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Sample records for high cellular activity

  1. Evaluation of biological activities of highly diluted nucleotide sequences by using cellular models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Dorfman

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: highly diluted specific nucleic acids (SNA®, designed to modulate viral and cytokine genes expression, are currently used in Micro-Immunotherapy to treat viral infections and immune disorders. Although some preliminary studies have showed clinical benefit of these homeopathic preparations [1], no experimental data are available to explain their mechanism of action. Aims: to investigate the in vitro effect of two sets of highly diluted (HD SNA targeting i latent/lytic Epstein-Barr virus (SNA EBV and ii TNF-α and its receptor p55 involved in rheumatoid arthritis (SNA RA on cellular models. Methodology: serial homeopathic dilutions of SNA EBV and SNA RA (15cH-18cH were tested on a EBV-positive B-lymphoblastoid (B95-8 and on a LPS-stimulated macrophage (THP1 cell lines respectively, in comparison with agitated/diluted water and scramble DNA sequences prepared in the same conditions (negative controls. For B95-8 proliferative model, high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1 was used as reference. Analyzed biological parameters on B95-8 were i cell proliferation measured after 24 and 48h of incubation with HD SNA and ii expression of the EBV ZEBRA protein in response to TGF-β by Western-blotting (T+24h. For THP1 model, TNF-α synthesis and release were determined by RT-qPCR and ELISA (protein, after stimulation by LPS (1µg/ml and HD SNA co-administration. Results: we demonstrated that HD SNA RA significantly down-regulated TNF-α synthesis and release. This biological activity was showed to be specific (no effect of HD scramble SNA and related to the level of dilution (maximal effect with higher dilutions. Unexpectedly, a biological effect of agitated/diluted water was also detected in both cellular models. For B95-8 model, this effect resulted in a significant decrease of B95-8 proliferation (comparable to the HMGB1 reference and an inhibition of ZEBRA expression. Similarly, a reproducible

  2. Versatile assays for high throughput screening for activators or inhibitors of intracellular proteases and their cellular regulators.

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    Hideki Hayashi

    Full Text Available Intracellular proteases constitute a class of promising drug discovery targets. Methods for high throughput screening against these targets are generally limited to in vitro biochemical assays that can suffer many technical limitations, as well as failing to capture the biological context of proteases within the cellular pathways that lead to their activation. METHODS #ENTITYSTARTX00026;We describe here a versatile system for reconstituting protease activation networks in yeast and assaying the activity of these pathways using a cleavable transcription factor substrate in conjunction with reporter gene read-outs. The utility of these versatile assay components and their application for screening strategies was validated for all ten human Caspases, a family of intracellular proteases involved in cell death and inflammation, including implementation of assays for high throughput screening (HTS of chemical libraries and functional screening of cDNA libraries. The versatility of the technology was also demonstrated for human autophagins, cysteine proteases involved in autophagy.Altogether, the yeast-based systems described here for monitoring activity of ectopically expressed mammalian proteases provide a fascile platform for functional genomics and chemical library screening.

  3. High Cellular Monocyte Activation in People Living With Human Immunodeficiency Virus on Combination Antiretroviral Therapy and Lifestyle-Matched Controls Is Associated With Greater Inflammation in Cerebrospinal Fluid

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    Booiman, Thijs; Wit, Ferdinand W.; Maurer, Irma; De Francesco, Davide; Sabin, Caroline A.; Harskamp, Agnes M.; Prins, Maria; Garagnani, Paolo; Pirazzini, Chiara; Franceschi, Claudio; Fuchs, Dietmar; Gisslén, Magnus; Winston, Alan; Reiss, Peter; Reiss, P.; Wit, F. W. N. M.; Schouten, J.; Kooij, K. W.; van Zoest, R. A.; Elsenga, B. C.; Janssen, F. R.; Heidenrijk, M.; Zikkenheiner, W.; van der Valk, M.; Kootstra, N. A.; Booiman, T.; Harskamp-Holwerda, A. M.; Boeser-Nunnink, B.; Maurer, I.; Mangas Ruiz, M. M.; Girigorie, A. F.; Villaudy, J.; Frankin, E.; Pasternak, A.; Berkhout, B.; van der Kuyl, T.; Portegies, P.; Schmand, B. A.; Geurtsen, G. J.; ter Stege, J. A.; Klein Twennaar, M.; Majoie, C. B. L. M.; Caan, M. W. A.; Su, T.; Weijer, K.; Bisschop, P. H. L. T.; Kalsbeek, A.; Wezel, M.; Visser, I.; Ruhé, H. G.; Franceschi, C.; Garagnani, P.; Pirazzini, C.; Capri, M.; Dall’Olio, F.; Chiricolo, M.; Salvioli, S.; Hoeijmakers, J.; Pothof, J.; Prins, M.; Martens, M.; Moll, S.; Berkel, J.; Totté, M.; Kovalev, S.; Gisslén, M.; Fuchs, D.; Zetterberg, H.; Winston, A.; Underwood, J.; McDonald, L.; Stott, M.; Legg, K.; Lovell, A.; Erlwein, O.; Doyle, N.; Kingsley, C.; Sharp, D. J.; Leech, R.; Cole, J. H.; Zaheri, S.; Hillebregt, M. M. J.; Ruijs, Y. M. C.; Benschop, D. P.; Burger, D.; de Graaff-Teulen, M.; Guaraldi, G.; Bürkle, A.; Sindlinger, T.; Moreno-Villanueva, M.; Keller, A.; Sabin, C.; de Francesco, D.; Libert, C.; Dewaele, S.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Increased monocyte activation and intestinal damage have been shown to be predictive for the increased morbidity and mortality observed in treated people living with human immunodeficiency virus (PLHIV). Methods. A cross-sectional analysis of cellular and soluble markers of monocyte activation, coagulation, intestinal damage, and inflammation in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of PLHIV with suppressed plasma viremia on combination antiretroviral therapy and age and demographically comparable HIV-negative individuals participating in the Comorbidity in Relation to AIDS (COBRA) cohort and, where appropriate, age-matched blood bank donors (BBD). Results. People living with HIV, HIV-negative individuals, and BBD had comparable percentages of classical, intermediate, and nonclassical monocytes. Expression of CD163, CD32, CD64, HLA-DR, CD38, CD40, CD86, CD91, CD11c, and CX3CR1 on monocytes did not differ between PLHIV and HIV-negative individuals, but it differed significantly from BBD. Principal component analysis revealed that 57.5% of PLHIV and 62.5% of HIV-negative individuals had a high monocyte activation profile compared with 2.9% of BBD. Cellular monocyte activation in the COBRA cohort was strongly associated with soluble markers of monocyte activation and inflammation in the CSF. Conclusions. People living with HIV and HIV-negative COBRA participants had high levels of cellular monocyte activation compared with age-matched BBD. High monocyte activation was predictive for inflammation in the CSF. PMID:28680905

  4. Glycosylation regulates prestin cellular activity.

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    Rajagopalan, Lavanya; Organ-Darling, Louise E; Liu, Haiying; Davidson, Amy L; Raphael, Robert M; Brownell, William E; Pereira, Fred A

    2010-03-01

    Glycosylation is a common post-translational modification of proteins and is implicated in a variety of cellular functions including protein folding, degradation, sorting and trafficking, and membrane protein recycling. The membrane protein prestin is an essential component of the membrane-based motor driving electromotility changes (electromotility) in the outer hair cell (OHC), a central process in auditory transduction. Prestin was earlier identified to possess two N-glycosylation sites (N163, N166) that, when mutated, marginally affect prestin nonlinear capacitance (NLC) function in cultured cells. Here, we show that the double mutant prestin(NN163/166AA) is not glycosylated and shows the expected NLC properties in the untreated and cholesterol-depleted HEK 293 cell model. In addition, unlike WT prestin that readily forms oligomers, prestin(NN163/166AA) is enriched as monomers and more mobile in the plasma membrane, suggesting that oligomerization of prestin is dependent on glycosylation but is not essential for the generation of NLC in HEK 293 cells. However, in the presence of increased membrane cholesterol, unlike the hyperpolarizing shift in NLC seen with WT prestin, cells expressing prestin(NN163/166AA) exhibit a linear capacitance function. In an attempt to explain this finding, we discovered that both WT prestin and prestin(NN163/166AA) participate in cholesterol-dependent cellular trafficking. In contrast to WT prestin, prestin(NN163/166AA) shows a significant cholesterol-dependent decrease in cell-surface expression, which may explain the loss of NLC function. Based on our observations, we conclude that glycosylation regulates self-association and cellular trafficking of prestin(NN163/166AA). These observations are the first to implicate a regulatory role for cellular trafficking and sorting in prestin function. We speculate that the cholesterol regulation of prestin occurs through localization to and internalization from membrane microdomains by

  5. Mapping whole-brain activity with cellular resolution by light-sheet microscopy and high-throughput image analysis (Conference Presentation)

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    Silvestri, Ludovico; Rudinskiy, Nikita; Paciscopi, Marco; Müllenbroich, Marie Caroline; Costantini, Irene; Sacconi, Leonardo; Frasconi, Paolo; Hyman, Bradley T.; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2016-03-01

    Mapping neuronal activity patterns across the whole brain with cellular resolution is a challenging task for state-of-the-art imaging methods. Indeed, despite a number of technological efforts, quantitative cellular-resolution activation maps of the whole brain have not yet been obtained. Many techniques are limited by coarse resolution or by a narrow field of view. High-throughput imaging methods, such as light sheet microscopy, can be used to image large specimens with high resolution and in reasonable times. However, the bottleneck is then moved from image acquisition to image analysis, since many TeraBytes of data have to be processed to extract meaningful information. Here, we present a full experimental pipeline to quantify neuronal activity in the entire mouse brain with cellular resolution, based on a combination of genetics, optics and computer science. We used a transgenic mouse strain (Arc-dVenus mouse) in which neurons which have been active in the last hours before brain fixation are fluorescently labelled. Samples were cleared with CLARITY and imaged with a custom-made confocal light sheet microscope. To perform an automatic localization of fluorescent cells on the large images produced, we used a novel computational approach called semantic deconvolution. The combined approach presented here allows quantifying the amount of Arc-expressing neurons throughout the whole mouse brain. When applied to cohorts of mice subject to different stimuli and/or environmental conditions, this method helps finding correlations in activity between different neuronal populations, opening the possibility to infer a sort of brain-wide 'functional connectivity' with cellular resolution.

  6. On-Chip Detection of Cellular Activity

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    Almog, R.; Daniel, R.; Vernick, S.; Ron, A.; Ben-Yoav, H.; Shacham-Diamand, Y.

    The use of on-chip cellular activity monitoring for biological/chemical sensing is promising for environmental, medical and pharmaceutical applications. The miniaturization revolution in microelectronics is harnessed to provide on-chip detection of cellular activity, opening new horizons for miniature, fast, low cost and portable screening and monitoring devices. In this chapter we survey different on-chip cellular activity detection technologies based on electrochemical, bio-impedance and optical detection. Both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell-on-chip technologies are mentioned and reviewed.

  7. Guiding cellular activity with polarized light.

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    Constant, Colin; Bergano, Andrea; Sugaya, Kiminobu; Dogariu, Aristide

    2017-07-03

    Actin, cytoskeleton protein forming microfilaments, play a crucial role in cellular motility. Here we show that exposure to very low levels of polarized light guide their orientation in-vivo within the live cell. Using a simple model to describe the role of actin-filament orientation in directional cellular motion, we demonstrate that the actin polymerization/depolymerization mechanism develops primarily along this direction and, under certain conditions, can lead to guidance of the cell movement. Our results also show a dose dependent increase in actin activity in direct correspondence to the level of laser irradiance. We found that total expression of Tau protein, which stabilize microtubules, was decreased by the irradiance, indicating that exposure to the light may change the activity of kinase, leading to increased cell activity. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. A high-efficiency cellular extraction system for biological proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in quantitative high-resolution mass spectrometry have led to significant improvements in the sensitivity and specificity of biochemical analyses of cellular reactions, protein-protein interactions, and small molecule drug discovery. These approaches depend on cellular proteome extraction that preserves native protein activities. Here, we systematically analyzed mechanical methods of cell lysis and physical protein extraction to identify those that maximize the extraction ...

  9. Hierarchical Cellular Structures in High-Capacity Cellular Communication Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, R K; Agrawal, N K

    2011-01-01

    In the prevailing cellular environment, it is important to provide the resources for the fluctuating traffic demand exactly in the place and at the time where and when they are needed. In this paper, we explored the ability of hierarchical cellular structures with inter layer reuse to increase the capacity of mobile communication network by applying total frequency hopping (T-FH) and adaptive frequency allocation (AFA) as a strategy to reuse the macro and micro cell resources without frequency planning in indoor pico cells [11]. The practical aspects for designing macro- micro cellular overlays in the existing big urban areas are also explained [4]. Femto cells are inducted in macro / micro / pico cells hierarchical structure to achieve the required QoS cost effectively.

  10. Cellular receptors for plasminogen activators recent advances.

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    Ellis, V

    1997-10-01

    The generation of the broad-specificity protease plasmin by the plasminogen activators urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) is implicated in a variety of pathophysiological processes, including vascular fibrin dissolution, extracellular matrix degradation and remodeling, and cell migration. A mechanism for the regulation of plasmin generation is through binding of the plasminogen activators to specific cellular receptors: uPA to the glycolipid-anchored membrane protein urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and tPA to a number of putative binding sites. The uPA-uPAR complex can interact with a variety of ligands, including plasminogen, vitronectin, and integrins, indicating a multifunctional role for uPAR, regulating not only efficient and spatially restricted plasmin generation but also having the potential to modulate cell adhesion and signal transduction. The cellular binding of tPA, although less well characterized, also has the capacity to regulate plasmin generation and to play a significant role in vessel-wall biology. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:227-234). © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc.

  11. Coordination of autophagy with other cellular activities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan WANG; Zheng-hong QIN

    2013-01-01

    The cell biological phenomenon of autophagy has attracted increasing attention in recent years,partly as a consequence of the discovery of key components of its cellular machinery.Autophagy plays a crucial role in a myriad of cellular functions.Autophagy has its own regulatory mechanisms,but this process is not isolated.Autophagy is coordinated with other cellular activities to maintain cell homeostasis.Autophagy is critical for a range of human physiological processes.The multifunctional roles of autophagy are explained by its ability to interact with several key components of various cell pathways.In this review,we focus on the coordination between autophagy and other physiological processes,including the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS),energy homeostasis,aging,programmed cell death,the immune responses,microbial invasion and inflammation.The insights gained from investigating autophagic networks should increase our understanding of their roles in human diseases and their potential as targets for therapeutic intervention.

  12. Cellular antioxidant activity of common vegetables.

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    Song, Wei; Derito, Christopher M; Liu, M Keshu; He, Xiangjiu; Dong, Mei; Liu, Rui Hai

    2010-06-01

    The measurement of antioxidant activity using biologically relevant assays is important to screen fruits, vegetables, natural products, and dietary supplements for potential health benefits. The cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay quantifies antioxidant activity using a cell culture model and was developed to meet the need for a more biologically representative method than the popular chemistry antioxidant capacity measures. The objective of the study was to determine the CAA, total phenolic contents, and oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) values of 27 vegetables commonly consumed in the United States. Beets, broccoli, and red pepper had the highest CAA values, whereas cucumber had the lowest. CAA values were significantly correlated to total phenolic content. Potatoes were found to be the largest contributors of vegetable phenolics and CAA to the American diet. Increased fruit and vegetable consumption is an effective strategy to increase antioxidant intake and decrease oxidative stress and may lead to reduced risk of developing chronic diseases, such as cancer and cardiovascular disease.

  13. Dynamics of active cellular response under stress

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    de, Rumi; Zemel, Assaf; Safran, Samuel

    2008-03-01

    Forces exerted by and on adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. In addition, recent experiments have shown that stem cell differentiation is controlled, at least in part, by the elasticity of the surrounding matrix. Using a simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to both the mechanosensitive nature of cells and the elastic response of the matrix, we predict the dynamics of orientation of cells. The model predicts many features observed in measurements of cellular forces and orientation including the increase with time of the forces generated by cells in the absence of applied stress and the consequent decrease of the force in the presence of quasi-static stresses. We also explain the puzzling observation of parallel alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency. The dependence of the cell orientation angle on the Poisson ratio of the surrounding material can be used to distinguish systems in which cell activity is controlled by stress from those where cell activity is controlled by strain. Reference: Nature Physics, vol. 3, pp 655 (2007).

  14. A High-Efficiency Cellular Extraction System for Biological Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhabaria, Avantika; Cifani, Paolo; Reed, Casie; Steen, Hanno; Kentsis, Alex

    2015-08-07

    Recent developments in quantitative high-resolution mass spectrometry have led to significant improvements in the sensitivity and specificity of the biochemical analyses of cellular reactions, protein-protein interactions, and small-molecule-drug discovery. These approaches depend on cellular proteome extraction that preserves native protein activities. Here, we systematically analyzed mechanical methods of cell lysis and physical protein extraction to identify those that maximize the extraction of cellular proteins while minimizing their denaturation. Cells were mechanically disrupted using Potter-Elvehjem homogenization, probe- or adaptive-focused acoustic sonication, and were in the presence of various detergents, including polyoxyethylene ethers and esters, glycosides, and zwitterions. Using fluorescence spectroscopy, biochemical assays, and mass spectrometry proteomics, we identified the combination of adaptive focused acoustic (AFA) sonication in the presence of a binary poloxamer-based mixture of octyl-β-glucoside and Pluronic F-127 to maximize the depth and yield of the proteome extraction while maintaining native protein activity. This binary poloxamer extraction system allowed for native proteome extraction comparable in coverage to the proteomes extracted using denaturing SDS or guanidine-containing buffers, including the efficient extraction of all major cellular organelles. This high-efficiency cellular extraction system should prove useful for a variety of cell biochemical studies, including structural and functional proteomics.

  15. Mathematical analysis of complex cellular activity

    CERN Document Server

    Bertram, Richard; Teka, Wondimu; Vo, Theodore; Wechselberger, Martin; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2015-01-01

    This book contains two review articles on mathematical physiology that deal with closely related topics but were written and can be read independently. The first article reviews the basic theory of calcium oscillations (common to almost all cell types), including spatio-temporal behaviors such as waves. The second article uses, and expands on, much of this basic theory to show how the interaction of cytosolic calcium oscillators with membrane ion channels can result in highly complex patterns of electrical spiking. Through these examples one can see clearly how multiple oscillatory processes interact within a cell, and how mathematical methods can be used to understand such interactions better. The two reviews provide excellent examples of how mathematics and physiology can learn from each other, and work jointly towards a better understanding of complex cellular processes. Review 1: Richard Bertram, Joel Tabak, Wondimu Teka, Theodore Vo, Martin Wechselberger: Geometric Singular Perturbation Analysis of Burst...

  16. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A.

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response.

  17. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response.

  18. Cellular reprogramming through mitogen-activated protein kinases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin eLee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades are conserved eukaryote signaling modules where MAPKs, as the final kinases in the cascade, phosphorylate protein substrates to regulate cellular processes. While some progress in the identification of MAPK substrates has been made in plants, the knowledge on the spectrum of substrates and their mechanistic action is still fragmentary. In this focused review, we discuss the biological implications of the data in our original paper (Sustained mitogen-activated protein kinase activation reprograms defense metabolism and phosphoprotein profile in Arabidopsis thaliana; Frontiers in Plant Science 5: 554 in the context of related research. In our work, we mimicked in vivo activation of two stress-activated MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6, through transgenic manipulation of Arabidopsis thaliana and used phosphoproteomics analysis to identify potential novel MAPK substrates. Here, we plotted the identified putative MAPK substrates (and downstream phosphoproteins as a global protein clustering network. Based on a highly stringent selection confidence level, the core networks highlighted a MAPK-induced cellular reprogramming at multiple levels of gene and protein expression – including transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, post-translational (such as protein modification, folding and degradation steps, and also protein re-compartmentalization. Additionally, the increase in putative substrates/phosphoproteins of energy metabolism and various secondary metabolite biosynthesis pathways coincides with the observed accumulation of defense antimicrobial substances as detected by metabolome analysis. Furthermore, detection of protein networks in phospholipid or redox elements suggests activation of downstream signaling events. Taken in context with other studies, MAPKs are key regulators that reprogram cellular events to orchestrate defense signaling in eukaryotes.

  19. Stable cellular senescence is associated with persistent DDR activation.

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    Fumagalli, Marzia; Rossiello, Francesca; Mondello, Chiara; d'Adda di Fagagna, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is activated upon DNA damage generation to promote DNA repair and inhibit cell cycle progression in the presence of a lesion. Cellular senescence is a permanent cell cycle arrest characterized by persistent DDR activation. However, some reports suggest that DDR activation is a feature only of early cellular senescence that is then lost with time. This challenges the hypothesis that cellular senescence is caused by persistent DDR activation. To address this issue, we studied DDR activation dynamics in senescent cells. Here we show that normal human fibroblasts retain DDR markers months after replicative senescence establishment. Consistently, human fibroblasts from healthy aged donors display markers of DDR activation even three years in culture after entry into replicative cellular senescence. However, by extending our analyses to different human cell strains, we also observed an apparent DDR loss with time following entry into cellular senescence. This though correlates with the inability of these cell strains to survive in culture upon replicative or irradiation-induced cellular senescence. We propose a model to reconcile these results. Cell strains not suffering the prolonged in vitro culture stress retain robust DDR activation that persists for years, indicating that under physiological conditions persistent DDR is causally involved in senescence establishment and maintenance. However, cell strains unable to maintain cell viability in vitro, due to their inability to cope with prolonged cell culture-associated stress, show an only-apparent reduction in DDR foci which is in fact due to selective loss of the most damaged cells.

  20. Stable cellular senescence is associated with persistent DDR activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Fumagalli

    Full Text Available The DNA damage response (DDR is activated upon DNA damage generation to promote DNA repair and inhibit cell cycle progression in the presence of a lesion. Cellular senescence is a permanent cell cycle arrest characterized by persistent DDR activation. However, some reports suggest that DDR activation is a feature only of early cellular senescence that is then lost with time. This challenges the hypothesis that cellular senescence is caused by persistent DDR activation. To address this issue, we studied DDR activation dynamics in senescent cells. Here we show that normal human fibroblasts retain DDR markers months after replicative senescence establishment. Consistently, human fibroblasts from healthy aged donors display markers of DDR activation even three years in culture after entry into replicative cellular senescence. However, by extending our analyses to different human cell strains, we also observed an apparent DDR loss with time following entry into cellular senescence. This though correlates with the inability of these cell strains to survive in culture upon replicative or irradiation-induced cellular senescence. We propose a model to reconcile these results. Cell strains not suffering the prolonged in vitro culture stress retain robust DDR activation that persists for years, indicating that under physiological conditions persistent DDR is causally involved in senescence establishment and maintenance. However, cell strains unable to maintain cell viability in vitro, due to their inability to cope with prolonged cell culture-associated stress, show an only-apparent reduction in DDR foci which is in fact due to selective loss of the most damaged cells.

  1. Cellular automaton rules conserving the number of active sites

    CERN Document Server

    Boccara, N; Boccara, Nino; Fuks, Henryk

    1997-01-01

    This paper shows how to determine all the unidimensional two-state cellular automaton rules of a given number of inputs which conserve the number of active sites. These rules have to satisfy a necessary and sufficient condition. If the active sites are viewed as cells occupied by identical particles, these cellular automaton rules represent evolution operators of systems of identical interacting particles whose total number is conserved. Some of these rules, which allow motion in both directions, mimic ensembles of one-dimensional pseudo-random walkers. The corresponding stochastic processes are, however, not Gaussian.

  2. Active elastic thin shell theory for cellular deformations

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    Berthoumieux, Hélène; Maître, Jean-Léon; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp; Paluch, Ewa K.; Jülicher, Frank; Salbreux, Guillaume

    2014-06-01

    We derive the equations for a thin, axisymmetric elastic shell subjected to an internal active stress giving rise to active tension and moments within the shell. We discuss the stability of a cylindrical elastic shell and its response to a localized change in internal active stress. This description is relevant to describe the cellular actomyosin cortex, a thin shell at the cell surface behaving elastically at a short timescale and subjected to active internal forces arising from myosin molecular motor activity. We show that the recent observations of cell deformation following detachment of adherent cells (Maître J-L et al 2012 Science 338 253-6) are well accounted for by this mechanical description. The actin cortex elastic and bending moduli can be obtained from a quantitative analysis of cell shapes observed in these experiments. Our approach thus provides a non-invasive, imaging-based method for the extraction of cellular physical parameters.

  3. Cellular phosphatases facilitate combinatorial processing of receptor-activated signals

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    Siddiqui Zaved

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although reciprocal regulation of protein phosphorylation represents a key aspect of signal transduction, a larger perspective on how these various interactions integrate to contribute towards signal processing is presently unclear. For example, a key unanswered question is that of how phosphatase-mediated regulation of phosphorylation at the individual nodes of the signaling network translates into modulation of the net signal output and, thereby, the cellular phenotypic response. Results To address the above question we, in the present study, examined the dynamics of signaling from the B cell antigen receptor (BCR under conditions where individual cellular phosphatases were selectively depleted by siRNA. Results from such experiments revealed a highly enmeshed structure for the signaling network where each signaling node was linked to multiple phosphatases on the one hand, and each phosphatase to several nodes on the other. This resulted in a configuration where individual signaling intermediates could be influenced by a spectrum of regulatory phosphatases, but with the composition of the spectrum differing from one intermediate to another. Consequently, each node differentially experienced perturbations in phosphatase activity, yielding a unique fingerprint of nodal signals characteristic to that perturbation. This heterogeneity in nodal experiences, to a given perturbation, led to combinatorial manipulation of the corresponding signaling axes for the downstream transcription factors. Conclusion Our cumulative results reveal that it is the tight integration of phosphatases into the signaling network that provides the plasticity by which perturbation-specific information can be transmitted in the form of a multivariate output to the downstream transcription factor network. This output in turn specifies a context-defined response, when translated into the resulting gene expression profile.

  4. High-throughput screening for modulators of cellular contractile force

    CERN Document Server

    Park, Chan Young; Tambe, Dhananjay; Chen, Bohao; Lavoie, Tera; Dowell, Maria; Simeonov, Anton; Maloney, David J; Marinkovic, Aleksandar; Tschumperlin, Daniel J; Burger, Stephanie; Frykenberg, Matthew; Butler, James P; Stamer, W Daniel; Johnson, Mark; Solway, Julian; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Krishnan, Ramaswamy

    2014-01-01

    When cellular contractile forces are central to pathophysiology, these forces comprise a logical target of therapy. Nevertheless, existing high-throughput screens are limited to upstream signaling intermediates with poorly defined relationship to such a physiological endpoint. Using cellular force as the target, here we screened libraries to identify novel drug candidates in the case of human airway smooth muscle cells in the context of asthma, and also in the case of Schlemm's canal endothelial cells in the context of glaucoma. This approach identified several drug candidates for both asthma and glaucoma. We attained rates of 1000 compounds per screening day, thus establishing a force-based cellular platform for high-throughput drug discovery.

  5. Detection of recombinant and cellular MALT1 paracaspase activity.

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    Nagel, Daniel; Krappmann, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    MALT1 (mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue protein 1) is a key regulator of antigen-induced NF-κB activation in the adaptive immune response. Activation of proteolytic activity of the MALT1 paracaspase was shown to boost the immune response. Additionally, MALT1 proteolytic activity is essential for the survival of MALT1-dependent lymphoma, such as the activated B-cell type (ABC) of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) or MALT lymphoma. The functional impact of MALT1 paracaspase on T-cell activation and lymphomagenesis suggests that MALT1 is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and distinct lymphoma entities. To evaluate the requirement of MALT1 in further detail, direct measurement of its activity status is of great importance. We have established a fluorogenic cleavage assay which can be used to measure activity of recombinant and cellular MALT1. Here we describe the basis of the cleavage assay and include a detailed protocol for recombinant production of MALT1 and also the cellular immunoprecipitation of endogenous MALT1 to determine its proteolytic activity.

  6. High-throughput microcavitation bubble induced cellular mechanotransduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Jonathan Lee

    Focused pulsed laser irradiation allows for the deposition of energy with high spatial and temporal resolution. These attributes provide an optimal tool for non-contact manipulation in cellular biology such as laser microsurgery, cell membrane permeabilization, as well as targeted cell death. In this thesis we investigate the direct physical effects produced by laser- generated microcavitation bubbles in adherent cell cultures. We examine how variation in pulse durations (180 ps - 6ns) and pulse energy (0.5 - 40 mu;J) affect microcavitation bubble (mu;CB) generated cell lysis, necrosis, and molecular delivery. To compare the effects of pulse duration we employ classical fluid dynamics modeling to quantify the perturbation caused on cell populations from mu;CB generated microTsunamis (a transient microscale burst of hydrodynamic shear stress). Through time-resolved imaging we capture the mu;CB dynamics at various energies and pulse durations. Moreover, the mathematical modeling provides information regarding the cellular exposure to time varying shear stress and impulse as a function of radial location from the mu;CB center. We demonstrate that the resultant cellular effect can be predicted based on the total impulse across a two order of magnitude span of pulse duration and pulse energy. We also examine the region of cells beyond the zone of molecular delivery to investigate possible cellular reactions to mu;Tsunami exposure. Our studies have shown that cellular mechanotransduction occurs within cell populations spanning an area of up to 1 mm2 surrounding the mu;CB. Visualization of mechanotransduction is achieved through the visualization of intracellular calcium signaling via fluorescence microscopy that occurs due to the ability of the muTsunami generated shear stresses to stimulate G-protein coupled receptors at the apical cell surface. Moreover, we have shown that the observed signaling can be attenuated in a dose-dependent manner using 2-APB which is a known

  7. Highly roughened polycaprolactone surfaces using oxygen plasma-etching and in vitro mineralization for bone tissue regeneration: fabrication, characterization, and cellular activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YongBok; Kim, GeunHyung

    2015-01-01

    Herein, poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) surfaces were treated to form various roughness values (R(a)=290-445 nm) and polar functional groups on the surfaces using a plasma-etching process, followed by immersion into simulated body fluid (SBF) for apatite formation. The surface morphology, chemical composition, and mean roughness of the plasma-etched PCL surfaces were measured, and various physical and morphological properties (water contact angles, protein absorption ability, and crystallite size of the apatite layer) of the in vitro mineralized PCL surfaces were evaluated. The roughened PCL surface P-3, which was treated with a sufficient plasma exposure time (4 h), achieved homogeneously distributed apatite formation after soaking in SBF for 7 days, as compared with other surfaces that were untreated or plasma-treated for 30 min or 2 h. Furthermore, to demonstrate their feasibility as a biomimetic surface, pre-osteoblast cells (MC3T3-E1) were cultured on the mineralized PCL surfaces, and cell viability, DAPI-phalloidin fluorescence assay, and alizarin red-staining of the P-3 surface were highly improved compared to the P-1 surface treated with a 30-min plasma exposure time; compared to untreated mineralized PCL surface (N-P), P-3 showed even greater improvements in cell viability and DAPI-phalloidin fluorescence assay. Based on these results, we found that the mineralized PCL surface supplemented with the appropriate plasma treatment can be implicitly helpful to achieve rapid hard tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Study of Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni antioxidant activities and cellular properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Cecilia; Graziano, Sara; Zimmermann, Benno F

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the antioxidant activities, cytotoxicity and proliferative properties in Stevia rebaudiana leaves and stems. Leaves extracts exhibited a higher antioxidant activity than stems extract, through oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) and cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assays. Stevioside and rebaudioside A, the main sweetening metabolites in stevia leaves, exhibited a low ORAC value in comparison with plant extracts, while did not elicit any CAA. Stevia rebaudiana did not exhibit toxicity against HepG2 (hepatocellular carcinoma) human cells. No proliferative nor catalase modulations were observed in cells treated with such extracts. Our findings support the promising role of stevia that, apart from its sweetness, can act as a source of antioxidants, even at the intracellular level. This activity makes S. rebaudiana crude extract an interesting resource of natural sweetness with antioxidant properties which may find numerous applications in foods and nutritional supplements industries.

  9. Liposome-mediated cellular delivery of active gp91(phox.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Marques

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gp91(phox is a transmembrane protein and the catalytic core of the NADPH oxidase complex of neutrophils. Lack of this protein causes chronic granulomatous disease (CGD, a rare genetic disorder characterized by severe and recurrent infections due to the incapacity of phagocytes to kill microorganisms. METHODOLOGY: Here we optimize a prokaryotic cell-free expression system to produce integral mammalian membrane proteins. CONCLUSIONS: Using this system, we over-express truncated forms of the gp91(phox protein under soluble form in the presence of detergents or lipids resulting in active proteins with a "native-like" conformation. All the proteins exhibit diaphorase activity in the presence of cytosolic factors (p67(phox, p47(phox, p40(phox and Rac and arachidonic acid. We also produce proteoliposomes containing gp91(phox protein and demonstrate that these proteins exhibit activities similar to their cellular counterpart. The proteoliposomes induce rapid cellular delivery and relocation of recombinant gp91(phox proteins to the plasma membrane. Our data support the concept of cell-free expression technology for producing recombinant proteoliposomes and their use for functional and structural studies or protein therapy by complementing deficient cells in gp91(phox protein.

  10. Exploring cellular memory molecules marking competent and active transcriptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu De-Pei

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development in higher eukaryotes involves programmed gene expression. Cell type-specific gene expression is established during this process and is inherited in succeeding cell cycles. Higher eukaryotes have evolved elegant mechanisms by which committed gene-expression states are transmitted through numerous cell divisions. Previous studies have shown that both DNase I-sensitive sites and the basal transcription factor TFIID remain on silenced mitotic chromosomes, suggesting that certain trans-factors might act as bookmarks, maintaining the information and transmitting it to the next generation. Results We used the mouse globin gene clusters as a model system to examine the retention of active information on M-phase chromosomes and its contribution to the persistence of transcriptional competence of these gene clusters in murine erythroleukemia cells. In cells arrested in mitosis, the erythroid-specific activator NF-E2p45 remained associated with its binding sites on the globin gene loci, while the other major erythroid factor, GATA-1, was removed from chromosome. Moreover, despite mitotic chromatin condensation, the distant regulatory regions and promoters of transcriptionally competent globin gene loci are marked by a preserved histone code consisting in active histone modifications such as H3 acetylation, H3-K4 dimethylation and K79 dimethylation. Further analysis showed that other active genes are also locally marked by the preserved active histone code throughout mitotic inactivation of transcription. Conclusion Our results imply that certain kinds of specific protein factors and active histone modifications function as cellular memory markers for both competent and active genes during mitosis, and serve as a reactivated core for the resumption of transcription when the cells exit mitosis.

  11. Cellular transformation by human papillomaviruses: Lessons learned by comparing high- and low-risk viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; Roman, Ann

    2013-01-01

    The oncogenic potential of papillomaviruses (PVs) has been appreciated since the 1930s yet the mechanisms of virally-mediated cellular transformation are still being revealed. Reasons for this include: a) the oncoproteins are multifunctional, b) there is an ever-growing list of cellular interacting proteins, c) more than one cellular protein may bind to a given region of the oncoprotein, and d) there is only limited information on the proteins encoded by the corresponding non-oncogenic PVs. The perspective of this review will be to contrast the activities of the viral E6 and E7 proteins encoded by the oncogenic human PVs (termed high-risk HPVs) to those encoded by their non-oncogenic counterparts (termed low-risk HPVs) in an attempt to sort out viral life cycle-related functions from oncogenic functions. The review will emphasize lessons learned from the cell culture studies of the HPVs causing mucosal/genital tract cancers. PMID:22284986

  12. Circulating (CD3−CD19+CD20−IgD−CD27highCD38high) Plasmablasts: A Promising Cellular Biomarker for Immune Activity for Anti-PLA2R1 Related Membranous Nephropathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beukinga, Ingrid; Willard-Gallo, Karen; Nortier, Joëlle; Pradier, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN) is a kidney specific autoimmune disease mainly mediated by anti-phospholipase A2 receptor 1 autoantibody (PLA2R1 Ab). The adequate assessment of chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody, rituximab (RTX), efficacy is still needed to improve clinical outcome of patient with MN. We evaluated the modification of plasmablasts (CD3−CD19+CD20−IgD−CD27highCD38high), a useful biomarker of RTX response in other autoimmune diseases, and memory (CD3−CD19+CD20+IgD−CD27+CD38−) and naive (CD3−CD19+CD20+IgD+CD27−CD38low) B cells by fluorescence-activated cell sorter analysis in PLA2R1 related MN in one patient during the 4 years of follow-up after RTX. RTX induced complete disappearance of CD19+ B cells, plasmablasts, and memory B cells as soon as day 15. Despite severe CD19+ lymphopenia, plasmablasts and memory B cells reemerged early before naive B cells (days 45, 90, and 120, resp.). During the follow-up, plasmablasts decreased more rapidly than memory B cells but still remained elevated as compared to day 0 of RTX. Concomitantly, anti-PLA2R1 Ab increased progressively. Our single case report suggests that, besides monitoring of serum anti-PLA2R1 Ab level, enumeration of circulating plasmablasts and memory B cells represents an attractive and complementary tool to assess immunological activity and efficacy of RTX induced B cells depletion in anti-PLA2R1 Ab related MN. PMID:27493452

  13. Monocyte Activation in Immunopathology: Cellular Test for Development of Diagnostics and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina A. Ivanova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several highly prevalent human diseases are associated with immunopathology. Alterations in the immune system are found in such life-threatening disorders as cancer and atherosclerosis. Monocyte activation followed by macrophage polarization is an important step in normal immune response to pathogens and other relevant stimuli. Depending on the nature of the activation signal, macrophages can acquire pro- or anti-inflammatory phenotypes that are characterized by the expression of distinct patterns of secreted cytokines and surface antigens. This process is disturbed in immunopathologies resulting in abnormal monocyte activation and/or bias of macrophage polarization towards one or the other phenotype. Such alterations could be used as important diagnostic markers and also as possible targets for the development of immunomodulating therapy. Recently developed cellular tests are designed to analyze the phenotype and activity of living cells circulating in patient’s bloodstream. Monocyte/macrophage activation test is a successful example of cellular test relevant for atherosclerosis and oncopathology. This test demonstrated changes in macrophage activation in subclinical atherosclerosis and breast cancer and could also be used for screening a panel of natural agents with immunomodulatory activity. Further development of cellular tests will allow broadening the scope of their clinical implication. Such tests may become useful tools for drug research and therapy optimization.

  14. Synthesis of marmycin A and investigation into its cellular activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañeque, Tatiana; Gomes, Filipe; Mai, Trang Thi; Maestri, Giovanni; Malacria, Max; Rodriguez, Raphaël

    2015-09-01

    Anthracyclines such as doxorubicin are used extensively in the treatment of cancers. Anthraquinone-related angucyclines also exhibit antiproliferative properties and have been proposed to operate via similar mechanisms, including direct genome targeting. Here, we report the chemical synthesis of marmycin A and the study of its cellular activity. The aromatic core was constructed by means of a one-pot multistep reaction comprising a regioselective Diels-Alder cycloaddition, and the complex sugar backbone was introduced through a copper-catalysed Ullmann cross-coupling, followed by a challenging Friedel-Crafts cyclization. Remarkably, fluorescence microscopy revealed that marmycin A does not target the nucleus but instead accumulates in lysosomes, thereby promoting cell death independently of genome targeting. Furthermore, a synthetic dimer of marmycin A and the lysosome-targeting agent artesunate exhibited a synergistic activity against the invasive MDA-MB-231 cancer cell line. These findings shed light on the elusive pathways through which anthraquinone derivatives act in cells, pointing towards unanticipated biological and therapeutic applications.

  15. Modeling earthquake activity using a memristor-based cellular grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourkas, Ioannis; Sirakoulis, Georgios Ch.

    2013-04-01

    Earthquakes are absolutely among the most devastating natural phenomena because of their immediate and long-term severe consequences. Earthquake activity modeling, especially in areas known to experience frequent large earthquakes, could lead to improvements in infrastructure development that will prevent possible loss of lives and property damage. An earthquake process is inherently a nonlinear complex system and lately scientists have become interested in finding possible analogues of earthquake dynamics. The majority of the models developed so far were based on a mass-spring model of either one or two dimensions. An early approach towards the reordering and the improvement of existing models presenting the capacitor-inductor (LC) analogue, where the LC circuit resembles a mass-spring system and simulates earthquake activity, was also published recently. Electromagnetic oscillation occurs when energy is transferred between the capacitor and the inductor. This energy transformation is similar to the mechanical oscillation that takes place in the mass-spring system. A few years ago memristor-based oscillators were used as learning circuits exposed to a train of voltage pulses that mimic environment changes. The mathematical foundation of the memristor (memory resistor), as the fourth fundamental passive element, has been expounded by Leon Chua and later extended to a more broad class of memristors, known as memristive devices and systems. This class of two-terminal passive circuit elements with memory performs both information processing and storing of computational data on the same physical platform. Importantly, the states of these devices adjust to input signals and provide analog capabilities unavailable in standard circuit elements, resulting in adaptive circuitry and providing analog parallel computation. In this work, a memristor-based cellular grid is used to model earthquake activity. An LC contour along with a memristor is used to model seismic activity

  16. Antifungal activity of redox-active benzaldehydes that target cellular antioxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many pathogenic fungi are becoming resistant to currently available drugs. Disruption of cellular antioxidation systems should be an effective method for control of fungal pathogens. Such disruption can be achieved with redox-active compounds. The aim of this study was to identify benzaldehydes that...

  17. New approach to modulate retinal cellular toxic effects of high glucose using marine epa and dha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fagon Roxane

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protective effects of omega-3 fatty acids against cellular damages of high glucose were studied on retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE cells. Methods Retinal epithelial cells were incubated with omega-3 marine oils rich in EPA and DHA and then with high glucose (25 mM for 48 hours. Cellular responses were compared to normal glucose (5 mM: intracellular redox status, reactive oxygen species (ROS, mitochondrial succinate deshydrogenase activity, inflammatory cytokines release and caveolin-1 expression were evaluated using microplate cytometry, ELISA and flow cytometry techniques. Fatty acids incorporation in retinal cell membranes was analysed using chromatography. Results Preincubation of the cells with fish oil decreased ROS overproduction, mitochondrial alterations and TNFα release. These protective effects could be attributed to an increase in caveolin-1 expression induced by marine oil. Conclusion Marine formulations rich in omega-3 fatty acids represent a promising therapeutic approach for diabetic retinopathy.

  18. Spontaneous Motion in Hierarchically Assembled Active Cellular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daniel

    2013-03-01

    With exquisite precision and reproducibility, cells orchestrate the cooperative action of thousands of nanometer-sized molecular motors to carry out mechanical tasks at much larger length scales, such as cell motility, division and replication. Besides their biological importance, such inherently far-from-equilibrium processes are an inspiration for the development of soft materials with highly sought after biomimetic properties such as autonomous motility and self-healing. I will describe our exploration of such a class of biologically inspired soft active materials. Starting from extensile bundles comprised of microtubules and kinesin, we hierarchically assemble active analogs of polymeric gels, liquid crystals and emulsions. At high enough concentration, microtubule bundles form an active gel network capable of generating internally driven chaotic flows that enhance transport and fluid mixing. When confined to emulsion droplets, these 3D networks buckle onto the water-oil interface forming a dense thin film of bundles exhibiting cascades of collective buckling, fracture, and self-healing driven by internally generated stresses from the kinesin clusters. When compressed against surfaces, this active nematic cortex exerts traction stresses that propel the locomotion of the droplet. Taken together, these observations exemplify how assemblies of animate microscopic objects exhibit collective biomimetic properties that are fundamentally distinct from those found in materials assembled from inanimate building blocks. These assemblies, in turn, enable the generation of a new class of materials that exhibit macroscale flow phenomena emerging from nanoscale components.

  19. Cellular Antisense Activity of PNA-Oligo(bicycloguanidinium) Conjugates forming Self-Assembled Nano-aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valero, Julian; Shiraishi, Takehiko; de Mendoza, Javier;

    2015-01-01

    A series of peptide nucleic acid-oligo(bicycloguanidinium) (PNA-BGn) conjugates have been synthesized and characterized in terms of cellular antisense activity using the pLuc750HeLa cell splice correction assay. PNA-BG4 conjugates exhibit low micromolar antisense activity and the cellular activit...

  20. Mitotically active cellular fibroma of ovary should be differentiated from fibrosarcoma: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Lin; Lin, Ming; Fan, Xinmin

    2014-01-01

    The clinicopathologic characteristic of mitotically active cellular fibroma is significantly different from the malignant behavior of ovarian fibrosarcoma. Therefore, it's very important to differentiate mitotically active cellular fibroma from ovarian fibrosarcoma. We report a case in which a 39-year-old woman was found with an ovarian tumor measuring 105 × 71 × 47 mm. The tumor ruptured and adhered to the peritoneum. Microscopic examination showed densely cellular spindle-shaped tumor cells. The cellular atypia was mild. The Ki-67 proliferation index was approximately 10%. The patient remained free of tumor for more than 66 months without any adjuvant chemotherapy after operation. After reviewing the literature, we diagnosed this case as mitotically active cellular fibroma rather than ovarian fibrosarcoma. It is very important to differentiate these two tumors because of the marked differences in treatment modalities and prognosis between them. The ovarian fibrous tumors with mitotic figures ≥ 4 per 10 high-power fields but no severe nuclear atypia should be mostly diagnosed as mitotically active cellular fibroma of ovary. The correct diagnosis is the key to avoid excessive treatments.

  1. A preliminary study on estimating extra-cellular nitrate reductase activities in estuarine systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pant H. K.

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes catalyzing ammonium (NH4+/nitrate (NO3– into nitrous oxide (N2O/molecular nitrogen (N2, play critical roles in water quality management. The objective of this paper was to investigate the role of extra-cellular enzymes in cycling of nitrogen (N in aquatic systems. It appears that N in estuaries, salt marshes, etc., does not stay long enough to be available for uptake, thus, creating N limited conditions. This study showed that indigenous extra-cellular nitrate reductase along with others involved in N transformations in the waters/sediments of estuarine systems can cause complete removal of NH4+ and NO3– from the waters and available NH4+ and NO3– from the sediments. These results indicate that due to high extra-cellular nitrate reductase and other enzymes associated with N transformations in sediments/waters, substantial amounts of NH4+ and NO3– can be quickly lost from the systems as N2O and/or nitric oxide (NO, in turn, creating N limited conditions in estuarine systems. Such high activities of indigenous nitrate reductase and others are useful in removing readily bioavailable N from the systems, thereby avoidance of eutrophic conditions. However, they might contribute in increasing the N2O, a potent greenhouse gas with global warming potential (GWP of 296, in the atmosphere.

  2. Genetic Algorithm Calibration of Probabilistic Cellular Automata for Modeling Mining Permit Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, S.J.; Raines, G.L.

    2003-01-01

    We use a genetic algorithm to calibrate a spatially and temporally resolved cellular automata to model mining activity on public land in Idaho and western Montana. The genetic algorithm searches through a space of transition rule parameters of a two dimensional cellular automata model to find rule parameters that fit observed mining activity data. Previous work by one of the authors in calibrating the cellular automaton took weeks - the genetic algorithm takes a day and produces rules leading to about the same (or better) fit to observed data. These preliminary results indicate that genetic algorithms are a viable tool in calibrating cellular automata for this application. Experience gained during the calibration of this cellular automata suggests that mineral resource information is a critical factor in the quality of the results. With automated calibration, further refinements of how the mineral-resource information is provided to the cellular automaton will probably improve our model.

  3. Coated with nanomaterials intraocular lenses, ophthalmic and human body implantable devices with high catalytic antioxidant activities: a new nanotechnology strategy of peroxidase cellular enzyme mimics increasing the biocompatibility and therapeutic deployment of the medical prosthetic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A

    2013-04-01

    While cataract surgery is generally recognized as being one of the safest operations, there is still a significant complication rate. From 30 to 50% of all patients in the United States having cataract extraction develop opacification of the posterior lens capsule within two years and require laser treatment with its own significant risk of complications. Of the patients having cataract surgery, 0.8% develop retinal detachments, from 0.6% to 1.3% were rehospitalized for corneal edema or required corneal transplantation and about 0.1% presented with endophthalmitis . Thus, aside from secondary cataract, about 2% of 1.3 million people, or 26,000 individuals in the United States annually develop serious complications as a result of cataract surgery. The aim of this investigation was to increase the safety and effectiveness of an individual intraocular lens (IOL) preventing an impairment in peroxide metabolism of the mature human cataractous lenses compared to normal lenses employing the specific nanotechnology coating which substitutes the inhibitory effect of the implantable device towards the active species of oxygen and the ability of IOL to regulate the H2O2 and lipid hydroperoxides levels in the surrounding medium. The implantation of IOLs with metabolic activity improves the capability of the surrounding ocular tissues to withstand oxidative stress induced in ocular humors by the photochemical and other metabolic reactions. The coated implantable medical device with thin film of platinum applied with magnetron sputtering, reacts as a body enzyme with deleterious peroxide compounds and free radical oxygen species in body fluids and tissue when said device is implanted into human body. The IOL having haptics coated with thin film of platinum, catalyzes the reduction of peroxide compounds to decrease their levels within the aqueous humor. Further, the coatings also scavenge toxic free radicals of oxygen, thus preventing cellular dysfunction resulting from oxidative

  4. Dermal quercetin smartCrystals®: Formulation development, antioxidant activity and cellular safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatahet, T; Morille, M; Hommoss, A; Dorandeu, C; Müller, R H; Bégu, S

    2016-05-01

    Flavonoids are natural plant pigments, which possess high antioxidative and antiradical activities. However, their poor water solubility led to a limited bioavailability. To overcome this major hurdle, quercetin nanocrystals were produced implementing smartCrystals® technology. This process combines bead milling and subsequent high-pressure homogenization at relatively low pressure (300bar). To test the possibility to develop a dermal formulation from quercetin smartCrystals®, quercetin nanosuspensions were admixed to Lutrol® F127 and hydroxythylcellulose nonionic gels. The physicochemical properties (morphology, size and charge), saturation solubility, dissolution velocity and the antioxidant properties (DPPH assay) as well as the cellular interaction of the produced quercetin smartCrystals® were studied and compared to crude quercetin powder. Quercetin smartCrystals® showed a strong increase in the saturation solubility and the dissolution velocity (7.6 fold). SmartCrystals® loaded or not into gels proved to be physically stable over a period of three months at 25°C. Interestingly, in vitro DPPH assay confirmed the preservation of quercetin antioxidative properties after nanonization. In parallel, the nanocrystalline form did not display cellular toxicity, even at high concentration (50μg/ml), as assayed on an epithelial cell line (VERO cells). In addition, the nanocrystalline form confirmed a protective activity for VERO cells against hydrogen peroxide induced toxicity in vitro. This new formulation presents a promising approach to deliver quercetin efficiently to skin in well-tolerated formulations.

  5. Child mortality, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and cellular aging in mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barha, Cindy K; Salvante, Katrina G; Hanna, Courtney W; Wilson, Samantha L; Robinson, Wendy P; Altman, Rachel M; Nepomnaschy, Pablo A

    2017-01-01

    Psychological challenges, including traumatic events, have been hypothesized to increase the age-related pace of biological aging. Here we test the hypothesis that psychological challenges can affect the pace of telomere attrition, a marker of cellular aging, using data from an ongoing longitudinal-cohort study of Kaqchikel Mayan women living in a population with a high frequency of child mortality, a traumatic life event. Specifically, we evaluate the associations between child mortality, maternal telomere length and the mothers' hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA), or stress axis, activity. Child mortality data were collected in 2000 and 2013. HPAA activity was assessed by quantifying cortisol levels in first morning urinary specimens collected every other day for seven weeks in 2013. Telomere length (TL) was quantified using qPCR in 55 women from buccal specimens collected in 2013. Shorter TL with increasing age was only observed in women who experienced child mortality (p = 0.015). Women with higher average basal cortisol (p = 0.007) and greater within-individual variation (standard deviation) in basal cortisol (p = 0.053) presented shorter TL. Non-parametric bootstrapping to estimate mediation effects suggests that HPAA activity mediates the effect of child mortality on TL. Our results are, thus, consistent with the hypothesis that traumatic events can influence cellular aging and that HPAA activity may play a mediatory role. Future large-scale longitudinal studies are necessary to confirm our results and further explore the role of the HPAA in cellular aging, as well as to advance our understanding of the underlying mechanisms involved.

  6. Cellular origin and procoagulant activity of tissue factor-exposing microparticles in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, A.; Berckmans, R.J.; Böing, A.N.; Sturk, A.; Büller, H.R.; Kamphuisen, P.W.; Nieuwland, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In patients with cancer, tissue factor-exposing microparticles (TF-exposing MP) have been associated with disease progression and thrombosis. The cellular origin and coagulant activity of TF-exposing MP, however, remain disputed. Therefore, we investigated the cellular origin of the TF-e

  7. Antifungal activity of redox-active benzaldehydes that target cellular antioxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahoney Noreen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disruption of cellular antioxidation systems should be an effective method for control of fungal pathogens. Such disruption can be achieved with redox-active compounds. Natural phenolic compounds can serve as potent redox cyclers that inhibit microbial growth through destabilization of cellular redox homeostasis and/or antioxidation systems. The aim of this study was to identify benzaldehydes that disrupt the fungal antioxidation system. These compounds could then function as chemosensitizing agents in concert with conventional drugs or fungicides to improve antifungal efficacy. Methods Benzaldehydes were tested as natural antifungal agents against strains of Aspergillus fumigatus, A. flavus, A. terreus and Penicillium expansum, fungi that are causative agents of human invasive aspergillosis and/or are mycotoxigenic. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was also used as a model system for identifying gene targets of benzaldehydes. The efficacy of screened compounds as effective chemosensitizers or as antifungal agents in formulations was tested with methods outlined by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI. Results Several benzaldehydes are identified having potent antifungal activity. Structure-activity analysis reveals that antifungal activity increases by the presence of an ortho-hydroxyl group in the aromatic ring. Use of deletion mutants in the oxidative stress-response pathway of S. cerevisiae (sod1Δ, sod2Δ, glr1Δ and two mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK mutants of A. fumigatus (sakAΔ, mpkCΔ, indicates antifungal activity of the benzaldehydes is through disruption of cellular antioxidation. Certain benzaldehydes, in combination with phenylpyrroles, overcome tolerance of A. fumigatus MAPK mutants to this agent and/or increase sensitivity of fungal pathogens to mitochondrial respiration inhibitory agents. Synergistic chemosensitization greatly lowers minimum inhibitory (MIC or fungicidal (MFC

  8. Punicalagin exerts protective effect against high glucose-induced cellular stress and neural tube defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jianxiang; Reece, E Albert; Yang, Peixin

    2015-11-13

    Maternal diabetes-induced birth defects remain a significant health problem. Studying the effect of natural compounds with antioxidant properties and minimal toxicities on diabetic embryopathy may lead to the development of new and safe dietary supplements. Punicalagin is a primary polyphenol found in pomegranate juice, which possesses antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumorigenic properties, suggesting a protective effect of punicalagin on diabetic embryopathy. Here, we examined whether punicalagin could reduce high glucose-induced neural tube defects (NTDs), and if this rescue occurs through blockage of cellular stress and caspase activation. Embryonic day 8.5 (E8.5) mouse embryos were cultured for 24 or 36 h with normal (5 mM) glucose or high glucose (16.7 mM), in presence or absence of 10 or 20 μM punicalagin. 10 μM punicalagin slightly reduced NTD formation under high glucose conditions; however, 20 μM punicalagin significantly inhibited high glucose-induced NTD formation. Punicalagin suppressed high glucose-induced lipid peroxidation marker 4-hydroxynonenal, nitrotyrosine-modified proteins, and lipid peroxides. Moreover, punicalagin abrogated endoplasmic reticulum stress by inhibiting phosphorylated protein kinase ribonucleic acid (RNA)-like ER kinase (p-PERK), phosphorylated inositol-requiring protein-1α (p-IRE1α), phosphorylated eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (p-eIF2α), C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP), binding immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and x-box binding protein 1 (XBP1) mRNA splicing. Additionally, punicalagin suppressed high glucose-induced caspase 3 and caspase 8 cleavage. Punicalagin reduces high glucose-induced NTD formation by blocking cellular stress and caspase activation. These observations suggest punicalagin supplements could mitigate the teratogenic effects of hyperglycemia in the developing embryo, and possibly prevent diabetes-induced NTDs.

  9. Highly efficient enzyme encapsulation in a protein nanocage: towards enzyme catalysis in a cellular nanocompartment mimic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonen, Lise; Nolte, Roeland J. M.; van Hest, Jan C. M.

    2016-07-01

    The study of enzyme behavior in small nanocompartments is crucial for the understanding of biocatalytic processes in the cellular environment. We have developed an enzymatic conjugation strategy to attach a model enzyme to the interior of a cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid. It is shown that with this methodology high encapsulation efficiencies can be achieved. Additionally, we demonstrate that the encapsulation does not affect the enzyme performance in terms of a decreased activity or a hampered substrate diffusion. Finally, it is shown that the encapsulated enzymes are protected against proteases. We believe that our strategy can be used to study enzyme kinetics in an environment that approaches physiological conditions.The study of enzyme behavior in small nanocompartments is crucial for the understanding of biocatalytic processes in the cellular environment. We have developed an enzymatic conjugation strategy to attach a model enzyme to the interior of a cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid. It is shown that with this methodology high encapsulation efficiencies can be achieved. Additionally, we demonstrate that the encapsulation does not affect the enzyme performance in terms of a decreased activity or a hampered substrate diffusion. Finally, it is shown that the encapsulated enzymes are protected against proteases. We believe that our strategy can be used to study enzyme kinetics in an environment that approaches physiological conditions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental procedures for the cloning, expression, and purification of all proteins, as well as supplementary figures and calculations. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr04181g

  10. Dependence of cellular activity at protein adsorbed biointerfaces with nano- to microscale dimensionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nune, C; Misra, R D K; Somani, M C; Karjalainen, L P

    2014-06-01

    Protein adsorption is one of the first-few events that occur when a biomedical device comes in contact with the physiological system. The adsorption process is subsequently followed by communication with cells and formation of tissue. Given the strong interest in nanostructured surfaces, we describe here the impact of grain structure from nanograined (NG) regime to coarse-grained (CG) regime on the self-assembly of proteins (bovine serum albumin) and consequent functional response of osteoblasts. The objective is accomplished using the innovative concept of "phase reversion" that enables a wide range of grain size (from NG to CG regime) to be obtained using an identical set of parameters, besides additional attributes of high strength/weight ratio and wear resistance. Depending on the grain structure a consistent and significant change in the adsorption characteristics of protein was observed at biointerface, such that the cell density was statistically different. The high surface coverage and leaf-like conformation of adsorbed protein on NG surface as compared to bare branch-like structure with low surface coverage on the CG surface, was beneficial in favorably modulating cellular activity (osteoblast functions: cell attachment, proliferation, actin, vinculin, and fibronectin expression). This is the first report that elucidates the impact of grain structure from NG to CG regime on cellular activity. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Cellular Cholesterol Directly Activates Smoothened in Hedgehog Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Pengxiang; Nedelcu, Daniel; Watanabe, Miyako; Jao, Cindy; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Jing; Salic, Adrian

    2016-08-01

    In vertebrates, sterols are necessary for Hedgehog signaling, a pathway critical in embryogenesis and cancer. Sterols activate the membrane protein Smoothened by binding its extracellular, cysteine-rich domain (CRD). Major unanswered questions concern the nature of the endogenous, activating sterol and the mechanism by which it regulates Smoothened. We report crystal structures of CRD complexed with sterols and alone, revealing that sterols induce a dramatic conformational change of the binding site, which is sufficient for Smoothened activation and is unique among CRD-containing receptors. We demonstrate that Hedgehog signaling requires sterol binding to Smoothened and define key residues for sterol recognition and activity. We also show that cholesterol itself binds and activates Smoothened. Furthermore, the effect of oxysterols is abolished in Smoothened mutants that retain activation by cholesterol and Hedgehog. We propose that the endogenous Smoothened activator is cholesterol, not oxysterols, and that vertebrate Hedgehog signaling controls Smoothened by regulating its access to cholesterol.

  12. Technology Learning Activities: Columbus Sailed the Ocean Blue, the Cellular Connection, Emergency Shelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchison, Cindy; Deal, Walter F., III

    1992-01-01

    Presents learning activities such as planning and building a sailboat, manufacturing cellular phone cases, and designing and building emergency shelters. Includes the context, the challenge, resources used, objectives, materials needed, and an evaluation. (JOW)

  13. Learning about Cellular Respiration: An Active Approach Illustrating the Process of Scientific Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Margaret (Peg)

    1998-01-01

    Details the active-learning approach to teaching cellular respiration in an introductory, one-semester course for nonmajors. Focuses on a laboratory exercise designed to answer the question of what happens to food when eaten. Contains 19 references. (DDR)

  14. Activation of nuclear factor-kappa B signalling promotes cellular senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rovillain, E.; Mansfield, L.; Caetano, C.; Alvarez-Fernandez, M.; Caballero, O. L.; Medema, R. H.; Hummerich, H.; Jat, P. S.

    Cellular senescence is a programme of irreversible cell cycle arrest that normal cells undergo in response to progressive shortening of telomeres, changes in telomeric structure, oncogene activation or oxidative stress. The underlying signalling pathways, of major clinicopathological relevance, are

  15. Activation of nuclear factor-kappa B signalling promotes cellular senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rovillain, E.; Mansfield, L.; Caetano, C.; Alvarez-Fernandez, M.; Caballero, O. L.; Medema, R. H.; Hummerich, H.; Jat, P. S.

    2011-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a programme of irreversible cell cycle arrest that normal cells undergo in response to progressive shortening of telomeres, changes in telomeric structure, oncogene activation or oxidative stress. The underlying signalling pathways, of major clinicopathological relevance, are

  16. Arginine metabolism in sugar deprived Lactococcus lactis enhances survival and cellular activity, while supporting flavour production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandsma, J B; van de Kraats, I; Abee, T; Zwietering, M H; Meijer, W C

    2012-02-01

    Flavour development in cheese is affected by the integrity of Lactococcus lactis cells. Disintegrated cells enhance for instance the enzymatic degradation of casein to free amino acids, while integer cells are needed to produce specific flavour compounds from amino acids. The impact of the cellular activity of these integer cells on flavour production remains to be elucidated. In this study we investigated whether lactose-deprived L. lactis cells that use arginine as an alternative energy source can extend cellular activity and produce more specific flavours. In cheese experiments we demonstrated that arginine metabolising cells survived about 3 times longer than non-arginine metabolising cells, which suggests prolonged cellular activity. Cellular activity and flavour production of L. lactis was further studied in vitro to enable controlled arginine supplementation. Comparable with the results found in cheese, the survival rates of in vitro incubated cells improved when arginine was metabolised. Furthermore, elongated cellular activity was reflected in 3-4-fold increased activity of flavour generating enzymes. The observed prolonged cellular activity resulted in about 2-fold higher concentrations of typical Gouda cheese flavours. These findings provide new leads for composing starter cultures that will produce specific flavour compounds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dual fluorescent molecular substrates selectively report the activation, sustainability and reversibility of cellular PKB/Akt activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Duanwen; Bai, Mingfeng; Tang, Rui; Xu, Baogang; Ju, Xiaoming; Pestell, Richard G.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2013-04-01

    Using a newly developed near-infrared (NIR) dye that fluoresces at two different wavelengths (dichromic fluorescence, DCF), we discovered a new fluorescent substrate for Akt, also known as protein kinase B, and a method to quantitatively report this enzyme's activity in real time. Upon insulin activation of cellular Akt, the enzyme multi-phosphorylated a single serine residue of a diserine DCF substrate in a time-dependent manner, culminating in monophospho- to triphospho-serine products. The NIR DCF probe was highly selective for the Akt1 isoform, which was demonstrated using Akt1 knockout cells derived from MMTV-ErbB2 transgenic mice. The DCF mechanism provides unparalleled potential to assess the stimulation, sustainability, and reversibility of Akt activation longitudinally. Importantly, NIR fluorescence provides a pathway to translate findings from cells to living organisms, a condition that could eventually facilitate the use of these probes in humans.

  18. Extrasynaptic glutamate receptor activation as cellular bases for dynamic range compression in pyramidal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina D Oikonomou

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive synaptic stimulation overcomes the ability of astrocytic processes to clear glutamate from the extracellular space, allowing some dendritic segments to become submerged in a pool of glutamate. This dynamic arrangement activates extrasynaptic NMDA receptors located on dendritic shafts. We used voltage-sensitive and calcium-sensitive dyes to probe dendritic function in this glutamate-rich location. An excess of glutamate in the extrasynaptic space was achieved either by repetitive synaptic stimulation or by glutamate iontophoresis onto the dendrites of pyramidal neurons. Two successive activations of synaptic inputs produced a typical NMDA spike, whereas five successive synaptic inputs produced characteristic plateau potentials, reminiscent of cortical UP states. While NMDA spikes were coupled with brief calcium transients highly restricted to the glutamate input site, the dendritic plateau potentials were accompanied by calcium influx along the entire dendritic branch. Once initiated, the glutamate-mediated dendritic plateau potentials could not be interrupted by negative voltage pulses. Activation of extrasynaptic NMDA receptors in cellular compartments void of spines is sufficient to initiate and support plateau potentials. The only requirement for sustained depolarizing events is a surplus of free glutamate near a group of extrasynaptic receptors. Highly nonlinear dendritic spikes (plateau potentials are summed in a highly sublinear fashion at the soma, revealing the cellular bases of signal compression in cortical circuits. Extrasynaptic NMDA receptors provide pyramidal neurons with a function analogous to a dynamic range compression in audio engineering. They limit or reduce the volume of loud sounds (i.e. strong glut. inputs and amplify quiet sounds (i.e. glutamatergic inputs that barely cross the dendritic threshold for local spike initiation. Our data also explain why consecutive cortical UP states have uniform amplitudes in a

  19. Cellular mechanisms of myogenic activity in gastric smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H

    2000-06-01

    In many regions of the intestine, a thin layer of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) lie in the myenteric region, between the circular and longitudinal muscle layers. ICC are connected by gap junctions to surrounding ICC and also with circular and longitudinal smooth muscle cells, forming a large electrical syncytium. Damage of the ICC causes a disorder in the patterns of rhythmic activity. Isolated ICC produce a rhythmic oscillation of the membrane potential. All these observations have led to the suggestion that ICC may be the pacemaker cell responsible for intestinal activity. Gastric smooth muscles generate slow oscillatory membrane potential changes (slow waves) and spike potentials. The activity is considered to be linked to the metabolism in the cell. Three types of cells located in the gastric wall (circular and longitudinal smooth muscle cells and ICC) produce synchronized electrical responses with different shapes. The electrical responses appear to originate in ICC and then spread to the smooth muscle layers, indicating that ICC may also be the pacemaker cells responsible for gastric activity. However, isolated circular smooth muscle tissues spontaneously generate regenerative potentials, suggesting that there are at least two sites for the initiation of spontaneous activity in the stomach. Regenerative potentials persist in the presence of Ca-antagonists and are inhibited by agents which disrupt intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. Depolarization of the membrane elicits regenerative potentials after a long delay and the potentials have long refractory periods. This suggests that an unidentified 2nd messenger may be formed during the delay between membrane depolarization and the initiation of a regenerative potential. In gastric muscles of mutant mice which do not express inositol trisphosphate (InsP(3)) receptors, spike potentials but not slow waves are generated, suggesting the possible involvement of InsP(3) in the initiation of spontaneous activity.

  20. Active Cellular Mechanics and Information Processing in the Living Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M.

    2014-07-01

    I will present our recent work on the organization of signaling molecules on the surface of living cells. Using novel experimental and theoretical approaches we have found that many cell surface receptors are organized as dynamic clusters driven by active currents and stresses generated by the cortical cytoskeleton adjoining the cell surface. We have shown that this organization is optimal for both information processing and computation. In connecting active mechanics in the cell with information processing and computation, we bring together two of the seminal works of Alan Turing.

  1. Cellular Mechanisms of Calcium-Mediated Triggered Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhen

    Life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias continue to pose a major health problem. Ventricular fibrillation, which is a complex form of electrical wave turbulence in the lower chambers of the heart, stops the heart from pumping and is the largest cause of natural death in the United States. Atrial fibrillation, a related form of wave turbulence in the upper heart chambers, is in turn the most common arrhythmia diagnosed in clinical practice. Despite extensive research to date, mechanisms of cardiac arrhythmias remain poorly understood. It is well established that both spatial disorder of the refractory period of heart cells and triggered activity (TA) jointly contribute to the initiation and maintenance of arrhythmias. TA broadly refers to the abnormal generation of a single or a sequence of abnormal excitation waves from a small submillimeter region of the heart in the interval of time between two normal waves generated by the heart's natural pacemaker (the sinoatrial node). TA has been widely investigated experimentally and occurs in several pathological conditions where the intracellular concentration of free Ca2+ ions in heart cells becomes elevated. Under such conditions, Ca2+ can be spontaneously released from intracellular stores, thereby driving an electrogenic current that exchanges 3Na+ ions for one Ca2+ ion across the cell membrane. This current in turn depolarizes the membrane of heart cells after a normal excitation. If this calcium-mediated "delayed after depolarization'' (DAD) is sufficiently large, it can generate an action potential. While the arrhythmogenic importance of spontaneous Ca2+ release and DADs is well appreciated, the conditions under which they occur in heart pathologies remain poorly understood. Calcium overload is only one factor among several other factors that can promote DADs, including sympathetic nerve stimulation, different expression levels of membrane ion channels and calcium handling proteins, and different mutations of those

  2. Application of Local Activity Theory of Cellular Neural Network with Two Ports to the Coupled Lorenz-Cell Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN LeQuan; YU Na

    2002-01-01

    Some criteria for the local activity theory in two-port cellular neural network cells with three local state variables are applied to a coupled Lorenz-cell model. The numerical simulation exhibited that emergence may exist if the selected cell parameters are nearby or on the edge of chaos domain. The local activity theory has provided a new tool of studying the complexity of high dimensional coupled nonlinear physical systems.

  3. A Study of cellular phone possessors' sex consciousness and sex action in high school

    OpenAIRE

    池田, かよ子; 久保田, 美雪; 渡邊, 典子; Ikeda, Kayoko; Kubota, Miyuki; Watanabe, Noriko

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this survey for 304 high school students (116 boys and 188 girls) is to make sure how high school students who possess cellular phones use their phones, what they use their phones for, to what extent they get information about sex, how far they feel conscious of sex and their sex action. (1) About 60% of the girls have cellular phones, which is larger than the rate of the boys who have cellularphones. (2) As for the frequency of using cellular phones, about 80% of the girls use...

  4. Aldolase B knockdown prevents high glucose-induced methylglyoxal overproduction and cellular dysfunction in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghai Liu

    Full Text Available We used cultured endothelial cells as a model to examine whether up-regulation of aldolase B and enhanced methylglyoxal (MG formation play an important role in high glucose-induced overproduction of advanced glycosylation endproducts (AGEs, oxidative stress and cellular dysfunction. High glucose (25 mM incubation up-regulated mRNA levels of aldose reductase (an enzyme converting glucose to fructose and aldolase B (a key enzyme that catalyzes MG formation from fructose and enhanced MG formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and HUVEC-derived EA. hy926 cells. High glucose-increased MG production in EA. hy926 cells was completely prevented by siRNA knockdown of aldolase B, but unaffected by siRNA knockdown of aldolase A, an enzyme responsible for MG formation during glycolysis. In addition, inhibition of cytochrome P450 2E1 or semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase which produces MG during the metabolism of lipid and proteins, respectively, did not alter MG production. Both high glucose (25 mM and MG (30, 100 µM increased the formation of N(ε-carboxyethyl-lysine (CEL, a MG-induced AGE, oxidative stress (determined by the generation of oxidized DCF, H(2O(2, protein carbonyls and 8-oxo-dG, O-GlcNAc modification (product of the hexosamine pathway, membrane protein kinase C activity and nuclear translocation of NF-κB in EA. hy926 cells. However, the above metabolic and signaling alterations induced by high glucose were completely prevented by knockdown of aldolase B and partially by application of aminoguanidine (a MG scavenger or alagebrium (an AGEs breaker. In conclusion, efficient inhibition of aldolase B can prevent high glucose-induced overproduction of MG and related cellular dysfunction in endothelial cells.

  5. Molecular mechanism of cellular reception of ionizing radiation and of activation of signal transduction pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Keiji [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    1997-03-01

    The author reviewed what in cells receives ionizing radiation as a stress and which signal transduction pathway is activated to induce the stress reaction in the following order: Activation of protein kinase C (PKC) pathway by radiation, activation of MAP kinase superfamily by radiation, induction of p53 function by radiation, and radiation exposure and stress reaction pathway. Conclusion was as follows: Cellular receptors to radiation can be cell membrane and DNA. Membrane reception of radiation induces activation of tyrosine kinase and sphingomyelinase, which resulting in activation of PKC- and MAP kinase-mediated signal transduction. The signal generated in the nucleus participates in regulation of cell cycle and in DNA repair. Therefore, it seems that irradiation of ionizing radiation gives energy to various cellular receptor sites as well as DNA, which generate various independent signals to be transduced and accumulated in the nucleus, and leading to cellular response. (K.H.). 63 refs.

  6. Antioxidant activity of puha (Sonchus oleraceus L.) as assessed by the cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Arlene; Thompson, Scott; Stark, Mirjam; Ou, Zong-Quan; Gould, Kevin S

    2011-12-01

    There is considerable interest in antioxidant dietary components that can be protective against degenerative diseases in humans. Puha (Sonchus oleraceus L.) is a rich source of polyphenols, and exhibits strong antioxidant activity as measured by the 2,2-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. However, the potential of puha to protect against degenerative diseases requires that low molecular weight antioxidants (LMWA) are absorbed by, and active in, human cells. The cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay was used to investigate the antioxidant activity of puha leaf extracts. Preparation methods of freezing and freeze-drying reduced the total polyphenolic content compared with fresh puha, but did not affect the LMWA potential as determined by the DPPH assay. The IC(50) values were 0.012 ± 0.003 mg/mL and 0.010 ± 0.005 mg/mL for freeze-dried and fresh puha leaves, respectively. Using the CAA assay, it was shown that LMWAs from foliar extracts of puha were effectively absorbed into HepG2 cells, and exerted antioxidant activity at levels comparable to those of extracts from blueberry fruits, the much-touted antioxidant superfood. Methylene blue staining of HepG2 cells indicated that puha extracts were not cytotoxic at concentrations below 100 mg DW/mL. The data indicate the potential of puha as a nutraceutical supplement for human health.

  7. High content analysis at single cell level identifies different cellular responses dependent on nanomaterial concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manshian, Bella B; Munck, Sebastian; Agostinis, Patrizia; Himmelreich, Uwe; Soenen, Stefaan J

    2015-09-08

    A mechanistic understanding of nanomaterial (NM) interaction with biological environments is pivotal for the safe transition from basic science to applied nanomedicine. NM exposure results in varying levels of internalized NM in different neighboring cells, due to variances in cell size, cell cycle phase and NM agglomeration. Using high-content analysis, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of fluorescent quantum dots on cultured cells, where all effects were correlated with the concentration of NMs at the single cell level. Upon binning the single cell data into different categories related to NM concentration, this study demonstrates, for the first time, that quantum dots activate both cytoprotective and cytotoxic mechanisms, resulting in a zero net result on the overall cell population, yet with significant effects in cells with higher cellular NM levels. Our results suggest that future NM cytotoxicity studies should correlate NM toxicity with cellular NM numbers on the single cell level, as conflicting mechanisms in particular cell subpopulations are commonly overlooked using classical toxicological methods.

  8. High content analysis at single cell level identifies different cellular responses dependent on nanomaterial concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manshian, Bella B.; Munck, Sebastian; Agostinis, Patrizia; Himmelreich, Uwe; Soenen, Stefaan J.

    2015-09-01

    A mechanistic understanding of nanomaterial (NM) interaction with biological environments is pivotal for the safe transition from basic science to applied nanomedicine. NM exposure results in varying levels of internalized NM in different neighboring cells, due to variances in cell size, cell cycle phase and NM agglomeration. Using high-content analysis, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of fluorescent quantum dots on cultured cells, where all effects were correlated with the concentration of NMs at the single cell level. Upon binning the single cell data into different categories related to NM concentration, this study demonstrates, for the first time, that quantum dots activate both cytoprotective and cytotoxic mechanisms, resulting in a zero net result on the overall cell population, yet with significant effects in cells with higher cellular NM levels. Our results suggest that future NM cytotoxicity studies should correlate NM toxicity with cellular NM numbers on the single cell level, as conflicting mechanisms in particular cell subpopulations are commonly overlooked using classical toxicological methods.

  9. Cellular Activation of the Self-Quenched Fluorescent Reporter Probe in Tumor Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei A. Bogdanov, Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of intralysosomal proteolysis of near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF self-quenched macromolecular probe (PGC-Cy5.5 has been previously reported and used for tumor imaging. Here we demonstrate that proteolysis can be detected noninvasively in vivo at the cellular level. A codetection of GFP fluorescence (using two-photon excitation and NIRF was performed in tumor-bearing animals injected with PGC-Cy5.5. In vivo microscopy of tumor cells in subdermal tissue layers (up to 160 μm showed a strong Cy5.5 dequenching effect in GFP-negative cells. This observation was corroborated by flow cytometry, sorting, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis of tumor-isolated cells. Both GFP-positive (81% total and GFP-negative (19% total populations contained Cy5.5-positive cells. The GFP-negative cells were confirmed to be host mouse cells by the absence of rat cathepsin mRNA signal. The subfraction of GFPnegative cells (2.5-3.0% had seven times higher NIRF intensity than the majority of GFP-positive or GFPnegative cells (372 and 55 AU, respectively. Highly NIRF-positive, FP-negative cells were CD45-and MAC3-positive. Our results indicate that: 1 intracellular proteolysis can be imaged in vivo at the cellular level using cathepsin-sensitive probes; 2 tumor-recruited cells of hematopoetic origin participate most actively in uptake and degradation of long-circulating macromolecular probes.

  10. Aquatide Activation of SIRT1 Reduces Cellular Senescence through a SIRT1-FOXO1-Autophagy Axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chae Jin; Lee, Yong-Moon; Kang, Seung Goo; Lim, Hyung W; Shin, Kyong-Oh; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Huh, Yang Hoon; Choi, Suin; Kor, Myungho; Seo, Ho Seong; Park, Byeong Deog; Park, Keedon; Ahn, Jeong Keun; Uchida, Yoshikazu; Park, Kyungho

    2017-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is a relevant environment factor to induce cellular senescence and photoaging. Both autophagy- and silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1)-dependent pathways are critical cellular processes of not only maintaining normal cellular functions, but also protecting cellular senescence in skin exposed to UV irradiation. In the present studies, we investigated whether modulation of autophagy induction using a novel synthetic SIRT1 activator, heptasodium hexacarboxymethyl dipeptide-12 (named as Aquatide), suppresses the UVB irradiation-induced skin aging. Treatment with Aquatide directly activates SIRT1 and stimulates autophagy induction in cultured human dermal fibroblasts. Next, we found that Aquatide-mediated activation of SIRT1 increases autophagy induction via deacetylation of forkhead box class O (FOXO) 1. Finally, UVB irradiation-induced cellular senescence measured by SA-β-gal staining was significantly decreased in cells treated with Aquatide in parallel to occurring SIRT1 activation-dependent autophagy. Together, Aquatide modulates autophagy through SIRT1 activation, contributing to suppression of skin aging caused by UV irradiation.

  11. Cellular graphene aerogel combines ultralow weight and high mechanical strength: A highly efficient reactor for catalytic hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingxing; Zhang, Jianling; Sang, Xinxin; Liu, Chengcheng; Luo, Tian; Peng, Li; Han, Buxing; Tan, Xiuniang; Ma, Xue; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Ning

    2016-05-12

    The construction of three-dimensional graphene aerogels (GAs) is of great importance owing to their outstanding properties for various applications. Up to now, the combination of ultralow weight and super mechanical strength for GA remains a great challenge. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of cellular GAs by a facile, easily controlled and versatile route, i.e. the chemical reduction of graphene oxide assemblies at oil-water interface under a mild condition (70 °C). The GA is ultralight (with density <3 mg cm(-3)) yet mechanically resilient because the walls of the cell closely pack in a highly ordered manner to maximize mechanical strength. The GA has been utilized as an appealing reactor for catalytic hydrogenation, which exhibited great advantages such as large oil absorption capability, exceptional catalytic activity, ease of product separation and high stability.

  12. Ceruloplasmin ferroxidase activity stimulates cellular iron uptake by a trivalent cation-specific transport mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attieh, Z. K.; Mukhopadhyay, C. K.; Seshadri, V.; Tripoulas, N. A.; Fox, P. L.

    1999-01-01

    The balance required to maintain appropriate cellular and tissue iron levels has led to the evolution of multiple mechanisms to precisely regulate iron uptake from transferrin and low molecular weight iron chelates. A role for ceruloplasmin (Cp) in vertebrate iron metabolism is suggested by its potent ferroxidase activity catalyzing conversion of Fe2+ to Fe3+, by identification of yeast copper oxidases homologous to Cp that facilitate high affinity iron uptake, and by studies of "aceruloplasminemic" patients who have extensive iron deposits in multiple tissues. We have recently shown that Cp increases iron uptake by cultured HepG2 cells. In this report, we investigated the mechanism by which Cp stimulates cellular iron uptake. Cp stimulated the rate of non-transferrin 55Fe uptake by iron-deficient K562 cells by 2-3-fold, using a transferrin receptor-independent pathway. Induction of Cp-stimulated iron uptake by iron deficiency was blocked by actinomycin D and cycloheximide, consistent with a transcriptionally induced or regulated transporter. Cp-stimulated iron uptake was completely blocked by unlabeled Fe3+ and by other trivalent cations including Al3+, Ga3+, and Cr3+, but not by divalent cations. These results indicate that Cp utilizes a trivalent cation-specific transporter. Cp ferroxidase activity was required for iron uptake as shown by the ineffectiveness of two ferroxidase-deficient Cp preparations, copper-deficient Cp and thiomolybdate-treated Cp. We propose a model in which iron reduction and subsequent re-oxidation by Cp are essential for an iron uptake pathway with high ion specificity.

  13. Antimicrobial activities and cellular responses to natural silicate clays and derivatives modified by cationic alkylamine salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shan-Hui; Tseng, Hsiang-Jung; Hung, Huey-Shan; Wang, Ming-Chien; Hung, Chiung-Hui; Li, Pei-Ru; Lin, Jiang-Jen

    2009-11-01

    Nanometer-scale silicate platelet (NSP) materials were previously developed by increasing the interlayer space and exfoliation of layered silicate clays such as montmorillonite and synthetic fluorinated mica by the process of polyamine exfoliation. In this study, the antibacterial activity and cytotoxicity of these nanometer-scale silicate clays were evaluated. The derivatives of NSP (NSP-S) which were modified by C18-fatty amine salts via ionic exchange association exhibited the highest antibacterial activity in the aqueous state among all clays. The high antibacterial activity, however, was accompanied by elevated cytotoxicity. The variations of cell surface markers (CD29 and CD44) and type I collagen expression of fibroblasts treated with the clays were measured to clarify the mechanism of the silicate-induced cytotoxicity. The signal transduction pathway involved the downregulation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), which appeared to participate in silicate-induced cytotoxicity. This study helped to understand the antibacterial potential of NSP and the interaction of natural and modified clays with cellular activities.

  14. Cellular trafficking and anticancer activity of Garcinia mangostana extract-encapsulated polymeric nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan-In P

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Porntip Pan-In,1,2 Supason Wanichwecharungruang,3,4 Justin Hanes,2,5 Anthony J Kim2,6,7 1Program in Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand; 2Center for Nanomedicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand; 4Nanotec-CU Center of Excellence on Food and Agriculture, Bangkok, Thailand; 5Department of Ophthalmology, Biomedical Engineering, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Neurosurgery, and Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 6Department of Neurosurgery, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 7Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Garcinia mangostana Linn extract (GME is a natural product that has received considerable attention in cancer therapy, and has the potential to reduce side effects of chemotherapeutics and improve efficacy. We formulated GME-encapsulated ethyl cellulose (GME-EC and a polymer blend of ethyl cellulose and methyl cellulose (GME-EC/MC nanoparticles. We achieved high drug-loading and encapsulation efficiency using a solvent-displacement method with particle sizes around 250 nm. Cellular uptake and accumulation of GME was higher for GME-encapsulated nanoparticles compared to free GME. In vitro cytotoxicity analysis showed effective anticancer activity of GME-EC and GME-EC/MC nanoparticles in HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner. GME-EC/MC nanoparticles showed approximately twofold-higher anticancer activity compared to GME-EC nanoparticles, likely due to their enhanced bioavailability. GME-encapsulated nanoparticles primarily entered HeLa cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and trafficked through the endolysosomal pathway. As far as we know, this is the first report on the cellular uptake and intracellular trafficking mechanism of drug-loaded cellulose-based nanoparticles

  15. High concentrations of H2O2 make aerobic glycolysis energetically more favourable than cellular respiration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid R Molavian

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the original observation of the Warburg Effect in cancer cells, over eight decades ago, the major question of why aerobic glycolysis is favored over oxidative phosphorylation has remained unresolved. An understanding of this phenomenon may well be the key to the development of more effective cancer therapies. In this paper, we use a semi-empirical method to throw light on this puzzle. We show that aerobic glycolysis is in fact energetically more favorable than oxidative phosphorylation for concentrations of peroxide (H2O2 above some critical threshold value. The fundamental reason for this is the activation and high engagement of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP in response to the production of reactive oxygen species H2O2 by mitochondria and the high concentration of H2O2 (produced by mitochondria and other sources. This makes oxidative phosphorylation an inefficient source of energy since it leads (despite high levels of ATP production to a concomitant high energy consumption in order to respond to the hazardous waste products resulting from cellular processes associated with this metabolic pathway. We also demonstrate that the high concentration of H2O2 results in an increased glucose consumption, and also increases the lactate production in the case of glycolysis.

  16. Detection of silent cells, synchronization and modulatory activity in developing cellular networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Johannes J J; Dawitz, Julia; Kroon, Tim; Pires, Johny; Dassen, Valerie J; Berkhout, Janna A; Emperador Melero, Javier; Nadadhur, Aish G; Alevra, Mihai; Toonen, Ruud F; Heine, Vivi M; Mansvelder, Huibert D; Meredith, Rhiannon M

    2016-04-01

    Developing networks in the immature nervous system and in cellular cultures are characterized by waves of synchronous activity in restricted clusters of cells. Synchronized activity in immature networks is proposed to regulate many different developmental processes, from neuron growth and cell migration, to the refinement of synapses, topographic maps, and the mature composition of ion channels. These emergent activity patterns are not present in all cells simultaneously within the network and more immature "silent" cells, potentially correlated with the presence of silent synapses, are prominent in different networks during early developmental periods. Many current network analyses for detection of synchronous cellular activity utilize activity-based pixel correlations to identify cellular-based regions of interest (ROIs) and coincident cell activity. However, using activity-based correlations, these methods first underestimate or ignore the inactive silent cells within the developing network and second, are difficult to apply within cell-dense regions commonly found in developing brain networks. In addition, previous methods may ignore ROIs within a network that shows transient activity patterns comprising both inactive and active periods. We developed analysis software to semi-automatically detect cells within developing neuronal networks that were imaged using calcium-sensitive reporter dyes. Using an iterative threshold, modulation of activity was tracked within individual cells across the network. The distribution pattern of both inactive and active, including synchronous cells, could be determined based on distance measures to neighboring cells and according to different anatomical layers.

  17. Activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal stress axis induces cellular oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jereme G. Spiers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids released from the adrenal gland in response to stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis induce activity in the cellular reduction-oxidation (redox system. The redox system is a ubiquitous chemical mechanism allowing the transfer of electrons between donor/acceptors and target molecules during oxidative phosphorylation while simultaneously maintaining the overall cellular environment in a reduced state. The objective of this review is to present an overview of the current literature discussing the link between HPA axis-derived glucocorticoids and increased oxidative stress, particularly focussing on the redox changes observed in the hippocampus following glucocorticoid exposure.

  18. Polyamines regulate cell growth and cellular methylglyoxal in high-glucose medium independently of intracellular glutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Min-Kyu; Lee, Mun-Hyoung; Park, Seong-Jun; Shin, Sang-Min; Liu, Rui; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2016-03-01

    Polyamines can presumably inhibit protein glycation, when associated with the methylglyoxal inevitably produced during glycolysis. Herein, we hypothesized a nonenzymatic interaction between putrescine and methylglyoxal in putrescine-deficient or -overexpressing Dictyostelium cells in high-glucose medium, which can control methylglyoxal production. Putrescine was essentially required for growth rescue accompanying methylglyoxal detoxification when cells underwent growth defect and cell cycle G1-arrest when supplemented with high glucose. Furthermore, methylglyoxal regulation by putrescine seemed to be a parallel pathway independent of the changes in cellular glutathione content in high-glucose medium. Consequently, we suggest that Dictyostelium cells need polyamines for normal growth and cellular methylglyoxal regulation.

  19. Phase-field simulation of formation of cellular dendrites and fine cellular structures at high growth velocities during directional solidification of Ti56Al44 alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin-zhong; GUO Jing-jie; SU Yan-qing; WU Shi-ping; FU Heng-zhi

    2005-01-01

    A phase-field model whose free energy of the solidification system derived from the Calphad thermodynamic modeling of phase diagram was used to simulate formation of cellular dendrites and fine cellular structures of Ti56Al44 alloy during directional solidification at high growth velocities. The liquid-solid phase transition of L→β was chosen. The dynamics of breakdown of initially planar interfaces into cellular dendrites and fine cellular structures were shown firstly at two growth velocities. Then the unidirectional free growths of two initial nucleations evolving to fine cellular dendrites were investigated. The tip splitting phenomenon is observed and the negative temperature gradient in the liquid represents its supercooling directional solidification. The simulation results show the realistic evolution of interfaces and microstructures and they agree with experimental one.

  20. Cellular Telephones Measure Activity and Lifespace in Community-Dwelling Adults: Proof of Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Ana Katrin; Witbrodt, Bradley C.; Hoarty, Carrie A.; Carlson, Richard H.; Goulding, Evan H.; Potter, Jane F.; Bonasera, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To describe a system that uses off-the-shelf sensor and telecommunication technologies to continuously measure individual lifespace and activity levels in a novel way. DESIGN Proof of concept involving three field trials of 30, 30, and 21 days. SETTING Omaha, Nebraska, metropolitan and surrounding rural region. PARTICIPANTS Three participants (48-year-old man, 33-year-old woman, and 27-year-old male), none with any functional limitations. MEASUREMENTS Cellular telephones were used to detect in-home position and in-community location and to measure physical activity. Within the home, cellular telephones and Bluetooth transmitters (beacons) were used to locate participants at room-level resolution. Outside the home, the same cellular telephones and global positioning system (GPS) technology were used to locate participants at a community-level resolution. Physical activity was simultaneously measured using the cellular telephone accelerometer. RESULTS This approach had face validity to measure activity and lifespace. More importantly, this system could measure the spatial and temporal organization of these metrics. For example, an individual’s lifespace was automatically calculated across multiple time intervals. Behavioral time budgets showing how people allocate time to specific regions within the home were also automatically generated. CONCLUSION Mobile monitoring shows much promise as an easily deployed system to quantify activity and lifespace, important indicators of function, in community-dwelling adults. PMID:21288235

  1. Protease activated receptor-1 regulates macrophage-mediated cellular senescence : a risk for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Cong; Rezaee, Farhad; Waasdorp, Maaike; Shi, Kun; van der Poll, Tom; Borensztajn, Keren; Spek, C. Arnold

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a destructive disease in part resulting from premature or mature cellular aging. Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) recently emerged as a critical component in the context of fibrotic lung diseases. Therefore, we aimed to study the role of macrophages in PAR

  2. Changes in Stoichiometry, Cellular RNA, and Alkaline Phosphatase Activity of Chlamydomonas in Response to Temperature and Nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessen, Dag O; Hafslund, Ola T; Andersen, Tom; Broch, Catharina; Shala, Nita K; Wojewodzic, Marcin W

    2017-01-01

    Phytoplankton may respond both to elevated temperatures and reduced nutrients by changing their cellular stoichiometry and cell sizes. Since increased temperatures often cause increased thermal stratification and reduced vertical flux of nutrients into the mixed zone, it is difficult to disentangle these drivers in nature. In this study, we used a factorial design with high and low levels of phosphorus (P) and high and low temperature to assess responses in cellular stoichiometry, levels of RNA, and alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) in the chlorophyte Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Growth rate, C:P, C:N, N:P, RNA, and APA all responded primarily to P treatment, but except for N:P and APA, also temperature contributed significantly. For RNA, the contribution from temperature was particularly strong with higher cellular levels of RNA at low temperatures, suggesting a compensatory allocation to ribosomes to maintain protein synthesis and growth. These experiments suggest that although P-limitation is the major determinant of growth rate and cellular stoichiometry, there are pronounced effects of temperature also via interaction with P. At the ecosystem level, nutrients and temperature will thus interact, but temperatures would likely exert a stronger impact on these phytoplankton traits indirectly via its force on stratification regimes and vertical nutrient fluxes.

  3. Changes in Stoichiometry, Cellular RNA, and Alkaline Phosphatase Activity of Chlamydomonas in Response to Temperature and Nutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessen, Dag O.; Hafslund, Ola T.; Andersen, Tom; Broch, Catharina; Shala, Nita K.; Wojewodzic, Marcin W.

    2017-01-01

    Phytoplankton may respond both to elevated temperatures and reduced nutrients by changing their cellular stoichiometry and cell sizes. Since increased temperatures often cause increased thermal stratification and reduced vertical flux of nutrients into the mixed zone, it is difficult to disentangle these drivers in nature. In this study, we used a factorial design with high and low levels of phosphorus (P) and high and low temperature to assess responses in cellular stoichiometry, levels of RNA, and alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) in the chlorophyte Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Growth rate, C:P, C:N, N:P, RNA, and APA all responded primarily to P treatment, but except for N:P and APA, also temperature contributed significantly. For RNA, the contribution from temperature was particularly strong with higher cellular levels of RNA at low temperatures, suggesting a compensatory allocation to ribosomes to maintain protein synthesis and growth. These experiments suggest that although P-limitation is the major determinant of growth rate and cellular stoichiometry, there are pronounced effects of temperature also via interaction with P. At the ecosystem level, nutrients and temperature will thus interact, but temperatures would likely exert a stronger impact on these phytoplankton traits indirectly via its force on stratification regimes and vertical nutrient fluxes. PMID:28167934

  4. Cellular Stress Response Gene Expression During Upper and Lower Body High Intensity Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanowicz, Andrzej; Sawczyn, Stanisław; Niespodziński, Bartłomiej; Mieszkowski, Jan; Kochanowicz, Kazimierz

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The aim was to compare the effect of upper and lower body high-intensity exercise on chosen genes expression in athletes and non-athletes. Method Fourteen elite male artistic gymnasts (EAG) aged 20.6 ± 3.3 years and 14 physically active men (PAM) aged 19.9 ± 1.0 years performed lower and upper body 30 s Wingate Tests. Blood samples were collected before, 5 and 30 minutes after each effort to assess gene expression via PCR. Results Significantly higher mechanical parameters after lower body exercise was observed in both groups, for relative power (8.7 ± 1.2 W/kg in gymnasts, 7.2 ± 1.2 W/kg in controls, p = 0.01) and mean power (6.7 ± 0.7 W/kg in gymnasts, 5.4 ± 0.8 W/kg in controls, p = 0.01). No differences in lower versus upper body gene expression were detected for all tested genes as well as between gymnasts and physical active man. For IL-6 m-RNA time-dependent effect was observed. Conclusions Because of no significant differences in expression of genes associated with cellular stress response the similar adaptive effect to exercise may be obtained so by lower and upper body exercise. PMID:28141870

  5. Defining high-detail hazard maps by a cellular automata approach: application to Mount Etna (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Spataro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The individuation of areas that are more likely to be affected by new events in volcanic regions is of fundamental relevance for the mitigation of the possible consequences, both in terms of loss of human life and material properties. Here, we describe a methodology for defining flexible high-detail lava-hazard maps and a technique for the validation of the results obtained. The methodology relies on: (i an accurate analysis of the past behavior of the volcano; (ii a new version of the SCIARA model for lava-flow simulation (based on the macroscopic cellular automata paradigm; and (iii high-performance parallel computing for increasing computational efficiency. The new release of the SCIARA model introduces a Bingham-like rheology as part of the minimization algorithm of the differences for the determination of outflows from a generic cell, and an improved approach to lava cooling. The method is here applied to Mount Etna, the most active volcano in Europe, and applications to land-use planning and hazard mitigation are presented.

  6. Structural elucidation and cellular antioxidant activity evaluation of major antioxidant phenolics in lychee pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Dongxiao; Ti, Huihui; Zhang, Ruifen; Zhang, Mingwei; Wei, Zhengchen; Deng, Yuanyuan; Guo, Jinxin

    2014-09-01

    Lychee pulp contains phenolic compounds that are strong antioxidants, but the identities of the major antioxidants present are unknown. In the present study, the major contributors to the antioxidant activity of fresh lychee pulp were identified and their cellular antioxidant activities were investigated. Aqueous acetone extracts of lychee pulp were fractionated on polyamide resin, and those fractions with the largest antioxidant and radical scavenging activities were selected using cellular antioxidant activity and oxygen radical absorbance capacity assays. Three compounds that were major contributors to the antioxidant activity in these fractions were obtained by reverse-phase preparative HPLC and identified as quercetin 3-O-rutinoside-7-O-α-L-rhamnosidase (quercetin 3-rut-7-rha), quercetin 3-O-rutinoside (rutin) and (-)-epicatechin using NMR spectroscopy, HMBC, and ESI-MS spectrometry. The concentration of quercetin 3-rut-7-rha was 17.25mg per 100g of lychee pulp fresh weight. This is the first report of the identification and cellular antioxidant activity of quercetin 3-rut-7-rha from lychee pulp.

  7. Scavenger receptor B1 facilitates macrophage uptake of silver nanoparticles and cellular activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldossari, Abdullah A.; Shannahan, Jonathan H. [The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (United States); Podila, Ramakrishna [Clemson University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (United States); Brown, Jared M., E-mail: jared.brown@ucdenver.edu [The University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Due to increased use of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for their antimicrobial activity, concerns have risen regarding potential adverse human health effects. Scavenger receptor B1 (SR-B1), a major receptor for high-density lipoprotein (HDL), is expressed by macrophages and has also been reported to play a role in recognition of negatively charged particles. We, therefore, hypothesized that SR-B1 mediates macrophage uptake of AgNPs and inflammatory activation. To test this hypothesis, we exposed a mouse macrophage cell line RAW264.7 (RAW) and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) to 20 nm citrate-suspended AgNPs. To verify the role of the SR-B1 receptor, we utilized a SR-B1 inhibitor (Blt2). In vitro studies demonstrated uptake of AgNPs and HDL-coated AgNPs by macrophages which were significantly reduced following pretreatment with Blt2. Inflammatory cytokine arrays revealed that macrophages exposed to AgNPs up-regulated expression of Tnf-α, Oncostatin m (OSM), Ccl4, Il17f, Ccl7, and Ccl2, whereas Il16 was found to be down-regulated. Macrophage activation was observed following AgNP and HDL-coated AgNP exposure as measured by OSM protein production and increased surface expression of CD86. These markers of activation were reduced with Blt2 pretreatment. The in vitro findings were confirmed in vivo through pulmonary instillation of AgNPs in mice. Pulmonary instillation of AgNPs resulted in a recruitment of inflammatory cells that were reduced in SR-B1-deficient mice or following Blt2 pretreatment. This study suggests that SR-B1 plays a major role in cellular recognition of AgNPs and the induction of cell responses that could contribute to inflammation caused by AgNP exposure.

  8. Bringing the light to high throughput screening: use of optogenetic tools for the development of recombinant cellular assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agus, Viviana; Di Silvio, Alberto; Rolland, Jean Francois; Mondini, Anna; Tremolada, Sara; Montag, Katharina; Scarabottolo, Lia; Redaelli, Loredana; Lohmer, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    The use of light-activated proteins represents a powerful tool to control biological processes with high spatial and temporal precision. These so called "optogenetic" technologies have been successfully validated in many recombinant systems, and have been widely applied to the study of cellular mechanisms in intact tissues or behaving animals; to do that, complex, high-intensity, often home-made instrumentations were developed to achieve the optimal power and precision of light stimulation. In our study we sought to determine if this optical modulation can be obtained also in a miniaturized format, such as a 384-well plate, using the instrumentations normally dedicated to fluorescence analysis in High Throughput Screening (HTS) activities, such as for example the FLIPR (Fluorometric Imaging Plate Reader) instrument. We successfully generated optogenetic assays for the study of different ion channel targets: the CaV1.3 calcium channel was modulated by the light-activated Channelrhodopsin-2, the HCN2 cyclic nucleotide gated (CNG) channel was modulated by the light activated bPAC adenylyl cyclase, and finally the genetically encoded voltage indicator ArcLight was efficiently used to measure potassium, sodium or chloride channel activity. Our results showed that stable, robust and miniaturized cellular assays can be developed using different optogenetic tools, and efficiently modulated by the FLIPR instrument LEDs in a 384-well format. The spatial and temporal resolution delivered by this technology might enormously advantage the early stages of drug discovery, leading to the identification of more physiological and effective drug molecules.

  9. Telmisartan enhances mitochondrial activity and alters cellular functions in human coronary artery endothelial cells via AMP-activated protein kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Hirofumi; Sugiyama, Seigo; Nozaki, Toshimitsu; Sugamura, Koichi; Toyama, Kensuke; Matsubara, Junichi; Fujisue, Koichiro; Ohba, Keisuke; Maeda, Hirofumi; Konishi, Masaaki; Akiyama, Eiichi; Sumida, Hitoshi; Izumiya, Yasuhiro; Yasuda, Osamu; Kim-Mitsuyama, Shokei; Ogawa, Hisao

    2015-04-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in cellular senescence and impaired function of vascular endothelium, resulted in cardiovascular diseases. Telmisartan is a unique angiotensin II type I receptor blocker that has been shown to prevent cardiovascular events in high risk patients. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a critical role in mitochondrial biogenesis and endothelial function. This study assessed whether telmisartan enhances mitochondrial function and alters cellular functions via AMPK in human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). In cultured HCAECs, telmisartan significantly enhanced mitochondrial activity assessed by mitochondrial reductase activity and intracellular ATP production and increased the expression of mitochondria related genes. Telmisartan prevented cellular senescence and exhibited the anti-apoptotic and pro-angiogenic properties. The expression of genes related anti-oxidant and pro-angiogenic properties were increased by telmisartan. Telmisartan increased endothelial NO synthase and AMPK phosphorylation. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma signaling was not involved in telmisartan-induced improvement of mitochondrial function. All of these effects were abolished by inhibition of AMPK. Telmisartan enhanced mitochondrial activity and exhibited anti-senescence effects and improving endothelial function through AMPK in HCAECs. Telmisartan could provide beneficial effects on vascular diseases via enhancement of mitochondrial activity and modulating endothelial function through AMPK activation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Using Shared Memory As A Cache In High Performance Cellular Automata Water Flow Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Topa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphics processors (GPU -- Graphic Processor Units recently have gained a lot of interest as an efficient platform for general-purpose computation. Cellular Automata approach which is inherently parallel gives the opportunity to implement high performance simulations. This paper presents how shared memory in GPU can be used to improve performance for Cellular Automata models. In our previous works, we proposed algorithms for Cellular Automata model that use only a GPU global memory. Using a profiling tool, we found bottlenecks in our approach. We introduce modifications that takes an advantage of fast shared memory. The modified algorithm is presented in details, and the results of profiling and performance test are demonstrated. Our unique achievement is comparing the efficiency of the same algorithm working with a global and shared memory.

  11. Antiproliferative Activity and Cellular Uptake of Evodiamine and Rutaecarpine Based on 3D Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Guo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Evodiamine (EVO and rutaecarpine (RUT are promising anti-tumor drug candidates. The evaluation of the anti-proliferative activity and cellular uptake of EVO and RUT in 3D multicellular spheroids of cancer cells would better recapitulate the native situation and thus better reflect an in vivo response to the treatment. Herein, we employed the 3D culture of MCF-7 and SMMC-7721 cells based on hanging drop method and evaluated the anti-proliferative activity and cellular uptake of EVO and RUT in 3D multicellular spheroids, and compared the results with those obtained from 2D monolayers. The drugs’ IC50 values were significantly increased from the range of 6.4–44.1 μM in 2D monolayers to 21.8–138.0 μM in 3D multicellular spheroids, which may be due to enhanced mass barrier and reduced drug penetration in 3D models. The fluorescence of EVO and RUT was measured via fluorescence spectroscopy and the cellular uptake of both drugs was characterized in 2D tumor models. The results showed that the cellular uptake concentrations of RUT increased with increasing drug concentrations. However, the EVO concentrations uptaken by the cells showed only a small change with increasing drug concentrations, which may be due to the different solubility of EVO and Rut in solvents. Overall, this study provided a new vision of the anti-tumor activity of EVO and RUT via 3D multicellular spheroids and cellular uptake through the fluorescence of compounds.

  12. Differential activities of cellular and viral macro domain proteins in binding of ADP-ribose metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuvonen, Maarit; Ahola, Tero

    2009-01-01

    Macro domain is a highly conserved protein domain found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Macro domains are also encoded by a set of positive-strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of animal cells, including coronaviruses and alphaviruses. The functions of the macro domain are poorly understood, but it has been suggested to be an ADP-ribose-binding module. We have here characterized three novel human macro domain proteins that were found to reside either in the cytoplasm and nucleus [macro domain protein 2 (MDO2) and ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2] or in mitochondria [macro domain protein 1 (MDO1)], and compared them with viral macro domains from Semliki Forest virus, hepatitis E virus, and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and with a yeast macro protein, Poa1p. MDO2 specifically bound monomeric ADP-ribose with a high affinity (K(d)=0.15 microM), but did not bind poly(ADP-ribose) efficiently. MDO2 also hydrolyzed ADP-ribose-1'' phosphate, resembling Poa1p in all these properties. Ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2 did not show affinity for ADP-ribose or its derivatives, but instead bound poly(A). MDO1 was generally active in these reactions, including poly(A) binding. Individual point mutations in MDO1 abolished monomeric ADP-ribose binding, but not poly(ADP-ribose) binding; in poly(ADP-ribose) binding assays, the monomer did not compete against polymer binding. The viral macro proteins bound poly(ADP-ribose) and poly(A), but had a low affinity for monomeric ADP-ribose. Thus, the viral proteins do not closely resemble any of the human proteins in their biochemical functions. The differential activity profiles of the human proteins implicate them in different cellular pathways, some of which may involve RNA rather than ADP-ribose derivatives.

  13. Cellular Imaging at 1.5 T: Detecting Cells in Neuroinflammation using Active Labeling with Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman J. Oweida

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability to visualize cell infiltration in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a well-known animal model for multiple sclerosis in humans, was investigated using a clinical 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI scanner, a custom-built, high-strength gradient coil insert, a 3-D fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA imaging sequence and a superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO contrast agent. An “active labeling” approach was used with SPIO administered intravenously during inflammation in EAE. Our results show that small, discrete regions of signal void corresponding to iron accumulation in EAE brain can be detected using FIESTA at 1.5 T. This work provides early evidence that cellular abnormalities that are the basis of diseases can be probed using cellular MRI and supports our earlier work which indicates that tracking of iron-labeled cells will be possible using clinical MR scanners.

  14. Light-activated hypericin induces cellular destruction of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C. S.; Leung, A. W. N.

    2010-01-01

    Hypericin from Hypericum perforatum plants shows an important promise in the photodynamic therapy on malignant tumor. The present study investigated that light-activated hypericin induced the cellular destruction of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells. The result showed that hypericin resulted in a drug- and light-dose dependent cytotoxicity in the CNE-2 cells, meaning the photocytotoxicity of hypericin depends on both of the drug concentration (0 - 2.5 μM) and light-doses (1 - 8 J/cm2). We further investigated the apoptosis of the CNE-2 cells 8 hours after photosensitization of hypericin using fluorescence microscopy with Hoechst 33258 staining. Flow cytometry with annexin V-FITC and PI staining was used to analyze early and late apoptosis. These data demonstrated that light-activated hypericin could significantly lead to the cellular destruction of the CNE-2 cells and induce early apoptosis as a prominent mode of cell death.

  15. LED-activated pheophorbide a induces cellular destruction of colon cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, C. S.; Leung, A. W. N.; Liu, L.; Xia, X. S.

    2010-07-01

    Pheophorbide a (Pa) from Chinese herbal medicine Scutellaria Barbata and Silkworm Excreta shows an important promise in the photodynamic therapy on malignant tumor. The present study investigated that LED-activated Pa induced the cellular destruction of colon cancer HT-29 cells. The results showed that Pa resulted in a drug-dose dependent photocytotoxicity in the HT-29 cells, meaning the photocytotoxicity of Pa depends on the drug concentration (0 - 2 μM). We further investigated the apoptosis of the HT-29 cells 18 hours after photosensitization of Pa using a confocal laser scanning microscopy with Hoechst 33258 staining. These data demonstrated that LED-activated Pa could significantly induce the cellular destruction of the HT-29 cells.

  16. Embryo as an active granular fluid: stress-coordinated cellular constriction chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb, Michael; Gao, Guo-Jie; Thomas, Jeffrey; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2016-11-01

    Mechanical stress plays an intricate role in gene expression in individual cells and sculpting of developing tissues. Motivated by our observation of the cellular constriction chains (CCCs) during the initial phase of ventral furrow formation in the Drosophila melanogaster embryo, we propose an active granular fluid (AGF) model that provides valuable insights into cellular coordination in the apical constriction process. In our model, cells are treated as circular particles connected by a predefined force network, and they undergo a random constriction process in which the particle constriction probability P is a function of the stress exerted on the particle by its neighbors. We find that when P favors tensile stress, constricted particles tend to form chain-like structures. In contrast, constricted particles tend to form compact clusters when P favors compression. A remarkable similarity of constricted-particle chains and CCCs observed in vivo provides indirect evidence that tensile-stress feedback coordinates the apical constriction activity.

  17. Active cellular sensing with quantum dots: Transitioning from research tool to reality; a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delehanty, James B., E-mail: james.delehanty@nrl.navy.mil [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Code 6900, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Susumu, Kimihiro, E-mail: susumu@ccs.nrl.navy.mil [Optical Sciences Division, Code 5611, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Manthe, Rachel L., E-mail: rmanthe@umd.edu [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Code 6900, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Fischell Department of Bioengineering, School of Engineering, University of Maryland College Park, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Algar, W. Russ, E-mail: russ.algar.ctr.ca@nrl.navy.mil [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Code 6900, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Medintz, Igor L., E-mail: igor.medintz@nrl.navy.mil [Center for Bio/Molecular Science and Engineering, Code 6900, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2012-10-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quantum dots (QDs) have evolved beyond mere cellular labeling reagents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant advances have been made in QD materials, surface coatings and bioconjugation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cellular targeting/delivery has been achieved using polymers, peptides, proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerous QD-based sensing applications: extracellular, membrane, intracellular. - Abstract: The application of luminescent semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) within a wide range of biological imaging and sensing formats is now approaching its 15th year. The unique photophysical properties of these nanomaterials have long been envisioned as having the potential to revolutionize biosensing within cellular studies that rely on fluorescence. However, it is only now that these materials are making the transition towards accomplishing this goal. With the idea of understanding how to actively incorporate QDs into different types of cellular biosensing, we review the progress in many of the areas relevant to achieving this goal. This includes the synthesis of the QDs themselves, with an emphasis on minimizing potential toxicity, along with the general methods for making these nanocrystalline structures stable in aqueous media. We next survey some methods for conjugating QDs to biomolecules to allow them to participate in active biosensing. Lastly, we extensively review many of the applications where QDs have been demonstrated in an active role in cellular biosensing. These formats cover a wide range of possibilities including where the QDs have contributed to: monitoring the cell's interaction with its extracellular environment; elucidating the complex molecular interplay that characterizes the plasma membrane; understanding how cells continuously endocytose and exocytose materials across the cellular membrane; visualizing organelle trafficking; and, perhaps most importantly, monitoring the intracellular

  18. Relationship between Carbachol Hyperstimulation-Induced Pancreatic Acinar Cellular Injury and Trypsinogen or NF-κB Activation in Rats in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between M3 cholinergic receptor agonist (carbachol) hyperstimulationinduced pancreatic acinar cellular injury and trypsinogen activation or NF-κB activation in rats was studied in vitro. Rat pancreatic acinar cells were isolated, cultured and treated with carbachol, the active protease inhibitor (pefabloc), and NF-κB inhibitor (PDTC) in vitro. Intracellular trypsin activity was measured by using a fluorogenic substrate. The cellular injury was evaluated by measuring the leakage of LDH from pancreatic acinar cells. The results showed that as compared with control group, 10-3 mol/L carbachol induced a significant increase of the intracellular trypsin activity and the leakage of LDH from pancreatic acinar cells. Pretreatment with 2 mmol/L pefabloc could significantly decrease the activity of trypsin and the leakage of LDH from pancreatic acinar cells (P <0.01) following the treatment with a high concentration of carbachol (10-3 mol/L) in vitro. The addition of 10-2 mol/L PDTC didn't result in a significant decrease in the activity of trypsin and the leakage of LDH from pancreatic acinar cells treated with a high concentration of carbachol (10-3 mol/L) in vitro (P>0.05). It was concluded that intracellular trypsinogen activation is likely involved in pancreatic acinar cellular injury induced by carbachol hyperstimulation in vitro. NF-κB activation may not be involved in pancreatic acinar cellular injury induced by carbachol hyperstimulation in vitro.

  19. A Microfabricated 96-Well 3D Assay Enabling High-Throughput Quantification of Cellular Invasion Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Rui; Wei, Yuanchen; Li, Chaobo; Chen, Feng; Chen, Deyong; Zhao, Xiaoting; Luan, Shaoliang; Fan, Beiyuan; Guo, Wei; Wang, Junbo; Chen, Jian

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a 96-well microfabricated assay to study three-dimensional (3D) invasion of tumor cells. A 3D cluster of tumor cells was first generated within each well by seeding cells onto a micro-patterned surface consisting of a central fibronectin-coated area that promotes cellular attachment, surrounded by a poly ethylene glycol (PEG) coated area that is resistant to cellular attachment. Following the formation of the 3D cell clusters, a 3D collagen extracellular matrix was formed in each well by thermal-triggered gelation. Invasion of the tumor cells into the extracellular matrix was subsequently initiated and monitored. Two modes of cellular infiltration were observed: A549 cells invaded into the extracellular matrix following the surfaces previously coated with PEG molecules in a pseudo-2D manner, while H1299 cells invaded into the extracellular matrix in a truly 3D manner including multiple directions. Based on the processing of 2D microscopic images, a key parameter, namely, equivalent invasion distance (the area of invaded cells divided by the circumference of the initial cell cluster) was obtained to quantify migration capabilities of these two cell types. These results validate the feasibility of the proposed platform, which may function as a high-throughput 3D cellular invasion assay. PMID:28240272

  20. Interplay between cellular activity and three-dimensional scaffold-cell constructs with different foam structure processed by electron beam melting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nune, Krishna C; Misra, R Devesh K; Gaytan, Sara M; Murr, Lawrence E

    2015-05-01

    The cellular activity, biological response, and consequent integration of scaffold-cell construct in the physiological system are governed by the ability of cells to adhere, proliferate, and biomineralize. In this regard, we combine cellular biology and materials science and engineering to fundamentally elucidate the interplay between cellular activity and interconnected three-dimensional foamed architecture obtained by a novel process of electron beam melting and computational tools. Furthermore, the organization of key proteins, notably, actin, vinclulin, and fibronectin, involved in cellular activity and biological functions and relationship with the structure was explored. The interconnected foamed structure with ligaments was favorable to cellular activity that includes cell attachment, proliferation, and differentiation. The primary rationale for favorable modulation of cellular functions is that the foamed structure provided a channel for migration and communication between cells leading to highly mineralized extracellular matrix (ECM) by the differentiating osteoblasts. The filopodial interaction amongst cells on the ligaments was a governing factor in the secretion of ECM, with consequent influence on maturation and mineralization. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. The Stability, Sustained Release and Cellular Antioxidant Activity of Curcumin Nanoliposomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Chen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a multifunctional and natural agent considered to be pharmacologically safe. However, its application in the food and medical industry is greatly limited by its poor water solubility, physicochemical instability and inadequate bioavailability. Nanoliposome encapsulation could significantly enhance the solubility and stability of curcumin. Curcumin nanoliposomes exhibited good physicochemical properties (entrapment efficiency = 57.1, particle size = 68.1 nm, polydispersity index = 0.246, and zeta potential = −3.16 mV. Compared with free curcumin, curcumin nanoliposomes exhibited good stability against alkaline pH and metal ions as well as good storage stability at 4 °C. Curcumin nanoliposomes also showed good sustained release properties. Compared with free curcumin, curcumin nanoliposomes presented an equal cellular antioxidant activity, which is mainly attributed to its lower cellular uptake as detected by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry. This study provide theoretical and practical guides for the further application of curcumin nanoliposomes.

  2. Redox regulation of human OGG1 activity in response to cellular oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravard, Anne; Vacher, Monique; Gouget, Barbara; Coutant, Alexandre; de Boisferon, Florence Hillairet; Marsin, Stéphanie; Chevillard, Sylvie; Radicella, J Pablo

    2006-10-01

    8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG), a common and mutagenic form of oxidized guanine in DNA, is eliminated mainly through base excision repair. In human cells its repair is initiated by human OGG1 (hOGG1), an 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase. We investigated the effects of an acute cadmium exposure of human lymphoblastoid cells on the activity of hOGG1. We show that coinciding with alteration of the redox cellular status, the 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase activity of hOGG1 was nearly completely inhibited. However, the hOGG1 activity returned to normal levels once the redox cellular status was normalized. In vitro, the activity of purified hOGG1 was abolished by cadmium and could not be recovered by EDTA. In cells, however, the reversible inactivation of OGG1 activity by cadmium was strictly associated with reversible oxidation of the protein. Moreover, the 8-oxoG DNA glycosylase activity of purified OGG1 and that from crude extracts were modulated by cysteine-modifying agents. Oxidation of OGG1 by the thiol oxidant diamide led to inhibition of the activity and a protein migration pattern similar to that seen in cadmium-treated cells. These results suggest that cadmium inhibits hOGG1 activity mainly by indirect oxidation of critical cysteine residues and that excretion of the metal from the cells leads to normalization of the redox cell status and restoration of an active hOGG1. The results presented here unveil a novel redox-dependent mechanism for the regulation of OGG1 activity.

  3. Comparison of phytochemical profiles, antioxidant and cellular antioxidant activities of different varieties of blueberry (Vaccinium spp.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huailing; Guo, Xinbo; Hu, Xiaodan; Li, Tong; Fu, Xiong; Liu, Rui Hai

    2017-02-15

    Numerous reports have demonstrated that the consumption of fruits and vegetables is beneficial for the human health. Blueberries, in particular, are rich in phytochemicals including free and bound forming. Phytochemical profiles of 14 varieties of blueberry were compared in this study. 12 compounds were analyzed and had significant changes in blueberry fruits. Total antioxidant activities in different blueberry varieties varied about 2.6times by oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay, and 2times by peroxyl radical scavenging capacity (PSC) assay. The cellular antioxidant activities (CAA) in different varieties varied about 3.9times without phosphate buffer saline (PBS) wash, and 4.7times with PBS wash by CAA assay. Blueberry extracts had potent antiproliferative activities against HepG2 human liver cancer cells, indicating the potential protective benefits associated with their use as functional foods. The anti-proliferative activity was observed to be dose-dependent in blueberry extracts.

  4. Human papillomavirus 16E6 and NFX1-123 potentiate notch signaling and differentiation without activating cellular arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vliet-Gregg, Portia A.; Hamilton, Jennifer R. [Center for Global Infectious Disease Research, Seattle Children' s Research Institute, 1900 Ninth Ave., Seattle, WA 98101 (United States); Katzenellenbogen, Rachel A., E-mail: rkatzen@uw.edu [Center for Global Infectious Disease Research, Seattle Children' s Research Institute, 1900 Ninth Ave., Seattle, WA 98101 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle WA (United States)

    2015-04-15

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR HPV) oncoproteins bind host cell proteins to dysregulate and uncouple apoptosis, senescence, differentiation, and growth. These pathways are important for both the viral life cycle and cancer development. HR HPV16 E6 (16E6) interacts with the cellular protein NFX1-123, and they collaboratively increase the growth and differentiation master regulator, Notch1. In 16E6 expressing keratinocytes (16E6 HFKs), the Notch canonical pathway genes Hes1 and Hes5 were increased with overexpression of NFX1-123, and their expression was directly linked to the activation or blockade of the Notch1 receptor. Keratinocyte differentiation genes Keratin 1 and Keratin 10 were also increased, but in contrast their upregulation was only indirectly associated with Notch1 receptor stimulation and was fully unlinked to growth arrest, increased p21{sup Waf1/CIP1}, or decreased proliferative factor Ki67. This leads to a model of 16E6, NFX1-123, and Notch1 differently regulating canonical and differentiation pathways and entirely uncoupling cellular arrest from increased differentiation. - Highlights: • 16E6 and NFX1-123 increased the Notch canonical pathway through Notch1. • 16E6 and NFX1-123 increased the differentiation pathway indirectly through Notch1. • 16E6 and NFX1-123 increased differentiation gene expression without growth arrest. • Increased NFX1-123 with 16E6 may create an ideal cellular phenotype for HPV.

  5. [Functional activity of peritonal macrophages in liver immune damage of cellular and antibody genesis in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynova, T V; Aleksieieva, I M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of present work was to compare the functional activity of peritoneal macrophages (Mf) at T-cellular and antibody induced hepatitis in mice of CBA line. T-cellular hepatitis was caused by concanavalin A (ConA), antibody-induced hepatitis was caused by administration of xenogenic anti-liver antibodies: gamma-globulin fractions of antihepatocytotoxic serum (gamma-AHCS). It was found that single injection of ConA or gamma-AHCS caused damage of liver with cytolytic syndrome through 20 hours. Functional activity of Mf in these conditions was significantly different. Application of ConA resulted in the decrease in phagocytosis of latex particles and oxygen-dependent metabolism; application of gamma-AHCS--to increase of these processes. Weakening of Mf activity may be one of the reasons for the decrease of dead cell eliminations that results in the maintenance of inflammatory reaction. At the same time significant amplification of phagocytic Mf activity may be one of the pathways of free radical endogenic sources increase that causes cell alteration and plays its role as mediators at inflammation.

  6. Cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay for assessing antioxidants, foods, and dietary supplements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Kelly L; Liu, Rui Hai

    2007-10-31

    A cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) assay for quantifying the antioxidant activity of phytochemicals, food extracts, and dietary supplements has been developed. Dichlorofluorescin is a probe that is trapped within cells and is easily oxidized to fluorescent dichlorofluorescein (DCF). The method measures the ability of compounds to prevent the formation of DCF by 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (ABAP)-generated peroxyl radicals in human hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells. The decrease in cellular fluorescence when compared to the control cells indicates the antioxidant capacity of the compounds. The antioxidant activities of selected phytochemicals and fruit extracts were evaluated using the CAA assay, and the results were expressed in micromoles of quercetin equivalents per 100 micromol of phytochemical or micromoles of quercetin equivalents per 100 g of fresh fruit. Quercetin had the highest CAA value, followed by kaempferol, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), myricetin, and luteolin among the pure compounds tested. Among the selected fruits tested, blueberry had the highest CAA value, followed by cranberry > apple = red grape > green grape. The CAA assay is a more biologically relevant method than the popular chemistry antioxidant activity assays because it accounts for some aspects of uptake, metabolism, and location of antioxidant compounds within cells.

  7. Cytomegalovirus Destruction of Focal Adhesions Revealed in a High-Throughput Western Blot Analysis of Cellular Protein Expression† ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Stanton, Richard James; McSharry, Brian Patrick; Rickards, Carole Ruth; Wang, Edward Chung Yern; Tomasec, Peter; Wilkinson, Gavin William Grahame

    2007-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) systematically manages the expression of cellular functions, rather than exerting the global shutoff of host cell protein synthesis commonly observed with other herpesviruses during the lytic cycle. While microarray technology has provided remarkable insights into viral control of the cellular transcriptome, HCMV is known to encode multiple mechanisms for posttranscriptional and posttranslation regulation of cellular gene expression. High-throughput Western blotti...

  8. Use of an Anaerobic Chamber Environment for the Assay of Endogenous Cellular Protein-Tyrosine Phosphatase Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Li

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein-tyrosine phosphatases (PTPases have a catalytic cysteine residue whose reduced state is integral to the reaction mechanism. Since exposure to air can artifactually oxidize this highly reactive thiol, PTPase assays have typically used potent reducing agents to reactivate the enzymes present; however, this approach does not allow for the measurement of the endogenous PTPase activity directly isolated from the in vivo cellular environment. Here we provide a method for using an anaerobic chamber to preserve the activity of the total PTPase complement in a tissue lysate or of an immunoprecipitated PTPase homolog to characterize their endogenous activation state. Comparison with a sample treated with biochemical reducing agents allows the determination of the activatable (reducible fraction of the endogenous PTPase pool.

  9. Cellular Localization of Dieldrin and Structure–Activity Relationship of Dieldrin Analogues in Dopaminergic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Erin M. G.; Florang, Virginia R.; Davenport, Laurie L.; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Doorn, Jonathan A.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of Parkinson’s disease (PD) correlates with environmental exposure to pesticides, such as the organochlorine insecticide, dieldrin. Previous studies found an increased concentration of the pesticide in the striatal region of the brains of PD patients and also that dieldrin adversely affects cellular processes associated with PD. These processes include mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species production. However, the mechanism and specific cellular targets responsible for dieldrin-mediated cellular dysfunction and the structural components of dieldrin contributing to its toxicity (toxicophore) have not been fully defined. In order to identify the toxicophore of dieldrin, a structure–activity approach was used, with the toxicity profiles of numerous analogues of dieldrin (including aldrin, endrin, and cis-aldrin diol) assessed in PC6-3 cells. The MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays were used to monitor cell viability and membrane permeability after treatment with each compound. Cellular assays monitoring ROS production and extracellular dopamine metabolite levels were also used. Structure and stereochemistry for dieldrin were found to be very important for toxicity and other end points measured. Small changes in structure for dieldrin (e.g., comparison to the stereoisomer endrin) yielded significant differences in toxicity. Interestingly, the cis-diol metabolite of dieldrin was found to be significantly more toxic than the parent compound. Disruption of dopamine catabolism yielded elevated levels of the neurotoxin, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, for many organochlorines. Comparisons of the toxicity profiles for each dieldrin analogue indicated a structure-specific effect important for elucidating the mechanisms of dieldrin neurotoxicity. PMID:23763672

  10. Cellular localization of dieldrin and structure-activity relationship of dieldrin analogues in dopaminergic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Erin M G; Florang, Virginia R; Davenport, Laurie L; Jinsmaa, Yunden; Doorn, Jonathan A

    2013-07-15

    The incidence of Parkinson's disease (PD) correlates with environmental exposure to pesticides, such as the organochlorine insecticide, dieldrin. Previous studies found an increased concentration of the pesticide in the striatal region of the brains of PD patients and also that dieldrin adversely affects cellular processes associated with PD. These processes include mitochondrial function and reactive oxygen species production. However, the mechanism and specific cellular targets responsible for dieldrin-mediated cellular dysfunction and the structural components of dieldrin contributing to its toxicity (toxicophore) have not been fully defined. In order to identify the toxicophore of dieldrin, a structure-activity approach was used, with the toxicity profiles of numerous analogues of dieldrin (including aldrin, endrin, and cis-aldrin diol) assessed in PC6-3 cells. The MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays were used to monitor cell viability and membrane permeability after treatment with each compound. Cellular assays monitoring ROS production and extracellular dopamine metabolite levels were also used. Structure and stereochemistry for dieldrin were found to be very important for toxicity and other end points measured. Small changes in structure for dieldrin (e.g., comparison to the stereoisomer endrin) yielded significant differences in toxicity. Interestingly, the cis-diol metabolite of dieldrin was found to be significantly more toxic than the parent compound. Disruption of dopamine catabolism yielded elevated levels of the neurotoxin, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, for many organochlorines. Comparisons of the toxicity profiles for each dieldrin analogue indicated a structure-specific effect important for elucidating the mechanisms of dieldrin neurotoxicity.

  11. Concurrent measurement of cellular turbidity and hemoglobin to evaluate the antioxidant activity of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellik, Yuva; Iguer-Ouada, Mokrane

    2016-01-01

    In past decades, a multitude of analytical methods for measuring antioxidant activity of plant extracts has been developed. However, when using methods to determine hemoglobin released from human erythrocytes treated with ginger extracts, we found hemoglobin concentrations were significantly higher than in untreated control samples. This suggests in the presence of antioxidants that measuring hemoglobin alone is not sufficient to determine hemolysis. We show concurrent measurement of erythrocyte concentration and hemoglobin is essential in such assays, and describe a new protocol based on simultaneous measurement of cellular turbidity and hemoglobin.

  12. Sipuleucel-T (Provenge): active cellular immunotherapy for advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKarney, I

    2007-09-01

    (1) Sipuleucel-T (Provenge) is an active cellular immunotherapy (therapeutic vaccine) that is designed to stimulate the patient's T-cells to recognize and attack prostate cancer cells that express prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) antigen. (2) Sipuleucel-T demonstrated a survival benefit in men with advanced androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC), although this preliminary finding requires confirmation in larger trials. (3) Mild to moderate myalgia, chills, fever, and tremor are the most commonly reported adverse events for patients receiving sipuleucel-T. These events generally resolve quickly. (4) More studies are needed to evaluate sipuleucel-T in the earlier stages of prostate cancer and in combination with conventional therapies.

  13. Profile-QSAR: a novel meta-QSAR method that combines activities across the kinase family to accurately predict affinity, selectivity, and cellular activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Eric; Mukherjee, Prasenjit; Sullivan, David; Jansen, Johanna

    2011-08-22

    Profile-QSAR is a novel 2D predictive model building method for kinases. This "meta-QSAR" method models the activity of each compound against a new kinase target as a linear combination of its predicted activities against a large panel of 92 previously studied kinases comprised from 115 assays. Profile-QSAR starts with a sparse incomplete kinase by compound (KxC) activity matrix, used to generate Bayesian QSAR models for the 92 "basis-set" kinases. These Bayesian QSARs generate a complete "synthetic" KxC activity matrix of predictions. These synthetic activities are used as "chemical descriptors" to train partial-least squares (PLS) models, from modest amounts of medium-throughput screening data, for predicting activity against new kinases. The Profile-QSAR predictions for the 92 kinases (115 assays) gave a median external R²(ext) = 0.59 on 25% held-out test sets. The method has proven accurate enough to predict pairwise kinase selectivities with a median correlation of R²(ext) = 0.61 for 958 kinase pairs with at least 600 common compounds. It has been further expanded by adding a "C(k)XC" cellular activity matrix to the KxC matrix to predict cellular activity for 42 kinase driven cellular assays with median R²(ext) = 0.58 for 24 target modulation assays and R²(ext) = 0.41 for 18 cell proliferation assays. The 2D Profile-QSAR, along with the 3D Surrogate AutoShim, are the foundations of an internally developed iterative medium-throughput screening (IMTS) methodology for virtual screening (VS) of compound archives as an alternative to experimental high-throughput screening (HTS). The method has been applied to 20 actual prospective kinase projects. Biological results have so far been obtained in eight of them. Q² values ranged from 0.3 to 0.7. Hit-rates at 10 uM for experimentally tested compounds varied from 25% to 80%, except in K5, which was a special case aimed specifically at finding "type II" binders, where none of the compounds were predicted to be

  14. Effect of electromagnetic fields emitted by cellular phones on the latency of evoked electrodermal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esen, F; Esen, H

    2006-03-01

    The widespread use of cellular phones raises the question of their possible adverse biological effects, especially on the central nervous system (CNS). Therefore, the authors examined the effect of electromagnetic fields emitted by cellular phones (CPEMFs) on the evoked neuronal activity of CNS relating to generation and representation of electrodermal activity (EDA), an index of sympathetic nervous system activity. EDA (skin resistance response; SRR) latency was lengthened approximately 200 ms with CPEMFs exposure irrespective of the head site next to mobile phone used. Hemispheric asymmetry of EDA-2 pathway, which is represented by shorter SRR latency in the right hand of the right hand responders, was also distorted with CPEMFs. Because the CNS regions including EDA-2 are also involved in tasks of motor timing and time estimation, delayed response in this neuronal network due to CPEMFs exposure may increase the response time of mobile phone users. Therefore, the findings point to the potential risks of mobile phones on the function of CNS and consequently, possible increase in the risk of phone-related driving hazards.

  15. Chemical and cellular antioxidant activity of phytochemicals purified from olive mill waste waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelino, Donato; Gennari, Lorenzo; Blasa, Manuela; Selvaggini, Roberto; Urbani, Stefania; Esposto, Sonia; Servili, Maurizio; Ninfali, Paolino

    2011-03-09

    The isolation and identification of a phytocomplex from olive mill waste waters (OMWW) was achieved. The isolated phytocomplex is made up of the following three phenolic compounds: hydroxytyrosol (3,4-DHPEA), tyrosol (p-HPEA) and the dialdehydic form of decarboxymethyl elenolic acid, linked with (3,4-dihydroxyphenyl)ethanol (3,4-DHPEA-EDA). The purification of this phytocomplex was reached by partial dehydration of the OMWW, followed by liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl acetate and middle pressure liquid chromatography (MPLC) on a Sephadex LH-20 column. The phytocomplex accounted for 6% of the total phenolic content of the OMWW. The phytocomplex and individual compounds were tested for antioxidant capacity by the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) method. The ORAC phytocomplex produced 10,000 ORAC units/g dry weight, whereas the cellular antioxidant activity, measured by the cellular antioxidant activity in red blood cell (CAA-RBC) method, demonstrated that the phytocomplex and all of the components are able to permeate the cell membrane thus exhibiting antioxidant activity inside the red blood cells. Our phytocomplex could be employed in the formulation of fortified foods and nutraceuticals, with the goal to obtain substantial health protective effects due to the suitable combination of the component molecules.

  16. Dense and Cellular Zirconia Produced by Gel Casting with Agar: Preparation and High Temperature Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marc Tulliani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified gel-casting process was developed to produce both dense and highly porous (40% volume yttria tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP using agar, a natural polysaccharide, as gelling agent. A fugitive phase, made of commercial polyethylene spheres, was added to the ceramic suspension before gelling to produce cellular ceramic structures. The characterization of the microstructural features of both dense and cellular ceramics was carried out by FEG SEM analysis of cross-sections produced by focused ion beam. The mechanical properties of the components were characterized at room temperature by nanoindentation tests in continuous stiffness measurement mode, by investigating the direct effect of the presence of residual microporosity. The presence of a diffuse residual microporosity from incomplete gel deaeration resulted in a decay of the bending strength and of the elastic modulus. The mechanical behavior of both dense and cellular zirconia (in terms of elastic modulus, flexural strength, and deformation at rupture was investigated by performing four-point bending tests at the temperature of 1500°C.

  17. Design, Fabrication, and Testing of a SOI-MEMS-Based Active Microprobe for Potential Cellular Force Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design, analysis, fabrication, and characterization of an electrostatically driven single-axis active probing device for the applications of cellular force sensing and materials characterization. The active microprobe is actuated by linear comb drivers to generate the motion in the probing direction. Both actuation and sensing comb-drive structures are designed for the probing stage. The sensing comb structures enable us to sense the probe displacement when the device is actuated, which enables applications of force-balanced sensing and provides the capability of closed-loop control towards better accuracy. The designed active probing device is fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI substrate with a 10 μm thick device layer through surface micromachining technologies and deep reactive-ion etching (DRIE process. The handle layer beneath probe stage is etched away by DRIE process to decrease the film damping between the stage and the handle wafer thus achieving high-quality factor. The fabricated stage provides a motion range of 14 μm at actuation voltage of 140 V. The measured natural frequency of the stage is 1.5 kHz under ambient conditions. A sensitivity of 6 fF/μm has been achieved. The proposed single-axis probe is aimed at sensing cellular force which ranges from a few nano-Newton to μN and micromanipulation applications.

  18. Effects of insulin and actin on phosphofructokinase activity and cellular distribution in skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Ana Paula P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report evidences that the association of phosphofructokinase and F-actin can be affected by insulin stimulation in rabbit skeletal muscle homogenates and that this association can be a mechanism of phos-phofructokinase regulation. Through co-sedimentation techniques, we observed that on insulin-stimulated tissues, approximately 70% of phosphofructokinase activity is co-located in an actin-enriched fraction, against 28% in control. This phenomenon is accompanied by a 100% increase in specific phosphofructokinase activity in stimulated homogenates. Purified F-actin causes an increase of 230% in phosphofructokinase activity and alters its kinetic parameters. The presence of F-actin increases the affinity of phosphofructokinase for fructose 6-phosphate nevertheless, with no changes in maximum velocity (Vmax. Here we propose that the modulation of cellular distribution of phosphofructokinase may be one of the mechanisms of control of glycolytic flux in mammalian muscle by insulin.

  19. Effect of Cellular Location of Human Carboxylesterase 2 on CPT-11 Hydrolysis and Anticancer Activity.

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    Yuan-Ting Hsieh

    Full Text Available CPT-11 is an anticancer prodrug that is clinically used for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. Hydrolysis of CPT-11 by human carboxylesterase 2 (CE2 generates SN-38, a topoisomerase I inhibitor that is the active anti-tumor agent. Expression of CE2 in cancer cells is under investigation for the tumor-localized activation of CPT-11. CE2 is normally expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum of cells but can be engineered to direct expression of active enzyme on the plasma membrane or as a secreted form. Although previous studies have investigated different locations of CE2 expression in cancer cells, it remains unclear if CE2 cellular location affects CPT-11 anticancer activity. In the present study, we directly compared the influence of CE2 cellular location on substrate hydrolysis and CPT-11 cytotoxicity. We linked expression of CE2 and enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP via a foot-and-mouth disease virus 2A (F2A peptide to facilitate fluorescence-activated cell sorting to achieve similar expression levels of ER-located, secreted or membrane-anchored CE2. Soluble CE2 was detected in the medium of cells that expressed secreted and membrane-anchored CE2, but not in cells that expressed ER-retained CE2. Cancer cells that expressed all three forms of CE2 were more sensitive to CPT-11 as compared to unmodified cancer cells, but the membrane-anchored and ER-retained forms of CE2 were consistently more effective than secreted CE2. We conclude that expression of CE2 in the ER or on the membrane of cancer cells is suitable for enhancing CPT-11 anticancer activity.

  20. Understanding the Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Physical Activity-Induced Health Benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufer, P Darrell; Bamman, Marcas M; Muoio, Deborah M; Bouchard, Claude; Cooper, Dan M; Goodpaster, Bret H; Booth, Frank W; Kohrt, Wendy M; Gerszten, Robert E; Mattson, Mark P; Hepple, Russell T; Kraus, William E; Reid, Michael B; Bodine, Sue C; Jakicic, John M; Fleg, Jerome L; Williams, John P; Joseph, Lyndon; Evans, Mary; Maruvada, Padma; Rodgers, Mary; Roary, Mary; Boyce, Amanda T; Drugan, Jonelle K; Koenig, James I; Ingraham, Richard H; Krotoski, Danuta; Garcia-Cazarin, Mary; McGowan, Joan A; Laughlin, Maren R

    2015-07-07

    The beneficial effects of physical activity (PA) are well documented, yet the mechanisms by which PA prevents disease and improves health outcomes are poorly understood. To identify major gaps in knowledge and potential strategies for catalyzing progress in the field, the NIH convened a workshop in late October 2014 entitled "Understanding the Cellular and Molecular Mechanisms of Physical Activity-Induced Health Benefits." Presentations and discussions emphasized the challenges imposed by the integrative and intermittent nature of PA, the tremendous discovery potential of applying "-omics" technologies to understand interorgan crosstalk and biological networking systems during PA, and the need to establish an infrastructure of clinical trial sites with sufficient expertise to incorporate mechanistic outcome measures into adequately sized human PA trials. Identification of the mechanisms that underlie the link between PA and improved health holds extraordinary promise for discovery of novel therapeutic targets and development of personalized exercise medicine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Determining antioxidant activities of lactobacilli cell-free supernatants by cellular antioxidant assay: a comparison with traditional methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiali Xing

    Full Text Available Antioxidant activity of lactic acid bacteria is associated with multiple health-protective effects. Traditional indexes of chemical antioxidant activities poorly reflect the antioxidant effects of these bacteria in vivo. Cellular antioxidant activity (CAA assay was used in this study to determine the antioxidant activity of cell-free supernatants (CFSs of 10 Lactobacillus strains. The performance of the CAA assay was compared with that of four chemical antioxidant activity assays, namely, DPPH radical scavenging, hydroxyl radical scavenging (HRS, reducing power (RP, and inhibition of linoleic acid peroxidation (ILAP. Results of the CAA assay were associated with those of DPPH and ILAP assays, but not with those of RP and HRS assays. The inter- and intra-specific antioxidant activities of CFS were characterized by chemical and CAA assays. L. rhamnosus CCFM 1107 displayed a high antioxidative effect similar to positive control L. rhamnosus GG ATCC 53103 in all of the assays. The CAA assay is a potential method for the detection of antioxidant activities of lactobacilli CFSs.

  2. Quantitative high content imaging of cellular adaptive stress response pathways in toxicity for chemical safety assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Steven; Hiemstra, Steven; Huppelschoten, Suzanna; Danen, Erik; Niemeijer, Marije; Hendriks, Giel; Vrieling, Harry; Herpers, Bram; van de Water, Bob

    2014-03-17

    Over the past decade, major leaps forward have been made on the mechanistic understanding and identification of adaptive stress response landscapes underlying toxic insult using transcriptomics approaches. However, for predictive purposes of adverse outcome several major limitations in these approaches exist. First, the limited number of samples that can be analyzed reduces the in depth analysis of concentration-time course relationships for toxic stress responses. Second these transcriptomics analysis have been based on the whole cell population, thereby inevitably preventing single cell analysis. Third, transcriptomics is based on the transcript level, totally ignoring (post)translational regulation. We believe these limitations are circumvented with the application of high content analysis of relevant toxicant-induced adaptive stress signaling pathways using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter cell-based assays. The goal is to establish a platform that incorporates all adaptive stress pathways that are relevant for toxicity, with a focus on drug-induced liver injury. In addition, cellular stress responses typically follow cell perturbations at the subcellular organelle level. Therefore, we complement our reporter line panel with reporters for specific organelle morphometry and function. Here, we review the approaches of high content imaging of cellular adaptive stress responses to chemicals and the application in the mechanistic understanding and prediction of chemical toxicity at a systems toxicology level.

  3. Cucurbitacin IIb exhibits anti-inflammatory activity through modulating multiple cellular behaviors of mouse lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Wang

    Full Text Available Cucurbitacin IIb (CuIIb is one of the major active compounds in Hemsleyadine tablets which have been used for clinical treatment of bacillary dysentery, enteritis and acute tonsilitis. However, its action mechanism has not been completely understood. This study aimed to explore the anti-inflammatory activity of CuIIb and its underlying mechanism in mitogen-activated lymphocytes isolated from mouse mesenteric lymph nodes. The results showed that CuIIb inhibited the proliferation of concanavalin A (Con A-activated lymphocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. CuIIb treatment arrested their cell cycle in S and G2/M phases probably due to the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton and the modulation of p27(Kip1 and cyclin levels. Moreover, the surface expression of activation markers CD69 and CD25 on Con A-activated CD3(+ T lymphocytes was suppressed by CuIIb treatment. Both Con A- and phorbol ester plus ionomycin-induced expression of TNF-α, IFN-γ and IL-6 proteins was attenuated upon exposure to CuIIb. Mechanistically, CuIIb treatment suppressed the phosphorylation of JNK and Erk1/2 but not p38 in Con A-activated lymphocytes. Although CuIIb unexpectedly enhanced the phosphorylation of IκB and NF-κB (p65, it blocked the nuclear translocation of NF-κB (p65. In support of this, CuIIb significantly decreased the mRNA levels of IκBα and TNF-α, two target genes of NF-κB, in Con A-activated lymphocytes. In addition, CuIIb downregulated Con A-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and increased cell apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that CuIIb exhibits its anti-inflammatory activity through modulating multiple cellular behaviors and signaling pathways, leading to the suppression of the adaptive immune response.

  4. Kresoxim methyl dissipation kinetics and its residue effect on soil extra-cellular and intra-cellular enzymatic activity in four different soils of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabale, Rupali P; Shabeer T P, Ahammed; Utture, Sagar C; Banerjee, Kaushik; Oulkar, Dasharath P; Adsule, Pandurang G; Deshmukh, Madhukar B

    2015-01-01

    The rate of degradation of kresoxim methyl and its effect on soil extra-cellular (acid phosphatase, alkaline phosphatase and β-glucosidase) and intra-cellular (dehydrogenase) enzymes were explored in four different soils of India. In all the tested soils, the degradation rate was faster at the beginning, which slowed down with time indicating a non-linear pattern of degradation. Rate of degradation in black soil was fastest followed by saline, brown and red soils, respectively and followed 1st or 1st + 1st order kinetics with half-life ranging between 1-6 days for natural soil and 1-19 days for sterile soils. The rate of degradation in natural against sterilized soils suggests that microbial degradation might be the major pathway of residue dissipation. Although small changes in enzyme activities were observed, kresoxim methyl did not have any significant deleterious effect on the enzymatic activity of the various test soils in long run. Simple correlation studies between degradation percentage and individual enzyme activities did not establish any significant relationships. The pattern and change of enzyme activity was primarily due to the effect of the incubation period rather than the effect of kresoxim methyl itself.

  5. Benzothiophene inhibitors of MK2. Part 1: structure-activity relationships, assessments of selectivity and cellular potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Long, Scott A; Pierce, Betsy S; Mahoney, Matthew W; Mourey, Robert J

    2009-08-15

    Identification of potent benzothiophene inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2), structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies, selectivity assessments against CDK2, cellular potency and mechanism of action are presented. Crystallographic data provide a rationale for the observed MK2 potency as well as selectivity over CDK2 for this class of inhibitors.

  6. Endothelin-1 activation of ETB receptors leads to a reduced cellular proliferative rate and an increased cellular footprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Jamie L.; Taylor, Linda; Polgar, Peter, E-mail: peterp@bu.edu

    2012-06-10

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is a vasoactive peptide which signals through two G-protein coupled receptors, endothelin receptor A (ETA) and B (ETB). We determined that ET-1 activation of its ETB receptor in stably cDNA transfected CHO cells leads to a 55% reduction in cell number by end-point cell counting and a 35% decrease in cell growth by a real-time cell-substrate impedance-based assay after 24 h of cell growth. When CHO ETB cells were synchronized in the late G1 cell cycle phase, ET-1 delayed their S phase progression compared to control by 30% as determined by [{sup 3}H]-thymidine incorporation. On the other hand, no such delay was observed during late G2/M to G1 transit when cells were treated with ET-1 after release from mitotic arrest. Using the cell-substrate impedance-based assay, we observed that ET-1 induces opposing morphological changes in CHO ETA and CHO ETB cells with ETB causing an increase in the cell footprint and ETA a decrease. Likewise, in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, which express both ETA and ETB receptors, ET-1 induces an ETA-dependent contraction and an ETB dependent dilation. These results are shedding light on a possible beneficial role for ETB in diseases involving ET-1 dysfunction such as pulmonary hypertension. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ET- hinders cell proliferation in CHO cells transfected with ETB. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ET-1 also decreases the rate of DNA synthesis in CHO ETB cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer JNK and PI3K appear to be involved in this reduction of DNA synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ETB activation in CHO ETB cells and hSMCs leads to dilatory morphological changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In CHO ETA and hSMCs, ETA activation leads to constrictive morphological changes.

  7. Reverting p53 activation after recovery of cellular stress to resume with cell cycle progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazo, Pedro A

    2017-05-01

    The activation of p53 in response to different types of cellular stress induces several protective reactions including cell cycle arrest, senescence or cell death. These protective effects are a consequence of the activation of p53 by specific phosphorylation performed by several kinases. The reversion of the cell cycle arrest, induced by p53, is a consequence of the phosphorylated and activated p53, which triggers its own downregulation and that of its positive regulators. The different down-regulatory processes have a sequential and temporal order of events. The mechanisms implicated in p53 down-regulation include phosphatases, deacetylases, and protein degradation by the proteasome or autophagy, which also affect different p53 protein targets and functions. The necessary first step is the dephosphorylation of p53 to make it available for interaction with mdm2 ubiquitin-ligase, which requires the activation of phosphatases targeting both p53 and p53-activating kinases. In addition, deacetylation of p53 is required to make lysine residues accessible to ubiquitin ligases. The combined action of these downregulatory mechanisms brings p53 protein back to its basal levels, and cell cycle progression can resume if cells have overcome the stress or damage situation. The specific targeting of these down-regulatory mechanisms can be exploited for therapeutic purposes in cancers harbouring wild-type p53.

  8. Activation of arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR) in T lineage cells inhibits cellular growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nohara, K.; Tomohiro, I.; Chiharu, T. [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Dioxins, including the most toxic congener, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD), exert their toxic effects by binding and activating the arylhydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a liganddependent transcription factor. Upon binding dioxins, the AhR in the cytoplasm is activated and translocated to the nucleus, where it heterodimerizes with another transcription factor, ARNT. The AhR/ARNT heterodimer modulates expressions of various genes by binding xenobiotic responsive elements (XREs) in their enhancer regions or modifies cellular functions through protein-protein interactions. The AhR activation by TCDD exposure induces various immunotoxic reactions including thymus involution and suppression of T cell-dependent antibody production. We have investigated the roles of AhR activation in T lineage cells and their underlying mechanisms by generating transgenic (Tg) mice expressing a constitutively active AhR (CA-AhR) mutant specifically in T cells and by transiently expressing the CA-AhR mutant in Jurkat T cells.

  9. Metal oxide nanoparticles interact with immune cells and activate different cellular responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simón-Vázquez R

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Rosana Simón-Vázquez, Tamara Lozano-Fernández, Angela Dávila-Grana, Africa González-Fernández Immunology Laboratory, Biomedical Research Center (CINBIO and Institute of Biomedical Research of Ourense-Pontevedra-Vigo (IBI, University of Vigo, Campus Lagoas Marcosende, Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain Abstract: Besides cell death, nanoparticles (Nps can induce other cellular responses such as inflammation. The potential immune response mediated by the exposure of human lymphoid cells to metal oxide Nps (moNps was characterized using four different moNps (CeO2, TiO2, Al2O3, and ZnO to study the three most relevant mitogen-activated protein kinase subfamilies and the nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of the activated B-cell inhibitor, IκBα, as well as the expression of several genes by immune cells incubated with these Nps. The moNps activated different signaling pathways and altered the gene expression in human lymphocyte cells. The ZnO Nps were the most active and the release of Zn2+ ions was the main mechanism of toxicity. CeO2 Nps induced the smallest changes in gene expression and in the IκBα protein. The effects of the particles were strongly dependent on the type and concentration of the Nps and on the cell activation status prior to Np exposure. Keywords: Jurkat, MAPK, NFκB, qPCR, inflammation, metabolism

  10. Graphene Enhances Cellular Proliferation through Activating the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Sun, Cheng; Liao, Chunyang; Cui, Lin; Li, Haishan; Qu, Guangbo; Yu, Wenlian; Song, Naining; Cui, Yuan; Wang, Zheng; Xie, Wenping; Chen, Huiming; Zhou, Qunfang

    2016-07-27

    Graphene has promising applications in food packaging, water purification, and detective sensors for contamination monitoring. However, the biological effects of graphene are not fully understood. It is necessary to clarify the potential risks of graphene exposure to humans through diverse routes, such as foods. In the present study, graphene, as the model nanomaterial, was used to test its potential effects on the cell proliferation based on multiple representative cell lines, including HepG2, A549, MCF-7, and HeLa cells. Graphene was characterized by Raman spectroscopy, particle size analysis, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The cellular responses to graphene exposure were evaluated using flow cytometry, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide, and alamarBlue assays. Rat cerebral astrocyte cultures, as the non-cancer cells, were used to assess the potential cytotoxicity of graphene as well. The results showed that graphene stimulation enhanced cell proliferation in all tested cell cultures and the highest elevation in cell growth was up to 60%. A western blot assay showed that the expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF) was upregulated upon graphene treatment. The phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) and the downstream proteins, ShC and extracellular regulating kinase (ERK), were remarkably induced, indicating that the activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK signaling pathway was triggered. The activation of PI3 kinase p85 and AKT showed that the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway was also involved in graphene-induced cell proliferation, causing the increase of cell ratios in the G2/M phase. No influences on cell apoptosis were observed in graphene-treated cells when compared to the negative controls, proving the low cytotoxicity of this emerging nanomaterial. The findings in this study revealed the potential cellular biological effect of graphene, which may give useful hints on its biosafety

  11. Characteristics of Middle School Students Learning Actions in Outdoor Mathematical Activities with the Cellular Phone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Wajeeh; Baya'a, Nimer

    2012-01-01

    Learning in the cellular phone environment enables utilizing the multiple functions of the cellular phone, such as mobility, availability, interactivity, verbal and voice communication, taking pictures or recording audio and video, measuring time and transferring information. These functions together with mathematics-designated cellular phone…

  12. Characteristics of Middle School Students Learning Actions in Outdoor Mathematical Activities with the Cellular Phone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daher, Wajeeh; Baya'a, Nimer

    2012-01-01

    Learning in the cellular phone environment enables utilizing the multiple functions of the cellular phone, such as mobility, availability, interactivity, verbal and voice communication, taking pictures or recording audio and video, measuring time and transferring information. These functions together with mathematics-designated cellular phone…

  13. Fluorescence Modified Chitosan-Coated Magnetic Nanoparticles for High-Efficient Cellular Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nie Fang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Labeling of cells with nanoparticles for living detection is of interest to various biomedical applications. In this study, novel fluorescent/magnetic nanoparticles were prepared and used in high-efficient cellular imaging. The nanoparticles coated with the modified chitosan possessed a magnetic oxide core and a covalently attached fluorescent dye. We evaluated the feasibility and efficiency in labeling cancer cells (SMMC-7721 with the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles exhibited a high affinity to cells, which was demonstrated by flow cytometry and magnetic resonance imaging. The results showed that cell-labeling efficiency of the nanoparticles was dependent on the incubation time and nanoparticles’ concentration. The minimum detected number of labeled cells was around 104by using a clinical 1.5-T MRI imager. Fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy instruments were used to monitor the localization patterns of the magnetic nanoparticles in cells. These new magneto-fluorescent nanoagents have demonstrated the potential for future medical use.

  14. Label-free imaging of cellular malformation using high resolution photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongjiang; Li, Bingbing; Yang, Sihua

    2014-09-01

    A label-free high resolution photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) system for imaging cellular malformation is presented. The carbon fibers were used to testify the lateral resolution of the PAM. Currently, the lateral resolution is better than 2.7 μm. The human normal red blood cells (RBCs) were used to prove the imaging capability of the system, and a single red blood cell was mapped with high contrast. Moreover, the iron deficiency anemia RBCs were clearly distinguished from the cell morphology by using the PAM. The experimental results demonstrate that the photoacoustic microscopy system can accomplish label-free photoacoustic imaging and that it has clinical potential for use in the detection of erythrocytes and blood vessels malformation.

  15. Downregulation of cellular protective factors of rumen epithelium in goats fed high energy diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred Hollmann

    Full Text Available Energy-rich diets can challenge metabolic and protective functions of the rumen epithelial cells, but the underlying factors are unclear. This study sought to evaluate proteomic changes of the rumen epithelium in goats fed a low, medium, or high energy diet. Expression of protein changes were compared by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis followed by protein identification with matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Of about 2,000 spots commonly detected in all gels, 64 spots were significantly regulated, which were traced back to 24 unique proteins. Interestingly, the expression profiles of several chaperone proteins with important cellular protective functions such as heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein, peroxiredoxin-6, serpin H1, protein disulfide-isomerase, and selenium-binding protein were collectively downregulated in response to high dietary energy supply. Similar regulation patterns were obtained for some other proteins involved in transport or metabolic functions. In contrast, metabolic enzymes like retinal dehydrogenase 1 and ATP synthase subunit beta, mitochondrial precursor were upregulated in response to high energy diet. Lower expressions of chaperone proteins in the rumen epithelial cells in response to high energy supply may suggest that these cells were less protected against the potentially harmful rumen toxic compounds, which might have consequences for rumen and systemic health. Our findings also suggest that energy-rich diets and the resulting acidotic insult may render rumen epithelial cells more vulnerable to cellular damage by attenuating their cell defense system, hence facilitating the impairment of rumen barrier function, typically observed in energy-rich fed ruminants.

  16. Downregulation of Cellular Protective Factors of Rumen Epithelium in Goats Fed High Energy Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmann, Manfred; Miller, Ingrid; Hummel, Karin; Sabitzer, Sonja; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U.; Razzazi-Fazeli, Ebrahim; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2013-01-01

    Energy-rich diets can challenge metabolic and protective functions of the rumen epithelial cells, but the underlying factors are unclear. This study sought to evaluate proteomic changes of the rumen epithelium in goats fed a low, medium, or high energy diet. Expression of protein changes were compared by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis followed by protein identification with matrix assisted laser desorption ionisation tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Of about 2,000 spots commonly detected in all gels, 64 spots were significantly regulated, which were traced back to 24 unique proteins. Interestingly, the expression profiles of several chaperone proteins with important cellular protective functions such as heat shock cognate 71 kDa protein, peroxiredoxin-6, serpin H1, protein disulfide-isomerase, and selenium-binding protein were collectively downregulated in response to high dietary energy supply. Similar regulation patterns were obtained for some other proteins involved in transport or metabolic functions. In contrast, metabolic enzymes like retinal dehydrogenase 1 and ATP synthase subunit beta, mitochondrial precursor were upregulated in response to high energy diet. Lower expressions of chaperone proteins in the rumen epithelial cells in response to high energy supply may suggest that these cells were less protected against the potentially harmful rumen toxic compounds, which might have consequences for rumen and systemic health. Our findings also suggest that energy-rich diets and the resulting acidotic insult may render rumen epithelial cells more vulnerable to cellular damage by attenuating their cell defense system, hence facilitating the impairment of rumen barrier function, typically observed in energy-rich fed ruminants. PMID:24349094

  17. [Nicotinic acid increases cellular transport of high density lipoprotein cholesterol in patients with hypoalphalipoproteinemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Catalina; Droppelmann, Katherine; Quiñones, Verónica; Amigo, Ludwig; Mendoza, Camila; Serrano, Valentina; Véjar, Margarita; Maiz, Alberto; Rigotti, Attilio

    2015-09-01

    Plasma high density lipoproteins (HDL) are involved in reverse cholesterol transport mediated by the scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI). Nicotinic acid increases HDL cholesterol levels, even though its specific impact on SR-BI dependent-cellular cholesterol transport remains unknown. To determine the effect of nicotinic acid on HDL particle functionality in cholesterol efflux and uptake mediated by SR-BI in cultured cells in hypoalphalipoproteinemic patients. In a pilot study, eight patients with low HDL (≤ 40 mg/dL) were treated with extended release nicotinic acid. HDL cholesterol and phospholipid levels, HDL2 and HDL3 fractions and HDL particle sizes were measured at baseline and post-therapy. Before and after nicotinic acid treatment, HDL particles were used for cholesterol transport studies in cells transfected with SR-BI. Nicotinic acid treatment raised total HDL cholesterol and phospholipids, HDL2 levels as well as HDL particle size. Nicotinic acid significantly increased HDL cholesterol efflux and uptake capacity mediated by SR-BI in cultured cells. Nicotinic acid therapy increases SR-BI-dependent HDL cholesterol transport in cultured cells, establishing a new cellular mechanism by which this lipid-lowering drug appears to modulate HDL metabolism in patients with hypoalphalipoproteinemia.

  18. Silibinin inhibits HIV-1 infection by reducing cellular activation and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Janela; Lovelace, Erica S; Elahi, Shokrollah; Maurice, Nicholas J; Wagoner, Jessica; Dragavon, Joan; Mittler, John E; Kraft, Zane; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Stamatatos, Leonidis; Horton, Helen; De Rosa, Stephen C; Coombs, Robert W; Polyak, Stephen J

    2012-01-01

    Purified silymarin-derived natural products from the milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum) block hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and inhibit T cell proliferation in vitro. An intravenous formulation of silibinin (SIL), a major component of silymarin, displays anti-HCV effects in humans and also inhibits T-cell proliferation in vitro. We show that SIL inhibited replication of HIV-1 in TZM-bl cells, PBMCs, and CEM cells in vitro. SIL suppression of HIV-1 coincided with dose-dependent reductions in actively proliferating CD19+, CD4+, and CD8+ cells, resulting in fewer CD4+ T cells expressing the HIV-1 co-receptors CXCR4 and CCR5. SIL inhibition of T-cell growth was not due to cytotoxicity measured by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or necrosis. SIL also blocked induction of the activation markers CD38, HLA-DR, Ki67, and CCR5 on CD4+ T cells. The data suggest that SIL attenuated cellular functions involved in T-cell activation, proliferation, and HIV-1 infection. Silymarin-derived compounds provide cytoprotection by suppressing virus infection, immune activation, and inflammation, and as such may be relevant for both HIV mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected subjects.

  19. Silibinin inhibits HIV-1 infection by reducing cellular activation and proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janela McClure

    Full Text Available Purified silymarin-derived natural products from the milk thistle plant (Silybum marianum block hepatitis C virus (HCV infection and inhibit T cell proliferation in vitro. An intravenous formulation of silibinin (SIL, a major component of silymarin, displays anti-HCV effects in humans and also inhibits T-cell proliferation in vitro. We show that SIL inhibited replication of HIV-1 in TZM-bl cells, PBMCs, and CEM cells in vitro. SIL suppression of HIV-1 coincided with dose-dependent reductions in actively proliferating CD19+, CD4+, and CD8+ cells, resulting in fewer CD4+ T cells expressing the HIV-1 co-receptors CXCR4 and CCR5. SIL inhibition of T-cell growth was not due to cytotoxicity measured by cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or necrosis. SIL also blocked induction of the activation markers CD38, HLA-DR, Ki67, and CCR5 on CD4+ T cells. The data suggest that SIL attenuated cellular functions involved in T-cell activation, proliferation, and HIV-1 infection. Silymarin-derived compounds provide cytoprotection by suppressing virus infection, immune activation, and inflammation, and as such may be relevant for both HIV mono-infected and HIV/HCV co-infected subjects.

  20. A conformational change within the WAVE2 complex regulates its degradation following cellular activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Noah; Biber, Guy; Fried, Sophia; Reicher, Barak; Levy, Omer; Sabag, Batel; Noy, Elad; Barda-Saad, Mira

    2017-01-01

    WASp family Verprolin-homologous protein-2 (WAVE2), a member of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp) family of actin nucleation promoting factors, is a central regulator of actin cytoskeleton polymerization and dynamics. Multiple signaling pathways operate via WAVE2 to promote the actin-nucleating activity of the actin-related protein 2/3 (Arp2/3) complex. WAVE2 exists as a part of a pentameric protein complex known as the WAVE regulatory complex (WRC), which is unstable in the absence of its individual proteins. While the involvement of WAVE2 in actin polymerization has been well documented, its negative regulation mechanism is poorly characterized to date. Here, we demonstrate that WAVE2 undergoes ubiquitylation in a T-cell activation dependent manner, followed by proteasomal degradation. The WAVE2 ubiquitylation site was mapped to lysine 45, located at the N-terminus where WAVE2 binds to the WRC. Using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), we reveal that the autoinhibitory conformation of the WRC maintains the stability of WAVE2 in resting cells; the release of autoinhibition following T-cell activation facilitates the exposure of WAVE2 to ubiquitylation, leading to its degradation. The dynamic conformational structures of WAVE2 during cellular activation dictate its degradation. PMID:28332566

  1. Tetraspanin CD9 modulates human lymphoma cellular proliferation via histone deacetylase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herr, Michael J. [Vascular Biology Center of Excellence, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Department of Medicine, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Department of Molecular Sciences, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Department of Surgery, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Longhurst, Celia M.; Baker, Benjamin [Vascular Biology Center of Excellence, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Homayouni, Ramin [Department of Biology, Bioinformatics Program, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States); Speich, Henry E.; Kotha, Jayaprakash [Vascular Biology Center of Excellence, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Jennings, Lisa K., E-mail: ljennings@uthsc.edu [Vascular Biology Center of Excellence, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Department of Medicine, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Department of Molecular Sciences, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Department of Surgery, The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN 38163 (United States); Department of Biology, Bioinformatics Program, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152 (United States)

    2014-05-16

    Highlights: • CD9 is differentially expressed in human Burkitt’s lymphoma cells. • We found that CD9 expression promotes these cells proliferation. • CD9 expression also increases HDAC activity. • HDAC inhibition decreased both cell proliferation and importantly CD9 expression. • CD9 may dictate HDAC efficacy and play a role in HDAC regulation. - Abstract: Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) is a type of hematological malignancy that affects two percent of the overall population in the United States. Tetraspanin CD9 is a cell surface protein that has been thoroughly demonstrated to be a molecular facilitator of cellular phenotype. CD9 expression varies in two human lymphoma cell lines, Raji and BJAB. In this report, we investigated the functional relationship between CD9 and cell proliferation regulated by histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity in these two cell lines. Introduction of CD9 expression in Raji cells resulted in significantly increased cell proliferation and HDAC activity compared to Mock transfected Raji cells. The increase in CD9–Raji cell proliferation was significantly inhibited by HDAC inhibitor (HDACi) treatment. Pretreatment of BJAB cells with HDAC inhibitors resulted in a significant decrease in endogenous CD9 mRNA and cell surface expression. BJAB cells also displayed decreased cell proliferation after HDACi treatment. These results suggest a significant relationship between CD9 expression and cell proliferation in human lymphoma cells that may be modulated by HDAC activity.

  2. Role of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species in the Activation of Cellular Signals, Molecules, and Function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Indo, Hiroko P.; Hawkins, Clare L; Nakanishi, Ikuo

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are a major source of intracellular energy and reactive oxygen species in cells, but are also increasingly being recognized as a controller of cell death. Here, we review evidence of signal transduction control by mitochondrial superoxide generation via the nuclear factor-κB (NF......-κB) and GATA signaling pathways. We have also reviewed the effects of ROS on the activation of MMP and HIF. There is significant evidence to support the hypothesis that mitochondrial superoxide can initiate signaling pathways following transport into the cytosol. In this study, we provide evidence of TATA...... signal transductions by mitochondrial superoxide. Oxidative phosphorylation via the electron transfer chain, glycolysis, and generation of superoxide from mitochondria could be important factors in regulating signal transduction, cellular homeostasis, and cell death....

  3. Inhibition of cellular Shp2 activity by a methyl ester analog of SPI-112.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liwei; Pernazza, Daniele; Scott, Latanya M; Lawrence, Harshani R; Ren, Yuan; Luo, Yunting; Wu, Xin; Sung, Shen-Shu; Guida, Wayne C; Sebti, Said M; Lawrence, Nicholas J; Wu, Jie

    2010-09-15

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) Shp2 (PTPN11) is an attractive target for anticancer drug discovery because it mediates growth factor signaling and its gain-of-function mutants are causally linked to leukemias. We previously synthesized SPI-112 from a lead compound of Shp2 inhibitor, NSC-117199. In this study, we demonstrated that SPI-112 bound to Shp2 by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and displayed competitive inhibitor kinetics to Shp2. Like some other compounds in the PTP inhibitor discovery efforts, SPI-112 was not cell permeable, precluding its use in biological studies. To overcome the cell permeation issue, we prepared a methyl ester SPI-112 analog (SPI-112Me) that is predicted to be hydrolyzed to SPI-112 upon entry into cells. Fluorescence uptake assay and confocal imaging suggested that SPI-112Me was taken up by cells. Incubation of cells with SPI-112Me inhibited epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated Shp2 PTP activity and Shp2-mediated paxillin dephosphorylation, Erk1/2 activation, and cell migration. SPI-112Me treatment also inhibited Erk1/2 activation by a Gab1-Shp2 chimera. Treatment of Shp2(E76K) mutant-transformed TF-1 myeloid cells with SPI-112Me resulted in inhibition of Shp2(E76K)-dependent cell survival, which is associated with inhibition of Shp2(E76K) PTP activity, Shp2(E76K)-induced Erk1/2 activation, and Bcl-XL expression. Furthermore, SPI-112Me enhanced interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-stimulated STAT1 tyrosine phosphorylation, ISRE-luciferase reporter activity, p21 expression, and the anti-proliferative effect. Thus, the SPI-112 methyl ester analog was able to inhibit cellular Shp2 PTP activity.

  4. Activation of the cellular mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways ERK, P38 and JNK during Toxoplasma gondii invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valère A.

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Host cell invasion is essential for the pathogenicity of the obligate intracellular protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. In the present study, we evaluated the ability of T. gondii tachyzoites to trigger phosphorylation of the different mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK in human monocytic cells THP1. Kinetic experiments show that the peak of extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2, P38 and cjun-NH2 terminal kinase (JNKs phosphorylation occurs between 10 and 60 min. The use of specific inhibitors of ERK1/2, P38 and JNK1/2 phosphorylation indicates the specificity of MAPKs phosphorylation during invasion. Signaling through cellular and parasite mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase pathways appears to be critical for T. gondii invasion.

  5. Lymphocyte activation and hepatic cellular infiltration in immunocompetent mice infected by dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsuen-Chin; Lai, Show-Yun; Sung, Jui-Min; Lee, Shu-Hwae; Lin, Yu-Chin; Wang, Wei-Kung; Chen, Yee-Chun; Kao, Chuan-Liang; King, Chwan-Chuen; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A

    2004-07-01

    Activation and expansion of dengue virus-specific T cells and abnormal liver functions in dengue patients have been documented. However, it remains to be determined whether T cells are involved in the pathogenic mechanism of dengue virus infection. In this study, immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice were employed to study dengue virus-induced T cell activation. Mice were inoculated with 10(8) PFU dengue virus serotype 2 strain 16681 by the intravenous route. Dengue viral core RNA was detected by RT-PCR in mouse serum, liver, spleen, and brain at different time points after infection. Splenic T cells were activated as evidenced by their expression of CD69 and O-glycosylated CD43 at as early as day 3 after infection. Splenic T cell expression of O-glycosylated CD43 and IFN-gamma production coordinately peaked at day 5. Coincided with the peak of splenic T cell activation was hepatic lymphocyte infiltration and elevation of liver enzymes. Flow cytometric analysis revealed the infiltrating CD8(+) T cell to CD4(+) T cell ratio was 5/3. After a second inoculation of dengue virus, hepatic T cell infiltration and liver enzyme levels increased sharply. The infiltrating hepatic CD8(+) T cell to CD4(+) T cell ratio increased to 5.8/1. A strong correlation was found between T cell activation and hepatic cellular infiltration in immunocompetent mice infected with dengue virus. The kinetics of liver enzyme elevation also correlated with that of T cell activation. These data suggest a relationship between T cell infiltration and elevation of liver enzymes.

  6. Identification of host cellular proteins that interact with the M protein of a highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus vaccine strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Li, Yanwei; Dong, Hong; Wang, Li; Peng, Jinmei; An, Tongqing; Yang, Xufu; Tian, Zhijun; Cai, Xuehui

    2017-02-22

    The highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) continues to pose one of the greatest threats to the swine industry. M protein is the most conserved and important structural protein of PRRSV. However, information about the host cellular proteins that interact with M protein remains limited. Host cellular proteins that interact with the M protein of HP-PRRSV were immunoprecipitated from MARC-145 cells infected with PRRSV HuN4-F112 using the M monoclonal antibody (mAb). The differentially expressed proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS. The screened proteins were used for bioinformatics analysis including Gene Ontology, the interaction network, and the enriched KEGG pathways. Some interested cellular proteins were validated to interact with M protein by CO-IP. The PRRSV HuN4-F112 infection group had 10 bands compared with the control group. The bands included 219 non-redundant cellular proteins that interact with M protein, which were identified by LC-MS/MS with high confidence. The gene ontology and Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway bioinformatic analyses indicated that the identified proteins could be assigned to several different subcellular locations and functional classes. Functional analysis of the interactome profile highlighted cellular pathways associated with protein translation, infectious disease, and signal transduction. Two interested cellular proteins-nuclear factor of activated T cells 45 kDa (NF45) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA)-that could interact with M protein were validated by Co-IP and confocal analyses. The interactome data between PRRSV M protein and cellular proteins were identified and contribute to the understanding of the roles of M protein in the replication and pathogenesis of PRRSV. The interactome of M protein will aid studies of virus/host interactions and provide means to decrease the threat of PRRSV to the swine industry in the future.

  7. Regulation of Ras exchange factors and cellular localization of Ras activation by lipid messengers in T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse E. Jun

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The Ras-MAPK signaling pathway is highly conserved throughout evolution and is activated downstream of a wide range of receptor stimuli. Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RasGEFs catalyze GTP loading of Ras and play a pivotal role in regulating receptor-ligand induced Ras activity. In T cells, three families of functionally important RasGEFs are expressed: RasGRF, RasGRP, and SOS-family GEFs.Early on it was recognized that Ras activation is critical for T cell development and that the RasGEFs play an important role herein. More recent work has revealed that nuances in Ras activation appear to significantly impact T cell development and selection. These nuances include distinct biochemical patterns of analog versus digital Ras activation, differences in cellular localization of Ras activation, and intricate interplays between the RasGEFs during distinct T cell developmental stages as revealed by various new mouse models. In many instances, the exact nature of these nuances in Ras activation or how these may result from fine-tuning of the RasGEFs is not understood.One large group of biomolecules critically involved in the control of Ras-GEFs´functions are lipid second messengers. Multiple, yet distinct lipid products are generated following T cell receptor (TCR stimulation and bind to different domains in the RasGRP and SOS RasGEFs to facilitate the activation of the membrane-anchored Ras GTPases. In this review we highlight how different lipid-based elements are generated by various enzymes downstream of the TCR and other receptors and how these dynamic and interrelated lipid products may fine-tune Ras activation by RasGEFs in developing T cells.

  8. Cellular uptake and activity of heparin functionalised cerium oxide nanoparticles in monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, S R Simon; Whitelock, John M; Tomic, Romana; Gunawan, Cindy; Teoh, Wey Yang; Amal, Rose; Lord, Megan S

    2013-06-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) are effective in scavenging intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study nanoceria synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis (dXRD = 12 nm) were functionalised with heparin via an organosilane linker, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. Nanoceria were functionalised with approximately 130 heparin molecules per nanoparticle as determined by thermo gravimetric analysis. Heparin functionalised nanoceria were more effectively internalised by the human monocyte cell line, U937, and U937 cells that had been activated with phorbol 12 myristate 13-acetate (PMA) than bare nanoceria. The heparin functionalised nanoceria were also more effective in scavenging ROS than nanoceria in both activated and unactivated U937 cells. Heparin coupled nanoceria were found to be biologically active due to their ability to bind fibroblast growth factor 2 and signal through FGF receptor 1. Additionally, the heparin-coupled nanoceria, once internalised by the cells, were found to be degraded by 48 h. Together these data demonstrated that heparin enhanced the biological properties of nanoceria in terms of cellular uptake and ROS scavenging, while the nanoceria themselves were more effective at delivering heparin intracellularly than exposing cells to heparin in solution.

  9. Critical roles of cellular glutathione homeostasis and jnk activation in andrographolide-mediated apoptotic cell death in human hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lili; Shen, Kaikai; Jiang, Ping; Morahan, Grant; Wang, Zhengtao

    2011-08-01

    Andrographolide (ANDRO), isolated from the traditional herbal medicine Andrographis paniculata, is reported to have the potential therapeutic effects for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in our previous reports. Here, we investigated the mechanism of ANDRO-mediated apoptotic cell death, focusing on the involvement of cellular reduced glutathione (GSH) homeostasis and c-Jun NH(2) -Terminal kinase (JNK). Buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of cellular GSH biosynthesis, significantly augmented ANDRO-induced cytotoxicity in hepatoma Hep3B and HepG2 cells. BSO depleted cellular GSH, and augmented ANDRO-induced apoptosis, inhibition of colony formation and JNK activation in Hep3B cells. All these effects could be reversed by GSH monoethyl ester (GSH.EE), whose deacetylation replenishes cellular GSH. BSO also augmented ANDRO-induced activation of apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-4 (MKK4) and c-Jun, which are all up-stream or down-stream signals of JNK. Further results showed that JNK inhibitor SP600125 and 420116 both reversed ANDRO-induced cytotoxicity, and SP600125 also decreased ANDRO-increased intracellular GSH and GCL activity. Finally, we showed that in nude mice bearing xenografted Hep3B tumors, BSO improved the inhibition of tumor growth by ANDRO. Taken together, our results suggest that there is a crosstalk between JNK activation and cellular GSH homeostasis, and ANDRO targets this to induce cytotoxicity in hepatoma cells.

  10. Activation of the cellular unfolded protein response by recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Balakrishnan

    Full Text Available The unfolded protein response (UPR is a stress-induced cyto-protective mechanism elicited towards an influx of large amount of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In the present study, we evaluated if AAV manipulates the UPR pathways during its infection. We first examined the role of the three major UPR axes, namely, endoribonuclease inositol-requiring enzyme-1 (IRE1α, activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6 and PKR-like ER kinase (PERK in AAV infected cells. Total RNA from mock or AAV infected HeLa cells were used to determine the levels of 8 different ER-stress responsive transcripts from these pathways. We observed a significant up-regulation of IRE1α (up to 11 fold and PERK (up to 8 fold genes 12-48 hours after infection with self-complementary (scAAV2 but less prominent with single-stranded (ssAAV2 vectors. Further studies demonstrated that scAAV1 and scAAV6 also induce cellular UPR in vitro, with AAV1 vectors activating the PERK pathway (3 fold while AAV6 vectors induced a significant increase on all the three major UPR pathways [6-16 fold]. These data suggest that the type and strength of UPR activation is dependent on the viral capsid. We then examined if transient inhibition of UPR pathways by RNA interference has an effect on AAV transduction. siRNA mediated silencing of PERK and IRE1α had a modest effect on AAV2 and AAV6 mediated gene expression (∼1.5-2 fold in vitro. Furthermore, hepatic gene transfer of scAAV2 vectors in vivo, strongly elevated IRE1α and PERK pathways (2 and 3.5 fold, respectively. However, when animals were pre-treated with a pharmacological UPR inhibitor (metformin during scAAV2 gene transfer, the UPR signalling and its subsequent inflammatory response was attenuated concomitant to a modest 2.8 fold increase in transgene expression. Collectively, these data suggest that AAV vectors activate the cellular UPR pathways and their selective inhibition may be beneficial during AAV mediated gene transfer.

  11. Boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) functionalized carbon nano-onions for high resolution cellular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelmess, Juergen; de Luca, Elisa; Signorelli, Angelo; Baldrighi, Michele; Becce, Michele; Brescia, Rosaria; Nardone, Valentina; Parisini, Emilio; Echegoyen, Luis; Pompa, Pier Paolo; Giordani, Silvia

    2014-10-01

    Carbon nano-onions (CNOs) are an exciting class of carbon nanomaterials, which have recently demonstrated a facile cell-penetration capability. In the present work, highly fluorescent boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dyes were covalently attached to the surface of CNOs. The introduction of this new carbon nanomaterial-based imaging platform, made of CNOs and BODIPY fluorophores, allows for the exploration of synergetic effects between the two building blocks and for the elucidation of its performance in biological applications. The high fluorescence intensity exhibited by the functionalized CNOs translates into an excellent in vitro probe for the high resolution imaging of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. It was also found that the CNOs, internalized by the cells by endocytosis, localized in the lysosomes and did not show any cytotoxic effects. The presented results highlight CNOs as excellent platforms for biological and biomedical studies due to their low toxicity, efficient cellular uptake and low fluorescence quenching of attached probes.Carbon nano-onions (CNOs) are an exciting class of carbon nanomaterials, which have recently demonstrated a facile cell-penetration capability. In the present work, highly fluorescent boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dyes were covalently attached to the surface of CNOs. The introduction of this new carbon nanomaterial-based imaging platform, made of CNOs and BODIPY fluorophores, allows for the exploration of synergetic effects between the two building blocks and for the elucidation of its performance in biological applications. The high fluorescence intensity exhibited by the functionalized CNOs translates into an excellent in vitro probe for the high resolution imaging of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. It was also found that the CNOs, internalized by the cells by endocytosis, localized in the lysosomes and did not show any cytotoxic effects. The presented results highlight CNOs as excellent platforms for biological and biomedical

  12. Cellular handling of a dexamethasone-anti-E-selectin immunoconjugate by activated endothelial cells : Comparison with free dexamethasone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, RJ; Asgeirsdottir, SA; Meijer, DKF; Molema, G

    2002-01-01

    Purpose. For selective inhibition of endothelial cell activation in chronic inflammation, we have developed a dexamethasone-anti-E-selectin immunoconjugate. The present study was performed to evaluate the cellular handling of this immunoconjugate by activated primary endothelial cells and to compare

  13. Apigenin inhibits enterovirus 71 replication through suppressing viral IRES activity and modulating cellular JNK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiaowen; Qiu, Min; Chen, Deyan; Zheng, Nan; Jin, Yu; Wu, Zhiwei

    2014-09-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a member of genus Enterovirus in Picornaviridae family, which is one of the major causative agents for hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), and sometimes associated with severe central nervous system diseases in children. Currently there are no effective therapeutic medicines or vaccines for the disease. In this report, we found that apigenin and luteolin, two flavones that differ only in the number of hydroxyl groups could inhibit EV71-mediated cytopathogenic effect (CPE) and EV71 replication with low cytotoxicity. Both molecules also showed inhibitory effect on the viral polyprotein expression. They prevented EV71-induced cell apoptosis, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and cytokines up-regulation. Time-of-drug addition study demonstrated that apigenin and luteolin acted after viral entry. We examined the effect of apigenin and luteolin on 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) activity, two viral proteases responsible for viral polyprotein processing, and found that they showed less inhibitory activity on 2A(pro) or 3C(pro). Further studies demonstrated that apigenin, but not luteolin could interfere with viral IRES activity. Also, apigenin inhibited EV71-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation which is critical for viral replication, in contrast to luteolin that did not. This study demonstrated that apigenin may inhibit EV71 replication through suppressing viral IRES activity and modulating cellular JNK pathway. It also provided evidence that one hydroxyl group difference in the B ring between apigenin and luteolin resulted in the distinct antiviral mechanisms. This study will provide the basis for better drug development and further identification of potential drug targets.

  14. Changes and significance of SIRT3 expression in cellular senescence induced by high glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin ZHANG

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the role of the silent information regulator 3(SIRT3 in the decrepitude process of human diploid fibroblasts(WI-38 induced by high glucose.Methods The WI-38 cells [population doublings(PDs,20-32] were cultured in media containing different concentrations of glucose as follows: low glucose(3.34mmol/L,LG,normal glucose(5.56mmol/L,NG,and high glucose(25mmol/L,HG.The protein expression levels of p21,p27,catalase,MnSOD,and SIRT3 were evaluated through Western blot.The double-label immunofluorescence assay was used to detect the location and expression of SIRT3,MnSOD,and senescence-associated heterochromatin foci(SAHF in the WI-38 cells.The ROS level was determined with fluorescent probe.Results The results from the Western blot showed that the protein expression of SIRT3,catalase,and MnSOD decreased significantly in the HG group compared with the LG and NG groups(P 0.05.SIRT3 and MnSOD were highly expressed in the cytoplasm.The ROS levels in the HG group were elevated compared with those in the LG and NG groups.Conclusion SIRT3 may play an important role in cellular senescence induced by high glucose in human diploid fibroblasts.

  15. Active macropinocytosis induction by stimulation of epidermal growth factor receptor and oncogenic Ras expression potentiates cellular uptake efficacy of exosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakase, Ikuhiko; Kobayashi, Nahoko Bailey; Takatani-Nakase, Tomoka; Yoshida, Tetsuhiko

    2015-06-03

    Exosomes are approximately 100-nm vesicles that consist of a lipid bilayer of cellular membranes secreted in large quantities from various types of normal and disease-related cells. Endocytosis has been reported as a major pathway for the cellular uptake of exosomes; however, the detailed mechanisms of their cellular uptake are still unknown. Here, we demonstrate the active induction of macropinocytosis (accompanied by actin reorganisation, ruffling of plasma membrane, and engulfment of large volumes of extracellular fluid) by stimulation of cancer-related receptors and show that the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor significantly enhances the cellular uptake of exosomes. We also demonstrate that oncogenic K-Ras-expressing MIA PaCa-2 cells exhibit intensive macropinocytosis that actively transports extracellular exosomes into the cells compared with wild-type K-Ras-expressing BxPC-3 cells. Furthermore, encapsulation of the ribosome-inactivating protein saporin with EGF in exosomes using our simple electroporation method produces superior cytotoxicity via the enhanced cellular uptake of exosomes. Our findings contribute to the biological, pharmaceutical, and medical research fields in terms of understanding the macropinocytosis-mediated cellular uptake of exosomes with applications for exosomal delivery systems.

  16. Amyloid-beta leads to impaired cellular respiration, energy production and mitochondrial electron chain complex activities in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhein, V; Baysang, G; Rao, S; Meier, F; Bonert, A; Müller-Spahn, F; Eckert, A

    2009-09-01

    Evidence suggests that amyloid-beta (Abeta) protein is a key factor in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and it has been recently proposed that mitochondria are involved in the biochemical pathway by which Abeta can lead to neuronal dysfunction. Here we investigated the specific effects of Abeta on mitochondrial function under physiological conditions. Mitochondrial respiratory functions and energy metabolism were analyzed in control and in human wild-type amyloid precursor protein (APP) stably transfected human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y). Mitochondrial respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC) in vital cells was measured with a high-resolution respirometry system (Oxygraph-2k). In addition, we determined the individual activities of mitochondrial complexes I-IV that compose ETC and ATP cellular levels. While the activities of complexes I and II did not change between cell types, complex IV activity was significantly reduced in APP cells. In contrast, activity of complex III was significantly enhanced in APP cells, as compensatory response in order to balance the defect of complex IV. However, this compensatory mechanism could not prevent the strong impairment of total respiration in vital APP cells. As a result, the respiratory control ratio (state3/state4) together with ATP production decreased in the APP cells in comparison with the control cells. Chronic exposure to soluble Abeta protein may result in an impairment of energy homeostasis due to a decreased respiratory capacity of mitochondrial electron transport chain which, in turn, may accelerate neurons demise.

  17. Correlating in Vitro and in Vivo Activities of Light-Inducible Dimers: A Cellular Optogenetics Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Ryan A; Zimmerman, Seth P; Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Bear, James E; Kuhlman, Brian

    2016-01-15

    Light-inducible dimers are powerful tools for cellular optogenetics, as they can be used to control the localization and activity of proteins with high spatial and temporal resolution. Despite the generality of the approach, application of light-inducible dimers is not always straightforward, as it is frequently necessary to test alternative dimer systems and fusion strategies before the desired biological activity is achieved. This process is further hindered by an incomplete understanding of the biophysical/biochemical mechanisms by which available dimers behave and how this correlates to in vivo function. To better inform the engineering process, we examined the biophysical and biochemical properties of three blue-light-inducible dimer variants (cryptochrome2 (CRY2)/CIB1, iLID/SspB, and LOVpep/ePDZb) and correlated these characteristics to in vivo colocalization and functional assays. We find that the switches vary dramatically in their dark and lit state binding affinities and that these affinities correlate with activity changes in a variety of in vivo assays, including transcription control, intracellular localization studies, and control of GTPase signaling. Additionally, for CRY2, we observe that light-induced changes in homo-oligomerization can have significant effects on activity that are sensitive to alternative fusion strategies.

  18. Special Issue: Redox Active Natural Products and Their Interaction with Cellular Signalling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Jacob

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, research into natural products has experienced a certain renaissance. The urgent need for more and more effective antibiotics in medicine, the demand for ecologically friendly plant protectants in agriculture, “natural” cosmetics and the issue of a sustainable and healthy nutrition in an ageing society have fuelled research into Nature’s treasure chest of “green gold”. Here, redox active secondary metabolites from plants, fungi, bacteria and other (micro-organisms often have been at the forefront of the most interesting developments. These agents provide powerful means to interfere with many, probably most cellular signaling pathways in humans, animals and lower organisms, and therefore can be used to protect, i.e., in form of antioxidants, and to frighten off or even kill, i.e., in form of repellants, antibiotics, fungicides and selective, often catalytic “sensor/effector” anticancer agents. Interestingly, whilst natural product research dates back many decades, in some cases even centuries, and compounds such as allicin and various flavonoids have been investigated thoroughly in the past, it has only recently become possible to investigate their precise interactions and mode(s of action inside living cells. Here, fluorescent staining and labelling on the one side, and appropriate detection, either qualitatively under the microscope or quantitatively in flow cytometers and plate readers, on the other, enable researchers to obtain the various pieces of information necessary to construct a fairly complete puzzle of how such compounds act and interact in living cells. Complemented by the more traditional activity assays and Western Blots, and increasingly joined by techniques such as proteomics, chemogenetic screening and mRNA profiling, these cell based bioanalytical techniques form a powerful platform for “intracellular diagnostics”. In the case of redox active compounds, especially of Reactive Sulfur

  19. Lipolysis - a highly regulated multi-enzyme complex mediates the catabolism of cellular fat stores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, Achim; Zimmermann, Robert; Oberer, Monika; Zechner, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    Lipolysis is the biochemical pathway responsible for the catabolism of triacylglycerol (TAG) stored in cellular lipid droplets. The hydrolytic cleavage of TAG generates non-esterified fatty acids, which are subsequently used as energy substrates, essential precursors for lipid and membrane synthesis, or mediators in cell signaling processes. Consistent with its central importance in lipid and energy homeostasis, lipolysis occurs in essentially all tissues and cell types, it is most abundant, however, in white and brown adipose tissue. Over the last 5years, important enzymes and regulatory protein factors involved in lipolysis have been identified. These include an essential TAG hydrolase named adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) [annotated as patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein A2], the ATGL activator comparative gene identification-58 [annotated as α/β hydrolase containing protein 5], and the ATGL inhibitor G0/G1 switch gene 2. Together with the established hormone-sensitive lipase [annotated as lipase E] and monoglyceride lipase, these proteins constitute the basic "lipolytic machinery". Additionally, a large number of hormonal signaling pathways and lipid droplet-associated protein factors regulate substrate access and the activity of the "lipolysome". This review summarizes the current knowledge concerning the enzymes and regulatory processes governing lipolysis of fat stores in adipose and non-adipose tissues. Special emphasis will be given to ATGL, its regulation, and physiological function. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Lipolysis – A highly regulated multi-enzyme complex mediates the catabolism of cellular fat stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lass, Achim; Zimmermann, Robert; Oberer, Monika; Zechner, Rudolf

    2011-01-01

    Summary Lipolysis is the biochemical pathway responsible for the catabolism of triacylglycerol (TAG) stored in cellular lipid droplets. The hydrolytic cleavage of TAG generates non-esterified fatty acids, which are subsequently used as energy substrates, essential precursors for lipid and membrane synthesis, or mediators in cell signaling processes. Consistent with its central importance in lipid and energy homeostasis, lipolysis occurs in essentially all tissues and cell types, it is most abundant, however, in white and brown adipose tissue. Over the last 5 years, important enzymes and regulatory protein factors involved in lipolysis have been identified. These include an essential TAG hydrolase named adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) [annotated as patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein A2], the ATGL activator comparative gene identification-58 [annotated as α/β hydrolase containing protein 5], and the ATGL inhibitor G0/G1 switch gene 2. Together with the established hormone-sensitive lipase [annotated as lipase E] and monoglyceride lipase, these proteins constitute the basic “lipolytic machinery”. Additionally, a large number of hormonal signaling pathways and lipid droplet-associated protein factors regulate substrate access and the activity of the “lipolysome”. This review summarizes the current knowledge concerning the enzymes and regulatory processes governing lipolysis of fat stores in adipose and non-adipose tissues. Special emphasis will be given to ATGL, its regulation, and physiological function. PMID:21087632

  1. Cellular and molecular regulation of the activation of mammalian primordial follicles: somatic cells initiate follicle activation in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Liu, Kui

    2015-01-01

    The first small follicles to appear in the mammalian ovaries are primordial follicles. The initial pool of primordial follicles serves as the source of developing follicles and oocytes for the entire reproductive lifespan of the animal. Although the selective activation of primordial follicles is critical for female fertility, its underlying mechanisms have remained poorly understood. A search of PubMed was conducted to identify peer-reviewed literature pertinent to the study of mammalian primordial follicle activation, especially recent reports of the role of primordial follicle granulosa cells (pfGCs) in regulating this process. In recent years, molecular mechanisms that regulate the activation of primordial follicles have been elucidated, mostly through the use of genetically modified mouse models. Several molecules and pathways operating in both the somatic pfGCs and oocytes, such as the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) and the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathways, have been shown to be important for primordial follicle activation. More importantly, recent studies have provided an updated view of how exactly signaling pathways in pfGCs and in oocytes, such as the KIT ligand (KL) and KIT, coordinate in adult ovaries so that the activation of primordial follicles is achieved. In this review, we have provided an updated picture of how mammalian primordial follicles are activated. The functional roles of pfGCs in governing the activation of primordial follicles in adulthood are highlighted. The in-depth understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of primordial follicle activation will hopefully lead to more treatments of female infertility, and the current progress indicates that the use of existing primordial follicles as a source for obtaining fertilizable oocytes as a new treatment for female infertility is just around the corner. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of

  2. Dysfunction of nucleus accumbens-1 activates cellular senescence and inhibits tumor cell proliferation and oncogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Cheng, Yan; Ren, Xingcong; Hori, Tsukasa; Huber-Keener, Kathryn J; Zhang, Li; Yap, Kai Lee; Liu, David; Shantz, Lisa; Qin, Zheng-Hong; Zhang, Suping; Wang, Jianrong; Wang, Hong-Gang; Shih, Ie-Ming; Yang, Jin-Ming

    2012-08-15

    Nucleus accumbens-1 (NAC1), a nuclear factor belonging to the BTB/POZ gene family, has emerging roles in cancer. We report here that NAC1 acts as a negative regulator of cellular senescence in transformed and nontransformed cells, and dysfunction of NAC1 induces senescence and inhibits its oncogenic potential. We show that NAC1 deficiency markedly activates senescence and inhibits proliferation in tumor cells treated with sublethal doses of γ-irradiation. In mouse embryonic fibroblasts from NAC1 knockout mice, following infection with a Ras virus, NAC1-/- cells undergo significantly more senescence and are either nontransformed or less transformed in vitro and less tumorigenic in vivo when compared with NAC1+/+ cells. Furthermore, we show that the NAC1-caused senescence blunting is mediated by ΔNp63, which exerts its effect on senescence through p21, and that NAC1 activates transcription of ΔNp63 under stressful conditions. Our results not only reveal a previously unrecognized function of NAC1, the molecular pathway involved and its impact on pathogenesis of tumor initiation and development, but also identify a novel senescence regulator that may be exploited as a potential target for cancer prevention and treatment.

  3. Photodynamic activity of the boronated chlorin e6 amide in artificial and cellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonenko, Yuri N; Kotova, Elena A; Omarova, Elena O; Rokitskaya, Tatyana I; Ol'shevskaya, Valentina A; Kalinin, Valery N; Nikitina, Roza G; Osipchuk, Julia S; Kaplan, Mikhail A; Ramonova, Alla A; Moisenovich, Mikhail M; Agapov, Igor I; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic tumor-destroying activity of the boronated chlorin e6 derivative BACE (chlorin e6 13(1)-N-{2-[N-(1-carba-closo-dodecaboran-1-yl)methyl]aminoethyl}amide-15(2), 17(3)-dimethyl ester), previously described in Moisenovich et al. (2010) PLoS ONE 5(9) e12717, was shown here to be enormously higher than that of unsubstituted chlorin e6, being supported by the data on much higher photocytotoxicity of BACE in M-1 sarcoma cell culture. To validate membrane damaging effect as the basis of the enhanced tumoricidal activity, BACE was compared with unsubstituted chlorin e6 in the potency to photosensitize dye leakage from liposomes, transbilayer lipid flip-flop, inactivation of gramicidin A ionic channels in planar lipid membranes and erythrocyte hemolysis. In all the models comprising artificial and cellular membranes, the photodynamic effect of BACE exceeded that of chlorin e6. BACE substantially differed from chlorin e6 in the affinity to liposomes and erythrocytes, as monitored by fluorescence spectroscopy, flow cytometry and centrifugation. The results support the key role of membrane binding in the photodynamic effect of the boronated chlorin e6 amide.

  4. Scanning electron microscopic description of cellular activity and mineral changes in feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, O; Boudigues, S; Pilet, P; Aguado, E; Heymann, D; Daculsi, G

    2001-12-01

    The cellular activity and changes in mineral composition of dental tissues involved in feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions were investigated. Teeth with at least 1 lesion (n = 10) were extracted from 10 different cats that were presented primarily for chronic gingivostomatitis and/or severe periodontal disease. Scanning electron microscopic methods were used to determine the presence of resorptive cells in 8 teeth while 2 teeth were evaluated for pathologic changes in dental mineral composition. Observations were complicated by the presence of organic wear on the dental surfaces, however resorptive cells could be clearly identified in feline odontoclastic resorptive lesions. Resorptive cells had morphologic features indicative of "osteoclast-like" cells or odontoclasts. Resorptive cell activity created a resorption area of darker dentin continuous with physiologic dentin. The darker dentin area seemed poorly mineralized and showed a significantly lower calcium/phosphorous ratio compared with adjacent physiologic denting in 1 tooth. A significantly higher level of magnesium combined with available carbonate ions may have increased the solubility in areas of darker dentin.

  5. PCL/alginate composite scaffolds for hard tissue engineering: fabrication, characterization, and cellular activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Bok; Kim, Geun Hyung

    2015-02-09

    Alginates have been used widely in biomedical applications because of good biocompatibility, low cost, and rapid gelation in the presence of calcium ions. However, poor mechanical properties and fabrication-ability for three-dimensional shapes have been obstacles in hard-tissue engineering applications. To overcome these shortcomings of alginates, we suggest a new composite system, consisting of a synthetic polymer, poly(ε-caprolactone), and various weight fractions (10-40 wt %) of alginate. The fabricated composite scaffolds displayed a multilayered 3D structure, consisting of microsized composite struts, and they provided a 100% offset for each layer. To show the feasibility of the scaffold for hard tissue regeneration, the composite scaffolds fabricated were assessed not only for physical properties, including surface roughness, tensile strength, and water absorption and wetting, but also in vitro osteoblastic cellular responses (cell-seeding efficiency, cell viability, fluorescence analyses, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and mineralization) by culturing with preosteoblasts (MC3T3-E1). Due to the alginate components in the composites, the scaffolds showed significantly enhanced wetting behavior, water-absorption (∼12-fold), and meaningful biological activities (∼2.1-fold for cell-seeding efficiency, ∼2.5-fold for cell-viability at 7 days, ∼3.4-fold for calcium deposition), compared with a pure PCL scaffold.

  6. Cellular localization of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) following traumatic brain injury in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Landeghem, Frank K H; Weiss, Thorsten; Oehmichen, Manfred; von Deimling, Andreas

    2007-06-01

    The pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) is involved in many processes of the developing and mature central nervous system, such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, neurotransmission, inflammation and neuroprotection. Alternative posttranslational processing of PACAP results in two biologically active, amidated 27- and 38-amino acid peptides termed PACAP27 and PACAP38. In the present study, we examined whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects cellular immunopositivity for PACAP27 and PACAP38. Patients (n = 55) were classified into three groups dependent on their survival time (under 24 h, between 24 h and 7 days and between 7 days and 99 days postinjury). PACAP27 and PACAP38 were expressed by neurons and glial cells in normal human neocortex (n = 10). Following TBI, the total number of PACAP27- and PACAP38-positive cells was significantly decreased for a prolonged survival period within the traumatized neocortex. In the pericontusional cortex, the number of cells expressing PACAP27 and PACAP38 was significantly increased at all survival times examined. Triple immunofluorescence examinations revealed a significant increase in the absolute numbers of GFAP-positive reactive astrocytes as well as a decrease in the CNP-positive oligodendrocytes, each coexpressing PACAP27 or PACAP38 in the contusional and pericontusional cortex. We hypothesize that the increase of glial PACAP immunoreactivity may be interpreted as part of a complex endogenous neuroprotective response in the pericontusional regions, but the precise role of PACAP following TBI is yet to be determined.

  7. Cellular effect of high doses of silica-coated quantum dot profiled with high throughput gene expression analysis and high content cellomics measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Stilwell, Jackie L; Gerion, Daniele; Ding, Lianghao; Elboudwarej, Omeed; Cooke, Patrick A; Gray, Joe W; Alivisatos, A Paul; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2006-04-01

    change in expression level of greater than 2-fold. Genes activated in treated cells included those involved in carbohydrate binding, intracellular vesicle formation, and cellular response to stress. Conversely, PEG-silane-Qdots induce a down-regulation of genes involved in controlling the M-phase progression of mitosis, spindle formation, and cytokinesis. Promoter analysis of these results reveals that expression changes may be attributed to the down-regulation of FOXM and BHLB2 transcription factors. Remarkably, PEG-silane-Qdots, unlike carbon nanotubes, do not activate genes indicative of a strong immune and inflammatory response or heavy-metal-related toxicity. The experimental evidence shows that CdSe/ZnS Qdots, if appropriately protected, induce negligible toxicity to the model cell system studied here, even when exposed to high dosages. This study indicates that PEG-coated silanized Qdots pose minimal impact to cells and are a very promising alternative to uncoated Qdots.

  8. The bright side of plasmonic gold nanoparticles; activation of Nrf2, the cellular protective pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Alona; Soroka, Yoram; Frušić-Zlotkin, Marina; Lewis, Aaron; Kohen, Ron

    2016-06-01

    Plasmonic gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are widely investigated for cancer therapy, due to their ability to strongly absorb light and convert it to heat and thus selectively destroy tumor cells. In this study we shed light on a new aspect of AuNPs and their plasmonic excitation, wherein they can provide anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory protection by stimulating the cellular protective Nrf2 pathway. Our study was carried out on cells of the immune system, macrophages, and on skin cells, keratinocytes. A different response to AuNPs was noted in the two types of cells, explained by their distinct uptake profiles. In keratinocytes, the exposure to AuNPs, even at low concentrations, was sufficient to activate the Nrf2 pathway, without any irradiation, due to the presence of free AuNPs inside the cytosol. In contrast, in macrophages, the plasmonic excitation of the AuNPs by a low, non-lethal irradiation dose was required for their release from the constraining vesicles. The mechanism by which AuNPs activate the Nrf2 pathway was studied. Direct and indirect activation were suggested, based on the inherent ability of the AuNPs to react with thiol groups and to generate reactive oxygen species, in particular, under plasmonic excitation. The ability of AuNPs to directly activate the Nrf2 pathway renders them good candidates for treatment of disorders in which the up-regulation of Nrf2 is beneficial, specifically for topical treatment of inflammatory skin diseases.

  9. Theoretical analyses of cellular transmembrane voltage in suspensions induced by high-frequency fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yong; Wang, Changzhen; Peng, Ruiyun; Wang, Lifeng; Hu, Xiangjun

    2015-04-01

    A change of the transmembrane voltage is considered to cause biophysical and biochemical responses in cells. The present study focuses on the cellular transmembrane voltage (Δφ) induced by external fields. We detail analytical equations for the transmembrane voltage induced by external high-frequency (above the relaxation frequency of the cell membrane) fields on cells of a spherical shape in suspensions and layers. At direct current (DC) and low frequencies, the cell membrane was assumed to be non-conductive under physiologic conditions. However, with increasing frequency, the permittivity of the cytoplasm/extracellular medium and conductivity of the membrane must be accounted for. Our main work is to extend application of the analytical solution of Δφ to the high-frequency range. We first introduce the transmembrane voltage generated by DC and low-frequency exposures on a single cell. Then, we focus on cell suspensions exposed to high-frequency fields. Using the effective medium theory and the reasonable assumption, the approximate analytical solution of Δφ on cells in suspensions and layers can be derived. Phenomenological effective medium theory equations cannot be used to calculate the local electric field of cell suspensions, so we raised a possible solution based on the Bergman theory. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. The heat-shock factor is not activated in mammalian cells exposed to cellular phone frequency microwaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laszlo, Andrei; Moros, Eduardo G; Davidson, Teri; Bradbury, Matt; Straube, William; Roti Roti, Joseph

    2005-08-01

    There has been considerable interest in the biological effects of exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation, given the explosive growth of cellular telephone use, with the possible induction of malignancy being a significant concern. Thus the determination of whether nonthermal effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation contribute to the process leading to malignancy is an important task. One proposed pathway to malignancy involves the induction of the stress response by exposures to cell phone frequency microwaves. The first step in the induction of the stress response is the activation of the DNA-binding activity of the specific transcription factor involved in this response, the heat-shock factor (HSF). The DNA-binding activity of HSF in hamster, mouse and human cells was determined after acute and continuous exposures to frequency domain multiple access (FDMA)- or code domain multiple access (CDMA)-modulated microwaves at low (0.6 W/kg) or high (approximately 5 W/kg) SARs at frequencies used for mobile communication. The DNA-binding activity of HSF was monitored using a gel shift assay; the calibration of this assay indicated that an increase of approximately 10% in the activation of the DNA-binding activity of HSF after a 1 degrees C increase in temperature could be detected. We failed to detect any increase in the DNA-binding ability of HSF in cultured mammalian cells as a consequence of any exposure tested, within the sensitivity of our assay. Our results do not support the notion that the stress response is activated as a consequence of exposure to microwaves of frequencies associated with mobile communication devices.

  11. Resveratrol against Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter cryaerophilus: activity and effect on cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Susana; Silva, Filomena; Queiroz, João A; Oleastro, Mónica; Domingues, Fernanda C

    2014-06-16

    The frequent isolation of Arcobacter butzleri and Arcobacter cryaerophilus from food samples makes it imperative to search for potential compounds able to inhibit the development of these bacteria. Taking this into consideration, this study focuses on the antimicrobial activity of resveratrol and its mechanism of action against A. butzleri and A. cryaerophilus. The activity of resveratrol was assessed by a microdilution method and time-kill curves. Resveratrol effect on cellular functions was assessed by flow cytometry evaluating intracellular DNA content and metabolic activity. Ethidium bromide (EtBr) accumulation in the presence of resveratrol was also evaluated, as well as the susceptibility to resveratrol in the presence of phenylalanine-arginine β-naphthylamide (PAβN). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to further evaluate cell damage caused by resveratrol. Resveratrol presented MIC values of 100 and 50μg/mL to A. butzleri and A. cryaerophilus, respectively. Based on the time-kill curves, resveratrol exhibited bactericidal activity, leading to a ≥3log10CFU/mL reduction of initial inoculums, for A. butzleri exponential phase cells incubated for 6h with 1× MIC or with 2× MIC after 24h for stationary phase cells. For A. cryaerophilus cells in exponential growth phase, 99.9% killing was achieved after 24h incubation with 2× MIC, whereas, for stationary phase cells, bactericidal activity was only detected after incubation with 4× MIC. Incubation with resveratrol led to a decrease in both intracellular DNA content and metabolic activity. An increase in the accumulation of EtBr was observed in the presence of resveratrol, and the efflux pump inhibitor PAβN reduced the MIC of resveratrol. SEM analysis revealed disintegration of A. butzleri cells treated with resveratrol, whereas no morphological alteration was observed for A. cryaerophilus cells. Resveratrol has a good anti-Arcobacter activity, and the results obtained suggest that this compound

  12. Changes in cellular immune activation and memory T-cell subsets in HIV-infected Zambian children receiving HAART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainwater-Lovett, Kaitlin; Nkamba, Hope; Mubiana-Mbewe, Mwangelwa; Moore, Carolyn B; Margolick, Joseph; Moss, William J

    2014-12-15

    Increased exposure to a broad array of pathogens in children residing in sub-Saharan Africa may lead to heightened immune activation and increased proportions of memory T cells. Changes in the size of these cellular subsets have implications for restoration of normal immune function after treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and are not well characterized in young sub-Saharan African children. CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T-cell subsets were measured by flow cytometry in 157 HIV-infected Zambian children before and at 3-month intervals during HAART for up to 30 months and in 34 control children at a single study visit. Before HAART, HIV-infected children had higher levels of activated and effector memory (EM) CD4⁺ and CD8⁺ T cells, and lower levels of naive T cells and CD8⁺ T cells expressing IL-7Rα, compared with control children. The median duration of follow-up was 14.9 months (interquartile range, 6.4-23.2) among 120 HIV-infected children with at least 1 study follow-up visit. Levels of immune activation and EM CD4⁺ T cells declined within 6 months of HAART, but the percentages of EM CD4 T cells and effector CD8⁺ T cells remained elevated through 30 months of HAART. IL-7Rα-expressing CD8⁺ T cells increased with HAART, suggesting expansion of memory capacity. HAART significantly reduced levels of immune activation and EM CD4⁺ T cells, and promoted reconstitution of naive T cells and IL-7Rα-expressing CD8⁺ T cells. However, persistently high levels of EM CD4⁺ T cells in HIV-infected children may reflect chronic perturbations in T-cell subset composition.

  13. Effect of inhomogeneous activity distributions and airway geometry on cellular doses in radon lung dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szoke, Istvan; Balashazy, Imre; Farkas, Arpad [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, PO Box 49, 1525 Budapest (Hungary); Hofmann, Werner [University of Salzburg, Hellbrunner Str. 34, 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2007-07-01

    The human tracheobronchial system has a very complex structure including cylindrical airway ducts connected by airway bifurcation units. The deposition of the inhaled aerosols within the airways exhibits a very inhomogeneous pattern. The formation of deposition hot spots near the carinal ridge has been confirmed by experimental and computational fluid and particle dynamics (CFPD) methods. In spite of these observations, current radon lung dosimetry models apply infinitely long cylinders as models of the airway system and assume uniform deposition of the inhaled radon progenies along the airway walls. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of airway geometry and non-uniform activity distributions within bronchial bifurcations on cellular dose distributions. In order to answer these questions, the nuclear doses of the bronchial epithelium were calculated in three different irradiation situations. (1) First, CFPD methods were applied to calculate the distribution of the deposited alpha-emitting nuclides in a numerically constructed idealized airway bifurcation. (2) Second, the deposited radionuclides were randomly distributed along the surface of the above-mentioned geometry. (3) Finally, calculations were made in cylindrical geometries corresponding to the parent and daughter branches of the bifurcation geometry assuming random nuclide activity distribution. In all three models, the same {sup 218}Po and {sup 214}Po surface activities per tissue volumes were assumed. Two conclusions can be drawn from this analysis: (i) average nuclear doses are very similar in all three cases (minor differences can be attributed to differences in the linear energy transfer (LET) spectra) and (ii) dose distributions are significantly different in all three cases, with the highest doses at the carinal ridge in case 3. (authors)

  14. Sleep deprivation and divergent toll-like receptor-4 activation of cellular inflammation in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Judith E; Carrillo, Carmen; Olmstead, Richard; Witarama, Tuff; Breen, Elizabeth C; Yokomizo, Megumi; Seeman, Teresa; Irwin, Michael R

    2015-02-01

    Sleep disturbance and aging are associated with increases in inflammation, as well as increased risk of infectious disease. However, there is limited understanding of the role of sleep loss on age-related differences in immune responses. This study examines the effects of sleep deprivation on toll-like receptor activation of monocytic inflammation in younger compared to older adults. Community-dwelling adults (n = 70) who were categorized as younger (25-39 y old, n = 21) and older (60-84 y old, n = 49) participants, underwent a sleep laboratory-based experimental partial sleep deprivation (PSD) protocol including adaptation, an uninterrupted night of sleep, sleep deprivation (sleep restricted to 03:00-07:00), and recovery. Blood samples were obtained each morning to measure toll-like receptor-4 activation of monocyte intracellular production of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Partial sleep deprivation induced a significant increase in the production of IL-6 and/or TNF-α that persisted after a night of recovery sleep (F(2,121.2) = 3.8, P sleep loss, such that younger adults had an increase in inflammatory cytokine production that was not present in older adults (F(2,121.2) = 4.0, P sleep loss. Whereas sleep loss increases cellular inflammation in younger adults and may contribute to inflammatory disorders, blunted toll-like receptor activation in older adults may increase the risk of infectious disease seen with aging. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  15. Role of cellular density, in vitro, in anti-tumor activity of CFA-treated and immunized cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyeki, E M; Truitt, G A; Bisel, T U

    1976-11-01

    Incorporation of tritiated deoxythymidine (3HdT) into DNA was used to measure growth, in vitro, of P815 tumor cells admixed with spleen and peritoneal effector cells. At a high tumor cell density ((1x10(5) cells per dish), using anti-theta and anti-macrophage sera, T-cells and macrophages from the peritoneum of immunized mice could be identified as cells possessing anti-tumor activity. A nonspecific inhibition by normal effector cells, which occurred at the high tumor cell density, did not occur at a lower tumor cell density (1x10(4) cells per dish). Therefore, the effects of immunization and Freund's adjuvant treatment on the anti-tumor activity of effector cells were determined more accurately when normal cells were no longer inhibitory. Thus, experimental variables dealing with cellular density (cells/mm2 of the culture vessel surface) and effector:tumor cell ratios play an important role in the anti-proliferative capacity of effector cells.

  16. Activation Mechanism and Cellular Localization of Membrane-Anchored Alginate Polymerase in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradali, M Fata; Ghods, Shirin; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2017-05-01

    The exopolysaccharide alginate, produced by the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, confers a survival advantage to the bacterium by contributing to the formation of characteristic biofilms during infection. Membrane-anchored proteins Alg8 (catalytic subunit) and Alg44 (copolymerase) constitute the alginate polymerase that is being activated by the second messenger molecule bis-(3', 5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), but the mechanism of activation remains elusive. To shed light on the c-di-GMP-mediated activation of alginate polymerization in vivo, an in silico structural model of Alg8 fused to the c-di-GMP binding PilZ domain informed by the structure of cellulose synthase, BcsA, was developed. This structural model was probed by site-specific mutagenesis and different cellular levels of c-di-GMP. Results suggested that c-di-GMP-mediated activation of alginate polymerization involves amino acids residing at two loops, including H323 (loop A) and T457 and E460 (loop B), surrounding the catalytic site in the predicted model. The activities of the respective Alg8 variants suggested that c-di-GMP-mediated control of substrate access to the catalytic site of Alg8 is dissimilar to the known activation mechanism of BcsA. Alg8 variants responded differently to various c-di-GMP levels, while MucR imparted c-di-GMP for activation of alginate polymerase. Furthermore, we showed that Alg44 copolymerase constituted a stable dimer, with its periplasmic domains required for protein localization and alginate polymerization and modification. Superfolder green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions of Alg8 and Alg44 showed a nonuniform, punctate, and patchy arrangement of both proteins surrounding the cell. Overall, this study provides insights into the c-di-GMP-mediated activation of alginate polymerization while assigning functional roles to Alg8 and Alg44, including their subcellular localization and distribution.IMPORTANCE The exopolysaccharide alginate is an

  17. High resolution light-sheet based high-throughput imaging cytometry system enables visualization of intra-cellular organelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju Regmi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Visualization of intracellular organelles is achieved using a newly developed high throughput imaging cytometry system. This system interrogates the microfluidic channel using a sheet of light rather than the existing point-based scanning techniques. The advantages of the developed system are many, including, single-shot scanning of specimens flowing through the microfluidic channel at flow rate ranging from micro- to nano- lit./min. Moreover, this opens-up in-vivo imaging of sub-cellular structures and simultaneous cell counting in an imaging cytometry system. We recorded a maximum count of 2400 cells/min at a flow-rate of 700 nl/min, and simultaneous visualization of fluorescently-labeled mitochondrial network in HeLa cells during flow. The developed imaging cytometry system may find immediate application in biotechnology, fluorescence microscopy and nano-medicine.

  18. High resolution simulations of energy absorption in dynamically loaded cellular structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, R. E.; Cotton, M.; Harris, E. J.; Eakins, D. E.; McShane, G.

    2017-03-01

    Cellular materials have potential application as absorbers of energy generated by high velocity impact. CTH, a Sandia National Laboratories Code which allows very severe strains to be simulated, has been used to perform very high resolution simulations showing the dynamic crushing of a series of two-dimensional, stainless steel metal structures with varying architectures. The structures are positioned to provide a cushion between a solid stainless steel flyer plate with velocities ranging from 300 to 900 m/s, and an initially stationary stainless steel target. Each of the alternative architectures under consideration was formed by an array of identical cells each of which had a constant volume and a constant density. The resolution of the simulations was maximised by choosing a configuration in which one-dimensional conditions persisted for the full period over which the specimen densified, a condition which is most readily met by impacting high density specimens at high velocity. It was found that the total plastic flow and, therefore, the irreversible energy dissipated in the fully densified energy absorbing cell, increase (a) as the structure becomes more rodlike and less platelike and (b) as the impact velocity increases. Sequential CTH images of the deformation processes show that the flow of the cell material may be broadly divided into macroscopic flow perpendicular to the compression direction and jetting-type processes (microkinetic flow) which tend to predominate in rod and rodlike configurations and also tend to play an increasing role at increased strain rates. A very simple analysis of a configuration in which a solid flyer impacts a solid target provides a baseline against which to compare and explain features seen in the simulations. The work provides a basis for the development of energy absorbing structures for application in the 200-1000 m/s impact regime.

  19. High-resolution fiber-optic microendoscopy for in situ cellular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Mark; Yu, Dihua; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2011-01-11

    Many biological and clinical studies require the longitudinal study and analysis of morphology and function with cellular level resolution. Traditionally, multiple experiments are run in parallel, with individual samples removed from the study at sequential time points for evaluation by light microscopy. Several intravital techniques have been developed, with confocal, multiphoton, and second harmonic microscopy all demonstrating their ability to be used for imaging in situ. With these systems, however, the required infrastructure is complex and expensive, involving scanning laser systems and complex light sources. Here we present a protocol for the design and assembly of a high-resolution microendoscope which can be built in a day using off-the-shelf components for under US$5,000. The platform offers flexibility in terms of image resolution, field-of-view, and operating wavelength, and we describe how these parameters can be easily modified to meet the specific needs of the end user. We and others have explored the use of the high-resolution microendoscope (HRME) in in vitro cell culture, in excised and living animal tissues, and in human tissues in vivo. Users have reported the use of several different fluorescent contrast agents, including proflavine, benzoporphyrin-derivative monoacid ring A (BPD-MA), and fluoroscein, all of which have received full, or investigational approval from the FDA for use in human subjects. High-resolution microendoscopy, in the form described here, may appeal to a wide range of researchers working in the basic and clinical sciences. The technique offers an effective and economical approach which complements traditional benchtop microscopy, by enabling the user to perform high-resolution, longitudinal imaging in situ.

  20. Continuous cellularization of calcium phosphate hybrid scaffolds induced by plasma polymer activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergemann, Claudia [University Medical Center Rostock, Cell Biology, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Cornelsen, Matthias [University of Rostock, Fluid Technology and Microfluidics, Justus-von-Liebig Weg 6, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Quade, Antje [Leibniz-Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP), Felix-Hausdorff-Str. 2, D-17489 Greifswald (Germany); Laube, Thorsten; Schnabelrauch, Matthias [INNOVENT e.V., Biomaterials Department, Pruessingstrasse 27B, D-07745 Jena (Germany); Rebl, Henrike [University Medical Center Rostock, Cell Biology, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Weißmann, Volker [Institute for Polymer Technologies (IPT) e.V., Alter Holzhafen 19, D-23966 Wismar (Germany); Seitz, Hermann [University of Rostock, Fluid Technology and Microfluidics, Justus-von-Liebig Weg 6, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Nebe, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.nebe@med.uni-rostock.de [University Medical Center Rostock, Cell Biology, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany)

    2016-02-01

    The generation of hybrid materials based on β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and various biodegradable polymers like poly(L-lactide-co-D,L-lactide) (PLA) represents a common approach to overcoming the disadvantages of pure TCP devices. These disadvantages lie in TCP's mechanical properties, such as brittleness. The positive characteristic of PLA — improvement of compressive strength of calcium phosphate scaffolds – is diametrically opposed to its cell attractiveness. Therefore, the objective of this work was to optimize osteoblast migration and cellularization inside a three-dimensionally (3D) printed, PLA polymer stabilized TCP hybrid scaffold by a plasma polymer process depositing amino groups via allylamine. MG-63 osteoblastic cells inside the 10 mm hybrid scaffold were dynamically cultivated for 14 days in a 3D model system integrated in a perfusion reactor. The whole TCP/PLA hybrid scaffold was continuously colonized due to plasma polymerized allylamine activation inducing the migration potential of osteoblasts. - Highlights: • Mechanical stabilization of β-tricalcium phosphate scaffolds by PLA infiltration • Hybrid scaffolds with higher cell attraction due to plasma polymerized allylamine • 3D perfusion in vitro model for observation of cell migration inside scaffolds • Enhanced cell migration within plasma polymer coated TCP hybrid scaffolds.

  1. A human cellular sequence implicated in trk oncogene activation is DNA damage inducible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Ishai, R.; Scharf, R.; Sharon, R.; Kapten, I. (Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel))

    1990-08-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum cells, which are deficient in the repair of UV light-induced DNA damage, have been used to clone DNA-damage-inducible transcripts in human cells. The cDNA clone designated pC-5 hybridizes on RNA gel blots to a 1-kilobase transcript, which is moderately abundant in nontreated cells and whose synthesis is enhanced in human cells following UV irradiation or treatment with several other DNA-damaging agents. UV-enhanced transcription of C-5 RNA is transient and occurs at lower fluences and to a greater extent in DNA-repair-deficient than in DNA-repair-proficient cells. Southern blot analysis indicates that the C-5 gene belongs to a multigene family. A cDNA clone containing the complete coding sequence of C-5 was isolated. Sequence analysis revealed that it is homologous to a human cellular sequence encoding the amino-terminal activating sequence of the trk-2h chimeric oncogene. The presence of DNA-damage-responsive sequences at the 5' end of a chimeric oncogene could result in enhanced expression of the oncogene in response to carcinogens.

  2. Phenolic contents and cellular antioxidant activity of Chinese hawthorn "Crataegus pinnatifida".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Lingrong; Guo, Xingbo; Liu, Rui Hai; You, Lijun; Abbasi, Arshad Mehmood; Fu, Xiong

    2015-11-01

    It is evident from various epidemiological studies that consumption of fruits and vegetables is essential to maintain health and in the disease prevention. Present study was designed to examine phenolic contents and antioxidant properties of three varieties of Crataegus pinnatifida (Chinese hawthorn). Shanlihong variety exhibited elevated levels of total phenolics and flavonoid contents, including free and bond phenolics. Procyanidin B2 was most abundant phenolic compound in all samples, followed by epicatechin, chlorogenic acid, hyperoside, and isoquercitrin. The free ORAC values, and free hydro-PSC values were 398.3-555.8 μmol TE/g DW, and 299.1-370.9 μmol VCE/g DW, respectively. Moreover, the free cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) values were 678-1200 μmol of QE/100 g DW in the no PBS wash protocol, and 345.9-532.9 μmol of QE/100 g DW in the PBS wash protocol. C. pinnatifida fruit could be valuable to promote consumer health. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ceruloplasmin Oxidation, a Feature of Parkinson's Disease CSF, Inhibits Ferroxidase Activity and Promotes Cellular Iron Retention

    KAUST Repository

    Olivieri, S.

    2011-12-14

    Parkinson\\'s disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by oxidative stress and CNS iron deposition. Ceruloplasmin is an extracellular ferroxidase that regulates cellular iron loading and export, and hence protects tissues from oxidative damage. Using two-dimensional electrophoresis, we investigated ceruloplasmin patterns in the CSF of human Parkinson\\'s disease patients. Parkinson\\'s disease ceruloplasmin profiles proved more acidic than those found in healthy controls and in other human neurological diseases (peripheral neuropathies, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Alzheimer\\'s disease); degrees of acidity correlated with patients\\' pathological grading. Applying an unsupervised pattern recognition procedure to the two-dimensional electrophoresis images, we identified representative pathological clusters. In vitro oxidation of CSF in two-dimensional electrophoresis generated a ceruloplasmin shift resembling that observed in Parkinson\\'s disease and co-occurred with an increase in protein carbonylation. Likewise, increased protein carbonylation was observed in Parkinson\\'s disease CSF, and the same modification was directly identified in these samples on ceruloplasmin. These results indicate that ceruloplasmin oxidation contributes to pattern modification in Parkinson\\'s disease. From the functional point of view, ceruloplasmin oxidation caused a decrease in ferroxidase activity, which in turn promotes intracellular iron retention in neuronal cell lines as well as in primary neurons, which are more sensitive to iron accumulation. Accordingly, the presence of oxidized ceruloplasmin in Parkinson\\'s disease CSF might be used as a marker for oxidative damage and might provide new insights into the underlying pathological mechanisms.

  4. Cellular differentiation state modulates the mRNA export activity of SR proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Valentina; McNicoll, François; Steiner, Michaela C; Richter, Florian M; Solovyeva, Anfisa; Wegener, Marius; Schwich, Oliver D; Poser, Ina; Zarnack, Kathi; Wittig, Ilka; Neugebauer, Karla M; Müller-McNicoll, Michaela

    2017-07-03

    SR proteins function in nuclear pre-mRNA processing, mRNA export, and translation. To investigate their cellular dynamics, we developed a quantitative assay, which detects differences in nucleocytoplasmic shuttling among seven canonical SR protein family members. As expected, SRSF2 and SRSF5 shuttle poorly in HeLa cells but surprisingly display considerable shuttling in pluripotent murine P19 cells. Combining individual-resolution cross-linking and immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) and mass spectrometry, we show that elevated arginine methylation of SRSF5 and lower phosphorylation levels of cobound SRSF2 enhance shuttling of SRSF5 in P19 cells by modulating protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions. Moreover, SRSF5 is bound to pluripotency-specific transcripts such as Lin28a and Pou5f1/Oct4 in the cytoplasm. SRSF5 depletion reduces and overexpression increases their cytoplasmic mRNA levels, suggesting that enhanced mRNA export by SRSF5 is required for the expression of pluripotency factors. Remarkably, neural differentiation of P19 cells leads to dramatically reduced SRSF5 shuttling. Our findings indicate that posttranslational modification of SR proteins underlies the regulation of their mRNA export activities and distinguishes pluripotent from differentiated cells. © 2017 Botti et al.

  5. Chemical Composition and, Cellular Evaluation of the Antioxidant Activity of Desmodium adscendens Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Nsemi Muanda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Desmodium adscendens plant is widely used as juice or tea in various parts of the world against a wide range of diseases. This study determines the quality and the quantity of polyphenols, flavonoids, anthocyanins, and tannins in D. adscendens leaves by UV-spectrophotometry and RP-HPLC methods. In addition, the antioxidant capacity of these phenolic compounds is evaluated by ABTS (2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic, DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1 picrylhydrazyl, and Cellular tests. D. adscendens leaves are mainly composite of flavonoid compounds with 12.8 mg of catechin equivalent (CE/g dw. The amounts of total polyphenol compounds are 11.1 mg of gallic acid equivalent (GAE/g dw. The quantity of total anthocyanin and total tannin compounds is not considerable 0.0182 mg CgE/g dw and 0.39 mg CE/g dw, respectively. A direct correlation between phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity is observed (R2=0.96. The RP-HPLC analyses reveal that the main phenolic compound identified in the methanol-water extract is quercetrin dihydrat (2.11 mg/mL. According to the results, it is observed that D. adscendens leaves possess a considerable scavenging antioxidant and antiradical capacity, therefore these antioxidant properties might increase the therapeutic value of this medicinal plant.

  6. Chemical Composition and, Cellular Evaluation of the Antioxidant Activity of Desmodium adscendens Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muanda, François Nsemi; Bouayed, Jaouad; Djilani, Abdelouaheb; Yao, Chunyan; Soulimani, Rachid; Dicko, Amadou

    2011-01-01

    Desmodium adscendens plant is widely used as juice or tea in various parts of the world against a wide range of diseases. This study determines the quality and the quantity of polyphenols, flavonoids, anthocyanins, and tannins in D. adscendens leaves by UV-spectrophotometry and RP-HPLC methods. In addition, the antioxidant capacity of these phenolic compounds is evaluated by ABTS (2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic)), DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1 picrylhydrazyl), and Cellular tests. D. adscendens leaves are mainly composite of flavonoid compounds with 12.8 mg of catechin equivalent (CE)/g dw. The amounts of total polyphenol compounds are 11.1 mg of gallic acid equivalent (GAE)/g dw. The quantity of total anthocyanin and total tannin compounds is not considerable 0.0182 mg CgE/g dw and 0.39 mg CE/g dw, respectively. A direct correlation between phenolic compounds and antioxidant activity is observed (R(2) = 0.96). The RP-HPLC analyses reveal that the main phenolic compound identified in the methanol-water extract is quercetrin dihydrat (2.11 mg/mL). According to the results, it is observed that D. adscendens leaves possess a considerable scavenging antioxidant and antiradical capacity, therefore these antioxidant properties might increase the therapeutic value of this medicinal plant.

  7. TWO-DIMENSIONAL CELLULAR AUTOMATON MODEL FOR THE EVOLUTION OF ACTIVE REGION CORONAL PLASMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López Fuentes, Marcelo [Instituto de Astronomía y Física del Espacio, CONICET-UBA, CC. 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Klimchuk, James A., E-mail: lopezf@iafe.uba.ar [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-02-01

    We study a two-dimensional cellular automaton (CA) model for the evolution of coronal loop plasmas. The model is based on the idea that coronal loops are made of elementary magnetic strands that are tangled and stressed by the displacement of their footpoints by photospheric motions. The magnetic stress accumulated between neighbor strands is released in sudden reconnection events or nanoflares that heat the plasma. We combine the CA model with the Enthalpy Based Thermal Evolution of Loops model to compute the response of the plasma to the heating events. Using the known response of the X-Ray Telescope on board Hinode, we also obtain synthetic data. The model obeys easy-to-understand scaling laws relating the output (nanoflare energy, temperature, density, intensity) to the input parameters (field strength, strand length, critical misalignment angle). The nanoflares have a power-law distribution with a universal slope of –2.5, independent of the input parameters. The repetition frequency of nanoflares, expressed in terms of the plasma cooling time, increases with strand length. We discuss the implications of our results for the problem of heating and evolution of active region coronal plasmas.

  8. Evidence of parasexual activity in "asexual amoebae" Cochliopodium spp. (Amoebozoa): extensive cellular and nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekle, Yonas I; Anderson, O Roger; Lecky, Ariel F

    2014-09-01

    The majority of microbial eukaryotes have long been considered asexual, though new evidence indicates sex, or sexual-like (parasexual) behaviors that deviate from the usual union of two gametes, among other variant aspects. Over a dozen amoebozoans are implicated to have sexual stages. However, the exact mechanism by which sex occurs in these lineages remains elusive. This is mainly due to the diverse quality and cryptic nature of their life cycle. In this study we present evidence of some previously unreported aspects of the life cycle of an amoeba, Cochliopodium, that undergoes unusual intraspecific interactions using light microscopy and immunocytochemistry. Similar to other amoebozoans, Cochliopodium, is considered asexual with no published reports of sex or parasexuality. We also investigated environmental conditions that govern the observed intraspecific interactions. Both light microscopic and immunocytochemistry evidence demonstrates Cochliopodium undergoes cellular fusion (plasmogamy) and nuclear fusion (karyogamy). Large plasmodia eventually undergo karyogamy and contain large fused, polyploid, nuclei. These are observed to fragment, subsequently, by karyotomy (nuclear fission) and cytoplasmic fission to yield uninucleated amoebae. This process could lead to a non-meiotic, parasexual exchange of chromosomes in Cochliopodium. These findings strongly suggest that Cochliopodium is involved in parasexual activity and should no longer be considered strictly asexual.

  9. Continuous cellularization of calcium phosphate hybrid scaffolds induced by plasma polymer activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergemann, Claudia; Cornelsen, Matthias; Quade, Antje; Laube, Thorsten; Schnabelrauch, Matthias; Rebl, Henrike; Weißmann, Volker; Seitz, Hermann; Nebe, Barbara

    2016-02-01

    The generation of hybrid materials based on β-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) and various biodegradable polymers like poly(l-lactide-co-d,l-lactide) (PLA) represents a common approach to overcoming the disadvantages of pure TCP devices. These disadvantages lie in TCP's mechanical properties, such as brittleness. The positive characteristic of PLA - improvement of compressive strength of calcium phosphate scaffolds - is diametrically opposed to its cell attractiveness. Therefore, the objective of this work was to optimize osteoblast migration and cellularization inside a three-dimensionally (3D) printed, PLA polymer stabilized TCP hybrid scaffold by a plasma polymer process depositing amino groups via allylamine. MG-63 osteoblastic cells inside the 10mm hybrid scaffold were dynamically cultivated for 14days in a 3D model system integrated in a perfusion reactor. The whole TCP/PLA hybrid scaffold was continuously colonized due to plasma polymerized allylamine activation inducing the migration potential of osteoblasts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Lunar Dust and Lunar Simulant Activation, Monitoring, Solution and Cellular Toxicity Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevarajan, A.S.; Wallace, W.T.

    2009-01-01

    During the Apollo missions, many undesirable situations were encountered that must be mitigated prior to returning humans to the moon. Lunar dust (that part of the lunar regolith less than 20 m in diameter) was found to produce several problems with astronaut s suits and helmets, mechanical seals and equipment, and could have conceivably produced harmful physiological effects for the astronauts. For instance, the abrasive nature of the dust was found to cause malfunctions of various joints and seals of the spacecraft and suits. Additionally, though efforts were made to exclude lunar dust from the cabin of the lunar module, a significant amount of material nonetheless found its way inside. With the loss of gravity correlated with ascent of the lunar module from the lunar surface to rendezvous with the command module, much of the major portions of the contaminating soil and dust began to float, irritating the astronaut s eyes and being inhaled into their lungs. Our goal has been to understand some of the properties of lunar dust that could lead to possible hazards for humans. Due to the lack of an atmosphere, there is nothing to protect the lunar soil from ultraviolet radiation, solar wind, and meteorite impacts. These processes could all serve to activate the soil, or produce reactive surface species. In order to understand the possible toxic effects of the reactive dust, it is necessary to reactivate the dust, as samples returned during the Apollo missions were exposed to the atmosphere of the Earth. We have used grinding and UV exposure to mimic some of the processes occurring on the Moon. The level of activation has been monitored using two methods: fluorescence spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). These techniques allow the monitoring of hydroxyl radical production in solution. We have found that grinding of lunar dust produces 2-3 times the concentration of hydroxyl radicals as lunar simulant and 10 times that of quartz. Exposure

  11. Activation of human natural killer cells by the soluble form of cellular prion protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seong, Yeon-Jae [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hafis Clinic, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Pil Soo; Jang, Young-Soon; Choi, Young Joon [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Bum-Chan [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Su-Hyung [Laboratory of Translational Immunology and Vaccinology, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Woo [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Eui-Cheol, E-mail: ecshin@kaist.ac.kr [Laboratory of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Graduate School of Medical Science and Engineering, KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-21

    Cellular prion protein (PrP{sup C}) is widely expressed in various cell types, including cells of the immune system. However, the specific roles of PrP{sup C} in the immune system have not been clearly elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the effects of a soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C} protein on human natural killer (NK) cells. Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} protein was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with the Fc portion of human IgG{sub 1} (PrP{sup C}-Fc). PrP{sup C}-Fc binds to the surface of human NK cells, particularly to CD56{sup dim} NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced the production of cytokines and chemokines and the degranulation of granzyme B from NK cells. In addition, PrP{sup C}-Fc facilitated the IL-15-induced proliferation of NK cells. PrP{sup C}-Fc induced phosphorylation of ERK-1/2 and JNK in NK cells, and inhibitors of the ERK or the JNK pathways abrogated PrP{sup C}-Fc-induced cytokine production in NK cells. In conclusion, the soluble form of recombinant PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Recombinant soluble PrP{sup C} (PrP{sup C}-Fc) was generated by fusion of human PrP{sup C} with IgG1 Fc portion. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein induces the production of cytokines and degranulation from human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein enhances the IL-15-induced proliferation of human NK cells. • PrP{sup C}-Fc protein activates human NK cells via the ERK and JNK signaling pathways.

  12. An enhanced high-speed multi-digit BCD adder using quantum-dot cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajitha, D.; Ramanaiah, K. V.; Sumalatha, V.

    2017-02-01

    The advent of development of high-performance, low-power digital circuits is achieved by a suitable emerging nanodevice called quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA). Even though many efficient arithmetic circuits were designed using QCA, there is still a challenge to implement high-speed circuits in an optimized manner. Among these circuits, one of the essential structures is a parallel multi-digit decimal adder unit with significant speed which is very attractive for future environments. To achieve high speed, a new correction logic formulation method is proposed for single and multi-digit BCD adder. The proposed enhanced single-digit BCD adder (ESDBA) is 26% faster than the carry flow adder (CFA)-based BCD adder. The multi-digit operations are also performed using the proposed ESDBA, which is cascaded innovatively. The enhanced multi-digit BCD adder (EMDBA) performs two 4-digit and two 8-digit BCD addition 50% faster than the CFA-based BCD adder with the nominal overhead of the area. The EMDBA performs two 4-digit BCD addition 24% faster with 23% decrease in the area, similarly for 8-digit operation the EMDBA achieves 36% increase in speed with 21% less area compared to the existing carry look ahead (CLA)-based BCD adder design. The proposed multi-digit adder produces significantly less delay of (N –1) + 3.5 clock cycles compared to the N* One digit BCD adder delay required by the conventional BCD adder method. It is observed that as per our knowledge this is the first innovative proposal for multi-digit BCD addition using QCA.

  13. Impedance matching network for high frequency ultrasonic transducer for cellular applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Gon; Yoon, Sangpil; Kim, Hyung Ham; Shung, K Kirk

    2016-02-01

    An approach for the design of an impedance matching network (IMN) for high frequency ultrasonic transducers with large apertures based on impedance analysis for cellular applications is presented in this paper. The main objectives were to maximize energy transmission from the excitation source to the ultrasonic transducers for cell manipulation and to achieve low input parameters for the safe operation of an ultrasonic transducer because the piezoelectric material in high frequency ultrasonic transducers is prone to breakage due to its being extremely thin. Two ultrasonic transducers, which were made of lithium niobate single crystal with the thickness of 15 μm, having apertures of 4.3 mm (fnumber=1.23) and 2.6mm (fnumber=0.75) were tested. L-type IMN was selected for high sensitivity and compact design of the ultrasonic transducers. The target center frequency was chosen as the frequency where the electrical admittance (|Y|) and phase angle (θz) from impedance analysis was maximal and zero, respectively. The reference center frequency and reference echo magnitude were selected as the center frequency and echo magnitude, measured by pulse-echo testing, of the ultrasonic transducer without IMN. Initial component values and topology of IMN were determined using the Smith chart, and pulse-echo testing was analyzed to verify the performance of the ultrasonic transducers with and without IMN. After several iterations between changing component values and topology of IMN, and pulse-echo measurement of the ultrasonic transducer with IMN, optimized component values and topology of IMN were chosen when the measured center frequency from pulse-echo testing was comparable to the target frequency, and the measured echo magnitude was at least 30% larger than the reference echo magnitude. Performance of an ultrasonic transducer with and without IMN was tested by observing a tangible dent on the surface of a plastic petridish and single cell response after an acoustic pulse was

  14. Cellular lightweight concrete containing high-calcium fly ash and natural zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jitchaiyaphum, Khamphee; Sinsiri, Theerawat; Jaturapitakkul, Chai; Chindaprasirt, Prinya

    2013-05-01

    Cellular lightweight concrete (CLC) with the controlled density of approximately 800 kg/m3 was made from a preformed foam, Type-I Portland cement (OPC), fly ash (FA), or natural zeolite (NZ), and its compressive strength, setting time, water absorption, and microstructure of were tested. High-calcium FA and NZ with the median particle sizes of 14.52 and 7.72 μm, respectively, were used to partially replace OPC at 0, 10wt%, 20wt%, and 30wt% of the binder (OPC and pozzolan admixture). A water-to-binder mass ratio (W/B) of 0.5 was used for all mixes. The testing results indicated that CLC containing 10wt% NZ had the highest compressive strength. The replacement of OPC with NZ decreased the total porosity and air void size but increased the capillary porosity of the CLC. The incorporation of a suitable amount of NZ decreased the setting time, total porosity, and pore size of the paste compared with the findings with the same amount of FA. The total porosity and cumulative pore volume decreased, whereas the gel and capillary pores increased as a result of adding both pozzolans at all replacement levels. The water absorption increased as the capillary porosity increased; this effect depended on the volume of air entrained and the type or amount of pozzolan.

  15. Cellular and molecular alterations in human epithelial cells transformed by high let radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hei, T. K.; Piao, C. Q.; Sutter, T.; Willey, J. C.; Suzuki, K.

    An understanding of the radiobiological effects of high LET radiation is essential for human risk estimation and radiation protection. In the present study, we show that a single, 30 cGy dose of 150 keV/mum ^4He ions can malignantly transform human papillomavirus immortalized human bronchial epithelial [BEP2D] cells. Transformed cells produce progressively growing tumors in nude mice. The transformation frequency by the single dose of alpha particles is estimated to be approximately 4 x 10^-7. Based on the average cross-sectional area of BEP2D cells, it can be calculated that a mean traversal of 1.4 particles per cell is sufficient to induce tumorigenic conversion of these cells 3 to 4 months post-irradiation. Tumorigenic BEP2D cells overexpress mutated p53 tumor suppressor oncoproteins in addition to the cell cycle control gene cyclin D1 and D2. This model provides an opportunity to study the cellular and molecular changes at the various stages in radiation carcinogenesis involving human cells.

  16. Cellular trafficking determines the exon skipping activity of Pip6a-PMO in mdx skeletal and cardiac muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehto, Taavi; Castillo Alvarez, Alejandra; Gauck, Sarah; Gait, Michael J; Coursindel, Thibault; Wood, Matthew J A; Lebleu, Bernard; Boisguerin, Prisca

    2014-03-01

    Cell-penetrating peptide-mediated delivery of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) has shown great promise for exon-skipping therapy of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Pip6a-PMO, a recently developed conjugate, is particularly efficient in a murine DMD model, although mechanisms responsible for its increased biological activity have not been studied. Here, we evaluate the cellular trafficking and the biological activity of Pip6a-PMO in skeletal muscle cells and primary cardiomyocytes. Our results indicate that Pip6a-PMO is taken up in the skeletal muscle cells by an energy- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis. Interestingly, its cellular distribution is different in undifferentiated and differentiated skeletal muscle cells (vesicular versus nuclear). Likewise, Pip6a-PMO mainly accumulates in cytoplasmic vesicles in primary cardiomyocytes, in which clathrin-mediated endocytosis seems to be the pre-dominant uptake pathway. These differences in cellular trafficking correspond well with the exon-skipping data, with higher activity in myotubes than in myoblasts or cardiomyocytes. These differences in cellular trafficking thus provide a possible mechanistic explanation for the variations in exon-skipping activity and restoration of dystrophin protein in heart muscle compared with skeletal muscle tissues in DMD models. Overall, Pip6a-PMO appears as the most efficient conjugate to date (low nanomolar EC50), even if limitations remain from endosomal escape.

  17. Effect of LED photobiomodulation on fluorescent light induced changes in cellular ATPases and Cytochrome c oxidase activity in Wistar rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Ahamed Basha; C, Mathangi D; R, Shyamala

    2016-12-01

    Fluorescent light exposure at night alters cellular enzyme activities resulting in health defects. Studies have demonstrated that light emitting diode photobiomodulation enhances cellular enzyme activities. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the effects of fluorescent light induced changes in cellular enzymes and to assess the protective role of pre exposure to 670 nm LED in rat model. Male Wistar albino rats were divided into 10 groups of 6 animals each based on duration of exposure (1, 15, and 30 days) and exposure regimen (cage control, exposure to fluorescent light [1800 lx], LED preexposure followed by fluorescent light exposure and only LED exposure). Na(+)-K(+) ATPase, Ca(2+) ATPase, and cytochrome c oxidase of the brain, heart, kidney, liver, and skeletal muscle were assayed. Animals of the fluorescent light exposure group showed a significant reduction in Na(+)-K(+) ATPase and Ca(2+) ATPase activities in 1 and 15 days and their increase in animals of 30-day group in most of the regions studied. Cytochrome c oxidase showed increase in their level at all the time points assessed in most of the tissues. LED light preexposure showed a significant enhancement in the degree of increase in the enzyme activities in almost all the tissues and at all the time points assessed. This study demonstrates the protective effect of 670 nm LED pre exposure on cellular enzymes against fluorescent light induced change.

  18. 接受48周高效抗逆转录病毒治疗的艾滋病患者细胞内HIV DNA定量检测及其意义%Cellular HIV DNA quantitative testing and its significance in Chinese AIDS patients during 48 weeks' highly-active antiretroviral treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑煜煌; 姚运海; 林一鹤; 谌资; 周华英; Diallo Mamadou Alius; 陈霞; 何艳; 贺波; 贺梅; 王红艳; 肖水灵; 罗艳

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察中国艾滋病患者外周血T淋巴细胞及单核细胞作为HIV-1病毒储存库的情况,了解其在接受48周高效抗逆转录病毒治疗( HAART)中的动态变化及其临床意义.方法 35例慢性HIV-1感染的成人在初治HAART的0、24、48周,使用流式细胞仪测定血T淋巴细胞亚群数量,使用磁珠分选法从外周血单个核细胞中分离T淋巴细胞和单核细胞并提取细胞DNA,采用实时荧光定量RT-PCR法检测血清HIV RNA、用SYBR Green实时PCR对T淋巴细胞和单核细胞内的前病毒HIV DNA载量进行定量测定;使用SPSS 18.0软件对收集的数据进行分析.结果 35例艾滋病患者在HAART初次启动的0、24、48周,外周血HIV RNA水平分别为(4.12±1.41)、≤1.69、≤1.69lg拷贝/ml,CD4+ T淋巴细胞数分别为(196±101)、(321±112)、(392±127)个/μl;在T淋巴细胞中HIV DNA水平分别为(4.03±0.53)、(2.74±1.16)、(2.45±0.41)lg拷贝/106细胞,在单核细胞中HIV DNA水平分别为(2.51 ±0.68)、(2.16±0.34)、(2.03±0.25) lg拷贝/106细胞.统计学分析显示,在48周HAART过程中,外周血HIV RNA水平与CD4+ T淋巴细胞数呈负相关,与T淋巴细胞及单核细胞中的前病毒HIV DNA水平均呈正相关;T淋巴细胞中的HIV DNA下降速度慢于单核细胞;外周血CD4+ T淋巴细胞与T淋巴细胞前病毒HIV DNA载量呈负相关.结论 HIV感染者T淋巴细胞和单核细胞均可作为HIV病毒储存库,而淋巴细胞是更主要的储存库细胞;细胞内HIV DNA水平与血HIV RNA水平变化正相关,与血CD4+T淋巴细胞数呈负相关,T淋巴细胞内前病毒HIV DNA水平变化可能作为HAART中AIDS病程进展的观察指标之一.%Objective To observe the dynamic changes of peripheral blood T lymphocytes and monocytes,which serve as HIV-1 viral reservoirs,in Chinese HIV-infected patients receiving highly-active antiretroviral treatment ( HAART ) for 48 weeks and its clinical significance. Methods A total of 35

  19. Normalizing for individual cell population context in the analysis of high-content cellular screens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knapp Bettina

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-content, high-throughput RNA interference (RNAi offers unprecedented possibilities to elucidate gene function and involvement in biological processes. Microscopy based screening allows phenotypic observations at the level of individual cells. It was recently shown that a cell's population context significantly influences results. However, standard analysis methods for cellular screens do not currently take individual cell data into account unless this is important for the phenotype of interest, i.e. when studying cell morphology. Results We present a method that normalizes and statistically scores microscopy based RNAi screens, exploiting individual cell information of hundreds of cells per knockdown. Each cell's individual population context is employed in normalization. We present results on two infection screens for hepatitis C and dengue virus, both showing considerable effects on observed phenotypes due to population context. In addition, we show on a non-virus screen that these effects can be found also in RNAi data in the absence of any virus. Using our approach to normalize against these effects we achieve improved performance in comparison to an analysis without this normalization and hit scoring strategy. Furthermore, our approach results in the identification of considerably more significantly enriched pathways in hepatitis C virus replication than using a standard analysis approach. Conclusions Using a cell-based analysis and normalization for population context, we achieve improved sensitivity and specificity not only on a individual protein level, but especially also on a pathway level. This leads to the identification of new host dependency factors of the hepatitis C and dengue viruses and higher reproducibility of results.

  20. Activation of WIP1 phosphatase by HTLV-1 Tax mitigates the cellular response to DNA damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajhal Dayaram

    Full Text Available Genomic instability stemming from dysregulation of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA damage response (DDR is a common feature of many cancers. The cancer adult T cell leukemia (ATL can occur in individuals infected with human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1, and ATL cells contain extensive chromosomal abnormalities, suggesting that they have defects in the recognition or repair of DNA damage. Since Tax is the transforming protein encoded by HTLV-1, we asked whether Tax can affect cell cycle checkpoints and the DDR. Using a combination of flow cytometry and DNA repair assays we showed that Tax-expressing cells exit G(1 phase and initiate DNA replication prematurely following damage. Reduced phosphorylation of H2AX (γH2AX and RPA2, phosphoproteins that are essential to properly initiate the DDR, was also observed in Tax-expressing cells. To determine the cause of decreased DDR protein phosphorylation in Tax-expressing cells, we examined the cellular phosphatase, WIP1, which is known to dephosphorylate γH2AX. We found that Tax can interact with Wip1 in vivo and in vitro, and that Tax-expressing cells display elevated levels of Wip1 mRNA. In vitro phosphatase assays showed that Tax can enhance Wip1 activity on a γH2AX peptide target by 2-fold. Thus, loss of γH2AX in vivo could be due, in part, to increased expression and activity of WIP1 in the presence of Tax. siRNA knockdown of WIP1 in Tax-expressing cells rescued γH2AX in response to damage, confirming the role of WIP1 in the DDR. These studies demonstrate that Tax can disengage the G(1/S checkpoint by enhancing WIP1 activity, resulting in reduced DDR. Premature G(1 exit of Tax-expressing cells in the presence of DNA lesions creates an environment that tolerates incorporation of random mutations into the host genome.

  1. Resistance to degradation and cellular distribution are important features for the antitumor activity of gomesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buri, Marcus V; Domingues, Tatiana M; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; Casaes-Rodrigues, Rafael L; Rodrigues, Elaine Guadelupe; Miranda, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Many reports have shown that antimicrobial peptides exhibit anticancer abilities. Gomesin (Gm) exhibits potent cytotoxic activity against cancer cells by a membrane pore formation induced after well-orchestrated intracellular mechanisms. In this report, the replacements of the Cys by Ser or Thr, and the use D-amino acids in the Gm structure were done to investigate the importance of the resistance to degradation of the molecule with its cytotoxicity. [Thr(2,6,11,15)]-Gm, and [Ser(2,6,11,15)]-Gm exhibits low cytotoxicity, and low resistance to degradation, and after 24 h are present in localized area near to the membrane. Conversely, the use of D-amino acids in the analogue [D-Thr(2,6,11,15)]-D-Gm confers resistance to degradation, increases its potency, and maintained this peptide spread in the cytosol similarly to what happens with Gm. Replacements of Cys by Thr and Gln by L- or D-Pro ([D-Thr(2,6,11,15), Pro(9)]-D-Gm, and [Thr(2,6,11,15), D-Pro(9)]-Gm), which induced a similar β-hairpin conformation, also increase their resistance to degradation, and cytotoxicity, but after 24 h they are not present spread in the cytosol, exhibiting lower cytotoxicity in comparison to Gm. Additionally, chloroquine, a lysosomal enzyme inhibitor potentiated the effect of the peptides. Furthermore, the binding and internalization of peptides was determined, but a direct correlation among these factors was not observed. However, cholesterol ablation, which increase fluidity of cellular membrane, also increase cytotoxicity and internalization of peptides. β-hairpin spatial conformation, and intracellular localization/target, and the capability of entry are important properties of gomesin cytotoxicity.

  2. Resistance to degradation and cellular distribution are important features for the antitumor activity of gomesin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus V Buri

    Full Text Available Many reports have shown that antimicrobial peptides exhibit anticancer abilities. Gomesin (Gm exhibits potent cytotoxic activity against cancer cells by a membrane pore formation induced after well-orchestrated intracellular mechanisms. In this report, the replacements of the Cys by Ser or Thr, and the use D-amino acids in the Gm structure were done to investigate the importance of the resistance to degradation of the molecule with its cytotoxicity. [Thr(2,6,11,15]-Gm, and [Ser(2,6,11,15]-Gm exhibits low cytotoxicity, and low resistance to degradation, and after 24 h are present in localized area near to the membrane. Conversely, the use of D-amino acids in the analogue [D-Thr(2,6,11,15]-D-Gm confers resistance to degradation, increases its potency, and maintained this peptide spread in the cytosol similarly to what happens with Gm. Replacements of Cys by Thr and Gln by L- or D-Pro ([D-Thr(2,6,11,15, Pro(9]-D-Gm, and [Thr(2,6,11,15, D-Pro(9]-Gm, which induced a similar β-hairpin conformation, also increase their resistance to degradation, and cytotoxicity, but after 24 h they are not present spread in the cytosol, exhibiting lower cytotoxicity in comparison to Gm. Additionally, chloroquine, a lysosomal enzyme inhibitor potentiated the effect of the peptides. Furthermore, the binding and internalization of peptides was determined, but a direct correlation among these factors was not observed. However, cholesterol ablation, which increase fluidity of cellular membrane, also increase cytotoxicity and internalization of peptides. β-hairpin spatial conformation, and intracellular localization/target, and the capability of entry are important properties of gomesin cytotoxicity.

  3. An improved Cellular Automata model to simulate the behavior of high density crowd and validation by experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feliciani, Claudio; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2016-06-01

    In this article we present an improved version of the Cellular Automata floor field model making use of a sub-mesh system to increase the maximum density allowed during simulation and reproduce phenomena observed in dense crowds. In order to calibrate the model's parameters and to validate it we used data obtained from an empirical observation of bidirectional pedestrian flow. A good agreement was found between numerical simulation and experimental data and, in particular, the double outflow peak observed during the formation of deadlocks could be reproduced in numerical simulations, thus allowing the analysis of deadlock formation and dissolution. Finally, we used the developed high density model to compute the flow-ratio dependent fundamental diagram of bidirectional flow, demonstrating the instability of balanced flow and predicting the bidirectional flow behavior at very high densities. The model we presented here can be used to prevent dense crowd accidents in the future and to investigate the dynamics of the accidents which already occurred in the past. Additionally, fields such as granular and active matter physics may benefit from the developed framework to study different collective phenomena.

  4. Cellular immune profiling after sequential clofarabine and lenalidomide for high risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Prachi; Klotz, Jeffrey; Dunavin, Neil; Lu, Kit; Koklanaris, Eleftheria; Draper, Debbie; Superata, Jeanine; Chinian, Fariba; Yu, Quan; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Wong, Susan; Muranski, Pawel; Barrett, A John; Ito, Sawa; Battiwalla, Minoo

    2017-01-01

    Patients with high risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) are commonly older with multiple co-morbidities, rendering them unsuitable for intensive induction chemotherapy or transplantation. We report preliminary cellular immune profiling of four cases receiving sequential clofarabine and lenalidomide for high risk MDS and AML in a phase I study. Our results highlight the potential of immune profiling for monitoring immune-modifying agents in high risk MDS and AML.

  5. Cellular immune profiling after sequential clofarabine and lenalidomide for high risk myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prachi Jain

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with high risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML are commonly older with multiple co-morbidities, rendering them unsuitable for intensive induction chemotherapy or transplantation. We report preliminary cellular immune profiling of four cases receiving sequential clofarabine and lenalidomide for high risk MDS and AML in a phase I study. Our results highlight the potential of immune profiling for monitoring immune-modifying agents in high risk MDS and AML.

  6. Janus Separator of Polypropylene-Supported Cellular Graphene Framework for Sulfur Cathodes with High Utilization in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hong-Jie; Wang, Dai-Wei; Huang, Jia-Qi; Cheng, Xin-Bing; Yuan, Zhe; Wei, Fei; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the conversion chemistry of the sulfur cathode, the lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries exhibit high theoretical energy density. However, the intrinsic mobile redox centers during the sulfur/Li2S-to-lithium polysulfides solid-to-liquid phase transition induce low sulfur utilization and poor cycling life. Herein, the Janus separator of mesoporous cellular graphene framework (CGF)/polypropylene membrane to promote the utilization of sulfur cathode is introduced. The porous polypropylene membrane serves as an insulating substrate in contact with lithium anode while CGFs that possess high electrical conductivity of 100 S cm(-1), a large mesopore volume of 3.1 cm(3) g(-1), and a huge surface area of 2120 m(2) g(-1) are adhered on cathode side to reactivate the shuttling-back polysulfides and to preserve the ion channels. Therefore, the Li-S cell with the "two-face" CGF Janus separator exhibit a high initial capacity of 1109 mAh g(-1) and superior capacity preserved upon 800 mAh g(-1) after 250 cycles at 0.2 C, which is 40% higher on sulfur utilization efficiency than the corresponding results with routine polypropylene separators. There are significant improvements on capacity as well as electrochemical kinetics. A very high areal capacity of 5.5 mAh cm(-2) combined with high sulfur content of 80% and areal loading amount of 5.3 mg cm(-2) is achieved for such advanced configuration. The negative impact of shuttle mechanism on lowering the utilization of sulfur and overall energy density of a Li-S battery is well eliminated by applying CGF separators. Consequently, employing carbonaceous materials as Janus face of separators enlightens new opportunities for improving the utilization of active materials and energy density of devices that involve complex phase evolution and conversion electrochemistry.

  7. Janus Separator of Polypropylene‐Supported Cellular Graphene Framework for Sulfur Cathodes with High Utilization in Lithium–Sulfur Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hong‐Jie; Wang, Dai‐Wei; Cheng, Xin‐Bing; Yuan, Zhe; Wei, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the conversion chemistry of the sulfur cathode, the lithium–sulfur (Li–S) batteries exhibit high theoretical energy density. However, the intrinsic mobile redox centers during the sulfur/Li2S‐to‐lithium polysulfides solid‐to‐liquid phase transition induce low sulfur utilization and poor cycling life. Herein, the Janus separator of mesoporous cellular graphene framework (CGF)/polypropylene membrane to promote the utilization of sulfur cathode is introduced. The porous polypropylene membrane serves as an insulating substrate in contact with lithium anode while CGFs that possess high electrical conductivity of 100 S cm−1, a large mesopore volume of 3.1 cm3 g−1, and a huge surface area of 2120 m2 g−1 are adhered on cathode side to reactivate the shuttling‐back polysulfides and to preserve the ion channels. Therefore, the Li–S cell with the “two‐face” CGF Janus separator exhibit a high initial capacity of 1109 mAh g−1 and superior capacity preserved upon 800 mAh g−1 after 250 cycles at 0.2 C, which is 40% higher on sulfur utilization efficiency than the corresponding results with routine polypropylene separators. There are significant improvements on capacity as well as electrochemical kinetics. A very high areal capacity of 5.5 mAh cm−2 combined with high sulfur content of 80% and areal loading amount of 5.3 mg cm−2 is achieved for such advanced configuration. The negative impact of shuttle mechanism on lowering the utilization of sulfur and overall energy density of a Li–S battery is well eliminated by applying CGF separators. Consequently, employing carbonaceous materials as Janus face of separators enlightens new opportunities for improving the utilization of active materials and energy density of devices that involve complex phase evolution and conversion electrochemistry.

  8. Active Control of Cellular Orientation through In-Situ Stress in the Substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Heng-An; WANG Xiu-Xi; YAN Shun-Ping

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the orientation of cells on substrates to find possible methods for controlling the cellular orientation.The force dipole model is employed in our modelling and simulation.The elastic interaction between cells as well as the elastic interaction between the cell and in-situ stress field in the substrate are found to be the two main physical mechanisms to control the cellular orientation,The former interaction dominates the cellular orientation when the in-situ stress is small.while the later dominates when the in-situ stress is large enough.Two cells tend to align perpendicularly on a free substrate,but the cellular orientation varies with the increasing in-situ stress.Two cells tend to align in parallel when the normal stress is large enough.Their direction is perpendicular to the extension stress direction or parallel to the compression stress direction.When the positive in-situ shear stress is large enough,the two cells tend to align at-45°.Based on this theoretical simulation,it is believed that the cellular orientation on substrates can be controlled by the in-situ stresses.

  9. High-order sliding mode control of a DC motor drive via a switched controlled multi-cellular converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djemaï, M.; Busawon, K.; Benmansour, K.; Marouf, A.

    2011-11-01

    In this article, we present a high-order sliding mode controller of a DC motor drive connected to a multi-cellular converter. More specifically, we design a second-order (super-twisting) control algorithm for the speed regulation of a DC motor. For this, a switching control for the multi-cellular converter is derived in order to supply the correct reference value for the speed regulation. A practical implementation of the controller is realised using a laboratory set-up. The performance and the validity of the controller are shown experimentally.

  10. High-Activity Dealloyed Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kongkanand, Anusorn [General Motors LLC, Pontiac, MI (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Reduction of costly Pt usage in proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes is one of the major challenges towards development and commercialization of fuel cell vehicles. Although few have met the initial-kinetic activity requirements in a realistic fuel cell device, no catalyst material has ever met the demanding fuel cell durability targets set by DOE. In this project, a team of 4 universities and 2 companies came together to investigate a concept that appeared promising in preliminary non-fuel cell tests then to further develop the catalyst to a mature level ready for vehicle implementation. The team consists of academia with technical leadership in their respective areas, a catalyst supplier, and a fuel cell system integrator.The tightly collaborative project enabled development of a highly active and durable catalyst with performance that significantly exceeds that of previous catalysts and meets the DOE targets for the first time (Figure 1A). The catalyst was then further evaluated in full-active-area stack in a realistic vehicle operating condition (Figure 1B). This is the first public demonstration that one can realize the performance benefit and Pt cost reduction over a conventional pure Pt catalyst in a long-term realistic PEMFC system. Furthermore, systematic analyses of a range of catalysts with different performance after fuel cell testing allowed for correlation between catalyst microstructure and its electrocatalytic activity and durability. This will in turn aid future catalyst development.

  11. The Na{sup +}/K{sup +} -pump in rat peritoneal mast cells: Some aspects of regulatio of activity and cellular fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudsen, T. [Odense Univ., Dept. of Pharmacology, Inst. of Medical Biology, The Faculty of Health Scineces (Denmark)

    1995-12-31

    The mast cell contains potent mediators of inflammation which are released after IgE-directed and non-IgE-directed stimulation of the cell. This highly specialized cell is therefore ascribed a role in the pathogenesis of disease states in which the inflammatory response plays a role for the development of the clinical symptoms. Thus, besides being of interest in basic research, studies of the cellular processes leading to release of inflammatory mediators from the mast cell also also have important clinical implications. The aim of the present work has been to document the existence of the Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-pump in rat peritoneal mast cells, to investigate the regulation of the pump activity and to explore whether modulation of the pump activity interferes with the cellular stimulus/secretion coupling mechanism. The Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-pump activity following stimulation of the mast cell was also investigated. The pump activity was assessed as the ouabain-sensitive cellular potassium uptake with {sup 86}Rb{sup +} as a tracer for potassium. The histamine release from the mast cell following IgE-directed and non-IgE-directed stimulation of the cell was used as a parameter of cellular degranulation. Histamine was measured by spectrofluorometry. Besides describing aspects of the function and regulation of the Na{sup +}/K{sup +}-pump in the rat peritoneal mast cell, this thesis points to the potential role of sodium transport mechanisms in mast cell physiology. Pharmacological manipulations of such transport mechanisms might in the future add to the treatment of allergic diseases. (au) 253 refs.

  12. Social interactions of eating behaviour among high school students: a cellular automata approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbaghian, Vahid; Mago, Vijay K; Wu, Tiankuang; Fritz, Charles; Alimadad, Azadeh

    2012-10-09

    Overweight and obesity in children and adolescents is a global epidemic posing problems for both developed and developing nations. The prevalence is particularly alarming in developed nations, such as the United States, where approximately one in three school-aged adolescents (ages 12-19) are overweight or obese. Evidence suggests that weight gain in school-aged adolescents is related to energy imbalance exacerbated by the negative aspects of the school food environment, such as presence of unhealthy food choices. While a well-established connection exists between the food environment, presently there is a lack of studies investigating the impact of the social environment and associated interactions of school-age adolescents. This paper uses a mathematical modelling approach to explore how social interactions among high school adolescents can affect their eating behaviour and food choice. In this paper we use a Cellular Automata (CA) modelling approach to explore how social interactions among school-age adolescents can affect eating behaviour, and food choice. Our CA model integrates social influences and transition rules to simulate the way individuals would interact in a social community (e.g., school cafeteria). To replicate these social interactions, we chose the Moore neighbourhood which allows all neighbours (eights cells in a two-dimensional square lattice) to influence the central cell. Our assumption is that individuals belong to any of four states; Bring Healthy, Bring Unhealthy, Purchase Healthy, and Purchase Unhealthy, and will influence each other according to parameter settings and transition rules. Simulations were run to explore how the different states interact under varying parameter settings. This study, through simulations, illustrates that students will change their eating behaviour from unhealthy to healthy as a result of positive social and environmental influences. In general, there is one common characteristic of changes across time

  13. Phyto-mediated nanostructured carriers based on dual vegetable actives involved in the prevention of cellular damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Istrati, D.; Lacatusu, I.; Bordei, N.; Badea, G.; Oprea, O. [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Polizu Street No. 1, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Stefan, L.M. [National Institute of Research and Development for Biological Sciences, Splaiul Independentei Street No. 296, 060031 Bucharest (Romania); Stan, R. [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Polizu Street No. 1, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Badea, N., E-mail: nicoleta.badea@gmail.com [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Polizu Street No. 1, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Meghea, A. [University Politehnica of Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Polizu Street No. 1, 011061 Bucharest (Romania)

    2016-07-01

    The growing scientific interest in exploitation of vegetable bioactives has raised a number of questions regarding their imminent presence in pharmaceutical formulations. This study intends to demonstrate that a dual combination between vegetable oil (e.g. thistle oil, safflower oil, sea buckthorn oil) and a carrot extract represents an optimal approach to formulate safe carrier systems that manifest cell regeneration effect and promising antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Inclusion of both natural actives into lipid carriers imparted a strong negative charge on the nanocarrier surface (up to − 45 mV) and displayed average sizes of 70 nm to 140 nm. The entrapment efficiency of carrot extract into nanostructured carriers ranged between 78.3 and 88.3%. The in vitro release study has demonstrated that the entrapment of the extract represents a viable way for an equilibrated release of carotenoids. Besides the excellent antioxidant properties (e.g. scavenging up to 98% of the free oxygen radicals), the results of cellular integrity (e.g. cell viability of 133%) recommend these nanocarriers based on dual carrot extract–bioactive oil as a promising trend for the treatment of certain disorders in which oxidative stress plays a prominent role. In addition, the lipid nanocarriers based on safflower oil and sea buckthorn oil demonstrated an anti-inflammatory effect on LPS induced THP-1 macrophages, by inhibiting the secretion of two pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-α. - Highlights: • Safety phyto-mediated nanostructured carriers (NLC) based on two kinds of bioactives • Carrot extract incorporation into nanostructured carriers ranged from 78 to 88.3%. • High antioxidant activity of NLC by scavenging up to 98% free oxygen radicals • Extract entrapment represents a viable way for an equilibrated release of carotenoids. • Remarkable regenerative effect of L929 cell, with a proliferation of 133.4%.

  14. Dynamic changes of cellular HIV-1 DNA quantification during highly active antiretroviral therapy in Chinese HIV infected individuals%艾滋病抗病毒治疗中外周血细胞病毒库的动态变化及其意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈霞; 郑煜煌; 加路; 何艳; 周华英; 谌资; 罗艳; 贺波; 贺梅

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To observe the dynamic changes of 3 types of viral reservoir cells (NK cells,T lymphocytes and monocytes),and its relationship with treatment effect in Chinese HIV-1 infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) for 2 years.Methods:A total of 40 chronic HIV-1-infected adults who initiated HAART were enrolled in this study and followed up for 2 years.Peripheral whole blood was obtained from each patient at baseline (0 month),6,12,18 and 24 months.Real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR was used to detect the HIV-1 RNA in the plasma and HIV-1 DNA in NK cells,T lymphocytes and monocytes.All the data were statistically analyzed.Results:CD4 count increased with the decrease of the viral load during HAART.After HAART initiation,HIV-1 DNA showed a significant decrease in NK cells,T lymphocytes and monocytes.The HIV-1 DNA from T lymphocytes,NK cells and monocytes correlated positively with the HIV-1 RNA (P<0.05) while NK cells and T lymphocytes correlated negatively with CD4+T cell count.However we did not find significant correlation between CD4+T cell count and HIV-1 DNA in monocytes at the baseline of HAART.Conclusion:This study found that NK cell was an important HIV cellular reservoir besides T lymphocytes and monocytes.T lymphocytes may be the main long lasting HIV reservoir.HIV-1 proviral DNA may play an important role in the efficacy of treatment and monitoring the disease progression.%目的:观察中国HIV-1感染者和AIDS病(HIV/AIDS)患者在两年高效抗反转录病毒治疗(highly active antiretroviral therapy,HAART)过程中,外周血NK细胞、T淋巴细胞以及单核细胞3种HIV-1病毒储存库的动态变化及其与治疗效果的关系.方法:40例初次接受HAART的HIV/AIDS患者被纳入本研究并随访2年.在启动治疗0,6,12,18,24个月后,检测其外周血HIV-1 RNA病毒载量,CD4+T细胞数量,NK细胞、单核细胞和T淋巴细胞内的HIV-1 DNA水平,对数据进行统计学

  15. A Study of the Efficiency of High-strength, Steel, Cellular-core Sandwich Plates in Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Aldie E , Jr; Semonian, Joseph W

    1956-01-01

    Structural efficiency curves are presented for high-strength, stainless-steel, cellular-core sandwich plates of various proportions subjected to compressive end loads for temperatures of 80 F and 600 F. Optimum proportions of sandwich plates for any value of the compressive loading intensity can be determined from the curves. The efficiency of steel sandwich plates of optimum proportions is compared with the efficiency of solid plates of high-strength steel and aluminum and titanium alloys at the two temperatures.

  16. Magneto-optical cellular chip model for intracellular orientational-dynamic-activity detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Y.; Iwasaka, M.; Kurita, S.; Owada, N.

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, a magneto-optical cellular chip model (MoCCM) was developed to detect intracellular dynamics in macromolecules by using magneto-optical effects. For the purpose of cell-measurement under strong static magnetic fields of up to 10 T, we constructed a cellular chip model, which was a thin glass plate with a well for a cell culture. A cell line of osteoblast MC3T3-E1 was incubated in the glass well, and the well, 0.3 mm in depth, was sealed by a cover glass when the MoCCM was set in a fiber optic system. An initial intensity change of the polarized light transmission, which dispersed perpendicular to the cell's attaching surface, was collected for 10 to 60 min, and then magnetic fields were applied parallel and perpendicular to the surface and light direction, respectively. The magnetic birefringence signals that originated from the magnetic orientation of intracellular molecules such as cytoskeletons apparently appeared when the magnetic fields were constant at 10 T. A statistical analysis with 15 experiments confirmed that the cellular components under 10 T magnetic fields caused a stronger alignment, which was transferred into polarizing light intensity that increased more than the case before exposure. Cellular conditions such as generation and cell density affected the magnetic birefringence signals.

  17. Inhibition of cellular activation of retroviral replication by CD8+ T cells derived from non-human primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J D; Bednarik, D P; Folks, T M; Jehuda-Cohen, T; Villinger, F; Sell, K W; Ansari, A A

    1993-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that CD8+ T cells inhibit viral replication at the level of cellular activation, an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed cell line (FEc1) from a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-seropositive sooty mangabey monkey was transfected with a human CD4 gene and shown to be replication-competent for HIV-1, HIV-2 and SIV. Utilizing a dual-chamber culture system, it was found that inhibition of viral replication can be mediated by a soluble factor. The FEc1 cell line was transiently transfected with an LTR-driven CAT reporter gene. It was found that autologous CD8+ T cells markedly inhibited CAT activity. Furthermore, co-transfection of the FEc1 cell line with an LTR-driven tat plasmid and LTR-CAT was able to quantitatively mitigate the suppressive effect. Thus, this inhibition appears to be directed at cellular mechanisms of viral transcription. Control transfections with an LTR-driven CAT plasmid with a mutation at the NFkB binding site yielded no CAT activity, suggesting that most viral replication as measured by CAT activity is dependent, to a large extent, upon cellularly derived NFkB binding proteins.

  18. The influence of temperature on the electrical resistivity of the cellular polypropylene and the effect of activation energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Floran; Dhima, Pranvera; Mandija, Florian

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we determine the surface and volume electrical resistivity of the 50 μm thick cellular polypropylen (VHD50), for the temperature range 393-453 K. For this we use a contemporary methodology, which consist of a voltage measurement across the sample, with a known current flowing through it. This methodology includes a three-electrode system, which allows us to estimate the resistivity of the samples, based on their corresponding total resistances. The electric fields applied for a time interval of 1 min are of the order of 200 kVm (-1). The order of magnitude of surface and volume electrical resistivity is 10(13) Ω and 10(11) Ωm, respectively. For both types of the resistivity, the temperature dependence is an increasing or decreasing exponential function, depending on the type of the activation energy, (its average value for the temperature range mentioned above is 41,20 kJmol (-1)), totally confirmed by the corresponding theoretical interpretation, conditioned by the ionic conduction. The methodology and equipment used, as well as the satisfying accordance with the results, found out directly or indirectly with the consulted literature, confirm the high accuracy of experimental measurements.

  19. Structure of modified [epsilon]-polylysine micelles and their application in improving cellular antioxidant activity of curcuminoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hailong; Li, Ji; Shi, Ke; Huang, Qingrong (Rutgers)

    2015-10-15

    The micelle structure of octenyl succinic anhydride modified {var_epsilon}-polylysine (M-EPL), an anti-microbial surfactant prepared from natural peptide {var_epsilon}-polylysine in aqueous solution has been studied using synchrotron small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Our results revealed that M-EPLs formed spherical micelles with individual size of 24-26 {angstrom} in aqueous solution which could further aggregate to form a larger dimension with averaged radius of 268-308 {angstrom}. Furthermore, M-EPL micelle was able to encapsulate curcuminoids, a group of poorly-soluble bioactive compounds from turmeric with poor oral bioavailability, and improve their water solubility. Three loading methods, including solvent evaporation, dialysis, and high-speed homogenization were compared. The results indicated that the dialysis method generated the highest loading capacity and curcuminoids water solubility. The micelle encapsulation was confirmed as there were no free curcuminoid crystals detected in the differential scanning calorimetry analysis. It was also demonstrated that M-EPL encapsulation stabilized curcuminoids against hydrolysis at pH 7.4 and the encapsulated curcuminoids showed elevated cellular antioxidant activity compared with free curcuminoids. This work suggested that M-EPL could be used as new biopolymer micelles for delivering poorly soluble drugs/phytochemicals and improving their bioactivities.

  20. Portal vein glucose entry triggers a coordinated cellular response that potentiates hepatic glucose uptake and storage in normal but not high-fat/high-fructose-fed dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coate, Katie C; Kraft, Guillaume; Irimia, Jose M; Smith, Marta S; Farmer, Ben; Neal, Doss W; Roach, Peter J; Shiota, Masakazu; Cherrington, Alan D

    2013-02-01

    The cellular events mediating the pleiotropic actions of portal vein glucose (PoG) delivery on hepatic glucose disposition have not been clearly defined. Likewise, the molecular defects associated with postprandial hyperglycemia and impaired hepatic glucose uptake (HGU) following consumption of a high-fat, high-fructose diet (HFFD) are unknown. Our goal was to identify hepatocellular changes elicited by hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and PoG signaling in normal chow-fed (CTR) and HFFD-fed dogs. In CTR dogs, we demonstrated that PoG infusion in the presence of hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia triggered an increase in the activity of hepatic glucokinase (GK) and glycogen synthase (GS), which occurred in association with further augmentation in HGU and glycogen synthesis (GSYN) in vivo. In contrast, 4 weeks of HFFD feeding markedly reduced GK protein content and impaired the activation of GS in association with diminished HGU and GSYN in vivo. Furthermore, the enzymatic changes associated with PoG sensing in chow-fed animals were abolished in HFFD-fed animals, consistent with loss of the stimulatory effects of PoG delivery. These data reveal new insight into the molecular physiology of the portal glucose signaling mechanism under normal conditions and to the pathophysiology of aberrant postprandial hepatic glucose disposition evident under a diet-induced glucose-intolerant condition.

  1. Asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM) for ultrafast high-contrast cellular imaging in flow

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, Terence T W; Ho, Kenneth K Y; Tang, Matthew Y H; Robles, Joseph D F; Wei, Xiaoming; Chan, Antony C S; Tang, Anson H L; Lam, Edmund Y; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Chan, Godfrey C F; Shum, Ho Cheung; Tsia, Kevin K

    2013-01-01

    Accelerating imaging speed in optical microscopy is often realized at the expense of image contrast, image resolution, and detection sensitivity- a common predicament for advancing high-speed and high-throughput cellular imaging. We here demonstrate a new imaging approach, called asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM), which can deliver ultrafast label-free high-contrast flow imaging with well delineated cellular morphological resolution and in-line optical image amplification to overcome the compromised imaging sensitivity at high speed. We show that ATOM can separately reveal the enhanced phase-gradient and absorption contrast in microfluidic live-cell imaging at a flow speed as high as ~10 m/s, corresponding to an imaging throughput of ~100,000 cells/sec. ATOM could thus be the enabling platform to meet the pressing need for intercalating optical microscopy in cellular assay, e.g. imaging flow cytometry- permitting high-throughput access to the morphological information of the individu...

  2. Asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM) for ultrafast high-contrast cellular imaging in flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Terence T. W.; Lau, Andy K. S.; Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Tang, Matthew Y. H.; Robles, Joseph D. F.; Wei, Xiaoming; Chan, Antony C. S.; Tang, Anson H. L.; Lam, Edmund Y.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Chan, Godfrey C. F.; Shum, Ho Cheung; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2014-01-01

    Accelerating imaging speed in optical microscopy is often realized at the expense of image contrast, image resolution, and detection sensitivity – a common predicament for advancing high-speed and high-throughput cellular imaging. We here demonstrate a new imaging approach, called asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM), which can deliver ultrafast label-free high-contrast flow imaging with well delineated cellular morphological resolution and in-line optical image amplification to overcome the compromised imaging sensitivity at high speed. We show that ATOM can separately reveal the enhanced phase-gradient and absorption contrast in microfluidic live-cell imaging at a flow speed as high as ~10 m/s, corresponding to an imaging throughput of ~100,000 cells/sec. ATOM could thus be the enabling platform to meet the pressing need for intercalating optical microscopy in cellular assay, e.g. imaging flow cytometry – permitting high-throughput access to the morphological information of the individual cells simultaneously with a multitude of parameters obtained in the standard assay. PMID:24413677

  3. Cellular automaton simulations of the temporal pattern of activity of a volcano with an application to Vesuvius activity between 1631 and 1944

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piegari, E.; Di Maio, R.; Scandone, R.

    2012-04-01

    We simulate the volcanic activity of a basaltic stratovolcano by using a cellular automaton model where magma is allowed to rise through self-organized crack networks. Magma rises toward the surface by filling connected paths of fractures until the magma's density is less than, or equal to that of the surrounding rocks. If magma enters a less dense rock layer, it cools and thus solidifies; as a result, the local density profile is modified, and solid filled dikes are formed. We simulate the temporal evolution of such high density pathway of dikes which magma may eventually utilize to reach the surface with the occurrence of an eruption. Magma degassing is also taken into account by means of the relationship between the pressure-controlled water solubility and the lithostatic pressure. We study the statistical properties of the automaton by varying the model parameters and, in particular, the thickness of the uppermost rock layer, which controls the buoyancy rate of magma rise because of its low value of density. We show that, if the initial rock density profile is restored after each eruption because, for example, piecemeal or chaotic collapses, a characteristic timescale appears in the inter-event repose time distribution, which represents the average time that magma takes to form an high density pathway through the less dense rock layer. An application of the model to the statistics of the eruptive activity of the Somma-Vesuvius volcano for the 1631-1944 period is discussed.

  4. Vaginal Fornix Discharge Cellularity and Its Leukocyte Esterase Activity for Diagnosis of Endometritis in Dairy Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl HAJIBEMANI

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to evaluate the application of some strip test markers (i.e., leukocyte esterase (LE activity, protein, nitrate and pH for diagnosis of endometritis in dairy cows using vaginal fornix discharge. Also, the total white blood cell count (t-WBC/l of this secretion and degenerative changes of neutrophils in cervical cytology were used as alternative methods to predict progression of the endometritis severity. Holstein cows (n=215 between 30-40 days in milk (DIM were included and examined. Giemsa-stained smear was prepared from cervical mucus. Cervical cytology test was considered as reference screening method for the detection of subclinical endometritis. The LE activity and t-WBC in the vaginal fornix discharge of subclinical endometritis cows were significantly higher than those from healthy cows. Sensitivity and specificity were 78% and 73% for LE10 activity (10 minutes after contacting with discharges and 60% and 69% for t-WBC (cut off point=210 cells/l for diagnosis of subclinical endometritis, respectively. There was a good agreement between LE10 activity, t-WBC and cervical cytology test with a Kappa coefficient of 0.4 and 0.42, respectively (P<0.0001. Total WBC count in discharge and degenerative neutrophils (DN percentages increase simultaneously with the degree and severity of endometritis. There was a highly significant (P<0.01 correlation between t-WBC and some reagent strip test markers (LE activity, protein and nitrate in clear discharge of studied cows. In conclusion, the present results suggest the LE activity and t-WBC in vaginal fornix discharge could be used as non-invasive reliable and valid methods for screening of subclinical endometritis in postpartum dairy herds.

  5. LRRK2 Kinase Activity and Biology are Not Uniformly Predicted by its Autophosphorylation and Cellular Phosphorylation Site Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April eReynolds

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Missense mutations in the Leucine Rich Repeat protein Kinase 2 (LRRK2 gene are the most common genetic predisposition to develop Parkinson’s disease (PD LRRK2 is a large multi-domain phosphoprotein with a GTPase domain and a serine/threonine protein kinase domain whose activity is implicated in neuronal toxicity; however the precise mechanism is unknown. LRRK2 autophosphorylates on several serine/threonine residues across the enzyme and is found constitutively phosphorylated on Ser910, Ser935, Ser955 and Ser973, which are proposed to be regulated by upstream kinases. Here we investigate the phosphoregulation at these sites by analyzing the effects of disease-associated mutations Arg1441Cys, Arg1441Gly, Ala1442Pro, Tyr1699Cys, Ile2012Thr, Gly2019Ser, and Ile2020Thr. We also studied alanine substitutions of phosphosite serines 910, 935, 955 and 973 and specific LRRK2 inhibition on autophosphorylation of LRRK2 Ser1292, Thr1491, Thr2483 and phosphorylation at the cellular sites. We found that mutants in the Roc-COR domains, including Arg1441Cys, Arg1441His, Ala1442Pro and Tyr1699Cys, can positively enhance LRRK2 kinase activity while concomitantly inducing the dephosphorylation of the cellular sites. Mutation of the cellular sites individually did not affect LRRK2 intrinsic kinase activity; however, Ser910/935/955/973Ala mutations trended toward increased kinase activity of LRRK2. Increased cAMP levels did not lead to increased LRRK2 cellular site phosphorylation, 14-3-3 binding or kinase activity. In cells, inhibition of LRRK2 kinase activity leads to dephosphorylation of Ser1292 by Calyculin A and okadaic acid sensitive phosphatases, while the cellular sites are dephosphorylated by Calyculin A sensitive phosphatases. These findings indicate that comparative analysis of both Ser1292 and Ser910/935/955/973 phosphorylation sites will provide important and distinct measures of LRRK2 kinase and biological activity in vitro and in vivo.

  6. Early Inflammatory Responses Following Cell Grafting in the CNS Trigger Activation of the Subventricular Zone: A Proposed Model of Sequential Cellular Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praet, Jelle; Santermans, Eva; Daans, Jasmijn; Le Blon, Debbie; Hoornaert, Chloé; Goossens, Herman; Hens, Niel; Van der Linden, Annemie; Berneman, Zwi; Ponsaerts, Peter

    2015-01-01

    While multiple rodent preclinical studies, and to a lesser extent human clinical trials, claim the feasibility, safety, and potential clinical benefit of cell grafting in the central nervous system (CNS), currently only little convincing knowledge exists regarding the actual fate of the grafted cells and their effect on the surrounding environment (or vice versa). Our preceding studies already indicated that only a minor fraction of the initially grafted cell population survives the grafting process, while the surviving cell population becomes invaded by highly activated microglia/macrophages and surrounded by reactive astrogliosis. In the current study, we further elaborate on early cellular and inflammatory events following syngeneic grafting of eGFP(+) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (mEFs) in the CNS of immunocompetent mice. Based on obtained quantitative histological data, we here propose a detailed mathematically derived working model that sequentially comprises hypoxia-induced apoptosis of grafted mEFs, neutrophil invasion, neoangiogenesis, microglia/macrophage recruitment, astrogliosis, and eventually survival of a limited number of grafted mEFs. Simultaneously, we observed that the cellular events following mEF grafting activates the subventricular zone neural stem and progenitor cell compartment. This proposed model therefore further contributes to our understanding of cell graft-induced cellular responses and will eventually allow for successful manipulation of this intervention.

  7. Changes in the cellular energy state affect the activity of the bacterial phosphotransferase system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohwer, J.M.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Shinohara, Y.;

    1996-01-01

    The effect of different cellular free-energy states on the uptake of methyl alfa-D-glucopyranoside, an analoque of glucose, by Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system was investigated. The intracellular ATP/ADP ratio was varied by changing the expression...... of the atp operon, which codes for the H+-ATPase, or by adding an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation or an inhibitor of respiration. Corresponding initial phosphotransferase uptake rates were determined using an improved uptake assay that works with growing cells in steady state. The results show...... that the initial uptake rate was decreased under conditions of lowered intracellular ATP/ADP ratios, irrespective of which method was used to change the cellular energy state.. When either the expression of the atp operon was changed or 2,4-dinitrophenol was added to wild-type cells, the relationship between...

  8. Changes in the cellular energy state affect the activity of the bacterial phosphotransferase system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohwer, J.M.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Shinohara, Y.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of different cellular free-energy states on the uptake of methyl alfa-D-glucopyranoside, an analoque of glucose, by Escherichia coli phosphoenolpyruvate:carbohydrate phosphotransferase system was investigated. The intracellular ATP/ADP ratio was varied by changing the expression...... of the atp operon, which codes for the H+-ATPase, or by adding an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation or an inhibitor of respiration. Corresponding initial phosphotransferase uptake rates were determined using an improved uptake assay that works with growing cells in steady state. The results show...... that the initial uptake rate was decreased under conditions of lowered intracellular ATP/ADP ratios, irrespective of which method was used to change the cellular energy state.. When either the expression of the atp operon was changed or 2,4-dinitrophenol was added to wild-type cells, the relationship between...

  9. Perfluorinated chemicals: Differential toxicity, inhibition of aromatase activity and alteration of cellular lipids in human placental cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorrochategui, Eva; Pérez-Albaladejo, Elisabet [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA–CSIC, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Casas, Josefina [Department of Biomedicinal Chemistry, IQAC–CSIC, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Lacorte, Sílvia, E-mail: slbqam@cid.csic.es [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA–CSIC, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Porte, Cinta, E-mail: cinta.porte@cid.csic.es [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IDAEA–CSIC, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    The cytotoxicity of eight perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), namely, perfluorobutanoic acid (PFBA), perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), perfluorododecanoic acid (PFDoA), perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS), perfluorohexanesulfonate (PFHxS) and perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) was assessed in the human placental choriocarcinoma cell line JEG-3. Only the long chain PFCs – PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA – showed significant cytotoxicity in JEG-3 cells with EC50 values in the range of 107 to 647 μM. The observed cytotoxicity was to some extent related to a higher uptake of the longer chain PFCs by cells (PFDoA > PFOS ≫ PFNA > PFOA > PFHxA). Moreover, this work evidences a high potential of PFOS, PFOA and PFBS to act as aromatase inhibitors in placental cells with IC50s in the range of 57–80 μM, the inhibitory effect of PFBS being particularly important despite the rather low uptake of the compound by cells. Finally, exposure of JEG-3 cells to a mixture of the eight PFCs (0.6 μM each) led to a relative increase (up to 3.4-fold) of several lipid classes, including phosphatidylcholines (PCs), plasmalogen PC and lyso plasmalogen PC, which suggests an interference of PFCs with membrane lipids. Overall, this work highlights the ability of the PFC mixture to alter cellular lipid pattern at concentrations well below those that generate toxicity, and the potential of the short chain PFBS, often considered a safe substitute of PFOS, to significantly inhibit aromatase activity in placental cells. - Highlights: • Eight perfluorinated chemicals of different chain lengths have been selected. • Long chain ones – PFOS, PFDoA, PFNA, PFOA – were cytotoxic in placenta cells. • The uptake of long chain perfluorinated chemicals by cells was comparatively higher. • PFOS, PFOA and the short chain PFBS significantly inhibited aromatase activity. • A mixture of perfluorinated chemicals significantly altered placenta cell

  10. Organizing the Cellular and Molecular Heterogeneity in High Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer by Mass Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    the vast array of genetic events found in cancer all converge on three essential cellular processes, cell fate, cell survival and genome maintenance...developed: from the Nolan Lab: Citrus 12, X-shift (unpublished), Gatefinder (unpublished), Pe’er Lab: DREMI 13. A manuscript describing X-shift has been...checked with other clustering algorithms such as used by the Citrus algorithm 12 as well as manual gating of the CyTOF data. The latter is considered

  11. Caenorhabditis elegans maintains highly compartmentalized cellular distribution of metals and steep concentration gradients of manganese.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gawain McColl

    Full Text Available Bioinorganic chemistry is critical to cellular function. Homeostasis of manganese (Mn, for example, is essential for life. A lack of methods for direct in situ visualization of Mn and other biological metals within intact multicellular eukaryotes limits our understanding of management of these metals. We provide the first quantitative subcellular visualization of endogenous Mn concentrations (spanning two orders of magnitude associated with individual cells of the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans.

  12. Organizing the Cellular and Molecular Heterogeneity in High-Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer by Mass Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    array of genetic events found in cancer all converge on three essential cellular processes, cell fate, cell survival and genome maintenance all...Columbia) (these efforts will be ongoing throughout most of the duration of this award) New tools developed: from the Nolan Lab: Citrus [12], X-shift...p53(total) Cell cycle/ Genome integrety Lu175 Protein Biology Isotope Protein Biology Isotope CD235 Erythroid cells In113 HLA-DR DCs/B cells/monocytes

  13. High-resolution Fiber-optic Microendoscopy for in situ Cellular Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Pierce, Mark; Yu, Dihua; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Many biological and clinical studies require the longitudinal study and analysis of morphology and function with cellular level resolution. Traditionally, multiple experiments are run in parallel, with individual samples removed from the study at sequential time points for evaluation by light microscopy. Several intravital techniques have been developed, with confocal, multiphoton, and second harmonic microscopy all demonstrating their ability to be used for imaging in situ 1. With these syst...

  14. Histologic Evaluation of Apical Early Cellular Activity Utilizing Variable Endodontic Regeneration Treatment Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-03

    to the tooth by the pulp through reactionary dentin formation is lost. Pulpal necrosis in an immature root decreases the overall prognosis for the...studies in a canine model for periodontal regeneration, indicating regenerative cellular events were largely established or complete within a 2...connective tissue within the canal, seemingly of periodontal origin (20), as well as the formation of bone-like or cementum-l ike tissues overlying developed

  15. Metal oxide nanoparticles interact with immune cells and activate different cellular responses

    OpenAIRE

    Simón-Vázquez R; Lozano-Fernández T; Dávila-Grana A; González-Fernández A

    2016-01-01

    Rosana Simón-Vázquez, Tamara Lozano-Fernández, Angela Dávila-Grana, Africa González-Fernández Immunology Laboratory, Biomedical Research Center (CINBIO) and Institute of Biomedical Research of Ourense-Pontevedra-Vigo (IBI), University of Vigo, Campus Lagoas Marcosende, Vigo, Pontevedra, Spain Abstract: Besides cell death, nanoparticles (Nps) can induce other cellular responses such as inflammation. The potential immune respon...

  16. Adjuvant activity of peanut, cottonseed and rice oils on cellular and humoral response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Freitas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The potentiality of the usage of vegetable oils such as soybean, corn, olive, sesame, murici seed, rapeseed, linseed, rice and cashew nuts as adjuvant of the humoral and cellular immune response has been recently shown. In the present work, besides of evaluating the adjuvant action of peanut, cottonseed and rice oils on humoral and cellular immune responses against ovalbumin (OVA we also evaluated the protective immune response induced by Leishmania antigens. The peanut oil significantly increased the synthesis of anti-ovalbumin antibodies in the primary response, but it did not favor cellular response. Concerning mice immunized with L. amazonensis antigens emulsified with peanut oil exacerbated skin lesions and lymph node parasite load what suggests stimulation of the Th2 immune response and down regulation of Th1 response. The cottonseed oil was shown to have adjuvant effect to the humoral response, stimulating a secondary response and also favored the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH response to OVA. The rice oil stimulated a strong DTH reaction to OVA and enhanced the synthesis of antibodies after the third dose. Mice immunized with L. amazonensis antigens emulsified with rice oil or cotton seed oil were protected from developing skin lesions and lymph node parasite load. These results emphasize the interest and importance of the vegetable oils as tools in different procedures of immunization and their differential role in relation to the other adjuvant under usage.

  17. Flavones induce immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects by activating cellular anti-oxidant activity: a structure-activity relationship study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilani-Jaziri, Soumaya; Mustapha, Nadia; Mokdad-Bzeouich, Imen; El Gueder, Dorra; Ghedira, Kamel; Ghedira-Chekir, Leila

    2016-05-01

    Flavonoids impart a variety of biological activities, including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-genotoxic effects. This study investigated the effects of flavone luteolin and apigenin on immune cell functions, including proliferation, natural killer (NK) cell activity, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity of isolated murine splenocytes. We report for the first time that flavones enhance lymphocyte proliferation at 10 μM. Luteolin and apigenin significantly promote lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated splenocyte proliferation and enhance humoral immune responses. Luteolin induces a weak cell proliferation of lectin-stimulated splenic T cells, when compared to apigenin. In addition, both flavones significantly enhance NK cell and CTL activities. Furthermore, our study demonstrated that both flavones could inhibit lysosomal enzyme activity, suggesting a potential anti-inflammatory effect. The anti-inflammatory activity was concomitant with the cellular anti-oxidant effect detected in macrophages, red blood cells, and splenocytes. We conclude from this study that flavones exhibited an immunomodulatory effect which could be ascribed, in part, to its cytoprotective capacity via its anti-oxidant activity.

  18. Bioprinting-Based High-Throughput Fabrication of Three-Dimensional MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cellular Spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Ling

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular spheroids serving as three-dimensional (3D in vitro tissue models have attracted increasing interest for pathological study and drug-screening applications. Various methods, including microwells in particular, have been developed for engineering cellular spheroids. However, these methods usually suffer from either destructive molding operations or cell loss and non-uniform cell distribution among the wells due to two-step molding and cell seeding. We have developed a facile method that utilizes cell-embedded hydrogel arrays as templates for concave well fabrication and in situ MCF-7 cellular spheroid formation on a chip. A custom-built bioprinting system was applied for the fabrication of sacrificial gelatin arrays and sequentially concave wells in a high-throughput, flexible, and controlled manner. The ability to achieve in situ cell seeding for cellular spheroid construction was demonstrated with the advantage of uniform cell seeding and the potential for programmed fabrication of tissue models on chips. The developed method holds great potential for applications in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug screening.

  19. Exploiting the multiplexing capabilities of tandem mass tags for high-throughput estimation of cellular protein abundances by mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrné, Erik; Martinez-Segura, Amalia; Syed, Afzal Pasha; Vina-Vilaseca, Arnau; Gruber, Andreas J; Marguerat, Samuel; Schmidt, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    The generation of dynamic models of biological processes critically depends on the determination of precise cellular concentrations of biomolecules. Measurements of system-wide absolute protein levels are particularly valuable information in systems biology. Recently, mass spectrometry based proteomics approaches have been developed to estimate protein concentrations on a proteome-wide scale. However, for very complex proteomes, fractionation steps are required, increasing samples number and instrument analysis time. As a result, the number of full proteomes that can be routinely analyzed is limited. Here we combined absolute quantification strategies with the multiplexing capabilities of isobaric tandem mass tags to determine cellular protein abundances in a high throughput and proteome-wide scale even for highly complex biological systems, such as a whole human cell line. We generated two independent data sets to demonstrate the power of the approach regarding sample throughput, dynamic range, quantitative precision and accuracy as well as proteome coverage in comparison to existing mass spectrometry based strategies.

  20. Digital Morphing Wing: Active Wing Shaping Concept Using Composite Lattice-Based Cellular Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenett, Benjamin; Calisch, Sam; Cellucci, Daniel; Cramer, Nick; Gershenfeld, Neil; Swei, Sean

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We describe an approach for the discrete and reversible assembly of tunable and actively deformable structures using modular building block parts for robotic applications. The primary technical challenge addressed by this work is the use of this method to design and fabricate low density, highly compliant robotic structures with spatially tuned stiffness. This approach offers a number of potential advantages over more conventional methods for constructing compliant robots. The discrete assembly reduces manufacturing complexity, as relatively simple parts can be batch-produced and joined to make complex structures. Global mechanical properties can be tuned based on sub-part ordering and geometry, because local stiffness and density can be independently set to a wide range of values and varied spatially. The structure's intrinsic modularity can significantly simplify analysis and simulation. Simple analytical models for the behavior of each building block type can be calibrated with empirical testing and synthesized into a highly accurate and computationally efficient model of the full compliant system. As a case study, we describe a modular and reversibly assembled wing that performs continuous span-wise twist deformation. It exhibits high performance aerodynamic characteristics, is lightweight and simple to fabricate and repair. The wing is constructed from discrete lattice elements, wherein the geometric and mechanical attributes of the building blocks determine the global mechanical properties of the wing. We describe the mechanical design and structural performance of the digital morphing wing, including their relationship to wind tunnel tests that suggest the ability to increase roll efficiency compared to a conventional rigid aileron system. We focus here on describing the approach to design, modeling, and construction as a generalizable approach for robotics that require very lightweight, tunable, and actively deformable structures. PMID:28289574

  1. A quantitative proteomic analysis of cellular responses to high glucose media in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenke; Dai, Shujia; Bones, Jonathan; Ray, Somak; Cha, Sangwon; Karger, Barry L; Li, Jingyi Jessica; Wilson, Lee; Hinckle, Greg; Rossomando, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    A goal in recombinant protein production using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells is to achieve both high specific productivity and high cell density. Addition of glucose to the culture media is necessary to maintain both cell growth and viability. We varied the glucose concentration in the media from 5 to 16 g/L and found that although specific productivity of CHO-DG44 cells increased with the glucose level, the integrated viable cell density decreased. To examine the biological basis of these results, we conducted a discovery proteomic study of CHO-DG44 cells grown under batch conditions in normal (5 g/L) or high (15 g/L) glucose over 3, 6, and 9 days. Approximately 5,000 proteins were confidently identified against an mRNA-based CHO-DG44 specific proteome database, with 2,800 proteins quantified with at least two peptides. A self-organizing map algorithm was used to deconvolute temporal expression profiles of quantitated proteins. Functional analysis of altered proteins suggested that differences in growth between the two glucose levels resulted from changes in crosstalk between glucose metabolism, recombinant protein expression, and cell death, providing an overall picture of the responses to high glucose environment. The high glucose environment may enhance recombinant dihydrofolate reductase in CHO cells by up-regulating NCK1 and down-regulating PRKRA, and may lower integrated viable cell density by activating mitochondrial- and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated cell death pathways by up-regulating HtrA2 and calpains. These proteins are suggested as potential targets for bioengineering to enhance recombinant protein production.

  2. Multi-cellular natural killer (NK) cell clusters enhance NK cell activation through localizing IL-2 within the cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Miju; Kim, Tae-Jin; Kim, Hye Mi; Doh, Junsang; Lee, Kyung-Mi

    2017-01-01

    Multi-cellular cluster formation of natural killer (NK) cells occurs during in vivo priming and potentiates their activation to IL-2. However, the precise mechanism underlying this synergy within NK cell clusters remains unclear. We employed lymphocyte-laden microwell technologies to modulate contact-mediated multi-cellular interactions among activating NK cells and to quantitatively assess the molecular events occurring in multi-cellular clusters of NK cells. NK cells in social microwells, which allow cell-to-cell contact, exhibited significantly higher levels of IL-2 receptor (IL-2R) signaling compared with those in lonesome microwells, which prevent intercellular contact. Further, CD25, an IL-2R α chain, and lytic granules of NK cells in social microwells were polarized toward MTOC. Live cell imaging of lytic granules revealed their dynamic and prolonged polarization toward neighboring NK cells without degranulation. These results suggest that IL-2 bound on CD25 of one NK cells triggered IL-2 signaling of neighboring NK cells. These results were further corroborated by findings that CD25-KO NK cells exhibited lower proliferation than WT NK cells, and when mixed with WT NK cells, underwent significantly higher level of proliferation. These data highlights the existence of IL-2 trans-presentation between NK cells in the local microenvironment where the availability of IL-2 is limited.

  3. Community structure, cellular rRNA content, and activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria in marine Arctic sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravenschlag, K.; Sahm, K.; Knoblauch, C.;

    2000-01-01

    The community structure of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) of a marine Arctic sediment (Smeerenburg-fjorden, Svalbard) a-as characterized by both fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and rRNA slot blot hybridization by using group- and genus-specific 16S rRNA-targeted oligonucleotide probes...... that FISH and rRNA slot blot hybridization gave comparable results. Furthermore, a combination of the two methods allowed us to calculate specific cellular rRNA contents with respect to localization in the sediment profile. The rRNA contents of Desulfosarcina-Desulfococcus cells were highest in the first 5...... mm of the sediment (0.9 and 1.4 fg, respectively) and decreased steeply with depth, indicating that maximal metabolic activity occurred close to the surface, Based on SRB cell numbers, cellular sulfate reduction rates were calculated. The rates were highest in the surface layer (0.14 fmol cell(-1...

  4. Bioenergetics Race: Teaching Cellular Metabolism to High School Students Through an Educational Game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.E.P. Silva

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Biochemistry is a science that deals with complex and abstract topics, which are often not understood by high school students, thus interfering in theteaching/learning process. The educational teaching game isa methodology advocated by several educators. The aim of this study was to develop a pedagogical practice to assist in the teaching/learning of high school students. Inthis context we designed a game about Metabolism, which was named "Bioenergetics Race". The game issimple, uses low cost materials and have easy access. The game consists of a board, chips, and a list with 100 multiple questions. Operation of the game: Selected questions lead the students to draw a card and move the corresponding number of squares on the board. The one who reachesthe finish line first is the winner. To consolidate the proposal information, every answer was discussed. At the end of the game the students answered a questionnaire. According to 77.5% of players the level of difficulty was large and 83% rated the game as good for educational proposal. It was found that 100% of students had neverparticipated in such activity in the classroom. It is notable the interest of students andthe abstract and complex topics are better assimilated.

  5. Membrane plasmalogen composition and cellular cholesterol regulation: a structure activity study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Myat Khine K

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Disrupted cholesterol regulation leading to increased circulating and membrane cholesterol levels is implicated in many age-related chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD, Alzheimer's disease (AD, and cancer. In vitro and ex vivo cellular plasmalogen deficiency models have been shown to exhibit impaired intra- and extra-cellular processing of cholesterol. Furthermore, depleted brain plasmalogens have been implicated in AD and serum plasmalogen deficiencies have been linked to AD, CVD, and cancer. Results Using plasmalogen deficient (NRel-4 and plasmalogen sufficient (HEK293 cells we investigated the effect of species-dependent plasmalogen restoration/augmentation on membrane cholesterol processing. The results of these studies indicate that the esterification of cholesterol is dependent upon the amount of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA-containing ethanolamine plasmalogen (PlsEtn present in the membrane. We further elucidate that the concentration-dependent increase in esterified cholesterol observed with PUFA-PlsEtn was due to a concentration-dependent increase in sterol-O-acyltransferase-1 (SOAT1 levels, an observation not reproduced by 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA reductase inhibition. Conclusion The present study describes a novel mechanism of cholesterol regulation that is consistent with clinical and epidemiological studies of cholesterol, aging and disease. Specifically, the present study describes how selective membrane PUFA-PlsEtn enhancement can be achieved using 1-alkyl-2-PUFA glycerols and through this action reduce levels of total and free cholesterol in cells.

  6. Active Degradation Explains the Distribution of Nuclear Proteins during Cellular Senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Giampieri

    Full Text Available The amount of cellular proteins is a crucial parameter that is known to vary between cells as a function of the replicative passages, and can be important during physiological aging. The process of protein degradation is known to be performed by a series of enzymatic reactions, ranging from an initial step of protein ubiquitination to their final fragmentation by the proteasome. In this paper we propose a stochastic dynamical model of nuclear proteins concentration resulting from a balance between a constant production of proteins and their degradation by a cooperative enzymatic reaction. The predictions of this model are compared with experimental data obtained by fluorescence measurements of the amount of nuclear proteins in murine tail fibroblast (MTF undergoing cellular senescence. Our model provides a three-parameter stationary distribution that is in good agreement with the experimental data even during the transition to the senescent state, where the nuclear protein concentration changes abruptly. The estimation of three parameters (cooperativity, saturation threshold, and maximal velocity of the reaction, and their evolution during replicative passages shows that only the maximal velocity varies significantly. Based on our modeling we speculate the reduction of functionality of the protein degradation mechanism as a possible competitive inhibition of the proteasome.

  7. Active Degradation Explains the Distribution of Nuclear Proteins during Cellular Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giampieri, Enrico; De Cecco, Marco; Remondini, Daniel; Sedivy, John; Castellani, Gastone

    2015-01-01

    The amount of cellular proteins is a crucial parameter that is known to vary between cells as a function of the replicative passages, and can be important during physiological aging. The process of protein degradation is known to be performed by a series of enzymatic reactions, ranging from an initial step of protein ubiquitination to their final fragmentation by the proteasome. In this paper we propose a stochastic dynamical model of nuclear proteins concentration resulting from a balance between a constant production of proteins and their degradation by a cooperative enzymatic reaction. The predictions of this model are compared with experimental data obtained by fluorescence measurements of the amount of nuclear proteins in murine tail fibroblast (MTF) undergoing cellular senescence. Our model provides a three-parameter stationary distribution that is in good agreement with the experimental data even during the transition to the senescent state, where the nuclear protein concentration changes abruptly. The estimation of three parameters (cooperativity, saturation threshold, and maximal velocity of the reaction), and their evolution during replicative passages shows that only the maximal velocity varies significantly. Based on our modeling we speculate the reduction of functionality of the protein degradation mechanism as a possible competitive inhibition of the proteasome.

  8. Rapid Directional Solidification with Ultra-High Temperature Gradient and Cellular Spacing Selection of Cu-Mn Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The detailed laser surface remelting experiments of Cu-31.4 wt pct Mn and Cu-26.6 wt pct Mn alloys on a 5 kW CO2laser were carried out to study the effects of processing parameters (scanning velocity, output power of laser) on the growthdirection of microstructure in the molten pool and cellular spacing selection under the condition of ultra-high temperaturegradient and rapid directional solidification. The experimental results show that the growth direction of microstructure isstrongly affected by laser processing parameters. The ultra-high temperature gradient directional solidification can be realizedon the surface of samples during laser surface remelting by controlling laser processing parameters, the temperature gradientand growth velocity can reach 106 K/m and 24.1 mm/s, respectively, and the solidification microstructure in the center ofthe molten pool grows along the laser beam scanning direction. There exists a distribution range of cellular spacings underthe laser rapid solidification conditions, and the average spacing decreases with increasing of growth rate. The maximum,λ minimum, λmin, and average primary spacing,λ, as functions of growth rate, Vb, can be given by, λ =12.54V b-0.61,λmin=4.47 Vb-0.52, λ=9.09Vb-0.62, respectively. The experimental results are compared with the current Hunt-Lu model forrapid cellular/dendritic growth, and a good agreement is found.

  9. Comparative effect of Piper betle, Chlorella vulgaris and tocotrienol-rich fraction on antioxidant enzymes activity in cellular ageing of human diploid fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makpol, Suzana; Yeoh, Thong Wei; Ruslam, Farah Adilah Che; Arifin, Khaizurin Tajul; Yusof, Yasmin Anum Mohd

    2013-08-16

    Human diploid fibroblasts (HDFs) undergo a limited number of cellular divisions in culture and progressively reach a state of irreversible growth arrest, a process termed cellular ageing. Even though beneficial effects of Piper betle, Chlorella vulgaris and tocotrienol-rich fraction (TRF) have been reported, ongoing studies in relation to ageing is of interest to determine possible protective effects that may reverse the effect of ageing. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of P. betle, C. vulgaris and TRF in preventing cellular ageing of HDFs by determining the activity of antioxidant enzymes viz.; catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase. Different passages of HDFs were treated with P. betle, C. vulgaris and TRF for 24 h prior to enzymes activity determination. Senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA β-gal) expression was assayed to validate cellular ageing. In cellular ageing of HDFs, catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities were reduced, but SOD activity was heightened during pre-senescence. P. betle exhibited the strongest antioxidant activity by reducing SA β-gal expression, catalase activities in all age groups, and SOD activity. TRF exhibited a strong antioxidant activity by reducing SA β-gal expression, and SOD activity in senescent HDFs. C. vulgaris extract managed to reduce SOD activity in senescent HDFs. P. betle, C. vulgaris, and TRF have the potential as anti-ageing entities which compensated the role of antioxidant enzymes in cellular ageing of HDFs.

  10. Changes in the topography of cellular components in pea root statocytes exposed to high gradient magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyavskaya, Ninel A.; Polishchuk, Olexandr V.; Kondrachuk, Alexander V.

    2005-08-01

    High-gradient magnetic field (HGMF) is one of methods, by which gravitropism in plants is studied. The aim of our study was elucidation of HGMF effects on topography of cellular components in root statocytes of 4- day Pisum sativum L. seedlings in comparison to gravistimulation. Under gravistimulation during 5, 30 and 60 min seedlings were rotated 45o; magnetostimulation was carried out along gap between two NdFeB magnets (0.7 T). Morphometric measurements were made from images of whole statocytes, for upper, middle and lower thirds of cells, and proximal and distal halves of cells. Morphometric analysis revealed that HGMF resulted in the redistribution of all cellular components in statocytes. The correlation in the amyloplast distribution between gravistimulation and magnetostimulation was established.

  11. The Na+/Glucose Cotransporter Inhibitor Canagliflozin Activates AMPK by Inhibiting Mitochondrial Function and Increasing Cellular AMP Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Simon A; Ford, Rebecca J; Smith, Brennan K; Gowans, Graeme J; Mancini, Sarah J; Pitt, Ryan D; Day, Emily A; Salt, Ian P; Steinberg, Gregory R; Hardie, D Grahame

    2016-09-01

    Canagliflozin, dapagliflozin, and empagliflozin, all recently approved for treatment of type 2 diabetes, were derived from the natural product phlorizin. They reduce hyperglycemia by inhibiting glucose reuptake by sodium/glucose cotransporter (SGLT) 2 in the kidney, without affecting intestinal glucose uptake by SGLT1. We now report that canagliflozin also activates AMPK, an effect also seen with phloretin (the aglycone breakdown product of phlorizin), but not to any significant extent with dapagliflozin, empagliflozin, or phlorizin. AMPK activation occurred at canagliflozin concentrations measured in human plasma in clinical trials and was caused by inhibition of Complex I of the respiratory chain, leading to increases in cellular AMP or ADP. Although canagliflozin also inhibited cellular glucose uptake independently of SGLT2, this did not account for AMPK activation. Canagliflozin also inhibited lipid synthesis, an effect that was absent in AMPK knockout cells and that required phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) 1 and/or ACC2 at the AMPK sites. Oral administration of canagliflozin activated AMPK in mouse liver, although not in muscle, adipose tissue, or spleen. Because phosphorylation of ACC by AMPK is known to lower liver lipid content, these data suggest a potential additional benefit of canagliflozin therapy compared with other SGLT2 inhibitors. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  12. The Interaction of the Gammaherpesvirus 68 orf73 Protein with Cellular BET Proteins Affects the Activation of Cell Cycle Promoters▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottinger, Matthias; Pliquet, Daniel; Christalla, Thomas; Frank, Ronald; Stewart, James P.; Schulz, Thomas F.

    2009-01-01

    Infection of mice with murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) provides a valuable animal model for gamma-2 herpesvirus (rhadinovirus) infection and pathogenesis. The MHV-68 orf73 protein has been shown to be required for the establishment of viral latency in vivo. This study describes a novel transcriptional activation function of the MHV-68 orf73 protein and identifies the cellular bromodomain containing BET proteins Brd2/RING3, Brd3/ORFX, and BRD4 as interaction partners for the MHV-68 orf73 protein. BET protein members are known to interact with acetylated histones, and Brd2 and Brd4 have been implicated in fundamental cellular processes, including cell cycle regulation and transcriptional regulation. Using MHV-68 orf73 peptide array assays, we identified Brd2 and Brd4 interaction sites in the orf73 protein. Mutation of one binding site led to a loss of the interaction with Brd2/4 but not the retinoblastoma protein Rb, to impaired chromatin association, and to a decreased ability to activate the BET-responsive cyclin D1, D2, and E promoters. The results therefore pinpoint the binding site for Brd2/4 in a rhadinoviral orf73 protein and suggest that the recruitment of a member of the BET protein family allows the MHV-68 orf73 protein to activate the promoters of G1/S cyclins. These findings point to parallels between the transcriptional activator functions of rhadinoviral orf73 proteins and papillomavirus E2 proteins. PMID:19244327

  13. Comparative study on antiproliferation properties and cellular antioxidant activities of commonly consumed food legumes against nine human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baojun; Chang, Sam K C

    2012-10-01

    The aims of this work were to compare health promoting effects of commonly consumed food legumes in terms of cancer cell proliferation inhibitory effects and cellular antioxidant activities (CAA). The CAA was evaluated by fluorescence microplate reader based on in vitro animal cell cultivation. Antiproliferative properties were assayed by MTT method using in vitro cell culture system. Phytochemicals (including total phenolic, procyanidin, saponin and phytic acid) and chemical antioxidant activities (including DPPH free radical scavenging activity, oxygen radical absorbing capacity, peroxyl radical scavenging capacity (PRSC)) were also determined for comparison purposes. The results showed that different types of legumes possessed considerable variations in their phytochemicals, as well as chemical and cellular antioxidant activities. Adzuki bean exhibited the strongest antiproliferative properties in a dose-dependent manner against all digestive system cancer cell lines (CAL27, AGS, HepG2, SW480 and Caco-2), ovary cancer cell SK-OV-3 and breast cancer cell MCF-7 among all legumes tested. Black soybean exhibited the highest saponin, phytic acid content, PRSC values, and the strongest CAA values. These results indicate that commonly consumed food legumes may serve as an excellent dietary source of natural antioxidants for health promotion and cancer prevention.

  14. Esterification of Ginsenoside Rh2 Enhanced Its Cellular Uptake and Antitumor Activity in Human HepG2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang; Deng, Ze-Yuan; Zhang, Bing; Xiong, Zeng-Xing; Zheng, Shi-Lian; Tan, Chao-Li; Hu, Jiang-Ning

    2016-01-13

    Our previous research had indicated that the octyl ester derivative of ginsenoside Rh2 (Rh2-O) might have a higher bioavailability than Rh2 in the Caco-2 cell line. The aim of this study was to investigate the cellular uptake and antitumor effects of Rh2-O in human HepG2 cells as well as its underlying mechanism compared with Rh2. Results showed that Rh2-O exhibited a higher cellular uptake (63.24%) than Rh2 (36.76%) when incubated with HepG2 cells for 24 h. Rh2-O possessed a dose- and time-dependent inhibitory effect against the proliferation of HepG2 cells. The IC50 value of Rh2-O for inhibition of HepG2 cell proliferation was 20.15 μM, which was roughly half the value of Rh2. Rh2-O induced apoptosis of HepG2 cells through a mitochondrial-mediated intrinsic pathway. In addition, the accumulation of ROS was detected in Rh2-O-treated HepG2 cells, which participated in the apoptosis of HepG2 cells. Conclusively, the findings above all suggested that Rh2-O as well as Rh2 inducing HepG2 cells apoptosis might involve similar mechanisms; however, Rh2-O had better antitumor activities than Rh2, probably due to its higher cellular uptake.

  15. High-performance full adder architecture in quantum-dot cellular automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Rashidi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA is a new and promising computation paradigm, which can be a viable replacement for the complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor technology at nano-scale level. This technology provides a possible solution for improving the computation in various computational applications. Two QCA full adder architectures are presented and evaluated: a new and efficient 1-bit QCA full adder architecture and a 4-bit QCA ripple carry adder (RCA architecture. The proposed architectures are simulated using QCADesigner tool version 2.0.1. These architectures are implemented with the coplanar crossover approach. The simulation results show that the proposed 1-bit QCA full adder and 4-bit QCA RCA architectures utilise 33 and 175 QCA cells, respectively. Our simulation results show that the proposed architectures outperform most results so far in the literature.

  16. 2D cellular automaton model for the evolution of active region coronal plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Fuentes, Marcelo López

    2016-01-01

    We study a 2D cellular automaton (CA) model for the evolution of coronal loop plasmas. The model is based on the idea that coronal loops are made of elementary magnetic strands that are tangled and stressed by the displacement of their footpoints by photospheric motions. The magnetic stress accumulated between neighbor strands is released in sudden reconnection events or nanoflares that heat the plasma. We combine the CA model with the Enthalpy Based Thermal Evolution of Loops (EBTEL) model to compute the response of the plasma to the heating events. Using the known response of the XRT telescope on board Hinode we also obtain synthetic data. The model obeys easy to understand scaling laws relating the output (nanoflare energy, temperature, density, intensity) to the input parameters (field strength, strand length, critical misalignment angle). The nanoflares have a power-law distribution with a universal slope of -2.5, independent of the input parameters. The repetition frequency of nanoflares, expressed in t...

  17. Cellular immune activation in children with acute dengue virus infections is modulated by apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Khin S; Endy, Timothy P; Mongkolsirichaikul, Duangrat; Manomuth, Choompun; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Vaughn, David W; Nisalak, Ananda; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A; Libraty, Daniel H

    2006-09-01

    Apoptosis is an important modulator of cellular immune responses during systemic viral infections. Peripheral-blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) apoptosis and plasma soluble levels of CD95, a mediator of apoptosis, were determined in sequential samples from children participating in a prospective study of dengue virus (DV) infections. During the period of defervescence, levels of PBMC apoptosis were higher in children developing dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), the most severe form of illness, than in those with dengue fever (DF) and other, nondengue, febrile illnesses. CD8(+) T lymphocytes made up approximately half of the peak circulating apoptotic PBMCs in DHF and DF. Maximum plasma levels of soluble CD95 were also higher in children with DHF than in those with DF. The level of PBMC apoptosis correlated with dengue disease severity. Apoptosis appears to be involved in modulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses to DV infection and is likely involved in the evolution of immune responses in other viral hemorrhagic fevers.

  18. Cellular scaling rules for the brain of Artiodactyla include a highly folded cortex with few neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo eSiqueira Kazu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative analysis of the cellular composition of rodent, primate, insectivore and afrotherian brains has shown that nonneuronal scaling rules are similar across these mammalian orders that diverged about 95 million years ago, and therefore appear to be conserved in evolution, while neuronal scaling rules appear to be free to vary in a clade-specific manner. Here we analyze the cellular scaling rules that apply to the brain of artiodactyls, a group within the order Cetartiodactyla, believed to be a relatively recent radiation from the common Eutherian ancestor. We find that artiodactyls share nonneuronal scaling rules with all groups analyzed previously. Artiodactyls share with afrotherians and rodents, but not with primates, the neuronal scaling rules that apply to the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. The neuronal scaling rules that apply to the remaining brain areas are however distinct in artiodactyls. Importantly, we show that the folding index of the cerebral cortex scales with the number of neurons in the cerebral cortex in distinct fashions across artiodactyls, afrotherians, rodents, and primates, such that the artiodactyl cerebral cortex is more convoluted than primate cortices of similar numbers of neurons. Our findings suggest that the scaling rules found to be shared across modern afrotherians, glires and artiodactyls applied to the common Eutherian ancestor, such as the relationship between the mass of the cerebral cortex as a whole and its number of neurons. In turn, the distribution of neurons along the surface of the cerebral cortex, which is related to its degree of gyrification, appears to be a clade-specific characteristic. If the neuronal scaling rules for artiodactyls extend to all cetartiodactyls, we predict that the large cerebral cortex of cetaceans will still have fewer neurons than the human cerebral cortex.

  19. Cellular scaling rules for the brain of Artiodactyla include a highly folded cortex with few neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazu, Rodrigo S; Maldonado, José; Mota, Bruno; Manger, Paul R; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of the cellular composition of rodent, primate, insectivore, and afrotherian brains has shown that non-neuronal scaling rules are similar across these mammalian orders that diverged about 95 million years ago, and therefore appear to be conserved in evolution, while neuronal scaling rules appear to be free to vary in a clade-specific manner. Here we analyze the cellular scaling rules that apply to the brain of artiodactyls, a group within the order Cetartiodactyla, believed to be a relatively recent radiation from the common Eutherian ancestor. We find that artiodactyls share non-neuronal scaling rules with all groups analyzed previously. Artiodactyls share with afrotherians and rodents, but not with primates, the neuronal scaling rules that apply to the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. The neuronal scaling rules that apply to the remaining brain areas are, however, distinct in artiodactyls. Importantly, we show that the folding index of the cerebral cortex scales with the number of neurons in the cerebral cortex in distinct fashions across artiodactyls, afrotherians, rodents, and primates, such that the artiodactyl cerebral cortex is more convoluted than primate cortices of similar numbers of neurons. Our findings suggest that the scaling rules found to be shared across modern afrotherians, glires, and artiodactyls applied to the common Eutherian ancestor, such as the relationship between the mass of the cerebral cortex as a whole and its number of neurons. In turn, the distribution of neurons along the surface of the cerebral cortex, which is related to its degree of gyrification, appears to be a clade-specific characteristic. If the neuronal scaling rules for artiodactyls extend to all cetartiodactyls, we predict that the large cerebral cortex of cetaceans will still have fewer neurons than the human cerebral cortex.

  20. Synthesis of an excellent electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction with supercritical fluid: Graphene cellular monolith with ultrafine and highly dispersive multimetallic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yazhou; Cheng, Xiaonong; Yen, Clive H.; Wai, Chien M.; Wang, Chongmin; Yang, Juan; Lin, Yuehe

    2017-04-01

    Graphene cellular monolith (GCM) can be used as an excellent support for nanoparticles in widespread applications. However, it's still a great challenge to deposit the desirable nanoparticles in GCM that have small size, controllable structure, composition, and high dispersion using the current methods. Here we demonstrate a green, efficient and large-scale method to address this challenge using supercritical fluid (SCF). By this superior method, graphene hydrogel can be transferred into GCM while being deposited with ultrafine and highly dispersive nanoparticles. Specifically, the bimetallic PtFe/GCM and the trimetallic PtFeCo/GCM catalysts are successfully synthesized, and their electrocatalytic performances toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are also studied. The resultant PtFe/GCM shows the significant enhancement in ORR activity, including a factor of 8.47 enhancement in mass activity (0.72 A mgPt-1), and a factor of 7.67 enhancement in specific activity (0.92 mA cm-2), comparing with those of the commercial Pt/C catalyst (0.085 A mgPt-1, 0.12 mA cm-2). Importantly, by introducing the Co, the trimetallic PtFeCo/GCM exhibits the further improved ORR activities (1.28 A mgPt-1, 1.80 mA cm-2). The high ORR activity is probably attributed to the alloying structure, ultrafine size, highly dispersive, well-defined, and a better interface with 3D porous graphene support.

  1. Synthesis of an excellent electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction with supercritical fluid: Graphene cellular monolith with ultrafine and highly dispersive multimetallic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Yazhou; Cheng, Xiaonong; Yen, Clive H.; Wai, Chien M.; Wang, Chongmin; Yang, Juan; Lin, Yuehe

    2017-04-01

    Graphene cellular monolith (GCM) can be used as an excellent support for nanoparticles in widespread applications. However, it's still a great challenge to deposit the desirable nanoparticles in GCM that have small size, controllable structure, composition, and high dispersion using the current methods. Here we demonstrate a green, efficient and large-scale method to address this challenge using supercritical fluid (SCF). By this superior method, graphene hydrogel can be transferred into GCM while being deposited with ultrafine and highly dispersive nanoparticles. Specifically, the bimetallic PtFe/GCM and the trimetallic PtFeCo/GCM catalysts are successfully synthesized, and their electrocatalytic performances toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) are also studied. The resultant PtFe/GCM shows the significant enhancement in ORR activity, including a factor of 8.47 enhancement in mass activity (0.72 A mgPt-1), and a factor of 7.67 enhancement in specific activity (0.92 mA cm-2), comparing with those of the commercial Pt/C catalyst (0.085 A mgPt-1, 0.12 mA cm-2). Importantly, by introducing the Co, the trimetallic PtFeCo/GCM exhibits the further improved ORR activities (1.28 A mgPt-1, 1.80 mA cm-2). The high ORR activity is probably attributed to the alloying structure, ultrafine size, highly dispersive, well-defined, and a better interface with 3D porous graphene support.

  2. Behavioral and cellular consequences of high-electrode count Utah Arrays chronically implanted in rat sciatic nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wark, H. A. C.; Mathews, K. S.; Normann, R. A.; Fernandez, E.

    2014-08-01

    Objective. Before peripheral nerve electrodes can be used for the restoration of sensory and motor functions in patients with neurological disorders, the behavioral and histological consequences of these devices must be investigated. These indices of biocompatibility can be defined in terms of desired functional outcomes; for example, a device may be considered for use as a therapeutic intervention if the implanted subject retains functional neurons post-implantation even in the presence of a foreign body response. The consequences of an indwelling device may remain localized to cellular responses at the device-tissue interface, such as fibrotic encapsulation of the device, or they may affect the animal more globally, such as impacting behavioral or sensorimotor functions. The objective of this study was to investigate the overall consequences of implantation of high-electrode count intrafascicular peripheral nerve arrays, High Density Utah Slanted Electrode Arrays (HD-USEAs; 25 electrodes mm-2). Approach. HD-USEAs were implanted in rat sciatic nerves for one and two month periods. We monitored wheel running, noxious sensory paw withdrawal reflexes, footprints, nerve morphology and macrophage presence at the tissue-device interface. In addition, we used a novel approach to contain the arrays in actively behaving animals that consisted of an organic nerve wrap. A total of 500 electrodes were implanted across all ten animals. Main results. The results demonstrated that chronic implantation (⩽8 weeks) of HD-USEAs into peripheral nerves can evoke behavioral deficits that recover over time. Morphology of the nerve distal to the implantation site showed variable signs of nerve fiber degeneration and regeneration. Cytology adjacent to the device-tissue interface also showed a variable response, with some electrodes having many macrophages surrounding the electrodes, while other electrodes had few or no macrophages present. This variability was also seen along the length

  3. SIRT1 overexpression antagonizes cellular senescence with activated ERK/S6k1 signaling in human diploid fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Huang

    Full Text Available Sir2, a NAD-dependent deacetylase, modulates lifespan in yeasts, worms and flies. The SIRT1, mammalian homologue of Sir2, regulates signaling for favoring survival in stress. But whether SIRT1 has the function to influence cell viability and senescence under non-stressed conditions in human diploid fibroblasts is far from unknown. Our data showed that enforced SIRT1 expression promoted cell proliferation and antagonized cellular senescence with the characteristic features of delayed Senescence-Associated beta-galactosidase (SA-beta-gal staining, reduced Senescence-Associated Heterochromatic Foci (SAHF formation and G1 phase arrest, increased cell growth rate and extended cellular lifespan in human fibroblasts, while dominant-negative SIRT1 allele (H363Y did not significantly affect cell growth and senescence but displayed a bit decreased lifespan. Western blot results showed that SIRT1 reduced the expression of p16(INK4A and promoted phosphorylation of Rb. Our data also exposed that overexpression of SIRT1 was accompanied by enhanced activation of ERK and S6K1 signaling. These effects were mimicked in both WI38 cells and 2BS cells by concentration-dependent resveratrol, a SIRT1 activator. It was noted that treatment of SIRT1-.transfected cells with Rapamycin, a mTOR inhibitor, reduced the phosphorylation of S6K1 and the expression of Id1, implying that SIRT1-induced phosphorylation of S6K1 may be partly for the decreased expression of p16(INK4A and promoted phosphorylation of Rb in 2BS. It was also observed that the expression of SIRT1 and phosphorylation of ERK and S6K1 was declined in senescent 2BS. These findings suggested that SIRT1-promoted cell proliferation and antagonized cellular senescence in human diploid fibroblasts may be, in part, via the activation of ERK/ S6K1 signaling.

  4. Schwann cells are activated by ATP released from neurons in an in vitro cellular model of Miller Fisher syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Rodella

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The neuromuscular junction is exposed to different types of insult, including mechanical trauma, toxins and autoimmune antibodies and, accordingly, has retained through evolution a remarkable ability to regenerate. Regeneration is driven by multiple signals that are exchanged among the cellular components of the junction. These signals are largely unknown. Miller Fisher syndrome is a variant of Guillain–Barré syndrome caused by autoimmune antibodies specific for epitopes of peripheral axon terminals. Using an animal model of Miller Fisher syndrome, we recently reported that a monoclonal anti-polysialoganglioside GQ1b antibody plus complement damages nerve terminals with production of mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide, which activates Schwann cells. Several additional signaling molecules are likely to be involved in the activation of the regeneration program in these cells. Using an in vitro cellular model consisting of co-cultured primary neurons and Schwann cells, we found that ATP is released by neurons injured by the anti-GQ1b antibody plus complement. Neuron-derived ATP acts as an alarm messenger for Schwann cells, where it induces the activation of intracellular pathways, including calcium signaling, cAMP and CREB, which, in turn, produce signals that promote nerve regeneration. These results contribute to defining the cross-talk taking place at the neuromuscular junction when it is attacked by anti-gangliosides autoantibodies plus complement, which is crucial for nerve regeneration and is also likely to be important in other peripheral neuropathies.

  5. Cellular-level near-wall unsteadiness of high-hematocrit erythrocyte flow using confocal {mu}PIV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick, Michael J. [Carnegie Mellon University, Molecular Biosensor and Imaging Center (MBIC), Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Chen, Chia-Yuan; Dur, Onur; Pekkan, Kerem [Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Biomedical and Mechanical Engineering, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Frakes, David H. [Arizona State University, School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering and School of Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering, Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2011-04-15

    In hemodynamics, the inherent intermittency of two-phase cellular-level flow has received little attention. Unsteadiness is reported and quantified for the first time in the literature using a combination of fluorescent dye labeling, time-resolved scanning confocal microscopy, and micro-particle image velocimetry ({mu}PIV). The near-wall red blood cell (RBC) motion of physiologic high-hematocrit blood in a rectangular microchannel was investigated under pressure-driven flow. Intermittent flow was associated with (1) the stretching of RBCs as they passed through RBC clusters with twisting motions; (2) external flow through local obstacles; and (3) transitionary rouleaux formations. Velocity profiles are presented for these cases. Unsteady flow clustered in local regions. Extra-cellular fluid flow generated by individual RBCs was examined using submicron fluorescent microspheres. The capabilities of confocal {mu}PIV post-processing were verified using synthetic raw PIV data for validation. Cellular interactions and oscillating velocity profiles are presented, and 3D data are made available for computational model validation. (orig.)

  6. Association of high HLA-E expression during acute cellular rejection and numbers of HLA class I leader peptide mismatches with reduced renal allograft survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guberina, Hana; Rebmann, Vera; Wagner, Bettina; da Silva Nardi, Fabiola; Dziallas, Phillip; Dolff, Sebastian; Bienholz, Anja; Wohlschlaeger, Jeremias; Bankfalvi, Agnes; Heinemann, Falko M; Witzke, Oliver; Zoet, Yvonne M; Claas, Frans H J; Horn, Peter A; Kribben, Andreas; Doxiadis, Ilias I N

    2017-03-01

    Non-classical Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-E preferentially presents leader peptides derived from classical HLA-class I molecules. HLA-E can trigger opposed immune responses by interacting with inhibitory NKG2A or by activating NKG2C receptors on NK and T-cells. We studied the impact of HLA-E on renal allograft survival during acute cellular rejection. HLA-E expression was up-regulated in acute cellular rejection (ACR) biopsies (n=12) compared to biopsies from 13 renal allografts with no rejection-signs. HLA-E up-regulation was correlated with numbers of HLA-class I leader peptide mismatches (p=0.04). CD8+ and CD56+ infiltrating cells correlated with HLA-E expression (pE-mediated immune activation. Moreover, HLA-E expression correlated with deterioration in renal allograft function (pE along with high numbers of mismatched HLA-class I leader peptides might represent additional targets for immune-activating responses.

  7. Control of intestinal promoter activity of the cellular migratory regulator gene ELMO3 by CDX2 and SP1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coskun, Mehmet; Boyd, Mette; Olsen, Jørgen;

    2010-01-01

    An important aspect of the cellular differentiation in the intestine is the migration of epithelial cells from the crypt to the villus tip. As homeodomaine transcription factor CDX2 has been suggested to influence cell migration, we performed a genome-wide promoter analysis for CDX2 binding...... migration. However, no information is available about the transcriptional regulation of the ELMO3 gene. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of CDX2 in the regulation of the ELMO3 promoter activity. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that CDX2 bound to conserved CDX2...... sequences and mutations of the CDX2-binding sites, significantly reduced the promoter activity. Reporter gene assays demonstrated that the region mediating ELMO3 basal transcriptional activity to be located between -270 and -31 bp. Sequence analysis revealed no typical TATA-box, but four GC-rich sequences...

  8. State-dependent cellular activity patterns of the cat paraventricular hypothalamus measured by reflectance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Morten Pilgaard; Rector, D M; Poe, G R

    1996-01-01

    Activity within the cat paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) during sleep and waking states was measured by quantifying intrinsic tissue reflectivity. A fiber optic probe consisting of a 1.0 mm coherent image conduit, surrounded by plastic fibers which conducted 660 nm source light, was attached...... to a charge-coupled device camera, and positioned over the PVH in five cats. Electrodes for assessing state variables, including electroencephalographic activity, eye movement, and somatic muscle tone were also placed. After surgical recovery, reflected light intensity was measured continuously at 2.5 Hz...... during spontaneously varying sleep/waking states. Sequential state transitions from active waking to quiet waking, quiet sleep and active sleep were accompanied by progressively increased levels of PVH activity. Overall activity was highest during active sleep, and decreased markedly upon awakening...

  9. Resolution of the cellular proteome of the nucleocapsid protein from a highly pathogenic isolate of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus identifies PARP-1 as a cellular target whose interaction is critical for virus biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Long; Lear, Zoe; Hughes, David J; Wu, Weining; Zhou, En-min; Whitehouse, Adrian; Chen, Hongying; Hiscox, Julian A

    2015-03-23

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is a major threat to the swine industry and food security worldwide. The nucleocapsid (N) protein is a major structural protein of PRRSV. The primary function of this protein is to encapsidate the viral RNA genome, and it is also thought to participate in the modulation of host cell biology and recruitment of cellular factors to facilitate virus infection. In order to the better understand these latter roles the cellular interactome of PRRSV N protein was defined using label free quantitative proteomics. This identified several cellular factors that could interact with the N protein including poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1 (PARP-1), a cellular protein, which can add adenosine diphosphate ribose to a protein. Use of the PARP-1 small molecule inhibitor, 3-AB, in PRRSV infected cells demonstrated that PARP-1 was required and acted as an enhancer factor for virus biology. Serial growth of PRRSV in different concentrations of 3-AB did not yield viruses that were able to grow with wild type kinetics, suggesting that by targeting a cellular protein crucial for virus biology, resistant phenotypes did not emerge. This study provides further evidence that cellular proteins, which are critical for virus biology, can also be targeted to ablate virus growth and provide a high barrier for the emergence of drug resistance. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Impaired CK1 delta activity attenuates SV40-induced cellular transformation in vitro and mouse mammary carcinogenesis in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidrun Hirner

    Full Text Available Simian virus 40 (SV40 is a powerful tool to study cellular transformation in vitro, as well as tumor development and progression in vivo. Various cellular kinases, among them members of the CK1 family, play an important role in modulating the transforming activity of SV40, including the transforming activity of T-Ag, the major transforming protein of SV40, itself. Here we characterized the effects of mutant CK1δ variants with impaired kinase activity on SV40-induced cell transformation in vitro, and on SV40-induced mammary carcinogenesis in vivo in a transgenic/bi-transgenic mouse model. CK1δ mutants exhibited a reduced kinase activity compared to wtCK1δ in in vitro kinase assays. Molecular modeling studies suggested that mutation N172D, located within the substrate binding region, is mainly responsible for impaired mutCK1δ activity. When stably over-expressed in maximal transformed SV-52 cells, CK1δ mutants induced reversion to a minimal transformed phenotype by dominant-negative interference with endogenous wtCK1δ. To characterize the effects of CK1δ on SV40-induced mammary carcinogenesis, we generated transgenic mice expressing mutant CK1δ under the control of the whey acidic protein (WAP gene promoter, and crossed them with SV40 transgenic WAP-T-antigen (WAP-T mice. Both WAP-T mice as well as WAP-mutCK1δ/WAP-T bi-transgenic mice developed breast cancer. However, tumor incidence was lower and life span was significantly longer in WAP-mutCK1δ/WAP-T bi-transgenic animals. The reduced CK1δ activity did not affect early lesion formation during tumorigenesis, suggesting that impaired CK1δ activity reduces the probability for outgrowth of in situ carcinomas to invasive carcinomas. The different tumorigenic potential of SV40 in WAP-T and WAP-mutCK1δ/WAP-T tumors was also reflected by a significantly different expression of various genes known to be involved in tumor progression, specifically of those involved in wnt-signaling and DNA

  11. Sirtuin 7 promotes cellular survival following genomic stress by attenuation of DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiran, Shashi; Oddi, Vineesha [Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500001 (India); Ramakrishna, Gayatri, E-mail: gayatrirama1@gmail.com [Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad, Telangana, 500001 (India); Laboratory of Cancer Cell Biology, Department of Research, Institute of Liver and Biliary Sciences, Delhi 110070 (India)

    2015-02-01

    Maintaining the genomic integrity is a constant challenge in proliferating cells. Amongst various proteins involved in this process, Sirtuins play a key role in DNA damage repair mechanisms in yeast as well as mammals. In the present work we report the role of one of the least explored Sirtuin viz., SIRT7, under conditions of genomic stress when treated with doxorubicin. Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized osteosarcoma (U2OS) cells to DNA damage induced cell death by doxorubicin. SIRT7 overexpression in NIH3T3 delayed cell cycle progression by causing delay in G1 to S transition. SIRT7 overexpressing cells when treated with low dose of doxorubicin (0.25 µM) showed delayed onset of senescence, lesser accumulation of DNA damage marker γH2AX and lowered levels of growth arrest markers viz., p53 and p21 when compared to doxorubicin treated control GFP expressing cells. Resistance to DNA damage following SIRT7 overexpression was also evident by EdU incorporation studies where cellular growth arrest was significantly delayed. When treated with higher dose of doxorubicin (>1 µM), SIRT7 conferred resistance to apoptosis by attenuating stress activated kinases (SAPK viz., p38 and JNK) and p53 response thereby shifting the cellular fate towards senescence. Interestingly, relocalization of SIRT7 from nucleolus to nucleoplasm together with its co-localization with SAPK was an important feature associated with DNA damage. SIRT7 mediated resistance to doxorubicin induced apoptosis and senescence was lost when p53 level was restored by nutlin treatment. Overall, we propose SIRT7 attenuates DNA damage, SAPK activation and p53 response thereby promoting cellular survival under conditions of genomic stress. - Highlights: • Knockdown of SIRT7 sensitized cells to DNA damage induced apoptosis. • SIRT7 delayed onset of premature senescence by attenuating DNA damage response. • Overexpression of SIRT7 delayed cell cycle progression by delaying G1/S transition. • Upon DNA damage SIRT

  12. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments. PMID:27729845

  13. Activation of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channels delays ischemia-induced cellular uncoupling in rat heart

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-liangSHEN; Ying-yingCHEN; Xun-dongWU; IainCBRUCE; QiangXIA

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To test the hypothesis that cellular uncoupling induced by myocardial ischemia is mediated by activation of mitochondrial ATP-sensitive potassium channels (mitoKATP). METHODS: Rat hearts were perfused on a Langendorff apparatus and subjected to 40-min ischemia followed by 30-min reperfusion (I/R). Changes in cellular coupling were monitored by measuring whole-tissue resistance. RESULTS: (1) In hearts subjected to I/R, the onset of uncoupling started at (13.3± 1.0) min of ischemia; (2) Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) delayed the onset of uncoupling until (22.7±1.3) min. Blocking mitoKATP channels with 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD) before the IPC abolishedthe uncoupling delay [(12.6±1.6)min]; (3) Calcium preconditioning (CPC) had the same effect as IPC. And this effect was reversed by blocking the mitoKATP channel again. In the CPC group the onset of uncoupling occurred after (20.6±1.3) min, and this was canceled by 5-HD [(13.6±0.8) min]; (4) In hearts pretreated with the specific mitoKATP channel opener diazoxide before sustained ischemia, the onset was delayed to (18.4±1.4) min; (5) 5-HD canceled the protective effects of diazoxide (12.6±1.0) min; and both the L-type Ca2+ channel inhibitor verapamiland the free radical scavenger N-(2-mercaptopropionyl)glycine, reduced the extended onset time induced by diazoxide[to (13.3±1.8) min and (13.4±2.1) min, respectively]. CONCLUSION: IPC and CPC delay the onset of cellular uncoupling induced by acute ischemia in rat heart, and the underlying mechanism involves activation of the mitoKATP channels.

  14. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defined mechanisms. Prion protein, for instance, interacts with divalent cations via multiple metal-binding sites and it modulates several metal-dependent physiological functions, such as S-nitrosylation of NMDA receptors. In this work we focused on the effect of prion protein absence on copper and iron metabolism during development and adulthood. In particular, we investigated copper and iron functional values in serum and several organs such as liver, spleen, total brain and isolated hippocampus. Our results show that iron content is diminished in prion protein-null mouse serum, while it accumulates in liver and spleen. Our data suggest that these alterations can be due to impairments in copper-dependent cerulopalsmin activity which is known to affect iron mobilization. In prion protein-null mouse total brain and hippocampus, metal ion content shows a fluctuating trend, suggesting the presence of homeostatic compensatory mechanisms. However, copper and iron functional values are likely altered also in these two organs, as indicated by the modulation of metal-binding protein expression levels. Altogether, these results reveal that the absence of the cellular prion protein impairs copper metabolism and copper-dependent oxidase activity, with ensuing alteration of iron mobilization from cellular storage compartments.

  15. Cellular contractility and extracellular matrix stiffness regulate matrix metalloproteinase activity in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haage, Amanda; Schneider, Ian C

    2014-08-01

    The pathogenesis of cancer is often driven by local invasion and metastasis. Recently, mechanical properties of the tumor microenvironment have been identified as potent regulators of invasion and metastasis, while matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are classically known as significant enhancers of cancer cell migration and invasion. Here we have been able to sensitively measure MMP activity changes in response to specific extracellular matrix (ECM) environments and cell contractility states. Cells of a pancreatic cancer cell line, Panc-1, up-regulate MMP activities between 3- and 10-fold with increased cell contractility. Conversely, they down-regulate MMP activities when contractility is blocked to levels seen with pan-MMP activity inhibitors. Similar, albeit attenuated, responses are seen in other pancreatic cancer cell lines, BxPC-3 and AsPC-1. In addition, MMP activity was modulated by substrate stiffness, collagen gel concentration, and the degree of collagen cross-linking, when cells were plated on collagen gels ranging from 0.5 to 5 mg/ml that span the physiological range of substrate stiffness (50-2000 Pa). Panc-1 cells showed enhanced MMP activity on stiffer substrates, whereas BxPC-3 and AsPC-1 cells showed diminished MMP activity. In addition, eliminating heparan sulfate proteoglycans using heparinase completely abrogated the mechanical induction of MMP activity. These results demonstrate the first functional link between MMP activity, contractility, and ECM stiffness and provide an explanation as to why stiffer environments result in enhanced cell migration and invasion.

  16. A High-Precision Micropipette Sensor for Cellular-Level Real-Time Thermal Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonseok Chang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We report herein development of a novel glass micropipette thermal sensor fabricated in a cost-effective manner, which is capable of measuring steady thermal fluctuation at spatial resolution of ~2 µm with an accuracy of ±0.01 °C. We produced and tested various micrometer-sized sensors, ranging from 2 µm to 30 µm. The sensor comprises unleaded low-melting-point solder alloy (Sn-based as a core metal inside a pulled borosilicate glass pipette and a thin film of nickel coating outside, creating a thermocouple junction at the tip. The sensor was calibrated using a thermally insulated calibration chamber, the temperature of which can be controlled with an accuracy of ±0.01 °C, and the thermoelectric power (Seebeck coefficient of the sensor was recorded from 8.46 to 8.86 µV/°C. We have demonstrated the capability of measuring temperatures at a cellular level by inserting our temperature sensor into the membrane of a live retinal pigment epithelium cell subjected to a laser beam with a focal spot of 6 μm. We measured transient temperature profiles and the maximum temperatures were in the range of 38–55 ± 0.5 °C.

  17. Cognitive radio networks efficient resource allocation in cooperative sensing, cellular communications, high-speed vehicles, and smart grid

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Tao; Cao, Yang

    2015-01-01

    PrefaceAcknowledgmentsAbout the AuthorsIntroductionCognitive Radio-Based NetworksOpportunistic Spectrum Access NetworksCognitive Radio Networks with Cooperative SensingCognitive Radio Networks for Cellular CommunicationsCognitive Radio Networks for High-Speed VehiclesCognitive Radio Networks for a Smart GridContent and OrganizationTransmission Slot Allocation in an Opportunistic Spectrum Access NetworkSingle-User Single-Channel System ModelProbabilistic Slot Allocation SchemeOptimal Probabilistic Slot AllocationBaseline PerformanceExponential DistributionHyper-Erlang DistributionPerformance An

  18. Investigations of DNA damage induction and repair resulting from cellular exposure to high dose-rate pulsed proton beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renis, M.; Malfa, G.; Tomasello, B. [Drug Sciences Department, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Borghesi, M.; Schettino, G. [Queen' s University Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Favetta, M.; Romano, F.; Cirrone, G. A. P. [National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN-LNS), Catania (Italy); Manti, L. [Physics Science Department, University of Naples Federico II, Naples, and National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN), Naples (Italy)

    2013-07-26

    Studies regarding the radiobiological effects of low dose radiation, microbeam irradiation services have been developed in the world and today laser acceleration of protons and heavy ions may be used in radiation therapy. The application of different facilities is essential for studying bystander effects and relating signalling phenomena in different cells or tissues. In particular the use of ion beams results advantageous in cancer radiotherapy compared to more commonly used X-rays, since the ability of ions in delivering lethal amount of doses into the target tumour avoiding or limiting damage to the contiguous healthy tissues. At the INFN-LNS in Catania, a multidisciplinary radiobiology group is strategically structured aimed to develop radiobiological research, finalised to therapeutic applications, compatible with the use of high dose laser-driven ion beams. The characteristic non-continuous dose rates with several orders of magnitude of laser-driven ion beams makes this facility very interesting in the cellular systems' response to ultra-high dose rates with non-conventional pulse time intervals cellular studies. Our group have projected to examine the effect of high dose laser-driven ion beams on two cellular types: foetal fibroblasts (normal control cells) and DU145 (prostate cancer cells), studying the modulation of some different bio-molecular parameters, in particular cell proliferation and viability, DNA damage, redox cellular status, morphological alterations of both the cytoskeleton components and some cell organelles and the possible presence of apoptotic or necrotic cell death. Our group performed preliminary experiments with high energy (60 MeV), dose rate of 10 Gy/min, doses of 1, 2, 3 Gy and LET 1 keV/μm on human foetal fibroblasts (control cells). We observed that cell viability was not influenced by the characteristics of the beam, the irradiation conditions or the analysis time. Conversely, DNA damage was present at time 0, immediately

  19. PATHOGEN IMPACT ON THE ACTIVITY DYNAMICS OF POTATO SUSPENSION CELLS EXTRA-CELLULAR PEROXIDASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graskova I.A.

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the activity of extracellular peroxidases were measured in cell suspension cultures of potato infected by Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus (Spieck. et Kotth. Skapt et Burkh. The total extracellular peroxidases activity of the resistant potato variety was higher than that of the sensitive variety both before and after infection. The enzyme of the resistant variety had a рН optimum of 6.2, while that of the sensitive variety was 5.4. Extracellular peroxidases of the sensitive potato variety were activated 10 minutes after infection, and displayed highest activity 1.5-2 hours later. In the resistant variety, peroxidase activity rose sharply in the first minutes of infection, and second peak of activity occurred 1.5-2 hours later. The increase of extracellular peroxidases activity of the sensitive potato variety under pathogenesis is connected with the change of genome expression and synthesis of proteins. The increase of enzyme activity of resistant potato variety in the first moments of infection is not related to proteins synthesis and is apparently conditioned by the change of kinetic parameters.

  20. Novel water-soluble polyurethane nanomicelles for cancer chemotherapy: physicochemical characterization and cellular activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosroushahi Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efficient delivery of anticancer chemotherapies such as paclitaxel (PTX can improve treatment strategy in a variety of tumors such as breast and ovarian cancers. Accordingly, researches on polymeric nanomicelles continue to find suitable delivery systems. However, due to biocompatibility concerns, a few micellar nanoformulations have exquisitely been translated into clinical uses. Here, we report the synthesis of novel water-soluble nanomicelles using bioactive polyurethane (PU polymer and efficient delivery of PTX in the human breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Results The amphiphilic polyurethane was prepared through formation of urethane bounds between hydroxyl groups in poly (tetramethylene ether glycol (PTMEG and dimethylol propionic acid with isocyanate groups in toluene diisocyanate (TDI. The free isocyanate groups were blocked with phenol, while the free carboxyl groups of dimethylol propionic acid were reacted with triethylamine to attain ionic centers in the polymer backbone. These hydrophobic PTMEG blocks displayed self-assembly forming polymeric nanomicelles in water. The PTX loaded PU nanomicelles showed suitable physical stability, negative zeta potential charge (-43 and high loading efficiency (80% with low level of critical micelle concentration (CMC. In vitro drug release profile showed a faster rate of drug liberation at pH 5.4 as compared to that of pH 7.4, implying involvement of a pH-sensitive mechanism for drug release from the nanomicelles. The kinetic of release exquisitely obeyed the Higuchi model, confirming involvement of diffusion and somewhat erosion at pH 5.4. These nanomicelles significantly inhibited the growth and proliferation of the human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, leading them to apoptosis. The real time RT-PCR analysis confirmed the activation of apoptosis as result of liberation of cytochrome c in the cells treated with the PTX loaded PU nanomicelles. The comet assay analysis showed somewhat DNA

  1. Mapping social behavior-induced brain activation at cellular resolution in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yongsoo; Venkataraju, Kannan Umadevi; Pradhan, Kith; Mende, Carolin; Taranda, Julian; Turaga, Srinivas C; Arganda-Carreras, Ignacio; Ng, Lydia; Hawrylycz, Michael J; Rockland, Kathleen S; Seung, H Sebastian; Osten, Pavel

    2015-01-13

    Understanding how brain activation mediates behaviors is a central goal of systems neuroscience. Here, we apply an automated method for mapping brain activation in the mouse in order to probe how sex-specific social behaviors are represented in the male brain. Our method uses the immediate-early-gene c-fos, a marker of neuronal activation, visualized by serial two-photon tomography: the c-fos-GFP+ neurons are computationally detected, their distribution is registered to a reference brain and a brain atlas, and their numbers are analyzed by statistical tests. Our results reveal distinct and shared female and male interaction-evoked patterns of male brain activation representing sex discrimination and social recognition. We also identify brain regions whose degree of activity correlates to specific features of social behaviors and estimate the total numbers and the densities of activated neurons per brain areas. Our study opens the door to automated screening of behavior-evoked brain activation in the mouse.

  2. Mapping Social Behavior-Induced Brain Activation at Cellular Resolution in the Mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsoo Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how brain activation mediates behaviors is a central goal of systems neuroscience. Here, we apply an automated method for mapping brain activation in the mouse in order to probe how sex-specific social behaviors are represented in the male brain. Our method uses the immediate-early-gene c-fos, a marker of neuronal activation, visualized by serial two-photon tomography: the c-fos-GFP+ neurons are computationally detected, their distribution is registered to a reference brain and a brain atlas, and their numbers are analyzed by statistical tests. Our results reveal distinct and shared female and male interaction-evoked patterns of male brain activation representing sex discrimination and social recognition. We also identify brain regions whose degree of activity correlates to specific features of social behaviors and estimate the total numbers and the densities of activated neurons per brain areas. Our study opens the door to automated screening of behavior-evoked brain activation in the mouse.

  3. Creative elements: network-based predictions of active centres in proteins, cellular and social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Csermely, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Active centres and hot spots of proteins have a paramount importance in enzyme action, protein complex formation and drug design. Recently a number of publications successfully applied the analysis of residue networks to predict active centres in proteins. Most real-world networks show a number of properties, such as small-worldness or scale-free degree distribution, which are rather general features of networks from molecules to the society. Based on extensive analogies I propose that the existing findings and methodology enable us to detect active centres in cells, social networks and ecosystems. Members of these active centres are creative elements of the respective networks, which may help them to survive unprecedented, novel challenges, and play a key role in the development, survival and evolvability of complex systems.

  4. TAp73-mediated the activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase enhances cellular chemosensitivity to cisplatin in ovarian cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingde Zhang

    Full Text Available P73, one member of the tumor suppressor p53 family, shares highly structural and functional similarity to p53. Like p53, the transcriptionally active TAp73 can mediate cellular response to chemotherapeutic agents in human cancer cells by up-regulating the expressions of its pro-apoptotic target genes such as PUMA, Bax, NOXA. Here, we demonstrated a novel molecular mechanism for TAp73-mediated apoptosis in response to cisplatin in ovarian cancer cells, and that was irrespective of p53 status. We found that TAp73 acted as an activator of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK signaling pathway by up-regulating the expression of its target growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible protein GADD45 alpha (GADD45α and subsequently activating mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-4 (MKK4. Inhibition of JNK activity by a specific inhibitor or small interfering RNA (siRNA significantly abrogated TAp73-mediated apoptosis induced by cisplatin. Furthermore, inhibition of GADD45α by siRNA inactivated MKK4/JNK activities and also blocked TAp73-mediated apoptosis induction by cisplatin. Our study has demonstrated that TAp73 activated the JNK apoptotic signaling pathway in response to cisplatin in ovarian cancer cells.

  5. Hyperglycemia- and hyperinsulinemia-induced insulin resistance causes alterations in cellular bioenergetics and activation of inflammatory signaling in lymphatic muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yang; Fluckey, James D; Chakraborty, Sanjukta; Muthuchamy, Mariappan

    2017-07-01

    Insulin resistance is a well-known risk factor for obesity, metabolic syndrome (MetSyn) and associated cardiovascular diseases, but its mechanisms are undefined in the lymphatics. Mesenteric lymphatic vessels from MetSyn or LPS-injected rats exhibited impaired intrinsic contractile activity and associated inflammatory changes. Hence, we hypothesized that insulin resistance in lymphatic muscle cells (LMCs) affects cell bioenergetics and signaling pathways that consequently alter contractility. LMCs were treated with different concentrations of insulin or glucose or both at various time points to determine insulin resistance. Onset of insulin resistance significantly impaired glucose uptake, mitochondrial function, oxygen consumption rates, glycolysis, lactic acid, and ATP production in LMCs. Hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia also impaired the PI3K/Akt while enhancing the ERK/p38MAPK/JNK pathways in LMCs. Increased NF-κB nuclear translocation and macrophage chemoattractant protein-1 and VCAM-1 levels in insulin-resistant LMCs indicated activation of inflammatory mechanisms. In addition, increased phosphorylation of myosin light chain-20, a key regulator of lymphatic muscle contraction, was observed in insulin-resistant LMCs. Therefore, our data elucidate the mechanisms of insulin resistance in LMCs and provide the first evidence that hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia promote insulin resistance and impair lymphatic contractile status by reducing glucose uptake, altering cellular metabolic pathways, and activating inflammatory signaling cascades.-Lee, Y., Fluckey, J. D., Chakraborty, S., Muthuchamy, M. Hyperglycemia- and hyperinsulinemia-induced insulin resistance causes alterations in cellular bioenergetics and activation of inflammatory signaling in lymphatic muscle. © FASEB.

  6. Immunosuppressive activity of Semen Persicae ethanol extract on specific antibody and cellular response to ovalbumin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Bin; Qin, Feng; Sun, Hong-Xiang

    2006-09-01

    The immunosuppressive activity of the ethanol extract of Semen Persicae (EESP) was studied with respect to specific antibody and cellular response to ovalbumin (OVA) in mice. The effects of EESP on mice splenocyte proliferation in vitro were measured. EESP significantly suppressed concanavalin A (ConA)- and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated splenocyte proliferation in vitro in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, the effects of EESP at three dose levels on the humoral and cellular immune responses in the OVA-immunized mice were examined. ICR Mice were immunized subcutaneously with OVA on day 0 and 14. Starting on the day of immunization, the mice were administered intraperitoneally with EESP at a single dose of 0.25, 0.5, and 1.0 mg, and cyclosporin A (CsA, positive drug) at a single dose of 0.1 mg at intervals of 7 days. On day 28, mitogen- and OVA-induced splenocyte proliferation and OVA-specific antibody level in serum were measured. EESP significantly decreased ConA-, LPS-, and OVA-induced splenocyte proliferation in the OVA-immunized mice at the dose of 1.0 mg. Meanwhile, the OVA-specific serum IgG, IgG1, and IgG2b antibody levels in the OVA-immunized mice were markedly reduced by EESP in a dose-dependent manner. The results suggest that EESP could suppress the cellular and humoral immune response in mice, and deserve further research to be developed as immunosuppressant.

  7. Just Working with the Cellular Machine: A High School Game for Teaching Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Fernanda Serpa; Dumpel, Renata; Gomes da Silva, Luisa B.; Rodrigues, Carlos R.; Santos, Dilvani O.; Cabral, Lucio Mendes; Castro, Helena C.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular biology is a difficult comprehension subject due to its high complexity, thus requiring new teaching approaches. Herein, we developed an interdisciplinary board game involving the human immune system response against a bacterial infection for teaching molecular biology at high school. Initially, we created a database with several…

  8. Direct measurement of matrix metalloproteinase activity in 3D cellular microenvironments using a fluorogenic peptide substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leight, Jennifer L; Alge, Daniel L; Maier, Andrew J; Anseth, Kristi S

    2013-10-01

    Incorporation of degradable moieties into synthetic hydrogels has greatly increased the utility of these three-dimensional matrices for in vitro cell culture as well as tissue engineering applications. A common method for introducing degradability is the inclusion of oligopeptides sensitive to cleavage by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), enabling cell-mediated remodeling and migration within the material. While this strategy has been effective, characterization and measurement of cell-mediated degradation in these materials has remained challenging. There are 20+ MMP family members whose activity is regulated in space and time by a number of biochemical and biophysical cues. Thus, the typical approach of characterizing cleavage of degradable moieties in solution with recombinant enzymes does not easily translate to three-dimensional cell-mediated matrix remodeling. To address this challenge, we report here the synthesis of a cell-laden hydrogel matrix functionalized with a fluorogenic peptide substrate to provide real-time, quantitative monitoring of global MMP activity. Using this system, stimulation of MMP activity was observed with growth factor treatment in mammary epithelial cells and compared to classical zymography results. Further, the effect of biophysical cues on MMP activity of human mesenchymal stem cells was also investigated where more rigid hydrogels were observed to increase MMP activity. The regulation of MMP activity by these biochemical and biophysical cues highlights the need for in situ, real-time measurement of hydrogel degradation, and use of these functionalized hydrogels will aid in future rational design of degradable synthetic hydrogels for in vitro cell studies and tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cellular Activity of New Small Molecule Protein Arginine Deiminase 3 (PAD3) Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Haya; Khan, Hasan A; Tjin, Caroline C; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2016-09-08

    The protein arginine deiminases (PADs) catalyze the post-translational deimination of arginine side chains. Multiple PAD isozymes have been characterized, and abnormal PAD activity has been associated with several human disease states. PAD3 has been characterized as a modulator of cell growth via apoptosis inducing factor and has been implicated in the neurodegenerative response to spinal cord injury. Here, we describe the design, synthesis, and evaluation of conformationally constrained versions of the potent and selective PAD3 inhibitor 2. The cell activity of representative inhibitors in this series was also demonstrated for the first time by rescue of thapsigargin-induced cell death in PAD3-expressing HEK293T cells.

  10. Improved cellular activity of antisense peptide nucleic acids by conjugation to a cationic peptide-lipid (CatLip) domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppelhus, Uffe; Shiraishi, Takehiko; Zachar, Vladimir;

    2008-01-01

    Conjugation to cationic cell penetrating peptides (such as Tat, Penetratin, or oligo arginines) efficiently improves the cellular uptake of large hydrophilic molecules such as oligonucleotides and peptide nucleic acids, but the cellular uptake is predominantly via an unproductive endosomal pathwa...

  11. The cytotoxicity of lead and uranium on rat osteoblastic cells is highly dependent on chemical speciation and cellular accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milgram, S.; Carriere, M.; Thiebault, C.; Gouget, B. [CEA Saclay, CNRS - UMR9956, Lab Pierre Sue, F-91198 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Malval, L. [INSERM, E366, Lab Biol Tissue Osseux, St Etienne, (France)

    2007-07-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Uranium (U) and lead (Pb), as other heavy metals, present a strong chemical toxicity. After blood contamination, U and Pb, complexed with proteins or inorganic molecules are conveyed to target organs, the skeleton being the major long-term storage site. Once in bones, both metals are incorporated in the hydroxyapatite matrix by substitution with calcium. They can thus be released during re-modelling, which explains in part their toxicity. Although the clinical effects of these metals are well known, the cellular mechanisms of their action are not well understood. To investigate the biological effects of U and Pb acute exposure on osteoblasts, ROS17/2.8 cells were exposed to Pb or U [0-1 mM] for 24 h. The most relevant chemical and physical states, namely the most likely forms (species) of the toxics in contact with cells after blood contamination were selected for cell exposure. For each metal species, Pb and U toxicity were assessed through cell viability assay. The results show that whatever the speciation, U chemical toxicity to bone cells is far lower than Pb toxicity. Pb appears to be cytotoxic when left free in the exposure medium or when it is complexed with bicarbonate, cysteine or citrate, but not with albumin or phosphate (an insoluble form of Pb). In order to explain these differences in sensitivity between different metals and metal chemical species, time-course and dose-response curves of cellular accumulation at lethal or sub-lethal doses were drawn by direct elemental analysis of metal concentrations in digested cell pellets, using Inductive Coupling Plasma Mass Spectroscopy. These showed a clear correlation between toxicity and cellular accumulation. Also, Pb induces an inhibition of ALP activity after 24 h exposure to sub-lethal doses, which is speciation-dependent and again correlates with cellular accumulation. Phenotypic effects of U are under investigation. In addition, electron-microscopic observation of

  12. Antiarrhythmic effect of IKr activation in a cellular model of LQT3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diness, Jonas Goldin; Hansen, Rie Schultz; Nissen, Jakob Dahl;

    2008-01-01

    . Application of ATX-II (10 nM) was proarrhythmic, causing a profound increase of APD(90) as well as early afterdepolarizations and increased beat-to-beat variability. Two independent I(Kr) activators attenuated the proarrhythmic effects of ATX-II. NS3623 did not affect the late sodium current (I...

  13. Promising anticancer activities of Justicia simplex D. Don. in cellular and animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Litty; Aranjani, Jesil Mathew; Pai, K Sreedhara Ranganath; Srinivasan, K K

    2017-03-06

    Justicia simplex D. Don. belonging to the family of Acanthaceae has been traditionally used for treatment of rheumatism, inflammation and bronchitis. The plant is traditionally considered as an anticancer medicine and is used by healers of Karnataka to treat various types of cancers. The present study aims at the elucidation of anticancer activity of various extracts of J. simplex, isolation of its active constituents and assessment of the role in growth inhibition and angiogenesis both in vitro and in vivo. Extracts of J. simplex was evaluated for the in vitro cytotoxic effect by Brine Shrimp Lethality assay, Trypan Blue dye exclusion assay and antiproliferative assay. In vivo cytotoxicity of the extracts were determined by liquid tumor model in Swiss albino mice. Tumor prognosis, metastasis and angiogenesis were assessed by VEGF expression of the solid tumor. Phytochemical analysis afforded the isolation of a compound, the chemical structure of which was established using IR, NMR and TOF-MS spectral method. The compound was also evaluated for the growth inhibitory and angiogenic effects. The petroleum ether extract revealed potent anticancer activity in in vitro and in vivo studies. The anti-angiogenic effect is due to the down regulation of VEGF expression. The growth inhibitory assay revealed that the isolated compound namely triacontanoic ester of 5''-hydroxyjustisolin is responsible for the anticancer activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Functionally Charged Polystyrene Particles Activate Immortalized Mouse Microglia (BV2): Cellular and Genomic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of particle surface charge on the biological activation of immortalized mouse microglia (BV2) was examined. Same size (~850-950 nm) spherical polystyrene microparticles (SPM) with net negative (carboxyl, COOH-) or positive (dimethyl amino, CH3)2

  15. Multi-cellular 3D human primary liver cell culture elevates metabolic activity under fluidic flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esch, Mandy B; Prot, Jean-Matthieu; Wang, Ying I; Miller, Paula; Llamas-Vidales, Jose Ricardo; Naughton, Brian A; Applegate, Dawn R; Shuler, Michael L

    2015-05-21

    We have developed a low-cost liver cell culture device that creates fluidic flow over a 3D primary liver cell culture that consists of multiple liver cell types, including hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells (fibroblasts, stellate cells, and Kupffer cells). We tested the performance of the cell culture under fluidic flow for 14 days, finding that hepatocytes produced albumin and urea at elevated levels compared to static cultures. Hepatocytes also responded with induction of P450 (CYP1A1 and CYP3A4) enzyme activity when challenged with P450 inducers, although we did not find significant differences between static and fluidic cultures. Non-parenchymal cells were similarly responsive, producing interleukin 8 (IL-8) when challenged with 10 μM bacterial lipoprotein (LPS). To create the fluidic flow in an inexpensive manner, we used a rocking platform that tilts the cell culture devices at angles between ±12°, resulting in a periodically changing hydrostatic pressure drop between reservoirs and the accompanying periodically changing fluidic flow (average flow rate of 650 μL min(-1), and a maximum shear stress of 0.64 dyne cm(-2)). The increase in metabolic activity is consistent with the hypothesis that, similar to unidirectional fluidic flow, primary liver cell cultures increase their metabolic activity in response to fluidic flow periodically changes direction. Since fluidic flow that changes direction periodically drastically changes the behavior of other cells types that are shear sensitive, our findings support the theory that the increase in hepatic metabolic activity associated with fluidic flow is either activated by mechanisms other than shear sensing (for example increased opportunities for gas and metabolite exchange), or that it follows a shear sensing mechanism that does not depend on the direction of shear. Our mode of device operation allows us to evaluate drugs under fluidic cell culture conditions and at low device manufacturing and operation

  16. PKCθ activation in pancreatic acinar cells by gastrointestinal hormones/neurotransmitters and growth factors is needed for stimulation of numerous important cellular signaling cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancho, Veronica; Berna, Marc J.; Thill, Michelle; Jensen, R. T.

    2011-01-01

    The novel PKCθ isoform is highly expressed in T-cells, brain and skeletal muscle and originally thought to have a restricted distribution. It has been extensively studied in T-cells and shown to be important for apoptosis, T-cell activation and proliferation. Recent studies showed its presence in other tissues and importance in insulin signaling, lung surfactant secretion, intestinal barrier permeability, platelet and mast-cell functions. However, little information is available for PKCθ activation by gastrointestinal(GI) hormones/neurotransmitters and growth factors. In the present study we used rat pancreatic acinar cells to explore their ability to activate PKCθ and the possible interactions with important cellular mediators of their actions. Particular attention was paid to cholecystokinin(CCK), a physiological regulator of pancreatic function and important in pathological processes affecting acinar function, like pancreatitis. PKCθ-protein/mRNA were present in the pancreatic acini, and T538-PKCθ phosphorylation/activation was stimulated only by hormones/neurotransmitters activating phospholipase C. PKCθ was activated in time- and dose-related manner by CCK, mediated 30% by high-affinity CCKA-receptor activation. CCK stimulated PKCθ translocation from cytosol to membrane. PKCθ inhibition (by pseudostrate-inhibitor or dominant negative) inhibited CCK- and TPA-stimulation of PKD, Src, RafC, PYK2, p125FAK and IKKα/β, but not basal/stimulated enzyme secretion. Also CCK- and TPA-induced PKCθ activation produced an increment in PKCθ’s direct association with AKT, RafA, RafC and Lyn. These results show for the first time PKCθ presence in pancreatic acinar cells, its activation by some GI hormones/neurotransmitters and involvement in important cell signaling pathways mediating physiological responses (enzyme secretion, proliferation, apoptosis, cytokine expression, and pathological responses like pancreatitis and cancer growth). PMID:21810446

  17. Solid-phase synthesis, characterization, and cellular activities of collagen-model nanodiamond-peptide conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapinska, Anna M; Tokmina-Roszyk, Dorota; Amar, Sabrina; Tokmina-Roszyk, Michal; Mochalin, Vadym N; Gogotsi, Yury; Cosme, Patrick; Terentis, Andrew C; Fields, Gregg B

    2015-05-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) have received considerable attention as potential drug delivery vehicles. NDs are small (∼5 nm diameter), can be surface modified in a controllable fashion with a variety of functional groups, and have little observed toxicity in vitro and in vivo. However, most biomedical applications of NDs utilize surface adsorption of biomolecules, as opposed to covalent attachment. Covalent modification provides reliable and reproducible ND-biomolecule ratios, and alleviates concerns over biomolecule desorption prior to delivery. The present study has outlined methods for the efficient solid-phase conjugation of ND to peptides and characterization of ND-peptide conjugates. Utilizing collagen-derived peptides, the ND was found to support or even enhance the cell adhesion and viability activities of the conjugated sequence. Thus, NDs can be incorporated into peptides and proteins in a selective manner, where the presence of the ND could potentially enhance the in vivo activities of the biomolecule it is attached to.

  18. Cellular fatty acid composition, protein profile and antimicrobial activity of Bacillus sp., isolated from fish gut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushparaj Sujith

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To purify and partially characterize the antimicrobial compounds from bacteria Bacillus sp., isolated from fish gut. Methods: Protein and fatty acids were isolated from the bacteria and checked for the presence of antibacterial activity. Protein has been purified to apparent homogeneity from the supernatants of culture by means of ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by dialysis. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses were performed for proteins to identify the functional groups. Results: Protein showed an apparent molecular mass 56, 47 and 39 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Fatty acids were extracted and subjected to gas chromatographic analysis. Conclusions: The antimicrobial activity of the bacteria might be due to the presence of fatty acids and proteins which holds promise for the development of new drugs.

  19. Cellular fatty acid composition, protein profile and antimicrobial activity of Bacillus sp., isolated from fish gut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pushparaj Sujith; Baskaran Rohini; Singaram Jayalakshmi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To purify and partially characterize the antimicrobial compounds from bacteriaBacillus sp., isolated from fish gut. Methods: Protein and fatty acids were isolated from the bacteria and checked for the presence of antibacterial activity. Protein has been purified to apparent homogeneity from the supernatants of culture by means of ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by dialysis. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analyses were performed for proteins to identify the functional groups.Results:sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Fatty acids were extracted and subjected to gas chromatographic analysis.Conclusions:Protein showed an apparent molecular mass 56, 47 and 39 kDa on sodium dodecyl acids and proteins which holds promise for the development of new drugs. The antimicrobial activity of the bacteria might be due to the presence of fatty acids and proteins which holds promise for the development of new drugs.

  20. Small molecule inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus RnpA alter cellular mRNA turnover, exhibit antimicrobial activity, and attenuate pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick D Olson

    Full Text Available Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is estimated to cause more U.S. deaths annually than HIV/AIDS. The emergence of hypervirulent and multidrug-resistant strains has further amplified public health concern and accentuated the need for new classes of antibiotics. RNA degradation is a required cellular process that could be exploited for novel antimicrobial drug development. However, such discovery efforts have been hindered because components of the Gram-positive RNA turnover machinery are incompletely defined. In the current study we found that the essential S. aureus protein, RnpA, catalyzes rRNA and mRNA digestion in vitro. Exploiting this activity, high through-put and secondary screening assays identified a small molecule inhibitor of RnpA-mediated in vitro RNA degradation. This agent was shown to limit cellular mRNA degradation and exhibited antimicrobial activity against predominant methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA lineages circulating throughout the U.S., vancomycin intermediate susceptible S. aureus (VISA, vancomycin resistant S. aureus (VRSA and other Gram-positive bacterial pathogens with high RnpA amino acid conservation. We also found that this RnpA-inhibitor ameliorates disease in a systemic mouse infection model and has antimicrobial activity against biofilm-associated S. aureus. Taken together, these findings indicate that RnpA, either alone, as a component of the RNase P holoenzyme, and/or as a member of a more elaborate complex, may play a role in S. aureus RNA degradation and provide proof of principle for RNA catabolism-based antimicrobial therapy.

  1. [Cellular mechanism of the generation of spontaneous activity in gastric muscle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Eri; Kito, Yoshihiko; Fukuta, Hiroyasu; Yanai, Yoshimasa; Hashitani, Hikaru; Yamamoto, Yoshimichi; Suzuki, Hikaru

    2004-03-01

    In gastric smooth muscles, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) might be the pacemaker cells of spontaneous activities since ICC are rich in mitochondria and are connected with smooth muscle cells via gap junctions. Several types of ICC are distributed widely in the stomach wall. A group of ICC distributed in the myenteric layer (ICC-MY) were the pacemaker cells of gastrointestinal smooth muscles. Pacemaker potentials were generated in ICC-MY, and the potentials were conducted to circular smooth muscles to trigger slow waves and also conducted to longitudinal muscles to form follower potentials. In circular muscle preparations, interstitial cells distributed within muscle bundles (ICC-IM) produced unitary potentials, which were conducted to circular muscles to form slow potentials by summation. In mutant mice lacking inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor, slow waves were absent in gastric smooth muscles. The generation of spontaneous activity was impaired by the inhibition of Ca(2+)-release from internal stores through IP(3) receptors, inhibition of mitochondrial Ca(2+)-handling with proton pump inhibitors, and inhibition of ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels at the mitochondrial inner membrane. These results suggested that mitochondrial Ca(2+)-handling causes the generation of spontaneous activity in pacemaker cells. Possible involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) in the Ca(2+) signaling system was also suggested.

  2. Cellular Origin of Spontaneous Ganglion Cell Spike Activity in Animal Models of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Margolis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we review evidence that loss of photoreceptors due to degenerative retinal disease causes an increase in the rate of spontaneous ganglion spike discharge. Information about persistent spike activity is important since it is expected to add noise to the communication between the eye and the brain and thus impact the design and effective use of retinal prosthetics for restoring visual function in patients blinded by disease. Patch-clamp recordings from identified types of ON and OFF retinal ganglion cells in the adult (36–210 d old rd1 mouse show that the ongoing oscillatory spike activity in both cell types is driven by strong rhythmic synaptic input from presynaptic neurons that is blocked by CNQX. The recurrent synaptic activity may arise in a negative feedback loop between a bipolar cell and an amacrine cell that exhibits resonant behavior and oscillations in membrane potential when the normal balance between excitation and inhibition is disrupted by the absence of photoreceptor input.

  3. The influence of cellular structures on flow stress of high strength components manufactured using SLM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahshid, Rasoul; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; Loft Højbjerre, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing has shown significant improvement in material and machines for high-quality solid freeform fabrication processes such as selective laser melting (SLM). In particular, manufacturing lattice structures using the SLM procedure is of interest. This research examines the effect...

  4. Host- and Strain-Specific Regulation of Influenza Virus Polymerase Activity by Interacting Cellular Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bortz, Eric; Westera, Liset; Maamary, Jad; Steel, John; Albrecht, Randy A.; Manicassamy, Balaji; Chase, Geoffrey; Martinez-Sobrido, Luis; Schwemmle, Martin; Garcia-Sastre, Adolfo

    2011-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza A (HPAI) viruses of the H5N1 subtype have recently emerged from avian zoonotic reservoirs to cause fatal human disease. Adaptation of HPAI virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (PB1, PB2, and PA proteins) and nucleoprotein (NP) to interactions with mammalian host prote

  5. An Asynchronous Recurrent Network of Cellular Automaton-Based Neurons and Its Reproduction of Spiking Neural Network Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Takashi; Torikai, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    Modeling and implementation approaches for the reproduction of input-output relationships in biological nervous tissues contribute to the development of engineering and clinical applications. However, because of high nonlinearity, the traditional modeling and implementation approaches encounter difficulties in terms of generalization ability (i.e., performance when reproducing an unknown data set) and computational resources (i.e., computation time and circuit elements). To overcome these difficulties, asynchronous cellular automaton-based neuron (ACAN) models, which are described as special kinds of cellular automata that can be implemented as small asynchronous sequential logic circuits have been proposed. This paper presents a novel type of such ACAN and a theoretical analysis of its excitability. This paper also presents a novel network of such neurons, which can mimic input-output relationships of biological and nonlinear ordinary differential equation model neural networks. Numerical analyses confirm that the presented network has a higher generalization ability than other major modeling and implementation approaches. In addition, Field-Programmable Gate Array-implementations confirm that the presented network requires lower computational resources.

  6. Effects of FCGRIIIa-158V/F polymorphism on antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity activity of adalimumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Koji; Kobayashi, Daigo; Hatoyama, Saori; Yamamoto, Mizuki; Takayanagi, Risa; Yamada, Yasuhiko

    2017-09-15

    The associations between the efficacy of IgG reagents and the FCGRIIIa-158V/F polymorphism (rs396991) have been investigated. Although the genotype frequencies in healthy Japanese have been reported, those have varied, as one study reported that the proportions of V/V, V/F, and F/F were 59.1%, 38.6%, and 2.3%, respectively, while another study found that they were 4%, 44%, and 52%, respectively. However, there are no known investigations of the association between the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity of adalimumab (ADA), an IgG reagent, in combination with FcγRIIIa and the polymorphism. In this study, we analyzed healthy Japanese to clarify genotype frequency using a direct sequence method. In addition, we examined the association between the ADA-mediated ADCC activity and the polymorphism. Our results showed that the frequencies of the V/V, V/F, and F/F genotypes in healthy Japanese were 9.2%, 39.8%, and 51.0%, respectively. The average activity of ADA-mediated ADCC was 25.0%, 19.0%, and 13.3% in the V/V, V/F, and F/F genotypes, respectively. Then, the ADCC activity of V/V was significantly higher than that of F/F (p F polymorphism. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. High resolution respirometry analysis of polyethylenimine-mediated mitochondrial energy crisis and cellular stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, Arnaldur; Larsen, Anna Karina; Parhamifar, Ladan

    2013-01-01

    of PEI-mediated plasma membrane damage and subsequent ATP leakage to the extracellular medium. Studies with freshly isolated mouse liver mitochondria corroborated with bioenergetic findings and demonstrated parallel polycation concentration- and time-dependent changes in state 2 and state 4o oxygen flux...... and spectrophotometry analysis of cytochrome c oxidase activity we were able to identify complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase) as a likely specific site of PEI mediated inhibition within the electron transport system. Unraveling the mechanisms of PEI-mediated mitochondrial energy crisis is central for combinatorial design...

  8. Activation of cellular oncogenes by chemical carcinogens in Syrian hamster embryo fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, R.; Reiss, E.; Roellich, G.; Schiffmann, D. (Univ. of Wuerzburg (West Germany)); Barrett, J.C.; Wiseman, R.W. (National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (USA)); Pechan, R.

    1990-08-01

    Carcinogen-induced point mutations resulting in activation of ras oncogenes have been demonstrated in various experimental systems such as skin carcinogenesis, mammary, and liver carcinogenesis. In many cases, the data support the conclusion that these point mutations are critical changes in the initiation of these tumors. The Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell transformation model system has been widely used to study the multistep process of chemically induced neoplastic transformation. Recent data suggest that activation of the Ha-ras gene via point mutation is one of the crucial events in the transformation of these cells. The authors have now cloned the c-Ha-ras proto-oncogene from SHE cDNA-libraries, and we have performed polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing to analyze tumor cell lines induced by different chemical carcinogens for the presence of point mutations. No changes were detectable at codons 12, 13, 59, 61, and 117 or adjacent regions in tumor cell lines induced by diethylstilbestrol, asbestos, benzo(a)pyrene, trenbolone, or aflatoxin B{sub 1}. Thus, it is not known whether point mutations in the Ha-ras proto-oncogene are essential for the acquisition of the neoplastic phenotype of SHE cells. Activation of other oncogenes or inactivation of tumor suppressor genes may be responsible for the neoplastic progression of these cells. However, in SHE cells neoplastically transformed by diethylstilbestrol or trenbolone, a significant elevation of the c-Ha-ras expression was observed. Enhanced expression of c-myc was detected in SHE cells transformed by benzo(a)pyrene or trenbolone.

  9. Cellular immune responses and phagocytic activity of fishes exposed to pollution of volcano mud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risjani, Yenny; Yunianta; Couteau, Jerome; Minier, Christophe

    2014-05-01

    Since May 29, 2006, a mud volcano in the Brantas Delta of the Sidoarjo district has emitted mud that has inundated nearby villages. Pollution in this area has been implicated in detrimental effects on fish health. In fishes, leukocyte and phagocytic cells play a vital role in body defenses. We report for the first time the effect of "LUSI" volcano mud on the immune systems of fish in the Brantas Delta. The aim of this study was to find biomarkers to allow the evaluation of the effects of volcanic mud and anthropogenic pollution on fish health in the Brantas Delta. The study took places at the Brantas Delta, which was polluted by volcano mud, and at reference sites in Karangkates and Pasuruan. Leukocyte numbers were determined using a Neubauer hemocytometer and a light microscope. Differential leukocyte counts were determined using blood smears stained with May Grunwald-Giemsa, providing neutrophil, lymphocyte and monocyte counts. Macrophages were taken from fish kidney, and their phagocytic activity was measured. In vitro analyses revealed that leukocyte and differential leukocyte counts (DLC) were higher in Channa striata and Chanos chanos caught from the polluted area. Macrophage numbers were higher in Oreochromis mossambicus than in the other species, indicating that this species is more sensitive to pollution. In areas close to volcanic mud eruption, all specimens had lower phagocytic activity. Our results show that immune cells were changed and phagocytic activity was reduced in the polluted area indicating cytotoxicity and alteration of the innate immune system in fishes exposed to LUSI volcano mud and anthropogenic pollution.

  10. Cellular automata

    CERN Document Server

    Codd, E F

    1968-01-01

    Cellular Automata presents the fundamental principles of homogeneous cellular systems. This book discusses the possibility of biochemical computers with self-reproducing capability.Organized into eight chapters, this book begins with an overview of some theorems dealing with conditions under which universal computation and construction can be exhibited in cellular spaces. This text then presents a design for a machine embedded in a cellular space or a machine that can compute all computable functions and construct a replica of itself in any accessible and sufficiently large region of t

  11. Cellular size as a means of tracking mTOR activity and cell fate of CD4+ T cells upon antigen recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen N Pollizzi

    Full Text Available mTOR is a central integrator of metabolic and immunological stimuli, dictating immune cell activation, proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we demonstrate that within a clonal population of activated T cells, there exist both mTORhi and mTORlo cells exhibiting highly divergent metabolic and immunologic functions. By taking advantage of the role of mTOR activation in controlling cellular size, we demonstrate that upon antigen recognition, mTORhi CD4+ T cells are destined to become highly glycolytic effector cells. Conversely, mTORlo T cells preferentially develop into long-lived cells that express high levels of Bcl-2, CD25, and CD62L. Furthermore, mTORlo T cells have a greater propensity to differentiate into suppressive Foxp3+ T regulatory cells, and this paradigm was also observed in human CD4+ T cells. Overall, these studies provide the opportunity to track the development of effector and memory T cells from naïve precursors, as well as facilitate the interrogation of immunologic and metabolic programs that inform these fates.

  12. Changes of Ca2+ activated potassium channels and cellular proliferation in autogenous vein grafts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱济先; 宋胜云; 马保安; 范清宇

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate changes of Ca2+ activated potassium channels (KCa) in autogenous vein grafts. Methods: Contraction of venous ring was measured by means of perfusion in vitro. The intimal rabbits proliferation of vascular and proliferation of cultured smooth muscle cells(vascular smooth muscle cells, VSMCs)were observed by the means of computerised image analysis and MTT method respectively. Furthermore, whole cell mode of patch clamp was used to record KCa of VSMCs isolated from autogenous vein grafts. Results: One week after transplantation there were no significant differences of contraction and intimal relative thickness between autogenous vein grafts and control. Contraction and intimal relative thickness of autogenous vein graft were significantly increased 2 weeks after transplantation (P<0.05, n=8 vs control), and they was more enhanced 4 weeks after vein transplantation (P<0.01, n=8 vs control).TEA(blocker of Ca2+ activated potassium channels)increased MTT A490 nm value of VSMCs from femoral vein in a dose dependent manner(P<0.05, n=8). KCa current density was significantly attenuated in VSMCs from autogenous vein grafts (1-4) week after transplantation(P<0.05, n=5).Conclusion: KCa is inhibited in autogenous vein graft, which account for vasospasm and intimal proliferation.

  13. Histone acetyltransferase Hbo1: catalytic activity, cellular abundance, and links to primary cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Masayoshi; Takahashi, Yoshihisa; Mizzen, Craig A; Cook, Richard G; Fujita, Masatoshi; Allis, C David; Frierson, Henry F; Fukusato, Toshio; Smith, M Mitchell

    2009-05-01

    In addition to the well-characterized proteins that comprise the pre-replicative complex, recent studies suggest that chromatin structure plays an important role in DNA replication initiation. One of these chromatin factors is the histone acetyltransferase (HAT) Hbo1 which is unique among HAT enzymes in that it serves as a positive regulator of DNA replication. However, several of the basic properties of Hbo1 have not been previously examined, including its intrinsic catalytic activity, its molecular abundance in cells, and its pattern of expression in primary cancer cells. Here we show that recombinant Hbo1 can acetylate nucleosomal histone H4 in vitro, with a preference for lysines 5 and 12. Using semi-quantitative western blot analysis, we find that Hbo1 is approximately equimolar with the number of active replication origins in normal human fibroblasts but is an order of magnitude more abundant in both MCF7 and Saos-2 established cancer cell lines. Immunohistochemistry for Hbo1 in 11 primary human tumor types revealed strong Hbo1 protein expression in carcinomas of the testis, ovary, breast, stomach/esophagus, and bladder.

  14. PKR is activated by cellular dsRNAs during mitosis and acts as a mitotic regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoosik; Lee, Jung Hyun; Park, Jong-Eun; Cho, Jun; Yi, Hyerim; Kim, V Narry

    2014-06-15

    dsRNA-dependent protein kinase R (PKR) is a ubiquitously expressed enzyme well known for its roles in immune response. Upon binding to viral dsRNA, PKR undergoes autophosphorylation, and the phosphorylated PKR (pPKR) regulates translation and multiple signaling pathways in infected cells. Here, we found that PKR is activated in uninfected cells, specifically during mitosis, by binding to dsRNAs formed by inverted Alu repeats (IRAlus). While PKR and IRAlu-containing RNAs are segregated in the cytosol and nucleus of interphase cells, respectively, they interact during mitosis when nuclear structure is disrupted. Once phosphorylated, PKR suppresses global translation by phosphorylating the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α). In addition, pPKR acts as an upstream kinase for c-Jun N-terminal kinase and regulates the levels of multiple mitotic factors such as cyclins A and B and Polo-like kinase 1 and phosphorylation of histone H3. Disruption of PKR activation via RNAi or expression of a transdominant-negative mutant leads to misregulation of the mitotic factors, delay in mitotic progression, and defects in cytokinesis. Our study unveils a novel function of PKR and endogenous dsRNAs as signaling molecules during the mitosis of uninfected cells.

  15. Cellular and molecular mechanisms activating the cell death processes by chalcones: Critical structural effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champelovier, Pierre; Chauchet, Xavier; Hazane-Puch, Florence; Vergnaud, Sabrina; Garrel, Catherine; Laporte, François; Boutonnat, Jean; Boumendjel, Ahcène

    2013-12-01

    Chalcones are naturally occurring compounds with diverse pharmacological activities. Chalcones derive from the common structure: 1,3-diphenylpropenone. The present study aims to better understand the mechanistic pathways triggering chalcones anticancer effects and providing evidences that minor structural difference could lead to important difference in mechanistic effect. We selected two recently investigated chalcones (A and B) and investigated them on glioblastoma cell lines. It was found that chalcone A induced an apoptotic process (type I PCD), via the activation of caspase-3, -8 and -9. Chalcone A also increased CDK1/cyclin B ratios and decreased the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm). Chalcone B induced an autophagic cell death process (type II PCD), ROS-related but independent of both caspases and protein synthesis. Both chalcones increased Bax/Bcl2 ratios and decreased Ki67 and CD71 antigen expressions. The present investigation reveals that despite the close structure of chalcones A and B, significant differences in mechanism of effect were found.

  16. Cellular transcripts regulated during infections with Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Avian Influenza virus in 3 host systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Suriani M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly pathogenic Avian Influenza (HPAI virus is able to infect many hosts and the virus replicates in high levels in the respiratory tract inducing severe lung lesions. The pathogenesis of the disease is actually the outcome of the infection as determined by complex host-virus interactions involving the functional kinetics of large numbers of participating genes. Understanding the genes and proteins involved in host cellular responses are therefore, critical for the elucidation of the mechanisms of infection. Methods Differentially expressed transcripts regulated in a H5N1 infections of whole lung organ of chicken, in-vitro chick embryo lung primary cell culture (CeLu and a continuous Madin Darby Canine Kidney cell line was undertaken. An improved mRNA differential display technique (Gene Fishing™ using annealing control primers that generates reproducible, authentic and long PCR products that are detectable on agarose gels was used for the identification of differentially expressed genes (DEGs. Seven of the genes have been selected for validation using a TaqMan® based real time quantitative PCR assay. Results Thirty seven known and unique differentially expressed genes from lungs of chickens, CeLu and MDCK cells were isolated. Among the genes isolated and identified include heat shock proteins, Cyclin D2, Prenyl (decaprenyl diphosphate synthase, IL-8 and many other unknown genes. The quantitative real time RT-PCR assay data showed that the transcription kinetics of the selected genes were clearly altered during infection by the Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza virus. Conclusion The Gene Fishing™ technique has allowed for the first time, the isolation and identification of sequences of host cellular genes regulated during H5N1 virus infection. In this limited study, the differentially expressed genes in the three host systems were not identical, thus suggesting that their responses to the H5N1 infection may not share

  17. Chemical and cellular investigations of trans-ammine-pyridine-dichlorido-platinum(II), the likely metabolite of the antitumor active cis-diammine-pyridine-chorido-platinum(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dechen; Min, Yuanzeng; Cheng, Qinqin; Shi, Hongdong; Wei, Kaiju; Arnesano, Fabio; Natile, Giovanni; Liu, Yangzhong

    2013-12-01

    It has been proposed that the well-studied monofunctional platinum complex cis-[PtCl(NH3)2(py)](+) (cDPCP) forms DNA adducts similar to those of the trans platinum complex trans-[PtCl2(NH3)(py)] (ampyplatin, py=pyridine). Thus this latter could be the active form of cDPCP. Detailed studies on the mechanism of ampyplatin action were performed in this work. Results indicate that ampyplatin has significantly higher antiproliferative activity than cDPCP and is comparable to cisplatin. Cellular uptake experiments indicate that ampyplatin can be efficiently accumulated in A549 cancer cells. Binding of ampyplatin to DNA mainly produces monofunctional adducts; remarkably, these adducts can be recognized by the HMGB1 protein. Kinetic studies on the reaction with GMP indicate that the reactivity of ampyplatin is much lower than that of transplatin and is more similar to that of trans-[PtCl2{E-HN=C(Me)OMe}2] (trans-EE), a widely investigated antitumor active trans-oriented platinum complex. In addition, the hydrolysis of ampyplatin is significantly suppressed, whereas the hydrolysis of the mono-GMP adduct is highly enhanced. These results indicate that the mechanism of ampyplatin differs not only from that of antitumor inactive transplatin but also from that of antitumor active trans-EE and this could account for the remarkable activity of parent cDPCP.

  18. Structure, antihyperglycemic activity and cellular actions of a novel diglycated human insulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Harte, F P; Boyd, A C; McKillop, A M;

    2000-01-01

    Human insulin was glycated under hyperglycemic reducing conditions and a novel diglycated form (M(r) 6135.1 Da) was purified by RP-HPLC. Endoproteinase Glu-C digestion combined with mass spectrometry and automated Edman degradation localized glycation to Gly(1) and Phe(1) of the insulin A- and B......-chains, respectively. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of diglycated insulin to mice alone or in combination with glucose (7 nmol/kg) resulted in a 43-61% and 11-34% reduction in glucose lowering activity, respectively, compared with native insulin. Consistent with these findings, diglycated insulin (10(-9) to 10......(-7) mol/liter) was 22-38% less effective (P insulin in stimulating glucose uptake, glucose oxidation and glycogen production in isolated mouse abdominal muscle....

  19. Multiple, but Concerted Cellular Activities of the Human Protein Hap46/BAG-1M and Isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Gehring

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The closely related human and murine proteins Hap46/BAG-1M and BAG-1, respectively, were discovered more than a decade ago by molecular cloning techniques. These and the larger isoform Hap50/BAG-1L, as well as shorter isoforms, have the ability to interact with a seemingly unlimited array of proteins of completely unrelated structures. This problem was partially resolved when it was realized that molecular chaperones of the hsp70 heat shock protein family are major primary association partners, binding being mediated by the carboxy terminal BAG-domain and the ATP-binding domain of hsp70 chaperones. The latter, in turn, can associate with an almost unlimited variety of proteins through their substrate-binding domains, so that ternary complexes may result. The protein folding activity of hsp70 chaperones is affected by interactions with Hap46/BAG-1M or isoforms. However, there also exist several proteins which bind to Hap46/BAG-1M and isoforms independent of hsp70 mediation. Moreover, Hap46/BAG-1M and Hap50/BAG-1L, but not the shorter isoforms, can bind to DNA in a sequence-independent manner by making use of positively charged regions close to their amino terminal ends. This is the molecular basis for their effects on transcription which are of major physiological relevance, as discussed here in terms of a model. The related proteins Hap50/BAG-1L and Hap46/BAG-1M may thus serve as molecular links between such diverse bioactivities as regulation of gene expression and protein quality control. These activities are coordinated and synergize in helping cells to cope with conditions of external stress. Moreover, they recently became markers for the aggressiveness of several cancer types.

  20. Probing binding and cellular activity of pyrrolidinone and piperidinone small molecules targeting the urokinase receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Timmy; Liu, Degang; Zhou, Donghui; Li, Liwei; Knabe, William Eric; Wang, Fang; Oh, Kyungsoo; Meroueh, Samy O

    2013-12-01

    The urokinase receptor (uPAR) is a cell-surface protein that is part of an intricate web of transient and tight protein interactions that promote cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Here, we evaluate the binding and biological activity of a new class of pyrrolidinone and piperidinone compounds, along with derivatives of previously-identified pyrazole and propylamine compounds. Competition assays revealed that the compounds displace a fluorescently labeled peptide (AE147-FAM) with inhibition constant (Ki ) values ranging from 6 to 63 μM. Structure-based computational pharmacophore analysis followed by extensive explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and free energy calculations suggested the pyrazole-based and piperidinone-based compounds adopt different binding modes, despite their similar two-dimensional structures. In cells, pyrazole-based compounds showed significant inhibition of breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB-231) and pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cell proliferation, but piperidinone-containing compounds exhibited no cytotoxicity even at concentrations of 100 μM. One pyrazole-based compound impaired MDA-MB-231 invasion, adhesion, and migration in a concentration-dependent manner, while the piperidinone inhibited only invasion. The pyrazole derivative inhibited matrix metalloprotease-9 (gelatinase) activity in a concentration-dependent manner, while the piperidinone showed no effect suggesting different mechanisms for inhibition of cell invasion. Signaling studies further highlighted these differences, showing that pyrazole compounds completely inhibited ERK phosphorylation and impaired HIF1α and NF-κB signaling, while pyrrolidinones and piperidinones had no effect. Annexin V staining suggested that the effect of the pyrazole-based compound on proliferation was due to cell killing through an apoptotic mechanism. The compounds identified represent valuable leads in the design of further derivatives with higher affinities and

  1. Antimicrobial activity and cellular toxicity of nanoparticle-polymyxin B conjugates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soonhyang; Chibli, Hicham; Wong, Jody; Nadeau, Jay L, E-mail: jay.nadeau@mcgill.ca [Department of Biomedical Engineering, McGill University, 3775 University Street, Montreal QC, H3A 2B4 (Canada)

    2011-05-06

    We investigate the antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity to mammalian cells of conjugates of the peptide antibiotic polymyxin B (PMB) to Au nanoparticles and CdTe quantum dots. Au nanoparticles fully covered with PMB are identical in antimicrobial activity to the free drug alone, whereas partially-conjugated Au particles show decreased effectiveness in proportion to the concentration of Au. CdTe-PMB conjugates are more toxic to Escherichia coli than PMB alone, resulting in a flattening of the steep PMB dose-response curve. The effect is most pronounced at low concentrations of PMB, with a greater effect on the concentration required to reduce growth by half (IC50) than on the concentration needed to inhibit all growth (minimum inhibitory concentration, MIC). The Gram positive organism Staphylococcus aureus is resistant to both PMB and CdTe, showing minimal increased sensitivity when the two are conjugated. Measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation shows a significant reduction in photo-generated hydroxyl and superoxide radicals with CdTe-PMB as compared with bare CdTe. There is a corresponding reduction in toxicity of QD-PMB versus bare CdTe to mammalian cells, with nearly 100% survival in fibroblasts exposed to bactericidal concentrations of QD-PMB. The situation in bacteria is more complex: photoexcitation of the CdTe particles plays a small role in IC50 but has a significant effect on the MIC, suggesting that at least two different mechanisms are responsible for the antimicrobial action seen. These results show that it is possible to create antimicrobial agents using concentrations of CdTe quantum dots that do not harm mammalian cells.

  2. Retrovolution: HIV–Driven Evolution of Cellular Genes and Improvement of Anticancer Drug Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossolillo, Paola; Winter, Flore; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Gallois-Montbrun, Sarah; Negroni, Matteo

    2012-01-01

    In evolution strategies aimed at isolating molecules with new functions, screening for the desired phenotype is generally performed in vitro or in bacteria. When the final goal of the strategy is the modification of the human cell, the mutants selected with these preliminary screenings may fail to confer the desired phenotype, due to the complex networks that regulate gene expression in higher eukaryotes. We developed a system where, by mimicking successive infection cycles with HIV-1 derived vectors containing the gene target of the evolution in their genome, libraries of gene mutants are generated in the human cell, where they can be directly screened. As a proof of concept we created a library of mutants of the human deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) gene, involved in the activation of nucleoside analogues used in cancer treatment, with the aim of isolating a variant sensitizing cancer cells to the chemotherapy compound Gemcitabine, to be used in gene therapy for anti-cancer approaches or as a poorly immunogenic negative selection marker for cell transplantation approaches. We describe the isolation of a dCK mutant, G12, inducing a 300-fold sensitization to Gemcitabine in cells originally resistant to the prodrug (Messa 10K), an effect 60 times stronger than the one induced by the wt enzyme. The phenotype is observed in different tumour cell lines irrespective of the insertion site of the transgene and is due to a change in specificity of the mutated kinase in favour of the nucleoside analogue. The mutations characterizing G12 are distant from the active site of the enzyme and are unpredictable on a rational basis, fully validating the pragmatic approach followed. Besides the potential interest of the G12 dCK variant for therapeutic purposes, the methodology developed is of interest for a large panel of applications in biotechnology and basic research. PMID:22927829

  3. Retrovolution: HIV-driven evolution of cellular genes and improvement of anticancer drug activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossolillo, Paola; Winter, Flore; Simon-Loriere, Etienne; Gallois-Montbrun, Sarah; Negroni, Matteo

    2012-08-01

    In evolution strategies aimed at isolating molecules with new functions, screening for the desired phenotype is generally performed in vitro or in bacteria. When the final goal of the strategy is the modification of the human cell, the mutants selected with these preliminary screenings may fail to confer the desired phenotype, due to the complex networks that regulate gene expression in higher eukaryotes. We developed a system where, by mimicking successive infection cycles with HIV-1 derived vectors containing the gene target of the evolution in their genome, libraries of gene mutants are generated in the human cell, where they can be directly screened. As a proof of concept we created a library of mutants of the human deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) gene, involved in the activation of nucleoside analogues used in cancer treatment, with the aim of isolating a variant sensitizing cancer cells to the chemotherapy compound Gemcitabine, to be used in gene therapy for anti-cancer approaches or as a poorly immunogenic negative selection marker for cell transplantation approaches. We describe the isolation of a dCK mutant, G12, inducing a 300-fold sensitization to Gemcitabine in cells originally resistant to the prodrug (Messa 10K), an effect 60 times stronger than the one induced by the wt enzyme. The phenotype is observed in different tumour cell lines irrespective of the insertion site of the transgene and is due to a change in specificity of the mutated kinase in favour of the nucleoside analogue. The mutations characterizing G12 are distant from the active site of the enzyme and are unpredictable on a rational basis, fully validating the pragmatic approach followed. Besides the potential interest of the G12 dCK variant for therapeutic purposes, the methodology developed is of interest for a large panel of applications in biotechnology and basic research.

  4. Retrovolution: HIV-driven evolution of cellular genes and improvement of anticancer drug activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Rossolillo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In evolution strategies aimed at isolating molecules with new functions, screening for the desired phenotype is generally performed in vitro or in bacteria. When the final goal of the strategy is the modification of the human cell, the mutants selected with these preliminary screenings may fail to confer the desired phenotype, due to the complex networks that regulate gene expression in higher eukaryotes. We developed a system where, by mimicking successive infection cycles with HIV-1 derived vectors containing the gene target of the evolution in their genome, libraries of gene mutants are generated in the human cell, where they can be directly screened. As a proof of concept we created a library of mutants of the human deoxycytidine kinase (dCK gene, involved in the activation of nucleoside analogues used in cancer treatment, with the aim of isolating a variant sensitizing cancer cells to the chemotherapy compound Gemcitabine, to be used in gene therapy for anti-cancer approaches or as a poorly immunogenic negative selection marker for cell transplantation approaches. We describe the isolation of a dCK mutant, G12, inducing a 300-fold sensitization to Gemcitabine in cells originally resistant to the prodrug (Messa 10K, an effect 60 times stronger than the one induced by the wt enzyme. The phenotype is observed in different tumour cell lines irrespective of the insertion site of the transgene and is due to a change in specificity of the mutated kinase in favour of the nucleoside analogue. The mutations characterizing G12 are distant from the active site of the enzyme and are unpredictable on a rational basis, fully validating the pragmatic approach followed. Besides the potential interest of the G12 dCK variant for therapeutic purposes, the methodology developed is of interest for a large panel of applications in biotechnology and basic research.

  5. Antimicrobial activity and cellular toxicity of nanoparticle-polymyxin B conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soonhyang; Chibli, Hicham; Wong, Jody; Nadeau, Jay L.

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity to mammalian cells of conjugates of the peptide antibiotic polymyxin B (PMB) to Au nanoparticles and CdTe quantum dots. Au nanoparticles fully covered with PMB are identical in antimicrobial activity to the free drug alone, whereas partially-conjugated Au particles show decreased effectiveness in proportion to the concentration of Au. CdTe-PMB conjugates are more toxic to Escherichia coli than PMB alone, resulting in a flattening of the steep PMB dose-response curve. The effect is most pronounced at low concentrations of PMB, with a greater effect on the concentration required to reduce growth by half (IC50) than on the concentration needed to inhibit all growth (minimum inhibitory concentration, MIC). The Gram positive organism Staphylococcus aureus is resistant to both PMB and CdTe, showing minimal increased sensitivity when the two are conjugated. Measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation shows a significant reduction in photo-generated hydroxyl and superoxide radicals with CdTe-PMB as compared with bare CdTe. There is a corresponding reduction in toxicity of QD-PMB versus bare CdTe to mammalian cells, with nearly 100% survival in fibroblasts exposed to bactericidal concentrations of QD-PMB. The situation in bacteria is more complex: photoexcitation of the CdTe particles plays a small role in IC50 but has a significant effect on the MIC, suggesting that at least two different mechanisms are responsible for the antimicrobial action seen. These results show that it is possible to create antimicrobial agents using concentrations of CdTe quantum dots that do not harm mammalian cells.

  6. Stimulatory and possible antioxidant effects of High Density Green Photons (HDGP) on cellular systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paslaru, L; Nastase, A; Stefan, L; Florea, R; Sorop, A; Ionescu, E; Popescu, I; Comorasan, S

    2014-01-01

    The interactions between the electromagnetic field and the biological systems were extensively investigated, with remarkable results and advanced technologies. Nevertheless, the visible domain of the spectrum has been rather neglected, since the classic physics did not allow electronic transitions induced by visible light. Recently, the interaction of light with the matter has generated a new scientific domain known in Physics as optical manipulation, with the new concepts of optical matter and optical force. This article presents the results of our work concerning in vitro effects of High Density Green Photons (HDGP) irradiation on cell cultures: stimulation of cell proliferation and migration and a possible antioxidant action.

  7. A galvanic replacement route to prepare strongly fluorescent and highly stable gold nanodots for cellular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chuanxi; Wang, Yu; Xu, Lin; Shi, Xiaodong; Li, Xiangwei; Xu, Xiaowei; Sun, Hongchen; Yang, Bai; Lin, Quan

    2013-02-11

    Fluorescent gold nanodots (GNDs) are an important kind of nanoprobes. Herein, the application of galvanic replacement for the preparation of fluorescent GNDs is reported. Using presynthesized and size-controlled Ag nanodots (Ag NDs) as templates, the as-prepared GNDs have strong fluorescence (quantum yields ~10%) with high stability and surface bioactivity. The resultant GNDs show excellent photoluminescence properties with high photo-, time-, metal-, and pH-stability, which are attributed to the protective surface layer of glutathione (GSH) and the presence of Au(I)-S complexes on the surface of the gold core. GSH, a naturally occurring and readily available tripeptide with carboxyl and amino functional groups, allows good dispersion of the as-prepared GNDs in aqueous solution and favorable biocompatibility. These advantages, combined with their small size, mean that the as-prepared GNDs have potential application in biological labeling, especially as a DNA probe for the specific detection of nucleic acids. In this study, the CAL-27 cells are used as a model to evaluate the fluorescence imaging of GNDs.

  8. Cellular automata to understand the behaviour of beach-dune systems: Application to El Fangar Spit active dune system (Ebro delta, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio-Parra, Fernando; Rodríguez-Santalla, Inmaculada

    2016-08-01

    Coastal dunes are sedimentary environments characterized by their high dynamism. Their evolution is determined by sedimentary exchanges between the beach-dune subsystems and the dune dynamics itself. Knowledge about these exchanges is important to prioritize management and conservation strategies of these environments. The aim of this work is the inclusion of the aeolian transport rates obtained using a calibrated cellular automaton to estimate the beach-dune sediment exchange rates in a real active dune field at El Fangar Spit (Ebro Delta, Spain). The dune dynamics model is able to estimate average aeolian sediment fluxes. These are used in combination with the observed net sediment budget to obtain a quantitative characterization of the sediment exchange interactions. The methods produce a substantial improvement in the understanding of coastal sedimentary systems that could have major implications in areas where the management and conservation of dune fields are of concern.

  9. The fungal quorum-sensing molecule farnesol activates innate immune cells but suppresses cellular adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Ines; Spielberg, Steffi; Weber, Michael; Albrecht-Eckardt, Daniela; Bläss, Markus; Claus, Ralf; Barz, Dagmar; Scherlach, Kirstin; Hertweck, Christian; Löffler, Jürgen; Hünniger, Kerstin; Kurzai, Oliver

    2015-03-17

    Farnesol, produced by the polymorphic fungus Candida albicans, is the first quorum-sensing molecule discovered in eukaryotes. Its main function is control of C. albicans filamentation, a process closely linked to pathogenesis. In this study, we analyzed the effects of farnesol on innate immune cells known to be important for fungal clearance and protective immunity. Farnesol enhanced the expression of activation markers on monocytes (CD86 and HLA-DR) and neutrophils (CD66b and CD11b) and promoted oxidative burst and the release of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α] and macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha [MIP-1α]). However, this activation did not result in enhanced fungal uptake or killing. Furthermore, the differentiation of monocytes to immature dendritic cells (iDC) was significantly affected by farnesol. Several markers important for maturation and antigen presentation like CD1a, CD83, CD86, and CD80 were significantly reduced in the presence of farnesol. Furthermore, farnesol modulated migrational behavior and cytokine release and impaired the ability of DC to induce T cell proliferation. Of major importance was the absence of interleukin 12 (IL-12) induction in iDC generated in the presence of farnesol. Transcriptome analyses revealed a farnesol-induced shift in effector molecule expression and a down-regulation of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) receptor during monocytes to iDC differentiation. Taken together, our data unveil the ability of farnesol to act as a virulence factor of C. albicans by influencing innate immune cells to promote inflammation and mitigating the Th1 response, which is essential for fungal clearance. Farnesol is a quorum-sensing molecule which controls morphological plasticity of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. As such, it is a major mediator of intraspecies communication. Here, we investigated the impact of farnesol on human innate immune cells known to be

  10. Exogenous coenzyme Q10 modulates MMP-2 activity in MCF-7 cell line as a breast cancer cellular model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirmiranpour Hossein

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/Aims Matrix Metalloproteinases 2 is a key molecule in cellular invasion and metastasis. Mitochondrial ROS has been established as a mediator of MMP activity. Coenzyme Q10 contributes to intracellular ROS regulation. Coenzyme Q10 beneficial effects on cancer are still in controversy but there are indications of Coenzyme Q10 complementing effect on tamoxifen receiving breast cancer patients. Methods In this study we aimed to investigate the correlation of the effects of co-incubation of coenzyme Q10 and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC on intracellular H2O2 content and Matrix Metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2 activity in MCF-7 cell line. Results and Discussion Our experiment was designed to assess the effect in a time and dose related manner. Gelatin zymography and Flowcytometric measurement of H2O2 by 2'7',-dichlorofluorescin-diacetate probe were employed. The results showed that both coenzyme Q10 and N-acetyl-L-cysteine reduce MMP-2 activity along with the pro-oxidant capacity of the MCF-7 cell in a dose proportionate manner. Conclusions Collectively, the present study highlights the significance of Coenzyme Q10 effect on the cell invasion/metastasis effecter molecules.

  11. Influence of constriction, wall tension, smooth muscle activation and cellular deformation on rat resistance artery vasodilator reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, Ilsley; Mandalà, Maurizio; Morton, Jude; Davidge, Sandra T; Osol, George

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated how vasoconstriction (tone), wall tension, smooth muscle activation, and vascular wall deformation influence resistance artery vasodilator reactivity. Resistance arteries, from two different regional circulations (splanchnic, uterine) and from pregnant and non-pregnant rats, were cannulated and pressurized, or mounted on a wire myograph under isometric conditions prior to being exposed to both endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine, ACh) and -independent (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) vasodilator agonists. A consistent pattern of reduced vasodilator sensitivity was noted as a function of extent of preconstriction for both agonists noted in pressurized arteries. A similar pattern regarding activation was noted in wire-mounted arteries in response to SNP but not ACh. Wall tension proved to be a major determinant of vascular smooth muscle vasodilator reactivity and its normalization reversed this pattern, as more constricted vessels were more sensitive to ACh relaxation without any change in SNP sensitivity, suggesting that endothelial deformation secondary to vasoconstriction augments its vasodilator output. To our knowledge, this is the first study to dissect out the complex interplay between biophysical forces impinging on VSM (pressure, wall tension), the ambient level of tone (vasoconstriction, smooth muscle cell activation), and consequences of cellular (particularly endothelial) deformation secondary to constriction in determining resistance artery vasodilatory reactivity.

  12. Development of a novel LC/MS method to quantitate cellular stearoyl-CoA desaturase activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, Roslyn [Pfizer Global Research, La Jolla Laboratories, 10770 Science Center Drive, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Greig, Michael J. [Pfizer Global Research, La Jolla Laboratories, 10770 Science Center Drive, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)], E-mail: michael.greig@pfizer.com; Bhat, B. Ganesh [Pfizer Global Research, La Jolla Laboratories, 10770 Science Center Drive, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

    2008-10-03

    Stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1) is an enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in de novo synthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids-mainly oleate and palmitoleate from stearoyl-CoA and palmitoyl-Co A, respectively. These products are the most abundant monounsaturated fatty acids in membrane phospholipids, triglycerides, cholesterol esters. Reports on mice with a targeted disruption of SCD1 gene (SCD1-/-) exhibit improved glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity compared to wild-type suggesting SCD1 could be a therapeutic target for diabetes and related metabolic diseases. Measurement of SCD1 activity is technically challenging and traditional cell-based SCD1 assay procedure is labor intensive with low throughput. We describe here a novel medium-throughput LC/MS cell-based assay for determining cellular SCD1 activity, facilitating screening of potential SCD1 inhibitor compounds. Confluent HepG2 cells were grown in 24-well plates and incubated with vehicle or an inhibitor followed by incubation with deuterium labeled saturated fatty acid substrates. Total cell lipids were extracted and the conversion of stearate to oleate was measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Sterculate, a known inhibitor of SCD1, inhibited the enzyme activity in a dose dependent manner in this assay with a calculated EC{sub 50} of 247 nM. The medium-throughput method described here is an important step towards identifying an inhibitor of SCD1 to treat diabetes and related metabolic diseases.

  13. Simple Cellular Model of Long-Range Multiplicity and $p_t$ Correlations in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Vechernin, V V

    2003-01-01

    A simple cellular model for the description of the long-range multiplicity and $p_t$ correlations in high-energy nuclear collisions originating from the string fusion model is proposed. Three versions of the model: without fusion, with local and with global string fusion are formulated. A Gauss approximation which enables explicit analytical calculations of the correlation functions in some asymptotic cases in the framework of the model is developed. The assumptions of the model and the validity of a Gauss approximation are checked up in the simplest (no fusion) case when the explicit solution of the model can be found. The role of a size of cells is analysed. The modification of the results in the case of non-Poissonian distributions is also discussed.

  14. INFLUENCE OF DOSE RATE ON THE CELLULAR RESPONSE TO LOW- AND HIGH-LET RADIATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Sophie eWozny

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC treatment failure is mostly explained by loco-regional progression or intrinsic radioresistance. Radiotherapy has recently evolved with the emergence of heavy ion radiations or new fractionation schemes of photon therapy which modify the dose-rate of treatment delivery. The aim of the present study was then to evaluate the in vitro influence of a dose rate variation during conventional radiotherapy or carbon ion hadrontherapy treatment in order to improve the therapeutic care of patient. In this regard, two HNSCC cell lines were irradiated with photons or 72MeV/n carbon ions at a dose rate of 0.5, 2 or 10Gy/min.For both radiosensitive and radioresistant cells, the change in dose rate significantly affected cell survival in response to photon exposure, this variation of radiosensitivity was associated to the number of initial and residual DNA double-strand breaks. By contrast, the dose rate change did not affect neither cell survival nor the residual DNA double-strand breaks after carbon ion irradiation. As a result, the Relative Biological Efficiency at 10% survival increased when the dose rate decreased.In conclusion, in the radiotherapy treatment of HNSCC, it is advised to remain very careful when modifying the classical schemes towards altered-fractionation. At the opposite, as the dose rate does not seem to have any effects after carbon ion exposure, there is less need to adapt hadrontherapy treatment planning during active system irradiation

  15. Influence of Dose Rate on the Cellular Response to Low- and High-LET Radiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozny, Anne-Sophie; Alphonse, Gersende; Battiston-Montagne, Priscillia; Simonet, Stéphanie; Poncet, Delphine; Testa, Etienne; Guy, Jean-Baptiste; Rancoule, Chloé; Magné, Nicolas; Beuve, Michael; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treatment failure is mostly explained by locoregional progression or intrinsic radioresistance. Radiotherapy (RT) has recently evolved with the emergence of heavy ion radiations or new fractionation schemes of photon therapy, which modify the dose rate of treatment delivery. The aim of the present study was then to evaluate the in vitro influence of a dose rate variation during conventional RT or carbon ion hadrontherapy treatment in order to improve the therapeutic care of patient. In this regard, two HNSCC cell lines were irradiated with photons or 72 MeV/n carbon ions at a dose rate of 0.5, 2, or 10 Gy/min. For both radiosensitive and radioresistant cells, the change in dose rate significantly affected cell survival in response to photon exposure. This variation of radiosensitivity was associated with the number of initial and residual DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). By contrast, the dose rate change did not affect neither cell survival nor the residual DNA DSBs after carbon ion irradiation. As a result, the relative biological efficiency at 10% survival increased when the dose rate decreased. In conclusion, in the RT treatment of HNSCC, it is advised to remain very careful when modifying the classical schemes toward altered fractionation. At the opposite, as the dose rate does not seem to have any effects after carbon ion exposure, there is less need to adapt hadrontherapy treatment planning during active system irradiation.

  16. Hemin activation of innate cellular response blocks human immunodeficiency virus type-1-induced osteoclastogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, Kazuyo [Microscopy and Imaging Core Facility, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD (United States); Adhikari, Rewati [Division of Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States); Yamada, Kenneth M. [National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Dhawan, Subhash, E-mail: subhash.dhawan@fda.hhs.gov [Division of Transfusion Transmitted Diseases, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, Food and Drug Administration, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-08-14

    The normal skeletal developmental and homeostatic process termed osteoclastogenesis is exacerbated in numerous pathological conditions and causes excess bone loss. In cancer and HIV-1-infected patients, this disruption of homeostasis results in osteopenia and eventual osteoporesis. Counteracting the factors responsible for these metabolic disorders remains a challenge for preventing or minimizing this co-morbidity associated with these diseases. In this report, we demonstrate that a hemin-induced host protection mechanism not only suppresses HIV-1 associated osteoclastogenesis, but it also exhibits anti-osteoclastogenic activity for non-infected cells. Since the mode of action of hemin is both physiological and pharmacological through induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an endogenous host protective response to an FDA-licensed therapeutic used to treat another disease, our study suggests an approach to developing novel, safe and effective therapeutic strategies for treating bone disorders, because hemin administration in humans has previously met required FDA safety standards. - Highlights: • HIV-1 infection induced osteoclastogenesis in primary human macrophages. • Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction inhibited HIV-1-induced osteoclastogenesis in macrophages. • HO-1 induction suppressed RANKL-enhanced osteoclastogenesis in HIV-1-infected macrophages. • This inverse relationship between HO-1 and HIV-1 pathogenesis may define a novel host defense response against HIV-1 infection.

  17. High-resolution adaptive optics retinal imaging of cellular structure in choroideremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jessica I W; Han, Grace; Klinman, Eva; Maguire, William M; Chung, Daniel C; Maguire, Albert M; Bennett, Jean

    2014-09-04

    We characterized retinal structure in patients and carriers of choroideremia using adaptive optics and other high resolution modalities. A total of 57 patients and 18 carriers of choroideremia were imaged using adaptive optics scanning light ophthalmoscopy (AOSLO), optical coherence tomography (OCT), autofluorescence (AF), and scanning light ophthalmoscopy (SLO). Cone density was measured in 59 eyes of 34 patients where the full cone mosaic was observed. The SLO imaging revealed scalloped edges of RPE atrophy and large choroidal vessels. The AF imaging showed hypo-AF in areas of degeneration, while central AF remained present. OCT images showed outer retinal tubulations and thinned RPE/interdigitation layers. The AOSLO imaging revealed the cone mosaic in central relatively intact retina, and cone density was either reduced or normal at 0.5 mm eccentricity. The border of RPE atrophy showed abrupt loss of the cone mosaic at the same location. The AF imaging in comparison with AOSLO showed RPE health may be compromised before cone degeneration. Other disease features, including visualization of choroidal vessels, hyper-reflective clumps of cones, and unique retinal findings, were tabulated to show the frequency of occurrence and model disease progression. The data support the RPE being one primary site of degeneration in patients with choroideremia. Photoreceptors also may degenerate independently. High resolution imaging, particularly AOSLO in combination with OCT, allows single cell analysis of disease in choroideremia. These modalities promise to be useful in monitoring disease progression, and in documenting the efficacy of gene and cell-based therapies for choroideremia and other diseases as these therapies emerge. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01866371.). Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  18. High-density lipoprotein maintains skeletal muscle function by modulating cellular respiration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehti, Maarit; Donelan, Elizabeth; Abplanalp, William; Al-Massadi, Omar; Habegger, Kirk M; Weber, Jon; Ress, Chandler; Mansfeld, Johannes; Somvanshi, Sonal; Trivedi, Chitrang; Keuper, Michaela; Ograjsek, Teja; Striese, Cynthia; Cucuruz, Sebastian; Pfluger, Paul T; Krishna, Radhakrishna; Gordon, Scott M; Silva, R A Gangani D; Luquet, Serge; Castel, Julien; Martinez, Sarah; D'Alessio, David; Davidson, W Sean; Hofmann, Susanna M

    2013-11-26

    Abnormal glucose metabolism is a central feature of disorders with increased rates of cardiovascular disease. Low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) are a key predictor for cardiovascular disease. We used genetic mouse models with increased HDL levels (apolipoprotein A-I transgenic [apoA-I tg]) and reduced HDL levels (apoA-I-deficient [apoA-I ko]) to investigate whether HDL modulates mitochondrial bioenergetics in skeletal muscle. ApoA-I ko mice exhibited fasting hyperglycemia and impaired glucose tolerance test compared with wild-type mice. Mitochondria isolated from gastrocnemius muscle of apoA-I ko mice displayed markedly blunted ATP synthesis. Endurance capacity during exercise exhaustion test was impaired in apoA-I ko mice. HDL directly enhanced glucose oxidation by increasing glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration rate in C2C12 muscle cells. ApoA-I tg mice exhibited lower fasting glucose levels, improved glucose tolerance test, increased lactate levels, reduced fat mass, associated with protection against age-induced decline of endurance capacity compared with wild-type mice. Circulating levels of fibroblast growth factor 21, a novel biomarker for mitochondrial respiratory chain deficiencies and inhibitor of white adipose lipolysis, were significantly reduced in apoA-I tg mice. Consistent with an increase in glucose utilization of skeletal muscle, genetically increased HDL and apoA-I levels in mice prevented high-fat diet-induced impairment of glucose homeostasis. In view of impaired mitochondrial function and decreased HDL levels in type 2 diabetes mellitus, our findings indicate that HDL-raising therapies may preserve muscle mitochondrial function and address key aspects of type 2 diabetes mellitus beyond cardiovascular disease.

  19. Increased Expression and Cellular Localization of Spermine Oxidase in Ulcerative Colitis and Relationship to Disease Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Shih-Kuang S.; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Blanca Piazuelo, M.; Coburn, Lori A.; Williams, Christopher S.; Delgado, Alberto G.; Casero, Robert A.; Schwartz, David A.; Wilson, Keith T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Polyamines are important in cell growth and wound repair, but have also been implicated in inflammation-induced carcinogenesis. Polyamine metabolism includes back-conversion of spermine to spermidine by the enzyme spermine oxidase (SMO), which produces hydrogen peroxide that causes oxidative stress. In ulcerative colitis (UC), levels of spermine are decreased compared to spermidine. Therefore, we sought to determine if SMO is involved in UC. Methods Colon biopsies and clinical information from subjects undergoing colonoscopy for evaluation of UC or colorectal cancer screening were utilized from 16 normal controls and 53 UC cases. Histopathologic disease severity was graded and the Mayo Disease Activity Index (DAI) and endoscopy subscore assessed. SMO mRNA expression was measured in frozen biopsies by Taq-Man-based real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Formalin-fixed tissues were used for SMO immunohistochemistry. Results There was a 3.1-fold upregulation of SMO mRNA levels in UC patients compared to controls (P = 0.044), and a 3.7-fold increase in involved left colon versus paired uninvolved right colon (P < 0.001). With worsening histologic injury in UC there was a progressive increase in SMO staining of mononuclear inflammatory cells. There was a similar increase in SMO staining with worsening endoscopic disease severity and strong correlation with the DAI (r = 0.653, P < 0.001). Inflammatory cell SMO staining was increased in involved left colon versus uninvolved right colon. Conclusions SMO expression is upregulated in UC tissues, deriving from increased levels in mononuclear inflammatory cells. Dysregulated polyamine homeostasis may contribute to chronic UC by altering immune responses and increasing oxidative stress. PMID:20127992

  20. Integrated, High-Throughput, Multiomics Platform Enables Data-Driven Construction of Cellular Responses and Reveals Global Drug Mechanisms of Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Jeremy L; Farrow, Melissa A; Gutierrez, Danielle B; Palmer, Lauren D; Muszynski, Nicole; Sherrod, Stacy D; Pino, James C; Allen, Jamie L; Spraggins, Jeffrey M; Lubbock, Alex L R; Jordan, Ashley; Burns, William; Poland, James C; Romer, Carrie; Manier, M Lisa; Nei, Yuan-Wei; Prentice, Boone M; Rose, Kristie L; Hill, Salisha; Van de Plas, Raf; Tsui, Tina; Braman, Nathaniel M; Keller, M Ray; Rutherford, Stacey A; Lobdell, Nichole; Lopez, Carlos F; Lacy, D Borden; McLean, John A; Wikswo, John P; Skaar, Eric P; Caprioli, Richard M

    2017-03-03

    An understanding of how cells respond to perturbation is essential for biological applications; however, most approaches for profiling cellular response are limited in scope to pre-established targets. Global analysis of molecular mechanism will advance our understanding of the complex networks constituting cellular perturbation and lead to advancements in areas, such as infectious disease pathogenesis, developmental biology, pathophysiology, pharmacology, and toxicology. We have developed a high-throughput multiomics platform for comprehensive, de novo characterization of cellular mechanisms of action. Platform validation using cisplatin as a test compound demonstrates quantification of over 10 000 unique, significant molecular changes in less than 30 days. These data provide excellent coverage of known cisplatin-induced molecular changes and previously unrecognized insights into cisplatin resistance. This proof-of-principle study demonstrates the value of this platform as a resource to understand complex cellular responses in a high-throughput manner.

  1. Planning High-Risk High-Reward Activities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casault, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    This body of work addresses a gap in financial and economic theories related to assets that are typically associated with high uncertainty. Specifically, this thesis provides some foundational work towards a new way to quantify and explain how high-risk high-reward activities, such as exploration,

  2. In vitro testing of cellular response to ultra high frequency electromagnetic field radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavicic, Ivan; Trosic, Ivancica

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether low-level, ultra high frequency (UHF) irradiation of 935 MHz influences the cell structure and growth of V79 cells. UHF field was generated inside a Gigahertz Transversal Electromagnetic Mode cell (GTEM-cell) with a Hewlett-Packard signal generator. The electric field strength was 8.2+/-0.3 V/cm and the average specific absorption rate (SAR) was calculated to be 0.12 W/kg. Cell samples were cultivated in a humidified atmosphere at 37 degrees C with 5% CO2. Prepared cell samples were exposed to a 935 MHz continuous wave frequency field for 1, 2, and 3 h. The structure of microtubule proteins has been determined using the immunocytochemical method. Cell growth was determined by cell counts for each hour of exposure during five post-exposure days. Negative- and positive-cell controls were included into the experimental procedure. In comparison with control cells, the microtubule structure clearly altered after 3h of irradiation (pgrowth was noted in cells exposed for 3h three days after irradiation (pcell growth.

  3. Genotoxicity and activation of cellular defenses in transplanted zebra mussels Dreissena polymorpha along the Seine river.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Châtel, Amélie; Faucet-Marquis, Virginie; Gourlay-Francé, Catherine; Pfohl-Leszkowicz, Annie; Vincent-Hubert, Françoise

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to confirm the relevance of studying DNA adduct formation in a field study. In that context, freshwater mussels Dreissena polymorpha, collected in a reference station, were transplanted in different sites with a pollution gradient. After one and two months, mussels were collected and DNA adduct formation was analyzed using the (32)P post labelling technique on both gills and digestive glands. In addition, the expression of genes involved in the detoxification system (catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione S-transferase (GST), HSP70, aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), P glycoprotein (PgP), metallothionein (MT)) was assessed by RT-PCR. DNA adducts were observed at amount comparable to data from literature. Increase of DNA adducts after two months of transplantation could be correlated with strong modulation of gene expression implicated in detoxification processes. Indeed, PgP and HSP70 gene expressions were similarly induced in gills and digestive glands while SOD and CAT expressions were down regulated in both tissues. AHR, GST and MT genes were differently regulated depending upon the tissue studied and the level of contamination in the different sites. We demonstrated that mussels transplanted in the different stations with pollution gradient were able to biotransform PAHs, assessed by DNA adduct formation and the high decrease of detoxification genes. Specific DNA adducts pattern obtained after one and two month mussel transplantations demonstrated the relevance of DNA adduct as biomarker of environmental pollution.

  4. Genetic and cellular dissection of the activation of AM14 rheumatoid factor B cells in a mouse model of lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Allison; Zheng, Ying Yi; Choi, Seung-Chul; Zeumer, Leilani; Morel, Laurence

    2015-08-01

    The RF-specific AM14 tg BCR has been used as a model to dissect the mechanisms of B cell tolerance to ICs containing nucleic acids. We have shown previously that AM14 RF B cells break tolerance in the TC mouse model of lupus through the dual engagement of the AM14 BCR and TLR9. In this study, we showed that neither the expression of Sle1 or Sle2 susceptibility loci alone was sufficient to activate AM14 RF B cells, suggesting that the production of antichromatin IgG2a(a) autoAg mediated by Sle1 and an intrinsically higher B cell activation mediated by Sle2 were required. We also showed that the B6 genetic background enhanced the selection of AM14 RF B cells to the MZB cell compartment regardless of the expression of the Sle loci and therefore, of their activation into AFCs. Furthermore, some AM14 RF B cells were selected into the B-1a compartment, where they did not differentiate into AFCs. Therefore, it is unlikely that the selection of AM14 RF B cells to the MZB or B-1a cell compartments in TC.AM14(a) mice is responsible for their breach of tolerance. Finally, we showed that the presence of expression of Sle1 in non-tg cells, most likely T cells, is necessary for the activation of AM14 RF B cells into AFCs. Overall, these results suggest a threshold model of activation of AM14 RF B cells on the B6 background with additive genetic and cellular contribution of multiple sources. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  5. Numerical simulation on the adaptation of forms in trabecular bone to mechanical disuse and basic multi-cellular unit activation threshold at menopause

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Gong; Yubo Fan; Ming Zhang

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify the effects of mechanical disuse and basic multi-cellular unit (BMU) activation threshold on the form of trabecular bone during menopause. A bone adaptation model with mechanical-biological factors at BMU level was integrated with finite element analysis to simulate the changes of trabecular bone structure during menopause. Mechanical disuse and changes in the BMU activation threshold were applied to the model for the period from 4 years before to 4 years after menopause.The changes in bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness and fractal dimension of the trabecular structures were used to quantify the changes of trabecular bone in three different cases associated with mechanical disuse and BMU activation threshold. It was found that the changes in the simulated bone volume fraction were highly correlated and consistent with clinical data, and that the trabecular thickness reduced signi-ficantly during menopause and was highly linearly correlated with the bone volume fraction, and that the change trend of fractal dimension of the simulated trabecular structure was in correspondence with clinical observations. The numerical simulation in this paper may help to better understand the relationship between the bone morphology and the mecha- nical, as well as biological environment; and can provide a quantitative computational model and methodology for the numerical simulation of the bone structural morphological changes caused by the mechanical environment, and/or the biological environment.

  6. Numerical simulation on the adaptation of forms in trabecular bone to mechanical disuse and basic multi-cellular unit activation threshold at menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, He; Fan, Yubo; Zhang, Ming

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify the effects of mechanical disuse and basic multi-cellular unit (BMU) activation threshold on the form of trabecular bone during menopause. A bone adaptation model with mechanical- biological factors at BMU level was integrated with finite element analysis to simulate the changes of trabecular bone structure during menopause. Mechanical disuse and changes in the BMU activation threshold were applied to the model for the period from 4 years before to 4 years after menopause. The changes in bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness and fractal dimension of the trabecular structures were used to quantify the changes of trabecular bone in three different cases associated with mechanical disuse and BMU activation threshold. It was found that the changes in the simulated bone volume fraction were highly correlated and consistent with clinical data, and that the trabecular thickness reduced significantly during menopause and was highly linearly correlated with the bone volume fraction, and that the change trend of fractal dimension of the simulated trabecular structure was in correspondence with clinical observations. The numerical simulation in this paper may help to better understand the relationship between the bone morphology and the mechanical, as well as biological environment; and can provide a quantitative computational model and methodology for the numerical simulation of the bone structural morphological changes caused by the mechanical environment, and/or the biological environment.

  7. Highly differentiated cellular and circuit properties of infralimbic pyramidal neurons projecting to the periaqueductal gray and amygdala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley N Ferreira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The infralimbic (IL cortex is a key node in an inter-connected network involved in fear and emotion processing. The cellular and circuit-level mechanisms whereby IL neurons receive, filter, and modulate incoming signals they project onward to diverse downstream nodes in this complex network remain poorly understood. Using the mouse as our model, we applied anatomical labeling strategies, brain slice electrophysiology, and focal activation of caged glutamate via laser scanning photostimulation (glu-LSPS for quantitative neurophysiological analysis of projectionally defined neurons in IL. Injection of retrograde tracers into the periaqueductal grey (PAG and basolateral amygdala (BLA was used to identify cortico-PAG (CP and cortico-BLA (CA neurons in IL. CP neurons were found exclusively in layer 5 of IL whereas CA neurons were detected throughout layer 2, 3 and 5 of IL. We also identified a small percentage of IL neurons that project to both the PAG and the BLA. We found that layer 5 CP neurons have a more extensive dendritic structure compared to layer 5 CA neurons. Neurophysiological recordings performed on retrogradely labeled neurons in acute brain slice showed that CP and CA neurons in IL could be broadly classified in two groups: neuronal resonators and non-resonators. Layer 2 CA neurons were the only class that was exclusively non-resonating. CP, CA, and CP/CA neurons in layers 3 and 5 of IL consisted of heterogeneous populations of resonators and non-resonators showing that projection target is not an exclusive predictor of intrinsic physiology. Circuit mapping using glu-LSPS revealed that the strength and organization of local excitatory and inhibitory inputs were stronger to CP compared to CA neurons in IL. Together, our results establish an organizational scheme linking cellular neurophysiology with microcircuit parameters of defined neuronal subclasses in IL that send descending commands to subcortical structures involved in fear

  8. Effect of Lower and Upper Body High Intensity Training on Genes Associated with Cellular Stress Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanowicz, Andrzej; Kochanowicz, Kazimierz; Mieszkowski, Jan; Niespodziński, Bartłomiej; Sawczyn, Stanisław

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effect of upper and lower body high intensity exercise (HIE) on select gene expression in athletes. Fourteen elite male artistic gymnasts (age 20.9 ± 2.6 years; weight 68.6 ± 7.2 kg; fat free mass 63.6 ± 6.7 kg; height 1.70 ± 0.04 m) performed lower and upper body 30 s Wingate Tests (WAnTs) before and after eight weeks of specific HIIT. Two milliliters of blood was collected before and after (5, 30 min, resp.) lower and upper body WAnTs, and select gene expression was determined by PCR. Eight weeks of HIIT caused a significant increase in maximal power (722 to 751 Wat), relative peak power in the lower body WAnTs (10.1 to 11 W/kg), mean power (444 to 464 W), and relative mean power (6.5 to 6.8 W/kg). No significant differences in lower versus upper body gene expression were detected after HIIT, and a significant decrease in the IL6/IL10 ratio was observed after lower (−2∧0.57 p = 0.0019) and upper (−2∧0.5 p = 0.03) WAnTs following eight weeks of HIIT. It is hypothesized that a similar adaptive response to exercise may be obtained by lower and upper body exercise. PMID:28589135

  9. High-Aspect Ratio Bio-Metallic Nanocomposites for Cellular Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deodhar, Sneha; Huckaby, Justin; Delahoussaye, Miles; DeCoster, Mark A.

    2014-08-01

    We synthesized high aspect ratio composites with biological and metal components. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) revealed linear morphology and smooth surface texture. SEM, TEM and light microscopy showed that composites have scalable dimensions from nano- to micro-, with diameters as low as 60 nm, lengths exceeding 150 pm, and average aspect ratio of 100. The structures are stable, remaining intact for over one year in dried form and in liquid, and did not aggregate, in contrast to metal nanoparticles such as iron and copper. Many metal nanoparticles are toxic to cells, limiting their use for biological applications. The bio-metallic composites characterized here showed lower toxicity compared to their precursor metal nanoparticles in brain tumor cell cultures. Due to these more biocompatible properties, we tested the ability of the composites to interact with cells. Zeta potential analysis indicated that composites carry a net negative charge (-24.3 ± 2.2 mV), while the starting metal nanoparticles measured (43.3 ± 2.4 mV). We labeled the composites with poly-l-lysine fluorescein isothiocyanate (PLL-FITC), which shifted the potential to 3.5 ± 2.9 mV. It was observed by fluorescence microscopy that composites smaller than cells were internalized by some cells and larger composites remained outside. Cells became fluorescent over time due to leakage of PLL-FITC from the composites which lost fluorescence over time. Higher biocompatibility, low aggregation, and ability to control size distribution of the linear composites may make them ideal vehicles to deliver drugs or other materials to cells, and may be used as a scaffolding material for cells.

  10. Analysis of the relationship between cancer procoagulant activity and PCNA and Ki-67 expression in cases of common and cellular uterine leiomyomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szajda, Slawomir D; Jóźwik, Marcin; Sulkowska, Mariola; Chabielska, Ewa; Sulkowski, Stanislaw; Jóźwik, Maciej

    2006-01-01

    Histological subtypes of uterine leiomyomas may substantially differ in their cellular biology, including the intensity of synthesis of cancer markers and expression of cell proliferation markers. The present investigation aimed to determine the activity of cancer procoagulant (CP) in subtypes of leiomyomas, including cellular leiomyomas, and to verify whether these activities correlate with immunoexpression of cell proliferation markers: the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Ki-67. Preoperative peripheral venous blood and postoperative tissue material were obtained from 24 women operated on in a tertiary referral academic department. The activity of CP in serum was measured with the use of a coagulative method according to Gordon and Benson, and in tissue homogenates with the use of a spectrophotometric method according to Colucci et al. The control serum values were obtained from 20 healthy women without any gynecological disease, and the control solid tissue values from histologically confirmed postoperative normal reproductive tissues obtained from six patients. PCNA and Ki-67 expression were determined immunohistochemically using monoclonal antibodies. Both the tissue and serum activity for CP was considerably higher for common leiomyomas and cellular leiomyomas than for control tissues, but did not differ significantly between the leiomyoma subtypes. Intratumor CP activity significantly correlated with PCNA expression but not with Ki-67 expression. Cellular leiomyomas do not differ substantially in the serum and intratumor CP activity from common leiomyomas. There is a relationship of intratumor CP activity with PCNA expression, a finding which requires further investigation.

  11. Phyto-mediated nanostructured carriers based on dual vegetable actives involved in the prevention of cellular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istrati, D; Lacatusu, I; Bordei, N; Badea, G; Oprea, O; Stefan, L M; Stan, R; Badea, N; Meghea, A

    2016-07-01

    The growing scientific interest in exploitation of vegetable bioactives has raised a number of questions regarding their imminent presence in pharmaceutical formulations. This study intends to demonstrate that a dual combination between vegetable oil (e.g. thistle oil, safflower oil, sea buckthorn oil) and a carrot extract represents an optimal approach to formulate safe carrier systems that manifest cell regeneration effect and promising antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Inclusion of both natural actives into lipid carriers imparted a strong negative charge on the nanocarrier surface (up to -45mV) and displayed average sizes of 70nm to 140nm. The entrapment efficiency of carrot extract into nanostructured carriers ranged between 78.3 and 88.3%. The in vitro release study has demonstrated that the entrapment of the extract represents a viable way for an equilibrated release of carotenoids. Besides the excellent antioxidant properties (e.g. scavenging up to 98% of the free oxygen radicals), the results of cellular integrity (e.g. cell viability of 133%) recommend these nanocarriers based on dual carrot extract-bioactive oil as a promising trend for the treatment of certain disorders in which oxidative stress plays a prominent role. In addition, the lipid nanocarriers based on safflower oil and sea buckthorn oil demonstrated an anti-inflammatory effect on LPS induced THP-1 macrophages, by inhibiting the secretion of two pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and TNF-α.

  12. Monoacylated Cellular Prion Proteins Reduce Amyloid-β-Induced Activation of Cytoplasmic Phospholipase A2 and Synapse Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewan West

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ and the loss of synapses. Aggregation of the cellular prion protein (PrPC by Aβ oligomers induced synapse damage in cultured neurons. PrPC is attached to membranes via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchor, the composition of which affects protein targeting and cell signaling. Monoacylated PrPC incorporated into neurons bound “natural Aβ”, sequestering Aβ outside lipid rafts and preventing its accumulation at synapses. The presence of monoacylated PrPC reduced the Aβ-induced activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2 and Aβ-induced synapse damage. This protective effect was stimulus specific, as treated neurons remained sensitive to α-synuclein, a protein associated with synapse damage in Parkinson’s disease. In synaptosomes, the aggregation of PrPC by Aβ oligomers triggered the formation of a signaling complex containing the cPLA2.a process, disrupted by monoacylated PrPC. We propose that monoacylated PrPC acts as a molecular sponge, binding Aβ oligomers at the neuronal perikarya without activating cPLA2 or triggering synapse damage.

  13. Cisplatin as an Anti-Tumor Drug: Cellular Mechanisms of Activity, Drug Resistance and Induced Side Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Maria Florea

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Platinum complexes are clinically used as adjuvant therapy of cancers aiming to induce tumor cell death. Depending on cell type and concentration, cisplatin induces cytotoxicity, e.g., by interference with transcription and/or DNA replication mechanisms. Additionally, cisplatin damages tumors via induction of apoptosis, mediated by the activation of various signal transduction pathways, including calcium signaling, death receptor signaling, and the activation of mitochondrial pathways. Unfortunately, neither cytotoxicity nor apoptosis are exclusively induced in cancer cells, thus, cisplatin might also lead to diverse side-effects such as neuro- and/or renal-toxicity or bone marrow-suppression. Moreover, the binding of cisplatin to proteins and enzymes may modulate its biochemical mechanism of action. While a combination-chemotherapy with cisplatin is a cornerstone for the treatment of multiple cancers, the challenge is that cancer cells could become cisplatin-resistant. Numerous mechanisms of cisplatin resistance were described including changes in cellular uptake, drug efflux, increased detoxification, inhibition of apoptosis and increased DNA repair. To minimize cisplatin resistance, combinatorial therapies were developed and have proven more effective to defeat cancers. Thus, understanding of the biochemical mechanisms triggered by cisplatin in tumor cells may lead to the design of more efficient platinum derivates (or other drugs and might provide new therapeutic strategies and reduce side effects.

  14. Cisplatin as an Anti-Tumor Drug: Cellular Mechanisms of Activity, Drug Resistance and Induced Side Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florea, Ana-Maria [Department of Neuropathology, Heinrich-Heine University, Düsseldorf (Germany); Büsselberg, Dietrich, E-mail: dib2015@qatar-med.cornell.edu [Weil Cornell Medical College in Qatar, Qatar Foundation-Education City, P.O. Box 24144, Doha (Qatar)

    2011-03-15

    Platinum complexes are clinically used as adjuvant therapy of cancers aiming to induce tumor cell death. Depending on cell type and concentration, cisplatin induces cytotoxicity, e.g., by interference with transcription and/or DNA replication mechanisms. Additionally, cisplatin damages tumors via induction of apoptosis, mediated by the activation of various signal transduction pathways, including calcium signaling, death receptor signaling, and the activation of mitochondrial pathways. Unfortunately, neither cytotoxicity nor apoptosis are exclusively induced in cancer cells, thus, cisplatin might also lead to diverse side-effects such as neuro- and/or renal-toxicity or bone marrow-suppression. Moreover, the binding of cisplatin to proteins and enzymes may modulate its biochemical mechanism of action. While a combination-chemotherapy with cisplatin is a cornerstone for the treatment of multiple cancers, the challenge is that cancer cells could become cisplatin-resistant. Numerous mechanisms of cisplatin resistance were described including changes in cellular uptake, drug efflux, increased detoxification, inhibition of apoptosis and increased DNA repair. To minimize cisplatin resistance, combinatorial therapies were developed and have proven more effective to defeat cancers. Thus, understanding of the biochemical mechanisms triggered by cisplatin in tumor cells may lead to the design of more efficient platinum derivates (or other drugs) and might provide new therapeutic strategies and reduce side effects.

  15. Alphavirus replicon particles expressing TRP-2 provide potent therapeutic effect on melanoma through activation of humoral and cellular immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Avogadri

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malignant melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and is refractory to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Therefore alternative approaches to treat this disease, such as immunotherapy, are needed. Melanoma vaccine design has mainly focused on targeting CD8+ T cells. Activation of effector CD8+ T cells has been achieved in patients, but provided limited clinical benefit, due to immune-escape mechanisms established by advanced tumors. We have previously shown that alphavirus-based virus-like replicon particles (VRP simultaneously activate strong cellular and humoral immunity against the weakly immunogenic melanoma differentiation antigen (MDA tyrosinase. Here we further investigate the antitumor effect and the immune mechanisms of VRP encoding different MDAs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: VRP encoding different MDAs were screened for their ability to prevent the growth of the B16 mouse transplantable melanoma. The immunologic mechanisms of efficacy were investigated for the most effective vaccine identified, focusing on CD8+ T cells and humoral responses. To this end, ex vivo immune assays and transgenic mice lacking specific immune effector functions were used. The studies identified a potent therapeutic VRP vaccine, encoding tyrosinase related protein 2 (TRP-2, which provided a durable anti-tumor effect. The efficacy of VRP-TRP2 relies on a novel immune mechanism of action requiring the activation of both IgG and CD8+ T cell effector responses, and depends on signaling through activating Fcγ receptors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study identifies a VRP-based vaccine able to elicit humoral immunity against TRP-2, which plays a role in melanoma immunotherapy and synergizes with tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. These findings will aid in the rational design of future immunotherapy clinical trials.

  16. Alphavirus replicon particles expressing TRP-2 provide potent therapeutic effect on melanoma through activation of humoral and cellular immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avogadri, Francesca; Merghoub, Taha; Maughan, Maureen F; Hirschhorn-Cymerman, Daniel; Morris, John; Ritter, Erika; Olmsted, Robert; Houghton, Alan N; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2010-09-10

    Malignant melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer and is refractory to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Therefore alternative approaches to treat this disease, such as immunotherapy, are needed. Melanoma vaccine design has mainly focused on targeting CD8+ T cells. Activation of effector CD8+ T cells has been achieved in patients, but provided limited clinical benefit, due to immune-escape mechanisms established by advanced tumors. We have previously shown that alphavirus-based virus-like replicon particles (VRP) simultaneously activate strong cellular and humoral immunity against the weakly immunogenic melanoma differentiation antigen (MDA) tyrosinase. Here we further investigate the antitumor effect and the immune mechanisms of VRP encoding different MDAs. VRP encoding different MDAs were screened for their ability to prevent the growth of the B16 mouse transplantable melanoma. The immunologic mechanisms of efficacy were investigated for the most effective vaccine identified, focusing on CD8+ T cells and humoral responses. To this end, ex vivo immune assays and transgenic mice lacking specific immune effector functions were used. The studies identified a potent therapeutic VRP vaccine, encoding tyrosinase related protein 2 (TRP-2), which provided a durable anti-tumor effect. The efficacy of VRP-TRP2 relies on a novel immune mechanism of action requiring the activation of both IgG and CD8+ T cell effector responses, and depends on signaling through activating Fcγ receptors. This study identifies a VRP-based vaccine able to elicit humoral immunity against TRP-2, which plays a role in melanoma immunotherapy and synergizes with tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. These findings will aid in the rational design of future immunotherapy clinical trials.

  17. High effective silica fume alkali activator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vladimír Živica

    2004-04-01

    Growing demands on the engineering properties of cement based materials and the urgency to decrease unsuitable ecologic impact of Portland cement manufacturing represent significant motivation for the development of new cement corresponding to these aspects. One category represents prospective alkali activated cements. A significant factor influencing their properties is alkali activator used. In this paper we present a new high effective alkali activator prepared from silica fume and its effectiveness. According to the results obtained this activator seems to be more effective than currently used activators like natrium hydroxide, natrium carbonate, and water glass.

  18. Transcriptional Activity of HTLV-I Tax Influences the Expression of Marker Genes Associated with Cellular Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francene J. Lemoine

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I has been identified as the etiologic agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL. HTLV-I encodes a transcriptional regulatory protein, Tax, which also functions as the viral transforming protein. Through interactions with a number of cellular transcription factors Tax can modulate cellular gene expression. Since the majority of Tax-responsive cellular genes are important regulators of cellular proliferation, the transactivating functions of Tax appear to be necessary for cellular transformation by HTLV-I. Gaining a complete understanding of the broad range of genes regulated by Tax, the temporal pattern of their expression, and their effects on cell function may identify early markers of disease progression mediated by this virus.

  19. Epigenetic modifications of triterpenoid ursolic acid in activating Nrf2 and blocking cellular transformation of mouse epidermal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyuck; Ramirez, Christina N; Su, Zheng-Yuan; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2016-07-01

    Ursolic acid (UA), a well-known natural triterpenoid found in abundance in blueberries, cranberries and apple peels, has been reported to possess many beneficial health effects. These effects include anticancer activity in various cancers, such as skin cancer. Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the world. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a master regulator of antioxidative stress response with anticarcinogenic activity against UV- and chemical-induced tumor formation in the skin. Recent studies show that epigenetic modifications of Nrf2 play an important role in cancer prevention. However, the epigenetic impact of UA on Nrf2 signaling remains poorly understood in skin cancer. In this study, we investigated the epigenetic effects of UA on mouse epidermal JB6 P+ cells. UA inhibited cellular transformation by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate at a concentration at which the cytotoxicity was no more than 25%. Under this condition, UA induced the expression of the Nrf2-mediated detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A1. DNA methylation analysis revealed that UA demethylated the first 15 CpG sites of the Nrf2 promoter region, which correlated with the reexpression of Nrf2. Furthermore, UA reduced the expression of epigenetic modifying enzymes, including the DNA methyltransferases DNMT1 and DNMT3a and the histone deacetylases (HDACs) HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3 and HDAC8 (Class I) and HDAC6 and HDAC7 (Class II), and HDAC activity. Taken together, these results suggest that the epigenetic effects of the triterpenoid UA could potentially contribute to its beneficial effects, including the prevention of skin cancer.

  20. Regulation of HTLV-1 tax stability, cellular trafficking and NF-κB activation by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavorgna, Alfonso; Harhaj, Edward William

    2014-10-23

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a complex retrovirus that infects CD4+ T cells and causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) in 3%-5% of infected individuals after a long latent period. HTLV-1 Tax is a trans-activating protein that regulates viral gene expression and also modulates cellular signaling pathways to enhance T-cell proliferation and cell survival. The Tax oncoprotein promotes T-cell transformation, in part via constitutive activation of the NF-κB transcription factor; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. Ubiquitination is a type of post-translational modification that occurs in a three-step enzymatic cascade mediated by E1, E2 and E3 enzymes and regulates protein stability as well as signal transduction, protein trafficking and the DNA damage response. Emerging studies indicate that Tax hijacks the ubiquitin machinery to activate ubiquitin-dependent kinases and downstream NF-κB signaling. Tax interacts with the E2 conjugating enzyme Ubc13 and is conjugated on C-terminal lysine residues with lysine 63-linked polyubiquitin chains. Tax K63-linked polyubiquitination may serve as a platform for signaling complexes since this modification is critical for interactions with NEMO and IKK. In addition to NF-κB signaling, mono- and polyubiquitination of Tax also regulate its subcellular trafficking and stability. Here, we review recent advances in the diverse roles of ubiquitin in Tax function and how Tax usurps the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway to promote oncogenesis.

  1. A novel power-efficient high-speed clock management unit using quantum-dot cellular automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abutaleb, M. M.

    2017-04-01

    Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) is one of the most attractive alternatives for complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology. The QCA widely supports a new paradigm in the field of nanotechnology that has the potential for high density, low power, and high speed. The clock manager is an essential building block in the new microwave and radio frequency integrated circuits. This paper describes a novel QCA-based clock management unit (CMU) that provides innovative clocking capabilities. The proposed CMU is achieved by utilizing edge-triggered D-type flip-flops (D-FFs) in the design of frequency synthesizer and phase splitter. Edge-triggered D-FF structures proposed in this paper have the successful QCA implementation and simulation with the least complexity and power dissipation as compared to earlier structures. The frequency synthesizer is used to generate new clock frequencies from the reference clock frequency based on a combination of power-of-two frequency dividers. The phase splitter is integrated with the frequency synthesizer to generate four clock signals that are 90o out of phase with each other. This paper demonstrates that the proposed QCA CMU structure has a superior performance. Furthermore, the proposed CMU is straightforwardly scalable due to the use of modular component architecture.

  2. Follicular lymphoma: in vitro effects of combining lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell-induced cytotoxicity and rituximab- and obinutuzumab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Muñoz, Ricardo; López-Díaz-de-Cerio, Ascensión; Feliu, Jesus; Panizo, Angel; Giraldo, Pilar; Rodríguez-Calvillo, Mercedes; Grande, Carlos; Pena, Esther; Olave, Mayte; Panizo, Carlos; Inogés, Susana

    2016-04-01

    Follicular lymphoma (FL) is a disease of paradoxes-incurable but with a long natural history. We hypothesized that a combination of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells and monoclonal antibodies might provide a robust synergistic treatment and tested this hypothesis in a phase II clinical trial (NCT01329354). In this trial, in addition to R-CHOP, we alternated the administration of only rituximab with rituximab and autologous LAK cells that were expanded ex vivo. Our objective was to determine the in vitro capability of LAK cells generated from FL patients to produce cytotoxicity against tumor cell lines and to determine rituximab- and obinutuzumab-induced cytotoxicity via antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity. We analyzed the LAK cell-induced cytotoxicity and rituximab (R)- and obinutuzumab (GA101)-induced ADCC activity. We show that LAK cells generated from FL patients induce cytotoxicity against tumor cell lines. R and GA101 enhance cytolysis through ADCC activity of LAK cells. Impaired LAK cell cytotoxicity and ADCC activity were detected in 50 % of patients. Percentage of NK cells in LAK infusions were correlated with the R- and GA101-induced ADCC. Our results indicate that the combination of R or GA101 and LAK cells should be an option as frontline maintenance therapy in patients with FL.

  3. The deubiquitinase activity of the Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 effector, SseL, prevents accumulation of cellular lipid droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Ellen T; Auweter, Sigrid D; Antunes, L Caetano M; Vogl, A Wayne; Han, Jun; Guttman, Julian A; Croxen, Matthew A; Menendez, Alfredo; Covey, Scott D; Borchers, Christoph H; Finlay, B Brett

    2011-11-01

    To cause disease, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium requires two type III secretion systems that are encoded by Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and -2). These secretion systems serve to deliver specialized proteins (effectors) into the host cell cytosol. While the importance of these effectors to promote colonization and replication within the host has been established, the specific roles of individual secreted effectors in the disease process are not well understood. In this study, we used an in vivo gallbladder epithelial cell infection model to study the function of the SPI-2-encoded type III effector, SseL. The deletion of the sseL gene resulted in bacterial filamentation and elongation and the unusual localization of Salmonella within infected epithelial cells. Infection with the ΔsseL strain also caused dramatic changes in host cell lipid metabolism and led to the massive accumulation of lipid droplets in infected cells. This phenotype was directly attributable to the deubiquitinase activity of SseL, as a Salmonella strain carrying a single point mutation in the catalytic cysteine also resulted in extensive lipid droplet accumulation. The excessive buildup of lipids due to the absence of a functional sseL gene also was observed in murine livers during S. Typhimurium infection. These results suggest that SseL alters host lipid metabolism in infected epithelial cells by modifying the ubiquitination patterns of cellular targets.

  4. Effects of Activating Mutations on EGFR Cellular Protein Turnover and Amino Acid Recycling Determined Using SILAC Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Greig

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid mutations of proteins that are targeted in cancer therapy often lead to drug resistance. Often, the mutation directly affects a drug’s binding site, effectively blocking binding of the drug, but these mutations can have other effects such as changing the protein turnover half-life. Utilizing SILAC MS, we measured the cellular turnover rates of an important non-small cell lung cancer target, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Wild-type (WT EGFR, EGFR with a single activating mutant (Del 746–750 or L858R, and the drug-resistant double mutant (L858R/T790M EGFR were analyzed. In non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, EGFR turnover rates ranged from 28 hours in A431 cells (WT to 7.5 hours in the PC-9 cells (Del 746–750 mutant. The measurement of EGFR turnover rate in PC-9 cells dosed with irreversible inhibitors has additional complexity due to inhibitor effects on cell viability and results were reported as a range. Finally, essential amino acid recycling (K and R was measured in different cell lines. The recycling was different in each cell line, but the overall inclusion of the effect of amino acid recycling on calculating EGFR turnover rates resulted in a 10–20% reduction in rates.

  5. Actomyosin-mediated cellular tension drives increased tissue stiffness and beta-catenin activation to induce epidermal hyperplasia and tumor growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samuel, M.S.; Lopez, J.I.; McGhee, E.J.; Croft, D.R.; Strachan, D.; Timpson, P.; Munro, J.; Schroder, E.; Zhou, J.; Brunton, V.; Barker, N.; Clevers, H.; Sansom, O.J.; Anderson, K.I.; Weaver, V.M.; Olson, M.F.

    2011-01-01

    Tumors and associated stroma manifest mechanical properties that promote cancer. Mechanosensation of tissue stiffness activates the Rho/ROCK pathway to increase actomyosin-mediated cellular tension to re-establish force equilibrium. To determine how actomyosin tension affects tissue homeostasis and

  6. Autophagic flux is highly active in early mitosis and differentially regulated throughout the cell cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Zhiyuan; Ji, Xinmiao; Wang, Dongmei; Liu, Juanjuan; Zhang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Mitosis is a fast process that involves dramatic cellular remodeling and has a high energy demand. Whether autophagy is active or inactive during the early stages of mitosis in a naturally dividing cell is still debated. Here we aimed to use multiple assays to resolve this apparent discrepancy. Although the LC3 puncta number was reduced in mitosis, the four different cell lines we tested all have active autophagic flux in both interphase and mitosis. In addition, the autophagic flux was highl...

  7. Simultaneous structure-activity studies and arming of natural products by C-H amination reveal cellular targets of eupalmerin acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Cisar, Justin S.; Zhou, Cong-Ying; Vera, Brunilda; Williams, Howard; Rodríguez, Abimael D.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Romo, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Natural products have a venerable history of, and enduring potential for the discovery of useful biological activity. To fully exploit this, the development of chemical methodology that can functionalize unique sites within these complex structures is highly desirable. Here, we describe the use of rhodium(II)-catalysed C-H amination reactions developed by Du Bois to carry out simultaneous structure-activity relationship studies and arming (alkynylation) of natural products at ‘unfunctionalized’ positions. Allylic and benzylic C-H bonds in the natural products undergo amination while olefins undergo aziridination, and tertiary amine-containing natural products are converted to amidines by a C-H amination-oxidation sequence or to hydrazine sulfamate zwitterions by an unusual N-amination. The alkynylated derivatives are ready for conversion into cellular probes that can be used for mechanism-of-action studies. Chemo- and site-selectivity was studied with a diverse library of natural products. For one of these—the marine-derived anticancer diterpene, eupalmerin acetate—quantitative proteome profiling led to the identification of several protein targets in HL-60 cells, suggesting a polypharmacological mode of action.

  8. Enclosure for handling high activity materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimeno de Osso, F.

    1977-07-01

    One of the most important problems that are met at the laboratories producing and handling radioisotopes is that of designing, building and operating enclosures suitable for the safe handling of active substances. With this purpose in mind, an enclosure has been designed and built for handling moderately high activities under a shielding made of 150 mm thick lead. In this report a description is given of those aspects that may be of interest to people working in this field. (Author)

  9. Extra-cellular matrix proteins induce matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1 activity and increase airway smooth muscle contraction in asthma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha K Rogers

    Full Text Available Airway remodelling describes the histopathological changes leading to fixed airway obstruction in patients with asthma and includes extra-cellular matrix (ECM deposition. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1 is present in remodelled airways but its relationship with ECM proteins and the resulting functional consequences are unknown. We used airway smooth muscle cells (ASM and bronchial biopsies from control donors and patients with asthma to examine the regulation of MMP-1 by ECM in ASM cells and the effect of MMP-1 on ASM contraction. Collagen-I and tenascin-C induced MMP-1 protein expression, which for tenascin-C, was greater in asthma derived ASM cells. Tenascin-C induced MMP-1 expression was dependent on ERK1/2, JNK and p38 MAPK activation and attenuated by function blocking antibodies against the β1 and β3 integrin subunits. Tenascin-C and MMP-1 were not expressed in normal airways but co-localised in the ASM bundles and reticular basement membrane of patients with asthma. Further, ECM from asthma derived ASM cells stimulated MMP-1 expression to a greater degree than ECM from normal ASM. Bradykinin induced contraction of ASM cells seeded in 3D collagen gels was reduced by the MMP inhibitor ilomastat and by siRNA knockdown of MMP-1. In summary, the induction of MMP-1 in ASM cells by tenascin-C occurs in part via integrin mediated MAPK signalling. MMP-1 and tenascin-C are co-localised in the smooth muscle bundles of patients with asthma where this interaction may contribute to enhanced airway contraction. Our findings suggest that ECM changes in airway remodelling via MMP-1 could contribute to an environment promoting greater airway narrowing in response to broncho-constrictor stimuli and worsening asthma symptoms.

  10. Cellular Telephone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨周

    1996-01-01

    Cellular phones, used in automobiles, airliners, and passenger trains, are basically low-power radiotelephones. Calls go through radio transmitters that are located within small geographical units called cells. Because each cell’s signals are too weak to interfere with those of other cells operating on the same fre-

  11. Cellular Effect of High Doses of Silica-Coated Quantum Dot Profiled with High Throughput Gene Expression Analysis and High Content Cellomics Measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Tingting; Stilwell, Jackie L.; Gerion, Daniele; Ding, Lianghao; Elboudwarej, Omeed; Cooke, Patrick A.; Gray, Joe W.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2006-01-01

    Quantum dots (Qdots) are now used extensively for labeling in biomedical research, and this use is predicted to grow because of their many advantages over alternative labeling methods. Uncoated Qdots made of core/shell CdSe/ZnS are toxic to cells because of the release of Cd2+ ions into the cellular environment. This problem has been partially overcome by coating Qdots with polymers, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), or other inert molecules. The most promising coating to date, for reducing toxici...

  12. [3D cellular models: a powerful access to cutaneous physiology and to innovative developments of cosmetic active compounds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, V; Grenier, S; Pivard, F; Perrier, E

    2005-12-01

    Two different anti-ageing cosmetic actives based respectively, on dermal compartment regeneration and on dermoepidermal reinforcement, have been developed using tissular engineering models. Conjointly use of different innovative three-dimensional models such as reconstructed dermis and skin built with human cells coming from variable aged donors allowed first, a better understanding of matrix modifications due to ageing and second, the screening of active ingredients highly targeted to reverse observed damages. The validity of such three-dimensional models has been then confirmed by in vivo studies on healthy volunteers.

  13. The endocytic receptor megalin binds the iron transporting neutrophil-gelatinase-associated lipocalin with high affinity and mediates its cellular uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, Vibeke; Jacobsen, Christian; Strong, Roland K

    2005-01-01

    in delivering iron to cells during formation of the tubular epithelial cells of the primordial kidney. No cellular receptor for NGAL has been described. We show here that megalin, a member of the low-density lipoprotein receptor family expressed in polarized epithelia, binds NGAL with high affinity, as shown...

  14. Highly Ordered 1D Fullerene Crystals for Concurrent Control of Macroscopic Cellular Orientation and Differentiation toward Large-Scale Tissue Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Kosuke; Kasuya, Yuki; Yamazaki, Tomohiko; Ji, Qingmin; Nakanishi, Waka; Hill, Jonathan P; Sakai, Hideki; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2015-07-15

    A highly aligned 1D fullerene whisker (FW) scaffold in a centimeter area is fabricated by interfacial alignment. The resulting aligned FW scaffold enables concurrent control over cellular orientation and differentiation to muscle cells. This aligned FW scaffold is made by a facile method, and hence the substrate is a promising alternative to other cell scaffolds for tissue engineering.

  15. High-throughput investigation of endothelial-to-mesenchymal transformation (EndMT) with combinatorial cellular microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zongjie; Calpe, Blaise; Zerdani, Jalil; Lee, Youngsang; Oh, Jonghyun; Bae, Hojae; Khademhosseini, Ali; Kim, Keekyoung

    2016-07-01

    In the developing heart, a specific subset of endocardium undergoes an endothelial-to-mesenchymal transformation (EndMT) thus forming nascent valve leaflets. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and growth factors (GFs) play important roles in regulating EndMT but the combinatorial effect of GFs with ECM proteins is less well understood. Here we use microscale engineering techniques to create single, binary, and tertiary component microenvironments to investigate the combinatorial effects of ECM proteins and GFs on the attachment and transformation of adult ovine mitral valve endothelial cells to a mesenchymal phenotype. With the combinatorial microenvironment microarrays, we utilized 60 different combinations of ECM proteins (Fibronectin, Collagen I, II, IV, Laminin) and GFs (TGF-β1, bFGF, VEGF) and were able to identify new microenvironmental conditions capable of modulating EndMT in MVECs. Experimental results indicated that TGF-β1 significantly upregulated the EndMT while either bFGF or VEGF downregulated EndMT process markedly. Also, ECM proteins could influence both the attachment of MVECs and the response of MVECs to GFs. In terms of attachment, fibronectin is significantly better for the adhesion of MVECs among the five tested proteins. Overall collagen IV and fibronectin appeared to play important roles in promoting EndMT process. Great consistency between macroscale and microarrayed experiments and present studies demonstrates that high-throughput cellular microarrays are a promising approach to study the regulation of EndMT in valvular endothelium. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1403-1412. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Bufalin-loaded mPEG-PLGA-PLL-cRGD nanoparticles: preparation, cellular uptake, tissue distribution, and anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Peihao; Wang, Yan; Qiu, YanYan; Hou, LiLi; Liu, Xuan; Qin, Jianmin; Duan, Yourong; Liu, Peifeng; Qiu, Ming; Li, Qi

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that bufalin has a good antitumor effect but has high toxicity, poor water solubility, a short half-life, a narrow therapeutic window, and a toxic dose that is close to the therapeutic dose, which all limit its clinical application. This study aimed to determine the targeting efficacy of nanoparticles (NPs) made of methoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG), polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), poly-L-lysine (PLL), and cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD) loaded with bufalin, ie, bufalin-loaded mPEG-PLGA-PLL-cRGD nanoparticles (BNPs), in SW620 colon cancer-bearing mice. BNPs showed uniform size. The size, shape, zeta potential, drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, and release of these nanoparticles were studied in vitro. The tumor targeting, cellular uptake, and growth-inhibitory effect of BNPs in vivo were tested. BNPs were of uniform size with an average particle size of 164 ± 84 nm and zeta potential of 2.77 mV. The encapsulation efficiency was 81.7% ± 0.89%, and the drug load was 3.92% ± 0.16%. The results of in vitro cytotoxicity studies showed that although the blank NPs were nontoxic, they enhanced the cytotoxicity of bufalin in BNPs. Drug release experiments showed that the release of the drug was prolonged and sustained. The results of confocal laser scanning microscopy indicated that BNPs could effectively bind to human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In the SW620 xenograft mice model, the BNPs could effectively target the tumor in vivo. The BNPs were significantly more effective than other NPs in preventing tumor growth. BNPs had even size distribution, were stable, and had a slow-releasing and tumor-targeting effect. BNPs significantly inhibited colon cancer growth in vitro and in vivo. As a novel drug carrier system, BNPs are a potentially promising targeting treatment for colon cancer.

  17. High-activity liquid packaging design criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    In recent studies, it has been acknowledged that there is an emerging need for packaging to transport high-activity liquid off the Hanford Site to support characterization and process development activities of liquid waste stored in underground tanks. These studies have dealt with specimen testing needs primarily at the Hanford Site; however, similar needs appear to be developing at other US Department of Energy (DOE) sites. The need to ship single and multiple specimens to offsite laboratories is anticipated because it is predicted that onsite laboratories will be overwhelmed by an increasing number and size (volume) of samples. Potentially, the specimen size could range from 250 mL to greater than 50 L. Presently, no certified Type-B packagings are available for transport of high-activity liquid radioactive specimens in sizes to support Site missions.

  18. The β-domain of cluster 2b streptokinase is a major determinant for the regulation of its plasminogen activation activity by cellular plasminogen receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yueling; Mayfield, Jeffrey A; Ploplis, Victoria A; Castellino, Francis J

    2014-02-21

    Cluster 2b streptokinase (SK2b), secreted by invasive skin-trophic strains of Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS), is a human plasminogen (hPg) activator that optimally functions when human plasma hPg is bound, via its kringle-2 domain, to cognizant bacterial cells through the a1a2 domain of the major cellular hPg receptor, Plasminogen-binding group A streptococcal M-like protein (PAM). Another class of streptokinases (SK1), secreted primarily by GAS strains that possess affinity for pharyngeal infections, does not require PAM-bound hPg for optimal activity. We find herein that replacement of the central β-domain of SK2b with the same module from SK1 reduces the dependency of SK2b on PAM, and the converse is true when the β-domain of SK1 is replaced with this same region of SK2b. These data suggest that simple evolutionary shuttling of protein domains in GAS can be employed by GAS to rapidly generate strains that differ in tissue tropism and invasive capability and allow the bacteria to survive different challenges by the host.

  19. Effects of wearing bio-active material coated fabric against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damaged in Sprague-Dawley rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Jung Ae; Kim, Hye Rim; Yoon, Sun Hye; Nam, Sang Hyun; Park, Sang Hyun; Jang, Beom Su [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Go, Kyung Chan; Yang, Gwang Wung; Rho, Young Hwan; Park, Hyo Suk [Research and Development Center, VENTEX Co. Ltd., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Ionizing radiation causes cellular damage and death through the direct damage and/or indirectly the production of ROS, which induces oxidative stress. This study was designed to evaluate the in vivo radioprotective effects of a bio-active material coated fabric (BMCF) against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Healthy male SD rats wore bio-active material coated (concentrations in 10% and 30%) fabric for 7 days after 3 Gy of γ-irradiation. Radioprotective effects were evaluated by performing various biochemical assays including spleen and thymus index, WBC count, hepatic damage marker enzymes [aspartate transaminase (AST) and alanine transaminase (ALT)] in plasma, liver antioxidant enzymes, and mitochondrial activity in muscle. Exposure to γ-irradiation resulted in hepatocellular and immune systemic damage. Gamma-irradiation induced decreases in antioxidant enzymes. However, wearing the BMCF-30% decreased significantly AST and ALT activities in plasma. Furthermore, wearing the BMCF-30% increased SOD (superoxide dismutase) and mitochondrial activity. These results suggest that wearing BMCF offers effective radioprotection against γ-irradiation-induced cellular damage in SD rats.

  20. High activity carbon sorbents for mercury capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George G. Stavropoulos; Irene S. Diamantopoulou; George E. Skodras; George P. Sakellaropoulos [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Chemical Process Engineering Laboratory

    2006-07-01

    High efficiency activated carbons have been prepared for removing mercury from gas streams. Starting materials used were petroleum coke, lignite, charcoal and olive seed waste, and were chemically activated with KOH. Produced adsorbents were primarily characterized for their porosity by N{sub 2} adsorption at 77K. Their mercury retention capacity was characterized based on the breakthrough curves. Compared with typical commercial carbons, they have exhibited considerably enhanced mercury adsorption capacity. An attempt has been made to correlate mercury entrapment and pore structure. It has been shown that physical surface area is increased during activation in contrast to the mercury adsorption capacity that initially increases and tends to decrease at latter stages. Desorption of active sites may be responsible for this behavior. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Highly Parallel Computing Architectures by using Arrays of Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA): Opportunities, Challenges, and Recent Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijany, Amir; Toomarian, Benny N.

    2000-01-01

    There has been significant improvement in the performance of VLSI devices, in terms of size, power consumption, and speed, in recent years and this trend may also continue for some near future. However, it is a well known fact that there are major obstacles, i.e., physical limitation of feature size reduction and ever increasing cost of foundry, that would prevent the long term continuation of this trend. This has motivated the exploration of some fundamentally new technologies that are not dependent on the conventional feature size approach. Such technologies are expected to enable scaling to continue to the ultimate level, i.e., molecular and atomistic size. Quantum computing, quantum dot-based computing, DNA based computing, biologically inspired computing, etc., are examples of such new technologies. In particular, quantum-dots based computing by using Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA) has recently been intensely investigated as a promising new technology capable of offering significant improvement over conventional VLSI in terms of reduction of feature size (and hence increase in integration level), reduction of power consumption, and increase of switching speed. Quantum dot-based computing and memory in general and QCA specifically, are intriguing to NASA due to their high packing density (10(exp 11) - 10(exp 12) per square cm ) and low power consumption (no transfer of current) and potentially higher radiation tolerant. Under Revolutionary Computing Technology (RTC) Program at the NASA/JPL Center for Integrated Space Microelectronics (CISM), we have been investigating the potential applications of QCA for the space program. To this end, exploiting the intrinsic features of QCA, we have designed novel QCA-based circuits for co-planner (i.e., single layer) and compact implementation of a class of data permutation matrices, a class of interconnection networks, and a bit-serial processor. Building upon these circuits, we have developed novel algorithms and QCA

  2. Highly Parallel Computing Architectures by using Arrays of Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA): Opportunities, Challenges, and Recent Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijany, Amir; Toomarian, Benny N.

    2000-01-01

    There has been significant improvement in the performance of VLSI devices, in terms of size, power consumption, and speed, in recent years and this trend may also continue for some near future. However, it is a well known fact that there are major obstacles, i.e., physical limitation of feature size reduction and ever increasing cost of foundry, that would prevent the long term continuation of this trend. This has motivated the exploration of some fundamentally new technologies that are not dependent on the conventional feature size approach. Such technologies are expected to enable scaling to continue to the ultimate level, i.e., molecular and atomistic size. Quantum computing, quantum dot-based computing, DNA based computing, biologically inspired computing, etc., are examples of such new technologies. In particular, quantum-dots based computing by using Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA) has recently been intensely investigated as a promising new technology capable of offering significant improvement over conventional VLSI in terms of reduction of feature size (and hence increase in integration level), reduction of power consumption, and increase of switching speed. Quantum dot-based computing and memory in general and QCA specifically, are intriguing to NASA due to their high packing density (10(exp 11) - 10(exp 12) per square cm ) and low power consumption (no transfer of current) and potentially higher radiation tolerant. Under Revolutionary Computing Technology (RTC) Program at the NASA/JPL Center for Integrated Space Microelectronics (CISM), we have been investigating the potential applications of QCA for the space program. To this end, exploiting the intrinsic features of QCA, we have designed novel QCA-based circuits for co-planner (i.e., single layer) and compact implementation of a class of data permutation matrices, a class of interconnection networks, and a bit-serial processor. Building upon these circuits, we have developed novel algorithms and QCA

  3. High-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus selectively reverses dopamine denervation-induced cellular defects in the output structures of the basal ganglia in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salin, Pascal; Manrique, Christine; Forni, Claude; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia

    2002-06-15

    High-frequency stimulation (HFS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) is now recognized as an effective treatment for advanced Parkinson's disease, but the molecular basis of its effects remains unknown. This study examined the effects of unilateral STN HFS (2 hr of continuous stimulation) in intact and hemiparkinsonian awake rats on STN neuron metabolic activity and on neurotransmitter-related gene expression in the basal ganglia, by means of in situ hybridization histochemistry and immunocytochemistry. In both intact and hemiparkinsonian rats, this stimulation was found to induce c-fos protein expression but to decrease cytochrome oxidase subunit I mRNA levels in STN neurons. STN HFS did not affect the dopamine lesion-mediated overexpression of enkephalin mRNA or the decrease in substance P in the ipsilateral striatum. The lesion-induced increases in intraneuronal glutamate decarboxylase 67 kDa isoform (GAD67) mRNA levels on the lesion side were reversed by STN HFS in the substantia nigra, partially antagonized in the entopeduncular nucleus but unaffected in the globus pallidus. The stimulation did not affect neuropeptide or GAD67 mRNA levels in the side contralateral to the dopamine lesion or in intact animals. These data furnish the first evidence that STN HFS decreases the metabolic activity of STN neurons and antagonizes dopamine lesion-mediated cellular defects in the basal ganglia output structures. They provide molecular substrate to the therapeutic effects of this stimulation consistent with the current hypothesis that HFS blocks STN neuron activity. However, the differential impact of STN HFS on the effects of dopamine lesion among structures receiving direct STN inputs suggests that this stimulation may not cause simply interruption of STN outflow.

  4. P2X7 Cell Death Receptor Activation and Mitochondrial Impairment in Oxaliplatin-Induced Apoptosis and Neuronal Injury: Cellular Mechanisms and In Vivo Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    France Massicot

    Full Text Available Limited information is available regarding the cellular mechanisms of oxaliplatin-induced painful neuropathy during exposure of patients to this drug. We therefore determined oxidative stress in cultured cells and evaluated its occurrence in C57BL/6 mice. Using both cultured neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y and macrophage (RAW 264.7 cell lines and also brain tissues of oxaliplatin-treated mice, we investigated whether oxaliplatin (OXA induces oxidative stress and apoptosis. Cultured cells were treated with 2-200 µM OXA for 24 h. The effects of pharmacological inhibitors of oxidative stress or inflammation (N-acetyl cysteine, ibuprofen, acetaminophen were also tested. Inhibitors were added 30 min before OXA treatment and then in combination with OXA for 24 h. In SH-SY5Y cells, OXA caused a significant dose-dependent decrease in viability, a large increase in ROS and NO production, lipid peroxidation and mitochondrial impairment as assessed by a drop in mitochondrial membrane potential, which are deleterious for the cell. An increase in levels of negatively charged phospholipids such as cardiolipin but also phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol, was also observed. Additionally, OXA caused concentration-dependent P2X7 receptor activation, increased chromatin condensation and caspase-3 activation associated with TNF-α and IL-6 release. The majority of these toxic effects were equally observed in Raw 264.7 which also presented high levels of PGE2. Pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with pharmacological inhibitors significantly reduced or blocked all the neurotoxic OXA effects. In OXA-treated mice (28 mg/kg cumulated dose significant cold hyperalgesia and oxidative stress in the tested brain areas were shown. Our study suggests that targeting P2X7 receptor activation and mitochondrial impairment might be a potential therapeutic strategy against OXA-induced neuropathic pain.

  5. Cytotoxic activity, DNA damage, cellular uptake, apoptosis and western blot analysis of ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complex against human lung decarcinoma A549 cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Shang-Hai; Jiang, Guang-Bin; Yao, Jun-Hua; Li, Wei; Han, Bing-Jie; Zhang, Cheng; Zeng, Chuan-Chuan; Liu, Yun-Jun

    2015-11-01

    A new ruthenium(II) polypyridyl complex [Ru(dmp)2(pddppn)](ClO4)2Ru1 was synthesized and characterized. The cytotoxic activity in vitro of the complex was evaluated by MTT method. Ru1 shows high effect on the inhibition of the cell growth against BEL-7402, HeLa, MG-63 and A549 cells with low IC50 values of 1.6±0.4, 9.0±0.8, 1.5±0.2 and 1.5±0.3 μM, respectively. The cellular uptake indicates that Ru1 can enter into the cytoplasm and accumulate in the cell nuclei. Ru1 can induce apoptosis in A549 cells and enhance the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induce the decrease of mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, Ru1 can down-regulate the levels of Bcl-2, Bcl-x, Bak, and Bim expression and up-regulate the expression of Bag-1 and Bad. The complex induces apoptosis of A549 cells through an intrinsic ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction pathway, which was accompanied by regulating the expression of caspases and Bcl-2 family proteins. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Review of quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy: promising novel imaging technique to resolve neuronal network activity and identify cellular biomarkers of psychiatric disorders

    KAUST Repository

    Marquet, Pierre

    2014-09-22

    Quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) has recently emerged as a new powerful quantitative imaging technique well suited to noninvasively explore a transparent specimen with a nanometric axial sensitivity. In this review, we expose the recent developments of quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM). Quantitative phase-digital holographic microscopy (QP-DHM) represents an important and efficient quantitative phase method to explore cell structure and dynamics. In a second part, the most relevant QPM applications in the field of cell biology are summarized. A particular emphasis is placed on the original biological information, which can be derived from the quantitative phase signal. In a third part, recent applications obtained, with QP-DHM in the field of cellular neuroscience, namely the possibility to optically resolve neuronal network activity and spine dynamics, are presented. Furthermore, potential applications of QPM related to psychiatry through the identification of new and original cell biomarkers that, when combined with a range of other biomarkers, could significantly contribute to the determination of high risk developmental trajectories for psychiatric disorders, are discussed.

  7. Simultaneous structure-activity studies and arming of natural products by C–H amination reveal cellular targets of eupalmerin acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Cisar, Justin S.; Zhou, Congying; Vera, Brunilda; Williams, Howard; Rodríguez, Abimael D.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Romo, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    To fully exploit the inherent and enduring potential of natural products for fundamental cell biology and drug lead discovery, synthetic methods for functionalizing unique sites are highly desirable. Here we describe a strategy for the derivatization of natural products at ‘unfunctionalized’ positions via Rh(II)-catalyzed amination enabling simultaneous structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies and arming (alkynylation) of natural products. Employing Du Bois C–H amination, allylic and benzylic C–H bonds underwent amination and olefins underwent aziridination. With tertiary amine-containing natural products, amidines were produced via C–H amination/oxidation and unusual N-aminations provided hydrazine sulfamate inner salts. The alkynylated derivatives are readied for subsequent conjugation to access cellular probes for mechanism of action studies. Both chemo- and site-selectivity was studied by application to a diverse set of natural products including the marine-derived anticancer diterpene, eupalmerin acetate (EPA). Quantitative proteome profiling with an alkynyl EPA derivative obtained by site-selective, allylic C–H amination led to identification of several protein targets in HL-60 cells, including several known to be associated with cancer proliferation, suggestive of a polypharmacological mode of action for EPA. PMID:23695633

  8. Local immunosuppression induced by high viral load of human papillomavirus: characterization of cellular phenotypes producing interleukin-10 in cervical neoplastic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Thiago Theodoro Martins; Bonin, Camila Mareti; Ferreira, Alda Maria Teixeira; Padovani, Cacilda Tezelli Junqueira; Fernandes, Carlos Eurico dos Santos; Machado, Ana Paula; Tozetti, Inês Aparecida

    2015-09-01

    A specific immune response to human papillomavirus (HPV) in the cervical microenvironment plays a key role in eradicating infection and eliminating mutated cells. However, high-risk HPVs modulate immune cells to create an immunosuppressive microenvironment, and induce these immune cells to produce interleukin 10 (IL-10). This production of IL-10, in conjunction with HPV infection, contributes to the appearance of cervical neoplastic lesions. We sought to characterize the IL-10-producing cellular phenotype, and investigate the influence of host and HPV factors upon the induction of an immunosuppressive microenvironment. Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated an increase in IL-10 production by keratinocytes, macrophages and Langerhans cells in high-grade cervical lesions and cervical cancer. This increase was more pronounced in patients older than 30 years, and was also correlated with high viral load, and infection with a single HPV type, particularly high-risk HPVs. Our results indicate the existence of a highly immunosuppressive microenvironment composed of different IL-10-producing cellular phenotypes in cervical cancer samples, and samples classified as high-grade cervical lesions (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia stages II and III). The immunosuppressive microenvironment that developed for these different cellular phenotypes favours viral persistence and neoplastic progression.

  9. Production of high specific activity silicon-32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, D.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Brzezinski, M.A. [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Marine Biotechnology Center

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project (LDRD) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). There were two primary objectives for the work performed under this project. The first was to take advantage of capabilities and facilities at Los Alamos to produce the radionuclide {sup 32}Si in unusually high specific activity. The second was to combine the radioanalytical expertise at Los Alamos with the expertise at the University of California to develop methods for the application of {sup 32}Si in biological oceanographic research related to global climate modeling. The first objective was met by developing targetry for proton spallation production of {sup 32}Si in KCl targets and chemistry for its recovery in very high specific activity. The second objective was met by developing a validated field-useable, radioanalytical technique, based upon gas-flow proportional counting, to measure the dynamics of silicon uptake by naturally occurring diatoms.

  10. Integrating high-content imaging and chemical genetics to probe host cellular pathways critical for Yersinia pestis infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna P Kota

    Full Text Available The molecular machinery that regulates the entry and survival of Yersinia pestis in host macrophages is poorly understood. Here, we report the development of automated high-content imaging assays to quantitate the internalization of virulent Y. pestis CO92 by macrophages and the subsequent activation of host NF-κB. Implementation of these assays in a focused chemical screen identified kinase inhibitors that inhibited both of these processes. Rac-2-ethoxy-3 octadecanamido-1-propylphosphocholine (a protein Kinase C inhibitor, wortmannin (a PI3K inhibitor, and parthenolide (an IκB kinase inhibitor, inhibited pathogen-induced NF-κB activation and reduced bacterial entry and survival within macrophages. Parthenolide inhibited NF-κB activation in response to stimulation with Pam3CSK4 (a TLR2 agonist, E. coli LPS (a TLR4 agonist or Y. pestis infection, while the PI3K and PKC inhibitors were selective only for Y. pestis infection. Together, our results suggest that phagocytosis is the major stimulus for NF-κB activation in response to Y. pestis infection, and that Y. pestis entry into macrophages may involve the participation of protein kinases such as PI3K and PKC. More importantly, the automated image-based screening platform described here can be applied to the study of other bacteria in general and, in combination with chemical genetic screening, can be used to identify host cell functions facilitating the identification of novel antibacterial therapeutics.

  11. Bufalin-loaded mPEG-PLGA-PLL-cRGD nanoparticles: preparation, cellular uptake, tissue distribution, and anticancer activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan YR

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Peihao Yin,1,* Yan Wang,1,* YanYan Qiu,1 LiLi Hou,1 Xuan Liu,1 Jianmin Qin,1 Yourong Duan,2 Peifeng Liu,2 Ming Qiu,3 Qi Li11Department of Clinical Oncology, Putuo Hospital and Interventional Cancer Institute of Integrative Medicine, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, China; 2Shanghai Cancer Institute, Jiaotong University, Shanghai, China; 3Department of General Surgery, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, China *These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Recent studies have shown that bufalin has a good antitumor effect but has high toxicity, poor water solubility, a short half-life, a narrow therapeutic window, and a toxic dose that is close to the therapeutic dose, which all limit its clinical application. This study aimed to determine the targeting efficacy of nanoparticles (NPs made of methoxy polyethylene glycol (mPEG, polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA, poly-L-lysine (PLL, and cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (cRGD loaded with bufalin, ie, bufalin-loaded mPEG-PLGA-PLL-cRGD nanoparticles (BNPs, in SW620 colon cancer-bearing mice.Methods: BNPs showed uniform size. The size, shape, zeta potential, drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, and release of these nanoparticles were studied in vitro. The tumor targeting, cellular uptake, and growth-inhibitory effect of BNPs in vivo were tested.Results: BNPs were of uniform size with an average particle size of 164 ± 84 nm and zeta potential of 2.77 mV. The encapsulation efficiency was 81.7% ± 0.89%, and the drug load was 3.92% ± 0.16%. The results of in vitro cytotoxicity studies showed that although the blank NPs were nontoxic, they enhanced the cytotoxicity of bufalin in BNPs. Drug release experiments showed that the release of the drug was prolonged and sustained. The results of confocal laser scanning microscopy indicated that BNPs could effectively bind to human umbilical vein endothelial cells. In the SW620

  12. Active vibration isolation of high precision machines

    CERN Document Server

    Collette, C; Artoos, K; Hauviller, C

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a review of active control strategies used to isolate high precisionmachines (e.g. telescopes, particle colliders, interferometers, lithography machines or atomic force microscopes) from external disturbances. The objective of this review is to provide tools to develop the best strategy for a given application. Firstly, the main strategies are presented and compared, using single degree of freedom models. Secondly, the case of huge structures constituted of a large number of elements, like particle colliders or segmented telescopes, is considered.

  13. A cellular reporter to evaluate CRM1 nuclear export activity: functional analysis of the cancer-related mutant E571K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Santisteban, Iraia; Arregi, Igor; Alonso-Mariño, Marián; Urbaneja, María A; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J; Bañuelos, Sonia; Rodríguez, Jose A

    2016-12-01

    The exportin CRM1 binds nuclear export signals (NESs), and mediates active transport of NES-bearing proteins from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Structural and biochemical analyses have uncovered the molecular mechanisms underlying CRM1/NES interaction. CRM1 binds NESs through a hydrophobic cleft, whose open or closed conformation facilitates NES binding and release. Several cofactors allosterically modulate the conformation of the NES-binding cleft through intramolecular interactions involving an acidic loop and a C-terminal helix in CRM1. This current model of CRM1-mediated nuclear export has not yet been evaluated in a cellular setting. Here, we describe SRV100, a cellular reporter to interrogate CRM1 nuclear export activity. Using this novel tool, we provide evidence further validating the model of NES binding and release by CRM1. Furthermore, using both SRV100-based cellular assays and in vitro biochemical analyses, we investigate the functional consequences of a recurrent cancer-related mutation, which targets a residue near CRM1 NES-binding cleft. Our data indicate that this mutation does not necessarily abrogate the nuclear export activity of CRM1, but may increase its affinity for NES sequences bearing a more negatively charged C-terminal end.

  14. Retinol-binding protein 4 and its membrane receptor STRA6 control adipogenesis by regulating cellular retinoid homeostasis and retinoic acid receptor α activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muenzner, Matthias; Tuvia, Neta; Deutschmann, Claudia; Witte, Nicole; Tolkachov, Alexander; Valai, Atijeh; Henze, Andrea; Sander, Leif E; Raila, Jens; Schupp, Michael

    2013-10-01

    Retinoids are vitamin A (retinol) derivatives and complex regulators of adipogenesis by activating specific nuclear receptors, including the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR). Circulating retinol-binding protein 4 (RBP4) and its membrane receptor STRA6 coordinate cellular retinol uptake. It is unknown whether retinol levels and the activity of RAR and RXR in adipocyte precursors are linked via RBP4/STRA6. Here, we show that STRA6 is expressed in precursor cells and, dictated by the apo- and holo-RBP4 isoforms, mediates bidirectional retinol transport that controls RARα activity and subsequent adipocyte differentiation. Mobilization of retinoid stores in mice by inducing RBP4 secretion from the liver activated RARα signaling in the precursor cell containing the stromal-vascular fraction of adipose tissue. Retinol-loaded holo-RBP4 blocked adipocyte differentiation of cultured precursors by activating RARα. Remarkably, retinol-free apo-RBP4 triggered retinol efflux that reduced cellular retinoids, RARα activity, and target gene expression and enhanced adipogenesis synergistically with ectopic STRA6. Thus, STRA6 in adipocyte precursor cells links nuclear RARα activity to the circulating RBP4 isoforms, whose ratio in obese mice was shifted toward limiting the adipogenic potential of their precursors. This novel cross talk identifies a retinol-dependent metabolic function of RBP4 that may have important implications for the treatment of obesity.

  15. Active dissemination of cellular antigens by DCs facilitates CD8(+) T-cell priming in lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Irina; Feferman, Tali; Milo, Idan; Tal, Orna; Golani, Ofra; Drexler, Ingo; Shakhar, Guy

    2017-09-05

    Antigen (Ag)-specific activation of naïve T cells by migrating dendritic cells (DCs) is a highly efficient process, although the chances for their co-localization in lymph nodes (LNs) appear low. Ag presentation may be delegated from Ag-donor DCs to the abundant resident DCs, but the routes of Ag transfer and how it facilitates T-cell activation remain unclear. We visualized CD8(+) T cell-DC interactions to study the sites, routes and cells mediating Ag transfer in mice. In vitro, Ag transfer from isolated ovalbumin (OVA)(+) bone marrow (BM)-DCs triggered widespread arrest, Ca(2+) flux and CD69 upregulation in OT-I T cells contacting recipient DCs. Intravital two-photon imaging revealed that survival of Ag-donor DCs in LNs was required for Ag dissemination among resident CD11c(+) DCs. Upon interaction with recipient DCs, CD8(+) T cells clustered, upregulated CD69, proliferated and differentiated into effectors. Few DCs sufficed for activation, and for efficient Ag dissemination LFA-1 expression on recipient DCs was essential. Similar findings characterized DCs infected with a replication-deficient OVA-expressing Vaccinia virus known to downregulate MHC-I. Overall, active Ag dissemination from live incoming DCs helped activate CD8(+) T cells by increasing the number of effective presenting cells and salvaged T-cell priming when Ag-donor DCs could not present Ag. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. IN ABSENCE OF THE CELLULAR PRION PROTEIN, ALTERATIONS IN COPPER METABOLISM AND COPPER-DEPENDENT OXIDASE ACTIVITY AFFECT IRON DISTRIBUTION

    OpenAIRE

    Lisa Gasperini; Elisa Meneghetti; Giuseppe Legname; Federico Benetti

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defin...

  17. In Absence of the Cellular Prion Protein, Alterations in Copper Metabolism and Copper-Dependent Oxidase Activity Affect Iron Distribution

    OpenAIRE

    Gasperini, Lisa; Meneghetti, Elisa; Legname, Giuseppe; Benetti, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Essential elements as copper and iron modulate a wide range of physiological functions. Their metabolism is strictly regulated by cellular pathways, since dysregulation of metal homeostasis is responsible for many detrimental effects. Neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and prion diseases are characterized by alterations of metal ions. These neurodegenerative maladies involve proteins that bind metals and mediate their metabolism through not well-defin...

  18. Cellular Response to Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bo; YAN Shi-Wei

    2011-01-01

    To explore the nonlinear activities of the cellular signaling system composed of one transcriptional arm and one protein-interaction arm, we use an irradiation-response module to study the dynamics of stochastic interactions.It is shown that the oscillatory behavior could be described in a unified way when the radiation-derived signal and noise are incorporated.

  19. Deranged Bioenergetics and Defective Redox Capacity in T Lymphocytes and Neutrophils Are Related to Cellular Dysfunction and Increased Oxidative Stress in Patients with Active Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko-Jen Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary excretion of N-benzoyl-glycyl-Nε-(hexanonyllysine, a biomarker of oxidative stress, was higher in 26 patients with active systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE than in 11 non-SLE patients with connective tissue diseases and in 14 healthy volunteers. We hypothesized that increased oxidative stress in active SLE might be attributable to deranged bioenergetics, defective reduction-oxidation (redox capacity, or other factors. We demonstrated that, compared to normal cells, T lymphocytes (T and polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN of active SLE showed defective expression of facilitative glucose transporters GLUT-3 and GLUT-6, which led to increased intracellular basal lactate and decreased ATP production. In addition, the redox capacity, including intracellular GSH levels and the enzyme activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px and γ-glutamyl-transpeptidase (GGT, was decreased in SLE-T. Compared to normal cells, SLE-PMN showed decreased intracellular GSH levels, and GGT enzyme activity was found in SLE-PMN and enhanced expression of CD53, a coprecipitating molecule for GGT. We conclude that deranged cellular bioenergetics and defective redox capacity in T and PMN are responsible for cellular immune dysfunction and are related to increased oxidative stress in active SLE patients.

  20. High Energy Activation Data Library (HEAD-2009)

    CERN Document Server

    Korovin, Yury A; Konobeyev, Alexander Yu; Stankovskiy, Alexey Yu; Mashnik, Stepan G

    2010-01-01

    A proton activation data library for 682 nuclides from 1-H to 210-Po in the energy range from 150 MeV up to 1 GeV was developed. To calculate proton activation data, the MCNPX 2.6.0 and CASCADE/INPE codes were chosen. Different intranuclear cascade, preequilibrium, and equilibrium nuclear reaction models and their combinations were used. The optimum calculation models have been chosen on the basis of statistical correlations for calculated and experimental proton data taken from the EXFOR library of experimental nuclear data. All the data are written in ENDF-6 format. The library is called HEPAD-2008 (High-Energy Proton Activation Data). A revision of IEAF-2005 neutron activation data library has been performed: A set of nuclides for which the cross-section data can be (and were) updated using more modern and improved models is specified, and the corresponding calculations have been made in the present work. The new version of the library is called IEAF-2009. The HEPAD-2008 and IEAF-2009 are merged to the fin...

  1. Tempo-spatially resolved cellular dynamics of human immunodeficiency virus transacting activator of transcription (Tat) peptide-modified nanocargos in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lin; Yang, Qiaoyu; Xiao, Lehui

    2014-08-01

    Understanding the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular fate of nanocarriers in living cells is of great importance for the rational design of efficient drug delivery cargos as well as the development of robust biomedical diagnostic probes. In present study, with a dual wavelength view darkfield microscope (DWVD), the tempo-spatially resolved dynamics of Tat peptide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (TGNPs, with size similar to viruses) in living HeLa cells were extensively explored. It was found that energy-dependent endocytosis (both clathrin- and caveolae-mediated processes were involved) was the prevailing pathway for the cellular uptake of TGNPs. The time-correlated dynamic spatial distribution information revealed that TGNPs could not actively target the cell nuclei, which is contrary to previous observations based on fixed cell results. More importantly, the inheritance of TGNPs to the daughter cells through mitosis was found to be the major route to metabolize TGNPs by HeLa cells. These understandings on the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular fate of nanocargos in living cells would provide deep insight on how to improve and controllably manipulate their translocation efficiency for targeted drug delivery.Understanding the cellular uptake mechanism and intracellular fate of nanocarriers in living cells is of great importance for the rational design of efficient drug delivery cargos as well as the development of robust biomedical diagnostic probes. In present study, with a dual wavelength view darkfield microscope (DWVD), the tempo-spatially resolved dynamics of Tat peptide-functionalized gold nanoparticles (TGNPs, with size similar to viruses) in living HeLa cells were extensively explored. It was found that energy-dependent endocytosis (both clathrin- and caveolae-mediated processes were involved) was the prevailing pathway for the cellular uptake of TGNPs. The time-correlated dynamic spatial distribution information revealed that TGNPs

  2. Relation of murine thoracic aortic structural and cellular changes with aging to passive and active mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Jason B; Mukherjee, Rupak; Stroud, Robert E; Jones, Jeffrey A; Ikonomidis, John S

    2015-02-25

    Maintenance of the structure and mechanical properties of the thoracic aorta contributes to aortic function and is dependent on the composition of the extracellular matrix and the cellular content within the aortic wall. Age-related alterations in the aorta include changes in cellular content and composition of the extracellular matrix; however, the precise roles of these age-related changes in altering aortic mechanical function are not well understood. Thoracic aortic rings from the descending segment were harvested from C57BL/6 mice aged 6 and 21 months. Thoracic aortic diameter and wall thickness were higher in the old mice. Cellular density was reduced in the medial layer of aortas from the old mice; concomitantly, collagen content was higher in old mice, but elastin content was similar between young and old mice. Stress relaxation, an index of compliance, was reduced in aortas from old mice and correlated with collagen fraction. Contractility of the aortic rings following potassium stimulation was reduced in old versus young mice. Furthermore, collagen gel contraction by aortic smooth muscle cells was reduced with age. These results demonstrate that numerous age-related structural changes occurred in the thoracic aorta and were related to alterations in mechanical properties. Aortic contractility decreased with age, likely because of a reduction in medial cell number in addition to a smooth muscle contractile deficit. Together, these unique findings provide evidence that the age-related changes in structure and mechanical function coalesce to provide an aortic substrate that may be predisposed to aortopathies. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  3. CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR BASIS OF HAPLOIDENTICAL HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN THE SUCCESSFUL TREATMENT OF HIGH RISK LEUKEMIAS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANCO eLOCATELLI

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells are involved in innate immune responses and play a major role in tumor surveillance and in defence against viruses. Human NK cells recognize HLA-class I molecules via surface receptors (KIR and NKG2A delivering signals that inhibit NK cell function and kill HLA-class I-deficient target cells, a frequent event in tumors or virus-infected cells. NK cell triggering is mediated by activating receptors that recognize ligands expressed primarily on tumors or virus-infected cells. NK cells play also a key role in the cure of high-risk leukemias. Thus, donor-derived alloreactive NK cells are fundamental effectors in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML and in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients undergoing haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. Alloreactive NK cells mediate killing of leukemia cells and patient’s DC, thus preventing respectively leukemic relapses and graft-versus-host responses. FACS analysis of KIRs expressed by NK cells allows to define the size of the alloreactive NK subset and the selection of the best potential donor. Recently, it has been shown that also the expression of activating KIRs, in particular the (C2-specific KIR2DS1, may contribute to donor NK alloreactivity. It has also been established a correlation between the size of the alloreactive NK cell population and the clinical outcome. Notably, the alloreactive NK cells derived from donor’s HSC are generated and persist in patients over time. The high survival rates of patients undergoing haploidentical HSCT highlight an important new reality in the setting of allograft performed to cure otherwise fatal leukemias. Novel approaches are in progress to further improve the clinical outcome based on the infusion of donor alloreactive NK cells either as a component of the transplanted cell population or as in vitro expanded NK cells.

  4. Increased BK viremia and progression to BK-virus nephropathy following high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin for acute cellular rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonyapredee, Maytee; Knight, Kendral; Little, Dustin

    2014-06-01

    BK virus nephropathy and cellular rejection are common causes of allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients. The two can be difficult to distinguish on allograft biopsy and can be present simultaneously. Management of the patient with coexistent BK infection and rejection is complicated by the conflicting ideals of decreasing immunosuppression to treat the former and increasing immunosuppression to treat the latter. The authors present the case of a 57-year-old renal transplant recipient who underwent allograft biopsy 8 weeks post-transplant for evaluation of increased serum creatinine in the setting of BK viremia (BKV). Biopsy revealed Banff classification 1b acute cellular rejection, with insufficient evidence to diagnose BK virus-associated nephropathy. The patient was administered intravenous immune globulin (IVIG), with no other changes in immunosuppressive therapy. Plasma and urine BK increased exponentially following IVIG administration, and allograft function further deteriorated. Repeat biopsy showed overt BK viral nephropathy, and BKV and creatinine decreased only after reduction in immunosuppression and initiation of leflunomide. Although case series have suggested a potential role for IVIG in the setting of BK infection, further study is needed to define the safety and efficacy of this approach. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  5. Small and intermediate conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels confer distinctive patterns of distribution in human tissues and differential cellular localisation in the colon and corpus cavernosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mao Xiang; Gorman, Shelby A; Benson, Bill; Singh, Kuljit; Hieble, J Paul; Michel, Martin C; Tate, Simon N; Trezise, Derek J

    2004-06-01

    The SK/IK family of small and intermediate conductance calcium-activated potassium channels contains four members, SK1, SK2, SK3 and IK1, and is important for the regulation of a variety of neuronal and non-neuronal functions. In this study we have analysed the distribution of these channels in human tissues and their cellular localisation in samples of colon and corpus cavernosum. SK1 mRNA was detected almost exclusively in neuronal tissues. SK2 mRNA distribution was restricted but more widespread than SK1, and was detected in adrenal gland, brain, prostate, bladder, liver and heart. SK3 mRNA was detected in almost every tissue examined. It was highly expressed in brain and in smooth muscle-rich tissues including the clitoris and the corpus cavernosum, and expression in the corpus cavernosum was upregulated up to 5-fold in patients undergoing sex-change operations. IK1 mRNA was present in surface-rich, secretory and inflammatory cell-rich tissues, highest in the trachea, prostate, placenta and salivary glands. In detailed immunohistochemical studies of the colon and the corpus cavernosum, SK1-like immunoreactivity was observed in the enteric neurons. SK3-like immunoreactivity was observed strongly in smooth muscle and vascular endothelium. IK1-like immunoreactivity was mainly observed in inflammatory cells and enteric neurons of the colon, but absent in corpus cavernosum. These distinctive patterns of distribution suggest that these channels are likely to have different biological functions and could be specifically targeted for a number of human diseases, such as irritable bowel syndrome, hypertension and erectile dysfunction.

  6. Chemically crosslinked nanogels of PEGylated poly ethyleneimine (L-histidine substituted) synthesized via metal ion coordinated self-assembly for delivery of methotrexate: Cytocompatibility, cellular delivery and antitumor activity in resistant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abolmaali, Samira Sadat, E-mail: s.abolmaali@gmail.com [Pharmaceutical Nanotechnology Department, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz 71345 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tamaddon, Ali Mohammad, E-mail: amtamadon@gmail.com [Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz 71345 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadi, Samaneh, E-mail: samaneh.mohammadi1986@gmail.com [Center for Nanotechnology in Drug Delivery, Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz 71345 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Amoozgar, Zohreh, E-mail: zohreh_amoozgar@dfci.harvard.edu [Department of Cancer Immunology and Aids, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Dinarvand, Rasoul, E-mail: dinarvand@tums.ac.ir [Faculty of Pharmacy, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran 14174 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-05-01

    Self-assembled nanogels were engineered by forming Zn{sup 2+}-coordinated micellar templates of PEGylated poly ethyleneimine (PEG-g-PEI), chemical crosslinking and subsequent removal of the metal ion. Creation of stable micellar templates is a crucial step for preparing the nanogels. To this aim, imidazole moieties were introduced to the polymer by Fmoc-L-histidine using carbodiimide chemistry. It was hypothesized the nanogels loaded with methotrexate (MTX), a chemotherapeutic agent, circumvent impaired carrier activity in HepG2 cells (MTX-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma). So, the nanogels were post-loaded with MTX and characterized by {sup 1}H-NMR, FTIR, dynamic light scattering-zeta potential, atomic force microscopy, and drug release experiments. Cellular uptake and the antitumor activity of MTX-loaded nanogels were investigated by flow cytometry and MTT assay. Discrete, spherical and uniform nanogels, with sizes about 77–83 nm and a relatively high drug loading (54 ± 4% w/w), showed a low polydispersity and neutral surface charges. The MTX-loaded nanogels, unlike empty nanogels, lowered viability of HepG2 cells; the nanogels demonstrated cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis comparably higher than MTX as free drug that was shown to be through i) cellular uptake of the nanogels by clathrin-mediated transport and ii) endosomolytic activity of the nanogels in HepG2 cells. These findings indicate the potential antitumor application of this preparation, which has to be investigated in-vivo. - Highlights: • Nanogel synthesis through chemical crosslinking of the transition metal ion coordinated polymer self-assembly • An enhanced cytocompatibility if compared to unmodified polymer • A noticeable endocytic cellular internalization and endosomolytic activity • A specific antitumor cytotoxicity, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in resistant tumor cells.

  7. The Arabidopsis homeobox gene SHOOT MERISTEMLESS has cellular and meristem-organisational roles with differential requirements for cytokinin and CYCD3 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scofield, Simon; Dewitte, Walter; Nieuwland, Jeroen; Murray, James A H

    2013-07-01

    The Arabidopsis class-1 KNOX gene SHOOT MERISTEMLESS (STM) encodes a homeodomain transcription factor essential for shoot apical meristem (SAM) formation and sustained activity. STM activates cytokinin (CK) biosynthesis in the SAM, but the extent to which STM function is mediated through CK is unclear. Here we show that STM inhibits cellular differentiation and endoreduplication, acting through CK and the CK-inducible CYCD3 cell cycle regulators, establishing a mechanistic link to cell cycle control which provides sustained mitotic activity to maintain a pool of undifferentiated cells in the SAM. Equivalent functions are revealed for the related KNOX genes KNAT1/BP and KNAT2 through ectopic expression. STM is also required for proper meristem organisation and can induce de novo meristem formation when expressed ectopically, even when CK levels are reduced or CK signaling is impaired. This function in meristem establishment and organisation can be replaced by KNAT1/BP, but not KNAT2, despite its activation of CK responses, suggesting that promotion of CK responses alone is insufficient for SAM organisation. We propose that STM has dual cellular and meristem-organisational functions that are differentially represented in the class-1 KNOX gene family and have differing requirements for CK and CYCD3. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. High inorganic phosphate causes DNMT1 phosphorylation and subsequent fibrotic fibroblast activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Xiaoying [Department of Nephrology and Rheumatology, Göttingen University Medical Center, Georg August University, Göttingen (Germany); Department of Cardiology and Pneumology, Göttingen University Medical Center, Georg August University, Göttingen (Germany); Xu, Xingbo [Department of Cardiology and Pneumology, Göttingen University Medical Center, Georg August University, Göttingen (Germany); Zeisberg, Elisabeth M. [Department of Cardiology and Pneumology, Göttingen University Medical Center, Georg August University, Göttingen (Germany); German Center for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Göttingen (Germany); Zeisberg, Michael, E-mail: mzeisberg@med.uni-goettingen.de [Department of Nephrology and Rheumatology, Göttingen University Medical Center, Georg August University, Göttingen (Germany); German Center for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK), Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-04-08

    Phosphate is an essential constituent of critical cellular functions including energy metabolism, nucleic acid synthesis and phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling. Increased plasma phosphate levels are an independent risk factor for lowered life-expectancy as well as for heart and kidney failure. Nevertheless, direct cellular effects of elevated phosphate concentrations within the microenvironment are poorly understood and have been largely neglected in favor of phosphor-regulatory hormones. Because interstitial fibrosis is the common determinant of chronic progressive kidney disease, and because fibroblasts are major mediators of fibrogenesis, we here explored the effect of high extracellular phosphate levels on renal fibroblasts. We demonstrate that high inorganic phosphate directly induces fibrotic fibroblast activation associated with increased proliferative activity, increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin and increased synthesis of type I collagen. We further demonstrate that such fibroblast activation is dependent on phosphate influx, aberrant phosphorylation of DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 and aberrant CpG island promoter methylation. In summary, our studies demonstrate that elevated phosphate concentrations induce pro-fibrotic fibroblast activation independent of phospho-regulatory hormones. - Highlights: • We exposed human kidney fibroblasts to media containing 1 mM or 3 mM phosphate. • Increased phosphate influx causes phosphorylation of DNA methyltransferase Dnmt1. • Phosphorylated Dnmt1 causes promoter methylation and transcriptional silencing of RASAL1. • Depletion of RASAL1 causes increased intrinsic Ras-GTP activity and fibroblast activation. • Inorganic phosphate causes fibroblast activation independent of phospho-regulatory hormones.

  9. Architected Cellular Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaedler, Tobias A.; Carter, William B.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing enables fabrication of materials with intricate cellular architecture, whereby progress in 3D printing techniques is increasing the possible configurations of voids and solids ad infinitum. Examples are microlattices with graded porosity and truss structures optimized for specific loading conditions. The cellular architecture determines the mechanical properties and density of these materials and can influence a wide range of other properties, e.g., acoustic, thermal, and biological properties. By combining optimized cellular architectures with high-performance metals and ceramics, several lightweight materials that exhibit strength and stiffness previously unachievable at low densities were recently demonstrated. This review introduces the field of architected materials; summarizes the most common fabrication methods, with an emphasis on additive manufacturing; and discusses recent progress in the development of architected materials. The review also discusses important applications, including lightweight structures, energy absorption, metamaterials, thermal management, and bioscaffolds.

  10. Concrete with Highly Active Rice Husk Ash

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG Qing-ge; LIN Qing-yu; YU Qi-jun; ZHAO San-ying; YANG Lu-feng; Shuichi Sugita

    2004-01-01

    The overall aim was to investigate the effect of highly active rice husk ash (RHA) produced by an industrial furnace on some properties of concrete. The strength, pore volume and pore distribution of concrete and the Ca(OH)2 content in concrete were investigated by JIS A 1108 (Method of test for compressive strength of concrete), a mercury instrument porosimeter, and the thermogravimetric analysis, respectively. The results show that,with RHA replacement of cement,the compressive strength of concrete is increased evidently;the average pore radius of concrete is greatly decreased, especially the portion of the pores greater than 20nm in radius is decreased while the amount of smaller pores is increased, and the more the RHA replacement, the less the amount of Ca(OH)2 in concrete. The latter two results are the main reasons for the strength enhancement of concrete.

  11. A possible role for extra-cellular ATP in plant responses to high frequency, low amplitude electromagnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, David; Faure, Catherine; Bonnet, Pierre; Girard, Sébastien; Ledoigt, Gérard; Davies, Eric; Gendraud, Michel; Paladian, Françoise; Vian, Alain

    2008-06-01

    In parallel to evoking the accumulation of stress-related transcripts, exposure to low level 900 MHz EMF affected the levels of ATP, the main energy molecule of the cell. Its concentration dropped rapidly (27% after 30 min) in response to EMF exposure, along with a 18% decrease in the adenylate energy charge (AEC), a good marker of cell energy status. One could interpret this decrease in ATP and AEC in a classical way, i.e., as the result of an increase in cellular energy usage, but recent work brings exciting new insights in pointing out a signalling function for ATP, especially in the stress physiology context where it could trigger both reactive oxygen species and calcium movement (this latter being involved in plant responses to EMF exposure). In this addendum, we discuss our results within this new perspective for ATP function.

  12. Humoral and cellular immunity to hepatitis B virus-derived antigens: comparative activity of Freund complete adjuvant alum, and liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Y; Ionescu-Matiu, I; Dreesman, G R; Kramp, W; Six, H R; Hollinger, F B; Melnick, J L

    1980-01-01

    Complete Freud adjuvant, aluminum gel, and liposomes were compared for their ability to enhance the immunogenicity of an intact 22-nm HBsAg particle vaccine and an HBsAg-derived polypeptide vaccine in guinea pigs. Both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses were evaluated. The greatest immune response was obtained with complete Freund adjuvant, regardless of the antigen preparation. Aluminum gel appeared to be a better adjuvant for 22-nm HBsAg particles, but the liposomes rendered polypeptide preparations more immunogenic. The possibility that various proportions were entrapped in aqueous compartments instead of being inserted into the lipid bilayers of liposomes might account for this difference. The development of both humoral and cellular immunity was dependent upon the use of an adjuvant, because aqueous preparations had poor immunogenicity. PMID:7014445

  13. Enhanced cellular activities of polycaprolactone/alginate-based cell-laden hierarchical scaffolds for hard tissue engineering applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, HyeongJin; Kim, GeunHyung

    2014-09-15

    Biomedical scaffolds have been widely investigated because they are essential for support and promotion of cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation in three-dimensional (3D) structures. An ideal scaffold should be highly porous to enable efficient nutrient and oxygen transfer and have a 3D structure that provides optimal micro-environmental conditions for the seeded cells to obtain homogeneous growth after a long culture period. In this study, new hierarchical osteoblast-like cell (MG-63)-laden scaffolds consisting of micro-sized struts/inter-layered micro-nanofibres and cell-laden hydrogel struts with mechanically stable and biologically superior properties were introduced. Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) was used as a sacrificial component to generate pores within the cell-laden hydrogel struts to attain a homogeneous cell distribution and rapid cell growth in the scaffold interior. The alginate-based cell-laden struts with PEO induced fast/homogeneous cell release, in contrast to nonporous cell-laden struts. Various weight fractions (0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 3.5 wt%) of PEO were used, of which 2 wt% PEO in the cell-laden strut resulted in the most appropriate cell release and enhanced biological activities (cell proliferation and calcium deposition), compared to nonporous cell-laden struts.

  14. A Monosaccharide Residue Is Sufficient to Maintain Mouse and Human IgG Subclass Activity and Directs IgG Effector Functions to Cellular Fc Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Kao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin G (IgG glycosylation modulates antibody activity and represents a major source of heterogeneity within antibody preparations. Depending on their glycosylation pattern, individual IgG glycovariants present in recombinant antibody preparations may trigger effects ranging from enhanced pro-inflammatory activity to increased anti-inflammatory activity. In contrast, reduction of IgG glycosylation beyond the central mannose core is generally believed to result in impaired IgG activity. However, this study reveals that a mono- or disaccharide structure consisting of one N-acetylglucosamine with or without a branching fucose residue is sufficient to retain the activity of the most active human and mouse IgG subclasses in vivo and further directs antibody activity to cellular Fcγ receptors. Notably, the activity of minimally glycosylated antibodies is not predicted by in vitro assays based on a monomeric antibody-Fcγ-receptor interaction analysis, whereas in vitro assay systems using immune complexes are more suitable to predict IgG activity in vivo.

  15. Rapid solid-phase microwave synthesis of highly photoluminescent nitrogen-doped carbon dots for Fe3+ detection and cellular bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guili; Xu, Minghan; Shu, Mengjun; Li, Xiaolin; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Liling; Su, Yanjie; Hu, Nantao; Zhang, Yafei

    2016-09-01

    Recently, carbon dots (CDs) have been playing an increasingly important role in industrial production and biomedical field because of their excellent properties. As such, finding an efficient method to quickly synthesize a large scale of relatively high purity CDs is of great interest. Herein, a facile and novel microwave method has been applied to prepare nitrogen doped CDs (N-doped CDs) within 8 min using L-glutamic acid as the sole reaction precursor in the solid phase condition. The as-prepared N-doped CDs with an average size of 1.64 nm are well dispersed in aqueous solution. The photoluminescence of N-doped CDs is pH-sensitive and excitation-dependent. The N-doped CDs show a strong blue fluorescence with relatively high fluorescent quantum yield of 41.2%, which remains stable even under high ionic strength. Since the surface is rich in oxygen-containing functional groups, N-doped CDs can be applied to selectively detect Fe3+ with the limit of detection of 10-5 M. In addition, they are also used for cellular bioimaging because of their high fluorescent intensity and nearly zero cytotoxicity. The solid-phase microwave method seems to be an effective strategy to rapidly obtain high quality N-doped CDs and expands their applications in ion detection and cellular bioimaging.

  16. Cellular photobiology.

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The various cell lines of the epidermis and dermis can be activated or conversely altered by actinic irradiations. Keratinocytes, melanocytes, Langerhans cells and connective tissue cells are the main targets. Peer reviewed

  17. Activation of autophagy via Ca(2+)-dependent AMPK/mTOR pathway in rat notochordal cells is a cellular adaptation under hyperosmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Li-Bo; Cao, Lu; Yin, Xiao-Fan; Yasen, Miersalijiang; Yishake, Mumingjiang; Dong, Jian; Li, Xi-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Nucleus pulposus (NP) cells experience hyperosmotic stress in spinal discs; however, how these cells can survive in the hostile microenvironment remains unclear. Autophagy has been suggested to maintain cellular homeostasis under different stresses by degrading the cytoplasmic proteins and organelles. Here, we explored whether autophagy is a cellular adaptation in rat notochordal cells under hyperosmotic stress. Hyperosmotic stress was found to activate autophagy in a dose- and time-dependent manner. SQSTM1/P62 expression was decreased as the autophagy level increased. Transient Ca(2+) influx from intracellular stores and extracellular space was stimulated by hyperosmotic stress. Activation of AMPK and inhibition of p70S6K were observed under hyperosmotic conditions. However, intercellular Ca(2+) chelation inhibited the increase of LC3-II and partly reversed the decrease of p70S6K. Hyperosmotic stress decreased cell viability and promoted apoptosis. Inhibition of autophagy led to SQSTM1/P62 accumulation, reduced cell viability, and accelerated apoptosis in notochordal cells under this condition. These evidences suggest that autophagy induction via the Ca(2+)-dependent AMPK/mTOR pathway might occur as an adaptation mechanism for notochordal cells under hyperosmotic stress. Thus, activating autophagy might be a promising approach to improve viability of notochordal cells in intervertebral discs.

  18. Identification of microbes from the surfaces of food-processing lines based on the flow cytometric evaluation of cellular metabolic activity combined with cell sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juzwa, W; Duber, A; Myszka, K; Białas, W; Czaczyk, K

    2016-09-01

    In this study the design of a flow cytometry-based procedure to facilitate the detection of adherent bacteria from food-processing surfaces was evaluated. The measurement of the cellular redox potential (CRP) of microbial cells was combined with cell sorting for the identification of microorganisms. The procedure enhanced live/dead cell discrimination owing to the measurement of the cell physiology. The microbial contamination of the surface of a stainless steel conveyor used to process button mushrooms was evaluated in three independent experiments. The flow cytometry procedure provided a step towards monitoring of contamination and enabled the assessment of microbial food safety hazards by the discrimination of active, mid-active and non-active bacterial sub-populations based on determination of their cellular vitality and subsequently single cell sorting to isolate microbial strains from discriminated sub-populations. There was a significant correlation (r = 0.97; p flow cytometry, despite there being differences in the absolute number of cells detected. The combined approach of flow cytometric CRP measurement and cell sorting allowed an in situ analysis of microbial cell vitality and the identification of species from defined sub-populations, although the identified microbes were limited to culturable cells.

  19. Attenuation of the suppressive activity of cellular splicing factor SRSF3 by Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus ORF57 protein is required for RNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majerciak, Vladimir; Lu, Mathew; Li, Xiaofan; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) ORF57 is a multifunctional post-transcriptional regulator essential for viral gene expression during KSHV lytic infection. ORF57 requires interactions with various cellular proteins for its function. Here, we identified serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 3 (SRSF3, formerly known as SRp20) as a cellular cofactor involved in ORF57-mediated splicing of KSHV K8β RNA. In the absence of ORF57, SRSF3 binds to a suboptimal K8β intron and inhibits K8β splicing. Knockdown of SRSF3 promotes K8β splicing, mimicking the effect of ORF57. The N-terminal half of ORF57 binds to the RNA recognition motif of SRSF3, which prevents SRSF3 from associating with the K8β intron RNA and therefore attenuates the suppressive effect of SRSF3 on K8β splicing. ORF57 also promotes splicing of heterologous non-KSHV transcripts that are negatively regulated by SRSF3, indicating that the effect of ORF57 on SRSF3 activity is independent of RNA target. SPEN proteins, previously identified as ORF57-interacting partners, suppress ORF57 splicing activity by displacing ORF57 from SRSF3-RNA complexes. In summary, we have identified modulation of SRSF3 activity as the molecular mechanism by which ORF57 promotes RNA splicing.

  20. The MAP kinase-activated protein kinase Rck2p regulates cellular responses to cell wall stresses, filamentation and virulence in the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xichuan; Du, Wei; Zhao, Jingwen; Zhang, Lilin; Zhu, Zhiyan; Jiang, Linghuo

    2010-06-01

    Rck2p is the Hog1p-MAP kinase-activated protein kinase required for the attenuation of protein synthesis in response to an osmotic challenge in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Rck2p also regulates rapamycin sensitivity in both S. cerevisiae and Candida albicans. In this study, we demonstrate that the deletion of CaRCK2 renders C. albicans cells sensitive to, and CaRck2p translocates from the cytosol to the nucleus in response to, cell wall stresses caused by Congo red, Calcoflor White, elevated heat and zymolyase. However, the kinase activity of CaRck2p is not required for the cellular response to these cell wall stresses. Furthermore, transcripts of cell wall protein-encoding genes CaBGL2, CaHWP1 and CaXOG1 are reduced in C. albicans cells lacking CaRCK2. The deletion of CaRCK2 also reduces the in vitro filamentation of C. albicans and its virulence in a mouse model of systemic candidasis. The kinase activity of CaRck2p is required for the virulence, but not for the in vitro filamentation, in C. albicans. Therefore, Rck2p regulates cellular responses to cell wall stresses, filamentation and virulence in the human fungal pathogen C. albicans.

  1. Quantification of histone H3 Lys27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) by high-throughput microscopy enables cellular large-scale screening for small-molecule EZH2 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luense, Svenja; Denner, Philip; Fernández-Montalván, Amaury; Hartung, Ingo; Husemann, Manfred; Stresemann, Carlo; Prechtl, Stefan

    2015-02-01

    EZH2 inhibition can decrease global histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) and thereby reactivates silenced tumor suppressor genes. Inhibition of EZH2 is regarded as an option for therapeutic cancer intervention. To identify novel small-molecule (SMOL) inhibitors of EZH2 in drug discovery, trustworthy cellular assays amenable for phenotypic high-throughput screening (HTS) are crucial. We describe a reliable approach that quantifies changes in global levels of histone modification marks using high-content analysis (HCA). The approach was validated in different cell lines by using small interfering RNA and SMOL inhibitors. By automation and miniaturization from a 384-well to 1536-well plate, we demonstrated its utility in conducting phenotypic HTS campaigns and assessing structure-activity relationships (SAR). This assay enables screening of SMOL EZH2 inhibitors and can advance the mechanistic understanding of H3K27me3 suppression, which is crucial with regard to epigenetic therapy. We observed that a decrease in global H3K27me3, induced by EZH2 inhibition, comprises two distinct mechanisms: (1) inhibition of de novo DNA methylation and (II) inhibition of dynamic, replication-independent H3K27me3 turnover. This report describes an HCA assay for primary HTS to identify, profile, and optimize cellular active SMOL inhibitors targeting histone methyltransferases, which could benefit epigenetic drug discovery. © 2014 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  2. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Ngl3p is an active 3′–5′ exonuclease with a specificity towards poly-A RNA reminiscent of cellular deadenylases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feddersen, Ane; Dedic, Emil; Poulsen, Esben Guldahl

    2012-01-01

    –Endonuclease–Phosphatase (EEP) families, respectively. Ngl3p has been identified as a new member of the EEP family of exonucleases based on sequence homology, but its activity and biological roles are presently unknown. Here, we show using in vitro deadenylation assays on defined RNA species mimicking poly-A containing m......RNAs that yeast Ngl3p is a functional 3′–5′ exonuclease most active at slightly acidic conditions. We further show that the enzyme depends on divalent metal ions for activity and possesses specificity towards poly-A RNA similar to what has been observed for cellular deadenylases. The results suggest that Ngl3p...

  3. Synthetic High-Density Lipoprotein-Like Nanocarrier Improved Cellular Transport of Lysosomal Cholesterol in Human Sterol Carrier Protein-Deficient Fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Da-Eun; Kim, Ok-Kyung; Park, Yoo Kyoung; Lee, Jeongmin

    2016-01-01

    Sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2), which is not found in tissues of people with Zellweger syndrome, facilitates the movement of cholesterol within cells, resulting in abnormal accumulation of cholesterol in SCP-2-deficient cells. This study investigated whether synthetic high-density lipoprotein-like nanocarrier (sHDL-NC) improves the cellular transport of lysosomal cholesterol to plasma membrane in SCP-2-deficient fibroblasts. Human SCP-2-deficient fibroblasts were incubated with [(3)H-cholesterol]LDL as a source of cholesterol and sHDL-NC. The cells were fractionated by centrifugation permit tracking of [(3)H]-cholesterol from lysosome into plasma membrane. Furthermore, cellular content of cholesteryl ester as a storage form and mRNA expression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor were measured to support the cholesterol transport to plasma membrane. Incubation with sHDL-NC for 8 h significantly increased uptake of [(3)H]-cholesterol to lysosome by 53% and further enhanced the transport of [(3)H]-cholesterol to plasma membrane by 32%. Treatment with sHDL-NC significantly reduced cellular content of cholesteryl ester and increased mRNA expression of LDL receptor (LDL-R). In conclusion, sHDL-NC enables increased transport of lysosomal cholesterol to plasma membrane. In addition, these data were indirectly supported by decreased cellular content of cholesteryl ester and increased gene expression of LDL-R. Therefore, sHDL-NC may be a useful vehicle for transporting cholesterol, which may help to prevent accumulation of cholesterol in SCP-2-deficient fibroblasts.

  4. The Role of Palmitoylation in Signalling, Cellular Trafficking and Plasma Membrane Localization of Protease-Activated Receptor-2

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) is a G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) activated by proteolytic cleavage of its amino terminal domain by trypsin-like serine proteases. This irreversible activation mechanism leads to rapid receptor desensitization by internalisation and degradation. We have explored the role of palmitoylation, the post-translational addition of palmitate, in PAR2 signalling, trafficking, cell surface expression and desensitization. Experiments using the palmitoylation inh...

  5. Expression of human papilloma virus type 16 E5 protein in amelanotic melanoma cells regulates endo-cellular pH and restores tyrosinase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coccia Raffaella

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Melanin synthesis, the elective trait of melanocytes, is regulated by tyrosinase activity. In tyrosinase-positive amelanotic melanomas this rate limiting enzyme is inactive because of acidic endo-melanosomal pH. The E5 oncogene of the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 is a small transmembrane protein with a weak transforming activity and a role during the early steps of viral infections. E5 has been shown to interact with 16 kDa subunit C of the trans-membrane Vacuolar ATPase proton pump ultimately resulting in its functional suppressions. However, the cellular effects of such an interaction are still under debate. With this work we intended to explore whether the HPV16 E5 oncoprotein does indeed interact with the vacuolar ATPase proton pump once expressed in intact human cells and whether this interaction has functional consequences on cell metabolism and phenotype. Methods The expression of the HPV16-E5 oncoproteins was induced in two Tyrosinase-positive amelanotic melanomas (the cell lines FRM and M14 by a retroviral expression construct. Modulation of the intracellular pH was measured with Acridine orange and fluorescence microscopy. Expression of tyrosinase and its activity was followed by RT-PCR, Western Blot and enzyme assay. The anchorage-independence growth and the metabolic activity of E5 expressing cells were also monitored. Results We provide evidence that in the E5 expressing cells interaction between E5 and V-ATPase determines an increase of endo-cellular pH. The cellular alkalinisation in turn leads to the post-translational activation of tyrosinase, melanin synthesis and phenotype modulation. These effects are associated with an increased activation of tyrosine analogue anti-blastic drugs. Conclusion Once expressed within intact human cells the HPV16-E5 oncoprotein does actually interact with the vacuolar V-ATPase proton pump and this interaction induces a number of functional effects. In amelanotic melanomas these

  6. Solid bioneedle-delivered influenza vaccines are highly thermostable and induce both humoral and cellular immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C Soema

    Full Text Available The potential of bioneedles to deliver influenza vaccines was investigated. Four influenza vaccine formulations were screened to determine the optimal formulation for use with bioneedles. The stability of the formulations after freeze-drying was checked to predict the stability of the influenza vaccines in the bioneedles. Subunit, split, virosomal and whole inactivated influenza (WIV vaccine were formulated and lyophilized in bioneedles, and subsequently administered to C57BL/6 mice. Humoral and cellular immune responses were assessed after vaccination. The thermostability of lyophilized vaccines was determined after one-month storage at elevated temperatures. Bioneedle influenza vaccines induced HI titers that are comparable to those induced by intramuscular WIV vaccination. Delivery by bioneedles did not alter the type of immune response induced by the influenza vaccines. Stability studies showed that lyophilized influenza vaccines have superior thermostability compared to conventional liquid vaccines, and remained stable after one-month storage at 60°C. Influenza vaccines delivered by bioneedles are a viable alternative to conventional liquid influenza vaccines. WIV was determined to be the most potent vaccine formulation for administration by bioneedles. Lyophilized influenza vaccines in bioneedles are independent of a cold-chain, due to their increased thermostability, which makes distribution and stockpiling easier.

  7. Inhibition of cAMP-activated intestinal chloride secretion by diclofenac: cellular mechanism and potential application in cholera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawin Pongkorpsakol

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP-activated intestinal Cl- secretion plays an important role in pathogenesis of cholera. This study aimed to investigate the effect of diclofenac on cAMP-activated Cl- secretion, its underlying mechanisms, and possible application in the treatment of cholera. Diclofenac inhibited cAMP-activated Cl- secretion in human intestinal epithelial (T84 cells with IC50 of ∼ 20 µM. The effect required no cytochrome P450 enzyme-mediated metabolic activation. Interestingly, exposures of T84 cell monolayers to diclofenac, either in apical or basolateral solutions, produced similar degree of inhibitions. Analyses of the apical Cl- current showed that diclofenac reversibly inhibited CFTR Cl- channel activity (IC50 ∼ 10 µM via mechanisms not involving either changes in intracellular cAMP levels or CFTR channel inactivation by AMP-activated protein kinase and protein phosphatase. Of interest, diclofenac had no effect on Na(+-K(+ ATPases and Na(+-K(+-Cl- cotransporters, but inhibited cAMP-activated basolateral K(+ channels with IC50 of ∼ 3 µM. In addition, diclofenac suppressed Ca(2+-activated Cl- channels, inwardly rectifying Cl- channels, and Ca(2+-activated basolateral K(+ channels. Furthermore, diclofenac (up to 200 µM; 24 h of treatment had no effect on cell viability and barrier function in T84 cells. Importantly, cholera toxin (CT-induced Cl- secretion across T84 cell monolayers was effectively suppressed by diclofenac. Intraperitoneal administration of diclofenac (30 mg/kg reduced both CT and Vibrio cholerae-induced intestinal fluid secretion by ∼ 70% without affecting intestinal fluid absorption in mice. Collectively, our results indicate that diclofenac inhibits both cAMP-activated and Ca(2+-activated Cl- secretion by inhibiting both apical Cl- channels and basolateral K+ channels in intestinal epithelial cells. Diclofenac may be useful in the treatment of cholera and other types of secretory diarrheas resulting from intestinal

  8. Inhibition of cAMP-Activated Intestinal Chloride Secretion by Diclofenac: Cellular Mechanism and Potential Application in Cholera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongkorpsakol, Pawin; Pathomthongtaweechai, Nutthapoom; Srimanote, Potjanee; Soodvilai, Sunhapas; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Muanprasat, Chatchai

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic AMP-activated intestinal Cl− secretion plays an important role in pathogenesis of cholera. This study aimed to investigate the effect of diclofenac on cAMP-activated Cl− secretion, its underlying mechanisms, and possible application in the treatment of cholera. Diclofenac inhibited cAMP-activated Cl− secretion in human intestinal epithelial (T84) cells with IC50 of ∼20 µM. The effect required no cytochrome P450 enzyme-mediated metabolic activation. Interestingly, exposures of T84 cell monolayers to diclofenac, either in apical or basolateral solutions, produced similar degree of inhibitions. Analyses of the apical Cl− current showed that diclofenac reversibly inhibited CFTR Cl− channel activity (IC50∼10 µM) via mechanisms not involving either changes in intracellular cAMP levels or CFTR channel inactivation by AMP-activated protein kinase and protein phosphatase. Of interest, diclofenac had no effect on Na+-K+ ATPases and Na+-K+-Cl− cotransporters, but inhibited cAMP-activated basolateral K+ channels with IC50 of ∼3 µM. In addition, diclofenac suppressed Ca2+-activated Cl− channels, inwardly rectifying Cl− channels, and Ca2+-activated basolateral K+ channels. Furthermore, diclofenac (up to 200 µM; 24 h of treatment) had no effect on cell viability and barrier function in T84 cells. Importantly, cholera toxin (CT)-induced Cl− secretion across T84 cell monolayers was effectively suppressed by diclofenac. Intraperitoneal administration of diclofenac (30 mg/kg) reduced both CT and Vibrio cholerae-induced intestinal fluid secretion by ∼70% without affecting intestinal fluid absorption in mice. Collectively, our results indicate that diclofenac inhibits both cAMP-activated and Ca2+-activated Cl− secretion by inhibiting both apical Cl− channels and basolateral K+ channels in intestinal epithelial cells. Diclofenac may be useful in the treatment of cholera and other types of secretory diarrheas resulting from intestinal

  9. Novel TiC/Ti Open Cellular Foams Prepared by a Modified Sponge-coating Method Using High Frequency Induction Heating Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Gao; Xingxiang Xu; Zhenming Yang; Junqi Zhang; Chunhai Jiang; Jinsong Zhang

    2013-01-01

    A new kind of open cellular foam material with three dimensionally interconnected TiC/Ti struts was prepared by a two-step sponge-coating and high frequency induction heating process.The microstructure,composition and compression strength of the prepared TiC/Ti foam materials were characterized.It was confirmed that the incorporation of Ti into TiC resulted in an inter-bonded Ti-TiC-Ti layered structure in the struts,which enhanced the plasticity of the composite foam materials.

  10. Cellular uptake of {sup 99m}TcN-NOET in human leukaemic HL-60 cells is related to calcium channel activation and cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillermet, Stephanie; Vuillez, Jean-Philippe; Caravel, Jean-Pierre; Marti-Batlle, Daniele; Fagret, Daniel [Universite de Grenoble, Radiopharmaceutiques Biocliniques, La Tronche (France); Fontaine, Eric [Universite de Grenoble, Laboratoire de Bioenergetique Fondamentale et Appliquee, Grenoble (France); Pasqualini, Roberto [Cis Bio International Schering SA, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2006-01-01

    A major goal of nuclear oncology is the development of new radiolabelled tracers as proliferation markers. Intracellular calcium waves play a fundamental role in the course of the cell cycle. These waves occur in non-excitable tumour cells via store-operated calcium channels (SOCCs). Bis(N-ethoxy, N-ethyldithiocarbamato) nitrido technetium (V)-99m ({sup 99m}TcN-NOET) has been shown to interact with L-type voltage-operated calcium channels (VOCCs) in cultured cardiomyocytes. Considering the analogy between VOCCs and SOCCs, we sought to determine whether {sup 99m}TcN-NOET also binds to activated SOCCs in tumour cells in order to clarify the potential value of this tracer as a proliferation marker. Uptake kinetics of {sup 99m}TcN-NOET were measured in human leukaemic HL-60 cells over 60 min and the effect of several calcium channel modulators on 1-min tracer uptake was studied. The uptake kinetics of {sup 99m}TcN-NOET were compared both with the variations of cytosolic free calcium concentration measured by indo-1/AM and with the variations in the SG{sub 2}M cellular proliferation index. All calcium channel inhibitors significantly decreased the cellular uptake of {sup 99m}TcN-NOET whereas the activator thapsigargin induced a significant 10% increase. In parallel, SOCC activation by thapsigargin, as measured using the indo-1/AM probe, was inhibited by nicardipine. These results indicate that the uptake of {sup 99m}TcN-NOET is related to the activation of SOCCs. Finally, a correlation was observed between the tracer uptake and variations in the proliferation index SG{sub 2}M. The uptake of {sup 99m}TcN-NOET seems to be related to SOCC activation and to cell proliferation in HL-60 cells. These results indicate that {sup 99m}TcN-NOET might be a marker of cell proliferation. (orig.)

  11. High-Throughput Analysis of Enzyme Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Guoxin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) techniques have been applied to many research fields nowadays. Robot microarray printing technique and automation microtiter handling technique allows HTS performing in both heterogeneous and homogeneous formats, with minimal sample required for each assay element. In this dissertation, new HTS techniques for enzyme activity analysis were developed. First, patterns of immobilized enzyme on nylon screen were detected by multiplexed capillary system. The imaging resolution is limited by the outer diameter of the capillaries. In order to get finer images, capillaries with smaller outer diameters can be used to form the imaging probe. Application of capillary electrophoresis allows separation of the product from the substrate in the reaction mixture, so that the product doesn't have to have different optical properties with the substrate. UV absorption detection allows almost universal detection for organic molecules. Thus, no modifications of either the substrate or the product molecules are necessary. This technique has the potential to be used in screening of local distribution variations of specific bio-molecules in a tissue or in screening of multiple immobilized catalysts. Another high-throughput screening technique is developed by directly monitoring the light intensity of the immobilized-catalyst surface using a scientific charge-coupled device (CCD). Briefly, the surface of enzyme microarray is focused onto a scientific CCD using an objective lens. By carefully choosing the detection wavelength, generation of product on an enzyme spot can be seen by the CCD. Analyzing the light intensity change over time on an enzyme spot can give information of reaction rate. The same microarray can be used for many times. Thus, high-throughput kinetic studies of hundreds of catalytic reactions are made possible. At last, we studied the fluorescence emission spectra of ADP and obtained the detection limits for ADP under three different

  12. Low-dose ionizing radiation induces direct activation of natural killer cells and provides a novel approach for adoptive cellular immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guozi; Kong, Qingyu; Wang, Guanjun; Jin, Haofan; Zhou, Lei; Yu, Dehai; Niu, Chao; Han, Wei; Li, Wei; Cui, Jiuwei

    2014-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that limited availability and cytotoxicity have restricted the development of natural killer (NK) cells in adoptive cellular immunotherapy (ACI). While it has been reported that low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) could enhance the immune response in animal studies, the influence of LDIR at the cellular level has been less well defined. In this study, the authors aim to investigate the direct effects of LDIR on NK cells and the potential mechanism, and explore the application of activation and expansion of NK cells by LDIR in ACI. The authors found that expansion and cytotoxicity of NK cells were markedly augmented by LDIR. The levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α in the supernatants of cultured NK cells were significantly increased after LDIR. Additionally, the effect of the P38 inhibitor (SB203580) significantly decreased the expanded NK cell cytotoxicity, cytokine levels, and expression levels of FasL and perforin. These findings indicate that LDIR induces a direct expansion and activation of NK cells through possibly the P38-MAPK pathway, which provides a potential mechanism for stimulation of NK cells by LDIR and a novel but simplified approach for ACI.

  13. Metabolic Activity of Bacteria at High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, A.; Daniel, I.; Oger, P.

    2008-12-01

    Over the last 20 years, there has been increasing evidence for the presence of a large number of microbes in the oceanic subsurface. Such a habitat has a very low energy input because it is deprived of light. A few meters below the sediment surface, conditions are already anoxic in most cases, sulfate reduction and/or methanogenesis becoming thus the primary respiratory reactions of organic matter. Neither the fate of methanogenesis, nor the fate of Dissimilatory Metal-Reduction (DMR) has been investigated so far as a function of pressure. For this reason, we measured experimentally the pressure limits of microbial anaerobic energetic metabolism. In practice, we measured in situ the kinetics of selenite respiration by the bacterial model Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) between 0 and 150 MPa at 30°C. MR-1 stationary-phase cells were used in Luria-Bertani (LB) medium amended with lactate as an additional electron donor and sodium selenite as an electron acceptor. In situ measurements were performed by X- ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy in both a diamond-anvil cell and an autoclave. A red precipitate of amorphous Se(0) was virtually observed at any pressure to 150 MPa. A progressive reduction of selenite Se(IV) into selenium Se(0) was also observed in the evolution of XANES spectra with time. All kinetics between 0.1 and 150 MPa can be adjusted to a first order kinetic law. MR-1 respires all available selenite up to 60 MPa. Above 60 MPa, the respiration yield decreases linearly as a function of pressure and reaches 0 at 155 ±5 MPa. This indicates that selenite respiration by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 stops at about 155 MPa, whereas its growth is arrested at 50 MPa. Hence, the present results show that the respiration of selenium by the strain MR-1 occurs efficiently up to 60 MPa and 30°C, i.e. from the surface of a continental sediment to an equivalent depth of about 2 km, or beneath a 5-km water column and

  14. Telomerase activity is spontaneously increased in lymphocytes from patients with atopic dermatitis and correlates with cellular proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Kehuai; Volke, Anne Rehné; Lund, Marianne

    1999-01-01

    , and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) (0.1 microg/ml). Telomerase activity was measured by the telomeric repeat amplification protocol-based telomerase polymerase chain reaction enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at 0 and 72 h of incubation. In addition, DNA synthesis of the cells was assayed using 3H......-thymidine incorporation. We found that telomerase activity in non-stimulated PBMC from patients with AD was significantly up-regulated without any stimulation during the 72 h of in vitro incubation. The most potent stimulator of telomerase activity was SEA, followed by anti-CD3 plus IL-2, anti-CD3 alone, and PPD. IL-2...

  15. Cellular Activation and Intracellular HCV Load in Peripheral Blood Monocytes Isolated from HCV Monoinfected and HIV-HCV Coinfected Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Isabelle Dichamp; Wasim Abbas; Amit Kumar; Vincent Di Martino; Georges Herbein

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During HCV infection, the activation status of peripheral blood monocytes and its impact on HCV replication are poorly understood. We hypothesized that a modified activation of peripheral blood monocytes in HIV-HCV coinfected compared to HCV monoinfected patients may contribute to different monocytes reservoirs of HCV replication. METHODS: We performed a case-control analysis involving HCV-infected patients with and without HIV coinfection. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells (P...

  16. Clinical significance of telomerase activity in peritoneal lavage fluid from patients with gastric cancer and its relationship with cellular proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-Xu Da; Xiao-Ting Wu; Tian-Kang Guo; Zi-Guang Zhao; Ting Luo; Kun Qian; Ming-Ming Zhang; Jie Wang

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the efficacy of telomerase activity assay and peritoneal lavage cytology (PLC) examination in peritoneal lavage fluid for the prediction of peritoneal metastasis in gastric cancer patients, and to explore the relationship between telomerase activity and proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression.METHODS: Telomeric repeated amplification protocol (TRAP)-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was performed to measure the telomerase activity in 60 patients with gastric cancer and 50 with peptic ulcer. PLC analysis of the 60 patients with gastric cancer was used for comparison. The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in gastric carcinoma was immunohistochemically examined.RESULTS: The telomerase activity and PLC positive rate in peritoneal lavage fluid from patients with gastric cancer was 41.7% (25/60), and 25.0% (15/60), respectively. The positive rate of telomerase activity was significantly higher than that of PLC in the group Of pT4 (15/16 vs 9/16, P < 0.05), P1-3 (13/13 vs 9/13, P < 0.05) and diffuse type (22/42 vs 13/42, P < 0.05). The patients with positive telomerase activity, peritoneal metastasis, and serosal invasion had significantly higher levels of average PCNA proliferation index (PI), (55.00 ± 6.59 vs 27.43 ± 7.72, 57.26 ± 10.18 vs 29.15 ± 8.31, and 49.82 ± 6.74 vs 24;65 ± 7.33, respectively, P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: The TRAP assay for telomerase activity is a useful adjunct for cytologic method in the diagnosis of peritoneal micrometastasis and well related to higher proliferating activity of gastric cancer. The results of this study also suggest a promising future therapeutic strategy for treating peritoneal dissemination based on telomerase inhibition.

  17. Repeated low-dose 17β-estradiol treatment prevents activation of apoptotic signaling both in the synaptosomal and cellular fraction in rat prefrontal cortex following cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanojlović, Miloš; Zlatković, Jelena; Guševac, Ivana; Grković, Ivana; Mitrović, Nataša; Zarić, Marina; Horvat, Anica; Drakulić, Dunja

    2015-01-01

    Disturbance in blood circulation is associated with numerous pathological conditions characterized by cognitive decline and neurodegeneration. Activation of pro-apoptotic signaling previously detected in the synaptosomal fraction may underlie neurodegeneration in the prefrontal cortex of rats submitted to permanent bilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (two-vessel occlusion, 2VO). 17β-Estradiol (E) exerts potent neuroprotective effects in the brain affecting, among other, ischemia-induced pathological changes. As most significant changes in rats submitted to 2VO were observed on 7th day following the insult, of interest was to examine whether 7 day treatment with low dose of E (33.3 µg/kg/day) prevents formerly reported neurodegeneration and may represent additional therapy during the early post-ischemic period. Role of E treatment on apoptotic pathway was monitored on Bcl-2 family members, cytochrome c, caspase 3 and PARP protein level in the synaptosomal (P2) fraction of the prefrontal cortex. Furthermore, changes of these proteins were examined in the cytosolic, mitochondrial and nuclear fraction, with the emphasis on potential involvement of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and protein kinase B (Akt) activation and their role in nuclear translocation of transcriptional nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) associated with alteration of Bax and Bcl-2 gene expression. The extent of cellular damage was determined using DNA fragmentation and Fluoro-Jade B staining. The absence of activation of apoptotic cascade both in the P2 and cell accompanied with decreased DNA fragmentation and number of degenerating neurons clearly indicates that E treatment ensures the efficient protection against ischemic insult. Moreover, E-mediated modulation of pro-apoptotic signaling in the cortical cellular fractions involves cooperative activation of ERK and Akt, which may be implicated in the observed prevention of neurodegenerative changes.

  18. Cellular adaptive response of distal renal tubular cells to high-oxalate environment highlights surface alpha-enolase as the enhancer of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Fong-Ngern, Kedsarin; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2013-03-27

    Hyperoxaluria is one of etiologic factors of calcium oxalate kidney stone disease. However, response of renal tubular cells to high-oxalate environment remained largely unknown. We applied a gel-based proteomics approach to characterize changes in cellular proteome of MDCK cells induced by 10mM sodium oxalate. A total of 14 proteins were detected as differentially expressed proteins. The oxalate-induced up-regulation of alpha-enolase in whole cell lysate was confirmed by 2-D Western blot analysis. Interaction network analysis revealed that cellular adaptive response under high-oxalate condition involved stress response, energy production, metabolism and transcriptional regulation. Down-regulation of RhoA, which was predicted to be associated with the identified proteins, was confirmed by immunoblotting. In addition, the up-regulation of alpha-enolase on apical surface of renal tubular epithelial cells was also confirmed by immunoblotting of the isolated apical membranes and immunofluorescence study. Interestingly, blockage of alpha-enolase expressed on the cell surface by antibody neutralization significantly reduced the number of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystals adhered on the cells. These results strongly suggest that surface alpha-enolase plays an important role as the enhancer of COM crystal binding. The increase of alpha-enolase expressed on the cell surface may aggravate kidney stone formation in patients with hyperoxaluria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cyclophilin A enhances macrophage differentiation and lipid uptake in high glucose conditions: a cellular mechanism for accelerated macro vascular disease in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Surya; Vinitha, Anandan; Kartha, Cheranellore Chandrasekharan

    2016-11-03

    Vascular disease in diabetes is initiated by monocyte adhesion to vascular endothelium, transmigration and formation of foam cells. Increasing clinical evidence supports a role for the secretory protein, cyclophilin A in diabetic vascular disease. The means by which cyclophilin A contributes to vascular lesion development in diabetes is however largely unknown. In this study we investigated using THP1 cells and human monocytes whether cyclophilin A under hyperglycemic conditions, functions in the inflammatory cascade as a chemoattractant and increases lipid uptake by formation of foam cells invitro. We developed an invitro model of monocytes cultured in 20 mm glucose (high glucose) equivalent to 360 mg/dL of plasma glucose levels. These monocytes were then differentiated into macrophages using PMA and subsequently transformed to lipid laden foam cells using oxidized low density lipoproteins in the presence and absence of cyclophilin A. This cellular model was used to study monocyte to macrophage differentiation, transmigration and foam cell formation. A similar cellular model using siRNA mediated transient elimination of the cyclophilin A gene as well as chemical inhibitors were used to further confirm the role of cyclophilin A in the differentiation and foam cell formation process. Cyclophilin A effectively increased migration of high glucose treated monocytes to the endothelial cell monolayer (p diabetes mellitus.

  20. Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis through suppressing cellular signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Guangwen; Yang, Jing; Zhao, Wenhao; Xu, Chan; Hong, Zongguo; Mei, Zhinan; Yang, Xinzhou, E-mail: xinzhou_yang@hotmail.com

    2014-12-01

    Kurarinol is a flavonoid isolated from roots of the medical plant Sophora flavescens. However, its cytotoxic activity against hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells and toxic effects on mammalians remain largely unexplored. Here, the pro-apoptotic activities of kurarinol on HCC cells and its toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice were evaluated. The molecular mechanisms underlying kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis were also investigated. We found that kurarinol dose-dependently provoked HepG2, Huh-7 and H22 HCC cell apoptosis. In addition, kurarinol gave rise to a considerable decrease in the transcriptional activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) in HCC cells. Suppression of STAT3 signaling is involved in kurarinol-induced HCC cell apoptosis. In vivo studies showed that kurarinol injection substantially induced transplanted H22 cell apoptosis with low toxic impacts on tumor-bearing mice. Similarly, the transcriptional activity of STAT3 in transplanted tumor tissues was significantly suppressed after kurarinol treatment. Collectively, our current research demonstrated that kurarinol has the capacity of inducing HCC cell apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo with undetectable toxic impacts on the host. Suppressing STAT3 signaling is implicated in kurarinol-mediated HCC cell apoptosis. - Highlights: • Kurarinol induces hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell apoptosis. • Kurarinol induces HCC cell apoptosis via inhibiting STAT3. • Kurarinol exhibits low toxic effects on tumor-bearing animals.

  1. Enhanced NF-κB activation and cellular function in macrophages lacking IκB kinase 1 (IKK1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiutang; Lu, Qingxian; Bottero, Virginie; Estepa, Gabriela; Morrison, Lisa; Mercurio, Frank; Verma, Inder M.

    2005-01-01

    IκB kinase (IKK) complex plays a key regulatory role in macrophages for NF-κB activation during both innate and adaptive immune responses. Because IKK1–/– mice died at birth, we differentiated functional macrophages from embryonic day 15.5 IKK1 mutant embryonic liver. The embryonic liver-derived macrophage (ELDM) showed enhanced phagocytotic clearance of bacteria, more efficient antigen-presenting capacity, elevated secretion of several key proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and known NFκB target genes. Increased NFκB activity in IKK1 mutant ELDM was the result of prolonged degradation of IκBα in response to infectious pathogens. The delayed restoration of IκBα in pathogen-activated IKK1–/– ELDM was a direct consequence of uncontrolled IKK2 kinase activity. We hypothesize that IKK1 plays a checkpoint role in the proper control of IκBα kinase activity in innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:16116086

  2. Essential role of PSM/SH2-B variants in insulin receptor catalytic activation and the resulting cellular responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Manchao; Deng, Youping; Tandon, Ruchi; Bai, Cheng; Riedel, Heimo

    2008-01-01

    The positive regulatory role of PSM/SH2-B downstream of various mitogenic receptor tyrosine kinases or gene disruption experiments in mice support a role of PSM in the regulation of insulin action. Here, four alternative PSM splice variants and individual functional domains were compared for their role in the regulation of specific metabolic insulin responses. We found that individual PSM variants in 3T3-L1 adipocytes potentiated insulin-mediated glucose and amino acid transport, glycogenesis, lipogenesis, and key components in the metabolic insulin response including p70 S6 kinase, glycogen synthase, glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3), Akt, Cbl, and IRS-1. Highest activity was consistently observed for PSM alpha, followed by beta, delta, and gamma with decreasing activity. In contrast, dominant-negative peptide mimetics of the PSM Pro-rich, pleckstrin homology (PH), or src homology 2 (SH2) domains inhibited any tested insulin response. Potentiation of the insulin response originated at the insulin receptor (IR) kinase level by PSM variant-specific regulation of the Km (ATP) whereas the Vmax remained unaffected. IR catalytic activation was inhibited by peptide mimetics of the PSM SH2 or dimerization domain (DD). Either peptide should disrupt the complex of a PSM dimer linked to IR via SH2 domains as proposed for PSM activation of tyrosine kinase JAK2. Either peptide abolished downstream insulin responses indistinguishable from PSM siRNA knockdown. Our results implicate an essential role of the PSM variants in the activation of the IR kinase and the resulting metabolic insulin response. PSM variants act as internal IR ligands that in addition to potentiating the insulin response stimulate IR catalytic activation even in the absence of insulin.

  3. Cord blood Streptococcus pneumoniae-specific cellular immune responses predict early pneumococcal carriage in high-risk infants in Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, J P; Richmond, P C; Strickland, D; Prescott, S L; Pomat, W S; Michael, A; Nadal-Sims, M A; Edwards-Devitt, C J; Holt, P G; Lehmann, D; van den Biggelaar, A H J

    2017-03-01

    In areas where Streptococcus pneumoniae is highly endemic, infants experience very early pneumococcal colonization of the upper respiratory tract, with carriage often persisting into adulthood. We aimed to explore whether newborns in high-risk areas have pre-existing pneumococcal-specific cellular immune responses that may affect early pneumococcal acquisition. Cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) of 84 Papua New Guinean (PNG; high endemic) and 33 Australian (AUS; low endemic) newborns were stimulated in vitro with detoxified pneumolysin (dPly) or pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA; families 1 and 2) and compared for cytokine responses. Within the PNG cohort, associations between CBMC dPly and PspA-induced responses and pneumococcal colonization within the first month of life were studied. Significantly higher PspA-specific interferon (IFN)-γ, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-5, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-13 responses, and lower dPly-IL-6 responses were produced in CBMC cultures of PNG compared to AUS newborns. Higher CBMC PspA-IL-5 and PspA-IL-13 responses correlated with a higher proportion of cord CD4 T cells, and higher dPly-IL-6 responses with a higher frequency of cord antigen-presenting cells. In the PNG cohort, higher PspA-specific IL-5 and IL-6 CBMC responses were associated independently and significantly with increased risk of earlier pneumococcal colonization, while a significant protective effect was found for higher PspA-IL-10 CBMC responses. Pneumococcus-specific cellular immune responses differ between children born in pneumococcal high versus low endemic settings, which may contribute to the higher risk of infants in high endemic settings for early pneumococcal colonization, and hence disease.

  4. Molecular and Cellular Signaling

    CERN Document Server

    Beckerman, Martin

    2005-01-01

    A small number of signaling pathways, no more than a dozen or so, form a control layer that is responsible for all signaling in and between cells of the human body. The signaling proteins belonging to the control layer determine what kinds of cells are made during development and how they function during adult life. Malfunctions in the proteins belonging to the control layer are responsible for a host of human diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancers. Most drugs target components in the control layer, and difficulties in drug design are intimately related to the architecture of the control layer. Molecular and Cellular Signaling provides an introduction to molecular and cellular signaling in biological systems with an emphasis on the underlying physical principles. The text is aimed at upper-level undergraduates, graduate students and individuals in medicine and pharmacology interested in broadening their understanding of how cells regulate and coordinate their core activities and how diseases ...

  5. An electrochemical DNA biosensor for evaluating the effect of mix anion in cellular fluid on the antioxidant activity of CeO2 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yanwu; Zhang, Yan; Qin, Fei; Yao, Xin

    2015-08-15

    CeO2 nanoparticles are of particular interest as a novel antioxidant for scavenging free radicals. However, some studies showed that they could cause cell damage or death by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). Up to now, it is not well understood about these paradoxical phenomena. Therefore, many attentions have been paid to the factors that could affect the antioxidant activity of CeO2 nanoparticles. CeO2 nanoparticles would inevitably encounter body fluid environment for its potential medical application. In this work the antioxidant activity behavior of CeO2 nanoparticles is studied in simulated cellular fluid, which contains main body anions (HPO4(2-), HCO3(-), Cl(-) and SO4(2-)), by a method of electrochemical DNA biosensor. We found that in the solution of Cl(-) and SO4(2-), CeO2 nanoparticles can protect DNA from damage by hydroxyl radicals, while in the presence of HPO4(2-) and HCO3(-), CeO2 nanoparticles lose the antioxidant activity. This can be explained by the cerium phosphate and cerium carbonate formed on the surface of the nanoparticles, which interfere with the redox cycling between Ce(3+) and Ce(4+). These results not only add basic knowledge to the antioxidant activity of CeO2 nanoparticles under different situations, but also pave the way for practical applications of nanoceria. Moreover, it also shows electrochemical DNA biosensor is an effective method to explore the antioxidant activity of CeO2 nanoparticles.

  6. Avian reovirus nonstructural protein p17-induced G(2)/M cell cycle arrest and host cellular protein translation shutoff involve activation of p53-dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulu, Julius L C; Huang, Wei R; Wang, L; Shih, Wen L; Liu, Hung J

    2010-08-01

    The effects of avian reovirus (ARV) p17 protein on cell cycle progression and host cellular protein translation were studied. ARV infection and ARV p17 transfection resulted in the accumulation of infected and/or transfected cells in the G(2)/M phase of the cell cycle. The accumulation of cells in the G(2)/M phase was accompanied by upregulation and phosphorylation of the G(2)/M-phase proteins ATM, p53, p21(cip1/waf1), Cdc2, cyclin B1, Chk1, Chk2, and Cdc25C, suggesting that p17 induces a G(2)/M cell cycle arrest through activation of the ATM/p53/p21(cip1/waf1)/Cdc2/cyclin B1 and ATM/Chk1/Chk2/Cdc25C pathways. The G(2)/M cell cycle arrest resulted in increased virus replication. In the present study, we also provide evidence demonstrating that p17 protein is responsible for ARV-induced host cellular protein translation shutoff. Increased phosphorylation levels of the eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2) and initiation factor eIF2alpha and reduced phosphorylation levels of the eukaryotic translation initiation factors eIF4E, eIF4B, and eIF4G, as well as 4E-BP1 and Mnk-1 in p17-transfected cells, demonstrated that ARV p17 suppresses translation initiation factors and translation elongation factors to induce host cellular protein translation shutoff. Inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin resulted in a decrease in the levels of phosphorylated 4E-BP1, eIF4B, and eIF4G and an increase in the levels eEF2 but did not affect ARV replication, suggesting that ARV replication was not hindered by inhibition of cap-dependent translation. Taken together, our data indicate that ARV p17-induced G(2)/M arrest and host cellular translation shutoff resulted in increased ARV replication.

  7. Research on active queue management algorithm based on cellular ant%基于元胞蚁群的主动队列管理算法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张春琴; 谢立春

    2012-01-01

    order to mitigate the network congestion phenomenon, a novel active queue management algorithm (Drop Front algorithm based on Cellular Ant, DFCA) is proposed by Drop Front. In this algorithm, the maximum of actual network queue length is build by cellular ant. And the dropping N-pack-ets method from queue head is presented by comparing the relationship between network queue length and threshold. Then, with the long-rang dependence data, a simulation was conducted to study DFCA and RED, as well as DROP-TAIL algorithm. The results show that DFCA has better adaptability.%针对网络拥塞现象,基于弃头方式提出了一种新的主动队列管理算法.该算法首先利用元胞蚁群建立了实际网络队长最大值的计算方法,同时通过判断网络队长与阈值的关系,采取从队列头部丢弃N个数据包的方法.最后,以长相关数据进行仿真实验,对比分析了DFCA与RED、DROP-TAIL之间的优劣,结果表明该算法具有较好的适应性.

  8. Intercalator conjugates of pyrimidine locked nucleic acid-modified triplex-forming oligonucleotides: improving DNA binding properties and reaching cellular activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Erika; Corgnali, Maddalena; Perrouault, Loïc; Roig, Victoria; Asseline, Ulysse; Sørensen, Mads D.; Babu, B. Ravindra; Wengel, Jesper; Giovannangeli, Carine

    2005-01-01

    Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) are powerful tools to interfere sequence-specifically with DNA-associated biological functions. (A/T,G)-containing TFOs are more commonly used in cells than (T,C)-containing TFOs, especially C-rich sequences; indeed the low intracellular stability of the non-covalent pyrimidine triplexes make the latter less active. In this work we studied the possibility to enhance DNA binding of (T,C)-containing TFOs, aiming to reach cellular activities; to this end, we used locked nucleic acid-modified TFOs (TFO/LNAs) in association with 5′-conjugation of an intercalating agent, an acridine derivative. In vitro a stable triplex was formed with the TFO-acridine conjugate: by SPR measurements at 37°C and neutral pH, the dissociation equilibrium constant was found in the nanomolar range and the triplex half-life ∼10 h (50-fold longer compared with the unconjugated TFO/LNA). Moreover to further understand DNA binding of (T,C)-containing TFO/LNAs, hybridization studies were performed at different pH values: triplex stabilization associated with pH decrease was mainly due to a slower dissociation process. Finally, biological activity of pyrimidine TFO/LNAs was evaluated in a cellular context: it occurred at concentrations ∼0.1 μM for acridine-conjugated TFO/LNA (or ∼2 μM for the unconjugated TFO/LNA) whereas the corresponding phosphodiester TFO was inactive, and it was demonstrated to be triplex-mediated. PMID:16049028

  9. DNA-based vaccination induces humoral and cellular immune responses against hepatitis B virus surface antigen in mice without activation of C-myc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lian-San; Qin, Shan; Zhou, Tao-You; Tang, Hong; Liu, Li; Lei, Bing-Jun

    2000-04-01

    AIM:To develop a safe and effective DNA vaccine for inducing humoral and cellular immunological responses against hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg).METHODS:BALB/c mice were inoculated with NV-HB/s, a recombinant plasmid that had been inserted S gene of hepatitis B virus genome and could express HBsAg in eukaryotes. HBsAg expression was measured by ABC immunohis tochemical assay, generation of anti-HBs by ELISA and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL), by MTT method, existence of vaccine DNA by Southern blot hybridization and activation of oncogene C-myc by in situ hybridization.RESULTS:With NV-HB/s vaccination by intramuscular injection, anti-HBs was initially positive 2 weeks after inoculation while all mice tested were HBsAg positive in the muscles.The titers and seroconversion rate of anti-HBs were steadily increasing as time went on and were dose dependent. All the mice inoculated with 100&mgr;g NV-HB/s were anti-HBs positive one month after inoculation, the titer was 1 1024 or more. The humoral immune response was similar induced by either intramuscular or intradermal injection. CTL activities were much stronger (45.26%) in NV-HB/s DNA immunized mice as compared with those (only 6%) in plasma-derived HBsAg vaccine immunized mice. Two months after inoculation, all muscle samples were positive by Southernblot hybridization for NV-HB/s DNA detection, but decreased to 25% and all were undetectable by in situ hybridiza-tion after 6 months.No oncogene C-myc activation was found in the muscle of inoculation site.CONCLUSION:NV-HB/s could generate humoral and cellular immunolo-gical responses against HBsAg that had been safely expressed in situ by NV-HB/s vaccination.

  10. High inorganic phosphate causes DNMT1 phosphorylation and subsequent fibrotic fibroblast activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiaoying; Xu, Xingbo; Zeisberg, Elisabeth M; Zeisberg, Michael

    2016-04-08

    Phosphate is an essential constituent of critical cellular functions including energy metabolism, nucleic acid synthesis and phosphorylation-dependent cell signaling. Increased plasma phosphate levels are an independent risk factor for lowered life-expectancy as well as for heart and kidney failure. Nevertheless, direct cellular effects of elevated phosphate concentrations within the microenvironment are poorly understood and have been largely neglected in favor of phosphor-regulatory hormones. Because interstitial fibrosis is the common determinant of chronic progressive kidney disease, and because fibroblasts are major mediators of fibrogenesis, we here explored the effect of high extracellular phosphate levels on renal fibroblasts. We demonstrate that high inorganic phosphate directly induces fibrotic fibroblast activation associated with increased proliferative activity, increased expression of α-smooth muscle actin and increased synthesis of type I collagen. We further demonstrate that such fibroblast activation is dependent on phosphate influx, aberrant phosphorylation of DNA methyltransferase DNMT1 and aberrant CpG island promoter methylation. In summary, our studies demonstrate that elevated phosphate concentrations induce pro-fibrotic fibroblast activation independent of phospho-regulatory hormones.

  11. [Mechanism of differential effect of low dose adaptogens on the functional activity of normal and transformed cellular elements in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udintsev, S N; Shakhov, V P; Borovskoĭ, I G

    1991-01-01

    Influence of water solutions of chemically pure adaptogen--synthetic analog of Rhodiola Rosea extract phenol composition (SAR) on functional activity of hemopoietic and tumor cells of mice with Ehrlich ascite cancer was studied in vitro. The periodical character of SAR effects was shown to be different for both types of cells, and at 1 x 10(-2) and 1 x 10(-26) M concentrations simultaneous stimulation of blood marrow cells colony-forming activity and inhibition of the latter in tumor elements was revealed. Essential changes of reactions of both cell types after adding the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase blocker Actinomycin D permit to suggest SAR effects to be connected with drug influence on the membrane RNA of the target cells.

  12. Differential effects of Sp cellular transcription factors on viral promoter activation by varicella-zoster virus (VZV) IE62 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohamed I; Ruyechan, William T; Hay, John; Arvin, Ann

    2015-11-01

    The immediate early (IE) 62 protein is the major varicella-zoster virus (VZV) regulatory factor. Analysis of the VZV genome revealed 40 predicted GC-rich boxes within 36 promoters. We examined effects of ectopic expression of Sp1-Sp4 on IE62- mediated transactivation of three viral promoters. Ectopic expression of Sp3 and Sp4 enhanced IE62 activation of ORF3 and gI promoters while Sp3 reduced IE62 activation of ORF28/29 promoter and VZV DNA replication. Sp2 reduced IE62 transactivation of gI while Sp1 had no significant influence on IE62 activation with any of these viral promoters. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) confirmed binding of Sp1 and Sp3 but not Sp2 and Sp4 to the gI promoter. Sp1-4 bound to IE62 and amino acids 238-258 of IE62 were important for the interaction with Sp3 and Sp4 as well as Sp1. This work shows that Sp family members have differential effects on IE62-mediated transactivation in a promoter-dependent manner.

  13. Cellular renewal and improvement of local cell effector activity in peritoneal cavity in response to infectious stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra dos Anjos Cassado

    Full Text Available The peritoneal cavity (PerC is a singular compartment where many cell populations reside and interact. Despite the widely adopted experimental approach of intraperitoneal (i.p. inoculation, little is known about the behavior of the different cell populations within the PerC. To evaluate the dynamics of peritoneal macrophage (MØ subsets, namely small peritoneal MØ (SPM and large peritoneal MØ (LPM, in response to infectious stimuli, C57BL/6 mice were injected i.p. with zymosan or Trypanosoma cruzi. These conditions resulted in the marked modification of the PerC myelo-monocytic compartment characterized by the disappearance of LPM and the accumulation of SPM and monocytes. In parallel, adherent cells isolated from stimulated PerC displayed reduced staining for β-galactosidase, a biomarker for senescence. Further, the adherent cells showed increased nitric oxide (NO and higher frequency of IL-12-producing cells in response to subsequent LPS and IFN-γ stimulation. Among myelo-monocytic cells, SPM rather than LPM or monocytes, appear to be the central effectors of the activated PerC; they display higher phagocytic activity and are the main source of IL-12. Thus, our data provide a first demonstration of the consequences of the dynamics between peritoneal MØ subpopulations by showing that substitution of LPM by a robust SPM and monocytes in response to infectious stimuli greatly improves PerC effector activity.

  14. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signalling pathway in normal and malignant B cells: activation mechanisms, regulation and impact on cellular functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha D Pauls

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K pathway is a central signal transduction axis controlling normal B cell homeostasis and activation in humoral immunity. The p110δ PI3K catalytic subunit has emerged as a critical mediator of multiple B cell functions. The activity of this pathway is regulated at multiple levels, with inositol phosphatases PTEN and SHIP both playing critical roles. When deregulated, the PI3K pathway can contribute to B cell malignancies and autoantibody production. This review summarizes current knowledge on key mechanisms that activate and regulate the PI3K pathway and influence normal B cell functional responses including the development of B cell subsets, antigen presentation, immunogloblulin isotype switch, germinal center responses and maintenance of B cell anergy. We also discuss PI3K pathway alterations reported in select B cell malignancies and highlight studies indicating the functional significance of this pathway in malignant B cell survival and growth within tissue microenvironments. Finally, we comment on early clinical trial results, which support PI3K inhibition as a promising treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

  15. The phosphoinositide 3-kinase signaling pathway in normal and malignant B cells: activation mechanisms, regulation and impact on cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, Samantha D; Lafarge, Sandrine T; Landego, Ivan; Zhang, Tingting; Marshall, Aaron J

    2012-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) pathway is a central signal transduction axis controlling normal B cell homeostasis and activation in humoral immunity. The p110δ PI3K catalytic subunit has emerged as a critical mediator of multiple B cell functions. The activity of this pathway is regulated at multiple levels, with inositol phosphatases PTEN and SHIP both playing critical roles. When deregulated, the PI3K pathway can contribute to B cell malignancies and autoantibody production. This review summarizes current knowledge on key mechanisms that activate and regulate the PI3K pathway and influence normal B cell functional responses including the development of B cell subsets, antigen presentation, immunoglobulin isotype switch, germinal center responses, and maintenance of B cell anergy. We also discuss PI3K pathway alterations reported in select B cell malignancies and highlight studies indicating the functional significance of this pathway in malignant B cell survival and growth within tissue microenvironments. Finally, we comment on early clinical trial results, which support PI3K inhibition as a promising treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.