were directionally coincident with GW150914. We use this nondetection to constrain neutrino emission from the gravitational-wave event.

  12. High-cadence observations of spicular-type events on the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetye, J.; Doyle, J. G.; Scullion, E.; Nelson, C. J.; Kuridze, D.; Henriques, V.; Woeger, F.; Ray, T.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Chromospheric observations taken at high-cadence and high-spatial resolution show a range of spicule-like features, including Type-I, Type-II (as well as rapid blue-shifted excursions (RBEs) and rapid red-shifted excursions (RREs) which are thought to be on-disk counterparts of Type-II spicules) and those which seem to appear within a few seconds, which if interpreted as flows would imply mass flow velocities in excess of 1000 km s-1. Aims: This article seeks to quantify and study rapidly appearing spicular-type events. We also compare the multi-object multi-frame blind deconvolution (MOMFBD) and speckle reconstruction techniques to understand if these spicules are more favourably observed using a particular technique. Methods: We use spectral imaging observations taken with the CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter (CRISP) on the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope. Data was sampled at multiple positions within the Hα line profile for both an on-disk and limb location. Results: The data is host to numerous rapidly appearing features which are observed at different locations within the Hα line profile. The feature's durations vary between 10-20 s and lengths around 3500 km. Sometimes, a time delay in their appearance between the blue and red wings of 3-5 s is evident, whereas, sometimes they are near simultaneous. In some instances, features are observed to fade and then re-emerge at the same location several tens of seconds later. Conclusions: We provide the first statistical analysis of these spicules and suggest that these observations can be interpreted as the line-of-sight (LOS) movement of highly dynamic spicules moving in and out of the narrow 60 mÅ transmission filter that is used to observe in different parts of the Hα line profile. The LOS velocity component of the observed fast chromospheric features, manifested as Doppler shifts, are responsible for their appearance in the red and blue wings of Hα line. Additional work involving data at other

  13. LEONA: Transient Luminous Event and Thunderstorm High Energy Emission Collaborative Network in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sao Sabbas, F. T.

    2012-12-01

    This project has the goal of establishing the Collaborative Network LEONA, to study the electrodynamical coupling of the atmospheric layers signaled by Transient Luminous Events - TLEs and high energy emissions from thunderstorms. We will develop and install a remotely controlled network of cameras to perform TLE observations in different locations in South America and one neutron detector in southern Brazil. The camera network will allow building a continuous data set of the phenomena studied in this continent. The first two trial units of the camera network are already installed, in Brazil and Peru, and two more will be installed until December 2012, in Argentina and Brazil. We expect to determine the TLE geographic distribution, occurrence rate, morphology, and possible coupling with other geophysical phenomena in South America, such as the South Atlantic Magnetic Anomaly - SAMA. We also expect to study thunderstorm neutron emissions in a region of intense electrical activity, measuring neutron fluxes with high time resolution simultaneously with TLEs and lightning for the first time in South America. Using an intensified high-speed camera for TLE observation during 2 campaigns we expect to be able to determine the duration and spatial- temporal development of the TLEs observed, to study the structure and initiation of sprites and to measure the velocity of development of sprite structures and the sprite delay. The camera was acquired via the FAPESP project DEELUMINOS (2005-2010), which also nucleated our research group Atmospheric Electrodynamical Coupling - ACATMOS. LEONA will nucleate this research in other institutions in Brazil and other countries in South America, providing continuity for this important research in our region. The camera network will be an unique tool to perform consistent long term TLE observation, and in fact is the only way to accumulate a data set for a climatological study of South America, since satellite instrumentation turns off in

  14. Continuous and discrete extreme climatic events affecting the dynamics of a high-arctic reindeer population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kung-Sik; Mysterud, Atle; Øritsland, Nils Are; Severinsen, Torbjørn; Stenseth, Nils Chr

    2005-10-01

    Climate at northern latitudes are currently changing both with regard to the mean and the temporal variability at any given site, increasing the frequency of extreme events such as cold and warm spells. Here we use a conceptually new modelling approach with two different dynamic terms of the climatic effects on a Svalbard reindeer population (the Brøggerhalvøya population) which underwent an extreme icing event ("locked pastures") with 80% reduction in population size during one winter (1993/94). One term captures the continuous and linear effect depending upon the Arctic Oscillation and another the discrete (rare) "event" process. The introduction of an "event" parameter describing the discrete extreme winter resulted in a more parsimonious model. Such an approach may be useful in strongly age-structured ungulate populations, with young and very old individuals being particularly prone to mortality factors during adverse conditions (resulting in a population structure that differs before and after extreme climatic events). A simulation study demonstrates that our approach is able to properly detect the ecological effects of such extreme climate events.

  15. Abrupt Changes at the Permian/Triassic Boundary: Tempo of Events from High-Resolution Cyclostratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampino, M. R.; Prokoph, A.; Adler, A. C.

    2000-01-01

    the nearby Reppwand outcrop section, the same faunal changes occurs over only 0.8 m or about 8,000 years, close to the limit of time-resolution induced by bioturbation and reworking in these sediments. The sharp negative global carbon-isotope shift took place within less than or equal to 40,000 yr, and the isotope excursions persisted for approximately 480,000 yr into the Early Triassic. The results indicate that the severe marine faunal event that marks the P/Tr boundary was very sudden, perhaps less than the resolution window in the GK-1 core, and suggest a catastrophic cause. The wavelet-analysis approach to high-resolution cyclostratigraphy can be applied to other P/Tr boundary sections, and when combined with precise absolute dating and magnetostratigraphic methods promises a significant increase in resolution in determining the correlation and tempo of the end-Permian extinctions and related events worldwide.

  16. Influence of anthropogenic inputs and a high-magnitude flood event on metal contamination pattern in surface bottom sediments from the Deba River urban catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Santos, Miren; Probst, Anne; García-García, Jon; Ruiz-Romera, Estilita

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of anthropogenic factors (infrastructure construction and industrial and wastewater inputs) and hydrological factors (high-magnitude flood events) on metal and organic contamination and on the source variability of sediments taken from the Deba River and its tributaries. The pollution status was evaluated using a sequential extraction procedure (BCR 701), enrichment factor, individual and global contamination factors and a number of statistical analysis methods. Zn, Cu and Cr were found to have significant input from anthropogenic sources, with moderately severe enrichment, together with an extremely high potential risk of contamination. The principal scavenger of Cu and Cr was organic matter, whereas Zn was uniformly distributed among all non-residual fractions. For Fe, the anthropogenic contribution was more obviously detected in bulk sediments (flood event resulted in a washout of the river bed and led to a general decrease in fine-grained sediment and metal concentrations in labile fractions of channel-bottom sediments, and a consequent downstream transfer of the pollution.

  17. High-cadence observations of spicular-type events and their wave-signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetye, Juie

    2016-05-01

    We present, a statistical study of spectral images, taken from the CRISP instrument at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope in H-alpha 656.28 nm of fast spicules with Doppler velocities in the range of -41km/s to +41 km/s. Remarkably, many of these spicules display apparent velocities above 500 km/s, very short lifetimes of up to 20 s combined with width or thickness of 100 km and apparent lengths of around 3500 km. Here we present, the other spectral properties of these events in the H-alpha line scan. Most features showed signature in multiple line position as we scan along the line scan. In around 89 % of the cases, there is temporal offset by 3.7 s to 5 s between the red-wing and blue-wing signatures. Another result is that 25% of cases are repetitive i.e. appear at the same location but they are not co-temporal or necessarily periodic in nature. Putting all the evidence together, we interpret the observations as mass motions (of flux tubes) that appear in the field-of-view of CRISP’s 0.0060 nm filters in the line of sight, along their projection as we scan. Further we observed transverse motion associated with these structures, which in some cases could be related to high-frequency kink-waves. We describe some cases showing this motion and the energies associated with them. The current work presented already tests the limits of current telescopes in terms of the temporal and spatial resolution. DKIST VTF instrument, having 3 times more spatial resolution than CRISP and much higher temporal resolution, we can being to understand the nature of such fine-scale transient phenomena in greater details.

  18. Recharge heterogeneity and high intensity rainfall events increase contamination risk for Mediterranean groundwater resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Andreas; Jasechko, Scott; Gleeson, Tom; Wada, Yoshihide; Andreo, Bartolomé; Barberá, Juan Antonio; Brielmann, Heike; Charlier, Jean-Baptiste; Darling, George; Filippini, Maria; Garvelmann, Jakob; Goldscheider, Nico; Kralik, Martin; Kunstmann, Harald; Ladouche, Bernard; Lange, Jens; Mudarra, Matías; Francisco Martín, José; Rimmer, Alon; Sanchez, Damián; Stumpp, Christine; Wagener, Thorsten

    2017-04-01

    Karst develops through the dissolution of carbonate rock and results in pronounced spatiotemporal heterogeneity of hydrological processes. Karst groundwater in Europe is a major source of fresh water contributing up to half of the total drinking water supply in some countries like Austria or Slovenia. Previous work showed that karstic recharge processes enhance and alter the sensitivity of recharge to climate variability. The enhanced preferential flow from the surface to the aquifer may be followed by enhanced risk of groundwater contamination. In this study we assess the contamination risk of karst aquifers over Europe and the Mediterranean using simulated transit time distributions. Using a new type of semi-distributed model that considers the spatial heterogeneity of karst hydraulic properties, we were able to simulate karstic groundwater recharge including its heterogeneous spatiotemporal dynamics. The model is driven by gridded daily climate data from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS). Transit time distributions are calculated using virtual tracer experiments. We evaluated our simulations by independent information on transit times derived from observed time series of water isotopes of >70 karst springs over Europe. The simulations indicate that, compared to humid, mountain and desert regions, the Mediterranean region shows a stronger risk of contamination in Europe because preferential flow processes are most pronounced given thin soil layers and the seasonal abundance of high intensity rainfall events in autumn and winter. Our modelling approach includes strong simplifications and its results cannot easily be generalized but it still highlights that the combined effects of variable climate and heterogeneous catchment properties constitute a strong risk on water quality.

  19. A High-Resolution Porphyrin Nitrogen Isotope Record of an Oceanic Anoxic Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, A.; Higgins, M. B.; Robinson, R. S.; Carter, S. J.

    2010-12-01

    Nitrogen isotope values measured in sediments deposited at times of widespread marine suboxic conditions are consistently more depleted in 15N than are modern marine sediments. We measured a high-resolution δ15N record of sedimentary porphyrins from a section spanning the Cenomanian-Turonian Oceanic Anoxic Event (OAE) II to examine changes in the nitrogen cycle recorded in surface waters. We compare these values to δ15N values of three sedimentary fractions: bulk sediment, extractable organic matter (bitumen), and non-extractable organic matter (kerogen). All fractions record similar trends; are offset from each other by consistent differences that are reflective of algal (not cyanobacterial) export; and are depleted in 15N compared to modern sedimentary samples, both before, during, and after the interval defined by the OAE. Prior to the termination of OAE II, there is a slight further negative excursion in δ15N values. In order to interpret these and other depleted δ15N values measured in similar black shales, we invoke a nitrogen isotope model that considers the importance of redox transformations of N under suboxic conditions. This model invokes an ocean in which the deep N reservoir is dominated by NH4+, limited nitrification occurs in the photic zone, and chemocline denitrification acts as a quantitative sink for downwelling nitrate. Although in this model a large component of net production may be fueled by N fixation, N fixation alone cannot generate biomass with δ15N values as depleted as are seen in many Mesozoic OAE sections. We postulate that throughout the Phanerozoic, excursions leading to negative values of d15N reflect relatively low rates of nitrosification relative to the sum of NH4+ utilization and N fixation.

  20. Dynamics of the MAP IOP 15 severe Mistral event: Observations and high-resolution numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guénard, V.; Drobinski, P.; Caccia, J. L.; Tedeschi, G.; Currier, P.

    2006-04-01

    This paper investigates the fundamental processes involved in a severe Mistral event that occurred during the Mesoscale Alpine Program (from 6 to 9 November 1999). The Mistral refers to a violent north/north-westerly wind blowing in south-eastern France from the Rhône valley to the French Riviera. The study is based on measurements from radiosoundings launched from Lyon and Nîmes and from two UHF wind profilers located near Marseille and Toulon allowing a good description of the flow in the complex terrain formed by the south-western Alps. Observational results are compared with RAMS non-hydrostatic numerical simulations performed with 27 km, 9 km and 3 km nested grids. The numerical simulations capture the flow complexity both upstream of the Alps and in the coastal area affected by the Mistral. They correctly reproduce horizontal wind speeds and directions, vertical velocities, virtual potential temperature and relative humidity documented by the observational network. The simulations are used to point out the main dynamical processes generating the Mistral. It is found that flow splitting around the Alps and around the isolated peaks bordering the south-eastern part of the Rhône valley (Mont Ventoux 1909 m, Massif du Lubéron 1425 m) induces the low-level jet observed near Marseille that lasts for 36 hours. The high-resolution simulation indicates that the transient low-level jet lasting for only 9 hours observed at Toulon is due to a gravity wave breaking over local topography (the Sainte Baume 1147 m) where hydraulic jumps are involved. A mountain wake with two opposite-sign potential-vorticity banners is generated. The mesoscale wake explains the westward progression of the large-scale Alpine wake.

  1. Characteristics of High-Impact Long-Duration Freezing Rain Events over North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCray, Christopher; Gyakum, John; Atallah, Eyad

    2017-04-01

    While even short periods of freezing rain can be hazardous, the most severe economic and public health impacts tend to occur when it persists for many hours. Predicting the precise and often fragile temperature stratification necessary for freezing rain to persist remains an important forecast challenge. To better elucidate the conditions responsible for the most severe impacts, we concentrate on surface observations of long-duration (6 or more hours) freezing rain events over North America from 1979-2015. Furthermore, we analyze cases in which multiple stations observe long-duration events simultaneously. Following these cases over successive days allows us to generate maps of freezing rain "tracks" which are then categorized by their geographic distributions. We then analyze the conditions that lead to the occurrence of freezing rain for each of these categories. The climatology of long-duration freezing rain events is largely controlled by a combination of synoptic patterns and local terrain effects, which help to maintain or replenish cold air at the surface. As with freezing rain in general, long-duration events occur most frequently from southeastern Canada into the northeastern United States, with a maximum in the St. Lawrence River Valley of Quebec. An examination of the longest-duration events at each station shows a broader geographic distribution, with local maxima in the frequency of 18+ h events over Oklahoma and surrounding states in the South Central United States (SCUS) - a region with relatively low annual freezing rain frequencies. Classification of individual events shows us that in many instances, the SCUS and northeastern North America are impacted by long-duration freezing rain during the same cases. Indeed, the category responsible for the greatest number of freezing rain observations over the largest area is one which begins in the SCUS (often Texas or Oklahoma), with freezing rain occurring over a broad southwest-northeast swath (2-3000 km

  2. UKIRT microlensing surveys as a pathfinder for $WFIRST$: The detection of five highly extinguished low-$|b|$ events

    CERN Document Server

    Shvartzvald, Y; Gould, A; Henderson, C B; Howell, S B; Beichman, C

    2016-01-01

    Optical microlensing surveys are restricted from detecting events near the Galactic plane and center, where the event rate is thought to be the highest, due to the high optical extinction of these fields. In the near-infrared (NIR), however, the lower extinction leads to a corresponding increase in event detections and is a primary driver for the wavelength coverage of the $WFIRST$ microlensing survey. During the 2015 and 2016 bulge observing seasons we conducted NIR microlensing surveys with UKIRT in conjunction with and in support of the $Spitzer$ and $Kepler$ microlensing campaigns. Here we report on five highly extinguished ($A_H=0.81-1.97$), low-Galactic latitude ($-0.98\\le b\\le -0.36$) microlensing events discovered from our 2016 survey. Four of them were monitored with an hourly cadence by optical surveys but were not reported as discoveries, likely due to the high extinction. Our UKIRT surveys and suggested future NIR surveys enable the first measurement of the microlensing event rate in the NIR. This...

  3. Remote measurement of cloud microphysics and its influence in predicting high impact weather events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bipasha, Paul S.; Jinya, John

    2016-05-01

    observations from A-Train , geostationary and futuristic imaging spectroscopic sensors, a multi-dimensional, and multi-scalar exploration of cloud systems is anticipated leading to accurate prediction of high impact weather events.

  4. Latitudinal Responses of F2 Peak Parameters to High-intensity Long-duration Continuous AE Activity (HILDCAA) Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spraggs, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    The ionospheric responses to geomagnetic storms form an important part of the space weather study. The ionospheric perturbations may be described as enhancements and depletions compared to the quiet time variations, known as positive and negative phases of the ionospheric storms, respectively. In spite of a significant volume of studies on the ionospheric responses to the geomagnetic storms, understanding of ionospheric storm has not reached a level where it is possible to predict it. Geomagnetic activity may be divided into three categories: substorms, storms of different intensity, and high-intensity long-duration continuous AE activity (HILDCAA) events. This work presents specifically the latitudinal responses of the noontime F region peak parameters (hmF2 and foF2) to HILDCAA events. For this, digisonde data from 51 stations around the world was selected from the Digital Ionogram Data Base (DIDbase) from 2004 to 2012. For the same period 19 HILDCAA events were detected. Preliminary results show a positive effect in the peak parameters of the southern hemisphere and a negative effect in those of the northern hemisphere, suggesting that there is a predominantly northward component of the meridional winds. Additionally, it seems that the events occurring around the summer solstice have meridional wind components that are exclusively northward, while two of the six winter time events have southward components. Wintertime events are also the only ones with a very prominent eastward component of the zonal winds.

  5. High prevalence of peripheral arterial disease in patients with previous cerebrovascular or coronary event

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehlsen, Jesper; Wiinberg, Niels; Joergensen, Bjarne S

    2010-01-01

    The presence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in patients with other manifestations of cardiovascular disease identifies a population at increased risk of complications both during acute coronary events and on a long-term basis and possibly a population in whom secondary prevention of cardiov......The presence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) in patients with other manifestations of cardiovascular disease identifies a population at increased risk of complications both during acute coronary events and on a long-term basis and possibly a population in whom secondary prevention...

  6. Particle physics explanations for ultra-high energy cosmic ray events

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manuel Dress

    2004-02-01

    The origin of cosmic ray events with $E\\gtrsim 10^{11}$ GeV remains mysterious. In this talk I briefly summarize several proposed particle physics explanations: a breakdown of Lorentz invariance, the `$Z$-burst' scenario, new hadrons with masses of several GeV as primaries, and magnetic monopoles with mass below 1010 GeV as primaries. I then describe in a little more detail the idea that these events are due to the decays of very massive, long-lived exotic particles.

  7. Cardiovascular Events in Cancer Patients Treated with Highly or Moderately Emetogenic Chemotherapy: Results from a Population-Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thao T. Vo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on cardiovascular safety in cancer patients treated with highly or moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC or MEC, who may have taken the antiemetic, aprepitant, have been limited to clinical trials and postmarketing spontaneous reports. Our study explored background rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD events among HEC- or MEC-treated cancer patients in a population-based setting to contextualize events seen in a new drug development program and to determine at a high level whether rates differed by aprepitant usage. Medical and pharmacy claims data from the 2005–2007 IMPACT National Benchmark Database were classified into emetogenic chemotherapy categories and CVD outcomes. Among 5827 HEC/MEC-treated patients, frequencies were highest for hypertension (16–21% and composites of venous (7–12% and arterial thromboembolic events (4–7%. Aprepitant users generally did not experience higher frequencies of events compared to nonusers. Our study serves as a useful benchmark of background CVD event rates in a population-based setting of cancer patients.

  8. High Resolution Modeling in Mountainous Terrain for Water Resource Management: AN Extreme Precipitation Event Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masarik, M. T.; Watson, K. A.; Flores, A. N.; Anderson, K.; Tangen, S.

    2016-12-01

    The water resources infrastructure of the Western US is designed to deliver reliable water supply to users and provide recreational opportunities for the public, as well as afford flood control for communities by buffering variability in precipitation and snow storage. Thus water resource management is a balancing act of meeting multiple objectives while trying to anticipate and mitigate natural variability of water supply. Currently, the forecast guidance available to personnel managing resources in mountainous terrain is lacking in two ways: the spatial resolution is too coarse, and there is a gap in the intermediate time range (10-30 days). To address this need we examine the effectiveness of using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, a state of the art, regional, numerical weather prediction model, as a means to generate high-resolution weather guidance in the intermediate time range. This presentation will focus on a reanalysis and hindcasting case study of the extreme precipitation and flooding event in the Payette River Basin of Idaho during the period of June 2nd-4th, 2010. For the reanalysis exercise we use NCEP's Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) and the North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) data sets as input boundary conditions to WRF. The model configuration includes a horizontal spatial resolution of 3km in the outer nest, and 1 km in the inner nest, with output temporal resolution of 3 hrs and 1 hr, respectively. The hindcast simulations, which are currently underway, will make use of the NCEP Climate Forecast System Reforecast (CFSRR) data. The current state of these runs will be discussed. Preparations for the second of two components in this project, weekly WRF forecasts during the intense portion of the water year, will be briefly described. These forecasts will use the NCEP Climate Forecast System version 2 (CFSv2) operational forecast data as boundary conditions to provide forecast guidance geared towards water resource

  9. Biofilm formation and sanitizer resistance of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 strains isolated from "High Event Period" meat contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the meat industry, a “High Event Period” (HEP) is defined as a time period during which commercial meat plants experience a higher than usual rate of E. coli O157:H7 contamination. Genetic analysis indicated that within a HEP, most of the E. coli O157:H7 strains belong to a singular dominant str...

  10. La sequía de 1937 en Santiago del Estero: Antecedentes y consecuencias de un acontecimiento ambiental The drought of 1937 in Santiago del Estero: Antecedents and consequences of an environmental event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Tasso

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Durante los años 1935 a 1937 se produjo una importante sequía que afectó duramente a las regiones áridas y semiáridas del noroeste argentino, así como de México y Estados Unidos. En esta nota se estudia la repercusión de ese acontecimiento ambiental sobre la economía y la sociedad de Santiago del Estero, que marca un antes y un después en su historia agraria. Hasta ese año se consolidó el modelo agroforestal surgido entre 1880-1900, que combinaba el obraje, la finca y la economía campesina. La gran sequía hizo fracasar dos cosechas seguidas, y disminuyó el stock ganadero vacuno y caprino en un 80%. Esto tuvo consecuencias catastróficas en una sociedad rural, cuya dieta dependía en gran medida de su propia producción, desatando la hambruna más notable en la historia contemporánea de esta provincia. Entre las numerosas consecuencias de esta sequía, estudiamos sus efectos en la población, la economía y las políticas públicas. Las iniciativas del Estado fueron dispersas y tardías, y no pudieron contener los problemas de miles de familias que enfrentaron el hambre y el desamparo social. Este drama regional adquirió dimensión nacional a través de la prensa oral y escrita, que en los últimos meses de 1937 promovió una campaña solidaria en gran escala. El éxodo inauguró un sendero migratorio hacia las zonas fabriles de Berisso, Ensenada y el Gran Buenos Aires. La sequía también estimuló la construcción de los diques Los Quiroga (1949 y la presa de embalse de Río Hondo (1968. La literatura también recogió este tema como símbolo del drama campesino en el imaginario colectivo.During the years 1935 to 1937 there was a significant drought that hit the arid and semiarid regions of northwestern argentina, as well as from Mexico and the United States. This note discusses the impact of this environmental event on the economy and society of Santiago del Estero, which marks a before and an after in its agricultural history

  11. Variations in airborne bacterial communities at high altitudes over the Noto Peninsula (Japan in response to Asian dust events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Maki

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol particles, including airborne microorganisms, are transported through the free troposphere from the Asian continental area to the downwind area in East Asia and can influence climate changes, ecosystem dynamics, and human health. However, the variations present in airborne bacterial communities in the free troposphere over downwind areas are poorly understood, and there are few studies that provide an in-depth examination of the effects of long-range transport of aerosols (natural and anthropogenic particles on bacterial variations. In this study, the vertical distributions of airborne bacterial communities at high altitudes were investigated and the bacterial variations were compared between dust events and non-dust events.Aerosols were collected at three altitudes from ground level to the free troposphere (upper level: 3000 or 2500 m; middle level: 1200 or 500 m; and low level: 10 m during Asian dust events and non-dust events over the Noto Peninsula, Japan, where westerly winds carry aerosols from the Asian continental areas. During Asian dust events, air masses at high altitudes were transported from the Asian continental area by westerly winds, and laser imaging detection and ranging (lidar data indicated high concentrations of non-spherical particles, suggesting that dust-sand particles were transported from the central desert regions of Asia. The air samples collected during the dust events contained 10–100 times higher concentrations of microscopic fluorescent particles and optical particle counter (OPC measured particles than in non-dust events. The air masses of non-dust events contained lower amounts of dust-sand particles. Additionally, some air samples showed relatively high levels of black carbon, which were likely transported from the Asian continental coasts. Moreover, during the dust events, microbial particles at altitudes of  >  1200 m increased to the concentrations ranging from 1. 2 × 106 to 6

  12. The thermal consequences of river-level variations in an urban groundwater body highly affected by groundwater heat pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gil, Alejandro; Vázquez-Suñe, Enric; Schneider, Eduardo Garrido; Sánchez-Navarro, José Ángel; Mateo-Lázaro, Jesús

    2014-07-01

    The extensive implementation of ground source heat pumps in urban aquifers is an important issue related to groundwater quality and the future economic feasibility of existent geothermal installations. Although many cities are in the immediate vicinity of large rivers, little is known about the thermal river-groundwater interaction at a kilometric-scale. The aim of this work is to evaluate the thermal impact of river water recharges induced by flood events into an urban alluvial aquifer anthropogenically influenced by geothermal exploitations. The present thermal state of an urban aquifer at a regional scale, including 27 groundwater heat pump installations, has been evaluated. The thermal impacts of these installations in the aquifer together with the thermal impacts from "cold" winter floods have also been spatially and temporally evaluated to ensure better geothermal management of the aquifer. The results showed a variable direct thermal impact from 0 to 6 °C depending on the groundwater-surface water interaction along the river trajectory. The thermal plumes far away from the riverbed also present minor indirect thermal impacts due to hydraulic gradient variations. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. PFOS and PFOSA in Bottlenose Dolphins: An Investigation into Two Unusually High Mortality Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Along the Atlantic coast of the United States during 1987 and 1988, bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) suffered one of this country's largest marine mammal mass mortality events. An estimated 50% of all near-shore bottlenose died during this short period. Two years later a ...

  14. High Energy Solar Particle Events and their Associated Coronal Mass Ejections

    CERN Document Server

    Manoharan, P K

    2010-01-01

    Intense solar energetic particle (SEP) events data, associated with ground level enhancements (GLEs), occurred during 1989 to 2006 have been obtained from the spectrometers on board GOES spacecraft in the energy range 10-100 MeV. The interplanetary effects of these events and their associated coronal mass ejections (CMEs) have been provided by the LASCO/SOHO coronagraph images in the field of view of 2-30 {\\rsun} and the interplanetary scintillation images from the Ooty Radio Telescope in the heliocentric distance range of $\\sim$40-250 R$_\\odot$. The comparison between the radial evolution of the CME and its associated particle spectrum shows that the spectrum is soft at the onset of the particle event. A flat spectrum is observed at the peak of the particle event and the spectrum becomes steeper as the CME moves farther out into the inner heliosphere. However, the magnitude of change in spectral slopes differs from one CME to the other, suggesting the difference in energy available within the CME to drive th...

  15. Effect of high flow events on spatiotemporal variation of E. coli concentrations in creek sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediments can harbor large populations of Escherichia coli often times in greater amounts than the overlying water column. Resuspension of sediments during storm events causes the release of E. coli which drastically changes microbial water quality metrics. It is not well known how populations of E....

  16. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Mean number in highly inclined events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J. J.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Newton, D.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.; Pierre Auger Collaboration, [No Value

    2015-01-01

    We present the first hybrid measurement of the average muon number in air showers at ultrahigh energies, initiated by cosmic rays with zenith angles between 62° and 80°. The measurement is based on 174 hybrid events recorded simultaneously with the surface detector array and the fluorescence detecto

  17. Associated Electron-Muon Events from High-Energy Hadronic Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaag, Robert Emil

    The inclusive reaction p + N (--->) e + (mu) + X was measured at an energy of 38.8 GeV (center of mass). Data representing a total luminosity of 13.4 inverse femtobarns (13.4 x 10('39) cm('-2)) were analyzed. Three associated electron-muon events were observed. The observed signal was 0.02 (+OR-) 0.015 of the Drell-Yan di-muon production. The expected number of e(mu) events from tau lepton pair production and decay was calculated to be 0.5 (+OR-) 0.1. A two sigma upper limit for (lepton family number violating) two body resonant decays to e + (mu) was obtained (physi- cally reasonable model. No prompt e(mu) events attributable to charm production and decay, or bottom production and decay, were seen. This corresponded to a two sigma upper limit for charm pair produc- tion of ) D + (')D (--->) e + K (--->) e + (mu) interpretation of these candidate events was consistent with the lower limit on charm production obtained with the prompt e(mu) rate.

  18. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Mean number in highly inclined events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J. J.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Newton, D.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.; Pierre Auger Collaboration, [No Value

    2015-01-01

    We present the first hybrid measurement of the average muon number in air showers at ultrahigh energies, initiated by cosmic rays with zenith angles between 62° and 80°. The measurement is based on 174 hybrid events recorded simultaneously with the surface detector array and the fluorescence detecto

  19. A high diet quality is associated with lower incidence of cardiovascular events in the Malmo diet and cancer cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Hlebowicz

    Full Text Available AIMS: To investigate if diet quality is related to incidence of cardiovascular (CV events. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A diet quality index based on the 2005 Swedish Nutrition Recommendations and the Swedish Dietary Guidelines was created and included six dietary components: saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, fish and shellfish, dietary fiber, fruit and vegetables, and sucrose. The index ranked 17126 participants (59% women of the population-based Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort (Sweden on their dietary intakes. Total index score was categorized as low, medium or high. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to model associations between index score categories and index components with risk of incident CV events, with adjustment for potential confounders. The incidence of first CV events (non-fatal or fatal myocardial infarction or ischemic stroke or death from ischemic heart disease was monitored from baseline (1991-1996 until December 31, 2008; 703 CV events occurred in women and 1093 in men. RESULTS: A high diet quality was associated with decreased risk of CV events when compared to a low diet quality. In multivariate analysis, the risk reduction was 32% (hazard ratio = 0.68, 95% confidence interval: 0.49-0.73 in men and 27% (hazard ratio = 0.73, 95% confidence interval: 0.59-0.91 in women. When examined separately and mutually adjusted for each other, the individual components were either not associated with CV risk or marginally decreased risks were seen. CONCLUSION: High quality diets in line with current recommendations may reduce the risk of CV events. This study illustrates the importance of considering a combination of dietary factors when evaluating diet-disease associations.

  20. High-Resolution Mapping of Homologous Recombination Events in rad3 Hyper-Recombination Mutants in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominska, Margaret; Moriel-Carretero, María; Herrera-Moyano, Emilia; Aguilera, Andrés; Petes, Thomas D.

    2016-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisae RAD3 gene is the homolog of human XPD, an essential gene encoding a DNA helicase of the TFIIH complex involved in both nucleotide excision repair (NER) and transcription. Some mutant alleles of RAD3 (rad3-101 and rad3-102) have partial defects in DNA repair and a strong hyper-recombination (hyper-Rec) phenotype. Previous studies showed that the hyper-Rec phenotype associated with rad3-101 and rad3-102 can be explained as a consequence of persistent single-stranded DNA gaps that are converted to recombinogenic double-strand breaks (DSBs) by replication. The systems previously used to characterize the hyper-Rec phenotype of rad3 strains do not detect the reciprocal products of mitotic recombination. We have further characterized these events using a system in which the reciprocal products of mitotic recombination are recovered. Both rad3-101 and rad3-102 elevate the frequency of reciprocal crossovers about 100-fold. Mapping of these events shows that three-quarters of these crossovers reflect DSBs formed at the same positions in both sister chromatids (double sister-chromatid breaks, DSCBs). The remainder reflects DSBs formed in single chromatids (single chromatid breaks, SCBs). The ratio of DSCBs to SCBs is similar to that observed for spontaneous recombination events in wild-type cells. We mapped 216 unselected genomic alterations throughout the genome including crossovers, gene conversions, deletions, and duplications. We found a significant association between the location of these recombination events and regions with elevated gamma-H2AX. In addition, there was a hotspot for deletions and duplications at the IMA2 and HXT11 genes near the left end of chromosome XV. A comparison of these data with our previous analysis of spontaneous mitotic recombination events suggests that a sub-set of spontaneous events in wild-type cells may be initiated by incomplete NER reactions, and that DSCBs, which cannot be repaired by sister

  1. Lifecycle Problems in Consequence Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehman William

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE guidance documents require economists and planners to meet a very high standard when evaluating consequences resulting from flood events. The guidance documents require analysts to evaluate how government action changes the consequences over time, in addition to evaluating how government inaction changes consequences over time as well. Corps guidance (Engineering Regulation 1105-2-100, Section 2-3.c.4 and Engineering Regulation 1105-2-100, Section 2-3.b respectively require the evaluation of direct and indirect economic impacts, life risk impacts, and agricultural impacts for both current conditions and future most likely conditions across a range of alternatives. Evaluating the potential for impacts from flooding across time, and how time impacts their existence or vulnerability, is considered a “lifecycle approach”. Little to no guidance is available on the process of calculating this “lifecycle approach” regarding changes in the value and number of assets within the floodplain over time. Performing a lifecycle analysis of a project over durations from 30 to 100 years, depending on the project purpose, requires evaluation of the changes in human behavior caused by changes in the floodplain such as reconstruction of structures, maintenance of structures, construction of new structures, population growth, and what type of structures are being built within the study area. This type of evaluation is not fully supported by most of the software programs utilized for flood risk management in the planning context. This paper is intended to describe pros and cons of economic lifecycle evaluation techniques to address the needs stated by policy, and tools that are being developed to support this analysis.

  2. Physical distress is associated with cardiovascular events in a high risk population of elderly men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemsdal Tor O

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-reported health perceptions such as physical distress and quality of life are suggested independent predictors of mortality and morbidity in patients with established cardiovascular disease. This study examined the associations between these factors and three years incidence of cardiovascular events in a population of elderly men with long term hyperlipidemia. Methods We studied observational data in a cohort of 433 men aged 64–76 years from a prospective, 2 × 2 factorial designed, three-year interventional trial. Information of classical risk factors was obtained and the following questionnaires were administered at baseline: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Physical Symptom Distress Index and Life Satisfaction Index. The occurrence of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, cerebrovascular incidences and peripheral arterial disease were registered throughout the study period. Continuous data with skewed distribution was split into tertiles. Hazard ratios (HR were calculated from Cox regression analyses to assess the associations between physical distress, quality of life and cardiovascular events. Results After three years, 49 cardiovascular events were registered, with similar incidence among subjects with and without established cardiovascular disease. In multivariate analyses adjusted for age, smoking, systolic blood pressure, serum glucose, HADS-anxiety and treatment-intervention, physical distress was positively associated (HR 3.1, 95% CI 1.2 – 7.9 for 3rd versus 1st tertile and quality of life negatively associated (HR 2.6, 95% CI 1.1–5.8 for 3rd versus 1st tertile with cardiovascular events. The association remained statistically significant only for physical distress (hazard ratio 2.8 95% CI 1.2 – 6.8, p Conclusion Physical distress, but not quality of life, was independently associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events in an observational study of elderly men predominantly

  3. Consequences of exchanging carbohydrates for proteins in the cholesterol metabolism of mice fed a high-fat diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Raymond

    Full Text Available Consumption of low-carbohydrate, high-protein, high-fat diets lead to rapid weight loss but the cardioprotective effects of these diets have been questioned. We examined the impact of high-protein and high-fat diets on cholesterol metabolism by comparing the plasma cholesterol and the expression of cholesterol biosynthesis genes in the liver of mice fed a high-fat (HF diet that has a high (H or a low (L protein-to-carbohydrate (P/C ratio. H-P/C-HF feeding, compared with L-P/C-HF feeding, decreased plasma total cholesterol and increased HDL cholesterol concentrations at 4-wk. Interestingly, the expression of genes involved in hepatic steroid biosynthesis responded to an increased dietary P/C ratio by first down-regulation (2-d followed by later up-regulation at 4-wk, and the temporal gene expression patterns were connected to the putative activity of SREBF1 and 2. In contrast, Cyp7a1, the gene responsible for the conversion of cholesterol to bile acids, was consistently up-regulated in the H-P/C-HF liver regardless of feeding duration. Over expression of Cyp7a1 after 2-d and 4-wk H-P/C-HF feeding was connected to two unique sets of transcription regulators. At both time points, up-regulation of the Cyp7a1 gene could be explained by enhanced activations and reduced suppressions of multiple transcription regulators. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the hypocholesterolemic effect of H-P/C-HF feeding coincided with orchestrated changes of gene expressions in lipid metabolic pathways in the liver of mice. Based on these results, we hypothesize that the cholesterol lowering effect of high-protein feeding is associated with enhanced bile acid production but clinical validation is warranted. (246 words.

  4. Implications of high-temperature events and water deficits on protein profiles in wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Vinjett) grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fen; Jørgensen, Anders D; Li, Huawei; Søndergaard, Ib; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte; Jiang, Dong; Wollenweber, Bernd; Jacobsen, Susanne

    2011-05-01

    Increased climatic variability is resulting in an increase of both the frequency and the magnitude of extreme climate events. Therefore, cereals may be exposed to more than one stress event in the growing season, which may ultimately affect crop yield and quality. Here, effects are reported of interaction of water deficits and/or a high-temperature event (32°C) during vegetative growth (terminal spikelet) with either of these stress events applied during generative growth (anthesis) in wheat. Influence of combinations of stress on protein fractions (albumins, globulins, gliadins and glutenins) in grains and stress-induced changes on the albumin and gliadin proteomes were investigated by 2-DE and MS. The synthesis of individual protein fractions was shown to be affected by both the type and time of the applied stresses. Identified drought or high-temperature-responsive proteins included proteins involved in primary metabolism, storage and stress response such as late embryogenesis abundant proteins, peroxiredoxins and α-amylase/trypsin inhibitors. Several proteins, e.g. heat shock protein and 14-3-3 protein changed in abundance only under multiple high temperatures.

  5. High Resolution Simulations of a Severe Hail Storm and Flooding Event over La Paz city with WRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamuriano, Marcelo; Brönnimann, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    On February 19, 2002 a very local hail storm and a flash flood episode occurred in La Paz city, Bolivia. About 40 millimeters of precipitation in over an hour was observed, it was the strongest rainfall registered until that date. This event caused at least 69 causalities and important damages to the city's infrastructure, being considered as an exceptional natural disaster. It is thought that the vertical humid air motion driven by the high surface temperatures and topographical forcing is the responsible of such event, nevertheless a formal study about the atmospheric features leading to this episode has not been done yet. In order to overcome this issue, a series of high resolution numerical experiments with the WRF-ARW model is conducted using two global datasets: GFS and ECMWF. Several micro-physics schemes are used in a four-nested domain configuration with 2 kilometers as finest resolution, giving more details about the effects topography on this event. Overall, high-resolution simulations improves the spatial distribution of rainfall and represents better the local atmospheric circulation leading to this extreme event.

  6. Fragmentation of urban forms and the environmental consequences: results from a high-spatial resolution model system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, U. W.; Wang, Z. S.

    2008-10-01

    Each city has its unique urban form. The importance of urban form on sustainable development has been recognized in recent years. Traditionally, air quality modelling in a city is in a mesoscale with grid resolution of kilometers, regardless of its urban form. This paper introduces a GIS-based air quality and noise model system developed to study the built environment of highly compact urban forms. Compared with traditional mesoscale air quality model system, the present model system has a higher spatial resolution down to individual buildings along both sides of the street. Applying the developed model system in the Macao Peninsula with highly compact urban forms, the average spatial resolution of input and output data is as high as 174 receptor points per km2. Based on this input/output dataset with a high spatial resolution, this study shows that even the highly compact urban forms can be fragmented into a very small geographic scale of less than 3 km2. This is due to the significant temporal variation of urban development. The variation of urban form in each fragment in turn affects air dispersion, traffic condition, and thus air quality and noise in a measurable scale.

  7. Economic consequences of mastitis and withdrawal of milk with high somatic cell count in Swedish dairy herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C; Østergaard, Søren; Emanuelson, U

    2010-01-01

    no clinical mastitis (CM) while keeping the incidence of subclinical mastitis (SCM) constant and vice versa. Six different strategies to withdraw milk with high SCC were compared. The decision to withdraw milk was based on herd-level information in three scenarios: withdrawal was initiated when the predicted......% of the herd net return given the initial incidence of mastitis. Expressed per cow-year, the avoidable cost of mastitis was €55. The costs per case of CM and SCM were estimated at €278 and €60, respectively. Withdrawing milk with high SCC was never profitable because this generated a substantial amount of milk...... resulted in less negative effect on net return. It was concluded that the current milk-pricing system makes it more profitable for farmers to sell a larger amount of milk with higher SCC than to withdraw milk with high SCC to obtain payment premiums, at least in herds with mastitis incidences within...

  8. Genome-wide high-resolution mapping of UV-induced mitotic recombination events in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Yin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and most other eukaryotes, mitotic recombination is important for the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks (DSBs. Mitotic recombination between homologous chromosomes can result in loss of heterozygosity (LOH. In this study, LOH events induced by ultraviolet (UV light are mapped throughout the genome to a resolution of about 1 kb using single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP microarrays. UV doses that have little effect on the viability of diploid cells stimulate crossovers more than 1000-fold in wild-type cells. In addition, UV stimulates recombination in G1-synchronized cells about 10-fold more efficiently than in G2-synchronized cells. Importantly, at high doses of UV, most conversion events reflect the repair of two sister chromatids that are broken at approximately the same position whereas at low doses, most conversion events reflect the repair of a single broken chromatid. Genome-wide mapping of about 380 unselected crossovers, break-induced replication (BIR events, and gene conversions shows that UV-induced recombination events occur throughout the genome without pronounced hotspots, although the ribosomal RNA gene cluster has a significantly lower frequency of crossovers.

  9. Conjunction Assessment Late-Notice High-Interest Event Investigation: Space Weather Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachura, D.; Hejduk, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    Late-notice events usually driven by large changes in primary (protected) object or secondary object state. Main parameter to represent size of state change is component position difference divided by associated standard deviation (epsilon divided by sigma) from covariance. Investigation determined actual frequency of large state changes, in both individual and combined states. Compared them to theoretically expected frequencies. Found that large changes ( (epsilon divided by sigma) is greater than 3) in individual object states occur much more frequently than theory dictates. Effect is less pronounced in radial components and in events with probability of collision (Pc) greater than 1 (sup -5) (1e-5). Found combined state matched much closer to theoretical expectation, especially for radial and cross-track. In-track is expected to be the most vulnerable to modeling errors, so not surprising that non-compliance largest in this component.

  10. High-Achieving Black Students, Biculturalism, and Out-of-School STEM Learning Experiences: Exploring Some Unintended Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, Ebony O.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the complex challenges of high-achieving Black students who are successful in becoming immersed in predominately White STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) spaces and how such immersion can exacerbate their experiences of racial stereotyping and other forms of racial bias. The author…

  11. A high-efficiency self-powered wireless sensor node for monitoring concerning vibratory events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dacheng; Li, Suiqiong; Li, Mengyang; Xie, Danpeng; Dong, Chuan; Li, Xinxin

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents a self-powered wireless alarming sensor node (SWASN), which was designed to monitor the occurrence of concerning vibratory events. The major components of the sensor node include a vibration-threshold-triggered energy harvester (VTTEH) that powers the sensor node, a dual threshold voltage control circuit (DTVCC) for power management and a radio frequency (RF) signal transmitting module. The VTTEH generates significant electric energy only when the input vibration reaches certain amplitude. Thus, the VTTEH serves as both the power source and the vibration-event-sensing element for the sensor node. The DTVCC was specifically designed to utilize the limited power supply from the VTTEH to operate the sensor node. Constructed with only voltage detectors and MOSFETs, the DTVCC achieved low power consumption, which was 65% lower compared with the power management circuit designed in our previous work. Meanwhile, a RF transmit circuit was constructed based on the commercially available CC1110-F32 wireless transceiver chip and a compact planar antenna was designed to improve the signal transmission distance. The sensor node was fabricated and was characterized both in the laboratory and in the field. Experimental results showed that the SWASN could automatically send out alarming signals when the simulated concerning event occurred. The waiting time between two consecutive transmission periods is less than 125 s and the transmission distance can reach 1.31 km. The SWASN will have broad applications in field surveillances.

  12. When do ego threats lead to self-regulation failure? Negative consequences of defensive high self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambird, Kathleen Hoffman; Mann, Traci

    2006-09-01

    High self-esteem (HSE) is increasingly recognized as heterogeneous. By measuring subtypes of HSE, the present research reevaluates the finding that HSE individuals show poor self-regulation following ego threat (Baumeister, Heatherton, & Tice, 1993). In Experiment 1, participants with HSE showed poor self-regulation after ego threat only if they also were defensive (high in self-presentation bias). In Experiment 2, two measures--self-presentation bias and implicit self-esteem--were used to subtype HSE individuals as defensive. Both operationalizations of defensive HSE predicted poor self-regulation after ego threat. The results indicate that (a) only defensive HSE individuals are prone to self-regulation failure following ego threat and (b) measures of self-presentation bias and implicit self-esteem can both be used to detect defensiveness.

  13. Consequences of a Maternal High-Fat Diet and Late Gestation Diabetes on the Developing Rat Lung

    OpenAIRE

    Michelle L Baack; Forred, Benjamin J.; Larsen, Tricia D.; Jensen, Danielle N.; Wachal, Angela L.; Khan, Muhammad Ali; Vitiello, Peter F.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Infants born to diabetic or obese mothers are at risk of respiratory distress and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN), conceivably through fuel-mediated pathogenic mechanisms. Prior research and preventative measures focus on controlling maternal hyperglycemia, but growing evidence suggests a role for additional circulating fuels including lipids. Little is known about the individual or additive effects of a maternal high-fat diet on fetal lung development. Objec...

  14. Water, proton, and oxygen transport in high IEC, short side chain PFSA ionomer membranes: consequences of a frustrated network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaoyan; Holdcroft, Steven; Mani, Ana; Zhang, Yongming; Shi, Zhiqing

    2011-10-28

    The effect of ion exchange capacity (IEC) on the water sorption properties of high IEC, short side chain (SSC) PFSA ionomer membranes, and the relationships between water content, proton conductivity, proton mobility, water permeation, oxygen diffusion, and oxygen permeation are investigated. SSC PFSA ionomer membranes possessing 1.3, 1.4, and 1.5 mmol g(-1) IEC are compared to a series of long side chain (LSC) PFSA ionomer membranes ranging in IEC from 0.9 to 1.13 mmol g(-1). At 25 °C, fully-hydrated SSC ionomer membranes are characterized as possessing higher water contents (56-75 vol%), moderate λ values (15-18), high analytical acid concentrations (2-2.8 M), and moderate conductivity (88-115 mS/cm); but lower than anticipated effective proton mobility. Complementary measurements of water permeability, oxygen diffusion, and oxygen permeability also yield lower than expected values given their much higher water contents. Potential benefits afforded by reducing the side chain length of PFSA ionomer membranes, such as increased crystallinity, higher IEC, and high hydrated acid concentration are offset by a less-developed, frustrated hydrophilic percolation network, which provides a motivation for future improvements of transport properties for this class of material. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2011

  15. A new dynamic model for highly efficient mass transfer in aerated bioreactors and consequences for kLa identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Stefan; Murray, Douglas B; Machne, Rainer

    2012-12-01

    Gas-liquid mass transfer is often rate-limiting in laboratory and industrial cultures of aerobic or autotrophic organisms. The volumetric mass transfer coefficient k(L) a is a crucial characteristic for comparing, optimizing, and upscaling mass transfer efficiency of bioreactors. Reliable dynamic models and resulting methods for parameter identification are needed for quantitative modeling of microbial growth dynamics. We describe a laboratory-scale stirred tank reactor (STR) with a highly efficient aeration system (k(L) a ≈ 570 h(-1)). The reactor can sustain yeast culture with high cell density and high oxygen uptake rate, leading to a significant drop in gas concentration from inflow to outflow (by 21%). Standard models fail to predict the observed mass transfer dynamics and to identify k(L) a correctly. In order to capture the concentration gradient in the gas phase, we refine a standard ordinary differential equation (ODE) model and obtain a system of partial integro-differential equations (PIDE), for which we derive an approximate analytical solution. Specific reactor configurations, in particular a relatively short bubble residence time, allow a quasi steady-state approximation of the PIDE system by a simpler ODE model which still accounts for the concentration gradient. Moreover, we perform an appropriate scaling of all variables and parameters. In particular, we introduce the dimensionless overall efficiency κ, which is more informative than k(L) a since it combines the effects of gas inflow, exchange, and solution. Current standard models of mass transfer in laboratory-scale aerated STRs neglect the gradient in the gas concentration, which arises from highly efficient bubbling systems and high cellular exchange rates. The resulting error in the identification of κ (and hence k(L) a) increases dramatically with increasing mass transfer efficiency. Notably, the error differs between cell-free and culture-based methods of parameter identification

  16. High-Energy Electromagnetic Offline Follow-Up of Ligo-Virgo Gravitational-Wave Binary Coalescence Candidate Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, L.; Briggs, M. S.; Camp, J.; Christensen, N.; Connaughton, V.; Jenke, P.; Remillard, R. A.; Veitch, J.

    2015-01-01

    We present two different search methods for electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational-wave (GW) events from ground-based detectors using archival NASA high-energy data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and RXTE All-sky Monitor (ASM) instruments. To demonstrate the methods, we use a limited number of representative GW background noise events produced by a search for binary neutron star coalescence over the last two months of the LIGO-Virgo S6/VSR3 joint science run. Time and sky location provided by the GW data trigger a targeted search in the high-energy photon data. We use two custom pipelines: one to search for prompt gamma-ray counterparts in GBM, and the other to search for a variety of X-ray afterglow model signals in ASM. We measure the efficiency of the joint pipelines to weak gamma-ray burst counterparts, and a family of model X-ray afterglows. By requiring a detectable signal in either electromagnetic instrument coincident with a GW event, we are able to reject a large majority of GW candidates. This reduces the signal-to-noise ratio of the loudest surviving GW background event by around 15-20 percent.

  17. High-Energy Electromagnetic Offline Follow-Up of Ligo-Virgo Gravitational-Wave Binary Coalescence Candidate Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, L.; Briggs, M. S.; Camp, J.; Christensen, N.; Connaughton, V.; Jenke, P.; Remillard, R. A.; Veitch, J.

    2015-01-01

    We present two different search methods for electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational-wave (GW) events from ground-based detectors using archival NASA high-energy data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and RXTE All-sky Monitor (ASM) instruments. To demonstrate the methods, we use a limited number of representative GW background noise events produced by a search for binary neutron star coalescence over the last two months of the LIGO-Virgo S6/VSR3 joint science run. Time and sky location provided by the GW data trigger a targeted search in the high-energy photon data. We use two custom pipelines: one to search for prompt gamma-ray counterparts in GBM, and the other to search for a variety of X-ray afterglow model signals in ASM. We measure the efficiency of the joint pipelines to weak gamma-ray burst counterparts, and a family of model X-ray afterglows. By requiring a detectable signal in either electromagnetic instrument coincident with a GW event, we are able to reject a large majority of GW candidates. This reduces the signal-to-noise ratio of the loudest surviving GW background event by around 15-20 percent.

  18. Studying the Underlying Event in Drell-Yan and High Transverse Momentum Jet Production at the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V.E.; Barnett, B.A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, D.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R.E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H.S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K.L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S.H.; Chen, Y.C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J.P.; Chung, K.; Chung, W.H.; Chung, Y.S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C.I.; Ciocci, M.A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M.E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C.A.; Cox, D.J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J.C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; De Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; De Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; d'Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; di Giovanni, G.P.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J.R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Ebina, Koji; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H.C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W.T.; Feild, R.G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J.P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M.J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J.C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J.E.; Garfinkel, A.F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J.L.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gonzalez, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A.T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R.C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S.R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.Y.; Han, J.Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R.F.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hickman, M.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C.S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.C.; Hughes, R.E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E.J.; Jha, M.K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K.K.; Jun, S.Y.; Jung, J.E.; Junk, T.R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P.E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D.H.; Kim, H.S.; Kim, H.W.; Kim, J.E.; Kim, M.J.; Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.H.; Kim, Y.K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D.J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A.V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N.P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A.T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R.L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H.S.; Lee, J.S.; Lee, S.W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Lin, C.J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D.O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N.S.; Loginov, A.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C.P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martinez, M.; Martinez-Ballarin, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M.E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K.S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moon, C.S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M.J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mulmenstadt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M.S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S.H.; Oh, Y.D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramanov, A.A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D.E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T.J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W.K.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E.E.; Schmidt, M.A.; Schmidt, M.P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S.Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P.F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A.J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J.R.; Snider, F.D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G.L.; Suh, J.S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P.K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G.A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzman, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vazquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R.G.; Wagner, R.L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W.C.; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A.B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H.H.; Wilson, M.G.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B.L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wurthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Y.C.; Yao, W.M.; Yeh, G.P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G.B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S.S.; Yun, J.C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2010-01-01

    We study the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions by examining the behavior of charged particles (transverse momentum pT > 0.5 GeV/c, pseudorapidity |\\eta| < 1) produced in association with large transverse momentum jets (~2.2 fb-1) or with Drell-Yan lepton-pairs (~2.7 fb-1) in the Z-boson mass region (70 < M(pair) < 110 GeV/c2) as measured by CDF at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy. We use the direction of the lepton-pair (in Drell-Yan production) or the leading jet (in high-pT jet production) in each event to define three regions of \\eta-\\phi space; toward, away, and transverse, where \\phi is the azimuthal scattering angle. For Drell-Yan production (excluding the leptons) both the toward and transverse regions are very sensitive to the underlying event. In high-pT jet production the transverse region is very sensitive to the underlying event and is separated into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the hard component (initial and final-state radiation) from the beam-beam...

  19. MOA-2008-BLG-379Lb: A Massive Planet from a High Magnification Event with a Faint Source

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, D; Sumi, T; Bennett, D P; Bond, I A; Abe, F; Botzler, C S; Freeman, M; Fukagawa, M; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Itow, Y; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N; Saito, To; Shibai, H; Sullivan, D J; Suzuki, K; Sweatman, W L; Takino, S; Tristram, P J; Wada, K; Yock, P C M; Szymański, M K; Kubiak, M; Soszyński, I; Pietrzyński, G; Poleski, R; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, Ł

    2013-01-01

    We report analysis of high microlensing event MOA-2008-BLG-379, which has a strong microlensing anomaly at its peak, due to a massive planet with a mass ratio of q = 6.9 x 10^{-3}. Because the faint source star crosses the large resonant caustic, the planetary signal dominates the light curve. This is unusual for planetary microlensing events, and as a result, the planetary nature of this light curve was not immediately noticed. The planetary nature of the event was found when the MOA Collaboration conducted a systematic study of binary microlensing events previously identified by the MOA alert system. We have conducted a Bayesian analysis based on a standard Galactic model to estimate the physical parameters of the lens system. This yields a host star mass of M_L = 0.66_{-0.33}^{+0.29} M_Sun orbited by a planet of mass m_P = 4.8_{-2.4}^{+2.1} M_Jup at an orbital separation of a = 4.1_{-1.5}^{+1.9} AU at a distance of D_L = 3.6 +/- 1.3 kpc. The faint source magnitude of I_S = 21.30 and relatively high lens-so...

  20. Studying the Underlying Event in Drell-Yan and High Transverse Momentum Jet Production at the Tevatron

    CERN Document Server

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Berge, D; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; di Giovanni, G P; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, Koji; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Gonzalez, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hickman, M; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S C; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martinez, M; Martinez-Ballarin, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mulmenstadt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramanov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St. Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzman, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vazquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, M G; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wurthwein, F; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2010-01-01

    We study the underlying event in proton-antiproton collisions by examining the behavior of charged particles (transverse momentum pT > 0.5 GeV/c, pseudorapidity |\\eta| < 1) produced in association with large transverse momentum jets (~2.2 fb-1) or with Drell-Yan lepton-pairs (~2.7 fb-1) in the Z-boson mass region (70 < M(pair) < 110 GeV/c2) as measured by CDF at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy. We use the direction of the lepton-pair (in Drell-Yan production) or the leading jet (in high-pT jet production) in each event to define three regions of \\eta-\\phi space; toward, away, and transverse, where \\phi is the azimuthal scattering angle. For Drell-Yan production (excluding the leptons) both the toward and transverse regions are very sensitive to the underlying event. In high-pT jet production the transverse region is very sensitive to the underlying event and is separated into a MAX and MIN transverse region, which helps separate the hard component (initial and final-state radiation) from the beam-beam...

  1. The behavioral and health consequences of sleep deprivation among U.S. high school students: relative deprivation matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meldrum, Ryan Charles; Restivo, Emily

    2014-06-01

    To evaluate whether the strength of the association between sleep deprivation and negative behavioral and health outcomes varies according to the relative amount of sleep deprivation experienced by adolescents. 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Survey data of high school students (N=15,364) were analyzed. Associations were examined on weighted data using logistic regression. Twelve outcomes were examined, ranging from weapon carrying to obesity. The primary independent variable was a self-reported measure of average number of hours slept on school nights. Participants who reported deprivations in sleep were at an increased risk of a number of negative outcomes. However, this varied considerably across different degrees of sleep deprivation. For each of the outcomes considered, those who slept less than 5h were more likely to report negative outcomes (adjusted odds ratios ranging from 1.38 to 2.72; prelative to sleeping 8 or more hours. However, less extreme forms of sleep deprivation were, in many instances, unrelated to the outcomes considered. Among U.S. high school students, deficits in sleep are significantly and substantively associated with a variety of negative outcomes, and this association is particularly pronounced for students achieving fewer than 5h of sleep at night. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. High-quality forage can replace concentrate when cows enter the deposition phase without negative consequences for milk production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hymøller, Lone; Alstrup, Lene; Larsen, Mette Krogh

    2014-01-01

    -RP), and low CFR (30:70) and low CP (14% of DM; LCFR-LP), where RP met the Danish recommendations. Cows were fed concentrate in an automatic milking unit. After calving, cows were fed HCFR-RP until entering deposition, defined as 11 kg (Jersey) or 15 kg (Holstein) of weight gain from the lowest weight after...... cows were assigned to 4 mixed rations in a 2 × 2 factorial design with 2 concentrate to forage ratios (CFR) and 2 CP levels: high CFR (40:60) and recommended CP [16% of dry matter (DM); HCFR-RP], high CFR (40:60) and low CP (14% of DM; HCFR-LP), low CFR (30:70) and recommended CP (16% of DM; LCFR...... calving. Subsequently, cows either remained on HCFR-RP or changed to one of the other mixed rations. Comparing strategies during wk 9 to 30 of lactation showed higher dry matter intake (DMI) of mixed ration on HCFR compared with LCFR and on RP compared with LP. The DMI of the concentrate was higher...

  3. Community Response to a Heavy Precipitation Event in High Temperature, Chemosynthetic Biofilms and Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Dombard, D. R.; Loiacono, S. T.; Shock, E.

    2012-12-01

    Coordinated analysis of the "Bison Pool" (BP) Environmental Genome and a complementary contextual geochemical dataset of ~75 parameters revealed biogeochemical cycling and metabolic and microbial community shifts in a Yellowstone National Park hot spring ecosystem (1). The >22m outflow of BP is a gradient of decreasing temperature, increasing dissolved oxygen, and changing availability of nutrients. Microbial life at BP transitions from a 92°C chemosynthetic community in the BP source pool to a 56°C photosynthetic mat community. Metagenomic data at BP showed the potential for both heterotrophic and autotrophic carbon metabolism (rTCA and acetyl-CoA cycles) in the highest temperature, chemosynthetic regions (1). This region of the outflow is dominated by Aquificales and Pyrococcus relatives, with smaller contributions of heterotrophic Bacteria. Following a 2h heavy precipitation event we observed an influx of exogenous organic material into the source pool supplied from the meadow surrounding the BP area. We sampled biomass and fluid at several locations within the outflow immediately following the event, and on several occasions for the next eight days. Elemental analysis and carbon and nitrogen isotopic analyses were conducted on biomass and sediment, and dissolved organic and inorganic carbon content and δ13C of fluids were analyzed. DNA and RNA were extracted, and following RT-PCR, nitrogen cycle functional gene expression was evaluated. Previous work at BP has shown that chemosynthetic biomass may carry isotopic signatures of fractionation during carbon fixation, via the acetyl-CoA and rTCA cycles (2). However, the addition of exogenous organic carbon during the rain event had an immediate and dramatic effect on the sediments and biofilms in the chemosynthetic zone of the outflow. Dissolved organic carbon was the highest measured in six years. Chemosynthetic biomass responded by incorporating the organic carbon. Carbon isotopic signatures in chemosynthetic

  4. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishon, G.; Fisch, J.; Horn, I.; Kaczmarek, K.; Bijma, J.; Gruber, D. F.; Nir, O.; Popovich, Y.; Tchernov, D.

    2015-10-01

    Coral reefs occupy only ~ 0.1 percent of the ocean's habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced a significant global decline due to a variety of causes, one of the major causes being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching, the coral expels its symbiotic algae, thereby losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been extensively investigated, there is no scientific data on historical coral bleaching prior to 1979. In this study, we employ high-resolution femtosecond Laser Ablation Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS) to demonstrate a distinct biologically induced decline of boron (B) isotopic composition (δ11B) as a result of coral bleaching. These findings and methodology offer a new use for a previously developed isotopic proxy to reconstruct paleo-coral bleaching events. Based on a literature review of published δ11B data and our recorded vital effect of coral bleaching on the δ11B signal, we also describe at least two possible coral bleaching events since the Last Glacial Maximum. The implementation of this bleaching proxy holds the potential of identifying occurrences of coral bleaching throughout the geological record. A deeper temporal view of coral bleaching will enable scientists to determine if it occurred in the past during times of environmental change and what outcome it may have had on coral population structure. Understanding the frequency of bleaching events is also critical for determining the relationship between natural and anthropogenic causes of these events.

  5. On the counterintuitive consequences of high-performance work practices in cross-border post-merger human integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasilaki, A.; Smith, Pernille; Giangreco, A.

    2012-01-01

    , such as communication, employee involvement, and team building, may not always produce the expected effects on human integration; rather, it can have the opposite effects if top management does not closely monitor the immediate results of deploying such practices. Implications for managers dealing with post......Human integration in cross-border mergers poses challenges to the successful implementation of post-merger processes. Executives often rely on human resource practices to achieve human integration in newly formed organisations. Using an ethnographic study of a merger of four banks in four countries......, this article investigates the impact of systemic and integrated human resource practices [i.e., high-performance work practices (HPWPs)] on human integration and how their implementation affects employees' behaviours and attitudes towards post-merger human integration. We find that the implementation of HPWPs...

  6. Sensitivity of (d,p) reactions to high n-p momenta and the consequences for nuclear spectroscopy studies

    CERN Document Server

    Bailey, G W; Tostevin, J A

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical models of low-energy (d,p) single-neutron transfer reactions are a crucial link between experimentation, nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysical studies. Whereas reaction models that use local optical potentials are insensitive to short-range physics in the deuteron, we show that including the inherent nonlocality of the nucleon-target interactions and realistic deuteron wave functions generates significant sensitivity to high n-p relative momenta and to the underlying nucleon-nucleon interaction. We quantify this effect upon the deuteron channel distorting potentials within the framework of the adiabatic deuteron breakup model. The implications for calculated (d,p) cross sections and spectroscopic information deduced from experiments are discussed.

  7. [Climate changes, floods, and health consequences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelozzi, Paola; de' Donato, Francesca

    2014-02-01

    In the European Region, floods are the most common natural disaster, causing extensive damage and disruption. In Italy, it has been estimated that over 68% of municipalities are at high hydrogeological risk and with the recent intense rainfall events local populations have been facing severe disruptions. The health consequences of floods are wide ranging and are dependent upon the vulnerability of the environment and the local population. Health effects can be a direct or indirect consequence of flooding. The immediate health impacts of floods include drowning, heart attacks, injuries and hypothermia. The indirect effects include, injuries and infections, water-borne infectious disease, mental health problems, respiratory disease and allergies in both the medium and long term after a flood. Future efforts should be addressed to integrate health preparedness and prevention measures into emergency flood plans and hydrological warning systems.

  8. Neural events leading to and associated with detection of sounds under high processing load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri, Merav; Humphries, Colin; Binder, Jeffrey R; Liebenthal, Einat

    2013-03-01

    The neural events that lead to successful or failed detection of suprathreshold sounds are not well established. In this experiment, event-related potentials (ERPs) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) were recorded while participants performed two tasks: a primary difficult duration judgment task on a sequence of tones presented to one ear, and a secondary target detection task on an auditory oddball stream presented to the other ear. The paradigm was designed to elicit competition and variability in detection of auditory targets despite identical input. Successful detection of auditory targets was associated mainly with greater fMRI activity in superior parietal cortex and thalamus. In the ERPs, successful detection was linked with a larger fronto-central negativity at 200-400 ms, and a later centro-posterior positivity. Failure to detect targets was associated with greater fMRI signal in the default mode network, a significantly smaller electrical fronto-central negativity and no late positivity. These findings demonstrate that variability in auditory detection is related to modulation of activity in multimodal parietal and frontal networks active ∼ 200 ms after target onset. Results are consistent with a limited capacity and late selection view of attention.

  9. Stellar Death by Black Hole: How Tidal Disruption Events Unveil the High Energy Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Eric Robert

    2017-08-01

    When a star comes very close to a supermassive black hole, the tidal field of the hole can be strong enough to deform and stretch the star into a stream of debris. Half of this stellar debris stream returns to the black hole and forms an accretion disk, briefly lighting up the black hole and, in the most extreme cases, launching relativistic jets. These ``tidal disruption events,'' from the initial stellar destruction to the eventual jet production, are the focus of my thesis, and during this talk I will describe some of the theoretical advances we have made in understanding them. I will also discuss more recent work that shows how this relatively simple picture can be more complicated when the disrupting black hole is part of a binary system. Despite the added complexity, I will argue that there is a timescale over which one expects to see variation in the luminosity of a tidal disruption event from a binary supermassive black hole system. Using these predictions and a set of simulations, I will motivate such an interpretation for the superluminous supernova ASASSN-15lh.

  10. Patients at high risk of adverse events from intravenous contrast media after computed tomography examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddan, Donal [University College Galway Hospitals, Unit 7, Merlin Park Hospital, Galway (Ireland)]. E-mail: donal.reddan@mailn.hse.ie

    2007-05-15

    Adverse reactions to iodinated contrast media (CM) may occur and require prompt recognition and treatment. Although adverse reactions to radiocontrast agents cannot be eliminated, an important first step toward reducing their incidence is to identify patients at greatest risk. Prior to examinations using CM, patients should be adequately assessed by obtaining thorough medical histories and using simple screening tests. Studies have demonstrated that patients with a history of asthma, allergy, hyperthyroidism, and previous reaction to CM are at risk for severe reactions to iodinated CM. Renal adverse reactions reportedly occur more frequently in patients with pre-existing chronic kidney disease, especially those with diabetic nephropathy. Patients with congestive heart failure, dehydration, older age, and those who use nephrotoxic medications are also at risk for developing contrast-associated nephropathy. The occurrence of adverse events may be further increased in patients with multiple risk factors. As the number of patients undergoing computed tomography procedures continues to increase, it is essential for physicians to be able to identify patients at risk for adverse events of CM. Patient-related risk factors are discussed and simple tools for risk stratification presented.

  11. Atmospheric ionization by high-fluence, hard spectrum solar proton events and their probable appearance in the ice core archive

    CERN Document Server

    Melott, Adrian L; Laird, Claude M; Neuenswander, Ben; Atri, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    Solar energetic particles ionize the atmosphere, leading to production of nitrogen oxides. It has been suggested that some such events are visible as layers of nitrate in ice cores, yielding archives of energetic, high fluence solar proton events (SPEs). There has been controversy, due to slowness of transport for these species down from the upper stratosphere; past numerical simulations based on an analytic calculation have shown very little ionization below the mid stratosphere. These simulations suffer from deficiencies: they consider only soft SPEs and narrow energy ranges; spectral fits are poorly chosen; with few exceptions secondary particles in air showers are ignored. Using improved simulations that follow development of the proton-induced air shower, we find consistency with recent experiments showing substantial excess ionization down to 5 km. We compute nitrate available from the 23 February 1956 SPE, which had a high fluence, hard spectrum, and well-resolved associated nitrate peak in a Greenland...

  12. Search for Dark Matter in events with a hight- p$_T$ photon and high missing transverse momentum in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Ratti, M G

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a search for new particles in events with a high-pT photon and high missing transverse momentum with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. The analysis is performed on the data collected by ATLAS at a centre of mass energy of 8TeV and corresponding to a total integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb$^{−1}$. No excess has been found with respect to the Standard Model expectation. A modelindependent upper limit on the fiducial cross section for the production of events with a photon and large missing transverse momentum is set. Exclusion limits on the direct pair production of dark matter candidates are presented.

  13. Implications of high-temperature events and water deficits on protein profiles in wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Vinjett) grain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Fen; Jørgensen, Anders Dysted; Li, Huawei

    2011-01-01

    Increased climatic variability is resulting in an increase of both the frequency and the magnitude of extreme climate events. Therefore, cereals may be exposed to more than one stress event in the growing season, which may ultimately affect crop yield and quality. Here, effects are reported...... and glutenins) in grains and stress-induced changes on the albumin and gliadin proteomes were investigated by 2-DE and MS. The synthesis of individual protein fractions was shown to be affected by both the type and time of the applied stresses. Identified drought or high-temperature-responsive proteins included...... proteins involved in primary metabolism, storage and stress response such as late embryogenesis abundant proteins, peroxiredoxins and alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitors. Several proteins, e.g. heat shock protein and 14-3-3 protein changed in abundance only under multiple high temperatures....

  14. Encoding negative events under stress: high subjective arousal is related to accurate emotional memory despite misinformation exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoscheidt, Siobhan M; LaBar, Kevin S; Ryan, Lee; Jacobs, W Jake; Nadel, Lynn

    2014-07-01

    Stress at encoding affects memory processes, typically enhancing, or preserving, memory for emotional information. These effects have interesting implications for eyewitness accounts, which in real-world contexts typically involve encoding an aversive event under stressful conditions followed by potential exposure to misinformation. The present study investigated memory for a negative event encoded under stress and subsequent misinformation endorsement. Healthy young adults participated in a between-groups design with three experimental sessions conducted 48 h apart. Session one consisted of a psychosocial stress induction (or control task) followed by incidental encoding of a negative slideshow. During session two, participants were asked questions about the slideshow, during which a random subgroup was exposed to misinformation. Memory for the slideshow was tested during the third session. Assessment of memory accuracy across stress and no-stress groups revealed that stress induced just prior to encoding led to significantly better memory for the slideshow overall. The classic misinformation effect was also observed - participants exposed to misinformation were significantly more likely to endorse false information during memory testing. In the stress group, however, memory accuracy and misinformation effects were moderated by arousal experienced during encoding of the negative event. Misinformed-stress group participants who reported that the negative slideshow elicited high arousal during encoding were less likely to endorse misinformation for the most aversive phase of the story. Furthermore, these individuals showed better memory for components of the aversive slideshow phase that had been directly misinformed. Results from the current study provide evidence that stress and high subjective arousal elicited by a negative event act concomitantly during encoding to enhance emotional memory such that the most aversive aspects of the event are well remembered and

  15. Characterization of the High-Speed-Stage Bearing Skidding of Wind Turbine Gearboxes Induced by Dynamic Electricity Grid Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helsen, Jan; Guillaume, Patrick; Guo, Yi; Keller, Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    Bearing behavior is an important factor for wind turbine drivetrain reliability. Extreme loads and dynamic excitations pose challenges to the bearing design and therefore its performance. Excessive skidding of the bearing rollers should be avoided because it can cause scuffing failures. Excitations coming from wind and the electricity grid can subject the drivetrain to fluctuating torque and nontorque loads. Wind-induced excitations have been investigated predominantly in literature. However, modern wind turbines are subjected more and more to grid-induced loads because of stricter electricity grid regulations. For example, during fault-ride-through events, turbines are required to stay connected for a longer period of time during the grid failure. This work investigates the influence of electrically induced excitations on the skidding behaviour of the tapered roller bearings on the high-speed stage of a wind turbine gearbox. This skidding behaviour during dynamic events is described as a potential bearing failure initiator by many researchers; however, only limited full-scale dynamic testing is documented. Therefore, a dedicated gridloss-type event is defined in the paper and conducted in a dynamometer test on a full-scale wind turbine nacelle. During the event, a complete electricity grid failure is simulated while the turbine is at rated speed and predefined torque levels. Particular focus is on the characterization of the high-speed shaft tapered roller bearing slip behavior. Strain-gauge bridges in grooves along the circumference of the outer ring are used to characterize the bearing load zone in detail. It is shown that during the torque reversals of the transient event, roller slip can be induced. This indicates the potential of the applied load case to go beyond the preload of the tapered roller bearing. Furthermore, the relation between the applied torque and skidding level is studied.

  16. Characterization of the High-Speed-Stage Bearing Skidding of Wind Turbine Gearboxes Induced by Dynamic Electricity Grid Events: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helsen, Jan; Guillaume, Patrick; Guo, Yi; Keller, Jonathan

    2016-05-18

    Bearing behavior is an important factor for wind turbine drivetrain reliability. Extreme loads and dynamic excitations pose challenges to the bearing design and therefore its performance. Excessive skidding of the bearing rollers should be avoided because it can cause scuffing failures. Excitations coming from wind and the electricity grid can subject the drivetrain to fluctuating torque and nontorque loads. Wind-induced excitations have been investigated predominantly in literature. However, modern wind turbines are subjected more and more to grid-induced loads because of stricter electricity grid regulations. For example, during fault-ride-through events, turbines are required to stay connected for a longer period of time during the grid failure. This work investigates the influence of electrically induced excitations on the skidding behaviour of the tapered roller bearings on the high-speed stage of a wind turbine gearbox. This skidding behaviour during dynamic events is described as a potential bearing failure initiator by many researchers; however, only limited full-scale dynamic testing is documented. Therefore, a dedicated gridloss-type event is defined in the paper and conducted in a dynamometer test on a full-scale wind turbine nacelle. During the event, a complete electricity grid failure is simulated while the turbine is at rated speed and predefined torque levels. Particular focus is on the characterization of the high-speed shaft tapered roller bearing slip behavior. Strain-gauge bridges in grooves along the circumference of the outer ring are used to characterize the bearing load zone in detail. It is shown that during the torque reversals of the transient event, roller slip can be induced. This indicates the potential of the applied load case to go beyond the preload of the tapered roller bearing. Furthermore, the relation between the applied torque and skidding level is studied.

  17. Selection of high temperatures for hibernation by the pocket mouse, Perognathus longimembris: ecological advantages and energetic consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, A.R.

    Daily metabolism was calculated from food consumption in pocket mice, Perognathus longimembris, at 8/sup 0/C, 18/sup 0/C, and 31/sup 0/C. At temperatures below thermal neutrality for this species, daily metabolism was related to the amount of time the mice spent in torpor. Ambient temperature has no net effect on the minimum energy expenditure during a typical 5-mo hibernation season. Once an animal has accumulated a food store of approximately 130 g of millet seeds, it has the minimum energy necessary to hibernate at any environmental temperature. Such temperature compensation results from the complex effects of temperature on (1) the ratio of time of euthermy to time of torpor, (2) the energetic cost per hour of torpor, (3) the energetic cost per hour of euthermy, and (4) the energetic cost of arousal from torpor. The amount of time spent in torpor was inversely dependent on the food supply, indicating that euthermia is preferred even during the hibernation season. Mice also maximize the time of euthermia by selecting high environmental temperatures at all times of the year. Torpor probably occurs naturally only during the winter when the highest temperatures available to the mice are below thermal neutrality. The maximization of the time of euthermia reduces the chances of freezing during hibernation and enhances the animal's ability to excape from predators.

  18. Age effect on fatigue-induced limb acceleration as a consequence of high-level sustained submaximal contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chien-Ting; Huang, Chien-Chun; Young, Ming-Shing; Hwang, Ing-Shiou

    2007-08-01

    In reference to electromyographic measurement, the study was conducted to reassess differences in the behavior of fatigue-related neuromuscular function between young and elderly humans with limb acceleration (LA). Fourteen young and fourteen elderly subjects performed sustained index abduction at 75% of their maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) until task failure. Measures of neuromuscular function, including temporal/spectral features of muscle activity of the first dorsal interosseous (FDI) and LA of the index and hand, were monitored. The results showed a manifest fatigue-induced increase in LA of the index in the elderly group, but not in the young group. In contrast, only the young group developed a significant increase in amplitude of the electromyography (EMG) until task failure. Spectral analyses of LA in the index reflected marked age-dependent reorganization following muscle fatigue, with a greater reduction of relative spectral amplitude of LA in the range of 20-40 Hz, but a lesser reduction in coherence between EMG and LA in the elderly group. In line with fatigue-associated restructuring of LA, the mechanical coupling of the metacarpophalangeal joint was more severely undermined in the elderly group than in the young group. The present study manifested an age-related difference in the relative contributions of neural versus mechanical factors to muscle fatigue. Subsequent to a high-level sustained submaximal isometric contraction, a predominant mechanical failure of the musculotendon complex in the elderly was featured with LA, whereas EMG measurement characterized prevailing impairment of neuromuscular propagation in the young.

  19. High-energy neutrino follow-up search of gravitational wave event GW150914 with ANTARES and IceCube

    OpenAIRE

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Albert, A.; M. André; Anghinolfi, M.; Ardid, M.; Aubert, J.-J.; Avgitas, T.; Baret, B.; Barrios-Martí, J.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bormuth, R.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Bruijn, R.

    2016-01-01

    We present the high-energy-neutrino follow-up observations of the first gravitational wave transient GW150914 observed by the Advanced LIGO detectors on September 14, 2015. We search for coincident neutrino candidates within the data recorded by the IceCube and Antares neutrino detectors. A possible joint detection could be used in targeted electromagnetic follow-up observations, given the significantly better angular resolution of neutrino events compared to gravitational waves. We find no n...

  20. Early detection of atrial high rate episodes predicts atrial fibrillation and thromboembolic events in patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witt, Christoffer Tobias; Kronborg, Mads Brix; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In patients without any history of atrial fibrillation (AF), detection of subclinical atrial high rate episodes (AHRE) by implanted devices has been associated with an increased thromboembolic risk. The predictive value of AHRE in patients with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT...... of AF, detection of early AHRE after CRT implantation is associated with a significantly increased risk of clinical AF and thromboembolic events, particularly AHRE longer than 24 hours....

  1. Snow cover and extreme winter warming events control flower abundance of some, but not all species in high arctic Svalbard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenchuk, Philipp R; Elberling, Bo; Cooper, Elisabeth J

    2013-08-01

    The High Arctic winter is expected to be altered through ongoing and future climate change. Winter precipitation and snow depth are projected to increase and melt out dates change accordingly. Also, snow cover and depth will play an important role in protecting plant canopy from increasingly more frequent extreme winter warming events. Flower production of many Arctic plants is dependent on melt out timing, since season length determines resource availability for flower preformation. We erected snow fences to increase snow depth and shorten growing season, and counted flowers of six species over 5 years, during which we experienced two extreme winter warming events. Most species were resistant to snow cover increase, but two species reduced flower abundance due to shortened growing seasons. Cassiope tetragona responded strongly with fewer flowers in deep snow regimes during years without extreme events, while Stellaria crassipes responded partly. Snow pack thickness determined whether winter warming events had an effect on flower abundance of some species. Warming events clearly reduced flower abundance in shallow but not in deep snow regimes of Cassiope tetragona, but only marginally for Dryas octopetala. However, the affected species were resilient and individuals did not experience any long term effects. In the case of short or cold summers, a subset of species suffered reduced reproductive success, which may affect future plant composition through possible cascading competition effects. Extreme winter warming events were shown to expose the canopy to cold winter air. The following summer most of the overwintering flower buds could not produce flowers. Thus reproductive success is reduced if this occurs in subsequent years. We conclude that snow depth influences flower abundance by altering season length and by protecting or exposing flower buds to cold winter air, but most species studied are resistant to changes. Winter warming events, often occurring

  2. A Simple Engineering Analysis of Solar Particle Event High Energy Tails and Their Impact on Vehicle Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.; Walker, Steven A.; Clowdsley, Martha S.

    2016-01-01

    The mathematical models for Solar Particle Event (SPE) high energy tails are constructed with several di erent algorithms. Since limited measured data exist above energies around 400 MeV, this paper arbitrarily de nes the high energy tail as any proton with an energy above 400 MeV. In order to better understand the importance of accurately modeling the high energy tail for SPE spectra, the contribution to astronaut whole body e ective dose equivalent of the high energy portions of three di erent SPE models has been evaluated. To ensure completeness of this analysis, simple and complex geometries were used. This analysis showed that the high energy tail of certain SPEs can be relevant to astronaut exposure and hence safety. Therefore, models of high energy tails for SPEs should be well analyzed and based on data if possible.

  3. High multiple paternity and low last-male sperm precedence in a hermaphroditic planarian flatworm: consequences for reciprocity patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongratz, N; Michiels, N K

    2003-06-01

    It is difficult to predict a priori how mating success translates into fertilization success in simultaneous hermaphrodites with internal fertilization. Whereas insemination decisions will be determined by male interests, fertilization will depend on female interests, possibly leading to discrepancies between insemination and fertilization patterns. The planarian flatworm Schmidtea polychroa, a simultaneous hermaphrodite in which mating partners trade sperm was studied. Sperm can be stored for months yet individuals mate frequently. Using microsatellites, maternity and paternity data were obtained from 748 offspring produced in six groups of 10 individuals during four weeks. Adults produced young from four mates on average. Reciprocal fertilization between two mates was found in only 41 out of 110 registered mate combinations, which is clearly less than what is predicted from insemination patterns. Multiple paternity was high: > 80% of all cocoons had two to five fathers for only three to five offspring per cocoon. Because animals were collected from a natural population, 28% of all hatchlings were sired by unknown sperm donors in the field, despite a 10-day period of acclimatization and within-group mating. This percentage decreased only moderately throughout the experiment, showing that sperm can be stored and used for at least a month, despite frequent mating and sperm digestion. The immediate paternity a sperm donor could expect to obtain was only about 25%. Male reproductive success increased linearly with the number of female partners, providing support for Bateman's principle in hermaphrodites. Our results suggest that hermaphrodites do not trade fertilizations when trading sperm during insemination, lending support to the view that such conditional sperm exchange is driven by exchange of resources.

  4. Measurements in a highly polluted Asian mega city: observations of aerosol number size distribution, modal parameters and nucleation events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mönkkönen

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Diurnal variation of number size distribution (particle size 3–800 nm and modal parameters (geometric standard deviation, geometric mean diameter and modal aerosol particle concentration in a highly polluted urban environment was investigated during October and November 2002 in New Delhi, India. Continuous monitoring for more than two weeks with the time resolution of 10 min was conducted using a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (twin DMPS. The results indicated clear increase in Aitken mode (25–100 nm particles during traffic peak hours, but towards the evenings there were more Aitken mode particles compared to the mornings. Also high concentrations of accumulation mode particles (>100 nm were detected in the evenings only. In the evenings, biomass/refuse burning and cooking are possible sources beside the traffic. We have also shown that nucleation events are possible in this kind of atmosphere even though as clear nucleation events as observed in rural sites could not be detected. The formation rate of 3 nm particles (J3 of the observed events varied from 3.3 to 13.9 cm−3s−1 and the growth rate varied from 11.6 to 18.1 nmh−1 showing rapid growth and high formation rate, which seems to be typical in urban areas.

  5. Measurements in a highly polluted Asian mega city: observations of aerosol number size distribution, modal parameters and nucleation events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Mönkkönen

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Diurnal variation of number size distribution (particle size 3-800nm and modal parameters (geometric standard deviation, geometric mean diameter and modal aerosol particle concentration in a highly polluted urban environment was investigated during October and November 2002 in New Delhi, India. Continuous monitoring for more than two weeks with the time resolution of 10min was conducted using a Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (twin DMPS. The results indicated clear increase in Aitken mode (25-100nm particles during traffic peak hours, but towards the evenings there were more Aitken mode particles compared to the mornings. Also high concentrations of accumulation mode particles (>100nm were detected in the evenings only. In the evenings, biomass/refuse burning and cooking are possible sources beside the traffic. We have also shown that nucleation events are possible in this kind of atmosphere even though as clear nucleation events as observed in rural sites could not be detected. The formation rate of 3nm particles (J3 of the observed events varied from 3.3 to 13.9cm-3s-1 and the growth rate varied from 11.6 to 18.1nmh-1 showing rapid growth and high formation rate, which seems to be typical in urban areas.

  6. NEW FERMI-LAT EVENT RECONSTRUCTION REVEALS MORE HIGH-ENERGY GAMMA RAYS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwood, W. B. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Baldini, L. [Universita di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bregeon, J.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Sgro, C.; Tinivella, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bruel, P. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Chekhtman, A. [Center for Earth Observing and Space Research, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Cohen-Tanugi, J. [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS/IN2P3, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Drlica-Wagner, A.; Omodei, N.; Rochester, L. S.; Usher, T. L. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Granot, J. [Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Ra' anana 43537 (Israel); Longo, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Razzaque, S. [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa); Zimmer, S., E-mail: melissa.pesce.rollins@pi.infn.it, E-mail: nicola.omodei@stanford.edu, E-mail: granot@openu.ac.il [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2013-09-01

    Based on the experience gained during the four and a half years of the mission, the Fermi-LAT Collaboration has undertaken a comprehensive revision of the event-level analysis going under the name of Pass 8. Although it is not yet finalized, we can test the improvements in the new event reconstruction with the special case of the prompt phase of bright gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), where the signal-to-noise ratio is large enough that loose selection cuts are sufficient to identify gamma rays associated with the source. Using the new event reconstruction, we have re-analyzed 10 GRBs previously detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) for which an X-ray/optical follow-up was possible and found four new gamma rays with energies greater than 10 GeV in addition to the seven previously known. Among these four is a 27.4 GeV gamma ray from GRB 080916C, which has a redshift of 4.35, thus making it the gamma ray with the highest intrinsic energy ({approx}147 GeV) detected from a GRB. We present here the salient aspects of the new event reconstruction and discuss the scientific implications of these new high-energy gamma rays, such as constraining extragalactic background light models, Lorentz invariance violation tests, the prompt emission mechanism, and the bulk Lorentz factor of the emitting region.

  7. A novel paleo-bleaching proxy using boron isotopes and high-resolution laser ablation to reconstruct coral bleaching events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Dishon

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Coral reefs occupy only ~0.1% of the oceans habitat, but are the most biologically diverse marine ecosystem. In recent decades, coral reefs have experienced significant global declines due to a variety of causes, one of the major being widespread coral bleaching events. During bleaching the coral expels its symbiotic algae losing its main source of nutrition generally obtained through photosynthesis. While recent coral bleaching events have been extensively investigated, there is no scientific data on historical coral bleaching prior to 1979. In this study, we employ high-resolution femtosecond Laser Ablation Multiple Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-MC-ICP-MS to demonstrate a distinct biologically-induced decline of boron (B isotopic composition (δ11B as a result of coral bleaching. These findings and methodology offer a new use for a previously developed isotopic proxy to reconstruct paleo-coral bleaching events. Based on a literature review of published δ11B data and our recorded "vital effect" of coral bleaching on the δ11B signal, we also describe at least two possible coral bleaching events since the Last Glacial Maximum. The implementation of this bleaching proxy holds the potential of identifying occurrences of coral bleaching throughout the geological record. A deeper temporal view of coral bleaching will enable scientists to determine if it occurred in the past during times of environmental change and what outcome it may have had on coral population structure.

  8. High Cadence Observations and Analysis of Spicular-type Events Using CRISP Onboard SST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetye, J.; Doyle, J. G.; Scullion, E.; Nelson, C. J.; Kuridze, D.

    2016-04-01

    We present spectroscopic and imaging observations of apparent ultra-fast spicule-like features observed with CRisp Imaging SpectroPolarimeter (CRISP) at the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope (SST). The data shows spicules with an apparent velocity above 500 km s-1, very short lifetimes of up to 20 s and length/height around 3500 km. The spicules are seen as dark absorption structures in the Hα wings ±516 mÅ, ±774 mÅ and ±1032 mÅ which suddenly appear and disappear from the FOV. These features show a time delay in their appearance in the blue and red wings by 3-5 s. We suggest that their appearance/disappearance is due to their Doppler motion in and out of the 60 mÅ filter. See Fig. 1 for the evolution of the event at two line positions.

  9. High-Performance Signal Detection for Adverse Drug Events using MapReduce Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kai; Sun, Xingzhi; Tao, Ying; Xu, Linhao; Wang, Chen; Mao, Xianling; Peng, Bo; Pan, Yue

    2010-11-13

    Post-marketing pharmacovigilance is important for public health, as many Adverse Drug Events (ADEs) are unknown when those drugs were approved for marketing. However, due to the large number of reported drugs and drug combinations, detecting ADE signals by mining these reports is becoming a challenging task in terms of computational complexity. Recently, a parallel programming model, MapReduce has been introduced by Google to support large-scale data intensive applications. In this study, we proposed a MapReduce-based algorithm, for common ADE detection approach, Proportional Reporting Ratio (PRR), and tested it in mining spontaneous ADE reports from FDA. The purpose is to investigate the possibility of using MapReduce principle to speed up biomedical data mining tasks using this pharmacovigilance case as one specific example. The results demonstrated that MapReduce programming model could improve the performance of common signal detection algorithm for pharmacovigilance in a distributed computation environment at approximately liner speedup rates.

  10. High quality maize centromere 10 sequence reveals evidence of frequent recombination events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kai Wolfgruber

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The ancestral centromeres of maize contain long stretches of the tandemly arranged CentC repeat. The abundance of tandem DNA repeats and centromeric retrotransposons (CR have presented a significant challenge to completely assembling centromeres using traditional sequencing methods. Here we report a nearly complete assembly of the 1.85 Mb maize centromere 10 from inbred B73 using PacBio technology and BACs from the reference genome project. The error rates estimated from overlapping BAC sequences are 7 x 10-6 and 5 x 10-5 for mismatches and indels, respectively. The number of gaps in the region covered by the reassembly was reduced from 140 in the reference genome to three. Three expressed genes are located between 92 and 477 kb of the inferred ancestral CentC cluster, which lies within the region of highest centromeric repeat density. The improved assembly increased the count of full-length centromeric retrotransposons from 5 to 55 and revealed a 22.7 kb segmental duplication that occurred approximately 121,000 years ago. Our analysis provides evidence of frequent recombination events in the form of partial retrotransposons, deletions within retrotransposons, chimeric retrotransposons, segmental duplications including higher order CentC repeats, a deleted CentC monomer, centromere-proximal inversions, and insertion of mitochondrial sequences. Double-strand DNA break (DSB repair is the most plausible mechanism for these events and may be the major driver of centromere repeat evolution and diversity. This repair appears to be mediated by microhomology, suggesting that tandem repeats may have evolved to facilitate the repair of frequent DSBs in centromeres.

  11. Role of land state in a high resolution mesoscale model for simulating the Uttarakhand heavy rainfall event over India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, P. V.; Pattnaik, S.; Rai, D.; Osuri, K. K.; Mohanty, U. C.; Tripathy, S.

    2016-04-01

    In 2013, Indian summer monsoon witnessed a very heavy rainfall event (>30 cm/day) over Uttarakhand in north India, claiming more than 5000 lives and property damage worth approximately 40 billion USD. This event was associated with the interaction of two synoptic systems, i.e., intensified subtropical westerly trough over north India and north-westward moving monsoon depression formed over the Bay of Bengal. The event had occurred over highly variable terrain and land surface characteristics. Although global models predicted the large scale event, they failed to predict realistic location, timing, amount, intensity and distribution of rainfall over the region. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of land state conditions in simulating this severe event using a high resolution mesoscale model. The land conditions such as multi-layer soil moisture and soil temperature fields were generated from High Resolution Land Data Assimilation (HRLDAS) modelling system. Two experiments were conducted namely, (1) CNTL (Control, without land data assimilation) and (2) LDAS, with land data assimilation (i.e., with HRLDAS-based soil moisture and temperature fields) using Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) modelling system. Initial soil moisture correlation and root mean square error for LDAS is 0.73 and 0.05, whereas for CNTL it is 0.63 and 0.053 respectively, with a stronger heat low in LDAS. The differences in wind and moisture transport in LDAS favoured increased moisture transport from Arabian Sea through a convectively unstable region embedded within two low pressure centers over Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal. The improvement in rainfall is significantly correlated to the persistent generation of potential vorticity (PV) in LDAS. Further, PV tendency analysis confirmed that the increased generation of PV is due to the enhanced horizontal PV advection component rather than the diabatic heating terms due to modified flow fields. These results suggest that, two

  12. Role of land state in a high resolution mesoscale model for simulating the Uttarakhand heavy rainfall event over India

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P V Rajesh; S Pattnaik; D Rai; K K Osuri; U C Mohanty; S Tripathy

    2016-04-01

    In 2013, Indian summer monsoon witnessed a very heavy rainfall event (>30 cm/day) over Uttarakhandin north India, claiming more than 5000 lives and property damage worth approximately 40 billionUSD. This event was associated with the interaction of two synoptic systems, i.e., intensified subtropicalwesterly trough over north India and north-westward moving monsoon depression formed over the Bayof Bengal. The event had occurred over highly variable terrain and land surface characteristics. Althoughglobal models predicted the large scale event, they failed to predict realistic location, timing, amount,intensity and distribution of rainfall over the region. The goal of this study is to assess the impactof land state conditions in simulating this severe event using a high resolution mesoscale model. Theland conditions such as multi-layer soil moisture and soil temperature fields were generated from HighResolution Land Data Assimilation (HRLDAS) modelling system. Two experiments were conductednamely, (1) CNTL (Control, without land data assimilation) and (2) LDAS, with land data assimilation(i.e., with HRLDAS-based soil moisture and temperature fields) using Weather Research and Forecasting(WRF) modelling system. Initial soil moisture correlation and root mean square error for LDAS is 0.73and 0.05, whereas for CNTL it is 0.63 and 0.053 respectively, with a stronger heat low in LDAS. Thedifferences in wind and moisture transport in LDAS favoured increased moisture transport from ArabianSea through a convectively unstable region embedded within two low pressure centers over Arabian Seaand Bay of Bengal. The improvement in rainfall is significantly correlated to the persistent generation ofpotential vorticity (PV) in LDAS. Further, PV tendency analysis confirmed that the increased generationof PV is due to the enhanced horizontal PV advection component rather than the diabatic heatingterms due to modified flow fields. These results suggest that, two different synoptic

  13. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein as a Predictor of Cardiovascular Events after ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Daniel Rios Pinto; Ramos, Adriane Monserrat; Vieira, Pedro Lima; Menti, Eduardo; Bordin, Odemir Luiz; de Souza, Priscilla Azambuja Lopes; de Quadros, Alexandre Schaan; Portal, Vera Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    Background The association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and recurrent major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction who undergo primary percutaneous coronary intervention remains controversial. Objective To investigate the potential association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and an increased risk of MACE such as death, heart failure, reinfarction, and new revascularization in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention. Methods This prospective cohort study included 300 individuals aged >18 years who were diagnosed with ST-elevation myocardial infarction and underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention at a tertiary health center. An instrument evaluating clinical variables and the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk scores was used. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein was determined by nephelometry. The patients were followed-up during hospitalization and up to 30 days after infarction for the occurrence of MACE. Student's t, Mann-Whitney, chi-square, and logistic regression tests were used for statistical analyses. P values of ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results The mean age was 59.76 years, and 69.3% of patients were male. No statistically significant association was observed between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and recurrent MACE (p = 0.11). However, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was independently associated with 30-day mortality when adjusted for TIMI [odds ratio (OR), 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.51; p = 0.005] and GRACE (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.06-1.49; p = 0.007) risk scores. Conclusion Although high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was not predictive of combined major cardiovascular events within 30 days after ST-elevation myocardial infarction in patients who underwent primary angioplasty and stent

  14. High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein as a Predictor of Cardiovascular Events after ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Daniel Rios Pinto; Ramos, Adriane Monserrat; Vieira, Pedro Lima; Menti, Eduardo; Bordin, Odemir Luiz Jr.; Souza, Priscilla Azambuja Lopes de; Quadros, Alexandre Schaan de; Portal, Vera Lúcia, E-mail: veraportal.pesquisa@gmail.com [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências da Saúde: Cardiologia - Instituto de Cardiologia/Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2014-07-15

    The association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and recurrent major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction who undergo primary percutaneous coronary intervention remains controversial. To investigate the potential association between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and an increased risk of MACE such as death, heart failure, reinfarction, and new revascularization in patients with ST-elevation myocardial infarction treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention. This prospective cohort study included 300 individuals aged >18 years who were diagnosed with ST-elevation myocardial infarction and underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention at a tertiary health center. An instrument evaluating clinical variables and the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) risk scores was used. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein was determined by nephelometry. The patients were followed-up during hospitalization and up to 30 days after infarction for the occurrence of MACE. Student's t, Mann-Whitney, chi-square, and logistic regression tests were used for statistical analyses. P values of ≤0.05 were considered statistically significant. The mean age was 59.76 years, and 69.3% of patients were male. No statistically significant association was observed between high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and recurrent MACE (p = 0.11). However, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was independently associated with 30-day mortality when adjusted for TIMI [odds ratio (OR), 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.07-1.51; p = 0.005] and GRACE (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.06-1.49; p = 0.007) risk scores. Although high-sensitivity C-reactive protein was not predictive of combined major cardiovascular events within 30 days after ST-elevation myocardial infarction in patients who underwent primary angioplasty and stent implantation, it was an independent predictor

  15. High-resolution simulation of heatwave events in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, P.; Li, D.; Bou-Zeid, E.

    2015-12-01

    Heatwave intensity and frequency are predicted to increase in the coming years, and this will bear adverse consequences to the environmental well-being and the socio-economic fabric in urbanized areas. The hazardous combination of increased heat storage and reduced water retention capacities of the land surface make the urban areas warmer than the surrounding rural areas in what is commonly known as the urban heat island (UHI) effect. The primary motives of this study are to quantify the interaction of this city-scale UHI with synoptic-scale heatwave episodes and to analyze the factors that mediate this interaction. A modified version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) is utilized to simulate two heatwave episodes in New York City. The land surface scheme in the default WRF model is modified to better represent the surface to atmosphere exchanges over urban areas. Our results indicate that during the heatwave episodes, the daily-averaged UHI in NYC increased by 1.5 K. Furthermore, most of this amplification occurs in the mid-afternoon period when the temperatures peak. Wind direction and urban-rural contrasts in available energy and moisture availability are found to have significant and systematic effects on the UHI, but wind speed plays a secondary role.

  16. High-resolution simulation of heatwave events in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthy, P.; Li, D.; Bou-Zeid, E.

    2017-04-01

    Heatwave intensity and frequency are predicted to increase in the coming years, and this will bear adverse consequences to the environmental well-being and the socio-economic fabric in urbanized areas. The hazardous combination of increased heat storage and reduced water retention capacities of the land surface make the urban areas warmer than the surrounding rural areas in what is commonly known as the urban heat island (UHI) effect. The primary motives of this study are to quantify the interaction of this city-scale UHI with synoptic-scale heatwave episodes and to analyze the factors that mediate this interaction. A modified version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) is utilized to simulate two heatwave episodes in New York City. The land surface scheme in the default WRF model is modified to better represent the surface to atmosphere exchanges over urban areas. Our results indicate that during the heatwave episodes, the daily-averaged UHI in NYC increased by 1.5 K. Furthermore, most of this amplification occurs in the mid-afternoon period when the temperatures peak. Wind direction and urban-rural contrasts in available energy and moisture availability are found to have significant and systematic effects on the UHI, but wind speed plays a secondary role.

  17. Identification of High-Momentum Top Quarks, Higgs Bosons, and W and Z Bosons Using Boosted Event Shapes

    CERN Document Server

    Conway, J S; Erbacher, R D; Pilot, J

    2016-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider, numerous physics processes expected within the standard model and theories beyond it give rise to very high momentum particles decaying to multihadronic final states. Development of algorithms for efficient identification of such "boosted" particles while rejecting the background from multihadron jets from light quarks and gluons can greatly aid in the sensitivity of measurements and new particle searches. This paper presents a new method for identifying boosted high-mass particles using event shapes in Lorentz-boosted reference frames. Variables calculated in these frames for multihadronic jets can then be used as input to a large artificial neural network to discriminate their origin.

  18. Identification of high-momentum top quarks, Higgs bosons, and W and Z bosons using boosted event shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, J. S.; Bhaskar, R.; Erbacher, R. D.; Pilot, J.

    2016-11-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider, numerous physics processes expected within the standard model and theories beyond it give rise to very-high-momentum particles decaying to multihadronic final states. Development of algorithms for efficient identification of such "boosted" particles while rejecting the background from multihadron jets from light quarks and gluons can greatly aid in the sensitivity of measurements and new particle searches. This paper presents a new method for identifying boosted high-mass particles using event shapes in Lorentz-boosted reference frames. Variables calculated in these frames for multihadronic jets can then be used as input to a large artificial neural network to discriminate their origin.

  19. Modeling particle acceleration and transport during high-energy solar gamma-ray events: Results from the HESPERIA project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afanasiev, Alexandr; Battarbee, Markus; Vainio, Rami; Rouillard, Alexis; Aran, Angels; Sipola, Robert; Pomoell, Jens

    2016-04-01

    The EU/H2020 project "High Energy Solar Particle Events foRecastIng and Analysis" (HESPERIA) has an objective to gain improved understanding of solar energetic particle (SEP) acceleration, release and transport related to long-duration gamma-ray emissions recently observed by Fermi/LAT. We have performed simulation studies for particle acceleration and transport for the 17 May 2012 event, which is also a Ground Level Enhancement (GLE) of solar cosmic rays. The particle event is modeled assuming that it is accelerated by the shock wave driven by the erupting coronal mass ejection (CME). We first analyze the 3-dimensional propagation of the shock through the corona using imaging observations from SDO, SOHO and STEREO spacecraft. The derived kinematics of the shock is combined with magnetohydrodynamic and potential field modeling of the ambient corona to derive the evolution of the shock parameters on a large set of field lines. We then employ the self-consistent Coronal Shock Acceleration (CSA) simulation model of the University of Turku to study the acceleration process on selected field lines and combine it with a new model of downstream particle transport to assess the energy spectrum and time profile of accelerated particles precipitating in the dense surface regions below the corona. We also employ the Shock and Particle (SaP) simulation model of the University of Barcelona to analyze the interplanetary counterpart of the Fermi event. In this paper, we will present the observations of the event, our approach to the modeling and the first results of the analysis. The work has received funding from the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 637324 (HESPERIA).

  20. Phenomenological consequences of supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinchliffe, I.; Littenberg, L.

    1982-01-01

    This report deals with the phenomenological consequences of supersymmetric theories, and with the implications of such theories for future high energy machines. It is concerned only with high energy predictions of supersymmetry; low energy consequences (for example in the K/sub o/anti K/sub o/ system) are discussed in the context of future experiments by another group, and will be mentioned briefly only in the context of constraining existing models. However a brief section is included on the implication for proton decay, although detailed experimental questions are not discussed. The report is organized as follows. Section I consists of a brief review of supersymmetry and the salient features of existing supersymmetric models; this section can be ignored by those familiar with such models since it contains nothing new. Section 2 deals with the consequences for nucleon decay of SUSY. The remaining sections then discuss the physics possibilities of various machines; e anti e in Section 3, ep in Section 4, pp (or anti pp) colliders in Section 5 and fixed target hadron machines in Section 6.

  1. A climatological analysis of high-precipitation events in Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, and associated large-scale atmospheric conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welker, Christoph; Martius, Olivia; Froidevaux, Paul; Reijmer, Carleen H.; Fischer, Hubertus

    2015-04-01

    Dronning Maud Land (DML), located in the Atlantic sector of East Antarctica, has become an area of intensive ice core research in recent years. Ice cores are used to study past climatic changes among others. To correctly interpret the ice core information, a profound understanding of the glaciological processes that lead to ice sheet formation as well as of the atmospheric conditions under which snow accumulation occurs is indispensable. Earlier studies showed that in DML especially high-precipitation events complicate the interpretation of ice core data. The atmospheric conditions leading to high precipitation in DML have been widely investigated, however these investigations tended to focus on individual case studies. Our main objective in this study is to analyse the link between high precipitation in DML and the large-scale atmospheric conditions from a climatological perspective. High-precipitation events are analysed at Halvfarryggen ice dome (71.2°S, 6.7°W), a potential ice core drilling site situated in the relatively wet, low-altitude coastal region of DML, and at Kohnen Station (75°S, 0.1°E), a deep ice core drilling site located in DML's dry, high-altitude interior. For our climatological analysis, we primarily make use of atmospheric reanalysis data from the ERA-Interim project for 1979-2009; complemented by precipitation data from the Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System and snow accumulation measurements from automatic weather stations located near Halvfarryggen and Kohnen Station. To describe the large-scale atmospheric conditions, we focus on vertically integrated water vapour transport (IVT), upper level potential vorticity, surface cyclone frequency, and atmospheric blocking frequency. In line with earlier studies, we find that high-precipitation events in DML are typically associated with amplified upper level waves. This large-scale atmospheric flow pattern is preceded by the downstream development of a Rossby wave train from the eastern

  2. High Resolution Simulation of a Colorado Rockies Extreme Snow and Rain Event in both a Current and Future Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Roy; Ikeda, Kyoko; Liu, Changhai; Gutmann, Ethan; Gochis, David

    2016-04-01

    Modeling of extreme weather events often require very finely resolved treatment of atmospheric circulation structures in order to produce and localize the large moisture fluxes that result in extreme precipitation. This is particularly true for cool season orographic precipitation processes where the representation of the landform can significantly impact vertical velocity profiles and cloud moisture entrainment rates. This study presents results for high resolution regional climate modeling study of the Colorado Headwaters region using an updated version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model run at 4 km horizontal resolution and a hydrological extension package called WRF-Hydro. Previous work has shown that the WRF modeling system can produce credible depictions of winter orographic precipitation over the Colorado Rockies if run at horizontal resolutions warming on total precipitation, snow-rain partitioning and surface hydrological fluxes (evapotranspiration and runoff) will be discussed in the context of how potential changes in temperature impact the amount of precipitation, the phase of precipitation (rain vs. snow) and the timing and amplitude of streamflow responses. The results show using the Pseudo Global Warming technique that intense precipitation rates significantly increased during the event and a significant fraction of the snowfall converts to rain which significantly amplifies the runoff response from one where runoff is produced gradually to one in which runoff is rapidly translated into streamflow values that approach significant flooding risks. Results from a new, CONUS scale high resolution climate simulation of extreme events in a current and future climate will be presented as time permits.

  3. High-energy electromagnetic offline follow-up of LIGO-Virgo gravitational-wave binary coalescence candidate events

    CERN Document Server

    Blackburn, Lindy; Camp, Jordan; Christensen, Nelson; Connaughton, Valerie; Jenke, Peter; Remillard, Ronald A; Veitch, John

    2014-01-01

    We present two different search methods for electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational-wave events from ground-based detectors using archival NASA high-energy data from the Fermi-GBM and RXTE-ASM instruments. To demonstrate the methods, we use a limited number of representative gravitational-wave background noise events produced by a search for binary neutron star coalescence over the last two months of the LIGO-Virgo S6/VSR3 joint science run. Time and sky location provided by the GW data trigger a targeted search in the high-energy photon data. We use two custom pipelines: one to search prompt gamma-ray counterparts in GBM, and the other to search for a variety of X-ray afterglow model signals in ASM. We measure the efficiency of the joint pipelines to weak gamma-ray burst counterparts, and a family of model X-ray afterglows. By requiring a detectable signal in either EM instrument coincident with a GW event we are able to reject a large majority of GW candidates, which reduces the signal-to-noise of the...

  4. The Direct Detection of Boosted Dark Matter at High Energies and PeV events at IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Atri; Gupta, Aritra

    2015-01-01

    If dark matter(DM) dominantly comprises of a massive, non-thermal relic $\\phi$ (mass $m_\\phi$), which decays preferentially (with a very long-lifetime) to another, significantly lighter DM particle $\\chi$, a small non-thermal but highly energetic population of DM may be created around energies $E = m_\\phi/2$. If $\\chi$ interacts with nucleons, it is possible that its cross-section, like the neutrino-nucleus coherent cross-section, may be undetectably small at low energies but may rise sharply with energy leading to deep inelastic scattering not dis-similar to neutral current neutrino-nucleon interactions. Thus, its direct detection may be possible via cascades in very large neutrino detectors. IceCube (IC) has recently reported three ultra-high energy PeV cascade events clustered around $1-2$ PeV. We apply this notion to these events and discuss the features which may help discriminate this scenario from one in which only astrophysical neutrinos constitute the IC event sample.

  5. Soundscapes, events, resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mubi Brighenti

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Put it bluntly, a soundscape is the sonic counterpart, or component, of landscape. From such minimal assumption, some interesting consequences follow: just as landscape is far from being a simple stage-set upon which events take place, soundscape, too, is itself evental, i.e., it consists of events. Not only because its nature, far from being acoustics is always ‘psychoacoustics’, as Murray Schafer (1977/1994 first argued. Processes of environmental perception are of course there.

  6. Studies of High-Mass Drell-Yan Dimuon Events in the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Lanyov, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The potential of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment to measure Drell-Yan muon pairs is discussed. The muon pairs can be measured in CMS with high precision up to very high invariant masses. The systematic errors are considered. The potential to carry out precise measurements of the forward-backward asymmetry is discussed.

  7. A Unique TAS Setup for high multiplicity events at VECC, Kolkata using BaF2 detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A granular total absorption spectrometer (TAS has been developed at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Kolkata, India using 50 elements of BaF2 detectors and covering 4π. The advantage with such a granular setup is that one can get sum spectrum with the condition of different multiplicity hits in an event. It has been shown that one can get clean sum-peaks devoid of individual peaks with the choice of two or higher fold of multiplicity. The large granularity makes it a unique TAS setup particularly for the high multiplicity events. The set up has been tested using different radioactive sources with one, two or multiple γ rays in cascade. The set up is ready to be used online.

  8. Calibration of the ATLAS $b$-tagging algorithm in $t\\bar{t}$ events with high multiplicity of jets

    CERN Document Server

    La Ruffa, Francesco; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The calibration of the ATLAS $b$-tagging in environments characterised by high multiplicity of jets is presented. The calibration uses reconstructed $t\\bar{t}$ candidate events collected by the ATLAS detector in proton-proton collisions at LHC with a centre-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s}$ of 13$\\,$TeV, with a final state containing one charged lepton, missing transverse momentum and at least four jets. The $b$-tagging efficiencies are measured not only as a function of the most relevant kinematic quantities, such as the transverse momentum or the presudo-rapidity of the jets, but also as a function of quantities that are sensitive to close-by jet activity. The results extend the regions where data-to-simulation $b$-tagging scale factors are derived when using dilepton $t\\bar{t}$ events.

  9. Criticality of Low-Energy Protons in Single-Event Effects Testing of Highly-Scaled Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellish, Jonathan A.; Marshall, Paul W.; Rodbell, Kenneth P.; Gordon, Michael S.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Schwank, James R.; Dodds, Nathaniel A.; Castaneda, Carlos M.; Berg, Melanie D.; Kim, Hak S.; Phan, Anthony M.; Seidleck, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    We report low-energy proton and low-energy alpha particle single-event effects (SEE) data on a 32 nm silicon-on-insulator (SOI) complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) latches and static random access memory (SRAM) that demonstrates the criticality of using low-energy protons for SEE testing of highly-scaled technologies. Low-energy protons produced a significantly higher fraction of multi-bit upsets relative to single-bit upsets when compared to similar alpha particle data. This difference highlights the importance of performing hardness assurance testing with protons that include energy distribution components below 2 megaelectron-volt. The importance of low-energy protons to system-level single-event performance is based on the technology under investigation as well as the target radiation environment.

  10. Study of cosmic ray events with high muon multiplicity using the ALICE detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, Jaroslav; Aggarwal, Madan Mohan; Aglieri Rinella, Gianluca; Agnello, Michelangelo; Agrawal, Neelima; Ahammed, Zubayer; Ahn, Sang Un; Aiola, Salvatore; Akindinov, Alexander; Alam, Sk Noor; Aleksandrov, Dmitry; Alessandro, Bruno; Alexandre, Didier; Alfaro Molina, Jose Ruben; Alici, Andrea; Alkin, Anton; Millan Almaraz, Jesus Roberto; Alme, Johan; Alt, Torsten; Altinpinar, Sedat; Altsybeev, Igor; Alves Garcia Prado, Caio; Andrei, Cristian; Andronic, Anton; Anguelov, Venelin; Anielski, Jonas; Anticic, Tome; Antinori, Federico; Antonioli, Pietro; Aphecetche, Laurent Bernard; Appelshaeuser, Harald; Arcelli, Silvia; Armesto Perez, Nestor; Arnaldi, Roberta; Arsene, Ionut Cristian; Arslandok, Mesut; Audurier, Benjamin; Augustinus, Andre; Averbeck, Ralf Peter; Azmi, Mohd Danish; Bach, Matthias Jakob; Badala, Angela; Baek, Yong Wook; Bagnasco, Stefano; Bailhache, Raphaelle Marie; Bala, Renu; Baldisseri, Alberto; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, Fernando; Baral, Rama Chandra; Barbano, Anastasia Maria; Barbera, Roberto; Barile, Francesco; Barnafoldi, Gergely Gabor; Barnby, Lee Stuart; Ramillien Barret, Valerie; Bartalini, Paolo; Barth, Klaus; Bartke, Jerzy Gustaw; Bartsch, Esther; Basile, Maurizio; Bastid, Nicole; Basu, Sumit; Bathen, Bastian; Batigne, Guillaume; Batista Camejo, Arianna; Batyunya, Boris; Batzing, Paul Christoph; Bearden, Ian Gardner; Beck, Hans; Bedda, Cristina; Belikov, Iouri; Bellini, Francesca; Bello Martinez, Hector; Bellwied, Rene; Belmont Iii, Ronald John; Belmont Moreno, Ernesto; Belyaev, Vladimir; Bencedi, Gyula; Beole, Stefania; Berceanu, Ionela; Bercuci, Alexandru; Berdnikov, Yaroslav; Berenyi, Daniel; Bertens, Redmer Alexander; Berzano, Dario; Betev, Latchezar; Bhasin, Anju; Bhat, Inayat Rasool; Bhati, Ashok Kumar; Bhattacharjee, Buddhadeb; Bhom, Jihyun; Bianchi, Livio; Bianchi, Nicola; Bianchin, Chiara; Bielcik, Jaroslav; Bielcikova, Jana; Bilandzic, Ante; Biswas, Rathijit; Biswas, Saikat; Bjelogrlic, Sandro; Blair, Justin Thomas; Blanco, Fernando; Blau, Dmitry; Blume, Christoph; Bock, Friederike; Bogdanov, Alexey; Boggild, Hans; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Bombara, Marek; Book, Julian Heinz; Borel, Herve; Borissov, Alexander; Borri, Marcello; Bossu, Francesco; Botta, Elena; Boettger, Stefan; Braun-Munzinger, Peter; Bregant, Marco; Breitner, Timo Gunther; Broker, Theo Alexander; Browning, Tyler Allen; Broz, Michal; Brucken, Erik Jens; Bruna, Elena; Bruno, Giuseppe Eugenio; Budnikov, Dmitry; Buesching, Henner; Bufalino, Stefania; Buncic, Predrag; Busch, Oliver; Buthelezi, Edith Zinhle; Bashir Butt, Jamila; Buxton, Jesse Thomas; Caffarri, Davide; Cai, Xu; Caines, Helen Louise; Calero Diaz, Liliet; Caliva, Alberto; Calvo Villar, Ernesto; Camerini, Paolo; Carena, Francesco; Carena, Wisla; Carnesecchi, Francesca; Castillo Castellanos, Javier Ernesto; Castro, Andrew John; Casula, Ester Anna Rita; Cavicchioli, Costanza; Ceballos Sanchez, Cesar; Cepila, Jan; Cerello, Piergiorgio; Cerkala, Jakub; Chang, Beomsu; Chapeland, Sylvain; Chartier, Marielle; Charvet, Jean-Luc Fernand; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chattopadhyay, Sukalyan; Chelnokov, Volodymyr; Cherney, Michael Gerard; Cheshkov, Cvetan Valeriev; Cheynis, Brigitte; Chibante Barroso, Vasco Miguel; Dobrigkeit Chinellato, David; Cho, Soyeon; Chochula, Peter; Choi, Kyungeon; Chojnacki, Marek; Choudhury, Subikash; Christakoglou, Panagiotis; Christensen, Christian Holm; Christiansen, Peter; Chujo, Tatsuya; Chung, Suh-Urk; Zhang, Chunhui; Cicalo, Corrado; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, Federico; Cleymans, Jean Willy Andre; Colamaria, Fabio Filippo; Colella, Domenico; Collu, Alberto; Colocci, Manuel; Conesa Balbastre, Gustavo; Conesa Del Valle, Zaida; Connors, Megan Elizabeth; Contreras Nuno, Jesus Guillermo; Cormier, Thomas Michael; Corrales Morales, Yasser; Cortes Maldonado, Ismael; Cortese, Pietro; Cosentino, Mauro Rogerio; Costa, Filippo; Crochet, Philippe; Cruz Albino, Rigoberto; Cuautle Flores, Eleazar; Cunqueiro Mendez, Leticia; Dahms, Torsten; Dainese, Andrea; Danu, Andrea; Das, Debasish; Das, Indranil; Das, Supriya; Dash, Ajay Kumar; Dash, Sadhana; De, Sudipan; De Caro, Annalisa; De Cataldo, Giacinto; De Cuveland, Jan; De Falco, Alessandro; De Gruttola, Daniele; De Marco, Nora; De Pasquale, Salvatore; Deisting, Alexander; Deloff, Andrzej; Denes, Ervin Sandor; D'Erasmo, Ginevra; Dhankher, Preeti; Di Bari, Domenico; Di Mauro, Antonio; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Diaz Corchero, Miguel Angel; Dietel, Thomas; Dillenseger, Pascal; Divia, Roberto; Djuvsland, Oeystein; Dobrin, Alexandru Florin; Dobrowolski, Tadeusz Antoni; Domenicis Gimenez, Diogenes; Donigus, Benjamin; Dordic, Olja; Drozhzhova, Tatiana; Dubey, Anand Kumar; Dubla, Andrea; Ducroux, Laurent; Dupieux, Pascal; Ehlers Iii, Raymond James; Elia, Domenico; Engel, Heiko; Epple, Eliane; Erazmus, Barbara Ewa; Erdemir, Irem; Erhardt, Filip; Espagnon, Bruno; Estienne, Magali Danielle; Esumi, Shinichi; Eum, Jongsik; Evans, David; Evdokimov, Sergey; Eyyubova, Gyulnara; Fabbietti, Laura; Fabris, Daniela; Faivre, Julien; Fantoni, Alessandra; Fasel, Markus; Feldkamp, Linus; Felea, Daniel; Feliciello, Alessandro; Feofilov, Grigorii; Ferencei, Jozef; Fernandez Tellez, Arturo; Gonzalez Ferreiro, Elena; Ferretti, Alessandro; Festanti, Andrea; Feuillard, Victor Jose Gaston; Figiel, Jan; Araujo Silva Figueredo, Marcel; Filchagin, Sergey; Finogeev, Dmitry; Fionda, Fiorella; Fiore, Enrichetta Maria; Fleck, Martin Gabriel; Floris, Michele; Foertsch, Siegfried Valentin; Foka, Panagiota; Fokin, Sergey; Fragiacomo, Enrico; Francescon, Andrea; Frankenfeld, Ulrich Michael; Fuchs, Ulrich; Furget, Christophe; Furs, Artur; Fusco Girard, Mario; Gaardhoeje, Jens Joergen; Gagliardi, Martino; Gago Medina, Alberto Martin; Gallio, Mauro; Gangadharan, Dhevan Raja; Ganoti, Paraskevi; Gao, Chaosong; Garabatos Cuadrado, Jose; Garcia-Solis, Edmundo Javier; Gargiulo, Corrado; Gasik, Piotr Jan; Gauger, Erin Frances; Germain, Marie; Gheata, Andrei George; Gheata, Mihaela; Ghosh, Premomoy; Ghosh, Sanjay Kumar; Gianotti, Paola; Giubellino, Paolo; Giubilato, Piero; Gladysz-Dziadus, Ewa; Glassel, Peter; Gomez Coral, Diego Mauricio; Gomez Ramirez, Andres; Gonzalez Zamora, Pedro; Gorbunov, Sergey; Gorlich, Lidia Maria; Gotovac, Sven; Grabski, Varlen; Graczykowski, Lukasz Kamil; Graham, Katie Leanne; Grelli, Alessandro; Grigoras, Alina Gabriela; Grigoras, Costin; Grigoryev, Vladislav; Grigoryan, Ara; Grigoryan, Smbat; Grynyov, Borys; Grion, Nevio; Grosse-Oetringhaus, Jan Fiete; Grossiord, Jean-Yves; Grosso, Raffaele; Guber, Fedor; Guernane, Rachid; Guerzoni, Barbara; Gulbrandsen, Kristjan Herlache; Gulkanyan, Hrant; Gunji, Taku; Gupta, Anik; Gupta, Ramni; Haake, Rudiger; Haaland, Oystein Senneset; Hadjidakis, Cynthia Marie; Haiduc, Maria; Hamagaki, Hideki; Hamar, Gergoe; Harris, John William; Harton, Austin Vincent; Hatzifotiadou, Despina; Hayashi, Shinichi; Heckel, Stefan Thomas; Heide, Markus Ansgar; Helstrup, Haavard; Herghelegiu, Andrei Ionut; Herrera Corral, Gerardo Antonio; Hess, Benjamin Andreas; Hetland, Kristin Fanebust; Hilden, Timo Eero; Hillemanns, Hartmut; Hippolyte, Boris; Hosokawa, Ritsuya; Hristov, Peter Zahariev; Huang, Meidana; Humanic, Thomas; Hussain, Nur; Hussain, Tahir; Hutter, Dirk; Hwang, Dae Sung; Ilkaev, Radiy; Ilkiv, Iryna; Inaba, Motoi; Ippolitov, Mikhail; Irfan, Muhammad; Ivanov, Marian; Ivanov, Vladimir; Izucheev, Vladimir; Jacobs, Peter Martin; Jadhav, Manoj Bhanudas; Jadlovska, Slavka; Jahnke, Cristiane; Jang, Haeng Jin; Janik, Malgorzata Anna; Pahula Hewage, Sandun; Jena, Chitrasen; Jena, Satyajit; Jimenez Bustamante, Raul Tonatiuh; Jones, Peter Graham; Jung, Hyungtaik; Jusko, Anton; Kalinak, Peter; Kalweit, Alexander Philipp; Kamin, Jason Adrian; Kang, Ju Hwan; Kaplin, Vladimir; Kar, Somnath; Karasu Uysal, Ayben; Karavichev, Oleg; Karavicheva, Tatiana; Karayan, Lilit; Karpechev, Evgeny; Kebschull, Udo Wolfgang; Keidel, Ralf; Keijdener, Darius Laurens; Keil, Markus; Khan, Mohammed Mohisin; Khan, Palash; Khan, Shuaib Ahmad; Khanzadeev, Alexei; Kharlov, Yury; Kileng, Bjarte; Kim, Beomkyu; Kim, Do Won; Kim, Dong Jo; Kim, Hyeonjoong; Kim, Jinsook; Kim, Mimae; Kim, Minwoo; Kim, Se Yong; Kim, Taesoo; Kirsch, Stefan; Kisel, Ivan; Kiselev, Sergey; Kisiel, Adam Ryszard; Kiss, Gabor; Klay, Jennifer Lynn; Klein, Carsten; Klein, Jochen; Klein-Boesing, Christian; Kluge, Alexander; Knichel, Michael Linus; Knospe, Anders Garritt; Kobayashi, Taiyo; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Kofarago, Monika; Kollegger, Thorsten; Kolozhvari, Anatoly; Kondratev, Valerii; Kondratyeva, Natalia; Kondratyuk, Evgeny; Konevskikh, Artem; Kopcik, Michal; Kour, Mandeep; Kouzinopoulos, Charalampos; Kovalenko, Oleksandr; Kovalenko, Vladimir; Kowalski, Marek; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, Greeshma; Kral, Jiri; Kralik, Ivan; Kravcakova, Adela; Kretz, Matthias; Krivda, Marian; Krizek, Filip; Kryshen, Evgeny; Krzewicki, Mikolaj; Kubera, Andrew Michael; Kucera, Vit; Kugathasan, Thanushan; Kuhn, Christian Claude; Kuijer, Paulus Gerardus; Kumar, Ajay; Kumar, Jitendra; Lokesh, Kumar; Kumar, Shyam; Kurashvili, Podist; Kurepin, Alexander; Kurepin, Alexey; Kuryakin, Alexey; Kushpil, Svetlana; Kweon, Min Jung; Kwon, Youngil; La Pointe, Sarah Louise; La Rocca, Paola; Lagana Fernandes, Caio; Lakomov, Igor; Langoy, Rune; Lara Martinez, Camilo Ernesto; Lardeux, Antoine Xavier; Lattuca, Alessandra; Laudi, Elisa; Lea, Ramona; Leardini, Lucia; Lee, Graham Richard; Lee, Seongjoo; Legrand, Iosif; Lehas, Fatiha; Lemmon, Roy Crawford; Lenti, Vito; Leogrande, Emilia; Leon Monzon, Ildefonso; Leoncino, Marco; Levai, Peter; Li, Shuang; Li, Xiaomei; Lien, Jorgen Andre; Lietava, Roman; Lindal, Svein; Lindenstruth, Volker; Lippmann, Christian; Lisa, Michael Annan; Ljunggren, Hans Martin; Lodato, Davide Francesco; Lonne, Per-Ivar; Loginov, Vitaly; Loizides, Constantinos; Lopez, Xavier Bernard; Lopez Torres, Ernesto; Lowe, Andrew John; Luettig, Philipp Johannes; Lunardon, Marcello; Luparello, Grazia; Ferreira Natal Da Luz, Pedro Hugo; Maevskaya, Alla; Mager, Magnus; Mahajan, Sanjay; Mahmood, Sohail Musa; Maire, Antonin; Majka, Richard Daniel; Malaev, Mikhail; Maldonado Cervantes, Ivonne Alicia; Malinina, Liudmila; Mal'Kevich, Dmitry; Malzacher, Peter; Mamonov, Alexander; Manko, Vladislav; Manso, Franck; Manzari, Vito; Marchisone, Massimiliano; Mares, Jiri; Margagliotti, Giacomo Vito; Margotti, Anselmo; Margutti, Jacopo; Marin, Ana Maria; Markert, Christina; Marquard, Marco; Martin, Nicole Alice; Martin Blanco, Javier; Martinengo, Paolo; Martinez Hernandez, Mario Ivan; Martinez-Garcia, Gines; Martinez Pedreira, Miguel; Martynov, Yevgen; Mas, Alexis Jean-Michel; Masciocchi, Silvia; Masera, Massimo; Masoni, Alberto; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Mastroserio, Annalisa; Masui, Hiroshi; Matyja, Adam Tomasz; Mayer, Christoph; Mazer, Joel Anthony; Mazzoni, Alessandra Maria; Mcdonald, Daniel; Meddi, Franco; Melikyan, Yuri; Menchaca-Rocha, Arturo Alejandro; Meninno, Elisa; Mercado-Perez, Jorge; Meres, Michal; Miake, Yasuo; Mieskolainen, Matti Mikael; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Milano, Leonardo; Milosevic, Jovan; Minervini, Lazzaro Manlio; Mischke, Andre; Mishra, Aditya Nath; Miskowiec, Dariusz Czeslaw; 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Oeschler, Helmut Oskar; Oh, Saehanseul; Oh, Sun Kun; Ohlson, Alice Elisabeth; Okatan, Ali; Okubo, Tsubasa; Olah, Laszlo; Oleniacz, Janusz; Oliveira Da Silva, Antonio Carlos; Oliver, Michael Henry; Onderwaater, Jacobus; Oppedisano, Chiara; Orava, Risto; Ortiz Velasquez, Antonio; Oskarsson, Anders Nils Erik; Otwinowski, Jacek Tomasz; Oyama, Ken; Ozdemir, Mahmut; Pachmayer, Yvonne Chiara; Pagano, Paola; Paic, Guy; Pajares Vales, Carlos; Pal, Susanta Kumar; Pan, Jinjin; Pandey, Ashutosh Kumar; Pant, Divyash; Papcun, Peter; Papikyan, Vardanush; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Pareek, Pooja; Park, Woojin; Parmar, Sonia; Passfeld, Annika; Paticchio, Vincenzo; Patra, Rajendra Nath; Paul, Biswarup; Peitzmann, Thomas; Pereira Da Costa, Hugo Denis Antonio; Pereira De Oliveira Filho, Elienos; Peresunko, Dmitry Yurevich; Perez Lara, Carlos Eugenio; Perez Lezama, Edgar; Peskov, Vladimir; Pestov, Yury; Petracek, Vojtech; Petrov, Viacheslav; Petrovici, Mihai; Petta, Catia; Piano, Stefano; Pikna, Miroslav; Pillot, Philippe; 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Zardoshti, Nima; Zarochentsev, Andrey; Zavada, Petr; Zavyalov, Nikolay; Zbroszczyk, Hanna Paulina; Zgura, Sorin Ion; Zhalov, Mikhail; Zhang, Haitao; Zhang, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yonghong; Zhang, Zuman; Zhao, Chengxin; Zhigareva, Natalia; Zhou, Daicui; Zhou, You; Zhou, Zhuo; Zhu, Hongsheng; Zhu, Jianhui; Zichichi, Antonino; Zimmermann, Alice; Zimmermann, Markus Bernhard; Zinovjev, Gennady; Zyzak, Maksym

    2016-01-19

    ALICE is one of four large experiments at the CERN Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, specially designed to study particle production in ultra-relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Located 52 meters underground with 28 meters of overburden rock, it has also been used to detect muons produced by cosmic ray interactions in the upper atmosphere. In this paper, we present the multiplicity distribution of these atmospheric muons and its comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. This analysis exploits the large size and excellent tracking capability of the ALICE Time Projection Chamber. A special emphasis is given to the study of high multiplicity events containing more than 100 reconstructed muons and corresponding to a muon areal density $\\rho_{\\mu} > 5.9~$m$^{-2}$. Similar events have been studied in previous underground experiments such as ALEPH and DELPHI at LEP. While these experiments were able to reproduce the measured muon multiplicity distribution with Monte Carlo simulations at low and intermediate multiplic...

  11. Chernobyl accident and its consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gittus, J.H.; Bonell, P.G.; Hicks, D.

    1987-01-01

    The USSR power reactor programme is first described. The reasons for the accident at the Chernobyl-4 RBMK nuclear reactor on 26 April 1986, the sequence of events that took place, and the immediate and long-term consequences are considered. A description of the RBMK-type reactors is given and the design changes resulting from the experience of the accident are explained. The source terms describing the details of the radioactivity release associated with the accident and the environmental consequences are covered in the last two sections of the report. Throughout the text comments referring to the UK Nuclear Installations Inspectorate Safety assessment principles have been inserted. (U.K.).

  12. Impaired Early Attentional Processes in Parkinson's Disease: A High-Resolution Event-Related Potentials Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrine Bocquillon

    Full Text Available The selection of task-relevant information requires both the focalization of attention on the task and resistance to interference from irrelevant stimuli. A previous study using the P3 component of the event-related potentials suggested that a reduced ability to resist interference could be responsible for attention disorders at early stages of Parkinson's disease (PD, with a possible role of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC.Our objective was to better determine the origin of this impairment, by studying an earlier ERP component, the N2, and its subcomponents, as they reflect early inhibition processes and as they are known to have sources in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, which is involved together with the DLPFC in inhibition processes. Fifteen early-stage PD patients and 15 healthy controls (HCs performed a three-stimulus visual oddball paradigm, consisting in detecting target inputs amongst standard stimuli, while resisting interference from distracter ones. A 128-channel electroencephalogram was recorded during this task and the generators of the N2 subcomponents were identified using standardized weighted low-resolution electromagnetic tomography (swLORETA.PD patients displayed fewer N2 generators than HCs in both the DLPFC and the ACC, for all types of stimuli. In contrast to controls, PD patients did not show any differences between their generators for different N2 subcomponents.Our data suggest that impaired inhibition in PD results from dysfunction of the DLPFC and the ACC during the early stages of attentional processes.

  13. Muons in air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory: Mean number in highly inclined events

    Science.gov (United States)

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W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Islo, K.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J. J.; Matthews, A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Newton, D.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Roberts, J.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Younk, P.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2015-02-01

    We present the first hybrid measurement of the average muon number in air showers at ultrahigh energies, initiated by cosmic rays with zenith angles between 62° and 80°. The measurement is based on 174 hybrid events recorded simultaneously with the surface detector array and the fluorescence detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The muon number for each shower is derived by scaling a simulated reference profile of the lateral muon density distribution at the ground until it fits the data. A 1019 eV shower with a zenith angle of 67°, which arrives at the surface detector array at an altitude of 1450 m above sea level, contains on average (2.68 ±0.04 ±0.48 (sys))×107 muons with energies larger than 0.3 GeV. The logarithmic gain d ln Nμ/d ln E of muons with increasing energy between 4 ×1018 eV and 5 ×1019 eV is measured to be (1.029 ±0.024 ±0.030 (sys)) .

  14. Characterization of high-intensity, long-duration continuous auroral activity (HILDCAA) events using recurrence quantification analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Odim; Oliveira Domingues, Margarete; Echer, Ezequiel; Hajra, Rajkumar; Everton Menconi, Varlei

    2017-08-01

    Considering the magnetic reconnection and the viscous interaction as the fundamental mechanisms for transfer particles and energy into the magnetosphere, we study the dynamical characteristics of auroral electrojet (AE) index during high-intensity, long-duration continuous auroral activity (HILDCAA) events, using a long-term geomagnetic database (1975-2012), and other distinct interplanetary conditions (geomagnetically quiet intervals, co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs)/high-speed streams (HSSs) not followed by HILDCAAs, and events of AE comprised in global intense geomagnetic disturbances). It is worth noting that we also study active but non-HILDCAA intervals. Examining the geomagnetic AE index, we apply a dynamics analysis composed of the phase space, the recurrence plot (RP), and the recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) methods. As a result, the quantification finds two distinct clusterings of the dynamical behaviours occurring in the interplanetary medium: one regarding a geomagnetically quiet condition regime and the other regarding an interplanetary activity regime. Furthermore, the HILDCAAs seem unique events regarding a visible, intense manifestations of interplanetary Alfvénic waves; however, they are similar to the other kinds of conditions regarding a dynamical signature (based on RQA), because it is involved in the same complex mechanism of generating geomagnetic disturbances. Also, by characterizing the proper conditions of transitions from quiescent conditions to weaker geomagnetic disturbances inside the magnetosphere and ionosphere system, the RQA method indicates clearly the two fundamental dynamics (geomagnetically quiet intervals and HILDCAA events) to be evaluated with magneto-hydrodynamics simulations to understand better the critical processes related to energy and particle transfer into the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. Finally, with this work, we have also reinforced the potential applicability of the RQA method for

  15. Adipose Tissue-Specific Deletion of 12/15-Lipoxygenase Protects Mice from the Consequences of a High-Fat Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banumathi K. Cole

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, and inflammation in adipose tissue. 12/15-Lipoxygenase (12/15-LO generates proinflammatory lipid mediators, which induce inflammation in adipose tissue. Therefore we investigated the role of 12/15-LO activity in mouse white adipose tissue in promoting obesity-induced local and systemic inflammatory consequences. We generated a mouse model for fat-specific deletion of 12/15-LO, aP2-Cre; 12/15-LOloxP/loxP, which we call ad-12/15-LO mice, and placed wild-type controls and ad-12/15-LO mice on a high-fat diet for 16 weeks and examined obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance. High-fat diet-fed ad-12/15-LO exhibited improved fasting glucose levels and glucose metabolism, and epididymal adipose tissue from these mice exhibited reduced inflammation and macrophage infiltration compared to wild-type mice. Furthermore, fat-specific deletion of 12/15-LO led to decreased peripheral pancreatic islet inflammation with enlarged pancreatic islets when mice were fed the high-fat diet compared to wild-type mice. These results suggest an interesting crosstalk between 12/15-LO expression in adipose tissue and inflammation in pancreatic islets. Therefore, deletion of 12/15-LO in adipose tissue can offer local and systemic protection from obesity-induced consequences, and blocking 12/15-LO activity in adipose tissue may be a novel therapeutic target in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  16. High temporal discounters overvalue immediate rewards rather than undervalue future rewards: an event-related brain potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniawsky, Avital S; Holroyd, Clay B

    2013-03-01

    Impulsivity is characterized in part by heightened sensitivity to immediate relative to future rewards. Although previous research has suggested that "high discounters" in intertemporal choice tasks tend to prefer immediate over future rewards because they devalue the latter, it remains possible that they instead overvalue immediate rewards. To investigate this question, we recorded the reward positivity, a component of the event-related brain potential (ERP) associated with reward processing, with participants engaged in a task in which they received both immediate and future rewards and nonrewards. The participants also completed a temporal discounting task without ERP recording. We found that immediate but not future rewards elicited the reward positivity. High discounters also produced larger reward positivities to immediate rewards than did low discounters, indicating that high discounters relatively overvalued immediate rewards. These findings suggest that high discounters may be more motivated than low discounters to work for monetary rewards, irrespective of the time of arrival of the incentives.

  17. A new type of Ambiguity in the Planet and Binary Interpretations of Central Perturbations of High-magnification Gravitational Microlensing Events

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, J.-Y; Shin, I.-G; Han, C.

    2012-01-01

    High-magnification microlensing events provide an important channel to detect planets. Perturbations near the peak of a high-magnification event can be produced either by a planet or a binary companion. It is known that central perturbations induced by both types of companions can be generally di...

  18. Real time high frequency monitoring of water quality in river streams using a UV-visible spectrometer: interest, limits and consequences for monitoring strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucheux, Mikaël; Fovet, Ophélie; Gruau, Gérard; Jaffrézic, Anne; Petitjean, Patrice; Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal; Ruiz, Laurent

    2013-04-01

    Stream water chemistry is highly variable in space and time, therefore high frequency water quality measurement methods are likely to lead to conceptual advances in the hydrological sciences. Sub-daily data on water quality improve the characterization of pollutant sources and pathways during flood events as well as during long-term periods [1]. However, real time, high frequency monitoring devices needs to be properly calibrated and validated in real streams. This study analyses data from in situ monitoring of a stream water quality. During two hydrological years (2010-11, 2011-12), a submersible UV-visible spectrometer (Scan Spectrolyser) was used for surface water quality measurement at the outlet of a headwater catchment located at Kervidy-Naizin, Western France (AgrHys long-term hydrological observatory, http://www.inra.fr/ore_agrhys/). The spectrometer is reagentless and equipped with an auto-cleaning system. It allows real time, in situ and high frequency (20 min) measurements and uses a multiwavelengt spectral (200-750 nm) for simultaneous measurement of nitrate, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and total suspended solids (TSS). A global calibration based on a PLS (Partial Least Squares) regression is provided by the manufacturer as default configuration of the UV-visible spectrometer. We carried out a local calibration of the spectrometer based on nitrates and DOC concentrations analysed in the laboratory from daily manual sampling and sub-daily automatic sampling of flood events. TSS results are compared with 15 min turbidity records from a continuous turdidimeter (Ponsel). The results show a good correlation between laboratory data and spectrometer data both during basis flows periods and flood events. However, the local calibration gives better results than the global one. Nutrient fluxes estimates based on high and different low frequency time series (daily to monthly) are compared to discuss the implication for environmental monitoring strategies. Such

  19. Understanding risks in the light of uncertainty: low-probability, high-impact coastal events in cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadie, Luis Maria; Galarraga, Ibon; Sainz de Murieta, Elisa

    2017-01-01

    A quantification of present and future mean annual losses due to extreme coastal events can be crucial for adequate decision making on adaptation to climate change in coastal areas around the globe. However, this approach is limited when uncertainty needs to be accounted for. In this paper, we assess coastal flood risk from sea-level rise and extreme events in 120 major cities around the world using an alternative stochastic approach that accounts for uncertainty. Probability distributions of future relative (local) sea-level rise have been used for each city, under three IPPC emission scenarios, RCP 2.6, 4.5 and 8.5. The approach allows a continuous stochastic function to be built to assess yearly evolution of damages from 2030 to 2100. Additionally, we present two risk measures that put low-probability, high-damage events in the spotlight: the Value at Risk (VaR) and the Expected Shortfall (ES), which enable the damages to be estimated when a certain risk level is exceeded. This level of acceptable risk can be defined involving different stakeholders to guide progressive adaptation strategies. The method presented here is new in the field of economics of adaptation and offers a much broader picture of the challenges related to dealing with climate impacts. Furthermore, it can be applied to assess not only adaptation needs but also to put adaptation into a timeframe in each city.

  20. High Triglycerides Predicts Arteriogenic Erectile Dysfunction and Major Adverse Cardiovascular Events in Subjects With Sexual Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corona, Giovanni; Cipriani, Sarah; Rastrelli, Giulia; Sforza, Alessandra; Mannucci, Edoardo; Maggi, Mario

    2016-09-01

    The atherogenic role of triglycerides (TG) remains controversial. The aim of the present study is to analyze the contribution of TG in the pathogenesis of erectile dysfunction (ED) and to verify the value of elevated TG in predicting major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE). An unselected series of 3,990 men attending our outpatient clinic for sexual dysfunction was retrospectively studied. A subset of this sample (n = 1,687) was enrolled in a longitudinal study. Several clinical, biochemical, and instrumental (penile color Doppler ultrasound; PCDU) factors were evaluated. Among the patients studied, after adjustment for confounders, higher TG levels were associated with arteriogenic ED and a higher risk of clinical and biochemical hypogonadism. Conversely, no association between TG and other sexual dysfunctions was observed. When pathological PCDU parameters-including flaccid acceleration (<1.17 m/sec(2)) or dynamic peak systolic velocity (PSV <35 cm/sec)-were considered, the negative association between impaired penile flow and higher TG levels was confirmed, even when subjects taking lipid-lowering drugs or those with diabetes were excluded from the analysis (OR = 6.343 [1.243;32.362], P = .026 and 3.576 [1.104;11.578]; P = .34 for impaired acceleration and PSV, respectively). Similarly, when the same adjusted models were applied, TG levels were associated with a higher risk of hypogonadism, independently of the definition criteria (OR = 2.892 [1.643;5.410], P < .0001 and 4.853 [1.965;11.990]; P = .001 for total T <12 and 8 nM, respectively). In the longitudinal study, after adjusting for confounders, elevated TG levels (upper quartile: 162-1686 mg/dL) were independently associated with a higher incidence of MACE (HR = 2.469 [1.019;5.981]; P = .045), when compared to the rest of the sample. Our data suggest an association between elevated TG and arteriogenic ED and its cardiovascular (CV) risk stratification. Whether the use of TG lowering drugs

  1. Are children's views of the "enemy" shaped by a highly-publicized negative event?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppenheimer, L.

    2010-01-01

    In the beginning of the first decade of this century, some highly-publicized extremistic acts of terror occurred. A hostage tragedy in a school in Beslan (North Ossetia) was followed in the Netherlands by the brutal murder of the controversial Dutch filmmaker and newspaper columnist Theo van Gogh, b

  2. High-latitude ionospheric response to a sudden impulse event during northward IMF conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moretto, T.; Ridley, A.J.; Engebretson, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    A high-density structure under northward interplanetary magnetic field B-z conditions is identified at the Wind and IMP 8 satellites, both in the solar wind on August 22, 1995. A compression of the magnetosphere is observed by the GOES 7 magnetometer within a few minutes of the pressure increase ...

  3. Can new heavy gauge bosons be observed in ultra-high energy cosmic neutrino events?

    CERN Document Server

    Ježo, T; Lyonnet, F; Montanet, F; Schienbein, I; Tartare, M

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of models beyond the Standard Model predict charged and neutral resonances, generically called $W'$- and $Z'$-bosons, respectively. In this paper we study the impact of such resonances on the deep inelastic scattering of ultra-high energy neutrinos as well as on the resonant charged current $\\bar\

  4. Failure to Respond to Food Resource Decline Has Catastrophic Consequences for Koalas in a High-Density Population in Southern Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desley A Whisson

    Full Text Available Understanding the ability of koalas to respond to changes in their environment is critical for conservation of the species and their habitat. We monitored the behavioural response of koalas to declining food resources in manna gum (Eucalyptus viminalis woodland at Cape Otway, Victoria, Australia, from September 2011 to November 2013. Over this period, koala population density increased from 10.1 to 18.4 koalas.ha-1. As a result of the high browsing pressure of this population, manna gum canopy condition declined with 71.4% manna gum being completely or highly defoliated in September 2013. Despite declining food resources, radio collared koalas (N = 30 exhibited high fidelity to small ranges (0.4-1.2 ha. When trees became severely defoliated in September 2013, koalas moved relatively short distances from their former ranges (mean predicted change in range centroid = 144 m and remained in areas of 0.9 to 1.0 ha. This was despite the high connectivity of most manna gum woodland, and close proximity of the study site (< 3 km to the contiguous mixed forest of the Great Otway National Park. Limited movement had catastrophic consequences for koalas with 71% (15/21 of radio collared koalas dying from starvation or being euthanased due to their poor condition between September and November 2013.

  5. Search for new physics in high pT like-sign dilepton events at CDF II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaltonen, T; Álvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Brisuda, A; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Bucciantonio, M; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Kittiwisit, P; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Porter, R; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rubbo, F; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shreyber, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sissakian, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tu, Y; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2011-10-28

    We present a search for new physics in events with two high pT leptons of the same electric charge, using data with an integrated luminosity of 6.1 fb(-1). The observed data are consistent with standard model predictions. We set 95% C.L. lower limits on the mass of doubly charged scalars decaying to like-sign dileptons, m(H±±) > 190-245 GeV/c(2), assuming 100% BR to ee, μμ or eμ.

  6. High aortic augmentation index predicts mortality and cardiovascular events in men from a general population, but not in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janner, Julie Hjortsø; Godtfredsen, Nina Skavlan; Ladelund, Steen

    2012-01-01

    Background: A recent meta-analysis concluded that augmentation index (AIx), a measure of pulse wave reflections influencing the central blood pressure, is related to mortality and cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and is likely to be clinically useful. However, prospective data based on non high...... relates to CVD in men but question the value in women. This gender differences may relate to different development in AIx with increasing age in men and women. Further studies are needed before AIx can be considered in CVD risk stratification or clinical practice....

  7. Relationship Between South Atlantic Subtropical High and South Atlantic SST Anomalies during Extreme Precipitation Events on Southeast Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampuch, L.; Ambrizzi, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Southeast region of Brazil comprises the states of Sao Paulo, Minas Gerais, Rio de Janeiro and Espirito Santo. It occupies 10.85% of Brazilian territory and is highly urbanized. The Southeast Brazil is the biggest geoeconomic region of the country having a strong and diverse economy. Agriculture dominates in all states of the region. The main agricultural products are sugar cane, coffee, cotton, maize, cassava, rice, beans and fruits. Livestock farming is also practiced in the region. The largest herd of cattle is found in the state of Minas Gerais. These activities are highly dependent on the amount and distribution of rainfall. Studies of extreme precipitation events over Brazil have been well emphasized in the literature over the years and their relationship with anomalies of sea surface temperature (SST) in both the Pacific and the Atlantic Ocean have been analyzed. This paper investigates the extreme events occurring in southeastern Brazil from 1982 to 2004 using the technique of quantiles. The composite technique was applied to precipitation, sea level pressure anomaly (SLP) and sea surface temperature anomaly (SST) data in order to investigate the characteristics of rainfall patterns, the position and intensity of South Atlantic subtropical high (SASH) and SST anomalies in the Southern Atlantic Ocean (SAO) in the occurrence of these events and to make a distinction between dry and wet extremes. Analyzing the precipitation patterns, it was noticed that the composition of dry events throughout the Southeast Brazil has negative precipitation anomalies. Particularly, in the southern part of the region there is a large precipitation deficit, having an average of 50mm in the winter months. The composition for the wet events shows that, on average, positive precipitation anomalies with the southern region containing the highest cumulative average, reaching a positive anomaly of 100mm. The composition of SLP in the case of dry events indicates a positive anomaly

  8. An Event to Encourage High School Students to Pursue College Degrees in Physics and Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukiet, Bruce; Thomas, Gordon

    2003-04-01

    We discuss a Math and Physics Day for high school students and teachers, with hands-on activities and seminars involving mathematics and physics. Participants also learn about careers for those who go on to major in physics and mathematics in college. The New York State Section of the APS has provided generous support for this workshop through its Outreach grant program. Approximately a dozen high schools and 100 students attend each year. The program, which runs from 9:15 AM until 2:15 PM, includes an introduction to undergraduate degree programs in Mathematics, Statistics, Optics, Actuarial Science and Applied Physics, a group physics experiment/contest, brief talks over lunch by speakers from industry who have degrees in Math or Physics, and an afternoon seminar. Teachers earn Professional Development credit.

  9. Ultra-high throughput real-time instruments for capturing fast signals and rare events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Brandon Walter

    Wide-band signals play important roles in the most exciting areas of science, engineering, and medicine. To keep up with the demands of exploding internet traffic, modern data centers and communication networks are employing increasingly faster data rates. Wide-band techniques such as pulsed radar jamming and spread spectrum frequency hopping are used on the battlefield to wrestle control of the electromagnetic spectrum. Neurons communicate with each other using transient action potentials that last for only milliseconds at a time. And in the search for rare cells, biologists flow large populations of cells single file down microfluidic channels, interrogating them one-by-one, tens of thousands of times per second. Studying and enabling such high-speed phenomena pose enormous technical challenges. For one, parasitic capacitance inherent in analog electrical components limits their response time. Additionally, converting these fast analog signals to the digital domain requires enormous sampling speeds, which can lead to significant jitter and distortion. State-of-the-art imaging technologies, essential for studying biological dynamics and cells in flow, are limited in speed and sensitivity by finite charge transfer and read rates, and by the small numbers of photo-electrons accumulated in short integration times. And finally, ultra-high throughput real-time digital processing is required at the backend to analyze the streaming data. In this thesis, I discuss my work in developing real-time instruments, employing ultrafast optical techniques, which overcome some of these obstacles. In particular, I use broadband dispersive optics to slow down fast signals to speeds accessible to high-bit depth digitizers and signal processors. I also apply telecommunication multiplexing techniques to boost the speeds of confocal fluorescence microscopy. The photonic time stretcher (TiSER) uses dispersive Fourier transformation to slow down analog signals before digitization and

  10. BRCA and early events in the development of high grade serous ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia HL George

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Women who have an inherited mutation in the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes have a substantial increased lifetime risk of developing epithelial ovarian cancer, and epidemiological factors related to parity, ovulation and hormone regulation have a dramatic effect on the risk in both BRCA mutation carriers and non-carriers. The most common and most aggressive histotype of epithelial ovarian cancer, high-grade serous carcinoma, is also the histotype associated with germline BRCA mutations. In recent years, evidence has emerged indicating that the likely tissue of origin of high-grade serous carcinoma is the fallopian tube. We have reviewed what is known about the fallopian tube in BRCA mutation carriers at both the transcriptional and translational aspect of their biology. We propose that changes of the transcriptome in BRCA heterozygotes reflect an altered response to the ovulatory stresses from microenvironment, which may include the post-ovulation inflammatory response and altered reproductive hormone physiology.

  11. Can new heavy gauge bosons be observed in ultra-high energy cosmic neutrino events?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ježo, T.; Klasen, M.; Lyonnet, F.; Montanet, F.; Schienbein, I.; Tartare, M.

    2014-04-01

    A wide range of models beyond the Standard Model predict charged and neutral resonances, generically called W' and Z' bosons, respectively. In this paper we study the impact of such resonances on the deep inelastic scattering of ultra-high energy neutrinos as well as on the resonant charged current ν¯ee- scattering (Glashow resonance). We find that the effects of such resonances cannot be observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory or any foreseeable upgrade of it.

  12. High-content analysis of sequential events during the early phase of influenza A virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Indranil; Yamauchi, Yohei; Helenius, Ari; Horvath, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) represents a worldwide threat to public health by causing severe morbidity and mortality every year. Due to high mutation rate, new strains of IAV emerge frequently. These IAVs are often drug-resistant and require vaccine reformulation. A promising approach to circumvent this problem is to target host cell determinants crucial for IAV infection, but dispensable for the cell. Several RNAi-based screens have identified about one thousand cellular factors that promote IAV infection. However, systematic analyses to determine their specific functions are lacking. To address this issue, we developed quantitative, imaging-based assays to dissect seven consecutive steps in the early phases of IAV infection in tissue culture cells. The entry steps for which we developed the assays were: virus binding to the cell membrane, endocytosis, exposure to low pH in endocytic vacuoles, acid-activated fusion of viral envelope with the vacuolar membrane, nucleocapsid uncoating in the cytosol, nuclear import of viral ribonucleoproteins, and expression of the viral nucleoprotein. We adapted the assays to automated microscopy and optimized them for high-content screening. To quantify the image data, we performed both single and multi-parametric analyses, in combination with machine learning. By time-course experiments, we determined the optimal time points for each assay. Our quality control experiments showed that the assays were sufficiently robust for high-content analysis. The methods we describe in this study provide a powerful high-throughput platform to understand the host cell processes, which can eventually lead to the discovery of novel anti-pathogen strategies.

  13. Characterization of a high resolution and high sensitivity pre-clinical PET scanner with 3D event reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Rissi, M; Bolle, E; Dorholt, O; Hines, K E; Rohne, O; Skretting, A; Stapnes, S; Volgyes, D

    2012-01-01

    COMPET is a preclinical PET scanner aiming towards a high sensitivity, a high resolution and MRI compatibility by implementing a novel detector geometry. In this approach, long scintillating LYSO crystals are used to absorb the gamma-rays. To determine the point of interaction (P01) between gamma-ray and crystal, the light exiting the crystals on one of the long sides is collected with wavelength shifters (WLS) perpendicularly arranged to the crystals. This concept has two main advantages: (1) The parallax error is reduced to a minimum and is equal for the whole field of view (FOV). (2) The P01 and its energy deposit is known in all three dimension with a high resolution, allowing for the reconstruction of Compton scattered gamma-rays. Point (1) leads to a uniform point source resolution (PSR) distribution over the whole FOV, and also allows to place the detector close to the object being imaged. Both points (1) and (2) lead to an increased sensitivity and allow for both high resolution and sensitivity at the...

  14. Erratic pollination, high selfing levels and their correlates and consequences in an altitudinally widespread above-tree-line species in the high Andes of Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Mary T. K.; Muñoz, María S.; Henríquez, Carolina; Till-Bottraud, Irène; Pérez, Fernánda

    2006-09-01

    Unfavorable temperatures and weather conditions for biotic pollination in above-tree-line alpine habitats predict self-compatibility, high levels of autogamy and small flower size ("autogamy reproductive assurance hypothesis"), or alternatively, compensatory measures such as greater flower longevity and larger display size so as to capture scarce visits and maintain outcrossing ("increased pollination probability hypothesis"). We assess these possibilities in a fine-tuned study of Chaetanthera euphrasioides (Asteraceae) populations located above-tree-line in the Andes of central Chile, where prior, independently obtained information on community flower visitation rates is available. Visitation by flies and Andrenid bees was highly erratic in all populations and among years, and the rates well below the community averages. We found evidence for high levels of self-compatibility, equally high autogamous potential, low genetic diversity and high and similar F IS in all populations studied, associated with no clear trends in floral morphology. Strong decoupling of C. euphrasioides reproductive biology with community-level pollinator availability in the alpine fails to support either of the above-mentioned hypotheses and suggests early acquisition of autogamy with present-day pollinator conditions being adequate to maintain low visitation rates at all elevations. Our study provides the only instance where alternative hypotheses on alpine breeding systems have been tested with prior access to independently quantified community-level flower visitation rates.

  15. A new method of distinguishing models of the high-Q{sup 2} events at HERA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Z. [University of Oregon, Eugene (United States). Institute of Theoretical Science; He, X.G.; McKellar, B. [University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1997-07-01

    A new method is proposed to distinguish models for the high Q{sup 2} e{sup +}p {yields} e{sup +}X anomaly at HERA by looking at a new observable which is insensitive to parton distribution function (PDF), but sensitive to new physics. Three models have been considered: modification of PDF`s, new physics due to s-channel production of new particle and new physics due to contact interactions. Using this new method it is possible to distinguish different models with increased luminosity 11 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Uncertainty analysis of numerical model simulations and HFR measurements during high energy events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donncha, Fearghal O.; Ragnoli, Emanuele; Suits, Frank; Updyke, Teresa; Roarty, Hugh

    2013-04-01

    The identification and decomposition of sensor and model shortcomings is a fundamental component of any coastal monitoring and predictive system. In this research, numerical model simulations are combined with high-frequency radar (HFR) measurements to provide insights into the statistical accuracy of the remote sensing unit. A combination of classical tidal analysis and quantitative measures of correlation evaluate the performance of both across the bay. A network of high frequency radars is deployed within the Chesapeake study site, on the East coast of the United States, as a backbone component of the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS). This system provides real-time synoptic measurements of surface currents in the zonal and meridional direction at hourly intervals in areas where at least two stations overlap, and radial components elsewhere. In conjunction with this numerical simulations using EFDC (Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code), an advanced three-dimensional model, provide additional details on flows, encompassing both surface dynamics and volumetric transports, while eliminating certain fundamental error inherent in the HFR system such as geometric dilution of precision (GDOP) and range dependencies. The aim of this research is an uncertainty estimate of both these datasets allowing for a degree of inaccuracy in both. The analysis focuses on comparisons between both the vector and radial component of flows returned by the HFR relative to numerical predictions. The analysis provides insight into the reported accuracy of both the raw radial data and the post-processed vector current data computed from combining the radial data. Of interest is any loss of accuracy due to this post-processing. Linear regression techniques decompose the surface currents based on dominant flow processes (tide and wind); statistical analysis and cross-correlation techniques measure agreement between the processed signal and dominant forcing parameters. The tidal signal

  17. Safety and tolerability of ramipril 10 mg in patients at high risk of cardiovascular events: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathial, Manish

    2008-07-01

    To assess the safety and tolerability of ramipril 10 mg in patients at high risk of cardiovascular (CV) events by observing the levels of blood pressure (BP) and by recording the incidence of cough in these patients, a study was conducted in a total of 1048 patients who participated in the registry. Eligible patients in this prospective, observational, longitudinal, multicentre registry included all normotensives--including treated hypertensives--with BP risk reduction and had been prescribed by the treating physician. The primary outcome was the effect on BP at 8 weeks, and the secondary outcome was the incidence of cough at 8 weeks. Ramipril was initiated at 2.5 mg once daily (OD) for a week, followed by 5 mg OD for 3 weeks and was then increased to 10 mg OD. Data was analysed using ANOVA and Chi-square test. A total of 1,048 patients participated in this registry; 868 (82.82%) continued with the treatment till the end of the registry (ie, 8 weeks). At baseline, systolic BP was 130.10 +/- 5.38 mm Hg, while diastolic BP was 81.07 +/- 4.36 mm Hg. At 8 weeks, these values changed non-significantly to 123.41 +/- 6.33 mm Hg and 79.03 +/- 4.84 mm Hg, respectively. At week 1, 41 patients had cough, which increased non-significantly to 58 by week 8. Only 6 patients complained of severe cough at week 8, which did not lead to treatment discontinuation. Tolerability of the treatment was assessed to be 'excellent' or 'good' by 63.3% patients and 67% physicians. Treatment with ramipril 10 mg daily in patients with high risk of CV events and normal/ controlled BP produced neither a significant fall in BP nor significant adverse events in real-world clinical practice and was well tolerated.

  18. High School Pedagogy: The Influence of High School In-class Activities and Events On Introductory College Physics Success

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Brooke

    2014-01-01

    This study explores how students’ grades in introductory college physics are influenced by the pedagogy used in their high school physics classes. The success of college science professors is often judged on the basis of the success of their students. This disregards the 18+ years of experiences with which students come into their physics classroom. This study aims to answer the question of what pedagogy best prepares students for introductory college physics. This quantitative study an...

  19. Consequences of Delay in Postsecondary Education: Degree Attainment for 1972, 1980, and 1982 High School Graduates. E.D. TABS. National Longitudinal Study 1972. High School and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Eva; Schmitt, Carl

    This Department of Education (ED) Tabulation provides data in six tables on the effect of delay in entering postsecondary education (PE) on degree attainment for 1972, 1980, and 1982 high school graduates. The data compare the patterns of delay in PE among these three cohorts by pattern of enrollment, type of institution, and selected student…

  20. Patterns and Consequences of Delay in Postsecondary Education: 1972, 1980, and 1982 High School Graduates. Survey Report. National Longitudinal Study 1972. High School and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle, Eva; Schmitt, Carl

    Patterns of delay in entering 4-year, 2-year, and less-than-2-year postsecondary institutions (PIs) for 1972, 1980, and 1982 high school graduates are described. Two types of delay were studied: (1) delay in beginning at a particular type of institution, and (2) stopping out for a period before returning (i.e., leaving school for over 2 months or…

  1. Energy reconstruction of high energy muon and neutrino events in KM3NeT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drakopoulou Evangelia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available KM3NeT will be a European deep-sea infrastructure of neutrino telescopes covering a volume of several cubic kilometers in the Mediterranean Sea aiming to search for high energy neutrinos from galactic and extragalactic sources. This analysis focuses on muons coming from neutrino charged-current interactions. In large water Cherenkov detectors the reconstructed muon is used to approximate the neutrino direction and energy, thus providing information on the astrophysical neutrino source. Muon energy estimation is also critical for the differentiation of neutrinos originating from astrophysical sources from neutrinos generated in the atmosphere which constitute the detector background. We describe a method to determine the muon and neutrino energy employing a Neural Network. An energy resolution of approximately 0.27 has been achieved for muons at the TeV range.

  2. Detection and Analysis of High Ice Concentration Events and Supercooled Drizzle from IAGOS Commercial Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Martin; Baumgardner, Darrel; Lloyd, Gary; Beswick, Karl; Freer, Matt; Durant, Adam

    2016-04-01

    Hazardous encounters with high ice concentrations that lead to temperature and airspeed sensor measurement errors, as well as engine rollback and flameout, continue to pose serious problems for flight operations of commercial air carriers. Supercooled liquid droplets (SLD) are an additional hazard, especially for smaller commuter aircraft that do not have sufficient power to fly out of heavy icing conditions or heat to remove the ice. New regulations issued by the United States and European regulatory agencies are being implemented that will require aircraft below a certain weight class to carry sensors that will detect and warn of these types of icing conditions. Commercial aircraft do not currently carry standard sensors to detect the presence of ice crystals in high concentrations because they are typical found in sizes that are below the detection range of aircraft weather radar. Likewise, the sensors that are currently used to detect supercooled water do not respond well to drizzle-sized drops. Hence, there is a need for a sensor that can fill this measurement void. In addition, the forecast models that are used to predict regions of icing rely on pilot observations as the only means to validate the model products and currently there are no forecasts for the prevalence of high altitude ice crystals. Backscatter Cloud Probes (BCP) have been flying since 2011 under the IAGOS project on six Airbus commercial airliners operated by Lufthansa, Air France, China Air, Iberia and Cathay Pacific, and measure cloud droplets, ice crystals and aerosol particles larger than 5 μm. The BCP can detect these particles and measures an optical equivalent diameter (OED) but is not able to distinguish the type of particle, i.e. whether they are droplets, ice crystals, dust or ash. However, some qualification can be done based on measured temperature to discriminate between liquid water and ice. The next generation BCP (BCPD, Backscatter Cloud Probe with polarization detection) is

  3. An Efficient Decoder for the Recognition of Event-Related Potentials in High-Density MEG Recordings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Reichert

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Brain–computer interfacing (BCI is a promising technique for regaining communication and control in severely paralyzed people. Many BCI implementations are based on the recognition of task-specific event-related potentials (ERP such as P300 responses. However, because of the high signal-to-noise ratio in noninvasive brain recordings, reliable detection of single trial ERPs is challenging. Furthermore, the relevant signal is often heterogeneously distributed over several channels. In this paper, we introduce a new approach for recognizing a sequence of attended events from multi-channel brain recordings. The framework utilizes spatial filtering to reduce both noise and signal space considerably. We introduce different models that can be used to construct the spatial filter and evaluate the approach using magnetoencephalography (MEG data involving P300 responses, recorded during a BCI experiment. Compared to the accuracy achieved in the BCI experiment performed without spatial filtering, the recognition rate increased significantly to up to 95.3% on average (SD: 5.3%. In combination with the data-driven spatial filter construction we introduce here, our framework represents a powerful method to reliably recognize a sequence of brain potentials from high-density electrophysiological data, which could greatly improve the control of BCIs.

  4. Iron-nucleated folding of a metalloprotein in high urea: resolution of metal binding and protein folding events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morleo, Anna; Bonomi, Francesco; Iametti, Stefania; Huang, Victor W; Kurtz, Donald M

    2010-08-10

    Addition of iron salts to chaotrope-denatured aporubredoxin (apoRd) leads to nearly quantitative recovery of its single Fe(SCys)(4) site and native protein structure without significant dilution of the chaotrope. This "high-chaotrope" approach was used to examine iron binding and protein folding events using stopped-flow UV-vis absorption and CD spectroscopies. With a 100-fold molar excess of ferrous iron over denatured apoRd maintained in 5 M urea, the folded holoFe(III)Rd structure was recovered in >90% yield with a t(1/2) of Ser iron ligand variants support formation of an unfolded-Fe(SCys)(3) complex between steps 1 and 2, which we propose is the key nucleation event that pulls together distal regions of the protein chain. These results show that folding of chaotrope-denatured apoRd is iron-nucleated and driven by extraordinarily rapid formation of the Fe(SCys)(4) site from an essentially random coil apoprotein. This high-chaotrope, multispectroscopy approach could clarify folding pathways of other [M(SCys)(3)]- or [M(SCys)(4)]-containing proteins.

  5. A High-Efficiency Uneven Cluster Deployment Algorithm Based on Network Layered for Event Coverage in UWSNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanen Yu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Most existing deployment algorithms for event coverage in underwater wireless sensor networks (UWSNs usually do not consider that network communication has non-uniform characteristics on three-dimensional underwater environments. Such deployment algorithms ignore that the nodes are distributed at different depths and have different probabilities for data acquisition, thereby leading to imbalances in the overall network energy consumption, decreasing the network performance, and resulting in poor and unreliable late network operation. Therefore, in this study, we proposed an uneven cluster deployment algorithm based network layered for event coverage. First, according to the energy consumption requirement of the communication load at different depths of the underwater network, we obtained the expected value of deployment nodes and the distribution density of each layer network after theoretical analysis and deduction. Afterward, the network is divided into multilayers based on uneven clusters, and the heterogeneous communication radius of nodes can improve the network connectivity rate. The recovery strategy is used to balance the energy consumption of nodes in the cluster and can efficiently reconstruct the network topology, which ensures that the network has a high network coverage and connectivity rate in a long period of data acquisition. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm improves network reliability and prolongs network lifetime by significantly reducing the blind movement of overall network nodes while maintaining a high network coverage and connectivity rate.

  6. Changes in the frequency and return level of high ozone pollution events over the eastern United States following emission controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, H. E.; Fiore, A. M.; Polvani, L. M.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Fang, Y.

    2013-03-01

    In order to quantify the impact of recent efforts to abate surface ozone (O3) pollution, we analyze changes in the frequency and return level of summertime (JJA) high surface O3 events over the eastern United States (US) from 1988-1998 to 1999-2009. We apply methods from extreme value theory (EVT) to maximum daily 8-hour average ozone (MDA8 O3) observed by the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) and define O3 extremes as days on which MDA8 O3 exceeds a threshold of 75 ppb (MDA8 O3>75). Over the eastern US, we find that the number of summer days with MDA8 O3>75 declined on average by about a factor of two from 1988-1998 to 1999-2009. The applied generalized Pareto distribution (GPD) fits the high tail of MDA8 O3 much better than a Gaussian distribution and enables the derivation of probabilistic return levels (describing the probability of exceeding a value x within a time window T) for high O3 pollution events. This new approach confirms the significant decline in both frequency and magnitude of high O3 pollution events over the eastern US during recent years reported in prior studies. Our analysis of 1-yr and 5-yr return levels at each station demonstrates the strong impact of changes in air quality regulations and subsequent control measures (e.g., the ‘NOx SIP Call’), as the 5-yr return levels of the period 1999-2009 correspond roughly to the 1-yr return levels of the earlier time period (1988-1998). Regionally, the return levels dropped between 1988-1998 and 1999-2009 by about 8 ppb in the Mid-Atlantic (MA) and Great Lakes (GL) regions, while the strongest decline, about 13 ppb, is observed in the Northeast (NE) region. Nearly all stations (21 out of 23) have 1-yr return levels well below 100 ppb and 5-yr return levels well below 110 ppb in 1999-2009. Decreases in eastern US O3 pollution are largest after full implementation of the nitrogen oxide (NOx) reductions under the ‘NOx SIP Call’. We conclude that the application of EVT methods

  7. Consequences for selected high-elevation butterflies and moths from the spread of Pinus mugo into the alpine zone in the High Sudetes Mountains

    OpenAIRE

    Bílá, Karolína; Šipoš, Jan; Kindlmann, Pavel; Kuras, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Due to changes in the global climate, isolated alpine sites have become one of the most vulnerable habitats worldwide. The indigenous fauna in these habitats is threatened by an invasive species, dwarf pine (Pinus mugo), which is highly competitive and could be important in determining the composition of the invertebrate community. In this study, the association of species richness and abundance of butterflies with the extent of Pinus mugo cover at individual alpine sites was determined. Butt...

  8. High-latitude electromagnetic and particle energy flux during an event with sustained strongly northward IMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Korth

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a case study of a prolonged interval of strongly northward orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field on 16 July 2000, 16:00-19:00 UT to characterize the energy exchange between the magnetosphere and ionosphere for conditions associated with minimum solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. With reconnection occurring tailward of the cusp under northward IMF conditions, the reconnection dynamo should be separated from the viscous dynamo, presumably driven by the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH instability. Thus, these conditions are also ideal for evaluating the contribution of a viscous interaction to the coupling process. We derive the two-dimensional distribution of the Poynting vector radial component in the northern sunlit polar ionosphere from magnetic field observations by the constellation of Iridium satellites together with drift meter and magnetometer observations from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP F13 and F15 satellites. The electromagnetic energy flux is then compared with the particle energy flux obtained from auroral images taken by the far-ultraviolet (FUV instrument on the Imager for Magnetopause to Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE spacecraft. The electromagnetic energy input to the ionosphere of 51 GW calculated from the Iridium/DMSP observations is eight times larger than the 6 GW due to particle precipitation all poleward of 78° MLAT. This result indicates that the energy transport is significant, particularly as it is concentrated in a small region near the magnetic pole, even under conditions traditionally considered to be quiet and is dominated by the electromagnetic flux. We estimate the contributions of the high and mid-latitude dynamos to both the Birkeland currents and electric potentials finding that high-latitude reconnection accounts for 0.8 MA and 45kV while we attribute <0.2MA and ~5kV to an interaction at lower latitudes having the sense of a viscous interaction. Given that these

  9. Comparing Self-Regulation-Associated Event Related Potentials in Preschool Children with and without High Levels of Disruptive Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabell, Adam S; Olson, Sheryl L; Tardif, Twila; Thompson, Meaghan C; Gehring, William J

    2016-11-28

    Deficient self-regulation plays a key role in the etiology of early onset disruptive behavior disorders and signals risk for chronic psychopathology. However, to date, there has been no research comparing preschool children with and without high levels of disruptive behavior using Event Related Potentials (ERPs) associated with specific self-regulation sub-processes. We examined 15 preschool children with high levels of disruptive behavior (35 % female) and 20 peers with low disruptive behavior (50 % female) who completed a Go/No-go task that provided emotionally valenced feedback. We tested whether 4 ERP components: the Error Related Negativity, the Error Positivity, the Feedback Related Negativity, and the No-go N2, differed in preschool children with and without high levels of disruptive behavior. Preschoolers with high levels of disruptive behavior showed less differentiation between the Error Positivity and corresponding waveforms following correct responses at posterior sites. Preschoolers with high and low disruptive behavior also showed differences in Go/No-go N2 waveform amplitudes across electrodes. These findings suggest that preschool children with high levels of disruptive behavior may show abnormal brain activity during certain self-regulation sub-processes, informing potential advances in conceptualizing and treating early disruptive behavior.

  10. Multi-Agent System based Event-Triggered Hybrid Controls for High-Security Hybrid Energy Generation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dou, Chun-Xia; Yue, Dong; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes multi-agent system based event- triggered hybrid controls for guaranteeing energy supply of a hybrid energy generation system with high security. First, a mul-ti-agent system is constituted by an upper-level central coordi-nated control agent combined with several lower...... switching control, distributed dynamic regulation and coordinated switching con-trol are designed fully dependent on the hybrid behaviors of all distributed energy resources and the logical relationships be-tween them, and interact with each other by means of the mul-ti-agent system to form hierarchical......-level unit agents. Each lower-level unit agent is responsible for dealing with internal switching control and distributed dynamic regula-tion for its unit system. The upper-level agent implements coor-dinated switching control to guarantee the power supply of over-all system with high security. The internal...

  11. A Network QoS Framework for Real-time Event Systems in highly Mobile Ad-hoc Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Duran-Limon

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A new class of applications can now be envisaged with the emergence of both mobile ad hoc computing and ubiquitous computing, which imposes a number of new unsolved challenges. Examples of such applications include automatic car control systems and air traffic control systems. Applications of such kind have real-time constraints and are characterised by being highly mobile and proactive, i.e. able to operate without human intervention. Moreover, this kind of applications requires multiple-source multicasting. However, current approaches mainly focus on offering support for continuous flows in low mobile environments where single-source multicasting is assumed. In this paper, we present the QoSMMANET (QoS Management in Mobile Ad hoc Networks framework, which offers QoS support for real-time event systems in highly mobile ad hoc environments. Our approach is validated by a number of experiments carried out in the ns-2 network simulator.

  12. Implications of a electroweak triplet scalar leptoquark on the ultra-high energy neutrino events at IceCube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mileo, Nicolas [IFLP, CONICET - Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de La Plata,C.C. 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Puente, Alejandro de la [Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Physics, Carleton University,1125 Colonel By Drive, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 (Canada); Szynkman, Alejandro [IFLP, CONICET - Departamento de Física, Universidad Nacional de La Plata,C.C. 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2016-11-22

    We study the production of scalar leptoquarks at IceCube, in particular, a particle transforming as a triplet under the weak interaction. The existence of electroweak-triplet scalars is highly motivated by models of grand unification and also within radiative seesaw models for neutrino mass generation. In our framework, we extend the Standard Model by a single colored electroweak-triplet scalar leptoquark and analyze its implications on the excess of ultra-high energy neutrino events observed by the IceCube collaboration. We consider only couplings between the leptoquark to first generation of quarks and first and second generations of leptons, and carry out a statistical analysis to determine the parameters that best describe the IceCube data as well as set 95% CL upper bounds. We analyze whether this study is still consistent with most up-to-date LHC data and various low energy observables.

  13. Implications of a Electroweak Triplet Scalar Leptoquark on the Ultra-High Energy Neutrino Events at IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Mileo, Nicolas; Szynkman, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    We study the production of scalar leptoquarks at IceCube, in particular, a particle transforming as a triplet under the weak interaction. The existence of electroweak-triplet scalars is highly motivated by models of grand unification and also within radiative seesaw models for neutrino mass generation. In our framework, we extend the Standard Model by a single colored electroweak-triplet scalar leptoquark and analyze its implications on the excess of ultra-high energy neutrino events observed by the IceCube collaboration. We consider only couplings between the leptoquark to first generation leptons and quarks and carry out a statistical analysis to determine the parameters that best describe the IceCube data as well as set $95\\%$ CL upper bounds. We analyze whether this study is still consistent with most up-to-date LHC data and various low energy observables.

  14. Seismic Consequence Abstraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Gross

    2004-10-25

    The primary purpose of this model report is to develop abstractions for the response of engineered barrier system (EBS) components to seismic hazards at a geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and to define the methodology for using these abstractions in a seismic scenario class for the Total System Performance Assessment - License Application (TSPA-LA). A secondary purpose of this model report is to provide information for criticality studies related to seismic hazards. The seismic hazards addressed herein are vibratory ground motion, fault displacement, and rockfall due to ground motion. The EBS components are the drip shield, the waste package, and the fuel cladding. The requirements for development of the abstractions and the associated algorithms for the seismic scenario class are defined in ''Technical Work Plan For: Regulatory Integration Modeling of Drift Degradation, Waste Package and Drip Shield Vibratory Motion and Seismic Consequences'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171520]). The development of these abstractions will provide a more complete representation of flow into and transport from the EBS under disruptive events. The results from this development will also address portions of integrated subissue ENG2, Mechanical Disruption of Engineered Barriers, including the acceptance criteria for this subissue defined in Section 2.2.1.3.2.3 of the ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'' (NRC 2003 [DIRS 163274]).

  15. Consequences for selected high-elevation butterflies and moths from the spread of Pinus mugo into the alpine zone in the High Sudetes Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bílá, Karolína; Šipoš, Jan; Kindlmann, Pavel; Kuras, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Due to changes in the global climate, isolated alpine sites have become one of the most vulnerable habitats worldwide. The indigenous fauna in these habitats is threatened by an invasive species, dwarf pine (Pinus mugo), which is highly competitive and could be important in determining the composition of the invertebrate community. In this study, the association of species richness and abundance of butterflies with the extent of Pinus mugo cover at individual alpine sites was determined. Butterflies at alpine sites in the High Sudetes Mountains (Mts.) were sampled using Moericke yellow water traps. The results of a Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) indicated that at a local scale the area of alpine habitats is the main limiting factor for native species of alpine butterflies. Butterfly assemblages are associated with distance to the tree-line with the optimum situated in the lower forest zone. In addition the CCA revealed that biotic factors (i.e. Pinus mugo and alpine tundra vegetation) accounted for a significant amount of the variability in species data. Regionally, the CCA identified that the species composition of butterflies and moths is associated with presence and origin of Pinus mugo. Our study provides evidence that the structure of the Lepidopteran fauna that formed during the postglacial period and also the present composition of species assemblages is associated with the presence of Pinus mugo. With global warming, Pinus mugo has the potential to spread further into alpine areas and negatively affect the local species communities.

  16. Consequences for selected high-elevation butterflies and moths from the spread of Pinus mugo into the alpine zone in the High Sudetes Mountains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolína Bílá

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to changes in the global climate, isolated alpine sites have become one of the most vulnerable habitats worldwide. The indigenous fauna in these habitats is threatened by an invasive species, dwarf pine (Pinus mugo, which is highly competitive and could be important in determining the composition of the invertebrate community. In this study, the association of species richness and abundance of butterflies with the extent of Pinus mugo cover at individual alpine sites was determined. Butterflies at alpine sites in the High Sudetes Mountains (Mts. were sampled using Moericke yellow water traps. The results of a Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA indicated that at a local scale the area of alpine habitats is the main limiting factor for native species of alpine butterflies. Butterfly assemblages are associated with distance to the tree-line with the optimum situated in the lower forest zone. In addition the CCA revealed that biotic factors (i.e. Pinus mugo and alpine tundra vegetation accounted for a significant amount of the variability in species data. Regionally, the CCA identified that the species composition of butterflies and moths is associated with presence and origin of Pinus mugo. Our study provides evidence that the structure of the Lepidopteran fauna that formed during the postglacial period and also the present composition of species assemblages is associated with the presence of Pinus mugo. With global warming, Pinus mugo has the potential to spread further into alpine areas and negatively affect the local species communities.

  17. U-Pb SHRIMP zircon dating of high-grade rocks from the Upper Allochthonous Terrane of Bragança and Morais Massifs (NE Portugal); geodynamic consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateus, A.; Munhá, J.; Ribeiro, A.; Tassinari, C. C. G.; Sato, K.; Pereira, E.; Santos, J. F.

    2016-04-01

    Bragança and Morais Massifs are part of the mega-klippen ensemble of NW Iberia, comprising a tectonic pile of four allochthonous units stacked above the Central-Iberian Zone autochthon. On top of this pile, the Upper Allochthonous Terrane (UAT) includes different high-grade metamorphic series whose age and geodynamic meaning are controversial. Mafic granulites provided U-Pb zircon ages at 399 ± 7 Ma, dating the Variscan emplacement of UAT. In contrast, U-Pb zircon ages of ky- and hb-eclogites, felsic/intermediate HP/HT-granulites and orthogneisses (ca. 500-480 Ma) are identical to those of gabbros (488 ± 10 Ma) and Grt-pyroxenites (495 ± 8 Ma) belonging to a mafic/ultramafic igneous suite that records upper mantle melting and mafic magma crustal underplating at these times. Gabbros intrude the high-grade units of UAT and did not underwent the HP metamorphic event experienced by eclogites and granulites. These features and the zircon dates resemblance among different lithologies, suggest that extensive age resetting of older events may have been correlative with the igneous suite emplacement/crystallisation. Accordingly, reconciliation of structural, petrological and geochronological evidence implies that the development and early deformation of UAT high-grade rocks should be ascribed to an orogenic cycle prior to ≈ 500 Ma. Undisputable dating of this cycle is impossible, but the sporadic vestiges of Cadomian ages cannot be disregarded. The ca. 500-480 Ma time-window harmonises well with the Lower Palaeozoic continental rifting that trace the Variscan Wilson Cycle onset and the Rheic Ocean opening. Subsequent preservation of the high heat-flow regime, possibly related to the Palaeotethys back-arc basin development (ca. 450-420 Ma), would explain the 461 ± 10 Ma age yielded by some zircon domains in felsic granulites, conceivably reflecting zircon dissolution/recrystallisation till Ordovician times, long before the Variscan paroxysm (ca. 400-390 Ma). This

  18. Changes in Sea-Level Pressure over South Korea Associated with High-Speed Solar Wind Events

    CERN Document Server

    Cho, Il-Hyun; Marubashi, Katsuhide; Kim, Yeon-Han; Park, Young-Deuk; Chang, Heon-Young

    2011-01-01

    We explore a possibility that the daily sea-level pressure (SLP) over South Korea responds to the high-speed solar wind event. This is of interest in two aspects: First, if there is a statistical association this can be another piece of evidence showing that various meteorological observables indeed respond to variations in the interplanetary environment. Second, this can be a very crucial observational constraint since most models proposed so far are expected to preferentially work in higher latitude regions than the low latitude region studied here. We have examined daily solar wind speed ${\\rm V}$, daily SLP difference ${\\rm \\Delta SLP}$, and daily ${\\rm \\log(BV^{2})}$ using the superposed epoch analysis in which the key date is set such that the daily solar wind speed exceeds 800 ${\\rm kms^{-1}}$. We find that the daily ${\\rm \\Delta SLP}$ averaged out of 12 events reaches its peak at day +1 and gradually decreases back to its normal level. The amount of positive deviation of ${\\rm \\Delta SLP}$ is +2.5 hPa...

  19. Storm impacts on a high energy sandy beach system, northwest Ireland: short (event) to long term (decadal) behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisado-Pintado, Emilia; Jackson, Derek; Cooper, Andrew; O'Connor, Marianne

    2017-04-01

    Long-term monitoring of beach dynamics is an important element in risk prevention and management of both natural and human resources at the coast. The predicted intensification in storminess (frequency, duration and magnitude), partly associated with climate change, represents a pressing concern for coastal communities globally and has undoubtedly led to an improvement in available techniques and technologies for observation and analysis. Here we examine a high energy Atlantic beach system at Five Fingers strand (NW Ireland) to help understand hydrodynamic forcing on beach response under various wave energy scenarios. The system, which has been modally attuned to a large swell wave environment, periodically undergoes significant morphological changes over various spatial and temporal scales manifest in the development and movements of dynamic nearshore bars and a nearshore ebb-tide delta. A combination of field and laboratory techniques (GPS, Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) Instrumentation, Drone surveys) implemented from the shoreface to the beach, captures the response and evolution of the system over the short (event), medium (weeks to months) and long-term (multiyear) timescale. Numerical modelling of nearshore wave hydrodynamics (using SWAN wave simulation model) helps understanding wave forcing across shoreface area and is ran under a number of iterative time intervals. Here, we investigate the role of infrequent and sometimes extreme events in the system to understand the importance of clustering of storminess and the occurrence of single high-magnitude storm events that perturb the inlet-beach system and thus induce key morphodynamic changes. Preliminary results show that ultimately the configuration of the ebb-tide channel influences the geomorphic response of the system. In the short term, a storm induced erosion of the shoreface is observed, which also appears to lead to changes in the ebb-tide channel, and ultimately the welding of a nearshore bar

  20. Implications of Public Reporting of Risk-Adjusted Mortality Following Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: Misperceptions and Potential Consequences for High-Risk Patients Including Nonsurgical Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anuj; Yeh, Robert W; Tamis-Holland, Jacqueline E; Patel, Shalin H; Guyton, Robert A; Klein, Lloyd W; Rab, Tanveer; Kirtane, Ajay J

    2016-10-24

    Assessment of clinical outcomes such as 30-day mortality following coronary revascularization procedures has historically been used to spur quality improvement programs. Public reporting of risk-adjusted outcomes is already mandated in several states, and proposals to further expand public reporting have been put forward as a means of increasing transparency and potentially incentivizing high quality care. However, for public reporting of outcomes to be considered a useful surrogate of procedural quality of care, several prerequisites must be met. First, the reporting measure must be truly representative of the quality of the procedure itself, rather than be dominated by other underlying factors, such as the overall level of illness of a patient. Second, to foster comparisons among physicians and institutions, the metric requires accurate ascertainment of and adjustment for differences in patient risk profiles. This is particularly relevant for high-risk clinical patient scenarios. Finally, the potential deleterious consequences of public reporting of a quality metric should be considered prior to expanding the use of public reporting more broadly. In this viewpoint, the authors review in particular the characterization of high-risk patients currently treated by percutaneous coronary interventional procedures, assessing the adequacy of clinical risk models used in this population. They then expand upon the limitations of 30-day mortality as a quality metric for percutaneous coronary intervention, addressing the strengths and limitations of this metric, as well as offering suggestions to enhance its future use in public reporting. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Relationship of lipoproteins to cardiovascular events: the AIM-HIGH Trial (Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome With Low HDL/High Triglycerides and Impact on Global Health Outcomes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyton, John R; Slee, April E; Anderson, Todd; Fleg, Jerome L; Goldberg, Ronald B; Kashyap, Moti L; Marcovina, Santica M; Nash, Stephen D; O'Brien, Kevin D; Weintraub, William S; Xu, Ping; Zhao, Xue-Qiao; Boden, William E

    2013-10-22

    This study sought to examine the relationship between niacin treatment, lipoproteins, and cardiovascular (CV) outcomes in this secondary analysis of the AIM-HIGH (Atherothrombosis Intervention in Metabolic Syndrome With Low HDL/High Triglycerides and Impact on Global Health Outcomes) trial. During a 3-year follow-up in 3,414 patients with established CV disease and low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, combined niacin + low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)-lowering therapy did not reduce CV events compared with LDL-C-lowering therapy alone. Subjects taking simvastatin and/or ezetimibe were randomized to receive extended-release (ER) niacin 1,500 to 2,000 mg or minimal immediate-release niacin (≤ 150 mg) as placebo at bedtime. LDL-C levels in both groups were maintained from 40 to 80 mg/dl. Hazard ratios were estimated by using Cox proportional hazards models for relationships between lipoproteins and the composite endpoint of CV death, myocardial infarction, acute coronary syndrome, ischemic stroke, or symptom-driven revascularization. CV outcomes were not associated with ER niacin in any baseline lipoprotein tertile. In a subset of patients in both the highest triglyceride (≥ 198 mg/dl) and lowest HDL-C (<33 mg/dl) tertiles, ER niacin showed a trend toward benefit (hazard ratio: 0.74, p = 0.073). In-trial LDL-C levels, non-HDL-C levels, and the total cholesterol/HDL-C ratio were positively associated with CV events in the control group, but these relationships were absent in the ER niacin group. Baseline lipoprotein tertiles did not predict differential benefit or harm with ER niacin added to LDL-C-lowering therapy, but a small dyslipidemic subgroup may benefit. ER niacin attenuated expected relationships of lipoprotein risk factors with CV events, raising the possibility that nonlipoprotein actions of niacin could affect risk. (Niacin Plus Statin to Prevent Vascular Events [AIM-HIGH]; NCT00120289). Copyright © 2013 American College

  2. Combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging of cavitation events induced by short pulses of high-intensity ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gateau, Jérôme; Aubry, Jean-François; Pernot, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickaël

    2011-03-01

    The activation of natural gas nuclei to induce larger bubbles is possible using short ultrasonic excitations of high amplitude, and is required for ultrasound cavitation therapies. However, little is known about the distribution of nuclei in tissues. Therefore, the acoustic pressure level necessary to generate bubbles in a targeted zone and their exact location are currently difficult to predict. To monitor the initiation of cavitation activity, a novel all-ultrasound technique sensitive to single nucleation events is presented here. It is based on combined passive detection and ultrafast active imaging over a large volume using the same multi-element probe. Bubble nucleation was induced using a focused transducer (660 kHz, f-number = 1) driven by a high-power electric burst (up to 300 W) of one to two cycles. Detection was performed with a linear array (4 to 7 MHz) aligned with the single-element focal point. In vitro experiments in gelatin gel and muscular tissue are presented. The synchronized passive detection enabled radio-frequency data to be recorded, comprising high-frequency coherent wave fronts as signatures of the acoustic emissions linked to the activation of the nuclei. Active change detection images were obtained by subtracting echoes collected in the unnucleated medium. These indicated the appearance of stable cavitating regions. Because of the ultrafast frame rate, active detection occurred as quickly as 330 μs after the high-amplitude excitation and the dynamics of the induced regions were studied individually.

  3. Modern applications of high energy ion beams: From "single-event burnout" to human eye cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homeyer, H.; Mahnke, H.-E.

    1996-12-01

    Energetic ion beams, originally the domain of nuclear physics, become increasingly important tools in many other fields of research and development. The choice of ion species and ion energy allows an enormously wide variation of the penetration depth and of the amount of the electronic stopping power. These features are utilized to modify or damage materials and living tissues in a specific way. Materials modification with energetic ion beams is one of the central aims of research and development at the ion beam laboratory, ISL-Berlin, a center for ion-beam applications at the Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin. In particular, energetic protons will be used for eye cancer treatment. Selected topics such as the "single-event burnout" of high power diodes and the eye cancer therapy setup will be presented in detail.

  4. Projected changes in high ozone pollution events over the Eastern United States over the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Harald E.; Fiore, Arlene M.; Horrowitz, Larry W.; Naik, Vaishali

    2014-05-01

    Over the past few decades, thresholds for the United States (US) National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for ozone (O3), established to protect public health and welfare, have been lowered repeatedly. We recently applied methods from extreme value theory (EVT) to maximum daily 8-hour average ozone (MDA8 O3) observed by the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet) to quantify the significant decline in both frequency and magnitude of high O3 pollution events over the Eastern US from 1988 to 2009. These improvements to Eastern US air quality have been reported in prior studies and result from changes in air quality regulations and subsequent control measures (e.g., the "NOx SIP Call") as demonstrated by our analysis of 1-year and 5-year return levels. Here we extend this analysis to future projections of high O3 pollution events spanning the course of the 21st century. To this aim, we analyze simulations from the GFDL CM3 chemistry-climate model under selected Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios: RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 (representing a moderate and strong climate warming with a global mean temperature change by 2100 compared to present day of +2.3K and +4.5K, respectively). Under both scenarios, NOx emissions decrease by ~80% over North America by 2100 under the assumption of aggressive ozone pollution controls. A third scenario, termed RCP4.5_WMGG, in which well-mixed greenhouse gases follow the RCP4.5 scenario but O3 and aerosol precursor emissions are held at 2005 levels, enables us to isolate the role of climate change from that of emission reductions. As we find a positive bias in GFDL CM3 MDA8 O3 compared to the Eastern US CASTNet O3 measurements during summer (a common feature in the current generation of models), we develop a correction method based on quantile-mapping. This bias correction effectively removes the model bias while preserving the temporal changes in MDA8 O3 as simulated under different RCPs over the course of the 21st

  5. Early Holocene High Magnitude Debris Flow Events and Environmental Change as Illustrated by the Moxi Platform, Hengduan Mountains, SW China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Junyan; CHENG Genwei; LI Yongfei

    2006-01-01

    Thick debris flow deposits in the Hengduan Mountains of southwestern China record landscape instability at the close of the last glaciation and in the early Holocene. The deposits, ranging in thickness from 100 to 200 m, are common and in high magnitude in the valleys of this region. They are products of large debris flows induced by glacier and enabled by the presence of large amount of glacial debris on the landscape. The carbon 14 dating from Moxi Platform indicates that a period of catastrophic debris flows occurred at c. 7 kyr B.P., and was concurrent with other glacial-fluvial fans and terraces which tied to regional climatic oscillations elsewhere in the Himalaya. The comparable events suggest a strong climatic control on earth surface processes for the dynamics, magnitude, and frequency in this region.

  6. Evaluating the use of drone photogrammetry for measurement of stream channel morphology and response to high flow events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Katie; Ballow, William

    2015-04-01

    great promise for the drone photogrammetry methods, which encouraged the exploration of the possibility of repeat aerial surveys to evaluate channel response to high flow events. Repeat drone surveys were performed following a sequence of high-flow events in Proctor Creek to evaluate the possibility of using these methods for assessment of stream channel response to flooding.

  7. A comparison of NEXRAD WSR-88D rain estimates with gauge measurements for high and low reflectivity gradient precipitation events.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jendrowski, P.; Kelly, D. S.; Klazura, G. E.; Thomale, J. M.

    1999-04-14

    Rain gauge measurements were compared with radar-estimated storm total precipitation for 43 rain events that occurred at ten locations. Gauge-to-radar ratios (G/R) were computed for each case. The G/R ratio is strongly related to precipitation type, with the mean G/R slightly less than 1.00 for high-reflectivity gradient cases and greater than 2.00 (factor of 2 radar underestimation) for low-reflectivity gradient cases. both precipitation types indicated radar underestimate at the nearest ranges. However, the high-reflectivity gradient cases indicated radar overestimation at further ranges, while the low-reflectivity gradient cases indicated significant radar underestimation at all ranges. Occurrences of radar overestimates may have been related to high reflectivity returns from melting ice, bright-band effects in stratiform systems and hail from convective systems. Bright-band effects probably were responsible for improving the radar underestimates in the second range interval (50-99.9 km) for the low-reflectivity gradient cases. Other possibilities for radar overestimates are anomalous propagation (AP) of the radar beam. Smith, et al. (1996) concluded that bright band and AP lead to systematic overestimate of rainfall at intermediate ranges.

  8. High-sensitivity troponin T and cardiovascular events in systolic blood pressure categories: atherosclerosis risk in communities study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Yashashwi; Sun, Wensheng; de Lemos, James A; Taffet, George E; Virani, Salim S; Ndumele, Chiadi E; Mosley, Thomas H; Hoogeveen, Ron C; Coresh, Josef; Wright, Jacqueline D; Heiss, Gerardo; Boerwinkle, Eric A; Bozkurt, Biykem; Solomon, Scott D; Ballantyne, Christie M; Nambi, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Based on observational studies, there is a linear increase in cardiovascular risk with higher systolic blood pressure (SBP), yet clinical trials have not shown benefit across all SBP categories. We assessed whether troponin T measured using high-sensitivity assay was associated with cardiovascular disease within SBP categories in 11 191 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study participants. Rested sitting SBP by 10-mm Hg increments and troponin categories were identified. Incident heart failure hospitalization, coronary heart disease, and stroke were ascertained for a median of 12 years after excluding individuals with corresponding disease. Approximately 53% of each type of cardiovascular event occurred in individuals with SBPrisk compared with those with troponin T risk, particularly for heart failure. Individuals with lower SBP but measurable troponin T had greater cardiovascular risk compared with those with suboptimal SBP but undetectable troponin T. Future trials of systolic hypertension may benefit by using high-sensitivity troponin T to target high-risk patients. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Methods to improve and understand the sensitivity of high purity germanium detectors for searches of rare events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volynets, Oleksandr

    2012-07-27

    Observation of neutrinoless double beta-decay could answer fundamental questions on the nature of neutrinos. High purity germanium detectors are well suited to search for this rare process in germanium. Successful operation of such experiments requires a good understanding of the detectors and the sources of background. Possible background sources not considered before in the presently running GERDA high purity germanium detector experiment were studied. Pulse shape analysis using artificial neural networks was used to distinguish between signal-like and background-like events. Pulse shape simulation was used to investigate systematic effects influencing the efficiency of the method. Possibilities to localize the origin of unwanted radiation using Compton back-tracking in a granular detector system were examined. Systematic effects in high purity germanium detectors influencing their performance have been further investigated using segmented detectors. The behavior of the detector response at different operational temperatures was studied. The anisotropy effects due to the crystallographic structure of germanium were facilitated in a novel way to determine the orientation of the crystallographic axes.

  10. Search for high energy gamma-ray emission from tidal disruption events with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Peng, Feng-Kun; Wang, Xiang-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Massive black holes at galaxy center may tear apart a star when the star passes occasionally within the disruption radius, which is the so-called tidal disruption event(TDE