WorldWideScience

Sample records for high clouds typically

  1. High-velocity clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, BP; vanWoerden, H

    1997-01-01

    High-velocity clouds (HVCs) consist of neutral hydrogen (HI) at velocities incompatible with a simple model of differential galactic rotation; in practice one uses \\v(LSR)\\ greater than or equal to 90 km/s to define HVCs. This review describes the main features of the sky and velocity distributions,

  2. Highly Ionized Envelopes of High Velocity Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Zekis, Erin E

    2009-01-01

    We present recent results on highly ionized gas in Galactic High-Velocity Clouds (HVCs), originally surveyed in OVI (Sembach et al. 2003). In a new FUSE/HST survey of SiII/III/IV (Shull et al. 2009) toward 37 AGN, we detected SiIII (lambda 1206.500 A) absorption with a sky coverage fraction 81 +/- 5% (61 HVCs along 30 of 37 high-latitude sight lines). The SiIII (lambda 1206.500 A) line is typically 4-5 times stronger than OVI (lambda 1031.926 A). The mean HVC column density of perhaps 10^19 cm^-2 of low-metallicity (0.1 - 0.2 Z_sun) ionized gas in the low halo. Recent determinations of HVC distances allow us to estimate a total reservoir of ~10^8 M_sun. Estimates of infall velocities indicate an infall rate of around 1 M_sun yr^-1, comparable to the replenishment rate for star formation in the disk. HVCs appear to be sheathed by intermediate-temperature gas (10^4.0 - 10^4.5 K) detectable in SiIII and SiIV, as well as hotter gas seen in OVI and other high ions. To prepare for HST observations of 10 HVC-selecte...

  3. The formation process and cloud physical characteristics for a typical downburst-producing thunderstorm in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xueliang; FU Danhong

    2003-01-01

    The formation process and characteristics of cloud physical structure of a severe thunderstorm accompanied with strong wind on 23 August, 2001 in Beijing was studied using PSU/NCAR mesoscale model (MM5)coupling with a severe storm model with hail-bin microphysics. The results show that the specific topography and distribution features of cold/warm current in the Beijing region played prominent roles in forming, developing and maintaining the severe storm. Due to solar radiation heating and topographic lifting, the convective cells were easily formed when the westerly airflow passed over high mountainous regions in Beijing. The warm and wet air entered the cloud from its frontage and enhanced the convection, and formed a large amount of graupel/hail particles at the middle and upper portion of the clouds. The precipitation was primarily formed due to melting of graupel/hail particles. The strong downdraft was mainly produced by negative buoyancy due to loading,melting of graupel/hail particles as well as evaporative cooling of rain water. The divergent airflow induced by the strong downdraft led to the disastrous burst winds at the surface and also forced lifting of warm and wet airflow in the moving direction of the storm and formed new clouds that further promoted and maintained the storm development.

  4. Cloud Variations under Subtropical High Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Sha; LIU Qi; FU Yun-Fei

    2011-01-01

    The cloud variations under subtropical high (STH) conditions during summers over a ten-year period are studied using combined data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction. The results reveal that clouds mainly experience an isolated evolution in the STHs, which is designated in this study by the 1540 gpm geopotential lines at 850 hPa. In the STH domain throughout the Northern Hemisphere, the average amount of total clouds exceeds 30%. Low clouds dominate in the STH domain, contributing over 60% of total cloud amount within the Pacific subtropical high and over 40% within the Atlantic subtropical high. The prevalence of low clouds in above regions is determined by the circulation pattern around 150°-180°E and 850 hPa, which suppresses both the upward development of the cloud tops and the water vapor divergences near the surface. Furthermore, clouds present great geographical incoherence within the STH domain. In the eastern STHs, the amount of middle and low clouds increases to peak in the early morning and decreases to a trough in the afternoon, while the amount of high clouds remains stable throughout the day. Conversely, in the western STHs, the diurnal amplitude of low and middle clouds is less than three, while high clouds dramatically reach the maximum in the afternoon and drop to the minimum in the evening. Among the nine cloud categories, stratocumulus clouds with greater optical thickness account for the most under STH conditions, no matter their occurrence or amount, causing more shortwave cloud radiative forcing to cool the local atmosphere and surface as a consequence.

  5. High performance cloud auditing and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, Baek-Young; Song, Sejun

    2014-01-01

    This book mainly focuses on cloud security and high performance computing for cloud auditing. The book discusses emerging challenges and techniques developed for high performance semantic cloud auditing, and presents the state of the art in cloud auditing, computing and security techniques with focus on technical aspects and feasibility of auditing issues in federated cloud computing environments.   In summer 2011, the United States Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) CyberBAT Cloud Security and Auditing Team initiated the exploration of the cloud security challenges and future cloud auditing research directions that are covered in this book. This work was supported by the United States government funds from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), the AFOSR Summer Faculty Fellowship Program (SFFP), the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Visiting Faculty Research Program (VFRP), the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institute of Health (NIH). All chapters were partially suppor...

  6. Cloud Variations under Subtropical High Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The cloud variations under subtropical high(STH) conditions during summers over a ten-year period are studied using combined data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction.The results reveal that clouds mainly experience an isolated evolution in the STHs,which is designated in this study by the 1540 gpm geopotential lines at 850 hPa.In the STH domain throughout the Northern Hemisphere,the average amount of total clouds exceeds 30%.Low clouds dominate in the STH domain,contributing over 60%of total cloud amount within the Pacific subtropical high and over 40%within the Atlantic subtropical high.The prevalence of low clouds in above regions is determined by the circulation pattern around 150°-180°E and 850 hPa,which suppresses both the upward development of the cloud tops and the water vapor divergences near the surface.Furthermore,clouds present great geographical incoherence within the STH domain.In the eastern STHs,the amount of middle and low clouds increases to peak in the early morning and decreases to a trough in the afternoon,while the amount of high clouds remains stable throughout the day.Conversely,in the western STHs,the diurnal amplitude of low and middle clouds is less than three,while high clouds dramatically reach the maximum in the afternoon and drop to the minimum in the evening.Among the nine cloud categories,stratocumulus clouds with greater optical thickness account for the most under STH conditions,no matter their occurrence or amount,causing more shortwave cloud radiative forcing to cool the local atmosphere and surface as a consequence.

  7. The SDSS High Latitude Cloud Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGehee, P. M.

    2009-01-01

    The high latitude clouds (|b| > 30) are primarily translucent molecular clouds and diffuse Galactic cirrus with the majority of them seen at high latitude simply due to their proximity to the Sun. The rare exceptions are those, like the Draco and other intermediate or high velocity clouds, found significantly above or below the Galactic plane. To date, star formation has only been verified in MBM 12 and MBM 20, which are two of the densest high latitude molecular clouds. We present results from an ongoing study of high latitude clouds based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Two Micron All-Sky Survey (2MASS). This study consists of two major efforts, the first (described here) to provide a 3-D mapping of the interstellar dust using a color-excess technique, the second to identify candidate low-mass Classical T Tauri stars in the field.

  8. Protostar Formation in Magnetic Molecular Clouds beyond Ion Detachment: II. Typical Axisymmetric Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Tassis, K; Tassis, Konstantinos; Mouschovias, Telemachos Ch.

    2007-01-01

    We follow the ambipolar-diffusion--driven formation and evolution of a fragment in a magnetically supported molecular cloud, until a hydrostatic protostellar core forms at its center. This problem was formulated in Paper I. We determine the density, velocity and magnetic field as functions of space and time, and the contribution of ambipolar diffusion and Ohmic dissipation to the resolution of the magnetic flux problem of star formation. The issue of whether the magnetic field ever decouples from the (neutral) matter is also addressed. We also find that the electrons do not decouple from the field lines before thermal ionization becomes important and recouples the magnetic field to the neutral matter. Ohmic dissipation becomes more effective than ambipolar diffusion as a flux reduction mechanism only at the highest densities (a few times 10^12 particles per cubic cm). In the high-density central parts of the core, the magnetic field acquires an almost spatially uniform structure, with a value that, at the end...

  9. Typical Profiles and Distributions of Plasma and Magnetic Field Parameters in Magnetic Clouds at 1 AU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, L.; Masías-Meza, J. J.; Dasso, S.; Démoulin, P.; Zhukov, A. N.; Gulisano, A. M.; Mierla, M.; Kilpua, E.; West, M.; Lacatus, D.; Paraschiv, A.; Janvier, M.

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic clouds (MCs) are a subset of interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs). They are important because of their simple internal magnetic field configuration, which resembles a magnetic flux rope, and because they represent one of the most geoeffective types of solar transients. In this study, we analyze their internal structure using a superposed epoch method on 63 events observed at L1 by the Advance Composition Explorer (ACE), between 1998 and 2006. In this way, we obtain an average profile for each plasma and magnetic field parameter at each point of the cloud. Furthermore, we take a fixed time-window upstream and downstream from the MC to also sample the regions preceding the cloud and the wake trailing it. We then perform a detailed analysis of the internal characteristics of the clouds and their surrounding solar wind environments. We find that the parameters studied are compatible with log-normal distribution functions. The plasma β and the level of fluctuations in the magnetic field vector are the best parameters to define the boundaries of MCs. We find that one third of the events shows a peak in plasma density close to the trailing edge of the flux ropes. We provide several possible explanations for this result and investigate if the density peak is of a solar origin ( e.g. erupting prominence material) or formed during the magnetic cloud travel from the Sun to 1 AU. The most plausible explanation is the compression due to a fast overtaking flow, coming from a coronal hole located to the east of the solar source region of the magnetic cloud.

  10. High-energy radiation from the impact of high-velocity clouds on the galactic disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Ana Laura; Romero, Gustavo Esteban; del Valle, Maŕıa Victoria

    2017-01-01

    High-velocity clouds (HVCs) are HI clouds with velocities of more than 100 km s-1. These clouds do not partake of the differential Galactic rotation; a significant fraction of them are falling down towards the Galactic disk. The typical mass of these clouds is ˜ 104 M⊙, so in a collision with the disk energies of the order of ˜ 1051 erg can be released into the interstellar medium. Such collisions should produce strong shocks propagating through both the cloud and the disk. Under adequate conditions, these shocks can accelerate particles up to relativistic energies by Fermi mechanism. In this work, we study the hydrodynamical inter-actions and the relevant radiative processes (thermal and non-thermal) associated with HVC-disk collisions. We find that a shock propagating through a typical cloud should give rise to significant non-thermal radio emission, whereas the protons accelerated there diffuse and might emit elsewhere. A shock propagating through the disk, on the other hand, produces extended gamma-ray emission and injects protons with energies from 10 GeV to ˜1 TeV. Taking into account the injected mass rate of HI in our Galaxy by cloud bombardement, we found that ˜ 10 % of the Galactic cosmic ray power could be generated by these cloud-disk collisional events.

  11. Case study of the 9 April 2009 ‘brown’ cloud: Observations of usually high cloud droplet concentrations in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delene, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    Cloud droplets nucleate on aerosol particles termed cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). It is well known that a larger number concentration of CCN results in a larger number concentration of droplets in developing cumulus clouds. However, the conditions where dust particles can serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and hence change cloud droplet concentration and precipitation formation processes is uncertain. Aircraft measurements of cloud droplet concentration between 13:20 and 13:30 UTC during the 9 April 2009 flight near Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, show total cloud droplet concentration (3-50 µm in diameter) of 800 to 1200 #/cm-3 at a altitude of 18000 ft. Typical cloud droplet concentration for this type of cloud in the Riyadh region is approximately 400 #/cm-3 and is typical of observation made between 13:00 and 13:20 UTC during the 9 April 2009 flight at 18,000 ft. Photographs of ice accumulation on the unprotected leading edge of the aircraft’s wing due to the freezing of super cooled droplets show a color changed from white during the time of low droplet number condensation to brown during the high droplet number concentration. It is hypothesized that high droplet number concentration observations were the result of ingestion of a large about of dust particles by the cloud. : Case Study of the 9 April 2009 ‘Brown’ Cloud: Observations of Usually High Cloud Droplet Concentrations in Saudi Arabia.

  12. Developing cloud chambers with high school students

    CERN Document Server

    Ishizuka, Ryo; Sato, Shoma; Zeze, Syoji

    2013-01-01

    The result and outcome of the cloud chamber project, which aims to develop a cloud chamber useful for science education is reported in detail. A project includes both three high school students and a teacher as a part of Super Science High School (SSH) program in our school. We develop a dry ice free cloud chamber using salt and ice (or snow). Technical detail of the chamber is presented. We also argue how the project affects student's cognition, motivation, academic skills and behavior. The research project had been done in very similar way to those of professional researchers, i.e., planning research, applying fund, writing a paper and giving a talk in conferences. From interviews with students, we learn that such style of scientific activity is very effective in promoting student's motivation for learning science.

  13. Developing Cloud Chambers with High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizuka, Ryo; Tan, Nobuaki; Sato, Shoma; Zeze, Syoji

    The result and outcome of the cloud chamber project, which aims to develop a cloud chamber useful for science education is reported in detail. A project includes both three high school students and a teacher as a part of Super Science High School (SSH) program in our school. We develop a dry-ice-free cloud chamber using salt and ice (or snow). Technical details of the chamber are described. We also argue how the project have affected student's cognition, motivation, academic skills and behavior. The research project has taken steps of professional researchers, i.e., in planning research, applying fund, writing a paper and giving a talk in conferences. From interviews with students, we have learnt that such style of scientific activity is very effective in promoting student's motivation for learning science.

  14. Detecting Dark Matter in High Velocity Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, G F; Putman, M E; Lewis, Geraint F; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Putman, Mary E; Gibson, Brad C

    2000-01-01

    Many high velocity HI clouds (HVCs) are now believed to be scattered throughout the Galactic halo on scales of tens of kiloparsecs. Some of these clouds appear to contain substantial HI masses (>10^6 Msun). It has been suggested that these structures may be associated with dark matter `mini halos' accreting onto the Galactic halo. For a compact HVC along the sight line to a more distant galaxy, we demonstrate that `pixel gravitational lensing' provides a crucial test for the presence of a dark halo in the form of massive compact objects. The detection of pixel lensing will provide an independent means to map the mass distribution within HVCs.

  15. Turbulence in high latitude molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shore, S. N.; Larosa, T. N.; Magnani, L.; Chastain, R. J.; Costagliola, F.

    We summarize a continuing investigation of turbulence in high-latitude translucent molecular clouds. These low mass (~ 50 M(solar), nearby (~ 100 pc), non-star forming clouds appear to be condensing out of the atomic cirrus and must be forced by external dynamical processes, since they lack internal sources, for which we can distinguish the injection scale for the turbulence. We have now mapped three clouds -- MBM 3, MBM 16, and MBM 40 -- with high spatial (0.03 pc) and velocity resolution (<0.08 km/s) in 12CO(1-0) 13CO(1-0) (NRAO 12m and FCRAO). All three clouds show evidence for large-shear flows and we propose that the turbulent motions are powered by shear-flow instability. The densest gas is structured into filaments but the velocity profiles do not change in going across a filament indicating that shocks are not compressing the gas. The density field is more likely the result of thermal instability. The velocity-size relationship, a commonly used diagnostic of ISM turbulence, does not hold in these clouds: the linewidth does not increase with region size. The centroid velocity probability distribution function (PDF) is a more precise measure of turbulence. In these clouds the PDFs exhibit broad wings, consistent with a Lorentzian distribution and showing evidence non-Gaussian correlated processes. This is a clear signature of intermittency. We have also begun a mapping survey of CS (1-0), CS (2-1), H2CO, and HCO+ at Arecibo and OSO and willdiscuss results for the Polaris flare and L1512. We will also discusssome implications of these studies for the turbulent dissipation in these systems.

  16. High-Latitude Molecular Clouds as (Gamma)-ray Sources for GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, D F; Dame, T M; Digel, S W

    2005-01-05

    For about two decades, a population of relative small and nearby molecular clouds has been known to exist at high Galactic latitudes. Lying more than 10{sup o} from the Galactic plane, these clouds have typical distances of {approx}150 pc, angular sizes of {approx}1{sup o}, and masses of order tens of solar masses. These objects are passive sources of high-energy {gamma}-rays through cosmic ray-gas interactions. Using a new wide-angle CO survey of the northern sky, we show that typical high-latitude clouds are not bright enough in {gamma}-rays to have been detected by EGRET, but that of order 100 of them will be detectable by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on GLAST. Thus, we predict a new steady population of {gamma}-ray sources at high Galactic latitudes, perhaps the most numerous after active galactic nuclei.

  17. DISTRIBUTION AND ORIGIN OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS .3. CLOUDS, COMPLEXES AND POPULATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WAKKER, BP; VANWOERDEN, H

    1991-01-01

    We present the first complete catalogue of high-velocity clouds (HVCs), followed by a classification of these clouds into complexes and populations. The catalogue will form the basis for comparisons with theoretical models. The study described here yields the following conclusions: (1) Differential

  18. DISTRIBUTION AND ORIGIN OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS .3. CLOUDS, COMPLEXES AND POPULATIONS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WAKKER, BP; VANWOERDEN, H

    1991-01-01

    We present the first complete catalogue of high-velocity clouds (HVCs), followed by a classification of these clouds into complexes and populations. The catalogue will form the basis for comparisons with theoretical models. The study described here yields the following conclusions: (1) Differential

  19. ABOUT THE SUITABILITY OF CLOUDS IN HIGH-PERFORMANCE COMPUTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Richter

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing has become the ubiquitous computing and storage paradigm. It is also attractive for scientists, because they do not have to care any more for their own IT infrastructure, but can outsource it to a Cloud Service Provider of their choice. However, for the case of High-Performance Computing (HPC in a cloud, as it is needed in simulations or for Big Data analysis, things are getting more intricate, because HPC codes must stay highly efficient, even when executed by many virtual cores (vCPUs. Older clouds or new standard clouds can fulfil this only under special precautions, which are given in this article. The results can be extrapolated to other cloud OSes than OpenStack and to other codes than OpenFOAM, which were used as examples.

  20. High Pressure Angle Gears: Comparison to Typical Gear Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Zabrajsek, Andrew J.

    2010-01-01

    A preliminary study has been completed to determine the feasibility of using high-pressure angle gears in aeronautic and space applications. Tests were conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Spur Gear Test Facility at speeds up to 10,000 rpm and 73 N*m (648 in.*lb) for 3.18, 2.12, and 1.59 module gears (8, 12, and 16 diametral pitch gears), all designed to operate in the same test facility. The 3.18 module (8-diametral pitch), 28 tooth, 20deg pressure angle gears are the GRC baseline test specimen. Also, 2.12 module (12-diametral pitch), 42 tooth, 25deg pressure angle gears were tested. Finally 1.59 module (16-diametral pitch), 56 tooth, 35deg pressure angle gears were tested. The high-pressure angle gears were the most efficient when operated in the high-speed aerospace mode (10,000 rpm, lubricated with a synthetic turbine engine oil), and produced the lowest wear rates when tested with a perfluoroether-based grease. The grease tests were conducted at 150 rpm and 71 N*m (630 in.*lb).

  1. Electron clouds in high energy hadron accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrov, Fedor

    2013-08-29

    The formation of electron clouds in accelerators operating with positrons and positively charge ions is a well-known problem. Depending on the parameters of the beam the electron cloud manifests itself differently. In this thesis the electron cloud phenomenon is studied for the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) conditions, and for the heavy-ion synchrotron SIS-100 as a part of the FAIR complex in Darmstadt, Germany. Under the FAIR conditions the extensive use of slow extraction will be made. After the acceleration the beam will be debunched and continuously extracted to the experimental area. During this process, residual gas electrons can accumulate in the electric field of the beam. If this accumulation is not prevented, then at some point the beam can become unstable. Under the SPS and LHC conditions the beam is always bunched. The accumulation of electron cloud happens due to secondary electron emission. At the time when this thesis was being written the electron cloud was known to limit the maximum intensity of the two machines. During the operation with 25 ns bunch spacing, the electron cloud was causing significant beam quality deterioration. At moderate intensities below the instability threshold the electron cloud was responsible for the bunch energy loss. In the framework of this thesis it was found that the instability thresholds of the coasting beams with similar space charge tune shifts, emittances and energies are identical. First of their kind simulations of the effect of Coulomb collisions on electron cloud density in coasting beams were performed. It was found that for any hadron coasting beam one can choose vacuum conditions that will limit the accumulation of the electron cloud below the instability threshold. We call such conditions the ''good'' vacuum regime. In application to SIS-100 the design pressure 10{sup -12} mbar corresponds to the good vacuum regime. The transition to the bad vacuum

  2. Distances to galactic high-velocity clouds : Complex C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, B. P.; York, D. G.; Howk, J. C.; Barentine, J. C.; Wilhelm, R.; Peletier, R. F.; van Woerden, H.; Beers, T. C.; Ivezic, Z.; Richter, P.; Schwarz, U. J.

    2007-01-01

    We report the first determination of a distance bracket for the high- velocity cloud (HVC) complex C. Combined with previous measurements showing that this cloud has a metallicity of 0.15 times solar, these results provide ample evidence that complex C traces the continuing accretion of intergalacti

  3. Distances to galactic high-velocity clouds : Complex C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, B. P.; York, D. G.; Howk, J. C.; Barentine, J. C.; Wilhelm, R.; Peletier, R. F.; van Woerden, H.; Beers, T. C.; Ivezic, Z.; Richter, P.; Schwarz, U. J.

    2007-01-01

    We report the first determination of a distance bracket for the high- velocity cloud (HVC) complex C. Combined with previous measurements showing that this cloud has a metallicity of 0.15 times solar, these results provide ample evidence that complex C traces the continuing accretion of intergalacti

  4. Effect of cosmic ray on global high cloud from MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H.-S.; Choi, Y.-S.

    2012-04-01

    The Earth's climate is affected by not only internal forcings but also external forcings related with solar activities. The energetic particles called "cosmic rays" from outer space have been considered as a potentially important external climate forcing since the first report by Svensemark and Friis-Christensen (1997) which showed a significant correlation between cloudiness and cosmic ray. This correlation is a basis of a couple of hypotheses in microphysical processes: ion-aerosol clear-air mechanism and ion-aerosol near-cloud mechanism. These mechanisms have been either supported or objected by many successive studies, most of which correlated long-term trends of cloud and cosmic ray. However, it is most likely that such methodology is not suitable to find actual connection, because long-term trends of clouds may invite affection by many factors other than cosmic ray. It is therefore necessary to find the relation at shorter time scale, since cosmic ray affect the process of cloud formation in a moment. Here we show spatial distributions of correlation between global high cloud fraction data from MODIS and cosmic ray of neutron monitor data from McMurdo, Antarctic. We removed 3-month running means from the original data in order to get high frequency fluctuations. As results, positive correlations are dominant in the spatial distribution, especially over lands on the northern hemisphere and oceans on the Southern hemisphere. On the other hand, negative correlations exist over limited area including the Indian Ocean. According to the cross-correlation (with time lags), the areas with positive correlation is widely distributed at zero lag. At ±1 month lags, the signs of correlations become the opposite of that at zero lag. Furthermore, the correlation between relative high cloud amount to total cloud and cosmic ray shows similar distribution to the correlation between absolute high cloud amount and cosmic ray, implying stronger high cloud response to cosmic ray

  5. Bubble cloud dynamics in a high-pressure spherical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Phillip Andrew

    A bubble cloud is a population of bubbles confined to a region within a fluid. Bubble clouds play a large role in a variety of naturally occurring phenomena and man-made applications (e.g., ocean noise, cavitation damage, sonoluminescence, ultrasonic cleaning, drug delivery, lithotripsy). It is important, therefore, to understand the behavior of bubble clouds so that their effects may be enhanced or diminished as desired. This work explores and characterizes the properties of bubble clouds nucleated inside a high-pressure spherical acoustic resonator, in connection with recent interest in acoustic inertial confinement fusion (acoustic ICF). A laser system was developed to repeatably nucleate a cloud of bubbles inside the resonator. The resulting events were then observed, primarily with schlieren imaging methods. Preliminary studies of the bubble cloud dynamics showed the sensitivity of the initial cloud to nucleation parameters including the phase of nucleation, the laser energy, and the acoustic power. After many acoustic cycles, some bubble clouds are observed to evolve into a tight cluster. The formation of these clusters correlates with initial bubble distributions which have a large cloud interaction parameter, β. Cluster dynamics are seen to be largely driven by reconverging shock waves from previous collapses reflected from the resonator's interior surface. Initial expansion of the cluster boundary is on the order of 8 mm/µs and the maximum radius approaches 3 mm. Shock pressures are estimated to be > 10 GPa at a radius of 100 µm using weak shock theory.

  6. Spaceborne cloud-profiling radar: instrument parameter optimization for resolving highly layered cloud structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Chi; Tinel, Claire; Caillault, Karine; Testud, Jacques; Caubet, Eric

    2003-04-01

    EarthCARE, a candidate Earth Explorer Core mission of ESA, aims to improve our knowledge of the impact of clouds and aerosols on the Earth's radiative budget. The satellite will carry two nadir sounding active instruments: a Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) and a backscatter lidar. In addition, a multispectral cloud-imager, a Fourier transform spectrometer and a broadband radiometer complement the payload. The objective of the present study was to optimize the parameters of the CPR for retrieving accurate radiative profiles for highly layered cloud structures. Realistic cloud scenarios taken from ground-based experiments have been used for simulating the radar response to cloud layers. A radar simulator was developed initially for one-dimensional simulation of the radar echos. The cloud microphysical properties were retrieved using a model as a function of the reflectivity factor and temperature, based on information from in-situ measurements. An extensive parametric analysis was performed for various vertical resolutions and sensitivities which have direct impacts on the radar design and necessary resources on-board the satellite. The analysis demonstrated that the proposed radar characteristics will meet the top-of-the-atmosphere radiative flux density estimation accuracy of 10 W/m2 as recommended by WCRP.

  7. ELECTRON CLOUD EFFECTS IN HIGH INTENSITY PROTON ACCELERATORS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WEI,J.; MACEK,R.J.

    2002-04-14

    One of the primary concerns in the design and operation of high-intensity proton synchrotrons and accumulators is the electron cloud and associated beam loss and instabilities. Electron-cloud effects are observed at high-intensity proton machines like the Los Alamos National Laboratory's PSR and CERN's SPS, and investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the design of next-generation high-intensity proton accelerators like the Spallation Neutron Source ring, emphasis is made in minimizing electron production and in enhancing Landau damping. This paper reviews the present understanding of the electron-cloud effects and presents mitigation measures.

  8. The Open Cloud Testbed: A Wide Area Testbed for Cloud Computing Utilizing High Performance Network Services

    CERN Document Server

    Grossman, Robert; Sabala, Michal; Bennet, Collin; Seidman, Jonathan; Mambratti, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Recently, a number of cloud platforms and services have been developed for data intensive computing, including Hadoop, Sector, CloudStore (formerly KFS), HBase, and Thrift. In order to benchmark the performance of these systems, to investigate their interoperability, and to experiment with new services based on flexible compute node and network provisioning capabilities, we have designed and implemented a large scale testbed called the Open Cloud Testbed (OCT). Currently the OCT has 120 nodes in four data centers: Baltimore, Chicago (two locations), and San Diego. In contrast to other cloud testbeds, which are in small geographic areas and which are based on commodity Internet services, the OCT is a wide area testbed and the four data centers are connected with a high performance 10Gb/s network, based on a foundation of dedicated lightpaths. This testbed can address the requirements of extremely large data streams that challenge other types of distributed infrastructure. We have also developed several utiliti...

  9. Evaluation of Cloud Parameterizations in a High Resolution Atmospheric General Circulation Model Using ARM Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govindasamy, B; Duffy, P

    2002-04-12

    Typical state of the art atmospheric general circulation models used in climate change studies have horizontal resolution of approximately 300 km. As computing power increases, many climate modeling groups are working toward enhancing the resolution of global models. An important issue that arises when resolution of a model is changed is whether cloud and convective parameterizations, which were developed for use at coarser resolutions, will need to be reformulated or re-tuned. We propose to investigate this issue and specifically cloud statistics using ARM data. The data streams produced by highly instrumented sections of Cloud and Radiation Testbeds (CART) of ARM program will provide a significant aid in the evaluation of cloud and convection parameterization in high-resolution models. Recently, we have performed multiyear global-climate simulations at T170 and T239 resolutions, corresponding to grid cell sizes of 0.7{sup 0} and 0.5{sup 0} respectively, using the NCAR Community Climate Model. We have also a performed climate change simulation at T170. On the scales of a T42 grid cell (300 km) and larger, nearly all quantities we examined in T170 simulation agree better with observations in terms of spatial patterns than do results in a comparable simulation at T42. Increasing the resolution to T239 brings significant further improvement. At T239, the high-resolution model grid cells approach the dimensions of the highly instrumented sections of ARM Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites. We propose to form a cloud climatology using ARM data for its CART sites and evaluate cloud statistics of the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) at higher resolutions over those sites using this ARM cloud climatology. We will then modify the physical parameterizations of CAM for better agreement with ARM data. We will work closely with NCAR in modifying the parameters in cloud and convection parameterizations for the high-resolution model. Our proposal to evaluate the cloud

  10. Arecibo imaging of compact high-velocity clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Burton, W B; Chengalur, J N

    2001-01-01

    Ten isolated compact high-velocity clouds (CHVCs) of the type cataloged by Braun & Burton (1999) have been imaged with the Arecibo telescope and were found to have a nested core/halo morphology. We argue that a combination of high-resolution filled-aperture and synthesis data is crucial to determining the intrinsic properties of the CHVCs. We identify the halos as Warm Neutral Medium surrounding one or more cores in the Cool Neutral Medium phase. These halos are clearly detected and resolved by the Arecibo filled-aperture imaging, which reaches a limiting sensitivity (1 sigma) of N_H about 2x10^17 cm^-2 over the typical 70 km/s linewidth at zero intensity. The FWHM linewidth of the halo gas is found to be 25 km/s, consistent with a WNM thermal broadening within 10^4 K gas. Substantial asymmetries are found at high N_H (>10^18.5 cm^-2) levels in 60% of our sample. A high degree of reflection-symmetry is found at low N_H (<10^18.5 cm^-2) in all sources studied at these levels. The column-density profiles...

  11. Dynamical evolution of high velocity clouds in the intergalactic medium

    CERN Document Server

    Konz, C; Birk, G T

    2002-01-01

    HI observations of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) indicate, that they are interacting with their ambient medium. Even clouds located in the very outer Galactic halo or the intergalactic space seem to interact with their ambient medium. In this paper, we investigate the dynamical evolution of high velocity neutral gas clouds moving through a hot magnetized ambient plasma by means of two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic plasma-neutral gas simulations. This situation is representative for the fast moving dense neutral gas cloudlets in the Magellanic Stream as well as for high velocity clouds in general. The question on the dynamical and thermal stabilization of a cold dense neutral cloud in a hot thin ambient halo plasma is numerically investigated. The simulations show the formation of a comet-like head-tail structure combined with a magnetic barrier of increased field strength which exerts a stabilizing pressure on the cloud and hinders hot plasma from diffusing into the cloud. The simulations can explain both the...

  12. High CO depletion in southern infrared-dark clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Fontani, F; Beltran, M T; Dodson, R; Rioja, M; Brand, J; Caselli, P; Cesaroni, R

    2012-01-01

    Infrared-dark high-mass clumps are among the most promising objects to study the initial conditions of the formation process of high-mass stars and rich stellar clusters. In this work, we have observed the (3-2) rotational transition of C18O with the APEX telescope, and the (1,1) and (2,2) inversion transitions of NH3 with the Australia Telescope Compact Array in 21 infrared-dark clouds already mapped in the 1.2 mm continuum, with the aim of measuring basic chemical and physical parameters such as the CO depletion factor (fD), the gas kinetic temperature and the gas mass. In particular, the C18O (3-2) line allows us to derive fD in gas at densities higher than that traced by the (1-0) and (2-1) lines, typically used in previous works. We have detected NH3 and C18O in all targets. The clumps possess mass, H2 column and surface densities consistent with being potentially the birthplace of high-mass stars. We have measured fD in between 5 and 78, with a mean value of 32 and a median of 29. These values are, to o...

  13. Platform for High-Assurance Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Privacy-Preserving Smart Grid. ACM SIGOPS Operating Systems Review - Special Issue on Repeatability and Sharing of Experimental Artifacts. Vol. 49(1...22 12. Ken Birman and Heesung Sohn. Hosting Dynamic Data in the Cloud with Isis2 and the Ida DHT. In Proceedings of the First ACM SIGOPS...20. Haoyan Geng and Robbert van Renesse. Sprinkler -- Reliable Broadcast for Geographically Dispersed Datacenters. In Proceedings ACM /IFIP

  14. Star Formation and Molecular Clouds at High Galactic Latitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGehee, P. M.

    2008-12-01

    In this chapter we review the young stars and molecular clouds found at high Galactic latitudes (|b| ≥ 30°). These are mostly associated with two large-scale structures on the sky, the Gould Belt and the Taurus star formation region, and a handful of molecular clouds including MBM 12 and MBM 20 which, as a population, consist of the nearest star formation sites to our Sun. There are also a few young stars that are found in apparent isolation far from any molecular cloud. The high latitude clouds are primarily translucent molecular clouds and diffuse Galactic cirrus with the majority of them seen at high latitude simply due to their proximity to the Sun. The rare exceptions are those, like the Draco and other intermediate or high velocity clouds, found significantly above or below the Galactic plane. We review the processes that result in star formation within these low density and extraplanar environments as well as the mechanisms for production of isolated T Tauri stars. We present and discuss the known high-latitude stellar nurseries and young stellar objects.

  15. Star Formation and Molecular Clouds at High Galactic Latitude

    CERN Document Server

    McGehee, Peregrine M

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter we review the young stars and molecular clouds found at high Galactic latitudes $(|b| \\ge 30^\\circ)$. These are mostly associated with two large-scale structures on the sky, the Gould Belt and the Taurus star formation region, and a handful of molecular clouds including MBM 12 and MBM 20 which, as a population, consist of the nearest star formation sites to our Sun. There are also a few young stars that are found in apparent isolation far from any molecular cloud. The high latitude clouds are primarily translucent molecular clouds and diffuse Galactic cirrus with the majority of them seen at high latitude simply due to their proximity to the Sun. The rare exceptions are those, like the Draco and other intermediate or high velocity clouds, found significantly above or below the Galactic plane. We review the processes that result in star formation within these low density and extraplanar environments as well as the mechanisms for production of isolated T Tauri stars. We present and discuss the k...

  16. COLLISIONS BETWEEN DARK MATTER CONFINED HIGH VELOCITY CLOUDS AND MAGNETIZED GALACTIC DISKS: THE SMITH CLOUD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galyardt, Jason; Shelton, Robin L., E-mail: jeg@uga.edu, E-mail: rls@physast.uga.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602 (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Galaxy’s population of High Velocity Clouds (HVCs) may include a subpopulation that is confined by dark matter minihalos and falling toward the Galactic disk. We present the first magnetohydrodynamic simulational study of dark-matter-dominated HVCs colliding with a weakly magnetized galactic disk. Our HVCs have baryonic masses of 5 × 10{sup 6}M{sub ⊙} and dark matter minihalo masses of 0, 3 × 10{sup 8}, or 1 × 10{sup 9} M{sub ⊙}. They are modeled on the Smith Cloud, which is said to have collided with the disk 70 Myr ago. We find that, in all cases, the cloud’s collision with the galactic disk creates a hole in the disk, completely disperses the cloud, and forms a bubble-shaped structure on the far side of the disk. In contrast, when present, the dark matter minihalo continues unimpeded along its trajectory. Later, as the minihalo passes through the bubble structure and galactic halo, it accretes up to 6.0 × 10{sup 5} M{sub ⊙} in baryonic material, depending on the strengths of the magnetic field and minihalo gravity. These simulations suggest that if the Smith Cloud is associated with a dark matter minihalo and collided with the Galactic disk, the minihalo has accreted the observed gas. However, if the Smith Cloud is dark-matter-free, it is on its first approach toward the disk. These simulations also suggest that the dark matter is most concentrated either at the head of the cloud or near the cloud, depending upon the strength of the magnetic field, a point that could inform indirect dark matter searches.

  17. Towards Constraint-based High Performance Cloud System in the Process of Cloud Computing Adoption in an Organization

    CERN Document Server

    Simalango, Mikael Fernandus; Oh, Sangyoon

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing is penetrating into various domains and environments, from theoretical computer science to economy, from marketing hype to educational curriculum and from R&D lab to enterprise IT infrastructure. Yet, the currently developing state of cloud computing leaves several issues to address and also affects cloud computing adoption by organizations. In this paper, we explain how the transition into the cloud can occur in an organization and describe the mechanism for transforming legacy infrastructure into a virtual infrastructure-based cloud. We describe the state of the art of infrastructural cloud, which is essential in the decision making on cloud adoption, and highlight the challenges that can limit the scale and speed of the adoption. We then suggest a strategic framework for designing a high performance cloud system. This framework is applicable when transformation cloudbased deployment model collides with some constraints. We give an example of the implementation of the framework in a desi...

  18. Cloud CPFP: a shotgun proteomics data analysis pipeline using cloud and high performance computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudgian, David C; Mirzaei, Hamid

    2012-12-07

    We have extended the functionality of the Central Proteomics Facilities Pipeline (CPFP) to allow use of remote cloud and high performance computing (HPC) resources for shotgun proteomics data processing. CPFP has been modified to include modular local and remote scheduling for data processing jobs. The pipeline can now be run on a single PC or server, a local cluster, a remote HPC cluster, and/or the Amazon Web Services (AWS) cloud. We provide public images that allow easy deployment of CPFP in its entirety in the AWS cloud. This significantly reduces the effort necessary to use the software, and allows proteomics laboratories to pay for compute time ad hoc, rather than obtaining and maintaining expensive local server clusters. Alternatively the Amazon cloud can be used to increase the throughput of a local installation of CPFP as necessary. We demonstrate that cloud CPFP allows users to process data at higher speed than local installations but with similar cost and lower staff requirements. In addition to the computational improvements, the web interface to CPFP is simplified, and other functionalities are enhanced. The software is under active development at two leading institutions and continues to be released under an open-source license at http://cpfp.sourceforge.net.

  19. Smith's Cloud: A High-velocity Cloud Colliding with the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Lockman, Felix J; Heroux, A J; Langston, Glen I

    2008-01-01

    New 21cm HI observations made with the Green Bank Telescope show that the high-velocity cloud known as Smith's Cloud has a striking cometary appearance and many indications of interaction with the Galactic ISM. The velocities of interaction give a kinematic distance of 12.4 +/-1.3 kpc, consistent with the distance derived from other methods. The Cloud is >3 x 1 kpc in size and its tip at (l,b)=(39 deg,-13 deg) is 7.6 kpc from the Galactic center and 2.9 kpc below the Galactic plane. It has greater than 10^6 M solar masses in HI. Its leading section has a total space velocity near 300 km/s, is moving toward the Galactic plane with a velocity of 73+/-26 km/s, and is shedding material to the Galaxy. In the absence of drag the Cloud will cross the plane in about 27 Myr. Smith's Cloud may be an example of the accretion of gas by the Milky Way needed to explain certain persistent anomalies in Galactic chemical evolution.

  20. A high performance scientific cloud computing environment for materials simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Jorissen, Kevin; Rehr, John J

    2011-01-01

    We describe the development of a scientific cloud computing (SCC) platform that offers high performance computation capability. The platform consists of a scientific virtual machine prototype containing a UNIX operating system and several materials science codes, together with essential interface tools (an SCC toolset) that offers functionality comparable to local compute clusters. In particular, our SCC toolset provides automatic creation of virtual clusters for parallel computing, including tools for execution and monitoring performance, as well as efficient I/O utilities that enable seamless connections to and from the cloud. Our SCC platform is optimized for the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2). We present benchmarks for prototypical scientific applications and demonstrate performance comparable to local compute clusters. To facilitate code execution and provide user-friendly access, we have also integrated cloud computing capability in a JAVA-based GUI. Our SCC platform may be an alternative to traditi...

  1. Using Cloud Technology to Support Monitoring During High Profile Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Megan; Adighibe, Enyinnaya; Lombardo, Joseph; Loschen, Wayne; Stewart, Miles; Vernon, Michael O.

    2013-01-01

    Objective In May 2012, thousands of protesters, descended on Chicago during the NATO Summit to voice their concern about social and economic inequality. Given the increased numbers of international and domestic visitors to the Windy City and the tension surrounding protesting during the summit, increased monitoring for health events within the city and Chicago metropolitan region was advised. This project represents the first use of cloud technology to support monitoring for a high profile event. Introduction Hospital emergency departments in Cook and surrounding counties currently send data to the Cook County Department of Public Health (CCDPH) instance of ESSENCE on CCDPH servers. The cloud instance of ESSENCE has been enhanced to receive and export all meaningful use data elements in the meaningful use format. The NATO summit provided the opportunity for a demonstration project to assess the ability of an Amazon GovCloud instance of ESSENCE to ingest and process meaningful use data, and to export meaningful use surveillance data to the Cook County Locker in BioSense 2.0. Methods In the three weeks leading up to the NATO Summit, HL7 data extracts were sent to BioSense 2.0 and a data feed was established to the Amazon GovCloud instance of ESSENCE. Queries specific to anticipated health events associated with the summit such as injuries, tear gas exposure, and general exposure, were developed. Several features of the cloud instance of ESSENCE enhanced the ability of CCDPH staff epidemiologists to conduct analyses, including the sharing capabilities of queries and the myESSENCE dashboard feature. The sharing capabilities within the cloud instance of ESSENCE allowed queries to be easily shared with multiple staff epidemiologists and across health jurisdictions. The myESSENCE dashboard feature was used to create dashboards of surveillance results, including time series graphs, maps, and records of interest for relevant queries, that were shared with public health

  2. High-Resolution CH Observations of Two Translucent Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastain, Raymond J.; Cotten, David; Magnani, Loris

    2010-01-01

    We present high-resolution (1farcm3 × 1farcm6) observations of the CH 2Π1/2 (F = 1-1) emission line at 3335 MHz in two high-latitude translucent clouds, MBM 3 and 40. At the assumed cloud distances, the angular resolution corresponds to ~0.05 pc, nearly an order of magnitude better than previous studies. Comparisons of the CH emission with previously obtained CO(1-0) data are difficult to interpret: the CO and CH line emission correlates in MBM 40 but not in MBM 3. In both clouds, there is a spatial offset in the peak emission, and perhaps in velocity for MBM 40. The difference in emission characteristics for the two tracers are noticeable in these two nearby clouds because of the high spatial resolution. Since both CH and CO are deemed to be reliable tracers of H2, our results indicate that more care should be taken when using one of these tracers to determine the mass of a nearby molecular cloud.

  3. Global patterns of solar influence on high cloud cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, Mihai; Voiculescu, Mirela

    2016-07-01

    One of the main sources of uncertainty in climate projections is represented by clouds, which have a profound influence on the Earth's radiation budget through the feedbacks in which they are involved. The improvement of clouds representation in General Circulation Models relies largely on constraints derived from observations and on correct identification of processes that influence cloud formation or lifetime. Here we identify solar forced high cloud cover (HCC) patterns in reanalysis and observed data extending over the 1871-2009 period, based on their associations with known fingerprints of the same forcing on surface air temperature, sea surface temperature (SST) and sea level pressure fields. The solar influence on HCC has maximum amplitudes over the Pacific basin, where HCC anomalies are distributed in bands of alternating polarities. The colocation of the HCC and SST anomalies bands indicates a thermal influence on high clouds through convection and an amplification of the HCC anomalies by a positive feedback of long-wave fluxes, which increases the solar signal. Consistent with numerical simulations, the solar forced HCC pattern appears to be generated through a constructive interference between the so-called "top-down" and "bottom-up" mechanisms of solar influence on climate and is amplified by ocean-atmosphere positive feedbacks.

  4. Draco Nebula, a molecular cloud associated with a high velocity cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mebold, U.; Kalberla, P.W.M.

    1984-11-01

    Extended and very faint bright nebulae are found in high galactic latitudes at the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey. Such a nebula, located in the constellation Draco and called Draco Nebula or Dracula, was found to be in detailed positional coincidence with a 21 cm emission line feature. Estimates of the minimum visual extinction from star counts ON and OFF Dracula and an estimated visual surface brightness indicate that Dracula fits the relation SBV 24.2 - 2.5 log AV for dust clouds located above the galactic plane and reflecting the integrated starlight of the galactic disk. Hence Dracula is probably a reflection nebula. Indicators of molecular hydrogen in Dracula, molecules such as CO, were searched for by using a 2.5-m mm-telescope. Molecular hydrogen column densities were estimated. The dynamics of CO clumps was studied. Dracula has a close positional and possibly even astrophysical relationship to the high velocity cloud phenomenon.

  5. The Draco Nebula, a Molecular Cloud Associated with a High Velocity Cloud?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebold, U.; Kalberla, P. W. M.

    1984-01-01

    Extended and very faint bright nebulae are found in high galactic latitudes at the Palomar Observatory Sky Survey. Such a nebula, located in the constellation Draco and called Draco Nebula or Dracula, was found to be in detailed positional coincidence with a 21 cm emission line feature. Estimates of the minimum visual extinction from star counts ON and OFF Dracula and an estimated visual surface brightness indicate that Dracula fits the relation SBV = 24.2 - 2.5 log AV for dust clouds located above the galactic plane and reflecting the integrated starlight of the galactic disk. Hence Dracula is probably a reflection nebula. Indicators of molecular hydrogen in Dracula, molecules such as CO, were searched for by using a 2.5-m mm-telescope. Molecular hydrogen column densities were estimated. The dynamics of CO clumps was studied. Dracula has a close positional and possibly even astrophysical relationship to the high velocity cloud phenomenon.

  6. High lightning activity in maritime clouds near Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kucienska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lightning activity detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN over oceanic regions adjacent to Mexico is often as high as that observed over the continent. In order to explore the possible cause of the observed high flash density over those regions, the relationships between lightning, rainfall, vertical hydrometeor profiles, latent heating, wind variability and aerosol optical thickness are analyzed. The characteristics of lightning and precipitation over four oceanic zones adjacent to Mexican coastlines are contrasted against those over the continent. In addition, we compare two smaller regions over the Tropical Pacific Ocean: one located within the Inter-Tropical Converge Zone and characterized by high rainfall and weak lightning activity and the other influenced by a continental jet and presenting high rainfall and strong lightning activity over the Gulf of Tehuantepec. Maritime precipitating clouds that develop within the region influenced by offshore winds exhibit similar properties to continental clouds: large content of precipitation ice and an increased height range of coexistence of precipitation ice and cloud water. During the rainy season, monthly distribution of lightning within the region influenced by the continental jet is contrary to that of rainfall. Moreover, the monthly variability of lightning is very similar to the variability of the meridional wind component and it is also related to the variability of aerosol optical depth. The analysis strongly suggests that the high lightning activity observed over the Gulf of Tehuantepec is caused by continental cloud condensation nuclei advected over the ocean.

  7. Molecular cores of the high-latitude cloud MBM 40

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chol Minh, Y. C. Young; Kim, Hyun-Goo; Lee, Youngung; Park, Hyeran; Kim, Kwang-Tae; Park, Yong-Sun; Joon Kim, Sang

    2003-11-01

    Towards the high-latitude cloud MBM 40, we identify 3 dense molecular cores of M˜0.2-0.5 M ⊙, and sizes of ˜0.2 pc in diameter embedded in the H I cloud of ˜8 M ⊙ which is observed to be extended along the northeast-southwest direction. The molecular cloud is located almost perpendicularly to the H I emission. We confirm the previous result of Magnani et al. that MBM 40 is not a site for new star formations. We found a very poor correlation between the H I and the IRAS 100 μm emissions, but the CO (1-0) and 100 μm emissions show a better correlation of WCO/ I100=1±0.2 K km s -1 (MJy sr -1) -1. This ratio is larger by a factor of ≥5 than in dense dark clouds, which may indicate that the CO is less depleted in MBM 40 than in dense dark clouds.

  8. High-Performance Cloud Computing: A View of Scientific Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Vecchiola, Christian; Buyya, Rajkumar

    2009-01-01

    Scientific computing often requires the availability of a massive number of computers for performing large scale experiments. Traditionally, these needs have been addressed by using high-performance computing solutions and installed facilities such as clusters and super computers, which are difficult to setup, maintain, and operate. Cloud computing provides scientists with a completely new model of utilizing the computing infrastructure. Compute resources, storage resources, as well as applications, can be dynamically provisioned (and integrated within the existing infrastructure) on a pay per use basis. These resources can be released when they are no more needed. Such services are often offered within the context of a Service Level Agreement (SLA), which ensure the desired Quality of Service (QoS). Aneka, an enterprise Cloud computing solution, harnesses the power of compute resources by relying on private and public Clouds and delivers to users the desired QoS. Its flexible and service based infrastructure...

  9. Cloud detection method for Chinese moderate high resolution satellite imagery (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Bo; Chen, Wuhan; Wu, Shanlong; Liu, Qinhuo

    2016-10-01

    Cloud detection of satellite imagery is very important for quantitative remote sensing research and remote sensing applications. However, many satellite sensors don't have enough bands for a quick, accurate, and simple detection of clouds. Particularly, the newly launched moderate to high spatial resolution satellite sensors of China, such as the charge-coupled device on-board the Chinese Huan Jing 1 (HJ-1/CCD) and the wide field of view (WFV) sensor on-board the Gao Fen 1 (GF-1), only have four available bands including blue, green, red, and near infrared bands, which are far from the requirements of most could detection methods. In order to solve this problem, an improved and automated cloud detection method for Chinese satellite sensors called OCM (Object oriented Cloud and cloud-shadow Matching method) is presented in this paper. It firstly modified the Automatic Cloud Cover Assessment (ACCA) method, which was developed for Landsat-7 data, to get an initial cloud map. The modified ACCA method is mainly based on threshold and different threshold setting produces different cloud map. Subsequently, a strict threshold is used to produce a cloud map with high confidence and large amount of cloud omission and a loose threshold is used to produce a cloud map with low confidence and large amount of commission. Secondly, a corresponding cloud-shadow map is also produced using the threshold of near-infrared band. Thirdly, the cloud maps and cloud-shadow map are transferred to cloud objects and cloud-shadow objects. Cloud and cloud-shadow are usually in pairs; consequently, the final cloud and cloud-shadow maps are made based on the relationship between cloud and cloud-shadow objects. OCM method was tested using almost 200 HJ-1/CCD images across China and the overall accuracy of cloud detection is close to 90%.

  10. WESTERBORK OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS - THE DATA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WAKKER, BP

    1991-01-01

    The results of Westerbork * observations of small-scale structure in high-velocity clouds (HVCs) at 1' angular and 1 km s-1 velocity resolution are presented in the form of a table of observational parameters, maps of hydrogen column density, velocity-right ascension cuts, and histograms of the line

  11. WESTERBORK OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS - DISCUSSION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WAKKER, BP; SCHWARZ, UJ

    1991-01-01

    Six high-velocity cloud fields were observed with 1' and 1 km s-1 resolution, using the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The structures seen in earlier observations at 10' resolution break up into a disorderly collection of concentrations. The presence of much substructure has important implica

  12. Westerbork HI observations of two High-Velocity Clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoppelenburg, PS; Schwarz, UJ; van Woerden, H

    1998-01-01

    Westerbork HI synthesis observations are presented for the directions of the stars 4 Lac and HD 135485. Interstellar absorption lines at high velocities had been reported in the UV spectrum of 4 Lac, setting an upper limit of 1.2 kpc on the distance of the associated, small HI cloud (Bates et al. 19

  13. Lidar observations of high-altitude aerosol layers (cirrus clouds)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleva, Atanaska D.; Grigorov, Ivan V.

    2013-03-01

    Aerosols, clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions are recognized as the key factors influencing the climate. Clouds are the primary modulators of the Earth's radiative budget. This paper focuses on the detection of high-altitude aerosol layers in the troposphere over mid-latitude lidar station in Sofia, Bulgaria. They are situated in the height-region 6 km÷16 km, with thickness in the range 0.2 km÷5 km and have varying optical characteristics. On the basis of the general utilized classification of the Cirrus clouds, high values of the calculated atmospheric backscatter coefficient and Angströmexponent estimation results we conclude that the registered strongly scattered aerosol layers are Cirrus clouds. Lidar measurements are performed with an aerosol lidar, equipped with Nd:YAG laser at wavelengths 532 nm and 1064 nm. Mainly, lidar data are presented in terms of vertical atmospheric backscatter coefficient profiles. We also include 2Dcolormap in height-time coordinates build on the basis of so called range corrected signals. It shows in general changes of the aerosol stratification over the lidar station during the measurement period. We employed HYSPLIT backward trajectories and DREAM forecasts to analyze the lidar profile outlines and characterize the events during which Cirrus cloud samples were observed. So was remarked that most of the results were obtained during Saharan dust long-way transport over the city of Sofia. Reported experimental examples are extracted from regular lidar investigations of the atmosphere within the frame of European project EARLINET.

  14. The X-ray shadow of the high-latitude molecular cloud MBM 12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowden, S. L.; Mccammon, D.; Verter, F.

    1993-01-01

    ROSAT XRT/PSPC observations show a deep shadow cast by the high-latitude molecular cloud MBM 12 in the 3/4 keV diffuse background. Modeling of the shadow implies that less than 20 percent of the typical high-latitude 3/4 keV diffuse background intensity is emitted in front of the cloud (D = 60-70 pc). A weaker shadow consistent with the lower optical depth at higher energies was observed in the 1.5 keV band. Since little shadowing was seen in the 1/4 keV band, this observation places strong constraints on the amount of 0.5-2 keV emission that is intermixed with the source of the observed 1/4 keV flux.

  15. Are Compact High-Velocity Clouds Extragalactic Objects?

    CERN Document Server

    Maloney, P R; Maloney, Philip R.; Putman, Mary E.

    2003-01-01

    Compact high-velocity clouds (CHVCs) are the most distant of the HVCs in the Local Group model and would have HI volume densities of order 0.0003/cm^3. Clouds with these volume densities and the observed neutral hydrogen column densities will be largely ionized, even if exposed only to the extragalactic ionizing radiation field. Here we examine the implications of this process for models of CHVCs. We have modeled the ionization structure of spherical clouds (with and without dark matter halos) for a large range of densities and sizes, appropriate to CHVCs over the range of suggested distances, exposed to the extragalactic ionizing photon flux. Constant-density cloud models in which the CHVCs are at Local Group distances have total (ionized plus neutral) gas masses roughly 20-30 times larger than the neutral gas masses, implying that the gas mass alone of the observed population of CHVCs is about 40 billion solar masses. With a realistic (10:1) dark matter to gas mass ratio, the total mass in such CHVCs is a s...

  16. High temperature condensate clouds in super-hot Jupiter atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Wakeford, Hannah R; Lewis, Nikole K; Kataria, Tiffany; Marley, Mark S; Fortney, Jonathan J; Mandell, Avi M

    2016-01-01

    Deciphering the role of clouds is central to our understanding of exoplanet atmospheres, as they have a direct impact on the temperature and pressure structure, and observational properties of the planet. Super-hot Jupiters occupy a temperature regime similar to low mass M-dwarfs, where minimal cloud condensation is expected. However, observations of exoplanets such as WASP-12b (Teq ~ 2500 K) result in a transmission spectrum indicative of a cloudy atmosphere. We re-examine the temperature and pressure space occupied by these super-hot Jupiter atmospheres, to explore the role of the initial Al- and Ti-bearing condensates as the main source of cloud material. Due to the high temperatures a majority of the more common refractory material is not depleted into deeper layers and would remain in the vapor phase. The lack of depletion into deeper layers means that these materials with relatively low cloud masses can become significant absorbers in the upper atmosphere. We provide condensation curves for the initial ...

  17. Galactic fountains and their connection with high and intermediate velocity clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Spitoni, E; Matteucci, F

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to calculate the expansion law and chemical enrichment of a supershell powered by the energetic feedback of a typical Galactic OB association at various galactocentric radii. We study then the orbits of the fragments created when the supershell breaks out and we compare their kinetic and chemical properties with the available observations of high - and intermediate - velocity clouds. We use the Kompaneets (1960) approximation for the evolution of the superbubble driven by sequential supernova explosions and we compute the abundances of oxygen and iron residing in the thin cold supershell. We assume that supershells are fragmented by means of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and we follow the orbit of the clouds either ballistically or by means of a hybrid model considering viscous interaction between the clouds and the extra-planar gas.Given the self-similarity of the Kompaneets solutions, clouds are always formed ~ 448 pc above the plane. If the initial metallicity is solar, the polluti...

  18. Analysis of spatial inhomogeneities in cumulus clouds using high spatial resolution Landsat data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lindsay; Welch, R. M.; Musil, D. J.

    1986-01-01

    Aircraft observations and high resolution Landsat MSS digital data are used to determine the sizes of spatial inhomogeneities ('holes') in cumulus clouds. The majority of holes are found near cloud edges, but the larger holes tend to be found in cloud interiors. Aircraft measurements show these cloud spatial inhomogeneities in the range of 100 to 500 m, while Landsat data show them in the range of 100 m to 3 km. The number of holes per cloud decreases exponentially with increasing hole diameter. Small clouds not only have smaller holes, but also fewer holes than large clouds. Large clouds have large holes in them, as well as large numbers of the smaller holes. The total cloud area occupied by holes increases with increasing cloud size.

  19. High Performance Networks From Supercomputing to Cloud Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Abts, Dennis

    2011-01-01

    Datacenter networks provide the communication substrate for large parallel computer systems that form the ecosystem for high performance computing (HPC) systems and modern Internet applications. The design of new datacenter networks is motivated by an array of applications ranging from communication intensive climatology, complex material simulations and molecular dynamics to such Internet applications as Web search, language translation, collaborative Internet applications, streaming video and voice-over-IP. For both Supercomputing and Cloud Computing the network enables distributed applicati

  20. Entanglement typicality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlsten, Oscar C. O.; Lupo, Cosmo; Mancini, Stefano; Serafini, Alessio

    2014-09-01

    We provide a summary of both seminal and recent results on typical entanglement. By ‘typical’ values of entanglement, we refer here to values of entanglement quantifiers that (given a reasonable measure on the manifold of states) appear with arbitrarily high probability for quantum systems of sufficiently high dimensionality. We shall focus on pure states and work within the Haar measure framework for discrete quantum variables, where we report on results concerning the average von Neumann and linear entropies as well as arguments implying the typicality of such values in the asymptotic limit. We then proceed to discuss the generation of typical quantum states with random circuitry. Different phases of entanglement, and the connection between typical entanglement and thermodynamics are discussed. We also cover approaches to measures on the non-compact set of Gaussian states of continuous variable quantum systems.

  1. Star formation in a diffuse high-altitude cloud?

    CERN Document Server

    Kerp, J; Roehser, T

    2016-01-01

    A recent discovery of two stellar clusters associated with the diffuse high-latitude cloud HRK 81.4-77.8 has important implications for star formation in the Galactic halo. We derive a plausible distance estimate to HRK 81.4-77.8 primarily from its gaseous properties. We spatially correlate state-of-the-art HI, far-infrared and soft X-ray data to analyze the diffuse gas in the cloud. The absorption of the soft X-ray emission from the Galactic halo by HRK 81.4-77.8 is used to constrain the distance to the cloud. HRK 81.4-77.8 is most likely located at an altitude of about 400 pc within the disk-halo interface of the Milky Way Galaxy. The HI data discloses a disbalance in density and pressure between the warm and cold gaseous phases. Apparently, the cold gas is compressed by the warm medium. This disbalance might trigger the formation of molecular gas high above the Galactic plane on pc to sub-pc scales.

  2. Data Intensive High Energy Physics Analysis in a Distributed Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Sobie, R J; Anderson, M; Armstrong, P; Fransham, K; Gable, I; Harris, D; Leavett-Brown, C; Paterson, M; Penfold-Brown, D; Vliet, M; Charbonneau, A; Impey, R; Podaima, W

    2011-01-01

    We show that distributed Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) compute clouds can be effectively used for the analysis of high energy physics data. We have designed a distributed cloud system that works with any application using large input data sets requiring a high throughput computing environment. The system uses IaaS-enabled science and commercial clusters in Canada and the United States. We describe the process in which a user prepares an analysis virtual machine (VM) and submits batch jobs to a central scheduler. The system boots the user-specific VM on one of the IaaS clouds, runs the jobs and returns the output to the user. The user application accesses a central database for calibration data during the execution of the application. Similarly, the data is located in a central location and streamed by the running application. The system can easily run one hundred simultaneous jobs in an efficient manner and should scale to many hundreds and possibly thousands of user jobs.

  3. Typical characteristics of cloud manufacturing and several key issues of cloud service composition%云制造特征及云服务组合关键问题研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶飞; 张霖; 郭华; 罗永亮; 任磊

    2011-01-01

    In order to realize sharing and collaboration of manufacturing resources and manufacturing ability based on knowledge and to realize added value of manufacturing resource, through analyzing typical characteristics of Cloud Manufacturing(CMfg), relationships among resources, manufacturing cloud service and manufacturing cloud were discussed. Function structure of CMfg service management prototype system was designed. Requirements of Cloud Service Composition(CSC)in whole-lifecycle implementation of CMfg were studied. Several key issues for CSC, including modeling, description and consistency check, correlation relationship, composition flexibility, composition network as well as its dynamic characteristics, modeling & evaluation, and optimal-selection were studied in particular. It provided theoretical foundation for realizing effective and intelligent CMfg service management.%为实现基于知识的制造资源和制造能力的共享与协同,实现云制造系统中资源服务的增值和增效,在分析云制造典型特征后,对云制造中的资源、制造云服务、制造云的关系进行了阐述.在此基础上,设计了制造云服务管理原型系统功能结构,对基于云制造全生命周期运行的云服务组合需求进行r阐述.对云服务组合建模/描述和一致件检查、云服务关联关系、云服务组合柔性、组合网络及其动力学特性、云服务组合建模与评估、组合优选等实现云服务组合的关键问题进行了研究,为未来实现高效智能化的云制造服务管理提供理论支持.

  4. Implementasi Cloud Storage Menggunakan OwnCloud yang High-Availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhwan Ar-Razy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of practicum courses in Department of Computer Engineering Diponegoro University has some drawbacks, one of them is a lot of lab assistant and the practitioner experiencing difficulties in terms of archiving. One solution to solve the problem is implementing a shared file storage system that is easy and can be accessed by both practitioners or lab assistants. The purpose of this research is to build a cloud-based storage systems that are reliable to preventing crash damage hardware and high availability. The purpose of this research is achieved by designing the appropriate methodology. The result of this research is a storage system that is on the server side by using virtualization and data replication (DRBD as a storage method. The system is composed of two physical servers and one virtual server. Physical servers are using Proxmox VE as operating system and virtual server is using Ubuntu Server as operating system. OwnCloud applications and files are stored in the virtual server. File storage system has several major functions, which are: upload, download, user management, remove, and restore. The functions are executed through web pages, desktop application and Android application.

  5. HCN ice in Titan's high-altitude southern polar cloud

    CERN Document Server

    de Kok, Remco J; Maltagliati, Luca; Irwin, Patrick G J; Vinatier, Sandrine

    2014-01-01

    Titan's middle atmosphere is currently experiencing a rapid change of season after northern spring arrived in 2009. A large cloud was observed for the first time above Titan's southern pole in May 2012, at an altitude of 300 km. This altitude previously showed a temperature maximum and condensation was not expected for any of Titan's atmospheric gases. Here we show that this cloud is composed of micron-sized hydrogen cyanide (HCN) ice particles. The presence of HCN particles at this altitude, together with new temperature determinations from mid-infrared observations, indicate a very dramatic cooling of Titan's atmosphere inside the winter polar vortex in early 2012. Such a cooling is completely contrary to previously measured high-altitude warming in the polar vortex, and temperatures are a hundred degrees colder than predicted by circulation models. Besides elucidating the nature of Titan's mysterious polar cloud, these results thus show that post-equinox cooling at the winter pole is much more efficient th...

  6. The design of cloud workflow systems

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Gaofeng

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing is the latest market-oriented computing paradigm which brings software design and development into a new era characterized by ""XaaS"", i.e. everything as a service. Cloud workflows, as typical software applications in the cloud, are composed of a set of partially ordered cloud software services to achieve specific goals. However, due to the low QoS (quality of service) nature of the cloud environment, the design of workflow systems in the cloud becomes a challenging issue for the delivery of high quality cloud workflow applications. To address such an issue, this book presents

  7. Pattern recognition of typical defects in high-voltage storage capacitors based on DC partial discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU GuangNing; BIAN ShanShan; ZHOU LiRen; ZHANG XueQin; RAN HanZheng; YU ChengLong

    2009-01-01

    High-voltage storage capacitors(hereinafter call capacitors for short)have been widely used in pulsed power technology.In accordance with the actual work conditions of capacitors,direct current partial discharge(DCPD)detection was put forward.The whole test system was based on the impedance balance circuit characterized by good configuration and anti-interference ability.Through DCPD detection on capacitors which contained four typical defects respectively,test results revealed that DCPD signals could well reflect the state of capacitor insulation.DCPD distribution spectra of capacitors containing four typical defects were obviously different.Defects in capacitors could be exactly judged by computer-aided pattern recognition based on support vector machine(SVM).

  8. Pattern recognition of typical defects in high-voltage storage capacitors based on DC partial discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    High-voltage storage capacitors(hereinafter call capacitors for short)have been widely used in pulsed power technology.In accordance with the actual work conditions of capacitors,direct current partial discharge(DCPD)detection was put forward.The whole test system was based on the impedance balance circuit characterized by good configuration and anti-interference ability.Through DCPD detection on capacitors which contained four typical defects respectively,test results revealed that DCPD signals could well reflect the state of capacitor insulation.DCPD distribution spectra of capacitors containing four typical defects were obviously different.Defects in capacitors could be exactly judged by computer–aided pattern recognition based on support vector machine(SVM).

  9. MAGNETIC FIELDS IN HIGH-MASS INFRARED DARK CLOUDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, T.; Kauffmann, J. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Tan, J. C. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Goldsmith, P. F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Carey, S. J. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 314-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Menten, K. M., E-mail: tpillai.astro@gmail.com [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2015-01-20

    High-mass stars are cosmic engines known to dominate the energetics in the Milky Way and other galaxies. However, their formation is still not well understood. Massive, cold, dense clouds, often appearing as infrared dark clouds (IRDCs), are the nurseries of massive stars. No measurements of magnetic fields in IRDCs in a state prior to the onset of high-mass star formation (HMSF) have previously been available, and prevailing HMSF theories do not consider strong magnetic fields. Here, we report observations of magnetic fields in two of the most massive IRDCs in the Milky Way. We show that IRDCs G11.11–0.12 and G0.253+0.016 are strongly magnetized and that the strong magnetic field is as important as turbulence and gravity for HMSF. The main dense filament in G11.11–0.12 is perpendicular to the magnetic field, while the lower density filament merging onto the main filament is parallel to the magnetic field. The implied magnetic field is strong enough to suppress fragmentation sufficiently to allow HMSF. Other mechanisms reducing fragmentation, such as the entrapment of heating from young stars via high-mass surface densities, are not required to facilitate HMSF.

  10. Dense gas in high-latitude molecular clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reach, W.R.; Pound, M.W.; Wilner, D.J. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)); Lee, Y.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have surveyed high-latitude molecular clouds (MBM 12, 7, 55, 40) in spectral lines that are believed to be dense-gas' tracers due to the high H[sub 2] volume density required for collisional excitation. An extensive CS (2-1) line map of MBM 12 revealed emission that is not confined to clumps. Less than 20% of the integrated line emission from the cloud originates in clearly identified clumps with size between 0.2 pc and 0.02 pc in the integrated line map. The bulk of the emission originates from a relatively smooth horseshoe' structure about 0.1 pc wide and 1 pc long. The CS (2-1) map correlates with the published Bell Labs [sup 13] CO map, with significant [sup 13] CO emission even where the CS emission is undetectable. Within the central core, the C[sup 18]O(1-0) and CS(2-1) lines are positively correlated with significant scatter. There is some indication of higher CS/[sup 13]CO in the cores than the horseshoe'. The observed correlations suggest that both the diffuse CS and [sup 13]CO originate from either numerous, unresolved clumps, or the diffuse parts of the cloud. High-spatial-resolution observations of HCO[sup +] from MBM 12 obtained with the BIMA Hat Creek array demonstrated that the main core emission is primarily on spatial scales greater than 0.004 pc. It appears that the authors have resolved most of the spatial structure of the dense-gas' tracers and have found that the emission is primarily diffuse. To understand the excitation mechanism of the CS rotational levels, a multitransitional study of the 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2 lines is being performed. The CS excitation may be governed by electron collisions in regions with H[sub 2] column densities an order of magnitude lower than the critical density' of [approx gt] 2 [times] 10[sup 4] cm[sup -3]. If electron collisions are populating the CS levels, then the CS and [sup 13]CO lines can both be produced in the outer parts of the cloud, explaining their positive correlation

  11. Magnetic Fields in High-Mass Infrared Dark Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Pillai, Thushara; Tan, Jonathan; Goldsmith, Paul; Carey, Sean; Menten, Karl

    2014-01-01

    High-mass Stars are cosmic engines known to dominate the energetics in the Milky Way and other galaxies. However, their formation is still not well understood. Massive, cold, dense clouds, often appearing as Infrared Dark Clouds (IRDCs), are the nurseries of massive stars. No measurements of magnetic fields in IRDCs in a state prior to the onset of high-mass star formation (HMSF) have previously been available, and prevailing HMSF theories do not consider strong magnetic fields. Here, we report observations of magnetic fields in two of the most massive IRDCs in the Milky Way. We show that IRDCs G11.11-0.12 and G0.253+0.016 are strongly magnetized and that the strong magnetic field is as important as turbulence and gravity for HMSF. The main dense filament in G11.11-0.12 is perpendicular to the magnetic field, while the lower density filament merging onto the main filament is parallel to the magnetic field. The implied magnetic field is strong enough to suppress fragmentation sufficiently to allow HMSF. Other ...

  12. Ultra-Compact High Velocity Clouds as Minihalos and Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Faerman, Yakov; McKee, Christopher F

    2013-01-01

    We present dark-matter minihalo models for the Ultra-Compact High Velocity HI Clouds (UCHVCs) recently discovered in the 21 cm ALFALFA survey. We assume gravitational confinement of 10^4 K HI gas by flat-cored dark-matter subhalos within the Local Group. We show that for flat cores, typical (median) tidally-stripped cosmological subhalos at redshift z=0 have dark-matter masses of ~10^7 M_{sun} within the central 300 pc (independent of total halo mass), consistent with the "Strigari mass scale" observed in low-luminosity dwarf galaxies. Flat-cored subhalos also resolve the mass-discrepancy between simulated and observed satellites around the Milky Way. For the UCHVCs we calculate the photoionization-limited hydrostatic gas profiles for any distance-dependent total observed HI mass and predict the associated (projected) HI half-mass radii, assuming the clouds are embedded in distant (d > 300 kpc) and unstripped subhalos. For a typical UCHVC (0.9 Jy km/s) we predict physical HI half-mass radii of 0.18 to 0.35 kp...

  13. Greenhouse Gas Inventory of a Typical High-End Industrial Park in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Global climate change caused by greenhouse gas (GHG emissions, which severely limits the development of human society and threatens the survival of humanity, has drawn the international community's long-term attention. Gathering the most important production factors in the region, an industrial park usually represents the development level of specific industries in the region. Therefore, the industrial park should be regarded as the base unit for developing a low-carbon economy and reducing GHG emissions. Focusing on a typical high-end industrial park in Beijing, we analyze the carbon sources within the system boundary and probe into the emission structure in view of life-cycle analysis. A GHG inventory is thereby set up to calculate all GHG emissions from the concerned park. Based on the results, suggestions are presented to guide the low-carbon development of the high-end industrial park.

  14. Cloud geometry from high-resolution airborne solar spectral imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinner, Tobias; Schwarz, Ulrich; Kölling, Tobias; Höppler, Lucas; Mayer, Bernhard

    2017-04-01

    The spatial distribution of clouds is the most fundamental cloud characteristic. Before successive methods can provide any additional microphysical insight, the cloud geometry has to be identified. The cloud spatial distribution itself has an important effect on the radiation budget and its variability over a cloudy scene and can this way feed back on cloud dynamics. In addition to the impact on the cloud radiative effect, orientation of the cloud surface has an decisive effect on remote sensing of microphysical parameters of inhomogeneous clouds with passive sensors. It is found that knowledge of cloud geometry significantly reduces retrieval uncertainties. With the latter motivation in mind, we will present the derivation of cloud geometry from passive observations of solar radiation reflected by clouds. observations collected during the German HALO aircraft campaigns ACRIDICON in Brazil 2014 for cloud sides as well as nadir observations during the North Atlantic NARVAL-2 and NAWDEX 2016 campaigns are used. Measurements of spectral radiation around the oxygen-A band from the hyperspectral imager specMACS as well as stereographic data collected by a video camera are used. In the spectral method distance between sensor and cloud is derived using the fact that an increase in absorption path length is reflected by a deepening of the oxygen absorption band around 762 nm. Sensitivity of the depth of this absorption band to other parameters like the surface albedo, aerosol content or cloud density (LWC or extinction) is investigated and the related uncertainty is quantified. For validation, results of the spectral method are compared to results from stereographic methods based on visible imagery collected at the same time.

  15. High Velocity Cloud Edges and Mini-HVCs

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffman, G L; Salpeter, E E

    2002-01-01

    Arecibo mapping is reported of the neutral hydrogen distribution along selected directions out from the centers of two small High Velocity Clouds (HVC), W486 and W491. Both HVCs have a small inner region where the neutral hydrogen column density N_HI decreases slowly and a larger outer region where N_HI declines more rapidly, smoothly and exponentially from ~ 2 X 10^19 atoms cm^-2 down to < 10^18 atoms cm^-2. Line widths, and presumably temperature and turbulence, do not increase in the outermost regions. Therefore pressure decreases smoothly, making confinement by dark matter gravity more likely than confinement by external pressure. The more extended HVC, W491, has a superimposed small cloud (which we dub a ``mini-HVC''), offset by 66 km s^-1 in velocity along the line of sight with peak column density about 5 X 10^18 atoms cm^-2. Preliminary data toward future mapping of two more HVCs reveals two more mini-HVCs of similarly small size and central column density a bit less than 1 X 10^19 atoms cm^-2. We ...

  16. Observational evidence of high ice concentration in a shallow convective cloud embedded in stratiform cloud over North China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiefan; Lei, Hengchi; Hou, Tuanjie

    2017-04-01

    In this study we observed the microphysical properties, including the vertical and horizontal distributions of ice particles, liquid water content and ice habit, in different regions of a slightly supercooled stratiform cloud. Using aircraft instrument and radar data, the cloud top temperature was recorded as higher than -15°C, behind a cold front, on 9 September 2015 in North China. During the flight sampling, the high ice number concentration area was located in the supercooled part of a shallow convective cloud embedded in a stratiform cloud, where the ambient temperature was around -3°C. In this area, the maximum number concentrations of particles with diameter greater than 100 μm and 500 μm ( N 100 and N 500) exceeded 300 L-1 and 30 L-1, respectively, and were related to large supercooled water droplets with diameter greater than 24 μm derived from cloud-aerosol spectrometer probe measurements. The ice particles types in this region were predominantly columnar, needle, graupel, and some freezing drops, suggesting that the occurrence of high ice number concentrations was likely related to the Hallett-Mossop mechanism, although many other ice multiplication processes cannot be totally ruled out. The maximum ice number concentration obtained during the first penetration was around two to three orders of magnitude larger than that predicted by the Demott and Fletcher schemes when assuming the cloud top temperature was around -15°C. During the second penetration conducted within the stratiform cloud, N 100 and N 500 decreased by a factor of five to ten, and the presence of columnar and needle-like crystals became very rare.

  17. Two typical structure patterns in jammed monodisperse disk packings at high densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ye; Jin, Weiwei; Liu, Lufeng; Li, Shuixiang

    2016-11-01

    We generate a large number of monodisperse disk packings in two dimensions via geometric-based packing algorithms including the relaxation algorithm and the Torquato-Jiao algorithm. Using the geometric-structure approach, a clear boundary of the geometrical feasible region in the order map is found which quite differs from that of the jammed region. For a certain packing density higher than 0.83, the crystalline degree varies in different packing samples. We find that the local hexatic order may increase in two fairly different ways as the system densifies. Therefore, two typical non-equilibrium jammed patterns, termed polycrystal and distorted crystal, are defined at high packing densities. Furthermore, their responses to isotropic compression are investigated using a compression-relaxation molecular dynamic protocol. The distorted crystal pattern is more stable than the polycrystal one with smaller displacements despite its low occurrence frequency. The results are helpful in understanding the structure and phase transition of disk packings.

  18. Radiation properties and emissivity parameterization of high level thin clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M.-L. C.

    1984-01-01

    To parameterize emissivity of clouds at 11 microns, a study has been made in an effort to understand the radiation field of thin clouds. The contributions to the intensity and flux from different sources and through different physical processes are calculated by using the method of successive orders of scattering. The effective emissivity of thin clouds is decomposed into the effective absorption emissivity, effective scattering emissivity, and effective reflection emissivity. The effective absorption emissivity depends on the absorption and emission of the cloud; it is parameterized in terms of optical thickness. The effective scattering emissivity depends on the scattering properties of the cloud; it is parameterized in terms of optical thickness and single scattering albedo. The effective reflection emissivity follows the similarity relation as in the near infrared cases. This is parameterized in terms of the similarity parameter and optical thickness, as well as the temperature difference between the cloud and ground.

  19. A Cloud-Computing-Based Data Placement Strategy in High-Speed Railway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanning Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As an important component of China’s transportation data sharing system, high-speed railway data sharing is a typical application of data-intensive computing. Currently, most high-speed railway data is shared in cloud computing environment. Thus, there is an urgent need for an effective cloud-computing-based data placement strategy in high-speed railway. In this paper, a new data placement strategy named hierarchical structure data placement strategy is proposed. The proposed method combines the semidefinite programming algorithm with the dynamic interval mapping algorithm. The semi-definite programming algorithm is suitable for the placement of files with various replications, ensuring that different replications of a file are placed on different storage devices, while the dynamic interval mapping algorithm ensures better self-adaptability of the data storage system. A hierarchical data placement strategy is proposed for large-scale networks. In this paper, a new theoretical analysis is provided, which is put in comparison with several other previous data placement approaches, showing the efficacy of the new analysis in several experiments.

  20. The structure of the high-latitude molecular cloud toward HD 210121

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredel, Roland; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; de Vries, Cor P.; Black, John H.

    1992-04-01

    Optical absorption line observations and millimeter emission of the high-latitude cloud toward the star HD 21021 are reported. The cloud was mapped with the ESO submillimeter telescope. Maps of (C-12)O and (C-13)O emission are presented and the line profiles and velocity structure of the cloud are discussed. The optical absorption line observations allow an independent determination of the H2 column density along the line of sight. The molecular column densities found in this cloud were consistent with those measured in diffuse and translucent clouds. Attention is given to the physical and chemical properties of the cloud with reference to chemical models. Analysis indicates that small fluctuations in H2 column density and other factors can produce large variations of CO abundance and column density in clouds where carbon is just being transformed into CO.

  1. High Amplitude (delta)-Scutis in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, A; Cook, K H; Nikolaev, S; Huber, M E; Rest, A; Becker, A C; Challis, P; Clocchiatti, A; Miknaitis, G; Minniti, D; Morelli, L; Olsen, K; Prieto, J L; Suntzeff, N B; Welch, D L; Wood-Vasey, W M

    2010-01-25

    The authors present 2323 High-Amplitude {delta}-Scutis (HADS) candidates discovered in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) by the SuperMACHO survey (Rest et al. 2005). Frequency analyses of these candidates reveal that several are multimode pulsators, including 119 whose largest amplitude of pulsation is in the fundamental (F) mode and 19 whose largest amplitude of pulsation is in the first overtone (FO) mode. Using Fourier decomposition of the HADS light curves, they find that the period-luminosity (PL) relation defined by the FO pulsators does not show a clear separation from the PL-relation defined by the F pulsators. This differs from other instability strip pulsators such as type c RR Lyrae. They also present evidence for a larger amplitude, subluminous population of HADS similar to that observed in Fornax (Poretti et al. 2008).

  2. High Amplitude \\delta-Scutis in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Garg, A; Nikolaev, S; Huber, M E; Rest, A; Becker, A C; Challis, P; Clocchiatti, A; Miknaitis, G; Minniti, D; Morelli, L; Olsen, K; Prieto, J L; Suntzeff, N B; Welch, D L; Wood-Vasey, W M

    2010-01-01

    We present 2323 High-Amplitude \\delta-Scuti (HADS) candidates discovered in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) by the SuperMACHO survey (Rest et al. 2005). Frequency analyses of these candidates reveal that several are multimode pulsators, including 119 whose largest amplitude of pulsation is in the fundamental (F) mode and 19 whose largest amplitude of pulsation is in the first overtone (FO) mode. Using Fourier decomposition of the HADS light curves, we find that the period-luminosity (PL) relation defined by the FO pulsators does not show a clear separation from the PL-relation defined by the F pulsators. This differs from other instability strip pulsators such as type c RR Lyrae. We also present evidence for a larger amplitude, subluminous population of HADS similar to that observed in Fornax (Poretti et al. 2008).

  3. A ground-up approach to High Throughput Cloud Computing in High-Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00245123; Ganis, Gerardo; Bagnasco, Stefano

    The thesis explores various practical approaches in making existing High Throughput computing applications common in High Energy Physics work on cloud-provided resources, as well as opening the possibility for running new applications. The work is divided into two parts: firstly we describe the work done at the computing facility hosted by INFN Torino to entirely convert former Grid resources into cloud ones, eventually running Grid use cases on top along with many others in a more flexible way. Integration and conversion problems are duly described. The second part covers the development of solutions for automatizing the orchestration of cloud workers based on the load of a batch queue and the development of HEP applications based on ROOT's PROOF that can adapt at runtime to a changing number of workers.

  4. Cloud and Cloud Shadow Masking of High and Medium Resolution Optical Sensors- An Algorithm Inter-Comparison Example for Landsat 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, Carole; Stelzer, Kerstin; Brockmann, Carsten; Bertels, Luc; Pringle, Nicholas; Paperin, Michael; Danne, Olaf; Knaeps, Els; Ruddick, Kevin

    2016-08-01

    Image processing for satellite water quality products requires reliable cloud and cloud shadow detection and cloud classification before atmospheric correction. Within the FP7/HIGHROC ("HIGH spatial and temporal Resolution Ocean Colour") Project, it was necessary to improve cloud detection and the cloud classification algorithms for the spatial high resolution sensors, aiming at Sentinel 2 and using Landsat 8 as a precursor. We present a comparison of three different algorithms, AFAR developed by RBINS; ACCAm created by VITO, and IDEPIX developed by Brockmann Consult. We show image comparisons and the results of the comparison using a pixel identification database (PixBox); FMASK results are also presented as reference.

  5. Emotional expression of high school students with visual impairments and their typically developing peers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučinić Vesna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Emotions are adaptive reaction to events from the environment and they represent the central part of every person's life. Willing emotional expression influences people from the environment according to our expectations if they recognize our emotions. Studies on expressing emotions in persons with visual impairments indicate the existence of the same type of spontaneous emotional expressions as in typically developing population. Also, these studies point to difficulties in presenting willing emotional expressions. The aim of this research was to determine the difference in emotional expression between high school students with visual impairments and their typically developing peers. The sample consisted of 33 students with visual impairments and the same number of students with no developmental disabilities. Emotional states simulation scenario by Friedman et al. was used in this research. Emotional expression was assessed with regard to the level of success in simulating seven emotions (happiness, sadness, anger, disgust, surprise, fear, and neutral state. The participants' task was to simulate the given emotional states in three structured situations (uttering two sentences and a series of vowels. The simulation of emotions was recorded. On the basis of video recordings, three independent assessors measured the success in simulating emotions on a nine-point scale. By analyzing the obtained results, a statistically significant difference in emotional expression was determined between the participants with visual impairments and their peers with no developmental disabilities (F(1=3.692; p=0.05.Arithmetic mean differences are statistically significant for simulating disgust (p=0.002 and surprise (p=0.01. In the group of participants with visual impairments, gender was a significant factor in simulating the emotional state of happiness (p=0.024, while type of school was a significant factor in simulating sadness (p=0.027.

  6. Properties of High-Redshift Lyman Alpha Clouds II. Statistical Properties of the Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Press, W H; Press, William H.; Rybicki, George B.

    1993-01-01

    Curve of growth analysis, applied to the Lyman series absorption ratios deduced in our previous paper, yields a measurement of the logarithmic slope of distribution of \\Lya\\ clouds in column density $N$. The observed exponential distribution of the clouds' equivalent widths $W$ is then shown to require a broad distribution of velocity parameters $b$, extending up to 80 km s$^{-1}$. We show how the exponential itself emerges in a natural way. An absolute normalization for the differential distribution of cloud numbers in $z$, $N$, and $b$ is obtained. By detailed analysis of absorption fluctuations along the line of sight we are able to put upper limits on the cloud-cloud correlation function $\\xi$ on several megaparsec length scales. We show that observed $b$ values, if thermal, are incompatible, in several different ways, with the hypothesis of equilibrium heating and ionization by a background UV flux. Either a significant component of $b$ is due to bulk motion (which we argue against on several grounds), o...

  7. Assessing the Behavior of Typically Lithophile Elements Under Highly Reducing Conditions Relevant to the Planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Rick, II; Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Danielson, Lisa R.

    2017-01-01

    With the data returned from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission, there are now numerous constraints on the physical and chemical properties of Mercury, including its surface composition (e.g., Evans et al. 2012; Nittler et al. 201 l; Peplowski et al. 2012; Weider et al. 2012). The high Sand low FeO contents observed from MESSENGER on the planet's surface suggests a low oxygen fugacity of the present planetary materials. Estimates of the oxygen fugacity for Mercurian magmas are approximately 3- 7 log units below the Iron-Wiistite (Fe-FeO) oxygen buffer (McCubbin et al. 2012; Zolotov et al. 2013), several orders of magnitude more reducing than other terrestrial bodies we have data from such as the Earth, Moon, or Mars (Herd 2008; Sharp, McCubbin, and Shearer 2013; Wadhwa 2008). Most of our understanding of elemental partitioning behavior comes from observations made on terrestrial rocks, but Mercury's oxygen fugacity is far outside the conditions of those samples. With limited oxygen available, lithophile elements may instead exhibit chalcophile, halophile, or siderophile behaviors. Furthermore, very few natural samples of rocks that formed under reducing conditions are available in our collections (e.g., enstatite chondrites, achondrites, aubrites). The goal of this study is to conduct experiments at high pressure and temperature conditions to determine the elemental partitioning behavior of typically lithophile elements as a function of decreasing oxygen fugacity.

  8. The space density of primordial gas clouds near galaxies and groups and their relation to galactic high-velocity clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, MA; Briggs, FH

    2000-01-01

    The Arecibo H I Strip Survey probed the halos of similar to 300 cataloged galaxies and the environments of similar to 14 groups with sensitivity to neutral hydrogen masses greater than or equal to 10(7) M-circle dot. The survey detected no objects with properties resembling the high-velocity clouds

  9. Architecture & Design of Affordable and Highly Available Enterprise Cloud Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabi Prasad Padhy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a way to increase capacity or add capabilities on the fly without investing in additional infrastructure, licensing additional software or training new personnel. Enterprises must embrace this bleeding edge real-time business model in order to compete in the current marketplace. Deployment of enterprise applications in public cloud can reduce investment on IT infrastructure both in terms of hardware and software, whenever new services are to be provisioned. Furthermore, cloud services are quite attractive to business because of its dynamic scalability, privacy, performance and ability to handle heterogeneous environments. Instead of spending a lot of time in figuring out server setup and working on routers, it is judicious to subscribe cloud based 24/7 support and affordable services. It’s an extremely important consideration to subscribe to at least two cloud vendors for smooth running of applications and ensure application availability by switching from one provider to another with minimal management effort. In this article we have proposed an architecture and design of a cost affordable online enterprise cloud application that subscribes to two public cloud vendors with respect to cost and availability parameters. We also present the reasons for the current trend of enterprises moving towards 24/7 online business cloud services.

  10. A cloud mask methodology for high resolution remote sensing data combining information from high and medium resolution optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedano, Fernando; Kempeneers, Pieter; Strobl, Peter; Kucera, Jan; Vogt, Peter; Seebach, Lucia; San-Miguel-Ayanz, Jesús

    2011-09-01

    This study presents a novel cloud masking approach for high resolution remote sensing images in the context of land cover mapping. As an advantage to traditional methods, the approach does not rely on thermal bands and it is applicable to images from most high resolution earth observation remote sensing sensors. The methodology couples pixel-based seed identification and object-based region growing. The seed identification stage relies on pixel value comparison between high resolution images and cloud free composites at lower spatial resolution from almost simultaneously acquired dates. The methodology was tested taking SPOT4-HRVIR, SPOT5-HRG and IRS-LISS III as high resolution images and cloud free MODIS composites as reference images. The selected scenes included a wide range of cloud types and surface features. The resulting cloud masks were evaluated through visual comparison. They were also compared with ad-hoc independently generated cloud masks and with the automatic cloud cover assessment algorithm (ACCA). In general the results showed an agreement in detected clouds higher than 95% for clouds larger than 50 ha. The approach produced consistent results identifying and mapping clouds of different type and size over various land surfaces including natural vegetation, agriculture land, built-up areas, water bodies and snow.

  11. Final Report for "Modeling Electron Cloud Diagnostics for High-Intensity Proton Accelerators"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seth A Veitzer

    2009-09-25

    Electron clouds in accelerators such as the ILC degrade beam quality and limit operating efficiency. The need to mitigate electron clouds has a direct impact on the design and operation of these accelerators, translating into increased cost and reduced performance. Diagnostic techniques for measuring electron clouds in accelerating cavities are needed to provide an assessment of electron cloud evolution and mitigation. Accurate numerical modeling of these diagnostics is needed to validate the experimental techniques. In this Phase I, we developed detailed numerical models of microwave propagation through electron clouds in accelerating cavities with geometries relevant to existing and future high-intensity proton accelerators such as Project X and the ILC. Our numerical techniques and simulation results from the Phase I showed that there was a high probability of success in measuring both the evolution of electron clouds and the effects of non-uniform electron density distributions in Phase II.

  12. RAPPORT: running scientific high-performance computing applications on the cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jeremy; Filippis, Ioannis; Woodbridge, Mark; Bauer, Daniela; Hong, Neil Chue; Jackson, Mike; Butcher, Sarah; Colling, David; Darlington, John; Fuchs, Brian; Harvey, Matt

    2013-01-28

    Cloud computing infrastructure is now widely used in many domains, but one area where there has been more limited adoption is research computing, in particular for running scientific high-performance computing (HPC) software. The Robust Application Porting for HPC in the Cloud (RAPPORT) project took advantage of existing links between computing researchers and application scientists in the fields of bioinformatics, high-energy physics (HEP) and digital humanities, to investigate running a set of scientific HPC applications from these domains on cloud infrastructure. In this paper, we focus on the bioinformatics and HEP domains, describing the applications and target cloud platforms. We conclude that, while there are many factors that need consideration, there is no fundamental impediment to the use of cloud infrastructure for running many types of HPC applications and, in some cases, there is potential for researchers to benefit significantly from the flexibility offered by cloud platforms.

  13. High Vertically Resolved Atmospheric and Surface/Cloud Parameters Retrieved with Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Liu, Xu; Larar, Allen M.; Smith, WIlliam L.; Taylor, Jonathan P.; Schluessel, Peter; Strow, L. Larrabee; Mango, Stephen A.

    2008-01-01

    The Joint Airborne IASI Validation Experiment (JAIVEx) was conducted during April 2007 mainly for validation of the IASI on the MetOp satellite. IASI possesses an ultra-spectral resolution of 0.25/cm and a spectral coverage from 645 to 2760/cm. Ultra-spectral resolution infrared spectral radiance obtained from near nadir observations provide atmospheric, surface, and cloud property information. An advanced retrieval algorithm with a fast radiative transfer model, including cloud effects, is used for atmospheric profile and cloud parameter retrieval. This physical inversion scheme has been developed, dealing with cloudy as well as cloud-free radiance observed with ultraspectral infrared sounders, to simultaneously retrieve surface, atmospheric thermodynamic, and cloud microphysical parameters. A fast radiative transfer model, which applies to the cloud-free and/or clouded atmosphere, is used for atmospheric profile and cloud parameter retrieval. A one-dimensional (1-d) variational multi-variable inversion solution is used to improve an iterative background state defined by an eigenvector-regression-retrieval. The solution is iterated in order to account for non-linearity in the 1-d variational solution. It is shown that relatively accurate temperature and moisture retrievals are achieved below optically thin clouds. For optically thick clouds, accurate temperature and moisture profiles down to cloud top level are obtained. For both optically thin and thick cloud situations, the cloud top height can be retrieved with relatively high accuracy (i.e., error system, such as the NPOESS Airborne Sounder Testbed - Interferometer (NAST-I), dedicated dropsondes, radiosondes, and ground based Raman Lidar. The capabilities of satellite ultra-spectral sounder such as the IASI are investigated indicating a high vertical structure of atmosphere is retrieved.

  14. Using High-Resolution Airborne Remote Sensing to Study Aerosol Near Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Robert; Munchak, Leigh; Mattoo, Shana; Marshak, Alexander; Wilcox, Eric; Gao, Lan; Yorks, John; Platnick, Steven

    2016-01-01

    The horizontal space in between clear and cloudy air is very complex. This so-called twilight zone includes activated aerosols that are not quite clouds, thin cloud fragments that are not easily observable, and dying clouds that have not quite disappeared. This is a huge challenge for satellite remote sensing, specifically for retrieval of aerosol properties. Identifying what is cloud versus what is not cloud is critically important for attributing radiative effects and forcings to aerosols. At the same time, the radiative interactions between clouds and the surrounding media (molecules, surface and aerosols themselves) will contaminate retrieval of aerosol properties, even in clear skies. Most studies on aerosol cloud interactions are relevant to moderate resolution imagery (e.g. 500 m) from sensors such as MODIS. Since standard aerosol retrieval algorithms tend to keep a distance (e.g. 1 km) from the nearest detected cloud, it is impossible to evaluate what happens closer to the cloud. During Studies of Emissions, Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS), the NASA ER-2 flew with the enhanced MODIS Airborne Simulator (eMAS), providing MODIS-like spectral observations at high (50 m) spatial resolution. We have applied MODIS-like aerosol retrieval for the eMAS data, providing new detail to characterization of aerosol near clouds. Interpretation and evaluation of these eMAS aerosol retrievals is aided by independent MODIS-like cloud retrievals, as well as profiles from the co-flying Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL). Understanding aerosolcloud retrieval at high resolution will lead to better characterization and interpretation of long-term, global products from lower resolution (e.g.MODIS) satellite retrievals.

  15. High performance computing network for cloud environment using simulators

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, N Ajith

    2012-01-01

    Cloud computing is the next generation computing. Adopting the cloud computing is like signing up new form of a website. The GUI which controls the cloud computing make is directly control the hardware resource and your application. The difficulty part in cloud computing is to deploy in real environment. Its' difficult to know the exact cost and it's requirement until and unless we buy the service not only that whether it will support the existing application which is available on traditional data center or had to design a new application for the cloud computing environment. The security issue, latency, fault tolerance are some parameter which we need to keen care before deploying, all this we only know after deploying but by using simulation we can do the experiment before deploying it to real environment. By simulation we can understand the real environment of cloud computing and then after it successful result we can start deploying your application in cloud computing environment. By using the simulator it...

  16. Assessing the Behavior of Typically Lithophile Elements Under Highly Reducing Conditions Relevant to the Planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Rick, II; Vander Kaaden, Kathleen E.; McCubbin, Francis M.; Danielson, Lisa R.

    2017-01-01

    With the data returned from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission, there are now numerous constraints on the physical and chemical properties of Mercury, including its surface composition. The high Sand low FeO contents observed from MESSENGER suggest a low oxygen fugacity of the present materials on the planet's surface. Most of our understanding of elemental partitioning behavior comes from observations made on terrestrial rocks, but Mercury's oxygen fugacity is far outside the conditions of those samples, estimated at approximately 3-7 log units below the Iron-Wtistite (lW) oxygen buffer, several orders of magnitude more reducing than other terrestrial bodies we have data from. With limited oxygen available, lithophile elements may instead exhibit chalcophile, halophile, or siderophile behaviors. Furthermore, very few natural samples of rocks that formed under reducing conditions (e.g., enstatite chondrites, achondrites, aubrites) are available in our collections for examination of this change in geochemical affinity. Our goal is to determine the elemental partitioning behavior of typically lithophile elements at lower oxygen fugacity as a function of temperature and pressure. Experiments were conducted at I GPa in a 13 mm QUICKpress piston cylinder and at 4 GPa in an 880-ton multianvil press, at temperatures up to 1850degC. The composition of starting materials for the experiments were designed so the final run products contained metal, silicate melt, and sulfide melt phases. Oxygen fugacity was controlled in the experiments by adding silicon metal to the samples, in order to utilize the Si-Si02 buffer, which is approximately 5 log units more reducing than the IW buffer at our temperatures of interest. The target silicate melt composition was diopside (CaMgSi206) because measured surface compositions indicate partial melting of a pyroxene-rich mantle. The results of our experiments will aid in our understanding of

  17. The Effects of Drag and Tidal Forces on the Orbits of High-Velocity Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Alexandre; Benjamin, R. A.

    2013-06-01

    Over the past several years, orbital constraints have been obtained for several high velocity cloud complexes surrounding the Milky Way: Complex GCP (Smith Cloud), Complex A, Complex H, Complex GCN, and the Magellanic Stream. We summarize what is known about the orbits of these clouds and and discuss how well each of these complexes fits a balistic trajectory, and discuss how the length of a complex across the sky is related to the inital "fragmentation" and velocity dispersion of the clouds. We then introduce gas drag into the simulation of the orbits of these complexes. We present analytical tests of our numerical method and characterize the departure of the clouds from the ballistic trajectory as a function of drag parameters (ambient gas density and velocity and cloud column density). Using the results of these simulations we comment on the survivability and ultimate fate of HVC in the context of the different models of drag forces.

  18. High lightning activity in maritime clouds near Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucienska, B.; Raga, G. B.; Romero-Centeno, R.

    2012-09-01

    Lightning activity detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN) over oceanic regions adjacent to Mexico is often as high as that observed over the continent. In order to explore the possible causes of the observed high flash density over those regions, the relationships between lightning, rainfall, vertical hydrometeor profiles, latent heating, wind variability and aerosol optical depth are analyzed. The characteristics of lightning and precipitation over four oceanic zones adjacent to Mexican coastlines are contrasted against those over the continent. The number of flashes per rainfall over some coastal maritime regions is found to be higher than over the continent. The largest number of flashes per rainfall is observed during the biomass burning season. In addition, we compare two smaller areas of the Tropical Pacific Ocean: one located within the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone and characterized by high rainfall and weak lightning activity and the other one influenced by a continental wind jet and characterized by high rainfall and strong lightning activity. During the rainy season, the monthly distribution of lightning within the region influenced by the continental wind jet is contrary to that of rainfall. Moreover, the monthly variability of lightning is very similar to the variability of the meridional wind component and it is also related to the variability of aerosol optical depth. The analysis suggests that the high lightning activity observed over coastal Pacific region is linked to the continental cloud condensation nuclei advected over the ocean. Analysis of daily observations indicates that the greatest lightning density is observed for moderate values of the aerosol optical depth, between 0.2 and 0.35.

  19. Gravity waves and high-altitude CO$_2$ ice cloud formation in the Martian atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Yiğit, Erdal; Hartogh, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We present the first general circulation model simulations that quantify and reproduce patches of extremely cold air required for CO$_2$ condensation and cloud formation in the Martian mesosphere. They are created by subgrid-scale gravity waves (GWs) accounted for in the model with the interactively implemented spectral parameterization. Distributions of GW-induced temperature fluctuations and occurrences of supersaturation conditions are in a good agreement with observations of high-altitude CO$_2$ ice clouds. Our study confirms the key role of GWs in facilitating CO$_2$ cloud formation, discusses their tidal modulation, and predicts clouds at altitudes higher than have been observed to date.

  20. A PROFICIENT MODEL FOR HIGH END SECURITY IN CLOUD COMPUTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Bala Chandar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is an inspiring technology due to its abilities like ensuring scalable services, reducing the anxiety of local hardware and software management associated with computing while increasing flexibility and scalability. A key trait of the cloud services is remotely processing of data. Even though this technology had offered a lot of services, there are a few concerns such as misbehavior of server side stored data , out of control of data owner's data and cloud computing does not control the access of outsourced data desired by the data owner. To handle these issues, we propose a new model to ensure the data correctness for assurance of stored data, distributed accountability for authentication and efficient access control of outsourced data for authorization. This model strengthens the correctness of data and helps to achieve the cloud data integrity, supports data owner to have control on their own data through tracking and improves the access control of outsourced data.

  1. 3D modeling of GJ1214b's atmosphere: formation of inhomogeneous high clouds and observational implications

    CERN Document Server

    Charnay, Benjamin; Misra, Amit; Leconte, Jérémy; Arney, Giada

    2015-01-01

    The warm sub-Neptune GJ1214b has a featureless transit spectrum which may be due to the presence of high and thick clouds or haze. Here, we simulate the atmosphere of GJ1214b with a 3D General Circulation Model for cloudy hydrogen-dominated atmospheres, including cloud radiative effects. We show that the atmospheric circulation is strong enough to transport micrometric cloud particles to the upper atmosphere and generally leads to a minimum of cloud at the equator. By scattering stellar light, clouds increase the planetary albedo to 0.4-0.6 and cool the atmosphere below 1 mbar. However, the heating by ZnS clouds leads to the formation of a stratospheric thermal inversion above 10 mbar, with temperatures potentially high enough on the dayside to evaporate KCl clouds. We show that flat transit spectra consistent with HST observations are possible if cloud particle radii are around 0.5 micron, and that such clouds should be optically thin at wavelengths > 3 microns. Using simulated cloudy atmospheres that fit th...

  2. Analysis of high altitude clouds in the martian atmosphere based on Mars Climate Sounder observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitarini, L.; Määttänen, A.; Fouchet, T.; Kleinboehl, A.; Kass, D. M.; Schofield, J. T.

    2016-11-01

    High altitude clouds have been observed in the Martian atmosphere. However, their properties still remain to be characterized. Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) aboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) is an instrument that measures radiances in the thermal infrared, both in limb and nadir views. It allows us to retrieve vertical profiles of radiance, temperature and aerosols. Using the MCS data and radiative transfer model coupled with an automated inversion routine, we can investigate the chemical composition of the high altitude clouds. We will present the first results on the properties of the clouds. CO2 ice is the best candidate to be the main component of some high altitude clouds due to the most similar spectral variation compared to water ice or dust, in agreement with previous studies. Using cloud composition of contaminated CO2 ice (dust core surrounded by CO2 ice) might improve the fitting result, but further study is needed.

  3. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-12-17

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges.

  4. The Relationship of Highly Reflective Clouds to Tropical Climate Anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastenrath, Stefan

    1990-03-01

    The interannual variability of tropical convection related to the Southern Oscillation (SO) and regional climate anomalies is studied from satellite-derived estimates of highly reflective clouds (HRC) during 1971-87. The novel HRC data bank provides a particularly useful measure of tropical convection for the purposes of climate diagnostics, because of its length and continuity of record. For the first time, maps are presented of the patterns of correlation between the SO, as well as regional rainfall anomalies, and convection over the global tropics.Throughout the year, the SO (high SO phase defined by anomalously high/low pressure at Tahiti/Darwin) exhibits a highly significant negative correlation with HRC in the equatorial Pacific but a much weaker positive correlation with Indonesia. The SO is correlated positively with HRC in the Amazon basin in boreal winter but negatively with HRC over central Africa throughout most of the year. The three equatorial convection centers tend to vary in unison, in particular those over the Amazon basin and central Africa, while the positive correlations of any of these centers with the SO are much weaker. Copious precipitation during the March-April rainy season of northeast Brazil is associated with a southward displaced low-pressure trough and embedded wind confluence, as well as a southward shift of the convection belt in the sector extending from South America across the Atlantic into equatorial Africa. During abundant Nordeste rainy seasons, as in the high SO phase, convective activity tends to be enhanced over Indonesia but reduced in the equatorial Pacific. Copious rainfall in Subsaharan West Africa (Sahel) tends to be associated with the high SO phase and thus intense convection over Indonesia and reduced convective activity in the equatorial central Pacific. Another new finding is the strong inverse relationship of Sahel rainfall with the convection over central Africa. Abundant Indian summer monsoon rainfall is

  5. The Improvement and Implementation of Global Illumination Rendring Method Based on Point Cloud for Typical Landforms%基于点云的典型地貌全局光渲染方法的改进及实现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨静波; 朱剑刚; 姜真杰

    2014-01-01

    针对典型地貌全局光渲染中的重点问题:环境遮挡以及色溢的渲染效率和效果,提出光线追踪、光能传递以外的另一种改进方法——点云计算方式。分析了点云算法的原理、特点和优越性,选取张家界石英砂岩峰林地貌三维模型作为样本,测试和比较了光线追踪和点云计算方法的实际效果,实验表明点云计算方式有更高的效率和更好的表现效果,论文也为其他典型地貌的全局光渲染提供了可行的制作方案和流程。%In the global illumination rendering for typical landforms,there are two key problems, namely , the efficiency and effectiveness of ambient occlusion and color bleeding . The paper presents an improved method other than the raytracing and radiosity method,which is called point cloud .We analyze the principle, characteristics and advantages of point cloud algorithm. By choosing Zhangjiajie quartz sandstone peak forest landforms as a sample,we set up a 3d model to test and compare the actual effects of ray tracing and point cloud method. Experiments show that point cloud method has higher efficiency and better effect. Paper also provides the feasible production solution and process for global illumination rendering of other typical landforms .

  6. The collision of high-velocity clouds with a galactic disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Bodenheimer, P.; Rozyczka, M.; Franco, J.

    1986-01-01

    Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations for the interaction of high-velocity clouds with a galactic disk are presented. The impinging clouds are assumed to be spherical and the target disk is represented by a constant density slab, n(g) = 1/cu cm, with a total width W(g) = 200 pc. The numerical experiments cover a wide range of cloud densities, between 0.1 and 100/cu cm, and velocities between 100 and 300 km/s. At a time approximately 10 to the 7th yr after impact, two types of final configurations are found. In the first case, the infalling cloud is completely shocked in a time short compared with the crossing time of the disk. Then, the generated cavity has time to grow sideways and large scale structures with a round shape, and in some cases nearly spherical, are produced. In the second case, which occurs for high density clouds, the cloud is shocked on a time scale longer than or comparable to the crossing time. The resultant cylindrical holes drilled across the entire disk have the dimensions of the impinging cloud. Cloud-galaxy interactions are compared with other energy sources and the morphologies of the resultant structures are suggested to resemble the large scale structures observed in H I.

  7. Properties of the electron cloud in a high-energy positron and electron storage ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. C. Harkay

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Low-energy, background electrons are ubiquitous in high-energy particle accelerators. Under certain conditions, interactions between this electron cloud and the high-energy beam can give rise to numerous effects that can seriously degrade the accelerator performance. These effects range from vacuum degradation to collective beam instabilities and emittance blowup. Although electron-cloud effects were first observed two decades ago in a few proton storage rings, they have in recent years been widely observed and intensely studied in positron and proton rings. Electron-cloud diagnostics developed at the Advanced Photon Source enabled for the first time detailed, direct characterization of the electron-cloud properties in a positron and electron storage ring. From in situ measurements of the electron flux and energy distribution at the vacuum chamber wall, electron-cloud production mechanisms and details of the beam-cloud interaction can be inferred. A significant longitudinal variation of the electron cloud is also observed, due primarily to geometrical details of the vacuum chamber. Such experimental data can be used to provide realistic limits on key input parameters in modeling efforts, leading ultimately to greater confidence in predicting electron-cloud effects in future accelerators.

  8. Emotional expression of high school students with visual impairments and their typically developing peers

    OpenAIRE

    Vučinić Vesna; Jablan Branka; Stanimirović Dragana; Drinčić Natalija

    2015-01-01

    Emotions are adaptive reaction to events from the environment and they represent the central part of every person's life. Willing emotional expression influences people from the environment according to our expectations if they recognize our emotions. Studies on expressing emotions in persons with visual impairments indicate the existence of the same type of spontaneous emotional expressions as in typically developing population. Also, these studies point to difficulties in presenting willing...

  9. Distance to the High-Latitude Molecular Cloud MBM 37 (LDN 183)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Richard P.; Janusz, Robert; Straizys, Vytautas; Corbally, Christopher J.; Munari, Ulisse; Andersson, B.-G.; Zdanavicius, Justas; Maskoliunas, Marius; Kazlauskas, Algirdas

    2017-01-01

    The molecular cloud MBM 37 and the corresponding dust cloud LDN 183 belong to a group of high-latitude clouds near the Serpens Caput and Libra border at b = +36 deg. We determined the distance to this cloud applying the extinction Av vs. distance diagram based on two-dimensional photometric classification of about 800 stars down to V = 15 mag and about 200 stars down to V = 19 mag observed in the Vilnius seven-color system. Additionally, for the stars brighter than V = 12 mag MK types were determined spectroscopically. Distances for part of them, located nearer than 500 pc, were calculated from the Gaia parallaxes. The distance to MBM 37 is found to be at 90 pc placing it among the dust and molecular clouds closest to the Sun.

  10. Pressure-driven fragmentation of clouds at high redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Dhanoa, Harpreet; Yates, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of a hyper metal-poor star with total metallicity of $\\le 10^{-5}$ Z$_\\odot$, has motivated new investigations of how such objects can form from primordial gas polluted by a single supernova. In this paper we present a shock-cloud model which simulates a supernova remnant interacting with a cloud in a metal-free environment at redshift $z=10$. Pre-supernova conditions are considered, which include a multiphase neutral medium and H II region. A small dense clump ($n=100$ cm$^{-3}$), located 40 pc from a 40 M$_\\odot$ metal-free star, embedded in a $n=10$ cm$^{-3}$ ambient cloud. The evolution of the supernova remnant (explosion energy $10^{52}$ erg) and its subsequent interaction with the dense clump is examined. This is the first study to include a comprehensive treatment of the non-equilibrium chemistry and associated radiative cooling that is occurring at all stages of the shock-cloud model. We have included a primordial chemistry network that covers the temperature range $10-10^9$ K, and is co...

  11. Importance of aerosol composition and mixing state for cloud droplet activation in the high Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Leck

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN were measured throughout an expedition by icebreaker around the central Arctic Ocean, including a 3 week ice drift operation at 87° N, from 3 August to 9 September 2008. In agreement with previous observations in the area and season median daily CCN concentrations at 0.2% water vapor supersaturation were typically in the range of 15 to 30 cm−3, but concentrations varied by two to three orders of magnitude over the expedition and were occasionally below 1 cm−3. The CCN concentrations were highest near the ice edge and fell by a factor of three in the first 48 h of transport from the open sea into the pack ice region. For longer transport times they increased again indicating a local source over the pack ice, suggested to be polymer gels, via drops injected into the air by bubbles bursting on open leads. By assuming Köhler theory and simulating the cloud nucleation process using a Lagrangian adiabatic air parcel model that solves the kinetic formulation for condensation of water on size resolved aerosol particles we inferred the properties of the unexplained non-water soluble aerosol fraction that is necessary for reproducing the observed concentrations of CCN. We propose that the portion of the internally/externally mixed water insoluble particles was larger in the corresponding smaller aerosol sizes ranges. These particles were physically and chemically behaving as polymer gels: the interaction of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic entities on the structures of polymer gels during cloud droplet activation would at first only show a partial wetting character and only weak hygroscopic growth. Given time, a high CCN activation efficiency is achieved, which is promoted by the hydrophilicity or surface-active properties of the gels. Thus the result in this study argues for that the behavior of the high Arctic aerosol in CCN-counters operating at water vapor supersaturations > 0.4% (high relative

  12. VLA Observations of the Magnetic Field of the Smith High Velocity Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betti, Sarah; Hill, Alex S.; Mao, Sui Ann; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M.; Lockman, Felix J.; Benjamin, Robert A.; Gaensler, Bryan M.

    2017-01-01

    High velocity clouds (HVCs) are hydrogen gas clouds around galaxies with velocities inconsistent with Galactic rotation. HVCs may fuel future star formation and drive galaxy evolution. The Smith Cloud is an HVC with an orbit suggesting it has made at least one passage through the disk. A measured magnetic field suggests how it survived passage through the Galactic halo. The Faraday rotation measure (RM) provides information about the strength and direction of the magnetic field. We use the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to obtain reliable RMs towards ~950 background point sources to measure the geometry of the magnetic field of the Smith Cloud. These RMs constrain the strength of the magnetic field at the head, tail, and body of the Smith Cloud while RMs directly behind the Smith Cloud suggest there is ionized gas associated with the cloud that has not previously been detected. The confirmation of the magnetic field of the Smith Cloud along with a detailed morphology of the magnetic field structure will constrain how HVCs pass through the Galactic halo without losing their gas and survive the passage through the intergalactic and interstellar media.

  13. High-resolution HI and CO observations of high-latitude intermediate-velocity clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Röhser, T; Bekhti, N Ben; Winkel, B

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate-velocity clouds (IVCs) are HI halo clouds that are likely related to a Galactic fountain process. In-falling IVCs are candidates for the re-accretion of matter onto the Milky Way. We study the evolution of IVCs at the disk-halo interface, focussing on the transition from atomic to molecular IVCs. We compare an atomic IVC to a molecular IVC and characterise their structural differences in order to investigate how molecular IVCs form high above the Galactic plane. With high-resolution HI observations of the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and 12CO(1-0) and 13CO(1-0) observations with the IRAM 30m telescope, we analyse the small-scale structures within the two clouds. By correlating HI and far-infrared (FIR) dust continuum emission from the Planck satellite, the distribution of molecular hydrogen (H2) is estimated. We conduct a detailed comparison of the HI, FIR, and CO data and study variations of the $X_\\rm{CO}$ conversion factor. The atomic IVC does not disclose detectable CO emission. The a...

  14. Automatic cloud detection for high resolution satellite stereo images and its application in terrain extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Teng; Hu, Xiangyun; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Lulin; Tao, Pengjie; Lu, Luping

    2016-11-01

    The automatic extraction of terrain from high-resolution satellite optical images is very difficult under cloudy conditions. Therefore, accurate cloud detection is necessary to fully use the cloud-free parts of images for terrain extraction. This paper addresses automated cloud detection by introducing an image matching based method under a stereo vision framework, and the optimization usage of non-cloudy areas in stereo matching and the generation of digital surface models (DSMs). Given that clouds are often separated from the terrain surface, cloudy areas are extracted by integrating dense matching DSM, worldwide digital elevation model (DEM) (i.e., shuttle radar topography mission (SRTM)) and gray information from the images. This process consists of the following steps: an image based DSM is firstly generated through a multiple primitive multi-image matcher. Once it is aligned with the reference DEM based on common features, places with significant height differences between the DSM and the DEM will suggest the potential cloud covers. Detecting cloud at these places in the images then enables precise cloud delineation. In the final step, elevations of the reference DEM within the cloud covers are assigned to the corresponding region of the DSM to generate a cloud-free DEM. The proposed approach is evaluated with the panchromatic images of the Tianhui satellite and has been successfully used in its daily operation. The cloud detection accuracy for images without snow is as high as 95%. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method can significantly improve the usage of the cloudy panchromatic satellite images for terrain extraction.

  15. GPU-based ray tracing algorithm for high-speed propagation prediction in typical indoor environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Lixin; Guan, Xiaowei; Liu, Zhongyu

    2015-10-01

    A fast 3-D ray tracing propagation prediction model based on virtual source tree is presented in this paper, whose theoretical foundations are geometrical optics(GO) and the uniform theory of diffraction(UTD). In terms of typical single room indoor scene, taking the geometrical and electromagnetic information into account, some acceleration techniques are adopted to raise the efficiency of the ray tracing algorithm. The simulation results indicate that the runtime of the ray tracing algorithm will sharply increase when the number of the objects in the single room is large enough. Therefore, GPU acceleration technology is used to solve that problem. As is known to all, GPU is good at calculation operation rather than logical judgment, so that tens of thousands of threads in CUDA programs are able to calculate at the same time, in order to achieve massively parallel acceleration. Finally, a typical single room with several objects is simulated by using the serial ray tracing algorithm and the parallel one respectively. It can be found easily from the results that compared with the serial algorithm, the GPU-based one can achieve greater efficiency.

  16. CO J = 3 -> 2 observations of translucent and high-latitude molecular clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dishoeck, van E.F.; Phillips, T.G.; Black, J.H.; Gredel, R.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements were carried out on the CO J = 3-2 emission line at 345 GHz from a number of translucent and high-latitude molecular clouds, as well as on the J = 2-1 and J = 1-0 lines of both the (C-12)O and (C-13)O. It is shown that the physical conditions in the high-latitude clouds are very similar

  17. The distance to two neutral hydrogen clouds : The high-velocity complex A and the low-latitude intermediate-velocity cloud

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wakker, B; Howk, C; Schwarz, U; vanWoerden, H; Beers, T; Wilhelm, R; Kalberla, P; Danly, L

    1996-01-01

    A lower limit to the distance of the high-velocity cloud (HVC) complex A of 4 kpc (z > 3 kpc) is derived. The HVC is detected toward the Seyfert galaxy Mrk 106 in Mg II lambda lambda 2796, 2803 absorption spectra taken with Hubble Space Telescope (HST) proving that Mg+ is present in the cloud. It is

  18. Very high cloud detection in more than two decades of HIRS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolat, Utkan; Menzel, W. Paul; Olson, Erik; Frey, Richard

    2013-04-01

    This paper reports on the use of High-resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) measurements to infer the presence of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric (UT/LS) clouds. UT/LS cloud detection is based on the fact that, when viewing an opaque UT/LS cloud that fills the sensor field of view, positive lapse rates above the tropopause cause a more absorbing CO2 or H2O-sensitive spectral band to measure a brightness temperature warmer than that of a less absorbing or nearly transparent infrared window spectral band. The HIRS sensor has flown on 16 polar-orbiting satellites from TIROS-N through NOAA-19 and Metop-A and -B, forming the only 30 year record that includes H2O and CO2-sensitive spectral bands enabling the detection of these UT/LS clouds. Comparison with collocated Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization data reveals that 97% of the HIRS UT/LS cloud determinations are within 2.5 km of the tropopause (defined as the coldest level in the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Global Data Assimilation System); more clouds are found above the tropopause than below. From NOAA-14 data spanning 1995 through 2005, we find indications of UT/LS clouds in 0.7% of the observations from 60N to 60S using CO2 absorption bands; however, in the region of the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), this increases to 1.7%. During El Niño years, UT/LS clouds shift eastward out of their normal location in the western Pacific region. Monthly trends from 1987 through 2011 using data from NOAA-10 onwards show decreases in UT/LS cloud detection in the region of the ITCZ from 1987 until 1996, increases until 2001, and decreases thereafter.

  19. High-Precision Registration of Point Clouds Based on Sphere Feature Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junhui; Wang, Zhao; Gao, Jianmin; Huang, Youping; Towers, David Peter

    2016-12-30

    Point cloud registration is a key process in multi-view 3D measurements. Its precision affects the measurement precision directly. However, in the case of the point clouds with non-overlapping areas or curvature invariant surface, it is difficult to achieve a high precision. A high precision registration method based on sphere feature constraint is presented to overcome the difficulty in the paper. Some known sphere features with constraints are used to construct virtual overlapping areas. The virtual overlapping areas provide more accurate corresponding point pairs and reduce the influence of noise. Then the transformation parameters between the registered point clouds are solved by an optimization method with weight function. In that case, the impact of large noise in point clouds can be reduced and a high precision registration is achieved. Simulation and experiments validate the proposed method.

  20. GASS High Velocity Clouds in the Region of the Magellanic Leading Arm

    CERN Document Server

    For, Bi-Qing; McClure-Griffiths, Naomi M

    2012-01-01

    We present a new catalog of high-velocity clouds in the region of the Magellanic Leading Arm. The catalog is based on neutral hydrogen (HI) from the Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey (GASS). Excellent spectral resolution allows clouds with narrow-line components to be resolved. The total number of detected clouds is 407. We describe the method of cataloging and present the basic parameters of the clouds. We discuss the general distribution of the high-velocity clouds and classify the clouds based on their morphological type. The presence of a significant number of head-tail clouds and their distribution in the region is compared with simulations. We suggest that ram-pressure stripping is a more important factor than tidal forces for the morphology and formation of the Magellanic Leading Arm and that different environmental conditions might explain the morphological difference between the Magellanic Leading Arm and Magellanic Stream. Using the velocity structure of the Leading Arm we derive the distance for the c...

  1. Optical nucleation of bubble clouds in a high pressure spherical resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Phillip; Sampathkumar, A; Murray, Todd W; Gaitan, D Felipe; Glynn Holt, R

    2011-11-01

    An experimental setup for nucleating clouds of bubbles in a high-pressure spherical resonator is described. Using nanosecond laser pulses and multiple phase gratings, bubble clouds are optically nucleated in an acoustic field. Dynamics of the clouds are captured using a high-speed CCD camera. The images reveal cloud nucleation, growth, and collapse and the resulting emission of radially expanding shockwaves. These shockwaves are reflected at the interior surface of the resonator and then reconverge to the center of the resonator. As the shocks reconverge upon the center of the resonator, they renucleate and grow the bubble cloud. This process is repeated over many acoustic cycles and with each successive shock reconvergence, the bubble cloud becomes more organized and centralized so that subsequent collapses give rise to stronger, better defined shockwaves. After many acoustic cycles individual bubbles cannot be distinguished and the cloud is then referred to as a cluster. Sustainability of the process is ultimately limited by the detuning of the acoustic field inside the resonator. The nucleation parameter space is studied in terms of laser firing phase, laser energy, and acoustic power used.

  2. High-velocity H I clouds and the adiabatic theory of galaxy formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroshkevich, A.G.; Shandarin, S.F.

    1979-05-01

    The intergalactic interpretation of high-velocity H I clouds is examined in terms of the evolutionary theory of galaxy formation. From 21-cm line measurements and the representation of the intergalactic medium according to the adiabatic theory of galaxy formation (the ''pancake'' theory), parameters (density, mass, radius, entropy, distance) are calculated for various clouds, regarded as quasistationary. The observational and theoretical estimates are consistent. The assumption that many H I clouds are extragalactic is in good accord with the evolutionary theory.

  3. Interplanetary dust particles, not wind blown dust, control high altitude ice clouds on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwick, Victoria; Toon, Owen B.

    2016-10-01

    Water ice clouds on Mars are commonly observed at high altitudes. However, current generation Mars three-dimensional general circulation models (GCM) struggle to reproduce clouds above approximately 20-30 km. On Mars, as on Earth, ice cloud formation likely initiates by heterogeneous nucleation, which requires a population of suspended ice nuclei contiguous with supersaturated atmospheric water vapor. Although supersaturation is observed at high altitudes and has been reproduced in models, models predict very few ice nuclei. The small number of ice nuclei in the upper atmosphere is due to the assumption in Mars GCMs that the only source of ice nuclei is dust from the Martian surface. However, terrestrial mesospheric noctilucent clouds have been shown to form by ice nucleation on particles originating from ablated micrometeroids. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that a population of micrometeoric ablation biproducts on Mars exists and can act as a site for cloud nucleation at high altitudes. We present simulations using the Community Atmosphere Model for Mars (MarsCAM) based on the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model for Earth,coupled with a physically based, state-of-the-art cloud and dust physics model, the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres (CARMA) to show that ablating micrometeoroids can yield abundant ice nuclei throughout the upper atmosphere of Mars. We find that simulations including a constant annual micrometeoroid flux allows us to reproduce the observed properties of high altitude water ice clouds including vertical distribution and particle size. In general, effective radius decreases with increasing altitude. We have additionally explored the impact of variable ablation rates. Preliminary results suggest that relatively high ablation rates, near or greater than 50%, are required to reproduce observed cloud features.

  4. Very High Excitation Lines of H2 in the Orion Molecular Cloud Outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geballe, T. R.; Burton, M. G.; Pike, R. E.

    2017-03-01

    Vibration-rotation lines of H2 from highly excited levels approaching the dissociation limit have been detected at a number of locations in the shocked gas of the Orion Molecular Cloud (OMC-1), including in a Herbig-Haro object near the tip of one of the OMC-1 “fingers.” Population diagrams show that, while the excited H2 is almost entirely at a kinetic temperature of ˜1800 K (typical for vibrationally shock-excited H2), as in the previously reported case of Herbig-Haro object HH 7 up to a few percent of the H2 is at a kinetic temperature of ˜5000 K. The location with the largest fraction of hot H2 is the Herbig-Haro object, where the outflowing material is moving at a higher speed than at the other locations. Although theoretical work is required for a better understanding of the 5000 K H2 (including how it cools), its existence and the apparent dependence of its abundance relative to that of the cooler component on the relative velocities of the outflow and the surrounding ambient gas appear broadly consistent with it having recently reformed. The existence of this high-temperature H2 appears to be a common characteristic of shock-excited molecular gas.

  5. High and typical {sup 18}F-FDG bowel uptake in patients treated with metformin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gontier, Eric; Bonardel, Gerald; Mantzarides, Marina; Foehrenbach, Herve [Military Hospital Val-de-Grace, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris, cedex 05 (France); Fourme, Emmanuelle [Cancer Research Center Rene Huguenin, Department of Medical Statistics, Saint-Cloud (France); Wartski, Myriam; Pecking, Alain-Paul; Alberini, Jean-Louis [Cancer Research Center Rene Huguenin, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Saint-Cloud (France); Blondet, Cyrille [University Hospital of Strasbourg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Strasbourg (France); Le Stanc, Elise [Foch Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Suresnes (France)

    2008-01-15

    This prospective and bi-centric study was conducted in order to determine the impact of antidiabetic treatments (AD) on {sup 18}F-FDG bowel uptake in type 2 diabetic patients. Fifty-five patients with previously diagnosed and treated type 2 diabetes mellitus (group 1) were divided in two subgroups: AD treatment including metformin (n=32; group 1a) and AD treatment excluding metformin (n=23; group 1b). The 95 patients without diabetes mellitus made up controls (group 2). {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in small intestine and colon was visually graded and semi-quantitatively measured using the maximum standardized uptake value. {sup 18}F-FDG bowel uptake was significantly increased in AD patients (group 1) as compared to controls (group 2) (p<0.001). Bowel uptake was significantly higher in AD patients including metformin (group 1a) as compared to AD patients excluding metformin (group 1b) (p<0.01), whose bowel uptake was not significantly different from controls (group 2). A metformin treatment was predictive of an increased bowel uptake in the small intestine (odds ratio OR=16.9, p<0.0001) and in the colon (OR=95.3, p<0.0001), independently of the other factors considered in the multivariate analysis. Bowel uptake pattern in the patients treated with metformin was typically intense, diffuse and continuous along the bowel, strongly predominant in the colon, in both the digestive wall and lumen. This study emphasizes that metformin significantly increases {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in colon and, to a lesser extent, in small intestine. It raises the question of stopping metformin treatment before an {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT scan is performed for intra-abdominal neoplasic lesion assessment. (orig.)

  6. HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLES FLUX ORIGIN IN THE CLOUDS, DARK LIGHTNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov, V.V.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Problem of high-energy particles flux origin in clouds is discussed. Conditions in which dark lightning preceding the ordinary one and creating additional ionization, fluxes of fast electrons with MeV energy prior to the earthquake detected among lightning initiating ball-lightning, glow, sprites are considered. All above phenomena appear to be of general nature founded on quantum entanglement of hydrogen bonds protons in water clasters inside clouds.

  7. Effects of a sweptback hydrofoil on the force and longitudinal stability characteristics of a typical high-speed airplane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Raymond B

    1948-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in the Langley 8-foot high-speed tunnel to determine the effects of a sweptback hydrofoil on the force and longitudinal stability characteristics of a typical high-speed airplane. The Mach number range for this investigation was from 0.60 to 0.95 and at M = 1.20. The effects of the hydrofoil on the lift, drag, and pitching-moment characteristics are presented.

  8. Dense gas in high-latitude molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reach, William T.; Pound, Marc W.; Wilner, David J.; Lee, Youngung

    1995-01-01

    The nearby molecular clouds MBM 7, 12, 30, 32, 40, 41, and 55 were surveyed for tracers of dense gas, including the (1-0), (2-1), and (3-2) rotational lines of CS and the (1-0) lines of HCO(+) and HCN. MBM 7 and MBM 12 contain dense cores, while the other clouds contain little or no traces of dense gas. Comparison of the emission from dense gas tracers to that of (13)CO reveals that the former are more compact in angular size as well as line width. An extensive CS(2-1) survey of part of MBM 12 reveals that the emission is characterized by clumps on approximately 3 min scales as well as extended emission. Observations of the CS(1-0) and (3-2) lines using telescopes with matched beam sizes reveal that the volume density must be at least approximately 10(exp 4.5)/cc within the (3-2) emitting regions, which are approximately 0.03 pc in radius. Electron excitation of the CS rotational levels is ruled out (in the cores) by comparing the (3-2)/(1-0) line ratios with models including H2 and electron collisions. The volume density in the cores is substantially larger than in the portions of the cloud traced by CO emission. The density increases into the cores as r(exp -2), suggesting dynamical collapse. The masses of the cores are close to the virial mass, suggesting they are dynamically bound. The cores in MBM 7 and MBM 12 are thus likely to form stars; they are the nearest sites of star formation.

  9. ULTRA-COMPACT HIGH VELOCITY CLOUDS AS MINIHALOS AND DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faerman, Yakov; Sternberg, Amiel [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978 (Israel); McKee, Christopher F., E-mail: yakovfae@post.tau.ac.il [Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-11-10

    We present dark matter minihalo models for the Ultra-Compact, High-Velocity H I Clouds (UCHVCs) recently discovered in the 21 cm ALFALFA survey. We assume gravitational confinement of 10{sup 4} K H I gas by flat-cored dark-matter subhalos within the Local Group. We show that for flat cores, typical (median) tidally stripped cosmological subhalos at redshift z = 0 have dark-matter masses of ∼10{sup 7} M{sub ☉} within the central 300 pc (independent of total halo mass), consistent with the 'Strigari mass scale' observed in low-luminosity dwarf galaxies. Flat-cored subhalos also resolve the mass discrepancy between simulated and observed satellites around the Milky Way. For the UCHVCs, we calculate the photoionization-limited hydrostatic gas profiles for any distance-dependent total observed H I mass and predict the associated (projected) H I half-mass radii, assuming the clouds are embedded in distant (d ∼> 300 kpc) and unstripped subhalos. For a typical UCHVC (0.9 Jy km s{sup –1}), we predict physical H I half-mass radii of 0.18 to 0.35 kpc (or angular sizes of 0.'6 to 2.'1) for distances ranging from 300 kpc to 2 Mpc. As a consistency check, we model the gas-rich dwarf galaxy Leo T, for which there is a well-resolved H I column density profile and a known distance (420 kpc). For Leo T, we find that a subhalo with M{sub 300} = 8 (± 0.2) × 10{sup 6} M{sub ☉} best fits the observed H I profile. We derive an upper limit of P{sub HIM} ∼< 150 cm{sup –3} K for the pressure of any enveloping hot intergalactic medium gas at the distance of Leo T. Our analysis suggests that some of the UCHVCs may in fact constitute a population of 21 cm-selected but optically faint dwarf galaxies in the Local Group.

  10. Observations of fluorescent aerosol-cloud interactions in the free troposphere at the Sphinx high Alpine research station, Jungfraujoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, I.; Lloyd, G.; Bower, K. N.; Connolly, P. J.; Flynn, M. J.; Kaye, P. H.; Choularton, T. W.; Gallagher, M. W.

    2015-09-01

    The fluorescent nature of aerosol at a high Alpine site was studied using a wide-band integrated bioaerosol (WIBS-4) single particle multi-channel ultra violet-light induced fluorescence (UV-LIF) spectrometer. This was supported by comprehensive cloud microphysics and meteorological measurements with the aims of cataloguing concentrations of bio-fluorescent aerosols at this high altitude site and also investigating possible influences of UV-fluorescent particle types on cloud-aerosol processes. Analysis of background free tropospheric air masses, using a total aerosol inlet, showed there to be a minor but statistically insignificant increase in the fluorescent aerosol fraction during in-cloud cases compared to out of cloud cases. The size dependence of the fluorescent aerosol fraction showed the larger aerosol to be more likely to be fluorescent with 80 % of 10 μm particles being fluorescent. Whilst the fluorescent particles were in the minority (NFl/NAll = 0.27±0.19), a new hierarchical agglomerative cluster analysis approach, Crawford et al. (2015) revealed the majority of the fluorescent aerosol were likely to be representative of fluorescent mineral dust. A minor episodic contribution from a cluster likely to be representative of primary biological aerosol particles (PBAP) was also observed with a wintertime baseline concentration of 0.1±0.4 L-1. Given the low concentration of this cluster and the typically low ice active fraction of studied PBAP (e.g. pseudomonas syringae) we suggest that the contribution to the observed ice crystal concentration at this location is not significant during the wintertime.

  11. Patterns of Play Behaviors and Learning Center Choices between High Ability and Typical Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Hope E.

    2015-01-01

    There is a dearth of research regarding young children with high intellectual abilities, particularly research involving the direct observation of children in naturalistic settings. The current study examines 2 years of observations of young children (aged 37-71 months; n = 34) at an early childhood facility. The children were observed during the…

  12. Typical Protectionism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ZHIPING

    2010-01-01

    @@ In the middle of October,acting on a complaint from the United Steelworkers union,the Office of the U.S.Trade Representative initiated a Section 301 investigation into China's clean energy policies and practices.The move has aroused strong opposition from China.China's New Energy Association says the probe is neither well-founded nor responsible,and is typical trade protectionism.

  13. A typical wave wake from high-speed vessels: its group structure and run-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Didenkulova

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available High-amplitude water waves induced by high-speed vessels are regularly observed in Tallinn Bay, the Baltic Sea, causing intense beach erosion and disturbing marine habitants in the coastal zone. Such a strong impact on the coast may be a result of a certain group structure of the wave wake. In order to understand it, here we present an experimental study of the group structure of these wakes at Pikakari beach, Tallinn Bay. The most energetic vessel waves at this location (100 m from the coast at the water depth 2.7 m have amplitudes of about 1 m and periods of 8–10 s and cause maximum run-up heights on a beach up to 1.4 m. These waves represent frequency modulated packets where the largest and longest waves propagate ahead of other smaller amplitude and period waves. Sometimes the groups of different heights and periods can be separated even within one wave wake event. The wave heights within a wake are well described by the Weibull distribution, which has different parameters for wakes from different vessels. Wave run-up heights can also be described by Weibull distribution and its parameters can be connected to the parameters of the distribution of wave heights 100 m from the coast. Finally, the run-up of individual waves within a packet is studied. It is shown that the specific structure of frequency modulated wave packets, induced by high-speed vessels, leads to a sequence of high wave run-ups at the coast, even when the original wave heights are rather moderate. This feature can be a key to understanding the significant impact on coasts caused by fast vessels.

  14. High-throughput screen detects calcium signaling dysfunction in typical sporadic autism spectrum disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmunk, Galina; Nguyen, Rachel L.; Ferguson, David L.; Kumar, Kenny; Parker, Ian; Gargus, J. Jay

    2017-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a heterogeneous group of neurodevelopmental disorders without any defined uniting pathophysiology. Ca2+ signaling is emerging as a potential node in the genetic architecture of the disorder. We previously reported decreased inositol trisphosphate (IP3)-mediated Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum in several rare monogenic syndromes highly comorbid with autism – fragile X and tuberous sclerosis types 1 and 2 syndromes. We now extend those findings to a cohort of subjects with sporadic ASD without any known mutations. We developed and applied a high throughput Fluorometric Imaging Plate Reader (FLIPR) assay to monitor agonist-evoked Ca2+ signals in human primary skin fibroblasts. Our results indicate that IP3 -mediated Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum in response to activation of purinergic receptors is significantly depressed in subjects with sporadic as well as rare syndromic forms of ASD. We propose that deficits in IP3-mediated Ca2+ signaling represent a convergent hub function shared across the spectrum of autistic disorders – whether caused by rare highly penetrant mutations or sporadic forms – and holds promise as a biomarker for diagnosis and novel drug discovery. PMID:28145469

  15. Typical Responses in Giving Evaluation: An Analysis of High and Low Context Culture Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferany Arifin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at discussing high and low context in responses given by the students to evaluate their friend’s impromptu speech performance. The study focuses on the characteristics of high and low context represented specifically on (1 direct-indirect (2 simple-complex response, and (3 relationship orientation. The study is based on the analysis of ten responses given by ten students with different sexes. Classroom observation followed by transcription analysis is used. The data were collected naturally at undergraduate campus. The result shows that using indirect and complex responses can maintain harmonious relationship with others. The basic asumption is that the students tend to communicate in high level context. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk membahas konteks tinggi dan rendah dalam mengevaluasi performansi pidato tanpa persiapan temannya. Penelitian ini memusatkan perhatian pada ciri konteks tinggi dan rendah yang direpresentasikan oleh (1 tanggapan langsung-tak langsung (2 sederhana-kompleks, dan (3 orientasi hubungan. Penelitian ini didasarkan pada sepuluh tanggapan yang diberikan oleh sepuluh mahasiswa pria dan wanita. Pengamatan kelas yang diikuti dengan analisis transkripsi digunakan untuk pengumpulan data. Data dikumpulkan di kampus diploma. Analisis menunjukkan bahwa siswa cenderung menggunakan tanggapan kompleks dan tak langsung agar dapat menjaga keharmonisan hubungan dengan temannya. Oleh karena itu asumsi dasarnya adalah bahwa siswa cenderung berkomunikasi dalam konteks level tinggi.

  16. Magnetized High Velocity Clouds in the Galactic Halo: A New Distance Constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grønnow, Asger; Tepper-García, Thor; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.

    2017-08-01

    High velocity gas that does not conform to Galactic rotation is observed throughout the Galaxy’s halo. One component of this gas, H i high velocity clouds (HVCs), have attracted attention since their discovery in the 1960s and remain controversial in terms of their origins, largely due to the lack of reliable distance estimates. The recent discovery of enhanced magnetic fields toward HVCs has encouraged us to explore their connection to cloud evolution, kinematics, and survival as they fall through the magnetized Galactic halo. For a reasonable model of the halo magnetic field, most infalling clouds see transverse rather than radial field lines. We find that significant compression (and thereby amplification) of the ambient magnetic field occurs in front of the cloud and in the tail of material stripped from the cloud. The compressed transverse field attenuates hydrodynamical instabilities. This delays cloud destruction, though not indefinitely. The observed {\\boldsymbol{B}} field compression is related to the cloud’s distance from the Galactic plane. As a result, the observed rotation measure provides useful distance information on a cloud’s location.

  17. Remote measurement of cloud microphysics and its influence in predicting high impact weather events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bipasha, Paul S.; Jinya, John

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the cloud microphysical processes and precise retrieval of parameters governing the same are crucial for weather and climate prediction. Advanced remote sensing sensors and techniques offer an opportunity for monitoring micro-level developments in cloud structure. . Using the observations from a visible and near-infrared lidar onboard CALIPSO satellite (part of A-train) , the spatial variation of cloud structure has been studied over the Tropical monsoon region . It is found that there is large variability in the cloud microphysical parameters manifesting in distinct precipitation regimes. In particular, the severe storms over this region are driven by processes which range from the synoptic to the microphysical scale. Using INSAT-3D data, retrieval of cloud microphysical parameters like effective radius (CER) and optical depth (COD) were carried out for tropical cyclone Phailine. It was observed that there is a general increase of CER in a top-down direction, characterizing the progressively increasing number and size of precipitation hydrometeors while approaching the cloud base. The distribution of CER relative to cloud top temperature for growing convective clouds has been investigated to reveal the evolution of the particles composing the clouds. It is seen that the relatively high concentration of large particles in the downdraft zone is closely related to the precipitation efficiency of the system. Similar study was also carried using MODIS observations for cyclones over Indian Ocean (2010-2013), in which we find that that the mean effective radius is 24 microns with standard deviation 4.56, mean optical depth is 21 with standard deviation 13.98, mean cloud fraction is 0.92 with standard deviation 0.13 and mainly ice phase is dominant. Thus the remote observations of microstructure of convective storms provide very crucial information about the maintenance and potential devastation likely to be associated with it. With the synergistic

  18. Implementation and use of a highly available and innovative IaaS solution: the Cloud Area Padovana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiftimiei, C.; Andreetto, P.; Bertocco, S.; Biasotto, M.; Dal Pra, S.; Costa, F.; Crescente, A.; Dorigo, A.; Fantinel, S.; Fanzago, F.; Frizziero, E.; Gulmini, M.; Michelotto, M.; Sgaravatto, M.; Traldi, S.; Venaruzzo, M.; Verlato, M.; Zangrando, L.

    2015-12-01

    While in the business world the cloud paradigm is typically implemented purchasing resources and services from third party providers (e.g. Amazon), in the scientific environment there's usually the need of on-premises IaaS infrastructures which allow efficient usage of the hardware distributed among (and owned by) different scientific administrative domains. In addition, the requirement of open source adoption has led to the choice of products like OpenStack by many organizations. We describe a use case of the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN) which resulted in the implementation of a unique cloud service, called ’Cloud Area Padovana’, which encompasses resources spread over two different sites: the INFN Legnaro National Laboratories and the INFN Padova division. We describe how this IaaS has been implemented, which technologies have been adopted and how services have been configured in high-availability (HA) mode. We also discuss how identity and authorization management were implemented, adopting a widely accepted standard architecture based on SAML2 and OpenID: by leveraging the versatility of those standards the integration with authentication federations like IDEM was implemented. We also discuss some other innovative developments, such as a pluggable scheduler, implemented as an extension of the native OpenStack scheduler, which allows the allocation of resources according to a fair-share based model and which provides a persistent queuing mechanism for handling user requests that can not be immediately served. Tools, technologies, procedures used to install, configure, monitor, operate this cloud service are also discussed. Finally we present some examples that show how this IaaS infrastructure is being used.

  19. Material Surface Damage under High Pulse Loads Typical for ELM Bursts and Disruptions in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landman, I.S.; Pestchanyi, S.E.; Bazylev, B.N [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). Inst. for Pulsed Power and Microwave Technology; Safronov, V.M. [Troitsk Inst. for Innovation and Fusion Research (TRINITI) (Russian Federation); Garkusha, I.E. [Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology (KIPT) (Ukraine). Inst. of Plasma Physics

    2004-08-01

    The divertor armour material for the tokamak ITER will probably be carbon manufactured as fibre composites (CFC) and tungsten as either brush-like structures or thin plates. Disruptive pulse loads where the heat deposition Q may reach 10{sup 2} MJ/m{sup 2} on a time scale {tau} of 3 ms, or operation in the ELMy H-mode at repetitive loads with Q {approx} 3MJ/m{sup 2} and {tau}{approx}0.3 ms; deteriorate armour performance. This work surveys recent numerical and experimental investigations of erosion mechanisms at these off-normal regimes carried out at FZK, TRINITI, and IPP-Kharkov. The modelling uses the anisotropic thermomechanics code PEGASUS-3D for the simulation of CFC brittle destruction, the surface melt motion code MEMOS-1.5D for tungsten targets, and the radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code FOREV-2D for calculating the plasma impact and simulating the heat loads for the ITER regime. Experiments aimed at validating these codes are being carried out at the plasma gun facilities MK-200UG, QSPA-T, and QSPA-Kh50 which produce powerful streams of hydrogen plasma with Q=10-30MJ/m{sup 2} and {tau} = 0.03-0.5 ms. Essential results are, for CFC targets, the experiments at high heat loads and the development of a local overheating model incorporated in PEGASUS-3D, and for the tungsten targets the analysis of evaporation- and melt motion erosion on the base of MEMOS-1.5D calculations for repetitive ELMs.

  20. Material Surface Damage under High Pulse Loads Typical for ELM Bursts and Disruptions in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, I. S.; Pestchanyi, S. E.; Safronov, V. M.; Bazylev, B. N.; Garkusha, I. E.

    The divertor armour material for the tokamak ITER will probably be carbon manufactured as fibre composites (CFC) and tungsten as either brush-like structures or thin plates. Disruptive pulse loads where the heat deposition Q may reach 102 MJ/m 2 on a time scale Ïä of 3 ms, or operation in the ELMy H-mode at repetitive loads with Q âe 1/4 3 MJ/m2 and Ïä âe 1/4 0.3 ms, deteriorate armour performance. This work surveys recent numerical and experimental investigations of erosion mechanisms at these off-normal regimes carried out at FZK, TRINITI, and IPP-Kharkov. The modelling uses the anisotropic thermomechanics code PEGASUS-3D for the simulation of CFC brittle destruction, the surface melt motion code MEMOS-1.5D for tungsten targets, and the radiation-magnetohydrodynamics code FOREV-2D for calculating the plasma impact and simulating the heat loads for the ITER regime. Experiments aimed at validating these codes are being carried out at the plasma gun facilities MK-200UG, QSPA-T, and QSPA-Kh50 which produce powerful streams of hydrogen plasma with Q = 10–30 MJ/m2 and Ïä = 0.03–0.5 ms. Essential results are, for CFC targets, the experiments at high heat loads and the development of a local overheating model incorporated in PEGASUS-3D, and for the tungsten targets the analysis of evaporation- and melt motion erosion on the base of MEMOS-1.5D calculations for repetitive ELMs.

  1. High-Latitude Molecular Clouds in an H I Filament toward the MBM 53, 54, and 55 Complex: Existence of an H2 Cloud with Low CO Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, H.; Onishi, T.; Mizuno, A.; Fukui, Y.

    2003-07-01

    We carried out a CO survey of high Galactic latitude molecular clouds toward an H I filament that contains a molecular cloud complex, MBM 53, 54, and 55, with the NANTEN telescope. Our observation covered the whole area of the H I filament in 12CO (J=1-0) with a 4' grid spacing. The filament is found to consist of a number of clumpy molecular clouds, and we identified 110 12CO clouds in the region, whose total mass is estimated to be ~1200 Msolar. 13CO (J=1-0) observations were carried out toward the region of high 12CO intensities in order to measure the optical depth of molecular gas. There is no detection in C18O (J=1-0) line in the observed region, indicating that there are no clouds dense enough to form stars in the near future. These observations spatially resolved the entire gas distribution of MBM 53, 54, and 55 for the first time, and we have found a massive cloud, HLCG 92-35, around (l, b)~(92°, -35°) whose mass is ~330 Msolar, corresponding to ~1/4 of the total mass. This CO cloud occupies the Galactic western half of a circular H I cloud toward (l, b)=(93.5d, -35.5d), and the H I to CO mass ratio is estimated to be the largest in the observed region. The far-infrared excess over H I emission, which is a good indicator of an existence of molecular hydrogen, toward HLCG 92-35 is the largest in the observed region. The ratio of the luminosity of the infrared excess to CO mass is also significantly larger than those of the other clouds, by a factor of ~5. These facts indicate that HLCG 92-35 is a CO-forming molecular cloud, which is younger than the MBM clouds in terms of molecular cloud formation. Some past explosive event has been suggested toward the H I filament. Toward HLCG 92-35, the molecular gas distributed along the western edge of the H I cloud, which implies that the molecular gas may be formed by a compression of expanding H I shell.

  2. High-temperature condensate clouds in super-hot Jupiter atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeford, H. R.; Visscher, C.; Lewis, N. K.; Kataria, T.; Marley, M. S.; Fortney, J. J.; Mandell, A. M.

    2017-02-01

    Deciphering the role of clouds is central to our understanding of exoplanet atmospheres, as they have a direct impact on the temperature and pressure structure, and observational properties of the planet. Super-hot Jupiters occupy a temperature regime similar to low-mass M-dwarfs, where minimal cloud condensation is expected. However, observations of exoplanets such as WASP-12b (Teq ˜ 2500 K) result in a transmission spectrum indicative of a cloudy atmosphere. We re-examine the temperature and pressure space occupied by these super-hot Jupiter atmospheres, to explore the role of the initial Al- and Ti-bearing condensates as the main source of cloud material. Due to the high temperatures, a majority of the more common refractory material is not depleted into deeper layers and would remain in the vapour phase. The lack of depletion into deeper layers means that these materials with relatively low cloud masses can become significant absorbers in the upper atmosphere. We provide condensation curves for the initial Al- and Ti-bearing condensates which may be used to provide quantitative estimates of the effect of metallicity on cloud masses, as planets with metal-rich hosts potentially form more opaque clouds because more mass is available for condensation. Increased metallicity also pushes the point of condensation to hotter, deeper layers in the planetary atmosphere further increasing the density of the cloud. We suggest that planets around metal-rich hosts are more likely to have thick refractory clouds, and discuss the implication on the observed spectra of WASP-12b.

  3. Heads in the Cloud: A Primer on Neuroimaging Applications of High Performance Computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatil, Anwar S; Younas, Sohail; Pourreza, Hossein; Figley, Chase R

    2015-01-01

    With larger data sets and more sophisticated analyses, it is becoming increasingly common for neuroimaging researchers to push (or exceed) the limitations of standalone computer workstations. Nonetheless, although high-performance computing platforms such as clusters, grids and clouds are already in routine use by a small handful of neuroimaging researchers to increase their storage and/or computational power, the adoption of such resources by the broader neuroimaging community remains relatively uncommon. Therefore, the goal of the current manuscript is to: 1) inform prospective users about the similarities and differences between computing clusters, grids and clouds; 2) highlight their main advantages; 3) discuss when it may (and may not) be advisable to use them; 4) review some of their potential problems and barriers to access; and finally 5) give a few practical suggestions for how interested new users can start analyzing their neuroimaging data using cloud resources. Although the aim of cloud computing is to hide most of the complexity of the infrastructure management from end-users, we recognize that this can still be an intimidating area for cognitive neuroscientists, psychologists, neurologists, radiologists, and other neuroimaging researchers lacking a strong computational background. Therefore, with this in mind, we have aimed to provide a basic introduction to cloud computing in general (including some of the basic terminology, computer architectures, infrastructure and service models, etc.), a practical overview of the benefits and drawbacks, and a specific focus on how cloud resources can be used for various neuroimaging applications.

  4. Searching for Dark Matter Annihilation in the Smith High-Velocity Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drlica-Wagner, Alex; Gomez-Vargas, German A.; Hewitt, John W.; Linden, Tim; Tibaldo, Luigi

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that some high-velocity clouds may be confined by massive dark matter halos. In particular, the proximity and proposed dark matter content of the Smith Cloud make it a tempting target for the indirect detection of dark matter annihilation. We argue that the Smith Cloud may be a better target than some Milky Way dwarf spheroidal satellite galaxies and use gamma-ray observations from the Fermi Large Area Telescope to search for a dark matter annihilation signal. No significant gamma-ray excess is found coincident with the Smith Cloud, and we set strong limits on the dark matter annihilation cross section assuming a spatially extended dark matter profile consistent with dynamical modeling of the Smith Cloud. Notably, these limits exclude the canonical thermal relic cross section (approximately 3 x 10 (sup -26) cubic centimeters per second) for dark matter masses less than or approximately 30 gigaelectronvolts annihilating via the B/B- bar oscillation or tau/antitau channels for certain assumptions of the dark matter density profile; however, uncertainties in the dark matter content of the Smith Cloud may significantly weaken these constraints.

  5. Heads in the Cloud: A Primer on Neuroimaging Applications of High Performance Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatil, Anwar S.; Younas, Sohail; Pourreza, Hossein; Figley, Chase R.

    2015-01-01

    With larger data sets and more sophisticated analyses, it is becoming increasingly common for neuroimaging researchers to push (or exceed) the limitations of standalone computer workstations. Nonetheless, although high-performance computing platforms such as clusters, grids and clouds are already in routine use by a small handful of neuroimaging researchers to increase their storage and/or computational power, the adoption of such resources by the broader neuroimaging community remains relatively uncommon. Therefore, the goal of the current manuscript is to: 1) inform prospective users about the similarities and differences between computing clusters, grids and clouds; 2) highlight their main advantages; 3) discuss when it may (and may not) be advisable to use them; 4) review some of their potential problems and barriers to access; and finally 5) give a few practical suggestions for how interested new users can start analyzing their neuroimaging data using cloud resources. Although the aim of cloud computing is to hide most of the complexity of the infrastructure management from end-users, we recognize that this can still be an intimidating area for cognitive neuroscientists, psychologists, neurologists, radiologists, and other neuroimaging researchers lacking a strong computational background. Therefore, with this in mind, we have aimed to provide a basic introduction to cloud computing in general (including some of the basic terminology, computer architectures, infrastructure and service models, etc.), a practical overview of the benefits and drawbacks, and a specific focus on how cloud resources can be used for various neuroimaging applications. PMID:27279746

  6. An analysis of high cloud variability: imprints from the El Niño-Southern Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, King-Fai; Su, Hui; Mak, Sze-Ning; Chang, Tiffany M.; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Norris, Joel R.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2017-01-01

    Using data from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP), we examine how near-global (60°N-60°S) high cloud fraction varies over time in the past three decades. Our focus is on identifying dominant modes of variability and associated spatial patterns, and how they are related to sea surface temperature. By performing the principal component analysis, we find that the first two principal modes of high cloud distribution show strong imprints of the two types of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)—the canonical ENSO and the ENSO Modoki. Comparisons between ISCCP data and 14 models from the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (AMIP5) show that models simulate the spatial pattern and the temporal variations of high cloud fraction associated with the canonical ENSO very well but the magnitudes of the canonical ENSO vary among the models. Furthermore, the multi-model mean of the second principal mode in the AMIP5 simulations appears to capture the temporal behavior of the second mode but individual AMIP5 models show large discrepancies in capturing observed temporal variations. A new metric, defined by the relative variances of the first two principal components, suggests that most of the AMIP5 models overestimate the second principal mode of high clouds.

  7. Cell Model of In-cloud Scavenging of Highly Soluble Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baklanov, A.; Elperin, T.; Fominykh, A.; Krasovitov, B.

    2012-04-01

    Transport of soluble gases in clouds is an integral part of the atmospheric transport of gases and is important for understanding the global distribution pattern of soluble trace gases. In the present study we investigated mass transfer during absorption of highly soluble gases such as hydrogen peroxide H2O2 and nitric acid HNO3 by stagnant cloud droplets in the presence of inert admixtures. Diffusion interactions between droplets, caused by the overlap of depleted of soluble gas regions around the neighboring droplets, are taken into account in the approximation of a cellular model of a gas-droplet suspension whereby a suspension is viewed as a periodic structure consisting of the identical spherical cells with periodic boundary conditions at the cell boundary. Using this model we determined temporal and spatial dependencies of the concentration of the soluble trace gas in a gaseous phase and in a droplet and calculated the dependence of the scavenging coefficient on time. It is shown that scavenging of highly soluble gases by cloud droplets leads to essential decrease of soluble trace gas concentration in the interstitial air. We found that scavenging coefficient for gas absorption by cloud droplets remains constant and sharply decreases only at the final stage of absorption. This assertion implies the exponential time decay of the average concentration of the soluble trace gas in the gaseous phase and can be used for the parameterization of gas scavenging by cloud droplets in the atmospheric transport modeling. In the calculations we employed gamma size distribution of cloud droplets. It was shown that despite of the comparable values of Henry's law constants for the hydrogen peroxide and the nitric acid, the nitric acid is scavenged more effectively by cloud than the hydrogen peroxide due to a major affect of the dissociation reaction on nitric acid scavenging. We obtained also the analytical expressions for the "equilibrium values" of concentration of the

  8. Tool-based Risk Assessment of Cloud Infrastructures as Socio-Technical Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nidd, Michael; Ivanova, Marieta Georgieva; Probst, Christian W.

    2015-01-01

    Assessing risk in cloud infrastructures is difficult. Typical cloud infrastructures contain potentially thousands of nodes that are highly interconnected and dynamic. Another important component is the set of human actors who get access to data and computing infrastructure. The cloud infrastructure...... is extracted automatically from the configuration of the cloud infrastructure, which is especially important for systems so dynamic and complex....... exercise for cloud infrastructures using the socio-technical model developed in the TRESPASS project; after showing how to model typical components of a cloud infrastructure, we show how attacks are identified on this model and discuss their connection to risk assessment. The technical part of the model...

  9. The origins of ice crystals measured in mixed phase clouds at High-Alpine site Jungfraujoch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Lloyd

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available During the winter of 2013 and 2014 measurements of cloud microphysical properties over a five week period at the high Alpine site Jungfraujoch, Switzerland were carried out as part of the Cloud Aerosol Characterisation Experiments (CLACE and the Ice Nucleation Process Investigation and Quantification project (INUPIAQ Measurements of aerosol properties at a second, lower site, Schilthorn, Switzerland, were used as input for a primary ice nucleation scheme to predict ice nuclei concentrations at Jungfraujoch Frequent, rapid transitions in the ice and liquid properties of the clouds at Jungfraujoch were identified that led to large fluctuations in ice mass fractions over temporal scales of seconds to hours. During the measurement period we observed high concentrations of ice particles that exceeded 1000 L−1 at temperatures around −15 °C, verified by multiple instruments These concentrations could not be explained using the usual primary ice nucleation schemes, which predicted ice nucleus concentrations several orders of magnitude smaller than the peak ice crystal number concentrations. Secondary ice production through the Hallet–Mossop process as a possible explanation was ruled out, as the cloud was rarely within the active temperature range for this process It is shown that other mechanisms of secondary ice particle production cannot explain the highest ice particle concentrations. We describe 4 possible mechanisms that could lead to high cloud ice concentrations generated from the snow covered surfaces surrounding the measurement site. Of these we show that hoar frost crystals generated at the cloud enveloped snow surface could be the most important source of cloud ice concentrations Blowing snow was also observed to make significant contributions at higher wind speeds when ice crystal concentrations were −1.

  10. Overlap statistics of cumuliform boundary-layer cloud fields in large-eddy simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neggers, R.A.J.; Heus, T.; Siebesma, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    Overlap statistics of cumuliform boundary-layer clouds are studied using large-eddy simulations at high resolutions. The cloud overlap is found to be highly inefficient, due to the typical irregularity of cumuliform clouds over a wide range of scales. The detection of such inefficient overlap is ena

  11. Cloud Computing (3)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Bai; Xu Liutong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Editor's Desk: In the preceding two parts of this series, several aspects of cloud computing-including definition, classification, characteristics, typical applications, and service levels-were discussed. This part continues with a discussion of Cloud Computing Oopen Architecture and Market-Oriented Cloud. A comparison is made between cloud computing and other distributed computing technologies, and Google's cloud platform is analyzed to determine how distributed computing is implemented in its particular model.

  12. 一次典型层积云的飞机观测结果及与卫星资料的对比分析%In situ aircraft observations of one typical stratocumulus cloud process compared with the satellite measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵增亮; 毛节泰; 王磊; 魏强; 韩志刚; 李成才

    2011-01-01

    concentration, liquid water content and effective radius from the aircraft PMS measurements of 2 flights in Huabei Plain are analyzed in detail. The cloud microphysical parameters from the vertical observation of 5 ascending and descending legs were used in the SBDART (Santa Barbara D1SORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer) to simulate and compared with the data from the spectral channels of the GMS5/VISSR .and the N0AA15/AVHRR. And then a comparison between the simulation and the satellite reflective channel measurements was completed. The in situ measurements show that the depth of stratocumulus cloud is about 1000 m, the maximum cloud droplet concentration is 425 cm-3 , and the maximum liquid water content is 0. 2 g/m3. During the first flight, the average values of cloud droplet concentration, liquid water content, and effective radius are 225 ± 75 cm-3, 0. 08 ± 0. 03 g/m3 and 7. 2 ± 1. 6 μm, respectively. During the second flight, the average values of cloud droplet concentration, liquid water content, and effective radius are 196 ± 73 cm-3 , 0. 04 ± 0.02 g/m3 and 4.9 ± 1.4 μm, respectively. Based on the calculation of the average value at the vertical interval of 500 m, the average cloud effective radius is 6.1 ± 1. 7 μm, and the average stratocumulus cloud liquid water content (the cloud layer extends from 1000 to 1500 m) is typically 29. 5 ± 17. 5 g/m2. The sensitive analyses indicate that the visible channel reflectance is highly determined by the optical depth in the presence of cloud. In situ aircraft measurements were used to calculate the cloud albedo on the satellite spectral channel, and then the results were compared with the satellite measurements. The comparison shows that the relative bias is 7% with no systemic bias. It can be concluded that it is feasible to use aircraft measurements to calculate the cloud radiative properties. After the comparison with the similar observation in other countries, it indicates that the cloud water content calculated

  13. GPU based cloud system for high-performance arrhythmia detection with parallel k-NN algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tae Joon Jun; Hyun Ji Park; Hyuk Yoo; Young-Hak Kim; Daeyoung Kim

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose an GPU based Cloud system for high-performance arrhythmia detection. Pan-Tompkins algorithm is used for QRS detection and we optimized beat classification algorithm with K-Nearest Neighbor (K-NN). To support high performance beat classification on the system, we parallelized beat classification algorithm with CUDA to execute the algorithm on virtualized GPU devices on the Cloud system. MIT-BIH Arrhythmia database is used for validation of the algorithm. The system achieved about 93.5% of detection rate which is comparable to previous researches while our algorithm shows 2.5 times faster execution time compared to CPU only detection algorithm.

  14. High-mass star formation triggered by collision between CO filaments in N159 West in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Fukui, Yasuo; Tokuda, Kazuki; Morioka, Yuuki; Onishi, Toshikazu; Torii, Kazufumi; Ohama, Akio; Nayak, Omnarayani; Meixner, Margaret; Sewilo, Marta; Indebetouw, Remy; Kawamura, Akiko; Saigo, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Tachihara, Kengo; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Madden, Suzanna; Galametz, Maud; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Mizuno, Norikazu; Chen, Rosie

    2015-01-01

    We have carried out 13CO (J=2-1) observations of the active star-forming region N159 West in the LMC with ALMA. We have found that the CO distribution at a sub-pc scale is highly elongated with a small width. These elongated clouds called "filaments" show straight or curved distributions with a typical width of 0.5-1.0 pc and a length of 5-10 pc. All the known infrared YSOs are located toward the filaments. We have found broad CO wings of two molecular outflows toward young high-mass stars in N159W-N and N159W-S, whose dynamical timescale is ~10^4 yrs. This is the first discovery of protostellar outflow in external galaxies. For N159W-S which is located toward an intersection of two filaments we set up a hypothesis that the two filaments collided with each other ~10^5 yrs ago and triggered formation of the high-mass star having ~37Mo. The colliding clouds show significant enhancement in linewidth in the intersection, suggesting excitation of turbulence in the shocked interface layer between them as is consist...

  15. Probabilistic approach to cloud and snow detection on Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musial, J. P.; Hüsler, F.; Sütterlin, M.; Neuhaus, C.; Wunderle, S.

    2014-03-01

    Derivation of probability estimates complementary to geophysical data sets has gained special attention over the last years. Information about a confidence level of provided physical quantities is required to construct an error budget of higher-level products and to correctly interpret final results of a particular analysis. Regarding the generation of products based on satellite data a common input consists of a cloud mask which allows discrimination between surface and cloud signals. Further the surface information is divided between snow and snow-free components. At any step of this discrimination process a misclassification in a cloud/snow mask propagates to higher-level products and may alter their usability. Within this scope a novel probabilistic cloud mask (PCM) algorithm suited for the 1 km × 1 km Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data is proposed which provides three types of probability estimates between: cloudy/clear-sky, cloudy/snow and clear-sky/snow conditions. As opposed to the majority of available techniques which are usually based on the decision-tree approach in the PCM algorithm all spectral, angular and ancillary information is used in a single step to retrieve probability estimates from the precomputed look-up tables (LUTs). Moreover, the issue of derivation of a single threshold value for a spectral test was overcome by the concept of multidimensional information space which is divided into small bins by an extensive set of intervals. The discrimination between snow and ice clouds and detection of broken, thin clouds was enhanced by means of the invariant coordinate system (ICS) transformation. The study area covers a wide range of environmental conditions spanning from Iceland through central Europe to northern parts of Africa which exhibit diverse difficulties for cloud/snow masking algorithms. The retrieved PCM cloud classification was compared to the Polar Platform System (PPS) version 2012 and Moderate Resolution Imaging

  16. Ultraviolet, optical, and infrared observations of the high-latitude molecular cloud toward HD 210121

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Daniel E.; Fowler, James R.

    1992-01-01

    Low-resolution UV spectra of the B3 V star HD 210121, located behind the high-latitude molecular cloud DBB 80, yield an extinction curve exhibiting a far-UV rise that is among the steepest known. The apparently simple line of sight affords an excellent opportunity for investigating the absorption and emission characteristics of a single, isolated interstellar cloud characterized by extreme UV extinction. The low ratios of the IRAS bands with respect to I(100 microns) suggest that the radiation field incident on the cloud is lower than the average interstellar field, with further attenuation of the field within the cloud. The apparent relative enhancement of I(12 microns) compared with models of dust emission, and the extremely steep far-UV extinction together are consistent with the presence of an enhanced population of very small grains; the normal calcium depletion suggests that there has been little wholesale grain destruction. The steep far-UV extinction may help to explain the relatively high abundances of CO and CN. The disagreement in density for this cloud inferred from C2 absorption versus that inferred from CO emission may be due in part to clumping in the gas sample by the radio beams.

  17. Ultraviolet, optical, and infrared observations of the high-latitude molecular cloud toward HD 210121

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welty, Daniel E.; Fowler, James R.

    1992-01-01

    Low-resolution UV spectra of the B3 V star HD 210121, located behind the high-latitude molecular cloud DBB 80, yield an extinction curve exhibiting a far-UV rise that is among the steepest known. The apparently simple line of sight affords an excellent opportunity for investigating the absorption and emission characteristics of a single, isolated interstellar cloud characterized by extreme UV extinction. The low ratios of the IRAS bands with respect to I(100 microns) suggest that the radiation field incident on the cloud is lower than the average interstellar field, with further attenuation of the field within the cloud. The apparent relative enhancement of I(12 microns) compared with models of dust emission, and the extremely steep far-UV extinction together are consistent with the presence of an enhanced population of very small grains; the normal calcium depletion suggests that there has been little wholesale grain destruction. The steep far-UV extinction may help to explain the relatively high abundances of CO and CN. The disagreement in density for this cloud inferred from C2 absorption versus that inferred from CO emission may be due in part to clumping in the gas sample by the radio beams.

  18. High-performance computational condensed-matter physics in the cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehr, J. J.; Svec, L.; Gardner, J. P.; Prange, M. P.

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of high performance scientific computation in condensed-matter physics using cloud computers as an alternative to traditional computational tools. The availability of these large, virtualized pools of compute resources raises the possibility of a new compute paradigm for scientific research with many advantages. For research groups, cloud computing provides convenient access to reliable, high performance clusters and storage, without the need to purchase and maintain sophisticated hardware. For developers, virtualization allows scientific codes to be pre-installed on machine images, facilitating control over the computational environment. Detailed tests are presented for the parallelized versions of the electronic structure code SIESTA ootnotetextJ. Soler et al., J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 14, 2745 (2002). and for the x-ray spectroscopy code FEFF ootnotetextA. Ankudinov et al., Phys. Rev. B 65, 104107 (2002). including CPU, network, and I/O performance, using the the Amazon EC2 Elastic Cloud.

  19. Cloud radiative properties and aerosol - cloud interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viviana Vladutescu, Daniela; Gross, Barry; Li, Clement; Han, Zaw

    2015-04-01

    The presented research discusses different techniques for improvement of cloud properties measurements and analysis. The need for these measurements and analysis arises from the high errors noticed in existing methods that are currently used in retrieving cloud properties and implicitly cloud radiative forcing. The properties investigated are cloud fraction (cf) and cloud optical thickness (COT) measured with a suite of collocated remote sensing instruments. The novel approach makes use of a ground based "poor man's camera" to detect cloud and sky radiation in red, green, and blue with a high spatial resolution of 30 mm at 1km. The surface-based high resolution photography provides a new and interesting view of clouds. As the cloud fraction cannot be uniquely defined or measured, it depends on threshold and resolution. However as resolution decreases, cloud fraction tends to increase if the threshold is below the mean, and vice versa. Additionally cloud fractal dimension also depends on threshold. Therefore these findings raise concerns over the ability to characterize clouds by cloud fraction or fractal dimension. Our analysis indicate that Principal Component analysis may lead to a robust means of quantifying cloud contribution to radiance. The cloud images are analyzed in conjunction with a collocated CIMEL sky radiometer, Microwave Radiometer and LIDAR to determine homogeneity and heterogeneity. Additionally, MFRSR measurements are used to determine the cloud radiative properties as a validation tool to the results obtained from the other instruments and methods. The cloud properties to be further studied are aerosol- cloud interaction, cloud particle radii, and vertical homogeneity.

  20. Cloud Computing (1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Bai; Xu Liutong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Editor's Desk: Cloud computing is a topic of intense interest in the Internet field. Major IT giants have launched their own cloud computing products. This four-part lecture series will discuss cloud computing technology in the following aspects: The first part provides a brief description of the origin and characteristics of cloud computing from the users view of point; the other parts introduce typical applications of cloud computing, technically analyze the specific content within the cloud, its components, architecture and computational paradigm, compare cloud computing to other distributed computing technologies, and discuss its successful cases, commercial models, related technical and economic issues, and development trends.

  1. Cloud Computing (2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Bai; Xu Liutong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Editor's Desk: Cloud computing is a topic of intense interest in the Internet field. Major IT giants have launched their own cloud computing products. This four-part lecture series discusses cloud computing technology in the following aspects: The first part provided a brief description of the origin and characteristics of cloud computing from the users view of point; the other parts introduce typical applications of cloud computing, technically analyze the specific content within the cloud, its components, architecture and computational paradigm, compare cloud computing to other distributed computing technologies, and discuss its successful cases, commercial models, related technical and economic issues, and development trends.

  2. A Method for Obtaining High Frequency, Global, IR-Based Convective Cloud Tops for Studies of the TTL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Ueyama, Rei; Jensen, Eric; Schoeberl, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Models of varying complexity that simulate water vapor and clouds in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) show that including convection directly is essential to properly simulating the water vapor and cloud distribution. In boreal winter, for example, simulations without convection yield a water vapor distribution that is too uniform with longitude, as well as minimal cloud distributions. Two things are important for convective simulations. First, it is important to get the convective cloud top potential temperature correctly, since unrealistically high values (reaching above the cold point tropopause too frequently) will cause excessive hydration of the stratosphere. Second, one must capture the time variation as well, since hydration by convection depends on the local relative humidity (temperature), which has substantial variation on synoptic time scales in the TTL. This paper describes a method for obtaining high frequency (3-hourly) global convective cloud top distributions which can be used in trajectory models. The method uses rainfall thresholds, standard IR brightness temperatures, meteorological temperature analyses, and physically realistic and documented corrections IR brightness temperature corrections to derive cloud top altitudes and potential temperatures. The cloud top altitudes compare well with combined CLOUDSAT and CALIPSO data, both in time-averaged overall vertical and horizontal distributions and in individual cases (correlations of .65-.7). An important finding is that there is significant uncertainty (nearly .5 km) in evaluating the statistical distribution of convective cloud tops even using lidar. Deep convection whose tops are in regions of high relative humidity (such as much of the TTL), will cause clouds to form above the actual convection. It is often difficult to distinguish these clouds from the actual convective cloud due to the uncertainties of evaluating ice water content from lidar measurements. Comparison with models show that

  3. Atomic Hydrogen Gas in Dark-Matter Minihalos and the Compact High Velocity Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Sternberg, A; Wolfire, M G

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the coupled hydrostatic and ionization structures of pressure-supported gas clouds that are confined by gravitationally dominant dark-matter (DM) mini-halos and by an external bounding pressure provided by a hot medium. We focus on clouds that are photoionized and heated by the present-day background metagalactic field and determine the conditions for the formation of warm (WNM), and multi-phased (CNM/WNM) neutral atomic hydrogen (HI) cores in the DM-dominated clouds. We consider LCDM dark-matter halos, and we compute models for a wide range of halo masses, total cloud gas masses, and external bounding pressures. We present models for the pressure-supported HI structures observed in the Local Group dwarf galaxies Leo A and Sag DIG. We then construct minihalo models for the multi-phased (and low-metallicity) compact high-velocity HI clouds (CHVCs). If the CHVCs are drawn from the same family of halos that successfully reproduce the dwarf galaxy observations, then the CHVCs must be "circumgalactic ...

  4. X-RAY EMISSION FROM STELLAR JETS BY COLLISION AGAINST HIGH-DENSITY MOLECULAR CLOUDS: AN APPLICATION TO HH 248

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Santiago, J.; Ustamujic, S.; Castro, A. I. Gómez de [S. D. Astronomía y Geodesia, Facultad de Ciencias Matemáticas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Bonito, R.; Orlando, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Orellana, M. [Sede Andina de la Universidad Nacional de Río Negro (Argentina); Miceli, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Albacete-Colombo, J. F. [Sede Atlántica de la Universidad Nacional de Río Negro, Don Bosco y Leloir s/n, 8500 Viedma RN (Argentina); Castro, E. de [Dpto. de Astrofísica y CC. de la Atmósfera, Facultad de Física, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-06-10

    We investigate the plausibility of detecting X-ray emission from a stellar jet that impacts a dense molecular cloud, a scenario that may be typical for classical T Tauri stars with jets in dense star-forming complexes. We first model the impact of a jet against a dense cloud using two-dimensional axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations, exploring different configurations of the ambient environment. Then, we compare our results with XMM-Newton observations of the Herbig–Haro object HH 248, where extended X-ray emission aligned with the optical knots is detected at the edge of the nearby IC 434 cloud. Our simulations show that a jet can produce plasma with temperatures up to 10{sup 7} K, consistent with production of X-ray emission, after impacting a dense cloud. We find that jets denser than the ambient medium but less dense than the cloud produce detectable X-ray emission only at impact with the cloud. From an exploration of the model parameter space, we constrain the physical conditions (jet density and velocity and cloud density) that reproduce the intrinsic luminosity and emission measure of the X-ray source possibly associated with HH 248 well. Thus, we suggest that the extended X-ray source close to HH 248 corresponds to a jet impacting a dense cloud.

  5. 3D High Resolution l1-SPIRiT Reconstruction on Gadgetron based Cloud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Hui; Kelmann, Peter; Inati, Souheil;

    Applying non-linear reconstruction to high resolution 3D MRI is challenging because of the lengthy computing time needed for those iterative algorithms. To achieve practical processing duration to enable clinical usage of non-linear reconstruction, we have extended previously published Gadgetron...... framework to support distributed computing in a cloud environment. This extension is named GT-Plus. A cloud version of 3D l1-SPIRiT was implemented on the GT-Plus framework. We demonstrate that a 3mins reconstruction could be achieved for 1mm3 isotropic resolution neuro scans with significantly improved...

  6. C2DF: High Rate DDOS filtering method in Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pourya Shamsolmoali

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Distributed Denial of Service (DDOS attacks have become one of the main threats in cloud environment. A DDOS attack can make large scale of damages to resources and access of the resources to genuine cloud users. Old-established defending system cannot be easily applied in cloud computing due to their relatively low competence and wide storage. In this paper we offered a data mining and neural network technique, trained to detect and filter DDOS attacks. For the simulation experiments we used KDD Cup dataset and our lab datasets. Our proposed model requires small storage and ability of fast detection. The obtained results indicate that our model has the ability to detect and filter most type of TCP attacks. Detection accuracy was the metric used to evaluate the performance of our proposed model. From the simulation results, it is visible that our algorithms achieve high detection accuracy (97% with fewer false alarms.

  7. Detection of CH and CH+ in a high latitude molecular cloud

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de C.P.; Dishoeck, van E.F.

    1988-01-01

    Interstellar absorption lines of CH and CH(+) have been detected toward the star HD 210121, which is located behind a previously unknown high-latitude cloud. The CH observations and the measured extinction toward the star provide independent measures of the H2 column density along the line of sight,

  8. High-resolution mapping of Martian water ice clouds using Mars Express OMEGA observations - Derivation of the diurnal cloud life cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szantai, Andre; Audouard, Joachim; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Forget, Francois; Pottier, Alizée; Millour, Ehouarn; Gondet, Brigitte; Langevin, Yves; Bibring, Jean-Pierre

    2016-10-01

    The mapping in space and time of water ice clouds can help to explain the Martian water cycle and atmospheric circulation. For this purpose, an ice cloud index (ICI) corresponding to the depth of a water ice absorption band at 3.4 microns is derived from a series of OMEGA images (spectels) covering 5 Martian years. The ICI values for the corresponding pixels are then binned on a high-resolution regular grid (1° longitude x 1° latitude x 5° Ls x 1 h local time) and averaged. Inside each bin, the cloud cover is calculated by dividing the number of pixels considered as cloudy (after comparison to a threshold) to the number of all (valid) pixelsWe compare the maps of clouds obtained around local time 14:00 with collocated TES cloud observations (which were only obtained around this time of the day). A good agreement is found.Averaged ICI compared to the water ice column variable from the Martian Climate Database (MCD) show a correct correlation (~0.5) , which increases when values limited to the tropics only are compared.The number of gridpoints containing ICI values is small ( ~1%), but by taking several neighbor gridpoints and over longer periods, we can observe a cloud life cycle during daytime. An example in the the tropics, around the northern summer solstice, shows a decrease of cloudiness in the morning followed by an increase in the afternoon.

  9. Automatic conversational scene analysis in children with Asperger syndrome/high-functioning autism and typically developing peers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavano, Alessandro; Pesarin, Anna; Murino, Vittorio; Cristani, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with Asperger syndrome/High Functioning Autism fail to spontaneously attribute mental states to the self and others, a life-long phenotypic characteristic known as mindblindness. We hypothesized that mindblindness would affect the dynamics of conversational interaction. Using generative models, in particular Gaussian mixture models and observed influence models, conversations were coded as interacting Markov processes, operating on novel speech/silence patterns, termed Steady Conversational Periods (SCPs). SCPs assume that whenever an agent's process changes state (e.g., from silence to speech), it causes a general transition of the entire conversational process, forcing inter-actant synchronization. SCPs fed into observed influence models, which captured the conversational dynamics of children and adolescents with Asperger syndrome/High Functioning Autism, and age-matched typically developing participants. Analyzing the parameters of the models by means of discriminative classifiers, the dialogs of patients were successfully distinguished from those of control participants. We conclude that meaning-free speech/silence sequences, reflecting inter-actant synchronization, at least partially encode typical and atypical conversational dynamics. This suggests a direct influence of theory of mind abilities onto basic speech initiative behavior.

  10. Automatic conversational scene analysis in children with Asperger syndrome/high-functioning autism and typically developing peers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Tavano

    Full Text Available Individuals with Asperger syndrome/High Functioning Autism fail to spontaneously attribute mental states to the self and others, a life-long phenotypic characteristic known as mindblindness. We hypothesized that mindblindness would affect the dynamics of conversational interaction. Using generative models, in particular Gaussian mixture models and observed influence models, conversations were coded as interacting Markov processes, operating on novel speech/silence patterns, termed Steady Conversational Periods (SCPs. SCPs assume that whenever an agent's process changes state (e.g., from silence to speech, it causes a general transition of the entire conversational process, forcing inter-actant synchronization. SCPs fed into observed influence models, which captured the conversational dynamics of children and adolescents with Asperger syndrome/High Functioning Autism, and age-matched typically developing participants. Analyzing the parameters of the models by means of discriminative classifiers, the dialogs of patients were successfully distinguished from those of control participants. We conclude that meaning-free speech/silence sequences, reflecting inter-actant synchronization, at least partially encode typical and atypical conversational dynamics. This suggests a direct influence of theory of mind abilities onto basic speech initiative behavior.

  11. Energy-Performance-Based Design-Build Process: Strategies for Procuring High-Performance Buildings on Typical Construction Budgets: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheib, J.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2014-08-01

    NREL experienced a significant increase in employees and facilities on our 327-acre main campus in Golden, Colorado over the past five years. To support this growth, researchers developed and demonstrated a new building acquisition method that successfully integrates energy efficiency requirements into the design-build requests for proposals and contracts. We piloted this energy performance based design-build process with our first new construction project in 2008. We have since replicated and evolved the process for large office buildings, a smart grid research laboratory, a supercomputer, a parking structure, and a cafeteria. Each project incorporated aggressive efficiency strategies using contractual energy use requirements in the design-build contracts, all on typical construction budgets. We have found that when energy efficiency is a core project requirement as defined at the beginning of a project, innovative design-build teams can integrate the most cost effective and high performance efficiency strategies on typical construction budgets. When the design-build contract includes measurable energy requirements and is set up to incentivize design-build teams to focus on achieving high performance in actual operations, owners can now expect their facilities to perform. As NREL completed the new construction in 2013, we have documented our best practices in training materials and a how-to guide so that other owners and owner's representatives can replicate our successes and learn from our experiences in attaining market viable, world-class energy performance in the built environment.

  12. Automatic Conversational Scene Analysis in Children with Asperger Syndrome/High-Functioning Autism and Typically Developing Peers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavano, Alessandro; Pesarin, Anna; Murino, Vittorio; Cristani, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with Asperger syndrome/High Functioning Autism fail to spontaneously attribute mental states to the self and others, a life-long phenotypic characteristic known as mindblindness. We hypothesized that mindblindness would affect the dynamics of conversational interaction. Using generative models, in particular Gaussian mixture models and observed influence models, conversations were coded as interacting Markov processes, operating on novel speech/silence patterns, termed Steady Conversational Periods (SCPs). SCPs assume that whenever an agent's process changes state (e.g., from silence to speech), it causes a general transition of the entire conversational process, forcing inter-actant synchronization. SCPs fed into observed influence models, which captured the conversational dynamics of children and adolescents with Asperger syndrome/High Functioning Autism, and age-matched typically developing participants. Analyzing the parameters of the models by means of discriminative classifiers, the dialogs of patients were successfully distinguished from those of control participants. We conclude that meaning-free speech/silence sequences, reflecting inter-actant synchronization, at least partially encode typical and atypical conversational dynamics. This suggests a direct influence of theory of mind abilities onto basic speech initiative behavior. PMID:24489674

  13. Antarctic clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Lachlan-Cope, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Sensitivity studies with global climate models show that, by their influence on the radiation balance, Antarctic clouds play a major role in the climate system, both directly at high southern latitudes and indirectly globally, as the local circulation changes lead to global teleconnections. Unfortunately, observations of cloud distribution in the Antarctic are limited and often of low quality because of the practical difficulty in observing clouds in the harsh Antarctic environment. The best ...

  14. Small Scale Structure at High Redshift II. Physical Properties of the CIV Absorbing Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Rauch, M; Barlow, T A; Rauch, Michael; Sargent, Wallace L.W.; Barlow, Thomas A.

    2001-01-01

    Keck HIRES spectra were obtained of the separate images of three gravitationally lensed QSOs (UM 673, Q1104-1804, and Q1422+2309). We studied the velocity and column density differences in CIV doublets in each QSO. Unlike the low ionization gas clouds typical of the interstellar gas in the Galaxy or damped Ly alpha galaxies, the spatial density distribution of CIV absorbing gas clouds turns out to be mostly featureless on scales up to a few hundred parsecs, with column density differences rising to 50 percent or more over separations beyond a few kpc. Similarly, velocity shear becomes detectable only over distances larger than a few hundred pc, rising to 70 km/s at a few kpc. The energy transmitted to the gas is substantially less than in present day star-forming regions, and the gas is less turbulent on a given spatial scale than, e.g., local HII regions. The quiescence of CIV clouds, taken with their probable low density, imply that these objects are not internal to galaxies. The CIV absorbers could be gas ...

  15. Tool-based risk assessment of cloud infrastructures as socio-technical systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nidd, Michael; Ivanova, Marieta Georgieva; Probst, Christian W.; Tanner, Axel; Ko, Ryan; Choo, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Assessing risk in cloud infrastructures is difficult. Typical cloud infrastructures contain potentially thousands of nodes that are highly interconnected and dynamic. Another important component is the set of human actors who get access to data and computing infrastructure. The cloud infrastructure

  16. Tool-based Risk Assessment of Cloud Infrastructures as Socio-Technical Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nidd, Michael; Ivanova, Marieta Georgieva; Probst, Christian W.; Tanner, Axel; Ko, Ryan; Choo, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Assessing risk in cloud infrastructures is difficult. Typical cloud infrastructures contain potentially thousands of nodes that are highly interconnected and dynamic. Another important component is the set of human actors who get access to data and computing infrastructure. The cloud infrastructure

  17. High-resolution WRF simulation of cloud properties over the super typhoon Haiyan: physics parameterizations and comparison against MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Tanvir; Srivastava, Prashant K.; Dai, Qiang

    2016-11-01

    Numerical weather prediction (NWP) models can complement the satellite technology in simulating the cloud properties, especially in extreme storm events, when gathering new data becomes more than essential for accurate weather forecasting. In this study, we investigate the capability of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to realistically simulate some important cloud properties in high-resolution grids, such as cloud phase (e.g., liquid or ice) and cloud water path. The sensitivity of different combinations of physics parameterizations to the simulated cloud fields is studied. The experiment is conducted on a super typhoon event by configuring the WRF model in two domains, with two-way nesting, allowing bidirectional information exchange between the parent and the nest. In order to do the assessment, the simulated cloud fields are compared against MODIS-derived cloud properties from one overpass scene. While the simulations have been able to capture the spatial distribution of cloud properties reasonably well, produced cloud quantities such as ice water path has been significantly overestimated when compared to the MODIS optical cloud information. The microphysics parameterizations are found to be more sensitive than the planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterizations.

  18. Distributions and radiative forcings of various cloud types based on active and passive satellite datasets – Part 1: Geographical distributions and overlap of cloud types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Li

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on four year' 2B-CLDCLASS-Lidar (Radar-Lidar cloud classification product from CloudSat, we analyze the geographical distributions of different cloud types and their co-occurrence frequency across different seasons, moreover, utilize the vertical distributions of cloud type to further evaluate the cloud overlap assumptions. The statistical results show that more high clouds, altocumulus, stratocumulus or stratus and cumulus are identified in the Radar-Lidar cloud classification product compared to previous results from Radar-only cloud classification (2B-CLDCLASS product from CloudSat. In particularly, high clouds and cumulus cloud fractions increased by factors 2.5 and 4–7, respectively. The new results are in more reasonable agreement with other datasets (typically the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP and surface observer reports. Among the cloud types, altostratus and altocumulus are more popular over the arid/semi-arid land areas of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, respectively. These features weren't observed by using the ISCCP D1 dataset. For co-occurrence of cloud types, high cloud, altostratus, altocumulus and cumulus are much more likely to co-exist with other cloud types. However, stratus/stratocumulus, nimbostratus and convective clouds are much more likely to exhibit individual features. After considering the co-occurrence of cloud types, the cloud fraction based on the random overlap assumption is underestimated over the vast ocean except in the west-central Pacific Ocean warm pool. Obvious overestimations are mainly occurring over land areas in the tropics and subtropics. The investigation therefore indicates that incorporate co-occurrence information of cloud types based on Radar-Lidar cloud classification into the overlap assumption schemes used in the current GCMs possible be able to provide an better predictions for vertically projected total cloud fraction.

  19. Dual wavelength lidar observation of tropical high-altitude cirrus clouds during the ALBATROSS 1996 Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyerle, G.; Schäfer, H.-J.; Neuber, R.; Schrems, O.; McDermid, I. S.

    Dual wavelength aerosol lidar observations of tropical high-altitude cirrus clouds were performed during the ALBATROSS 1996 campaign aboard the research vessel “POLARSTERN” on the Atlantic ocean in October-November 1996. On the basis of 57 hours of night-time observations between 23.5°N and 23.5°S we find in 72% of the altitude profiles indications of the presence of cirrus cloud layers. This percentage drops to 32% at subtropical latitudes (23.5°-30°) based on 15 hours of data. About one-half of the subtropical and tropical cirrus layers are subvisual with an optical depth of less than 0.03 at a wavelength of 532 nm. In general the clouds exhibit high spatial and temporal variability on scales of a few tens of meters vertically and a few hundred meters horizontally. No clouds are observed above the tropopause. An abrupt change in the relation between the color ratios of the parallel and perpendicular backscatter coefficients at about 240 K is interpreted in terms of changes of particle shape and/or size distribution. At temperatures between 195 and 255 K only a small fraction of the observations are consistent with the presence of small particles with dimensions of less than 0.1 µm.

  20. The Collisions Of High-Velocity Clouds With A Magnetized Gaseous Galactic Disk

    CERN Document Server

    Santillan, A; Martos, M A; Kim, J; Santillan, Alfredo; Franco, Jose; Martos, Marco; Kim, Jongsoo

    1999-01-01

    We present two-dimensional MHD numerical simulations for the interaction of high-velocity clouds with both magnetic and non-magnetic Galactic thick gaseous disks. For the magnetic models, the initial magnetic field is oriented parallel to the disk, and we consider two different field topologies (with and without tension effects): parallel and perpendicular to the plane of motion of the clouds. The impinging clouds move in oblique trajectories and fall toward the central disk with different initial velocities. The $B$-field lines are distorted and compressed during the collision, increasing the field pressure and tension. This prevents the cloud material from penetrating into the disk, and can even transform a high-velocity inflow into an outflow, moving away from the disk. The perturbation creates a complex, turbulent, pattern of MHD waves that are able to traverse the disk of the Galaxy, and induce oscillations on both sides of the plane. Thus, the magnetic field efficiently transmits the perturbation over a...

  1. The high-latitude cloud MBM 7. I. H I and CO observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minh, Y. C.; Park, Y. S.; Kim, K. T.; Irvine, W. M.; Brewer, M. K.; Turner, B. E.

    1996-01-01

    The high-latitude cloud (HLC) MBM 7 has been observed in the 21 cm H I line and the 12CO(1-0) and 13CO(1-0) lines with similar spatial resolutions. The data reveal a total mass approximately 30 M solar for MBM 7 and a complex morphology. The cloud consists of a cold dense core of 5 M solar surrounded by atomic and molecular gas with about 25 M solar, which is embedded in hotter and more diffuse H I gas. We derive a total column density N(H I + 2H2) of 1 x 10(21) cm-2 toward the center and 1 x 10(20) cm-3 toward the envelope of MBM 7. The CO line indicates the existence of dense cores [n(H2) > or = 2000 cm-3] of size (FWHM) approximately 0.5 pc. The morphology suggests shock compression from the southwest direction, which can form molecular cores along the direction perpendicular to the H I distribution. The H I cloud extends to the northeast, and the velocity gradient appears to be about 2.8 km s-1 pc-1 in this direction, which indicates a systematic outward motion which will disrupt the cloud in approximately 10(6) yr. The observed large line widths of approximately 2 km s-1 for CO suggest that turbulent motions exist in the cloud, and hydrodynamical turbulence may dominate the line broadening. Considering the energy and pressure of MBM 7, the dense cores appear not to be bound by gravity, and the whole cloud including the dense cores seem to be expanding. The distance to HLCs suggest that they belong to the galactic plane, since the scale height of the cloud is < or approximately equal to 100 pc. Compared to the more familiar dense dark clouds, HLCs may differ only in their small mass and low density, with their proximity reducing the filling factor and enhancing the contrast of the core and envelope structure.

  2. Dst prediction for a period of high-density plasmas in magnetic clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, H.; Sakurai, T.

    We examine geomagnetic effects for high-density plasmas in magnetic clouds and their relationship to solar sources. It is well known that Bz component of interplanetary magnetic field plays an important role for estimation of Dst from solar wind parameters (Burton et al.1975). However, magnetic clouds frequently carry high-density plasmas, which are interpreted as the remnants of filament. In order to clarify their geomagnetic effects, we try to estimate Dst by adopting different methods introducing effects of solar wind parameters. In our estimation the most important point is laid on the sense of Dst variation rather than its magnitude. The most suitable estimation is obtained by setting up a threshold for plasma density, in which for a case of plasma density greater than 20 /cc the Fenrich and Luhmann (1998)'s formula should be used, while in the other cases the Burton's formula are adopted. In both estimations the O'Brien and McPherron (2000)'s ring current decay time is employed. Furthermore, we examine the solar origin corresponding to the magnetic clouds and then compared characteristic signatures of the magnetic cloud with those observed on the solar surface. As a result, we confirm that the magnetic structure of interplanetary flux rope is in good agreement with the structures of the magnetic neutral line near disappearing filaments and heliospheric current sheet (HCS). On the basis of these studies, we suggest that for the geomagnetic disturbance forecast, the effect of high-density plasmas carried with magnetic clouds should be taken into account of as well as that of interplanetary magnetic field.

  3. The kinetic chemistry of dense interstellar clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graedel, T. E.; Langer, W. D.; Frerking, M. A.

    1982-01-01

    A model of the time-dependent chemistry of dense interstellar clouds is formulated to study the dominant chemical processes in carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation, the formation of nitrogen-containing molecules, and the evolution of product molecules as a function of cloud density and temperature. The abundances of the dominant isotopes of the carbon- and oxygen-bearing molecules are calculated. The chemical abundances are found to be quite sensitive to electron concentration since the electron concentration determines the ratio of H3(+) to He(+), and the electron density is strongly influenced by the metals abundance. For typical metal abundances and for H2 cloud density not less than 10,000 molecules/cu cm, nearly all carbon exists as CO at late cloud ages. At high cloud density, many aspects of the chemistry are strongly time dependent. Finally, model calculations agree well with abundances deduced from observations of molecular line emission in cold dense clouds.

  4. Energy Efficiency and Capacity Tradeoff in Cloud Radio Access Network of High-Speed Railways

    OpenAIRE

    Shichao Li; Gang Zhu; Siyu Lin; Qian Gao; Lei Xiong; Weiliang Xie; Xiaoyu Qiao

    2017-01-01

    To meet the increasing demand of high-data-rate services of high-speed railway (HSR) passengers, cloud radio access network (C-RAN) is proposed. This paper investigates the tradeoff between energy efficiency (EE) performance and capacity in C-RAN of HSR. Considering that the train location can be predicted, we propose a predictable path loss based time domain power allocation method (PPTPA) to improve EE performance of HSR communication system. First, we consider that the communication system...

  5. Tropical deep convective life cycle: Cb-anvil cloud microphysics from high-altitude aircraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, W.; Borrmann, S.; Fierli, F.; Weigel, R.; Mitev, V.; Matthey, R.; Ravegnani, F.; Sitnikov, N. M.; Ulanovsky, A.; Cairo, F.

    2014-12-01

    The case study presented here focuses on the life cycle of clouds in the anvil region of a tropical deep convective system. During the SCOUT-O3 campaign from Darwin, Northern Australia, the Hector storm system has been probed by the Geophysica high-altitude aircraft. Clouds were observed by in situ particle probes, a backscatter sonde, and a miniature lidar. Additionally, aerosol number concentrations have been measured. On 30 November 2005 a double flight took place and Hector was probed throughout its life cycle in its developing, mature, and dissipating stage. The two flights were four hours apart and focused on the anvil region of Hector in altitudes between 10.5 and 18.8 km (i.e. above 350 K potential temperature). Trajectory calculations, satellite imagery, and ozone measurements have been used to ensure that the same cloud air masses have been probed in both flights. The size distributions derived from the measurements show a change not only with increasing altitude but also with the evolution of Hector. Clearly different cloud to aerosol particle ratios as well as varying ice crystal morphology have been found for the different development stages of Hector, indicating different freezing mechanisms. The development phase exhibits the smallest ice particles (up to 300 μm) with a rather uniform morphology. This is indicative for rapid glaciation during Hector's development. Sizes of ice crystals are largest in the mature stage (larger than 1.6 mm) and even exceed those of some continental tropical deep convective clouds, also in their number concentrations. The backscatter properties and particle images show a change in ice crystal shape from the developing phase to rimed and aggregated particles in the mature and dissipating stages; the specific shape of particles in the developing phase cannot be distinguished from the measurements. Although optically thin, the clouds in the dissipating stage have a large vertical extent (roughly 6 km) and persist for at

  6. A Convective Cloud Feedback and Spring Arctic Sea Ice Forecasting at High CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbot, D. S.; Walker, C. C.; Tziperman, E.

    2008-12-01

    Winter and spring sea ice dramatically cool the Arctic climate during the the coldest seasons of the year and may have remote effects on global climate as well. Accurate forecasting of winter and spring sea ice has significant social and economic benefits. Such forecasting requires the identification and understanding of all the feedbacks that can affect sea ice. A novel convective cloud feedback has recently been proposed in the context of explaining equable climates, e.g., the climate of the Eocene, that might be important for determining future winter and spring sea ice. In this feedback CO2 -initiated warming leads to sea ice reduction, which which allows increased heat and moisture fluxes from the ocean surface, which destabilizes the atmosphere and leads to atmospheric convection. This atmospheric convection produces high and optically thick convective clouds and increases high-altitude moisture levels, both of which trap outgoing longwave radiation and therefore result in a further warming and sea ice loss. Here it is shown that this convective cloud feedback is active during winter in the coupled ocean-sea ice-land-atmosphere global climate models used for the 1%/year CO2 increase to quadrupling scenario of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) fourth assessment report. It is further shown that the convective cloud feedback plays an essential role in the elimination of maximum seasonal (spring) sea ice in NCAR's CCSM model, one of the IPCC models that nearly completely loses spring sea ice. This is done by performing a sensitivity analysis using the atmospheric component of CCSM, run at a CO2 concentration of 1120 ppm, by selectively disabling the convective cloud feedback and the ocean heat transport feedback. The result is that both feedbacks are necessary for the elimination of spring sea ice at this CO2 concentration.

  7. Modeling of Polar Precipitation with CloudSat, AIRS and High Frequency Microwave Radiometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, F. J.; Park, K.; Wang, N.; Haddad, Z. S.

    2009-12-01

    While measuring and monitoring precipitation in polar regions is difficult, recent studies have shown that microwave radiances measured by operational high-frequency sounders, such as the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) and the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS), are sensitive to falling snow, though the frozen surface makes it very difficult to retrieve snowfall rates from these radiometric measurements. Since the microwave sounding channels are sensitive to the variable surface emissivity, the crucial step was to classify these data according to fractional ice coverage (derived from AMSR-E) and use principal component analyses to further separate the variations due to the radiometric signatures of the precipitation from that of the surface. These results quantify the correlation between the higher principal components of the microwave radiances and the CloudSat radar reflectivity profile. Further radiative transfer modeling of the polar atmosphere is done using the AIRS temperature and moisture profiles to specify the background atmosphere. We relate the simulated microwave radiances to the near-surface precipitation itself, by considering several hydrometeor habit and size distributions and super-cooled cloud liquid fractions, performing reflectivity-to-snow-content retrievals from the CloudSat radar profiles of ice and liquid water content.. With this methodology, one can simulate polar precipitation observations systematically utilizing these time/space matched measurements from the CloudSat radar and polar-orbiting high-frequency radiometers such as MHS or the SSMIS. In turn, this will help evaluate the realism of numerical models and their microphysical assumptions, particularly as the latter appear to have significant difficulties representing Arctic clouds accurately.

  8. Achieving High Performance Distributed System: Using Grid, Cluster and Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kr Singh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To increase the efficiency of any task, we require a system that would provide high performance along with flexibilities and cost efficiencies for user. Distributed computing, as we are all aware, has become very popular over the past decade. Distributed computing has three major types, namely, cluster, grid and cloud. In order to develop a high performance distributed system, we need to utilize all the above mentioned three types of computing. In this paper, we shall first have an introduction of all the three types of distributed computing. Subsequently examining them we shall explore trends in computing and green sustainable computing to enhance the performance of a distributed system. Finally presenting the future scope, we conclude the paper suggesting a path to achieve a Green high performance distributed system using cluster, grid and cloud computing

  9. Observation of cloud-to-ground lightning channels with high-speed video camera

    CERN Document Server

    Buguet, M; Blanchet, P; Pédeboy, S; Barnéoud, P; Laroche, P

    2014-01-01

    Between May and October 2013 (period of sustained thunderstorm activity in France), several cloud-to-ground lightning flashes have been observed in Paris area with a high-speed video camera (14000 frames per second). The localization and the polarity of the recorded cloud-to-ground flashes have been obtained from the French lightning detection network M{\\'e}t{\\'e}orage which is equipped with the same low frequency sensors used by the US NLDN. In this paper we focused on 7 events (3 positive cloud-to-ground lightning flashes and 4 negative cloud-to-ground lightning flashes). The propagation velocity of the leaders and its temporal evolution have been estimated; the evolution of branching of the negative leaders have been observed during the propagation of the channel which get connected to ground and initiate the first return stroke. One aim of this preliminary study is to emphasize the differences between the characteristics of the positive and of the negative leaders.

  10. Implications of Observed High Supersaturation for TTL Cloud Formation and Dehydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Eric

    2004-01-01

    In situ measurements of water vapor concentration made during the CRYSTAL-FACE and Pre-AVE missions indicate higher than expected supersaturations in both clear and cloudy air near the cold tropical tropopause: (1) steady-state ice supersaturations of 20-30% were measured within cirrus at T supersaturations exceeding 100% (near water saturation) were observed under cloud-free conditions near 187 K. The in-cloud measurements challenge the conventional belief that any water vapor in excess of ice saturation should be depleted by crystal growth given sufficient time. The high clear-sky supersaturations imply that thresholds for ice nucleation due to homogeneous freezing of aerosols (or any other mechanism) are much higher than those inferred from laboratory measurements. We will use simulations of Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL) transport and cloud formation throughout the tropics to show that these effects have important implications for TTL cloud frequency and freeze-drying of air crossing the tropical tropopause cold trap.

  11. The penetration of plasma clouds across magnetic boundaries the role of high frequency oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Hurtig, T; Raadu, M A; Hurtig, Tomas; Brenning, Nils; Raadu, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    Experiments are reported where a collisionfree plasma cloud penetrates a magnetic barrier by self-polarization. We here focus on the resulting anomalous magnetic field diffusion into the plasma cloud, two orders of magnitude faster than classical, which is one important aspect of the plasma cloud penetration mechanism. Without such fast magnetic diffusion, clouds with kinetic beta below unity would not be able to penetrate magnetic barriers at all. Tailor-made diagnostics has been used for measurements in the parameter range with the kinetic beta ? 0.5 to 10, and with normalized width w/r(gi) of the order of unity. Experimental data on hf fluctuations in density and in electric field has been combined to yield the effective anomalous transverse resistivity eta(EFF). It is concluded that they are both dominated by highly nonlinear oscillations in the lower hybrid range, driven by a strong diamagnetic current loop that is set up in the plasma in the penetration process. The anomalous magnetic diffusion rate, ca...

  12. On the Metallicity and Origin of the Smith High-Velocity Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, Andrew J; Lockman, Felix J; Wakker, Bart P; Hill, Alex S; Heitsch, Fabian; Stark, David V; Barger, Kathleen A; Sembach, Kenneth R; Rahman, Mubdi

    2015-01-01

    The Smith Cloud is a gaseous high-velocity cloud (HVC) in an advanced state of accretion, only 2.9 kpc below the Galactic plane and due to impact the disk in 27 Myr. It is unique among HVCs in having a known distance (12.4+/-1.3 kpc) and a well-constrained 3D velocity (296 km/s), but its origin has long remained a mystery. Here we present the first absorption-line measurements of its metallicity, using HST/COS UV spectra of three AGN lying behind the Cloud together with Green Bank Telescope 21 cm spectra of the same directions. Using Voigt-profile fitting of the S II 1250, 1253, 1259 triplet together with ionization corrections derived from photoionization modeling, we derive the sulfur abundance in each direction; a weighted average of the three measurements gives [S/H]=-0.28+/-0.14, or 0.53+0.21-0.15 solar metallicity. The finding that the Smith Cloud is metal-enriched lends support to scenarios where it represents recycled Galactic material rather than the remnant of a dwarf galaxy or accreting intergalact...

  13. Building a LiDAR point cloud simulator: Testing algorithms for high resolution topographic change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrea, Dario; Abellán, Antonio; Derron, Marc-Henri; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2014-05-01

    Terrestrial laser technique (TLS) is becoming a common tool in Geosciences, with clear applications ranging from the generation of a high resolution 3D models to the monitoring of unstable slopes and the quantification of morphological changes. Nevertheless, like every measurement techniques, TLS still has some limitations that are not clearly understood and affect the accuracy of the dataset (point cloud). A challenge in LiDAR research is to understand the influence of instrumental parameters on measurement errors during LiDAR acquisition. Indeed, different critical parameters interact with the scans quality at different ranges: the existence of shadow areas, the spatial resolution (point density), and the diameter of the laser beam, the incidence angle and the single point accuracy. The objective of this study is to test the main limitations of different algorithms usually applied on point cloud data treatment, from alignment to monitoring. To this end, we built in MATLAB(c) environment a LiDAR point cloud simulator able to recreate the multiple sources of errors related to instrumental settings that we normally observe in real datasets. In a first step we characterized the error from single laser pulse by modelling the influence of range and incidence angle on single point data accuracy. In a second step, we simulated the scanning part of the system in order to analyze the shifting and angular error effects. Other parameters have been added to the point cloud simulator, such as point spacing, acquisition window, etc., in order to create point clouds of simple and/or complex geometries. We tested the influence of point density and vitiating point of view on the Iterative Closest Point (ICP) alignment and also in some deformation tracking algorithm with same point cloud geometry, in order to determine alignment and deformation detection threshold. We also generated a series of high resolution point clouds in order to model small changes on different environments

  14. Redundant Wavelets on Graphs and High Dimensional Data Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Ram, Idan; Cohen, Israel

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new redundant wavelet transform applicable to scalar functions defined on high dimensional coordinates, weighted graphs and networks. The proposed transform utilizes the distances between the given data points. We modify the filter-bank decomposition scheme of the redundant wavelet transform by adding in each decomposition level linear operators that reorder the approximation coefficients. These reordering operators are derived by organizing the tree-node features so as to shorten the path that passes through these points. We explore the use of the proposed transform to image denoising, and show that it achieves denoising results that are close to those obtained with the BM3D algorithm.

  15. Electron cloud instability in high intensity proton rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ohmi

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available An e^{-}p instability has been observed in some proton rings. The instability, which causes beam loss, limits the performance of the ring. The instability may be serious for 3 and 50 GeV proton storage rings in the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC. We study the e^{-}p instability in several high intensity proton storage rings operated in the world. This work informs J-PARC of the necessity to cure the instability, for example, by applying a TiN coating on the chamber surface.

  16. High-Resolution Images of Diffuse Neutral Clouds in the Milky Way. I. Observations, Imaging, and Basic Cloud Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Pidopryhora, Yurii; Dickey, John M; Rupen, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    A set of diffuse interstellar clouds in the inner Galaxy within a few hundred pc of the Galactic plane has been observed at an angular resolution of ~1 arcmin combining data from the NRAO Green Bank Telescope and the Very Large Array. At the distance of the clouds the linear resolution ranges from ~1.9 pc to ~2.8 pc. These clouds have been selected to be somewhat out of the Galactic plane and are thus not confused with unrelated emission, but in other respects they are a Galactic population. They are located near the tangent points in the inner Galaxy, and thus at a quantifiable distance: $2.3 \\leq R \\leq 6.0$ kpc from the Galactic Center, and $-1000 \\leq z \\leq +610$ pc from the Galactic plane. These are the first images of the diffuse neutral HI clouds that may constitute a considerable fraction of the ISM. Peak HI column densities range from $N_{HI} = 0.8-2.9 \\times 10^{20}$ cm$^{-2}$. Cloud diameters vary between about 10 and 100 pc, and their HI mass spans the range from less than a hundred to a few thou...

  17. 3D MODELING OF GJ1214b's ATMOSPHERE: FORMATION OF INHOMOGENEOUS HIGH CLOUDS AND OBSERVATIONAL IMPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charnay, B.; Meadows, V.; Misra, A.; Arney, G. [Astronomy Department, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98125 (United States); Leconte, J., E-mail: bcharnay@uw.edu [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St George Street, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2015-11-01

    The warm sub-Neptune GJ1214b has a featureless transit spectrum that may be due to the presence of high and thick clouds or haze. Here, we simulate the atmosphere of GJ1214b with a 3D General Circulation Model for cloudy hydrogen-dominated atmospheres, including cloud radiative effects. We show that the atmospheric circulation is strong enough to transport micrometric cloud particles to the upper atmosphere and generally leads to a minimum of cloud at the equator. By scattering stellar light, clouds increase the planetary albedo to 0.4–0.6 and cool the atmosphere below 1 mbar. However, the heating by ZnS clouds leads to the formation of a stratospheric thermal inversion above 10 mbar, with temperatures potentially high enough on the dayside to evaporate KCl clouds. We show that flat transit spectra consistent with Hubble Space Telescope observations are possible if cloud particle radii are around 0.5 μm, and that such clouds should be optically thin at wavelengths >3 μm. Using simulated cloudy atmospheres that fit the observed spectra we generate transit, emission, and reflection spectra and phase curves for GJ1214b. We show that a stratospheric thermal inversion would be readily accessible in near- and mid-infrared atmospheric spectral windows. We find that the amplitude of the thermal phase curves is strongly dependent on metallicity, but only slightly impacted by clouds. Our results suggest that primary and secondary eclipses and phase curves observed by the James Webb Space Telescope in the near- to mid-infrared should provide strong constraints on the nature of GJ1214b's atmosphere and clouds.

  18. Matching dust emission structures and magnetic field in high-latitude cloud L1642: comparing Herschel and Planck maps

    CERN Document Server

    Malinen, J; Montillaud, J; Juvela, M; Ristorcelli, I; Clark, S E; Berné, O; Bernard, J -Ph; Pelkonen, V -M; Collins, D C

    2015-01-01

    The nearby cloud L1642 is one of only two known very high latitude (|b| > 30 deg) clouds actively forming stars. It is a rare example of star formation in isolated conditions, and can reveal important details of star formation in general, e.g., of the effect of magnetic fields. We compare Herschel dust emission structures and magnetic field orientation revealed by Planck polarization maps in L1642. The high-resolution (~18-40") Herschel data reveal a complex structure including a dense, compressed central blob with elongated extensions, low density striations, "fishbone" like structures with a spine and perpendicular striations, and a spiraling "tail". The Planck polarization data (at 10' resolution) reveal an ordered magnetic field pervading the cloud and aligned with the surrounding striations. There is a complex interplay between the cloud structure and large scale magnetic field. This suggests that magnetic field is closely linked to the formation and evolution of the cloud. CO rotational emission confirm...

  19. A Hybrid-Streaming Method for Cloud Gaming: To Improve the Graphics Quality delivered on Highly Accessible Game Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kar Long Chan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The emerging Cloud Gaming Service provides a highly accessible video gaming experience. With Cloud Gaming, potential players without enough local resource can access high-quality gaming using low-spec devices. With advancing technology, we consider that if the processing power at low-spec devices can be well harvested, the quality delivered on Cloud Gaming can be further improved. Therefore, we propose a Hybrid-Streaming System that aimed at improving the graphic quality delivered by Cloud Gaming. By utilizing the available rendering power from both the Cloud Server and client PC, the system distributes rendering operations to both sides to achieve the desired improvement. Quantitative results show the proposed method improves graphics quality, as well as reducing the server’s workload while attaining acceptable network bandwidth consumption levels.

  20. Distances to the high galactic latitude molecular clouds G192-67 and MBM 23-24

    CERN Document Server

    Grant, C E; Grant, Catherine E.; Burrows, David N.

    1999-01-01

    We report on distance determinations for two high Galactic latitude cloud complexes, G192-67 and MBM 23-24. No distance determination exists in the literature for either cloud. Thirty-four early type stars were observed towards the two clouds, more than half of which have parallaxes measured by the Hipparcos satellite. For the remaining stars we have made spectroscopic distance estimates. The data consist of high resolution echelle spectra centered on the Na I D lines, and were obtained over six nights at the Coude Feed telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory. Interstellar absorption lines were detected towards some of the stars, enabling estimates of the distances to the clouds of 109 +/- 14 pc for G192-67, and of 139 +/- 33 pc for MBM 23-24. We discuss the relationship of these clouds to other ISM features such as the Local Hot Bubble and the local cavity in neutral hydrogen.

  1. Cell Model of In-cloud Scavenging of Highly Soluble Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Baklanov, Alexander; Fominykh, Andrew; Krasovitov, Boris

    2012-01-01

    We investigate mass transfer during absorption of highly soluble gases such as HNO_{3}, H_{2}O_{2} by stagnant cloud droplets in the presence of inert admixtures. Thermophysical properties of the gases and liquids are assumed to be constant. Diffusion interactions between droplets, caused by the overlap of depleted of soluble gas regions around the neighboring droplets, are taken into account in the approximation of a cellular model of a gas-droplet suspension whereby a suspension is viewed as a periodic structure consisting of the identical spherical cells with periodic boundary conditions at the cell boundary. Using this model we determined temporal and spatial dependencies of the concentration of the soluble trace gas in a gaseous phase and in a droplet and calculated the dependence of the scavenging coefficient on time. It is shown that scavenging of highly soluble gases by cloud droplets leads to essential decrease of soluble trace gas concentration in the interstitial air. We found that scavenging coeff...

  2. Quantification of marine aerosol subgrid variability and its correlation with clouds based on high-resolution regional modeling: Quantifying Aerosol Subgrid Variability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Guangxing; Qian, Yun; Yan, Huiping; Zhao, Chun; Ghan, Steven J.; Easter, Richard C.; Zhang, Kai

    2017-06-16

    One limitation of most global climate models (GCMs) is that with the horizontal resolutions they typically employ, they cannot resolve the subgrid variability (SGV) of clouds and aerosols, adding extra uncertainties to the aerosol radiative forcing estimation. To inform the development of an aerosol subgrid variability parameterization, here we analyze the aerosol SGV over the southern Pacific Ocean simulated by the high-resolution Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled to Chemistry. We find that within a typical GCM grid, the aerosol mass subgrid standard deviation is 15% of the grid-box mean mass near the surface on a 1 month mean basis. The fraction can increase to 50% in the free troposphere. The relationships between the sea-salt mass concentration, meteorological variables, and sea-salt emission rate are investigated in both the clear and cloudy portion. Under clear-sky conditions, marine aerosol subgrid standard deviation is highly correlated with the standard deviations of vertical velocity, cloud water mixing ratio, and sea-salt emission rates near the surface. It is also strongly connected to the grid box mean aerosol in the free troposphere (between 2 km and 4 km). In the cloudy area, interstitial sea-salt aerosol mass concentrations are smaller, but higher correlation is found between the subgrid standard deviations of aerosol mass and vertical velocity. Additionally, we find that decreasing the model grid resolution can reduce the marine aerosol SGV but strengthen the correlations between the aerosol SGV and the total water mixing ratio (sum of water vapor, cloud liquid, and cloud ice mixing ratios).

  3. GALACTIC ALL-SKY SURVEY HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS IN THE REGION OF THE MAGELLANIC LEADING ARM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    For, Bi-Qing; Staveley-Smith, Lister [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); McClure-Griffiths, N. M., E-mail: biqing.for@uwa.edu.au [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, PO Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

    2013-02-10

    We present a catalog of high-velocity clouds in the region of the Magellanic Leading Arm. The catalog is based on neutral hydrogen (H I) observations from the Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey. Excellent spectral resolution allows clouds with narrow-line components to be resolved. The total number of detected clouds is 419. We describe the method of cataloging and present the basic parameters of the clouds. We discuss the general distribution of the high-velocity clouds and classify the clouds based on their morphological type. The presence of a significant number of head-tail clouds and their distribution in the region is discussed in the context of Magellanic System simulations. We suggest that ram-pressure stripping is a more important factor than tidal forces for the morphology and formation of the Magellanic Leading Arm and that different environmental conditions might explain the morphological difference between the Magellanic Leading Arm and Magellanic Stream. We also discuss a newly identified population of clouds that forms the LA IV and a new diffuse bridge-like feature connecting the LA II and III complexes.

  4. Empirical Analysis of High Efficient Remote Cloud Data Center Backup Using HBase and Cassandra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao Rong Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available HBase, a master-slave framework, and Cassandra, a peer-to-peer (P2P framework, are the two most commonly used large-scale distributed NoSQL databases, especially applicable to the cloud computing with high flexibility and scalability and the ease of big data processing. Regarding storage structure, different structure adopts distinct backup strategy to reduce the risks of data loss. This paper aims to realize high efficient remote cloud data center backup using HBase and Cassandra, and in order to verify the high efficiency backup they have applied Thrift Java for cloud data center to take a stress test by performing strictly data read/write and remote database backup in the large amounts of data. Finally, in terms of the effectiveness-cost evaluation to assess the remote datacenter backup, a cost-performance ratio has been evaluated for several benchmark databases and the proposed ones. As a result, the proposed HBase approach outperforms the other databases.

  5. Energy Deposition in Magnetic Cloud and High Speed Stream Driven Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, E. J.; Turner, N. E.

    2004-12-01

    The solar wind couples a large amount of energy into the magnetosphere-ionosphere system; this energy is released in the form of geomagnetic storms. While the precise mechanism for this coupling and release is yet unclear, it is well established that different solar wind conditions create different responses within the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. We are examining the impact of high speed stream-driven and magnetic cloud-driven storms on the global redistribution of energy throughout the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. Data are used from ACE, WIND, and ground magnetometers. We estimate the energy input and output for multiple geomagnetic storms spanning from1995 to 1998. The comparison of storms reveals high speed stream-driven storms deposit less energy per second, but over longer durations. The comparison further reveals magnetic cloud-driven storms have deeper Dst* depressions but with shorter durations. Our results suggest magnetic cloud-driven storms with similar input parameters as high speed stream-driven storms produce an overall lower energy deposition.

  6. Tightening of tropical ascent and high clouds key to precipitation change in a warmer climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hui; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Neelin, J. David; Shen, T. Janice; Zhai, Chengxing; Yue, Qing; Wang, Zhien; Huang, Lei; Choi, Yong-Sang; Stephens, Graeme L.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2017-06-01

    The change of global-mean precipitation under global warming and interannual variability is predominantly controlled by the change of atmospheric longwave radiative cooling. Here we show that tightening of the ascending branch of the Hadley Circulation coupled with a decrease in tropical high cloud fraction is key in modulating precipitation response to surface warming. The magnitude of high cloud shrinkage is a primary contributor to the intermodel spread in the changes of tropical-mean outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and global-mean precipitation per unit surface warming (dP/dTs) for both interannual variability and global warming. Compared to observations, most Coupled Model Inter-comparison Project Phase 5 models underestimate the rates of interannual tropical-mean dOLR/dTs and global-mean dP/dTs, consistent with the muted tropical high cloud shrinkage. We find that the five models that agree with the observation-based interannual dP/dTs all predict dP/dTs under global warming higher than the ensemble mean dP/dTs from the ~20 models analysed in this study.

  7. High-Resolution Global Modeling of the Effects of Subgrid-Scale Clouds and Turbulence on Precipitating Cloud Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogenschutz, Peter [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Moeng, Chin-Hoh [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-10-13

    The PI’s at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), Chin-Hoh Moeng and Peter Bogenschutz, have primarily focused their time on the implementation of the Simplified-Higher Order Turbulence Closure (SHOC; Bogenschutz and Krueger 2013) to the Multi-scale Modeling Framework (MMF) global model and testing of SHOC on deep convective cloud regimes.

  8. Tropical deep convective life cycle: Cb-anvil cloud microphysics from high altitude aircraft observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Frey

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The case study presented here focusses on the life cycle of clouds in a tropical deep convective system. During the SCOUT-O3 campaign from Darwin, Northern Australia, the Hector storm system has been probed by the Geophysica high altitude aircraft. Clouds were observed by in situ particle probes, a backscatter sonde, and a miniature lidar. Additionally, aerosol number concentrations have been measured. On 30 November 2005 a double flight took place and Hector was probed throughout its life cycle in its developing, mature, and dissipating stage. The two flights were four hours apart and focussed on the anvil region of Hector in altitudes between 10.5 km and 18.8 km (i.e. above 350 K potential temperature. Trajectory calculations and ozone measurements have been used to identify that the same cloud air masses have been probed in both flights. The size distributions derived from the measurements not only show a change with increasing altitude but also with the evolution of Hector. Clearly different aerosol to cloud particle ratios as well as varying ice crystal morphology have been found for the different development stages of Hector, indicating a change in freezing mechanisms. The development phase exhibits the smallest ice particles (up to 300 μm with a rather uniform morphology. This is indicative for rapid glaciation during Hector's development. Sizes of ice crystals are largest in the mature stage (larger 1.6 mm and even exceed those of some continental tropical deep convective clouds, also in their number concentrations. The backscatter properties and particle images show a change from frozen droplets in the developing phase to rimed and aggregated particles. The clouds in the dissipating stage have a large vertical extend (roughly 6 km though optically thin and persist for at least 6 h. This poses a high potential for affecting the tropical tropopause layer background conditions regarding humidity, e.g. through facilitating subvisible

  9. Tropical deep convective life cycle: Cb-anvil cloud microphysics from high altitude aircraft observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, W.; Borrmann, S.; Fierli, F.; Weigel, R.; Mitev, V.; Matthey, R.; Ravegnani, F.; Sitnikov, N. M.; Ulanovsky, A.; Cairo, F.

    2014-05-01

    The case study presented here focusses on the life cycle of clouds in a tropical deep convective system. During the SCOUT-O3 campaign from Darwin, Northern Australia, the Hector storm system has been probed by the Geophysica high altitude aircraft. Clouds were observed by in situ particle probes, a backscatter sonde, and a miniature lidar. Additionally, aerosol number concentrations have been measured. On 30 November 2005 a double flight took place and Hector was probed throughout its life cycle in its developing, mature, and dissipating stage. The two flights were four hours apart and focussed on the anvil region of Hector in altitudes between 10.5 km and 18.8 km (i.e. above 350 K potential temperature). Trajectory calculations and ozone measurements have been used to identify that the same cloud air masses have been probed in both flights. The size distributions derived from the measurements not only show a change with increasing altitude but also with the evolution of Hector. Clearly different aerosol to cloud particle ratios as well as varying ice crystal morphology have been found for the different development stages of Hector, indicating a change in freezing mechanisms. The development phase exhibits the smallest ice particles (up to 300 μm) with a rather uniform morphology. This is indicative for rapid glaciation during Hector's development. Sizes of ice crystals are largest in the mature stage (larger 1.6 mm) and even exceed those of some continental tropical deep convective clouds, also in their number concentrations. The backscatter properties and particle images show a change from frozen droplets in the developing phase to rimed and aggregated particles. The clouds in the dissipating stage have a large vertical extend (roughly 6 km) though optically thin and persist for at least 6 h. This poses a high potential for affecting the tropical tropopause layer background conditions regarding humidity, e.g. through facilitating subvisible cirrus formation, and

  10. Land cover changes and forest landscape evolution (1985–2009 in a typical Mediterranean agroforestry system (High Agri Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Simoniello

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study focuses on the transformations of a typical Mediterranean agroforestry landscape of southern Italy (High Agri Valley – Basilicata region occurred during 24 years. In this period, the valuable agricultural and natural areas that compose such a landscape were subjected to intensive industry-related activities linked to the exploitation of the largest European on-shore oil reservoir. Landsat imagery acquired in 1985 and 2009 were used to detect changes in forest areas and major land use trajectories. Landscape metrics indicators were adopted to characterize landscape structure and evolution of both the complex ecomosaic (14 land cover classes and the Forest/Non Forest arrangement. Our results indicate a net increase of 11% of forest areas between 1985 and 2009. The major changes concern: increase of all forest covers at the expense of pastures and grasses, enlargement of riparian vegetation, expansion of artificial areas. The observed expansion of forests was accompanied by a decrease of the fragmentation levels likely due to the reduction of small glades that break forest homogeneity and to the recolonization of herbaceous areas. Overall, we observe an evolution towards a more stable configuration depicting a satisfactory picture of vegetation health.

  11. Land cover changes and forest landscape evolution (1985-2009) in a typical Mediterranean agroforestry system (high Agri Valley)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoniello, T.; Coluzzi, R.; Imbrenda, V.; Lanfredi, M.

    2015-06-01

    The present study focuses on the transformations of a typical Mediterranean agroforestry landscape of southern Italy (high Agri Valley - Basilicata region) that occurred over 24 years. In this period, the valuable agricultural and natural areas that compose such a landscape were subjected to intensive industry-related activities linked to the exploitation of the largest European onshore oil reservoir. Landsat imagery acquired in 1985 and 2009 were used to detect changes in forest areas and major land use trajectories. Landscape metrics indicators were adopted to characterize landscape structure and evolution of both the complex ecomosaic (14 land cover classes) and the forest/non-forest arrangement. Our results indicate a net increase of 11% of forest areas between 1985 and 2009. The major changes concern increase of all forest covers at the expense of pastures and grasses, enlargement of riparian vegetation, and expansion of artificial areas. The observed expansion of forests was accompanied by a decrease of the fragmentation levels likely due to the reduction of small glades that break forest homogeneity and to the recolonization of herbaceous areas. Overall, we observe an evolution towards a more stable configuration depicting a satisfactory picture of vegetation health.

  12. Is gastrectomy-induced high turnover of bone with hyperosteoidosis and increase of mineralization a typical osteomalacia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Ueyama

    Full Text Available Gastrectomy (GX is thought to result in osteomalacia due to deficiencies in Vitamin D and Ca. Using a GX rat model, we showed that GX induced high turnover of bone with hyperosteoidosis, prominent increase of mineralization and increased mRNA expression of both osteoclast-derived tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase 5b and osteocalcin. The increased 1, 25(OH2D3 level and unchanged PTH and calcitonin levels suggested that conventional bone and Ca metabolic pathways were not involved or changed in compensation. Thus, GX-induced bone pathology was different from a typical osteomalacia. Gene expression profiles through microarray analysis and data mining using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis indicated that 612 genes were up-regulated and 1,097 genes were down-regulated in the GX bone. These genes were related functionally to connective tissue development, skeletal and muscular system development and function, Ca signaling and the role of osteoblasts, osteoclasts and chondrocytes. Network analysis indicated 9 genes (Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 family, member A1; Aquaporin 9; Interleukin 1 receptor accessory protein; Very low density lipoprotein receptor; Periostin, osteoblast specific factor; Aggrecan; Gremlin 1; Angiopoietin-like 4; Wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 10B were hubs connected with tissue development and immunological diseases. These results suggest that chronic systemic inflammation might underlie the GX-induced pathological changes in bone.

  13. Molecular clouds without detectable CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blitz, Leo; Bazell, David; Desert, F. Xavier

    1990-03-01

    The clouds identified by Desert, Bazell, and Boulanger (DBB clouds) in their search for high-latitude molecular clouds were observed in the CO (J = 1-0) line, but only 13 percent of the sample was detected. The remaining 87 percent are diffuse molecular clouds with CO abundances of about 10 to the -6th, a typical value for diffuse clouds. This hypothesis is shown to be consistent with Copernicus data. The DBB clouds are shown to ben an essentially complete catalog of diffuse molecular clouds in the solar vicinity. The total molecular surface density in the vicinity of the sun is then only about 20 percent greater than the 1.3 solar masses/sq pc determined by Dame et al. (1987). Analysis of the CO detections indicates that there is a sharp threshold in extinction of 0.25 mag before CO is detectable and is derived from the IRAS I(100) micron threshold of 4 MJy/sr. This threshold is presumably where the CO abundance exhibits a sharp increase

  14. A High Performance Cloud-Based Protein-Ligand Docking Prediction Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jui-Le Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential of predicting druggability for a particular disease by integrating biological and computer science technologies has witnessed success in recent years. Although the computer science technologies can be used to reduce the costs of the pharmaceutical research, the computation time of the structure-based protein-ligand docking prediction is still unsatisfied until now. Hence, in this paper, a novel docking prediction algorithm, named fast cloud-based protein-ligand docking prediction algorithm (FCPLDPA, is presented to accelerate the docking prediction algorithm. The proposed algorithm works by leveraging two high-performance operators: (1 the novel migration (information exchange operator is designed specially for cloud-based environments to reduce the computation time; (2 the efficient operator is aimed at filtering out the worst search directions. Our simulation results illustrate that the proposed method outperforms the other docking algorithms compared in this paper in terms of both the computation time and the quality of the end result.

  15. Cloud object store for checkpoints of high performance computing applications using decoupling middleware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, John M.; Faibish, Sorin; Grider, Gary

    2016-04-19

    Cloud object storage is enabled for checkpoints of high performance computing applications using a middleware process. A plurality of files, such as checkpoint files, generated by a plurality of processes in a parallel computing system are stored by obtaining said plurality of files from said parallel computing system; converting said plurality of files to objects using a log structured file system middleware process; and providing said objects for storage in a cloud object storage system. The plurality of processes may run, for example, on a plurality of compute nodes. The log structured file system middleware process may be embodied, for example, as a Parallel Log-Structured File System (PLFS). The log structured file system middleware process optionally executes on a burst buffer node.

  16. Cloud object store for archive storage of high performance computing data using decoupling middleware

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bent, John M.; Faibish, Sorin; Grider, Gary

    2015-06-30

    Cloud object storage is enabled for archived data, such as checkpoints and results, of high performance computing applications using a middleware process. A plurality of archived files, such as checkpoint files and results, generated by a plurality of processes in a parallel computing system are stored by obtaining the plurality of archived files from the parallel computing system; converting the plurality of archived files to objects using a log structured file system middleware process; and providing the objects for storage in a cloud object storage system. The plurality of processes may run, for example, on a plurality of compute nodes. The log structured file system middleware process may be embodied, for example, as a Parallel Log-Structured File System (PLFS). The log structured file system middleware process optionally executes on a burst buffer node.

  17. The road toward a full, high resolution Molecular Cloud catalog of the Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Colombo, Dario; Ginsburg, Adam; Duarte-Cabral, Ana; Hughes, Annie

    2015-01-01

    The statistical description of Giant Molecular Cloud (GMC) properties relies heavily on the performance of automatic identification algorithms, which are often seriously affected by the survey design. The algorithm we designed, SCIMES (Spectral Clustering for Interstellar Molecular Emission Segmentation), is able to overcome some of these limitations by considering the cloud segmentation problem in the broad framework of the graph theory. The application of the code on the CO(3-2) High Resolution Survey (COHRS) data allowed for a robust decomposition of more than 12,000 objects in the Galactic Plane. Together with the wealth of Galactic Plane surveys of the recent years, this approach will help to open the door to a future, systematic cataloging of all discrete molecular features of our own Galaxy.

  18. Cloud object store for archive storage of high performance computing data using decoupling middleware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, John M.; Faibish, Sorin; Grider, Gary

    2015-06-30

    Cloud object storage is enabled for archived data, such as checkpoints and results, of high performance computing applications using a middleware process. A plurality of archived files, such as checkpoint files and results, generated by a plurality of processes in a parallel computing system are stored by obtaining the plurality of archived files from the parallel computing system; converting the plurality of archived files to objects using a log structured file system middleware process; and providing the objects for storage in a cloud object storage system. The plurality of processes may run, for example, on a plurality of compute nodes. The log structured file system middleware process may be embodied, for example, as a Parallel Log-Structured File System (PLFS). The log structured file system middleware process optionally executes on a burst buffer node.

  19. Feature extraction and classification of clouds in high resolution panchromatic satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharghi, Elan

    The development of sophisticated remote sensing sensors is rapidly increasing, and the vast amount of satellite imagery collected is too much to be analyzed manually by a human image analyst. It has become necessary for a tool to be developed to automate the job of an image analyst. This tool would need to intelligently detect and classify objects of interest through computer vision algorithms. Existing software called the Rapid Image Exploitation Resource (RAPIER®) was designed by engineers at Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific (SSC PAC) to perform exactly this function. This software automatically searches for anomalies in the ocean and reports the detections as a possible ship object. However, if the image contains a high percentage of cloud coverage, a high number of false positives are triggered by the clouds. The focus of this thesis is to explore various feature extraction and classification methods to accurately distinguish clouds from ship objects. An examination of a texture analysis method, line detection using the Hough transform, and edge detection using wavelets are explored as possible feature extraction methods. The features are then supplied to a K-Nearest Neighbors (KNN) or Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier. Parameter options for these classifiers are explored and the optimal parameters are determined.

  20. Multiwavelength study of the high-latitude cloud L1642: chain of star formation

    CERN Document Server

    Malinen, J; Zahorecz, S; Rivera-Ingraham, A; Montillaud, J; Arimatsu, K; Bernard, J -Ph; Doi, Y; Haikala, L; Kawabe, R; Marton, G; McGehee, P; Pelkonen, V -M; Ristorcelli, I; Shimajiri, Y; Takita, S; Toth, L V; Tsukagoshi, T; Ysard, N

    2014-01-01

    L1642 is one of the two high galactic latitude (|b| > 30deg) clouds confirmed to have active star formation. We examine the properties of this cloud, especially the large-scale structure, dust properties, and compact sources in different stages of star formation. We present high-resolution far-infrared and submm observations with the Herschel and AKARI satellites and mm observations with the AzTEC/ASTE telescope, which we combined with archive data from near- and mid-infrared (2MASS, WISE) to mm observations (Planck). The Herschel observations, combined with other data, show a sequence of objects from a cold clump to young stellar objects at different evolutionary stages. Source B-3 (2MASS J04351455-1414468) appears to be a YSO forming inside the L1642 cloud, instead of a foreground brown dwarf, as previously classified. Herschel data reveal striation in the diffuse dust emission around L1642. The western region shows striation towards NE and has a steeper column density gradient on its southern side. The den...

  1. In vitro digestion rate and estimated glycemic index of oat flours from typical and high β-glucan oat lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Jung; White, Pamela J

    2012-05-23

    The in vitro starch digestion rate and estimated glycemic index (GI) of oat flours and oat starches from typical and high β-glucan oat lines were evaluated along with the impact of heating on starch digestion. Flour from oat lines ('Jim', 'Paul', IA95, and N979 containing 4.0, 5.3, 7.4, and 7.7% β-glucan, respectively) was digested by pepsin and porcine pancreatin. To determine the impact of heating on starch digestion, oat slurries were prepared by mixing oat flour and water (1:8 ratio) and heating for 10 min prior to digestion. Viscosity, as measured on a Rapid Visco Analyzer, increased with increases in concentration and molecular weight of β-glucan. The in vitro starch digestion of oat flours and a control, white bread made from wheat flour, increased as the digestion time increased. Starch digestion of oat flour was slower than that of the control (p oat-flour slurries increased the starch digestion from a range of 31-39% to a range of 52-64% measured after 180 min of in vitro digestion. There were no differences in starch digestibility among oat starches extracted from the different oat lines. The GI, estimated by starch hydrolysis of oat flours, ranged from 61 to 67, which increased to a range of 77-86 after heating. Oat-flour slurries prepared from IA95 and N979 lines with high β-glucan concentrations had lower GI values than did slurries made from Jim and Paul lines. Starch digestion was negatively correlated with β-glucan concentrations in heated oat-flour slurries (R(2) = 0.92). These results illustrate that the oat soluble fiber, β-glucan, slowed the rate of starch digestion. This finding will help to develop new food products with low GI by using oat β-glucan.

  2. Screaming Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fikke, Svein; Egill Kristjánsson, Jón; Nordli, Øyvind

    2017-04-01

    "Mother-of-pearl clouds" appear irregularly in the winter stratosphere at high northern latitudes, about 20-30 km above the surface of the Earth. The size range of the cloud particles is near that of visible light, which explains their extraordinary beautiful colours. We argue that the Norwegian painter Edvard Munch could well have been terrified when the sky all of a sudden turned "bloodish red" after sunset, when darkness was expected. Hence, there is a high probability that it was an event of mother-of-pearl clouds which was the background for Munch's experience in nature, and for his iconic Scream. Currently, the leading hypothesis for explaining the dramatic colours of the sky in Munch's famous painting is that the artist was captivated by colourful sunsets following the enormous Krakatoa eruption in 1883. After carefully considering the historical accounts of some of Munch's contemporaries, especially the physicist Carl Störmer, we suggest an alternative hypothesis, namely that Munch was inspired by spectacular occurrences of mother-of-pearl clouds. Such clouds, which have a wave-like structure akin to that seen in the Scream were first observed and described only a few years before the first version of this motive was released in 1892. Unlike clouds related to conventional weather systems in the troposphere, mother-of-pearl clouds appear in the stratosphere, where significantly different physical conditions prevail. This result in droplet sizes within the range of visible light, creating the spectacular colour patterns these clouds are famous for. Carl Störmer observed such clouds, and described them in minute details at the age of 16, but already with a profound interest in science. He later noted that "..these mother-of-pearl clouds was a vision of indescribable beauty!" The authors find it logical that the same vision could appear scaring in the sensible mind of a young artist unknown to such phenomena.

  3. On the aerosol-cloud relationship at a high-alpine site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltensperger, U.; Schwikowski, M.; Jost, D.T.; Nyeki, S.; Gaeggeler, H.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Field experiments at the Jungfraujoch showed that during the presence of a cloud, most of the aerosol mass is transferred into the cloud phase. This results in smaller cloud droplets for increasing aerosol concentration, which increases the albedo of clouds (known as the indirect effect of climate forcing by aerosol particles). (author) 1 fig., 4 refs.

  4. THE GALFA-H I COMPACT CLOUD CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saul, Destry R.; Peek, J. E. G.; Grcevich, J.; Putman, M. E.; Brown, A. R. H.; Hamden, E. T. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Douglas, K. A. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Calgary/Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 248, Penticton, BC V2A 6J9 (Canada); Korpela, E. J. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Stanimirovic, S.; Lee, M.; Burkhart, B.; Pingel, N. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 475 N Charter St, Madison, WI 53703 (United States); Heiles, C. [Radio Astronomy Lab, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Gibson, S. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Western Kentucky University, Bowling Green, KY 42101 (United States); Begum, A. [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, ITI Campus (Gas Rahat) Building, Govindpura, Bhopal-23 (India); Tonnesen, S. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2012-10-10

    We present a catalog of 1964 isolated, compact neutral hydrogen clouds from the Galactic Arecibo L-Band Feed Array Survey Data Release One. The clouds were identified by a custom machine-vision algorithm utilizing the difference of Gaussian kernels to search for clouds smaller than 20'. The clouds have velocities typically between |V{sub LSR}| =20 and 400 km s{sup -1}, line widths of 2.5-35 km s{sup -1}, and column densities ranging from 1 to 35 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} cm{sup -2}. The distances to the clouds in this catalog may cover several orders of magnitude, so the masses may range from less than a solar mass for clouds within the Galactic disk, to greater than 10{sup 4} M{sub Sun} for high-velocity clouds (HVCs) at the tip of the Magellanic Stream. To search for trends, we separate the catalog into five populations based on position, velocity, and line width: HVCs; galaxy candidates; cold low-velocity clouds (LVCs); warm, low positive-velocity clouds in the third Galactic quadrant; and the remaining warm LVCs. The observed HVCs are found to be associated with previously identified HVC complexes. We do not observe a large population of isolated clouds at high velocities as some models predict. We see evidence for distinct histories at low velocities in detecting populations of clouds corotating with the Galactic disk and a set of clouds that is not corotating.

  5. Cloud Atlas: Discovery of Patchy Clouds and High-amplitude Rotational Modulations In a Young, Extremely Red L-type Brown Dwarf

    CERN Document Server

    Lew, Ben W P; Zhou, Yifan; Schneider, Glenn; Burgasser, Adam J; Karalidi, Theodora; Yang, Hao; Marley, Mark S; Cowan, N B; Bedin,; R., L; Metchev, Stanimir A; Radigan, Jacqueline; Lowrance, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Condensate clouds fundamentally impact the atmospheric structure and spectra of exoplanets and brown dwarfs but the connections between surface gravity, cloud structure, dust in the upper atmosphere, and the red colors of some brown dwarfs remain poorly understood. Rotational modulations enable the study of different clouds in the same atmosphere, thereby providing a method to isolate the effects of clouds. Here we present the discovery of high peak-to-peak amplitude (8%) rotational modulations in a low-gravity, extremely red (J-Ks=2.55) L6 dwarf WISEP J004701.06+680352.1 (W0047). Using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) time-resolved grism spectroscopy we find a best-fit rotational period (13.20$\\pm$0.14 hours) with a larger amplitude at 1.1 micron than at 1.7 micron. This is the third largest near-infrared variability amplitude measured in a brown dwarf, demonstrating that large-amplitude variations are not limited to the L/T transition but are present in some extremely red L-type dwarfs. We report a tentativ...

  6. High Resolution Mapping of Interstellar Clouds by Near--IR Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Padoan, P; Pelkonen, V M; Padoan, Paolo; Juvela, Mika; Pelkonen, Veli-Matti

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the possibility of mapping interstellar clouds at unprecedentedly high spatial resolution by means of near-IR imaging of their scattered light. We calculate the scattering of the interstellar radiation field by a cloud model obtained from the simulation of a supersonic turbulent flow. Synthetic maps of scattered light are computed in the J, H and K bands and are found to allow an accurate estimate of column density, in the range of visual extinction between 1 and 20 magnitudes. We provide a formalism to convert the intensity of scattered light at these near-IR bands into a total gas column density. We also show that this new method of mapping interstellar clouds is within the capability of existing near-IR facilities, which can achieve a spatial resolution of up to ~ 0.1 arcsec. This opens new perspectives in the study of interstellar dust and gas structure on very small scales. The validity of the method has been recently demonstrated by the extraordinary images of the Perseus region obtained by F...

  7. Dynamical and thermodynamical coupling between the North Atlantic subtropical high and the marine boundary layer clouds in boreal summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Li, Wenhong; Deng, Yi; Yang, Song; Jiang, Jonathan H.; Huang, Lei; Liu, W. Timothy

    2017-06-01

    This study investigates dynamical and thermodynamical coupling between the North Atlantic subtropical high (NASH), marine boundary layer (MBL) clouds, and the local sea surface temperatures (SSTs) over the North Atlantic in boreal summer for 1984-2009 using NCEP/DOE Reanalysis 2 dataset, various cloud data, and the Hadley Centre sea surface temperature. On interannual timescales, the summer mean subtropical MBL clouds to the southeast of the NASH is actively coupled with the NASH and local SSTs: a stronger (weaker) NASH is often accompanied with an increase (a decrease) of MBL clouds and abnormally cooler (warmer) SSTs along the southeast flank of the NASH. To understand the physical processes between the NASH and the MBL clouds, the authors conduct a data diagnostic analysis and implement a numerical modeling investigation using an idealized anomalous atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM). Results suggest that significant northeasterly anomalies in the southeast flank of the NASH associated with an intensified NASH tend to induce stronger cold advection and coastal upwelling in the MBL cloud region, reducing the boundary surface temperature. Meanwhile, warm advection associated with the easterly anomalies from the African continent leads to warming over the MBL cloud region at 700 hPa. Such warming and the surface cooling increase the atmospheric static stability, favoring growth of the MBL clouds. The anomalous diabatic cooling associated with the growth of the MBL clouds dynamically excites an anomalous anticyclone to its north and contributes to strengthening of the NASH circulation in its southeast flank. The dynamical and thermodynamical couplings and their associated variations in the NASH, MBL clouds, and SSTs constitute an important aspect of the summer climate variability over the North Atlantic.

  8. Cloud migration

    CERN Document Server

    Höllwarth, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    This book is designed for managers and entrepreneurs, who are considering improving the economics and flexibility of their IT solutions and infrastructures. The book is also for readers who wish to learn more about the Cloud, but do not want to become specialists.This book discusses the technical, legal, fiscal, economic, organisational and environmental aspects of Cloud services. If you are looking for practical advice on vendor selection and certification, as well as real world Cloud project case studies, this is the book to consult.It is the result of a highly cooper

  9. Cloud Atlas: Discovery of Patchy Clouds and High-amplitude Rotational Modulations in a Young, Extremely Red L-type Brown Dwarf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Ben W. P.; Apai, Daniel; Zhou, Yifan; Schneider, Glenn; Burgasser, Adam J.; Karalidi, Theodora; Yang, Hao; Marley, Mark S.; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Bedin, Luigi R.; Metchev, Stanimir A.; Radigan, Jacqueline; Lowrance, Patrick J.

    2016-10-01

    Condensate clouds fundamentally impact the atmospheric structure and spectra of exoplanets and brown dwarfs, but the connections between surface gravity, cloud structure, dust in the upper atmosphere, and the red colors of some brown dwarfs remain poorly understood. Rotational modulations enable the study of different clouds in the same atmosphere, thereby providing a method to isolate the effects of clouds. Here, we present the discovery of high peak-to-peak amplitude (8%) rotational modulations in a low-gravity, extremely red (J-K s = 2.55) L6 dwarf WISEP J004701.06+680352.1 (W0047). Using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) time-resolved grism spectroscopy, we find a best-fit rotational period (13.20 ± 0.14 hr) with a larger amplitude at 1.1 μm than at 1.7 μm. This is the third-largest near-infrared variability amplitude measured in a brown dwarf, demonstrating that large-amplitude variations are not limited to the L/T transition but are present in some extremely red L-type dwarfs. We report a tentative trend between the wavelength dependence of relative amplitude, possibly proxy for small dust grains lofted in the upper atmosphere, and the likelihood of large-amplitude variability. By assuming forsterite as a haze particle, we successfully explain the wavelength-dependent amplitude with submicron-sized haze particle sizes of around 0.4 μm. W0047 links the earlier spectral and later spectral type brown dwarfs in which rotational modulations have been observed; the large amplitude variations in this object make this a benchmark brown dwarf for the study of cloud properties close to the L/T transition.

  10. Cloud Computing with iPlant Atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Sheldon J; Skidmore, Edwin J; LaRose, Christopher J; Mercer, Andre W; Noutsos, Christos

    2013-10-15

    Cloud Computing refers to distributed computing platforms that use virtualization software to provide easy access to physical computing infrastructure and data storage, typically administered through a Web interface. Cloud-based computing provides access to powerful servers, with specific software and virtual hardware configurations, while eliminating the initial capital cost of expensive computers and reducing the ongoing operating costs of system administration, maintenance contracts, power consumption, and cooling. This eliminates a significant barrier to entry into bioinformatics and high-performance computing for many researchers. This is especially true of free or modestly priced cloud computing services. The iPlant Collaborative offers a free cloud computing service, Atmosphere, which allows users to easily create and use instances on virtual servers preconfigured for their analytical needs. Atmosphere is a self-service, on-demand platform for scientific computing. This unit demonstrates how to set up, access and use cloud computing in Atmosphere.

  11. On the Metallicity and Origin of the Smith High-velocity Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Andrew J.; Lehner, Nicolas; Lockman, Felix J.; Wakker, Bart P.; Hill, Alex S.; Heitsch, Fabian; Stark, David V.; Barger, Kathleen A.; Sembach, Kenneth R.; Rahman, Mubdi

    2016-01-01

    The Smith Cloud (SC) is a gaseous high-velocity cloud (HVC) in an advanced state of accretion, only 2.9 kpc below the Galactic plane and due to impact the disk in ≈27 Myr. It is unique among HVCs in having a known distance (12.4 ± 1.3 kpc) and a well-constrained 3D velocity (296 km s-1), but its origin has long remained a mystery. Here we present the first absorption-line measurements of its metallicity, using Hubble Space Telescope/COS UV spectra of three active galactic nuclei lying behind the Cloud together with Green Bank Telescope 21 cm spectra of the same directions. Using Voigt-profile fitting of the S ii λλ1250, 1253, 1259 triplet together with ionization corrections derived from photoionization modeling, we derive the sulfur abundance in each direction; a weighted average of the three measurements gives [S/H] = -0.28 ± 0.14, or {0.53}-0.15+0.21 solar metallicity. The finding that the SC is metal-enriched lends support to scenarios where it represents recycled Galactic material, rather than the remnant of a dwarf galaxy or accreting intergalactic gas. The metallicity and trajectory of the Cloud are both indicative of an origin in the outer disk. However, its large mass and prograde kinematics remain to be fully explained. If the cloud has accreted cooling gas from the corona during its fountain trajectory, as predicted in recent theoretical work, its current mass would be higher than its launch mass, alleviating the mass concern. Based on observations taken under program 13840 of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555, and under program GBT09A_17 of the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under a cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  12. A High-Resolution Study of the CO-H2 Conversion Factor in the Diffuse Cloud MBM 40

    CERN Document Server

    Cotten, David L

    2013-01-01

    We made CO(1-0) observations of 103 lines of sight in the core and envelope of the high-latitude cloud MBM 40 to determine how the CO-H_2 conversion factor (X_CO) varies throughout the cloud. Calibrating X_CO with CH data at similar resolution (1' for CO, 1.5' for CH) yields values of X_CO ranging from 0.3 10^20 to 3.6 10^20 cm^-2 [K km s^-1]^-1 with an average of 1.5 +/- 0.3 10^20 cm^-2 [K km s^-1]^-1. Given that the cloud has a peak reddening of 0.24 mag, it should be classed as a diffuse rather than a translucent molecular cloud. The mass obtained from the CO data and our values of X_CO is 9.6 M(solar) for the core, 12 M(solar) for the envelope, and 10 M(solar) for the periphery of the cloud. A third of the molecular mass of the cloud is found in a region with E(B-V) < 0.12 mag. With these mass estimates, we determine that the cloud is not gravitationally bound.

  13. A high-resolution study of the CO-H2 conversion factor in the diffuse cloud MBM 40

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotten, David L.; Magnani, Loris

    2013-12-01

    We made CO(1-0) observations of 103 lines of sight in the core and envelope of the high-latitude cloud MBM 40 to determine how the CO-H2 conversion factor (XCO) varies throughout the cloud. Calibrating XCO with CH data at similar resolution (1 arcmin for CO, 1.5 arcmin for CH) yields values of XCO ranging from 0.6 × 1020 to 3.3 × 1020 cm-2 (K km s-1)-1 with an average of 1.3 × 1020 cm-2 (K km s-1)-1. Given that the cloud has a peak reddening of 0.24 mag, it should be classed as a diffuse rather than a translucent molecular cloud. The mass obtained from the CO data and our values of XCO is 9.6 M⊙ for the core, 12 M⊙ for the envelope and 10 M⊙ for the periphery of the cloud. A third of the molecular mass of the cloud is found in a region with E(B - V) < 0.12 mag. With these mass estimates, we determine that the cloud is not gravitationally bound.

  14. Development of a cloud model to generate high-frequency solar irradiance and power data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, Michael C.; Beaucage, Philippe; Frank, Jaclyn D.; Freedman, Jeffrey M. [AWS Truepower, Albany, NY (United States); Vidal, Jose [AWS Truepower, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes a new method to synthesize high-frequency ({proportional_to}2 second) solar irradiance and photovoltaic output data for grid integration studies. The method couples a numerical weather prediction model with a newly developed stochastic-kinematic cloud model. The coupled model is shown to match the mean profiles as well as ramping characteristics of measured data on Oahu, Hawaii. This model was used to synthesize 2 years of 2-second irradiance and PV data for over 800 MW of hypothetical utility-scale and residential rooftop sites for the Hawaii Solar Integration Study. (orig.)

  15. Comparing Herschel dust emission structures, magnetic fields observed by Planck, and dynamics: high-latitude star forming cloud L1642

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinen, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    The nearby high-latitude cloud L1642 is one of only two known very high latitude (|b| > 30 deg) clouds actively forming stars. This cloud is a rare example of star formation in isolated conditions, and can reveal important details of star formation in general, e.g., of the effect of magnetic fields. We compare Herschel dust emission structures and magnetic field orientation revealed by Planck polarization maps in L1642, and also combine these with dynamic information from molecular line observations. The high-resolution Herschel data reveal a complex structure including a dense, compressed central blob with elongated extensions, low density striations, "fishbone" like structures with a spine and perpendicular striations, and a spiraling "tail". The Planck polarization data reveal an ordered magnetic field that pervades the cloud and is aligned with the surrounding low density striations. We show that there is a complex interplay between the cloud structure and large scale magnetic fields revealed by Planck polarization data at 10' resolution. This suggests that the magnetic field is closely linked to the formation and evolution of the cloud. We see a clear transition from aligned to perpendicular structures approximately at a column density of NH = 2x10^21 cm-2. We conclude that Planck polarization data revealing the large scale magnetic field orientation can be very useful even when comparing to the finest structures in higher resolution data, e.g. Herschel at ~18" resolution.

  16. Dust, Gas, and Star Formation in the MBM 18--19 High-Latitude Cloud Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Kristen A.; Reed, Cyrus M.

    Projected on the plane of the sky, the MBM 19 molecular cloud extends from the MBM 18 high-latitude cloud toward the Taurus star-forming regions. We present a new CO(J = 1--0) map of MBM 19 that shows clumpy emission with line intensities above 3 K in some regions despite low, relatively smooth 100 micron emission and modest visual extinction. This map complements data that show extremely high polarization efficiency of dust aligned along the bridge axis and low values of the ratio of total-to-selective extinction throughout the complex. In addition, several ongoing searches for spectral signatures of young stars have found evidence for star formation associated with MBM 18--19. We discuss variation in the molecular gas fraction and dust-to-gas ratio estimates, as well as the implications all these data have for understanding star formation in the region. Results of this study and others like it will provide insight into dust and gas of the translucent interstellar medium and star formation at high galactic latitude. This research was supported by the American Astronomical Society's Small Research Grant Program.

  17. High-dynamic-range extinction mapping of infrared dark clouds: Dependence of density variance with sonic Mach number in molecular clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kainulainen, Jouni

    2012-01-01

    Measuring the mass distribution of infrared dark clouds (IRDCs) over the wide dynamic range of their column densities is a fundamental obstacle in determining the initial conditions of high-mass star formation and star cluster formation. We present a new technique to derive high-dynamic-range, arcsecond-scale resolution column density data for IRDCs and demonstrate the potential of such data in measuring the density variance - sonic Mach number relation in molecular clouds. We combine near-infrared data from the UKIDSS/Galactic Plane Survey with mid-infrared data from the Spitzer/GLIMPSE survey to derive dust extinction maps for a sample of ten IRDCs. We then examine the linewidths of the IRDCs using 13CO line emission data from the FCRAO/Galactic Ring Survey and derive a column density - sonic Mach number relation for them. For comparison, we also examine the relation in a sample of nearby molecular clouds. The presented column density mapping technique provides a very capable, temperature independent tool f...

  18. A Catalogue of Field Horizontal Branch Stars Aligned with High Velocity Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Thom, C; Christlieb, N; Thom, Christopher; Gibson, Brad K.; Christlieb, Norbert

    2005-01-01

    We present a catalogue of 430 Field Horizontal Branch (FHB) stars, selected from the Hamburg/ESO Survey (HES), which fortuitously align with high column density neutral hydrogen (HI) High-Velocity Cloud (HVC) gas. These stars are ideal candidates for absorption-line studies of HVCs, attempts at which have been made for almost 40 years with little success. A parent sample of 8321 HES FHB stars was used to extract HI spectra along each line-of-sight, using the HI Parkes All-Sky Survey. All lines-of-sight aligned with high velocity HI emission with peak brightness temperatures greater than 120mK were examined. The HI spectra of these 430 probes were visually screened and cross-referenced with several HVC catalogues. In a forthcoming paper, we report on the results of high-resolution spectroscopic observations of a sample of stars drawn from this catalogue.

  19. A Coordinated Effort to Improve Parameterization of High-Latitude Cloud and Radiation Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. O. Pinto, A.H. Lynch

    2005-12-14

    The goal of this project is the development and evaluation of improved parameterization of arctic cloud and radiation processes and implementation of the parameterizations into a climate model. Our research focuses specifically on the following issues: (1) continued development and evaluation of cloud microphysical parameterizations, focusing on issues of particular relevance for mixed phase clouds; and (2) evaluation of the mesoscale simulation of arctic cloud system life cycles.

  20. Cloud computing for comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Dennis P; Kudtarkar, Parul; Fusaro, Vincent A; Pivovarov, Rimma; Patil, Prasad; Tonellato, Peter J

    2010-05-18

    Large comparative genomics studies and tools are becoming increasingly more compute-expensive as the number of available genome sequences continues to rise. The capacity and cost of local computing infrastructures are likely to become prohibitive with the increase, especially as the breadth of questions continues to rise. Alternative computing architectures, in particular cloud computing environments, may help alleviate this increasing pressure and enable fast, large-scale, and cost-effective comparative genomics strategies going forward. To test this, we redesigned a typical comparative genomics algorithm, the reciprocal smallest distance algorithm (RSD), to run within Amazon's Elastic Computing Cloud (EC2). We then employed the RSD-cloud for ortholog calculations across a wide selection of fully sequenced genomes. We ran more than 300,000 RSD-cloud processes within the EC2. These jobs were farmed simultaneously to 100 high capacity compute nodes using the Amazon Web Service Elastic Map Reduce and included a wide mix of large and small genomes. The total computation time took just under 70 hours and cost a total of $6,302 USD. The effort to transform existing comparative genomics algorithms from local compute infrastructures is not trivial. However, the speed and flexibility of cloud computing environments provides a substantial boost with manageable cost. The procedure designed to transform the RSD algorithm into a cloud-ready application is readily adaptable to similar comparative genomics problems.

  1. Behavior of predicted convective clouds and precipitation in the high-resolution Unified Model over the Indian summer monsoon region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, A.; Sethunadh, Jisesh; Rakhi, R.; Arulalan, T.; Mohandas, Saji; Iyengar, Gopal R.; Rajagopal, E. N.

    2017-05-01

    National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting high-resolution regional convective-scale Unified Model with latest tropical science settings is used to evaluate vertical structure of cloud and precipitation over two prominent monsoon regions: Western Ghats (WG) and Monsoon Core Zone (MCZ). Model radar reflectivity generated using Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project Observation Simulator Package along with CloudSat profiling radar reflectivity is sampled for an active synoptic situation based on a new method using Budyko's index of turbulence (BT). Regime classification based on BT-precipitation relationship is more predominant during the active monsoon period when convective-scale model's resolution increases from 4 km to 1.5 km. Model predicted precipitation and vertical distribution of hydrometeors are found to be generally in agreement with Global Precipitation Measurement products and BT-based CloudSat observation, respectively. Frequency of occurrence of radar reflectivity from model implies that the low-level clouds below freezing level is underestimated compared to the observations over both regions. In addition, high-level clouds in the model predictions are much lesser over WG than MCZ.

  2. The collisions of high-velocity clouds with the galactic halo

    CERN Document Server

    Jelinek, Petr; 10.1016/j.cpc.2011.01.023

    2011-01-01

    Spiral galaxies are surrounded by a widely distributed hot coronal gas and seem to be fed by infalling clouds of neutral hydrogen gas with low metallicity and high velocities. We numerically study plasma waves produced by the collisions of these high-velocity clouds (HVCs) with the hot halo gas and with the gaseous disk. In particular, we tackle two problems numerically: 1) collisions of HVCs with the galactic halo gas and 2) the dispersion relations to obtain the phase and group velocities of plasma waves from the equations of plasma motion as well as further important physical characteristics such as magnetic tension force, gas pressure, etc. The obtained results allow us to understand the nature of MHD waves produced during the collisions in galactic media and lead to the suggestion that these waves can heat the ambient halo gas. These calculations are aiming at leading to a better understanding of dynamics and interaction of HVCs with the galactic halo and of the importance of MHD waves as a heating proce...

  3. Cloud-Top Entrainment in Stratocumulus Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellado, Juan Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Cloud entrainment, the mixing between cloudy and clear air at the boundary of clouds, constitutes one paradigm for the relevance of small scales in the Earth system: By regulating cloud lifetimes, meter- and submeter-scale processes at cloud boundaries can influence planetary-scale properties. Understanding cloud entrainment is difficult given the complexity and diversity of the associated phenomena, which include turbulence entrainment within a stratified medium, convective instabilities driven by radiative and evaporative cooling, shear instabilities, and cloud microphysics. Obtaining accurate data at the required small scales is also challenging, for both simulations and measurements. During the past few decades, however, high-resolution simulations and measurements have greatly advanced our understanding of the main mechanisms controlling cloud entrainment. This article reviews some of these advances, focusing on stratocumulus clouds, and indicates remaining challenges.

  4. A Discovery of a Compact High Velocity Cloud-Galactic Supershell System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Geumsook; Koo, Bon-Chul; Kang, Ji-hyun; Gibson, Steven J.; Peek, Joshua Eli Goldston; Douglas, Kevin A.; Korpela, Eric J.; Heiles, Carl E.

    2017-01-01

    High velocity clouds (HVCs) are neutral hydrogen (HI) gas clouds having very different radial velocities from those of the Galactic disk material. While some large HVC complexes are known to be gas streams tidally stripped from satellite galaxies of the Milky Way, there are relatively isolated and small angular-sized HVCs, so called “compact HVCs (CHVCs)”, the origin of which remains controversial. There are about 300 known CHVCs in the Milky Way, and many of them show a head-tail structure, implying a ram pressure interaction with the diffuse Galactic halo gas. It is, however, not clear whether CHVCs are completely dissipated in the Galactic halo to feed the multi-phase circumgalactic medium or they can survive their trip through the halo and collide with the Galactic disk. The colliding CHVCs may leave a gigantic trail in the disk, and it had been suggested that some of HI supershells that require ≧ 3 x 1052 erg may be produced by the collision of such HVCs.Here we report the detection of a kiloparsec (kpc)-size supershell in the outskirts of the Milky Way with the compact HVC 040+01-282 (hereafter, CHVC040) at its geometrical center using the “Inner-Galaxy Arecibo L-band Feed Array” HI 21 cm survey data. The morphological and physical properties of both objects suggest that CHVC040, which is either a fragment of a nearby disrupted galaxy or a cloud that originated from an intergalactic accreting flow, collided with the disk ˜5 Myr ago to form the supershell. Our results show that some compact HVCs can survive their trip through the Galactic halo and inject energy and momentum into the Milky Way disk.

  5. Vertical Cloud Climatology During TC4 Derived from High-Altitude Aircraft Merged Lidar and Radar Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavka, Dennis; Tian, Lin; Hart, William; Li, Lihua; McGill, Matthew; Heymsfield, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    profiles occurring 94 percent of the time during the ER-2 flights. One to three cloud layers were common, with the average calculated at 2.03 layers per profile. The upper troposphere had a cloud frequency generally over 30%, reaching 42 percent near 13 km during the study. There were regional differences. The Caribbean was much clearer than the Pacific regions. Land had a much higher frequency of high clouds than ocean areas. One region just south and west of Panama had a high probability of clouds below 15 km altitude with the frequency never dropping below 25% and reaching a maximum of 60% at 11-13 km altitude. These cloud statistics will help characterize the cloud volume for TC4 scientists as they try to understand the complexities of the tropical atmosphere.

  6. The First Distance Constraint on the Renegade High Velocity Cloud Complex WD

    CERN Document Server

    Peek, J E G; Sana, Hugues; Roman-Duval, Julia; Tumlinson, Jason; Zheng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    We present medium-resolution, near-ultraviolet VLT/FLAMES observations of the star USNO-A0600-15865535. We adapt a standard method of stellar typing to our measurement of the shape of the Balmer epsilon absorption line to demonstrates that USNO-A0600-15865535 is a blue horizontal branch star, residing in the lower stellar halo at a distance of 4.4 kpc from the Sun. We measure the H & K lines of singly-ionized calcium and find two isolated velocity components, one originating in the disk, and one associated with high-velocity cloud complex WD. This detection demonstrated that complex WD is closer than ~4.4 kpc and is the first distance constraint on the +100 km/s Galactic complex of clouds. We find that Complex WD is not in corotation with the Galactic disk as has been assumed for decades. We examine a number of scenarios, and find that the most likely is that Complex WD was ejected from the solar neighborhood and is only a few kpc from the Sun.

  7. A High-velocity Cloud Impact Forming a Supershell in the Milky Way

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Geumsook; Koo, Bon-Chul; Kang, Ji-hyun; Gibson, Steven J.; Peek, J. E. G.; Douglas, Kevin A.; Korpela, Eric J.; Heiles, Carl E.

    2016-08-01

    Neutral atomic hydrogen (H i) gas in interstellar space is largely organized into filaments, loops, and shells, the most prominent of which are “supershells.” These gigantic structures, which require ≳ 3× {10}52 erg to form, are generally thought to be produced by either the explosion of multiple supernovae (SNe) in OB associations or, alternatively, by the impact of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) falling into the Galactic disk. Here, we report the detection of a kiloparsec (kpc)-size supershell in the outskirts of the Milky Way with the compact HVC 040 + 01-282 (hereafter, CHVC040) at its geometrical center using the “Inner-Galaxy Arecibo L-band Feed Array” H i 21 cm survey data. The morphological and physical properties of both objects suggest that CHVC040, which is either a fragment of a nearby disrupted galaxy or a cloud that originated from an intergalactic accreting flow, collided with the disk ˜5 Myr ago to form the supershell. Our results show that some compact HVCs can survive their trip through the Galactic halo and inject energy and momentum into the Milky Way disk.

  8. Dust in a compact, cold, high-velocity cloud: A new approach to removing foreground emission

    CERN Document Server

    Lenz, Daniel; Kerp, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Because isolated high-velocity clouds (HVCs) are found at great distances from the Galactic radiation field and because they have subsolar metallicities, there have been no detections of dust in these structures. A key problem in this search is the removal of foreground dust emission. Using the Effelsberg-Bonn HI Survey and the Planck far-infrared data, we investigate a bright, cold, and clumpy HVC. This cloud apparently undergoes an interaction with the ambient medium and thus has great potential to form dust. To remove the local foreground dust emission we used a regularised, generalised linear model and we show the advantages of this approach with respect to other methods. To estimate the dust emissivity of the HVC, we set up a simple Bayesian model with mildly informative priors to perform the line fit instead of an ordinary linear least-squares approach. We find that the foreground can be modelled accurately and robustly with our approach and is limited mostly by the cosmic infrared background. Despite t...

  9. A High-Velocity Cloud Impact Forming a Supershell in the Milky Way

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Geumsook; Kang, Ji-hyun; Gibson, Steven J; Peek, J E G; Douglas, Kevin A; Korpela, Eric J; Heiles, Carl E

    2016-01-01

    Neutral atomic hydrogen (HI) gas in interstellar space is largely organized into filaments, loops, and shells, the most prominent of which are "supershells". These gigantic structures requiring $\\gtrsim 3 \\times 10^{52}$ erg to form are generally thought to be produced by either the explosion of multiple supernovae (SNe) in OB associations or alternatively by the impact of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) falling to the Galactic disk. Here we report the detection of a kiloparsec (kpc)-size supershell in the outskirts of the Milky Way with the compact HVC 040+01$-$282 (hereafter CHVC040) at its geometrical center using the "Inner-Galaxy Arecibo L-band Feed Array" HI 21-cm survey data. The morphological and physical properties of both objects suggest that CHVC040, which is either a fragment of a nearby disrupted galaxy or a cloud originated from an intergalactic accreting flow, collided with the disk $\\sim 5$ Myrs ago to form the supershell. Our result shows that some compact HVCs can survive their trip through the ...

  10. Masers associated with high-mass star formation regions in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Ellingsen, S P; Caswell, J L; Quinn, L J; Fuller, G A

    2010-01-01

    We report the results of a sensitive search for 12.2 GHz methanol maser emission towards a sample of eight high-mass star formation regions in the Large Magellanic Clouds which have been detected in other maser transitions. We detected one source towards the star formation region N105a. This is the first detection of a 12.2 GHz methanol maser outside our Galaxy. We also made near-contemporaneous observations of the 6.7 GHz methanol and 22 GHz water masers towards these sources, resulting in the detection of water maser emission in six new sources, including one associated with the strongest 6.7 GHz maser in the Magellanic Clouds IRAS 05011-6815. The majority of the maser sources are closely associated with objects identified as likely Young Stellar Objects (YSO) on the basis of Spitzer Space Telescope observations. We find that the YSOs associated with masers tend to be more luminous and have redder infrared colours than the sample as a whole. SED modeling of the YSOs shows that the masers are associated with...

  11. A Scan with the EUVE DS Telescope across the High-latitude Molecular Cloud MBM12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghoefer, Thomas W.

    We propose to scan across the nearby high-latitude molecular cloud MBM12 and its vicinity with the EUVE Deep Survey (DS) telescope. A distance of 65 pc and an EUV mean free path of ~100 pc in the vicinity of MBM12 makes this an ideal target to apply a newly developed method, based on a differential cloud technique, to measure physical conditions of the hot gas in the local ISM by means of EUVE observations. Snowden, McCammon & Verter (1993) reported the detection of an X-ray shadow in the 3/4 keV diffuse background at the position of MBM12. However, a shadow in the 1/4 keV band, which would surely be present as a consequence of the higher optical depth at lower energies, cannot be seen in the data. This is quite suprising! Stellar reddening measurements of stars in the direction of MBM12 indicate an HI column density that is too low to reveal a shadow at soft X-ray wavelength. However, in the EUV range MBM12 is opaque and the proposed observations shall be used to derive the density and the pressure of the hot gas in the direction of MBM12 and hopefully to provide an explanation for the contradictory results given by Snowden et al.

  12. Achievement of a high-mobility FET with a cloud-aligned composite oxide semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Shunpei; Shima, Yukinori; Hosaka, Yasuharu; Okazaki, Kenichi; Koezuka, Junichi

    2016-11-01

    We have recently discovered that films of a widely used In-Ga-Zn oxide (IGZO) with \\text{In}:\\text{Ga}:\\text{Zn} = 1:1:1 have different material composition states when sputter-deposited under different conditions using the same polycrystalline IGZO target. Significant improvements in on-state current and mobility (as high as 40 cm2·V-1·s-1) are obtained. The results of local composition analysis indicate that the deposited film is not composed of any known homogeneous IGZO compound and that the components of this film are separated into two types of nanoparticle regions: one type is composed mainly of GaO x and GaZnO x , which contribute to on/off (switching) characteristics, and the other is composed mainly of InO x and InZnO x , which contribute to on-state characteristics. These regions constitute a new type of oxide semiconductor (OS) film. The nanoparticles with a blurry boundary extend like a cloud, probably complementing one another. We consider that this OS film has a novel composition, which can be described as a “cloud-aligned composite OS” (CAC-OS).

  13. Global Distribution of Water Vapor and Cloud Cover--Sites for High Performance THz Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Suen, Jonathan Y; Lubin, Philip M

    2014-01-01

    Absorption of terahertz radiation by atmospheric water vapor is a serious impediment for radio astronomy and for long-distance communications. Transmission in the THz regime is dependent almost exclusively on atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV). Though much of the Earth has PWV that is too high for good transmission above 200 GHz, there are a number of dry sites with very low attenuation. We performed a global analysis of PWV with high-resolution measurements from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) on two NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites over the year of 2011. We determined PWV and cloud cover distributions and then developed a model to find transmission and atmospheric radiance as well as necessary integration times in the various windows. We produced global maps over the common THz windows for astronomical and satellite communications scenarios. Notably, we show that up through 1 THz, systems could be built in excellent sites of Chile, Greenland and the Tibetan Plateau, ...

  14. Mapping Metal-Enriched High Velocity Clouds to Very Low HI Column Densities

    CERN Document Server

    Churchill, C W; Masiero, J R; Churchill, Chris; Charlton, Jane

    2001-01-01

    Our galaxy is the nearest known quasar absorption line system, and it uniquely provides us with an opportunity to probe multiple lines of sight through the same galaxy. This is essential for our interpretations of the complex kinematic profiles seen in the MgII absorption due to lines of sight through intermediate redshift galaxies. The Milky Way halo has never been probed for high velocity clouds below the 21-cm detection threshold of N(HI)~10^18 cm-2. Through a survey of MgII absorption looking toward the brightest AGNs and quasars, it will be possible to reach down a few orders of magnitude in HI column density. The analogs to the high velocity components of the MgII absorption profiles due to intermediate redshift galaxies should be seen. We describe a program we are undertaking, and present some preliminary findings.

  15. Automatic Cloud Bursting under FermiCloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hao [Fermilab; Shangping, Ren [IIT; Garzoglio, Gabriele [Fermilab; Timm, Steven [Fermilab; Bernabeu, Gerard [Fermilab; Kim, Hyun Woo; Chadwick, Keith; Jang, Haengjin [KISTI, Daejeon; Noh, Seo-Young [KISTI, Daejeon

    1900-01-01

    Cloud computing is changing the infrastructure upon which scientific computing depends from supercomputers and distributed computing clusters to a more elastic cloud-based structure. The service-oriented focus and elasticity of clouds can not only facilitate technology needs of emerging business but also shorten response time and reduce operational costs of traditional scientific applications. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is currently in the process of building its own private cloud, FermiCloud, which allows the existing grid infrastructure to use dynamically provisioned resources on FermiCloud to accommodate increased but dynamic computation demand from scientists in the domains of High Energy Physics (HEP) and other research areas. Cloud infrastructure also allows to increase a private cloud’s resource capacity through “bursting” by borrowing or renting resources from other community or commercial clouds when needed. This paper introduces a joint project on building a cloud federation to support HEP applications between Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Korea Institution of Science and Technology Information, with technical contributions from the Illinois Institute of Technology. In particular, this paper presents two recent accomplishments of the joint project: (a) cloud bursting automation and (b) load balancer. Automatic cloud bursting allows computer resources to be dynamically reconfigured to meet users’ demands. The load balance algorithm which the cloud bursting depends on decides when and where new resources need to be allocated. Our preliminary prototyping and experiments have shown promising success, yet, they also have opened new challenges to be studied

  16. Automatic Cloud Bursting under FermiCloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hao [Fermilab; Shangping, Ren [IIT; Garzoglio, Gabriele [Fermilab; Timm, Steven [Fermilab; Bernabeu, Gerard [Fermilab; Kim, Hyun Woo; Chadwick, Keith; Jang, Haengjin [KISTI, Daejeon; Noh, Seo-Young [KISTI, Daejeon

    2013-01-01

    Cloud computing is changing the infrastructure upon which scientific computing depends from supercomputers and distributed computing clusters to a more elastic cloud-based structure. The service-oriented focus and elasticity of clouds can not only facilitate technology needs of emerging business but also shorten response time and reduce operational costs of traditional scientific applications. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is currently in the process of building its own private cloud, FermiCloud, which allows the existing grid infrastructure to use dynamically provisioned resources on FermiCloud to accommodate increased but dynamic computation demand from scientists in the domains of High Energy Physics (HEP) and other research areas. Cloud infrastructure also allows to increase a private cloud’s resource capacity through “bursting” by borrowing or renting resources from other community or commercial clouds when needed. This paper introduces a joint project on building a cloud federation to support HEP applications between Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Korea Institution of Science and Technology Information, with technical contributions from the Illinois Institute of Technology. In particular, this paper presents two recent accomplishments of the joint project: (a) cloud bursting automation and (b) load balancer. Automatic cloud bursting allows computer resources to be dynamically reconfigured to meet users’ demands. The load balance algorithm which the cloud bursting depends on decides when and where new resources need to be allocated. Our preliminary prototyping and experiments have shown promising success, yet, they also have opened new challenges to be studied

  17. Marine boundary layer cloud property retrievals from high-resolution ASTER observations: case studies and comparison with Terra MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Frank; Wind, Galina; Zhang, Zhibo; Platnick, Steven; Di Girolamo, Larry; Zhao, Guangyu; Amarasinghe, Nandana; Meyer, Kerry

    2016-12-01

    A research-level retrieval algorithm for cloud optical and microphysical properties is developed for the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) aboard the Terra satellite. It is based on the operational MODIS algorithm. This paper documents the technical details of this algorithm and evaluates the retrievals for selected marine boundary layer cloud scenes through comparisons with the operational MODIS Data Collection 6 (C6) cloud product. The newly developed, ASTER-specific cloud masking algorithm is evaluated through comparison with an independent algorithm reported in [Zhao and Di Girolamo(2006)]. To validate and evaluate the cloud optical thickness (τ) and cloud effective radius (reff) from ASTER, the high-spatial-resolution ASTER observations are first aggregated to the same 1000 m resolution as MODIS. Subsequently, τaA and reff, aA retrieved from the aggregated ASTER radiances are compared with the collocated MODIS retrievals. For overcast pixels, the two data sets agree very well with Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficients of R > 0.970. However, for partially cloudy pixels there are significant differences between reff, aA and the MODIS results which can exceed 10 µm. Moreover, it is shown that the numerous delicate cloud structures in the example marine boundary layer scenes, resolved by the high-resolution ASTER retrievals, are smoothed by the MODIS observations. The overall good agreement between the research-level ASTER results and the operational MODIS C6 products proves the feasibility of MODIS-like retrievals from ASTER reflectance measurements and provides the basis for future studies concerning the scale dependency of satellite observations and three-dimensional radiative effects.

  18. Verbal creativity in autism: comprehension and generation of metaphoric language in high-functioning autism spectrum disorder and typical development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasirer, Anat; Mashal, Nira

    2014-01-01

    Studies on creativity in participants with autism generally show impoverished performance as well as deficient comprehension of metaphoric language. However, very little is known about the ability to generate metaphors in this population. The present study examines verbal creativity in adults with autism-spectrum disorder (ASD) through tasks that rely on novel metaphoric language. Seventeen adults with ASD (mean age = 21.06) and 17 typically developing peers (mean age = 22.71) participated in the study. A multiple-choice questionnaire consisting of conventional and novel metaphors was used to test comprehension, and a sentence completion questionnaire was used to test generation of creative language. Results show similar performance in comprehension of conventional and novel metaphors in both groups, whereas adults with ASD generated more creative metaphors relative to the control group. Scores on tests of vocabulary and naming contributed to the prediction of conventional metaphor comprehension, while scores on tests of mental flexibility contributed to the prediction of novel metaphor comprehension. In addition, scores on a test of non-verbal intelligence contributed to the prediction of metaphor generation. The study points to unique verbal creativity in ASD. PMID:25157225

  19. High-Resolution CRM Simulations from IHOP: Cloud-Radiation Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, S. E.; Tao, W.; Zeng, X.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Kumar, S.; Eastman, J. L.

    2006-05-01

    The Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model is a cloud-resolving model (CRM) and has been coupled to different land surface models to better simulate continental convection. Originally the GCE model was coupled to PLACE (the Parameterization for Land-Cloud-Exchange) but has recently been coupled to LIS (the Land Information System), which contains a suite of different land models. CRMs can explicity resolve the interaction between clouds and radiation. The GCE model was used to simulate a convective case day that occurred on 12 June 2002 over the central southern plains during the International H2O Project (IHOP), which took place during the summer of 2002. The objectives of this study are to examine the fine-scale and aggregate impact on convection and clouds of sub-sampling cloud-radiation interactions in the model by updating the radiation fields less frequently the cloud microphysics. This is commonly done to save computations and speed up simulations.

  20. Comparison of the Bender Gestalt-II and VMI-V in Samples of Typical Children and Children with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volker, Martin A.; Lopata, Christopher; Vujnovic, Rebecca K.; Smerbeck, Audrey M.; Toomey, Jennifer A.; Rodgers, Jonathan D.; Schiavo, Audrey; Thomeer, Marcus L.

    2010-01-01

    The visual-motor skills of 60 children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders (HFASDs) and 46 typically developing children were assessed using the Bender Visual-Motor Gestalt Test-Second Edition (BG-II) and Beery-Buktenica Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration, Fifth Edition (VMI-V). Within-group comparisons yielded substantive…

  1. Quality of Life of High-Functioning Children and Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Typically Developing Peers: Self- and Proxy-Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egilson, Snaefrídur T.; Ólafsdóttir, Linda B.; Leósdóttir, Thóra; Saemundsen, Evald

    2017-01-01

    Studies have shown parents to report lower quality of life for their children with autism spectrum disorder than children's self-report scores and the same applies for data on typically developing children. Our objectives were to: (1) explore how high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorder rate their quality of life compared with…

  2. Comparison of the Bender Gestalt-II and VMI-V in Samples of Typical Children and Children with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volker, Martin A.; Lopata, Christopher; Vujnovic, Rebecca K.; Smerbeck, Audrey M.; Toomey, Jennifer A.; Rodgers, Jonathan D.; Schiavo, Audrey; Thomeer, Marcus L.

    2010-01-01

    The visual-motor skills of 60 children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders (HFASDs) and 46 typically developing children were assessed using the Bender Visual-Motor Gestalt Test-Second Edition (BG-II) and Beery-Buktenica Developmental Test of Visual-Motor Integration, Fifth Edition (VMI-V). Within-group comparisons yielded substantive…

  3. Quality of Life of High-Functioning Children and Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder and Typically Developing Peers: Self- and Proxy-Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egilson, Snaefrídur T.; Ólafsdóttir, Linda B.; Leósdóttir, Thóra; Saemundsen, Evald

    2017-01-01

    Studies have shown parents to report lower quality of life for their children with autism spectrum disorder than children's self-report scores and the same applies for data on typically developing children. Our objectives were to: (1) explore how high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorder rate their quality of life compared with…

  4. Motor and Tactile-Perceptual Skill Differences between Individuals with High-Functioning Autism and Typically Developing Individuals Ages 5-21

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Dahab, Sana M. N.; Skidmore, Elizabeth R.; Holm, Margo B.; Rogers, Joan C.; Minshew, Nancy J.

    2013-01-01

    We examined motor and tactile-perceptual skills in individuals with high-functioning autism (IHFA) and matched typically developing individuals (TDI) ages 5-21 years. Grip strength, motor speed and coordination were impaired in IHFA compared to matched TDI, and the differences between groups varied with age. Although tactile-perceptual skills of…

  5. OMMYDCLD: a New A-train Cloud Product that Co-locates OMI and MODIS Cloud and Radiance Parameters onto the OMI Footprint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Brad; Joiner, Joanna; Vasilkov, Alexander; Veefkind, Pepijn; Platnick, Steven; Wind, Galina

    2014-01-01

    Clouds cover approximately 60% of the earth's surface. When obscuring the satellite's field of view (FOV), clouds complicate the retrieval of ozone, trace gases and aerosols from data collected by earth observing satellites. Cloud properties associated with optical thickness, cloud pressure, water phase, drop size distribution (DSD), cloud fraction, vertical and areal extent can also change significantly over short spatio-temporal scales. The radiative transfer models used to retrieve column estimates of atmospheric constituents typically do not account for all these properties and their variations. The OMI science team is preparing to release a new data product, OMMYDCLD, which combines the cloud information from sensors on board two earth observing satellites in the NASA A-Train: Aura/OMI and Aqua/MODIS. OMMYDCLD co-locates high resolution cloud and radiance information from MODIS onto the much larger OMI pixel and combines it with parameters derived from the two other OMI cloud products: OMCLDRR and OMCLDO2. The product includes histograms for MODIS scientific data sets (SDS) provided at 1 km resolution. The statistics of key data fields - such as effective particle radius, cloud optical thickness and cloud water path - are further separated into liquid and ice categories using the optical and IR phase information. OMMYDCLD offers users of OMI data cloud information that will be useful for carrying out OMI calibration work, multi-year studies of cloud vertical structure and in the identification and classification of multi-layer clouds.

  6. Determination of triazine herbicides in milk by cloud point extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tiantian; Cao, Peng; Geng, Jinpei; Li, Jinqiang; Wang, Mingzhen; Wang, Minglin; Li, Xiaoyu; Yin, Dalu

    2014-01-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection was used to detect four triazines in milk. An efficient pretreatment method known as cloud point extraction (CPE) was proposed for extracting and preconcentrating analytes. The parameters of CPE including surfactant type and concentration, electrolyte, sample pH, incubation temperature and duration were investigated. Under optimal conditions, satisfying recoveries in the range of 70.5-96.9% were achieved for four triazines. The limits of detection ranged from 6.79 to 11.19μg L(-1). The linear range of quantitation for the four triazines was 50-2000μg L(-1), and the correlation coefficients of the calibration curves were all 0.9999. The results demonstrated that the proposed method was efficient and reliable for the determination of triazine herbicides in milk samples.

  7. High-pressure cloud point data for the system glycerol + olive oil + n-butane + AOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Bender

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This work reports high-pressure cloud point data for the quaternary system glycerol + olive oil + n-butane + AOT surfactant. The static synthetic method, using a variable-volume view cell, was employed for obtaining the experimental data at pressures up to 27 MPa. The effects of glycerol/olive oil concentration and surfactant addition on the pressure transition values were evaluated in the temperature range from 303 K to 343 K. For the system investigated, vapor-liquid (VLE, liquid-liquid (LLE and vapor-liquid-liquid (VLLE equilibrium were recorded. It was experimentally observed that, at a given temperature and surfactant content, an increase in the concentration of glycerol/oil ratio led to a pronounced increase in the slope of the liquid-liquid coexistence curve. A comparison with results reported for the same system but using propane as solvent showed that much lower pressure transition values are obtained when using n-butane.

  8. Next generation aerosol-cloud microphysics for advanced high-resolution climate predictions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennartz, Ralf; Hamilton, Kevin P; Phillips, Vaughan T.J.; Wang, Yuqing; Brenguier, Jean-Louis

    2013-01-14

    The three top-level project goals are: -We proposed to develop, test, and run a new, physically based, scale-independent microphysical scheme for those cloud processes that most strongly affect greenhouse gas scenarios, i.e. warm cloud microphysics. In particular, we propsed to address cloud droplet activation, autoconversion, and accretion. -The new, unified scheme was proposed to be derived and tested using the University of Hawaii's IPRC Regional Atmospheric Model (iRAM). -The impact of the new parameterizations on climate change scenarios will be studied. In particular, the sensitivity of cloud response to climate forcing from increased greenhouse gas concentrations will be assessed.

  9. On CLOUD nine

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The team from the CLOUD experiment - the world’s first experiment using a high-energy particle accelerator to study the climate - were on cloud nine after the arrival of their new three-metre diameter cloud chamber. This marks the end of three years’ R&D and design, and the start of preparations for data taking later this year.

  10. CloudDOE: a user-friendly tool for deploying Hadoop clouds and analyzing high-throughput sequencing data with MapReduce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wei-Chun; Chen, Chien-Chih; Ho, Jan-Ming; Lin, Chung-Yen; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Wang, Yu-Chun; Lee, D T; Lai, Feipei; Huang, Chih-Wei; Chang, Yu-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Explosive growth of next-generation sequencing data has resulted in ultra-large-scale data sets and ensuing computational problems. Cloud computing provides an on-demand and scalable environment for large-scale data analysis. Using a MapReduce framework, data and workload can be distributed via a network to computers in the cloud to substantially reduce computational latency. Hadoop/MapReduce has been successfully adopted in bioinformatics for genome assembly, mapping reads to genomes, and finding single nucleotide polymorphisms. Major cloud providers offer Hadoop cloud services to their users. However, it remains technically challenging to deploy a Hadoop cloud for those who prefer to run MapReduce programs in a cluster without built-in Hadoop/MapReduce. We present CloudDOE, a platform-independent software package implemented in Java. CloudDOE encapsulates technical details behind a user-friendly graphical interface, thus liberating scientists from having to perform complicated operational procedures. Users are guided through the user interface to deploy a Hadoop cloud within in-house computing environments and to run applications specifically targeted for bioinformatics, including CloudBurst, CloudBrush, and CloudRS. One may also use CloudDOE on top of a public cloud. CloudDOE consists of three wizards, i.e., Deploy, Operate, and Extend wizards. Deploy wizard is designed to aid the system administrator to deploy a Hadoop cloud. It installs Java runtime environment version 1.6 and Hadoop version 0.20.203, and initiates the service automatically. Operate wizard allows the user to run a MapReduce application on the dashboard list. To extend the dashboard list, the administrator may install a new MapReduce application using Extend wizard. CloudDOE is a user-friendly tool for deploying a Hadoop cloud. Its smart wizards substantially reduce the complexity and costs of deployment, execution, enhancement, and management. Interested users may collaborate to improve the

  11. CloudDOE: a user-friendly tool for deploying Hadoop clouds and analyzing high-throughput sequencing data with MapReduce.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chun Chung

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Explosive growth of next-generation sequencing data has resulted in ultra-large-scale data sets and ensuing computational problems. Cloud computing provides an on-demand and scalable environment for large-scale data analysis. Using a MapReduce framework, data and workload can be distributed via a network to computers in the cloud to substantially reduce computational latency. Hadoop/MapReduce has been successfully adopted in bioinformatics for genome assembly, mapping reads to genomes, and finding single nucleotide polymorphisms. Major cloud providers offer Hadoop cloud services to their users. However, it remains technically challenging to deploy a Hadoop cloud for those who prefer to run MapReduce programs in a cluster without built-in Hadoop/MapReduce. RESULTS: We present CloudDOE, a platform-independent software package implemented in Java. CloudDOE encapsulates technical details behind a user-friendly graphical interface, thus liberating scientists from having to perform complicated operational procedures. Users are guided through the user interface to deploy a Hadoop cloud within in-house computing environments and to run applications specifically targeted for bioinformatics, including CloudBurst, CloudBrush, and CloudRS. One may also use CloudDOE on top of a public cloud. CloudDOE consists of three wizards, i.e., Deploy, Operate, and Extend wizards. Deploy wizard is designed to aid the system administrator to deploy a Hadoop cloud. It installs Java runtime environment version 1.6 and Hadoop version 0.20.203, and initiates the service automatically. Operate wizard allows the user to run a MapReduce application on the dashboard list. To extend the dashboard list, the administrator may install a new MapReduce application using Extend wizard. CONCLUSIONS: CloudDOE is a user-friendly tool for deploying a Hadoop cloud. Its smart wizards substantially reduce the complexity and costs of deployment, execution, enhancement, and

  12. High-accuracy diagnostic tool for electron cloud observation in the LHC based on synchronous phase measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban Müller, J. F.; Baudrenghien, P.; Mastoridis, T.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Valuch, D.

    2015-11-01

    Electron cloud effects, which include heat load in the cryogenic system, pressure rise, and beam instabilities, are among the main intensity limitations for the LHC operation with 25 ns spaced bunches. A new observation tool was proposed and developed to monitor the e-cloud activity and it has already been used successfully during the LHC run 1 (2010-2012) and it is being intensively used in operation during the start of the LHC run 2 (2015-2018). It is based on the fact that the power loss of each bunch due to e-cloud can be estimated using bunch-by-bunch measurement of the synchronous phase. The measurements were done using the existing beam phase module of the low-level rf control system. In order to achieve the very high accuracy required, corrections for reflection in the cables and for systematic errors need to be applied followed by a post-processing of the measurements. Results clearly show the e-cloud buildup along the bunch trains and its time evolution during each LHC fill as well as from fill to fill. Measurements during the 2012 LHC scrubbing run reveal a progressive reduction in the e-cloud activity and therefore a decrease in the secondary electron yield. The total beam power loss can be computed as a sum of the contributions from all bunches and compared with the heat load deposited in the cryogenic system.

  13. 3D High Resolution l1-SPIRiT Reconstruction on Gadgetron based Cloud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Hui; Kelmann, Peter; Inati, Souheil

    framework to support distributed computing in a cloud environment. This extension is named GT-Plus. A cloud version of 3D l1-SPIRiT was implemented on the GT-Plus framework. We demonstrate that a 3mins reconstruction could be achieved for 1mm3 isotropic resolution neuro scans with significantly improved...

  14. Comparing Point Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-04-01

    Point clouds are one of the most primitive and fundamental surface representations. A popular source of point clouds are three dimensional shape...acquisition devices such as laser range scanners. Another important field where point clouds are found is in the representation of high-dimensional...framework for comparing manifolds given by point clouds is presented in this paper. The underlying theory is based on Gromov-Hausdorff distances, leading

  15. The head-tail structure of high-velocity clouds. A survey of the northern sky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüns, C.; Kerp, J.; Kalberla, P. M. W.; Mebold, U.

    2000-05-01

    We present new observational results on high-velocity clouds (HVCs) based on an analysis of the Leiden/Dwingeloo \\ion{HI} survey. We cataloged all HVCs with N_HI>= 1*1019 cm-2 and found 252 clouds that form a representative flux limited sample. The detailed analysis of each individual HVC in this sample revealed a significant number of HVCs (nearly 20%) having simultaneously a velocity and a column density gradient. These HVCs have a cometary appearance in the position-velocity representation and are called henceforward head-tail HVCs (HT HVCs). The head is the region with the highest column density of the HVC, while the column density of the tail is in general much lower (by a factor of 2-4). The absolute majority of the cataloged HVCs belongs to the well known HVC complexes. With exception of the very faint HVC complex L, all HVC complexes contain HT HVCs. The HT HVCs were analyzed statistically with respect to their physical parameters like position, velocity (v_LSR, v_GSR), and column density. We found a linear correlation between the fraction of HVCs having a head-tail structure and the peak column density of the HVCs. While there is no correlation between the fraction of HT HVCs and v_LSR, we found a dependence of the fraction of HT HVCs and v_GSR. There is no significant correlation between the fraction of HT HVCs and the parameters galactic longitude and latitude. The HT HVCs may be interpreted as HVCs that are currently interacting with their ambient medium. In the context of this model the tails represent material that is stripped off from the HVC core. We discuss the implications of this model for galactic and extragalactic HVCs.

  16. High-resolution modeling of the cusp density anomaly: Response to particle and Joule heating under typical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Douglas G.; Walterscheid, Richard L.; Clemmons, James H.; Hecht, James. H.

    2016-03-01

    An established high-resolution dynamical model is employed to understand the behavior of the thermosphere beneath the Earth's magnetic cusps, with emphasis on the factors contributing to the density structures observed by the CHAMP and Streak satellite missions. In contrast to previous modeling efforts, this approach combines first principles dynamical modeling with the high spatial resolution needed to describe accurately mesoscale features such as the cusp. The resulting density structure is shown to be consistent with observations, including regions of both enhanced and diminished neutral density along the satellite track. This agreement is shown to be the result of a straightforward application of input conditions commonly found in the cusp rather than exaggerated or extreme conditions. It is found that the magnitude of the density change is sensitive to the width of the cusp region and that models that can resolve widths on the order of 2° of latitude are required to predict density variations that are consistent with the observations.

  17. Complete genome sequence of Bacillus thuringiensis CTC-A typical strain with high production of S-layer proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhaoxia; Li, Junhua; Zheng, Jinshui; Geng, Ce; Peng, Donghai; Sun, Ming

    2016-02-20

    Bacillus thuringiensis CTC, which is identified as serotype H2, serovar. finitimus, is high production of S-layer protein. Due to the property of forming isoporous lattices on the whole cell surface, S-layer protein has been widely used in (nano) biotechnology, biomimetics, biomedicine, especially been employed for displaying many important active proteins. Here, we report the complete genome of strain CTC, which contains one circular chromosome and one linear plasmid.

  18. Swift J045106.8-694803; a highly magnetised neutron star in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Klus, Helen; Bird, Antony J; Coe, Malcolm; Corbet, Robin; Udalski, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    We report the analysis of a highly magnetised neutron star in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The high mass X-ray binary pulsar Swift J045106.8-694803 has been observed with Swift X-ray telescope (XRT) in 2008, the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in 2011 and the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission - Newton (XMM-Newton) in 2012. The change in spin period over these four years indicates a spin-up rate of -5.01+/-0.06 s/yr, amongst the highest observed for an accreting pulsar. This spin-up rate can be accounted for using Ghosh and Lamb's (1979) accretion theory assuming it has a magnetic field of (1.2 +0.2 -0.7)x10^14 Gauss. This is over the quantum critical field value. There are very few accreting pulsars with such high surface magnetic fields and this is the first of which to be discovered in the LMC. The large spin-up rate is consistent with Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) observations which show that Swift J045106.8-694803 has had a consistently high X-ray luminosity for at least five years. Optical spectra h...

  19. Swift J045106.8-694803: A Highly Magnetised Neutron Star in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klus, H.; Bartlett, E. S.; Bird, A. J.; Coe, M.; Corbet, R. H. D.; Udalski, A.

    2013-01-01

    We report the analysis of a highly magnetised neutron star in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). The high mass X-ray binary pulsar Swift J045106.8-694803 has been observed with Swift X-ray telescope (XRT) in 2008, The Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) in 2011 and the X-ray Multi-Mirror Mission - Newton (XMM-Newton) in 2012. The change in spin period over these four years indicates a spin-up rate of 5.010.06 s/yr, amongst the highest observed for an accreting pulsar. This spin-up rate can be accounted for using Ghosh and Lambs (1979) accretion theory assuming it has a magnetic field of (1.2 +/= 0.20/0.7) x 10(exp 14) Gauss. This is over the quantum critical field value. There are very few accreting pulsars with such high surface magnetic fields and this is the first of which to be discovered in the LMC. The large spin-up rate is consistent with Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) observations which show that Swift J045106.8-694803 has had a consistently high X-ray luminosity for at least five years. Optical spectra have been used to classify the optical counterpart of Swift J045106.8-694803 as a B0-1 III-V star and a possible orbital period of 21.631 +/- 0.005 days has been found from MACHO optical photometry.

  20. Highly absorbed X-ray binaries in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Novara, G; Mereghetti, S; Haberl, F; Coe, M; Filipovic, M; Udalski, A; Paizis, A; Pietsch, W; Sturm, R; Gilfanov, M; Tiengo, A; Payne, J; Smits, D; De Horta, A

    2011-01-01

    Many of the high mass X-ray binaries (HMXRBs) discovered in recent years in our Galaxy are characterized by a high absorption, most likely intrinsic to the system, which hampers their detection at the softest X-ray energies. We have undertaken a search for highly-absorbed X-ray sources in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) with a systematic analysis of 62 XMM-Newton SMC observations. We obtained a sample of 30 sources showing evidence for an equivalent hydrogen column density larger than 3x10^23 cm^-2. Five of these sources are clearly identified as HMXRBs: four were already known (including three X-ray pulsars) and one, XMM J005605.8-720012, reported here for the first time. For the latter, we present optical spectroscopy confirming the association with a Be star in the SMC. The other sources in our sample have optical counterparts fainter than magnitude ~16 in the V band, and many of them have possible NIR counterparts consistent with highly reddened early type stars in the SMC. While their number is broadly ...

  1. Sector and Sphere: the design and implementation of a high-performance data cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yunhong; Grossman, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    Cloud computing has demonstrated that processing very large datasets over commodity clusters can be done simply, given the right programming model and infrastructure. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of the Sector storage cloud and the Sphere compute cloud. By contrast with the existing storage and compute clouds, Sector can manage data not only within a data centre, but also across geographically distributed data centres. Similarly, the Sphere compute cloud supports user-defined functions (UDFs) over data both within and across data centres. As a special case, MapReduce-style programming can be implemented in Sphere by using a Map UDF followed by a Reduce UDF. We describe some experimental studies comparing Sector/Sphere and Hadoop using the Terasort benchmark. In these studies, Sector is approximately twice as fast as Hadoop. Sector/Sphere is open source. PMID:19451100

  2. Sector and Sphere: the design and implementation of a high-performance data cloud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yunhong; Grossman, Robert L

    2009-06-28

    Cloud computing has demonstrated that processing very large datasets over commodity clusters can be done simply, given the right programming model and infrastructure. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of the Sector storage cloud and the Sphere compute cloud. By contrast with the existing storage and compute clouds, Sector can manage data not only within a data centre, but also across geographically distributed data centres. Similarly, the Sphere compute cloud supports user-defined functions (UDFs) over data both within and across data centres. As a special case, MapReduce-style programming can be implemented in Sphere by using a Map UDF followed by a Reduce UDF. We describe some experimental studies comparing Sector/Sphere and Hadoop using the Terasort benchmark. In these studies, Sector is approximately twice as fast as Hadoop. Sector/Sphere is open source.

  3. A Comprehensive Archival Search for Counterparts to Ultra-Compact High Velocity Clouds: Five Local Volume Dwarf Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Sand, D J; Bennet, P; Willman, B; Hargis, J; Strader, J; Olszewski, E; Tollerud, E J; Simon, J D; Caldwell, N; Guhathakurta, P; James, B L; Koposov, S; McLeod, B; Morrell, N; Peacock, M; Salinas, R; Seth, A C; Stark, D P; Toloba, E

    2015-01-01

    We report the discovery of five Local Volume dwarf galaxies uncovered during a comprehensive archival search for optical counterparts to ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs). The UCHVC population of HI clouds are thought to be candidate gas-rich, low mass halos at the edge of the Local Group and beyond, but no comprehensive search for stellar counterparts to these systems has been presented. Careful visual inspection of all publicly available optical and ultraviolet imaging at the position of the UCHVCs revealed six blue, diffuse counterparts with a morphology consistent with a faint dwarf galaxy beyond the Local Group. Optical spectroscopy of all six candidate dwarf counterparts show that five have an H$\\alpha$-derived velocity consistent with the coincident HI cloud, confirming their association; the sixth diffuse counterpart is likely a background object. The size and luminosity of the UCHVC dwarfs is consistent with other known Local Volume dwarf irregular galaxies. The gas fraction ($M_{HI}/M_{sta...

  4. Final Technical Report for "High-resolution global modeling of the effects of subgrid-scale clouds and turbulence on precipitating cloud systems"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Vincent [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2016-11-25

    The Multiscale Modeling Framework (MMF) embeds a cloud-resolving model in each grid column of a General Circulation Model (GCM). A MMF model does not need to use a deep convective parameterization, and thereby dispenses with the uncertainties in such parameterizations. However, MMF models grossly under-resolve shallow boundary-layer clouds, and hence those clouds may still benefit from parameterization. In this grant, we successfully created a climate model that embeds a cloud parameterization (“CLUBB”) within a MMF model. This involved interfacing CLUBB’s clouds with microphysics and reducing computational cost. We have evaluated the resulting simulated clouds and precipitation with satellite observations. The chief benefit of the project is to provide a MMF model that has an improved representation of clouds and that provides improved simulations of precipitation.

  5. DISTRIBUTION AND ORIGIN OF HIGH-VELOCITY CLOUDS .2. STATISTICAL-ANALYSIS OF THE WHOLE-SKY SURVEY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WAKKER, BP

    1991-01-01

    A sensitive, almost complete, whole-sky survey of high-velocity clouds (HVCs) has been made available by Bajaja et al. (1985) and Hulsbosch & Wakker (1988, Paper I). This paper (Paper II in a series on HVCs) is dedicated to the analysis of the statistical properties of these surveys. The main conclu

  6. Beyond the Flipped Classroom: A Highly Interactive Cloud-Classroom (HIC) Embedded into Basic Materials Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Bhagat, Kaushal Kumar; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2016-01-01

    The present study compares the highly interactive cloud-classroom (HIC) system with traditional methods of teaching materials science that utilize crystal structure picture or real crystal structure model, in order to examine its learning effectiveness across three dimensions: knowledge, comprehension and application. The aim of this study was to…

  7. Social functioning using direct and indirect measures with children with High Functioning Autism, nonverbal learning disability, and typically developing children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semrud-Clikeman, Margaret; Fine, Jodene Goldenring; Bledsoe, Jesse

    2016-01-01

    Social perception is an important underlying foundation for emotional development and overall adaptation. The majority of studies with children with High Functioning Autism (HFA) or nonverbal learning disabilities (NLD) evaluating social functioning have used measures of parent and/or teacher ratings. The present study utilized parent and teacher ratings of behavior as well as executive functioning in addition to direct measures of social perception. Three groups participated in this study (control [n = 38] HFA [n = 36], NLD [n = 31]). Results indicated that the HFA group experienced the most difficulty understanding emotional cues on the direct measure while both the HFA and NLD groups experienced difficulty with nonverbal cues. Significant difficulties were reported on the parent rating scale for sadness and social withdrawal for both clinical groups. Executive functioning was found to be particularly problematic for the clinical groups. The direct social perception measure was highly correlated with the measures of executive functioning and reflects the contribution that executive functions have on social functioning. These findings suggest that the clinical presentation on behavior rating scales may be very similar for children with HFA and NLD. Moreover, it appears that measures of executive functioning are sensitive to the clinical difficulties these groups experience. The findings also suggest there is a commonality in these disorders that warrants further investigation.

  8. Cloud Statistics and Discrimination in the Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, M.; Comiso, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    Despite their important role in the climate system, cloud cover and their statistics are poorly known, especially in the polar regions, where clouds are difficult to discriminate from snow covered surfaces. The advent of the A-train, which included Aqua/MODIS, CALIPSO/CALIOP and CloudSat/CPR sensors has provided an opportunity to improve our ability to accurately characterize the cloud cover. MODIS provides global coverage at a relatively good temporal and spatial resolution while CALIOP and CPR provide limited nadir sampling but accurate characterization of the vertical structure and phase of the cloud cover. Over the polar regions, cloud detection from a passive sensors like MODIS is challenging because of the presence of cold and highly reflective surfaces such as snow, sea-ice, glaciers, and ice-sheet, which have surface signatures similar to those of clouds. On the other hand, active sensors such as CALIOP and CPR are not only very sensitive to the presence of clouds but can also provide information about its microphysical characteristics. However, these nadir-looking sensors have sparse spatial coverage and their global data can have data spatial gaps of up to 100 km. We developed a polar cloud detection system for MODIS that is trained using collocated data from CALIOP and CPR. In particular, we employ a machine learning system that reads the radiative profile observed by MODIS and determine whether the field of view is cloudy or clear. Results have shown that the improved cloud detection scheme performs better than typical cloud mask algorithms using a validation data set not used for training. A one-year data set was generated and results indicate that daytime cloud detection accuracies improved from 80.1% to 92.6% (over sea-ice) and 71.2% to 87.4% (over ice-sheet) with CALIOP data used as the baseline. Significant improvements are also observed during nighttime, where cloud detection accuracies increase by 19.8% (over sea-ice) and 11.6% (over ice

  9. Organic acids as cloud condensation nuclei: Laboratory studies of highly soluble and insoluble species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pradeep Kumar

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of sub-micron-sized organic acid particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN has been examined at room temperature using a newly constructed continuous-flow, thermal-gradient diffusion chamber (TGDC. The organic acids studied were: oxalic, malonic, glutaric, oleic and stearic. The CCN properties of the highly soluble acids - oxalic, malonic and glutaric - match very closely Köhler theory predictions which assume full dissolution of the dry particle and a surface tension of the growing droplet equal to that of water. In particular, for supersaturations between 0.3 and 0.6, agreement between the dry particle diameter which gives 50% activation and that calculated from Köhler theory is to within 3nm on average. In the course of the experiments, considerable instability of glutaric acid particles was observed as a function of time and there is evidence that they fragment to some degree to smaller particles. Stearic acid and oleic acid, which are both highly insoluble in water, did not activate at supersaturations of 0.6% with dry diameters up to 140nm. Finally, to validate the performance of the TGDC, we present results for the activation of ammonium sulfate particles that demonstrate good agreement with Köhler theory if solution non-ideality is considered. Our findings support earlier studies in the literature that showed highly soluble organics to be CCN active but insoluble species to be largely inactive.

  10. Infrared Dark Clouds in the Small Magellanic Cloud?

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Min-Young; Ott, Jürgen; van Loon, Jacco Th; Bolatto, Alberto D; Jones, Paul A; Cunningham, Maria R; Devine, Kathryn E; Oliveira, Joana M

    2009-01-01

    We have applied the unsharp-masking technique to the 24 $\\mu$m image of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope, to search for high-extinction regions. This technique has been used to locate very dense and cold interstellar clouds in the Galaxy, particularly infrared dark clouds (IRDCs). Fifty five candidate regions of high-extinction, namely high-contrast regions (HCRs), have been identified from the generated decremental contrast image of the SMC. Most HCRs are located in the southern bar region and mainly distributed in the outskirts of CO clouds, but most likely contain a significant amount of H2. HCRs have a peak-contrast at 24 $\\mu$m of 2 - 2.5 % and a size of 8 - 14 pc. This corresponds to the size of typical and large Galactic IRDCs, but Galactic IRDCs are 2 - 3 times darker at 24 $\\mu$m than our HCRs. To constrain the physical properties of the HCRs, we have performed NH3, N2H+, HNC, HCO+, and HCN observations toward one of the HCRs, HCR LIRS36-EAST, using the Aust...

  11. Triggered O Star Formation in M20 via Cloud–Cloud Collision: Comparisons between High-resolution CO Observations and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torii, K.; Hattori, Y.; Hasegawa, K.; Ohama, A.; Haworth, T. J.; Shima, K.; Habe, A.; Tachihara, K.; Mizuno, N.; Onishi, T.; Mizuno, A.; Fukui, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Understanding high-mass star formation is one of the top-priority issues in astrophysics. Recent observational studies have revealed that cloud–cloud collisions may play a role in high-mass star formation in several places in the Milky Way and the Large Magellanic Cloud. The Trifid Nebula M20 is a well-known Galactic H ii region ionized by a single O7.5 star. In 2011, based on the CO observations with NANTEN2, we reported that the O star was formed by the collision between two molecular clouds ∼0.3 Myr ago. Those observations identified two molecular clouds toward M20, traveling at a relative velocity of 7.5 {km} {{{s}}}-1. This velocity separation implies that the clouds cannot be gravitationally bound to M20, but since the clouds show signs of heating by the stars there they must be spatially coincident with it. A collision is therefore highly possible. In this paper we present the new CO J = 1–0 and J = 3–2 observations of the colliding clouds in M20 performed with the Mopra and ASTE telescopes. The high-resolution observations revealed that the two molecular clouds have peculiar spatial and velocity structures, i.e., a spatially complementary distribution between the two clouds and a bridge feature that connects the two clouds in velocity space. Based on a new comparison with numerical models, we find that this complementary distribution is an expected outcome of cloud–cloud collisions, and that the bridge feature can be interpreted as the turbulent gas excited at the interface of the collision. Our results reinforce the cloud–cloud collision scenario in M20.

  12. On the Feasibility of a Network Coded Mobile Storage Cloud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sipos, Marton A.; Fitzek, Frank; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2015-01-01

    Conventional cloud storage services offer relatively good reliability and performance in a cost-effective manner. However, they are typically structured in a centralized and highly controlled fashion. In more dynamic storage scenarios, these centralized approaches are unfeasible and developing...... decentralized storage approaches becomes critical. The novelty of this paper is the introduction of the highly dynamic distributed mobile cloud, which uses free resources on user devices to move storage to the edges of the network. At the core of our approach, lies the use of random linear network coding...... to simulate the processes governing user behavior to show feasibility of mobile storage clouds in real scenarios....

  13. The features of heterogeneous water droplet evaporation in high-temperature combustion products of typical flammable liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piskunov Maxim V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the experimental results on heating and evaporation features of heterogeneous (with opaque solid particles – the size of 0.05-0.5 mm, relative mass concentration 0-1% water droplets (the initial size – radius 1-3 mm during their motion through high-temperature (500-1800 K gases. A significant increase in the integral characteristics of evaporation by introducing opaque inclusions into droplets was observed. The influence of energy accumulation on the conditions of droplet evaporation at the internal solid/liquid interfaces was established. For proportioned inclusions, the conditions of intensive vaporization (leading to the explosive disintegration of droplets at internal inclusion/liquid interfaces was set. To summarize research results, experiments were conducted with the combustion products of kerosene, gasoline, industrial alcohol, acetone, and oil. The particles of graphite, carbon, and aluminum as solid inclusions were used. The investigation compared integral characteristics of heterogeneous droplet evaporation under the conditions of non-stationary (gas temperature varied from 1800 K to 500 K over the length of channel and nearly stationary (gas temperature was maintained at about 1100 K heating.

  14. Development and testing of an aerosol-stratus cloud parameterization scheme for middle and high latitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, P.Q.; Meyers, M.P.; Kreidenweis, S.; Cotton, W.R. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The aim of this new project is to develop an aerosol/cloud microphysics parameterization of mixed-phase stratus and boundary layer clouds. Our approach is to create, test, and implement a bulk-microphysics/aerosol model using data from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) sites and large-eddy simulation (LES) explicit bin-resolving aerosol/microphysics models. The primary objectives of this work are twofold. First, we need the prediction of number concentrations of activated aerosol which are transferred to the droplet spectrum, so that the aerosol population directly affects the cloud formation and microphysics. Second, we plan to couple the aerosol model to the gas and aqueous-chemistry module that will drive the aerosol formation and growth. We begin by exploring the feasibility of performing cloud-resolving simulations of Arctic stratus clouds over the North Slope CART site. These simulations using Colorado State University`s regional atmospheric modeling system (RAMS) will be useful in designing the structure of the cloud-resolving model and in interpreting data acquired at the North Slope site.

  15. A Cost of Illness Study of Children with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders and Comorbid Anxiety Disorders as Compared to Clinically Anxious and Typically Developing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steensel, Francisca J.; Dirksen, Carmen D.; Bögels, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    The study's aim was to estimate the societal costs of children with high-functioning ASD and comorbid anxiety disorder(s) (ASD + AD-group; n = 73), and to compare these costs to children with anxiety disorders (AD-group; n = 34), and typically developing children (controls; n = 87). Mean total costs for the ASD + AD-group amounted €17,380 per…

  16. A Cost of Illness Study of Children with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders and Comorbid Anxiety Disorders as Compared to Clinically Anxious and Typically Developing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steensel, Francisca J.; Dirksen, Carmen D.; Bögels, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    The study's aim was to estimate the societal costs of children with high-functioning ASD and comorbid anxiety disorder(s) (ASD + AD-group; n = 73), and to compare these costs to children with anxiety disorders (AD-group; n = 34), and typically developing children (controls; n = 87). Mean total costs for the ASD + AD-group amounted €17,380 per…

  17. What can simulated molecular clouds tell us about real molecular clouds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte-Cabral, A.; Dobbs, C. L.

    2016-06-01

    We study the properties of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) from a smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation of a portion of a spiral galaxy, modelled at high resolution, with robust representations of the physics of the interstellar medium. We examine the global molecular gas content of clouds, and investigate the effect of using CO or H2 densities to define the GMCs. We find that CO can reliably trace the high-density H2 gas, but misses less dense H2 clouds. We also investigate the effect of using 3D CO densities versus CO emission with an observer's perspective, and find that CO-emission clouds trace well the peaks of the actual GMCs in 3D, but can miss the lower density molecular gas between density peaks which is often CO-dark. Thus, the CO emission typically traces smaller clouds within larger GMC complexes. We also investigate the effect of the galactic environment (in particular the presence of spiral arms), on the distribution of GMC properties, and we find that the mean properties are similar between arm and inter-arm clouds, but the tails of some distributions are indicative of intrinsic differences in the environment. We find highly filamentary clouds (similar to the giant molecular filaments of our Galaxy) exclusively in the inter-arm region, formed by galactic shear. We also find that the most massive GMC complexes are located in the arm, and that as a consequence of more frequent cloud interactions/mergers in the arm, arm clouds are more sub-structured and have higher velocity dispersions than inter-arm clouds.

  18. Energy Efficiency and Capacity Tradeoff in Cloud Radio Access Network of High-Speed Railways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shichao Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To meet the increasing demand of high-data-rate services of high-speed railway (HSR passengers, cloud radio access network (C-RAN is proposed. This paper investigates the tradeoff between energy efficiency (EE performance and capacity in C-RAN of HSR. Considering that the train location can be predicted, we propose a predictable path loss based time domain power allocation method (PPTPA to improve EE performance of HSR communication system. First, we consider that the communication system of HSR only bears the passenger information services (PISs. The energy-efficient power allocation problem with delay constraint is studied. The formulated problem is nonconvex. To deal with it, an equivalent convex problem is reformulated. Based on PPTPA, we propose an iterative algorithm to improve the EE performance. Second, we consider that the PISs and the train control services (TCSs are all bore. A capacity optimization problem with joint EE and services transmission delay constraints is formulated. Based on PPTPA, we propose a hybrid power allocation scheme to improve the capacity of the system. Finally, we analyze the effect of small-scale fading on EE performance. The effectiveness of the proposed power allocation algorithm is validated by HSR channel measurement trace based emulation results and extensive simulation results.

  19. Identifying galaxy candidates in WSRT HI imaging of ultra-compact high velocity clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Elizabeth A K; Cannon, John M; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Haynes, Martha P

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs) were identified in the ALFALFA HI survey as potential gas-bearing dark matter halos. Here we present higher resolution neutral hydrogen (HI) observations of twelve UCHVCS with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). The UCHVCs were selected based on a combination of size, isolation, large recessional velocity and high column density as the best candidate dark matter halos. The WSRT data were tapered to image the UCHVCs at 210" (comparable to Arecibo) and 105" angular resolution. In a comparison of the single-dish to interferometer data, we find that the line flux recovered in the WSRT observations is comparable to that from the single-dish ALFALFA data. In addition, any structure seen in the ALFALFA data is reproduced in the WSRT maps at the same angular resolution. At 210'" resolution all the sources are generally compact with a smooth HI morphology, as expected from their identification as UCHVCs. At the higher angular resolution, a majority of the source...

  20. Connecting hygroscopic growth at high humidities to cloud activation for different particle types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wex, H; Stratmann, F; Hennig, T; Hartmann, S; Niedermeier, D; Nilsson, E; Ziese, M [Leibniz-Institute for Tropospheric Research, Leipzig (Germany); Ocskay, R; Salma, I [Institute of Chemistry, Eoetvoes University, Budapest (Hungary); Rose, D [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Biogeochemistry Department, Mainz (Germany)], E-mail: wex@tropos.de

    2008-07-15

    This work recompiles studies that have been done with respect to hygroscopic growth in the regime of high relative humidities and with respect to activation for different kinds of particle at LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator) during the last few years. The particles examined consisted of a mixture of succinic acid and ammonium sulfate, seawater samples, soot coated with an organic and/or an inorganic substance, and two different atmospheric HULIS (HUmic LIke Substance) samples. An influence of changing non-ideal behavior and of slightly soluble substances on the hygroscopic growth was found in varying degrees in the subsaturation regime. The measured hygroscopic growth was extrapolated towards supersaturation, using a simple form of the Koehler equation, and assuming a constant number of molecules/ions in solution for high relative humidities ({>=}95% or {>=}98%, depending on the particles). When the surface tension of water was used, the modeled critical supersaturations reproduced the measured ones for the seawater samples and for the coated soot particles. To reach agreement between measured and modeled critical supersaturations for the HULIS particles, a concentration-dependent surface tension had to be used, with values of the surface tension that were lower than that of water, but larger than those that had been reported for bulk measurements in the past.

  1. A Catalog of Ultra-compact High Velocity Clouds from the ALFALFA Survey: Local Group Galaxy Candidates?

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Elizabeth A K; Haynes, Martha P

    2013-01-01

    We present a catalog of 59 ultra-compact high velocity clouds (UCHVCs) extracted from the 40% complete ALFALFA HI-line survey. The ALFALFA UCHVCs have median flux densities of 1.34 Jy km/s, median angular diameters of 10', and median velocity widths of 23 km/s. We show that the full UCHVC population cannot easily be associated with known populations of high velocity clouds. Of the 59 clouds presented here, only 11 are also present in the compact cloud catalog extracted from the commensal GALFA-HI survey, demonstrating the utility of this separate dataset and analysis. Based on their sky distribution and observed properties, we infer that the ALFALFA UCHVCs are consistent with the hypothesis that they may be very low mass galaxies within the Local Volume. In that case, most of their baryons would be in the form of gas, and because of their low stellar content, they remain unidentified by extant optical surveys. At distances of ~1 Mpc, the UCHVCs have neutral hydrogen (HI) masses of ~10^5 -10^6 M_sun, HI diamet...

  2. Evidence of High Ice Supersaturation in Cirrus Clouds Using ARM Raman Lidar Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comstock, Jennifer M.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Turner, David D.

    2004-06-05

    Water vapor amounts in the upper troposphere are crucial to understanding the radiative feedback of cirrus clouds on the Earth’s climate. We use a unique, year-long dataset of water vapor mixing ratio inferred from ground-based Raman lidar measurements to study the role of ice supersaturation in ice nucleation processes. We find that ice supersaturation occurs 31% of the time in over 300,000 data points. We also examine the distribution of ice supersaturation with height and find that in the uppermost portion of a cloud layer, the air is ice supersaturated 43% of the time. These measurements show that large ice supersaturation is common in cirrus clouds, which supports the theory of ice forming homogeneously. Given the continuous nature of these Raman lidar measurements, our results have important implications for studying ice nucleation processes using cloud microphysical models.

  3. ARM Raman Lidar Measurements of High Ice Supersaturation in Cirrus Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comstock, Jennifer M.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Turner, David D.

    2004-09-01

    Water vapor amounts in the upper troposphere are crucial to understanding the radiative feedback of cirrus clouds on the Earth's climate. We use a unique, year-long dataset of water vapor mixing ratio inferred from ground-based Raman lidar measurements to study the role of ice supersaturation in ice nucleation processes. We find that ice supersaturation occurs 31% of the time in over 300,000 data points. We also examine the distribution of ice supersaturation with height and find that in the uppermost portion of a cloud layer, the air is ice supersaturated 43% of the time. These measurements show that large ice supersaturation is common in cirrus clouds, which supports the theory of ice forming homogeneously. Given the continuous nature of these Raman lidar measurements, our results have important implications for studying ice nucleation processes using cloud microphysical models.

  4. Techniques for the measurements of the line of sight velocity of high altitude Barium clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mende, S. B.

    1981-01-01

    It is demonstrated that for maximizing the scientific output of future ion cloud release experiments a new type of instrument is required which will measure the line of sight velocity of the ion cloud by the Doppler Technique. A simple instrument was constructed using a 5 cm diameter solid Fabry-Perot etalon coupled to a low light level integrating television camera. It was demonstrated that the system has both the sensitivity and spectral resolution for the detection of ion clouds and the measurement of their line of sight Doppler velocity. The tests consisted of (1) a field experiment using a rocket barium cloud release to check the sensitivity, (2) laboratory experiments to show the spectral resolving capabilities of the system. The instrument was found to be operational if the source was brighter than about 1 kilorayleigh and it had a wavelength resolution much better than .2A which corresponds to about 12 km/sec or an acceleration potential of 100 volts.

  5. Taxonomy of cloud computing services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefer, C.N.; Karagiannis, G.

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing is a highly discussed topic, and many big players of the software industry are entering the development of cloud services. Several companies want to explore the possibilities and benefits of cloud computing, but with the amount of cloud computing services increasing quickly, the need

  6. Taxonomy of cloud computing services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoefer, C.N.; Karagiannis, Georgios

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing is a highly discussed topic, and many big players of the software industry are entering the development of cloud services. Several companies want to explore the possibilities and benefits of cloud computing, but with the amount of cloud computing services increasing quickly, the need

  7. Retrieving high-resolution surface solar radiation with cloud parameters derived by combining MODIS and MTSAT data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Tang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cloud parameters (cloud mask, effective particle radius and liquid/ice water path are the important inputs in determining surface solar radiation (SSR. These parameters can be derived from MODIS with high accuracy but their temporal resolution is too low to obtain high temporal resolution SSR retrievals. In order to obtain hourly cloud parameters, the Artificial Neural Network (ANN is applied in this study to directly construct a functional relationship between MODIS cloud products and Multi-functional Transport Satellite (MTSAT geostationary satellite signals. Meanwhile, an efficient parameterization model for SSR retrieval is introduced and, when driven with MODIS atmospheric and land products, its root mean square error (RMSE is about 100 W m-2 for 44 Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN stations. Once the estimated cloud parameters and other information (such as aerosol, precipitable water, ozone and so on are input to the model, we can derive SSR at high spatio-temporal resolution. The retrieved SSR is first evaluated against hourly radiation data at three experimental stations in the Haihe River Basin of China. The mean bias error (MBE and RMSE in hourly SSR estimate are 12.0 W m-2 (or 3.5 % and 98.5 W m-2 (or 28.9 %, respectively. The retrieved SSR is also evaluated against daily radiation data at 90 China Meteorological Administration (CMA stations. The MBEs are 9.8 W m-2 (5.4 %; the RMSEs in daily and monthly-mean SSR estimates are 34.2 W m-2 (19.1 % and 22.1 W m-2 (12.3 %, respectively. The accuracy is comparable or even higher than other two radiation products (GLASS and ISCCP-FD, and the present method is more computationally efficient and can produce hourly SSR data at a spatial resolution of 5 km.

  8. Measured and modelled cloud condensation nuclei number concentration at the high alpine site Jungfraujoch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Jurányi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosol particles are able to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN and are therefore important for the climate and the hydrological cycle, but their properties are not fully understood. Total CCN number concentrations at 10 different supersaturations in the range of SS=0.12–1.18% were measured in May 2008 at the remote high alpine research station, Jungfraujoch, Switzerland (3580 m a.s.l.. In this paper, we present a closure study between measured and predicted CCN number concentrations. CCN predictions were done using dry number size distribution (scanning particle mobility sizer, SMPS and bulk chemical composition data (aerosol mass spectrometer, AMS, and multi-angle absorption photometer, MAAP in a simplified Köhler theory. The predicted and the measured CCN number concentrations agree very well and are highly correlated. A sensitivity study showed that the temporal variability of the chemical composition at the Jungfraujoch can be neglected for a reliable CCN prediction, whereas it is important to know the mean chemical composition. The exact bias introduced by using a too low or too high hygroscopicity parameter for CCN prediction was further quantified and shown to be substantial for the lowest supersaturation.

    Despite the high average organic mass fraction (~45% in the fine mode, there was no indication that the surface tension was substantially reduced at the point of CCN activation. A comparison between hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA, AMS/MAAP, and CCN derived κ values showed that HTDMA measurements can be used to determine particle hygroscopicity required for CCN predictions if no suitable chemical composition data are available.

  9. Measured and modelled cloud condensation nuclei concentration at the high alpine site Jungfraujoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurányi, Z.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Decarlo, P. F.; Kammermann, L.; Baltensperger, U.

    2010-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles are able to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and are therefore important for the climate and the hydrological cycle, but their properties are not fully understood. Total CCN number concentrations at 10 different supersaturations in the range of SS = 0.12-1.18% were measured in May 2008 at the remote high alpine research station, Jungfraujoch, Switzerland (3580 m asl.). In this paper, we present a closure study between measured and predicted CCN number concentrations. CCN predictions were done using number size distribution (scanning particle mobility sizer, SMPS) and bulk chemical composition data (aerosol mass spectrometer, AMS, and multi-angle absorption photometer, MAAP) in a simplified Köhler theory. The predicted and the measured CCN concentrations agree very well and are highly correlated. A sensitivity study showed that the temporal variability of the chemical composition at the Jungfraujoch can be neglected for a reliable CCN prediction, whereas it is important to know the mean chemical composition. The exact bias introduced by using a too low or too high hygroscopicity parameter for CCN prediction was further quantified and shown to be substantial for the lowest supersaturation. Despite the high average organic mass fraction (45%) during the measurement campaign, there was no indication that the surface tension was substantially reduced at the point of CCN activation. A comparison between hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA), AMS/MAAP, and CCN derived κ values showed that HTDMA measurements can be used as a chemical composition proxy for CCN predictions if no suitable chemical composition data are available.

  10. Measured and modelled cloud condensation nuclei concentration at the high alpine site Jungfraujoch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Jurányi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosol particles are able to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN and are therefore important for the climate and the hydrological cycle, but their properties are not fully understood. Total CCN number concentrations at 10 different supersaturations in the range of SS = 0.12–1.18% were measured in May 2008 at the remote high alpine research station, Jungfraujoch, Switzerland (3580 m asl.. In this paper, we present a closure study between measured and predicted CCN number concentrations. CCN predictions were done using number size distribution (scanning particle mobility sizer, SMPS and bulk chemical composition data (aerosol mass spectrometer, AMS, and multi-angle absorption photometer, MAAP in a simplified Köhler theory. The predicted and the measured CCN concentrations agree very well and are highly correlated. A sensitivity study showed that the temporal variability of the chemical composition at the Jungfraujoch can be neglected for a reliable CCN prediction, whereas it is important to know the mean chemical composition. The exact bias introduced by using a too low or too high hygroscopicity parameter for CCN prediction was further quantified and shown to be substantial for the lowest supersaturation.

    Despite the high average organic mass fraction (45% during the measurement campaign, there was no indication that the surface tension was substantially reduced at the point of CCN activation. A comparison between hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA, AMS/MAAP, and CCN derived κ values showed that HTDMA measurements can be used as a chemical composition proxy for CCN predictions if no suitable chemical composition data are available.

  11. Measured and modelled cloud condensation nuclei number concentration at the high alpine site Jungfraujoch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurányi, Z.; Gysel, M.; Weingartner, E.; Decarlo, P. F.; Kammermann, L.; Baltensperger, U.

    2010-08-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles are able to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and are therefore important for the climate and the hydrological cycle, but their properties are not fully understood. Total CCN number concentrations at 10 different supersaturations in the range of SS=0.12-1.18% were measured in May 2008 at the remote high alpine research station, Jungfraujoch, Switzerland (3580 m a.s.l.). In this paper, we present a closure study between measured and predicted CCN number concentrations. CCN predictions were done using dry number size distribution (scanning particle mobility sizer, SMPS) and bulk chemical composition data (aerosol mass spectrometer, AMS, and multi-angle absorption photometer, MAAP) in a simplified Köhler theory. The predicted and the measured CCN number concentrations agree very well and are highly correlated. A sensitivity study showed that the temporal variability of the chemical composition at the Jungfraujoch can be neglected for a reliable CCN prediction, whereas it is important to know the mean chemical composition. The exact bias introduced by using a too low or too high hygroscopicity parameter for CCN prediction was further quantified and shown to be substantial for the lowest supersaturation. Despite the high average organic mass fraction (~45%) in the fine mode, there was no indication that the surface tension was substantially reduced at the point of CCN activation. A comparison between hygroscopicity tandem differential mobility analyzer (HTDMA), AMS/MAAP, and CCN derived κ values showed that HTDMA measurements can be used to determine particle hygroscopicity required for CCN predictions if no suitable chemical composition data are available.

  12. High-Mass X-ray binaries in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Haberl, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The last comprehensive catalogue of high-mass X-ray binaries in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) was published about 10 years ago. Since then new such systems were discovered, mainly by X-ray observations with Chandra and XMM-Newton. For the majority of the proposed HMXBs in the SMC no X-ray pulsations were discovered yet and unless other properties of the X-ray source and/or the optical counterpart confirm their HMXB nature, they remain only candidate HMXBs. From a literature search we collect a catalogue of 148 confirmed and candidate HMXBs in the SMC and investigate their properties to shed light on their real nature. Based on the sample of well established HMXBs (the pulsars), we investigate which observed properties are most appropriate for a reliable classification. Using spectral and temporal characteristics of the X-ray sources and colour-magnitude diagrams from the optical to the infrared of their likely counterparts and taking into account the uncertainty in the X-ray position we define different le...

  13. Determination of xanthohumol in beer based on cloud point extraction coupled with high performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ligang; Zhao, Qi; Jin, Haiyan; Zhang, Xiaopan; Xu, Yang; Yu, Aimin; Zhang, Hanqi; Ding, Lan

    2010-04-15

    A method based on coupling of cloud point extraction (CPE) with high performance liquid chromatography separation and ultraviolet detection was developed for determination of xanthohumol in beer. The nonionic surfactant Triton X-114 was chosen as the extraction medium. The parameters affecting the CPE were evaluated and optimized. The highest extraction yield of xanthohumol was obtained with 2.5% of Triton X-114 (v/v) at pH 5.0, 15% of sodium chloride (w/v), 70 degrees C of equilibrium temperature and 10 min of equilibrium time. Under these conditions, the limit of detection of xanthohumol is 0.003 mg L(-1). The intra- and inter-day precisions expressed as relative standard deviations are 4.6% and 6.3%, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for determination of xanthohumol in various beer samples. The contents of xanthohumol in these samples are in the range of 0.052-0.628 mg L(-1), and the recoveries ranging from 90.7% to 101.9% were obtained. The developed method was demonstrated to be efficient, green, rapid and inexpensive for extraction and determination of xanthohumol in beer.

  14. [Determination of six pesticides in milk using cloud point extraction-high performance liquid chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Cui, Yanmei; Liu, Wei; Yang, Mingmin; Chen, Jianbo

    2007-11-01

    The feasibility of employing cloud point extraction (CPE) as extraction and preconcentration method for the recovery of herbicides from milk samples followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis is demonstrated. An aqueous surfactant solution containing 60 g/L Tween 20 or Triton X-100 was heated with an appropriate concentration of (NH4)2SO4 or NaCl for the extraction of herbicides. The extract was analyzed by HPLC subsequently. Six herbicides in milk were analyzed simultaneously. The results showed that the linear dynamic ranges of detection were 20 - 10 000 microg/L for tralkoxydim, metribuzin and bromoxynil, 30 - 10 000 microg/L for mefenacet, and 50 - 10 000 microg/L for bensulfuron-methyl and nicosulfuron. The correlation coefficients were 0.998 1 - 0.999 7. The average recoveries of the six herbicides ranged from 85.09% to 96.74%. The relative standard deviations for the six herbicides were in the range of 1.90% - 3.98%. The limits of detection for the six pesticides were lower than the maximum residue limits (MRL) of China. The results indicate that the method is easier, faster, sensitive and produces less pollutants.

  15. H ii REGIONS WITHIN A COMPACT HIGH VELOCITY CLOUD. A NEARLY STARLESS DWARF GALAXY?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellazzini, M. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Magrini, L. [INAF—Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Mucciarelli, A.; Fraternali, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Bologna, Viale Berti Pichat, 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Beccari, G. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura Santiago (Chile); Ibata, R.; Martin, N. [Obs. astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l’Université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Battaglia, G. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Testa, V. [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monteporzio (Italy); Fumana, M.; Marchetti, A. [INAF—IASF, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133, Milano (Italy); Correnti, M., E-mail: michele.bellazzini@oabo.inaf.it [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-02-10

    Within the SECCO survey we identified a candidate stellar counterpart to the Ultra Compact High Velocity Cloud (UCHVC) HVC274.68+74.70-123 that was suggested by Adams et al. to be a possible mini halo within the Local Group of galaxies. The spectroscopic follow-up of the brightest sources within the candidate reveals the presence of two H ii regions whose radial velocity is compatible with a physical association with the UVHVC. The available data do not allow us to give a definite answer on the nature of the newly identified system. A few alternative hypotheses are discussed. However, the most likely possibility is that we have found a new faint dwarf galaxy residing in the Virgo cluster of galaxies, which we name SECCO 1. Independently of its actual distance, SECCO 1 displays a ratio of neutral hydrogen mass to V luminosity of M{sub H} {sub I}/L{sub V}≳20, by far the largest among local dwarfs. Hence, it appears to be a nearly starless galaxy and it may be an example of the missing links between normal dwarfs and the dark mini halos that are predicted to exist in large numbers according to the currently accepted cosmological model.

  16. High Mass X-ray Binaries and Recent Star Formation History of the Small Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Shtykovskiy, P

    2007-01-01

    We study the relation between high-mass X-ray binary (HMXB) population and recent star formation history (SFH) for the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). Using archival optical SMC observations, we have approximated the color-magnitude diagrams of the stellar population by model stellar populations and, in this way, reconstructed the spatially resolved SFH of the galaxy over the past 100 Myr.We analyze the errors and stability of this method for determining the recent SFH and show that uncertainties in the models of massive stars at late evolutionary stages are the main factor that limits its accuracy. By combining the SFH with the spatial distribution of HMXBs obtained from XMM-Newton observations, we have derived the dependence of the HMXB number on the time elapsed since the star formation event. The number of young systems with ages 10 Myr is shown to be smaller than the prediction based on the type-II supernova rate. The HMXB number reaches its maximum ~20-50 Myr after the star formation event. This may be at...

  17. Visualization of High-Dimensional Point Clouds Using Their Density Distribution's Topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oesterling, P; Heine, C; Janicke, H; Scheuermann, G; Heyer, G

    2011-11-01

    We present a novel method to visualize multidimensional point clouds. While conventional visualization techniques, like scatterplot matrices or parallel coordinates, have issues with either overplotting of entities or handling many dimensions, we abstract the data using topological methods before presenting it. We assume the input points to be samples of a random variable with a high-dimensional probability distribution which we approximate using kernel density estimates on a suitably reconstructed mesh. From the resulting scalar field we extract the join tree and present it as a topological landscape, a visualization metaphor that utilizes the human capability of understanding natural terrains. In this landscape, dense clusters of points show up as hills. The nesting of hills indicates the nesting of clusters. We augment the landscape with the data points to allow selection and inspection of single points and point sets. We also present optimizations to make our algorithm applicable to large data sets and to allow interactive adaption of our visualization to the kernel window width used in the density estimation.

  18. HD and H2 formation in low-metallicity dusty gas clouds at high reshift

    CERN Document Server

    Cazaux, S

    2009-01-01

    Context: The HD and H2 molecules play important roles in the cooling of primordial and very metal-poor gas at high redshift. Aims: Grain surface and gas phase formation of HD and H2 is investigated to assess the importance of trace amounts of dust, 10^{-5}-10^{-3} Zo, in the production of HD and H2. Methods: We consider carbonaceous and silicate grains and include both physisorption and chemisorption, tunneling, and realistic grain surface barriers. We find, for a collapsing gas cloud environment with coupled chemical and thermal balance, that dust abundances as small as 10^{-5} solar lead to a strong boost in the H2 formation rate due to surface reactions. As a result of this enhancement in H2, HD is formed more efficiently in the gas phase through the D+ +H2 reaction. Direct formation of HD on dust grains cannot compete well with this gas phase process for dust temperatures below 150 K. We also derive up-to-date analytic fitting formulae for the grain surface formation of H2 and HD, including the different ...

  19. METSAT information content: Cloud screening and solar correction investigations on the influence of NOAA-6 advanced very high resolution radiometer derived vegetation assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, M. L.

    1983-01-01

    The development of the cloud indicator index (CII) for use with METSAT's advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) is described. The CII is very effective at identification of clouds. Also, explored are different solar correction and standard techniques and the impact of these corrections have on the information content of AVHRR data.

  20. Lidar Observations of Tropical High-altitude Cirrus Clouds: Results form Dual Wavelength Raman Lidar Measurements During the ALBATROSS Campaign 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuber, R.; Wegener, Alfred; Schrems, O.; McDermid, I. S.

    1997-01-01

    Results from dual wavelength Raman Lidar Observations of tropical high-altitude cirrus clouds are reported. Based on 107 hours of night-time measurements cirrus cloud were present in more than 50% of the observations at latitudes between 23.5 degress S and 23.5 degrees N and altitudes between 11 and 16km.

  1. Lidar Observations of Tropical High-altitude Cirrus Clouds: Results form Dual Wavelength Raman Lidar Measurements During the ALBATROSS Campaign 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuber, R.; Wegener, Alfred; Schrems, O.; McDermid, I. S.

    1997-01-01

    Results from dual wavelength Raman Lidar Observations of tropical high-altitude cirrus clouds are reported. Based on 107 hours of night-time measurements cirrus cloud were present in more than 50% of the observations at latitudes between 23.5 degress S and 23.5 degrees N and altitudes between 11 and 16km.

  2. Scalable Multi-Tenant Authorization in Highly-Collaborative Cloud Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy Gerges

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative applications have lately gained extramomentum due to two recent phenomena: data explosion andcloud computing. With more and more data and applicationsbeing hosted in the “cloud”, it becomes easier for organizationswith varying levels of mutual trust to share and collaborate overresources. However, a pressing challenge remains with the need ofeach organization to control access to its resources. Authorization,usually implemented as role-based access control (RBAC, hasbeen recently proposed as a consolidated, multi-tenant cloudservice, whereby RBAC rules of the collaborating organizationsare stored centrally with a trusted authorization provider to maskheterogeneity and to simplify management. A critical factor tothe success of such aggregating approach to access control isthe scalability of the rule store to the number of collaboratingorganizations and to the degree of collaboration.In this paper, we focus on the scalability of the online rulestore, that is, the set of rules that are checked with everyauthorization request, and thus, needs to reside in fast storage(e.g., main memory. We show that the size of the online rule storeincreases quadratically with the number of collaborating organizations in highly-collaborative cloud applications, applicationsin which resources are shared massively across organizations.We propose an authorization system that scales well to thedegree of collaboration and call our system highly-collaborativeauthorization service (HCAS. HCAS is based on role mapping, awell-known RBAC technique that maps roles across collaboratingorganizations. HCAS replaces the inter-domain RBAC rules witha more scalable set of role-mapping tuples. Using simulation,we show that HCAS achieves super-linear savings in the sizeof online rule store. HCAS exhibits a favorable behavior of aslightly decreasing rule set with increasing degree of collaborationin highly-collaborative settings. Scalability of online memoryin RBAC

  3. Search Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/cloud.html Search Cloud To use the sharing features on this ... of Top 110 zoster vaccine Share the MedlinePlus search cloud with your users by embedding our search ...

  4. A Universal Dynamic Threshold Cloud Detection Algorithm (UDTCDA) supported by a prior surface reflectance database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lin; Wei, Jing; Wang, Jian; Mi, Xueting; Guo, Yamin; Lv, Yang; Yang, Yikun; Gan, Ping; Zhou, Xueying; Jia, Chen; Tian, Xinpeng

    2016-06-01

    Conventional cloud detection methods are easily affected by mixed pixels, complex surface structures, and atmospheric factors, resulting in poor cloud detection results. To minimize these problems, a new Universal Dynamic Threshold Cloud Detection Algorithm (UDTCDA) supported by a priori surface reflectance database is proposed in this paper. A monthly surface reflectance database is constructed using long-time-sequenced MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer surface reflectance product (MOD09A1) to provide the surface reflectance of the underlying surfaces. The relationships between the apparent reflectance changes and the surface reflectance are simulated under different observation and atmospheric conditions with the 6S (Second Simulation of the Satellite Signal in the Solar Spectrum) model, and the dynamic threshold cloud detection models are developed. Two typical remote sensing data with important application significance and different sensor parameters, MODIS and Landsat 8, are selected for cloud detection experiments. The results were validated against the visual interpretation of clouds and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation cloud measurements. The results showed that the UDTCDA can obtain a high precision in cloud detection, correctly identifying cloudy pixels and clear-sky pixels at rates greater than 80% with error rate and missing rate of less than 20%. The UDTCDA cloud product overall shows less estimation uncertainty than the current MODIS cloud mask products. Moreover, the UDTCDA can effectively reduce the effects of atmospheric factors and mixed pixels and can be applied to different satellite sensors to realize long-term, large-scale cloud detection operations.

  5. Cloud Computing: A study of cloud architecture and its patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandeep Handa,

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing is a general term for anything that involves delivering hosted services over the Internet. Cloud computing is a paradigm shift following the shift from mainframe to client–server in the early 1980s. Cloud computing can be defined as accessing third party software and services on web and paying as per usage. It facilitates scalability and virtualized resources over Internet as a service providing cost effective and scalable solution to customers. Cloud computing has evolved as a disruptive technology and picked up speed with the presence of many vendors in cloud computing space. The evolution of cloud computing from numerous technological approaches and business models such as SaaS, cluster computing, high performance computing, etc., signifies that the cloud IDM can be considered as a superset of all the corresponding issues from these paradigms and many more. In this paper we will discuss Life cycle management, Cloud architecture, Pattern in Cloud IDM, Volatility of Cloud relations.

  6. The use of low density high accuracy (LDHA) data for correction of high density low accuracy (HDLA) point cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Michal Bartosz; Wozniak, Adam; Mayer, J. R. R.

    2016-06-01

    Coordinate measuring techniques rely on computer processing of coordinate values of points gathered from physical surfaces using contact or non-contact methods. Contact measurements are characterized by low density and high accuracy. On the other hand optical methods gather high density data of the whole object in a short time but with accuracy at least one order of magnitude lower than for contact measurements. Thus the drawback of contact methods is low density of data, while for non-contact methods it is low accuracy. In this paper a method for fusion of data from two measurements of fundamentally different nature: high density low accuracy (HDLA) and low density high accuracy (LDHA) is presented to overcome the limitations of both measuring methods. In the proposed method the concept of virtual markers is used to find a representation of pairs of corresponding characteristic points in both sets of data. In each pair the coordinates of the point from contact measurements is treated as a reference for the corresponding point from non-contact measurement. Transformation enabling displacement of characteristic points from optical measurement to their match from contact measurements is determined and applied to the whole point cloud. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm was evaluated by comparison with data from a coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Three surfaces were used for this evaluation: plane, turbine blade and engine cover. For the planar surface the achieved improvement was of around 200 μm. Similar results were obtained for the turbine blade but for the engine cover the improvement was smaller. For both freeform surfaces the improvement was higher for raw data than for data after creation of mesh of triangles.

  7. The Cloud Radar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racette, Paul; Heymsfield, Gerald; Li, Lihua; Tian, Lin; Zenker, Ed

    2003-01-01

    Improvement in our understanding of the radiative impact of clouds on the climate system requires a comprehensive view of clouds including their physical dimensions, dynamical generation processes, and detailed microphysical properties. To this end, millimeter vave radar is a powerful tool by which clouds can be remotely sensed. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has developed the Cloud Radar System (CRS). CRS is a highly sensitive 94 GHz (W-band) pulsed-Doppler polarimetric radar that is designed to fly on board the NASA high-altitude ER-2 aircraft. The instrument is currently the only millimeter wave radar capable of cloud and precipitation measurements from above most all clouds. Because it operates from high-altitude, the CRS provides a unique measurement perspective for cirrus cloud studies. The CRS emulates a satellite view of clouds and precipitation systems thus providing valuable measurements for the implementation and algorithm validation for the upcoming NASA CloudSat mission that is designed to measure ice cloud distributions on the global scale using a spaceborne 94 GHz radar. This paper describes the CRS instrument and preliminary data from the recent Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE). The radar design is discussed. Characteristics of the radar are given. A block diagram illustrating functional components of the radar is shown. The performance of the CRS during the CRYSTAL-FACE campaign is discussed.

  8. ESA's high-energy observatories spot doughnut-shaped cloud with a black-hole filling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    enshrouding torus. However, Beckmann's group took the path less trodden and studied the central black hole by peering through the torus. With XMM-Newton and Integral, they could detect some of the X-rays and gamma rays, emitted by the accretion disc, which partially penetrate the torus. "By peering right into the torus, we see the black hole phenomenon in a whole new light, or lack of light, as the case may be here," Beckmann said. Beckmann's group saw how different processes around a black hole produce light at different wavelengths. For example, some of the gamma rays produced close to the black hole get absorbed by iron atoms in the torus and are re-emitted at a lower energy. This in fact is how the scientists knew they were seeing `reprocessed’ light farther out. Also, because of the line of sight towards NGC 4388, they knew this iron was from a torus on the same plane as the accretion disk, and not from gas clouds `above’ or `below’ the accretion disk. This new view through the haze has provided valuable insight into the relationship between the black hole, its accretion disc and the doughnut, and supports the torus model in several ways. Gas in the accretion disc close to the black hole reaches high speeds and temperatures (over 100 million degrees, hotter than the Sun) as it races toward the void. The gas radiates predominantly at high energies, in the X-ray wavelengths. According to Beckmann, this light is able to escape the black hole because it is still outside of its border, but ultimately collides with matter in the torus. Some of it is absorbed; some of it is reflected at different wavelengths, like sunlight penetrating a cloud; and the very energetic gamma rays pierce through. "This torus is not as dense as a real doughnut or a true German Krapfen, but it is far hotter - up to a thousand degrees - and loaded with many more calories," Beckmann said. The new observations also pinpoint the origin of the high-energy emission from NGC 4388. While the lower

  9. Zen of cloud learning cloud computing by examples on Microsoft Azure

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Haishi

    2014-01-01

    Zen of Cloud: Learning Cloud Computing by Examples on Microsoft Azure provides comprehensive coverage of the essential theories behind cloud computing and the Windows Azure cloud platform. Sharing the author's insights gained while working at Microsoft's headquarters, it presents nearly 70 end-to-end examples with step-by-step guidance on implementing typical cloud-based scenarios.The book is organized into four sections: cloud service fundamentals, cloud solutions, devices and cloud, and system integration and project management. Each chapter contains detailed exercises that provide readers w

  10. Monte Carlo Bayesian Inference on a Statistical Model of Sub-gridcolumn Moisture Variability Using High-resolution Cloud Observations . Part II; Sensitivity Tests and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Arlindo M.; Norris, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    Part I presented a Monte Carlo Bayesian method for constraining a complex statistical model of GCM sub-gridcolumn moisture variability using high-resolution MODIS cloud data, thereby permitting large-scale model parameter estimation and cloud data assimilation. This part performs some basic testing of this new approach, verifying that it does indeed significantly reduce mean and standard deviation biases with respect to the assimilated MODIS cloud optical depth, brightness temperature and cloud top pressure, and that it also improves the simulated rotational-Ramman scattering cloud optical centroid pressure (OCP) against independent (non-assimilated) retrievals from the OMI instrument. Of particular interest, the Monte Carlo method does show skill in the especially difficult case where the background state is clear but cloudy observations exist. In traditional linearized data assimilation methods, a subsaturated background cannot produce clouds via any infinitesimal equilibrium perturbation, but the Monte Carlo approach allows finite jumps into regions of non-zero cloud probability. In the example provided, the method is able to restore marine stratocumulus near the Californian coast where the background state has a clear swath. This paper also examines a number of algorithmic and physical sensitivities of the new method and provides guidance for its cost-effective implementation. One obvious difficulty for the method, and other cloud data assimilation methods as well, is the lack of information content in the cloud observables on cloud vertical structure, beyond cloud top pressure and optical thickness, thus necessitating strong dependence on the background vertical moisture structure. It is found that a simple flow-dependent correlation modification due to Riishojgaard (1998) provides some help in this respect, by better honoring inversion structures in the background state.

  11. Research on the classification result and accuracy of building windows in high resolution satellite images: take the typical rural buildings in Guangxi, China, as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baishou; Gao, Yujiu

    2015-12-01

    The information extracted from the high spatial resolution remote sensing images has become one of the important data sources of the GIS large scale spatial database updating. The realization of the building information monitoring using the high resolution remote sensing, building small scale information extracting and its quality analyzing has become an important precondition for the applying of the high-resolution satellite image information, because of the large amount of regional high spatial resolution satellite image data. In this paper, a clustering segmentation classification evaluation method for the high resolution satellite images of the typical rural buildings is proposed based on the traditional KMeans clustering algorithm. The factors of separability and building density were used for describing image classification characteristics of clustering window. The sensitivity of the factors influenced the clustering result was studied from the perspective of the separability between high image itself target and background spectrum. This study showed that the number of the sample contents is the important influencing factor to the clustering accuracy and performance, the pixel ratio of the objects in images and the separation factor can be used to determine the specific impact of cluster-window subsets on the clustering accuracy, and the count of window target pixels (Nw) does not alone affect clustering accuracy. The result can provide effective research reference for the quality assessment of the segmentation and classification of high spatial resolution remote sensing images.

  12. Typical High-Temperature Seal Structur of Reusable and Hypersonic Vehicles%飞行器典型热密封结构

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李凡; 王树浩; 陈江涛; 赵光辉; 于焕光

    2013-01-01

    Reusable and hypersonic vehicles pose an extraordinary challenge for seal structures. Airframes and engines require lightweight, high-temperature seal structural that can withstand the extreme environment of hypersonic flight. This paper reviews relevant seal technology for typical vehicles (e. g. Space Shuttle, X-38 and X-51) and presents several seal technologies for future hypersonic vehicles, foucs on high-temperature seal structural of the space shuttle TPS, vehicle penetrations and control surfaces.%对航天飞机、X-38和X-51等飞行器的热密封结构进行了综合评述.分析了机身TPS、机身开口部位及控制面三个安装部位的热密封结构特点,综述了其热密封组件的研究历程和使用现状.

  13. Adaptive Network Coded Clouds: High Speed Downloads and Cost-Effective Version Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sipos, Marton A.; Heide, Janus; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2017-01-01

    developed a novel scheme using recoding with limited packets to trade-off storage space, reliability, and data retrieval speed. Implementation and measurements with commercial cloud providers show that up to 9x less network use is needed compared to other network coding schemes, while maintaining similar...

  14. Measurement of the line-of-sight velocity of high-altitude barium clouds A technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mende, S. B.; Harris, S. E.

    1982-01-01

    It is demonstrated that for maximizing the scientific output of future ionospheric and magnetospheric ion cloud release experiments a new type of instrument is required which will measure the line-of-sight velocity of the ion cloud by the Doppler technique. A simple instrument was constructed using a 5-cm diam solid Fabry-Perot etalon coupled to a low-light-level integrating TV camera. It was demonstrated that the system has both the sensitivity and spectral resolution for detection of ion clouds and measurement of their line-of-sight Doppler velocity. The tests consisted of (1) a field experiment using a rocket barium cloud release to check sensitivity, and (2) laboratory experiments to show the spectral resolving capabilities of the system. The instrument was found to be operational if the source was brighter than approximately 1 kR, and it had a wavelength resolution much better than 0.2 A, which corresponds to approximately 12 km/sec or in the case of barium ion an acceleration potential of 100 V. The instrument is rugged and, therefore, simple to use in field experiments or on flight instruments. The sensitivity limit of the instrument can be increased by increasing the size of the etalon.

  15. Automatic Detection of Clouds and Shadows Using High Resolution Satellite Image Time Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Detecting clouds and their shadows is one of the primaries steps to perform when processing satellite images because they may alter the quality of some products such as large-area orthomosaics. The main goal of this paper is to present the automatic method developed at IGN-France for detecting clouds and shadows in a sequence of satellite images. In our work, surface reflectance orthoimages are used. They were processed from initial satellite images using a dedicated software. The cloud detection step consists of a region-growing algorithm. Seeds are firstly extracted. For that purpose and for each input ortho-image to process, we select the other ortho-images of the sequence that intersect it. The pixels of the input ortho-image are secondly labelled seeds if the difference of reflectance (in the blue channel) with overlapping ortho-images is bigger than a given threshold. Clouds are eventually delineated using a region-growing method based on a radiometric and homogeneity criterion. Regarding the shadow detection, our method is based on the idea that a shadow pixel is darker when comparing to the other images of the time series. The detection is basically composed of three steps. Firstly, we compute a synthetic ortho-image covering the whole study area. Its pixels have a value corresponding to the median value of all input reflectance ortho-images intersecting at that pixel location. Secondly, for each input ortho-image, a pixel is labelled shadows if the difference of reflectance (in the NIR channel) with the synthetic ortho-image is below a given threshold. Eventually, an optional region-growing step may be used to refine the results. Note that pixels labelled clouds during the cloud detection are not used for computing the median value in the first step; additionally, the NIR input data channel is used to perform the shadow detection, because it appeared to better discriminate shadow pixels. The method was tested on times series of Landsat 8 and Pl

  16. Benchmark Comparison of Cloud Analytics Methods Applied to Earth Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnes, Chris; Little, Mike; Huang, Thomas; Jacob, Joseph; Yang, Phil; Kuo, Kwo-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Cloud computing has the potential to bring high performance computing capabilities to the average science researcher. However, in order to take full advantage of cloud capabilities, the science data used in the analysis must often be reorganized. This typically involves sharding the data across multiple nodes to enable relatively fine-grained parallelism. This can be either via cloud-based file systems or cloud-enabled databases such as Cassandra, Rasdaman or SciDB. Since storing an extra copy of data leads to increased cost and data management complexity, NASA is interested in determining the benefits and costs of various cloud analytics methods for real Earth Observation cases. Accordingly, NASA's Earth Science Technology Office and Earth Science Data and Information Systems project have teamed with cloud analytics practitioners to run a benchmark comparison on cloud analytics methods using the same input data and analysis algorithms. We have particularly looked at analysis algorithms that work over long time series, because these are particularly intractable for many Earth Observation datasets which typically store data with one or just a few time steps per file. This post will present side-by-side cost and performance results for several common Earth observation analysis operations.

  17. Benchmark Comparison of Cloud Analytics Methods Applied to Earth Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnes, C.; Little, M. M.; Huang, T.; Jacob, J. C.; Yang, C. P.; Kuo, K. S.

    2016-12-01

    Cloud computing has the potential to bring high performance computing capabilities to the average science researcher. However, in order to take full advantage of cloud capabilities, the science data used in the analysis must often be reorganized. This typically involves sharding the data across multiple nodes to enable relatively fine-grained parallelism. This can be either via cloud-based filesystems or cloud-enabled databases such as Cassandra, Rasdaman or SciDB. Since storing an extra copy of data leads to increased cost and data management complexity, NASA is interested in determining the benefits and costs of various cloud analytics methods for real Earth Observation cases. Accordingly, NASA's Earth Science Technology Office and Earth Science Data and Information Systems project have teamed with cloud analytics practitioners to run a benchmark comparison on cloud analytics methods using the same input data and analysis algorithms. We have particularly looked at analysis algorithms that work over long time series, because these are particularly intractable for many Earth Observation datasets which typically store data with one or just a few time steps per file. This post will present side-by-side cost and performance results for several common Earth observation analysis operations.

  18. Secure and robust cloud computing for high-throughput forensic microsatellite sequence analysis and databasing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sarah F; Scheible, Melissa K; Williams, Christopher; Silva, Deborah S B S; Hoggan, Marina; Eichman, Christopher; Faith, Seth A

    2017-08-08

    Next-generation Sequencing (NGS) is a rapidly evolving technology with demonstrated benefits for forensic genetic applications, and the strategies to analyze and manage the massive NGS datasets are currently in development. Here, the computing, data storage, connectivity, and security resources of the Cloud were evaluated as a model for forensic laboratory systems that produce NGS data. A complete front-to-end Cloud system was developed to upload, process, and interpret raw NGS data using a web browser dashboard. The system was extensible, demonstrating analysis capabilities of autosomal and Y-STRs from a variety of NGS instrumentation (Illumina MiniSeq and MiSeq, and Oxford Nanopore MinION). NGS data for STRs were concordant with standard reference materials previously characterized with capillary electrophoresis and Sanger sequencing. The computing power of the Cloud was implemented with on-demand auto-scaling to allow multiple file analysis in tandem. The system was designed to store resulting data in a relational database, amenable to downstream sample interpretations and databasing applications following the most recent guidelines in nomenclature for sequenced alleles. Lastly, a multi-layered Cloud security architecture was tested and showed that industry standards for securing data and computing resources were readily applied to the NGS system without disadvantageous effects for bioinformatic analysis, connectivity or data storage/retrieval. The results of this study demonstrate the feasibility of using Cloud-based systems for secured NGS data analysis, storage, databasing, and multi-user distributed connectivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cloud Processed CCN Affect Cloud Microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, J. G.; Noble, S. R., Jr.; Tabor, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    Variations in the bimodality/monomodality of CCN spectra (Hudson et al. 2015) exert opposite effects on cloud microphysics in two aircraft field projects. The figure shows two examples, droplet concentration, Nc, and drizzle liquid water content, Ld, against classification of CCN spectral modality. Low ratings go to balanced separated bimodal spectra, high ratings go to single mode spectra, strictly monomodal 8. Intermediate ratings go merged modes, e.g., one mode a shoulder of another. Bimodality is caused by mass or hygroscopicity increases that go only to CCN that made activated cloud droplets. In the Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T) small cumuli with lower Nc, greater droplet mean diameters, MD, effective radii, re, spectral widths, σ, cloud liquid water contents, Lc, and Ld were closer to more bimodal (lower modal ratings) below cloud CCN spectra whereas clouds with higher Nc, smaller MD, re, σ, and Ld were closer to more monomodal CCN (higher modal ratings). In polluted stratus clouds of the MArine Stratus/Stratocumulus Experiment (MASE) clouds that had greater Nc, and smaller MD, re, σ, Lc, and Ld were closer to more bimodal CCN spectra whereas clouds with lower Nc, and greater MD, re, σ, Lc, and Ld were closer to more monomodal CCN. These relationships are opposite because the dominant ICE-T cloud processing was coalescence whereas chemical transformations (e.g., SO2 to SO4) were dominant in MASE. Coalescence reduces Nc and thus also CCN concentrations (NCCN) when droplets evaporate. In subsequent clouds the reduced competition increases MD and σ, which further enhance coalescence and drizzle. Chemical transformations do not change Nc but added sulfate enhances droplet and CCN solubility. Thus, lower critical supersaturation (S) CCN can produce more cloud droplets in subsequent cloud cycles, especially for the low W and effective S of stratus. The increased competition reduces MD, re, and σ, which inhibit coalescence and thus reduce drizzle

  20. Martian Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Released 28 June 2004 The atmosphere of Mars is a dynamic system. Water-ice clouds, fog, and hazes can make imaging the surface from space difficult. Dust storms can grow from local disturbances to global sizes, through which imaging is impossible. Seasonal temperature changes are the usual drivers in cloud and dust storm development and growth. Eons of atmospheric dust storm activity has left its mark on the surface of Mars. Dust carried aloft by the wind has settled out on every available surface; sand dunes have been created and moved by centuries of wind; and the effect of continual sand-blasting has modified many regions of Mars, creating yardangs and other unusual surface forms. This image was acquired during early spring near the North Pole. The linear 'ripples' are transparent water-ice clouds. This linear form is typical for polar clouds. The black regions on the margins of this image are areas of saturation caused by the build up of scattered light from the bright polar material during the long image exposure. Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 68.1, Longitude 147.9 East (212.1 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution. Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip

  1. Cryptographic Cloud Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamara, Seny; Lauter, Kristin

    We consider the problem of building a secure cloud storage service on top of a public cloud infrastructure where the service provider is not completely trusted by the customer. We describe, at a high level, several architectures that combine recent and non-standard cryptographic primitives in order to achieve our goal. We survey the benefits such an architecture would provide to both customers and service providers and give an overview of recent advances in cryptography motivated specifically by cloud storage.

  2. Characterization and quantification of aerosol chemical species present below and within cloud over an eastern Himalayan high altitude hill station in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Arindam; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Sarkar, Chirantan; Ghosh, Sanjay; Raha, Sibaji

    2016-07-01

    There are two main processes through which aerosols and gases get scavenged by rain called below-cloud scavenging or "washout" and in-cloud scavenging or "rainout". The first process refers to the washout of the aerosols and gases present below the cloud during precipitation events by raindrops along their fall. The second process corresponds to the condensation of water vapor on aerosol particles during the formation of cloud droplets and incorporation of gases surrounding the droplets by aqueous-phase reactions. However, the most efficient pathway to remove the atmospheric pollutants is below cloud scavenging which is a major pointer of ecosystem, biogeochemical cycle as well as the climate change. A study has been conducted in 2014 and 2015 monsoon (June-September) in Darjeeling (27.01 ° N, 88.15 ° E), a high altitude (2200 m asl) hill station over eastern Himalaya in India. The study was focused on the below-cloud and in-cloud scavenging of various aerosol ionic species. Attempt was also made to estimate the contribution of in-cloud scavenging and below-cloud scavenging by collecting rain samples sequentially for different rain events. Sea-salt (Na+, sea-Mg2+, Cl- and sea-SO4 2-) and soil dust (non-sea Ca2+, non-sea-Mg2+) species show sharp decrease in concentration for each of the rain sample. This indicates that these species were mostly accumulated below the cloud and washed out during rain. Their concentrations were thus decreased sharply as rains progressed. On the other hand, non-SO4-2 and NH4+ showed different behavior. Their concentrations decreased sharply at the initial stage of the rain and then remained almost constant with rainfall. This explains wash out of these two species at the initial stage of the rain and their contribution from "within the cloud". NH4 + and non-sea-SO4 2- could thus act as cloud condensation nuclei over this part of Himalaya. A strong correlation between these two species indicates their association as (NH4)2SO4. Acidity

  3. What can simulated molecular clouds tell us about real molecular clouds?

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte-Cabral, A

    2016-01-01

    We study the properties of giant molecular clouds (GMCs) from an SPH simulation of a portion of a spiral galaxy, modelled at high resolution, with robust representations of the physics of the interstellar medium. We examine the global molecular gas content of clouds, and investigate the effect of using CO or H2 densities to define the GMCs. We find that CO can reliably trace the high-density H2 gas, but misses less dense H2 clouds. We also investigate the effect of using 3D CO densities versus CO emission with an observer's perspective, and find that CO-emission clouds trace well the peaks of the actual GMCs in 3D, but can miss the lower density molecular gas between density peaks which is often CO-dark. Thus the CO emission typically traces smaller clouds within larger GMC complexes. We also investigate the effect of the galactic environment (in particular the presence of spiral arms), on the distribution of GMC properties, and we find that the mean properties are similar between arm and inter-arm clouds, bu...

  4. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25

    cloud optical properties formulated in terms of PSD parameters in combination with remote measurements of thermal radiances to characterize the small mode. This is possible since the absorption efficiency (Qabs) of small mode crystals is larger at 12 µm wavelength relative to 11 µm wavelength due to the process of wave resonance or photon tunneling more active at 12 µm. This makes the 12/11 µm absorption optical depth ratio (or equivalently the 12/11 µm Qabs ratio) a means for detecting the relative concentration of small ice particles in cirrus. Using this principle, this project tested and developed PSD schemes that can help characterize cirrus clouds at each of the three ARM sites: SGP, NSA and TWP. This was the main effort of this project. These PSD schemes and ice sedimentation velocities predicted from them have been used to test the new cirrus microphysics parameterization in the GCM known as the Community Climate Systems Model (CCSM) as part of an ongoing collaboration with NCAR. Regarding the second problem, we developed and did preliminary testing on a passive thermal method for retrieving the total water path (TWP) of Arctic mixed phase clouds where TWPs are often in the range of 20 to 130 g m-2 (difficult for microwave radiometers to accurately measure). We also developed a new radar method for retrieving the cloud ice water content (IWC), which can be vertically integrated to yield the ice water path (IWP). These techniques were combined to determine the IWP and liquid water path (LWP) in Arctic clouds, and hence the fraction of ice and liquid water. We have tested this approach using a case study from the ARM field campaign called M-PACE (Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment). This research led to a new satellite remote sensing method that appears promising for detecting low levels of liquid water in high clouds typically between -20 and -36 oC. We hope to develop this method in future research.

  5. Object Based Image Analysis Combining High Spatial Resolution Imagery and Laser Point Clouds for Urban Land Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Guihua; Li, Jonathan; Yang, Yuanxi; Fang, Yong

    2016-06-01

    With the rapid developments of the sensor technology, high spatial resolution imagery and airborne Lidar point clouds can be captured nowadays, which make classification, extraction, evaluation and analysis of a broad range of object features available. High resolution imagery, Lidar dataset and parcel map can be widely used for classification as information carriers. Therefore, refinement of objects classification is made possible for the urban land cover. The paper presents an approach to object based image analysis (OBIA) combing high spatial resolution imagery and airborne Lidar point clouds. The advanced workflow for urban land cover is designed with four components. Firstly, colour-infrared TrueOrtho photo and laser point clouds were pre-processed to derive the parcel map of water bodies and nDSM respectively. Secondly, image objects are created via multi-resolution image segmentation integrating scale parameter, the colour and shape properties with compactness criterion. Image can be subdivided into separate object regions. Thirdly, image objects classification is performed on the basis of segmentation and a rule set of knowledge decision tree. These objects imagery are classified into six classes such as water bodies, low vegetation/grass, tree, low building, high building and road. Finally, in order to assess the validity of the classification results for six classes, accuracy assessment is performed through comparing randomly distributed reference points of TrueOrtho imagery with the classification results, forming the confusion matrix and calculating overall accuracy and Kappa coefficient. The study area focuses on test site Vaihingen/Enz and a patch of test datasets comes from the benchmark of ISPRS WG III/4 test project. The classification results show higher overall accuracy for most types of urban land cover. Overall accuracy is 89.5% and Kappa coefficient equals to 0.865. The OBIA approach provides an effective and convenient way to combine high

  6. Cloud Computing Adoption Model for Universities to Increase ICT Proficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safiya Okai

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Universities around the world especially those in developing countries are faced with the problem of delivering the level of information and communications technology (ICT needed to facilitate teaching, learning, research, and development activities ideal in a typical university, which is needed to meet educational needs in-line with advancement in technology and the growing dependence on IT. This is mainly due to the high cost involved in providing and maintaining the needed hardware and software. A technology such as cloud computing that delivers on demand provisioning of IT resources on a pay per use basis can be used to address this problem. Cloud computing promises better delivery of IT services as well as availability whenever and wherever needed at reduced costs with users paying only as much as they consume through the services of cloud service providers. The cloud technology reduces complexity while increasing speed and quality of IT services provided; however, despite these benefits the challenges that come with its adoption have left many sectors especially the higher education skeptical in committing to this technology. This article identifies the reasons for the slow rate of adoption of cloud computing at university level, discusses the challenges faced and proposes a cloud computing adoption model that contains strategic guidelines to overcome the major challenges identified and a roadmap for the successful adoption of cloud computing by universities. The model was tested in one of the universities and found to be both useful and appropriate for adopting cloud computing at university level.

  7. Taking the High Ground: A Case for Department of Defense Application of Public Cloud Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    IT cannot be sustained in a declining budget environment with users demanding better services. Wyld captures the essence of much of the problem for...the DoD laboratory data centers into model versions of public providers. An open source project, called Eucalyptus (http://www.eucalyptus.com), would...be an excellent starting point for such a project. Eucalyptus is a software plat- form for implementing private cloud computing solutions on top of

  8. Dynamics of Cavitation Clouds within a High-Intensity Focused Ultrasonic Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    which , the model predicts a constant steady-state velocity of 1.36 m/s (after the initial acceleration ), which is 12% lower than the averaged observed...ORGANIZATION REPORT NO. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFMC) AFRL/RQRC 10 E. Saturn Blvd. Edwards AFB CA 93524-7680 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING...not exceed 2 m/s, implying that other mechanisms must be involved in accelerating the clouds. The present of neighboring boundaries with the

  9. Numerical modeling of altocumulus cloud layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuairen

    1998-07-01

    Altocumulus (Ac) clouds are predominantly water clouds and typically less than several hundred meters thick. Ac cloud heights are mid-level, from 2 to 8 km. Ac clouds cover large portions of the Earth and play an important role in the Earth's energy budget through their effects on solar and infrared radiation. A two-dimensional cloud resolving model (CRM) and a one-dimensional turbulent closure model (TCM) are used to study Ac clouds with idealized initial conditions. An elevated mixed layer model (MLM) is developed and the results for the MLM are compared with results for CRM. The impacts of large-scale vertical motion, and solar and IR radiation, the utility of the TCM, the mixed layer characteristics and circulation of Ac layers, the turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) budget, and effects of relative humidify (RH) above the cloud are studied with a series of numerical simulations using the CRM and TCM. The results show that weak large-scale vertical motion may allow for a long lifetime of Ac clouds. In the nocturnal case, feedbacks between the liquid water path (LWP), IR radiation, and entrainment lead to an Ac layer with a nearly steady structure and circulation. The solar radiation in the diurnal case leads to decreases in the LWP, circulation intensity, and entrainment rate during the day. The comparison of TCM and CRM simulations suggests that TCM simulations can portray the basic characteristics of Ac clouds. The Ac convective layer includes mainly the cloud region and a shallow subcloud layer. In the Ac convective layers, the updrafts are wide and weak, whereas the downdrafts are narrow and strong. The updrafts are associated with regions of large cloud water mixing ratio, and the downdrafts with the regions of small cloud water mixing ratio. In Ac layers, the TKE is as large as in stratocumulus-topped-boundary-layer (STBL). The TKE is produced by buoyancy in the cloud region, dissipated by viscous dissipation, and redistributed upward and downward through

  10. Periodical shedding of cloud cavitation from a single hydrofoil in high-speed cryogenic channel flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yutaka ITO; Koichi SETO; Takao NAGASAKI

    2009-01-01

    In order to explain criteria for periodical shedding of the cloud cavitation, flow patterns of cavitation around a piano-convex hydrofoil were observed using a cryogenic cavitation tunnel of a blowdown type. Two hydrofoils of similarity of 20 and 60 mm in chord length with two test sections of 20 and 60 mm in width were prepared. Working fluids were water at ambient temperature, hot water and liquid nitrogen. The parameter range was varied between 0.3 and 1.4 for cavitation number, 9 and 17 m/sec for inlet flow velocity, and -8° and 8° for the flow in-cidence angle, respectively. At incidence angle 8°, that is, the convex surface being suction surface, periodical shedding of the whole cloud cavitation was observed on the convex surface under the specific condition with cavitation number and inlet flow velocity, respectively, 0.5, 9 m/sec for liquid nitrogen at 192℃ and 1.4, 11 m/sec for water at 88℃, whereas under the supercavitation condition, it was not observable. Periodical shedding of cloud cavitation occurs only in the case that there are both the adverse pressure gradient and the slow flow region on the hydrofoil.

  11. All-sky census of Galactic high-latitude molecular intermediate-velocity clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhser, T.; Kerp, J.; Lenz, D.; Winkel, B.

    2016-12-01

    Context. The H i halo clouds of the Milky Way, and in particular the intermediate-velocity clouds (IVCs), are thought to be connected to Galactic fountain processes. Observations of fountain clouds are important for understanding the role of matter recycling and accretion onto the Galactic disk and subsequent star formation. Aims: Here, we quantify the amount of molecular gas in the Galactic halo. We focus on the rare class of molecular IVCs (MIVCs) and search for new objects. Methods: The H i-FIR correlation was studied across the entire northern and southern Galactic hemispheres at Galactic latitudes | b | > 20° to determine the amount and distribution of molecular gas in IVCs. We used the most recent large-scale H i and FIR data, the Effelsberg Bonn-H i Survey, the Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey, and the Planck FIR surveys. Results: We present a catalogue of 239 MIVC candidates on the northern and southern Galactic hemispheres. Among these candidates, all previously known MIVCs are recovered except for one single source. The frequency of candidates differs significantly between the northern and southern Galactic hemispheres and between negative and positive LSR velocities as well. Conclusions: In our approach we analyse the local Galactic environment. Extrapolating our results to the entire Galaxy, the global inflow of atomic and molecular IVC gas onto the Milky Way may account for the major fraction of the gaseous mass that is required to sustain the current Galactic star formation rate.

  12. An all-sky census of Galactic high-latitude molecular intermediate-velocity clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Röhser, T; Lenz, D; Winkel, B

    2016-01-01

    The HI halo clouds of the Milky Way and in particular the intermediate-velocity clouds (IVCs) are thought to be connected to Galactic fountain processes. Observations of fountain clouds are important for understanding the role of matter recycling and accretion onto the Galactic disk and subsequent star formation. Here, we quantify the amount of molecular gas in the Galactic halo. We focus on the rare class of molecular IVCs (MIVCs) and search for new objects. The HI-FIR correlation is studied across the entire northern and southern Galactic hemispheres at Galactic latitudes $|b|>20^\\circ$ in order to determine the amount and distribution of molecular gas in IVCs. We use the most recent large-scale HI and FIR data, the Effelsberg Bonn-HI Survey, the Parkes Galactic All-Sky Survey, and the Planck FIR surveys. We present a catalogue of 239 MIVC candidates on the northern and southern Galactic hemispheres. Among these candidates all previously known MIVCs are recovered except for a single one only. The frequency ...

  13. Lidar observations of tropical high-altitude cirrus clouds: results from dual-wavelength Raman lidar measurements during the ALBATROSS campaign 1996

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyerle, Georg; Schaefer, H. J.; Schrems, Otto; Neuber, R.; Rairoux, P.; McDermid, I. S.

    1997-05-01

    Results from dual wavelength Raman lidar observations of tropical high-altitude cirrus clouds are reported. Based on 107 hours of night-time measurements cirrus clouds were present in more than 50% of the observations at latitudes between 23.5 degrees south and 23.5 degrees north and altitudes between 11 and 16 km. Volume depolarization is found to be a sensitive parameter for the detection of subvisible cloud layers. Using Mie scattering calculations estimates of the ice water content are derived.

  14. JINR cloud infrastructure evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, A. V.; Balashov, N. A.; Kutovskiy, N. A.; Semenov, R. N.

    2016-09-01

    To fulfil JINR commitments in different national and international projects related to the use of modern information technologies such as cloud and grid computing as well as to provide a modern tool for JINR users for their scientific research a cloud infrastructure was deployed at Laboratory of Information Technologies of Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. OpenNebula software was chosen as a cloud platform. Initially it was set up in simple configuration with single front-end host and a few cloud nodes. Some custom development was done to tune JINR cloud installation to fit local needs: web form in the cloud web-interface for resources request, a menu item with cloud utilization statistics, user authentication via Kerberos, custom driver for OpenVZ containers. Because of high demand in that cloud service and its resources over-utilization it was re-designed to cover increasing users' needs in capacity, availability and reliability. Recently a new cloud instance has been deployed in high-availability configuration with distributed network file system and additional computing power.

  15. MACCS : Multi-Mission Atmospheric Correction and Cloud Screening tool for high-frequency revisit data processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrucci, B.; Huc, M.; Feuvrier, T.; Ruffel, C.; Hagolle, O.; Lonjou, V.; Desjardins, C.

    2015-10-01

    For the production of Level2A products during Sentinel-2 commissioning in the Technical Expertise Center Sentinel-2 in CNES, CESBIO proposed to adapt the Venus Level-2 , taking advantage of the similarities between the two missions: image acquisition at a high frequency (2 days for Venus, 5 days with the two Sentinel-2), high resolution (5m for Venus, 10, 20 and 60m for Sentinel-2), images acquisition under constant viewing conditions. The Multi-Mission Atmospheric Correction and Cloud Screening (MACCS) tool was born: based on CNES Orfeo Toolbox Library, Venμs processor which was already able to process Formosat2 and VENμS data, was adapted to process Sentinel-2 and Landsat5-7 data; since then, a great effort has been made reviewing MACCS software architecture in order to ease the add-on of new missions that have also the peculiarity of acquiring images at high resolution, high revisit and under constant viewing angles, such as Spot4/Take5 and Landsat8. The recursive and multi-temporal algorithm is implemented in a core that is the same for all the sensors and that combines several processing steps: estimation of cloud cover, cloud shadow, water, snow and shadows masks, of water vapor content, aerosol optical thickness, atmospheric correction. This core is accessed via a number of plug-ins where the specificity of the sensor and of the user project are taken into account: products format, algorithmic processing chaining and parameters. After a presentation of MACCS architecture and functionalities, the paper will give an overview of the production facilities integrating MACCS and the associated specificities: the interest for this tool has grown worldwide and MACCS will be used for extensive production within the THEIA land data center and Agri-S2 project. Finally the paper will zoom on the use of MACCS during Sentinel-2 In Orbit Test phase showing the first Level-2A products.

  16. Trust management in cloud services

    CERN Document Server

    Noor, Talal H; Bouguettaya, Athman

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the design and implementation of Cloud Armor, a novel approach for credibility-based trust management and automatic discovery of cloud services in distributed and highly dynamic environments. This book also helps cloud users to understand the difficulties of establishing trust in cloud computing and the best criteria for selecting a service cloud. The techniques have been validated by a prototype system implementation and experimental studies using a collection of real world trust feedbacks on cloud services.The authors present the design and implementation of a novel pro

  17. Using Information From Prior Satellite Scans to Improve Cloud Detection Near the Day-Night Terminator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Christopher R.; Minnis, Patrick; Trepte, Qing Z.; Palikonda, Rabindra; Ayers, Jeffrey K.; Spangenberg, Doulas A.

    2012-01-01

    With geostationary satellite data it is possible to have a continuous record of diurnal cycles of cloud properties for a large portion of the globe. Daytime cloud property retrieval algorithms are typically superior to nighttime algorithms because daytime methods utilize measurements of reflected solar radiation. However, reflected solar radiation is difficult to accurately model for high solar zenith angles where the amount of incident radiation is small. Clear and cloudy scenes can exhibit very small differences in reflected radiation and threshold-based cloud detection methods have more difficulty setting the proper thresholds for accurate cloud detection. Because top-of-atmosphere radiances are typically more accurately modeled outside the terminator region, information from previous scans can help guide cloud detection near the terminator. This paper presents an algorithm that uses cloud fraction and clear and cloudy infrared brightness temperatures from previous satellite scan times to improve the performance of a threshold-based cloud mask near the terminator. Comparisons of daytime, nighttime, and terminator cloud fraction derived from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) radiance measurements show that the algorithm greatly reduces the number of false cloud detections and smoothes the transition from the daytime to the nighttime clod detection algorithm. Comparisons with the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) data show that using this algorithm decreases the number of false detections by approximately 20 percentage points.

  18. A unified model for the maximum mass scales of molecular clouds, stellar clusters and high-redshift clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina-Campos, Marta; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik

    2017-08-01

    We present a simple, self-consistent model to predict the maximum masses of giant molecular clouds (GMCs), stellar clusters and high-redshift clumps as a function of the galactic environment. Recent works have proposed that these maximum masses are set by shearing motions and centrifugal forces, but we show that this idea is inconsistent with the low masses observed across an important range of local-Universe environments, such as low-surface density galaxies and galaxy outskirts. Instead, we propose that feedback from young stars can disrupt clouds before the global collapse of the shear-limited area is completed. We develop a shear-feedback hybrid model that depends on three observable quantities: the gas surface density, the epicylic frequency and the Toomre parameter. The model is tested in four galactic environments: the Milky Way, the Local Group galaxy M31, the spiral galaxy M83 and the high-redshift galaxy zC406690. We demonstrate that our model simultaneously reproduces the observed maximum masses of GMCs, clumps and clusters in each of these environments. We find that clouds and clusters in M31 and in the Milky Way are feedback-limited beyond radii of 8.4 and 4 kpc, respectively, whereas the masses in M83 and zC406690 are shear-limited at all radii. In zC406690, the maximum cluster masses decrease further due to their inspiral by dynamical friction. These results illustrate that the maximum masses change from being shear-limited to being feedback-limited as galaxies become less gas rich and evolve towards low shear. This explains why high-redshift clumps are more massive than GMCs in the local Universe.

  19. Influence of the Kuwait oil fires plume (1991) on the microphysical development of clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudich, Yinon; Sagi, Ayelet; Rosenfeld, Daniel

    2003-08-01

    Applications of new retrieval methods to old satellite data allowed us to study the effects of smoke from the Kuwait oil fires in 1991 on clouds and precipitation. The properties of smoke-affected and smoke-free clouds were compared on the background of the dust-laden desert atmosphere. Several effects were observed: (1) clouds typically developed at the top of the smoke plume, probably because of solar heating and induced convection by the strongly absorbing aerosols; (2) large salt particles from the burning mix of oil and brines formed giant cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) close to the source, which initiated coalescence in the highly polluted clouds; (3) farther away from the smoke source, the giant CCN were deposited, and the extremely high concentrations of medium and small CCN dominated cloud development by strongly suppressing drop coalescence and growth with altitude; and (4) the smaller cloud droplets in the smoke-affected clouds froze at colder temperatures and suppressed both the water and ice precipitation forming processes. These observations imply that over land the smoke particles are not washed out efficiently and can be transported to long distances, extending the observed effects to large areas. The absorption of solar radiation by the smoke induces convection above the smoke plumes and consequently leads to formation of clouds with roots at the top of the smoke layer. This process dominates over the semidirect effect of cloud evaporation due to the smoke-induced enhanced solar heating, at least in the case of the Kuwait fires.

  20. Emotion recognition through static faces and moving bodies: a comparison between typically-developed adults and individuals with high level of autistic traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossana eActis-Grosso

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated whether the type of stimulus (pictures of static faces vs. body motion contributes differently to the recognition of emotions. The performance (accuracy and response times of 25 Low Autistic Traits (LAT group young adults (21 males and 20 young adults (16 males with either High Autistic Traits (HAT group or with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder was compared in the recognition of four emotions (Happiness, Anger, Fear and Sadness either shown in static faces or conveyed by moving bodies (patch-light displays, PLDs. Overall, HAT individuals were as accurate as LAT ones in perceiving emotions both with faces and with PLDs. Moreover, they correctly described non-emotional actions depicted by PLDs, indicating that they perceived the motion conveyed by the PLDs per se. For LAT participants, happiness proved to be the easiest emotion to be recognized: in line with previous studies we found a happy face advantage for faces, which for the first time was also found for bodies (happy body advantage. Furthermore, LAT participants recognized sadness better by static faces and fear by PLDs. This advantage for motion kinematics in the recognition of fear was not present in HAT participants, suggesting that i emotion recognition is not generally impaired in HAT individuals, ii the cues exploited for emotion recognition by LAT and HAT groups are not always the same. These findings are discussed against the background of emotional processing in typically and atypically developed individuals.

  1. Emotion recognition through static faces and moving bodies: a comparison between typically developed adults and individuals with high level of autistic traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis-Grosso, Rossana; Bossi, Francesco; Ricciardelli, Paola

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether the type of stimulus (pictures of static faces vs. body motion) contributes differently to the recognition of emotions. The performance (accuracy and response times) of 25 Low Autistic Traits (LAT group) young adults (21 males) and 20 young adults (16 males) with either High Autistic Traits or with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder (HAT group) was compared in the recognition of four emotions (Happiness, Anger, Fear, and Sadness) either shown in static faces or conveyed by moving body patch-light displays (PLDs). Overall, HAT individuals were as accurate as LAT ones in perceiving emotions both with faces and with PLDs. Moreover, they correctly described non-emotional actions depicted by PLDs, indicating that they perceived the motion conveyed by the PLDs per se. For LAT participants, happiness proved to be the easiest emotion to be recognized: in line with previous studies we found a happy face advantage for faces, which for the first time was also found for bodies (happy body advantage). Furthermore, LAT participants recognized sadness better by static faces and fear by PLDs. This advantage for motion kinematics in the recognition of fear was not present in HAT participants, suggesting that (i) emotion recognition is not generally impaired in HAT individuals, (ii) the cues exploited for emotion recognition by LAT and HAT groups are not always the same. These findings are discussed against the background of emotional processing in typically and atypically developed individuals. PMID:26557101

  2. Physical therapists' use of interventions with high evidence of effectiveness in the management of a hypothetical typical patient with acute low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhail, Christine; Korner-Bitensky, Nicol; Rossignol, Michel; Dumas, Jean-Pierre

    2005-11-01

    Evidence-based practice aims to improve patient care and service delivery, particularly in the management of individuals with low back pain (LBP), the largest client group seen by outpatient physical therapists. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of use of interventions with evidence of effectiveness in the management of acute nonspecific LBP by physical therapists. A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted on 100 physical therapists working with patients with LBP. Using a telephone-administered interview, therapists described their current and desired treatment practices for a typical case of LBP. Each intervention reported was coded according to its evidence of effectiveness (strong, moderate, limited, or none). Information on clinician, workplace, and client characteristics also was obtained. The prevalence of use of interventions with strong or moderate evidence of effectiveness was 68%. However, 90% to 96% of therapists also used interventions for which research evidence was limited or absent. Users of interventions with high evidence of effectiveness, as compared with nonusers, had graduated more recently and had taken a higher number of postgraduate clinical courses. Although most therapists use interventions with high evidence of effectiveness, much of their patient time is spent on interventions that are not well reported in the literature. The results indicate the need for improvement in the quality of clinical research as well as its dissemination and implementation in a way that is appealing to therapists, such as through practice-related courses.

  3. Cosmic rays, clouds, and climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, N.; Svensmark, Henrik

    2000-01-01

    in the Earth's radiation budget through trapping outgoing radiation and reflecting incoming radiation. If a physical link between these two features can be established, it would provide a mechanism linking solar activity and Earth's climate. Recent satellite observations have further revealed a correlation...... between cosmic ray flux and low cloud top temperature. The temperature of a cloud depends on the radiation properties determined by its droplet distribution. Low clouds are warm (> 273 K) and therefore consist of liquid water droplets. At typical atmospheric supersaturations (similar to1%) a liquid cloud...

  4. Reconfigurable Martian Data Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, D. J.; Moeller, R. C.; Pingree, P.; Lay, N.; Reeves, G.

    2012-06-01

    The objective is to develop a constellation of small satellites in orbit around Mars that would provide a highly scalable and dynamically allocatable high performance computing resource. Key is use of Field Programmable Gate Arrays for the cloud.

  5. A COMPACT HIGH VELOCITY CLOUD NEAR THE MAGELLANIC STREAM: METALLICITY AND SMALL-SCALE STRUCTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Nimisha [Ecole Polytechnique, Route de Saclay, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Fox, Andrew J.; Tumlinson, Jason; Thom, Christopher; Ely, Justin [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Westmeier, Tobias [ICRAR, The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia)

    2015-02-10

    The Magellanic Stream (MS) is a well-resolved gaseous tail originating from the Magellanic Clouds. Studies of its physical properties and chemical composition are needed to understand its role in Galactic evolution. We investigate the properties of a compact HVC (CHVC 224.0-83.4-197) lying close on the sky to the MS to determine whether it is physically connected to the Stream and to examine its internal structure. Our study is based on analysis of HST/COS spectra of three QSOs (Ton S210, B0120-28, and B0117-2837) all of which pass through this single cloud at small angular separation (≲0.°72), allowing us to compare physical conditions on small spatial scales. No significant variation is detected in the ionization structure from one part of the cloud to the other. Using Cloudy photoionization models, toward Ton S210 we derive elemental abundances of [C/H] = –1.21 ± 0.11, [Si/H] = –1.16 ± 0.11, [Al/H] = –1.19 ± 0.17, and [O/H] = –1.12 ± 0.22, which agree within 0.09 dex. The CHVC abundances match the 0.1 solar abundances measured along the main body of the Stream. This suggests that the CHVC (and by extension the extended network of filaments to which it belongs) has an origin in the MS. It may represent a fragment that has been removed from the Stream as it interacts with the gaseous Galactic halo.

  6. Speech Acts during Friends' and Non-Friends' Spontaneous Conversations in Preschool Dyads with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder versus Typical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauminger-Zviely, Nirit; Golan-Itshaky, Adi; Tubul-Lavy, Gila

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we videotaped two 10-min. free-play interactions and coded speech acts (SAs) in peer talk of 51 preschoolers (21 ASD, 30 typical), interacting with friend versus non-friend partners. Groups were matched for maternal education, IQ (verbal/nonverbal), and CA. We compared SAs by group (ASD/typical), by partner's friendship status…

  7. Modeling typical performance measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weekers, Anke Martine

    2009-01-01

    In the educational, employment, and clinical context, attitude and personality inventories are used to measure typical performance traits. Statistical models are applied to obtain latent trait estimates. Often the same statistical models as the models used in maximum performance measurement are appl

  8. Cloud Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthing, Hans Henrik

    Denne præsentation beskriver fordele og værdier ved anvendelse af Cloud Computing. Endvidere inddrager resultater fra en række internationale analyser fra ISACA om Cloud Computing.......Denne præsentation beskriver fordele og værdier ved anvendelse af Cloud Computing. Endvidere inddrager resultater fra en række internationale analyser fra ISACA om Cloud Computing....

  9. ExScalibur: A High-Performance Cloud-Enabled Suite for Whole Exome Germline and Somatic Mutation Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Riyue; Hernandez, Kyle; Huang, Lei; Kang, Wenjun; Bartom, Elizabeth; Onel, Kenan; Volchenboum, Samuel; Andrade, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing has facilitated the discovery of causal genetic variants associated with human diseases at deep coverage and low cost. In particular, the detection of somatic mutations from tumor/normal pairs has provided insights into the cancer genome. Although there is an abundance of publicly-available software for the detection of germline and somatic variants, concordance is generally limited among variant callers and alignment algorithms. Successful integration of variants detected by multiple methods requires in-depth knowledge of the software, access to high-performance computing resources, and advanced programming techniques. We present ExScalibur, a set of fully automated, highly scalable and modulated pipelines for whole exome data analysis. The suite integrates multiple alignment and variant calling algorithms for the accurate detection of germline and somatic mutations with close to 99% sensitivity and specificity. ExScalibur implements streamlined execution of analytical modules, real-time monitoring of pipeline progress, robust handling of errors and intuitive documentation that allows for increased reproducibility and sharing of results and workflows. It runs on local computers, high-performance computing clusters and cloud environments. In addition, we provide a data analysis report utility to facilitate visualization of the results that offers interactive exploration of quality control files, read alignment and variant calls, assisting downstream customization of potential disease-causing mutations. ExScalibur is open-source and is also available as a public image on Amazon cloud.

  10. ExScalibur: A High-Performance Cloud-Enabled Suite for Whole Exome Germline and Somatic Mutation Identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riyue Bao

    Full Text Available Whole exome sequencing has facilitated the discovery of causal genetic variants associated with human diseases at deep coverage and low cost. In particular, the detection of somatic mutations from tumor/normal pairs has provided insights into the cancer genome. Although there is an abundance of publicly-available software for the detection of germline and somatic variants, concordance is generally limited among variant callers and alignment algorithms. Successful integration of variants detected by multiple methods requires in-depth knowledge of the software, access to high-performance computing resources, and advanced programming techniques. We present ExScalibur, a set of fully automated, highly scalable and modulated pipelines for whole exome data analysis. The suite integrates multiple alignment and variant calling algorithms for the accurate detection of germline and somatic mutations with close to 99% sensitivity and specificity. ExScalibur implements streamlined execution of analytical modules, real-time monitoring of pipeline progress, robust handling of errors and intuitive documentation that allows for increased reproducibility and sharing of results and workflows. It runs on local computers, high-performance computing clusters and cloud environments. In addition, we provide a data analysis report utility to facilitate visualization of the results that offers interactive exploration of quality control files, read alignment and variant calls, assisting downstream customization of potential disease-causing mutations. ExScalibur is open-source and is also available as a public image on Amazon cloud.

  11. The 21cm "Outer Arm" and the Outer-Galaxy High-Velocity Clouds: Connected by Kinematics, Metallicity, and Distance

    CERN Document Server

    Tripp, Todd M

    2011-01-01

    We compare and discuss the metallicity, kinematics, and distance of the gaseous "Outer Arm" (OA) and the high-velocity clouds (HVCs) in the outer Galaxy. Using high-resolution ultraviolet spectra obtained with the HST Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) and FUSE, we detect the OA in a variety of absorption lines toward two QSOs, H1821+643 and HS0624+6907. We show that the OA is not detected in absorption in STIS spectra of several stars in the OA direction, consistent with the OA distance constraint of Lehner & Howk, which brackets the Galactocentric radius to 9-18 kpc. We also show that HVC Complex G, which is near the OA at a similar velocity, is detected in absorption toward the two stars; this HVC is in the solar vicinity at R(G)=8.3-10.2 kpc. HVC Complex C is known to be at a similar distance. Comparison of the low- and high-ion absorption profiles clearly shows that the OA is a multiphase cloud. Toward H1821+643, the low-ionization metals lines are composed of multiple narrow components, ind...

  12. Discovery of two embedded clusters with WISE in the high Galactic latitude cloud HRK 81.4-77.8

    CERN Document Server

    Camargo, Denilso; Bonatto, Charles; Salerno, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Molecular clouds at very high latitude ($b>60^{\\circ}$) away from the Galactic plane are rare and in general are expected to be non-star-forming. However, we report the discovery of two embedded clusters (Camargo 438 and Camargo 439) within the high-latitude molecular cloud HRK 81.4-77.8 using WISE. Camargo 439 with Galactic coordinates $\\ell=81.11^{\\circ}$ and $b=-77.84^{\\circ}$ is an $\\sim2$ Myr embedded cluster (EC) located at a distance from the Sun of $d_{\\odot}=5.09\\pm0.47$ kpc. Adopting the distance of the Sun to the Galactic centre $R_{\\odot}=7.2$ kpc we derive for Camargo 439 a Galactocentric distance of $R_{GC}=8.70\\pm0.26$ kpc and a vertical distance from the plane of $-4.97\\pm0.46$ kpc. Camargo 438 at $\\ell=79.66^{\\circ}$ and $b=-78.86^{\\circ}$ presents similar values. The derived parameters for these two ECs put HRK 81.4-77.8 in the halo at a distance from the Galactic centre of $\\sim8.7$ kpc and $\\sim5.0$ kpc from the disc. Star clusters provide the only direct means to determine the high latitu...

  13. Alpine cloud climatology using long-term NOAA-AVHRR satellite data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaestner, M.; Kriebel, K.T.

    2000-07-01

    Three different climates have been identified by our evaluation of AVHRR (advanced very high resolution radiometer) data using APOLLO (AVHRR processing scheme over land, clouds and ocean) for a five-years cloud climatology of the Alpine region. The cloud cover data from four layers were spatially averaged in boxes of 15 km by 14 km. The study area only comprises 540 km by 560 km, but contains regions with moderate, Alpine and Mediterranean climate. Data from the period July 1989 until December 1996 have been considered. The temporal resolution is one scene per day, the early afternoon pass, yielding monthly means of satellite derived cloud coverages 5% to 10% above the daily mean compared to conventional surface observation. At nonvegetated sites the cloudiness is sometimes significantly overestimated. Averaging high resolution cloud data seems to be superior to low resolution measurements of cloud properties and averaging is favourable in topographical homogeneous regions only. The annual course of cloud cover reveals typical regional features as foehn or temporal singularities as the so-called Christmas thaw. The cloud cover maps in spatially high resolution show local luff/lee features which outline the orography. Less cloud cover is found over the Alps than over the forelands in winter, an accumulation of thick cirrus is found over the High Alps and an accumulation of thin cirrus north of the Alps. (orig.)

  14. Seasonal cycle of cloud cover analyzed using Meteosat images

    OpenAIRE

    Massons, J.; Domingo, D.; Lorente, J.

    1998-01-01

    A cloud-detection method was used to retrieve cloudy pixels from Meteosat images. High spatial resolution (one pixel), monthly averaged cloud-cover distribution was obtained for a 1-year period. The seasonal cycle of cloud amount was analyzed. Cloud parameters obtained include the total cloud amount and the percentage of occurrence of clouds at three altitudes. Hourly variations of cloud cover are also analyzed. Cloud properties determined are coherent with those obtained in previous studies....

  15. Parallel high resolution imaging of diffuse objects in the Magellanic Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Jeremy

    1996-07-01

    The Magellanic Clouds, because of their well-determined distance and small extinction, allow an unprecedented opportunity to observe many ISM phenomena occurring in a whole galaxy. The HST resolution {0.1" = 0.025 pc} offers detail hitherto poorly studied in the extragalactic context on the morphology and spatial relationships in various ISM processes associated with the evolution of Population I and Population II systems. This long term {11 cycles} parallel program exploits these opportunities by obtaining WFPC2 images of appropriate targets that are accessible at the same time as primary pointings. The number of priority parallel observations per Cycle is estimated at 20; and our intent is to accumulate a significant archive of Magellanic Cloud direct images over the life of the program. The parallel targets, to be specified in crafting rules executed as part of the Phase II planning of each HST Cycle, will include {or search for} compact H II regions and young clusters, proto-stellar and maser regions, reflection nebulae, Herbig-Haro objects, stellar ejecta, SNR and wind-driven shells, shells, planetary nebulae and Very Low Excitation nebulae. The observations will be primarily in the Balmer lines and the stronger forbidden lines, with supplemental continuum images.

  16. Birds of a high-altitude cloud forest in Alta Verapaz, Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisermann, Knut; Schulz, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    The Northern Central American Highlands have been recognized as endemic bird area, but little is known about bird communities in Guatemalan cloud forests. From 1997 to 2001 a total of 142 bird species were recorded between 2000 and 2400 masl in cloud forest and agricultural clearings on Montaña Caquipec (Alta Verapaz, Guatemala). The bird community is described based on line transect counts within the forest. Pooling census data from undisturbed and disturbed forest, the Gray-breasted Wood-Wren (Henicorhina leucophrys) was found to be the most abundant species, followed in descending order by the Common Bush-Tanager (Chlorospingus ophthalmicus), the Paltry Tyrannulet (Zimmerius vilissimus), the Yellowish Flycatcher (Empidonax flavescens), the Ruddy-capped Nightingale-Thrush (Catharus frantzi), and the Amethyst-throated Hummingbird (Lampornis amethystinus). Bird communities in undisturbed and disturbed forest were found to be similar (Serensen similarity index 0.85), indicating low human impact. Of all recorded species, approximately 27% were Nearctic-Neotropical migratory birds. The most abundant one was the Wilson's Warbler (Wilsonia pusilla). The Montaña Caquipec is an important area for bird conservation, which is indicated by the presence of four species listed in the IUCN Red List (Highland Guan Penelopina nigra, Resplendent Quetzal Pharomachrus mocinno, Pink-headed Warbler Ergaticus versicolor, Golden-cheeked Warbler Dendroica chrysoparia), and 42 Mesoamerican endemics, of which 14 species are endemic to the Central American Highlands. The results presented here will be useful as baseline data for a long-term monitoring.

  17. A High Resolution Study of the HI-H2 Transition across the Perseus Molecular Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Min-Young; Douglas, Kevin A; Knee, Lewis B G; Di Francesco, James; Gibson, Steven J; Begum, Ayesha; Grcevich, Jana; Heiles, Carl; Korpela, Eric J; Leroy, Adam K; Peek, J E G; Pingel, Nick; Putman, Mary E; Saul, Destry

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the fundamental principles of H2 formation in a giant molecular cloud (GMC), we derive the HI and H2 surface density (Sigma_HI and Sigma_H2) images of the Perseus molecular cloud on sub-pc scales (~0.4 pc). We use the far-infrared data from the Improved Reprocessing of the IRAS Survey and the V-band extinction image provided by the COMPLETE Survey to estimate the dust column density image of Perseus. In combination with the HI data from the Galactic Arecibo L-band Feed Array HI Survey and an estimate of the local dust-to-gas ratio, we then derive the Sigma_H2 distribution across Perseus. We find a relatively uniform Sigma_HI ~ 6-8 Msun pc^-2 for both dark and star-forming regions, suggesting a minimum HI surface density required to shield H2 against photodissociation. As a result, a remarkably tight and consistent relation is found between Sigma_H2/Sigma_HI and Sigma_HI+Sigma_H2. The transition between the HI- and H2-dominated regions occurs at N(HI)+2N(H2) ~ (8-10) x 10^20 cm^-2. Our findings ...

  18. Recording Approach of Heritage Sites Based on Merging Point Clouds from High Resolution Photogrammetry and Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grussenmeyer, P.; Alby, E.; Landes, T.; Koehl, M.; Guillemin, S.; Hullo, J. F.; Assali, P.; Smigiel, E.

    2012-07-01

    Different approaches and tools are required in Cultural Heritage Documentation to deal with the complexity of monuments and sites. The documentation process has strongly changed in the last few years, always driven by technology. Accurate documentation is closely relied to advances of technology (imaging sensors, high speed scanning, automation in recording and processing data) for the purposes of conservation works, management, appraisal, assessment of the structural condition, archiving, publication and research (Patias et al., 2008). We want to focus in this paper on the recording aspects of cultural heritage documentation, especially the generation of geometric and photorealistic 3D models for accurate reconstruction and visualization purposes. The selected approaches are based on the combination of photogrammetric dense matching and Terrestrial Laser Scanning (TLS) techniques. Both techniques have pros and cons and recent advances have changed the way of the recording approach. The choice of the best workflow relies on the site configuration, the performances of the sensors, and criteria as geometry, accuracy, resolution, georeferencing, texture, and of course processing time. TLS techniques (time of flight or phase shift systems) are widely used for recording large and complex objects and sites. Point cloud generation from images by dense stereo or multi-view matching can be used as an alternative or as a complementary method to TLS. Compared to TLS, the photogrammetric solution is a low cost one, as the acquisition system is limited to a high-performance digital camera and a few accessories only. Indeed, the stereo or multi-view matching process offers a cheap, flexible and accurate solution to get 3D point clouds. Moreover, the captured images might also be used for models texturing. Several software packages are available, whether web-based, open source or commercial. The main advantage of this photogrammetric or computer vision based technology is to get

  19. Large Amplitude Variations of an L/T Transition Brown Dwarf: Multi-Wavelength Observations of Patchy, High-Contrast Cloud Features

    CERN Document Server

    Radigan, Jacqueline; Lafrenière, David; Artigau, Etienne; Marley, Mark; Saumon, Didier

    2012-01-01

    We present multiple-epoch photometric monitoring in the $J$, $H$, and $K_s$ bands of the T1.5 dwarf 2MASS J21392676+0220226 (2M2139), revealing persistent, periodic ($P=7.72\\pm$0.05 hr) variability with a peak-to-peak amplitude as high as 26% in the $J$-band. The light curve shape varies on a timescale of days, suggesting that evolving atmospheric cloud features are responsible. Using interpolations between model atmospheres with differing cloud thicknesses to represent a heterogeneous surface, we find that the multi-wavelength variations and the near-infrared spectrum of 2M2139 can be reproduced by either (1)cool, thick cloud features sitting above a thinner cloud layer, or (2)warm regions of low condensate opacity in an otherwise cloudy atmosphere, possibly indicating the presence of holes or breaks in the cloud layer. We find that temperature contrasts between thick and thin cloud patches must be greater than 175 K and as high as 425 K. We also consider whether the observed variability could arise from an ...

  20. Tropical high-altitude Andean lakes located above the tree line attenuate UV-A radiation more strongly than typical temperate alpine lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Ximena; Lazzaro, Xavier; Coronel, Jorge S

    2013-09-01

    Tropical high-altitude Andean lakes are physically harsh ecosystems. Located above the treeline (≥4000 m a.s.l.), they share common features with temperate alpine lakes, which impose extreme conditions on their aquatic organisms: e.g., strong winds, broad diel variations in water temperature, and intense solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR). However, because of their latitude, they differ in two major ecological characteristics: they lack ice cover during the winter and they do not present summer water column stratification. We sampled 26 tropical high-altitude Andean lakes from three regions of the Bolivian Eastern Andes Cordillera during the wet period (austral summer). We performed an ordination to better describe the typology of Andean lakes in relation to the environmental variables, and we assessed the relationships among them, focussing on the UV-A transparency (360 nm) throughout the water column. We found a positive correlation between UV-A transparency calculated as Z(1%) (the depth which reaches 1% of the surface UV-A), the lake maximum depth and Secchi transparency (r = 0.61). Z(1%) of UV-A was smaller in shallow lakes than in deep lakes, indicating that shallow lakes are less transparent to UV-A than deep lakes. We hypothesize that, compared to shallow lakes, deep lakes (maximum depth > 10 m) may have lower dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations (that absorb UV radiation) due to lower temperature and reduced macrophyte cover. Based on our data, tropical high-altitude Andean lakes are less transparent to UV-A (K(d) range = 1.4-11.0 m(-1); Z(1%) depth range = 0.4-3.2 m) than typical temperate alpine lakes (1-6 m(-1), 3-45 m, respectively). Moreover, they differ in vertical profiles of UV-A, chlorophyll-a, and temperature, suggesting that they may have a distinct ecological functioning. Such peculiarities justify treating tropical high-altitude Andean lakes as a separate category of alpine lakes. Tropical high-altitude Andean lakes have been poorly

  1. Large and small-scale structure of the Intermediate and High Velocity Clouds towards the LMC and SMC

    CERN Document Server

    Smoker, J V; Keenan, F P

    2015-01-01

    We employ CaII K and NaI D interstellar absorption-line spectroscopy of early-type stars in the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds to investigate the large- and small-scale structure in foreground Intermediate and High Velocity Clouds (I/HVCs). These data include FLAMES-GIRAFFE CaII K observations of 403 stars in four open clusters, plus FEROS or UVES spectra of 156 stars in the LMC and SMC. The FLAMES observations are amongst the most extensive probes to date of CaII structures on 20 arcsec scales From the FLAMES data within a 0.5 degree field-of-view, the CaII K equivalent width in the I/HVC components towards three clusters varies by factors of >10. There are no detections of molecular gas in absorption at intermediate or high velocities, although molecular absorption is present at LMC and Galactic velocities towards some sightlines. The sightlines show variations in EW exceeding a factor 7 in CH+ towards NGC 1761 over scales of less than 10 arcminutes. The FEROS/UVES data show CaII K I/HVC absorption in $\\...

  2. Development of a High Resolution Weather Forecast Model for Mesoamerica Using the NASA Nebula Cloud Computing Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Case, Jonathan L.; Venner, Jason; Moreno-Madrinan, Max. J.; Delgado, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two years, scientists in the Earth Science Office at NASA fs Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) have explored opportunities to apply cloud computing concepts to support near real ]time weather forecast modeling via the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Collaborators at NASA fs Short ]term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center and the SERVIR project at Marshall Space Flight Center have established a framework that provides high resolution, daily weather forecasts over Mesoamerica through use of the NASA Nebula Cloud Computing Platform at Ames Research Center. Supported by experts at Ames, staff at SPoRT and SERVIR have established daily forecasts complete with web graphics and a user interface that allows SERVIR partners access to high resolution depictions of weather in the next 48 hours, useful for monitoring and mitigating meteorological hazards such as thunderstorms, heavy precipitation, and tropical weather that can lead to other disasters such as flooding and landslides. This presentation will describe the framework for establishing and providing WRF forecasts, example applications of output provided via the SERVIR web portal, and early results of forecast model verification against available surface ] and satellite ]based observations.

  3. Cloud optics

    CERN Document Server

    Kokhanovsky, A

    2006-01-01

    Clouds affect the climate of the Earth, and they are an important factor in the weather. Therefore, their radiative properties must be understood in great detail. This book summarizes current knowledge on cloud optical properties, for example their ability to absorb, transmit, and reflect light, which depends on the clouds' geometrical and microphysical characteristics such as sizes of droplets and crystals, their shapes, and structures. In addition, problems related to the image transfer through clouds and cloud remote sensing are addressed in this book in great detail. This book can be an im

  4. Preparation of High Purity V2O5 from a Typical Low-Grade Refractory Stone Coal Using a Pyro-Hydrometallurgical Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Yang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The recovery of vanadium from a typical low-grade refractory stone coal was investigated using a pyro-hydrometallurgical process specifically including blank roasting, acid leaching, solvent extraction, and chemical precipitation. The appropriate role of parameters in each process was analyzed in detail. Roasting temperature and roasting time during the roasting process showed a significant effect on leaching efficiency of vanadium. Using H2SO4 as a leaching agent, vanadium leaching efficiency can achieve above 90% under the optimum leaching conditions of CaF2 dosage of 5%, sulfuric acid concentration of 4 mol/L, liquid to solid ratio of 2:1 mL/g, leaching time of 2 h, and leaching temperature of 95 °C. 99.10% of vanadium can be extracted from the leaching solution in three stages under the conditions of initial pH of 1.6, trioctylamine (TOA extractant concentration of 20% (vol, phase ratio (A/O of 2, and reaction time of 2 min. 1.0 mol/L NaOH was used to strip vanadium from the extracted solvent phase. After purification and precipitation, vanadium can be crystallized as ammonium metavanadate. The V2O5 product with a purity of 99.75% is obtained after ammonium metavanadate thermal decomposition at 550 °C for 2 h. The total vanadium recovery in the whole process is above 88%. This process has advantages of short operation time, high vanadium extraction efficiency, and high purity of the product.

  5. How does the topic of conversation affect verbal exchange and eye gaze? A comparison between typical development and high-functioning autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadig, Aparna; Lee, Iris; Singh, Leher; Bosshart, Kyle; Ozonoff, Sally

    2010-07-01

    Conversation is a primary area of difficulty for individuals with high-functioning autism (HFA) although they have unimpaired formal language abilities. This likely stems from the unstructured nature of face-to-face conversation as well as the need to coordinate other modes of communication (e.g. eye gaze) with speech. We conducted a quantitative analysis of both verbal exchange and gaze data obtained from conversations between children with HFA and an adult, compared with those of typically developing children matched on language level. We examined a new question: how does speaking about a topic of interest affect reciprocity of verbal exchange and eye gaze? Conversations on generic topics were compared with those on individuals' circumscribed interests, particularly intense interests characteristic of HFA. Two opposing hypotheses were evaluated. Speaking about a topic of interest may improve reciprocity in conversation by increasing participants' motivation and engagement. Alternatively, it could engender more one-sided interaction, given the engrossing nature of circumscribed interests. In their verbal exchanges HFA participants demonstrated decreased reciprocity during the interest topic, evidenced by fewer contingent utterances and more monologue-style speech. Moreover, a measure of stereotyped behaviour and restricted interest symptoms was inversely related to reciprocal verbal exchange. However, both the HFA and comparison groups looked significantly more to their partner's face during the interest than generic topic. Our interpretation of results across modalities is that circumscribed interests led HFA participants to be less adaptive to their partner verbally, but speaking about a highly practiced topic allowed for increased gaze to the partner. The function of this increased gaze to partner may differ for the HFA and comparison groups.

  6. Evaluation of Subgrid-scale Hydrometeor Transport Schemes using a High-resolution Cloud-resolving Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, May Wai San; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Wang, Minghuai

    2015-09-14

    Potential ways of parameterizing vertical turbulent fluxes of hydrometeors are examined using a high-resolution cloud-resolving model. The cloud-resolving model uses the Morrison microphysics scheme, which contains prognostic variables for rain, graupel, ice, and snow. A benchmark simulation with a horizontal grid spacing of 250 m of a deep convection case carried out to evaluate three different ways of parameterizing the turbulent vertical fluxes of hydrometeors: an eddy-diffusion approximation, a quadrant-based decomposition, and a scaling method that accounts for within-quadrant (subplume) correlations. Results show that the down-gradient nature of the eddy-diffusion approximation tends to transport mass away from concentrated regions, whereas the benchmark simulation indicates that the vertical transport tends to transport mass from below the level of maximum to aloft. Unlike the eddy-diffusion approach, the quadri-modal decomposition is able to capture the signs of the flux gradient but underestimates the magnitudes. The scaling approach is shown to perform the best by accounting for within-quadrant correlations, and improves the results for all hydrometeors except for snow. A sensitivity study is performed to examine how vertical transport may affect the microphysics of the hydrometeors. The vertical transport of each hydrometeor type is artificially suppressed in each test. Results from the sensitivity tests show that cloud-droplet-related processes are most sensitive to suppressed rain or graupel transport. In particular, suppressing rain or graupel transport has a strong impact on the production of snow and ice aloft. Lastly, a viable subgrid-scale hydrometeor transport scheme in an assumed probability density function parameterization is discussed.

  7. Typicals/Típicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Vélez

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Typicals is a series of 12 colour photographs digitally created from photojournalistic images from Colombia combined with "typical" craft textiles and text from guest writers. Typicals was first exhibited as photographs 50cm x 75cm in size, each with their own magnifying glass, at the Contemporary Art Space at Gorman House in Canberra, Australia, in 2000. It was then exhibited in "Feedback: Art Social Consciousness and Resistance" at Monash University Museum of Art in Melbourne, Australia, from March to May 2003. From May to June 2003 it was exhibited at the Museo de Arte de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia Santa Fé Bogotá, Colombia. In its current manifestation the artwork has been adapted from the catalogue of the museum exhibitions. It is broken up into eight pieces corresponding to the contributions of the writers. The introduction by Sylvia Vélez is the PDF file accessible via a link below this abstract. The other seven PDF files are accessible via the 'Research Support Tool' section to the right of your screen. Please click on 'Supp. Files'. Please note that these files are around 4 megabytes each, so it may be difficult to access them from a dial-up connection.

  8. Kinematic Structure of Molecular Gas around High-mass YSO, Papillon Nebula, in N159 East in the Large Magellanic Cloud: A New Perspective with ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saigo, Kazuya; Onishi, Toshikazu; Nayak, Omnarayani; Meixner, Margaret; Tokuda, Kazuki; Harada, Ryohei; Morioka, Yuuki; Sewiło, Marta; Indebetouw, Remy; Torii, Kazufumi; Kawamura, Akiko; Ohama, Akio; Hattori, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Tachihara, Kengo; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Madden, Suzanne; Galametz, Maud; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Chen, C.-H. Rosie; Mizuno, Norikazu; Fukui, Yasuo

    2017-01-01

    We present the ALMA Band 3 and Band 6 results of 12CO(2-1), 13CO(2-1), H30α recombination line, free–free emission around 98 GHz, and the dust thermal emission around 230 GHz toward the N159 East Giant Molecular Cloud (N159E) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). LMC is the nearest active high-mass star-forming face-on galaxy at a distance of 50 kpc and is the best target for studing high-mass star formation. ALMA observations show that N159E is the complex of filamentary clouds with the width and length of ∼1 pc and several parsecs. The total molecular mass is 0.92 × 105 M⊙ from the 13CO(2-1) intensity. N159E harbors the well-known Papillon Nebula, a compact high-excitation H ii region. We found that a YSO associated with the Papillon Nebula has the mass of 35 M⊙ and is located at the intersection of three filamentary clouds. It indicates that the formation of the high-mass YSO was induced by the collision of filamentary clouds. Fukui et al. reported a similar kinematic structure toward two YSOs in the N159 West region, which are the other YSOs that have the mass of ≳35 M⊙. This suggests that the collision of filamentary clouds is a primary mechanism of high-mass star formation. We found a small molecular hole around the YSO in Papillon Nebula with a sub-parsec scale. It is filled by free–free and H30α emission. The temperature of the molecular gas around the hole reaches ∼80 K. It indicates that this YSO has just started the distruction of parental molecular cloud.

  9. Using cloud computing infrastructure with CloudBioLinux, CloudMan, and Galaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afgan, Enis; Chapman, Brad; Jadan, Margita; Franke, Vedran; Taylor, James

    2012-06-01

    Cloud computing has revolutionized availability and access to computing and storage resources, making it possible to provision a large computational infrastructure with only a few clicks in a Web browser. However, those resources are typically provided in the form of low-level infrastructure components that need to be procured and configured before use. In this unit, we demonstrate how to utilize cloud computing resources to perform open-ended bioinformatic analyses, with fully automated management of the underlying cloud infrastructure. By combining three projects, CloudBioLinux, CloudMan, and Galaxy, into a cohesive unit, we have enabled researchers to gain access to more than 100 preconfigured bioinformatics tools and gigabytes of reference genomes on top of the flexible cloud computing infrastructure. The protocol demonstrates how to set up the available infrastructure and how to use the tools via a graphical desktop interface, a parallel command-line interface, and the Web-based Galaxy interface.

  10. Parameter Estimation of Fossil Oysters from High Resolution 3D Point Cloud and Image Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuricic, Ana; Harzhauser, Mathias; Dorninger, Peter; Nothegger, Clemens; Mandic, Oleg; Székely, Balázs; Molnár, Gábor; Pfeifer, Norbert

    2014-05-01

    A unique fossil oyster reef was excavated at Stetten in Lower Austria, which is also the highlight of the geo-edutainment park 'Fossilienwelt Weinviertel'. It provides the rare opportunity to study the Early Miocene flora and fauna of the Central Paratethys Sea. The site presents the world's largest fossil oyster biostrome formed about 16.5 million years ago in a tropical estuary of the Korneuburg Basin. About 15,000 up to 80-cm-long shells of Crassostrea gryphoides cover a 400 m2 large area. Our project 'Smart-Geology for the World's largest fossil oyster reef' combines methods of photogrammetry, geology and paleontology to document, evaluate and quantify the shell bed. This interdisciplinary approach will be applied to test hypotheses on the genesis of the taphocenosis (e.g.: tsunami versus major storm) and to reconstruct pre- and post-event processes. Hence, we are focusing on using visualization technologies from photogrammetry in geology and paleontology in order to develop new methods for automatic and objective evaluation of 3D point clouds. These will be studied on the basis of a very dense surface reconstruction of the oyster reef. 'Smart Geology', as extension of the classic discipline, exploits massive data, automatic interpretation, and visualization. Photogrammetry provides the tools for surface acquisition and objective, automated interpretation. We also want to stress the economic aspect of using automatic shape detection in paleontology, which saves manpower and increases efficiency during the monitoring and evaluation process. Currently, there are many well known algorithms for 3D shape detection of certain objects. We are using dense 3D laser scanning data from an instrument utilizing the phase shift measuring principle, which provides accurate geometrical basis < 3 mm. However, the situation is difficult in this multiple object scenario where more than 15,000 complete or fragmentary parts of an object with random orientation are found. The goal

  11. High Performance Speed Sensorless Control of Three-Phase Induction Motor Based on Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. M. Salem

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Induction motor is a cast of alternating current motor where charge endures allotted to the rotor close-at-hand deputation of conductive charge. These motors are broadly applied in industrial claim due to they are arduous along with adhere no contacts. The speed controller of deltoid phase induction motor is applied to alleviate the aberration of speed. The central constructivist of this paper is to accrue the performance of speed sensorless control of three phase induction motor. To increase its performance, this paper presents a modified method for speed controller of an indirect vector-controlled induction motor drive using cloud computing technique. Our methodology depends on speed sensorless scheme to obtain the speed signal feedback; the speed estimator is based on model reference adaptive control that uses the stator current and rotor flux as state variables for estimating the speed. In this method, the stator current error is represented as a function of first degree of the estimated speed error. An analysis and simulation of the tried algorithm is birthed and applied easing a TMS320C31 floating-point notational alert Processor. And accumulate the action of the three phase induction motor we conceived our appraisals affixed to the accountant based on cloud computing tactics. This intelligent policy uses the guidelines of the speed controller efficiently. Simulation and experimental results depicted that the motor speed is decelerated articulately to destine its illusion apprise without above and inferior smack and with about zero steady state error. The apprised accelerate alert and its dispatching buoy amassed off line from burlesque. After effects display an advantageous affinity among the accounted speed alert and it's dispatching allocated as well as aped speed flares

  12. High definition clouds and precipitation for climate prediction -results from a unified German research initiative on high resolution modeling and observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauser, F.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from the German BMBF initiative 'High Definition Cloud and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction -HD(CP)2'. This initiative addresses most of the problems that are discussed in this session in one, unified approach: cloud physics, convection, boundary layer development, radiation and subgrid variability are approached in one organizational framework. HD(CP)2 merges both observation and high performance computing / model development communities to tackle a shared problem: how to improve the understanding of the most important subgrid-scale processes of cloud and precipitation physics, and how to utilize this knowledge for improved climate predictions. HD(CP)2 is a coordinated initiative to: (i) realize; (ii) evaluate; and (iii) statistically characterize and exploit for the purpose of both parameterization development and cloud / precipitation feedback analysis; ultra-high resolution (100 m in the horizontal, 10-50 m in the vertical) regional hind-casts over time periods (3-15 y) and spatial scales (1000-1500 km) that are climatically meaningful. HD(CP)2 thus consists of three elements (the model development and simulations, their observational evaluation and exploitation/synthesis to advance CP prediction) and its first three-year phase has started on October 1st 2012. As a central part of HD(CP)2, the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) has been carried out in spring 2013. In this campaign, high resolution measurements with a multitude of instruments from all major centers in Germany have been carried out in a limited domain, to allow for unprecedented resolution and precision in the observation of microphysics parameters on a resolution that will allow for evaluation and improvement of ultra-high resolution models. At the same time, a local area version of the new climate model ICON of the Max Planck Institute and the German weather service has been developed that allows for LES-type simulations on high resolutions on

  13. Sensitivity estimations for cloud droplet formation in the vicinity of the high alpine research station Jungfraujoch (3580 m a.s.l.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hammer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol radiative forcing estimates suffer from large uncertainties as a result of insufficient understanding of aerosol–cloud interactions. The main source of these uncertainties are dynamical processes such as turbulence and entrainment but also key aerosol parameters such as aerosol number concentration and size distribution, and to a much lesser extent, the composition. From June to August 2011 a Cloud and Aerosol Characterization Experiment (CLACE was performed at the high-alpine research station Jungfraujoch (Switzerland, 3580 m a.s.l. focusing on the activation of aerosol to form liquid-phase clouds (in the cloud base temperature range of −8 to 5 °C. With a box model the sensitivity of the effective peak supersaturation (SSpeak, an important parameter for cloud activation, to key aerosol and dynamical parameters was investigated. It was found that the updraft velocity, defining the cooling rate of an air parcel, is the parameter with the largest influence on SSpeak. Small-scale variations in the cooling rate with large amplitudes can significantly alter CCN activation. Thus, an accurate knowledge of the air parcel history is required to estimate SSpeak. The results show that the cloud base updraft velocities estimated from the horizontal wind measurements made at the Jungfraujoch can be divided by a factor of approximately 4 to get the updraft velocity required for the model to reproduce the observed SSpeak.

  14. Highly sensitive detection of five typical fluoroquinolones in low-fat milk by field-enhanced sample injection-based CE in bubble cell capillary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yan; Gasilova, Natalia; Qiao, Liang; Zhou, Ying-Lin; Zhang, Xin-Xiang; Girault, Hubert H

    2014-12-01

    Fluoroquinolones are a group of synthetic antibiotics with a broad activity spectrum against mycoplasma, Gram-positive, and Gram-negative bacteria. Due to the extensive use of fluoroquinolones in farming and veterinary science, there is a constant need in the analytical methods able to efficiently monitor their residues in food products of animal origin, regulated by Commission Regulation (European Union) no. 37/2010. Herein, field-enhanced sample injection for sample stacking prior the CZE separation was developed inside a bubble cell capillary for highly sensitive detection of five typical fluoroquinolones in bovine milk. Ethylenediamine was proposed as the main component of BGE for the antibiotics separation. The effect of BGE composition, injection parameters, and water plug length on the field-enhanced sample injection-based CE with UV detection was investigated. Under the optimized conditions, described field-enhanced sample injection-based CE-UV analysis of fluoroquinolones provides LODs varying from 0.4 to 1.3 ng/mL. These LOD values are much lower (from 460 to 1500 times) than those obtained by a conventional CE in a standard capillary without bubble cell. The developed method was finally applied for the analysis of fluoroquinolones in low-fat milk from a Swiss supermarket. Sample recovery values from 93.6 to 106.0% for different fluoroquinolones, and LODs from 0.7 to 2.5 μg/kg, were achieved. Moreover, the proposed ethylenediamine-based BGE as volatile and compatible with MS system, enabled the coupling of the field-enhanced sample injection-based CE with a recently introduced electrostatic spray ionization MS via an iontophoretic fraction collection interface for qualitative fluoroquinolones identification. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. An Assessment of Differences Between Cloud Effective Particle Radius Retrievals for Marine Water Clouds from Three MODIS Spectral Bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platnick, Steven; Zhang, Zhibo

    2011-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud product provides three separate 1 km resolution retrievals of cloud particle effective radii (r (sub e)), derived from 1.6, 2.1 and 3.7 micron band observations. In this study, differences among the three size retrievals for maritime water clouds (designated as r (sub e), 1.6 r (sub e), 2.1 and r (sub e),3.7) were systematically investigated through a series of case studies and global analyses. Substantial differences are found between r (sub e),3.7 and r (sub e),2.1 retrievals (delta r (sub e),3.7-2.l), with a strong dependence on cloud regime. The differences are typically small, within +/- 2 micron, over relatively spatially homogeneous coastal stratocumulus cloud regions. However, for trade wind cumulus regimes, r (sub e),3.7 was found to be substantially smaller than r (sub e),2.1, sometimes by more than 10 micron. The correlation of delta r(sub e),3.7-2.1 with key cloud parameters, including the cloud optical thickness (tau), r (sub e) and a cloud horizontal heterogeneity index (H-sigma) derived from 250 m resolution MODIS 0.86 micron band observations, were investigated using one month of MODIS Terra data. It was found that differences among the three r (sub e) retrievals for optically thin clouds (tau 0.3, both r (sub e),1.6 and r (sub e),2.1 were seen to increase quickly with H-sigma. On the other hand, r (sub e),3.7 statistics showed little dependence on H-sigma and remained relatively stable over the whole range of H-sigma values. Potential contributing causes to the substantial r (sub e),3.7 and r (sub e),2.1 differences are discussed. In particular, based on both 1-D and 3-D radiative transfer simulations, we have elucidated mechanisms by which cloud heterogeneity and 3-D radiative effects can cause large differences between r (sub e),3.7 and r (sub e),2.l retrievals for highly inhomogeneous clouds. Our results suggest that the contrast in observed delta r (sub e)3.7-2.1 between cloud

  16. Kinematic Structure of Molecular Gas around High-mass Star YSO, Papillon Nebula, in N159 East in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Saigo, Kazuya; Nayak, Omnarayani; Meixner, Margaret; Tokuda, Kazuki; Harada, Ryohei; Morioka, Yuuki; Sewilo, Marta; Indebetouw, Remy; Torii, Kazufumi; Kawamura, Akiko; Ohama, Akio; Hattori, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Tachihara, Kengo; Minamidani, Tetsuhiro; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Madden, Suzanne; Galametz, Maud; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Chen, C -H Rosie; Mizuno, Norikazu; Fukui, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    We present the ALMA Band 3 and Band 6 results of 12CO(2-1), 13$CO(2-1), H30alpha recombination line, free-free emission around 98 GHz, and the dust thermal emission around 230 GHz toward the N159 East Giant Molecular Cloud (N159E) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). LMC is the nearest active high-mass star forming face-on galaxy at a distance of 50 kpc and is the best target for studing high-mass star formation. ALMA observations show that N159E is the complex of filamentary clouds with the width and length of ~1 pc and 5 pc - 10 pc, respectively. The total molecular mass is 0.92 x 10^5 Msun from the 13CO(2-1) intensity. N159E harbors the well-known Papillon Nebula, a compact high-excitation HII region. We found that a YSO associated with the Papillon Nebula has the mass of 35 Msun and is located at the intersection of three filamentary clouds. It indicates that the formation of the high-mass YSO was induced by the collision of filamentary clouds. Fukui et al. 2015 reported a similar kinematic structure towa...

  17. Detection of an Optical Counterpart to the ALFALFA Ultra-compact High-velocity Cloud AGC 249525

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesh, William; Rhode, Katherine L.; Salzer, John J.; Janowiecki, Steven; Adams, Elizabeth A. K.; Haynes, Martha P.; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Cannon, John M.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the detection at >98% confidence of an optical counterpart to AGC 249525, an ultra-compact high-velocity cloud (UCHVC) discovered by the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA survey blind neutral hydrogen survey. UCHVCs are compact, isolated H i clouds with properties consistent with their being nearby low-mass galaxies, but without identified counterparts in extant optical surveys. Analysis of the resolved stellar sources in deep g- and i-band imaging from the WIYN pODI camera reveals a clustering of possible red giant branch stars associated with AGC 249525 at a distance of 1.64 ± 0.45 Mpc. Matching our optical detection with the H i synthesis map of AGC 249525 from Adams et al. shows that the stellar overdensity is exactly coincident with the highest-density H i contour from that study. Combining our optical photometry and the H i properties of this object yields an absolute magnitude of -7.1≤slant {M}V≤slant -4.5, a stellar mass between 2.2+/- 0.6× {10}4 {M}⊙ and 3.6+/- 1.0× {10}5 {M}⊙ , and an H i to stellar mass ratio between 9 and 144. This object has stellar properties within the observed range of gas-poor ultra-faint dwarfs in the Local Group, but is gas-dominated.

  18. Cloud point extraction of plutonium in environmental matrixes coupled to ICPMS and α spectrometry in highly acidic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Charles; Whitty-Léveillé, Laurence; Larivière, Dominic

    2013-11-01

    A new cloud point extraction procedure has been developed for the quantification of plutonium(IV) in environmental samples. The separation procedure can be either coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) or α spectrometry for plutonium quantification. The method uses a combination of selective ligand (P,P'-di(2-ethylhexyl) methanediphosphonic acid (H2DEH[MDP])) and micelle shielding by bromine formation to enable quantitative extraction of Pu in highly acidic solutions. Cross-optimization of all parameters (nonionic and ionic surfactant, chelating agent, bromate, bromide, and pH) led to optimal of the extraction conditions. Figures of merit of the method for the detection using α spectrometry and ICPMS are reported (limit of detection, limit of quantification, minimal detectable activity, and recovery). Quantitative extractions (>95%) were obtained for a wide variety of aqueous and digested samples (synthetic urine, wastewater, drinking water, seawater, and soil samples). The method features the first successful coupling between α spectrometry and cloud point extraction and is the first demonstration of CPE suitability with metaborate fusion as a sample preparation approach, techniques used extensively in nuclear industries.

  19. Beyond the Flipped Classroom: A Highly Interactive Cloud-Classroom (HIC) Embedded into Basic Materials Science Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Wei-Kai; Bhagat, Kaushal Kumar; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2016-06-01

    The present study compares the highly interactive cloud-classroom (HIC) system with traditional methods of teaching materials science that utilize crystal structure picture or real crystal structure model, in order to examine its learning effectiveness across three dimensions: knowledge, comprehension and application. The aim of this study was to evaluate the (HIC) system, which incorporates augmented reality, virtual reality and cloud-classroom to teach basic materials science courses. The study followed a pretest-posttest quasi-experimental research design. A total of 92 students (aged 19-20 years), in a second-year undergraduate program, participated in this 18-week-long experiment. The students were divided into an experimental group and a control group. The experimental group (36 males and 10 females) was instructed utilizing the HIC system, while the control group (34 males and 12 females) was led through traditional teaching methods. Pretest, posttest, and delayed posttest scores were evaluated by multivariate analysis of covariance. The results indicated that participants in the experimental group who used the HIC system outperformed the control group, in the both posttest and delayed posttest, across three learning dimensions. Based on these results, the HIC system is recommended to be incorporated in formal materials science learning settings.

  20. Initiation and propagation of cloud-to-ground lightning observed with a high-speed video camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, M. D.; Rakov, V. A.

    2016-12-01

    Complete evolution of a lightning discharge, from its initiation at an altitude of about 4 km to its ground attachment, was optically observed for the first time at the Lightning Observatory in Gainesville, Florida. The discharge developed during the late stage of a cloud flash and was initiated in a decayed branch of the latter. The initial channel section was intermittently illuminated for over 100 ms, until a bidirectionally extending channel (leader) was formed. During the bidirectional leader extension, the negative end exhibited optical and radio-frequency electromagnetic features expected for negative cloud-to-ground strokes developing in virgin air, while the positive end most of the time appeared to be inactive or showed intermittent channel luminosity enhancements. The development of positive end involved an abrupt creation of a 1-km long, relatively straight branch with a streamer corona burst at its far end. This 1-km jump appeared to occur in virgin air at a remarkably high effective speed of the order of 106 m/s. The positive end of the bidirectional leader connected to another bidirectional leader to form a larger bidirectional leader, whose negative end attached to the ground and produced a 36-kA return stroke.

  1. Cloud speed sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fung

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Changing cloud cover is a major source of solar radiation variability and poses challenges for the integration of solar energy. A compact and economical system that measures cloud motion vectors to estimate power plant ramp rates and provide short term solar irradiance forecasts is presented. The Cloud Speed Sensor (CSS is constructed using an array of luminance sensors and high-speed data acquisition to resolve the progression of cloud passages across the sensor footprint. An embedded microcontroller acquires the sensor data and uses a cross-correlation algorithm to determine cloud motion vectors. The CSS was validated against an artificial shading test apparatus, an alternative method of cloud motion detection from ground measured irradiance (Linear Cloud Edge, LCE, and a UC San Diego Sky Imager (USI. The CSS detected artificial shadow directions and speeds to within 15 and 6% accuracy, respectively. The CSS detected (real cloud directions and speeds without average bias and with average weighted root mean square difference of 22° and 1.9 m s−1 when compared to USI and 33° and 1.5 m s−1 when compared to LCE results.

  2. INTEGRATION OF POINT CLOUDS FROM TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNING AND IMAGE-BASED MATCHING FOR GENERATING HIGH-RESOLUTION ORTHOIMAGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Salach

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An orthoimage is one of the basic photogrammetric products used for architectural documentation of historical objects; recently, it has become a standard in such work. Considering the increasing popularity of photogrammetric techniques applied in the cultural heritage domain, this research examines the two most popular measuring technologies: terrestrial laser scanning, and automatic processing of digital photographs. The basic objective of the performed works presented in this paper was to optimize the quality of generated high-resolution orthoimages using integration of data acquired by a Z+F 5006 terrestrial laser scanner and a Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital camera. The subject was one of the walls of the “Blue Chamber” of the Museum of King Jan III’s Palace at Wilanów (Warsaw, Poland. The high-resolution images resulting from integration of the point clouds acquired by the different methods were analysed in detail with respect to geometric and radiometric correctness.

  3. Integration of Point Clouds from Terrestrial Laser Scanning and Image-Based Matching for Generating High-Resolution Orthoimages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salach, A.; Markiewicza, J. S.; Zawieska, D.

    2016-06-01

    An orthoimage is one of the basic photogrammetric products used for architectural documentation of historical objects; recently, it has become a standard in such work. Considering the increasing popularity of photogrammetric techniques applied in the cultural heritage domain, this research examines the two most popular measuring technologies: terrestrial laser scanning, and automatic processing of digital photographs. The basic objective of the performed works presented in this paper was to optimize the quality of generated high-resolution orthoimages using integration of data acquired by a Z+F 5006 terrestrial laser scanner and a Canon EOS 5D Mark II digital camera. The subject was one of the walls of the "Blue Chamber" of the Museum of King Jan III's Palace at Wilanów (Warsaw, Poland). The high-resolution images resulting from integration of the point clouds acquired by the different methods were analysed in detail with respect to geometric and radiometric correctness.

  4. Reconstruction of cloud geometry using a scanning cloud radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, F.; Winkler, C.; Zinner, T.

    2015-06-01

    Clouds are one of the main reasons of uncertainties in the forecasts of weather and climate. In part, this is due to limitations of remote sensing of cloud microphysics. Present approaches often use passive spectral measurements for the remote sensing of cloud microphysical parameters. Large uncertainties are introduced by three-dimensional (3-D) radiative transfer effects and cloud inhomogeneities. Such effects are largely caused by unknown orientation of cloud sides or by shadowed areas on the cloud. Passive ground-based remote sensing of cloud properties at high spatial resolution could be crucially improved with this kind of additional knowledge of cloud geometry. To this end, a method for the accurate reconstruction of 3-D cloud geometry from cloud radar measurements is developed in this work. Using a radar simulator and simulated passive measurements of model clouds based on a large eddy simulation (LES), the effects of different radar scan resolutions and varying interpolation methods are evaluated. In reality, a trade-off between scan resolution and scan duration has to be found as clouds change quickly. A reasonable choice is a scan resolution of 1 to 2°. The most suitable interpolation procedure identified is the barycentric interpolation method. The 3-D reconstruction method is demonstrated using radar scans of convective cloud cases with the Munich miraMACS, a 35 GHz scanning cloud radar. As a successful proof of concept, camera imagery collected at the radar location is reproduced for the observed cloud cases via 3-D volume reconstruction and 3-D radiative transfer simulation. Data sets provided by the presented reconstruction method will aid passive spectral ground-based measurements of cloud sides to retrieve microphysical parameters.

  5. Bacterial diversity in typical Italian salami at different ripening stages as revealed by high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Połka, Justyna; Rebecchi, Annalisa; Pisacane, Vincenza; Morelli, Lorenzo; Puglisi, Edoardo

    2015-04-01

    The bacterial diversity involved in food fermentations is one of the most important factors shaping the final characteristics of traditional foods. Knowledge about this diversity can be greatly improved by the application of high-throughput sequencing technologies (HTS) coupled to the PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA subunit. Here we investigated the bacterial diversity in batches of Salame Piacentino PDO (Protected Designation of Origin), a dry fermented sausage that is typical of a regional area of Northern Italy. Salami samples from 6 different local factories were analysed at 0, 21, 49 and 63 days of ripening; raw meat at time 0 and casing samples at 21 days of ripening where also analysed, and the effect of starter addition was included in the experimental set-up. Culture-based microbiological analyses and PCR-DGGE were carried out in order to be compared with HTS results. A total of 722,196 high quality sequences were obtained after trimming, paired-reads assembly and quality screening of raw reads obtained by Illumina MiSeq sequencing of the two bacterial 16S hypervariable regions V3 and V4; manual curation of 16S database allowed a correct taxonomical classification at the species for 99.5% of these reads. Results confirmed the presence of main bacterial species involved in the fermentation of salami as assessed by PCR-DGGE, but with a greater extent of resolution and quantitative assessments that are not possible by the mere analyses of gel banding patterns. Thirty-two different Staphylococcus and 33 Lactobacillus species where identified in the salami from different producers, while the whole data set obtained accounted for 13 main families and 98 rare ones, 23 of which were present in at least 10% of the investigated samples, with casings being the major sources of the observed diversity. Multivariate analyses also showed that batches from 6 local producers tend to cluster altogether after 21 days of ripening, thus indicating that HTS has the potential

  6. Impact of aerosol on post-frontal convective clouds over Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rieger

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We carried out simulations with predefined and simulated aerosol distributions in order to investigate the improvement in the forecasting capabilities of an operational weather forecast model by the use of an improved aerosol representation. This study focuses on convective cumulus clouds developing after the passage of a cold front on 25 April 2008 over Germany. The northerly flow after the cold front leads to increased sea salt aerosol concentrations compared to prefrontal conditions. High aerosol number concentrations are simulated in the interactive scenario representing typically polluted conditions. Nevertheless, due to the presence of sea salt particles, effective radii of cloud droplets reach values typical of pristine clouds (between 7 µm and 13 µm at the same time. Compared to the predefined continental and maritime aerosol scenarios, the simulated aerosol distribution leads to a significant change in cloud properties such as cloud droplet radii and number concentrations. Averaged over the domain covered by the convective cumuli clouds, we found a systematic decrease in precipitation with increasing aerosol number concentrations. Differences in cloud cover, short wave radiation and cloud top heights are buffered by systematic differences in precipitation and the related diabatic effects. Comparisons with measured precipitation show good agreement for the interactive aerosol scenario as well as for the extreme maritime aerosol scenario.

  7. QSO ABSORPTION SYSTEMS DETECTED IN Ne VIII: HIGH-METALLICITY CLOUDS WITH A LARGE EFFECTIVE CROSS SECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meiring, J. D.; Tripp, T. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Werk, J. K.; Prochaska, J. X. [University of California Observatories-Lick Observatory, UC Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Howk, J. C. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Jenkins, E. B. [Princeton University Observatory, Peyton Hall, Ivy Lane, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Lehner, N.; Sembach, K. R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2013-04-10

    Using high-resolution, high signal-to-noise ultraviolet spectra of the z{sub em} = 0.9754 quasar PG1148+549 obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on the Hubble Space Telescope, we study the physical conditions and abundances of Ne VIII+O VI absorption line systems at z{sub abs} = 0.68381, 0.70152, 0.72478. In addition to Ne VIII and O VI, absorption lines from multiple ionization stages of oxygen (O II, O III, O IV) are detected and are well aligned with the more highly ionized species. We show that these absorbers are multiphase systems including hot gas (T Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 5.7} K) that produces Ne VIII and O VI, and the gas metallicity of the cool phase ranges from Z = 0.3 Z{sub Sun} to supersolar. The cool ( Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 4} K) phases have densities n{sub H} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} and small sizes (<4 kpc); these cool clouds are likely to expand and dissipate, and the Ne VIII may be within a transition layer between the cool gas and a surrounding, much hotter medium. The Ne VIII redshift density, dN/dz{approx}7{sup +7}{sub -3}, requires a large number of these clouds for every L > 0.1 L* galaxy and a large effective absorption cross section ({approx}> 100 kpc), and indeed, we find a star-forming {approx}L {sup *} galaxy at the redshift of the z{sub abs} = 0.72478 system, at an impact parameter of 217 kpc. Multiphase absorbers like these Ne VIII systems are likely to be an important reservoir of baryons and metals in the circumgalactic media of galaxies.

  8. Research on cloud computing solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liudvikas Kaklauskas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing can be defined as a new style of computing in which dynamically scala-ble and often virtualized resources are provided as a services over the Internet. Advantages of the cloud computing technology include cost savings, high availability, and easy scalability. Voas and Zhang adapted six phases of computing paradigms, from dummy termi-nals/mainframes, to PCs, networking computing, to grid and cloud computing. There are four types of cloud computing: public cloud, private cloud, hybrid cloud and community. The most common and well-known deployment model is Public Cloud. A Private Cloud is suited for sensitive data, where the customer is dependent on a certain degree of security.According to the different types of services offered, cloud computing can be considered to consist of three layers (services models: IaaS (infrastructure as a service, PaaS (platform as a service, SaaS (software as a service. Main cloud computing solutions: web applications, data hosting, virtualization, database clusters and terminal services. The advantage of cloud com-puting is the ability to virtualize and share resources among different applications with the objective for better server utilization and without a clustering solution, a service may fail at the moment the server crashes.DOI: 10.15181/csat.v2i2.914

  9. High and Intermediate-Mass Young Stellar Objects in the Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Gruendl, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    (Abridged) Photometry of archival Spitzer observations of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) are used to search for young stellar objects (YSOs). Simple mid-infrared selection criteria were used to exclude most normal and evolved stars and background galaxies. We identify a sample of 2,910 sources in the LMC that could potentially be YSOs. We then simultaneously considered images and photometry from the optical through mid-IR wavelengths to assess the source morphology, spectral energy distribution (SED), and the surrounding interstellar environment to determine the most likely nature of each source. From this examination of the initial sample, we suggest 1,172 sources are most likely YSOs and 1,075 probable background galaxies, consistent with expectations based on SWIRE survey data. Spitzer IRS observations of 269 of the brightest YSOs from our sample have confirmed that ~>95% are indeed YSOs. A comprehensive search for YSOs in the LMC has also been carried out by the SAGE team. There are three major differen...

  10. [Optimization of sample pretreatment method for the determination of typical artificial sweeteners in soil by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Biting; Gan, Zhiwei; Hu, Hongwei; Sun, Hongwen

    2014-09-01

    The sample pretreatment method for the determination of four typical artificial sweeteners (ASs) including sucralose, saccharin, cyclamate, and acesulfame in soil by high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) was optimized. Different conditions of extraction, including four extractants (methanol, acetonitrile, acetone, deionized water), three kinds of ionic strength of sodium acetate solution (0.001, 0.01, 0.1 mol/L), four pH values (3, 4, 5 and 6) of 0.01 mol/L acetate-sodium acetate solution, four set durations of extraction (20, 40, 60, 120 min) and number of extraction times (1, 2, 3, 4 times) were compared. The optimal sample pretreatment method was finally set up. The sam- ples were extracted twice with 25 mL 0.01 mol/L sodium acetate solution (pH 4) for 20 min per cycle. The extracts were combined and then purified and concentrated by CNW Poly-Sery PWAX cartridges with methanol containing 1 mmol/L tris (hydroxymethyl) amino methane (Tris) and 5% (v/v) ammonia hydroxide as eluent. The analytes were determined by HPLC-MS/MS. The recoveries were obtained by spiked soil with the four artificial sweeteners at 1, 10, 100 μg/kg (dry weight), separately. The average recoveries of the analytes ranged from 86.5% to 105%. The intra-day and inter-day precisions expressed as relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range of 2.56%-5.94% and 3.99%-6.53%, respectively. Good linearities (r2 > 0.995) were observed between 1-100 μg/kg (dry weight) for all the compounds. The limits of detection were 0.01-0.21 kg/kg and the limits of quantification were 0.03-0.70 μg/kg for the analytes. The four artificial sweeteners were determined in soil samples from farmland contaminated by wastewater in Tianjin. This method is rapid, reliable, and suitable for the investigation of artificial sweeteners in soil.

  11. Cloud Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Antonopoulos, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Cloud computing has recently emerged as a subject of substantial industrial and academic interest, though its meaning and scope is hotly debated. For some researchers, clouds are a natural evolution towards the full commercialisation of grid systems, while others dismiss the term as a mere re-branding of existing pay-per-use technologies. From either perspective, 'cloud' is now the label of choice for accountable pay-per-use access to third party applications and computational resources on a massive scale. Clouds support patterns of less predictable resource use for applications and services a

  12. Global retrieval of ATSR cloud parameters and evaluation (GRAPE: dataset assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Sayer

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Along-Track Scanning Radiometers (ATSRs provide a long time-series of measurements suitable for the retrieval of cloud properties. This work evaluates the freely-available Global Retrieval of ATSR Cloud Parameters and Evaluation (GRAPE dataset (version 3 created from the ATSR-2 (1995–2003 and Advanced ATSR (AATSR; 2002 onwards records. Users are recommended to consider only retrievals flagged as high-quality, where there is a good consistency between the measurements and the retrieved state (corresponding to about 60% of converged retrievals over sea, and more than 80% over land. Cloud properties are found to be generally free of any significant spurious trends relating to satellite zenith angle. Estimates of the random error on retrieved cloud properties are suggested to be generally appropriate for optically-thick clouds, and up to a factor of two too small for optically-thin cases. The correspondence between ATSR-2 and AATSR cloud properties is high, but a relative calibration difference between the sensors of order 5–10% at 660 nm and 870 nm limits the potential of the current version of the dataset for trend analysis. As ATSR-2 is thought to have the better absolute calibration, the discussion focusses on this portion of the record. Cloud-top heights from GRAPE compare well to ground-based data at four sites, particularly for shallow clouds. Clouds forming in boundary-layer inversions are typically around 1 km too high in GRAPE due to poorly-resolved inversions in the modelled temperature profiles used. Global cloud fields are compared to satellite products derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP measurements, and a climatology of liquid water content derived from satellite microwave radiometers. In all cases the main reasons for differences are linked to differing sensitivity to, and treatment of, multi-layer cloud systems. The correlation

  13. Global retrieval of ATSR cloud parameters and evaluation (GRAPE: dataset assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Sayer

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The Along-Track Scanning Radiometers (ATSRs provide a long time-series of measurements suitable for the retrieval of cloud properties. This work evaluates the freely-available Global Retrieval of ATSR Cloud Parameters and Evaluation (GRAPE dataset (version 3 created from the ATSR-2 (1995–2003 and Advanced ATSR (AATSR; 2002 onwards records. Users are recommended to consider only retrievals flagged as high-quality, where there is a good consistency between the measurements and the retrieved state (corresponding to about 60% of converged retrievals over sea, and more than 80% over land. Cloud properties are found to be generally free of any significant spurious trends relating to satellite zenith angle. Estimates of the random error on retrieved cloud properties are suggested to be generally appropriate for optically-thick clouds, and up to a factor of two too small for optically-thin cases. The correspondence between ATSR-2 and AATSR cloud properties is high, but a relative calibration difference between the sensors of order 5–10% at 660 nm and 870 nm limits the potential of the current version of the dataset for trend analysis. As ATSR-2 is thought to have the better absolute calibration, the discussion focusses on this portion of the record. Cloud-top heights from GRAPE compare well to ground-based data at four sites, particularly for shallow clouds. Clouds forming in boundary-layer inversions are typically around 1 km too high in GRAPE due to poorly-resolved inversions in the modelled temperature profiles used. Global cloud fields are compared to satellite products derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP measurements, and a climatology of liquid water content derived from satellite microwave radiometers. In all cases the main reasons for differences are linked to differing sensitivity to, and treatment of, multi-layer cloud systems. The correlation

  14. Determination of frequencies of oscillations of cloud cavitation on a 2-D hydro- foil from high-speed camera observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Patrik ZIMA; Tom FRST; Milan SEDL; Martin KOMREK; Rostislav HUZLK

    2016-01-01

    A method is presented to determine significant frequencies of oscillations of cavitation structures from high-speed camera recordings of a flow around a 2-D hydrofoil. The top view of the suction side of an NACA 2412 hydrofoil is studied in a transparent test section of a cavitation tunnel for selected cloud cavitation regimes with strong oscillations induced by the leading-edge cavity shedding. The ability of the method to accurately determine the dominant oscillation frequencies is confirmed by pressure measure- ments. The method can resolve subtle flow characteristics that are not visible to the naked eye. The method can be used for non- invasive experimental studies of oscillations in cavitating flows with adequate visual access when pressure measurements are not available or when such measurements would disturb the flow.

  15. Determination of trace mercury species by high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry after cloud point extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haiting; Chen, Jianguo; Jin, Xianzhong; Wei, Danyi

    2009-12-30

    A sensitive method for speciation analysis of inorganic mercury (Hg(2+)) and methyl mercury (MeHg(+)) has been developed by using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) combined with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after cloud point extraction. The analytes were complexed with sodium diethyldithiocarbamate (DDTC) and preconcentrated by a non-ionic surfactant Triton X-114. Mercury species were effectively separated by HPLC in less than 6 min. The enhancement factors for 25 mL sample solution were 42 and 21, and the limits of detection were 4 and 10 ng L(-1) for Hg(2+) and MeHg(+), respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to the determination of trace amount of mercury species in environmental and biological samples.

  16. A case study for cloud based high throughput analysis of NGS data using the globus genomics system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvaneshwar, Krithika; Sulakhe, Dinanath; Gauba, Robinder; Rodriguez, Alex; Madduri, Ravi; Dave, Utpal; Lacinski, Lukasz; Foster, Ian; Gusev, Yuriy; Madhavan, Subha

    2015-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies produce massive amounts of data requiring a powerful computational infrastructure, high quality bioinformatics software, and skilled personnel to operate the tools. We present a case study of a practical solution to this data management and analysis challenge that simplifies terabyte scale data handling and provides advanced tools for NGS data analysis. These capabilities are implemented using the "Globus Genomics" system, which is an enhanced Galaxy workflow system made available as a service that offers users the capability to process and transfer data easily, reliably and quickly to address end-to-endNGS analysis requirements. The Globus Genomics system is built on Amazon 's cloud computing infrastructure. The system takes advantage of elastic scaling of compute resources to run multiple workflows in parallel and it also helps meet the scale-out analysis needs of modern translational genomics research.

  17. A case study for cloud based high throughput analysis of NGS data using the globus genomics system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krithika Bhuvaneshwar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing (NGS technologies produce massive amounts of data requiring a powerful computational infrastructure, high quality bioinformatics software, and skilled personnel to operate the tools. We present a case study of a practical solution to this data management and analysis challenge that simplifies terabyte scale data handling and provides advanced tools for NGS data analysis. These capabilities are implemented using the “Globus Genomics” system, which is an enhanced Galaxy workflow system made available as a service that offers users the capability to process and transfer data easily, reliably and quickly to address end-to-endNGS analysis requirements. The Globus Genomics system is built on Amazon's cloud computing infrastructure. The system takes advantage of elastic scaling of compute resources to run multiple workflows in parallel and it also helps meet the scale-out analysis needs of modern translational genomics research.

  18. High altitude clouds impacts on the design of optical feeder link and optical ground station network for future broadband satellite services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulenard, S.; Ruellan, M.; Roy, B.; Riédi, J.; Parol, F.; Rissons, A.

    2014-03-01

    Optical links at 1.55μm are envisaged to cope with the increasing capacity demand from geostationary telecom satellite operators without the need of Radio Frequency (RF) coordination. Due to clouds blockages, site diversity techniques based on a network of Optical Ground Stations (OGS) are necessary to reach the commonly required link availability (e.g. 99.9% over the year). Evaluation of the N Optical Ground Station Network (N-OGSN) availability is based on Clouds Masks (CMs) and depends on the clouds attenuation taken in the optical communication budget link. In particular, low attenuation of high semitransparent clouds (i.e. cirrus) could be incorporated into the budget link at the price of larger or more powerful optical terminals. In this paper, we present a method for the calibration of the attenuation at 1.55 μm of high semitransparent clouds. We perform OGS localization optimization in Europe and we find that the incorporation of thin cirrus attenuation in the budget link reduces by 20% the number of handover (i.e. switches OGS) and the handover rate. It is also shown that the minimum number of station required in Europe to reach 99.9% link availability is 10 to 11. When the zone of research is enlarged the Africa, this number is reduced to 3 to 4.

  19. ``Missing'' cloud condensation nuclei in peat smoke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, U.; Frank, G. P.; Helas, G.; Iinuma, Y.; Zeromskiene, K.; Gwaze, P.; Hennig, T.; Massling, A.; Schmid, O.; Herrmann, H.; Wiedensohler, A.; Andreae, M. O.

    2005-06-01

    We characterized particulate emissions from vegetation fires by burning Indonesian and German peat and other biomass fuels in a controlled laboratory setting. By measuring cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) both as a function of particle diameter (dp) and supersaturation (S), we discovered particles in peat smoke that were not activated to cloud droplets at high S (1.6%). These hydrophobic particles were present predominantly in the size range of dp > 200 nm, where typical wood burning particles are activated at S < 0.3%. Ambient measurements during the 1997 Indonesian peat fires suggested that peat smoke particles are highly soluble and therefore efficient CCN. Our CCN measurements performed on fresh smoke from peat samples of the same area suggest that these Indonesian smoke particles probably acquired soluble material through chemical processing in the atmosphere. Freshly emitted peat smoke particles are at least partially not very efficient CCN.

  20. High-speed observation of bubble cloud generation near a rigid wall by second-harmonic superimposed ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Shin; Yasuda, Jun; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2013-08-01

    Cavitation bubbles are known to accelerate therapeutic effects of ultrasound. Although negative acoustic pressure is the principle factor of cavitation, positive acoustic pressure has a role for bubble cloud formation at a high intensity of focused ultrasound when cavitation bubbles provide pressure release surfaces converting the pressure from highly positive to negative. In this study, the second-harmonic was superimposed onto the fundamental acoustic pressure to emphasize either peak positive or negative pressure. The peak negative and positive pressure emphasized waves were focused on a surface of an aluminum block. Cavitation bubbles induced near the block were observed with a high-speed camera by backlight and the size of the cavitation generation region was measured from the high-speed images. The negative pressure emphasized waves showed an advantage in cavitation inception over the positive pressure emphasized waves. In the sequence of the negative pressure emphasized waves immediately followed by the positive pressure emphasized waves, cavitation bubbles were generated on the block by the former waves and the cavitation region were expanded toward the transducer in the latter waves with high reproducibility. The sequence demonstrated its potential usefulness in enhancing the effects of therapeutic ultrasound at a high acoustic intensity.

  1. Statistical properties of cloud lifecycles in cloud-resolving models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Plant

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A new technique is described for the analysis of cloud-resolving model simulations, which allows one to investigate the statistics of the lifecycles of cumulus clouds. Clouds are tracked from timestep-to-timestep within the model run. This allows for a very simple method of tracking, but one which is both comprehensive and robust. An approach for handling cloud splits and mergers is described which allows clouds with simple and complicated time histories to be compared within a single framework. This is found to be important for the analysis of an idealized simulation of radiative-convective equilibrium, in which the moist, buoyant, updrafts (i.e., the convective cores were tracked. Around half of all such cores were subject to splits and mergers during their lifecycles. For cores without any such events, the average lifetime is 30 min, but events can lengthen the typical lifetime considerably.

  2. Managing Clouds in Cloud Platforms

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmat, Kamal A

    2010-01-01

    Managing cloud services is a fundamental challenge in todays virtualized environments. These challenges equally face both providers and consumers of cloud services. The issue becomes even more challenging in virtualized environments that support mobile clouds. Cloud computing platforms such as Amazon EC2 provide customers with flexible, on demand resources at low cost. However, they fail to provide seamless infrastructure management and monitoring capabilities that many customers may need. For instance, Amazon EC2 doesn't fully support cloud services automated discovery and it requires a private set of authentication credentials. Salesforce.com, on the other hand, do not provide monitoring access to their underlying systems. Moreover, these systems fail to provide infrastructure monitoring of heterogenous and legacy systems that don't support agents. In this work, we explore how to build a cloud management system that combines heterogeneous management of virtual resources with comprehensive management of phys...

  3. CLOUD–CLOUD COLLISION AS A TRIGGER OF THE HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION: A MOLECULAR LINE STUDY IN RCW 120

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torii, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Hattori, Y.; Sano, H.; Ohama, A.; Yamamoto, H.; Tachihara, K.; Soga, S.; Shimizu, S.; Fukui, Y. [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Okuda, T.; Mizuno, N. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Onishi, T. [Department of Astrophysics, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Mizuno, A., E-mail: torii@a.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2015-06-10

    RCW 120 is a Galactic H ii region that has a beautiful ring shape that is bright in the infrared. Our new CO J = 1–0 and J = 3–2 observations performed with the NANTEN2, Mopra, and ASTE telescopes have revealed that two molecular clouds with a velocity separation of 20 km s{sup −1} are both physically associated with RCW 120. The cloud at −8 km s{sup −1} apparently traces the infrared ring, while the other cloud at −28 km s{sup −1} is distributed just outside the opening of the infrared ring, interacting with the H ii region as suggested by the high kinetic temperature of the molecular gas and by the complementary distribution with the ionized gas. A spherically expanding shell driven by the H ii region is usually considered to be the origin of the observed ring structure in RCW 120. Our observations, however, indicate no evidence of the expanding motion in the velocity space, which is inconsistent with the expanding shell model. We postulate an alternative that, by applying the model introduced by Habe and Ohta, the exciting O star in RCW 120 was formed by a collision between the present two clouds at a collision velocity of ∼30 km s{sup −1}. In the model, the observed infrared ring can be interpreted as the cavity created in the larger cloud by the collision, whose inner surface is illuminated by the strong ultraviolet radiation after the birth of the O star. We discuss that the present cloud–cloud collision scenario explains the observed signatures of RCW 120, i.e., its ring morphology, coexistence of the two clouds and their large velocity separation, and absence of the expanding motion.

  4. Birds of a high-altitude cloud forest in Alta Verapaz, Guatemala

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knut Eisermann

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The Northern Central American Highlands have been recognized as endemic bird area, but little is known about bird communities in Guatemalan cloud forests. From 1997 to 2001 a total of 142 bird species were recorded between 2 000 and 2 400 masl in cloud forest and agricultural clearings on Montaña Caquipec (Alta Verapaz, Guatemala. The bird community is described based on line transect counts within the forest. Pooling census data from undisturbed and disturbed forest, the Gray-breasted Wood-Wren (Henicorhina leucophrys was found to be the most abundant species, followed in descending order by the Common Bush-Tanager (Chlorospingus ophthalmicus, the Paltry Tyrannulet (Zimmerius vilissimus, the Yellowish Flycatcher (Empidonax flavescens, the Ruddy-capped Nightingale-Thrush (Catharus frantzii, and the Amethyst-throated Hummingbird (Lampornis amethystinus. Bird communities in undisturbed and disturbed forest were found to be similar (Sørensen similarity index 0.85, indicating low human impact. Of all recorded species, ~27% were Nearctic-Neotropical migratory birds. The most abundant one was the Wilson’s Warbler (Wilsonia pusilla. The Montaña Caquipec is an important area for bird conservation, which is indicated by the presence of four species listed in the IUCN Red List (Highland Guan Penelopina nigra, Resplendent Quetzal Pharomachrus mocinno, Pink-headed Warbler Ergaticus versicolor, Golden-cheeked Warbler Dendroica chrysoparia, and 42 Mesoamerican endemics, of which 14 species are endemic to the Central American Highlands. The results presented here will be useful as baseline data for a long-term monitoring. Rev. Biol. Trop. 53(3-4: 577-594. Epub 2005 Oct 3.Las alturas del norte de Centroamérica han sido reconocidas como región de aves endémicas, pero se conoce poco sobre las comunidades de aves en bosques nubosos de Guatemala. De 1997 a 2001 se han detectado 142 especies de aves entre 2 000 y 2 400 msnm en el bosque nuboso y áreas agr

  5. A Typical Synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Noort, Thomas; Achten, Peter; Plasmeijer, Rinus

    We present a typical synergy between dynamic types (dynamics) and generalised algebraic datatypes (GADTs). The former provides a clean approach to integrating dynamic typing in a statically typed language. It allows values to be wrapped together with their type in a uniform package, deferring type unification until run time using a pattern match annotated with the desired type. The latter allows for the explicit specification of constructor types, as to enforce their structural validity. In contrast to ADTs, GADTs are heterogeneous structures since each constructor type is implicitly universally quantified. Unfortunately, pattern matching only enforces structural validity and does not provide instantiation information on polymorphic types. Consequently, functions that manipulate such values, such as a type-safe update function, are cumbersome due to boilerplate type representation administration. In this paper we focus on improving such functions by providing a new GADT annotation via a natural synergy with dynamics. We formally define the semantics of the annotation and touch on novel other applications of this technique such as type dispatching and enforcing type equality invariants on GADT values.

  6. A prototype Infrastructure for Cloud-based distributed services in High Availability over WAN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulfon, C.; Carlino, G.; De Salvo, A.; Doria, A.; Graziosi, C.; Pardi, S.; Sanchez, A.; Carboni, M.; Bolletta, P.; Puccio, L.; Capone, V.; Merola, L.

    2015-12-01

    In this work we present the architectural and performance studies concerning a prototype of a distributed Tier2 infrastructure for HEP, instantiated between the two Italian sites of INFN-Romal and INFN-Napoli. The network infrastructure is based on a Layer-2 geographical link, provided by the Italian NREN (GARR), directly connecting the two remote LANs of the named sites. By exploiting the possibilities offered by the new distributed file systems, a shared storage area with synchronous copy has been set up. The computing infrastructure, based on an OpenStack facility, is using a set of distributed Hypervisors installed in both sites. The main parameter to be taken into account when managing two remote sites with a single framework is the effect of the latency, due to the distance and the end-to-end service overhead. In order to understand the capabilities and limits of our setup, the impact of latency has been investigated by means of a set of stress tests, including data I/O throughput, metadata access performance evaluation and network occupancy, during the life cycle of a Virtual Machine. A set of resilience tests has also been performed, in order to verify the stability of the system on the event of hardware or software faults. The results of this work show that the reliability and robustness of the chosen architecture are effective enough to build a production system and to provide common services. This prototype can also be extended to multiple sites with small changes of the network topology, thus creating a National Network of Cloud-based distributed services, in HA over WAN.

  7. MORPHOLOGY CATEGORY OF GEOMAGNETIC STORMS AND CHARACTERISTICS OF INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC CLOUDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章公亮

    1991-01-01

    Six typical geomagnetic storms are analyzed from the aspect of varieties of morphologycategories of magnetic storms with sudden commencement caused by interplanetary magneticclouds. The main conclusions obtained are drawn. The high-density structure in front ofmagnetic cloud is an important factor in determining the property of the initial phase ofgeomagnetic storm. Under similar conditions for the magnetic field of magnetic cloud, thevelocities of both the background solar wind and the magnetic cloud affect the developmentand intensity of magnetic storm. The onset and recovery of strong main phase are control-led by the orientation of the field vector inclination with respect to the ecliptic plane. Oneof the main features of the storm generated from a positive magnetic cloud is the long-delayed main phase. The solar wind streams behind the magnetic cloud keep affecting therecovery of main phase of magnetic storm.

  8. Cloud Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswami, Rama; Raths, David; Schaffhauser, Dian; Skelly, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    For many IT shops, the cloud offers an opportunity not only to improve operations but also to align themselves more closely with their schools' strategic goals. The cloud is not a plug-and-play proposition, however--it is a complex, evolving landscape that demands one's full attention. Security, privacy, contracts, and contingency planning are all…

  9. Cloud Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    This article features a major statewide initiative in North Carolina that is showing how a consortium model can minimize risks for districts and help them exploit the advantages of cloud computing. Edgecombe County Public Schools in Tarboro, North Carolina, intends to exploit a major cloud initiative being refined in the state and involving every…

  10. Cloud Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Mirashe, Shivaji P

    2010-01-01

    Computing as you know it is about to change, your applications and documents are going to move from the desktop into the cloud. I'm talking about cloud computing, where applications and files are hosted on a "cloud" consisting of thousands of computers and servers, all linked together and accessible via the Internet. With cloud computing, everything you do is now web based instead of being desktop based. You can access all your programs and documents from any computer that's connected to the Internet. How will cloud computing change the way you work? For one thing, you're no longer tied to a single computer. You can take your work anywhere because it's always accessible via the web. In addition, cloud computing facilitates group collaboration, as all group members can access the same programs and documents from wherever they happen to be located. Cloud computing might sound far-fetched, but chances are you're already using some cloud applications. If you're using a web-based email program, such as Gmail or Ho...

  11. Interstellar molecular clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bally, J.

    1986-04-01

    The physical properties of the molecular phase of the interstellar medium are studied with regard to star formation and the structure of the Galaxy. Most observations of molecular clouds are made with single-dish, high-surface precision radio telescopes, with the best resolution attainable at 0.2 to 1 arcmin; the smallest structures that can be resolved are of order 10 to the 17th cm in diameter. It is now believed that: (1) most of the mass of the Galaxy is in the form of giant molecular clouds; (2) the largest clouds and those responsible for most massive star formation are concentrated in spiral arms; (3) the molecular clouds are the sites of perpetual star formation, and are significant in the chemical evolution of the Galaxy; (4) giant molecular clouds determine the evolution of the kinematic properties of galactic disk stars; (5) the total gas content is diminishing with time; and (6) most clouds have supersonic internal motions and do not form stars on a free-fall time scale. It is concluded that though progress has been made, more advanced instruments are needed to inspect the processes operating within stellar nurseries and to study the distribution of the molecular clouds in more distant galaxies. Instruments presently under construction which are designed to meet these ends are presented.

  12. Cloud Security: Issues and Research Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-18

    al. present two storage isolation schemes that enable cloud users with high security requirements to verify that their disk storage is isolated from...Proof of Isolation for Cloud Storage Zhan Wang, Kun Sun, Sushil Jajodia, and Jiwu Jing 6. Selective and Fine-Grained Access to Data in the Cloud ... Cloud Security: Issues and Research Directions We organized an invitational workshop at George Mason University on Cloud Security: Issues and Research

  13. High-resolution ice nucleation spectra of sea-ice bacteria: implications for cloud formation and life in frozen environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Junge

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Even though studies of Arctic ice forming particles suggest that a bacterial or viral source derived from open leads could be important for ice formation in Arctic clouds (Bigg and Leck, 2001, the ice nucleation potential of most polar marine psychrophiles or viruses has not been examined under conditions more closely resembling those in the atmosphere. In this paper, we examined the ice nucleation activity (INA of several representative Arctic and Antarctic sea-ice bacterial isolates and a polar Colwellia phage virus. High-resolution ice nucleation spectra were obtained for droplets containing bacterial cells or virus particles using a free-fall freezing tube technique. The fraction of frozen droplets at a particular droplet temperature was determined by measuring the depolarized light scattering intensity from solution droplets in free-fall. Our experiments revealed that all sea-ice isolates and the virus nucleated ice at temperatures very close to the homogeneous nucleation temperature for the nucleation medium – which for artificial seawater was –42.2±0.3°C. Our results suggest that immersion freezing of these marine psychro-active bacteria and viruses would not be important for heterogeneous ice nucleation processes in polar clouds or to the formation of sea ice. These results also suggested that avoidance of ice formation in close proximity to cell surfaces might be one of the cold-adaptation and survival strategies for sea-ice bacteria. The fact that INA occurs at such low temperature could constitute one factor that explains the persistence of metabolic activities at temperatures far below the freezing point of seawater.

  14. High-resolution ice nucleation spectra of sea-ice bacteria: implications for cloud formation and life in frozen environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Junge

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Even though studies of Arctic ice forming particles suggest that a bacterial or viral source derived from open leads could be important for cloud formation in the Arctic (Bigg and Leck, 2001, the ice nucleation potential of most polar marine psychrophiles or viruses has not been examined under conditions more closely resembling those in the atmosphere. In this paper, we examined the ice nucleation activity (INA of several representative Arctic and Antarctic sea-ice bacterial isolates and a polar Colwellia phage virus. High-resolution ice nucleation spectra were obtained for droplets containing bacterial cells or virus particles using a free-fall freezing tube technique. The fraction of frozen droplets at a particular droplet temperature was determined by measuring the depolarized light scattering intensity from solution droplets in free-fall. Our experiments revealed that all sea-ice isolates and the virus nucleated ice at temperatures very close to the homogeneous nucleation temperature for the nucleation medium – which for artificial seawater was −42.2±0.3°C. Our results indicated that these marine psychro-active bacteria and viruses are not important for heterogeneous ice nucleation processes in sea ice or polar clouds. These results also suggested that avoidance of ice formation in close proximity to cell surfaces might be one of the cold-adaptation and survival strategies for sea-ice bacteria. The fact that INA occurs at such low temperature could constitute one factor that explains the persistence of metabolic activities at temperatures far below the freezing point of seawater.

  15. Parameterization and analysis of 3-D radiative transfer in clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varnai, Tamas

    2012-03-16

    This report provides a summary of major accomplishments from the project. The project examines the impact of radiative interactions between neighboring atmospheric columns, for example clouds scattering extra sunlight toward nearby clear areas. While most current cloud models don't consider these interactions and instead treat sunlight in each atmospheric column separately, the resulting uncertainties have remained unknown. This project has provided the first estimates on the way average solar heating is affected by interactions between nearby columns. These estimates have been obtained by combining several years of cloud observations at three DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility sites (in Alaska, Oklahoma, and Papua New Guinea) with simulations of solar radiation around the observed clouds. The importance of radiative interactions between atmospheric columns was evaluated by contrasting simulations that included the interactions with those that did not. This study provides lower-bound estimates for radiative interactions: It cannot consider interactions in cross-wind direction, because it uses two-dimensional vertical cross-sections through clouds that were observed by instruments looking straight up as clouds drifted aloft. Data from new DOE scanning radars will allow future radiative studies to consider the full three-dimensional nature of radiative processes. The results reveal that two-dimensional radiative interactions increase overall day-and-night average solar heating by about 0.3, 1.2, and 4.1 Watts per meter square at the three sites, respectively. This increase grows further if one considers that most large-domain cloud simulations have resolutions that cannot specify small-scale cloud variability. For example, the increases in solar heating mentioned above roughly double for a fairly typical model resolution of 1 km. The study also examined the factors that shape radiative interactions between atmospheric columns

  16. Cloud Forensics Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Cloud Computing , Forensics , IT Security, Standards, Monitoring, Virtualization. I. INTRODUCTION LOUD computing has come to mean many different...an efficient re-allocation of resources. VI. ACCOUNTABILITY, MONITORING AND FORENSICS The goal of computer forensics is to perform a structured...away from the concept of cloud computing [12 - 14]. We believe, however, that a precise statement of the high assurance and forensics requirements

  17. The frequency and nature of `cloud-cloud collisions' in galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, C. L.; Pringle, J. E.; Duarte-Cabral, A.

    2015-02-01

    We investigate cloud-cloud collisions and giant molecular cloud evolution in hydrodynamic simulations of isolated galaxies. The simulations include heating and cooling of the interstellar medium (ISM), self-gravity and stellar feedback. Over time-scales scales is more complex and involves a greater fraction of intercloud material. We find that mergers or collisions occur every 8-10 Myr (1/15th of an orbit) in a simulation with spiral arms, and once every 28 Myr (1/5th of an orbit) with no imposed spiral arms. Both figures are higher than expected from analytic estimates, as clouds are not uniformly distributed in the galaxy. Thus, clouds can be expected to undergo between zero and a few collisions over their lifetime. We present specific examples of cloud-cloud interactions in our results, including synthetic CO maps. We would expect cloud-cloud interactions to be observable, but find they appear to have little or no impact on the ISM. Due to a combination of the clouds' typical geometries, and moderate velocity dispersions, cloud-cloud interactions often better resemble a smaller cloud nudging a larger cloud. Our findings are consistent with the view that spiral arms make little difference to overall star formation rates in galaxies, and we see no evidence that collisions likely produce massive clusters. However, to confirm the outcome of such massive cloud collisions we ideally need higher resolution simulations.

  18. Investigation of the effective peak supersaturation for liquid-phase clouds at the high-alpine site Jungfraujoch, Switzerland (3580 m a.s.l.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hammer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aerosols influence the Earth's radiation budget directly through absorption and scattering of solar radiation in the atmosphere but also indirectly by modifying the properties of clouds. However, climate models still suffer from large uncertainties as a result of insufficient understanding of aerosol-cloud interactions. At the high altitude research station Jungfraujoch (JFJ; 3580 m a.s.l., Switzerland cloud condensation nuclei (CCN number concentrations at eight different supersaturations (SS from 0.24% to 1.18% were measured using a CCN counter during Summer 2011. Simultaneously, in-situ aerosol activation properties of the prevailing ambient clouds were investigated by measuring the total and interstitial (non-activated dry particle number size distributions behind two different inlet systems. Combining all experimental data, a new method was developed to retrieve the so-called effective peak supersaturation SSpeak, as a measure of the SS at which ambient clouds are formed. A 17-month CCN climatology was then used to retrieve the SSpeak values also for four earlier summer campaigns (2000, 2002, 2004 and 2010 where no direct CCN data were available. The SSpeak values varied between 0.01% and 2.0% during all campaigns. An overall median SSpeak of 0.35% and dry activation diameter of 87 nm was observed. It was found that the difference in topography between northwest and southeast plays an important role for the effective peak supersaturation in clouds formed in the vicinity of the JFJ, while differences in the number concentration of potential CCN only play a minor role. Results show that air masses coming from the southeast (with the slowly rising terrain of the Aletsch Glacier generally experience lower SSpeak values than air masses coming from the northwest (steep slope. The observed overall median values were 0.41% and 0.22% for northwest and southeast wind conditions, respectively, corresponding to literature values for cumulus clouds and

  19. Arctic Clouds and Sea Ice Inhomogeneities and Plane-parallel Biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozwadowska, A.; Cahalan, R. F.

    increase in the mean surface albedo. Moreover, Arctic all-liquid stratus is typically much more uniform than its lower latitude counterpart. Therefore biases in the Arctic are mainly related to the variability in surface albedo, with the largest magnitude coming from highly reflective and variable sea ice surfaces. In the case of the transmittance bias, optically thicker and more variable clouds also contribute to the high relative bias magnitude. The cloud contribution to the albedo bias is negligible when surface albedo is high; however over a dark surface, variable and thick cloud may result in albedo bias of larger magnitude.

  20. Cloud Infrastructure Service Management - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Anasuya Threse Innocent

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The new era of computing called Cloud Computing allows the user to access the cloud services dynamically over the Internet wherever and whenever needed. Cloud consists of data and resources; and the cloud services include the delivery of software, infrastructure, applications, and storage over the Internet based on user demand through Internet. In short, cloud computing is a business and economic model allowing the users to utilize high-end computing and storage virtually with minimal infrastructure on their end. Cloud has three service models namely, Cloud Software-as-a-Service (SaaS, Cloud Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS, and Cloud Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS. This paper talks in depth of cloud infrastructure service management.

  1. Si iv Column Densities Predicted from Non-Equilibrium Ionization Simulations of Turbulent Mixing Layers and High-Velocity Clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Kwak, Kyujin; Henley, David B

    2015-01-01

    We present predictions of the Si iv ions in turbulent mixing layers (TMLs) between hot and cool gas and in cool high-velocity clouds (HVCs) that travel through a hot halo, complementing the C iv, N v, and O vi predictions in Kwak & Shelton, Kwak et al., and Henley et al. We find that the Si iv ions are most abundant in regions where the hot and cool gases first begin to mix or where the mixed gas has cooled significantly. The predicted column densities of high velocity Si iv and the predicted ratios of Si iv to C iv and O vi found on individual sightlines in our HVC simulations are in good agreement with observations of high velocity gas. Low velocity Si iv is also seen in the simulations, as a result of decelerated gas in the case of the HVC simulations and when looking along directions that pass perpendicular to the direction of motion in the TML simulations. The ratios of low velocity Si iv to C iv and O vi in the TML simulations are in good agreement with those recorded for Milky Way halo gas, while t...

  2. Securing Cloud from Cloud Drain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niva Das

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Today, in the world of communication, connected systems is growing at a rapid pace. To accommodate this growth the need for computational power and storage is also increasing at a similar rate. Companies are investing a large amount of resources in buying, maintaining and ensuring availability of the system to their customers. To mitigate these issues, cloud computing is playing a major role [1]. The underlying concept of cloud computing dates back to the ‘50s but the term entering into widespread usage can be traced to 2006 when Amazon.com announced the Elastic Compute Cloud. In this paper, we will discuss about cloud security approaches. We have used the term “CloudDrain” to define data leakage in case of security compromise.

  3. Retrieval of cloud microphysical parameters from INSAT-3D: a feasibility study using radiative transfer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinya, John; Bipasha, Paul S.

    2016-05-01

    Clouds strongly modulate the Earths energy balance and its atmosphere through their interaction with the solar and terrestrial radiation. They interact with radiation in various ways like scattering, emission and absorption. By observing these changes in radiation at different wavelength, cloud properties can be estimated. Cloud properties are of utmost importance in studying different weather and climate phenomena. At present, no satellite provides cloud microphysical parameters over the Indian region with high temporal resolution. INSAT-3D imager observations in 6 spectral channels from geostationary platform offer opportunity to study continuous cloud properties over Indian region. Visible (0.65 μm) and shortwave-infrared (1.67 μm) channel radiances can be used to retrieve cloud microphysical parameters such as cloud optical thickness (COT) and cloud effective radius (CER). In this paper, we have carried out a feasibility study with the objective of cloud microphysics retrieval. For this, an inter-comparison of 15 globally available radiative transfer models (RTM) were carried out with the aim of generating a Look-up- Table (LUT). SBDART model was chosen for the simulations. The sensitivity of each spectral channel to different cloud properties was investigated. The inputs to the RT model were configured over our study region (50°S - 50°N and 20°E - 130°E) and a large number of simulations were carried out using random input vectors to generate the LUT. The determination of cloud optical thickness and cloud effective radius from spectral reflectance measurements constitutes the inverse problem and is typically solved by comparing the measured reflectances with entries in LUT and searching for the combination of COT and CER that gives the best fit. The products are available on the website www.mosdac.gov.in

  4. Cumulus cloud venting of mixed layer ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, J. K. S.; Shipley, S. T.; Browell, E. V.; Brewer, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Observations are presented which substantiate the hypothesis that significant vertical exchange of ozone and aerosols occurs between the mixed layer and the free troposphere during cumulus cloud convective activity. The experiments utilized the airborne Ultra-Violet Differential Absorption Lidar (UV-DIAL) system. This system provides simultaneous range resolved ozone concentration and aerosol backscatter profiles with high spatial resolution. Evening transects were obtained in the downwind area where the air mass had been advected. Space-height analyses for the evening flight show the cloud debris as patterns of ozone typically in excess of the ambient free tropospheric background. This ozone excess was approximately the value of the concentration difference between the mixed layer and free troposphere determined from independent vertical soundings made by another aircraft in the afternoon.

  5. Heteronuclear diatomics in diffuse and translucent clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Weselak, T

    2013-01-01

    Diffuse and translucent molecular clouds fill a vast majority of the interstellar space in the galactic disk being thus the most typical objects of the Interstellar Medium (ISM). Recent advances in observational techniques of modern optical and ultraviolet spectroscopy led to detection of many features of atomic and molecular origin in spectra of such clouds. Molecular spectra of heteronuclear diatomic molecules, ie. OH, OH+, CH CH+, CN, NH, CO play an important role in understanding chemistry and physical conditions in environments they do populate. A historical review of astronomical observations of interstellar molecules is presented. Recent results based on visual and ultraviolet observations of molecular features in spectra of reddened, early type OB-stars are presented and discussed. Appearance of vibrational-rotational spectra with observed transitions based on high-quality spectra, are also presented. Relations between column densities of heteronuclear diatomics (based on the recommended oscillator st...

  6. Study on the application of mobile internet cloud computing platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Songchun; Fu, Songyin; Chen, Zheng

    2012-04-01

    The innovative development of computer technology promotes the application of the cloud computing platform, which actually is the substitution and exchange of a sort of resource service models and meets the needs of users on the utilization of different resources after changes and adjustments of multiple aspects. "Cloud computing" owns advantages in many aspects which not merely reduce the difficulties to apply the operating system and also make it easy for users to search, acquire and process the resources. In accordance with this point, the author takes the management of digital libraries as the research focus in this paper, and analyzes the key technologies of the mobile internet cloud computing platform in the operation process. The popularization and promotion of computer technology drive people to create the digital library models, and its core idea is to strengthen the optimal management of the library resource information through computers and construct an inquiry and search platform with high performance, allowing the users to access to the necessary information resources at any time. However, the cloud computing is able to promote the computations within the computers to distribute in a large number of distributed computers, and hence implement the connection service of multiple computers. The digital libraries, as a typical representative of the applications of the cloud computing, can be used to carry out an analysis on the key technologies of the cloud computing.

  7. Cloud Computing For Microfinances

    CERN Document Server

    V, Suma; M, Vaidehi; Nair, T R Gopalakrishnan

    2012-01-01

    Evolution of Science and Engineering has led to the growth of several commercial applications. The wide spread implementation of commercial based applications has in turn directed the emergence of advanced technologies such as cloud computing. India has well proven itself as a potential hub for advanced technologies including cloud based industrial market. Microfinance system has emerged out as a panacea to Indian economy since the population encompasses of people who come under poverty and below poverty index. However, one of the key challenges in successful operation of microfinance system in India has given rise to integration of financial services using sophisticated cloud computing model. This paper, therefore propose a fundamental cloud-based microfinance model in order to reduce high transaction risks involved during microfinance operations in an inexpensive and efficient manner.

  8. Green symbiotic cloud communications

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafa, H D; Desai, Uday B; Baveja, Brij Mohan

    2017-01-01

    This book intends to change the perception of modern day telecommunications. Communication systems, usually perceived as “dumb pipes”, carrying information / data from one point to another, are evolved into intelligently communicating smart systems. The book introduces a new field of cloud communications. The concept, theory, and architecture of this new field of cloud communications are discussed. The book lays down nine design postulates that form the basis of the development of a first of its kind cloud communication paradigm entitled Green Symbiotic Cloud Communications or GSCC. The proposed design postulates are formulated in a generic way to form the backbone for development of systems and technologies of the future. The book can be used to develop courses that serve as an essential part of graduate curriculum in computer science and electrical engineering. Such courses can be independent or part of high-level research courses. The book will also be of interest to a wide range of readers including b...

  9. CloudETL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xiufeng; Thomsen, Christian; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2014-01-01

    Extract-Transform-Load (ETL) programs process data into data warehouses (DWs). Rapidly growing data volumes demand systems that scale out. Recently, much attention has been given to MapReduce for parallel handling of massive data sets in cloud environments. Hive is the most widely used RDBMS...... the powerful Pig platform for data processing on MapReduce does not support such dimensional ETL processing. To remedy this, we present the ETL framework CloudETL which uses Hadoop to parallelize ETL execution and to process data into Hive. The user defines the ETL process by means of high-level constructs...... and transformations and does not have to worry about technical MapReduce details. CloudETL supports different dimensional concepts such as star schemas and SCDs. We present how CloudETL works and uses different performance optimizations including a purpose-specific data placement policy to co-locate data. Further, we...

  10. Cloud and Cloud Shadow Masking Using Multi-Temporal Cloud Masking Algorithm in Tropical Environmental

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candra, D. S.; Phinn, S.; Scarth, P.

    2016-06-01

    A cloud masking approach based on multi-temporal satellite images is proposed. The basic idea of this approach is to detect cloud and cloud shadow by using the difference reflectance values between clear pixels and cloud and cloud shadow contaminated pixels. Several bands of satellite image which have big difference values are selected for developing Multi-temporal Cloud Masking (MCM) algorithm. Some experimental analyses are conducted by using Landsat-8 images. Band 3 and band 4 are selected because they can distinguish between cloud and non cloud. Afterwards, band 5 and band 6 are used to distinguish between cloud shadow and clear. The results show that the MCM algorithm can detect cloud and cloud shadow appropriately. Moreover, qualitative and quantitative assessments are conducted using visual inspections and confusion matrix, respectively, to evaluate the reliability of this algorithm. Comparison between this algorithm and QA band are conducted to prove the reliability of the approach. The results show that MCM better than QA band and the accuracy of the results are very high.

  11. X-ray emission from stellar jets by collision against high-density molecular clouds: an application to HH 248

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Santiago, Javier; Orellana, Mariana; Miceli, Marco; Orlando, Salvatore; Ustamujic, Sabina; Albacete-Colombo, Juan Facundo; de Castro, Elisa; de Castro, Ana Ines Gomez

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the plausibility of detecting X-ray emission from a stellar jet that impacts against a dense molecular cloud. This scenario may be usual for classical T Tauri stars with jets in dense star-forming complexes. We first model the impact of a jet against a dense cloud by 2D axisymmetric hydrodynamic simulations, exploring different configurations of the ambient environment. Then, we compare our results with XMM-Newton observations of the Herbig-Haro object HH 248, where extended X-ray emission aligned with the optical knots is detected at the edge of the nearby IC 434 cloud. Our simulations show that a jet can produce plasma with temperatures up to 10 MK, consistent with production of X-ray emission, after impacting a dense cloud. We find that jets denser than the ambient medium but less dense than the cloud produce detectable X-ray emission only at the impact onto the cloud. From the exploration of the model parameter space, we constrain the physical conditions (jet density and velocity, cloud den...

  12. Cloud Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Baun, Christian; Nimis, Jens; Tai, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Cloud computing is a buzz-word in today's information technology (IT) that nobody can escape. But what is really behind it? There are many interpretations of this term, but no standardized or even uniform definition. Instead, as a result of the multi-faceted viewpoints and the diverse interests expressed by the various stakeholders, cloud computing is perceived as a rather fuzzy concept. With this book, the authors deliver an overview of cloud computing architecture, services, and applications. Their aim is to bring readers up to date on this technology and thus to provide a common basis for d

  13. FAME-C: Retrieval of cloud top pressure with vertically inhomogeneous cloud profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henken, Cintia Carbajal; Lindstrot, Rasmus; Filipitsch, Florian; Walther, Andi; Preusker, Rene; Fischer, Jürgen

    2013-05-01

    A synergistic FAME-C (Freie Universität Berlin AATSR-MERIS Cloud Retrieval) algorithm is developed within the frame of the ESA CCI Cloud project. Within FAME-C the ratio of two MERIS measurements (the Oxygen-A absorption channel and a window channel) is used to retrieve cloud top pressure. In case of high, extended clouds the retrieved cloud top pressure is generally too high. This can be understood as an overestimation of extinction in upper cloud layers due to the assumption of vertical homogeneous clouds in the radiative transfer simulations. To include more realistic cloud vertical profiles, one year of data from the Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) onboard CloudSat has been used to determine average normalized cloud vertical extinction profiles with a fixed pressure thickness for nine cloud types. The nine cloud types are based on the ISCCP COT-CTP classification table. The retrieved cloud top pressure, now using CloudSat cloud profiles in the forward model, is compared to CPR reflectivities as well as the retrieved cloud top pressure using vertically homogeneous cloud profiles. In the first number of cases under examination the overestimation of cloud top pressure, and therefore the bias, is reduced by a large amount when using CloudSat vertical cloud profiles. Another advantage is that no assumption about the cloud geometrical thickness has to be made in the new retrieval. It should be noted that comparisons between FAME-C products and A-train products can only be made at high latitudes where A-train and ENVISAT have overlapping overflights.

  14. Dynamics of cavitation clouds within a high-intensity focused ultrasonic beam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Yuan; Katz, Joseph; Prosperetti, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    In this experimental study, we generate a 500 kHz high-intensity focused ultrasonic beam, with pressure amplitude in the focal zone of up to 1.9 MPa, in initially quiescent water. The resulting pressure field and behavior of the cavitation bubbles are measured using high-speed digital in-line hologr

  15. Preparation of cold Mg{sup +}ion clouds for sympathetic cooling of highly charged ions at SPECTRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazan, Radu Mircea

    2012-02-15

    The bound electrons in hydrogen-like or lithium-like heavy ions experience extremely strong electric and magnetic fields in the surrounding of the nucleus. Laser spectroscopy of the ground-state hyperfine splitting in the lead region provides a sensitive tool to test strong-field quantum electro dynamics (QED), especially in the magnetic sector. Previous measurements on hydrogen-like systems performed in an electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) or at the experimental storage ring (ESR) were experimentally limited in accuracy due to statistics, the large Doppler broadening and the ion energy. The full potential of the QED test can only be exploited if measurements for hydrogen- and lithium-like ions are performed with accuracy improved by 2-3 orders of magnitude. Therefore, the new Penning trap setup SPECTRAP - dedicated for laser spectroscopy on trapped and cooled highly charged ions - is currently commissioned at GSI Darmstadt. Heavy highly charged ions will be delivered to this trap by the HITRAP facility in the future. SPECTRAP is a cylindrical Penning trap with axial access for external ion injection and radial optical access mounted inside a cold-bore superconducting Helmholtz-type split-coil magnet. To reach the targeted accuracy in laser spectroscopy, an efficient and fast cooling process for the highly charged ions must be employed. This can be realized by sympathetic cooling with a cloud of laser-cooled light ions. Within this thesis work, a laser system and an ion source for the production of such a {sup 24}Mg{sup +} ion cloud was developed and commissioned at SPECTRAP. An all-solid-state laser system for the generation of 279.6 nm light was designed and built. It consists of a fiber laser at 1118.5 nm followed by frequency quadrupling using two successive second-harmonic generation stages with actively stabilized ring resonators and nonlinear crystals. The laser system can deliver more than 15 mW of UV laser power under optimal conditions and requires little

  16. AP-Cloud: Adaptive Particle-in-Cloud method for optimal solutions to Vlasov-Poisson equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingyu; Samulyak, Roman; Jiao, Xiangmin; Yu, Kwangmin

    2016-07-01

    We propose a new adaptive Particle-in-Cloud (AP-Cloud) method for obtaining optimal numerical solutions to the Vlasov-Poisson equation. Unlike the traditional particle-in-cell (PIC) method, which is commonly used for solving this problem, the AP-Cloud adaptively selects computational nodes or particles to deliver higher accuracy and efficiency when the particle distribution is highly non-uniform. Unlike other adaptive techniques for PIC, our method balances the errors in PDE discretization and Monte Carlo integration, and discretizes the differential operators using a generalized finite difference (GFD) method based on a weighted least square formulation. As a result, AP-Cloud is independent of the geometric shapes of computational domains and is free of artificial parameters. Efficient and robust implementation is achieved through an octree data structure with 2:1 balance. We analyze the accuracy and convergence order of AP-Cloud theoretically, and verify the method using an electrostatic problem of a particle beam with halo. Simulation results show that the AP-Cloud method is substantially more accurate and faster than the traditional PIC, and it is free of artificial forces that are typical for some adaptive PIC techniques.

  17. Sensitivity estimations for cloud droplet formation in the vicinity of the high-alpine research station Jungfraujoch (3580 m a.s.l.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Hammer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol radiative forcing estimates suffer from large uncertainties as a result of insufficient understanding of aerosol–cloud interactions. The main source of these uncertainties is dynamical processes such as turbulence and entrainment but also key aerosol parameters such as aerosol number concentration and size distribution, and to a much lesser extent, the composition. From June to August 2011 a Cloud and Aerosol Characterization Experiment (CLACE2011 was performed at the high-alpine research station Jungfraujoch (Switzerland, 3580 m a.s.l. focusing on the activation of aerosol to form liquid-phase clouds (in the cloud base temperature range of −8 to 5 °C. With a box model the sensitivity of the effective peak supersaturation (SSpeak, an important parameter for cloud activation, to key aerosol and dynamical parameters was investigated. The updraft velocity, which defines the cooling rate of an air parcel, was found to have the greatest influence on SSpeak. Small-scale variations in the cooling rate with large amplitudes can significantly alter CCN activation. Thus, an accurate knowledge of the air parcel history is required to estimate SSpeak. The results show that the cloud base updraft velocities estimated from the horizontal wind measurements made at the Jungfraujoch can be divided by a factor of approximately 4 to get the updraft velocity required for the model to reproduce the observed SSpeak. The aerosol number concentration and hygroscopic properties were found to be less important than the aerosol size in determining SSpeak. Furthermore turbulence is found to have a maximum influence when SSpeak is between approximately 0.2 and 0.4 %. Simulating the small-scale fluctuations with several amplitudes, frequencies and phases, revealed that independently of the amplitude, the effect of the frequency on SSpeak shows a maximum at 0.46 Hz (median over all phases and at higher frequencies, the maximum SSpeak decreases again.

  18. DETECTION OF SINGLE TREE STEMS IN FORESTED AREAS FROM HIGH DENSITY ALS POINT CLOUDS USING 3D SHAPE DESCRIPTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Amiri

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Airborne Laser Scanning (ALS is a widespread method for forest mapping and management purposes. While common ALS techniques provide valuable information about the forest canopy and intermediate layers, the point density near the ground may be poor due to dense overstory conditions. The current study highlights a new method for detecting stems of single trees in 3D point clouds obtained from high density ALS with a density of 300 points/m2. Compared to standard ALS data, due to lower flight height (150–200 m this elevated point density leads to more laser reflections from tree stems. In this work, we propose a three-tiered method which works on the point, segment and object levels. First, for each point we calculate the likelihood that it belongs to a tree stem, derived from the radiometric and geometric features of its neighboring points. In the next step, we construct short stem segments based on high-probability stem points, and classify the segments by considering the distribution of points around them as well as their spatial orientation, which encodes the prior knowledge that trees are mainly vertically aligned due to gravity. Finally, we apply hierarchical clustering on the positively classified segments to obtain point sets corresponding to single stems, and perform ℓ1-based orthogonal distance regression to robustly fit lines through each stem point set. The ℓ1-based method is less sensitive to outliers compared to the least square approaches. From the fitted lines, the planimetric tree positions can then be derived. Experiments were performed on two plots from the Hochficht forest in Oberösterreich region located in Austria.We marked a total of 196 reference stems in the point clouds of both plots by visual interpretation. The evaluation of the automatically detected stems showed a classification precision of 0.86 and 0.85, respectively for Plot 1 and 2, with recall values of 0.7 and 0.67.

  19. Cloud computing for detecting high-order genome-wide epistatic interaction via dynamic clustering

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Xuan; Meng, Yu; Yu, Ning; Pan, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Backgroud Taking the advan tage of high-throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping technology, large genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been considered to hold promise for unravelling complex relationships between genotype and phenotype. At present, traditional single-locus-based methods are insufficient to detect interactions consisting of multiple-locus, which are broadly existing in complex traits. In addition, statistic tests for high order epistatic interactions...

  20. Microphysics of Pyrocumulonimbus Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fridlind, Ann

    2004-01-01

    The intense heat from forest fires can generate explosive deep convective cloud systems that inject pollutants to high altitudes. Both satellite and high-altitude aircraft measurements have documented cases in which these pyrocumulonimbus clouds inject large amounts of smoke well into the stratosphere (Fromm and Servranckx 2003; Jost et al. 2004). This smoke can remain in the stratosphere, be transported large distances, and affect lower stratospheric chemistry. In addition recent in situ measurements in pyrocumulus updrafts have shown that the high concentrations of smoke particles have significant impacts on cloud microphysical properties. Very high droplet number densities result in delayed precipitation and may enhance lightning (Andrew et al. 2004). Presumably, the smoke particles will also lead to changes in the properties of anvil cirrus produces by the deep convection, with resulting influences on cloud radiative forcing. In situ sampling near the tops of mature pyrocumulonimbus is difficult due to the high altitude and violence of the storms. In this study, we use large eddy simulations (LES) with size-resolved microphysics to elucidate physical processes in pyrocumulonimbus clouds.

  1. Microphysics of Pyrocumulonimbus Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Eric; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Fridlind, Ann

    2004-01-01

    The intense heat from forest fires can generate explosive deep convective cloud systems that inject pollutants to high altitudes. Both satellite and high-altitude aircraft measurements have documented cases in which these pyrocumulonimbus clouds inject large amounts of smoke well into the stratosphere (Fromm and Servranckx 2003; Jost et al. 2004). This smoke can remain in the stratosphere, be transported large distances, and affect lower stratospheric chemistry. In addition recent in situ measurements in pyrocumulus updrafts have shown that the high concentrations of smoke particles have significant impacts on cloud microphysical properties. Very high droplet number densities result in delayed precipitation and may enhance lightning (Andrew et al. 2004). Presumably, the smoke particles will also lead to changes in the properties of anvil cirrus produces by the deep convection, with resulting influences on cloud radiative forcing. In situ sampling near the tops of mature pyrocumulonimbus is difficult due to the high altitude and violence of the storms. In this study, we use large eddy simulations (LES) with size-resolved microphysics to elucidate physical processes in pyrocumulonimbus clouds.

  2. Cloud Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Mark Talmage

    2004-05-01

    Cloud formation is crucial to the heritage of modern physics, and there is a rich literature on this important topic. In 1927, Charles T.R. Wilson was awarded the Nobel Prize in physics for applications of the cloud chamber.2 Wilson was inspired to study cloud formation after working at a meteorological observatory on top of the highest mountain in Scotland, Ben Nevis, and testified near the end of his life, "The whole of my scientific work undoubtedly developed from the experiments I was led to make by what I saw during my fortnight on Ben Nevis in September 1894."3 To form clouds, Wilson used the sudden expansion of humid air.4 Any structure the cloud may have is spoiled by turbulence in the sudden expansion, but in 1912 Wilson got ion tracks to show up by using strobe photography of the chamber immediately upon expansion.5 In the interim, Millikan's study in 1909 of the formation of cloud droplets around individual ions was the first in which the electron charge was isolated. This study led to his famous oil drop experiment.6 To Millikan, as to Wilson, meteorology and physics were professionally indistinct. With his meteorological physics expertise, in WWI Millikan commanded perhaps the first meteorological observation and forecasting team essential to military operation in history.7 But even during peacetime meteorology is so much of a concern to everyone that a regular news segment is dedicated to it. Weather is the universal conversation topic, and life on land could not exist as we know it without clouds. One wonders then, why cloud formation is never covered in physics texts.

  3. A simple and versatile cloud-screening method for MAX-DOAS retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Gielen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a cloud-screening method based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS measurements, more specifically using zenith sky spectra and O4 differential slant-column densities (DSCDs. Using the colour index (CI, i.e. the ratio of the radiance at two wavelengths, we define different sky conditions including clear, thin clouds/polluted, fully-cloudy, and heavily polluted. We also flag the presence of broken and scattered clouds. The O4 absorption is a good tracer for cloud-induced light-path changes and is used to detect clouds and discriminate between instances of high aerosol optical depth (AOD and high cloud optical depth (COD. We apply our cloud screening to MAX-DOAS (multi-axis DOAS retrievals at three different sites with different typical meteorological conditions, more specifically suburban Beijing (39.75° N, 116.96° E, Brussels (50.78° N, 4.35° E and Jungfraujoch (46.55° N, 7.98° E. We find that our cloud screening performs well characterizing the different sky conditions. The flags based on the colour index are able to detect changes in visibility due to aerosols and/or (scattered clouds. The O4-based multiple-scattering flag is able to detect optically thick clouds, and is needed to correctly identify clouds for sites with extreme aerosol pollution. Removing data taken under cloudy conditions results in a better agreement, in both correlation and slope, between the AOD retrievals and measurements from other co-located instruments.

  4. Transforming the representation of the boundary layer and low clouds for high-resolution regional climate modeling: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Hall, Alex

    2013-07-24

    Stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds in subtropical oceanic regions (e.g., Southeast Pacific) cover thousands of square kilometers and play a key role in regulating global climate (e.g., Klein and Hartmann, 1993). Numerical modeling is an essential tool to study these clouds in regional and global systems, but the current generation of climate and weather models has difficulties in representing them in a realistic way (e.g., Siebesma et al., 2004; Stevens et al., 2007; Teixeira et al., 2011). While numerical models resolve the large-scale flow, subgrid-scale parameterizations are needed to estimate small-scale properties (e.g. boundary layer turbulence and convection, clouds, radiation), which have significant influence on the resolved scale due to the complex nonlinear nature of the atmosphere. To represent the contribution of these fine-scale processes to the resolved scale, climate models use various parameterizations, which are the main pieces in the model that contribute to the low clouds dynamics and therefore are the major sources of errors or approximations in their representation. In this project, we aim to 1) improve our understanding of the physical processes in thermal circulation and cloud formation, 2) examine the performance and sensitivity of various parameterizations in the regional weather model (Weather Research and Forecasting model; WRF), and 3) develop, implement, and evaluate the advanced boundary layer parameterization in the regional model to better represent stratocumulus, shallow cumulus, and their transition. Thus, this project includes three major corresponding studies. We find that the mean diurnal cycle is sensitive to model domain in ways that reveal the existence of different contributions originating from the Southeast Pacific land-masses. The experiments suggest that diurnal variations in circulations and thermal structures over this region are influenced by convection over the Peruvian sector of the Andes cordillera, while

  5. Cloud Aggregation and Bursting for Object Based Sharable Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Pradeep Kumar Tripathi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cloud computing promises innate scalability and high availability at low cost. So far cloud storage deployments were subject to big companies but an increasing amount of available open-source systems allow also smaller private cloud installations. In this paper we discuss cloud aggregation and cloud bursting with their empirical review. Based on the review we map class and object in the sharable small clouds for making clouds more efficient. We also consider some of the security concern for the cloud computing for authorized data sharing between clouds.

  6. Marine Cloud Brightening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, H.; Connolly, P.; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob; Parkes, Ben; Rasch, Philip J.; Rush, John; Salter, Stephen; Stevenson, Tom; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Qin; Wood, Robert

    2012-09-07

    The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could - subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identified herein - have the capacity to balance global warming up to the carbon dioxide-doubling point. We describe herein an account of our recent research on a number of critical issues associated with MCB. This involves (i) GCM studies, which are our primary tools for evaluating globally the effectiveness of MCB, and assessing its climate impacts on rainfall amounts and distribution, and also polar sea-ice cover and thickness; (ii) high-resolution modelling of the effects of seeding on marine stratocumulus, which are required to understand the complex array of interacting processes involved in cloud brightening; (iii) microphysical modelling sensitivity studies, examining the influence of seeding amount, seedparticle salt-mass, air-mass characteristics, updraught speed and other parameters on cloud-albedo change; (iv) sea water spray-production techniques; (v) computational fluid dynamics studies of possible large-scale periodicities in Flettner rotors; and (vi) the planning of a three-stage limited-area field research experiment, with the primary objectives of technology testing and determining to what extent, if any, cloud albedo might be enhanced by seeding marine stratocumulus clouds on a spatial scale of around 100 km. We stress that there would be no justification for deployment of MCB unless it was clearly established that no significant adverse consequences would result. There would also need to be an international agreement firmly in favour of such action.

  7. Marine cloud brightening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, John; Bower, Keith; Choularton, Tom; Coe, Hugh; Connolly, Paul; Cooper, Gary; Craft, Tim; Foster, Jack; Gadian, Alan; Galbraith, Lee; Iacovides, Hector; Johnston, David; Launder, Brian; Leslie, Brian; Meyer, John; Neukermans, Armand; Ormond, Bob; Parkes, Ben; Rasch, Phillip; Rush, John; Salter, Stephen; Stevenson, Tom; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Qin; Wood, Rob

    2012-09-13

    The idea behind the marine cloud-brightening (MCB) geoengineering technique is that seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with copious quantities of roughly monodisperse sub-micrometre sea water particles might significantly enhance the cloud droplet number concentration, and thereby the cloud albedo and possibly longevity. This would produce a cooling, which general circulation model (GCM) computations suggest could-subject to satisfactory resolution of technical and scientific problems identified herein-have the capacity to balance global warming up to the carbon dioxide-doubling point. We describe herein an account of our recent research on a number of critical issues associated with MCB. This involves (i) GCM studies, which are our primary tools for evaluating globally the effectiveness of MCB, and assessing its climate impacts on rainfall amounts and distribution, and also polar sea-ice cover and thickness; (ii) high-resolution modelling of the effects of seeding on marine stratocumulus, which are required to understand the complex array of interacting processes involved in cloud brightening; (iii) microphysical modelling sensitivity studies, examining the influence of seeding amount, seed-particle salt-mass, air-mass characteristics, updraught speed and other parameters on cloud-albedo change; (iv) sea water spray-production techniques; (v) computational fluid dynamics studies of possible large-scale periodicities in Flettner rotors; and (vi) the planning of a three-stage limited-area field research experiment, with the primary objectives of technology testing and determining to what extent, if any, cloud albedo might be enhanced by seeding marine stratocumulus clouds on a spatial scale of around 100×100 km. We stress that there would be no justification for deployment of MCB unless it was clearly established that no significant adverse consequences would result. There would also need to be an international agreement firmly in favour of such action.

  8. A modelling study of moisture redistribution by thin cirrus clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dinh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A high resolution 2-dimensional numerical model is used to study the moisture redistribution following homogeneous ice nucleation induced by Kelvin waves in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL. We compare results for dry/moist initial conditions, and three levels of complexity for the representation of cloud processes: full bin microphysics and radiative effects of the ice, ditto but without radiative effects, and instantaneous removal of moisture in excess of saturation upon nucleation. Cloud evolution and the profiles of moisture redistribution are found to be sensitive to initial conditions and cloud processes. Ice sedimentation leads to a downward flux of water. On the other hand, the cloud radiative heating induces upward advection of the cloudy air. This results in an upward flux of water vapour if the cloudy air is moister (or drier than the environment, which is typically when the environment is subsaturated (or supersaturated. The numerical results show that only a small fraction (less than 25% of the cloud experiences nucleation. Sedimentation and reevaporation are important, and hydrated layers in observation may be as good an indicator as dehydrated layers for the occurrence of thin cirrus clouds. The calculation with instantaneous removal of condensates misses the hydration by construction, but also underestimates dehydration due to lack of moisture removal from sedimenting particles below the nucleation level, and due to nucleation before reaching the minimum saturation mixing ratio. The sensitivity to initial conditions and cloud processes suggests that it is difficult to reach generic, quantitative conclusions regarding the role of thin cirrus clouds for the moisture distribution in the TTL and stratosphere.

  9. Searching for Optical Counterparts to Ultra-compact High Velocity Clouds: Possible Detection of a Counterpart to AGC 198606

    CERN Document Server

    Janesh, William; Salzer, John J; Janowiecki, Steven; Adams, Elizabeth A K; Haynes, Martha P; Giovanelli, Riccardo; Cannon, John M; Muñoz, Ricardo R

    2015-01-01

    We report on initial results from a campaign to obtain optical imaging of a sample of Ultra Compact High Velocity Clouds (UCHVCs) discovered by the ALFALFA neutral hydrogen (HI) survey. UCHVCs are sources with velocities and sizes consistent with their being low-mass dwarf galaxies in the Local Volume, but without optical counterparts in existing catalogs. We are using the WIYN 3.5-m telescope and pODI camera to image these objects and search for an associated stellar population. In this paper, we present our observational strategy and method for searching for resolved stellar counterparts to the UCHVCs. We combine careful photometric measurements, a color-magnitude filter, and spatial smoothing techniques to search for stellar overdensities in the g- and i-band images. We also run statistical tests to quantify the likelihood that whatever overdensities we find are real and not chance superpositions of sources. We demonstrate the method by applying it to two data sets: WIYN imaging of Leo P, a UCHVC discovere...

  10. Comparison of Scores on the Checklist for Autism Spectrum Disorder, Childhood Autism Rating Scale, and Gilliam Asperger's Disorder Scale for Children with Low Functioning Autism, High Functioning Autism, Asperger's Disorder, ADHD, and Typical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Calhoun, Susan L.; Murray, Michael J.; Morrow, Jill D.; Yurich, Kirsten K. L.; Mahr, Fauzia; Cothren, Shiyoko; Purichia, Heather; Bouder, James N.; Petersen, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Reliability and validity for three autism instruments were compared for 190 children with low functioning autism (LFA), 190 children with high functioning autism or Asperger's disorder (HFA), 76 children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and 64 typical children. The instruments were the Checklist for Autism Spectrum Disorder…

  11. Comparison of Scores on the Checklist for Autism Spectrum Disorder, Childhood Autism Rating Scale, and Gilliam Asperger's Disorder Scale for Children with Low Functioning Autism, High Functioning Autism, Asperger's Disorder, ADHD, and Typical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Susan Dickerson; Calhoun, Susan L.; Murray, Michael J.; Morrow, Jill D.; Yurich, Kirsten K. L.; Mahr, Fauzia; Cothren, Shiyoko; Purichia, Heather; Bouder, James N.; Petersen, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Reliability and validity for three autism instruments were compared for 190 children with low functioning autism (LFA), 190 children with high functioning autism or Asperger's disorder (HFA), 76 children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and 64 typical children. The instruments were the Checklist for Autism Spectrum Disorder…

  12. Stratification Learning: Detecting Mixed Density and Dimensionality in High Dimensional Point Clouds (PREPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    extending manifold learning to stratification learning. 1 Introduction Data in high dimensions is becoming ubiquitous, from image analysis and finances to...hard clustering technique based on the fractal dimension (box-counting). Starting from an initial clustering, they incrementally add points into the...References [1] D. Barbara and P. Chen. Using the fractal dimension to cluster datasets. In Proceedings of the Sixth ACM SIGKDD, pages 260–264, 2000. [2

  13. Horizontally oriented plates in clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Bréon, François-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Horizontally oriented plates in clouds generate a sharp specular reflectance signal in the glint direction, often referred to as "subsun". This signal (amplitude and width) may be used to analyze the relative area fraction of oriented plates in the cloud top layer and their characteristic tilt angle to the horizontal. We make use of spaceborne measurements from the POLDER instrument to provide a statistical analysis of these parameters. More than half of the clouds show a detectable maximum reflectance in the glint direction, although this maximum may be rather faint. The typical effective fraction (area weighted) of oriented plates in clouds lies between 10-3 and 10-2. For those oriented plates, the characteristic tilt angle is less than 1 degree in most cases. These low fractions imply that the impact of oriented plates on the cloud albedo is insignificant. The largest proportion of clouds with horizontally oriented plates is found in the range 500-700 hPa, in agreement with typical in situ observation of p...

  14. Small fraction of marine cloud condensation nuclei made up of sea spray aerosol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, P. K.; Coffman, D. J.; Johnson, J. E.; Upchurch, L. M.; Bates, T. S.

    2017-09-01

    Sea spray aerosols impact Earth's radiation balance by directly scattering solar radiation. They also act as cloud condensation nuclei, thereby altering cloud properties including reflectivity, lifetime and extent. The influence of sea spray aerosol on cloud properties is thought to be particularly strong over remote ocean regions devoid of continental particles. Yet the contribution of sea spray aerosol to the population of cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer remains poorly understood. Here, using a lognormal-mode-fitting procedure, we isolate sea spray aerosols from measurements of particle size and abundance over the Pacific, Southern, Arctic and Atlantic oceans to determine the contribution of sea spray aerosol to the population of cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer. On a global basis, with the exception of the high southern latitudes, sea spray aerosol makes a contribution of less than 30% to the cloud condensation nuclei population for air that is supersaturated at 0.1 to 1.0%--the supersaturation range typical of marine boundary layer clouds. Instead, the cloud condensation nuclei population between 70° S and 80° N is composed primarily of non-sea-salt sulfate aerosols, due to large-scale meteorological features that result in entrainment of particles from the free troposphere.

  15. Two-component model of the interaction of an interstellar cloud with surrounding hot plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Provornikova, E A; Lallement, R

    2011-01-01

    We present a two-component gasdynamic model of an interstellar cloud embedded in a hot plasma. It is assumed that the cloud consists of atomic hydrogen gas, interstellar plasma is quasineutral. Hydrogen atoms and plasma protons interact through a charge exchange process. Magnetic felds and radiative processes are ignored in the model. The influence of heat conduction within plasma on the interaction between a cloud and plasma is studied. We consider the extreme case and assume that hot plasma electrons instantly heat the plasma in the interaction region and that plasma flow can be described as isothermal. Using the two-component model of the interaction of cold neutral cloud and hot plasma, we estimate the lifetime of interstellar clouds. We focus on the clouds typical for the cluster of local interstellar clouds embedded in the hot Local Bubble and give an estimate of the lifetime of the Local interstellar cloud where the Sun currently travels. The charge transfer between highly charged plasma ions and neutr...

  16. THE PHYSICAL CONDITIONS IN A PRE-SUPER STAR CLUSTER MOLECULAR CLOUD IN THE ANTENNAE GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, K. E.; Indebetouw, R.; Evans, A. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Leroy, A. K.; Brogan, C. L.; Hibbard, J.; Sheth, K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Whitmore, B. C., E-mail: kej7a@virginia.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2015-06-10

    We present an analysis of the physical conditions in an extreme molecular cloud in the Antennae merging galaxies. This cloud has properties consistant with those required to form a globular cluster. We have obtained ALMA CO and 870 μm observations of the Antennae galaxy system with ∼0.″5 resolution. This cloud stands out in the data with a radius of ≲24 pc and mass of >5 × 10{sup 6} M{sub ⊙}. The cloud appears capable of forming a globular cluster, but the lack of associated thermal radio emission indicates that star formation has not yet altered the environment. The lack of thermal radio emission places the cloud in an early stage of evolution, which we expect to be short-lived (≲1 Myr) and thus rare. Given its mass and kinetic energy, for the cloud to be confined (as its appearance strongly suggests) it must be subject to an external pressure of P/k{sub B} ≳ 10{sup 8} K cm{sup −3}–10,000 times higher than typical interstellar pressure. This would support theories that high pressures are required to form globular clusters and may explain why extreme environments like the Antennae are preferred environments for generating such objects. Given the cloud temperature of ∼25 K, the internal pressure must be dominated by non-thermal processes, most likely turbulence. We expect the molecular cloud to collapse and begin star formation in ≲1 Myr.

  17. Fast simulators for satellite cloud optical centroid pressure retrievals; evaluation of OMI cloud retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Joiner

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The cloud Optical Centroid Pressure (OCP is a satellite-derived parameter that is commonly used in trace-gas retrievals to account for the effects of clouds on near-infrared through ultraviolet radiance measurements. Fast simulators are desirable to further expand the use of cloud OCP retrievals into the operational and climate communities for applications such as data assimilation and evaluation of cloud vertical structure in general circulation models. In this paper, we develop and validate fast simulators that provide estimates of the cloud OCP given a vertical profile of optical extinction. We use a pressure-weighting scheme where the weights depend upon optical parameters of clouds and/or aerosols. A cloud weighting function is easily extracted using this formulation. We then use fast simulators to compare two different satellite cloud OCP retrievals, from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI, with estimates based on collocated cloud extinction profiles from a combination of CloudSat radar and MODIS visible radiance data. These comparisons are made over a wide range of conditions to provide a comprehensive validation of the OMI cloud OCP retrievals. We find generally good agreement between OMI cloud OCPs and those predicted by CloudSat. However, the OMI cloud OCPs from the two independent algorithms agree better with each other than either does with the estimates from CloudSat/MODIS. Differences between OMI cloud OCPs and those based on CloudSat/MODIS may result from undetected snow/ice at the surface, cloud 3-D effects, cases of low clouds obscurred by ground-clutter in CloudSat observations and by opaque high clouds in CALIPSO lidar observations, and the fact that CloudSat/CALIPSO only observes a relatively small fraction of an OMI field-of-view.

  18. An Automated Technique for Generating Georectified Mosaics from Ultra-High Resolution Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV Imagery, Based on Structure from Motion (SfM Point Clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Watson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs are an exciting new remote sensing tool capable of acquiring high resolution spatial data. Remote sensing with UAVs has the potential to provide imagery at an unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. The small footprint of UAV imagery, however, makes it necessary to develop automated techniques to geometrically rectify and mosaic the imagery such that larger areas can be monitored. In this paper, we present a technique for geometric correction and mosaicking of UAV photography using feature matching and Structure from Motion (SfM photogrammetric techniques. Images are processed to create three dimensional point clouds, initially in an arbitrary model space. The point clouds are transformed into a real-world coordinate system using either a direct georeferencing technique that uses estimated camera positions or via a Ground Control Point (GCP technique that uses automatically identified GCPs within the point cloud. The point cloud is then used to generate a Digital Terrain Model (DTM required for rectification of the images. Subsequent georeferenced images are then joined together to form a mosaic of the study area. The absolute spatial accuracy of the direct technique was found to be 65–120 cm whilst the GCP technique achieves an accuracy of approximately 10–15 cm.

  19. Observations of [C II] 158 micron Line and Far-infrared Continuum Emission toward the High-latitude Molecular Clouds in Ursa Major

    CERN Document Server

    Matsuhara, H; Yonekura, Y; Fukui, Y; Kawada, M K; Bock, J J; Matsuhara, Hideo; Tanaka, Masahiro; Yonekura, Yoshinori; Fukui, Yasuo; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Bock, James. J.

    1997-01-01

    We report the results of a rocket-borne observation of [C II] 158\\micron line and far-infrared continuum emission at 152.5\\micron toward the high latitude molecular clouds in Ursa Major. We also present the results of a follow-up observation of the millimeter ^{12}CO J=1-0 line over a selected region observed by the rocket-borne experiment. We have discovered three small CO cloudlets from the follow-up ^{12}CO observations. We show that these molecular cloudlets, as well as the MBM clouds(MBM 27/28/29/30), are not gravitationally bound. Magnetic pressure and turbulent pressure dominate the dynamic balance of the clouds. After removing the HI-correlated and background contributions, we find that the [C II] emission peak is displaced from the 152.5\\micron and CO peaks, while the 152.5\\micron continuum emission is spatially correlated with the CO emission. We interpret this behavior by attributing the origin of [C II] emission to the photodissociation regions around the molecular clouds illuminated by the local ...

  20. Cloud Vertical Structure variability within MODIS Cloud Regimes according to CloudSat-CALIPSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, N.; Oreopoulos, L.; Lee, D.

    2016-12-01

    To advance the understanding of the relationships and associations between active and passive views of cloud systems systematic comparisons are needed. We take advantage of A-Train's capability to collect a multitude of coincident measurements of atmospheric hydrometeors to develop a framework for examining cloud vertical structure (CVS). The backbone of our comparisons are cloud regimes (CRs) derived from co-varying cloud optical thickness and cloud top pressure retrieved from the MODIS radiometer. CloudSat and CALIPSO observations containing information about cloud occurrence throughout atmospheric layers are segregated and composited according to the MODIS regime classification for Aqua-only CR occurrences. With this approach, vertical profiles of cloud systems are organized in a way that allows them to be thoroughly studied and compared. We examine the frequency of occurrence within each MODIS CR of coarsely resolved CVS permutations (namely the possible combinations of clouds occurring at high, middle, and low altitudes either in isolation or in various configurations of contiguous or non-contiguous overlap). We look for similarities and extreme contrasts in CVS among MODIS CRs, dependence of CVS on the degree of deviation from the CR centroid, and regional dependences within the occurrences of the same CR. The presentation aims to demonstrate pathways towards a better knowledge of the information content of each type (i.e., active/passive) of measurement and to expose categories of cloud systems where the combination of measurements with different strengths and sensitivities is helping rather than confounding interpretations of the nature of cloudiness.

  1. Satellite retrieval of cloud condensation nuclei concentrations by using clouds as CCN chambers

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying the aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative effect at a global scale requires simultaneous satellite retrievals of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations and cloud base updraft velocities (Wb). Hitherto, the inability to do so has been a major cause of high uncertainty regarding anthropogenic aerosol/cloud-mediated radiative forcing. This can be addressed by the emerging capability of estimating CCN and Wb of boundary layer convective clouds from an operational polar orbiting wea...

  2. THE DIRECT REGISTRATION OF LIDAR POINT CLOUDS AND HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGE BASED ON LINEAR FEATURE BY INTRODUCING AN UNKNOWN PARAMETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Chunjing

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The registration between optical images and point clouds is the first task when the combination of these two datasets is concerned. Due to the discrete nature of the point clouds, and the 2D-3D transformation in particular, a tie points based registration strategy which is commonly adopted in image-to-image registration is hard to be used directly in this scenario. A derived collinear equation describing the map relationship between an image point and a ground point is used as the mathematical model for registration, with the point in the LiDAR space expressed by its parametric form. such a map relation can be viewed as the mathematical model which registers the image pixels to point clouds. This model is not only suitable for a single image registration but also applicable to multiple consecutive images. We also studied scale problem in image and point clouds registration, with scale problem is defined by the optimal corresponding between the image resolution and the density of point clouds. Test dataset includes the DMC images and point clouds acquired by the Leica ALS50 II over an area in Henan Prov., China. Main contributions of the paper includes: [1] an derived collinear equation is introduced by which a ground point is expressed by its parametric form, which makes it possible to replace point feature by linear feature, hence avoiding the problem that it is almost impossible to find a point in the point clouds which is accurately corresponds to a point in the image space; [2] least square method is used to calculate the registration transformation parameters and the unknown parameter λ in the same time;[3] scale problem is analyzed semi-quantitatively and to the authors’ best knowledge, it is the first time in literature that clearly defines the scale problem and carries out semi-quantitative analysis in the context of LiDAR data processing.

  3. What is typical is good: the influence of face typicality on perceived trustworthiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofer, Carmel; Dotsch, Ron; Wigboldus, Daniel H J; Todorov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The role of face typicality in face recognition is well established, but it is unclear whether face typicality is important for face evaluation. Prior studies have focused mainly on typicality's influence on attractiveness, although recent studies have cast doubt on its importance for attractiveness judgments. Here, we argue that face typicality is an important factor for social perception because it affects trustworthiness judgments, which approximate the basic evaluation of faces. This effect has been overlooked because trustworthiness and attractiveness judgments have a high level of shared variance for most face samples. We show that for a continuum of faces that vary on a typicality-attractiveness dimension, trustworthiness judgments peak around the typical face. In contrast, perceived attractiveness increases monotonically past the typical face, as faces become more like the most attractive face. These findings suggest that face typicality is an important determinant of face evaluation.

  4. Extracting features buried within high density atom probe point cloud data through simplicial homology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Srikant; Kaluskar, Kaustubh; Broderick, Scott; Rajan, Krishna

    2015-12-01

    Feature extraction from Atom Probe Tomography (APT) data is usually performed by repeatedly delineating iso-concentration surfaces of a chemical component of the sample material at different values of concentration threshold, until the user visually determines a satisfactory result in line with prior knowledge. However, this approach allows for important features, buried within the sample, to be visually obscured by the high density and volume (~10(7) atoms) of APT data. This work provides a data driven methodology to objectively determine the appropriate concentration threshold for classifying different phases, such as precipitates, by mapping the topology of the APT data set using a concept from algebraic topology termed persistent simplicial homology. A case study of Sc precipitates in an Al-Mg-Sc alloy is presented demonstrating the power of this technique to capture features, such as precise demarcation of Sc clusters and Al segregation at the cluster boundaries, not easily available by routine visual adjustment.

  5. The Diffuse Interstellar Cloud Experiment: a high-resolution far-ultraviolet spectrograph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindhelm, Eric; Beasley, Matthew; Burgh, Eric B; Green, James C

    2012-03-01

    We have designed, assembled, and launched a sounding rocket payload to perform high-resolution far-ultraviolet spectroscopy. The instrument is functionally a Cassegrain telescope followed by a modified Rowland spectrograph. The spectrograph was designed to achieve a resolving power (R=λ/δλ) of 60,000 in a compact package by adding a magnifying secondary optic. This is enabled by using a holographically ruled grating to minimize aberrations induced by the second optic. We designed the instrument to observe two stars on opposing sides of a nearby hot/cold gas interface. Obtaining spectra of the O VI doublet in absorption toward these stars can provide new insight into the processes governing hot gas in the local interstellar medium. Here we present the optical design and alignment of the telescope and spectrograph, as well as flight results.

  6. Simulating Electron Clouds in Heavy-Ion Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, R.H.; Friedman, A.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Lund, S.M.; Molvik,A.W.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Seidl, P.A.; Vay, J-L.; Stoltz, P.; Veitzer, S.

    2005-04-07

    Contaminating clouds of electrons are a concern for most accelerators of positive-charged particles, but there are some unique aspects of heavy-ion accelerators for fusion and high-energy density physics which make modeling such clouds especially challenging. In particular, self-consistent electron and ion simulation is required, including a particle advance scheme which can follow electrons in regions where electrons are strongly-, weakly-, and un-magnetized. They describe their approach to such self-consistency, and in particular a scheme for interpolating between full-orbit (Boris) and drift-kinetic particle pushes that enables electron time steps long compared to the typical gyro period in the magnets. They present tests and applications: simulation of electron clouds produced by three different kinds of sources indicates the sensitivity of the cloud shape to the nature of the source; first-of-a-kind self-consistent simulation of electron-cloud experiments on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, in which the machine can be flooded with electrons released by impact of the ion beam and an end plate, demonstrate the ability to reproduce key features of the ion-beam phase space; and simulation of a two-stream instability of thin beams in a magnetic field demonstrates the ability of the large-timestep mover to accurately calculate the instability.

  7. Density Profiles in Molecular Cloud Cores Associated with High-Mass Star-Forming Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Pirogov, Lev E

    2009-01-01

    Radial density profiles for the sample of dense cores associated with high-mass star-forming regions from southern hemisphere have been derived using the data of observations in continuum at 250 GHz. Radial density profiles for the inner regions of 16 cores (at distances $\\la 0.2-0.8$ pc from the center) are close on average to the $\\rho\\propto r^{-\\alpha}$ dependence, where $\\alpha=1.6\\pm 0.3$. In the outer regions density drops steeper. An analysis with various hydrostatic models showed that the modified Bonnor-Ebert model, which describes turbulent sphere confined by external pressure, is preferable compared with the logotrope and polytrope models practically in all cases. With a help of the Bonnor-Ebert model, estimates of central density in a core, non-thermal velocity dispersion and core size are obtained. The comparison of central densities with the densities derived earlier from the CS modeling reveals differences in several cases. The reasons of such differences are probably connected with the presen...

  8. High dispersion spectroscopy of two A supergiant systems in the Small Magellanic Cloud with novel properties

    CERN Document Server

    Mennickent, R E

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of a spectroscopic investigation of two novel variable bright blue stars in the SMC, OGLE004336.91-732637.7 (SMC-SC3) and the periodically occulted star OGLE004633.76-731204.3 (SMC-SC4), whose photometric properties were reported by Mennickent et al. (2010). High-resolution spectra in the optical and far-UV show that both objects are actually A + B type binaries. Three spectra of SMC-SC4 show radial velocity variations, consistent with the photometric period of 184.26 days found in Mennickent et al. 2010. The optical spectra of the metallic lines in both systems show combined absorption and emission components that imply that they are formed in a flattened envelope. A comparison of the radial velocity variations in SMC-SC4 and the separation of the V and R emission components in the Halpha emission profile indicate that this envelope, and probably also the envelope around SMC-SC3, is a circumbinary disk with a characteristic orbital radius some three times the radius of the binary syste...

  9. Extracting features buried within high density atom probe point cloud data through simplicial homology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srinivasan, Srikant; Kaluskar, Kaustubh; Broderick, Scott; Rajan, Krishna, E-mail: krajan@iastate.edu

    2015-12-15

    Feature extraction from Atom Probe Tomography (APT) data is usually performed by repeatedly delineating iso-concentration surfaces of a chemical component of the sample material at different values of concentration threshold, until the user visually determines a satisfactory result in line with prior knowledge. However, this approach allows for important features, buried within the sample, to be visually obscured by the high density and volume (~10{sup 7} atoms) of APT data. This work provides a data driven methodology to objectively determine the appropriate concentration threshold for classifying different phases, such as precipitates, by mapping the topology of the APT data set using a concept from algebraic topology termed persistent simplicial homology. A case study of Sc precipitates in an Al–Mg–Sc alloy is presented demonstrating the power of this technique to capture features, such as precise demarcation of Sc clusters and Al segregation at the cluster boundaries, not easily available by routine visual adjustment. - Highlights: • Provides a data driven methodology to select appropriate concentration threshold. • Maps topology of APT data using persistent simplicial homology. • The application to Sc precipitates in an Al–Mg–Sc alloy is provided. • Capture features not easily available by routine visual adjustment.

  10. 基于云技术的电子商务发展模式解析--对国内外典型企业的比较研究%Analysis of Electronic Commerce Development Model Based on Cloud Technology:A Comparative Study on Typical Enterprises at Home and Abroad

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    霍春辉; 张京心

    2014-01-01

    云技术是一种基于互联网的超级计算模式。通过分析云技术的特点,探讨了其在电子商务企业中的应用,并通过对亚马逊、阿里巴巴和苏宁云商等典型企业的案例分析,进一步剖析了云技术在电子商务中的应用模式。%Cloud is a supercomputing model based on Internet .This paper explores the application functions of Cloud in e-commerce enterprises by analyzing the characteristics of Cloud .Through the case study on Amazon , Alibaba and Suning Commerce , it analyzes further the application mode of Cloud in e -commerce.

  11. High-accuracy diagnostic tool for electron cloud observation in the LHC based on synchronous phase measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Esteban Müller, J F; Shaposhnikova, E; Valuch, D; Mastoridis, T

    2014-01-01

    Electron cloud effects such as heat load in the cryogenic system, pressure rise and beam instabilities are among the main limitations for the LHC operation with 25 ns spaced bunches. A new observation tool was developed to monitor the e-cloud activity and has been successfully used in the LHC during Run 1 (2010-2012). The power loss of each bunch due to the e-cloud can be estimated using very precise bunch-by-bunch measurement of the synchronous phase shift. In order to achieve the required accuracy, corrections for reflection in the cables and some systematic errors need to be applied followed by a post-processing of the measurements. Results clearly show the e-cloud build-up along the bunch trains and its evolution during each LHC fill as well as from fill to fill. Measurements during the 2012 LHC scrubbing run reveal a progressive reduction in the e-cloud activity and therefore a decrease in the secondary electron yield (SEY). The total beam power loss can be computed as a sum of the contributions from all...