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Sample records for high cci group

  1. The Effects of Gardeniae Fructus Aqua-Acupuncture on Liver Injury of Rats Induced by CCI4 (

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park, Hee-Soo

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the study of the effects of Aqua-acupuncture with Gardeniae Fructus on thc recovery of rat's liver which was damaged by 0.3ml/ea of CCI4. Rats were divided into 4 groups; Normal-group(None treated group, Control-group(Not treated after CCI4-intoxicated, Exp. I(Treated with Saline Aqua-acupuncture after CCI4-intoxicated and Exp. ll(Treated with Gardeniae Fructus Aqua-acupuncture after CCI4-intoxicated. Biochemical assays for each serum enzyme activities of AST, ALT, Albumin, LDH, γ-GT, TG and Total cholesterol were performed. The results were summarized as follows: 1. AST activities in serum significantly decreased in the Gardeniae Fructus Aqua-acupuncture treated group after CCI4-intoxicated. In companson with Saline-treated group after CCI4-intoxicated, the Gardeniae Fructus Aqua-acupuncture treated group *The professor of Dept. of Acupuncture & Moxibustion, 2. At T activities in serum significantly decreased in the Gardeniae Fructus Aqua-acupuncture treated group after CCI4-intoxicated. In com pan son with Saline-treated group after CCI4-intoxicated, the Gardeniae Fructus Aqua-acupuncture treated group after CCI4-intoxicated worked effectively to rat's damaged liver. 3. Albumin in serum increased in the Gardeniae Fructus Aqua-acupurkture treated group after CCI4-intoxicated. 4. LDH in serum significantly decreased in the Gardeniae Fructus Aqua-acupuncture treated group after CCI4-intoxicated. In comparison with Saline-treated group after CClcintox icated, the Gardeniae Fructus Aqua acupuncture treated group after CCI4-intoxicated worked highly effectively to rat's damaged liver. 5. γ-GT In serum significantly decreased In the Gardeniae Fructus Aqua-acupuncture trea ted group after CCI4-intoxicated. In compan son with Saline-treated group after CCI4-intoxicated, the Crardeniae Fructus Aqua-acupuncture treated group after CCI4-intoxicated was not recognized significantly. 6. TG in serum significantly decreased in the Gardeniae Fructus

  2. CCI Open Data Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, H.; Pechorro, E.; Bennett, V.; Farquhar, C.; Blower, J.

    2016-08-01

    The European Space Agency's (ESA's) Climate Change Initiative (CCI) Programme, producing harmonised datasets from long term Earth Observation satellite data records for a number of Essential Climate Variables (ECV's), provides a solid basis for climate science and modelling, for specialist application development and ultimately for European and global policy making.The resulting Climate Data Records (CDRs) represent a major investment of science, funding and personal effort, therefore extended access to those products is a key element of programme success.ECV datasets are currently being distributed through individual ECV teams, and access procedures and interfaces vary. To compliment and unify the work of the individual teams and to maximise the visibility and uptake of ECV data in the climate data user community within and beyond the CCI, a new ESA CCI project has started, to create a central open data portal and metadata catalogue for the ESA CCI project.This paper highlights key features of the Portal to date.

  3. Report of CCI Early Childhood Think Tank on Governance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child Care, Inc., 2008

    2008-01-01

    Child Care, Inc. (CCI) invited a group of early childhood experts to help reflect on what CCI had learned from other states about governance and to apply that knowledge to New York City. The goal was to foster more systemic thinking about how to move toward a more coherent early care and education system in New York City that would better meet the…

  4. Transcriptomes of Frankia sp. strain CcI3 in growth transitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bickhart Derek M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frankia sp. strains are actinobacteria that form N2-fixing root nodules on angiosperms. Several reference genome sequences are available enabling transcriptome studies in Frankia sp. Genomes from Frankia sp. strains differ markedly in size, a consequence proposed to be associated with a high number of indigenous transposases, more than 200 of which are found in Frankia sp. strain CcI3 used in this study. Because Frankia exhibits a high degree of cell heterogeneity as a consequence of its mycelial growth pattern, its transcriptome is likely to be quite sensitive to culture age. This study focuses on the behavior of the Frankia sp. strain CcI3 transcriptome as a function of nitrogen source and culture age. Results To study global transcription in Frankia sp. CcI3 grown under different conditions, complete transcriptomes were determined using high throughput RNA deep sequencing. Samples varied by time (five days vs. three days and by culture conditions (NH4+ added vs. N2 fixing. Assembly of millions of reads revealed more diversity of gene expression between five-day and three-day old cultures than between three day old cultures differing in nitrogen sources. Heat map analysis organized genes into groups that were expressed or repressed under the various conditions compared to median expression values. Twenty-one SNPs common to all three transcriptome samples were detected indicating culture heterogeneity in this slow-growing organism. Significantly higher expression of transposase ORFs was found in the five-day and N2-fixing cultures, suggesting that N starvation and culture aging provide conditions for on-going genome modification. Transposases have previously been proposed to participate in the creating the large number of gene duplication or deletion in host strains. Subsequent RT-qPCR experiments confirmed predicted elevated transposase expression levels indicated by the mRNA-seq data. Conclusions The overall pattern of

  5. CCI President Participated in China Cotton Summit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ On May 7-8 the 2010 China Cotton Summit and the International Cotton Fair were held in Sanya, Hainan Province, China. Mr. Wallace L. Darneille, the new president of Cotton Council International (CCI) made a special trip to China to participate in the event and present on the "cotton and textile supply and demand situation in the U.S."

  6. CCI President Participated in China Cotton Summit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    On May 7-8 the 2010 China Cotton Summit and the International Cotton Fair were held in Sanya,Hainan Province,China.Mr.Wallace L.Darneille, the new president of Cotton Council International(CCI) made a special trip to China to participate in the event and present on the"cotton and textile supply and demand situation in the U.S."

  7. Hyperbaric oxygenation alleviates chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain and inhibits GABAergic neuron apoptosis in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Huiqun; Li, Fenghua; Thomas, Sebastian; Yang, Zhongjin

    2017-09-15

    Dysfunction of GABAergic inhibitory controls contributes to the development of neuropathic pain. We examined our hypotheses that (1) chronic constriction injury (CCI)-induced neuropathic pain is associated with increased spinal GABAergic neuron apoptosis, and (2) hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) alleviates CCI-induced neuropathic pain by inhibiting GABAergic neuron apoptosis. Male rats were randomized into 3 groups: CCI, CCI+HBO and the control group (SHAM). Mechanical allodynia was tested daily following CCI procedure. HBO rats were treated at 2.4 atmospheres absolute (ATA) for 60min once per day. The rats were euthanized and the spinal cord harvested on day 8 and 14 post-CCI. Detection of GABAergic cells and apoptosis was performed. The percentages of double positive stained cells (NeuN/GABA), cleaved caspase-3 or Cytochrome C in total GABAergic cells or in total NeuN positive cells were calculated. HBO significantly alleviated mechanical allodynia. CCI-induced neuropathic pain was associated with significantly increased spinal apoptotic GABA-positive neurons. HBO considerably decreased these spinal apoptotic cells. Cytochrome-C-positive neurons and cleaved caspase-3-positive neurons were also significantly higher in CCI rats. HBO significantly decreased these positive cells. Caspase-3 mRNA was also significantly higher in CCI rats. HBO reduced mRNA expression of caspase-3. CCI-induced neuropathic pain was associated with increased apoptotic GABAergic neurons induced by activation of key proteins of mitochondrial apoptotic pathways in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. HBO alleviated CCI-induced neuropathic pain and reduced GABAergic neuron apoptosis. The beneficial effect of HBO may be via its inhibitory role in CCI-induced GABAergic neuron apoptosis by suppressing mitochondrial apoptotic pathways in the spinal cord. Increased apoptotic GABAergic neurons induced by activation of key proteins of mitochondrial apoptotic pathways in the dorsal horn of the spinal

  8. Reciprocal regulation by the CepIR and CciIR quorum sensing systems in Burkholderia cenocepacia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malott Rebecca J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Burkholderia cenocepacia belongs to a group of closely related organisms called the B. cepacia complex (Bcc which are important opportunistic human pathogens. B. cenocepacia utilizes a mechanism of cell-cell communication called quorum sensing to control gene expression including genes involved in virulence. The B. cenocepacia quorum sensing network includes the CepIR and CciIR regulatory systems. Results Global gene expression profiles during growth in stationary phase were generated using microarrays of B. cenocepacia cepR, cciR and cepRcciIR mutants. This is the first time CciR was shown to be a global regulator of quorum sensing gene expression. CepR was primarily responsible for positive regulation of gene expression while CciR generally exerted negative gene regulation. Many of the genes that were regulated by both quorum sensing systems were reciprocally regulated by CepR and CciR. Microarray analysis of the cepRcciIR mutant suggested that CepR is positioned upstream of CciR in the quorum sensing hierarchy in B. cenocepacia. A comparison of CepIR-regulated genes identified in previous studies and in the current study showed a substantial amount of overlap validating the microarray approach. Several novel quorum sensing-controlled genes were confirmed using qRT-PCR or promoter::lux fusions. CepR and CciR inversely regulated flagellar-associated genes, the nematocidal protein AidA and a large gene cluster on Chromosome 3. CepR and CciR also regulated genes required for iron transport, synthesis of extracellular enzymes and surface appendages, resistance to oxidative stress, and phage-related genes. Conclusion For the first time, the influence of CciIR on global gene regulation in B. cenocepacia has been elucidated. Novel genes under the control of the CepIR and CciIR quorum sensing systems in B. cenocepacia have been identified. The two quorum sensing systems exert reciprocal regulation of many genes likely enabling fine

  9. Resource allocation with CCI suppression for multiuser MIMO-OFDM downlink in correlated channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Chengwen; Zhang Zhongzhao; Ma Yongkui

    2008-01-01

    To minimize the overall transmit power while maintaining a constant data rate and target BER,a downlink adaptive resource allocation algorithm with jointing the exclusive manner and the shared manner is proposed for multiuser MIMO-OFDM system in correlated channels. The algorithm allocates all the subcarriers to different users according to their spatial correlations. The users with high spatial correlation are allocated in the same group and the exclusive manner is applied. The shared manner with an improved null broadening method,which improves the performance of co-channel interference (CCI) suppression and decreases the number of transmit antennas required, is applied between the different group users. As the user's direction of departure (DOD) changes very slowly, a looking up table method is used to reduce the computational complexity. The simulation results show that despite the angle spread of DOD, when compared with the exclusive manner, the proposed algorithm improves the spectral efficiency, and when compared with the TDMA-ZF (zero forcing) shared manner, the proposed algorithm decreases the total transmit power by at least 1 dB.

  10. The Rapalogue, CCI-779, improves salivary gland function following radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Morgan-Bathke

    Full Text Available The standard of care for head and neck cancer typically includes surgical resection of the tumor followed by targeted head and neck radiation. However depending on tumor location and stage, some cases may not require surgical resection while others may be treated with chemoradiation. Unfortunately, these radiation treatments cause chronic negative side effects for patients. These side effects are associated with damage to surrounding normal salivary gland tissue and include xerostomia, changes in taste and malnutrition. The underlying mechanisms of chronic radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction are unknown, however, in rodent models persistently elevated proliferation is correlated with reduced stimulated salivary flow. The rapalogue, CCI-779, has been used in other cell systems to induce autophagy and reduce proliferation, therefore the aim of this study was to determine if CCI-779 could be utilized to ameliorate chronic radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction. Four to six week old Atg5f/f; Aqp5-Cre, Atg5+/+; Aqp5-Cre and FVB mice were treated with targeted head and neck radiation. FVB mice were treated with CCI-779, chloroquine, or DMSO post-radiation. Stimulated salivary flow rates were determined and parotid and submandibular salivary gland tissues were collected for analyses. Mice with a defect in autophagy, via a conditional knockout of Atg5 in the salivary glands, display increased compensatory proliferation in the acinar cell compartment and hypertrophy at 24-72 hours following radiation. FVB mice treated with post-therapy CCI-779 have significant improvements in salivary gland physiology as determined by stimulated salivary flow rates, proliferation indices and amylase production and secretion. Consequently, post-radiation use of CCI-779 allows for improvement of salivary gland function and reestablishment of glandular homeostasis. As CCI-779 is already FDA approved for other uses, it could have a secondary use to alleviate

  11. Ice_Sheets_CCI: Essential Climate Variables for the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, R.; Sørensen, L. S.; Khan, A.; Aas, C.; Evansberget, D.; Adalsteinsdottir, G.; Mottram, R.; Andersen, S. B.; Ahlstrøm, A.; Dall, J.; Kusk, A.; Merryman, J.; Hvidberg, C.; Khvorostovsky, K.; Nagler, T.; Rott, H.; Scharrer, M.; Shepard, A.; Ticconi, F.; Engdahl, M.

    2012-04-01

    As part of the ESA Climate Change Initiative (www.esa-cci.org) a long-term project "ice_sheets_cci" started January 1, 2012, in addition to the existing 11 projects already generating Essential Climate Variables (ECV) for the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS). The "ice_sheets_cci" goal is to generate a consistent, long-term and timely set of key climate parameters for the Greenland ice sheet, to maximize the impact of European satellite data on climate research, from missions such as ERS, Envisat and the future Sentinel satellites. The climate parameters to be provided, at first in a research context, and in the longer perspective by a routine production system, would be grids of Greenland ice sheet elevation changes from radar altimetry, ice velocity from repeat-pass SAR data, as well as time series of marine-terminating glacier calving front locations and grounding lines for floating-front glaciers. The ice_sheets_cci project will involve a broad interaction of the relevant cryosphere and climate communities, first through user consultations and specifications, and later in 2012 optional participation in "best" algorithm selection activities, where prototype climate parameter variables for selected regions and time frames will be produced and validated using an objective set of criteria ("Round-Robin intercomparison"). This comparative algorithm selection activity will be completely open, and we invite all interested scientific groups with relevant experience to participate. The results of the "Round Robin" exercise will form the algorithmic basis for the future ECV production system. First prototype results will be generated and validated by early 2014. The poster will show the planned outline of the project and some early prototype results.

  12. Aerosol retrieval experiments in the ESA Aerosol_cci project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer-Popp, T.; de Leeuw, G.; Griesfeller, J.; Martynenko, D.; Klüser, L.; Bevan, S.; Davies, W.; Ducos, F.; Deuzé, J. L.; Graigner, R. G.; Heckel, A.; von Hoyningen-Hüne, W.; Kolmonen, P.; Litvinov, P.; North, P.; Poulsen, C. A.; Ramon, D.; Siddans, R.; Sogacheva, L.; Tanre, D.; Thomas, G. E.; Vountas, M.; Descloitres, J.; Griesfeller, J.; Kinne, S.; Schulz, M.; Pinnock, S.

    2013-08-01

    Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) project Aerosol_cci (2010-2013), algorithms for the production of long-term total column aerosol optical depth (AOD) datasets from European Earth Observation sensors are developed. Starting with eight existing pre-cursor algorithms three analysis steps are conducted to improve and qualify the algorithms: (1) a series of experiments applied to one month of global data to understand several major sensitivities to assumptions needed due to the ill-posed nature of the underlying inversion problem, (2) a round robin exercise of "best" versions of each of these algorithms (defined using the step 1 outcome) applied to four months of global data to identify mature algorithms, and (3) a comprehensive validation exercise applied to one complete year of global data produced by the algorithms selected as mature based on the round robin exercise. The algorithms tested included four using AATSR, three using MERIS and one using PARASOL. This paper summarizes the first step. Three experiments were conducted to assess the potential impact of major assumptions in the various aerosol retrieval algorithms. In the first experiment a common set of four aerosol components was used to provide all algorithms with the same assumptions. The second experiment introduced an aerosol property climatology, derived from a combination of model and sun photometer observations, as a priori information in the retrievals on the occurrence of the common aerosol components. The third experiment assessed the impact of using a common nadir cloud mask for AATSR and MERIS algorithms in order to characterize the sensitivity to remaining cloud contamination in the retrievals against the baseline dataset versions. The impact of the algorithm changes was assessed for one month (September 2008) of data: qualitatively by inspection of monthly mean AOD maps and quantitatively by comparing daily gridded satellite data against daily averaged AERONET sun photometer

  13. Aerosol retrieval experiments in the ESA Aerosol_cci project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Holzer-Popp

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI project Aerosol_cci (2010–2013, algorithms for the production of long-term total column aerosol optical depth (AOD datasets from European Earth Observation sensors are developed. Starting with eight existing pre-cursor algorithms three analysis steps are conducted to improve and qualify the algorithms: (1 a series of experiments applied to one month of global data to understand several major sensitivities to assumptions needed due to the ill-posed nature of the underlying inversion problem, (2 a round robin exercise of "best" versions of each of these algorithms (defined using the step 1 outcome applied to four months of global data to identify mature algorithms, and (3 a comprehensive validation exercise applied to one complete year of global data produced by the algorithms selected as mature based on the round robin exercise. The algorithms tested included four using AATSR, three using MERIS and one using PARASOL. This paper summarizes the first step. Three experiments were conducted to assess the potential impact of major assumptions in the various aerosol retrieval algorithms. In the first experiment a common set of four aerosol components was used to provide all algorithms with the same assumptions. The second experiment introduced an aerosol property climatology, derived from a combination of model and sun photometer observations, as a priori information in the retrievals on the occurrence of the common aerosol components. The third experiment assessed the impact of using a common nadir cloud mask for AATSR and MERIS algorithms in order to characterize the sensitivity to remaining cloud contamination in the retrievals against the baseline dataset versions. The impact of the algorithm changes was assessed for one month (September 2008 of data: qualitatively by inspection of monthly mean AOD maps and quantitatively by comparing daily gridded satellite data against daily averaged AERONET sun

  14. OECD 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test plan, Rev. 0 January 31, 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. The first of these two tests, CCI-1, was conducted on December 19, 2003. This test investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two

  15. Evaluating ESA CCI soil moisture in East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Amy; Shukla, Shraddhanand; Arsenault, Kristi R.; Wang, Shugong; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Verdin, James P.

    2016-06-01

    To assess growing season conditions where ground based observations are limited or unavailable, food security and agricultural drought monitoring analysts rely on publicly available remotely sensed rainfall and vegetation greenness. There are also remotely sensed soil moisture observations from missions like the European Space Agency (ESA), Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP); however, these time series are still too short to conduct studies that demonstrate the utility of these data for operational applications, or to provide historical context for extreme wet or dry events. To promote the use of remotely sensed soil moisture in agricultural drought and food security monitoring, we evaluate the quality of a 30+ year time series of merged active-passive microwave soil moisture from the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI-SM) over East Africa. Compared to the Normalized Difference Vegetation index (NDVI) and modeled soil moisture products, we find substantial spatial and temporal gaps in the early part of the CCI-SM record, with adequate data coverage beginning in 1992. From this point forward, growing season CCI-SM anomalies are well correlated (R > 0.5) with modeled soil moisture, and in some regions, NDVI. We use pixel-wise correlation analysis and qualitative comparisons of seasonal maps and time series to show that remotely sensed soil moisture can inform remote drought monitoring that has traditionally relied on rainfall and NDVI in moderately vegetated regions.

  16. Effect of salt stress on the physiology of Frankia sp strain CcI6

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rediet Oshone; Samira R Mansour; Louis S Tisa

    2013-11-01

    Actinorhizal plants are able to overcome saline soils and reclaim land. Frankia sp strain CcI6 was isolated from nodules of Casuarina cunninghamiana found in Egypt. Phylogenetic analysis of Frankia sp. strain CcI6 revealed that the strain is closely related to Frankia sp. strain CcI3. The strain displays an elevated level of NaCl tolerance. Vesicle production and nitrogenase activity were also influenced by NaCl.

  17. Error Probability of MRC in Frequency Selective Nakagami Fading in the Presence of CCI and ACI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mohammad Azizur; Sum, Chin-Sean; Funada, Ryuhei; Sasaki, Shigenobu; Baykas, Tuncer; Wang, Junyi; Harada, Hiroshi; Kato, Shuzo

    An exact expression of error rate is developed for maximal ratio combining (MRC) in an independent but not necessarily identically distributed frequency selective Nakagami fading channel taking into account inter-symbol, co-channel and adjacent channel interferences (ISI, CCI and ACI respectively). The characteristic function (CF) method is adopted. While accurate analysis of MRC performance cannot be seen in frequency selective channel taking ISI (and CCI) into account, such analysis for ACI has not been addressed yet. The general analysis presented in this paper solves a problem of past and present interest, which has so far been studied either approximately or in simulations. The exact method presented also lets us obtain an approximate error rate expression based on Gaussian approximation (GA) of the interferences. It is shown, especially while the channel is lightly faded, has fewer multipath components and a decaying delay profile, the GA may be substantially inaccurate at high signal-to-noise ratio. However, the exact results also reveal an important finding that there is a range of parameters where the simpler GA is reasonably accurate and hence, we don't have to go for more involved exact expression.

  18. The effect of nicotine withdrawal on hyperalgesia in CCI rats%尼古丁戒断对CCI大鼠痛觉过敏的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张彦伟; 逯素芬; 李长营; 张宗旺

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨尼古丁戒断慢性压迫性损伤(chronic constriction injury,CCI)大鼠痛觉过敏的行为学变化.方法 成年雄性SD大鼠96只,随机分为正常对照组(n=6)、尼古丁戒断组(NT组)、CCI组和NT+CCI组.NT组、CCI组和NT+CCI组大鼠按术后1、3、5、7、14 d分为5个亚组,每个亚组6只.观察各组大鼠上述时间点机械刺激缩足阈值(mechanical withdrawal threshold,MWT)、热刺激缩足潜伏期(thermal withdrawal latency,TWL)的变化.结果 与Control组相比,CCI组大鼠术后1、3、5、7、14d MWT显著降低、TWL明显缩短(P<0.05),至第7d变化最明显(P<0.01);与CCI组比较,NT+CCI组大鼠术后1、3、5、7、14 d MWT和TWL均降低(P<0.05),以术后7d降低最为显著(P<0.01).结论 尼古丁戒断引起CCI大鼠痛觉敏感性增高.%Objective To explore the effect of nicotine withdrawal on postoperative hyperalgesia in chronic constriction injury (CCI) rats.Methods 96 adult male SD rats were randomly divided into control group (n=6),nicotine withdrawal group (NT group),CCI group and NT+CCI group.The rats in NT group,CCI group and NT+CCI group were divided into 5 subgroups according to postoperative 1 d,3 d,5 d,7 d and 14 d,6 rats in each subgroup.The changes of mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) and thermal withdrawal latency (TWL) were observed at time points above in each group for every rat.Results Compared with control group,MWT and TWL significantly decreased in CCI group at postoperative 1 d,3 d,5 d,7 d and 14 d (P<0.05),to the lowest at the 7th day (P<0.01).Compared with CCI group,MWT and TWL both decreased in NT+CCI group at postoperative 1 d,3 d,5 d,7 d and 14 d (P<0.05),to the lowest at the 7th day (P<0.01).Conclusion Nicotine withdrawal may raise postoperative hyperalgesia in CCI rats.

  19. Beamforming in Two-Way Fixed Gain Amplify-and-Forward Relay Systems with CCI

    CERN Document Server

    Duong, Trung Q; Zepernick, Hans-Jurgen; Yuen, Chau

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the outage performance of a two-way fixed gain amplify-and-forward (AF) relay system with beamforming, arbitrary antenna correlation, and co-channel interference (CCI). Assuming CCI at the relay, we derive the exact individual user outage probability in closed-form. Additionally, while neglecting CCI, we also investigate the system outage probability of the considered network, which is declared if any of the two users is in transmission outage. Our results indicate that in this system, the position of the relay plays an important role in determining the user as well as the system outage probability via such parameters as signal-to-noise imbalance, antenna configuration, spatial correlation, and CCI power. To render further insights into the effect of antenna correlation and CCI on the diversity and array gains, an asymptotic expression which tightly converges to exact results is also derived.

  20. Group Delay of High Q Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahramzy, Pevand; Pedersen, Gert Frølund

    2013-01-01

    become an issue, when working with high Q antennas, because of the steep phase shift over the frequency. In this paper, it is measured how large group delay variations can become, when going from a low Q antenna to a high Q antenna. The group delay of a low Q antenna is shown to be around 1.3 ns, whereas...... a high Q antenna has group delay of around 22 ns. It is due to this huge group delay variation characteristics of high Q antennas, that signal distortion might occur in the radio system with high Q antennas....

  1. Assessment Of The Impact Of ESA CCI Land Cover Information For Global Climate Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khlystova, Iryna G.; Loew, A.; Hangemann, S.; Defourny, P.; Brockmann, C.; Bontemps, S.

    2013-12-01

    Addressing the issues of climate change, the European Space Agency has recently initiated the Global Monitoring of an Essential Climate Variables program (ESA Climate Change Initiative). The main objective is to realize the full potential of the long-term global Earth Observation archives that ESA has established over the last thirty years. Due to well organized data access and transparency for the data quality, as well as long-term scientific and technical support, the provided datasets have become very attractive for the use in Earth System Modeling. The Max Plank Institute for Meteorology is contributing to the ESA CCI via the Climate Modeler User Group (CMUG) activities and is responsible for providing a modeler perspective on the Land Cover and Fire Essential Climate Variables. The new ESA land cover ECV has recently released a new global 300-m land cover dataset. This dataset is supported by an interactive tool which allows flexible horizontal re-scaling and conversion from currently accepted satellite specific land classes to the model- specific Plant Functional Types (PFT) categorization. Such a dataset is an ideal starting point for the generation of the land cover information for the initialization of model cover fractions. In this presentation, we show how the usage of this new dataset affects the model performance, comparing it to the standard model set-up, in terms of energy and water fluxes. To do so, we performed a number of offline land-system simulations with original standard JSBACH land cover information and with the new ESA CCI land cover product. We have analyzed the impact of land cover on a simulated surface albedo, temperature and energy fluxes as well as on the biomass load and fire carbon emissions.

  2. Quantitative MRI and DTI Abnormalities During the Acute Period Following CCI in the Ferret.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Elizabeth B; Schwerin, Susan C; Radomski, Kryslaine L; Irfanoglu, Mustafa O; Juliano, Sharon L; Pierpaoli, Carlo M

    2016-09-01

    During the acute time period following traumatic brain injury (TBI), noninvasive brain imaging tools such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can provide important information about the clinical and pathological features of the injury and may help predict long-term outcomes. In addition to standard imaging approaches, several quantitative MRI techniques including relaxometry and diffusion MRI have been identified as promising reporters of cellular alterations after TBI and may provide greater sensitivity and specificity for identifying brain abnormalities especially in mild TBI. However, for these imaging tools to be useful, it is crucial to define their relationship with the neurophysiological response to brain injury. Recently, a model of controlled cortical impact (CCI) has been developed in the ferret which has many advantages compared with rodent models (e.g., gyrencephalic cortex and high white matter volume). The objective of this study was to evaluate quantitative MRI metrics in the ferret CCI model, including T2 values and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) metrics, during the acute time period. Longitudinal quantitative comparisons of in vivo MRI and DTI metrics were evaluated to identify abnormalities and characterize their spatial patterns in the ferret brain. Ex vivo MRI and DTI maps were then compared with histological staining for glial and neuronal abnormalities. The main findings of this article describe T2, diffusivity, and anisotropy markers of tissue change during the acute time period following mild TBI, and ex vivo analyses suggest that MRI and DTI markers are sensitive to subtle cellular alterations in this model. This was confirmed by comparison with immunohistochemistry, also showing altered markers in regions of MRI and DTI change.

  3. Using a Simple Knowledge Organization System to facilitate Catalogue and Search for the ESA CCI Open Data Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Antony; Bennett, Victoria; Donegan, Steve; Juckes, Martin; Kershaw, Philip; Petrie, Ruth; Stephens, Ag; Waterfall, Alison

    2016-04-01

    The ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) is a €75m programme that runs from 2009-2016, with a goal to provide stable, long-term, satellite-based essential climate variable (ECV) data products for climate modellers and researchers. As part of the CCI, ESA have funded the Open Data Portal project to establish a central repository to bring together the data from these multiple sources and make it available in a consistent way, in order to maximise its dissemination amongst the international user community. Search capabilities are a critical component to attaining this goal. To this end, the project is providing dataset-level metadata in the form of ISO 19115 records served via a standard OGC CSW interface. In addition, the Open Data Portal is re-using the search system from the Earth System Grid Federation (ESGF), successfully applied to support CMIP5 (5th Coupled Model Intercomparison Project) and obs4MIPs. This uses a tightly defined controlled vocabulary of metadata terms, the DRS (The Data Reference Syntax) which encompass different aspects of the data. This system hs facilitated the construction of a powerful faceted search interface to enable users to discover data at the individual file level of granularity through ESGF's web portal frontend. The use of a consistent set of model experiments for CMIP5 allowed the definition of a uniform DRS for all model data served from ESGF. For CCI however, there are thirteen ECVs, each of which is derived from multiple sources and different science communities resulting in highly heterogeneous metadata. An analysis has been undertaken of the concepts in use, with the aim to produce a CCI DRS which could be provide a single authoritative source for cataloguing and searching the CCI data for the Open Data Portal. The use of SKOS (Simple Knowledge Organization System) and OWL (Web Ontology Language) to represent the DRS are a natural fit and provide controlled vocabularies as well as a way to represent relationships between

  4. High frequency group pulse electrochemical machining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Gaoyang; ZHANG Zhijing; ZHANG Weimin; TANG Xinglun

    2007-01-01

    In the process of machining ultrathin metal structure parts,the signal composition of high frequency group pulse,the influence of frequency to reverse current,and the design of the cathode in high frequency group pulse electrochemical machining (HGPECM) are discussed.The experiments on process were carried out.Results indicate that HGPECM can greatly improve the characteristics of the inter-electrode gap flow field,reduce electrode passivation,and obtain high machining quality.The machining quality is obviously improved by increasing the main pulse frequency.The dimensional accuracy reaches 30-40 pro and the roughness attained is at 0.30-0.35 μm.High frequency group pulse electrochemical machining can be successfully used in machining micro-parts.

  5. The GHG-CCI Project of ESA's Climate Change Initiative: Data Products and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwitz, M.; Reuter, M.; Schneising, O.; Boesch, H.; Aben, I.; Alexe, M.; Bergamaschi, P.; Bovensmann, H.; Brunner, D.; Buchmann, B.; Burrows, J. P.; Butz, A.; Chevallier, F.; Crevoisier, C. D.; De Maziere, M.; De Wachter, E.; Detmers, R.; Dils, B.; Feng, L.; Frankenberg, C.; Hasekamp, O. P.; Hewson, W.; Heymann, J.; Houweling, S.; Kaminski, T.; Laeng, A.; Leeuwen, T. T. v.; Lichtenberg, G.; Marshall, J.; Noel, S.; Notholt, J.; Palmer, P. I.; Parker, R.; Sundstrom, A.-M.; Scholze, M.; Stiller, G.; Warneke, T.; Zehner, C.

    2016-08-01

    The goal of the GHG-CCI project (http://www.esa-ghg- cci.org/) of ESA's Climate Change Initiative (CCI) is to generate global atmospheric satellite-derived carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) data sets as needed to improve our understanding of the regional sources and sinks of these important greenhouse gases (GHG). Here we present an overview about the latest data set called Climate Research Data Package No. 3 (CRDP3). We focus on the GHG-CCI project core data products, which are near-surface-sensitive column-averaged dry air mole fractions of CO2 and CH4, denoted XCO2 (in ppm) and XCH4 (in ppb) retrieved from SCIAMACHY/ENVISAT (2002-2012) and TANSO-FTS/GOSAT (2009-today) nadir mode radiance observations in the near- infrared/shortwave-infrared spectral region. The GHG- CCI products are primarily individual sensor Level 2 products. However, we also generate merged Level 2 products ("EMMA products"). Here we also present a first GHG-CCI Level 3 product, namely XCO2 and XCH4 in Obs4MIPs format (monthly, 5°x5°).

  6. OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partition of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the

  7. Dynamic Optimal CCI Weight Channel Pre-evaluative Assignment in Adaptive Array Antenna System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Weixiao; ZHANG Naitong

    2001-01-01

    Dynamic Channel Assignment (DCA)together with Adaptive Array Antenna (AAA) takes an important part in cellular mobile communication system. In this paper, a conception of co-channel in terference (CCI) quantification is advanced in multicell 8-element circular adaptive array antenna system.Normalized CCI weight relational expression, which is concerned in distance and look angle difference is sublimed from experiential sampling, induction and non-linear fitting. Then an algorithm of optimal CCI weight channel pre-evaluation is proposed as a solution of dynamic channel assignment. The least sum of weight value before assignment is used to pre-evaluate the performance of all the channels. Based on an approached practical cellular model, a series of systemclassed simulations are accomplished. Simulation resuits show that this algorithm is quite effective: system capacity is increased greatly; traffic block probabilities are decreased remarkably; nice channel quality is maintained; the reliability of DCA is enhanced; the higher frequency utilization efficiency is also obtained.

  8. OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partition of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the

  9. 78 FR 7773 - CCI Roseton LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission CCI Roseton LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...-referenced proceeding, of CCI Roseton LLC's application for market-based rate authority, with an...

  10. CCI and CI Join Hands:A Better Supply Chain with More Innovations on Cotton Fabrics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tom; Xue

    2010-01-01

    Cotton Council International("CCI")and Cotton Incorporated("CI") joined forces again,from October 19-22,2010 at Intertextile Shanghai,to promote natural fiber-U.S.cotton.As global textile strategic partners,both organizations were bringing together alliances through the cotton

  11. Inter-comparison of ice sheet mass balance products from GRACE: ESA CCI Round Robin results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, A.; Horwath, M.; Horvath, A.

    Both the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS) and the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) have been identified as key parameters, so called Essential Climate Variables (ECV), in the climate system. Within the framework of the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) of the European Space Agency (ESA), reliable long-term satel...

  12. Released polysaccharides (RPS) from Cyanothece sp. CCY 0110 as biosorbent for heavy metals bioremediation: interactions between metals and RPS binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Rita; Rossi, Federico; Andrenelli, Luisa; Pereira, Sara Bernardes; De Philippis, Roberto; Tamagnini, Paula

    2016-09-01

    Bioremediation of heavy metals using microorganisms can be advantageous compared to conventional physicochemical methods due to the use of renewable resources and efficiencies of removal particularly cations at low concentrations. In this context, cyanobacteria/cyanobacterial extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) emerge as a valid alternative due to the anionic nature and particular composition of these polymers. In this work, various culture fractions of the unicellular cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. CCY 0110 were employed in bioremoval assays using three of the most common heavy metal pollutants in water bodies-copper, cadmium, and lead-separately or in combined systems. Our study showed that the released polysaccharides (RPS) were the most efficient fraction, removing the metal(s) by biosorption. Therefore, this polymer was subsequently used to evaluate the interactions between the metals/RPS binding sites using SEM-EDX, ICP-OES, and FTIR. Acid and basic pretreatments applied to the polymer further improve the process efficiency, and the exposure to an alkaline solution seems to alter the RPS conformation. The differences observed in the specific metal bioremoval seem to be mainly due to the RPS organic functional groups available, mainly carboxyl and hydroxyl, than to an ion exchange mechanism. Considering that Cyanothece is a highly efficient RPS-producer and that RPS can be easily separated from the culture, immobilized or confined, this polymer can be advantageous for the establishment/improvement of heavy metal removal systems.

  13. User Requirements from the Climate Modelling Community for Next Generation Global Products from Land Cover CCI Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooistra, Lammert; van Groenestijn, Annemarie; Kalogirou, Vasileios; Arino, Olivier; Herold, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Land Cover has been selected as one of 11 Essential Climate Variables which will be elaborated during the first phase of the ESA Climate Change Initiative (2010- 2013). In the first stage of the Land Cover CCI project, an user requirements analysis has been carried out on the basis of which the detailed specifications of a global land cover product can be defined which match the requirements from the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) and the climate modelling community. As part of the requirements analysis, an user consultation mechanism was set-up to actively involve different climate modelling groups by setting out surveys to different type of users within the climate modelling community and the broad land cover data user community. The evolution of requirements from current models to future new modelling approaches was specifically taken into account. In addition, requirements from the GCOS Implementation Plan 2004 and 2010 and associated strategic earth observation documents for land cover were assessed and a detailed literature review was carried out. The outcome of the user requirements assessment shows that although the range of requirements coming from the climate modelling community is broad, there is a good match among the requirements coming from different user groups and the broader requirements derived from GCOS, CMUG and other relevant international panels. More specific requirements highlight that future land cover datasets should be both stable and have a dynamic component; deal with the consistency in relationships between land cover classes and land surface parameters; should provide flexibility to serve different scales and purposes; and should provide transparency of product quality. As a next step within the Land Cover CCI project, the outcome of this user requirements analysis will be used as input for the product specification of the next generation Global Land Cover datasets.

  14. OECD MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test data report-thermalhydraulic results, Rev. 0 October 15, 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-2 experiment, which was conducted on August 24, 2004. Test specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg

  15. OECD MCCI project 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-3 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev. 0 October 15, 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of a third long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiment designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-3 experiment, which was conducted on September 22, 2005. Test specifications for CCI-3 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 375

  16. OECD MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test data report-thermalhydraulic results, Rev. 0 October 15, 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-2 experiment, which was conducted on August 24, 2004. Test specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg

  17. Combination strategy of PARP inhibitor with antioxidant prevent bioenergetic deficits and inflammatory changes in CCI-induced neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komirishetty, Prashanth; Areti, Aparna; Gogoi, Ranadeep; Sistla, Ramakrishna; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2017-02-01

    Neuropathic pain, a debilitating pain condition and the underlying pathogenic mechanisms are complex and interwoven amongst each other and still there is scant information available regarding therapies which promise to treat the condition. Evidence indicate that oxidative/nitrosative stress induced poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) overactivation initiate neuroinflammation and bioenergetic crisis culminating into neurodegenerative changes following nerve injury. Hence, we investigated the therapeutic effect of combining an antioxidant, quercetin and a PARP inhibitor, 4-amino 1, 8-naphthalimide (4-ANI) on the hallmark deficits induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of sciatic nerve in rats. Quercetin (25 mg/kg, p.o.) and 4-ANI (3 mg/kg, p.o.) were administered either alone or in combination for 14 days to examine sciatic functional index, allodynia and hyperalgesia using walking track analysis, Von Frey, acetone spray and hot plate tests respectively. Malondialdehyde, nitrite and glutathione levels were estimated to detect oxidative/nitrosative stress; mitochondrial membrane potential and cytochrome c oxidase activity to assess mitochondrial function; NAD & ATP levels to examine the bioenergetic status and levels of inflammatory markers were evaluated in ipsilateral sciatic nerve. Quercetin and 4-ANI alone improved the pain behaviour and biochemical alterations but the combination therapy demonstrated an appreciable reversal of CCI-induced changes. Nitrotyrosine and Poly ADP-Ribose (PAR) immunopositivity was decreased and nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf-2) levels were increased significantly in micro-sections of the sciatic nerve and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) of treatment group. These results suggest that simultaneous inhibition of oxidative stress-PARP activation cascade may potentially be useful strategies for management of trauma induced neuropathic pain.

  18. Greenhouse gas observations from space: The GHG-CCI project of ESA's Climate Change Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwitz, Michael; Noël, Stefan; Bergamaschi, Peter; Boesch, Hartmut; Bovensmann, Heinrich; Notholt, Justus; Schneising, Oliver; Hasekamp, Otto; Reuter, Maximilian; Parker, Robert; Dils, Bart; Chevallier, Frederic; Zehner, Claus; Burrows, John

    2012-07-01

    The GHG-CCI project (http://www.esa-ghg-cci.org) is one of several projects of ESA's Climate Change Initiative (CCI), which will deliver various Essential Climate Variables (ECVs). The goal of GHG-CCI is to deliver global satellite-derived data sets of the two most important anthropogenic greenhouse gases (GHGs) carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) suitable to obtain information on regional CO2 and CH4 surface sources and sinks as needed for better climate prediction. The GHG-CCI core ECV data products are column-averaged mole fractions of CO2 and CH4, XCO2 and XCH4, retrieved from SCIAMACHY on ENVISAT and TANSO on GOSAT. Other satellite instruments will be used to provide constraints in upper layers such as IASI, MIPAS, and ACE-FTS. Which of the advanced algorithms, which are under development, will be the best for a given data product still needs to be determined. For each of the 4 GHG-CCI core data products - XCO2 and XCH4 from SCIAMACHY and GOSAT - several algorithms are being further developed and the corresponding data products are inter-compared to identify which data product is the most appropriate. This includes comparisons with corresponding data products generated elsewhere, most notably with the operational data products of GOSAT generated at NIES and the NASA/ACOS GOSAT XCO2 product. This activity, the so-called "Round Robin exercise", will be performed in the first two years of this project. At the end of the 2 year Round Robin phase (end of August 2012) a decision will be made which of the algorithms performs best. The selected algorithms will be used to generate the first version of the ECV GHG. In the last six months of this 3 year project the resulting data products will be validated and made available to all interested users. In the presentation and overview about this project will be given focussing on the latest results.

  19. Animal Rights Groups Target High School Dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Andrew

    1992-01-01

    Two groups leading the charge against dissection are People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) and the Student Action Corps for Animals (SACA). Protests by student and community members remain the movement's strongest weapon. (MLF)

  20. The Child Concentration Inventory (CCI): Initial validation of a child self-report measure of sluggish cognitive tempo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Stephen P; Luebbe, Aaron M; Joyce, Ann Marie

    2015-09-01

    Sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) is characterized by excessive daydreaming, mental confusion, slowness, and low motivation. Several teacher- and parent-report measures of SCT have recently been developed but a child self-report measure of SCT does not yet exist despite clear links between SCT and internalizing psychopathology (for which self-report is often desired). This study examined the initial reliability and validity of the Child Concentration Inventory (CCI), a child self-report measure of SCT symptoms, in a school-based sample of 124 children (ages 8-13; 55% female). Children completed the CCI and measures of academic/social functioning, emotion regulation, and self-esteem. Teachers completed measures of psychopathology symptoms (including SCT) and academic/social functioning. Although exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) supported a 3-factor model of the CCI (consisting of slow, sleepy, and daydreamer scales closely resembling the factor structure of the parent-report version of this measure), bifactor modeling and omega reliability indices indicated that the CCI is best conceptualized as unidimensional. CCI scores were significantly correlated with teacher-rated SCT and were statistically distinct from teacher-rated ADHD and child-rated anxiety/depression. After controlling for sex, grade, and other psychopathology symptoms, the CCI total score was significantly associated with poorer child-reported academic/social functioning and self-worth in addition to increased loneliness and emotion dysregulation. Child ratings on the CCI were moderately to strongly correlated with poorer teacher-rated academic/social functioning but these associations were reduced to nonsignificance after controlling for demographics and other psychopathology symptoms. Findings provide preliminary support for the CCI, and future directions include replication with adolescents and clinical samples in order to further examine the CCI's factor structure, reliability, validity

  1. Sunspot Group Development in High Resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Muraközy, J; Ludmány, A

    2014-01-01

    The Solar and Heliospheric Obseratory/Michelson Doppler Imager--Debrecen Data (SDD) sunspot catalogue provides an opportunity to study the details and development of sunspot groups on a large statistical sample. The SDD data allow, in particular, the differential study of the leading and following parts with a temporal resolution of 1.5 hours. In this study, we analyse the equilibrium distance of sunspot groups as well as the evolution of this distance over the lifetime of the groups and the shifts in longitude associated with these groups. We also study the asymmetry between the compactness of the leading and following parts, as well as the time-profiles for the development of the area of sunspot groups. A logarithmic relationship has been found between the total area and the distance of leading-following parts of active regions (ARs) at the time of their maximum area. In the developing phase the leading part moves forward; this is more noticeable in larger ARs. The leading part has a higher growth rate than...

  2. Photoelectron Spectroscopy,Photoionization Mass Spectroscopy,and Theoretical Study on CCI3SSCN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Du; Li Yao; Mao-fa Ge

    2008-01-01

    Trichloromethanesulfenyl thiocyanate,CCI3SSCN,was generated and studied by photoelectron spectroscoy (PES),photoionization mass spectroscopy(PIMS),and theoretical calculations.This molecule exhibits a gaucho conformation,and the torsional angle around S-S bond is 91.4° due to the sulfur-sulfur lone pair interactions.After ionization,the ground-state cationic-radical form of CC13SSCN+ adopts a trans planar main-atom structure with Cs symmetry.The highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of CCI3SSCN corresponds to the electrons mainly localized on the sulfur 3p lone pair MO.The first ionization energy is determined to be 10.40 eV.

  3. ADEA CCI vision focuses on preparing graduates for discoveries of the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Ronald J; Bushong, Martha

    2010-08-01

    The vision of the American Dental Education Association's Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education (ADEA CCI) is embodied in its new slogan: building consensus and leading change to prepare graduates for an undiscovered future. The ADEA CCI envisions a future in which dental practice is vastly different from what it is today and dental education must be very different for graduates who face a future of unimaginable scientific discovery. Dental curricula need to change to better prepare today's dental students, not only for the practice of today but also for the challenges they will face in their practices of the future. The goal of "building consensus" is directed toward the many constituencies that work with dental education and its graduates. The ADEA CCI has developed a variety of policy recommendations, strategies, and resources to help policymakers, dental educators, and dental graduates better prepare for this undiscovered future. A key resource is twenty-two commissioned white papers that cover diverse topics, such as curriculum reform, facilitating change, faculty development, student assessment, and academic leadership.

  4. High School Transfer Students: A Group Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valine, Warren J.; Amos, Louise Cleary

    1973-01-01

    A counselor's awareness of many incidents of adjustment problems among new students in a large and impersonal high school prompted an effort to make changes in the situation; the resulting program, designed to help new students is described in this article. (Author)

  5. In-situ databases and comparison of ESA Ocean Colour Climate Change Initiative (OC-CCI) products with precursor data, towards an integrated approach for ocean colour validation and climate studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotas, Vanda; Valente, André; Couto, André B.; Grant, Mike; Chuprin, Andrei; Jackson, Thomas; Groom, Steve; Sathyendranath, Shubha

    2014-05-01

    Ocean colour (OC) is an Oceanic Essential Climate Variable, which is used by climate modellers and researchers. The European Space Agency (ESA) Climate Change Initiative project, is the ESA response for the need of climate-quality satellite data, with the goal of providing stable, long-term, satellite-based ECV data products. The ESA Ocean Colour CCI focuses on the production of Ocean Colour ECV uses remote sensing reflectances to derive inherent optical properties and chlorophyll a concentration from ESA's MERIS (2002-2012) and NASA's SeaWiFS (1997 - 2010) and MODIS (2002-2012) sensor archives. This work presents an integrated approach by setting up a global database of in situ measurements and by inter-comparing OC-CCI products with pre-cursor datasets. The availability of in situ databases is fundamental for the validation of satellite derived ocean colour products. A global distribution in situ database was assembled, from several pre-existing datasets, with data spanning between 1997 and 2012. It includes in-situ measurements of remote sensing reflectances, concentration of chlorophyll-a, inherent optical properties and diffuse attenuation coefficient. The database is composed from observations of the following datasets: NOMAD, SeaBASS, MERMAID, AERONET-OC, BOUSSOLE and HOTS. The result was a merged dataset tuned for the validation of satellite-derived ocean colour products. This was an attempt to gather, homogenize and merge, a large high-quality bio-optical marine in situ data, as using all datasets in a single validation exercise increases the number of matchups and enhances the representativeness of different marine regimes. An inter-comparison analysis between OC-CCI chlorophyll-a product and satellite pre-cursor datasets was done with single missions and merged single mission products. Single mission datasets considered were SeaWiFS, MODIS-Aqua and MERIS; merged mission datasets were obtained from the GlobColour (GC) as well as the Making Earth Science

  6. Validation of the ESA CCI soil moisture product in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ru; Zhang, Ling; Wang, Zhe; Quaye-Ballard, Jonathan Arthur; You, Jiajun; Shen, Xiaoji; Gao, Wei; Huang, LiJun; Zhao, Yinghui; Ke, Zunyou

    2016-06-01

    The quality of a newly merged soil moisture product (ECV_SM v0.1) from active and passive microwave sensors has attracted widespread international attention. The performance evaluation of this product will benefit studies on climate, meteorology, agriculture, hydrology, ecology and the environment. In this study, meteorological station data and the Noah soil moisture product were used to validate the ECV_SM product in China. First, some conventional statistical measures, such as correlation coefficients, bias, root mean square difference (RMSD) and mean relative error (MRE), were computed to describe the level of agreement between the meteorological station data and ECV_SM values. The accuracy was moderately high (the correlation was significant at the 0.05 level), although the two datasets differed slightly for various types of land cover. Compared with cropland and urban and built-up areas, the performance of ECV_SM was best in grassland regions. Second, the triple collocation technique was used to assess the random error in the meteorological station data, Noah soil moisture product and ECV_SM product. The mean errors in these three datasets were 0.108, 0.079 and 0.075 m3 m-3, respectively, on July 8, 2010 and 0.099, 0.061 and 0.059 m3 m-3, respectively, on October 8, 2010. Only two days of data were used for the triple collocation test as a representative, but this cannot precisely indicate that the test results on any other day correspond with the test results on these two days. Additionally, a trend analysis of ECV_SM during 2003-2010 was carried out using the Mann-Kendall trend test.

  7. High energy flare physics group summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. M.; Kurfess, J. D.

    1989-01-01

    The contributions of the High Energy Flare Physics Special Session in the American Astronomical Society Solar Physics Division Meeting are reviewed. Oral and poster papers were presented on observatories and instruments available for the upcoming solar maximum. Among these are the space-based Gamma Ray Observatory, the Solar Flare and Cosmic Burst Gamma Ray Experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft, the Soft X Ray Telescope on the spacecraft Solar-A, and the balloon-based Gamma Ray Imaging Device. Ground based observatories with new capabilities include the BIMA mm-wave interferometer (Univ. of California, Berkeley; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Maryland), Owens Valley Radio Observatory and the Very Large Array. The highlights of the various instrument performances are reported and potential data correlations and collaborations are suggested.

  8. Smoking Rates Still High in Some Racial Groups, CDC Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_160256.html Smoking Rates Still High in Some Racial Groups, CDC ... lot of progress in getting Americans to stop smoking, some groups still have high smoking rates, a ...

  9. Consistent group selection in high-dimensional linear regression

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Fengrong; 10.3150/10-BEJ252

    2010-01-01

    In regression problems where covariates can be naturally grouped, the group Lasso is an attractive method for variable selection since it respects the grouping structure in the data. We study the selection and estimation properties of the group Lasso in high-dimensional settings when the number of groups exceeds the sample size. We provide sufficient conditions under which the group Lasso selects a model whose dimension is comparable with the underlying model with high probability and is estimation consistent. However, the group Lasso is, in general, not selection consistent and also tends to select groups that are not important in the model. To improve the selection results, we propose an adaptive group Lasso method which is a generalization of the adaptive Lasso and requires an initial estimator. We show that the adaptive group Lasso is consistent in group selection under certain conditions if the group Lasso is used as the initial estimator.

  10. The Assessment of Atmospheric Correction Processors for MERIS Based on In-Situ Measurements-Updates in OC-CCI Round Robin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Dagmar; Krasemann, Hajo; Zuhilke, Marco; Doerffer, Roland; Brockmann, Carsten; Steinmetz, Francois; Valente, Andre; Brotas, Vanda; Grant, kMicheal G.; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Melin, Frederic; Franz, Bryan A.; Mazeran, Constant; Regner, Peter

    2016-08-01

    The Ocean Colour Climate Change Initiative (OC- CCI) provides a long-term time series of ocean colour data and investigates the detectable climate impact. A reliable and stable atmospheric correction (AC) procedure is the basis for ocean colour products of the necessary high quality.The selection of atmospheric correction processors is repeated regularly based on a round robin exercise, at the latest when a revised production and release of the OC-CCI merged product is scheduled. Most of the AC processors are under constant development and changes are implemented to improve the quality of satellite-derived retrievals of remote sensing reflectances. The changes between versions of the inter-comparison are not restricted to the implementation of AC processors. There are activities to improve the quality flagging for some processors, and the system vicarious calibration for AC algorithms in their sensor specific behaviour are widely studied. Each inter-comparison starts with an updated in-situ database, as more spectra are included in order to broaden the temporal and spatial range of satellite match-ups. While the OC-CCI's focus has laid on case-1 waters in the past, it has expanded to the retrieval of case-2 products now. In light of this goal, new bidirectional correction procedures (normalisation) for the remote sensing spectra have been introduced. As in-situ measurements are not always available at the satellite sensor specific central wave- lengths, a band-shift algorithm has to be applied to the dataset.In order to guarantee an objective selection from a set of four atmospheric correction processors, the common validation strategy of comparisons between in-situ and satellite-derived water leaving reflectance spectra, is aided by a ranking system. In principal, the statistical parameters are transformed into relative scores, which evaluate the relationship of quality dependent on the algorithms under study. The sensitivity of these scores to the selected

  11. Overlay Share Mesh for Interactive Group Communication with High Dynamic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Yan-hua; CAI Yun-ze; XU Xiao-ming

    2007-01-01

    An overlay share mesh infrastructure is presented for high dynamic group communication systems, such as distributed interactive simulation (DIS) and distributed virtual environments (DVE). Overlay share mesh infrastructure can own better adapting ability for high dynamic group than tradition multi-tree multicast infrastructure by sharing links among different groups. The mechanism of overlay share mesh based on area of interest (AOI) was discussed in detail in this paper. A large number of simulation experiments were done and the permance of mesh infrastructure was studied. Experiments results proved that overlay mesh infrastructure owns better adaptability than traditional multi-tree infrastructure for high dynamic group communication systems.

  12. Comparison of two pretransplant predictive models and a flexible HCT-CI using different cut off points to determine low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups: the flexible HCT-CI Is the best predictor of NRM and OS in a population of patients undergoing allo-RIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barba, Pere; Piñana, Jose Luis; Martino, Rodrigo; Valcárcel, David; Amorós, Alex; Sureda, Anna; Briones, Javier; Delgado, Julio; Brunet, Salut; Sierra, Jorge

    2010-03-01

    Patient comorbidities are being increasingly analyzed as predictors for outcome after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), especially in allogeneic HSCT (Allo-HSCT). Researchers from Seattle have recently developed several pretransplant scoring systems (hematopoietic cell transplantation comorbidity index [HCT-CI] and the Pretransplantation Assessment of Mortality (PAM) model) from large sets of HSCT recipients with the aim of improving non-transplant models, mainly the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). The validation of these comorbidity indexes in other institutions and in different disease and conditioning-related settings is of interest to determine whether these models are potentially applicable in clinical practice and in research settings. We performed a retrospective study in our institution including 194 consecutive reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) AlloHSCT (allo-RIC) recipients to compare the predictive value of the PAM score, CCI, the original HCT-CI, and the flexible HCT-CI using a different risk group stratification. The median patient pretransplant scores for the HCT-CI, PAM, and CCI were 3.5, 22, and 0, respectively. The flexible HCT-CI risk-scoring system (restratified as: low risk [LR] 0-3 points, intermediate risk [IR] 4-5 points, and high risk [HR] >5 points) was the best predictor for non-relapse mortality (NRM). The 100-day and 2-year NRM incidence in these risk categories was 4% (95% confidence interval C.I. 2%-11%), 16% (95% C.I. 9%-31%), and 29% (95% C.I. 19%-45%), respectively (P HR. In conclusion, our single-center study suggests that the flexible HCT-CI is a good predictor of 2-year NRM and survival after an allo-RIC. Copyright (c) 2010 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of the ESA Sea Ice CCI (SICCI) project sea ice concentration data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kern, Stefan; Bell, Louisa; Ivanova, Natalia;

    around these two SIC values; consequently SIC can be negative or above 100%. In order to fully evaluate SICCI SIC this natural variability needs to be taken into account. In contrast to most other SIC retrieval algorithms the SICCI algorithm does not filter spurious sea ice over open water with a weather......During phase 1 of the European Space Agency’s (ESA) climate change initiative (CCI) sea ice project (SICCI project) a sea ice concentration (SIC) data product was produced by employing a hybrid SIC retrieval algorithm comprising the Bristol and the Comiso-Bootstrap algorithm in frequency mode. SIC...... filter because by doing so often substantial portions of the sea ice cover along the ice edge are discarded....

  14. Evaluation of the ESA Sea Ice CCI (SICCI) project sea ice concentration data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kern, Stefan; Bell, Louisa; Ivanova, Natalia

    During phase 1 of the European Space Agency’s (ESA) climate change initiative (CCI) sea ice project (SICCI project) a sea ice concentration (SIC) data product was produced by employing a hybrid SIC retrieval algorithm comprising the Bristol and the Comiso-Bootstrap algorithm in frequency mode. SIC...... process, and SIC total uncertainty. A flag layer allows to identify where SIC may be less reliable. The unlimited SIC contains the full range of SIC values retrieved. The natural variability of the measured TBs around the typical TBs at 0% and 100% SIC (the so-called tie points) causes SIC to spread...... around these two SIC values; consequently SIC can be negative or above 100%. In order to fully evaluate SICCI SIC this natural variability needs to be taken into account. In contrast to most other SIC retrieval algorithms the SICCI algorithm does not filter spurious sea ice over open water with a weather...

  15. Group Lasso for high dimensional sparse quantile regression models

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Kengo

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the statistical properties of the group Lasso estimator for high dimensional sparse quantile regression models where the number of explanatory variables (or the number of groups of explanatory variables) is possibly much larger than the sample size while the number of variables in "active" groups is sufficiently small. We establish a non-asymptotic bound on the $\\ell_{2}$-estimation error of the estimator. This bound explains situations under which the group Lasso estimator is potentially superior/inferior to the $\\ell_{1}$-penalized quantile regression estimator in terms of the estimation error. We also propose a data-dependent choice of the tuning parameter to make the method more practical, by extending the original proposal of Belloni and Chernozhukov (2011) for the $\\ell_{1}$-penalized quantile regression estimator. As an application, we analyze high dimensional additive quantile regression models. We show that under a set of primitive regularity conditions, the group Lasso estimator c...

  16. Are amino groups advantageous to insensitive high explosives (IHEs)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xia; Wen, Yushi; Xiang, Bin; Long, Xinping; Zhang, Chaoyang

    2012-10-01

    There is usually a contradiction between increasing energy densities and reducing sensitivities of explosives. The explosives with both high energy densities and low sensitivities, or the so-called insensitive high explosives (IHEs), are desirable in most cases. It seems from applied explosives that amino groups are advantageous to IHE but the amount of amino groups contained IHEs is very limited. To make this clear, we present systemic examinations of the effects on the two properties stressed in IHEs after introducing amino groups to different molecular skeletons. As a result, the amino groups on resonant sites to nitro groups in conjugated systems can improve distinctly sensitivities and change energy densities in terms of oxygen balance; while the amino groups in unconjugated systems can hardly increase energy densities and usually cause increased sensitivities. It agrees well with a fact that almost all the molecules of applied amino group contained explosives possess conjugated skeletons. We therefore confirm that if amino groups are introduced resonantly to a nitro group in a conjugated system and the introduction improves OB, they are advantageous to IHEs.

  17. HIV Sentinel Surveillance Among High Risk Groups: Scenario In Gujarat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L B Chavan, Prakash Patel, Vaibhav Gharat

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surveillance is the ongoing systematic collection, collation, analysis and interpretation of data so that appropriate action can be taken within time. Aims and Objective: The present annual HIV sentinel surveillance (HSS was carried out for monitoring trends of HIV epidemic in high risk group populations in selected sites of Gujarat state.. Methodology: The HSS was carried out in representative populations from High Risk Group (HRG like Female Sex Workers (FSW, Man having Sex with Man (MSM and Single Male Migrant. Target sample size was 250 at each HRG site (Female Sex Worker, Male Sex Male & SMM. Consecutive sampling was done at designated sentinel site for selecting the survey participants. Results: Overall 3726 samples (1494 FSWs, 1732 MSMs & 500 SMM were tested in the High risk group of HSS 2008. The overall sero-positivity in samples from FSWs, MSMs sites was 4.5%. Sero-positivity was more or less high (? 5% among FSWs as well as MSMs irrespective of age, place of residence, literacy level, occupation; and migration status. Conclusion: The overall trend of sero-positivity in High risk groups shows decreasing trend of HIV in the state from 2004 to 2008.

  18. Beijing Encourages High-Risk Groups to Undertake AIDS Test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    High-risk groups in Beijing, China's capital city, such as sex workers, drug-takers who share needles and gay communities are being encouraged to take voluntary counseling and tests (VCT) as part of an effort to stem the spread of AIDS. Tens of thousands of flyers have been distributed to disease control centers at district levels, and they will be handed to high-risk individuals by AIDS workers and volunteers over the next few weeks.

  19. Structural Insights into the Interaction Between a Potent Anti-Inflammatory Protein, Viral CC Chemokine Inhibitor (vCCI), and the Human CC Chemokine, Eotaxin-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Nai-Wei; Gao, Yong; Schill, Megan S.; Isern, Nancy G.; Dupureur, Cynthia M.; Liwang, Patricia J.

    2014-01-30

    Chemokines play important roles in the immune system, not only recruiting leukocytes to the site of infection and inflammation but also guiding cell homing and cell development. The soluble poxvirusencoded protein vCCI, a CC chemokine inhibitor, can bind to human CC chemokines tightly to impair the host immune defense. This protein has no known homologs in eukaryotes, and may represent a potent method to stop inflammation. Previously, our structure of the vCCI:MIP-1β complex indicated that vCCI uses negatively charged residues in β-sheet II to interact with positively charged residues in the MIP-1βN-terminus, 20’s region and 40’s loop. However, the interactions between vCCI and other CC chemokines have not yet been fully explored. Here, we used NMR and fluorescence anisotropy to study the interaction between vCCI and eotaxin-1 (CCL11), another CC chemokine that is an important factor in the asthma response. NMR results reveal that the binding pattern is very similar to the vCCI:MIP-1βcomplex, and suggest that electrostatic interactions provide a major contribution to binding. Fluorescence anisotropy results on variants of eotaxin-1 further confirm the critical roles of the charged residues in eotaxin. Compared to wild-type eotaxin, single, double, or triple mutations at these critical charged residues weaken the binding. One exception is the K47A mutation that exhibits increased affinity for vCCI, which can be explained structurally. In addition, the binding affinity between vCCI and other wild type CC chemokines, MCP-1, MIP-1β and RANTES, were determined as 1.09 nM, 1.16 nM, and 0.22 nM, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first work quantitatively measuring the binding affinity between vCCI and different CC chemokines.

  20. Assimilating ESA-CCI Soil Moisture into the JULES-EMPIRE Data Assimilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaife, T. L.; Black, E.; Browne, P.; Lewis, J.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface models, such as the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES, the land surface component of the Hadley Centre models) are used in a wide variety of applications, such as climate modelling, flood prediction and crop yield forecasting. However, how best to implement Data Assimilation (DA) for these models remains an open question. At a fundamental level these models are very different from atmospheric models for which traditional DA was developed. This poster describes the integration of JULES with the EMPIRE framework. EMPIRE (Employing MPI for Researching Ensembles) implements a test bed for ensemble based DA techniques that makes use of MPI message passing to exploit all available processing power. In particular EMPIRE contains several flavours of Particle Filter which show promise for the land surface DA problem. Examples of assimilating soil moisture observations from the ESA CCI data set into JULES are given for a number of sites in Africa. The model ensemble is generated by considering uncertainty in the driving data taken from the TAMSAT operational rainfall product. The results show considerable improvement in the modelled soil moisture and in particular the seasonal timing of the soil wetness.

  1. Establishment of a novel dwarf rat strain: cartilage calcification insufficient (CCI) rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Masami; Watanabe, Minoru; Yokomi, Izuru; Matsumoto, Naoki; Sudo, Katsuko; Satoh, Hitoshi; Igarashi, Tsuneo; Seki, Azusa; Amano, Hitoshi; Ohura, Kiyoshi; Ryu, Kakei; Shibata, Shunichi; Nagayama, Motohiko; Tanuma, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Rats with dwarfism accompanied by skeletal abnormalities, such as shortness of the limbs, tail, and body (dwarf rats), emerged in a Jcl-derived Sprague-Dawley rat colony maintained at the Institute for Animal Experimentation, St. Marianna University Graduate School of Medicine. Since the dwarfism was assumed to be due to a genetic mutation based on its frequency, we bred the dwarf rats and investigated their characteristics in order to identify the causative factors of their phenotypes and whether they could be used as a human disease model. One male and female that produced dwarf progeny were selected, and reproduction was initiated by mating the pair. The incidence of dwarfism was 25.8% among the resultant litter, and dwarfism occurred in both genders, suggesting that it was inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. At 12 weeks of age, the body weights of the male and female dwarf rats were 40% and 57% of those of the normal rats, respectively. In soft X-ray radiographic and histological examinations, shortening and hypoplasia of the long bones, such as the tibia and femur, were observed, which were suggestive of endochondral ossification abnormalities. An immunohistochemical examination detected an aggrecan synthesis disorder, which might have led to delayed calcification and increased growth plate thickening in the dwarf rats. We hypothesized that the principal characteristics of the dwarf rats were systemically induced by insufficient cartilage calcification in their long bones; thus, we named them cartilage calcification insufficient (CCI) rats.

  2. Production of satellite-derived aerosol climate data records: current status of the ESA Aerosol_cci project

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, Gerrit; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pinnock, Simon

    2015-04-01

    and the Aerosol_cci team Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) project Aerosol_cci (Phase 1: 2010 -2014; Phase 2: 2014-2017) intensive work has been conducted to improve algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol information from European sensors ATSR (3 algorithms), PARASOL, MERIS (3 algorithms), synergetic AATSR/SCIAMACHY, OMI and GOMOS. Whereas OMI and GOMOS were used to derive absorbing aerosol index and stratospheric extinction profiles, respectively, Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and Ångström coefficient were retrieved from the other sensors. The cooperation between the project partners, including both the retrieval teams and independent validation teams, has resulted in a strong improvement of most algorithms. In particular the AATSR retrieved AOD is qualitatively similar to that from MODIS, usually taken as the standard, MISR and SeaWiFS. This conclusion has been reached form several different ways of validation of the L2 and L3 products, using AERONET sun photometer data as the common ground-truth for the application of both 'traditional' statistical techniques and a 'scoring' technique using spatial and temporal correlations. Quantitatively, the limited AATSR swath width of 500km results in a smaller amount of data. Nevertheless, the assimilation of AATSR-retrieved AOD, together with MODIS data, contributes to improving the in the ECMWF climate model results. In addition to the multi-spectral AOD, and thus the Ångström Exponent, also a per-pixel uncertainty is provided and validated. By the end of Aerosol_cci Phase 1 the ATSR algorithms have been applied to both ATSR-2 and AATSR resulting in an AOD time series of 17 years. In phase 2 this work is continued with a focus on the further improvement of the ATSR algorithms as well as those for the other instruments and algorithms, mentioned above, which in phase 1 were considered less mature. The first efforts are on the further characterization of the uncertainties and on better understanding of the

  3. Highly Scalable Trip Grouping for Large Scale Collective Transportation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gidofalvi, Gyozo; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Risch, Tore

    2008-01-01

    Transportation-related problems, like road congestion, parking, and pollution, are increasing in most cities. In order to reduce traffic, recent work has proposed methods for vehicle sharing, for example for sharing cabs by grouping "closeby" cab requests and thus minimizing transportation cost...... and utilizing cab space. However, the methods published so far do not scale to large data volumes, which is necessary to facilitate large-scale collective transportation systems, e.g., ride-sharing systems for large cities. This paper presents highly scalable trip grouping algorithms, which generalize previous...

  4. The Sodankylä in situ soil moisture observation network: an example application of ESA CCI soil moisture product evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonen, Jaakko; Vehviläinen, Juho; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Smolander, Tuomo; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Bircher, Simone; Pulliainen, Jouni

    2016-04-01

    During the last decade there has been considerable development in remote sensing techniques relating to soil moisture retrievals over large areas. Within the framework of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Climate Change Initiative (CCI) a new soil moisture product has been generated, merging different satellite-based surface soil moisture based products. Such remotely sensed data need to be validated by means of in situ observations in different climatic regions. In that context, a comprehensive, distributed network of in situ measurement stations gathering information on soil moisture, as well as soil temperature, has been set up in recent years at the Finnish Meteorological Institute's (FMI) Sodankylä Arctic research station. The network forms a calibration and validation (CAL-VAL) reference site and is used as a tool to evaluate the validity of satellite retrievals of soil properties. In this paper we present the Sodankylä CAL-VAL reference site soil moisture observation network, its instrumentation as well as its areal representativeness over the study area and the region in general as a whole. As an example of data utilization, comparisons of spatially weighted average top-layer soil moisture observations between the years 2012 and 2014 against ESA CCI soil moisture data product estimates are presented and discussed. The comparisons were made against a single ESA CCI data product pixel encapsulating most of the Sodankylä CAL-VAL network sites. Comparisons are made with daily averaged and running weekly averaged soil moisture data as well as through application of an exponential soil moisture filter. The overall achieved correlation between the ESA CCI data product and in situ observations varies considerably (from 0.479 to 0.637) depending on the applied comparison perspective. Similarly, depending on the comparison perspective used, inter-annual correlation comparison results exhibit even more pronounced variation, ranging from 0.166 to 0.840.

  5. Endogenous CBS-H2S Pathway Contributes to the Development of CCI-Induced Neuropathic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Yulong; Li, Aiyuan; Qiu, Bihui; Chen, Feng; Chen, Liang; Liu, Daming; Chen, Shuxian; Zhou, Wei; Zhou, Hong

    2016-06-01

    Studies showed a complex relationship between hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and neuropathic pain. In this study, the relationship between endogenous CBS-H2S pathway in L4-6 spinal cord and neuropathic pain was explored. A total of 163 adult Kunming mice were used in this study. CBS expression and H2S formation in L4-6 spinal cord were detected in the development of neuropathic pain firstly. Then, effect of AOAA, an CBS inhibitor, on treatment of neuropathic pain by chronic construction injury surgery (CCI) was detected. Pain thresholds and activation of NF-κB(p65), ERK1/2 and CREB were measured as biomarks of neuropathic pain. Results showed that CCI surgery significantly upregulated protein expression of CBS and H2S formation. Correlation analysis showed pain thresholds had negative relationships with protein expression of CBS and H2S formation. Treatment with AOAA, a CBS inhibitor, inhibited CCI-induced upregulation of CBS expression and H2S formation (P H2S pathway promoted the development of neuropathic pain. CBS-H2S pathway could be a promising target for treatment of neuropathic pain.

  6. Group Lasso estimation of high-dimensional covariance matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Bigot, Jérémie; Loubes, Jean-Michel; Alvarez, Lilian Muniz

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the Group Lasso estimator of the covariance matrix of a stochastic process corrupted by an additive noise. We propose to estimate the covariance matrix in a high-dimensional setting under the assumption that the process has a sparse representation in a large dictionary of basis functions. Using a matrix regression model, we propose a new methodology for high-dimensional covariance matrix estimation based on empirical contrast regularization by a group Lasso penalty. Using such a penalty, the method selects a sparse set of basis functions in the dictionary used to approximate the process, leading to an approximation of the covariance matrix into a low dimensional space. Consistency of the estimator is studied in Frobenius and operator norms and an application to sparse PCA is proposed.

  7. High Mobility Group Proteins and Their Post-Translational Modifications

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qingchun; Wang, Yinsheng

    2008-01-01

    The high mobility group (HMG) proteins, including HMGA, HMGB and HMGN, are abundant and ubiquitous nuclear proteins that bind to DNA, nucleosome and other multi-protein complexes in a dynamic and reversible fashion to regulate DNA processing in the context of chromatin. All HMG proteins, like histone proteins, are subjected to extensive post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as lysine acetylation, arginine/lysine methylation and serine/threonine phosphorylation, to modulate their inter...

  8. Differences in evolutionary pressure acting within highly conserved ortholog groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind L

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In highly conserved widely distributed ortholog groups, the main evolutionary force is assumed to be purifying selection that enforces sequence conservation, with most divergence occurring by accumulation of neutral substitutions. Using a set of ortholog groups from prokaryotes, with a single representative in each studied organism, we asked the question if this evolutionary pressure is acting similarly on different subgroups of orthologs defined as major lineages (e.g. Proteobacteria or Firmicutes. Results Using correlations in entropy measures as a proxy for evolutionary pressure, we observed two distinct behaviors within our ortholog collection. The first subset of ortholog groups, called here informational, consisted mostly of proteins associated with information processing (i.e. translation, transcription, DNA replication and the second, the non-informational ortholog groups, mostly comprised of proteins involved in metabolic pathways. The evolutionary pressure acting on non-informational proteins is more uniform relative to their informational counterparts. The non-informational proteins show higher level of correlation between entropy profiles and more uniformity across subgroups. Conclusion The low correlation of entropy profiles in the informational ortholog groups suggest that the evolutionary pressure acting on the informational ortholog groups is not uniform across different clades considered this study. This might suggest "fine-tuning" of informational proteins in each lineage leading to lineage-specific differences in selection. This, in turn, could make these proteins less exchangeable between lineages. In contrast, the uniformity of the selective pressure acting on the non-informational groups might allow the exchange of the genetic material via lateral gene transfer.

  9. The Greenhouse Gas Climate Change Initiative (GHG-CCI: comparative validation of GHG-CCI SCIAMACHY/ENVISAT and TANSO-FTS/GOSAT CO2 and CH4 retrieval algorithm products with measurements from the TCCON network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dils

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Column-averaged dry-air mole fractions of carbon dioxide and methane have been retrieved from spectra acquired by the TANSO-FTS and SCIAMACHY instruments on board GOSAT and ENVISAT using a range of European retrieval algorithms. These retrievals have been compared with data from ground-based high-resolution Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS from the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON. The participating algorithms are the Weighting Function Modified Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS algorithm (WFMD, University of Bremen, the Bremen Optimal Estimation DOAS algorithm (BESD, University of Bremen, the Iterative Maximum A Posteriori DOAS (IMAP, Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL and Netherlands Institute for Space Research algorithm (SRON, the proxy and full-physics versions of SRON's RemoTeC algorithm (SRPR and SRFP respectively and the proxy and full-physics versions of the University of Leicester's adaptation of the OCO (Orbiting Carbon Observatory algorithm (OCPR and OCFP respectively. The goal of this algorithm inter-comparison was to identify strengths and weaknesses of the various so-called Round Robin data sets generated with the various algorithms so as to determine which of the competing algorithms would proceed to the next round of the European Space Agency's (ESA Greenhouse Gas Climate Change Initiative (GHG-CCI project, which is the generation of the so-called Climate Research Data Package (CRDP, which is the first version of the Essential Climate Variable (ECV "Greenhouse Gases" (GHG. For CO2, all algorithms reach the precision requirements for inverse modelling ( For CH4, the precision for both SCIAMACHY products (50.2 ppb for IMAP and 76.4 ppb for WFMD fail to meet the XCH4 precision ranges between 18.1 and 14.0 ppb. Looking at the SRA, all GOSAT algorithm products reach the < 10 ppm threshold (values ranging between 5.4 and 6.2 ppb. For SCIAMACHY, IMAP and WFMD have a SRA of 17.2 ppb and 10.5 ppb respectively.

  10. Effects of NO-711 administered intrathecally on phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve in rats%鞘内注射GABA转运体-1抑制剂NO-711对CCI大鼠脊髓背角pERK表达的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李轶聪; 李悦; 付宝军; 刘芳; 李恩有

    2011-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of NO-711 administered intrathecally on the mechanical and heat hyperalgesia and the expression of pERK induced by CCI of the sciatic nerve in rats, and investigate the possible mechanism of NO-711 antinociceptive transmission at the spinal level Methods One hundred and twenty six male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into six groups (n=21): CCI + NO-711 50 μg (N50), CCI + NO-711 100 μg (N100), CCI + NO-711 200 μg (N200), CCI + normal saline group (CN), CCI, and sham operation (S). The mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) and thermal withdrawal latency (TWL) in S and CCI groups were measured before operation and 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 and 21 d after operation, respectively. Rats in NS0,N100, N200 or CN groups were intrathecally cathetered 5 d before operation and administered with NO-711 or saline 5 d after CCI. The nociceptive thresholds and pERK expression in the spinal dorsal horn were measured before and after administration 30 rain, 1, 2, 4 and 8 h, respectively. Results CCI group formed steady mechanical and heat hyperalgeia from 1 d to 21 d after operation. Intrathecal administration of NO-711can increase the MWT and TWL in a dose-dependent pattern. NO-711 inhibited the expression of pERK in a dose-dependent pattern. Conclusion Intrathecal NO-711 can reduce the mechanical and heat hyperalgesia of rats via the inhibition of expression of pERK following CCI.%目的 观察γ-氨基丁酸(GABA)转运体-1(GAT-1)抑制剂NO-711对坐骨神经慢性松结扎(OCI)大鼠机械和热痛阈及脊髓背角神经元磷酸化细胞外信号调节激酶(pERK)表达的影响,探讨NO-711在脊髓水平抗痛敏的机制.方法 雄性SD大鼠126只,随机均分为六组(n=21):CCI+NO-711 50μg组(N50组)、CCI+NO-711 100 μg组(N100组)、CCI+NO-711 200 μg组(N200组)、CCI+生理盐水组(CN组)、CCI组、假手术组(S组).CCI组和S组在术前、术后1、3、5、7、14、21 d测定大鼠机械缩腿阈值(MWT)和热缩腿潜伏期(TWL

  11. High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 in Wound Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Patrone

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1, a member of highly conserved non-histone DNA binding protein family, has been studied as transcription factor and growth factor. Secreted extracellularly by activated monocytes and macrophages or passively released by necrotic or damaged cells, extracellular HMGB1 is a potent mediator of inflammation. Extracellular HMGB1 has apparently contrasting biological actions: it sustains inflammation (with the possible establishment of autoimmunity or of self-maintaining tissue damage, but it also activates and recruits stem cells, boosting tissue repair. Here, we focus on the role of HMGB1 in physiological and pathological responses, the mechanisms by which it contributes to tissue repair and therapeutic strategies base on targeting HMGB1.

  12. Electroweak renormalization group corrections in high energy processes

    CERN Document Server

    Melles, M

    2001-01-01

    At energies ($\\sqrt{s}$) much higher than the electroweak gauge boson masses ($M$) large logarithmic corrections of the scale ratio $\\sqrt{s}/M$ occur. While the electroweak Sudakov type double (DL) and universal single (SL) logarithms have recently been resummed, at higher orders the electroweak renormalization group (RG) corrections are folded with the DL Sudakov contributions and must be included for a consistent subleading treatment to all orders. In this paper we derive first all relevant formulae for massless as well as massive gauge theories including all such terms up to order ${\\cal O} (\\alpha^n \\beta_0 \\log^{2n-1} \\frac{s}{M^2})$ by integrating over the corresponding running couplings. The results for broken gauge theories in the high energy regime are then given in the framework of the infrared evolution equation (IREE) method. The analogous QED-corrections below the weak scale $M$ are included by appropriately matching the low energy solution to the renormalization group improved high energy resul...

  13. High solid and high stability waterborne polyurethanes via ionic groups in soft segments and chain termini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S K; Kim, B K

    2009-08-01

    High solid and high stability waterborne polyurethanes were molecularly designed and synthesized. The positions and concentrations of the anionic groups were varied, along with the molecular weights of the polyol. It was found that the dispersions containing ionic groups at the chain termini (called terminal ions) gave the smallest dispersion size, and the highest dispersion stability and viscosity, whereas the hard ions, containing ionic groups in the hard segments, resulted in the greatest swelling in water. However, the mechanical and dynamic mechanical properties of the dispersion cast films were similar. It was demonstrated that highly stable dispersions with a high solid content (45%) can be obtained at a low ionic content (2%) by simply incorporating the ionic groups at the flexible chain ends. The results were interpreted in terms of the high mobility and low free energy of the chain ends.

  14. [HTLV-I infection in a high-risk group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, E; Ollero, M; Gimeno, A; Colchero, J; Alcoucer, R; Márquez, P

    1990-07-01

    The aim of this study is to detect the presence of HTLV-1 in a high-risk population in west Andalusia. We studied 267 samples of serum from 255 patients: 179 of these patients being intravenous drug-users, 14 had ADVP sexual partners, 16 were inhalation drug-users, 4 were hemophiliacs, 9 had other high-risk habits and 25 hematological patients afflicted with leukemia or lymphoma. All of them were tested for antibodies against HTLV-1 by means of an in vitro qualitative ELISA technique (ELISA Du Pont HTLV-1). The positive results were confirmed by the Western blot technique. Additionally, the p24 antigen and the antibodies against VIH-1 and VIH-2 (ENV/CORE) were analysed, except in the 25 hematological patients. We found 20 serum samples positive to HTLV-1 by ELISA (7.4%), but only 1 (0.3%) was confirmed by the Western blot technique. The prevalence of VIH-1 was 46%; 9% had p24 VIH antigen and 26% had false positive ELISA to VIH-2. We found a statistically significant relationship (p = 0.0005) between positive ELISA to HTLV-1 and antibodies against VIH. We conclude that HTLV-1 has penetrated into the high-risk population of west Andalusia , although not yet to a great degree, and point out the need for seric epidemiological surveillance to prevent the spread of the retrovirus in these groups.

  15. A Selective Review of Group Selection in High Dimensional Models

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Jian; Ma, Shuangge

    2012-01-01

    Grouping structures arise naturally in many statistical modeling problems. Several methods have been proposed for variable selection that respect grouping structure in variables. Examples include the group LASSO and several concave group selection methods. In this article, we give a selective review of group selection concerning methodological developments, theoretical properties, and computational algorithms. We pay particular attention to group selection methods involving concave penalties. We address both group selection and bi-level selection methods. We describe several applications of these methods in nonparametric additive models, semiparametric regression, seemingly unrelated regressions, genomic data analysis and genome wide association studies. We also highlight some issues that require further study.

  16. Sparse group lasso and high dimensional multinomial classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, Martin; Hansen, N.R.

    2014-01-01

    group lasso classifier. On three different real data examples the multinomial group lasso clearly outperforms multinomial lasso in terms of achieved classification error rate and in terms of including fewer features for the classification. An implementation of the multinomial sparse group lasso...

  17. Quality Assessment of the CCI ECV Soil Moisture Product Using ENVISAT ASAR Wide Swath Data over Spain, Ireland and Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Pratola

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, great progress has been made by the scientific community in generating satellite-derived global surface soil moisture products, as a valuable source of information to be used in a variety of applications, such as hydrology, meteorology and climatic modeling. Through the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative (ESA CCI, the most complete and consistent global soil moisture (SM data record based on active and passive microwaves sensors is being developed. However, the coarse spatial resolution characterizing such data may be not sufficient to accurately represent the moisture conditions. The objective of this work is to assess the quality of the CCI Essential Climate Variable (ECV SM product by using finer spatial resolution Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR Wide Swath and in situ soil moisture data taken over three regions in Europe. Ireland, Spain, and Finland have been selected with the aim of assessing the spatial and temporal representativeness of the ECV SM product over areas that differ in climate, topography, land cover and soil type. This approach facilitated an understanding of the extent to which geophysical factors, such as soil texture, terrain composition and altitude, affect the retrieved ECV SM product values. A good temporal and spatial agreement has been observed between the three soil moisture datasets for the Irish and Spanish sites, while poorer results have been found at the Finnish sites. Overall, the two different satellite derived products capture the soil moisture temporal variations well and are in good agreement with each other.

  18. High-mobility group box-1 in sterile inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsung, A; Tohme, S; Billiar, T R

    2014-11-01

    High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) was originally defined as a ubiquitous nuclear protein, but it was later determined that the protein has different roles both inside and outside of cells. Nuclear HMGB1 regulates chromatin structure and gene transcription, whereas cytosolic HMGB1 is involved in inflammasome activation and autophagy. Extracellular HMGB1 has drawn attention because it can bind to related cell signalling transduction receptors, such as the receptor for advanced glycation end products, Toll-like receptor (TLR)2, TLR4 and TLR9. It also participates in the development and progression of a variety of diseases. HMGB1 is actively secreted by stimulation of the innate immune system, and it is passively released by ischaemia or cell injury. This review focuses on the important role of HMGB1 in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic sterile inflammatory conditions. Strategies that target HMGB1 have been shown to significantly decrease inflammation in several disease models of sterile inflammation, and this may represent a promising clinical approach for treatment of certain conditions associated with sterile inflammation. © 2014 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  19. Could CCI or FBCI Fully Eliminate the Impact of Curve Flexibility When Evaluating the Surgery Outcome for Thoracic Curve Idiopathic Scoliosis Patient? A Retrospective Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changwei Yang

    Full Text Available To clarify if CCI or FBCI could fully eliminate the influence of curve flexibility on the coronal correction rate.We reviewed medical record of all thoracic curve AIS cases undergoing posterior spinal fusion with all pedicle screw systems from June 2011 to July 2013. Radiographical data was collected and calculated. Student t test, Pearson correlation analysis and linear regression analysis were used to analyze the data.60 were included in this study. The mean age was 14.7 y (10-18 y with 10 males (17% and 50 females (83%. The average Risser sign was 2.7. The mean thoracic Cobb angle before operation was 51.9°. The mean bending Cobb angle was 27.6° and the mean fulcrum bending Cobb angle was 17.4°. The mean Cobb angle at 2 week after surgery was 16.3°. The Pearson correlation coefficient r between CCI and BFR was -0.856(P<0.001, and between FBCI and FFR was -0.728 (P<0.001. A modified FBCI (M-FBCI = (CR-0.513/BFR or a modified CCI (M-CCI = (CR-0.279/FFR was generated by curve estimation has no significant correlation with FFR (r=-0.08, p=0.950 or with BFR (r=0.123, p=0.349.Fulcrum-bending radiographs may better predict the outcome of AIS coronal correction than bending radiographs in thoracic curveAIS patients. Neither CCI nor FBCI can fully eliminate the impact of curve flexibility on the outcome of correction. A modified CCI or FBCI can better evaluating the corrective effects of different surgical techniques or instruments.

  20. Sparse group lasso and high dimensional multinomial classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vincent, Martin; Hansen, N.R.

    2014-01-01

    algorithm is available in the R package msgl. Its performance scales well with the problem size as illustrated by one of the examples considered - a 50 class classification problem with 10 k features, which amounts to estimating 500 k parameters. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.......The sparse group lasso optimization problem is solved using a coordinate gradient descent algorithm. The algorithm is applicable to a broad class of convex loss functions. Convergence of the algorithm is established, and the algorithm is used to investigate the performance of the multinomial sparse...... group lasso classifier. On three different real data examples the multinomial group lasso clearly outperforms multinomial lasso in terms of achieved classification error rate and in terms of including fewer features for the classification. An implementation of the multinomial sparse group lasso...

  1. Average Exceptional Lie Group Hierarchy and High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    El Naschie, M S

    2008-01-01

    Starting from an invariant total dimension for an exceptional Lie symmetry groups hierarchy, we drive all the essential characteristic and coupling constants of the fundamental interactions of physics. It is shown in a most simplistic fashion that all physical fields are various transfinite scaling transformation and topological deformation of each other. An extended standard model on the other hand turned out to be a compact sub group H of a version of E7 exceptional Lie group E7(−5) with dimH =69. Thus particle physics, electromagnetism as well as gravity and the bulk are all representable via modular spaces akin to the famous compactified version of F. Klein’s modular curve.

  2. The Highly Perturbed X-ray Bright Group NGC 5044

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Laurence

    2014-09-01

    The NGC 5044 group is the X-ray brightest group in the sky and hosts many small X-ray cavities that were inflated by weak AGN outbursts. The cumulative effect of many weak AGN outbursts may be the dominant reheating mechanism in cooling flows. While AGN feedback probably prevents the bulk of gas from cooling in NGC 5044, the presence of molecular structures, Halpha filaments, [CII] emission and star formation indicates that at least some gas is able to condense out of the hot phase. The near by 5044 group is the best target for detecting small X-ray cavities with Chandra and investigating the cumulative effect of repeated weak AGN outbursts. The wealth of multi-frequency data also makes NGC 5044 an ideal target for studying gas over a broad range of temperatures in a cooling flow.

  3. Improving nutritional management within high-risk groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wayenburg, van C.A.M.; Binsbergen, van J.J.; Berg, van den M.G.A.; Merkx, M.A.W.; Staveren, van W.A.; Rasmussen-Conrad, E.; Weel, van C.

    2009-01-01

    The current pitfalls and future possibilities of nutritional management are discussed by two patients with tongue cancer who have suffered from substantial weight loss. Their nutritional problems are illustrative of those among other (cancer) patient groups. The main concerns are the lack of early c

  4. Highly Scalable Trip Grouping for Large Scale Collective Transportation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gidofalvi, Gyozo; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Risch, Tore

    2008-01-01

    Transportation-related problems, like road congestion, parking, and pollution, are increasing in most cities. In order to reduce traffic, recent work has proposed methods for vehicle sharing, for example for sharing cabs by grouping "closeby" cab requests and thus minimizing transportation cost...

  5. Numerical simulation of 2D ablation profile in CCI-2 experiment by moving particle semi-implicit method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Penghui, E-mail: phchai@vis.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Kondo, Masahiro; Erkan, Nejdet; Okamoto, Koji

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Multiphysics models were developed based on Moving Particle Semi-implicit method. • Mixing process, chemical reaction can be simulated in MCCI calculation. • CCI-2 experiment was simulated to validate the models. • Simulation and experimental results for sidewall ablation agree well. • Simulation results confirm the rapid erosion phenomenon observed in the experiment. - Abstract: Numerous experiments have been performed to explore the mechanisms of molten core-concrete interaction (MCCI) phenomena since the 1980s. However, previous experimental results show that uncertainties pertaining to several aspects such as the mixing process and crust behavior remain. To explore the mechanism governing such aspects, as well as to predict MCCI behavior in real severe accident events, a number of simulation codes have been developed for process calculations. However, uncertainties exist among the codes because of the use of different empirical models. In this study, a new computational code is developed using multiphysics models to simulate MCCI phenomena based on the moving particle semi-implicit (MPS) method. Momentum and energy equations are used to solve the velocity and temperature fields, and multiphysics models are developed on the basis of the basic MPS method. The CCI-2 experiment is simulated by applying the developed code. With respect to sidewall ablation, good agreement is observed between the simulation and experimental results. However, axial ablation is slower in the simulation, which is probably due to the underestimation of the enhancement effect of heat transfer provided by the moving bubbles at the bottom. In addition, the simulation results confirm the rapid erosion phenomenon observed in the experiment, which in the numerical simulation is explained by solutal convection provided by the liquid concrete at the corium/concrete interface. The results of the comparison of different model combinations show the effect of each

  6. Highly adaptive tests for group differences in brain functional connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junghi Kim

    2015-01-01

    The proposed tests combine statistical evidence against a null hypothesis from multiple sources across a range of plausible tuning parameter values reflecting uncertainty with the unknown truth. These highly adaptive tests are not only easy to use, but also high-powered robustly across various scenarios. The usage and advantages of these novel tests are demonstrated on an Alzheimer's disease dataset and simulated data.

  7. Distribution of influenza vaccine to high-risk groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ompad, Danielle C; Galea, Sandro; Vlahov, David

    2006-01-01

    Vaccine distribution programs have historically targeted individuals at high risk of complications due to influenza. Despite recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, vaccination coverage among high-risk populations has been generally low. This review systematically summarizes the recent literature evaluating programs in different settings, from within medical settings to venue-based and community-based approaches, in an effort to identify successful program components. The published literature was identified by using the MEDLINE database from 1990 to 2006 covering studies that reported on interventions or programs aimed at vaccinating high-risk populations. The authors reviewed 56 studies. In the United States, the Healthy People 2010 goals included 90% vaccination coverage for adults aged > or = 65 years and 60% for high-risk adults aged 18-64 years. Only a handful of the studies reviewed managed to meet those goals. Interventions that increased vaccination coverage to Healthy People 2010 goals included advertising, provider and patient mailings, registry-based telephone calls, patient and staff education, standing orders coupled with standardized forms, targeting of syringe exchange customers, and visiting nurses. Few studies evaluated the impact of vaccination programs by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status. Few studies targeted individuals outside of the health-care and social services sectors. Given the growing disparities in health and health-care access, understanding the way in which interventions can remedy disparities is crucial.

  8. p300 exerts an epigenetic role in chronic neuropathic pain through its acetyltransferase activity in rats following chronic constriction injury (CCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Xiao-Yan

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropathic pain is detrimental to human health; however, its pathogenesis still remains largely unknown. Overexpression of pain-associated genes and increased nociceptive somato-sensitivity are well observed in neuropathic pain. The importance of epigenetic mechanisms in regulating the expression of pro- or anti-nociceptive genes has been revealed by studies recently, and we hypothesize that the transcriptional coactivator and the histone acetyltransferase E1A binding protein p300 (p300, as a part of the epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation, may be involved in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI. To test this hypothesis, two different approaches were used in this study: (I down-regulating p300 with specific small hairpin RNA (shRNA and (II chemical inhibition of p300 acetyltransferase activity by a small molecule inhibitor, C646. Results Using the CCI rat model, we found that the p300 expression was increased in the lumbar spinal cord on day 14 after CCI. The treatment with intrathecal p300 shRNA reversed CCI-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, and suppressed the expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, a neuropathic pain-associated factor. Furthermore, C646, an inhibitor of p300 acetyltransferase, also attenuated mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, accompanied by a suppressed COX-2 expression, in the spinal cord. Conclusions The results suggest that, through its acetyltransferase activity in the spinal cord after CCI, p300 epigenetically plays an important role in neuropathic pain. Inhibiting p300, using interfering RNA or C646, may be a promising approach to the development of new neuropathic pain therapies.

  9. Sunshine Group Builds High-End Aluminum Product Industrial Base

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    In order to propel development of the aluminum industry to move toward featured,specialized,and ecological directions,Sunlight Sanyuan Aluminum Company plans to expropriate 300 mu of land in Hanjiang District of Putian City,Fujian province,where it plans to construct high-end aluminum product industrial park,introduce the world’s most advanced fully automatic production equipment and technologies for aluminum profile and

  10. High-performance functional Renormalization Group calculations for interacting fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, J.; Sánchez de la Peña, D.; Rohe, D.; Di Napoli, E.; Honerkamp, C.; Maier, S. A.

    2017-04-01

    We derive a novel computational scheme for functional Renormalization Group (fRG) calculations for interacting fermions on 2D lattices. The scheme is based on the exchange parametrization fRG for the two-fermion interaction, with additional insertions of truncated partitions of unity. These insertions decouple the fermionic propagators from the exchange propagators and lead to a separation of the underlying equations. We demonstrate that this separation is numerically advantageous and may pave the way for refined, large-scale computational investigations even in the case of complex multiband systems. Furthermore, on the basis of speedup data gained from our implementation, it is shown that this new variant facilitates efficient calculations on a large number of multi-core CPUs. We apply the scheme to the t ,t‧ Hubbard model on a square lattice to analyze the convergence of the results with the bond length of the truncation of the partition of unity. In most parameter areas, a fast convergence can be observed. Finally, we compare to previous results in order to relate our approach to other fRG studies.

  11. The 2-(Triphenylsilylethoxycarbonyl-(“Tpseoc”- Group: A New Silicon-Based, Fluoride Cleavable Oxycarbonyl Protecting Group Highly Orthogonal to the Boc-, Fmoc- and Cbz-Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Golkowski

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Starting from 2-(triphenylsilylethanol a new oxycarbonyl protecting group cleavable by fluoride ion induced Peterson-elimination has been developed. Known 2-(triphenylsilylethanol has been prepared from commercially available triphenylvinyl-silane by a hydroboration-oxidation sequence using the sterically hindered borane reagent 9-BBN. The silyl alcohol was subsequently transformed into its chloroformate, imidazolylcarboxylic acid ester and p-nitrophenyl carbonate and used in standard protocols for the formation of carbamates and carbonates. The Tpseoc group proved to be highly resistant against acidic conditions applied in removal of tert-butyl esters and the t-Boc-group. It also withstood catalytic hydrogenation, treatment with morpholine, methylhydrazine and Pd-reagents/allyl-scavanger combinations, conditions required to cleave Cbz-, Fmoc-, phthalimide- and Alloc-groups. The Tpseoc-group is cleaved upon treatment with TBAF/CsF at 0 °C or r.t. with cleavage times reaching from

  12. Short Circuits or Superconductors? Effects of Group Composition on High-Achieving Students' Science Assessment Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Noreen M.; Nemer, Kariane Mari; Zuniga, Stephen

    2002-01-01

    Studied the effects of group ability composition (homogeneous versus heterogeneous) on group processes and outcomes for high-ability students completing science assessments. Results for 83 high ability students show the quality of group functioning serves as the strongest predictor of high-ability students' performance and explained much of the…

  13. Casuarina root exudates alter the physiology, surface properties, and plant infectivity of Frankia sp. strain CcI3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauchemin, Nicholas J; Furnholm, Teal; Lavenus, Julien; Svistoonoff, Sergio; Doumas, Patrick; Bogusz, Didier; Laplaze, Laurent; Tisa, Louis S

    2012-01-01

    The actinomycete genus Frankia forms nitrogen-fixing symbioses with 8 different families of actinorhizal plants, representing more than 200 different species. Very little is known about the initial molecular interactions between Frankia and host plants in the rhizosphere. Root exudates are important in Rhizobium-legume symbiosis, especially for initiating Nod factor synthesis. We measured differences in Frankia physiology after exposure to host aqueous root exudates to assess their effects on actinorhizal symbioses. Casuarina cunninghamiana root exudates were collected from plants under nitrogen-sufficient and -deficient conditions and tested on Frankia sp. strain CcI3. Root exudates increased the growth yield of Frankia in the presence of a carbon source, but Frankia was unable to use the root exudates as a sole carbon or energy source. Exposure to root exudates caused hyphal "curling" in Frankia cells, suggesting a chemotrophic response or surface property change. Exposure to root exudates altered Congo red dye binding, which indicated changes in the bacterial surface properties at the fatty acid level. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed fatty acid changes and revealed further carbohydrate changes. Frankia cells preexposed to C. cunninghamiana root exudates for 6 days formed nodules on the host plant significantly earlier than control cells. These data support the hypothesis of early chemical signaling between actinorhizal host plants and Frankia in the rhizosphere.

  14. High and Low Consensus Groups: A Content and Relational Interaction Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeStephen, Rolayne S.

    1983-01-01

    Analyzed the complete interaction of high and low consensus groups in a basic small group course. Interaction analysis indicated that both the relational and content levels of communication are significantly different for high versus low consensus groups. The conclusion that increased feedback leads to decision satisfaction was confirmed. (JAC)

  15. Big Data: Laying the Groundwork. ECAR Working Group Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almes, Guy T.; Hillegas, Curtis W.; Lance, Timothy; Lynch, Clifford A.; Monaco, Gregory E.; Mundrane, Michael R.; Zottola, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is part of series of the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research Campus Cyberinfrastructure (ECAR-CCI) Working Group. The topic of big data continues to receive a great deal of publicity because of its promise for opening new avenues of scholarly discovery and commercial opportunity. The ability to sift rapidly through massive amounts…

  16. Big Data: Laying the Groundwork. ECAR Working Group Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almes, Guy T.; Hillegas, Curtis W.; Lance, Timothy; Lynch, Clifford A.; Monaco, Gregory E.; Mundrane, Michael R.; Zottola, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is part of series of the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research Campus Cyberinfrastructure (ECAR-CCI) Working Group. The topic of big data continues to receive a great deal of publicity because of its promise for opening new avenues of scholarly discovery and commercial opportunity. The ability to sift rapidly through massive amounts…

  17. Satellite-Derived Aerosol Climate Data Records in the ESA Aerosol_Cci Project: From ERS-2, Envisat to Sentinel-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leeuw, Gerrit; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; North, Peter R. J.; Heckel, Andreas; Pinnock, Simon

    2015-12-01

    With the focus of Sentinel-3 on ocean applications and services, important parts of the payload are the Sea and Land Surface Temperature Radiometer (SLSTR) and the Ocean Land Colour Instrument (OLCI). Apart from Ocean applications, these instruments are also very important for atmospheric observations and in particular for aerosol retrieval. This is the reason why the predecessor instruments AATSR and MERIS have extensively been used in the ESA Climate Change Initiative project Aerosol_cci. In this contribution a brief overview of the current status of the Aerosol_cci project is presented. Full-mission time series of ATSR-2 and AATSR have been processed to provide 17 years of global aerosol information. Selected examples of recent achievements are presented. The experience with ATSR-2, AATSR and MERIS will be used to continue the current time series with SLSTR and OLCI.

  18. The ESA Cloud_cci project: generation of multi-decadal, consistent, global data sets of cloud properties with uncertainty information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapelberg, Stefan; Finkensieper, Stephan; Stengel, Martin; Schlundt, Cornelia; Sus, Oliver; Hollmann, Rainer; Poulsen, Caroline; ESA Cloud cci Team

    2016-04-01

    In 2010 the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) Cloud project was started along with 12 other CCI projects covering atmospheric, oceanic and terrestrial "essential climate variables (ECV)". The main goal is the generation of satellite-based climate data records that meet the challenging requirements of the Global Climate Observing System. The objective target within the ESA Cloud_cci project is the generation of long-term coherent cloud property datasets covering 33 years that also provide mathematically consistent uncertainty information following the optimal estimation (OE) retrieval theory. The cloud properties considered are cloud mask, cloud top level estimates, cloud thermodynamic phase, cloud optical thickness, cloud effective radius and post processed parameters such as cloud liquid and ice water path. In this presentation we will discuss the benefit of using an optimal estimation retrieval framework, which provides consistence among the retrieved cloud variables and pixel-based uncertainty estimates based on different passive instruments such as AVHRR, MODIS and AATSR. We will summarize the results of the project so far along with ongoing further developments that currently take place. Our results will be compared with other well-established satellite data records, surface observations and cloud climatologies (e.g., PATMOS-X, ISCCP, CLARA-A2, MODIS collection 6, SYNOP). These inter-comparison results will indicate the strengths and weaknesses of the Cloud_cci datasets. Finally, we will present long-term time series of the retrieved cloud variables for AVHRR (1982-2014) that enable global, multi-decadal analyses of clouds.

  19. ODaCCI: Ontology-guided Data Curation for Multisite Clinical Research Data Integration in the NINDS Center for SUDEP Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Licong; Huang, Yan; Tao, Shiqiang; Lhatoo, Samden D; Zhang, Guo-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) is the leading mode of epilepsy-related death. The Center for SUDEP Research (CSR) is an NINDS-funded Center Without Wall's initiative aimed at prospectively creating a comprehensive clinical research resource for SUDEP. This resource consists of a growing set of data and biological samples of a statistically significant cohort of patients at an elevated risk, best represented by the Epilepsy Monitoring Unit (EMU) patient population. The Informatics and Data Analytics Core (IDAC) of CSR has developed a state-of-the- art informatics infrastructure, to integrate patient data captured in multiple EMU's at a greatly accelerated pace. Data quality assurance is a priority of IDAC. This paper reports our approach, Ontology-guided Data Curation for Multisite Clinical Research Data Integration (ODaCCI), to address the challenging task of centralized data curation while new data is continuously generated and integrated from distributed sites. ODaCCI leverages the Epilepsy and Seizure Ontology not only for upstream data capture, but also for supporting a range of quality assurance tasks such as data quality monitoring, data update, and data reports. Between October 2014 and February 2016, ODaCCI has integrated phenotypic and electroencephalogram signal data of 629 patients from 7 clinical sites, while supporting continuous and asynchronous data quality enhancement overtime.

  20. Major forest changes and land cover transitions based on plant functional types derived from the ESA CCI Land Cover product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Ciais, Philippe; MacBean, Natasha; Peng, Shushi; Defourny, Pierre; Bontemps, Sophie

    2016-05-01

    Land use and land cover change are of prime concern due to their impacts on CO2 emissions, climate change and ecological services. New global land cover products at 300 m resolution from the European Space Agency (ESA) Climate Change Initiative Land Cover (CCI LC) project for epochs centered around 2000, 2005 and 2010 were analyzed to investigate forest area change and land cover transitions. Plant functional types (PFTs) fractions were derived from these land cover products according to a conversion table. The gross global forest loss between 2000 and 2010 is 172,171 km2, accounting for 0.6% of the global forest area in year 2000. The forest changes are mainly distributed in tropical areas such as Brazil and Indonesia. Forest gains were only observed between 2005 and 2010 with a global area of 9844 km2, mostly from crops in Southeast Asia and South America. The predominant PFT transition is deforestation from forest to crop, accounting for four-fifths of the total increase of cropland area between 2000 and 2010. The transitions from forest to bare soil, shrub, and grass also contributed strongly to the total areal change in PFTs. Different PFT transition matrices and composition patterns were found in different regions. The highest fractions of forest to bare soil transitions were found in the United States and Canada, reflecting forest management practices. Most of the degradation from grassland and shrubland to bare soil occurred in boreal regions. The areal percentage of forest loss and land cover transitions generally decreased from 2000-2005 to 2005-2010. Different data sources and uncertainty in the conversion factors (converting from original LC classes to PFTs) contribute to the discrepancy in the values of change in absolute forest area.

  1. Student Counseling Groups in Senior High School Settings: An Evaluation of Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Susan E.; Kilmann, Peter R.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviewed the studies which evaluated counseling groups in senior high school settings. A methodological evaluation was conducted within four areas: subjects, counselors, treatment, and outcome criteria. Overall, behavioral and directive groups achieved greater success than nondirective or client-centered groups. (Author)

  2. Queuing Theory Based Co-Channel Interference Analysis Approach for High-Density Wireless Local Area Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Han, Guangjie; Qian, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Increased co-channel interference (CCI) in wireless local area networks (WLANs) is bringing serious resource constraints to today’s high-density wireless environments. CCI in IEEE 802.11-based networks is inevitable due to the nature of the carrier sensing mechanism however can be reduced by resource optimization approaches. That means the CCI analysis is basic, but also crucial for an efficient resource management. In this article, we present a novel CCI analysis approach based on the queuing theory, which considers the randomness of end users’ behavior and the irregularity and complexity of network traffic in high-density WLANs that adopts the M/M/c queuing model for CCI analysis. Most of the CCIs occur when multiple networks overlap and trigger channel contentions; therefore, we use the ratio of signal-overlapped areas to signal coverage as a probabilistic factor to the queuing model to analyze the CCI impacts in highly overlapped WLANs. With the queuing model, we perform simulations to see how the CCI influences the quality of service (QoS) in high-density WLANs. PMID:27563896

  3. Queuing Theory Based Co-Channel Interference Analysis Approach for High-Density Wireless Local Area Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Han, Guangjie; Qian, Yujie

    2016-08-23

    Increased co-channel interference (CCI) in wireless local area networks (WLANs) is bringing serious resource constraints to today's high-density wireless environments. CCI in IEEE 802.11-based networks is inevitable due to the nature of the carrier sensing mechanism however can be reduced by resource optimization approaches. That means the CCI analysis is basic, but also crucial for an efficient resource management. In this article, we present a novel CCI analysis approach based on the queuing theory, which considers the randomness of end users' behavior and the irregularity and complexity of network traffic in high-density WLANs that adopts the M/M/c queuing model for CCI analysis. Most of the CCIs occur when multiple networks overlap and trigger channel contentions; therefore, we use the ratio of signal-overlapped areas to signal coverage as a probabilistic factor to the queuing model to analyze the CCI impacts in highly overlapped WLANs. With the queuing model, we perform simulations to see how the CCI influences the quality of service (QoS) in high-density WLANs.

  4. Victimization of high performers: the roles of envy and work group identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eugene; Glomb, Theresa M

    2014-07-01

    Drawing from victim precipitation, social comparison, and identity theories, this study develops and tests an integrative model of the victimization of high-performing employees. We examine envy as an explanatory mechanism of the victimization of high performers from fellow group members and propose work group identification as a moderator of this envy mechanism. Study 1, in a sample of 4,874 university staff employees in 339 work groups, supports the proposition that high performers are more likely to be targets of victimization. In Study 2, multisource data collected at 2 time points (217 employees in 67 work groups in 3 organizations), supports the proposition that high performers are more likely to be targets of victimization because of fellow group members' envy, and work group identification mitigates the mediated relationship.

  5. The Effects of Cooperative Learning on Junior High School Students during Small Group Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, Robyn M.

    2004-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of cooperative learning on junior high school students who worked in structured or unstructured cooperative groups. Two hundred and twenty-three junior high school students participated in the study and worked in three or four-person, mixed gender and achievement groups. The results show that the children in the…

  6. Controlling self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptides at high pH using heterocyclic capping groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Adam D.; Wojciechowski, Jonathan P.; Robinson, Andrew B.; Heu, Celine; Garvey, Christopher J.; Ratcliffe, Julian; Waddington, Lynne J.; Gardiner, James; Thordarson, Pall

    2017-03-01

    Using small angle neutron scattering (SANS), it is shown that the existence of pre-assembled structures at high pH for a capped diphenylalanine hydrogel is controlled by the selection of N-terminal heterocyclic capping group, namely indole or carbazole. At high pH, changing from a somewhat hydrophilic indole capping group to a more hydrophobic carbazole capping group results in a shift from a high proportion of monomers to self-assembled fibers or wormlike micelles. The presence of these different self-assembled structures at high pH is confirmed through NMR and circular dichroism spectroscopy, scanning probe microscopy and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy.

  7. Controlling self-assembly of diphenylalanine peptides at high pH using heterocyclic capping groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Adam D.; Wojciechowski, Jonathan P.; Robinson, Andrew B.; Heu, Celine; Garvey, Christopher J.; Ratcliffe, Julian; Waddington, Lynne J.; Gardiner, James; Thordarson, Pall

    2017-01-01

    Using small angle neutron scattering (SANS), it is shown that the existence of pre-assembled structures at high pH for a capped diphenylalanine hydrogel is controlled by the selection of N-terminal heterocyclic capping group, namely indole or carbazole. At high pH, changing from a somewhat hydrophilic indole capping group to a more hydrophobic carbazole capping group results in a shift from a high proportion of monomers to self-assembled fibers or wormlike micelles. The presence of these different self-assembled structures at high pH is confirmed through NMR and circular dichroism spectroscopy, scanning probe microscopy and cryogenic transmission electron microscopy. PMID:28272523

  8. In-Group Ostracism Increases High-Fidelity Imitation in Early Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Jones, Rachel E; Whitehouse, Harvey; Legare, Cristine H

    2016-01-01

    The Cyberball paradigm was used to examine the hypothesis that children use high-fidelity imitation as a reinclusion behavior in response to being ostracized by in-group members. Children (N = 176; 5- to 6-year-olds) were either included or excluded by in- or out-group members and then shown a video of an in-group or an out-group member enacting a social convention. Participants who were excluded by their in-group engaged in higher-fidelity imitation than those who were included by their in-group. Children who were included by an out-group and those who were excluded by an out-group showed no difference in imitative fidelity. Children ostracized by in-group members also displayed increased anxiety relative to children ostracized by out-group members. The data are consistent with the proposal that high-fidelity imitation functions as reinclusion behavior in the context of in-group ostracism.

  9. When high achievers and low achievers work in the same group: the roles of group heterogeneity and processes in project-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Rebecca Wing-yi; Lam, Shui-fong; Chan, Joanne Chung-yan

    2008-06-01

    There has been an ongoing debate about the inconsistent effects of heterogeneous ability grouping on students in small group work such as project-based learning. The present research investigated the roles of group heterogeneity and processes in project-based learning. At the student level, we examined the interaction effect between students' within-group achievement and group processes on their self- and collective efficacy. At the group level, we examined how group heterogeneity was associated with the average self- and collective efficacy reported by the groups. The participants were 1,921 Hong Kong secondary students in 367 project-based learning groups. Student achievement was determined by school examination marks. Group processes, self-efficacy and collective efficacy were measured by a student-report questionnaire. Hierarchical linear modelling was used to analyse the nested data. When individual students in each group were taken as the unit of analysis, results indicated an interaction effect of group processes and students' within-group achievement on the discrepancy between collective- and self-efficacy. When compared with low achievers, high achievers reported lower collective efficacy than self-efficacy when group processes were of low quality. However, both low and high achievers reported higher collective efficacy than self-efficacy when group processes were of high quality. With 367 groups taken as the unit of analysis, the results showed that group heterogeneity, group gender composition and group size were not related to the discrepancy between collective- and self-efficacy reported by the students. Group heterogeneity was not a determinant factor in students' learning efficacy. Instead, the quality of group processes played a pivotal role because both high and low achievers were able to benefit when group processes were of high quality.

  10. OECD MMCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCCI-1 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev 0 January 31, 2004.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten coreconcrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-1 experiment, which was conducted on December 19, 2003. Test specifications for CCI-1 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg

  11. 77 FR 1778 - U.S.-EU High Level Working Group on Jobs and Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-11

    ... TRADE REPRESENTATIVE U.S.-EU High Level Working Group on Jobs and Growth AGENCY: Office of the United... Working Group on Jobs and Growth, led by U.S. Trade Representative Ron Kirk and EU Trade Commissioner... and investment to support mutually beneficial job creation, economic growth, and...

  12. A Content Literacy Collaborative Study Group: High School Teachers Take Charge of Their Professional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Gail M.

    2008-01-01

    The progress and effects of a collaborative study group as a method of job-embedded professional development were studied. Eight high school teachers representing a variety of disciplines and the author (a literacy specialist) met monthly as a collaborative group for one school year to investigate materials and methods for literacy strategy…

  13. Flexible Grouping and Student Learning in a High-Needs School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, Sharon; Deniz, Carla Baker; Tortora, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The study focused on the impact of flexible grouping on student learning during a period of time in a high-needs school. The study tracked non transient, below-goal elementary students on multiple literacy assessments during a 5-year flexible grouping implementation. Results showed that the percentage of students attaining mastery increased in 16…

  14. Preference for High Status Predicts Implicit Outgroup Bias among Children from Low-Status Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newheiser, Anna-Kaisa; Dunham, Yarrow; Merrill, Anna; Hoosain, Leah; Olson, Kristina R.

    2014-01-01

    Whereas members of high-status racial groups show ingroup preference when attitudes are measured implicitly, members of low-status racial groups--both adults and children--typically show no bias, potentially reflecting awareness of the ingroup's low status. We hypothesized that when status differences are especially pronounced, children from…

  15. IUDS AS COFACTORS FOR HIV/PID IN HIGH RISK GROUPS AND DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZengH.Q.; EsquleAriasandESEHafez

    1989-01-01

    IUD cofactors which enhance HIV heterosexual/ bisexual transmission are high risk groups and in Third World Countries include; a) menstrual irregularities; b) abnormal inflammatory responses, increased blood flow/cellularity of endometnum; c) massive

  16. High-Resolution Crystal Structures Elucidate the Molecular Basis of Cholera Blood Group Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggelund, Julie Elisabeth; Burschowsky, Daniel; Bjørnestad, Victoria Ariel; Hodnik, Vesna; Anderluh, Gregor; Krengel, Ute

    2016-04-01

    Cholera is the prime example of blood-group-dependent diseases, with individuals of blood group O experiencing the most severe symptoms. The cholera toxin is the main suspect to cause this relationship. We report the high-resolution crystal structures (1.1-1.6 Å) of the native cholera toxin B-pentamer for both classical and El Tor biotypes, in complexes with relevant blood group determinants and a fragment of its primary receptor, the GM1 ganglioside. The blood group A determinant binds in the opposite orientation compared to previously published structures of the cholera toxin, whereas the blood group H determinant, characteristic of blood group O, binds in both orientations. H-determinants bind with higher affinity than A-determinants, as shown by surface plasmon resonance. Together, these findings suggest why blood group O is a risk factor for severe cholera.

  17. An Epidemiological Profile Of Diabetes Mellitus Amongst High Risk Age Group - A Community Based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem Ahmad; Suresh Chandra; R P Sharma; J P Srivastava; S C Saxena

    2004-01-01

    Research Question : What is the epidemiological profile of Diabetes mellitus amongst high-risk age group population in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Objectives : To study the prevalence, magnitude, possible associates and socio demographic variables related to Diabetes mellitus amongst the high risk age group population in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Study Design : Cross-sectional study.Setting : The study was performed on five thousand population each in urban and rural areas of Kanpur...

  18. Group Differences in Test-Taking Behaviour: An Example from a High-Stakes Testing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlund, Tova; Eklöf, Hanna; Lyrén, Per-Erik

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated whether different groups of test-takers vary in their reported test-taking behaviour in a high-stakes test situation. A between-group design (N = 1129) was used to examine whether high and low achievers, as well as females and males, differ in their use of test-taking strategies, and in level of reported test anxiety and…

  19. Group Differences in Test-Taking Behaviour: An Example from a High-Stakes Testing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlund, Tova; Eklöf, Hanna; Lyrén, Per-Erik

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated whether different groups of test-takers vary in their reported test-taking behaviour in a high-stakes test situation. A between-group design (N = 1129) was used to examine whether high and low achievers, as well as females and males, differ in their use of test-taking strategies, and in level of reported test anxiety and…

  20. Highly porous organic polymers bearing tertiary amine group and their exceptionally high CO2 uptake capacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Ruth; Bhaumik, Asim

    2015-02-01

    We report a very simple and unique strategy for synthesis of a tertiary amine functionalized high surface area porous organic polymer (POP) PDVTA-1 through the co-polymerization of monomers divinylbenzene (DVB) and triallylamine (TAA) under solvothermal reaction conditions. Two different PDVTA-1 samples have been synthesized by varying the molar ratio of the monomers. The porous polymeric materials have been thoroughly characterized by solid state 13C CP MAS-NMR, FT-IR and UV-vis spectroscopy, N2 sorption, HR TEM and FE SEM to understand its chemical environment, nanostructure, bonding, morphology and related surface properties. PDVTA-1 with higher amine content (DVB/TAA=4.0) showed exceptionally high CO2 uptake capacity of 85.8 wt% (19.5 mmol g-1) at 273 K and 43.69 wt% (9.93 mmol g-1) at 298 K under 3 bar pressure, whereas relatively low amine loaded material (DVB/TAA=7.0) shows uptake capacity of 59.2 wt% (13.45 mmol g-1) at 273 K and 34.36 wt% (7.81 mmol g-1) at 298 K. Highly porous nanostructure together with very high surface area and basicity at the surface due to the presence of abundant basic tertiary amine N-sites in the framework of PDVTA-1 could be responsible for very high CO2 adsorption.

  1. The Greenhouse Gas Climate Change Initiative (GHG-CCI): comparison and quality assessment of near-surface-sensitive satellite-derived CO2 and CH4 global data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchwitz, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The GHG-CCI project is one of several projects of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Climate Change Initiative (CCI). The goal of the CCI is to generate and deliver data sets of various satellite-derived Essential Climate Variables (ECVs) in line with GCOS (Global Climate Observing System) requirements. The "ECV Greenhouse Gases" (ECV GHG) is the global distribution of important climate relevant gases - atmospheric CO2 and CH4 - with a quality sufficient to obtain information on regional CO2 and CH4 sources and sinks. Two satellite instruments deliver the main input data for GHG-CCI: SCIAMACHY/ENVISAT and TANSO-FTS/GOSAT. The first order priority goal of GHG-CCI is the further development of retrieval algorithms for near-surface-sensitive column-averaged dry air mole fractions of CO2 and CH4, denoted XCO2 and XCH4, to meet the demanding user requirements. GHG-CCI focusses on four core data products: XCO2 from SCIAMACHY and TANSO and XCH4 from the same two sensors. For each of the four core data products at least two candidate retrieval algorithms have been independently further developed and the corresponding data products have been quality assessed and inter-compared. This activity is referred to as "Round Robin" (RR) activity within the CCI. The main goal of the RR was to identify for each of the four core products which algorithm to be used to generate the Climate Research Data Package (CRDP), which will essentially be the first version of the ECV GHG. This manuscript gives an overview about the GHG-CCI RR and related activities. This comprises the establishment of the user requirements, the improvement of the candidate retrieval algorithms and comparisons with ground-based observations and models. The manuscript summarizes the final RR algorithm selection decision and its justification. Comparison with ground-based Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) data indicates that the "breakthrough" single measurement precision requirement has been met for

  2. The relationship of value orientations in older adolescents with high status position in a student group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.D. Kuteynikova

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We present study results of social and psychological characteristics of group and individual value orientations in older adolescents. We considered the main criteria to be content and orientation of values, and level of value-oriented student group unity. The study involved 86 high school students of IX-XI grades of Moscow schools. We used a set of socio-psychological methods and instructional techniques: sociometry, referentometry, a technique of defining the informal intragroup power structure in a contact community, "Values and orientation of the individual" method by L.N.Silantieva, a method of determining the degree of value-orientation of group unity. The results obtained show that in high school there is a relationship between the student's status in the group and his system of individual and group value orientations. The most significant differences among students with different status position were detected in the content and direction of value orientations.

  3. The Effectiveness of Cognitive Group Therapy on Decreasing Depression among High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammad nazariy

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depending on its etiology, many methods have been established for the treatment of depression among adolescents; cognitive therapy is one of them. The purpose of the present research was to investigate the effect of cognitive group therapy on decreasing depression among high school students. Methods: From the male students of a boarding high school in Tarom district of Gazvin province, a sample of 16 students were randomly selected and assigned into experimental and control groups. The measurement tool was Beck depression inventory. The experimental group participated in 8 sessions of cognitive therapy, while the control group did not receive any treatment. The mean scores of the two groups were compared through independent t-test. Results: The results of the study showed significant differences between the mean scores of the pre-tests and post-tests of the experimental and control groups, so that cognitive group therapy had reduced the depression mean score in the experimental group (-2.1 vs. -0.25. Conclusion: The findings of the study indicate that cognitive group therapy can reduce the depression among students. These findings can be used for therapeutic planning within the cognitive paradigm to reduce or prevent depression among student

  4. A High-Leverage Language Teaching Practice: Leading an Open-Ended Group Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Erin

    2015-01-01

    In response to calls for more practice-based teacher education, this study investigated the way in which two high-performing novice world language teachers, one in Spanish and one in Latin, implemented a high-leverage teaching practice, leading an open-ended group discussion. Observational data revealed a number of constituent micro-practices. The…

  5. A High-Leverage Language Teaching Practice: Leading an Open-Ended Group Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Erin

    2015-01-01

    In response to calls for more practice-based teacher education, this study investigated the way in which two high-performing novice world language teachers, one in Spanish and one in Latin, implemented a high-leverage teaching practice, leading an open-ended group discussion. Observational data revealed a number of constituent micro-practices. The…

  6. The transition from the tropical to the extra-tropical ozone-QBO signature in EMAC-ESCiMo, ERA interim and ozone CCI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerzenmacher, Tobias; Joeckel, Patrick; Braesicke, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in the tropical zonal mean stratospheric winds is a major driver of interannual ozone variability in the tropics. The associated ozone variability is clearly seen in the tropics. In addition, it affects the interannual ozone variability in sub-tropical and mid-latitude regions. The QBO influence on ozone in all latitudes can be diagnosed in climate model data (free running or nudged EMAC simulations from the ESCiMo project), reanalysis data (ERA-Interim) and satellite data (ozone CCI). We extract the ozone-QBO signature from the data by using a Fourier filtering technique so that the modelled and observed structures can be compared. Starting from the signal in total column ozone, we construct composite latitude height cross-sections of ozone to reveal the vertical structure of QBO related changes for different phases of the ozone-QBO. We discuss the differences between the modelled (EMAC) and observed (CCI) signatures and compare them to ERA-Interim (a data assimilation system). With this diagnostic we improve our understanding of the physical mechanisms that contribute to ozone variability and how an `ozone change signal' can migrate from the tropics to the extra-tropics. Understanding the main mechanisms involved in this signal transfer lays the foundation for an improved trend detection on decadal time scales.

  7. Working group report on advanced high-voltage high-power and energy-storage space systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, H. A.; Cooke, D. L.; Evans, R. W.; Hastings, D.; Jongeward, G.; Laframboise, J. G.; Mahaffey, D.; Mcintyre, B.; Pfizer, K. A.; Purvis, C.

    1986-01-01

    Space systems in the future will probably include high-voltage, high-power energy-storage and -production systems. Two such technologies are high-voltage ac and dc systems and high-power electrodynamic tethers. The working group identified several plasma interaction phenomena that will occur in the operation of these power systems. The working group felt that building an understanding of these critical interaction issues meant that several gaps in our knowledge had to be filled, and that certain aspects of dc power systems have become fairly well understood. Examples of these current collection are in quiescent plasmas and snap over effects. However, high-voltage dc and almost all ac phenomena are, at best, inadequately understood. In addition, there is major uncertainty in the knowledge of coupling between plasmas and large scale current flows in space plasmas. These gaps in the knowledge are addressed.

  8. REPORT OF THE SNOWMASS M6 WORKING GROUP ON HIGH INTENSITY PROTON SOURCES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHOU,W.; WEI,J.

    2001-08-14

    The M6 working group had more than 40 active participants (listed in Section 4). During the three weeks at Snowmass, there were about 50 presentations, covering a wide range of topics associated with high intensity proton sources. The talks are listed in Section 5. This group also had joint sessions with a number of other working groups, including E1 (Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders), E5 (Fixed-Target Experiments), M1 (Muon Based Systems), T4 (Particle Sources), T5 (Beam dynamics), T7 (High Performance Computing) and T9 (Diagnostics). The M6 group performed a survey of the beam parameters of existing and proposed high intensity proton sources, in particular, of the proton drivers. The results are listed in Table 1. These parameters are compared with the requirements of high-energy physics users of secondary beams in Working Groups E1 and E5. According to the consensus reached in the E1 and E5 groups, the U.S. HEP program requires an intense proton source, a 1-4 MW Proton Driver, by the end of this decade.

  9. Simulation of the Mechanical Response of the 11T Magnet by Means of COMSOL-MpCCI-ANSYS Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Wilczek, Michal

    2017-01-01

    This report covers the work during my Summer Student internship at CERN as a part of the STEAM group (Simulation of Transient Effects in Accelerator Magnets) in the Technology Department, Machine Protection and Electrical Integrity group. I was responsible for the development of the ANSYS APDL model of the 11T superconducting magnet serving as a proof of concept for magneto-thermo-mechanical co-simulations of quench propagation in COMSOL and ANSYS software. The aforementioned co-simulation estimates the magnetic, thermal, and mechanical response of the magnet during the discharge process, while protected by a recently developed method, called Coupling-Loss Induced Quench (CLIQ). The already existing STEAM framework performs field/circuit coupling of a magneto-thermal field models previously developed by the STEAM. The next task of the group aimed at combining magneto-thermal field solution with the mechanical simulations. Such a coupling is of interest for the High-Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Colli...

  10. Acceleration of high resolution temperature based optimization for hyperthermia treatment planning using element grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kok, H P; de Greef, M; Bel, A; Crezee, J

    2009-08-01

    In regional hyperthermia, optimization is useful to obtain adequate applicator settings. A speed-up of the previously published method for high resolution temperature based optimization is proposed. Element grouping as described in literature uses selected voxel sets instead of single voxels to reduce computation time. Elements which achieve their maximum heating potential for approximately the same phase/amplitude setting are grouped. To form groups, eigenvalues and eigenvectors of precomputed temperature matrices are used. At high resolution temperature matrices are unknown and temperatures are estimated using low resolution (1 cm) computations and the high resolution (2 mm) temperature distribution computed for low resolution optimized settings using zooming. This technique can be applied to estimate an upper bound for high resolution eigenvalues. The heating potential of elements was estimated using these upper bounds. Correlations between elements were estimated with low resolution eigenvalues and eigenvectors, since high resolution eigenvectors remain unknown. Four different grouping criteria were applied. Constraints were set to the average group temperatures. Element grouping was applied for five patients and optimal settings for the AMC-8 system were determined. Without element grouping the average computation times for five and ten runs were 7.1 and 14.4 h, respectively. Strict grouping criteria were necessary to prevent an unacceptable exceeding of the normal tissue constraints (up to approximately 2 degrees C), caused by constraining average instead of maximum temperatures. When strict criteria were applied, speed-up factors of 1.8-2.1 and 2.6-3.5 were achieved for five and ten runs, respectively, depending on the grouping criteria. When many runs are performed, the speed-up factor will converge to 4.3-8.5, which is the average reduction factor of the constraints and depends on the grouping criteria. Tumor temperatures were comparable. Maximum exceeding

  11. Implementing high-fidelity simulations with large groups of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Barbara; Shaw, Luanne; Zamzam, Rebekah

    2015-01-01

    Nurse educators are increasing the use of simulation as a teaching strategy. Simulations are conducted typically with a small group of students. This article describes the process for implementing 6 high-fidelity simulations with a large group of undergraduate nursing students. The goal was to evaluate if student knowledge increased on postsimulation quiz scores when only a few individuals actively participated in the simulation while the other students observed.

  12. The Effectivenss of a Group Guidance Program on The Realistic Field Choice Amondst First Year High

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davut AYDIN

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the effectiveness of a group guidance program in terms of assisting first year high school students to choose realistically their study field was examined.The research was carried out with 40 pupils who were randomly selected among the first year Özel Ferda Lisesi pupils, in Ankara, during the academic year 2001-2002.The subjects were separated to two groups: the experimental group which attended the group guidance program and the control group which did not. Both groups were tested before the guidance program was implemented and after.The program developed by the researcher, was mainly based on cognitive-behavioural approach with a substantial emphasis on informational and interactional techniques.The independent variable of the research was the group guidance program that was applied to the experimental group. The dependent variable of the study was students’ aptitude points.The program consisted of 12 sessions and it was administered every five days. Each session lasted for about 90 minutes. After the last session of the program, the student evaluation scale, which was developed by Kuzgun, was given to both the experimental and the control group members. In order to test this hypothesis thedependent-samples t-test was used.The results indicated that the experimental group members’ score both in the aptitude test become closer to their teachers rating after the group guidance program while the control group members score did not change from the first to the second application of the test.

  13. High rhesus (Rh(D)) negative frequency and ethnic-group based ABO blood group distribution in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golassa, Lemu; Tsegaye, Arega; Erko, Berhanu; Mamo, Hassen

    2017-07-26

    Knowledge of the distribution of ABO-Rh(D) blood groups in a locality is vital for safe blood services. However, the distribution of these blood systems among Ethiopians in general is little explored. This study was, therefore, designed to determine the ABO-Rh(D) blood group distribution among patients attending Gambella hospital, southwestern Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study was conducted between November and December 2013 (N = 449). The patients were grouped into two broad categories. Those who originally moved from different parts of Ethiopia and currently residing in Gambella are named 'highlanders' (n = 211). The other group consisted of natives (Nilotics) to the locality (n = 238). ABO-Rh(D) blood groups were typed by agglutination, open-slide test method, using commercial antisera (Biotech laboratories Ltd, Ipswich, Suffolk, UK). Overall, majority of the participants (41.20%) had blood type 'O' followed by types 'A' (34.96%), 'B' (20.48%) and 'AB' (3.34%). However, blood type 'A' was the most frequent (44.07%) blood group among the 'highlanders' and 50.42% of Nilotic natives had type 'O'. The proportion of participants devoid of the Rh factor was 19.37%. While the ABO blood group distribution is similar to previous reports, the Rh(D) frequency is much higher than what was reported so far for Ethiopia and continental Africa.

  14. Calculation Method to Determine the Group Composition of Vacuum Distillate with High Content of Saturated Hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazarova Galina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Calculation method to determine the group composition of the heavy fraction of vacuum distillate with high content of saturated hydrocarbons, obtained by vacuum distillation of the residue from the West Siberian oil with subsequent hydrotreating, are given in this research. The method is built on the basis of calculation the physico-chemical characteristics and the group composition of vacuum distillate according to the fractional composition and density considering with high content of saturated hydrocarbons in the fraction. Calculation method allows to determine the content of paraffinic, naphthenic, aromatic hydrocarbons and the resins in vacuum distillate with high accuracy and can be used in refineries for rapid determination of the group composition of vacuum distillate.

  15. Relations between high and low power groups: the importance of legitimacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornsey, Matthew J; Spears, Russell; Cremers, Iris; Hogg, Michael A

    2003-02-01

    Using a social identity perspective, two experiments examined the effects of power and the legitimacy of power differentials on intergroup bias. In Experiment 1, 125 math-science students were led to believe that they had high or low representation in a university decision-making body relative to social-science students and that this power position was either legitimate or illegitimate. Power did not have an independent effect on bias; rather, members of both high and low power groups showed more bias when the power hierarchy was illegitimate than when it was legitimate. This effect was replicated in Experiment 2 (N = 105). In addition, Experiment 2 showed that groups located within an unfair power hierarchy expected the superordinate power body to be more discriminatory than did those who had legitimately high or low power. The results are discussed in terms of their implications for group relations.

  16. Big Data in the Campus Landscape: Basic Infrastructure Support. ECAR Working Group Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almes, Guy T.; Zottola, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is part of series of the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research Campus Cyberinfrastructure (ECAR-CCI) Working Group. The topic of big data continues to receive a great deal of publicity because of its promise for opening new avenues of scholarly discovery and commercial opportunity. The ability to sift rapidly through massive amounts…

  17. Big Data in the Campus Landscape: Security and Privacy. ECAR Working Group Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, William; Corn, Mike; Hillegas, Curt; Wada, Kent

    2015-01-01

    This paper is part of series of the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research Campus Cyberinfrastructure (ECAR-CCI) Working Group. The topic of big data continues to receive a great deal of publicity because of its promise for opening new avenues of scholarly discovery and commercial opportunity. The ability to sift rapidly through massive amounts…

  18. Big Data in the Campus Landscape: Curation. ECAR Working Group Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Clifford A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is part of series of the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research Campus Cyberinfrastructure (ECAR-CCI) Working Group. The topic of big data continues to receive a great deal of publicity because of its promise for opening new avenues of scholarly discovery and commercial opportunity. The ability to sift rapidly through massive amounts…

  19. Big Data in the Campus Landscape: Basic Infrastructure Support. ECAR Working Group Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almes, Guy T.; Zottola, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper is part of series of the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research Campus Cyberinfrastructure (ECAR-CCI) Working Group. The topic of big data continues to receive a great deal of publicity because of its promise for opening new avenues of scholarly discovery and commercial opportunity. The ability to sift rapidly through massive amounts…

  20. Big Data in the Campus Landscape: Curation. ECAR Working Group Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Clifford A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper is part of series of the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research Campus Cyberinfrastructure (ECAR-CCI) Working Group. The topic of big data continues to receive a great deal of publicity because of its promise for opening new avenues of scholarly discovery and commercial opportunity. The ability to sift rapidly through massive amounts…

  1. Big Data in the Campus Landscape: Security and Privacy. ECAR Working Group Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, William; Corn, Mike; Hillegas, Curt; Wada, Kent

    2015-01-01

    This paper is part of series of the EDUCAUSE Center for Analysis and Research Campus Cyberinfrastructure (ECAR-CCI) Working Group. The topic of big data continues to receive a great deal of publicity because of its promise for opening new avenues of scholarly discovery and commercial opportunity. The ability to sift rapidly through massive amounts…

  2. An Epidemiological Profile Of Diabetes Mellitus Amongst High Risk Age Group - A Community Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem Ahmad

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Research Question : What is the epidemiological profile of Diabetes mellitus amongst high-risk age group population in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Objectives : To study the prevalence, magnitude, possible associates and socio demographic variables related to Diabetes mellitus amongst the high risk age group population in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Study Design : Cross-sectional study.Setting : The study was performed on five thousand population each in urban and rural areas of Kanpur. Participants : High risk age group population i.e. 45 years and above.Study variables: Age, sex, education, working status, social class. Impaired glucose tolerance. Body mass index, Hypertension, family history of diabetes mellitus.Statistical analysis : Chi-square test. Percentages.Results : The overall prevalence of Diabetes mellitus amongst high risk age group population was found to be 7.6% with 11.3% in urban areas and 3.6% in rural areas. The overall maximum prevalence was in the 56-60 years age group. Higher prevalence was observed amongst the graduates and onwards (30.1%, social class-1 (32.1%, sedentary lifestyle (62.5%, obese (19.7%. hypertensives (39.5%, family history of diabetes mellitus (31.5%. It was observed that 77.7% cases in rural areas and 26.9% cases in urban areas were newly diagnosed.

  3. Summary report of working group 3: Laser and high-gradient structure-based acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andonian, Gerard; Simakov, Evgenya

    2017-03-01

    High-gradient particle acceleration with reduced power demands is essential for miniaturization and cost reduction of future accelerators. Applications for compact accelerators span collider research for High Energy Physics, light source development for Basic Energy Sciences and National Security, and industrial accelerators for Energy and Environmental Applications. Working Group 3 discussed and surveyed the recent advances in achieving higher gradients and better acceleration efficiency in externally powered, structure-based accelerators. The topics covered in Working Group 3 included dielectric laser acceleration, millimeter-wave accelerators, breakdown phenomena, exotic topologies such as photonic band-gap structures, artificial materials, and nanostructures, and novel rf technology.

  4. Generation of High-order Group-velocity-locked Vector Solitons

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, X X; Zhang, Q; Li, L; Tang, D Y; Shen, D Y; Fu, S N; Liu, D M; Zhao, L M

    2015-01-01

    We report numerical simulations on the high-order group-velocity-locked vector soliton (GVLVS) generation based on the fundamental GVLVS. The high-order GVLVS generated is characterized with a two-humped pulse along one polarization while a single-humped pulse along the orthogonal polarization. The phase difference between the two humps could be 180 degree. It is found that by appropriate setting the time separation between the two components of the fundamental GVLVS, the high-order GVLVS with different pulse width and pulse intensity could be obtained. 1+2 and 2+2 type high-order GVLVS could be either obtained.

  5. Impact of a patient-centered pharmacy program and intervention in a high-risk group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Janice M; Shartle, Deborah; Faudskar, Larry; Matlin, Olga S; Brennan, Troyen A

    2013-04-01

    The medication therapy management (MTM) program identified high-risk members in a large employer group and invited them to participate in an MTM program. The intervention consisted of at least 3 consultations with a clinical pharmacist to review and discuss drug therapy. The goal was to improve drug therapy adherence and clinical outcomes. To assess the impact of MTM on plan-paid health care costs, utilization of medical services, overall days supply of targeted medications, and medication possession ratios (MPRs). The MTM and control group comprised eligible members of a large employer prescription benefit plan who were identified between October 1, 2007, and November 12, 2008, and invited to participate. Control group members were selected from targeted members who declined. After propensity score matching to ensure similarity of groups at baseline, each group had 2,250 members. Baseline comparisons and post-period impact analyses between groups were conducted using bivariate analysis. Post-period analyses used tests for paired comparisons. The MTM and control group members were studied for the year before and after their individual program invitations. We measured pre-post differences between the MTM members and controls in total heath care costs, inpatient visits, emergency room (ER) visits, total days supply, and MPRs for 5 conditions: diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, depression, and asthma. MTM members significantly reduced their plan-paid health care costs by 10.3% or $977, compared with an increase of 0.7% or $62 in the control group (P = 0.048). Inpatient visits in the MTM group decreased by 18.6%, while the control group experienced an increase of 24.2% (P  less than  0.001). While both groups had decreases in ER visits, the groups were not significantly different (P = 0.399). Average days supply for the MTM group increased by 72.7 days over baseline; for the control group, it decreased by 111.1 days (P  less than  0.001). MTM members

  6. Multiple Group Testing Procedures for Analysis of High-Dimensional Genomic Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hyoseok; Kim, Kipoong

    2016-01-01

    In genetic association studies with high-dimensional genomic data, multiple group testing procedures are often required in order to identify disease/trait-related genes or genetic regions, where multiple genetic sites or variants are located within the same gene or genetic region. However, statistical testing procedures based on an individual test suffer from multiple testing issues such as the control of family-wise error rate and dependent tests. Moreover, detecting only a few of genes associated with a phenotype outcome among tens of thousands of genes is of main interest in genetic association studies. In this reason regularization procedures, where a phenotype outcome regresses on all genomic markers and then regression coefficients are estimated based on a penalized likelihood, have been considered as a good alternative approach to analysis of high-dimensional genomic data. But, selection performance of regularization procedures has been rarely compared with that of statistical group testing procedures. In this article, we performed extensive simulation studies where commonly used group testing procedures such as principal component analysis, Hotelling's T2 test, and permutation test are compared with group lasso (least absolute selection and shrinkage operator) in terms of true positive selection. Also, we applied all methods considered in simulation studies to identify genes associated with ovarian cancer from over 20,000 genetic sites generated from Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation27K Beadchip. We found a big discrepancy of selected genes between multiple group testing procedures and group lasso.

  7. Function of the triceps surae muscle group in low and high arched feet: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branthwaite, Helen; Pandyan, Anand; Chockalingam, Nachiappan

    2012-06-01

    The Achilles tendon has been shown to be comprised of segmental components of tendon arising from the tricpes surae muscle group. Motion of the foot joints in low and high arched feet may induce a change in behaviour of the triceps surae muscle group due to altered strain on the tendon. Surface electromyogram of the medial and lateral gastrocnemius and the soleus muscle from 12 subjects (with 6 low arched and 6 high arched feet) (1:1) was recorded whilst walking at a self selected speed along a 10m walkway. The results showed a high variability in muscle activity between groups with patterns emerging within groups. Soleus was more active in 50% of the low arch feet at forefoot loading and there was a crescendo of activity towards heel lift in 58% of all subjects. This observed variability between groups and foot types emphasises the need for further work on individual anatomical variation and foot function to help in the understanding and management of Achilles tendon pathologies and triceps surae dysfunction.

  8. High Power test of a low group velocity X-band Accelerator Structure for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Döbert, S; Riddone, G; Taborelli, M; Wuensch, W; Zennaro, R; Fukuda, S; Higashi, Y; Higo, T; Matsumoto, S; Ueno, K; Yokoyama, K; Adolphsen, C; Dolgashev, V; Laurent, L; Lewandowski, J; Tantawi, S; Wang, F; Wang, JW

    2008-01-01

    In recent years evidence has been found that the maximum sustainable gradient in an accelerating structure depends on the rf power flow through the structure. The CLIC study group has consequently designed a new prototype structure for CLIC with a very low group velocity, input power and average aperture ( = 0.13). The 18 cell structure has a group velocity of 2.6 % at the entrance and 1 % at the last cell. Several of these structures have been made in a collaboration between KEK, SLAC and CERN. A total of five brazed-disk structures and two quadrant structures have been made. The high power results of the first KEK/SLAC built structure is presented which reached an unloaded gradient in excess of 100 MV/m at a pulse length of 230 ns with a breakdown rate below 10-6 per meter active length. The high-power testing was done using the NLCTA facility at SLAC.

  9. Tropolone as a High-Performance Robust Anchoring Group for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashino, Tomohiro; Fujimori, Yamato; Sugiura, Kenichi; Tsuji, Yukihiro; Ito, Seigo; Imahori, Hiroshi

    2015-07-27

    A tropolone group has been employed for the first time as an anchoring group for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The DSSC based on a porphyrin, YD2-o-C8T, with a tropolone moiety exhibited a power-conversion efficiency of 7.7 %, which is only slightly lower than that observed for a reference porphyrin, YD2-o-C8, with a conventional carboxylic group. More importantly, YD2-o-C8T was found to be superior to YD2-o-C8 with respect to DSSC durability and binding ability to TiO2 . These results unambiguously demonstrate that tropolone is a highly promising dye-anchoring group for DSSCs in terms of device durability as well as photovoltaic performance.

  10. Evolving Cross-Group Relationships: The Story of Miller High, 1950-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eick, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines students' evolving cross-group relationships in a comprehensive high school in Baltimore County, Maryland, USA, between 1950 and 2000. The findings of this research, situated at the intersections of two lenses of inquiry: oral historical analysis and critical studies, uncover both the power of students accustomed to integrated…

  11. High Y-chromosomal Differentiation Among Ethnic Groups of Dir and Swat Districts, Pakistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Inam; Olofsson, Jill K; Margaryan, Ashot

    2017-01-01

    , these five ethnic groups fall mostly outside the previously characterized Y-chromosomal gene pools of the Indo-Pakistani subcontinent. Male founder effects, coupled with culturally and topographically based constraints upon marriage and movement, are likely responsible for the high degree of genetic...

  12. Influenza vaccination coverage among high-risk groups in 11 European countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loerbroks, A.; Stock, C.; Bosch, J.A.; Litaker, D.G.; Apfelbacher, C.J.

    BACKGROUND: National vaccination coverage rates for individuals at increased risk of influenza-related complications represent a useful public health indicator of preparedness. We compared European countries regarding (i) vaccination coverage among high-risk groups and (ii) the likelihood that

  13. Review of Social Skills Training Groups for Youth with Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappadocia, M. Catherine; Weiss, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Although social skills deficits represent core symptoms of Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism, there is limited research investigating the empirical validity of social skills interventions currently being used with these populations. This literature review compares three types of social skills training groups: traditional, cognitive…

  14. Group Social Skills Instruction for Adolescents with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan W.; Koenig, Kathleen; Scahill, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Given the increased recognition of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and the chronic and pervasive nature of associated deficits, there is a pressing need for effective treatments. The feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a structured, group social skills training program for high-functioning youth with ASD was examined in this study. Fifteen…

  15. Group Mentoring: a Way to Retain ´High-Risk´Teachers on the Job

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Lisbeth Angela Lunde

    2015-01-01

    The present article concerns group mentoring combined with action learning as a way to counteract work related sickness and early retirement for´ high risk´ teachers. Focus has been on reflection and vitalization. The data shows that this way of working has many possibilities in supporting...

  16. Review of Social Skills Training Groups for Youth with Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappadocia, M. Catherine; Weiss, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Although social skills deficits represent core symptoms of Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism, there is limited research investigating the empirical validity of social skills interventions currently being used with these populations. This literature review compares three types of social skills training groups: traditional, cognitive…

  17. High mobility group A1 enhances tumorigenicity of human cholangiocarcinoma and confers resistance to therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintavalle, Cristina; Burmeister, Katharina; Piscuoglio, Salvatore

    2017-01-01

    High mobility group A1 (HMGA1) protein has been described to play an important role in numerous types of human carcinoma. By the modulation of several target genes HMGA1 promotes proliferation and epithelial-mesenchymal transition of tumor cells. However, its role in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) has ...

  18. Internet-based Group Relations: A High School Peace Educational Project in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablon, Yaacov B.; Katz, Yaacov J.

    2001-01-01

    Describes how Internet-based group communication was used as the major strategy to promote the societal values of understanding, equality, tolerance, and peace between Jewish and Bedouin Arab high school students in Israel. Discusses changes in student attitudes and considers the prognosis for long-term change and cooperation between the two…

  19. High-Frequency Heart Rate Variability Linked to Affiliation with a New Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baljinder K Sahdra

    Full Text Available This study tests the hypothesis that high levels of high-frequency heart rate variability (HF-HRV predisposes individuals to affiliate with new groups. Resting cardiac physiological recordings were taken before and after experimental sessions to measure trait high-frequency heart rate variability as an index of dispositional autonomic influence on heart rate. Following an experimental manipulation of priming of caring-related words, participants engaged in a minimal group paradigm, in which they imagined being a member of one of two arbitrary groups, allocated money to members of the two groups, and rated their affiliation with the groups. High levels of HF-HRV were associated with ingroup favouritism while allocating money, an effect largely attributable to a positive relationship between HF-HRV and allocation of money to the ingroup, and less due to a negative relationship between HF-HRV and money allocation to the outgroup. HF-HRV was also associated with increased self-reported affiliation feelings for the ingroup but was unrelated to feelings towards the outgroup. These effects remained substantial even after controlling for age, gender, BMI, mood, caffeine consumption, time of day of data collection, smoking and alcohol behaviour, and respiration rate. Further, the effects were observed regardless of whether participants were primed with caring-related words or not. This study is the first to bridge a long history of research on ingroup favouritism to the relatively recent body of research on cardiac vagal tone by uncovering a positive association between HF-HRV and affiliation with a novel group.

  20. Incidence of high blood pressure in a group of tannery workers in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Cordeiro

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to measure the incidence of high blood pressure (HBP in a medium-size tannery in Botucatu, São Paulo State, southeast Brazil. A previous study at this tannery showed a high prevalence of arterial hypertension. A positive correlation was found between cumulated work time and arterial pressure. We followed a cohort of workers for seven years. At the end of this period, HBP incidence rate was calculated as 0.0964.year-1. This was considered high compared to other occupational groups.

  1. Vaccination rates among the general adult population and high-risk groups in the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy Annunziata

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In order to adequately assess the effectiveness of vaccination in helping to control vaccine-preventable infectious disease, it is important to identify the adherence and uptake of risk-based recommendations. METHODS: The current project includes data from five consecutive datasets of the National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS: 2007 through 2011. The NHWS is an annual, Internet-based health questionnaire, administered to a nationwide sample of adults (aged 18 or older which included items on vaccination history as well as high-risk group status. Vaccination rates and characteristics of vaccinees were reported descriptively. Logistic regressions were conducted to predict vaccination behavior from sociodemographics and risk-related variables. RESULTS: The influenza vaccination rate for all adults 18 years and older has increased significantly from 28.0% to 36.2% from 2007 to 2011 (ps<.05. Compared with those not at high risk (25.1%, all high-risk groups were vaccinated at a higher rate, from 36.8% (pregnant women to 69.7% (those with renal/kidney disease; however, considerable variability among high-risk groups was observed. Vaccination rates among high-risk groups for other vaccines varied considerably though all were below 50%, with the exception of immunocompromised respondents (57.5% for the hepatitis B vaccine and 52.5% for the pneumococcal vaccine and the elderly (50.4% for the pneumococcal. Multiple risk factors were associated with increased rate of vaccination for most vaccines. Significant racial/ethnic differences with influenza, hepatitis, and herpes zoster vaccination rates were also observed (ps<.05. CONCLUSIONS: Rates of influenza vaccination have increased over time. Rates varied by high-risk status, demographics, and vaccine. There was a pattern of modest vaccination rate increases for individuals with multiple risk factors. However, there were relatively low rates of vaccination for most risk-based recommendations

  2. Sulfonic Groups Originated Dual-Functional Interlayer for High Performance Lithium-Sulfur Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Gu, Sui; Guo, Jing; Rui, Kun; Chen, Chunhua; Zhang, Sanpei; Jin, Jun; Yang, Jianhua; Wen, Zhaoyin

    2017-05-03

    The lithium-sulfur battery is one of the most prospective chemistries in secondary energy storage field due to its high energy density and high theoretical capacity. However, the dissolution of polysulfides in liquid electrolytes causes the shuttle effect, and the rapid decay of lithium sulfur battery has greatly hindered its practical application. Herein, combination of sulfonated reduced graphene oxide (SRGO) interlayer on the separator is adopted to suppress the shuttle effect. We speculate that this SRGO layer plays two roles: physically blocking the migration of polysulfide as ion selective layer and anchoring lithium polysulfide by the electronegative sulfonic group. Lewis acid-base theory and density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that sulfonic groups have a strong tendency to interact with lithium ions in the lithium polysulfide. Hence, the synergic effect involved by the sulfonic group contributes to the enhancement of the battery performance. Furthermore, the uniformly distributed sulfonic groups working as active sites which could induce the uniform distribution of sulfur, alleviating the excessive growth of sulfur and enhancing the utilization of active sulfur. With this interlayer, the prototype battery exhibits a high reversible discharge capacity of more than 1300 mAh g(-1) and good capacity retention of 802 mAh g(-1) after 250 cycles at 0.5 C rate. After 60 cycles at different rates from 0.2 to 4 C, the cell with this functional separator still recovered a high specific capacity of 1100 mAh g(-1) at 0.2 C. The results demonstrate a promising interlayer design toward high performance lithium-sulfur battery with longer cycling life, high specific capacity, and rate capability.

  3. Synthesis of modified polyacrylamide with high content of hydroxamate groups and settling performance of red mud

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘锦伟; 胡慧萍; 王梦; 陈湘攀; 陈启元; 丁治英

    2015-01-01

    Hydroxamated polyacrylamide (HPAM) was synthesized from polyacrylamide (PAM) with high relative molecular mass under the optimum reaction conditions (pH 12 and a molar ratio of hydroxylamine to amide groups of 1.5 at 50 °C for 12 h). The hydroxamate groups of HPAM were verified by Fourier transform infrared spectrum (FT-IR). 46% (molar fration) hydroxamate groups and 23% (molar fraction) carbonyl groups on HPAM were determined by conductometric titration combined with Kjeldahl’s microanalysis method. The settling performance achieved at different flocculant dosages was investigated with high goethite-containing red mud slurry of simulated Bayer process synthesized in laboratory. It turns out that the settling performance of high goethite-containing red mud was better with HPAM. The average settling rate of red mud in the first 5 min and the turbidity of supernatant after settling for 30 min are 2.36 m/h and 507 NTU, respectively, at a flocculant dosage of 120 g/t, which is similar to that achieved with Hx-600.

  4. Microstructuring of thermo-mechanically highly stressed surfaces final report of the DFG research group 576

    CERN Document Server

    Rienäcker, Adrian; Knoll, Gunter; Bach, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Maier, Hans; Reithmeier, Eduard; Dinkelacker, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    This contributed volume presents the final research results of the DFG Research Group 576, which is a joint initiative of five different institutes of the Leibniz Universität Hannover and the Universität Kassel, Germany. The research of the DFG Research Group 576 focuses on improving the tribological behavior of thermomechanically highly stressed surfaces, particularly on cylinder liner for combustion engines. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students who want to specialize in the field.

  5. University of Virginia High Energy Physics Group. Final performance report, June 1, 1989--January 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy Contracts for 1989 covered the initial year of the University of Virginia High Energy Physics Group. The first proposal was submitted in the fall of 1988 and the first allocation of funding was received in June 1989. This first contract which covered the time period June 1, 1989--January 31, 1990 was in the amount of $186,000 and covered UVa HEP group operations and equipment during that period. At that point, a regular contract year was established and two subsequent contracts were issued for February 1, 1990--January 31, 1991 and February 1, 1991--January 31, 992 with awards of $280,000 and $580,000, respectively. The funding between June, 1989 and January, 1992 covered the activities of both the UVa Theory Group (Task A) and the UVa HEP Experimental Group (Task B). Expenditures of all above funds was completed by January 31, 1994. In this time period, certain initial things were accomplished using the operating funds provided by DOE and the seed funds ($2.2 million over the period). There were three main areas of activities, the building of the University of Virginia HEP infrastructure (construction of lab space, computer facilities, electronic shop, machine shop and office space), the hiring of personnel (faculty, post docs, and students) and the physics activities of the group. Much of the physics program of the experimental group revolved around the study of production and decay of heavy flavor. A list of technical papers generated by their work is provided.

  6. High mobility group B1 levels in sepsis and Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskici, Zeynep M; Açıkgöz, Şerefden; Pişkin, Nihal; Mungan, Görkem; Can, Murat; Güven, Berrak; Köktürk, Fürüzan

    2012-01-01

    Cytokines trigger coagulant and fibrinolytic systems in sepsis to result in Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC) that is an important complication and leads to disseminated hemorrhages and multi-organ failure. High Mobility Group B1 DNA Binding (HMGB1) protein is a cytokine taking part in systemic inflammatory response. The objective of this study was to investigate HMGB1 levels in groups of septic patients with and without DIC.Twenty-one septic patients without DIC and 12 septic patients with DIC from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) were included in the study. In addition, 20 patients admitted to the ICU without sepsis or DIC and 20 healthy volunteers served as controls. Levels of HMGB1, prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, D-dimer, protein C, protein S, anti-thrombin III (ATIII), platelet (thrombocyte) and leukocyte count were determined. Levels of fibrinogen, protein C, ATIII and platelet count were significantly lower and D-dimer was significantly higher in the group with sepsis plus DIC compared to the group with sepsis without DIC. Levels of HMGB1 were higher in the group with sepsis and DIC compared to the group with sepsis; however, the difference was not statistically significant and the levels of HGMB1 of both groups were significantly higher compared to ICU and healthy control groups. HMGB1 levels were not significantly different in survivor and non survivor patients. HMGB1 levels did not differ in lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) and urinary tract infection (UTI) in regard to the etiology of sepsis.

  7. Group velocity locked vector dissipative solitons in a high repetition rate fiber laser

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Yiyang; Li, Lei; Sun, Qizhen; Wu, Zhichao; Xu, Zhilin; Fu, Songnian; Zhao, Luming

    2016-01-01

    Vectorial nature of dissipative solitons (DSs) with high repetition rates is studied for the first time in a normal-dispersion fiber laser. Despite the fact that the formed DSs are strongly chirped and the repetition rate is greater than 100 MHz, polarization locked and polarization rotating group velocity locked vector DSs can be formed under 129.3 MHz fundamental mode-locking and 258.6 MHz harmonic mode-locking of the fiber laser, respectively. The two orthogonally polarized components of these vector DSs possess distinctly different central wavelengths and travel together at the same group velocity in the laser cavity, resulting in a gradual spectral edge and small steps on the optical spectra, which can be considered as an auxiliary indicator of the group velocity locked vector DSs.

  8. High-Resolution Group Quantization Phase Processing Method in Radio Frequency Measurement Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Baoqing; Feng, Dazheng; Tang, Yaohua; Geng, Xin; Zhang, Duo; Cai, Chaofeng; Wan, Maoquan; Yang, Zhigang

    2016-07-08

    Aiming at the more complex frequency translation, the longer response time and the limited measurement precision in the traditional phase processing, a high-resolution phase processing method by group quantization higher than 100 fs level is proposed in radio frequency measurement range. First, the phase quantization is used as a step value to quantize every phase difference in a group by using the fixed phase relationships between different frequencies signals. The group quantization is formed by the results of the quantized phase difference. In the light of frequency drift mainly caused by phase noise of measurement device, a regular phase shift of the group quantization is produced, which results in the phase coincidence of two comparing signals which obtain high-resolution measurement. Second, in order to achieve the best coincidences pulse, a subtle delay is initiatively used to reduce the width of the coincidences fuzzy area according to the transmission characteristics of the coincidences in the specific medium. Third, a series of feature coincidences pulses of fuzzy area can be captured by logic gate to achieve the best phase coincidences information for the improvement of the measurement precision. The method provides a novel way to precise time and frequency measurement.

  9. Promoting Physical Activity With Group Pictures. Affiliation-Based Visual Communication for High-Risk Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifegerste, Doreen; Rossmann, Constanze

    2017-02-01

    Past research in social and health psychology has shown that affiliation motivation is associated with health behavior, especially for high-risk populations, suggesting that targeting this motivation could be a promising strategy to promote physical activity. However, the effects that affiliation appeals (e.g., pictures depicting companionship during physical activities) and accompanying slogans have on motivating physical activity have been largely unexplored. Hence, our two studies experimentally tested the effects of exposure to affiliation-based pictures for overweight or less active people, as well as the moderating effect of affiliation motivation. The results of these two studies give some indication that group pictures (with or without an accompanying slogan) can be an effective strategy to improve high-risk populations' attitudes, self-efficacy, and intentions to engage in physical activity. Affiliation motivation as a personality trait did not interact with these effects, but was positively associated with attitudes, independent of the group picture effect.

  10. Polybenzimidazole Membranes Containing Benzimidazole Side Groups for High Temprature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Jingshuai; Li, Xueyuan; Xu, Yizin

    2013-01-01

    Polybenzimidazole (PBI) with a high molecular weight of 69,000 was first synthesized. It was afterwards grafted with benzimidazole pendant groups on the backbones. The acid doped benzimidaozle grafted PBI membranes were investigated and characterized including fuel cell tests at elevated temperat......Polybenzimidazole (PBI) with a high molecular weight of 69,000 was first synthesized. It was afterwards grafted with benzimidazole pendant groups on the backbones. The acid doped benzimidaozle grafted PBI membranes were investigated and characterized including fuel cell tests at elevated...... temperatures without humidification. At an acid doping level of 13.1 mol H3PO4 per average molar repeat unit, the PBI membranes with a benzimidazole grafting degree of 10.6% demonstrated a conductivity of 0.15 S cm-1 and a H2-air fuel cell peak power density of 378 mW cm-2 at 180 oC at ambient pressure without...

  11. High CO2-capture ability of a porous organic polymer bifunctionalized with carboxy and triazole groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lin-Hua; Suh, Myunghyun Paik

    2013-08-26

    A new porous organic polymer, SNU-C1, incorporating two different CO2 -attracting groups, namely, carboxy and triazole groups, has been synthesized. By activating SNU-C1 with two different methods, vacuum drying and supercritical-CO2 treatment, the guest-free phases, SNU-C1-va and SNU-C1-sca, respectively, were obtained. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas of SNU-C1-va and SNU-C1-sca are 595 and 830 m(2) g(-1), respectively, as estimated by the N2-adsorption isotherms at 77 K. At 298 K and 1 atm, SNU-C1-va and SNU-C1-sca show high CO2 uptakes, 2.31 mmol  g(-1) and 3.14 mmol  g(-1), respectively, the high level being due to the presence of abundant polar groups (carboxy and triazole) exposed on the pore surfaces. Five separation parameters for flue gas and landfill gas in vacuum-swing adsorption were calculated from single-component gas-sorption isotherms by using the ideal adsorbed solution theory (IAST). The data reveal excellent CO2-separation abilities of SNU-C1-va and SNU-C1-sca, namely high CO2-uptake capacity, high selectivity, and high regenerability. The gas-cycling experiments for the materials and the water-treated samples, experiments that involved treating the samples with a CO2-N2 gas mixture (15:85, v/v) followed by a pure N2 purge, further verified the high regenerability and water stability. The results suggest that these materials have great potential applications in CO2 separation.

  12. CLASSIFICATION OF ORTHOGNATHIC SURGERY PATIENTS INTO LOW AND HIGH BLEEDING RISK GROUPS USING THROMBELASTOGRAPHY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elenius Madsen, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Title: CLASSIFICATION OF ORTHOGNATHIC SURGERY PATIENTS INTO LOW AND HIGH BLEEDING RISK GROUPS USING THROMBELASTOGRAPHY Objectives: Orthognathic surgery involves surgical manipulation of jaw and face skeletal structure. A subgroup of patients undergoing orthognathic surgery suffers from excessive ...... to their bleeding risk. This valuable knowledge will be useful with regard to optimization of patient safety, staff composition and transfusion preparations. This pilot study included only 41 patients, and further studies are needed to consolidate the observations done....

  13. High Mobility Group Protein HMGB2 Is a Critical Regulator of Plasmodium Oocyst Development*S⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Gissot, Mathieu; Ting, Li-Min; Daly, Thomas M.; Bergman, Lawrence W.; Sinnis, Photini; Kim, Kami

    2008-01-01

    The sexual cycle of Plasmodium is required for transmission of malaria from mosquitoes to mammals, but how parasites induce the expression of genes required for the sexual stages is not known. We disrupted the Plasmodium yoelii gene encoding high mobility group nuclear factor hmgb2, which encodes a DNA-binding protein potentially implicated in transcriptional regulation of malaria gene expression. We investigated its function in vivo in the vertebrate and invertebrate ...

  14. Generation of pseudo-high-order group velocity locked vector solitons in fiber lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Xinxin; Li, Lei; Ge, Yanqi; Luo, Jiaolin; Zhang, Qian; Tang, Dingyuan; Shen, Deyuan; Fu, Songnian; Liu, Deming; Zhao, Luming

    2015-01-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate the generation of pseudo-high-order group velocity locked vector solitons (GVLVS) in a fiber laser using a SESAM as the mode locker. With the help of an external all-fiber polarization resolved system, a GVLVS with a two-humped pulse along one polarization while a single-humped pulse along the orthogonal polarization could be obtained. The phase difference between the two humps is 180 degree.

  15. High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 Correlates with Renal Function in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD)

    OpenAIRE

    Bruchfeld, Annette; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Lindholm, Bengt; Barany, Peter; Yang, Lihong; Stenvinkel, Peter; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2007-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with inflammation and malnutrition and carries a markedly increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 (HMGB-1) is a 30-kDa nuclear and cytosolic protein known as a transcription and growth factor, recently identified as a proinflammatory mediator of tissue injury. Recent data implicates HMGB-1 in endotoxin lethality, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. The aim of this post-hoc, cross-sectional study was to...

  16. CLASSIFICATION OF ORTHOGNATHIC SURGERY PATIENTS INTO LOW AND HIGH BLEEDING RISK GROUPS USING THROMBELASTOGRAPHY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elenius Madsen, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Title: CLASSIFICATION OF ORTHOGNATHIC SURGERY PATIENTS INTO LOW AND HIGH BLEEDING RISK GROUPS USING THROMBELASTOGRAPHY Objectives: Orthognathic surgery involves surgical manipulation of jaw and face skeletal structure. A subgroup of patients undergoing orthognathic surgery suffers from excessive...... intraoperative blood loss. Classification of patients according to their bleeding risk will improve the surgical procedure with regard to staff composition, blood transfusion and patient safety. Thrombelastography is a global coagulation assay measuring the viscoelastic properties of whole blood samples, taking...

  17. Effects of a Group of High-Rise Structures on Ground Motions under Seismic Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-jun Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional simulation was created to determine the seismic performance of coupled systems with a group of up to 100 pile-high-rise structures resting on soil layers using system modal, harmonic, and time domain analysis. The results demonstrated that the existence of a structural group mitigates the structural responses with respect to the single-structure-soil interaction (SSI and results in significantly nonuniform ground seismic motions. Due to the influence of a structural group, adjacent structures can exhibit fully alternating mechanical behavior, and buildings in the urban fringe are subjected to stronger shaking than downtown buildings. The overall trend of the influence of structural groups is that ground motions are lessened inside an urban area, and ground motions at the locations between structures differ from those at the locations of the structures. Moreover, the effective distance of a structural group on ground motions is associated with the urban width. Less distance between structures enhances the interaction effect. In addition, the soil properties can greatly influence the system’s seismic responses and can even completely change the effect trends. The results in our paper are consistent with the phenomena observed in the Mexico City earthquake and the 1976 earthquake in Friuli, Italy.

  18. Chemoenzymatic Synthesis of a Type 2 Blood Group A Tetrasaccharide and Development of High-throughput Assays Enables a Platform for Screening Blood Group Antigen-cleaving Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, David H; Ernst, Sabrina; Kötzler, Miriam P; Withers, Stephen G

    2015-08-01

    A facile enzymatic synthesis of the methylumbelliferyl β-glycoside of the type 2 A blood group tetrasaccharide in good yields is reported. Using this compound, we developed highly sensitive fluorescence-based high-throughput assays for both endo-β-galactosidase and α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase activity specific for the oligosaccharide structure of the blood group A antigen. We further demonstrate the potential to use this assay to screen the expressed gene products of metagenomic libraries in the search for efficient blood group antigen-cleaving enzymes.

  19. High-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation alters thermal but not mechanical allodynia following chronic constriction injury of the rat sciatic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, D L; Clemente, F R

    1998-11-01

    To determine if daily transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) can alter the thermal and mechanical allodynia that develops after chronic constriction injury (CCI) to the right sciatic nerve of rats. A completely randomized experimental design was used. Four groups of rats underwent CCI surgery to the right sciatic nerve and either were not treated with TENS or received TENS starting at different times after the CCI surgery. TENS was delivered daily for 1 hour to CCI rats through self-adhesive electrodes applied to skin innervated by the right dorsal rami of lumbar spinal nerves L1-6. Rats of different groups received daily TENS starting immediately, 20 to 30 hours, or 3 days after the CCI surgery. Thermal and mechanical pain thresholds of hind paws were assessed bilaterally in all rats twice before the CCI surgery (baseline) and then 2, 7, 12, and 14 days after surgery. Thermal and mechanical allodynia were expressed as difference scores between the pain thresholds of right and left hind paws. These values were normalized to differences that existed between the two paws at baseline. Daily TENS beginning immediately after CCI surgery prevented the development of thermal allodynia at all assessment times (p < .05). Daily TENS starting 1 day after surgery reduced thermal allodynia, but only on days 2 and 14 (p < .05). Daily TENS beginning 3 days after surgery had no effect on the development of thermal allodynia. Regardless of when it was started, daily TENS did not consistently alter mechanical allodynia in CCI rats. It appears that daily TENS can prevent thermal but not mechanical allodynia in this model. However, early intervention with the treatment is critical if it is to be effective at all.

  20. Report of the Snowmass M6 Working Group on high intensity proton sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiren Chou and J. Wei

    2002-08-20

    The U.S. high-energy physics program needs an intense proton source, a 1-4 MW Proton Driver (PD), by the end of this decade. This machine will serve as a stand-alone facility that will provide neutrino superbeams and other high intensity secondary beams such as kaons, muons, neutrons, and anti-protons (cf. E1 and E5 group reports) and also serve as the first stage of a neutrino factory (cf. M1 group report). It can also be a high brightness source for a VLHC. Based on present accelerator technology and project construction experience, it is both feasible and cost-effective to construct a 1-4 MW Proton Driver. Two recent PD design studies have been made, one at FNAL and the other at the BNL. Both designed PD's for 1 MW proton beams at a cost of about U.S. $200M (excluding contingency and overhead) and both designs were upgradeable to 4 MW. An international collaboration between FNAL, BNL and KEK on high intensity proton facilities is addressing a number of key design issues. The superconducting (sc) RF cavities, cryogenics, and RF controls developed for the SNS can be directly adopted to save R&D efforts, cost, and schedule. PD studies are also actively being pursued at Europe and Japan.

  1. Evaluation of anger management groups in a high-security hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Claire; Gandolfi, Stacy; Dudley, Alison; Thomas, Brian; Tapp, James; Moore, Estelle

    2013-12-01

    Anger management programmes for offenders typically aim to improve the management of emotion associated with aggressive and antisocial behaviour. Such programmes have been quite extensively evaluated in prison and probation settings, but there is less published research in forensic mental health settings. This study aimed to evaluate anger management groups in a high-security hospital. Eighty-six patients were referred for a 20-session anger management intervention. Outcomes were self-reported experiences of anger and changes in institutionally documented incidents of aggression. Incident rates were retrospectively reviewed for all group graduates, where data were available, including a comparison group of graduates who acted as their own controls. Group graduates reported sustained reductions in feelings of anger and positive changes in their use of aggression in reaction to provocation. Some reduction in incidents of physical aggression was noted when group completers were compared with non-completers. Incidents of verbal aggression were observed to increase for graduates. There was also a trend towards improvement when treated men were compared with men on the waiting list. Our findings contribute to the growing evidence for anger management groups for aggressive men, although the low-base rate of incidents, typical of such a containing and therapeutic hospital setting, rendered the analysis of behavioural outcomes difficult. Anger management sessions for male forensic psychiatric patients can be effective in reducing incidents of physical aggression in response to provocation. Evaluation of treatments for anger is particularly difficult in secure and protective settings, where the aim is to keep incidents of actual physical aggression to a minimum. Further research of this kind is needed to test the value of self-reported reduction in angry feelings as an indicator of clinically useful progress. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. NEWBORNS OF HIGH RISK GROUPS AND ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL CARDIAC ACTIVITY DURING THE PERIOD OF EARLY ADAPTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. Tumaeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study characteristics of electrophysiological cardiac activity in children of risk groups and to assess possibilities of Holter-electrocardiography (H-ECG in revealing of cardiac dysfunction during the period of early adaptation. Patients and methods: 250 newborns were examined. The main group consisted of 200 children with cerebral ischemia (CI. This group was divided into 2 subgroups: 100 full-term and 100 premature (at various gestation age infants. Control group contained 50 children born at 38–40th weeks of gestation with physiological course of pregnancy and delivery, APGAR score of 8–9 points. Complex examination included H-ECG according the standard technic with evaluation of the hearth rate (HR during sleep and wakefulness; HRmin, HRmax; arrhythmias, conductivity disorders, duration of the intervals; rhythm variability. Results: according to the ECG children with CI, especially premature ones, and children delivered via Cesarean section more often had ST-T disturbances, arrhythmias (sinus tachycardia, less often — sinus bradycardia and conductivity disorders, Q-Tc prolongation. H-EGC revealed decrease of sleep HR, HRmin and HRmax in children with CI especially in delivered via Cesarean section. The most common arrhythmia was supraventricular extrasystole.  Pauses in rhythms and variability were the highest in premature children delivered via Cesarean section. Conclusions: hypoxia/ischemia is a trigger for development of cardiovascular dysfuncion in newborns. Premature and children delivered via Cesarean section form a group of high risk. H-ECG widens possibilities of revealing of symptoms of cardiac dysfunction (disturbances at the basal level of functioning, of adaptation resources of the sinus node, electric instability of the myocardium and heart rate variability in children of risk group for development of cardiovascular disorders. 

  3. A typical wave wake from high-speed vessels: its group structure and run-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Didenkulova

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available High-amplitude water waves induced by high-speed vessels are regularly observed in Tallinn Bay, the Baltic Sea, causing intense beach erosion and disturbing marine habitants in the coastal zone. Such a strong impact on the coast may be a result of a certain group structure of the wave wake. In order to understand it, here we present an experimental study of the group structure of these wakes at Pikakari beach, Tallinn Bay. The most energetic vessel waves at this location (100 m from the coast at the water depth 2.7 m have amplitudes of about 1 m and periods of 8–10 s and cause maximum run-up heights on a beach up to 1.4 m. These waves represent frequency modulated packets where the largest and longest waves propagate ahead of other smaller amplitude and period waves. Sometimes the groups of different heights and periods can be separated even within one wave wake event. The wave heights within a wake are well described by the Weibull distribution, which has different parameters for wakes from different vessels. Wave run-up heights can also be described by Weibull distribution and its parameters can be connected to the parameters of the distribution of wave heights 100 m from the coast. Finally, the run-up of individual waves within a packet is studied. It is shown that the specific structure of frequency modulated wave packets, induced by high-speed vessels, leads to a sequence of high wave run-ups at the coast, even when the original wave heights are rather moderate. This feature can be a key to understanding the significant impact on coasts caused by fast vessels.

  4. Report of the Snowmass T7 working group on high performance computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Ko; R. Ryne; P. Spentzouris

    2002-12-05

    The T7 Working Group on High Performance Computing (HPC) had more than 30 participants. During the three weeks at Snowmass there were about 30 presentations. This working group also had joint sessions with a number of other working groups, including E1 (Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders), M1 (Muon Based Systems), M6 (High Intensity Proton Sources), T4 (Particle sources), T5 (Beam dynamics), and T8 (Advanced Accelerators). The topics that were discussed fall naturally into three areas: (1) HPC requirements for next-generation accelerator design, (2) state-of-the-art in HPC simulation of accelerator systems, and (3) applied mathematics and computer science activities related to the development of HPC tools that will be of use to the accelerator community (as well as other communities). This document summarizes the material mentioned above and includes recommendations for future HPC activities in the accelerator community. The relationship of those activities to the HENP/SciDAC project on 21st century accelerator simulation is also discussed.

  5. REPORT OF THE SNOWMASS T7 WORKING GROUP ON HIGH PERFORMANCE COMPUTING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Kwok

    2002-08-30

    The T7 Working Group on High Performance Computing (HPC) had more than 30 participants (listed in Section 6). During the three weeks at Snowmass there were about 30 presentations (listed in Section 7). This working group also had joint sessions with a number of other working groups, including E1 (Neutrino Factories and Muon Colliders), M1 (Muon Based Systems), M6 (High Intensity Proton Sources), T4 (Particle Sources), T5 (Beam dynamics), and T8 (Advanced Accelerators). The topics that were discussed fall naturally into three areas: (1) HPC requirements for next-generation accelerator design, (2) state-of-the-art in HPC simulation of accelerator systems, and (3) applied mathematics and computer science activities related to the development of HPC tools that will be of use to the accelerator community (as well as other communities). This document summarizes the material mentioned above and includes recommendations for future HPC activities in the accelerator community. The relationship of those activities to the HENP/SciDAC project on 21st century accelerator simulation is also discussed.

  6. Closeout Report: Experimental High Energy Physics Group at the University of South Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, Charles M; Godang, Romulus

    2013-06-25

    The High Energy Physics group at the University of South Alabama has been supported by this research grant (DE-FG02-96ER40970) since 1996. One researcher, Dr. Merrill Jenkins, has been supported on this grant during this time worked on fixed target experiments at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, west of Chicago, Illinois. These experiments have been E-705, E-771, E-871 (HyperCP) and E-921 (CKM) before it was canceled for budgetary reasons. After the cancellation of CKM, Dr. Jenkins joined the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment as an associate member via the High Energy Physics Group at the Florida State University. A second, recently tenured faculty member, Dr. Romulus Godang joined the group in 2009 and has been supported by this grant since then. Dr. Godang is working on the BaBaR experiment at SLAC and has joined the Belle-II experiment located in Japan at KEK. According to the instructions sent to us by our grant monitor, we are to concentrate on the activities over the last three years in this closeout report.

  7. High-precision thermodynamic and critical properties from tensor renormalization-group flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinczewski, Michael; Berker, A Nihat

    2008-01-01

    The recently developed tensor renormalization-group (TRG) method provides a highly precise technique for deriving thermodynamic and critical properties of lattice Hamiltonians. The TRG is a local coarse-graining transformation, with the elements of the tensor at each lattice site playing the part of the interactions that undergo the renormalization-group flows. These tensor flows are directly related to the phase diagram structure of the infinite system, with each phase flowing to a distinct surface of fixed points. Fixed-point analysis and summation along the flows give the critical exponents, as well as thermodynamic functions along the entire temperature range. Thus, for the ferromagnetic triangular lattice Ising model, the free energy is calculated to better than 10(-5) along the entire temperature range. Unlike previous position-space renormalization-group methods, the truncation (of the tensor index range D) in this general method converges under straightforward and systematic improvements. Our best results are easily obtained with D=24, corresponding to 4624-dimensional renormalization-group flows.

  8. High-Precision Thermodynamic and Critical Properties from Tensor Renormalization-Group Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinczewski, Michael; Berker, A. Nihat

    2008-03-01

    The recently developed tensor renormalization-group (TRG) method [1] provides a highly precise technique for deriving thermodynamic and critical properties of lattice Hamiltonians. The TRG is a local coarse-graining transformation, with the elements of the tensor at each lattice site playing the part of the interactions that undergo the renormalization-group flows. These tensor flows are directly related [2] to the phase diagram structure of the infinite system, with each phase flowing to a distinct surface of fixed points. Fixed-point analysis and summation along the flows give the critical exponents, as well as thermodynamic functions along the entire temperature range. Thus, for the ferromagnetic triangular lattice Ising model, the free energy is calculated to better than 10-5 along the entire temperature range. Unlike previous position-space renormalization-group methods, the truncation (of the tensor index range D) in this general method converges under straightforward and systematic improvements. Our best results are easily obtained with D=24, corresponding to 4624-dimensional renormalization-group flows. [1] M. Levin and C.P. Nave, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 120601 (2007). [2] M. Hinczewski and A.N. Berker, arXiv:0709.2803v1 [cond-mat.stat-mech], Phys. Rev. E, in press.

  9. Protein adsorption of dialdehyde cellulose-crosslinked chitosan with high amino group contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ung-Jin; Lee, Yeong Ro; Kang, Tong Ho; Choi, Joon Weon; Kimura, Satoshi; Wada, Masahisa

    2017-05-01

    Crosslinked chitosan was prepared by Schiff base formation between the aldehyde groups of dialdehyde cellulose (DAC) and the amino groups of chitosan and a subsequent reduction. DAC was obtained through periodate oxidation of cellulose and solubilization in hot water at 100°C for 1h. Three grades of DAC-crosslinked chitosan were prepared by adding various amounts DAC. The degrees of crosslinking as determined by amino group content were 3.8, 8.3, and 12.1%, respectively. DAC-crosslinked chitosan showed higher stability in the pH 2-9 range and no cytotoxicity was identified over the course of a 21-day long-term stability test. Also, DAC-crosslinked chitosan showed remarkably high bovine serum albumin (BSA) adsorption capacity at pH 5.5 as a result of the increased amino group content, due to the reaction between DAC and chitosan molecular chains occurring at multiple points even though DAC-crosslinked chitosan showed a lower degree of crosslinking.

  10. The Local Group as a time machine: studying the high-redshift Universe with nearby galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Johnson, Benjamin D; Bullock, James S; Conroy, Charlie; Fitts, Alex

    2015-01-01

    We infer the UV luminosities of Local Group galaxies at early cosmic times ($z \\sim 2$ and $z \\sim 7$) by combining stellar population synthesis modeling with star formation histories derived from deep color-magnitude diagrams constructed from Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations. Our analysis provides a basis for understanding high-$z$ galaxies - including those that may be unobservable even with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) - in the context of familiar, well-studied objects in the very low-$z$ Universe. We find that, at the epoch of reionization, all Local Group dwarfs were less luminous than the faintest galaxies detectable in deep HST observations of blank fields. We predict that JWST will observe $z \\sim 7$ progenitors of galaxies similar to the Large Magellanic Cloud today; however, the HST Frontier Fields initiative may already be observing such galaxies, highlighting the power of gravitational lensing. Consensus reionization models require an extrapolation of the observed blank-field lum...

  11. Identification and characterization of the lamprey high-mobility group box 1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Pang

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, a highly conserved DNA-binding protein, plays an important role in maintaining nucleosome structures, transcription, and inflammation. We identified a homolog of HMGB1 in the Japanese lamprey (Lampetra japonica. The Lampetra japonica HMGB1 gene (Lj-HMGB1 has over 70% sequence identity with its homologs in jawed vertebrates. Despite the reasonably high sequence identity with other HMGB1 proteins, Lj-HMGB1 did not group together with these proteins in a phylogenetic analysis. We examined Lj-HMGB1 expression in lymphocyte-like cells, and the kidneys, heart, gills, and intestines of lampreys before and after the animals were challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS and concanavalin A (ConA. Lj-HMGB1 was initially expressed at a higher level in the heart, but after treatment with LPS and ConA only the gills demonstrated a significant up-regulation of expression. The recombinant Lj-HMGB1 (rLj-HMGB1 protein bound double-stranded DNA and induced the proliferation of human adenocarcinoma cells to a similar extent as human HMGB1. We further revealed that Lj-HMGB1 was able to induce the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, a pro-inflammatory mediator, in activated human acute monocytic leukemia cells. These results suggest that lampreys use HMGB1 to activate their innate immunity for the purpose of pathogen defense.

  12. Colorectal cancer screening in high-risk groups is increasing, although current smokers fall behind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oluyemi, Aminat O; Welch, Amy R; Yoo, Lisa J; Lehman, Erik B; McGarrity, Thomas J; Chuang, Cynthia H

    2014-07-15

    There is limited information about colorectal cancer (CRC) screening trends in high-risk groups, including the black, obese, diabetic, and smoking populations. For this study, the authors evaluated national CRC screening trends in these high-risk groups to provide insights into whether screening resources are being appropriately used. This was a nationally representative, population-based study using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System from the Centers for Disease Control. Data analysis was performed using bivariate analyses with weighted logistic regression. In the general population, CRC screening increased significantly from 59% to 65% during the years 2006 to 2010. The screening prevalence in non-Hispanic blacks was 58% in 2006 and 65% in 2010. Among obese individuals, the prevalence of up-to-date CRC screening increased significantly from 59% in 2006 to 66% in 2010. Screening prevalence in individuals with diabetes was 63% in 2006 and 69% in 2010. The CRC screening prevalence in current smokers was 45% in 2006 and 50% in 2010. The odds of CRC screening in the non-Hispanic black population, the obese population, and the diabetic population were higher than in non-Hispanic whites, normal weight individuals, and the population without diabetes, respectively. Current smokers had significantly lower odds of CRC screening than never-smokers in the years studied (2006: odds ratio [OR], 0.71; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.66-0.76; 2008: OR, 0.67; 95% CI, 0.63-0.71; 2010: OR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.66-0.73). The prevalence of CRC screening in high-risk groups is trending upward. Despite this, current smokers have significantly lower odds of CRC screening compared with the general population. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  13. High-end Manufacture of Yulian Energy Group Focused Efforts on Aluminum Deep Processing Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    Aluminum deep processing products recorded brisk production and sales,Q1 sales completed29%of the whole year plan,budget profit completed 67%of the annual plan,first 3months of the year fulfilled consecutive profitearning,customer orders have been scheduled for production till June.Such splendid score sheet indicated that the high-end manufacture of Henan Yulian Energy Group Co.,Ltd,a pilot enterprise for transition and upgrading in Henan aluminum industry,has flexed its

  14. Parallel adaptive integration in high-performance functional Renormalization Group computations

    CERN Document Server

    Lichtenstein, Julian; de la Peña, David Sánchez; Vidović, Toni; Di Napoli, Edoardo

    2016-01-01

    The conceptual framework provided by the functional Renormalization Group (fRG) has become a formidable tool to study correlated electron systems on lattices which, in turn, provided great insights to our understanding of complex many-body phenomena, such as high- temperature superconductivity or topological states of matter. In this work we present one of the latest realizations of fRG which makes use of an adaptive numerical quadrature scheme specifically tailored to the described fRG scheme. The final result is an increase in performance thanks to improved parallelism and scalability.

  15. Report of the working group on production and dynamics of high brightness beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, R.L. [MS H851I, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Bisognano, J.; Brau, C.; Hogan, M.; Kim, K.; Milton, S.; Nuhn, H.; Pagani, C.; Pierini, P.; Reiser, M.; Schmerge, J.; Serafini, L.; Teng, L.; Winick, H.; Cornacchia, M.

    1997-02-01

    This paper summarizes the main discussions of the Working Group on the Production and Dynamics of High Brightness Beams. The following topics are covered in this paper: proposed new electron sources and needed research on existing sources, discussions on issues relating to the description of phase space on non-thermalized electron beam distributions and the theoretical modeling on non-thermalized electron beam distributions, and the present status of the theoretical modeling of beam transport in bends. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Documentation for The Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) data archived at NODC (NODC Accession 0123222)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature (GHRSST) is an international open group for SST data producers, users, and scientists. It brings together...

  17. The high resolution vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectra of the group VI dihydrides and deuterides Rydberg series

    CERN Document Server

    Mayhew, C A

    1984-01-01

    The high resolution absorption spectra of the important group VI dihydrides and deuterides in the vacuum ultraviolet below, and up to, their first ionisation potentials are presented. These spectra were recorded using synchrotron radiation as the background light source in conjunction with a 3m normal incidence vacuum spectrograph, equipped with holographic gratings. Due to the nature of the originating orbital for the majority of optical transitions in the VUV well developed Rydberg series are observed. One particular series can be followed up to fairly high n, so that accurate values of the first ionisation potential are determined. The identifications of the Rydberg series are made from arguments relating to their oscillator strengths, quantum defects, symmetries and from comparisons with the spectra of the corresponding united atoms i.e. the inert gases. Examples of the symmetry assignments for Rydberg series from rotational band contour analyses of the lower Rydberg members for the H sub 2 S, H sub 2 Se ...

  18. Renormalization group evolution of multi-gluon correlators in high energy QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitru, A.; Jalilian-Marian, J.; Lappi, T.; Schenke, B.; Venugopalan, R.

    2011-12-01

    Many-body QCD in leading high energy Regge asymptotics is described by the Balitsky-JIMWLK hierarchy of renormalization group equations for the x evolution of multi-point Wilson line correlators. These correlators are universal and ubiquitous in final states in deeply inelastic scattering and hadronic collisions. For instance, recently measured di-hadron correlations at forward rapidity in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are sensitive to four and six point correlators of Wilson lines in the small x color fields of the dense nuclear target. We evaluate these correlators numerically by solving the functional Langevin equation that describes the Balitsky-JIMWLK hierarchy. We compare the results to mean-field Gaussian and large Nc approximations used in previous phenomenological studies. We comment on the implications of our results for quantitative studies of multi-gluon final states in high energy QCD.

  19. Renormalization group evolution of multi-gluon correlators in high energy QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Dumitru, Adrian; Lappi, Tuomas; Schenke, Bjoern; Venugopalan, Raju

    2011-01-01

    Many-body QCD in leading high energy Regge asymptotics is described by the Balitsky-JIMWLK hierarchy of renormalization group equations for the x evolution of multi-point Wilson line correlators. These correlators are universal and ubiquitous in final states in deeply inelastic scattering and hadronic collisions. For instance, recently measured di-hadron correlations at forward rapidity in deuteron-gold collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are sensitive to four and six point correlators of Wilson lines in the small x color fields of the dense nuclear target. We evaluate these correlators numerically by solving the functional Langevin equation that describes the Balitsky-JIMWLK hierarchy. We compare the results to mean-field Gaussian and large N_c approximations used in previous phenomenological studies. We comment on the implications of our results for quantitative studies of multi-gluon final states in high energy QCD.

  20. High-field electron transport in nanoscale group-III nitride devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komirenko, S.M.; Kim, K.W. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Kochelap, V.A. [Inst. of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev-28 (Ukraine); Stroscio, M.A. [Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Mathematical Sciences Div.

    2001-11-08

    Focusing on the short-size group-III nitride heterostructures, we have developed a model which takes into account main features of transport of electrons injected into a polar semiconductor under high electric fields. The model is based on an exact analytical solution of Boltzmann transport equation. The electron velocity distribution over the device is analyzed at different fields and the basic characteristics of the high-field electron transport are obtained. The critical field for the runaway regime, when electron energies and velocities increase with distance which results in the average velocities higher than the peak velocity in bulk-like samples, is determined. We have found that the runaway electrons are characterized by a distribution function with population inversion. Different nitride-based small-size devices where this effect can have an impact on the device performance are considered. (orig.)

  1. High temperature fuel cell membranes based on poly(arylene ether)s containing benzimidazole groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Sik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Yu Seung [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Kwan - Soo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boncella, James M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kuiper, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guiver, Michael D [CANADA

    2009-01-01

    Development of new high-performance polymer membranes that retain their proton conductivity under low humidity conditions is one of the most critical requirements to commercialize PEMFC systems. Current sulfonated proton exchange membranes acquire proton conductivity by water that solvates ion and carries proton. Consequently, a loss of water under low RH conditions immediately results in a loss of proton conductivity. One approach to maintain proton conductivity under low RH conditions is to replace water with a less volatile proton solvent. Kreuer has pointed out the possibility to develop fully polymeric proton-conducting membranes based on nitrogen-containing heterocycles such as imidazole, benzimidazole, and pyrazole. We have attempted to blend those less volatile proton solvent with sulfonated copolymers such as polystyrene sulfonic acid, Nafion, poly(arylene ether sulfone, BPSH-xx). [Ref. DOE review meeting 2007 and 2008] However, we observed that imidazole was slowly sublimated out as temperature and humidity increases which could cause poisoning of electro-catalyst, corrosion and losing conductivity. In this presentation, we report the synthesis of novel poly(arylene ether sulfone)s containing benzimidazole groups These benzimidazole containing polymer was blended with sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone). In the blend system, benzimidazole group attached to the polysulfone acts as a medium through the basic nitrogen for transfer of protons between the sulfonic acid groups. Proton conductivity of the blend membranes was investigated as a function of water content at 80 C and compared the performance with water based proton conduction system.

  2. High prevalence of hypertension among an ethnic group in Sudan: implications for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Sufian K; Elsugud, Nada A; Bushara, Sarra O; Elmadhoun, Wadie M; Ahmed, Mohamed H

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is an emerging non-communicable disease in developing countries. Due to its silent nature and serious complications, active screening is essential in order to prevent complications. For instance, premature mortality from cardiovascular diseases could be prevented by the effective control of hypertension. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of undiagnosed hypertension among Nuba ethnic group living in Atbara city, north Sudan and to identify the associated risk factors. All consenting 500 adults from Nuba tribe who live in El Wihda District, Atbara were included. Blood pressure (BP) and body mass index were measured. Standard interviewing procedures were used to record medical history, socio-demographic data, and lifestyle characteristics. Among the 500 participants, females were 364 (72.8%) and males were 136 (27.2%). The overall prevalence of undiagnosed hypertension was 49.4% (30.8% stage 1 hypertension and 18.6% stage 2 hypertension). In addition, 41% of the population was having prehypertension. The significant risk factors for high BP were: male sex, age above 45 years, overweight, illiteracy, and alcohol consumption. Undiagnosed high BP is very common among Nuba ethnic group; therefore, active screening and early management are recommended to prevent complications.

  3. High-temperature mass spectrometry - Vaporization of group 4-B metal carbides. [using Knudsen effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, C. A.; Kohl, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    The high temperature vaporization of the metal-carbon systems TiC, ZrC, HfC, and ThC was studied by the Knudsen effusion - mass spectrometric method. For each system the metal dicarbide and tetracarbide molecular species were identified in the gas phase. Relative ion currents of the carbides and metals were measured as a function of temperature. Second- and third-law methods were used to determine enthalpies. Maximum values were established for the dissociation energies of the metal monocarbide molecules TiC, ZrC, HfC, and ThC. Thermodynamic functions used in the calculations are discussed in terms of assumed molecular structures and electronic contributions to the partition functions. The trends shown by the dissociation energies of the carbides of Group 4B are compared with those of neighboring groups and discussed in relation to the corresponding oxides and chemical bonding. The high temperature molecular beam inlet system and double focusing mass spectrometer are described.

  4. NEW APPROACHES TO REHABILITATION AMONG CHILDREN FROM HIGH RISK GROUPS OF TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Aksenova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The research studied the impact of the mixture of bacteria lysates (IRS 19 on the recurrence of the acute respiratory infections among the weakened and sickly children from TB high risk group, who underwent rehabilitation at the anti TB health center. The researcher studied the tolerance to the physical loads (Shalkov test, secretory Iga concentration in the saliva, recurrence of the acute respiratory infections under supervision in catamnesis within a year. To prevent and treat bacterial nasal and respiratory infections, the authors used the mixture of bacteria lysates (Solvay pharma along the specific chemical tuberculosis prevention. Performed complex rehabilitation increased the resistance of the children's body infected with TB mycobacteria and conduced to the increase of the normergic reactions to tuber culine. They revealed that the recurrence of the acute respiratory infections among the children, who received the mixture of bacteria lysates, made up 0,9 ± 0,2 among the children infected and 1,1 ± 0,2 non=infected with tb mycobacteria within the first 6 months of observation. In the test group, these indices came to 2,2 ± 0,3 and 2,3 ± 0,2, respectively. After they carried on the immunocorrection course, the saliva witnessed the increase of the secretory Iga concentration (among the children both infected and non infected with TB mycobacteria. performed research proves that it is clinically efficient, safe and expedient to introduce the seasonal course of the local immuno corrector — the mixture of bacteria lysates to the set of the rehabilitation actions among the children from TB high risk groups, which allows them to recommend wider application of this medication in children.Key words: mixture of bacteria lysates, tuberculosis, prevention, children.

  5. Amide group anchored glucose oxidase based anodic catalysts for high performance enzymatic biofuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Yongjin; Ahn, Yeonjoo; Kim, Do-Heyoung; Kwon, Yongchai

    2017-01-01

    A new enzyme catalyst is formed by fabricating gold nano particle (GNP)-glucose oxidase (GOx) clusters that are then attached to polyethyleneimine (PEI) and carbon nanotube (CNT) with cross-linkable terephthalaldehyde (TPA) (TPA/[CNT/PEI/GOx-GNP]). Especially, amide bonds belonging to TPA play an anchor role for incorporating rigid bonding among GNP, GOx and CNT/PEI, while middle size GNP is well bonded with thiol group of GOx to form strong GNP-GOx cluster. Those bonds are identified by chemical and electrochemical characterizations like XPS and cyclic voltammogram. The anchording effect of amide bonds induces fast electron transfer and strong chemical bonding, resulting in enhancements in (i) catalytic activity, (ii) amount of immobilized GOx and (ii) performance of enzymatic biofuel cell (EBC) including the catalyst. Regarding the catalytic activity, the TPA/[CNT/PEI/GOx-GNP] produces high electron transfer rate constant (6 s-1), high glucose sensitivity (68 μA mM-1 cm-2), high maximum current density (113 μA cm-2), low charge transfer resistance (17.0 Ω cm2) and long-lasting durability while its chemical structure is characterized by XPS confirming large portion of amide bond. In EBC measurement, it has high maximum power density (0.94 mW cm-2) compatible with catalytic acitivity measurements.

  6. Trends in birth across high-parity groups by race/ethnicity and maternal age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliyu, Muktar H; Salihu, Hamisu M; Keith, Louis G; Ehiri, John E; Islam, M Aminul; Jolly, Pauline E

    2005-06-01

    The changing racial and ethnic diversity of the U.S. population along with delayed childbearing suggest that shifts in the demographic composition of gravidas are likely. It is unclear whether trends in the proportion of births to parous women in the United States have changed over the decades by race and ethnicity, reflecting parallel changes in population demographics. Singleton deliveries > or = 20 weeks of gestation in the United States from 1989 through 2000 were analyzed using data from the "Natality data files" assembled by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS). We classified maternal age into three categories; younger mothers (aged or = 40 years) and maternal race/ethnicity into three groups: blacks (non-Hispanic), Hispanics and whites (non-Hispanic). We computed birth rates by period of delivery across the entire population and repeated the analysis stratified by age and maternal race. Chi-squared statistics for linear trend were utilized to assess linear trend across three four-year phases: 1989-1992, 1993-1996 and 1997-2000. In estimating the association between race/ethnicity and parity status, the direct method of standardization was employed to adjust for maternal age. Over the study period, the total number of births to blacks and whites diminished consistently (p for trend fashion among the high (5-9 previous live births), very high (10-14 previous live births) and extremely high (> or = 15 previous live births) parity groups (p for trend < 0.001). After maternal age standardization, black and Hispanic women were more likely to have higher parity as compared to whites. Our findings demonstrate substantial variation in parity patterns among the main racial and ethnic populations in the United States. These results may help in formulating strategies that will serve as templates for optimizing resource allocation across the different racial/ethnic subpopulations in the United States.

  7. Teaching high-school Geoscience through a group-based activity: the Geotrivia experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakopoulou, Athanasia

    2015-04-01

    Geotrivia is an educational game which aims at the enhancement of geoscience teaching in secondary education, through an interactive group-based activity. As behavioural teaching methods no longer excite students in a multitask society, new approaches should be implemented to keep up with novel learning methodologies and team-based techniques. Thus, the main aim of the experiment was to come up with an alternative learning process on geology and geography in order to upgrade and attract more students to Geosciences. Geotrivia is based on the techniques of motivation (competition to be the winner) and enjoyable educational time (it is funny to play a game) in terms of team-based student collaboration. Pedagogical aims of Geotrivia consist of team-based work, independency, autonomy and initiative, active participation, student self-evaluation and metacognition. Geotrivia is a card game, consisting of about 150 playing cards, a whistle and an hourglass. Each playing card contains a geology- or geography-related question and the answer to the question is given in the lower part of the card. Class students are divided in about 4 groups of about 5 students each. The aim of each group is to collect as many cards as possible. The hourglass is flipped and a member of the team takes the pack of cards and uses it to ask questions to his team; the other members have to answer as many questions. The team wins a card when they give a correct answer. The game is played at the end of each curriculum unit; a comprehensive version of the game is held at end of the school year. Most -but not all- questions are based on the course syllabus, which deals with the geology and geography of Europe at junior high school level (e.g. what is the cause of high seismicity in Greece?). Accordingly, Geotrivia questions can be adjusted to each country school book of geology - geography at any grade. To evaluate the results of Geotrivia, we used the methodology of pretest and posttest, an

  8. The Group for High Resolution Sea Surface Temperature: Past, Present and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlon, Craig; Casey, Kenneth; Minnett, Peter; Corlett, Gary

    2014-05-01

    In the last decade, satellite Agencies, science, operational user/producer and Sea Surface Temperature practitioner communities have come together within the Group for High Resolution SST (GHRSST) to create a new framework for generation, delivery and application of improved common format high-resolution (~1-10 km) satellite SST datasets for the benefit of society. The GHRSST data system is a mature, robust, and highly reliable near real time and delayed mode data system known as the GHRSST Regional/Global Task Sharing framework (R/GTS) and has operated in NRT since 2006. It consists of distributed Regional Data Assembly Centers (RDACs) around the world that submit their data to a Global Data Assembly Center (GDAC) maintained at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (JPL PO.DAAC), where all the data are available for 30 days. After that they are transferred to the GHRSST Long Term Stewardship and Reanalysis Facility (LTSRF) at the U.S. National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC) for long-term preservation and distribution. The extensive user base includes many operational meteorological services, the scientific community, industry and Government. Since the R/GTS has operated, statistics show over 72,000 users have accessed the R/GTS in NRT, accessing over 100 million files amounting to more than 232 Tb of information. GHRSST has an organisation structure that has both fixed and flexible components allowing it to respond effectively and efficiently to new and emerging challenges. GHRSST has often been cited as a model for other Virtual Communities/Constellations. GHRSST is underpinned by an international Science Team and International Project Office together. Long-standing GHRSST Technical Advisory Groups (TAG) and ad hoc Working Groups (WG) are typically at the "cutting edge" of international SST activities delivering real coordination in space-based Earth observations for societal benefit through the prioritized

  9. Continuous glucose monitoring system and new era of early diagnosis of diabetes in high risk groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Soliman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM systems are an emerging technology that allows frequent glucose measurements to monitor glucose trends in real time. Their use as a diagnostic tool is still developing and appears to be promising. Combining intermittent glucose self-monitoring (SGM and CGM combines the benefits of both. Significant improvement in the treatment modalities that may prevent the progress of prediabetes to diabetes have been achieved recently and dictates screening of high risk patients for early diagnosis and management of glycemic abnormalities. The use of CGMS in the diagnosis of early dysglycemia (prediabetes especially in high risk patients appears to be an attractive approach. In this review we searched the literature to investigate the value of using CGMS as a diagnostic tool compared to other known tools, namely oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT and measurement of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C in high risk groups. Those categories of patients include adolescents and adults with obesity especially those with family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO, gestational diabetes, cystic fibrosis, thalassemia major, acute coronary syndrome (ACS, and after renal transplantation. It appears that the ability of the CGMS for frequently monitoring (every 5 min glucose changes during real-life settings for 3 to 5 days stretches the chance to detect more glycemic abnormalities during basal and postprandial conditions compared to other short-timed methods.

  10. High burden of invasive group A streptococcal disease in the Northern Territory of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, R; Patel, M; Currie, B J; Holt, D C; Harris, T; Krause, V

    2016-04-01

    Although the incidence of invasive group A streptococcal disease in northern Australia is very high, little is known of the regional epidemiology and molecular characteristics. We conducted a case series of Northern Territory residents reported between 2011 and 2013 with Streptococcus pyogenes isolates from a normally sterile site. Of the 128 reported episodes, the incidence was disproportionately high in the Indigenous population at 69·7/100 000 compared to 8·8/100 000 in the non-Indigenous population. Novel to the Northern Territory is the extremely high incidence in haemodialysis patients of 2205·9/100 000 population; and for whom targeted infection control measures could prevent transmission. The incidences in the tropical north and semi-arid Central Australian regions were similar. Case fatality was 8% (10/128) and streptococcal toxic shock syndrome occurred in 14 (11%) episodes. Molecular typing of 82 isolates identified 28 emm types, of which 63 (77%) were represented by four emm clusters. Typing confirmed transmission between infant twins. While the diverse range of emm types presents a challenge for effective coverage by vaccine formulations, the limited number of emm clusters raises optimism should cluster-specific cross-protection prove efficacious. Further studies are required to determine effectiveness of chemoprophylaxis for contacts and to inform public health response.

  11. The relation between star formation, morphology and local density in high redshift clusters and groups

    CERN Document Server

    Poggianti, Bianca M; Finn, Rose; Bamford, Steven; De Lucia, Gabriella; Varela, Jesus; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Halliday, Claire; Noll, Stefan; Saglia, Roberto; Zaritsky, Dennis; Best, Philip; Clowe, Douglas; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Jablonka, Pascale; Pello, Roser; Rudnick, Gregory; Simard, Luc; von der Linden, Anja; White, Simon

    2008-01-01

    We investigate how the [OII] properties and the morphologies of galaxies in clusters and groups at z=0.4-0.8 depend on projected local galaxy density, and compare with the field at similar redshifts and clusters at low-z. In both nearby and distant clusters, higher-density regions contain proportionally fewer star-forming galaxies, and the average [OII] equivalent width of star-forming galaxies is independent of local density. However, in distant clusters the average current star formation rate (SFR) in star-forming galaxies seems to peak at densities ~15-40 galaxies Mpc^{-2}. At odds with low-z results, at high-z the relation between star-forming fraction and local density varies from high- to low-mass clusters. Overall, our results suggest that at high-z the current star formation (SF) activity in star-forming galaxies does not depend strongly on global or local environment, though the possible SFR peak seems at odds with this conclusion. We find that the cluster SFR normalized by cluster mass anticorrelate...

  12. Two high-mobility group box domains act together to underwind and kink DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sánchez-Giraldo, R.; Acosta-Reyes, F. J. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Malarkey, C. S. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Saperas, N. [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Churchill, M. E. A., E-mail: mair.churchill@ucdenver.edu [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO 80045 (United States); Campos, J. L., E-mail: mair.churchill@ucdenver.edu [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-06-30

    The crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an unmodified AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. A new mode of DNA recognition for HMG box proteins is found in which two box A domains bind in an unusual configuration generating a highly kinked DNA structure. High-mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is an essential and ubiquitous DNA architectural factor that influences a myriad of cellular processes. HMGB1 contains two DNA-binding domains, box A and box B, which have little sequence specificity but have remarkable abilities to underwind and bend DNA. Although HMGB1 box A is thought to be responsible for the majority of HMGB1–DNA interactions with pre-bent or kinked DNA, little is known about how it recognizes unmodified DNA. Here, the crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. Two box A domains of HMGB1 collaborate in an unusual configuration in which the Phe37 residues of both domains stack together and intercalate the same CG base pair, generating highly kinked DNA. This represents a novel mode of DNA recognition for HMGB proteins and reveals a mechanism by which structure-specific HMG boxes kink linear DNA.

  13. Isolation of a very high molecular weight polylactosamine from an ovarian cyst mucin of blood group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, A.S.S.; Bush, C.A.

    1986-05-01

    Treatment of a blood group A active ovarian cyst mucin glycoprotein with alkaline borohydride under conditions expected to cleave-O-glycosidically linked carbohydrate chains releases a polysaccharide of average molecular weight 25,000 daltons. It contains no peptide or mannose at the 1% level and carbohydrate analysis gives fuc:galNAc:gal:glcNAc in the ratio of 1:1:2.5:2.5. The /sup 13/C and /sup 1/H NMR spectra show that the polysaccharide has non-reducing terminal side chains of the structure galNAc(..cap alpha..-1 ..-->.. 3)(fuc(..cap alpha..-1 ..-->.. 2)) gal(..beta..-1 ..-->.. 3) glcNAc (i.e. a type 1 chain). Periodate oxidation removes all the fucose and galNAc from the non-reducing terminal but leaves intact the backbone composed of ..beta..-linked gal and glcNAc as would be expected for a polylactosamine. They conclude that this is a high molecular weight polylactosamine which is related to the asparagine linked polylactosamine chains of cell surface glycoproteins which have been implicated in cell differentiation. However, the blood group A polysaccharide from the ovarian cyst mucin is unique in several respects. It has a much larger molecular weight than even the erythroglycan of the red cell membrane protein, band 3, and is linked to the protein by an -O-glycosidic bond rather than the -N-asparagine linkage of the previously known polylactosamines which have a trimannosyl core. Its blood group A side chains are on a type one core rather than type 2 which is found on other polylactosamines.

  14. Nosocomial infections in brazilian pediatric patients: using a decision tree to identify high mortality groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M.M. Lopes

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections (NI are frequent events with potentially lethal outcomes. We identified predictive factors for mortality related to NI and developed an algorithm for predicting that risk in order to improve hospital epidemiology and healthcare quality programs. We made a prospective cohort NI surveillance of all acute-care patients according to the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System guidelines since 1992, applying the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1988 definitions adapted to a Brazilian pediatric hospital. Thirty-eight deaths considered to be related to NI were analyzed as the outcome variable for 754 patients with NI, whose survival time was taken into consideration. The predictive factors for mortality related to NI (p < 0.05 in the Cox regression model were: invasive procedures and use of two or more antibiotics. The mean survival time was significantly shorter (p < 0.05 with the Kaplan-Meier method for patients who suffered invasive procedures and for those who received two or more antibiotics. Applying a tree-structured survival analysis (TSSA, two groups with high mortality rates were identified: one group with time from admission to the first NI less than 11 days, received two or more antibiotics and suffered invasive procedures; the other group had the first NI between 12 and 22 days after admission and was subjected to invasive procedures. The possible modifiable factors to prevent mortality involve invasive devices and antibiotics. The TSSA approach is helpful to identify combinations of predictors and to guide protective actions to be taken in continuous-quality-improvement programs.

  15. Nosocomial infections in brazilian pediatric patients: using a decision tree to identify high mortality groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M.M. Lopes

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections (NI are frequent events with potentially lethal outcomes. We identified predictive factors for mortality related to NI and developed an algorithm for predicting that risk in order to improve hospital epidemiology and healthcare quality programs. We made a prospective cohort NI surveillance of all acute-care patients according to the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System guidelines since 1992, applying the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 1988 definitions adapted to a Brazilian pediatric hospital. Thirty-eight deaths considered to be related to NI were analyzed as the outcome variable for 754 patients with NI, whose survival time was taken into consideration. The predictive factors for mortality related to NI (p < 0.05 in the Cox regression model were: invasive procedures and use of two or more antibiotics. The mean survival time was significantly shorter (p < 0.05 with the Kaplan-Meier method for patients who suffered invasive procedures and for those who received two or more antibiotics. Applying a tree-structured survival analysis (TSSA, two groups with high mortality rates were identified: one group with time from admission to the first NI less than 11 days, received two or more antibiotics and suffered invasive procedures; the other group had the first NI between 12 and 22 days after admission and was subjected to invasive procedures. The possible modifiable factors to prevent mortality involve invasive devices and antibiotics. The TSSA approach is helpful to identify combinations of predictors and to guide protective actions to be taken in continuous-quality-improvement programs.

  16. High affinity group III mGluRs regulate mossy fiber input to CA3 interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Kathleen E; Meriney, Stephen D; Barrionuevo, Germán

    2011-12-01

    Stratum lacunosum-moleculare interneurons (L-Mi) in hippocampal area CA3 target the apical dendrite of pyramidal cells providing feedforward inhibition. Here we report that selective activation of group III metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) 4/8 with L(+)-2-amino-4-phosphnobytyric acid (L-AP4; 10 μM) decreased the probability of glutamate release from the mossy fiber (MF) terminals synapsing onto L-Mi. Consistent with this interpretation, application of L-AP4 in the presence of 3 mM strontium decreased the frequency of asynchronous MF EPSCs in L-Mi. Furthermore, the dose response curve showed that L-AP4 at 400 μM produced no further decrease in MF EPSC amplitude compared with 20 μM L-AP4, indicating the lack of mGluRs 7 at these MF terminals. We also found that one mechanism of mGluRs 4/8-mediated inhibition of release is linked to N-type voltage gated calcium channels at MF terminals. Application of the group III mGluR antagonist MSOP (100 μM) demonstrated that mGluRs 4/8 are neither tonically active nor activated by low and moderate frequencies of activity. However, trains of stimuli to the MF at 20 and 40 Hz delivered during the application of MSOP revealed a relief of inhibition of transmitter release and an increase in the overall probability of action potential firing in the postsynaptic L-Mi. Interestingly, the time to first action potential was significantly shorter in the presence of MSOP, indicating that mGluR 4/8 activation delays L-Mi firing in response to MF activity. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the timing and probability of action potentials in L-Mi evoked by MF synaptic input is regulated by the activation of presynaptic high affinity group III mGluRs.

  17. OBJECTS GROUPING FOR SEGMENTATION OF ROADS NETWORK IN HIGH RESOLUTION IMAGES OF URBAN AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Maboudi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Updated road databases are required for many purposes such as urban planning, disaster management, car navigation, route planning, traffic management and emergency handling. In the last decade, the improvement in spatial resolution of VHR civilian satellite sensors – as the main source of large scale mapping applications – was so considerable that GSD has become finer than size of common urban objects of interest such as building, trees and road parts. This technological advancement pushed the development of “Object-based Image Analysis (OBIA” as an alternative to pixel-based image analysis methods. Segmentation as one of the main stages of OBIA provides the image objects on which most of the following processes will be applied. Therefore, the success of an OBIA approach is strongly affected by the segmentation quality. In this paper, we propose a purpose-dependent refinement strategy in order to group road segments in urban areas using maximal similarity based region merging. For investigations with the proposed method, we use high resolution images of some urban sites. The promising results suggest that the proposed approach is applicable in grouping of road segments in urban areas.

  18. Simple and high yield access to octafunctional azido, amine and urea group bearing cubic spherosilicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Sandra; Kickelbick, Guido

    2016-12-20

    Spherosilicates and polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes represent unique well-defined rigid building blocks for molecular and hybrid materials. Drawbacks in their synthesis are often low yields and the restricted presence of functional groups either based on incomplete transformation of all corners or the reactivity of the functional groups. Particularly amine-functionalization reveals some synthetic challenges. In this study we report the synthesis of a new class of octafunctionalized hydrogen bond forming spherosilicates via a facile route based on octabromo alkyl functionalized cubic spherosilicates. Four different alkyl chain lengths, namely C4, C5, C6 and C11, were realized starting from ω-alkenylbromides via hydrosilylation of Q8M8(H). Using sodium azide in a mixture of acetonitrile : DMF = 10 : 1, the octaazide was obtained quantitatively and could be rapidly transformed in an octaamine cube via catalytic hydrogenation over Pd/C in absolute ethanol. The following reaction to hydrogen bond forming spherosilicates was performed in situ by adding propyl isocyanate. All transformations proceed quantitatively at the eight corners of the cube, which was evidenced by NMR spectroscopy and ESI-MS measurements. The Q8-target compound can be separated after each reaction step over simple chemical workup while no cage rearrangement was observed. The structures were confirmed using (1)H, (13)C, (29)Si-NMR, FT-IR, elemental analysis and ESI-MS. The method opens a high yield route (overall isolated yield 83-88%) for structural building blocks in hybrid materials.

  19. Highly Fluorescent Group 13 Metal Complexes with Cyclic, Aromatic Hydroxamic Acid Ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, Michael; Moore, Evan G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-02-11

    The neutral complexes of two ligands based on the 1-oxo-2-hydroxy-isoquinoline (1,2-HOIQO) motif with group 13 metals (Al, Ga, In) show bright blue-violet luminescence in organic solvents. The corresponding transition can be attributed to ligand-centered singlet emission, characterized by a small Stokes shifts of only a few nm combined with lifetimes in the range between 1-3 ns. The fluorescence efficiency is high, with quantum yields of up to 37% in benzene solution. The crystal structure of one of the indium(III) complexes (trigonal space group R-3, a = b = 13.0384(15) {angstrom}, c = 32.870(8) {angstrom}, ? = {beta} = 90{sup o}, {gamma} = 120{sup o}, V = 4839.3(14) {angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 6) shows a six-coordinate geometry around the indium center which is close to trigonal-prismatic, with a twist angle between the two trigonal faces of 20.7{sup o}. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations (Al and Ga: B3LYP/6-31G(d)); In: B3LYP/LANL2DZ of the fac and mer isomers with one of the two ligands indicate that there is no clear preference for either one of the isomeric forms of the metal complexes. In addition, the metal centers do not have a significant influence on the electronic structure, and as a consequence, on the predominant intraligand optical transitions.

  20. Objects Grouping for Segmentation of Roads Network in High Resolution Images of Urban Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maboudi, M.; Amini, J.; Hahn, M.

    2016-06-01

    Updated road databases are required for many purposes such as urban planning, disaster management, car navigation, route planning, traffic management and emergency handling. In the last decade, the improvement in spatial resolution of VHR civilian satellite sensors - as the main source of large scale mapping applications - was so considerable that GSD has become finer than size of common urban objects of interest such as building, trees and road parts. This technological advancement pushed the development of "Object-based Image Analysis (OBIA)" as an alternative to pixel-based image analysis methods. Segmentation as one of the main stages of OBIA provides the image objects on which most of the following processes will be applied. Therefore, the success of an OBIA approach is strongly affected by the segmentation quality. In this paper, we propose a purpose-dependent refinement strategy in order to group road segments in urban areas using maximal similarity based region merging. For investigations with the proposed method, we use high resolution images of some urban sites. The promising results suggest that the proposed approach is applicable in grouping of road segments in urban areas.

  1. Chronic bronchitis is an independently associated factor for more symptom and high-risk groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi JY

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Joon Young Choi,1 Hyoung Kyu Yoon,2 Seoung Ju Park,3 Yong Bum Park,4 Kyeong-Cheol Shin,5 Ju Ock Na,6 Kwang Ha Yoo,7 Ki-Suck Jung,8 Young Kyoon Kim,1 Chin Kook Rhee1 1Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St Mary’s Hospital, 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Yeouido St Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, 3Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju, 4Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Kangdong Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul, 5Regional Center for Respiratory Disease, Yeungnam University Medical Center, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu, 6Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan, 7Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, 8Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Hallym University Medical Center, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang, Republic of Korea Background: The chronic bronchitis (CB phenotype has been associated with poor quality of life and an increased risk of disease in patients with COPD. However, little information exists regarding the relationship between the CB phenotype and the COPD assessment test (CAT score. The goal of this study was to reveal the different pattern of CAT scores between CB and non-CB patients. Moreover, we aimed to investigate whether the CB phenotype is an independently associated factor for more symptom and high-risk groups.Methods: Data were obtained from the Korea COPD Subgroup Study cohort recruited from 46 centers in South

  2. Hydrocarbon group type determination in jet fuels by high performance liquid chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    Results are given for the analysis of some jet and diesel fuel samples which were prepared from oil shale and coal syncrudes. Thirty-two samples of varying chemical composition and physical properties were obtained. Hydrocarbon types in these samples were determined by fluorescent indicator adsorption (FIA) analysis, and the results from three laboratories are presented and compared. Recently, rapid high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods have been proposed for hydrocarbon group type analysis, with some suggestion for their use as a replacement of the FIA technique. Two of these methods were used to analyze some of the samples, and these results are also presented and compared. Two samples of petroleum-based Jet A fuel are similarly analyzed.

  3. Screening for TB by sputum culture in high-risk groups in Copenhagen, Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Sidse Graff; Wrona Olsen, Nete; Seersholm, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Evidence on screening high-risk groups for TB by mobile X-ray in low-incidence countries is building, but knowledge on other possible screening methods is limited. In this retrospective study we report results from a community based programme screening for TB by spot sputum culture....... METHODS: On seven occasions, from September 2012 through June 2014, we offered TB screening to all persons present at 11 locations where socially marginalised people gather in Copenhagen. Spot sputum samples from participants were examined by smear microscopy and culture. Genotype, nucleic acid......-positive and seven (19.4%) were smear-positive. Twelve out of 21 (57.1%) cases tested were nucleic acid amplification test positive. Twenty-eight (77.8%) had chest X-ray suggestive of TB. All patients with TB started treatment, 30 (83.3%) had a successful outcome. DISCUSSION: Screening for TB by spot sputum culture...

  4. Potential role of high mobility group box 1 in viral infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haichao; Ward, Mary F; Fan, Xue-Gong; Sama, Andrew E; Li, Wei

    2006-01-01

    A nuclear protein, high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), is released passively by necrotic cells and actively by macrophages/monocytes in response to exogenous and endogenous inflammatory stimuli. After binding to the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), or Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4), HMGB1 activates macrophages/monocytes to express proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and adhesion molecules. Pharmacological suppression of its activities or release is protective against lethal endotoxemia and sepsis, establishing HMGB1 as a critical mediator of lethal systemic inflammation. In light of observations that many viruses (e.g., West Nile virus, Salmon anemia virus) can induce passive HMGB1 release, we propose a potential pathogenic role of HMGB1 in viral infectious diseases.

  5. Phase transitions in Group III-V and II-VI semiconductors at high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, S. C.; Liu, C. Y.; Spain, I. L.; Skelton, E. F.

    1979-01-01

    The structures and transition pressures of Group III-V and II-VI semiconductors and of a pseudobinary system (Ga/x/In/1-x/Sb) have been investigated. Results indicate that GaP, InSb, GaSb, GaAs and possible AlP assume Metallic structures at high pressures; a tetragonal, beta-Sn-like structure is adopted by only InSb and GaSb. The rocksalt phase is preferred in InP, InAs, AlSb, ZnO and ZnS. The model of Van Vechten (1973) gives transition pressures which are in good agreement with measured values, but must be refined to account for the occurrence of the ionic rocksalt structure in some compounds. In addition, discrepancies between the theoretical scaling values for volume changes at the semiconductor-to-metal transitions are observed.

  6. Thiacalix[4]arene derivatives containing multiple aromatic groups: High efficient extractants for organic dyes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chuang Yang; Zusheng Wang; Hongyu Guo; Ziyu Jiao; Fafu Yang

    2015-08-01

    Click reaction of alkynylthiacalix[4]arene with ethyl 2-azidoacetate, followed by ammonolysis with hydrazine hydrate and Schiff-base condensation with benzaldehyde or salicyic aldehyde, afforded two novel thiacalix[4]arene derivatives containing multiple aromatic groups in yields of 86% and 90%. Their complexation properties for four organic dyes were investigated by liquid-liquid extraction experiments, complexation UV-Vis spectra and mass spectrum. The highest extraction percentage was 97% for Neutral red. The UV- Vis spectra and ESI-MS spectrum indicated the 1:1 complexes in DMSO solution. The association constants were as high as 1∼ 8 × 104 M−1. These complexation experiments showed that thiacalix[4]arene receptors possess excellent complexation capabilities for dyes.

  7. Hierarchy of kissing numbers for exceptional Lie symmetry groups in high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Naschie, M.S. [Donghua University, Shanghai (China); Department of Physics University of Alexandria, Alexandria (Egypt)], E-mail: Chaossf@aol.com

    2008-01-15

    We are constructing a hierarchy of kissing numbers representing singular contact points of hyper-spheres in exceptional Lie symmetry groups lattice arrangement embedded in the 26 dimensional bosonic strings spacetime. That way we find a total number of points and dimensions equal to 548. This is 52 more than the order of E{sub 8}E{sub 8} of heterotic string theory and leads to the prediction of 69 elementary particles at an energy scale under 1 T. In other words, our mathematical model predicts nine more particles than what is currently experimentally known to exist in the standard model of high energy physics namely only 60. The result is thus in full agreement with all our previous theoretical findings.

  8. Effect of Solution Focused Group Counseling for High School Students in Order to Struggle with School Burnout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Bünyamin

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the effect of solution focused group counseling upon high school students struggling with school burnout was analyzed. The research was an experimental study in which a pre-test post-test control group random design was used, depending upon the real experimental model. The study group included 30 students that volunteered from…

  9. Large Group Exposure Treatment: a Feasibility Study in Highly Spider Fearful Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Wannemueller

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A large group one-session exposure treatment (LG-OST based on indirect modeled exposure strategies was carried out to investigate its feasibility and effectiveness in a sample of highly spider fearful individuals (N = 78. The stability of LG-OST-effects was assessed at 8-month follow-up (FU. Furthermore, a second sample (N = 30 of highly spider fearful individuals was treated in a standard, single-person one-session treatment (SP-OST design to compare LG-OST-effects to a standard spider fear treatment. Participants’ fear of spider was assessed by multiple questionnaires and by a behavioral approach test (BAT. The fear assessment took place before and after the respective intervention, and at 8-month follow-up in LG-OST. Regarding subjective spider fear measures, LG-OST mainly showed medium to large effect sizes, ranging from Cohen’s d = .69 to d = 1.21, except for one small effect of d = .25. After LG-OST, participants approached the spider closer at post-treatment measures (d = 1.18. LG-OST-effects remained stable during the 8-month FU-interval. However, SP-OST-effects proved superior in most measures. An LG-OST-protocol provided evidence for feasibility and efficiency. The effects of LG-OST were equal to those of indirect modeled exposure strategies, carried out in single-settings. LG-OST may represent a useful tool in future phobia-treatment, especially if it can match the effects of single-setting OST, e.g., by including more direct exposure elements in future large group attempts.

  10. Holography as a highly efficient renormalization group flow. I. Rephrasing gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Nicolas; Kuperstein, Stanislav; Mukhopadhyay, Ayan

    2016-07-01

    We investigate how the holographic correspondence can be reformulated as a generalization of Wilsonian renormalization group (RG) flow in a strongly interacting large-N quantum field theory. We first define a highly efficient RG flow as one in which the Ward identities related to local conservation of energy, momentum and charges preserve the same form at each scale. To achieve this, it is necessary to redefine the background metric and external sources at each scale as functionals of the effective single-trace operators. These redefinitions also absorb the contributions of the multitrace operators to these effective Ward identities. Thus, the background metric and external sources become effectively dynamical, reproducing the dual classical gravity equations in one higher dimension. Here, we focus on reconstructing the pure gravity sector as a highly efficient RG flow of the energy-momentum tensor operator, leaving the explicit constructive field theory approach for generating such RG flows to the second part of the work. We show that special symmetries of the highly efficient RG flows carry information through which we can decode the gauge fixing of bulk diffeomorphisms in the corresponding gravity equations. We also show that the highly efficient RG flow which reproduces a given classical gravity theory in a given gauge is unique provided the endpoint can be transformed to a nonrelativistic fixed point with a finite number of parameters under a universal rescaling. The results obtained here are used in the second part of this work, where we do an explicit field-theoretic construction of the RG flow and obtain the dual classical gravity theory.

  11. High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 correlates with renal function in chronic kidney disease (CKD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruchfeld, Annette; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Lindholm, Bengt; Barany, Peter; Yang, Lihong; Stenvinkel, Peter; Tracey, Kevin J

    2008-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with inflammation and malnutrition and carries a markedly increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 (HMGB-1) is a 30-kDa nuclear and cytosolic protein known as a transcription and growth factor, recently identified as a proinflammatory mediator of tissue injury. Recent data implicates HMGB-1 in endotoxin lethality, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. The aim of this post-hoc, cross-sectional study was to determine whether HMGB-1 serum levels are elevated in CKD patients. The study groups were categorized as follows: 110 patients starting dialysis defined as CKD 5; 67 patients with moderately to severely reduced renal function or CKD 3-4; and 48 healthy controls. High-sensitivity C-reactive-protein (hs-CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), serum-albumin (S-albumin), hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)), hemoglobin, subjective global nutritional assessment (SGA), and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were analyzed. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare groups and Spearman's rank correlation test was used for continuous variables. HMGB-1, measured by Western blot, was significantly (P < 0.001) elevated in CKD 5 (146.7 +/- 58.6 ng/mL) and CKD 3-4 (85.6 +/- 31.8) compared with controls (10.9 +/- 10.5). HMGB-1 levels were correlated positively with TNF (Rho = 0.52; P < 0.001), hs-CRP (Rho = 0.38; P < 0.001), IL-6 (Rho = 0.30; P < 0.001), HbA(1c) (Rho = 0.14; P = 0.02) and SGA (Rho = 0.21; P = 0.002) and negatively correlated with GFR (Rho = -0.69; P = 0.0001), Hb (Rho = -0.60; P < 0.001), S-albumin (Rho = -0.31; P < 0.001). The current study has revealed that HMGB-1 is elevated significantly in CKD patients and correlates with GFR as well as markers of inflammation and malnutrition. Future studies may delineate whether HMGB-1 is also a marker of disease activity and severity as well as a predictor of outcome in CKD.

  12. High-fidelity simulation among bachelor students in simulation groups and use of different roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thidemann, Inger-Johanne; Söderhamn, Olle

    2013-12-01

    Cost limitations might challenge the use of high-fidelity simulation as a teaching-learning method. This article presents the results of a Norwegian project including two simulation studies in which simulation teaching and learning were studied among students in the second year of a three-year bachelor nursing programme. The students were organised into small simulation groups with different roles; nurse, physician, family member and observer. Based on experiences in different roles, the students evaluated the simulation design characteristics and educational practices used in the simulation. In addition, three simulation outcomes were measured; knowledge (learning), Student Satisfaction and Self-confidence in Learning. The simulation was evaluated to be a valuable teaching-learning method to develop professional understanding and insight independent of roles. Overall, the students rated the Student Satisfaction and Self-confidence in Learning as high. Knowledge about the specific patient focus increased after the simulation activity. Students can develop practical, communication and collaboration skills, through experiencing the nurse's role. Assuming the observer role, students have the potential for vicarious learning, which could increase the learning value. Both methods of learning (practical experience or vicarious learning) may bridge the gap between theory and practice and contribute to the development of skills in reflective and critical thinking.

  13. ''High intensity per bunch'' working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Third Generation Light Sources are supposed to store high intensity beams not only in many tightly spaced bunches (multibunch operation), but also in few bunch or even single lunch modes of operation, required for example for time structure experiments. Single bunch instabilities, driven by short-range wake fields, however spoil the beam quality, both longitudinally and transversely. Straightforward ways of handling them, by pushing up the chromaticity ({zeta} = {delta}Q/({delta}p/p)) for example, enabled to raise the charge per bunch, but to the detriment of beam lifetime. In addition, since the impedance of the vacuum chamber deteriorates with the installation of new insertion devices, the current thresholds tend to dope down continuously. The goal of this Working Group was then to review these limitations in the existing storage rings, where a large number of beam measurements have been performed to characterise them, and to discuss different strategies which are used against them. About 15 different laboratories reported on the present performance of storage rings, experiences gained in high charge per bunch, and on simulation results and theoretical studies. More than 25 presentations addressed the critical issues and stimulated the discussion. Four main topics came out: - Observation and experimental data; - Impedance studies and tracking codes; - Theoretical investigations; - Cures and feedback. (author)

  14. Expression and Effects of High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoao Pang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the significance of high- mobility group box1 (HMGB1 and T-cell-mediated immunity and prognostic value in cervical cancer. HMGB1, forkhead/winged helix transcription factor p3 (Foxp3, IL-2, and IL-10 protein expression was analyzed in 100 cervical tissue samples including cervical cancer, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN, and healthy control samples using immunohistochemistry. Serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC-Ag was immunoradiometrically measured in 32 serum samples from 37 cases of squamous cervical cancer. HMGB1 and SCC-Ag were then correlated to clinicopathological characteristics. HMGB1 expression tends to increase as cervical cancer progresses and it was found to be significantly correlated to FIGO stage and lymph node metastasis. These findings suggest that HMGB1 may be a useful prognostic indicator of cervical carcinoma. In addition, there were significant positive relationships between HMGB1 and FOXP3 or IL-10 expression (both p < 0.05. In contrast, HMGB1 and IL-2 expression was negatively correlated (p < 0.05. HMGB1 expression may activate Tregs or facilitate Th2 polarization to promote immune evasion of cervical cancer. Elevated HMGB1 protein in cervical carcinoma samples was associated with a high recurrence of HPV infection in univariate analysis (p < 0.05. HMGB1 expression and levels of SCC-Ag were directly correlated in SCC (p < 0.05. Thus, HMGB1 may be a useful biomarker for patient prognosis and cervical cancer prediction and treatment.

  15. High pressure stability of the monosilicides of cobalt and the platinum group elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, J.A., E-mail: jeanalexis.hernandez@ens-lyon.fr [Laboratoire de géologie de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5276, École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 46 Allée d’Italie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France); Vočadlo, L.; Wood, I.G. [Department of Earth Sciences, University College London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-25

    Highlights: • We model the high-pressure phases of cobalt- and platinum-group-monosilicides. • CoSi, RuSi, OsSi transform with pressure from the ε-FeSi to the CsCl structure. • RhSi and IrSi transform with pressure from the MnP structure to the ε-FeSi structure. • PdSi and PtSi transform with pressure from the MnP structure to the CuTi structure. - Abstract: The high pressure stability of CoSi, RuSi, RhSi, PdSi, OsSi, IrSi and PtSi was investigated by static first-principles calculations up to 300 GPa at 0 K. As found experimentally, at atmospheric pressure, CoSi, RuSi and OsSi were found to adopt the cubic ε-FeSi structure (P2{sub 1}3) whereas RhSi, PdSi, IrSi and PtSi were found to adopt the orthorhombic MnP (Pnma) structure. At high pressure, CoSi, RuSi and OsSi show a phase transition to the CsCl structure (Pm3{sup ¯}m) structure at 270 GPa, 7 GPa and 6 GPa respectively. RhSi and IrSi were found to transform to an ε-FeSi structure at 10 GPa and 25 GPa. For PdSi and PtSi, a transformation from the MnP structure to the tetragonal CuTi structure (P4/nmm) occurs at 13 GPa and 20 GPa. The pressure dependence of the electronic density of states reveals that RuSi and OsSi are semiconductors in the ε-FeSi structure and become metallic in the CsCl structure. RhSi and IrSi are metals in the MnP structure and become semimetals in their high pressure ε-FeSi form. CoSi in the ε-FeSi configuration is a semimetal. PdSi and PtSi remain metallic throughout up to 300 GPa.

  16. Social Skills Group Training in High-Functioning Autism: A Qualitative Responder Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choque Olsson, Nora; Rautio, Daniel; Asztalos, Jenny; Stoetzer, Ulrich; Bölte, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Systematic reviews show some evidence for the efficacy of group-based social skills group training in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder, but more rigorous research is needed to endorse generalizability. In addition, little is known about the perspectives of autistic individuals participating in social skills group training.…

  17. Social Skills Group Training in High-Functioning Autism: A Qualitative Responder Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choque Olsson, Nora; Rautio, Daniel; Asztalos, Jenny; Stoetzer, Ulrich; Bölte, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Systematic reviews show some evidence for the efficacy of group-based social skills group training in children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder, but more rigorous research is needed to endorse generalizability. In addition, little is known about the perspectives of autistic individuals participating in social skills group training.…

  18. Blood group genotyping: from patient to high-throughput donor screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Veldhuisen; C.E. van der Schoot; M. de Haas

    2009-01-01

    Blood group antigens, present on the cell membrane of red blood cells and platelets, can be defined either serologically or predicted based on the genotypes of genes encoding for blood group antigens. At present, the molecular basis of many antigens of the 30 blood group systems and 17 human platele

  19. Screening in high-risk group of gestational diabetes mellitus with its maternal and fetal outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angadi Rajasab Nilofer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is a metabolic disorder defined as glucose intolerance with the onset or first recognition during pregnancy. Women with GDM are at increased risk for adverse obstetric and perinatal outcome. The complications associated with GDM can be prevented by early recognition, intense monitoring and proper treatment. Aims: The present study was done to screen the high-risk pregnancy group for GDM, to find the incidence of abnormal results on screening and to correlate the abnormal results with the maternal and fetal outcomes. The study was done in a tertiary care hospital and teaching institute. It was a prospective cohort study. Materials and Methods: Selective screening for GDM was done in 150 pregnant women with high-risk factors. Screening was done with 50 g glucose challenge test (GCT after 18 weeks, and if GCT was negative then the test was repeated after 28 weeks of pregnancy. The patients who were having an abnormal GCT were subjected to 100 g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT. All GDM patients were followed up and treated with diet and/or insulin therapy till delivery to know maternal and fetal outcomes. The period of study was from April 2008 to March 2009. Results: 7.3% of study population was OGCT positive. 6% of the study population was OGTT positive. Age >25 years, obesity, family history of DM, and past history of GDM were the risk factors significantly associated with GDM. One newborn had hypoglycemia and one had hyperbilirubinemia. The fetal and maternal outcome in GDM patients was good in our study due to early diagnosis and intervention. Conclusion: Women with GDM are at an increased risk for adverse obstetric and perinatal outcome. The increased morbidity in GDM is preventable by meticulous antenatal care.

  20. Holography as a highly efficient renormalization group flow. II. An explicit construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behr, Nicolas; Mukhopadhyay, Ayan

    2016-07-01

    We complete the reformulation of the holographic correspondence as a highly efficient renormalization group (RG) flow that can also determine the UV data in the field theory in the strong-coupling and large-N limit. We introduce a special way to define operators at any given scale in terms of appropriate coarse-grained collective variables, without requiring the use of the elementary fields. The Wilsonian construction is generalized by promoting the cutoff to a functional of these collective variables. We impose three criteria to determine the coarse-graining. The first criterion is that the effective Ward identities for local conservation of energy, momentum, etc. should preserve their standard forms, but in new scale-dependent background metric and sources which are functionals of the effective single-trace operators. The second criterion is that the scale-evolution equations of the operators in the actual background metric should be state-independent, implying that the collective variables should not explicitly appear in them. The final required criterion is that the end point of the scale-evolution of the RG flow can be transformed to a fixed point corresponding to familiar nonrelativistic equations with a finite number of parameters, such as incompressible nonrelativistic Navier-Stokes, under a certain universal rescaling of the scale and of the time coordinate. Using previous work, we explicitly show that in the hydrodynamic limit each such highly efficient RG flow reproduces a unique classical gravity theory with precise UV data that satisfy our IR criterion and also lead to regular horizons in the dual geometries. We obtain the explicit coarse-graining which reproduces Einstein's equations. In a simple example, we are also able to construct a low-energy effective action and compute the beta function. Finally, we show how our construction can be interpolated with the traditional Wilsonian RG flow at a suitable scale and can be used to develop new

  1. High frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation with diphenidol administration results in an additive antiallodynic effect in rats following chronic constriction injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Heng-Teng; Chiu, Chong-Chi; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Hung, Ching-Hsia; Chen, Yu-Wen

    2015-03-04

    The impact of coadministration of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) and diphenidol is not well established. Here we estimated the effects of diphenidol in combination with TENS on mechanical allodynia and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression. Using an animal chronic constriction injury (CCI) model, the rat was estimated for evidence of mechanical sensitivity via von Frey hair stimulation and TNF-α expression in the sciatic nerve using the ELISA assay. High frequency (100Hz) TENS or intraperitoneal injection of diphenidol (2.0μmol/kg) was applied daily, starting on postoperative day 1 (POD1) and lasting for the next 13 days. We demonstrated that both high frequency TENS and diphenidol groups had an increase in mechanical withdrawal thresholds of 60%. Coadministration of high frequency TENS and diphenidol gives better results of paw withdrawal thresholds in comparison with high frequency TENS alone or diphenidol alone. Both diphenidol and coadministration of high frequency TENS with diphenidol groups showed a significant reduction of the TNF-α level compared with the CCI or HFS group (Phigh frequency TENS group exhibited a higher TNF-α level than the sham group (Phigh frequency TENS alone, and the combination produced a reduction of neuropathic allodynia. Both diphenidol and the combination of diphenidol with high frequency TENS inhibited TNF-α expression. A moderately effective dose of diphenidol appeared to have an additive effect with high frequency TENS. Therefore, multidisciplinary treatments could be considered for this kind of mechanical allodynia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of a group approach on the performance of high school mathematics learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Dhlamini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the effects of a group approach versus a non-group approach on the mathematics performance of learners. A group approach refers to an arrangement in which learners sit together to discuss and solve mathematics tasks. We studied a convenience sample of low-performing Grade 10 mathematics learners using a quasi-experimental design with a non-equivalent control group. The experimental group was taught using a group approach and the control group using non-group approach instruction. To measure the effects of teaching approaches, we administered a Financial Mathematics Achievement Test (FMAT before and after the experiment. Using a one-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA the study found that learners in a group approach learning environment performed significantly better than learners taught through a non-group teaching mode (p < 0.05. The theory of cognitive load was used to interpret the results. The results suggest that a group approach may be effective when teaching certain mathematics topics in Grade 10 classrooms.

  3. The Unusually High Halo Concentration of the Fossil Group NGC 6482: Evidence for Weak Adiabatic Contraction

    CERN Document Server

    Buote, David A

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the massive isolated elliptical galaxy / fossil group NGC 6482 for which previous X-ray studies of a modest Chandra observation obtained a very uncertain, but also possibly very high, halo concentration. We present new measurements of the hot gas surface brightness, temperature, and iron abundance using the modest Chandra observation and a previously unpublished Suzaku observation, the latter of which allows measurements of the gas properties to be extended out to ~r_2500. By constructing hydrostatic equilibrium models of the gas with separate components for the gas, BCG stellar mass, and the dark matter (DM), we measure c_200 = 32.2 +/- 7.1 and M_200 = (4.5 +/- 0.6 x 10^12 M_sun using an NFW DM profile. For a halo of this mass, c_200 exceeds the mean value (7.1) expected for relaxed LCDM halos by $3.5 \\sigma$ in terms of the observational error, and by $6 \\sigma$ considering the intrinsic scatter in the LCDM c-M relation, which situates NGC 6482 as the most extreme outlier known for a fossil syste...

  4. Anabolic Properties of High Mobility Group Box Protein-1 in Human Periodontal Ligament Cells In Vitro

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    Michael Wolf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High mobility group box protein-1 (HMGB1 is mainly recognized as a chemoattractant for macrophages in the initial phase of host response to pathogenic stimuli. However, recent findings provide evidence for anabolic properties in terms of enhanced proliferation, migration, and support of wound healing capacity of mesenchymal cells suggesting a dual role of the cytokine in the regulation of immune response and subsequent regenerative processes. Here, we examined potential anabolic effects of HMGB1 on human periodontal ligament (PDL cells in the regulation of periodontal remodelling, for example, during orthodontic tooth movement. Preconfluent human PDL cells (hPDL were exposed to HMGB1 protein and the influence on proliferation, migration, osteogenic differentiation, and biomineralization was determined by MTS assay, real time PCR, immunofluorescence cytochemistry, ELISA, and von Kossa staining. HMGB1 protein increased hPDL cell proliferation, migration, osteoblastic marker gene expression, and protein production as well as mineralized nodule formation significantly. The present findings support the dual character of HMGB1 with anabolic therapeutic potential that might support the reestablishment of the structural and functional integrity of the periodontium following periodontal trauma such as orthodontic tooth movement.

  5. Population groups at high risk for poor oral self care: the basis for oral health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artnik, Barbara; Premik, Marjan; Zaletel-Kragelj, Lijana

    2008-01-01

    Identification of population groups at high risk for poor oral self-care in adults was needed in order to enable more focused planning of oral health promotion actions in Slovenia. The study was based on the national health behaviour database in adults aged 25-64. Data collected in 2001 were used. The sample size was 15,379. The overall response rate was 64%, and 8,392 questionnaires were eligible for oral self-care assessment. A complex indicator based on oral hygiene, frequency of visiting a dentist, and nutritional habits was derived. The outcome of interest was poor oral self-care. Logistic regression was used to test multivariate associations between several factors (gender, age, educational level, social class, etc.) and poor oral self-care. The overall prevalence of poor oral self-care was 6.9%. The odds for this outcome were higher for men (OR(males vs. females) = 7.49, p social classes (OR(lower vs. upper-middle) = 6.20, p social classes.

  6. PREVALENCE OF INTERNET ADDICTION: A PILOT STUDY IN A GROUP OF ITALIAN HIGH-SCHOOL STUDENTS

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    Mario Campanella

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study aimed at exploring the prevalence of Internet Addiction (IA amongst a group of high-school students living in Southern Italy. Method: 560 hundred students of both sexes of a “Liceo Classico” who volenteered for the study were included. They completed a smaller version of a specific questionnaire for IA developed by us. Results: 500, out of the total of 560 questionnaires that were returned, were correctly completed and could be analyzed. The main findings were that almost all students used the smartphone to access Internet. About 16% of them used it for a time ranging between 90 and 120 minutes a day, and the remaining less than one hour. The most used applications were Facebook and Whatsup. Fifty percent of the students owned a videogame console, and dedicated less than two hours a day on videogames. The ensuing data were presented to the students and a debate was promoted amongst them. Conclusions: Internet and related technology are now part of the everyday life especially of adolescents. The benefits and limits of them should be underlined. On the same time, an incresead awareness on the possibility of developing an excessive use until a real addiction should be promoted amongst younger generations.

  7. Blockade of high mobility group box-1 protein attenuates experimental severe acute pancreatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hidehiro Sawa; Takashi Ueda; Yoshifumi Takeyama; Takeo Yasuda; Makoto Shinzeki; Takahiro Nakajima; Yoshikazu Kuroda

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To examine the effects of anti-high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) neutralizing antibody in experimental severe acute pancreatitis (SAP).METHODS: SAP was induced by creating closed duodenal loop in C3H/HeN mice. SAP was induced immediately after intraperitoneal injection of anti-HMGB1 neutralizing antibody (200 μg). Severity of pancreatitis, organ injury (liver, kidney and lung), and bacterial translocation to pancreas was examined 12 h after induction of SAP.RESULTS: Anti-HMGB1 neutralizing antibody significantly improved the elevation of the serum amylase level and the histological alterations of pancreas and lung in SAP.Anti-HMGB1 antibody also significantly ameliorated the elevations of serum alanine aminotransferase and creatinine in SAP. However, anti-HMGB1 antibody worsened the bacterial translocation to pancreas.CONCLUSION: Blockade of HMGB1 attenuated the development of SAP and associated organ dysfunction,suggesting that HMGB1 may act as a key mediator for inflammatory response and organ injury in SAP.

  8. High Mobility Group B Proteins, Their Partners, and Other Redox Sensors in Ovarian and Prostate Cancer

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    Aida Barreiro-Alonso

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells try to avoid the overproduction of reactive oxygen species by metabolic rearrangements. These cells also develop specific strategies to increase ROS resistance and to express the enzymatic activities necessary for ROS detoxification. Oxidative stress produces DNA damage and also induces responses, which could help the cell to restore the initial equilibrium. But if this is not possible, oxidative stress finally activates signals that will lead to cell death. High mobility group B (HMGB proteins have been previously related to the onset and progressions of cancers of different origins. The protein HMGB1 behaves as a redox sensor and its structural changes, which are conditioned by the oxidative environment, are associated with different functions of the protein. This review describes recent advances in the role of human HMGB proteins and other proteins interacting with them, in cancerous processes related to oxidative stress, with special reference to ovarian and prostate cancer. Their participation in the molecular mechanisms of resistance to cisplatin, a drug commonly used in chemotherapy, is also revised.

  9. High mobility group box 1 protein as a late-acting mediator of acute lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Waldemar; Stetkiewicz, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Acute inflammatory lung injury is often a delayed complication of critical illness and is associated with increased mortality. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, in addition to its role as a transcriptional regulator factor, has been identified as a late mediator of endotoxin lethality and might be also involved in the development and progression of acute lung injury. HMGB1 protein itself can cause an acute inflammatory response manifested by increased production of proinflammatory cytokines and neutrophil accumulation. The delayed kinetics of HMGB1 protein release indicate that this protein is a distal mediator of acute inflamatory lung injury. Anti-HMGB1 protein antibodies attenuated endotoxin-induced lung injury, but not the early release of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta, indicating that HMGB1 protein is a late mediator of endotoxin-induced acute lung injury. HMGB1 protein is not released by apoptotic cells but is passively released by necrotic or damaged somatic and immune cells and it functions as a major stimulus of necrosis-induced inflammation. HMGB1 protein is also released by activated monocytes/macrophages and induces delayed and biphasic release of proinflammatory mediators from these cells. HMGB1 protein failed to stimulate cytokines release in lymphocytes, indicating that cellular stimulation is specific. We would like to suggest that HMGB1 protein may be also a primary mediator of the inflammatory responses to lung cells injury caused by toxic environmental chemicals.

  10. Superconductivity in Group III-V Semiconductor AlN Under High Pressure

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    G. Selva Dancy

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The electronic properties of cubic zinc blende type group III-V semiconductor AlN under pressure is studied using full potential linear muffin-tin orbital (FP-LMTO method. At normal pressure, AlN is an indirect bandgap semiconductor with band gap value 4.56 eV. When the pressure is increased, there is enhanced overlapping between the wave functions of the neighboring atoms. As a result the widths of the valence and empty conduction bands increase. These changes lead to the narrowing and indirect closing of the band gaps in AlN (metallization. On further increase of pressure, AlN becomes a superconductor and AlN comes under the class of electron-phonon-mediated high pressure superconductors. The superconducting transition temperatures (Tc of AlN are obtained as a function of pressure for the CsCl structure. It is also confirmed that the metallization, structural phase transition and onset of superconductivity do not occur simultaneously in this compound. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v7i3.628

  11. Regnase-1 in microglia negatively regulates high mobility group box 1-mediated inflammation and neuronal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Xi; Wang, Chen; Huang, Shao-Fei; Chen, Qiong; Hu, Ya-Fang; Zhou, Liang; Gu, Yong

    2016-04-05

    Extracellular high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) has been demonstrated to function as a proinflammatory cytokine and induces neuronal injury in response to various pathological stimuli in central nervous system (CNS). However, the regulatory factor involved in HMGB1-mediated inflammatory signaling is largely unclear. Regulatory RNase 1 (Regnase-1) is a potent anti-inflammation enzyme that can degrade a set of mRNAs encoding proinflammatory cytokines. The present study aims to determine the role of Regnase-1 in the regulation of HMGB1-mediated inflammatory injury in CNS. Cultured microglia and rat brain were treated with recombinant HMGB1 to examine the induction of Regnase-1 expression. Moreover, the role of Regnase-1 in modulating the expression of inflammatory cytokines and neuronal injury was then investigated in microglia by specific siRNA knockdown upon HMGB1 treatment. Results showed that HMGB1 could significantly induce the de novo synthesis of Regnase-1 in cultured microglia. Consistently, Regnase-1 was elevated and found to be co-localized with microglia marker in the brain of rat treated with HMGB1. Silencing Regnase-1 in microglia enhanced HMGB1-induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines and exacerbated neuronal toxicity. Collectively, these results suggest that Regnase-1 can be induced by HMGB1 in microglia and negatively regulates HMGB1-mediated neuroinflammation and neuronal toxicity.

  12. The High Velocity Galaxy Problem of $\\Lambda$CDM in the Local Group $-$ Including External Perturbers

    CERN Document Server

    Banik, Indranil

    2016-01-01

    We recently used an axisymmetric model of the Local Group (LG) to show that the observed positions and velocities of galaxies inside it are difficult to reconcile with the standard cosmological model, $\\Lambda$CDM (MNRAS, 459, 2237). We now extend this investigation using a 3D model of the LG. This makes it feasible to directly include several other mass concentrations within and just outside the LG e.g. M33 and IC 342, respectively. As before, LG dwarf galaxies are treated as test particles. Although our best-fitting 3D model yields different velocity predictions for individual galaxies, the overall picture remains unchanged. In particular, observed radial velocities (RVs) tend to exceed $\\Lambda$CDM model predictions. The typical mismatch is slightly higher than in our earlier axisymmetric analysis, with a root mean square value of $\\sim$50 km/s. \\emph{Our main finding is that including the 3D distribution of massive perturbing dark matter halos is unlikely to help greatly with the high velocity galaxy prob...

  13. The Proinflammatory Cytokine High-Mobility Group Box-1 Mediates Retinal Neuropathy Induced by Diabetes

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    Ahmed M. Abu El-Asrar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To test the hypothesis that increased expression of proinflammatory cytokine high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1 in epiretinal membranes and vitreous fluid from patients with proliferative diabetic retinopathy and in retinas of diabetic rats plays a pathogenetic role in mediating diabetes-induced retinal neuropathy. Retinas of 1-month diabetic rats and HMGB1 intravitreally injected normal rats were studied using Western blot analysis, RT-PCR and glutamate assay. In addition, we studied the effect of the HMGB1 inhibitor glycyrrhizin on diabetes-induced biochemical changes in the retina. Diabetes and intravitreal injection of HMGB1 in normal rats induced significant upregulation of HMGB1 protein and mRNA, activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2, cleaved caspase-3 and glutamate; and significant downregulation of synaptophysin, tyrosine hydroxylase, glutamine synthetase, and glyoxalase 1. Constant glycyrrhizin intake from the onset of diabetes did not affect the metabolic status of the diabetic rats, but it significantly attenuated diabetes-induced upregulation of HMGB1 protein and mRNA, activated ERK1/2, cleaved caspase-3, and glutamate. In the glycyrrhizin-fed diabetic rats, the decrease in synaptophysin, tyrosine hydroxylase, and glyoxalase 1 caused by diabetes was significantly attenuated. These findings suggest that early retinal neuropathy of diabetes involves upregulated expression of HMGB1 and can be ameliorated by inhibition of HMGB1.

  14. Vast planes of satellites in a high resolution simulation of the Local Group: comparison to Andromeda

    CERN Document Server

    Gillet, N; Knebe, A; Libeskind, N; Yepes, G; Gottlober, S; Hoffman, Y

    2014-01-01

    We search for vast planes of satellites (VPoS) in a high resolution simulation of the Local Group performed by the CLUES project, which improves significantly the resolution of former similar studies. We use a simple method for detecting planar configurations of satellites, and validate it on the known plane of M31. We implement a range of prescriptions for modelling the satellite populations, roughly reproducing the variety of recipes used in the literature, and investigate the occurence and properties of planar structures in these populations. The structure of the simulated satellite systems is strongly non-random and contains planes of satellites, predominantly co-rotating, with, in some cases, sizes comparable to the plane observed in M31 by Ibata et al.. However the latter is slightly richer in satellites, slightly thinner and has stronger co-rotation, which makes it stand out as overall more exceptional than the simulated planes, when compared to a random population. Although the simulated planes we fin...

  15. High-Quality Ultra-Compact Grid Layout of Grouped Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoghourdjian, Vahan; Dwyer, Tim; Gange, Graeme; Kieffer, Steve; Klein, Karsten; Marriott, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Prior research into network layout has focused on fast heuristic techniques for layout of large networks, or complex multi-stage pipelines for higher quality layout of small graphs. Improvements to these pipeline techniques, especially for orthogonal-style layout, are difficult and practical results have been slight in recent years. Yet, as discussed in this paper, there remain significant issues in the quality of the layouts produced by these techniques, even for quite small networks. This is especially true when layout with additional grouping constraints is required. The first contribution of this paper is to investigate an ultra-compact, grid-like network layout aesthetic that is motivated by the grid arrangements that are used almost universally by designers in typographical layout. Since the time when these heuristic and pipeline-based graph-layout methods were conceived, generic technologies (MIP, CP and SAT) for solving combinatorial and mixed-integer optimization problems have improved massively. The second contribution of this paper is to reassess whether these techniques can be used for high-quality layout of small graphs. While they are fast enough for graphs of up to 50 nodes we found these methods do not scale up. Our third contribution is a large-neighborhood search meta-heuristic approach that is scalable to larger networks.

  16. High mobility group protein 1: A collaborator in nucleosome dynamics and estrogen-responsive gene expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William M Scovell

    2016-01-01

    High mobility group protein 1(HMGB1) is a multifunctional protein that interacts with DNA and chromatin to influence the regulation of transcription, DNA replication and repair and recombination. We show that HMGB1 alters the structure and stability of the canonical nucleosome(N) in a nonenzymatic,adenosine triphosphate-independent manner. As a result, the canonical nucleosome is converted to two stable, physically distinct nucleosome conformers. Although estrogen receptor(ER) does not bind to its consensus estrogen response element within a nucleosome, HMGB1 restructures the nucleosome to facilitate strong ER binding. The isolated HMGB1-restructured nucleosomes(N’ and N’’) remain stable and exhibit a number of characteristics that are distinctly different from the canonical nucleosome. These findings complement previous studies that showed(1) HMGB1 stimulates in vivo transcriptional activation at estrogen response elements and(2) knock down of HMGB1 expression by siR NA precipitously reduced transcriptional activation. The findings indicate that a major facet of the mechanism of HMGB1 action involves a restructuring of aspects of the nucleosome that appear to relax structural constraints within the nucleosome. The findings are extended to reveal the differences between ER and the other steroid hormone receptors. A working proposal outlines mechanisms that highlight the multiple facets that HMGB1 may utilize in restructuring the nucleosome.

  17. Generation and characterization of a polyclonal antibody against human high mobility group box 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fen; Li, Runsheng; Hong, Aizhen; Duan, Fei; Li, Yuhua

    2013-11-01

    A human high mobility group box 4 (hHMGB4) expression construct (pET‑28a/hHMGB4) was generated by cloning the hHMGB4 full‑length cDNA in the expression vector pET‑28a(+). The hHMGB4 fusion protein with His6‑Tag was prepared using E.coli BL21 (DE3) transformed with pET‑28a/hHMGB4 and purified via preparative SDS‑PAGE plus electroelution. Immunization of rabbits with the purified hHMGB4 generated polyclonal antibodies. The titer of the antiserum was determined to be 1:102,400 by ELISA analysis. Western blotting analysis showed that the antibody specifically recognized the recombinant hHMGB4 protein and also the endogenous hHMGB4 protein in prostate cancer cells. In addition, immunohistochemical staining analysis using the prepared antibody revealed marked hHMGB4 staining in the nuclei of the human prostate tissue. These data demonstrate that the anti‑hHMGB4 polyclonal antibody may be a useful reagent for the functional study of hHMGB4.

  18. Insights into the physiology and ecology of the brackish-water-adapted Cyanobacterium Nodularia spumigena CCY9414 based on a genome-transcriptome analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Voss

    Full Text Available Nodularia spumigena is a filamentous diazotrophic cyanobacterium that dominates the annual late summer cyanobacterial blooms in the Baltic Sea. But N. spumigena also is common in brackish water bodies worldwide, suggesting special adaptation allowing it to thrive at moderate salinities. A draft genome analysis of N. spumigena sp. CCY9414 yielded a single scaffold of 5,462,271 nucleotides in length on which genes for 5,294 proteins were annotated. A subsequent strand-specific transcriptome analysis identified more than 6,000 putative transcriptional start sites (TSS. Orphan TSSs located in intergenic regions led us to predict 764 non-coding RNAs, among them 70 copies of a possible retrotransposon and several potential RNA regulators, some of which are also present in other N2-fixing cyanobacteria. Approximately 4% of the total coding capacity is devoted to the production of secondary metabolites, among them the potent hepatotoxin nodularin, the linear spumigin and the cyclic nodulapeptin. The transcriptional complexity associated with genes involved in nitrogen fixation and heterocyst differentiation is considerably smaller compared to other Nostocales. In contrast, sophisticated systems exist for the uptake and assimilation of iron and phosphorus compounds, for the synthesis of compatible solutes, and for the formation of gas vesicles, required for the active control of buoyancy. Hence, the annotation and interpretation of this sequence provides a vast array of clues into the genomic underpinnings of the physiology of this cyanobacterium and indicates in particular a competitive edge of N. spumigena in nutrient-limited brackish water ecosystems.

  19. The High Velocity Galaxy Challenge to ΛCDM in the Local Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Indranil

    2017-06-01

    In the Local Group (LG), Andromeda (M31) is approaching the Milky Way (MW) at ˜110 km/s despite the large scale cosmic expansion. To turn it around locally to this extent, their combined mass must lie in a narrow range of values. This constrains the gravitational field in the LG as there are no other objects of similar masses. We have conducted calculations solving test particle trajectories in this gravitational field using a 2D dynamical model including Cen A and the LMC (MNRAS, 459, 2237). Although few objects have radial velocities (RVs) much below the predictions of the best-fitting model, some have RVs much above them, sometimes by as much as 100 km/s. This situation persists even when we used a 3D model including perturbers and satellites (MNRAS, 467, 2180).The observations may be explained by a past close flyby of the MW and M31, which arises in Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) but not ΛCDM. In this context, a simplified calculation suggests that the recently discovered plane of satellites around the MW and a similar plane around M31 could be explained by a past MW-M31 flyby, but only if they orbit within a particular plane. We used this information in a more detailed MOND simulation of the flyby and its effect on the rest of the LG, treating it as a cloud of ˜3×105 test particles. The high speeds of the MW and M31 at pericentre allow for efficient gravitational slingshots of these particles. Those flung out to the greatest distance tend to lie very close to the MW-M31 orbital plane, probably because the greatest impulses occur for objects flung out almost parallel to the motion of the perturber.I will describe this simulation and recent work (Arxiv: 1701.06559) showing that LG dwarfs with the most anomalously high RVs (relative to our 3D model) indeed lie close to a plane oriented similarly to our expected MW-M31 orbital plane based on considering their satellite systems. This plane of distant LG dwarfs passes within 140 kpc of the MW and M31 and

  20. Seroprevalence of Brucellosis and Risk Factors Related to High Risk Occupational Groups in Kazeroon, South of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Taheri

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brucellosis is a major zoonosis worldwide. Many people for their professions are at higher risk of contracting the disease.Objective: To determine the seroprevalence of brucellosis and its risk factors in a group of high risk professions.Methods: In a cross-sectional study, all personnel or students of veterinary schools, slaughters and butchers working in the city were invited to participate (n=141. A comparison group (n=44 randomly selected from patients who were selected at random from people attended our healthcare center for reasons other than the infectious diseases.Results: 4 veterinarians, 15 veterinary assistants, 42 veterinarian students, 52 butchers, 17 slaughters, 8 slaughterhouse workers and 3 chefs made the first group and 14 storekeepers, 5 students of engineering, 11 clerks, 13 freelance workers, and 1 high school student made the comparison group. While the rate of consumption of most of the studied dairy products was almost similar in both groups, comparison group patients consumed more often milk (p<0.001 and cream (p<0.001 than the high risk group. 11 (7.8%; 95% CI: 3.4%–12.2% cases from high risk group and none of the comparison group were found seropositive for Brucella.Conclusion: Profession is the main factor in seropositivity. Consumption of dairy products and raw milk is not associated with a higher risk of seropositivity.

  1. Using a Random Dependent Group Contingency to Increase On-Task Behaviors of High School Students with High Incidence Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Brenda D.; Campbell-Whatley, Gloria D.; Lo, Ya-yu

    2009-01-01

    Group contingencies have the advantages of encouraging individual students to collectively feel responsible for appropriate and inappropriate classroom behaviors and have shown effectiveness in improving students' behavior. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a random dependent group contingency on the on-task behaviors of…

  2. Potentiation of NMDA receptor-dependent cell responses by extracellular high mobility group box 1 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Pedrazzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extracellular high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 protein can operate in a synergistic fashion with different signal molecules promoting an increase of cell Ca(2+ influx. However, the mechanisms responsible for this effect of HMGB1 are still unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that, at concentrations of agonist per se ineffective, HMGB1 potentiates the activation of the ionotropic glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR in isolated hippocampal nerve terminals and in a neuroblastoma cell line. This effect was abolished by the NMDA channel blocker MK-801. The HMGB1-facilitated NMDAR opening was followed by activation of the Ca(2+-dependent enzymes calpain and nitric oxide synthase in neuroblastoma cells, resulting in an increased production of NO, a consequent enhanced cell motility, and onset of morphological differentiation. We have also identified NMDAR as the mediator of HMGB1-stimulated murine erythroleukemia cell differentiation, induced by hexamethylenebisacetamide. The potentiation of NMDAR activation involved a peptide of HMGB1 located in the B box at the amino acids 130-139. This HMGB1 fragment did not overlap with binding sites for other cell surface receptors of HMGB1, such as the advanced glycation end products or the Toll-like receptor 4. Moreover, in a competition assay, the HMGB1((130-139 peptide displaced the NMDAR/HMGB1 interaction, suggesting that it comprised the molecular and functional site of HMGB1 regulating the NMDA receptor complex. CONCLUSION: We propose that the multifunctional cytokine-like molecule HMGB1 released by activated, stressed, and damaged or necrotic cells can facilitate NMDAR-mediated cell responses, both in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues, independently of other known cell surface receptors for HMGB1.

  3. Concurrent Weekly Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy for High risk group of Uterine Cervical Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Hyun Suk; Kang, Seung Hee; Kim, Ju Ree; Lee, Eung Soo; Kim, Yong Bong; Park, Sung Kwan [Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-12-15

    Locally advanced cervical carcinoma has shown high rate of local failure and poor survival rate despite the advances in modern radiation therapy techniques. Combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy demonstrated benefit in improving local control and possibly the overall survival. Twelve patients with advanced stages(Figo stage III, IV) or 11b with bulky tumors(>5 cm in diameter) were treated with combination of radiation therapy and concurrent weekly cisplatin between May of 1988 and September of 1991 at Inje University Paik Hospital. Cisplatin was administered in bolus injections of 50mg at weekly intervals during the courses of radiation therapy. Median follow-up period was 34 months with ranges from 3 to 53 months. Eleven patients were evaluable for the estimation of response. Response was noted in all the 11 patients: complete response(CR) in 7(64%), partial response (PR) in 4(36%). Of the 7 patients with CR, all maintained local control, whereas only 1 of 4 with PR showed local control. Six of 7 with CR are alive disease free on the completion of follow-up. Eight of 11 patients (73%) maintained local control in the pelvis. The Median survival for CR patient is 27 months and 9 months for the PR patients. Analysis of survival by stage shows 11 b 4/5, III 2/e and IV 1/3. Overall survival rate was 61%. Three patients recurred : 1 at local, 1 in distant site and 1 with local and distant site. Toxicity for the combination therapy was not excessive. These results are preliminary, but definitely encouraging in view of markedly improved response rate compared with the results of historical control group.

  4. High mobility group B1 impairs hepatocyte regeneration in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Runkuan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acetaminophen (APAP overdose induces massive hepatocyte necrosis. Necrotic tissue releases high mobility group B1 (HMGB1, and HMGB1 contributes to liver injury. Even though blockade of HMGB1 does not protect against APAP-induced acute liver injury (ALI at 9 h time point, the later time points are not studied and the role of HMGB1 in APAP overdose is unknown, it is possible that neutralization of HMGB1 might improve hepatocyte regeneration. This study aims to test whether blockade of HMGB1 improves hepatocyte regeneration after APAP overdose. Methods Male C57BL/6 mice were treated with a single dose of APAP (350 mg/kg. 2 hrs after APAP administration, the APAP challenged mice were randomized to receive treatment with either anti-HMGB1 antibody (400 μg per dose or non-immune (sham IgG every 24 hours for a total of 2 doses. Results 24 hrs after APAP injection, anti-HMGB1 therapy instead of sham IgG therapy significantly improved hepatocyte regeneration microscopically; 48 hrs after APAP challenge, the sham IgG treated mice showed 14.6% hepatic necrosis; in contrast, blockade of HMGB1 significantly decreased serum transaminases (ALT and AST, markedly reduced the number of hepatic inflammatory cells infiltration and restored liver structure to nearly normal; this beneficial effect was associated with enhanced hepatic NF-κB DNA binding and increased the expression of cyclin D1, two important factors related to hepatocyte regeneration. Conclusion HMGB1 impairs hepatocyte regeneration after APAP overdose; Blockade of HMGB1 enhances liver recovery and may present a novel therapy to treat APAP overdose.

  5. Late Byzantine mineral soda high alumina glasses from Asia Minor: a new primary glass production group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schibille, Nadine

    2011-04-19

    The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey) that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA) and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS). The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor.

  6. Late Byzantine mineral soda high alumina glasses from Asia Minor: a new primary glass production group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Schibille

    Full Text Available The chemical characterisation of archaeological glass allows the discrimination between different glass groups and the identification of raw materials and technological traditions of their production. Several lines of evidence point towards the large-scale production of first millennium CE glass in a limited number of glass making factories from a mixture of Egyptian mineral soda and a locally available silica source. Fundamental changes in the manufacturing processes occurred from the eight/ninth century CE onwards, when Egyptian mineral soda was gradually replaced by soda-rich plant ash in Egypt as well as the Islamic Middle East. In order to elucidate the supply and consumption of glass during this transitional period, 31 glass samples from the assemblage found at Pergamon (Turkey that date to the fourth to fourteenth centuries CE were analysed by electron microprobe analysis (EPMA and by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS. The statistical evaluation of the data revealed that the Byzantine glasses from Pergamon represent at least three different glass production technologies, one of which had not previously been recognised in the glass making traditions of the Mediterranean. While the chemical characteristics of the late antique and early medieval fragments confirm the current model of glass production and distribution at the time, the elemental make-up of the majority of the eighth- to fourteenth-century glasses from Pergamon indicate the existence of a late Byzantine glass type that is characterised by high alumina levels. Judging from the trace element patterns and elevated boron and lithium concentrations, these glasses were produced with a mineral soda different to the Egyptian natron from the Wadi Natrun, suggesting a possible regional Byzantine primary glass production in Asia Minor.

  7. Seroprevalence and risk factors for brucellosis in a high-risk group of individuals in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, A K M Anisur; Dirk, Berkvens; Fretin, David; Saegerman, Claude; Ahmed, Muzahed Uddin; Muhammad, Noor; Hossain, Akram; Abatih, Emmanuel

    2012-03-01

    Brucellosis is an occupational hazard of livestock farmers, dairy workers, veterinarians, slaughterhouse workers, and laboratory personnel, all of whom are considered to belong to the high-risk occupational group (HROG). A study was undertaken to determine the seroprevalence of brucellosis, identify risk factors associated with brucellosis seropositivity, and detect Brucella at genus level using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) among people in the HROG in the Dhaka division of Bangladesh. A sample of 500 individuals from the HROG was collected from three districts of Dhaka division of Bangladesh. A multiple random effects logistic regression model was used to identify potential risk factors. Two types of real-time PCR methods were applied to detect Brucella genus-specific DNA using serum from seropositive patients. The prevalence of brucellosis based on the three tests was observed to be 4.4% based on a parallel interpretation. The results of the multiple random effects logistic regression analysis with random intercept for district revealed that the odds of brucellosis seropositivity among individuals who had been in contact with livestock for more than 26 years was about 14 times higher as compared to those who had less than 5 years of contact with livestock. In addition, when the contact was with goats, the odds of brucellosis seropositivity were about 60 times higher as compared to when contact was with cattle only. Noticeable variation in brucellosis seropositivity among humans within the three districts was noted. All of the 13 individuals who tested positive for the serological tests were also positive in two types of real-time PCR using the same serum samples. Livestock farmers of brucellosis positive herds had a significantly higher probability to be seropositive for brucellosis. The study emphasized that contact with livestock, especially goats, is a significant risk factor for the transmission of brucellosis among individuals in the HROG.

  8. High mobility group box 1 protein: possible pathogenic link to atrial fibrillation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Xiao-rong; WANG Xiao-hong; LIU Hue-fen; ZHOU Wen-jie; JIANG Hong

    2012-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained dysrhythmia in clinical practice.The bulk of evidence suggests that inflammatory processes,oxidative stress and matrix metalloproteinase are associated with development of AF.However,these agents may be involved in high mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1).We hypothesized that HMGB1 may be a possible pathogenic link to AF.A growing body of evidence supports these hypotheses.First,the level of serum HMGB1 is significantly increased in patients with AF including paroxysmal and persistent AF.Second,HMGB1 has been identified as a new pro-inflammatory cytokine in cardiovascular diseases,along with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α,interleukin (IL)-6,and C-reactive protein,and there is cross-talk between HMGB1 and inflammatory cytokines.Third,oxidative stress is involved in the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine,HMGB1,indicating there is cross-talk between oxidative stress and inflammation,and oxidative stress may reinforce the effect of inflammation on the pathogenesis of AF and inflammation may play a more important role in the pathogenesis of AF.Fourth,HMGB1 can promote matrix metalloproteinase-9 upregulation and activation.Fifth,HMGB1 receptors (receptor for advanced glycation end products,Toll-like receptor-2,4) may mediate the atrial structural remodeling or be up-regulated in patients with non-valvular AF.These results suggest that HMGB1 may participate in the pathogenesis of AF and provide a potential target for pharmacological interruption of AF.

  9. Cardiac nuclear high mobility group box 1 prevents the development of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funayama, Akira; Shishido, Tetsuro; Netsu, Shunsuke; Narumi, Taro; Kadowaki, Shinpei; Takahashi, Hiroki; Miyamoto, Takuya; Watanabe, Tetsu; Woo, Chang-Hoon; Abe, Jun-ichi; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Nakao, Kazuwa; Takeishi, Yasuchika; Kubota, Isao

    2013-09-01

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is an abundant and ubiquitous nuclear DNA-binding protein that has multiple functions dependent on its cellular location. HMGB1 binds to DNA, facilitating numerous nuclear functions including maintenance of genome stability, transcription, and repair. However, little is known about the effects of nuclear HMGB1 on cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. The aim of this study was to examine whether nuclear HMGB1 plays a role in the development of cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload. Analysis of human biopsy samples by immunohistochemistry showed decreased nuclear HMGB1 expression in failing hearts compared with normal hearts. Nuclear HMGB1 decreased in response to both endothelin-1 (ET-1) and angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulation in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes, where nuclear HMGB1 was acetylated and translocated to the cytoplasm. Overexpression of nuclear HMGB1 attenuated ET-1 induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Thoracic transverse aortic constriction (TAC) was performed in transgenic mice with cardiac-specific overexpression of HMGB1 (HMGB1-Tg) and wild-type (WT) mice. Cardiac hypertrophy after TAC was attenuated in HMGB1-Tg mice and the survival rate after TAC was higher in HMGB1-Tg mice than in WT mice. Induction of foetal cardiac genes was decreased in HMGB1-Tg mice compared with WT mice. Nuclear HMGB1 expression was preserved in HMGB1-Tg mice compared with WT mice and significantly attenuated DNA damage after TAC was attenuated in HMGB1-TG mice. These results suggest that the maintenance of stable nuclear HMGB1 levels prevents hypertrophy and heart failure by inhibiting DNA damage.

  10. Socialization of Physical and Social Aggression in Early Adolescents' Peer Groups: High-Status Peers, Individual Status, and Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bing; Xie, Hongling

    2012-01-01

    The influence of high-status peers on a target individual's physical and manipulative social aggression in peer groups was examined in a diverse sample of seventh-grade students. A total of 245 individual members belonging to 65 groups were included in analyses. Aggression was assessed by peer and victim nominations in the fall and spring…

  11. The Effects of Individual or Group Guidelines on the Calibration Accuracy and Achievement of High School Biology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bol, Linda; Hacker, Douglas J.; Walck, Camilla C.; Nunnery, John A.

    2012-01-01

    A 2 x 2 factorial design was employed in a quasi-experiment to investigate the effects of guidelines in group or individual settings on the calibration accuracy and achievement of 82 high school biology students. Significant main effects indicated that calibration practice with guidelines and practice in group settings increased prediction and…

  12. Direct experimental and numerical determination of extremely high group indices in photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Rune Shim; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2005-01-01

    We report on time-of-flight experimental measurements and numerical calculations of the group-index dispersion in a photonic crystal waveguide realized in silicon-on-insulator material. Experimentally group indices higher than 230 has been observed. Numerical 2D and 3D time-domain simulations show...

  13. 600,000t/a High-Precision Aluminum Project of Yulian Group was Completed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2016-01-01

    On January 11,Yulian Group 600,000t/a highprecision aluminum project was completed and launched into production,and entered production stage.It has been learned that,the production launching of this project signaled that Yulian Group became China’s first

  14. Quasi-isometric classification of some high dimensional right-angled Artin groups

    CERN Document Server

    Behrstock, Jason A; Neumann, Walter D

    2009-01-01

    In this note we give the quasi-isometry classification for a class of right angled Artin groups. In particular, we obtain the first such classification for a class of Artin groups with dimension larger than 2; our families exist in every dimension.

  15. Plasma high-mobility group box 1 levels predict mortality after ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten V; Pedersen, Sune; Møgelvang, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    We evaluated the potential association between plasma high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) levels and outcome in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention.......We evaluated the potential association between plasma high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) levels and outcome in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated with primary percutaneous coronary intervention....

  16. Validation of a blood group genotyping method based on high-resolution melting curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Tianxiang; Hong, Ying; Wang, Naihong; Fu, Xuemei; Zhou, Changhua

    2014-01-01

    The detection of polymorphism is the basis of blood group genotyping and phenotype prediction. Genotyping may be useful to determine blood groups when serologic results are unclear. The development and application of different methods for blood group genotyping may be needed as a substitute for blood group typing. The purpose of this study is to establish an approach for blood group genotyping based on a melting curve analysis of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Using DNA extracted from whole blood, we developed and validated a DNA typing method for detecting DO*01/DO*02, DO*01/DI*02, LU*01/LU*02, and GYPB*03/GYBP*04 alleles using a melting curve analysis. All assays were confirmed with a commercial reagent containing sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP), and a cohort of the samples was confirmed with sequencing. Results for all blood groups were within the range of specificity and assay variability. Genotypes of 300 blood donors were fully consistent with PCR-SSP data. The obtained genotype distribution is in complete concordance with existing data for the Chinese population. There are several advantages for this approach of blood group genotyping: lower contamination rates with PCR products in this laboratory, ease of performance, automation potential, and rapid cycling time.

  17. Risk perception, preventive behaviors, and vaccination coverage in the Korean population during the 2009-2010 pandemic influenza A (H1N1: comparison between high-risk group and non-high-risk group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Yeon Heo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study was carried out to estimate the vaccination coverage, public perception, and preventive behaviors against pandemic influenza A (H1N1 and to understand the motivation and barriers to vaccination between high-risk and non-high-risk groups during the outbreak of pandemic influenza A (H1N1. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cross-sectional nationwide telephone survey of 1,650 community-dwelling Korean adults aged 19 years and older was conducted in the later stage of the 2009-2010 pandemic influenza A (H1N1 outbreak. The questionnaire identified the demographics, vaccination status of participants and all household members, barriers to non-vaccination, perceived threat, and preventive behaviors. In Korea, the overall rate of pandemic influenza vaccination coverage in the surveyed population was 15.5%; vaccination coverage in the high-risk group and non-high-risk group was 47.3% and 8.0%, respectively. In the high-risk group, the most important triggering event for vaccination was receiving a notice from a public health organization. In the non-high-risk group, vaccination was more strongly influenced by previous experience with influenza or mass media campaigns. In both groups, the most common reasons for not receiving vaccination was that their health was sufficient to forgo the vaccination, and lack of time. There was no significant difference in how either group perceived the threat or adopted preventive behavior. The predictive factors for pandemic influenza vaccination were being elderly (age ≥ 65 years, prior seasonal influenza vaccination, and chronic medical disease. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: With the exception of vaccination coverage, the preventive behaviors of the high-risk group were not different from those of the non-high-risk group during the 2009-2010 pandemic. For future pandemic preparedness planning, it is crucial to reinforce preventive behaviors to avoid illness before vaccination and to increase

  18. Designing Organisations in the CCI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolsteeg, Johan; Smulders, Frido; Bohemia, Eric; Rieple, Alison; Liedtka, Jeanne; Cooper, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the application of the IDER-model, that combines design thinking and design related implementation theories that take the potential conflicting value systems into account as well as a focus on the subsequent realization of associated organizational changes. An additional chal

  19. The Carbon City Index (CCI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Britta; Straatman, Bas; Mangalagiu, Diana

    This paper presents a consumption-based Carbon City Index for CO2 emissions in a city. The index is derived from regional consumption and not from regional production. It includes imports and exports of emissions, factual emission developments, green investments as well as low carbon city...... development policies and stakeholder engagement. The index is based on a multi-region input-output model used in most parts of the world for more than half a century. We demonstrate the index through comparative case studies of three Danish regions: a rural region with a city center, the municipality...... of Sønderborg, a mid-sized city region, the municipality of Odense, and a metropolitan area, the municipality of Copenhagen. We demonstrate how city initiatives implemented to reduce emissions are translated into easy to access input-output parameters changes and how the index transparently assesses...

  20. Designing organizations in the CCI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolsteeg, J.; Smulders, F.E.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Drastic cuts in government budgets will force cultural organizations to reconsider their position by initiating internal discussions on how to avert the risk of these cuts. In order to avoid gradual withering of their proposition, cultural organizations will increasingly search for new organizationa

  1. Highly dispersed Pd nanoparticles on chemically modified graphene with aminophenyl groups for formic acid oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Su-Dong; Shen, Cheng-Min; Tong, Hao; He, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Gang; Gao, Hong-Jun

    2011-11-01

    A novel electrode material based on chemically modified graphene (CMG) with aminophenyl groups is covalently functionalized by a nucleophilic ring-opening reaction between the epoxy groups of graphene oxide and the aminophenyl groups of p-phenylenediamine. Palladium nanoparticles with an average diameter of 4.2 nm are deposited on the CMG by a liquid-phase borohydride reduction. The electrocatalytic activity and stability of the Pd/CMG composite towards formic acid oxidation are found to be higher than those of reduced graphene oxide and commercial carbon materials such as Vulcan XC-72 supported Pd electrocatalysts.

  2. SPATIAL COMPATIBLE USER GROUPING ALGORITHM FOR MULTIUSER MIMO SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Lei; Niu Zhisheng

    2007-01-01

    A spatial compatible user grouping algorithm is proposed to reduce CoChannel Interference (CCI) in Space Division Multiple Access (SDMA) multiuser Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO)systems. We evaluate the interferences among users by use of distances between row spaces spanned by users' channel matrixes, then control frequency sharing according to the compatible user grouping algorithm. Results show that the row space distance algorithm outperforms others because it can fully utilize the information from users' channel matrixes, especially the matrix structure information. The results also prove that the algorithm based on channel matrix structure analysis is a better candidate for spatial compatibility approximation.

  3. The weakness of strong ties : Collective action failure in a highly cohesive group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flache, A; Macy, MW

    1996-01-01

    Following Homans, exchange theorists have modeled informal social control as an exchange of peer approval for compliance with group obligations. The exchange model predicts higher compliance in cohesive networks with strong social ties. However, previous specifications failed to incorporate bilatera

  4. The Unusually High Halo Concentration of the Fossil Group NGC 6482: Evidence for Weak Adiabatic Contraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buote, David A.

    2017-01-01

    Although fossil galaxy systems are thought to be very old, and thus should possess above-average halo concentrations, typically fossils have unexceptional concentrations of their masses. We revisit the massive isolated elliptical galaxy/fossil group NGC 6482 for which previous X-ray studies of a modest Chandra observation obtained a very uncertain, but also possibly very high, halo concentration. We present new measurements of the hot gas surface brightness, temperature, and iron abundance using the modest Chandra observation and a previously unpublished Suzaku observation, the latter of which allows the measurements of the gas properties to be extended out to ∼ {r}2500. By constructing hydrostatic equilibrium models of the gas with separate components for the gas, the stellar mass of the large central galaxy (BCG), and the dark matter (DM), we measure {c}200=32.2+/- 7.1 and {M}200=(4.5+/- 0.6)× {10}12 {M}ȯ using a Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) DM profile. For a halo of this mass, the measured concentration c200 exceeds the mean value (7.1) expected for relaxed ΛCDM halos by 3.5σ in terms of the observational error, and by 6σ considering the intrinsic scatter in the ΛCDM c–M relation, which situates NGC 6482 as the most extreme outlier known for a fossil system. We explored several variants of adiabatic contraction (AC) models and, while the AC models provide fits of the same quality as the uncontracted models, they do have the following advantages: (1) lower c200 that is less of an outlier in the ΛCDM c–M relation, and (2) baryon fractions ({f}{{b},200}) that agree better with the mean cosmic value. While the standard AC prescriptions yield a BCG stellar mass that is uncomfortably low compared to results from stellar population synthesis (SPS) models, a weaker AC variant that artificially shuts off cooling and star formation at z = 2 yields the same stellar mass as the uncontracted models. These are probably the reasons why our X-ray analysis prefers this

  5. Grouping of Persistent Scatterers in high-resolution SAR data of urban scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunert, Alexander; Soergel, Uwe

    2012-09-01

    Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) is a technique to simultaneously estimate surface deformation and 3D structure from stacks of SAR images. It was proposed first about one decade ago to monitor preferably urban areas, where in general the highest numbers of PS are found. At that time no high-resolution satellite SAR data were available. Instead, for example, stacks of ERS imagery were used providing ground range resolution of about 25 m. In data of such kind only the strongest PS can be detected, which are usually caused by corner reflectors built by orthogonal building and road planes of considerable size, whereas smaller structures causing weaker ones signal are averaged by clutter or mutually interfere with others in the same resolution cell. Thus, if any, only a few or even just one single PS are found per building. The advent of a new senor generation of systems like TerraSAR-X and COSMO-Skymed in 2007 led to a significant improvement of spatial resolution of about one order of magnitude. This comes along with a dramatic rise of PS density: In some cases tens to hundreds are detected at large buildings, which offers the possibility to monitor even individual urban objects. In addition, especially at building façades the distribution of those PS is often quite regular. A reason for that is the usually rectilinear arrangement of façade structures inducing PS like windows or balconies. Those patterns contain a lot of information about the objects under investigation, which is mostly ignored in current PSI processing schemes. For example, consider a regular structure of windows on a certain façade of a multi-story building. Assuming the same kind of structure generates one single PS at each window, the phase centers of all scatterers caused by windows of each floor share the same height. This means, we may benefit from such kind of redundancy, for instance, to improve the height estimate by averaging over PS having the same elevation. In this work, we

  6. High mobility group protein DSP1 negatively regulates HSP70 transcription in Crassostrea hongkongensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Zongyu; Xu, Delin; Cui, Miao; Zhang, Qizhong, E-mail: zhangqzdr@126.com

    2016-06-10

    HSP70 acts mostly as a molecular chaperone and plays important roles in facilitating the folding of nascent peptides as well as the refolding or degradation of the denatured proteins. Under stressed conditions, the expression level of HSP70 is upregulated significantly and rapidly, as is known to be achieved by various regulatory factors controlling the transcriptional level. In this study, a high mobility group protein DSP1 was identified by DNA-affinity purification from the nuclear extracts of Crassostrea hongkongensis using the ChHSP70 promoter as a bait. The specific interaction between the prokaryotically expressed ChDSP1 and the FITC-labeled ChHSP70 promoter was confirmed by EMSA analysis. ChDSP1 was shown to negatively regulate ChHSP70 promoter expression by Luciferase Reporter Assay in the heterologous HEK293T cells. Both ChHSP70 and ChDSP1 transcriptions were induced by either thermal or CdCl{sub 2} stress, while the accumulated expression peaks of ChDSP1 were always slightly delayed when compared with that of ChHSP70. This indicates that ChDSP1 is involved, very likely to exert its suppressive role, in the recovery of the ChHSP70 expression from the induced level to its original state. This study is the first to report negative regulator of HSP70 gene transcription, and provides novel insights into the mechanisms controlling heat shock protein expression. -- Highlights: •HMG protein ChDSP1 shows affinity to ChHSP70 promoter in Crassostrea hongkongensis. •ChDSP1 negatively regulates ChHSP70 transcription. •ChHSP70 and ChDSP1 transcriptions were coordinately induced by thermal/Cd stress. •ChDSP1 may contribute to the recovery of the induced ChHSP70 to its original state. •This is the first report regarding negative regulator of HSP70 transcription.

  7. Impact of the Educational Use of Facebook Group on the High School Students' Proper Usage of Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karal, Hasan; Kokoc, Mehmet; Cakir, Ozlem

    2017-01-01

    This study examines impact of the educational use of Facebook group on the high school students' proper usage of language. The study included thirty students who attend 11th grade in a high school in Trabzon, Turkey. Firstly, preliminary data about Facebook usage of students were obtained to understand the factors that motivate students to use…

  8. Joint retrieval of surface reflectance and aerosol properties from MSG/SEVIRI observations in the framework of aerosol_CCI2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damman, Alix; Zunz, Violette; Govaerts, Yves; Kaminski, Thomas; Voßbeck, Michael

    2016-04-01

    towards a multi-year retrieval over the whole SEVIRI disk. The retrieved aerosol properties will be used in the context of the aerosol_cci2 project. First results will be presented here both over land and sea surfaces and compared with AERONET data. They will demonstrate the capability of PISA to decouple the fraction of the TOA BRF signals coming from the surface reflectance from the one originating from the aerosol scattering.

  9. Four-wave mixing in slow light photonic crystal waveguides with very high group index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juntao; O'Faolain, Liam; Krauss, Thomas F

    2012-07-30

    We report efficient four-wave mixing in dispersion engineered slow light silicon photonic crystal waveguides with a flat band group index of n(g) = 60. Using only 15 mW continuous wave coupled input power, we observe a conversion efficiency of -28 dB. This efficiency represents a 30 dB enhancement compared to a silicon nanowire of the same length. At higher powers, thermal redshifting due to linear absorption was found to detune the slow light regime preventing the expected improvement in efficiency. We then overcome this thermal limitation by using oxide-clad waveguides, which we demonstrate for group indices of ng = 30. Higher group indices may be achieved with oxide clad-waveguides, and we predict conversion efficiencies approaching -10 dB, which is equivalent to that already achieved in silicon nanowires but for a 50x shorter length.

  10. Symmetry group prerequisite for E-infinity in high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Naschie, M.S. [Department of Physics, Alexandria University (United Kingdom); KACST, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Department of Astrophysics, Cairo University, Cairo (Egypt)], E-mail: Chaossf@aol.com

    2008-01-15

    The work addresses the question of extending certain symplectic and exceptional Lie Symmetry groups to the realm of chaotic dynamics. Using a collection of simple examples, the technique of transfinite continuation is illustrated and various physically relevant results are obtained. The paper is intended as an elementary introduction to the use of symmetry groups in transfinite physics and as such is a sequel to a series of previous papers constituting the elementary and advanced mathematical prerequisite for a proper understanding of E-infinity theory.

  11. Non-asymptotic Oracle Inequalities for the Lasso and Group Lasso in high dimensional logistic model

    CERN Document Server

    Kwemou, Marius

    2012-01-01

    We consider the problem of estimating a function $f_{0}$ in logistic regression model. We propose to estimate this function $f_{0}$ by a sparse approximation build as a linear combinaison of elements of a given dictionary of $p$ functions. This sparse approximation is selected by the Lasso or Group Lasso procedure. In this context, we state non asymptotique oracle inequalities for Lasso and Group Lasso under restricted eigenvalues assumption as introduced in \\cite{BRT}. Those theoretical results are illustrated through a simulation study.

  12. Group Music Intervention Reduces Aggression and Improves Self-Esteem in Children with Highly Aggressive Behavior: A Pilot Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ae-Na Choi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the effects of group music intervention on aggression and self-esteem in children with highly aggressive behavior. Forty-eight children were allocated to either a music intervention group or an untreated control group. The music intervention group received 50 min of music intervention twice weekly for 15 consecutive weeks. The outcome measures were Child Behavior Checklist Aggression Problems Scale (Parents, Child Aggression Assessment Inventory (Teachers and Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale. After 15 weeks, the music intervention group showed significant reduction of aggression and improvement of self-esteem compared with the control group. All outcome measures were significantly lower in the music intervention group than prior to treatment, while there was no change in the control group. These findings suggest that music can reduce aggressive behavior and improve self-esteem in children with highly aggressive behavior. Music intervention is an easily accessible therapy for children and as such may be an effective intervention for aggressive behavior. Further more, objective and replicable measures are required from a randomized controlled trial with a larger sample size and active comparable control.

  13. High-Grade Color Offset Paper of Xinya Paper Group Started Operation Successfully

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    On March 5th, the 3150 mm paper machine of Xinya Paper Group started the operation successfully. Originally, the paper machine produced ordinary culture paper, using mixed straw and wood pulp as the raw material. With the market demand shift toward higher quality, the original products produced can no longer meet the requirements.

  14. First Things First: Anger Management Group Work in a Mainstream High School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Martin; O'Gorman, Shannon

    2017-01-01

    In an attempt to support the emotional development and behavioural choices of young students in grades 7-10, a six session therapeutic group programme was devised--culminating in a written manual to enable future replication of the programme. This pilot programme was introduced as a once-weekly, morning session aimed at prioritising a student's…

  15. A highly conserved neutralizing epitope on group 2 influenza A viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ekiert, D.C.; Friesen, R.H.E.; Bhanha, G.; Kwaks, T.; Jongeneelen, M.; Yu, W.; Ophorst, C.; Cox, F.; Korse, H.J.W.M.; Brandenburg, B.; Vogels, R.; Brakenhoff, J.P.J.; Kompier, R.; Koldijk, M.H.; Cornelissen, A.H.M.; Poon, L.L.M.; Peiris, M.; Koudstaal, W.; Wilson, I.A.; Goudsmit, J.

    2011-01-01

    Current flu vaccines provide only limited coverage against seasonal strains of influenza viruses. The identification of VH1-69 antibodies that broadly neutralize almost all influenza A group 1 viruses constituted a breakthrough in the influenza field. Here, we report the isolation and characterizati

  16. High School Students and Online Commemoration of the Group's Cultural Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Alon; Hirsch, Tal Litvak

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the interaction of three equivalent issues: education, cultural trauma and the Internet. Theory suggests that the educational system plays an important role in the transmission and maintenance of the memory of a group's defining cultural trauma. However little is empirically known of the ways education influences the attitudes…

  17. Acidobacteria form a coherent but highly diverse group within the bacterial domain: evidence from environmental genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaiser, Achim; Ochsenreiter, Torsten; Lanz, Christa;

    2003-01-01

    Acidobacteria have been established as a novel phylum of Bacteria that is consistently detected in many different habitats around the globe by 16S rDNA-based molecular surveys. The phylogenetic diversity, ubiquity and abundance of this group, particularly in soil habitats, suggest an important...

  18. High School Students and Online Commemoration of the Group's Cultural Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Alon; Hirsch, Tal Litvak

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the interaction of three equivalent issues: education, cultural trauma and the Internet. Theory suggests that the educational system plays an important role in the transmission and maintenance of the memory of a group's defining cultural trauma. However little is empirically known of the ways education influences the attitudes…

  19. Using Group Projects as a Strategy to Increase Cooperation among Low- and High-Achieving Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh Pham, Thi Hong

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the perceptions, interactions and behaviours of different-ability college students when they worked on different types of assessments. Two classes of 145 Vietnamese college students participated in this three-month study. The students were assigned to mixed-ability groups, each of which consisted of five students.…

  20. Seroepidemiological Study of Brucellosis in High Risk Groups in Boyerahmad 1384

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AM Khosravani

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Introduction & Objective: Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease that may have a major public health and economic impact in most countries. The disease appears as a Malt fever in humans and abortion in animals. This study was designed to determine the serologic titer of Brucella in high risk and non high risk people in Boyerahmad. Materials & Methods: A retrospective seroepidemiological study was performed on samples collected from 604 high risk and non high risk people using Rose Bengol test, tube standard test as a rapid test and 2 mercaptoethanol (2ME and comb's wright as a confirmatory test. The data collected were analyzed by X2 test via SPSS. Results: Seroprevalence of Brucellosis in high risk people appeared to be high in the Rose Bengal and tube standard test (TST 6.62 at titer ≥1/40 whereas for non high risk it was 0%. Confirmation test in high risk people was shown with 2ME in four people. Conclusion: Brucellosis is a major cause of disease in high risk people which can be due to direct or indirect contact with diary products of the related animals.

  1. Highly porous organic polymers bearing tertiary amine group and their exceptionally high CO{sub 2} uptake capacities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Ruth; Bhaumik, Asim, E-mail: msab@iacs.res.in

    2015-02-15

    We report a very simple and unique strategy for synthesis of a tertiary amine functionalized high surface area porous organic polymer (POP) PDVTA-1 through the co-polymerization of monomers divinylbenzene (DVB) and triallylamine (TAA) under solvothermal reaction conditions. Two different PDVTA-1 samples have been synthesized by varying the molar ratio of the monomers. The porous polymeric materials have been thoroughly characterized by solid state {sup 13}C CP MAS-NMR, FT-IR and UV–vis spectroscopy, N{sub 2} sorption, HR TEM and FE SEM to understand its chemical environment, nanostructure, bonding, morphology and related surface properties. PDVTA-1 with higher amine content (DVB/TAA=4.0) showed exceptionally high CO{sub 2} uptake capacity of 85.8 wt% (19.5 mmol g{sup −1}) at 273 K and 43.69 wt% (9.93 mmol g{sup −1}) at 298 K under 3 bar pressure, whereas relatively low amine loaded material (DVB/TAA=7.0) shows uptake capacity of 59.2 wt% (13.45 mmol g{sup −1}) at 273 K and 34.36 wt% (7.81 mmol g{sup −1}) at 298 K. Highly porous nanostructure together with very high surface area and basicity at the surface due to the presence of abundant basic tertiary amine N-sites in the framework of PDVTA-1 could be responsible for very high CO{sub 2} adsorption. - Graphical abstract: Exceptionally high CO2 uptake (85.8 wt % at 273 K) has been observed over a high surface area porous organic polymer PDVTA-1 synthesized through copolymerization of divinylbenzene and triallyl amine. - Highlights: • Designing the synthesis of a new N-rich cross-linked porous organic polymer PDVTA-1. • PDVTA-1 showed mesoporosity with very high surface area of 903 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. • High surface area and presence of basic sites facilitates the CO{sub 2} uptake. • PDVTA-1 showed exceptionally high CO{sub 2} adsorption capacity of 85.8 wt% at 273 K, 3 bar pressure.

  2. Do High Ability Learners Enjoy Learning Alone "or" in Groups? It Depends....

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanevsky, Lannie

    2015-01-01

    Pedagogical shifts favouring collaborative learning and findings of recent studies have raised concerns regarding the claim that gifted students prefer to learn alone. The purpose of this study was to further investigate if, when and how high ability learners want to work with or without others. The distributions of 416 high ability students (n =…

  3. Patterns and Factors of High School Dropout Risks of Racial and Linguistic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunha; Chang, Mido; Singh, Kusum; Allen, Katherine R.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the dropout trajectories of racial and linguistic minority students and explored the effects of students' contextual factors on their high school dropout risks. Our motivation was to identify the dropout patterns of Black, Hispanic, and Hispanic English language learner (ELL) students, who have comparatively high dropout rates,…

  4. Extraction of Roof Lines from High-Resolution Images by a Grouping Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Poz, A. P.; Fernandes, V. J. M.

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a method for extracting groups of straight lines that represent roof boundaries and roof ridgelines from highresolution aerial images using corresponding Airborne Laser Scanner (ALS) roof polyhedrons as initial approximations. The proposed method is based on two main steps. First, straight lines that are candidates to represent roof ridgelines and roof boundaries of a building are extracted from the aerial image. Second, a group of straight lines that represent roof boundaries and roof ridgelines of a selected building is obtained through the optimization of a Markov Random Field (MRF)-based energy function using the genetic algorithm optimization method. The formulation of this energy function considers several attributes, such as the proximity of the extracted straight lines to the corresponding projected ALS-derived roof polyhedron and the rectangularity (extracted straight lines that intersect at nearly 90°). Experimental results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  5. ICE CRAWLERS (GRYLLOBLATTODEA – THE HISTORY OF THE INVESTIGATION OF A HIGHLY UNUSUAL GROUP OF INSECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Wipfler

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Grylloblattodea are one of the most unusual groups of insects and the second smallest order. All known extant species are wingless and exhibit a remarkable preference for cold temperatures. Although their morphology was intensively investigated shortly after their discovery, the systematic position has been disputed for a long time. The placement of Grylloblattodea as sister-group to the recently described Mantophasamtodea is supported by morphological and molecular evidence. However, the relationships of this clade, Xenonomia, among the polyneopteran lineages is not clear. Transcriptome analyses, in addition to the study of winged grylloblattodean fossils, may help to clarify the position of Xenonomia and aid in the reconstruction of the “phylogenetic backbone” of Polyneoptera.

  6. Acidobacteria form a coherent but highly diverse group within the bacterial domain: evidence from environmental genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaiser, Achim; Ochsenreiter, Torsten; Lanz, Christa

    2003-01-01

    Acidobacteria have been established as a novel phylum of Bacteria that is consistently detected in many different habitats around the globe by 16S rDNA-based molecular surveys. The phylogenetic diversity, ubiquity and abundance of this group, particularly in soil habitats, suggest an important...... insert libraries directly from DNA of a calcerous grassland soil. Genomic fragments of Acidobacteria were identified with specific 16S rDNA probes and sequence analyses of six independently identified clones were performed, representing in total more than 210,000 bp. The 16S rRNA genes of the genomic...... fragments differed between 2.3% and 19.9% and were placed into two different subgroups of Acidobacteria (groups III and V). Although partial co-linearity was found between genomic fragments, the gene content around the rRNA operons was generally not conserved. Phylogenetic reconstructions with orthologues...

  7. Nutrient-dense food groups have high energy costs: an econometric approach to nutrient profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillot, Matthieu; Darmon, Nicole; Darmon, Michel; Lafay, Lionel; Drewnowski, Adam

    2007-07-01

    Consumers wishing to replace some of the foods in their diets with more nutrient-dense options need to be able to identify such foods on the basis of nutrient profiling. The present study used nutrient profiling to rank 7 major food groups and 25 subgroups in terms of their contribution to dietary energy, diet quality, and diet cost for 1332 adult participants in the French National INCA1 Study. Nutrient profiles were based on the presence of 23 qualifying nutrients, expressed as the percentage of nutrient adequacy per 8 MJ, and 3 negative or disqualifying nutrients, expressed as the percentage of the maximal recommended values for saturated fatty acids, added sugar, and sodium per 1.4 kg. Calculated cost of energy (euro/8 MJ) was based on the mean retail price of 619 foods in the nutrient composition database. The meat and the fruit and vegetables food groups had the highest nutritional quality but were associated with highest energy costs. Sweets and salted snacks had the lowest nutritional quality but were also one of the least expensive sources of dietary energy. Starches and grains were unique because they were low in disqualifying nutrients yet provided low-cost dietary energy. Within each major food group, some subgroups had a higher nutritient-to-price ratio than others. However, the fact that food groups with the more favorable nutrient profiles were also associated with higher energy costs suggests that the present structure of food prices may be a barrier to the adoption of food-based dietary guidelines, at least by low-income households.

  8. New Atomic Data for Doubly Ionized Iron Group Atoms by High Resolution UV Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter L.; Pickering, Juliet C.; Thorne, A. P.

    2002-01-01

    Currently available laboratory spectroscopic data of doubly ionized iron-group element were obtained about 50 years ago using spectrographs of modest dispersion, photographic plates, and eye estimates of intensities. The accuracy of the older wavelength data is about 10 mAngstroms at best, whereas wavelengths are now needed to an accuracy of 1 part in 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 7) (0.2 to 2 mAngstroms at 2000 Angstroms). The Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy group at Imperial College, London, and collaborators at the Harvard College Observatory have used a unique VUV FT spectrometer in a program focussed on improving knowledge of spectra of many neutral and singly and doubly ionized, astrophysically important, iron group elements. Spectra of Fe II and Fe III have been recorded at UV and VUV wavelengths with signal-to-noise ratios of several hundred for the stronger lines. Wavelengths and energy levels for Fe III are an order of magnitude more accurate than previous work; analysis is close to completion. f-values for Fe II have been published.

  9. Test anxiety, coping strategies, and perceived health in a group of high school students: a Turkish sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aysan, F; Thompson, D; Hamarat, E

    2001-12-01

    A group of high school juniors and a group of high school seniors in Izmir, Turkey completed measures of test anxiety, coping skills, and perceived health status both before and after a major exam period. Students with high test anxiety used less effective coping mechanisms and tended to have poorer perceptions of their health. Prior to the exams, juniors displayed higher test anxiety and used less effective coping mechanisms than seniors. After the exam periods, improvements were seen for both age groups on perceived health, but scores of younger students remained significantly higher than scores of seniors on one of the key measures of test anxiety. Results of the study lend support to those of previous studies done in other cultural contexts, and findings have implications for the development of interventions designed to help students cope with stress.

  10. Pastoral Group Counselling at a High Security Prison in Israel: Integrating Pierre Janet's Psychological Analysis with Fritz Perls' Gestalt Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Paul; Brown, Marta

    2015-03-01

    This is a report of a short-term, pastoral counselling group conducted with Jewish internees in a high security prison in Israel. It was held as an adjunct to daily secular individual and group counselling and rehabilitation run by the Department of Social Work. Pastoral counselling employed spiritual and psychosocial methodologies to reduce anger, improve prisoner frustration tolerance, and develop a sense of self-efficacy and communal identity. It combined semi-didactic scriptural input with Pierre Janet's personality model, Fritz Perls' gestalt therapy, and analysis of the group process. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions:sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  11. High-mobility group box protein 1 promotes the survival of myeloid-derived suppressor cells by inducing autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Katherine H; Horn, Lucas A; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2016-09-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells are immune-suppressive cells that are elevated in most individuals with cancer, where their accumulation and suppressive activity are driven by inflammation. As myeloid-derived suppressor cells inhibit anti-tumor immunity and promote tumor progression, we are determining how their viability is regulated. Previous studies have established that the damage-associated molecular pattern molecule high-mobility group box protein 1 drives myeloid-derived suppressor cell accumulation and suppressive potency and is ubiquitously present in the tumor microenvironment. As high-mobility group box protein 1 also facilitates tumor cell survival by inducing autophagy, we sought to determine if high-mobility group box protein 1 regulates myeloid-derived suppressor cell survival through induction of autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy increased the quantity of apoptotic myeloid-derived suppressor cells, demonstrating that autophagy extends the survival and increases the viability of myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Inhibition of high-mobility group box protein 1 similarly increased the level of apoptotic myeloid-derived suppressor cells and reduced myeloid-derived suppressor cell autophagy, demonstrating that in addition to inducing the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells, high-mobility group box protein 1 sustains myeloid-derived suppressor cell viability. Circulating myeloid-derived suppressor cells have a default autophagic phenotype, and tumor-infiltrating myeloid-derived suppressor cells are more autophagic, consistent with the concept that inflammatory and hypoxic conditions within the microenvironment of solid tumors contribute to tumor progression by enhancing immune-suppressive myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Overall, these results demonstrate that in addition to previously recognized protumor effects, high-mobility group box protein 1 contributes to tumor progression by increasing myeloid-derived suppressor cell viability by

  12. High Energy Hadron Colliders - Report of the Snowmass 2013 Frontier Capabilities Hadron Collider Study Group

    CERN Document Server

    Barletta, William; Battaglia, Marco; Klute, Markus; Mangano, Michelangelo; Prestemon, Soren; Rossi, Lucio; Skands, Peter

    2013-01-01

    High energy hadron colliders have been the tools for discovery at the highest mass scales of the energy frontier from the SppS, to the Tevatron and now the LHC. This report reviews future hadron collider projects from the high luminosity LHC upgrade to a 100 TeV hadron collider in a large tunnel, the underlying technology challenges and R&D directions and presents a series of recommendations for the future development of hadron collider research and technology.

  13. The Neural Correlates of In-group and Self-Face Perception: Is There Overlap for High Identifiers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daan eScheepers

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Social identity, the part of the self-concept derived from group membership, is a key explanatory construct for a wide variety of behaviors, ranging from organizational commitment to discrimination towards out-groups. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we examined the neural basis of social identity through a comparison with the neural correlates of self-face perception. Participants viewed a series of pictures, one at a time, of themselves, a familiar other, in-group members, and out-group members. We created a contrast for self-face perception by subtracting brain activation in response to the familiar other from brain activation in response to the self face, and a contrast for social identity by subtracting brain activation in response to out-group faces from brain activation in response to in-group faces. In line with previous research, for the self—familiar other contrast we found activation in several right-hemisphere regions (inferior frontal gyrus, inferior and superior parietal lobules. In addition, we found activation in closely-adjacent brain areas for the social identity contrast. Importantly, significant clusters of activation in this in-group—out-group contrast only emerged to the extent that participants reported high identification with the in-group. These results suggest that self-perception and social identity depend on partly similar neural processes.

  14. Human RBCs blood group conversion from A to O using a novel α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase of high specific activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU ChengYu; XU Hua; WANG LiSheng; ZHANG JianGeng; ZHANG YangPei

    2008-01-01

    α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (aNAGA) can convert group A human red blood cells (RBCs) to group O. One novel aNAGA gene was cloned by PCR from Elizabethkingia meningosepticum isolated from a domestic clinical sample. Pure recombinant aNAGA was obtained by genetic engineering and protein purification with a calculated molecule of 49.6 kD. aNAGA was selective for terminal a-N-acetylgalacto-samine residue with a high specific activity, aNAGA could completely remove A antigens of 1 U (about 100 mL) group A1 or A2 RBCs in 1 h at pH 6.8 and 25℃ with a consumption of 1.5 or 0.4 mg recombinant enzyme. Enzyme-converted group A RBCs did not agglutinate after being mixed with monoclonal anti-A or sera of groups A, B, AB and O. Other blood group antigens except ABO had no change. FCM analy-sis showed that A antigens and A1 antigens disappeared while H antigens increased. It indicated thataNAGA successfully converted human blood group A RBCs to universally transfusable group O RBCs without the risk of ABO-incompatible transfusion reactions. This aNAGA was suitable for producing universal RBCs to increase clinical transfusion safety, improve the RBCs supply, and to decrease transfusion cost and support transfusion service in case of emergency,

  15. Local Group Dwarf Galaxies and the Star Formation Law at High Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Gnedin, N Yu

    2000-01-01

    I show how the existing observational data on Local Group dwarf galaxies can be used to estimate the average star formation law during the first 3 Gyr of the history of the universe. I find that the observational data are consistent with the orthodox Schmidt law with a star formation efficiency of about 4 percent if the star formation is continuous (during the first 3 Gyr). The efficiency is proportionally higher if most of the gas in the dwarfs was consumed (and never replenished) in a short time interval well before the universe turned 3 Gyr.

  16. CLUES to the past: Local Group progenitors amongst high-redshift Lyman Break Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    dayal, Pratika; Dunlop, James S

    2013-01-01

    We use state-of-the-art numerical simulations to explore the observability and the expected physical properties of the progenitors of the local group galaxies at z=6-8, within 1 billion years of the big bang. We find that the most massive progenitors of the Milky Way (MW) and Andromeda (M31) at z=6 and 7 are predicted to have absolute UV continuum magnitudes between -17 and -18, suggesting that their analogues lie close to the detection limits of the deepest near-infrared surveys conducted to date (i.e. HST WFC3/IR UDF12). This in turn confirms that the majority of currently known z=6-8 galaxies are expected to be the seeds of present-day galaxies which are more massive than L* spirals. We also discuss the properties of the local-group progenitors at these early epochs, extending down to absolute magnitudes M_UV = -13. The most massive MW/M31 progenitors at z=7 have stellar masses of about 10^7.5-8 solar masses, stellar metallicities between 3 and 6% of the solar value, and predicted observed UV continuum slo...

  17. Are African-American High School Students Less Motivated to Learn Spanish than Other Ethnic Groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Comfort

    2012-01-01

    Although there is some evidence in the vague literature available to indicate that African Americans are underrepresented in foreign language studies, this issue has never been investigated with a focus on Spanish. Six hundred and thirty-one students enrolled in high school Spanish in a racially diverse school district in West Texas were surveyed…

  18. Long-term effects of nutritional group education for persons at high cardiovascular risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemelmans, WJE; Broer, J; Hulshof, KFAM; Siero, FW; May, JF; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    Background: Treatment of persons at high risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) should include nutritional counselling, but little is known about the effects of different types of education. Methods: In a quasi-experimental study design the effects of a nutritional education programme (1(st) year:

  19. Long-term effects of nutritional group education for persons at high cardiovascular risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemelmans, WJE; Broer, J; Hulshof, KFAM; Siero, FW; May, JF; Meyboom-de Jong, B

    2004-01-01

    Background: Treatment of persons at high risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) should include nutritional counselling, but little is known about the effects of different types of education. Methods: In a quasi-experimental study design the effects of a nutritional education programme (1(st) year: th

  20. Long-term effects of nutritional group education for persons at high cardiovascular risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bemelmans, W.J.E.; Broer, J.; Hulshof, K.F.A.M.; Siero, F.W.; May, J.F.; Meyboom-de Jong, B.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Treatment of persons at high risk for coronary heart disease (CHD) should include nutritional counselling, but little is known about the effects of different types of education. Methods: In a quasi-experimental study design the effects of a nutritional education programme (1st year: thre

  1. Elliptic Curves of High Rank with Nontrivial Torsion Group over $\\Q$

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    We construct elliptic curves over $\\Q$ of high Mordell--Weil rank, with a nontrivial torsion subgroup. We improve the rank records for the cases $\\Z/2\\Z \\times \\Z/2\\Z$, $\\Z/3\\Z$, $\\Z/4\\Z$, $\\Z/5\\Z$, $\\Z/6\\Z$, $\\Z/7\\Z$ and $\\Z/8\\Z$.

  2. Pathological Behavior of Renormalization-Group Maps at High Fields and Above the Transition Temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enter, Aernout C.D. van; Fernández, Roberto; Kotecký, Roman

    We show that decimation transformations applied to high-q Potts models result in non-Gibbsian measures even for temperatures higher than the transition temperature. We also show that majority transformations applied to the Ising model in a very strong field at low temperatures produce non-Gibbsian

  3. Relations between high and low power groups : The importance of legitimacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hornsey, MJ; Spears, R; Cremers, M.; Hogg, MA

    2003-01-01

    Using a social identity perspective, two experiments examined the effects of power and the legitimacy of power differentials on intergroup bias. In Experiment 1, 125 math-science students were led to believe that they had high or low representation in a university decision-making body relative to so

  4. Phase-specific brain change of spatial working memory processing in genetic and ultra-high risk groups of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jung-Seok; Park, Ji-Young; Jung, Myung Hun; Jang, Joon Hwan; Kang, Do-Hyung; Jung, Wi Hoon; Han, Ji Yeon; Choi, Chi-Hoon; Hong, Kyung Sue; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2012-11-01

    Spatial working memory (WM) processing has 3 distinct phases: encoding, maintenance, and retrieval and its dysfunction is a core feature in schizophrenia. We examined phase-specific brain activations associated with spatial WM in first-degree relatives of schizophrenia (genetic high risk, GHR), ultra-high risk (UHR) subjects, patients with schizophrenia, and healthy controls. We used an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging in 17 GHR subjects, 21 UHR subjects, 15 clinically stable patients with schizophrenia and 16 healthy controls, while subjects were performing a spatial delayed-response task. During the encoding phase, the GHR group showed increased activation in the fronto-parietal regions, whereas the UHR and schizophrenia groups showed significantly less activation in these regions than did the healthy control group. Especially, frontal activation was strongest in GHR subjects, followed by healthy controls, and occurred to a lesser degree in the UHR group, with the least activation occurring in the schizophrenia group. During the maintenance phase, the thalamus showed a differential activation, similar to frontal activation pattern during the encoding phase. During the retrieval phase, no prominent differential activations were found. Increased activations were observed in the superior temporal gyrus during the encoding and maintenance phases in the GHR, UHR, and schizophrenia groups relative to healthy controls. Our findings suggest that functional deficits associated with spatial WM processing emerge in the UHR before the onset of schizophrenia and compensatory neural processes exist in the GHR with genetic liability to schizophrenia.

  5. A Policy Intervention Study to Identify High-Risk Groups to Prevent Industrial Accidents in Republic of Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwan Hyung Yi

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: The manufacturing industry, age over 50 years and workplaces with more than 50 employees showed a high severity level of occupational accidents. Male workers showed a higher severity level of occupational accidents than female workers. The employment period of < 3 years and newly hired workers with a relatively shorter working period are likely to have more occupational accidents than others. Overall, an industrial accident prevention policy must be established by concentrating all available resources and capacities of these high-risk groups.

  6. HIV and sexual risk behaviors among recognized high-risk groups in Bangladesh: need for a comprehensive prevention program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Mofizul; Conigrave, Katherine M

    2008-07-01

    To examine trends in HIV and related risk behaviors among recognized high-risk groups in Bangladesh, the types and extent of prevention initiatives that have been undertaken, and highlight the immediate needs. Journal publications and conference abstracts and proceedings were reviewed. Experts involved in the development and evaluation of current programs or policy were contacted for official reports and policy documents. The trends in sexual risk behaviors over five rounds of national surveillance were tabulated. Gaps in the ongoing prevention interventions have been assessed in the light of the Anderson-May equation. Periodic surveillance on recognized high-risk groups shows that HIV prevalence has been increasing steadily. In the capital city, HIV prevalence in one subset of a high-risk group is close to the level of a concentrated epidemic (4.9%). The high prevalence of sexual risk behaviors among drug users and sex workers and their clients is alarming. Although a small increase in condom use and a reduction of syphilis have been noted among subsets of high-risk groups in recent years, this is clearly not enough to curb the threat of a possible HIV epidemic. There is an urgent need for a comprehensive prevention program that should include more efforts on education and condom promotion, effective management of all sexually transmitted infections, a screening program for migrant workers, the continuation of both behavioral and serological components of HIV surveillance, and the expansion of surveillance to cover the remaining high-risk groups, with due consideration to the consistency of surveillance indicators.

  7. Meeting notes of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) futures group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houser, M.M. [comp.

    1995-08-01

    This report is a compilation of the notes from the ten meetings. The group charter is: (1) to identify and characterize the range of possibilities and necessities for keeping the HFIR operating for at least the next 15 years; (2) to identify and characterize the range of possibilities for enhancing the scientific and technical utility of the HFIR; (3) to evaluate the benefits or impacts of these possibilities on the various scientific fields that use the HFIR or its products; (4) to evaluate the benefits or impacts on the operation and maintenance of the HFIR facility and the regulatory requirements; (5) to estimate the costs, including operating costs, and the schedules, including downtime, for these various possibilities; and one possible impact of proposed changes may be to stimulate increased pressure for a reduced enrichment fuel for HFIR.

  8. Influenza C virus high seroprevalence rates observed in 3 different population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salez, Nicolas; Mélade, Julien; Pascalis, Hervé; Aherfi, Sarah; Dellagi, Koussay; Charrel, Rémi N; Carrat, Fabrice; de Lamballerie, Xavier

    2014-08-01

    The epidemiology of Influenza C virus (FLUCV) infections remains poorly characterised. Here, we have examined the age- and location-specific seroprevalence of antibodies against FLUCV in 1441 sera from metropolitan continental France (Marseille), South-West Indian Ocean French territories (Reunion Island) and United-Kingdom (Edinburgh) using a combination of haemagglutination inhibition, virus neutralisation and ELISA assays. Our results show that immunity to FLUCV is common in all locations studied (global seroprevalence values >50%) and that the first immunising contacts generally occur early in life (i.e., in the 0-4 year-old age group). The latter item is further supported by the detection of FLUCV RNA by RT-PCR in naso-pharyngeal samples collected in patient attending the Emergency Room of the Public hospitals of Marseille, France with a large majority of children under 10 years-old: 17 (60.7%) in children ≤3 yo, 10 (35.7%) in the 4-10 yo age group and 1 (3.6%) in an adult (49yo). The temporal distribution of cases was atypical with regard to influenza (a large proportion of cases occurred in spring and summer) and the clinical presentation was diverse, including but being not limited to classical Influenza-like-Ilnesses. Altogether, our results indicate an intense circulation of FLUCV in the different study areas and an early occurrence of infection in human life. Flu C appears to be a widely under-diagnosed and under-studied human paediatric disease that obviously deserves further clinical and epidemiological characterisation. Copyright © 2014 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Role of high mobility group box-1 and protection of growth hormone and somatostatin in severe acute pancreatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Y.F. [Department of Surgery, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Wu, M. [Department of Surgery, Jinshan Pavilion Forest Hospital, Shanghai (China); Ma, B.J.; Cai, D.A.; Yin, B.B. [Department of Surgery, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai (China)

    2014-09-12

    In this study, we investigated the potential role of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in severe acute pancreatitis (SAP) and the effects of growth hormone (G) and somatostatin (S) in SAP rats. The rats were randomly divided into 6 groups of 20 each: sham-operated, SAP, SAP+saline, SAP+G, SAP+S and SAP+G+S. Ileum and pancreas tissues of rats in each group were evaluated histologically. HMGB1 mRNA expression was measured by reverse transcription-PCR. Levels of circulating TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and endotoxin were also measured. In the SAP group, interstitial congestion and edema, inflammatory cell infiltration, and interstitial hemorrhage occurred in ileum and pancreas tissues. The levels of HMGB1, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6 and endotoxin were significantly up-regulated in the SAP group compared with those in the sham-operated group, and the 7-day survival rate was 0%. In the SAP+G and SAP+S groups, the inflammatory response of the morphological structures was alleviated, the levels of HMGB1, TNF-α, IL-1, IL-6, and endotoxin were significantly decreased compared with those in the SAP group, and the survival rate was increased. Moreover, in the SAP+G+S group, all histological scores were significantly improved and the survival rate was significantly higher compared with the SAP group. In conclusion, HMGB1 might participate in pancreas and ileum injury in SAP. Growth hormone and somatostatin might play a therapeutic role in the inflammatory response of SAP.

  10. When do high and low status group members support confrontation? The role of perceived pervasiveness of prejudice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Kimberly Barsamian; Barreto, Manuela; Kaiser, Cheryl R; Rego, Marco Silva

    2016-03-01

    This paper examines how perceived pervasiveness of prejudice differentially affects high and low status group members' support for a low status group member who confronts. In Experiment 1 (N = 228), men and women read a text describing sexism as rare or as pervasive and subsequently indicated their support for a woman who confronted or did not confront a sexist remark. Experiment 2 (N = 324) specified the underlying process using a self-affirmation manipulation. Results show that men were more supportive of confrontation when sexism was perceived to be rare than when it was pervasive. By contrast, women tended to prefer confrontation when sexism was pervasive relative to when it was rare. Personal self-affirmation decreased men's and increased women's support for confrontation when prejudice was rare, suggesting that men's and women's support for confrontation when prejudice is rare is driven by personal impression management considerations. Implications for understanding how members of low and high status groups respond to prejudice are discussed.

  11. Quantitative changes of high mobility group non-histone chromosomal proteins HMG1 and HMG2 during rooster spermatogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiva, M; Mezquita, C

    1983-10-17

    The quantitative changes of a group of non-histone chromosomal proteins identified by its solubility, electrophoretic mobility and amino acid analysis as the high mobility group proteins HMG1 and HMG2, were studied throughout rooster spermatogenesis. The ratio HMG1/HMG2 remained constant (0.66 +/- 0.04) during the transition from dividing meiotic and premeiotic cells to nondividing spermatids and from transcriptionally active cells (spermatogonia, spermatocytes and early spermatids) to transcriptionally inactive late spermatids. The ratios HMG1/nucleosomal histone and HMG2/nucleosomal histone increased markedly at the end of spermiogenesis during the transition from nucleohistone to nucleoprotamine when nucleosomes are being disassembled. The high mobility group chromosomal proteins HMG1 and HMG2 were not detectable in the nuclei of rooster spermatozoa.

  12. Evaluation of Didactic Material Designed to Be Used by High School Art Teachers: The Use of Focus Groups and Questionnaires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Adriana Mortara; Martins, Maria Helena Pires

    2009-01-01

    The article describes and discusses the use of focus groups and questionnaires to evaluate educational printed material for high school level art teachers prior to publication. The material consisted of "The Notebook of the Investigative Teacher," created by the Instituto Itau Cultural to help teachers develop critical skills in…

  13. Differential School Effects among Low, Middle, and High Social Class Composition Schools: A Multiple Group, Multilevel Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palardy, Gregory J.

    2008-01-01

    This study uses large-scale survey data and a multiple group, multilevel latent growth curve model to examine differential school effects between low, middle, and high social class composition public schools. The results show that the effects of school inputs and school practices on learning differ across the 3 subpopulations. Moreover, student…

  14. A Case Study of Markdale High School's Implementation of Heterogeneously-Grouped Classes in English, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre-Louis, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe Markdale High School's change from separate college preparatory and general level classes to heterogeneously-grouped classes in English, mathematics, science, and social studies, with particular emphasis on the principal's leadership style, change process, and teacher concerns (Hall & Hord, 2006)…

  15. Sequence-specific high mobility group box factors recognize 10-12-base pair minor groove motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Beest, M; Dooijes, D; van De Wetering, M

    2000-01-01

    Sequence-specific high mobility group (HMG) box factors bind and bend DNA via interactions in the minor groove. Three-dimensional NMR analyses have provided the structural basis for this interaction. The cognate HMG domain DNA motif is generally believed to span 6-8 bases. However, alignment...

  16. Parent Training with High-Risk Immigrant Chinese Families: A Pilot Group Randomized Trial Yielding Practice-Based Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Anna S.; Fung, Joey J.; Ho, Lorinda Y.; Liu, Lisa L.; Gudino, Omar G.

    2011-01-01

    We studied the efficacy and implementation outcomes of a culturally responsive parent training (PT) program. Fifty-four Chinese American parents participated in a wait-list controlled group randomized trial (32 immediate treatment, 22 delayed treatment) of a 14-week intervention designed to address the needs of high-risk immigrant families.…

  17. Synthesis and characterization of highly ordered functional mesoporous silica thin films with positively chargeable -NH2 groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Nanguo; Assink, Roger A; Smarsly, Bernd; Brinker, C Jeffrey

    2003-05-21

    Highly ordered mesoporous organic-inorganic hybrid silica thin films with covalently bonded, positively chargeable -NH2 terminal groups were synthesized by evaporation induced self-assembly of tetraethoxysilane, 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane, and a nonionic surfactant under acid conditions and characterized using TEM, GISAXS, FTIR, SAW-based N2 sorption, and TGA.

  18. Differential School Effects among Low, Middle, and High Social Class Composition Schools: A Multiple Group, Multilevel Latent Growth Curve Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palardy, Gregory J.

    2008-01-01

    This study uses large-scale survey data and a multiple group, multilevel latent growth curve model to examine differential school effects between low, middle, and high social class composition public schools. The results show that the effects of school inputs and school practices on learning differ across the 3 subpopulations. Moreover, student…

  19. Friends and Family: A Literature Review on How High School Social Groups Influence Advanced Math and Science Coursetaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottfried, Michael; Owens, Ann; Williams, Darryl; Kim, Hui Yon; Musto, Michela

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we synthesized the literature on how informal contexts, namely friends and family social groups, shape high school students' likelihood of pursuing advanced math and science coursework. Extending scholarly understandings of STEM education, we turned to the body of literature with three guiding questions: (1) What influence do…

  20. Inhibition of high-mobility group box 1 as therapeutic option in autoimmune disease : lessons from animal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaper, Fleur; Heeringa, Peter; Bijl, Marc; Westra, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a molecule that has gained much attention in the last couple of years as an important player in innate immune responses and modulating factor in several (auto) immune diseases. Furthermore, advancements have been made in identifying the diverse

  1. Improving question asking in high-functioning adolescents with autism spectrum disorders - Effectiveness of small-group training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palmen, A.M.J.W.; Didden, H.C.M.; Arts, M.C.M.

    2008-01-01

    Small-group training consisting of feedback and self-management was effective in improving question-asking skills during tutorial conversations in nine high-functioning adolescents with autism spectrum disorder. Training was implemented in a therapy room and lasted 6 weeks. Sessions were conducted o

  2. The space density of primordial gas clouds near galaxies and groups and their relation to galactic high-velocity clouds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, MA; Briggs, FH

    2000-01-01

    The Arecibo H I Strip Survey probed the halos of similar to 300 cataloged galaxies and the environments of similar to 14 groups with sensitivity to neutral hydrogen masses greater than or equal to 10(7) M-circle dot. The survey detected no objects with properties resembling the high-velocity clouds

  3. Pulmonary levels of high-mobility group box 1 during mechanical ventilation and ventilator-associated pneumonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zoelen, Marieke A D; Ishizaka, Akitoshi; Wolthuls, Esther K; Choi, Goda; van der Poll, Tom; Schultz, Marcus J

    2008-01-01

    High-mobility group box (HMGB) 1 is a recently discovered proinflammatory mediator that contributes to acute lung injury. We determined HMGB-1 levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of patients during mechanical ventilation (MV) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid

  4. High K Oxide Insulated Gate Group III Nitride-Based FETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-21

    the physical and electrical properties of high-k dielectric oxides on gallium nitride were explored. The efficacies of several cleaning procedures...surface roughening. Parameters examined included the oxide composition (AI203, Ti02, and Ga203), the gallium nitride crystallographic orientation (c...and m-plane), and its crystal polarity (Ga- anc N-polar). 15. SUBJECT TERMS Gallium nitride , oxides, atomic layer deposition, capitance-voltage

  5. Improving High-Throughput Sequencing Approaches for Reconstructing the Evolutionary Dynamics of Upper Paleolithic Human Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seguin-Orlando, Andaine

    been mainly driven by the development of High-Throughput DNA Sequencing (HTS) technologies but also by the implementation of novel molecular tools tailored to the manipulation of ultra short and damaged DNA molecules. Our ability to retrieve traces of genetic material has tremendously improved, pushing...... work on admixture events between Neanderthals and anatomically modern humans and but also suggested that the latter were organized in small family units whose members avoided inbreeding....

  6. Compilation of high energy physics reaction data: inventory of the particle data group holdings 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, G.C.; Stevens, P.R.; Rittenberg, A.

    1980-12-01

    A compilation is presented of reaction data taken from experimental high energy physics journal articles, reports, preprints, theses, and other sources. Listings of all the data are given, and the data points are indexed by reaction and momentum, as well as by their source document. Much of the original compilation was done by others working in the field. The data presented also exist in the form of a computer-readable and searchable database; primitive access facilities for this database are available.

  7. When High Achievers and Low Achievers Work in the Same Group: The Roles of Group Heterogeneity and Processes in Project-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing-Yi Cheng, Rebecca; Lam, Shui-Fong; Chung-Yan Chan, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    Background: There has been an ongoing debate about the inconsistent effects of heterogeneous ability grouping on students in small group work such as project-based learning. Aim: The present research investigated the roles of group heterogeneity and processes in project-based learning. At the student level, we examined the interaction effect…

  8. Analysis of group-velocity dispersion of high-frequency Rayleigh waves for near-surface applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Xu, Y.; Zeng, C.

    2011-01-01

    The Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) method is an efficient tool to obtain the vertical shear (S)-wave velocity profile using the dispersive characteristic of Rayleigh waves. Most MASW researchers mainly apply Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity dispersion for S-wave velocity estimation with a few exceptions applying Rayleigh-wave group-velocity dispersion. Herein, we first compare sensitivities of fundamental surface-wave phase velocities with group velocities with three four-layer models including a low-velocity layer or a high-velocity layer. Then synthetic data are simulated by a finite difference method. Images of group-velocity dispersive energy of the synthetic data are generated using the Multiple Filter Analysis (MFA) method. Finally we invert a high-frequency surface-wave group-velocity dispersion curve of a real-world example. Results demonstrate that (1) the sensitivities of group velocities are higher than those of phase velocities and usable frequency ranges are wider than that of phase velocities, which is very helpful in improving inversion stability because for a stable inversion system, small changes in phase velocities do not result in a large fluctuation in inverted S-wave velocities; (2) group-velocity dispersive energy can be measured using single-trace data if Rayleigh-wave fundamental-mode energy is dominant, which suggests that the number of shots required in data acquisition can be dramatically reduced and the horizontal resolution can be greatly improved using analysis of group-velocity dispersion; and (3) the suspension logging results of the real-world example demonstrate that inversion of group velocities generated by the MFA method can successfully estimate near-surface S-wave velocities. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  9. Assisting High School Students with Career Indecision Using a Shortened Form of the Career Construction Interview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehfuss, Mark C.; Sickinger, Pamela H.

    2015-01-01

    A shortened form of the Career Construction Interview (CCI) was used to help high school students struggling with the career decision making process. The shortened instrument is described, as well as, its use with eleventh grade high school students who had low levels of career concern and career curiosity. Students who completed the exercise…

  10. High prevalence and genetic diversity of HCV among HIV-1 infected people from various high-risk groups in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Shang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Co-infection with HIV-1 and HCV is a significant global public health problem and a major consideration for anti-HIV-1 treatment. HCV infection among HIV-1 positive people who are eligible for the newly launched nationwide anti-HIV-1 treatment program in China has not been well characterized. METHODOLOGY: A nationwide survey of HIV-1 positive injection drug uses (IDU, former paid blood donors (FBD, and sexually transmitted cases from multiple provinces including the four most affected provinces in China was conducted. HCV prevalence and genetic diversity were determined. We found that IDU and FBD have extremely high rates of HCV infection (97% and 93%, respectively. Surprisingly, people who acquired HIV-1 through sexual contact also had a higher rate of HCV infection (20% than the general population. HIV-1 subtype and HCV genotypes were amazingly similar among FBD from multiple provinces stretching from Central to Northeast China. However, although patterns of overland trafficking of heroin and distinct HIV-1 subtypes could be detected among IDU, HCV genotypes of IDU were more diverse and exhibited significant regional differences. CONCLUSION: Emerging HIV-1 and HCV co-infection and possible sexual transmission of HCV in China require urgent prevention measures and should be taken into consideration in the nationwide antiretroviral treatment program.

  11. Urban road traffic deaths: data linkage and identification of high-risk population sub-groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Maria Miana Mattos Paixão

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study analyzes the profile of deaths from road traffic accidents in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, by linking two public databases, the Information System of the Urban Transportation and Transit Company (BH10 and the Mortality Information System (SIM. The linked database (n = 306 identified a 24% under-recording rate for deaths and differed in the age distribution from the BH10 database and in roadway user category when compared to the mortality database. The mortality rate for road traffic accidents within the city limits was 10.2 per 100,000 thousand, and was higher among men, young adults, and the elderly. Poisson multivariate regression showed a higher mean death rate for motorcycle occupants (rate ratio – RR: 1.81; pedestrians (RR: 1.32; males (RR: 1.24; single/divorced (RR: 1.27; young adults 18-29 years of age (RR: 1.75; elderly (RR: 1.59; and deaths at the crash site (RR: 1.39 when compared to the reference categories. The study unveils the city’s traffic violence, expressed by the large proportion of deaths at the crash site and within the first 24 hours, and confirms the relevance of database linkage for characterizing vulnerable groups and traffic accident mortality in the urban setting.

  12. Control technology and coordination deformation mechanism of rise entry group with high ground stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qingfeng; Zhu Quanqu

    2012-01-01

    Based on engineering practices of Wuyang Coal Mine,we carried out X-ray diffract researches on No.3 coal; and the rocks of its roof and floor by XRD meter,and simulated the interactive effect of the surrounding rock deformation by FLAC2D5.0 numerical simulation software under the condition of different tunneling method of multimine roadway in parallel.The internal structures of the surrounding rocks of 76 belt roadway were monitored by borehole observation instruments; and then,we analyzed the reason of failure and deformation of surrounding rocks of several rise entry,and proposed the technical measures for controlling interactive effect of several rise entry surrounding rock deformation at last.For the thickness seam rise roadway,two conclusions were drawn:one is that the co-deformation among roadway groups mainly reflecton that both shear failure and deformation in coal pillar among roadways have decreased the width of pillar core region and clamping action of coal pillar to roof strata,increased the actual span of roof strata,intensified the flexural failure of roof strata and prized the bed separation of roof deep rock strata.The other conclusion is that the factors controlling the interactive deformation among roadways is obvious when appropriate re-adjustment in construction sequence of the tunneling of multimine parallel roadways because the construction sequence among roadways also has great effects on deformation of the surrounding rock in roadway.

  13. Thompson's renormalization group method applied to QCD at high energy scale

    CERN Document Server

    Nassif, Claudio; Silva, P R

    2007-01-01

    We use a renormalization group method to treat QCD-vacuum behavior specially closer to the regime of asymptotic freedom. QCD-vacuum behaves effectively like a "paramagnetic system" of a classical theory in the sense that virtual color charges (gluons) emerges in it as a spin effect of a paramagnetic material when a magnetic field aligns their microscopic magnetic dipoles. Due to that strong classical analogy with the paramagnetism of Landau's theory,we will be able to use a certain Landau effective action without temperature and phase transition for just representing QCD-vacuum behavior at higher energies as being magnetization of a paramagnetic material in the presence of a magnetic field $H$. This reasoning will allow us to apply Thompson's approach to such an action in order to extract an "effective susceptibility" ($\\chi>0$) of QCD-vacuum. It depends on logarithmic of energy scale $u$ to investigate hadronic matter. Consequently we are able to get an ``effective magnetic permeability" ($\\mu>1$) of such a ...

  14. Manicurists and pedicurists – Occupation group at high risk of work-related dermatoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Kieć-Świerczyńska

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years occupational skin and respiratory diseases have been more and more frequently diagnosed in small production and service enterprises. The awareness of occupational exposure and its possible health effects among their workers and employers is not sufficient. Beauty salons, in addition to hairdressers and beauticians, frequently employ manicurists and pedicurists. The workers often happen to perform various activities interchangeably. The health status of beauty salons workers has rarely been assessed. The most numerous reports concern hairdressers. In this occupational group, the occurrence of skin lesions induced by wet work and frequent allergy to metals, hair dyes and bleaches and perm solutions has been emphasized, while information about health hazards for being a manicurist or pedicurist in beauty salons is seldom reported. The aim of this paper is to present professional activities (manicure and pedicure, methods of nail stylization, occupational exposure and literature data on work-related adverse health effects in manicurists and pedicurists. Wet work and exposure to solvents, fragrances, resins, metals, gum, detergents may cause skin disorders (contact dermatitis, urticaria, angioedema, photodermatoses, conjunctivitis, anaphylaxis, respiratory tract diseases, including asthma. The discussed occupations are also associated with the increased incidence of bacterial (particularly purulent, viral and fungal infections and cancer. Med Pr 2013;64(4:579–591

  15. Characterizing the AB Doradus Moving Group Via High Resolution Spectroscopy and Kinematic Traceback

    CERN Document Server

    McCarthy, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of 10 proposed F and G members of the nearby, young moving group AB Doradus (ABD). Our sample was obtained using the 2.7m telescope at the McDonald Observatory with the coude echelle spectrograph, achieving R $\\sim$ 60,000 and S/N $\\sim$ 200. We derive spectroscopic T$_{eff}$, log(g), [Fe/H], and microturbulance (v$_{t}$) using a bootstrap method of the TGVIT software resulting in typical errors of 33K in T$_{eff}$, 0.08 dex in log(g), 0.03 dex in [Fe/H], and 0.13 km s$^{-1}$ in v$_{t}$. Characterization of the ABD sample is performed in three ways: (1) Chemical homogeneity, (2) Kinematic Traceback, and (3) Isochrone fitting. We find the average metal abundance is [M/H] = -0.03 $\\pm$ 0.06 with a traceback age of 125 Myrs. Our stars were fit to 3 different evolutionary models (Siess et al. 2000, Baraffe et al. 1998, and YREC) and we found the best match to our ABD sample is the YREC [M/H] = -0.1 model. In our sample of 10 stars, we identify 1 star which is a probable non-member, ...

  16. HI in NGC 5433 and its Environment: High-Latitude Emission in a Small Galaxy Group

    CERN Document Server

    Spekkens, K; Saikia, D J

    2004-01-01

    We present HI synthesis maps of the edge-on starburst NGC 5433 and its environment, obtained with the VLA in its C and D configurations. The observations and spectral model residuals of the main disc emission in NGC 5433 reveal 3 extraplanar features. We associate 2 of these features with coherent extraplanar extensions across multiple spectral channels in our data, including a complete loop in position-velocity space. Interpreting the latter as an expanding shell we derive a corresponding input energy of 2 x 10^54 ergs, comparable to that for the largest supershells found in the Galaxy and those in other edge-on systems. NGC 5433 is in a richer environment than previously thought. We confirm that KUG 1359+326 is a physical companion to NGC 5433 and find two new faint companions, both with Minnesota Automated Plate Scanner identifications, that we label SIS-1 and SIS-2. Including the more distant IC 4357, NGC 5433 is the dominant member of a group of at least 5 galaxies, spanning over 750 kpc in a filamentary...

  17. Epidemiology of Brucellosis in High Risk Group & PUO Patients of Western – Rajasthan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhu Prakash, Suman Bhansali, Ekta Gupta, Dinesh Kothari, Arvind Mathur, Sneha Ambuwani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Brucellosis is an important re-emerging zoonosis with a worldwide distribution. Brucellosis in India is yet a very common but often neglected disease. Methods: A retro prospective study was done in western Rajasthan on PUO patients those who attended Hospital attached of Dr. SNMC Jodhpur. Total 570 samples were tested for Brucella antibodies titration. In study group samples of PUO Patients (420, Milkmen & Veterinarians (70, Meat Handlers (30 & Healthy Control (50 were taken for finding their Antibrucella antibody titers Typhoid by Widal Test, Malaria by MP Strip Test were included in exclusion criteria for PUO patients All samples were tested by Stained Febrile Antigen. Results: Positivity for Antibrucella Antibody was 25.72%, 26.66%, 37.14%& 6.00% in PUO Patients, Meat Handlers & Veterinarians, Milkman & Healthy Control respectively. Conclusion & Recommendations: As climatic conditions of Western Rajasthan mimics with Middle East where Brucellosis is prevalent, in clinical practice Brucellosis should be kept in differential diagnosis & management of PUO& all preventive measure should be used for prevention of this Zoonotic disease.. A safe and effective vaccine in human is not yet available. Prevention is dependent upon increasing public awareness through health education programmes and safe livestock practices. Active co-operation between health and veterinary services should be promoted.

  18. Is the illite group the cause of high electrical conductivityin certain lithospheric areas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Muschietti

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the problem of the mineralogical-petrographic interpretation of the "anomalous" conductive layer inside the lithosphere, which has resulted from electromagnetic deep soundings. Three situations can be found: 1 a resistivity of less than 1 ? ·m in the Very High Conductivity Layer (VHCL; 2 a resistivity of 1÷100 ? ·m in the High Conductivity Layer (HCL; 3 a resistivity of 102 ÷ 103 ? ·m in the Continental Lower Crust (CLC. We have focused our attention on the HCL because of its widespread distribution. Most authors attribute HCL conductivity to the presence of salt water or graphitic materials, that are uniformly and continuously distributed inside rocks. Other hypotheses from the literature are the presence of oxides and/or sulphides, rock melting, and brine-bearing rocks. Each one of these elements can cause high electrical conductivity, depending on the petrophysical conditions, but much discussion involves the necessary physical continuity of the conductive elements. We forward one more hypothesis as follows. By means of experiments on rock samples from different geographical and deep areas, under simulated in situ physical conditions (e.g., pressure, temperature, saturation, we have found resistivity values similar to the in situ ones. Chemical, mineralogical, and petrographic analyses have shown the presence of large amounts of phyllosilicate minerals, such as illite. These minerals act in two ways: they produce the physical continuity of associated conductive minerals, and they decrease the resistivity of rocks. This second hypothesis is consistent with both the very widespread diffusion of illite inside the Earth's crust, and with the good conductivity found in depth.

  19. Obtaining Highly Excited Eigenstates of Many-Body Localized Hamiltonians by the Density Matrix Renormalization Group Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemani, Vedika; Pollmann, Frank; Sondhi, S L

    2016-06-17

    The eigenstates of many-body localized (MBL) Hamiltonians exhibit low entanglement. We adapt the highly successful density-matrix renormalization group method, which is usually used to find modestly entangled ground states of local Hamiltonians, to find individual highly excited eigenstates of MBL Hamiltonians. The adaptation builds on the distinctive spatial structure of such eigenstates. We benchmark our method against the well-studied random field Heisenberg model in one dimension. At moderate to large disorder, the method successfully obtains excited eigenstates with high accuracy, thereby enabling a study of MBL systems at much larger system sizes than those accessible to exact-diagonalization methods.

  20. Proton-conducting electrolyte membranes based on hyperbranched polymer with a sulfonic acid group for high-temperature fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Takahito, E-mail: itoh@chem.mie-u.ac.j [Division of Chemistry for Materials, Graduate School of Engineering, Mie University, 1577 Kurima Machiya-cho, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Sakakibara, Takahiro; Takagi, Yuki; Tamura, Masashi; Uno, Takahiro; Kubo, Masataka [Division of Chemistry for Materials, Graduate School of Engineering, Mie University, 1577 Kurima Machiya-cho, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Aihara, Yuichi [Samsung Yokohama Research Institute, 2-7 Sugasawa-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama 230-0027 (Japan)

    2010-01-25

    The hyperbranched polymers (HBP-SA-Acs) with both a sulfonic acid group as a functional group and an acryloyl group as a cross-linker at terminals in different ratios of sulfonic acid group/acryloyl group (SO{sub 3}H/Ac) were successfully synthesized as a new thermally stable proton-conducting electrolyte. The cross-linked hyperbranched polymer electrolyte membranes (CL-HBP-SAs) were prepared by thermal polymerizations of the HBP-SA-Acs using benzoyl peroxide, and their ionic conductivities under dry condition and thermal properties were investigated. The ionic conductivities of the CL-HBP-SAs were found to be in the range of 2.2 x 10{sup -4} to 3.3 x 10{sup -6} S/cm, depending upon the SO{sub 3}H unit contents, at 150 deg. C under dry condition, and showed the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher (VTF) type temperature dependence, indicating that proton transfer is cooperated by local polymer chain motion. All CL-HBP-SAs were thermally stable up to 260 deg. C, and they had suitable thermal stability as electrolyte membranes for the high-temperature fuel cells under dry condition. Fuel cell measurement using a single membrane electrode assembly cell with a cross-linked electrolyte membrane was successfully performed under non-humidified condition. It was demonstrated that applying the concept of dry polymer system to proton conduction is one possible approach toward high-temperature fuel cells.

  1. Regulation of Autophagy-Related Protein and Cell Differentiation by High Mobility Group Box 1 Protein in Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanhuan Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1 is a molecule related to the development of inflammation. Autophagy is vital to maintain cellular homeostasis and protect against inflammation of adipocyte injury. Our recent work focused on the relationship of HMGB1 and autophagy in 3T3-L1 cells. In vivo experimental results showed that, compared with the normal-diet group, the high-fat diet mice displayed an increase in adipocyte size in the epididymal adipose tissues. The expression levels of HMGB1 and LC3II also increased in epididymal adipose tissues in high-fat diet group compared to the normal-diet mice. The in vitro results indicated that HMGB1 protein treatment increased LC3II formation in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes in contrast to that in the control group. Furthermore, LC3II formation was inhibited through HMGB1 knockdown by siRNA. Treatment with the HMGB1 protein enhanced LC3II expression after 2 and 4 days but decreased the expression after 8 and 10 days among various differentiation stages of adipocytes. By contrast, FABP4 expression decreased on the fourth day and increased on the eighth day. Hence, the HMGB1 protein modulated autophagy-related proteins and lipid-metabolism-related genes in adipocytes and could be a new target for treatment of obesity and related metabolic diseases.

  2. An epidemiological study of diabetes mellitus amongst high risk age group population in urban and Rural areas of kanpur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadeem Ahmad

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Research Question : - What is the magnitude of Diabetes mellitus in the urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Objectives:To study the prevalence of diabetes mellitus amongst high risk age group population in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.To compare the magnitude of problem of diabetes mellitus between urban and rural areas of Kanpur.To study the possible associates and socio-demographic variables related to diabetes mellitus.Study Design : Cross sectional study.Setting : The study was performed on three thousand population each in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Participants : High risk age group population i.e. 45 years and above.Study variables : Age, Sex. impaired glucose tolerance. Body mass index, Education, Working status. Social class, family history of diabetes.Statistical analysis : Chi-square lest, percentagesResults From a total of 676 persons of high risk age group i.e. 45 years and above, the overall prevalence of diabetes mellitus in the study areas was observed lobe 7. l%with 9.94% in urban and 3.61% in rural areas, the maximum percetage of diabetes cases (41.66% was in the age group of 56-60 years. Higher prevalence of diabetes was observed in the obese (56.25% and sedentary (87.5% persons. The family history' of diabetes mellitus was present in (35.41% of diabetes mellitus cases.

  3. Birth outcomes for Asian-American adolescents: a high-risk group?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauh, V A; Andrews, H F

    1999-01-01

    To explore the risks of moderately low (MLBW) and very low birthweight (VLBW) among Asian-American women, with particular attention to adolescent mothers. Data from birth certificates on 28,477 Asian women who gave birth in New York City between 1987 and 1993 were used to calculate percentages of MLBW and VLBW, and logistic regression analysis was used to estimate odds ratios for maternal age, country of origin, and other risk factors. Adolescents had elevated risks for both MLBW and VLBW, and most of this risk was attributed to the high prevalence of maternal sociodemographic risk factors among adolescents, as compared to older women. A significantly elevated risk of VLBW was found for teens who were born in the United States, suggesting a worrisome picture for second-generation Asian Americans.

  4. Dynamical real-space renormalization group calculations with a highly connected clustering scheme on disordered networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcan, D; Erzan, A

    2005-02-01

    We have defined a type of clustering scheme preserving the connectivity of the nodes in a network, ignored by the conventional Migdal-Kadanoff bond moving process. In high dimensions, our clustering scheme performs better for correlation length and dynamical critical exponents than the conventional Migdal-Kadanoff bond moving scheme. In two and three dimensions we find the dynamical critical exponents for the kinetic Ising model to be z=2.13 and z=2.09 , respectively, at the pure Ising fixed point. These values are in very good agreement with recent Monte Carlo results. We investigate the phase diagram and the critical behavior of randomly bond diluted lattices in d=2 and 3 in the light of this transformation. We also provide exact correlation exponent and dynamical critical exponent values on hierarchical lattices with power-law and Poissonian degree distributions.

  5. Rural Indian tribal communities: an emerging high-risk group for HIV/AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galwankar Sagar

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rural Indian tribes are anthropologically distinct with unique cultures, traditions and practices. Over the years, displacement and rapid acculturation of this population has led to dramatic changes in their socio-cultural and value systems. Due to a poor health infrastructure, high levels of poverty and ignorance, these communities are highly vulnerable to various health problems, especially, communicable diseases including HIV/AIDS. Our study sought to assess knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding sexuality, and the risk factors associated with the spread of HIV/AIDS and STDs among these communities. Methods A nested cross sectional study was undertaken as part of the on going Reproductive and Child Health Survey. A total of 5,690 participants age 18–44 were recruited for this study. Data were obtained through home interviews, and focused on socio-demographics, knowledge, attitudes and behaviors regarding sexuality, HIV/AIDS and other STDs. Results The study revealed that only 22% of adults had even heard of AIDS, and 18 % knew how it is transmitted. In addition, only 5% knew that STDs and AIDS were related to each other. AIDS awareness among women was lower compared to men (14% vs.30 %. Regarding sexual practices, 35% of the respondents reported having had extramarital sexual encounters, with more males than females reporting extramarital affairs. Conclusion Lack of awareness, permissiveness of tribal societies for premarital or extra-marital sexual relationships, and sexual mixing patterns predispose these communities to HIV/AIDS and STD infections. There is a dire need for targeted interventions in order to curtail the increasing threat of HIV and other STDs among these vulnerable populations.

  6. Age-related differences in functional nodes of the brain cortex - a high model order group ICA study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Littow

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Functional MRI measured with blood oxygen dependent (BOLD contrast in the absence of intermittent tasks reflects spontaneous activity of so called resting state networks (RSN of the brain. Group level independent component analysis (ICA of BOLD data can separate the human brain cortex into 42 independent RSNs. In this study we evaluated age related effects from primary motor and sensory, and, higher level control RSNs. 168 healthy subjects were scanned and divided into three groups: 55 adolescents (ADO, 13.2 ± 2.4 yrs, 59 young adults (YA, 22.2 ± 0.6yrs , and 54 older adults (OA, 42.7 ± 0.5 yrs, all with normal IQ. High model order group probabilistic ICA components (70 were calculated and dual regression analysis was used to compare 21 RSN’s spatial differences between groups. The power spectra were derived from individual ICA mixing matrix time series of the group analyses for frequency domain analysis. We show that primary sensory and motor networks tend to alter more in younger age groups, whereas associative and higher level cognitive networks consolidate and re-arrange until older adulthood. The change has a common trend: both spatial extent and the low frequency power of the RSN’s reduce with increasing age. We interpret these result as a sign of normal pruning via focusing of activity to less distributed local hubs.

  7. High resolution spectroscopy of the three dimensional cosmic web with close QSO groups

    CERN Document Server

    Cappetta, M; Cristiani, S; Saitta, F; Viel, M

    2010-01-01

    We study the three-dimensional distribution of matter at z~2 using high resolution spectra of QSO pairs and simulated spectra drawn from cosmological hydro-dynamical simulations. We present a sample of 15 QSOs, corresponding to 21 baselines of angular separations evenly distributed between ~1 and 14 arcmin, observed with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) at the European Southern Observatory-Very Large Telescope (ESO-VLT). The observed correlation functions of the transmitted flux in the HI Lya forest transverse to and along the line of sight are in agreement, implying that the distortions in redshift space due to peculiar velocities are relatively small and - within the relatively large error bars - not significant. The clustering signal is significant up to velocity separations of ~300 km/s, corresponding to about 5 h^{-1} comoving Mpc. Compatibility at the 2 sigma level has been found both for the Auto- and Cross-correlation functions and for the set of the Cross correlation coefficient...

  8. Thioetherification of chloroheteroarenes: a binuclear catalyst promotes wide scope and high functional-group tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platon, Mélanie; Wijaya, Novi; Rampazzi, Vincent; Cui, Luchao; Rousselin, Yoann; Saeys, Mark; Hierso, Jean-Cyrille

    2014-09-22

    A constrained binuclear palladium catalyst system affords selective thioetherification of a wide range of functionalized arenethiols with chloroheteroaromatic partners with the highest turnover numbers (TONs) reported to date and tolerates a large variety of reactive functions. The scope of this system includes the coupling of thiophenols with six- and five-membered 2-chloroheteroarenes (i.e., functionalized pyridine, pyrazine, quinoline, pyrimidine, furane, and thiazole) and 3-bromoheteroarenes (i.e., pyridine and furane). Electron-rich congested thiophenols and fluorinated thiophenols are also suitable partners. The coupling of unprotected amino-2-chloropyridines with thiophenol and the successful employment of synthetically valuable chlorothiophenols are described with the same catalyst system. DFT studies attribute the high performance of this binuclear palladium catalyst to the decreased stability of thiolate-containing resting states. Palladium loading was as low as 0.2 mol %, which is important for industrial application and is a step forward in solving catalyst activation/deactivation problems. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Comparison of dyslipidemia among the normal-BMI and high-BMI group of people of rural Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seetharaman Ranganathan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Overweight and obesity are considered major epidemic health problems in both developed and underdeveloped countries, as many studies showed a remarkable rise. One of the causes of dyslipidemia is obesity. Body mass index (BMI correlates reasonably well with laboratory-based measures of adiposity for population studies, and is extremely practical in most clinical settings. Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate the lipid profile of patients with normal BMI and high BMI. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study of 400 subjects attended the medical outpatient department (OPD of a private medical college hospital at Salem from March 2010 to August 2011. The subjects were divided into two groups (200 in each group: (1 high BMI (BMI 25 and above and (2 normal BMI (BMI less than 25. The laboratory parameters; cholesterol (TC, low-density lipoprotein (LDL, high-density lipoprotein (HDL and triglyceride (TG were determined directly by using an automated chemistry analyzer. Statistical Analysis: The Student′s t-test was used for comparison between categorical variables, i.e. lipid profile, high-BMI and normal-BMI subjects at P ≤0.05. Results: The total cholesterol, LDL and very LDL cholesterol and the TGs are found to be relatively high among the subjects with high BMI when compared with normal BMI persons, and this difference was found to be statistically significant (P 0.05. Conclusion: By analyzing the results of the study conducted, it was concluded that there was an increased risk of dyslipidemia among the high-BMI group compared with the normal-BMI people. Hence, a community-based education in this regard is of utmost importance.

  10. High-performance composite membrane with enriched CO2-philic groups and improved adhesion at the interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yifan; Wang, Shaofei; Wu, Hong; Guo, Ruili; Liu, Ye; Jiang, Zhongyi; Tian, Zhizhang; Zhang, Peng; Cao, Xingzhong; Wang, Baoyi

    2014-05-14

    A novel strategy to design a high-performance composite membrane for CO2 capture via coating a thin layer of water-swellable polymers (WSPs) onto a porous support with enriched CO2-philic groups is demonstrated in this study. First, by employing a versatile platform technique combining non-solvent-induced phase separation and surface segregation, porous support membranes with abundant CO2-philic ethylene oxide (EO) groups at the surface are successfully prepared. Second, a thin selective layer composed of Pebax MH 1657 is deposited onto the support membranes via dip coating. Because of the water-swellable characteristic of Pebax and the enriched EO groups at the interface, the composite membranes exhibit high CO2 permeance above 1000 GPU with CO2/N2 selectivity above 40 at a humidified state (25 °C and 3 bar). By tuning the content of the PEO segment at the interface, the composite membranes can show either high CO2 permeance up to 2420 GPU with moderate selectivity of 46.0 or high selectivity up to 109.6 with fairly good CO2 permeance of 1275 GPU. Moreover, enrichment of the PEO segment at the interface significantly improves interfacial adhesion, as revealed by the T-peel test and positron annihilation spectroscopy measurement. In this way, the feasibility of designing WSP-based composite membranes by enriching CO2-philic groups at the interface is validated. We hope our findings may pave a generic way to fabricate high-performance composite membranes for CO2 capture using cost-effective materials and facile methods.

  11. Girls in foster care: a vulnerable and high-risk group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdell, Elizabeth B; Cavanaugh, Deborah J; Burgess, Ann W; Prentky, Robert A

    2009-01-01

    To describe the characteristics of girls in foster care who have exhibited sexually abusive behavior. This was a chart review and a descriptive, exploratory study of 155 female children and adolescents (age 4-17 years) who were in foster care and had been evaluated for their sexual abusive and aggressive behaviors. Findings indicated that these girls had significant histories of maltreatment, chronic health issues, and foster care placement instability; 84% of the girls had been physically abused; 95% were victims of ongoing abuse by the biological parents (78%). Sexual abuse was reported by 81%, and 68% were sexually abused by more than one individual. Ninety-five percent were neglected; 51% of the neglect was classified as severe and chronic. All of the girls (100%) had been shown to exhibit sexually abusive and inappropriate behaviors toward other children, including exposing themselves to age-mates, violation of body space, sexually aggressive remarks, sexual touching without permission, and sexual touching of much younger children. Ninety-two percent of the girls had two or more changes in caregivers by age 16 years. Over one-third of the girls (39.2%) experienced four or more different living situations that lasted less than 1 month. These girls demonstrated a variety of behavior problems that place them at high risk for multiple foster care placements, which can negatively impact upon their well-being and health. Whether in healthcare settings, schools, the workplace, community, in-patient, or psychiatric settings, nurses and other healthcare providers have access to children and their foster care caregivers. Nurses and other healthcare clinicians are in an ideal position to provide a safe clinical environment contributing to the health, education, and support to these girls.

  12. Students of dietetics & nutrition; a high risk group for eating disorders?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Mealha

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Changes in eating behaviour of university students are common and widely studied. Although the risk of developing eating disorders seems to be obvious among nutrition students, there is a lack of research in this field. This study aimed to: determine the risk of developing eating disorders in Dietetics and Nutrition (DN students, through the comparison of eating behaviours, food habits, nutritional status, body composition and physical activity with those of other college students (from health and non-health degrees. Methods: Cross-sectional and comparative study. The sample included 189 female students, aged 18 to 25 years (20.3 ± 2.0, from two Portuguese public universities. All students were measured (weight, height, % fat mass and waist circumference and answered four validated questionnaires to assess eating behaviour, food patterns and physical activity. Results: There was a low risk of eating disorders development among these students (4.2%. No significant differences between students from DN, health and non-health degrees concerning eating behaviour, nutritional status and body composition were found, contrasting with differences in some food habits and physical activity (p < 0.05. Conclusions: Despite the low risk of eating disorders among DN students, a large percentage of them had body weight concerns. DN students had the highest percentages of normal weight, no cardio-metabolic risk according to waist circumference and normal fat mass. DN students had the healthiest food habits and they also practiced moderate and intense physical activity in a high percentage, suggesting a possible positive influence of more knowledge on food and health. Results suggested the importance of more research in college students in order to identify the need for intervention and improve their lifestyle.

  13. Barcoding Neotropical birds: assessing the impact of nonmonophyly in a highly diverse group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Bárbara R N; Chaves, Anderson V; Nascimento, Augusto C A; Chevitarese, Juliana; Vasconcelos, Marcelo F; Santos, Fabrício R

    2015-07-01

    In this study, we verified the power of DNA barcodes to discriminate Neotropical birds using Bayesian tree reconstructions of a total of 7404 COI sequences from 1521 species, including 55 Brazilian species with no previous barcode data. We found that 10.4% of species were nonmonophyletic, most likely due to inaccurate taxonomy, incomplete lineage sorting or hybridization. At least 0.5% of the sequences (2.5% of the sampled species) retrieved from GenBank were associated with database errors (poor-quality sequences, NuMTs, misidentification or unnoticed hybridization). Paraphyletic species (5.8% of the total) can be related to rapid speciation events leading to nonreciprocal monophyly between recently diverged sister species, or to absence of synapomorphies in the small COI region analysed. We also performed two series of genetic distance calculations under the K2P model for intraspecific and interspecific comparisons: the first included all COI sequences, and the second included only monophyletic taxa observed in the Bayesian trees. As expected, the mean and median pairwise distances were smaller for intraspecific than for interspecific comparisons. However, there was no precise 'barcode gap', which was shown to be larger in the monophyletic taxon data set than for the data from all species, as expected. Our results indicated that although database errors may explain some of the difficulties in the species discrimination of Neotropical birds, distance-based barcode assignment may also be compromised because of the high diversity of bird species and more complex speciation events in the Neotropics. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. TEACCH-based group social skills training for children with high-functioning autism: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Kayoko; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Ando, Masahiko; Anme, Tokie; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Yamaguchi, Hinako; Nakayama, Takeo

    2013-10-01

    Although social skills training programs for people with high-functioning autism (HFA) are widely practiced, the standardization of curricula, the examination of clinical effectiveness, and the evaluation of the feasibility of future trials have yet to be done in Asian countries. To compensate for this problem, a Japanese pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) of the Treatment and Education of Autistic and Related Communication Handicapped Children (TEACCH)-based group social skills training for children with HFA and their mothers was conducted. Eleven children with HFA, aged 5-6 years, and their mothers were randomly assigned to the TEACCH program (n=5) or a waiting-list control group (n=6). The program involved comprehensive group intervention and featured weekly 2-hour sessions, totaling 20 sessions over six months. The adaptive behaviors and social reciprocity of the children, parenting stress, and parent-child interactions were assessed using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), Parenting Stress Index (PSI), Beck depression inventory-II (BDI-II), and Interaction Rating Scale (IRS). Through this pilot trial, the intervention and evaluation of the program has been shaped. There were no dropouts from the program and the mothers' satisfaction was high. The outcome measurements improved more in the program group than in the control group, with moderate effect sizes (SDQ, 0.71; PSI, 0.58; BDI-II, 0.40; and IRS, 0.69). This pilot trial also implied that this program is more beneficial for high IQ children and mothers with low stress than for those who are not. We have standardized the TEACCH program, confirmed the feasibility of a future trial, and successfully estimated the positive effect size. These findings will contribute to a larger trial in the future and to forthcoming systematic reviews with meta-analyses. UMIN000004560.

  15. Purpurogallin, a Natural Phenol, Attenuates High-Mobility Group Box 1 in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Induced Vasospasm in a Rat Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Zen Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 was shown to be an important extracellular mediator involved in vascular inflammation of animals following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH. This study is of interest to examine the efficacy of purpurogallin, a natural phenol, on the alternation of cytokines and HMGB1 in a SAH model. A rodent double hemorrhage SAH model was employed. Basilar arteries (BAs were harvested to examine HMGB1 mRNA and protein expression (Western blot. CSF samples were to examine IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α (rt-PCR. Deformed endothelial wall, tortuous elastic lamina, and necrotic smooth muscle were observed in the vessels of SAH groups but were absent in the purpurogallin group. IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in the SAH only and SAH plus vehicle groups were significantly elevated (P<0.01. Purpurgallin dose-dependently reduced HMGB1 protein expression. Likewise, high dose purpurogallin reduced TNF-α and HMGB1 mRNA levels. In conclusion, purpurogallin exerts its neuroinflammation effect through the dual effect of inhibiting IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA expression and reducing HMGB1 protein and mRNA expression. This study supports purpurogallin could attenuate both proinflammatory cytokines and late-onset inflammasome in SAH induced vasospasm.

  16. Status Report of the DPHEP Study Group: Towards a Global Effort for Sustainable Data Preservation in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Akopov, Zaven; Asner, David; Avetisyan, Eduard; Barring, Olof; Beacham, James; Bellis, Matthew; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bethke, Siegfried; Boehnlein, Amber; Brooks, Travis; Browder, Thomas; Brun, Rene; Cartaro, Concetta; Cattaneo, Marco; Chen, Gang; Corney, David; Cranmer, Kyle; Culbertson, Ray; Dallmeier-Tiessen, Sunje; Denisov, Dmitri; Diaconu, Cristinel; Dodonov, Vitaliy; Doyle, Tony; Dubois-Felsmann, Gregory; Ernst, Michael; Gasthuber, Martin; Geiser, Achim; Gianotti, Fabiola; Giubellino, Paolo; Golutvin, Andrey; Gordon, John; Guelzow, Volker; Hara, Takanori; Hayashii, Hisaki; Heiss, Andreas; Hemmer, Frederic; Hernandez, Fabio; Heyes, Graham; Holzner, Andre; Igo-Kemenes, Peter; Iijima, Toru; Incandela, Joe; Jones, Roger; Kemp, Yves; van Dam, Kerstin Kleese; Knobloch, Juergen; Kreincik, David; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Le Diberder, Francois; Levonian, Sergey; Levy, Aharon; Li, Qizhong; Lobodzinski, Bogdan; Maggi, Marcello; Malka, Janusz; Mele, Salvatore; Mount, Richard; Neal, Homer; Olsson, Jan; Ozerov, Dmitri; Piilonen, Leo; Punzi, Giovanni; Regimbal, Kevin; Riley, Daniel; Roney, Michael; Roser, Robert; Ruf, Thomas; Sakai, Yoshihide; Sasaki, Takashi; Schnell, Gunar; Schroeder, Matthias; Schutz, Yves; Shiers, Jamie; Smith, Tim; Snider, Rick; South, David M.; St. Denis, Rick; Steder, Michael; Van Wezel, Jos; Varnes, Erich; Votava, Margaret; Wang, Yifang; Weygand, Dennis; White, Vicky; Wichmann, Katarzyna; Wolbers, Stephen; Yamauchi, Masanori; Yavin, Itay; von der Schmitt, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Data from high-energy physics (HEP) experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. An inter-experimental study group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis was convened as a panel of the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA). The group was formed by large collider-based experiments and investigated the technical and organisational aspects of HEP data preservation. An intermediate report was released in November 2009 addressing the general issues of data preservation in HEP. This paper includes and extends the intermediate report. It provides an analysis of the research case for data preservation and a detailed description of the various projects at experiment, laboratory and international levels. In addition, the paper provides a concrete proposal for an international organisation in charge of the data management and policies in high-energy physics.

  17. Status Report of the DPHEP Study Group: Towards a Global Effort for Sustainable Data Preservation in High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akopov, Zaven [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Amerio, Silvia [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Padova (Italy); Asner, David [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Avetisyan, Eduard [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Barring, Olof [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Beacham, James [New York Univ., NY (United States); Bernardi, Gregorio [Lab. Nuclear Physics and High Energies (LPNHE), Paris (France); Bethke, Siegfried [Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPI), Munich (Germany); Boehnlein, Amber [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Brooks, Travis [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Browder, Thomas [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States); Brun, Rene [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Cartaro, Concetta [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Cattaneo, Marco [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Chen, Gang [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP); Corney, David [Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC), Oxford (United Kingdom). Rutherford Appleton Lab. (RAL); Cranmer, Kyle [New York Univ., NY (United States); Culbertson, Ray [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Dallmeier-Tiessen, Sunje [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Denisov, Dmitri [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States). et al.

    2013-03-27

    Data from high-energy physics (HEP) experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. An inter-experimental study group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis was convened as a panel of the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA). The group was formed by large collider-based experiments and investigated the technical and organisational aspects of HEP data preservation. An intermediate report was released in November 2009 addressing the general issues of data preservation in HEP. This paper includes and extends the intermediate report. It provides an analysis of the research case for data preservation and a detailed description of the various projects at experiment, laboratory and international levels. In addition, the paper provides a concrete proposal for an international organisation in charge of the data management and policies in high-energy physics.

  18. Clinical significance of serum high mobility group box 1 protein in patients with severe traumatic brain injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    濮雪华

    2014-01-01

    Objective To detect the levels of high mobility group box 1 protein(HMGB1),tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α),interleukin-6(IL-6),C-reactive protein(CRP)in order to explore the clinical significance of HMGB1 in patients with severely traumatic brain injury.Methods A total of 75 patients composed of 40 male and35 female with severely traumatic brain

  19. Average exceptional Lie and Coxeter group hierarchies with special reference to the standard model of high energy particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Naschie, M.S. [King Abdullah Al Saud Institute of Nano and Advanced Technologies, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: Chaossf@aol.com

    2008-08-15

    The notions of the order of a symmetry group may be extended to that of an average, non-integer order. Building on this extension, it can be shown that the five classical exceptional Lie symmetry groups could be extended to a hierarchy, the total sum of which is four times {alpha}-bar{sub 0}=137+k{sub 0} of the electromagnetic field. Subsequently it can be shown that all known and conjectured physical fields may be derived by E-infinity transfinite scaling transformation. Consequently E{sub 8}E{sub 8} exceptional Lie symmetry groups manifold, the SL(2,7){sub c} holographic modular curve boundary {gamma}(7), Einstein-Kaluza gravity R{sup (n=4)} and R{sup (n=5)} as well as the electromagnetic field are all topological transformations of each other. It is largely a matter of mathematical taste to choose E{sub 8} or the electromagnetic field associated with {alpha}-bar{sub 0} as derived or as fundamental. However since E{sub 8} has been extensively studied by the founding father of group theory and has recently been mapped completely, it seems beneficial to discuss at least high energy physics starting from the largest of the exceptional groups.

  20. Electro-optic prism-pair setup for efficient high bandwidth isochronous CEP phase shift or group delay generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobert, Olivier; Mennerat, Gabriel; Cornaggia, Christian; Lupinski, Dominique; Perdrix, Michel; Guillaumet, Delphine; Lepetit, Fabien; Oksenhendler, Thomas; Comte, Michel

    2016-05-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of an electro-optic prism pair pure carrier-envelope phase (CEP) shifter at low voltage (shift of 1 rad for a voltage of 90 V, applied to a crystal of 5 mm aperture). Validating our mathematical model, the experiments prove that this set-up which uses two rubidium titanyl phosphate (RTP) crystals, can be used either as an efficient high bandwidth CEP shifter without modifying the group delay of an ultrashort pulse (isochronous CEP shifter) or alternatively as a group delay generator with quasi-constant CEP (Pure Group Delay generator). These two configurations which correspond to specific geometries are characterized by spectral interferometry with a 800 nm mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser. The results are in very good agreement with the model. In the pure group delay mode, a group delay of 2.3 fs is obtained at 1000 V/cm without significant CEP shift. In the isochronous mode, a shift of 5.5 rad at 1000 V/cm is generated without significant delay. The applied voltage is also lowered by a factor of nearly three in this configuration, compared to the case of an RTP rectangular slab of the same total length.

  1. Community health workers, social support and cervical cancer screening among high-risk groups in rural Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Patrick F; Belinson, Suzanne E; Ottolenghi, Emma; Smyth, Kathleen; Belinson, Jerome L

    2013-11-01

    Rural Mexico has a low screening prevalence and high burden of cervical cancer. One strategy to increase screening coverage utilizes community health workers (CHWs) to recruit high-risk women and address barriers. We conducted a systematic cross-sectional survey of 196 women residing in Chiapas, Mexico who were recruited by either CHWs or traditional means for screening. This analysis compares 110 rural women's risk factors, attitudes and knowledge of cervical cancer and socioeconomic factors stratified by type of recruitment. Women who were informed of screening by CHWs were more likely to be of high risk sub-groups and report higher scores of social support but were also more likely to endorse difficulty with access and fatalistic attitudes about cancer. Utilizing CWHs results in increased screening among high-risk women and increased social support for screening among rural women, addressing a significant barrier, but may have limited effects on other barriers.

  2. The expression of high-mobility group box protein-1 in temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis with disc perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yaping; Fang, Wei; Li, Cheng; Guo, Huilin; Li, Yingjie; Long, Xing

    2016-02-01

    High-mobility group box protein-1 (HMGB-1), a potent promoter of inflammation, was believed to be a potential trigger of osteoarthritis (OA). Only a few studies have investigated the role of HMGB-1 in temporomandibular joint (TMJ) OA, especially in disc perforation cases. But in this study, not only the expression of HMGB-1 in TMJ OA with disc perforation was investigated but also the possible role of HMGB-1 in TMJ OA was discussed. Synovial membrane and disc specimens were collected from patients with TMJ OA, and the expression of HMGB-1 was detected using immunohistochemistry, real-time quantitative PCR and Western blotting. High-mobility group box protein-1 expressed strongly in cytoplasm and nucleus of lining layer cells and endothelial cells in osteoarthritic synovium. Staining of HMGB-1 was found intensive in the frontier tissue of the perforation in the perforated discs. HMGB-1 expression was also upregulated in osteoarthritic synovial cells and disc cells according to real-time quantitative PCR and Western blotting analysis. High-mobility group box protein-1 expression was upregulated in TMJ OA and might promote the progression of TMJ OA. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Retinol-induced changes in the phosphorylation levels of histones and high mobility group proteins from Sertoli cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C.F. Moreira

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin proteins play a role in the organization and functions of DNA. Covalent modifications of nuclear proteins modulate their interactions with DNA sequences and are probably one of the multiple factors involved in the process of switch on/off transcriptionally active regions of DNA. Histones and high mobility group proteins (HMG are subject to many covalent modifications that may modulate their capacity to bind to DNA. We investigated the changes induced in the phosphorylation pattern of cultured Wistar rat Sertoli cell histones and high mobility group protein subfamilies exposed to 7 µM retinol for up to 48 h. In each experiment, 6 h before the end of the retinol treatment each culture flask received 370 KBq/ml [32P]-phosphate. The histone and HMGs were isolated as previously described [Moreira et al. Medical Science Research (1994 22: 783-784]. The total protein obtained by either method was quantified and electrophoresed as described by Spiker [Analytical Biochemistry (1980 108: 263-265]. The gels were stained with Coomassie brilliant blue R-250 and the stained bands were cut and dissolved in 0.5 ml 30% H2O2 at 60oC for 12 h. The vials were chilled and 5.0 ml scintillation liquid was added. The radioactivity in each vial was determined with a liquid scintillation counter. Retinol treatment significantly changed the pattern of each subfamily of histone and high mobility group proteins.

  4. CCY-1a-E2 induces G2/M phase arrest and apoptotic cell death in HL-60 leukemia cells through cyclin-dependent kinase 1 signaling and the mitochondria-dependent caspase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin-Fen; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lin, Chingju; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Lee, Miau-Rong

    2016-09-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that 2-[(3-methoxybenzyl)oxy]benzaldehyde (CCY-1a-E2) is a potent compound that acts against multiple human leukemia cell lines. CCY-1a-E2 was also shown to have efficacious anti‑leukemic activity in vivo. However, the molecular mechanism of action of CCY‑1a‑E2 attributed to its anticancer effect remains poorly understood. In the present study, CCY‑1a‑E2 suppressed cell viability in multiple leukemia cell lines (HL‑60, K562, KG‑1 and KG‑1a) via inhibition of cell proliferation, cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. CCY‑1a‑E2 exhibited a marked toxic effect on HL‑60 cells and displayed low cytotoxicity in normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Results from flow cytometric analysis indicated that CCY‑1a‑E2 promoted G2/M phase arrest and promoted apoptosis in the HL‑60 cells. CCY‑1a‑E2 treatment upregulated cyclin B, cyclin‑dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), cell division cycle 25C (cdc25C) and p21 protein expression. CCY‑1a‑E2 caused apoptotic cell death and DNA fragmentation as determined by 4',6‑diamidino‑2‑phenylindole (DAPI) staining and DNA gel electrophoresis. Elevated activities of caspase‑8, ‑9 and ‑3 were observed during CCY‑1a‑E2‑induced cell apoptosis; their specific inhibitors were found to block CCY‑1a‑E2‑induced apoptosis, respectively. Moreover, CCY‑1a‑E2 time‑dependently disrupted the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), and it enhanced the protein levels of Fas/CD95, cytochrome c, Bax, cleaved PARP, as well as attenuated Bcl‑2 expression in the HL‑60 cells. Our results provide direct evidence that supports the future potential therapeutic application of CCY-1a-E2 in leukemia.

  5. Changes of High Mobility Group box 1 in Serum of Pig Acute Hepatic Failure Model and Significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan ZHANG; Yongwen HE; Zhongping DUAN

    2008-01-01

    The role of the high mobility group box 1 (HMGB-1) in acute hepatic failure and the ef- fect of artificial liver support system treatment on HMGB-1 level were investigated. Pig models of acute hepatic failure were induced by D-galactosamine and randomly divided into two groups with or without artificial liver support system treatment. Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) levels were detected by the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the expression of HMGB-1 by Western blot, and serum levels of HMGB-1, liver function and hepatic pathology were observed after artificial liver support system treatment. The levels of TNF-α and IL-1β were increased and reached the peak at 24th h in the acute hepatic failure group, then quickly decreased. The serum level of HMGB-1 was increased at 24th h in the acute hepatic failure group and reached the peak at 48th h, then kept a stable high level. Significant liver injury appeared at 24th h and was continuously getting worse in the pig models of acute hepatic failure. In contrast, the liver injury was significantly alleviated and serum level of HMGB-1 was significantly decreased in the group treated with artificial liver support system (P<0.05). It was suggested that HMGB-1 may participate in the inflammatory response and liver injury in the late stage of the acute liver failure. Artificial liver support system treatment can reduce serum HMGB-1 level and relieve liver pathological damage.

  6. Impact of Comorbidity, Race, and Marital Status in Men Referred for Prostate Biopsy with PSA >20 ng/mL: A Pilot Study in High-Risk Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Zachary; Muller, Roberto; Li, Qiang; Tatem, Alexander J; King, Sherita A; Freedland, Stephen J; Madi, Rabii; Terris, Martha K; Moses, Kelvin A

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess the impact of comorbidity, race, and marital status on overall survival (OS) among men presenting for prostate biopsy with PSA >20 ng/mL. Methods. Data were reviewed from 2000 to 2012 and 78 patients were included in the cohort. We analyzed predictors of OS using a Cox proportional hazards model and the association between Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI) score and PCa diagnosis or high-grade cancer using logistic regression and multinomial regression models, respectively. Results. The median age of patients was 62.5 (IQR 57-73) years. Median CCI was 3 (IQR 2-4), 69% of patients were African American men, 56% of patients were married, and 85% of patients had a positive biopsy. CCI (HR 1.52, 95% CI 1.19, 1.94), PSA (HR 1.62, 95% CI 1.09, 2.42), and Gleason sum (HR 2.04, 95% CI 1.17, 3.56) were associated with OS. CCI was associated with Gleason sum 7 (OR 4.06, 95% CI 1.04, 15.89) and Gleason sum 8-10 (OR 4.52, 95% CI 1.16, 17.54) PCa. Conclusions. CCI is an independent predictor of high-grade disease and worse OS among men with PCa. Race and marital status were not significantly associated with survival in this cohort. Patient comorbidity is an important component of determining the optimal approach to management of prostate cancer.

  7. Factors affecting food choices of older adults from high and low socioeconomic groups: a discrete choice experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphuis, Carlijn B M; de Bekker-Grob, Esther W; van Lenthe, Frank J

    2015-04-01

    Healthiness, price, and convenience are typically indicated as important motives for food choices; however, it is largely unknown to what extent older adults from high and low socioeconomic groups differ in these underlying motives. A discrete choice experiment (DCE) is an innovative way to elicit implicit motives for food choices. The aim was to investigate differences in food motives between socioeconomic groups by means of a DCE. A DCE was carried out during a face-to-face interview among older adults as part of the Health and Living Conditions in Eindhoven and surrounding cities (GLOBE) cohort study, The Netherlands. Participants (n = 399; mean age: 63.3 y) were offered a series of choice sets about a usual dinner at home and were asked to choose in each choice set between 2 meals and an opt-out choice, with different combinations of attribute levels. We included 5 meal attributes (taste, healthiness, preparation time, travel time to shops, and price) and 3 or 4 levels for each attribute. Data were analyzed by multinomial logit models. Healthiness, taste, price, and travel time to the grocery store proved to significantly influence older adults' meal decisions; preparation time was not significant. Healthiness was the most important attribute for all of the participants. More highly educated participants rated a healthy and less expensive meal to be more important than did less educated participants. Those with a high income rated a meal that was healthy and very tasteful to be more important than did those with a lower income. Healthiness, taste, price, and travel time to grocery shops influenced older adults' meal decisions. Higher socioeconomic groups valued health more than did lower socioeconomic groups. DCEs represent a promising method to gain insight into the relative importance of motives for food choices. This trial was registered at www.isrctn.com as ISRCTN60293770. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  8. Interplay between human high mobility group protein 1 and replication protein A on psoralen-cross-linked DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reddy, Madhava C; Christensen, Jesper; Vasquez, Karen M

    2005-01-01

    Human high mobility group box (HMGB) 1 and -2 proteins are highly conserved and abundant chromosomal proteins that regulate chromatin structure and DNA metabolism. HMGB proteins bind preferentially to DNA that is bent or underwound and to DNA damaged by agents such as cisplatin, UVC radiation......, and benzo[a]pyrenediol epoxide (BPDE). Binding of HMGB1 to DNA adducts is thought to inhibit nucleotide excision repair (NER), leading to cell death, but the biological roles of these proteins remain obscure. We have used psoralen-modified triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) to direct a psoralen-DNA...... interstrand cross-link (ICL) to a specific site to determine the effect of HMGB proteins on recognition of these lesions. Our results reveal that human HMGB1 (but not HMGB2) binds with high affinity and specificity to psoralen ICLs, and interacts with the essential NER protein, replication protein A (RPA...

  9. Great Expectations: The Role of Rules in Guiding Pro-social Behaviour in Groups with High Versus Low Autistic Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameel, Leila; Vyas, Karishma; Bellesi, Giulia; Cassell, Diana; Channon, Shelley

    2015-08-01

    Measuring autistic traits in the general population has proven sensitive for examining cognition. The present study extended this to pro-social behaviour, investigating the influence of expectations to help others. A novel task describing characters in need of help was administered to students scoring high versus low on the Autism-Spectrum Quotient. Scenarios had two variants, describing either a 'clear-cut' or 'ambiguous' social rule. Participants with high versus low autistic traits were less pro-social and sympathetic overall towards the characters. The groups' ratings of characters' expectations were comparable, but those with high autistic traits provided more rule-based rationales in the clear-cut condition. This pattern of relatively intact knowledge in the context of reduced pro-social behaviour has implications for social skill training programmes.

  10. The Use of Group Activities in Introductory Biology Supports Learning Gains and Uniquely Benefits High-Achieving Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gili Marbach-Ad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the implementation and effectiveness of small-group active engagement (GAE exercises in an introductory biology course (BSCI207 taught in a large auditorium setting. BSCI207 (Principles of Biology III—Organismal Biology is the third introductory core course for Biological Sciences majors. In fall 2014, the instructors redesigned one section to include GAE activities to supplement lecture content. One section (n = 198 employed three lectures per week. The other section (n = 136 replaced one lecture per week with a GAE class. We explored the benefits and challenges associated with implementing GAE exercises and their relative effectiveness for unique student groups (e.g., minority students, high- and low-grade point average [GPA] students. Our findings show that undergraduates in the GAE class exhibited greater improvement in learning outcomes than undergraduates in the traditional class. Findings also indicate that high-achieving students experienced the greatest benefit from GAE activities. Some at-risk student groups (e.g., two-year transfer students showed comparably low learning gains in the course, despite the additional support that may have been afforded by active learning. Collectively, these findings provide valuable feedback that may assist other instructors who wish to revise their courses and recommendations for institutions regarding prerequisite coursework approval policies.

  11. Collaboration of chemistry instructional games and group investigation (Gi) model to improve learning outcome in high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspita, Ita; Sugiyarto, Kristian H.; Ikhsan, Jaslin

    2017-05-01

    The aims of this research are to: (1) develop chemistry instructional games on reaction rate matter; and (2) reveal the collaboration of chemistry instructional games and group investigation model to improvement learning outcome in high school student. This study is research and development (R&D). The procedure of developing product was adapted from Borg & Gall that modified into three principal steps: product planning, product developing, and product evaluating. The product planning step consist of field study, literature study, and manufacturing product. Product developing was developed product using Adobe Flash Professional CS 6 program. The last, product evaluating was performed by year XI of high school students, uses experimental methods nonequivalent control-group design by control class and experiment class. The results of this research show that: (1) a software of chemistry instructional games successfully developed using Adobe Flash Professional CS 6 and can be run on Android device; and (2) the test results of students showed that the collaboration of instructional games and group investigation model able to improvement learning outcome of hight school student.

  12. Phylogenetics, species boundaries and timing of resource tracking in a highly specialized group of seed beetles (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kergoat, Gael J; Le Ru, Bruno P; Genson, Gwenaelle; Cruaud, Corinne; Couloux, Arnaud; Delobel, Alex

    2011-06-01

    Though for a long time it was hypothesized that the extraordinary diversity of phytophagous insects was better explained by a synchronous pattern of co-diversification with plants, the results of recent studies have led to question this theory, suggesting that the diversification of insects occurred well after that of their hosts. In this study we address this issue by investigating the timing of diversification of a highly specialized group of seed beetles, which mostly feeds on legume plants from the tribe Indigofereae. To that purpose, a total of 130 specimens were sequenced for six genes and analyzed under a Bayesian phylogenetic framework. Based on the resulting trees we performed several analyses that allowed a better definition of the group boundaries and to investigate the status of several taxa through the use of molecular species delimitation analyses in combination with morphological evidences. In addition the evolution of host plant use was reconstructed and different molecular-dating approaches were carried out in order to assess the ages of several clades of interest. The resulting framework suggests a more ancient than previously thought origin for seed beetles, and a pattern of rapid host plant colonization. These findings call for further similar studies in other highly specialized groups of phytophagous insects.

  13. Anhydrous proton-conducting electrolyte membranes based on hyperbranched polymer with phosphonic acid groups for high-temperature fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Takahito; Hirai, Keita; Tamura, Masashi; Uno, Takahiro; Kubo, Masataka [Division of Chemistry for Materials, Graduate School of Engineering, Mie University, 1577 Kurima Machiya-cho, Tsu, Mie 514-8507 (Japan); Aihara, Yuichi [Samsung Yokohama Research Institute, 2-7 Sugasawa-cho, Tsurumi-ku, Yokohama 230-0027 (Japan)

    2008-04-01

    The two different molecular weight hyperbranched polymers (HBP(L)-PA-Ac and HBP(H)-PA-Ac) with both phosphonic acid group as a functional group and acryloyl group as a cross-linker at the chain ends were successfully synthesized as a new thermally stable proton-conducting electrolyte. The cross-linked electrolyte membranes (CL-HBP-PA) were prepared by their thermal polymerizations using benzoyl peroxide and their ionic conductivities under dry condition and thermal properties were investigated. The ionic conductivities of the low molecular weight CL-HBP(L)-PA membrane and the high molecular weight CL-HBP(H)-PA membrane were found to be 1.2 x 10{sup -5} and 2.6 x 10{sup -6} S cm{sup -1}, respectively, at 150 C under dry condition, and showed the Vogel-Tamman-Fulcher (VTF) type temperature dependence. Both membranes were thermally stable up to 300 C, and they had suitable thermal stability as electrolyte membranes for the high-temperature fuel cells under dry condition. Fuel cell measurements using a single membrane electrode assembly cell with both cross-linked membranes were successfully performed. (author)

  14. Prevalence of hepatitis B surface antigen & its subtypes in high risk group subjects & voluntary blood donors in Bombay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elavia, A J; Banker, D D

    1991-09-01

    HBsAg positive subjects belonging to high risk groups and voluntary blood donors were analysed for prevalence of HBsAg among various groups of subjects for ascertaining the carrier status among the voluntary blood donors, HBsAg subtype distribution, and association of HBsAg with blood groups and caste or religion. The prevalence of HBsAg varied from 2.02 per cent in voluntary blood donors to 58.38 per cent in patients of acute viral hepatitis. 70.5 per cent subjects had subtype 'ay' while 23.9 per cent of the subjects had subtype 'ad'. We also found compound 'ady' subtype in 5.6 per cent of our subjects. HBsAg/adr, a subtype not usually prevalent in India, was found in 30 of the 90 'ad' sera. Co-occurrence of HBsAg and anti-HBs was noted in 9 subjects. Homotypic anti-HBs was found to occur together mainly in voluntary blood donors, while heterotypic anti-HBs was found to occur together mainly multi-transfused patients. There was no significant correlation between HBsAg and blood group antigens and a relatively higher incidence of HBsAg among the Jain community was observed.

  15. Alleviation of high-fat diet-induced fatty liver damage in group IVA phospholipase A2-knockout mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ii, Hiromi; Yokoyama, Naoki; Yoshida, Shintaro; Tsutsumi, Kae; Hatakeyama, Shinji; Sato, Takashi; Ishihara, Keiichi; Akiba, Satoshi

    2009-12-01

    Hepatic fat deposition with hepatocellular damage, a feature of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, is mediated by several putative factors including prostaglandins. In the present study, we examined whether group IVA phospholipase A(2) (IVA-PLA(2)), which catalyzes the first step in prostanoid biosynthesis, is involved in the development of fatty liver, using IVA-PLA(2)-knockout mice. Male wild-type mice on high-fat diets (20% fat and 1.25% cholesterol) developed hepatocellular vacuolation and liver hypertrophy with an increase in the serum levels of liver damage marker aminotransferases when compared with wild-type mice fed normal diets. These high-fat diet-induced alterations were markedly decreased in IVA-PLA(2)-knockout mice. Hepatic triacylglycerol content was lower in IVA-PLA(2)-knockout mice than in wild-type mice under normal dietary conditions. Although high-fat diets increased hepatic triacylglycerol content in both genotypes, the degree was lower in IVA-PLA(2)-knockout mice than in wild-type mice. Under the high-fat dietary conditions, IVA-PLA(2)-knockout mice had lower epididymal fat pad weight and smaller adipocytes than wild-type mice. The serum level of prostaglandin E(2), which has a fat storage effect, was lower in IVA-PLA(2)-knockout mice than in wild-type mice, irrespective of the kind of diet. In both genotypes, high-fat diets increased serum leptin levels equally between the two groups, but did not affect the serum levels of adiponectin, resistin, free fatty acid, triacylglycerol, glucose, or insulin. Our findings suggest that a deficiency of IVA-PLA(2) alleviates fatty liver damage caused by high-fat diets, probably because of the lower generation of IVA-PLA(2) metabolites, such as prostaglandin E(2). IVA-PLA(2) could be a promising therapeutic target for obesity-related diseases including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

  16. High-fidelity simulation enhances pediatric residents' retention, knowledge, procedural proficiency, group resuscitation performance, and experience in pediatric resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, David M; Wu, Chang L; Williams, Daniel C; King, Lydia; Dobson, Joseph V

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the effect of high-fidelity simulation (HFS) pediatric resuscitation training on resident performance and self-reported experience compared with historical controls. In this case-control study, pediatric residents at a tertiary academic children's hospital participated in a 16-hour HFS resuscitation curriculum. Primary outcome measures included cognitive knowledge, procedural proficiency, retention, and self-reported comfort and procedural experience. The intervention group was compared with matched-pair historical controls. Forty-one residents participated in HFS training with 32 matched controls. The HFS group displayed significant initial and overall improvement in knowledge (P historical controls but also reported increased real-life resuscitation experiences and related procedures.

  17. "Where are all the lonely people?" A population-based study of high-risk groups across the life span

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasgaard, Mathias; Friis, Karina; Shevlin, Mark

    2016-01-01

    -demographic and health-related factors were associated with an increased risk of severe loneliness in specific age groups. Being female, having a low educational level and living in a deprived area were only associated with loneliness in adolescence/emerging adulthood. Receiving disability pensions and living alone (i......Background. Loneliness is a prevalent and urgent public health issue. Optimal planning of community approaches to loneliness requires a differentiated understanding of loneliness across the life span. We identified groups at high risk of loneliness by exploring the relationship between loneliness......Item Loneliness Scale. Results. The relation between loneliness and age took a shallow U-shaped distribution. Ethnic minority status, receiving disability pensions or being unemployed, living alone, prolonged mental disorder, and psychiatric treatment were strongly associated with severe loneliness. Socio...

  18. Prevalence of Neutralizing Antibodies to Japanese Encephalitis Virus among High-Risk Age Groups in South Korea, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Young Ran; Han, Myung Guk; Lee, Won-Ja; Jeong, Young Eui

    2016-01-01

    After an extensive vaccination policy, Japanese encephalitis (JE) was nearly eliminated since the mid-1980s in South Korea. Vaccination in children shifted the affected age of JE patients from children to adults. However, an abrupt increase in JE cases occurred in 2010, and this trend has continued. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of neutralizing antibodies to the JE virus (JEV) among high-risk age groups (≥40 years) in South Korea. A plaque reduction neutralization test was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of neutralizing antibodies to JEV in 945 subjects within four age groups (30–39, 40–49, 50–59, and 60–69 years) in 10 provinces. Of the 945 enrolled subjects, 927 (98.1%) exhibited antibodies against JEV. No significant differences were found in the prevalence of neutralizing antibodies according to sex, age, or occupation. However, there were significant differences in the plaque reduction rate according to age and occupation; oldest age group had a higher reduction rate, and subjects who were employed in agriculture or forestry also had a higher value than the other occupations. We also found that three provinces (Gangwon, Jeonnam, and Gyeongnam) had a relatively lower plaque reduction rate than the other locations. In addition, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were conducted to determine recent viral infections and 12 (2.2%) subjects were found to have been recently infected by the virus. In conclusion, the present study clearly indicated that the prevalence of neutralizing antibodies has been maintained at very high levels among adult age groups owing to vaccination or natural infections, or both. In the future, serosurveillance should be conducted periodically using more representative samples to better understand the population-level immunity to JE in South Korea. PMID:26807709

  19. Severity of sepsisis is correlated with the elevation of serum high-mobility group box 1 in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Li-chao; XIONG Li-ze; QIN Ming-zhe; ZHENG Li-na; LU Yan; WANG Qiang; PENG Dao-rong; YU Xin-ping; XIN Yu-chang; JI Gen-lin

    2009-01-01

    Background Sepsis is a leading cause of death in the intensive care units. The late inflammatory cytokine,high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), plays a critical role in sepsis. In the present study, we investigated the association between the serum HMGB1 levels and the severity of organ injury in the lipopolysaccharide-induced sepsis in rats.Methods To produce an animal model of sepsis with different degree of organ injury, animals were treated with three different doses of lipopolysaccharide (4, 8 and 16 mg/kg), and the animals in control group were treated with the same volume of the vehicle (saline). The levels of serum HMGB1 were measured at 0, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, 32 and 48 hours after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or vehicle injection, meanwhile the biochemical and histopathological indicators for the severity of organ injury were assessed.Results The level of HMGB1 had a positive, high correlation with the abnormal changes of serum cardiac troponin Ⅰ, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, creatinine and blood urea nitrogen, as well as the pathologic scores of heart, lung, liver and kidney.Conclusions The level of serum HMGB1 is highly correlated with the severity of sepsis in rats, suggesting that HMGB1 could serve as a valuable adjunct in the diagnosis and management of sepsis.

  20. Evaluation of high mobility group box 1 protein as a presurgical diagnostic marker reflecting the severity of acute appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Chuanxin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives To validate the role of high mobility group box-1(HMGB1 in diagnosis of acute appendicitis (AA with different pathological severity. Methods According to the pathologically diagnosis, 150 patients underwent appendectomies between Jan. 2007 and Dec, 2010 were divided into acute simple, acute suppurative and acute gangrenous appendicitis as group 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Each patient group contains 50 sex and age matched cases to make comparison with 50 healthy volunteers. The mRNA and protein expression levels of serum HMGB1 were determined by real-time quantitative PCR and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Serum High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP levels were determined by rate nephelometric immunoassay. Results In comparison with health volunteers, relative HMGB1 mRNA levels in group 1, 2 and 3 were significantly increased 3.05 ± 0.51,8.33 ± 0.75 and 13.74 ± 1.09 folds, reflecting a tendency of augmented severity. In accordance, serum protein levels of HMGB1 were 10.97 ± 1.64, 14.42 ± 1.56 and 18.08 ± 2.41 ng/ml in 3 patient groups, which are significantly higher than that of healthy volunteers’ 5.47 ± 0.73 ng/ml. hs-CRP levels were 12.85 ± 3.41, 21.04 ± 1.98 and 31.07 ± 5.46 ng/ml in 3 patients groups compared with 2.06 ± 0.77 ng/ml in controls. The concentrations of HMGB1 and hs-CRP were both positively correlated with disease severity. Conclusion Serum HMGB1 constitutes as a valuable marker in diagnosis of AA. Positively correlated with hs-CRP level, mRNA and protein expression of HMGB1 to a certain extent reflected the severity of AA.

  1. High-grade endometrial stromal sarcomas: a clinicopathologic study of a group of tumors with heterogenous morphologic and genetic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciallis, Andrew P; Bedroske, Patrick P; Schoolmeester, John K; Sukov, William R; Keeney, Gary L; Hodge, Jennelle C; Bell, Debra A

    2014-09-01

    The existence of a "high-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma" category of tumors has been a controversial subject owing to, among other things, the difficulty in establishing consistent diagnostic criteria. Currently, the recommended classification for such tumors is undifferentiated uterine/endometrial sarcoma. Interest in this subject has recently increased markedly with the identification of recurrent molecular genetic abnormalities. At Mayo Clinic, a group of neoplasms has been observed that morphologically resemble, either cytologically or architecturally, classic "low-grade" endometrial stromal sarcoma but feature obvious deviations, specifically, 17 tumors with unequivocally high-grade morphology. These high-grade tumors displayed 3 morphologic themes: (1) tumors with a component that is identical to low-grade ESS that transitions abruptly into an obviously higher-grade component; (2) tumors composed exclusively of high-grade cells with uniform nuclear features but with a permeative pattern of infiltration; (3) tumors similar to the second group but with a different, yet characteristic, cytomorphology featuring enlarged round to ovoid cells (larger than those found in low-grade ESS) with smooth nuclear membranes and distinct chromatin clearing but lacking prominent nucleoli. We collected clinicopathologic data, applied immunohistochemical studies, and also tested tumors by fluorescence in situ hybridization for abnormalities in JAZF1, PHF1, YWHAE, and CCND1. Tumors from these 3 groups were found to be immunohistochemically and genetically distinct from one another. Most notable was the fact that category 3 contained all the cases that tested positive for YWHAE rearrangement, did not show any classic translocations for JAZF1, PHF1, or CCND1, often presented at a high stage, and behaved aggressively. This study demonstrates the morphologic, immunophenotypic, and molecular genetic heterogeneity that exists within "undifferentiated endometrial sarcomas" as

  2. Southwest Oncology Group S0008: A Phase III Trial of High-Dose Interferon Alfa-2b Versus Cisplatin, Vinblastine, and Dacarbazine, Plus Interleukin-2 and Interferon in Patients With High-Risk Melanoma—An Intergroup Study of Cancer and Leukemia Group B, Children's Oncology Group, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group, and Southwest Oncology Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Lawrence E.; Othus, Megan; Atkins, Michael B.; Tuthill, Ralph J.; Thompson, John A.; Vetto, John T.; Haluska, Frank G.; Pappo, Alberto S.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Redman, Bruce G.; Moon, James; Ribas, Antoni; Kirkwood, John M.; Sondak, Vernon K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose High-dose interferon (IFN) for 1 year (HDI) is the US Food and Drug Administration–approved adjuvant therapy for patients with high-risk melanoma. Efforts to modify IFN dose and schedule have not improved efficacy. We sought to determine whether a shorter course of biochemotherapy would be more effective. Patients and Methods S0008 (S0008: Chemotherapy Plus Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Melanoma) was an Intergroup phase III trial that enrolled high-risk patients (stage IIIA-N2a through IIIC-N3), randomly assigning them to receive either HDI or biochemotherapy consisting of dacarbazine, cisplatin, vinblastine, interleukin-2, IFN alfa-2b (IFN-α-2b) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor given every 21 days for three cycles. Coprimary end points were relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). Results In all, 432 patients were enrolled. Grade 3 and 4 adverse events occurred in 57% and 7% of HDI patients and 36% and 40% of biochemotherapy patients, respectively. At a median follow-up of 7.2 years, biochemotherapy improved RFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.75; 95% CI, 0.58 to 0.97; P = .015), with a median RFS of 4.0 years (95% CI, 1.9 years to not reached [NR]) versus 1.9 years for HDI (95% CI, 1.2 to 2.8 years) and a 5-year RFS of 48% versus 39%. Median OS was not different (HR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.74 to 1.31; P = .55), with a median OS of 9.9 years (95% CI, 4.62 years to NR) for biochemotherapy versus 6.7 years (95% CI, 4.5 years to NR) for HDI and a 5-year OS of 56% for both arms. Conclusion Biochemotherapy is a shorter, alternative adjuvant treatment for patients with high-risk melanoma that provides statistically significant improvement in RFS but no difference in OS and more toxicity compared with HDI. PMID:25332243

  3. Small Groups: Student Productive Interactions in Learning Cooperative (Case Study of Mathematics Learning at Junior High School in Pakis, Malang

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Tri Utaminingtyas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to describe the process of student interaction in solving problems through cooperative learning. The subject of this research are 7th grade students of a junior high school in Malang, Indonesia. Data were collected by recording directly when learning takes place especially when pairing or forming small groups. This interaction is built with heterogeneous student skills. The results showed that the interaction that occurs in students provides an understanding of the concept of opportunity. Consequently, the students solved the problem correctly. This interaction is known as productive interaction.

  4. An epidemiological study of diabetes mellitus amongst high risk age group population in urban and Rural areas of kanpur

    OpenAIRE

    Nadeem Ahmad; Suresh Chandra; R P Sharma; J P Srivastava

    2003-01-01

    Research Question : - What is the magnitude of Diabetes mellitus in the urban and rural areas of Kanpur.Objectives:To study the prevalence of diabetes mellitus amongst high risk age group population in urban and rural areas of Kanpur.To compare the magnitude of problem of diabetes mellitus between urban and rural areas of Kanpur.To study the possible associates and socio-demographic variables related to diabetes mellitus.Study Design : Cross sectional study.Setting : The study was performed o...

  5. A Quantitative Study on the in-vitro and in-vivo Acetylation of High Mobility Group A1 Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qingchun; Zhang, Kangling; Zou, Yan; Perna, Avi; Wang, Yinsheng

    2007-01-01

    High mobility group (HMG) A1 proteins are subject to a number of post-translational modifications, which may regulate their function in gene transcription and other cellular processes. We examined, by using mass spectrometry, the acetylation of HMGA1a and HMGA1b proteins induced by histone acetyltransferases p300 and PCAF in vitro and in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells in vivo. It turned out that five lysine residues in HMGA1a, i.e., Lys-14, Lys-64, Lys-66, Lys-70, and Lys-73, could be acety...

  6. High Order Fefferman-Phong Type Inequalities in Carnot Groups and Regularity for Degenerate Elliptic Operators plus a Potential

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    Pengcheng Niu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Let {X1,X2,…,Xm} be the basis of space of horizontal vector fields in a Carnot group G=(Rn;∘ (mhigh order Fefferman-Phong type inequalities in G. As applications, we derive a priori Lp(G estimates for the nondivergence degenerate elliptic operators L=-∑i,j=1maij(xXiXj+V(x with VMO coefficients and a potential V belonging to an appropriate Stummel type class introduced in this paper. Some of our results are also new even for the usual Euclidean space.

  7. Coronary artery calcium score using electron beam tomography in the patients with acute obstructive coronary arterial disease : comparative study within asymptomatic high-risk group of atherosclerosis and chronic obstructive coronary arterial disease group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Seok Jong; Choi, Byoung Wook; Choe, Kyu Ok [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-04-01

    To compare, through analysis of the coronary artery calcium (CAC) score and the risk factors for atherosclerosis, the characteristics of acute coronary syndrome between an asymptomatic high-risk group of atherosclerosis patients and a chronic coronary arterial obstructive disease(CAOD) group. The CAC scores of an asymptomatic high-risk group of atherosclerosis patients (group I, n=284), a chronic CAOD croup (group II, n=39) and an acute coronary syndrome group (group III, n=21) were measured by electron beam tomography. Forty-seven patients with CAOD from groups II and III underwent coronary angiography, and we scrutinized age, sex and risk factors including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, obesity, smoking, hypercholesterolemia and low high-density lipoproteinemia. The numbers of stenotic coronary arterial branches and degree of stenosis revealed by coronary angiography were also recorded. We determined the differences between the three groups in terms of CAC score and the risk factors, the relationship between CAC score and risk factors, and the characteristic features of each type of CAOD group. The mean CA score of group III (135.1) was not statistically different from that of group I (135.7) or group II (365.8). Among patients aged below 50, the mean CAC score of group III (127.4) was significantly higher than that of group I (6.2), (p=0.0006). The mean CAC score at the sixth decade was also significantly different between group I(81.5) and group II (266.9). The mean age of group III (54.2 years) was significantly lower than that of group I (58.1 years) (p=0.047) and of group II (60.1) (p=0.022). There was significant correlation between the number of stenotic coronary arterial branches and log(CAC +1) (p<.01). The square root of the CAC score and the maximal degree of stenosis was also well correlated (p<.01). There was no difference in the mean number of risk factors among the three groups, though the incidence of smoking in group III was significantly

  8. The mitochondrial genome of Paraspadella gotoi is highly reduced and reveals that chaetognaths are a sister-group to protostomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helfenbein, Kevin G.; Fourcade, H. Matthew; Vanjani, Rohit G.; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2004-05-01

    We report the first complete mitochondrial (mt) DNA sequence from a member of the phylum Chaetognatha (arrow worms). The Paraspadella gotoi mtDNA is highly unusual, missing 23 of the genes commonly found in animal mtDNAs, including atp6, which has otherwise been found universally to be present. Its 14 genes are unusually arranged into two groups, one on each strand. One group is punctuated by numerous non-coding intergenic nucleotides, while the other group is tightly packed, having no non-coding nucleotides, leading to speculation that there are two transcription units with differing modes of expression. The phylogenetic position of the Chaetognatha within the Metazoa has long been uncertain, with conflicting or equivocal results from various morphological analyses and rRNA sequence comparisons. Comparisons here of amino acid sequences from mitochondrially encoded proteins gives a single most parsimonious tree that supports a position of Chaetognatha as sister to the protostomes studied here. From this, one can more clearly interpret the patterns of evolution of various developmental features, especially regarding the embryological fate of the blastopore.

  9. High Glucose-Induced PC12 Cell Death by Increasing Glutamate Production and Decreasing Methyl Group Metabolism

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    Minjiang Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. High glucose- (HG- induced neuronal cell death is responsible for the development of diabetic neuropathy. However, the effect of HG on metabolism in neuronal cells is still unclear. Materials and Methods. The neural-crest derived PC12 cells were cultured for 72 h in the HG (75 mM or control (25 mM groups. We used NMR-based metabolomics to examine both intracellular and extracellular metabolic changes in HG-treated PC12 cells. Results. We found that the reduction in intracellular lactate may be due to excreting more lactate into the extracellular medium under HG condition. HG also induced the changes of other energy-related metabolites, such as an increased succinate and creatine phosphate. Our results also reveal that the synthesis of glutamate from the branched-chain amino acids (isoleucine and valine may be enhanced under HG. Increased levels of intracellular alanine, phenylalanine, myoinositol, and choline were observed in HG-treated PC12 cells. In addition, HG-induced decreases in intracellular dimethylamine, dimethylglycine, and 3-methylhistidine may indicate a downregulation of methyl group metabolism. Conclusions. Our metabolomic results suggest that HG-induced neuronal cell death may be attributed to a series of metabolic changes, involving energy metabolism, amino acids metabolism, osmoregulation and membrane metabolism, and methyl group metabolism.

  10. mzGroupAnalyzer--predicting pathways and novel chemical structures from untargeted high-throughput metabolomics data.

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    Hannes Doerfler

    Full Text Available The metabolome is a highly dynamic entity and the final readout of the genotype x environment x phenotype (GxExP relationship of an organism. Monitoring metabolite dynamics over time thus theoretically encrypts the whole range of possible chemical and biochemical transformations of small molecules involved in metabolism. The bottleneck is, however, the sheer number of unidentified structures in these samples. This represents the next challenge for metabolomics technology and is comparable with genome sequencing 30 years ago. At the same time it is impossible to handle the amount of data involved in a metabolomics analysis manually. Algorithms are therefore imperative to allow for automated m/z feature extraction and subsequent structure or pathway assignment. Here we provide an automated pathway inference strategy comprising measurements of metabolome time series using LC- MS with high resolution and high mass accuracy. An algorithm was developed, called mzGroupAnalyzer, to automatically explore the metabolome for the detection of metabolite transformations caused by biochemical or chemical modifications. Pathways are extracted directly from the data and putative novel structures can be identified. The detected m/z features can be mapped on a van Krevelen diagram according to their H/C and O/C ratios for pattern recognition and to visualize oxidative processes and biochemical transformations. This method was applied to Arabidopsis thaliana treated simultaneously with cold and high light. Due to a protective antioxidant response the plants turn from green to purple color via the accumulation of flavonoid structures. The detection of potential biochemical pathways resulted in 15 putatively new compounds involved in the flavonoid-pathway. These compounds were further validated by product ion spectra from the same data. The mzGroupAnalyzer is implemented in the graphical user interface (GUI of the metabolomics toolbox COVAIN (Sun & Weckwerth, 2012

  11. mzGroupAnalyzer--predicting pathways and novel chemical structures from untargeted high-throughput metabolomics data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Hannes; Sun, Xiaoliang; Wang, Lei; Engelmeier, Doris; Lyon, David; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    The metabolome is a highly dynamic entity and the final readout of the genotype x environment x phenotype (GxExP) relationship of an organism. Monitoring metabolite dynamics over time thus theoretically encrypts the whole range of possible chemical and biochemical transformations of small molecules involved in metabolism. The bottleneck is, however, the sheer number of unidentified structures in these samples. This represents the next challenge for metabolomics technology and is comparable with genome sequencing 30 years ago. At the same time it is impossible to handle the amount of data involved in a metabolomics analysis manually. Algorithms are therefore imperative to allow for automated m/z feature extraction and subsequent structure or pathway assignment. Here we provide an automated pathway inference strategy comprising measurements of metabolome time series using LC- MS with high resolution and high mass accuracy. An algorithm was developed, called mzGroupAnalyzer, to automatically explore the metabolome for the detection of metabolite transformations caused by biochemical or chemical modifications. Pathways are extracted directly from the data and putative novel structures can be identified. The detected m/z features can be mapped on a van Krevelen diagram according to their H/C and O/C ratios for pattern recognition and to visualize oxidative processes and biochemical transformations. This method was applied to Arabidopsis thaliana treated simultaneously with cold and high light. Due to a protective antioxidant response the plants turn from green to purple color via the accumulation of flavonoid structures. The detection of potential biochemical pathways resulted in 15 putatively new compounds involved in the flavonoid-pathway. These compounds were further validated by product ion spectra from the same data. The mzGroupAnalyzer is implemented in the graphical user interface (GUI) of the metabolomics toolbox COVAIN (Sun & Weckwerth, 2012, Metabolomics 8: 81

  12. BABELOMICS: a suite of web tools for functional annotation and analysis of groups of genes in high-throughput experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shahrour, Fátima; Minguez, Pablo; Vaquerizas, Juan M; Conde, Lucía; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2005-07-01

    We present Babelomics, a complete suite of web tools for the functional analysis of groups of genes in high-throughput experiments, which includes the use of information on Gene Ontology terms, interpro motifs, KEGG pathways, Swiss-Prot keywords, analysis of predicted transcription factor binding sites, chromosomal positions and presence in tissues with determined histological characteristics, through five integrated modules: FatiGO (fast assignment and transference of information), FatiWise, transcription factor association test, GenomeGO and tissues mining tool, respectively. Additionally, another module, FatiScan, provides a new procedure that integrates biological information in combination with experimental results in order to find groups of genes with modest but coordinate significant differential behaviour. FatiScan is highly sensitive and is capable of finding significant asymmetries in the distribution of genes of common function across a list of ordered genes even if these asymmetries were not extreme. The strong multiple-testing nature of the contrasts made by the tools is taken into account. All the tools are integrated in the gene expression analysis package GEPAS. Babelomics is the natural evolution of our tool FatiGO (which analysed almost 22,000 experiments during the last year) to include more sources on information and new modes of using it. Babelomics can be found at http://www.babelomics.org.

  13. Krüppel-like factor 4 promotes high-mobility group box 1-induced chemotherapy resistance in osteosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun; Liu, Ke; Song, Deye; Ding, Muliang; Wang, Junjie; Jin, Qingping; Ni, Jiangdong

    2016-03-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant bone tumor, and the frequent acquisition of chemoresistance is often an obstacle to achieving favorable outcomes during chemotherapy. Recently, Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4) has been shown to be associated with chemotherapy resistance in a few tumors; however, the involvement of KLF4 in chemotherapy resistance in osteosarcoma cells remains unknown. In this study, quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis revealed that KLF4 expression was significantly increased in response to cisplatin, methotrexate and doxorubicin treatment in osteosarcoma cells, and knockdown of KLF4 increased sensitivity to these anticancer drugs by decreasing cellular clonogenic ability and increasing apoptosis. Moreover, our data suggest that KLF4-regulated drug resistance might, at least partially, positively regulate high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which was found to be a significant contributor to chemoresistance in osteosarcoma cells in our previous study. In summary, this study highlights the significance of KLF4/HMGB1 interaction in regulating chemotherapy resistance, and suggests that targeting KLF4/high-mobility group box 1 may be a therapeutic strategy for osteosarcoma chemotherapy.

  14. The stool microbiota of insulin resistant women with recent gestational diabetes, a high risk group for type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugmann, Marina; Breier, Michaela; Rottenkolber, Marietta; Banning, Friederike; Ferrari, Uta; Sacco, Vanessa; Grallert, Harald; Parhofer, Klaus G; Seissler, Jochen; Clavel, Thomas; Lechner, Andreas

    2015-08-17

    The gut microbiota has been linked to metabolic diseases. However, information on the microbiome of young adults at risk for type 2 diabetes (T2D) is lacking. The aim of this cross-sectional analysis was to investigate whether insulin resistant women with previous gestational diabetes (pGDM), a high risk group for T2D, differ in their stool microbiota from women after a normoglycemic pregnancy (controls). Bacterial communities were analyzed by high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing using fecal samples from 42 pGDM and 35 control subjects 3-16 months after delivery. Clinical characterization included a 5-point OGTT, anthropometrics, clinical chemistry markers and a food frequency questionnaire. Women with a Prevotellaceae-dominated intestinal microbiome were overrepresented in the pGDM group (p microbiota are already present in young adults at risk for T2D and that further investigations of a potential pathophysiological role of gut bacteria in early T2D development are warranted.

  15. Trial of a "credit card" asthma self-management plan in a high-risk group of patients with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, W; Burgess, C; Ayson, M; Crane, J; Pearce, N; Beasley, R

    1996-05-01

    The "credit card" asthma self-management plan provides the adult asthmatic patient with simple guidelines for the self-management of asthma, which are based on the self-assessment of peak expiratory flow rate recordings and symptoms. The study was a trial of the clinical efficacy of the credit card plan in a high-risk group of asthmatic patients. In this "before-and-after" trial, patients discharged from the emergency department of Wellington Hospital, after treatment for severe asthma were invited to attend a series of hospital outpatient clinics at which the credit card plan was introduced. Questionnaires were used to compare markers of asthma morbidity, requirement for emergency medical care, and medication use during the 6-month period before and after intervention with the credit card plan. Of the 30 patients with asthma who attended the first outpatient clinic, 26 (17 women and 9 men) completed the program. In these 26 participants, there was a reduction in both morbidity and requirement for acute medical services: specifically, the proportion waking with asthma more than once a week decreased from 65% to 23% (p = 0.005) and the proportion visiting the emergency department for treatment of severe asthma decreased from 58% to 15% (p = 0.004). The patients attending the clinics commented favorably on the plan, in particular on its usefulness as an educational tool for monitoring and treating their asthma. Although the interpretation of this study is limited by the lack of a randomized control group, the findings are consistent with other evidence that the credit card asthma self-management plan can be an effective and acceptable system for improving asthma care in a high-risk group of adult patients with asthma.

  16. Assessment of independent risk factors of conversion into psychosis in the ultra-high risk state group of patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gawłowska

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was the independent psychosis risk factors assessment in a group of subjects fulfilling the criteria of at risk mental state, under specialist outpatient psychiatric care. Participants: Seventy-one patients – 33 women and 38 men, were involved into this study, aged on average 17.34, all under psychiatric care. The patients were recruited into the study in the sequence of their outpatient clinic admission. The criterion to be included into the study was the diagnosis of ultra-high risk state (UHRS – defined according to the Australian research group principles. Subsequently, the patients were divided into subgroups according to the clinical features of their mental state. Method: The author’s demographic questionnaire was applied in the study. Information regarding the family history of psychosis was obtained from patients and/or their relatives or carers. The patients’ mental state was assessed monthly – according to the presence of psychotic symptoms, change of their incidence and duration, presence of depressive symptoms or aggressive behaviour (measured by a three-level scale. On the basis of the obtained information, we evaluated: 1 conversion into psychosis time – measured from diagnosing of UHRS to the development of full-symptom psychosis, 2 therapeutic methods used (psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy or both, 3 use of psychoactive substances after being diagnosed with UHRS, 4 presence of serious life stressors (the patients’ subjective estimation – during the six-month period preceding the conversion into psychosis. Results: 1 In the UHRS group of patients, staying under professional outpatient psychiatric care, the use of marijuana was an independent risk factor of conversion into psychosis. 2 In the investigated group of patients with at risk mental state we did not find any correlation between modulating factors (including: therapeutic methods used, depressive symptoms, aggression or

  17. Mom Power: preliminary outcomes of a group intervention to improve mental health and parenting among high-risk mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzik, Maria; Rosenblum, Katherine L; Alfafara, Emily A; Schuster, Melisa M; Miller, Nicole M; Waddell, Rachel M; Stanton Kohler, Emily

    2015-06-01

    Maternal psychopathology and traumatic life experiences may adversely impact family functioning, the quality of the parent-child relationship and the attachment bond, placing the child's early social-emotional development at risk. Attachment-based parenting interventions may be particularly useful in decreasing negative outcomes for children exposed to risk contexts, yet high risk families frequently do not engage in programs to address mental health and/or parenting needs. This study evaluated the effects of Mom Power (MP), a 13-session parenting and self-care skills group program for high-risk mothers and their young children (age parenting competence, and engagement in treatment. Mothers were referred from community health providers for a phase 1 trial to assess feasibility, acceptability, and pilot outcomes. At baseline, many reported several identified risk factors, including trauma exposure, psychopathology, poverty, and single parenthood. Ninety-nine mother-child pairs were initially recruited into the MP program with 68 women completing and providing pre- and post-self-report measures assessing demographics and trauma history (pre-assessment only), maternal mental health (depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)), parenting, and intervention satisfaction. Results indicate that MP participation was associated with reduction in depression, PTSD, and caregiving helplessness. A dose response relationship was evident in that, despite baseline equivalence, women who attended ≥70 % of the 10 groups (completers; N = 68) improved on parenting and mental health outcomes, in contrast to non-completers (N = 12). Effects were most pronounced for women with a mental health diagnosis at baseline. The intervention was perceived as helpful and user-friendly. Results indicate that MP is feasible, acceptable, and holds promise for improving maternal mental health and parenting competence among high-risk dyads. Further research is warranted to evaluate

  18. A case study of Markdale High School's implementation of heterogeneously-grouped classes in English, mathematics, science, and social studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre-Louis, Fred

    The purpose of this study was to describe Markdale High School's change from separate college preparatory and general level classes to heterogeneously-grouped classes in English, mathematics, science, and social studies, with particular emphasis on the principal's leadership style, change process, and teacher concerns (Hall & Hord, 2006) experienced during this effort. The researcher used Hall and Hord's (2006) Concern-Based Adoption Model (CBAM) as a conceptual framework. Specifically, the researcher applied three elements of the CBAM model: (a) the Twelve Principles of Change, (b) the Change Facilitator Styles, and (c) the Stages of Concerns. Hall and Hord's framework served as a lens through which the researcher analyzed all data. The researcher used a mixed-method (qualitative and quantitative) approach to answer the four research questions. The participants completed three instruments: (a) the Stages of Concern Questionnaire (SoCQ), (b) the Principles of Change Survey, and (c) the Facilitator Style Survey. All three instruments were self-report, paper-pencil surveys. The sample included 72 faculty members who experienced the change over the past three years. Findings from the three data sources and the school principal's comments during debriefing are indicated for each research question and reported by unit of analysis. Respective to the research questions, the researcher concluded that: (1) Markdale High School accomplished the change by implementing both structural and instructional changes supporting to the change to heterogeneous grouping; (2) even though teachers had divergent opinions on the school principal's facilitation style, the principal thought of himself as an incrementalist and a practitioner of differentiated facilitation styles; (3) while half of the faculty felt that they received formal training on heterogeneous grouping, (4) half felt that they did not have a choice in the decision-making process as it occurred with college preparatory and

  19. The expansion of thymopoiesis in neonatal mice is dependent on expression of high mobility group a 2 protein (Hmga2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berent-Maoz, Beata; Montecino-Rodriguez, Encarnacion; Fice, Michael; Casero, David; Seet, Christopher S; Crooks, Gay M; Lowry, William; Dorshkind, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Cell number in the mouse thymus increases steadily during the first two weeks after birth. It then plateaus and begins to decline by seven weeks after birth. The factors governing these dramatic changes in cell production are not well understood. The data herein correlate levels of High mobility group A 2 protein (Hmga2) expression with these temporal changes in thymopoiesis. Hmga2 is expressed at high levels in murine fetal and neonatal early T cell progenitors (ETP), which are the most immature intrathymic precursors, and becomes almost undetectable in these progenitors after 5 weeks of age. Hmga2 expression is critical for the initial, exponential expansion of thymopoiesis, as Hmga2 deficient mice have a deficit of ETPs within days after birth, and total thymocyte number is repressed compared to wild type littermates. Finally, our data raise the possibility that similar events occur in humans, because Hmga2 expression is high in human fetal thymic progenitors and falls in these cells during early infancy.

  20. The expansion of thymopoiesis in neonatal mice is dependent on expression of high mobility group a 2 protein (Hmga2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Berent-Maoz

    Full Text Available Cell number in the mouse thymus increases steadily during the first two weeks after birth. It then plateaus and begins to decline by seven weeks after birth. The factors governing these dramatic changes in cell production are not well understood. The data herein correlate levels of High mobility group A 2 protein (Hmga2 expression with these temporal changes in thymopoiesis. Hmga2 is expressed at high levels in murine fetal and neonatal early T cell progenitors (ETP, which are the most immature intrathymic precursors, and becomes almost undetectable in these progenitors after 5 weeks of age. Hmga2 expression is critical for the initial, exponential expansion of thymopoiesis, as Hmga2 deficient mice have a deficit of ETPs within days after birth, and total thymocyte number is repressed compared to wild type littermates. Finally, our data raise the possibility that similar events occur in humans, because Hmga2 expression is high in human fetal thymic progenitors and falls in these cells during early infancy.

  1. Identidad social de un grupo de altos ingresos económicos. Social identity of a group of high income

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Dujarric Bermúdez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available La investigación indaga la existencia de una relación entre los ingresos económicos y la identidad, para lo cual se trabajó con un grupo de altos ingresos de la provincia de La Habana. Desde el Enfoque de Identidades Sociales se intenta comprender la configuración subjetiva de este grupo, así como su proyección ante la situación actual del país. Utilizamos un enfoque mixto, procesando la información a partir del Statistical Packetfor Social Sciencies (SPSS y el análisis de contenido. Los resultados obtenidos evidencian que los ingresos modelan una identidad social y constituyen un referente sobre cómo se está moviendo la subjetividad de este grupo social, así como de su proyección ante la situación actual del país. The research investigates the existence of a relationship between economic income and social identity, for which we worked with a group of high incomes in the province of Havana. From the Social Identity Perspective we try to understand the subjectivity of this group and its projection to the current situation. We worked with a mixed methodology and processed the information using the Statistical Packet for Social Sciencies (SPSS and the content analysis. The results show that incomes shape an identity and give some hints about the movement ofthis group social subjectivity, in this period of reforms.

  2. Neurocognitive functioning in a group of offspring genetically at high-risk for schizophrenia in Eastern Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozan, Erol; Deveci, Erdem; Oral, Meltem; Karahan, Utku; Oral, Elif; Aydin, Nazan; Kirpinar, Ismet

    2010-05-31

    We assessed major cognitive domains in symptom-free children of patients with schizophrenia compared to the healthy children of parents with no psychopathology using neurocognitive tests. We hypothesized that, offspring at high-risk for schizophrenia would have significant impairment in major domains: attention, memory, verbal-linguistic ability and executive functions. Thirty symptom-free children (17-males, 13-females; intelligence quotient=99.6+/-13.6; age=12.69+/-2.32 and education=5.8+/-2.3 years) having a parent diagnosed with schizophrenia and 37 healthy children matched for gender (19-males, 18-females), IQ (106.05+/-14.70), age (12.48+/-2.58) and years of education (6.0+/-2.5) were evaluated. The study group showed significant poor performance in cognitive domains, such as working memory (assessed with Auditory consonant trigram test), focused attention (Stroop test), attention speed (Trail making test), divided attention (Auditory consonant trigram test), executive functions (Wisconsin card sorting test), verbal fluency (Controlled word association test) and declarative memory (Rey verbal learning and Short-term memory test). However, no group differences were detected either on verbal attention (Digit span forward test) or sustained attention (TOVA, a continuous performance task); the latter as consistently reported to be a predictor of schizophrenia. In order to determine the cognitive endophenotype of schizophrenia, it seems more rational to conduct comprehensive evaluation of neurocognitive domains in well-matched groups via using sufficiently challenging tests to detect slight deficits. In addition, longitudinal studies with a larger sample size evaluating neurocognitive functions combined with genetic analysis may provide clues about explaining the genetic background of the disorder within the endophenocognitype concept and serve as new targets for early interventions.

  3. Association of a Specific Algal Group with Methylmercury Accumulation in Periphyton of a Tropical High-Altitude Andean Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, William G; Achá, Darío; Point, David; Masbou, Jeremy; Alanoca, Lucia; Amouroux, David; Lazzaro, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Periphyton relevance for methylmercury (MeHg) production and accumulation are now well known in aquatic ecosystems. Sulfate-reducing bacteria and other microbial groups were identified as the main MeHg producers, but the effect of periphyton algae on the accumulation and transfer of MeHg to the food web remains little studied. Here we investigated the role of specific groups of algae on MeHg accumulation in the periphyton of Schoenoplectus californicus ssp. (Totora) and Myriophyllum sp. in Uru Uru, a tropical high-altitude Bolivian lake with substantial fishing and mining activities accruing around it. MeHg concentrations were most strongly related to the cell abundance of the Chlorophyte genus Oedogonium (r (2) = 0.783, p = 0.0126) and to no other specific genus despite the presence of other 34 genera identified. MeHg was also related to total chlorophyll-a (total algae) (r (2) = 0.675, p = 0.0459), but relations were more significant with chlorophyte cell numbers, chlorophyll-b (chlorophytes), and chlorophyll-c (diatoms and dinoflagellates) (r (2) = 0.72, p = 0.028, r (2) = 0.744, p = 0.0214, and r (2) = 0.766, p = 0.0161 respectively). However, Oedogonium explains most variability of chlorophytes and chlorophyll-c (r (2) = 0.856, p = < 0.001 and r (2) = 0.619, p = 0.002, respectively), suggesting it is the most influential group for MeHg accumulation and periphyton algae composition at this particular location and given time.

  4. Exploring the Potential of High Resolution Remote Sensing Data for Mapping Vegetation and the Age Groups of Oil Palm Plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiran, N.; Sarker, M. L. R.

    2014-02-01

    The land use/land cover transformation in Malaysia is enormous due to palm oil plantation which has provided huge economical benefits but also created a huge concern for carbon emission and biodiversity. Accurate information about oil palm plantation and the age of plantation is important for a sustainable production, estimation of carbon storage capacity, biodiversity and the climate model. However, the problem is that this information cannot be extracted easily due to the spectral signature for forest and age group of palm oil plantations is similar. Therefore, a noble approach "multi-scale and multi-texture algorithms" was used for mapping vegetation and different age groups of palm oil plantation using a high resolution panchromatic image (WorldView-1) considering the fact that pan imagery has a potential for more detailed and accurate mapping with an effective image processing technique. Seven texture algorithms of second-order Grey Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) with different scales (from 3×3 to 39×39) were used for texture generation. All texture parameters were classified step by step using a robust classifier "Artificial Neural Network (ANN)". Results indicate that single spectral band was unable to provide good result (overall accuracy = 34.92%), while higher overall classification accuracies (73.48%, 84.76% and 93.18%) were obtained when textural information from multi-scale and multi-texture approach were used in the classification algorithm.

  5. Successful Reach and Adoption of a workplace health promotion RCT targeting a group of high-risk workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekner Dorte

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cleaners are rarely introduced to workplace health promotion programs. The study's objective was to evaluate the reach and adoption of a workplace randomized controlled trial (RCT among cleaners in Denmark. Methods Cleaning businesses with at least 30 employees, that could offer a weekly 1-hour intervention during working hours, were invited to participate. Employees working at least 20 hours/week were invited to answer a screening questionnaire and consent to participate. Analyses determined the differences in health variables between responders and non-responders, consenters and non-consenters, participants and non-participants and between participants of the RCT's three groups: physical coordination training, cognitive-behavioural theory-based training and reference group. Results From 16 eligible workplaces, a representative sample of 50% adopted the trial. Of 758 eligible employees, 78% responded to the screening questionnaire and 49% consented to participate. Consenters and participants differed from non-consenters and non-participants by having higher BMI, more chronic diseases and poorer musculoskeletal health. Conclusions This study indicates that workplace health promotion programs directed at health risk factors among cleaners enable significant adoption and reach to a high-risk subgroup of the Danish workforce. Trial registration Trial registration ISRCTN96241850

  6. Use of high-throughput in vitro toxicity screening data in cancer hazard evaluations by IARC Monograph Working Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Weihsueh A; Guyton, Kathryn Z; Martin, Matthew T; Reif, David M; Rusyn, Ivan

    2017-07-24

    Evidence regarding carcinogenic mechanisms serves a critical role in International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monograph evaluations. Three recent IARC Working Groups pioneered inclusion of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ToxCast program high-throughput screening (HTS) data to supplement other mechanistic evidence. In Monograph V110, HTS profiles were compared between perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and prototypical activators across multiple nuclear receptors. For Monograph V112 -113, HTS assays were mapped to 10 key characteristics of carcinogens identified by an IARC expert group, and systematically considered as an additional mechanistic data stream. Both individual assay results and ToxPi-based rankings informed mechanistic evaluations. Activation of multiple nuclear receptors in HTS assays showed that PFOA targets peroxisome proliferator activated and other receptors. ToxCast assays substantially covered 5 of 10 key characteristics, corroborating literature evidence of "induces oxidative stress" and "alters cell proliferation, cell death or nutrient supply" and filling gaps for "modulates receptor-mediated effects." Thus, ToxCast HTS data were useful both in evaluating specific mechanistic hypotheses and in the overall evaluation of mechanistic evidence. However, additional HTS assays are needed to provide more comprehensive coverage of the 10 key characteristics of carcinogens that form the basis of current IARC mechanistic evaluations.

  7. Adsorption of the Inflammatory Mediator High-Mobility Group Box 1 by Polymers with Different Charge and Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Tripisciano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High-mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1 is a conserved protein with a variety of biological functions inside as well as outside the cell. When released by activated immune cells, it acts as a proinflammatory cytokine. Its delayed release has sparked the interest in HMGB1 as a potential therapeutic target. Here, we studied the adsorption of HMGB1 to anionic methacrylate-based polymers as well as to neutral polystyrene-divinylbenzene copolymers. Both groups of adsorbents exhibited efficient binding of recombinant HMGB1 and of HMGB1 derived from lipopolysaccharide-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The adsorption characteristics depended on particle size, porosity, accessibility of the pores, and charge of the polymers. In addition to these physicochemical parameters of the adsorbents, modifications of the molecule itself (e.g., acetylation, phosphorylation, and oxidation, interaction with other plasma proteins or anticoagulants (e.g., heparin, or association with extracellular microvesicles may influence the binding of HMGB1 to adsorbents and lead to preferential depletion of HMGB1 subsets with different biological activity.

  8. AUTOREGRESSIVE MODEL AND POWER SPECTRUM CHARATERISTICS OF CURRENT SIGNAL IN HIGH FREQUENCY GROUP PULSE MICRO ELECTROCHEMICAL MACHINING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Xinglun; ZHANG Zhijing; ZHOU Zhaoying; YANG Xiaodong

    2006-01-01

    The identification of the inter-electrode gap size in the high frequency group pulse micro-electrochemical machining (HGPECM) is mainly discussed. The auto-regressive(AR) model of group pulse current flowing across the cathode and the anode are created under different situations with different processing parameters and inter-electrode gap size. The AR model based on the current signals indicates that the order of the AR model is obviously different relating to the different processing conditions and the inter-electrode gap size; Moreover, it is different about the stability of the dynamic system, i.e. the white noise response of the Green's function of the dynamic system is diverse. In addition, power spectrum method is used in the analysis of the dynamic time series about the current signals with different inter-electrode gap size, the results show that there exists a strongest power spectrum peak, characteristic power spectrum(CPS), to the current signals related to the different inter-electrode gap size in the range of 0~5 kHz. Therefore, the CPS of current signals can implement the identification of the inter-electrode gap.

  9. 1991 Technical progress report of the University of South Carolina`s High Energy Physics Group, February 1990--July 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    The high energy physics group at the University of South Carolina includes five teaching faculty members, one research faculty member, and five graduate students. Profs. Childers, Darden, and Wilson devote most of their research effort to Fermilab experiment E789, which is designed to observe charmless two-body decays of b-flavored mesons and baryons. Prof. Wilson works on Fermilab experiment E687 which studies charm physics in the wide-band photon beam. Profs. Rosenfeld and Wang participate in the AMY collaboration, which studies electron-positron interactions using the TRISTAN collider at KEK. Prof. Rosenfeld and one student collaborate with personnel from KEK and INS, Tokyo, on an experiment to detect a 17 keV neutrino in the {beta}-decay spectrum of {sup 63}Ni. Members of the group also participate in Fermilab Proposal P803 which will search for the oscillation of muon neutrino to tau neutrino with sensitivity better than a factor of 40 than previously achieved and in Superconducting Super Collider activities which include the development of an imaging preradiator. A brief discussion is given on progress made for each program.

  10. Activated carbon fibers with a high content of surface functional groups by phosphoric acid activation of PPTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Muñiz, Alberto; Suárez-García, Fabián; Martínez-Alonso, Amelia; Tascón, Juan M D

    2011-09-01

    Activated carbon fibers (ACFs) were prepared by chemical activation of poly(p-phenylene terephthalamide (PPTA) with phosphoric acid, with a particular focus on the effects of impregnation ratio and carbonization temperature on both surface chemistry and porous texture. Thermogravimetric studies of the pyrolysis of PPTA impregnated with different amounts of phosphoric acid indicated that this reagent has a strong influence on the thermal degradation of the polymer, lowering the decomposition temperature and increasing the carbon yield. As concerns surface chemistry, TPD and chemical analysis results indicated that the addition of phosphoric acid increases the concentration of oxygenated surface groups, with a maximum at an impregnation ratio of 100 wt.%. The resulting materials present uncommon properties, namely a large amount of oxygen- and phosphorus-containing surface groups and a high nitrogen content. Porosity development following H(3)PO(4) activation was very significant, with values close to 1700 m(2)/g and 0.80 cm(3)/g being reached for the BET surface area and total pore volume, respectively. The pore size distributions remained confined to the micropore and narrow mesopore (<10 nm) range.

  11. Worksite interventions for preventing physical deterioration among employees in job-groups with high physical work demands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtermann, Andreas; Jørgensen, Marie B; Gram, Bibi

    2010-01-01

    demands, physical capacities and health profile of workers in each job-group. The RCT among cleaners, characterized by repetitive work tasks and musculoskeletal disorders, aims at making the cleaners less susceptible to musculoskeletal disorders by physical coordination training or cognitive behavioral...... theory based training (CBTr). Because health-care workers are reported to have high prevalence of overweight and heavy lifts, the aim of the RCT is long-term weight-loss by combined physical exercise training, CBTr and diet. Construction work, characterized by heavy lifting, pushing and pulling, the RCT...... aims at improving physical capacity and promoting musculoskeletal and cardiovascular health. At the industrial work-place characterized by repetitive work tasks, the intervention aims at reducing physical exertion and musculoskeletal disorders by combined physical exercise training, CBTr...

  12. Eco-friendly one-pot synthesis of highly dispersible functionalized graphene nanosheets with free amino groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiting; Duan, Xuezhi; Qian, Gang; Zhou, Xinggui; Yuan, Weikang

    2013-02-01

    An eco-friendly, facile and scalable hydrothermal approach, in which the reduction and functionalization of graphite oxide (GO) are completed in one pot, is proposed for the synthesis of monolayer 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES)-functionalized graphenes (A-FGs). Atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction analyses indicate that the as-synthesized A-FGs consist of only one or a few layered graphenes, while x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis reveal that APTES is bonded to graphene by the dehydration reaction between the Si-OH (produced by APTES hydration) and the -OH on the GO surface. As a result, free amino groups are left on the A-FGs. Moreover, A-FGs are highly dispersible in dimethylsulfoxide, APTES and ethylene glycol, and their solubilities are up to 0.89, 4.03 and 0.90 mg ml-1, respectively.

  13. High Energy Physics Forum for Computational Excellence: Working Group Reports (I. Applications Software II. Software Libraries and Tools III. Systems)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, Salman [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Roser, Robert [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Computing plays an essential role in all aspects of high energy physics. As computational technology evolves rapidly in new directions, and data throughput and volume continue to follow a steep trend-line, it is important for the HEP community to develop an effective response to a series of expected challenges. In order to help shape the desired response, the HEP Forum for Computational Excellence (HEP-FCE) initiated a roadmap planning activity with two key overlapping drivers -- 1) software effectiveness, and 2) infrastructure and expertise advancement. The HEP-FCE formed three working groups, 1) Applications Software, 2) Software Libraries and Tools, and 3) Systems (including systems software), to provide an overview of the current status of HEP computing and to present findings and opportunities for the desired HEP computational roadmap. The final versions of the reports are combined in this document, and are presented along with introductory material.

  14. High Energy Physics Forum for Computational Excellence: Working Group Reports (I. Applications Software II. Software Libraries and Tools III. Systems)

    CERN Document Server

    Habib, Salman; LeCompte, Tom; Marshall, Zach; Borgland, Anders; Viren, Brett; Nugent, Peter; Asai, Makoto; Bauerdick, Lothar; Finkel, Hal; Gottlieb, Steve; Hoeche, Stefan; Sheldon, Paul; Vay, Jean-Luc; Elmer, Peter; Kirby, Michael; Patton, Simon; Potekhin, Maxim; Yanny, Brian; Calafiura, Paolo; Dart, Eli; Gutsche, Oliver; Izubuchi, Taku; Lyon, Adam; Petravick, Don

    2015-01-01

    Computing plays an essential role in all aspects of high energy physics. As computational technology evolves rapidly in new directions, and data throughput and volume continue to follow a steep trend-line, it is important for the HEP community to develop an effective response to a series of expected challenges. In order to help shape the desired response, the HEP Forum for Computational Excellence (HEP-FCE) initiated a roadmap planning activity with two key overlapping drivers -- 1) software effectiveness, and 2) infrastructure and expertise advancement. The HEP-FCE formed three working groups, 1) Applications Software, 2) Software Libraries and Tools, and 3) Systems (including systems software), to provide an overview of the current status of HEP computing and to present findings and opportunities for the desired HEP computational roadmap. The final versions of the reports are combined in this document, and are presented along with introductory material.

  15. Effects of high mobility group protein box 1 and toll like receptor 4 pathway on warts caused by human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Hui; Liu, Hongbo; Deng, Yunhua; Xie, Yuyan; Shen, Guanxin

    2014-10-01

    Accumulative evidence has demonstrated that inflammation has an important role in human papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenicity. However, the effects of high mobility group protein box 1 (HMGB1)-toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway associated inflammation on epidermal warts caused by HPV remain unclear. The present study investigated the HMGB1, TLR4 and nuclear factor-κB p65 expression in condyloma acuminatum (CA) and verruca vulgaris (VV). Immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis revealed that p65 expression in epithelial nuclei in VV and CA was significantly higher than in normal skin (NS) (Pwarts caused by HPV. HMGB1-TLR4 pathway-associated inflammation may therefore have a pivotal role in CA. HMGB1, rather than TLR4, may be a vital mediator of inflammation in VV. Therapies targeting HMGB1 may be a potential strategy for the treatment of HPV-associated warts.

  16. Usefulness of postoperative hip irradiation in the prevention of heterotopic bone formation in a high risk group of patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacLennan, I.; Keys, H.M.; Evarts, C.M.; Rubin, P.

    1984-01-01

    Heterotopic ossification is a complication of total hip arthroplasty in 14 to 30% of patients. Significant functional impairment will occur in up to 28% of patients with ectopic bone. The high risk group includes those with preexisting heterotopic bone in either hip, those suffering from hypertrophic osteoarthritis or ankylosing spondylitis and patients who have had multiple procedures on the hip. Fifty-eight patients (67 hips) were irradiated after surgical removal of ectopic bone (53 hips) or received radiation prophylaxis of heterotopic ossification (14 hips). Ninety-five percent of patients had either no bone visible or insignificant amounts of ectopic bone visible on postoperative hip X-rays. Only 5% of patients showed significant persistence of ectopic bone. Postoperative hip function was dramatically improved compared to preoperative function in all patients treated. The importance of early commencement of irradiation is emphasized.

  17. The active gene that encodes human High Mobility Group 1 protein (HMG1) contains introns and maps to chromosome 13

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, S. [Dipartimento di Genetica e di Biologia dei Microrganismi, Milan (Italy); Finelli, P.; Rocchi, M. [Istituto di Genetica, Bari (Italy)] [and others

    1996-07-15

    The human genome contains a large number of sequences related to the cDNA for High Mobility Group 1 protein (HMG1), which so far has hampered the cloning and mapping of the active HMG1 gene. We show that the human HMG1 gene contains introns, while the HMG1-related sequences do not and most likely are retrotransposed pseudogenes. We identified eight YACs from the ICI and CEPH libraries that contain the human HMG1 gene. The HMG1 gene is similar in structure to the previously characterized murine homologue and maps to human chromosome 13 and q12, as determined by in situ hybridization. The mouse Hmg1 gene maps to the telomeric region of murine Chromosome 5, which is syntenic to the human 13q12 band. 18 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Evidence of neofunctionalization after the duplication of the highly conserved Polycomb group gene Caf1-55 in the obscura group of Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Martín, Juan M; Papaceit, Montserrat; Segarra, Carmen

    2017-01-17

    Drosophila CAF1-55 protein is a subunit of the Polycomb repressive complex PRC2 and other protein complexes. It is a multifunctional and evolutionarily conserved protein that participates in nucleosome assembly and remodelling, as well as in the epigenetic regulation of a large set of target genes. Here, we describe and analyze the duplication of Caf1-55 in the obscura group of Drosophila. Paralogs exhibited a strong asymmetry in evolutionary rates, which suggests that they have evolved according to a neofunctionalization process. During this process, the ancestral copy has been kept under steady purifying selection to retain the ancestral function and the derived copy (Caf1-55dup) that originated via a DNA-mediated duplication event ~18 Mya, has been under clear episodic selection. Different maximum likelihood approaches confirmed the action of positive selection, in contrast to relaxed selection, on Caf1-55dup after the duplication. This adaptive process has also taken place more recently during the divergence of D. subobscura and D. guanche. The possible association of this duplication with a previously detected acceleration in the evolutionary rate of three CAF1-55 partners in PRC2 complexes is discussed. Finally, the timing and functional consequences of the Caf1-55 duplication is compared to other duplications of Polycomb genes.

  19. Short Circuits or Superconductors? Examining Factors That Encourage or Undermine Group Learning and Collaboration among High-Ability Students. CSE Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Noreen M.; Welner, Mari; Zuniga, Stephen

    This study investigated the effects of group ability composition (homogeneous versus heterogeneous) on group processes and outcomes for high ability students completing science performance assessments. Participants were 99 seventh and eighth graders from 9 classes in 2 schools. The results show that group ability composition does not have…

  20. Comparison of antibiotic susceptibility in viridans group streptococci in low and high antibiotic-prescribing General Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsmith, C E; Hara, Y; Sato, T; Nakajima, T; Nakanishi, S; Mason, C; Moore, J E; Matsuda, M; Coulter, W A

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotic resistance has become a global public health issue. Most antibiotics are prescribed in the community, although there is less stewardship of such agents in the community compared to secondary and tertiary care. Few studies have attempted to examine the prescribing practices in General Practice and its impact on antibiotic resistance and, therefore, a study was performed in order to compare antibiotic susceptibilities of commensal viridans group streptococci (VGS) obtained from patient cohorts in General Practices (GP), who were high and low prescribers of oral antibiotics. Sixty-five patients (antibiotic susceptibility against (i) tetracyclines (doxycycline); (ii) macrolides (erythromycin); (iii) β-lactams (penicillin G); and (iv) fluoroquinolones (ofloxacin & levofloxacin). There were no significant differences in MICs between high and low GP prescribers with doxycycline (P = 0·094), erythromycin (P = 0·122), ofloxacin (P = 0·193) and levofloxacin (P = 0·058). However, there was a significant difference between high and low GP practices with regard to penicillin G (P = 0·031). This finding is important as the β-lactams are the most commonly prescribed oral antibiotic in the community. This study demonstrates that high prescribing practices may lead to an altered (higher) level of resistance to these agents in the commensal VGS population, which may be important as reservoirs of antibiotic resistance determinants in subsequent horizontal gene transfer events, particularly with newly colonizing pathogens, including pneumococci. Primary care physicians should be aware that increased prescribing of antibiotics may led to increased level of penicillin resistance. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Molecular cloning and characterization of high mobility group box1 (Ls-HMGB1) from humphead snapper, Lutjanus sanguineus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jia; Xia, Hongli; Huang, Yucong; Lu, Yishan; Wu, Zaohe; Jian, Jichang

    2014-10-01

    High mobility group box1 (HMGB1) is a kind of chromatin-associated nonhistone protein important for nucleosome formation, transcriptional regulation and inflammation. However, the reports about HMGB1 of marine fish were still limited. Here, we cloned and characterized a HMGB1 gene from humphead snapper, Lutjanus sanguineus (Ls-HMGB1). The Ls-HMGB1 cDNA composed of 1199 bp with a 70 bp of 5'-UTR, 630 bp open reading frame (ORF) and 499 bp 3'-UTR, encoded a polypeptide of 210 amino acids (GenBank Accession No: KJ783442). Sequence alignment of Ls-HMGB1 showed the highest similarity of 91% with Sciaenops ocellatus HMGB1 protein. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed that Ls-HMGB1 had relatively high expression level in skin, kidney and heart. After Vibrio harveyi and poly I:C stimulation, transcripts of Ls-HMGB1 were significantly increased and reached to peak at 18 h p.i. The L. sanguineus interleukin-6 (Ls-IL6) transcription in HK leukocytes was significantly induced by recombinant LsHMGB1 (rLsHMGB1). These results indicated that Ls-HMGB1 may play an important role in immune response of L. sanguineus during pathogen challenge.

  2. Cognitive Vision and Perceptual Grouping by Production Systems with Blackboard Control - An Example for High-Resolution SAR-Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelsen, Eckart; Middelmann, Wolfgang; Sörgel, Uwe

    The laws of gestalt-perception play an important role in human vision. Psychological studies identified similarity, good continuation, proximity and symmetry as important inter-object relations that distinguish perceptive gestalts from arbitrary sets of clutter objects. Particularly, symmetry and continuation possess a high potential in detection, identification, and reconstruction of man-made objects. This contribution focuses on coding this principle in an automatic production system. Such systems capture declarative knowledge. Procedural details are defined as control strategy for an interpreter. Often an exact solution is not feasible while approximately correct interpretations of the data with the production system are sufficient. Given input data and a production system the control acts accumulatively instead of reducing. The approach is assessment driven features any-time capability and fits well into the recently discussed paradigms of cognitive vision. An example from automatic extraction of groupings and symmetry in man-made structure from high resolution SAR-image data is given. The contribution also discusses the relations of such approach to the "mid-level" of what is today proposed as "cognitive vision".

  3. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats Are emm Type-Specific in Highly Prevalent Group A Streptococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Po-Xing; Chan, Yuen-Chi; Chiou, Chien-Shun; Chiang-Ni, Chuan; Wang, Shu-Ying; Tsai, Pei-Jane; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Lin, Yee-Shin; Liu, Ching-Chuan; Wu, Jiunn-Jong

    2015-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are the bacterial adaptive immune system against foreign nucleic acids. Given the variable nature of CRISPR, it could be a good marker for molecular epidemiology. Group A streptococcus is one of the major human pathogens. It has two CRISPR loci, including CRISPR01 and CRISPR02. The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of CRISPR-associated gene cassettes (cas) and CRISPR arrays in highly prevalent emm types. The cas cassette and CRISPR array in two CRISPR loci were analyzed in a total of 332 strains, including emm1, emm3, emm4, emm12, and emm28 strains. The CRISPR type was defined by the spacer content of each CRISPR array. All strains had at least one cas cassette or CRISPR array. More than 90% of the spacers were found in one emm type, specifically. Comparing the consistency between emm and CRISPR types by Simpson's index of diversity and the adjusted Wallace coefficient, CRISPR01 type was concordant to emm type, and CRISPR02 showed unidirectional congruence to emm type, suggesting that at least for the majority of isolates causing infection in high income countries, the emm type can be inferred from CRISPR analysis, which can further discriminate isolates sharing the same emm type.

  4. Synthesis of High Performance Cyclic Olefin Polymers (COPs with Ester Group via Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Cui

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Novel ester group functionalized cyclic olefin polymers (COPs with high glass transition temperature, high transparency, good mechanical performance and excellent film forming ability have been achieved in this work via efficient ring-opening metathesis copolymerization of exo-1,4,4a,9,9a,10-hexahydro-9,10(1′,2′-benzeno-l,4-methanoanthracene (HBM and comonomers (5-norbornene-2-yl methylacetate (NMA, 5-norbornene-2-yl methyl 2-ethylhexanoate (NME or 5-norbornene-2-yl methyldodecanoate (NMD utilizing the Grubbs first generation catalyst, Ru(CHPh(Cl2(PCy32 (Cy = cyclohexyl, G1, followed by hydrogenation of double bonds in the main chain. The fully hydrogenated copolymers were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance, FT-IR spectroscopy analysis, gel permeation chromatography, and thermo gravimetric analysis. Differential scanning calorimetry curves showed that the glass transition temperatures (Tg linearly decreased with the increasing of comonomers content, which was easily controlled by changing feed ratios of HBM and comonomers. Static water contact angles tests indicate that hydrophilicity of copolymers can also be modulated by changing the comonomers incorporation. Additionally, the mechanical performances of copolymers were also investigated.

  5. Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats Are emm Type-Specific in Highly Prevalent Group A Streptococci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Xing Zheng

    Full Text Available Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR are the bacterial adaptive immune system against foreign nucleic acids. Given the variable nature of CRISPR, it could be a good marker for molecular epidemiology. Group A streptococcus is one of the major human pathogens. It has two CRISPR loci, including CRISPR01 and CRISPR02. The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of CRISPR-associated gene cassettes (cas and CRISPR arrays in highly prevalent emm types. The cas cassette and CRISPR array in two CRISPR loci were analyzed in a total of 332 strains, including emm1, emm3, emm4, emm12, and emm28 strains. The CRISPR type was defined by the spacer content of each CRISPR array. All strains had at least one cas cassette or CRISPR array. More than 90% of the spacers were found in one emm type, specifically. Comparing the consistency between emm and CRISPR types by Simpson's index of diversity and the adjusted Wallace coefficient, CRISPR01 type was concordant to emm type, and CRISPR02 showed unidirectional congruence to emm type, suggesting that at least for the majority of isolates causing infection in high income countries, the emm type can be inferred from CRISPR analysis, which can further discriminate isolates sharing the same emm type.

  6. Genomic characterisation, chromosomal assignment and in vivo localisation of the canine High Mobility Group A1 (HMGA1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reimann-Berg Nicola

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The high mobility group A1 proteins (HMGA1a/HMGA1b are highly conserved between mammalian species and widely described as participating in various cellular processes. By inducing DNA conformation changes the HMGA1 proteins indirectly influence the binding of various transcription factors and therefore effect the transcription regulation. In humans chromosomal aberrations affecting the HMGA1 gene locus on HSA 6p21 were described to be the cause for various benign mesenchymal tumours while high titres of HMGA1 proteins were shown to be associated with the neoplastic potential of various types of cancer. Interestingly, the absence of HMGA1 proteins was shown to cause insulin resistance and diabetes in humans and mice. Due to the various similarities in biology and presentation of human and canine cancers the dog has joined the common rodent animal model for therapeutic and preclinical studies. Accordingly, the canine genome was sequenced completely twice but unfortunately this could not solve the structure of canine HMGA1 gene. Results Herein we report the characterisation of the genomic structure of the canine HMGA1 gene consisting of 7 exons and 6 introns spanning in total 9524 bp, the in vivo localisation of the HMGA1 protein to the nucleus, and a chromosomal assignment of the gene by FISH to CFA12q11. Additionally, we evaluated a described canine HMGA1 exon 6 SNP in 55 Dachshunds. Conclusion The performed characterisations will make comparative analyses of aberrations affecting the human and canine gene and proteins possible, thereby providing a basis for revealing mechanisms involved in HMGA1 related pathogenesis in both species.

  7. Sources of stress for students in high school college preparatory and general education programs: group differences and associations with adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suldo, Shannon M; Shaunessy, Elizabeth; Thalji, Amanda; Michalowski, Jessica; Shaffer, Emily

    2009-01-01

    Navigating puberty while developing independent living skills may render adolescents particularly vulnerable to stress, which may ultimately contribute to mental health problems (Compas, Orosan, & Grant, 1993; Elgar, Arlett, & Groves, 2003). The academic transition to high school presents additional challenges as youth are required to interact with a new and larger peer group and manage greater academic expectations. For students enrolled in academically rigorous college preparatory programs, such as the International Baccalaureate (IB) program, the amount of stress perceived may be greater than typical (Suldo, Shaunessy, & Hardesty, 2008). This study investigated the environmental stressors and psychological adjustment of 162 students participating in the IB program and a comparison sample of 157 students in general education. Factor analysis indicated students experience 7 primary categories of stressors, which were examined in relation to students' adjustment specific to academic and psychological functioning. The primary source of stress experienced by IB students was related to academic requirements. In contrast, students in the general education program indicated higher levels of stressors associated with parent-child relations, academic struggles, conflict within family, and peer relations, as well as role transitions and societal problems. Comparisons of correlations between categories of stressors and students' adjustment by curriculum group reveal that students in the IB program reported more symptoms of psychopathology and reduced academic functioning as they experienced higher levels of stress, particularly stressors associated with academic requirements, transitions and societal problems, academic struggles, and extra-curricular activities. Applied implications stem from findings suggesting that students in college preparatory programs are more likely to (a) experience elevated stress related to academic demands as opposed to more typical adolescent

  8. Pathophysiology of Endometriosis: Role of High Mobility Group Box-1 and Toll-Like Receptor 4 Developing Inflammation in Endometrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Bo Hyon; Chon, Seung Joo; Choi, Young Sik; Cho, SiHyun; Lee, Byung Seok; Seo, Seok Kyo

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been proposed as a potential factor associated with the establishment and progression of endometriosis. Although a few studies have shown possible mechanisms which may play roles in development, progression of endometriosis, few are known in regards of initiation of the disease, especially in the relationship with endometrium. The aim of our study was to investigate whether normal endometrium may be changed by Damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), which may contribute developing pathologic endometrium to induce endometriosis. Endometrial tissues were obtained from 10 patients with fibroids undergoing hysterectomy at a university hospital. High mobility group box-1 (HMGB-1), which is a representative DAMP, has been chosen that may induce alteration in endometrium. In preceding immunohistochemistry experiments using paraffin-block sections from endometriosis (N = 33) and control (N = 27) group, retrospectively, HMGB-1 expression was shown in both epithelial and stromal cell. HMGB-1 expression was significantly increased in secretory phase of endometriosis group, comparing to the controls. To examine the alteration of endometrial stromal cell (HESC) by oxidative stress in terms of HMGB-1, cell proliferation and expression of its receptor, TLR4 was measured according to recombinant HMGB-1 use. Cell proliferation was assessed by CCK-8 assay; real-time PCR and western blotting were used to quantify Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) mRNA and protein expression respectively. A TLR4 antagonist (LPS-RS) and an inhibitor of the NF-κB pathway (TPCA-1, an IKK-2 inhibitor) were used to confirm the relationships between HMGB-1, TLR4, and the NF-κB pathway. Passive release of HMGB-1 was significantly proportional to the increase in cell death (P<0.05). HESCs showed significant proliferation following treatment with rHMGB-1 (P<0.05), and increased TLR4 expression was observed following rHMGB-1 treatment (P<0.05) in a concentration-dependent manner

  9. Model comparison on genomic predictions using high-density markers for different groups of bulls in the Nordic Holstein population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, H; Su, G; Janss, L; Zhang, Y; Lund, M S

    2013-07-01

    This study compared genomic predictions based on imputed high-density markers (~777,000) in the Nordic Holstein population using a genomic BLUP (GBLUP) model, 4 Bayesian exponential power models with different shape parameters (0.3, 0.5, 0.8, and 1.0) for the exponential power distribution, and a Bayesian mixture model (a mixture of 4 normal distributions). Direct genomic values (DGV) were estimated for milk yield, fat yield, protein yield, fertility, and mastitis, using deregressed proofs (DRP) as response variable. The validation animals were split into 4 groups according to their genetic relationship with the training population. Groupsmgs had both the sire and the maternal grandsire (MGS), Groupsire only had the sire, Groupmgs only had the MGS, and Groupnon had neither the sire nor the MGS in the training population. Reliability of DGV was measured as the squared correlation between DGV and DRP divided by the reliability of DRP for the bulls in validation data set. Unbiasedness of DGV was measured as the regression of DRP on DGV. The results indicated that DGV were more accurate and less biased for animals that were more related to the training population. In general, the Bayesian mixture model and the exponential power model with shape parameter of 0.30 led to higher reliability of DGV than did the other models. The differences between reliabilities of DGV from the Bayesian models and the GBLUP model were statistically significant for some traits. We observed a tendency that the superiority of the Bayesian models over the GBLUP model was more profound for the groups having weaker relationships with training population. Averaged over the 5 traits, the Bayesian mixture model improved the reliability of DGV by 2.0 percentage points for Groupsmgs, 2.7 percentage points for Groupsire, 3.3 percentage points for Groupmgs, and 4.3 percentage points for Groupnon compared with GBLUP. The results showed that a Bayesian model with intense shrinkage of the explanatory

  10. High prevalence of spotted fever group rickettsiae in Amblyomma variegatum from Uganda and their identification using sizes of intergenic spacers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Ryo; Qiu, Yongjin; Igarashi, Manabu; Magona, Joseph W; Zhou, Lijia; Ito, Kimihito; Sugimoto, Chihiro

    2013-12-01

    The spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae are obligate intracellular bacteria transmitted by ticks that cause several tick-borne rickettsioses in humans worldwide. This study was intended to determine the prevalence of SFG rickettsiae in Amblyomma variegatum from 7 districts across Uganda. In addition to sequencing of gltA and ompA genes, identification of Rickettsia species based on the sizes of highly variable intergenic spacers, namely, dksA-xerC, mppA-purC, and rpmE-tRNA(fMet) was carried out. Application of multiplex PCR for simultaneous amplification of 3 spacers combined with capillary electrophoresis separation allowed simple, accurate, and high-throughput fragment sizing with considerable time and cost savings. Rickettsia genus-specific real-time PCR detected 136 positives out of 140 samples, giving an overall prevalence of 97.1%. Most samples (n=113) had a size combination of 225, 195, and 341 bp for dksA-xerC, mppA-purC, and rpmE-tRNA(fMet), respectively, which was identical to that of R. africae, a causative agent of African tick bite fever. In addition, several samples had size variants in either dksA-xerC or rpmE-tRNA(fMet). Nonetheless, the partial sequences of gltA and ompA genes of samples of all size combinations showed the greatest similarity to R. africae (99.3-100% for gltA and 98.1-100% for ompA). Given these results, it is highly possible that the tested ticks were infected with R. africae or closely related species. This is a first report on molecular genetic detection of R. africae and its high endemicity in Uganda. Clinicians in this country should be aware of this pathogen as a cause of non-malarial febrile illness. This study provided a starting point for the development of Rickettsia species identification based on the sizes of intergenic spacers. The procedure is simple, rapid, and cost-effective to perform; hence it might be particularly well suited for preliminary species identification in epidemiological investigations. The results

  11. Group Guidance Services with Self-Regulation Technique to Improve Student Learning Motivation in Junior High School (JHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranoto, Hadi; Atieka, Nurul; Wihardjo, Sihadi Darmo; Wibowo, Agus; Nurlaila, Siti; Sudarmaji

    2016-01-01

    This study aims at: determining students motivation before being given a group guidance with self-regulation technique, determining students' motivation after being given a group counseling with self-regulation technique, generating a model of group counseling with self-regulation technique to improve motivation of learning, determining the…

  12. Aspirin’s Active Metabolite Salicylic Acid Targets High Mobility Group Box 1 to Modulate Inflammatory Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyong Woo; Tian, Miaoying; Song, Fei; Venereau, Emilie; Preti, Alessandro; Park, Sang-Wook; Hamilton, Keith; Swapna, G V T; Manohar, Murli; Moreau, Magali; Agresti, Alessandra; Gorzanelli, Andrea; De Marchis, Francesco; Wang, Huang; Antonyak, Marc; Micikas, Robert J; Gentile, Daniel R; Cerione, Richard A; Schroeder, Frank C; Montelione, Gaetano T; Bianchi, Marco E; Klessig, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) and its derivatives have been used for millennia to reduce pain, fever and inflammation. In addition, prophylactic use of acetylsalicylic acid, commonly known as aspirin, reduces the risk of heart attack, stroke and certain cancers. Because aspirin is rapidly de-acetylated by esterases in human plasma, much of aspirin’s bioactivity can be attributed to its primary metabolite, SA. Here we demonstrate that human high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a novel SA-binding protein. SA-binding sites on HMGB1 were identified in the HMG-box domains by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic studies and confirmed by mutational analysis. Extracellular HMGB1 is a damage-associated molecular pattern molecule (DAMP), with multiple redox states. SA suppresses both the chemoattractant activity of fully reduced HMGB1 and the increased expression of proinflammatory cytokine genes and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) induced by disulfide HMGB1. Natural and synthetic SA derivatives with greater potency for inhibition of HMGB1 were identified, providing proof-of-concept that new molecules with high efficacy against sterile inflammation are attainable. An HMGB1 protein mutated in one of the SA-binding sites identified by NMR chemical shift perturbation studies retained chemoattractant activity, but lost binding of and inhibition by SA and its derivatives, thereby firmly establishing that SA binding to HMGB1 directly suppresses its proinflammatory activities. Identification of HMGB1 as a pharmacological target of SA/aspirin provides new insights into the mechanisms of action of one of the world’s longest and most used natural and synthetic drugs. It may also provide an explanation for the protective effects of low-dose aspirin usage. PMID:26101955

  13. Clinical Value of High Mobility Group Box 1 and the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products in Head and Neck Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Austin; Bhavsar, Sheila; Riley, Erinn; Caponetti, Gabriel; Agrawal, Devendra

    2016-10-01

    Introduction High mobility group box 1 is a versatile protein involved in gene transcription, extracellular signaling, and response to inflammation. Extracellularly, high mobility group box 1 binds to several receptors, notably the receptor for advanced glycation end-products. Expression of high mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products has been described in many cancers. Objectives To systematically review the available literature using PubMed and Web of Science to evaluate the clinical value of high mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Data synthesis A total of eleven studies were included in this review. High mobility group box 1 overexpression is associated with poor prognosis and many clinical and pathological characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas patients. Additionally, the receptor for advanced glycation end-products demonstrates potential value as a clinical indicator of tumor angiogenesis and advanced staging. In diagnosis, high mobility group box 1 demonstrates low sensitivity. Conclusion High mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products are associated with clinical and pathological characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Further investigation of the prognostic and diagnostic value of these molecules is warranted.

  14. Clinical Value of High Mobility Group Box 1 and the Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products in Head and Neck Cancer: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen, Austin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction High mobility group box 1 is a versatile protein involved in gene transcription, extracellular signaling, and response to inflammation. Extracellularly, high mobility group box 1 binds to several receptors, notably the receptor for advanced glycation end-products. Expression of high mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products has been described in many cancers. Objectives To systematically review the available literature using PubMed and Web of Science to evaluate the clinical value of high mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Data synthesis A total of eleven studies were included in this review. High mobility group box 1 overexpression is associated with poor prognosis and many clinical and pathological characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas patients. Additionally, the receptor for advanced glycation end-products demonstrates potential value as a clinical indicator of tumor angiogenesis and advanced staging. In diagnosis, high mobility group box 1 demonstrates low sensitivity. Conclusion High mobility group box 1 and the receptor for advanced glycation end-products are associated with clinical and pathological characteristics of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Further investigation of the prognostic and diagnostic value of these molecules is warranted.

  15. High-Mobility Group Box 1 Disrupts Metabolic Function with Cigarette Smoke Exposure in a Ceramide-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver J. Taylor

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We have previously found that cigarette smoke disrupts metabolic function, in part, by increasing muscle ceramide accrual. To further our understanding of this, we sought to determine the role of the cytokine high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1, which is increased with smoke exposure, in smoke-induced muscle metabolic perturbations. To test this theory, we determined HMGB1 from lungs of human smokers, as well as from lung cells from mice exposed to cigarette smoke. We also treated cells and mice directly with HMGB1, in the presence or absence of myriocin, an inhibitor of serine palmitoyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in ceramide biosynthesis. Outcomes included assessments of insulin resistance and muscle mitochondrial function. HMGB1 was significantly increased in both human lungs and rodent alveolar macrophages. Further testing revealed that HMGB1 treatment elicited a widespread increase in ceramide species and reduction in myotube mitochondrial respiration, an increase in reactive oxygen species, and reduced insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. Inhibition of ceramide biosynthesis with myriocin was protective. In mice, by comparing treatments of HMGB1 injections with or without myriocin, we found that HMGB1 injections resulted in increased muscle ceramides, especially C16 and C24, which were necessary for reduced muscle mitochondrial respiration and compromised insulin and glucose tolerance. In conclusion, HMGB1 may be a necessary intermediate in the ceramide-dependent metabolic consequences of cigarette smoke exposure.

  16. High Mobility Group Box Protein 1 Boosts Endothelial Albumin Transcytosis through the RAGE/Src/Caveolin-1 Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Dan; Peng, Tao; Gou, Shanmiao; Li, Yiqing; Wu, Heshui; Wang, Chunyou; Yang, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    High-mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1), an inflammatory mediator, has been reported to destroy cell-cell junctions, resulting in vascular endothelial hyperpermeability. Here, we report that HMGB1 increases the endothelial transcytosis of albumin. In mouse lung vascular endothelial cells (MLVECs), HMGB1 at a concentration of 500 ng/ml or less did not harm cell-cell junctions but rapidly induced endothelial hyperpermeability to 125I-albumin. HMGB1 induced an increase in 125I-albumin and AlexaFluor 488-labeled albumin internalization in endocytosis assays. Depletion of receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but not TLR2 or TLR4, suppressed HMGB1-induced albumin transcytosis and endocytosis. Genetic and pharmacological destruction of lipid rafts significantly inhibited HMGB1-induced albumin endocytosis and transcytosis. HMGB1 induced the rapid phosphorylation of caveolin (Cav)-1 and Src. Either RAGE gene silencing or soluble RAGE suppressed Cav-1 Tyr14 phosphorylation and Src Tyr418 phosphorylation. The Src inhibitor 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl) pyrazolo[3,4-d] pyrimidine (PP2) blocked HMGB1-induced Cav-1 Tyr14 phosphorylation. PP2 and overexpression of Cav-1 with a T14F mutation significantly inhibited HMGB1-induced transcytosis and albumin endocytosis. Our findings suggest that HMGB1 induces the transcytosis of albumin via RAGE-dependent Src phosphorylation and Cav-1 phosphorylation. These studies revealed a new mechanism of HMGB1-induced endothelial hyperpermeability. PMID:27572515

  17. Meteoric Be-10 from Sirius Group suggests high elevation McMurdo Dry Valleys permanently frozen since 6 Ma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Warren W.; Schiller, Martin; Ditchburn, Bob G.; Graham, Ian J.; Zondervan, Albert

    2012-11-01

    A long-standing debate concerning Neogene Antarctic climate in the McMurdo Dry Valleys relies largely on evidence from landscape evolution, glacial modeling and stratigraphy. We provide new evidence from meteoric 10Be for the onset of frozen, hyper-arid conditions on a high elevation (1840 m) interfluve at Table Mountain. A simple decay model for the co-occurrence of meteoric 10Be and illuviated clay in cores of ice-cemented glacial sediments indicates that the clays were actively migrating down from the surface in a warm climate until the system froze between 6 and 9 Ma. Although this age range may be sensitive to possible interference by in situ produced 10Be, the implied minimum age of 6 Ma for the Sirius Group indicates that the Dry Valleys were permanently frozen down to this elevation at this time. The model also suggests denudation rates of 1-6 cm Myr-1 since freezing. These data provide an independent test of glacial-stratigraphic evidence used to determine Antarctic paleoclimate.

  18. Pick-up of early visual information to guide kinetics and kinematics within a group of highly skilled baseball batters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MüLler, Sean; Lalović, Alex; Dempsey, Alasdair R; Rosalie, Simon M; Harbaugh, Allen G

    2014-10-01

    This pilot study integrated sport expertise and biomechanics methodologies within a baseball batting task. Purpose was to examine differences within a highly skilled group of baseball batters to use visual information to guide weight transfer and bat movements. One batter who played at Major League Baseball (MLB) level was compared to five batters who played at Australian Baseball League (ABL) level in a case-control design. Batters faced pitchers in a simulated competition and attempted to hit pitches, while vision was temporally occluded during ball flight or not occluded. Time of weight transfer (kinetics), as well as bat downswing initiation and duration (kinematics) from the point of ball release, were compared between the MLB batter and ABL batters. Results indicated that the MLB batter coordinated his striking pattern by completing his weight transfer earlier than the ABL batters. His bat downswing was also initiated earlier than some ABL batters, but there was no difference in duration of bat downswing between batters. All batters initiated bat downswing prior to completion of weight transfer. Understanding of motor expertise is furthered using a novel methodology.

  19. VAST PLANES OF SATELLITES IN A HIGH-RESOLUTION SIMULATION OF THE LOCAL GROUP: COMPARISON TO ANDROMEDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillet, N.; Ocvirk, P.; Aubert, D. [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de lUniversité, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Knebe, A.; Yepes, G. [Departamento de Física Teórica, Módulo, Universidad Autónomade Madrid, Cantoblanco E-28049 (Spain); Libeskind, N.; Gottlöber, S. [Leibniz-Institute für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Hoffman, Y. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2015-02-10

    We search for vast planes of satellites (VPoS) in a high-resolution simulation of the Local Group performed by the CLUES project, which improves significantly the resolution of previous similar studies. We use a simple method for detecting planar configurations of satellites, and validate it on the known plane of M31. We implement a range of prescriptions for modeling the satellite populations, roughly reproducing the variety of recipes used in the literature, and investigate the occurrence and properties of planar structures in these populations. The structure of the simulated satellite systems is strongly non-random and contains planes of satellites, predominantly co-rotating, with, in some cases, sizes comparable to the plane observed in M31 by Ibata et al. However, the latter is slightly richer in satellites, slightly thinner, and has stronger co-rotation, which makes it stand out as overall more exceptional than the simulated planes, when compared to a random population. Although the simulated planes we find are generally dominated by one real structure forming its backbone, they are also partly fortuitous and are thus not kinematically coherent structures as a whole. Provided that the simulated and observed planes of satellites are indeed of the same nature, our results suggest that the VPoS of M31 is not a coherent disk and that one-third to one-half of its satellites must have large proper motions perpendicular to the plane.

  20. International kidney paired donation transplantations to increase kidney transplant of O group and highly sensitized patient: First report from India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kute, Vivek B; Patel, Himanshu V; Shah, Pankaj R; Modi, Pranjal R; Shah, Veena R; Rizvi, Sayyed J; Pal, Bipin C; Shah, Priya S; Wakhare, Pavan S; Shinde, Saiprasad G; Ghodela, Vijay A; Varyani, Umesh T; Patel, Minaxi H; Trivedi, Varsha B; Trivedi, Hargovind L

    2017-01-01

    AIM To report the first international living related two way kidney paired donation (KPD) transplantation from India which occurred on 17th February 2015 after legal permission from authorization committee. METHODS Donor recipient pairs were from Portugal and India who were highly sensitized and ABO incompatible with their spouse respectively. The two donor recipient pairs had negative lymphocyte cross-matching, flow cross-match and donor specific antibody in two way kidney exchange with the intended KPD donor. Local KPD options were fully explored for Indian patient prior to embarking on international KPD. RESULTS Both pairs underwent simultaneous uneventful kidney transplant surgeries and creatinine was 1 mg/dL on tacrolimus based immunosuppression at 11 mo follow up. The uniqueness of these transplantations was that they are first international KPD transplantations in our center. CONCLUSION International KPD will increases quality and quantity of living donor kidney transplantation. This could be an important step to solving the kidney shortage with additional benefit of reduced costs, improved quality and increased access for difficult to match incompatible pairs like O blood group patient with non-O donor and sensitized patient. To the best of our knowledge this is first international KPD transplantation from India. PMID:28280697

  1. Expression of high mobility group box 1 in inflamed dental pulp and its chemotactic effect on dental pulp cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xufang, E-mail: xufang.zhang@student.qut.edu.au [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4059 (Australia); Jiang, Hongwei, E-mail: jianghw@163.com [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Gong, Qimei, E-mail: gongqmei@gmail.com [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Fan, Chen, E-mail: c3.fan@student.qut.edu.au [Institute of Health and Biomedical Innovation, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, QLD 4059 (Australia); Huang, Yihua, E-mail: enu0701@163.com [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China); Ling, Junqi, E-mail: lingjq@mail.sysu.edu.cn [Department of Operative Dentistry and Endodontics, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Guangdong Province Key Laboratory of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510055 (China)

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • HMGB1 translocated from nucleus to cytoplasm during dental pulp inflammation. • HMGB1and its receptor RAGE were up-regulated in hDPCs under LPS stimulation. • HMGB1 enhanced hDPCs migration and induces cytoskeleton reorganization. • HMGB1 may play a critical role in dental pulp repair during inflamed state. - Abstract: High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) is a chromatin protein which can be released extracellularly, eliciting a pro-inflammatory response and promoting tissue repair process. This study aimed to examine the expression and distribution of HMGB1 and its receptor RAGE in inflamed dental pulp tissues, and to assess its effects on proliferation, migration and cytoskeleton of cultured human dental pulp cells (DPCs). Our data demonstrated that cytoplasmic expression of HMGB1 was observed in inflamed pulp tissues, while HMGB1 expression was confined in the nuclei in healthy dental pulp. The mRNA expression of HMGB1 and RAGE were significantly increased in inflamed pulps. In in vitro cultured DPCs, expression of HMGB1 in both protein and mRNA level was up-regulated after treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Exogenous HMGB1 enhanced DPCs migration in a dose-dependent manner and induced the reorganization of f-actin in DPCs. Our results suggests that HMGB1 are not only involved in the process of dental pulp inflammation, but also play an important role in the recruitment of dental pulp stem cells, promoting pulp repair and regeneration.

  2. Treatment of multiple myeloma with high-risk cytogenetics: a consensus of the International Myeloma Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avet-Loiseau, Hervé; Lonial, Sagar; Usmani, Saad; Siegel, David; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Chng, Wee-Joo; Moreau, Philippe; Attal, Michel; Kyle, Robert A.; Caers, Jo; Hillengass, Jens; San Miguel, Jesús; van de Donk, Niels W. C. J.; Einsele, Hermann; Bladé, Joan; Durie, Brian G. M.; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Mateos, María-Victoria; Palumbo, Antonio; Orlowski, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The International Myeloma Working Group consensus updates the definition for high-risk (HR) multiple myeloma based on cytogenetics Several cytogenetic abnormalities such as t(4;14), del(17/17p), t(14;16), t(14;20), nonhyperdiploidy, and gain(1q) were identified that confer poor prognosis. The prognosis of patients showing these abnormalities may vary with the choice of therapy. Treatment strategies have shown promise for HR cytogenetic diseases, such as proteasome inhibition in combination with lenalidomide/pomalidomide, double autologous stem cell transplant plus bortezomib, or combination of immunotherapy with lenalidomide or pomalidomide. Careful analysis of cytogenetic subgroups in trials comparing different treatments remains an important goal. Cross-trial comparisons may provide insight into the effect of new drugs in patients with cytogenetic abnormalities. However, to achieve this, consensus on definitions of analytical techniques, proportion of abnormal cells, and treatment regimens is needed. Based on data available today, bortezomib and carfilzomib treatment appear to improve complete response, progression-free survival, and overall survival in t(4;14) and del(17/17p), whereas lenalidomide may be associated with improved progression-free survival in t(4;14) and del(17/17p). Patients with multiple adverse cytogenetic abnormalities do not benefit from these agents. FISH data are implemented in the revised International Staging System for risk stratification. PMID:27002115

  3. Genetics of gliadins coded by the group 1 chromosomes in the high-quality bread wheat cultivar Neepawa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dachkevitch, T; Redaelli, R; Biancardi, A M; Metakovsky, E V; Pogna, N E

    1993-04-01

    The inheritance and biochemical properties of gliadins controlled by the group 1 chromosomes of the high-quality bread wheat cultivar Neepawa were studied in the progeny of the cross Neepawa x Costantino by six different electrophoretic procedures. Chromosome 1B of Neepawa contains two gliadin loci, one (Gli-B1) coding for at least six ω- or γ-gliadins, the other (Gli-B3) controlling the synthesis of gliadin N6 only. The map distance between these loci was calculated as 22.1 cM. Amongst the chromosome 1A gliadins, three proteins are encoded at the Gli-A1 locus whereas polypeptides N14-N15-N16 are controlled by a remote locus which recombines with Gli-A1. Six other gliadins are controlled by a gene cluster at Gli-D1 on chromosome 1D. Canadian wheat cultivars sharing the Gli-B1 allele of Neepawa were found to differ in the presence or absence of gliadin N6. The electrophoretic mobilities of proteins N6 and N14-N15-N16 were unaffected by the addition of a reducing agent during two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamid-gel electrophoresis, suggesting the absence of intra-chain disulphide bonds in their structure.

  4. Highly frequent mutations in negative regulators of multiple virulence genes in group A streptococcal toxic shock syndrome isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikebe, Tadayoshi; Ato, Manabu; Matsumura, Takayuki; Hasegawa, Hideki; Sata, Tetsutaro; Kobayashi, Kazuo; Watanabe, Haruo

    2010-04-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is a severe invasive infection characterized by the sudden onset of shock and multiorgan failure; it has a high mortality rate. Although a number of studies have attempted to determine the crucial factors behind the onset of STSS, the responsible genes in group A Streptococcus have not been clarified. We previously reported that mutations of csrS/csrR genes, a two-component negative regulator system for multiple virulence genes of Streptococcus pyogenes, are found among the isolates from STSS patients. In the present study, mutations of another negative regulator, rgg, were also found in clinical isolates of STSS patients. The rgg mutants from STSS clinical isolates enhanced lethality and impaired various organs in the mouse models, similar to the csrS mutants, and precluded their being killed by human neutrophils, mainly due to an overproduction of SLO. When we assessed the mutation frequency of csrS, csrR, and rgg genes among S. pyogenes isolates from STSS (164 isolates) and non-invasive infections (59 isolates), 57.3% of the STSS isolates had mutations of one or more genes among three genes, while isolates from patients with non-invasive disease had significantly fewer mutations in these genes (1.7%). The results of the present study suggest that mutations in the negative regulators csrS/csrR and rgg of S. pyogenes are crucial factors in the pathogenesis of STSS, as they lead to the overproduction of multiple virulence factors.

  5. High-Mobility Group Box-1 Induces Decreased Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor-Mediated Neuroprotection in the Diabetic Retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Abu El-Asrar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To test the hypothesis that brain-derived neurotrophic factor-(BDNF- mediated neuroprotection is reduced by high-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1 in diabetic retina, paired vitreous and serum samples from 46 proliferative diabetic retinopathy and 34 nondiabetic patients were assayed for BDNF, HMGB1, soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1, and TBARS. We also examined retinas of diabetic and HMGB1 intravitreally injected rats. The effect of the HMGB1 inhibitor glycyrrhizin on diabetes-induced changes in retinal BDNF expressions was studied. Western blot, ELISA, and TBARS assays were used. BDNF was not detected in vitreous samples. BDNF levels were significantly lower in serum samples from diabetic patients compared with nondiabetics, whereas HMGB1, sRAGE, sICAM-1, and TBARS levels were significantly higher in diabetic serum samples. MCP-1 levels did not differ significantly. There was significant inverse correlation between serum levels of BDNF and HMGB1. Diabetes and intravitreal administration of HMGB1 induced significant upregulation of the expression of HMGB1, TBARS, and cleaved caspase-3, whereas the expression of BDNF and synaptophysin was significantly downregulated in rat retinas. Glycyrrhizin significantly attenuated diabetes-induced downregulation of BDNF. Our results suggest that HMGB1-induced downregulation of BDNF might be involved in pathogenesis of diabetic retinal neurodegeneration.

  6. High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) as an immune-modulating factor for polarization of human T lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lifeng Huang; Yongming Yao; Haidong Meng; Xiaodong Zhao; Ning Dong; Yan Yu

    2008-01-01

    Objective This study was performed to investigate the effect of high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB 1) on immune function of human T lymphocytes in vitro and explore its potential role in cell-mediated immune dysfunction.Methods Fresh blood was obtained from healthy adult volunteers and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated,then rhHMGB 1 was added to PBMCs.Four-color flow cytometric (FCM) analysis was used for the measurement of intracellular cytokine including interleukin Results (1) Different stimulating time and dosage of rhHMGB 1 did not alter the number of IFN-a positive cells (Th 1).rhHMGB 1 stimulation provoked a dose-dependent and time-dependent increase in Th2 subset and decrease in ratio of Th 1 to Th2.(2) Compared with the untreated cells,when the cells were coincubated with rhHMGB 1 (10-100ng/ml) for 12 hrs,protein release of IL-2 and sIL-2R were significantly up-regulated.At 48 hrs,in contrast,protein production was relatively lower in cells after exposure to 100-1000 ng/ml rhHMGBI.Conclusions These findings demonstrated that HMGB1 has a dual influence on immune functions of human T lymphocytes.

  7. The conserved lymphokine element-0 in the IL5 promoter binds to a high mobility group-1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrugo, J; Marsh, D G; Ghosh, B

    1996-10-01

    The conserved lymphokine elements-0 (CLE0) in the IL5 promoter is essential for the expression of IL-5. Here, we report the cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding a novel CLE0-binding protein, CLEBP-1 from a mouse Th2 clone, D10.G4.1. Interestingly, it was found that the CLEBP1 cDNA sequence was almost identical to the sequences of known high mobility group-1 (HMG1) cDNAs. When expressed as a recombinant fusion protein in Escherichia coli, CLEBP-1 was shown to bind to the IL5-CLE0 element in electrophoretic mobility-shift assays (EMSA) and southwestern blot analysis. The CLEBP-1 fusion protein cross-reacts with and-HMG-1/2 in Western blot analysis. It also binds to the CLE0 elements of IL4, GMCSF and GCSF genes. CLEBP-1 and closely related HMG-1 and HMG-2 proteins may play key roles in facilitating the expression of the lymphokine genes that contain CLE0 elements.

  8. Ethyl pyruvate reduces myocardial ischemia and reperfusion injury by inhibiting high mobility group box 1 protein in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaorong; Cui, Bo; Zhou, Xiaoya; Xu, Changwu; Lu, Zhibing; Jiang, Hong

    2012-01-01

    High mobility group box 1 protein (HMGB1) plays an important role in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury. Ethyl pyruvate (EP), a potent reactive oxygen species scavenger, has been reported to inhibit myocardial apoptosis and reduce myocardial I/R injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism by which EP reduces myocardial I/R injury in rats. Anesthetized male rats were once treated with EP (50 mg/kg, i.p.) before ischemia, and then subjected to ischemia for 30 min followed by reperfusion for 4 h. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), creatine kinase (CK), malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and infarct size were measured. HMGB1 expression was assessed by immunoblotting. The results showed that pretreatment of EP (50 mg/kg) could significantly reduce the infarct size and the levels of LDH and CK after 4 h reperfusion (all PR. The present study suggested that ethyl pyruvate could attenuate myocardial I/R injury by inhibiting HMGB1 expression.

  9. Inhibition of high-mobility group box 1 expression by siRNA in rat hepatic stellate cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-Song Ge; Jian-Xin Wu; Jian-Gao Fan; Yao-Jun Wang; Ying-Wei Chen

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To explore the role of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein during liver fibrogenesis and investigate the functional effects of HMGB1 gene silencing in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) using siRNA. METHODS: Hepatic fibrosis in rats was induced through serial subcutaneous injections of dimethylnitrosamine, and expression of HMGB1 was detected by immunohistochemistry. HMGB1 siRNAs were developed and transiently transfected into HSC-T6 cells using Lipofectamine 2000. HMGB1 expression was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Western blotting analysis. Expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and collagen types Ⅰ and Ⅲ was evaluated by real-time PCR. Cell proliferation and the cell cycle were determined using the methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium method. Finally, collagen content in HSC supernatant was evaluated by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: The results showed that HMGB1 was upregulated during liver fibrosis and that its expression was closely correlated with the deposition of collagen. siRNA molecules were successfully transfected into HSCs and induced inhibition of HMGB1 expression in a time-dependent manner. Moreover, HMGB1 siRNA treatment inhibited synthesis of α-SMA and collagen types Ⅰ and Ⅲ in transfected HSCs. CONCLUSION: This study suggests a significant functional role for HMGB1 in the development of liver fibrosis. It also demonstrates that downregulation of HMGB1 expression might be a potential strategy to treat liver fibrosis.

  10. High-Mobility Group Box 1 Disrupts Metabolic Function with Cigarette Smoke Exposure in a Ceramide-Dependent Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Oliver J.; Thatcher, Mikayla O.; Carr, Sheryl T.; Gibbs, Jonathan L.; Trumbull, Annie M.; Harrison, Mitchell E.; Winden, Duane R.; Pearson, Mackenzie J.; Tippetts, Trevor S.; Holland, William L.; Reynolds, Paul R.; Bikman, Benjamin T.

    2017-01-01

    We have previously found that cigarette smoke disrupts metabolic function, in part, by increasing muscle ceramide accrual. To further our understanding of this, we sought to determine the role of the cytokine high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which is increased with smoke exposure, in smoke-induced muscle metabolic perturbations. To test this theory, we determined HMGB1 from lungs of human smokers, as well as from lung cells from mice exposed to cigarette smoke. We also treated cells and mice directly with HMGB1, in the presence or absence of myriocin, an inhibitor of serine palmitoyltransferase, the rate-limiting enzyme in ceramide biosynthesis. Outcomes included assessments of insulin resistance and muscle mitochondrial function. HMGB1 was significantly increased in both human lungs and rodent alveolar macrophages. Further testing revealed that HMGB1 treatment elicited a widespread increase in ceramide species and reduction in myotube mitochondrial respiration, an increase in reactive oxygen species, and reduced insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation. Inhibition of ceramide biosynthesis with myriocin was protective. In mice, by comparing treatments of HMGB1 injections with or without myriocin, we found that HMGB1 injections resulted in increased muscle ceramides, especially C16 and C24, which were necessary for reduced muscle mitochondrial respiration and compromised insulin and glucose tolerance. In conclusion, HMGB1 may be a necessary intermediate in the ceramide-dependent metabolic consequences of cigarette smoke exposure. PMID:28531105

  11. Network-constrained group lasso for high-dimensional multinomial classification with application to cancer subtype prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xinyu; Wang, Xuefeng; Chen, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Classic multinomial logit model, commonly used in multiclass regression problem, is restricted to few predictors and does not take into account the relationship among variables. It has limited use for genomic data, where the number of genomic features far exceeds the sample size. Genomic features such as gene expressions are usually related by an underlying biological network. Efficient use of the network information is important to improve classification performance as well as the biological interpretability. We proposed a multinomial logit model that is capable of addressing both the high dimensionality of predictors and the underlying network information. Group lasso was used to induce model sparsity, and a network-constraint was imposed to induce the smoothness of the coefficients with respect to the underlying network structure. To deal with the non-smoothness of the objective function in optimization, we developed a proximal gradient algorithm for efficient computation. The proposed model was compared to models with no prior structure information in both simulations and a problem of cancer subtype prediction with real TCGA (the cancer genome atlas) gene expression data. The network-constrained mode outperformed the traditional ones in both cases.

  12. Oxytocin enhances orienting to social information in a selective group of high-functioning male adults with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althaus, M; Groen, Y; Wijers, A A; Noltes, H; Tucha, O; Hoekstra, P J

    2015-12-01

    The study investigated the effects of nasally administered oxytocin on neurophysiological orienting to empathy-evoking pictures in normally intelligent male adults with and without an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). It further investigated whether these effects might be moderated by the individual's approach and avoidance tendencies. All subjects participated in a randomised double-blind placebo controlled crossover trial where either oxytocin (OXT) or placebo was administered preceding the viewing of affective pictures.The pictures, selected from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS), represented a systematic variation of pleasant, unpleasant and neutral scenes with and without humans. Both cardiac (ECR) and cortical (LPP) evoked orienting responses were measured and both were enhanced for the pictures with humans, in particular for the unpleasant ones. No significant group differences were found, nor were there any treatment effects. Moderator analysis, however, demonstrated that OXT did enhance orienting to affective pictures with humansin male adults with ASD who are easily distressed when seeing others in stressful situations and in healthy males who are highly sensitive to anticipated punishment and criticism or have a low drive for goal achievement. Individual differences in stress-related avoidance tendencies should be taken into account when considering OXT as a treatment of social deficiencies in autism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Activation of Plant Innate Immunity by Extracellular High Mobility Group Box 3 and Its Inhibition by Salicylic Acid.

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    Hyong Woo Choi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Damage-associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs signal the presence of tissue damage to induce immune responses in plants and animals. Here, we report that High Mobility Group Box 3 (HMGB3 is a novel plant DAMP. Extracellular HMGB3, through receptor-like kinases BAK1 and BKK1, induced hallmark innate immune responses, including i MAPK activation, ii defense-related gene expression, iii callose deposition, and iv enhanced resistance to Botrytis cinerea. Infection by necrotrophic B. cinerea released HMGB3 into the extracellular space (apoplast. Silencing HMGBs enhanced susceptibility to B. cinerea, while HMGB3 injection into apoplast restored resistance. Like its human counterpart, HMGB3 binds salicylic acid (SA, which results in inhibition of its DAMP activity. An SA-binding site mutant of HMGB3 retained its DAMP activity, which was no longer inhibited by SA, consistent with its reduced SA-binding activity. These results provide cross-kingdom evidence that HMGB proteins function as DAMPs and that SA is their conserved inhibitor.

  14. High Mobility Group Box-1 Protein and Outcomes in Critically Ill Surgical Patients Requiring Open Abdominal Management

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    Michelle S. Malig

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Previous studies assessing various cytokines in the critically ill/injured have been uninformative in terms of translating to clinical care management. Animal abdominal sepsis work suggests that enhanced intraperitoneal (IP clearance of Damage-Associated Molecular Patterns (DAMPs improves outcome. Thus measuring the responses of DAMPs offers alternate potential insights and a representative DAMP, High Mobility Group Box-1 protein (HMGB-1, was considered. While IP biomediators are being recognized in critical illness/trauma, HMGB-1 behaviour has not been examined in open abdomen (OA management. Methods. A modified protocol for HMGB-1 detection was used to examine plasma/IP fluid samples from 44 critically ill/injured OA patients enrolled in a randomized controlled trial comparing two negative pressure peritoneal therapies (NPPT: Active NPPT (ANPPT and Barker’s Vacuum Pack NPPT (BVP. Samples were collected and analyzed at the time of laparotomy and at 24 and 48 hours after. Results. There were no statistically significant differences in survivor versus nonsurvivor HMGB-1 plasma or IP concentrations at baseline, 24 hours, or 48 hours. However, plasma HMGB-1 levels tended to increase continuously in the BVP cohort. Conclusions. HMGB-1 appeared to behave differently between NPPT cohorts. Further studies are needed to elucidate the relationship of HMGB-1 and outcomes in septic/injured patients.

  15. Targeting of highly conserved Dengue virus sequences with anti-Dengue virus trans-splicing group I introns

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    Fraser Tresa S

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue viruses (DENV are one of the most important viral diseases in the world with approximately 100 million infections and 200,000 deaths each year. The current lack of an approved tetravalent vaccine and ineffective insecticide control measures warrant a search for alternatives to effectively combat DENV. The trans-splicing variant of the Tetrahymena thermophila group I intron catalytic RNA, or ribozyme, is a powerful tool for post-transcriptional RNA modification. The nature of the ribozyme and the predictability with which it can be directed makes it a powerful tool for modifying RNA in nearly any cell type without the need for genome-altering gene therapy techniques or dependence on native cofactors. Results Several anti-DENV Group I trans-splicing introns (αDENV-GrpIs were designed and tested for their ability to target DENV-2 NGC genomes in situ. We have successfully targeted two different uracil bases on the positive sense genomic strand within the highly conserved 5'-3' cyclization sequence (CS region common to all serotypes of DENV with our αDENV-GrpIs. Our ribozymes have demonstrated ability to specifically trans-splice a new RNA sequence downstream of the targeted site in vitro and in transfected insect cells as analyzed by firefly luciferase and RT-PCR assays. The effectiveness of these αDENV-GrpIs to target infecting DENV genomes is also validated in transfected or transformed Aedes mosquito cell lines upon infection with unattenuated DENV-2 NGC. Conclusions Analysis shows that our αDENV-GrpIs have the ability to effectively trans-splice the DENV genome in situ. Notably, these results show that the αDENV-GrpI 9v1, designed to be active against all forms of Dengue virus, effectively targeted the DENV-2 NGC genome in a sequence specific manner. These novel αDENV-GrpI introns provide a striking alternative to other RNA based approaches for the transgenic suppression of DENV in transformed mosquito cells and

  16. α-Helical domain is essential for antimicrobial activity of high mobility group nucleosomal binding domain 2 (HMGN2)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun FENG; Ning HUANG; Qi WU; Lang BAO; Bo-yao WANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To examine the antimicrobial spectrum and functional structure of high mobility group nucleosomal binding domain 2 (HMGN2). Methods: OMIGA protein structure software was used to analyze the two-dimensional structure of HMGN2. Synthetic short peptides were generated for studying the relationship between function and structure. Prokaryotic expression vectors were constructed for the holo-HMGN2 and its helical domain. Their E coli-based products were also prepared for antimicrobial testing. The antimicrobial assay included minimal effective concentration, minimal inhibitory concentration, and minimal bactericidal concentration. Results: OMIGA protein structure software analysis revealed a transmembrane α-helical structure (the putative antimicrobial domain) located from position 18 to 48 of the HMGN2 protein sequence. The antimicrobial assay showed that the MIC of the recombinant holo-HMGN2 against E coli ML-35p (an ampicillin-resistance strain), Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and Candida albicans ATCC 10231 were 12.5, 25, and 100 mg/L, respectively. Against the same microorganisms, the MIC of the synthetic HMGN2 α-helical domain were 12.5, 25,and 100 mg/L, respectively, that is, the same as with the recombinant form of HMGN2. In contrast, recombinant holo-HMGN2 was inactive against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923. The synthetic N-terminal and C-terminal fragments of HMGN2 had no antimicrobial activity against E coli ML-35p, P aeruginosa ATCC 27853 or C albicans ATCC 10231. Conclusion: HMGN2 showed potent antimicrobial activity against E coli ML-35p, P aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and, to some extent, against C albicans ATCC 10231, but was inactive against S aureus ATCC 25923 in these assay systems. Its α-helical structure may be essential for the antimicrobial activity of HMGN2.

  17. Extracellular high-mobility group box 1 mediates pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Liu, Ming; Jiang, Hong; Yu, Ying; Yu, Peng; Tong, Rui; Wu, Jian; Zhang, Shuning; Yao, Kang; Zou, Yunzeng; Ge, Junbo

    2016-03-01

    Inflammation plays a key role in pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure, but the mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which is increased in myocardium under pressure overload, may be involved in pressure overload-induced cardiac injury. The objectives of this study are to determine the role of HMGB1 in cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac dysfunction under pressure overload. Pressure overload was imposed on the heart of male wild-type mice by transverse aortic constriction (TAC), while recombinant HMGB1, HMGB1 box A (a competitive antagonist of HMGB1) or PBS was injected into the LV wall. Moreover, cardiac myocytes were cultured and given sustained mechanical stress. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed after the operation and sections for histological analyses were generated from paraffin-embedded hearts. Relevant proteins and genes were detected. Cardiac HMGB1 expression was increased after TAC, which was accompanied by its translocation from nucleus to both cytoplasm and intercellular space. Exogenous HMGB1 aggravated TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac dysfunction, as demonstrated by echocardiographic analyses, histological analyses and foetal cardiac genes detection. Nevertheless, the aforementioned pathological change induced by TAC could partially be reversed by HMGB1 inhibition. Consistent with the in vivo observations, mechanical stress evoked the release and synthesis of HMGB1 in cultured cardiac myocytes. This study indicates that the activated and up-regulated HMGB1 in myocardium, which might partially be derived from cardiac myocytes under pressure overload, may be of crucial importance in pressure overload-induced cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac dysfunction.

  18. Interferon regulatory factor-1 mediates the release of high mobility group box-1 in endotoxemia in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Pin-hua; Jon Cardinal; LI Mo-li; HU Cheng-ping; Allan Tsung

    2013-01-01

    Background The extracellular release of the danger signal high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) has been implicated in the pathogenesis and outcomes of sepsis.Understanding the mechanisms responsible for HMGB1 release can lead to the identification of targets that may inhibit this process.The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) is an important mediator of innate immune responses and has been shown to participate in mortality associated with endotoxemia; however,its role in mediating the release of HMGB1 in these settings is unknown.Methods Male IRF-1 knockout (KO) and age matched C57BL/6 wild type (WT) mice were given intraperitoneal (IP)injections of lipopolysaccharide (LPS).In some experiments,96 hours survival rates were observed.In other experiments,mice were sacrificed 12 hours after LPS administration and sera were harvested for future analysis.In in vitro study,RAW 264.7 murine monocyte/macrophage-like cells or primary peritoneal macrophage obtained from IRF-1 KO and WF mice were cultured for LPS mediated HMGB1 release analysis.And the mechanism for HMGB1 release was analyzed by immune-precipitation.Results IRF-1 KO mice experienced less mortality,and released less systerric HMGB1 compared to their WT counterparts.Exogenous administration of recombinant HMGB1 to IRF-1 KO mice returned the mortality rate to that seen originally in IRF-1 WT mice.Using cultures of peritoneal macrophages or RAW264.7 cells,in vitro LPS stimulation induced the release of HMGB1 in an IRF-1 dependent manner.And the janus associated kinase (JAK)-IRF-1 signal pathway appeared to participate in the signaling mechanisms of LPS-induced HMGB1 release by mediating acetylation of HMGB1.Conclusion IRF-1 plays a role in LPS induced release of HMGB1 and therefore may serve as a novel target in sepsis.

  19. Involvement of high mobility group box 1 in the development and maintenance of chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Takeshi; Tsubota, Maho; Kawaishi, Yudai; Yamanishi, Hiroki; Kamitani, Natsuki; Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Liu, Keyue; Nishibori, Masahiro; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2016-07-15

    Given that high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a nuclear protein, once released to the extracellular space, promotes nociception, we asked if inactivation of HMGB1 prevents or reverses chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy in rats and also examined possible involvement of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and the receptor for advanced glycation endproduct (RAGE), known as targets for HMGB1. Painful neuropathy was produced by repeated i.p. administration of paclitaxel or vincristine in rats. Nociceptive threshold was determined by the paw pressure method and/or von Frey test in the hindpaw. Tissue protein levels were determined by immunoblotting. Repeated i.p. administration of the anti-HMGB1-neutralizing antibody or recombinant human soluble thrombomodulin (rhsTM), known to inactivate HMGB1, prevented the development of hyperalgesia and/or allodynia induced by paclitaxel or vincristine in rats. A single i.p. or intraplantar (i.pl.) administration of the antibody or rhsTM reversed the chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A single i.pl. administration of a TLR4 antagonist or low molecular weight heparin, known to inhibit RAGE, attenuated the hyperalgesia caused by i.pl. HMGB1 and also the chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy. Paclitaxel or vincristine treatment significantly decreased protein levels of HMGB1 in the dorsal root ganglia, but not sciatic nerves. HMGB1 thus participates in both development and maintenance of chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy, in part through RAGE and TLR4. HMGB1 inactivation is considered useful to prevent and treat the chemotherapy-induced painful neuropathy.

  20. Highly frequent mutations in negative regulators of multiple virulence genes in group A streptococcal toxic shock syndrome isolates.

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    Tadayoshi Ikebe

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS is a severe invasive infection characterized by the sudden onset of shock and multiorgan failure; it has a high mortality rate. Although a number of studies have attempted to determine the crucial factors behind the onset of STSS, the responsible genes in group A Streptococcus have not been clarified. We previously reported that mutations of csrS/csrR genes, a two-component negative regulator system for multiple virulence genes of Streptococcus pyogenes, are found among the isolates from STSS patients. In the present study, mutations of another negative regulator, rgg, were also found in clinical isolates of STSS patients. The rgg mutants from STSS clinical isolates enhanced lethality and impaired various organs in the mouse models, similar to the csrS mutants, and precluded their being killed by human neutrophils, mainly due to an overproduction of SLO. When we assessed the mutation frequency of csrS, csrR, and rgg genes among S. pyogenes isolates from STSS (164 isolates and non-invasive infections (59 isolates, 57.3% of the STSS isolates had mutations of one or more genes among three genes, while isolates from patients with non-invasive disease had significantly fewer mutations in these genes (1.7%. The results of the present study suggest that mutations in the negative regulators csrS/csrR and rgg of S. pyogenes are crucial factors in the pathogenesis of STSS, as they lead to the overproduction of multiple virulence factors.

  1. Characterization of an Entamoeba histolytica High-Mobility-Group Box Protein Induced during Intestinal Infection ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhyankar, Mayuresh M.; Hochreiter, Amelia E.; Hershey, Jessica; Evans, Clive; Zhang, Yan; Crasta, Oswald; Sobral, Bruno W. S.; Mann, Barbara J.; Petri, William A.; Gilchrist, Carol A.

    2008-01-01

    The unicellular eukaryote Entamoeba histolytica is a human parasite that causes amebic dysentery and liver abscess. A genome-wide analysis of gene expression modulated by intestinal colonization and invasion identified an upregulated transcript that encoded a putative high-mobility-group box (HMGB) protein, EhHMGB1. We tested if EhHMGB1 encoded a functional HMGB protein and determined its role in control of parasite gene expression. Recombinant EhHMGB1 was able to bend DNA in vitro, a characteristic of HMGB proteins. Core conserved residues required for DNA bending activity in other HMGB proteins were demonstrated by mutational analysis to be essential for EhHMGB1 activity. EhHMGB1 was also able to enhance the binding of human p53 to its cognate DNA sequence in vitro, which is expected for an HMGB1 protein. Confocal microscopy, using antibodies against the recombinant protein, confirmed its nuclear localization. Overexpression of EhHMGB1 in HM1:IMSS trophozoites led to modulation of 33 transcripts involved in a variety of cellular functions. Of these, 20 were also modulated at either day 1 or day 29 in the mouse model of intestinal amebiasis. Notably, four transcripts with known roles in virulence, including two encoding Gal/GalNAc lectin light chains, were modulated in response to EhHMGB1 overexpression. We concluded that EhHMGB1 was a bona fide HMGB protein with the capacity to recapitulate part of the modulation of parasite gene expression seen during adaptation to the host intestine. PMID:18658254

  2. High-mobility group Box-1 is involved in NMDA-induced retinal injury the in rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Kenji; Mizuta, Aya; Fujimura, Kyosuke; Kurauchi, Yuki; Mori, Asami; Nakahara, Tsutomu; Ishii, Kunio

    2015-08-01

    High-mobility group Box-1 (HMGB1) is known to be released from injured cells and to induce an inflammatory response. Although HMGB1 was reported to mediate ischemia-reperfusion injury of the brain, its role in glutamate excitotoxicity of the retina remains controversial. Here, the authors demonstrated the evidence that HMGB1 is involved in the retinal damage induced by NMDA. Under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to intravitreal injection of NMDA (200 nmol/eye) or HMGB1 protein derived from bovines (5-15 μg/eye). Intravitreal anti-HMGB1 IgY (5 μg/eye) was simultaneously administered with NMDA or HMGB1. Seven days later, animals were killed and 5-μm retinal sections through the optic nerve head were obtained. These specimens were subjected to morphometry. Intravitreal NMDA and HMGB1 protein evoked cell loss in the ganglion cell layer 7 days later. Intravitreal anti-HMGB1 IgY reduced these damages. Anti-HMGB1 IgY reduced the number of 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG)-positive cells induced by intravitreal NMDA. Toll-like receptor 2/4 antagonist peptide, receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) antagonist peptide, and FPS-ZM1 significantly reduced the retinal damage induced by HMGB1 protein. The results in the present study suggest that HMGB1 is at least in part involved in NMDA-induced retinal injury, and probably induces cell death of retinal ganglion cells with increase of oxidative stress, via activation of toll-like receptor 2/4 and RAGE in the rat retina.

  3. Urinary levels of high mobility group box-1 are associated with disease activity in antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated vasculitis.

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    Tian-Tian Ma

    Full Text Available High mobility group box-1 (HMGB1, a kind of pro-inflammatory mediator, is associated with inflammatory conditions and tissue damage. Our previous study demonstrated that the circulating levels of HMGB1 correlated with disease activity of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV. In the current study, we aimed to measure urinary levels of HMGB1 in AAV patients, correlated them to clinical activity index and analysed the immunohistochemical HMGB1 staining in kidney specimens.50 patients with AAV in active stage and 56 patients with AAV in remission were recruited. The urinary levels of HMGB1 were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Moreover, renal biopsy specimens from 27 patients with active AAV were randomly collected to evaluate the deposition of HMGB1.Urinary HMGB1 levels in AAV patients in active stage were significantly higher than those in AAV patients in remission and healthy controls (1.46 [0.56-3.43] versus 0.38 [0.10-1.35] mg/μmolCr, P=0.001; 1.46 [0.56-3.43] versus 0.48 [0.40-0.60] mg/μmolCr, P=0.000, respectively. Further analysis found that urinary levels of HMGB1 correlated with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r=0.354, p=0.012, C-reactive protein (r=0.289, p=0.042, and Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score (r=0.350, p=0.013. Renal tissue of active AAV patients showed HMGB1 was mainly expressed in the cytoplasm and the extracellular space. The percentage of HMGB1-negative nuclei in renal tissue of patients with active AAV was significantly higher than that in normal controls (60.6±20.2 % versus 2.7±0.6 %, p<0.01.Urinary levels of HMGB1 may be associated with the disease activity in AAV patients.

  4. Proinflammatory effect of high-mobility group protein B1 on keratinocytes: an autocrine mechanism underlying psoriasis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weigang; Guo, Sen; Li, Bing; Liu, Lin; Ge, Rui; Cao, Tianyu; Wang, Huina; Gao, Tianwen; Wang, Gang; Li, Chunying

    2017-02-01

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune skin disease, in which keratinocytes play a crucial pathogenic role. High-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) is an inflammatory factor that can be released from keratinocyte nuclei in psoriatic lesions. We aimed to investigate the proinflammatory effect of HMGB1 on keratinocytes and the contribution of HMGB1 to psoriasis development. Normal human keratinocytes were treated with recombinant human HMGB1, and the production of inflammatory factors and the intermediary signalling pathways were examined. Furthermore, the imiquimod-induced psoriasis-like mouse model was used to investigate the role of HMGB1 in psoriasis development in vivo. A total of 11 inflammatory factors were shown to be upregulated by HMGB1 in keratinocytes, among which interleukin (IL)-18 showed the greatest change. We then found that activation of the nuclear factor-κB signalling pathway and inflammasomes accounted for HMGB1-induced IL-18 expression and secretion. Moreover, HMGB1 and downstream IL-18 contributed to the development of psoriasiform dermatitis in the imiquimod-treated mice. In addition, T-helper 17 immune response in the psoriasis-like mouse model could be inhibited by both HMGB1 and IL-18 blockade. Our findings indicate that HMGB1 secreted from keratinocytes can facilitate the production and secretion of inflammatory factors such as IL-18 in keratinocytes in an autocrine way, thus promoting the development of psoriasis. Blocking the proinflammatory function of the HMGB1-IL-18 axis may be useful for psoriasis treatment in the future. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Spinal high-mobility group box 1 contributes to mechanical allodynia in a rat model of bone cancer pain

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    Tong, Wei [Department of Out-Patient, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Wang, Wei; Huang, Jing [Department of Anatomy and K. K. Leung Brain Research Centre, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Ren, Ning [Comprehensive Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Wu, Sheng-Xi, E-mail: shengxi@fmmu.edu.cn [Department of Anatomy and K. K. Leung Brain Research Centre, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Li, Yong-Qi, E-mail: devneuro@fmmu.edu.cn [Comprehensive Diagnostic and Therapeutic Center, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)

    2010-05-14

    Mechanisms underlying bone cancer-induced pain are largely unknown. Previous studies indicate that neuroinflammation in the spinal dorsal horn is especially involved. Being first reported as a nonhistone chromosomal protein, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is now implicated as a mediator of inflammation. We hypothesized that HMGB1 could trigger the release of cytokines in the spinal dorsal horn and contribute to bone cancer pain. To test this hypothesis, we first built a bone cancer pain model induced by intratibal injection of Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma cells. The structural damage to the tibia was monitored by radiological analysis. The mechanical allodynia was measured and the expression of spinal HMGB1 and IL-1{beta} was evaluated. We observed that inoculation of cancer cells, but not heat-killed cells, induced progressive bone destruction from 9 d to 21 d post inoculation. Behavioral tests demonstrated that the significant nociceptive response in the cancer cells-injected rats emerged on day 9 and this kind of mechanical allodynia lasted at least 21 d following inoculation. Tumor cells inoculation significantly increased HMGB1 expression in the spinal dorsal horn, while intrathecal injecting a neutralizing antibody against HMGB1 showed an effective and reliable anti-allodynia effect with a dose-dependent manner. IL-1{beta} was significantly increased in caner pain rats while intrathecally administration of anti-HMGB1 could decrease IL-1{beta}. Together with previous reports, we predict that bone cancer induces HMGB1 production, enhancing spinal IL-1{beta} expression and thus modulating spinal excitatory synaptic transmission and pain response.

  6. Association of genetic polymorphism of pre-microRNA-146a rs2910164 and serum high-mobility group box 1 with febrile seizures in Egyptian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issac, Marianne Samir Makboul; Girgis, Marian; Haroun, Mervat; Shalaby, Amal

    2015-03-01

    Interaction between immune-inflammatory process and genetic factors might be implicated in the pathogenesis of febrile seizures. Pre-microRNA (miR)-146a rs2910164 polymorphism is postulated to modulate expression of miR-146a whose anti-inflammatory role involves regulation of high-mobility group box 1. Our aim is to examine whether rs2910164 polymorphism influences serum high-mobility group box 1 levels and whether an association exists between both and febrile seizures. The study included 136 children, divided into 4 groups. Real-time polymerase chain reaction was used for detection of rs2910164 polymorphism and high-mobility group box 1 was measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. High-mobility group box 1 levels were higher in febrile seizure patients compared to the other groups. Rs2910164 polymorphism was not associated with increased risk of febrile seizures. Rs2910164 polymorphism might be accompanied by an upregulation of the proinflammatory process as it might be associated with an increase in high-mobility group box 1 and leukocytic count. © The Author(s) 2014.

  7. HIGHLY REFRACTORY CRUCIBLES OF STABILIZED ZIRCONIA FOR INDUCTION MELTING OF THE PLATINUM GROUP METALS, FABRICATED BY VIBROCASTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Primachenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As the result of the studies at PJSC « UKRNIIO them. A.S.Berezhnogo» the technology and commercial production of crucibles from stabilized zirconia for the smelting of platinum group metals are develop

  8. High-performance ab initio density matrix renormalization group method: Applicability to large-scale multireference problems for metal compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashige, Yuki; Yanai, Takeshi

    2009-06-01

    This article presents an efficient and parallelized implementation of the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm for quantum chemistry calculations. The DMRG method as a large-scale multireference electronic structure model is by nature particularly efficient for one-dimensionally correlated systems, while the present development is oriented toward applications for polynuclear transition metal compounds, in which the macroscopic one-dimensional structure of electron correlation is absent. A straightforward extension of the DMRG algorithm is proposed with further improvements and aggressive optimizations to allow its application with large multireference active space, which is often demanded for metal compound calculations. Special efficiency is achieved by making better use of sparsity and symmetry in the operator and wave function representations. By accomplishing computationally intensive DMRG calculations, the authors have found that a large number of renormalized basis states are required to represent high entanglement of the electron correlation for metal compound applications, and it is crucial to adopt auxiliary perturbative correction to the projected density matrix during the DMRG sweep optimization in order to attain proper convergence to the solution. Potential energy curve calculations for the Cr2 molecule near the known equilibrium precisely predicted the full configuration interaction energies with a correlation space of 24 electrons in 30 orbitals [denoted by (24e,30o)]. The energies are demonstrated to be accurate to 0.6mEh (the error from the extrapolated best value) when as many as 10 000 renormalized basis states are employed for the left and right DMRG block representations. The relative energy curves for [Cu2O2]2+ along the isomerization coordinate were obtained from DMRG and other correlated calculations, for which a fairly large orbital space (32e,62o) is modeled as a full correlation space. The DMRG prediction nearly overlaps

  9. Specific labeling and assignment strategies of valine methyl groups for NMR studies of high molecular weight proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas, Guillaume; Crublet, Elodie [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France); Hamelin, Olivier [CNRS (France); Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jérôme, E-mail: jerome.boisbouvier@ibs.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Institut de Biologie Structurale (IBS) (France)

    2013-09-28

    The specific protonation of valine and leucine methyl groups in proteins is typically achieved by overexpressing proteins in M9/D{sub 2}O medium supplemented with either labeled α-ketoisovalerate for the labeling of the four prochiral methyl groups or with 2-acetolactate for the stereospecific labeling of the valine and leucine side chains. However, when these labeling schemes are applied to large protein assemblies, significant overlap between the correlations of the valine and leucine methyl groups occurs, hampering the analysis of 2D methyl-TROSY spectra. Analysis of the leucine and valine biosynthesis pathways revealed that the incorporation of labeled precursors in the leucine pathway can be inhibited by the addition of exogenous l-leucine-d{sub 10}. We exploited this property to label stereospecifically the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups of valine with minimal scrambling to the leucine residues. This new labeling protocol was applied to the 468 kDa homododecameric peptidase TET2 to decrease the complexity of its NMR spectra. All of the pro-S valine methyl resonances of TET2 were assigned by combining mutagenesis with this innovative labeling approach. The assignments were transferred to the pro-R groups using an optimally labeled sample and a set of triple resonance experiments. This improved labeling scheme enables us to overcome the main limitation of overcrowding in the NMR spectra of prochiral methyl groups, which is a prerequisite for the site-specific measurement of the structural and dynamic parameters or for the study of interactions in very large protein assemblies.

  10. Specific labeling and assignment strategies of valine methyl groups for NMR studies of high molecular weight proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Guillaume; Crublet, Elodie; Hamelin, Olivier; Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jérôme

    2013-11-01

    The specific protonation of valine and leucine methyl groups in proteins is typically achieved by overexpressing proteins in M9/D2O medium supplemented with either labeled α-ketoisovalerate for the labeling of the four prochiral methyl groups or with 2-acetolactate for the stereospecific labeling of the valine and leucine side chains. However, when these labeling schemes are applied to large protein assemblies, significant overlap between the correlations of the valine and leucine methyl groups occurs, hampering the analysis of 2D methyl-TROSY spectra. Analysis of the leucine and valine biosynthesis pathways revealed that the incorporation of labeled precursors in the leucine pathway can be inhibited by the addition of exogenous l-leucine-d10. We exploited this property to label stereospecifically the pro-R and pro-S methyl groups of valine with minimal scrambling to the leucine residues. This new labeling protocol was applied to the 468 kDa homododecameric peptidase TET2 to decrease the complexity of its NMR spectra. All of the pro-S valine methyl resonances of TET2 were assigned by combining mutagenesis with this innovative labeling approach. The assignments were transferred to the pro-R groups using an optimally labeled sample and a set of triple resonance experiments. This improved labeling scheme enables us to overcome the main limitation of overcrowding in the NMR spectra of prochiral methyl groups, which is a prerequisite for the site-specific measurement of the structural and dynamic parameters or for the study of interactions in very large protein assemblies.

  11. Clinical features and treatment outcome of very elderly patients over 80 years old with multiple myeloma: comparison with patients in different age groups in the era of novel agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsue, Kosei; Matsue, Yuya; Fujisawa, Manabu; Fukumoto, Kota; Suehara, Yasuhito; Sugihara, Hiroki; Takeuchi, Masami

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of 175 consecutive patients admitted to our hospital between April 2004 and June 2014, and identified 42 (24%), 80 (46%), and 53 (30%) patients ≥ 80, 66-79, and ≤ 65 years old, respectively. The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of the ≥ 80, 66-79, and ≤ 65 years old groups were 19.1, 26.3, and 54.3 months, and 31.9, 54.8, and 83.8 months, respectively. Patients ≥ 80 but not ≤ 79 years old with ECOG performance score (PS) ≥ 3 and/or Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) ≥ 5 showed significantly shorter survival. ECOG PS and CCI predicted the treatment outcome of patients ≥ 80 but did not predict ≤ 79 years old.

  12. Identification of specific age groups with a high risk for developing cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinova, Vesna; Schatlo, Bawarjan; Voit, Martin; Suntheim, Patricia; Rohde, Veit; Mielke, Dorothee

    2016-07-01

    The impact of age on the incidence of cerebral vasospasm after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is a matter of ongoing discussion. The aim of this study was to identify age groups with a higher risk for developing vasospasm, delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND), or delayed infarction (DI) and to identify a cut-off age for a better risk stratification. We defined six age groups (70 years). ROC analysis was performed to determine a cutoff age with the highest positive predictive value (PPV) for developing vasospasm, defined as a blood-flow-velocity-increase >120 cm/s in transcranial-Doppler-sonography (TCD). Multivariate binary-logistic-regression-analysis was then performed to evaluate differences in the incidence of cerebral vasospasm, DIND, and DI among the different age groups. A total of 753 patients were included in the study. The highest incidence (70 %) of TCD-vasospasm was found in patients between 30 and 39 years of age. The cutoff age with the highest PPV (65 %) for developing TCD-vasospasm was 38 years. Multivariate analysis revealed that age <38 years (OR 3.6; CI 95 % 2.1-6.1; p < 0.001) best predicted vasospasm, followed by the need for cerebrospinal fluid drainage (OR 1.5; CI 95 % 1.0-2.3; p = 0.04). However, lower age did not correlate with higher rates of DIND or infarcts. The overall vasospasm-incidence after aSAH is age-dependent and highest in the age group <38 years. Surprisingly, the higher incidence in the younger age group does not translate into a higher rate of DIND/DI. This finding may hint towards age-related biological factors influencing the association between arterial narrowing and cerebral ischemia.

  13. The Differences between High-Score Group and Low-Score Group In Modifiable Learner Variables%英语专业高/低分学生学习者可控因素的差异研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晶; 侯润颖

    2013-01-01

    The research reports a study on the differences between high-score group and low-score group in modifiable learner variables such as level of effort, learning motivations, learning beliefs and learning strategies. The subjects for the survey are 96 English majors. Statistical results show that: 1) Students from low-score group seem to spend more time learning English every week; their intrinsic motivations are significantly stronger than those of high-score group, whereas there is no big difference in extrinsic motivations. 2) Students from two groups are significantly different in management belief, form- focused belief and meaning-focused belief. 3) Students from two groups display significant differences in management strategies, form-focused strat⁃egies and meaning-focused strategies, and the high-score group tends to make more frequent use.%  该研究以96名英语专业大学生为研究对象进行了问卷调查,分析了高分组与低分组学生在努力程度、学习动机、学习观念及学习策略等学习者可控因素方面的差异。研究发现,1)低分组每周课外学习英语的时间显著高于高分组,深层动机均值显著低于高分组,表层动机方面则与高分组没有显著差异;2)高分组在管理观念、形式操练观念和功能操练观念上的均值显著高于低分组,依赖母语观念不存在显著差异;3)高分组使用管理策略、形式操练策略和功能操练策略的频率显著高于低分组,而在依赖母语策略使用上则没有显著差异。

  14. The high-energy multi-group HEST1.0 library based on ENDF/B-VII.0: development, verification and preliminary application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun; Chen, Yi-Xue; Wang, Wei-Jin; Yin, Wen; Liang, Tian-Jiao; Jia, Xue-Jun

    2012-03-01

    ENDF/B-VII.0, which was released by the USA Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in December 2006, was demonstrated to perform much better than previous ENDF evaluations over a broad range of benchmark experiments. A high-energy (up to 150 MeV) multi-group library set named HEST1.0 with 253-neutron and 48-photon groups has been developed based on ENDF/B-VII.0 using the NJOY code. This paper provides a summary of the procedure to produce the library set and a detailed description of the verification of the multi-group library set by several shielding benchmark devices, in particular for high-energy neutron data. In addition, the first application of HEST1.0 to the shielding design of the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is demonstrated.

  15. The high-energy multi-group HEST1.0 library based on ENDF/B-Ⅶ.0: development, verification and preliminary application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jun; CHEN Yi-Xue; WANG Wei-Jin; YIN Wen; LIANG Tian-Jiao; JIA Xue-Jun

    2012-01-01

    ENDF/B-Ⅶ.0,which was released by the USA Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG)in December 2006,was demonstrated to perform much better than previous ENDF evaluations over a broad range of benchmark experiments.A high-energy (up to 150 MeV) multi-group library set named HEST1.0with 253-neutron and 48-photon groups has been developed based on ENDF/B-Ⅶ.0 using the N JOY code.This paper provides a summary of the procedure to produce the library set and a detailed description of the verification of the multi-group library set by several shielding benchmark devices,in particular for high-energy neutron data.In addition,the first application of HEST1.0 to the shielding design of the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) is demonstrated.

  16. Social status and the pursuit of positive social identity: Systematic domains of intergroup differentiation and discrimination for high- and low- status groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldmeadow, Julian A; Fiske, Susan T

    2010-07-01

    Research on intergroup discrimination has focused on the cognitive and motivational mechanisms involved, but the role of stereotype content has been neglected. Drawing on social identity theory and stereotype content research, the current studies investigated the role of stereotype content in intergroup differentiation and discrimination. Across two studies, students from high- and low-status groups differentiated themselves positively on stereotypes of competence and warmth respectively, and in allocations of resources in domains relevant to competence (academics, research) and warmth (sports, community outreach). Furthermore, there was evidence that discrimination by high- and low-status groups was driven by their respective stereotypes of competence and warmth. It is argued that stereotypes of competence and warmth, derived from status and power relations between groups, define the domains in which groups pursue positively distinct identities.

  17. Is Early Ability Grouping Good for High-Achieving Students' Psychosocial Development? Effects of the Transition into Academically Selective Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Michael; Neumann, Marko; Tetzner, Julia; Böse, Susanne; Knoppick, Henrike; Maaz, Kai; Baumert, Jürgen; Lehmann, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates school context effects on psychosocial characteristics (academic self-concept, peer relations, school satisfaction, and school anxiety) of high-achieving and gifted students. Students who did or did not make an early transition from elementary to secondary schools for high-achieving and gifted students in 5th grade…

  18. The Efficacy of a Social Skills Group Intervention for Improving Social Behaviors in Children with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRosier, Melissa E.; Swick, Danielle C.; Davis, Naomi Ornstein; McMillen, Janey Sturtz; Matthews, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    This study tested the efficacy of a new social skills intervention, "S ocial S kills GR oup IN tervention-High Functioning Autism" ("S.S.GRIN-HFA"), designed to improve social behaviors in children with high functioning autism spectrum disorders. Fifty-five children were randomly assigned to "S.S.GRIN-HFA" treatment (n = 27) or control (i.e.,…

  19. High-Dimensional Random Matrices from the Classical Matrix Groups, and Generalized Hypergeometric Functions of Matrix Argument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald St. P. Richards

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Results from the theory of the generalized hypergeometric functions of matrix argument, and the related zonal polynomials, are used to develop a new approach to study the asymptotic distributions of linear functions of uniformly distributed random matrices from the classical compact matrix groups. In particular, we provide a new approach for proving the following result of D’Aristotile, Diaconis, and Newman: Let the random matrix Hn be uniformly distributed according to Haar measure on the group of n × n orthogonal matrices, and let An be a non-random n × n real matrix such that tr (A'nAn = 1. Then, as n→∞, √n tr AnHn converges in distribution to the standard normal distribution.

  20. Synthesis of ¹⁸O-labeled photosynthetically active chlorophylls at the 3- or 7-carbonyl group with high regioselectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Hidetada; Mizoguchi, Tadashi; Tamiaki, Hitoshi

    2010-09-01

    The 3- and 7-formyl groups of chlorophyll-d (Chl-d) and bacteriochlorophyll-e (BChl-e), respectively, were regioselectively labeled with an isotopically stable oxygen-18 (¹⁸O) atom to give 3¹-¹⁸O-labeled Chl-d and 7¹-¹⁸O-labeled BChl-e (ca. 90% ¹⁸O) by exchanging the carbonyl oxygen atoms in the presence of acidic H₂ ¹⁸O (ca. 95% ¹⁸O). Another photosynthetically active chlorophyll, BChl-a possessing the 3-acetyl group was treated under similar acidic conditions to afford a trace amount of 3¹-¹⁸O-labeled BChl-a and further demetallated compound, the corresponding 3¹-¹⁸O-labeled bacteriopheophytin-a as the major product with 55% ¹⁸O-degree. The FT-IR spectra of ¹⁸O-(un)labeled chlorophylls in the solution and the solid states showed that the 3- and 7-carbonyl stretching vibration modes moved to about a 30-cm⁻¹ lower wavenumber by ¹⁸O-labeling at the 3¹- and 7¹-oxo moieties. In artificial chlorosome-like self-aggregates of BChl-e, the ¹⁸O-labeled 7-carbonyl stretching mode was completely resolved from the specially hydrogen-bonded 13-C=O stretching mode, evidently indicating no interaction of the 7-CHO with other functional groups in the supramolecules.