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Sample records for high clay content

  1. Wave liquefaction in soils with clay content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, Özgür; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents the results of an experimental study of the influence of clay content (in silt-clay and sand-clay mixtures) on liquefaction beneath progressive waves. The experiments showed that the influence of clay content is very significant. Susceptibility of silt to liquefaction is increa...

  2. Soil clay content underlies prion infection odds

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Walter W.; Walsh, D.P.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; Winkelman, D.L.; Miller, M.W.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental factors-especially soil properties-have been suggested as potentially important in the transmission of infectious prion diseases. Because binding to montmorillonite (an aluminosilicate clay mineral) or clay-enriched soils had been shown to enhance experimental prion transmissibility, we hypothesized that prion transmission among mule deer might also be enhanced in ranges with relatively high soil clay content. In this study, we report apparent influences of soil clay content on the odds of prion infection in free-ranging deer. Analysis of data from prion-infected deer herds in northern Colorado, USA, revealed that a 1% increase in the clay-sized particle content in soils within the approximate home range of an individual deer increased its odds of infection by up to 8.9%. Our findings suggest that soil clay content and related environmental properties deserve greater attention in assessing risks of prion disease outbreaks and prospects for their control in both natural and production settings. ?? 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  3. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors—Air Gap Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Bore

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling.

  4. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors—Air Gap Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Delepine Lesoille, Sylvie; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling. PMID:27096865

  5. Error Analysis of Clay-Rock Water Content Estimation with Broadband High-Frequency Electromagnetic Sensors--Air Gap Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bore, Thierry; Wagner, Norman; Lesoille, Sylvie Delepine; Taillade, Frederic; Six, Gonzague; Daout, Franck; Placko, Dominique

    2016-04-18

    Broadband electromagnetic frequency or time domain sensor techniques present high potential for quantitative water content monitoring in porous media. Prior to in situ application, the impact of the relationship between the broadband electromagnetic properties of the porous material (clay-rock) and the water content on the frequency or time domain sensor response is required. For this purpose, dielectric properties of intact clay rock samples experimental determined in the frequency range from 1 MHz to 10 GHz were used as input data in 3-D numerical frequency domain finite element field calculations to model the one port broadband frequency or time domain transfer function for a three rods based sensor embedded in the clay-rock. The sensor response in terms of the reflection factor was analyzed in time domain with classical travel time analysis in combination with an empirical model according to Topp equation, as well as the theoretical Lichtenecker and Rother model (LRM) to estimate the volumetric water content. The mixture equation considering the appropriate porosity of the investigated material provide a practical and efficient approach for water content estimation based on classical travel time analysis with the onset-method. The inflection method is not recommended for water content estimation in electrical dispersive and absorptive material. Moreover, the results clearly indicate that effects due to coupling of the sensor to the material cannot be neglected. Coupling problems caused by an air gap lead to dramatic effects on water content estimation, even for submillimeter gaps. Thus, the quantitative determination of the in situ water content requires careful sensor installation in order to reach a perfect probe clay rock coupling.

  6. Gas detection in sands of high silt-clay content in the Cook Inlet area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettis, F.

    1976-01-01

    When a sand contains a large amount of silt and clay it is often difficult to detect zones that contain gas using only the Archie Saturation Relationship. However, gas may be detected in these shaly formations using certain quick-look techniques. Log examples of these are presented in this paper. The first quick-look technique is an overlay of the neutron log on a density log. The neutron log is shifted relative to the density log to make the two porosity curves track in shaly water sands. Gas-bearing intervals become readily apparent from separations of the two curves where the density porosity is reading higher than the shifted neutron porosity. The second is an overlay of a neutron log on the sonic interval-transit-time log. The sonic log is shifted so as to match the neutron log in average tight sands in the section. This method has proved to be more optimistic than the density-neutron overlay above. It will find the gas-bearing zones, but may result in testing a zone or two which is nonproductive. The third method, used when no neutron log has been run, is a crossplot of the difference, sonic porosity minus density porosity, versus gamma ray API units. This is the most unreliable of the three methods because of the difficulty of determining the end points and the slope of the line on the plot which separates the gas zones from the non-gas zones

  7. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1998-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has through years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R 466). It states natural clay deposits may be used for membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system may contain at least 95% of all leachate created throughout...... ion transport as well as diffusion.Clay prospection for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island Lolland. The natural clay contains 60 to 75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium-type. The clay material...... has been evaluated using standardised methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15 to 0.3m thick clay membrane have been tested...

  8. Clay membrane made of natural high plasticity clay:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Niels; Baumann, Jens

    1999-01-01

    Leachate containment in Denmark has throughout the years been regulated by the DIF Recommendation for Sanitary Landfill Liners (DS/R4669. It states that natural clay deposits may be used as membrane material provided the membrane and drainage system contains at least 95% of all leachate created...... into account advective ion transport as well as diffusion. Clay prospecting for clays rich in smectite has revealed large deposits of Tertiary clay of very high plasticity in the area around Rødbyhavn on the Danish island of Lolland. The natural clay contains 60-75% smectite, dominantly as a sodium......-type. The clay material has been evaluated using the standardized methods related to mineralogy, classification, compaction and permeability, and initial studies of diffusion properties have been carried out. Furthermore, at a test site the construction methods for establishing a 0.15-0.3 m thick clay membrane...

  9. Recovery of Porosity and Permeability for High Plasticity Clays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette; Foged, Niels Nielsen

    to be the case for high plasticity clays that are uncemented, and with a high content of clay minerals, especially smectite. Oedometer tests on samples from the Paleogene period show that 80% or more of the compaction will recover when unloaded, and if unloaded to a stress lower than in situ stress level...

  10. The Ecological Perspective of Landslides at Soils with High Clay Content in the Middle Bogowonto Watershed, Central Java, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junun Sartohadi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The clay layers at hilly regions in the study area were very thick. The presence of very thick clay caused several difficulties in terms of environmental management, particularly in reducing georisk due to landslide. However, initial observations proved that areas of active landslides had better vegetation cover. The objective of this study was to find out ecological roles of landslides in livelihood in the Middle Bogowonto Watershed. The ecological roles of landslide were examined through field empirical evidences. Texture, bulk density, permeability, structure, and index plasticity were conducted for analyses of soil physical properties. Stepwise interpretation was made using 1 : 100,000–1 : 25,000 Indonesian topographic maps and remote sensing images of 30 m–<10 m spatial resolution. The results showed that landslides formed three landform zones: residual, erosional, and depositional zones. The area that did not slid, the residual zone, had massive soil structure and very hard consistency. Crops cultivated in this zone did not grow well. In the areas of active landslide, the environmental conditions seemed to be more favorable for living creatures. The landslides resulted in depositional zones with gentle slopes (4° to 15°, higher water availability, and easier soil management. The landslides also acted as the rearrangement process of landforms for better living environment.

  11. Influence of Clay Content, Mineralogy and Fabric On Radar Frequency Response of Aquifer Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, L. J.; Handley, K.

    High frequency electromagnetic methods such as ground penetrating radar (GPR) and time domain reflectometry (TDR) are widely employed to measure water saturation in the vadose zone and water filled porosity in the saturated zone. However, previous work has shown that radar frequency dielectric properties are strongly influenced by clay as well as by water content. They have also shown that that the dielectric response of clay minerals is strongly frequency dependent, and that even a small proportion of clay such as that present in many sandstone aquifers can have a large effect at typi- cal GPR frequencies (around 100MHz). Hence accurate water content/porosity deter- mination requires clay type and content to be taken into account. Reported here are dielectric measurements on clay-sand mixtures, aimed at investigating the influence of clay mineralogy, particle shape, and the geometrical arrangement of the mixture constituents on GPR and TDR response. Dielectric permittivity (at 50-1000MHz) was measured for mixtures of Ottawa Sand and various clay minerals or clay size quartz rock flour, using a specially constructed dielectric cell. Both homogeneous and layered mixtures were tested. The influence of pore water salinity, clay type, and particle arrangement on the dielectric response is interpreted in terms of dielectric dispersion mechanisms. The appropriateness of var- ious dielectric mixing rules such as the Complex Refractive Index Method (CRIM) for determination of water content or porosity from field GPR and TDR data are dis- cussed.

  12. Clay content evaluation in soils through GPR signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosti, Fabio; Patriarca, Claudio; Slob, Evert; Benedetto, Andrea; Lambot, Sébastien

    2013-10-01

    The mechanical behavior of soils is partly affected by their clay content, which arises some important issues in many fields of employment, such as civil and environmental engineering, geology, and agriculture. This work focuses on pavement engineering, although the method applies to other fields of interest. Clay content in bearing courses of road pavement frequently causes damages and defects (e.g., cracks, deformations, and ruts). Therefore, the road safety and operability decreases, directly affecting the increase of expected accidents. In this study, different ground-penetrating radar (GPR) methods and techniques were used to non-destructively investigate the clay content in sub-asphalt compacted soils. Experimental layout provided the use of typical road materials, employed for road bearing courses construction. Three types of soils classified by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) as A1, A2, and A3 were used and adequately compacted in electrically and hydraulically isolated test boxes. Percentages of bentonite clay were gradually added, ranging from 2% to 25% by weight. Analyses were carried out for each clay content using two different GPR instruments. A pulse radar with ground-coupled antennae at 500 MHz centre frequency and a vector network analyzer spanning the 1-3 GHz frequency range were used. Signals were processed in both time and frequency domains, and the consistency of results was validated by the Rayleigh scattering method, the full-waveform inversion, and the signal picking techniques. Promising results were obtained for the detection of clay content affecting the bearing capacity of sub-asphalt layers.

  13. Prediction of clay content from water vapour sorption isotherms considering hysteresis and soil organic matter content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, E.; Tuller, M.; Møldrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    Soil texture, in particular the clay fraction, governs numerous environmental, agricultural and engineering soil processes. Traditional measurement methods for clay content are laborious and impractical for large-scale soil surveys. Consequently, clay prediction models that are based on water...... within a RH range from 3 to 93%. The clay contents, which ranged between 1 and 56%, were measured with a combination of sieving and sedimentation methods. Two regression models were developed for both adsorption and desorption at 10 RH levels (5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90%). While the first...

  14. Estimation of bitumen and clay content in fine tailings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motta Cabrera, S.C.; Bryan, J.; Kantzas, A.

    2007-01-01

    Fine tailings are the components of tailings ponds and the by-product of the oil sand extraction process, consisting mostly of water with small amounts of bitumen, sand, silts and clays. Because of the large volumes of tailings, an important environmental and production process issue involves the reduction of the remaining bitumen in the tailings stream. This paper presented the results of a study that used low field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) in order to estimate the bitumen, clay and water content of synthetic tailings samples. NMR is a non-destructive technique that is utilized to determine compositions of oil and brine emulsions and the viscosity of heavy oil and bitumen as well as in reservoir characterization, measuring properties such as permeability, porosity, mobile and immobile fluids, and fluid saturations. The study prepared and tested numerous samples with variable water, bitumen, sand and clay concentrations in the NMR tool under ambient conditions. Two qualities of water and bitumen were used to prepare the synthetic samples. Each type of water and bitumen was analyzed as a single substance and in a mixture with the typical solids found in tailings composition. These included kaolinite, illite, sodium montmorillonite and sand. These synthetic samples were analyzed using different mixing configurations, as a function of time and in two different NMR tools. It was concluded that NMR is a potential application for on-line determination of tailings streams composition. 18 refs., 3 tabs., 17 figs

  15. Considering Organic Carbon for Improved Predictions of Clay Content from Water Vapor Sorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per

    2014-01-01

    Accurate determination of the soil clay fraction (CF) is of crucial importance for characterization of numerous environmental, agricultural, and engineering processes. Because traditional methods for measurement of the CF are laborious and susceptible to errors, regression models relating the CF...... to water vapor sorption isotherms that can be rapidly measured with a fully automated vapor sorption analyzer are a viable alternative. In this presentation we evaluate the performance of recently developed regression models based on comparison with standard CF measurements for soils with high organic...... carbon (OC) content and propose a modification to improve prediction accuracy. Evaluation of the CF prediction accuracy for 29 soils with clay contents ranging from 6 to 25% and with OC contents from 2.0 to 8.4% showed that the models worked reasonably well for all soils when the OC content was below 2...

  16. Clay content prediction using on-the-go proximal soil sensor fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tabatabai, Salman; Knadel, Maria; Greve, Mogens Humlekrog

    on soil usability, very few studies so far have provided robust and accurate predictions for fields with high clay content variability. An on-the-go multi-sensor platform was used to measure topsoil (25cm) VNIR spectra and temperature as well as electrical conductivity of top 30cm and top 90cm in 5 fields...... least squares regression (PLSR) and support vector machines regression (SVMR) were performed using VNIR spectra, EC and soil temperature as predictors and clay content as the response variable. PLSR and SVMR models were validated using full and 20-segment cross-validation respectively. The results were...... highly accurate with R2 of 0.91 and 0.93, root mean square error (RMSE) of 1.19 and 1.08, and ratio of performance to interquartile range (RPIQ) of 4.6 and 5.1 for PLSR and SVMR respectively. This shows the high potential of on-the-go soil sensor fusion to predict soil clay content and automate...

  17. Influence of clay and surfactant content in non-aqueous fluid rheology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guedes, I.C.; Gomes, N.L.; Menezes, R.R.; Campos, L.F.A.; Ferreira, H.S.

    2012-01-01

    The bentonite clay used as viscosity agent in the production of non-aqueous fluids cannot be used without organic treatment for their surfaces to become hydrophobic. These clays are called organophilic clays, and are generally obtained by adding, in an aqueous way, ionic or a nonionic surfactant. Recent studies of the variables involved in the dispersion of bentonite clays and in the process of organophilization, showed their lack of influence. This work aims to study the influence of clay content and surfactants on the rheology of nonaqueous fluids. To this end, the clays were treats and characterized, evidencing the incorporation of the surfactant, and then formulated non-aqueous fluids, following PETROBRAS standards, being possible to verify the influence of clay content and surfactant both from the point of view as the characterizing and rheological behavior. (author)

  18. The effect of motor vehicle emission towards lead (Pb content of rice field soil with different clay content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.C.Wati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Motor vehicle gas emission contains lead (Pb which is a hazardous and toxic substance. Agricultural land, especially rice field, which is located nearby roads passed by many motor vehicle, are susceptible to the accumulation of Pb. If Pb is permeated by plants cultivated in the rice field, it will be very hazardous for humans as they are the final consumers. Hence, it is essential to identify Pb content of rice-field soil initiated by motor vehicle gas emission. This study was aimed to identify the effects of motor vehicle density, the distance between rice-field and road, and the clay content of soil towards Pb content of soils in Blitar and Ngawi Regencies of East Java. The method used for the study was survey method managed by using three-factor nested design with three replicates. The results of this study showed that motor vehicle density and the distance of rice field to road provide significant affected the total of Pb content of soil. However, the dissemination pattern of Pb in the soil was irregular due to the factors of climate and environment. Before Pb reached soil surface, Pb was spread out in the air due to the effect of temperature, wind velocity, vehicle velocity, size of vehicle, and road density. Consequently, the location with low motor vehicle density and positioned faraway to the road had higher total rate of Pb than the location with high motor vehicle density and positioned nearby the road. Clay content affected the total rate of Pb content as much as 37%, every 1% increase of clay content increased the total rate of Pb as much as 0.08 mg/kg.

  19. Influence of the clay content and drying of successive no solvents change in the morphology of polyamide 6 / clay membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, C.H.; Ferreira, R.S.B.; Bezerra, E.B.; Leite, A.M.D.; Araujo, E.D.; Lira, H.L.

    2014-01-01

    Membranes of polyamide 6/clay nanocomposites with different contents (1 and 3%) of Brazilian bentonite clay using the technique of phase inversion was obtained. The nanocomposites were obtained in a co-rotating twin screw extruder, by the melt intercalation method and were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), which showed possibly an exfoliated and / or partially exfoliated structure was obtained. The membranes were dried at room temperature and also by successive exchange of non-solvents, to prevent collapse the pores using ethanol and n-hexane as a non-solvent. From the photomicrographs of top surface by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed to morphology change in the membranes from the presence of different clay contents as well as drying the same by successive exchange of non-solvents, obtaining membranes with larger amount of pores uniformly distributed. (author)

  20. Estimation of hydraulic conductivity on clay content in soil determined from resistivity data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevnin, Vladimir; Delgado-Rodriguez, Omar; Mousatov, Aleksandr [Mexican Petroleum Institute, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Ryjov, Albert [Moscow State Geological Prospecting Academy, Geophysical Faculty, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-07-15

    The influence of clay content in sandy and clayey soils on hydraulic conductivity (filtration coefficient) is considered. A review of published experimental data on the relationship of hydraulic conductivity with soil lithology and grain size, as dependent on clay content is presented. Theoretical calculations include clay content. Experimental and calculated data agree, and several approximation formulas for filtration coefficient vs clay content are presented. Clay content in soil is estimated from electric resistivity data obtained from 2D VES interpretation. A two-step method is proposed, the first step including clay content calculating from soil resistivity and groundwater salinity, and the second step including filtration coefficient estimating from clay content. Two applications are presented. [Spanish] El contenido de arcilla en suelos areno-arcillosos influye sobre la permeabilidad hidraulica (coeficiente de filtracion). Se presenta una revision de datos experimentales publicados que relacionan el coeficiente de filtracion con el tipo litologico del suelo y el tamano de las particulas. A partir de calculos teoricos, se modifican las conocidas formulas que relacionan el coeficiente de filtracion con el contenido de arcilla. Se estima el contenido de arcilla a partir de los datos interpretados por el metodo SEV, y se propone un procedimiento para la estimacion del coeficiente de filtracion: (a) calculo del contenido de arcilla a partir de la resistividad del suelo y de la salinidad del agua subterranea, (b) estimacion del coeficiente de filtracion a partir del contenido de arcilla. Se presentan algunos ejemplos de la aplicacion de esta metodologia.

  1. Content and distribution of fluorine in rock, clay and water in fluorosis area Zhaotong, Yunnan Province

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, K.; Li, H.; Feng, F. (and others) [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2007-04-15

    About 160 samples of coal, pyritic coal balls, coal seam gangue, clay, corn, capsicum and drinking water were collected from the endemic fluorosis area of Zhenxiong and Weixin county, China to determine the fluorine content, distribution pattern and source in this fluorosis area. The study shows that the average fluorine content in the coal samples collected from 3 coal mines of the Late Permian coals in Zhenxiong and Weixin county, Zhaotong City, which are the main mining coals there, is 77.13 mg/kg. The average fluorine content coals collected form thee typical fluorosis villages in 72.56 mg/kg. Both of them are close to the world average and little low than the Chinese average. The fluorine content of drinking water is lower than 0.35 mg/L, the clay used as an additive for coal-burning and as a binfer in briquette-making by local residents has a high content of fluorine, ranging from 367-2,435 mg/kg, with the majority higher than 600 mg/kg and an average of 1,084.2 mg/kg. 29 refs., 5 tabs.

  2. Monitoring water content in Opalinus Clay within the FE-Experiment: Test application of dielectric water content sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaki, T.; Vogt, T.; Komatsu, M.; Müller, H. R.

    2013-12-01

    The spatiotemporal variation of water content in the near field rock around repository tunnels for radioactive waste in clay formations is one of the essential quantities to be monitored for safety assessment in many waste disposal programs. Reliable measurements of water content are important not only for the understanding and prediction of coupled hydraulic-mechanic processes that occur during tunnel construction and ventilation phase, but also for the understanding of coupled thermal-hydraulic-mechanical (THM) processes that take place in the host rock during the post closure phase of a repository tunnel for spent fuel and high level radioactive waste (SF/HLW). The host rock of the Swiss disposal concept for SF/HLW is the Opalinus Clay formation (age of approx. 175 Million years). To better understand the THM effects in a full-scale heater-engineered barrier-rock system in Opalinus Clay, a full-scale heater test, namely the Full-Scale Emplacement (FE) experiment, was initiated in 2010 at the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory in north-western Switzerland. The experiment is designed to simulate the THM evolution of a SF/HLW repository tunnel based on the Swiss disposal concept in a realistic manner during the construction, emplacement, backfilling, and post-closure phases. The entire experiment implementation (in a 50 m long gallery with approx. 3 m diameter) as well as the post-closure THM evolution will be monitored using a network of several hundred sensors. The sensors will be distributed in the host rock, the tunnel lining, the engineered barrier, which consists of bentonite pellets and blocks, and on the heaters. The excavation is completed and the tunnel is currently being ventilated. Measuring water content in partially saturated clay-rich high-salinity rock with a deformable grain skeleton is challenging. Therefore, we use the ventilation phase (before backfilling and heating) to examine the applicability of commercial water content sensors and to

  3. Synthesis of polymer gel electrolyte with high molecular weight poly(methyl methacrylate)-clay nanocomposite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneghetti, Paulo; Qutubuddin, Syed; Webber, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Polymer nanocomposite gel electrolytes consisting of high molecular weight poly(methyl methacrylate) PMMA-clay nanocomposite, ethylene carbonate (EC)/propylene carbonate (PC) as plasticizer, and LiClO 4 electrolyte are reported. Montmorillonite clay was ion exchanged with a zwitterionic surfactant (octadecyl dimethyl betaine) and dispersed in methyl methacrylate, which was then polymerized to synthesize PMMA-clay nanocomposites. The nanocomposite was dissolved in a mixture of EC/PC with LiClO 4 , heated and pressed to obtain polymer gel electrolyte. X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the gels indicated intercalated clay structure with d-spacings of 2.85 and 1.40 nm. In the gel containing plasticizer, the clay galleries shrink suggesting intercalation rather than partial exfoliation observed in the PMMA-clay nanocomposite. Ionic conductivity varied slightly and exhibited a maximum value of 8 x 10 -4 S/cm at clay content of 1.5 wt.%. The activation energy was determined by modeling the conductivity with a Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher expression. The clay layers are primarily trapped inside the polymer matrix. Consequently, the polymer does not interact significantly with LiClO 4 electrolyte as shown by FTIR. The presence of the clay increased the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the gel as determined by differential scanning calorimetry. The PMMA nanocomposite gel electrolyte shows a stable lithium interfacial resistance over time, which is a key factor for use in electrochemical applications

  4. Influence of clay content on wave-induced liquefaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirca, V.S. Ozgur; Sumer, B. Mutlu; Fredsøe, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    of measurements were carried out: (1) pore-water pressure measurements across the soil depth and (2) water-surface elevation measurements. These measurements were synchronized with video recordings of the liquefaction process from the side. The ranges of the various quantities in the experiments were wave height...... of silt and clay was not liquefied. Sand may become prone to liquefaction with the introduction of clay, contrary to the general perception that this type of sediment is normally liquefaction-resistant under waves. For instance, sand with d50 50:4 mmwas liquefied with CC510:8%, whereas sand with d50 50...

  5. Correlation of index tests with smectite content determined with XRD in bentonite and smectite rich clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumpulainen, Sirpa; Kiviranta, Leena; Korkeakoski, Petri

    2012-01-01

    on exchangeable cations, that is, concentration of exchangeable sodium. Preliminary results suggest that better correlation of methylene blue absorption with smectite content also requires information of exchangeable sodium. Additionally, in order to achieve better correlation of cation exchange capacity with smectite content, variations in the cation exchange capacity of pure smectite or the contents of other minerals, such as other clay minerals and iron oxides as well as organic matter which participate into cation exchange reactions, needed to be taken into account. Although other minerals than smectite have high specific surface areas, there was no need to include additional parameters to correlate EGME based specific surface area with smectite content in the studied materials. Correlations of index test results with smectite content are presented in Figure 1, which also indices the excavation or source areas for tested materials. In general, index tests correlated well with smectite content after corrections made with exchangeable cation composition, cation exchange capacity of pure smectite, or contents of other minerals present. The scattering of data points indicated not only the suitability of each index method for testing the smectite content in bentonite and smectite rich clay materials, but also uncertainties in analyses and tests. The correlation was best for EGME, WAC and LL, and worst for MB and CEC. However, in order to achieve good correlations for WAC and LL, exchangeable cation content needed to be taken into account, thus making the performance of these tests much more complicated and time-consuming. So far the only index test that did not require any additional tests or analyses for having a good correlation with smectite content was EGME. Nevertheless, the number of samples tested was considered to be low to make definitive conclusions. The work will be continued in 2012. (authors)

  6. Effect of clay content on morphology and processability of electrospun keratin/poly(lactic acid) nanofiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isarankura Na Ayutthaya, Siriorn; Tanpichai, Supachok; Sangkhun, Weradesh; Wootthikanokkhan, Jatuphorn

    2016-04-01

    This research work has concerned the development of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) removal filters from biomaterials, based on keratin extracted from chicken feather waste and poly(lactic acid) (PLA) (50/50%w/w) blend. Clay (Na-montmorillonite) was also added to the blend solution prior to carrying out an electro-spinning process. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of clay content on viscosity, conductivity, and morphology of the electrospun fibers. Scanning electron micrographs showed that smooth and bead-free fibers were obtained when clay content used was below 2 pph. XRD patterns of the electrospun fibers indicated that the clay was intercalated and exfoliated within the polymers matrix. Percentage crystallinity of keratin in the blend increased after adding the clay, as evidenced from FTIR spectra and DSC thermograms. Transmission electron micrographs revealed a kind of core-shell structure with clay being predominately resided within the keratin rich shell and at the interfacial region. Filtration performance of the electrospun keratin/PLA fibers, described in terms of pressure drop and its capability of removing methylene blue, were also explored. Overall, our results demonstrated that it was possible to improve process-ability, morphology and filtration efficiency of the electrospun keratin fibers by adding a suitable amount of clay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Study of influence of content organoclay on mechanical properties of propylene and bentonite clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, Giselly M.G.; Costa, Jonei M.; Pachekoski, Wagner; Barbosa, Joseane D. Viana; Farias, Romulo

    2011-01-01

    In this work we studied activated organoclay nanocomposites in pilot scale, obtained by physical mixing in twin screw extruder co-rotating. The organophilic clay content included in the formulation of these compounds ranged from 2 to 6% by weight. The clays were characterized using the techniques of x-ray. Systems PP / clay were characterized by tensile test, flexural and impact strength. The results indicated that there was no loss of mechanical properties and thermo-mechanical properties of the nanocomposite obtained. (author)

  8. The role of organic matter and clay content in sediments for bioavailability of pyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasojević, Jelena; Maletić, Snežana; Rončević, Srđan; Grgić, Marko; Krčmar, Dejan; Varga, Nataša; Dalmacija, Božo

    2018-01-01

    Evaluation of the bioavailable fractions of organic contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is extremely important for assessing their risk to the environment. This available fraction, which can be solubilised and/or easily extracted, is believed to be the most accessible for bioaccumulation, biosorption and/or transformation. Sediment organic matter (OM) and clay play an important role in the biodegradation and bioavailability of PAHs. The strong association of PAHs with OM and clay in sediments has a great influence not only on their distribution but also on their long-term environmental impact. This paper investigates correlations between bioavailability and the clay and OM contents in sediments. The results show that OM is a better sorbent for pyrene (chosen as a model PAH) and that increasing the OM content reduces the bioavailable fraction. A mathematical model was used to predict the kinetic desorption, and these results showed that the sediment with the lowest content of OM had an F fast value of 24%, whereas sediment with 20% OM gave a value of 9%. In the experiments with sediments with different clay contents, no clear dependence between clay and rate constants of the fast desorbing fractions was observed, which can be explained by the numerous possible interactions at the molecular level.

  9. Effect of clay content in rock on oil extraction under alkaline seam conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vezirov, D Sh; Gorbunov, A T; Kasimov, Sh A; Kashchavtsev, V E; Tairov, N D

    1978-01-01

    When oil beds are flooded with alkaline solutions, the alkaline concentration in the solution can be significantly reduced as a result of the interaction between clay and alkali. Large losses of alkali in the bed can render the flooding method ineffective. Experimental studies were conducted on porous media containing up to 25% clay at a constant permeability of 1 D in order to determine the oil extraction indices for clay-containing rock. Constant permeability is maintained by using clays, marshalite, and quartz sand in various proportions. Oil having a viscosity of 99.17 sP, and containing a large amount of surfactants, including 1.1% naphthenic acid, was extracted by fresh water and a 0.25% solution of NaOH. The extraction of oil by fresh water and NaOH solution from quartz sand indicated the advantage of using alkaline solutions. The extraction coefficient increased by 11% with the use of this method. As clay is added to the sand, the extraction coefficient decreases, and is reduced to 12.7% when the clay content reaches 25%. Nevertheless, a comparison of data obtained for quartz sand with fresh water on a porous medium containing 25% clay with an alkaline solution, indicates that the extraction coefficient is just 1.5% lower even in the presence of such a large amount of clay. Consequently, alkaline flooding should still be given preference over the usual methods under specific conditions and where the rock has a comparatively large amount of clay, in view of all the basic factors that influence the extraction process. The results obtained can be used for selecting alkaline concentration in evaluating the efficiency of flooding oil beds with alkaline solutions. 2 figures, 2 tables.

  10. Electrical properties of multiphase composites based on carbon nanotubes and an optimized clay content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egiziano, Luigi; Lamberti, Patrizia; Spinelli, Giovanni; Tucci, Vincenzo; Guadagno, Liberata; Vertuccio, Luigi

    2016-05-01

    The experimental results concerning the characterization of a multiphase nanocomposite systems based on epoxy matrix, loaded with different amount of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and an optimized Hydrotalcite (HT) clay content (i.e. 0.6 wt%), duly identified by an our previous theoretical study based on Design of Experiment (DoE), are presented. Dynamic-mechanical analysis (DMA) reveal that even the introduction of higher HT loading (up to 1%wt) don't affect significantly the mechanical properties of the nanocomposites while morphological investigations show an effective synergy between clay and carbon nanotubes that leads to peculiar micro/nanostructures that favor the creation of the electrical conductive network inside the insulating resin. An electrical characterization is carried out in terms of DC electrical conductivity, percolation threshold (EPT) and frequency response in the range 10Hz-1MHz. In particular, the measurements of the DC conductivity allow to obtain the typical "percolation" curve also found for classical CNT-polymer mixtures and a value of about 2 S/m for the electrical conductivity is achieved at the highest considered CNTs concentration (i.e. 1 wt%). The results suggest that multiphase nanocomposites obtained incorporating dispersive nanofillers, in addition to the conductive one, may be a valid alternative to the polymer blends, to improve the properties of the polymeric materials thus able to meet high demands, particularly concerning their mechanical and thermal stability and electrical features required in the aircraft engineering.

  11. Beyond clay - using selective extractions to improve predictions of soil carbon content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, C.; Berhe, A. A.; Blankinship, J. C.; Crow, S. E.; Druhan, J. L.; Heckman, K. A.; Keiluweit, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Marin-Spiotta, E.; Plante, A. F.; Schaedel, C.; Schimel, J.; Sierra, C. A.; Thompson, A.; Wagai, R.; Wieder, W. R.

    2016-12-01

    A central component of modern soil carbon (C) models is the use of clay content to scale the relative partitioning of decomposing plant material to respiration and mineral stabilized soil C. However, numerous pedon to plot scale studies indicate that other soil mineral parameters, such as Fe- or Al-oxyhydroxide content and specific surface area, may be more effective than clay alone for predicting soil C content and stabilization. Here we directly address the following question: Are there soil physicochemical parameters that represent mineral C association and soil C content that can replace or be used in conjunction with clay content as scalars in soil C models. We explored the relationship of soil C content to a number of soil physicochemical and physiographic parameters using the National Cooperative Soil Survey database that contains horizon level data for > 62,000 pedons spanning global ecoregions and geographic areas. The data indicated significant variation in the degree of correlation among soil C, clay and Fe-/Al-oxyhydroxides with increasing moisture variability. Specifically, dry, water-limited systems (PET/MAP > 1) presented strong positive correlations between clay and soil C, that decreased significantly to little or no correlation in wet, energy-limited systems (PET/MAP soil C to oxalate extractable Al+Fe increased significantly with increasing moisture availability. This pattern was particularly well expressed for subsurface B horizons. Multivariate analyses indicated similar patterns, with clear climate and ecosystem level variation in the degree of correlation among soil C and soil physicochemical properties. The results indicate a need to modify current soil C models to incorporate additional C partitioning parameters that better account for climate and ecoregion variability in C stabilization mechanisms.

  12. Beyond clay: Towards an improved set of variables for predicting soil organic matter content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Craig; Heckman, Katherine; Wieder, William R.; Keiluweit, Marco; Lawrence, Corey R.; Berhe, Asmeret Asefaw; Blankinship, Joseph C.; Crow, Susan E.; Druhan, Jennifer; Hicks Pries, Caitlin E.; Marin-Spiotta, Erika; Plante, Alain F.; Schadel, Christina; Schmiel, Joshua P.; Sierra, Carlos A.; Thompson, Aaron; Wagai, Rota

    2018-01-01

    Improved quantification of the factors controlling soil organic matter (SOM) stabilization at continental to global scales is needed to inform projections of the largest actively cycling terrestrial carbon pool on Earth, and its response to environmental change. Biogeochemical models rely almost exclusively on clay content to modify rates of SOM turnover and fluxes of climate-active CO2 to the atmosphere. Emerging conceptual understanding, however, suggests other soil physicochemical properties may predict SOM stabilization better than clay content. We addressed this discrepancy by synthesizing data from over 5,500 soil profiles spanning continental scale environmental gradients. Here, we demonstrate that other physicochemical parameters are much stronger predictors of SOM content, with clay content having relatively little explanatory power. We show that exchangeable calcium strongly predicted SOM content in water-limited, alkaline soils, whereas with increasing moisture availability and acidity, iron- and aluminum-oxyhydroxides emerged as better predictors, demonstrating that the relative importance of SOM stabilization mechanisms scales with climate and acidity. These results highlight the urgent need to modify biogeochemical models to better reflect the role of soil physicochemical properties in SOM cycling.

  13. Application of short-wave infrared (SWIR) spectroscopy in quantitative estimation of clay mineral contents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, Jinfeng; Xing, Lixin; Pan, Jun; Meng, Tao; Liang, Liheng

    2014-01-01

    Clay minerals are significant constituents of soil which are necessary for life. This paper studied three types of clay minerals, kaolinite, illite, and montmorillonite, for they are not only the most common soil forming materials, but also important indicators of soil expansion and shrinkage potential. These clay minerals showed diagnostic absorption bands resulting from vibrations of hydroxyl groups and structural water molecules in the SWIR wavelength region. The short-wave infrared reflectance spectra of the soil was obtained from a Portable Near Infrared Spectrometer (PNIS, spectrum range: 1300∼2500 nm, interval: 2 nm). Due to the simplicity, quickness, and the non-destructiveness analysis, SWIR spectroscopy has been widely used in geological prospecting, chemical engineering and many other fields. The aim of this study was to use multiple linear regression (MLR) and partial least squares (PLS) regression to establish the optimizing quantitative estimation models of the kaolinite, illite and montmorillonite contents from soil reflectance spectra. Here, the soil reflectance spectra mainly refers to the spectral reflectivity of soil (SRS) corresponding to the absorption-band position (AP) of kaolinite, illite, and montmorillonite representative spectra from USGS spectral library, the SRS corresponding to the AP of soil spectral and soil overall spectrum reflectance values. The optimal estimation models of three kinds of clay mineral contents showed that the retrieval accuracy was satisfactory (Kaolinite content: a Root Mean Square Error of Calibration (RMSEC) of 1.671 with a coefficient of determination (R 2 ) of 0.791; Illite content: a RMSEC of 1.126 with a R 2 of 0.616; Montmorillonite content: a RMSEC of 1.814 with a R 2 of 0.707). Thus, the reflectance spectra of soil obtained form PNIS could be used for quantitative estimation of kaolinite, illite and montmorillonite contents in soil

  14. Comparing Kriging and Regression Approaches for Mapping Soil Clay Content in a diverse Danish Landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adhikari, Kabindra; Bou Kheir, Rania; Greve, Mette Balslev

    2013-01-01

    Information on the spatial variability of soil texture including soil clay content in a landscape is very important for agricultural and environmental use. Different prediction techniques are available to assess and map spatial variability of soil properties, but selecting the most suitable techn...... the prediction in OKst compared with that in OK, whereas RT showed the lowest performance of all (R2 = 0.52; RMSE = 0.52; and RPD = 1.17). We found RKrr to be an effective prediction method and recommend this method for any future soil mapping activities in Denmark....... technique at a given site has always been a major issue in all soil mapping applications. We studied the prediction performance of ordinary kriging (OK), stratified OK (OKst), regression trees (RT), and rule-based regression kriging (RKrr) for digital mapping of soil clay content at 30.4-m grid size using 6...

  15. Effects of Organic Matter and Clay Content in Soil on Pesticide Adsorption Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rada Đurović

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of organic matter and clay content on the adsorption of atrazine, acetochlor, clomazone, pendimethalin and oxyfluorfen in soil samples was studied. In order to determine whether and to what degree different soil properties affect the process of determinationof selected pesticides, three soils with different clay and organic matter contents were used. An optimized liquid-solid extraction procedure followed by SPME measurement was applied to analyse the selected pesticides in soil samples. Detection and quantificationwere done by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS. Relative standard deviation (RSD values for multiple analyses of soil samples fortified at 30 μg/kg of each pesticide were below 19%. Limits of detection (LODs for all compounds studied were less than 2 μg/kg. The results indicate that soils with different physico-chemical properties have different effects on the adsorption of most pesticides, especially at higher concentration levels.

  16. Geotechnical properties of Karwar marine clay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.T.; Nayak, B.U.; Naik, R.L.

    Karwar marine clay possesses high plasticity characteristics with natural water content higher than the liquid limit. Liquidity index was as high as 1.7. Predominant clay mineral was kaolinite. Undrained shear strength showed an increasing trend...

  17. Quantifying the clay content with borehole depth and impact on reservoir flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarath Kumar, Aaraellu D.; Chattopadhyay, Pallavi B.

    2017-04-01

    This study focuses on the application of reservoir well log data and 3D transient numerical model for proper optimization of flow dynamics and hydrocarbon potential. Fluid flow through porous media depends on clay content that controls porosity, permeability and pore pressure. The pressure dependence of permeability is more pronounced in tight formations. Therefore, preliminary clay concentration analysis and geo-mechanical characterizations have been done by using wells logs. The assumption of a constant permeability for a reservoir is inappropriate and therefore the study deals with impact of permeability variation for pressure-sensitive formation. The study started with obtaining field data from available well logs. Then, the mathematical models are developed to understand the efficient extraction of oil in terms of reservoir architecture, porosity and permeability. The fluid flow simulations have been done using COMSOL Multiphysics Software by choosing time dependent subsurface flow module that is governed by Darcy's law. This study suggests that the reservoir should not be treated as a single homogeneous structure with unique porosity and permeability. The reservoir parameters change with varying clay content and it should be considered for effective planning and extraction of oil. There is an optimum drawdown for maximum production with varying permeability in a reservoir.

  18. Content of arsenic, selenium, mercury in the coal, food, clay and drinking water on the Zhaotong fluorosis area, eastern Yunnan Province

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Kun-li; Li Hui-jie; Chen Tong-bin (and others) [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research

    2008-03-15

    About 160 samples of coal, corn, capsicum and drinking water were collected from the endemic fluorosis area of Zhenxiong and Weixin County, Zhaotong City of Yunnan Province, to determine the arsenic (As), selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg) content by AAF-800. The study found that the As content in the main coal seam from the Late Permian coal mines in Zhaotong City is 8.84 mg/kg and some civil coal can reach 89.09 mg/kg. The Se and Hg in the coal samples of Late Permian is lower, but Se and Hg are more concentrated in the pyritic coal balls and the pyritic gangue of the coal seam. The As content in corn and capsicum dried by coal-burning is more than 0.7 mg/kg, the natural standard amount of arsenic content permitted in food by China. The Se and Hg content in corn dried by coal-burning is lower than the natural standard of Se and Hg content in food in China but the Se and Hg content of capsicum dried by coal-burning exceeds the amount permitted by the natural standard for food in China. Clay, used as an additive for the coal-burning process and as a binder in making briquettes, contains a high content of As, generally more than 16 mg/kg. However, the Se and Hg content of clay itself are low. The As, Se and Hg content of drinking water are lower than the natural standard of As, Se and Hg content in the drinking water. So, there is high-As content coal and high-As content dried corn and capsicum in the endemic fluorosis area of Zhaotong City of Yunnan Province. The high As content of the dried corn and capsicum might have originated from the high arsenic content of burnt coal and clay. 30 refs., 4 tabs.

  19. Dielectric properties of clay-rock and their influence on water content measurement with TDR probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bore, T.; Coelho, D.; Robinet, J.C.; Delepine-Lesoille, S.; Placko, D.; Gatabin, C.; Sabouroux, P.; Six, G.; Taillade, F.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Clays constitute major components for radioactive waste repositories managed by Andra. Water content monitoring is one of the indicators chosen to evaluate the health of the structure. In this perspective, several TDR probes have been installed in various structures, made of three types of clay materials: the bentonite, the clay-rock (Callovo-Oxfordian mud-stone) and the compacted crushed clay-rock. . The technique consists of a time-of-flight measurement of an electric pulse along the TDR probes. To convert flight time propagation delay into water content, calibrations are required. This conversion is however neither accurate, nor generalizable for other mixtures. For precise understanding and modeling of the sensing chain, a better knowledge the complex permittivity of clay materials is necessary. Chosen TDR sensing lines make use of a step electric pulse (such as Campbell TDR100). Considering the rise time of this system, the frequency content of the measured TDR wave form extends from about 20 kHz to roughly 1.5 GHz. Material dielectric must thus be characterized over a broad band frequency. The determination of the electromagnetic properties using non resonant method is fundamentally deduced from their impedance and the wave velocities in the materials. This kind of technique relies on a device able to direct the electromagnetic energy towards a material and to collect the reflected and transmitted parts. In a first step, we designed a transmission line to provide electromagnetic characterizations of clay material. The clay material under test is inserted into a brass coaxial cell specifically designed for our purposes. Two conical transition units surround the specimen holder. The electromagnetic properties of the sample are based on the reflection from the material and the transmission through the material measured by a vector network analyser (VNA). The determination of the electromagnetic properties from

  20. Influence of Laurolactam Content on the Clay Intercalation of Polyamide 6,12/Clay Nanocomposites Synthesized by Open Ring Anionic Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Cabrera Álvarez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ anionic homo- and copolymerization of caprolactam (CL and laurolactam (LL with sodium montmorillonite clay (NaMMT was carried out using two different initiators, sodium caprolactamate (CLNa and caprolactam magnesium bromide (CLMgBr. Degree of conversion and final molecular weight were used to assess the advancement and efficiency of the polymerization reaction and X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy were used to evaluate the sodium montmorillonite clay intercalation/exfoliation. The use of CLNa as initiator produced a higher conversion degree and molecular weight than the use of CLMgBr. Through DSC, it was observed that CLNa and CLMgBr tended to produce random and block copolymer structures, respectively, and either random or block, this eventually has an effect on the clay dispersion within the polymer matrix. In all cases, increasing the LL content produced a decrease in the conversion degree and in the molecular weight of the resulting polymer.

  1. Water and solute transport in agricultural soils predicted by volumetric clay and silt contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karup, Dan; Møldrup, Per; Paradelo Pérez, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    tracer mass could be well fitted to an analytical solution to the classical convection-dispersion equation. Both cumulative tracer mass and concentration as a function of time were hereby reasonable well predicted from the simple inputs of bulk density, clay and silt contents, and applied tracer mass......Solute transport through the soil matrix is heterogeneous and greatly affected by soil texture, soil structure, and macropore networks. This study examined the relationship between tracer breakthrough characteristics, soil hydraulic properties, and basic soil properties. Hundred...... of the soil structure rather than the actual formation of macropores causing preferential flow. The arrival times of 5 % and up to 50 % of the tracer mass were found to be strongly correlated with volumetric fines content. The hereby predicted tracer concentration breakthrough points up to 50% of applied...

  2. Flame retardancy of highly filled polyamide 6/clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasari, Aravind; Yu Zhongzhen; Mai Yiuwing; Liu Songlin

    2007-01-01

    To obtain an in-depth physical knowledge of the protective barrier stability and uniformity under fire conditions, we prepared highly filled polyamide 6/organoclay nanocomposites and characterized their thermal and flammability properties. The objectives were to identify a critical composition that is needed to form a stable char with no apertures or cracks and to gain a thorough understanding of the mechanisms of flame retardancy. It was shown that there is no need for higher percentages of clay and even smaller amounts of clay (<10 wt%) should be enough to achieve good fire performance. Factors such as incoherency, poor stability and non-uniformity of the char or the presence of large cracks and formation of island-like structures were insignificant in slowing down the heat release and mass loss rates. Nevertheless, there was no stage during the flammability test where the fire completely extinguished even when the protective layer was stable and free from major cracks/apertures. Based on these results, new insights and approaches to process better flame retardant polymer nanocomposites are discussed

  3. Influence of the chemical modification and content of the clay on the mechanical properties of polypropylene and national bentonite composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libano, Elaine V.D.G.; Pacheco, Elen B.A.V.; Visconte, Leila L.Y.

    2011-01-01

    The polypropylene/national clay composite was prepared by melt intercalation in a counter-rotating twin screw extruder, using bentonite as filler either in the natural (BENT) form or modified with the ammonium salt, cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (BENT-org). The clay was used in 1, 3 and 5%w. The influence of the modification and content of clay on the mechanical properties of this system was analysed. The analyses of infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that clay organophilization did occur. The tensile modulus and the tensile strength at the yield point were not affected by chemical modification (BENT and BENT-org) or clay content. On the other hand, it was evidenced that the elongation at the yield point decreased with the addition of BENT and BENT-org to polypropylene. According to the thermogravimetric results, it was evidenced that the incorporation of clay into polypropylene improved thermal stability of the polymer in the composites with 5%w of BENT and 3 and 5%w of BENT-org. (author)

  4. The Influence of SAND’s Gradation and Clay Content of Direct Sheart Test on Clayey Sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibisono, Gunawan; Agus Nugroho, Soewignjo; Umam, Khairul

    2018-03-01

    The shear strength of clayey-sand can be affected by several factors, e.g. gradation, density, moisture content, and the percentage of clay and sand fraction. The same percentage of clay and sand fraction in clayey-sand mixtures may have different shear strengths due to those factors. This research aims to study the effect of clay content on sand that cause the change of its shear strength. Samples consisted of different clay and sand fractions were reconstituted at a certain moisture content. Sand fractions varied from well-graded to poorly-graded sand. Shear strength was measured in terms of the direct shear test. Prior to the test, surcharge loads were applied to represent overburden pressures. Shear strength results and their components (i.e. Cohesion and internal angle of friction) were correlated with physical properties of samples (i.e. grading coefficient of curvature, coefficient of uniformity, and density). Results showed that samples classified as well-graded and dense sand had higher shear strength. In the other hand, the shear strengths decreased when the mixtures became poorly-graded and less dense. The inclusion of the clay fraction increased cohesion component and decreased internal angle of friction.

  5. Obtaining and Organophilisation of Smectite Clays with Reduced Iron Oxide Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karasa Jūlija

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Raw clays from the Baltic region are characterized as smectite containing clays with significant amount of naturally occurring impurities that limiting the potential applications of crude Baltic clay resources. Purification of clay samples from Šaltiškių deposit (Venta basin was carried out by varied concentration hydrochloric acid solutions and resulted in fine removal of carbonates and iron oxide. The main idea of this work is to widen the possible applications of local clay resources providing a new type of raw material for further organoclay production.

  6. Preparation and properties of recycled HDPE/clay hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong Lei; Qinglin Wu; Craig M. Clemons

    2007-01-01

    Hybrids based on recycled high density polyethylene (RHDPE) and organic clay were made by melt compounding. The influence of blending method, compatibilizers, and clay content on clay intercalation and exfoliation, RHDPE crystallization behavior, and the mechanical properties of RHDPE/clay hybrids were investigated. Both maleated polyethylene (MAPE) and titanate could...

  7. The Composition and Physical Properties of Some Clays of Cross ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and quartz as the main subsidiary non-clay mineral. The high plasticity index of the clays corresponds to the more transported clays of the tertiary- to –recent environment. The percentage of linear shrinkage varied from 11-16% with the lowest shrinkage (11%), having the coarsest features. Silica (SiO2) content of the clays ...

  8. Can mud (silt and clay) concentration be used to predict soil organic carbon content within seagrass ecosystems?

    KAUST Repository

    Serrano, Oscar

    2016-09-07

    The emerging field of blue carbon science is seeking cost-effective ways to estimate the organic carbon content of soils that are bound by coastal vegetated ecosystems. Organic carbon (C-org) content in terrestrial soils and marine sediments has been correlated with mud content (i.e., silt and clay, particle sizes <63 mu m), however, empirical tests of this theory are lacking for coastal vegetated ecosystems. Here, we compiled data (n = 1345) on the relationship between C-org and mud contents in seagrass ecosystems (79 cores) and adjacent bare sediments (21 cores) to address whether mud can be used to predict soil C-org content. We also combined these data with the delta C-13 signatures of the soil C-org to understand the sources of Corg stores. The results showed that mud is positively correlated with soil C-org content only when the contribution of seagrass-derived C-org to the sedimentary C-org pool is relatively low, such as in small and fast-growing meadows of the genera Zostera, Halodule and Halophila, and in bare sediments adjacent to seagrass ecosystems. In large and long-living seagrass meadows of the genera Posidonia and Amphibolis there was a lack of, or poor relationship between mud and soil C-org content, related to a higher contribution of seagrass-derived C-org to the sedimentary C-org pool in these meadows. The relatively high soil C-org contents with relatively low mud contents (e.g., mud-C-org saturation) in bare sediments and Zostera, Halodule and Halophila meadows was related to significant allochthonous inputs of terrestrial organic matter, while higher contribution of seagrass detritus in Amphibolis and Posidonia meadows disrupted the correlation expected between soil C-org and mud contents. This study shows that mud is not a universal proxy for blue carbon content in seagrass ecosystems, and therefore should not be applied generally across all seagrass habitats. Mud content can only be used as a proxy to estimate soil C-org content for

  9. Red-clay ceramic powders as geopolymer precursors: Consideration of amorphous portion and CaO content

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Keppert, M.; Vejmelková, E.; Bezdička, Petr; Doleželová, M.; Čáchová, M.; Scheinherrová, L.; Pokorný, J.; Vyšvařil, M.; Rovnaníková, P.; Černý, R.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 161, SEP (2018), s. 82-89 ISSN 0169-1317 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Amorphous content * Calcium oxide * Composition * Geopolymers * Red-clay ceramics Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 3.101, year: 2016

  10. Heavy Metal Diffusion through Soft Clay under High Hydraulic Gradients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaheer Ahmed Almani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was focused on the determination of contaminant transport parameters of heavy metal Zinc moving through saturated soft Bangkok undisturbed clay under high hydraulic gradients. These parameters were compared with contaminant transport determined under concentration gradient alone (pure diffusion. In total fifteen column tests were conducted and a mathematical model was applied to determine the coefficients. Two different source concentrations conditions, constant and decreasing, were applied. Testing periods were ranged from 15-60 days while hydraulic gradients were ranged from 0-500. The curves between relative concentration and time and pore volume were developed for the constant source condition whereas curves between source reservoirs concentrations and time were developed for decreasing source condition. The effective diffusion and distribution coefficients, De and Kd, were determined by curve fitting using the computer code POLLUTE v 6.3. The results showed that diffusion coefficient increases and distribution coefficient decreases as hydraulic gradient increases from 0 to high value of 500 due to contribution of dispersion and additional molecular diffusion at high advective velocity. Thus, testing at high gradients ensures the safe performance of earthen barriers under worse conditions.

  11. Characterization of clay used for red ceramic fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, P.S.; Morais, A.S.C.; Caldas, T.C.C.; Monteiro, S.N.; Vieira, C.M.F.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to characterize a clay used in the red ceramics fabrication, from Campos dos Goytacazes north of the State of Rio de Janeiro. The clay was submitted for physical, chemical and mineralogical tests. The results showed that the clay has a high content of clay minerals with kaolinitic predominance, high loss on ignition and low flux oxides. It is recommended that this clay is mixed with non-plastic materials. (author)

  12. The effect of clay content in sands used for cementitious materials in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, V.A.; Purnell, P.; Still, G.T.; Thomas, T.H.

    2007-01-01

    The cost of building materials in Less Economically Developed Countries (LEDCs) is one of the single largest contributing factors to housing costs. They are often transported over relatively large distances at considerable expense. Local sands may contain significant amounts of clay, considered by local artisans to be detrimental to concrete strength; however, in an LEDC context, there is little evidence to support this. In this study, the compressive strength and workability of representative LEDC clay-contaminated concrete was determined. Clay-cement interactions were studied using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). Different clays appeared to have fundamentally different effects on both workability and strength. No chemical interactions were detected. It was concluded that satisfactory concrete could be made from clay-contaminated sand

  13. Growth of Carbon Nanotubes on Clay: Unique Nanostructured Filler for High-Performance Polymer Nanocomposites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Wei-De; Phang, In Yee; Liu, Tianxi

    2006-01-01

    High-performance composites are produced using nanostructured clay-carbon nanotube (CNT) hybrids as a reinforcing filler. The intercalation of iron particles between the clay platelets serves as the catalyst for the growth of CNTs, while the platelets are exfoliated by the CNTs, forming the unique

  14. Effect of the platinum content on the microstructure and micropore size distribution of Pt/alumina-pillared clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Vargas, M; Valencia-Rios, J; Vicente, M A; Korili, S A; Gil, A

    2005-12-15

    The aim of this work is to study the effect of the platinum content (0-1.8 wt % Pt) on the microstructure of an alumina-pillared clay. For this purpose, the nitrogen physisorption data at -196 degrees C, the micropore size distributions of the supported platinum catalysts, and the hydrogen chemisorption results at 30 degrees C have been analyzed and compared. The preparation of the catalysts has modified the textural properties of the Al-pillared clay support, giving rise to a loss of surface area and micropore volume. After reduction at 420 degrees C, the presence of dispersed metallic platinum with mean crystallite size in the 22-55 A range has been found by hydrogen adsorption. Comparison of all results reveals that the platinum species block the micropore entrances by steric hindrance to nitrogen access as the platinum content increases.

  15. Heavy metal content and potential health risk of geophagic white clay from the Kumasi Metropolis in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Asantewah Nkansah

    Full Text Available Geophagia is the craving for non-food substances and commonly practiced among pregnant women and children. Consumption of geophagic clay samples can have serious implications on the health of the consumers as a result of the presence of toxic metals such as Pb, As, Hg and Cd. This study sought to determine the levels of heavy metals in the studied geophagic clay samples and to determine the potential risks of heavy metals as cumulative carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risks to the health of the consumers via oral (ingestion and dermal exposure routes. A total of thirty (30 white clay samples were analysed using Niton Thermo scientific XRF Analyser (Mobile Test S, NDTr-XL3t-86956, com 24. The clay samples were found to contain essential elements such as Ca, Fe, K and Zn as well as toxic metals such as As and Pb. There were isolated cases of the presence of Hg and all samples had Cd levels below detection. Health risk indices such as hazard quotient and cancer risk were calculated and the results indicated that consumers are likely to suffer from cancer through ingestion of geophagic clay. Bioaccessibility studies were done on zinc and it did not indicate any potential toxicity due to zincs essential nature. The levels of heavy metals in some of the geophagic clay consumed by some residents in the Kumasi were high compared to the Permitted Maximum Tolerable Daily Intake (PMTDI by (WHO/FAO and may pose potential health threat over time. Keywords: Geophagia, White clay, Heavy metals, Health risk assessment, Permitted maximum tolerable daily intake

  16. Conversion of South African clays into high quality zeolites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Musyoka, Nicholas M

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Clays obtained from South Africa were used as feedstock materials for the synthesis of zeolites. The conventional alkaline hydrothermal treatment of the starting material (90 °C for 8 h)was preceded by a fusion step (550 °C for 1.5 h) to improve...

  17. Evaluation of the lithology contents and types of clay minerals using downhole spectral analyzer of natural gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zivanov, M.; Savicic, M.; Grbovic, G.

    1992-01-01

    The microprocessor downhole spectrum analyzer of natural gamma radiation is an important part of the new generation of geophysical well logging systems. This instrument produces complete energy spectra of the penetrated formations. here physical principles of logging are shown. based on the logging results from one of the wells complex lithology was identified, together with shale contents in the formation and types of clay and minerals. (author)

  18. Influence of mineralogy and moisture content on plasticity and induced anisotropic damage of a clay-stone: application to nuclear waste disposals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiarelli, A.S.; Sibai, M.; Karami, M.; Ledesert, B.; Hoteit, N.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of mineralogy and moisture content on mechanical behaviour of a clay-stone rock is studied by the way of uniaxial and triaxial compression tests and microscopic observations. Some parameters characteristic of phenomena like plasticity and induced anisotropic damage are discussed as a function of these two factors. Rock behaviour becomes more brittle when calcite content grows or when clay or moisture content decreases. At the micro-level, plasticity is induced by slip of clay sheets and induced anisotropic damage appears by growth of oriented microcracks at the interface between grains and matrix. (authors)

  19. The general situation of clay site for high-level waste geological disposal repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Changxuan; Liu Xiaodong; Liu Pinghui

    2008-01-01

    Host medium is vitally important for safety of high-level radiaoactive waste (HLW) geological disposal. Clay, as host media of geological repository of HLW, has received greater attention for its inherent advantages. This paper summarizes IAEA and OECD/NEA's some safety guides on site selection and briefly introduces the process of the site selection, their studies and the characteristics of the clay formations in Switz-erland, France and Belgian. Based on these analyses, some suggestions are made to China's HLW repository clay site selection. (authors)

  20. Deformation properties of highly plastic fissured Palaeogene clay - Lack of stress memory?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette; Hededal, Ole; Foged, Niels Nielsen

    2012-01-01

    are evaluated based on the degree of debonding caused by natural processes insitu as compared to processes induced during severe loading and unloading in laboratory. A long term oedometer test on Lillebælt Clay with a series of loading and unloading cycles was carried out. The test results are used to evaluate......The geological preconsolidation of the Palaeogene clays in Denmark is estimated to 5-8 MPa or more, whereas laboratory and field experiences indicate values between 100 and 3000 kPa. Presumably, the high plasticity clay loses its memory of earlier preloads due to swelling, or as an effect...

  1. X-ray-phase and IR-spectral study of clay rocks mineral content of the Caspian Sea Gulf depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakonov, A.N.; Mukhanova, M.U.

    2000-01-01

    Samples of clays selected from different oil fields (Sazankurak, Kemerkol, Kozha and others) and deposition depths are examined on both the X-ray diffractometers (Dron-2 and Dron-4) and the infrared-spectrometers (IR-20). In this diagnostic the American file with different minerals X-ray systematized data is used. The X-ray reflections, which are in compliance with suitable inter-plane distances and clay impurities reflex intensities are determined. With confirmation purpose for mineral content correctness obtained according X-ray-phase analysis the infrared-spectrometric method is used, in which principal attention was paid to absorption field (3,400-3,700 cm -1 ) of H 2 O and OH valency frequency vibrations

  2. Structural changes in a clay-containing nanocomposite with a different moisture content caused by its deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajtel'son, E.A.; Glaskova, T.I.; Korkhovm, V.P.; Aniskevich, A.N.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation of the properties of a clay-containing nanocomposite with an epoxy binder under moisture-temperature and mechanical action. It has been established that whatever the moisture content, the nanocomposite crystallizes under the thermomechanical action (upon reaching the glasstransition temperature). When the nanocomposite is heated to 70 C, the restructuring process is reversible, and its heating to above 150 C leads to its amorphization. The presence of clay nanoparticles (up to 6 mass percent) does not influence the temperature of structural transitions of the nanocomposite and does not cause a substantial strengthening effect. The sorbed moisture plasticizes the nanocomposite and decreases its glasstransition temperature by 10 C. The specific features of the thermomechanical behavior of nanocomposites upon their tensile prestrain or creep are due to the formation of an oriented structure. Their crystallization begins at lower temperatures and with a higher degree of crystallinity than that of unloaded nanostructures. (authors)

  3. Effect of carbonate content on the mechanical behaviour of clay fault-gouges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Elisenda; Niemeijer, André; Hangx, Suzanne; Spiers, Chris

    2015-04-01

    Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) in depleted oil and gas reservoirs is considered to be the most promising technology to achieve large-scale reduction in anthropogenic emissions. In order to retain the stored CO2 from the atmosphere for the very long-term, i.e. on timescales of the order of 103-104 years, it is essential to maintain the integrity of the caprock, and more specifically of any faults penetrating the seal. When selecting suitable CO2-storage reservoirs, pre-exisiting faults within the caprock require close attention, as changes in the stress state resulting from CO2-injection may induce fault slip motion which might cause leakage. Little is known about the effect of fluid-rock interactions on the mineral composition, mechanical properties and the integrity and sealing capacity of the caprock. Previous studies on the effect of mineral composition on the frictional properties of fault gouges have shown that friction is controlled by the dominant phase unless there is a frictionally weak, through-going fabric. However, the effect on stability is less clear. Since long-term CO2-exposure might cause chemical reactions, potentially resulting in the dissolution or precipitation of carbonate minerals, a change in mineralogy could affect the mechanical stability of a caprock significantly. Calcite, for example, is known to be prone to micro-seismicity and shows a transition from velocity-strengthening to velocity-weakening behaviour around 100-150°C. Therefore, we investigated the effect of varying clay:carbonate ratios on fault friction behaviour, fault reactivation potential and slip stability, i.e. seismic vs. aseismic behaviour. Three types of simulated fault gouges were used: i) carbonate-free, natural clay-rich caprock samples, consisting of predominantly phyllosilicates (~80%) and quartz ~20%), ii) pure calcite, and iii) mixtures of carbonate-free clay-rich caprock and pure calcite, with predetermined clay:carbonate ratios. For the natural clay

  4. SPRAYED CLAY TECHNOLOGY FOR THE DEEP REPOSITORY OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Hausmannová

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The sealing barrier will play very important role in the Czech disposal concept of high level radioactive waste. It follows Swedish SKB3 design where granitic rock environment will host the repository. Swelling clay based materials as the most favorable for sealing purposes were selected. Such clays must fulfill certain requirements (e.g. on swelling properties, hydraulic conductivity or plasticity and must be stable for thousands of years. Better sealing behavior is obtained when the clay is compacted. Technology of the seal construction can vary according to its target dry density. Very high dry density is needed for buffer (sealing around entire canister with radioactive waste. Less strict requirements are on material backfilling the access galleries. It allows compaction to lower dry density than in case of buffer. One of potential technology for backfilling is to compact clay layers in most of the gallery profile by common compaction machines (rollers etc. and to spray clay into the uppermost part afterwards. The paper introduces the research works on sprayed clay technology performed at the Centre of Experimental Geotechnics of the Czech Technical University in Prague. Large scale in situ demonstration of filling of short drift in the Josef Gallery is also mentioned.

  5. High Concentration of Red Clay as an Alternative for Antibiotics in Aquaculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaejoon; Jee, Seung Cheol; Sung, Jung-Suk; Park, Woojun

    2016-01-01

    The use of antibiotics in aquaculture raises environmental and food safety concerns because chronic exposure of an aquatic ecosystem to antibiotics can result in the spread of antibiotic resistance, bioaccumulation of antibiotics in the organisms, and transfer of antibiotics to humans. In an attempt to overcome these problems, high-concentration red clay was applied as an alternative antibiotic against the following common fish pathogens: Aeromonas salmonicida, Vibrio alginolyticus, and Streptococcus equinus. The growth of A. salmonicida and V. alginolyticus was retarded by red clay, whereas that of S. equinus was promoted. Phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy analyses confirmed the attachment of red clay on cell surfaces, resulting in rapid gravitational removal and cell surface damage in both A. salmonicida and V. alginolyticus, but not in S. equinus. Different cell wall properties of grampositive species may explain the unharmed cell surface of S. equinus. Significant levels of oxidative stress were generated in only the former two species, whereas significant changes in membrane permeability were found only in S. equinus, probably because of its physiological adaptation. The bacterial communities in water samples from Oncorhynchus mykiss aquacultures supplemented with red clay showed similar structure and diversity as those from oxytetracycline-treated water. Taken together, the antibiotic effects of high concentrations of red clay in aquaculture can be attributed to gravitational removal, cell surface damage, and oxidative stress production, and suggest that red clay may be used as an alternative for antibiotics in aquaculture.

  6. Evaluation of kaolinite clays of Moa for the production of cement based clinker-calcined clay-limestone (LC3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger S. Almenares-Reyes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Clay materials from two outcrops of the Moa region were analyzed to determine their potential use as supplementary cementitious material in the production of ternary cements based on limestone-calcined clay. The clays were characterized by atomic absorption spectroscopy (EAA, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and thermogravimetric analysis (ATG. These methods revealed high aluminum in clays, moderate kaolinite content, a disordered structure and the presence of impurities. The solubility of aluminum and silicon in alkali and the compressive strength of LC3 systems is proportional to their content in clay, being higher for the one with higher kaolinite content and greater structural disorder (outcrop D1, although the clay of both outcrops may constitute supplementary cementitious materials in the production of ternary cements based clinker-calcined clay-limestone. The suitable thermal activation range for both clays is between 650 ° C and 850 ° C.

  7. Earth Pressure at rest of Søvind Marl – a highly overconsolidated Eocene clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech, Gitte Lyng; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluated earth pressure at rest, K0, in highly overconsolidated Eocene clay called Søvind Marl, which exhibits extremely high plasticity indices of up to 300%, a highly fissured structure, and preconsolidation stresses up to 6,800 kPa. Continuous Loading Oedometer (CLO) tests...

  8. Clay content drives carbon stocks in soils under a plantation of Eucalyptus saligna Labill. in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanise Luisa Sausen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil carbon accumulation is largely dependent on net primary productivity. To our knowledge, there have been no studies investigating the dynamics of carbon accumulation in weathered subtropical soils, especially in managed eucalyptus plantations. We quantified the seasonal input of leaf litter, the leaf decomposition rate and soil carbon stocks in an commercial plantation of Eucalyptus saligna Labill. in southern Brazil. Our goal was to evaluate, through multiple linear regression, the influence that certain chemical characteristics of litter, as well as chemical and physical characteristics of soil, have on carbon accumulation in soil organic matter fractions. Variables related to the chemical composition of litter were not associated with the soil carbon stock in the particulate and mineral fractions. However, certain soil characteristics were significantly associated with the carbon stock in both fractions. The concentrations of nutrients associated with plant growth and productivity, such as phosphorus, sulfur, copper and zinc, were associated with variations in the labile carbon pool (particulate fraction. Clay content was strongly associated with the carbon stock in the mineral fraction. The carbon accumulation and stabilization in weathered subtropical Ultisol seems to be mainly associated with the intrinsic characteristics of the soil, particularly clay content, rather than with the quantity, chemical composition or decomposition rate of the litter.

  9. Clastic compaction unit classification based on clay content and integrated compaction recovery using well and seismic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Hong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Compaction correction is a key part of paleo-geomorphic recovery methods. Yet, the influence of lithology on the porosity evolution is not usually taken into account. Present methods merely classify the lithologies as sandstone and mudstone to undertake separate porosity-depth compaction modeling. However, using just two lithologies is an oversimplification that cannot represent the compaction history. In such schemes, the precision of the compaction recovery is inadequate. To improve the precision of compaction recovery, a depth compaction model has been proposed that involves both porosity and clay content. A clastic lithological compaction unit classification method, based on clay content, has been designed to identify lithological boundaries and establish sets of compaction units. Also, on the basis of the clastic compaction unit classification, two methods of compaction recovery that integrate well and seismic data are employed to extrapolate well-based compaction information outward along seismic lines and recover the paleo-topography of the clastic strata in the region. The examples presented here show that a better understanding of paleo-geomorphology can be gained by applying the proposed compaction recovery technology.

  10. Pure and impure clays and their firing products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murad, E.; Wagner, U.

    1989-01-01

    Moessbauer spectroscopy is highly suited for the study of clays whose industrial uses depend on the iron content. Reactions that take place during clay firing can be readily monitored by Moessbauer spectroscopy. Following dehydroxylation of clay minerals, the quadrupole splitting of octahedrally coordinated iron (III) increases abruptly, but reverts to lower values upon the formation of new, better ordered phases at higher temperatures. It is also shown that iron oxides may account for a considerably higher proportion of the total iron content of many clays than is commonly recognized, and their existence must be taken into consideration for a correct interpretation of the Moessbauer spectra of clays. (orig.)

  11. The Effects of High Salinity Groundwater on the Performance of Clay Barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, David

    2005-08-01

    , leading to decreased water activity in the clay. Introduced ions enter the swelling pressure-inducing volume in the clay. Swelling pressure is systematically reduced at all clay densities by interaction with saline fluids. SKB believes that if the buffer density exceeds 1.9 Mg/m 3 , the functional requirements for the swelling pressure to exceed 1 MPa will be fulfilled, even with groundwater salinities equivalent to 3 M NaCl. Similarly, the functional requirement for buffer hydraulic conductivity of 10 -12 m/s will also be fulfilled if the buffer density is greater than 1.8 Mg/m 3 , and with NaCl equivalent salinity equal to 3M (∼175 g/l TDS). A review of work carried out elsewhere related to the swelling of montmorillonitic clays shows that the mechanistic understanding of such processes is less well advanced than that presented by SKB. Backfill materials are even more susceptible to loss of swelling pressure in saline groundwaters. SKB is currently studying several different designs for tunnel and repository backfill. With regard to salinity effects, they state that a hydraulic conductivity of 10 -10 m/s and a swelling pressure > 0.1 MPa at a groundwater TDS of 35 g/l is the target for this assessment. According to the results of the Backfill and Plug test, the 'concept A' backfill (SKB's current reference backfill concept) had a density of 1.7 Mg/m 3 , a hydraulic conductivity of 4x10 -10 m/s, a compressibility of 30 MPa and a swelling pressure of 0.15 - 0.2 MPa (all with a groundwater salinity of 1.2 % NaCl). These values are deemed acceptable by SKB, except for the slightly too high hydraulic conductivity. However, it should be noted that SKB had to increase the proportion of clay in the mixture from 15 % to 30 % to achieve these properties. SKB continues its research in this area in conjunction with Posiva to assess different backfill formulations. Research on tunnel backfilling in Canada suggests that an initial density of at least 0.9 Mg/m 3 is required to

  12. The Effects of High Salinity Groundwater on the Performance of Clay Barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David [Quintessa Ltd., Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    external electrolyte solution enter the clay volume, leading to decreased water activity in the clay. Introduced ions enter the swelling pressure-inducing volume in the clay. Swelling pressure is systematically reduced at all clay densities by interaction with saline fluids. SKB believes that if the buffer density exceeds 1.9 Mg/m{sup 3}, the functional requirements for the swelling pressure to exceed 1 MPa will be fulfilled, even with groundwater salinities equivalent to 3 M NaCl. Similarly, the functional requirement for buffer hydraulic conductivity of 10{sup -12} m/s will also be fulfilled if the buffer density is greater than 1.8 Mg/m{sup 3}, and with NaCl equivalent salinity equal to 3M ({approx}175 g/l TDS). A review of work carried out elsewhere related to the swelling of montmorillonitic clays shows that the mechanistic understanding of such processes is less well advanced than that presented by SKB. Backfill materials are even more susceptible to loss of swelling pressure in saline groundwaters. SKB is currently studying several different designs for tunnel and repository backfill. With regard to salinity effects, they state that a hydraulic conductivity of 10{sup -10} m/s and a swelling pressure > 0.1 MPa at a groundwater TDS of 35 g/l is the target for this assessment. According to the results of the Backfill and Plug test, the 'concept A' backfill (SKB's current reference backfill concept) had a density of 1.7 Mg/m{sup 3}, a hydraulic conductivity of 4x10{sup -10} m/s, a compressibility of 30 MPa and a swelling pressure of 0.15 - 0.2 MPa (all with a groundwater salinity of 1.2 % NaCl). These values are deemed acceptable by SKB, except for the slightly too high hydraulic conductivity. However, it should be noted that SKB had to increase the proportion of clay in the mixture from 15 % to 30 % to achieve these properties. SKB continues its research in this area in conjunction with Posiva to assess different backfill formulations. Research on tunnel

  13. Influence of Random Inclusion of Coconut Fibres on the Short term Strength of Highly Compressible Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramani Sujatha, Evangelin; SaiSree, S.; Prabalini, C.; Aysha Farsana, Z.

    2017-07-01

    The choice of natural fibres for soil stabilization provides an economic, safe and eco-friendly alternative to improve the properties of soil. They are an important step forward toward sustainable development. An attempt was made to study the influence of the random addition of untreated coconut fibres on the short term strength of soil, its stress-strain behavior, compaction characteristics and index properties. The soil selected for the study is a highly compressible clay sample with a liquid limit of 52.5 % and plasticity index of 38 %. The soil has no organic content. The study reveals that the compaction curves tend to shift to the right side, indicating more plastic behavior with the addition of fibres. The addition of fibres also reorient the soil structure to a more dispersed fashion. A significant increase in the unconfined compressive strength is also observed. An increase of nearly 51 % in the unconfined compressive strength is observed at 0.75 % coir inclusion. The stress-strain behavior of the soil shows a shift toward more plastic behavior. The mode of failure of the soil specimen is by cracking and with fibre inclusion, length of the failure cracks is restrained as the fibre tends to hold the cracks together, resulting in shorter cracks, with significant bulging of the specimen at failure.

  14. Preconsolidation of Søvind Marl - a highly fissured Eocene clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech, Gitte Lyng; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl

    2015-01-01

    Determination of the preconsolidation stresses is a key tool in geotechnical engineering used to evaluate and estimate the behavior of soils. However, it has been proven difficult to accurately estimate the preconsolidation in highly fissured overconsolidated clays, due to the effect of the fissu...

  15. Comparison of Liquid Limit of Highly Plastic Clay by Means of Casagrande and Fall Cone Apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech, Gitte Lyng; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2011-01-01

    The connection between the Liquid Limit found using the Casagrande and the Fall Cone Apparatus is tested for the Danish Eocene Clay that has Liquid Limits up to 350% and Plasticity Index up to 300%, which is well outside the normal range of Casagrande’s Plasticity Chart. Based on the high plastic...

  16. Synthesis and Properties of High Strength Thin Film Composites of Poly(ethylene Oxide and PEO-PMMA Blend with Cetylpyridinium Chloride Modified Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saleem Khan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ion-conducting thin film composites of polymer electrolytes were prepared by mixing high MW poly(ethylene oxide (PEO, poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA as a polymer matrix, cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC modified MMT as filler, and different content of LiClO4 by using solution cast method. The crystallinity, ionic conductivity (σ, and mechanical properties of the composite electrolytes and blend composites were evaluated by using XRD, AC impedance, and UTM studies, respectively. The modification of clay by CPC showed enhancement in the d-spacing. The loading of clay has effect on crystallinity of PEO systems. Blend composites showed better mechanical properties. Young’s modulus and elongation at break values showed increase with salt and clay incorporation in pure PEO. The optimum composition composite of PEO with 3.5 wt% of salt and 3.3 wt% of CPMMT exhibited better performance.

  17. Predicting soil particle density from clay and soil organic matter contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; McBride, R.A.; Keller, T.

    2017-01-01

    Soil particle density (Dp) is an important soil property for calculating soil porosity expressions. However, many studies assume a constant value, typically 2.65Mgm−3 for arable, mineral soils. Fewmodels exist for the prediction of Dp from soil organic matter (SOM) content. We hypothesized...

  18. Desaturation of a clay-stone around a ventilated gallery: numerical modelling of pressures and water contents under various conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ababou, Rachid; Mansouri, Nahla; Bailly, David; Poutrel, Adrien

    2012-01-01

    (cylindrical drift) is discretized and internalized as a 3D 'macro-porous' body within the computational porous domain. Secondly, the properties of this internal macro-porous body are adjusted in such a way that it will transmit properly the imposed suction (or pressure, or flux, as the case may be) from external to internal boundaries. Here, the suction is imposed on the entry face of the gallery (external boundary), and it is transmitted to the clay/gallery interface (internal boundary). The macro-porous body has a porosity of 100%, a large Darcy permeability compared to the clay-stone, and other special nonlinear and non-isotropic unsaturated properties. Briefly, numerical modelling was conducted with BIGFLOW 3D, an implicit finite volume solver of the saturated/unsaturated Richards equation in mixed form (moisture content 'θ', pressure head 'h'). We used the nonlinear Van Genuchten / Mualem conductivity and water retention curves (K(h); θ(h)) in the unsaturated zone. A specific elastic storativity (S S ) was added in the saturated zone to take into account slight deformation mechanisms in a simplified way (the storativity model does not deal with total stress; it assumes δσ EFF ∼ δp, where p is pore pressure, and σ EFF is Terzaghi's effective stress taken positive when extensional). Finally, the BIGFLOW code can also handle 3D heterogeneity and nonlinear diagonal anisotropy, that is: [Kii(h,x,y,z); θ(h,x,y,z)]. We used these additional capabilities of the code in some of the tests. Figs.1 and 2 show the evolution of desaturation for a 'Type I' test, i.e., with suction imposed on a flat horizontal piece of wall located at the roof of the drift. The drift 'radius' (half-side) is R=2 m. The case shown here is only 'moderately dry': the prescribed suction is ψ=3000 m (∼30 MPa), corresponding to H R =80.74% at T AIR =25 C and P ATM =1 bar (according to Kelvin's law). The imposed desaturation of the porous medium at the drift wall is significant (more than 50% drop

  19. Characterization of clay used for red ceramic fabrication; Caracterizacao de argila utilizada para fabricacao de ceramica vermelha

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, P.S.; Morais, A.S.C.; Caldas, T.C.C.; Monteiro, S.N.; Vieira, C.M.F. [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro (LAMAV/UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Materiais Avancados; Ribeiro, M.M., E-mail: patriciasp_@hotmail.com [Instituto Federal Fluminense (IFF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this work is to characterize a clay used in the red ceramics fabrication, from Campos dos Goytacazes north of the State of Rio de Janeiro. The clay was submitted for physical, chemical and mineralogical tests. The results showed that the clay has a high content of clay minerals with kaolinitic predominance, high loss on ignition and low flux oxides. It is recommended that this clay is mixed with non-plastic materials. (author)

  20. Can the water content of highly compacted bentonite be increased by applying a high water pressure?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Kasbohm, J.

    2001-10-01

    A great many laboratory investigations have shown that the water uptake in highly compacted MX-80 clay takes place by diffusion at low external pressure. It means that wetting of the clay buffer in the deposition holes of a KBS-3 repository is very slow if the water pressure is low and that complete water saturation can take several tens of years if the initial degree of water saturation of the buffer clay and the ability of the rock to give off water are low. It has therefore been asked whether injection of water can raise the degree of water saturation and if a high water pressure in the nearfield can have the same effect. The present report describes attempts to moisten highly compacted blocks of MX-80 clay with a dry density of 1510 kg/m 3 by injecting water under a pressure of 650 kPa through a perforated injection pipe for 3 and 20 minutes, respectively. The interpretation was made by determining the water content of a number of samples located at different distances from the pipe. An attempt to interpret the pattern of distribution of injected uranium acetate solution showed that the channels into which the solution went became closed in a few minutes and that dispersion in the homogenized clay gave low U-concentrations. The result was that the water content increased from about 9 to about 11-12 % within a distance of about 1 centimeter from the injection pipe and to slightly more than 9 % at a distance of about 4-5 cm almost independently of the injection time. Complete water saturation corresponds to a water content of about 30 % and the wetting effect was hence small from a practical point of view. By use of microstructural models it can be shown that injected water enters only the widest channels that remain after the compaction and that these channels are quickly closed by expansion of the hydrating surrounding clay. Part of the particles that are thereby released become transported by the flowing water and cause clogging of the channels, which is

  1. Quantification of SOC and Clay Content Using Visible Near-Infrared Reflectance–Mid-Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy With Jack-Knifing Partial Least Squares Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Yi; Knadel, Maria; Gislum, René

    2014-01-01

    A total of 125 soil samples were collected from a Danish field varying in soil texture from sandy to loamy. Visible near-infrared reflectance (Vis-NIR) and mid-infrared reflectance (MIR) spectroscopy combined with chemometric methods were used to predict soil organic carbon (SOC) and clay content...

  2. Synthesis of Highly Reactive Subnano-sized Zero-valent Iron using Smectite Clay Templates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Cheng; Jia, Hanzhang; Li, Hui; Teppen, Brian J.; Boyd, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    A novel method was developed for synthesizing subnano-sized zero-valent iron (ZVI) using smectite clay layers as templates. Exchangeable Fe(III) cations compensating the structural negative charges of smectites were reduced with NaBH4, resulting in the formation of ZVI. The unique structure of smectite clay, in which isolated exchangeable Fe(III) cations reside near the sites of structural negative charges, inhibited the agglomeration of ZVI resulting in the formation of discrete regions of subnanoscale ZVI particles in the smectite interlayer regions. X-ray diffraction revealed an interlayer spacing of ~ 5 Å. The non-structural iron content of this clay yields a calculated ratio of two atoms of ZVI per three cation exchange sites, in full agreement with the XRD results since the diameter of elemental Fe is 2.5 Å. The clay-templated ZVI showed superior reactivity and efficiency compared to other previously reported forms of ZVI as indicated by the reduction of nitrobenzene; structural Fe within the aluminosilicate layers was nonreactive. At a 1:3 molar ratio of nitrobenzene:non-structural Fe, a reaction efficiency of 83% was achieved, and over 80% of the nitrobenzene was reduced within one minute. These results confirm that non-structural Fe from Fe(III)-smectite was reduced predominantly to ZVI which was responsible for the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline. This new form of subnano-scale ZVI may find utility in the development of remediation technologies for persistent environmental contaminants, e.g. as components of constructed reactive domains such as reactive caps for contaminated sediments. PMID:20446730

  3. Synthesis of highly reactive subnano-sized zero-valent iron using smectite clay templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Cheng; Jia, Hanzhong; Li, Hui; Teppen, Brian J; Boyd, Stephen A

    2010-06-01

    A novel method was developed for synthesizing subnano-sized zero-valent iron (ZVI) using smectite clay layers as templates. Exchangeable Fe(III) cations compensating the structural negative charges of smectites were reduced with NaBH(4), resulting in the formation of ZVI. The unique structure of smectite clay, in which isolated exchangeable Fe(III) cations reside near the sites of structural negative charges, inhibited the agglomeration of ZVI resulting in the formation of subnanoscale ZVI particles in the smectite interlayer regions. X-ray diffraction revealed an interlayer spacing of approximately 5 A. The non-structural iron content of this clay yields a calculated ratio of two atoms of ZVI per three cation exchange sites, in full agreement with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) results since the diameter of elemental Fe is 2.5 A. The clay-templated ZVI showed superior reactivity and efficiency compared to other previously reported forms of ZVI as indicated by the reduction of nitrobenzene; structural Fe within the aluminosilicate layers was nonreactive. At a 1:3 molar ratio of nitrobenzene/non-structural Fe, a reaction efficiency of 83% was achieved, and over 80% of the nitrobenzene was reduced within one minute. These results confirm that non-structural Fe from Fe(III)-smectite was reduced predominantly to ZVI which was responsible for the reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline. This new form of subnanoscale ZVI may find utility in the development of remediation technologies for persistent environmental contaminants, for example, as components of constructed reactive domains such as reactive caps for contaminated sediments.

  4. Performance assessment of the disposal of vitrified high-level waste in a clay layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallants, Dirk; Marivoet, Jan; Sillen, Xavier

    2001-01-01

    Deep disposal is considered a safe solution to the management of high-level radioactive waste. The safety is usually demonstrated by means of a performance assessment. This paper discusses the methodological aspects and some of the results obtained for the performance assessment of the disposal of vitrified high-level waste in a clay layer in Belgium. The calculations consider radionuclide migration through the following multi-barrier components, all of which contribute to the overall safety: (1) engineered barriers and the host clay layer, (2) overlying aquifer, and (3) biosphere. The interfaces between aquifers and biosphere are limited to the well and river pathway. Results of the performance assessment calculations are given in terms of the time evolution of the dose rates of the most important fission and activation products and actinides. The role of the glass matrix in the overall performance of the repository is also discussed

  5. Experimental study of the effect of high porewater salinity on the physical properties of a natural smectitic clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, Roland

    2001-03-01

    Natural smectitic clays for backfilling tunnels and shafts in deep repositories may be an alternative to mixtures of bentonite and ballast. Very salt groundwater is known to raise the hydraulic conductivity and reduce the expandability of clay materials in general and of bentonite/ballast mixtures in particular and the present study aimed at determining the impact of salt water on the major physical properties of natural smectitic clays, represented by the German Friedland Ton. The investigation showed that the compactability of the investigated clay is not significantly affected by the water content in contrast to bentonite/ballast fills, and that the conductivity and expandability are acceptable even at salt contents of up to 20 % if the bulk density at saturation is slightly higher than 2000 kg/m 3 . For salt contents up to 3. 5 % the corresponding density is around 1900 kg/m 3 . In general, the investigated clay offers better physical properties than mixtures of bentonite/ballast mixtures with up to 30 % bentonite content

  6. Experimental study of the effect of high porewater salinity on the physical properties of a natural smectitic clay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, Roland [Geodevelopment AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2001-03-01

    Natural smectitic clays for backfilling tunnels and shafts in deep repositories may be an alternative to mixtures of bentonite and ballast. Very salt groundwater is known to raise the hydraulic conductivity and reduce the expandability of clay materials in general and of bentonite/ballast mixtures in particular and the present study aimed at determining the impact of salt water on the major physical properties of natural smectitic clays, represented by the German Friedland Ton. The investigation showed that the compactability of the investigated clay is not significantly affected by the water content in contrast to bentonite/ballast fills, and that the conductivity and expandability are acceptable even at salt contents of up to 20 % if the bulk density at saturation is slightly higher than 2000 kg/m{sup 3} . For salt contents up to 3. 5 % the corresponding density is around 1900 kg/m{sup 3}. In general, the investigated clay offers better physical properties than mixtures of bentonite/ballast mixtures with up to 30 % bentonite content.

  7. Radionuclide release from high level waste forms under repository conditions in clay or granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godon, N.; Lanza, F.

    1990-01-01

    The behaviour of both fully active and simulated vitrified high level waste (HLW) has been studied under conditions that are likely to occur in future repositories in clay and granite. The simulated HLW was doped with Cs, Sr, Tc and the actinides and the leaching of these elements from the glass has been measured together with their concentrations in the water of the near-field and their distribution between the various components of the repository. The diffusion coefficients of several elements in Boom clay has also been measured. The results show that the concentrations of Tc and the actinides in the near-field of a repository will be very low and that the actinides will only diffuse very slowly away from the vicinity of the glass. 24 refs., 1 figs., 7 tabs

  8. Assessment of potential Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, clays when subjected to high rates of heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filgueira, R.L.; Pereira, L.M.; Dutra, R.P.S.; Nascimento, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this work we study three clays of the state of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, to evaluate the potential them when subjected to high rates of heating. The samples were formed by pressing and subject to rates of 5 deg C / min, 10 deg C / min and 15 deg C / min, with temperature of 950 deg C. This study determined the technological properties of the samples. The mineralogical composition was identified by X-ray diffraction. The chemical composition was determined by Xray fluorescence. The Atterberg limits, were used to classify the samples on the plasticity. Were also performed: dilatometry, size analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The examination of the processing variables and the intrinsic characteristics of each material indicates that the RX clay showed the best results for the manufacture of blocks and tiles. The techniques used in this study were efficient and the initial objectives were achieved. (author)

  9. Determination of metal ion contents of two antiemetic clays use in Geophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon E. Owumi

    2015-01-01

    Specifically, our result indicates unacceptably high levels of aluminum in Eko and Omumu (>10-fold greater than the highest desirable levels set by the USEPA. The aluminum concentrations were influenced by the pH condition in which the samples were digested. Dietary exposure to aluminum at such high levels may be deleterious to maternal health and fetal development. Therefore consumption of Eko and Omumu as an antidote to reduce nausea during pregnancy should be discouraged. Future studies are planned to investigate specific impacts on fetal and maternal health and likely teratogenicity in rodent models.

  10. Effects of clay on toxin binding capacity, ruminal fermentation, diet digestibility, and growth of steers fed high-concentrate diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelo, D S; Lancaster, N A; Melnichenko, S; Muegge, C R; Schoonmaker, J P

    2017-10-01

    proportional adsorption was decreased to 35.5 and 91.1% at 5,200 μg/mL ( clay effectively binds ruminal toxins, decreases ruminal lactate, and improves performance only during adaptation to a high-concentrate feedlot diet.

  11. Improvement of Soil Moisture Retrieval from Hyperspectral VNIR-SWIR Data Using Clay Content Information: From Laboratory to Field Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Oltra-Carrió

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to study the constraints and performance of SMC retrieval methodologies in the VNIR (Visible-Near InfraRed and SWIR (ShortWave InfraRed regions (from 0.4 to 2.5 µm when passing from controlled laboratory conditions to field conditions. Five different approaches of signal processing found in literature were considered. Four local criteria are spectral indices (WISOIL, NSMI, NINSOL and NINSON. These indices are the ratios between the spectral reflectances acquired at two specific wavelengths to characterize moisture content in soil. The last criterion is based in the convex hull concept and it is a global method, which is based on the analysis of the full spectral signature of the soil. The database was composed of 464 and 9 spectra, respectively, measured over bare soils in laboratory and in-situ. For each measurement, SMC and texture were well-known and the database was divided in two parts dedicated to calibration and validation steps. The calibration part was used to define the empirical relation between SMC and SMC retrieval approaches, with coefficients of determination (R2 between 0.72 and 0.92. A clay content (CC dependence was detected for the NINSOL and NINSON indices. Consequently, two new criteria were proposed taking into account the CC contribution (NINSOLCC and NINSONCC. The well-marked regression between SMC and global/local indices, and the interest of using the CC, were confirmed during the validation step using laboratory data (R² superior to 0.76 and Root mean square errors inferior to 8.3% m3∙m−3 in all cases and using in-situ data, where WISOIL, NINSOLCC and NINSONCC criteria stand out among the NSMI and CH.

  12. Alteration of MX-80 by hydrothermal treatment under high salt content conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pusch, R. [Geodevelopment AB, Lund (Sweden); Kasbohm, J. [Greifswald Univ. (Germany). Geological Dep.

    2002-02-01

    If brammalit, i.e. sodium illite, is formed from smectite in Na-rich salt water at high temperature such conversion can also take place in the buffer clay that surrounds the canisters in a KBS-3 repository. The present study comprised two laboratory test series with MX-80 clay, one with compacted clay powder with a dry density of 1200 to 1300 kg/m{sup 3} and saturation with 10% and 20% NaCl solutions followed by heating to 110 deg C under closed conditions for 30 days. In the second series air-dry compacted clay powder in a cell was heated at 110 deg C for the same period of time and connected to vessels with 10% and 20% NaCl solutions. The first series represents the conditions in the buffer clay after saturation with Na-rich salt water while the second one corresponds to the conditions in the course of saturation with such water. All laboratory tests were made after short-term percolation with distilled water for making sure that the hydro-thermally treated samples were fully fluid-saturated. The results from the physical testing showed that the hydraulic conductivity and swelling pressure of the hydrothermally treated clay samples were on the same order of magnitude as for untreated clay. Comparison with illitic clays shows that the latter are at least a hundred times more permeable than the hydrothermally treated salt clays in the present study, which hence indicates that conversion to illite was insignificant. This is obvious also from the fact that while illitic clays have very low swelling pressures the hydrothermally treated clays exhibited swelling pressures on the same order of magnitude as untreated MX-80. XRD analysis showed a clear difference in mineral constitution between the two test series. Thus, while no significant change from the typical mineralogy of untreated MX-80 was found for hydrothermal treatment of clay saturated with 10 and 20% NaCl solution, except for some very slight neoformation of illite-smectite mixed layers or irreversible

  13. Shearing of saturated clays in rock joints at high confining pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.; Mao, N.

    1979-01-01

    Saturated clays are sheared between rock joints at various pore water pressures and at confining pressures up to 3 kb (300 Mpa). Sliding on these joints is stable. For a given clay, the shear stress required to initiate sliding increases linearly with the effective normal stress across the sliding surface, with a slope of 0.08 +- 0.01 for joints filled with saturated montmorillonite, 0.12 +- 0.01 with saturated chlorite, 0.15 +- 0.01 with saturated kaolinite, and 0.22 +- 0.02 with saturated silty illite. Thus at high confining pressures the shear stress required to initiate sliding on joints filled with saturated clays are very much smaller than that required to initiate sliding on clean rock joints or on joints filled with dry gouge materials. In the crust, saturation of gouge materials along active faults would greatly lower the frictional resistance to faulting and would stabilize fault movement. Different fault behaviors such as stable creep along some faults and intermittent but sudden slip along others may reflect in part different degrees of saturation of fault zones at depth

  14. Chitin/clay microspheres with hierarchical architecture for highly efficient removal of organic dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; Mao, Jie; Peng, Na; Luo, Xiaogang; Chang, Chunyu

    2018-05-15

    Numerous adsorbents have been reported for efficient removal of dye from water, but the high cost raw materials and complicated fabrication process limit their practical applications. Herein, novel nanocomposite microspheres were fabricated from chitin and clay by a simple thermally induced sol-gel transition. Clay nanosheets were uniformly embedded in a nanofiber weaved chitin microsphere matrix, leading to their hierarchical architecture. Benefiting from this unique structure, microspheres could efficiently remove methylene blue (MB) through a spontaneous physic-sorption process which fit well with pseudo-second-order and Langmuir isotherm models. The maximal values of adsorption capability obtained by calculation and experiment were 152.2 and 156.7 mg g -1 , respectively. Chitin/clay microspheres (CCM2) could remove 99.99% MB from its aqueous solution (10 mg g -1 ) within 20 min. These findings provide insight into a new strategy for fabrication of dye adsorbents with hierarchical structure from low cost raw materials. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Geotechnical studies of Jaitapur marine clay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.T.; Nayak, B.U.

    characterisEd. by high water content and high Atterberg limits. Undrained shear strength varied from 1.8 to 6 KPa. These were moderately sensitive clays. Carbonate content which varied from 3 to 27%, was found to influence engineering properties of the soil...

  16. The nature of strong Brønsted acidity of Ni-SMM clay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yue, C.; Liu, C.; Mezari, B.; Brückner, A.; Pidko, E.A.; Rigutto, M.S.; Hensen, E.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    The origin of the high Brønsted acidity of Ni-SMM (Ni-substituted synthetic mica-montmorillonite; beidellite structure) clays was investigated. Ni-SMM clays with varying F content, SMM with F and Ni-SMM without F in the structure were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. Ni-SMM clays with

  17. Identification of chlorinated solvents degradation zones in clay till by high resolution chemical, microbial and compound specific isotope analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Ida; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Bælum, Jacob

    2013-01-01

    subsampling of the clay till cores. The study demonstrates that an integrated approach combining chemical analysis, molecular microbial tools and compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) was required in order to document biotic and abiotic degradations in the clay till system. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.......The degradation of chlorinated ethenes and ethanes in clay till was investigated at a contaminated site (Vadsby, Denmark) by high resolution sampling of intact cores combined with groundwater sampling. Over decades of contamination, bioactive zones with degradation of trichloroethene (TCE) and 1...

  18. The effect of type, concentration and volume of dispersing agent on the magnitude of the clay content determined by the hydrometer analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, A; Fanourakis, G C

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the physical properties of soils, including the clay content, is of utmost importance in the field of geotechnical engineering. The hydrometer analysis is the most widely used technique for the analysis of the particle size distribution of the fine-grained fraction of a soil, calculated using sedimentation principles. The hydrometer analysis utilises a dispersing agent - Calgon 33:7 (comprising 33 grams of sodium hexametaphosphate and 7 grams of sodium carbonate when mixed in 1 l...

  19. High temperature proton exchange membranes based on polybenzimidazole and clay composites for fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plackett, David; Siu, Ana; Li, Qingfeng

    2011-01-01

    dispersion of modified laponite clay was achieved in polybenzimidazole (PBI) solutions which, when cast and allowed to dry, resulted in homogeneous and transparent composite membranes containing up to 20 wt% clay in the polymer. The clay was organically modified using a series of ammonium and pyr...

  20. Morphology and melt rheology of nylon 11/clay nanocomposites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, Xiaofeng; Yang, Jun; Zhu, Lianchao; Wang, Biao; Sun, Guangping; Lv, Pengfei; Phang, In Yee; Liu, Tianxi

    2006-01-01

    Nylon 11 (PA11)/clay nanocomposites have been prepared by melt-blending, followed by melt-extrusion through a capillary. Transmission electron microscopy shows that the exfoliated clay morphology is dominant for low nanofiller content, while the intercalated one is prevailing for high filler

  1. Clay Play

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Liz; Steffan, Dana

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to use clay as a potential material for young children to explore. As teachers, the authors find that their dialogue about the potential of clay as a learning medium raises many questions: (1) What makes clay so enticing? (2) Why are teachers noticing different play and conversation around the clay table as compared to…

  2. Ball clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Part of the 2000 annual review of the industrial minerals sector. A general overview of the ball clay industry is provided. In 2000, sales of ball clay reached record levels, with sanitary ware and tile applications accounting for the largest sales. Ball clay production, consumption, prices, foreign trade, and industry news are summarized. The outlook for the ball clay industry is also outlined.

  3. Biocompatible high performance hyperbranched epoxy/clay nanocomposite as an implantable material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barua, Shaswat; Dutta, Nipu; Karak, Niranjan; Karmakar, Sanjeev; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Aidew, Lipika; Buragohain, Alak K

    2014-01-01

    Polymeric biomaterials are in extensive use in the domain of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. High performance hyperbranched epoxy is projected here as a potential biomaterial for tissue regeneration. Thermosetting hyperbranched epoxy nanocomposites were prepared with Homalomena aromatica rhizome oil-modified bentonite as well as organically modified montmorillonite clay. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopic techniques confirmed the strong interfacial interaction of clay layers with the epoxy matrix. The poly(amido amine)-cured thermosetting nanocomposites exhibited high mechanical properties like impact resistance (>100 cm), scratch hardness (>10 kg), tensile strength (48–58 MPa) and elongation at break (11.9–16.6%). Cytocompatibility of the thermosets was found to be excellent as evident by MTT and red blood cell hemolytic assays. The nanocomposites exhibited antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 11632), Escherichia coli (ATCC 10536), Mycobacterium smegmatis (ATCC14468) and Candida albicans (ATCC 10231) strains. In vivo biocompatibility of the best performing nanocomposite was ascertained by histopathological study of the brain, heart, liver and skin after subcutaneous implantation in Wistar rats. The material supported the proliferation of dermatocytes without induction of any sign of toxicity to the above organs. The adherence and proliferation of cells endorse the nanocomposite as a non-toxic biomaterial for tissue regeneration. (paper)

  4. Biocompatible high performance hyperbranched epoxy/clay nanocomposite as an implantable material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Shaswat; Dutta, Nipu; Karmakar, Sanjeev; Chattopadhyay, Pronobesh; Aidew, Lipika; Buragohain, Alak K; Karak, Niranjan

    2014-04-01

    Polymeric biomaterials are in extensive use in the domain of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. High performance hyperbranched epoxy is projected here as a potential biomaterial for tissue regeneration. Thermosetting hyperbranched epoxy nanocomposites were prepared with Homalomena aromatica rhizome oil-modified bentonite as well as organically modified montmorillonite clay. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopic techniques confirmed the strong interfacial interaction of clay layers with the epoxy matrix. The poly(amido amine)-cured thermosetting nanocomposites exhibited high mechanical properties like impact resistance (>100 cm), scratch hardness (>10 kg), tensile strength (48-58 MPa) and elongation at break (11.9-16.6%). Cytocompatibility of the thermosets was found to be excellent as evident by MTT and red blood cell hemolytic assays. The nanocomposites exhibited antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 11632), Escherichia coli (ATCC 10536), Mycobacterium smegmatis (ATCC14468) and Candida albicans (ATCC 10231) strains. In vivo biocompatibility of the best performing nanocomposite was ascertained by histopathological study of the brain, heart, liver and skin after subcutaneous implantation in Wistar rats. The material supported the proliferation of dermatocytes without induction of any sign of toxicity to the above organs. The adherence and proliferation of cells endorse the nanocomposite as a non-toxic biomaterial for tissue regeneration.

  5. Clay-brick firing in a high-temperature solar furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villeda-Munoz, G. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Unidad Queretaro, Queretaro (Mexico)]. E-mail: gvilledam@ipn.mx; Castaneda-Miranda, A. [Computation & amp; Mechatronic Studies Division, Universidad Politecnica de Queretaro, Queretaro (Mexico)]. E-mail: acastaneda@upq.edu.mx; Pless, R.C. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Unidad Queretaro, Queretaro (Mexico)]. E-mail: rpless@ipn.mx; Vega-Duran, J.T. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Unidad Queretaro, Queretaro (Mexico); Pineda-Pinon, J. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Unidad Queretaro, Queretaro (Mexico)]. E-mail: jpinedap@ipn.mx

    2011-10-15

    The firing process for clay-brick production in traditional kilns generates atmospheric pollution when industrial and domestic scrap is used as fuel. An alternative is presented here, using the solar energy for clay-brick firing. We are developing a system for clay-brick firing to reach temperatures between 900 degrees Celsius and 1050 degrees Celsius; these temperatures are sufficiently high to fire bricks or similar ceramic products. The present paper describes the design and characterization of the components of a solar furnace for clay-brick firing with inner chamber dimensions of 0.48 * 0.61 * 0.64 m. To convey the sunlight to the firing chamber, a heliostat with nine 1 * 1 m mirrors is used to send the rays of the sun to an off-axis parabolic concentrator that focuses the light on the entrance of the firing chamber. The heliostat has a solar-tracking system which makes primary and secondary adjustments to assure that the reflected solar radiation always arrives at the concentrator. The firing chamber contains a prismatic cavity that absorbs the solar radiation to generate the heat which is needed for baking the bricks inside the firing chamber. [Spanish] El proceso de coccion para la produccion de tabiques de arcilla en hornos tradicionales genera contaminacion atmosferica cuando los desechos industriales y domesticos se usan como combustibles. Aqui se presenta una alternativa, utilizando la energia solar para la coccion de tabiques de arcilla. Estamos desarrollando un sistema para la coccion de tabiques de arcilla para alcanzar temperaturas entre 900 grados centigradosy 1050 grados centigrados; estas temperaturas son suficientemente altas para cocer tabiques o productos ceramicos similares. El presente articulo describe el diseno y caracterizacion de los componentes de un horno solar para la coccion de tabiques de arcilla con una camara con dimensiones internas de 0.48 * 0.61 *× 0.64 m. Para dirigir los rayos solares a la camara de coccion, un heliostato

  6. Preparation and characterization of clay bonded high strength silica refractory by utilizing agriculture waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhardwaj, A.; Hossain, S.K.S.; Majh, M.R.

    2017-01-01

    Clay bonded silica refractory was prepared by utilizing agriculture waste called rice husk ash (RHA) and refractory grog. Various samples were prepared with different compositions based upon partial replacement of quartz by RHA. Rectangular samples were prepared by following semi dry process prior to pressing in a uniaxial hydraulic press and sintering at a temperature of 1200°C in air atmosphere. Various physical, mechanical and thermal characterizations were done like X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), apparent porosity (AP), bulk density (BD), cold crushing strength (CCS), refractoriness and thermal conductivity measurement. The sample utilizing 30% of RHA was considered most optimum composition which produced cold crushing strength of 38MPa and thermal conductivity of 2.08W/mK at 800°C with a considerable good refractoriness. Enhancement in the mechanical as well as thermal properties may be considered as attributed to the amorphous silica which has reacted more easily and efficiently with other material surrounding giving rise to the densification and produced stable crystalline phase to the refractory material. These promising characteristics suggests that the RHA may lead to be used as a potential material for the preparation of clay bonded high strength silica refractories. [es

  7. The opalinus clay project - disposal of medium and highly-active nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, U.

    2003-01-01

    This article describes the project to demonstrate the feasibility of disposing of long-living medium-active and highly-radioactive nuclear wastes in sedimentary rock in Switzerland. The disposal tasks to be carried out are reviewed and the solutions proposed are described, including short-term handling, intermediate storage and final disposal of low, medium and highly-active wastes. The present state of affairs is described and, in particular, the feasibility of implementing a final storage facility in the opalinus clay beds to be found in northern Switzerland. The project for such a facility in the wine-growing area of the canton of Zurich is described in detail, including the storage concept, the technology to be used and operational aspects as well as questions of safety

  8. Nanoporous polymer--clay hybrid membranes for gas separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defontaine, Guillaume; Barichard, Anne; Letaief, Sadok; Feng, Chaoyang; Matsuura, Takeshi; Detellier, Christian

    2010-03-15

    Nanohybrid organo-inorgano clay mineral-polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes were prepared by the reaction of pure and/or modified natural clay minerals (Sepiolite and montmorillonite) with PDMS in hexane, followed by evaporation of the solvent at 70 degrees C. The membranes were characterized by means of XRD, SEM, ATD-TG and solid state (29)Si magic angle spinning (MAS) and cross-polarization (CP) CP/MAS NMR. The morphology of the membranes depends on the content loading of clay mineral. For low content, the membrane composition is homogeneous, with well dispersed nanoparticles of clay into the polymer matrix, whereas for higher clay content, the membranes are constituted also of a mixture of well dispersed nanoparticles into the polymer, but in the presence of agglomerations of small clay particles. Quantitative (29)Si MAS NMR demonstrated a strong correlation between the clay content of the membrane and the average length of the PDMS chain, indicating that the nanohybrid material is made of clay particles covalently linked to the PDMS structure. This is particularly the case for Sepiolite with has a high density of Q(2) silanol sites. The separation performances of the prepared membranes were tested for CO(2)/CH(4) and O(2)/N(2) mixtures. The observed separation factors showed an increase of the selectivity in the case of CO(2)/CH(4) in comparison with membranes made from PDMS alone under the same conditions. 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of nanocomposites employing high-density polyethylene and organo clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lessa, Tathiane C. Rodrigues F.; Tavares, Maria Ines B.; Pita, Vitor J.R.R.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to prepare nanocomposites of high-density polyethylene and montmorillonite organoclay by polymer melt intercalation, employing different processing parameters. Effective clay incorporation into polyethylene matrix was observed. The nanocomposites were structurally characterized. Intercalated nanocomposites were obtained from different process parameters, employing polyethylene resin and montmorillonite organoclays. The XRD results and other analysis showed that the processing parameters affect the organoclay delamination. The polyethylene nanocomposite presented the better performance using twin screw extruder, at 90 rpm. The purpose of characterization of polyethylene/organoclay nanocomposite by low-field NMR showed that this technique was important to understand changes in the molecular mobility of polyethylene when organoclay was incorporated. (author)

  10. Clay Houses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedro, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a project designed for fourth-graders that involves making clay relief sculptures of houses. Knowing the clay houses will become a family heirloom makes this lesson even more worth the time. It takes three classes to plan and form the clay, and another two to underglaze and glaze the final products.

  11. Far Field Sorption Data Bases for Performance Assessment of a High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository in an Undisturbed Opalinus Clay Host Rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradburry, M.; Baeyens, B.

    2003-08-01

    An Opalinus Clay formation in the Zuercher Weinland is under consideration by Nagra as a potential location for a high-level and long-Iived intermediate-level radioactive waste repository. Performance assessment studies will be performed for this site and the purpose of this report is to describe the procedures used to develop sorption data bases appropriate for an undisturbed Opalinus Clay host rock which are required for such safety analysis calculations. In tight, low water content argillaceous rock formations such as Opalinus Clay, there is uncertainty concerning the in situ pH/P CO 2 . In order to take this intrinsic uncertainty into account porewater chemistries were calculated for a reference case, pH = 7.24, and for two other pH values, 6.3 and 7.8. Sorption data bases are given for the three cases. The basis for the sorption data bases is 'in-house' sorption measurements for Cs(I), Sr(II), Ni(II), Eu(III), Sn(IV), Se(IV), Th(IV) and I(-I) carried out on Opalinus Clay samples from Mont Terri (Canton Jura) since at the time the experiments were performed no core samples from the Benken borehole (Zuercher Weinland) were available. The Opalinus Clay at Mont Terri and Benken are part of the same geological formation . Despite having directly measured data for the above key radionuclides, some of the required distribution ratios (Rd) used to generate the sorption data bases still came from the open literature. An important part of this report is concerned with describing the procedures whereby these selected literature Rd values were modified so as to apply to the Benken Opalinus Clay mineralogy and groundwater chemistries calculated at the three pH values given above. The resulting Rd values were then further modified using so-called Lab→Field transfer factors to produce sorption values which were appropriate to the in situ bulk rock for the selected range of water chemistry conditions. Finally, it is important to have some appreciation of the uncertainties

  12. Far Field Sorption Data Bases for Performance Assessment of a High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository in an Undisturbed Opalinus Clay Host Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradburry, M.; Baeyens, B

    2003-08-01

    An Opalinus Clay formation in the Zuercher Weinland is under consideration by Nagra as a potential location for a high-level and long-Iived intermediate-level radioactive waste repository. Performance assessment studies will be performed for this site and the purpose of this report is to describe the procedures used to develop sorption data bases appropriate for an undisturbed Opalinus Clay host rock which are required for such safety analysis calculations. In tight, low water content argillaceous rock formations such as Opalinus Clay, there is uncertainty concerning the in situ pH/P{sub CO{sub 2}}. In order to take this intrinsic uncertainty into account porewater chemistries were calculated for a reference case, pH = 7.24, and for two other pH values, 6.3 and 7.8. Sorption data bases are given for the three cases. The basis for the sorption data bases is 'in-house' sorption measurements for Cs(I), Sr(II), Ni(II), Eu(III), Sn(IV), Se(IV), Th(IV) and I(-I) carried out on Opalinus Clay samples from Mont Terri (Canton Jura) since at the time the experiments were performed no core samples from the Benken borehole (Zuercher Weinland) were available. The Opalinus Clay at Mont Terri and Benken are part of the same geological formation . Despite having directly measured data for the above key radionuclides, some of the required distribution ratios (Rd) used to generate the sorption data bases still came from the open literature. An important part of this report is concerned with describing the procedures whereby these selected literature Rd values were modified so as to apply to the Benken Opalinus Clay mineralogy and groundwater chemistries calculated at the three pH values given above. The resulting Rd values were then further modified using so-called Lab{yields}Field transfer factors to produce sorption values which were appropriate to the in situ bulk rock for the selected range of water chemistry conditions. Finally, it is important to have some

  13. Polyurethane/organo clay nano composite materials via in-situ polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehab, A.; Agag, T; Akelah, A.; Shalaby, N.

    2005-01-01

    Polyurethane/organo clay nano composites have been synthesized via in situ polymerization. The organo clay firstly prepared by intercalation of lyamine or amino lauric acid into montmorillonite-clay (MMT) through ion exchange process. The syntheses of polyurethane/organo clay hybrid films containing different ratio of clay were carried out by swelling the organo clay, into diol and diamine or into different kinds of diols, followed by addition of diisocyanate. The nano composites with dispersed structure of MMT was obtained as evidence by scanning electron microscope and x-ray diffraction. X-ray analysis showed that the d-spacing increased to more than 44A since there is no peaks corresponding to do spacing in organo clay with all the ratios (1, 5, 10, 20%). Also, SEM results confirm the dispersion of nanometer silicate layers in the polyurethane matrix. This indicated that the clay was completely exfoliated and homogeneous dispersion in the polyurethane matrix. Also, it was found that the presence of organo clay leads to improvement the mechanical properties. Since, the tensile strength increased with increasing the organo clay contents to 20% by the ratio 194% in compared to the 1H: with 0% organo clay. Also, the elongation is a decreases with increasing the organo clay contents. The results shown the tensile strength of PU/SMA/ALA-MMT nano composites is high by 6-7 times than the corresponding to PU/Tvr-MMT

  14. Project Opalinus Clay: Sorption Data Bases For Opalinus Clay Influenced By A High pH Plume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Baeyens, B

    2004-11-01

    The interaction of groundwater with the large quantities of cement/concrete used in the construction and backfilling of emplacement tunnels containing long-lived intermediate level radioactive waste may give rise to the release of a pulse of hyper alkaline fluid (pH plume) into the surrounding rock. Since the pH of this plume could remain in excess of 12.5 for tens of thousands of years, many minerals in a sedimentary host rock would be unstable leading to dissolution reactions, secondary mineral precipitation and changes in groundwater chemistry. An Opalinus day formation in the Zuercher Weinland, is under consideration by Nagra as a potential host rock for a repository of spent fuel (SF), vitrified high-level waste (HLW) from reprocessing of spent fuel and long-lived intermediate-Ievel radioactive waste (ILW). The purpose of this report is to assess the effects of the interactions between a pH plume and Opalinus day on the sorption properties of the formation and to provide appropriate sorption data bases. (author)

  15. Clay dispersibility and soil friability – testing the soil clay-to-carbon saturation concept

    OpenAIRE

    Schjønning, P.; de Jonge, L.W.; Munkholm, L.J.; Moldrup, P.; Christensen, B.T.; Olesen, J.E.

    2011-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with OC as a predictor of clay dispersibility and soil friability. Soil was sampled three years in a field varying in clay content (~100 to ~220 g kg-1 soil) and grown with different crop rotations. Clay ...

  16. Kinethical Aspects of High Solid Contents Copoly(Styrene/Butylacrylate-Cloisite 30B Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mirzataheri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High solid content poly (styrene-co-butyl acrylate latex ( with 20% and 40% solid content including high amounts of Cloisite 30B (7 wt% and 10 wt% were kinetically investigated. Gravimetric method via measuring the rate of polymerization, number of particles and average number of radicals per particle was used. Results showed that by increasing the solid content; the average diameter of polymer particles decreased. Studies on the polymerization rate depict that the increase in polymer particle size provides more average reactive radicals per polymer particle, which increased from 0.48 to 0.88 for the sample containing 7 wt% clay and 20 wt% solid content. Observed armored particles with honeycomb morphology is the most novelty of this research work, which is suitable for making barrier packaging films.

  17. High-Strengthening of Cement-Treated Clay by Mechanical Dehydration

    OpenAIRE

    Kasama, Kiyonobu; Zen, Kouki; Iwataki, Kiyoharu; 笠間, 清伸; 善, 功企; 岩瀧, 清治

    2007-01-01

    A technique called the cement-mixing and mechanical dehydration method (CMD) as one of recycling techniques for soft clay slurry is developed. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the CMD for increasing the strength of soft clay, a series of unconfined compression tests and several durability tests were performed together with the literature review of unconfined compressive strength in cement-treated soils. Moreover, a series of constant strain rate consolidation tests were also performe...

  18. Laboratory and field tests for radionuclide migration and high flow paths in clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourke, P.J.; Jefferies, N.L.; Lineham, T.R.; Nesirky, P.

    1991-01-01

    Two investigations have been undertaken in this programme. The principal investigation was at Culham Laboratory, England, where water flow within the Kimmeridge clay was measured. A subsidiary investigation at SCK/CEN was undertaken at the Underground Research Laboratory SCK/CEN Mol, Belgium, where an in situ measurement of solute transport by diffusion was attempted. The in situ migration experiment at the Underground Research Laboratory at SCK/CEN Mol, Belgium, was unsuccessful, due to problems with the engineering installation. These difficulties caused significant disturbance to the Boom clay which was to be tested. Nevertheless the laboratory test proved the feasibility of the experiment. The field measurements at Culham Laboratory, Oxfordshire, were completed with the flow testing of a very silty clay horizon in the Kimmeridge clay. This layer was proved to be laterally continuous after drilling three exploratory boreholes. The hydraulic conductivity of the layer was ≥ 10 -8 ms -1 and comparative tests in the clay showed the conductivity of the clay to be at least 50 times less. 12 figs

  19. Study of Various Techniques for Improving Weak and Compressible Clay Soil under a High Earth Embankment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zein A.K. M.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the suitability of three soil improvement techniques for the construction of a high earth embankment on thick weak and highly compressible clay soil. The eastern approach embankment of Alhalfaya Bridge on the River Nile linking Khartoum North and Omdurman cities was chosen as a case study and a comprehensive site investigation program was carried out to determine the properties the subsurface soils. The study results showed that unless the subsurface soils have been improved they may fail or undergo excessively large settlements due to the embankment construction. Three ground improvement techniques based on the principles of the “staged construction method, SCM”, “vertical sand drain, VSD” and “sand compaction piles, SCP” of embankment foundation soil treatment are discussed and evaluated. Embankment design options based on applications of the above methods have been proposed for foundation treatment to adequately support embankment loads. A method performance evaluation based on the improvement of soil properties achieved; the time required for construction and compared estimated costs criteria was made to assess the effectiveness and expected overall performance. Adoption of any of the soil improvement techniques considered depends mainly on the most critical and decisive factor governing the embankment design. Based on the overall performance for the embankment case studied, the sand drains is considered as the most appropriate improvement method followed by the sand compaction piles technique whereas the staged construction method showed the poorest overall performance.

  20. Three-dimensionally interconnected Si frameworks derived from natural halloysite clay: a high-capacity anode material for lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hao; Xiong, Hao; Liu, Xiaohe; Chen, Gen; Zhang, Ning; Wang, Haidong; Ma, Renzhi; Qiu, Guanzhou

    2018-05-23

    On account of its high theoretical capacity, silicon (Si) has been regarded as a promising anode material for Li-ion batteries. Extracting Si content from earth-abundant and low-cost aluminosilicate minerals, rather than from artificial silica (SiO2) precursors, is a more favorable and practical method for the large-scale application of Si anodes. In this work, three-dimensionally interconnected (3D-interconnected) Si frameworks with a branch diameter of ∼15 nm are prepared by the reduction of amorphous SiO2 nanotubes derived from natural halloysite clay. Benefiting from their nanostructure, the as-prepared 3D-interconnected Si frameworks yield high reversible capacities of 2.54 A h g-1 at 0.1 A g-1 after 50 cycles, 1.87 A h g-1 at 0.5 A g-1 after 200 cycles, and 0.97 A h g-1 at 2 A g-1 after a long-term charge-discharge process of 500 cycles, remarkably outperforming the commercial Si material. Further, when the as-prepared Si frameworks and commercial LiCoO2 cathodes are paired in full cells, a high anode capacity of 0.98 A h g-1 is achieved after 100 cycles of rapid charge/discharge at 2 A g-1. This work provides a new strategy for the synthesis of high-capacity Si anodes derived from natural aluminosilicate clay.

  1. Thermal effects on clay rocks for deep disposal of high-level radioactive waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Liang Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Thermal effects on the Callovo-Oxfordian and Opalinus clay rocks for hosting high-level radioactive waste were comprehensively investigated with laboratory and in situ experiments under repository relevant conditions: (1 stresses covering the range from the initial lithostatic state to redistributed levels after excavation, (2 hydraulic drained and undrained boundaries, and (3 heating from ambient temperature up to 90 °C–120 °C and a subsequent cooling phase. The laboratory experiments were performed on normal-sized and large hollow cylindrical samples in various respects of thermal expansion and contraction, thermally-induced pore water pressure, temperature influences on deformation and strength, thermal impacts on swelling, fracture sealing and permeability. The laboratory results obtained from the samples are consistent with the in situ observations during heating experiments in the underground research laboratories at Bure and Mont-Terri. Even though the claystones showed significant responses to thermal loading, no negative effects on their favorable barrier properties were observed.

  2. Modelling of radionuclide migration and heat transport from an High-Level-Radioactive-Waste-repository (HLW) in Boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Put, M.; Henrion, P.

    1992-01-01

    For the modelling of the migration of radionuclides in the Boom clay formation, the analytical code MICOF has been updated with a 3-dimensional analytical solution for discrete sources. the MICOF program is used for the calculation of the release of α and β emitters from the HIGH LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES (HLW). A coherent conceptual model is developed which describes all the major physico-chemical phenomena influencing the migration of radionuclides in the Boom clay. The concept of the diffusion accessible porosity is introduced and included in the MICOF code. Different types of migration experiments are described with their advantages and disadvantages. The thermal impact of the HLW disposal in the stratified Boom clay formation has been evaluated by a finite element simulation of the coupled heat and mass transport equation. The results of the simulations show that under certain conditions thermal convection cells may form, but the convective heat transfer in the clay formation is negligible. 6 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs., 5 appendices

  3. High Content Screening: Understanding Cellular Pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed Zaffar Ali Mohamed Amiroudine; Daryl Jesus Arapoc; Zainah Adam; Shafii Khamis

    2015-01-01

    High content screening (HCS) is the convergence between cell-based assays, high-resolution fluorescence imaging, phase-contrast imaging of fixed- or live-cell assays, tissues and small organisms. It has been widely adopted in the pharmaceutical and biotech industries for target identification and validation and as secondary screens to reveal potential toxicities or to elucidate a drugs mechanism of action. By using the ImageXpress® Micro XLS System HCS, the complex network of key players controlling proliferation and apoptosis can be reduced to several sentinel markers for analysis. Cell proliferation and apoptosis are two key areas in cell biology and drug discovery research. Understanding the signaling pathways in cell proliferation and apoptosis is important for new therapeutic discovery because the imbalance between these two events is predominant in the progression of many human diseases, including cancer. The DNA binding dye DAPI is used to determine the nuclear size and nuclear morphology as well as cell cycle phases by DNA content. Images together with MetaXpress® analysis results provide a convenient and easy to use solution to high volume image management. In particular, HCS platform is beginning to have an important impact on early drug discovery, basic research in systems cell biology, and is expected to play a role in personalized medicine or revealing off-target drug effects. (author)

  4. Preparation of novel ceramics with high CaO content from steel slag

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Lihua; Li, Yu; Zhou, Yuanyuan; Cang, Daqiang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Efficiently utilize such solid waste with high CaO content. • A novel ceramics was put forward by traditional ceramic process. • The novel ceramics attained high strength. • Sintering mechanisms of the novel ceramics were discussed. - Abstract: Steel slag, an industrial waste discharged from steelmaking process, cannot be extensively used in traditional aluminosilicate based ceramics manufacturing for its high content of calcium oxide. In order to efficiently utilize such solid waste, a method of preparing ceramics with high CaO content was put forward. In this paper, steel slag in combination with quartz, talcum, clay and feldspar was converted to a novel ceramic by traditional ceramic process. The sintering mechanism, microstructure and performances were studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques, combined experimenting of linear shrinkage, water absorption and flexural strength. The results revealed that all crystal phases in the novel ceramic were pyroxene group minerals, including diopsite ferrian, augite and diopsite. Almost all raw materials including quartz joined the reaction and transformed into pyroxene or glass phase in the sintering process, and different kinds of clays and feldspars had no impact on the final crystal phases. Flexural strength of the ceramic containing 40 wt.% steel slag in raw materials can reach 143 MPa at sintering temperature of 1210 °C and its corresponding water absorption, weight loss, linear shrinkage were 0.02%, 8.8%, 6.0% respectively. Pyroxene group minerals in ceramics would contribute to the excellent physical and mechanical properties

  5. Can mud (silt and clay) concentration be used to predict soil organic carbon content within seagrass ecosystems?

    KAUST Repository

    Serrano, Oscar; Lavery, P. S.; Duarte, Carlos M.; Kendrick, Gary A.; Calafat, Antoni; York, P.; Steven, Andy; Macreadie, Peter I.

    2016-01-01

    The emerging field of blue carbon science is seeking cost-effective ways to estimate the organic carbon content of soils that are bound by coastal vegetated ecosystems. Organic carbon (C-org) content in terrestrial soils and marine sediments has

  6. Availability of potassium in biomass combustion ashes and gasification biochars after application to soils with variable pH and clay content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaoxi; Rubæk, Gitte Holton; Sørensen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    .8–7.8) and clay contents (3–17%). Exchangeable K in the product-soil mixture was determined, and the K recovery rate from the applied products varied from 31 to 86%. The relative recovery compared to applied KCl was used to indicate K availability and was 50–86% across all soils, but lower for two sewage sludge....... The objective of this study was to evaluate the potassium (K) availability in various types of biomass ashes and gasification biochars (GBs) derived from straw, wood, sewage sludge and poultry manure when mixed with soil. A 16-week incubation study was conducted with three contrasting soils of variable pH (5...

  7. Clay mineralogy, strontium and neodymium isotope ratios in the sediments of two High Arctic catchments (Svalbard)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindshaw, Ruth S.; Tosca, Nicholas J.; Piotrowski, Alexander M.; Tipper, Edward T.

    2018-03-01

    The identification of sediment sources to the ocean is a prerequisite to using marine sediment cores to extract information on past climate and ocean circulation. Sr and Nd isotopes are classical tools with which to trace source provenance. Despite considerable interest in the Arctic Ocean, the circum-Arctic source regions are poorly characterised in terms of their Sr and Nd isotopic compositions. In this study we present Sr and Nd isotope data from the Paleogene Central Basin sediments of Svalbard, including the first published data of stream suspended sediments from Svalbard. The stream suspended sediments exhibit considerable isotopic variation (ɛNd = -20.6 to -13.4; 87Sr / 86Sr = 0.73421 to 0.74704) which can be related to the depositional history of the sedimentary formations from which they are derived. In combination with analysis of the clay mineralogy of catchment rocks and sediments, we suggest that the Central Basin sedimentary rocks were derived from two sources. One source is Proterozoic sediments derived from Greenlandic basement rocks which are rich in illite and have high 87Sr / 86Sr and low ɛNd values. The second source is Carboniferous to Jurassic sediments derived from Siberian basalts which are rich in smectite and have low 87Sr / 86Sr and high ɛNd values. Due to a change in depositional conditions throughout the Paleogene (from deep sea to continental) the relative proportions of these two sources vary in the Central Basin formations. The modern stream suspended sediment isotopic composition is then controlled by modern processes, in particular glaciation, which determines the present-day exposure of the formations and therefore the relative contribution of each formation to the stream suspended sediment load. This study demonstrates that the Nd isotopic composition of stream suspended sediments exhibits seasonal variation, which likely mirrors longer-term hydrological changes, with implications for source provenance studies based on fixed

  8. Mineral-produced high-pressure striae and clay polish: Key evidence for nonballistic transport of ejecta from Ries crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, E.C.T.

    1976-01-01

    Recently discovered mineral-produced, deeply incised striae and mirror-like polish on broken surfaces of limestone fragments from the sedimentary ejecta of the Ries impact crater of southern Germany are described. The striae and polish were produced under high confining pressures during high-velocity nonballistic transport of the ejecta mass within the time span of the cratering event (measured in terms of seconds). The striae on these fragments were produced by scouring by small mineral grains embedded in the surrounding clay matrix, and the polish was formed under the same condition, by movements of relatively fragment-free clay against the fragment surfaces. The occurrence of these striae and polish is key evidence for estimating the distribution and determining the relative importance of nonballistic and ballistic transport of ejecta from the shallow Ries stony meteorite impact crater.

  9. Influence of the clay content and drying of successive no solvents change in the morphology of polyamide 6 / clay membranes; Influencia do teor de argila e da secagem por troca sucessiva de nao solventes na morfologia das membranas de poliamida 6 / argila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, C.H.; Ferreira, R.S.B.; Bezerra, E.B.; Leite, A.M.D.; Araujo, E.D.; Lira, H.L., E-mail: caio.henrique7@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Membranes of polyamide 6/clay nanocomposites with different contents (1 and 3%) of Brazilian bentonite clay using the technique of phase inversion was obtained. The nanocomposites were obtained in a co-rotating twin screw extruder, by the melt intercalation method and were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), which showed possibly an exfoliated and / or partially exfoliated structure was obtained. The membranes were dried at room temperature and also by successive exchange of non-solvents, to prevent collapse the pores using ethanol and n-hexane as a non-solvent. From the photomicrographs of top surface by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed to morphology change in the membranes from the presence of different clay contents as well as drying the same by successive exchange of non-solvents, obtaining membranes with larger amount of pores uniformly distributed. (author)

  10. Effect of high shear mixing parameters and degassing temperature on the morphology of epoxy-clay nanocomposites

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Qadhi, Muneer; Merah, N.; Mezghani, Khaled S.; Khan, Zafarullah; Gasem, Zuhair Mattoug Asad; Sougrat, Rachid

    2013-01-01

    Epoxy-clay nanocomposites were prepared by high shear mixing method using Nanomer I.30E nanoclay as nano-reinforcement in diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA). The effect of mixing speed and time on the nature and degree of clay dispersion were investigated by varying the mixing speed in the range of 500-8000 RPM and mixing time in the range of 15-90 minutes. The effect of degassing temperature on the morphology of the resultant nanocomposites was also studied. Scanning and transmission microscopy (SEM and TEM) along with x-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used to characterize the effect of shear mixing speed, mixing time and degassing temperature on the structure of the resultant nanocomposites. The SEM, TEM and XRD examinations demonstrated that the degree of clay dispersion was improved with increasing the high shear mixing speed and mixing time. The results showed that the optimum high shear mixing speed and mixing time were 6000 rpm and 60 min, respectively. It was observed that the structure of the nanocomposites that have been degassed at 65°C was dominated by ordered intercalated morphology while disordered intercalated with some exfoliated morphology was found for the sample degassed at 100°C for the first 2 hours of the degassing process. © (2013) Trans Tech Publications, Switzerland.

  11. Influence of carbonate micro-fabrics on the failure strength of Callovo-Oxfordian clay stones and Opalinus Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinkenberg, M.; Dohrmann, R.; Kaufhold, S.; Siegesmund, S.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The potential use of clay stones as host rock for radioactive waste disposal is currently investigated. For this application, hydraulic conductivity, swelling properties, water uptake, rheological and mechanical properties are of great importance. The Opalinus Clay (Mont-Terri, Switzerland) and the Callovo- Oxfordian clay stone (France) are the most frequently studied clay stones. One goal is to develop a numerical model being able to predict the mechanical behaviour of clay stones under repository-like conditions. Experimental investigations reveal that Opalinus Clay and Callovo-Oxfordian clay stone behave different with respect to the dependence of mechanical strength on the carbonate content. The failure strength of Opalinus Clay decreases with increasing carbonate content, whereas it increases with increasing carbonate content when Callovo-Oxfordian clay stone is considered. To supply proper data and enable reliable model assumptions, the use of suitable experimental techniques for the description of the microstructure is indispensable. After mechanical testing, samples were taken perpendicular to the bedding and polished sections were prepared. The micro-fabrics were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and image analysis. Backscattered electron (BSE) images were used for the image analysis because carbonates can be extracted by grey level analysis. The image analysis of the extracted particles provides the following parameters: area, longest and shortest axis of an ellipse (surrounding the particle), perimeter, the angle to horizontal (longest axis), and the aspect ratio (longest axis/shortest axis). Callovo-Oxfordian clay stone shows a homogenous distribution of fine-grained carbonates and dovetail connection of calcium carbonate with the clayey matrix. In contrast Opalinus Clay shows large elongated carbonate grains (high aspect ratios) of shell fragments. Cracks are mostly related to these

  12. Preparation and characterization of clay bonded high strength silica refractory by utilizing agriculture waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Bhardwaj

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Clay bonded silica refractory was prepared by utilizing agriculture waste called rice husk ash (RHA and refractory grog. Various samples were prepared with different compositions based upon partial replacement of quartz by RHA. Rectangular samples were prepared by following semi dry process prior to pressing in a uniaxial hydraulic press and sintering at a temperature of 1200 °C in air atmosphere. Various physical, mechanical and thermal characterizations were done like X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscope (SEM, apparent porosity (AP, bulk density (BD, cold crushing strength (CCS, refractoriness and thermal conductivity measurement. The sample utilizing 30% of RHA was considered most optimum composition which produced cold crushing strength of 38 MPa and thermal conductivity of 2.08 W/m K at 800 °C with a considerable good refractoriness. Enhancement in the mechanical as well as thermal properties may be considered as attributed to the amorphous silica which has reacted more easily and efficiently with other material surrounding giving rise to the densification and produced stable crystalline phase to the refractory material. These promising characteristics suggests that the RHA may lead to be used as a potential material for the preparation of clay bonded high strength silica refractories. Resumen: Se preparó sílice refractaria unida a arcilla con residuos agrícolas conocidos como ceniza de cascarilla de arroz (rice husk ash [RHA] y grog refractario. Se prepararon varias muestras con diferentes composiciones basadas en la sustitución parcial de cuarzo por RHA. Las muestras rectangulares se prepararon siguiendo un proceso semiseco antes de prensarlas en una prensa hidráulica uniaxial y sinterizarlas a una temperatura de 1.200 °C en atmósfera de aire. Se realizaron diversas caracterizaciones físicas, mecánicas y térmicas, como la difracción de rayos X, el microscopio electrónico de barrido, la porosidad

  13. Toxic element composition of multani mitti clay for nutritional safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waheed, S.; Faiz, Y.; Rahman, S.; Siddique, N.

    2013-01-01

    Geophagy of multani mitti (MM) clay is very common in central Pakistan especially amongst women. It was therefore mandatory to establish baseline levels of toxic elements in this clay for its safe dietary consumption by consumers of different genders, age groups and physical states. Instrumental neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectrometry techniques were used to determine the nutritional safety of MM clay for oral intake. All quantified toxic elements were detected at trace levels with composition in the descending order; Pb > Br > As > Sb > Hg > Cd. Comparison of these elements in MM clay with other clays shows that As, Cd, and Pb, are lowest in MM clay while its Br and Hg contents are high. Highest weekly dietary intakes of As, Br, Cd, Hg, and Sb were found to be 18, 0.05, 1.6, 9.2 and 1.1 % of the respective recommended provisional tolerable weekly intakes. The findings of this study show that As, Br, Cd, Hg and Sb in MM clay are well below the tolerance levels. However its Pb concentration is very high and may pose health concerns. The data presented in this study can be used as national base level guideline for geophagy of MM clay by men, women (normal, pregnant and lactating) and children. (author)

  14. California Bearing Ratio (CBR) test on stabilization of clay with lime addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastuty, I. P.; Roesyanto; Limbong, M. N.; Oberlyn, S. J.

    2018-02-01

    Clay is a type of soil with particles of certain minerals giving plastic properties when mixed with water. Soil has an important role in a construction, besides as a building material in a wide variety of civil engineering works, soil is also used as supporting foundation of the building. Basic properties of clay are rock-solid in dry and plastic with medium water content. In high water content, clay becomes sticky like (cohesive) and soften. Therefore, clay stabilization is necessary to repair soil’s mechanical properties. In this research, lime is use as a stabilizer that contains the Ca+ element to bond bigger particles. Lime used is slaked lime Ca(OH)2. Clay used has liquid limitation (LL) value of 47.33%, plasticity index of 29.88% and CBR value 6.29. The results explain about 10% lime mixture variation gives the optimum stabilized clay with CBR value of 8.75%.

  15. High-pressure gas-breakthrough apparatus and a procedure for determining the gas-breakthrough pressure of compacted clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hume, H.B.

    1997-08-01

    Gas may be produced in a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault. Given that the vault will be sealed with clay-based materials, the fate of the gas is uncertain. Therefore, an instrument was previously built to measure the pressure required to pass gas through compacted clay materials (a gas-breakthrough apparatus). However, the 10 MPa pressure limit of the apparatus was insufficient to test compacted buffer material at the density proposed in the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste disposal. Therefore, a high-pressure (50 Wa) gas-breakthrough apparatus was designed, constructed and installed. This report describes the components of the apparatus and the materials and procedures that are used for the gas-breakthrough tests. (author)

  16. High content screening in microfluidic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Raymond; Paliwal, Saurabh; Levchenko, Andre

    2011-01-01

    Importance of the field Miniaturization is key to advancing the state-of-the-art in high content screening (HCS), in order to enable dramatic cost savings through reduced usage of expensive biochemical reagents and to enable large-scale screening on primary cells. Microfluidic technology offers the potential to enable HCS to be performed with an unprecedented degree of miniaturization. Areas covered in this review This perspective highlights a real-world example from the authors’ work of HCS assays implemented in a highly miniaturized microfluidic format. Advantages of this technology are discussed, including cost savings, high throughput screening on primary cells, improved accuracy, the ability to study complex time-varying stimuli, and ease of automation, integration, and scaling. What the reader will gain The reader will understand the capabilities of a new microfluidics-based platform for HCS, and the advantages it provides over conventional plate-based HCS. Take home message Microfluidics technology will drive significant advancements and broader usage and applicability of HCS in drug discovery. PMID:21852997

  17. Dielectric characterization of Bentonite clay at various moisture contents and with mixtures of biomass in the microwave spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study assesses the potential for using bentonite as a microwave absorber for microwave-assisted biomass pyrolysis based on the dielectric properties. Dielectric properties of bentonite at different moisture contents were measured using a coaxial line dielectric probe and vector network analyzer...

  18. Mechanisms associated with the high adsorption of dibenzo-p-dioxin from water by smectite clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cun; Li, Hui; Teppen, Brian J; Johnston, Cliff T; Boyd, Stephen A

    2009-04-15

    Clay minerals may be an important unrecognized sorptive phase for dioxins in soils and clay deposits. Smectites, especially Cs-saponite, effectively adsorbed dibenzo-p-dioxin (DD) from water, reaching 0.8% (wt/wt). Adsorption was promoted by exchangeable cations with low hydration energies, and negative charge in the smectite arising from the tetrahedral siloxane sheets. X-ray diffraction measurements revealed that as DD loading increased to > or =8000 mg/kg the clay basal spacing increased abruptly from 12.3 to 15.2 A demonstrating DD intercalation. The 12.3 A spacing provides an interlayer distance that closely matches the molecular thickness of DD. In this configuration DD is essentially dehydrated as it interacts with the opposing hydrophobic siloxane sheets and with coplanar Cs+ via one of the dioxin ring oxygens. Ab initio calculations suggest that geometrical structures form at higher loadings in which intercalated DD molecules adopt a butterfly geometry sandwiched between dehydrated interlayer Cs+ and the siloxane surface, consistent with the 15.2 A spacing, wherein Cs+ interacts with dioxin ring oxygens and benzene ring pi-electrons. Fourier transformation infrared measurements confirm that adsorbed DD is present in orientations that are not parallel with the interlayer planar siloxane surfaces of smectite.

  19. Sodium-calcium ion exchange on clay minerals at moderate to high ionic strengths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, W.J.

    1979-12-01

    Sodium-calcium ion exchange on several clay minerals was studied at ionic strengths ranging from 0.01 to above 1.0. The minerals studied included attapulgite, illite, kaolin, and several montmorillonites. Distribution coefficients of calcium and sodium were obtained for the minerals over a wide range of solution conditions at pH five and equilibrium constants were calculated. The distribution coefficient of calcium, D/sub Ca/, was studied as a function of time, solution pH, loading, sodium concentration, and ionic strength fraction of sodium in constant ionic strength solutions. The distribution coefficient of sodium, D/sub Na/, was also studied as a function of time, loading, and sodium ionic strength fraction in constant total ionic strength solutions. Values of equilibrium constants calculated from distribution coefficients for solutions of constant ionic strength scattered bwteen 2 and 10 kg/kg for the montmorillonites and attapulgite while equilibrium constants for illite ranged from 5 to 10 kg/kg. No equilibrium constants for kaolin were calculated since distribution coefficients of sodium on this clay were too small to be measured. It was found that equilibrium constants at trace sodium loading were generally lower than those for higher sodium loadings by an order of magnitude or more due to the sensitivity of sodium distribution coefficients to the concentration of sodium in the clay at low loadings. Theoretical and experimental treatments of ion exclusion were included

  20. Geostatistical characterization of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay variability: from conventional and high resolution log data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefranc, Marie

    2007-01-01

    Andra (National Radioactive Waste Management Agency) has conducted studies in its Meuse/Haute-Marne Underground Research Laboratory located at a depth of about 490 m in a 155-million-year-old argillaceous rock: the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite. The purpose of the present work is to obtain as much information as possible from high-resolution log data and to optimize their analysis to specify and characterize space-time variations of the argillites from the Meuse/Haute-Marne site and subsequently predict the evolution of argillite properties on a 250 km 2 zone around the underground laboratory (transposition zone). The aim is to outline a methodology to transform depth intervals into geological time intervals and thus to quantify precisely the sedimentation rate variation, estimate duration; for example the duration of bio-stratigraphical units or of hiatuses. The latter point is particularly important because a continuous time recording is often assumed in geological modelling. The spatial variations can be studied on various scales. First, well-to-well correlations are established between seven wells at different scales. Relative variations of the thickness are observed locally. Second, FMI (Full-bore Formation Micro-Imager, Schlumberger) data are studied in detail to extract as much information as possible. For example, the analysis of FMI images reveals a clear carbonate - clay inter-bedding which displays cycles. Third, geostatistical tools are used to study these cycles. The vario-graphic analysis of conventional log data shows one metre cycles. With FMI data, smaller periods can be detected. Variogram modelling and factorial kriging analysis suggest that three spatial periods exist. They vary vertically and laterally in the boreholes but cycle ratios are stable and similar to orbital-cycle ratios (Milankovitch cycles). The three periods correspond to eccentricity, obliquity and precession. Since the duration of these orbital cycles is known, depth intervals can

  1. Effect of the incorporation of modified purified clay with different content surfactants in the thermal and mechanical PET nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Itamara F.; Soares, Anna P.S.; Silva, Suedina M.L.; Malta, Oscar M.L.

    2011-01-01

    An organically modified bentonite purified with different amounts of alkyl ammonium salts and alkyl phosphonium was used as filler in the preparation of nanocomposites of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). PET/organophilic bentonite masterbatch were prepared in a Haake torque rheometer at 260° C, 60 rpm for 10min. Then, the master batch obtained were mixed with PET in quantities necessary to obtain the nominal content of 1 wt% of bentonite, a twin screw extruder counter-rotating to 275°C in all heating zones and 60 rpm. Subsequently, the mixtures were injected (Arburg All Rounder), in the form of tensile specimens (ASTM D638). The effect of incorporating this type of filler on thermal and mechanical properties of nanocomposites of PET will be investigated. The incorporation of different types of organoclay to PET resulted in intercalated nanocomposites and partially exfoliated. The intercalated morphology showed higher thermal stability. (author)

  2. Fish DNA-modified clays: Towards highly flame retardant polymer nanocomposite with improved interfacial and mechanical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabihi, Omid; Ahmadi, Mojtaba; Khayyam, Hamid; Naebe, Minoo

    2016-12-01

    Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) has been recently found to be an efficient renewable and environmentally-friendly flame retardant. In this work, for the first time, we have used waste DNA from fishing industry to modify clay structure in order to increase the clay interactions with epoxy resin and take benefit of its additional thermal property effect on thermo-physical properties of epoxy-clay nanocomposites. Intercalation of DNA within the clay layers was accomplished in a one-step approach confirmed by FT-IR, XPS, TGA, and XRD analyses, indicating that d-space of clay layers was expanded from ~1.2 nm for pristine clay to ~1.9 nm for clay modified with DNA (d-clay). Compared to epoxy nanocomposite containing 2.5%wt of Nanomer I.28E organoclay (m-clay), it was found that at 2.5%wt d-clay loading, significant enhancements of ~14%, ~6% and ~26% in tensile strength, tensile modulus, and fracture toughness of epoxy nanocomposite can be achieved, respectively. Effect of DNA as clay modifier on thermal performance of epoxy nanocomposite containing 2.5%wt d-clay was evaluated using TGA and cone calorimetry analysis, revealing significant decreases of ~4000 kJ/m2 and ~78 kW/m2 in total heat release and peak of heat release rate, respectively, in comparison to that containing 2.5%wt of m-clay.

  3. Interphase vs confinement in starch-clay bionanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coativy, Gildas; Chevigny, Chloé; Rolland-Sabaté, Agnès; Leroy, Eric; Lourdin, Denis

    2015-03-06

    Starch-clay bionanocomposites containing 1-10% of natural montmorillonite were elaborated by melt processing in the presence of water. A complex macromolecular dynamics behavior was observed: depending on the clay content, an increase of the glass transition temperature and/or the presence of two overlapped α relaxation peaks were detected. Thanks to a model allowing the prediction of the average interparticle distance, and its comparison with the average size of starch macromolecules, it was possible to associate these phenomena to different populations of macromolecules. In particular, it seems that for high clay content (10%), the slowdown of segmental relaxation due to confinement of the starch macromolecules between the clay tactoïds is the predominant phenomenon. While for lower clay contents (3-5%), a significant modification of chain relaxation seems to occur, due to the formation of an interphase by the starch macromolecules in the vicinity of clay nanoparticles coexisting with the bulk polymer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. CORRELATION BETWEEN CLAY CONTENT AND SEED DEPTH IN NO-TILLAGE CORN (Zea mays L. / CORRELAÇÃO ENTRE O CONTEÚDO DE ARGILA E A PROFUNDIDADE DE DEPOSIÇÃO DAS SEMENTES MILHO (Zea mays L. EM PLANTIO DIRETO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PEDRO HENRIQUE WEIRICH NETO

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThe region of Campos Gerais, in the State of Paraná, is leader in grain yields and state-of-the-art no-tillage farming. The widely adopted  no-tillage system tends to increment soil variability. There are several studies about spatial variability of soil characteristics affecting grain yield, but not enough attention has been given to the variability resulting of human actions. The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation of soil clay content and the depth of placement of corn seeds on areas under no-till systems management. The four selected cornfields areas for the study are property of local farm cooperatives associates. The points for evaluation were defined considering the local mapping of soil texture. Clay content varied from 94 to 489 g kg-1 on Plot 1; from 222 to 414 g kg-1 on Plot 2; from 269 to 509 of rows to be considered for plant distribution and seed depth analyses. The coefficient of variation (CV of plant distribution was between 23 and 56%. For seed depth, the CV was between 18 and 34%. The regression analysis showed high coefficients of determination (r2 for plots 1 and 2 (r2=0,85 and 0,83. The clay content was generally higher on plots 3 and 4. In this case, the analysis of variance was not significant, and the coefficients of determination were low (r2=0,22 and 0,01. Results indicate that clay content values may be used to delimit g kg-1 on plot 3; and from 368 to 698 g kg-1 on plot 4. The type of planter determined the number management zones on the field, where the depth of seed placing in the planting process can be regulated in different ways.Keywords: Soil Texture, Planting Process, Management Zones

  5. Improved Yield of High Molecular Weight DNA Coincides with Increased Microbial Diversity Access from Iron Oxide Cemented Sub-Surface Clay Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Richard A.; Robeson, Michael S.; Shakya, Migun; Moberly, James G.; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana A.; Gu, Baohua; Elias, Dwayne A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite over three decades of progress, extraction of high molecular weight (HMW) DNA from high clay soils or iron oxide cemented clay has remained challenging. HMW DNA is desirable for next generation sequencing as it yields the most comprehensive coverage. Several DNA extraction procedures were compared from samples that exhibit strong nucleic acid adsorption. pH manipulation or use of alternative ion solutions offered no improvement in nucleic acid recovery. Lysis by liquid N2 grinding in concentrated guanidine followed by concentrated sodium phosphate extraction supported HMW DNA recovery from clays high in iron oxides. DNA recovered using 1 M sodium phosphate buffer (PB) as a competitive desorptive wash was 15.22±2.33 µg DNA/g clay, with most DNA consisting of >20 Kb fragments, compared to 2.46±0.25 µg DNA/g clay with the Powerlyzer system (MoBio). Increasing PB concentration in the lysis reagent coincided with increasing DNA fragment length during initial extraction. Rarefaction plots of 16S rRNA (V1–V3 region) pyrosequencing from A-horizon and clay soils showed an ∼80% and ∼400% larger accessed diversity compared to the Powerlyzer soil DNA system, respectively. The observed diversity from the Firmicutes showed the strongest increase with >3-fold more operational taxonomic units (OTU) recovered. PMID:25033199

  6. Clay-Alcohol-Water Dispersions: Anomalous Viscosity Changes Due to Network Formation of Clay Nanosheets Induced by Alcohol Clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuji; Haraguchi, Kazutoshi

    2017-05-16

    Clay-alcohol-water ternary dispersions were compared with alcohol-water binary mixtures in terms of viscosity and optical absorbance. Aqueous clay dispersions to which lower alcohols (ethanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, and tert-butanol) were added exhibited significant viscosity anomalies (maxima) when the alcohol content was 30-55 wt %, as well as optical absorbance anomalies (maxima). The maximum viscosity (η max ) depended strongly on the clay content and varied between 300 and 8000 mPa·s, making it remarkably high compared with the viscosity anomalies (2 mPa·s) observed in alcohol-water binary mixtures. The alcohol content at η max decreased as the hydrophobicity of the alcohol increased. The ternary dispersions with viscosity anomalies exhibited thixotropic behaviors. The effects of other hydrophilic solvents (glycols) and other kinds of clays were also clarified. Based on these findings and the average particle size changes, the viscosity anomalies in the ternary dispersions were explained by alcohol-clustering-induced network formation of the clay nanosheets. It was estimated that 0.9, 1.7, and 2.5 H 2 O molecules per alcohol molecule were required to stabilize the ethanol, 2-propanol, and tert-butanol, respectively, in the clay-alcohol-water dispersions.

  7. Montmorillonite clay/polypropylene (HMSPP) nanocomposites: evaluation of thermal and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, L.G.H.; Oliani, W.L.; Lugao, A.B.; Parra, D.F.

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of HMSPP (high melt strength polypropylene) properties in nanocomposites was done in composites of 0.1; 1; 3; 5; 10 wt% of Cloisite 20A clay. The PP-g-MA (polypropylene graft maleic anhydride) was the compatibilizer agent in the process of extrusion in twin-screw. Mechanical tests performed in the nanocomposites with higher clay content showed higher values of rupture in 5 and 10 wt% of Cloisite. The thermal properties were evaluate utilizing Calorimetry Differential Exploratory (DSC) and in the sample of 10 wt% of Cloisite were observed increase of the melting temperature and increase of crystallinity. The morphology was investigated by the Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transformed Infrared (FTIR), in which the sample with lower clay amount, 1 wt% of Cloisite showed better dispersion of the clay. X-Ray Diffraction reported the clay intercalation in the sample with 5 wt% of clay. (author)

  8. clay nanocomposites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present work deals with the synthesis of specialty elastomer [fluoroelastomer and poly (styrene--ethylene-co-butylene--styrene (SEBS)]–clay nanocomposites and their structure–property relationship as elucidated from morphology studies by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray ...

  9. Polyethersulfone/clay membranes and its water permeability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalho, Thamyres Cardoso de; Medeiros, Vanessa da Nobrega; Araujo, Edcleide Maria de; Lira, Helio Lucena; Leite, Amanda Melissa Damiao

    2017-01-01

    Membranes can be considered polymeric or inorganic films that function as a semipermeable barrier to filtration on a molecular scale, separating two phases and restricting, totally or partially, the transportation of one or more chemical species (solute) present in the solution. Therefore, the aim of this work is to produce polyethersulfone membranes (PES) and polyethersulfone/clay by phase inversion technique and evaluate the presence of clay in obtaining membranes for wastewater treatment. The used solvent was dimethylformamide (DMF) and clays were Brasgel PA (MMT) and Cloisite Na (CL Na) in the proportion of 3 to 5% (wt.). By Xray diffraction (XRD), the membranes with 3% of MMT and CL Na clays apparently had partially exfoliated structures. For the composition with 5% of CL Na a small peak was observed, which indicates that this is possibly an intercalated structure or microcomposite. By scanning electron microscopy (SEM), visualizes that the pure surface of the pure PES membrane a structure apparently without pores was observed in the used magnification and without roughness surface when compared to membranes with clay. The measurements of contact angle indicated that the inclusion of clay altered the wetting ability of the membranes. The flow with distilled water for all membranes started high and over time reached a stabilization level. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence and the content of clay altered the morphology of the membrane, contributing to an increase in water flow. (author)

  10. Influence of clay organic modifier on morphology and performance of poly(ε-caprolactone/clay nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Marija S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two series of poly(e-caprolactone nanocomposites with different organo-modified clays (1 to 8 wt% were prepared by the solution casting method. Organoclays with polar (Cloisite®C30B and nonpolar (Cloisite®C15A organic modifier and with different miscibility with poly(e-caprolactone matrix, were chosen. Exfoliated and/or intercalated nanocomposite’s structures were obtained by using high dilution and an ultrasonic treatment for the composite preparation. The effect of the surface modification and clay content on the morphology, mechanical and thermal properties of the nanocomposites was studied. Scanning electron microscopy excluded the formation of microcomposite. The wide-angle X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the tendency toward exfoliated structure is higher for the Cloisite®C30B, which had better miscibility with poly(e-caprolactone matrix. Differences in spherulites’ sizes and morphology between two series of the nanocomposites were observed by the optical microscopy performed on as-casted films. Enthalpies of fusion and degrees of crystallinity were higher for nanocomposites than for neat poly(e-caprolactone and increase with the clay loading in both series, as a consequence of the clay nucleating effect. Decreased thermal stability of nanocomposites was ascribed to thermal instability of organic modifiers of the clays. The Halpin-Tsai model was used to compare the theoretically predicted values of the Young’s modulus with experimentally obtained ones in tensile tests.[Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172062

  11. Atrazine biodegradation modulated by clays and clay/humic acid complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besse-Hoggan, Pascale; Alekseeva, Tatiana; Sancelme, Martine; Delort, Anne-Marie; Forano, Claude

    2009-01-01

    The fate of pesticides in the environment is strongly related to the soil sorption processes that control not only their transfer but also their bioavailability. Cationic (Ca-bentonite) and anionic (Layered Double Hydroxide) clays behave towards the ionisable pesticide atrazine (AT) sorption with opposite tendencies: a noticeable sorption capacity for the first whereas the highly hydrophilic LDH showed no interactions with AT. These clays were modified with different humic acid (HA) contents. HA sorbed on the clay surface and increased AT interactions. The sorption effect on AT biodegradation and on its metabolite formation was studied with Pseudomonas sp. ADP. The biodegradation rate was greatly modulated by the material's sorption capacity and was clearly limited by the desorption rate. More surprisingly, it increased dramatically with LDH. Adsorption of bacterial cells on clay particles facilitates the degradation of non-sorbed chemical, and should be considered for predicting pesticide fate in the environment. - The biodegradation rate of atrazine was greatly modulated by adsorption of the pesticide and also bacterial cells on clay particles.

  12. Evaluation of the bleaching flux in clays containing hematite and different clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Junior, E.M.; Lusa, T.; Silva, T.M.; Medeiros, B.B.; Santos, G.R. dos; Morelli, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the addition of a synthetic flux in a clay mineral constituted by illite phase in the presence of iron oxide with the hematite, promotes color change of the firing products, making the reddish color firing into whiteness. This flow is constituted of a vitreous phase of the silicates family obtained by fusion/solidification of oxides and carbonates. Thus, the objective of this work was that of studying the interaction of the iron element in the final color mechanism of the different types of mineral crystal phase of the clays. In order to study the phenomenon, we obtained different compositions between the select clays and the synthetic flow, and characterization using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and visual analysis. The results showed that the action of the synthetic flow as a modifying agent for color depends on the mineral crystal phase of the clays. The color firing modification does not occur in the clays content high levels of kaolinite mineral phase. (author)

  13. Clay Cuffman: A Cool, Calm, Relaxed Guy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Gina

    2010-01-01

    This article describes Clay Cuffman, a simple clay-sculpture project that requires two or three sessions, and works for students from the upper-elementary level through high school. It takes about 1.5 pounds of clay per student--about the size of a small grapefruit. The Cuffman project is a great way for upper-elementary through high-school…

  14. Characterization of clay-modified thermoset polymers under various environmental conditions for the use in high-voltage power pylons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kliem, Mathias; Høgsberg, Jan Becker; Wang, Qian

    2017-01-01

    The effect of nanoclay on various material properties like damping and strength of typical thermoset polymers, such as epoxy and vinyl ester, was investigated. Different environmental conditions typical for high-voltage transmission pylons made of composite materials were taken into account. Resin...... samples were prepared with various clay weight fractions ranging from 0% to 3%. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and rheological analysis were used to study the morphology and the structure of the nanocomposites. For all nanoclay-modified thermoset polymers......, the morphology was found to be of exfoliated structure mainly. Static, uniaxial tensile tests showed that the addition of nanoclay to thermoset polymers led to a beneficial effect on the stiffness, whereas the tensile strength and ductility significantly decreased. When exposed to different environmental...

  15. Characterization of clay minerals and organic matter in shales: Application to high-level nuclear waste isolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gueven, N.; Landis, C.R.; Jacobs, G.K.

    1988-10-01

    The objective of the Sedimentary Rock Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is to conduct investigations to assess the potential for shale to serve as a host medium for the isolation of high-level nuclear wastes. The emphasis on shale is a result of screening major sedimentary rock types (shale, sandstone, carbonate , anhydrite, and chalk) for a variety of attributes that affect the performance of repositories. The retardation of radionuclides was recognized as one of the potentially favorable features of shale. Because shale contains both clay minerals and organic matter, phases that may provide significant sorption of radioelement, the characterization of these phases is essential. In addition, the organic matter in shale has been identified as a critical area for study because of its potential to play either a favorable (reductant) or deleterious (organic ligands) role in the performance of a repository sited in shale. 36 refs., 36 figs., 10 tabs

  16. Clay minerals behaviour in thin sandy clay-rich lacustrine turbidites (Lake Hazar, Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Ouahabi, Meriam; Hubert-Ferrari, Aurelia; Lamair, Laura; Hage, Sophie

    2017-04-01

    Turbidites have been extensively studied in many different areas using cores or outcrop, which represent only an integrated snapshot of a dynamic evolving flow. Laboratory experiments provide the missing relationships between the flow characteristics and their deposits. In particular, flume experiments emphasize that the presence of clay plays a key role in turbidity current dynamics. Clay fraction, in small amount, provides cohesive strength to sediment mixtures and can damp turbulence. However, the degree of flocculation is dependent on factors such as the amount and size of clay particles, the surface of clay particles, chemistry and pH conditions in which the clay particles are dispersed. The present study focuses on thin clayey sand turbidites found in Lake Hazar (Turkey) occurring in stacked thin beds. Depositional processes and sources have been previously studied and three types were deciphered, including laminar flows dominated by cohesion, transitional, and turbulence flow regimes (Hage et al., in revision). For the purpose of determine the clay behavior in the three flow regimes, clay mineralogical, geochemical measurements on the cores allow characterising the turbidites. SEM observations provide further information regarding the morphology of clay minerals and other clasts. The study is particularly relevant given the highly alkaline and saline water of the Hazar Lake. Clay minerals in Hazar Lake sediments include kaolinite (1:1-type), illite and chlorite (2:1-type). Hazar lake water is alkaline having pH around 9.3, in such alkaline environment, a cation-exchange reaction takes place. Furthermore, in saline water (16‰), salts can act as a shield and decrease the repulsive forces between clay particle surfaces. So, pH and salt content jointly impact the behaviour of clays differently. Since the Al-faces of clay structures have a negative charge in basic solutions. At high pH, all kaolinite surfaces become negative-charged, and then kaolinite

  17. Pb-Zn mineralization of the Ali ou Daoud area (Central High Atlas, Morocco): characterisation of the deposit and relationships with the clay assemblages; Mineralisation Pb-Zn du type MVT de la region d'Ali ou Daoud (Haut Atlas Central, Maroc): caracterisations du gite et relations avec les corteges de mineraux argileux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouguina, E. M.; Daoudi, L.

    2008-07-01

    Zn-Pb-Fe ores in the Ali ou Daoud deposit (Central High Atlas) are found as stratiform levels and as karst fillings in carbonate platforms facies of Bajocian age. Tectonic structures (e.g., syn sedimentary faults) played a relevant role in the ore emplacement. The dolomitic ore-related host-rock levels are characterized by the presence of kaolinite enrichment in clay levels in amounts directly related to the proportion of the clay minerals. The latter is evidenced by correlation between kaolinite and sulphide contents, suggesting that the installation of kaolinite and mineralizations would result from the same hydrothermal fluid. (Author) 55 refs.

  18. The Influence of Clay on the Rate of Decay of Amino Acid Metabolites Synthesized in Soils during Decomposition of Cellulose

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst

    1975-01-01

    caused by the treatments in the different soils was, however, not related to the amount of silt + clay, and a high content of this material did not protect organic material against the effect of the treatments. is concluded that the silt + clay fraction ensures stabilization of amino acid metabolites...... produced during the period of intense biological activity that follows the addition of decomposable, energy rich material to the soil. The amount of amino acid metabolites stabilized increased with increasing concentration of silt + clay, but the rate of decay of the amino acid material during later stages......14C-labelled cellulose was added to seven different soils containing silt + clay (particles

  19. Compressive Strength of Compacted Clay-Sand Mixes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faseel Suleman Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of sand to improve the strength of natural clays provides a viable alternative for civil infrastructure construction involving earthwork. The main objective of this note was to investigate the compressive strength of compacted clay-sand mixes. A natural clay of high plasticity was mixed with 20% and 40% sand (SP and their compaction and strength properties were determined. Results indicated that the investigated materials exhibited a brittle behaviour on the dry side of optimum and a ductile behaviour on the wet side of optimum. For each material, the compressive strength increased with an increase in density following a power law function. Conversely, the compressive strength increased with decreasing water content of the material following a similar function. Finally, the compressive strength decreased with an increase in sand content because of increased material heterogeneity and loss of sand grains from the sides during shearing.

  20. Woody plant roots fail to penetrate a clay-lined landfill: Managment implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, George R.; Handel, Steven N.

    1995-01-01

    In many locations, regulatory agencies do not permit tree planting above landfills that are sealed with a capping clay, because roots might penetrate the clay barrier and expose landfill contents to leaching. We find, however, no empirical or theoretical basis for this restriction, and instead hypothesize that plant roots of any kind are incapable of penetrating the dense clays used to seal landfills. As a test, we excavated 30 trees and shrubs, of 12 species, growing over a clay-lined municipal sanitary landfill on Staten Island, New York. The landfill had been closed for seven years, and featured a very shallow (10 to 30-cm) soil layer over a 45-cm layer of compacted grey marl (Woodbury series) clay. The test plants had invaded naturally from nearby forests. All plants examined—including trees as tall as 6 m—had extremely shallow root plates, with deformed tap roots that grew entirely above and parallel to the clay layer. Only occasional stubby feeder roots were found in the top 1 cm of clay, and in clay cracks at depths to 6 cm, indicating that the primary impediment to root growth was physical, although both clay and the overlying soil were highly acidic. These results, if confirmed by experimental research should lead to increased options for the end use of many closed sanitary landfills.

  1. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from undisturbed soil cores sampled along a natural clay gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendelboe, Anders Lindblad; Møldrup, Per; Heckrath, Goswin Johann

    2011-01-01

    correlated to the accumulated outflow and was described as a diffusion controlled process, using ¾(accumulated outflow). The mass of leached particles was positively correlated to the clay content as well as to water-dispersible colloids. Particulate phosphorus (P) was linearly correlated to concentration......The presence of strongly sorbing compounds in groundwater and tile drains can be a result of colloid-facilitated transport. Colloid and phosphorus leaching from macropores in undisturbed soil cores sampled across a natural clay gradient at Aarup, Denmark, were studied. The aim of the study...... was to correlate easily measurable soil properties, such as clay content and water-dispersible colloids, to colloid and phosphorus leaching. The clay contents across the gradient ranged from 0.11 to 0.23 kg kgj1. Irrigating with artificial rainwater, all samples showed a high first flush of colloids and phosphorus...

  2. Homogeneity vs. Heterogeneity of Porosity in Boom Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemes, Susanne; Desbois, Guillaume; Urai, Janos L.; De Craen, Mieke; Honty, Miroslav

    2013-01-01

    Microstructural investigations on Boom Clay at nano- to micrometer scale, using BIB-SEM methods, result in porosity characterization for different mineral phases from direct observations on high resolution SE2-images of representative elementary areas (REAs). High quality, polished surfaces of cross-sections of ∼ 1 mm 2 size were produced on three different samples from the Mol-Dessel research site (Belgium). More than 33,000 pores were detected, manually segmented and analyzed with regard to their size, shape and orientation. Two main pore classes were defined: Small pores (< 500 nm (ED)) within the clay matrices of samples and =big' pores (> 500 nm (ED)) at the interfaces between clay and non-clay mineral (NCM) grains. Samples investigated show similar porosities regarding the first pore-class, but differences occur at the interfaces between clay matrix and NCM grains. These differences were interpreted to be due to differences in quantitative mineralogy (amount of non-clay mineral grains) and grain-size distributions between samples investigated. Visible porosities were measured as 15 to 17 % for samples investigated. Pore-size distributions of pores in clay are similar for all samples, showing log-normal distributions with peaks around 60 nm (ED) and more than 95 % of the pores being smaller than 500 nm (ED). Fitting pore-size distributions using power-laws with exponents between 1.56 and 1.7, assuming self-similarity of the pore space, thus pores smaller than the pore detection resolution following the same power-laws and using these power-laws for extrapolation of pore-size distributions below the limit of pore detection resolution, results in total estimated porosities between 20 and 30 %. These results are in good agreement with data known from Mercury Porosimetry investigations (35-40 % porosity) and water content porosity measurements (∼ 36 %) performed on Boom Clay. (authors)

  3. New sunflower seeds with high contents of phytosterols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velasco Leonardo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Dietary phytosterols have a positive nutritional impact because they contribute to reduce cholesterol levels in blood. Accordingly, foods rich in phytosterols are required in a healthy diet. Vegetable oils are the richest source of phytosterols in the diet, though sunflower oil has lower phytosterol content than other seed oils such as rapeseed and corn. Increasing phytosterol content in sunflower oil requires optimizing first selection procedures. In this way, the development of accurate methods for analyzing phytosterol content in seeds instead of oils has opened up recently the way for large-scale screening for this trait. Large variability for seed phytosterol content has been identified in sunflower germplasm, from which we have developed a line, IASP-18, with about twofold seed phytosterol content than conventional sunflower. The trait is expressed across environments. Genetic studies are underway to characterize its inheritance and assess the feasibility of introgressing genes for high phytosterol content into elite sunflower germplasm.

  4. Photoinduced charge separation in a colloidal system of exfoliated layered semiconductor controlled by coexisting aluminosilicate clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakato, Teruyuki; Yamada, Yoshimi; Miyamoto, Nobuyoshi

    2009-02-05

    We investigated photoinduced charge separation occurring in a multicomponent colloidal system composed of oxide nanosheets of photocatalytically active niobate and photochemically inert clay and electron accepting methylviologen dications (MV2+). The inorganic nanosheets were obtained by exfoliation of layered hexaniobate and hectorite clay. The niobate and clay nanosheets were spatially separated in the colloidally dispersed state, and the MV2+ molecules were selectively adsorbed on the clay platelets. UV irradiation of the colloids led to electron transfer from the niobate nanosheets to the MV2+ molecules adsorbed on clay. The photoinduced electron transfer produced methylviologen radical cations (MV*+), which was characterized by high yield and long lifetime. The yield and stability of the MV*+ species were found to depend strongly on the clay content of the colloid: from a few mol % to approximately 70 mol % of the yield and several tens of minutes to more than 40 h of the lifetime. The contents of the niobate nanosheets and MV2+ molecules and the aging of the colloid also affected the photoinduced charge separation. In the absence of MV2+ molecules in the colloid, UV irradiation induced electron accumulation in the niobate nanosheets. The stability of the electron-accumulated state also depended on the clay content. The variation in the photochemical behavior is discussed in relation to the viscosity of the colloid.

  5. Induced polarization of clay-sand mixtures: experiments and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okay, G.; Leroy, P.; Tournassat, C.; Ghorbani, A.; Jougnot, D.; Cosenza, P.; Camerlynck, C.; Cabrera, J.; Florsch, N.; Revil, A.

    2012-01-01

    were performed with a cylindrical four-electrode sample-holder (cylinder made of PVC with 30 cm in length and 19 cm in diameter) associated with a SIP-Fuchs II impedance meter and non-polarizing Cu/CuSO 4 electrodes. These electrodes were installed at 10 cm from the base of the sample holder and regularly spaced (each 90 degree). The results illustrate the strong impact of the Cationic Exchange Capacity (CEC) of the clay minerals upon the complex conductivity. The amplitude of the in-phase conductivity of the kaolinite-clay samples is strongly dependent to saturating fluid salinity for all volumetric clay fractions, whereas the in-phase conductivity of the smectite-clay samples is quite independent on the salinity, except at the low clay content (5% and 1% of clay in volume). This is due to the strong and constant surface conductivity of smectite associated with its very high CEC. The quadrature conductivity increases steadily with the CEC and the clay content. We observe that the dependence on frequency of the quadrature conductivity of sand-kaolinite mixtures is more important than for sand-bentonite mixtures. For both types of clay, the quadrature conductivity seems to be fairly independent on the pore fluid salinity except at very low clay contents (1% in volume of kaolinite-clay). This is due to the constant surface site density of Na counter-ions in the Stern layer of clay materials. At the lowest clay content (1%), the magnitude of the quadrature conductivity increases with the salinity, as expected for silica sands. In this case, the surface site density of Na counter-ions in the Stern layer increases with salinity. The experimental data show good agreement with predicted values given by our Spectral Induced Polarization (SIP) model. This complex conductivity model considers the electrochemical polarization of the Stern layer coating the clay particles and the Maxwell-Wagner polarization. We use the differential effective medium theory to calculate the complex

  6. Synthesis, thermal properties and applications of polymer-clay nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meneghetti, Paulo [Chemical Engineering Department, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Ave. Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Qutubuddin, Syed [Chemical Engineering Department, Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Ave. Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)]. E-mail: sxq@case.edu

    2006-03-15

    Polymer-clay nanocomposites constitute a new class of materials in which the polymer matrix is reinforced by uniformly dispersed inorganic particles (usually 10 wt.% or less) having at least one dimension in the nanometer scale. Nanocomposites exhibit improved properties when compared to pure polymer or conventional composites, such as enhanced mechanical and thermal properties, reduced gas permeability, and improved chemical stability. In this work, the synthesis of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/clay nanocomposites is described via two methods: in situ and emulsion polymerization. The in situ technique follows a two-step process: ion-exchange of the clay to make it hydrophobic, and polymerization after dispersing the functionalized clay in the monomer. The emulsion technique combines the two steps of the in situ method into one by conducting ion-exchange and polymerization in an aqueous medium in the same reactor. The clay (montmorillonite, MMT) is functionalized with a zwitterionic surfactant, octadecyl-dimethyl betaine (C18DMB). Partially exfoliated nanocomposite, observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), was obtained by emulsion polymerization with 10 wt.% clay. Glass transition temperature (T {sub g}) of this nanocomposite was 18 deg. C higher than pure PMMA. With the same clay content, in situ polymerization produced intercalated nanocomposite with T {sub g} 10 deg. C lower than the emulsion nanocomposite. The storage modulus of partially exfoliated nanocomposite was superior to the intercalated structure and to the pure polymer. Using nanocomposite technology, novel PMMA nanocomposite gel electrolytes were synthesized exhibiting improved ionic conductivity and stable lithium interfacial resistance. Nanocomposites can also be used for gas storage and packaging applications as demonstrated by high barrier polymer-clay films.

  7. Synthesis, thermal properties and applications of polymer-clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meneghetti, Paulo; Qutubuddin, Syed

    2006-01-01

    Polymer-clay nanocomposites constitute a new class of materials in which the polymer matrix is reinforced by uniformly dispersed inorganic particles (usually 10 wt.% or less) having at least one dimension in the nanometer scale. Nanocomposites exhibit improved properties when compared to pure polymer or conventional composites, such as enhanced mechanical and thermal properties, reduced gas permeability, and improved chemical stability. In this work, the synthesis of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)/clay nanocomposites is described via two methods: in situ and emulsion polymerization. The in situ technique follows a two-step process: ion-exchange of the clay to make it hydrophobic, and polymerization after dispersing the functionalized clay in the monomer. The emulsion technique combines the two steps of the in situ method into one by conducting ion-exchange and polymerization in an aqueous medium in the same reactor. The clay (montmorillonite, MMT) is functionalized with a zwitterionic surfactant, octadecyl-dimethyl betaine (C18DMB). Partially exfoliated nanocomposite, observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), was obtained by emulsion polymerization with 10 wt.% clay. Glass transition temperature (T g ) of this nanocomposite was 18 deg. C higher than pure PMMA. With the same clay content, in situ polymerization produced intercalated nanocomposite with T g 10 deg. C lower than the emulsion nanocomposite. The storage modulus of partially exfoliated nanocomposite was superior to the intercalated structure and to the pure polymer. Using nanocomposite technology, novel PMMA nanocomposite gel electrolytes were synthesized exhibiting improved ionic conductivity and stable lithium interfacial resistance. Nanocomposites can also be used for gas storage and packaging applications as demonstrated by high barrier polymer-clay films

  8. Adjustment of the expedite method for clay content determination in Rondônia soils Ajuste de método expedito para determinação de teor de argila em solos de Rondônia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo André Schlindwein

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Soil clay content is an important soil attribute and has been used to classification of phosphorus status in the soil in order to determinate the needing of phosphorus amounts to be applied to crops production. The aim of this research was to adjust the method for soil clay content determination, adopted by the laboratories of Southern Brazil (ROLAS-RS/SC, for soil clay content evaluation in Rondônia soils. The study was conducted using 50 soil samples from Rondônia State with wide range clay content. It was tested shaking periods (1.5, 2.0 and 2.5h associated with periods for soil particles decantation (1.5 and 2.0h to correlate with the standard method for soil texture testing, known as the pipette method. Clay content determined through this method was significantly correlated with pipette method. The better treatment was the combination of 2.0h of shaking and 1.5h of decantation, resulted in total period of 3.5h, which reduced the period to determine the soil clay content without loss of accuracy.O teor de argila é um importante atributo de solo e é utilizado na determinação de faixas de teores de fósforo para fins de recomendação de adubação. O objetivo deste trabalho foi ajustar o método de determinação de argila utilizado pelos laboratórios da ROLAS-RS/SC para avaliar os teores de argila dos solos de Rondônia. O estudo foi conduzido com 50 amostras de solos do Estado de Rondônia, com diferentes teores de argila. O teor de argila foi determinado utilizando-se o método da ROLAS-RS/SC, com diferentes períodos de agitação (1,5; 2,0 e 2,5h e de decantação das partículas do solo (1,5 e 2,0h e o método da pipeta, considerado padrão para essa determinação. Os teores de argila determinados nas combinações de períodos de agitação e de decantação se correlacionaram significativamente com os teores determinados pelo método da pipeta. O melhor tratamento foi a combinação de 2,0h de agitação e 1,5h de decanta

  9. Preparation of polymer-organo clay nano composites through the spray drying process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardo, Paulo R.A.; Pessan, Luiz A.; Carvalho, Antonio J.F. de; Vidotti, Suel E.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the work was the study and preparation of polymer nano composites with montmorillonite organo clays (MMT) through the spray drying process. A new technique was proposed and tested to obtaining polymer nano composites, based on the use of the spray drying process to produce a nano composite with high clay content. The process consisted of the following stages: clay intercalation in water solution, with after addition of polyvinyl alcohol (PVOH) and a hydro soluble polyester ionomer (GEROLPS20) as exfoliation agents; spray drying the mixture obtained; incorporation powder in EVOH, PET e PP matrix. The effects of exfoliation agent on morphological and thermal properties of the nano composites were studied by XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and TGA. The results demonstrate that the process of spray drying is an innovative way to obtain a nano composite with high clay content. (author)

  10. Clay matrix voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdicakis, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In many countries, it is planned that the long life highly radioactive nuclear spent fuel will be stored in deep argillaceous rocks. The sites selected for this purpose are anoxic and satisfy several recommendations as mechanical stability, low permeability and low redox potential. Pyrite (FeS 2 ), iron(II) carbonate, iron(II) bearing clays and organic matter that are present in very small amounts (about 1% w:w) in soils play a major role in their reactivity and are considered today as responsible for the low redox potential values of these sites. In this communication, we describe an electrochemical technique derived from 'Salt matrix voltammetry' and allowing the almost in-situ voltammetric characterization of air-sensitive samples of soils after the only addition of the minimum humidity required for electrolytic conduction. Figure 1 shows the principle of the developed technique. It consists in the entrapment of the clay sample between a graphite working electrode and a silver counter/quasi-reference electrode. The sample was previously humidified by passing a water saturated inert gas through the electrochemical cell. The technique leads to well-defined voltammetric responses of the electro-active components of the clays. Figure 2 shows a typical voltammogram relative to a Callovo-Oxfordian argillite sample from Bure, the French place planned for the underground nuclear waste disposal. During the direct scan, one can clearly distinguish the anodic voltammetric signals for the oxidation of the iron (II) species associated with the clay and the oxidation of pyrite. The reverse scan displays a small cathodic signal for the reduction of iron (III) associated with the clay that demonstrates that the majority of the previously oxidized iron (II) species were transformed into iron (III) oxides reducible at lower potentials. When a second voltammetric cycle is performed, one can notice that the signal for iron (II

  11. Coupling diffusion and high-pH precipitation/dissolution in the near field of a HLW repository in clay by means of reactive solute transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samper, J.; Font, I.; Yang, C.; Montenegro, L.

    2004-12-01

    The reference concept for a HLW repository in clay in Spain includes a 75 cm thick bentonite buffer which surrounds canisters. A concrete sustainment 20 cm thick is foreseen between the bentonite buffer and the clay formation. The long term geochemical evolution of the near field is affected by a high-pH hyperalkaline plume induced by concrete. Numerical models of multicomponent reactive transport have been developped in order to quantify the evolution of the system over 1 Ma. Water flow is negligible once the bentonite buffer is saturated after about 20 years. Therefore, solute transport occurs mainly by diffusion. Models account for aqueous complexation, acid-base and redox reactions, cation exchange, and mineral dissolution precipitation in the bentonite, the concrete and the clay formation. Numerical results obtained witth CORE2D indicate that the high-pH plume causes significant changes in porewater chemistry both in the bentonite buffer and the clay formation. Porosity changes caused by mineral dissolution/precipitation are extremely important. Therefore, coupled modes of diffusion and reactive transport accounting for changes in porosity caused by mineral precipitation are required in order to obtain realistic predictions.

  12. Mineralogical and Micro-fabric investigation of the Sandy Facies of Opalinus Clay (Mont Terri)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufhold, Annette; Siegesmund, Siegfried; Dohrmann, Reiner; Graesle, Werner; Plischke, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    In the field of geological disposal of radioactive waste in many countries argillaceous formations are considered as potential host rock. For the understanding of the long-term behaviour of clay host rock, it is important to understand the interaction between mechanical behaviour, micro-fabric, and mineral composition. Previous publications showed that particularly the carbonate content and the arrangement of the carbonate grains (as cement in the matrix or as shells) determines the mechanical strength of Opalinus Clay and Callovo-Oxfordian Clay specimens, respectively. Klinkenberg et al. (2009) studied the shaly facies of Opalinus Clay, however, the actual deposit is planned to be built in the sandy facies of Opalinus Clay. The aim of the present study is to investigate the relation between micro-fabric, mineral composition, and mechanical properties of different samples derived from the sandy facies (BLT-A2). Image analysis showed that the carbonates in the sandy facies mainly occur as 1) matrix which in turn acts as cement. Carbonates also occur 2) in the fine sand fraction and 3) biogenic carbonates as traces. The carbonates of the sandy facies, therefore, appear to be similar to the carbonates of the Callovo-Oxfordian Clay with respect to their possible influence on failure strength. The mechanical testing showed that the shear strength increases with increasing carbonate content. This phenomenon was also observed for the samples of the Callovo-Oxfordian Clay, while the opposite relation was found for the shaly facies of the Opalinus Clay. Preliminary results presented here, indicate that the sandy facies (drilling BLT-A2) and Callovo-Oxfordian Clay show similar mechanical properties - in detail: 1) Micro-fabric: carbonates predominate in the matrix, 2) Mineralogy: high carbonate content and 3) Mechanical testing: shear strength increases with increasing carbonate content, where the type of carbonates which controls the increase of strength has to be

  13. Pb-Zn mineralization of Ali ou Daoud area (Central High Atlas, Morocco: characterisation of deposit and relationship with the clay assemblages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daoudi, L.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Zn-Pb-Fe ores in the Ali ou Daoud deposit (Central High Atlas are found as stratiform levels and as karst fillings in carbonate platforms facies of Bajocian age. Tectonic structures (e.g., synsedimentary faults played a relevant role in the ore emplacement. The dolomitic ore-related host-rock levels are characterized by the presence of kaolinite enrichment in clay levels in amounts directly related to the proportion of the clay minerals. The latter is evidenced by correlation between kaolinite and sulphide contents, suggesting that the installation of kaolinite and mineralisations would result from the same hydrothermal fluid.[Français] Dans les séries sédimentaires carbonatées d’Ali ou Daoud (Haut Atlas Central, les minéralisations à Zn, Pb et Fe en amas stratiformes forment les faciès de remplissage des karsts d’une plateforme carbonatée bajocienne. Le contrôle structural joue un rôle capital dans la localisation du gîte en bordure de plateforme sur des failles synsédimentaires. Dans les niveaux dolomitiques encaissants des minéralisations, les assemblages argileux sont caractérisés par la présence de kaolinite dont la teneur varie parallèlement avec celle du minerai. Ceci suggère que la mise en place de la kaolinite et des minéralisations résulterait du même fluide hydrothermal. [Español] En las series sedimentarias carbonatadas de Ali ou Daoud (Alto Atlas Central, las mineralizaciones de Zn, Pb y Fe aparecen en niveles estratiformes como facies de reemplazamiento de los karsts de una plataforma carbonatada Bajociense. El control estructural desempeña un papel crucial en la localización del yacimiento a lo largo de la plataforma sobre fallas sinsedimentarias. En los niveles dolomíticos que incluyen las mineralizaciones, las asociaciones arcillosas se caracterizan por la presencia de caolinita, cuyo contenido varía paralelamente al de la mineralización. Esto sugiere que la creación de caolinita y de la

  14. Drying shrinkage problems in high-plastic clay soils in Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Longitudinal cracking in pavements due to drying shrinkage of high-plastic subgrade soils has been a major : problem in Oklahoma. Annual maintenance to seal and repair these distress problems costs significant amount of : money to the state. The long...

  15. Activación de arcillas de bajo grado a altas temperaturas Activation of low grade clays at high temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rancés Castillo

    2010-01-01

    calcined at 900 Celsius degrees. The same process was conducted with non-sediment material. Due to calcinations, the specific surface decreased significantly, and therefore, its pozzolanic activity, which was assessed by monitoring the CH consumption in cement pastes of several ages, as well as compressive strength in cement mortars. Calcined material, apparently inert, was ground until achieving high finesse. An experimental series made of sugar cane straw ash was introduced, as a reference to the pozzolans previously studied. Ground calcined clays increased its pozzolanic activity at a huge extent, which is characterized by a higher consumption of CH in cement pastes and by a higher compressive strength in cement mortars. Apparently this change takes place due to grinding effect on the reactivity of calcined clayey soils. The best results were obtained from sediment samples before their calcinations. The compressive strength of cement mortars, replacing a 30% the cement weight by such material, is similar to the control (100% cement at 7 days, and higher at 28 and 60 days. Although such replacement does not decrease total porosity, it does decrease sorptivity, mainly in samples produced with calcined and ground sedimented material. Probably this phenomenon occurs because of pores capillary refining process induced by the precipitation of products of pozzolanic reaction.

  16. Strategy for Extracting DNA from Clay Soil and Detecting a Specific Target Sequence via Selective Enrichment and Real-Time (Quantitative) PCR Amplification ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yankson, Kweku K.; Steck, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    We present a simple strategy for isolating and accurately enumerating target DNA from high-clay-content soils: desorption with buffers, an optional magnetic capture hybridization step, and quantitation via real-time PCR. With the developed technique, μg quantities of DNA were extracted from mg samples of pure kaolinite and a field clay soil. PMID:19633108

  17. Clay exfoliation and polymer/clay aerogels by supercritical carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona eLongo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 treatments of a montmorillonite (MMT intercalated with ammonium cations bearing two long hydrocarbon tails (organo-modified MMT, OMMT led to OMMT exfoliation, with loss of the long-range order in the packing of the hydrocarbon tails and maintenance of the long-range order in the clay layers. The intercalated and the derived exfoliated OMMT have been deeply characterized, mainly by X-ray diffraction analyses. Monolithic composite aerogels, with large amounts of both intercalated and exfoliated OMMT and including the nanoporous-crystalline δ form of syndiotactic polystyrene (s-PS, have been prepared, by scCO2 extractions of s-PS-based gels. Also for high OMMT content, the gel and aerogel preparation procedures occur without re-aggregation of the exfoliated clay, which is instead observed for other kinds of polymer processing. Aerogels with the exfoliated OMMT have more even dispersion of the clay layers, higher elastic modulus and larger surface area than aerogels with the intercalated OMMT. Extremely light materials with relevant transport properties could be prepared. Moreover, s-PS-based aerogels with exfoliated OMMT could be helpful for the handling of exfoliated clay minerals.

  18. Clay Dispersibility and Soil Friability-Testing the Soil Clay-to-Carbon Saturation Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjønning, Per; de Jonge, Lis Wollesen; Munkholm, Lars Juhl

    2012-01-01

    Soil organic carbon (OC) influences clay dispersibility, which affects soil tilth conditions and the risk of vertical migration of clay colloids. No universal lower threshold of OC has been identified for satisfactory stabilization of soil structure. We tested the concept of clay saturation with OC...... as a predictor of clay dispersibility and soil friability. Soil was sampled 3 yr in a field varying in clay content (∼100 to ∼220 g kg−1 soil) and grown with different crop rotations. Clay dispersibility was measured after end-over-end shaking of field-moist soil and 1- to 2-mm sized aggregates either air......-dried or rewetted to −100 hPa matric potential. Tensile strength of 1- to 2-, 2- to 4-, 4- to 8-, and 8- to 16-mm air-dried aggregates was calculated from their compressive strength, and soil friability estimated from the strength–volume relation. Crop rotation characteristics gave only minor effects on clay...

  19. A method for producing electrolyte and heat resistant drilling muds from bentonite clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyev, K; Bedelcheva, A; Uzunova, I

    1979-01-01

    A method is developed for producing clay suspensions, which are resistant to electrolytes, high temperature and pressure, on the basis of bentonite clays with a high content of montmorillonite. The method is based on the subsequent introduction into the suspension of magnesium chloride (calcium chloride) and sodium chloride with intense mixing and maintenance of the high viscosity of the clay mass. The electrolytes are added in a specific order and volume: the magnesium chloride or calcium chloride at 1-3% and the sodium chloride at approximately 30%. The clay suspensions are characterized by high SNS and filtration (40 cm/sup 3/ in 30 min). The operational indicators may be regulated so that they remain in accordance with the required standards.

  20. Highly ordered self-assembling polymer/clay nanocomposite barrier film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ray; Chen, Yihong; Beall, Gary W

    2015-05-27

    Efforts to mimic complex-structured biologically based materials such as abalone shell have occupied substantial research time and effort in science and engineering. The majority of the efforts involve tedious and expensive techniques and processes. Layer-by-layer (LBL) is one such technique that can produce materials with quite unique physical properties, approaching, and in some cases surpassing, those seen in nature. The LBL technique, however, is quite tedious and difficult to implement commercially. We report here the discovery of an organic/inorganic spontaneous self-assembling system that forms a highly structured nanocomposite. The driving force behind this self-assembly appears to be entropy. This discovery should open up completely new avenues to designing hierarchical composites and structures. The films have been studied by X-ray diffraction and the barrier properties for oxygen diffusion measured.

  1. Hydrogen isotope ratios of clay minerals constituting clay veins found in granitic rocks in Hiroshima Prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitagawa, Ryuji; Kakitani, Satoru; Kuroda, Yoshimatsu; Matsuo, Sadao; Suzuoki, Tetsuro.

    1980-01-01

    The deuterium content of the constitutional and interlayer water extracted from the clay minerals (illite, montmorillonite, interstratified illite-montmorillonite mineral, kaolinite, halloysite) constituting the clay veins found in the granitic rocks in Hiroshima Prefecture was measured. The clay minerals were heated at 270 deg C to extract the interlayer water, then heated to 1,400 or 1,500 deg C to extract the constitutional water. The deuterium content of the local surface water collected from sampling points was measured. In the clay veins formed along perpendicular joints, the constituent clay minerals change from lower to upper part: illite → montmorillonite → kaolinite → halloysite. The deuterium content values of the constitutional water for illite and montmorillonite were estimated to be -67 to -69% and -86 to -89%, respectively. The deuterium content values of the constitutional water for halloysite range from -68 to -80% and for kaolinite from -63 to -67%. (J.P.N.)

  2. Clay 2001 dossier: progress report on feasibility studies and research into deep geological disposal of high-level, long-lived waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    A French Act of Parliament passed on 30 December 1991 set out the main areas of research required to prepare solutions for the long-term management of high-level, long-lived radioactive waste. The three avenues of research listed in the Act included a feasibility study of the deep geological disposal of these waste, with responsibility for steering the study given to ANDRA, France National Agency for Radioactive Waste Management. Following government decisions taken in 1998, the study focused on two types of geological medium, clay and granite. The clay formations study is essentially based on results from an underground laboratory sited at the border between the Meuse and Haute-Marne departments, where the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite beds are being investigated. No site has yet been chosen for an underground laboratory for the granite study, so for the time being this will draw on generic work and on research carried out in laboratories outside France. ANDRA has decided to present an initial report on the results of its research programme, publishing a dossier on the work on clay formations in 2001 with a second dossier covering the work on granite due for release in 2002. This dossier is thus a review of the work carried out by ANDRA on the feasibility study into a radioactive waste repository in a clay formation. It represents one step in a process of studies and research work leading up to the submission of a report due in 2005 containing ANDRA conclusions on the feasibility of a repository in the clay formation. (author)

  3. Thermal volume changes in clays and clay-stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delage, P.; Sulem, J.; Mohajerani, M.; Tang, A.M.; Monfared, M.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The disposal of high activity exothermic radioactive waste at great depth in clay host rocks will induce a temperature elevation that has been investigated in various underground research laboratories in Belgium, France and Switzerland through in-situ tests. Thermal effects are better known in clays (in particular Boom clay) than in clay-stone (e.g. Opalinus clay and Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone). In terms of volume changes, Figure 1 confirms the findings of Hueckel and Baldi (1990) that volume changes depend on the over-consolidation ratio (OCR) of the clay. In drained conditions, normally consolidated clays exhibit plastic contraction when heated, whereas over-consolidated clay exhibit elastic dilation. The nature of thermal volume changes in heated clays obviously has a significant effect on thermally induced pore pressures, when drainage is not instantaneous like what occurs in-situ. Compared to clays, the thermal volume change behaviour of clay-stones is less well known than that of clays. clay-stone are a priori suspected to behave like over-consolidated clays. In this paper, a comparison of recent results obtained in the laboratory on the drained thermal volume changes of clay-stones is presented and discussed. It is difficult to run drained mechanical tests in clay-stones like the Opalinus clay and the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone because of their quite low permeability (10 -12 - 10 -13 m/s). This also holds true for thermal tests. Due to the significant difference in thermal expansion coefficient between minerals and water, it is necessary to adopt very slow heating rate (0.5 - 1 C/h) to avoid any thermal pressurization. To do so, a new hollow cylinder apparatus (100 mm external diameter, 60 mm internal diameter) with lateral drainages reducing the drainage length to half the sample thickness (10 mm) has been developed (Monfared et al. 2011). The results of a drained cyclic thermal test carried out on

  4. Comparison of the Nanostructure and Mechanical Performance of Highly Exfoliated Epoxy-Clay Nanocomposites Prepared by Three Different Protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiravand, Fatemeh; Hutchinson, John M; Calventus, Yolanda; Ferrando, Francesc

    2014-05-30

    Three different protocols for the preparation of polymer layered silicate nanocomposites based upon a tri-functional epoxy resin, triglycidyl para -amino phenol (TGAP), have been compared in respect of the cure kinetics, the nanostructure and their mechanical properties. The three preparation procedures involve 2 wt% and 5 wt% of organically modified montmorillonite (MMT), and are: isothermal cure at selected temperatures; pre-conditioning of the resin-clay mixture before isothermal cure; incorporation of an initiator of cationic homopolymerisation, a boron tri-fluoride methyl amine complex, BF₃·MEA, within the clay galleries. It was found that features of the cure kinetics and of the nanostructure correlate with the measured impact strength of the cured nanocomposites, which increases as the degree of exfoliation of the MMT is improved. The best protocol for toughening the TGAP/MMT nanocomposites is by the incorporation of 1 wt% BF₃·MEA into the clay galleries of nanocomposites containing 2 wt% MMT.

  5. Water balance of an earth fill built of organic clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birle Emanuel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents investigations on the water balance of an earth fill built of organic clay in humid climate. As the organic soil used for the fill contains geogenetically elevated concentrations of arsenic, particular attention is paid on the seepage flow through the fill. The test fill is 5 m high, 30 m long and 25 m wide. The fill consists of the organic clay compacted at water contents wet and dry of Proctor Optimum covered by a drainage mat and a 60 cm thick top layer. For the determination of the water balance extensive measuring systems were installed. The seepage at the bottom measured so far was less than 2 % of the precipitation. The interflow in the drainage mat above the compacted organic clay was of similar magnitude. The estimated evapotranspiration reached approx. 84 % of the precipitation. According to these measurements the percolation is much lower than the percolation of many landfill covers in humid climates.

  6. Rocks, Clays, Water, and Salts: Highly Durable, Infinitely Rechargeable, Eminently Controllable Thermal Batteries for Buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan W. Rempel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Materials that store the energy of warm days, to return that heat during cool nights, have been fundamental to vernacular building since ancient times. Although building with thermally rechargeable materials became a niche pursuit with the advent of fossil fuel-based heating and cooling, energy and climate change concerns have sparked new enthusiasm for these substances of high heat capacity and moderate thermal conductivity: stone, adobe, rammed earth, brick, water, concrete, and more recently, phase-change materials. While broadly similar, these substances absorb and release heat in unique patterns characteristic of their mineralogies, densities, fluidities, emissivities, and latent heats of fusion. Current architectural practice, however, shows little awareness of these differences and the resulting potential to match materials to desired thermal performance. This investigation explores that potential, illustrating the correspondence between physical parameters and thermal storage-and-release patterns in direct-, indirect-, and isolated-gain passive solar configurations. Focusing on heating applications, results demonstrate the superiority of water walls for daytime warmth, the tunability of granite and concrete for evening warmth, and the exceptional ability of phase-change materials to sustain near-constant heat delivery throughout the night.

  7. Geochemical of clay formations : study of Spanish clay REFERENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turrero, M. J.; Pena, J.

    2003-01-01

    Clay rocks are investigated in different international research programs in order to assess its feasibility for the disposal of high level radioactive wastes. This is because different sepcific aspects: they have low hydraulic conductivity (10''-11-10''-15 m/s), a high sorption capacity, self-sealing capacity of facults and discontinuities and mechanical resistance. Several research programs on clay formations are aimed to study the chemistry of the groundwater and the water-rock reactions that control it: e. g. Boom Clay (Mol, Belgium), Oxford Clay /Harwell, United Kingdom), Toarcian Clay (Tournemire, France), Palfris formation (Wellenberg, Switzerland), Opalinus Clay (Bure, France). Based on these studies, considerable progress in the development of techniques for hydrologic, geochemical and hydrogeochemical characterization of mudstones has been accomplished (e. g. Beaufais et al. 1994, De Windt el al. 1998. Thury and Bossart 1999, Sacchi and Michelot 2000) with important advances in the knowledge of geochemical process in these materials (e. g. Reeder et al. 1993, Baeyens and Brandbury 1994, Beaucaire et al. 2000, Pearson et al., 2003).Furtermore, geochemical modeling is commonly used to simulate the evolution of water chemistry and to understand quantitatively the processes controlling the groundwater chemistry (e. g. Pearson et al. 1998, Tempel and Harrison 2000, Arcos et al., 2001). The work presented here is part of a research program funded by Enresa in the context of its R and D program. It is focused on the characterization of a clay formation (reference Argillaceous Formation, RAF) located within the Duero Basin (north-centralSpain). The characterisation of th ephysical properties,, fluid composition, mineralogy, water-rock reaction processes, geochemical modelling and sorption properties of the clays from the mentioned wells is the main purpose of this work. (Author)

  8. The Compressibility and Swell of Mixtures for Sand-Clay Liners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muawia A. Dafalla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sand-clay liners utilize expansive clay to act as a filler to occupy the voids in the sand and thus reduce the hydraulic conductivity of the mixture. The hydraulic conductivity and transfer of water and other substances through sand-clay mixtures are of prime concern in the design of liners and hydraulic barriers. Many successful research studies have been undertaken to achieve appropriate mixtures that satisfy hydraulic conductivity requirements. This study investigates compressibility and swelling properties of mixtures to ensure that they were acceptable for light structures, roads, and slabs on grade. A range of sand-expansive clay mixtures were investigated for swell and compression properties. The swelling and compressibility indices were found to increase with increasing clay content. The use of highly expansive material can result in large volume changes due to swell and shrinkage. The inclusion of less expansive soil material as partial replacement of bentonite by one-third to two-thirds is found to reduce the compressibility by 60% to 70% for 10% and 15% clay content, respectively. The swelling pressure and swell percent were also found significantly reduced. Adding less expansive natural clay to bentonite can produce liners that are still sufficiently impervious and at the same time less problematic.

  9. Early containment of high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream in clay-bearing blended cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruger, A.A.; Olson, R.A.; Tennis, P.D.

    1995-04-01

    Portland cement blended with fly ash and attapulgite clay was mixed with high-alkaline solution simulating low-level radioactive waste stream at a one-to-one weight ratio. Mixtures were adiabatically and isothermally cured at various temperatures and analyzed for phase composition, total alkalinity, pore solution chemistry, and transport properties as measured by impedance spectroscopy. Total alkalinity is characterized by two main drops. The early one corresponds to a rapid removal of phosphorous, aluminum, sodium, and to a lesser extent potassium solution. The second drop from about 10 h to 3 days is mainly associated with the removal of aluminum, silicon, and sodium. Thereafter, the total alkalinity continues descending, but at a lower rate. All pastes display a rapid flow loss that is attributed to an early precipitation of hydrated products. Hemicarbonate appears as early as one hour after mixing and is probably followed by apatite precipitation. However, the former is unstable and decomposes at a rate that is inversely related to the curing temperature. At high temperatures, zeolite appears at about 10 h after mixing. At 30 days, the stabilized crystalline composition Includes zeolite, apatite and other minor amounts of CaCO 3 , quartz, and monosulfate Impedance spectra conform with the chemical and mineralogical data. The normalized conductivity of the pastes shows an early drop, which is followed by a main decrease from about 12 h to three days. At three days, the permeability of the cement-based waste as calculated by Katz-Thompson equation is over three orders of magnitude lower than that of ordinary portland cement paste. However, a further decrease in the calculated permeability is questionable. Chemical stabilization is favorable through incorporation of waste species into apatite and zeolite

  10. Clay with Desiccation Cracks is an Advection Dominated Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baram, S.; Kurtzman, D.; Sher, Y.; Ronen, Z.; Dahan, O.

    2012-04-01

    Heavy clay sediments are regarded "safe" from the hydrological point of view due to their low hydraulic conductivities. However, the formation of desiccation cracks in dispersive clays may dramatically change their bulk hydraulic properties. The impact of desiccation cracks on water percolation, dissolved salts and contaminants transport and redox related reactions (microbial ammonium oxidation and denitrification) were investigated in 6 -12 m clay layer near a diary farm waste lagoon. The study implemented unique vadose-zone monitoring systems that enable in-situ measurements of the temporal variation of the sediment's water content along with frequent sampling of the sediment's pore water along the entire vadose zone (> 30 m). Results from four years of continuous measurements showed quick rises in sediment water content following rain events and temporal wastewater overflows. The percolation pattern indicated dominance of preferential flow through a desiccation-cracks network crossing the entire clay sediment layer. High water-propagation velocities (0.4 - 23.6 m h-1) were observed, indicating that the desiccation-crack network remains open and serves as a preferential flow pathway year-round, even at high sediment water content (~0.50 m3 m-3). The rapid percolation bypassed the most bio-geo-active parts of the soil, transporting even highly sorptive contaminants (testosterone and estrogen) in to the deep sections of the vadose zone, accelerating the underlying groundwater contamination. The ammonium and nitrate concentrations in the vadose zone and the high number of nitrifying and denitrifying bacteria (~108 gene copies gdry-sediemt-1, each) found in the sediment indicated that the entire vadose zone is aerated even at high water content conditions (~0.55 m3 m-3). The dissolved salts concentration in the pore-water and the δ2H-H2O and δ18O-H2O values of the pore-water substantially increased with depth (becoming less depleted) in the clay sediment

  11. Improvement Of The U-Th Method For Dating Of Impure Calcite Having A Large Amount Of Clay And Very Low Uranium Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samer Farkh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The U-Th method also called series method of uranium is improved by a new experimental protocol and successfully applied to the impure calcite with uranium concentration 005 dpmg which was previously difficult to be dated accurately. Our experiments performed on 15 calcite samples taken from France and Morocco have highlighted the importance of this methodological improvement by enabling i the elimination of 100 of clay residues ii the reduction of calcite quantity necessary to the chemical manipulation from 20g to 5g iii the analysis of calcite samples poor in uranium and on the other hand rich with clay and iiii the reduction of the lower limit of the U-Th method from 10 Kyrs to 6 Kyrs. The optimization of U-Th method in this work provided a better dating of the accurate age of calcite. Thus this technique is important for the chemical analysis of stalagmite floors of different caves in the region of the Near East.

  12. High Solid Contents Copoly (Styrene/Butyl Acrylate-Cloisite 30B Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mirzataheri

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Higher solid contents (20 % and 40 % nanocomposites of poly (styrene-co-butyl acrylate including higher content of Cloisite 30B (7 wt% and 10 wt % were prepared via miniemulsion polymerization. Stability of the final latexes proved outstanding combination of polymerization procedure and surfactants. Morphological studies revealed by TEM, SAX and XRD showed three structures of core-shell, armored and individual dispersion of clay layers within the polymer particles. The effect of Cloisite 30B content on the barrier properties presents excellent and wide use of these films for packaging and nanocoatings industries.

  13. Concrete-Opalinus clay interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenni, A.; Maeder, U.; Lerouge, C.; Gaboreau, S.; Schwyn, B.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Designs for deep geologic disposal of radioactive waste foresee cementitious materials as structural elements, backfill or waste matrix. Therefore, studies of interactions between cement and all other materials involved are important. Interactions are mostly driven by chemical gradients in pore water and might lead to mineralogical alterations in the barrier system, which in turn influence properties like swelling pressure, permeability, or specific retention in case of clay materials. Existing laboratory and in-situ studies using clay-stone revealed significant alteration in both cement and clay-stone. Phase dissolution, precipitation, and carbonation, were found to cause an overall porosity increase in the cement with a possible decrease close to the interface, and clogging in the clay-stone [2]. Most of the work was done on cement pastes rather than concretes to avoid analytical complications caused by aggregates, and the scale of investigation was chosen in the range of centimetres rather than micrometers. The Cement-Clay Interaction (CI) experiment at the Mont Terri Underground Laboratory (St. Ursanne, Switzerland) aims at replicating some of the processes at interfaces to be expected.For this purpose, two vertical cylindrical boreholes (384 mm diameter, up to 10 m length) in Opalinus Clay (OPA) were filled with layers of three different concretes and bentonite. The concrete formulations are based on common aggregate content and grain size distributions, combined with three different cements: Portland cement (OPC), ESDRED cement especially designed for repository applications (40% of cement substituted with silica fume), and low alkali cement (LAC, containing slag and nano-silica).In this study, we present a characterisation of the three concrete-OPA interfaces after two years of alteration and deduce possible mechanisms. Backscattered electron (BE) imaging and energy dispersive spectrum (EDX) element mapping

  14. Spectromicroscopy of Fe distributions in clay microcrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundl, T. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Cerasari, S.; Garcia, A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Clays are ubiquitous crystalline particles found in nature that are responsible for contributing to a wide range of chemical reactions in soils. The structure of these mineral particles changes when the particle is hydrated ({open_quotes}wet{close_quotes}), from that when it is dry. This makes a study of the microscopic distribution of chemical content of these nanocrystals difficult using standard techniques that require vacuum. In addition to large structural changes, it is likely that chemical changes accompany the drying process. As a result, spectroscopic measurements on dried clay particles may not accurately reflect the actual composition of the material as found in the environment. In this work, the authors extend the use of the ALS Spectromicroscopy Facility STXM to high spectral and spatial resolution studies of transition metal L-edges in environmental materials. The authors are studying mineral particles of montmorillonite, which is an Fe bearing clay which can be prepared with a wide distribution of Fe concentrations, and with Fe occupying different substitutional sites.

  15. Transport of oxidants and radionuclides through a clay barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neretnieks, I.

    1978-02-01

    The masstransfer rate for oxidants to, and radionuclides from a capsule in a repository has been computed. The capsule which is 0.75 m in diameter is surrounded by Montmorillonite clay. The hole is 1.5 m in diameter. For one capsule about 1220g copper will corrode due to oxygen corrosion in 10 000 years. If the fissures in the rock nearest the hole are filled with clay, the corrosion will decrease significantly. This is valid for a case where the groundwater is in equilibrium with oxygen of 0.2 bar pressure (normal air pressure). Measurements of the oxygen content in groundwater at large depths show a more than 1 000 times smaller values. The transport rate will then be correspondingly smaller. Corrosion due to sulphate/sulphide corrosion may reach some 590 g in the same time if there is 10 mg/l of the least abundant component. The radionuclides Sr 90 , Cs 137 , Am 241 and Am 243 will decay totally in the clay barriers. Pu 240 will be seriously hindered. The total dissolution of the uranium oxide in a capsule takes at least 1.8 million years. Nuclides with high solubilities decrease in about 2 000 years to half their original concentration. The sodium in the Montmorillonite clay in the fissures is exchanged for calcium in about 20 000 years. The exchange of the sodium in the clay in the hole takes millions of years

  16. Study of the feasibility of the utilization of clays from Poco Fundo (MG) for its use in bricks fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar Junior, L.A.; Souza, M.H.O.; Moreno, M.M.T.

    2012-01-01

    This work aimed to make an analysis of mineralogical (Macroscopic Description and X-Ray Diffraction), chemical (X-Ray Fluorescence and Organic Carbon Analysis) and ceramic (Particle Size Distribution, Mechanical Resistance, Water Absorption, Apparent Porosity, among others) properties of the alluvial clays collected in Poco Fundo county - Minas Gerais State, Brazil - in order to confirm the feasibility of these clays for bricks manufacturing. There were collected 4 samples from the main potteries of the county, and they were nominated PF-01, PF-02, PF-03 and MAC-01. The clays from these region display high content of quartz, kaolinite and present refractory behavior, and the alkalis content (Na 2 O and K 2 O) is low, because the studied area suffered an intense weathering process. The sample PF-03 presented the most promising ceramic results, mainly due to the lower content in silica and higher amounts of organic matter, denoting a clay coming from a swampy area. (author)

  17. Shedding Light on Filovirus Infection with High-Content Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rekha G. Panchal

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Microscopy has been instrumental in the discovery and characterization of microorganisms. Major advances in high-throughput fluorescence microscopy and automated, high-content image analysis tools are paving the way to the systematic and quantitative study of the molecular properties of cellular systems, both at the population and at the single-cell level. High-Content Imaging (HCI has been used to characterize host-virus interactions in genome-wide reverse genetic screens and to identify novel cellular factors implicated in the binding, entry, replication and egress of several pathogenic viruses. Here we present an overview of the most significant applications of HCI in the context of the cell biology of filovirus infection. HCI assays have been recently implemented to quantitatively study filoviruses in cell culture, employing either infectious viruses in a BSL-4 environment or surrogate genetic systems in a BSL-2 environment. These assays are becoming instrumental for small molecule and siRNA screens aimed at the discovery of both cellular therapeutic targets and of compounds with anti-viral properties. We discuss the current practical constraints limiting the implementation of high-throughput biology in a BSL-4 environment, and propose possible solutions to safely perform high-content, high-throughput filovirus infection assays. Finally, we discuss possible novel applications of HCI in the context of filovirus research with particular emphasis on the identification of possible cellular biomarkers of virus infection.

  18. The influence of clay minerals on acoustic properties of sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Olav

    1997-12-31

    This thesis aims to provide better understanding of the relationship between the acoustic properties and the petrophysical/mineralogical properties in sand-prone rock. It emphasizes the influence of clay minerals. The author develops a method to deposit clay minerals/mineral aggregates in pore space of a rigid rock framework. Kaolinite aggregates were flushed into porous permeable Bentheimer sandstone to evaluate the effect of pore filling minerals on porosity, permeability and acoustic properties. The compressional velocity was hardly affected by the clay content and it was found that the effect of minor quantities of pore filling minerals may be acoustically modelled as an ideal suspension, where the pore fluid bulk modulus is modified by the bulk modulus of the clay minerals. The influence of clays on acoustic velocities in petroleum reservoir rocks was investigated through ultrasonic measurements of compressional- and shear-waves on core material from reservoir and non-reservoir units on the Norwegian Continental Shelf. The measured velocities decrease as the porosity increases, but are not strongly dependent on the clay content. The measured velocities are less dependent on the petrophysical and lithological properties than indicated by previous authors and published mathematical models, and stiffness reduction factors are introduced in two of the models to better match the data. Velocities are estimated along the wellbores based on non-sonic well logs and reflect well the actual sonic log well measurements. In some wells the compressional velocity cannot be modelled correctly by the models suggested. Very high compressional wave anisotropy was measured in the dry samples at atmospheric conditions. As the samples were saturated, the anisotropy was reduced to a maximum of about 30% and decreases further upon pressurization. Reservoir rocks retrieved from 2500 m are more stress dependent than those retrieved from less than 200 m depth. 168 refs., 117 figs., 24

  19. High plant uptake of radiocesium from organic soils due to Cs mobility and low soil K content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, A.L.; Wright, S.M.; Naylor, C.; Kennedy, V.H.; Dodd, B.A.; Singleton, D.L.; Barnett, C.L.; Stevens, P.A.

    1999-01-01

    Post-Chernobyl experience has demonstrated that persistently high plant transfer of 137 Cs occurs from organic soils in upland and seminatural ecosystems. The soil properties influencing this transfer have been known for some time but have not been quantified. A pot experiment was conducted using 23 soils collected from selected areas of Great Britain, which were spiked with 134 Cs, and Agrostis capillaris grown for 19--45 days. The plant-to-soil 134 Cs concentration ratio (CR) varied from 0.06 to 44; log CR positively correlated to soil organic matter content (R 2 = 0.84), and CR values were highest for soils with low distribution coefficients (K d ) of 134 Cs. Soils with high organic matter contents and high concentrations of NH 4 + in solution showed high 134 Cs mobility (low K d ). The plant-to-soil solution 134 Cs ratio decreased sharply with increasing soil solution K + . A two parameter linear model, used to predict log CR from soil solution K + and K d , explained 94% of the variability in CR values. In conclusion, the high transfer of 134 Cs in organic soils is related to both the high 134 Cs mobility (low clay content and high NH 4 + concentrations) and low K availability

  20. Denuded zone in Czochralski silicon wafer with high carbon content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Jiahe; Yang Deren; Ma Xiangyang; Que Duanlin

    2006-01-01

    The thermal stability of the denuded zone (DZ) created by high-low-high-temperature annealing in high carbon content (H[C]) and low carbon content (L[C]) Czochralski silicon (Cz-Si) has been investigated in a subsequent ramping and isothermal 1050 deg. C annealing. The tiny oxygen precipitates which might occur in the DZ were checked. It was found in the L[C] Cz-Si that the DZ shrank and the density of bulk micro-defects (BMDs) reduced with the increase of time spent at 1050 deg. C. Also, the DZs above 15 μm of thickness present in the H[C] Cz-Si wafers continuously and the density and total volume of BMDs first decreased then increased and finally decreased again during the treatments. Moreover, tiny oxygen precipitates were hardly generated inside the DZs, indicating that H[C] Cz-Si wafers could support the fabrication of integrated circuits

  1. Denuded zone in Czochralski silicon wafer with high carbon content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiahe; Yang, Deren; Ma, Xiangyang; Que, Duanlin

    2006-12-01

    The thermal stability of the denuded zone (DZ) created by high-low-high-temperature annealing in high carbon content (H[C]) and low carbon content (L[C]) Czochralski silicon (Cz-Si) has been investigated in a subsequent ramping and isothermal 1050 °C annealing. The tiny oxygen precipitates which might occur in the DZ were checked. It was found in the L[C] Cz-Si that the DZ shrank and the density of bulk micro-defects (BMDs) reduced with the increase of time spent at 1050 °C. Also, the DZs above 15 µm of thickness present in the H[C] Cz-Si wafers continuously and the density and total volume of BMDs first decreased then increased and finally decreased again during the treatments. Moreover, tiny oxygen precipitates were hardly generated inside the DZs, indicating that H[C] Cz-Si wafers could support the fabrication of integrated circuits.

  2. Use of clays as buffers in radioactive repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.

    1983-05-01

    For use as canister overpack, highly compacted bentonite is superior to illite and any reasonably montmorillonite-rich bentonite will do which is not too rich in sulphur. The organic content should be low and heat treatment may be required to bring this content down to an acceptable level. Heating to slightly more than 400degreeC does not affect the physical properties of neither montmorillonite, nor illite to a significant extent. Bentonite is also very suitable for use as sealing plugs in the form of highly compacted blocks. For use as backfill in tunnels and shafts, illitic clay is a candidate material which can be compacted on site to the rather high density that is required. Where a swelling capacity is needed, such as in the top part of tunnels, bentonite-based backfills are suitable and if Na saturated clay is used the bentoite fraction can be kept low. Thus, a 10 percent content of Na bentonite by weight should generally be sufficient for a well compacted mixture with respect to the required hydraulic conductivity, while a 20-30 percent content may be needed to arrive at a sufficient swelling power. The choice of a suitable clay material requires that the substance be properly characterized and tested. It is concluded that rather rigorous analyses are necessary as concerns overpacks, including mineralogical and granulometrical tests and the determination of the swelling characteristics as well as of certain chemical features. For backfills and for the current checking of all sorts of clay for use as buffer materials, the natural water content, the liquid limit and the swelling ability have to be determined, since they are the fingerprints of this type of soil. (author)

  3. Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    secondary levels. In subject matter didactics, the question of content is more developed, but it is still mostly confined to teaching on lower levels. As for higher education didactics, discussions on selection of content are almost non-existent on the programmatic level. Nevertheless, teachers are forced...... curriculum, in higher education, and to generate analytical categories and criteria for selection of content, which can be used for systematic didactical reflection. The larger project also concerns reflection on and clarification of the concept of content, including the relation between content at the level......Aim, content and methods are fundamental categories of both theoretical and practical general didactics. A quick glance in recent pedagogical literature on higher education, however, reveals a strong preoccupation with methods, i.e. how teaching should be organized socially (Biggs & Tang, 2007...

  4. Thermal Behaviour of clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tassoni, E.

    1985-01-01

    The programme carried out by ENEA to model the thermal-hydraulic-mechanical behaviour of the clay formations and to measure, in situ and in laboratory, the thermal properties of these rocks, is presented. An in situ heating experiment has been carried out in an open clay quarry in the area of Monterotondo, near Rome. The main goal of the experiment was to know the temperature field and the thermal effects caused by the high level radioactive waste disposed of in a clayey geological formation. The conclusions are as follows: - the thermal conduction codes are sufficiently accurate to forecast the temperature increases caused in the clay by the dissipation of the heat generated by high level radioactive waste; - the thermal conductivity deduced by means of the ''curve fitting'' method ranges from 0.015 to 0.017 W.cm -1 . 0 C -1 - the temperature variation associated with the transport of clay interstitial water caused by temperature gradient is negligible. A laboratory automated method has been designed to measure the thermal conductivity and diffusivity in clay samples. A review of experimental data concerning thermomechanical effects in rocks as well as results of thermal experiments performed at ISMES on clays are presented. Negative thermal dilation has been found both in the elastic and plastic range under constant stress. Thermoplastic deformation appears ten times greater than the thermoelastic one. A mathematical model is proposed in order to simulate the above and other effects that encompass thermal-elastic-plastic-pore water pressure response of clays at high temperature and effective pressure with undrained and transient drainage conditions. Implementation of the two versions into a finite element computer code is described

  5. Efficiency of phosphate fertilization to maize crop in high phosphorus content soil, evaluated by 32P tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevizam, Anderson R.; Alvarez Villanueva, Felipe C.; Silva, Maria Ligia de S.; Muraoka, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Application of high dosis of phosphorus (P) in agricultural soils is justified by its intense fixation by the soil clays, which reduce availability to crops. The objective of this research was to evaluate the response of maize crops to five rates of triple superphosphate in a soil with high available phosphorus content. Portions of 2 dm 3 of soil (Typic Quartzipisamment) with 75 mg kg -1 of available phosphorus and pH 7.00, collected from the upper 0-20 cm layer, were placed in plastic pots, received solution containing 5.55 MBq (150 μCi) of 32 P and incubated for 7 days. Then 0, 250, 500, 1000 and 4000 mg P kg -1 as triple superphosphate was added to soil in the respective pots and incubated for 15 days keeping the soil moisture to 60 % of the field capacity. Maize (Zea mays L.) plants, single hybrid P30F80, were grown for 50 days (after germination), collected, oven dried, weighed and ground in a Wiley mill for analysis of total P content and 32 P radioactivity. The maize dry matter increased with triple superphosphate rates. The phosphorus content and accumulation in the maize plants increased with triple superphosphate rate up to 4000 mg kg -1 . The percentage of phosphorus derived from the fertilizer ranged from 79 to 97% and consequently the phosphorus derived from soil decreased with increasing application of triple superphosphate. In spite of soil high P available content, maize plants responded to applied phosphorus rates. (author)

  6. Information management for high content live cell imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    White Michael RH

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High content live cell imaging experiments are able to track the cellular localisation of labelled proteins in multiple live cells over a time course. Experiments using high content live cell imaging will generate multiple large datasets that are often stored in an ad-hoc manner. This hinders identification of previously gathered data that may be relevant to current analyses. Whilst solutions exist for managing image data, they are primarily concerned with storage and retrieval of the images themselves and not the data derived from the images. There is therefore a requirement for an information management solution that facilitates the indexing of experimental metadata and results of high content live cell imaging experiments. Results We have designed and implemented a data model and information management solution for the data gathered through high content live cell imaging experiments. Many of the experiments to be stored measure the translocation of fluorescently labelled proteins from cytoplasm to nucleus in individual cells. The functionality of this database has been enhanced by the addition of an algorithm that automatically annotates results of these experiments with the timings of translocations and periods of any oscillatory translocations as they are uploaded to the repository. Testing has shown the algorithm to perform well with a variety of previously unseen data. Conclusion Our repository is a fully functional example of how high throughput imaging data may be effectively indexed and managed to address the requirements of end users. By implementing the automated analysis of experimental results, we have provided a clear impetus for individuals to ensure that their data forms part of that which is stored in the repository. Although focused on imaging, the solution provided is sufficiently generic to be applied to other functional proteomics and genomics experiments. The software is available from: fhttp://code.google.com/p/livecellim/

  7. Multifaceted role of clay minerals in pharmaceuticals

    OpenAIRE

    Khurana, Inderpreet Singh; Kaur, Satvinder; Kaur, Harpreet; Khurana, Rajneet Kaur

    2015-01-01

    The desirable physical and physiochemical properties of clay minerals have led them to play a substantial role in pharmaceutical formulations. Clay minerals like kaolin, smectite and palygorskite-sepiolite are among the world's most valuable industrial minerals and of considerable importance. The elemental features of clay minerals which caused them to be used in pharmaceutical formulations are high specific area, sorption capacity, favorable rheological properties, chemical inertness, swelli...

  8. Synthesis of titania modified silica-pillared clay (SPC) with highly ordered interlayered mesoporous structure for removing toxic metal ion Cr(VI) from aqueous state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Huihui, E-mail: maohuihui_beijing@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Catalytic Materials and Technology, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu Province 213164 (China); Zhu, Kongnan [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Catalytic Materials and Technology, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu Province 213164 (China); Li, Baoshan, E-mail: bsli@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Yao, Chao; Kong, Yong [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Advanced Catalytic Materials and Technology, Changzhou University, Changzhou, Jiangsu Province 213164 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Titanium-functionalized silica-pillared clays synthesized through post synthetic route was utilized as adsorbers for the removal of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions under different temperatures and initial concentrations. The starting mesostructured silica-pillared clay is assembled by intragallery ammonia-catalyzed hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane using cationic surfactant as gallery template, and subsequently, the formed interlayered pore walls were decorated with nano-sized TiO{sub 2} particle through organic titanium functionalization process. The kind of structural transformation has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis, UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), elemental analysis (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Such results indicate that most of the grafted titanium species was combined with Si–OH on the surface of gallery pores. By changing the concentration of organic titanium source during synthesis, the porous structure system is effected. Under suitable conditions, these materials exhibit high adsorption capacity and efficiency. Qualitative estimates of the thermodynamic parameters showed that the overall adsorption process is spontaneous (ΔG° < 0) and endothermic (ΔH° > 0). The adsorption isotherms of Cr(VI) on titanium-functionalized silica-pillared clay were best fitted by Redlich–Peterson models. Detail results of thermodynamics and kinetics are also presented.

  9. Synthesis of titania modified silica-pillared clay (SPC) with highly ordered interlayered mesoporous structure for removing toxic metal ion Cr(VI) from aqueous state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Huihui; Zhu, Kongnan; Li, Baoshan; Yao, Chao; Kong, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Titanium-functionalized silica-pillared clays synthesized through post synthetic route was utilized as adsorbers for the removal of Cr(VI) ions from aqueous solutions under different temperatures and initial concentrations. The starting mesostructured silica-pillared clay is assembled by intragallery ammonia-catalyzed hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane using cationic surfactant as gallery template, and subsequently, the formed interlayered pore walls were decorated with nano-sized TiO 2 particle through organic titanium functionalization process. The kind of structural transformation has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis, UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), elemental analysis (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Such results indicate that most of the grafted titanium species was combined with Si–OH on the surface of gallery pores. By changing the concentration of organic titanium source during synthesis, the porous structure system is effected. Under suitable conditions, these materials exhibit high adsorption capacity and efficiency. Qualitative estimates of the thermodynamic parameters showed that the overall adsorption process is spontaneous (ΔG° 0). The adsorption isotherms of Cr(VI) on titanium-functionalized silica-pillared clay were best fitted by Redlich–Peterson models. Detail results of thermodynamics and kinetics are also presented.

  10. Geochemical effects of electro-osmosis in clays

    KAUST Repository

    Loch, J. P. Gustav

    2010-02-13

    Geochemical effects of electro-osmosis in bentonite clay are studied in the laboratory, where a 6 mm thick bentonite layer is subjected to direct current. Acidification and alkalization near anode and cathode are expected, possibly causing mineral deterioration, ion mobilization and precipitation of new solids. Afterwards the clay is analysed by XRF and anolyte and catholyte are analysed by ICP-MS. In addition, as a preliminary experiment treated bentonite is analysed by high resolution μ-XRF. Electro-osmotic flow is observed. Due to its carbonate content the bentonite is pH-buffering. Alkalization in the catholyte is substantial. Ca, Na and Sr are significantly removed from the clay and accumulate in the catholyte. Recovery in the catholyte accounts for a small fraction of the element-loss from the clay. The rest will have precipitated in undetected solid phases. μ-XRF indicates the loss of Ca-content throughout the bentonite layer. © The Author(s) 2010.

  11. Method for creating high carbon content products from biomass oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Reginald; Seames, Wayne

    2012-12-18

    In a method for producing high carbon content products from biomass, a biomass oil is added to a cracking reactor vessel. The biomass oil is heated to a temperature ranging from about 100.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to crack the biomass oil. Tar is separated from the cracked biomass oil. The tar is heated to a temperature ranging from about 200.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to reduce the tar to a high carbon content product containing at least about 50% carbon by weight.

  12. Treatment for cracked and permeable Houston clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vipulanandan, C.; Leung, M.

    1991-01-01

    In this study, the treatability of a field clay (obtained from Houston, Texas) and a clay-sand mixture to reduce their hydraulic conductivity was evaluated. Remolded field clay and clay-sand mixture with and without methanol contamination were treated to reduce their hydraulic conductivity by permeating very dilute grout solutions. The concentration of sodium silicate in the grout solution was 8%, while the solid content in the cement grout was 0.3%. The hydraulic conductivity of permeable Houston clay (hydraulic conductivity >10 -5 cm/sec) could be reduced to less than 10 -7 cm/sec (U.S. EPA limit for soil barriers) by permeating with a selected combination of grout solutions

  13. Comparison of the Nanostructure and Mechanical Performance of Highly Exfoliated Epoxy-Clay Nanocomposites Prepared by Three Different Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Shiravand

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Three different protocols for the preparation of polymer layered silicate nanocomposites based upon a tri-functional epoxy resin, triglycidyl para-amino phenol (TGAP, have been compared in respect of the cure kinetics, the nanostructure and their mechanical properties. The three preparation procedures involve 2 wt% and 5 wt% of organically modified montmorillonite (MMT, and are: isothermal cure at selected temperatures; pre-conditioning of the resin-clay mixture before isothermal cure; incorporation of an initiator of cationic homopolymerisation, a boron tri-fluoride methyl amine complex, BF3·MEA, within the clay galleries. It was found that features of the cure kinetics and of the nanostructure correlate with the measured impact strength of the cured nanocomposites, which increases as the degree of exfoliation of the MMT is improved. The best protocol for toughening the TGAP/MMT nanocomposites is by the incorporation of 1 wt% BF3·MEA into the clay galleries of nanocomposites containing 2 wt% MMT.

  14. The aluminium content of infant formulas remains too high.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuchu, Nancy; Patel, Bhavini; Sebastian, Blaise; Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-08

    Recent research published in this journal highlighted the issue of the high content of aluminium in infant formulas. The expectation was that the findings would serve as a catalyst for manufacturers to address a significant problem of these, often necessary, components of infant nutrition. It is critically important that parents and other users have confidence in the safety of infant formulas and that they have reliable information to use in choosing a product with a lower content of aluminium. Herein, we have significantly extended the scope of the previous research and the aluminium content of 30 of the most widely available and often used infant formulas has been measured. Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were subjected to microwave digestion in the presence of 15.8 M HNO3 and 30% w/v H2O2 and the aluminium content of the digests was measured by TH GFAAS. Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were contaminated with aluminium. The concentration of aluminium across all milk products ranged from ca 100 to 430 μg/L. The concentration of aluminium in two soya-based milk products was 656 and 756 μg/L. The intake of aluminium from non-soya-based infant formulas varied from ca 100 to 300 μg per day. For soya-based milks it could be as high as 700 μg per day. All 30 infant formulas were contaminated with aluminium. There was no clear evidence that subsequent to the problem of aluminium being highlighted in a previous publication in this journal that contamination had been addressed and reduced. It is the opinion of the authors that regulatory and other non-voluntary methods are now required to reduce the aluminium content of infant formulas and thereby protect infants from chronic exposure to dietary aluminium.

  15. Engineering properties for high kitchen waste content municipal solid waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Gao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Engineering properties of municipal solid waste (MSW depend largely on the waste's initial composition and degree of degradation. MSWs in developing countries usually have a high kitchen waste content (called HKWC MSW. After comparing and analyzing the laboratory and field test results of physical composition, hydraulic properties, gas generation and gas permeability, and mechanical properties for HKWC MSW and low kitchen waste content MSW (called LKWC MSW, the following findings were obtained: (1 HKWC MSW has a higher initial water content (IWC than LKWC MSW, but the field capacities of decomposed HKWC and LKWC MSWs are similar; (2 the hydraulic conductivity and gas permeability for HKWC MSW are both an order of magnitude smaller than those for LKWC MSW; (3 compared with LKWC MSW, HKWC MSW has a higher landfill gas (LFG generation rate but a shorter duration and a lower potential capacity; (4 the primary compression feature for decomposed HKWC MSW is similar to that of decomposed LKWC MSW, but the compression induced by degradation of HKWC MSW is greater than that of LKWC MSW; and (5 the shear strength of HKWC MSW changes significantly with time and strain. Based on the differences of engineering properties between these two kinds of MSWs, the geo-environmental issues in HKWC MSW landfills were analyzed, including high leachate production, high leachate mounds, low LFG collection efficiency, large settlement and slope stability problem, and corresponding advice for the management and design of HKWC MSW landfills was recommended.

  16. Liquid alternative diesel fuels with high hydrogen content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancsok, Jenoe; Varga, Zoltan; Eller, Zoltan; Poelczmann, Gyoergy [Pannonia Univ., Veszprem (Hungary). MOL Dept. of Hydrocarbon Processing; Kasza, Tamas [MOL Hungarian Oil and Gas Plc., Szazhalombatta (Hungary)

    2013-06-01

    Mobility is a keystone of the sustainable development. In the operation of the vehicles as the tools of mobility internal combustion engines, so thus Diesel engines will play a remarkable role in the next decades. Beside fossil fuels - used for power these engines - liquid alternative fuels have higher and higher importance, because of their known advantages. During the presentation the categorization possibilities based on the chronology of their development and application will be presented. The importance of fuels with high hydrogen content will be reviewed. Research and development activity in the field of such kind of fuels will be presented. During this developed catalytic systems and main performance properties of the product will be presented which were obtained in case of biogasoils produced by special hydrocracking of natural triglycerides and in case of necessity followed by isomerization; furthermore in case of synthetic biogasoils obtained by the isomerization hydrocracking of Fischer-Tropsch paraffins produced from biomass based synthesis gas. Excellent combustion properties (cetane number > 65-75), good cold flow properties and reduced harmful material emission due to the high hydrogen content (C{sub n}H{sub 2n+2}) are highlighted. Finally production possibilities of linear and branched paraffins based on lignocelluloses are briefly reviewed. Summarizing it was concluded that liquid hydrocarbons with high isoparaffin content are the most suitable fuels regarding availability, economical and environmental aspects, namely the sustainable development. (orig.)

  17. Organophilization and characterization of commercial bentonite clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, B.B. da; Lima, J.C.C.; Alves, A.M.; Araujo, E.M.; Melo, T.J.A. de

    2012-01-01

    Bentonite clay is a plastic changes resulting from volcanic ash, consisting mostly of montmorillonite. The state of Paraiba is a major source of bentonite clay from Brazil, where the main oil fields are located in Boa Vista and represents the largest national production of raw and beneficiated bentonite. Aimed at the commercial value of this type of clay and its high applicability in the polls, this article aims to make a comparison between two kinds of clay, a national (Brasgel) and other imported (Cloisite) from organophilization of two commercial bentonite, ionic surfactant with Praepagem WB, and characterize them by XRD, FTIR and TG / DTG. We observe that despite getting inferior properties, the clay presents national values very similar to those presented by imported clay. (author)

  18. Experimental investigation of clay fly ash bricks for gamma-ray shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann Harjinder Singh; Mudahar, Gumel Singh [Dept. of Physics, Punjabi University, Patiala (India); Brar, Gurdarshan Singh [Dept. of Higher Education, Additional Project Director, Chandigarh (India); Mann, Kulwinder Singh [Dept. of Applied Sciences, I.K. Gujral Punjab Technical University, Jalandhar (India)

    2016-10-15

    This study aims to determine the effect of fly ash with a high replacing ratio of clay on the radiation shielding properties of bricks. Some interaction parameters (mass attenuation coefficients, half value layer, effective atomic number, effective electron density, and absorption efficiency) of clay fly ash bricks were measured with a NaI(Tl) detector at 661.6 keV, 1,173.2 keV, and 1,332.5 keV. For the investigation of their shielding behavior, fly ash bricks were molded using an admixture to clay. A narrow beam transmission geometry condition was used for the measurements. The measured values of these parameters were found in good agreement with the theoretical calculations. The elemental compositions of the clay fly ash bricks were analyzed by using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer. At selected energies the values of the effective atomic numbers and effective electron densities showed a very modest variation with the composition of the fly ash. This seems to be due to the similarity of their elemental compositions. The obtained results were also compared with concrete, in order to study the effect of fly ash content on the radiation shielding properties of clay fly ash bricks. The clay fly ash bricks showed good shielding properties for moderate energy gamma rays. Therefore, these bricks are feasible and eco-friendly compared with traditional clay bricks used for construction.

  19. Importância das espécies minerais no potássio total da fração argila de solos do Triângulo Mineiro Importance of mineral species in total potassium content of clay fraction in soils of the Triângulo Mineiro, Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Melo

    2003-10-01

    arenito da Formação Uberaba, migmatito/micaxisto do Grupo Araxá e basalto da Formação Serra Geral.Few studies relate the K reserve in soils developed in a humid tropic climate with the minerals found in the clay fraction. Nineteen soils were collected for this purpose in the Triângulo Mineiro region, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, developed from different parent materials and different weathering degrees. Due to the greater occurrence, a larger number of samples of the Bauru Group was collected, comprising all the geological formations found in the region. The total K content in soil and the sand, silt, and clay fractions were determined after the digestion of the soil samples by HF, HNO3 and H2SO4. To quantify the contribution of each mineral species to the total K content, Na-saturated clay samples were submitted by a sequential and selective mineral extraction procedure, following the order: amorphous Al and Fe oxides; crystalline Fe oxides; kaolinite and gibbsite; mica and other 2:1 minerals and; feldspar and resistant minerals. The clay mineralogy composition reflects the high weathering and leaching degree in soils of the Triângulo Mineiro, with low contents of amorphous minerals, a predominant proportion of kaolinite and the presence of other secondary resistant minerals. In spite of this mineral composition, the clay fraction presented the highest total K content, mainly in the most weathered soils. Due to the high proportion of kaolinite in the clay fraction, this mineral was an important source of non-exchangeable K forms. On the other hand, the contribution of amorphous Fe and Al oxides and crystalline Fe oxides to the total K content of the clay fraction was negligible. In general, easily weathered primary minerals (mica and feldspar contributed largely to the total K of the clay fraction, principally to the youngest soils developed from the Uberaba (sandstone and Serra Geral (basalt Formations, and the Araxá Group (migmatite/micaschist.

  20. Modeling of Cation Binding in Hydrated 2:1 Clay Minerals - Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, David E.

    2000-01-01

    Hydrated 2:1 clay minerals are high surface area, layered silicates that play a unique role in determining the fate of radionuclides in the environment. This project consisted of developing and implementing computer simulation methods for molecular characterization of the swelling and ion exchange properties of Hydrated 2:1 clay minerals, and the subsequent analysis and theoretical modeling with a view toward improving contaminant transport modeling as well as soil remediation and radionuclide containment strategies. Project results included the (a) development of simulation methods to treat clays under environmentally relevant conditions of variable water vapor pressure; (b) calculation of clay swelling thermodynamics as a function of interlayer ion size and charge (calculated quantities include immersion energies, free energies, and entropies of swelling); and (c) calculation of ion exchange free energies, including contributions from changing interlayer water contents and layer spacing

  1. Raman spectroscopy of adsorbed water in clays: first attempt at band assignment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligny, Dominique de; Guillaud, Emmanuel [Institut Lumiere Matiere, CNRS, Universite Lyon 1, 12 rue Ada Byron, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Gailhanou, Helene; Blanc, Philippe [BRGM, Service D3E, 3 avenue Claude Guillemin, 45000 Orleans (France)

    2013-07-01

    Raman spectroscopy can be a useful tool to determine water content within clays, or even in highly saturated solutions. The following assignment is proposed for the OH region of SAz-2: the two large bands at 3260 and 3475 cm{sup -1} are assigned to water in pores, the first one to water molecules coordinated to the interlayer cations, and the second one to structural Al-OH groups The band at 3600 cm{sup -1} is therefore more likely related to adsorbed water on the clay surface. Simple intensity ratios of these different bands give good estimates of water content. (authors)

  2. Auto Detection For High Level Water Content For Oil Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janier, Josefina Barnachea; Jumaludin, Zainul Arifin B.

    2010-06-01

    Auto detection of high level water content for oil well is a system that measures the percentage of water in crude oil. This paper aims to discuss an auto detection system for measuring the content of water level in crude oil which is applicable for offshore and onshore oil operations. Data regarding water level content from wells can be determined by using automation thus, well with high water level can be determined immediately whether to be closed or not from operations. Theoretically the system measures the percentage of two- fluid mixture where the fluids have different electrical conductivities which are water and crude oil. The system made use of grid sensor which is a grid pattern like of horizontal and vertical wires. When water occupies the space at the intersection of vertical and horizontal wires, an electrical signal is detected which proved that water completed the circuit path in the system. The electrical signals are counted whereas the percentage of water is determined from the total electrical signals detected over electrical signals provided. Simulation of the system using the MultiSIM showed that the system provided the desired result.

  3. Clay shale as host rock. A geomechanical contribution about Opalinus clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lempp, Christof; Menezes, Flora; Sachwitz, Simon

    2016-01-01

    permeability, however, is generated by hydraulically injected water when fracturing may occur. Such fracturing depends on the injection rate: Low injection rates lead to local structural disintegration, higher injection rates result in single crack propagation as is known from hydraulic fracturing tests. Such hydraulically formed fractures later tend to close with an increase of surrounding stress. This closure increase is comparable to a healing process because new hydraulic fractures can be generated consequently at higher stress levels. Such laboratory test results seem to be favorable when using fresh Opalinus clay as a host rock, but they are difficult to verify at standard in-situ-conditions with weathered or partly deconsolidated rocks. Similar organic-rich and differently overconsolidated pelitic rock types display a wide spectrum of geomechanical behaviors despite the fact that no visible or physical differences can be provided. A direct comparison of the Opalinus clay parameters from the Swabian Alb, as investigated here, and from Switzerland, as determined by the Nagra Company, show differences in the effective shear strength. Nevertheless, the scatter is much smaller than that occurring for undrained shear stress differences as a function of water content. Consequently, for each project one must define exactly the relevant conditions within the different pelitic rocks in order to determine the useful geomechanical parameters. Additionally, it can be an advantage to use great depths because of the favorable geomechanical characteristics of Opalinus clay at high pressure. In this way some of the construction problems in Opalinus clay may be reduced if not avoided by using deep boreholes for waste deposition.

  4. Corrosion Performance of Inconel 625 in High Sulphate Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Azzura

    2016-05-01

    Inconel 625 (UNS N06625) is a type of nickel-chromium-molybdenum alloy with excellent corrosion resistance in a wide range of corrosive media, being especially resistant to pitting and crevice corrosion. However, in aggressive environment, Inconel 625 will suffer corrosion attack like other metals. This research compared the corrosion performance of Inconel 625 when exposed to higher sulphate content compared to real seawater. The results reveal that Inconel 625 is excellent in resist the corrosion attack in seawater. However, at increasing temperature, the corrosion resistance of this metal decrease. The performance is same in seawater with high sulphate content at increasing temperature. It can be concluded that sulphate promote perforation on Inconel 625 and become aggressive agents that accelerate the corrosion attack.

  5. Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editor IJRED

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available International Journal of Renewable Energy Development www.ijred.com Volume 1             Number 3            October 2012                ISSN 2252- 4940   CONTENTS OF ARTICLES page Design and Economic Analysis of a Photovoltaic System: A Case Study 65-73 C.O.C. Oko , E.O. Diemuodeke, N.F. Omunakwe, and E. Nnamdi     Development of Formaldehyde Adsorption using Modified Activated Carbon – A Review 75-80 W.D.P Rengga , M. Sudibandriyo and M. Nasikin     Process Optimization for Ethyl Ester Production in Fixed Bed Reactor Using Calcium Oxide Impregnated Palm Shell Activated Carbon (CaO/PSAC 81-86 A. Buasri , B. Ksapabutr, M. Panapoy and N. Chaiyut     Wind Resource Assessment in Abadan Airport in Iran 87-97 Mojtaba Nedaei       The Energy Processing by Power Electronics and its Impact on Power Quality 99-105 J. E. Rocha and B. W. D. C. Sanchez       First Aspect of Conventional Power System Assessment for High Wind Power Plants Penetration 107-113 A. Merzic , M. Music, and M. Rascic   Experimental Study on the Production of Karanja Oil Methyl Ester and Its Effect on Diesel Engine 115-122 N. Shrivastava,  , S.N. Varma and M. Pandey  

  6. Deformation and Fabric in Compacted Clay Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensrich, C. M.; Pineda, J.; Luzin, V.; Suwal, L.; Kisi, E. H.; Allameh-Haery, H.

    2018-05-01

    Hydromechanical anisotropy of clay soils in response to deformation or deposition history is related to the micromechanics of platelike clay particles and their orientations. In this article, we examine the relationship between microstructure, deformation, and moisture content in kaolin clay using a technique based on neutron scattering. This technique allows for the direct characterization of microstructure within representative samples using traditional measures such as orientation density and soil fabric tensor. From this information, evidence for a simple relationship between components of the deviatoric strain tensor and the deviatoric fabric tensor emerge. This relationship may provide a physical basis for future anisotropic constitutive models based on the micromechanics of these materials.

  7. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-09-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI(aq)) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Time extrapolation aspects in the performance assessment of high and medium level radioactive waste disposal in the Boom Clay at Mol (Belgium)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volckaert, G.

    2000-01-01

    SCK-CEN is studying the disposal of high and long-lived medium level waste in the Boom Clay at Mol, Belgium. In the performance assessment for such a repository time extrapolation is an inherent problem due to the extremely long half-life of some important radionuclides. To increase the confidence in these time extrapolations SCK-CEN applies a combination of different experimental and modelling approaches including laboratory and in situ experiments, natural analogue studies, deterministic (or mechanistic) models and stochastical models. An overview is given of these approaches and some examples of applications to the different repository system components are given. (author)

  9. An objective method for High Dynamic Range source content selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narwaria, Manish; Mantel, Claire; Da Silva, Matthieu Perreira

    2014-01-01

    With the aim of improving the immersive experience of the end user, High Dynamic Range (HDR) imaging has been gaining popularity. Therefore, proper validation and performance benchmarking of HDR processing algorithms is a key step towards standardization and commercial deployment. A crucial...... component of such validation studies is the selection of a challenging and balanced set of source (reference) HDR content. In order to facilitate this, we present an objective method based on the premise that a more challenging HDR scene encapsulates higher contrast, and as a result will show up more...

  10. Climatic control on clay mineral formation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Many physico-chemical variables like rock-type,climate,topography and exposure age affect weathering environments.In the present study,an attempt is made to understand how the nature of clay minerals formed due to weathering differs in tropical regions receiving high and low rainfall. Clay mineralogy of weathering pro ...

  11. Assessment of adsorption behavior of dibutyltin (DBT) to clay-rich sediments in comparison to the highly toxic tributyltin (TBT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoch, Marion; Alonso-Azcarate, Jacinto; Lischick, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Adsorption of dibutyltin to marine sediments is influenced by the type of predominating clay material. - The sorption behavior of dibutyltin (DBT) to four types of natural clay-rich sediments as a function of pH and salinity was studied. The strongest affinity of DBT was found to the montmorillonite-rich sediment, which is characterized by the highest specific surface area and cation exchange capacity of the four used sediments. K d values range between 12 and 40 (l/kg) on simulated marine conditions (pH 8, salinity 32%o). A maximum of DBT adsorption was found at a salinity of 0%o and pH 6. Desorption occurred over the entire studied pH range (4-8) when contaminated sediments interact with butyltin-free water. The maximum of desorption coincided with the minimum of adsorption, and vice versa. The results of DBT adsorption are compared with tributyltin (TBT), and the mechanism of the adsorption process is discussed

  12. SCC with high volume of fly ash content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakhrakh Anton

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-compacting concrete is a very perspective building material. It provides great benefits during the construction of heavily reinforced buildings. SCC has outstanding properties such as high flowability, dense structure and high strength due to specific quality of aggregates, fillers, their proportion in mix, use of polycarboxylate-based superplasticizers. Main disadvantages of SCC are high price and the difficulty of obtaining a proper mix. Use of fillers, such as fly ash type F, is a way to make SCC cheaper by replacing part of cement. Fly ash also provides some technological and operating advantages. In this paper the influence of high volume (60% from cement fly ash type F on the properties of concrete mixture and hardened concrete is investigated. The result of the work shows the possibility of reduction the cost of SCC using ordinary fillers and high amount of fly ash. The investigated SCC has low speed of hardening (7-day compressive strength at the range of 41.8 MPa and high volume of entrained air content (3.5%.

  13. Letters and Viewpoints Potentials of Using Waste Burnt Clay as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samples of waste burnt clay were collected from various parts of the country to study their pozzolanic properties. The samples were ground into fine powder and taken for chemical tests. Results from the chemical tests on all the samples showed high silica content. In fact the combined percentages of Silica (SiO2), Alumina ...

  14. Geotechnical characterization of mined clay from Appalachian Ohio: challenges and implications for the clay mining industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Anthony R; Hettiarachchi, Hiroshan

    2011-07-01

    Clayey soil found in coal mines in Appalachian Ohio is often sold to landfills for constructing Recompacted Soil Liners (RSL) in landfills. Since clayey soils possess low hydraulic conductivity, the suitability of mined clay for RSL in Ohio is first assessed by determining its clay content. When soil samples are tested in a laboratory, the same engineering properties are typically expected for the soils originated from the same source, provided that the testing techniques applied are standard, but mined clay from Appalachian Ohio has shown drastic differences in particle size distribution depending on the sampling and/or laboratory processing methods. Sometimes more than a 10 percent decrease in the clay content is observed in the samples collected at the stockpiles, compared to those collected through reverse circulation drilling. This discrepancy poses a challenge to geotechnical engineers who work on the prequalification process of RSL material as it can result in misleading estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of the samples. This paper describes a laboratory investigation conducted on mined clay from Appalachian Ohio to determine how and why the standard sampling and/or processing methods can affect the grain-size distributions. The variation in the clay content was determined to be due to heavy concentrations of shale fragments in the clayey soils. It was also concluded that, in order to obtain reliable grain size distributions from the samples collected at a stockpile of mined clay, the material needs to be processed using a soil grinder. Otherwise, the samples should be collected through drilling.

  15. Effects of post-disposal gas generation in a repository for spent fuel, high-level waste and long-lived intermediate level waste sited in opalinus clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L.; Marschall, P.; Zuidema, P.; Gribi, P.

    2004-07-01

    This comprehensive report issued by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste NAGRA takes a look at post-disposal gas generation in a repository for spent fuel and highly radioactive wastes in Opalinus clay strata. This study provides a comprehensive treatment of the issue of gas generation in a repository for spent fuel (SF), vitrified high-level waste (HLW) and long-lived intermediate-level waste (ILW), sited in the Opalinus clay of the Zuercher Weinland in northern Switzerland. The issue of how gas generation in and transport from waste repositories may influence disposal system performance has been under study for many years, both at Nagra and internationally. The report consists of three main parts: (i) A synthesis of basic information on the host rock and on details of repository construction; (ii) A discussion on gas transport characteristics of the engineered barrier system and the geosphere; (iii) A discussion on the effects of gas on system performance, based on the available information on gas generation, gas transport properties and gas pathways provided in the previous parts of the report. Simplified model calculations based on a mass balance approach for the gas generated within the repository are presented and discussed

  16. NovaSil clay intervention in Ghanaians at high risk for aflatoxicosis: II. Reduction in biomarkers of aflatoxin exposure in blood and urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P; Afriyie-Gyawu, E; Tang, Y; Johnson, N M; Xu, L; Tang, L; Huebner, H J; Ankrah, N-A; Ofori-Adjei, D; Ellis, W; Jolly, P E; Williams, J H; Wang, J-S; Phillips, T D

    2008-05-01

    The efficacy of NovaSil clay (NS) to reduce aflatoxin (AF) biomarkers of exposure was evaluated in 656 blood samples and 624 urine samples collected from study participants during a 3-month phase IIa clinical intervention trial in Ghana. NS was delivered before meals via capsules. Serum AFB (1)-albumin adduct was measured by radioimmunoassay and urinary AFM (1) metabolites were quantified by immunoaffinity-high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-fluorescence methods. Levels of AFB (1) -albumin adduct in serum samples collected at baseline and at 1 month were similar (p = 0.2354 and p = 0.3645, respectively) among the placebo (PL), low dose (LD, 1.5 g NS day (-1)), and high dose (HD, 3.0 g NS day (-1)) groups. However, the levels of AFB (1)-albumin adduct at 3 months were significantly decreased in both the LD group (p clay can be used to reduce effectively the bioavailability of dietary AF based on a reduction of AF-specific biomarkers.

  17. A content analysis of tweets about high-potency marijuana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazos-Rehg, Patricia A; Sowles, Shaina J; Krauss, Melissa J; Agbonavbare, Vivian; Grucza, Richard; Bierut, Laura

    2016-09-01

    "Dabbing" involves heating extremely concentrated forms of marijuana to high temperatures and inhaling the resulting vapor. We studied themes describing the consequences of using highly concentrated marijuana by examining the dabbing-related content on Twitter. Tweets containing dabbing-related keywords were collected from 1/1-1/31/2015 (n=206,854). A random sample of 5000 tweets was coded for content according to pre-determined categories about dabbing-related behaviors and effects experienced using a crowdsourcing service. An examination of tweets from the full sample about respiratory effects and passing out was then conducted by selecting tweets with relevant keywords. Among the 5000 randomly sampled tweets, 3540 (71%) were related to dabbing marijuana concentrates. The most common themes included mentioning current use of concentrates (n=849; 24%), the intense high and/or extreme effects from dabbing (n=763; 22%) and excessive/heavy dabbing (n=517; 15%). Extreme effects included both physiological (n=124/333; 37%) and psychological effects (n=55/333; 17%). The most common physiologic effects, passing out (n=46/333; 14%) and respiratory effects (n=30/333; 9%), were then further studied in the full sample of tweets. Coughing was the most common respiratory effect mentioned (n=807/1179; 68%), and tweeters commonly expressed dabbing with intentions to pass out (416/915; 45%). This study adds to the limited understanding of marijuana concentrates and highlights self-reported physical and psychological effects from this type of marijuana use. Future research should further examine these effects and the potential severity of health consequences associated with concentrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Iodide uptake by negatively charged clay interlayers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichak, Jessica; Mills, Melissa; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-01-01

    Understanding iodide interactions with clay minerals is critical to quantifying risk associated with nuclear waste disposal. Current thought assumes that iodide does not interact directly with clay minerals due to electrical repulsion between the iodide and the negatively charged clay layers. However, a growing body of work indicates a weak interaction between iodide and clays. The goal of this contribution is to report a conceptual model for iodide interaction with clays by considering clay mineral structures and emergent behaviors of chemical species in confined spaces. To approach the problem, a suite of clay minerals was used with varying degrees of isomorphic substitution, chemical composition, and mineral structure. Iodide uptake experiments were completed with each of these minerals in a range of swamping electrolyte identities (NaCl, NaBr, KCl) and concentrations. Iodide uptake behaviors form distinct trends with cation exchange capacity and mineral structure. These trends change substantially with electrolyte composition and concentration, but do not appear to be affected by solution pH. The experimental results suggest that iodide may directly interact with clays by forming ion-pairs (e.g., NaI (aq) ) which may concentrate within the interlayer space as well as the thin areas surrounding the clay particle where water behavior is more structured relative to bulk water. Ion pairing and iodide concentration in these zones is probably driven by the reduced dielectric constant of water in confined space and by the relatively high polarizability of the iodide species. - Highlights: • Iodide sorption experiments were completed with a diverse array of clay minerals. • Iodide uptake trended with CEC and swamping electrolyte identity and concentration. • Results can be explained by considering the formation of ion pairs in clay interlayers

  19. Common clay and shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virta, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    Part of the 1999 Industrial Minerals Review. The clay and shale market in 1999 is reviewed. In the U.S., sales or use of clay and shale increased from 26.4 million st in 1998 to 27.3 million st in 1999, with an estimated 1999 value of production of $143 million. These materials were used to produce structural clay products, lightweight aggregates, cement, and ceramics and refractories. Production statistics for clays and shales and for their uses in 1999 are presented.

  20. Sorption of radionuclides by tertiary clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J.F.; Czurda, K.A.

    1990-01-01

    The sorption capacity of different clay types for some metals (Co, Cs, Sr and Zn), occurring as common radionuclides in radioactive waste deposits, had been analysed by a static (batch technique) and a dynamic method (percolation tests, in which the driving force is a hydraulic gradient). Sorption capacity generally increased with an increasing pH of solution. A decrease of sorption capacity had been observed in the order Zn > Cs ≥ Co > Sr for the batch and Cs > Zn > Sr > Co for the percolation tests. Clay marls showed a distinctly higher sorption respectively retention capacity as pure clays. Sorption capacity depends on solution parameters like type and concentration of radionuclide, pH, salt concentration, etc., and on rock parameters like mineral content (e.g. swelling clay minerals and carbonates), organic material, rock pH, micro fabric, etc. A third parameter of great influence is the contact time between clay and solution. The adsorption isotherms reflect two different adsorption mechanisms: a very rapid adsorption (a few minutes) on the external surfaces of clay minerals and a slow adsorption process (weeks and longer), due to the diffusion of metal ions into the interlayer space of clay minerals. 12 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  1. High GC content causes orphan proteins to be intrinsically disordered.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter Basile

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available De novo creation of protein coding genes involves the formation of short ORFs from noncoding regions; some of these ORFs might then become fixed in the population. These orphan proteins need to, at the bare minimum, not cause serious harm to the organism, meaning that they should for instance not aggregate. Therefore, although the creation of short ORFs could be truly random, the fixation should be subjected to some selective pressure. The selective forces acting on orphan proteins have been elusive, and contradictory results have been reported. In Drosophila young proteins are more disordered than ancient ones, while the opposite trend is present in yeast. To the best of our knowledge no valid explanation for this difference has been proposed. To solve this riddle we studied structural properties and age of proteins in 187 eukaryotic organisms. We find that, with the exception of length, there are only small differences in the properties between proteins of different ages. However, when we take the GC content into account we noted that it could explain the opposite trends observed for orphans in yeast (low GC and Drosophila (high GC. GC content is correlated with codons coding for disorder promoting amino acids. This leads us to propose that intrinsic disorder is not a strong determining factor for fixation of orphan proteins. Instead these proteins largely resemble random proteins given a particular GC level. During evolution the properties of a protein change faster than the GC level causing the relationship between disorder and GC to gradually weaken.

  2. Production of JET fuel containing molecules of high hydrogen content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasek Sz.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The harmful effects of aviation can only be reduced by using alternative fuels with excellent burning properties and a high hydrogen content in the constituent molecules. Due to increasing plastic consumption the amount of the plastic waste is also higher. Despite the fact that landfill plastic waste has been steadily reduced, the present scenario is not satisfactory. Therefore, the aim of this study is to produce JET fuel containing an alternative component made from straight-run kerosene and the waste polyethylene cracking fraction. We carried out our experiments on a commercial NiMo/Al2O3/P catalyst at the following process parameters: T=200-300°C, P=40 bar, LHSV=1.0-3.0 h-1, hydrogen/hydrocarbon ratio= 400 Nm3/m3. We investigated the effects of the feedstocks and the process parameters on the product yields, the hydrodesulfurization and hydrodearomatization efficiencies, and the main product properties. The liquid product yields varied between 99.7-99.8%. As a result of the hydrogenation the sulfur (1-1780 mg/kg and the aromatic contents (9.0-20.5% of the obtained products and the values of their smoke points (26.0-34.7 mm fulfilled the requirements of JET fuel standard. Additionally, the concentration of paraffins increased in the products and the burning properties were also improved. The freezing points of the products were higher than -47°C, therefore product blending is needed.

  3. Clay mineral type effect on bacterial enteropathogen survival in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Fiona P; Moynihan, Emma; Griffiths, Bryan S; Hillier, Stephen; Owen, Jason; Pendlowski, Helen; Avery, Lisa M

    2014-01-15

    Enteropathogens released into the environment can represent a serious risk to public health. Soil clay content has long been known to have an important effect on enteropathogen survival in soil, generally enhancing survival. However, clay mineral composition in soils varies, and different clay minerals have specific physiochemical properties that would be expected to impact differentially on survival. This work investigated the effect of clay materials, with a predominance of a particular mineral type (montmorillonite, kaolinite, or illite), on the survival in soil microcosms over 96 days of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Dublin, and Escherichia coli O157. Clay mineral addition was found to alter a number of physicochemical parameters in soil, including cation exchange capacity and surface area, and this was specific to the mineral type. Clay mineral addition enhanced enteropathogen survival in soil. The type of clay mineral was found to differentially affect enteropathogen survival and the effect was enteropathogen-specific. © 2013.

  4. Cermet anode compositions with high content alloy phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschman, Steven C.; Davis, Norman C.

    1989-01-01

    Cermet electrode compositions comprising NiO-NiFe.sub.2 O.sub.4 -Cu-Ni, and methods for making, are disclosed. Addition of nickel metal prior to formation and densification of a base mixture into the cermet allows for an increase in the total amount of copper and nickel that can be contained in the NiO-NiFe.sub.2 O.sub.4 oxide system. Nickel is present in a base mixture weight concentration of from 0.1% to 10%. Copper is present in the alloy phase in a weight concentration of from 10% to 30% of the densified composition. Such cermet electrodes can be formed to have electrical conductivities well in excess of 100 ohm.sup.-1 cm.sup.-1. Other alloy and oxide system cermets having high content metal phases are also expected to be manufacturable in accordance with the invention.

  5. Automation in high-content flow cytometry screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, U; Wand, M P

    2009-09-01

    High-content flow cytometric screening (FC-HCS) is a 21st Century technology that combines robotic fluid handling, flow cytometric instrumentation, and bioinformatics software, so that relatively large numbers of flow cytometric samples can be processed and analysed in a short period of time. We revisit a recent application of FC-HCS to the problem of cellular signature definition for acute graft-versus-host-disease. Our focus is on automation of the data processing steps using recent advances in statistical methodology. We demonstrate that effective results, on par with those obtained via manual processing, can be achieved using our automatic techniques. Such automation of FC-HCS has the potential to drastically improve diagnosis and biomarker identification.

  6. Diffusion in a pure, high-vacancy-content crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKee, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The idea that vacancies can follow a nonrandom walk in a solid has been developed and put into a quantitative form for diffusion in a pure, high-vacancy-content crystal. Intrinsic and tracer diffusion in a metal have been analyzed, and the electrical mobility in an ionic solid has been expressed in terms of the tracer diffusion coefficient and the separate correlation factors for atoms and vacancies. The description uses classical methods of diffusion theory, and generalized results that account for nonrandom vacancy walk have been shown to reduce to those obtained by Howard and Lidiard in a system where the vacancy moves randomly as an isolated point defect. Experimental data for carbon diffusion in fcc iron have been examined to illustrate an interstitial-vacancy analogy that was used in this analysis, and the general result has been applied specifically to discuss vacancy diffusion in Fe/sub 1-x/S

  7. Strength and Deformation Properties of Tertiary Clay at Moesgaard Museum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaufmann, Kristine Lee; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    The tertiary clay at Moesgaard Museum near Aarhus in the eastern part of Jutland in Denmark is a highly plastic, glacially disturbed nappe of Viborg Clay. The clay is characterised as a swelling soil, which could lead to damaging of the building due to additional heave of the soil. To take...

  8. Oxy-combustion of high water content fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Fei

    As the issues of global warming and the energy crisis arouse extensive concern, more and more research is focused on maximizing energy efficiency and capturing CO2 in power generation. To achieve this, in this research, we propose an unconventional concept of combustion - direct combustion of high water content fuels. Due to the high water content in the fuels, they may not burn under air-fired conditions. Therefore, oxy-combustion is applied. Three applications of this concept in power generation are proposed - direct steam generation for the turbine cycle, staged oxy-combustion with zero flue gas recycle, and oxy-combustion in a low speed diesel-type engine. The proposed processes could provide alternative approaches to directly utilize fuels which intrinsically have high water content. A large amount of energy to remove the water, when the fuels are utilized in a conventional approach, is saved. The properties and difficulty in dewatering high water content fuels (e.g. bioethanol, microalgae and fine coal) are summarized. These fuels include both renewable and fossil fuels. In addition, the technique can also allow for low-cost carbon capture due to oxy-combustion. When renewable fuel is utilized, the whole process can be carbon negative. To validate and evaluate this concept, the research focused on the investigation of the flame stability and characteristics for high water content fuels. My study has demonstrated the feasibility of burning fuels that have been heavily diluted with water in a swirl-stabilized burner. Ethanol and 1-propanol were first tested as the fuels and the flame stability maps were obtained. Flame stability, as characterized by the blow-off limit -- the lowest O2 concentration when a flame could exist under a given oxidizer flow rate, was determined as a function of total oxidizer flow rate, fuel concentration and nozzle type. Furthermore, both the gas temperature contour and the overall ethanol concentration in the droplets along the

  9. Radiation synthesis and characterization of thermo-sensitive PNIPA/clay hydrogels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Hongyan; He Suqin; Liu Wentao; Zhu Chengshen; Yang Mingcheng

    2007-01-01

    In this work, the thermo-sensitive hydrogels of PNIPA/Clay were synthesized by 60 Co-γ rays irradiation. The effects of organically modified clay and Na + clay, clay content, and dispersing condition on swelling behavior of PNIPA/clay hydrogels were investigated. The results showed that the equilibrium swelling ratio (SR) of the PNIPA/clay hydrogels is better than PNIPA, and the SR of PNIPA/organically modified clay hydrogels is the highest. With clay content increases, the SR of hydrogels became better. The deswelling behavior of hydrogel was improved, the deswelling ratio of the hydrogel with organically modified clay is highest, and ratio of losing water is 83%, while PNIPA is about 50%. The compressive properties of hydrogel composites were also examined. The results showed that the compressive properties of the PNIPA/clay hydrogels were improved distinctly than that of the conventional hydrogels without clay. And with increasing of clay content, the compressive properties of hydrogel composites improve rapidly. When the content of clay is 15%, the maximum compression force of the PNIPA/clay hydrogel is 5.28N, which is 14 times of PNIPA hydrogel and compression strength is 2.5 times. (authors)

  10. Mineralogy and geotechnical characteristics of some pottery clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mujib Olamide ADEAGBO

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The physical properties of soils, which are tremendously influenced by the active clay minerals in soil, are of great importance in geotechnical engineering. This paper investigates the clay-sized particles of the Igbara-Odo pottery clay, and compares results obtained with available data on the bulk sample, to determine their correlation and underline the dependence of the geotechnical properties of the bulk clay material on the clay-sized particles. The bulk clay sample consists of 52% sand-size particles, 21% silt and 27% clay. Analysis of the clay-sized particles and the bulk materials shows: specific gravity of 2.07 and 2.66, liquid limit of 91.0% and 33.0%, plastic limit of 27.5% and 14.3%, plasticity index of 63.5% and 18.7% and a linear shrinkage of 7.9% and 5.4%, for both clay-sized particles and bulk clay respectively. The activity value of the clay material (0.64 suggests the presence of Kaolinite and Ilite; and these were confirmed with X-Ray diffraction on the bulk sample and clay-sized particles. X-Ray diffraction patterns shows distinctive peaks which highlight the dominance of Kaolinite (with 8 peaks in the pottery clay sample for both clay-sized particles and bulk material; while traces of other clay minerals like Illite and Halloysite and rock minerals like Mica, Feldspar and Chrysotile were also found. These results suggest that the clay possesses high viability in the manufacturing of ceramics, refractory bricks, paper, fertilizer and paint. The clay material can be used as a subgrade in road construction, since it possesses low swelling characteristics.

  11. Quantifying the effect of squirt flow dispersion from compliant clay porosity in clay bearing sandstones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Kanne; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2013-01-01

    Compliant porosity in the form of cracks is known to cause significant attenuation and velocity dispersion through pore pressure gradients and consequent relaxation, dubbed squirt flow. Squirt flow from cracks vanish at high confining stress due to crack closing. Studies on clay bearing sandstones......-squirt flow on the bulk modulus of a clay bearing sandstone. The predicted magnitude of the clay-squirt effect on the bulk modulus is compared with experimental data. The clay-squirt effect is found to possibly account for a significant portion of the deviances from Gassmann fluid substitution in claybearing...... sandstones....

  12. A model for predicting embankment slope failures in clay-rich soils; A Louisiana example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, S. F.

    2015-12-01

    A model for predicting embankment slope failures in clay-rich soils; A Louisiana example It is well known that smectite-rich soils significantly reduce the stability of slopes. The question is how much smectite in the soil causes slope failures. A study of over 100 sites in north and south Louisiana, USA, compared slopes that failed during a major El Nino winter (heavy rainfall) in 1982-1983 to similar slopes that did not fail. Soils in the slopes were tested for per cent clay, liquid limits, plasticity indices and semi-quantitative clay mineralogy. Slopes with the High Risk for failure (85-90% chance of failure in 8-15 years after construction) contained soils with a liquid limit > 54%, a plasticity index over 29%, and clay contents > 47%. Slopes with an Intermediate Risk (55-50% chance of failure in 8-15 years) contained soils with a liquid limit between 36-54%, plasticity index between 16-19%, and clay content between 32-47%. Slopes with a Low Risk chance of failure (soils with a liquid limit plasticity index soil characteristics before construction. If the soils fall into the Low Risk classification, construct the embankment normally. If the soils fall into the High Risk classification, one will need to use lime stabilization or heat treatments to prevent failures. Soils in the Intermediate Risk class will have to be evaluated on a case by case basis.

  13. Treatment of Petroleum Drill Cuttings Using Stabilization/Solidification Method by Cement and Modified Clay Mixes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroush Ghasemi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available High organic content in petroleum drill cuttings is a substantial obstacle which hinders cement hydration and subsequently decreases the clean-up efficiency of the stabilization/solidification (S/S process. In this study, a modified clayey soil (montmorillonite with low to moderate polarity was used as an additive to cement. Because of its high adsorption capacity, the clay is capable of mitigating the destructive role of organic materials and preventing their interference with the hydration process. Mixes containing different ratios of cement, waste and modified clay were prepared and tested for their mechanical and chemical characteristics. Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH and Pb content of the samples were analyzed as well. For this purpose, the mixes were subjected to unconfined compressive strength (UCS and toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP tests. The results indicated that the specimens with 28-day curing time at a cement/waste ratio of 25% or higher (w/w and 10% modified clay (w/w met the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA criterion for compressive strength. Moreover, a reduction of 94% in the leaching of TPH was observed with the specimens undergoing the TCLP with a cement/waste ratio of 30% (w/w and a clay/waste ratio of 30% (w/w. Finally, the specimens with 30% cement/waste and 10% clay/waste ratios showed the least concentration (6.14% of leached Pb.

  14. Clays causing adhesion with tool surfaces during mechanical tunnel driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnoli, G.; Fernández-Steeger, T.; Stanjek, H.; Feinendegen, M.; Post, C.; Azzam, R.

    2009-04-01

    During mechanical excavation with a tunnel boring machine (TBM) it is possible that clays stick to the cutting wheel and to other metal parts. The resulting delays in the progress of construction work, cause great economic damage and often disputes between the public awarding authorities and executing companies. One of the most important factors to reduce successfully the clay adhesion is the use of special polymers and foams. But why does the clay stick to the metal parts? A first step is to recognize which kind of clay mineralogy shows serious adhesion problems. The mechanical properties of clay and clay suspensions are primarily determined by surface chemistry and charge distribution at the interfaces, which in turn affect the arrangement of the clay structure. As we know, clay is a multi-phase material and its behaviour depends on numerous parameters such as: clay mineralogy, clay fraction, silt fraction, sand fraction, water content, water saturation, Atterberg limits, sticky limit, activity, cation exchange capacity, degree of consolidation and stress state. It is therefore likely that adhesion of clay on steel is also affected by these clay parameters. Samples of clay formations, which caused problems during tunnel driving, will be analyzed in laboratory. Mineralogical analyses (diffractometry, etc.) will be carried out to observe which minerals are responsible for adherence problems. To manipulate the physical properties, batch tests will be carried out in order to eliminate or reduce the adhesion on tool surfaces through variation of the zeta potential. Second step is the performance of vane shear tests on clay samples. Different pore fluid (distilled water, pure NaCl solution, ethanol and methanol) will be used to study the variation of the mechanical behaviour of clay depending on the dielectric constant of the fluids. This project is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) and the DFG (German Research Foundation) in the

  15. The effect of clay incorporation on the mechanical properties of fluoroelastomer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zen, Heloisa Augusto; Oliveira, Jonathan Pereira de; Lugao, Ademar Benevolo

    2015-01-01

    In this work was studied the effect of clay incorporation in the mechanical properties of fluoroelastomer (FKM). The polymer matrix that was used is a compound of the commercial terpolymer of hexafluoropropylene, vinylidene fluoride and tetrafluoroethylene, with 70% of fluor content. This type of polymer is known for its resistance to high temperature and chemical products; it has low fuel permeation which allowing be used as sealant and especially as o-ring product. The incorporation of clay was carried to avoid excessive swelling and to observe the effect in the mechanical properties, for this application was used commercial clay, Cloisite® at 1 and 2% in weigh. The incorporation of clay into the FKM was carried out in a two roll cylinder. After that, the samples with and without clay loading were submitted to gamma radiation at 20 kGy in order to observe the changes in the polymer matrix. The characterization techniques used were: mechanical testes (stress - strain), rheometric properties and degree of swelling. After radiation process, was observed an increase in the swelling degree for the irradiated samples in relation to the pristine one. The incorporated samples with 1 and 2% of clay showed an increase in the elongation which can indicate a decrease in hardness of the polymer matrix. (author)

  16. Clay Portrait Boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbert, Nancy Corrigan

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to incorporate sculptural elements into her ceramics program, the author decided to try direct plaster casting of the face to make a plaster mold for clay. In this article, the author shares an innovative ceramics lesson that teaches students in making plaster casts and casting the face in clay. This project gives students the…

  17. Columns in Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  18. Analysis of cement-treated clay behavior by micromechanical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang , Dong-Mei; Yin , Zhenyu; Hicher , Pierre Yves; Huang , Hong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Experimental results show the significant influence of cement content on the mechanical properties of cement-treated clays. Cementation is produced by mixing a certain amount of cement with the saturated clay. The purpose of this paper is to model the cementation effect on the mechanical behavior of cement-treated clay. A micromechanical stress-strain model is developed considering explicitly the cementation at inter-cluster contacts. The inter-cluster bonding and debo...

  19. Gravel Mobility in a High Sand Content Riverbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haschenburger, J. K.

    2017-12-01

    In sand-gravel channels, sand may modify gravel transport by changing conditions of entrainment and promoting longer displacements or gravel may inhibit sand transport if concentrated into distinct deposits, which restrict sand supply with consequences for migrating bedform size or form. This study reports on gravel mobility in the lower San Antonio River, Texas, where gravel content in the bed material ranges from about 1% to more than 20%. Sediment transport observations were collected at three U.S. Geological Survey gauging stations by deploying a Helley-Smith sampler with a 0.2 mm mesh bag from which transport rates and mobile grain sizes were determined. The flow rates sampled translate into an annual exceedance expectation from 0.2% to 98%. Gravel transport rates are generally two orders of magnitude smaller than the rates of sand transport. However, the finest gravels are transported at rates on the same order of magnitude as the coarsest sands. At all sites, the 2 and 2.8 mm fractions are transported at the lowest flow rate sampled, suggesting mobility for at least 38% to as much as 98% of the year. Fractions as large as 8 mm are mobilized at flow rates that are expected between 25% and 53% of the year. The largest fractions captured in the sampling (16 to 32 mm) require flows closer to bankfull conditions that occur no more than 0.8% of the year. Results document that some gravel sizes can be frequently transported in low gradient riverbeds with high sand content.

  20. Fully Biodegradable Biocomposites with High Chicken Feather Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibon Aranberri

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to develop new biodegradable polymeric materials with high loadings of chicken feather (CF. In this study, the effect of CF concentration and the type of biodegradable matrix on the physical, mechanical and thermal properties of the biocomposites was investigated. The selected biopolymers were polylactic acid (PLA, polybutyrate adipate terephthalate (PBAT and a PLA/thermoplastic copolyester blend. The studied biocomposites were manufactured with a torque rheometer having a CF content of 50 and 60 wt %. Due to the low tensile strength of CFs, the resulting materials were penalized in terms of mechanical properties. However, high-loading CF biocomposites resulted in lightweight and thermal-insulating materials when compared with neat bioplastics. Additionally, the adhesion between CFs and the PLA matrix was also investigated and a significant improvement of the wettability of the feathers was obtained with the alkali treatment of the CFs and the addition of a plasticizer like polyethylene glycol (PEG. Considering all the properties, these 100% fully biodegradable biocomposites could be adequate for panel components, flooring or building materials as an alternative to wood–plastic composites, contributing to the valorisation of chicken feather waste as a renewable material.

  1. Clay intercalation and influence on crystallinity of EVA-based clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, D.S.; Prasad, R.; Gupta, R.K.; Bhattacharya, S.N.

    2005-01-01

    Various polymer clay nanocomposites (PCNs) were prepared from ethylene vinyl acetate copolymer (EVA) with 9, 18 and 28% vinyl acetate (VA) content filled with different wt.% (2.5, 5 and 7.5) of a Montmorillonite-based organo-modified clay (Cloisite[reg] C15A and C30B). The PCNs were prepared using melt blending techniques. Morphological information regarding intercalation and exfoliation were determined by using wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). WAXS and TEM confirmed that increasing the VA content was necessary to achieve greater clay-polymer interaction as seen from the comparatively higher intercalation of clay platelets with 28% VA. The effect of addition of clay on the development and the modification of crystalline morphology in EVA matrix was also studied using WAXS and temperature-modulated differential scanning calorimetry (MDSC). Results are presented showing that the addition of clay platelets does not increase the matrix crystallinity but the morphology was significantly modified such that there was an increase in the 'rigid' amorphous phase. Mechanical properties were also evaluated against the respective morphological information for each specimen and there are indications that the level of clay-polymer interaction plays a significant role in such morphological modification, and in such a way that affects the final PCN mechanical properties which has wide and significant applications in the packaging industries

  2. Development of automatic image analysis methods for high-throughput and high-content screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di, Zi

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the development of image analysis methods for ultra-high content analysis of high-throughput screens where cellular phenotype responses to various genetic or chemical perturbations that are under investigation. Our primary goal is to deliver efficient and robust image analysis

  3. Efficiency of phosphate fertilization to maize crop in high phosphorus content soil, evaluated by {sup 32}P tracer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trevizam, Anderson R.; Alvarez Villanueva, Felipe C.; Silva, Maria Ligia de S.; Muraoka, Takashi [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Fertilidade do Solo]. E-mails: trevizam@cena.usp.br; falvarez@cena.usp.br; mlsousi@hotmail.com; muraoka@cena.usp.br

    2007-07-01

    Application of high dosis of phosphorus (P) in agricultural soils is justified by its intense fixation by the soil clays, which reduce availability to crops. The objective of this research was to evaluate the response of maize crops to five rates of triple superphosphate in a soil with high available phosphorus content. Portions of 2 dm{sup 3} of soil (Typic Quartzipisamment) with 75 mg kg{sup -1} of available phosphorus and pH 7.00, collected from the upper 0-20 cm layer, were placed in plastic pots, received solution containing 5.55 MBq (150 {mu}Ci) of {sup 32}P and incubated for 7 days. Then 0, 250, 500, 1000 and 4000 mg P kg{sup -1} as triple superphosphate was added to soil in the respective pots and incubated for 15 days keeping the soil moisture to 60 % of the field capacity. Maize (Zea mays L.) plants, single hybrid P30F80, were grown for 50 days (after germination), collected, oven dried, weighed and ground in a Wiley mill for analysis of total P content and {sup 32}P radioactivity. The maize dry matter increased with triple superphosphate rates. The phosphorus content and accumulation in the maize plants increased with triple superphosphate rate up to 4000 mg kg{sup -1}. The percentage of phosphorus derived from the fertilizer ranged from 79 to 97% and consequently the phosphorus derived from soil decreased with increasing application of triple superphosphate. In spite of soil high P available content, maize plants responded to applied phosphorus rates. (author)

  4. Feasibility of using overburden clays for sealing purposes and laboratory testing of the clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, J. (Vyzkumny Ustav pro Hnede Uhli, Most (Czechoslovakia))

    1992-03-01

    Studies properties of overburden clay from North Bohemian surface coal mines for use as sealants of industrial and household waste that will be dumped at Czechoslovak surface mine sites. Basic requirements of sealing layers are optimum compressibility and impermeability by suitable compacting. Laboratory soil mechanical tests of different clay samples were carried out using the Proctor standard tests (PCS) and the Norwegian Geonor A/S - m 45 instrument. Laboratory tests were used to select the best available clay types with optimum density and moisture content. Experimental results of laboratory tests are provided.

  5. Effects of clay mineral type and organic matter on the uptake of radiocesium by pasture plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Souza, T.J.

    1980-10-01

    Studies were undertaken to examine the influence of interaction of clay minerals and organic matter on the uptake of radiocesium by two pasture plants, namely, ryegrass (Lolium italicum L) and red clover (Trifolium pratense L). The clay minerals used were bentonite (2.1 layer type) and kaolinite (1/1 layer type). Mixtures of clay and sand were prepared with 0.5, 10, 20 and 40 per cent clay and treated with organic matter (forest turf) at 0,5 and 10 per cent of the clay-sand mixtures. Results indicated that 134 Cs uptake by plants grown on the kaolinite-clay medium was greater than that on the bentonite-clay medium at a given organic matter level. Increasing the clay content of mixtures resulted in reduction in 134 Cs uptake by both plant species. The plant uptake of 134 Cs increased with additions of organic matter at a given clay content. (author)

  6. Processing, Characterization, and Modeling of Polymer/Clay Nanocomposite Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Choonghee; Naguib, Hani E.

    2007-04-01

    The effects of the material parameters and processing conditions on the foam morphologies, and mechanical properties of polymer/clay nanocomposite foams were studied. Microcellular closed-cell nanocomposite foams were manufactured with poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) and high density polyethylene (HDPE), where the nanoclay loadings of 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 wt% were used. The effect of clay contents and foaming conditions on the volume expansion ratio, cell size, elastic modulus, tensile strength, and elongation at break were investigated and compared between amorphous and semicrystalline polymers. An elastic modulus model for tensile behavior of foams was proposed by using the micromechanics theory. The model was expressed in terms of microstructural properties of polymer and physical properties of the foams. The tensile experimental data of the foams were compared with those predicted by the theoretical model.

  7. Design and Implementation of High Performance Content-Addressable Memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    content addressability and two basic implementations of content addressing. The need and application of hardware CAM is presented to motivate the " topic...3r Pass 4th Ps4 Pass Figure 2.15 Maximum SearchUsing All-Parallel CAM - left-most position (the most significant bit) and the other IF bits are zeros

  8. The effect of high pH alkaline solutions on the mineral stability of the Boom Clay - Batch experiments at 60 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honty, M.; De Craen, M.; Wang, L.; Madejova, J.; Czimerova, A.; Pentrak, M.; Stricek, I.; Van Geet, M.

    2010-01-01

    Boom Clay is currently viewed as a reference host formation for studies on deep geological disposal of radioactive waste in Belgium. The interactions between bulk rock Boom Clay and 0.1 M KOH, 0.1 M NaOH, 0.1 M Ca(OH) 2 , young cement water and evolved cement water solutions, ranging in pH from 12.5 to 13.2, were examined as static batch experiments at 60 deg. C to simulate alkaline plume perturbations, which are expected to occur in the repository due to the presence of concrete. Both liquids and solids were investigated at specific times between 90 and 510 days in order to control the elemental budget and to search for potential mineralogical alterations. Also, the clay fraction was separated from the whole-rock Boom Clay at the end of each run and characterized for its mineralogical composition. Thereby, the importance of the mineral matrix to buffer the alkaline attack and the role of organic matter to protect clay minerals were also addressed. The results indicate that the degree of geochemical perturbation in Boom Clay is dependent on the initial pH of the applied solution together with the nature of the major cation in the reactant fluids. The higher the initial pH of the media, the stronger its interaction with Boom Clay. No major non-clay mineralogical alteration of the Boom Clay was detected, but dissolution of kaolinite, smectite and illite occurred within the studied experimental conditions. The dissolution of clays is accompanied by the decrease in the layer charge, followed by a decrease in the cation-exchange capacity. The highest TOC values coincide with the highest total elemental concentrations in the leachates, and correspondingly, the highest dissolution degree. However, no quantitative link could be established between the degree of organic matter decomposition and clay dissolution.

  9. Compressibility characteristics of Sabak Bernam Marine Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lat, D. C.; Ali, N.; Jais, I. B. M.; Baharom, B.; Yunus, N. Z. M.; Salleh, S. M.; Azmi, N. A. C.

    2018-04-01

    This study is carried out to determine the geotechnical properties and compressibility characteristics of marine clay collected at Sabak Bernam. The compressibility characteristics of this soil are determined from 1-D consolidation test and verified by existing correlations by other researchers. No literature has been found on the compressibility characteristics of Sabak Bernam Marine Clay. It is important to carry out this study since this type of marine clay covers large coastal area of west coast Malaysia. This type of marine clay was found on the main road connecting Klang to Perak and the road keeps experiencing undulation and uneven settlement which jeopardise the safety of the road users. The soil is indicated in the Generalised Soil Map of Peninsular Malaysia as a CLAY with alluvial soil on recent marine and riverine alluvium. Based on the British Standard Soil Classification and Plasticity Chart, the soil is classified as a CLAY with very high plasticity (CV). Results from laboratory test on physical properties and compressibility parameters show that Sabak Bernam Marine Clay (SBMC) is highly compressible, has low permeability and poor drainage characteristics. The compressibility parameters obtained for SBMC is in a good agreement with other researchers in the same field.

  10. Effect of organically modified clay on mechanical properties, cytotoxicity and bactericidal properties of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sachin; Mishra, Anupam; Chatterjee, Kaushik

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of organically-modified clay nanoparticles in poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) for developing biodegradable composites. PCL nanocomposites reinforced with two different types of organically-modified clay (Cloisite 30B, C30B and Cloisite 93A, C93A) were prepared by melt-mixing. Morphology of PCL/clay nanocomposites characterized by scanning electron microscopy indicated good dispersion of nanoclay in the PCL matrix. Reinforcement of nanoclay in PCL enhanced mechanical properties without affecting thermal and degradation properties of PCL. Cytocompatibility of PCL/clay nanocomposites was studied using both osteoblasts and endothelial cells in vitro. Both composites (PCL/C30B and PCL/C93A) were cytotoxic with high toxicity observed for C30B even at low content of 1 wt %. The cytotoxicity was found to arise due to leachables from PCL/clay composites. Electrical conductivity measurements of aqueous media confirmed leaching of cationic surfactant from the PCL/clay composites PCL matrix. Both composites were found to be bactericidal but C30B was more effective than C93A. Taken together, it was observed that organically-modified nanoclay as fillers in PCL improves mechanical properties and imparts bactericidal properties but with increased risk of toxicity. These PCL/clay composites may be useful as stronger packaging material with antibacterial properties but are not suited as biomedical implants or for food packaging applications.

  11. Polyethersulfone/clay membranes and its water permeability; Membranas de polietersulfona/argila e sua permeabilidade a agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavalho, Thamyres Cardoso de; Medeiros, Vanessa da Nobrega; Araujo, Edcleide Maria de; Lira, Helio Lucena, E-mail: thamyrescc@gmail.com, E-mail: vanismedeiros@gmail.com, E-mail: edcleide.araujo@ufcg.edu.br, E-mail: helio.lira@ufcg.edu.br [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UAEMa/CCT/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia de Materiais; Leite, Amanda Melissa Damiao, E-mail: amanda.leite@ect.ufrn.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (ECT/UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Escola de Ciencia e Tecnologia

    2017-04-15

    Membranes can be considered polymeric or inorganic films that function as a semipermeable barrier to filtration on a molecular scale, separating two phases and restricting, totally or partially, the transportation of one or more chemical species (solute) present in the solution. Therefore, the aim of this work is to produce polyethersulfone membranes (PES) and polyethersulfone/clay by phase inversion technique and evaluate the presence of clay in obtaining membranes for wastewater treatment. The used solvent was dimethylformamide (DMF) and clays were Brasgel PA (MMT) and Cloisite Na (CL Na) in the proportion of 3 to 5% (wt.). By Xray diffraction (XRD), the membranes with 3% of MMT and CL Na clays apparently had partially exfoliated structures. For the composition with 5% of CL Na a small peak was observed, which indicates that this is possibly an intercalated structure or microcomposite. By scanning electron microscopy (SEM), visualizes that the pure surface of the pure PES membrane a structure apparently without pores was observed in the used magnification and without roughness surface when compared to membranes with clay. The measurements of contact angle indicated that the inclusion of clay altered the wetting ability of the membranes. The flow with distilled water for all membranes started high and over time reached a stabilization level. Thus, it can be concluded that the presence and the content of clay altered the morphology of the membrane, contributing to an increase in water flow. (author)

  12. On the loss of the rheological properties of activated montmorilonitic clays; Perda das propriedades reologicas de argilas montmoriloniticas ativadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D` Avila, Joao Sampaio; Araujo, Raymundo Nonato Vieira de; Araujo, Ney Sa de; Campos, Ediraldo Barros; Nascimento, Reinaldo Ribeiro do [Sergipe Univ., Aracaju, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    1988-12-31

    A theory is developed associating clay aging to two key factors: reversibility of the cationic exchange reaction (activation reaction) and real humidity content of the clay. Various rheological parameters were studied during the aging process, where clay quality was shown to decrease. Aging effects were verified with clays obtained from an extrusion and a batching reactor. (author) 7 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. GENERALIZATION, FORMULATION AND HEAT CONTENTS OF SIMULATED MSW WITH HIGH MOISTURE CONTENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. JOHARI

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a generalization technique for the formulation of simulated municipal solid waste. This technique is used for the elimination of the inconsistency in the municipal solid waste (MSW characteristics due to its heterogeneous nature. The compositions of simulated municipal solid waste were formulated from four major municipal waste streams components in Malaysia namely paper, plastic, food and yard waste. The technique produced four simplified waste generalization categories with composition of paper (19%, plastic (25%, food (27% and green waste (29% respectively. Comparative study was conducted for proximate analysis for the determination of volatile matter, fixed carbon and ash content. Ultimate analysis was performed for carbon and hydrogen content. The heat content for simulated and actual municipal solid waste showed good agreement. The moisture content of the simulated municipal solid waste and actual municipal solid waste were established at 52.34% and 61.71% respectively. Overall results were considered to be representative of the actual compositions of municipal solid waste in Malaysia.

  14. Detailed mineralogical characterization of the Bullfrog and Tram members USW-G1, with emphasis on clay mineralogy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bish, D.L.

    1981-10-01

    The detailed mineralogy of the Bullfrog and Tram Members of the Crater Flat Tuff from drill hole USW-G1 has been examined, primarily to characterize fully the amounts and types of clay minerals in the tuffs and the possible effects clay minerals have on rock properties. Results of bulk sample x-ray diffraction analyses agree closely with previous determinations, although slightly higher clay mineral contents were found in this study. X-ray diffraction analysis of fine fractions revealed that the clay minerals in the tuffs are sodium-saturated montmorillonite-beidellites with typical layer charges and no high-charge layers. These smectites are found in virtually all samples of the Bullfrog and Tram, and there is no correlation between the amounts of smectites and the amounts of zeolite, quartz, and feldspar. Smectites are present in both welded and nonwelded horizons and are scarce in some zones with slight-to-absent welding

  15. Thermal properties of clay-based buffer materials for a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhakrishna, H.S.

    1984-06-01

    The thermal properties of three types of bentonite clay, one illite-rich shale and one kaolin mixed with crushed granite were investigated. Thermal conductivity measurements were made over a range of mix proportions, moisture content, density and ambient temperature using the transient heat-probe method. The effects of thermal drying in the buffer zone prior to water uptake were investigated by means of laboratory-scale heater experiments. Illite-rich shale (Sealbond) and kaolin exhibited better compactability and thermal conductivity than the bentonite clays. The thermal conductivity of all types of clay buffers showed a high degree of moisture dependency and relatively no effect due to elevated temperature under high fluid pressure conditions. Bentonite buffers compacted to a dry density of 1200 to 1400 kg/m 3 showed extensive cracking due to differential shrinkage. Addition of crushed granite, and/or compaction to a higher density, reduced the thermal cracking of the buffer material

  16. Characterization of bentonite clay from “Greda” deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadežda Stanković

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on mineralogical and technological investigations of the deposit “Greda” important characteristics of bentonite clay were determined. Representative samples of the deposit were characterized with X-ray diffraction, low-temperature nitrogen adsorption, chemical analysis, differential thermal analysis and scanning electron microscopy. It was determined that the main mineral is montmorillonite and in subordinate quantities kaolinite, quartz and pyrite. The chemical composition generally shows high silica and alumina contents in all samples and small quantities of Fe3+, Ca2+ and Mg2+ cations. Based on technological and mineralogical research, bentonite from this deposit is a high-quality raw material for use in the ceramic industry.

  17. Characterization of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz N, C.; Olguin, M.T.; Solache R, M.; Alarcon H, T.; Aguilar E, A.

    2002-01-01

    The natural clays are the more abundant minerals on the crust. They are used for making diverse industrial products. Due to the adsorption and ion exchange properties of these, a great interest for developing research directed toward the use of natural clays for the waste water treatment has been aroused. As part of such researches it is very important to carry out previously the characterization of the interest materials. In this work the results of the mineral and elemental chemical composition are presented as well as the morphological characteristics of clay minerals from different regions of the Mexican Republic. (Author)

  18. Development of clay characterization methods for use in repository design with application to a natural Ca bentonite clay containing a redox front

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnland, O.; Pusch, R.

    1990-12-01

    Natural smectite clays in the form of 'true' bentonites formed from volcanic ash, or resulting from in-situ weathering of rock, are suitable for a number of sealing options in repositories, both as tightening component of sand/clay backfills and as highly efficient buffer for embedment of canisters, as well as for fracture sealing. The price and quality, in terms of smectite content and type of smectite, vary considerably and an optimum choice of clay for use in repositories has to be based on quantitative quality data. This requires characterization of the clay material for which a test scheme has been worked out. It comprises determination of the granulometrical, chemical, and mineralogical compositions, as well as of certain physical properties. Recent research shows the importance of the type of smectite for the longevity of buffers in repository environment, beidellite being less favourable and saponite superior to montmorillonite, which is the most common smectite species. The test scheme hence includes means of distinguishing between various smectite minerals. The influence of accessory minerals on the chemical integrity of both the smectite and the canister material requires identification also of such minerals, for which the scheme is useful as well. The report summarizes the various test procedures and gives data from application of the scheme to samples from a natural Ca bentonite containing a redox front. This study suggests that a significant part of the iron in the clay fraction is in the form of Fe 2+ in octahedral positions of the montmorillonite of unoxidized natural clay and that it is converted to Fe 3+ on oxidation. Part of the iron is probably in the form of the Fe 2+ Fe 3+ hydroxy compounds that give the unoxidized clay its bluish colour, while they can be assumed to be transformed to yellowish FeOOH forms on oxidation. (author)

  19. Evaluation of the bleaching flux in clays containing hematite and different clay minerals; Avaliacao do fundente descolorante em argilas contendo hematita e diferentes argilominerais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Junior, E.M.; Lusa, T.; Silva, T.M.; Medeiros, B.B.; Santos, G.R. dos [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (DAMEC/UFTPR), Pato Branco, PR (Brazil); Morelli, M.R., E-mail: geocrisr@utfpr.edu.com, E-mail: morelli@power.ufscar.br [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (DEMa/PPGCEM/UFSCar), SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that the addition of a synthetic flux in a clay mineral constituted by illite phase in the presence of iron oxide with the hematite, promotes color change of the firing products, making the reddish color firing into whiteness. This flow is constituted of a vitreous phase of the silicates family obtained by fusion/solidification of oxides and carbonates. Thus, the objective of this work was that of studying the interaction of the iron element in the final color mechanism of the different types of mineral crystal phase of the clays. In order to study the phenomenon, we obtained different compositions between the select clays and the synthetic flow, and characterization using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and visual analysis. The results showed that the action of the synthetic flow as a modifying agent for color depends on the mineral crystal phase of the clays. The color firing modification does not occur in the clays content high levels of kaolinite mineral phase. (author)

  20. Stabilisation of Clay Soil with Lime and Melon Husk Ash for use in Farm Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Mohammed

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The rising cost of traditional stabilising agents and the need for economical utilisation of industrial and agricultural waste for beneficial engineering purposes has encouraged an investigation into the stabilization of clay soil with lime and melon husk ash. The chemical composition of the melon husk ash that was used in stabilising clay soil was determined. The clay soil was divided into two parts, one part was used to determine the index properties while the other part was treated at British Standard Light (BSL compaction energy with 0 %, 2 %, 4 %, 6 % and 8 % melon husk ash by dry weight of the soil and each was admixed with 2 %, 4 %, 6 % and 8 % lime. The stabilised clay soil was cured for 7, 14 and 28 days before the unconfined compressive strength were determined while the coefficients of permeability of the stabilised clay soil were also determined at 28 days of curing. The data obtained from the experiment was subjected to analysis of variance to examine the significance at 5% level. Results showed that the natural clay soil belong to A-7-6 or CH (clay of high plasticity in the American Association of State Highway Transportation Official (AASHTO and Unified Soil Classification System (1986. The chemical composition of the ash had aluminum oxide, iron oxide and silicon dioxide values of 18.5%, 2.82% and 51.24% respectively. The unconfined compressive strength and coefficient of permeability of the natural clay soil was determined to be 285 kN/m2 and 1.45 x 10-5 cm/s, respectively. Increase in melon husk ash and lime percent increases the unconfined compressive strength (UCS of the stabilised clay soil significantly (p < 0.05 and decrease the coefficient of permeability when compared with the natural clay soil. The peak values of unconfined compressive strength for 7, 14 and 28 days of curing are 1200 kN/m2, 1598 kN/m2 and 1695 kN/m2 respectively at 6% MHA and 8% lime content while the lowest value for coefficient of permeability was 0

  1. Dwarf mutant of Papaver somniferum with high morphine content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauhan, S.P.; Patra, N.K.; Srivastava, H.K.

    1987-01-01

    Opium poppy, Papaver somniferum L. is an important medicinal plant known for its morphine, codeine, and thebaine alkaloids. This Institute had earlier released two latex opium yielding poppy varieties, Shyama and Shweta, which are now cultivated by the farmers under the supervision of the Narcotic Department of the Government of India. However, both these varieties became susceptible to downy mildew (Peronospora arborescens). Lodging due to heavy capsule weight is another problem affecting latex yield. With these problems in mind, we undertook mutation breeding on the above mentioned two varieties employing gamma rays (5 kR, 15 kR, 20 kR) and EMS (0.2%, 0.4%, 0.6%) and combined mutagens (5 kR + 0.2% EMS, 5 kR + 0.4% EMS and 5 kR + 0.6% EMS). M 1 from the treated seeds (405 plants) was raised in winter 1984-85. M 2 generation of 13,500 plants (i.e. 270 M 1 progenies x 50 plants) was raised in winter 1985/86. A dwarf mutant with high morphine content was identified in M 2 from the variety Shweta treated with 5 kR + 0.4% EMS. The mutant differs by its dwarf stature, compact leaf arrangements, multilocular capsules, increased capsule number, and small capsule size. The mutant is under testing for its superior morphine production. It may be used as dwarf gene source in hybridization for improving lodging resistance. This mutant is a novel type, which was not available in our germplasm collection

  2. Clay vein and its implication for uranium exploration activity in the northern part of the Alligator Rivers Uranium Field, northern Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasao, Eiji

    2003-01-01

    Clay veins have been found by uranium exploration drilling around the Black Rock uranium prospect in the northern part of the alligator Rivers Uranium Field (ARUF), northern Australia. The mineralogical and chemical features are described to clarify relations with uranium mineralization, because it is not accompanied by uranium mineralization. X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis for major elements indicate that the clay vein consists mainly of chlorite (clinochlore to ferroan clinochlore) and lesser mica clay mineral (t-1M dominant). The clay vein is compared with the clay alteration zone around the uranium deposits in ARUF in terms of mode of occurrence, mineral and chemical compositions. Mineral composition of the clay vein is only in accordance with that of the inner alteration halo of the clay alteration zone. It is, however, different from mineral composition of the outer alteration halo in terms of lack of Fe chlorite in the clay vein. Chemical composition of the clay vein is similar to that of the clay alteration zone, except for lack in the vein of high iron content which is observed in some samples of the alteration zone. As a whole, the feature of the clay vein corresponds to the inner alteration zone around the uranium deposit in ARUF. The mode of occurrence of the clay vein is very different from that of the clay alteration zone. Mode of occurrence, and mineral and chemical compositions of the clay vein resemble a chlorite vein in the Lower to Middle Proterozoic sandstone above the Jabiluka deposit, one of major uranium deposit in the ARUF. Because of the similarity between the clay and the chlorite veins, the clay vein is regarded as marginal facies of an alteration zone. The fluid that formed the clay vein is estimated to have been oxidized, because of the existence of hematite and ubiquitous Mg chlorite. This nature is in accordance with the mineralizing fluid that formed the inner alteration zone in the Nabarlek deposit. In conclusion, the vein

  3. Geosynthetic clay liners shrinkage under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabadani, Hamid; Rayhani, Mohammad T

    2014-06-01

    Geosynthetic clay liners are used as part of composite liner systems in municipal solid waste landfills and other applications to restrict the escape of contaminants into the surrounding environment. This is attainable provided that the geosynthetic clay liner panels continuously cover the subsoil. Previous case histories, however, have shown that some geosynthetic clay liner panels are prone to significant shrinkage and separation when an overlying geomembrane is exposed to solar radiation. Experimental models were initiated to evaluate the potential shrinkage of different geosynthetic clay liner products placed over sand and clay subsoils, subjected to simulated daily thermal cycles (60°C for 8 hours and 22°C for 16 hours) modelling field conditions in which the liner is exposed to solar radiation. The variation of geosynthetic clay liner shrinkage was evaluated at specified times by a photogrammetry technique. The manufacturing techniques, the initial moisture content, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to width) of the geosynthetic clay liner were found to considerably affect the shrinkage of geosynthetic clay liners. The particle size distribution of the subsoil and the associated suction at the geosynthetic clay liner-subsoil interface was also found to have significant effects on the shrinkage of the geosynthetic clay liner. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Carbon-Nitrogen Relationships during the Humification of Cellulose in Soils Containing Different Amounts of Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lasse Holst

    1981-01-01

    the 2 soils with the high content of clay had a relatively high content of available unlabeled soil-N which was used for synthesis of metabolic material. The proportionate retention of labeled C for a given soil was largely independent of the size of the amendments, whereas the proportionate amount....... Some of the labeled organic N when mineralized was re-incorporated into organic compounds containing increasing proportions of native soil-C, whereas labeled C when mineralized as CO2 disappeared from the soils. The amount of labeled amino acid-C, formed during decomposition of the labeled cellulose...... was most intense, and it held throughout the 4 yr of the incubation; proportionally it was independent of the amount of cellulose added and the temperature. The labeled amino acid-N content was not directly related to the amount of clay in the soil, presumably because more unlabeled soil-N was available...

  5. Classroom Instruction: The Influences of Marie Clay

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaughton, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Marie Clay's body of work has influenced classroom instruction in direct and indirect ways, through large overarching themes in our pedagogical content knowledge as well as specific smart practices. This paper focuses on her the contributions to our thinking about instruction which come from two broad theoretical concepts; emergent literacy…

  6. Technetium migration in natural clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luebke, Maria

    2015-01-01

    The present work was performed within the joint research project ''Retention of repository relevant radionuclides in argillaceous rocks and saline systems'' (contract no.: 02E10981), funded by the Federal Ministry for Economic Affairs and Energy (BMWi). The aim was to obtain first insights into the interaction of the long-lived fission product technetium and natural clay with regard to a repository for high-level nuclear waste. For this purpose Opalinus Clay from Mont Terri (northern Switzerland) was used as a reference material. The nuclide technetium-99 will contribute to the radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel for more than thousand years due to its long half-live. In case of a leakage of the storage vessels, the geochemistry of technetium is determined by its oxidation state, at which only the oxidation states +IV and +VII are relevant. Because of the high solubility and low affinity to sorption on surfaces of minerals, Tc(VII) is considered to be very mobile and thus the most hazardous species. The focuses of this study therefore are diffusion experiments with this mobile species and investigations of the effect of ferrous iron on the mobility and speciation of technetium.rnThe interaction of technetium and Opalinus Clay was studied in sorption and diffusion experiments varying several parameters (pH value, addition of reducing agents, effect of oxygen, diffusion pathways). In the course of this study spatially resolved investigations of the speciation have been performed on Opalinus Clay thin sections and bore cores for the first time. In addition to the speciation, further information regarding elemental distributions and crystalline phases near technetium enrichments were obtained. Supplementary investigations of powder samples allowed determining the molecular structure of technetium on the clay surface.rnBoth the combination of sorption experiments with spectroscopic investigations and the diffusion experiment exhibit a reduction of Tc

  7. Evaluation of the characteristics of high burnup and high plutonium content mixed oxide (MOX) fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-08-15

    Two kinds of MOX fuel irradiation tests, i.e., MOX irradiation test up to high burnup and MOX having high plutonium content irradiation test, have been performed from JFY 2007 for five years in order to establish technical data concerning MOX fuel behavior during irradiation, which shall be needed in safety regulation of MOX fuel with high reliability. The high burnup MOX irradiation test consists of irradiation extension and post irradiation examination (PIE). The activities done in JFY 2011 are destructive post irradiation examination (D-PIE) such as EPMA and SIMS at CEA (Commissariat a l'Enegie Atomique) facility. Cadarache and PIE data analysis. In the frame of irradiation test of high plutonium content MOX fuel programme, MOX fuel rods with about 14wt % Pu content are being irradiated at BR-2 reactor and corresponding PIE is also being done at PIE facility (SCK/CEN: Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie/Centre d'Etude l'Energie Nucleaire) in Belgium. The activities done in JFY 2011 are non-destructive post irradiation examination (ND-PIE) and D-PIE and PIE data analysis. In this report the results of EPMA and SIMS with high burnup irradiation test and the result of gamma spectrometry measurement which can give FP gas release rate are reported. (author)

  8. Corrosion resistance testing of high-boron-content stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrman, I.; Safek, V.

    1994-01-01

    Boron steels, i.e. stainless steels with boron contents of 0.2 to 2.25 wt.%, are employed in nuclear engineering for the manufacture of baskets or wells in which radioactive fissile materials are stored, mostly spent nuclear fuel elements. The resistance of such steels to intergranular corrosion and uniform corrosion was examined in the Strauss solution and in boric acid; the dependence of the corrosion rate of the steels on their chemical composition was investigated, and their resistance was compared with that of AISI 304 type steel. Corrosion resistance tests in actual conditions of ''wet'' compact storage (demineralized water or a weak boric acid solution) gave evidence that boron steels undergo nearly no uniform corrosion and, as electrochemical measurements indicated, match standard corrosion-resistant steels. Corrosion resistance was confirmed to decrease slightly with increasing boron content and to increase somewhat with increasing molybdenum content. (Z.S.). 3 tabs., 4 figs., 7 refs

  9. Aspects of clay/concrete interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oscarson, D.W.; Dixon, D.A.; Onofrei, M.

    1997-01-01

    In the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste management, both clay-based materials and concrete are proposed for use as barriers, seals or supporting structures. The main concern when clays and concrete are in proximity is the generation of a high-pH environment by concrete since clay minerals are relatively unstable at high pH. Here we examine the OH - -generating capacity of two high-performance concretes when in contact with several solutions. We also investigate various aspects of claylconcrete interactions. They are: (1) the alkalimetric titration of clay suspensions, (2) the effect of Ca(OH) 2 (portlandite) on the swelling and hydraulic properties of compacted bentonite, and (3) the influence of cement grout on a backfill clay retrieved from the 900-d Buffer/Container Experiment at the Underground Research Laboratory of AECL. The results indicate that although high-performance concretes establish significantly lower poresolution pH (9 to 10) than does ordinary portland cement, the pH is still somewhat higher than that of clay/groundwater systems of about pH 8. Hence, even if high-performance concrete is used in a disposal vault, the potential still exists for clay minerals to alter over long periods of time if in contact with this concrete. The data show, however, that clays have a substantial buffering capacity, and clay-based barriers can thus neutralize much of the OH - potentially released from concrete in a vault. Moreover, even after reacting for 120 d at 85 o C with up to 5 wt.% Ca(OH) 2 , compacted bentonite (dry density = 1.2 Mg/m 3 ) retains much of its swelling capacity and has a permeability low enough (hydraulic conductivity ≤ 10 -11 m/s) to ensure that molecular diffusion will be the main transport mechanism through compacted clay-based barriers. Furthermore, according to X-ray diffractometry, the clay mineral component of backfill was not altered by contact with a cement grout for 900 d in the Buffer/Container Experiment

  10. Engineered clay-shredded tyre mixtures as barrier materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Tabbaa, A.; Aravinthan, T.

    1997-01-01

    An engineered clay consisting of kaolin and bentonite was mixed with shredded tyre in various weight percentages and examined for use as a constituent in a landfill liner. The clay-tyre mixtures properties in terms of compaction, unconfined compressive strength, permeability to water and paraffin, leachability, stress-strain behaviour, free swell behaviour and swelling pressure were investigated. The results show that the dry density and strength reduced with the addition of tyre and also with increased tyre content but that good interaction was developed between the clay and tyre. The strain at failure increased showing reinforcing effect of the tyre. The permeability to paraffin was considerably reduced compared to that to water due to the presence of the tyre which caused high swelling pressures to develop. The leachability results indicate initial high concentrations leaching out of the soil-tyre mixtures which will be subjected to dilution in the environment. This work adds evidence to the potential advantages of using soil-tyre mixtures as a landfill liner material

  11. Investigation of isothermal water infiltration into fired clay brick by scattered neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Abd, A.; Abdel-Monem, A.M.; Kansouh, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    A method based on neutron scattering was proposed to investigate isothermal water infiltration in porous media. Two different kinds of fired clay bricks were investigated. While the sample absorb water, scattered neutrons from the different wetted regions, along the flow direction were continuously recorded. The results were discussed in terms of the theory of water infiltration in unsaturated porous media as well as by an anomalous diffusion approach. It was shown that the infiltration process in the Canadian clay brick (CCB) is Fickian and the water diffusivity was analytically determined, while it is non-Fickian in the Egyptian clay brick (ECB). The infiltration process in ECB can be modeled as a two stage Fickian process, at the low and high absorption times. The anomalous diffusion approach failed to describe the diffusion process in the ECB at all water contents. (author)

  12. Clay Treatment To Improve Its Color Parameters To Use Them In Porcelain Stoneware Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llop, M.; Notari, M.D.; Barrachina, E.; Nebot, I.; Nunez, I.; Carda, J.B.

    2010-01-01

    The porcelain stoneware tiles production needs high whiteness clays in order to be competitive in the ceramic sector. In the present work, Spanish clays used in the porcelain stoneware tiles production have been characterized in physic, chemist and mineralogical terms, in order to reduce its content of chromophore oxides (Fe2O3 and TiO2). These reduction processes are concerned with different physical and chemical treatments, as sieving at 150mm, magnetic separation using a 0.6T permanent magnet, or acid treatment with HCL and later neutralization with NH3. With these treatments, due to siderite elimination, chromophore oxides as Fe2O3 have been decreased from 2,36% to 1,66% in the chemically treated clay. (Author).

  13. Thixotropic Properties of Latvian Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Lakevičs, Vitālijs; Stepanova, Valentīna; Ruplis, Augusts

    2015-01-01

    This research studies Latvia originated Devon (Tūja, Skaņkalne), quaternary (Ceplīši), Jurassic, (Strēļi) and Triassic (Vadakste) deposit clays as well as Lithuania originated Triassic (Akmene) deposit clays. Thixotropic properties of clay were researched by measuring relative viscosity of clay in water suspensions. Relative viscosity is measured with a hopper method. It was detected that, when concentration of suspension is increased, clay suspension’s viscosity also increases. It happens un...

  14. Effect of coal mine dust and clay extracts on the biological activity of the quartz surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, V.; Jones, R.; Rollo, K.; Duffin, R.; Donaldson, K.; Brown, D.M. [Napier University, Edinburgh (United Kingdom). School of Life Science

    2004-04-01

    Modification of the quartz surface by aluminum salts and metallic iron have been shown to reduce the biological activity of quartz. This study aimed to investigate the ability of water soluble extracts of coal mine dust (CMD), low aluminum clays (hectorite and montmorillonite) and high aluminum clays (attapulgite and kaolin) to inhibit the reactivity of the quartz surface. DQ12 induced significant haemolysis of sheep erythrocytes in vitro and inflammation in vivo as indicated by increases in the total cell numbers, neutrophil cell numbers, MIP-2 protein and albumin content of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Treatment of DQ12 with CMD extract prevented both haemolysis and inflammation. Extracts of the high aluminum clays (kaolin and attapulgite) prevented inhibition of DQ12 induced haemolysis, and the kaolin extract inhibited quartz driven inflammation. DQ12 induced haemolysis by coal mine dust and kaolin extract could be prevented by pre-treatment of the extracts with a cation chellator. Extracts of the low aluminum clays (montmorillonite and hectorite) did not prevent DQ12 induced haemolysis, although the hectorite extract did prevent inflammation. These results suggest that CMD, and clays both low and rich in aluminum, all contain soluble components (possibly cations) capable of masking the reactivity of the quartz surface.

  15. Hydrothermal field test with french candidate clay embedding steel heater in the Stripa mine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Karnland, O.; Lajudie, A.; Lechelle, J.; Bouchet, A.

    1992-12-01

    Field experiments with French kaolinite/smectite clay heated up to 170 degrees C in boreholes in granite were conducted for 8 months and 4 years. The clay heated for 8 months has a considerably higher water content and it had undergone much less changes in mineralogy and physical properties than the clay exposed to heating for 4 years. The drying of the latter clay was probably caused by hydrogen gas from corrosion of the heater. The clay next to the heater turned into clay-stone despite conversion of the kaolinite component to smectite. (42 refs)

  16. Influence of Polymer-Clay Interfacial Interactions on the Ignition Time of Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zope, Indraneel S; Dasari, Aravind; Yu, Zhong-Zhen

    2017-08-11

    Metal ions present on smectite clay (montmorillonite) platelets have preferential reactivity towards peroxy/alkoxy groups during polyamide 6 (PA6) thermal decomposition. This changes the decomposition pathway and negatively affects the ignition response of PA6. To restrict these interfacial interactions, high-temperature-resistant polymers such as polyetherimide (PEI) and polyimide (PI) were used to coat clay layers. PEI was deposited on clay by solution-precipitation, whereas PI was deposited through a solution-imidization-precipitation technique before melt blending with PA6. The absence of polymer-clay interfacial interactions has resulted in a similar time-to-ignition of PA6/PEI-clay (133 s) and PA6/PI-clay (139 s) composites as neat PA6 (140 s). On the contrary, PA6 with conventional ammonium-based surfactant modified clay has showed a huge drop in time-to-ignition (81 s), as expected. The experimental evidences provided herein reveal the role of the catalytic activity of clay during the early stages of polymer decomposition.

  17. The Content of Literature in the High School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Dwight L.

    The content of a literature program defined in terms of the structure of literature is proposed. A three-layer definition of structure is suggested which considers (1) the substance of literature, including man and his gods, man and the natural world, man and other men, and man and himself; (2) mode in literature, including the romantic, comic,…

  18. Pedagogical Content Knowledge and Preparation of High School Physics Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etkina, Eugenia

    2010-01-01

    This paper contains a scholarly description of pedagogical practices of the Rutgers Physics/Physical Science Teacher Preparation program. The program focuses on three aspects of teacher preparation: knowledge of physics, knowledge of pedagogy, and knowledge of how to teach physics (pedagogical content knowledge--PCK). The program has been in place…

  19. Nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium with a high phycoerythrin content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, H; Rivas, J; Guerrero, M G; Losada, M

    1989-03-01

    The elemental and molecular composition, pigment content, and productivity of a phycoerythrin-rich nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium-an Anabaena strain isolated from the coastal lagoon Albufera de Valencia, Spain-has been investigated. When compared with other heterocystous species, this strain exhibits similar chlorophyll a, carotene, and total phycobiliprotein contents but differs remarkably in the relative proportion of specific phycobiliproteins; the content of C-phycoerythrin amounts to 8.3% (versus about 1% in the other species) of cell dry weight. Absorption and fluorescence spectra of intact phycobilisomes isolated from this Anabaena sp. corroborate the marked contribution of phycoerythrin as an antenna pigment, a circumstance that is unusual for cyanobacteria capable of fixing N(2). The pigment content of cells is affected by variations in irradiance and cell density, these adaptive changes being more patent for C-phycoerythrin than for phycocyanins. The Anabaena strain is clumpy and capable of rapid flocculation. It exhibits outdoor productivities higher than 20 g (dry weight) m day during summer.

  20. Highly durable piezo-electric energy harvester by a super toughened and flexible nanocomposite: effect of laponite nano-clay in poly(vinylidene fluoride)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Wahida; Ghosh, Sujoy Kumar; Ranjan Middya, Tapas; Mandal, Dipankar

    2017-09-01

    A highly durable piezoelectric energy harvester is introduced by integrating the toughness and flexibility of a non-electrically poled, laponite nano-clay mineral-induced γ-phase (up to 98%) in a poly(vinylidene-fluoride) (PVDF) matrix by a simple solvent evaporation technique. Owing to a superior electromechanical coupling effect, PVDF/laponite nanocomposites retain excellent biomechanical energy harvesting capabilities under external vibration (as high as 6 V output voltage and 70 nA output current under a compressive force of 300 N) and charge storage properties under an external high electric field (maximum 0.8~ \\text{J} \\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-3} of discharged energy density at a breakdown strength of 302 MV m-1). As a proof of concept, the fabricated nanogenerator (NG) possesses a high output power density (~6.3 mW m-2) that directly drives several consumer electronics without using any storage system or batteries. It paves the way for potential applicability in next generation electronics, particularly as a self-powered device and to configure sustainable internet of things (IoT) sensor networks.

  1. The influence of clay particles on the hydraulic conductivity of sandy soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fahmy, M.I.

    1961-01-01

    The relation between hydraulic conductivity and size of the sand particles and clay content was investigated in artificial mixtures of sand and clay and in natural soils, in four different ways in the laboratory and field.

    In the artificial mixtures coarse aggregates of illitic clay hardly

  2. A comparative study on Pb 2+ removal efficiencies of fired clay soils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Batch adsorption studies were carried out to evaluate the Pb2+ adsorption capacities of three different fired clay soils with different particle size distributions. Adsorption efficiency was observed to increase with an increase in clay content. Adsorption efficiencies of the fired clay soils were also influenced by the firing ...

  3. Isotopic exchange of 65Zn with stable Zn adsorbed on reference clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourg, A.C.M.; Filby, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    For reference clays of low organic content, Zn adsorbed on the clay minerals is in kinetic equilibrium with 65 Zn in solution. Thus the specific activity approach applied to the transport of 65 Zn(II) at the water-reference clay interface is intrinsically valid. (author)

  4. Consequences of the Thermal Transient on the Evolution of the Damaged Zone Around a Repository for Heat-Emitting High-Level Radioactive Waste in a Clay Formation: a Performance Assessment Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Li; Weetjens, Eef; Sillen, Xavier; Vietor, Tim; Li, Xiangling; Delage, Pierre; Labiouse, Vincent; Charlier, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A proper evaluation of the perturbations of the host rock induced by the excavation and the emplacement of exothermic wastes is essential for the assessment of the long-term safety of high-level radioactive waste disposals in clay formations. The impact of the thermal transient on the evolution of the damaged zone (DZ) has been explored in the European Commission project TIMODAZ (thermal impact on the damaged zone around a radioactive waste disposal in clay host rocks, 2006-2010). This paper integrates the scientific results of the TIMODAZ project from a performance assessment (PA) point of view, showing how these results support and justify key PA assumptions and the values of PA model parameters. This paper also contextualises the significance of the thermal impact on the DZ from a safety case perspective, highlighting how the project outcomes result into an improved understanding of the thermo-hydro-mechanical behaviour of the clay host rocks. The results obtained in the TIMODAZ project strengthen the assessment basis of the safety evaluation of the current repository designs. There was no evidence throughout the TIMODAZ experimental observations of a temperature-induced additional opening of fractures nor of a significant permeability increase of the DZ. Instead, thermally induced plasticity, swelling and creep seem to be beneficial to the sealing of fractures and to the recovery of a very low permeability in the DZ, close to that of an undisturbed clay host rock. Results from the TIMODAZ project indicate that the favourable properties of the clay host rock, which guarantee the effectiveness of the safety functions of the repository system, are expected to be maintained after the heating-cooling cycle. Hence, the basic assumptions usually made in PA calculations so far are expected to remain valid, and the performance of the system should not be affected in a negative way by the thermal evolution of the DZ around a radioactive waste repository in clay host rock.

  5. High water content in primitive continental flood basalts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qun-Ke; Bi, Yao; Li, Pei; Tian, Wei; Wei, Xun; Chen, Han-Lin

    2016-05-04

    As the main constituent of large igneous provinces, the generation of continental flood basalts (CFB) that are characterized by huge eruption volume (>10(5) km(3)) within short time span (primitive CFB in the early Permian Tarim large igneous province (NW China), using the H2O content of ten early-formed clinopyroxene (cpx) crystals that recorded the composition of the primitive Tarim basaltic melts and the partition coefficient of H2O between cpx and basaltic melt. The arc-like H2O content (4.82 ± 1.00 wt.%) provides the first clear evidence that H2O plays an important role in the generation of CFB.

  6. Pedagogical content knowledge and preparation of high school physics teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Eugenia Etkina

    2010-01-01

    This paper contains a scholarly description of pedagogical practices of the Rutgers Physics/Physical Science Teacher Preparation program. The program focuses on three aspects of teacher preparation: knowledge of physics, knowledge of pedagogy, and knowledge of how to teach physics (pedagogical content knowledge—PCK). The program has been in place for 7 years and has a steady production rate of an average of six teachers per year who remain in the profession. The main purpose of the paper is t...

  7. Clay shale as host rock. A geomechanical contribution about Opalinus clay; Tonstein als Wirtsgestein. Ein geomechanischer Beitrag ueber Opalinuston

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lempp, Christof; Menezes, Flora; Sachwitz, Simon [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Saale) (Germany). Inst. fuer Geowissenschaften und Geographie

    2016-12-15

    permeability, however, is generated by hydraulically injected water when fracturing may occur. Such fracturing depends on the injection rate: Low injection rates lead to local structural disintegration, higher injection rates result in single crack propagation as is known from hydraulic fracturing tests. Such hydraulically formed fractures later tend to close with an increase of surrounding stress. This closure increase is comparable to a healing process because new hydraulic fractures can be generated consequently at higher stress levels. Such laboratory test results seem to be favorable when using fresh Opalinus clay as a host rock, but they are difficult to verify at standard in-situ-conditions with weathered or partly deconsolidated rocks. Similar organic-rich and differently overconsolidated pelitic rock types display a wide spectrum of geomechanical behaviors despite the fact that no visible or physical differences can be provided. A direct comparison of the Opalinus clay parameters from the Swabian Alb, as investigated here, and from Switzerland, as determined by the Nagra Company, show differences in the effective shear strength. Nevertheless, the scatter is much smaller than that occurring for undrained shear stress differences as a function of water content. Consequently, for each project one must define exactly the relevant conditions within the different pelitic rocks in order to determine the useful geomechanical parameters. Additionally, it can be an advantage to use great depths because of the favorable geomechanical characteristics of Opalinus clay at high pressure. In this way some of the construction problems in Opalinus clay may be reduced if not avoided by using deep boreholes for waste deposition.

  8. Fire and Gas Barrier Properties of Poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile Nanocomposites Using Polycaprolactone/Clay Nanohybrid Based-Masterbatch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Benali

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Exfoliated nanocomposites are prepared by dispersion of poly(ε-caprolactone (PCL grafted montmorillonite nanohybrids used as masterbatches in poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile (SAN. The PCL-grafted clay nanohybrids with high inorganic content are synthesized by in situ intercalative ring-opening polymerization of ε-caprolactone between silicate layers organomodified by alkylammonium cations bearing two hydroxyl functions. The polymerization is initiated by tin alcoholate species derived from the exchange reaction of tin(II bis(2-ethylhexanoate with the hydroxyl groups borne by the ammonium cations that organomodified the clay. These highly filled PCL nanocomposites (25 wt% in inorganics are dispersed as masterbatches in commercial poly(styrene-co-acrylonitrile by melt blending. SAN-based nanocomposites containing 3 wt% of inorganics are accordingly prepared. The direct blend of SAN/organomodified clay is also prepared for sake of comparison. The clay dispersion is characterized by wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD, atomic force microscopy (AFM, and solid state NMR spectroscopy measurements. The thermal properties are studied by thermogravimetric analysis. The flame retardancy and gas barrier resistance properties of nanocomposites are discussed both as a function of the clay dispersion and of the matrix/clay interaction.

  9. Processing and characterization of Polystyrene/cornstarch/organophilic clay hybrids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Carlos Ivan R. de; Amorim, Ywrrenan C.; Andrade, Cristina T. de

    2011-01-01

    Polystyrene/cornstarch composite blends with organophilic Cloisite 15A were prepared in an internal mixer in the presence of maleic anhydride (MA). The contents of clay were 1, 3 and 5%, based on the weight of the blend. The results obtained by X-ray diffraction revealed significant intercalation and exfoliation of clay particles within the polymeric moiety, which indicate increased interaction between the components of the nanocomposites. Thermogravimetric analysis results revealed the increase in thermal stability for the compatibilized blends in relation to the noncompatibilized PS/starch blends. The composites showed better thermal stability with increasing clay content. (author)

  10. Heterogeneous uptake of the C1 to C4 organic acids on a swelling clay mineral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Tolbert

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Mineral aerosol is of interest due to its physiochemical impacts on the Earth's atmosphere. However, adsorbed organics could influence the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric mineral particles and alter their impact on the biosphere and climate. In this work, the heterogeneous uptake of a series of small organic acids on the swelling clay, Na-montmorillonite, was studied at 212 K as a function of relative humidity (RH, organic acid pressure and clay mass. A high vacuum chamber equipped with a quadrupole mass spectrometer and a transmission Fourier transform infrared spectrometer was used to detect the gas and condensed phases, respectively. Our results show that while the initial uptake efficiency was found to be independent of organic acid pressure, it increased linearly with increasing clay mass. Thus, the small masses studied allow access to the entire surface area of the clay sample with minimal effects due to surface saturation. Additionally, results from this study show that the initial uptake efficiency for butanoic (butyric acid on the clay increases by an order of magnitude as the RH is raised from 0% to 45% RH at 212 K while the initial uptake efficiency of formic, acetic and propanoic (propionic acids increases only slightly at higher humidities. However, the initial uptake efficiency decreases significantly in a short amount of time due to surface saturation effects. Thus, although the initial uptake efficiencies are appropriate for initial times, the fact that the uptake efficiency will decrease over time as the surface saturates should be considered in atmospheric models. Surface saturation results in sub-monolayer coverage of organic acid on montmorillonite under dry conditions and relevant organic acid pressures that increases with increasing humidity for all organic acids studied. Additionally, the presence of large organic acids may slightly enhance the water content of the clay above 45% RH. Our results indicate

  11. Chlordecone retention in the fractal structure of volcanic clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woignier, Thierry; Clostre, Florence; Macarie, Hervé; Jannoyer, Magalie

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Allophanic soils are highly polluted but less contaminant for cultivated vegetables. ► SAXS and TEM show the fractal structure of allophane aggregates at the nanoscale. ► Allophane aggregates play the role of a labyrinth which fixes and traps chlordecone. ► Allophane physical properties contribute to chlordecone retention in andosols. - Abstract: Chlordecone (CHLD), a soil and foodstuff pollutant, as well as an environmentally persistent organochlorine insecticide, was used intensively in banana fields. The chlordecone uptake of three crops was measured for two types of polluted soils: allophanic and non-allophanic. The uptake is lower for allophanic soils even if their chlordecone content is higher than with non-allophanic soils. The fractal structure of the allophane aggregates was characterized at the nanoscale by small angle X-rays scattering, pore size distribution and transmission electron microscopy. We showed that clay microstructures should be an important physico-chemical factor governing the fate of chlordecone in the environment. Allophanic clays result in two counterintuitive findings: higher contaminant trappings yet lower contaminant availability. We propose that this specific, tortuous structure, along with its associated low accessibility, partly explains the low availability of chlordecone confined in allophanic soils. Capsule The fractal and tortuous microstructure of allophane clay favours the chlordecone retention in soils and disfavours the crop uptake.

  12. Geotechnical Characterization of Mined Clay from Appalachian Ohio: Challenges and Implications for the Clay Mining Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Anthony R.; Hettiarachchi, Hiroshan

    2011-01-01

    Clayey soil found in coal mines in Appalachian Ohio is often sold to landfills for constructing Recompacted Soil Liners (RSL) in landfills. Since clayey soils possess low hydraulic conductivity, the suitability of mined clay for RSL in Ohio is first assessed by determining its clay content. When soil samples are tested in a laboratory, the same engineering properties are typically expected for the soils originated from the same source, provided that the testing techniques applied are standard, but mined clay from Appalachian Ohio has shown drastic differences in particle size distribution depending on the sampling and/or laboratory processing methods. Sometimes more than a 10 percent decrease in the clay content is observed in the samples collected at the stockpiles, compared to those collected through reverse circulation drilling. This discrepancy poses a challenge to geotechnical engineers who work on the prequalification process of RSL material as it can result in misleading estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of the samples. This paper describes a laboratory investigation conducted on mined clay from Appalachian Ohio to determine how and why the standard sampling and/or processing methods can affect the grain-size distributions. The variation in the clay content was determined to be due to heavy concentrations of shale fragments in the clayey soils. It was also concluded that, in order to obtain reliable grain size distributions from the samples collected at a stockpile of mined clay, the material needs to be processed using a soil grinder. Otherwise, the samples should be collected through drilling. PMID:21845150

  13. Geotechnical Characterization of Mined Clay from Appalachian Ohio: Challenges and Implications for the Clay Mining Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R. Moran

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Clayey soil found in coal mines in Appalachian Ohio is often sold to landfills for constructing Recompacted Soil Liners (RSL in landfills. Since clayey soils possess low hydraulic conductivity, the suitability of mined clay for RSL in Ohio is first assessed by determining its clay content. When soil samples are tested in a laboratory, the same engineering properties are typically expected for the soils originated from the same source, provided that the testing techniques applied are standard, but mined clay from Appalachian Ohio has shown drastic differences in particle size distribution depending on the sampling and/or laboratory processing methods. Sometimes more than a 10 percent decrease in the clay content is observed in the samples collected at the stockpiles, compared to those collected through reverse circulation drilling. This discrepancy poses a challenge to geotechnical engineers who work on the prequalification process of RSL material as it can result in misleading estimates of the hydraulic conductivity of the samples. This paper describes a laboratory investigation conducted on mined clay from Appalachian Ohio to determine how and why the standard sampling and/or processing methods can affect the grain-size distributions. The variation in the clay content was determined to be due to heavy concentrations of shale fragments in the clayey soils. It was also concluded that, in order to obtain reliable grain size distributions from the samples collected at a stockpile of mined clay, the material needs to be processed using a soil grinder. Otherwise, the samples should be collected through drilling.

  14. Effects of varied porosity on the physic-mechanical properties of sintered ceramic from Ifon clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatai Olufemi ARAMIDE

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of saw dust admixture on the physic-mechanical properties of sintered clay bonded carbonized palm kernel shell ceramic was investigated. Composite mixtures of powdered carbonized palm kernel shell and clay from Ifon deposit were produced using equal amount of clay and carbonized palm kernel shell. These were then mixed with varied amount of saw dust (0%, 5% and 10% in a ball mill for 6 hours. From this standard sample specimens were produced using uniaxial compression after mixing each mixture with 10% moisture of clay contents. The compressed samples were sintered at 9500C and soaked for one hour. The sintered samples were characterized for various physic-mechanical properties using state of the art equipment’s. The fired samples were also characterized using ultra-high-resolution field emission scanning electron microscope (UHR-FEGSEM equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDX. It was observed that the apparent porosity and water absorption of the clay bonded carbonized palm kernel shell ceramic increased with increased amount of saw dust admixture, cold crushing strength, Young’ modulus of elasticity and absorbed energy of the sample reduced with increased amount of saw dust admixture. It was concluded that the sample with 0% saw dust admixture is judged to possess optimum physic-mechanical properties.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and dielectric properties of polynorbornadiene–clay nanocomposites by ROMP using intercalated Ruthenium catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yalçınkaya, Esra Evrim; Balcan, Mehmet; Güler, Çetin

    2013-01-01

    Polynorbornadiene clay nanocomposites were prepared for the first time by the ring opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) using modified montmorillonite and polynorbornadiene the latter of which is used commonly in electric–electronic industry. The Na–MMT clay was modified by a quaternary ammonium salt containing Ruthenium complex as a suitable catalyst and intercalant as well. The norbornadiene monomers were polymerized within the modified montmorillonite layers by in-situ polymerization method in different clay loading degrees. Intercalation ability of the Ru catalyst and partially exfoliated nanocomposite structure were proved by powder X-ray Diffraction (XRD) Spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) methods. The nanocomposite materials with high thermal degradation temperature and low dielectric constant compared to the pure polynorbornadiene were obtained. The dielectric constants decreased with the increase of the clay content. - Highlights: • Polynorbornadiene–clay nanocomposites were prepared for the first time. • Ruthenium complex was assigned as both suitable catalyst and intercalant. • The norbornadiene was polymerized by in-situ polymerization method. • Exfoliation/intercalation structures were found to be related with loading degree. • PNBD–MMT nanocomposites had a higher thermal degradation temperature and lower dielectric constant

  16. Stabilization of Clay Soil Using Tyre Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Dheyab Ahmed

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The planning, designing, construction of excavations and foundations in soft to very soft clay soils are always difficult. They are problematic soil that caused trouble for the structures built on them because of the low shear strength, high water content, and high compressibility. This work investigates the geotechnical behavior of soft clay by using tyre ash material burnt in air. The investigation contains the following tests: physical tests, chemical tests, consolidation test, Compaction tests, shear test, California Bearing Ratio test CBR, and model tests. These tests were done on soil samples prepared from soft clay soil; tyre ash was used in four percentages (2, 4, 6, and 8%. The results of the tests were; The soil samples which gave the value of plasticity test were 2% (25, 4% (25.18, 6% (25.3, and 8% (26.7.The soil samples which gave the value of specific gravity were 2% (2.65, 4% (2.61, 6% (2.5, and 8% (2.36.The value of maximum dry density in a compaction test observed with 2% percentage gave the value 15.8 kN/m3, the 4% gave the value 15.4 kN/m 3 34 , 6% gave 15.3 kN/m 3 and 8%with 15.2 kN/m3 .Samples that gave the values of undrained shear strength test were 2% (55 kN/m 2 , 4% (76 kN/m2 , 6% (109 kN/m 2, and 8% (122 kN/m 2. The best of them is 8%. The sample that gave the best value for swelling test was 8%.The best value for compression index Cc was in 8%.The results of CBR test, were improved in all soil samples. The soil samples which gave the value for CBR were 2% (3.507%, 4% (4.308%, 6% (5.586%, and 8% (9.569%. The best value was obtained from 8%.

  17. The Role of Clay Swelling and Mineral Neoformation in the Stabilization of High Plasticity Soils Treated with the Fly Ash- and Metakaolin-Based Geopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud A. Mahrous

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the southern U.S. states, expansive soils are frequently encountered, presenting an important hazard in geotechnical engineering. This research relies on mineralogical and geochemical clues to explain the swelling behavior of smectite-rich, high-plasticity soils, documented in a series of geomechanical swelling tests that were performed on the soils stabilized with the metakaolin (MKG and fly ash (FAG based geopolymers. These geopolymers were mixed with the soil at several concentration levels. The lowest swelling percentage was shown to correspond to the sample stabilized with 12% FAG and was attributed to the neoformation of calcium silicate hydrates that acted as a cementitious material, preventing the soil from expanding by occupying the pore space, thus binding the clay particles together. Conversely, the 12% MKG-stabilized soil exhibited enormous expansion, which was explained by montmorillonite swelling to the point that it gradually began to lose its structural periodicity. The relatively high abundance of the newly formed feldspathoids in MKG-treated samples is believed to have greatly contributed to the overall soil expansion. Finally, the cation exchange capacity tests showed that the percentage of Na+ and Ca2+, as well as the pH value, exercised strong control on the swelling behavior of smectitic soils.

  18. Accurate control testing for clay liner permeability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, R J

    1991-08-01

    Two series of centrifuge tests were carried out to evaluate the use of centrifuge modelling as a method of accurate control testing of clay liner permeability. The first series used a large 3 m radius geotechnical centrifuge and the second series a small 0.5 m radius machine built specifically for research on clay liners. Two permeability cells were fabricated in order to provide direct data comparisons between the two methods of permeability testing. In both cases, the centrifuge method proved to be effective and efficient, and was found to be free of both the technical difficulties and leakage risks normally associated with laboratory permeability testing of fine grained soils. Two materials were tested, a consolidated kaolin clay having an average permeability coefficient of 1.2{times}10{sup -9} m/s and a compacted illite clay having a permeability coefficient of 2.0{times}10{sup -11} m/s. Four additional tests were carried out to demonstrate that the 0.5 m radius centrifuge could be used for linear performance modelling to evaluate factors such as volumetric water content, compaction method and density, leachate compatibility and other construction effects on liner leakage. The main advantages of centrifuge testing of clay liners are rapid and accurate evaluation of hydraulic properties and realistic stress modelling for performance evaluations. 8 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Decomposition kinetics of expanded austenite with high nitrogen contents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the decomposition kinetics of synthesized homogeneous expanded austenite formed by gaseous nitriding of stainless steel AISI 304L and AISI 316L with nitrogen contents up to 38 at.% nitrogen. Isochronal annealing experiments were carried out in both inert (N2) and reducing (H2......) atmospheres. Differential thermal analysis (DTA) and thermogravimetry were applied for identification of the decomposition reactions and X-ray diffraction analysis was applied for phase analysis. CrN precipitated upon annealing; the activation energies are 187 kJ/mol and 128 kJ/mol for AISI 316L and AISI 304L...

  20. Probabilistic safety assessment for a generic deep geological repository for high-level waste and long-lived intermediate-level waste in clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resele, G.; Holocher, J.; Mayer, G.; Hubschwerlen, N.; Niemeyer, M.; Beushausen, M.; Wollrath, J.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the selection procedure for the search of a final site location for the disposal of radioactive wastes, the comparison and evaluation of different potentially suitable repository systems in different types of host rocks will be an essential and crucial step. Since internationally accepted guidelines on how to perform such quantitative comparisons between repository systems with regard to their long-term safety behaviour are still lacking, in 2007 the German Federal Office for Radiation Protection launched the project 'VerSi' (Vergleichende Sicherheitsanalysen - Comparing Safety Assessments) that aims at the development of a methodology for the comparison of long-term safety assessments. A vital part of the VerSi project is the performance of long-term safety assessments for the comparison of two repository systems. The comparison focuses on a future repository for heat-generating, i.e. high-level and long-lived intermediate-level radioactive wastes in Germany. Rock salt is considered as a potential host rock for such a repository, and one repository system in VerSi is defined similarly to the potential site located in the Gorleben salt dome. Another suitable host rock formation may be clay. A generic location within the lower Cretaceous clays in Northern Germany is therefore chosen for the comparison of safety assessments within the VerSi project. The long-term safety assessment of a repository system for heat-generating radioactive waste at the generic clay location comprises different steps, amongst others: - Identifying the relevant processes in the near-field, in the geosphere and in the biosphere which are relevant for the long-term safety behaviour. - Development of a safety concept for the repository system. - Deduction of scenarios of the long-term evolution of the repository system. - Definition of statistic weights, i. e. the likelihood of occurrence of the scenarios. - Performance of a

  1. High nitrogen availability reduces polyphenol content in Sphagnum peat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragazza, Luca; Freeman, Chris

    2007-05-15

    Peat mosses of the genus Sphagnum constitute the bulk of living and dead biomass in bogs. These plants contain peculiar polyphenols which hamper litter peat decomposition through their inhibitory activity on microbial breakdown. In the light of the increasing availability of biologically active nitrogen in natural ecosystems, litter derived from Sphagnum mosses is an ideal substrate to test the potential effects of increased atmospheric nitrogen deposition on polyphenol content in litter peat. To this aim, we measured total nitrogen and soluble polyphenol concentration in Sphagnum litter peat collected in 11 European bogs under a chronic gradient of atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Our results demonstrate that increasing nitrogen concentration in Sphagnum litter, as a consequence of increased exogenous nitrogen availability, is accompanied by a decreasing concentration of polyphenols. This inverse relationship is consistent with reports that in Sphagnum mosses, polyphenol and protein biosynthesis compete for the same precursor. Our observation of modified Sphagnum litter chemistry under chronic nitrogen eutrophication has implications in the context of the global carbon balance, because a lower content of decay-inhibiting polyphenols would accelerate litter peat decomposition.

  2. Effects of Different Types of Clays and Maleic Anhydride Modified Polystyrene on Polystyrene/Clay Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mehrabzadeh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer/clay nanocomposites are considered as a new subject of research in Iran and the world. Addition of a minimum amount of clay (2-5wt% can improve the mechanical properties, enhance barrier properties and reduce flammability dramatically. Polystyrene (PS exhibits high strength, high modulus and excellent dimensional stability, but it has poor ductility, elongation, and flexural modulus. By incorporating clay into polystyrene these properties can be improved. In this study preparation of polystyrene/clay nanocomposite, effects of different types of clays (Cloisite 10A andNanomer I.30TC and maleic anhydride modified polystyrene on mechanical properties of the prepared polystyrene/clay nanocomposites were evaluated. Samples were prepared by a twin screw extruder. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques were employed to evaluate the extent of intercalation and exfoliation of silicate layers in the nanocomposites. Mechanical tests show that by addition of clay and maleic anhydride modified polystyrene the flexural modulus (~30% and elongation-at-break (~40% of prepared nanocomposites have been improved. XRD and TEM results show that nanocomposite have an intercalated structure with ability to change to further exfoliation structure.

  3. Water retention properties of Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan, Min; Delage, Pierre; Tang, Anh Minh; GATMIRI, Behrouz

    2012-01-01

    carried out by suction control by vapour control followed by the measurement of the water content once the sample equilibrated. All tests were run on samples of 38 mm diameter and 10 mm high trimmed. At all stages, careful determination of volume changes were carried out by hydrostatic weighing of waxed samples, providing the changes in volume and degree of saturation with suction. Figure 1e clearly shows that the first wetting path from initial state is comprised between the main wetting and main drying path, a well-known feature in unsaturated soils that is confirmed here for the COx clay-stone. Starting from an initial state at w = 7.5% (suction around 15 MPa) the water content at zero suction is between 11 and 12%. The COx sample is able to retain 2.6% water content under a 150 MPa suction. Figure 2, in which volumetric changes are plotted, shows that a significant swelling of around 7% occurred along the wetting path. Figure 2 also evidences a 1.5% shrinkage along the drying path. The changes in degree of saturation with suction are presented in Figure 1d. Starting from the initial state (S r = 92.6%), it seems that saturation gets close to 100% when reaching a 4.2 MPa suction. Interestingly, the main drying path is identical in this diagram, providing a value of the air entry value of about 6-7 MPa. Note however that this air entry value is that of a swollen sample somewhat different from the natural clay-stone that start de-saturating from an unswollen state along the gallery wall just after excavation. Inspection of Figures 1a and 1c indicates that desaturation starts at a water content of 9.3% after a saturated shrinkage from an initial water content of 12% with a decrease in porosity from 23 to 20.3% (to compare to the initial value of 17.6%). The shrinkage observed along the first drying path at suction larger than initial indicates that the porosity measured in the laboratory on somewhat de-saturated and shrunk samples is not exactly the in-situ natural

  4. A review of materials and corrosion issues regarding canisters for disposal of spent fuel and high-level waste in Opalinus clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landolt, D.; Davenport, A.; Payer, J.; Shoesmith, D.

    2009-01-01

    The project 'Entsorgungsnachweis' presented by NAGRA to the Swiss Federal Government in December 2002 assessed the feasibility of disposal of spent fuel (SF), vitrified high level waste (HLW) from reprocessing and long-lived intermediate level waste in an Opalinus Clay repository site in Northern Switzerland. NAGRA proposed the use of carbon steel canisters for disposal of SF/HLW and it also put forward an alternative concept of copper canisters with cast iron insert. In its reply the Federal Government acknowledged that NAGRA had successfully demonstrated the technical feasibility of disposal of SF/HLW. However, some of its experts raised a number of questions related to the choice of steel as canister material. Among others, it was questioned whether hydrogen formed by corrosion of steel in contact with saturated bentonite might adversely affect the barrier function of the Opalinus clay. It was also recommended that alternative canister materials and/or design concepts should be evaluated. To deal with these concerns NAGRA convened an international group of experts, the Canister Materials Review Board (CMRB), who were to review the existing information on canister materials that could be suitable for the proposed repository environment. Based on present knowledge of materials science, the CMRB was to recommend to NAGRA the most suitable material(s) for meeting the performance requirements for SF/HLW canisters. Specifically, the CMRB was to consider corrosion, including hydrogen generation, and stress-assisted failure processes that could affect the integrity and projected life time of SF/HLW canisters or impede the functioning of geological barriers while keeping in mind the overall feasibility of manufacturing, sealing and inspecting the canisters. The CMRB was further asked to identify the needs and provide advice for further studies by NAGRA on the long term performance and safety of SF/HLW canisters in the Swiss repository concept. For the assessment of the

  5. On the role of anisotropy in the perturbation of Boom Clay by a deep disposal repository for high-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sillen, X.; Li, X.L.; Van Marcke, P.; Chen, G.; Bastiaens, W.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. All along the characterisation programme of the Boom Clay, a potential host rock for geological disposal of long-lived, heat-emitting radioactive waste, evidences of anisotropy of key thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) properties have been collected through direct observations and laboratory measurements. In parallel, evidences of anisotropic THM behaviour of the clay massif were obtained during excavations and in-situ experiments in the underground research laboratory HADES at Mol. Careful analysis of the observations and simple modelling reveal the key role of the anisotropy of the material properties and, to a lesser extent, the in situ stresses in the development of a damaged zone around the galleries and the hydro-mechanical perturbation in the clay massif. As a consequence of the sedimentary deposition process, clay formations often exhibit visible bedding. This is the case for Boom Clay. Like other deep clays, Boom Clay also exhibits pronounced strain anisotropy under certain hydro-mechanical loading. Isotropic compression tests performed in the early nineties have shown that, for Boom Clay at a depth of about 225 m, the increments of deformation perpendicular to the bedding planes, i.e. vertical, are about two times larger than increments of deformation parallel to the bedding planes, i.e. horizontal. Moreover, it was observed that this mechanical anisotropy decreases progressively as the isotropic stress is increased. Drained heating tests under constant isotropic loading also evidenced anisotropic behaviour during thermo-consolidation. Like the mechanical properties, hydraulic and thermal properties of the Boom Clay also show anisotropy: lab and in situ measurements suggest that the horizontal hydraulic conductivity is about twice the vertical one while the ratio between horizontal and vertical thermal conductivities is about 1.4. The anisotropic THM behaviour of the Boom Clay was evidenced during excavations

  6. Distribution of Clay Minerals in Light Coal Fractions and the Thermal Reaction Products of These Clay Minerals during Combustion in a Drop Tube Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sida Tian

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available To estimate the contribution of clay minerals in light coal fractions to ash deposition in furnaces, we investigated their distribution and thermal reaction products. The light fractions of two Chinese coals were prepared using a 1.5 g·cm−3 ZnCl2 solution as a density separation medium and were burned in a drop-tube furnace (DTF. The mineral matter in each of the light coal fractions was compared to that of the relevant raw coal. The DTF ash from light coal fractions was analysed using hydrochloric acid separation. The acid-soluble aluminium fractions of DTF ash samples were used to determine changes in the amorphous aluminosilicate products with increasing combustion temperature. The results show that the clay mineral contents in the mineral matter of both light coal fractions were higher than those in the respective raw coals. For the coal with a high ash melting point, clay minerals in the light coal fraction thermally transformed more dehydroxylation products compared with those in the raw coal, possibly contributing to solid-state reactions of ash particles. For the coal with a low ash melting point, clay minerals in the light coal fraction produced more easily-slagging material compared with those in the raw coal, playing an important role in the occurrence of slagging. Additionally, ferrous oxide often produces low-melting substances in coal ash. Due to the similarities of zinc oxide and ferrous oxide in silicate reactions, we also investigated the interactions of clay minerals in light coal fractions with zinc oxide introduced by a zinc chloride solution. The extraneous zinc oxide could react, to a small extent, with clay minerals in the coal during DTF combustion.

  7. Multi-technical approach to characterize the dissolved organic matter from clay-stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchart, Pascale; Michels, Raymond; Faure, Pierre; Parant, Stephane; Bruggeman, Christophe; De Craen, Mieke

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Currently, different clay formations (Boom Clay, Callovo-Oxfordian argilites, Opalinus Clay, Toarcian shales...) are studied as reference host rocks for methodological studies on the geological disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive waste. While a significant effort is being done on the characterization of the mineral composition and the reactivity of the clays as barriers, the occurrence of organic matter, even in low proportion cannot be neglected. The organic matter appears as gas (C 1 -C 4 as identified in the Bure underground facilities), as solid (kerogen), as hydrocarbon liquids (free hydrocarbons within the kerogen or adsorbed on minerals) as well as in the aqueous phase (Dissolved Organic Matter - DOM). DOM raises specific interest, as it may have complexation properties towards metals and rare earth elements and is potentially mobile. Therefore, it is important to characterize the DOM as part of a study of feasibility of geological disposal. In this study, four host rocks were studied: - The Callovo-Oxfordian shales of Bure Underground Research Laboratory (Meuse, France); - The Opalinus Clay of Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory (Switzerland); - The Toarcian shales of Tournemire (Aveyron, France); - The Boom Clay formation studied in The HADES Underground Research Laboratory (Mol, Belgium). Organic matter characteristics vary upon formation in terms of (i) origin (mainly marine type II; mixtures of marine type II and higher plants type III organic matter often poorly preserved), (ii) TOC contents, (iii) thermal maturity (for instance, Opalinus Clay and Toarcian shales are more mature and have poor oxygen content compare to Callovo-Oxfordian shales and Boom Clay). These differences in organic matter quality may have an influence on the quantity and the quality of DOM. The DOM of the rocks was isolated by Soxhlet extraction using pure water. A quantitative and qualitative multi

  8. Pedagogical content knowledge and preparation of high school physics teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Etkina

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper contains a scholarly description of pedagogical practices of the Rutgers Physics/Physical Science Teacher Preparation program. The program focuses on three aspects of teacher preparation: knowledge of physics, knowledge of pedagogy, and knowledge of how to teach physics (pedagogical content knowledge—PCK. The program has been in place for 7 years and has a steady production rate of an average of six teachers per year who remain in the profession. The main purpose of the paper is to provide information about a possible structure, organization, and individual elements of a program that prepares physics teachers. The philosophy of the program and the coursework can be implemented either in a physics department or in a school of education. The paper provides details about the program course work and teaching experiences and suggests ways to adapt it to other local conditions.

  9. Automated microscopy for high-content RNAi screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy is one of the most powerful tools to investigate complex cellular processes such as cell division, cell motility, or intracellular trafficking. The availability of RNA interference (RNAi) technology and automated microscopy has opened the possibility to perform cellular imaging in functional genomics and other large-scale applications. Although imaging often dramatically increases the content of a screening assay, it poses new challenges to achieve accurate quantitative annotation and therefore needs to be carefully adjusted to the specific needs of individual screening applications. In this review, we discuss principles of assay design, large-scale RNAi, microscope automation, and computational data analysis. We highlight strategies for imaging-based RNAi screening adapted to different library and assay designs. PMID:20176920

  10. Clay facial masks: physicochemical stability at different storage temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zague, Vivian; de Almeida Silva, Diego; Baby, André Rolim; Kaneko, Telma Mary; Velasco, Maria Valéria Robles

    2007-01-01

    Clay facial masks--formulations that contain a high percentage of solids dispersed in a liquid vehicle--have become of special interest due to specific properties presented by clays, such as particle size, cooling index, high adsorption capacity, and plasticity. Although most of the physicochemical properties of clay dispersions have been studied, specific aspects concerning the physicochemical stability of clay mask products remain unclear. This work aimed at investigating the accelerated physicochemical stability of clay mask formulations stored at different temperatures. Formulations were subjected to centrifuge testing and to thermal treatment for 15 days, during which temperature was varied from -5.0 degrees to 45.0 degrees C. The apparent viscosity and visual aspect (homogeneity) of all formulations were affected by temperature variation, whereas color, odor, and pH value remained unaltered. These results, besides the estimation of physicochemical stability under aging, can be useful in determining the best storage conditions for clay-based formulations.

  11. Tensile mechanical response of polyethylene – clay nanocomposites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work we report on the microstructural and the mechanical characteristics of high density polyethylene (HDPE-clay nanocomposites, with particular attention to the creep behaviour. The samples were prepared through melt compounding, using two high-density polyethylenes with different melt flow rate (MFR, two different organo-modified clays, and changing the relative amount of a polyethylene grafted with maleic anhydride (PEgMA compatibilizer. The intercalation process is more effective as the matrix melt viscosity decreases (higher MFR, while the clay interlamellar spacing increases as the compatibilizer amount increases. The relative stiffness of the nanocomposites increases with the addition of clay, with a limited enhancement of the relative yield stress. The better intercalation obtained by the addition of the compatibilizer is not accompanied by a concurrent improvement of the tensile mechanical properties. The creep resistance is enhanced by the introduction of clay, with an appreciable dependence on both the polyethylene and the clay type.

  12. Substantiation of the hydrodynamic disintegration of hydraulic fluid’s mineral component of high-clay sand in precious metals placers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.P. Khrunina

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available General regularities and theoretical approaches determining hydroimpulsive effects on the mineral component of the hydraulic fluid are analyzed, with reference to the disintegration of high-clay sands of gold-bearing placers. Theoretical conclusions on the hydrodynamic effect on the solid component of the hydraulic fluid give insight into emerging processes in multicomponent media under hydrodynamic influences initiated by various sources of physical and mechanical influence. It is noted that the theoretical justification of the structurally complex hydrodynamic effect on the hydraulic fluid with the formation of phenomena arising from the collision of solid components with each other and obstacles includes the consideration of changes in such force characteristics as speed, pressure, flow power, and also changes in design parameters and characteristics of the environment. A conceptual approach is given to the theoretical substantiation of the disintegration of the hydraulic fluid’s mineral component using the example of the proposed installation. Calculation of economic indicators for the use of a hydrodynamic generator in comparison with processes based on known technologies has shown significant advantages of using the proposed installation, which can increase productivity and quality production indicators.

  13. Organic contaminant removal efficiency of sodium bentonite/clay (BC) mixtures in high permeability regions utilizing reclaimed wastewater: A meso-scale study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yang; Li, Yunkai; Ning, Zigong; Li, Pengxiang; Yang, Peiling; Liu, Chengcheng; Liu, Zhongwei; Xu, Feipeng; Hynds, Paul Dylan

    2018-03-01

    Wastewater reclamation now represents an effective measure for sustainable water resource management in arid regions, however wastewater components (organic micropollutants) may potentially impact local ecological and/or human health. Previous studies have shown that sodium bentonite/natural clay (BC) mixes may be used to effectively reduce riverbed infiltration in regions characterized by excessively high hydraulic conductivity. Accordingly, the current study sought to investigate the contaminant removal efficiency (Re) of several BC mass ratios in simulated dry riverbeds. Results indicate that the measured Re of NH4+-N, CODcr and BOD5 increased in concurrence with an increasing sodium bentonite ratio, up to a maximum Re of 97.4% (NH4+-N), 55.2% (CODcr), and 51.5% (BOD5). The primary contaminant removal site was shown to be the infiltration-reducing (BC) layer, accounting for approximately 40%, 60%, and 70% of NH4+-N, CODcr and BOD5 removal, respectively. Conversely, the removal efficiency of NO3-N was found to be low (managing recharge of non-potable aquifers with reclaimed wastewater.

  14. Performance of polymeric films based thermoplastic starch and organophilic clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cipriano, P.B.; Costa, A.N.M.; Araujo, S.S.; Araujo, A.R.A.; Canedo, E.L.; Carvalho, L.H.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was the development and investigation of the properties of flat films of LDPE/corn thermoplastic starch (TPS). A bentonite clay (Argel) was organophilized and characterized by XRD. This clay (1%) in both pristine and organophilic forms was added to the matrix (LDPE) and to LDPE/TPS systems with TPS contents varying from 5-20% w/w. The films manufactured (LDPE, LDPE/Clay, LDPE/TPS, LDPE/TPS/Clay) were characterized. Results indicate that water vapor permeability is dependent and increases with TPS content which was attributed to the higher affinity of water by TPS. TPS and Clay addition to LDPE led to significant changes in film properties with respect to the neat LDPE. In general,tensile and perforation forces increased with clay and TPS contents; the strength of thermo sealed films lowered with natural clay addition and increased with TPS and organoclay incorporation and, in general, dynamic friction coefficient decrease with organoclay and TPS addition. Best overall properties were obtained for the systems containing the organoclay and optimal properties were achieved for the 5%TPS10 LDPE1% ANO system. (author)

  15. Clay and concrete brick

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dlamini, MN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Brick is one of the most used and versatile building materials in use today. Bricks can be defined as modular units connected by mortar in the formation of a building system or product. Commonly the word brick is used to refer to clay bricks, which...

  16. 1,2'-Bis(4-aminophenoxy)benzene based designed fluoro-poly(ether-imide)/MMT clay nanocomposites: Synthesis and properties for high performance applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vora, Rohitkumar H.; Vora, Mayur

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to develop structure-property understanding of fluoro-polymer/inorganic clay nanocomposite (i.e., Ceramer) technology, two series of fluoro-poly(ether amic acid) (6F-PEAA)/organosoluble Montmorillonite (MMT) clay nanocomposite formulations containing varying percentage of diamine modified (ion-exchanged) organosoluble-MMT clay were prepared from the partially fluorinated fluoro poly(ether-amic acid)s (6F-PEAA) synthesized by reacting on 2,2'-bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenyl) hexafluoropropane dianhydride (6FDA) and di-ether-containing diamines, such as 1,2'-bis(4-aminophenoxy) benzene (o-BAPOB) and 4,4'-bis(4-aminophenoxy) diphenyl sulfone (p-SED), respectively. Self supporting films were cast from these formulations and cured at elevated temperatures. XRD data, indirectly confirmed the exfoliation of organosoluble-MMT clay at molecular level in the nanocomposite. The solubility, chemical resistance, morphology, thermo-oxidative stability, thermal degradation kinetics, mechanical behavior, and moisture absorption of these [(6F-PEI)/MMT clay] nanocomposite films were systematically studied

  17. Physical Properties of Latvian Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Jurgelāne, I; Stepanova, V; Ločs, J; Mālers, J; Bērziņa-Cimdiņa, L

    2012-01-01

    Physical and chemical properties of clays mostly depends on its mineral and chemical composition, particle size and pH value. The mutual influence of these parameters is complex. Illite is the most abundant clay mineral in Latvia and usually used in building materials and pottery. The viscosity and plasticity of Latvian clays from several deposits were investigated and correlated with mineral composition, particle size and pH value. Fractionated and crude clay samples were used. The p...

  18. Nanocomposites of PP and bentonite clay modified with different surfactants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Andre W.B.; Agrawal, Pankaj; Araujo, Edcleide M.; Melo, Tomas J.A.; Ueki, Marcelo M.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was the development of nano composites of polypropylene (PP) and national bentonite clay modified with different surfactants. The results of X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) showed that the organophilization process was effective. The surfactants led to a significant increase in the basal spacing of Brasgel PA clay. XRD results of the mixture PP/Brasgel PA clay modified with Praepagem WB surfactant indicated that a nanocomposite with intercalated structure was formed. When the Brasgel PA clay was modified with Praepagem HY surfactant, DRX results indicated that a micro composite was formed. Screw speed, clay content and PP viscosity had no influence on the XRD pattern of the obtained materials. (author)

  19. Performance of Kaolin Clay on the Concrete Pavement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, M. E.; Jaya, R. P.; Shahafuddin, M. N. A.; Yaacob, H.; Ibrahim, M. H. Wan; Nazri, F. M.; Ramli, N. I.; Mohammed, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    This paper investigates the performance of concrete pavement containing kaolin clay with their engineering properties and to determine the optimum kaolin clay content. The concrete used throughout the study was designed as grade 30 MPa strength with constant water to cement ratio of 0.49. The compressive strength, flexural strength and water absorption test was conducted in this research. The concrete mix designed with kaolin clay as cement replacement comprises at 0%, 5%, 10% and 15% by the total weight of cement. The results indicate that the strength of pavement concrete decreases as the percentage of kaolin clay increases. It also shows that the water absorption increases with the percentage of cement replacement. However, 5% kaolin clay is found to be the optimum level to replace cement in a pavement concrete.

  20. Decantation time of evaluation on bentonite clays fractionation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, J.; Menezes, R.R.; Neves, G.A.; Lira, H.L; Santana, L.N.L.

    2009-01-01

    Bentonite clays present a great number of industrial uses, from petroleum to pharmaceutics and cosmetic industry. The bentonite clay present particles with very fine particles that is responsible by the vast application of these materials. However, commercial clays present wide particle size distribution and a significant content of impurities, particularly quartz, in the form of silt and fine silt. So, the aim of this work is to analyze the effect of the stirring and decantation time in the deagglomeration, purification and size separation of the bentonite clay particles from Paraiba. The clays were characterized by X-ray diffraction and particle size distribution. Based on the results it was observed the decantation time give the elimination of the agglomerates formed by submicrometric particles. The uses of decantation column give separation of the fraction below 200nm. (author)

  1. Geochemical study of evaporite and clay mineral-oxyhydroxide samples from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brookins, D.G.

    1993-06-01

    Samples of clay minerals, insoluble oxyhydroxides, and their host evaporites from the WIPP site have been studied for their major and minor elements abundances, x-ray diffraction characteristics, K-Ar ages, and Rb-Sr ages. This study was undertaken to determine their overall geochemical characteristics and to investigate possible interactions between evaporates and insoluble constituents. The evaporite host material is water-soluble, having Cl/Br ratios typical of marine evaporites, although the Br content is low. Insoluble material (usually a mixture of clay minerals and oxyhydroxide phases) yields very high Cl/Br ratios, possibly because of Cl from admixed halide minerals. This same material yields K/Rb and Th/U ratios in the normal range for shales; suggesting little, if any, effect of evaporite-induced remobilization of U, K, or Rb in the insoluble material. The rare-earth element (REE) data also show normal REE/chondrite (REE/CHON) distribution patterns, supporting the K/Rb and Th/U data. Clay minerals yield K-Ar dates in the range 365 to 390 Ma and a Rb-Sr isochron age of 428 ± 7 Ma. These ages are well in excess of the 220- to 230-Ma formational age of the evaporites, and confirm the detrital origin of the clays. The ages also show that any evaporite or clay mineral reactions that might have occurred at or near the time of sedimentation and diagenesis were not sufficient to reset the K-Ar and Rb-Sr systematics of the clay minerals. Further, x-ray data indicate a normal evaporitic assemblage of clay minerals and Fe-rich oxyhydroxide phases. The clay minerals and other insoluble material appear to be resistant to the destructive effects of their entrapment in the evaporites, which suggests that these insoluble materials would be good getters for any radionuclides (hypothetically) released from the storage of radioactive wastes in the area

  2. Synthesis and characterization of carbon nanotubes on clay minerals and its application to a hydrogen peroxide biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, H.-L.; Jehng, J.-M.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on clay minerals, and the development of biosensors based on Nafion-CNT/Clay-Au and Nafion-CNT/Clay-Au-Glucose oxidase (GOD) composite films for the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and glucose, respectively. The CNTs are synthesized on nickel cation exchanged clay mineral platelets. From field-emission scanning electron microscope images, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transfer infrared and thermogravimetric analysis results, the clay layers are exfoliated and delaminated after the growth of CNTs on them. The mixed hybrid film of Nafion, CNT/Clay, Au particles and GOD is coated on the glassy carbon (GC) electrode to detect H 2 O 2 or glucose. This film exhibits a detection limit of 5.0 x 10 -5 M for H 2 O 2 with a sensitivity of 280 nA mM -1 . In addition, the amperometric response for glucose containing 2.0 mg mL -1 GOD in the Nafion-CNT/Clay-Au-GOD modified GC electrode exhibits a sensitivity of 620 nA mM -1 with a linear range up to 1850 μM. A higher sensitivity and shorter response time are observed with increasing GOD content in the composite matrix film. Besides, the highest sensitivity of 2032 nA mM -1 is obtained with the addition of the 10.0 mg mL -1 GOD in the composite film. Consequently, the CNT/Clay/Nafion medium can probably be a useful electrode for the development of sensors due to its high sensitivity and applicability

  3. Clay Animals and Their Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Creating clay animals and their habitats with second-grade students has long been one of the author's favorite classroom activities. Students love working with clay and they also enjoy drawing animal homes. In this article, the author describes how the students created a diorama instead of drawing their clay animal's habitat. This gave students…

  4. Evaluation of Water Vapor Sorption Hysteresis in Soils: The Role of Organic Matter and Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arthur, Emmanuel; Tuller, Markus; Moldrup, Per

    2015-01-01

    an important role. It is clear that modeling physical and biological soil processes is more accurate when SWC hysteresis is considered, particularly at low potentials where small differences in water content are associated with large changes in potential energy. The objectives of the presented study were to......: (i) evaluate and compare recently developed methods (MBET-n, Dh and SPN) for quantifying hysteresis in soils and pure clays, and (ii) investigate the role of organic matter (OM) and clay content and type on hysteresis. Five pure clays and two sets of soils with gradients in organic matter and clay....... For the SPN method, large contents of organic matter and clay in soils are associated with increased hysteresis. For both MBET-n and Dh methods, no clear trends of clay or OM contents effects on hysteresis was observed....

  5. Multiscale Micromechanical Modeling of Polymer/Clay Nanocomposites and the Effective Clay Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Nuo; Boyce, Mary C.; Parks, David M.; Manovitch, Oleg; Rutledge, Gregory C.; Lee, Hojun; McKinley, Gareth H.

    2003-03-01

    Polymer/clay nanocomposites have been observed to exhibit enhanced mechanical properties at low weight fractions (Wp) of clay. Continuum-based composite modeling reveals that the enhanced properties are strongly dependent on particular features of the second-phase ¡°particles¡+/-; in particular, the particle volume fraction (fp), the particle aspect ratio (L/t), and the ratio of particle mechanical properties to those of the matrix. However, these important aspects of as-processed nanoclay composites have yet to be consistently and accurately defined. A multiscale modeling strategy was developed to account for the hierarchical morphology of the nanocomposite: at a lengthscale of thousands of microns, the structure is one of high aspect ratio particles within a matrix; at the lengthscale of microns, the clay particle structure is either (a) exfoliated clay sheets of nanometer level thickness or (b) stacks of parallel clay sheets separated from one another by interlayer galleries of nanometer level height. Here, quantitative structural parameters extracted from XRD patterns and TEM micrographs are used to determine geometric features of the as-processed clay ¡°particles¡+/-, including L/t and the ratio of fp to Wp. These geometric features, together with estimates of silicate lamina stiffness obtained from molecular dynamics simulations, provide a basis for modeling effective mechanical properties of the clay particle. The structure-based predictions of the macroscopic elastic modulus of the nanocomposite as a function of clay weight fraction are in excellent agreement with experimental data. The adopted methodology offers promise for study of related properties in polymer/clay nanocomposites.

  6. Bulk Density Prediction for Histosols and Soil Horizons with High Organic Matter Content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidinei Julio Beutler

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Bulk density (Bd can easily be predicted from other data using pedotransfer functions (PTF. The present study developed two PTFs (PTF1 and PTF2 for Bd prediction in Brazilian organic soils and horizons and compared their performance with nine previously published equations. Samples of 280 organic soil horizons used to develop PTFs and containing at least 80 g kg-1 total carbon content (TOC were obtained from different regions of Brazil. The multiple linear stepwise regression technique was applied to validate all the equations using an independent data set. Data were transformed using Box-Cox to meet the assumptions of the regression models. For validation of PTF1 and PTF2, the coefficient of determination (R2 was 0.47 and 0.37, mean error -0.04 and 0.10, and root mean square error 0.22 and 0.26, respectively. The best performance was obtained for the PTF1, PTF2, Hollis, and Honeysett equations. The PTF1 equation is recommended when clay content data are available, but considering that they are scarce for organic soils, the PTF2, Hollis, and Honeysett equations are the most suitable because they use TOC as a predictor variable. Considering the particular characteristics of organic soils and the environmental context in which they are formed, the equations developed showed good accuracy in predicting Bd compared with already existing equations.

  7. Synthesis of organic/inorganic hybrid gel with acid activated clay after γ-ray radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghyun; Lee, Hoik; Sohn, Daewon

    2014-08-01

    A hybrid gel was prepared from acid activated clay (AA clay) and acrylic acid by gamma ray irradiation. Irradiated inorganic particles which have peroxide groups act as initiator because it generates oxide radicals by increasing temperature. Inorganic nanoparticles which are rigid part in hybrid gel also contribute to increase the mechanical property as a crosslinker. We prepared two hybrid gels to compare the effect of acid activated treatment of clay; one is synthesized with raw clay particles and another is synthesized with AA clay particles. The composition and structure of AA clay particles and raw clay particles were confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescence instrument and surface area analyzer. And chemical and physical property of hybrid gel with different ratios of acrylic acid and clay particle was tested by Raman spectroscope and universal testing machine (UTM). The synthesized hydrogel with 76% gel contents can elongated approximately 1000% of its original size.

  8. Characterization of organophilic attapulgite clay from state of Piaui

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, L.C. dos Santos; Alves, T.S.; Barbosa, R.

    2011-01-01

    The attapulgite is mineral clay typically fibrous. It owns a superficial area around 125 to 210 m²/g, cationics transfer capacity from 20 to 30 mill equivalents per 100g of clay, high capacity of sorption, considerable decolourizer capacity, chemical inertia and maintenance of thixotropics properties in the presence of electrolytes. The objective of this work was to perform the chemical modification of attapulgite original from state of Piaui - Brazil, for applications in polymeric nanocomposites. The chemical composition of clay without modification was determined by X-Ray Diffraction. The natural clay and organophilizated one were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), by Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy (FTIR), and Foster's swelling. The obtained results indicated the presence of characteristics groups of the salt in the clay, alteration in its chemical composition, evidencing that the chemical modification in the clay was efficient, could the same be applied in preparation of polymeric nanocomposites. (author)

  9. Non-combustible nuclear radiation shields with high hydrogen content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, W.C.; Peterson, J.M.

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to compositions, methods of production, and uses of non-combustible nuclear radiation shields, with particular emphasis on those containing a high concentration of hydrogen atoms, especially effective for moderating neutron energy by elastic scatter, dispersed as a discontinuous phase in a continuous phase of a fire resistant matrix

  10. An Introduction to Computing: Content for a High School Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jean B.

    A general outline of the topics that might be covered in a computers and computing course for high school students is provided. Topics are listed in the order in which they should be taught, and the relative amount of time to be spent on each topic is suggested. Seven units are included in the course outline: (1) general introduction, (2) using…

  11. Discharge efficiency in high-Xe-content plasma display panels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hayashi, D.; Kroesen, G.M.W.; Hagelaar, G.J.M.; Heusler, G.

    2004-01-01

    We study theoretically the overall output performance and the dominating reaction processes of the vacuum ultraviolet (UV) radiation production in high-Xe partial pressures in plasma display panels (PDPs) with Ne-Xe gas mixtures. A two-dimensional self-consistent fluid model is applied for the

  12. Synthesis and characterization of a PbO2-clay nanocomposite: Removal of lead from water using montmorillonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aroui, L.; Zerroual, L.; Boutahala, M.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The replacement of Na by Pb in the interlayer space of the smectite leads to a decrease in the intensity of the the (0 0 1) reflection as the concentration of lead nitrate increases. A significant restructuring at the particle scale is observed leading probably to the exfoliation of the caly. In addition, the thermal behaviour of the montmorillonite samples with regard to their dehydration and dehydroxilation capacities is significantly influenced. This leads to a lowering of the water content and a decrease in the ionic conductivity of the clay. Highlights: ► In the clay, Pb replaces Na ions and a significant restructuring at the particle scale is observed. ► Pb influenced significantly the thermal behaviour of the clay with regard to its dehydration. ► In the interlayer space, the exchange of Na by Pb leads to a decrease in the protonic conductivity. ► A PbO 2 -clay nanocomposite material with good conductivity is synthesized. -- Abstract: The aim of this paper is to present the results obtained with Pb(II) sorption on an Algerian Clay. The experiments were carried out using a batch process. Powder X-rays diffraction patterns (PXRD) prove that in the montmorillonite Pb replaces Na ions. A significant restructuring at the particle scale is observed leading to the disappearance of the d 001 reflection of the clay at high concentrations of lead. The replacement of hydrated Na with Pb ions influenced significantly the thermal behaviour of the montmorillonite samples with regard to their dehydration and dehydroxilation capacities with a lowering of the water content. A PbO 2 -clay composite material with good electrical conductivity is synthesized.

  13. Highly ordered macroporous woody biochar with ultra-high carbon content as supercapacitor electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Junhua; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Xinying; Holm, Nancy; Rajagopalan, Kishore; Chen, Fanglin; Ma, Shuguo

    2013-01-01

    Woody biochar monolith with ultra-high carbon content and highly ordered macropores has been prepared via one-pot pyrolysis and carbonization of red cedar wood at 750 °C without the need of post-treatment. Energy-dispersive spectroscope (EDX) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies show that the original biochar has a carbon content of 98 wt% with oxygen as the only detectable impurity and highly ordered macroporous texture characterized by alternating regular macroporous regions and narrow porous regions. Moreover, the hierarchically porous biochar monolith has a high BET specific surface area of approximately 400 m 2 g −1 . We have studied the monolith material as supercapacitor electrodes under acidic environment using electrochemical and surface characterization techniques. Electrochemical measurements show that the original biochar electrodes have a potential window of about 1.3 V and exhibit typical rectangular-shape voltammetric responses and fast charging–discharging behavior with a gravimetric capacitance of about 14 F g −1 . Simple activation of biochar in diluted nitric acid at room temperature leads to 7 times increase in the capacitance (115 F g −1 ). Because the HNO 3 -activation slightly decreases rather than increases the BET surface area of the biochar, an increase in the coverage of surface oxygen groups is the most likely origin of the substantial capacitance improvement. This is supported by EDX, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Raman measurements. Preliminary life-time studies show that biochar supercapacitors using the original and HNO 3 -activated electrodes are stable over 5000 cycles without performance decays. These facts indicate that the use of woody biochar is promising for its low cost and it can be a good performance electrode with low environmental impacts for supercapacitor applications

  14. Fully Biodegradable Biocomposites with High Chicken Feather Content

    OpenAIRE

    Aranberri, Ibon; Montes, Sarah; Azcune, Itxaso; Rekondo, Alaitz; Grande, Hans-Jürgen

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop new biodegradable polymeric materials with high loadings of chicken feather (CF). In this study, the effect of CF concentration and the type of biodegradable matrix on the physical, mechanical and thermal properties of the biocomposites was investigated. The selected biopolymers were polylactic acid (PLA), polybutyrate adipate terephthalate (PBAT) and a PLA/thermoplastic copolyester blend. The studied biocomposites were manufactured with a to...

  15. Choice of french clays as engineered barrier components for waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulon, H.; Lajudie, A.; Debrabant, P.; Atabek, R.; Jorda, M.; Andre-Jehan, R.

    1987-01-01

    Results are presented of physical measurements on candidate buffer materials for use in nuclear fuel waste disposal. The materials being considered as constituent elements of engineered barriers are essentially calcium smectite clays, in other terms swelling clays, coming from fourteen french deposits. The criteria for good candidates are mainly: smectite content in the clay materials, carbonate and organic material content and bulk density of the material, compacted under a pressure of 100 MPa. 14 references, 4 figures, 6 tables

  16. Se of polymers to control clay swelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slobod, R L; Beiswanger, J P.G.

    1968-01-01

    The injection of water to displace oil is one of the main methods used to increase oil recovery. High injection rates are generally desired, and in some cases the flood will not be economic unless high rates are maintained. The presence of clays which swell in the presence of water offers a complication to the problem of maintaining adequate injectivity. In the course of this study it was observed that certain polymers, when present in dilute concentrations in the water, had the ability to reduce the response of these clays to fresh water. Two polymers, one an anionic and the other nonionic, were found to be very effective in controlling the clays present in Berea cores. Successful control of clay swelling was obtained by use of solutions containing as little as 1.0 ppM of polymer, but at this low concentration appreciable volumes of treating solution were required. These results suggest that some minimum amount of polymer must be adsorbed to prevent clay swelling. In Berea sandstone this minimum amount appeared to be of the order of 0.03 mg per cc of pore space. A series of tests made using 10.0 ppM polymer showed that the polymer could be made through the porous system in which 0.066 per mg of polymer was adsorbed per cc of pore space.

  17. Relationship between the Morphology and Physico-Mechanical Properties of Polyethylene/Clay Nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezanavaz, R; Aghjeh, M K R

    2012-01-01

    Rheology, morphology and thermal behavior of HDPE/Clay nanocomposites were studied. The mechanical properties of these materials including tensile and creep behaviors were also taken into account. Different PE-g-MA samples with different MA contents and different rheological properties were laboratory synthesized and used as compatibilizer of PE and Clay. The results of X-ray diffraction in conjunction with the results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis indicated that, increasing in degree of grafted MA increases the penetration of PE chains onto the clay interlayer leading to intercalation and exfoliation. The intercalated and especially exfoliated nanocomposites exhibited higher viscosity and elasticity in particular at low frequency ranges, showing the formation of three dimensional networks with high interfacial interaction. The presence of such a network was evidenced by tand studies where the pseudo-solid like behavior was observed for exfoliated nanocomposites. From these results it was demonstrated that the linear viscoelastic properties of the nanocomposites have a reliable sensitivity to the extent of clay dispersion and they can be used as indirect method in the prediction of the morphology and therefore thermal and mechanical behavior of the nanocomposites. Incorporation of clay decreased the onset temperature of degradation due to the Hofmann elimination reaction, but increased remarkably the mid-point of the degradation temperature. Our laboratory synthesized intercalated nanocomposites displayed higher thermal stability than those of exfoliated samples. This was attributed to the barrier effect of clay layers to oxygen and volatile products, during the degradation of part of polymer chains which was intercalated in clay interlayer. Interestingly the results showed that the effect of Hofmann elimination reaction which decreases the onset temperature degradation of modified clay nanocomposites, can effectively be eliminated using a

  18. Microstructure Characteristics of High Lift Factor MOCVD REBCO Coated Conductors With High Zr Content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galstyan, E; Gharahcheshmeh, MH; Delgado, L; Xu, AX; Majkic, G; Selvamanickam, V

    2015-06-01

    We report the microstructural characteristics of high levels of Zr-added REBa2Cu3O7-x (RE = Gd, Y rare earth) coated conductors fabricated by Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD). The enhancements of the lift factor defined as a ratio of the in-field (3 T, B parallel to c-axis) critical current density (J(c)) at 30 K and self-field J(c) at 77 K have been achieved for Zr addition levels of 20 and 25 mol% via optimization of deposition parameters. The presence of strong flux pinning is attributed to the aligned nanocolumns of BaZrO3 and nanoprecipitates embedded in REBa2Cu3O7-x matrix with good crystal quality. A high density of BZO nanorods with a typical size 6-8 nm and spacing of 20 nm has been observed. Moreover, the high Zr content was found to induce a high density of intrinsic defects, including stacking faults and dislocations. The correlation between in-field performance along the c-axis and microstructure of (Gd, Y) BCO film with a high level of Zr addition is discussed.

  19. Retrogradation of Maize Starch after High Hydrostatic Pressure Gelation: Effect of Amylose Content and Depressurization Rate

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Zhi; Swedlund, Peter; Gu, Qinfen; Hemar, Yacine; Chaieb, Saharoui

    2016-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has been employed to gelatinize or physically modify starch dispersions. In this study, waxy maize starch, normal maize starch, and two high amylose content starch were processed by a HHP of the order of 600 MPa

  20. Catsius Clay Project. Calculation and Testing of Behaviour of Unsaturated Clay as Barrier in Radioactive Waste Repositories. Stage 2: Validation Exercises at Laboratory scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso, E. E.; Alcoverro, J.

    1999-01-01

    Stage 2 of CATSIUS CLAY Project: Validation Exercises at Laboratory Scale includes two Benchmarks, Benchmark 2.1: Oedometer Suction Controlled Tests on Samples of compacted Boom Clay and Benchmark 2.2: Small Scale Weltting-Heating Test on Compacted Bentonite. BM 2.1 had two parts: BM 2.1A (volumetric deformation upon wetting-drying cycles) and BM 2.1 B (swelling pressure test). In BM 2.1A, participants were asked to model the results of a series of five tests on samples of compacted Boom clay. In BM 2.1B, a swelling pressure test in which suction, vertical and horizontal stresses were monitored, was proposed as a blind exercise. Participants were asked to use, without further changes, the models calibrated in BM 2.1A. This exercise provides an evaluation of the capabilities of current mechanical constitutive models for unsaturated clay behaviour. It was found that, even if a calibration exercise on the basis of known experimental data is satisfactory, blind predictions of tests involving different paths may prove difficult. The test set up for BM 2.2 consisted of a stainless stell cell filled with highly expansive compacted bentonite (S2 clay from Almeria, Spain). The clay was subjected to a simultaneous central heating and a progressive water inflow through the botton plate. Temperature at various locations within the sample and the boundary radial stress were monitored throughout the test. Water content distribution was also measured at the end of the experiment. Predictions for this benchmark required the solution of field equations for flow, temperature distribution and mechanical analysis. Model parameters were derived from the extensive set of available experiments on this clay. Comparison between model predictions and measurements revealed the significance of water transport in vapour phase, the difficulties to predict boundary stresses and the general good agreement between measured and calculated temperatures. The report provides a detailed accojnt of the

  1. Catsius Clay Project. Calculation and Testing of Behaviour of Unsaturated Clay as Barrier in Radioactive Waste Repositories. Stage 2: Validation Exercises at Laboratory scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, E E; Alcoverro, J

    1999-07-01

    Stage 2 of CATSIUS CLAY Project: Validation Exercises at Laboratory Scale includes two Benchmarks, Benchmark 2.1: Oedometer Suction Controlled Tests on Samples of compacted Boom Clay and Benchmark 2.2: Small Scale Weltting-Heating Test on Compacted Bentonite. BM 2.1 had two parts: BM 2.1A (volumetric deformation upon wetting-drying cycles) and BM 2.1 B (swelling pressure test). In BM 2.1A, participants were asked to model the results of a series of five tests on samples of compacted Boom clay. In BM 2.1B, a swelling pressure test in which suction, vertical and horizontal stresses were monitored, was proposed as a blind exercise. Participants were asked to use, without further changes, the models calibrated in BM 2.1A. This exercise provides an evaluation of the capabilities of current mechanical constitutive models for unsaturated clay behaviour. It was found that, even if a calibration exercise on the basis of known experimental data is satisfactory, blind predictions of tests involving different paths may prove difficult. The test set up for BM 2.2 consisted of a stainless stell cell filled with highly expansive compacted bentonite (S2 clay from Almeria, Spain). The clay was subjected to a simultaneous central heating and a progressive water inflow through the botton plate. Temperature at various locations within the sample and the boundary radial stress were monitored throughout the test. Water content distribution was also measured at the end of the experiment. Predictions for this benchmark required the solution of field equations for flow, temperature distribution and mechanical analysis. Model parameters were derived from the extensive set of available experiments on this clay. Comparison between model predictions and measurements revealed the significance of water transport in vapour phase, the difficulties to predict boundary stresses and the general good agreement between measured and calculated temperatures. The report provides a detailed accojnt of the

  2. Diffusion through statically compacted clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, C.L.; Shebl, M.A.A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents experimental work on the effect of compaction on contaminant flow through clay liners. The experimental program included evaluation of soil properties, compaction, permeability and solute diffusion. A permeameter was built of non reactive materials to test samples compacted at different water contents and compactive efforts. The flow of a permeating solute, LiCl, was monitored. Effluent samples were collected for solute concentration measurements. The concentrations were measured by performing atomic adsorption tests. The analyzed results showed different diffusion characteristics when compaction conditions changed. At each compactive effort, permeability decreased as molding water content increased. Consequently, transit time (measured at relative concentration 50%) increased and diffusivity decreased. As compactive effort increased for soils compacted dry of optimum, permeability and diffusion decreased. On the other hand, as compactive effort increased for soils compacted wet of optimum, permeability and diffusivity increased. Tortuosity factor was indirectly measured from the diffusion and retardation rate. Tortuosity factor also decreased as placement water content was increased from dry of optimum to wet of optimum. Then decreases were more pronounced for low compactive effort tests. 27 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  3. 2005 dossier: clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This document makes a status of the researches carried out by the French national agency of radioactive wastes (ANDRA) about the geologic disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes in argilite formations. Content: 1 - Evaluation of the feasibility of a geologic disposal facility for high-level and long-lived radioactive wastes: framework of ANDRA's researches; 2 - design approach for a safe and reversible facility; 3 - containers; 4 - geologic characteristics of the Meuse/Haute-Marne site; 5 - disposal facilities; 6 - reversible exploitation of the disposal facility; 7 - compromise between long-term disposal safety and environment protection; 8 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  4. Behavior of clay exposed to heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heremans, R.; Buyens, M.; Manfroy, P.

    1978-01-01

    In the frame of his R and D programme on geological burial of solidified radioactive waste, the C.E.N./S.C.K. undertook experimental and theoretical work on the behavior of the Boom clay against heat. The work is performed under contract with the Commission of European Communities. In a first phase a series of chemical and physical properties were determined on clay samples taken at various depths during the core boring performed on the C.E.N./S.C.K. site in 1975. In a second phase, a simulated high level waste heat source was developed and tested in view of representative heat transfer experiments into the geological formation. In parallel to the experimental work, computarized theoretical studies were undertaken aiming an evaluation of heat effect of a vitrified high level waste repository on an underground structure in clay

  5. High carotenoids content can enhance resistance of selected Pinctada fucata families to high temperature stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zihao; Zhang, Bo; Liu, Baosuo; Li, Haimei; Fan, Sigang; Yu, Dahui

    2017-02-01

    Carotenoids are a class of natural antioxidants widely found in aquatic, and they have significant effects on the growth, survival, and immunity of these organisms. To investigate the mechanisms of carotenoids in high temperature resistance, we observed the immune response of selected pearl oyster Pinctada fucata (Akoya pearl oyster) families with different carotenoids contents to high temperature stress. The results indicated that the survival rate (SR) of P. fucata decreased significantly with increase in temperature from 26 °C to 34 °C and with the decrease of total carotenoids content (TCC); when the TCC was higher, the SR tended to be higher. TCC and total antioxidant capacity (TAC) decreased significantly at 30 °C with increasing stress time. Correlation analysis indicated that TAC was positively and linearly correlated with TCC, and SR was S-type correlated with TCC and TAC. Immune analysis indicated that levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in selected families (with higher TCC) under temperature stress (at 30 °C) were generally significantly lower than in the control group (with lowest TCC) and from 0 to 96 h, the levels of each of these substances varied significantly. Levels of SOD, CAT, and MDA within each family first rose from 0 to 3 h, then decreased to their lowest point after 24 h, and then rose again to their highest levels at 96 h. When TCC was higher, the levels of SOD, CAT, and MDA tended to be lower. These findings indicated that carotenoids play an important role in improving survival rates of P. fucata under high temperature stress by enhancing animals' antioxidant system, and could serve as an index for breeding stress-resistant lines in selective breeding practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Rapid recovery of high content phytosterols from corn silk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haiyan; Cao, Xiaowan; Liu, Yong; Shang, Fude

    2017-10-18

    Phytosterols have important physiological and officinal function. An efficient ultrasonic assisted extraction, purification and crystallization procedure of phytosterols was established from corn silk for the first time. The orthogonal test was applied to optimize the process parameters and a maximum phytosterols recovery as high as 10.5886 mg/g was achieved by ultrasonic treatment for 55 min with liquid-solid ratio of 12:1 at 35 °C, 220 w. The ultrasonic extraction temperature (T, °C) has the most significant effect on extraction yield of phytosterols. An orthogonal crystallization test was performed and the optimal conditions [crystallization temperature of 8 °C, time of 12 h and solid-liquid ratio of 1:1 (g/ml)] afforded maximum phytosterols purity of 92.76 ± 0.43%. An efficient extraction and crystallization procedure was established.

  7. The importance of mobile fission products for long-term safety in the case of disposal of vitrified high-level waste and spent fuel in a clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marivoet, J.; Weetjens, E.

    2009-01-01

    In Belgium, the possibility to dispose of high-level radioactive waste in clay formations is studied since 1976. In the PAGIS report, which was the first performance assessment of the disposal of vitrified high-level waste in a clay formation and which was published in 1988, the most important contributors to the total dose via a water well pathway were 237 Np, 135 Cs and 99 Tc. Since 1988, several elements that strongly influence the calculated doses have evolved:?the inventory of long-lived mobile fission and activation products in vitrified high-level waste has been improved; the half-life of 79 Se has been re-estimated; substantial progress has been made in the determination of migration parameters of the main fission and activation products and actinides. In recent performance assessments, the actinides and 135 Cs do not significantly contribute to the total dose, as they remain confined in the host clay formation during several millions of years due to sorption on clay minerals. Consequently, the total dose resulting from the disposal of vitrified high-level waste or spent fuel is essentially due to releases of mobile fission and activation products. On the basis of recent waste inventory data and parameter values, the most important contributors to the total dose via a water well are: in the case of disposal of spent fuel: 79 Se, 129 I, 126 Sn, 36 Cl, and 99 Tc; in the case of disposal of vitrified HLW: 79 Se, 126 Sn, 36 Cl, 129 I, and 99 Tc. Important remaining uncertainties are the transfer factors of volatile fission and activation products into the vitrified waste during reprocessing and migration parameters of Se. (author)

  8. Sorption of metal ions on clay minerals. 2: Mechanism of Co sorption on hectorite at high and low ionic strength and impact on the sorbent stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlegel, M.L.; Charlet, L.; Manceau, A.

    1999-12-15

    The mechanism of Co uptake from aqueous solution onto hectorite (a magnesian smectite) and its impact on the stability of this clay mineral were investigated as a function of Co concentration (TotCo = 20 to 200 {micro}M, 0.3 M NaNO{sub 3}) and ionic strength (0.3 and 0.01 M NaNO{sub 3}, TotCo = 100 {micro}M) by combining kinetics measurements and Co K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. The morphology of the sorbent phase was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and consists of lath-type particles bounded by large basal planes and layer edges. Time-dependent isotherms for Co uptake at high ionic strength indicated the existence of several sorption mechanisms having distinct equilibration times. The dissolution of hectorite was monitored before and after Co addition. Spectral simulations revealed the occurrence of {approximately} 2 Mg and {approximately} 2 Si neighboring cations at interatomic distances characteristic of edge-sharing linkages between Co and Mg octahedra and corner-sharing linkages between Co octahedra and Si tetrahedra, respectively. This local structure is characteristic of inner sphere mononuclear surface complexes at layer edges of hectorite platelets. The occurrence of these complexes even at low ionic strength apparently conflicts with kinetics results, as exchangeable divalent cations are known to form outer sphere surface complexes. To clarify this issue, the amount of Co adsorbed on exchange sites was calculated from the solute Co concentration, assuming that cation exchange was always at equilibrium. These calculations showed that sorbed Co was transferred within 48 h from exchange sites to edge sorption sites.

  9. Clay characterization of Monte Alegre-RN, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alencar, M.I.; Ferreira, O.F.; Ren, D.G.; Cunha, J.M.R.; Harima, E.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to characterize the clay from the municipality of Monte Alegre in Rio Grande do Norte. Clay (popularly known as tabatinga) is used in brick kilns for producing bricks and tiles. This study also verified the possibility of using this for industrial ceramics and ceramic tiles. The following techniques were used for characterization: chemical and mineralogical analysis which found the composition of this material the presence of quartz and kaolinite, plasticity index where the result was that the clay has plasticity null; solid residue content was 60, 19%, the determination of loss on ignition was 8.70% on checking the color of the burning got creamy clear. (author)

  10. OSMOSE experiment: high minor actinides contents pellets and pins fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jankowiak, A.; Leorier, C.; Desmouliere, F.; Donnet, L. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA/DEN/VRH/DTEC/SDTC/LEMA, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze cedex (France); Antony, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA/DEN/CAD/DER/SPEX/LPE, 13108 St Paul Lez Durance cedex (France); Bernard, D. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, CEA/DEN/ CAD/DER /SPRC/LEPh, 13108 St Paul Lez Durance cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    The OSMOSE program aims to provide accurate experimental data on integral neutron cross-sections of isotopes (i.e.: Th{sup 232}, U{sup 233}, U{sup 234}, U{sup 235}, U{sup 236}, U{sup 238}, Np{sup 237}, Pu{sup 238}, Pu{sup 239}, Pu{sup 240}, Pu{sup 241}, Pu{sup 242}, Am{sup 241}, Am{sup 243}, Cm{sup 244} and Cm{sup 245}). The study of these nuclides is performed on a large range of neutron spectra corresponding to specific experimental conditions (thermal, epithermal, moderated/fast, and fast spectra). This program will be used to provide guidance to all nuclear data programs in the world. This program has led to an optimized fabrication process for OSMOSE pellets and pins which were fabricated by the LEMA (Actinide based Materials Study Laboratory) in the ATALANTE facility both in glove box and shielded cell. The fabrication process made possible to obtain the required material characteristics including a high density, a good distribution of the isotopes in the uranium oxide matrices. A particular attention was paid to reduce chemical pollution of the samples. The program has been successfully achieved in July 2007 with the fabrication of the last two Cm doped samples. (authors)

  11. A preliminary study on titanium-clay interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wersin, P.; Grolimund, D.; Kumpulainen, S.; Brendle, J.; Snellman, M.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Posiva and SKB are developing a horizontal disposal design alternative, termed KBS-3H. In this design alternative, modules of a Cu-waste canister surrounded by bentonite blocks is placed in a perforated steel cylinder, a so-called supercontainer (SC), before emplacement in the deposition drifts. The current design for the SC is based on carbon steel. But because corrosion will lead to high hydrogen levels and iron-clay interactions, alternative materials are also being considered. A promising alternative are Ti alloys which display high strength and are known to behave as chemically inert materials under variety of conditions. Also for the Ti alloys, both the corrosion rate and interaction behaviour with other components in the drift needs to be known. In particular, it needs to be demonstrated that corrosion-derived Ti has no significant detrimental effects on the bentonite buffer which is one main barrier within the KBS-3H concept. Unfortunately, the benign inert behaviour of Ti makes it difficult to perform meaningful experiments. Hence, it is not surprising that so far, very little research work on this topic has been carried out and experience is very limited. A preliminary batch-type investigation has been launched to shed more light on Ti-clay interaction processes and on the Ti species resulting from these interactions. A series of experiments including purified MX-80 bentonite or synthetic 'Ti-free' montmorillonite were mixed with metallic Ti nano-powder or foil in 0.1 M NaCl solutions at different pH and temperature conditions. After several months, solid and solute samples from the first set of tests were analyzed by wet chemistry and spectroscopic methods. Ti speciation was analyzed with XAS combined with XRF as elemental mapping tool. A further series of tests will be analyzed in the near future. In addition to reacted samples, a number of reference and starting materials (e.g. MX-80, Rokle

  12. Considering clay rock heterogeneity in radionuclide retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grambow, B.; Montavon, G.; Tournassat, C.; Giffaut, E.; Altmann, S.

    2010-01-01

    considering the measured mass fraction of illite, I/S, and kaolinite. Five values were fitted simultaneous in the overall fit: the CECs of the kaolinite, the smectite and illite components as well as the illite fraction in both R0 and R1 I/S. For transport calculations of radionuclides it is important to know which part of the overall porosity belongs to the micropores and which to the interlayers of the smectite layers in the inter-stratified I/S. Making the hypothesis that, at the given degree of compaction, these interlayers are hydrated by two water layers one could calculate the fraction of micropores in total porosity from the measured I/S content and the fitted I/S ratio given for either R0 or R1. For high smectite contents there is about twice as much water in interlayers than in the micropores, while there is much more water in the micropores in case of low smectite contents. The retention and porosity models for Bentonite have been adapted successfully to argillite samples for various drill cores assuming additivity of the various mineralogical contributions, in particular illite and I/S and of the illite to smectite ratio in I/S. The approach leads to a reasonable quantitative representation of the CEC as well as of surface complexation site densities as a function of depth and mineralogical composition. Ratios of micropores to interlayer pore space were obtained as well. The good correlation of calculated and measured retention data for Cs and for Ni gave reasonable justification to apply the model for the prediction of K d variations of Cs all along a drill core. Predicted values vary by about a factor of 10. (authors)

  13. Laboratory study of the Flandres clay swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaddaj, Said

    1992-01-01

    The first chapter contains a survey about the swelling of soils, and about the experimental methods used to characterize this phenomenon. A classification of soils in function of their swelling potential is proposed. The second chapter deals with the properties of Flandres clay. Chemical and mineralogical compositions, mechanical properties and free swell index are given. The third chapter contains a presentation of the study of the swelling potential of Flandres clay using the oedometer. Four methods are described and used (free-swell, different pressures, pre-swell and direct-swell). A numerical simulation of free-swell tests is also given. The fourth chapter includes a presentation of the study of the swelling behaviour of Flandres clay using a triaxial cell. Three methods are used: free-swell, pre-swell and different-pressures. The last chapter contains a parametric study of the swelling behaviour of Flandres clay. The influence of some parameters such as sample thickness, initial water content, vertical load and load history is presented. (author) [fr

  14. A Study of Clay-Epoxy Nanocomposites Consisting of Unmodified Clay and Organo Clay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Edward

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Clay-epoxy nanocomposites were synthesized from DGEBA resin and montmorillonite clay with an in-situ polymerization. One type of untreated clay and two types of organo clay were used to produce the nanocompsoites. The aims of this study were to examine the nanocomposite structure using different tools and to compare the results between the unmodified clay and modified clays as nanofillers. Although diffractogram in reflection mode did not show any apparent peak of both types of materials, the transmitted XRD (X-Ray Difraction graphs, DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimeter analysis and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope images revealed that the modified clay-epoxy and unmodified clay-epoxy provides different results. Interestingly, the micrographs showed that some of the modified clay layers possessed non-exfoliated layers in the modified clay-epoxy nanocomposites. Clay aggregates and a hackle pattern were found from E-SEM images for both types of nanocomposite materials. It is shown that different tools should be used to determine the nanocomposite structure.

  15. Assessment of potential Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, clays when subjected to high rates of heating; Avaliacao da potencialidade de argilas do Rio Grande do Norte quando submetidas a elevadas taxas de aquecimento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filgueira, R L; Pereira, L M; Dutra, R P.S.; Nascimento, R M [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (DEMat/CT/UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia. Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais

    2009-07-01

    In this work we study three clays of the state of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, to evaluate the potential them when subjected to high rates of heating. The samples were formed by pressing and subject to rates of 5 deg C / min, 10 deg C / min and 15 deg C / min, with temperature of 950 deg C. This study determined the technological properties of the samples. The mineralogical composition was identified by X-ray diffraction. The chemical composition was determined by Xray fluorescence. The Atterberg limits, were used to classify the samples on the plasticity. Were also performed: dilatometry, size analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The examination of the processing variables and the intrinsic characteristics of each material indicates that the RX clay showed the best results for the manufacture of blocks and tiles. The techniques used in this study were efficient and the initial objectives were achieved. (author)

  16. Large Strain Analysis of Electro-Osmosis Consolidation for Clays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, J.

    2015-01-01

    Consolidation of soft clay creates a lot of problems in foundation engineering, because of the very low clay permeability and high compressibility. Primary consolidation takes a long time to complete if the material is left consolidating under atmospheric evaporation, and traditional dewatering

  17. Elastic deformation behaviour of Palaeogene clay from Fehmarn Belt area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Awadalkarim, Ahmed; Foged, Niels Nielsen; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2014-01-01

    Palaeogene clay samples were obtained by high quality boring and sampling techniques (Geobore S-system), during the extensive site investigations for building a bridge in the Fehmarn Belt area to link between Rødbyhavn in Denmark and Puttgarden in Germany. The Palaeogene clay is rich in smectite...

  18. Groundwater flow reference model of the Meuse/Haute-Marne region: implications on performance analysis of high and intermediate level and long lived radwaste repository in clay formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benabderrahmane, H.; Plas, F.; Yven, B.; Cornaton, F.; Perrochet, P.; Kerrou, J.; Stucki, J.; Caloz, P.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. An integrated multi-scale hydrogeological conceptual model of the Paris basin and the Meuse/Haute-Marne sector was developed to study the groundwater flow and solute transport behaviour in the multi-layered aquifer system and around the Callovo-Oxfordian clay formation as potential host for the French high and intermediate level and long lived radioactive waste. The Paris basin system (200000 km 2 ) consists of 27 aquiferous and semi-permeable (aquitard) hydrogeological units from Trias to Quaternary affected by 80 regional faults. It produces boundary conditions to the refined aquifer system of the 250 km 2 Meuse/Haute-Marne site, which includes 27 layers from Trias to Portlandian. The Callovo-Oxfordian clay formation is located at a mean depth of 500 m, with a minimum thickness of 130 m and hydraulic conductivity values of the order of 10-14 m/s. The numerical steady-state flow solution is calculated on a finite element mesh of about 3 million 2-D and 3-D linear elements (GEOS-CHYN 2009). At the top surface, the mesh refinement (250 m to 50 m) is locally constrained by the fault lineaments and the river network. At depth, it takes into account the 10 m to 500 m throw of the faults and the vertical flow through semi-permeable units. Triangular elements are used to represent a top surface layer that includes the weathered part of the outcropping formations, and quadrangular elements allow for the representation of the faults planes at depth. The layers are discretized into 6-nodded wedge elements, while 4-nodded tetrahedrons and 5-nodded pyramids are used to handle the pinching and the outcrop of the layers. The flow boundary conditions and source-sink terms are: - Specified hydraulic heads (Dirichlet) along the rivers and elsewhere on the top surface inflow fluxes (Neumann) derived from hydrological balance (with a mean inflow of 240 mm/year). - Specified hydraulic heads (Dirichlet) at the Manche coast side. - No

  19. Evaluation of ultra-high-performance-fiber reinforced concrete binder content using the response surface method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldahdooh, M.A.A.; Muhamad Bunnori, N.; Megat Johari, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We develop a practical method for adjusting the binder content of UHP-FRC. • We adjust the binder content of UHP-FRC mixtures using RSM. • Increasing the cement content does not contribute to enhance strength. • Increasing the content of cement will increase the flow of UHP-FRC mixtures. - Abstract: One of the major disadvantages in ultra-high-performance-fiber reinforced concrete (UHP-FRC) is its high ordinary Portland cement (OPC) content, which directly translates into an increase in OPC production. More OPC production results in increased emission of greenhouse gases, as well increased electrical energy consumption and concrete price. This study is aimed at adjusting the binder content (OPC and silica fume (SF) contents) of UHP-FRC using the response surface method. The present investigation shows that, for a given water/binder and superplasticizer/OPC, the compressive strength is independent of the binder content, whereas the flow depends on the binder content. Increasing the binder content does not enhance the strength compared with the required design strength because the capillary porosity increases with increasing OPC content; however, the workability increases. The final result is the production of a UHP-FRC with an OPC content of 720.49 kg/m 3 , an SF content of 214.25 kg/m 3 , a compressive strength of 181.41 MPa, a direct tensile strength of 12.49 MPa, a bending tensile strength of 30.31 MPa, and a flow of 167 mm

  20. Synthetic clay excels in 90Sr removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarneni, Sridhar; Kodama, Tatsuya; Paulus, William J.; Carlson, C.

    2000-01-01

    Tests with actual ground water from Hanford site, and fundamental studies of 2Na + →Sr 2+ exchange equilibria revealed that a synthetic clay is extremely selective for 90 Sr with a high capacity for uptake. Comparative studies with existing Sr selective ion exchangers clearly revealed that the present synthetic clay exhibited the best performance for 90 Sr removal from actual ground water collected from three different locations at Hanford. This novel Sr ion sieve is expected to be useful for the decontamination of the environment after accidental release and contamination with 90 Sr. (c) 2000 Materials Research Society

  1. Gassmann Modeling of Acoustic Properties of Sand-clay Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, B.; Carcione, J. M.

    The feasibility of modeling elastic properties of a fluid-saturated sand-clay mixture rock is analyzed by assuming that the rock is composed of macroscopic regions of sand and clay. The elastic properties of such a composite rock are computed using two alternative schemes.The first scheme, which we call the composite Gassmann (CG) scheme, uses Gassmann equations to compute elastic moduli of the saturated sand and clay from their respective dry moduli. The effective elastic moduli of the fluid-saturated composite rock are then computed by applying one of the mixing laws commonly used to estimate elastic properties of composite materials.In the second scheme which we call the Berryman-Milton scheme, the elastic moduli of the dry composite rock matrix are computed from the moduli of dry sand and clay matrices using the same composite mixing law used in the first scheme. Next, the saturated composite rock moduli are computed using the equations of Brown and Korringa, which, together with the expressions for the coefficients derived by Berryman and Milton, provide an extension of Gassmann equations to rocks with a heterogeneous solid matrix.For both schemes, the moduli of the dry homogeneous sand and clay matrices are assumed to obey the Krief's velocity-porosity relationship. As a mixing law we use the self-consistent coherent potential approximation proposed by Berryman.The calculated dependence of compressional and shear velocities on porosity and clay content for a given set of parameters using the two schemes depends on the distribution of total porosity between the sand and clay regions. If the distribution of total porosity between sand and clay is relatively uniform, the predictions of the two schemes in the porosity range up to 0.3 are very similar to each other. For higher porosities and medium-to-large clay content the elastic moduli predicted by CG scheme are significantly higher than those predicted by the BM scheme.This difference is explained by the fact

  2. Surface modification of montmorillonite on surface Acid-base characteristics of clay and thermal stability of epoxy/clay nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Jin; Seo, Dong-Il; Lee, Jae-Rock

    2002-07-01

    In this work, the effect of surface treatments on smectitic clay was investigated in surface energetics and thermal behaviors of epoxy/clay nanocomposites. The pH values, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were used to analyze the effect of cation exchange on clay surface and the exfoliation phenomenon of clay interlayer. The surface energetics of clay and thermal properties of epoxy/clay nanocomposites were investigated in contact angles and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. From the experimental results, the surface modification of clay by dodecylammonium chloride led to the increases in both distance between silicate layers of about 8 A and surface acid values, as well as in the electron acceptor component (gamma(+)(s)) of surface free energy, resulting in improved interfacial adhesion between basic (or electron donor) epoxy resins and acidic (electron acceptor) clay interlayers. Also, the thermal stability of nanocomposites was highly superior to pure epoxy resin due to the presence of the well-dispersed clay nanolayer, which has a barrier property in a composite system.

  3. Iron-clay interactions under a thermal gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jodin-Caumon, Marie-Camille; Mosser-Ruck, Regine; Randi, Aurelien; Cathelineau, Michel; Michau, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Repository in deep geological formations is considered as a possible solution for long-term high-level nuclear waste (HLW) management. The concept generally consists in a multiple barriers system including steel canister in a clay host rock. Heat and radiation emissions by HLW, corrosion of the canister and desaturation/re-saturation of the clay may affect the properties of the geological formation. In this context, the possible mineralogical evolutions of clays in contact with metal iron were studied in various conditions simulating those of HLW repository. Most of these studies were carried out at a constant temperature whereas the system will undergo a thermal gradient in time (progressive decrease of the temperature of the HLW with the decrease of its activity) and space (from the waste to the host rock). A thermal gradient may imply mass transport phenomena by convection and diffusion processes as a function of temperature, gradient intensity and the nature of the chemical elements. Here we show the effect of a thermal gradient in space on the interaction between the argillite from the ANDRA underground laboratory at Bure (Meuse/Haute-Marne) and metal iron. Tube-in-tube experiments were carried out. Argillite was put in two previously drilled platinum capsules (Diam. holes: 200 μm). Metal iron (powder and plate) was added in one of the Pt capsule. The Pt capsules were then loaded at the two ends of a gold tube. A fluid (H 2 O or a saline solution) was added and the gold tube was sealed and regularly pinched to form 5 precipitation niches. The iron/argillite mass ratio ranged between 0.3 and 0.5 and the fluid/argillite mass ratio was around 10. A thermal gradient 80 deg. C-150 deg. C or 150 deg. C-300 deg. C was applied to the tube during 3 and 6 months. The end of the gold tube with the Pt capsule containing iron was placed at the hot point (max. temperature 150 deg. C or 300 deg. C) or at the cold point (min

  4. Retention and loss of water extractable carbon in soils: effect of clay properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung-Ta; Marschner, Petra

    2014-02-01

    Clay sorption is important for organic carbon (C) sequestration in soils, but little is known about the effect of different clay properties on organic C sorption and release. To investigate the effect of clay content and properties on sorption, desorption and loss of water extractable organic C (WEOC), two experiments were conducted. In experiment 1, a loamy sand alone (native) or mixed with clay isolated from a surface or subsoil (78 and 96% clay) resulting in 90, 158 and 175 g clay kg(-1) soil. These soil treatments were leached with different WEOC concentrations, and then CO2 release was measured for 28 days followed by leaching with reverse osmosis water at the end of experiment. The second experiment was conducted to determine WEOC sorption and desorption of clays isolated from the loamy sand (native), surface soil and subsoil. Addition of clays isolated from surface and subsoil to sandy loam increased WEOC sorption and reduced C leaching and cumulative respiration in percentage of total organic C and WEOC added when expressed per g soil and per g clay. Compared to clays isolated from the surface and subsoil, the native clay had higher concentrations of illite and exchangeable Ca(2+), total organic C and a higher CEC but a lower extractable Fe/Al concentration. This indicates that compared to the clay isolated from the surface and the subsoil, the native clay had fewer potential WEOC binding sites because it had lower Fe/Al content thus lower number of binding sites and the existing binding sites are already occupied native organic matter. The results of this study suggest that in the soils used here, the impact of clay on WEOC sorption and loss is dependent on its indigenous organic carbon and Fe and/or Al concentrations whereas clay mineralogy, CEC, exchangeable Ca(2+) and surface area are less important. © 2013.

  5. Advances in Predictive Toxicology for Discovery Safety through High Content Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Mikael; Hornberg, Jorrit J

    2016-12-19

    High content screening enables parallel acquisition of multiple molecular and cellular readouts. In particular the predictive toxicology field has progressed from the advances in high content screening, as more refined end points that report on cellular health can be studied in combination, at the single cell level, and in relatively high throughput. Here, we discuss how high content screening has become an essential tool for Discovery Safety, the discipline that integrates safety and toxicology in the drug discovery process to identify and mitigate safety concerns with the aim to design drug candidates with a superior safety profile. In addition to customized mechanistic assays to evaluate target safety, routine screening assays can be applied to identify risk factors for frequently occurring organ toxicities. We discuss the current state of high content screening assays for hepatotoxicity, cardiotoxicity, neurotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and genotoxicity, including recent developments and current advances.

  6. Preparation of PEO/Clay Nanocomposites Using Organoclay Produced via Micellar Adsorption of CTAB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürses, Ahmet; Ejder-Korucu, Mehtap; Doğar, Çetin

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was the preparation of polyethylene oxide (PEO)/clay nanocomposites using organoclay produced via micellar adsorption of cethyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and their characterisation by X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra, and the investigation of certain mechanical properties of the composites. The results show that the basal distance between the layers increased with the increasing CTAB/clay ratio as parallel with the zeta potential values of particles. By considering the aggregation number of CTAB micelles and interlayer distances of organo-clay, it could be suggested that the predominant micelle geometry at lower CTAB/clay ratios is an ellipsoidal oblate, whereas, at higher CTAB/clay ratios, sphere-ellipsoid transition occurs. The increasing tendency of the exfoliation degree with an increase in clay content may be attributed to easier diffusion of PEO chains to interlayer regions. FT-IR spectra show that the intensity of Si-O stretching vibrations of the organoclays (1050 cm−1) increased, especially in the ratios of 1.0 g/g clay and 1.5 g/g clay with the increasing CTAB content. It was observed that the mechanical properties of the composites are dependent on both the CTAB/clay ratios and clay content of the composites. PMID:23365515

  7. Effect of by-product steel slag on the engineering properties of clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal I. Shalabi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Clay soils, mainly if they contain swelling minerals such as smectite or illite, may cause severe damage to structures, especially when these soils are subjected to wetting and drying conditions. High expansion and reduction in shear strength and foundation bearing capacity will take place due to the increase in water content of these soils. The engineering properties of these kinds of soils can be improved by using additives and chemical stabilizers. In this work, by-product steel slag was used to improve the engineering properties of clay soils. Lab and field experimental programs were developed to investigate the effect of adding different percentages of steel slag on plasticity, swelling, compressibility, shear strength, compaction, and California bearing ratio (CBR of the treated materials. The results of tests on the clay soil showed that as steel slag content increased, the soil dry density, plasticity, swelling potential, and cohesion intercept decreased and the angle of internal friction increased. For the CBR, the results of the tests showed an increase in the CBR value with the increase in slag content.

  8. Clay mineralogy and magnetic susceptibility of Oxisols in geomorphic surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Arantes Camargo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies analyzing the variability of clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility provide data for the delineation of site-specific management areas since many of their attributes are important to agronomy and the environment. This study aimed to evaluate the spatial variability of clay minerals, magnetic susceptibility, adsorbed phosphorus and physical attributes in Oxisols of sandstones in different geomorphic surfaces. For that purpose, soil samples were collected every 25 m along a transect located within the area where the geomorphic surfaces were identified and mapped. The transect occupied the central portion of 500 ha, where it was also sampled for density purposes with one sample per six hectares. Soil samples were collected at a depth of 0.0-0.2 m. The results of the physical, chemical, mineralogical and magnetic susceptibility analyses were subjected to statistical and geostatistical analyses. The nature of the clay minerals and magnetic susceptibility was dependent on the variation of the soil parent material. High values of magnetic susceptibility were associated with the presence of maghemite and magnetite of coarse size. The spatial variability of crystallinity and the content of Fe oxides, as well as magnetic susceptibility, were dependent on the age of the geomorphic surfaces. The youngest surface had greater spatial variability of these attributes. The iron (goethite and hematite and aluminum (gibbsite oxides in the youngest geomorphic surface influenced the low values of soil density and high values of total pore volume, micropores and P adsorption. The characterization of the spatial variability of Fe oxides and susceptibility allowed for the delineation of homogeneous areas.

  9. Rheological behavior of nanocomposite HMSPP (High Melt Strength Polypropylene) obtained by the addition of clay 'chocolate' organophilizated as reinforcement agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fermino, D.M.; Valenzuela-Diaz, F.R.; Parra, D.F.; Lugao, A.B.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to obtain a nanocomposite with a bentonite treated in laboratory in comparison to a commercial bentonite and the study of their rheological behavior. The treatment of the sodium clay organophilic in laboratory it was well succeeded as the result of FTIR testing and there was formation of nanocomposites with intercalated clays as XRD assay. In the rheology assay there was increase in a complex viscosity in all of nanocomposite samples of HMSPP. There were small changes in G' module and G″ for nanocomposites. Only with these rheology results we can not say it is interleaved microcomposite or nanocomposite because the criteria of both were not fully met

  10. CLAY SOIL STABILISATION USING POWDERED GLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. OLUFOWOBI

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper assesses the stabilizing effect of powdered glass on clay soil. Broken waste glass was collected and ground into powder form suitable for addition to the clay soil in varying proportions namely 1%, 2%, 5%, 10% and 15% along with 15% cement (base by weight of the soil sample throughout. Consequently, the moisture content, specific gravity, particle size distribution and Atterberg limits tests were carried out to classify the soil using the ASSHTO classification system. Based on the results, the soil sample obtained corresponded to Group A-6 soils identified as ‘fair to poor’ soil type in terms of use as drainage and subgrade material. This justified stabilisation of the soil. Thereafter, compaction, California bearing ratio (CBR and direct shear tests were carried out on the soil with and without the addition of the powdered glass. The results showed improvement in the maximum dry density values on addition of the powdered glass and with corresponding gradual increase up to 5% glass powder content after which it started to decrease at 10% and 15% powdered glass content. The highest CBR values of 14.90% and 112.91% were obtained at 5% glass powder content and 5mm penetration for both the unsoaked and soaked treated samples respectively. The maximum cohesion and angle of internal friction values of 17.0 and 15.0 respectively were obtained at 10% glass powder content.

  11. Synthesis of nano-sized silicon from natural halloysite clay and its high performance as anode for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiangyang; Wu, Lili; Yang, Juan; Tang, Jingjing; Xi, Lihua; Wang, Biao

    2016-08-01

    Recently, nanostructured Si has been intensively studied as a promising anode candidate for lithium ion batteries due to its ultrahigh capacity. However, the downsizing of Si to nanoscale dimension is often impeded by complicated and expensive methods. In this work, natural halloysite clay was utilized for the production of Si nanoparticles through selective acid etching and modified magnesiothermic reduction processes. The physical and chemical changes of these samples during the various processes have been analyzed. The as-prepared Hsbnd Si from halloysite clay is composed of many interconnected Si nanoparticles with an average diameter of 20-50 nm. Owing to the small size and porous nature, the Hsbnd Si nanoparticles exhibit a satisfactory performance as an anode for lithium ion batteries. Without further modification, a stable capacity over 2200 mAh g-1 at a rate of 0.2 C after 100 cycles and a reversible capacity above 800 mAh g-1 at a rate of 1 C after 1000 cycles can be obtained. As a result, this synthetic route is cost-effective and can be scaled up for mass production of Si nanoparticles, which may facilitate valuable utilization of halloysite clay and further commercial application of Si-based anode materials.

  12. The influence of compound admixtures on the properties of high-content slag cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongxu, L.; Xuequan, W.; Jinlin, S.; Yujiang, W.

    2000-01-01

    Based on the activation theory of alkali and sulfate, the influence of compound admixtures on the properties of high-content slag cement was studied by testing the strength, pore structure, hydrates, and microstructure, Test results show that compound admixtures can obviously improve the properties of high-content slag cement. The emphasis of the present research is two-fold: substituting gypsum with anhydrite and calcining gypsum. These both can improve early and later performance.

  13. The technology of uranium extraction from the brine with high chlorine-ion content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khakimov, N.; Nazarov, Kh.M.; Mirsaidov, I.U.; Negmatov, Sh.I.; Barotov, B.B.

    2010-01-01

    Present article is devoted to technology of uranium extraction from the brine with high chlorine-ion content. The research results on uranium extraction from the brine of Sasik-Kul Lake by means of sorption method were considered. The chemical composition of salt was determined. The process of uranium sorption was described and analyzed. The technology of uranium extraction from the brine with high chlorine-ion content was proposed.

  14. Fe(0)-clays interactions at 90°C under anoxic conditions: a comparative study between clay fraction of Callovo-Oxfordian and other purified clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivard, C.; Pelletier, M.; Villieras, F.; Barres, O.; Galmiche, M.; Ghanbaja, J.; Kohler, A.; Michau, N.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In the context of the geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste it is of prime importance to understand the interactions between the saturated clay formation and steel containers. This can be achieved through an in-depth analysis of iron-clay interactions. Previous studies on the subject investigated the influence of solid/liquid ratio, iron/clay ratio, temperature and reaction time. The aim of the present study is to explain Callovo-Oxfordian-Fe(0) interactions by determining the role of each mineral phases present in the Callovo-Oxfordian (clay minerals, quartz, carbonates and pyrite) on the mechanisms of interaction between metal iron and clay particles. In that context, it is especially important to understand in detail the influence of clay nature and to obtain some insight about the relationships between interaction mechanisms at the molecular scale and crystallographic properties (particle size, TO or TOT layers, amount of edge faces...). The influence of the combination of different clays and the addition of other minerals must also be studied. In a first step, the Callovo-Oxfordian argillite from the Andra's underground research laboratory was purified to extract the clay fraction (illite, illite-smectite, kaolinite and chlorite). Batch experiments were carried out in anoxic conditions at 90 deg. C in the presence of background electrolyte (NaCl 0.02 M.L -1 , CaCl 2 0.04 M.L -1 ) for durations of one, three or nine months in the presence of metallic iron powder. Experiments without iron were used as control. The iron/clay ratio was fixed at 1/3 with a solid/liquid ratio of 1/20. The above mentioned experiments were also carried out in parallel on other purified clays: two smectites (Georgia bentonite and SWy2 from the Clay Minerals Society), one illite (illite du Puy) and one kaolinite (KGa2, from the Clay Minerals society). At the end of the experiments, solid and liquid phases were

  15. Photometric determination of niobium in materials with high content of phosphorus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navrotskaya, V.A.; Aleksandrova, E.I.; Kletenik, Yu.B.

    1982-01-01

    To determine niobium in various samples of niobium concentrates with a high phosphorus content, a photometric method with pyridylazoresorcinol (PAR) is used. It is shown that all the elements indicated (Fe, Si, Ti, Al, Ca) including phosphorus do not interfere with the niobium determination with the use of PAR. The method has been tried on artificial samples with different content of the base components. Variation coefficient constitutes 4.5%. No systematic errors, due to a high content of any concomitant element, are detected. The determination threshold is 10 - 2 %

  16. Effects of biochar on hydraulic conductivity of compacted kaolin clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, James Tsz Fung; Chen, Zhongkui; Wong, Annie Yan Yan; Ng, Charles Wang Wai; Wong, Ming Hung

    2018-03-01

    Compacted clay is widely used as capillary barriers in landfill final cover system. Recently, biochar amended clay (BAC) has been proposed as a sustainable alternative cover material. However, the effects of biochar on saturated hydraulic conductivity (k sat ) of clay with high degree of compaction is not yet understood. The present study aims to investigate the effects of biochar on k sat of compacted kaolin clay. Soil specimens were prepared by amending kaolin clay with biochar derived from peanut-shell at 0, 5 and 20% (w/w). The k sat of soil specimens was measured using a flexible water permeameter. The effects of biochar on the microstructure of the compacted clay was also investigated using MIP. Adding 5% and 20% of biochar increased the k sat of compacted kaolin clay from 1.2 × 10 -9 to 2.1 × 10 -9 and 1.3 × 10 -8 ms -1 , respectively. The increase in k sat of clay was due to the shift in pore size distribution of compacted biochar-amended clay (BAC). MIP results revealed that adding 20% of biochar shifted the dominant pore diameter of clay from 0.01-0.1 μm (meso- and macropores) to 0.1-4 μm (macropores). Results reported in this communication revealed that biochar application increased the k sat of compacted clay, and the increment was positively correlated to the biochar percentage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Clay-Enriched Silk Biomaterials for Bone Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Llamas, Jabier Gallego; Vaiana, Christopher A.; Kadakia, Madhavi P.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    The formation of silk protein/clay composite biomaterials for bone tissue formation is described. Silk fibroin serves as an organic scaffolding material offering mechanical stability suitable for bone specific uses. Clay montmorillonite (Cloisite ® Na+) and sodium silicate are sources of osteoinductive silica-rich inorganic species, analogous to bioactive bioglass-like bone repair biomaterial systems. Different clay particle-silk composite biomaterial films were compared to silk films doped with sodium silicate as controls for support of human bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) in osteogenic culture. The cells adhered and proliferated on the silk/clay composites over two weeks. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed increased transcript levels for alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone sialoprotein (BSP), and collagen type 1 (Col I) osteogenic markers in the cells cultured on the silk/clay films in comparison to the controls. Early evidence for bone formation based on collagen deposition at the cell-biomaterial interface was also found, with more collagen observed for the silk films with higher contents of clay particles. The data suggest that the silk/clay composite systems may be useful for further study toward bone regenerative needs. PMID:21549864

  18. Research of Deformation of Clay Soil Mixtures Mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Romas Girkontas; Tadas Tamošiūnas; Andrius Savickas

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this article is to determine clay soils and clay soils mixtures deformations during drying. Experiments consisted from: a) clay and clay mixtures bridges (height ~ 0,30 m, span ~ 1,00 m); b) tiles of clay and clay, sand and straw (height, length, wide); c) cylinders of clay; clay and straw; clay, straw and sand (diameter; height). According to the findings recommendations for clay and clay mixtures drying technology application were presented. During the experiment clay bridge bear...

  19. The effect of freeze-thaw cycles on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waite, D.; Anderson, L.; Caliendo, J.; McFarland, M.

    1994-01-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the detrimental effects of freeze-thaw on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted clay. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect that molding water content has on the hydraulic conductivity of a compacted clay soil that is subjected to freeze-thaw cycles, and to determine the relationship between the number of freeze-thaw cycles and the hydraulic conductivity of the compacted clay soil. Clay soils compacted and frozen wet of optimum experienced an increase in hydraulic conductivity of approximately 140 fold. The hydraulic conductivity of clay compacted dry of optimum increased ten fold. These results are consistent with recent research which suggests that clay compacted wet of optimum experiences large increases in hydraulic conductivity while the hydraulic conductivity of clay compacted dry of optimum increases to a lesser extent. 12 refs., 9 figs

  20. Ventilation test at Mont Terri. Geoelectric monitoring of the opalinus clay desaturation. Phase 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieczorek, Klaus; Zhang, Chun-Liang; Rothfuchs, Tilmann

    2008-04-01

    Between December 2001 and May 2004, a ventilation experiment (VE) was performed in the Mont Terri Underground Research Laboratory (URL) and co-financed by the Commission of the European Communities. The objective was to investigate the desaturation of consolidated clay formations in consequence of the ventilation of underground openings of a repository in such a formation. The results of the geoelectric measurements performed in the second phase of the Mont Terri ventilation test can be summarized as follows: Geoelectric tomography has been found suitable for monitoring ventilation-induced saturation changes in the Opalinus clay. During ventilation with dry air a desaturation down to below 50% could be detected in both desaturation cycles. The desaturated zone extends less than 0.5 m into the rock around the microtunnel. During the second resaturation phase, ventilation with humid air led to quick resaturation at the tunnel surface, while resaturation of the rock mass took months. The still ongoing third resaturation phase seems to imply that resaturation of the rock mass may take years with no air circulation in the tunnel. The laboratory investigations on the Opalinus clay included the determination of water retention capacity, swelling pressure, free swelling/shrinking strains induced by moisture changes, and response of normal and large hollow clay samples to the ventilation of the central boreholes at different air humidity values. The Opalinus clay has a high water absorption capacity. The amount of water uptake in unconstraint conditions is much higher than the water content in the naturally confined state, indicating that the pore water in the natural clay rock is predominantly bound on clay minerals. The swelling pressure induced by wetting with vapour is very close to the major lithostatic stress at the sampling location. Water uptake from vapour causes a large free expansion of up to 12% over 8 months and even a breakdown along bedding planes. Release of

  1. Toxicological evaluation of clay minerals and derived nanocomposites: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisanaba, Sara; Pichardo, Silvia; Puerto, María; Gutiérrez-Praena, Daniel; Cameán, Ana M; Jos, Angeles

    2015-04-01

    Clays and clay minerals are widely used in many facets of our society. This review addresses the main clays of each phyllosilicate groups, namely, kaolinite, montmorillonite (Mt) and sepiolite, placing special emphasis on Mt and kaolinite, which are the clays that are more frequently used in food packaging, one of the applications that are currently exhibiting higher development. The improvements in the composite materials obtained from clays and polymeric matrices are remarkable and well known, but the potential toxicological effects of unmodified or modified clay minerals and derived nanocomposites are currently being investigated with increased interest. In this sense, this work focused on a review of the published reports related to the analysis of the toxicological profile of commercial and novel modified clays and derived nanocomposites. An exhaustive review of the main in vitro and in vivo toxicological studies, antimicrobial activity assessments, and the human and environmental impacts of clays and derived nanocomposites was performed. From the analysis of the scientific literature different conclusions can be derived. Thus, in vitro studies suggest that clays in general induce cytotoxicity (with dependence on the clay, concentration, experimental system, etc.) with different underlying mechanisms such as necrosis/apoptosis, oxidative stress or genotoxicity. However, most of in vivo experiments performed in rodents showed no clear evidences of systemic toxicity even at doses of 5000mg/kg. Regarding to humans, pulmonary exposure is the most frequent, and although clays are usually mixed with other minerals, they have been reported to induce pneumoconiosis per se. Oral exposure is also common both intentionally and unintentionally. Although they do not show a high toxicity through this pathway, toxic effects could be induced due to the increased or reduced exposure to mineral elements. Finally, there are few studies about the effects of clay minerals on

  2. Clay mineralogy and its palaeoclimatic significance in the Luochuan loess-palaeosols over ˜1.3 Ma, Shaanxi, northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Changdok; Hong, Hanlie; Cheng, Feng; Fang, Qian; Wang, Chaowen; Zhao, Lulu; Churchman, Gordon Jock

    2018-03-01

    To understand climate changes recorded in the Luochuan loess-palaeosols, Shaanxi province, northwestern China, clay mineralogy was studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods. XRD results show that clay mineral compositions in the Luochuan loess-palaeosols are dominantly illite, with minor chlorite, kaolinite, smectite, and illite-smectite mixed-layer clays (I/S). Illite is the most abundant species in the sediments, with a content of 61%-83%. The content of chlorite ranges from 5%-22%, and the content of kaolinite ranges from 5%-19%. Smectite (or I/S) occurs discontinuously along the loess profile, with a content of 0-8%. The Kübler index of illite (IC) ranges from 0.255°-0.491°, and the illite chemical index (ICI) ranges from 0.294-0.394. The CIA values of the loesspalaeosols are 61.9-69.02, and the R3+/(R3+ + R2+ + M+) values are 0.508-0.589. HRTEM observations show that transformation of illite to illite-smectite has occurred in both the loess and palaeosol, suggesting that the Luochuan loess-palaeosols have experienced a certain degree of chemical weathering. The Luochuan loess-palaeosols have the same clay mineral assemblage along the profile. However, the relative contents of clay mineral species, CIA, ICI, and IC values fluctuate frequently along the profile, and all these parameters display a similar trend. Moreover, climate changes suggested by the clay index are consistent with variations in the deep-sea δ18O records and the magnetic susceptibility value, and thus, climate changes in the Luochuan region have been controlled by global climate change.

  3. Creep in buffer clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pusch, R.; Adey, R.

    1999-12-01

    The study involved characterization of the microstructural arrangement and molecular forcefields in the buffer clay for getting a basis for selecting suitable creep models. It is concluded that the number of particles and wide range of the particle bond spectrum require that stochastical mechanics and thermodynamics will be considered and they are basic to the creep model proposed for predicting creep settlement of the canisters. The influence of the stress level on creep strain of MX-80 clay is not well known but for the buffer creep is approximately proportional to stress. Theoretical considerations suggest a moderate impact for temperatures up to 90 deg C and this is supported by model experiments. It is believed that the assumption of strain being proportional to temperature is conservative. The general performance of the stochastic model can be illustrated in principle by use of visco-elastic rheological models implying a time-related increase in viscosity. The shear-induced creep settlement under constant volume conditions calculated by using the proposed creep model is on the order of 1 mm in ten thousand years and up to a couple of millimeters in one million years. It is much smaller than the consolidation settlement, which is believed to be on the order of 10 mm. The general conclusion is that creep settlement of the canisters is very small and of no significance to the integrity of the buffer itself or of the canisters

  4. Euroclay 95. Clays and clay materials sciences. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsen, A.; Grobet, P.; Keung, M.; Leeman, H.; Schoonheydt, R.; Toufar, H.

    1995-01-01

    The document contains the abstracts of the invited lecturers (18) and posters (247) presented at EUROCLAY '95. Clays and clay materials sciences. 13 items (4 from the invited lecturers and 12 from posters) have been considered within the INIS Subject Scope and indexed separately

  5. Euroclay 95. Clays and clay materials sciences. Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsen, A; Grobet, P; Keung, M; Leeman, H; Schoonheydt, R; Toufar, H [eds.

    1995-08-20

    The document contains the abstracts of the invited lecturers (18) and posters (247) presented at EUROCLAY `95. Clays and clay materials sciences. 13 items (4 from the invited lecturers and 12 from posters) have been considered within the INIS Subject Scope and indexed separately.

  6. Assessment of clay stiffness and strength parameters using index properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed M. Ahmed

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available A new approach is developed to determine the shear wave velocity in saturated soft to firm clays using measurements of the liquid limit, plastic limit, and natural water content with depth. The shear wave velocity is assessed using the site-specific variation of the natural water content with the effective mean stress. Subsequently, an iterative process is envisaged to obtain the clay stiffness and strength parameters. The at-rest earth pressure coefficient, as well as bearing capacity factor and rigidity index related to the cone penetration test, is also acquired from the analyses. Comparisons are presented between the measured clay parameters and the results of corresponding analyses in five different case studies. It is demonstrated that the presented approach can provide acceptable estimates of saturated clay stiffness and strength parameters. One of the main privileges of the presented methodology is the site-specific procedure developed based on the relationships between clay strength and stiffness parameters, rather than adopting direct correlations. Despite of the utilized iterative processes, the presented approach can be easily implemented using a simple spreadsheet, benefiting both geotechnical researchers and practitioners. Keywords: Soft to firm clays, Atterberg limits, Shear wave velocity, Small-strain shear modulus, Constrained modulus, Undrained shear strength, Effective friction angle, Cone penetration test

  7. High oleic acid content materials of rapeseed (Brassica napus) produced by radiation breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan Chunyun; Liu Chunlin; Chen Sheyuan

    2006-01-01

    High oleic acid content rapeseed breeding has great significance, because high oleic acid oil is a healthy and nutritious oil, which is of a long shelflife and also propitious to producing biodiesel fuel. The high oleic acid content breeding materials of rapeseed (B. napus) were obtained by 80-100 kR ~(60)Co gamma ray ionizing radiation treatment of dry seeds and continuous selection. The results showed that the oleic acid contents of M (2), M (3) and M (4) progenies increased by different grades. Moreover, the oleic acid content of M (5) progeny increased greatly. The oleic acid contents were higher than 70% in the most of the plants and the highest one reached 93.5 %. The base G was transited by base A in fad (2) gene at the 270 site of high oleic acid mutation (M(6) 04-855). The location is at the beta folding area and conservative area of this protein. Base mutation at sites 1 044 and 1 062 also led to produce a stop condon. These changes in structure led to loss the function of fad (2). According to molecular mechanism of gene mutation, no matter what transvertion or transition happens, several replications are needed. That is to say several generations are needed. That was also the reason why high oleic acid content mutation occurred in later generations

  8. Experimental Study on Unconfined Compressive Strength of Basalt Fiber Reinforced Clay Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Lei; Hu, Guohui; Xu, Nan; Fu, Junyi; Xiang, Chao; Yang, Chen

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the mechanism and effect of basalt fiber reinforced clay soil, a series of unconfined compressive strength tests conducted on clay soil reinforced with basalt fiber have been performed under the condition of optimum water content and maximum dry density. Both the content and length of basalt fiber are considered in this paper. When the effect of content is studied, the 12 mm long fibers are dispersed into clay soil at different contents of 0.05%, 0.1%, 0.15%, 0.20%, 0.25%, 0...

  9. Clays in natural and engineered barriers for radioactive waste confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    Andra organised an International Symposium on the use of Natural and Engineered Clay-based Barriers for the Containment of Radioactive Waste hold at the Congress Centre of Tours, France, in March 2005. The symposium provided an opportunity to take stock of the potential properties of the clay-based materials present in engineered or natural barriers in order to meet the containment specifications of a deep geological repository for radioactive waste. It was intended for specialists working in the various disciplines involved with clays and clay based minerals, as well as scientists from agencies and organisations dealing with investigations on the disposal of high-level and long-lived radioactive waste. The themes of the Symposium included geology, geochemistry, transfers of materials, alteration processes, geomechanics, as well as the recent developments regarding the characterisation of clays, as well as experiments in surface and underground laboratories. The symposium consisted of plenary sessions, parallel specialized sessions and poster sessions. (author)

  10. Structural characterization of clays commercially used in red ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brito, E.M.; Moura, J.K.L.; Souza, R.B.; Brandim, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    The use of clays hills being an alternative to clay floodplain, due to environmental protection laws. The research project aims at the morphological and chemical characterization of hills clays used industrially for the production of ceramic tiles and blocks. Therefore, two types of methods were known commercially in the region of Teresina-PI through diffraction of X-rays (X-DR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry X-ray (EDS). It can be observed that the samples have a high percentage of quartz, hematite still having in its constitution aluminum oxide, zirconium oxide and titanium oxide. The results show that the clays are clays and montmorillonites may be used for the production of ceramic tiles and blocks, but as the proportion of using the same will be focusing the next job. (author)

  11. Utilization of crushed clay brick in cellular concrete production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A. Aliabdo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research program is to study the effect of using crushed clay brick as an alternative aggregate in aerated concrete. Two series of mixtures were designed to investigate the physico-mechanical properties and micro-structural analysis of autoclave aerated concrete and foamed concrete, respectively. In each series, natural sand was replaced with crushed clay brick aggregate. In both series results showed a significant reduction in unit weight, thermal conductivity and sound attenuation coefficient while porosity has increased. Improvement on compressive strength of autoclave aerated concrete was observed at a percentage of 25% and 50% replacement, while in foamed concrete compressive strength gradually decreased by increasing crushed clay brick aggregate content. A comparatively uniform distribution of pore in case of foamed concrete with natural sand was observed by scanning electron microscope, while the pores were connected mostly and irregularly for mixes containing a percentage higher than 25% clay brick aggregate.

  12. Control of clay minerals effect in flotation. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taner Hasan Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The increased exposure to low grade ores highlights the importance of understanding phyllosilicate gangue mineralogy which consists of common gangue minerals. To improve the flotation performance and ore quality the negative effect of the clay minerals on flotation should be identified. The presence of clay minerals leads to problems, such as changing the froth stability, which are related to swelling behaviour, increase in pulp viscosity, overconsumption of reagents, slime coating and mechanical entrainment. The clay content in the ore is changing from time to time and it is necessary to provide quick solutions to the issues caused by the new ore composition. The objective of this paper is to give an overview how to control the colloidal properties of clay minerals on flotation.

  13. Effect of PVA fiber content on creep property of fiber reinforced high-strength concrete columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zongnan; Wang, Tao; Wang, Weilun

    2018-04-01

    The effect of PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) fiber content on the creep property of fiber reinforced high-strength concrete columns was investigated. The correction factor of PVA fiber content was proposed and the creep prediction model of ACI209 was modified. Controlling the concrete strength as C80, changing the content of PVA fiber (volume fraction 0%, 0.25%, 0.5%, 1% respectively), the creep experiment of PVA fiber reinforced concrete columns was carried out, the creep coefficient of each specimen was calculated to characterize the creep property. The influence of PVA fiber content on the creep property was analyzed based on the creep coefficient and the calculation results of several frequently used creep prediction models. The correction factor of PVA fiber content was proposed to modify the ACI209 creep prediction model.

  14. Productivity of clay tailings from phosphate mining: 3. Grain crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mislevy, P.; Blue, W.G.; Roessler, C.E.; Martin, F.G.

    1991-01-01

    A split-fold field experiment was conducted to study forage and grain yield, forage quality, plant nutrient concentrations, changes in soil nutrients, and 226 Ra contents of four grain crops in various rotations. The crop rotations (1) corn (Zea mays L. Jacques 247)-sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. Cargil 205), (2) sunflower-grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L, Moench Northrup King Savanna 5), (3) soybean (Glycine max L. Merr. Williams 80)-grain sorghum, and (4) grain sorghum-soybean (University of Florida V-1) were grown on a dry phosphatic clay with and without a 50-mm surface layer of quartz-sand tailings. Results show that corn and grain sorghum produced highest forage yields and highest grain yields per harvest, respectively. Soybean harvested for forage (Crop 1) contained the highest crude protein and in vitro organic matter digestibility. Concentrations of P, K, Ca, Mg, and Fe in most of the forages were adequate for the diets of beef cattle, while those of Mn, Cu and Zn were low. Mehlich I-extractable soil, Ca, and Mg were considered very high and changed little over the 4-yr production period. Application of 50 mm of sand tailings tended to increase Mehlich I-extractable P, Ca, Mn, Cu, Zn, and Fe. Radium-226 concentration in the forage of all grain crops averaged 8.5 Bq kg -1 , which was about 17 times higher than that in the grain of the same crops. Concentrations of 226 Ra in the forage and grain were 1.1% and 0.09% of the concentration in clay respectively. These data indicate that phosphatic clays can be a valuable resource for the production of corn and sorghum grain that contain low concentrations of 226 Ra

  15. Characterisation of the wall-slip during extrusion of heavy-clay products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocserha, I.; Gömze, A. L.; Kulkov, S.; Kalatur, E.; Buyakova, S. P.; Géber, R.; Buzimov, A. Y.

    2017-01-01

    During extrusion through the extrusion die, heavy-clay compounds are usually show plug flow with extensive slip at the wall of the die. In this study, the viscosity and the thickness of the slip layer were investigated. For the examination a brick-clay from Malyi (Hungary) deposit was applied as a raw material. The clay was characterised by XRPD, BET, SEM and granulometry. As the slip layer consists of suspension of the fine clay fraction so the clay minerals content of the clay (dviscosity of suspension with different water content was measured by means of rotational viscosimeter. The thickness of the slip layer was calculated from the measured viscosity and other data obtained from an earlier study with capillary rheometer. The calculated thickness value showed a tendency to reach a limit value by increasing the extrusion speed.

  16. Iodide Sorption to Clays and the Relationship to Surface Charge and Clay Texture - 12356

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Andrew; Kruichiak, Jessica; Tellez, Hernesto; Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Iodine is assumed to behave conservatively in clay barriers around nuclear waste repositories and in natural sediments. Batch experiments tend to show little to no sorption, while in column experiments iodine is often retarded relative to tritiated water. Current surface complexation theory cannot account for negatively charged ion sorption to a negatively charged clay particle. Surface protonation and iodide sorption to clay minerals were examined using surface titrations and batch sorption experiments with a suite of clay minerals. Surface titrations were completed spanning a range of both pH values and ionic strengths. For reference, similar titrations were performed on pure forms of an Al-O powder. The titration curves were deconvoluted to attain the pKa distribution for each material at each ionic strength. The pKa distribution for the Al-O shows two distinct peaks at 4.8 and 7.5, which are invariant with ionic strength. The pKa distribution of clays was highly variable between the different minerals and as a function of ionic strength. Iodide sorption experiments were completed at high solid:solution ratios to exacerbate sorption properties. Palygorskite and kaolinite had the highest amount of iodide sorption and montmorillonite had the least. (authors)

  17. Faults in clays their detection and properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, G.; Carabelli, E.; Chiantore, V.; Colombo, P.F.; Gruszka, A.; Pensieri, R.; Superbo, S.; Gera, F.

    1991-01-01

    The 'Faults in clays project', a cooperative research effort between Ismes and Enea of Italy and BGS and Exeter University of the UK, has been aimed at assessing and improving the resolution capability of some high resolution geophysical techniques for the detection of discontinuities in clay formations. All Ismes activities have been carried out in Italy: they consisted in the search of one or more sites - faulted clay formations - suitable for the execution of geophysical and geotechnical investigations, in the execution of such tests and in additional geological surveys and laboratory (geotechnical and geochemical) testing. The selected sites were two quarries in plio-pleistocenic clay formations in central Italy where faults had been observed. The greatest part of the research work has been carried out in the Orte site where also two 90 m boreholes have been drilled and cored. Geophysical work at Orte consisted of vertical electrical soundings (VESs) and horizontal electrical lines (HELs), four high resolution seismic reflection lines, and in-hole and cross-hole logs. Laboratory activities were geotechnical characterization and permeability tests, and measurements of disequilibrium in the uranium decay series. At Narni, where Exeter University sampled soil gases for geochemical analyses, the geophysical work consisted in a geo-electrical survey (five VESs and two HELs), and in two high resolution reflection seismic lines. Additional investigations included a structural geology survey. The main conclusion of the research is that current geophysical techniques do not have a resolution capacity sufficient to detect the existence and determine the characteristics of faults in deep homogeneous clay formations

  18. Modeled effects on permittivity measurements of water content in high surface area porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.B.; Or, Dani

    2003-01-01

    Time domain reflectometry (TDR) has become an important measurement technique for determination of porous media water content and electrical conductivity due to its accuracy, fast response and automation capability. Water content is inferred from the measured bulk dielectric constant based on travel time analysis along simple transmission lines. TDR measurements in low surface area porous media accurately describe water content using an empirical relationship. Measurement discrepancies arise from dominating influences such as bound water due to high surface area, extreme aspect ratio particles or atypical water phase configuration. Our objectives were to highlight primary factors affecting dielectric permittivity measurements for water content determination in porous mixtures, and demonstrate the influence of these factors on mixture permittivity as predicted by a three-phase dielectric mixture model. Modeled results considering water binding, higher porosity, constituent geometry or phase configuration suggest any of these effects individually are capable of causing permittivity reduction, though all likely contribute in high surface area porous media

  19. Evaluation of Used Fuel Disposition in Clay-Bearing Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jove-Colon, Carlos F.; Weck, Philippe F.; Sassani, David Carl; Zheng, Liange; Rutqvist, Jonny; Steefel, Carl I.; Kim, Kuhhwi; Nakagawa, Seiji; Houseworth, James; Birkholzer, Jens T.; Caporuscio, Florie Andre; Cheshire, Michael; Rearick, Michael; McCarney, Mary K.; Zavarin, Mavrik; Benedicto, Ana; Kersting, Annie B.; Sutton, Mark.; Jerden, James L.; Frey, Kurt E.; Copple, Jacqueline M.; Ebert, William L.

    2014-08-01

    Radioactive waste disposal in shale/argillite rock formations has been widely considered given its desirable isolation properties (low permeability), geochemically reduced conditions, anomalous groundwater pressures, and widespread geologic occurrence. Clay/shale rock formations are characterized by their high content of clay minerals such as smectites and illites where diffusive transport and chemisorption phenomena predominate. These, in addition to low permeability, are key attributes of shale to impede radionuclide mobility. Shale host-media has been comprehensively studied in international nuclear waste repository programs as part of underground research laboratories (URLs) programs in Switzerland, France, Belgium, and Japan. These investigations, in some cases a decade or more long, have produced a large but fundamental body of information spanning from site characterization data (geological, hydrogeological, geochemical, geomechanical) to controlled experiments on the engineered barrier system (EBS) (barrier clay and seals materials). Evaluation of nuclear waste disposal in shale formations in the USA was conducted in the late 70’s and mid 80’s. Most of these studies evaluated the potential for shale to host a nuclear waste repository but not at the programmatic level of URLs in international repository programs. This report covers various R&D work and capabilities relevant to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in shale/argillite media. Integration and cross-fertilization of these capabilities will be utilized in the development and implementation of the shale/argillite reference case planned for FY15. Disposal R&D activities under the UFDC in the past few years have produced state-of-the-art modeling capabilities for coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC), used fuel degradation (source term), and thermodynamic modeling and database development to evaluate generic disposal concepts. The THMC models have been developed for shale

  20. Influence of clay mineralogy on clay based ceramic products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radzali Othman; Tuan Besar Tuan Sarif; Zainal Arifin Ahmad; Ahmad Fauzi Mohd Noor; Abu Bakar Aramjat

    1996-01-01

    Clay-based ceramic products can either be produced directly from a suitable clay source without the need further addition or such products can be produced from a ceramic body formulated by additions of other raw materials such as feldspar and silica sand. In either case, the mineralogical make-up of the clay component plays a dominating role in the fabrication and properties of the ceramic product. This study was sparked off by a peculiar result observed in one of five local ball clay samples that were used to reformulate a ceramic body. Initial characterisation tests conducted on the clays indicated that these clays can be classified as kaolinitic. However, one of these clays produced a ceramic body that is distinctively different in terms of whiteness, smoothness and density as compared to the other four clays. Careful re-examination of other characterisation data, such as particle size distribution and chemical analysis, failed to offer any plausible explanation. Consequently, the mineralogical analysis by x-ray diffraction was repeated by paying meticulous attention to specimen preparation. Diffraction data for the clay with anomalous behaviour indicated the presence of a ∼ 10A peak that diminished when the same specimen was re-tested after heating in an oven at 12O degree C whilst the other four clays only exhibit the characteristic kaolinite (Al sub 2 O sub 3. 2SiO sub 2. 2H sub 2 0) and muscovite peaks at ∼ 7A and ∼ 10A before and after heat treatment. This suggests the presence of the mineral halloysite (A1 sub 2 0 sub 3. 2SiO sub 2.4H sub 2 0) in that particular clay. This difference in mineralogy can be attributed to account for the variations in physical properties of the final product. Consequently, this paper reviews in general the precautionary measures that must be adhered to during any mineralogical investigation of clay minerals or clay-based materials. The common pitfalls during specimen preparation, machine settings and interpretation of

  1. Near Field sorption Data Bases for Compacted MX-80 Bentonite for Performance Assessment of a High-Level Radioactive Waste Repository in Opalinus Clay Host Rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M.; Baeyens, B

    2003-08-01

    Bentonites of various types and compacted forms are being investigated in many countries as backfill materials in high-level radioactive waste disposal concepts. Nagra is currently considering an Opalinus clay (OPA) formation in the Zuercher Weinland as a potential location for a high-level radioactive waste repository. A compacted MX-80 bentonite is foreseen as a potential backfill material. Performance assessment studies will be performed for this site and one of the requirements for such an assessment are sorption data bases (SDB) for the bentonite near-field. The purpose of this report is to describe the procedures used to develop the SDB. One of the pre-requisites for developing a SDB is a water chemistry for the compacted bentonite porewater. For a number of reasons mentioned in the report, and discussed in more detail elsewhere, this is not a straightforward task. There are considerable uncertainties associated with the major ion concentrations and in particular with the system pH and Eh. The MX-80 SDB was developed for a reference bentonite porewater (pH = 7.25) which was calculated using the reference OPA porewater. In addition, two further SDBs are presented for porewaters calculated at pH values of 6.9 and 7.9 corresponding to lower and upper bound values calculated for the range of groundwater compositions anticipated for the OPA host rock. 'In house' sorption isotherm data were measured for Cs(I), Ni(II), Eu(III), Th(IV), Se(IV) and 1(-1) on the 'as received' MX-80 material equilibrated with a simulated porewater composition. Complementary 'in house' sorption edge and isotherm measurements on conditioned Na/Ca montmorillonites were also available for many of these radionuclides. These data formed the core of the SDB. Nevertheless, some of the required sorption data still had to be obtained from the open literature. An important part of this report is concerned with describing selection procedures and the modifications

  2. Seismic Performance Comparison of a High-Content SDA Frame and Standard RC Frame

    OpenAIRE

    van de Lindt, John W.; Rechan, R. Karthik

    2011-01-01

    This study presents the method and results of an experiment to study the seismic behavior of a concrete portal frame with fifty percent of its cement content replaced with a spray dryer ash (SDA). Based on multiple-shake-table tests, the high content SDA frame was found to perform as well as the standard concrete frame for two earthquakes exceeding design-level intensity earthquakes. Hence, from a purely seismic/structural standpoint, it may be possible to replace approximately fifty percen...

  3. Encapsulation of Clay Platelets inside Latex Particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorn, D.J.; Ming, W.; Herk, van A.M.; Fernando, R.H.; Sung, Li-Piin

    2009-01-01

    We present our recent attempts in encapsulating clay platelets inside latex particles by emulsion polymerization. Face modification of clay platelets by cationic exchange has been shown to be insufficient for clay encapsulation, leading to armored latex particles. Successful encapsulation of

  4. Adsorption of Radioactive Cesium to Illite-Sericite Mixed Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J. H.; Choung, S.; Park, C. S.; Jeon, S.; Han, J. H.; Han, W. S.

    2016-12-01

    Once radioactive cesium is released into aquatic environments through nuclear accidents such as Chernobyl and Fukushima, it is harmful to human and ecological system for a long time (t1/2 = 30.2 years) because of its chemical toxicity and γ-radiation. Sorption mechanism is mainly applied to remove the cesium from aquatic environments. Illite is one of effective sorbent, considering economical cost for remediation. Although natural illite is typically produced as a mixture with sericite formed by phyllic alteration in hydrothermal ore deposits, the effects of illite-sericite mixed clays on cesium sorption was rarely studied. This study evaluated the sorption properties of cesium to natural illite collected at Yeongdong in Korea as the world-largest illite producing areas (termed "Yeongdong illite"). The illite samples were analyzed by XRF, XRD, FT-IR and SEM-EDX to determine mineralogy, chemical composition, and morphological characteristics, and used for batch sorption experiments. Most of "Yeongdong illite" samples predominantly consist of sericite, quartz, albite, plagioclase feldspar and with minor illite. Cesium sorption distribution coefficients (Kd,Cs) of various "Yeongdong illite" samples ranged from 500 to 4000 L/kg at low aqueous concentration (Cw 10-7 M). Considering Kd,Cs values were 400 and 6000 using reference sericite and illite materials, respectively, in this study, these results suggested that high contents of sericite significantly affect the decrease of sorption capabilities for radiocesium by natural illite (i.e., illite-sericite mixed clay).

  5. Sorption of activation products on London clay and Dungeness aquifer gravel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Berry, J.A.; Littleboy, A.K.; Pilkington, N.J. (AEA Decommissioning and Radwaste, Harwell Lab. (United Kingdom))

    1992-01-01

    The sortpion of a series of activation-product radionuclides onto London clay and Dungeness aquifer gravel from the nuclear reactor sites at Bradwell and Dungeness, has been examined. Batch sorption and through-diffusion experiments with clay determined chlorine as the chloride ion to be effectively non-sorbing; calcium to be weakly sorbing, whereas cobalt, nickel, niobium and samarium were moderately to strongly sorbing and silver was strongly sorbing. Distribution ratios (R[sub D] values) for Nb, Sm and Ag were found to have a strong dependence on the liquid-solid separation technique employed. The presence of high concentrations of calcium hydroxide led to lower values of R[sub D] for radioactive Ca but higher R[sub D] values for Sm and Ag. The sorption of Ni showed no apparent dependence on groundwater composition at low levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The values of R[sub D] for Co decreased as the DOC content was increased by addition of humic materials. Batch sorption studies with aquifer gravel demonstrated that Ca is weakly sorbing whereas Nb, Ag and Eu are moderately to strongly sorbing. R[sub D] values for Ca and for Ag under neutral pH conditions show little sensitivity to the liquid/solid separation technique used. However, R[sub D] values for Nb and Eu under neutral pH conditions and for Ag in alkaline solution (pH = 11 - 12) show a marked effect. The aquifer gravel was found to be highly inhomogeneous unlike the clay and sorption was greatest on samples with a high proportion of sand, reflecting the clay mineral content. (orig.).

  6. Sorption of activation products on London clay and Dungeness aquifer gravel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baston, G.M.N.; Berry, J.A.; Littleboy, A.K.; Pilkington, N.J.

    1992-01-01

    The sortpion of a series of activation-product radionuclides onto London clay and Dungeness aquifer gravel from the nuclear reactor sites at Bradwell and Dungeness, has been examined. Batch sorption and through-diffusion experiments with clay determined chlorine as the chloride ion to be effectively non-sorbing; calcium to be weakly sorbing, whereas cobalt, nickel, niobium and samarium were moderately to strongly sorbing and silver was strongly sorbing. Distribution ratios (R D values) for Nb, Sm and Ag were found to have a strong dependence on the liquid-solid separation technique employed. The presence of high concentrations of calcium hydroxide led to lower values of R D for radioactive Ca but higher R D values for Sm and Ag. The sorption of Ni showed no apparent dependence on groundwater composition at low levels of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The values of R D for Co decreased as the DOC content was increased by addition of humic materials. Batch sorption studies with aquifer gravel demonstrated that Ca is weakly sorbing whereas Nb, Ag and Eu are moderately to strongly sorbing. R D values for Ca and for Ag under neutral pH conditions show little sensitivity to the liquid/solid separation technique used. However, R D values for Nb and Eu under neutral pH conditions and for Ag in alkaline solution (pH = 11 - 12) show a marked effect. The aquifer gravel was found to be highly inhomogeneous unlike the clay and sorption was greatest on samples with a high proportion of sand, reflecting the clay mineral content. (orig.)

  7. On the thermal behaviour of Boom clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delage, P.; Cui Yu Jun; Sultan, N.

    2004-01-01

    When temperature is increased, the various phenomena that occur in a saturated natural potential host clay for nuclear waste disposal (Boom clay from SCK-CEN in Mol, Belgium) were experimentally investigated in a temperature controlled high stress triaxial cell. Firstly, the pore pressure build-up due to the difference in thermal dilation of both water and minerals was investigated through thermal consolidation tests. Interesting information was obtained about the dissipation of thermally induced pore pressure in Boom clay, based on the standard Terzaghi consolidation theory. Secondly, the volume change behaviour in drained conditions (i.e. under a very slow temperature increase) confirmed that the clay overconsolidation ratio (OCR) controlled the nature of the volume changes. Whereas overconsolidated soils use to dilate as any material when temperature is elevated, normally consolidated soils present a decrease in volume, which is less common. The principles of a coupled thermo-elasto-plastic model that was specifically developed to model this particular behaviour are finally presented. Obviously, it appears necessary to account in detail for these thermal phenomena in order to properly understand the response of the geological barrier in the near field once nuclear waste has been stored. (orig.)

  8. Innovation management and marketing in the high-tech sector: A content analysis of advertisements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerhard, D.; Brem, Alexander; Baccarella, Ch.

    2011-01-01

    Advertizing high-technology products is a tricky and critical task for every company, since it means operating in an environment with high market uncertainty. The work presents results of a content analysis of 110 adverts for consumer electronics products which examines how these products and the...

  9. Enzymatic pre-treatment of high content cellulosic feedstock improves biogas production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Animal wastes with high lignin and cellulosic contents can serve as the feedstock for biogas production (mainly methane) that could be used as alternative energy source. However, these high lignin and cellulosic feedstocks are quite recalcitrant to be readily utilized by methanogens to produce ben...

  10. Thixotropic Properties of Latvian Illite Containing Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Lakevičs, Vitālijs; Stepanova, Valentīna; Niedra, Santa; Dušenkova, Inga; Ruplis, Augusts

    2015-01-01

    Thixotropic properties of Latvian Devonian and Quaternary clays were studied. Dynamic viscosity of the water clay suspensions were measured with a rotating viscometer. Influence of concentration, pH and modifiers on the thixotropic clay properties was analyzed. It was found that Latvian clays have thixotropic properties. Stability of clay suspensions is described with the thixotropy hysteresis loop. Increasing the speed of the viscometer rotation, dynamic viscosity of the clay suspension decr...

  11. Viscosity and Plasticity of Latvian Illite Clays

    OpenAIRE

    Jurgelāne, I; Vecstaudža, J; Stepanova, V; Mālers, J; Bērziņa-Cimdiņa, L

    2012-01-01

    Due to viscosity and plasticity, clays and clay minerals are used in civil engineering, pottery and also in cosmetics and medicine as thickening agents and emulsion and suspension stabilizers. The rheological properties of clay suspensions are complex. Mostly it is an interaction between mineral composition, clay particle size and pH value and also depends on clay minerals. Clay-water suspension is non-Newtonian fluid showing thixotropic and pseudoplastic properties. Results showed that plast...

  12. Austenitic stainless steel alloys with high nickel contents in high temperature liquid metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konvicka, H.R.; Schwarz, N.F.

    1981-01-01

    Fe-Cr-Ni base alloys (nickel content: from 15 to 70 wt%, Chromium content: 15 wt%, iron: balance) together with stainless steel (W.Nr. 1.4981) have been exposed to flowing liquid sodium at 730 0 C in four intervals up to a cumulative exposure time of 1500 hours. Weight change data and the results of post-exposition microcharacterization of specimens are reported. The corrosion rates increase with increasing nickel content and tend to become constant after longer exposure times for each alloy. The corrosion rate of stainless steel is considerably reduced due to the presence of the base alloys. Different kinetics of nickel poor (up to 35% nickel) and nickel rich (> 50% nickel) alloys and nickel transport from nickel rich to nickel poor material is observed. (orig.)

  13. Permeability response of oil-contaminated compacted clays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvestri, V.; Mikhail, N.; Soulie, M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a laboratory investigation on the behavior of motor oil-contaminated, partially saturated compacted clays. For the study, both a natural clay and an artificially purified kaolinite, contaminated with 0 to 8% of motor oil, were firstly compacted following the ASTM standard procedure. Secondly, permeability tests were carried out in a triaxial cell on 10 cm-diameter compacted clay specimens. The results of the investigation indicate that increasing percentages of motor oil decrease both the optimum water content and the optimum dry density of the two clays. However, whereas the optimum water content on the average decreases by about 6% when the percentage contamination increases from 0 to 8%, the corresponding decrease in the optimum dry density is less than 3%. Even though the optimum dry density decreases as the percentage of oil increases from 0 to 8%, there is, however, a range in oil content varying between 2 and 4% for which the optimum dry density is slightly greater than that of the untreated soils. As far as the permeability tests are concerned, the results indicate that as the percentage of oil increases, the coefficient of permeability decreases substantially, especially for clay specimens which were initially compacted on the dry side of optimum

  14. Hydraulic and mechanical behavior of landfill clay liner containing SSA in contact with leachate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Lu, Haijun; Liu, Junzhu; Wang, Weiwei; Zhang, Xiong

    2018-05-01

    Sewage sludge ash (SSA) produced by municipal sludge can be used as a modified additive for clay liner, and improves the working performance of landfill clay liner in contact with leachate. Under the action of landfill leachate, the permeability, shear strength, phase composition, and pore structure of the modified clay are investigated through the flexible wall permeability test, triaxial shear test, thermal gravimetric and differential thermal analysis, and low-temperature nitrogen adsorption test, respectively. The hydraulic conductivity of the modified clay containing 0-5% SSA is in the range of 3.94 × 10 -8 -1.16 × 10 -7  cm/s, and the pollutant concentration of the sample without SSA was higher than others. The shear strength of the modified clay is more than that of the traditional clay liner, the cohesion rate of modified clay increases from 32.5 to 199.91 kPa, and the internal friction angle decreases from 32.5° to 15.6°. Furthermore, the weight loss rates of the samples are 15.69%, 17.92%, 18.06%, and 20.68%, respectively, when the SSA content increases from 0% to 5%. The total pore volume and average pore diameter of the modified clay decrease with the increase in the SSA content, respectively. However, the specific area of the modified clay increases with the increase in the SSA content.

  15. Hydrophobic Modification of Layered Clays and Compatibility for Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Jen Lin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on the intercalation and exfoliation of layered clays with polymeric intercalating agents involving poly(oxypropylene-amines and the particular uses for epoxy nanocomposites are reviewed. For intercalation, counter-ionic exchange reactions of clays including cationic layered silicates and anionic Al-Mg layered double hydroxide (LDH with polymeric organic ions afforded organoclays led to spatial interlayer expansion from 12 to 92 Å (X-ray diffraction as well as hydrophobic property. The inorganic clays of layered structure could be modified by the poly(oxypropyleneamine-salts as the intercalating agents with molecular weights ranging from 230 to 5,000 g/mol. Furthermore, natural montmorillonite (MMT clay could be exfoliated into thin layer silicate platelets (ca. 1 nm thickness in one step by using polymeric types of exfoliating agents. Different lateral dimensions of MMT, synthetic fluorinated Mica and LDH clays had been cured into epoxy nanocomposites. The hydrophobic amine-salt modification resulting in high spacing of layered or exfoliation of individual clay platelets is the most important factor for gaining significant improvements of properties. In particular, these modified clays were reported to gain significant improvements such as reduced coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE, enhanced thermal stability, and hardness. The utilization of these layered clays for initiating the epoxy self-polymerization was also reported to have a unique compatibility between clay and organic resin matrix. However, the matrix domain lacks of covalently bonded crosslink and leads to the isolation of powder material. It is generally concluded that the hydrophobic expansion of the clay inter-gallery spacing is the crucial step for enhancing the compatibility and the ultimate preparation of the advanced epoxy materials.

  16. Heteroaggregation of titanium dioxide nanoparticles with natural clay colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labille, Jérôme; Harns, Carrie; Bottero, Jean-Yves; Brant, Jonathan

    2015-06-02

    To better understand and predict the fate of engineered nanoparticles in the water column, we assessed the heteroaggregation of TiO2 nanoparticles with a smectite clay as analogues for natural colloids. Heteroaggregation was evaluated as a function of water salinity (10(-3) and 10(-1) M NaCl), pH (5 and 8), and selected nanoparticle concentration (0-4 mg/L). Time-resolved laser diffraction was used, coupled to an aggregation model, to identify the key mechanisms and variables that drive the heteroaggregation of the nanoparticles with colloids. Our data show that, at a relevant concentration, nanoparticle behavior is mainly driven by heteroaggregation with colloids, while homoaggregation remains negligible. The affinity of TiO2 nanoparticles for clay is driven by electrostatic interactions. Opposite surface charges and/or high ionic strength favored the formation of primary heteroaggregates via the attachment of nanoparticles to the clay. The initial shape and dispersion state of the clay as well as the nanoparticle/clay concentration ratio also affected the nature of the heteroaggregation mechanism. With dispersed clay platelets (10(-3) M NaCl), secondary heteroaggregation driven by bridging nanoparticles occurred at a nanoparticle/clay number ratio of greater than 0.5. In 10(-1) M NaCl, the clay was preaggregated into larger and more spherical units. This favored secondary heteroaggregation at lower nanoparticle concentration that correlated to the nanoparticle/clay surface area ratio. In this latter case, a nanoparticle to clay sticking efficiency could be determined.

  17. Hydrophobic Modification of Layered Clays and Compatibility for Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiang-Jen; Chan, Ying-Nan; Lan, Yi-Fen

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies on the intercalation and exfoliation of layered clays with polymeric intercalating agents involving poly(oxypropylene)-amines and the particular uses for epoxy nanocomposites are reviewed. For intercalation, counter-ionic exchange reactions of clays including cationic layered silicates and anionic Al-Mg layered double hydroxide (LDH) with polymeric organic ions afforded organoclays led to spatial interlayer expansion from 12 to 92 Å (X-ray diffraction) as well as hydrophobic property. The inorganic clays of layered structure could be modified by the poly(oxypropylene)amine-salts as the intercalating agents with molecular weights ranging from 230 to 5,000 g/mol. Furthermore, natural montmorillonite (MMT) clay could be exfoliated into thin layer silicate platelets (ca. 1 nm thickness) in one step by using polymeric types of exfoliating agents. Different lateral dimensions of MMT, synthetic fluorinated Mica and LDH clays had been cured into epoxy nanocomposites. The hydrophobic amine-salt modification resulting in high spacing of layered or exfoliation of individual clay platelets is the most important factor for gaining significant improvements of properties. In particular, these modified clays were reported to gain significant improvements such as reduced coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), enhanced thermal stability, and hardness. The utilization of these layered clays for initiating the epoxy self-polymerization was also reported to have a unique compatibility between clay and organic resin matrix. However, the matrix domain lacks of covalently bonded crosslink and leads to the isolation of powder material. It is generally concluded that the hydrophobic expansion of the clay inter-gallery spacing is the crucial step for enhancing the compatibility and the ultimate preparation of the advanced epoxy materials.

  18. Influence of low temperatures on aggregate disruption of heavy clay soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Kozlovsky Dufková

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Heavy clay soils that are normally resistant to wind erosion, from study site Ostrožská Nová Ves si­tua­ted in the foothills of the Bílé Karpaty Mountains, Czech Republic, were a subject of laboratory analyses. The analyses should found out the influence of overwinter processes on disruption of soil aggregates and thus reason of vulnerability to soil loss by wind. Two overwinter processes were observed – freezing and thawing, and freeze-drying of the soil. Both processes have indicated the increasing of erodible fraction in dependence of water content of analysed soils. Exposed frozen clay soils that freeze-dries during the winter in the foothills of Bílé Karpaty, leaves soils highly erodible in late winter and early spring.

  19. Technical application of agglomerated acidic heap leaching of clay-bearing uranium ore in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Yijun; Li Jianhua; Li Tieqiu; Zhong Pingru

    2002-01-01

    The permeability of ore mass has a great influence on the leaching period of heap leaching and the leaching efficiency, hence the uranium ores with high content of clay is difficult to acidic heap leaching. The Research Institute of Uranium Mining has engaged several years studies on the cementing agents of acidic agglomeration, agglomeration conditions, as well as the curing measures of agglomerated balls. On the basis of these studies, several types of clay-bearing ores have been tested with good results. The technique of agglomerated acidic heap leaching has been successfully applied in a uranium mine. Since agglomeration has effectively increased the permeability of ore heap, its leaching period is decreased from 200 days to 60 days, the leaching efficiency is increased to 96% from less than 40% comparing with direct heap leaching program

  20. ACTIVATED ADSORPTION ON CLAY OF MICROPOLLUTANTS FROM PAPER PRINTING INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIANA C. MIRILĂ

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a preliminary study of chemisorption onto anionic and cationic clays, in order to reduce the content of pollutants from a paper printing effluent, collected after technological step named: printing of paper fabric manufacturing. The procedure of filtration fallowed by adsorption process is an effective, fast and low cost technique for treatment of black effluent resulting from paper printing industry. The key parameters tested to achieve a high efficiency for the movement of micropollutants from printing fluid were substrate dose and contact time. The highest treatment performance was obtained for cationic substrate at pH = 6.80, in contact and agitated magnetically for 30 respectively 90 minutes at room temperature.

  1. Immobilization of industrial waste in cement–bentonite clay matrix

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Immobilization of industrial waste in cement–bentonite clay matrix. I B PLECAS* and S ... high structural integrity and minimizing the risk of escape by leaching. ..... Radioactive Waste Management and Nuclear Fuel Cycle 14. 195. Plecas I ...

  2. Comparative evaluation of clays from Abakaliki Formation with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Okeey Aghamelu

    Department of Geology, Ebonyi State University, Abakaliki, Ebonyi State, Nigeria. ... classified as inorganic clays of high plasticity (CH) according to Unified Soil Classification System .... movement through the outcrop locations and sample.

  3. CONTRAST IN CLAY MINERALOGY AND THEIR EFFECT ON ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    Clay minerals reduced the porosity and permeability of the Permo-Triassic sandstones. .... Lower Triassic-Lias .... and show high birefringence around the grains. ..... It is a regime after effective burial depth in which the solubility of minerals.

  4. Production of microbial oil with high oleic acid content by Trichosporon capitatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hong; Zong, Minhua [State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Engineering, College of Light Industry and Food Sciences, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Li, Yuanyuan; Chen, Lei [School of Biosciences and Bioengineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2011-01-15

    Microbial oils with high unsaturated fatty acids content, especially oleic acid content, are good feedstock for high quality biodiesel production. Trichosporon capitatum was found to accumulate lipid with around 80% oleic acid and 89% total unsaturated fatty acids content on nitrogen-limited medium. In order to improve its lipid yield, effects of medium components and culture conditions on cell growth and lipid accumulation were investigated. Optimization of media resulted in a 61% increase in the lipid yield of T. capitatum after cultivation at 28 C and 160 rpm for 6 days. In addition, T. capitatum could grow well on cane molasses and afford a lipid yield comparable to that on synthetic nitrogen-limited medium. The biodiesel from the microbial oil produced by T. capitatum on cane molasses displayed a low cold filter plugging point (-15 C), and so T. capitatum might be a promising strain to provide lipid suitable for high quality biodiesel production. (author)

  5. Enhancing protein to extremely high content in photosynthetic bacteria during biogas slurry treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Anqi; Zhang, Guangming; Meng, Fan; Lu, Pei; Wang, Xintian; Peng, Meng

    2017-12-01

    This work proposed a novel approach to achieve an extremely high protein content in photosynthetic bacteria (PSB) using biogas slurry as a culturing medium. The results showed the protein content of PSB could be enhanced strongly to 90% in the biogas slurry, which was much higher than reported microbial protein contents. The slurry was partially purified at the same time. Dark-aerobic was more beneficial than light-anaerobic condition for protein accumulation. High salinity and high ammonia of the biogas slurry were the main causes for protein enhancement. In addition, the biogas slurry provided a good buffer system for PSB to grow. The biosynthesis mechanism of protein in PSB was explored according to theoretical analysis. During biogas slurry treatment, the activities of glutamate synthase and glutamine synthetase were increased by 26.55%, 46.95% respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mineralogy and rheology of raw and activated Turonian to Coniacian clays from Benue Trough, northeastern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Arabi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery of oil and gas in Oloibiri, an onshore oilfield located in Oloibiri in Ogbia Local Government Area of Bayelsa State, Nigeria on Sunday 15th January 1956 by Shell Darcy, hundreds of oil wells have been drilled and not a single of these oil wells was drilled without the use of bentonite. This work is aimed at evaluating the rheological properties of raw and beneficiated Nigerian clays to ascertain their worth for use as drilling mud in oil and gas well drilling. This will save foreign earnings used in the importation of bentonite by the oil and gas development companies, create employment opportunity and open a new frontier for solid mineral development. Five clay samples from Pindiga Formation in Benue Trough, northeastern Nigeria were collected and subjected to elemental, rheological and other physical properties tests and analysis, while another portion of same samples were beneficiated using sodium carbonate, gum Arabic and poly-anionic cellulose for rheological enhancement then subjected to same cycle of tests and analysis above. Results obtained indicates that wet beneficiation as adopted in this study has proved to be more effective in Ca and Na ionic exchange. The rheological and other physical properties of the clays attained the standard that is required for use in oil and gas well drilling after addition of 12% sodium carbonate and 1.5 g poly-anionic cellulose. It was also discovered that when the formulation was allow to age (stay for 24 h, it attained optimum rheological requirement with 12% sodium carbonate and just 0.8 g poly-anionic cellulose. The clays studies do not require addition of weighing additive such as barite because of their high iron content which made their density attain the require standard even without additives. Keywords: Bentonitic clay, Beneficiation, Nigeria, Pindiga, Rheology, Mineralogy

  7. An experimental study of the effects of adsorbing and non-adsorbing gases on friction and permeability evolution in clay-rich fault gouge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisabeth, H. P.; Zoback, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the flow of fluids through fractures in clay-rich rocks is fundamental to a number of geoengineering enterprises, including development of unconventional hydrocarbon resources, nuclear waste storage and geological carbon sequestration. High clay content tends to make rocks plastic, low-porosity and anisotropic. In addition, some gasses adsorb to clay mineral surfaces, resulting in swelling and concomitant changes in physical properties. These complexities can lead to coupled behaviors that render prediction of fluid behavior in the subsurface difficult. We present the results of a suite of triaxial experiments on binary mixtures of quartz and illite grains to separate and quantify the effects of hydrostatic pressure, differential stress, clay content and gas chemistry on the evolution of mechanical and hydraulic characteristics of the gouge material during deformation. Tests are run on saw-cut samples prepared with gouge at 20 MPa confining pressure, 10 MPa pore pressure and at room temperature. Argon or carbon dioxide is used as pore fluid. Sample permeability, stress and strain are monitored continuously during hydrostatic and axial deformation. We find that pressure and shearing both lead to reductions in permeability. Adsorbing gas leads to swelling and promotes permeability reduction, but appears to have no effect on frictional properties. These results indicate that the seal integrity of clay-rich caprocks may not be compromised by shear deformation, and that depletion and shear deformation of unconventional reservoirs is expected to result in production declines.

  8. Effect of Subsurface Irrigation with Porous Clay Capsules on Quantitative and Quality of Grape Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ghorbani Vaghei

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Maintaining soil moisture content at about field capacity and reducing water loss in near root zone plays a key role for developing soil and water management programs. Clay pot or porous pipe is a traditional sub-irrigation method and is ideal for many farms in the world’s dry land with small and medium sized farms and gardens and is still used limitedly in dry lands of India, Iran, Pakistan, the Middle East, and Latin-America. Clay capsule is one of porous pipes in sub irrigation that is able to release water in near root zone with self- regulative capacity. Watering occurs only in amounts that the plants actually need (this amount is equal to field capacity and released water in near root zone without electricity or use of an automatic dispenser. Materials and Methods: A study was carried out in 2013 on the experimental field of agriculture faculty of Tarbiat Modares University, to study the effect of two irrigation types on qualitative and quantitative characters in grape production (Vitis vinifera L.. In order to provide the water requirement of grape plant were used porous clay capsules for sub irrigation with height and diameter of 12 cm and 3.5 cm and dripper with Neta film type for drip irrigation, respectively. Porous clay capsules provided from soil science group at Tarbiat Modares University. In this research, the volume of water delivered to grape plants during entire growth period in two different irrigation methods was measured separately with water-meters installed at all laterals. The water consumption, yield production and water use efficiency were evaluated and compared in two drip and porous clay irrigation systems at veraison phonological stages. In the veraison stages, cluster weight, cluster length, solid solution and pH content were measured in grape fruits. Leaf chlorophyll content and leaf water content were also measured in two irrigation systems. Results and Discussion: The results of fruit quality

  9. Repository tunnel construction in deep clay formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, B.G.; Mair, R.J.; Taylor, R.N.

    1992-01-01

    One of the objects of the Hades project at Mol, Belgium has been to evaluate the feasibility of construction of a deep repository in the Boom clay formation at depth of approximately 225 metres. The main objective of the present project was to analyse and interpret the detailed geotechnical measurements made around the Hades trial shaft and tunnel excavations and evaluate the safety of radioactive waste disposal in a repository facility in deep clay formations. Plasticity calculations and finite element analyses were used which gave results consistent with the in-situ measurements. It was shown that effective stress analysis could successfully predict the observed field behaviour. Correct modelling of the small-strain stiffness of the Boom clay was essential if reasonable predictions of the pore pressure response due to construction are to be made. The calculations undertaken indicated that, even in the long term, the pressures on the test drift tunnel lining are likely to be significantly lower than the overburden pressure. Larger long-term tunnel lining pressures are predicted for impermeable linings. A series of laboratory stress path tests was undertaken to determine the strength and stiffness characteristics of the Boom clay. The tests were conducted at appropriate effective stress levels on high-quality samples retrieved during construction of the test drift. The apparatus developed for the testing is described and the results discussed. The development of a self boring retracting pressure-meter is described. This novel in-situ testing device was specifically designed to determine from direct measurements the convergence/confinement curve relevant to tunnelling in clay formations. 44 refs., 60 figs., 3 tabs

  10. iScreen: Image-Based High-Content RNAi Screening Analysis Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Rui; Dong, Xiaonan; Levine, Beth; Xie, Yang; Xiao, Guanghua

    2015-09-01

    High-throughput RNA interference (RNAi) screening has opened up a path to investigating functional genomics in a genome-wide pattern. However, such studies are often restricted to assays that have a single readout format. Recently, advanced image technologies have been coupled with high-throughput RNAi screening to develop high-content screening, in which one or more cell image(s), instead of a single readout, were generated from each well. This image-based high-content screening technology has led to genome-wide functional annotation in a wider spectrum of biological research studies, as well as in drug and target discovery, so that complex cellular phenotypes can be measured in a multiparametric format. Despite these advances, data analysis and visualization tools are still largely lacking for these types of experiments. Therefore, we developed iScreen (image-Based High-content RNAi Screening Analysis Tool), an R package for the statistical modeling and visualization of image-based high-content RNAi screening. Two case studies were used to demonstrate the capability and efficiency of the iScreen package. iScreen is available for download on CRAN (http://cran.cnr.berkeley.edu/web/packages/iScreen/index.html). The user manual is also available as a supplementary document. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  11. STABILISATION OF SILTY CLAY SOIL USING CHLORIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TAMADHER T. ABOOD

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The object of this paper is to investigate the effect of adding different chloride compounds including (NaCl, MgCl2, CaCl2 on the engineering properties of silty clay soil. Various amounts of salts (2%, 4%, and 8% were added to the soil to study the effect of salts on the compaction characteristics, consistency limits and compressive strength. The main findings of this study were that the increase in the percentage of each of the chloride compounds increased the maximum dry density and decrease the optimum moisture content. The liquid limit, plastic limit and plasticity index decreased with the increase in salt content. The unconfinedcompressive strength increased as the salt content increased.

  12. A deep learning and novelty detection framework for rapid phenotyping in high-content screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Christoph; Hoefler, Rudolf; Samwer, Matthias; Gerlich, Daniel W.

    2017-01-01

    Supervised machine learning is a powerful and widely used method for analyzing high-content screening data. Despite its accuracy, efficiency, and versatility, supervised machine learning has drawbacks, most notably its dependence on a priori knowledge of expected phenotypes and time-consuming classifier training. We provide a solution to these limitations with CellCognition Explorer, a generic novelty detection and deep learning framework. Application to several large-scale screening data sets on nuclear and mitotic cell morphologies demonstrates that CellCognition Explorer enables discovery of rare phenotypes without user training, which has broad implications for improved assay development in high-content screening. PMID:28954863

  13. Clay characterization of Boa Saude-RN, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, D.G.; Alencar, M.I.; Ferreira, O.F.; Cunha, J.M.R.; Harima, E.

    2011-01-01

    This study characterized a sample of clay from the City of Boa Saude of Rio Grande do Norte. Clay is burning clear and used in Monte Alegre in the brick kilns for producing bricks and tiles. This study also verified the possibility of using these in the field of industrial ceramics. The following techniques were used for characterization: chemical and mineralogical analysis, which determined the presence of the following minerals, muscovite, quartz and kaolinite, the plasticity index can be said that the clay has an average plasticity index, also was made organic matter content, residue content, determination of loss on ignition was found that a loss of 9.38%, checking the color of burning gave a gradient of cream to orange with increasing temperature. (author)

  14. Possible influence of clay contamination on B isotope geochemistry of carbonaceous samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deyhle, Annette; Kopf, Achim

    2004-01-01

    The authors report results from an experimental study on mixtures of pure endmembers of natural clay and carbonate. The scientific rationale is an evaluation as to what extent B contents and B isotopes of carbonate samples may be obscured as a result of contamination with clay, particularly since both authigenic carbonates and biogenic carbonates (e.g. microfossil tests) often contain some clay. Three aliquots of a series of samples (each containing 0, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100% clay) were analyzed. Set 1 was washed with distilled, de-ionized water; for set 2 the HCl soluble parts were dissolved in 2 M HCl after washing; set 3 was completely digested with 30M HF prior to a series of ion exchanges. Isotope data of the endmembers are 6.6 per mille (100% marble) and -4.6%o (100% clay), with the clay being the dominant B source (ca. 50 ppm compared with 11 B adsorbed =12.9-14.1%o±0.5%o), while no B was mobilized from the carbonate. The HCl-dissolvable B in washed samples of set 2 show slightly increasing B contents with higher clay contents, suggesting that dissolution of the marble as well as B mobilization from the clay account for this trend. δ 11 B isotopes tend towards more negative values when clay content increases, indicating that some structurally-bound B is lost from the sheets of linked (Si, Al)O 4 tetrahedra of the clay mineral. This result shows that not only B adsorption, but possibly diffusion or weathering of broken edges of clay minerals releases some structurally bound B of clay minerals. Set 3, where bulk samples were completely HF-digested, shows as expected a linear increase in B concentrations and decreasing δ 11 B ratios with increasing clay content. The overall results suggest that relatively small amounts of clay (e.g. as contamination in a microfossil test) have no significant impact on the B content and δ 11 B measured for the carbonate, but that care has to be taken if clay exceeds 10wt.% (e.g. carbonate concretions, chimneys, etc.)

  15. Raw material of the Corumbatai formation at the region of ceramic pole of Santa Gertrudes - Sao Paulo, Brazil, with natural characteristics for fabrication of expanded clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, M.M.T.; Zanardo, A.; Rocha, R.R.; Roveri, C.D.

    2009-01-01

    This paper refers to the study of the bases material of the Corumbatai Formation (Parana Basin) from a clay mine, which presents limits for its use in ceramic tiles in dry grinding process due to its hardness and, especially, the high content of organic matter in relation to the clay overlaid. The characterization of the raw material and the product was accomplished by organic carbon analysis, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy and test-firing. Firing conditions were determined to get expanded clay, using fast firing static kiln and a continuous roller kiln, both from laboratory equipment, getting samples with variable density up to the limit of expansion, with density that can reach values lower than 0,5g.cm -3 because of the formation of closed pores and an external vitreous foil which provide a high mechanical resistance to the particles. (author)

  16. Clay mineral distribution on tropical shelf: an example from the western shelf of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Hashimi, N.H.; Nair, R.R.

    Seventy-five sediment samples collected from the Kerala continental shelf and slope during the 17th and 71st Cruises of RV Gaveshani were analysed by X-ray diffraction for clay mineral content. The distribution of total clay ( 4 mu fraction...

  17. Strength Properties of Aalborg Clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Kirsten Malte; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl; Augustesen, Anders Hust

    glacial time are characterised by the absence of this mussel. These deposits are named Aalborg Clay and Aalborg Sand. In the city of Aalborg, a fill layer superposes Aalborg Clay. This layer is at some places found to be 6m thick. This fill layer does not provide sufficient bearing capacity, which has...... resulted in many damaged buildings in Aalborg. To provide sufficient bearing capacity it is therefore necessary either to remove the fill or to construct the building on piles. Both methods imply that the strength of Aalborg Clay is important for the construction. This paper evaluates the strength...

  18. Fired products of Cr-smectite clays in nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Volzone

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The products of Cr-smectite clays heated to 1350 ° C in nitrogen were evaluated by X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis. Cr-smectite clays were prepared at room temperature by contact between smectite clays and Cr species contained in OH-Cr solutions. The Cr species were prepared using chromium nitrate solution by addition of NaOH solution with OH/Cr = 2. Products of firing in nitrogen at the high temperature were different (magnesia chromite, donathite, iron chromium oxide and picrochromite depending on the type of isomorphous substitution of the smectite structure and the amount of retained chromium.

  19. Fired products of Cr-smectite clays in nitrogen

    OpenAIRE

    C. Volzone; A. M. Cesio

    2004-01-01

    The products of Cr-smectite clays heated to 1350 ° C in nitrogen were evaluated by X-ray diffraction and chemical analysis. Cr-smectite clays were prepared at room temperature by contact between smectite clays and Cr species contained in OH-Cr solutions. The Cr species were prepared using chromium nitrate solution by addition of NaOH solution with OH/Cr = 2. Products of firing in nitrogen at the high temperature were different (magnesia chromite, donathite, iron chromium oxide and picrochromi...

  20. Calcium content and high calcium adaptation of plants in karst areas of southwestern Hunan, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Wei

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Rocky desertification is a major ecological problem of land degradation in karst areas. In these areas, the high soil calcium (Ca content has become an important environmental factor that can affect the restoration of vegetation. Consequently, the screening of plant species that can adapt to high Ca soil environments is a critical step in vegetation restoration. In this study, three grades of rocky desertification sample areas were selected in karst areas of southwestern Hunan, China (LRD: light rocky desertification; MRD: moderate rocky desertification; and IRD: intense rocky desertification. Each grade of these sample areas had three sample plots in different slope positions, each of which had four small quadrats (one in rocky-side areas, three in non-rocky-side areas. We measured the Ca content of leaves, branches, and roots from 41 plant species, as well as soil total Ca (TCa and exchangeable Ca (ECa at depths of 0–15, 15–30, and 30–45 cm in each small quadrat. The results showed that the soil Ca2+ content in rocky-side areas was significantly higher than that in non-rocky-side areas (p < 0.05. The mean soil TCa and ECa content increased gradually along with the grade of rocky desertification, in the order IRD > MRD > LRD. For all plant functional groups, the plant Ca content of aboveground parts was significantly higher than that of the belowground parts (p < 0.05. The soil ECa content had significant effects on plant Ca content of the belowground parts but had no significant effects on plant Ca content of the aboveground parts. Of the 41 plant species that were sampled, 17 were found to be dominant (important value > 1. The differences in Ca2+ content between the aboveground and belowground parts of the 17 dominant species were calculated, and their correlations with soil ECa content were analyzed. The results showed that these 17 species can be divided into three categories: Ca-indifferent plants, high

  1. Induced mutations in wheat, Triticum aestivum L., for high protein and lysine content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barriga, P.; Fuentes, R.

    1984-01-01

    With the aim of producing cultivars adapted to the Lakes Region of Chile (latitude 39-44 deg. South) with better protein content and high grain yield, in 1975 spring wheat seeds of genotypes Express and UACH-2-75 were irradiated with gamma rays in doses of 15, 25 and 35 Krad. The M 1 generation was field sown and harvested individually, initiating plant selection in the M 2 generation. The selection process, through six generations, has permitted to identify some mutants of high protein content. Two mutants UACH-2-I and UACH-3-I have been included in the National Co-operative Wheat Program for yield. A second experiment was initiated in 1981 with the objective of obtaining mutants not only for high protein content but also for high lysine content. For this purpose seeds of the spring wheat genotypes Huenufen and Austral were irradiated with gamma rays in doses of 10 and 25 Krad. The M 1 generation was sown at a high density and harvested in bulk. Selection per plant will start in the M 2 generation, continuing in the following. (author)

  2. Fe-based bulk amorphous alloys with iron contents as high as 82 at%

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jin-Feng; Liu, Xue; Zhao, Shao-Fan; Ding, Hong-Yu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yao, Ke-Fu, E-mail: kfyao@tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Fe-based bulk amorphous alloys (BAAs) with high Fe contents are advantageous due to their high saturation magnetization and low cost. However, preparing Fe-based BAAs with Fe contents higher than 80 at% is difficult due to their poor glass forming abilities (GFA). In this study, an Fe{sub 81}P{sub 8.5}C{sub 5.5}B{sub 2}Si{sub 3} BAA with a diameter of 1 mm and a saturation magnetization of 1.56 T was successfully prepared using the fluxing and copper mold casting methods. In addition, by introducing a small amount of elemental Mo to the alloy, an Fe{sub 82}Mo{sub 1}P{sub 6.5}C{sub 5.5}B{sub 2}Si{sub 3} BAA rod with a diameter of 1 mm, a high saturation magnetization of 1.59 T, a high yield stress of 3265 MPa, and a clear plasticity of 1.3% was prepared in the same way. The cost effectiveness and good magnetic properties of these newly-developed Fe-based BAAs with Fe contents as high as 82 at% would be advantageous and promising for industrial applications. - Highlights: • Novel Fe-based BAA with no other metallic element except 81 at% Fe was prepared. • Fe-based bulk amorphous alloy (BAA) with the highest Fe content (82%) was prepared. • Very high saturation magnetization of 1.59 T has been achieved. • A new thought for designing Fe-based BAA with high Fe content was provided.

  3. High-content screening of yeast mutant libraries by shotgun lipidomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarasov, Kirill; Stefanko, Adam; Casanovas, Albert

    2014-01-01

    To identify proteins with a functional role in lipid metabolism and homeostasis we designed a high-throughput platform for high-content lipidomic screening of yeast mutant libraries. To this end, we combined culturing and lipid extraction in 96-well format, automated direct infusion...... factor KAR4 precipitated distinct lipid metabolic phenotypes. These results demonstrate that the high-throughput shotgun lipidomics platform is a valid and complementary proxy for high-content screening of yeast mutant libraries....... nanoelectrospray ionization, high-resolution Orbitrap mass spectrometry, and a dedicated data processing framework to support lipid phenotyping across hundreds of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants. Our novel approach revealed that the absence of genes with unknown function YBR141C and YJR015W, and the transcription...

  4. Study of the Effect of Clay Particles on Low Salinity Water Injection in Sandstone Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Rezaei Gomari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The need for optimal recovery of crude oil from sandstone and carbonate reservoirs around the world has never been greater for the petroleum industry. Water-flooding has been applied to the supplement primary depletion process or as a separate secondary recovery method. Low salinity water injection is a relatively new method that involves injecting low salinity brines at high pressure similar to conventional water-flooding techniques, in order to recover crude oil. The effectiveness of low salinity water injection in sandstone reservoirs depends on a number of parameters such as reservoir temperature, pressure, type of clay particle and salinity of injected brine. Clay particles present on reservoir rock surfaces adsorb polar components of oil and modify wettability of sandstone rocks to the oil-wet state, which is accountable for the reduced recovery rates by conventional water-flooding. The extent of wettability alteration caused by three low salinity brines on oil-wet sandstone samples containing varying clay content (15% or 30% and type of clay (kaolinite/montmorillonite were analyzed in the laboratory experiment. Contact angles of mica powder and clay mixture (kaolinite/montmorillonite modified with crude oil were measured before and after injection with three low salinity sodium chloride brines. The effect of temperature was also analyzed for each sample. The results of the experiment indicate that samples with kaolinite clay tend to produce higher contact angles than samples with montmorillonite clay when modified with crude oil. The highest degree or extent of wettability alteration from oil-wet to intermediate-wet state upon injection with low salinity brines was observed for samples injected with brine having salinity concentration of 2000 ppm. The increase in temperature tends to produce contact angles values lying in the higher end of the intermediate-wet range (75°–115° for samples treated at 50 °C, while their corresponding

  5. Improvement of cassava for high dry matter, starch and low cyanogenic glucoside content by mutation induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nwachukwu, E C; Mbanaso, E N.A.; Ene, L S.O. [Plant Breeding Div., National Root Crops Research Inst., Umudike, Umuahia (Nigeria)

    1997-07-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is an important food in Nigeria. One drawback in its use as a staple food is the presence of cyanogenic glucosides which on hydrolysis produce the very toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN). To reduce the cyanogenic levels by mutation induction, three locally adopted and high yielding varieties of cassava, TMS 30572, NR 8817 and NR 84111 were irradiated with 20, 25 and 30 Gy gamma rays. There were a wide variation in HCN, dry matter and starch content of irradiated cassava plants, screened in the MV{sub 2} propagation. Fourteen cassavavariant lines were selected for low HCN content, and 22 lines for high dry matter content. These will be further tested for yield in replicated field trials. (author). 7 refs, 3 tabs.

  6. High content analysis of phagocytic activity and cell morphology with PuntoMorph

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Ali, Hassan; Gao, Han; Dalby-Hansen, Camilla

    2017-01-01

    methods for quantifying phagocytic activity in multiple dimensions including speed, accuracy, and resolution. Conclusions We provide a framework to facilitate the development of high content assays suitable for drug screening. For convenience, we implemented our algorithm in a standalone software package...... with image-based quantification of phagocytic activity. New method We present a robust algorithm and cell-based assay system for high content analysis of phagocytic activity. The method utilizes fluorescently labeled beads as a phagocytic substrate with defined physical properties. The algorithm employs...... content screening. Results We tested our assay system using microglial cultures. Our results recapitulated previous findings on the effects of microglial stimulation on cell morphology and phagocytic activity. Moreover, our cell-level analysis revealed that the two phenotypes associated with microglial...

  7. Improvement of cassava for high dry matter, starch and low cyanogenic glucoside content by mutation induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nwachukwu, E.C.; Mbanaso, E.N.A.; Ene, L.S.O.

    1997-01-01

    Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) is an important food in Nigeria. One drawback in its use as a staple food is the presence of cyanogenic glucosides which on hydrolysis produce the very toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN). To reduce the cyanogenic levels by mutation induction, three locally adopted and high yielding varieties of cassava, TMS 30572, NR 8817 and NR 84111 were irradiated with 20, 25 and 30 Gy gamma rays. There were a wide variation in HCN, dry matter and starch content of irradiated cassava plants, screened in the MV 2 propagation. Fourteen cassavavariant lines were selected for low HCN content, and 22 lines for high dry matter content. These will be further tested for yield in replicated field trials. (author). 7 refs, 3 tabs

  8. Comprehensive review of geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, M. Uma; Muthukumar, M.

    2017-11-01

    Human activity inevitably produces waste materials that must be managed. Some waste can be reused. However many wastes that cannot be used beneficially must be disposed of ensuring environmental safety. One of the common methods of disposal is landfilling. The most common problems of the landfill site are environmental degradation and groundwater contamination caused by leachate produced during the decomposition process of organic material and rainfall. Liner in a landfill is an important component which prevent leachate migration and prevent groundwater contamination. Earthen liners have been widely used to contain waste materials in landfill. Liners and covers for municipal and hazardous waste containment facilities are often constructed with the use of fine-grained, low plasticity soils. Because of low permeability geosynthetic clay liners and compacted clay liners are the main materials used in waste disposal landfills. This paper summaries the important geotechnical characteristics such as hydraulic conductivity, liquid limit and free swell index of geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner based on research findings. This paper also compares geosynthetic clay liner and compacted clay liner based on certain criteria such as thickness, availability of materials, vulnerability to damage etc.

  9. High Neonatal Blood Iron Content Is Associated with the Risk of Childhood Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Nyholm Kyvsgaard

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available (1 Background: Iron requirement increases during pregnancy and iron supplementation is therefore recommended in many countries. However, excessive iron intake may lead to destruction of pancreatic β-cells. Therefore, we aim to test if higher neonatal iron content in blood is associated with the risk of developing type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D in childhood; (2 Methods: A case-control study was conducted, including 199 children diagnosed with T1D before the age of 16 years from 1991 to 2005 and 199 controls matched on date of birth. Information on confounders was available in 181 cases and 154 controls. Iron was measured on a neonatal single dried blood spot sample and was analyzed by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Multivariate logistic regression was used to evaluate if iron content in whole blood was associated with the risk of T1D; (3 Results: A doubling of iron content increased the odds of developing T1D more than two-fold (odds ratio (95% CI, 2.55 (1.04; 6.24. Iron content increased with maternal age (p = 0.04 and girls had higher content than boys (p = 0.01; (4 Conclusions: Higher neonatal iron content associates to an increased risk of developing T1D before the age of 16 years. Iron supplementation during early childhood needs further investigation, including the causes of high iron in neonates.

  10. Practical technical solution for clay-contaminated sands used in concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estephane Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sand, whether natural or manufactured, shows in many instances varying degrees of high levels of clay contamination. This fact is encountered in different parts of the globe and can lead to serious problems in adjusting concrete mix proportions and requiring high water to cement ratios and/or high dosages of superplasticizers without necessarily meeting the workability requirements, even when the sand is previously washed with fresh water. In this paper, different types of sand from the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC region are being screened, analysed for their clay contents and consequent effects on plastic concrete quality. A technical solution is being proposed based on engineered superplasticizers. A testing protocol has been established to verify the robustness of optimized mix designs demonstrating the performance of the admixture in terms of initial and extended workability. In particular, it will be demonstrated that the customized concrete admixtures constitute by themselves a stand-alone answer to the usage of clay-contaminated sands in concrete.

  11. Environmental Degradation and Durability of Epoxy-Clay Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman P. Singh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This experimental investigation reports on the durability of epoxy-clay nanocomposites upon exposure to multiple environments. Nanocomposites are fabricated by mixing the clay particles using various combinations of mechanical mixing, high-shear dispersion, and ultrasonication. Clay morphology is characterized using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Specimens of both neat epoxy and the epoxy-clay nanocomposite are subjected to two environmental conditions: combined UV radiation and condensation on 3-hour repeat cycle and constant temperature-humidity, for a total exposure duration of 4770 hours. The presence of nanoscale clay inhibits moisture uptake, as demonstrated by exposure to constant temperature-humidity. Nonetheless, both materials lose mass under exposure to combined UV radiation and condensation due to the erosion of epoxy by a synergistic process. Surprisingly, the epoxy-clay specimens exhibit greater mass loss, as compared to neat epoxy. Mechanical testing shows that either environment does not significant affect the flexure modulus of either material. On the other hand, both materials undergo degradation in flexural strength when exposed to either environment. However, the epoxy-clay nanocomposite retains 37% more flexure strength than the neat epoxy after 4072 hours of exposure.

  12. Environmental Degradation and Durability of Epoxy-Clay Nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.P.; Zunjarrao, S.C.; Pandey, G.; Khait, M.; Korach, C.S.

    2010-01-01

    This experimental investigation reports on the durability of epoxy-clay nanocomposites upon exposure to multiple environments. Nanocomposites are fabricated by mixing the clay particles using various combinations of mechanical mixing, high-shear dispersion, and ultrasonication. Clay morphology is characterized using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. Specimens of both neat epoxy and the epoxy-clay nanocomposite are subjected to two environmental conditions: combined UV radiation and condensation on 3-hour repeat cycle and constant temperature-humidity, for a total exposure duration of 4770 hours. The presence of nanoscale clay inhibits moisture uptake, as demonstrated by exposure to constant temperature-humidity. Nonetheless, both materials lose mass under exposure to combined UV radiation and condensation due to the erosion of epoxy by a synergistic process. Surprisingly, the epoxy-clay specimens exhibit greater mass loss, as compared to neat epoxy. Mechanical testing shows that either environment does not significant affect the flexure modulus of either material. On the other hand, both materials undergo degradation in flexural strength when exposed to either environment. However, the epoxy-clay nanocomposite retains 37% more flexure strength than the neat epoxy after 4072 hours of exposure.

  13. The content and role of formal contracts in high-tech alliances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Gjalt; Woolthuis, Rosalinde Ja Klein

    2009-01-01

    In this study we investigate the governance structure of innovation processes in high-tech alliances, focusing on the content and role of formal contracts. The design of a formal agreement is one of the most important strategic decisions for alliance partners. Drawing upon transaction cost arguments

  14. Cultural Parallax and Content Analysis: Images of Black Women in High School History Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woyshner, Christine; Schocker, Jessica B.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the representation of Black women in high school history textbooks. To examine the extent to which Black women are represented visually and to explore how they are portrayed, the authors use a mixed-methods approach that draws on analytical techniques in content analysis and from visual culture studies. Their findings…

  15. Exceptional heat stability of high protein content dispersions containing whey protein particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saglam, D.; Venema, P.; Vries, de R.J.; Linden, van der E.

    2014-01-01

    Due to aggregation and/or gelation during thermal treatment, the amount of whey proteins that can be used in the formulation of high protein foods e.g. protein drinks, is limited. The aim of this study was to replace whey proteins with whey protein particles to increase the total protein content and

  16. Anti-cancer agents in Saudi Arabian herbals revealed by automated high-content imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjar, Dina A.; Kremb, Stephan Georg; Sioud, Salim; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid M.; Voolstra, Christian R.; Ravasi, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    in cancer therapy. Here, we used cell-based phenotypic profiling and image-based high-content screening to study the mode of action and potential cellular targets of plants historically used in Saudi Arabia's traditional medicine. We compared the cytological

  17. Chemical segregation of progeny of camphor trees with high camphor c.q. Linalool content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khien, P.V.; Chien, Ho Trung; Dung, N.X.; Leclercq, A.X.; Leclercq, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    The propagation of open pollinated seed from two camphor trees with a high camphor and linalool content, respectively, yielded 115 progeny. The chemical composition of the leaf oils of these trees was analyzed by a combination of capillary GC and GC/MS. Four chemotypes could be distinguished among

  18. Significance of clay art therapy for psychiatric patients admitted in a day hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquiléia Helena de Morais

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To understand the significance of clay art therapy for psychiatric patients admitted in a day hospital. Methodology. Qualitative, descriptive and exploratory research, undertaken with 16 patients in a day hospital in Londrina, in the state of Parana, Brazil, who participated in seven clay therapy sessions. Data collection took place from January to July 2012 through interviews guided by a semi structured questionnaire and the data were submitted to content analysis. Results. Three themes emerged: Becoming familiar with clay art therapy; Feeling clay therapy; and Realizing the effect of clay therapy. Conclusion. The use of clay as a therapeutic method by psychiatric patients promoted creativity, self-consciousness, and benefited those who sought anxiety relief.

  19. Studying the Effect of Crystal Size on Adsorption Properties of Clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdellatif, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Sorption of radionuclides on mineral surfaces strongly affects their fate and mobility in the geosphere. Therefore using of clay minerals as a barrier In LLW repositories can delay the dispersion of radionuclides into environment. That is of fundamental importance for maintaining environmental quality and for the safety and long-term performance of waste repositories. In this study XRD analysis was applied to investigate three different types of clay minerals for quantitative analysis of each type and the Mud Master program for the measurement of the crystallite thickness distribution (CTD) according to of the BWA (Bertaut-Warren Averbach) technique. Six sample s of the three types of clay (Kaolin, Aswan clay and Ball clay) were studied. XRD and Mud Master were used to investigate the relation between CTD and Cs -137 uptake mechanism onto the clay. It was found that the best adsorption capacity related to the kaolinite content and the lowest CTD

  20. Influence of the mineral composition of clay rocks on the stability of oil wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorocho, P. R; Badillo, Juan

    2012-01-01

    In the oil companies, the operation of drilling well bore could be more expensive if the composition of the rocks is clay, the cost could increase between 10 and 15% from the starting budget. In order to decrease this problem, the oil industry has spent too much money for developing mechanisms that can provide better control and stability in clay formations during the drilling. The Society Petroleum Engineers (SPE) in some researches have published that the main chemical effects that are involved in the interaction of perforation fluids and the clay formation are: 1) chemical osmosis; and 2) hydration stresses, although, there are others like: Capillary effects, dehydration, differences in pressure and cationic exchange. These factors are not present generally in independent form. At Piedemonte Llanero the problem of the well bore stability represents a high spending of money for oil companies, caused in this region by chemical factors between fluid/rock and mechanical factors as resulted of the stresses in the area. Metil Blue Testing (MBT) and X-ray Diffraction (DR-X) were made in samples of clay; these were taken from cuts extracted of boreholes drilled in some places of the Colombian Llanos. It was found that these samples had a moderate content of reactive and low content of swell minerals.The samples main component was kaolinite, this mineral does not let the rock get swell, but it produces caving in the hole. However, it is necessary to do other tests to quantify the damages and evaluate the influence of there gime of the stress during the perforation of well bore.

  1. Geochemical effects of electro-osmosis in clays

    KAUST Repository

    Loch, J. P. Gustav; Lima, Ana Teresa; Kleingeld, Pieter J.

    2010-01-01

    -osmotic flow is observed. Due to its carbonate content the bentonite is pH-buffering. Alkalization in the catholyte is substantial. Ca, Na and Sr are significantly removed from the clay and accumulate in the catholyte. Recovery in the catholyte accounts for a

  2. CERAMIC PROPERTIES OF PUGU KAOLIN CLAYS. PART 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    PART 2: EFFECT OF PHASE COMPOSITION ON FLEXURAL STRENGTH ... working in this field have established factors controlling the various ... The raw materials selected were kaolin clays from Pugu deposit in Tanzania, Norfloat potash .... the total mullite contents present in the samples since the method used does.

  3. Cyclic viscoelasticity and viscoplasticity of polypropylene/clay nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drozdov, Aleksey; Christiansen, Jesper de Claville; Hog Lejre, Anne-Lise

    2012-01-01

    Observations are reported in tensile relaxation tests under stretching and retraction on poly-propylene/clay nanocomposites with various contents of filler. A two-phase constitutive model is developed in cyclic viscoelasticity and viscoplasticity of hybrid nanocomposites. Adjustable parameters in...

  4. [Research on characteristics of soil clay mineral evolution in paddy field and dry land by XRD spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-dan; Li, Qiao; Luo, Xiang-li; Jiang, Hai-chao; Zheng, Qing-fu; Zhao, Lan-po; Wang, Ji-hong

    2014-08-01

    The present paper took the typical saline-alkali soil in Jilin province as study object, and determinated the soil clay mineral composition characteristics of soil in paddy field and dry land. Then XRD spectrum was used to analyze the evolutionary mechanism of clay mineral in the two kinds of soil. The results showed that the physical and chemical properties of soil in paddy field were better than those in dry land, and paddy field would promote the weathering of mineral particles in saline-alkali soil and enhance the silt content. Paddy field soil showed a strong potassium-removal process, with a higher degree of clay mineral hydration and lower degree of illite crystallinity. Analysis of XRD spectrum showed that the clay mineral composition was similar in two kinds of soil, while the intensity and position of diffraction peak showed difference. The evolution process of clay mineral in dry land was S/I mixture-->vermiculite, while in paddy field it was S/I mixture-->vermiculite-->kaolinite. One kind of hydroxylated 'chlorite' mineral would appear in saline-alkali soil in long-term cultivated paddy field. Taking into account that the physical and chemical properties of soil in paddy field were better then those in dry land, we could know that paddy field could help much improve soil structure, cultivate high-fertility soil and improve saline-alkali soil. This paper used XRD spectrum to determine the characteristics of clay minerals comprehensively, and analyzed two'kinds of land use comparatively, and was a new perspective of soil minerals study.

  5. Calcium content and high calcium adaptation of plants in karst areas of southwestern Hunan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaocong; Deng, Xiangwen; Xiang, Wenhua; Lei, Pifeng; Ouyang, Shuai; Wen, Hongfang; Chen, Liang

    2018-05-01

    Rocky desertification is a major ecological problem of land degradation in karst areas. In these areas, the high soil calcium (Ca) content has become an important environmental factor that can affect the restoration of vegetation. Consequently, the screening of plant species that can adapt to high Ca soil environments is a critical step in vegetation restoration. In this study, three grades of rocky desertification sample areas were selected in karst areas of southwestern Hunan, China (LRD: light rocky desertification; MRD: moderate rocky desertification; and IRD: intense rocky desertification). Each grade of these sample areas had three sample plots in different slope positions, each of which had four small quadrats (one in rocky-side areas, three in non-rocky-side areas). We measured the Ca content of leaves, branches, and roots from 41 plant species, as well as soil total Ca (TCa) and exchangeable Ca (ECa) at depths of 0-15, 15-30, and 30-45 cm in each small quadrat. The results showed that the soil Ca2+ content in rocky-side areas was significantly higher than that in non-rocky-side areas (p desertification, in the order IRD > MRD > LRD. For all plant functional groups, the plant Ca content of aboveground parts was significantly higher than that of the belowground parts (p 1). The differences in Ca2+ content between the aboveground and belowground parts of the 17 dominant species were calculated, and their correlations with soil ECa content were analyzed. The results showed that these 17 species can be divided into three categories: Ca-indifferent plants, high-Ca plants, and low-Ca plants. These findings provide a vital theoretical basis and practical guide for vegetation restoration and ecosystem reconstruction in rocky desertification areas.

  6. What makes a natural clay antibacterial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lynda B.; Metge, David W.; Eberl, Dennis D.; Harvey, Ronald W.; Turner, Amanda G.; Prapaipong, Panjai; Port-Peterson, Amisha T.

    2011-01-01

    Natural clays have been used in ancient and modern medicine, but the mechanism(s) that make certain clays lethal against bacterial pathogens has not been identified. We have compared the depositional environments, mineralogies, and chemistries of clays that exhibit antibacterial effects on a broad spectrum of human pathogens including antibiotic resistant strains. Natural antibacterial clays contain nanoscale (2+ solubility.

  7. Gamma and electron radiation effects on agricultural by-products with high fibre content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, J.W.; Baer, M.; Nehring, K.

    1983-01-01

    Gamma and electron radiation effects on wheat straw, oat straw, barley straw, rye straw and dried green fodder are reported. In vitro and in vivo studies show that the digestibility of these agricultural by-products with high fibre content can be increased up to 80% and more at high doses. The increase of the digestibility is connected with a depolymerization of the cellulose and hemicellulose. (author)

  8. The effect of High Pressure and High Temperature processing on carotenoids and chlorophylls content in some vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Celia; Baranda, Ana Beatriz; Martínez de Marañón, Iñigo

    2014-11-15

    The effect of High Pressure (HP) and High Pressure High Temperature (HPHT) processing on carotenoid and chlorophyll content of six vegetables was evaluated. In general, carotenoid content was not significantly influenced by HP or HPHT treatments (625 MPa; 5 min; 20, 70 and 117 °C). Regarding chlorophylls, HP treatment caused no degradation or slight increases, while HPHT processes degraded both chlorophylls. Chlorophyll b was more stable than chlorophyll a at 70 °C, but both of them were highly degraded at 117 °C. HPHT treatment at 117 °C provided products with a good retention of carotenoids and colour in the case of red vegetables. Even though the carotenoids also remained in the green vegetables, their chlorophylls and therefore their colour were so affected that milder temperatures need to be applied. As an industrial scale equipment was used, results will be useful for future industrial implementation of this technology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Law of nonlinear flow in saturated clays and radial consolidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    It was derived that micro-scale amount level of average pore radius of clay changed from 0.01 to 0.1 micron by an equivalent concept of flow in porous media. There is good agreement between the derived results and test ones. Results of experiments show that flow in micro-scale pore of saturated clays follows law of nonlinear flow. Theoretical analyses demonstrate that an interaction of solid-liquid interfaces varies inversely with permeability or porous radius. The interaction is an important reason why nonlinear flow in saturated clays occurs. An exact mathematical model was presented for nonlinear flow in micro-scale pore of saturated clays. Dimension and physical meanings of parameters of it are definite. A new law of nonlinear flow in saturated clays was established. It can describe characteristics of flow curve of the whole process of the nonlinear flow from low hydraulic gradient to high one. Darcy law is a special case of the new law. A mathematical model was presented for consolidation of nonlinear flow in radius direction in saturated clays with constant rate based on the new law of nonlinear flow. Equations of average mass conservation and moving boundary, and formula of excess pore pressure distribution and average degree of consolidation for nonlinear flow in saturated clay were derived by using an idea of viscous boundary layer, a method of steady state in stead of transient state and a method of integral of an equation. Laws of excess pore pressure distribution and changes of average degree of consolidation with time were obtained. Results show that velocity of moving boundary decreases because of the nonlinear flow in saturated clay. The results can provide geology engineering and geotechnical engineering of saturated clay with new scientific bases. Calculations of average degree of consolidation of the Darcy flow are a special case of that of the nonlinear flow.

  10. Internal friction in iron-aluminium alloys having a high aluminium content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillairet, J.; Delaplace, J.; Silvent, A.

    1966-01-01

    By using a torsion pendulum to measure the internal friction of iron-aluminium alloys containing between 25 and 50 atom per cent of aluminium, it has been possible to show the existence of three damping peaks due to interstitial carbon. Their evolution is followed as a function of the carbon content, of the thermal treatment and of the aluminium content. A model based on the preferential occupation of tetrahedral sites is proposed as an interpretation of the results. A study of the Zener peak in these substitution alloys shows also that a part of the short distance disorder existing at high temperatures can be preserved by quenching. (author) [fr

  11. SBR Brazilian organophilic/clay nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guimaraes, Thiago R.; Valenzuela-Diaz, Francisco R.; Morales, Ana Rita; Paiva, Lucilene B.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work is the obtaining of SBR composites using a Brazilian raw bentonite and the same bentonite treated with an organic salt. The clays were characterized by XRD. The clay addition in the composites was 10 pcr. The composites were characterized by XRD and had measured theirs tension strength (TS). The composite with Brazilian treated clay showed TS 233% higher than a composite with no clay, 133% higher than a composite with Cloisite 30B organophilic clay and 17% lower than a composite with Cloisite 20 A organophilic clay. XRD and TS data evidence that the composite with Brazilian treated clay is an intercalated nanocomposite. (author)

  12. The effect of manganese content on mechanical properties of high titanium microalloyed steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaolin, E-mail: lixiaolinwork@163.com [Shougang Research Institute of Technology, Beijing 100041 (China); Li, Fei; Cui, Yang; Xiao, Baoliang [Shougang Research Institute of Technology, Beijing 100041 (China); Wang, Xuemin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2016-11-20

    In this work, in order to achieve an optimum combination of high strength, ductility and toughness of high Ti microalloyed steel, extensive research efforts were exerted to study the effect of soaking temperature, manganese and sulfur content on properties of titanium steels. Precipitation hardening of Ti-bearing steels has been found to vary with different soaking temperature. Higher strength was achieved in these steels at higher soaking temperature due to dissolution of more TiC, Ti{sub 4}S{sub 2}C{sub 2} and little TiN, which lead to re-precipitation of fine carbides with greater volume fraction. The results of transmission electron microscope (TEM)analysis indicates that there were more and finer TiC precipitates coherent or semi-coherent with the ferrite matrix in the high manganese content steel than in low manganese content steel. The marked improvement in strength is also associated with low sulfur content. TiC particles smaller than 20 nm in 8Ti-8Mn steel help enhance strength to higher than 302 MPa compared with 8Mn steel.

  13. Painting with Clay: A Study of the Masters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skophammer, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Plasticine clay is a bendable material that is easily manipulated by students of all ages. It is a great material to work with because it does not dry out from day to day, so high-school students can work on an extended project. They do not have to worry about the clay drying and cracking, and the entire work of art does not have to be completed…

  14. A High Resolution Capacitive Sensing System for the Measurement of Water Content in Crude Oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Muhammad Zubair; Tang, Tong Boon

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a non-intrusive system to measure ultra-low water content in crude oil. The system is based on a capacitance to phase angle conversion method. Water content is measured with a capacitance sensor comprising two semi-cylindrical electrodes mounted on the outer side of a glass tube. The presence of water induces a capacitance change that in turn converts into a phase angle, with respect to a main oscillator. A differential sensing technique is adopted not only to ensure high immunity against temperature variation and background noise, but also to eliminate phase jitter and amplitude variation of the main oscillator that could destabilize the output. The complete capacitive sensing system was implemented in hardware and experiment results using crude oil samples demonstrated that a resolution of ±50 ppm of water content in crude oil was achieved by the proposed design. PMID:24967606

  15. A High Resolution Capacitive Sensing System for the Measurement of Water Content in Crude Oil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zubair Aslam

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design of a non-intrusive system to measure ultra-low water content in crude oil. The system is based on a capacitance to phase angle conversion method. Water content is measured with a capacitance sensor comprising two semi-cylindrical electrodes mounted on the outer side of a glass tube. The presence of water induces a capacitance change that in turn converts into a phase angle, with respect to a main oscillator. A differential sensing technique is adopted not only to ensure high immunity against temperature variation and background noise, but also to eliminate phase jitter and amplitude variation of the main oscillator that could destabilize the output. The complete capacitive sensing system was implemented in hardware and experiment results using crude oil samples demonstrated that a resolution of ±50 ppm of water content in crude oil was achieved by the proposed design.

  16. Investigation of water content in primary upper shield of high temperature engineering test reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumita, Junya; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Mogi, Haruyoshi; Itahashi, Shuuji; Kitami, Toshiyuki; Akutu, Youichi; Fuchita, Yasuhiro; Kawaguchi, Toru; Moriya, Masahiro

    1999-09-01

    A primary upper shield of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is composed of concrete (grout) which is packed into iron frames. The main function of the primary upper shield is to attenuate neutron and gamma ray from the core, that leads to satisfy dose equivalent rate limit of operating floor and stand-pipe room. Water content in the concrete is one of the most important things because it strongly affects neutron-shielding ability. Then, we carried out out-of-pile experiments to investigate relationship between temperature and water content in the concrete. Based on the experimental results, a hydrolysis-diffusion model was developed to investigate water release behavior from the concrete. The model showed that water content used for shielding design in the primary upper shield of the HTTR will be maintained if temperature during operating life is under 110degC. (author)

  17. Designing novel bulk metallic glass composites with a high aluminum content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z P; Gao, J E; Wu, Y; Wang, H; Liu, X J; Lu, Z P

    2013-11-27

    The long-standing challenge for forming Al-based BMGs and their matrix composites with a critical size larger than 1 mm have not been answered over the past three decades. In this paper, we reported formation of a series of BMG matrix composites which contain a high Al content up to 55 at.%. These composites can be cast at extraordinarily low cooling rates, compatible with maximum rod diameters of over a centimetre in copper mold casting. Our results indicate that proper additions of transition element Fe which have a positive heat of mixing with the main constituents La and Ce can appreciably improve the formability of the BMG matrix composites by suppressing the precipitation of Al(La,Ce) phase resulted from occurrence of the phase separation. However, the optimum content of Fe addition is strongly dependant on the total amount of the Al content in the Al-(CoCu)-(La,Ce) alloys.

  18. Formulation and make-up of simulated concentrated water, high ionic content aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gdowski, G.

    1997-01-01

    This procedure describes the formulation and make-up of Simulated Concentrated Water (SCW), a high-ionic-content water to be used for Activity E-20-50 Long-Term Corrosion Studies. This water has an ionic content which is nominally a factor of a thousand higher than that of representative waters at or near Yucca Mountain. Representative waters were chosen as J-13 well water [Harrar, 1990] and perched water at Yucca Mountain [Glassley, 1996]. J-13 well water is obtained from ground water that is in contact with the Topopah Spring tuff, which is the repository horizon rock. The perched water is located in the Topopah Spring tuff, but below the repository horizon and above the water table. A nominal thousand times higher ionic content was chosen to simulate the water that would result from the wetting of salts which have been previously deposited on a container surface

  19. Preparation of Al/Fe-Pillared Clays: Effect of the Starting Mineral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Helir-Joseph; Blanco, Carolina; Gil, Antonio; Vicente, Miguel-Ángel; Galeano, Luis-Alejandro

    2017-11-28

    Four natural clays were modified with mixed polyoxocations of Al/Fe for evaluating the effect of the physicochemical properties of the starting materials (chemical composition, abundance of expandable clay phases, cationic exchange capacity and textural properties) on final physicochemical and catalytic properties of Al/Fe-PILCs. The aluminosilicate denoted C2 exhibited the highest potential as starting material in the preparation of Al/Fe-PILC catalysts, mainly due to its starting cationic exchange capacity (192 meq/100 g) and the dioctahedral nature of the smectite phase. These characteristics favored the intercalation of the mixed (Al 13- x /Fe x ) 7+ Keggin-type polyoxocations, stabilizing a basal spacing of 17.4 Å and high increase of the BET surface (194 m²/g), mainly represented in microporous content. According to H₂-TPR analyses, catalytic performance of the incorporated Fe in the Catalytic Wet Peroxide Oxidation (CWPO) reaction strongly depends on the level of location in mixed Al/Fe pillars. Altogether, such physicochemical characteristics promoted high performance in CWPO catalytic degradation of methyl orange in aqueous medium at very mild reaction temperatures (25.0 ± 1.0 °C) and pressure (76 kPa), achieving TOC removal of 52% and 70% of azo-dye decolourization in only 75 min of reaction under very low concentration of clay catalyst (0.05 g/L).

  20. Reuse of wastewater sludge with marine clay as a new resource of construction aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, J H; Show, K Y; Lee, D J; Hong, S Y

    2004-01-01

    The disposal of sludge from wastewater treatment presents highly complex problems to any municipality. Most of the sludge disposal methods have varying degrees of environmental impact. Hence, it is necessary to explore potential areas of reuse in order to alleviate sludge disposal problems and to conserve natural resources. Industrial sludge and marine clay are two forms of high-volume wastes. Using these wastes as a resource of raw materials to produce construct