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Sample records for high carbonate concentrations

  1. Improved Dispersion of Carbon Nanotubes in Polymers at High Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao-Xuan; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2012-01-01

    The polymer nanocomposite used in this work comprises elastomer poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) as a polymer matrix and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a conductive nanofiller. To achieve uniform distribution of carbon nanotubes within the polymer, an optimized dispersion process was developed, featuring a strong organic solvent—chloroform, which dissolved PDMS base polymer easily and allowed high quality dispersion of MWCNTs. At concentrations as high as 9 wt.%, MWCNTs were dispersed uniformly through the polymer matrix, which presented a major improvement over prior techniques. The dispersion procedure was optimized via extended experimentation, which is discussed in detail. PMID:28348312

  2. High Black Carbon (BC) Concentrations along Indian National Highways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    Abstract:Black carbon (BC), the optically absorbing component of carbonaceous aerosol, has direct influence on radiation budget and global warming. Vehicular pollution is one of the main sources for poor air quality and also atmospheric pollution. The number of diesel vehicles has increased on the Indian National Highways during day and night; these vehicles are used for the transport of goods from one city to another city and also used for public transport. A smoke plume from the vehicles is a common feature on the highways. We have made measurements of BC mass concentrations along the Indian National Highways using a potable Aethalometer installed in a moving car. We have carried out measurements along Varanasi to Kanpur (NH-2), Varanasi to Durgapur (NH-2), Varanasi to Singrauli (SH-5A) and Varanasi to Ghazipur (NH-29). We have found high concentration of BC along highways, the average BC mass concentrations vary in the range 20 - 40 µg/m3 and found high BC mass concentrations up to 600 μg/m3. Along the highways high BC concentrations were characteristics of the presence of industrial area, power plants, brick kilns and slow or standing vehicles. The effect of increasing BC concentrations along the National Highways and its impact on the vegetation and human health will be presented. Key Words: Black Carbon; Aethalometer; mass concentration; Indian National Highways.

  3. Carbon Nanofibers Modified Graphite Felt for High Performance Anode in High Substrate Concentration Microbial Fuel Cells

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    Youliang Shen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon nanofibers modified graphite fibers (CNFs/GF composite electrode was prepared for anode in high substrate concentration microbial fuel cells. Electrochemical tests showed that the CNFs/GF anode generated a peak current density of 2.42 mA cm−2 at a low acetate concentration of 20 mM, which was 54% higher than that from bare GF. Increase of the acetate concentration to 80 mM, in which the peak current density of the CNFs/GF anode greatly increased and was up to 3.57 mA cm−2, was seven times as that of GF anode. Morphology characterization revealed that the biofilms in the CNFs/GF anode were much denser than those in the bare GF. This result revealed that the nanostructure in the anode not only enhanced current generation but also could tolerate high substrate concentration.

  4. Carbon assimilation in Eucalyptus urophylla grown under high atmospheric CO2 concentrations: A proteomics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Bruna Marques Dos; Balbuena, Tiago Santana

    2017-01-06

    Photosynthetic organisms may be drastically affected by the future climate projections of a considerable increase in CO2 concentrations. Growth under a high concentration of CO2 could stimulate carbon assimilation-especially in C3-type plants. We used a proteomics approach to test the hypothesis of an increase in the abundance of the enzymes involved in carbon assimilation in Eucalyptus urophylla plants grown under conditions of high atmospheric CO2. Our strategy allowed the profiling of all Calvin-Benson cycle enzymes and associated protein species. Among the 816 isolated proteins, those involved in carbon fixation were found to be the most abundant ones. An increase in the abundance of six key enzymes out of the eleven core enzymes involved in carbon fixation was detected in plants grown at a high CO2 concentration. Proteome changes were corroborated by the detection of a decrease in the stomatal aperture and in the vascular bundle area in Eucalyptus urophylla plantlets grown in an environment of high atmospheric CO2. Our proteomics approach indicates a positive metabolic response regarding carbon fixation in a CO2-enriched atmosphere. The slight but significant increase in the abundance of the Calvin enzymes suggests that stomatal closure did not prevent an increase in the carbon assimilation rates.

  5. Low powdered activated carbon concentrations to improve MBR sludge filterability at high salinity and low temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Remy, M.J.J.; Temmink, B.G.; Brink, van den P.; Rulkens, W.H.

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that powdered activated carbon (PAC), when applied at very low dosages and long SRTs, reduces membrane fouling in membrane bioreactor (MBRs). This effect was related to stronger flocs which are less sensitive to shear. Low temperature and high salt concentration ar

  6. Photorespiration and carbon concentrating mechanisms: two adaptations to high O2, low CO2 conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroney, James V; Jungnick, Nadine; Dimario, Robert J; Longstreth, David J

    2013-11-01

    This review presents an overview of the two ways that cyanobacteria, algae, and plants have adapted to high O2 and low CO2 concentrations in the environment. First, the process of photorespiration enables photosynthetic organisms to recycle phosphoglycolate formed by the oxygenase reaction catalyzed by ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). Second, there are a number of carbon concentrating mechanisms that increase the CO2 concentration around Rubisco which increases the carboxylase reaction enhancing CO2 fixation. This review also presents possibilities for the beneficial modification of these processes with the goal of improving future crop yields.

  7. High-resolution carbon dioxide concentration record 650,000-800,000 years before present

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luthi, D.; Bereiter, B.; Blunier, T.; Siegenthaler, U.; Kawamura, K.; Stocker, T.F. [Climate and Environm. Physics, Physics Inst., Univ. Bern, CH-3012 Bern, (Switzerland); Luthi, D.; Bereiter, B.; Blunier, T.; Siegenthaler, U.; Kawamura, K.; Stocker, T.F. [Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, Univ. Bern, CH-3012 Bern, (Switzerland); Le Floch, M.; Barnola, J.M.; Raynaud, D. [LGGE, CNRS-Univ. Grenoble 1, F-38402 Saint Martin d' Heres, (France); Jouzel, J. [Inst. Pierre Simon Laplace, LSCE, CEA-CNRS-Universite Versailles-Saint Quentin, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Fischer, H. [Alfred Wegener Inst. for Polar and Maine Research, D-27568 Bremerhaven, (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Changes in past atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations can be determined by measuring the composition of air trapped in ice cores from Antarctica. So far, the Antarctic Vostok and EPICA Dome C ice cores have provided a composite record of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels over the past 650,000 years. Here we present results of the lowest 200 m of the Dome C ice core, extending the record of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration by two complete glacial cycles to 800,000 yr before present. From previously published data and the present work, we find that atmospheric carbon dioxide is strongly correlated with Antarctic temperature throughout eight glacial cycles but with significantly lower concentrations between 650,000 and 750,000 yr before present. Carbon dioxide levels are below 180 parts per million by volume (p.p.m.v.) for a period of 3,000 yr during Marine Isotope Stage 16, possibly reflecting more pronounced oceanic carbon storage. We report the lowest carbon dioxide concentration measured in an ice core, which extends the pre-industrial range of carbon dioxide concentrations during the late Quaternary by about 10 p.p.m.v. to 172-300 p.p.m.v. (authors)

  8. Carbon dioxide as working fluid for medium and high-temperature concentrated solar thermal systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Duong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the benefits and drawbacks of using carbon dioxide in solar thermal systems at medium and high operating temperatures. For medium temperatures, application of CO2 in non-imaging-optics based compound parabolic concentrators (CPC combined with evacuated-tube collectors is studied. These collectors have been shown to obtain efficiencies higher than 40% operating at around 200℃ without the need of tracking. Validated numerical models of external compound parabolic concentrators (XCPCs are used to simulate their performance using CO2 as working fluid. For higher temperatures, a mathematical model is implemented to analyze the operating performance of a parabolic trough solar collector (PTC using CO2 at temperatures between 100℃ and 600℃.

  9. High Frequency Measurements of Methane Concentrations and Carbon Isotopes at a Marsh and Landfill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, B.; Wilson, B.; Chanton, J.; Eller, K.; Dong, F.; Baer, D. S.; Gupta, M.; Dzwonkowski, B.

    2012-12-01

    High frequency measurements of methane concentrations and carbon isotopes can help constrain the source strengths of methane emitted to the atmosphere. We report here methane concentrations and 13C values measured at 0.5 Hz with cavity enhanced laser absorption spectrometers (Los Gatos Research) deployed at a saltmarsh in Alabama and a landfill in Florida. Methane concentrations and 13C at the saltmarsh were monitored over a 2.5 day time period at 2 m, 0.5 m above the ground as well as from the outflow of a flow-through (2 L) chamber placed on the Spartina alterniflora dominated marsh. A typical measurement cycle included regular samples from two tanks of known methane concentrations and isotopic values and from ambient air samples. Over the 2.5-day measurement period methane concentrations and isotopic ratios at 2 m averaged 1.85 ppm and -43.57‰ (±0.34, 1 SE), respectively. The concentration and isotopic values from the chamber outflow varied from 1.92 to 5.81 ppm and -38.5 to -59.3‰, respectively. Methane flux from the marsh ranged from undetectable to 3.6 mgC m-2hr-1, with high fluxes measured during low tide. The 13δCH4 of the emitted CH4 from the marsh, determined from a mass balance equation using the chamber inflow and outflow concentration and isotopic values ranged from -62.1 to -93.9‰ and averaged -77‰ (±1.25, 1SE). At the landfill ambient methane concentrations and 13C ratios measured over multiple days varied from 4.25 to 11.91 ppm and from -58.81 to -45.12‰, respectively. At higher methane concentrations the δ13C of CH4 was more depleted consistent with previously observed relationship at this site made by more traditional techniques. Over a 30-minute measurement period CH4 concentrations at the landfill could vary by as much as 15 ppm. The high frequency continuous optical measurements with field-deployed instruments provide us with an unprecedented temporal resolution of CH4 concentrations and isotopic ratios. These measurements will

  10. High-resolution carbon dioxide concentration record 650,000-800,000 years before present

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lüthi, Dieter; Le Floch, Martine; Bereiter, Bernhard

    2008-01-01

    Changes in past atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations can be determined by measuring the composition of air trapped in ice cores from Antarctica. So far, the Antarctic Vostok and EPICA Dome C ice cores have provided a composite record of atmospheric carbon dioxide levels over the past 650......,000 years. Here we present results of the lowest 200 m of the Dome C ice core, extending the record of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration by two complete glacial cycles to 800,000 yr before present. From previously published data and the present work, we find that atmospheric carbon dioxide...... is strongly correlated with Antarctic temperature throughout eight glacial cycles but with significantly lower concentrations between 650,000 and 750,000 yr before present. Carbon dioxide levels are below 180 parts per million by volume (p.p.m.v.) for a period of 3,000 yr during Marine Isotope Stage 16...

  11. Carbon Concentration of Austenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Ławrynowicz

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The investigation was carried out to examine the influence of temperature and times of austempering process on the maximum extend towhich the bainite reaction can proceed and the carbon content in retained austenite. It should be noted that a small percentage change in theaustenite carbon content can have a significant effect on the subsequent austempering reaction changing the volume fraction of the phasespresent and hence, the resulting mechanical properties. Specimens were prepared from an unalloyed ductile cast iron, austenitised at 950oCfor 60 minutes and austempered by the conventional single-step austempering process at four temperatures between BS and MS, eg., 250,300, 350 and 400oC. The samples were austempered at these temperatures for 15, 30, 60, 120 and 240 minutes and finally quenched toambient temperature. Volume fractions of retained austenite and carbon concentration in the residual austenite have been observed byusing X-ray diffraction. Additionally, carbon concentration in the residual austenite was calculated using volume fraction data of austeniteand a model developed by Bhadeshia based on the McLellan and Dunn quasi-chemical thermodynamic model. The comparison ofexperimental data with the T0, T0' and Ae3' phase boundaries suggests the likely mechanism of bainite reaction in cast iron is displacive rather than diffusional. The carbon concentration in retained austenite demonstrates that at the end of bainite reaction the microstructure must consist of not only ausferrite but additionally precipitated carbides.

  12. Consequences of brief exposure to high concentrations of carbon monoxide in conscious rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Zengfa; Januszkiewicz, Adolph J; Mayorga, Maria A; Coleman, Gary D; Morrissette, Craig R

    2005-12-01

    Exposure to high-concentration carbon monoxide (CO) is of concern in military operations. Experimentally, the physiologic manifestations of a brief exposure to elevated levels of CO have not been fully described. This study investigated the development of acute CO poisoning in conscious male Sprague-Dawley rats (220-380 g). Animals were randomly grouped (n = 6) and exposed to either air or 1 of 6 CO concentrations (1000, 3000, 6000, 10,000, 12,000, or 24,000 ppm) in a continuous air/CO dynamic exposure chamber for 5 min. Respiration was recorded prior to and during exposures. Mixed blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and pH were measured before and immediately after exposure. Before exposure the mean baselines of respiratory minute volumes (RMVs) were 312.6 +/- 43.9, 275.2 +/- 40.8, and 302.3 +/- 39.1 ml/min for the 10,000, 12,000 and 24,000 ppm groups, respectively. In the last minute of exposure RMVs were 118.9 +/- 23.7, 62.1 +/- 10.4, and 22.0 +/- 15.1% (p 82%. Blood pH was unaltered and no death occurred in rats exposed to CO at concentrations 10,000 ppm for brief periods as short as 5 min may change RMV, resulting in acute respiratory failure, acidemia, and even death.

  13. High-quality, highly concentrated semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes for use in field effect transistors and biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Shan; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Liu, Chang; Sun, Dong-Ming; Yuan, Jiangtan; Zhao, Shi-Yong; Yin, Li-Chang; Cong, Hongtao; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2013-08-27

    We developed a simple and scalable selective synthesis method of high-quality, highly concentrated semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) by in situ hydrogen etching. Samples containing ~93% s-SWCNTs were obtained in bulk. These s-SWCNTs with good structural integrity showed a high oxidation resistance temperature of ~800 °C. Thin-film transistors based on the s-SWCNTs demonstrated a high carrier mobility of 21.1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at an on/off ratio of 1.1 × 10(4) and a high on/off ratio of 4.0 × 10(5) with a carrier mobility of 7.0 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). A biosensor fabricated using the s-SWCNTs had a very low dopamine detection limit of 10(-18) mol/L at room temperature.

  14. High concentration nitrogen doped carbon nanotube anodes with superior Li+ storage performance for lithium rechargeable battery application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xifei; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Yong; Li, Yongliang; Liu, Hao; Meng, Xiangbo; Yang, Jinli; Geng, Dongsheng; Wang, Dongniu; Li, Ruying; Sun, Xueliang

    2012-01-01

    A floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition method has been developed to synthesize carbon nanotubes doped with a high concentration of nitrogen. Their electrochemical performance as anodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) in comparison to pristine carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results indicated that the nitrogen content reaches as high as 16.4 at.%. Bamboo-like compartments were fabricated as shown by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. High concentration nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes (HN-CNTs) show approximately double reversible capacity of CNTs: 494 mAh g-1 vs. 260 mAh g-1, and present a much better rate capability than CNTs. The significantly superior electrochemical performance could be related to the high electrical conductivity and the larger number of defect sites in HN-CNTs for anodes of LIBs.

  15. Handspinning Enabled Highly Concentrated Carbon Nanotubes with Controlled Orientation in Nanofibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hoik; Watanabe, Kei; Kim, Myungwoong; Gopiraman, Mayakrishnan; Song, Kyung-Hun; Lee, Jung Soon; Kim, Ick Soo

    2016-11-01

    The novel method, handspinning (HS), was invented by mimicking commonly observed methods in our daily lives. The use of HS allows us to fabricate carbon nanotube-reinforced nanofibers (CNT-reinforced nanofibers) by addressing three significant challenges: (i) the difficulty of forming nanofibers at high concentrations of CNTs, (ii) aggregation of the CNTs, and (iii) control of the orientation of the CNTs. The handspun nanofibers showed better physical properties than fibers fabricated by conventional methods, such as electrospinning. Handspun nanofibers retain a larger amount of CNTs than electrospun nanofibers, and the CNTs are easily aligned uniaxially. We attributed these improvements provided by the HS process to simple mechanical stretching force, which allows for orienting the nanofillers along with the force direction without agglomeration, leading to increased contact area between the CNTs and the polymer matrix, thereby providing enhanced interactions. HS is a simple and straightforward method as it does not require an electric field, and, hence, any kinds of polymers and solvents can be applicable. Furthermore, it is feasible to retain a large amount of various nanofillers in the fibers to enhance their physical and chemical properties. Therefore, HS provides an effective pathway to create new types of reinforced nanofibers with outstanding properties.

  16. Bio-Inspired Supramolecular Chemistry Provides Highly Concentrated Dispersions of Carbon Nanotubes in Polythiophene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ting Lin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report the first observation, through X-ray diffraction, of noncovalent uracil–uracil (U–U dimeric π-stacking interactions in carbon nanotube (CNT–based supramolecular assemblies. The directionally oriented morphology determined using atomic force microscopy revealed highly organized behavior through π-stacking of U moieties in a U-functionalized CNT derivative (CNT–U. We developed a dispersion system to investigate the bio-inspired interactions between an adenine (A-terminated poly(3-adeninehexyl thiophene (PAT and CNT–U. These hybrid CNT–U/PAT materials interacted through π-stacking and multiple hydrogen bonding between the U moieties of CNT–U and the A moieties of PAT. Most importantly, the U···A multiple hydrogen bonding interactions between CNT–U and PAT enhanced the dispersion of CNT–U in a high-polarity solvent (DMSO. The morphology of these hybrids, determined using transmission electron microscopy, featured grape-like PAT bundles wrapped around the CNT–U surface; this tight connection was responsible for the enhanced dispersion of CNT–U in DMSO.

  17. Assessment of the Carbon Footprint, Social Benefit of Carbon Reduction, and Energy Payback Time of a High-Concentration Photovoltaic System

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    Allen H. Hu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Depleting fossil fuel sources and worsening global warming are two of the most serious world problems. Many renewable energy technologies are continuously being developed to overcome these challenges. Among these technologies, high-concentration photovoltaics (HCPV is a promising technology that reduces the use of expensive photovoltaic materials to achieve highly efficient energy conversion. This reduction process is achieved by adopting concentrating and tracking technologies. This study intends to understand and assess the carbon footprint and energy payback time (EPBT of HCPV modules during their entire life cycles. The social benefit of carbon reduction is also evaluated as another indicator to assess the energy alternatives. An HCPV module and a tracker from the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER were applied, and SimaPro 8.0.2 was used for the assessment. The functional unit used in this study was 1 kWh, which is produced by HCPV, and inventory data was sourced from Ecoinvent 3.0 and the Taiwan carbon footprint calculation database. The carbon footprint, EPBT, and social benefit of carbon reduction were evaluated as 107.69 g CO2eq/kWh, 2.61 years, and 0.022 USD/kWh, respectively. Direct normal irradiation (DNI, life expectancy, and the degradation rate of HCPV system were subjected to sensitivity analysis. Results show that the influence of lifetime assumption under a low DNI value is greater than those under high DNI values. Degradation rate is also another important factor when assessing the carbon footprint of HCPV under a low DNI value and a long lifetime assumption. The findings of this study can provide several insights for the development of the Taiwanese solar industry.

  18. Characteristics of High Time-Resolved Concentrations of Particulate Inorganic Ions and Black Carbon Downwind of Seoul, Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.; Choi, Y.; Kim, C.; Ghim, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Concentrations of inorganic ions and black carbon (BC) in PM2.5 were continuously measured using PILS (particle-into-liquid sampler, ADI 2081, Applikon) and MAAP (Multiangle Absorption Photometer, Model 5012, Thermo), respectively, for three and half months from mid-February to May, at intervals of 20-30 minutes. The measurements were made at the Global Campus of Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, about 35 km southeast of downtown Seoul, the general area of which is affected by prevailing northwesterlies. The site is considered to be an ideal place for exploring transport of air pollutants and formation of secondary ions by photochemical reactions since there are no major emission sources nearby except a 4-lane road running about 1.4 km to the west. Analyses were made by two stages. In the first stage, typical types of diurnal variations in inorganic ions and BC concentrations were identified using cluster analysis. Diurnal variations in concentrations of each cluster were compared with the mean diurnal variations during the measurement period. Factors causing the differences in diurnal variations were discussed by cluster and by species. In the second stage, high and low concentration episodes were determined based on three-day moving averages of the sum of concentrations of particulate inorganic ions and BC. Mean concentrations and compositions in each episode were compared with those during the measurement period.

  19. 40 CFR 52.1164 - Localized high concentrations-carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... have developed and have begun to implement a program to identify urban and suburban core areas and... control strategies to insure that such air quality standards will be achieved at such areas. Plans shall... implemented strategies will not create carbon monoxide violations elsewhere in the vicinity after the measures...

  20. High concentration powdered activated carbon-membrane bioreactor (PAC-MBR) for slightly polluted surface water treatment at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Cong; Yu, Shuili; Shi, Wenxin; Tian, Wende; Heijman, S G J; Rietveld, L C

    2012-06-01

    In this study, different concentrations of PAC combined with MBR were carried out to treat slightly polluted surface water (SPSW) at low temperature (10°C). Effects of PAC on the efficiencies of operation, treatment, and the performance of the process were investigated. It was found that the effluent quality, performance efficiency, resistance of shock load were all enhanced and chemical irreversible membrane fouling was reduced with increasing dosage of PAC in MBR. Only when the concentration of PAC which acted as biological carriers was high enough (i.g., 50 g/L), nitrification without initial inoculation in the filtration tank could start within 19 days and be completed within 35 days at 10°C. Fifty grams per liter PAC was the optimal dosage in MBR for stable and extended operation. Under this condition, mean removal efficiencies of ammonia nitrogen (NH(3)-N), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and UV(254) were 93%, 75%, and 85%, respectively.

  1. Concentrations and fluxes of dissolved organic carbon in runoff from a forested catchment: insights from high frequency measurements

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    S. Strohmeier

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC in runoff from catchments are often subject to substantial short-term variations. The aim of this study was to identify the compartmental sources of DOC in a forested catchment and the causes for short-term variations in runoff. Furthermore, we investigated the implication of short-term variations for the calculation of annual runoff fluxes. High frequency measurements (30 min intervals of DOC in runoff, of discharge and groundwater table were conducted for one year in the 4.2 km2 forested Lehstenbach catchment, Germany. Riparian wetland soils represent about 30% of the catchment area. The quality of DOC was investigated by three dimensional fluorescence excitation-emission matrices in samples taken from runoff, deep groundwater and shallow groundwater from the riparian wetland soils. The concentrations of DOC in runoff were highly variable at an hourly to daily time scale, ranging from 2.6 mg L−1 to 34 mg L−1 with an annual average of 9.2 mg L−1. The concentrations were positively related to discharge, with a counter clockwise hysteresis. Relations of DOC to discharge were steeper and the degree of hysteresis larger in the summer/fall than in the winter/spring period. Dynamics of groundwater table, discharge, DOC concentrations and DOC quality parameters indicated that DOC in runoff originated mainly from the riparian wetland soils, both under low and high flow conditions. The annual export of DOC from the catchment was 84 kg C ha−1 yr−1 when calculated from the high frequency measurements. If the annual export was calculated by simulated samplings of >2 days intervals substantial deviations resulted.

    Predicted changes in precipitation and discharge patterns as well as generally increasing temperatures likely will cause raising DOC exports from this catchment.

  2. Erosion-corrosion in carbon dioxide saturated systems in presence of sand, inhibitor, oil, and high concentration of salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassani, Shokrollah

    Oil and gas production is usually accompanied by formation water which typically contains high levels of chloride. Some effects of chloride concentration on corrosion are not widely known in the literature, and this can result in misleading conclusions. One goal of this research was to contribute to a better understanding of the effects of chloride concentration in CO2 corrosion. Experimental and theoretical studies conducted in the present work have shown that increasing the NaCl concentration in solution has three important effects on corrosion results. First, standard pH meter readings in high NaCl concentration solutions require corrections. Second, increasing the NaCl concentration decreases the CO2 concentration in solution and therefore contributes to a decrease in the corrosion rate. Third, increasing the NaCl concentration increases the solubility of FeCO3 and therefore reduces the likelihood of forming an iron carbonate scale. High NaCl concentration also decreases the sand erosion rate of the metal slightly by increasing the density and viscosity of the liquid. There are two main contributions of this research. The first contribution is the experimental characterization of inhibited erosion-corrosion behavior of mild steel under CO2-saturated conditions with a high salt concentration. Chemical inhibition is one the most important techniques for controlling erosion-corrosion in offshore mild steel pipelines, tubing and pipe fittings in oil and gas industry. The second contribution is the introduction of a new approach for predicting inhibited erosion-corrosion in mild steel pipes including the effects of flow and environmental conditions, sand production, and an oil phase. Sand erosion can decrease the efficiency of corrosion protection systems including iron-carbonate scale formation and chemical inhibition. The need to be able to predict inhibitor performance under sand production conditions is particularly acute when the wells are deep or off

  3. Highly-resolved Modeling of Emissions and Concentrations of Carbon Monoxide, Carbon Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, and Fine Particulate Matter in Salt Lake City, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, D. L.; Lin, J. C.; Mitchell, L.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate, high-resolution data on air pollutant emissions and concentrations are needed to understand human exposures and for both policy and pollutant management purposes. An important step in this process is also quantification of uncertainties. We present a spatially explicit and highly resolved emissions inventory for Salt Lake County, Utah, and trace gas concentration estimates for carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and fine particles (PM2.5) within Salt Lake City. We assess the validity of this approach by comparing measured concentrations against simulated values derived from combining the emissions inventory with an atmospheric model. The emissions inventory for the criteria pollutants was constructed using the 2011 National Emissions Inventory (NEI). The spatial and temporal allocation methods from the Emission Modeling Clearinghouse data set are used to downscale the NEI data from annual to hourly scales and from county-level to 500 m x 500 m resolution. Onroad mobile source emissions were estimated by combining a bottom-up emissions calculation approach for large roadway links with a top-down spatial allocation approach for other roadways. Vehicle activity data for road links were derived from automatic traffic responder data. The emissions inventory for CO2 was obtained from the Hestia emissions data product at an hourly, building, facility, and road link resolution. The AERMOD and CALPUFF dispersion models were used to transport emissions and estimate air pollutant concentrations at an hourly temporal and 500 m x 500 m spatial resolution. Modeled results were compared against measurements from a mobile lab equipped with trace gas measurement equipment traveling on pre-determined routes in the Salt Lake City area. The comparison between both approaches to concentration estimation highlights spatial locations and hours of high variability/uncertainty. Results presented here will inform understanding of variability and

  4. Correction for a measurement artifact of the Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP at high black carbon mass concentration levels

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    A.-P. Hyvärinen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP is a widely-used instrument for aerosol black carbon (BC measurements. In this paper, we show correction methods for an artifact found to affect the instrument accuracy in environments characterized by high black carbon concentrations. The artifact occurs after a filter spot change – as BC mass is accumulated on a fresh filter spot, the attenuation of the light (raw signal is weaker than anticipated. This causes a sudden decrease, followed by a gradual increase in measured BC concentration. The artifact is present in the data when the BC concentration exceeds ~3 μg m−3 at the typical MAAP flow rate of 16.7 L min−1 or 1 m3 h−1. The artifact is caused by erroneous dark counts in the photodetector measuring the transmitted light, in combination with an instrument internal averaging procedure of the photodetector raw signals. It was found that, in addition to the erroneous temporal response of the data, concentrations higher than 9 μg m−3 (at the flow rate of 16.7 L min−1 are underestimated by the MAAP. The underestimation increases with increasing BC accumulation rate. At a flow rate of 16.7 L min−1 and concentration of about 24 μg m−3 (BC accumulation rate ~0.4 μg min−1, the underestimation is about 30%. There are two ways of overcoming the MAAP artifact. One method is by logging the raw signal of the 165° photomultiplier measuring the reflected light from the filter spot. As this signal is not affected by the artifact, it can be converted to approximately correct absorption and BC values. However, as the typical print formats of the MAAP do not give the reflected signal as an output, a semi-empirical correction method was developed based on laboratory experiments to correct for the results in the post-processing phase. The correction function was applied to three MAAP datasets from

  5. Correction for a measurement artifact of the Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP at high black carbon mass concentration levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-P. Hyvärinen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP is a widely-used instrument for aerosol black carbon observations. In this paper, we show correction methods for an artifact found to affect the instrument accuracy in environments with high black carbon concentrations. The artifact occurs after a filter spot change – as BC mass is accumulated on a fresh filter spot, the attenuation of the light (raw signal is weaker than anticipated. This causes a sudden decrease, followed by a gradual increase in measured BC concentration. The artifact is present in the data when the BC concentration exceeds ∼3 μg m−3 at the typical MAAP flow rate of 16.7 l min−1 or 1 m3 h−1. The artifact is caused by erroneous dark counts in the photo detector measuring the transmitted light, in combination with an instrument internal averaging procedure of the photo detector raw signals. It was found that in addition to the erroneous temporal response of the data, concentrations higher than 9 μg m−3 (at the flow rate of 16.7 l min−1 are underestimated by the MAAP. The underestimation increases with increasing BC accumulation rate. At a flow rate of 16.7 l min−1 and concentration of about 24 μg m−3 (BC accumulation rate ∼0.4 μg min−1, the underestimation is about 30%. There are two ways of overcoming the MAAP artifact. One method is by logging the raw signal of the 165° photomultiplier measuring the reflected light from the filter spot. As this signal is not affected by the artifact, it can be converted to approximately correct absorption and BC values. However, as the typical print formats of the MAAP do not give the reflected signal as an output, a semi-empirical correction method was developed based on laboratory experiments to correct for the results in the post-processing phase. The correction function was applied to three MAAP datasets from Gual Pahari

  6. Correction for a measurement artifact of the Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) at high black carbon mass concentration levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Vakkari, V.; Laakso, L.; Hooda, R. K.; Sharma, V. P.; Panwar, T. S.; Beukes, J. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Josipovic, M.; Garland, R. M.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.; Petzold, A.

    2013-01-01

    The Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) is a widely-used instrument for aerosol black carbon (BC) measurements. In this paper, we show correction methods for an artifact found to affect the instrument accuracy in environments characterized by high black carbon concentrations. The artifact occurs after a filter spot change - as BC mass is accumulated on a fresh filter spot, the attenuation of the light (raw signal) is weaker than anticipated. This causes a sudden decrease, followed by a gradual increase in measured BC concentration. The artifact is present in the data when the BC concentration exceeds ~3 μg m-3 at the typical MAAP flow rate of 16.7 L min-1 or 1 m3 h-1. The artifact is caused by erroneous dark counts in the photodetector measuring the transmitted light, in combination with an instrument internal averaging procedure of the photodetector raw signals. It was found that, in addition to the erroneous temporal response of the data, concentrations higher than 9 μg m-3 (at the flow rate of 16.7 L min-1) are underestimated by the MAAP. The underestimation increases with increasing BC accumulation rate. At a flow rate of 16.7 L min-1 and concentration of about 24 μg m-3 (BC accumulation rate ~0.4 μg min-1), the underestimation is about 30%. There are two ways of overcoming the MAAP artifact. One method is by logging the raw signal of the 165° photomultiplier measuring the reflected light from the filter spot. As this signal is not affected by the artifact, it can be converted to approximately correct absorption and BC values. However, as the typical print formats of the MAAP do not give the reflected signal as an output, a semi-empirical correction method was developed based on laboratory experiments to correct for the results in the post-processing phase. The correction function was applied to three MAAP datasets from Gual Pahari (India), Beijing (China), and Welgegund (South Africa). In Beijing, the results could also be compared against a

  7. Application of high-resolution spectral absorbance measurements to determine dissolved organic carbon concentration in remote areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avagyan, Armine; Runkle, Benjamin R. K.; Kutzbach, Lars

    2014-09-01

    Accurate quantification of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface and soil pore waters is crucial for understanding changes in water resources under the influence of climate and land use changes. Sampling and laboratory analysis of DOC content at a sufficient temporal frequency are especially difficult to achieve for natural DOC sources like the extensive boreal and arctic mire landscapes due to their remoteness. Therefore, the goals of this paper are (1) to investigate the performance of a portable, high-resolution ultraviolet-visible light spectroscopic method for determining the DOC content of surface and soil pore water samples from a boreal mire complex and (2) to compare the spectroscopic method with other DOC measurement techniques, e.g., the wet heated persulfate oxidation method and a laboratory, expulsion-based spectrophotometric method and (3) to assess different multivariate models that relate absorbance measurements with DOC contents. The study indicates that high-resolution spectroscopic measurements provide a simple, robust and non-destructive method for measuring DOC content. These measurements are of short duration (<1 min) and the sample analysis is portable, rendering this method particularly advantageous for in situ investigations at remote field locations. The study also demonstrates that if absorbances at specific wavelengths are used as proxies for DOC concentration, it is recommended to create site-specific calibration models that include more than one wavelength to achieve the optimal accuracy of the proxy-based DOC quantification.

  8. Black Carbon Concentrations from ~1850-1980 from a High-Resolution Ice Core from Geladandong, Central Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, M.; Kaspari, S.; Kang, S.; Grigholm, B. O.; Mayewski, P. A.

    2011-12-01

    Black carbon (BC), produced by the incomplete combustion of fossil and bio-fuels, is estimated to be the second largest contributor to global warming behind CO2; when deposited on snow and ice BC reduces albedos, potentially enhancing surface melt and glacial retreat. The study of BC's past and present variability is imperative in order to better understand and estimate its potential impact on climate and water resources. This is especially important in the Himalaya/Tibetan Plateau, a region that provides fresh water to over a billion people and where BC's climatic effects are estimated to be the largest (Flanner et al., 2007; Ramanathan and Carmichael, 2008). To more accurately constrain BC's past variability in this sensitive region, an ice core recovered in 2005 from Mt. Geladandong (5800 m a.s.l.) on the central Tibetan Plateau was analyzed for BC at high resolution using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). Results indicate that 1) average BC concentrations at this location are higher than at other locations closer to BC sources and analyzed by the same method (Mt. Everest by Kaspari et al., 2011 and Muztagh Ata by Wang et al., in prep), and 2) BC exists in peak concentrations high enough (>10 μg/L) to cause a >1% reduction in surface albedo at the sampling location (Ming et al., 2009; Hadley et al., 2010). Potential causes of the higher BC concentrations at the Geladandong site include lower annual precipitation and the mechanical trapping and concentration of BC caused by surface melt and/or sublimation (Conway et al., 1996; Huang et al., 2011). Preliminary dating (Grigholm et al., in prep) has dated the top of the core to ~1980, suggesting that annual mass loss at the site has removed the upper portion of the record. This supports the findings of Kehrwald et al. (2008) who reported that glaciers below ~6050 m a.s.l. in the Himalaya/Tibetan Plateau are losing mass annually. Presented here is the record of BC on the central Tibetan Plateau over the time

  9. Black carbon concentrations in the highly polluted Kathmandu Valley, Nepal: a three year monitoring with a dual-spot Aethalometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupakheti, Maheswar; Drinovec, Luka; Puppala, SivaPraveen; Mahata, Khadak; Rupakheti, Dipesh; Kathayat, Bhogendra; Singdan, Pratik; Panday, Arnico; Lawrence, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Our knowledge about ambient black carbon (BC) in the vast Himalayan region, a region vulnerable to impacts of global warming, is very limited due to unavailability of a long-term ambient monitoring. Here we present results from a continuous monitoring of ambient BC concentrations, with a new generation Aethalometer (AE33), over a three year period (January 2013- January 2016) at a semi-urban site in the highly polluted Kathmandu Valley in the foothills of the central Himalaya, one of the most polluted cities in the world. This is the longest time series of BC concentrations that have been monitored with AE33 (which uses the dual-spot technique for a real-time filter loading compensation) in highly polluted ambient environment. The measurements were carried out under the framework of project SusKat (Sustainable Atmosphere for the Kathmandu Valley). BC concentrations were found to be extremely high, especially in winter and the pre-monsoon period, with the hourly-averaged values often exceeding 50 μg/m3. BC concentrations showed a clear diurnal cycle with a prominent peak around 8-9 am and a second peak around 8-9 pm local time in all four seasons. Night-time BC was also fairly high. The diurnal cycle was driven by a combination of increased emissions from traffic, cooking activities, garbage burning, and lower mixing heights (˜200 m) and reduced horizontal ventilation in the mornings and evenings. BC concentrations showed significant seasonal variations - a maximum in winter season and minimum during the monsoon (rainy) season, with monthly average values in the range 5-30 μg/m3. An increase in emissions from the operation of over 100 brick kilns in winter and spring, and an increase in the use of small but numerous diesel power generators during hours with power cuts contributed significantly to ambient BC concentrations in the valley. Fractional contributions of biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion to BC was estimated based on a real-time method for

  10. Design and evaluation of a high temperature/pressure supercritical carbon dioxide direct tubular receiver for concentrating solar power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Jesus Daniel

    This work focuses on the development of a solar power thermal receiver for a supercritical-carbon dioxide (sCO2), Brayton power-cycle to produce ~1 MWe. Closed-loop sCO2 Brayton cycles are being evaluated in combination with concentrating solar power to provide higher thermal-to-electric conversion efficiencies relative to conventional steam Rankine cycles. High temperatures (923--973 K) and pressures (20--25 MPa) are required in the solar receiver to achieve thermal efficiencies of ~50%, making concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies a competitive alternative to current power generation methods. In this study, the CSP receiver is required to achieve an outlet temperature of 923 K at 25 MPa or 973 K at 20 MPa to meet the operating needs. To obtain compatible receiver tube material, an extensive material review was performed based the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, ASME B31.1 and ASME B313.3 codes respectively. Subsequently, a thermal-structural model was developed using a commercial computational fluid (CFD) dynamics and structural mechanics software for designing and analyzing the tubular receiver that could provide the heat input for a ~2 MWth plant. These results were used to perform an analytical cumulative damage creep-fatigue analysis to estimate the work-life of the tubes. In sequence, an optical-thermal-fluid model was developed to evaluate the resulting thermal efficiency of the tubular receiver from the NSTTF heliostat field. The ray-tracing tool SolTrace was used to obtain the heat-flux distribution on the surfaces of the receiver. The K-ω SST turbulence model and P-1 radiation model used in Fluent were coupled with SolTrace to provide the heat flux distribution on the receiver surface. The creep-fatigue analysis displays the damage accumulated due to the cycling and the permanent deformation of the tubes. Nonetheless, they are able to support the required lifetime. The receiver surface temperatures were found to be within the safe

  11. Concentration-Dependent Carbon Diffusivity in Austenite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaoting; Michal, Gary M.; Ernst, Frank; Kahn, Harold; Heuer, Arthur H.

    2014-08-01

    The diffusion coefficient of carbon in austenite depends on the local carbon concentration. This concentration dependence is particularly noticeable during low-temperature "paraequilibrium" carburization. A critical review of the extensive literature on this topic reveals that an early paper by Asimow provides an excellent description of this substantial concentration dependence. The present analysis suggests that the marked concentration dependence of carbon diffusivity is most likely due to interstitial carbon decreasing the activation energy for carbon jumps from one interstitial site to its neighbor.

  12. Correlation of black carbon aerosol and carbon monoxide concentrations measured in the high-altitude environment of Mt. Huangshan, Eastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. L. Pan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the relationship between black carbon (BC and carbon monoxide (CO will help improve BC emission inventories and the evaluation of global/regional climate forcing effects. In the present work, the BC (PM1 and CO mixing ratio was continuously measured at a~high-altitude background station on the summit of Mt Huangshan between 2006 and 2009. Annual mean BC concentration was 654.6 ± 633.4 ng m−3 with maxima in spring and autumn, when biomass was burned over a large area in Eastern China. The yearly averaged CO concentration was 446.4 ± 167.6 ppbv, and the increase in the CO concentration was greatest in the cold season, implying that the large-scale domestic coal/biofuel combustion for heating has an effect. The BC–CO relationship was found to have different seasonal features but strong positive correlation (R > 0.8. Back trajectory cluster analysis showed that the ΔBC/ΔCO ratio of plumes from the Yangtze River Delta region was 6.58 ± 0.96 ng m−3 ppbv−1, which is consistent with result from INTEX-B emission inventory. The ΔBC/ΔCO ratios for air masses from Northern, Central Eastern and Southern China were 5.2 ± 0.63, 5.65 ± 0.58 and 5.21 ± 0.93 ng m−3 ppbv−1, respectively. Over the whole observation period, the ΔBC/ΔCO ratio had unimodal diurnal variations and had a maximum during the day (09:00–17:00 LST and minimum at night (21:00–04:00 LST in spring, summer, autumn and winter, indicating the effects of the intrusion of clean air mass from the high troposphere. The case study combined with measurements of urban PM10 concentrations and satellite observations demonstrated that the ΔBC/ΔCO ratio for a plume of burning biomass was 12.4 ng m−3 ppbv−1 and that for urban plumes in Eastern China was 5.3 ± 0.53 ng m−3 ppbv−1. Transportation and industry were deemed as

  13. Adaptation to high CO2 concentration in an optimal environment: radiation capture, canopy quantum yield and carbon use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, O.; Bugbee, B.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of elevated [CO2] on wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Veery 10) productivity was examined by analysing radiation capture, canopy quantum yield, canopy carbon use efficiency, harvest index and daily C gain. Canopies were grown at either 330 or 1200 micromoles mol-1 [CO2] in controlled environments, where root and shoot C fluxes were monitored continuously from emergence to harvest. A rapidly circulating hydroponic solution supplied nutrients, water and root zone oxygen. At harvest, dry mass predicted from gas exchange data was 102.8 +/- 4.7% of the observed dry mass in six trials. Neither radiation capture efficiency nor carbon use efficiency were affected by elevated [CO2], but yield increased by 13% due to a sustained increase in canopy quantum yield. CO2 enrichment increased root mass, tiller number and seed mass. Harvest index and chlorophyll concentration were unchanged, but CO2 enrichment increased average life cycle net photosynthesis (13%, P < 0.05) and root respiration (24%, P < 0.05). These data indicate that plant communities adapt to CO2 enrichment through changes in C allocation. Elevated [CO2] increases sink strength in optimal environments, resulting in sustained increases in photosynthetic capacity, canopy quantum yield and daily C gain throughout the life cycle.

  14. Adaptation to high CO2 concentration in an optimal environment: radiation capture, canopy quantum yield and carbon use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, O.; Bugbee, B.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of elevated [CO2] on wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Veery 10) productivity was examined by analysing radiation capture, canopy quantum yield, canopy carbon use efficiency, harvest index and daily C gain. Canopies were grown at either 330 or 1200 micromoles mol-1 [CO2] in controlled environments, where root and shoot C fluxes were monitored continuously from emergence to harvest. A rapidly circulating hydroponic solution supplied nutrients, water and root zone oxygen. At harvest, dry mass predicted from gas exchange data was 102.8 +/- 4.7% of the observed dry mass in six trials. Neither radiation capture efficiency nor carbon use efficiency were affected by elevated [CO2], but yield increased by 13% due to a sustained increase in canopy quantum yield. CO2 enrichment increased root mass, tiller number and seed mass. Harvest index and chlorophyll concentration were unchanged, but CO2 enrichment increased average life cycle net photosynthesis (13%, P CO2 enrichment through changes in C allocation. Elevated [CO2] increases sink strength in optimal environments, resulting in sustained increases in photosynthetic capacity, canopy quantum yield and daily C gain throughout the life cycle.

  15. Adaptation to high CO2 concentration in an optimal environment: radiation capture, canopy quantum yield and carbon use efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monje, O.; Bugbee, B.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of elevated [CO2] on wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Veery 10) productivity was examined by analysing radiation capture, canopy quantum yield, canopy carbon use efficiency, harvest index and daily C gain. Canopies were grown at either 330 or 1200 micromoles mol-1 [CO2] in controlled environments, where root and shoot C fluxes were monitored continuously from emergence to harvest. A rapidly circulating hydroponic solution supplied nutrients, water and root zone oxygen. At harvest, dry mass predicted from gas exchange data was 102.8 +/- 4.7% of the observed dry mass in six trials. Neither radiation capture efficiency nor carbon use efficiency were affected by elevated [CO2], but yield increased by 13% due to a sustained increase in canopy quantum yield. CO2 enrichment increased root mass, tiller number and seed mass. Harvest index and chlorophyll concentration were unchanged, but CO2 enrichment increased average life cycle net photosynthesis (13%, P CO2 enrichment through changes in C allocation. Elevated [CO2] increases sink strength in optimal environments, resulting in sustained increases in photosynthetic capacity, canopy quantum yield and daily C gain throughout the life cycle.

  16. Simultaneous nitrogen and organic carbon removal in aerobic granular sludge reactors operated with high dissolved oxygen concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bella, Gaetano; Torregrossa, Michele

    2013-08-01

    Simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) together with organic removal in granules is usually carried out without Dissolved Oxygen (DO) concentration control, at "low DO" (with a DOoxygen control with big sized granules. More specifically, the paper presents a experimentation focused on the analysis of two Sequencing Batch Reactors (SBRs), in bench scale, working with different aerobic sludge granules, in terms of granule size, and high DO concentration, (with concentration varying from anoxic conditions, about DO ∼0 mg/L, to values close to those of saturation, >7-8 mg/L, during feast and famine conditions respectively). In particular, different strategies of cultivation and several organic and nitrogen loading rate have been applied, in order to evaluate the efficiencies in SND process without dissolved oxygen control. The results show that, even under conditions of high DO concentration, nitrogen and organic matter can be simultaneously removed, with efficiency >90%. Nevertheless, the biological conditions in the inner layer of the granule may change significantly between small and big granules, during the feast and famine periods. From point of view of granule stability, it is also interesting that with a particle size greater than 1.5mm, after the cultivation start-up, the granules are presented stable for a long period (about 100 days) and, despite the variations of operational conditions, the granules breaking was always negligible. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Methanol-Tolerant Platinum-Palladium Catalyst Supported on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanofiber for High Concentration Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyoung Kim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Pt-Pd catalyst supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber (N-CNF was prepared and evaluated as a cathode electrode of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC. The N-CNF, which was directly synthesized by the catalytic chemical vapor deposition from acetonitrile at 640 °C, was verified as having a change of electrochemical surface properties such as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR activities and the electrochemical double layer compared with common carbon black (CB. To attain the competitive oxygen reduction reaction activity with methanol tolerance, the Pt and Pd metals were supported on the CB or the N-CNF. The physical and electrochemical characteristics of the N-CNF–supported Pt-Pd catalyst were examined and compared with catalyst supported on the CB. In addition, DMFC single cells using these catalysts as the cathode electrode were applied to obtain I-V polarization curves and constant current operating performances with high-concentration methanol as the fuel. Pt-Pd catalysts had obvious ORR activity even in the presence of methanol. The higher power density was obtained at all the methanol concentrations when it applied to the membrane electrode assembly (MEA of the DMFC. When the N-CNF is used as the catalyst support material, a better performance with high-concentration methanol is expected.

  18. Cyclic Voltammetry Determination of Epinephrine with a Nano-gold Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode in the Presence of High Concentration Ascorbic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Nano-gold (NG) modified glassy carbon electrodes (GCEs) were used for determination of epinephrine (EP) in the presence of high concentration ascorbic acid (AA) by cyclic voltammetry (CV). This modified electrode can not only catalytically oxidize EP and AA, but also separate the catalytic peak potentials of EP and AA by about 183.5 mV. In pH = 7.0 ogisogate byffer solution, the linear range of epinephrine was 5 ′ 106 ~ 1 × 10-4 mol/L.

  19. Cyclic Voltammetry Determination of Epinephrine with a Nano—gold Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode in the Presence of High Concentration Ascorbic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HongZHANG; XueQinGUI; 等

    2002-01-01

    Nano-gold(NG) modified glassy carbon electrodes(GCEs) were used for determination of epinephrine(EP) in the presence of high concentration ascorbic acid (AA) by cyclic voltammetry(CV). This modified electrode can not only catalytically oxidize EP and AA, but also separate the catalytic peak potentials of EP and AA by about 183.5mV. In pH=7.0 ogisogate byffer solution, the linear range of epinephrine was 5×106-1×10-4mol/L.

  20. Analytical strategy for the determination of various arsenic species in landfill leachate containing high concentrations of chlorine and organic carbon by HPLC-ICPMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, J.; An, J.; Kim, J.; Jung, H.; Kim, K.; Yoon, C.; Yoon, H.

    2012-12-01

    As a variety of wastes containing arsenic are disposed of in landfills, such facilities can play a prominent role in disseminating arsenic sources to the environment. Since it is widely recognized that arsenic toxicity is highly dependent on its species, accurate determination of various arsenic species should be considered as one of the essential goals to properly account for the potential health risk of arsenic in human and the environment. The inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry linked to high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-ICPMS) is acknowledged as one of the most important tools for the trace analysis of metallic speciation because of its superior separation capability and detectability. However, the complexity of matrices can cause severe interferences in the analysis results, which is the problem often encountered with HPLC-ICPMS system. High concentration of organic carbon in a sample solution causes carbon build-up on the skimmer and sampling cone, which reduces analytical sensitivity and requires a high maintenance level for its cleaning. In addition, argon from the plasma and chlorine from the sample matrix may combine to form 40Ar35Cl, which has the same nominal mass to charge (m/z) ratio as arsenic. In this respect, analytical strategy for the determination of various arsenic species (e.g., inorganic arsenite and arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid, dimethylarsinic acid, dimethyldithioarsinic acid, and arsenobetaine) in landfill leachate containing high concentrations of chlorine and organic carbon was developed in the present study. Solid phase extraction disk (i.e., C18 disk), which does not significantly adsorb any target arsenic species, was used to remove organic carbon in sample solutions. In addition, helium (He) gas was injected into the collision reaction cell equipped in ICPMS to collapse 40Ar35Cl into individual 40Ar and 35Cl. Although He gas also decreased arsenic intensity by blocking 75As, its signal to noise ratio

  1. Growth of silicon-doped Al0.6Ga0.4N with low carbon concentration at high growth rate using high-flow-rate metal organic vapor phase epitaxy reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenaga, Kazutada; Mishima, Akira; Yano, Yoshiki; Tabuchi, Toshiya; Matsumoto, Koh

    2016-05-01

    The relationship between the carbon concentration and electrical characteristics of silicon-doped AlGaN (Al > 0.5) was investigated using a high-flow-rate metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) reactor. The carbon concentration and electrical properties of AlGaN (Al > 0.5) were measured as a function of the growth rate, V/III ratio, and growth temperature. The growth rate of Al0.6Ga0.4N was linearly controlled up to 7.2 µm/h under a constant ammonia (NH3) flow rate. However, a decrease in V/III ratio resulted in an increase in carbon concentration to 8 × 1017 cm-3. With increased growth temperature, the carbon concentration decreased to less than 2 × 1017 cm-3 without showing any reduction in growth rate. As a result, n-type Al0.6Ga0.4N with a carrier concentration of 5.4 × 1018 cm-3 and a resistivity of 2.2 × 10-2 Ω·cm was obtained.

  2. Fine-root carbon and nitrogen concentration of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. in Italy Prealps: possible implications of coppice conversion to high forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattia eTerzaghi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fine-root systems represent a very sensitive plant compartment to environmental changes. Gaining further knowledge about their dynamics would improve soil carbon input understanding. This paper investigates C and N concentrations in fine roots in relation to different stand characteristics resulting from conversion of coppiced forests to high forests. In order to evaluate possible interferences due to different vegetative stages of vegetation, fine-root sampling was repeated 6 times in each stand during the same 2008 growing season. Fine-root sampling was conducted within three different soil depths (0-10; 10-20; and 20-30 cm. Fine-root traits were measured by means of WinRHIZO software which enable us to separate them into three different diameter classes (0-0.5, 0.5-1.0 and 1.0-2.0 mm. The data collected indicate that N concentration was higher in converted stands than in the coppiced stand whereas C concentration was higher in the coppiced stand than in converted stands. Consequently the fine-root C:N ratio was significantly higher in coppiced than in converted stands and showed an inverse relationship with fine-root turnover rate, confirming a significant change of fine-root status after the conversion of a coppice to high forest.

  3. Fine-root carbon and nitrogen concentration of European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) in Italy Prealps: possible implications of coppice conversion to high forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzaghi, Mattia; Montagnoli, Antonio; Di Iorio, Antonino; Scippa, Gabriella S; Chiatante, Donato

    2013-01-01

    Fine-root systems represent a very sensitive plant compartment to environmental changes. Gaining further knowledge about their dynamics would improve soil carbon input understanding. This paper investigates C and N concentrations in fine roots in relation to different stand characteristics resulting from conversion of coppiced forests to high forests. In order to evaluate possible interferences due to different vegetative stages of vegetation, fine-root sampling was repeated six times in each stand during the same 2008 growing season. Fine-root sampling was conducted within three different soil depths (0-10; 10-20; and 20-30 cm). Fine-root traits were measured by means of WinRHIZO software which enable us to separate them into three different diameter classes (0-0.5, 0.5-1.0 and 1.0-2.0 mm). The data collected indicate that N concentration was higher in converted stands than in the coppiced stand whereas C concentration was higher in the coppiced stand than in converted stands. Consequently the fine-root C:N ratio was significantly higher in coppiced than in converted stands and showed an inverse relationship with fine-root turnover rate, confirming a significant change of fine-root status after the conversion of a coppice to high forest.

  4. Control of residual carbon concentration in GaN high electron mobility transistor and realization of high-resistance GaN grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, X.G. [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhao, D.G., E-mail: dgzhao@red.semi.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Jiang, D.S.; Liu, Z.S.; Chen, P.; Le, L.C.; Yang, J.; Li, X.J. [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, S.M.; Zhu, J.J.; Wang, H.; Yang, H. [Suzhou Institute of Nano-tech and Nano-bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215125 (China)

    2014-08-01

    GaN films were grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) under various growth conditions. The influences of MOCVD growth parameters, i.e., growth pressure, ammonia (NH{sub 3}) flux, growth temperature, trimethyl-gallium flux and H{sub 2} flux, on residual carbon concentration ([C]) were systematically investigated. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy measurements show that [C] can be effectively modulated by growth conditions. Especially, it can increase by reducing growth pressure up to two orders of magnitude. High-resistance (HR) GaN epilayer with a resistivity over 1.0 × 10{sup 9} Ω·cm is achieved by reducing growth pressure. The mechanism of the formation of HR GaN epilayer is discussed. An Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N/GaN high electron mobility transistor structure with a HR GaN buffer layer and an additional low-carbon GaN channel layer is presented, exhibiting a high two dimensional electron gas mobility of 1815 cm{sup 2}/Vs. - Highlights: • Influence of MOCVD parameters on residual carbon concentration in GaN is studied. • GaN layer with a resistivity over 1 × 10{sup 9} Ω·cm is achieved by reducing growth pressure. • High electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures were prepared. • Control of residual carbon content results in HEMT with high 2-D electron gas mobility.

  5. Action of gibberellins on growth and metabolism of Arabidopsis plants associated with high concentration of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Dimas M; Araújo, Wagner L; Fernie, Alisdair R; Schippers, Jos H M; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2012-12-01

    Although the positive effect of elevated CO(2) concentration [CO(2)] on plant growth is well known, it remains unclear whether global climate change will positively or negatively affect crop yields. In particular, relatively little is known about the role of hormone pathways in controlling the growth responses to elevated [CO(2)]. Here, we studied the impact of elevated [CO(2)] on plant biomass and metabolism in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) in relation to the availability of gibberellins (GAs). Inhibition of growth by the GA biosynthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol (PAC) at ambient [CO(2)] (350 µmol CO(2) mol(-1)) was reverted by elevated [CO(2)] (750 µmol CO(2) mol(-1)). Thus, we investigated the metabolic adjustment and modulation of gene expression in response to changes in growth of plants imposed by varying the GA regime in ambient and elevated [CO(2)]. In the presence of PAC (low-GA regime), the activities of enzymes involved in photosynthesis and inorganic nitrogen assimilation were markedly increased at elevated [CO(2)], whereas the activities of enzymes of organic acid metabolism were decreased. Under ambient [CO(2)], nitrate, amino acids, and protein accumulated upon PAC treatment; however, this was not the case when plants were grown at elevated [CO(2)]. These results suggest that only under ambient [CO(2)] is GA required for the integration of carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolism underlying optimal biomass determination. Our results have implications concerning the action of the Green Revolution genes in future environmental conditions.

  6. Concentration-Gradient Multichannel Flow-Stream Membrane Capacitive Deionization Cell for High Desalination Capacity of Carbon Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Choonsoo; Lee, Juhan; Srimuk, Pattarachai; Aslan, Mesut; Presser, Volker

    2017-07-07

    We present a novel multichannel membrane flow-stream capacitive deionization (MC-MCDI) concept with two flow streams to control the environment around the electrodes and a middle channel for water desalination. The introduction of side channels to our new cell design allows operation in a highly saline environment, while the feed water stream in the middle channel (conventional CDI channel) is separated from the electrodes with anion- and cation-exchange membranes. At a high salinity gradient between side (1000 mm) and middle (5 mm) channels, MC-MCDI exhibited an unprecedented salt-adsorption capacity (SAC) of 56 mg g(-1) in the middle channel with charge efficiency close to unity and low energy consumption. This excellent performance corresponds to a fourfold increase in desalination performance compared to the state-of-the-art in a conventional CDI cell. The enhancement originates from the enhanced specific capacitance in high-molar saline media in agreement with the Gouy-Chapman-Stern theory and from a double-ion desorption/adsorption process of MC-MCDI through voltage operation from -1.2 to +1.2 V. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. High soil solution carbon und nitrogen concentrations in a drained Atlantic bog are reduced to natural levels by 10 yr of rewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, S.; Tiemeyer, B.; Gelbrecht, J.; Freibauer, A.

    2013-10-01

    Artificial drainage of peatlands causes dramatic changes in the release of greenhouse gases and in the export of dissolved carbon (C) and nutrients to downstream ecosystems. Rewetting anthropogenically altered peatlands offers a possibility to reduce nitrogen (N) and C losses. In this study, we investigate the impact of drainage and rewetting on the cycling of dissolved C and N as well as on dissolved gases over a period of 1 yr and 4 month, respectively. The peeper technique was used to receive a high vertical sampling resolution. Within one Atlantic bog complex a near natural site, two drained grasslands sites with different mean water table positions, and a former peat cutting area rewetted 10 yr ago were chosen. Our results clearly indicate that drainage increased the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), ammonia, nitrate and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) compared to the near natural site. Drainage depth further determined the release and therefore the concentration level of DOC and N species, but the biochemical cycling and therefore dissolved organic matter (DOM) quality and N species composition were unaffected. Thus, especially deep drainage can cause high DOC losses. In general, DOM at drained sites was enriched in aromatic moieties as indicated by SUVA280 and showed a higher degradation status (lower DOC to DON ratio) compared to the near natural site. At the drained sites, equal C to N ratios of uppermost peat layer and DOC to DON ratio of DOM in soil solution suggest that the uppermost degraded peat layer is the main source of DOM. Nearly constant DOC to DON ratios and SUVA280 values with depth furthermore indicated that DOM moving downwards through the drained sites remained largely unchanged. DON and ammonia contributed most to the total dissolved nitrogen (TN). The subsoil concentrations of nitrate were negligible due to strong decline in nitrate around mean water table depth. Methane production during the winter months at the drained

  8. High soil solution carbon und nitrogen concentrations in a drained Atlantic bog are reduced to natural levels by 10 yr of rewetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Frank

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Artificial drainage of peatlands causes dramatic changes in the release of greenhouse gases and in the export of dissolved carbon (C and nutrients to downstream ecosystems. Rewetting anthropogenically altered peatlands offers a possibility to reduce nitrogen (N and C losses. In this study, we investigate the impact of drainage and rewetting on the cycling of dissolved C and N as well as on dissolved gases over a period of 1 yr and 4 month, respectively. The peeper technique was used to receive a high vertical sampling resolution. Within one Atlantic bog complex a near natural site, two drained grasslands sites with different mean water table positions, and a former peat cutting area rewetted 10 yr ago were chosen. Our results clearly indicate that drainage increased the concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC, ammonia, nitrate and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON compared to the near natural site. Drainage depth further determined the release and therefore the concentration level of DOC and N species, but the biochemical cycling and therefore dissolved organic matter (DOM quality and N species composition were unaffected. Thus, especially deep drainage can cause high DOC losses. In general, DOM at drained sites was enriched in aromatic moieties as indicated by SUVA280 and showed a higher degradation status (lower DOC to DON ratio compared to the near natural site. At the drained sites, equal C to N ratios of uppermost peat layer and DOC to DON ratio of DOM in soil solution suggest that the uppermost degraded peat layer is the main source of DOM. Nearly constant DOC to DON ratios and SUVA280 values with depth furthermore indicated that DOM moving downwards through the drained sites remained largely unchanged. DON and ammonia contributed most to the total dissolved nitrogen (TN. The subsoil concentrations of nitrate were negligible due to strong decline in nitrate around mean water table depth. Methane production during the winter months at

  9. High soil solution carbon and nitrogen concentrations in a drained Atlantic bog are reduced to natural levels by 10 years of rewetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, S.; Tiemeyer, B.; Gelbrecht, J.; Freibauer, A.

    2014-04-01

    Anthropogenic drainage of peatlands releases additional greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, and dissolved carbon (C) and nutrients to downstream ecosystems. Rewetting drained peatlands offers a possibility to reduce nitrogen (N) and C losses. In this study, we investigate the impact of drainage and rewetting on the cycling of dissolved C and N as well as on dissolved gases, over a period of 1 year and a period of 4 months. We chose four sites within one Atlantic bog complex: a near-natural site, two drained grasslands with different mean groundwater levels and a former peat cutting area rewetted 10 years ago. Our results clearly indicate that long-term drainage has increased the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), ammonium, nitrate and dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) compared to the near-natural site. DON and ammonium contributed the most to the total dissolved nitrogen. Nitrate concentrations below the mean groundwater table were negligible. The concentrations of DOC and N species increased with drainage depth. In the deeply-drained grassland, with a mean annual water table of 45 cm below surface, DOC concentrations were twice as high as in the partially rewetted grassland with a mean annual water table of 28 cm below surface. The deeply drained grassland had some of the highest-ever observed DOC concentrations of 195.8 ± 77.3 mg L-1 with maximum values of >400 mg L-1. In general, dissolved organic matter (DOM) at the drained sites was enriched in aromatic moieties and showed a higher degradation status (lower DOC to DON ratio) compared to the near-natural site. At the drained sites, the C to N ratios of the uppermost peat layer were the same as of DOM in the peat profile. This suggests that the uppermost degraded peat layer is the main source of DOM. Nearly constant DOM quality through the profile furthermore indicated that DOM moving downwards through the drained sites remained largely biogeochemically unchanged. Unlike DOM concentration, DOM

  10. Physical cleaning of high carbon fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, McMahan L.; Champagne, Kenneth J.; Soong, Yee; Killmeyer, Richard P. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, US Department of Energy, P.O. Box 10940, Cochran Mills Roads, 15236 Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Maroto-Valer, M. Mercedes; Andresen, John M. [The Energy Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, 405 Academic Activities Building, 16802-2308 University Park, PA (United States); Ciocco, Michael V.; Zandhuis, Paul H. [Parson Project Services Inc, National Energy Technology Laboratory, P.O. Box 618, 15129 Library, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2002-04-20

    An industrial fly ash sample was cleaned by three different processes, which were triboelectrostatic separation, ultrasonic column agglomeration, and column flotation. The unburned carbon concentrates were collected at purities ranging up to 62% at recoveries of 62%. In addition, optical microscopy studies were conducted on the final carbon concentrates to determine the carbon forms (inertinite, isotropic coke and anisotropic coke) collected from these various physical-cleaning processes. The effects of the various cleaning processes on the production of different carbon forms from high carbon fly ashes will be discussed.

  11. Very high carbon delta -doping concentration in AlxGa1 - xAs grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy using trimethylaluminum as a doping precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, G.; Petravić, M.; Jagadish, C.

    1996-04-01

    Using trimethylaluminum (TMAl) or trimethylgallium (TMGa) as a doping precursor, carbon δ-doped AlxGa1-xAs has been grown in metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. Compared to TMGa, TMAl exhibits very high carbon δ-doping efficiency. The best hole profile of carbon δ-doped Al0.3Ga0.7As grown at 580 °C using TMAl as a doping precursor has a peak hole density of 1.6×1019 cm-3 for a full width at half-maximum of 85 Å with most of the incorporated carbon atoms being electrically active. When TMGa is used as the doping precursor, the hole density of carbon δ-doped AlxGa1-xAs significantly increases with an increase of the Al mole fraction. By comparison, the use of TMAl almost induces independence of the hole density on the Al mole fraction. The hole density of carbon δ-doped Al0.3Ga0.7As weakly increases when reducing the δ-doping temperature regardless of the doping precursors. The hole density of carbon δ-doped Al0.3Ga0.7As grown at 580 °C is proportionally associated with the moles of TMGa or TMAl totally input during a δ-doping step. Using heavily carbon δ-doped layers in Al0.3Ga0.7As, a carbon δ-doped pipi doping superlattice possessing a bulk-doped-like hole profile with an average hole density of 1.1×1019 cm-3 is therefore demonstrated as an alternative with unique advantages over other conventional carbon bulk-doping approaches.

  12. High black carbon and ozone concentrations during pollution transport in the Himalayas: Five years of continuous observations at NCO-P global GAW station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.Marinoni; P.Cristofanelli; P.Laj; R.Duchi; D.Putero; F.Calzolari; T.C.Landi

    2013-01-01

    To study the influence of polluted air-mass transport carrying ozone (O3) and black carbon (BC) in the high H-hmalayas,since March 2006 the Nepal Climate Observatory at Pyramid (NCO-P) GAW-WMO global station (Nepal,5079 m a.s.l.) is operative.During the first 5-year measurements,the O3 and BC concentrations have shown a mean value of 48 ± 12 ppb (± standard deviation) and 208 ± 374 ng/m3,respectively.Both O3 and BC showed well defined seasonal cycles with maxima during pre-monsoon (O3:61.3 ± 7.7 ppbV; BC:444 ± 433 ng/m3) and minima during the summer monsoon (O3:40.1 ± 12.4 ppbV; BC∶ 64 ± 101 ng/m3).The analysis of the days characterised by the presence of a significant BC increase with respect to the typical seasonal cycle identified 156 days affected by "acute" pollution events,corresponding to 9.1% of the entire data-set.Such events mostly occur in the pre-monsoon period,when the O3 diurnal variability is strongly related to the transport of polluted air-mass rich on BC.On average,these "acute" pollution events were characterised by dramatic increases of BC (352%) and O3 (29%) levels compared with the remaining days.

  13. High black carbon and ozone concentrations during pollution transport in the Himalayas: five years of continuous observations at NCO-P global GAW station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinoni, A; Cristofanelli, P; Laj, P; Duchi, R; Putero, D; Calzolari, F; Landi, T C; Vuillermoz, E; Maione, M; Bonasoni, P

    2013-08-01

    To study the influence of polluted air-mass transport carrying ozone (O3) and black carbon (BC) in the high Himalayas, since March 2006 the Nepal Climate Observatory at Pyramid (NCO-P) GAW-WMO global station (Nepal, 5079 m a.s.l.) is operative. During the first 5-year measurements, the O3 and BC concentrations have shown a mean value of 48 +/- 12 ppb (+/- standard deviation) and 208 +/- 374 ng/m3, respectively. Both O3 and BC showed well defined seasonal cycles with maxima during pre-monsoon (O3: 61.3 +/- 7.7 ppbV; BC: 444 +/- 433 ng/m3) and minima during the summer monsoon (O3: 40.1 +/- 12.4 ppbV; BC: 64 +/- 101 ng/m3). The analysis of the days characterised by the presence of a significant BC increase with respect to the typical seasonal cycle identified 156 days affected by "acute" pollution events, corresponding to 9.1% of the entire data-set. Such events mostly occur in the pre-monsoon period, when the O3 diurnal variability is strongly related to the transport of polluted air-mass rich on BC. On average, these "acute" pollution events were characterised by dramatic increases of BC (352%) and O3 (29%) levels compared with the remaining days.

  14. A novel control method for nitritation: The domination of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria by high concentrations of inorganic carbon in an airlift-fluidized bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokutomi, Takaaki; Shibayama, Chizu; Soda, Satoshi; Ike, Michihiko

    2010-07-01

    A novel nitritation method based on the addition of inorganic carbon (IC) was verified using an airlift-fluidized bed reactor packed with sponge cubes. A continuous-treatment experiment demonstrated that the type of nitrification-nitrite or nitrate accumulation-could be controlled by the addition of different alkalinity sources (NaHCO(3) or NaOH, respectively). The maximum rate of ammonia oxidation at 30 degrees C was 2.47kg-N/(m(3) d), with nitrate formation of less than 0.5% of the converted ammonia. Nitrite accumulation of over 90% was maintained stably over 250 days at 30 degrees C and was achieved even at 19 degrees C. Qualitative and quantitative shifts of nitrifying bacteria in the biofilm were monitored by real-time PCR and T-RFLP analysis. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) were dominant but nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) were eliminated in the reactor when NaHCO(3) was used as the alkalinity source. From the kinetic data, we inferred that high IC concentrations drive stable nitritation by promoting a higher growth rate for AOB than for NOB.

  15. Acclimation to high CO/sub 2/ in monoecious cucumbers. II. Carbon exchange rates, enzyme activities, and starch and nutrient concentrations. [Cucumis sativus L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peet, M.M.; Huber, S.C.; Patterson, D.T.

    1986-01-01

    Carbon exchange capacity of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) germinated and grown in controlled environment chambers at 1000 microliters per liter CO/sub 2/ decreased from the vegetative growth stage to the fruiting stage, during which time capacity of plants grown at 350 microliters per liter increased. Carbon exchange rates (CERs) measured under growth conditions during the fruiting period were, in fact, lower in plants grown at 1000 microliters per liter CO/sub 2/ than those grown at 350. Progressive decreases in CERs in 1000 microliters per liter plants were associated with decreasing stomatal conductances and activities of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase and carbonic anhydrase. Leaf starch concentrations were higher in 1000 microliters per liter CO/sub 2/ grown-plants than in 350 microliters per liter grown plants but calcium and nitrogen concentrations were lower, the greatest difference occurring at flowering. Sucrose synthase and sucrose-P-synthase activities were similar in 1000 microliters per liter compared to 350 microliters per liter plants during vegetative growth and flowering but higher in 350 microliters per liter plants at fruiting. The decreased carbon exchange rates observed in this cultivar at 1000 microliters per liter CO/sub 2/ could explain the lack of any yield increase when compared with plants grown at 350 microliters per liter.

  16. Gas exchange and the coagulation system of the blood during the effect on the body of high concentrations of oxygen and carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosh, L.; Agadzhanyan, N. A.; Davydov, G. A.; Rybakov, B. K.; Sergiyenko, A. S.

    1974-01-01

    Maximum permissible concentrations of oxygen and carbon dioxide in a controlled atmosphere were determined by evaluating their effects on human gas exchange, blood coagulation, and tolerances to acute hypoxia, acceleration, and physical loads. It was found that functional disturbances depend on the concentration of respiratory gases and the length of stay in an altered atmosphere. By changing the atmospheric composition and by bringing the gaseous environment into accordance with the work and rest regimen and energy expenditures, the general reactivity of the body changes favorably.

  17. Effect of high concentration of inert cosolutes on the refolding of an enzyme: carbonic anhydrase B in sucrose and ficoll 70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterroso, Begoña; Minton, Allen P

    2007-11-16

    The kinetics of refolding of carbonic anhydrase II following transfer from a buffer containing 5 m guanidinium chloride to a buffer containing 0.5 m guanidinium chloride were studied by measuring the time-dependent recovery of enzymatic activity. Experiments were carried out in buffer containing concentrations of two "inert" cosolutes, sucrose and Ficoll 70, a sucrose polymer, at concentrations up to 150 g/liter. Data analysis indicates that both cosolutes significantly accelerate the rate of refolding to native or compact near-native conformations, but decrease the fraction of catalytically active enzyme recovered in the limit of long time. According to the simplest model that fits the data, both cosolutes accelerate a competing side reaction yielding inactive compact species. Acceleration of the side reaction by Ficoll is significantly greater than that of sucrose at equal w/v concentrations.

  18. Methane and Carbon Dioxide Concentrations and Fluxes in Amazon Floodplains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melack, J. M.; MacIntyre, S.; Forsberg, B.; Barbosa, P.; Amaral, J. H.

    2016-12-01

    Field studies on the central Amazon floodplain in representative aquatic habitats (open water, flooded forests, floating macrophytes) combine measurements of methane and carbon dioxide concentrations and fluxes to the atmosphere over diel and seasonal times with deployment of meteorological sensors and high-resolution thermistors and dissolved oxygen sondes. A cavity ringdown spectrometer is used to determine gas concentrations, and floating chambers and bubble collectors are used to measure fluxes. To further understand fluxes, we measured turbulence as rate of dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy based on microstructure profiling. These results allow calculations of vertical mixing within the water column and of air-water exchanges using surface renewal models. Methane and carbon dioxide fluxes varied as a function of season, habitat and water depth. High CO2 fluxes at high water are related to high pCO2; low pCO2 levels at low water result from increased phytoplankton uptake. CO2 fluxes are highest at turbulent open water sites, and pCO2 is highest in macrophyte beds. Fluxes and pCH4 are high in macrophyte beds.

  19. Atmospheric black carbon and sulfate concentrations in Northeast Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Massling

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of Black Carbon (BC in aerosols at the high Arctic field site Villum Research Station (VRS at Station Nord in North Greenland showed a seasonal variation in BC concentrations with a maximum in winter and spring at ground level. The data was obtained using a Multi Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP. A similar seasonal pattern was found for sulfate concentrations with a maximum level during winter and spring analyzed by ion chromatography. A correlation between BC and sulfate concentrations was observed over the years 2011 to 2013. This finding gives the hint that most likely transport of primary emitted BC particles to the Arctic was accompanied by aging of the aerosols through condensational processes. This process may have led to the formation of secondary inorganic matter and further transport of BC particles as cloud processing and further washout of particles is less likely based on the typically observed transport patterns of air masses arriving at VRS. Additionally, concentrations of EC (elemental carbon based on a thermo-optical method were determined and compared to BC measurements. Model estimates of the climate forcing due to BC in the Arctic are based on contributions of long-range transported BC during spring and summer. The measured concentrations were here compared with model results obtained by the Danish Hemispheric Model, DEHM. Good agreement between measured and modeled concentrations of both BC and sulfate was observed. The dominant source is found to be combustion of fossil fuel with biomass burning as a minor though significant source. During winter and spring the Arctic atmosphere is known to be impacted by long-range transport of BC and associated with the Arctic haze phenomenon.

  20. Changes in plasma potassium concentration during carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Bugge, K; Lyng, K M

    1999-01-01

    Hyperkalaemia with ECG changes had been noted during prolonged carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum in pigs. We have compared plasma potassium concentrations during surgery in 11 patients allocated randomly to undergo either laparoscopic or open appendectomy and in another 17 patients allocated randomly...... to either carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum or abdominal wall lifting for laparoscopic colectomy. Despite an increasing metabolic acidosis, prolonged carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum resulted in only a slight increase in plasma potassium concentrations, which was both statistically and clinically insignificant....... Thus hyperkalaemia is unlikely to develop in patients with normal renal function undergoing carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic surgery....

  1. Changes in plasma potassium concentration during carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, A; Bugge, K; Lyng, K M

    1999-01-01

    Hyperkalaemia with ECG changes had been noted during prolonged carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum in pigs. We have compared plasma potassium concentrations during surgery in 11 patients allocated randomly to undergo either laparoscopic or open appendectomy and in another 17 patients allocated randomly...... to either carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum or abdominal wall lifting for laparoscopic colectomy. Despite an increasing metabolic acidosis, prolonged carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum resulted in only a slight increase in plasma potassium concentrations, which was both statistically and clinically insignificant....... Thus hyperkalaemia is unlikely to develop in patients with normal renal function undergoing carbon dioxide pneumoperitoneum for laparoscopic surgery....

  2. High performance carbon-carbon composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lalit M Manocha

    2003-02-01

    Carbon-carbon composites rank first among ceramic composite materials with a spectrum of properties and applications in various sectors. These composites are made of fibres in various directions and carbonaceous polymers and hydrocarbons as matrix precursors. Their density and properties depend on the type and volume fraction of reinforcement, matrix precursor used and end heat treatment temperature. Composites made with thermosetting resins as matrix precursors possess low densities (1.55–1.75 g/cm3) and well-distributed microporosity whereas those made with pitch as the matrix precursor, after densification exhibit densities of 1.8–2.0 g/cm3 with some mesopores, and those made by the CVD technique with hydrocarbon gases, possess intermediate densities and matrices with close porosities. The former (resin-based) composites exhibit high flexural strength, low toughness and low thermal conductivity, whereas the latter (pitch- and CVD-based) can be made with very high thermal conductivity (400–700 W/MK) in the fibre direction. Carbon-carbon composites are used in a variety of sectors requiring high mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, good frictional properties for brake pads in high speed vehicles or high thermal conductivity for thermal management applications. However, for extended life applications, these composites need to be protected against oxidation either through matrix modification with Si, Zr, Hf etc. or by multilayer oxidation protection coatings consisting of SiC, silica, zircon etc.

  3. High-efficiency solar concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansing, F. L.; Dorman, J.

    1980-01-01

    A new type of solar concentrator is presented using liquid lenses and simple translational tracking mechanism. The concentrator achieves a 100:1 nominal concentration ratio and is compared in performance with a flat-plate collector having two sheets of glazing and non-selective coating. The results of the thermal analysis show that higher temperatures can be obtained with the concentrator than is possible with the non-concentrator flat-plate type. Furthermore, the thermal efficiency far exceeds that of the comparative flat-plate type for all operating conditions.

  4. Atmospheric black carbon and sulfate concentrations in Northeast Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massling, A.; Nielsen, I. E.; Kristensen, D.; Christensen, J. H.; Sørensen, L. L.; Jensen, B.; Nguyen, Q. T.; Nøjgaard, J. K.; Glasius, M.; Skov, H.

    2015-08-01

    Measurements of equivalent black carbon (EBC) in aerosols at the high Arctic field site Villum Research Station (VRS) at Station Nord in North Greenland showed a seasonal variation in EBC concentrations with a maximum in winter and spring at ground level. Average measured concentrations were about 0.067 ± 0.071 for the winter and 0.011 ± 0.009 for the summer period. These data were obtained using a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP). A similar seasonal pattern was found for sulfate concentrations with a maximum level during winter and spring analyzed by ion chromatography. Here, measured average concentrations were about 0.485 ± 0.397 for the winter and 0.112 ± 0.072 for the summer period. A correlation between EBC and sulfate concentrations was observed over the years 2011 to 2013 stating a correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.72. This finding gives the hint that most likely transport of primary emitted BC particles to the Arctic was accompanied by aging of the aerosols through condensational processes. BC and sulfate are known to have only partly similar sources with respect to their transport pathways when reaching the high Arctic. Aging processes may have led to the formation of secondary inorganic matter and further transport of BC particles as cloud processing and further washout of particles is less likely based on the typically observed transport patterns of air masses arriving at VRS. Additionally, concentrations of EC (elemental carbon) based on a thermo-optical method were determined and compared to EBC measurements. EBC measurements were generally higher, but a correlation between EC and EBC resulted in a correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.64. Model estimates of the climate forcing due to BC in the Arctic are based on contributions of long-range transported BC during spring and summer. The measured concentrations were here compared with model results obtained by the Danish Eulerian Hemispheric Model, DEHM. Good agreement between measured and

  5. Concentration-mediated multicolor fluorescence polymer carbon dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Chan Jin; Lee, Gibaek; In, Insik; Park, Sung Young

    2016-05-01

    Polymer dots (PDs) showing concentration-mediated multicolor fluorescence were first prepared from sulfuric acid-treated dehydration of Pluronic® F-127 in a single step. Pluronic-based PDs (P-PDs) showed high dispersion stability in solvent media and exhibited a fluorescence emission that was widely tunable from red to blue by adjusting both the excitation wavelengths and the P-PD concentration in an aqueous solution. This unique fluorescence behavior of P-PDs might be a result of cross-talk in the fluorophores of the poly(propylene glycol)-rich core inside the P-PD through either energy transfer or charge transfer. Reconstruction of the surface energy traps of the P-PDs mediated through aggregation may lead to a new generation of carbon-based nanomaterials possessing a fluorescence emission and tunable by adjusting the concentration. These structures may be useful in the design of multifunctional carbon nanomaterials with tunable emission properties according to a variety of internal or external stimuli.

  6. Impacts of CO2 concentration on growth, lipid accumulation, and carbon-concentrating-mechanism-related gene expression in oleaginous Chlorella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianhua; Xu, Hui; Luo, Yuanchan; Wan, Minxi; Huang, Jianke; Wang, Weiliang; Li, Yuanguang

    2015-03-01

    Biodiesel production by microalgae with photosynthetic CO2 biofixation is thought to be a feasible way in the field of bioenergy and carbon emission reduction. Knowledge of the carbon-concentrating mechanism plays an important role in improving microalgae carbon fixation efficiency. However, little information is available regarding the dramatic changes of cells suffered upon different environmental factors, such as CO2 concentration. The aim of this study was to investigate the growth, lipid accumulation, carbon fixation rate, and carbon metabolism gene expression under different CO2 concentrations in oleaginous Chlorella. It was found that Chlorella pyrenoidosa grew well under CO2 concentrations ranging from 1 to 20 %. The highest biomass and lipid productivity were 4.3 g/L and 107 mg/L/day under 5 % CO2 condition. Switch from high (5 %) to low (0.03 %, air) CO2 concentration showed significant inhibitory effect on growth and CO2 fixation rate. The amount of the saturated fatty acids was increased obviously along with the transition. Low CO2 concentration (0.03 %) was suitable for the accumulation of saturated fatty acids. Reducing the CO2 concentration could significantly decrease the polyunsaturated degree in fatty acids. Moreover, the carbon-concentrating mechanism-related gene expression revealed that most of them, especially CAH2, LCIB, and HLA3, had remarkable change after 1, 4, and 24 h of the transition, which suggests that Chlorella has similar carbon-concentrating mechanism with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The findings of the present study revealed that C. pyrenoidosa is an ideal candidate for mitigating CO2 and biodiesel production and is appropriate as a model for mechanism research of carbon sequestration.

  7. Classroom Carbon Dioxide Concentration, School Attendance, and Educational Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaihre, Santosh; Semple, Sean; Miller, Janice; Fielding, Shona; Turner, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Background: We tested the hypothesis that classroom carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) concentration is inversely related to child school attendance and educational attainment. Methods: Concentrations of CO[subscript 2] were measured over a 3-5?day period in 60 naturally ventilated classrooms of primary school children in Scotland. Concentrations of…

  8. Classroom Carbon Dioxide Concentration, School Attendance, and Educational Attainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaihre, Santosh; Semple, Sean; Miller, Janice; Fielding, Shona; Turner, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Background: We tested the hypothesis that classroom carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) concentration is inversely related to child school attendance and educational attainment. Methods: Concentrations of CO[subscript 2] were measured over a 3-5?day period in 60 naturally ventilated classrooms of primary school children in Scotland. Concentrations of…

  9. New study on the correlation between carbon dioxide concentration in the environment and radon monitor devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrokhi, A; Burghele, B D; Fábián, F; Kovács, T

    2015-12-01

    The influence of high geogenic carbon dioxide concentrations on monitoring devices might present a significant challenge to the measurement of radon concentrations in environments with a high level of carbon dioxide concentration such as volcano sites, mofettes, caves, etc. In this study, the influence of carbon dioxide concentration on several different types of radon monitor devices - including Alpha Spectrometry (Sarad RTM 2200, EQF 3220, RAD7), Ionizing Chamber (AlphaGUARD PQ2000 PRO) and Active Cell (Active scintillation cell, Pylon 300A) - was examined to represent new aspects of radon measuring in environments with carbon dioxide. In light of the results, all measuring devices were exposed to variable conditions affected by carbon dioxide concentration, except for the AlphaGUARD, which was kept in a steady state throughout the experiment. It was observed that alpha spectroscopy devices were affected by carbon dioxide, since measured radon concentrations decreased in the presence of 70% and 90% carbon dioxide concentrations by 26.5 ± 2% and 14.5 ± 2.5% for EQF 3220, and 32 ± 2% and 35.5 ± 2% for RTM 2200. However, the ionizing chamber instrument was unaffected by changes in carbon dioxide concentration. It was determined that the RAD7 performed relatively inefficiently in the presence of carbon dioxide concentrations higher than 67% by an overall efficiency factor of approximately 0.52, confirming that it is not an admissible radon monitor instrument in environments with high carbon dioxide concentrations.

  10. Carbon Nanotube Based Microfluidic Elements for Filtration and Concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakajin, O; Ben-Barak, N; Peng, J; Noy, A

    2003-06-25

    We have developed a method for integration of patterned arrays of carbon nanotubes or the ''nanotube mesh'' into microfabricated channels. The method includes standard lithographic methods for patterning and etching the substrate, followed by catalyst patterning, CVD deposition of nanotubes, and anodic bonding of coverslip top. We will describe a carbon nanotube filtering device fabricated using this method and discuss the use of carbon nanotube arrays as molecular concentration and separation media.

  11. High-pressure Raman spectroscopy of carbon onions and nanocapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J. J.; Liu, G. H.; Wang, X. M.; Fujita, T.; Xu, B. S.; Chen, M. W.

    2009-08-01

    We report high-pressure Raman spectra of carbon onions and nanocapsules investigated by diamond anvil cell experiments. The pressure coefficient and elastic behavior of carbon onions and nanocapsules are found to be very similar to those of multiwall carbon nanotubes. Additionally, detectable structure changes, particularly the collapse of the concentric graphite structure, cannot been seen at pressures as high as ˜20 GPa, demonstrating that carbon onions and nanocapsules have significant hardness and can sustain very high pressures.

  12. Corals concentrate dissolved inorganic carbon to facilitate calcification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Nicola; Cohen, Itay; Finch, Adrian A; Erez, Jonathan; Tudhope, Alexander W

    2014-01-01

    The sources of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) used to produce scleractinian coral skeletons are not understood. Yet this knowledge is essential for understanding coral biomineralization and assessing the potential impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs. Here we use skeletal boron geochemistry to reconstruct the DIC chemistry of the fluid used for coral calcification. We show that corals concentrate DIC at the calcification site substantially above seawater values and that bicarbonate contributes a significant amount of the DIC pool used to build the skeleton. Corals actively increase the pH of the calcification fluid, decreasing the proportion of DIC present as CO2 and creating a diffusion gradient favouring the transport of molecular CO2 from the overlying coral tissue into the calcification site. Coupling the increases in calcification fluid pH and [DIC] yields high calcification fluid [CO3(2-)] and induces high aragonite saturation states, favourable to the precipitation of the skeleton.

  13. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Lovenduski

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−] on the basis of a~long control simulation with an Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32−] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32−] in the tropical Pacific and at the boundaries between the subtropical and subpolar gyres in the Northern Hemisphere, and relatively low interannual variability in the centers of the subtropical gyres and in the Southern Ocean. Statistical analysis of modeled [CO32−] variance and autocorrelation suggests that significant anthropogenic trends in the saturation state of aragonite (Ωaragonite are already or nearly detectable at the sustained, open-ocean time series sites, whereas several decades of observations are required to detect anthropogenic trends in Ωaragonite in the tropical Pacific, North Pacific, and North Atlantic. The detection timescale for anthropogenic trends in pH is shorter than that for Ωaragonite, due to smaller noise-to-signal ratios and lower autocorrelation in pH. In the tropical Pacific, the leading mode of surface [CO32−] variability is primarily driven by variations in the vertical advection of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in association with El Niño–Southern Oscillation. In the North Pacific, surface [CO32−] variability is caused by circulation-driven variations in surface DIC and strongly correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, with peak spectral power at 20–30-year periods. North Atlantic [CO32−] variability is also driven by variations in surface DIC, and exhibits weak correlations with both the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. As the scientific community seeks to detect the anthropogenic influence on ocean carbonate chemistry, these results

  14. Influence of the carbon dioxide concentration on the resistance to carbonation of concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.H.M.

    2013-01-01

    Carbonation of concrete at ambient CO2 concentration is a slow process. This makes the testing of the resistance of concrete against carbonation often too slow to be applicable for service life assessments of new structures. Raising the CO2-concentration will accelerate the test but the validity of

  15. Black carbon concentrations and mixing state in the Finnish Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raatikainen, T.; Brus, D.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Svensson, J.; Asmi, E.; Lihavainen, H.

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosol composition was measured using a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) in the Finnish Arctic during winter 2011-2012. The Sammaltunturi measurement site at the Pallas GAW (Global Atmosphere Watch) station receives air masses from different source regions including the Arctic Ocean and continental Europe. The SP2 provides detailed information about mass distributions and mixing state of refractory black carbon (rBC). The measurements showed widely varying rBC mass concentrations (0-120 ng m-3), which were related to varying contributions of different source regions and aerosol removal processes. The rBC mass was log-normally distributed showing a relatively constant rBC core mass mean diameter with an average of 194 nm (75-655 nm sizing range). On average, the number fraction of particles containing rBC was 0.24 (integrated over 350-450 nm particle diameter range) and the average particle diameter to rBC core volume equivalent diameter ratio was 2.0 (averaged over particles with 150-200 nm rBC core volume equivalent diameters). These average numbers mean that the observed rBC core mass mean diameter is similar to those of aged particles, but the observed particles seem to have unusually high particle to rBC core diameter ratios. Comparison of the measured rBC mass concentration with that of the optically detected equivalent black carbon (eBC) using an Aethalometer and a MAAP showed that eBC was larger by a factor of five. The difference could not be fully explained without assuming that only a part of the optically detected light absorbing material is refractory and absorbs light at the wavelength used by the SP2. Finally, climate implications of five different black carbon mixing state representations were compared using the Mie approximation and simple direct radiative forcing efficiency calculations. These calculations showed that the observed mixing state means significantly lower warming effect or even a net cooling effect when compared with

  16. High surface area, high permeability carbon monoliths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagasse, R.R.; Schroeder, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Organic Materials Processing Dept.

    1994-12-31

    The goal of this work is to prepare carbon monoliths having precisely tailored pore size distribution. Prior studies have demonstrated that poly(acrylonitrile) can be processed into a precursor having tailored macropore structure. Since the macropores were preserved during pyrolysis, this synthetic process provided a route to porous carbon having macropores with size =0.1 to 10{mu}m. No micropores of size <2 nm could be detected in the carbon, however, by nitrogen adsorption. In the present work, the authors have processed a different polymer, poly(vinylidene chloride) into a macroporous precursor, Pyrolysis produced carbon monoliths having macropores derived from the polymer precursor as well as extensive microporosity produced during the pyrolysis of the polymer. One of these carbons had BET surface area of 1,050 m{sup 2}/g and about 1.2 cc/g total pore volume, with about 1/3 of the total pore volume in micropores and the remainder in 1{mu}m macropores. No mesopores in the intermediate size range could be detected by nitrogen adsorption. Carbon materials having high surface area as well as micron size pores have potential applications as electrodes for double layer supercapacitors containing liquid electrolyte, or as efficient media for performing chemical separations.

  17. Effect of carbon concentration on changing the morphology of titanium carbide nanoparticles from cubic to cuboctahedron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, David E; Gupta, Ujjwal; Castleman, A W

    2010-01-26

    Titanium carbide nanoparticles were synthesized by flowing methane through a plasma generated from an arc discharge between two titanium electrodes. Different methane concentrations were employed in studies made to investigate the effects of carbon concentration on particle morphology. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the synthesized TiC nanopowders, whereupon it was found that nanocrystalline TiC nanoparticles prefer a cubic morphology at low concentrations of methane and a cuboctahedron morphology at high concentration of methane. The change in particle morphology is attributed to carbon affecting the relative growth rates of the {111} and {100} facets on a TiC seed crystal.

  18. Dynamics of Intracellular Polymers in Enhanced Biological Phosphorus Removal Processes under Different Organic Carbon Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhen Xing

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR may deteriorate or fail during low organic carbon loading periods. Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs in EBPR were acclimated under both high and low organic carbon conditions, and then dynamics of polymers in typical cycles, anaerobic conditions with excess organic carbons, and endogenous respiration conditions were examined. After long-term acclimation, it was found that organic loading rates did not affect the yield of PAOs and the applied low organic carbon concentrations were advantageous for the enrichment of PAOs. A low influent organic carbon concentration induced a high production of extracellular carbohydrate. During both anaerobic and aerobic endogenous respirations, when glycogen decreased to around 80 ± 10 mg C per gram of volatile suspended solids, PAOs began to utilize polyphosphate significantly. Regressed by the first-order reaction model, glycogen possessed the highest degradation rate and then was followed by polyphosphate, while biomass decay had the lowest degradation rate.

  19. Dynamics of intracellular polymers in enhanced biological phosphorus removal processes under different organic carbon concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lizhen; Ren, Li; Tang, Bo; Wu, Guangxue; Guan, Yuntao

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) may deteriorate or fail during low organic carbon loading periods. Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) in EBPR were acclimated under both high and low organic carbon conditions, and then dynamics of polymers in typical cycles, anaerobic conditions with excess organic carbons, and endogenous respiration conditions were examined. After long-term acclimation, it was found that organic loading rates did not affect the yield of PAOs and the applied low organic carbon concentrations were advantageous for the enrichment of PAOs. A low influent organic carbon concentration induced a high production of extracellular carbohydrate. During both anaerobic and aerobic endogenous respirations, when glycogen decreased to around 80 ± 10 mg C per gram of volatile suspended solids, PAOs began to utilize polyphosphate significantly. Regressed by the first-order reaction model, glycogen possessed the highest degradation rate and then was followed by polyphosphate, while biomass decay had the lowest degradation rate.

  20. Study on Behavior of Carbon Reduction of Monazite Concentrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The behavior of monazite concentrate reduced by carbon, especially the decomposed procedure of rare earth phosphates, was investigated by X-ray diffraction , electron probe, TG method and chemical analysis. The results show that rare earth phosphates in monazite concentrate can be reduced to their oxides, among them the decomposition processes of cerium phosphate are not in step with lanthanum phosphate, neodymium phosphate and so on, and the phosphorus was volatilized into air in simple form.

  1. Natural variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Lovenduski

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate variability in the surface ocean carbonate ion concentration ([CO32−] on the basis of a long control simulation with a fully-coupled Earth System Model. The simulation is run with a prescribed, pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration for 1000 years, permitting investigation of natural [CO32−] variability on interannual to multi-decadal timescales. We find high interannual variability in surface [CO32−] in the tropical Pacific and at the boundaries between the subtropical and subpolar gyres in the Northern Hemisphere, and relatively low interannual variability in the centers of the subtropical gyres and in the Southern Ocean. Statistical analysis of modeled [CO32−] variance and autocorrelation suggests that significant anthropogenic trends in the saturation state of aragonite (Ωaragonite are already or nearly detectable at the sustained, open-ocean timeseries sites, whereas several decades of observations are required to detect anthropogenic trends in Ωaragonite in the tropical Pacific, North Pacific, and North Atlantic. The detection timescale for anthropogenic trends in pH is shorter than that for Ωaragonite, due to smaller noise-to-signal ratios and lower autocorrelation in pH. In the tropical Pacific, the leading mode of surface [CO32−] variability is primarily driven by variations in the vertical advection of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC in association with El Niño–Southern Oscillation. In the North Pacific, surface [CO32−] variability is caused by circulation-driven variations in surface DIC and strongly correlated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, with peak spectral power at 20–30 year periods. North Atlantic [CO32−] variability is also driven by variations in surface DIC, and exhibits weak correlations with both the North Atlantic Oscillation and the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation. As the scientific community seeks to detect the anthropogenic influence on ocean carbonate chemistry, these

  2. Design and development of a high-concentration photovoltaic concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodge, R C

    1982-04-01

    The design and development of a high concentration photovoltaic concentrator module is discussed. The design concept described herein incorporates a curved groove domed Fresnel lens, a high concentration etched multiple vertical junction (EMVJ) solar cell and a passively cooled direct-bonded copper cell mount all packaged in a plastic module. Two seven inch diameter 1200x domed Fresnel lenses were fabricated using single point diamond turning technology. Testing at both GE and Sandia confirmed optical transmission efficiencies of over 83%. Samples of the latest available EMVJ cells were mounted and installed, with a domed Fresnel lens, into a prototype module. Subsequent testing demonstrated net lens-cell efficiencies of 10 to 13%. As a result of this program, salient conclusions have been formulated as to this technology.

  3. Carbon dioxide concentration in Mediterranean greenhouses : how much lost production?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanghellini, C.; Incrocci, L.; Gazquez, J.C.; Dimauro, B.

    2008-01-01

    In the absence of artificial supply of carbon dioxide in the greenhouse environment, the CO2 absorbed in the process of photosynthesis must ultimately come from the external ambient through the ventilation openings. This requires that the CO2 concentration within the house must be lower than the ext

  4. Characterization of Black and Brown Carbon Concentrations and Sources during winter in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Caiqing; Liu, Yue; Hansen, Anthony D. A.; Močnik, Griša; Zheng, Mei

    2017-04-01

    Carbonaceous aerosols, including black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC), play important roles in air quality, human health, and climate change. A better understanding of sources of light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosol (including black carbon and brown carbon) is particular critical for formulating emission-based control strategies and reducing uncertainties in current aerosol radiative forcing estimates. Beijing, the capital of China, has experienced serious air pollution problems and high concentrations of carbonaceous aerosols in recent years, especially during heating seasons. During November and December of 2016, several severe haze episodes occurred in Beijing, with hourly average PM2.5 mass concentration up to 400 μg/m3. In this study, concentration levels and sources of black carbon and brown carbon were investigated based on 7-wavelength Aethalometer (AE-33) with combination of other PM2.5 chemical composition information. Contributions of traffic and non-traffic emissions (e.g., coal combustion, biomass burning) were apportioned, and brown carbon was separated from black carbon. Our preliminary results showed that (1) Concentrations of BC were around 5.3±4.2 μg/m3 during the study period, with distinct diurnal variations during haze and non-haze days. (2) Traffic emissions contributed to about 37±17% of total BC, and exhibited higher contributions during non-haze days compared to haze days. (3) Coal combustion was a major source of black carbon and brown carbon in Beijing, which was more significant compared to biomass burning. Sources and the relative contributions to black carbon and brown carbon during haze and non-haze days will be further discussed.

  5. Inorganic carbon dominates total dissolved carbon concentrations and fluxes in British rivers: Application of the THINCARB model - Thermodynamic modelling of inorganic carbon in freshwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvie, Helen P; King, Stephen M; Neal, Colin

    2017-01-01

    River water-quality studies rarely measure dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) routinely, and there is a gap in our knowledge of the contributions of DIC to aquatic carbon fluxes and cycling processes. Here, we present the THINCARB model (THermodynamic modelling of INorganic CARBon), which uses widely-measured determinands (pH, alkalinity and temperature) to calculate DIC concentrations, speciation (bicarbonate, HCO3(-); carbonate, CO3(2-); and dissolved carbon dioxide, H2CO3(⁎)) and excess partial pressures of carbon dioxide (EpCO2) in freshwaters. If calcium concentration measurements are available, THINCARB also calculates calcite saturation. THINCARB was applied to the 39-year Harmonised Monitoring Scheme (HMS) dataset, encompassing all the major British rivers discharging to the coastal zone. Model outputs were combined with the HMS dissolved organic carbon (DOC) datasets, and with spatial land use, geology, digital elevation and hydrological datasets. We provide a first national-scale evaluation of: the spatial and temporal variability in DIC concentrations and fluxes in British rivers; the contributions of DIC and DOC to total dissolved carbon (TDC); and the contributions to DIC from HCO3(-) and CO3(2-) from weathering sources and H2CO3(⁎) from microbial respiration. DIC accounted for >50% of TDC concentrations in 87% of the HMS samples. In the seven largest British rivers, DIC accounted for an average of 80% of the TDC flux (ranging from 57% in the upland River Tay, to 91% in the lowland River Thames). DIC fluxes exceeded DOC fluxes, even under high-flow conditions, including in the Rivers Tay and Tweed, draining upland peaty catchments. Given that particulate organic carbon fluxes from UK rivers are consistently lower than DOC fluxes, DIC fluxes are therefore also the major source of total carbon fluxes to the coastal zone. These results demonstrate the importance of accounting for DIC concentrations and fluxes for quantifying carbon transfers from land

  6. Carbonic anhydrase levels and internal lacunar CO/sub 2/ concentrations in aquatic macrophytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, C.I.

    1979-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase levels were examined in a variety of aquatic macrophytes from different habitats. In general, carbonic anhydrase levels increased across the habitat gradient such that activities were low in submersed aquatic macrophytes and high in emergent macrophytes with floating-leaved and free-floating plants exhibiting intermediate activities. Internal lacunar CO/sub 2/ concentrations were analyzed in relation to carbonic anhydrase activities. There was no correlation between these two parameters. Internal CO/sub 2/ concentrations ranged from low to high in submersed macrophytes, but were low in floating-leaved and emergent macrophytes. The observed internal CO/sub 2/ concentrations are discussed in relation to the individual morphologies of the plants and the environments in which they occurred.

  7. Producing a highly concentrated coal suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mokudzu, K.; Atsudzima, T.; Kiyedzuka, Y.

    1983-06-03

    Coal from wet and dry grinding is loaded into a mixer with a mixer arm with the acquisition of a highly concentrated suspension. Foamers (for instance, alkylbenzolsulfonate) and foam stabilizers (for instance diethanolamide of lauric acid) are added in a ratio of 10 to (2 to 5). The high fluidity of the suspension is maintained by injecting air into the suspension and an 80 percent concentration of the suspension is achieved.

  8. Morphological Investigation of Calcium Carbonate during Ammonification-Carbonization Process of Low Concentration Calcium Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaigang Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafine calcium carbonate is a widely used cheap additive. The research is conducted in low degree supersaturation solution in order to study the polymorphic phases’ change and its factors of the calcium carbonate precipitate in the ammonification-carbonization process of the solution with calcium. Fine particles of calcium carbonate are made in the solution containing 0.015 mol/L of Ca2+. Over 98% of the calcium carbonate precipitate without ammonification resembles the morphology of calcite, while the introduction of ammonia can benefit the formation of vaterite. It was inferred that the main cause should be serious partial oversaturation or steric effects. Ammonia also helps to form the twin spherical calcium carbonate. However, particles formed in the process of ammonification-carbonization in solution with low concentration degree of calcium are not even with a scale of the particle diameter from 5 to 12 μm. Inorganic salts, alcohol, or organic acid salts have significant controlling effect on the particle diameter of calcium carbonate and can help to decrease the particle diameter to about 3 μm. Anionic surfactants can prevent the conglobation of calcium carbonate particles and shrink its diameter to 500 nm–1 μm.

  9. The carbon-nitrogen balance of the nodule and its regulation under elevated carbon dioxide concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libault, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Legumes have developed a unique way to interact with bacteria: in addition to preventing infection from pathogenic bacteria like any other plant, legumes also developed a mutualistic symbiotic relationship with one gender of soil bacteria: rhizobium. This interaction leads to the development of a new root organ, the nodule, where the differentiated bacteria fix for the plant the atmospheric dinitrogen (atmN2). In exchange, the symbiont will benefit from a permanent source of carbon compounds, products of the photosynthesis. The substantial amounts of fixed carbon dioxide dedicated to the symbiont imposed to the plant a tight regulation of the nodulation process to balance carbon and nitrogen incomes and outcomes. Climate change including the increase of the concentration of the atmospheric carbon dioxide is going to modify the rates of plant photosynthesis, the balance between nitrogen and carbon, and, as a consequence, the regulatory mechanisms of the nodulation process. This review focuses on the regulatory mechanisms controlling carbon/nitrogen balances in the context of legume nodulation and discusses how the change in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration could affect nodulation efficiency.

  10. Effects of Temperature and Catalyst Concentration on the Growth of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI Xiaodong; LI Dan; WANG Ye; LIANG Ji

    2005-01-01

    The effects of preheating and pyrolysis temperatures and catalyst concentration on the synthesis of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) using ferrocene as the catalyst and xylene as the carbon source in chemical vapor deposition were experimentally studied. The as-grown aligned CNTs were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electronic microscopy, high-resolution transmission electronic microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. The growth rate, the diameters, and the degree of crystal structure of the aligned CNTs were all found to depend on the preheating and pyrolysis temperatures and the catalyst concentration. The optimized conditions for the growth of aligned CNTs resulted in a rapid growth rate of 20.4 μm/min, with the CNTs having a good, uniform crystal structure, and clean surfaces with little amorphous carbon. The results also show that higher preheating temperatures and lower ferrocene concentrations favor the growth of single-walled CNTs.

  11. Sewage sludge composting simulation as carbon/nitrogen concentration change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nassereldeen Kabbashi

    2011-01-01

    Available composting models do not describe accurately the dynamics of composting processes.Difficulty in modeling composting processes is attributed mainly to the unpredicted change in process rate caused by change in activation energy value (E).This article presented the results of an attempt made to utilize patterns of change in carbon,nitrogen and temperature profiles to model sewage sludge composting process as a multi-stage process.Results of controlled sewage sludge composting experiments were used in th estudy.All the experiments were carried out as batch experiments in a 300-liter Horizontal Drum Bioreactor (HDB).Analysis of the profiles of carbon,nitrogen and temperature has indicated that there were clear patterns that could be used to develop simple models of the process,the initial C/N ratio was between 7-8 and the final C/N ratio of the compost in most experiments were found to be around 15.0,indicating the compost was fully matured and could be used safely for agricultural purpose.Electrical conductivity of composting material decreased from 1.83 to 1.67 dS/m,after a period,it increased gradually from 2.01 to 2.23 dS/m and remained at around 2.33 dS/m till the end of composting.It is found that change in the concentration of total carbon can reasonably be described by three constant process rate coefficients (k1,k2,k3).It is found that the process starts with a certain process rate coefficient (k1) and continues until peak temperature is reached,then it reaches lower process (k2) in the declining phase of the thermophilic stage,and finally it proceeds with a faster process rate (k3) when maturation is reached.Change in the concentration of total nitrogen has shown to have the same patterns of change as carbon.

  12. Carbon-Carbon High Melt Coating for Nozzle Extensions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Melt Coating system is applied to a carbon-carbon structure and embeds HfC, ZrB2 in the outer layers. ACC High Melt builds on the time tested base material...

  13. Organic carbon concentrations and stocks in Romanian mineral forest soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian C. Dincă

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Estimating soils organic carbon stock and its change in time is an actual concern for scientists and climate change policy makers. The present article firstly focus on determination of C stocks in Romania on forest soil types, as well as development of the spatial distribution mapping using a Geographic Information System (GIS and also the secondly on the quantification of uncertainty associated with currently available data on C concentration on forest soils geometrical layers. Determination of C stock was done based on forest management plans database created over 2000-2006. Unlike original database, the data for this study was harmonized on following depths: 0-10 cm, 10-20 cm, 20-40 cm, and > 40 cm. Then, the obtained values were grouped by soil types, resulting average values for the main forest soils from Romania. A soil area weighted average value of 137 t/ha is calculated for Romania, in the range of estimations for other European geographic and climatic areas. The soils that have the largest amount of organic carbon are andosols, vertisols, entic and haplic podzols, whereas the ones that have the smallest values of organic carbon are solonetz and solonchaks. Although current assessment relies on very large number of samples from the forest management planning database, the variability of C concentration remains very large, ~40-50% for coefficient the variation and ~100% of the average, when defining the range of 95% of entire soil population, rather showing the variability than uncertainty of the average estimated. Best fit for C concentration on geometric layers in any forest soil is asymmetric, associated with log-normal distributions.

  14. Effect of Particle Concentration on Ablation Behavior of Carbon/Carbon Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHA Bai-lin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A self-designed oxygen-kerosene ablation system was employed to study the ablation mechanism and performance of the carbon-carbon composites. Particle concentrations of the gas-solid two-phase ablation flow were 0, 1.37%, 2.22%, and 2.64% respectively. The microstructure of post-test samples was analysed through the scanning electron microscope (SEM, and the ablation rate was calculated. The influence principle of particle concentrations on the ablation rate of the carbon-carbon composites was studied, and the mechanism of ablation was analysed. Experiment results show that with no particles involved the mass ablation rate is 0.159g/s and the linear ablation rate is 0.175mm/s, while with particles introduced, the minimum mass ablation rate and linear ablation rate are 0.432g/s and 0.843mm/s respectively, with the increase of particle concentrations, the ablation rate becomes accelerated. Particle erosion makes the ablation of sample seriously intensified, and the ablation gradient of radial fiber on erosion surface is increased with the increase of particle concentrations as well.

  15. Elevated Carbon Dioxide Concentration Reduces Alarm Signaling in Aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boullis, Antoine; Fassotte, Bérénice; Sarles, Landry; Lognay, Georges; Heuskin, Stéphanie; Vanderplanck, Maryse; Bartram, Stefan; Haubruge, Eric; Francis, Frédéric; Verheggen, François J

    2017-02-01

    Insects often rely on olfaction to communicate with conspecifics. While the chemical language of insects has been deciphered in recent decades, few studies have assessed how changes in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations might impact pheromonal communication in insects. Here, we hypothesize that changes in the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide affect the whole dynamics of alarm signaling in aphids, including: (1) the production of the active compound (E)-β-farnesene (Eβf), (2) emission behavior when under attack, (3) perception by the olfactory apparatus, and (4) the escape response. We reared two strains of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, under ambient and elevated CO2 concentrations over several generations. We found that an increase in CO2 concentration reduced the production (i.e., individual content) and emission (released under predation events) of Eβf. While no difference in Eβf neuronal perception was observed, we found that an increase in CO2 strongly reduced the escape behavior expressed by an aphid colony following exposure to natural doses of alarm pheromone. In conclusion, our results confirm that changes to greenhouse gases impact chemical communication in the pea aphid, and could potentially have a cascade effect on interactions with higher trophic levels.

  16. Cellulase Inhibition by High Concentrations of Monosaccharides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsieh, Chia-Wen; Cannella, David; Jørgensen, Henning

    2014-01-01

    that low free water availability contributes to cellulase inhibition. Of the hydrolytic enzymes involved, those acting on the cellulose substrate, that is, exo- and endoglucanases, were the most inhibited. The β -glucosidases were shown to be less sensitive to high monosaccharide concentrations except...

  17. Cast Iron With High Carbon Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, P. A.; Hendrix, J. C.; Stefanescu, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    Method proposed for solidifying high-carbon cast iron without carbon particles segregating at upper surface. Solidification carried out in low gravity, for example on airplane flying free-fall parabolic trajectory. Many different microstructures obtained by proposed technique, and percentage by weight of carbon retained in melt much higher than at present.

  18. High-dimensional entanglement concentration of twisted photon pairs High-dimensional entanglement concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L. X.; Wu, Q. P.

    2012-10-01

    Recently, Dada et al. reported on the experimental entanglement concentration and violation of generalized Bell inequalities with orbital angular momentum (OAM) [Nat. Phys. 7, 677 (2011)]. Here we demonstrate that the high-dimensional entanglement concentration can be performed in arbitrary OAM subspaces with selectivity. Instead of violating the generalized Bell inequalities, the working principle of present entanglement concentration is visualized by the biphoton OAM Klyshko picture, and its good performance is confirmed and quantified through the experimental Shannon dimensionalities after concentration.

  19. High performance carbon nanocomposites for ultracapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wen

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to composite electrodes for electrochemical devices, particularly to carbon nanotube composite electrodes for high performance electrochemical devices, such as ultracapacitors.

  20. Relation between coal aromatic carbon concentration and proximate analysis fixed carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    Good agreement has been obtained between measured proximate analysis values for fixed carbon (FC) and the predictions of a thermal decomposition model. The model provides a basis for understanding the relation between FC and coal structure and between FC measured under proximate analysis conditions and coke or char measured in other thermal decomposition experiments. The key parameters in the model are the aromatic carbon concentration (C/sub ar/) and the tar yield. C/sub ar/ has been determined for 43 coals using quantitative infrared analysis. The aliphatic hydrogen concentration is measured from the absorption near 2900 cm/sub -1/ and the aliphatic carbon concentration is computed assuming a stoichiometry of CH/sub 1/./sub 8/. C/sub ar/ is then computed by difference. The results verify the good correlation between C/sub ar/ and FC discussed by van Krevelen. To explain this correlation, use has been made of a coal thermal decomposition model which has been successful in simulating the quantity and composition of volatile components yielded under vacuum pyrolysis conditions. To apply the model to proximate analysis, it was necessary to estimate the tar yields obtained with thick beds and the amounts of O, N, H, and S which remain with the FC. The tar yields for proximate analysis conditions have been estimated to be 1/3 to 1/4 the yields for thin beds in vacuum. To determine the composition of the FC, measurements were made on a lignite and a bituminous char produced in a thin bed heated by a wire grid for the time (7 min) and temperature (950 C) used in the proximate analysis, and on the FC residues from a proximate analysis volatile matter determination. Both residues give similar results, showing that approximately 10% of the 'fixed carbon' is not carbon. Values of FC computed with the model adjusted for the above conditions are in good agreement with the measured values. 25 refs.

  1. Measurement of low concentration and nano-quantity hydrogen sulfide in sera using unfunctionalized carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, X. C.; Zhang, W. J.; Sammynaiken, R.; Meng, Q. H.; Wu, D. Q.; Yang, Q.; Yang, W.; Zhang, Edwin M.; Wang, R.

    2009-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is produced in small amounts by certain cells in the mammalian body and has a number of biological functions. H2S gas naturally produced by the body is not simply a toxic gas; it could be a vascular dilator and play a physiological role in regulating cardiovascular functions. In order to know the effects of H2S, it is necessary to accurately know its concentrations in the body. Conventional measurement methods have their limitations concerning the small amount and low concentration of H2S in the body. A new paradigm of using carbon nanotubes in H2S measurement expresses its potential. However, the influence of proteins in the mammalian body must be studied in the measurement of H2S by carbon nanotubes. In this paper, we demonstrate a successful measurement of low concentration (20 µM) and nano-quantity (0.5 µg) H2S in the serum by using carbon nanotubes and further with the fluorescence of confocal laser scanning microscopy and the luminescence of Raman microscopy. Statistical analysis of the experimental data shows that the relationship between concentrations and intensities is linear, which thus makes the carbon nanotube sensor highly promising for the measurement of H2S in sera.

  2. Acute toxicity when concentration varies with time: A case study with carbon monoxide inhalation by rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Lisa M; Sommerville, Douglas R; Goodwin, Michelle R; James, R Arden; Channel, Stephen R

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to time-varying concentrations of toxic compounds is the norm in both occupational settings and daily human life, but little has been done to investigate the impact of variations in concentration on toxic outcomes; this case study with carbon monoxide helps fill that gap. Median acute lethality of 10-, 20-, 40-, and 60-min continuous exposures of rats to carbon monoxide was well described by the toxic load model (k = C(n) × t; k is constant, C = test concentration, n = toxic load exponent, and t = exposure duration) with n = 1.74. Dose response-relationships for 1-h exposures including a recovery period between 10- or 20-min pulses showed greater similarity (in both median lethality and steepness of dose-response curve) to continuous exposures with equivalent pulse duration and concentration, rather than a 60-min exposure with equivalent time-weighted average concentrations or toxic load. When pulses were of unequal concentration (3:1 ratio), only the high concentration pulse contributed to lethality. These findings show that fluctuations or interruptions in exposure over a short time scale (60 min or less) can have a substantial impact on outcomes (when n > 1), and thus high-resolution monitoring data are needed to aid interpretation of resulting outcomes.

  3. Temporal Variation of Carbon Monoxide Concentration at Congested Urban Roadways Intersection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanshyam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The carbon monoxide (CO is dominant among major traffic emitted pollutants such as respirable suspended particulate matter (RSPM, oxides of nitrogen (NOx, volatile organic carbons(VOCs and ozone (O3 etc. It is generated by automobiles due to incomplete combustion of the fuel. The vehicles that queue up at an intersection spend more time in idle driving mode generating more pollutant leading to higher pollutant concentrations. Therefore, the trends of average hourly CO concentrations at various locations of congested roadways intersection have been investigated. The four approach roads making intersection have been selected for the present study. CO monitoring has been carried out at 2 selected locations of each approach road. The CO concentration has been monitored from 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM at each location using portable online CO monitor. The average hourly CO concentrations data have been analyzed using MS excel spread sheet for each approach road. The average hourly concentration of monitored CO concentration at all receptors locations shows two peak CO concentration values (i.e., the morning peak and evening peak throughout the monitoring programme (March to May, 2011. The comparison of monitored values of average 1 hourly CO concentration levels as well as 8 hourly average concentration levels of CO showed non compliance with the prescribed standards (4000 µg/m3 average hourly and 2000 µg/m3 average 8 hourly CO concentration. The temporal CO concentration at various approach roads making roadway intersection shows non-uniform. The highest CO concentration has been observed to be towards high rise building and vice-versa. The least CO concentration has been observed towards either low rise building or open area.

  4. High capacity carbon dioxide sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietz, Steven Dean; Alptekin, Gokhan; Jayaraman, Ambalavanan

    2015-09-01

    The present invention provides a sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a CO.sub.2 capacity of at least 9 weight percent when measured at 22.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; an H.sub.2O capacity of at most 15 weight percent when measured at 25.degree. C. and 1 atmosphere; and an isosteric heat of adsorption of from 5 to 8.5 kilocalories per mole of CO.sub.2. The invention also provides a carbon sorbent in a powder, a granular or a pellet form for the removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams, comprising: a carbon content of at least 90 weight percent; a nitrogen content of at least 1 weight percent; an oxygen content of at most 3 weight percent; a BET surface area from 50 to 2600 m.sup.2/g; and a DFT micropore volume from 0.04 to 0.8 cc/g.

  5. A novel method for concurrent measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon concentration and its carbon isotope composition δ13C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K.; Cai, W. J.; Kim-Hak, D.; Jonsson, B. F.

    2016-02-01

    The concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon ([DIC]) and its stable carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) in the surface ocean are key to studying the important processes in the carbon cycle, e.g., photosynthesis and respiration, calcification, water mass mixing, and, in particularly, the Suess effect as well as the penetration of anthropogenic carbon into the surface ocean and the subsequent ocean acidification. Real-time, shipboard measurements of these properties are highly desired. Here we present a new method that concurrently measures [DIC] and δ13C of DIC in the surface ocean. The method couples sample acidification and delivery techniques (Apollo Scitech) with a cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS, Picarro), and works automatically to analyzer samples at the throughput of 8 minutes/sample. In each sampling cycle, a syringe pump withdraws a fixed volume of phosphoric acid and seawater sample, and injects them slowly into a reaction chamber where they were mixed. In the meantime, the CO2 evolved from the acidified sample is purged by a CO2-free gas flow into a CRDS carbon isotope analyzer for measurements of the CO2 concentration and δ13C-CO2. The concurrent injection, acidification, and purging yield a broad, flat peak of CO2 which is precisely and frequently measured by the CRDS analyzer. [DIC] and δ13C can then be calculated by integrating the concentration and δ13C of the CO2 peak. The precision of the [DIC] and δ13C is automated to run continuously onboard a research vessel as well as discrete samples in a lab environment.

  6. Effects of increasing seawater carbon dioxide concentrations on chain formation of the diatom Asterionellopsis glacialis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Barcelos e Ramos

    Full Text Available Diatoms can occur as single cells or as chain-forming aggregates. These two strategies affect buoyancy, predator evasion, light absorption and nutrient uptake. Adjacent cells in chains establish connections through various processes that determine strength and flexibility of the bonds, and at distinct cellular locations defining colony structure. Chain length has been found to vary with temperature and nutrient availability as well as being positively correlated with growth rate. However, the potential effect of enhanced carbon dioxide (CO2 concentrations and consequent changes in seawater carbonate chemistry on chain formation is virtually unknown. Here we report on experiments with semi-continuous cultures of the freshly isolated diatom Asterionellopsis glacialis grown under increasing CO2 levels ranging from 320 to 3400 µatm. We show that the number of cells comprising a chain, and therefore chain length, increases with rising CO2 concentrations. We also demonstrate that while cell division rate changes with CO2 concentrations, carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cellular quotas vary proportionally, evident by unchanged organic matter ratios. Finally, beyond the optimum CO2 concentration for growth, carbon allocation changes from cellular storage to increased exudation of dissolved organic carbon. The observed structural adjustment in colony size could enable growth at high CO2 levels, since longer, spiral-shaped chains are likely to create microclimates with higher pH during the light period. Moreover increased chain length of Asterionellopsis glacialis may influence buoyancy and, consequently, affect competitive fitness as well as sinking rates. This would potentially impact the delicate balance between the microbial loop and export of organic matter, with consequences for atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  7. Sulfur in foraminiferal calcite as a potential proxy for seawater carbonate ion concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, I.; de Nooijer, L. J.; Boer, W.; Reichart, G.-J.

    2017-07-01

    Sulfur (S) incorporation in foraminiferal shells is hypothesized to change with carbonate ion concentration [CO32-], due to substitution of sulfate for carbonate ions in the calcite crystal lattice. Hence S/Ca values of foraminiferal carbonate shells are expected to reflect sea water carbonate chemistry. To generate a proxy calibration linking the incorporation of S into foraminiferal calcite to carbonate chemistry, we cultured juvenile clones of the larger benthic species Amphistegina gibbosa and Sorites marginalis over a 350-1200 ppm range of pCO2 values, corresponding to a range in [CO32-] of 93 to 211 μmol/kg. We also investigated the potential effect of salinity on S incorporation by culturing juvenile Amphistegina lessonii over a large salinity gradient (25-45). Results show S/CaCALCITE is not impacted by salinity, but increases with increasing pCO2 (and thus decreasing [CO32-] and pH), indicating S incorporation may be used as a proxy for [CO32-]. Higher S incorporation in high-Mg species S. marginalis suggests a superimposed biomineralization effect on the incorporation of S. Microprobe imaging reveals co-occurring banding of Mg and S in Amphistegina lessonii, which is in line with a strong biological control and might explain higher S incorporation in high Mg species. Provided a species-specific calibration is available, foraminiferal S/Ca values might add a valuable new tool for reconstructing past ocean carbonate chemistry.

  8. Satellite observations of seasonal and regional variability of particulate organic carbon concentration in the Barents Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stramska, Malgorzata; Białogrodzka, Jagoda

    2016-04-01

    The Nordic and Barents Seas are of special interest for research on climate change, since they are located on the main pathway of the heat transported from low to high latitudes. Barents Sea is known to be an important area for formation of deep water and significant uptake from the atmosphere and sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). This region is characterized by supreme phytoplankton blooms and large amount of carbon is sequestered here due to biological processes. It is important to monitor the biological variability in this region in order to derive in depth understanding whether the size of carbon reservoirs and fluxes may vary as a result of climate change. In this presentation we analyze the 17 years (1998-2014) of particulate organic carbon (POC) concentration derived from remotely sensed ocean color. POC concentrations in the Barents Sea are among the highest observed in the global ocean with monthly mean concentrations in May exceeding 300 mg m-3. The seasonal amplitude of POC concentration in this region is larger when compared to other regions in the global ocean. Our results indicate that the seasonal increase in POC concentration is observed earlier in the year and higher concentrations are reached in the southeastern part of the Barents Sea in comparison to the southwestern part. Satellite data indicate that POC concentrations in the southern part of the Barents Sea tend to decrease in recent years, but longer time series of data are needed to confirm this observation. This work was funded by the Norway Grants (NCBR contract No. 201985, project NORDFLUX). Partial support for MS comes from the Institute of Oceanology (IO PAN).

  9. High-Efficient Excitation-Independent Blue Luminescent Carbon Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongzhen; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Fei; Wang, Yunpeng; Guo, Liang; Mei, Jingjing; Tian, Cancan; Yang, Xiaotian; Zhao, Dongxu

    2017-06-01

    Blue luminescent carbon dots (CDs) were synthesized by the hydrothermal method. Blue-shifts of the maximum emission wavelength from 480 to 443 nm were observed when the concentration of CD solution decreased. The photoluminescence (PL) spectra of CDs at low concentration showed an excitation-independent behaviour, which is very different from the previous reports. Two different emitting mechanisms might work: the intrinsic luminescence from sp2-carbon networks can be responsible for the shorter wavelength part of emission (excitation-independent) at low concentration and the high polarity of nanosized clusters led to the excitation-dependent behaviour of the longer wavelength part at high concentration of CD solution. The photophysical property and concentration-dependent behaviour of the CDs offered new insights into CDs from the viewpoints of both experiments and mechanisms, which will promote diverse potential applications of CDs in the near future.

  10. The Appearance, Taste, and Concentrations of Zolpidem Dissolved in Still Water and Carbonated Beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heide, Gunhild; Hjelmeland, Knut; Brochmann, Gerd-Wenche; Karinen, Ritva; Høiseth, Gudrun

    2017-08-15

    Zolpidem is a sedative that could be used to drug victims, but its suitability to dissolve in drinks is unknown. In this small study, we added either crushed or whole tablets of zolpidem hemitartrate to carbonated beverages or still water to observe how this affected the taste and appearance. Also, concentrations were measured by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry at different time intervals. Two crushed tablets (20 mg) in cider (250 mL) lead to a maximum concentration of 84 mg/L zolpidem base after 30 min, while the corresponding concentration after adding fifteen tablets (150 mg) was 467 mg/L. There was little change in taste, but froth and turbidity were observed when adding high doses to carbonated beverages. Carbonated beverages spiked with 20 mg of crushed zolpidem hemitartrate tablets reached concentrations that could cause impairment. Spiking with 150 mg could possibly be lethal if several mouthfuls were ingested. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  11. Effect of Varying Inert Gas and Acetylene Concentration on the Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrin, Rahat; Abbas, Syed Mustansar; Shah, Nazar Abbas; Mustafa, Muhammad Farooq; Ali, Zulfiqar; Ahmad, Nisar

    2016-03-01

    The multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with small diameter and high purity were achieved by chemical vapor deposition technique using silicon substrate. The introduction of specific concentration of inert gas with hydrocarbon played a key role in controlling morphology and diameter of MWCNTs. Nickel mixed ferrite nanoparticles were used as a catalyst for the growth of MWCNTs. Growth parameters like concentration of hydrocarbon source and inert gas flow, composition of catalyst particles and growth temperature were studied. In this work smaller diameter and twisted MWCNTs were formed by dilution of acetylene with argon gas. Electrical properties suggest a semimetallic behavior of synthesized MWCNTs.

  12. Diverse microbial species survive high ammonia concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Laura C.; Cockell, Charles S.; Summers, Stephen

    2012-04-01

    Planetary protection regulations are in place to control the contamination of planets and moons with terrestrial micro-organisms in order to avoid jeopardizing future scientific investigations relating to the search for life. One environmental chemical factor of relevance in extraterrestrial environments, specifically in the moons of the outer solar system, is ammonia (NH3). Ammonia is known to be highly toxic to micro-organisms and may disrupt proton motive force, interfere with cellular redox reactions or cause an increase of cell pH. To test the survival potential of terrestrial micro-organisms exposed to such cold, ammonia-rich environments, and to judge whether current planetary protection regulations are sufficient, soil samples were exposed to concentrations of NH3 from 5 to 35% (v/v) at -80°C and room temperature for periods up to 11 months. Following exposure to 35% NH3, diverse spore-forming taxa survived, including representatives of the Firmicutes (Bacillus, Sporosarcina, Viridibacillus, Paenibacillus, Staphylococcus and Brevibacillus) and Actinobacteria (Streptomyces). Non-spore forming organisms also survived, including Proteobacteria (Pseudomonas) and Actinobacteria (Arthrobacter) that are known to have environmentally resistant resting states. Clostridium spp. were isolated from the exposed soil under anaerobic culture. High NH3 was shown to cause a reduction in viability of spores over time, but spore morphology was not visibly altered. In addition to its implications for planetary protection, these data show that a large number of bacteria, potentially including spore-forming pathogens, but also environmentally resistant non-spore-formers, can survive high ammonia concentrations.

  13. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-10-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  14. High performance hydrophobic solvent, carbon dioxide capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nulwala, Hunaid; Luebke, David

    2017-05-09

    Methods and compositions useful, for example, for physical solvent carbon capture. A method comprising: contacting at least one first composition comprising carbon dioxide with at least one second composition to at least partially dissolve the carbon dioxide of the first composition in the second composition, wherein the second composition comprises at least one siloxane compound which is covalently modified with at least one non-siloxane group comprising at least one heteroatom. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) materials and ethylene-glycol based materials have high carbon dioxide solubility but suffer from various problems. PDMS is hydrophobic but suffers from low selectivity. Ethylene-glycol based systems have good solubility and selectivity, but suffer from high affinity to water. Solvents were developed which keep the desired combinations of properties, and result in a simplified, overall process for carbon dioxide removal from a mixed gas stream.

  15. Carbon concentration in species of the araucaria forest and effect of the ecological group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Farinha Watzlawick

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted in Boa Ventura do São Roque, Paraná State, Brazil, aiming to evaluate the carbon concentration in components of 12 arboreal species from the Araucaria Forest, as well as the performance of the 0.5 conversion factor and the influence of trees ecological groups in their carbon concentration. Carbon concentration averages were obtained from the tree components, and compared among them, among the species and the conversion factor, to assess the interspecific differences and the reliability of the conversion factor. To analyze the influence of ecological groups over the carbon concentration of the species, cluster analyzes were performed. It was not found significant difference among the carbon concentration in the components of the trees. However, comparing the 12 species, Luehea divaricata, Albizia polycephala and Cestrum sp. differed significantly, presenting lower carbon concentration. Comparison between carbon concentration average of the species and the 0.5 conversion factor indicated that the latter overestimates the carbon concentration in the trees at an average rate of 14.27%. No correlation was found between the ecological groups of the species and their carbon concentration, since groups were formed by species with distinct ecological traits.

  16. Facile synthesis of magnetic mesoporous hollow carbon microspheres for rapid capture of low-concentration peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Gong; Zhou, Ming-Da; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2014-08-13

    Mesoporous and hollow carbon microspheres embedded with magnetic nanoparticles (denoted as MHM) were prepared via a facile self-sacrificial method for rapid capture of low-abundant peptides from complex biological samples. The morphology, structure, surface property, and magnetism were well-characterized. The hollow magnetic carbon microspheres have a saturation magnetization value of 130.2 emu g(-1) at room temperature and a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller specific surface area of 48.8 m(2) g(-1) with an average pore size of 9.2 nm for the mesoporous carbon shell. The effectiveness of these MHM affinity microspheres for capture of low-concentration peptides was evaluated by standard peptides, complex protein digests, and real biological samples. These multifunctional hollow carbon microspheres can realize rapid capture and convenient separation of low-concentration peptides. They were validated to have better performance than magnetic mesoporous silica and commercial peptide-enrichment products. In addition, they can be easily recycled and present excellent reusability. Therefore, it is expected that this work may provide a promising tool for high-throughput discovery of peptide biomarkers from biological samples for disease diagnosis and other biomedical applications.

  17. Effect of initial glucose concentrations on carbon material and energy balances in hydrogen-producing Clostridium tyrobutyricum JM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Ji Hye; Lee, Dae Sung; Kim, Junhoon; Park, Jong Moon

    2009-03-01

    The carbon metabolism of newly isolated Clostridium tyrobutyricum JM1 was investigated at varying initial glucose concentrations (27.8-333.6mM). Because an understanding of metabolic regulations was required to provide guidance for further effective metabolic design or optimization, in this case, maximizing hydrogen production, carbon material, and energy balances by C. tyrobutyricum JM1 were determined and applied in anaerobic glucose metabolism. The overall carbon distribution suggested that initial glucose concentrations had strong influence on the stoichiometric coefficients of products and the molar production of ATP on the formation of biomass. C. tyrobutyricum JM1 had a high capacity for hydrogen production at the initial glucose concentration of 222.4 mM with high concentrations of acetate and butyrate.

  18. Numerical Study on the Acetylene Concentration in the Hydrogen-Carbon System in a Hydrogen Plasma Torch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Longwei; SHEN Jie; SHU Xingsheng; FANG Shidong; ZHANG Lipeng; MENG Yuedong

    2009-01-01

    Effects of the hydrogen/carbon mole ratio and pyrolysis gas pressure on the acetylene concentration in the hydrogen-carbon system in a plasma torch were numerically calculated by using the chemical thermodynamic equilibrium method of Gibbs free energy. The calculated results indicate that the hydrogen concentration and the pyrolysis gas pressure play crucial roles in acetylene formation. Appropriately abundant hydrogen, with a mole ratio of hydrogen to carbon about 1 or 2, and a relatively high pyrolysis gas pressure can enhance the acetylene concentration. In the experiment, a compromised project consisting of an appropriate hydrogen flow rate and a feasible high pyrolysis gas pressure needs to be carried out to increase the acetylene concentration from coal pyrolysis in the hydrogen plasma torch.

  19. Physical chemistry of highly concentrated emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foudazi, Reza; Qavi, Sahar; Masalova, Irina; Malkin, Alexander Ya

    2015-06-01

    This review explores the physics underlying the rheology of highly concentrated emulsions (HCEs) to determine the relationship between elasticity and HCE stability, and to consider whether it is possible to describe all physicochemical properties of HCEs on the basis of a unique physical approach. We define HCEs as emulsions with a volume fraction above the maximum closest packing fraction of monodisperse spheres, φm=0.74, even if droplets are not of polyhedron shape. The solid-like rheological behavior of HCEs is characterized by yield stress and elasticity, properties which depend on droplet polydispersity and which are affected by caging at volume fractions about the jamming concentration, φj. A bimodal size distribution in HCEs diminishes caging and facilitates droplet movement, resulting in HCEs with negligible yield stress and no plateau in storage modulus. Thermodynamic forces automatically move HCEs toward the lowest free energy state, but since interdroplet forces create local minimums - points beyond which free energy temporarily increases before it reaches the global minimum of the system - the free energy of HCEs will settle at a local minimum unless additional energy is added. Several attempts have been undertaken to predict the elasticity of HCEs. In many cases, the elastic modulus of HCEs is higher than the one predicted from classical models, which only take into account spatial repulsion (or simply interfacial energy). Improved models based on free energy calculation should be developed to consider the disjoining pressure and interfacial rheology in addition to spatial repulsion. The disjoining pressure and interfacial viscoelasticity, which result in the deviation of elasticity from the classical model, can be regarded as parameters for quantifying the stability of HCEs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Biophysical controls over concentration and depth distribution of soil organic carbon and nitrogen in desert playas

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Owen P.; Sala, Osvaldo E.

    2016-12-01

    Playa wetlands are important areas of soil organic carbon and nutrient storage in drylands. We conducted this study to assess how catchment biophysical variables control soil organic carbon and nitrogen in playas and how playas function differently than upland ecosystems. We found that playa organic carbon and nitrogen corresponded primarily with catchment vegetation cover and secondarily with catchment area, slope, and soil texture. The effect of increased organic matter production associated with high catchment vegetation cover overshadowed the potential effect of reduced run-on. We also found soil carbon and nitrogen profiles to be significantly shallower in playas than uplands. This trend is correlated with evidence of sedimentation and shallow-rooted plants in playas. Upland soils had a deeper carbon and nitrogen profile, which correlated with organic matter being generated by deeply rooted vegetation. In playas, C:N ratios remained constant through depth but in uplands, C:N ratios increased through depth. We found evidence that differences in rooting depth distributions and soil texture may explain these C:N variations between uplands and playas. In uplands, clay concentration increased with depth, whereas in playas, clay concentration did not change with depth, which highlighted the important role of sedimentation in these ecosystems. Our results suggest that small changes in playa catchment vegetation cover in response to climate change or grazing intensity would greatly impact playa soil organic carbon and nitrogen stocks. This effect would be due to the playa soils dependence on allochthonous organic matter and the large upland area that drains into playas.

  1. Carbon-Carbon High Melt Coating for Nozzle and Nozzle Extensions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — C-CAT, which has proven carbon-carbon fabrication capabilities, will investigate use of ACC-6 High Melt oxidation protective system on carbon-carbon for use on the...

  2. Ambient concentrations and insights on organic and elemental carbon dynamics in São Paulo, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro dos Santos, Djacinto A.; Brito, Joel F.; Godoy, José Marcus; Artaxo, Paulo

    2016-11-01

    The São Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA) is a megacity with about 20 million people and about 8 million vehicles, most of which are fueled with a significant fraction of ethanol - making it a unique case worldwide. This study presents organic and elemental carbon measurements using thermal-optical analysis from quartz filters collected in four sampling sites within the SPMA. Overall Organic Carbon (OC) concentration was comparable at all sites, where Street Canyon had the highest concentration (3.37 μg m-3) and Park site the lowest (2.65 μg m-3). Elemental Carbon (EC), emitted as result of incomplete combustion, has been significantly higher at the Street Canyon site (6.11 μg m-3) in contrast to all other three sites, ranging from 2.25 μg m-3 (Downtown) to 1.50 μg m-3 (Park). For all sampling sites, the average OC:EC ratio are found on the lower bound (urban site. An approach for apportionment between primary and secondary organic carbon based on primary OC:EC ratio was evaluated. The secondary OC was estimated to be 30-40% of total OC concentrations throughout the various sampling sites. The organic carbon dynamics has been further studied using each of the thermally-derived organic carbon fractions. Each of these has been studied regarding their correlation with EC and the correlation between different sites. The analyses have identified that the OC3 and OC4, i.e., the carbon fraction which evolves from the filter at temperatures above 450 °C, presents a regional behavior, with high correlation among all sites. Conversely, OC1, the first fraction to evolve, has depicted a more local characteristic. Furthermore, the fraction of OC which becomes char during the temperature increase under inert atmosphere (the Pyrolytic Carbon-PC) has been the only fraction not to present a significant correlation with EC. Since that EC is assumed to be a primary emission marker, it indicates that PC is not significant in traffic emissions. This study provided innovative

  3. High value carbon materials from PET recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, J. B.; Ania, C. O.; Arenillas, A.; Rubiera, F.; Pis, J. J.

    2004-11-01

    Poly(ethylene) terephthalate (PET), has become one of the major post-consumer plastic waste. In this work special attention was paid to minimising PET residues and to obtain a high value carbon material. Pyrolysis and subsequent activation of PET from post-consumer soft-drink bottles was performed. Activation was carried out at 925 °C under CO2 atmosphere to different burn-off degrees. Textural characterisation of the samples was carried out by performing N2 adsorption isotherms at -196 °C. The obtained carbons materials were mainly microporous, presenting low meso and macroporosity, and apparent BET surface areas of upto 2500 m2 g-1. The capacity of these materials for phenol adsorption and PAHs removal from aqueous solutions was measured and compared with that attained with commercial active carbons. Preliminary tests also showed high hydrogen uptake values, as good as the results obtained with high-tech carbon materials.

  4. Wet oxidation of real coke wastewater containing high thiocyanate concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulego, Paula; Collado, Sergio; Garrido, Laura; Laca, Adriana; Rendueles, Manuel; Díaz, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Coke wastewaters, in particular those with high thiocyanate concentrations, represent an important environmental problem because of their very low biodegradability. In this work, the treatment by wet oxidation of real coke wastewaters containing concentrations of thiocyanate above 17 mM has been studied in a 1-L semi-batch reactor at temperatures between 453 and 493 K, with total oxygen pressures in the range of 2.0-8.0 MPa. A positive effect of the matrix of real coke wastewater was observed, resulting in faster thiocyanate degradation than was obtained with synthetic wastewaters. Besides, the effect of oxygen concentration and temperature on thiocyanate wet oxidation was more noticeable in real effluents than in synthetic wastewaters containing only thiocyanate. It was also observed that the degree of mineralization of the matrix organic compounds was higher when the initial thiocyanate concentration increased. Taking into account the experimental data, kinetic models were obtained, and a mechanism implying free radicals was proposed for thiocyanate oxidation in the matrix considered. In all cases, sulphate, carbonates and ammonium were identified as the main reaction products of thiocyanate wet oxidation.

  5. Effect of carbon source and nitrate concentration on denitrifying phosphorus removal by DPB sludge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ya-yi; PENG Yong-zhen; Wang Shu-ying; PAN Mian-li

    2004-01-01

    Effect of added carbon source and nitrate concentration on the denitrifying phosphorus removal by DPB sludge was systematically studied using batch experiments, at the same time the variation of ORP was investigated.Results showed that the denitrifying and phosphorus uptake rate in anoxic phase increased with the high initial anaerobic carbon source addition. However once the initial COD concentration reached a certain level, which was in excess to the PHB saturation of poly-P bacteria, residual COD carried over to anoxic phase inhibited the subsequent denitrifying phosphorus uptake. Simultaneously, phosphate uptake continued until all nitrate was removed, following a slow endogenous release of phosphate. High nitrate concentration in anoxic phase increased the initial denitrifying phosphorus rate. Once the nitrate was exhausted, phosphate uptake changed to release. Moreover, the time of this turning point occurred later with the higher nitrate addition. On the other hand, through on-line monitoring the variation of the ORP with different initial COD concentration , it was found ORP could be used as a control parameter for phosphorus release, but it is impossible to utilize ORP for controlling the denitrificaion and anoxic phosphorus uptake operations.

  6. The concentration and isotopic composition of carbon in basaltic glasses from the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Jennifer G.; Delaney, John R.; Des Marais, David J.

    1993-01-01

    The abundance and C-13/C-12 ratios of carbon were analyzed in basaltic glass from twenty locations along the Juan de Fuca Ridge using a 3-step combustion/extraction technique. Carbon released during the first two combustion steps at 400-500 C and 600-650 C is interpreted to be secondary, and only the carbon recovered during a final combustion step at about 1200 C is thought to be indigenous to the samples. For carbon released at about 1200 C, glasses analyzed as 1-2 mm chips contained 23-146 ppm C with delta C-13 values of -4.8 to -9.3 per mil, whereas samples crushed to 38-63 microns or 63-90 microns yielded 56-103 ppm C with delta C-13 values of -6.1 to -9.2 per mil. The concentrations and isotopic compositions of the primary carbon dissolved in the glasses and present in the vesicles are similar to those previously reported for other ocean-ridge basalts. The Juan de Fuca basaltic magmas were not in equilibrium with respect to carbon when they erupted and quenched on the sea floor. Evidence of disequilibrium includes (1) a large range of carbon contents among glasses collected at similar depths, (2) a highly variable calculated carbon isotopic fractionation between melt and vapor determined by comparing crushed and uncrushed splits of the same sample, and (3) a lack of correlation between vesicle abundance, carbon concentration, and depth of eruption. Variations in carbon concentration and delta C-13 ratios along the ridge do not correlate with major element chemistry. The observed relationship between carbon concentrations and delta C-13 values may be explained by late-stage, variable degrees of open-system (Rayleigh-like) degassing.

  7. New Adsorption Cycles for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Ritter; Armin Ebner; Steven Reynolds Hai Du; Amal Mehrotra

    2008-07-31

    The objective of this three-year project was to study new pressure swing adsorption (PSA) cycles for CO{sub 2} capture and concentration at high temperature. The heavy reflux (HR) PSA concept and the use of a hydrotalcite like (HTlc) adsorbent that captures CO{sub 2} reversibly at high temperatures simply by changing the pressure were two key features of these new PSA cycles. Through the completion or initiation of nine tasks, a bench-scale experimental and theoretical program has been carried out to complement and extend the process simulation study that was carried out during Phase I (DE-FG26-03NT41799). This final report covers the entire project from August 1, 2005 to July 31, 2008. This program included the study of PSA cycles for CO{sub 2} capture by both rigorous numerical simulation and equilibrium theory analysis. The insight gained from these studies was invaluable toward the applicability of PSA for CO{sub 2} capture, whether done at ambient or high temperature. The rigorous numerical simulation studies showed that it is indeed possible to capture and concentrate CO{sub 2} by PSA. Over a wide range of conditions it was possible to achieve greater than 90% CO{sub 2} purity and/or greater than 90% CO{sub 2} recovery, depending on the particular heavy reflux (HR) PSA cycle under consideration. Three HR PSA cycles were identified as viable candidates for further study experimentally. The equilibrium theory analysis, which represents the upper thermodynamic limit of the performance of PSA process, further validated the use of certain HR PSA cycles for CO{sub 2} capture and concentration. A new graphical approach for complex PSA cycle scheduling was also developed during the course of this program. This new methodology involves a priori specifying the cycle steps, their sequence, and the number of beds, and then following a systematic procedure that requires filling in a 2-D grid based on a few simple rules, some heuristics and some experience. It has been

  8. Estimating Terrestrial Wood Biomass from Observed Concentrations of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, K. M.; Peters, W.; Carvalhais, N.; van der Werf, G.; Miller, J.

    2008-01-01

    We estimate terrestrial disequilibrium state and wood biomass from observed concentrations of atmospheric CO2 using the CarbonTracker system coupled to the SiBCASA biophysical model. Starting with a priori estimates of carbon flux from the land, ocean, and fossil fuels, CarbonTracker estimates net c

  9. Estimating Terrestrial Wood Biomass from Observed Concentrations of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, K. M.; Peters, W.; Carvalhais, N.; van der Werf, G.; Miller, J.

    2008-01-01

    We estimate terrestrial disequilibrium state and wood biomass from observed concentrations of atmospheric CO2 using the CarbonTracker system coupled to the SiBCASA biophysical model. Starting with a priori estimates of carbon flux from the land, ocean, and fossil fuels, CarbonTracker estimates net

  10. Magneto-carbonization method for production of carbon fiber, and high performance carbon fibers made thereby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit K.; Ozcan, Soydan; Eberle, Claude C.; Abdallah, Mohamed Gabr; Mackiewicz, Ludtka Gail; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Paulauskas, Felix Leonard; Rivard, John Daniel Kennedy

    2017-08-08

    Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from fiber precursor, wherein the fiber precursor is subjected to a magnetic field of at least 3 Tesla during a carbonization process. The carbonization process is generally conducted at a temperature of at least 400.degree. C. and less than 2200.degree. C., wherein, in particular embodiments, the carbonization process includes a low temperature carbonization step conducted at a temperature of at least or above 400.degree. C. or 500.degree. C. and less than or up to 1000.degree. C., 1100.degree. C., or 1200.degree. C., followed by a high temperature carbonization step conducted at a temperature of at least or above 1200.degree. C. In particular embodiments, particularly in the case of a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber precursor, the resulting carbon fiber may possess a minimum tensile strength of at least 600 ksi, a tensile modulus of at least 30 Msi, and an ultimate elongation of at least 1.5%.

  11. Biobased carbon content of resin extracted from polyethylene composite by carbon-14 concentration measurements using accelerator mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Taguchi, Kazuhiro; Kunioka, Masao; Funabashi, Masahiro; Ninomiya, Fumi

    2014-01-01

    An estimation procedure for biobased carbon content of polyethylene composite was studied using carbon-14 (14C) concentration ratios as measured by accelerated mass spectrometry (AMS). Prior to the measurement, additives and fillers in composites should be removed because they often contain a large amount of biobased carbon and may shift the estimation. Samples of resin with purity suitable for measurement were isolated from composites with a Soxhlet extractor using heated cyclohexanone. Afte...

  12. The Effect of Carbon Source and Fluoride Concentrations in the "Streptococcus Mutans" Biofilm Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulino, Tony P.; Andrade, Ricardo O.; Bruschi-Thedei, Giuliana C. M.; Thedei, Geraldo, Jr.; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of this class experiment is to show the influence of carbon source and of different fluoride concentrations on the biofilm formation by the bacterium "Streptococcus mutans." The observation of different biofilm morphology as a function of carbon source and fluoride concentration allows an interesting discussion regarding the…

  13. High-Temperature, High-Concentration Solar Thermoelectric Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Emily; Baranowski, Lauryn; Olsen, Michele; Ndione, Paul; Netter, Judy; Goodrich, Alan; Gray, Matthew; Parilla, Philip; Ginley, David; Toberer, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) powered with concentrated solar energy have potential for use as primary energy converters or as topping-cycles for more conventional concentrated solar power (CSP) technologies. Modeling based on current record modules from JPL suggests thermoelectric efficiencies of 18 % could be experimentally expected with a temperature gradient of 1000 - 100°C. Integrating these state-of-the-art TEGs with a concentrating solar receiver requires simultaneous optimization of optical, thermal, and thermoelectric systems. This talk will discuss the modeling, design, and experimental testing of STEG devices under concentrated sunlight. We have developed a model that combines thermal circuit modeling with optical ray tracing to design selective absorber coatings and cavities to minimize radiation losses from the system. We have fabricated selective absorber coatings and demonstrated that these selective absorber films can minimize blackbody radiation losses at high temperature and are stable after thermal cycling to 1000°C. On-sun testing of STEG devices and thermal simulators is ongoing and preliminary results will be discussed.

  14. Forsterite Carbonation in Wet-scCO2: Dependence on Adsorbed Water Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loring, J.; Benezeth, P.; Qafoku, O.; Thompson, C.; Schaef, T.; Bonneville, A.; McGrail, P.; Felmy, A.; Rosso, K.

    2013-12-01

    Capturing and storing CO2 in basaltic formations is one of the most promising options for mitigating atmospheric CO2 emissions resulting from the burning of fossil fuels. These geologic reservoirs have high reactive potential for CO2-mineral trapping due to an abundance of divalent-cation containing silicates, such as forsterite (Mg2SiO4). Recent studies have shown that carbonation of these silicates under wet scCO2 conditions, e. g. encountered near a CO2 injection well, proceeds along a different pathway and is more effective than in CO2-saturated aqueous fluids. The presence of an adsorbed water film on the forsterite surface seems to be key to reactivity towards carbonation. In this study, we employed in situ high pressure IR spectroscopy to investigate the dependence of adsorbed water film thickness on forsterite carbonation chemistry. Post reaction ex situ SEM, TEM, TGA, XRD, and NMR measurements will also be discussed. Several IR titrations were performed of forsterite with water at 50 °C and 90 bar scCO2. Aliquots of water were titrated at 4-hour reaction-time increments. Once a desired total water concentration was reached, data were collected for about another 30 hours. One titration involved 10 additions, which corresponds to 6.8 monolayers of adsorbed water. Clearly, a carbonate was precipitating, and its spectral signature matched magnesite. Another titration involved 8 aliquots, or up to 4.4 monolayers of water. The integrated absorbance under the CO stretching bands of carbonate as a function of time after reaching 4.4 monolayers showed an increase and then a plateau. We are currently unsure of the identity of the carbonate that precipitated, but it could be an amorphous anhydrous phase or magnesite crystals with dimensions of only several nanometers. A third titration only involved 3 additions, or up to 1.6 monolayers of water. The integrated absorbance under the CO stretching bands of carbonate as a function of time after reaching 1.6 monolayers

  15. Production of high concentrations of yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-11-10

    A microbe is aerobically cultured using O/sub 2/ or a gas rich in O/sub 2/. The grown cells are washed, concentrated and a portion of the cells used as a seed culture. Thus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (bakers' yeast) was cultured in a jar fermentor by flow down system maintaining the dissolved O/sub 2/ at 2-5 mg/L; volume of the initial medium containing 30% glucose was 350 mL and the initial washed cell concentration was 50 g dry cells/L. After 12 hours of cultivation, the volume of the medium increased to 750 mL and the cell concentration rose to 102 g dry cells/L; the yield was 49% with respect to glucose. The cells were washed and the cultivation was repeated by use of the washed cells; cell concentration reached 105 g dry cells/L.

  16. Exposure to fine particulate, black carbon, and particle number concentration in transportation microenvironments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Betancourt, R.; Galvis, B.; Balachandran, S.; Ramos-Bonilla, J. P.; Sarmiento, O. L.; Gallo-Murcia, S. M.; Contreras, Y.

    2017-05-01

    This research determined intake dose of fine particulate matter (PM2.5), equivalent black carbon (eBC), and number of sub-micron particles (Np) for commuters in Bogotá, Colombia. Doses were estimated through measurements of exposure concentration, a surrogate of physical activity, as well as travel times and speeds. Impacts of travel mode, traffic load, and street configuration on dose and exposure were explored. Three road segments were selected because of their different traffic loads and composition, and dissimilar street configuration. The transport modes considered include active modes (walking and cycling) and motorized modes (bus, car, taxi, and motorcycle). Measurements were performed simultaneously in the available modes at each road segment. High average eBC concentrations were observed throughout the campaign, ranging from 20 to 120 μgm-3 . Commuters in motorized modes experienced significantly higher exposure concentrations than pedestrians and bicyclists. The highest average concentrations of PM2.5, eBC , and Np were measured inside the city's Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system vehicles. Pedestrians and bicycle users in an open street configuration were exposed to the lowest average concentrations of PM2.5 and eBC , six times lower than those experienced by commuters using the BRT in the same street segment. Pedestrians experienced the highest particulate matter intake dose in the road segments studied, despite being exposed to lower concentrations than commuters in motorized modes. Average potential dose of PM2.5 and eBC per unit length traveled were nearly three times higher for pedestrians in a street canyon configuration compared to commuters in public transport. Slower travel speed and elevated inhalation rates dominate PM dose for pedestrians. The presence of dedicated bike lanes on sidewalks has a significant impact on reducing the exposure concentration for bicyclists compared to those riding in mixed traffic lanes. This study proposes a simple

  17. Horizontally staggered lightguide solar concentrator with lateral displacement tracking for high concentration applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongcai; Wu, Lin

    2015-07-10

    We present the design of a horizontally staggered lightguide solar concentrator with lateral displacement tracking for high concentration applications. This solar concentrator consists of an array of telecentric primary concentrators, a horizontally staggered lightguide layer, and a vertically tapered lightguide layer. The primary concentrator is realized by two plano-aspheric lenses with lateral movement and maintains a high F-number over an angle range of ±23.5°. The results of the simulations show that the solar concentrator achieves a high concentration ratio of 500× with ±0.5° of acceptance angle by a single-axis tracker and dual lateral translation stages.

  18. Synthesis of Boron-doped Diamond/Porous Ti Composite Materials——Effect of Carbon Concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Ming; CHANG Ming; LI Xiaowei

    2012-01-01

    Highly boron-doped diamond films were deposited on porous titanium substrates by hot filament chemical vapor deposition technique.The morphology variation of highly boron-doped diamond films grown on porous titanium substrates was investigated,and the effects of carbon concentration on nucleation density and diamond growth were also studied.The continuous change of surface morphology and structure of diamond film were characterized by scanning electron microscopy.The structures of diamond film and interlayer were analyzed by X-ray diffraction.The quality of boron-doped diamond film was confirmed by visible Raman spectroscopy.The experimental results reveal that surface morphology and quality of boron-doped diamond films are various due to the change of carbon concentration.The thickness of intermediate layer decreases with the carbon concentration increasing.

  19. Silicon-carbon interactions in high latitude watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humborg, C.; Morth, C.; Struyf, E.; Conley, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    Changes in climate and hydrology in high latitude regions could liberate large amounts of previously inactive organic carbon (OC) during a prolonging thawing period, and new studies have shown that a great deal of this organic C is remineralized as CO2 during its transport to the sea. However, OC (with its origin in atmospheric carbon) and dissolved silicate (DSi) concentrations in taiga and tundra rivers are intimately linked, and higher concentrations of weathering products are found in taiga and tundra rivers with a higher percentage of peat in their watersheds. It appears that the weathering regime of taiga and tundra watersheds is tightly linked to carbon-silicon interactions, in which carbon acts both as a weathering agent (soil CO2 from degradation of OC) and as a weathering product (DSi and bicarbonate). Whereas respiration of OC can be regarded as a positive feedback to global warming, weathering can be regarded as a negative feedback to global warming since atmospheric CO2 is converted to bicarbonate and thereby locked into the aquatic phase for geological time scales. Thus, bicarbonate export may compensate for significant amounts of exported OC thereby reducing the positive feedback to atmospheric CO2. However, the silicon-carbon interactions are not straight forward as suggested by classical inverse modelling,using the stochiometry of rock forming minerals as base, since high latitude wetlands contain a massive stock of amorphous silica (diatoms and phytoliths) buffering the actual DSi export, suggesting that the Si cycle is to a large extent biologically controlled.

  20. Discrepancy between Measured Serum Total Carbon Dioxide Content and Bicarbonate Concentration Calculated from Arterial Blood Gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngho; Massie, Larry; Murata, Glen H; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2015-12-07

    Large differences between the concentrations of serum total carbon dioxide (TCO2) and blood gas bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)) were observed in two consecutive simultaneously drawn sets of samples of serum and arterial blood gases in a patient who presented with severe carbon dioxide retention and profound acidemia. These differences could not be explained by the effect of the high partial pressure of carbon dioxide on TCO2, by variations in the dissociation constant of the carbonic acid/bicarbonate system or by faults caused by the algorithms of the blood gas apparatus that calculate HCO3 (-). A recalculation using the Henderson-Hasselbach equation revealed arterial blood gas HCO3 (-) values close to the corresponding serum TCO2 values and clarified the diagnosis of the acid-base disorder, which had been placed in doubt by the large differences between the reported TCO2 and HCO3 (-) values. Human error in the calculation of HCO3 (-) was identified as the source of these differences. Recalculation of blood gas HCO3 (-) should be the first step in identifying the source of large differences between serum TCO2 and blood gas HCO3 (-).

  1. High frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Abukari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on theoretical analysis of high frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes. Using the kinetic equation with constant relaxation time, an analytical expression for the complex conductivity is obtained. The real part of the complex conductivity is initially negative at zero frequency and become more negative with increasing frequency, until it reaches a resonance minimum at ω ∼ ωB for metallic zigzag CNs and ω < ωB for armchair CNs. This resonance enhancement is indicative for terahertz gain without the formation of current instabilities induced by negative dc conductivity. We noted that due to the high density of states of conduction electrons in metallic zigzag carbon nanotubes and the specific dispersion law inherent in hexagonal crystalline structure result in a uniquely high frequency conductivity than the corresponding values for metallic armchair carbon nanotubes. We suggest that this phenomenon can be used to suppress current instabilities that are normally associated with a negative dc differential conductivity.

  2. Computation of carbon concentration curves in vacuum carburizing of steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, M. Yu.; Smirnov, A. E.; Ryzhova, M. Yu.

    2013-05-01

    The boundary conditions of the diffusion problem in parametric form are determined on the basis of an experimental study of formation of carbon-saturated layers in vacuum carburizing. The boundary conditions are applied in a model of a process with cyclic modes of carburizing. Adequacy of the developed model is confirmed.

  3. Effects of vinylene carbonate on high temperature storage of high voltage Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Ji-Yong; Jung, In-Ho; Lee, Jong-Hoon

    The effects of vinylene carbonate (VC) on high temperature storage of high voltage Li-ion batteries are investigated. 1.3 M of LiPF 6 dissolved in ethylene carbonate (EC), ethylmethyl carbonate (EMC) and dimethyl carbonate (DMC) of 3:3:4 volume ratio is used as original electrolyte for 18650 cylindrical cells with LiCoO 2 cathode and graphite anode. VC is then added to electrolyte. At the initial stage of the high temperature storage, higher open-circuit voltage (OCV) is maintained when increasing the VC concentration. As the storage time increases, OCV of higher VC concentration drops gradually, and then the gas evolution takes place abruptly. Gas analysis shows methane (CH 4) decreases with increase of the VC concentration due to formation of stable solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer on the graphite. Since the residual VC after formation of the SEI layer decomposes on the cathode surface, carbon dioxide (CO 2) dramatically increases on the cathode with the VC concentration, leaving poly(VC) film at the anode surface, as suggested by XPS test results.

  4. Carbon dynamics in highly heterotrophic subarctic thaw ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Roiha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Global warming has accelerated the formation of permafrost thaw ponds in several subarctic and arctic regions. These ponds are net heterotrophic as evidenced by their greenhouse gas (GHG supersaturation levels (CO2 and CH4, and generally receive large terrestrial carbon inputs from the thawing and eroding permafrost. We measured seasonal and vertical variations in the concentration and type of dissolved organic matter (DOM in five subarctic thaw (thermokarst ponds in northern Quebec, and explored how environmental gradients influenced heterotrophic and phototrophic biomass and productivity. Late winter DOM had low aromaticity indicating reduced inputs of terrestrial carbon, while the high concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC suggests that some production of non-chromophoric dissolved compounds by the microbial food web took place under the ice cover. Summer DOM had a strong terrestrial signature, but was also characterized with significant inputs of algal-derived carbon, especially at the pond surface. During late winter, bacterial production was low (maximum of 0.8 mg C m−3 d−1 and was largely based on free-living bacterioplankton (58 %. Bacterial production in summer was high (up to 58 mg C m−3 d−1, dominated by particle-attached bacteria (67 %, and strongly correlated to the amount of terrestrial carbon. Primary production was restricted to summer surface waters due to strong light limitation deeper in the water column or in winter. The phototrophic biomass was equal to the heterotrophic biomass, but as the algae were mostly composed of mixotrophic species, most probably they used bacteria rather than solar energy in such shaded ponds. According to the δ13C analyses, non-algal carbon supported 51 % of winter and 37 % of summer biomass of the phantom midge larvae, Chaoborus sp., that are at the top of the trophic chain. Our results point to a strong heterotrophic energy pathway in these thaw pond ecosystems, where

  5. Concentrations of fine, ultrafine, and black carbon particles in auto-rickshaws in New Delhi, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, Joshua, S.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Reich, Alexander, H.; Deshpande, Shyam J.; Kaushik, Geetanjali; Chel, Arvind; Marshall, Julian D.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2011-08-01

    Concentrations of air pollutants from vehicles are elevated along roadways, indicating that human exposure in transportation microenvironments may not be adequately characterized by centrally located monitors. We report results from ˜180 h of real-time measurements of fine particle and black carbon mass concentration (PM 2.5, BC) and ultrafine particle number concentration (PN) inside a common vehicle, the auto-rickshaw, in New Delhi, India. Measured exposure concentrations are much higher in this study (geometric mean for ˜60 trip-averaged concentrations: 190 μg m -3 PM 2.5, 42 μg m -3 BC, 280 × 10 3 particles cm -3; GSD ˜1.3 for all three pollutants) than reported for transportation microenvironments in other megacities. In-vehicle concentrations exceeded simultaneously measured ambient levels by 1.5× for PM 2.5, 3.6× for BC, and 8.4× for PN. Short-duration peak concentrations (averaging time: 10 s), attributable to exhaust plumes of nearby vehicles, were greater than 300 μg m -3 for PM 2.5, 85 μg m -3 for BC, and 650 × 10 3 particles cm -3 for PN. The incremental increase of within-vehicle concentration above ambient levels—which we attribute to in- and near-roadway emission sources—accounted for 30%, 68% and 86% of time-averaged in-vehicle PM 2.5, BC and PN concentrations, respectively. Based on these results, we estimate that one's exposure during a daily commute by auto-rickshaw in Delhi is as least as large as full-day exposures experienced by urban residents of many high-income countries. This study illuminates an environmental health concern that may be common in many populous, low-income cities.

  6. Effect of Sulfur Concentration on the Morphology of Carbon Nanofibers Produced from a Botanical Hydrocarbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Kaushik

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractCarbon nanofibers (CNF with diameters of 20–130 nm with different morphologies were obtained from a botanical hydrocarbon: Turpentine oil, using ferrocene as catalyst source and sulfur as a promoter by simple spray pyrolysis method at 1,000 °C. The influence of sulfur concentration on the morphology of the carbon nanofibers was investigated. SEM, TEM, Raman, TGA/DTA, and BET surface area were employed to characterize the as-prepared samples. TEM analysis confirms that as-prepared CNFs have a very sharp tip, bamboo shape, open end, hemispherical cap, pipe like morphology, and metal particle trapped inside the wide hollow core. It is observed that sulfur plays an important role to promote or inhibit the CNF growth. Addition of sulfur to the solution of ferrocene and turpentine oil mixture was found to be very effective in promoting the growth of CNF. Without addition of sulfur, carbonaceous product was very less and mainly soot was formed. At high concentration of sulfur inhibit the growth of CNFs. Hence the yield of CNFs was optimized for a given sulfur concentration.

  7. Carbon material distribution and flux analysis under varying glucose concentrations in hydrogen-producing Clostridium tyrobutyricum JM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Ji Hye; Kim, Woong

    2016-06-20

    Anaerobic glucose metabolism in hydrogen-producing Clostridium tyrobutyricum was investigated in batch culture with varying initial glucose concentrations (27.8-333.6mM). To understand the regulation of metabolism, the carbon material and reduction balances were applied to estimate the carbon flux distribution for the first time, and metabolic flux analysis (MFA) was used to provide qualitative information and guidance for effective metabolic design. The overall flux distribution suggested that C. tyrobutyricum metabolism has a high capacity for the production of butyrate and hydrogen at an initial glucose concentration of 222.4mM, with balanced activities of NADH and ATP.

  8. Zooplankton community composition of high mountain lakes in the Tatra Mts., the Alps in North Tyrol, and Scotland: relationship to pH, depth, organic carbon, and chlorophyll-a concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skála Ivan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The European EMERGE (European Mountain lake Ecosystems: Regionalisation, diaGnostic & socio-economic Evaluation project was a survey of high mountain lakes (above treeline across Europe using unified methods of sampling and analysis. The sampling was carried out in summer or autumn 2000, and comprised biological samples, and samples for chemical analysis. Data from three lake districts are used in this paper: the Tatra Mts. in Slovakia and Poland (45 lakes, the Alps in Tyrol in Austria (22 lakes, and Scotland (30 lakes. As it is shown by multiple regression analysis, DTOC (dissolved or total organic carbon is the key variable for most groups of zooplankton. With increasing DTOC and mostly with chlorophyll-a decreasing, pH increasing and depth decreasing, macrofitrators with coarse filter meshes are replaced by microfiltrators with fine filter meshes. Higher DTOC may increase bacterioplankton production and advantage species able to consume bacteria (microfiltrators. Other zooplankton species also differ in their preference for DTOC, chlorophyll-a, pH and depth, but DTOC being positively correlated with chlorophyll-a and pH positively correlated with depth. It may be caused by their different preference for food quality in terms of C:P ratio.

  9. Successful treatment of high azo dye concentration wastewater using combined anaerobic/aerobic granular activated carbon-sequencing batch biofilm reactor (GAC-SBBR): simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini Koupaie, E; Alavi Moghaddam, M R; Hashemi, S H

    2013-01-01

    The application of a granular activated carbon-sequencing batch biofilm reactor (GAC-SBBR) for treatment of wastewater containing 1,000 mg/L Acid Red 18 (AR18) was investigated in this research. The treatment system consisted of a sequencing batch reactor equipped with moving GAC as biofilm support. Each treatment cycle consisted of two successive anaerobic (14 h) and aerobic (8 h) reaction phases. Removal of more than 91% chemical oxygen demand (COD) and 97% AR18 was achieved in this study. Investigation of dye decolorization kinetics showed that the dye removal was stimulated by the adsorption capacity of the GAC at the beginning of the anaerobic phase and then progressed following a first-order reaction. Based on COD analysis results, at least 77.8% of the dye total metabolites were mineralized during the applied treatment system. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that more than 97% of 1-naphthyalamine-4-sulfonate as one of the main sulfonated aromatic constituents of AR18 was removed during the aerobic reaction phase. According to the scanning electron microscopic analysis, the microbial biofilms grew in most cavities and pores of the GAC, but not on the external surfaces of the GAC.

  10. Effects of carbon concentration and carbon to nitrogen ratio on the growth and sporulation of several biocontrol fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Sun, Man H; Liu, Xing Z; Che, Yong S

    2007-01-01

    Effects of carbon concentration and carbon to nitrogen (C:N) ratio on six biocontrol fungal strains are reported in this paper. All fungal strains had extensive growth on the media supplemented with 6-12 gl(-1) carbon and C:N ratios from 10:1 to 80:1, and differed in nutrient requirements for sporulation. Except for the two strains of Paecilomyces lilacinus, all selected fungi attained the highest spore yields at a C:N ratio of 160:1 when the carbon concentration was 12 gl(-1) for Metarhizium anisopliae SQZ-1-21, 6 gl(-1) for M. anisopliae RS-4-1 and Trichoderma viride TV-1, and 8 gl(-1) for Lecanicillium lecanii CA-1-G. The optimal conditions for P. lilacinus sporulation were 8 gl(-1) carbon with a C:N ratio of 10:1 for M-14 and 12 gl(-1) carbon with a C:N ratio of 20:1 for IPC-P, respectively. The results indicated that the influence of carbon concentration and C:N ratio on fungal growth and sporulation is strain dependent; therefore, consideration for the complexity of nutrient requirements is essential for improving yields of fungal biocontrol agents.

  11. Cyanobacterial carbon concentrating mechanisms facilitate sustained CO2 depletion in eutrophic lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Morales-Williams

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton blooms are increasing in frequency, intensity, and duration in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. In many eutrophic lakes, these high levels of primary productivity correspond to periods of CO2 depletion in surface waters. Cyanobacteria and other groups of phytoplankton have the ability to actively transport bicarbonate (HCO3− across their cell membrane when CO2 concentrations are limiting, possibly giving them a competitive advantage over algae not using carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs. To investigate whether CCMs can maintain phytoplankton bloom biomass under CO2 depletion, we measured the δ13C signatures of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC and phytoplankton particulate organic carbon (δ13Cphyto in 16 mesotrophic to hypereutrophic lakes during the ice-free season of 2012. We used mass–balance relationships to determine the dominant inorganic carbon species used by phytoplankton under CO2 stress. We found a significant positive relationship between phytoplankton biomass and phytoplankton δ13C signatures as well as a significant nonlinear negative relationship between water column ρCO2 and isotopic composition of phytoplankton, indicating a shift from diffusive uptake to active uptake by phytoplankton of CO2 or HCO3− during blooms. Calculated photosynthetic fractionation factors indicated that this shift occurs specifically when surface water CO2 drops below atmospheric equilibrium. Our results indicate that active HCO3− uptake via CCMs may be an important mechanism in maintaining phytoplankton blooms when CO2 is depleted. Further increases in anthropogenic pressure, eutrophication, and cyanobacteria blooms are therefore expected to contribute to increased bicarbonate uptake to sustain primary production.

  12. Cyanobacterial carbon concentrating mechanisms facilitate sustained CO2 depletion in eutrophic lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Williams, Ana M.; Wanamaker, Alan D., Jr.; Downing, John A.

    2017-06-01

    Phytoplankton blooms are increasing in frequency, intensity, and duration in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. In many eutrophic lakes, these high levels of primary productivity correspond to periods of CO2 depletion in surface waters. Cyanobacteria and other groups of phytoplankton have the ability to actively transport bicarbonate (HCO3-) across their cell membrane when CO2 concentrations are limiting, possibly giving them a competitive advantage over algae not using carbon concentrating mechanisms (CCMs). To investigate whether CCMs can maintain phytoplankton bloom biomass under CO2 depletion, we measured the δ13C signatures of dissolved inorganic carbon (δ13CDIC) and phytoplankton particulate organic carbon (δ13Cphyto) in 16 mesotrophic to hypereutrophic lakes during the ice-free season of 2012. We used mass-balance relationships to determine the dominant inorganic carbon species used by phytoplankton under CO2 stress. We found a significant positive relationship between phytoplankton biomass and phytoplankton δ13C signatures as well as a significant nonlinear negative relationship between water column ρCO2 and isotopic composition of phytoplankton, indicating a shift from diffusive uptake to active uptake by phytoplankton of CO2 or HCO3- during blooms. Calculated photosynthetic fractionation factors indicated that this shift occurs specifically when surface water CO2 drops below atmospheric equilibrium. Our results indicate that active HCO3- uptake via CCMs may be an important mechanism in maintaining phytoplankton blooms when CO2 is depleted. Further increases in anthropogenic pressure, eutrophication, and cyanobacteria blooms are therefore expected to contribute to increased bicarbonate uptake to sustain primary production.

  13. Life support system cost study: Addendum to cost analysis of carbon dioxide concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakut, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    New cost data are presented for the Hydrogen-Depolarized Carbon Dioxide Concentrator (HDC), based on modifying the concentrator to delete the quick disconnect valves and filters included in the system model defined in MDC-G4631. System description, cost data and a comparison between CO2 concentrator costs are presented.

  14. High surface area carbon and process for its production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanos, Jimmy; Burress, Jacob; Pfeifer, Peter; Rash, Tyler; Shah, Parag; Suppes, Galen

    2016-12-13

    Activated carbon materials and methods of producing and using activated carbon materials are provided. In particular, biomass-derived activated carbon materials and processes of producing the activated carbon materials with prespecified surface areas and pore size distributions are provided. Activated carbon materials with preselected high specific surface areas, porosities, sub-nm (carbon consumption and metallic potassium intercalation into the carbon lattice during the activation process.

  15. Superconductivity in highly disordered dense carbon disulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Ranga P; Yoo, Choong-Shik; Struzhkin, Viktor V; Kim, Minseob; Muramatsu, Takaki; Matsuoka, Takahiro; Ohishi, Yasuo; Sinogeikin, Stanislav

    2013-07-16

    High pressure plays an increasingly important role in both understanding superconductivity and the development of new superconducting materials. New superconductors were found in metallic and metal oxide systems at high pressure. However, because of the filled close-shell configuration, the superconductivity in molecular systems has been limited to charge-transferred salts and metal-doped carbon species with relatively low superconducting transition temperatures. Here, we report the low-temperature superconducting phase observed in diamagnetic carbon disulfide under high pressure. The superconductivity arises from a highly disordered extended state (CS4 phase or phase III[CS4]) at ~6.2 K over a broad pressure range from 50 to 172 GPa. Based on the X-ray scattering data, we suggest that the local structural change from a tetrahedral to an octahedral configuration is responsible for the observed superconductivity.

  16. The effect of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations on the performance of the mangrove Avicennia germinans over a range of salinities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reef, Ruth; Winter, Klaus; Morales, Jorge; Adame, Maria Fernanda; Reef, Dana L; Lovelock, Catherine E

    2015-07-01

    By increasing water use efficiency and carbon assimilation, increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations could potentially improve plant productivity and growth at high salinities. To assess the effect of elevated CO2 on the salinity response of a woody halophyte, we grew seedlings of the mangrove Avicennia germinans under a combination of five salinity treatments [from 5 to 65 parts per thousand (ppt)] and three CO2 concentrations (280, 400 and 800 ppm). We measured survivorship, growth rate, photosynthetic gas exchange, root architecture and foliar nutrient and ion concentrations. The salinity optima for growth shifted higher with increasing concentrations of CO2 , from 0 ppt at 280 ppm to 35 ppt at 800 ppm. At optimal salinity conditions, carbon assimilation rates were significantly higher under elevated CO2 concentrations. However, at salinities above the salinity optima, salinity had an expected negative effect on mangrove growth and carbon assimilation, which was not alleviated by elevated CO2 , despite a significant improvement in photosynthetic water use efficiency. This is likely due to non-stomatal limitations to growth at high salinities, as indicated by our measurements of foliar ion concentrations that show a displacement of K(+) by Na(+) at elevated salinities that is not affected by CO2 . The observed shift in the optimal salinity for growth with increasing CO2 concentrations changes the fundamental niche of this species and could have significant effects on future mangrove distribution patterns and interspecific interactions.

  17. Effect of Sodium Carbonate Concentrations on the Formation and Mechanism of Regenerated Silk Fibroin Nanofibers by Electrospinning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Dou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Degumming is the first process for the preparation of all silk-based products. In this paper, effect of sodium carbonate concentrations for silk degumming on the formation of electrospun silk fibroin nanofibers was investigated and the reason for the silk electrospinning process was explained for the first time by differences from the microstructure of regenerated silk fibroin. With increasing the sodium carbonate concentration, microstructure both in the aqueous solutions and in the electrospinning solutions transformed from nanofibrils to nanoparticles, leading to obvious changes on rheological property; electrospinning solutions with nanofibrils behaved like the native silk dope and owned remarkably higher viscosity than the solutions with nanoparticles showing very low viscosity. More interestingly, nanofibrils favored the formation of silk nanofibers with ease, and even nanofibers could be electrospun at concentration 2%. However, nanoparticles were completely unable to generate nanofibers at high spinning concentration 8%. Importance of sodium carbonate concentrations is heavily emphasized for impacting the microstructure types and further influencing the electrospinning performance of regenerated silk. Hence, sodium carbonate concentrations provide a controllable choice for the preparation of silk-based electrospun biomaterials with desired properties.

  18. The Carbon Isotopic Content and Concentration of Ambient Formic and Acetic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bryan Jay

    A direct method for source determination of atmospheric formic and acetic acid, through carbon isotopic analysis of the ambient acids and their potential sources, has been successfully developed and tested. These first carbon isotopic measurements of formic acid in the atmosphere were found to be fairly constant, regardless of location. This is consistent with a single dominating source of formic acid, with vegetation emissions being the most likely controlling source. Collection of relatively large quantities (0.3 -3.0 mg) of the organic acids, which was necessary for carbon isotopic measurements, was effectively accomplished by a new method using calcium hydroxide-treated filters with a high-volume sampler. Samples were collected on a regular basis at Mount Lemmon, Arizona (elevation = 9200 feet A.S.L.). Atmospheric concentrations showed a well-defined seasonal pattern, with the lowest concentrations (about 0.2 ppbv) occurring in the middle of the winter, which steadily increased to a maximum of nearly 2 ppbv in the summer. The ^{13}C content (delta ^{13}C) of HCOOH averaged -20.9 +/- 2.5 ^0/_{00 } during the growing season (April-September) and -23.2 +/- 3.5 ^0/_{00} during the non-growing season at Mount Lemmon. Isotopic measurements of formic acid from several other locations included two west coast marine sites ( delta ^{13} C range of -19.1 to -24.6 ^0/_{00} ), three Colorado Rocky Mountain samples averaging -23.2 +/- 1.0 ^0/_{00}, two from the prairie of North Dakota (-23.5 +/- 1.0 ^0/ _{00}) and three samples collected in the urban Tucson, Arizona area (- 20.8 +/- 3.4 ^0 /_{00}). Source measurements included HCOOH emissions from two species of formicine ants (-18.8 +/- 1.7 ^0/_ {00}), and HCOOH in automobile exhaust (-28 ^0/ _{00} from leaded gasoline, and -48.6 ^0/ _{00} from unleaded). Further support for a biogenic source of atmospheric HCOOH came from the carbon-14 analysis of six Mount Lemmon HCOOH samples (93-113% modern carbon), using accelerator

  19. Comparison of manufactured and black carbon nanoparticle concentrations in aquatic sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelmans, A.A.; Nowack, B.; Wiesner, M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we show that concentrations of manufactured carbon-based nanoparticles (MCNPs) in aquatic sediments will be negligible compared to levels of black carbon nanoparticles (BCNPs). This is concluded from model calculations accounting for MCNP sedimentation fluxes, removal rates due to

  20. Effects of carbon dioxide concentration and nutrition on photosynthetic functions of white birch seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, S. [Lakehead Univ., Thunder Bay, ON (Canada). Faculty of Forestry and the Forest Environment; Dang, Q.L. [Lakehead Univ., Thunder Bay, ON (Canada). Faculty of Forest and the Forest Environment; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. of Botany, Laboratory of Quantitative Vegetation Ecology

    2006-11-15

    Increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) can impact photosynthesis and dry mass production of plants. This study investigated the physiological responses of white birch seedlings to elevated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) at low and high supplies of nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K). A 2-way factorial experiment was carried out with birch seedlings grown for 4 months in environment-controlled greenhouses. Elevated CO{sub 2} enhanced maximal carboxylation rate and photosynthetically active radiation-saturated electron transport rates were measured after 2.5 and 3.5 months of treatment, as well as actual photochemical efficiency and photosynthetic linear electron transport to carboxylation. Net photosynthetic rate increases were observed as well as increases in photosynthetic water use efficiency (WUE); photosynthetic N efficiency and P efficiency. Stomatal conductance, transpiration rate and the fraction of total photosynthetic linear electron transport partitioned to oxygenation were reduced. Low nutrient availability decreased net photosynthetic rates, WUE, and triose phosphate utilization. However, photosynthetic linear electron transport and N use efficiency increased. There were significant interactive effects of CO{sub 2} and nutrition over time, with evidence of photosynthetic up-regulation in response to elevated CO{sub 2} in seedlings receiving high nutrition. Photosynthetic depression in response to low nutrient availability was attributed to biochemical limitation rather than stomatal limitation. Elevated CO{sub 2} reduced leaf N concentration in seedlings receiving low nutrition, but had no significant effect on leaf P or K concentrations. High nutrient availability generally increased area-based leaf N, P and K concentrations but had negligible effects on K after 2.5 months of treatment. Results suggested that increases in electron partitioning to photorespiration in response to low nutrient availability may be related to

  1. Carbon dynamics in highly heterotrophic subarctic thaw ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiha, T.; Laurion, I.; Rautio, M.

    2015-12-01

    Global warming has accelerated the formation of permafrost thaw ponds in several subarctic and arctic regions. These ponds are net heterotrophic as evidenced by their greenhouse gas (GHG) supersaturation levels (CO2 and CH4), and generally receive large terrestrial carbon inputs from the thawing and eroding permafrost. We measured seasonal and vertical variations in the concentration and type of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in five subarctic thaw (thermokarst) ponds in northern Quebec, and explored how environmental gradients influenced heterotrophic and phototrophic biomass and productivity. Late winter DOM had low aromaticity indicating reduced inputs of terrestrial carbon, while the high concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) suggests that some production of non-chromophoric dissolved compounds by the microbial food web took place under the ice cover. Summer DOM had a strong terrestrial signature, but was also characterized with significant inputs of algal-derived carbon, especially at the pond surface. During late winter, bacterial production was low (maximum of 0.8 mg C m-3 d-1) and was largely based on free-living bacterioplankton (58 %). Bacterial production in summer was high (up to 58 mg C m-3 d-1), dominated by particle-attached bacteria (67 %), and strongly correlated with the amount of terrestrial carbon. Primary production was restricted to summer surface waters due to strong light limitation deeper in the water column or in winter. The phototrophic biomass was equal to the heterotrophic biomass, but as the algae were mostly composed of mixotrophic species, most probably they used bacteria rather than solar energy in such shaded ponds. Our results point to a strong heterotrophic energy pathway in these thaw pond ecosystems, where bacterioplankton dominates the production of new carbon biomass in both summer and winter.

  2. Estimating dissolved organic carbon concentration in turbid coastal waters using optical remote sensing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherukuru, Nagur; Ford, Phillip W.; Matear, Richard J.; Oubelkheir, Kadija; Clementson, Lesley A.; Suber, Ken; Steven, Andrew D. L.

    2016-10-01

    Dissolved Organic Carbon (DOC) is an important component in the global carbon cycle. It also plays an important role in influencing the coastal ocean biogeochemical (BGC) cycles and light environment. Studies focussing on DOC dynamics in coastal waters are data constrained due to the high costs associated with in situ water sampling campaigns. Satellite optical remote sensing has the potential to provide continuous, cost-effective DOC estimates. In this study we used a bio-optics dataset collected in turbid coastal waters of Moreton Bay (MB), Australia, during 2011 to develop a remote sensing algorithm to estimate DOC. This dataset includes data from flood and non-flood conditions. In MB, DOC concentration varied over a wide range (20-520 μM C) and had a good correlation (R2 = 0.78) with absorption due to coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and remote sensing reflectance. Using this data set we developed an empirical algorithm to derive DOC concentrations from the ratio of Rrs(412)/Rrs(488) and tested it with independent datasets. In this study, we demonstrate the ability to estimate DOC using remotely sensed optical observations in turbid coastal waters.

  3. Transcriptome profiling of the microalga Chlorella pyrenoidosa in response to different carbon dioxide concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xue; Shen, Jia; Bai, Fengwei; Xu, Nianjun

    2016-10-01

    To enrich our knowledge of carbon dioxide (CO2)-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in eukaryotic algae, we used high-throughput sequencing to investigate the transcriptome profiling of the microalga Chlorella pyrenoidosa (Chlorophyta) response to different CO2 levels. Altogether, 53.86 million (M) and 62.10M clean short reads of 100 nucleotides (nt) were generated from this microalga cultured at 4-fold air CO2 (control) and air CO2 concentrations by Illumina sequencing. A total of 32,662 unigenes were assembled from the two pooled samples. With an E-value cut-off of 1e-5, 9590, 6782, 5954, and 9092 unigenes were annotated in NR, Gene Ontology (GO), Eukaryotic Cluster of Orthologous Groups of proteins (KOG), and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases, respectively. After screening, 51 differentially expressed unigenes were up-regulated and 8 were down-regulated in the air CO2 group, relative to the control. The transcript levels of eight differentially expressed unigenes were validated by real-time quantitative PCR, which manifested that thioredoxin-like protein, laminin subunit beta-1, and chlorophyll a/b binding protein might be associated with the utilization of inorganic carbon at low CO2 levels.

  4. Variation in the concentration and age of nonstructural carbon stored in different tree tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Andrew; Carbone, Mariah; Huggett, Brett; Furze, Morgan; Czimczik, Claudia I.; Xu, Xiaomei

    2014-05-01

    Trees store nonstructural carbon (NSC), in the form of sugars and starch, in the ray parenchyma cells of woody tissues. These reserves provide a carbon buffer when demand (growth, protection, or metabolism) exceeds supply (photosynthesis). This is particularly important in the context of resilience to stress and disturbance, such as might be associated with various global change factors. However, storage allocation processes and the availability of stored reserves remain poorly understood in woody plants. To better understand how NSC reserves are distributed throughout the tree, and the degree to which NSC reserves mix across ring boundaries and tissue types, we destructively sampled two 30-year-old trees (one red oak, Quercus rubra L., and one white pine, Pinus strobus L.) growing at Harvard Forest, an oak-dominated temperate forest in the northeastern United States. We analyzed stemwood samples (divided into individual rings, bark, and phloem), coarse and fine branches, and coarse (separated into three depths) and fine roots for concentrations of total sugars and starch. For a subset of samples we used the radiocarbon (14C) "bomb spike" method to estimate the mean age of extracted sugars and starch. In oak, stemwood sugar and starch concentrations were highest (50 mg/g) in the youngest (most recently-formed) rings, and dropped off rapidly (to 10 mg/g or less) across the 10 most recent rings. In oak phloem tissue, sugar concentrations were high (90 mg/g) compared to starch (10 mg/g). In pine, sugar concentrations dropped off rapidly across the three most recent rings (from 30 mg/g to 10 mg/g) whereas starch concentrations were low even for the youngest rings (10 mg/g or less). In pine, phloem concentrations of both sugar (190 mg/g) and starch (20 mg/g) were both substantially higher than in oak. Such strong radial trends must be accounted for when scaling up to whole-tree budgets, as whole increment cores cannot properly integrate (on a ring-area basis) across the

  5. Carbon dioxide capture and nutrients removal utilizing treated sewage by concentrated microalgae cultivation in a membrane photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Ryo; Boonnorat, Jarungwit; Chiemchaisri, Chart; Chiemchaisri, Wilai; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2012-12-01

    A highly efficient microalgae cultivation process was developed for carbon dioxide capture using nutrients from treated sewage. A submerged-membrane filtration system was installed in a photobioreactor to achieve high nutrient loading and to maintain a high concentration and production of microalgae. Chlorella vulgaris, Botryococcus braunii and Spirulina platensis were continuously cultivated with simulated treated sewage and 1%-CO(2) gas. The optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT) and solids retention time (SRT) were explored to achieve the maximum CO(2) capture rate, nutrient removal rate and microalgae biomass productivity. The carbon dioxide capture rate and volumetric microalgae productivity were high when the reactor was operated under 1-day (HRT) and 18-days (SRT) conditions. The independent control of HRT and SRT is effective for efficient microalgae cultivation and carbon dioxide capture using treated sewage.

  6. Allowable carbon emissions for medium-to-high mitigation scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tachiiri, Kaoru; Hargreaves, Julia C.; Annan, James D.; Kawamiya, Michio [Research Inst. for Global Change, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokohama, (Japan)], e-mail: tachiiri@jamstec.go.jp; Huntingford, Chris [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Wallingford (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-15

    Using an ensemble of simulations with an intermediate complexity climate model and in a probabilistic framework, we estimate future ranges of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in order to follow three medium-high mitigation concentration pathways: RCP2.6, RCP4.5 and SCP4.5 to 2.6. Uncertainty is first estimated by allowing modelled equilibrium climate sensitivity, aerosol forcing and intrinsic physical and biogeochemical processes to vary within widely accepted ranges. Results are then constrained by comparison against contemporary measurements. For both constrained and unconstrained projections, our calculated allowable emissions are close to the standard (harmonised) emission scenarios associated with these pathways. For RCP4.5, which is the most moderate scenario considered in terms of required emission abatement, then after year 2100 very low net emissions are needed to maintain prescribed year 2100 CO{sub 2} concentrations. As expected, RCP2.6 and SCP4.5 to 2.6 require more strict emission reductions. The implication of this is that direct sequestration of carbon dioxide is likely to be required for RCP4.5 or higher mitigation scenarios, to offset any minimum emissions for society to function (the 'emissions floor'). Despite large uncertainties in the physical and biogeochemical processes, constraints from model-observational comparisons support a high degree of confidence in predicting the allowable emissions consistent with a particular concentration pathway. In contrast the uncertainty in the resulting temperature range remains large. For many parameter sets, and especially for RCP2.6, the land will turn into a carbon source within the twenty first century, but the ocean will remain as a carbon sink. For land carbon storage and our modelling framework, major reductions are seen in northern high latitudes and the Amazon basin even after atmospheric CO{sub 2} is stabilised, while for ocean carbon uptake, the tropical ocean regions will be a

  7. Inactivation of L. fructivorans in Sake Using a Continuous Flow System for High-Pressure Carbonation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    TANIMOTO, Shota; MATSUMOTO, Hideyuki; FUJII, Kazuyoshi; OHDOI, Ritsushi; SAKAMOTO, Koji; YAMANE, Yuichi; MIYAKE, Masaki; SHIMODA, Mitsuya; OSAJIMA, Yutaka

    2007-01-01

    ...) quality, was investigated using a continuous flow system for high-pressure carbonation. In addition, the effects of ethanol and sugar concentration on lactic acid bacteria inactivation were investigated. Cells of L. fructivorans (1×106CFU/ml...

  8. Residual stress in high modulus carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, K. J.; Diefendorf, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    The modulus and residual strain in carbon fibers are measured by successively electrochemically milling away the fiber surface. Electrochemical etching is found to remove the carbon fiber surface very uniformly, in contrast to air and wet oxidation. The precision of fiber diameter measurements is improved by using a laser diffraction technique instead of optical methods. More precise diameter measurements reveal that past correlations of diameter and fiber modulus are largely measurement artifact. The moduli of most carbon fibers decrease after the outer layers of the fibers are removed. Owing to experimental difficulties, the moduli and strengths of the fibers at their centers are not determined, and moduli are estimated on the basis of microstructure. The calculated residual stresses are found to be insensitive to these moduli estimates as well as the exact form of regression equation used to describe the moduli and residual strain distributions. Axial compressive residual stresses are found to be very high for some higher modulus carbon fibers. It is pointed out that the compressive stress makes the fibers insensitive to surface flaws when loaded in tension but it may initiate failure by buckling when loaded in compression.

  9. How low can you go? Assessing minimum concentrations of NSC in carbon limited tree saplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Guenter; Hartmann, Henrik; Schwendener, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    Tissue concentrations of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) are frequently used to determine the carbon balance of plants. Over the last years, an increasing number of studies have inferred carbon starvation in trees under environmental stress like drought from low tissue NSC concentrations. However, such inferences are limited by the fact that minimum concentrations of NSC required for survival are not known. So far, it was hypothesized that even under lethal carbon starvation, starch and low molecular sugar concentrations cannot be completely depleted and that minimum NSC concentrations at death vary across tissues and species. Here we present results of an experiment that aimed to determine minimum NSC concentrations in different tissues of saplings of two broad-leaved tree species (Acer pseudoplatanus and Quercus petratea) exposed to lethal carbon starvation via continuous darkening. In addition, we investigated recovery rates of NSC concentrations in saplings that had been darkened for different periods of time and were then re-exposed to light. Both species survived continuous darkening for about 12 weeks (confirmed by testing the ability to re-sprout after darkness). In all investigated tissues, starch concentrations declined close to zero within three to six weeks of darkness. Low molecular sugars also decreased strongly within the first weeks of darkness, but seemed to stabilize at low concentrations of 0.5 to 2 % dry matter (depending on tissue and species) almost until death. NSC concentrations recovered surprisingly fast in saplings that were re-exposed to light. After 3 weeks of continuous darkness, tissue NSC concentrations recovered within 6 weeks to levels of unshaded control saplings in all tissues and in both species. To our knowledge, this study represents the first experimental attempt to quantify minimum tissue NSC concentrations at lethal carbon starvation. Most importantly, our results suggest that carbon-starved tree saplings are able to

  10. Arsenic Adsorption Equilibrium Concentration and Adsorption Rate of Activated Carbon Coated with Ferric-Aluminum Hydroxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Oguma, T.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    In some areas of developing countries, ground or well water contaminated with arsenic has been reluctantly used as drinking water. It is highly desirable that effective and inexpensive arsenic removal agents should be developed and provided to reduce the potential health risk. Previous studies demonstrated that activated carbon coated with ferric-aluminum hydroxides (Fe-Al-C) has high adsorptive potential for removal of arsenic. In this study, a series of experiments using Fe-Al-C were carried to discuss adsorption equilibrium time, adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorption rate of arsenic for Fe-Al-C. Fe-Al-C used in this study was provided by Astec Co., Ltd. Powder reagent of disodium hydrogen arsenate heptahydrate was dissolved into ion-exchanged water. The solution was then further diluted with ion-exchanged water to be 1 and 10 mg/L as arsenic concentration. The pH of the solution was adjusted to be around 7 by adding HCl and/or NaOH. The solution was used as artificial arsenic contaminated water in two types of experiments (arsenic adsorption equilibrium and arsenic adsorption rate tests). The results of the arsenic equilibrium tests were showed that a time period of about 3 days to reach apparent adsorption equilibrium for arsenic. The apparent adsorption equilibrium concentration and adsorbed amount of arsenic on Fe-Al-C adsorbent could be estimated by application of various adsorption isotherms, but the distribution coefficient of arsenic between solid and liquid varies with experimental conditions such as initial concentration of arsenic and addition concentration of adsorbent. An adsorption rate equation that takes into account the reduction in the number of effective adsorption sites on the adsorbent caused by the arsenic adsorption reaction was derived based on the data obtained from the arsenic adsorption rate tests.

  11. Effects of elevated CO2 concentration and nitrogen supply on biomass and active carbon of freshwater marsh after two growing seasons in Sanjiang plain, Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Guangying; LIU Jingshuang; WANG Yang; DOU Jingxin; DONG Xiaoyong

    2009-01-01

    An experiment was carried out with treatments differing in nitrogen supply (0, 5 and 15 g N/m2) and CO2 level (350 and 700 μmol/mol) using OTC (open top chamber) equipment to investigate the biomass of Calamagrostis angustifolia and soil active carbon contents after two years. The results showed that elevated CO2 concentration increased the biomass of C. angustifolia and the magnitude of response varied with each growth period. Elevated CO2 concentration has increased aboveground biomass by 16.7% and 17.6% during the jointing and heading periods and only 3.5% and 9.4% during dough and maturity periods. The increases in belowground biomass due to CO2 elevation was 26.5%, 34.0% and 28.7% during the heading, dough and maturity periods, respectively. The response of biomass to enhanced CO2 concentration differed in N levels. Both the increase of aboveground biomass and belowground biomass were greater under high level of N supply (15 g N/m2). Elevated CO2 concentration also increased the allocation of biomass and carbon in root. Under elevated CO2 concentration, the average values of active carbon tended to increase. The increases of soil active soil contents followed the sequence of Microbial biomass carbon (10.6%) > dissolved organic carbon (7.5%) > oxidable labile carbon (6.6%) > carbohydrate carbon (4.1%). Stepwise regressions indicated there were significant correlations between the soil active carbon contents and plant biomass. Particularly, microbial carbon, oxidable labile carbon and carbohydrate carbon were found to be correlated with belowground biomass, while dissolved organic carbon has correlation with aboveground biomass. Therefore, increased biomass was regarded as the main driving force for the increase in soil active organic carbon under elevated CO2 concentration.

  12. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration: effects of increased carbon input in a Lolium perenne soil on microorganisms and decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van J.H.; Gorissen, A.; Polci, D.

    2000-01-01

    Effects of ambient and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (350 and 700 μl l-1) on net carbon input into soil, the production of root-derived material and the subsequent microbial transformation were investigated. Perennial ryegrass plants (L. perenne L.) were labelled in a continuously labelled

  13. Elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration: effects of increased carbon input in a Lolium perenne soil on microorganisms and decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginkel, van J.H.; Gorissen, A.; Polci, D.

    2000-01-01

    Effects of ambient and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations (350 and 700 μl l-1) on net carbon input into soil, the production of root-derived material and the subsequent microbial transformation were investigated. Perennial ryegrass plants (L. perenne L.) were labelled in a continuously labelled

  14. Influence of Nitric Acid Concentration on Characteristics of Olive Stone Based Activated Carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nouha Soudani; Souad Souissi-najar; Abdelmottaleb Ouederni

    2013-01-01

    In this work we investigated the effect of nitric acid concentration on the pore structure, surface chemis-try and liquid phase adsorption of olive stone based activated carbon prepared by mixing process using phosphoric acid and steam as activating agents. Chemicals and textural characterization show that the increase of HNO3 con-centration increases considerably the total acidic groups but decreases specific surface area and pore volume. The study of adsorption in aqueous solutions of two organics, phenol and methylene blue, on raw and oxidized activated carbon indicates that the treatment of mixed activated carbon with different concentrations of nitric acid improves the adsorbent capacity for methylene blue at HNO3 concentrations less or equal to 2 mol·L-1, while it has a negative effect on phenol adsorption.

  15. Application of Hydrothermal Treatment to High Concentrated Sewage Sludge for Anaerobic Digestion Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Orikawa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomato and seaweed were produced by utilizing CO2 and heat discharged from power generation using biogas in Toyogawa biomass park, Japan. The biogas was obtained by anaerobic digestion with hydrothermal treatment. The hydrothermal treatment was applied to the high concentrated sewage sludge (22 % total solids (TS dewatered sludge. The purpose of this study is to clarify the effect of hydrothermal treatment on the qualities of high concentrated sewage sludge, by analyzing particulate organic carbon (POC and dissolved organic carbon (DOC. The hydrothermal treatment was investigated under 10-60 min of treatment time, 180-200 °C of temperature, 10-22 %-TS of sewage sludge concentration. The results showed that the DOC in each conditions increased through hydrothermal treatment. The highest DOC obtained was 67 % of total carbon concentration, when the temperature was 180 °C, treatment time was 60 min and sewage sludge concentration was 10 %-TS. Furthermore, the viscosity of treated sewage sludge was decreased by hydrothermal treatment. In batch anaerobic digestion test, methane gas production was confirmed. In addition, this study evaluated the energy balance of this system. Thus, the results of this study indicated that the possibility of application of hydrothermal treatment to high concentrated sewage sludge for anaerobic digestion process. Keywords: anaerobic reaction, hydrothermal treatment, sewage sludge, solubilization

  16. Factors Impeding Enzymatic Wheat Gluten Hydrolysis at High Solid Concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hardt, N.A.; Janssen, A.E.M.; Boom, R.M.; Goot, van der A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Enzymatic wheat gluten hydrolysis at high solid concentrations is advantageous from an environmental and economic point of view. However, increased wheat gluten concentrations result in a concentration effect with a decreased hydrolysis rate at constant enzyme-to-substrate ratios and a decreased

  17. Effect of tooth-bleaching on the carbonate concentration in dental enamel by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Koudriavtsev, Tatiana; Herrera-Sancho, Óscar-Andrey

    2017-01-01

    Background There are not many studies evaluating the effects of surface treatments at the molecular level. The aim of this in vitro study was to analyze the concentration of carbonate molecules in dental enamel by Raman spectroscopy after the application of in-office and home whitening agents. Material and Methods Sixty human teeth were randomly divided into six groups and exposed to three different home bleaching gels (Day White) and three in-office whitening agents (Zoom! Whitespeed and PolaOffice) according to the manufacturer´s instructions. The concentration of carbonate molecules in enamel was measured prior to and during the treatment by means of Raman spectroscopy. Statistical analysis included repeated measures analysis of variance (p≤0.05) and Bonferroni pairwise comparisons. Results At home bleaching agents depicted a decrease in the carbonate molecule. This decrease was statistically significant for the bleaching gel with the highest hydrogen peroxide concentration (p≤0,05). In-office whitening agents caused an increase in carbonate, which was significant for all three groups (p≤0,05). Conclusions In-office bleaching gels seem to cause a gain in carbonate of the enamel structure, whilst at-home whitening gels caused a loss in carbonate. Key words:Bleaching, whitening, hydrogen peroxide, carbamide peroxide, Raman spectroscopy, carbonate.

  18. High activity carbon sorbents for mercury capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George G. Stavropoulos; Irene S. Diamantopoulou; George E. Skodras; George P. Sakellaropoulos [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece). Chemical Process Engineering Laboratory

    2006-07-01

    High efficiency activated carbons have been prepared for removing mercury from gas streams. Starting materials used were petroleum coke, lignite, charcoal and olive seed waste, and were chemically activated with KOH. Produced adsorbents were primarily characterized for their porosity by N{sub 2} adsorption at 77K. Their mercury retention capacity was characterized based on the breakthrough curves. Compared with typical commercial carbons, they have exhibited considerably enhanced mercury adsorption capacity. An attempt has been made to correlate mercury entrapment and pore structure. It has been shown that physical surface area is increased during activation in contrast to the mercury adsorption capacity that initially increases and tends to decrease at latter stages. Desorption of active sites may be responsible for this behavior. 10 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  19. High power density carbonate fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuh, C.; Johnsen, R.; Doyon, J.; Allen, J. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Carbonate fuel cell is a highly efficient and environmentally clean source of power generation. Many organizations worldwide are actively pursuing the development of the technology. Field demonstration of multi-MW size power plant has been initiated in 1996, a step toward commercialization before the turn of the century, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) is planning to introduce a 2.85MW commercial fuel cell power plant with an efficiency of 58%, which is quite attractive for distributed power generation. However, to further expand competitive edge over alternative systems and to achieve wider market penetration, ERC is exploring advanced carbonate fuel cells having significantly higher power densities. A more compact power plant would also stimulate interest in new markets such as ships and submarines where space limitations exist. The activities focused on reducing cell polarization and internal resistance as well as on advanced thin cell components.

  20. Proteomic analysis of carbon concentrating chemolithotrophic bacteria Serratia sp. for sequestration of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Randhir K; Srivastava, Shaili; Thakur, Indu Shekhar

    2014-01-01

    A chemolithotrophic bacterium enriched in the chemostat in presence of sodium bicarbonate as sole carbon source was identified as Serratia sp. by 16S rRNA sequencing. Carbon dioxide sequestering capacity of bacterium was detected by carbonic anhydrase enzyme and ribulose-1, 5- bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO). The purified carbonic anhydrase showed molecular weight of 29 kDa. Molecular weight of RuBisCO was 550 kDa as determined by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC), however, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed presence of two subunits whose molecular weights were 56 and 14 kDa. The Western blot analysis of the crude protein and purified sample cross reacted with RuBisCO large-subunit polypeptides antibodies showed strong band pattern at molecular weight around 56 kDa regions. Whole cell soluble proteins of Serratia sp. grown under autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/MS for differential expression of proteins. In proteomic analysis of 63 protein spots, 48 spots were significantly up-regulated in the autotrophically grown cells; seven enzymes showed its utilization in autotrophic carbon fixation pathways and other metabolic activities of bacterium including lipid metabolisms indicated sequestration potency of carbon dioxide and production of biomaterials.

  1. Proteomic analysis of carbon concentrating chemolithotrophic bacteria Serratia sp. for sequestration of carbon dioxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randhir K Bharti

    Full Text Available A chemolithotrophic bacterium enriched in the chemostat in presence of sodium bicarbonate as sole carbon source was identified as Serratia sp. by 16S rRNA sequencing. Carbon dioxide sequestering capacity of bacterium was detected by carbonic anhydrase enzyme and ribulose-1, 5- bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO. The purified carbonic anhydrase showed molecular weight of 29 kDa. Molecular weight of RuBisCO was 550 kDa as determined by fast protein liquid chromatography (FPLC, however, sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE showed presence of two subunits whose molecular weights were 56 and 14 kDa. The Western blot analysis of the crude protein and purified sample cross reacted with RuBisCO large-subunit polypeptides antibodies showed strong band pattern at molecular weight around 56 kDa regions. Whole cell soluble proteins of Serratia sp. grown under autotrophic and heterotrophic conditions were resolved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF/MS for differential expression of proteins. In proteomic analysis of 63 protein spots, 48 spots were significantly up-regulated in the autotrophically grown cells; seven enzymes showed its utilization in autotrophic carbon fixation pathways and other metabolic activities of bacterium including lipid metabolisms indicated sequestration potency of carbon dioxide and production of biomaterials.

  2. Corrosion by concentrated sulfuric acid in carbon steel pipes and tanks: state of the art

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panossian, Zehbour; Almeida, Neusvaldo Lira de; Sousa, Raquel Maria Ferreira de [Instituto de Pesquisas Tecnologicas (IPT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pimenta, Gutemberg de Souza [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas e Desenvolvimento (CENPES); Marques, Leandro Bordalo Schmidt [PETROBRAS Engenharia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    PETROBRAS, allied to the policy of reduction of emission of pollutants, has been adjusting the processes of the new refineries to obtain products with lower sulfur content. Thus, the sulfur dioxide, extracted from the process gases of a new refinery to be built in the Northeast, will be used to produce sulfuric acid with concentration between (94-96) %. This acid will be stored in carbon steel tanks and transported through a buried 8-km carbon steel pipe from the refinery to a pier, where it will be loaded onto ships and sent to the consumer markets. Therefore, the corrosion resistance of carbon steel by concentrated acid will become a great concern for the mentioned storage and transportation. When the carbon steel comes into contact with concentrated sulfuric acid, there is an immediate acid attack with the formation of hydrogen gas and ferrous ions which, in turn, forms a protective layer of FeSO{sub 4} on the metallic surface. The durability of the tanks and pipes made of carbon steel will depend on the preservation of this protective layer. This work presents a review of the carbon steel corrosion in concentrated sulfuric acid and discusses the preventive methods against this corrosion, including anodic protection. (author)

  3. Seasonal Variations of Atmospheric Black Carbon Concentrations and Implications for Nutrient Inputs and Organic Carbon Partitioning in the Marine Coastal Ecosystem of Halong Bay, North Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, X.; Thuoc, C. V.; Guinot, B. P.; Brune, J.; Lefebvre, J. P.; Raimbault, P.; Niggemann, J.; Dittmar, T.

    2016-02-01

    Black Carbon (BC) is an aerosol emitted during biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion. On a global scale, BC deposits on the ocean at a rate of 12-45 Tg per year, with higher fluxes in the northern hemisphere and in inter-tropical regions, following the occurrence of hotspots of atmospheric BC concentration. In the present study conducted in a coastal site located in a regional hotspot of atmospheric BC concentration, North Vietnam, we monitored the seasonal variations of atmospheric and marine BC during an annual cycle. Atmospheric BC followed a seasonal pattern characterized by high concentrations during the dry season, i.e. from October to April, and low concentrations during the wet season, i.e. from May to September. This trend is linked to a change in wind regime, with air masses originating from the North during the dry season and from the South during the wet season. On average, the contribution of BC to the particulate and the dissolved organic carbon pools was 43% and 3%, respectively. The concentration of particulate BC (PBC) was on average 50 times higher in the surface microlayer (SML) than in the water column. In the water column, the concentration of PBC was higher during the dry season than the wet season, which is consistent with variations of atmospheric BC concentrations. On the contrary, the concentration of dissolved BC (DBC) was lower during the dry season than the wet season. This seasonal pattern suggests that PBC concentration in coastal marine systems depends upon atmospheric BC concentration, while increased DBC concentration is linked to rainy conditions. The deposition of BC during the dry season was concomitant with a strong enrichment of organic phosphorus in the SML. During the annual cycle, the POC:DOC ratio was positively correlated with the concentration of PBC, suggesting adsorption of DOC onto BC particles and formation of POC via stimulation of aggregation processes.

  4. Concentrations and characteristics of organic carbon in surface water in Arizona: Influence of urbanization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhoff, P.; Anning, D.

    2000-01-01

    Dissolved (DOC) and total (TOC) organic carbon concentrations and compositions were studied for several river systems in Arizona, USA. DOC composition was characterized by ultraviolet and visible absorption and fluorescence emission (excitation wavelength of 370 nm) spectra characteristics. Ephemeral sites had the highest DOC concentrations, and unregulated perennial sites had lower concentrations than unregulated intermittent sites, regulated sites, and sites downstream from wastewater-treatment plants (p wastewater-treatment plant effluent were higher in DOC concentration (p wastewater-treatment plants) was found to affect temporal variability in DOC concentration and composition. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.Dissolved (DOC) and total (TOC) organic carbon concentrations and compositions were studied for several river systems in Arizona, USA. DOC composition was characterized by ultraviolet and visible absorption and fluorescence emission (excitation wavelength of 370 nm) spectra characteristics. Ephemeral sites had the highest DOC concentrations, and unregulated perennial sites had lower concentrations than unregulated intermittent sites, regulated sites, and sites downstream from wastewater-treatment plants (pwastewater-treatment plant effluent were higher in DOC concentration (pwastewater-treatment plants) was found to affect temporal variability in DOC concentration and composition.The influence of urbanization, becoming increasingly common in arid regions, on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in surface water resources was studied. DOC concentration and composition, seasonal watershed runoff events, streamflow variations, water management practices, and urban infrastructure in several Arizona watersheds were monitored. Ephemeral sites had the highest DOC levels, and unregulated perennial sites and lower concentrations than unregulated intermittent sites, regulated sites, and sites downstream from wastewater treatment plants. Reservoir outflows

  5. Refractive Secondary Solar Concentrator Demonstrated High-Temperature Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wayne A.

    2002-01-01

    Space applications that utilize solar thermal energy--such as electric power conversion systems, thermal propulsion systems, and furnaces--require highly efficient solar concentration systems. The NASA Glenn Research Center is developing the refractive secondary concentrator, which uses refraction and total internal reflection to efficiently concentrate and direct solar energy. When used in combination with advanced lightweight primary concentrators, such as inflatable thin films, the refractive secondary concentrator enables very high system concentration ratios and very high temperatures. Last year, Glenn successfully demonstrated a secondary concentrator throughput efficiency of 87 percent, with a projected efficiency of 93 percent using an antireflective coating. Building on this achievement, Glenn recently successfully demonstrated high-temperature operation of the secondary concentrator when it was used to heat a rhenium receiver to 2330 F. The high-temperature demonstration of the concentrator was conducted in Glenn's 68-ft long Tank 6 thermal vacuum facility equipped with a solar simulator. The facility has a rigid panel primary concentrator that was used to concentrate the light from the solar simulator onto the refractive secondary concentrator. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center provided a rhenium cavity, part of a solar thermal propulsion engine, to serve as the high-temperature receiver. The prototype refractive secondary concentrator, measuring 3.5 in. in diameter and 11.2 in. long, is made of single-crystal sapphire. A water-cooled splash shield absorbs spillage light outside of the 3.5-in. concentrator aperture. Multilayer foil insulation composed of tungsten, molybdenum, and niobium is used to minimize heat loss from the hightemperature receiver. A liquid-cooled canister calorimeter is used to measure the heat loss through the multilayer foil insulation.

  6. Comparison of black carbon (BC) aerosols in two urban areas - concentrations and size distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitzenberger, R.; Tohno, S.

    In this study, the BC aerosol measured at two very different urban sites is compared in terms of concentration, seasonal variation, and size distribution. During a 14 month study, one impactor sample was performed each month on a day with typical meteorological conditions. One (Vienna) or three (Uji) filter samples were obtained during the sampling time of the impactors. BC concentration in both the filter and impactor samples was analyzed with an optical technique (integrating sphere technique), where a calibration curve obtained from commercial carbon black is used to convert the optical signal to BC mass. Gravimetric mass concentration was measured at both sites. The gravimetric mass size distribution was measured only in Vienna. At both sites, the yearly average of the BC concentration on the sampling days was around 5 μg m -3. In Vienna, some seasonal trend with high concentrations during the cold season was observed, while in Uji, no pronounced seasonal trend was found. The BC size distribution in Uji was distinctly bimodal in the submicron size range. Log-normal distributions were fitted through the impactor data. The average BC mass median diameters (MMD) of the two submicron modes were 0.15 and 0.39 μm. Each mode contained about the same amount of BC mass. In Vienna only one submicron BC mode (average MMD 0.3 μm) was found because of the low size resolution of the impactor. An analysis of humidity effects on the MMDs of BC (both sites) and gravimetric mass (Vienna only) indicates that the Vienna aerosol is partly mixed internally with respect to BC, while the Uji aerosol seems to be externally mixed.

  7. Fabrication and tolerances of optics for high concentration photovoltaics

    OpenAIRE

    Benitez Gimenez, Pablo; Miñano Dominguez, Juan Carlos; Ahmadpanaih, Hamed; Mendes Lopes, Joao; Zamora Herranz, Pablo

    2014-01-01

    High Concentration Photovoltaics (HCPV) require an optical system with high efficiency, low cost and large tolerance. We describe the particularities of the HCPV applications, which constrain the optics design and the manufacturing techonologies.

  8. Black carbon concentrations across the tropical Atlantic boundary layer using three methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, K.; Lohmann, R.; Cantwell, M.; Herckes, P.

    2012-12-01

    24 particulate black carbon (BC) samples were quantified using three methods: a chemo-thermal oxidation at 375°C (CTO-375), a thermal optical transition method (Sunset Method), and pyrene fluorescence loss (PFL). BC samples were taken using a high-volume air sampler aboard the R/V Endeavor during the summer of 2010 in the Equatorial Atlantic Ocean in order to sample the aeolian "hotspot" plume of aerosols that extend from the African continent. Models have shown that annual elemental carbon (EC) deposition fluxes in this area could be as high as 25μg cm-2 a-1, which may be a significant contribution to the overall carbon budget as well as climate forcing simulations. Expected BC concentrations for this area, based on a global BC inventory using the MOGUNTIA global transport model, range between 0.01-1μg/m3 depending on season. The CTO-375 processed samples were run on an IRMS to get the total organic carbon (TOC), BC concentrations, and δ13C isotope ratios. BC was detected in every sample and concentrations ranged between 0.16-9.97μg/m3. BC concentrations were highest off the coast of the US and Caribbean islands but were lower (0.16-0.26μg/m3) in the African plume sampled between 1-5°N and 21-29°W. BC comprised between 13-81% of the TOC pool and δ13C isotopes between the TOC and BC for each sample differed by no more than 3‰. The TOC and BC pools average was -28.9‰ and -28.1‰ respectively, suggesting a C4 plant origin. A different isotope trend was evident for samples 16-19 (African plume). Their δ13C average was -23.1‰ for TOC, suggesting a mostly marine origin of the organic carbon or a mix of marine with C3 and C4 plants. This supports the observed lower BC/TOC ratio in these samples (13-50%). EC concentrations determined by the Sunset Method ranged between 0-0.32μg/m3, with EC being detected in only 8 of the 24 samples. In general, EC was found above the detection limit near the United States coastline or in the "hotspot" plume off Africa

  9. Recrystallization of High Carbon Steel during High Strain Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The recrystallization of high carbon steel during high temperature and high speed rolling has been studied by analyzing the stress-strain curves and the austenite grain size.Isothermal multi-pass hot compression at high strain rate was carried out by Gleeble-2000. The austenite grain size was measured by IBAS image analysis system. The results show that static recrystallization occurred at interpass time under pre-finish rolling, and at the finish rolling stage, due to the brief interpass time, static recrystallization can not be found.

  10. A method for monitoring mass concentration of black carbon particulate matter using photothermal interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baosheng; Wang, Yicheng; Li, Zhengqiang

    2016-03-01

    A method for measurements of mass concentration of black carbon particulate matter (PM) is proposed based on photothermal interferometry (PTI). A folded Jamin photothermal interferometer was used with a laser irradiation of particles deposited on a filter paper. The black carbon PM deposited on the filter paper was regarded as a film while the quartz filter paper was regarded as a substrate to establish a mathematical model for measuring the mass concentration of PM using a photothermal method. The photothermal interferometry system was calibrated and used to measure the atmospheric PM concentration corresponding to different dust-treated filter paper. The measurements were compared to those obtained using β ray method and were found consistent. This method can be particularly relevant to polluted atmospheres where PM is dominated by black carbon.

  11. Dynamic responses of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration to global temperature changes between 1850 and 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weile; Nemani, Ramakrishna

    2016-02-01

    Changes in Earth's temperature have significant impacts on the global carbon cycle that vary at different time scales, yet to quantify such impacts with a simple scheme is traditionally deemed difficult. Here, we show that, by incorporating a temperature sensitivity parameter (1.64 ppm yr-1 °C-1) into a simple linear carbon-cycle model, we can accurately characterize the dynamic responses of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration to anthropogenic carbon emissions and global temperature changes between 1850 and 2010 ( r 2 > 0.96 and the root-mean-square error reservoir (~12 year) approximates the long-term temperature sensitivity of global atmospheric CO2 concentration (~15 ppm °C-1), generally consistent with previous estimates based on reconstructed CO2 and climate records over the Little Ice Age. Our results suggest that recent increases in global surface temperatures, which accelerate the release of carbon from the surface reservoirs into the atmosphere, have partially offset surface carbon uptakes enhanced by the elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and slowed the net rate of atmospheric CO2 sequestration by global land and oceans by ~30% since the 1960s. The linear modeling framework outlined in this paper thus provides a useful tool to diagnose the observed atmospheric CO2 dynamics and monitor their future changes.

  12. Adsorption of ultra-low concentration malodorous substances using coal-derived granular activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urano, K.; Maeda, T.; Yamashita, H.; Hagio, S.; Arioka, A.

    1986-01-01

    The experimental adsorption is reported of diosmin and 2-methylisoborneol using two types of coal-derived granular activated carbon and one derived from coconut husk. It was discovered that carbons with more pores below 15 angstroms in size gave a higher equilibrium adsorption of malodorous substances at mg/l concentrations. It was also found that the coal-derived materials, which contained more pores larger than 15 angstroms, gave faster adsorption. Given that the coal-derived carbons have a longer service life, it is concluded that they are suitable for use in full-scale adsorption plant where contact times are short. 3 references, 5 figures, 5 tables.

  13. Estimating Terrestrial Wood Biomass from Observed Concentrations of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, K. M.; Peters, W.; Carvalhais, N.; van der Werf, G.; Miller, J.

    2008-12-01

    We estimate terrestrial disequilibrium state and wood biomass from observed concentrations of atmospheric CO2 using the CarbonTracker system coupled to the SiBCASA biophysical model. Starting with a priori estimates of carbon flux from the land, ocean, and fossil fuels, CarbonTracker estimates net carbon sources and sinks from 2000 to 2007 that are optimally consistent with observed CO2 concentrations. The a priori terrestrial Net Primary Productivity (NPP) and heterotrophic respiration (Rh) from SiBCASA assume steady state conditions for initial biomass, implying mature ecosystems with no disturbances where growth balances decay and the long-term, net carbon flux is zero. In reality, harvest, fires, and other disturbances reduce available biomass for decay, thus reducing Rh and resulting in a long-term carbon sink. The disequilibrium state is the ratio of Rh estimated from CarbonTracker to the steady state Rh from SiBCASA. Wood is the largest carbon pool in forest ecosystems and the dominant source of dead organic matter to the soil and litter pools. With much faster turnover times, the soil and litter pools reach equilibrium relative to the wood pool long before the wood pool itself reaches equilibrium. We take advantage of this quasi-steady state to estimate the size of the wood pool that will produce an Rh that corresponds to the net carbon sink from CarbonTracker. We then compare this estimated wood biomass to regional maps of observed above ground wood biomass from the US Forest Inventory Analysis.

  14. Highly efficient electroosmotic flow through functionalized carbon nanotube membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ji; Gerstandt, Karen; Majumder, Mainak; Zhan, Xin; Hinds, Bruce J.

    2011-08-01

    Carbon nanotube membranes with inner diameter ranging from 1.5-7 nm were examined for enhanced electroosmotic flow. After functionalization via electrochemical diazonium grafting and carbodiimide coupling reaction, it was found that neutral caffeine molecules can be efficiently pumped via electroosmosis. An electroosmotic velocity as high as 0.16 cm s-1 V-1 has been observed. Power efficiencies were 25-110 fold improved compared to related nanoporous materials, which has important applications in chemical separations and compact medical devices. Nearly ideal electroosmotic flow was seen in the case where the mobile cation diameter nearly matched the inner diameter of the single-walled carbon nanotube resulting in a condition of using one ion is to pump one neutral molecule at equivalent concentrations.

  15. Effects of Citric Acid Concentration and Activation Temperature on the Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengyi Li; Minwei Wang; Rongbin Zhang; Renzhong Wei; Niancai Peng

    2004-01-01

    A series of Ni-La-Mg catalyst samples were prepared by citric acid complex method, and carbon nanotubes were synthesized by catalytic decomposition of CH4 on these catalysts. The effects of the citric acid concentration and the activation temperature on catalytic activity were investigated by CO adsorption,TEM and XRD techniques. The experimental results showed that the particle size of the catalysts prepared through gel auto-combustion varied with the concentration of citric acid. Therefore carbon nanotubes with different diameters were obtained correspondingly. The effect of activation temperature on the activity of catalyst was negligible from 500 to 700 ℃, but it became pronounced at lower or higher temperatures.

  16. A method for quantitative analysis of aquatic humic substances in clear water based on carbon concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Kumiko; Takata, Akihiro; Shirai, Hidekado; Kozaki, Katsutoshi; Fujitake, Nobuhide

    2012-01-01

    Aquatic humic substances (AHSs) are major constituents of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in freshwater, where they perform a number of important ecological and geochemical functions, yet no method exists for quantifying all AHSs. We have developed a method for the quantitative analysis of AHSs based on their carbon concentration. Our approach includes: (1) the development of techniques for clear-water samples with low AHS concentrations, which normally complicate quantification; (2) avoiding carbon contamination in the laboratory; and (3) optimizing the AHS adsorption conditions.

  17. Black carbon concentrations and sources in the marine boundary layer of the tropical Atlantic Ocean using four methodologies

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Combustion-derived aerosols in the marine boundary layer have been poorly studied, especially in remote environments such as the open Atlantic Ocean. The tropical Atlantic has the potential to contain a high concentration of aerosols, such as black carbon, due to the African emission plume of biomass and agricultural burning products. Atmospheric particulate matter samples across the tropical Atlantic boundary layer were collected in the summer of 2010 during the southern he...

  18. High surface area carbon and process for its production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanos, Jimmy; Burress, Jacob; Pfeifer, Peter; Rash, Tyler; Shah, Parag; Suppes, Galen

    2016-12-13

    Activated carbon materials and methods of producing and using activated carbon materials are provided. In particular, biomass-derived activated carbon materials and processes of producing the activated carbon materials with prespecified surface areas and pore size distributions are provided. Activated carbon materials with preselected high specific surface areas, porosities, sub-nm (<1 nm) pore volumes, and supra-nm (1-5 nm) pore volumes may be achieved by controlling the degree of carbon consumption and metallic potassium intercalation into the carbon lattice during the activation process.

  19. Influence of temperature and solvent concentration on the kinetics of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase in carbon capture technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gladis, Arne; Deslauriers, Maria Gundersen; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2017-01-01

    In this study the effect of carbonic anhydrase addition on the absorption of CO2 was investigated in a wetted wall column apparatus. Four different solvents: the primary amine monoethanolamine (MEA), the sterically hindered primary amine 2-amino-2-methyl-1-propanol (AMP), the tertiary amine N......-methyl-diethanolamine (MDEA) and the carbonate salt solution K2CO3 were compared in concentrations from 5 to 50 wt% in a temperature range of 298–328 K with and without enzyme. Necessary mass transfer parameters such as liquid side mass transfer coefficient and solvent and enzyme reaction rates were determined...... and benchmarked to a 30 wt% MEA solution. The study reveals that the addition of the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) dramatically increases the liquid side mass transfer coefficient for MDEA, and K2CO3; AMP has a moderate increase whereas MEA was unchanged. The results confirm that just bicarbonate forming systems...

  20. Black carbon concentration and deposition estimations in Finland by the regional aerosol–climate model REMO-HAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Hienola

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The prediction skill of the regional aerosol–climate model REMO-HAM was assessed against the black carbon (BC concentration measurements from five locations in Finland, with focus on Hyytiälä station for the year 2005. We examined to what extent the model is able to reproduce the measurements using several statistical tools: median comparison, overlap coefficient (OVL; the common area under two probability distributions curves and Z score (a measure of standard deviation, shape and spread of the distributions. The results of the statistics showed that the model is biased low. The local and regional emissions of BC have a significant contribution, and the model tendency to flatten the observed BC is most likely dominated by the lack of domestic burning of biofuel in the emission inventories. A further examination of the precipitation data from both measurements and model showed that there is no correlation between REMO's excessive precipitation and BC underestimation. This suggests that the excessive wet removal is not the main cause of the low black carbon concentration output. In addition, a comparison of wind directions in relation with high black carbon concentrations shows that REMO-HAM is able to predict the BC source directions relatively well. Cumulative black carbon deposition fluxes over Finland were estimated, including the deposition on snow.

  1. Dissolved black carbon in the global cryosphere: Concentrations and chemical signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Alia L.; Wagner, Sasha; Jaffe, Rudolf; Xian, Peng; Williams, Mark; Armstrong, Richard; McKnight, Diane

    2017-06-01

    Black carbon (BC) is derived from the incomplete combustion of biomass and fossil fuels and can enhance glacial recession when deposited on snow and ice surfaces. Here we explore the influence of environmental conditions and the proximity to anthropogenic sources on the concentration and composition of dissolved black carbon (DBC), as measured by benzenepolycaroxylic acid (BPCA) markers, across snow, lakes, and streams from the global cryosphere. Data are presented from Antarctica, the Arctic, and high alpine regions of the Himalayas, Rockies, Andes, and Alps. DBC concentrations spanned from 0.62 μg/L to 170 μg/L. The median and (2.5, 97.5) quantiles in the pristine samples were 1.8 μg/L (0.62, 12), and nonpristine samples were 21 μg/L (1.6, 170). DBC is susceptible to photodegradation when exposed to solar radiation. This process leads to a less condensed BPCA signature. In general, DBC across the data set was composed of less polycondensed DBC. However, DBC from the Greenland Ice Sheet (GRIS) had a highly condensed BPCA molecular signature. This could be due to recent deposition of BC from Canadian wildfires. Variation in DBC appears to be driven by a combination of photochemical processing and the source combustion conditions under which the DBC was formed. Overall, DBC was found to persist across the global cryosphere in both pristine and nonpristine snow and surface waters. The high concentration of DBC measured in supraglacial melt on the GRIS suggests that DBC can be mobilized across ice surfaces. This is significant because these processes may jointly exacerbate surface albedo reduction in the cryosphere.Plain Language SummaryHere we present dissolved black carbon (DBC) results for snow and glacial melt systems in Antarctica, the Arctic, and high alpine regions of the Himalayas, Rockies, Andes, and Alps. Across the global cryosphere, DBC composition appears to be a result of photochemical processes occurring en route in the atmosphere or in situ on the

  2. A century of human-driven changes in the carbon dioxide concentration of lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perga, Marie-Elodie; Maberly, Stephen C.; Jenny, Jean-Philippe; Alric, Benjamin; Pignol, Cécile; Naffrechoux, Emmanuel

    2016-02-01

    Now that evasion of carbon dioxide (CO2) from inland waters is accounted for in global carbon models, it is crucial to quantify how these fluxes have changed in the past and forecast how they may alter in the future in response to local and global change. Here we developed a sediment proxy for the concentration of summer surface dissolved CO2 concentration and used it to reconstruct changes over the past 150 years for three large lakes that have been affected by climate warming, changes in nutrient load, and detrital terrigenous supplies. Initially CO2 neutral to the atmosphere, all three lakes subsequently fluctuated between near equilibrium and supersaturation. Although catchment inputs have supplied CO2 to the lakes, internal processes and reallocation have ultimately regulated decadal changes in lake surface CO2 concentration. Nutrient concentration has been the dominant driver of CO2 variability for a century although the reproducible, nonmonotonic relationship of CO2 to nutrient concentration suggests an interplay between metabolic and chemical processes. Yet for two of these lakes, climatic control of CO2 concentrations has been important over the last 30 years, promoting higher surface CO2 concentrations, likely by decreasing hypolimnetic carbon storage. This new approach offers the unique opportunity to scale, a posteriori, the long-term impact of human activities on lake CO2.

  3. LPWCO method for the treatment of high concentrated organic wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1998-01-01

    Based on wet air oxidation (WAO) and Fenton reagent, thispaper raises a new low pressure wet catalytic oxidation(LPWCO)which requires low pressure for the treatment of highlyconcentrated and refractory organic wastewater. Compared withgeneral wet air oxidation, the pressure of the treatment(0.1-0.6MPa) is only one of tens to percentage of latter(3.5-10MPa). Inaddition, its temperature is no more than 180℃.Compared withFenton reagent, while H2O2/COD(weight ratio) less than 1.2, theremoval of COD in the treatment is over twenty percents more thanFenton's even the value of COD is more than 14000mg/L. In thispaper, we study the effect factor of COD removal and the mechanismof this treatment. The existence of synergistic effect (catalytic oxidation and carbonization) for COD removal in H2SO4-Fenton reagent system under the condition of applied pressure and heating (0.1-0.6MPa, 104-165℃) was verified. The best condition of this disposal are as follows:H2O2/COD(weight ratio)=0.2-1.0, Fe2+ 0.6×10-3 mol, H2SO4 0.5mol, COD>1×104mg/L, the operating pressure is 0.1-0.6MPa and temperature is 104-165℃. This method suit to dispose the high-concentrated refractory wastewater, especially to the wastewater containing H2SO produced in the manufacture of pesticide, dyestuff and petrochemical works.

  4. Prediction of soil organic carbon concentration and soil bulk density of mineral soils for soil organic carbon stock estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putku, Elsa; Astover, Alar; Ritz, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Soil monitoring networks provide a powerful base for estimating and predicting nation's soil status in many aspects. The datasets of soil monitoring are often hierarchically structured demanding sophisticated data analyzing methods. The National Soil Monitoring of Estonia was based on a hierarchical data sampling scheme as each of the monitoring site was divided into four transects with 10 sampling points on each transect. We hypothesized that the hierarchical structure in Estonian Soil Monitoring network data requires a multi-level mixed model approach to achieve good prediction accuracy of soil properties. We used this database to predict soil bulk density and soil organic carbon concentration of mineral soils in arable land using different statistical methods: median approach, linear regression and mixed model; additionally, random forests for SOC concentration. We compared the prediction results and selected the model with the best prediction accuracy to estimate soil organic carbon stock. The mixed model approach achieved the best prediction accuracy in both soil organic carbon (RMSE 0.22%) and bulk density (RMSE 0.09 g cm-3) prediction. Other considered methods under- or overestimated higher and lower values of soil parameters. Thus, using these predictions we calculated the soil organic carbon stock of mineral arable soils and applied the model to a specific case of Tartu County in Estonia. Average estimated SOC stock of Tartu County is 54.8 t C ha-1 and total topsoil SOC stock 1.8 Tg in humus horizon.

  5. Direct analysis of δ13C and concentration of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in environmental samples by TOC-IRMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkels, Frédérique; Cerli, Chiara; Federherr, Eugen; Kalbitz, Karsten

    2014-05-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) plays an important role in carbon cycling in terrestrial and aquatic systems. Stable isotope analysis (delta 13C) of DOC could provide valuable insights in its origin, fluxes and environmental fate. Precise and routine analysis of delta 13C and DOC concentration are therefore highly desirable. A promising, new system has been developed for this purpose, linking a high-temperature combustion TOC analyzer trough an interface with a continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer (Elementar group, Hanau, Germany). This TOC-IRMS system enables simultaneous stable isotope (bulk delta 13C) and concentration analysis of DOC, with high oxidation efficiency by high-temperature combustion for complex mixtures as natural DOC. To give delta 13C analysis by TOC-IRMS the necessary impulse for broad-scale application, we present a detailed evaluation of its analytical performance for realistic and challenging conditions inclusive low DOC concentrations and environmental samples. High precision (standard deviation, SD predominantly memory effects, no concentration/volume effects and a wide linearity. Low DOC concentrations (highlighted by automated, online analysis, a variable injection volume, high throughput and no extensive maintenance. Sample analysis is simple, using small aliquots and with minimal sample preparation. Further investigations should focus on complex, saline matrices and very low DOC concentrations, to achieve a potential lower limit of 0.2 mgC/L. High-resolution, routine delta 13C analysis of DOC by TOC-IRMS offers opportunities for wide-scale application in terrestrial, freshwater and marine research to elucidate the role of DOC in biogeochemical processes and ecosystem functioning.

  6. Biobased carbon content of resin extracted from polyethylene composite by carbon-14 concentration measurements using accelerator mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Kazuhiro; Kunioka, Masao; Funabashi, Masahiro; Ninomiya, Fumi

    2014-01-01

    An estimation procedure for biobased carbon content of polyethylene composite was studied using carbon-14 ((14)C) concentration ratios as measured by accelerated mass spectrometry (AMS). Prior to the measurement, additives and fillers in composites should be removed because they often contain a large amount of biobased carbon and may shift the estimation. Samples of resin with purity suitable for measurement were isolated from composites with a Soxhlet extractor using heated cyclohexanone. After cooling of extraction solutions, the resin was recovered as a fine semi-crystalline precipitate, which was easily filtered. Recovery rates were almost identical (99%), even for low-density polyethylene and linear low-density polyethylene, which may have lower crystallinity. This procedure could provide a suitable approach for estimation of biobased carbon content by AMS on the basis of the standard ASTM D 6866. The biobased carbon content for resin extracted from polyethylene composites allow for the calculation of biosynthetic polymer content, which is an indicator of mass percentage of the biobased plastic resin in the composite.

  7. Concentration, sources and flux of dissolved organic carbon of precipitation at Lhasa city, the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.

    2015-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) plays important role in climate system, but few data are available on the Tibetan Plateau (TP). In this study 89 precipitation samples were collected at Lhasa, the largest city of southern Tibet, from March to December 2013. The average concentration and wet deposition fluxes of DOC was 1.10 mg C/L and 0.62 g C m-2.yr-1, respectively. Seasonally, low DOC concentration and high flux appeared during monsoon period, which were in line with heavy precipitation amount, reflecting dilution effect of precipitation for the DOC. Compared to other regions, the values of Lhasa were lower than those of large cites (e.g. Beijing and Seoul) mainly because of less air pollution of Lhasa. The relationship between DOC and ion analysis showed that DOC of Lhasa was derived mainly from the natural sources, followed by burning activities. Furthermore, △14C value of DOC indicated that fossil combustion contributed around 20% of the precipitation DOC of Lhasa, indicating that the atmosphere of Lhasa has been influenced by vehicle emissions. Therefore, although atmosphere of Lhasa is relatively clean, pollutants emitted from local sources cannot be ignored.

  8. Highly porous carbon from a natural cellulose fiber as high efficiency sorbent for lead in waste water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilangovan, Manikandan; Guna, Vijaykumar; Olivera, Sharon; Ravi, Ashwini; Muralidhara, H B; Santosh, M S; Reddy, Narendra

    2017-08-24

    The persistence of hollow centre in the carbon obtained from milkweed floss provides exceptional sorption characteristics, not seen in common biomasses or their derivatives. A considerably high sorption of 320mg of lead per gram of milkweed carbon was achieved without any chemical modification to the biomass. In this research, we have carbonized milkweed floss and used the carbon as a sorbent for lead in waste water. A high surface area of 170m(2)g(-1) and pore volume of 1.07cm(3)g(-1) was seen in the carbon. Almost complete removal (>99% efficiency) of lead could be achieved within 5min when the concentration of lead in the solution was 100ppm, close to that prevailing in industrial waste water. SEM images showed that the carbon was hollow and confocal images confirmed that the sorbate could penetrate inside the hollow tube. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Concentrations of suspended particulate organic carbon in the tidal Yorkshire Ouse River and Humber Estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uncles, R J; Frickers, P E; Easton, A E; Griffiths, M L; Harris, C; Howland, R J; King, R S; Morris, A W; Plummer, D H; Tappin, A D

    2000-05-05

    Data are presented for particulate organic carbon (POC) and particulate nitrogen (PN) concentrations in the Humber Estuary and tidal River Ouse Estuary. The POC data were derived from approximately monthly surveys and are consistent with data reported for suspended particulate matter (SPM) in the non-tidal River Ouse (the freshwater river) and with SPM, or bed sediments, in estuarine ecosystems such as the Mississippi, Delaware, San Francisco Bay, Tolo Harbour, the Vellar Estuary and Cochin Backwater, as well as the Loire, Gironde, Ems and Tamar Estuaries. Relative to the dry weight of SPM, the Humber-averaged organic carbon and nitrogen percentages during the year February 1995-March 1996 were 2.6 +/- 0.6% (mean and S.D.) and 0.21 +/- 0.04%, respectively. The ratio of Humber-averaged POC to Humber-averaged PN was 13 +/- 3. Higher POC levels were observed near the Humber's mouth and in the adjacent coastal zone during 'bloom' conditions, and in the upper estuarine reaches during large, winter and springtime freshwater inflows. At these times of high runoff, the POC content of SPM increased progressively up-estuary from the coastal zone to the tidal River Ouse. When inflows became very low, during late spring to early autumn of 1995, both the freshwater-saltwater interface (FSI) and the strengthening turbidity maximum (TM) moved further up-estuary and the POC content of SPM in the upper reaches of the Ouse became lower compared with that immediately down-estuary. This led to a poorly defined POC maximum near the confluence of the Humber, Ouse and Trent, before POC eventually decreased again towards the coastal zone. The lower POC contents in the upper estuarine reaches of the tidal Ouse may have been partly due to POC respiration by heterotrophic bacteria attached to SPM within the TM, consistent with the severe oxygen depletion observed there during high turbidity, summertime spring tides.

  10. Intercomparison of passive microwave sea ice concentration retrievals over the high-concentration Arctic sea ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    andersen, susanne; Tonboe, R.; Kaleschke, L.

    2007-01-01

    [1] Measurements of sea ice concentration from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) using seven different algorithms are compared to ship observations, sea ice divergence estimates from the Radarsat Geophysical Processor System, and ice and water surface type classification of 59 wide......-swath synthetic aperture radar (SAR) scenes. The analysis is confined to the high-concentration Arctic sea ice, where the ice cover is near 100%. During winter the results indicate that the variability of the SSM/I concentration estimates is larger than the true variability of ice concentration. Results from...... a trusted subset of the SAR scenes across the central Arctic allow the separation of the ice concentration uncertainty due to emissivity variations and sensor noise from other error sources during the winter of 2003-2004. Depending on the algorithm, error standard deviations from 2.5 to 5.0% are found...

  11. Adsorption of Crystal Violet on Activated Carbon Prepared from Coal Flotation Concentrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogmus, Ramazan; Depci, Tolga; Sarikaya, Musa; Riza Kul, Ali; Onal, Yunus

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study is firstly to investigate the floatability properties of Zilan- Van coal after microwave irradiation and secondly to produce activated carbon from flotation concentrate in order to remove Crystal Violet (CV) from waste water. The flotation experiments showed that microwave heating at 0.9 kW power level for 60 sec exposure time enhanced the hydrophobicity and increased the flotation yield. The activated carbon with remarkable surface area (696 m2/g) was produced from the flotation concentrate and used to adsorb CV from aqueous solution in a batch reactor at different temperature. The adsorption properties of CV onto the activated carbon are discussed in terms of the adsorption isotherms (Langmuir and Freundlich) and found that the experimental results best fitted by the Langmuir model.

  12. Geostatistical Analyses of Soil Organic Carbon Concentrations in Aligodarz Watershed, Lorestan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Davari

    2017-01-01

    statistically SOC content less than 1%. Lower SOC concentrations were associated with high altitude (r = −0.265**. The results of Pearson correlation analysis showed that soil organic carbon content has a significantly negative correlatiton with slope gradient (r = −0.217**. The results also indicated that the SOC content was variable for the different land use types. The irrigated lands had the highest SOC concentrations, while the pasture lands had the lowest SOC values. Conclusion: The square-root transformed data of SOC in Aligodarz watershed of Lorestan province, Iran, followed a normal distribution, with an arithmetic mean of 0.81%, and geometric mean of 0.73%. The coefficient of variation and nugget/sill ratio revealed a moderate spatial dependence of SOC in the study area. The results indicated that the major parts of the Aligodarz watershed have SOC content less than 1%. The land use type had a significant effect on the spatial variability of SOC and that lower SOC concentrations were associated with higher altitude and slope gradients. The irrigated and pasture lands had the highest and lowest SOC concentrations, respectively.

  13. High Stokes shift perylene dyes for luminescent solar concentrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguineti, Alessandro; Sassi, Mauro; Turrisi, Riccardo; Ruffo, Riccardo; Vaccaro, Gianfranco; Meinardi, Francesco; Beverina, Luca

    2013-02-25

    Highly efficient plastic based single layer Luminescent Solar Concentrators (LSCs) require the design of luminophores having complete spectral separation between absorption and emission spectra (large Stokes shift). We describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a new perylene dye possessing Stokes shift as high as 300 meV, fluorescent quantum yield in the LSC slab of 70% and high chemical and photochemical stability.

  14. Incorporation of uranium in benthic foraminiferal calcite reflects seawater carbonate ion concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keul, N.; Langer, G.; de Nooijer, L.J.; Nehrke, G.; Reichart, G.-J.; Bijma, J.

    2013-01-01

    The chemical and isotopic composition of foraminiferal shells (so-called proxies) reflects the physicochemical properties of the seawater. In current day paleoclimate research, the reconstruction of past seawater carbonate system to infer atmospheric CO2 concentrations is one of the most

  15. Incorporation of uranium in benthic foraminiferal calcite reflects seawater carbonate ion concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keul, N.; Langer, G.; de Nooijer, L.J.; Nehrke, G.; Reichart, G.-J.; Bijma, J.

    2013-01-01

    The chemical and isotopic composition of foraminiferal shells (so-called proxies) reflects the physicochemical properties of the seawater. In current day paleoclimate research, the reconstruction of past seawater carbonate system to infer atmospheric CO2 concentrations is one of the most pressing

  16. Northern European trees show a progressively diminishing response to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Waterhouse, JS

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available 1895-1994 of three tree species growing across northern Europe to increases in atmospheric CO2 concentrations using parameters derived from stable carbon isotope ratios of trunk cellulose. Using the isotope data, values of intrinsic water-use efficiency...

  17. Incorporation of uranium in benthic foraminiferal calcite reflects seawater carbonate ion concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keul, N.; Langer, G.; de Nooijer, L.J.; Nehrke, G.; Reichart, G.-J.; Bijma, J.

    2013-01-01

    The chemical and isotopic composition of foraminiferal shells (so-called proxies) reflects the physicochemical properties of the seawater. In current day paleoclimate research, the reconstruction of past seawater carbonate system to infer atmospheric CO2 concentrations is one of the most pressing ch

  18. Incorporation of uranium in benthic foraminiferal calcite reflects seawater carbonate ion concentration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keul, N.; Langer, G.; de Nooijer, L.J.; Nehrke, G.; Reichart, G.-J.; Bijma, J.

    2013-01-01

    The chemical and isotopic composition of foraminiferal shells (so-called proxies) reflects the physicochemical properties of the seawater. In current day paleoclimate research, the reconstruction of past seawater carbonate system to infer atmospheric CO2 concentrations is one of the most pressing ch

  19. The determination of hydroxide and carbonate in concentrated sodium chloride solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roolvink, W.B.; Bos, M.

    1980-01-01

    A computer method for the determination of carbonate and hydroxide in concentrated (2.89 M) sodium chloride solutions is described. The method is based on multiparametric curve-fitting and can also be applied to salts of dibasic acids with unknown equilibrium constants. The systematic error is not m

  20. Subalpine grassland carbon dioxide fluxes indicate substantial carbon losses under increased nitrogen deposition, but not at elevated ozone concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Matthias; Obrist, Daniel; Novak, Kris; Giger, Robin; Bassin, Seraina; Fuhrer, Jürg

    2010-05-01

    Ozone (O3) and nitrogen (N) deposition affect plant carbon (C) dynamics and may thus change ecosystem C-sink/-source properties. We studied effects of increased background O3 concentrations (up to ambient x 2) and increased N deposition (up to +50 kg ha-1 a-1) on mature, subalpine grassland during the third treatment year. During ten days and 13 nights, covering the vegetation period of 2006, we measured ecosystem-level CO2 exchange using a steady state cuvette. Light dependency of gross primary production (GPP) and temperature dependency of ecosystem respiration rates (Reco) were established. Soil temperature, soil water content, and solar radiation were monitored. Using Reco and GPP values, we calculated seasonal net ecosystem production (NEP), based on hourly averages of global radiation and soil temperature. Differences in NEP were compared to differences in soil organic C after five years of treatment. Under high O3 and with unchanged aboveground biomass, both mean Reco and GPP decreased throughout the season. Thus, NEP indicated an unaltered growing season CO2-C balance. Under high N treatment, with a +31% increase in aboveground productivity, mean Reco, but not GPP increased. Consequently, seasonal NEP yielded a 53.9 g C m-2 (± 22.05) C loss compared to control. Independent of treatment, we observed a negative NEP of 146.4 g C m-2 (±15.3). This C loss was likely due to a transient management effect, equivalent to a shift from pasture to hay meadow and a drought effect, specific to the 2006 summer climate. We argue that this resulted from strongly intensified soil microbial respiration, following mitigation of nutrient limitation. There was no interaction between O3 and N treatments. Thus, during the 2006 growing season, the subalpine grassland lost >2% of total topsoil organic C as respired CO2, with increased N deposition responsible for one-third of that loss.

  1. Hair and toenail arsenic concentrations of residents living in areas with high environmental arsenic concentrations.

    OpenAIRE

    Hinwood, Andrea L; Sim, Malcolm R; Jolley, Damien; de Klerk, Nick; Bastone, Elisa B; Gerostamoulos, Jim; Drummer, Olaf H

    2003-01-01

    Surface soil and groundwater in Australia have been found to contain high concentrations of arsenic. The relative importance of long-term human exposure to these sources has not been established. Several studies have investigated long-term exposure to environmental arsenic concentrations using hair and toenails as the measure of exposure. Few have compared the difference in these measures of environmental sources of exposure. In this study we aimed to investigate risk factors for elevated hai...

  2. Response of oxidative enzyme activities to nitrogen deposition affects soil concentrations of dissolved organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldrop, M.P.; Zak, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that atmospheric nitrate (NO3- ) deposition can alter soil carbon (C) storage by directly affecting the activity of lignin-degrading soil fungi. In a laboratory experiment, we studied the direct influence of increasing soil NO 3- concentration on microbial C cycling in three different ecosystems: black oak-white oak (BOWO), sugar maple-red oak (SMRO), and sugar maple-basswood (SMBW). These ecosystems span a broad range of litter biochemistry and recalcitrance; the BOWO ecosystem contains the highest litter lignin content, SMRO had intermediate lignin content, and SMBW leaf litter has the lowest lignin content. We hypothesized that increasing soil solution NO 3- would reduce lignolytic activity in the BOWO ecosystem, due to a high abundance of white-rot fungi and lignin-rich leaf litter. Due to the low lignin content of litter in the SMBW, we further reasoned that the NO3- repression of lignolytic activity would be less dramatic due to a lower relative abundance of white-rot basidiomycetes; the response in the SMRO ecosystem should be intermediate. We increased soil solution NO3- concentrations in a 73-day laboratory incubation and measured microbial respiration and soil solution dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and phenolics concentrations. At the end of the incubation, we measured the activity of ??-glucosidase, N-acetyl-glucosaminidase, phenol oxidase, and peroxidase, which are extracellular enzymes involved with cellulose and lignin degradation. We quantified the fungal biomass, and we also used fungal ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA) to gain insight into fungal community composition. In the BOWO ecosystem, increasing NO 3- significantly decreased oxidative enzyme activities (-30% to -54%) and increased DOC (+32% upper limit) and phenolic (+77% upper limit) concentrations. In the SMRO ecosystem, we observed a significant decrease in phenol oxidase activity (-73% lower limit) and an increase in soluble phenolic concentrations

  3. Applications of nonimaging optics for very high solar concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Gallagher, J.; Winston, R.

    1997-12-31

    Using the principles and techniques of nonimaging optics, solar concentrations that approach the theoretical maximum can be achieved. This has applications in solar energy collection wherever concentration is desired. In this paper, we survey recent progress in attaining and using high and ultrahigh solar fluxes. We review a number of potential applications for highly concentrated solar energy and the current status of the associated technology. By making possible new and unique applications for intense solar flux, these techniques have opened a whole new frontier for research and development of potentially economic uses of solar energy.

  4. Electron beam treatment of exhaust gas with high NOx concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licki, Janusz; Chmielewski, Andrzej G.; Pawelec, Andrzej; Zimek, Zbigniew; Witman, Sylwia

    2014-05-01

    Simulated exhaust gases with a high NOx concentration, ranging from 200 to 1700 ppmv, were irradiated by an electron beam from an accelerator. In the first part of this study, only exhaust gases were treated. Low NOx removal efficiencies were obtained for high NOx concentrations, even with high irradiation doses applied. In the second part of study, gaseous ammonia or/and vapor ethanol were added to the exhaust gas before its inlet to the plasma reactor. These additions significantly enhanced the NOx removal efficiency. The synergistic effect of high SO2 concentration on NOx removal was observed. The combination of electron beam treatment with the introduction of the above additions and with the performance of irradiation under optimal parameters ensured high NOx removal efficiency without the application of a solid-state catalyst.

  5. Kinetics and yields of pesticide biodegradation at low substrate concentrations and under conditions restricting assimilable organic carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbling, Damian E; Hammes, Frederik; Egli, Thomas; Kohler, Hans-Peter E

    2014-02-01

    The fundamentals of growth-linked biodegradation occurring at low substrate concentrations are poorly understood. Substrate utilization kinetics and microbial growth yields are two critically important process parameters that can be influenced by low substrate concentrations. Standard biodegradation tests aimed at measuring these parameters generally ignore the ubiquitous occurrence of assimilable organic carbon (AOC) in experimental systems which can be present at concentrations exceeding the concentration of the target substrate. The occurrence of AOC effectively makes biodegradation assays conducted at low substrate concentrations mixed-substrate assays, which can have profound effects on observed substrate utilization kinetics and microbial growth yields. In this work, we introduce a novel methodology for investigating biodegradation at low concentrations by restricting AOC in our experiments. We modified an existing method designed to measure trace concentrations of AOC in water samples and applied it to systems in which pure bacterial strains were growing on pesticide substrates between 0.01 and 50 mg liter(-1). We simultaneously measured substrate concentrations by means of high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection (HPLC-UV) or mass spectrometry (MS) and cell densities by means of flow cytometry. Our data demonstrate that substrate utilization kinetic parameters estimated from high-concentration experiments can be used to predict substrate utilization at low concentrations under AOC-restricted conditions. Further, restricting AOC in our experiments enabled accurate and direct measurement of microbial growth yields at environmentally relevant concentrations for the first time. These are critical measurements for evaluating the degradation potential of natural or engineered remediation systems. Our work provides novel insights into the kinetics of biodegradation processes and growth yields at low substrate concentrations.

  6. [Reasons of high concentration ammonium in Yellow River, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-qing; Xia, Xing-hui; Yang, Zhi-feng

    2007-07-01

    Ammonium nitrogen contamination is one of the major problems of the Yellow River in China. The speciation, concentration and sources of nitrogen compounds as well as the water environment conditions of the Yellow River had been analyzed to study the reasons for the fact that the ammonium nitrogen concentration was above the water quality standard. In addition, laboratory experiments had been carried out to investigate the effects of suspended sediment (SS) on nitrification rate. The results indicated that the presence of SS could accelerate the nitrification process, therefore, the effects of SS on nitrification rate was not the reason for the high level of ammonium nitrogen in the river. The excessive and continuous input of nitrogen contaminants to the river was the fundamental reason for the high concentration of ammonium nitrogen. Organic and ammonium nitrogen with high concentration inhibitted the nitrification processes. When the initial NH4+ -N concentrations were 10.1, 18.4 and 28.2 mg/L, nitrification efficiencies were 17.4%, 13.0% and 2.5%, respectively. When the initial organic nitrogen concentrations were 5.5 and 8.6 mg/L, the maximum concentrations of ammonium nitrogen produced by the oxidation of organic nitrogen would reach 0.47 and 1.69 mg/L and they would last for 2 days and 6 days, respectively. The oxygen-consuming organics and toxic substance existing in the river water could inhibit the activity of nitrifying bacteria, and thus lead to the accumulation of ammonium nitrogen. In addition, the high pH value of river water resulted in the high concentration of nonionic ammonium nitrogen which would reduce the activity of nitrifying bacteria and decrease the nitrification rates. Besides, low river runoff, low SS content and low activity of nitrifying bacteria resulted in the high level of ammonium nitrogen of the river in the low water season.

  7. Differences in Swallowing between High and Low Concentration Taste Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Nagy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Taste is a property that is thought to potentially modulate swallowing behavior. Whether such effects depend on taste, intensity remains unclear. This study explored differences in the amplitudes of tongue-palate pressures in swallowing as a function of taste stimulus concentration. Tongue-palate pressures were collected in 80 healthy women, in two age groups (under 40, over 60, stratified by genetic taste status (nontasters, supertasters. Liquids with different taste qualities (sweet, sour, salty, and bitter were presented in high and low concentrations. General labeled magnitude scale ratings captured perceived taste intensity and liking/disliking of the test liquids. Path analysis explored whether factors of taste, concentration, age group, and/or genetic taste status impacted: (1 perceived intensity; (2 palatability; and (3 swallowing pressures. Higher ratings of perceived intensity were found in supertasters and with higher concentrations, which were more liked/disliked than lower concentrations. Sweet stimuli were more palatable than sour, salty, or bitter stimuli. Higher concentrations elicited stronger tongue-palate pressures independently and in association with intensity ratings. The perceived intensity of a taste stimulus varies as a function of stimulus concentration, taste quality, participant age, and genetic taste status and influences swallowing pressure amplitudes. High-concentration salty and sour stimuli elicit the greatest tongue-palate pressures.

  8. High-strength porous carbon and its multifunctional applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtowicz, Marek A; Rubenstein, Eric P; Serio, Michael A; Cosgrove, Joseph E

    2013-12-31

    High-strength porous carbon and a method of its manufacture are described for multifunctional applications, such as ballistic protection, structural components, ultracapacitor electrodes, gas storage, and radiation shielding. The carbon is produced from a polymer precursor via carbonization, and optionally by surface activation and post-treatment.

  9. Modeling Study of the Contribution of Wildfires to Ambient Black Carbon Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, S. H.; Gonzalez-Abraham, R.; Lamb, B. K.; Larkin, N. K.; Strand, T.; O'Neill, S.

    2013-12-01

    Wildland fires are a major source of particulate emissions, including black carbon (BC). In combination with other emissions, these BC and particulate emissions can directly lead to air quality degradation, both locally and more regionally. BC and other particulate matter (PM) can also affect climate in various ways, including by scattering and absorbing radiation, modifying cloud formation and properties, and changing snow albedo. BC emissions reduction is a potential strategy for mitigating global warming because it is emitted in large quantities and has a relatively short lifetime in the atmosphere in comparison to long-live greenhouse gases. Due to the highly variable nature of wildland fires, both in terms of fire occurrences on the landscape and the high spatial and temporal variability of fuels, consumption, and emissions, the impact of wildfire emissions varies significantly over the period of the wildfire season as well as inter-annually. In the U.S., while anthropogenic emissions are projected to decrease, as the climate warms wildfire activity is predicted to increase along with the contribution of fire emissions. Thus, a robust analysis of the effects of BC from fire emissions on air quality and climate necessitates a comprehensive, multi-scale study of all fire-related pollutants and other emission sources spanning multiple years of fire data and weather conditions. In this study we apply the WRF-BlueSky-SMOKE-CMAQ regional air-quality modeling system for multi-year (1997-2005) summertime simulations to evaluate the contribution of fire emissions to atmospheric BC and total PM2.5 concentrations. Historical fire records from the Bureau of Land Management are used by the BlueSky framework to calculate fire emissions. Plume rise is calculated by the SMOKE emission processor, taking into account meteorology from the WRF model. These emissions are combined with anthropogenic emissions from the NEI 2002 and biogenic emissions from the MEGAN model. CMAQ is

  10. Kirishites, a new type of natural high-carbon compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Yu. B.; Skublov, G. T.; Yushkin, N. P.

    2010-01-01

    On the right-hand bank of the Volkhov River, in the natural area of tektite-like glasses (Volkhovites), fragments of shungites and slags with bunches of hairlike dark brownish enclosures were found. The filament thickness ranged from 20 to 100 μm, and separate “hairlines” were 3 cm in length. The composition of shungites and “hairlines” was found to be identical, which allowed us to consider the latter as aposhungite carbon formations. The high-carbon hairline structures associated with volkhovites are called kirishites. Kirishites are a new type of high-carbon structures that formed simultaneously with volkhovites in the case of explosion-type delivery of carbon slag and shungite fragments to the daylight surface during Holocene explosive activity. Under sharply reductive conditions, the slags partially melted, the melts were segregated, and carbonaceous-silicate and carbonaceous-ferriferous glasses formed with subsequent decompression-explosive liberation of carbon-supersaturated structures, which were extruded from shungite and slag fragments in the form of a resinoid mass. The “hairlines” were found to be zonal in structure: the central axial zones are composed of high-nitrogen hydrocarbon compounds, and peripheral regions are essentially carbonaceous with a high content of organic-mineral compounds and numerous microanomalies of petrogenic, volatile, rare, and ore elements. Infrared spectroscopy identified in kirishites proteinlike compounds, diagnosed in absorption bands (in cm-1) 600-720 (Amid V), 1200-1300 (Amid III), 1480-1590 (Amid II), 1600-1700 (Amid I), 3000-3800 (vibrations in NH2 and II groups). Gas chromatography, with the possibility of differentiation of left- and right-handed forms, revealed a broad spectrum of amino acids in kirishites, with their total content found to be the absolutely highest record for natural bitumens, an order of magnitude higher than the largest amino acid concentrations ever revealed in fibrous high

  11. Carbon allocation and element composition in four Chlamydomonas mutants defective in genes related to the CO2 concentrating mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memmola, Francesco; Mukherjee, Bratati; Moroney, James V; Giordano, Mario

    2014-09-01

    Four mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii with defects in different components of the CO2 concentrating mechanism (CCM) or in Rubisco activase were grown autotrophically at high pCO2 and then transferred to low pCO2, in order to study the role of different components of the CCM on carbon allocation and elemental composition. To study carbon allocation, we measured the relative size of the main organic pools by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence was used to analyze the elemental composition of algal cells. Our data show that although the organic pools increased their size at high CO2 in all strains, their stoichiometry was highly homeostatic, i.e., the ratios between carbohydrates and proteins, lipid and proteins, and carbohydrates and lipids, did not change significantly. The only exception was the wild-type 137c, in which proteins decreased relative to carbohydrates and lipids, when the cells were transferred to low CO2. It is noticeable that the two wild types used in this study responded differently to the transition from high to low CO2. Malfunctions of the CCM influenced the concentration of several elements, somewhat altering cell elemental stoichiometry: especially the C/P and N/P ratios changed appreciably in almost all strains as a function of the growth CO2 concentration, except in 137c and the Rubisco activase mutant rca1. In strain cia3, defective in the lumenal carbonic anhydrase (CA), the cell quotas of P, S, Ca, Mn, Fe, and Zn were about 5-fold higher at low CO2 than at high CO2. A Principle Components Analysis showed that, mostly because of its elemental composition, cia3 behaved in a substantially different way from all other strains, at low CO2. The lumenal CA thus plays a crucial role, not only for the correct functioning of the CCM, but also for element utilization. Not surprisingly, growth at high CO2 attenuated differences among strains.

  12. In-vehicle carbon dioxide concentration in commuting cars in Bangkok, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luangprasert, Maytat; Vasithamrong, Chainarin; Pongratananukul, Suphasit; Chantranuwathana, Sunhapos; Pumrin, Suree; De Silva, I P D

    2016-12-14

    It is known that in-vehicle carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration tends to increase due to occupant exhalation when the HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) air is in recirculation mode. Field experiments were conducted to measure CO2 concentration during typical commute in Bangkok, Thailand. The measured concentrations agreed with the concentration predicted using first-order mass balance equation, in both recirculating and outside air modes. The long-term transient decay of the concentration when the vehicle was parked and the HVAC system was turned off was also studied. This decay was found to follow Fickian diffusion process. The paper also provides useful operational details of the automotive HVAC system and fresh air ventilation exchange between cabin interior and exterior.

  13. Spatio-temporal variations of black carbon concentrations in the Megacity Beijing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Nina; Norra, Stefan; Fricker, Mathieu; Kaminski, Uwe; Chen, Yizhen; Chai, Fahe; Wang, Shulan; Yu, Yang; Cen, Kuang

    2013-11-01

    The spatial and temporal distribution and the flux of black carbon (BC) concentration in Beijing were continuously investigated over a two-year period at five sites to highlight the relative influence of contributing sources. The results demonstrate firstly that there is significant spatio-temporal variability of BC in Beijing. Highest concentrations occurred during winter primarily due to stagnant meteorological conditions, and seasonal BC sources, such as coal combustion for heating purposes. Biomass burning was identified as a minor seasonal source during the summer months. BC also varied spatially with higher concentrations in the SE of Beijing and lower concentrations in the NW, due to the differing emission intensity of various local BC sources such as traffic and industry. Frequently, overnight BC concentrations were higher due to specific meteorological conditions, such as the lower urban mixing layer height and various anthropogenic activities, such as exclusive night-time heavy duty vehicle traffic in the inner-city.

  14. Adsorption of pharmaceuticals onto activated carbon fiber cloths - Modeling and extrapolation of adsorption isotherms at very low concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallou, Hélène; Cimetière, Nicolas; Giraudet, Sylvain; Wolbert, Dominique; Le Cloirec, Pierre

    2016-01-15

    Activated carbon fiber cloths (ACFC) have shown promising results when applied to water treatment, especially for removing organic micropollutants such as pharmaceutical compounds. Nevertheless, further investigations are required, especially considering trace concentrations, which are found in current water treatment. Until now, most studies have been carried out at relatively high concentrations (mg L(-1)), since the experimental and analytical methodologies are more difficult and more expensive when dealing with lower concentrations (ng L(-1)). Therefore, the objective of this study was to validate an extrapolation procedure from high to low concentrations, for four compounds (Carbamazepine, Diclofenac, Caffeine and Acetaminophen). For this purpose, the reliability of the usual adsorption isotherm models, when extrapolated from high (mg L(-1)) to low concentrations (ng L(-1)), was assessed as well as the influence of numerous error functions. Some isotherm models (Freundlich, Toth) and error functions (RSS, ARE) show weaknesses to be used as an adsorption isotherms at low concentrations. However, from these results, the pairing of the Langmuir-Freundlich isotherm model with Marquardt's percent standard of deviation was evidenced as the best combination model, enabling the extrapolation of adsorption capacities by orders of magnitude.

  15. Uncertainties in neural network model based on carbon dioxide concentration for occupancy estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Azimil Gani; Rahman, Haolia; Kim, Jung-Kyung; Han, Hwataik [Kookmin University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    Demand control ventilation is employed to save energy by adjusting airflow rate according to the ventilation load of a building. This paper investigates a method for occupancy estimation by using a dynamic neural network model based on carbon dioxide concentration in an occupied zone. The method can be applied to most commercial and residential buildings where human effluents to be ventilated. An indoor simulation program CONTAMW is used to generate indoor CO{sub 2} data corresponding to various occupancy schedules and airflow patterns to train neural network models. Coefficients of variation are obtained depending on the complexities of the physical parameters as well as the system parameters of neural networks, such as the numbers of hidden neurons and tapped delay lines. We intend to identify the uncertainties caused by the model parameters themselves, by excluding uncertainties in input data inherent in measurement. Our results show estimation accuracy is highly influenced by the frequency of occupancy variation but not significantly influenced by fluctuation in the airflow rate. Furthermore, we discuss the applicability and validity of the present method based on passive environmental conditions for estimating occupancy in a room from the viewpoint of demand control ventilation applications.

  16. Trends in soil solution dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations across European forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camino-Serrano, Marta; Graf Pannatier, Elisabeth; Vicca, Sara; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Jonard, Mathieu; Ciais, Philippe; Guenet, Bertrand; Gielen, Bert; Peñuelas, Josep; Sardans, Jordi; Waldner, Peter; Etzold, Sophia; Cecchini, Guia; Clarke, Nicholas; Galić, Zoran; Gandois, Laure; Hansen, Karin; Johnson, Jim; Klinck, Uwe; Lachmanová, Zora; Lindroos, Antti-Jussi; Meesenburg, Henning; Nieminen, Tiina M.; Sanders, Tanja G. M.; Sawicka, Kasia; Seidling, Walter; Thimonier, Anne; Vanguelova, Elena; Verstraeten, Arne; Vesterdal, Lars; Janssens, Ivan A.

    2016-10-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in surface waters is connected to DOC in soil solution through hydrological pathways. Therefore, it is expected that long-term dynamics of DOC in surface waters reflect DOC trends in soil solution. However, a multitude of site studies have failed so far to establish consistent trends in soil solution DOC, whereas increasing concentrations in European surface waters over the past decades appear to be the norm, possibly as a result of recovery from acidification. The objectives of this study were therefore to understand the long-term trends of soil solution DOC from a large number of European forests (ICP Forests Level II plots) and determine their main physico-chemical and biological controls. We applied trend analysis at two levels: (1) to the entire European dataset and (2) to the individual time series and related trends with plot characteristics, i.e., soil and vegetation properties, soil solution chemistry and atmospheric deposition loads. Analyses of the entire dataset showed an overall increasing trend in DOC concentrations in the organic layers, but, at individual plots and depths, there was no clear overall trend in soil solution DOC. The rate change in soil solution DOC ranged between -16.8 and +23 % yr-1 (median = +0.4 % yr-1) across Europe. The non-significant trends (40 %) outnumbered the increasing (35 %) and decreasing trends (25 %) across the 97 ICP Forests Level II sites. By means of multivariate statistics, we found increasing trends in DOC concentrations with increasing mean nitrate (NO3-) deposition and increasing trends in DOC concentrations with decreasing mean sulfate (SO42-) deposition, with the magnitude of these relationships depending on plot deposition history. While the attribution of increasing trends in DOC to the reduction of SO42- deposition could be confirmed in low to medium N deposition areas, in agreement with observations in surface waters, this was not the case in high N deposition areas. In

  17. Sterile Filtration of Highly Concentrated Protein Formulations: Impact of Protein Concentration, Formulation Composition, and Filter Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allmendinger, Andrea; Mueller, Robert; Huwyler, Joerg; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Fischer, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Differences in filtration behavior of concentrated protein formulations were observed during aseptic drug product manufacturing of biologics dependent on formulation composition. The present study investigates filtration forces of monoclonal antibody formulations in a small-scale set-up using polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) or polyethersulfone (PES) filters. Different factors like formulation composition and protein concentration related to differences in viscosity, as well as different filtration rates were evaluated. The present study showed that filtration behavior was influenced by the presence or absence of a surfactant in the formulation, which defines the interaction between filter membrane and surface active formulation components. This can lead to a change in filter resistance (PES filter) independent on the buffer system used. Filtration behavior was additionally defined by rheological non-Newtonian flow behavior. The data showed that high shear rates resulting from small pore sizes and filtration pressure up to 1.0 bar led to shear-thinning behavior for highly concentrated protein formulations. Differences in non-Newtonian behavior were attributed to ionic strength related to differences in repulsive and attractive interactions. The present study showed that the interplay of formulation composition, filter material, and filtration rate can explain differences in filtration behavior/filtration flux observed for highly concentrated protein formulations thus guiding filter selection.

  18. High efficient preparation of carbon nanotube-grafted carbon fibers with the improved tensile strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenxin; Wang, Yanxiang; Wang, Chengguo; Chen, Jiqiang; Wang, Qifen; Yuan, Yan; Niu, Fangxu

    2016-02-01

    An innovative technique has been developed to obtain the uniform catalyst coating on continuously moving carbon fibers. Carbon nanotube (CNT)-grafted carbon fibers with significantly improved tensile strength have been succeeded to produce by using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) when compared to the tensile strength of untreated carbon fibers. The critical requirements for preparation of CNT-grafted carbon fibers with high tensile strength have been found, mainly including (i) the obtainment of uniform coating of catalyst particles with small particle size, (ii) the low catalyst-induced and mechano-chemical degradation of carbon fibers, and (iii) the high catalyst activity which could facilitate the healing and strengthening of carbon fibers during the growth of CNTs. The optimum growth temperature was found to be about 500 °C, and the optimum catalyst is Ni due to its highest activity, there is a pronounced increase of 10% in tensile strength of carbon fibers after CNT growth at 500 °C by using Ni catalyst. Based on the observation from HRTEM images, a healing and crosslink model of neighboring carbon crystals by CNTs has been formulated to reveal the main reason that causes an increase in tensile strength of carbon fibers after the growth of CNTs. Such results have provided the theoretical and experimental foundation for the large-scale preparation of CNT-grafted carbon fibers with the improved tensile strength, significantly promoting the development of CNT-grafted carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  19. Predicting Effects of Ocean Acidification and Warming on Algae Lacking Carbon Concentrating Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet E Kübler

    Full Text Available Seaweeds that lack carbon-concentrating mechanisms are potentially inorganic carbon-limited under current air equilibrium conditions. To estimate effects of increased atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and ocean acidification on photosynthetic rates, we modeled rates of photosynthesis in response to pCO2, temperature, and their interaction under limiting and saturating photon flux densities. We synthesized the available data for photosynthetic responses of red seaweeds lacking carbon-concentrating mechanisms to light and temperature. The model was parameterized with published data and known carbonate system dynamics. The model predicts that direction and magnitude of response to pCO2 and temperature, depend on photon flux density. At sub-saturating light intensities, photosynthetic rates are predicted to be low and respond positively to increasing pCO2, and negatively to increasing temperature. Consequently, pCO2 and temperature are predicted to interact antagonistically to influence photosynthetic rates at low PFD. The model predicts that pCO2 will have a much larger effect than temperature at sub-saturating light intensities. However, photosynthetic rates under low light will not increase proportionately as pCO2 in seawater continues to rise. In the range of light saturation (Ik, both CO2 and temperature have positive effects on photosynthetic rate and correspondingly strong predicted synergistic effects. At saturating light intensities, the response of photosynthetic rates to increasing pCO2 approaches linearity, but the model also predicts increased importance of thermal over pCO2 effects, with effects acting additively. Increasing boundary layer thickness decreased the effect of added pCO2 and, for very thick boundary layers, overwhelmed the effect of temperature on photosynthetic rates. The maximum photosynthetic rates of strictly CO2-using algae are low, so even large percentage increases in rates with climate change will not

  20. Denitrification of fertilizer wastewater at high chloride concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ucisik, Ahmed Süheyl; Henze, Mogens

    g/l. The results of the experiments showed that biological denitrification was feasible at the extreme environmental conditions prevailing in fertilizer wastewater. Stable continuous biological denitrfication of the synthetic high chloride wastewater was performed up to 77.4 g Cl/l at 37 degree C......Wastewater from fertilizer industry is characterized by high contents of chloride concentration, which normally vary between 60 and 76 g/l. Experiments with bilogical denitrification were performed in lab-scale "fill and draw" reactors with synthetic wastewater with chloride concentrations up to 77.4...

  1. Airborne black carbon concentrations over an urban region in western India-temporal variability, effects of meteorology, and source regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bapna, Mukund; Sunder Raman, Ramya; Ramachandran, S; Rajesh, T A

    2013-03-01

    This study characterizes over 5 years of high time resolution (5 min), airborne black carbon (BC) concentrations (July 2003 to December 2008) measured over Ahmedabad, an urban region in western India. The data were used to obtain different time averages of BC concentrations, and these averages were then used to assess the diurnal, seasonal, and annual variability of BC over the study region. Assessment of diurnal variations revealed a strong association between BC concentrations and vehicular traffic. Peaks in BC concentration were co-incident with the morning (0730 to 0830, LST) and late evening (1930 to 2030, LST) rush hour traffic. Additionally, diurnal variability in BC concentrations during major festivals (Diwali and Dushera during the months of October/November) revealed an increase in BC concentrations due to fireworks displays. Maximum half hourly BC concentrations during the festival days were as high as 79.8 μg m(-3). However, the high concentrations rapidly decayed suggesting that local meteorology during the festive season was favorable for aerosol dispersion. A multiple linear regression (MLR) model with BC as the dependent variable and meteorological parameters as independent variables was fitted. The variability in temperature, humidity, wind speed, and wind direction accounted for about 49% of the variability in measured BC concentrations. Conditional probability function (CPF) analysis was used to identify the geographical location of local source regions contributing to the effective BC measured (at 880 nm) at the receptor site. The east north-east (ENE) direction to the receptor was identified as a major source region. National highway (NH8) and two coal-fired thermal power stations (at Gandhinagar and Sabarmati) were located in the identified direction, suggesting that local traffic and power plant emissions were likely contributors to the measured BC.

  2. Design and Development of a High Efficiency CarbonGranular Bed Filter in Industrial Scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张济宇; 旷戈; 林诚

    2004-01-01

    The new dust removal technical route using the carbon-granular bed filter, packed of carbon particles with appropriate grade derive from an online-process vibration sieve, to replace the traditional baggy filter had been developed successfully for capturing the micro-carbon dusts produced from pulverization of petroleum coke,and the green close loop of carbon materials is thus completed in the combined pulverizing and classifying system and pulverized carbon dust removal process. The high dust removal efficiency greater than 99%, low outlet dust concentration less than 100 mg-m-S, low pressure drop through dust filtration chamber less than 980 Pa, simple and easy design, and flexible and stable operation were achieved also with the carbon-granular bed filter in both bench and industrial scale operations.

  3. High estrogen concentrations in receiving river discharge from a concentrated livestock feedlot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Te-San; Chen, Ting-Chien; Yeh, Kuei-Jyum C; Chao, How-Ran; Liaw, Ean-Tun; Hsieh, Chi-Ying; Chen, Kuan-Chung; Hsieh, Lien-Te; Yeh, Yi-Lung

    2010-07-15

    Environmental estrogenic chemicals interrupt endocrine systems and generate reproductive abnormalities in wildlife, especially natural and synthetic estrogenic steroid hormones such as 17beta-estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), estriol (E3), 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2), and diethylstilbestrol (DES). Concentrated animal feedlot operations (CAFOs) are of particular concern since large amounts of naturally excreted estrogens are discharged into aquatic environments. This study investigated E2, E1, E3, EE2, and DES with high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass (HPLC-MS/MS) analyses along Wulo Creek in southern Taiwan, near a concentrated livestock feedlot containing 1,030,000 broiler chickens, 934,000 laying hens, 85,000 pigs, and 1500 cattle. Sampling was performed from December 2008 to May 2009, in which 54 samples were collected. Experimental results indicate that concentrations of EE2 were lower than the limit of detection (LOD), and concentrations of DES were only detected twice. Concentrations ranged from 7.4 to 1267 ng/L for E1, from not detected (ND) to 313.6 ng/L for E2, and from ND to 210 ng/L for E3. E1 had the highest average mass fraction (72.2 + or - 3.6%), which was significantly higher than E3 (16.2 + or - 1.7%) and E2 (11.5 + or - 2.6%). Additionally, the mean E2 equivalent quotient (EEQ) ranged from 17.3 to 137.9 ng-E2/L. Despite having a markedly lower concentration than E1, E2 more significantly contributed (52.4 + or - 6.0%) EEQ than E1 (19.7 + or - 3.5%). Moreover, the concentrations of E2, E1, and E3 upstream were significantly higher than concentrations downstream, suggesting a high attenuation effect and fast degradation in the study water. Most concentrations in winter season were higher than those of spring season due to the low dilution effect and low microbial activity in the winter season. Based on the results of this study, we recommend further treatment of the wastewater discharge from the feedlot.

  4. Biodegradation dynamics of high catechol concentrations by Aspergillus awamori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanchev, Veselin; Stoilova, Ivanka; Krastanov, Albert

    2008-06-15

    The biodegradation process of high catechol concentrations by Aspergillus awamori was investigated. The values of the kinetic constants for a model of specific growth rate at different initial conditions were determined. At 1.0 g/L catechol concentration, the biodegradation process proceeded in the conditions of substrate limitation. At higher catechol concentrations (2.0 and 3.0 g/L) a presence of substrate inhibition was established. The dynamics of the specific catechol degradation rate was studied and the values of catechol and biomass concentrations, maximizing the specific catechol degradation rate, were estimated analytically. The specified ratio catechol/biomass could serve as a starting base for determination of the initial conditions for a batch process, for specifying the moment of feeding for a fed-batch process, and for monitoring and control of a continuous process by the aim of time-optimal control.

  5. Tropospheric carbon dioxide concentrations at a northern boreal site in Finland: basic variations and source areas

    OpenAIRE

    T. Aalto; J. Hatakka; J. Paatero; Tuovinen, J.-P.; Aurela, M.; Laurila, T.; Holmén, K.; Trivett, N.; Viisanen, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Diurnal and annual variations of CO2, O3, SO2, black carbon and condensation nuclei and their source areas were studied by utilizing air parcel trajectories and tropospheric concentration measurements at a boreal GAW site in Pallas, Finland. The average growth trend of CO2 was about 2.5 ppm yr−1 according to a 4-yr measurement period starting in October 1996. The annual cycle of CO2showed concentration difference of about 19 ppm between the summer minimum and winter maximum. The diurnal cycle...

  6. Raman spectroscopy on carbon nanotubes at high pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Loa, I.

    2003-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been the most extensively employed method to study carbon nanotubes at high pressures. This review covers reversible pressure-induced changes of the lattice dynamics and structure of single- and multi-wall carbon nanotubes as well as irreversible transformations induced by high pressures. The interplay of covalent and van-der-Waals bonding in single-wall nanotube bundles and a structural distortion near 2 GPa are discussed in detail. Attempts of transforming carbon nano...

  7. High shear treatment of concentrates and drying conditions influence the solubility of milk protein concentrate powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Mary Ann; Sanguansri, Peerasak; Williams, Roderick; Andrews, Helen

    2012-11-01

    The solubility of milk protein concentrate (MPC) powders was influenced by the method used for preparing the concentrate, drying conditions, and the type of dryer used. Increasing total solids of the ultrafiltered concentrates (23% total solids, TS) by diafiltration to 25% TS or evaporation to 31% TS decreased the solubility of MPC powders (80-83% protein, w/w dry basis), with ultrafiltration followed by evaporation to higher total solids having the greater detrimental effect on solubility. High shear treatment (homogenisation at 350/100 bar, microfluidisation at 800 bar or ultrasonication at 24 kHz, 600 watts) of ultrafiltered and diafiltered milk protein concentrates prior to spray drying increased the nitrogen solubility of MPC powders (82% protein, w/w dry basis). Of the treatments applied, microfluidisation was the most effective for increasing nitrogen solubility of MPC powders after manufacture and during storage. Manufacture of MPC powders (91% protein, w/w dry basis) prepared on two different pilot-scale dryers (single stage or two stage) from milk protein concentrates (20% TS) resulted in powders with different nitrogen solubility and an altered response to the effects of microfluidisation. Microfluidisation (400, 800 and 1200 bar) of the concentrate prior to drying resulted in increased long term solubility of MPC powders that were prepared on a single stage dryer but not those produced on a two stage spray dryer. This work demonstrates that microfluidisation can be used as a physical intervention for improving MPC powder solubility. Interactions between the method of preparation and treatment of concentrate prior to drying, the drying conditions and dryer type all influence MPC solubility characteristics.

  8. Carbonation Resistance of Sulphoaluminate Cement-based High Performance Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Decheng; XU Dongyu; CHENG Xin; CHEN Wen

    2009-01-01

    The influences of water/cement ratio and admixtures on carbonation resistance of sulphoaluminate cement-based high performance concrete(HPC)were investigated.The experimental results show that with the decreasing water/cement ratio,the carbonation depth of sulphoaluminate cement-based HPC is decreased remarkably,and the carbonation resistance capability is also improved with the adding admixtures.The morphologies and structure characteristics of sulphoaluminate cement hydration products before and after carbonation were analyzed using SEM and XRD.The analysis results reveal that the main hydration product of sulphoaluminate cement,that is ettringite(AFt),de-composes after carbonation.

  9. Preparation of free-standing high quality mesoporous carbon membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiqing [ORNL; Liang, Chengdu [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Zhu, Qing [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    Flat-sheet mesoporous carbon membranes with uniform pore size (e.g., 6.4 nm) and controllable thickness were prepared by pyrolysis of polymeric composite films, which were formed by self-assembly of phenolic resin and block copolymer under acidic conditions. Hexamethylenetetramine was selected as a solid cross-linker to control the rheology of polymeric carbon precursors so that the flat-sheet polymeric films could undergo carbonization without deformation, ensuring the preparation of mesoporous carbon membranes on a large scale with high quality. Gas transport properties through these mesoporous carbon membranes are also reported.

  10. High-concentration planar microtracking photovoltaic system exceeding 30% efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Jared S.; Grede, Alex J.; Wang, Baomin; Lipski, Michael V.; Fisher, Brent; Lee, Kyu-Tae; He, Junwen; Brulo, Gregory S.; Ma, Xiaokun; Burroughs, Scott; Rahn, Christopher D.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Rogers, John A.; Giebink, Noel C.

    2017-08-01

    Prospects for concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) power are growing as the market increasingly values high power conversion efficiency to leverage now-dominant balance of system and soft costs. This trend is particularly acute for rooftop photovoltaic power, where delivering the high efficiency of traditional CPV in the form factor of a standard rooftop photovoltaic panel could be transformative. Here, we demonstrate a fully automated planar microtracking CPV system solar cell at >660× concentration ratio over a 140∘ full field of view. In outdoor testing over the course of two sunny days, the system operates automatically from sunrise to sunset, outperforming a 17%-efficient commercial silicon solar cell by generating >50% more energy per unit area per day in a direct head-to-head competition. These results support the technical feasibility of planar microtracking CPV to deliver a step change in the efficiency of rooftop solar panels at a commercially relevant concentration ratio.

  11. Highly oriented carbon nanotube papers made of aligned carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Ding; Song Pengcheng; Liu Changhong; Wu Wei; Fan Shoushan [Tsinghua-Foxconn Nanotechnology Research Center and Department of Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: chliu@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2008-02-20

    Paper-like carbon nanotube (CNT) materials have many important applications such as in catalysts, in filtration, actuators, capacitor or battery electrodes, and so on. Up to now, the most popular way of preparing buckypapers has involved the procedures of dispersion and filtration of a suspension of CNTs. In this work, we present a simple and effective macroscopic manipulation of aligned CNT arrays called 'domino pushing' in the preparation of the aligned thick buckypapers with large areas. This simple method can efficiently ensure that most of the CNTs are well aligned tightly in the buckypaper. The initial measurements indicate that these buckypapers have better performance on thermal and electrical conductance. These buckypapers with controllable structure also have many potential applications, including supercapacitor electrodes.

  12. Waste to Energy Potential - A High Concentration Anaerobic Bioreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    REPORT DATE 23 MAY 2012 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Waste to Energy Potential - A High...and fermentative bacteria break down organic carbon to VFAs Acetogens break down VFAs to CH3CO2 − and H2 + Acetoclastic methanogens break...s -999999 999999 7 481 su -999999 999999 0 .. -999999 999999 HCA8 pti Flo$&-tdgc Tan.\\ feed su -999999 999999 0 .. -999999 999999 A-l>o -999999

  13. Balancing the carbon market. Analysing the international carbon market and abatement costs in 2020 for low-concentration targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Den Elzen, M.G.J.; Mendoza-Beltran, M.A.; Piris-Cabezas, P.; Van Vuuren, D.P.

    2009-08-15

    This report describes our analysis of the impact of various policy choices and scientific uncertainties on the price of tradable emission units on the global carbon market in 2020 and the associated abatement costs. Our analysis was done under the assumption that the overall goal is to stabilise long-term greenhouse gas concentrations at 450 ppm CO2-eq. To meet these stabilisation targets on the long-term, Annex I countries as a group need to reduce by 25-40% below 1990 levels by 2020, and non-Annex I countries as a group need to keep emissions substantially below baseline (about 15 to 30%). The integrated modelling framework FAIR 2.2 is used for our analysis. The main findings of this study are: the degree of ambition for reductions of Annex I and non-Annex I countries is the most important policy choice influencing the price and abatement costs. Other less important policy choices include the ambition of US climate policy and the participation of the developing countries in the global carbon market. By allowing the use of forest-based options - including avoiding deforestation - for compliance in a well-designed carbon trading system, the global abatement costs could be reduced by between 25% and 65%. This would also make ambitious mitigation targets more feasible. In addition to the policy choices, important scientific uncertainties, in particular the baseline emissions (i.e. emissions in the absence of climate policy) and the assumed marginal abatement costs, strongly influence the carbon market.

  14. Aerosol mass and black carbon concentrations, two year-round observations at NCO-P (5079 m, Southern Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Marinoni

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol mass and the absorbing fraction are important variables, needed to constrain the role of atmospheric particles in the Earth radiation budget, both directly and indirectly through CCN activation. In particular, their monitoring in remote areas and mountain sites is essential for determining source regions, elucidating the mechanisms of long range transport of anthropogenic pollutants, and validating regional and global models. Since March 2006, aerosol mass and black carbon concentration have been monitored at the Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid, a permanent high-altitude research station located in the Khumbu valley at 5079 m a.s.l. below Mt. Everest. The first two-year averages of PM1 and PM1-10 mass were 1.94 μg m−3 and 1.88 μg m−3, with standard deviations of 3.90 μg m−3 and 4.45 μg m−3, respectively, while the black carbon concentration average is 160.5 ng m−3, with a standard deviation of 296.1 ng m−3. Both aerosol mass and black carbon show well defined annual cycles, with a maximum during the pre-monsoon season and a minimum during the monsoon. They also display a typical diurnal cycle during all the seasons, with the lowest particle concentration recorded during the night, and a considerable increase during the afternoon, revealing the major role played by thermal winds in influencing the behaviour of atmospheric compounds over the high Himalayas. The aerosol concentration is subject to high variability: in fact, as well as frequent "background conditions" (55% of the time when BC concentrations are mainly below 100 ng m−3, concentrations up to 5 μg m−3 are reached during some episodes (a few days every year in the pre-monsoon seasons. The variability of PM and BC is the result of both short-term changes due to thermal wind development in the valley, and long-range transport/synoptic circulation. At

  15. Aerosol mass and black carbon concentrations, a two year record at NCO-P (5079 m, Southern Himalayas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Marinoni

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol mass and the absorbing fraction are important variables, needed to constrain the role of atmospheric particles in the Earth radiation budget, both directly and indirectly through CCN activation. In particular, their monitoring in remote areas and mountain sites is essential for determining source regions, elucidating the mechanisms of long range transport of anthropogenic pollutants, and validating regional and global models. Since March 2006, aerosol mass and black carbon concentration have been monitored at the Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid, a permanent high-altitude research station located in the Khumbu valley at 5079 m a.s.l. below Mt. Everest. The first two-year averages of PM1 and PM1−10 mass were 1.94 μg m−3 and 1.88 μg m−3, with standard deviations of 3.90 μg m−3 and 4.45 μg m−3, respectively, while the black carbon concentration average is 160.5 ng m−3, with a standard deviation of 296.1 ng m−3. Both aerosol mass and black carbon show well defined annual cycles, with a maximum during the pre-monsoon season and a minimum during the monsoon. They also display a typical diurnal cycle during all the seasons, with the lowest particle concentration recorded during the night, and a considerable increase during the afternoon, revealing the major role played by thermal winds in influencing the behaviour of atmospheric compounds over the high Himalayas. The aerosol concentration is subject to high variability: in fact, as well as frequent "background conditions" (55% of the time when BC concentrations are mainly below 100 ng m−3, concentrations up to 5 μg m−3 are reached during some episodes (a few days every year in the pre-monsoon seasons. The variability of PM and BC is the result of both short-term changes due to thermal wind development in the valley, and long-range transport/synoptic circulation

  16. Beryllium-10 concentrations in water samples of high northern latitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strobl, C.; Eisenhauer, A.; Schulz, V.; Baumann, S.; Mangini, A. [Heidelberger Akademie der Wissenschaften, Heildelberg (Germany); Kubik, P.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    {sup 10}Be concentrations in the water column of high northern latitudes were not available so far. We present different {sup 10}Be profiles from the Norwegian-Greenland Sea, the Arctic Ocean, and the Laptev Sea. (author) 3 fig., 3 refs.

  17. Optimization of Scatterer Concentration in High-Gain Scattering Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Jiu-Gao; ZHU He-Yuan; SUN Die-Chi; DU Ge-Guo; LI Fu-Ming

    2001-01-01

    We report the scatterer concentration-dependent behaviour of laser action in high-gain scattering media. Amodified model of a random laser is proposed to explain the experimental results in good agreement. We mayuse this modified model to design and optimize the random laser system. A further detailed model is needed toquantitatively analyse the far-field distribution of random laser action.

  18. Electrochemical Hydrogen Storage in a Highly Ordered Mesoporous Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan eLiu

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A highly order mesoporous carbon has been synthesized through a strongly acidic, aqueous cooperative assembly route. The structure and morphology of the carbon material were investigated using TEM, SEM and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. The carbon was proven to be meso-structural and consisted of graphitic micro-domain with larger interlayer space. AC impedance and electrochemical measurements reveal that the synthesized highly ordered mesoporous carbon exhibits a promoted electrochemical hydrogen insertion process and improved capacitance and hydrogen storage stability. The meso-structure and enlarged interlayer distance within the highly ordered mesoporous carbon are suggested as possible causes for the enhancement in hydrogen storage. Both hydrogen capacity in the carbon and mass diffusion within the matrix were improved.

  19. Seasonal variations in concentration and composition of dissolved organic carbon in Tokyo Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kubo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations of recalcitrant and bioavailable dissolved organic carbon (DOC and their seasonal variations were investigated at three stations in Tokyo Bay, Japan, and in two freshwater sources flowing into the bay to evaluate the significance of DOC degradation for the carbon budget in coastal waters and carbon export to the open ocean. Recalcitrant DOC (RDOC was differentiated from bioavailable DOC (BDOC as a remnant of DOC after 150 days of bottle incubation. On average, RDOC accounted for 78% of the total DOC in Shibaura sewage treatment plant (STP effluent, 67% in the upper Arakawa River water, 66% in the lower Arakawa River water, and 78% in surface bay water. RDOC concentrations were higher than BDOC at all stations. In freshwater environments, RDOC concentrations were almost constant throughout the year. In the bay, RDOC was higher during spring and summer than during autumn and winter. The relative abundance of RDOC in the bay derived from phytoplankton, terrestrial, and open oceanic waters was estimated to be 9%, 33%, and 58%, respectively, by multiple regression analysis of RDOC, salinity, and chl a. In addition, comparison with previous data from 1972 revealed that concentrations of RDOC and BDOC have decreased by 33% and 74% at freshwater sites and 39% and 76% at Tokyo Bay, while the ratio of RDOC to DOC has increased. The change in DOC concentration and composition was probably due to increased amounts of sewage treatment plant effluent entering the system. Tokyo Bay exported DOC, mostly RDOC, to the open ocean because of remineralization of BDOC.

  20. [Toxic effects of high concentrations of ammonia on Euglena gracilis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Shi, Xiao-Rong; Cui, Yi-Bin; Li, Mei

    2013-11-01

    Ammonia is among the common contaminants in aquatic environments. The present study aimed at evaluation of the toxicity of ammonia at high concentration by detecting its effects on the growth, pigment contents, antioxidant enzyme activities, and DNA damage (comet assay) of a unicellular microalga, Euglena gracilis. Ammonia restrained the growth of E. gracilis, while at higher concentrations, ammonia showed notable inhibition effect, the growth at 2 000 mg x L(-1) was restrained to 55.7% compared with that of the control; The contents of photosynthetic pigments and protein went up with increasing ammonia dosage and decreased when the ammonia concentration was above 1000 mg x L(-1); In addition, there was an obvious increase in SOD and POD activities, at higher concentration (2 000 mg x L(-1)), activities of SOD and POD increased by 30.7% and 49.4% compared with those of the control, indicating that ammonia could promote activities of antioxidant enzymes in E. gracilis; The degree of DNA damage observed in the comet assay increased with increasing ammonia concentration, which suggested that high dose of ammonia may have potential mutagenicity on E. gracilis.

  1. Hydronium-dominated ion transport in carbon-dioxide-saturated electrolytes at low salt concentrations in nanochannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pennathur, Sumita; Kristensen, Jesper; Crumrine, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Nanochannel ion transport is known to be governed by surface charge at low ionic concentrations. In this talk, we show that this surface charge is dominated by hydronium ions arising from dissolution of ambient atmospheric carbon dioxide. By refining the electrokinetic model of the nanochannel...... the surface reaction equilibrium constant for silica/hydronium reactions. The model describes our experimental data with aqueous potassium chloride solutions in 165-nm-high silica nanochannels well, and furthermore, by comparing model predictions with measurements in bulk and in nanochannels with hydrochloric...

  2. Carbon fluxes acclimate more strongly to elevated growth temperatures than to elevated CO2 concentrations in a northern conifer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, Yulia; Way, Danielle A

    2016-08-01

    Increasing temperatures and atmospheric CO2 concentrations will affect tree carbon fluxes, generating potential feedbacks between forests and the global climate system. We studied how elevated temperatures and CO2 impacted leaf carbon dynamics in Norway spruce (Picea abies), a dominant northern forest species, to improve predictions of future photosynthetic and respiratory fluxes from high-latitude conifers. Seedlings were grown under ambient (AC, c. 435 μmol mol(-1) ) or elevated (EC, 750 μmol mol(-1) ) CO2 concentrations at ambient, +4 °C, or +8 °C growing temperatures. Photosynthetic rates (Asat ) were high in +4 °C/EC seedlings and lowest in +8 °C spruce, implying that moderate, but not extreme, climate change may stimulate carbon uptake. Asat , dark respiration (Rdark ), and light respiration (Rlight ) rates acclimated to temperature, but not CO2 : the thermal optimum of Asat increased, and Rdark and Rlight were suppressed under warming. In all treatments, the Q10 of Rlight (the relative increase in respiration for a 10 °C increase in leaf temperature) was 35% higher than the Q10 of Rdark , so the ratio of Rlight to Rdark increased with rising leaf temperature. However, across all treatments and a range of 10-40 °C leaf temperatures, a consistent relationship between Rlight and Rdark was found, which could be used to model Rlight in future climates. Acclimation reduced daily modeled respiratory losses from warm-grown seedlings by 22-56%. When Rlight was modeled as a constant fraction of Rdark , modeled daily respiratory losses were 11-65% greater than when using measured values of Rlight . Our findings highlight the impact of acclimation to future climates on predictions of carbon uptake and losses in northern trees, in particular the need to model daytime respiratory losses from direct measurements of Rlight or appropriate relationships with Rdark .

  3. High-efficiency organic solar concentrators for photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Michael J; Mapel, Jonathan K; Heidel, Timothy D; Goffri, Shalom; Baldo, Marc A

    2008-07-11

    The cost of photovoltaic power can be reduced with organic solar concentrators. These are planar waveguides with a thin-film organic coating on the face and inorganic solar cells attached to the edges. Light is absorbed by the coating and reemitted into waveguide modes for collection by the solar cells. We report single- and tandem-waveguide organic solar concentrators with quantum efficiencies exceeding 50% and projected power conversion efficiencies as high as 6.8%. The exploitation of near-field energy transfer, solid-state solvation, and phosphorescence enables 10-fold increases in the power obtained from photovoltaic cells, without the need for solar tracking.

  4. Bioleaching of marmatite in high concentration of iron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱冠周; 吴伯增; 覃文庆; 蓝卓越

    2002-01-01

    Bioleaching of marmatite with a culture of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans in high concentration of iron was studied, the results show that the zinc leaching rate of the mixed culture is faster than that of the sole Thiobacillus ferrooxidans, the increasing iron concentration in leaching solution enhances the zinc leaching rate. The SEM analysis indicates that the chemical leaching residues is covered with porous solid layer of elemental sulfur, while elemental sulfur is not found in the bacterial leaching residues. The primary role of bacteria in bioleaching of sphalerite is to oxidize the chemical leaching products of ferrous ion and elemental sulfur, thus the indirect mechanism prevails in the bioleaching of marmatite.

  5. High concentration of calcium ions in Golgi apparatus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUESHAOBAI; M.ROBERTNICOUD; 等

    1994-01-01

    The interphase NIH3T3 cells were vitally fluorescentstained with calcium indicator fluo-3 and Glogi probe C6-NBD-ceramide,and then the single cells were examined by laser scanning confocal microscopy(LSCFM) for subcellular distributions of Ca2+ and the location of Golgi apparatus.In these cells,the intracellular Ca2+ were found to be highly concentrated in the Golgi apparatus.The changes of distribution of cytosolic high Ca2+ region and the Golgi apparatus coincided with the cell cycle phase.In calcium free medium,when the plasma membrane of the cells which had been loaded with fluo-3/AM were permeated by digitonin,the fluorescence of the Golgi region decreased far less than that of the cytosol.Our results indicated that the Glogi lumen retained significantly high concentration of free calcium.

  6. Review of silicon solar cells for high concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, R. J.

    1982-06-01

    The factors that limit the performance of high concentration silicon solar cells are reviewed. The design of a conventional high concentration cell is discussed, together with the present state of the art. Unconventional cell designs that have been proposed to overcome the limitations of the conventional design are reviewed and compared. The current status of unconventional cells is reviewed. Among the unconventional cells discussed are the interdigitated back-contact cell, the double-sided cell, the polka dot cell, and the V-groove cell. It is noted that all the designs for unconventional cells require long diffusion lengths for high efficiency operation, even though the demands in this respect are less for those cells with the optical path longer than the diffusion path.

  7. Water-soluble organic carbon in urban aerosol: concentrations, size distributions and contribution to particulate matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timonen, H. J.; Saarikoski, S. K.; Aurela, M. A.; Saarnio, K. M.; Hillamo, R. E. (Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland))

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the concentrations and particle mass size distributions of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in urban aerosols. The sample collection was carried out in spring 2006 at the SMEAR III station in Helsinki, Finland, by using a size-segregating method (MOUDI) and by collecting sub-micrometer fraction of aerosols on the filter. During the three-month measurement period, a major 12-day biomass burning pollution episode was observed. Concentrations of WSOC, organic carbon, monosaccharide anhydrides, inorganic ions and some organic acids (oxalic, succinic and malonic acid) were analyzed from the PM{sub 1} samples. The measured OC and WSOC concentrations varied in ranges 0.67-15.7 mug m-3 and 0.26-10.7 mug m3, respectively. The WSOC/OC concentration ratio was between 0.30 and 0.89 with an average of 0.54. Size distributions of WSOC, inorganic ions and total mass were determined from the MOUDI samples. WSOC had bimodal size distributions with a clear accumulation mode below 1 mum of particle aerodynamic diameter and minor coarse mode at sizes > 1 mum. (orig.)

  8. Elucidating Geochemical Controls on the Concentration and Composition of Organic Carbon in Deep Pelagic Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, E. R.; Hansel, C. M.; Anderson, C. H.; Murray, R. W.; Dyar, M. D.; Nordlund, D.; Wankel, S. D.; Johnson, D.; Spivack, A. J.; Sauvage, J.; McKinley, C. C.; Homola, K.; Present, T. M.; Pockalny, R. A.; D'Hondt, S.

    2015-12-01

    In marine sediments, total organic carbon (OC) content correlates strongly with mineral surface area as well as the abundance of specific mineral classes such as clays and metal oxides. Adsorption to mineral surfaces and the formation of mineral-organic matter aggregates are thought to provide protection against remineralization, yet the extent and mechanism(s) of this protection are unknown. Accordingly, the goal of this research is to elucidate the role of minerals in preserving carbon and the potential for this reservoir of mineral-hosted carbon to support heterotrophic metabolisms in the otherwise carbon-poor subseafloor. Here, we characterize the composition of OC in oxic and suboxic sediments collected during R/V Knorr expedition 223 to the subtropical western North Atlantic in November 2014. We find that OC concentrations decrease linearly over ~25 meters burial depth, from ~0.15 to 0.075 mol OC/kg solid. Organic C/N varies but is consistently less than Redfield values of ~6. Relative contributions of functional groups quantified using bulk-scale Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy change with depth and site lithology/geochemistry. We further observe microscale heterogeneity, including discrete carbonate particles amid disperse aromatic and amide/carboxylic-rich organic carbon, using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) coupled to NEXAFS. In the suboxic sediments, there is a transition from Mn(III/IV) phases toward more reduced phases shown by X-ray absorption spectroscopy between ~3-11 meters below core top, approximately between the interstitial water nitrate and nitrite maxima. Conversely, Fe(III)-bearing minerals are present throughout the core and may contribute to stabilization of OC. By further coupling micro- and macro-scale analysis, the role of minerals in OC sequestration in the marine subsurface will come to light.

  9. STRUCTURE AND CHARACTERISTICS OF PATENTED HIGH-CARBON WIRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ju. Borisenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of bainite structure on mechanical characteristics of wire of steel 80 after patenting is studied. The quantity and structure state of bainite, providing high complex of mechanical characteristics of high-carbon wire, is determined.

  10. STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF PATENTED HIGH-CARBON WIRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Borisenko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of bainite structure on mechanical characteristics of wire of steel 80 after patenting is studied. The quantity and structure state of bainite, providing high complex of mechanical characteristics of high-carbon wire, is determined.

  11. Comparation of Organic and Elemental carbon concentrations in PM2.5 in five Mexican cities: Potencial Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Murillo, J.; Cardenas, B.; Campos-Ramos, A.; Blanco-Jimenez, S.; Angeles-Garcia, F.

    2011-12-01

    During 2006-2010 the National Center for Environmental Research and Training of the National Institute of Ecology of Mexico, carried out several short field studies in the cities of Salamanca, Gto, Tula, Hgo; Guadalajara, Jal; Toluca, Edo Mex; and Tijuana, BC to determine concentration and chemical compositions of PM2.5. These cities, although different in size population have all important industrial and area sources that contribute to high PM2.5 concentrations and therefore potential health impacts. Chemical analyses included organic and elemental carbon for which DRI Model 2001 Thermal/Optical Carbon Analyzer (Atmoslytic Inc, Calabasas, CA, USA) was used. Highest PM2.5 mass mean concentrations were obtained in Salamanca (46 μg/m3), followed by Toluca (43 μg/m3), Guadalajara (37 μg/m3), Tula (20 μg/m3) and Tijuana (18 μg/m3). For Salamanca and Tula, annual levels exceeded the Mexican PM2.5 annual standard of 15 μg/m3. Total carbonaceous aerosol accounted for 41.4%, 41.1%, 32.3%, 29.5% and 29.1% of PM2.5 mass in Tula, Toluca, Guadalajara, Salamanca and Tijuana, respectively. Higher OC2, OC3 and OC4 carbon fractions were observed in Guadalajara, Tijuana and Toluca, indicating an important contribution of gasoline and diesel vehicles emissions in these cities. As for Tula and Salamanca, cities in which refineries and power plants are present, OC3, OC4, EC1 and EC2 represent the higher fractions which could be attributed to stationary sources that use heavy fuels for their combustion process. UNMIX and PMF analyses were used in order to identify the most important sources that contributes to OC and EC concentrations.

  12. Decomposition of high concentration SF6 using an electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Youn-Suk; Lee, Sung-Joo; Choi, Chang Yong; Park, Jun-Hyeong; Kim, Tak-Hyun; Jung, In-Ha

    2016-07-01

    In this study, high concentration SF6 (2-10%) was decomposed using an electron beam irradiation. Various influential factors were investigated to improve the destruction and removal efficiency (DRE) of SF6. The initial concentrations of SF6, absorbed doses, SF6/H2 ratios and retention times were the main factors of concern. As a result, the DRE increased as the adsorbed dose and retention time increased. The DRE of SF6 also increased up to 20% approximately when H2 was added to the reaction mixture. On the other hand, the DRE of SF6 decreased as initial concentrations of SF6 increased. Finally, the main by-product formed from SF6 decomposition by the electron beam was HF.

  13. CARBON FIBER COMPOSITES IN HIGH VOLUME

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Charles David [ORNL; Das, Sujit [ORNL; Jeon, Dr. Saeil [Volvo Trucks North America

    2014-01-01

    Vehicle lightweighting represents one of several design approaches that automotive and heavy truck manufacturers are currently evaluating to improve fuel economy, lower emissions, and improve freight efficiency (tons-miles per gallon of fuel). With changes in fuel efficiency and environmental regulations in the area of transportation, the next decade will likely see considerable vehicle lightweighting throughout the ground transportation industry. Greater use of carbon fiber composites and light metals is a key component of that strategy. This paper examines the competition between candidate materials for lightweighting of heavy vehicles and passenger cars. A 53-component, 25 % mass reduction, body-in-white cost analysis is presented for each material class, highlighting the potential cost penalty for each kilogram of mass reduction and then comparing the various material options. Lastly, as the cost of carbon fiber is a major component of the elevated cost of carbon fiber composites, a brief look at the factors that influence that cost is presented.

  14. Gas phase tricholoethylene removal at low concentration using activated carbon fiber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jun; HUANG Zheng-hong; WANG Zhan-sheng; KANG Fei-yu

    2004-01-01

    The breakthrough adsorption behaviors of gas phase trichloroethylene in a packed bed of activated carbon fibers(ACF) were investigated. The specific surface area of the ACF was 600 m2/g, 1400 m2/g and 1600 m2/g, respectively, and the concentration of trichioroethylene ranged from 270 mg/m3 to 2700 mg/m3 . Results showed that the capacity of adsorption increased with increasing specific surface area, the relationship between the logarithms of 10% breakthrough time and concentration was approximately linear over the experimental range, the breakthrough time decreased with increasing temperature and humidity. The breakthrough curves at different inlet concentration or different temperature can be predicted by several simple theoretical models with good agreements.

  15. Life at high salt concentrations, intracellular KCl concentrations, and acidic proteomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aharon eOren

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Extremely halophilic microorganisms that accumulate KCl for osmotic balance (the Halobacteriaceae, Salinibacter have a large excess of acidic amino acids in their proteins. This minireview explores the occurrence of acidic proteomes in halophiles of different physiology and phylogenetic affiliation. For fermentative bacteria of the order Halanaerobiales, known to accumulate KCl, an acidic proteome was predicted. However, this is not confirmed by genome analysis. The reported excess of acidic amino acids is due to a high content of Gln and Asn, which yield Glu and Asp upon acid hydrolysis. The closely related Halorhodospira halophila and Halorhodospira halochloris use different strategies to cope with high salt. The first has an acidic proteome and accumulates high KCl concentrations at high salt concentrations; the second does not accumulate KCl and lacks an acidic proteome. Acidic proteomes can be predicted from the genomes of some moderately halophilic aerobes that accumulate organic osmotic solutes (Halomonas elongata, Chromohalobacter salexigens and some marine bacteria. Based on the information on cultured species it is possible to understand the pI profiles predicted from metagenomic data from hypersaline environments.

  16. Removal of H2S using molten carbonate at high temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Makoto; Otaka, Maromu

    2013-12-01

    Gasification is considered to be an effective process for energy conversion from various sources such as coal, biomass, and waste. Cleanup of the hot syngas produced by such a process may improve the thermal efficiency of the overall gasification system. Therefore, the cleanup of hot syngas from biomass gasification using molten carbonate is investigated in bench-scale tests. Molten carbonate acts as an absorbent during desulfurization and dechlorination and as a thermal catalyst for tar cracking. In this study, the performance of molten carbonate for removing H2S was evaluated. The temperature of the molten carbonate was set within the range from 800 to 1000 °C. It is found that the removal of H2S is significantly affected by the concentration of CO2 in the syngas. When only a small percentage of CO2 is present, desulfurization using molten carbonate is inadequate. However, when carbon elements, such as char and tar, are continuously supplied, H2S removal can be maintained at a high level. To confirm the performance of the molten carbonate gas-cleaning system, purified biogas was used as a fuel in power generation tests with a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). The fuel cell is a high-performance sensor for detecting gaseous impurities. When purified gas from a gas-cleaning reactor was continuously supplied to the fuel cell, the cell voltage remained stable. Thus, the molten carbonate gas-cleaning reactor was found to afford good gas-cleaning performance.

  17. Effects of elevated carbon dioxide and sucrose concentrations on Arabidopsis thaliana root architecture and anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee-Ho, E.; Walton, L.J.; Reid, D.M.; Yeung, E.C.; Kurepin, L.V. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Biology

    2007-03-15

    Plant root growth is known to be influenced by higher levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Roots of some species grown in hydroponics under elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations may be more competitive sinks for photosynthetic assimilates than roots grown under lower CO{sub 2} conditions. Root branching patterns may also be influenced by elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations. Studies have also shown that factors such as soil compaction, salinity and the availability of nitrate, phosphorous, oxygen and water also influence root growth, and the effects of higher CO{sub 2} on roots can be confounded by such environmental factors. This study evaluated the effects of elevated carbon dioxide and sucrose concentrations on Arabidopsis thaliana root growth, morphology, and architecture. Both ambient and elevated CO{sub 2} levels were used along with various sucrose concentrations. The study revealed that A. thaliana plants grown on a phytagar medium in small chambers with elevated CO{sub 2} had longer roots, more lateral root growth than plants grown in ambient CO{sub 2}. Roots in elevated CO{sub 2} were found to have wider root diameters, and more secondary growth. The addition of sucrose to the media closely resembled the effects of elevated CO{sub 2}. In addition, the increase in sucrose concentration had a bigger effect on root morphology under ambient, than elevated CO{sub 2}. Therefore, both elevated CO{sub 2} and increased sucrose concentrations promote root growth by increasing their number, length, and diameter. The dichotomy branching index (DBI) also dropped resulting in a more dichotomous branching pattern. 34 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Relationships between Stomatal Behavior and Internal Carbon Dioxide Concentration in Crassulacean Acid Metabolism Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, W

    1979-06-01

    Measurements of internal gas phase CO(2) concentration, stomatal resistance, and acid content were made in Crassulacean acid metabolism plants growing under natural conditions. High CO(2) concentrations, sometimes in excess of 2%, were observed during the day in a range of taxonomically widely separated plants (Opuntia ficus-indica L., Opuntia basilaris Engelm. and Bigel., Agave desertii Engelm., Yucca schidigera Roezl. ex Ortiges, Ananas comosus [L.] Merr., Aloe vera L., Cattleya sp. and Phalanopsis sp.) and below ambient air concentrations were observed at night.Stomatal resistance was always high when CO(2) concentration was high and experiments in which attempts were made to manipulate internal CO(2) concentrations gave data consistent with stomatal behavior in Crassulacean acid metabolism being controlled by internal CO(2) concentration. Exogenous CO(2) applied in darkness at a concentration similar to those observed in the light caused stomatal resistance to increase.In pads of Opuntia basilaris Engelm. and Bigel. subjected to severe water stress internal gas phase CO(2) concentrations exhibited fluctuations opposite in phase to fluctuations in acid content. Stomatal resistance remained high and the opening response to low CO(2) concentration was almost entirely eliminated.

  19. Organic phosphorus mineralisation in a temperate grassland soil under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarosch, Klaus A.; Andresen, Louise; Gorenflo, André D.; Müller, Christoph; Frossard, Emmanuel; Bünemann, Else K.

    2016-04-01

    Background: Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for all biota and significant proportions of P in soil are present in organic form. Increased atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide ([CO2]) have been shown to influence plant P uptake traits, resulting in plant-mediated changes in soil P pools. However, little is known on the effect of elevated [CO2] on organic P mineralisation rates in soil. Study design & hypotheses: A 33P isotopic dilution experiment was performed with soils of the 17-year-old Giessen free air carbon dioxide enrichment (GiFACE) - trial. At the GiFACE, three plots are treated with 20 % elevated [CO2] while three control plots receive ambient air. We hypothesised that i) the observed positive effect of elevated [CO2] on plant growth translates into differences in soil organic P mineralisation rates between treated and untreated plots, resulting in ii) differences in soil organic P pools. Methods: Fresh soil (0-8 cm) was sampled from each plot, labelled with a carrier free 33P solution and incubated for 36 days at 19° C in the dark. On six time points, inorganic P and 33P in soil filtrates, soil microorganisms (by liquid fumigation) and resin extractable P were quantified. The baseline of 33P isotopic dilution was assessed from a short term batch experiment and extrapolated for 36 days. Gross organic P mineralisation rates were determined as the difference between isotopic dilution in the incubated soils (physicochemical + biological processes) minus extrapolated values (physicochemical processes only). Additionally, enzyme addition assays on alkaline soil extracts were performed to quantify different soil organic P classes, using enzymes with a known substrate specificity. Results & Discussion: Gross organic P mineralisation rates were high during the first three days (5.5 - 34.3 mg P kg-1 d-1), possibly due to the soil disturbance at labelling soils with 33P. However, gross organic P mineralisation decreased rapidly to rates between 0

  20. Cluster analysis of particulate matter (PM10) and black carbon (BC) concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žibert, Janez; Pražnikar, Jure

    2012-09-01

    The monitoring of air-pollution constituents like particulate matter (PM10) and black carbon (BC) can provide information about air quality and the dynamics of emissions. Air quality depends on natural and anthropogenic sources of emissions as well as the weather conditions. For a one-year period the diurnal concentrations of PM10 and BC in the Port of Koper were analysed by clustering days into similar groups according to the similarity of the BC and PM10 hourly derived day-profiles without any prior assumptions about working and non-working days, weather conditions or hot and cold seasons. The analysis was performed by using k-means clustering with the squared Euclidean distance as the similarity measure. The analysis showed that 10 clusters in the BC case produced 3 clusters with just one member day and 7 clusters that encompasses more than one day with similar BC profiles. Similar results were found in the PM10 case, where one cluster has a single-member day, while 7 clusters contain several member days. The clustering analysis revealed that the clusters with less pronounced bimodal patterns and low hourly and average daily concentrations for both types of measurements include the most days in the one-year analysis. A typical day profile of the BC measurements includes a bimodal pattern with morning and evening peaks, while the PM10 measurements reveal a less pronounced bimodality. There are also clusters with single-peak day-profiles. The BC data in such cases exhibit morning peaks, while the PM10 data consist of noon or afternoon single peaks. Single pronounced peaks can be explained by appropriate cluster wind speed profiles. The analysis also revealed some special day-profiles. The BC cluster with a high midnight peak at 30/04/2010 and the PM10 cluster with the highest observed concentration of PM10 at 01/05/2010 (208.0 μg m-3) coincide with 1 May, which is a national holiday in Slovenia and has very strong tradition of bonfire parties. The clustering of

  1. Modelling impacts of changes in carbon dioxide concentration, climate and nitrogen deposition on carbon sequestration by European forests and forest soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wamelink, G.W.W.; Wieggers, H.J.J.; Reinds, G.J.; Kros, J.; Mol-Dijkstra, J.P.; Oijen, van M.; Vries, de W.

    2009-01-01

    Changes in the Earth's atmosphere are expected to influence the growth, and therefore, carbon accumulation of European forests. We identify three major changes: (1) a rise in carbon dioxide concentration, (2) climate change, resulting in higher temperatures and changes in precipitation and (3) a

  2. Estimation of local concentration from measurements of stochastic adsorption dynamics using carbon nanotube-based sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Hong; Lee, Jay H. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Braatz, Richard D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge (United States)

    2016-01-15

    This paper proposes a maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method for estimating time varying local concentration of the target molecule proximate to the sensor from the time profile of monomolecular adsorption and desorption on the surface of the sensor at nanoscale. Recently, several carbon nanotube sensors have been developed that can selectively detect target molecules at a trace concentration level. These sensors use light intensity changes mediated by adsorption or desorption phenomena on their surfaces. The molecular events occurring at trace concentration levels are inherently stochastic, posing a challenge for optimal estimation. The stochastic behavior is modeled by the chemical master equation (CME), composed of a set of ordinary differential equations describing the time evolution of probabilities for the possible adsorption states. Given the significant stochastic nature of the underlying phenomena, rigorous stochastic estimation based on the CME should lead to an improved accuracy over than deterministic estimation formulated based on the continuum model. Motivated by this expectation, we formulate the MLE based on an analytical solution of the relevant CME, both for the constant and the time-varying local concentrations, with the objective of estimating the analyte concentration field in real time from the adsorption readings of the sensor array. The performances of the MLE and the deterministic least squares are compared using data generated by kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations of the stochastic process. Some future challenges are described for estimating and controlling the concentration field in a distributed domain using the sensor technology.

  3. Spatial variability of aerosol and black carbon concentrations in the troposphere of the Russian Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Valerii S.; Panchenko, Mikhail V.; Paris, Jean D.; Nédéléc, Philippe; Chernov, Dmitry G.; Shmargunov, Vladimir P.

    2015-11-01

    A cycle of flights of the Optik TU-134 Flying Laboratory of IAO SB RAS over regions of Western Siberia and the Russian Arctic (55.0-74.8°N, 61.3-82.9°E) was carried out on October 15-17 of 2014 within the framework of the YAK-AEROSIB Russian—French Project. The mass concentrations of submicron aerosol and Black Carbon (BC) in the troposphere up to a height of 8.5 km were measured in the flights. The ranges of variability were 0.3-20 μg/m3 for the aerosol concentration and 0.02-1 μg/m3 for the BC concentration. In the subpolar latitudes of 71-74.8°N, the lower levels of aerosol (0.8-6 μg/m3) and BC (0.02-0.3 μg/m3) were observed. The comparison of the results of airborne sensing in 2008 and 2014 has shown that in the Western Subartic the aerosol and BC concentrations in the vertical profiles up to six times exceeded those observed in the Eastern Subarctic (0.3-1 μg/m3 and 10-50 ng/m3). The excess of the mean integral BC concentrations and the aerosol optical depth was, on average, 2-2.5 times (0.16 mg/m2; 0.02). In the region of the Kara Sea at heights of 0.5-2 and 4-6 km, the excess of the aerosol content in the western sector in comparison with the eastern one was, on average, 2 times, while for the black carbon the excess achieved 7 times at heights of 1-2 km (0.25- 0.035 μg/m3). The mean integral concentrations of aerosol and black carbon ˜ 1.3 times exceeded those in the clearer eastern region of the sea (0.31 mg/m2; 0.049). The obtained estimates indicate the decrease of the aerosol and BC concentrations in the subpolar latitudes of the Russian Federation from the west to the east.

  4. Hydrogen depolarized carbon dioxide concentrator performance improvements and cell pair structural tests. [for manned space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddleston, J. D.; Aylward, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The investigations and testing associated with the CO2 removal efficiency and voltage degradation of a hydrogen depolarized carbon oxide concentrator are reported. Also discussed is the vibration testing of a water vapor electrolysis cell pair. Performance testing of various HDC cell pairs with Cs2CO3 electrolyte provided sufficient parametric and endurance data to size a six man space station prototype CO2 removal system as having 36 HDC cell pairs, and to verify a life capability exceeding six moths. Testing also demonstrated that tetramethylammonium carbonate is an acceptable HDC electrolyte for operating over the relative humidity range of 30 to 90 percent and over a temperature range of 50 to 80 F.

  5. Modeling of Carbon Concentration Profile Development During Both Atmosphere and Low Pressure Carburizing Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y.; Zhang, L.; Sisson, R. D.

    2013-07-01

    Heat treaters need an effective simulation tool to predict the carburization performance of a variety of steels. The tool is needed to not only predict the carbon profile but also optimize the process in terms of the cycle time and the total cost. CarbToolhas been developed to meet these needs for gas and vacuum carburization. In this article, CarbToolpredictions were compared with industrial experimental results for three types of steels (AISI 8620, 5120, and 4320), heat treated by both gas and vacuum carburizing processes. Based on the agreement of model predictions and experimental results, it is found that CarbToolcould be used to predict the carbon concentration profile for a variety of alloys in both gas and vacuum carburizing processes.

  6. Determination of Concentration Dependent Diffusion Coefficients of Carbon in Expanded Austenite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract. In the present paper various experimental procedures to experimentally determine the concentration dependent diffusion coefficient of carbon in expanded austenite are evaluated. To this end thermogravimetric carburization was simulated for various experimental conditions and the evaluated...... composition dependent diffusivity of carbon derived from the simulated experiments was compared with the input data. The most promising procedure for an accurate determination is shown to be stepwise gaseous carburizing of thin foils in a gaseous atmosphere; the finer the stepsize, the more accurate...... the approximation of the diffusivity. Thermogravimetry was applied to continuously monitor the weight change of thin foils of AISI 316 during carburizing in CO-H2 gas mixtures for one of the simulated experimental procedures....

  7. Biodegradation studies of oil sludge containing high hydrocarbons concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olguin-Lora, P.; Munoz-Colunga, A.; Castorena-Cortes, G.; Roldan-Carrillo, T.; Quej Ake, L.; Reyes-Avila, J.; Zapata-Penasco, I.; Marin-Cruz, J.

    2009-07-01

    Oil industry has a significant impact on environment due to the emission of, dust, gases, waste water and solids generated during oil production all the way to basic petrochemical product manufacturing stages. the aim of this work was to evaluate the biodegradation of sludge containing high hydrocarbon concentration originated by a petroleum facility. A sludge sampling was done at the oil residuals pool (ORP) on a gas processing center. (Author)

  8. Probing the Salt Concentration Dependent Nucelobase Distribution in a Single-Stranded DNA-Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Hybrid with Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumadwip; Patel, Nisheet; Chakrabarti, Rajarshi

    2016-01-28

    The hybrids of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and single stranded DNA (ssDNA) are novel nanoscale materials having remarkable applications in nanotechnology. The absorption of nucleobases on the surface of a SWCNT depends strongly on the ionic strength of the medium. In this paper, using atomistic molecular dynamics we have shown that at low salt concentration ssDNA wraps on the surface of SWCNT through hydrophobic π-π stacking between the DNA bases and the sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms of the carbon nanotube. At high salt concentration, however, the DNA molecule adopts a partially folded structure and the ssDNA-SWCNT wrapping gets weakened significantly due to the self-stacking of the DNA bases. Our study can find relevance in CNT mediated gene delivery processes where subsequent unwrapping of the gene from its carrier is anticipated across the cell membrane regulated by an existing salt concentration gradient.

  9. Particle sedimentation monitoring in high-concentration slurries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagasawa, Yoshihiro; Kato, Zenji; Tanaka, Satoshi

    2016-11-01

    In this study, the sedimentation states of particles in high-concentration slurries were elucidated by monitoring their internal states. We prepared transparent high-concentration silica slurries by adjusting the refractive index of the aqueous glycerol liquid in which the particles were dispersed to match that of the silica particles. In addition, a fluorescent dye was dissolved in the liquid. Then, we directly observed the individual and flocculated particles in the slurries during sedimentation by confocal laser scanning fluorescent microscopy. The particles were found to sediment very slowly while exhibiting fluctuating motion. The particle sedimentation rate in the high-concentration slurry with the aqueous glycerol solution (η =0.068 Pa. s ) and a particle volume fraction on the order of 0.3 was determined to be 1.58 ± 0.66 μ m. min-1 on the basis of the obtained image sequences for 24.9 h. In-situ observation provides a large amount of information about the sedimentation behavior of particles in condensed matter.

  10. Feasibility Study on High Concentrating Photovoltaic Power Towers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frohberger, Dirk; Jaus, Joachim; Wiesenfarth, Maike; Schramek, Philipp; Bett, Andreas W.

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents an analysis on the concept of high concentrating PV power towers. A feasibility study is conducted in order to evaluate the future potential of this technology. Objective of the analysis is to provide an improved basis for establishing research and development priorities for the PV power tower concept. Performance assessments and cost calculations for a 1 MW prototype PV tower power are derived. Based on the assumption of a highly homogeneously illuminated receiver, levelized costs of electricity of 0.29 €/kWh have been calculated for a prototype PV tower power.

  11. Effects of high nitrogen concentrations on the growth of submersed macrophytes at moderate phosphorus concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing; Wang, Hong-Zhu; Li, Yan; Shao, Jian-Chun; Liang, Xiao-Min; Jeppesen, Erik; Wang, Hai-Jun

    2015-10-15

    Eutrophication of lakes leading to loss of submersed macrophytes and higher turbidity is a worldwide phenomenon, attributed to excessive loading of phosphorus (P). However, recently, the role of nitrogen (N) for macrophyte recession has received increasing attention. Due to the close relationship between N and P loading, disentanglement of the specific effects of these two nutrients is often difficult, and some controversy still exists as to the effects of N. We studied the effects of N on submersed macrophytes represented by Vallisneria natans (Lour.) Hara in pots positioned at three depths (0.4 m, 0.8 m, and 1.2 m to form a gradient of underwater light conditions) in 10 large ponds having moderate concentrations of P (TP 0.03 ± 0.04 mg L(-1)) and five targeted concentrations of total nitrogen (TN) (0.5, 2, 10, 20, and 100 mg L(-1)), there were two ponds for each treatment. To study the potential shading effects of other primary producers, we also measured the biomass of phytoplankton (ChlaPhyt) and periphyton (ChlaPeri) expressed as chlorophyll a. We found that leaf length, leaf mass, and root length of macrophytes declined with increasing concentrations of TN and ammonium, while shoot number and root mass did not. All the measured growth indices of macrophytes declined significantly with ChlaPhyt, while none were significantly related to ChlaPeri. Neither ChlaPhyt nor ChlaPeri were, however, significantly negatively related to the various N concentrations. Our results indicate that shading by phytoplankton unrelated to the variation in N loading and perhaps toxic stress exerted by high nitrogen were responsible for the decline in macrophyte growth.

  12. Theoretical constraints on oxygen and carbon dioxide concentrations in the Precambrian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, J. F.

    1987-01-01

    Simple (one-dimensional) climate models suggest that carbon dioxide concentrations during the Archean must have been at least 100-1000 times the present level to keep the Earth's surface temperature above freezing in the face of decreased solar luminosity. Such models provide only lower bounds on CO2, so it is possible that CO2 levels were substantially higher than this and that the Archean climate was much warmer than today. Periods of extensive glaciation during the early and late Proterozoic, on the other hand, indicate that the climate at these times was relatively cool. To be consistent with climate models CO2 partial pressures must have declined from approximately 0.03 to 0.3 bar around 2.5 Ga ago to between 10(-3) and 10(-2) bar at 0.8 Ga ago. This steep decrease in carbon dioxide concentrations may be inconsistent with paleosol data, which implies that pCO2 did not change appreciably during that time. Oxygen was essentially absent from the Earth's atmosphere and oceans prior to the emergence of a photosynthetic source, probably during the late Archean. During the early Proterozoic the atmosphere and surface ocean were apparently oxidizing, while the deep ocean remained reducing. An upper limit of 6 x 10(-3) bar for pO2 at this time can be derived by balancing the burial rate of organic carbon with the rate of oxidation of ferrous iron in the deep ocean. The establishment of oxidizing conditions in the deep ocean, marked by the disappearance of banded iron formations approximately 1.7 Ga ago, permitted atmospheric oxygen to climb to its present level. O2 concentrations may have remained substantially lower than today, however, until well into the Phanerozoic.

  13. Carbon budget estimation of a subarctic catchment using a dynamic ecosystem model at high spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J.; Miller, P. A.; Persson, A.; Olefeldt, D.; Pilesjo, P.; Heliasz, M.; Jackowicz-Korczynski, M.; Yang, Z.; Smith, B.; Callaghan, T. V.; Christensen, T. R.

    2015-05-01

    A large amount of organic carbon is stored in high-latitude soils. A substantial proportion of this carbon stock is vulnerable and may decompose rapidly due to temperature increases that are already greater than the global average. It is therefore crucial to quantify and understand carbon exchange between the atmosphere and subarctic/arctic ecosystems. In this paper, we combine an Arctic-enabled version of the process-based dynamic ecosystem model, LPJ-GUESS (version LPJG-WHyMe-TFM) with comprehensive observations of terrestrial and aquatic carbon fluxes to simulate long-term carbon exchange in a subarctic catchment at 50 m resolution. Integrating the observed carbon fluxes from aquatic systems with the modeled terrestrial carbon fluxes across the whole catchment, we estimate that the area is a carbon sink at present and will become an even stronger carbon sink by 2080, which is mainly a result of a projected densification of birch forest and its encroachment into tundra heath. However, the magnitudes of the modeled sinks are very dependent on future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Furthermore, comparisons of global warming potentials between two simulations with and without CO2 increase since 1960 reveal that the increased methane emission from the peatland could double the warming effects of the whole catchment by 2080 in the absence of CO2 fertilization of the vegetation. This is the first process-based model study of the temporal evolution of a catchment-level carbon budget at high spatial resolution, including both terrestrial and aquatic carbon. Though this study also highlights some limitations in modeling subarctic ecosystem responses to climate change, such as aquatic system flux dynamics, nutrient limitation, herbivory and other disturbances, and peatland expansion, our study provides one process-based approach to resolve the complexity of carbon cycling in subarctic ecosystems while simultaneously pointing out the key model developments for capturing

  14. Carbon Solubility and Mass Action Concentrations of Fe-Cr-C Melts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An empirical equation of carbon solubility in Fe-Cr-C melts is regressed based on the experimental data from references. A calculating model of mass action concentrations for these melts is formulated on the basis of the coexistence theory of metallic melts involving compound formation, the phase diagram of Cr-C system as well as thermodynamic data of Fe-Cr-C melts. According to the model, the standard Gibbs free energies of formation of CrC and Cr3C2 are obtained. Satisfactory agreement between the calculated and measured values shows that the model can reflect the structural characteristics of Fe-Cr-C melts.

  15. Strength of briquettes made of Cu concentrate and carbon-bearing materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Oleksiak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, results of the research on application of residual fine-grained, carbon-bearing materials as coke substitutes in the shaft process of copper matter smelting are discussed. The addition was introduced into the charge as a component of concentrate-made briquettes, then, its effects on properties of the obtained briquettes were analysed for their compressive and drop strengths. The results of investigations confirmed the potential use of proposed alternative fuels (as briquette components in the process of copper matte smelting.

  16. Assessing recent measurement techniques for quantifying black carbon concentration in snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Schwarz

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We evaluate the performance of the Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2 and the Integrating Sphere/Integrating Sandwich Spectrophotometer (ISSW in quantifying the concentration of refractory black carbon (BC in snow samples. We find that the SP2 can be used to measure BC mass concentration in snow with substantially larger uncertainty (60% than for atmospheric sampling (<30%. Achieving this level of accuracy requires careful assessment of nebulizer performance and SP2 calibration with consideration of the fact that BC in snow tends to larger sizes than typically observed in the atmosphere. Once these issues are addressed, the SP2 is able to measure the size distribution and mass concentration of BC in the snow. Laboratory comparison of the SP2 and the Integrating Sphere/Integrating Sandwich Spectrophotometer (ISSW revealed significant biases in the estimate of BC concentration from the ISSW when test samples contained dust or non-absorbing particulates. These results suggest that current estimates of BC mass concentration in snow and ice using either the SP2 or the ISSW may be associated with significant underestimates of uncertainty.

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Major Factors Affecting Black Carbon Transport and Concentrations in the Unique Atmospheric Structures of Urban Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Marissa Shuang

    combined contribution from both traffic and atmospheric circulation accounted for observed spatiotemporal variability in PM2.5 concentrations. Based on these experimental and quantitative analyses, a three-dimensional model is proposed for contaminant's transport in highly urbanized Cincinnati region. Furthermore this dissertation explored implications on roadside pollutant evaluation, and on the risk analysis of future fuel substitution using biodiesel. The Gaussian-type models are poor in determining the effective emission factor particularly under nocturnal thermal inversion for which the effective emission factor is a function of lapse rate in the morning. The Gaussian models are applicable in daytime after the breakdown of thermal inversion. Lastly, among three types of fuels examined, the proposed butanol-added biodiesel-diesel blend (D80B15Bu5) yielded a good compromise between black carbon and NOx emissions while maintaining proper combustion properties. It is also found that the emission contained less black carbon and had higher organic carbon (OC) and elemental (EC) ratio than tested petroleum diesel. As demonstrated in other parts of this study, the OC-enriched emission will likely affect the black carbon occurrence and PM concentrations in the urban environments. Overall, it is suggested that urban formation and biofuel usage define the environmental impacts of black carbon, and are the focus for climate change mitigation and adaptation.

  18. Contribution of various carbon sources toward isoprene synthesis mediated by altered atmospheric CO2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, A. M.; Asensio, D.; Eller, A. S.; Wilkinson, M. J.; Schnitzler, J.; Jackson, R. B.; Monson, R. K.

    2010-12-01

    suggests that trees grown in sub-ambient CO2 also have significantly higher isoprene flux rates (4.678 nmol m-2 s-1) as compared to those grown in ambient (2.563 nmol m-2 s-1 ) and elevated (2.193 nmol m-2 s-1 ) CO2. However, trees from sub-ambient CO2 exhibit the lowest proportion of total isoprene molecules completely labeled (P Photorespiration, in conjunction with a small carbon pool and high turnover rates, may explain why trees grown in sub-ambient CO2 have a large percentage of isoprene incompletely labeled, despite exhibiting the fastest labeled carbon pools. These data offer a possible explanation for the large isoprene emissions observed from trees grown in sub-ambient CO2 and presents in fine detail the rate and sequence of recently assimilated carbon contributing to isoprene production in different CO2 environments.

  19. Strategies for the production of high concentrations of bioethanol from seaweeds: production of high concentrations of bioethanol from seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Mitsunori; Kawai, Shigeyuki; Murata, Kousaku

    2013-01-01

    Bioethanol has attracted attention as an alternative to petroleum-derived fuel. Seaweeds have been proposed as some of the most promising raw materials for bioethanol production because they have several advantages over lignocellulosic biomass. However, because seaweeds contain low contents of glucans, i.e., polysaccharides composed of glucose, the conversion of only the glucans from seaweed is not sufficient to produce high concentrations of ethanol. Therefore, it is also necessary to produce ethanol from other specific carbohydrate components of seaweeds, including sulfated polysaccharides, mannitol, alginate, agar and carrageenan. This review summarizes the current state of research on the production of ethanol from seaweed carbohydrates for which the conversion of carbohydrates to sugars is a key step and makes comparisons with the production of ethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. This review provides valuable information necessary for the production of high concentrations of ethanol from seaweeds.

  20. Carbonation of subduction-zone serpentinite (high-pressure ophicarbonate; Ligurian Western Alps) and implications for the deep carbon cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scambelluri, Marco; Bebout, Gray E.; Belmonte, Donato; Gilio, Mattia; Campomenosi, Nicola; Collins, Nathan; Crispini, Laura

    2016-05-01

    Much of the long-term carbon cycle in solid earth occurs in subduction zones, where processes of devolatilization, partial melting of carbonated rocks, and dissolution of carbonate minerals lead to the return of CO2 to the atmosphere via volcanic degassing. Release of COH fluids from hydrous and carbonate minerals influences C recycling and magmatism at subduction zones. Contradictory interpretations exist regarding the retention/storage of C in subducting plates and in the forearc to subarc mantle. Several lines of evidence indicate mobility of C, of uncertain magnitude, in forearcs. A poorly constrained fraction of the 40-115 Mt/yr of C initially subducted is released into fluids (by decarbonation and/or carbonate dissolution) and 18-43 Mt/yr is returned at arc volcanoes. Current estimates suggest the amount of C released into subduction fluids is greater than that degassed at arc volcanoes: the imbalance could reflect C subduction into the deeper mantle, beyond subarc regions, or storage of C in forearc/subarc reservoirs. We examine the fate of C in plate-interface ultramafic rocks, and by analogy serpentinized mantle wedge, via study of fluid-rock evolution of marble and variably carbonated serpentinite in the Ligurian Alps. Based on petrography, major and trace element concentrations, and carbonate C and O isotope compositions, we demonstrate that serpentinite dehydration at 2-2.5 GPa, 550 °C released aqueous fluids triggering breakdown of dolomite in nearby marbles, thus releasing C into fluids. Carbonate + olivine veins document flow of COH fluids and that the interaction of these COH fluids with serpentinite led to the formation of high-P carbonated ultramafic-rock domains (high-P ophicarbonates). We estimate that this could result in the retention of ∼0.5-2.0 Mt C/yr in such rocks along subduction interfaces. As another means of C storage, 1 to 3 km-thick layers of serpentinized forearc mantle wedge containing 50 modal % dolomite could sequester 1.62 to

  1. The soil organic carbon content of anthropogenically altered organic soils effects the dissolved organic matter quality, but not the dissolved organic carbon concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Stefan; Tiemeyer, Bärbel; Bechtold, Michel; Lücke, Andreas; Bol, Roland

    2016-04-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is an important link between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This is especially true for peatlands which usually show high concentrations of DOC due to the high stocks of soil organic carbon (SOC). Most previous studies found that DOC concentrations in the soil solution depend on the SOC content. Thus, one would expect low DOC concentrations in peatlands which have anthropogenically been altered by mixing with sand. Here, we want to show the effect of SOC and groundwater level on the quantity and quality of the dissolved organic matter (DOM). Three sampling sites were installed in a strongly disturbed bog. Two sites differ in SOC (Site A: 48%, Site B: 9%) but show the same mean annual groundwater level of 15 and 18 cm below ground, respectively. The SOC content of site C (11%) is similar to Site B, but the groundwater level is much lower (-31 cm) than at the other two sites. All sites have a similar depth of the organic horizon (30 cm) and the same land-use (low-intensity sheep grazing). Over two years, the soil solution was sampled bi-weekly in three depths (15, 30 and 60 cm) and three replicates. All samples were analyzed for DOC and selected samples for dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and delta-13C and delta-15N. Despite differences in SOC and groundwater level, DOC concentrations did not differ significantly (A: 192 ± 62 mg/L, B: 163 ± 55 mg/L and C: 191 ± 97 mg/L). At all sites, DOC concentrations exceed typical values for peatlands by far and emphasize the relevance even of strongly disturbed organic soils for DOC losses. Individual DOC concentrations were controlled by the temperature and the groundwater level over the preceding weeks. Differences in DOM quality were clearer. At site B with a low SOC content, the DOC:DON ratio of the soil solution equals the soil's C:N ratio, but the DOC:DON ratio is much higher than the C:N ratio at site A. In all cases, the DOC:DON ratio strongly correlates with delta-13C. There is no

  2. [Carbon emissions and low-carbon regulation countermeasures of land use change in the city and town concentrated area of central Liaoning Province, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Feng-ming; Liang, Wen-juan; Niu, Ming-fen; Wang, Jiao-yue

    2016-02-01

    Carbon emissions due to land use change have an important impact on global climate change. Adjustment of regional land use patterns has a great scientific significance to adaptation to a changing climate. Based on carbon emission/absorption parameters suitable for Liaoning Province, this paper estimated the carbon emission of land use change in the city and town concentrated area of central Liaoning Province. The results showed that the carbon emission and absorption were separately 308.51 Tg C and 11.64 Tg C from 1997 to 2010. It meant 3.8% of carbon emission. was offset by carbon absorption. Among the 296.87 Tg C net carbon emission of land use change, carbon emission of remaining land use type was 182.24 Tg C, accounting for 61.4% of the net carbon emission, while the carbon emission of land use transformation was 114.63 Tg C, occupying the rest 38.6% of net carbon emission. Through quantifying the mapping relationship between land use change and carbon emission, it was shown that during 1997-2004 the contributions of remaining construction land (40.9%) and cropland transform ation to construction land (40.6%) to carbon emission were larger, but the greater contributions to carbon absorption came from cropland transformation to forest land (38.6%) and remaining forest land (37.5%). During 2004-2010, the land use types for carbon emission and absorption were the same to the period of 1997-2004, but the contribution of remaining construction land to carbon emission increased to 80.6%, and the contribution of remaining forest land to carbon absorption increased to 71.7%. Based on the carbon emission intensity in different land use types, we put forward the low-carbon regulation countermeasures of land use in two aspects. In carbon emission reduction, we should strict control land transformation to construction land, increase the energy efficiency of construction land, and avoid excessive development of forest land and water. In carbon sink increase, we should

  3. The preparation and ethanol fermentation of high-concentration sugars from steam-explosion corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hui; Wang, Fengqin; Yin, Shuangyao; Ren, Tianbao; Song, Andong

    2015-05-01

    In the field of biofuel ethanol, high-concentration- reducing sugars made from cellulosic materials lay the foundation for high-concentration ethanol fermentation. In this study, corn stover was pre-treated in a process combining chemical methods and steam explosion; the cellulosic hydrolyzed sugars obtained by fed-batch saccharification were then used as the carbon source for high-concentration ethanol fermentation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae 1308, Angel yeast, and Issatchenkia orientalis were shake-cultured with Pachysolen tannophilus P-01 for fermentation. Results implied that the ethanol yields from the three types of mixed strains were 4.85 g/100 mL, 4.57 g/100 mL, and 5.02 g/100 mL (separately) at yield rates of 91.6, 89.3, and 92.2%, respectively. Therefore, it was inferred that shock-fermentation using mixed strains achieved a higher ethanol yield at a greater rate in a shorter fermentation period. This study provided a theoretical basis and technical guidance for the fermentation of industrial high-concentrated cellulosic ethanol.

  4. High-Conductance Thermal Interfaces Based on Carbon Nanotubes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a novel thermal interface material (TIM) that is based on an array of vertical carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for high heat flux applications. For...

  5. Large reductions in urban black carbon concentrations in the United States between 1965 and 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Preble, Chelsea V.; Hadley, Odelle L.; Bond, Tami C.; Apte, Joshua S.

    2017-02-01

    Long-term pollutant concentration trends can be useful for evaluating air quality effects of emission controls and historical transitions in energy sources. We employed archival records of coefficient of haze (COH), a now-retired measure of light-absorbing particulate matter, to re-construct historical black carbon (BC) concentrations at urban locations in the United States (U.S.). The following relationship between COH and BC was determined by reinstating into service COH monitors beside aethalometers for two years in Vallejo and one year in San Jose, California: BC (μg m-3) = 6.7COH + 0.1, R2 = 0.9. Estimated BC concentrations in ten states stretching from the East to West Coast decreased markedly between 1965 and 1980: 5-fold in Illinois, Ohio, and Virginia, 4-fold in Missouri, and 2.5-fold in Pennsylvania. Over the period from the mid-1960s to the early 2000s, annual average BC concentrations in New Jersey and California decreased from 13 to 2 μg m-3 and 4 to 1 μg m-3, respectively, despite concurrent increases in fossil fuel consumption from 1.6 to 2.1 EJ (EJ = 1018 J) in New Jersey and 4.2 to 6.4 EJ in California. New Jersey's greater reliance on BC-producing heavy fuel oils and coal in the 1960s and early 1970s and subsequent transition to cleaner fuels explains why the decrease was larger in New Jersey than California. Patterns in seasonal and weekly BC concentrations and energy consumption trends together indicate that reducing wintertime emissions - namely substituting natural gas and electricity for heavy fuel oil in the residential sector - and decreasing emissions from diesel vehicles contributed to lower ambient BC concentrations. Over the period of study, declining concentrations of BC, a potent and short-lived climate warming pollutant, contrast increasing fossil fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the U.S. Declining BC emissions may have had the benefit of mitigating some atmospheric warming driven by increased CO2 emissions with

  6. Removal of Toluene at Low Concentration with Activated Carbon Filter : Adsorption Analysis using Tenax Tube and TD-GCMSD

    OpenAIRE

    Shan, Chi-En

    2016-01-01

    Various studies have demonstrated the usefulness of adsorption of activated carbon on VOCs removal. Large porosity and high adsorption allows activated carbon to remove very small particles. This project was commissioned by the company name Genano Oy to test the activated carbon filter in their air purifier and hence to provide a database for the company. The purpose of this thesis was to study the effectiveness of impregnated activated carbon filter on toluene removal. Experiment was co...

  7. Highly Increased Flow-Induced Power Generation on Plasmonically Carbonized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jangheon; Lee, Janghyeon; Kim, Soohyun; Jung, Wonsuk

    2016-11-09

    We generate networks and carbonization between individualized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by an optimized plasmonic heating process using a halogen lamp to improve electrical properties for flow-induced energy harvesting. These properties were characterized by Raman spectra, a field-emission-scanning probe, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and thermographic camera. The electrical sheet resistance of carbonized SWCNTs was decreased to 2.71 kΩ/□, 2.5 times smaller than normal-SWCNTs. We demonstrated flow-induced voltage generation on SWCNTs at various ion concentrations of NaCl. The generated voltage and current for the carbonized-SWCNTs were 9.5 and 23.5 times larger than for the normal-SWCNTs, respectively, based on the electron dragging mechanism.

  8. Chronic Diarrhea Associated with High Teriflunomide Blood Concentration

    OpenAIRE

    Duquette, André; Frenette, Anne Julie; Doré, Maxime

    2016-01-01

    Objective To report the case of a patient treated with leflunomide that presented with chronic diarrhea associated with high teriflunomide blood concentration. Case Summary An 84-year-old woman taking leflunomide 20 mg once daily for the past 2 years to treat rheumatoid arthritis (RA) was investigated for severe chronic diarrhea that had been worsening for the past 5 months. The patient’s general condition progressively deteriorated and included electrolyte imbalances and a transient loss of ...

  9. Physiological responses of Pinus sylvestris to changing carbon dioxide and ozone concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holopainen, T. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science; Palomaeki, V. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Faculty of Forestry; Helmisaari, H.S. [Finnish Forest Research Inst., Helsinki (Finland)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The objective of this research is to study the effects of elevated ozone, carbon dioxide and their combination on ultrastructural, physiological and biochemical responses of Scots pine needles and how these effects are reflected to photosynthesis, carbohydrate and nutrient allocation and finally to shoot and root growth of trees. In addition the interactions of the studied trees and mycorrhizal fungi as well as insect herbivores are studied. The exposures have been running only for two growing periods and it seems necessary to continue the experiment over the third growing season in 1996. Since the analyses are partially incomplete, only preliminary conclusions are possible at the moment. The slightly increased shoot growth and needle width and increased amount of starch in chloroplasts point to the slight stimulating effect of elevated CO{sub 2} among the chamber treatments. Altogether the growth of the seedlings was best in the chamberless treatment indicating a negative chamber effect. The elevated ozone significantly increased the chlorotic mottling and overall yellowing of second year needles as well as caused increased density of chloroplast stroma and declined photosynthesis, all these responses being often related to ozone exposures. The ozone related responses appeared at both CO{sub 2} levels indicating no clear protection due to elevated CO{sub 2}. The ozone or carbon dioxide treatments were not able to significantly change nutrient concentrations, insect herbivory or carbon allocation among the secondary compounds of needles. A tendency of increased carbon allocation to fine roots due to ozone but not so clearly to CO{sub 2} was observed

  10. Regenerative Carbonate-Based Thermochemical Energy Storage System for Concentrating Solar Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gangwal, Santosh [Southern Research Inst., Durham, NC (United States); Muto, Andrew [Southern Research Inst., Durham, NC (United States)

    2017-08-30

    Southern Research has developed a thermochemical energy storage (TCES) technology that utilizes the endothermic-exothermic reversible carbonation of calcium oxide (lime) to store thermal energy at high-temperatures, such as those achieved by next generation concentrating solar power (CSP) facilities. The major challenges addressed in the development of this system include refining a high capacity, yet durable sorbent material and designing a low thermal resistance low-cost heat exchanger reactor system to move heat between the sorbent and a heat transfer fluid under conditions relevant for CSP operation (e.g., energy density, reaction kinetics, heat flow). The proprietary stabilized sorbent was developed by Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI). A factorial matrix of sorbent compositions covering the design space was tested using accelerated high throughput screening in a thermo-gravimetric analyzer. Several promising formulations were selected for more thorough evaluation and one formulation with high capacity (0.38 g CO2/g sorbent) and durability (>99.7% capacity retention over 100 cycles) was chosen as a basis for further development of the energy storage reactor system. In parallel with this effort, a full range of currently available commercial and developmental heat exchange reactor systems and sorbent loading methods were examined through literature research and contacts with commercial vendors. Process models were developed to examine if a heat exchange reactor system and balance of plant can meet required TCES performance and cost targets, optimizing tradeoffs between thermal performance, exergetic efficiency, and cost. Reactor types evaluated included many forms, from microchannel reactor, to diffusion bonded heat exchanger, to shell and tube heat exchangers. The most viable design for application to a supercritical CO2 power cycle operating at 200-300 bar pressure and >700°C was determined to be a combination of a diffusion bonded heat

  11. Effect of high soil copper concentration on mycorrhizal grapevines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales, Amaia; Santos, Erika S.; Viegas, Wanda; Aran, Diego; Pereira, Sofia H.; Vidigal, Patricia; Lopes, Carlos M.; Abreu, M. Manuela

    2017-04-01

    Repeated application of Copper (Cu) based fungicides in vineyards since the end of the 19th century has led to a significant increase in the concentration of this chemical element in many viticultural soils. Although Cu is an essential micronutrient for most organisms, it can be toxic for the development and survival of plants and soil (micro)organisms at high concentrations and eventually lead to yield loses in viticulture, as it negatively affects key physiological and biogeochemical processes. However, some soil microorganisms, including arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), have developed adaptive mechanisms for persistence in environments with supra-optimal levels of essential elements or in the presence of harmful ones, as well as for increasing plant tolerance to such abiotic stress conditions. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effect of a high total soil concentration of Cu on microbial soil activity as well as on the development of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal grapevines. A microcosm assay was set up under greenhouse and controlled conditions. Touriga Nacional grapevine variety plants grafted onto 1103P rootstocks were inoculated either with the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis or Funneliformis mosseae, or were left as non-inoculated controls. After three months, they were transplanted to containers filled with 4 kg of a sandy soil (pH: 7.0; electrical conductivity: 0.08 mS/cm; [organic C]: 5.6 g/kg; [N-NO3]: 1.1 mg/kg; [N-NH4]: 2.5 mg/kg; [extractable K]: 45.1 mg/kg; [extractable P]: 52.3 mg/kg), collected near to a vineyard in Pegões (Portugal). Two treatments were carried out: with and without Cu application. The soil with high Cu concentration was prepared by adding 300 mg Cu/kg (in the form of an aqueous solution of CuSO4·5H2O) followed by an incubation during four weeks in plastic bags at room temperature in dark. Physico-chemical soil characteristics (pH, electrical conductivity and nutrients concentration in available fraction), soil

  12. Effect of temperature and concentration on thermal conductivity and viscosity of ferrofluid loaded with carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavar, A.; Saghafian, M.; Salimpour, M. R.; Shafii, M. B.

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the thermal conductivity and viscosity of a hybrid nanofluid containing tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles and gum arabic (GA) coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs), experimentally. The magnetic nanoparticles and CNTs are physically attached as the result of interaction between the TMAH and GA molecules. The morphology and structure of the samples are characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experiments are carried out in the magnetic nanoparticles volume concentration range of 0.1-0.9 %, CNT volume concentration range of 0.05-1.35 % and the temperature range of 25-55 °C. The viscosity of the hybrid nanofluid increases with the increase of volume concentration, while it decreases with the increase of temperature. Besides, results show that hybrid nanofluid behaves as a shear thinning fluid. Furthermore, it is observed that the thermal conductivity of the hybrid nanofluid enhances with temperature and volume concentration.

  13. Relating urban airborne particle concentrations to shipping using carbon based elemental emission ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Graham R.; Juwono, Alamsyah M.; Friend, Adrian J.; Cheung, Hing-Cho; Stelcer, Eduard; Cohen, David; Ayoko, Godwin A.; Morawska, Lidia

    2014-10-01

    This study demonstrates a novel method for testing the hypothesis that variations in primary and secondary particle number concentration (PNC) in urban air are related to residual fuel oil combustion at a coastal port lying 30 km upwind, by examining the correlation between PNC and airborne particle composition signatures chosen for their sensitivity to the elemental contaminants present in residual fuel oil. Residual fuel oil combustion indicators were chosen by comparing the sensitivity of a range of concentration ratios to airborne emissions originating from the port. The most responsive were combinations of vanadium and sulphur concentration ([S], [V]) expressed as ratios with respect to black carbon concentration ([BC]). These correlated significantly with ship activity at the port and with the fraction of time during which the wind blew from the port. The average [V] when the wind was predominantly from the port was 0.52 ng m-3 (87%) higher than the average for all wind directions and 0.83 ng m-3 (280%) higher than that for the lowest vanadium yielding wind direction considered to approximate the natural background. Shipping was found to be the main source of V impacting urban air quality in Brisbane. However, contrary to the stated hypothesis, increases in PNC related measures did not correlate with ship emission indicators or ship traffic. Hence at this site ship emissions were not found to be a major contributor to PNC compared to other fossil fuel combustion sources such as road traffic, airport and refinery emissions.

  14. Particulate Matter Concentrations in East Oakland's High Street Corridor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, P.; Jackson, J.; Lewis, R.; Marigny, A.; Mitchell, J. D.; Nguyen, R.; Philips, B.; Randle, D.; Romero, D.; Spears, D.; Telles, C.; Weissman, D.

    2012-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM) is a complex mixture of small solid pieces and/or liquid droplets in the air. High concentrations of PM can pose a serious health hazard because inhalation can result in breathing problems and/or aggravate asthma. Long term exposure can increase the likelihood of respiratory problems like asthma and emphysema as well as cancer. The smaller the particles, the deeper they can get into the respiratory system. For this reason, the smallest particles, those smaller than 2.5 micrometers in diameter (PM2.5), are the most dangerous. PM2.5 is largely emitted from motor vehicles burning fuels that don't break down fully. Our research team investigated the levels of PM2.5 as well as particles smaller than 10 micrometers (PM10) and total suspended particulate (TSP) along the northeast-southwest trending High Street Corridor, near Fremont High School in East Oakland, California. Using the Aerocet 531 mass particle counter, team members walked through neighborhoods and along major roads within a 1 mile radius of Fremont High School. The Aerocet 531 recorded two minute average measurements of all the relevant PM sizes, which are reported in mg/m3. Measurements were consistently taken in the morning, between 8:30 and 11:30 am. Preliminary results indicate maximum readings of all PM sizes at sites that are in close proximity to a major freeway (Interstate-880). These results support our initial hypothesis that proximity to major roads and freeways, especially those with high diesel-fuel burning truck traffic, would be the primary factor affecting PM concentration levels. Preliminary median and maximum readings all suggest particulate matter levels below what the EPA would consider unhealthy or risky.

  15. Regulation of the carbon-concentrating mechanism in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 in response to changing light intensity and inorganic carbon availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnap, Robert L; Nambudiri, Rehka; Holland, Steven

    2013-11-01

    Photosynthetic organisms possess regulatory mechanisms to balance the various inputs of photosynthesis in a manner that minimizes over-excitation of the light-driven electron transfer apparatus, while maximizing the reductive assimilation of inorganic nutrients, most importantly inorganic carbon (Ci). Accordingly, the regulatory interactions coordinating responses to fluctuating light and responses to Ci availability are of fundamental significance. The inducible high affinity carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 has been studied in order to understand how it is integrated with the light and dark reactions of photosynthesis. To probe genetic regulatory mechanisms, genomic DNA microarrays were used to survey for differences in the expression of genes in response to a shift to high light conditions under conditions of either high or low Ci availability. Discrepancies in published experiments exist regarding the extent to which genes for the CCM are upregulated in response to high light treatment. These discrepancies may be due to critical differences in Ci availability existing during the different high light experiments. The present microarray experiments reexamine this by comparing high light treatment under two different Ci regimes: bubbling with air and bubbling with air enriched with CO2. While some transcriptional responses such as the downregulation of antenna proteins are quite similar, pronounced differences exist with respect to the differential expression of CCM and affiliated genes. The results are discussed in the context of a recent analysis revealing that small molecules that are intermediates of the light and dark reaction photosynthetic metabolism act as allosteric effectors of the DNA-binding proteins which modulate the expression of the CCM genes.

  16. Influences of carbon and silicon on blister formation in scale surface during high temperature oxidation of carbon steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Deuk-Jung; Lee, Jae-Sang; Koo, Yang-Mo

    2017-07-01

    The in-situ blistering phenomena of the scale `surface' was investigated on three carbon steels with respect to carbon and silicon concentrations, such as 0.05 wt%C, 0.2 wt%C, and 0.2 wt%C-0.2 wt%Si. The oxidation and blistering kinetics and blister area fraction during high temperature oxidation were analyzed. The average thickness of the surface scale by oxidation during isothermal holding from 800 to 1200 °C in dry air was observed to decrease when the amount of carbon increased and/or when Si was inserted additionally. Thus, the blistering behavior depended primarily on a change in oxidation temperature ( T ox ) as well as amounts of carbon and silicon in the matrix. It is also revealed that such blister formation would be triggered by growth of internal stress and active generations of CO and/or CO2 gases at the interface between the scale and matrix since carbon would result in an increase in the blister formation by generating CO and/or CO2 gas. In addition, silicon might play an important role in preventing the blister formation at T ox below 900 °C by reducing the thickness of the surface scale whilst silicon might enhance the blister formation by means of the appreciable micro-void formation in the scale layer at T ox higher 900 °C.

  17. High manganese concentrations in rocks at Gale crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Nina L.; Fischer, Woodward W.; Wiens, Roger C.; Grotzinger, John; Ollila, Ann M.; Anderson, Ryan B.; Clark, Benton C.; Gellert, Ralf; Mangold, Nicolas; Maurice, Sylvestre; Le Mouélic, Stéphane; Nachon, Marion; Schmidt, Mariek E.; Berger, Jeffrey; Clegg, Samuel M.; Forni, Olivier; Hardgrove, Craig; Melikechi, Noureddine; Newsom, Horton E.; Sautter, Violaine

    2014-01-01

    The surface of Mars has long been considered a relatively oxidizing environment, an idea supported by the abundance of ferric iron phases observed there. However, compared to iron, manganese is sensitive only to high redox potential oxidants, and when concentrated in rocks, it provides a more specific redox indicator of aqueous environments. Observations from the ChemCam instrument on the Curiosity rover indicate abundances of manganese in and on some rock targets that are 1–2 orders of magnitude higher than previously observed on Mars, suggesting the presence of an as-yet unidentified manganese-rich phase. These results show that the Martian surface has at some point in time hosted much more highly oxidizing conditions than has previously been recognized.

  18. Biodegradation of pitch-based high performance carbon fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, T. (Yamaguchi Univ., Yamaguchi, (Japan). Faculty of Education)

    1992-09-10

    Although carbon fibers are widely used in various purposes because of their excellent mechanical properties, their behavior under biodegradation by microorganisms has not been elucidated. To elucidate the process of biodegradation of carbon fibers is important for understanding thoroughly the durability and the functionality of the fibers. In this article, a study has been made on biodegradation of pitch-based high performance carbon fibers by microorganisms. The fiber which was degraded has been examined with a scanning electron microscope. Aspergillus flavus has broken surface areas of high performance carbon fibers in 60 days and the fibril structure under the surface layer of the fiber has been exfoliated by degradation. The fibrils on the second layer have been 100-110nm wide. The fibrils have been in line nearly parallel to the fiber axis. The above carbon fibers are carbon type, but in case of graphite type high performance carbon fibers, its broken areas have not been shown and they have shown much stronger resistance against microbial attacks. 11 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Shock initiation studies on high concentration hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stahl, David B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gibson, L. Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Concentrated hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) has been known to detonate for many years. However, because of its reactivity and the difficulty in handling and confining it, along with the large critical diameter, few studies providing basic information about the initiation and detonation properties have been published. We are conducting a study to understand and quantify the initiation and detonation properties of highly concentrated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} using a gas-driven two-stage gun to produce well defined shock inputs. Multiple magnetic gauges are used to make in-situ measurements of the growth of reaction and subsequent detonation in the liquid. These experiments are designed to be one-dimensional to eliminate any difficulties that might be encountered with large critical diameters. Because of the concern of the reactivity of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the confining materials, a remote loading system has been developed. The gun is pressurized, then the cell is filled and the experiment shot within less than three minutes. TV cameras are attached to the target so the cell filling can be monitored. Several experiments have been completed on {approx}98 wt % H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O mixtures; initiation has been observed in some experiments that shows homogeneous shock initiation behavior. The initial shock pressurizes and heats the mixture. After an induction time, a thermal explosion type reaction produces an evolving reactive wave that strengthens and eventually overdrives the first wave producing a detonation. From these measurements, we have determined unreacted Hugoniot information, times (distances) to detonation (Pop-plot points) that indicate low sensitivity, and detonation velocities of high concentration H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O solutions that agree with earlier estimates.

  20. Shock initiation studies on high concentration hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stahl, David B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gibson, L. Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Concentrated hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) has been known to detonate for many years. However, because of its reactivity and the difficulty in handling and confining it, along with the large critical diameter, few studies providing basic information about the initiation and detonation properties have been published. We are conducting a study to understand and quantify the initiation and detonation properties of highly concentrated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} using a gas-driven two-stage gun to produce well defined shock inputs. Multiple magnetic gauges are used to make in-situ measurements of the growth of reaction and subsequent detonation in the liquid. These experiments are designed to be one-dimensional to eliminate any difficulties that might be encountered with large critical diameters. Because of the concern of the reactivity of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the confining materials, a remote loading system has been developed. The gun is pressurized, then the cell is filled and the experiment shot within less than three minutes. TV cameras are attached to the target so the cell filling can be monitored. Several experiments have been completed on {approx}98 wt % H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O mixtures; initiation has been observed in some experiments that shows homogeneous shock initiation behavior. The initial shock pressurizes and heats the mixture. After an induction time, a thermal explosion type reaction produces an evolving reactive wave that strengthens and eventually overdrives the first wave producing a detonation. From these measurements, we have determined unreacted Hugoniot information, times (distances) to detonation (Pop-plot points) that indicate low sensitivity, and detonation velocities of high concentration H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O solutions that agree with earlier estimates.

  1. Investigation of the spatiotemporal variation and influencing factors on fine particulate matter and carbon monoxide concentrations near a road intersection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhanyong; Lu, Qing-Chang; He, Hong-Di; Wang, Dongsheng; Gao, Ya; Peng, Zhong-Ren

    2017-03-01

    The minute-scale variations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations near a road intersection in Shanghai, China were investigated to identify the influencing factors at three traffic periods. Measurement results demonstrate a synchronous variation of pollutant concentrations at the roadside and setbacks, and the average concentration of PM2.5 at the roadside is 7% (44% for CO) higher than that of setbacks within 500 m of the intersection. The pollution level at traffic peak periods is found to be higher than that of off-peak periods, and the morning peak period is found to be the most polluted due to a large amount of diesel vehicles and unfavorable dispersion conditions. Partial least square regressions were constructed for influencing factors and setback pollutant concentrations, and results indicate that meteorological factors are the most significant, followed by setback distance from the intersection and traffic factors. CO is found to be sensitive to distance from the traffic source and vehicle type, and highly dependent on local traffic conditions, whereas PM2.5 originates more from other sources and background levels. These findings demonstrate the importance of localized factors in understanding spatiotemporal patterns of air pollution at intersections, and support decision makers in roadside pollution management and control.

  2. Investigation of the spatiotemporal variation and influencing factors on fine particulate matter and carbon monoxide concentrations near a road intersection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhanyong; Lu, Qing-Chang; He, Hong-Di; Wang, Dongsheng; Gao, Ya; Peng, Zhong-Ren

    2016-05-01

    The minute-scale variations of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations near a road intersection in Shanghai, China were investigated to identify the influencing factors at three traffic periods. Measurement results demonstrate a synchronous variation of pollutant concentrations at the roadside and setbacks, and the average concentration of PM2.5 at the roadside is 7% (44% for CO) higher than that of setbacks within 500 m of the intersection. The pollution level at traffic peak periods is found to be higher than that of off-peak periods, and the morning peak period is found to be the most polluted due to a large amount of diesel vehicles and unfavorable dispersion conditions. Partial least square regressions were constructed for influencing factors and setback pollutant concentrations, and results indicate that meteorological factors are the most significant, followed by setback distance from the intersection and traffic factors. CO is found to be sensitive to distance from the traffic source and vehicle type, and highly dependent on local traffic conditions, whereas PM2.5 originates more from other sources and background levels. These findings demonstrate the importance of localized factors in understanding spatiotemporal patterns of air pollution at intersections, and support decision makers in roadside pollution management and control.

  3. Black carbon concentrations and sources in the marine boundary layer of the tropical Atlantic Ocean using four methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, K.; Cantwell, M.; Herckes, P.; Lohmann, R.

    2013-11-01

    Black carbon (BC) is the highly carbonaceous byproduct of biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion with a composition ranging from thermally stable soot to less recalcitrant charcoal. Atmospheric particulate matter samples across the tropical Atlantic Ocean were quantified for BC using four different methods: chemothermal oxidation at 375 °C (CTO-375), pyrene fluorescence loss, thermal optical transmittance, and optical transmission attenuation. The highest BC concentrations were detected in the Caribbean Sea and off the African coast, with a regional average of 0.6 μg m-3 for both. The lowest average concentrations were measured off the coast of South America at 0.2 to 0.3 μg m-3. The thermally-based CTO-375 method generally detected lower BC concentrations than the other three methods. The ratio of soot-like BC, as defined by the CTO-375 method, relative to the broader BC combustion continuum, as defined by the pyrene fluorescence loss, was <1 for all regions except for the Caribbean, supporting that charcoal was an important fraction of the aerosol BC. Regions impacted by biomass burning emissions should utilize multiple methods to better apportion the BC concentrations and sources.

  4. Optimization of the sintering atmosphere for high-density hydroxyapatite-carbon nanotube composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ashley A; Kinloch, Ian A; Windle, Alan H; Best, Serena M

    2010-10-06

    Hydroxyapatite-carbon nanotube (HA-CNT) composites have the potential for improved mechanical properties over HA for use in bone graft applications. Finding an appropriate sintering atmosphere for this composite presents a dilemma, as HA requires water in the sintering atmosphere to remain phase pure and well hydroxylated, yet CNTs oxidize at the high temperatures required for sintering. The purpose of this study was to optimize the atmosphere for sintering these composites. While the reaction between carbon and water to form carbon monoxide and hydrogen at high temperatures (known as the 'water-gas reaction') would seem to present a problem for sintering these composites, Le Chatelier's principle suggests this reaction can be suppressed by increasing the concentration of carbon monoxide and hydrogen relative to the concentration of carbon and water, so as to retain the CNTs and keep the HA's structure intact. Eight sintering atmospheres were investigated, including standard atmospheres (such as air and wet Ar), as well as atmospheres based on the water-gas reaction. It was found that sintering in an atmosphere of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, with a small amount of water added, resulted in an optimal combination of phase purity, hydroxylation, CNT retention and density.

  5. Carbon concentrations and carbon pool distributions in dry, moist, and cold mid-aged forests of the Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theresa B. Jain; Russell T. Graham; David Adams

    2010-01-01

    Although "carbon” management may not be a primary objective in forest management, influencing the distribution, composition, growth, and development of biomass to fulfill multiple objectives is; therefore, given a changing climate, managing carbon could influence future management decisions. Also, typically, the conversion from total biomass to total carbon is 50...

  6. Highly stable linear carbonate-containing electrolytes with fluoroethylene carbonate for high-performance cathodes in sodium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yongwon; Lee, Jaegi; Kim, Hyungsub; Kang, Kisuk; Choi, Nam-Soon

    2016-07-01

    Employing linear carbonates such as dimethyl carbonate (DMC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), and diethyl carbonate (DEC) as electrolyte solvents provides an opportunity to design appropriate electrolyte systems for high-performance sodium-ion batteries (SIBs). However, in practice, the use of linear carbonate-containing electrolytes is quite challenging because linear carbonates readily decompose at Na metal electrodes or sodiated anodes. One of the promising approaches is using an electrolyte additive to resolve the critical problems related to linear carbonates. Our investigation reveals that remarkable enhancement in electrochemical performance of Na4Fe3(PO4)2(P2O7) cathodes with linear carbonate-containing electrolytes is achieved by using a fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) additive. Importantly, the initial Coulombic efficiency of the Na deposition/stripping on a stainless steel (SS) electrode is drastically improved from 16% to 90% by introducing the FEC additive into ethylene carbonate (EC)/propylene carbonate (PC)/DEC (5/3/2, v/v/v)/0.5 M NaClO4. The underlying mechanism of FEC at the electrode-electrolyte interface is clearly demonstrated by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). In addition, the Na4Fe3(PO4)2(P2O7) cathode in EC/PC/DEC (5/3/2, v/v/v)/0.5 M sodium perchlorate (NaClO4) with FEC delivers a discharge capacity of 90.5 mAh g-1 at a current rate of C/2 and exhibits excellent capacity retention of 97.5% with high Coulombic efficiency of 99.6% after 300 cycles at 30 °C.

  7. EFFECT OF CARBON CONTENT ON MICROSTRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF HIGH STRENGTH AND HIGH ELONGATION STEELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y. Chen; X. Chen; P.H. Li; S.K. Pu; Z.X. Yuan; B.F. Xu; D.X. Lou; A.M. Guo; S.B.Zhou

    2003-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of new kind of hot-rolled high strengthand high elongation steels with retained austenite were studied by discussing the in-fluence of different carbon content. The research results indicate that carbon contenthas a significant effect on retaining austenite and consequently resulting in high elon-gation. Besides, new findings about relationship between carbon content and retainedaustenite as well as properties were discussed in the paper.

  8. EFFECT OF CARBON CONTENT ON MICROSTRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF HIGH STRENGTH AND HIGH ELONGATION STEELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.Chen; X.Chen; 等

    2003-01-01

    The microstructure and mechanical properties of new kind of hot-rolled high strength and high elongation steels with retained austenite were studied by discussing the in-fluence of different carbon content.The research results indicate that carbon content has a significant effect on retaining austenite and consequently resulting in high elon-gation.Besides,new findings about relationship between carbon content and retained austenite as well as properties were discussed in the paper.

  9. Source identification of high glyme concentrations in the Oder River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepien, D K; Püttmann, W

    2014-05-01

    The objective of the following study was to identify the source of high concentrations of glycol diethers (diglyme, triglyme, and tetraglyme) in the Oder River. Altogether four sampling campaigns were conducted and over 50 surface samples collected. During the first two samplings of the Oder River in the Oderbruch region (km 626-690), glymes were detected at concentrations reaching 0.065 μg L(-1) (diglyme), 0.54 μg L(-1) (triglyme) and 1.7 μg L(-1) (tetraglyme). The subsequent sampling of the Oder River, from the area close to the source to the Poland-Germany border (about 500 km) helped to identify the possible area of the dominating glyme entry into the river between km 310 and km 331. During that sampling, the maximum concentration of triglyme was 0.46 μg L(-1) and tetraglyme 2.2 μg L(-1); diglyme was not detected. The final sampling focused on the previously identified area of glyme entry, as well as on tributaries of the Oder River. Samples from Czarna Woda stream and Kaczawa River contained even higher concentrations of diglyme, triglyme, and tetraglyme, reaching 5.2 μg L(-1), 13 μg L(-1) and 81 μg L(-1), respectively. Finally, three water samples were analyzed from a wastewater treatment plant receiving influents from a Copper Smelter and Refinery; diglyme, triglyme, and tetraglyme were present at a maximum concentration of 1700 μg L(-1), 13,000 μg L(-1), and 190,000 μg L(-1), respectively. Further research helped to identify the source of glymes in the wastewater. The gas desulfurization process Solinox uses a mixture of glymes (Genosorb(®)1900) as a physical absorption medium to remove sulfur dioxide from off-gases from the power plant. The wastewater generated from the process and from the maintenance of the equipment is initially directed to the wastewater treatment plant where it undergoes mechanical and chemical treatment processes before being discharged to the tributaries of the Oder River. Although monoglyme was

  10. Microscopic Study of Carbon Surfaces Interacting with High Carbon Ferromanganese Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarian, Jafar; Kolbeinsen, Leiv

    2015-02-01

    The interaction of carbon materials with molten slags occurs in many pyro-metallurgical processes. In the production of high carbon ferromanganese in submerged arc furnace, the carbothermic reduction of MnO-containing silicate slags yields the metal product. In order to study the interaction of carbon with MnO-containing slags, sessile drop wettability technique is employed in this study to reduce MnO from a molten slag drop by carbon substrates. The interfacial area on the carbon substrate before and after reaction with slag is studied by scanning electron microscope. It is indicated that no Mn metal particles are found at the interface through the reduction of the MnO slag. Moreover, the reduction of MnO occurs through the contribution of Boudouard reaction and it causes carbon consumption in particular active sites at the interface, which generate carbon degradation and open pore growth at the interface. It is shown that the slag is fragmented to many micro-droplets at the reaction interface, potentially due to the effect on the interfacial energies of a provisional liquid Mn thin film. The rapid reduction of these slag micro-droplets affects the carbon surface with making deep micro-pores. A mechanism for the formation of slag micro-droplets is proposed, which is based on the formation of provisional micro thin films of liquid Mn at the interface.

  11. An analysis of continuous black carbon concentrations in proximity to an airport and major roadways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Robin E.; Andres Houseman, E.; Morin, Barbara; Levy, Jonathan I.

    Black carbon (BC), a constituent of particulate matter, is emitted from multiple combustion sources, complicating determination of contributions from individual sources or source categories from monitoring data. In close proximity to an airport, this may include aircraft emissions, other emissions on the airport grounds, and nearby major roadways, and it would be valuable to determine the factors most strongly related to measured BC concentrations. In this study, continuous BC concentrations were measured at five monitoring sites in proximity to a small regional airport in Warwick, Rhode Island from July 2005 to August 2006. Regression was used to model the relative contributions of aircraft and related sources, using real-time flight activity (departures and arrivals) and meteorological data, including mixing height, wind speed and direction. The latter two were included as a nonparametric smooth spatial term using thin-plate splines applied to wind velocity vectors and fit in a linear mixed model framework. Standard errors were computed using a moving-block bootstrap to account for temporal autocorrelation. Results suggest significant positive associations between hourly departures and arrivals at the airport and BC concentrations within the community, with departures having a more substantial impact. Generalized Additive Models for wind speed and direction were consistent with significant contributions from the airport, major highway, and multiple local roads. Additionally, inverse mixing height, temperature, precipitation, and at one location relative humidity, were associated with BC concentrations. Median contribution estimates indicate that aircraft departures and arrivals (and other sources coincident in space and time) contribute to approximately 24-28% of the BC concentrations at the monitoring sites in the community. Our analysis demonstrated that a regression-based approach with detailed meteorological and source characterization can provide insights

  12. Observation of vertical variability of black carbon concentration in lower troposphere on campaigns in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chilinski, M. T.; Markowicz, K. M.; Markowicz, J.

    2016-07-01

    This study presents two methods for observation of black carbon (BC) vertical profiles in lower troposphere based on the micro-aethalometer AE-51. In the first method micro-aethalometer was carried by observer along trail on slope of mountain valley. Second method uses unmanned aerial vehicle as a platform for collecting data up to 1500 m above ground. Our study presents vertical profiles collected in and above Subcarphatian Wislok valley. Profiles measured on trial on slopes of Wislok valley, were collected during strong smog conditions during autumn/winter season, when BC concentration reached values above 60 μg/m3. The smog intensive layer is usually close to the surface (up to 100 m) as a results of surface inversion and the mountain breeze circulation, which during the night transports air pollution emitted from houses toward the valley's bottom. Usually the vertical profiles of BC concentration show significant reduction with the altitude, however, some multilayered structures are also observed during night time inversion conditions. It has found that smog condition can develop in clean air mass, and in those cases local pollution has significant impact on the columnar aerosol properties. During such conditions the aerosol optical depth shows diurnal cycle which is rather not observed in the long-term data. UAV flights in the lower troposphere were conducted during two sessions, one with clean polar air masses (BC concentration < 1 μg/m3) and second with moderate aerosol conditions (BC concentration 1-5 μg/m3). Profile of BC concentration shows stratification of absorbing aerosols in a shape of multi-layer structures similarly to the lidar/ceilometer signals.

  13. Carbon dioxide consumption of the microalga Scenedesmus obtusiusculus under transient inlet CO2 concentration variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Juan; Morales, Marcia; Revah, Sergio

    2017-04-15

    The extensive microalgae diversity offers considerable versatility for a wide range of biotechnological applications in environmental and production processes. Microalgal cultivation is based on CO2 fixation via photosynthesis and, consequently, it is necessary to evaluate, in a short time and reliable way, the effect of the CO2 gas concentration on the consumption rate and establish the tolerance range of different strains and the amount of inorganic carbon that can be incorporated into biomass in order to establish the potential for industrial scale application. Dynamic experiments allow calculating the short-term microalgal photosynthetic activity of strains in photobioreactors. In this paper, the effect of step-changes in CO2 concentration fed to a 20L bubble column photobioreactor on the CO2 consumption rate of Scenedesmus obtusiusculus was evaluated at different operation times. The highest apparent CO2 consumption rate (336μmolm(-2)s(-1) and 5.6% of CO2) was 6530mgCO2gb(-1)d(-1) and it decreased to 222mgCO2gb(-1)d(-1) when biomass concentration increased of 0.5 to 3.1gbL(-1) and 5.6% of CO2 was fed. For low CO2 concentrations (<3.8%) the pH remained close to the optimal value (7.5 and 8). The CO2 consumption rates show that S. obtusiusculus was not limited by CO2 availability for concentrations above of 3.8%. The CO2 mass balance showed that 90% of the C-CO2 transferred was used for S. obtusiusculus growth. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Characteristics of black carbon aerosol mass concentration over the East Baltic region from two-year measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byčenkienė, Steigvilė; Ulevicius, Vidmantas; Kecorius, Simonas

    2011-04-01

    Continuous measurements of black carbon (BC) aerosol mass concentration were performed at a background site Preila (55°55'N, 21°00'E, 5 m a.s.l., Lithuania) during the period 2008-2009. The data were used to characterize the BC mass concentration distribution over the East Baltic region. High increase in aerosol BC concentration was associated with the change in air mass characteristics and biomass burning during the winter heating season and spring wildfires. Monthly means of BC concentration ranged from 212 to 1268 ng m(-3) and the highest hourly means of concentration were from 4800 to 6300 ng m(-3), predominantly in spring and winter months. During the October-April period the BC mass concentrations were about twice as high as those in the summertime. The BC diurnal pattern in winter was typically different from that in spring indicating the seasonal variation of the atmospheric boundary layer height. The weekday/weekend difference was not strongly pronounced because the BC concentrations in Preila are mainly affected by long-range transport or local sources. Typical periodicities caused by anthropogenic and meteorological influences have been identified using Fourier analysis. It was shown that domestic heating appears as a 365 day periodicity; traffic slightly contributes 5-7 day peaks in the spectrum and elevated long-range BC can be identified as characteristic peaks with periodicities in the range from 16 to 29 days.Temporal evolution and transport of BC aerosols were interpreted by the air mass backward trajectory analysis in conjunction with the examination of the wavelength dependence on the aethalometer data. Air masses originated from the North Atlantic Ocean and Scandinavia were favourable for lower BC concentrations (350 ng m(-3)), while the BC level associated with the Western Europe airflows was significantly higher (970 ng m(-3)). The mean values of Ångström exponent of the absorption coefficient (monthly means 1.45 ± 0.25 and 0.84 ± 0

  15. Mass concentrations of black carbon measured by four instruments in the middle of Central East China in June 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaya, Y.; Komazaki, Y.; Pochanart, P.; Liu, Y.; Akimoto, H.; Gao, J.; Wang, T.; Wang, Z.

    2008-12-01

    Mass concentrations of black carbon (BC) were determined in June 2006 at the top of Mount Tai (36.26° N, 117.11° E, 1534 m a.s.l.), located in the middle of Central East China, using four different instruments: a multi-angle absorption photometer (5012 MAAP, Thermo), a particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP, Radiance Research), an ECOC semi-continuous analyzer (Sunset Laboratory) and an Aethalometer (AE-21, Magee Scientific). High correlation coefficients (R2>0.88) were obtained between the measurements of the BC mass concentrations made using the different instruments. From the range of the slopes of the linear least-square fittings, we concluded that BC concentrations regionally-representative of the area were measured in a range with a maximum-to-minimum ratio of 1.5 (an exception was that the BC (PM2.5) concentrations derived from MAAP were ~2 times higher than the optical measurements (PM2.5) derived from the ECOC analyzer). While this range is significant, it is still sufficiently narrow to better constrain the large and highly uncertain emission rate of BC from Central East China. In detail, two optical instruments (the MAAP and the PSAP equipped with a heated inlet 400°C) tended to give higher concentrations than the thermal EC concentrations observed by the ECOC analyzer. The ratios of optical BC to thermal EC showed a positive correlation with the OC/EC ratio reported by the ECOC analyzer, suggesting two explanations. One is that the optical instruments overestimated BC concentrations in spite of careful cancellation of the scattering effect in the MAAP instrument and the expected evaporation of volatile species by heating the inlet of the PSAP instrument. The other is that the determined split points between OC and EC were too late when a large amount of OC underwent charring during the analysis, resulting in an underestimation of EC by the ECOC analyzer. High ratios of optical BC to thermal EC were recorded when the NOx/NOy ratio was low, implying

  16. Mass concentrations of black carbon measured by four instruments in the middle of Central East China in June 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kanaya

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Mass concentrations of black carbon (BC were determined in June 2006 at the top of Mount Tai (36.26° N, 117.11° E, 1534 m a.s.l., located in the middle of Central East China, using four different instruments: a multi-angle absorption photometer (5012 MAAP, Thermo, a particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP, Radiance Research, an ECOC semi-continuous analyzer (Sunset Laboratory and an Aethalometer (AE-21, Magee Scientific. High correlation coefficients (R2>0.88 were obtained between the measurements of the BC mass concentrations made using the different instruments. From the range of the slopes of the linear least-square fittings, we concluded that BC concentrations regionally-representative of the area were measured in a range with a maximum-to-minimum ratio of 1.5 (an exception was that the BC (PM2.5 concentrations derived from MAAP were ~2 times higher than the optical measurements (PM2.5 derived from the ECOC analyzer. While this range is significant, it is still sufficiently narrow to better constrain the large and highly uncertain emission rate of BC from Central East China. In detail, two optical instruments (the MAAP and the PSAP equipped with a heated inlet 400°C tended to give higher concentrations than the thermal EC concentrations observed by the ECOC analyzer. The ratios of optical BC to thermal EC showed a positive correlation with the OC/EC ratio reported by the ECOC analyzer, suggesting two explanations. One is that the optical instruments overestimated BC concentrations in spite of careful cancellation of the scattering effect in the MAAP instrument and the expected evaporation of volatile species by heating the inlet of the PSAP instrument. The other is that the determined split points between OC and EC were too late when a large amount of OC underwent charring during the analysis, resulting in an underestimation of EC by the ECOC analyzer. High ratios of optical BC to thermal EC were

  17. Mass concentrations of black carbon measured by four instruments in the middle of Central East China in June 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Kanaya

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Mass concentrations of black carbon (BC were determined in June 2006 at the top of Mount Tai (36.26° N, 117.11° E, 1534 m a.s.l., located in the middle of Central East China, using four different instruments: a multi-angle absorption photometer (5012 MAAP, Thermo, a particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP, Radiance Research, an ECOC semi-continuous analyzer (Sunset Laboratory and an Aethalometer (AE-21, Magee Scientific. High correlation coefficients (R2>0.88 were obtained between the measurements of the BC mass concentrations by the different instruments. From the range of the slopes of the linear least-square fittings, we concluded that the BC concentrations regionally-representative of the area were measured in a range with a maximum-to-minimum ratio of 1.5 (an exception was that the BC (PM2.5 concentrations derived from MAAP were ~2 times higher than the optical measurements (PM2.5 derived from the ECOC analyzer. This range is significant, but is still sufficiently narrow to better constrain the large and highly uncertain emission rate of BC from China. In detail, two optical instruments (the MAAP instrument and the PSAP instrument equipped with a heated inlet (400°C tended to give higher concentrations than the thermal EC concentrations observed by the ECOC analyzer. The ratios of optical BC to thermal EC showed a positive correlation with the OC/EC ratio reported by the ECOC analyzer, suggesting two possibilities. One is that the optical instruments overestimated BC concentrations in spite of careful cancellation of the scattering effect in the MAAP instrument and the expected evaporation of volatile species by heating the inlet of the PSAP instrument. The other is that the determined split points between OC and EC were too late when a large amount of OC underwent charring during the analysis, resulting in an underestimation of EC by the ECOC analyzer. High ratios of optical BC to thermal EC

  18. Removal of high concentrated ammonia nitrogen from landfill leachate by landfilled waste layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Hui-dong; HE Pin-jing; SHAO Li-ming; LI Guo-jian

    2004-01-01

    The landfill of municipal solid waste(MSW) could be regarded as denitrification reactor and used in ammonia nitrogen biological removal process. In this research, the process was applied to municipal solid waste(MSW) collected in Shanghai, China, which was characterized with high food waste content. The NH4+ removal efficiency in the system of SBR nitrifying reactor followed by fresh and matured landfilled waste layer in series was studied. In the nitrifying reactor, above 90% of NH4+ in leachate was oxidized to NO2- and NO3-. Then high concentrated NO2- and NO3- was removed in the way of denitrification process in fresh landfilled waste layer. At the same time, degradation of fresh landfilled waste was accelerated. Up to the day 120, 136.5 gC/(kg dry waste) and 17.9 gN/(kg dry waste) were produced from waste layer. It accounted for 50.15% and 86.89% of the total carbon and nitrogen content of preliminary fresh waste, which was 4.42 times and 5.17 times higher than that of reference column respectively. After filtering through matured landfilled waste, BOD5 concentration in leachate dropped to below 100 mg/L, which would not affect following nitrification adversely. Because the matured landfilled waste acted as a well methanogenic reactor, 23% of carbon produced accumulatively from fresh landfilled waste degradation was converted into CH4.

  19. High-speed roll-to-roll manufacturing of graphene using a concentric tube CVD reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsen, Erik S.; McNerny, Daniel Q.; Viswanath, B.; Pattinson, Sebastian W.; John Hart, A.

    2015-01-01

    We present the design of a concentric tube (CT) reactor for roll-to-roll chemical vapor deposition (CVD) on flexible substrates, and its application to continuous production of graphene on copper foil. In the CTCVD reactor, the thin foil substrate is helically wrapped around the inner tube, and translates through the gap between the concentric tubes. We use a bench-scale prototype machine to synthesize graphene on copper substrates at translation speeds varying from 25 mm/min to 500 mm/min, and investigate the influence of process parameters on the uniformity and coverage of graphene on a continuously moving foil. At lower speeds, high-quality monolayer graphene is formed; at higher speeds, rapid nucleation of small graphene domains is observed, yet coalescence is prevented by the limited residence time in the CTCVD system. We show that a smooth isothermal transition between the reducing and carbon-containing atmospheres, enabled by injection of the carbon feedstock via radial holes in the inner tube, is essential to high-quality roll-to-roll graphene CVD. We discuss how the foil quality and microstructure limit the uniformity of graphene over macroscopic dimensions. We conclude by discussing means of scaling and reconfiguring the CTCVD design based on general requirements for 2-D materials manufacturing. PMID:25997124

  20. Molten Salt-Carbon Nanotube Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Systems Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael Schuller; Frank Little; Darren Malik; Matt Betts; Qian Shao; Jun Luo; Wan Zhong; Sandhya Shankar; Ashwin Padmanaban

    2012-03-30

    We demonstrated that adding nanoparticles to a molten salt would increase its utility as a thermal energy storage medium for a concentrating solar power system. Specifically, we demonstrated that we could increase the specific heat of nitrate and carbonate salts containing 1% or less of alumina nanoparticles. We fabricated the composite materials using both evaporative and air drying methods. We tested several thermophysical properties of the composite materials, including the specific heat, thermal conductivity, latent heat, and melting point. We also assessed the stability of the composite material with repeated thermal cycling and the effects of adding the nanoparticles on the corrosion of stainless steel by the composite salt. Our results indicate that stable, repeatable 25-50% improvements in specific heat are possible for these materials. We found that using these composite salts as the thermal energy storage material for a concentrating solar thermal power system can reduce the levelized cost of electricity by 10-20%. We conclude that these materials are worth further development and inclusion in future concentrating solar power systems.

  1. Using ANN and EPR models to predict carbon monoxide concentrations in urban area of Tabriz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Shakerkhatibi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Forecasting of air pollutants has become a popular topic of environmental research today. For this purpose, the artificial neural network (AAN technique is widely used as a reliable method for forecasting air pollutants in urban areas. On the other hand, the evolutionary polynomial regression (EPR model has recently been used as a forecasting tool in some environmental issues. In this research, we compared the ability of these models to forecast carbon monoxide (CO concentrations in the urban area of Tabriz city. Methods: The dataset of CO concentrations measured at the fixed stations operated by the East Azerbaijan Environmental Office along with meteorological data obtained from the East Azerbaijan Meteorological Bureau from March 2007 to March 2013, were used as input for the ANN and EPR models. Results: Based on the results, the performance of ANN is more reliable in comparison with EPR. Using the ANN model, the correlation coefficient values at all monitoring stations were calculated above 0.85. Conversely, the R2 values for these stations were obtained <0.41 using the EPR model. Conclusion: The EPR model could not overcome the nonlinearities of input data. However, the ANN model displayed more accurate results compared to the EPR. Hence, the ANN models are robust tools for predicting air pollutant concentrations.

  2. Ultra High Energy Density Cathodes with Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    34Enhanced Capacity and Rate Capability of Carbon Nanotube Based Anodes with Titanium Contacts for Lithium Ion Batteries," ACS Nano, vol. 4, pp. 6121- 6131...2010/10/26 2010. [2] S. L. Chou, et al., "Silicon/Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Composite Paper as a Flexible Anode Material for Lithium Ion...AFRL-RV-PS- AFRL-RV-PS- TR-2013-0170 TR-2013-0170 ULTRA HIGH ENERGY DENSITY CATHODES WITH CARBON NANOTUBES Brian J. Landi, et al. Rochester

  3. Hybrid carbon nanostructure assemblage for high performance pseudo-capacitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Mishra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of novel nanocomposites for pseudo-capacitors with high capacitance and energy density is the spotlight of current energy research. In the present work, hybrid carbon nanostructure assemblage of graphene and multiwalled carbon nanotubes has been used as carbon support to nanostructured RuO2 and polyaniline for high energy supercapacitors. Maximum specific capacitances of 110, 235 and 440 F g−1 at the voltage sweep rate of 10 mV s−1 and maximum energy densities of 7, 12.5 and 20.5 Wh kg−1 were observed for carbon assemblage and its RuO2 and polyanilne decorated nanocomposites, respectively, with 1M H2SO4 as electrolyte.

  4. Facile synthesis of carbon nanofibers-bridged porous carbon nanosheets for high-performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yuting; Yan, Jun; Wu, Xiaoliang; Shan, Dandan; Zhou, Qihang; Jiang, Lili; Yang, Deren; Fan, Zhuangjun

    2016-03-01

    A facile and one-step method is demonstrated to prepare carbon nanofibers (CNFs)-bridged porous carbon nanosheets (PCNs) through carbonization of the mixture of bacterial cellulose and potassium citrate. The CNFs bridge PCNs to form integrated porous carbon architecture with high specific surface area of 1037 m2 g-1, much higher than those of pure PCNs (381 m2 g-1) and CNFs (510 m2 g-1). As a consequence, the PCN/CNF composite displays high specific capacitance of 261 F g-1, excellent rate capability and outstanding cycling stability (97.6% of capacitance retention after 10000 cycles). Moreover, the assembled symmetric supercapacitor with PCN/CNF electrodes delivers an ultrahigh energy density of 20.4 Wh kg-1 and outstanding cycling life (94.8% capacitance retention after 10000 cycles) in an aqueous electrolyte.

  5. Asphalt-derived high surface area activated porous carbons for carbon dioxide capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilov, Almaz S; Ruan, Gedeng; Hwang, Chih-Chau; Schipper, Desmond E; Tour, Josiah J; Li, Yilun; Fei, Huilong; Samuel, Errol L G; Tour, James M

    2015-01-21

    Research activity toward the development of new sorbents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture have been increasing quickly. Despite the variety of existing materials with high surface areas and high CO2 uptake performances, the cost of the materials remains a dominant factor in slowing their industrial applications. Here we report preparation and CO2 uptake performance of microporous carbon materials synthesized from asphalt, a very inexpensive carbon source. Carbonization of asphalt with potassium hydroxide (KOH) at high temperatures (>600 °C) yields porous carbon materials (A-PC) with high surface areas of up to 2780 m(2) g(-1) and high CO2 uptake performance of 21 mmol g(-1) or 93 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C. Furthermore, nitrogen doping and reduction with hydrogen yields active N-doped materials (A-NPC and A-rNPC) containing up to 9.3% nitrogen, making them nucleophilic porous carbons with further increase in the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas up to 2860 m(2) g(-1) for A-NPC and CO2 uptake to 26 mmol g(-1) or 114 wt % at 30 bar and 25 °C for A-rNPC. This is the highest reported CO2 uptake among the family of the activated porous carbonaceous materials. Thus, the porous carbon materials from asphalt have excellent properties for reversibly capturing CO2 at the well-head during the extraction of natural gas, a naturally occurring high pressure source of CO2. Through a pressure swing sorption process, when the asphalt-derived material is returned to 1 bar, the CO2 is released, thereby rendering a reversible capture medium that is highly efficient yet very inexpensive.

  6. The effect of atmospheric CO2 concentration on carbon isotope fractionation in C3 land plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Brian A.; Jahren, A. Hope

    2012-11-01

    Because atmospheric carbon dioxide is the ultimate source of all land-plant carbon, workers have suggested that pCO2 level may exert control over the amount of 13C incorporated into plant tissues. However, experiments growing plants under elevated pCO2 in both chamber and field settings, as well as meta-analyses of ecological and agricultural data, have yielded a wide range of estimates for the effect of pCO2 on the net isotopic discrimination (Δδ13Cp) between plant tissue (δ13Cp) and atmospheric CO2 (δ13CCO2). Because plant stomata respond sensitively to plant water status and simultaneously alter the concentration of pCO2 inside the plant (ci) relative to outside the plant (ca), any experiment that lacks environmental control over water availability across treatments could result in additional isotopic variation sufficient to mask or cancel the direct influence of pCO2 on Δδ13Cp. We present new data from plant growth chambers featuring enhanced dynamic stabilization of moisture availability and relative humidity, in addition to providing constant light, nutrient, δ13CCO2, and pCO2 level for up to four weeks of plant growth. Within these chambers, we grew a total of 191 C3 plants (128 Raphanus sativus plants and 63 Arabidopsis thaliana) across fifteen levels of pCO2 ranging from 370 to 4200 ppm. Three types of plant tissue were harvested and analyzed for carbon isotope value: above-ground tissues, below-ground tissues, and leaf-extracted nC31-alkanes. We observed strong hyperbolic correlations (R ⩾ 0.94) between the pCO2 level and Δδ13Cp for each type of plant tissue analyzed; furthermore the linear relationships previously suggested by experiments across small (10-350 ppm) changes in pCO2 (e.g., 300-310 ppm or 350-700 ppm) closely agree with the amount of fractionation per ppm increase in pCO2 calculated from our hyperbolic relationship. In this way, our work is consistent with, and provides a unifying relationship for, previous work on carbon isotopes

  7. Contribution of picoplankton to the total particulate organic carbon (POC concentration in the eastern South Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Grob

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus, picophytoeukaryotes and bacterioplankton abundances and contributions to the total particulate organic carbon concentration (POC, derived from the total particle beam attenuation coefficient (cp, were determined across the eastern South Pacific between the Marquesas Islands and the coast of Chile. All flow cytometrically derived abundances decreased towards the hyper-oligotrophic centre of the gyre and were highest at the coast, except for Prochlorococcus, which is not detected under eutrophic conditions. Temperature and nutrient availability appeared important in modulating picophytoplankton abundance, according to the prevailing trophic conditions. Although the non-vegetal particles tended to dominate the cp signal everywhere along the transect (50 to 83%, this dominance seemed to weaken from oligo- to eutrophic conditions, the contributions by vegetal and non-vegetal particles being about equal under mature upwelling conditions. Spatial variability in the vegetal compartment was more important than the non-vegetal one in shaping the water column particulate attenuation coefficient. Spatial variability in picophytoplankton biomass could be traced by changes in both Tchla and cp. Finally, picophytoeukaryotes contributed with ~38% on average to the total integrated phytoplankton carbon biomass or vegetal attenuation signal along the transect, as determined by direct size measurements on cells sorted by flow cytometry and optical theory. The role of picophytoeukaryotes in carbon and energy flow would therefore be very important, even under hyper-oligotrophic conditions.

  8. Interrelated modules in cyanobacterial photosynthesis: the carbon-concentrating mechanism, photorespiration, and light perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Beronda L; Lechno-Yossef, Sigal; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2016-05-01

    Here we consider the cyanobacterial carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) and photorespiration in the context of the regulation of light harvesting, using a conceptual framework borrowed from engineering: modularity. Broadly speaking, biological 'modules' are semi-autonomous functional units such as protein domains, operons, metabolic pathways, and (sub)cellular compartments. They are increasingly recognized as units of both evolution and engineering. Modules may be connected by metabolites, such as NADPH, ATP, and 2PG. While the Calvin-Benson-Bassham Cycle and photorespiratory salvage pathways can be considered as metabolic modules, the carboxysome, the core of the cyanobacterial CCM, is both a structural and a metabolic module. In photosynthetic organisms, which use light cues to adapt to the external environment and which tune the photosystems to provide the ATP and reducing power for carbon fixation, light-regulated modules are critical. The primary enzyme of carbon fixation, RuBisCO, uses CO2 as a substrate, which is accumulated via the CCM. However RuBisCO also has a secondary reaction in which it utilizes O2, a by-product of the photochemical modules, which leads to photorespiration. A complete understanding of the interplay among CCM and photorespiration is predicated on uncovering their connections to the light reactions and the regulatory factors and pathways that tune these modules to external cues. We probe this connection by investigating light inputs into the CCM and photorespiratory pathways in the chromatically acclimating cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Effect of Phosphoric Acid Concentration on the Characteristics of Sugarcane Bagasse Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, M. R. M.; Suraya, W. M. S. W.; Rafidah, H.; Amirza, A. R. M.; Attahirah, M. H. M. N.; Hani, M. S. N. Q.; Adnan, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    Impregnation method is one of the crucial steps involved in producing activated carbon using chemical activation process. Chemicals employed in this step is effective at decomposing the structure of material and forming micropores that helps in adsorption of contaminants. This paper explains thorough procedures that have been involved in producing sugarcane bagasse activated carbon (SBAC) by using 5%, 10%, 20%, 30% phosphoric acid (H3PO4) during the impregnation step. Concentration of H3PO4 used in the process of producing SBAC was optimized through several tests including bulk density, ash content, iodine adsorption and pore size diameter and the charactesristic of optimum SBAC produced has been compared with commercial activated carbon (CAC). Batch study has been carried out by using the SBAC produced from optimum condition to investigate the performance of SBAC in removal of turbidity and chemical oxygen demand (COD) from textile wastewater. From characteristic study, SBAC with 30% H3PO4 has shown the optimum value of bulk density, ash content, iodine adsorption and pore size diameter of 0.3023 g cm-3, 4.35%, 974.96 mg/g and 0.21-0.41 µm, respectively. These values are comparable to the characteristics of CAC. Experimental result from the batch study has been concluded that the SBAC has a promising potential in removing turbidity and COD of 75.5% and 66.3%, respectively which was a slightly lower than CAC which were able to remove 82.8% of turbidity and 70% of COD. As a conclusion, the SBAC is comparable with CAC in terms of their characteristics and the capability of removing contaminants from textile wastewater. Therefore, it has a commercial value to be used as an alternative of low-cost material in producing CAC.

  10. Catalytic wet air oxidation of high concentration pharmaceutical wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Wei; Wang, Xiaocong; Li, Daosheng; Ren, Yongzheng; Liu, Dongqi; Kang, Jianxiong

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the pretreatment of a high concentration pharmaceutical wastewater by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) process. Different experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of the catalyst type, operating temperature, initial system pH, and oxygen partial pressure on the oxidation of the wastewater. Results show that the catalysts prepared by the co-precipitation method have better catalytic activity compared to others. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) conversion increased with the increase in temperature from 160 to 220 °C and decreased with the increase in pH. Moreover, the effect of the oxygen partial pressure on the COD conversion was significant only during the first 20 min of the reaction. Furthermore, the biodegradability of the wastewater improved greatly after CWAO, the ratio of BOD5/COD increased less than 0.1-0.75 when treated at 220 °C (BOD: biochemical oxygen demand).

  11. Acquisition and Analysis of Data from High Concentration Solutions

    KAUST Repository

    Besong, Tabot M.D.

    2016-05-13

    The problems associated with ultracentrifugal analysis of macromolecular solutions at high (>10 mg/ml) are reviewed. Especially for the case of solutes which are non-monodisperse, meaningful results are not readily achievable using sedimentation velocity approaches. It is shown however by both simulation and analysis of practical data that using a modified form of an algorithm (INVEQ) published in other contexts, sedimentation equilibrium (SE) profiles can be analysed successfully, enabling topics such as oligomer presence or formation to be defined.To achieve this, it is necessary to employ an approach in which the solution density, which in an SE profile is radius-dependent, is taken into consideration. Simulation suggests that any reasonable level of solute concentration can be analysed.

  12. Climatic consequences of very high carbon dioxide levels in the earth's early atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, James F.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    1986-01-01

    The possible consequences of very high carbon dioxide concentrations in the earth's early atmosphere have been investigated with a radiative-convective climate model. The early atmosphere would apparently have been stable against the onset of a runaway greenhouse (that is, the complete evaporation of the oceans) for carbon dioxide pressures up to at least 100 bars. A 10- to 20-bar carbon dioxide atmosphere, such as may have existed during the first several hundred million years of the earth's history, would have had a surface temperature of approximately 85 to 110 C. The early stratosphere should have been dry, thereby precluding the possibility of an oxygenic prebiotic atmosphere caused by photodissociation of water vapor followed by escape of hydrogen to space. Earth's present atmosphere also appears to be stable against a carbon dioxide-induced runaway greenhouse.

  13. Climatic consequences of very high carbon dioxide levels in the earth's early atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, James F.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

    1986-01-01

    The possible consequences of very high carbon dioxide concentrations in the earth's early atmosphere have been investigated with a radiative-convective climate model. The early atmosphere would apparently have been stable against the onset of a runaway greenhouse (that is, the complete evaporation of the oceans) for carbon dioxide pressures up to at least 100 bars. A 10- to 20-bar carbon dioxide atmosphere, such as may have existed during the first several hundred million years of the earth's history, would have had a surface temperature of approximately 85 to 110 C. The early stratosphere should have been dry, thereby precluding the possibility of an oxygenic prebiotic atmosphere caused by photodissociation of water vapor followed by escape of hydrogen to space. Earth's present atmosphere also appears to be stable against a carbon dioxide-induced runaway greenhouse.

  14. Rheological properties of highly concentrated protein-stabilized emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrova, Tatiana D; Leal-Calderon, Fernando

    2004-05-20

    We prepared concentrated quasi monodisperse hexadecane-in-water emulsions stabilized by various proteins and investigated their rheological properties. Some protein-stabilized emulsions possess remarkably high elasticity and at the same time they are considerably fragile--they exhibit coalescence at yield strain and practically do not flow. The elastic storage modulus G' and the loss modulus G" of the emulsions were determined for different oil volume fractions above the random close packing. Surprisingly, the dimensionless elastic moduli G'/(sigma/a), sigma being the interfacial tension, and a being the mean drop radius, obtained for emulsions stabilized by different proteins do not collapse on a single master curve. They are almost always substantially higher than the corresponding values obtained for equivalent Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS)-stabilized emulsions. The unusually high elasticity cannot be attributed to a specificity of the continuous phase, because the osmotic equation of state of our emulsions is found identical to the one obtained for samples stabilized by classical surfactants. In parallel, we mimicked the thin films that separate the droplets in the concentrated emulsion and found that the protein adsorption layers contain a substantial number of sticky surface aggregates. These severely obstruct local rearrangements of individual drops in respect to their neighbors which leads to coalescence at yield strain. Furthermore, we found that G'/(sigma/a) is correlated (for a given oil volume fraction) to the dilatational elastic modulus, of the protein layer adsorbed on the droplets. The intrinsic elasticity of the protein layers, together with the blocked local rearrangements are considered as the main factors determining the unusual bulk elasticity of the studied emulsions.

  15. Do high concentrations of microcystin prevent Daphnia control of phytoplankton?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chislock, Michael F; Sarnelle, Orlando; Jernigan, Lauren M; Wilson, Alan E

    2013-04-15

    Toxin-producing cyanobacteria have frequently been hypothesized to limit the ability of herbivorous zooplankton (such as Daphnia) to control phytoplankton biomass by inhibiting feeding, and in extreme cases, causing zooplankton mortality. Using limnocorral experiments in hyper-eutrophic ponds located in Alabama and Michigan (U.S.A.), we tested the hypothesis that high levels of cyanobacteria and microcystin, a class of hepatotoxins produced by several cyanobacterial genera, prevent Daphnia from strongly reducing phytoplankton abundance. At the start of the first experiment (Michigan), phytoplankton communities were dominated by toxic Microcystis and Anabaena (∼96% of total phytoplankton biomass), and concentrations of microcystin were ∼3 μg L⁻¹. Two weeks after adding Daphnia pulicaria from a nearby eutrophic lake, microcystin levels increased to ∼6.5 μg L⁻¹, yet Daphnia populations increased exponentially (r = 0.24 day⁻¹). By the third week, Daphnia had suppressed phytoplankton biomass by ∼74% relative to the no Daphnia controls and maintained reduced phytoplankton biomass until the conclusion of the five-week experiment. In the second experiment (Alabama), microcystin concentrations were greater than 100 μg L⁻¹, yet a mixture of three D. pulicaria clones from eutrophic lakes in southern MI increased and again reduced phytoplankton biomass, in this case by over 80%. The ability of Daphnia to increase in abundance and suppress phytoplankton biomass, despite high initial levels of cyanobacteria and microcystin, indicates that the latter does not prevent strong control of phytoplankton biomass by Daphnia genotypes that are adapted to environments with abundant cyanobacteria and associated cyanotoxins.

  16. Highly Concentrated Acetic Acid Poisoning: 400 Cases Reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Brusin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caustic substance ingestion is known for causing a wide array of gastrointestinal and systemic complications. In Russia, ingestion of acetic acid is a major problem which annually affects 11.2 per 100,000 individuals. The objective of this study was to report and analyze main complications and outcomes of patients with 70% concentrated acetic acid poisoning. Methods: This was a retrospective study of patients with acetic acid ingestion who were treated at Sverdlovsk Regional Poisoning Treatment Center during 2006 to 2012. GI mucosal injury of each patient was assessed with endoscopy according to Zargar’s scale. Data analysis was performed to analyze the predictors of stricture formation and mortality. Results: A total of 400 patients with median age of 47 yr were included. GI injury grade I was found in 66 cases (16.5%, IIa in 117 (29.3%, IIb in 120 (30%, IIIa in 27 (16.7% and IIIb in 70 (17.5%. 11% of patients developed strictures and overall mortality rate was 21%. Main complications were hemolysis (55%, renal injury (35%, pneumonia (27% and bleeding during the first 3 days (27%. Predictors of mortality were age 60 to 79 years, grade IIIa and IIIb of GI injury, pneumonia, stages “I”, “F” and “L” of kidney damage according to the RIFLE scale and administration of prednisolone. Predictors of stricture formation were ingestion of over 100 mL of acetic acid and grade IIb and IIIa of GI injury. Conclusion: Highly concentrated acetic acid is still frequently ingested in Russia with a high mortality rate. Patients with higher grades of GI injury, pneumonia, renal injury and higher amount of acid ingested should be more carefully monitored as they are more susceptible to develop fatal consequences.          

  17. Observations of the uptake of carbonyl sulfide (COS by trees under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sandoval-Soto

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Global change affects ecosystems to adapt to elevated atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2. We understand that carbonyl sulfide (COS, a trace gas which is involved in building up the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer, is taken up by vegetation with the same triad of the enzmyes which are metabolizing the CO2, i.e. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase-Oxygenase (Rubisco, Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxylase (PEP-Co and carbonic anhydrase (CA. Therefore, we discuss a physiological/biochemical adaptation of these enzymes to affect the sink strength of vegetation for COS. We investigated the adaption of two European tree species, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus ilex, grown inside chambers under elevated CO2 and determined the exchange characteristics and the content of CA after a 1–2 yr period of adaption from 350 ppm to 800 ppm CO2. We could demonstrate that the COS compensation point, the CA activity and the deposition velocities may change and cause a decrease of the COS uptake by plant ecosystems. As a consequence, the atmospheric COS level may rise leading to higher input of this trace gas into the stratosphere and causing a higher energy reflection by the stratospheric sulfur aerosol into space, thus counteracting the direct radiative forcing by the tropospheric COS.

  18. Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations before 2.2 billion years ago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, R.; Kuo, P. H.; Holland, H. D.

    1995-01-01

    The composition of the Earth's early atmosphere is a subject of continuing debate. In particular, it has been suggested that elevated concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide would have been necessary to maintain normal surface temperatures in the face of lower solar luminosity in early Earth history. Fossil weathering profiles, known as palaeosols, have provided semi-quantitative constraints on atmospheric oxygen partial pressure (pO2) before 2.2 Gyr ago. Here we use the same well studied palaeosols to constrain atmospheric pCO2 between 2.75 and 2.2 Gyr ago. The observation that iron lost from the tops of these profiles was reprecipitated lower down as iron silicate minerals, rather than as iron carbonate, indicates that atmospheric pCO2 must have been less than 10(-1.4) atm--about 100 times today's level of 360 p.p.m., and at least five times lower than that required in one-dimensional climate models to compensate for lower solar luminosity at 2.75 Gyr. Our results suggest that either the Earth's early climate was much more sensitive to increases in pCO2 than has been thought, or that one or more greenhouse gases other than CO2 contributed significantly to the atmosphere's radiative balance during the late Archaean and early Proterozoic eons.

  19. Atmospheric aerosol brown carbon in the high Himalayas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirillova, Elena; Decesari, Stefano; Marinoni, Angela; Bonasoni, Paolo; Vuillermoz, Elisa; Facchini, M. Cristina; Fuzzi, Sandro

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic light-absorbing atmospheric aerosol can reach very high concentrations in the planetary boundary layer in South-East Asia ("brown clouds"), affecting atmospheric transparency and generating spatial gradients of temperature over land with a possible impact on atmospheric dynamics and monsoon circulation. Besides black carbon (BC), an important light-absorbing component of anthropogenic aerosols is the organic carbon component known as 'brown carbon' (BrC). In this research, we provided first measurements of atmospheric aerosol BrC in the high Himalayas during different seasons. Aerosol sampling was conducted at the GAW-WMO Global station "Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid" (NCO-P) located in the high Khumbu valley at 5079 m a.s.l. in the foothills of Mt. Everest. PM10 aerosol samples were collected from July 2013 to November 2014. The sampling strategy was set up in order to discriminate the daytime valley breeze bringing polluted air masses up to the observatory and free tropospheric air during nighttime. Water-soluble BrC (WS-BrC) and methanol-soluble BrC (MeS-BrC) were extracted and analyzed using a UV/VIS spectrophotometer equipped with a 50 cm liquid waveguide capillary cell. In the polluted air masses, the highest levels of the BrC light absorption coefficient at 365 nm (babs365) were observed during the pre-monsoon season (1.83±1.46 Mm-1 for WS-BrC and 2.86±2.49 Mm-1 for MeS-BrC) and the lowest during the monsoon season (0.21±0.22 Mm-1 for WS-BrC and 0.32±0.29 Mm-1 for MeS-BrC). The pre-monsoon season is the most frequently influenced by a strong atmospheric brown cloud (ABC) transport to NCO-P due to increased convection and mixing layer height over South Asia combined with the highest up-valley wind speed and the increase of the emissions from open fires due to the agricultural practice along the Himalayas foothills and the Indo-Gangetic Plain. In contrast, the monsoon season is characterized by a weakened valley wind regime and an

  20. High Temperature Carbonized Grass as a High Performance Sodium Ion Battery Anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Yao, Yonggang; Wan, Jiayu; Henderson, Doug; Zhang, Xiaogang; Hu, Liangbing

    2017-01-11

    Hard carbon is currently considered the most promising anode candidate for room temperature sodium ion batteries because of its relatively high capacity, low cost, and good scalability. In this work, switchgrass as a biomass example was carbonized under an ultrahigh temperature, 2050 °C, induced by Joule heating to create hard carbon anodes for sodium ion batteries. Switchgrass derived carbon materials intrinsically inherit its three-dimensional porous hierarchical architecture, with an average interlayer spacing of 0.376 nm. The larger interlayer spacing than that of graphite allows for the significant Na ion storage performance. Compared to the sample carbonized under 1000 °C, switchgrass derived carbon at 2050 °C induced an improved initial Coulombic efficiency. Additionally, excellent rate capability and superior cycling performance are demonstrated for the switchgrass derived carbon due to the unique high temperature treatment.

  1. Photosynthetic responses to understory shade and elevated carbon dioxide concentration in 4 northern hardwood tree species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sefcik, L.T.; Zak, D.R.; Ellsworth, D.S. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). School of Natural Resources and Environment

    2006-12-15

    Stimulation of photosynthesis in response to elevated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) varies among tree species and species groups. In this study, seedling responses to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentrations and solar irradiance over 2 growing seasons were investigated for shade tolerant Acer saccharum Marsh.; Fagus grandifolia J.F. Ehrh; and shade-intolerant Prunus serotina. Seedlings were exposed to a combination of elevated and ambient concentrations of CO{sub 2} and understory shade in open-top chambers placed in a forest understory. It was observed that the elevated CO{sub 2} treatment increased mean light-saturated net photosynthetic rates by 63 per cent in the shade-tolerant species and 67 per cent in the shade-intolerant species. When measured at the elevated CO{sub 2}, long-term enhancement of photosynthesis was 10 per cent lower than the instantaneous enhancement observed in ambient-CO{sub 2}-grown plants. As the growth irradiance increased, proportional enhancement due to elevated CO{sub 2} decreased from 97 per cent for plants grown in deep shade to 47 per cent for plants grown in moderate shade. Results indicated that in nitrogen (N) limited northern temperate forests, trees grown in deep shade may display greater photosynthetic gains from a CO{sub 2} enriched atmosphere than trees growing in more moderate shade, due to greater down-regulation. It was concluded that if elevated CO{sub 2} levels promote the survival of shade-intolerant species in dim understory light, the future composition and dynamics of successional forest communities may be altered. 70 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  2. Possible source of ancient carbon in phytolith concentrates from harvested grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, G. M.; Alexandre, A.; Southon, J. R.; Treseder, K. K.; Corbineau, R.; Reyerson, P. E.

    2012-05-01

    Plants absorb and transport silicon (Si) from soil, and precipitation of Si within the living plants results in micrometric amorphous biosilica particles known as phytoliths. During phytolith formation, a small amount of carbon (<2%) can become occluded in the silica structure (phytC) and therefore protected from degradation by the environment after plant tissue decomposition. Since the major C source within plants is from atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) via photosynthesis, the current understanding is that the radiocarbon (14C) content of phytC should reflect the 14C content of atmospheric CO2 at the time the plant is growing. This assumption was recently challenged by 14C data from phytoliths extracted from living grasses that yielded ages of several thousand years (2-8 kyr BP; in radiocarbon years "Before Present" (BP), "Present" being defined as 1950). Because plants can take up small amounts of C of varying ages from soils (e.g., during nutrient acquisition), we hypothesized that this transported C within the plant tissue could be attached to or even embedded in phytoliths. In this work, we explore this hypothesis by reviewing previously published data on biosilica mineralization and plant nutrient acquisition as well as by evaluating the efficiency of phytolith extraction protocols from scanning electron microscope (SEM) images and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS) analyses from harvested grasses phytolith concentrates. We show that current extraction protocols are inefficient since they do not entirely remove recalcitrant forms of C from plant tissue. Consequently, material previously measured as "phytC" may contain at least some fraction of soil-derived C (likely radiocarbon-old) taken up by roots. We also suggest a novel interpretation for at least some of the phytC - which enters via the root pathway during nutrient acquisition - that may help to explain the old ages previously obtained from phytolith concentrates.

  3. Possible source of ancient carbon in phytolith concentrates from harvested grasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Santos

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Plants absorb and transport silicon (Si from soil, and precipitation of Si within the living plants results in micrometric amorphous biosilica particles known as phytoliths. During phytolith formation, a small amount of carbon (<2% can become occluded in the silica structure (phytC and therefore protected from degradation by the environment after plant tissue decomposition. Since the major C source within plants is from atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 via photosynthesis, the current understanding is that the radiocarbon (14C content of phytC should reflect the 14C content of atmospheric CO2 at the time the plant is growing. This assumption was recently challenged by 14C data from phytoliths extracted from living grasses that yielded ages of several thousand years (2–8 kyr BP; in radiocarbon years "Before Present" (BP, "Present" being defined as 1950. Because plants can take up small amounts of C of varying ages from soils (e.g., during nutrient acquisition, we hypothesized that this transported C within the plant tissue could be attached to or even embedded in phytoliths. In this work, we explore this hypothesis by reviewing previously published data on biosilica mineralization and plant nutrient acquisition as well as by evaluating the efficiency of phytolith extraction protocols from scanning electron microscope (SEM images and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS analyses from harvested grasses phytolith concentrates. We show that current extraction protocols are inefficient since they do not entirely remove recalcitrant forms of C from plant tissue. Consequently, material previously measured as "phytC" may contain at least some fraction of soil-derived C (likely radiocarbon-old taken up by roots. We also suggest a novel interpretation for at least some of the phytC – which enters via the root pathway during nutrient acquisition – that may help to explain the old ages previously

  4. Possible source of ancient carbon in phytolith concentrates from harvested grasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Santos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants absorb and transport silicon (Si from soil, and precipitation of Si within the living plants results in micrometric amorphous biosilica particles known as phytoliths. During phytolith formation, a small amount of carbon (< 2 % can become occluded in the silica structure (phytC and therefore protected from degradation by the environment after plant tissue decomposition. Since the major C source within plants is from atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 via photosynthesis, the current understanding is that the radiocarbon (14C content of phytC should reflect the 14C content of atmospheric CO2 at the time the plant is growing. This assumption was recently challenged by 14C data from phytoliths extracted from living grasses that yielded ages of several thousand years (2–8 kyr BP; in radiocarbon years "Before Present" (BP, "Present" being defined as 1950. Because plants can take up small amounts of C of varying ages from soils (e.g. during nutrient acquisition, we hypothesized that this transported C within the plant tissue could be attached to or even embedded in phytoliths. In this work, we explore this hypothesis by reviewing previously published data on biosilica mineralization and plant nutrient acquisition as well as by evaluating the efficiency of phytolith extraction protocols from Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM images and Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS analyses from harvested grasses phytolith concentrates. We show that current extraction protocols are inefficient since they do not entirely remove recalcitrant forms of C from plant tissue. Consequently, material previously measured as "phytC" may contain at least some fraction of soil-derived C (likely radiocarbon-old taken up by roots. We also suggest a novel interpretation for at least some of the phytC – enters via the root pathway during nutrient acquisition – that may help to explain the old ages previously obtained

  5. Deep Sea Memory of High Atmospheric CO2 Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathesius, Sabine; Hofmann, Matthias; Caldeira, Ken; Schellnhuber, Hans Joachim

    2015-04-01

    Carbon dioxide removal (CDR) from the atmosphere has been proposed as a powerful measure to mitigate global warming and ocean acidification. Planetary-scale interventions of that kind are often portrayed as "last-resort strategies", which need to weigh in if humankind keeps on enhancing the climate-system stock of CO2. Yet even if CDR could restore atmospheric CO2 to substantially lower concentrations, would it really qualify to undo the critical impacts of past emissions? In the study presented here, we employed an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity (EMIC) to investigate how CDR might erase the emissions legacy in the marine environment, focusing on pH, temperature and dissolved oxygen. Against a background of a world following the RCP8.5 emissions path ("business-as-usual") for centuries, we simulated the effects of two massive CDR interventions with CO2 extraction rates of 5 GtC yr-1 and 25 GtC yr-1, respectively, starting in 2250. We found that the 5 GtC yr-1 scheme would have only minor ameliorative influence on the oceans, even after several centuries of application. By way of contrast, the extreme 25 GtC yr-1 scheme eventually leads to tangible improvements. However, even with such an aggressive measure, past CO2 emissions leave a substantial legacy in the marine environment within the simulated period (i.e., until 2700). In summary, our study demonstrates that anthropogenic alterations of the oceans, caused by continued business-as-usual emissions, may not be reversed on a multi-centennial time scale by the most aspirational geoengineering measures. We also found that a transition from the RCP8.5 state to the state of a strong mitigation scenario (RCP2.6) is not possible, even under the assumption of extreme extraction rates (25 GtC yr-1). This is explicitly demonstrated by simulating additional scenarios, starting CDR already in 2150 and operating until the atmospheric CO2 concentration reaches 280 ppm and 180 ppm, respectively. The simulated

  6. Carbon Bioavailability in a High Arctic Fjord Influenced by Glacial Meltwater, NE Greenland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria L. Paulsen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The land-to-ocean flux of organic carbon is increasing in glacierized regions in response to increasing temperatures in the Arctic (Hood et al., 2015. In order to understand the response of the coastal ecosystem metabolism to the organic carbon input it is essential to determine the bioavailability of the different carbon sources in the system. We quantified the bacterial turnover of organic carbon in a high Arctic fjord system (Young Sound, NE Greenland during the ice-free period (July-October 2014 and assessed the quality and quantity of the 3 major organic carbon sources; (1 local phytoplankton production (2 runoff from land-terminating glaciers and a lowland river and (3 inflow from the ocean shelf. We found that despite relatively low concentrations of DOC in the rivers, the bioavailability of the river–DOC was significantly higher than in the fjord, and characterized by high cell-specific bacterial production and low C:N ratios. In contrast, the DOC source entering via inflow of coastal shelf waters had high DOC concentrations with high C:N and low specific bacterial production. The phytoplankton production in the fjord could not sustain the bacterial carbon demand, but was still the major source of organic carbon for bacterial growth. We assessed the bacterial community composition and found that communities were specific for the different water types i.e., the bacterial community of the coastal inflow water could be traced mainly in the subsurface water, while the glacial river community strongly dominated the surface water in the fjord.

  7. Adaptation and acclimatization to formaldehyde in methylotrophs capable of high-concentration formaldehyde detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongcharoen, Rotsaman; Smith, Thomas J; Flint, Kenneth P; Dalton, Howard

    2005-08-01

    Formaldehyde is a highly toxic chemical common in industrial effluents, and it is also an intermediate in bacterial metabolism of one-carbon growth substrates, although its role as a bacterial growth substrate per se has not been extensively reported. This study investigated two highly formaldehyde-resistant formaldehyde utilizers, strains BIP and ROS1; the former strain has been used for industrial remediation of formaldehyde-containing effluents. The two strains were shown by means of 16S rRNA characterization to be closely related members of the genus Methylobacterium. Both strains were able to use formaldehyde, methanol and a range of multicarbon compounds as their principal growth substrate. Growth on formaldehyde was possible up to a concentration of at least 58 mM, and survival at up to 100 mM was possible after stepwise acclimatization by growth at increasing concentrations of formaldehyde. At such high concentrations of formaldehyde, the cultures underwent a period of formaldehyde removal without growth before the formaldehyde concentration fell below 60 mM, and growth could resume. Two-dimensional electrophoresis and MS characterization of formaldehyde-induced proteins in strain BIP revealed that the pathways of formaldehyde metabolism, and adaptations to methylotrophic growth, were very similar to those seen in the well-characterized methanol-utilizing methylotroph Methylobacterium extorquens AM1. Thus, it appears that many of the changes in protein expression that allow strain BIP to grow using high formaldehyde concentrations are associated with expression of the same enzymes used by M. extorquens AM1 to process formaldehyde as a metabolic intermediate during growth on methanol.

  8. Indoor carbon monoxide and PM{sub 2.5} concentrations by cooking fuels in Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, A.R. (Aga Khan Univ., Dept. Community Health Sciences, Karachi (Pakistan)); Lee, K. (Seoul National Univ., Graduate School of Public Health (Korea)); Bennett, D.; Yang, X.; Gold, E.B. (Univ. California at Davis, Dept. of Public Health, CA (United States)); Brown, K.H. (Univ. California at Davis, Program in Int. Nutrition, CA (United States)); Bhutta, Z.A. (Aga Khan Univ., Dep. of Pediatrics, Karachi (Pakistan))

    2009-02-15

    In developing countries biomass combustion is a frequently used source of domestic energy and may cause indoor air pollution. Carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 mum or less (PM{sub 2.5}) were measured in kitchens using wood or natural gas (NG) in a semi-rural community in Pakistan. Daytime CO and PM{sub 2.5} levels were measured for eight continuous hours in 51 wood and 44 NG users from December 2005 to April 2006. The laser photometer PM{sub 2.5} (Dustrak, TSI) was calibrated for field conditions and PM{sub 2.5} measurements were reduced by a factor of 2.77. CO was measured by an electrochemical monitor (Model T15v, Langan). The arithmetic mean for daytime CO concentration was 29.4 ppm in wood users; significantly higher than 7.5 ppm in NG users (P < 0.001). The arithmetic mean for daytime PM{sub 2.5} concentrations was 2.74 mg/m3 in wood users; significantly higher than 0.38 mg/m3 in NG users (P < 0.001). Higher peak levels of CO and PM{sub 2.5} were also observed in wood users. Time spent in the kitchen during fuel burning was significantly related to increasing CO and PM{sub 2.5} concentrations in wood users. These findings suggest that cooking with wood fuel may lead to hazardous concentrations of CO and PM{sub 2.5}. (au)

  9. The CarbonSat candidate mission: imaging greenhouse gas concentrations from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierk, Bernd; Caron, Jerôme; Löscher, Armin; Meijer, Yasjka; Bézy, Jean-Loup; Buchwitz, Michael; Bovensmann, H.

    2014-09-01

    CarbonSat is a proposed Earth observation mission, which was selected in 2010 as one of two candidates for becoming the European Space Agency's (ESA) eighth Earth Explorer (EE8). It is currently undergoing parallel feasibility studies (phase A) performed by two industrial consortia. CarbonSat aims at a better understanding of the natural and anthropogenic sources and sinks of the two most important anthropogenic greenhouse gases CO2 and CH4, which will contribute to a better understanding of climate feedback and forcing mechanisms. To achieve these objectives the instrument will quantify and monitor the spatial distribution of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). It will deliver global data sets of dry air column-averaged mixing ratios of these gases with high precision (1 - 3 ppm for CO2 and 6 - 12 ppb for CH4) and accuracy (0.5 ppm for CO2 and 5 ppb for CH4). The measurements will provide global coverage every 12 days above 40 degrees latitude at a spatial resolution of 2 x 3 km2. The retrieval products are inferred from observations of Earth radiance and solar irradiance at high to medium spectral resolution (0.1-0.55 nm) in the Near Infrared (747-773 nm) and Short Wave Infrared (1590- 1675 nm and 1925-2095 nm) spectral regions. The combination of high spatial resolution and global coverage requires a swath width larger than 180 km for three spatially co-aligned push-broom imaging spectrometers. The targeted product accuracy translates into stringent radiometric, spectral and geometric requirements for the instrument. This paper presents the system requirements derived from the demanding mission objectives and reports preliminary results of the feasibility studies. It highlights the key components of the instrument, focusing on the optical conceptual design, and addresses the identified critical performance aspects.

  10. Assessing diffuse and concentrated recharge in average and dry rainfall year in a semiarid carbonate sloping aquifer a preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcala, F. J.; Were, A.; Serrano-Ortiz, P.; Canton, Y.; Sole, A.; Villagarcia, L.; Contreras, S.; Kowalski, A. S.; Marrero, R.; Puigdefabregas, J.; Domingo, F.

    2009-07-01

    The chloride mass balance (CMB) method was applied in the unsaturated zone to estimate potential recharge (R{sub t}) rainfall in two small catchment of southern mid-to-high slope of Sierra de Gador carbonate aquifer (SE Spain) , in the average hydrological year 2003-04 and the unusually dry 2004-05. Unknown fractions of diffuse (R{sub D}) and concentrated recharge (R{sub c}) into R{sub t} were firstly evaluated to fit average and lower R{sub T} thresholds for modeling further long-term recharge. Daily rainfall and actual evapotranspiration (AET) from the Eddy Covariance (EC) technique provided yearly R{sub T} of 189 mm year{sup -}1 in 2003-04 and 8 mm year{sup -}1 in 2004-05.

  11. Unusual High Oxygen Reduction Performance in All-Carbon Electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Tao, Ying; Lv, Wei; Su, Fang-Yuan; Ke, Lei; Li, Jia; Wang, Da-Wei; Li, Baohua; Kang, Feiyu; Yang, Quan-Hong

    2014-09-01

    Carbon-based electrocatalysts are more durable and cost-effective than noble materials for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which is an important process in energy conversion technologies. Heteroatoms are considered responsible for the excellent ORR performance in many carbon-based electrocatalysts. But whether an all-carbon electrocatalyst can effectively reduce oxygen is unknown. We subtly engineered the interfaces between planar graphene sheets and curved carbon nanotubes (G-CNT) and gained a remarkable activity/selectivity for ORR (larger current, and n = 3.86, ~93% hydroxide + ~7% peroxide). This performance is close to that of Pt; and the durability is much better than Pt. We further demonstrate the application of this G-CNT hybrid as an all-carbon cathode catalyst for lithium oxygen batteries.We speculate that the high ORR activity of this G-CNT hybrid stems from the localized charge separation at the interface of the graphene and carbon nanotube, which results from the tunneling electron transfer due to the Fermi level mismatch on the planar and curved sp2 surfaces. Our result represents a conceptual breakthrough and pioneers the new avenues towards practical all-carbon electrocatalysis.

  12. Modelling acceptance of sunlight in high and low photovoltaic concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leutz, Ralf, E-mail: ralf.leutz@leopil.com [Leutz Optics and Illumination UG (haftungsbeschränkt), Marburg (Germany)

    2014-09-26

    A simple model incorporating linear radiation characteristics, along with the optical trains and geometrical concentration ratios of solar concentrators is presented with performance examples for optical trains of HCPV, LCPV and benchmark flat-plate PV.

  13. Highly concentrated nebular noble gases in porous nanocarbon separates from the Saratov (L4) meteorite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amari, Sachiko [McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences and the Physics Department, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Matsuda, Jun-ichi [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Stroud, Rhonda M. [Code 6360, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Chisholm, Matthew F., E-mail: sa@wuphys.wustl.edu [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2013-11-20

    The majority of heavy noble gases (Ar, Kr, and Xe) in primitive meteorites are stored in a poorly understood phase called Q. Although Q is thought to be carbonaceous, the full identity of the phase has remained elusive for almost four decades. In order to better characterize phase Q and, in turn, the early solar nebula, we separated carbon-rich fractions from the Saratov (L4) meteorite. We chose this meteorite because Q is most resistant in thermal alteration among carbonaceous noble gas carriers in meteorites and we hoped that, in this highly metamorphosed meteorite, Q would be present but not diamond: these two phases are very difficult to separate from each other. One of the fractions, AJ, has the highest {sup 132}Xe concentration of 2.1 × 10{sup –6} cm{sup 3} STP g{sup –1}, exceeding any Q-rich fractions that have yet been analyzed. Transmission electron microscopy studies of the fraction AJ and a less Q-rich fraction AI indicate that they both are primarily porous carbon that consists of domains with short-range graphene orders, with variable packing in three dimensions, but no long-range graphitic order. The relative abundance of Xe and C atoms (6:10{sup 9}) in the separates indicates that individual noble gas atoms are associated with only a minor component of the porous carbon, possibly one or more specific arrangements of the nanoparticulate graphene.

  14. Design philosophy and construction of a high concentration compound parabolic concentrator

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roos, TH

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) with a concentration ratio of 16:1 is under development at CSIR for volumetric receiver and solar fuels development. The ideal shape has been approximated by 6 and 12 facets in the longitudinal...

  15. High-performance deployable structures for the support of high-concentration ratio solar array modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobrem, M.

    1985-01-01

    A study conducted on high-performance deployable structures for the support of high-concentration ratio solar array modules is discussed. Serious consideration is being given to the use of high-concentration ratio solar array modules or applications such as space stations. These concentrator solar array designs offer the potential of reduced cost, reduced electrical complexity, higher power per unit area, and improved survivability. Arrays of concentrators, such as the miniaturized Cassegrainian concentrator modules, present a serious challenge to the structural design because their mass per unit area (5.7 kg/square meters) is higher than that of flexible solar array blankets, and the requirement for accurate orientation towards the Sun (plus or minus 0.5 degree) requires structures with improved accuracy potentials. In addition, use on a space station requires relatively high structural natural frequencies to avoid deleterious interactions with control systems and other large structural components. The objective here is to identify and evaluate conceptual designs of structures suitable for deploying and accurately supporting high-concentration ratio solar array modules.

  16. The effects of secular calcium and magnesium concentration changes on the thermodynamics of seawater acid/base chemistry: Implications for Eocene and Cretaceous ocean carbon chemistry and buffering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Mathis P.; Sigman, Daniel M.; Higgins, John A.; Haug, Gerald H.

    2015-05-01

    Reconstructed changes in seawater calcium and magnesium concentration ([Ca2+], [Mg2+]) predictably affect the ocean's acid/base and carbon chemistry. Yet inaccurate formulations of chemical equilibrium "constants" are currently in use to account for these changes. Here we develop an efficient implementation of the MIAMI Ionic Interaction Model to predict all chemical equilibrium constants required for carbon chemistry calculations under variable [Ca2+] and [Mg2+]. We investigate the impact of [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] on the relationships among the ocean's pH, CO2, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), saturation state of CaCO3 (Ω), and buffer capacity. Increasing [Ca2+] and/or [Mg2+] enhances "ion pairing," which increases seawater buffering by increasing the concentration ratio of total to "free" (uncomplexed) carbonate ion. An increase in [Ca2+], however, also causes a decline in carbonate ion to maintain a given Ω, thereby overwhelming the ion pairing effect and decreasing seawater buffering. Given the reconstructions of Eocene [Ca2+] and [Mg2+] ([Ca2+]~20 mM; [Mg2+]~30 mM), Eocene seawater would have required essentially the same DIC as today to simultaneously explain a similar-to-modern Ω and the estimated Eocene atmospheric CO2 of ~1000 ppm. During the Cretaceous, at ~4 times modern [Ca2+], ocean buffering would have been at a minimum. Overall, during times of high seawater [Ca2+], CaCO3 saturation, pH, and atmospheric CO2 were more susceptible to perturbations of the global carbon cycle. For example, given both Eocene and Cretaceous seawater [Ca2+] and [Mg2+], a doubling of atmospheric CO2 would require less carbon addition to the ocean/atmosphere system than under modern seawater composition. Moreover, increasing seawater buffering since the Cretaceous may have been a driver of evolution by raising energetic demands of biologically controlled calcification and CO2 concentration mechanisms that aid photosynthesis.

  17. Source sector and region contributions to concentration and direct radiative forcing of black carbon in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Liao, Hong; Mao, Yuhao; Ridley, David A.

    2016-01-01

    We quantify the contributions from five domestic emission sectors (residential, industry, transportation, energy, and biomass burning) and emissions outside of China (non-China) to concentration and direct radiative forcing (DRF) of black carbon (BC) in China for year 2010 using a nested-grid version of the global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) coupled with a radiative transfer model. The Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (HTAP) anthropogenic emissions of BC for year 2010 are used in this study. Simulated surface-layer BC concentrations in China have strong seasonal variations, which exceed 9 μg m-3 in winter and are about 1-5 μg m-3 in summer in the North China Plain and the Sichuan Basin. Residential sector is simulated to have the largest contribution to surface BC concentrations, by 5-7 μg m-3 in winter and by 1-3 μg m-3 in summer, reflecting the large emissions from winter heating and the enhanced wet deposition during summer monsoon. The contribution from industry sector is the second largest and shows relatively small seasonal variations; the emissions from industry sector contribute 1-3 μg m-3 to BC concentrations in the North China Plain and the Sichuan Basin. The contribution from transportation sector is the third largest, followed by that from biomass burning and energy sectors. The non-China emissions mainly influence the surface-layer concentrations of BC in western China; about 70% of surface-layer BC concentration in the Tibet Plateau is attributed to transboundary transport. Averaged over all of China, the all-sky DRF of BC at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) is simulated to be 1.22 W m-2. Sensitivity simulations show that the TOA BC direct radiative forcings from the five domestic emission sectors of residential, industry, energy, transportation, biomass burning, and non-China emissions are 0.44, 0.27, 0.01, 0.12, 0.04, and 0.30 W m-2, respectively. The domestic and non-China emissions contribute 75% and 25% to BC DRF in China

  18. Design and development of a high-concentration and high-efficiency photovoltaic concentrator using a curved Fresnel lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scharlack, R.S.; Moffat, A.

    1983-08-01

    Thermo Electron has designed a high concentration photovoltaic module that uses a domed, point-focus Fresnel lens. Their design, design optimization process, and results from lens and receiver tests are described in this report. A complete module has not been fabricated and probably will not be fabricated in the future; however, Thermo Electron's optical design, analysis, and testing of both secondary optical units and domed Fresnel lenses have made a significant contribution to our project. Tooling errors prevented the lens from reaching its potential efficiency by the end of the contract, and resolution of these tooling problems is currently being attempted with a follow-on contract, No. 68-9463.

  19. Key knowledge and data gaps in modelling the influence of CO2 concentration on the terrestrial carbon sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, T A M; Müller, C; Arneth, A; Haverd, V; Smith, B

    2016-09-20

    Primary productivity of terrestrial vegetation is expected to increase under the influence of increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations ([CO2]). Depending on the fate of such additionally fixed carbon, this could lead to an increase in terrestrial carbon storage, and thus a net terrestrial sink of atmospheric carbon. Such a mechanism is generally believed to be the primary global driver behind the observed large net uptake of anthropogenic CO2 emissions by the biosphere. Mechanisms driving CO2 uptake in the Terrestrial Biosphere Models (TBMs) used to attribute and project terrestrial carbon sinks, including that from increased [CO2], remain in large parts unchanged since those models were conceived two decades ago. However, there exists a large body of new data and understanding providing an opportunity to update these models, and directing towards important topics for further research. In this review we highlight recent developments in understanding of the effects of elevated [CO2] on photosynthesis, and in particular on the fate of additionally fixed carbon within the plant with its implications for carbon turnover rates, on the regulation of photosynthesis in response to environmental limitations on in-plant carbon sinks, and on emergent ecosystem responses. We recommend possible avenues for model improvement and identify requirements for better data on core processes relevant to the understanding and modelling of the effect of increasing [CO2] on the global terrestrial carbon sink. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  20. Carbon nanofibers grafted on activated carbon as an electrode in high-power supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryglewicz, Grażyna; Śliwak, Agata; Béguin, François

    2013-08-01

    A hybrid electrode material for high-power supercapacitors was fabricated by grafting carbon nanofibers (CNFs) onto the surface of powdered activated carbon (AC) through catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). A uniform thin layer of disentangled CNFs with a herringbone structure was deposited on the carbon surface through the decomposition of propane at 450 °C over an AC-supported nickel catalyst. CNF coating was controlled by the reaction time and the nickel content. The superior CNF/AC composite displays excellent electrochemical performance in a 0.5 mol L(-1) solution of K2 SO4 due to its unique structure. At a high scan rate (100 mV s(-1) ) and current loading (20 A g(-1) ), the capacitance values were three- and fourfold higher than those for classical AC/carbon black composites. Owing to this feature, a high energy of 10 Wh kg(-1) was obtained over a wide power range in neutral medium at a voltage of 0.8 V. The significant enhancement of charge propagation is attributed to the presence of herringbone CNFs, which facilitate the diffusion of ions in the electrode and play the role of electronic bridges between AC particles. An in situ coating of AC with short CNFs (below 200 nm) is a very attractive method for producing the next generation of carbon composite materials with a high power performance in supercapacitors working in neutral medium.

  1. Global warming preceded by increasing carbon dioxide concentrations during the last deglaciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakun, Jeremy D; Clark, Peter U; He, Feng; Marcott, Shaun A; Mix, Alan C; Liu, Zhengyu; Otto-Bliesner, Bette; Schmittner, Andreas; Bard, Edouard

    2012-04-04

    The covariation of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) concentration and temperature in Antarctic ice-core records suggests a close link between CO(2) and climate during the Pleistocene ice ages. The role and relative importance of CO(2) in producing these climate changes remains unclear, however, in part because the ice-core deuterium record reflects local rather than global temperature. Here we construct a record of global surface temperature from 80 proxy records and show that temperature is correlated with and generally lags CO(2) during the last (that is, the most recent) deglaciation. Differences between the respective temperature changes of the Northern Hemisphere and Southern Hemisphere parallel variations in the strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation recorded in marine sediments. These observations, together with transient global climate model simulations, support the conclusion that an antiphased hemispheric temperature response to ocean circulation changes superimposed on globally in-phase warming driven by increasing CO(2) concentrations is an explanation for much of the temperature change at the end of the most recent ice age.

  2. Impact of Wetland Decline on Decreasing Dissolved Organic Carbon Concentrations along the Mississippi River Continuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Shuiwang; He, Yuxiang; Kaushal, Sujay S.; Bianchi, Thomas S.; Ward, Nicholas D.; Guo, Laodong

    2017-01-09

    Prior to discharging to the ocean, large rivers constantly receive inputs of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from tributaries or fringing floodplains and lose DOC via continuous in situ processing along distances that span thousands of kilometers. Current concepts predicting longitudinal changes in DOC mainly focus on in situ processing or exchange with fringing floodplain wetlands, while effects of heterogeneous watershed characteristics are generally ignored. We analyzed results from a 17-year time-series of DOC measurements made at seven sites and three expeditions along the entire Mississippi River main channel with DOC measurements made every 17 km. The results show a clear downstream decrease in DOC concentrations that was consistent throughout the entire study period. Downstream DOC decreases were primarily (~63–71%) a result of constant dilutions by low-DOC tributary water controlled by watershed wetland distribution, while in situ processing played a secondary role. We estimate that from 1780 to 1980 wetland loss due to land-use alterations caused a ca. 58% decrease in in DOC concentrations in the tributaries of the Mississippi River. DOC reductions caused by watershed wetland loss likely impacted the capacity for the river to effectively remove nitrogen via denitrification, which can further exacerbate coastal hypoxia. These findings highlight the importance of watershed wetlands in regulating DOC longitudinally along the headland to ocean continuum of major rivers.

  3. Light climate and dissolved organic carbon concentration influence species-specific changes in fish zooplanktivory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidel, Brian C.; Baglini, Katherine; Jones, Stuart E.; Kelly, Patrick T.; Solomon, Christopher T.; Zwart, Jacob A.

    2017-01-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in lakes reduces light penetration and limits fish production in low nutrient lakes, reportedly via reduced primary and secondary production. Alternatively, DOC and light reductions could influence fish by altering their visual feeding. Previous studies report mixed effects of DOC on feeding rates of zooplanktivorous fish, but most investigators tested effects of a single concentration of DOC against clear-water, turbid, or algal treatments. We used a controlled laboratory study to quantify the effects of a DOC gradient (3–19 mg L−1) on average light climate and the zooplankton feeding rate of 3 common, north temperate fishes. Light availability, which was inversely related to DOC concentration, had a positive and linear effect on zooplankton consumption by juvenile largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) and bluegill (Lepomis macrochirus), explaining 22% and 28% of the variation in consumption, respectively. By contrast, zooplankton feeding rates by fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) were best predicted by a nonlinear, negative influence of light (R2 = 0.13). In bluegill feeding trials we found a general trend for positive selection of larger zooplankton (Cladocera and Chaoboridae); however, the light climate did not influence the selection of prey type. Largemouth bass selected for larger-bodied zooplankton, with weak evidence that selectivity for large Cladocera changed from negative to neutral selection based on electivity values across the light gradient. Our results suggest that the effect of DOC on the light climate of lakes may directly influence fish zooplanktivory and that this influence may vary among fish species.

  4. Using in-situ spectrophotometric sensors to monitoring dissolved organic carbon concentration: our S::CAN experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Martin; Waldron, Susan; Scott, Marian; Drew, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Dissolved organic carbon, (DOC), is the component of the organic carbon that can pass through a membrane filter, with the accepted maximum pore size of 0.7 μm. There is growing interest in high resolution time series of such data e.g. heterotrophic respiration of DOC in freshwater systems can fuel atmospheric CO2 efflux so observing variation in DOC concentration, [DOC], is meaningful. Field deployable sensors, capable of measuring [DOC] on a continuous basis, have the potential to provide us with a far higher resolution time series data than we can obtain through manual sampling. At a catchment area draining Europe's largest windfarm, Whitelee, we have deployed an S::CAN Spectrolyser. This device scans wavelengths from 200 to 735nm, generating a spectral fingerprint and then, using an inbuilt algorithm, returns a value for the DOC concentration, termed DOC-equivalent, [DOC-eq]. The Spectrolyser also estimates other parameters such as total organic carbon and the true colour of the water. Unfortunately, our field Spectrolyser [DOC] are different from lab based measurement of [DOC] of the same field filtered samples (measured using a Thermalox high temperature catalytic oxidation system). Comparing 28 lab measured [DOC] with Spectrolyser [DOC-eq] shows an average difference of 7.6 mg/l C. Here we discuss our interpretation of why this disparity exists and how to accommodate this offset such that accuracy is improved. We have tried various methods of keeping the lens and path length clean through brushing, acid cleaning and the recent installation of a high pressure air hose (recommended by S::CAN). We will compare output before and after this installation. Further complexity is added because light may be absorbed by other components of the field sample, such as particulate material, and this could compromise the estimated [DOC-eq]. [DOC] may be estimated using absorption measurements made at 254nm and 340nm (Tipping et al, 2009). We have implemented this formula

  5. Confinement of hydrogen at high pressure in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassila, David H.; Bonner, Brian P.

    2011-12-13

    A high pressure hydrogen confinement apparatus according to one embodiment includes carbon nanotubes capped at one or both ends thereof with a hydrogen-permeable membrane to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough. A hydrogen confinement apparatus according to another embodiment includes an array of multi-walled carbon nanotubes each having first and second ends, the second ends being capped with palladium (Pd) to enable the high pressure confinement of hydrogen and release of the hydrogen therethrough as a function of palladium temperature, wherein the array of carbon nanotubes is capable of storing hydrogen gas at a pressure of at least 1 GPa for greater than 24 hours. Additional apparatuses and methods are also presented.

  6. Effect of Fe ion concentration on corrosion of carbon steel in CO2 environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogowska, Magdalena; Gudme, J.; Rubin, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the corrosion behaviour of steel wires in solutions containing different concentrations of Fe2+ was investigated by the linear polarisation resistance method, while the evolution of pH was monitored in situ and changes of the Fe2+ concentration were monitored ex situ. Characterisation...... of the corrosion scales was performed using microscopic and diffraction techniques. Scale analysis revealed that the passivation of samples, exposed to initially highly Fe2+ supersaturated solution, occurred when a formation of a double layer took place, resulting in 30 times lower corrosion rate compared...

  7. Concentration and temperature controlled oxidation and cutting of single-walled carbon nanotubes by ammonium persulfate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AHMAD; Mirza; Nadeem

    2010-01-01

    SWNTs were oxidized by a simple wet chemical method involving treatment in aqueous ammonium persulfate(APS) solution at a certain temperature.Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy(XPS) demonstrated that a large amount of oxygen containing groups such as hydroxyl groups and carbonyl groups was attached to the sidewall of SWNTs.The oxidized SWNTs showed good solubility in polar solvents including water and DMF.Atomic force microscopic images showed that SWNTs could be cut into short pipes by the highly concentrated APS solution at 80℃.With the decrease of reaction temperature or APS concentration,the oxidized SWNTs remained uncut.

  8. Influence of the concentration of carbon nanotubes on electrical conductivity of magnetically aligned MWCNT–polypyrrole composites

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    KAVEH KAZEMIKIA; FAHIMEH BONABI; ALI ASADPOORCHALLO; MAJID SHOKRZADEH

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this work is to study the effect of high magnetic pulses on electrical property of carbon nanotube–polypyrrole (CNT–PPy) composites with different CNT concentrations. CNT–PPy composites are produced in fractions of 1, 5 and 9 wt%. During the polymerization process, the CNTs are homogeneously dispersed throughout the polymer matrix in an ultrasonic bath. Nanocomposite rods are prepared. After exposure to 30 magnetic pulses, the resistivity of the rods is measured. The surface conductivity of thin tablets of composites is studied by 4-probe technique. The magnitude of the pulsed magnetic field is 10 Tesla with time duration of 1.5 ms. The results show that after applying 30 magnetic pulses, the electrical resistivity of the composites decreases depending on the concentration of CNTs in the composites. The orientation of CNTs is probed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique. AFM images approved alignment of CNT–polymer fibres in the magnetic field.We found that the enhancement in the electrical properties of CNT–PPy composites is due to rearrangement and alignment of CNTs in a high magnetic field. The stability of nano-composites is studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

  9. Effect of low concentrations of carbon nanotubes on electric dipole relaxation in a polyurethane elastomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabenok, E. V.; Novikov, G. F.; Estrin, Ya. I.; Badamshina, E. R.

    2015-03-01

    The effect of small (up to 0.018 wt %) additions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) on the complex electric modulus M*= M' - jM″ and the spectrum of the relaxation times G(τ) of a cross-linked polyurethane elastomer containing ˜10 vol % of polyamide-6 dispersed in the polyurethane matrix and incompatible with it was studied. The measurements were conducted in the range of electric field frequencies 10-3-105 Hz at temperatures from 133 to 413 K. Based on the shape analysis of the M″( M') diagrams, the contributions of electric conductivity and dielectric relaxation to complex dielectric permittivity ɛ* = ɛ' - jɛ″ were separated and the effect of additions on α and β relaxation for both polyurethane and polyamide phases was analyzed in accordance with the peculiarities of phase-separated systems. The introduction of SWNTs in the composite affected the dielectric properties of the material; the maximum effect was observed at concentrations of 0.002-0.008 wt %; at higher SWNT concentrations, the scatter of data increased and did not allow us to evaluate the effect. The effect of SWNTs on G(τ) in the main phase was opposite to that in the polyamide phase. In the temperature range of α relaxation of the polyurethane phase, the relaxation times increased after the introduction of SWNTs evidently because of the decrease in the free volume that determines the α relaxation times of polyurethane. In contrast, for the polyamide phase in the range of α relaxation, the relaxation times decreased after the introduction of SWNTs. The results agree with the literature data on the effect of ultrasmall SWNT concentrations on the physicomechanical characteristics of the polyurethane elastomer and its electric conductivity.

  10. Variability of levels of PM, black carbon and particle number concentration in selected European cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Reche

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In many large cities of Europe standard air quality limit values of particulate matter (PM are exceeded. Emissions from road traffic and biomass burning are frequently reported to be the major causes. As a consequence of these exceedances a large number of air quality plans, most of them focusing on traffic emissions reductions, have been implemented in the last decade. In spite of this implementation, a number of cities did not record a decrease of PM levels. Thus, is the efficiency of air quality plans overestimated? Or do we need a more specific metric to evaluate the impact of the above emissions on the levels of urban aerosols?

    This study shows the results of the interpretation of the 2009 variability of levels of PM, black carbon (BC, aerosol number concentration (N and a number of gaseous pollutants in seven selected urban areas covering road traffic, urban background, urban-industrial, and urban-shipping environments from southern, central and northern Europe.

    The results showed that variations of PM and N levels do not always reflect the variation of the impact of road traffic emissions on urban aerosols. However, BC levels vary proportionally with those of traffic related gaseous pollutants, such as CO, NO2 and NO. Due to this high correlation, one may suppose that monitoring the levels of these gaseous pollutants would be enough to extrapolate exposure to traffic-derived BC levels. However, the BC/CO, BC/NO2 and BC/NO ratios vary widely among the cities studied, as a function of distance to traffic emissions, vehicle fleet composition and the influence of other emission sources such as biomass burning. Thus, levels of BC should be measured at air quality monitoring sites.

    During traffic rush hours, a narrow variation in the N/BC ratio was evidenced, but a wide variation of this ratio was determined for the noon period. Although in central and northern Europe N and BC levels tend to vary

  11. Factors affecting biotic mercury concentrations and biomagnification through lake food webs in the Canadian high Arctic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lescord, Gretchen L., E-mail: glescord@gmail.com [University of New Brunswick/Canadian Rivers Institute, 100 Tucker Park Rd, Saint John, NB E2L 4A6 (Canada); Kidd, Karen A. [University of New Brunswick/Canadian Rivers Institute, 100 Tucker Park Rd, Saint John, NB E2L 4A6 (Canada); Kirk, Jane L. [Environment Canada, Aquatic Contaminants Research Division, 867 Lakeshore Rd, Burlington, ON L7S 1A1 (Canada); O' Driscoll, Nelson J. [Acadia University, 15 University Ave, Wolfville, NS B4P 2R6 (Canada); Wang, Xiaowa; Muir, Derek C.G. [Environment Canada, Aquatic Contaminants Research Division, 867 Lakeshore Rd, Burlington, ON L7S 1A1 (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    In temperate regions of Canada, mercury (Hg) concentrations in biota and the magnitude of Hg biomagnification through food webs vary between neighboring lakes and are related to water chemistry variables and physical lake features. However, few studies have examined factors affecting the variable Hg concentrations in landlocked Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) or the biomagnification of Hg through their food webs. We estimated the food web structure of six high Arctic lakes near Resolute Bay, Nunavut, Canada, using stable carbon (δ{sup 13}C) and nitrogen (δ{sup 15}N) isotopes and measured Hg (total Hg (THg) in char, the only fish species, and methylmercury (MeHg) in chironomids and zooplankton) concentrations in biota collected in 2010 and 2011. Across lakes, δ{sup 13}C showed that benthic carbon (chironomids) was the dominant food source for char. Regression models of log Hg versus δ{sup 15}N (of char and benthic invertebrates) showed positive and significant slopes, indicting Hg biomagnification in all lakes, and higher slopes in some lakes than others. However, no principal components (PC) generated using all water chemistry data and physical characteristics of the lakes predicted the different slopes. The PC dominated by aqueous ions was a negative predictor of MeHg concentrations in chironomids, suggesting that water chemistry affects Hg bioavailability and MeHg concentrations in these lower-trophic-level organisms. Furthermore, regression intercepts were predicted by the PCs dominated by catchment area, aqueous ions, and MeHg. Weaker relationships were also found between THg in small char or MeHg in pelagic invertebrates and the PCs dominated by catchment area, and aqueous nitrate and MeHg. Results from these high Arctic lakes suggest that Hg biomagnification differs between systems and that their physical and chemical characteristics affect Hg concentrations in lower-trophic-level biota. - Highlights: • Mercury (Hg) in Arctic char and invertebrates

  12. Calcium carbonate as a possible dosimeter for high irradiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negron M, A.; Ramos B, S.; Camargo R, C. [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Uribe, R. M. [Kent State University, College of Technology, Kent OH (United States); Gomez V, V. [UNAM, Instituto de Quimica, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Kobayashi, K., E-mail: negron@nucleares.unam.mx [Yokohama National University (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    The aim of this work is to analyze the interactions of 5 MeV electron beam radiation and a 290 MeV/u Carbon beam with calcium carbonate (powder) at 298 K and at different irradiation doses, for the potential use of calcium carbonate as a high-dose dosimeter. The irradiation doses with the electron beam were from 0.015 to 9 MGy, and with Carbon beam from 1.5 kGy to 8 kGy. High-energy radiation induces the formation of free radicals in solid calcium carbonate that can be detected and measured by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). An increase of the EPR response for some of the free radicals produced in the sample was observed as a function of the irradiation dose. The response of one of the radicals decreased with the dose. These measurements are reproducible; the preparation of the sample is simple and inexpensive; and the signal is stable for several months. The response curves show that the dosimeter tends to saturate at 10 MGy. Based on these properties, we propose this chemical compound as a high-dose dosimeter, mainly for electron irradiation. (author)

  13. An Automatic High Efficient Method for Dish Concentrator Alignment

    OpenAIRE

    Yong Wang; Song Li; Jinshan Xu; Yijiang Wang; Xu Cheng; Changgui Gu; Shengyong Chen; Bin Wan

    2014-01-01

    Alignment of dish concentrator is a key factor to the performance of solar energy system. We propose a new method for the alignment of faceted solar dish concentrator. The isosceles triangle configuration of facet’s footholds determines a fixed relation between light spot displacements and foothold movements, which allows an automatic determination of the amount of adjustments. Tests on a 25 kW Stirling Energy System dish concentrator verify the feasibility, accuracy, and efficiency of our...

  14. Highly Stable Operation of Lithium Metal Batteries Enabled by the Formation of a Transient High Concentration Electrolyte Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jianming; Yan, Pengfei; Mei, Donghai; Engelhard, Mark H.; Cartmell, Samuel S.; Polzin, Bryant; Wang, Chong M.; Zhang, Jiguang; Xu, Wu

    2016-02-08

    Lithium (Li) metal has been extensively investigated as an anode for rechargeable battery applications due to its ultrahigh specific capacity and the lowest redox potential. However, significant challenges including dendrite growth and low Coulombic efficiency are still hindering the practical applications of rechargeable Li metal batteries. Here, we demonstrate that long-term cycling of Li metal batteries can be realized by the formation of a transient high concentration electrolyte layer near the surface of Li metal anode during high rate discharge process. The highly concentrated Li+ ions in this transient layer will immediately solvate with the available solvent molecules and facilitate the formation of a stable and flexible SEI layer composed of a poly(ethylene carbonate) framework integrated with other organic/inorganic lithium salts. This SEI layer largely suppresses the corrosion of Li metal anode by free organic solvents and enables the long-term operation of Li metal batteries. The fundamental findings in this work provide a new direction for the development and operation of Li metal batteries that could be operated at high current densities for a wide range of applications.

  15. Highly porous activated carbons prepared from carbon rich Mongolian anthracite by direct NaOH activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byamba-Ochir, Narandalai [School of Chemical Engineering, Chonnam National University, 77 Yongbong-Ro, Gwangju 61186 (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Wang Geun [Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Sunchon National University, 255 Jungang-Ro, Suncheon, Jeollanam-Do 57922 (Korea, Republic of); Balathanigaimani, M.S., E-mail: msbala@rgipt.ac.in [Department of Chemical Engineering, Rajiv Gandhi Institute of Petroleum Technology, Ratapur Chowk, Rae Bareli, 229316 Uttar Pradesh (India); Moon, Hee, E-mail: hmoon@jnu.ac.kr [School of Chemical Engineering, Chonnam National University, 77 Yongbong-Ro, Gwangju 61186 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-30

    Highlights: • Highly porous carbon materials from Mongolian anthracite by chemical activation. • Cheaper and eco-friendly activation process has been employed. • Activated carbons with graphitic structure and energetically heterogeneous surface. • Surface hydrophobicity and porosity of the activated carbons can be controlled. - Abstract: Highly porous activated carbons (ACs) were prepared from Mongolian raw anthracite (MRA) using sodium hydroxide as an activation agent by varying the mass ratio (powdered MRA/NaOH) as well as the mixing method of chemical agent and powdered MRA. The specific BET surface area and total pore volume of the prepared MRA-based activated carbons (MACs) are in the range of 816–2063 m{sup 2}/g and of 0.55–1.61 cm{sup 3}/g, respectively. The pore size distribution of MACs show that most of the pores are in the range from large micropores to small mesopores and their distribution can be controlled by the mass ratio and mixing method of the activating agent. As expected from the intrinsic property of the MRA, the highly graphitic surface morphology of prepared carbons was confirmed from Raman spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Furthermore the FTIR and XPS results reveal that the preparation of MACs with hydrophobic in nature is highly possible by controlling the mixing conditions of activating agent and powdered MRA. Based on all the results, it is suggested that the prepared MACs could be used for many specific applications, requiring high surface area, optimal pore size distribution, proper surface hydrophobicity as well as strong physical strength.

  16. Observations of the uptake of carbonyl sulfide (COS by trees under elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Sandoval-Soto

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Global change forces ecosystems to adapt to elevated atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2. We understand that carbonyl sulfide (COS, a trace gas which is involved in building up the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer, is taken up by vegetation with the same triad of the enzymes which are metabolizing CO2, i.e. ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEP-Co and carbonic anhydrase (CA. Therefore, we discuss a physiological/biochemical acclimation of these enzymes affecting the sink strength of vegetation for COS. We investigated the acclimation of two European tree species, Fagus sylvatica and Quercus ilex, grown inside chambers under elevated CO2, and determined the exchange characteristics and the content of CA after a 1–2 yr period of acclimation from 350 ppm to 800 ppm CO2. We demonstrate that a compensation point, by definition, does not exist. Instead, we propose to discuss a point of uptake affinity (PUA. The results indicate that such a PUA, the CA activity and the deposition velocities may change and may cause a decrease of the COS uptake by plant ecosystems, at least as long as the enzyme acclimation to CO2 is not surpassed by an increase of atmospheric COS. As a consequence, the atmospheric COS level may rise causing an increase of the radiative forcing in the troposphere. However, this increase is counterbalanced by the stronger input of this trace gas into the stratosphere causing a stronger energy reflection by the stratospheric sulfur aerosol into space (Brühl et al., 2012. These data are very preliminary but may trigger a discussion on COS uptake acclimation to foster measurements with modern analytical instruments.

  17. Selection of common bean lines with high grain yield and high grain calcium and iron concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nerinéia Dalfollo Ribeiro

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Genetic improvement of common bean nutritional quality has advantages in marketing and can contribute to society as a food source. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic variability for grain yield, calcium and iron concentrations in grains of inbred common bean lines obtained by different breeding methods. For this, 136 F7 inbred lines were obtained using the Pedigree method and 136 F7 inbred lines were obtained using the Single-Seed Descent (SSD method. The lines showed genetic variability for grain yield, and concentrations of calcium and iron independently of the method of advancing segregating populations. The Pedigree method allows obtaining a greater number of lines with high grain yield. Selection using the SSD method allows the identification of a larger number of lines with high concentrations of calcium and iron in grains. Weak negative correlations were found between grain yield and calcium concentration (r = -0.0994 and grain yield and iron concentration (r = -0.3926. Several lines show genetic superiority for grain yield and concentrations of calcium and iron in grains and their selection can result in new common bean cultivars with high nutritional quality.

  18. Enhanced biological carbon consumption in a high CO2 ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebesell, U; Schulz, K G; Bellerby, R G J; Botros, M; Fritsche, P; Meyerhöfer, M; Neill, C; Nondal, G; Oschlies, A; Wohlers, J; Zöllner, E

    2007-11-22

    The oceans have absorbed nearly half of the fossil-fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted into the atmosphere since pre-industrial times, causing a measurable reduction in seawater pH and carbonate saturation. If CO2 emissions continue to rise at current rates, upper-ocean pH will decrease to levels lower than have existed for tens of millions of years and, critically, at a rate of change 100 times greater than at any time over this period. Recent studies have shown effects of ocean acidification on a variety of marine life forms, in particular calcifying organisms. Consequences at the community to ecosystem level, in contrast, are largely unknown. Here we show that dissolved inorganic carbon consumption of a natural plankton community maintained in mesocosm enclosures at initial CO2 partial pressures of 350, 700 and 1,050 microatm increases with rising CO2. The community consumed up to 39% more dissolved inorganic carbon at increased CO2 partial pressures compared to present levels, whereas nutrient uptake remained the same. The stoichiometry of carbon to nitrogen drawdown increased from 6.0 at low CO2 to 8.0 at high CO2, thus exceeding the Redfield carbon:nitrogen ratio of 6.6 in today's ocean. This excess carbon consumption was associated with higher loss of organic carbon from the upper layer of the stratified mesocosms. If applicable to the natural environment, the observed responses have implications for a variety of marine biological and biogeochemical processes, and underscore the importance of biologically driven feedbacks in the ocean to global change.

  19. Method for creating high carbon content products from biomass oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Reginald; Seames, Wayne

    2012-12-18

    In a method for producing high carbon content products from biomass, a biomass oil is added to a cracking reactor vessel. The biomass oil is heated to a temperature ranging from about 100.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to crack the biomass oil. Tar is separated from the cracked biomass oil. The tar is heated to a temperature ranging from about 200.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to reduce the tar to a high carbon content product containing at least about 50% carbon by weight.

  20. Preparation of spherical cobalt carbonate powder with high tap density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Jin; WANG Jian-feng; LIU Yong-dong; LI Jie; LIU Ye-xiang

    2006-01-01

    Spherical cobalt carbonate with high tap density, good crystallization and uniform particle size was prepared by controlled chemical crystal method using cobalt chloride and ammonium bicarbonate as cobalt source and precipitator. The effects of pH value and reaction time on crystallization and physical properties of cobalt carbonate were studied. The results show that the key factors influencing the preparation process of spherical cobalt carbonate with high tap density and good crystallization are how to control pH value (7.25 ± 0.05) and keep some reaction time (about 10 h). Co4O3 was prepared by sintering spherical morphology CoCO3 samples at varied temperatures. The results show that as the decomposition temperature increases, the as-obtained Co4O3 products with porous structure transform into polyhedral structure with glazed surface, and simultaneously the cobalt content and tap density increase. However, the specific surface area shows a trend of decrease.

  1. High capacitance of coarse-grained carbide derived carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Oleksiy; Malinovskiy, Bohdan; Zozulya, Yuliya; Simon, Patrice; Gogotsi, Yury

    2016-02-01

    We report exceptional electrochemical properties of supercapacitor electrodes composed of large, granular carbide-derived carbon (CDC) particles. Using a titanium carbide (TiC) precursor, we synthesized 70-250 μm sized particles with high surface area and a narrow pore size distribution. Electrochemical cycling of these coarse-grained powders defied conventional wisdom that a small particle size is strictly required for supercapacitor electrodes and allowed high charge storage densities, rapid transport, and good rate handling ability. The material showcased capacitance above 100 F g-1 at sweep rates as high as 250 mV s-1 in organic electrolyte. 250-1000 micron thick dense CDC films with up to 80 mg cm-2 loading showed superior areal capacitances. The material significantly outperformed its activated carbon counterpart in organic electrolytes and ionic liquids. Furthermore, large internal/external surface ratio of coarse-grained carbons allowed the resulting electrodes to maintain high electrochemical stability up to 3.1 V in ionic liquid electrolyte. In addition to presenting novel insights into the electrosorption process, these coarse-grained carbons offer a pathway to low-cost, high-performance implementation of supercapacitors in automotive and grid-storage applications.

  2. An Automatic High Efficient Method for Dish Concentrator Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    2014-01-01

    for the alignment of faceted solar dish concentrator. The isosceles triangle configuration of facet’s footholds determines a fixed relation between light spot displacements and foothold movements, which allows an automatic determination of the amount of adjustments. Tests on a 25 kW Stirling Energy System dish concentrator verify the feasibility, accuracy, and efficiency of our method.

  3. Parametric uncertainties in global model simulations of black carbon column mass concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, Hana; Lee, Lindsay; Reddington, Carly; Carslaw, Ken; Mann, Graham

    2016-04-01

    Previous studies have deduced that the annual mean direct radiative forcing from black carbon (BC) aerosol may regionally be up to 5 W m-2 larger than expected due to underestimation of global atmospheric BC absorption in models. We have identified the magnitude and important sources of parametric uncertainty in simulations of BC column mass concentration from a global aerosol microphysics model (GLOMAP-Mode). A variance-based uncertainty analysis of 28 parameters has been performed, based on statistical emulators trained on model output from GLOMAP-Mode. This is the largest number of uncertain model parameters to be considered in a BC uncertainty analysis to date and covers primary aerosol emissions, microphysical processes and structural parameters related to the aerosol size distribution. We will present several recommendations for further research to improve the fidelity of simulated BC. In brief, we find that the standard deviation around the simulated mean annual BC column mass concentration varies globally between 2.5 x 10-9 g cm-2 in remote marine regions and 1.25 x 10-6 g cm-2 near emission sources due to parameter uncertainty Between 60 and 90% of the variance over source regions is due to uncertainty associated with primary BC emission fluxes, including biomass burning, fossil fuel and biofuel emissions. While the contributions to BC column uncertainty from microphysical processes, for example those related to dry and wet deposition, are increased over remote regions, we find that emissions still make an important contribution in these areas. It is likely, however, that the importance of structural model error, i.e. differences between models, is greater than parametric uncertainty. We have extended our analysis to emulate vertical BC profiles at several locations in the mid-Pacific Ocean and identify the parameters contributing to uncertainty in the vertical distribution of black carbon at these locations. We will present preliminary comparisons of

  4. Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Analysis of Atrazine and Desethylatrazine at Sub-μg/L Concentrations in Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreglmann, Kathrin; Hoeche, Martina; Steinbeiss, Sibylle; Reinnicke, Sandra; Elsner, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Environmental degradation of organic micropollutants is difficult to monitor due to their diffuse and ubiquitous input. Current approaches - concentrations measurements over time, or daughter-to-parent compound ratios - may fall short, because they do not consider dilution, compound- specific sorption characteristics or alternative degradation pathways. Compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) offers an alternative approach based on evidence from isotope values. Until now, however, the relatively high limits for precise isotope analysis by gas chromatography - isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC-IRMS) have impeded CSIA of sub µg/L scale micropollutant concentrations in field samples. We present the first measurements of C and N isotope ratios of the herbicide atrazine and its metabolite desethylatrazine at concentrations of 100 to 1000 ng/L in natural groundwater samples. Solid phase extraction and preparative HPLC were tested and validated for preconcentration and cleanup of groundwater samples of up to 10 liters without bias by isotope effects. Matrix interferences after solid phase extraction could be greatly reduced by a preparative HPLC cleanup step prior to GC-IRMS analysis. Sensitivity was increased by a factor of 6 to 8 by changing the injection method from large-volume-injection to cold-on-column injection on the GC-IRMS system. Carbon and nitrogen isotope values of field samples showed no obvious correlation with concentrations or desethylatrazine-to-atrazine ratios. Contrary to expectations, however, δ13C values of desethylatrazine were consistently less negative than those of atrazine from the same sites. Potentially, this line of evidence may contain information about further desethylatrazine degradation. In such a case the common practice of using desethylatrazine-to-atrazine ratios would underestimate natural atrazine degradation.

  5. Deposition of Diamond-Like carbon Films by High-Intensity Pulsed Ion Beam Ablation at Various Substrate Temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅显秀; 刘振民; 马腾才; 董闯

    2003-01-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) films have been deposited on to Si substrates at substrate temperatures from 25℃to 400 ℃ by a high-intensity pulsed-ion-beam (HIPIB) ablation deposition technique. The formation of DLC is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. According to an x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, the concentration of spa carbon in the films is about 40% when the substrate temperature is below 300 ℃. With increasing substrate temperature from 25 ℃ to 400 ℃, the concentration of sp3 carbon decreases from 43% to 8%. In other words,sp3 carbon is graphitized into sp2 carbon when the substrate temperature is above 300 ℃. The results of xray diffraction and atomic force microscopy show that, with increasing the substrate temperature, the surface roughness and the friction coefficient increase, and the microhardness and the residual stress of the films decrease.

  6. Starch source in high concentrate rations does not affect rumen pH, histamine and lipopolysaccharide concentrations in dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pilachai, R.; Schonewille, J.T.; Thamrongyoswittayakul, C.; Aiumlamai, S.; Wachirapakom, C.; Everts, H.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2012-01-01

    The replacement of ground corn by cassava meal on rumen pH, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and histamine concentrations under typical Thai feeding conditions (high concentrate diets and rice straw as the sole source of roughage) was investigated. Four rumen-fistulated crossbred Holstein, non-pregnant, dry

  7. Bandgap Engineering in High-Efficiency Multijunction Concentrator Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, R. R.; Sherif, R. A.; Kinsey, G. S.; Kurtz, S.; Fetzer, C. M.; Edmondson, K. M.; Law, D. C.; Cotal, H. L.; Krut, D. D.; Ermer, J. H.; Karam, N. H.

    2005-08-01

    This paper discusses semiconductor device research paths under investigation with the aim of reaching the milestone efficiency of 40%. A cost analysis shows that achieving very high cell efficiencies is crucial for the realization of cost-effective photovoltaics, because of the strongly leveraging effect of efficiency on module packaging and balance-of systems costs. Lattice-matched (LM) GaInP/ GaInAs/ Ge 3-junction cells have achieved the highest independently confirmed efficiency at 175 suns, 25?C, of 37.3% under the standard AM1.5D, low-AOD terrestrial spectrum. Lattice-mismatched, or metamorphic (MM), materials offer still higher potential efficiencies, if the crystal quality can be maintained. Theoretical efficiencies well over 50% are possible for a MM GaInP/ 1.17-eV GaInAs/ Ge 3-junction cell limited by radiative recombination at 500 suns. The bandgap - open circuit voltage offset, (Eg/q) - Voc, is used as a valuable theoretical and experimental tool to characterize multijunction cells with subcell bandgaps ranging from 0.7 to 2.1 eV. Experimental results are presented for prototype 6-junction cells employing an active {approx}1.1-eV dilute nitride GaInNAs subcell, with active-area efficiency greater than 23% and over 5.3 V open-circuit voltage under the 1-sun AM0 space spectrum. Such cell designs have theoretical efficiencies under the terrestrial spectrum at 500 suns concentration exceeding 55% efficiency, even for lattice-matched designs.

  8. Fine Particulate Matter in São Paulo During the Winter Months: Concentrations and Black Carbon Comparison Between Techniques and Equipments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, R. M.; Andrade, M. D. F.

    2014-12-01

    During the winter months in São Paulo, Brazil, particulate matter and black carbon were monitored using a Dust Trak (TSI model 8533), a Black Carbon monitor (MAAP-Thermo) and a PM2.5 sampler (Partisol-Thermo). The concentrations were obtained every 5 minutes, from June to August 2014, for the first and second and every 12 hours for the third. The experiment took place in a site at the University of São Paulo which is located in the Southeast part of the Metropolitan Area of São Paulo (MASP). MASP is one of the biggest urban centers of the world, with more than 20 million inhabitants, 10 million vehicles and high values of some regulated pollutants, as particulate matter, especially in winter. Ambient fine particles associated with vehicle emissions have been linked to adverse health effects. Black carbon has a significant share of particulate mass concentrations. Previous studies showed a contribution of more than 30% for São Paulo. This year the climate was atypical in São Paulo. The summer was the driest of the last 30 years. The winter was hot and also dry. Dust trak monitor showed peaks of more than 120 μg/m3 for PM2.5. For a specific period, black carbon concentrations from the MAAP monitor were compared to black carbon measured by optical reflectance on teflon filters collected by the Partisol sampler. Monitor values were around 30% higher, but specific characteristics can influence this value. In the past, optical reflectance and thermal techniques for black carbon were compared. The reflectance technique showed higher results for the fine fraction than the thermal method. Now, reflectance is being compared to instrument measurements and results are also satisfactory.

  9. A new technology for production of high thickness carbon/carbon composites for launchers application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, Marta; Delfini, Andrea; Pastore, Roberto; Micheli, Davide; Marchetti, Mario

    2016-11-01

    Carbon-Carbon (C/C) composites are known for their extraordinary stability and excellent mechanical properties, almost unchanged at high temperatures. Among the several advanced applications, C/C based materials can be used in engines as nozzle throat section for launchers. In particular, the main feature for such employment is the material high resistance in extreme thermal environment. On the other hand, large-size items are required for this kind of purposes, thus introducing criticalities in terms of material uniformity and final overall properties. Up to now, there no standard for the production of high thickness C/C structures. In this paper a novel manufacturing method is analyzed, following each phase of the process, from the carbon fiber preform design and preparation to the carbon densification by chemical vapor infiltration method. Five preforms of large dimensions with different characteristics have been manufactured and infiltrated. The realized prototypes have been then analyzed by means of mechanical, physical and morphological tests. Aim of the results of this preliminary work is to establish a set of guidelines for a well-defined high thickness C/C production method.

  10. High Oxygen Concentrations Adversely Affect the Performance of Pulmonary Surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Craig D; Boloori-Zadeh, Parnian; Silva, Maricris R; Gouldstone, Andrew

    2017-08-01

    Although effective in the neonatal population, exogenous pulmonary surfactant has not demonstrated a benefit in pediatric and adult subjects with hypoxic lung injury despite a sound physiologic rationale. Importantly, neonatal surfactant replacement therapy is administered in conjunction with low fractional FIO2 while pediatric/adult therapy is administered with high FIO2 . We suspected a connection between FIO2 and surfactant performance. Therefore, we sought to assess a possible mechanism by which the activity of pulmonary surfactant is adversely affected by direct oxygen exposure in in vitro experiments. The mechanical performance of pulmonary surfactant was evaluated using 2 methods. First, Langmuir-Wilhelmy balance was utilized to study the reduction in surface area (δA) of surfactant to achieve a low bound value of surface tension after repeated compression and expansion cycles. Second, dynamic light scattering was utilized to measure the size of pulmonary surfactant particles in aqueous suspension. For both experiments, comparisons were made between surfactant exposed to 21% and 100% oxygen. The δA of surfactant was 21.1 ± 2.0% and 35.8 ± 2.0% during exposure to 21% and 100% oxygen, respectively (P = .02). Furthermore, dynamic light-scattering experiments revealed a micelle diameter of 336.0 ± 12.5 μm and 280.2 ± 11.0 μm in 21% and 100% oxygen, respectively (P < .001), corresponding to a ∼16% decrease in micelle diameter following exposure to 100% oxygen. The characteristics of pulmonary surfactant were adversely affected by short-term exposure to oxygen. Specifically, surface tension studies revealed that short-term exposure of surfactant film to high concentrations of oxygen expedited the frangibility of pulmonary surfactant, as shown with the δA. This suggests that reductions in pulmonary compliance and associated adverse effects could begin to take effect in a very short period of time. If these findings can be demonstrated in vivo, a role for

  11. Nanostructured water and carbon dioxide inside collapsing carbon nanotubes at high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wenwen; Cerqueira, Tiago F T; Botti, Silvana; Marques, Miguel A L; San-Miguel, Alfonso

    2016-07-20

    We present simulations of the collapse under hydrostatic pressure of carbon nanotubes containing either water or carbon dioxide. We show that the molecules inside the tube alter the dynamics of the collapse process, providing either mechanical support and increasing the collapse pressure, or reducing mechanical stability. At the same time the nanotube acts as a nanoanvil, and the confinement leads to the nanostructuring of the molecules inside the collapsed tube. In this way, depending on the pressure and on the concentration of water or carbon dioxide inside the nanotube, we observe the formation of 1D molecular chains, 2D nanoribbons, and even molecular single and multi-walled nanotubes. The structure of the encapsulated molecules correlates with the mechanical response of the nanotube, opening up opportunities for the development of new devices or composite materials. Our analysis is quite general and it can be extended to other molecules in carbon nanotube nanoanvils, providing a strategy to obtain a variety of nano-objects with controlled features.

  12. Reduction-melting behaviors of boron-bearing iron concentrate/carbon composite pellets with addition of CaO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-song Wang

    2015-01-01

    Although the total amount of boron resources in China is high, the grades of these resources are low. The authors have already proposed a new comprehensive utilization process of boron-bearing iron concentrate based on the iron nugget process. The present work de-scribes a further optimization of the conditions used in the previous study. The effects of CaO on the reduction–melting behavior and proper-ties of the boron-rich slag are presented. CaO improved the reduction of boron-bearing iron concentrate/carbon composite pellets when its content was less than 1wt%. Melting separation of the composite pellets became difficult with the CaO content increased. The sulfur content of the iron nugget gradually decreased from 0.16wt%to 0.046wt%as the CaO content of the pellets increased from 1wt%to 5wt%. CaO negatively affected the iron yield and boron extraction efficiency of the boron-rich slag. The mineral phase evolution of the boron-rich slag during the reduction–melting separation of the composite pellets with added CaO was also deduced.

  13. INDOOR AIR QUALITY IN HOSPITALS - Verification of the physical parameters of comfort and the concentration of carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldir Nagel Schirmer

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In hospitals, the presence of pollutants in the indoor air creates conditions that may prejudice the recovery of patients and affect the productivity of employees. Thus, these places need air conditioning well designed, to provide adequate ventilation rates to ensure the comfort of its occupants and the aseptic of environments. The present study focused on evaluating the indoor air quality (IAQ in a surgical center and an intensive care unit, by checking the physical parameters of comfort and the concentrations of carbon dioxide, following the procedure recommended by Resolution No. 09 of the National Sanitary Surveillance Agency (ANVISA and to propose an air conditioning system for each of the environments evaluated. The results showed that the IAQ in those environments may be improved, since some of the parameters showed values higher than those recommended by that resolution. High concentrations of CO2 obtained, for example, can be justified by the lack of renewal of air. It is suggested that the air conditioning systems must to be substituted for that allowed the renewal of the air at rates acceptable to the current legislation.

  14. High-Efficiency Organic Solar Concentrators for Photovoltaics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michael J. Currie; Jonathan K. Mapel; Timothy D. Heidel; Shalom Goffri; Marc A. Baldo

    2008-01-01

    The cost of photovoltaic power can be reduced with organic solar concentrators. These are planar waveguides with a thin-film organic coating on the face and inorganic solar cells attached to the edges...

  15. Effect of L (+) ascorbic acid and monosodium glutamate concentration on the morphology of calcium carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraya, Mohamed El-shahte Ismaiel

    2015-11-01

    In this study, monosodium glutamate and ascorbic acid were used as crystal and growth modifiers to control the crystallization of CaCO3. Calcium carbonate prepared by reacting a mixed solution of Na2CO3 with CaCl2 at ambient temperature, (25 °C), constant Ca++/ CO3- - molar ratio and pH with stirring. The polymorph and morphology of the crystals were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicate that rhombohedral calcite was only formed in water without organic additives, and both calcite and spherical vaterite with various morphologies were produced in the presence of monosodium glutamate. The content of vaterite increased as the monosodium glutamate increased. In addition, spherical vaterite was obtained in the presence of different concentrations of ascorbic acid. The spherical vaterite posses an aggregate shape composed of nano-particles, ranging from 30 to 50 nm as demonstrated by the SEM and TEM analyses. Therefore, the ascorbic stabilizes vaterite and result in nano-particles compared to monosodium glutamate.

  16. Characterization of long-term and seasonal variations of black carbon (BC concentrations at Neumayer, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Weller

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Continuous black carbon (BC observations were conducted from 1999 through 2009 by an Aethalometer (AE10 and from 2006 through 2011 by a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP at Neumayer Station (NM under stringent contamination control. Considering the respective observation period, BC concentrations measured by the MAAP were somewhat higher (median ± standard deviation: 2.1 ± 2.0 ng m−3 compared to the AE10 results (1.6 ± 2.1 ng m−3. Neither for the AE10 nor for the MAAP data set a significant long-term trend could be detected. Consistently a pronounced seasonality was observed with both instruments showing a primary annual maximum between October and November and a minimum in April with a maximum/minimum ratio of 4.5/1.6 = 3.8 and 2.7/0.64 = 4.2 for the MAAP and AE10 data, respectively. Occasionally a secondary summer maximum in January/February was visible. With the aim to assess the impact of BC on optical properties of the aerosol at NM, we evaluated the BC data along with particle scattering coefficients measured by an integrating nephelometer. We found the mean single scattering albedo of ω550 = 0.992 ± 0.0090 (median: 0.994 at a wavelength of 550 nm with a range of values from 0.95 to 1.0.

  17. Characterization of long-term and seasonal variations of black carbon (BC concentrations at Neumayer, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Weller

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Continuous black carbon (BC observations were conducted from 1999 through 2009 by an Aethalometer (AE10 and from 2006 through 2011 by a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP at Neumayer Station (NM under stringent contamination control. Considering the respective observation period, BC concentrations measured by the MAAP were somewhat higher (median ± standard deviation: 2.1 ± 2.0 ng m−3 compared to the AE10 results (1.6 ± 2.1 ng m−3. Neither for the AE10 nor for the MAAP data set a significant long-term trend could be detected. Consistently a pronounced seasonality was observed with both instruments showing a primary annual maximum between October and November and a minimum in April with a maximum/minimum ratio of 4.5/1.6 = 3.8 and 2.7/0.64 = 4.2 for the MAAP and AE10 data, respectively. Occasionally a secondary summer maximum in January/February was visible. With the aim to assess the impact of BC on optical properties of the aerosol at NM, we evaluated the BC data along with particle scattering coefficients measured by an integrating nephelometer. We found the mean single scattering albedo of ω550 = 0.992 ± 0.0090 (median: 0.994 at a wavelength of 550 nm with a range of values from 0.95 to 1.0.

  18. Characterization of long-term and seasonal variations of black carbon (BC) concentrations at Neumayer, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, R.; Minikin, A.; Petzold, A.; Wagenbach, D.; König-Langlo, G.

    2013-02-01

    Continuous black carbon (BC) observations were conducted from 1999 through 2009 by an Aethalometer (AE10) and from 2006 through 2011 by a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) at Neumayer Station (NM) under stringent contamination control. Considering the respective observation period, BC concentrations measured by the MAAP were somewhat higher (median ± standard deviation: 2.1 ± 2.0 ng m-3) compared to the AE10 results (1.6 ± 2.1 ng m-3). Neither for the AE10 nor for the MAAP data set a significant long-term trend could be detected. Consistently a pronounced seasonality was observed with both instruments showing a primary annual maximum between October and November and a minimum in April with a maximum/minimum ratio of 4.5/1.6 = 3.8 and 2.7/0.64 = 4.2 for the MAAP and AE10 data, respectively. Occasionally a secondary summer maximum in January/February was visible. With the aim to assess the impact of BC on optical properties of the aerosol at NM, we evaluated the BC data along with particle scattering coefficients measured by an integrating nephelometer. We found the mean single scattering albedo of ω550 = 0.992 ± 0.0090 (median: 0.994) at a wavelength of 550 nm with a range of values from 0.95 to 1.0.

  19. Fluorophotometric determination of critical micelle concentration (CMC) of ionic and non-ionic surfactants with carbon dots via Stokes shift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavkush Bhaisare, Mukesh; Pandey, Sunil; Shahnawaz Khan, M; Talib, Abou; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2015-01-01

    A new and facile method for the determination of critical micelle concentration (CMC) of ionic and non-ionic surfactants is proposed in this article. Carbon dots exhibited substantial fluorescence and therefore enhanced the sensitivity of this evaluation. Understanding the formation of surfactant micelles is vital for the applications of biomedicine such as drug fabrication and smart molecular vehicles in delivering therapeutic dosage to various molecular sites. The fluorescence property of carbon dots was utilized for the first time to estimate the critical micelle concentration of surfactants. The central concept of the approach is based on the Stokes shift determination of a system composed of constant amount of carbon dots with varying concentrations of ionic and non-ionic surfactants. The synthesized carbon dots were characterized by FTIR, TEM, XRD, Raman, UV, and fluorescence spectroscope. The carbon dots were excited at 280 nm so as to obtain maximum emission for the Stokes shift measurement. The CMC value of cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Triton X-100, dodecyldimethyl(3-sulfopropyl)ammonium hydroxide (SB-12) evaluated by this approach was found to be 0.98, 7.3, 0.19, and 3.5mM, respectively. The signals of spectra were assigned and explained in terms of both electron transitions between specific molecular orbital and the interaction with solvent.

  20. Highly Luminescent Carbon Dots Synthesized by Microwave-Assisted Pyrolysis and Evaluation of Their Toxicity to Physa acuta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaobo; Jin, Xiaozhe; Pan, Wei; Guo, Enmian; Liu, Weijian; Li, Denghui; Lu, Kunchao; Si, Shuxin; Zhang, Nianxing; Jia, Zhenzhen; Shi, Yanping; Li, Qianqian; Wang, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    As a newly emerging class of nanomaterials, carbon dots have increasingly attracted researchers' attention. However, their potentially adverse environmental effects are yet largely unknown. In this work, the highly luminescent carbon dots were synthesized by microwave-assisted pyrolysis of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) and citric acid. Then acute and chronic toxicities of carbon dots to Physa acuta (P. acuta), as well as their effect on reproduction, were evaluated using the as-synthesized dots as an example. The quantum yield of the as-synthesized carbon dots was up to 53.5% excited at 360 nm with the most fluorescent fraction of 82.6% after simple purification by gel column. The results showed that no acute but chronic toxicities to P. acuta exposed to different treatment concentrations of the as-synthesized carbon dots were observed with dose- dependence. In addition, the fecundity of P. acuta was promoted significantly by the carbon dots at the concentrations of 0.5 and 1.0 mg/mL, yet inhibited at the concentration of 3.0 mg/mL after 12-day exposure. Mainly distributing in the visceral mass might be responsible for the effects of the carbon dots on the survival and fecundity of P. acuta. And there was no further evidence to confirm that the carbon dots can cause malformation in developing embryos.

  1. Carbon budget estimation of a subarctic catchment using a dynamic ecosystem model at high spatial resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tang

    2015-01-01

    Eriophorum, Sphagnum and then tundra heath during the observation periods. The catchment-level carbon fluxes from aquatic systems are dominated by CO2 emissions from streams. Integrated across the whole catchment, we estimate that the area is a carbon sink at present, and will become an even stronger carbon sink by 2080, which is mainly a result of a projected densification of birch forest and its encroachment into tundra heath. However, the magnitudes of the modelled sinks are very dependent on future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Furthermore, comparisons of global warming potentials between two simulations with and without CO2 increase since 1960 reveal that the increased methane emission from the peatland could double the warming effects of the whole catchment by 2080 in the absence of CO2 fertilization of the vegetation. This is the first process-based model study of the temporal evolution of a catchment-level carbon budget at high spatial resolution, integrating comprehensive and diverse fluxes including both terrestrial and aquatic carbon. Though this study also highlights some limitations in modelling subarctic ecosystem responses to climate change including aquatic system flux dynamics, nutrient limitation, herbivory and other disturbances and peatland expansion, our application provides a mechanism to resolve the complexity of carbon cycling in subarctic ecosystems while simultaneously pointing out the key model developments for capturing complex subarctic processes.

  2. Biodegradation of high concentrations of benzene vapors in a two phase partition stirred tank bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimi Ali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study examined the biodegradation rate of benzene vapors in a two phase stirred tank bioreactor by a bacterial consortium obtained from wastewater of an oil industry refinery house. Initially, the ability of the microbial consortium for degrading benzene was evaluated before running the bioreactor. The gaseous samples from inlet and outlet of bioreactor were directly injected into a gas chromatograph to determine benzene concentrations. Carbone oxide concentration at the inlet and outlet of bioreactor were also measured with a CO2 meter to determine the mineralization rate of benzene. Influence of the second non-aqueous phase (silicon oil has been emphasized, so at the first stage the removal efficiency (RE and elimination capacity (EC of benzene vapors were evaluated without any organic phase and in the second stage, 10% of silicon oil was added to bioreactor media as an organic phase. Addition of silicon oil increased the biodegradation performance up to an inlet loading of 5580 mg/m3, a condition at which, the elimination capacity and removal efficiency were 181 g/m3/h and 95% respectively. The elimination rate of benzene increased by 38% in the presence of 10% of silicone oil. The finding of this study demonstrated that two phase partition bioreactors (TPPBs are potentially effective tools for the treatment of gas streams contaminated with high concentrations of poorly water soluble organic contaminant, such as benzene.

  3. Biodegradation of High Concentrations of Benzene Vapors in a Two Phase Partition Stirred Tank Bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Karimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the biodegradation rate of benzene vapors in a two phase stirred tank bioreactor by a bacterial consortium obtained from wastewater of an oil industry refinery house. Initially, the ability of the microbial consortium for degrading benzene was evaluated before running the bioreactor. The gaseous samples from inlet and outlet of bioreactor were directly injected into a gas chromatograph to determine benzene concentrations. Carbone oxide concentration at the inlet and outlet of bioreactor were also measured with a CO2 meter to determine the mineralization rate of benzene. Influence of the second non-aqueous phase (silicon oil has been emphasized, so at the first stage the removal efficiency (RE and elimination capacity (EC of benzene vapors were evaluated without any organic phase and in the second stage, 10% of silicon oil was added to bioreactor media as an organic phase. Addition of silicon oil increased the biodegradation performance up to an inlet loading of 5580?mg/m3, a condition at which, the elimination capacity and removal efficiency were 181?g/m3/h and 95% respectively. The elimination rate of benzene increased by 38% in the presence of 10% of silicone oil. The finding of this study demonstrated that two phase partition bioreactors (TPPBs are potentially effective tools for the treatment of gas streams contaminated with high concentrations of poorly water soluble organic contaminant, such as benzene.

  4. Dissolved organic carbon, CO2, and CH4 concentrations and their stable isotope ratios in thermokarst lakes on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuicui Mu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermokarst lakes are widely distributed on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP, which accounts for 8% of the global permafrost area. These lakes probably promote organic matter biodegradation and thus accelerate the emission of carbon-based greenhouse gases. However, little is known about greenhouse gas concentrations and their stable isotopes characteristics of these lakes. In this study, we measured the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC, dissolved CO2 and CH4, as well as the distribution of δ13CCO2, δ13CCH4, and δ13COM (organic matter of lake sediments in thermokarst lakes on the QTP. Results showed that the OM of the lake sediments was highly decomposed. The concentrations of DOC, CO2 and CH4 in the lake water on the QTP were 1.2–49.6 mg L–1, 3.6–45.0 μmol L–1 and 0.28–3.0 μmol L–1, respectively. The highest CO2 and CH4 concentrations were recorded in July while the lowest values in September, which suggested that temperature had an effect on greenhouse gas production, although this pattern may also relate to thermal stratification of the water column. The results implied that thermokast lakes should be paid more attention to regarding carbon cycle and greenhouse gas emissions on the QTP.

  5. Elemental carbon, organic carbon, and dust concentrations in snow measured with thermal optical and gravimetric methods: Variations during the 2007-2013 winters at Sapporo, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchiki, Katsuyuki; Aoki, Teruo; Niwano, Masashi; Matoba, Sumito; Kodama, Yuji; Adachi, Kouji

    2015-01-01

    mass concentrations of light-absorbing snow impurities at Sapporo, Japan, were measured during six winters from 2007 to 2013. Elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) concentrations were measured with the thermal optical method, and dust concentration was determined by filter gravimetric measurement. The measurement results using the different filters were compared to assess the filtration efficiency. Adding NH4H2PO4 coagulant to melted snow samples improved the collection efficiency for EC particles by a factor of 1.45. The mass concentrations of EC, OC, and dust in the top 2 cm layer ranged in 0.007-2.8, 0.01-13, and 0.14-260 ppmw, respectively, during the six winters. The mass concentrations and their short-term variations were larger in the surface than in the subsurface. The snow impurity concentrations varied seasonally; that is, they remained relatively low during the accumulation season and gradually increased during the melting season. Although the surface snow impurities showed no discernible trend over the six winters, they varied from year to year, with a negative correlation between the snow impurity concentrations and the amount of snowfall. The surface snow impurities generally increased with the number of days elapsed since snowfall and showed a different rate for EC (1.44), OC (9.96), and dust (6.81). The possible processes causing an increase in surface snow impurities were dry deposition of atmospheric aerosols, melting of surface snow, and sublimation/evaporation of surface snow.

  6. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in UK soils and the influence of soil, vegetation type and seasonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Leon J L; Shotbolt, Laura; Ashmore, Mike R

    2012-06-15

    Given the lack of studies which measured dissolved organic carbon (DOC) over long periods, especially in non-forest habitat, the aim of this study was to expand the existing datasets with data of mainly non-forest sites that were representative of the major soil and habitat types in the UK. A further aim was to predict DOC concentrations from a number of biotic and abiotic explanatory variables such as rainfall, temperature, vegetation type and soil type in a multivariate way. Pore water was sampled using Rhizon or Prenart samplers at two to three week intervals for 1 year. DOC, pH, organic carbon, carbon/nitrogen (C:N) ratios of soils and slope were measured and data on vegetation, soil type, temperature and precipitation were obtained. The majority of the variation in DOC concentrations between the UK sites could be explained by simple empirical models that included annual precipitation, and soil C:N ratio with precipitation being negatively related to DOC concentrations and C:N ratio being positively related to DOC concentrations. Our study adds significantly to the data reporting DOC concentrations in soils, especially in grasslands, heathlands and moorlands. Broad climatic and site factors have been identified as key factors influencing DOC concentrations.

  7. High temperature SU-8 pyrolysis for fabrication of carbon electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassan, Yasmin Mohamed; Caviglia, Claudia; Hemanth, Suhith

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present the investigation of the pyrolysis parameters at high temperature (1100 °C) for the fabrication of two-dimensional pyrolytic carbon electrodes. The electrodes were fabricated by pyrolysis of lithographically patterned negative epoxy based photoresist SU-8. A central...... composite experimental design was used to identify the influence of dwell time at the highest pyrolysis temperature and heating rate on electrical, electrochemical and structural properties of the pyrolytic carbon: Van der Pauw sheet resistance measurements, cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance...... spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the pyrolytic carbon. The results show that the temperature increase from 900 °C to 1100 °C improves the electrical and electrochemical properties. At 1100 °C, longer dwell time leads to lower resistivity, while the variation of the pyrolysis...

  8. Sulfurized activated carbon for high energy density supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yunxia; Candelaria, Stephanie L.; Li, Yanwei; Li, Zhimin; Tian, Jianjun; Zhang, Lili; Cao, Guozhong

    2014-04-01

    Sulfurized activated carbon (SAC), made by coating the pore surface with thiophenic sulfur functional groups from the pyrolysis of sulfur flakes, were characterized and tested for supercapacitor applications. From X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), the sulfur content in the SAC was found to be 2.7 at%. Electrochemical properties from potentiostatic and galvanostatic measurements, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to evaluate the effect of sulfur on porous carbon electrodes. The SAC electrode exhibits better conductivity, and an obvious increase in specific capacitance that is almost 40% higher than plain activated carbons (ACs) electrode at a high current density of 1.4 A g-1. The proposed mechanism for improved conductivity and capacitive performance due to the sulfur functional groups on ACs will be discussed.

  9. Sorbents for CO2 capture from high carbon fly ashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroto-Valer, M Mercedes; Lu, Zhe; Zhang, Yinzhi; Tang, Zhong

    2008-11-01

    Fly ashes with high-unburned-carbon content, referred to as fly ash carbons, are an increasing problem for the utility industry, since they cannot be marketed as a cement extender and, therefore, have to be disposed. Previous work has explored the potential development of amine-enriched fly ash carbons for CO2 capture. However, their performance was lower than that of commercially available sorbents, probably because the samples investigated were not activated prior to impregnation and, therefore, had a very low surface area. Accordingly, the work described here focuses on the development of activated fly ash derived sorbents for CO2 capture. The samples were steam activated at 850 degrees C, resulting in a significant increase of the surface area (1075 m2/g). The activated samples were impregnated with different amine compounds, and the resultant samples were tested for CO2 capture at different temperatures. The CO2 adsorption of the parent and activated samples is typical of a physical adsorption process. The impregnation process results in a decrease of the surface areas, indicating a blocking of the porosity. The highest adsorption capacity at 30 and 70 degrees C for the amine impregnated activated carbons was probably due to a combination of physical adsorption inherent from the parent sample and chemical adsorption of the loaded amine groups. The CO2 adsorption capacities for the activated amine impregnated samples are higher than those previously published for fly ash carbons without activation (68.6 vs. 45 mg CO2/g sorbent).

  10. Investigation of carriers of lustrous carbon at high temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Holtzer

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lustrous carbon is very important in processes of iron casting in green sand. Lustrous carbon (pirografit is a microcrystalline carbon form, which evolves from a gaseous phase. In the case of applying additions, generating lustrous carbon, for sands with bentonite, there is always a danger of emitting – due to a high temperature of liquid cast iron and a humidity -compounds hazardous for a human health. There can be: CO, SO2, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene (the so-called: BTEX as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs. In order to asses the selected mixtures: bentonite – carrier of lustrous carbon, in which a coal dust fraction was limited, the thermogravimetric analysis and the analysis of evolving gases were performed. Examinations were carried out in the Applications Laboratory NITZSCH-Gerätebau GmbH, Selb/Bavaria, Germany. The NETZSCH model STA 449 F3 Jupiter® simultaneous thermal analyzer was used to measure the mass change and transformation energetics of materials. The system employed for this work was equipped with an SiC furnace capable of operation from 25 to 1550°C. The mass spectrometer of the QMS 403 allows detection of mass numbers between 1 and 300 amu (atomic mass unit.

  11. Effect of electrolyte concentration on performance of supercapacitor carbon electrode from fibers of oil palm empty fruit bunches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farma, R.; Deraman, M.; Talib, I. A.; Awitdrus, Omar, R.; Ishak, M. M.; Taer, E.; Basri, N. H.; Dolah, B. N. M.

    2015-04-01

    Fibers of oil palm empty fruit bunches were used to produce self-adhesive carbon grains (SACG). The SACG green monoliths were carbonized in N2 environment at 800°C to produce carbon monoliths (CM) and the CM was CO2 activated at 800°C for 4 hour to produce activated carbon monolith electrodes (ACM). The physical properties of the CMs and ACMs were investigated using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy and nitrogen adsorption-desorption. ACMs were used as electrode to fabricate symmetry supercapacitor cells and the cells which used H2SO4 electrolyte at 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 M were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge standard techniques. In this paper we report the physical properties of the ACM electrodes and the effect of electrolyte concentration on the electrochemical properties the ACM electrodes.

  12. Photosynthetic photon flux density, carbon dioxide concentration, and vapor pressure deficit effects on photosynthesis in cacao seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao) is a shade plant, native to the under-story of the evergreen rain forest of the Amazon basin and adapted to low levels of photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD). The influence of PPFD, leaf to air water vapor pressure deficit (VPD) and external carbon dioxide concentration...

  13. Physiological responses of coastal and oceanic diatoms to diurnal fluctuations in seawater carbonate chemistry under two CO2 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Futian; Wu, Yaping; Hutchins, David A.; Fu, Feixue; Gao, Kunshan

    2016-11-01

    Diel and seasonal fluctuations in seawater carbonate chemistry are common in coastal waters, while in the open-ocean carbonate chemistry is much less variable. In both of these environments, ongoing ocean acidification is being superimposed on the natural dynamics of the carbonate buffer system to influence the physiology of phytoplankton. Here, we show that a coastal Thalassiosira weissflogii isolate and an oceanic diatom, Thalassiosira oceanica, respond differentially to diurnal fluctuating carbonate chemistry in current and ocean acidification (OA) scenarios. A fluctuating carbonate chemistry regime showed positive or negligible effects on physiological performance of the coastal species. In contrast, the oceanic species was significantly negatively affected. The fluctuating regime reduced photosynthetic oxygen evolution rates and enhanced dark respiration rates of T. oceanica under ambient CO2 concentration, while in the OA scenario the fluctuating regime depressed its growth rate, chlorophyll a content, and elemental production rates. These contrasting physiological performances of coastal and oceanic diatoms indicate that they differ in the ability to cope with dynamic pCO2. We propose that, in addition to the ability to cope with light, nutrient, and predation pressure, the ability to acclimate to dynamic carbonate chemistry may act as one determinant of the spatial distribution of diatom species. Habitat-relevant diurnal changes in seawater carbonate chemistry can interact with OA to differentially affect diatoms in coastal and pelagic waters.

  14. Synthesis of mesoporous hollow carbon hemispheres as highly efficient Pd electrocatalyst support for ethanol oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Zaoxue; Meng, Hui; Li, Zihui; Shen, Pei Kang [The Key Laboratory of Low-carbon Chemistry and Energy Conservation of Guangdong Province, The State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, 510275 (China); Shi, Lei [Changling Catalyst Division, Sinopec Group, Yueyang 414012 (China)

    2010-05-15

    The synthesis procedure of the highly mesoporous hollow carbon hemispheres (HCHs) using glucose as carbon source and solid core mesoporous shell silica (SCMSS) as template and the formation mechanism of the HCHs have been presented. The HCHs show an ultrahigh surface area of 1095.59 m{sup 2} g{sup -1} and an average mesopore size of 9.38 nm. The hemispherical structure with large mesopores also results in the improvement in the mass transfer and therefore more concentrated ethanol solution can be used to increase the energy density. The additional advantage of the HCHs compared to the hollow carbon spheres is that they can provide the similar surface area at reduced volume. The current densities of ethanol oxidation on Pd nanoparticles supported on HCH (Pd/HCH) electrocatalyst are three times as many as on Pd/C at the same Pd loadings. (author)

  15. Electric anisotropy in high density polyethylene + carbon black composites induced by mechanical deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigueras-Santiago, E; Hernandez-Lopez, S; Camacho-Lopez, M A; Lara-Sanjuan, O, E-mail: eviguerass@uaemex.m [Laboratorio de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Materiales Avanzados (LIDMA), Facultad de Quimica, UAEM. Paseo Colon esq. con Paseo Tollocan, s/n. C.P. 50000, Toluca (Mexico)

    2009-05-01

    High density polyethylene + carbon black composites with electrical anisotropy was studied. Electrical anisotropy was induced by uniaxial mechanical deformation and injection moulding. We show that anisotropy depends on the carbon black concentration and percentage deformation. Resistivity had the highest anisotropy resistivity around the percolation threshold. Perpendicular resistivity showed two magnitude orders higher than parallel resistivity for injected samples, whereas resistivity showed an inverse behaviour for 100% tensile samples. Both directions were set respect to the deformation axe. Anisotropy could be explained in terms of the molecular deformation (alignment) of the polymer chains as a response of the deformation process originating a redistribution of the carbon black particles in both directions. Alignment of the polymer chains was evidenced by polarized Raman spectroscopy.

  16. Development of manufacturing capability for high-concentration, high-efficiency silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinton, R.A.; Verlinden, P.J.; Crane, R.A.; Swanson, R.N. [SunPower Corp., Sunnyvale, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This report presents a summary of the major results from a program to develop a manufacturable, high-efficiency silicon concentrator solar cell and a cost-effective manufacturing facility. The program was jointly funded by the Electric Power Research Institute, Sandia National Laboratories through the Concentrator Initiative, and SunPower Corporation. The key achievements of the program include the demonstration of 26%-efficient silicon concentrator solar cells with design-point (20 W/cm{sup 2}) efficiencies over 25%. High-performance front-surface passivations; that were developed to achieve this result were verified to be absolutely stable against degradation by 475 days of field exposure at twice the design concentration. SunPower demonstrated pilot production of more than 1500 of these cells. This cell technology was also applied to pilot production to supply 7000 17.7-cm{sup 2} one-sun cells (3500 yielded wafers) that demonstrated exceptional quality control. The average efficiency of 21.3% for these cells approaches the peak efficiency ever demonstrated for a single small laboratory cell within 2% (absolute). Extensive cost models were developed through this program and calibrated by the pilot-production project. The production levels achieved indicate that SunPower could produce 7-10 MW of concentrator cells per year in the current facility based upon the cell performance demonstrated during the program.

  17. Highly Sensitive Cadmium Concentration Sensor Using Long Period Grating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Lalasangi

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have proposed a simple and effective Long Period Grating chemical sensor for detecting the traces of Cadmium (Cd++ in drinking water at ppm level. Long Period gratings (LPG were fabricated by point-by-point technique with CO2 laser. We have characterized the LPG concentration sensor sensitivity for different solutions of Cd concentrations varying from 0.01 ppm to 0.04 ppm by injecting white Light source and observed transmitted spectra using Optical Spectrum Analyzer (OSA. Proper reagents have been used in the solutions for detection of the Cd species. The overall shift in wavelength is 10 nm when surrounding medium gradually changed from water to 0.04 ppm of cadmium concentrations. A comparative study has been done using sophisticated spectroscopic atomic absorption spectrometer (AAS and Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP instruments. The spectral sensitivity enhancement was done by modifying grating surface with gold nanoparticles.

  18. Exposure of commuters to carbon monoxide in Mexico city—I. Measurement of in-vehicle concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Bremauntz, Adrian A.; Ashmore, Michael R.

    The aims of this study were to determine in-vehicle carbon monoxide (CO) levels in major commuting modes in the Metropolitan Area of Mexico City (MAMC) and to identify the main factors affecting the variation in these CO concentrations. CO concentrations were measured inside public and private transport vehicles during the winter of 1991 in Mexico City. Measurements were taken along several commuting routes, during the morning and evening rush hours. Significant differences in CO concentrations were found between different transport modes. The highest CO concentrations were found inside autos and collective taxis, while metro trains, trolleybuses and buses had lower concentrations. In-vehicle CO concentrations in Mexico City were much higher than those reported for previous studies in the U.S.A.

  19. Methods and devices for high-throughput dielectrophoretic concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Cummings, Eric B. (Livermore, CA); Fiechtner, Gregory J. (Germantown, MD); Fintschenko, Yolanda (Livermore, CA); McGraw, Gregory J. (Ann Arbor, MI); Salmi, Allen (Escalon, CA)

    2010-02-23

    Disclosed herein are methods and devices for assaying and concentrating analytes in a fluid sample using dielectrophoresis. As disclosed, the methods and devices utilize substrates having a plurality of pores through which analytes can be selectively prevented from passing, or inhibited, on application of an appropriate electric field waveform. The pores of the substrate produce nonuniform electric field having local extrema located near the pores. These nonuniform fields drive dielectrophoresis, which produces the inhibition. Arrangements of electrodes and porous substrates support continuous, bulk, multi-dimensional, and staged selective concentration.

  20. Methods and devices for high-throughput dielectrophoretic concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Blake A.; Cummings, Eric B.; Fiechtner, Gregory J.; Fintschenko, Yolanda; McGraw, Gregory J.; Salmi, Allen

    2010-02-23

    Disclosed herein are methods and devices for assaying and concentrating analytes in a fluid sample using dielectrophoresis. As disclosed, the methods and devices utilize substrates having a plurality of pores through which analytes can be selectively prevented from passing, or inhibited, on application of an appropriate electric field waveform. The pores of the substrate produce nonuniform electric field having local extrema located near the pores. These nonuniform fields drive dielectrophoresis, which produces the inhibition. Arrangements of electrodes and porous substrates support continuous, bulk, multi-dimensional, and staged selective concentration.

  1. High surface area silicon carbide-coated carbon aerogel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A; Kuntz, Joshua D; Baumann, Theodore F; Satcher, Jr, Joe H

    2014-01-14

    A metal oxide-carbon composite includes a carbon aerogel with an oxide overcoat. The metal oxide-carbon composite is made by providing a carbon aerogel, immersing the carbon aerogel in a metal oxide sol under a vacuum, raising the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to atmospheric pressure, curing the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol at room temperature, and drying the carbon aerogel with the metal oxide sol to produce the metal oxide-carbon composite. The step of providing a carbon aerogel can provide an activated carbon aerogel or provide a carbon aerogel with carbon nanotubes that make the carbon aerogel mechanically robust. Carbon aerogels can be coated with sol-gel silica and the silica can be converted to silicone carbide, improved the thermal stability of the carbon aerogel.

  2. Practice of High Concentration Sludge for Efficient Nutrient Removal from Municipal Sewage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ang; ZHANG Yan-qiu; LI Yan

    2010-01-01

    ECOSUNIDE is a new activated sludge process based on the sludge concentration optimization theory.With it,we carried out a high sludge concentration by changing influent mode and distributing carbon source in a reasonable way,which can improve the ecological superiority of nitrification and denitrification for the growth of phosphorous accumulating organisms(PAOs)and nitrifiers and raised the nutrient removal efficiency of municipal sewage treatment plants.In 2007,we adopted this technique in Linyi Sewage Treatment Plant in Shandong Province,China.After the reconstruction,we achieved the high efficiency of nutrient removal with low investment under the dynamic load of the secondary sewage treatment plant.The effluent water qualities meet the class I-A criteria specified in Discharge Standard of Pollutants for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant(GB 18918-2002)and the rest effluent indexes meet the class I-B criteria.Besides, we have above 20% operating cost cut by stopping the internal reflux without power charge increased and any new pool structures built.

  3. An assessment of geochemical preparation methods prior to organic carbon concentration and carbon isotope ratio analyses of fine-grained sedimentary rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    KöNitzer, Sven F.; Leng, Melanie J.; Davies, Sarah J.; Stephenson, Michael H.

    2012-09-01

    This study summarizes organic carbon isotope (δ13C) and total organic carbon (TOC) data from a series of tests undertaken to provide an appropriate methodology for pre-analysis treatment of mudstones from an Upper Carboniferous sedimentary succession, in order to develop a consistent preparation procedure. The main treatments involved removing both inorganic carbonate and hydrocarbons (which might be extraneous) before δ13C and TOC analysis. The results show that decarbonating using hydrochloric acid causes significant reduction in δ13C and total carbon (TC) of the bulk material due to the removal of inorganic carbonate. These changes are most pronounced where soluble calcium carbonate (rather than Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate) is present. Deoiled samples show only slightly higher mean δ13C where visible bitumen was extracted from the bulk sample. Moreover, the isotopic signatures of the extracts are closely correlated to those of their respective bulk samples, suggesting that small yields of hydrocarbons were generated in situ with no isotopic fractionation. In addition, further δ13C and TC analyses were performed on samples where mixing of oil-based drilling mud with brecciated core material had been undertaken. Brecciated mudstone material did not display distinct isotopic signals compared to the surrounding fine-grained material. Overall we show that the most accurate assessment of bulk organic carbon isotopes and concentration in these samples can be achieved through decarbonating the material prior to measurement via the `rinse method'. However, our results support recent findings that pre-analysis acid treatments can cause variable and unpredictable errors in δ13C and TOC values. We believe that, despite these uncertainties, the findings presented here can be applied to paleoenvironmental studies on organic matter contained within sedimentary rocks over a range of geological ages and compositions.

  4. High Conductivity Carbon-Carbon Heat Pipes for Light Weight Space Power System Radiators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhasz, Albert J.

    2008-01-01

    Based on prior successful fabrication and demonstration testing of a carbon-carbon heat pipe radiator element with integral fins this paper examines the hypothetical extension of the technology via substitution of high thermal conductivity composites which would permit increasing fin length while still maintaining high fin effectiveness. As a result the specific radiator mass could approach an ultimate asymptotic minimum value near 1.0 kg/m2, which is less than one fourth the value of present day satellite radiators. The implied mass savings would be even greater for high capacity space and planetary surface power systems, which may require radiator areas ranging from hundreds to thousands of square meters, depending on system power level.

  5. Selective and Regenerative Carbon Dioxide Capture by Highly Polarizing Porous Carbon Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Youngtak; Le, Viet-Duc; Maiti, Uday Narayan; Hwang, Jin Ok; Park, Woo Jin; Lim, Joonwon; Lee, Kyung Eun; Bae, Youn-Sang; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2015-09-22

    Energy-efficient CO2 capture is a stringent demand for green and sustainable energy supply. Strong adsorption is desirable for high capacity and selective capture at ambient conditions but unfavorable for regeneration of adsorbents by a simple pressure control process. Here we present highly regenerative and selective CO2 capture by carbon nitride functionalized porous reduced graphene oxide aerogel surface. The resultant structure demonstrates large CO2 adsorption capacity at ambient conditions (0.43 mmol·g(-1)) and high CO2 selectivity against N2 yet retains regenerability to desorb 98% CO2 by simple pressure swing. First-principles thermodynamics calculations revealed that microporous edges of graphitic carbon nitride offer the optimal CO2 adsorption by induced dipole interaction and allows excellent CO2 selectivity as well as facile regenerability. This work identifies a customized route to reversible gas capture using metal-free, two-dimensional carbonaceous materials, which can be extended to other useful applications.

  6. Measurement of black carbon concentration as an indicator of air quality benefits of traffic restriction policies within the ecopass zone in Milan, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Invernizzi, Giovanni; Ruprecht, Ario; Mazza, Roberto; De Marco, Cinzia; Močnik, Griša; Sioutas, Costantinos; Westerdahl, Dane

    2011-07-01

    Traffic restrictions are an unpopular tool to mitigate urban air pollution, and a measurable improvement in air quality is needed to demonstrate the effectiveness of this measure. Previous attempts failed to detect measurable reductions of PM mass pollution within the areas subject to traffic restriction. However black carbon, which is emitted primarily by traffic sources, could be a PM metric more suitable than PM mass to demonstrate pollutant reductions. In this study we report the results of a black carbon monitoring campaign carried out in Milan, Italy, with the aim to detect - and demonstrate more suitably than PM mass - differences in local urban air quality among three zones located very closely with different traffic intensity. The study was carried out in three different days by measuring simultaneously black carbon and PM mass concentrations with fixed monitoring stations located in three main radial roads connecting the outskirts to the city center, each with three segments: 1) an outer one, with no traffic restrictions 2) an intermediate one, subject to the congestion traffic charge called "Ecopass", where a ticket is required to enter for cars equipped with engines prior to Euro 4 standard; 3) the pedestrian zone (no cars admitted) of Duomo Square in the city center, where each of the three main roads ends. The results demonstrated a sharply declining gradient in black carbon levels from the outer zone, without traffic restrictions, to the more central areas, for all of the three radial main roads. The differences in mean black carbon levels in the same day in the different traffic scheme locations were highly significant for each comparison. In contrast to the Black carbon results, mean PM 10, PM 2.5, PM 1 concentrations did not show significant differences among the different traffic zones on the different campaign days. The ratio of black carbon to PM 10 decreased by 47% and 62% in the Ecopass zone and in the pedestrian zone, respectively, as

  7. A carbon-air battery for high power generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Binbin; Ran, Ran; Zhong, Yijun; Su, Chao; Tadé, Moses O; Shao, Zongping

    2015-03-16

    We report a carbon-air battery for power generation based on a solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) integrated with a ceramic CO2-permeable membrane. An anode-supported tubular SOFC functioned as a carbon fuel container as well as an electrochemical device for power generation, while a high-temperature CO2-permeable membrane composed of a CO3(2-) mixture and an O(2-) conducting phase (Sm(0.2)Ce(0.8)O(1.9)) was integrated for in situ separation of CO2 (electrochemical product) from the anode chamber, delivering high fuel-utilization efficiency. After modifying the carbon fuel with a reverse Boudouard reaction catalyst to promote the in situ gasification of carbon to CO, an attractive peak power density of 279.3 mW cm(-2) was achieved for the battery at 850 °C, and a small stack composed of two batteries can be operated continuously for 200 min. This work provides a novel type of electrochemical energy device that has a wide range of application potentials.

  8. Flexible Carbon Nanotube Films for High Performance Strain Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olfa Kanoun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Compared with traditional conductive fillers, carbon nanotubes (CNTs have unique advantages, i.e., excellent mechanical properties, high electrical conductivity and thermal stability. Nanocomposites as piezoresistive films provide an interesting approach for the realization of large area strain sensors with high sensitivity and low manufacturing costs. A polymer-based nanocomposite with carbon nanomaterials as conductive filler can be deposited on a flexible substrate of choice and this leads to mechanically flexible layers. Such sensors allow the strain measurement for both integral measurement on a certain surface and local measurement at a certain position depending on the sensor geometry. Strain sensors based on carbon nanostructures can overcome several limitations of conventional strain sensors, e.g., sensitivity, adjustable measurement range and integral measurement on big surfaces. The novel technology allows realizing strain sensors which can be easily integrated even as buried layers in material systems. In this review paper, we discuss the dependence of strain sensitivity on different experimental parameters such as composition of the carbon nanomaterial/polymer layer, type of polymer, fabrication process and processing parameters. The insights about the relationship between film parameters and electromechanical properties can be used to improve the design and fabrication of CNT strain sensors.

  9. High pressure behavior of 3d transition metal carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfan, G. A.; Wang, S.; Boulard, E.; Mao, W. L.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the behavior of carbon-rich phases in Earth's lower mantle is critical for modeling the global carbon cycle since the lower mantle may be the major repository for carbon in our planet. We were interested in the behavior of carbonates containing 3d transition metals, which can exhibit unusual properties at extreme conditions. Thus, we studied siderite (FeCO3) and rhodochrosite (MnCO3) at high pressure using a diamond anvil cell coupled with Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray emission spectroscopy. In siderite we observed a high to low spin transition and associated volume collapse at approximately 46 GPa which is consistent with previous reports. Our Raman data show that the C-O bonds soften when the Fe2+ volume collapses (Farfan et al, 2012). In contrast, our XES results indicate that the Mn2+ in rhodochrosite does not undergo a spin transition like siderite up to 50 GPa. We observed a new Raman peak emerging above 48 GPa, which is a similar pressure at which a new structure was found in a previous XRD study.

  10. High Quantum Efficiency and High Concentration Erbium-Doped Silica Glasses Fabricated by Sintering Nanoporous Glasses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A new method was used to prepare erbium-doped high silica (SiO2%>96%) glasses by sintering nanoporous glasses. The concentration of erbium ions in high silica glasses can be considerably more than that in silica glasses prepared by using conventional methods. The fluorescence of 1532 nm has an FWHM (Full Wave at Half Maximum) of 50 nm, wider than 35 nm of EDSFA (erbium-doped silica fiber amplifer), and hence the glass possesses potential application in broadband fiber amplifiers. The Judd-Ofelt theoretical analysis reflects that the quantum efficiency of this erbium-doped glass is about 0.78, although the erbium concentration in this glass (6×103) is about twenty times higher than that in silica glass. These excellent characteristics of Er-doped high silica glass will be conducive to its usage in optical amplifiers and microchip lasers.

  11. Estimation of carbonate concentration and characterization of marine sediments by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Veerasingam, S.; Venkatachalapathy, R.

    . 2.3. Chemical analysis The percentage of calcium carbonate in the bulk sediment sample was determined on the basis of total inorganic carbon (TIC), which is obtained from total carbon (TC) and total organic carbon (TOC) measurements. TC and TOC... of sediment samples were determined with a CHNS elemental analyzer (Perkin Elmer Series II Model 2400 CHNS/O analyzer). Samples for TOC measurements were treated with ethanol and HCl and then heated for two hours at 250ºC to remove TIC. A salt correction...

  12. Effect of Fe ion concentration on fatigue life of carbon steel in aqueous CO2 environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogowska, Magdalena; Gudme, J.; Rubin, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, the corrosion fatigue behaviour of steel armours used in the flexible pipes, in aqueous solutions initially containing different concentrations of Fe2+, was investigated by four-point bending testing under saturated 1 bar CO2 condition. Corrosion fatigue results were supported with ex...... of Fe2+ marginally above the solubility limit of FeCO3 compared to the samples tested in highly supersaturated solution of Fe2+. Results revealed that the impact of the alternating stresses on the corrosion behaviour of samples reduces with lowering the applied stresses. At the stress range of 100 MPa...

  13. Air exchanges and indoor carbon dioxide concentration in Australian pig buildings: Effect of housing and management factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banhazi, T. M.; Stott, P.; Rutley, D.

    2011-01-01

    factors on the concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO(2)) and air exchange rates in 160 representative Australian pig buildings. CO(2) concentrations were measured, air changes per hour (ACH) were estimated using a CO(2) balance method, and structural and management parameters were recorded. The mean CO(2......(2) concentration. Air exchange rates were primarily affected by the type of ventilation, inlet height, stocking density, and building width and height. In conclusion, the equable Australian climate has allowed the construction of cheaper pig buildings, which provide an adequate environment for pig...

  14. Carbon concentrations of components of trees in 10-year-old Populus davidiana stands within the Desertification Combating Program of Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Huitao; Zhang, Wanjun; Cao, Jiansheng; Zhang, Xiang; Xu, Quanhong; Yang, Xue; Xiao, Dengpan; Zhao, Yanxia

    2016-03-01

    Most studies do not consider the potential variation in carbon concentration among the different tree components of the same species in regional scale. This study examined the carbon concentrations of the components (i.e., foliage, branch, stem, and root) in a 10-year-old poplar species (Populus davidiana Dode) from the Desertification Combating Program of Northern China. The highest and lowest carbon concentrations were found in the stem and foliage, respectively. There was a significant difference in carbon concentrations among the different tree components. All of the observed carbon concentrations of tree components were lower than those predicted using the conversion factor of 0.5 applied to component biomass. Stem carbon made up 59.7% of the total tree biomass carbon. The power equation estimating proportion of tree biomass carbon against the independent variable of diameter at breast height explained more than 90% of the variability in allocation of carbon among tree components. Tree height, as a second independent variable is also discussed. Our results suggest that the difference in organic carbon concentration among tree components should be incorporated into accurately develop forest carbon budget. Moreover, further investigations on how the diameter at breast height equation developed in the present study performs across broader scales are required.

  15. Carbon concentrations of components of trees in 10-year-old Populus davidiana stands within the Desertification Combating Program of Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Huitao; Zhang, Wanjun; Cao, Jiansheng; Zhang, Xiang; Xu, Quanhong; Yang, Xue; Xiao, Dengpan; Zhao, Yanxia

    2016-12-01

    Most studies do not consider the potential variation in carbon concentration among the different tree components of the same species in regional scale. This study examined the carbon concentrations of the components (i.e., foliage, branch, stem, and root) in a 10-year-old poplar species ( Populus davidiana Dode) from the Desertification Combating Program of Northern China. The highest and lowest carbon concentrations were found in the stem and foliage, respectively. There was a significant difference in carbon concentrations among the different tree components. All of the observed carbon concentrations of tree components were lower than those predicted using the conversion factor of 0.5 applied to component biomass. Stem carbon made up 59.7% of the total tree biomass carbon. The power equation estimating proportion of tree biomass carbon against the independent variable of diameter at breast height explained more than 90% of the variability in allocation of carbon among tree components. Tree height, as a second independent variable is also discussed. Our results suggest that the difference in organic carbon concentration among tree components should be incorporated into accurately develop forest carbon budget. Moreover, further investigations on how the diameter at breast height equation developed in the present study performs across broader scales are required.

  16. Influence of concentration and position of carboxyl groups on the electronic properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Ivi Valentini; Zanella, Ivana; de Souza Filho, Antonio Gomes; Fagan, Solange Binotto

    2014-10-21

    The effects of attaching COOH groups at different sites and in various concentrations on electronic and structural properties of (8,0) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) were investigated using ab initio calculations. The binding energies and the charge transfers between the COOH functional groups and the tube were calculated for several configurations and a novel feature in the electronic structure of these groups was observed. The electronic character of these systems can be modulated by playing with the concentration and the position of the carboxyl groups bonded on the tube wall. The carboxyl groups bound to different carbon atom sub-lattices are more hybridized than those bound in the same one. These results suggested that SWNT-COOH systems are a playground for engineering electronic properties through a proper chemical functionalization which exploit both the attachment site and concentration of functional groups.

  17. Study of the effect of magnesium concentration on the deposit of allotropic forms of calcium carbonate and related carbon steel interface behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Amor, Y., E-mail: yasser_ben@yahoo.f [Institut Superieur des Sciences et Technologies de l' Environnement de Borj-Cedria, B.P 1003, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia); Bousselmi, L. [Laboratoire Traitement et Recyclage des Eaux, B.P 273, Hammam-Lif, Technopole de Borj-Cedria, 8020 Soliman (Tunisia); Tribollet, B. [UPR 15 CNRS - Physique des liquides et Electrochimie, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - Tour 22, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Triki, E. [Unite de recherche Corrosion et Protection des metalliques, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Tunis, P.B. 37, 1002 Tunis, Belvedere (Tunisia)

    2010-06-30

    Different allotropic forms of calcium carbonate scales were electrochemically deposited on a carbon steel surface in artificial underground Tunisian water at -0.95 V{sub SCE} and various Mg{sup 2+} concentrations. Because of the importance of the diffusion process, the rotating disk electrode was used. The deposition kinetics were analyzed by chronoamperometry measurements and the calcareous layers were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The physical model proposed by Gabrielli was used to analyze the EIS measurements. Independent of the deposited allotropic form of calcium carbonate, the measurements showed that the oxygen reduction occurs in the pores formed between the CaCO{sub 3} crystals and the metallic surface.

  18. Whitings as a Potential Mechanism for Controlling Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations – Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady D. Lee; William A. Apel; Michelle R. Walton

    2006-03-01

    Species of cyanobacteria in the genera Synechococcus and Synechocystis are known to be the catalysts of a phenomenon called "whitings", which is the formation and precipitation of fine-grained CaCO3 particles. Whitings occur when the cyanobacteria fix atmospheric CO2 through the formation of CaCO3 on their cell surfaces which leads to precipitation to the ocean floor and subsequent entombment in mud. Whitings represent one potential mechanism for CO2 sequestration. Research was performed to determine the ability of various strains of Synechocystis and Synechococcus to calcify when grown in microcosms amended with 2.5 mM HCO3- and 3.4 mM Ca2+. Results indicated that while all strains tested have the ability to calcify, only two, Synechococcus species, strains PCC 8806 and PCC 8807, were able to calcify to the extent that CaCO3 was precipitated. Enumeration of the cyanobacterial cultures during testing indicated that cell density did not appear to have an effect on calcification. Factors that had the greatest effect on calcification were CO2 removal and subsequent generation of alkaline pH. As CO2 was removed, growth medium pH increased and soluble Ca2+ was removed from solution. The largest increases in growth medium pH occurred when CO2 levels dropped below 400 ppmv. Precipitation of CaCO3 catalyzed by the growth and physiology of cyanobacteria in the Genus Synechococcus represents a potential mechanism for sequestration of atmospheric CO2 produced during the burning of coal for power generation. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 and Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8807 were tested in microcosm experiments for their ability to calcify when exposed to a fixed calcium concentration of 3.4 mM and dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations of 0.5, 1.25 and 2.5 mM. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 removed calcium continuously over the duration of the experiment producing approximately 18.6 mg of solid-phase calcium. Calcium removal occurred over a two-day time period when

  19. Effects of carbon concentrations and carbon to nitrogen ratios on sporulation of two biological control fungi as determined by different culture methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Liu, Xingzhong

    2010-06-01

    The nematophagous fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia (Clavicipitaceae) and entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana (Cordycipitaceae) have great potential for biological control. However, a significant barrier to their commercial development as mycopesticides is the high costs associated with production. Carbon (C) concentration and C to nitrogen ratio (C:N ratio) greatly affect fungal growth and sporulation. Effects of C concentration and C:N ratio differed when the fungi were cultivated using two different methods: the conventional (continuous cultivation) method and a novel "two-stage" method. Sporulation of P. chlamydosporia (HSY-12-14) was the highest when the media contained 6 g l(-1) C and a C:N ratio of 40:1 or 8 g l(-1) C and C:N ratios of 20:1 or 40:1 for the conventional method but 8 g l(-1) C and a C:N ratio of only 10:1 with the novel "two-stage" method. Sporulation of B. bassiana (IBC1201) was the highest when the media contained 12 g l(-1) C and a C:N ratio of 40:1 with the conventional method but only 4 g l(-1) C and a C:N ratio of 5:1 with the novel "two-stage" method. In addition, the nutritional requirements as determined by the conventional method differed for mycelial growth and sporulation. Understanding the effects of nutrition on sporulation can help programs seeking to use these organisms as biological control agents and is essential for their mass production and commercialization.

  20. A carboxysomal carbon-concentrating mechanism in the cyanelles of the 'coelacanth' of the algal world, Cyanophora paradoxa?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathinejad, Sara; Steiner, Jürgen M; Reipert, Siegfried; Marchetti, Martina; Allmaier, Günter; Burey, Suzanne C; Ohnishi, Norikazu; Fukuzawa, Hideya; Löffelhardt, Wolfgang; Bohnert, Hans J

    2008-05-01

    Cyanelles are the peculiar plastids of glaucocystophyte algae that retained a peptidoglycan wall from the ancestral cyanobacterial endosymbiont. All cyanobacteria and most algae possess an inorganic carbon-concentrating mechanism (CCM) that involves a microcompartment--carboxysomes in prokaryotes and pyrenoids in eukaryotes--harboring the bulk of cellular (plastidic) Rubisco. In the case of the living fossil, Cyanophora paradoxa, the existence of a CCM was a matter of debate. Microarray data revealing 142 CO(2)-responsive genes (induced or repressed through a shift from high to low CO(2) conditions), gas exchange measurements and measurements of photosynthetic affinity provided strong support for a CCM. We favor a recent hypothesis that glaucocystophyte cyanelles as the closest cousins to cyanobacteria among plastids contain 'eukaryotic carboxysomes': bicarbonate enrichment within cyanelles should be considerably higher than in chloroplasts with their pyrenoid-based CCM. Thus, the stress-bearing function of the peptidoglycan layer, the other unique heritage, would be indispensable. An isolation method for cyanelle 'carboxysomes' was developed and the protein components other than Rubisco analyzed by MS. Rubisco activase was identified and corroborated by western blotting. The well-established cyanelle in vitro import system allows to use them as 'honorary cyanobacteria': assembly processes of supramolecular structures as phycobilisomes and carboxysomes thus can be studied after import of nucleus-encoded precursor proteins and subsequent fractionation. Even minor components can easily be tracked and a surprisingly dynamic view is obtained. Labeled pre-activase was imported into isolated cyanelles and 30% of the mature protein was found to be incorporated into the carboxysome fraction. A final decision between carboxysome or pyrenoid must await the identification of cyanelle carbonic anhydrase and, especially, the demonstration of shell proteins.

  1. A simple and highly effective process for the preparation of activated carbons with high surface area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Ying, E-mail: liyingjlu@163.com [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Ding Xuefeng; Guo Yupeng; Wang Lili; Rong Chunguang; Qu Yuning; Ma Xiaoyu [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Wang Zichen, E-mail: wangzc@jlu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: {yields} High surface area activated carbon can be prepared by rice husk H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} without pretreatment. {yields} The characteristics of the activated carbon were greatly influenced by post-processing method. {yields} The lower SiO{sub 2} content of the activated carbons, the higher pore volume the carbons had. {yields} Some silica in rice husk reacted with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} to form SiP{sub 2}O{sub 7} which could be removed by post-process. - Abstract: Activated carbons with high surface area were prepared by phosphoric acid as activation agent and rice husks as precursors. It was found that the characteristics of the activated carbons were influenced not only by the preparation but also by the post-processing method. The high surface area of the activated carbons was prepared under the optimum condition (50% H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with impregnation ratio of 5:1, activation temperature of 500 deg. C, activation time of 0.5 h, wash water temperature of 100 deg. C). SiO{sub 2} content could affect the surface area of activated carbons, either. The lower SiO{sub 2} content of the activated carbons, the higher pore volume the carbons had. The SiO{sub 2} content was 11.2% when used the optimum condition. The explanation was that silicon element in rice husks reacted with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} to form silicon phosphate (SiP{sub 2}O{sub 7}), and it could be proved further by X-ray diffraction analysis, SiP{sub 2}O{sub 7} could be removed by post-process.

  2. Experimental whole-lake increase of dissolved organic carbon concentration produces unexpected increase in crustacean zooplankton density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patrick T; Craig, Nicola; Solomon, Christopher T; Weidel, Brian C; Zwart, Jacob A; Jones, Stuart E

    2016-08-01

    The observed pattern of lake browning, or increased terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, across the northern hemisphere has amplified the importance of understanding how consumer productivity varies with DOC concentration. Results from comparative studies suggest these increased DOC concentrations may reduce crustacean zooplankton productivity due to reductions in resource quality and volume of suitable habitat. Although these spatial comparisons provide an expectation for the response of zooplankton productivity as DOC concentration increases, we still have an incomplete understanding of how zooplankton respond to temporal increases in DOC concentration within a single system. As such, we used a whole-lake manipulation, in which DOC concentration was increased from 8 to 11 mg L(-1) in one basin of a manipulated lake, to test the hypothesis that crustacean zooplankton production should subsequently decrease. In contrast to the spatially derived expectation of sharp DOC-mediated decline, we observed a small increase in zooplankton densities in response to our experimental increase in DOC concentration of the treatment basin. This was due to significant increases in gross primary production and resource quality (lower seston carbon-to-phosphorus ratio; C:P). These results demonstrate that temporal changes in lake characteristics due to increased DOC may impact zooplankton in ways that differ from those observed in spatial surveys. We also identified significant interannual variability across our study region, which highlights potential difficulty in detecting temporal responses of organism abundances to gradual environmental change (e.g., browning). © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Experimental whole-lake increase of dissolved organic carbon concentration produces unexpected increase in crustacean zooplankton density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Patrick T.; Craig, Nicola; Solomon, Christopher T.; Weidel, Brian C.; Zwart, Jacob A.; Jones, Stuart E.

    2016-01-01

    The observed pattern of lake browning, or increased terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration, across the northern hemisphere has amplified the importance of understanding how consumer productivity varies with DOC concentration. Results from comparative studies suggest these increased DOC concentrations may reduce crustacean zooplankton productivity due to reductions in resource quality and volume of suitable habitat. Although these spatial comparisons provide an expectation for the response of zooplankton productivity as DOC concentration increases, we still have an incomplete understanding of how zooplankton respond to temporal increases in DOC concentration within a single system. As such, we used a whole-lake manipulation, in which DOC concentration was increased from 8 to 11 mg L−1 in one basin of a manipulated lake, to test the hypothesis that crustacean zooplankton production should subsequently decrease. In contrast to the spatially derived expectation of sharp DOC-mediated decline, we observed a small increase in zooplankton densities in response to our experimental increase in DOC concentration of the treatment basin. This was due to significant increases in gross primary production and resource quality (lower seston carbon-to-phosphorus ratio; C:P). These results demonstrate that temporal changes in lake characteristics due to increased DOC may impact zooplankton in ways that differ from those observed in spatial surveys. We also identified significant interannual variability across our study region, which highlights potential difficulty in detecting temporal responses of organism abundances to gradual environmental change (e.g., browning).

  4. Potassium vapor assisted preparation of highly graphitized hierarchical porous carbon for high rate performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheng; Zeng, Ying; Tang, Qunli; Hu, Aiping; Xiao, Kuikui; Zhang, Shiying; Deng, Weina; Fan, Binbin; Zhu, Yanfei; Chen, Xiaohua

    2017-09-01

    Ultrahigh graphitized carbon microspheres with rich hierarchical pores (AGHPCM-1) have been successfully synthesized through the one-step activation-carbonization strategy (OACS) with porous sulfonated poly-divinylbenzene as the carbon precursor, iron as the hard template and catalyst, and potassium hydroxide (KOH) as activation agent. Through the XRD, TEM, Raman and BET analysis, AGHPCM-1 shows very high graphitization degree and rich micro-, meso- and macro-pores. More importantly, the mechanism for KOH to improve the graphitization degree of carbon materials in OACS has been illustrated by the thermodynamical theory. The tremendous heat releasing from the reaction between the catalyst precursor of Fe2O3 and potassium vapor plays a key role in the formation of graphitized carbon. It may provide a general direction to prepare highly graphitized porous carbon at a moderate temperature. Integrating the advantages of high graphitization degree and rich hierarchical porous structure, the AGHPCM-1 exhibits an excellent rate performance with a response to up to the high current density of 150 A g-1 and high scan rate of 2000 mV s-1. No obvious capacitance decay can be observed after 10000 charge/discharge cycles even at the high current density of 20 A g-1.

  5. High temperature carbon-carbon supercapacitor using ionic liquid as electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balducci, A.; Dugas, R.; Taberna, P.L.; Simon, P. [Universite Paul Sabatier, CIRIMAT, UMR CNRS 5085, 118 Route de Narbonne, 31062 Toulouse Cedex (France); Plee, D. [ARKEMA, GRL, RN 117, 64170 Lacq (France); Mastragostino, M. [Universita di Bologna, Dipartimento di Scienza dei Metalli, Elettrochimica e Tecniche Chimiche, Sede Amministrativa, via San Donato 15, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Passerini, S. [ENEA (Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment), IDROCOMB, Casaccia Research Center, Via Anguillarese 301, 00060 Rome (Italy)

    2007-03-20

    This paper presents results about the electrochemical and cycling characterizations of a supercapacitor cell using a microporous activated carbon as the active material and N-butyl-N-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (PYR{sub 14}TFSI) ionic liquid as the electrolyte. The microporous activated carbon exhibited a specific capacitance of 60 F g{sup -1} measured from the three-electrode cyclic voltammetry experiments at 20 mV s{sup -1} scan rate, with a maximum operating potential range of 4.5 V at 60 C. A coin cell assembled with this microporous activated carbon and PYR{sub 14}TFSI as the electrolyte was cycled for 40,000 cycles without any change of cell resistance (9 {omega} cm{sup 2}), at a voltage up to 3.5 V at 60 C, demonstrating a high cycling stability as well as a high stable specific capacitance in this ionic liquid electrolyte. These high performances make now this type of supercapacitor suitable for high temperature applications ({>=}60 C). (author)

  6. Highly porous activated carbons prepared from carbon rich Mongolian anthracite by direct NaOH activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byamba-Ochir, Narandalai; Shim, Wang Geun; Balathanigaimani, M. S.; Moon, Hee

    2016-08-01

    Highly porous activated carbons (ACs) were prepared from Mongolian raw anthracite (MRA) using sodium hydroxide as an activation agent by varying the mass ratio (powdered MRA/NaOH) as well as the mixing method of chemical agent and powdered MRA. The specific BET surface area and total pore volume of the prepared MRA-based activated carbons (MACs) are in the range of 816-2063 m2/g and of 0.55-1.61 cm3/g, respectively. The pore size distribution of MACs show that most of the pores are in the range from large micropores to small mesopores and their distribution can be controlled by the mass ratio and mixing method of the activating agent. As expected from the intrinsic property of the MRA, the highly graphitic surface morphology of prepared carbons was confirmed from Raman spectra and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies. Furthermore the FTIR and XPS results reveal that the preparation of MACs with hydrophobic in nature is highly possible by controlling the mixing conditions of activating agent and powdered MRA. Based on all the results, it is suggested that the prepared MACs could be used for many specific applications, requiring high surface area, optimal pore size distribution, proper surface hydrophobicity as well as strong physical strength.

  7. Concentration measurement of yeast suspensions using high frequency ultrasound backscattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvira, Luis; Vera, Pedro; Caña