WorldWideScience

Sample records for high bandwidth detector

  1. High bandwidth pixel detector modules for the ATLAS Insertable B-Layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Backhaus, Malte

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of the nature of the recently discovered electro-weak symmetry breaking mechanism of the standard model of particle physics as well as the search for physics beyond the standard model with the LHC require to collect even more data. To achieve this goal, the luminosity of the LHC will be increased in two steps. The increased luminosity results in serious challenges for the inner tracking systems of the experiments at the LHC. The ATLAS pixel detector will also be upgraded in a two stage program. During the shutdown in 2013 and 2014 a fourth hybrid pixel detector layer, the socalled Insertable B-Layer (IBL) is inserted inside the existing pixel detector. This thesis focuses on the characterization, performance measurement, and production quality assurance of the central sensitive elements of the IBL, the modules. This includes a full characterization of the readout chip (FE-I4) and of the assembled modules. A completely new inner tracking system is mandatory in ATLAS after the second luminosity increase in the shutdown of 2022 and 2023. The final chapter of this thesis introduces a new module concept that uses an industrial high voltage CMOS technology as sensor layer, which is capacitively coupled to the FE-I4 readout chip.

  2. LEVEL-1 DATA DRIVER CARD - A high bandwidth radiation tolerant aggregator board for detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gkountoumis, Panagiotis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Level-1 Data Driver Card (L1DDC) was designed for the needs of the future upgrades of the innermost stations of the ATLAS end-cap muon spectrometer. The detectors located at the muon Small Wheels will be replaced by a set of precision tracking and trigger detectors, the resistive Micromegas (MM) and the small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC). After the upgrade, the number of interactions per bunch-crossing will be increased up to 140, resulting in a dramatically large amount of produced data. The high number of electronic channels (about two million for the MM and about 300k for the sTGC) along with a harsh environment (radiation dose up to 1700Gy (inner radius) and a magnetic field up to 0:4T in the end cap region) led to the development of new radiation tolerant electronics and a scalable readout scheme able to handle the new data rates. In addition, correction mechanisms for Single Event Upsets (SEU) and communication errors must be implemented to assure the integrity of the transmitted data. The L1DDC i...

  3. Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Detector with High Efficiency, Broad Bandwidth, and Highly Symmetric Coupling to Transition Edge Sensor Bolometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollack, E.; Cao, N.; Chuss, D.; Denis, K.; Hsieh, W.-T.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Schneider, G.; Stevenson, T.; Travers, D.; U-yen, K.

    2008-01-01

    Four probe antennas transfer signals from waveguide to microstrip lines. The probes not only provide broadband impedance matching, but also thermally isolate waveguide and detector. In addition, we developed a new photonic waveguide choke joint design, with four-fold symmetry, to suppress power leakage at the interface. We have developed facilities to test superconducting circuit elements using a cryogenic microwave probe station, and more complete systems in waveguide. We used the ring resonator shown below to measure a dielectric loss tangent 99% coupling efficiency over 30% fractional bandwidth.

  4. Level-1 Data Driver Card - A high bandwidth radiation tolerant aggregator board for detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gkountoumis, Panagiotis; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Level-1 Data Driver Card (L1DDC) was designed for the needs of the future upgrades of the innermost stations of the ATLAS end-cap muon spectrometer. The L1DDC is a high speed aggregator board capable of communicating with multiple front-end electronic boards. It collects the Level-1 data along with monitoring data and transmits them to a network interface through bidirectional and/or unidirectional fiber links at 4.8 Gbps each. In addition, the L1DDC board distributes trigger, time and configuration data coming from the network interface to the front-end boards. The L1DDC is fully compatible with the Phase II upgrade where the trigger rate is expected to reach the 1 MHz. Three different types of L1DDC boards will be fabricated handling up to 10.080 Gbps of user data. It consist of custom made radiation tolerant ASICs: the GigaBit Transceiver (GBTx), the FEAST DC-DC converter, the Slow Control Adapter (SCA), and the Versatile Tranceivers (VTRX) and transmitters (VTTX). The overall scheme of the data acquis...

  5. High-bandwidth memory interface

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Chulwoo; Song, Junyoung

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an overview of recent advances in memory interface design at both the architecture and circuit levels. Coverage includes signal integrity and testing, TSV interface, high-speed serial interface including equalization, ODT, pre-emphasis, wide I/O interface including crosstalk, skew cancellation, and clock generation and distribution. Trends for further bandwidth enhancement are also covered.   • Enables readers with minimal background in memory design to understand the basics of high-bandwidth memory interface design; • Presents state-of-the-art techniques for memory interface design; • Covers memory interface design at both the circuit level and system architecture level.

  6. 3600 digital phase detector with 100-kHz bandwidth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, D.W.; Riggin, D.; Fazio, M.V.; Biddle, R.S.; Patton, R.D.; Jackson, H.A.

    1981-01-01

    The general availability of digital circuit components with propagation delay times of a few nanoseconds makes a digital phase detector with good bandwidth feasible. Such a circuit has a distinct advantage over its analog counterpart because of its linearity over wide range of phase shift. A phase detector that is being built at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project is described. The specifications are 100-kHz bandwidth, linearity of +- 1 0 over +- 180 0 of phase shift, and 0.66 0 resolution. To date, the circuit has achieved the bandwidth and resolution. The linearity is approximately +- 3 0 over +- 180 0 phase shift

  7. Network Bandwidth Utilization Forecast Model on High Bandwidth Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Wucherl; Sim, Alex

    2014-07-07

    With the increasing number of geographically distributed scientific collaborations and the scale of the data size growth, it has become more challenging for users to achieve the best possible network performance on a shared network. We have developed a forecast model to predict expected bandwidth utilization for high-bandwidth wide area network. The forecast model can improve the efficiency of resource utilization and scheduling data movements on high-bandwidth network to accommodate ever increasing data volume for large-scale scientific data applications. Univariate model is developed with STL and ARIMA on SNMP path utilization data. Compared with traditional approach such as Box-Jenkins methodology, our forecast model reduces computation time by 83.2percent. It also shows resilience against abrupt network usage change. The accuracy of the forecast model is within the standard deviation of the monitored measurements.

  8. Network bandwidth utilization forecast model on high bandwidth networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Wuchert (William) [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sim, Alex [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-03-30

    With the increasing number of geographically distributed scientific collaborations and the scale of the data size growth, it has become more challenging for users to achieve the best possible network performance on a shared network. We have developed a forecast model to predict expected bandwidth utilization for high-bandwidth wide area network. The forecast model can improve the efficiency of resource utilization and scheduling data movements on high-bandwidth network to accommodate ever increasing data volume for large-scale scientific data applications. Univariate model is developed with STL and ARIMA on SNMP path utilization data. Compared with traditional approach such as Box-Jenkins methodology, our forecast model reduces computation time by 83.2%. It also shows resilience against abrupt network usage change. The accuracy of the forecast model is within the standard deviation of the monitored measurements.

  9. 47 CFR 15.35 - Measurement detector functions and bandwidths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... are based on the use of measurement instrumentation employing an average detector function. Unless... in terms of the average value of the emission, and pulsed operation is employed, the measurement... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Measurement detector functions and bandwidths...

  10. Performance of the inverse photoemission spectrometer with a new bandpass photon detector of narrow bandwidth and high sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Yoshifumi; Nishihara, Katsuhiro; Mimura, Kojiro; Hari, Yasuko; Taniguchi, Masaki; Fujisawa, Masami

    1993-01-01

    A combination of a SrF 2 entrance window and a photomultiplier with the Cu-BeO first dynode coated with KCl film realizes the bandpass photon detector with the FWHM of 0.47 eV centered at 9.43 eV and the sensitivity improved by about one order of magnitude in comparison with the detector without the KCl film. The overall energy resolution of the inverse photoemission spectrometer consisting of an electron gun with a BaO cathode and the new detector has been estimated to be 0.56 eV using polycrystalline Au. Typical counting rate is 10 2 -10 3 counts/(μA s) for unoccupied states near the Fermi level of the Au at an acceptance angle of about 0.8π sr with an Al collecting mirror. (orig.)

  11. High bandwidth concurrent processing on commodity platforms

    CERN Document Server

    Boosten, M; Van der Stok, P D V

    1999-01-01

    The I/O bandwidth and real-time processing power required for high- energy physics experiments is increasing rapidly over time. The current requirements can only be met by using large-scale concurrent processing. We are investigating the use of a large PC cluster interconnected by Fast and Gigabit Ethernet to meet the performance requirements of the ATLAS second level trigger. This architecture is attractive because of its performance and competitive pricing. A major problem is obtaining frequent high-bandwidth I/O without sacrificing the CPU's processing power. We present a tight integration of a user-level scheduler and a zero-copy communication layer. This system closely approaches the performance of the underlying hardware in terms of both CPU power and I/O capacity. (0 refs).

  12. RAID Disk Arrays for High Bandwidth Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moren, Bill

    1996-01-01

    High bandwidth applications require large amounts of data transferred to/from storage devices at extremely high data rates. Further, these applications often are 'real time' in which access to the storage device must take place on the schedule of the data source, not the storage. A good example is a satellite downlink - the volume of data is quite large and the data rates quite high (dozens of MB/sec). Further, a telemetry downlink must take place while the satellite is overhead. A storage technology which is ideally suited to these types of applications is redundant arrays of independent discs (RAID). Raid storage technology, while offering differing methodologies for a variety of applications, supports the performance and redundancy required in real-time applications. Of the various RAID levels, RAID-3 is the only one which provides high data transfer rates under all operating conditions, including after a drive failure.

  13. Fast Faraday Cup With High Bandwidth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deibele, Craig E [Knoxville, TN

    2006-03-14

    A circuit card stripline Fast Faraday cup quantitatively measures the picosecond time structure of a charged particle beam. The stripline configuration maintains signal integrity, and stitching of the stripline increases the bandwidth. A calibration procedure ensures the measurement of the absolute charge and time structure of the charged particle beam.

  14. High Bandwidth Optical Links for Micro-Satellite Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Wilson, Keith E. (Inventor); Coste, Keith (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method, systems, apparatus and device enable high bandwidth satellite communications. An onboard tracking detector, installed in a low-earth orbit satellite, detects a position of an incoming optical beam received/transmitted from a first ground station of one or more ground stations. Tracker electronics determine orientation information of the incoming optical beam based on the position. Control electronics receive the orientation information from the tracker electronics, and control a waveguide drive electronics. The waveguide drive electronics control a voltage that is provided to an electro-optic waveguide beam steering device. The electro-optic waveguide beam steering device steers an outgoing optical beam to one of the one or more ground stations based on the voltage.

  15. Tactical Decision Aids High Bandwidth Links Using Autonomous Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    1 Tactical Decision Aids (High Bandwidth Links Using Autonomous Vehicles ) A. J. Healey, D. P. Horner, Center for Autonomous Underwater Vehicle...SUBTITLE Tactical Decision Aids (High Bandwidth Links Using Autonomous Vehicles ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  16. 360/degree/ digital phase detector with 100-kHz bandwidth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, D.W.; Riggin, D.; Fazio, M.V.; Biddle, R.S.; Patton, R.D.; Jackson, H.A.

    1981-01-01

    The general availability of digital circuit components with propagation delay times of a few nanoseconds makes a digital phase detector with good bandwidth feasible. Such a circuit has a distinct advantage over its analog counterpart because of its linearity over a wide range of phase shift. A description is given of a phase detector that is being built at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. The specifications are 100-kHz bandwidth, linearity of /plus or minus/1/degree/ over /plus or minus/180/degree/ of phase shift, and 0.66/degree/ resolution. To date, the circuit has achieved the bandwidth and resolution. The linearity is approximately /plus or minus/3/degree/ over /plus or minus/180/degree/ phase shift. 3 refs

  17. Review of high bandwidth fiber optics radiation sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, P.B.

    1985-01-01

    This paper summarizes the use of fiber optics or guided optical systems for radiation sensors. It is limited a passive systems wherein electrical is not required at the sensor location. However, electrically powered light sources, receivers and/or recorders may still be required for detection and data storage in sensor system operation. This paper emphasizes sensor technologies that permit high bandwidth measurements of transient radiation levels, and will also discuss several low bandwidth applications. 60 refs

  18. Optical interconnect technologies for high-bandwidth ICT systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chujo, Norio; Takai, Toshiaki; Mizushima, Akiko; Arimoto, Hideo; Matsuoka, Yasunobu; Yamashita, Hiroki; Matsushima, Naoki

    2016-03-01

    The bandwidth of information and communication technology (ICT) systems is increasing and is predicted to reach more than 10 Tb/s. However, an electrical interconnect cannot achieve such bandwidth because of its density limits. To solve this problem, we propose two types of high-density optical fiber wiring for backplanes and circuit boards such as interface boards and switch boards. One type uses routed ribbon fiber in a circuit board because it has the ability to be formed into complex shapes to avoid interfering with the LSI and electrical components on the board. The backplane is required to exhibit high density and flexibility, so the second type uses loose fiber. We developed a 9.6-Tb/s optical interconnect demonstration system using embedded optical modules, optical backplane, and optical connector in a network apparatus chassis. We achieved 25-Gb/s transmission between FPGAs via the optical backplane.

  19. Wide bandwidth transimpedance amplifier for extremely high sensitivity continuous measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Giorgio; Sampietro, Marco

    2007-09-01

    This article presents a wide bandwidth transimpedance amplifier based on the series of an integrator and a differentiator stage, having an additional feedback loop to discharge the standing current from the device under test (DUT) to ensure an unlimited measuring time opportunity when compared to switched discharge configurations while maintaining a large signal amplification over the full bandwidth. The amplifier shows a flat response from 0.6 Hz to 1.4 MHz, the capability to operate with leakage currents from the DUT as high as tens of nanoamperes, and rail-to-rail dynamic range for sinusoidal current signals independent of the DUT leakage current. Also available is a monitor output of the stationary current to track experimental slow drifts. The circuit is ideal for noise spectral and impedance measurements of nanodevices and biomolecules when in the presence of a physiological medium and in all cases where high sensitivity current measurements are requested such as in scanning probe microscopy systems.

  20. High bandwidth second-harmonic generation in partially deuterated KDP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, M.S.; Eimerl, D.; Velsko, S.P.

    1992-01-01

    We have experimentally determined the spectrally noncritical phasematching behavior of Type I frequency doubling in KDP and its dependence on deuteration level in partially deuterated KDP. The first order wavelength sensitivity parameter∂Δk/∂γ for Type I doubling of 1.053 μm light vanishes for a KD*P crystal with a deuteration level between 10 and 14%. Very high bandwidth frequency doubling of Nd:glass lasers is possible with such a crystal

  1. Ultra-high bandwidth quantum secured data transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynes, James F.; Tam, Winci W.-S.; Plews, Alan; Fröhlich, Bernd; Sharpe, Andrew W.; Lucamarini, Marco; Yuan, Zhiliang; Radig, Christian; Straw, Andrew; Edwards, Tim; Shields, Andrew J.

    2016-10-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) provides an attractive means for securing communications in optical fibre networks. However, deployment of the technology has been hampered by the frequent need for dedicated dark fibres to segregate the very weak quantum signals from conventional traffic. Up until now the coexistence of QKD with data has been limited to bandwidths that are orders of magnitude below those commonly employed in fibre optic communication networks. Using an optimised wavelength divisional multiplexing scheme, we transport QKD and the prevalent 100 Gb/s data format in the forward direction over the same fibre for the first time. We show a full quantum encryption system operating with a bandwidth of 200 Gb/s over a 100 km fibre. Exploring the ultimate limits of the technology by experimental measurements of the Raman noise, we demonstrate it is feasible to combine QKD with 10 Tb/s of data over a 50 km link. These results suggest it will be possible to integrate QKD and other quantum photonic technologies into high bandwidth data communication infrastructures, thereby allowing their widespread deployment.

  2. Managing high-bandwidth real-time data storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigelow, David D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brandt, Scott A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bent, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Hsing-Bung [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-09-23

    There exist certain systems which generate real-time data at high bandwidth, but do not necessarily require the long-term retention of that data in normal conditions. In some cases, the data may not actually be useful, and in others, there may be too much data to permanently retain in long-term storage whether it is useful or not. However, certain portions of the data may be identified as being vitally important from time to time, and must therefore be retained for further analysis or permanent storage without interrupting the ongoing collection of new data. We have developed a system, Mahanaxar, intended to address this problem. It provides quality of service guarantees for incoming real-time data streams and simultaneous access to already-recorded data on a best-effort basis utilizing any spare bandwidth. It has built in mechanisms for reliability and indexing, can scale upwards to meet increasing bandwidth requirements, and handles both small and large data elements equally well. We will show that a prototype version of this system provides better performance than a flat file (traditional filesystem) based version, particularly with regard to quality of service guarantees and hard real-time requirements.

  3. Extremelly High Bandwidth Rad Hard Data Acquisition System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advancements in sensors/detectors are needed to support future NASA mission concepts including polarimetry, large format imaging arrays, and high-sensitivity...

  4. High-energy detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E [South Setauket, NY; Camarda, Giuseppe [Farmingville, NY; Cui, Yonggang [Upton, NY; James, Ralph B [Ridge, NY

    2011-11-22

    The preferred embodiments are directed to a high-energy detector that is electrically shielded using an anode, a cathode, and a conducting shield to substantially reduce or eliminate electrically unshielded area. The anode and the cathode are disposed at opposite ends of the detector and the conducting shield substantially surrounds at least a portion of the longitudinal surface of the detector. The conducting shield extends longitudinally to the anode end of the detector and substantially surrounds at least a portion of the detector. Signals read from one or more of the anode, cathode, and conducting shield can be used to determine the number of electrons that are liberated as a result of high-energy particles impinge on the detector. A correction technique can be implemented to correct for liberated electron that become trapped to improve the energy resolution of the high-energy detectors disclosed herein.

  5. GHz-bandwidth upconversion detector using a unidirectional ring cavity to reduce multilongitudinal mode pump effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Lichun; Høgstedt, Lasse; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate efficient upconversion of modulated infrared (IR) signals over a wide bandwidth (up to frequencies in excess of 1 GHz) via cavity-enhanced sum-frequency generation (SFG) in a periodically poled LiNbO3. Intensity modulated IR signal is produced by combining beams from two 1547 nm...... narrow-linewidth lasers in a fiber coupler while tuning their wavelength difference down to 10 pm or less. The SFG crystal is placed inside an Nd:YVO4 ring cavity that provides 1064 nm circulating pump powers of up to 150 W in unidirectional operation. Measured Fabry-Perot spectrum at 1064 nm confirms...... the enhanced spectral stability from multiple to single longitudinal mode pumping condition. We describe analytically and demonstrate experimentally the deleterious effects of using a multimode pump to the high-bandwidth RF spectrum of the 630 nm SFG output. Offering enhanced sensitivity without the need...

  6. A wide-bandwidth and high-sensitivity robust microgyroscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Korhan; Sahin, Emre; Akin, Tayfun; Alper, Said Emre

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports a microgyroscope design concept with the help of a 2 degrees of freedom (DoF) sense mode to achieve a wide bandwidth without sacrificing mechanical and electronic sensitivity and to obtain robust operation against variations under ambient conditions. The design concept is demonstrated with a tuning fork microgyroscope fabricated with an in-house silicon-on-glass micromachining process. When the fabricated gyroscope is operated with a relatively wide bandwidth of 1 kHz, measurements show a relatively high raw mechanical sensitivity of 131 µV (° s −1 ) −1 . The variation in the amplified mechanical sensitivity (scale factor) of the gyroscope is measured to be less than 0.38% for large ambient pressure variations such as from 40 to 500 mTorr. The bias instability and angle random walk of the gyroscope are measured to be 131° h −1 and 1.15° h −1/2 , respectively

  7. Development of high frequency and wide bandwidth Johnson noise thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crossno, Jesse; Liu, Xiaomeng; Kim, Philip; Ohki, Thomas A.; Fong, Kin Chung

    2015-01-01

    We develop a high frequency, wide bandwidth radiometer operating at room temperature, which augments the traditional technique of Johnson noise thermometry for nanoscale thermal transport studies. Employing low noise amplifiers and an analog multiplier operating at 2 GHz, auto- and cross-correlated Johnson noise measurements are performed in the temperature range of 3 to 300 K, achieving a sensitivity of 5.5 mK (110 ppm) in 1 s of integration time. This setup allows us to measure the thermal conductance of a boron nitride encapsulated monolayer graphene device over a wide temperature range. Our data show a high power law (T ∼ 4) deviation from the Wiedemann-Franz law above T ∼ 100 K

  8. High-bandwidth piezoresistive force probes with integrated thermal actuation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doll, Joseph C; Pruitt, Beth L

    2012-01-01

    We present high-speed force probes with on-chip actuation and sensing for the measurement of pN-scale forces at the microsecond timescale. We achieve a high resonant frequency in water (1–100 kHz) with requisite low spring constants (0.3–40 pN nm −1 ) and low integrated force noise (1–100 pN) by targeting probe dimensions on the order of 300 nm thick, 1–2 μm wide and 30–200 μm long. Forces are measured using silicon piezoresistors, while the probes are actuated thermally with an aluminum unimorph and silicon heater. The piezoresistive sensors are designed using the open-source numerical optimization code that incorporates constraints on operating temperature. Parylene passivation enables operation in ionic media and we demonstrate simultaneous actuation and sensing. The improved design and fabrication techniques that we describe enable a 10–20-fold improvement in force resolution or measurement bandwidth over prior piezoresistive cantilevers of comparable thickness. (paper)

  9. High bandwidth piezoresistive force probes with integrated thermal actuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doll, Joseph C.; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2012-01-01

    We present high-speed force probes with on-chip actuation and sensing for the measurement of pN-scale forces at the microsecond time scale. We achieve a high resonant frequency in water (1–100 kHz) with requisite low spring constants (0.3–40 pN/nm) and low integrated force noise (1–100 pN) by targeting probe dimensions on the order of 300 nm thick, 1–2 μm wide and 30–200 μm long. Forces are measured using silicon piezoresistors while the probes are actuated thermally with an aluminum unimorph and silicon heater. The piezoresistive sensors are designed using open source numerical optimization code that incorporates constraints on operating temperature. Parylene passivation enables operation in ionic media and we demonstrate simultaneous actuation and sensing. The improved design and fabrication techniques that we describe enable a 10–20 fold improvement in force resolution or measurement bandwidth over prior piezoresistive cantilevers of comparable thickness. PMID:23175616

  10. Engineering the CernVM-Filesystem as a High Bandwidth Distributed Filesystem for Auxiliary Physics Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykstra, D.; Bockelman, B.; Blomer, J.; Herner, K.; Levshina, T.; Slyz, M.

    2015-12-01

    A common use pattern in the computing models of particle physics experiments is running many distributed applications that read from a shared set of data files. We refer to this data is auxiliary data, to distinguish it from (a) event data from the detector (which tends to be different for every job), and (b) conditions data about the detector (which tends to be the same for each job in a batch of jobs). Relatively speaking, conditions data also tends to be relatively small per job where both event data and auxiliary data are larger per job. Unlike event data, auxiliary data comes from a limited working set of shared files. Since there is spatial locality of the auxiliary data access, the use case appears to be identical to that of the CernVM- Filesystem (CVMFS). However, we show that distributing auxiliary data through CVMFS causes the existing CVMFS infrastructure to perform poorly. We utilize a CVMFS client feature called "alien cache" to cache data on existing local high-bandwidth data servers that were engineered for storing event data. This cache is shared between the worker nodes at a site and replaces caching CVMFS files on both the worker node local disks and on the site's local squids. We have tested this alien cache with the dCache NFSv4.1 interface, Lustre, and the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) FUSE interface, and measured performance. In addition, we use high-bandwidth data servers at central sites to perform the CVMFS Stratum 1 function instead of the low-bandwidth web servers deployed for the CVMFS software distribution function. We have tested this using the dCache HTTP interface. As a result, we have a design for an end-to-end high-bandwidth distributed caching read-only filesystem, using existing client software already widely deployed to grid worker nodes and existing file servers already widely installed at grid sites. Files are published in a central place and are soon available on demand throughout the grid and cached locally on the

  11. Engineering the CernVM-Filesystem as a High Bandwidth Distributed Filesystem for Auxiliary Physics Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dykstra, D. [Fermilab; Bockelman, B. [Nebraska U.; Blomer, J. [CERN; Herner, K. [Fermilab; Levshina, T. [Fermilab; Slyz, M. [Fermilab

    2015-12-23

    A common use pattern in the computing models of particle physics experiments is running many distributed applications that read from a shared set of data files. We refer to this data is auxiliary data, to distinguish it from (a) event data from the detector (which tends to be different for every job), and (b) conditions data about the detector (which tends to be the same for each job in a batch of jobs). Relatively speaking, conditions data also tends to be relatively small per job where both event data and auxiliary data are larger per job. Unlike event data, auxiliary data comes from a limited working set of shared files. Since there is spatial locality of the auxiliary data access, the use case appears to be identical to that of the CernVM- Filesystem (CVMFS). However, we show that distributing auxiliary data through CVMFS causes the existing CVMFS infrastructure to perform poorly. We utilize a CVMFS client feature called 'alien cache' to cache data on existing local high-bandwidth data servers that were engineered for storing event data. This cache is shared between the worker nodes at a site and replaces caching CVMFS files on both the worker node local disks and on the site's local squids. We have tested this alien cache with the dCache NFSv4.1 interface, Lustre, and the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) FUSE interface, and measured performance. In addition, we use high-bandwidth data servers at central sites to perform the CVMFS Stratum 1 function instead of the low-bandwidth web servers deployed for the CVMFS software distribution function. We have tested this using the dCache HTTP interface. As a result, we have a design for an end-to-end high-bandwidth distributed caching read-only filesystem, using existing client software already widely deployed to grid worker nodes and existing file servers already widely installed at grid sites. Files are published in a central place and are soon available on demand throughout the grid and cached

  12. High current, high bandwidth laser diode current driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, David J.; Zimmerman, Robert K., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A laser diode current driver has been developed for free space laser communications. The driver provides 300 mA peak modulation current and exhibits an optical risetime of less than 400 ps. The current and optical pulses are well behaved and show minimal ringing. The driver is well suited for QPPM modulation at data rates up to 440 Mbit/s. Much previous work has championed current steering circuits; in contrast, the present driver is a single-ended on/off switch. This results in twice the power efficiency as a current steering driver. The driver electrical efficiency for QPPM data is 34 percent. The high speed switch is realized with a Ku-band GaAsFET transistor, with a suitable pre-drive circuit, on a hybrid microcircuit adjacent to the laser diode.

  13. A high control bandwidth design method for aalborg inverter under weak grid condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Weimin; Zhou, Cong; Wang, Houqin

    2017-01-01

    Aalborg Inverter is a kind of high efficient Buck-Boost inverter. Since it may work in “Buck-Boost” mode, the control bandwidth should be high enough to ensure a good performance under any grid condition. However, during the “Boost” operation, the control bandwidth depends much on the grid...

  14. Adaptive slope compensation for high bandwidth digital current mode controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taeed, Fazel; Nymand, Morten

    2015-01-01

    An adaptive slope compensation method for digital current mode control of dc-dc converters is proposed in this paper. The compensation slope is used for stabilizing the inner current loop in peak current mode control. In this method, the compensation slope is adapted with the variations...... in converter duty cycle. The adaptive slope compensation provides optimum controller operation in term of bandwidth over wide range of operating points. In this paper operation principle of the controller is discussed. The proposed controller is implemented in an FPGA to control a 100 W buck converter...

  15. Ultra-low Noise, High Bandwidth, 1550nm HgCdTe APD, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To meet the demands of future high-capacity free space optical communications links, a high bandwidth, near infrared (NIR), single photon sensitive optoelectronic...

  16. THz Tube Waveguides With Low Loss, Low Dispersion, and High Bandwidth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bao, Hualong; Nielsen, Kristian; Bang, Ole

    2014-01-01

    We propose, model and experimentally characterize a novel class of terahertz hollow-core tube waveguides with high-loss cladding material, resulting in propagation with low loss, low dispersion, and high useful bandwidth.......We propose, model and experimentally characterize a novel class of terahertz hollow-core tube waveguides with high-loss cladding material, resulting in propagation with low loss, low dispersion, and high useful bandwidth....

  17. Knee implant imaging at 3 Tesla using high-bandwidth radiofrequency pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachschmidt, Theresa J; Sutter, Reto; Jakob, Peter M; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Nittka, Mathias

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the impact of high-bandwidth radiofrequency (RF) pulses used in turbo spin echo (TSE) sequences or combined with slice encoding for metal artifact correction (SEMAC) on artifact reduction at 3 Tesla in the knee in the presence of metal. Local transmit/receive coils feature increased maximum B1 amplitude, reduced SAR exposition and thus enable the application of high-bandwidth RF pulses. Susceptibility-induced through-plane distortion scales inversely with the RF bandwidth and the view angle, hence blurring, increases for higher RF bandwidths, when SEMAC is used. These effects were assessed for a phantom containing a total knee arthroplasty. TSE and SEMAC sequences with conventional and high RF bandwidths and different contrasts were tested on eight patients with different types of implants. To realize scan times of 7 to 9 min, SEMAC was always applied with eight slice-encoding steps and distortion was rated by two radiologists. A local transmit/receive knee coil enables the use of an RF bandwidth of 4 kHz compared with 850 Hz in conventional sequences. Phantom scans confirm the relation of RF bandwidth and through-plane distortion, which can be reduced up to 79%, and demonstrate the increased blurring for high-bandwidth RF pulses. In average, artifacts in this RF mode are rated hardly visible for patients with joint arthroplasties, when eight SEMAC slice-encoding steps are applied, and for patients with titanium fixtures, when TSE is used. The application of high-bandwidth RF pulses by local transmit coils substantially reduces through-plane distortion artifacts at 3 Tesla. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. High energy radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vosburgh, K.G.

    1975-01-01

    The high energy radiation detector described comprises a set of closely spaced wedge reflectors. Each wedge reflector is composed of three sides forming identical isoceles triangles with a common apex and an open base forming an equilateral triangle. The length of one side of the base is less than the thickness of the coat of material sensitive to high energy radiation. The wedge reflectors reflect the light photons spreading to the rear of the coat in such a way that each reflected track is parallel to the incident track of the light photon spreading rearwards. The angle of the three isosceles triangles with a common apex is between 85 and 95 deg. The first main surface of the coat of high energy radiation sensitive material is in contact with the projecting edges of the surface of the wedge reflectors of the reflecting element [fr

  19. High resolution imaging detectors and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Swapan K

    2015-01-01

    Interferometric observations need snapshots of very high time resolution of the order of (i) frame integration of about 100 Hz or (ii) photon-recording rates of several megahertz (MHz). Detectors play a key role in astronomical observations, and since the explanation of the photoelectric effect by Albert Einstein, the technology has evolved rather fast. The present-day technology has made it possible to develop large-format complementary metal oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) and charge-coupled device (CCD) array mosaics, orthogonal transfer CCDs, electron-multiplication CCDs, electron-avalanche photodiode arrays, and quantum-well infrared (IR) photon detectors. The requirements to develop artifact-free photon shot noise-limited images are higher sensitivity and quantum efficiency, reduced noise that includes dark current, read-out and amplifier noise, smaller point-spread functions, and higher spectral bandwidth. This book aims to address such systems, technologies and design, evaluation and calibration, control...

  20. THE IMPROVEMENT OF COMPUTER NETWORK PERFORMANCE WITH BANDWIDTH MANAGEMENT IN KEMURNIAN II SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayu Kanigoro

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This research describes the improvement of computer network performance with bandwidth management in Kemurnian II Senior High School. The main issue of this research is the absence of bandwidth division on computer, which makes user who is downloading data, the provided bandwidth will be absorbed by the user. It leads other users do not get the bandwidth. Besides that, it has been done IP address division on each room, such as computer, teacher and administration room for supporting learning process in Kemurnian II Senior High School, so wireless network is needed. The method is location observation and interview with related parties in Kemurnian II Senior High School, the network analysis has run and designed a new topology network including the wireless network along with its configuration and separation bandwidth on microtic router and its limitation. The result is network traffic on Kemurnian II Senior High School can be shared evenly to each user; IX and IIX traffic are separated, which improve the speed on network access at school and the implementation of wireless network.Keywords: Bandwidth Management; Wireless Network

  1. Enhancement of sensitivity and bandwidth of gravitational wave detectors using fast-light-based white light cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salit, M; Shahriar, M S

    2010-01-01

    The effect of gravitational waves (GWs) has been observed indirectly, by monitoring the change in the orbital frequency of neutron stars in a binary system as they lose energy via gravitational radiation. However, GWs have not yet been observed directly. The initial LIGO apparatus has not yet observed GWs. The advanced LIGO (AdLIGO) will use a combination of improved techniques in order to increase the sensitivity. Along with power recycling and a higher power laser source, the AdLIGO will employ signal recycling (SR). While SR would increase sensitivity, it would also reduce the bandwidth significantly. Previously, we and others have investigated, theoretically and experimentally, the feasibility of using a fast-light-based white light cavity (WLC) to circumvent this constraint. However, in the previous work, it was not clear how one would incorporate the white light cavity effect. Here, we first develop a general model for Michelson-interferometer-based GW detectors that can be easily adapted to include the effects of incorporating a WLC into the design. We then describe a concrete design of a WLC constructed as a compound mirror, to replace the signal recycling mirror. This design is simple, robust, completely non-invasive, and can be added to the AdLIGO system without changing any other optical elements. We show a choice of parameters for which the signal sensitivity as well as the bandwidth are enhanced significantly over what is planned for the AdLIGO, covering the entire spectrum of interest for gravitational waves

  2. High Temperature Superconductor Resonator Detectors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) infrared detectors were studied for years but never matured sufficiently for infusion into instruments. Several recent...

  3. Synthetic Pulse Dilation - PMT Model for high bandwidth gamma measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geppert-Kleinrath, H.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Meaney, K. D.; Lopez, F. E.; Khater, H.; Horsfield, C. J.; Gales, S.; Leatherland, A.; Hilsabeck, T.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, T.; Milnes, J.

    2017-10-01

    The Cherenkov mechanism used in Gas Cherenkov Detectors (GCD) is exceptionally fast. However, the temporal resolution of GCDs, such as the Gamma Reaction History diagnostic (GRH), is limited by the current state-of-the-art photomultiplier tube (PMT) to 100 ps. The new pulse dilation - PMT (PD-PMT) for NIF allows for a temporal resolution comparable to that of the gas cell, or of 10ps. Enhanced resolution will contribute to the quest for ignition in a crucial way through precision measurement of reaction history and areal density (ρ R) history, leading to better constrained models. Features such as onset of alpha heating, shock reverberations and burn truncation due to dynamically evolving failure modes will become visible for the first time. PD-PMT will be deployed on GCD-3 at NIF in 2018. Our synthetic PD-PMT model evaluates the capabilities of these future measurements, as well as minimum yield requirements for measurements performed in a well at 3.9 m from target chamber center (TCC), and within a diagnostic inserter at 0.2m from TCC.

  4. High modulation bandwidth of a light-emitting diode with surface plasmon coupling (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Han; Tu, Charng-Gan; Yao, Yu-Feng; Chen, Sheng-Hung; Su, Chia-Ying; Chen, Hao-Tsung; Kiang, Yean-Woei; Yang, Chih-Chung

    2017-02-01

    Besides lighting, LEDs can be used for indoor data transmission. Therefore, a large modulation bandwidth becomes an important target in the development of visible LED. In this regard, enhancing the radiative recombination rate of carriers in the quantum wells of an LED is a useful method since the modulation bandwidth of an LED is related to the carrier decay rate besides the device RC time constant To increase the carrier decay rate in an LED without sacrificing its output power, the technique of surface plasmon (SP) coupling in an LED is useful. In this paper, the increases of modulation bandwidth by reducing mesa size, decreasing active layer thickness, and inducing SP coupling in blue- and green-emitting LEDs are illustrated. The results are demonstrated by comparing three different LED surface structures, including bare p-type surface, GaZnO current spreading layer, and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) for inducing SP coupling. In a single-quantum-well, blue-emitting LED with a circular mesa of 10 microns in radius, SP coupling results in a modulation bandwidth of 528.8 MHz, which is believed to be the record-high level. A smaller RC time constant can lead to a higher modulation bandwidth. However, when the RC time constant is smaller than 0.2 ns, its effect on modulation bandwidth saturates. The dependencies of modulation bandwidth on injected current density and carrier decay time confirm that the modulation bandwidth is essentially inversely proportional to a time constant, which is inversely proportional to the square-root of carrier decay rate and injected current density.

  5. Extremelly High Bandwidth Rad Hard Data Acquisition System, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Analog-to-digital converters (ADCs) are the key components for digitizing high-speed analog data in modern data acquisition systems, which is a critical part of...

  6. High efficiency scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noakes, J.E.

    1976-01-01

    A scintillation counter consisting of a scintillation detector, usually a crystal scintillator optically coupled to a photomultiplier tube which converts photons to electrical pulses is described. The photomultiplier pulses are measured to provide information on impinging radiation. In inorganic crystal scintillation detectors to achieve maximum density, optical transparency and uniform activation, it has been necessary heretofore to prepare the scintillator as a single crystal. Crystal pieces fail to give a single composite response. Means are provided herein for obtaining such a response with crystal pieces, such means comprising the combination of crystal pieces and liquid or solid organic scintillator matrices having a cyclic molecular structure favorable to fluorescence. 8 claims, 6 drawing figures

  7. Towards realising high-speed large-bandwidth quantum memory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI BaoSen; DING DongSheng

    2016-01-01

    Indispensable for quantum communication and quantum computation,quantum memory executes on demand storage and retrieval of quantum states such as those of a single photon,an entangled pair or squeezed states.Among the various forms of quantum memory,Raman quantum memory has advantages forits broadband and high-speed characteristics,which results in a huge potential for applications in quantum networks and quantum computation.However,realising Raman quantum memory with true single photons and photonic entanglementis challenging.In this review,after briefly introducing the main benchmarks in the development of quantum memory and describing the state of the art,we focus on our recent experimental progress inquantum memorystorage of quantum states using the Raman scheme.

  8. High Dielectric Low Loss Transparent Glass Material Based Dielectric Resonator Antenna with Wide Bandwidth Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Arshad; Zheng, Yuliang; Braun, Hubertus; Hovhannisyan, Martun; Letz, Martin; Jakoby, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the application of new high permittivity and low loss glass material for antennas. This glass material is transparent. A very simple rectangular dielectric resonator antenna is designed first with a simple microstrip feeding line. In order to widen the bandwidth, the feed of the design is modified by forming a T-shaped feeding. This new design enhanced the bandwidth range to cover the WLAN 5 GHz band completely. The dielectric resonator antenna cut into precise dimensions is placed on the modified microstrip feed line. The design is simple and easy to manufacture and also very compact in size of only 36 × 28 mm. A -10 dB impedance bandwidth of 18% has been achieved, which covers the frequency range from 5.15 GHz to 5.95 GHz. Simulations of the measured return loss and radiation patterns are presented and discussed.

  9. High efficiency and broad bandwidth grating coupler between nanophotonic waveguide and fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Zhu; Xue-Jun, Xu; Zhi-Yong, Li; Liang, Zhou; Yu-De, Yu; Jin-Zhong, Yu; Wei-Hua, Han; Zhong-Chao, Fan

    2010-01-01

    A high efficiency and broad bandwidth grating coupler between a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) nanophotonic waveguide and fibre is designed and fabricated. Coupling efficiencies of 46% and 25% at a wavelength of 1.55 μm are achieved by simulation and experiment, respectively. An optical 3 dB bandwidth of 45 nm from 1530 nm to 1575 nm is also obtained in experiment. Numerical calculation shows that a tolerance to fabrication error of 10 nm in etch depth is achievable. The measurement results indicate that the alignment error of ±2 μm results in less than 1 dB additional coupling loss. (classical areas of phenomenology)

  10. Optical Characteristics of a Multichannel Hybrid Integrated Light Source for Ultra-High-Bandwidth Optical Interconnections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takanori Shimizu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The optical characteristics of a multi-channel hybrid integrated light source were described for an optical interconnection with a bandwidth of over 10 Tbit/s. The power uniformity of the relative intensity of a 1000-channel light source was shown, and the minimum standard deviation s of the optical power of the 200 output ports at each 25-channel laser diode (LD array was estimated to be 0.49 dB. This hybrid integrated light source is expected to be easily adaptable to a photonics-electronics convergence system for ultra-high-bandwidth interchip interconnections.

  11. High-bandwidth and flexible tracking control for precision motion with application to a piezo nanopositioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhao; Ling, Jie; Ming, Min; Xiao, Xiao-Hui

    2017-08-01

    For precision motion, high-bandwidth and flexible tracking are the two important issues for significant performance improvement. Iterative learning control (ILC) is an effective feedforward control method only for systems that operate strictly repetitively. Although projection ILC can track varying references, the performance is still limited by the fixed-bandwidth Q-filter, especially for triangular waves tracking commonly used in a piezo nanopositioner. In this paper, a wavelet transform-based linear time-varying (LTV) Q-filter design for projection ILC is proposed to compensate high-frequency errors and improve the ability to tracking varying references simultaneously. The LVT Q-filter is designed based on the modulus maximum of wavelet detail coefficients calculated by wavelet transform to determine the high-frequency locations of each iteration with the advantages of avoiding cross-terms and segmenting manually. The proposed approach was verified on a piezo nanopositioner. Experimental results indicate that the proposed approach can locate the high-frequency regions accurately and achieve the best performance under varying references compared with traditional frequency-domain and projection ILC with a fixed-bandwidth Q-filter, which validates that through implementing the LTV filter on projection ILC, high-bandwidth and flexible tracking can be achieved simultaneously by the proposed approach.

  12. High Bandwidth Communications Links Between Heterogeneous Autonomous Vehicles Using Sensor Network Modeling and Extremum Control Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    In future network-centric warfare environments, teams of autonomous vehicles will be deployed in a coorperative manner to conduct wide-area...of data back to the command station, autonomous vehicles configured with high bandwidth communication system are positioned between the command

  13. Highly-Integrated Hydraulic Smart Actuators and Smart Manifolds for High-Bandwidth Force Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Barasuol

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydraulic actuation is the most widely used alternative to electric motors for legged robots and manipulators. It is often selected for its high power density, robustness and high-bandwidth control performance that allows the implementation of force/impedance control. Force control is crucial for robots that are in contact with the environment, since it enables the implementation of active impedance and whole body control that can lead to a better performance in known and unknown environments. This paper presents the hydraulic Integrated Smart Actuator (ISA developed by Moog in collaboration with IIT, as well as smart manifolds for rotary hydraulic actuators. The ISA consists of an additive-manufactured body containing a hydraulic cylinder, servo valve, pressure/position/load/temperature sensing, overload protection and electronics for control and communication. The ISA v2 and ISA v5 have been specifically designed to fit into the legs of IIT’s hydraulic quadruped robots HyQ and HyQ-REAL, respectively. The key features of these components tackle 3 of today’s main challenges of hydraulic actuation for legged robots through: (1 built-in controllers running inside integrated electronics for high-performance control, (2 low-leakage servo valves for reduced energy losses, and (3 compactness thanks to metal additive manufacturing. The main contributions of this paper are the derivation of the representative dynamic models of these highly integrated hydraulic servo actuators, a control architecture that allows for high-bandwidth force control and their experimental validation with application-specific trajectories and tests. We believe that this is the first work that presents additive-manufactured, highly integrated hydraulic smart actuators for robotics.

  14. Requirements on high resolution detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, A. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    1997-02-01

    For a number of microtomography applications X-ray detectors with a spatial resolution of 1 {mu}m are required. This high spatial resolution will influence and degrade other parameters of secondary importance like detective quantum efficiency (DQE), dynamic range, linearity and frame rate. This note summarizes the most important arguments, for and against those detector systems which could be considered. This article discusses the mutual dependencies between the various figures which characterize a detector, and tries to give some ideas on how to proceed in order to improve present technology.

  15. High-fidelity polarization storage in a gigahertz bandwidth quantum memory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, D G; Michelberger, P S; Champion, T F M; Reim, K F; Lee, K C; Sprague, M R; Jin, X-M; Langford, N K; Kolthammer, W S; Nunn, J; Walmsley, I A

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a dual-rail optical Raman memory inside a polarization interferometer; this enables us to store polarization-encoded information at GHz bandwidths in a room-temperature atomic ensemble. By performing full process tomography on the system, we measure up to 97 ± 1% process fidelity for the storage and retrieval process. At longer storage times, the process fidelity remains high, despite a loss of efficiency. The fidelity is 86 ± 4% for 1.5 μs storage time, which is 5000 times the pulse duration. Hence, high fidelity is combined with a large time-bandwidth product. This high performance, with an experimentally simple setup, demonstrates the suitability of the Raman memory for integration into large-scale quantum networks. (paper)

  16. In-circuit-measurement of parasitic elements in high gain high bandwidth low noise transimpedance amplifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochems, P; Kirk, A; Zimmermann, S

    2014-12-01

    Parasitic elements play an important role in the development of every high performance circuit. In the case of high gain, high bandwidth transimpedance amplifiers, the most important parasitic elements are parasitic capacitances at the input and in the feedback path, which significantly influence the stability, the frequency response, and the noise of the amplifier. As these parasitic capacitances range from a few picofarads down to only a few femtofarads, it is nearly impossible to measure them accurately using traditional LCR meters. Unfortunately, they also cannot be easily determined from the transfer function of the transimpedance amplifier, as it contains several overlapping effects and its measurement is only possible when the circuit is already stable. Therefore, we developed an in-circuit measurement method utilizing minimal modifications to the input stage in order to measure its parasitic capacitances directly and with unconditional stability. Furthermore, using the data acquired with this measurement technique, we both proposed a model for the complicated frequency response of high value thick film resistors as they are used in high gain transimpedance amplifiers and optimized our transimpedance amplifier design.

  17. Cavity resonance absorption in ultra-high bandwidth CRT deflection structure by a resistive load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, M.E.; Hudson, C.L.

    1993-05-11

    An improved ultra-high bandwidth helical coil deflection structure for a cathode ray tube is described comprising a first metal member having a bore therein, the metal walls of which form a first ground plane; a second metal member coaxially mounted in the bore of the first metal member and forming a second ground plane; a helical deflection coil coaxially mounted within the bore between the two ground planes; and a resistive load disposed in one end of the bore and electrically connected to the first and second ground planes, the resistive load having an impedance substantially equal to the characteristic impedance of the coaxial line formed by the two coaxial ground planes to inhibit cavity resonance in the structure within the ultra-high bandwidth of operation. Preferably, the resistive load comprises a carbon film on a surface of an end plug in one end of the bore.

  18. Pickup design for high bandwidth bunch arrival-time monitors in free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelovski, Aleksandar; Penirschke, Andreas; Jakoby, Rolf [TU Darmstadt (Germany). Institut fuer Mikrowellentechnik und Photonik; Kuhl, Alexander; Schnepp, Sascha [TU Darmstadt (Germany). Graduate School of Computational Engineering; Bock, Marie Kristin; Bousonville, Michael; Schlarb, Holger [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Weiland, Thomas [TU Darmstadt (Germany). Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder

    2012-07-01

    The increased demands for low bunch charge operation mode in the free-electron lasers (FELs) require an upgrade of the existing synchronization equipment. As a part of the laser-based synchronization system, the bunch arrival-time monitors (BAMs) should have a sub-10 femtosecond precision for high and low bunch charge operation. In order to fulfill the resolution demands for both modes of operation, the bandwidth of such a BAM should be increased up to a cutoff frequency of 40 GHz. In this talk, we present the design and the realization of high bandwidth cone-shaped pickup electrodes as a part of the BAM for the FEL in Hamburg (FLASH) and the European X-ray free-electron laser (European XFEL). The proposed pickup was simulated with CST STUDIO SUITE, and a non-hermetic model was built up for radio frequency (rf) measurements.

  19. High precision thermal neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radeka, V.; Schaknowski, N.A.; Smith, G.C.; Yu, B. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Two-dimensional position sensitive detectors are indispensable in neutron diffraction experiments for determination of molecular and crystal structures in biology, solid-state physics and polymer chemistry. Some performance characteristics of these detectors are elementary and obvious, such as the position resolution, number of resolution elements, neutron detection efficiency, counting rate and sensitivity to gamma-ray background. High performance detectors are distinguished by more subtle characteristics such as the stability of the response (efficiency) versus position, stability of the recorded neutron positions, dynamic range, blooming or halo effects. While relatively few of them are needed around the world, these high performance devices are sophisticated and fairly complex, their development requires very specialized efforts. In this context, we describe here a program of detector development, based on {sup 3}He filled proportional chambers, which has been underway for some years at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Fundamental approaches and practical considerations are outlined that have resulted in a series of high performance detectors with the best known position resolution, position stability, uniformity of response and reliability over time, for devices of this type.

  20. High-Bandwidth Dynamic Full-Field Profilometry for Nano-Scale Characterization of MEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L-C; Huang, Y-T; Chang, P-B

    2006-01-01

    The article describes an innovative optical interferometric methodology to delivery dynamic surface profilometry with a measurement bandwidth up to 10MHz or higher and a vertical resolution up to 1 nm. Previous work using stroboscopic microscopic interferometry for dynamic characterization of micro (opto)electromechanical systems (M(O)EMS) has been limited in measurement bandwidth mainly within a couple of MHz. For high resonant mode analysis, the stroboscopic light pulse is insufficiently short to capture the moving fringes from dynamic motion of the detected structure. In view of this need, a microscopic prototype based on white-light stroboscopic interferometry with an innovative light superposition strategy was developed to achieve dynamic full-field profilometry with a high measurement bandwidth up to 10MHz or higher. The system primarily consists of an optical microscope, on which a Mirau interferometric objective embedded with a piezoelectric vertical translator, a high-power LED light module with dual operation modes and light synchronizing electronics unit are integrated. A micro cantilever beam used in AFM was measured to verify the system capability in accurate characterisation of dynamic behaviours of the device. The full-field seventh-mode vibration at a vibratory frequency of 3.7MHz can be fully characterized and nano-scale vertical measurement resolution as well as tens micrometers of vertical measurement range can be performed

  1. High-Bandwidth Dynamic Full-Field Profilometry for Nano-Scale Characterization of MEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, L-C [Graduate Institute of Automation Technology, National Taipei University of Technology, 1 Sec. 3 Chung-Hsiao East Rd., Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Huang, Y-T [Graduate Institute of Automation Technology, National Taipei University of Technology, 1 Sec. 3 Chung-Hsiao East Rd., Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Chang, P-B [Graduate Institute of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, 1 Sec. 3 Chung-Hsiao East Rd., Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China)

    2006-10-15

    The article describes an innovative optical interferometric methodology to delivery dynamic surface profilometry with a measurement bandwidth up to 10MHz or higher and a vertical resolution up to 1 nm. Previous work using stroboscopic microscopic interferometry for dynamic characterization of micro (opto)electromechanical systems (M(O)EMS) has been limited in measurement bandwidth mainly within a couple of MHz. For high resonant mode analysis, the stroboscopic light pulse is insufficiently short to capture the moving fringes from dynamic motion of the detected structure. In view of this need, a microscopic prototype based on white-light stroboscopic interferometry with an innovative light superposition strategy was developed to achieve dynamic full-field profilometry with a high measurement bandwidth up to 10MHz or higher. The system primarily consists of an optical microscope, on which a Mirau interferometric objective embedded with a piezoelectric vertical translator, a high-power LED light module with dual operation modes and light synchronizing electronics unit are integrated. A micro cantilever beam used in AFM was measured to verify the system capability in accurate characterisation of dynamic behaviours of the device. The full-field seventh-mode vibration at a vibratory frequency of 3.7MHz can be fully characterized and nano-scale vertical measurement resolution as well as tens micrometers of vertical measurement range can be performed.

  2. High-speed 405-nm superluminescent diode (SLD) with 807-MHz modulation bandwidth

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao

    2016-08-25

    III-nitride LEDs are fundamental components for visible-light communication (VLC). However, the modulation bandwidth is inherently limited by the relatively long carrier lifetime. In this letter, we present the 405 nm emitting superluminescent diode (SLD) with tilted facet design on semipolar GaN substrate, showing a broad emission of ∼9 nm at 20 mW optical power. Owing to the fast recombination (τ<0.35 ns) through the amplified spontaneous emission, the SLD exhibits a significantly large 3-dB bandwidth of 807 MHz. A data rate of 1.3 Gbps with a bit-error rate of 2.9 × 10 was obtained using on-off keying modulation scheme, suggesting the SLD being a high-speed transmitter for VLC applications.

  3. High-speed 405-nm superluminescent diode (SLD) with 807-MHz modulation bandwidth

    KAUST Repository

    Shen, Chao; Lee, Changmin; Ng, Tien Khee; Nakamura, Shuji; Speck, James S.; DenBaars, Steven P.; Alyamani, Ahmed Y.; El-Desouki, Munir M.; Ooi, Boon S.

    2016-01-01

    III-nitride LEDs are fundamental components for visible-light communication (VLC). However, the modulation bandwidth is inherently limited by the relatively long carrier lifetime. In this letter, we present the 405 nm emitting superluminescent diode (SLD) with tilted facet design on semipolar GaN substrate, showing a broad emission of ∼9 nm at 20 mW optical power. Owing to the fast recombination (τ<0.35 ns) through the amplified spontaneous emission, the SLD exhibits a significantly large 3-dB bandwidth of 807 MHz. A data rate of 1.3 Gbps with a bit-error rate of 2.9 × 10 was obtained using on-off keying modulation scheme, suggesting the SLD being a high-speed transmitter for VLC applications.

  4. Bandwidth Limitations in Characterization of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Fields in the Presence of Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khokhlova, V. A.; Bessonova, O. V.; Soneson, J. E.; Canney, M. S.; Bailey, M. R.; Crum, L. A.

    2010-03-01

    Nonlinear propagation effects result in the formation of weak shocks in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields. When shocks are present, the wave spectrum consists of hundreds of harmonics. In practice, shock waves are modeled using a finite number of harmonics and measured with hydrophones that have limited bandwidths. The goal of this work was to determine how many harmonics are necessary to model or measure peak pressures, intensity, and heat deposition rates of the HIFU fields. Numerical solutions of the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetzov-type (KZK) nonlinear parabolic equation were obtained using two independent algorithms, compared, and analyzed for nonlinear propagation in water, in gel phantom, and in tissue. Measurements were performed in the focus of the HIFU field in the same media using fiber optic probe hydrophones of various bandwidths. Experimental data were compared to the simulation results.

  5. A HIGH BANDWIDTH BIPOLAR POWER SUPPLY FOR THE FAST CORRECTORS IN THE APS UPGRADE*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ju; Sprau, Gary

    2017-06-25

    The APS Upgrade of a multi-bend achromat (MBA) storage ring requires a fast bipolar power supply for the fast correction magnets. The key performance requirement of the power supply includes a small-signal bandwidth of 10 kHz for the output current. This requirement presents a challenge to the design because of the high inductance of the magnet load and a limited input DC voltage. A prototype DC/DC power supply utilizing a MOSFET H-bridge circuit with a 500 kHz PWM has been developed and tested successfully. The prototype achieved a 10-kHz bandwidth with less than 3-dB attenuation for a signal 0.5% of the maximum operating current of 15 amperes. This paper presents the design of the power circuit, the PWM method, the control loop, and the test results.

  6. ICE-Based Custom Full-Mesh Network for the CHIME High Bandwidth Radio Astronomy Correlator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, K.; Cliche, J. F.; Dobbs, M. A.; Gilbert, A. J.; Ittah, D.; Mena Parra, J.; Smecher, G.

    2016-03-01

    New generation radio interferometers encode signals from thousands of antenna feeds across large bandwidth. Channelizing and correlating this data requires networking capabilities that can handle unprecedented data rates with reasonable cost. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) correlator processes 8-bits from N=2,048 digitizer inputs across 400MHz of bandwidth. Measured in N2× bandwidth, it is the largest radio correlator that is currently commissioning. Its digital back-end must exchange and reorganize the 6.6terabit/s produced by its 128 digitizing and channelizing nodes, and feed it to the 256 graphics processing unit (GPU) node spatial correlator in a way that each node obtains data from all digitizer inputs but across a small fraction of the bandwidth (i.e. ‘corner-turn’). In order to maximize performance and reliability of the corner-turn system while minimizing cost, a custom networking solution has been implemented. The system makes use of Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) transceivers to implement direct, passive copper, full-mesh, high speed serial connections between sixteen circuit boards in a crate, to exchange data between crates, and to offload the data to a cluster of 256 GPU nodes using standard 10Gbit/s Ethernet links. The GPU nodes complete the corner-turn by combining data from all crates and then computing visibilities. Eye diagrams and frame error counters confirm error-free operation of the corner-turn network in both the currently operating CHIME Pathfinder telescope (a prototype for the full CHIME telescope) and a representative fraction of the full CHIME hardware providing an end-to-end system validation. An analysis of an equivalent corner-turn system built with Ethernet switches instead of custom passive data links is provided.

  7. Applied techniques for high bandwidth data transfers across wide area networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.; Gunter, D.; Tierney, B.; Allcock, B.; Bester, J.; Bresnahan, J.; Tuecke, S.

    2001-01-01

    Large distributed systems such as Computational/Data Grids require large amounts of data to be co-located with the computing facilities for processing. From their work developing a scalable distributed network cache, the authors have gained experience with techniques necessary to achieve high data throughput over high bandwidth Wide Area Networks (WAN). The authors discuss several hardware and software design techniques, and then describe their application to an implementation of an enhanced FTP protocol called GridFTP. The authors describe results from the Supercomputing 2000 conference

  8. Re-use of Low Bandwidth Equipment for High Bit Rate Transmission Using Signal Slicing Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Christoph; Spolitis, S.; Vegas Olmos, Juan José

    : Massive fiber-to-the-home network deployment requires never ending equipment upgrades operating at higher bandwidth. We show effective signal slicing method, which can reuse low bandwidth opto-electronical components for optical communications at higher bit rates.......: Massive fiber-to-the-home network deployment requires never ending equipment upgrades operating at higher bandwidth. We show effective signal slicing method, which can reuse low bandwidth opto-electronical components for optical communications at higher bit rates....

  9. Bandwidth-limited control and ringdown suppression in high-Q resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borneman, Troy W; Cory, David G

    2012-12-01

    We describe how the transient behavior of a tuned and matched resonator circuit and a ringdown suppression pulse may be integrated into an optimal control theory (OCT) pulse-design algorithm to derive control sequences with limited ringdown that perform a desired quantum operation in the presence of resonator distortions of the ideal waveform. Inclusion of ringdown suppression in numerical pulse optimizations significantly reduces spectrometer deadtime when using high quality factor (high-Q) resonators, leading to increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity of inductive measurements. To demonstrate the method, we experimentally measure the free-induction decay of an inhomogeneously broadened solid-state free radical spin system at high Q. The measurement is enabled by using a numerically optimized bandwidth-limited OCT pulse, including ringdown suppression, robust to variations in static and microwave field strengths. We also discuss the applications of pulse design in high-Q resonators to universal control of anisotropic-hyperfine coupled electron-nuclear spin systems via electron-only modulation even when the bandwidth of the resonator is significantly smaller than the hyperfine coupling strength. These results demonstrate how limitations imposed by linear response theory may be vastly exceeded when using a sufficiently accurate system model to optimize pulses of high complexity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. APEnet+: high bandwidth 3D torus direct network for petaflops scale commodity clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammendola, R; Salamon, A; Salina, G; Biagioni, A; Prezza, O; Cicero, F Lo; Lonardo, A; Paolucci, P S; Rossetti, D; Tosoratto, L; Vicini, P; Simula, F

    2011-01-01

    We describe herein the APElink+ board, a PCIe interconnect adapter featuring the latest advances in wire speed and interface technology plus hardware support for a RDMA programming model and experimental acceleration of GPU networking; this design allows us to build a low latency, high bandwidth PC cluster, the APEnet+ network, the new generation of our cost-effective, tens-of-thousands-scalable cluster network architecture. Some test results and characterization of data transmission of a complete testbench, based on a commercial development card mounting an Altera ® FPGA, are provided.

  11. APEnet+: high bandwidth 3D torus direct network for petaflops scale commodity clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammendola, R; Salamon, A; Salina, G [INFN Tor Vergata, Roma (Italy); Biagioni, A; Prezza, O; Cicero, F Lo; Lonardo, A; Paolucci, P S; Rossetti, D; Tosoratto, L; Vicini, P [INFN Roma, Roma (Italy); Simula, F [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Roma (Italy)

    2011-12-23

    We describe herein the APElink+ board, a PCIe interconnect adapter featuring the latest advances in wire speed and interface technology plus hardware support for a RDMA programming model and experimental acceleration of GPU networking; this design allows us to build a low latency, high bandwidth PC cluster, the APEnet+ network, the new generation of our cost-effective, tens-of-thousands-scalable cluster network architecture. Some test results and characterization of data transmission of a complete testbench, based on a commercial development card mounting an Altera{sup Registered-Sign} FPGA, are provided.

  12. Three-Axis Attitude Estimation With a High-Bandwidth Angular Rate Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayard, David S.; Green, Joseph J.

    2013-01-01

    A continuing challenge for modern instrument pointing control systems is to meet the increasingly stringent pointing performance requirements imposed by emerging advanced scientific, defense, and civilian payloads. Instruments such as adaptive optics telescopes, space interferometers, and optical communications make unprecedented demands on precision pointing capabilities. A cost-effective method was developed for increasing the pointing performance for this class of NASA applications. The solution was to develop an attitude estimator that fuses star tracker and gyro measurements with a high-bandwidth angular rotation sensor (ARS). An ARS is a rate sensor whose bandwidth extends well beyond that of the gyro, typically up to 1,000 Hz or higher. The most promising ARS sensor technology is based on a magnetohydrodynamic concept, and has recently become available commercially. The key idea is that the sensor fusion of the star tracker, gyro, and ARS provides a high-bandwidth attitude estimate suitable for supporting pointing control with a fast-steering mirror or other type of tip/tilt correction for increased performance. The ARS is relatively inexpensive and can be bolted directly next to the gyro and star tracker on the spacecraft bus. The high-bandwidth attitude estimator fuses an ARS sensor with a standard three-axis suite comprised of a gyro and star tracker. The estimation architecture is based on a dual-complementary filter (DCF) structure. The DCF takes a frequency- weighted combination of the sensors such that each sensor is most heavily weighted in a frequency region where it has the lowest noise. An important property of the DCF is that it avoids the need to model disturbance torques in the filter mechanization. This is important because the disturbance torques are generally not known in applications. This property represents an advantage over the prior art because it overcomes a weakness of the Kalman filter that arises when fusing more than one rate

  13. Small-angle scattering of polychromatic X-rays: effects of bandwidth, spectral shape and high harmonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Sen; Luo, Sheng-Nian

    2018-02-16

    Polychromatic X-ray sources can be useful for photon-starved small-angle X-ray scattering given their high spectral fluxes. Their bandwidths, however, are 10–100 times larger than those using monochromators. To explore the feasibility, ideal scattering curves of homogeneous spherical particles for polychromatic X-rays are calculated and analyzed using the Guinier approach, maximum entropy and regularization methods. Monodisperse and polydisperse systems are explored. The influence of bandwidth and asymmetric spectra shape are exploredviaGaussian and half-Gaussian spectra. Synchrotron undulator spectra represented by two undulator sources of the Advanced Photon Source are examined as an example, as regards the influence of asymmetric harmonic shape, fundamental harmonic bandwidth and high harmonics. The effects of bandwidth, spectral shape and high harmonics on particle size determination are evaluated quantitatively.

  14. Small-angle scattering of polychromatic X-rays: effects of bandwidth, spectral shape and high harmonics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sen; Luo, Sheng Nian

    2018-03-01

    Polychromatic X-ray sources can be useful for photon-starved small-angle X-ray scattering given their high spectral fluxes. Their bandwidths, however, are 10-100 times larger than those using monochromators. To explore the feasibility, ideal scattering curves of homogeneous spherical particles for polychromatic X-rays are calculated and analyzed using the Guinier approach, maximum entropy and regularization methods. Monodisperse and polydisperse systems are explored. The influence of bandwidth and asymmetric spectra shape are explored via Gaussian and half-Gaussian spectra. Synchrotron undulator spectra represented by two undulator sources of the Advanced Photon Source are examined as an example, as regards the influence of asymmetric harmonic shape, fundamental harmonic bandwidth and high harmonics. The effects of bandwidth, spectral shape and high harmonics on particle size determination are evaluated quantitatively.

  15. Mahanaxar: quality of service guarantees in high-bandwidth, real-time streaming data storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigelow, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bent, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Hsing-Bung [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brandt, Scott [UCSC

    2010-04-05

    Large radio telescopes, cyber-security systems monitoring real-time network traffic, and others have specialized data storage needs: guaranteed capture of an ultra-high-bandwidth data stream, retention of the data long enough to determine what is 'interesting,' retention of interesting data indefinitely, and concurrent read/write access to determine what data is interesting, without interrupting the ongoing capture of incoming data. Mahanaxar addresses this problem. Mahanaxar guarantees streaming real-time data capture at (nearly) the full rate of the raw device, allows concurrent read and write access to the device on a best-effort basis without interrupting the data capture, and retains data as long as possible given the available storage. It has built in mechanisms for reliability and indexing, can scale to meet arbitrary bandwidth requirements, and handles both small and large data elements equally well. Results from our prototype implementation shows that Mahanaxar provides both better guarantees and better performance than traditional file systems.

  16. NbN nanowire optical detectors for high speed applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaranta, O; Pagano, S; Ejrnaes, M; Nappi, C; Pessina, E; Fontana, F

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a novel geometry for single photon optical detectors (SSPD) based on NbN nanowires. Traditionally the SSPD are realized in a meander structure in order to realize a reasonable (few square microns) collecting area. This has the disadvantage of generating a large detector inductance, mostly of kinetic origin, that strongly limits the detector operation in high speed applications, such as telecommunication. Moreover the extreme aspect ratio of the detector (a nanowire a fraction of mm long and 100 nm wide) puts strong requirements on the nanofabrication processes, with negative effects on the production yield. Our novel proposed geometry is based on a parallel stripes configuration designed in such a way that the light induced switching of a single stripe generates the switching of all the other through a cascade mechanism. The net result is an SSPD device that has a much lower intrinsic inductance, and consequently a much wider bandwidth (up to 10 GHz range). Moreover the signal amplitude generated is much larger than that of traditional SSPD, due to the contribution of all the parallel stripe. We present here the design and results of numerical simulation of the response of this novel type of SSPD. In particular we discuss of the design solutions that allow the cascade operation of the detector, by realizing a very fast and synchronous switching of all the parallel lines. Key issues, such as the optimal number of parallel lines, with respect to fabrication and operation constraints of the detectors are also discussed

  17. Applied techniques for high bandwidth data transfers across wide area networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jason; Gunter, Dan; Tierney, Brian; Allcock, Bill; Bester, Joe; Bresnahan, John; Tuecke, Steve

    2001-01-01

    Large distributed systems such as Computational/Data Grids require large amounts of data to be co-located with the computing facilities for processing. Ensuring that the data is there in time for the computation in today's Internet is a massive problem. From our work developing a scalable distributed network cache, we have gained experience with techniques necessary to achieve high data throughput over high bandwidth Wide Area Networks (WAN). In this paper, we discuss several hardware and software design techniques and issues, and then describe their application to an implementation of an enhanced FTP protocol called GridFTP. We also describe results from two applications using these techniques, which were obtained at the Supercomputing 2000 conference

  18. On Bandwidth Efficient Modulation for High-Data-Rate Wireless LAN Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stolpman Victor

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We address the problem of high-data-rate orthogonal frequency division multiplexed (OFDM systems under restrictive bandwidth constraints. Based on recent theoretic results, multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO configurations are best suited for this problem. In this paper, we examine several MIMO configurations suitable for high rate transmission. In all scenarios considered, perfect channel state information (CSI is assumed at the receiver. In constrast, availability of CSI at the transmitter is addressed separately. We show that powerful space-time codes can be developed by combining some simple well-known techniques. In fact, we show that for certain configurations, these space-time MIMO configurations are near optimum in terms of outage capacity as compared to previously published codes. Performance evaluation of these techniques is demonstrated within the IEEE 802.11a framework via Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. High-Q Variable Bandwidth Passive Filters for Software Defined Radio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arkesteijn, V.J.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    2001-01-01

    An important aspect of Software Defined Radio is the ability to define the bandwidth of the filter that selects the desired channel. This paper describes a technique for channel filtering, in which two passive filters are combined to obtain a variable bandwidth. Passive filters have the advantage of

  20. High-Q variable bandwidth passive filters for Software Defined Radio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arkesteijn, V.J.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    An important aspect of Software Defined Radio is the ability to define the bandwidth of the filter that selects the desired channel. This paper describes a technique for channel filtering, in which two passive filters are combined to obtain a variable bandwidth. Passive filters have the advantage of

  1. Propagation of 1-THz bandwidth electrical pulses on high Tc superconducting transmission lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuss, M.C.; Mankiewich, P.M.; Howard, R.E.; Harvey, T.E.; Brandle, C.D.; Straugh, B.L.; Smith, P.R.

    1989-01-01

    The new high temperature superconductors have triggered enormous interest not only because of the unique physics involved but also because of their technical potentials, such as the promise for propagation of extremely short electrical pulses. Superconducting band caps of --20TH z are predicted assuming BCS theory for the superconductor, making lossless propagation of electrical pulses as short as 50 fs possible. Despite microwave measurements at low frequencies of several gigahertz first studies at higher frequencies by Dykaar et al have shown distortion-free propagation of 100-GHz electrical pulses on YBa 2 Cu 3 O 3 (YBCO) lines for --5-mm propagation distance. Results were also reported for aluminum coplanar lines and a YBCO ground plane. The authors report on the propagation of 1-ps electrical pulses (1-THz bandwidth) on YBCO coplanar transmission lines defined on lanthanum gallate (LaGaO 3 ) as a substrate. On LaGaO 3 , YBCO grows highly oriented as on SrTiO 3 . However, unlike SrTiO 3 , LaGaO 3 has a much lower dielectric constant and small losses in the terahertz frequency range. Electrical pulses of --750-fs duration are generated in a radiation-damaged silicon-on-sapphire photoconductive switch integrated into a 20-μm coplanar stripline with 10-μm spacing and excited with 100-fs optical pulses from a CPM laser. An μ1-THz bandwidth electrical contact is made to the YBCO coplanar stripline defined on LaGaO 3 using a flip-chip geometry. They find that electrical pulses broaden only from 750 fs to 1 ps with little loss in amplitude on traveling through their flip-chip input and propagated electrical pulses are probed by electooptic sampling in two small LiTaO 3 crystals separated by 3 mm

  2. High performance visual display for HENP detectors

    CERN Document Server

    McGuigan, M; Spiletic, J; Fine, V; Nevski, P

    2001-01-01

    A high end visual display for High Energy Nuclear Physics (HENP) detectors is necessary because of the sheer size and complexity of the detector. For BNL this display will be of special interest because of STAR and ATLAS. To load, rotate, query, and debug simulation code with a modern detector simply takes too long even on a powerful work station. To visualize the HENP detectors with maximal performance we have developed software with the following characteristics. We develop a visual display of HENP detectors on BNL multiprocessor visualization server at multiple level of detail. We work with general and generic detector framework consistent with ROOT, GAUDI etc, to avoid conflicting with the many graphic development groups associated with specific detectors like STAR and ATLAS. We develop advanced OpenGL features such as transparency and polarized stereoscopy. We enable collaborative viewing of detector and events by directly running the analysis in BNL stereoscopic theatre. We construct enhanced interactiv...

  3. High performance visual display for HENP detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGuigan, Michael; Smith, Gordon; Spiletic, John; Fine, Valeri; Nevski, Pavel

    2001-01-01

    A high end visual display for High Energy Nuclear Physics (HENP) detectors is necessary because of the sheer size and complexity of the detector. For BNL this display will be of special interest because of STAR and ATLAS. To load, rotate, query, and debug simulation code with a modern detector simply takes too long even on a powerful work station. To visualize the HENP detectors with maximal performance we have developed software with the following characteristics. We develop a visual display of HENP detectors on BNL multiprocessor visualization server at multiple level of detail. We work with general and generic detector framework consistent with ROOT, GAUDI etc, to avoid conflicting with the many graphic development groups associated with specific detectors like STAR and ATLAS. We develop advanced OpenGL features such as transparency and polarized stereoscopy. We enable collaborative viewing of detector and events by directly running the analysis in BNL stereoscopic theatre. We construct enhanced interactive control, including the ability to slice, search and mark areas of the detector. We incorporate the ability to make a high quality still image of a view of the detector and the ability to generate animations and a fly through of the detector and output these to MPEG or VRML models. We develop data compression hardware and software so that remote interactive visualization will be possible among dispersed collaborators. We obtain real time visual display for events accumulated during simulations

  4. A 750MHz and a 8GHz High Bandwidth Digital FFT Spectrometer, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The scope of this project is to to develop a wide bandwidth, low power, and compact single board digital Fast Fourier Transform spectrometer (FFTS) optimized for the...

  5. Research of high energy radioactivity identification detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Kyun; Lee, Yong Bum; Hwang, Jong Sun; Choi, Seok Ki

    1998-07-01

    {Delta} {Epsilon}-{Epsilon} telescope high radioactivity detector was designed, fabricated, and tested at the 35 MeV proton energy. We developed the computer code to calculate the energy loss of projectile ions in the matter. Using the code, we designed and fabricated a detector to measure 15-50 MeV protons. The detector was successfully tested to measure the energy of protons and deuterons and to identify the ions. In future, we would like to extend the present result to the development of a higher energy proton detector and a heavy ion detector. (author). 10 refs., 3 tabs., 14 figs

  6. Photomask specifications for high energy physics detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pindo, M

    2002-01-01

    Planar technologies used for radiation detector fabrication imply an extensive use of photomasks whose characteristics are critical in determining final detector performance. Compatibly with their manufacturing process, photomasks must satisfy the application-specific requirements dictated both by wafer manufacturers and detector final users. The design and realization of microstrip and pixel detectors, widely used in high energy physics experiments, ask for intensive scientific effort, advanced technology and important economical investments. Photomask specification definition is one of the fundamental steps to optimize detector fabrication processes and fulfill experimental requirements at the most appropriate cost.

  7. Detector Developments for the High Luminosity LHC Era (2/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    Calorimetry and Muon Spectromers - Part II: When upgrading the LHC to higher luminosities, the detector and trigger performance shall be preserved - if not improved - with respect to the nominal performance. The ongoing R&D for new radiation tolerant front-end electronics for calorimeters with higher read-out bandwidth are summarized and new possibilities for the trigger systems are presented. Similar developments are foreseen for the muon spectrometers, where also radiation tolerance of the muon detectors and functioning at high background rates is important. The corresponding plans and research work for the calorimeter and muon detectors at a LHC with highest luminsity are presented.

  8. Large bandwidth RGC transimpedance preamplifier design in SCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ke; Wang Zheng; Liu Zhen'an; Wei Wei; Lu Weiguo; Gary Varner

    2009-01-01

    A Large Bandwidth RGC Transimpedance Preamplifier is designed for amplifying the high-fidelity timing signal in Switch Capacitance Array chip application. This amplifier have characteristics of low input impedance, large bandwidth, high transimpedance. It will be made under TSMC 0.25μm CMOS technology, and the supply voltage is single 2.5 V. Simulation results indicate: the transimpedance is 5000 ohm, -3dB BW is 953 MHz, and the detector output capacitance have litter effect on the bandwidth in some range. (authors)

  9. Effects of bandwidth, compression speed, and gain at high frequencies on preferences for amplified music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Brian C J

    2012-09-01

    This article reviews a series of studies on the factors influencing sound quality preferences, mostly for jazz and classical music stimuli. The data were obtained using ratings of individual stimuli or using the method of paired comparisons. For normal-hearing participants, the highest ratings of sound quality were obtained when the reproduction bandwidth was wide (55 to 16000 Hz) and ripples in the frequency response were small (less than ± 5 dB). For hearing-impaired participants listening via a simulated five-channel compression hearing aid with gains set using the CAM2 fitting method, preferences for upper cutoff frequency varied across participants: Some preferred a 7.5- or 10-kHz upper cutoff frequency over a 5-kHz cutoff frequency, and some showed the opposite preference. Preferences for a higher upper cutoff frequency were associated with a shallow high-frequency slope of the audiogram. A subsequent study comparing the CAM2 and NAL-NL2 fitting methods, with gains slightly reduced for participants who were not experienced hearing aid users, showed a consistent preference for CAM2. Since the two methods differ mainly in the gain applied for frequencies above 4 kHz (CAM2 recommending higher gain than NAL-NL2), these results suggest that extending the upper cutoff frequency is beneficial. A system for reducing "overshoot" effects produced by compression gave small but significant benefits for sound quality of a percussion instrument (xylophone). For a high-input level (80 dB SPL), slow compression was preferred over fast compression.

  10. A high performance long-reach passive optical network with a novel excess bandwidth distribution scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, I.-Fen; Zhang, Tsung-Min

    2015-06-01

    Long-reach passive optical networks (LR-PONs) have been considered to be promising solutions for future access networks. In this paper, we propose a distributed medium access control (MAC) scheme over an advantageous LR-PON network architecture that reroutes the control information from and back to all ONUs through an (N + 1) × (N + 1) star coupler (SC) deployed near the ONUs, thereby overwhelming the extremely long propagation delay problem in LR-PONs. In the network, the control slot is designed to contain all bandwidth requirements of all ONUs and is in-band time-division-multiplexed with a number of data slots within a cycle. In the proposed MAC scheme, a novel profit-weight-based dynamic bandwidth allocation (P-DBA) scheme is presented. The algorithm is designed to efficiently and fairly distribute the amount of excess bandwidth based on a profit value derived from the excess bandwidth usage of each ONU, which resolves the problems of previously reported DBA schemes that are either unfair or inefficient. The simulation results show that the proposed decentralized algorithms exhibit a nearly three-order-of-magnitude improvement in delay performance compared to the centralized algorithms over LR-PONs. Moreover, the newly proposed P-DBA scheme guarantees low delay performance and fairness even when under attack by the malevolent ONU irrespective of traffic loads and burstiness.

  11. Performance Evaluation of a High Bandwidth Liquid Fuel Modulation Valve for Active Combustion Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saus, Joseph R.; DeLaat, John C.; Chang, Clarence T.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2012-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center, a characterization rig was designed and constructed for the purpose of evaluating high bandwidth liquid fuel modulation devices to determine their suitability for active combustion control research. Incorporated into the rig s design are features that approximate conditions similar to those that would be encountered by a candidate device if it were installed on an actual combustion research rig. The characterized dynamic performance measures obtained through testing in the rig are planned to be accurate indicators of expected performance in an actual combustion testing environment. To evaluate how well the characterization rig predicts fuel modulator dynamic performance, characterization rig data was compared with performance data for a fuel modulator candidate when the candidate was in operation during combustion testing. Specifically, the nominal and off-nominal performance data for a magnetostrictive-actuated proportional fuel modulation valve is described. Valve performance data were collected with the characterization rig configured to emulate two different combustion rig fuel feed systems. Fuel mass flows and pressures, fuel feed line lengths, and fuel injector orifice size was approximated in the characterization rig. Valve performance data were also collected with the valve modulating the fuel into the two combustor rigs. Comparison of the predicted and actual valve performance data show that when the valve is operated near its design condition the characterization rig can appropriately predict the installed performance of the valve. Improvements to the characterization rig and accompanying modeling activities are underway to more accurately predict performance, especially for the devices under development to modulate fuel into the much smaller fuel injectors anticipated in future lean-burning low-emissions aircraft engine combustors.

  12. Large-area, low-noise, high-speed, photodiode-based fluorescence detectors with fast overdrive recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickman, S.; DeMille, D.

    2005-01-01

    Two large-area, low-noise, high-speed fluorescence detectors have been built. One detector consists of a photodiode with an area of 28 mmx28 mm and a low-noise transimpedance amplifier. This detector has a input light-equivalent spectral noise density of less than 3 pW/√(Hz), can recover from a large scattered light pulse within 10 μs, and has a bandwidth of at least 900 kHz. The second detector consists of a 16-mm-diam avalanche photodiode and a low-noise transimpedance amplifier. This detector has an input light-equivalent spectral noise density of 0.08 pW/√(Hz), also can recover from a large scattered light pulse within 10 μs, and has a bandwidth of 1 MHz

  13. A High Gain-Bandwidth Product Distributed Transimpedance Amplifier IC for High-Speed Optical Transmission Using Low-Cost GaAs Technology.

    OpenAIRE

    Giannini, F.; Limiti, E.; Orengo, G.; Serino, A.; De Dominicis, M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports a distributed baseband transimpedance amplifier for optical links up to 10 Gb/s. The amplifier operates as a baseband amplifier with a transimpedance gain of 48 dB Ω and a DC-to-9 GHz bandwidth. Some innovative design techniques to improve gain-bandwidth performance at low and high frequency with an available low-cost GaAs MESFET technology have been developed.

  14. A High-Linearity Low-Noise Amplifier with Variable Bandwidth for Neural Recoding Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Takeshi; Sueishi, Katsuya; Iwata, Atsushi; Matsushita, Kojiro; Hirata, Masayuki; Suzuki, Takafumi

    2011-04-01

    This paper describes a low-noise amplifier with multiple adjustable parameters for neural recording applications. An adjustable pseudo-resistor implemented by cascade metal-oxide-silicon field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) is proposed to achieve low-signal distortion and wide variable bandwidth range. The amplifier has been implemented in 0.18 µm standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process and occupies 0.09 mm2 on chip. The amplifier achieved a selectable voltage gain of 28 and 40 dB, variable bandwidth from 0.04 to 2.6 Hz, total harmonic distortion (THD) of 0.2% with 200 mV output swing, input referred noise of 2.5 µVrms over 0.1-100 Hz and 18.7 µW power consumption at a supply voltage of 1.8 V.

  15. CALDER: High-sensitivity cryogenic light detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casali, N.; Bellini, F.; Cardani, L.

    2017-01-01

    The current bolometric experiments searching for rare processes such as neutrinoless double-beta decay or dark matter interaction demand for cryogenic light detectors with high sensitivity, large active area and excellent scalability and radio-purity in order to reduce their background budget. The CALDER project aims to develop such kind of light detectors implementing phonon-mediated Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs). The goal for this project is the realization of a 5 × 5 cm"2 light detector working between 10 and 100mK with a baseline resolution RMS below 20 eV. In this work the characteristics and the performances of the prototype detectors developed in the first project phase will be shown.

  16. Theoretical investigation of injection-locked high modulation bandwidth quantum cascade lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Bo; Wang, Qi Jie

    2012-01-16

    In this study, we report for the first time to our knowledge theoretical investigation of modulation responses of injection-locked mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) at wavelengths of 4.6 μm and 9 μm, respectively. It is shown through a three-level rate equations model that the direct intensity modulation of QCLs gives the maximum modulation bandwidths of ~7 GHz at 4.6 μm and ~20 GHz at 9 μm. By applying the injection locking scheme, we find that the modulation bandwidths of up to ~30 GHz and ~70 GHz can be achieved for QCLs at 4.6 μm and 9 μm, respectively, with an injection ratio of 5 dB. The result also shows that an ultrawide modulation bandwidth of more than 200 GHz is possible with a 10 dB injection ratio for QCLs at 9 μm. An important characteristic of injection-locked QCLs is the nonexistence of unstable locking region in the locking map, in contrast to their diode laser counterparts. We attribute this to the ultra-short upper laser state lifetimes of QCLs.

  17. The effect of extending high-frequency bandwidth on the acceptable noise level (ANL) of hearing-impaired listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Earl; Ricketts, Todd; Hornsby, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of extending high-frequency bandwidth, for both a speech signal and a background noise, on the acceptable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of listeners with mild sensorineural hearing loss through utilization of the Acceptable Noise Level (ANL) procedure. In addition to extending high-frequency bandwidth, the effects of reverberation time and background noise type and shape were also examined. The study results showed a significant increase in the mean ANL (i.e. participants requested a better SNR for an acceptable listening situation) when high-frequency bandwidth was extended from 3 to 9 kHz and from 6 to 9 kHz. No change in the ANL of study participants was observed as a result of isolated modification to reverberation time or background noise stimulus. An interaction effect, however, of reverberation time and background noise stimulus was demonstrated. These findings may have implications for future design of hearing aid memory programs for listening to speech in the presence of broadband background noise.

  18. Single photon detector with high polarization sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qi; Li, Hao; You, LiXing; Zhang, WeiJun; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Zhen; Xie, XiaoMing; Qi, Ming

    2015-04-15

    Polarization is one of the key parameters of light. Most optical detectors are intensity detectors that are insensitive to the polarization of light. A superconducting nanowire single photon detector (SNSPD) is naturally sensitive to polarization due to its nanowire structure. Previous studies focused on producing a polarization-insensitive SNSPD. In this study, by adjusting the width and pitch of the nanowire, we systematically investigate the preparation of an SNSPD with high polarization sensitivity. Subsequently, an SNSPD with a system detection efficiency of 12% and a polarization extinction ratio of 22 was successfully prepared.

  19. High-Resolution PET Detector. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karp, Joel

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this project was to develop an understanding of the limits of performance for a high resolution PET detector using an approach based on continuous scintillation crystals rather than pixelated crystals. The overall goal was to design a high-resolution detector, which requires both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity for 511 keV gammas. Continuous scintillation detectors (Anger cameras) have been used extensively for both single-photon and PET scanners, however, these instruments were based on NaI(Tl) scintillators using relatively large, individual photo-multipliers. In this project we investigated the potential of this type of detector technology to achieve higher spatial resolution through the use of improved scintillator materials and photo-sensors, and modification of the detector surface to optimize the light response function.We achieved an average spatial resolution of 3-mm for a 25-mm thick, LYSO continuous detector using a maximum likelihood position algorithm and shallow slots cut into the entrance surface

  20. High tracking resolution detectors. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasile, Stefan; Li, Zheng

    2010-01-01

    High-resolution tracking detectors based on Active Pixel Sensor (APS) have been valuable tools in Nuclear Physics and High-Energy Physics research, and have contributed to major discoveries. Their integration time, radiation length and readout rate is a limiting factor for the planed luminosity upgrades in nuclear and high-energy physics collider-based experiments. The goal of this program was to demonstrate and develop high-gain, high-resolution tracking detector arrays with faster readout, and shorter radiation length than APS arrays. These arrays may operate as direct charged particle detectors or as readouts of high resolution scintillating fiber arrays. During this program, we developed in CMOS large, high-resolution pixel sensor arrays with integrated readout, and reset at pixel level. Their intrinsic gain, high immunity to surface and moisture damage, will allow operating these detectors with minimal packaging/passivation requirements and will result in radiation length superior to APS. In Phase I, we designed and fabricated arrays with calorimetric output capable of sub-pixel resolution and sub-microsecond readout rate. The technical effort was dedicated to detector and readout structure development, performance verification, as well as to radiation damage and damage annealing.

  1. Development of high sensitivity radon detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Takeuchi, Y; Kajita, T; Tasaka, S; Hori, H; Nemoto, M; Okazawa, H

    1999-01-01

    High sensitivity detectors for radon in air and in water have been developed. We use electrostatic collection and a PIN photodiode for these detectors. Calibration systems have been also constructed to obtain collection factors. As a result of the calibration study, the absolute humidity dependence of the radon detector for air is clearly observed in the region less than about 1.6 g/m sup 3. The calibration factors of the radon detector for air are 2.2+-0.2 (counts/day)/(mBq/m sup 3) at 0.08 g/m sup 3 and 0.86+-0.06 (counts/day)/(mBq/m sup 3) at 11 g/m sup 3. The calibration factor of the radon detector for water is 3.6+-0.5 (counts/day)/(mBq/m sup 3). The background level of the radon detector for air is 2.4+-1.3 counts/day. As a result, one standard deviation excess of the signal above the background of the radon detector for air should be possible for 1.4 mBq/m sup 3 in a one-day measurement at 0.08 g/m sup 3.

  2. A monolithically integrated detector-preamplifier on high-resistivity silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, S.; Spieler, H.

    1990-02-01

    A monolithically integrated detector-preamplifier on high-resistivity silicon has been designed, fabricated and characterized. The detector is a fully depleted p-i-n diode and the preamplifier is implemented in a depletion-mode PMOS process which is compatible with detector processing. The amplifier is internally compensated and the measured gain-bandwidth product is 30 MHz with an input-referred noise of 15 nV/√Hz in the white noise regime. Measurements with an Am 241 radiation source yield an equivalent input noise charge of 800 electrons at 200 ns shaping time for a 1.4 mm 2 detector with on-chip amplifier in an experimental setup with substantial external pickup

  3. Semiconductor high-energy radiation scintillation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastalsky, A.; Luryi, S.; Spivak, B.

    2006-01-01

    We propose a new scintillation-type detector in which high-energy radiation generates electron-hole pairs in a direct-gap semiconductor material that subsequently recombine producing infrared light to be registered by a photo-detector. The key issue is how to make the semiconductor essentially transparent to its own infrared light, so that photons generated deep inside the semiconductor could reach its surface without tangible attenuation. We discuss two ways to accomplish this, one based on doping the semiconductor with shallow impurities of one polarity type, preferably donors, the other by heterostructure bandgap engineering. The proposed semiconductor scintillator combines the best properties of currently existing radiation detectors and can be used for both simple radiation monitoring, like a Geiger counter, and for high-resolution spectrography of the high-energy radiation. An important advantage of the proposed detector is its fast response time, about 1 ns, essentially limited only by the recombination time of minority carriers. Notably, the fast response comes without any degradation in brightness. When the scintillator is implemented in a qualified semiconductor material (such as InP or GaAs), the photo-detector and associated circuits can be epitaxially integrated on the scintillator slab and the structure can be stacked-up to achieve virtually any desired absorption capability

  4. Hydrogen high pressure proportional drift detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arefiev, A.; Balaev, A.

    1983-01-01

    The design and operation performances of a proportional drift detector PDD are described. High sensitivity of the applied PAD makes it possible to detect the neutron-proton elastic scattering in the energy range of recoil protons as low as 1 keV. The PDD is filled with hydrogen up to the pressure at 40 bars. High purity of the gas is maintained by a continuously operating purification system. The detector has been operating for several years in a neutron beam at the North Area of the CERN SPS

  5. Development of a readout technique for the high data rate BTeV pixel detector at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, Bradley K.

    2001-01-01

    The pixel detector for the BTeV experiment at Fermilab provides digitized data from approximately 22 million silicon pixel channels. Portions of the detector are six millimeters from the beam providing a substantial hit rate and high radiation dose. The pixel detector data will be employed by the lowest level trigger system for track reconstruction every beam crossing. These requirements impose a considerable constraint on the readout scheme. This paper presents a readout technique that provides the bandwidth that is adequate for high hit rates, minimizes the number of radiation hard components, and satisfies all other design constraints

  6. A Very High Momentum Particle Identification Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Acconcia, T.V.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G.G.; Bellwied, R.; Bencedi, G.; Bencze, G.; Berenyi, D.; Boldizsar, L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Cindolo, F.; Chinellato, D.D.; D'Ambrosio, S.; Das, D.; Das, K.; Das-Bose, L.; Dash, A.K.; De Cataldo, G.; De Pasquale, S.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Futo, E.; Garcia, E.; Hamar, G.; Harton, A.; Iannone, G.; Jimenez, R.T.; Kim, D.W.; Kim, J.S.; Knospe, A.; Kovacs, L.; Levai, P.; Nappi, E.; Markert, C.; Martinengo, P.; Mayani, D.; Molnar, L.; Olah, L.; Paic, G.; Pastore, C.; Patimo, G.; Patino, M.E.; Peskov, V.; Pinsky, L.; Piuz, F.; Pochybova, S.; Sgura, I.; Sinha, T.; Song, J.; Takahashi, J.; Timmins, A.; Van Beelen, J.B.; Varga, D.; Volpe, G.; Weber, M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Yi, J.; Yoo, I.K.

    2014-01-01

    The construction of a new detector is proposed to extend the capabilities of ALICE in the high transverse momentum (pT) region. This Very High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (VHMPID) performs charged hadron identification on a track-by-track basis in the 5 GeV/c < p < 25 GeV/c momentum range and provides ALICE with new opportunities to study parton-medium interactions at LHC energies. The VHMPID covers up to 30% of the ALICE central barrel and presents sufficient acceptance for triggered- and tagged-jet studies, allowing for the first time identified charged hadron measurements in jets. This Letter of Intent summarizes the physics motivations for such a detector as well as its layout and integration into ALICE.

  7. High-voltage CMOS detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrler, F.; Blanco, R.; Leys, R.; Perić, I.

    2016-01-01

    High-voltage CMOS (HVCMOS) pixel sensors are depleted active pixel sensors implemented in standard commercial CMOS processes. The sensor element is the n-well/p-substrate diode. The sensor electronics are entirely placed inside the n-well which is at the same time used as the charge collection electrode. High voltage is used to deplete the part of the substrate around the n-well. HVCMOS sensors allow implementation of complex in-pixel electronics. This, together with fast signal collection, allows a good time resolution, which is required for particle tracking in high energy physics. HVCMOS sensors will be used in Mu3e experiment at PSI and are considered as an option for both ATLAS and CLIC (CERN). Radiation tolerance and time walk compensation have been tested and results are presented. - Highlights: • High-voltage CMOS sensors will be used in Mu3e experiment at PSI (Switzerland). • HVCMOS sensors are considered as an option for ATLAS (LHC/CERN) and CLIC (CERN). • Efficiency of more than 95% (99%) has been measured with (un-)irradiated chips. • The time resolution measured in the beam tests is nearly 100 ns. • We plan to improve time resolution and efficiency by using high-resistive substrate.

  8. High-voltage CMOS detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrler, F., E-mail: felix.ehrler@student.kit.edu; Blanco, R.; Leys, R.; Perić, I.

    2016-07-11

    High-voltage CMOS (HVCMOS) pixel sensors are depleted active pixel sensors implemented in standard commercial CMOS processes. The sensor element is the n-well/p-substrate diode. The sensor electronics are entirely placed inside the n-well which is at the same time used as the charge collection electrode. High voltage is used to deplete the part of the substrate around the n-well. HVCMOS sensors allow implementation of complex in-pixel electronics. This, together with fast signal collection, allows a good time resolution, which is required for particle tracking in high energy physics. HVCMOS sensors will be used in Mu3e experiment at PSI and are considered as an option for both ATLAS and CLIC (CERN). Radiation tolerance and time walk compensation have been tested and results are presented. - Highlights: • High-voltage CMOS sensors will be used in Mu3e experiment at PSI (Switzerland). • HVCMOS sensors are considered as an option for ATLAS (LHC/CERN) and CLIC (CERN). • Efficiency of more than 95% (99%) has been measured with (un-)irradiated chips. • The time resolution measured in the beam tests is nearly 100 ns. • We plan to improve time resolution and efficiency by using high-resistive substrate.

  9. Glass-embedded two-dimensional silicon photonic crystal devices with a broad bandwidth waveguide and a high quality nanocavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Seung-Woo; Han, Jin-Kyu; Song, Bong-Shik; Noda, Susumu

    2010-08-30

    To enhance the mechanical stability of a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab structure and maintain its excellent performance, we designed a glass-embedded silicon photonic crystal device consisting of a broad bandwidth waveguide and a nanocavity with a high quality (Q) factor, and then fabricated the structure using spin-on glass (SOG). Furthermore, we showed that the refractive index of the SOG could be tuned from 1.37 to 1.57 by varying the curing temperature of the SOG. Finally, we demonstrated a glass-embedded heterostructured cavity with an ultrahigh Q factor of 160,000 by adjusting the refractive index of the SOG.

  10. High precision detector robot arm system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Deming; Chu, Yong

    2017-01-31

    A method and high precision robot arm system are provided, for example, for X-ray nanodiffraction with an X-ray nanoprobe. The robot arm system includes duo-vertical-stages and a kinematic linkage system. A two-dimensional (2D) vertical plane ultra-precision robot arm supporting an X-ray detector provides positioning and manipulating of the X-ray detector. A vertical support for the 2D vertical plane robot arm includes spaced apart rails respectively engaging a first bearing structure and a second bearing structure carried by the 2D vertical plane robot arm.

  11. Electronics for very high rate tracking detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, H.H.; Dressnandt, N.; Ekenberg, T.; Gerds, E.J.; Newcomer, F.M.; Tedja, S.; Van Berg, R.; Van der Speigel, J.

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented on a system of electronics designed for very high rate tracking detectors at the SSC and LHC. The primary goal was a system for signal detection, time measurement, and readout for the straw tracker for SDC. An integrated circuit incorporating eight channels of amplifier-shaper-discriminator (including detector tail cancellation), and two different integrated circuits for time measurement are described. The performance of tracking measurements up to counting rates of 8 MHz per wire is reported, as well as preliminary results from a baseline restoration circuit. (orig.)

  12. Adventures in the evolution of a high-bandwidth network for central servers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swartz, K.L.; Cottrell, L.; Dart, M.

    1994-08-01

    In a small network, clients and servers may all be connected to a single Ethernet without significant performance concerns. As the number of clients on a network grows, the necessity of splitting the network into multiple sub-networks, each with a manageable number of clients, becomes clear. Less obvious is what to do with the servers. Group file servers on subnets and multihomed servers offer only partial solutions -- many other types of servers do not lend themselves to a decentralized model, and tend to collect on another, well-connected but overloaded Ethernet. The higher speed of FDDI seems to offer an easy solution, but in practice both expense and interoperability problems render FDDI a poor choice. Ethernet switches appear to permit cheaper and more reliable networking to the servers while providing an aggregate network bandwidth greater than a simple Ethernet. This paper studies the evolution of the server networks at SLAC. Difficulties encountered in the deployment of FDDI are described, as are the tools and techniques used to characterize the traffic patterns on the server network. Performance of Ethernet, FDDI, and switched Ethernet networks is analyzed, as are reliability and maintainability issues for these alternatives. The motivations for re-designing the SLAC general server network to use a switched Ethernet instead of FDDI are described, as are the reasons for choosing FDDI for the farm and firewall networks at SLAC. Guidelines are developed which may help in making this choice for other networks

  13. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Maoddi, Pietro; Mapelli, Alessandro

    This thesis deals with the development and study of microfluidic scintillation detectors, a technology of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles. Most of the interest for such devices comes from the use of a liquid scintillator, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to increased radiation resistance. A first part of the thesis focuses on the work performed in terms of design and modelling studies of novel prototype devices, hinting to new possibilities and applications. In this framework, the simulations performed to validate selected designs and the main technological choices made in view of their fabrication are addressed. The second part of this thesis deals with the microfabrication of several prototype devices. Two different materials were studied for the manufacturing of microfluidic scintillation detectors, namely the SU-8 photosensitive epoxy and monocrystalline silicon. For what concerns the former, an original fabrication appro...

  14. Technologies for low-bandwidth high-latency unmanned ground vehicle control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Teresa; Cogan, Ken; Hunt, Lee; Restine, Paul

    2014-05-01

    Automation technology has evolved at a rapid pace in recent years; however, many real-world problems require contextual understanding, problem solving, and other forms of higher-order thinking that extends beyond the capabilities of robots for the foreseeable future. This limits the complexity of automation which can be supplied to modern unmanned ground robots (UGV) and necessitates human-in-the-loop monitoring and control for some portions of missions. In order for the human operator to make decisions and provide tasking during key portions of the mission, existing solutions first derive significant information from a potentially dense reconstruction of the scene utilizing LIDAR, video, and other onboard sensors. A dense reconstruction contains too much data for real-time transmission over a modern wireless data link, so the robot electronics must first condense the scene representation prior to transmission. The control station receives this condensed scene representations and provides visual information to the human operator; the human operator then provides tele-operation commands in real-time to the robot. This paper discusses approaches to dense scene reduction of the data required to transmit to a human-in-the loop as well as the challenges associated with them. In addition, the complex and unstructured nature of real-world environments increases the need for tele-operation. Furthermore, many environments reduce the bandwidth and increase the latency of the link. Ultimately, worsening conditions will cause the tele-operation control process to break down, rendering the robot ineffective. In a worst-case scenario, extreme conditions causing a complete loss-of-communications could result in mission failure and loss of the vehicle.

  15. The ATLAS High-Granularity Timing Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Sacerdoti, Sabrina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    In the high luminosity phase of the LHC, scheduled to start in 2026, the instantaneous luminosity will be increased to up to $\\mathcal{L} = 7.5 × 10^{34} cm^{−2}s^{−1}$. As a consequence, the detectors will be faced with challenging conditions, in particular the increase of pile-up: an average of 200 interactions per bunch crossing are expected, corresponding to an average interaction density of 1.8 collisions/mm. The reconstruction performance will be severely degraded in the end-cap and forward region of the ATLAS detector, especially for jets and transverse missing energy. The addition of timing information in forward objects through the High-Granularity Timing Detector will help to recover the performance of these regions to levels similar to the ones expected in the central region of the detector. It will also provide a bunch-by-bunch luminosity measurement. This talk will be focused on the developments surrounding the LGAD sensors and front-end electronics, which are aimed to achieve a low time res...

  16. A Novel Approach to Reduce the Unicast Bandwidth of an IPTV System in a High-Speed Access Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El Hassane Khabbiza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Channel change time is a critical quality of experience (QOE metric for IP-based video delivery systems such as Internet Protocol Television (IPTV. An interesting channel change acceleration scheme based on peer-assisted delivery was recently proposed, which consists of deploying one FCC server (Fast Channel Change Server in the IP backbone in order to send the unicast stream to the STB (Set-Top Box before sending the normal multicast stream after each channel change. However, deploying such a solution will cause high bandwidth usage in the network because of the huge unicast traffic sent by the FCC server to the STBs. In this paper, we propose a new solution to reduce the bandwidth occupancy of the unicast traffic, by deploying the FCC server capabilities on the user STB. This means that, after each channel change request, the STB will receive the unicast traffic from another STB instead of the central server. By using this method, the unicast traffic will not pass through the IP network; it will be a peer-to-peer communication via the Access Network only. Extensive simulation results are presented to demonstrate the robustness of our new solution.

  17. Design of the corona current measurement sensor with wide bandwidth under dc ultra-high-voltage environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yingyi; Yuan, Haiwen; Yang, Qinghua; Cui, Yong

    2011-01-01

    The research in the field of corona discharge, which is one of the key technologies, can help us to realize ultra-high-voltage (UHV) power transmission. This paper proposes a new sampling resistance sensor to measure the dc UHV corona current in a wide band. By designing the structural and distributed parameters of the sensor, the UHV dielectric breakdown performance and the wide-band measuring characteristics of the sensor are satisfied. A high-voltage discharge test shows that the designed sensor can work under a 1200 kV dc environment without the occurrence of corona discharge. A frequency characteristic test shows that the measuring bandwidth of the sensor can be improved from the current 4.5 to 20 MHz. The test results in an actual dc UHV transmission line demonstrate that the sensor can accurately measure the corona current under the dc UHV environment

  18. Hard x-ray monochromator with milli-electron volt bandwidth for high-resolution diffraction studies of diamond crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoupin, Stanislav; Shvyd' ko, Yuri; Shu Deming; Khachatryan, Ruben; Xiao, Xianghui; DeCarlo, Francesco; Goetze, Kurt; Roberts, Timothy; Roehrig, Christian; Deriy, Alexey [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    We report on design and performance of a high-resolution x-ray monochromator with a spectral bandwidth of {Delta}E{sub X}{approx_equal} 1.5 meV, which operates at x-ray energies in the vicinity of the backscattering (Bragg) energy E{sub H} = 13.903 keV of the (008) reflection in diamond. The monochromator is utilized for high-energy-resolution diffraction characterization of diamond crystals as elements of advanced x-ray crystal optics for synchrotrons and x-ray free-electron lasers. The monochromator and the related controls are made portable such that they can be installed and operated at any appropriate synchrotron beamline equipped with a pre-monochromator.

  19. Diamond detectors for high energy physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäni, L.; Alexopoulos, A.; Artuso, M.; Bachmair, F.; Bartosik, M.; Beacham, J.; Beck, H.; Bellini, V.; Belyaev, V.; Bentele, B.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bes, A.; Brom, J.-M.; Bruzzi, M.; Cerv, M.; Chiodini, G.; Chren, D.; Cindro, V.; Claus, G.; Collot, J.; Cumalat, J.; Dabrowski, A.; D'Alessandro, R.; Dauvergne, D.; de Boer, W.; Dorfer, C.; Dünser, M.; Eremin, V.; Eusebi, R.; Forcolin, G.; Forneris, J.; Frais-Kölbl, H.; Gallin-Martel, L.; Gallin-Martel, M. L.; Gan, K. K.; Gastal, M.; Giroletti, C.; Goffe, M.; Goldstein, J.; Golubev, A.; Gorišek, A.; Grigoriev, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grummer, A.; Gui, B.; Guthoff, M.; Haughton, I.; Hiti, B.; Hits, D.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Hofmann, T.; Hosslet, J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hügging, F.; Hutton, C.; Jansen, H.; Janssen, J.; Kagan, H.; Kanxheri, K.; Kasieczka, G.; Kass, R.; Kassel, F.; Kis, M.; Konovalov, V.; Kramberger, G.; Kuleshov, S.; Lacoste, A.; Lagomarsino, S.; Lo Giudice, A.; Lukosi, E.; Maazouzi, C.; Mandic, I.; Mathieu, C.; Menichelli, M.; Mikuž, M.; Morozzi, A.; Moss, J.; Mountain, R.; Murphy, S.; Muškinja, M.; Oh, A.; Oliviero, P.; Passeri, D.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Picollo, F.; Pomorski, M.; Potenza, R.; Quadt, A.; Re, A.; Reichmann, M.; Riley, G.; Roe, S.; Sanz, D.; Scaringella, M.; Schaefer, D.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Scorzoni, A.; Seidel, S.; Servoli, L.; Smith, S.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Spagnolo, S.; Spanier, S.; Stenson, K.; Stone, R.; Sutera, C.; Tannenwald, B.; Taylor, A.; Traeger, M.; Tromson, D.; Trischuk, W.; Tuve, C.; Uplegger, L.; Velthuis, J.; Venturi, N.; Vittone, E.; Wagner, S.; Wallny, R.; Wang, J. C.; Weingarten, J.; Weiss, C.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Yamouni, M.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2018-01-01

    Beam test results of the radiation tolerance study of chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond against different particle species and energies is presented. We also present beam test results on the independence of signal size on incident particle rate in charged particle detectors based on un-irradiated and irradiated poly-crystalline CVD diamond over a range of particle fluxes from 2 kHz/cm2 to 10 MHz/cm2. The pulse height of the sensors was measured with readout electronics with a peaking time of 6 ns. In addition functionality of poly-crystalline CVD diamond 3D devices was demonstrated in beam tests and 3D diamond detectors are shown to be a promising technology for applications in future high luminosity experiments.

  20. Scanning fluorescence detector for high-throughput DNA genotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusch, Terry L.; Petsinger, Jeremy; Christensen, Carl; Vaske, David A.; Brumley, Robert L., Jr.; Luckey, John A.; Weber, James L.

    1996-04-01

    A new scanning fluorescence detector (SCAFUD) was developed for high-throughput genotyping of short tandem repeat polymorphisms (STRPs). Fluorescent dyes are incorporated into relatively short DNA fragments via polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and are separated by electrophoresis in short, wide polyacrylamide gels (144 lanes with well to read distances of 14 cm). Excitation light from an argon laser with primary lines at 488 and 514 nm is introduced into the gel through a fiber optic cable, dichroic mirror, and 40X microscope objective. Emitted fluorescent light is collected confocally through a second fiber. The confocal head is translated across the bottom of the gel at 0.5 Hz. The detection unit utilizes dichroic mirrors and band pass filters to direct light with 10 - 20 nm bandwidths to four photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). PMT signals are independently amplified with variable gain and then sampled at a rate of 2500 points per scan using a computer based A/D board. LabView software (National Instruments) is used for instrument operation. Currently, three fluorescent dyes (Fam, Hex and Rox) are simultaneously detected with peak detection wavelengths of 543, 567, and 613 nm, respectively. The detection limit for fluorescein-labeled primers is about 100 attomoles. Planned SCAFUD upgrades include rearrangement of laser head geometry, use of additional excitation lasers for simultaneous detection of more dyes, and the use of detector arrays instead of individual PMTs. Extensive software has been written for automatic analysis of SCAFUD images. The software enables background subtraction, band identification, multiple- dye signal resolution, lane finding, band sizing and allele calling. Whole genome screens are currently underway to search for loci influencing such complex diseases as diabetes, asthma, and hypertension. Seven production SCAFUDs are currently in operation. Genotyping output for the coming year is projected to be about one million total genotypes (DNA

  1. Effect of Feed Substrate Thickness on the Bandwidth and Radiation Characteristics of an Aperture-Coupled Microstrip Antenna with a High Permittivity Feed Substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hyun Kim

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The impedance bandwidth and radiation characteristics of an aperture-coupled microstrip line-fed patch antenna (ACMPA with a high permittivity (ɛr = 10 feed substrate suitable for integration with a monolithic microwave integrated circuit (MMIC are investigated for various feed substrate thicknesses through an experiment and computer simulation. The impedance bandwidth of an ACMPA with a high permittivity feed substrate increases as the feed substrate thickness decreases. Furthermore, the front-to-back ratio of an ACMPA with a high permittivity feed substrate increases and the cross-polarization level decreases as the feed substrate thickness decreases. As the impedance bandwidth of an ACMPA with a high permittivity feed substrate increases and its radiation characteristics improve as the feed substrate thickness decreases, the ACMPA configuration becomes suitable for integration with an MMIC.

  2. Summary of activity. Topic I: detectors and experiments. [High-energy detectors for use at ISABELLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, J; Ozaki, S

    1978-01-01

    Results of a workshop studying detectors for Isabelle experimental halls are described. The detectors must be very reliable. Spatial resolution of the tracking detectors must be high to provide accurate measurements of angle and momentum, retain a short resolving time, and show excellent multiparticle handling capability. Included in the study were hodoscopes, drift chambers, proportional chambers, time projection chambers, Cherenkov counters, electromagnetic shower detectors, and hadron calorimeters. Data handling methods were also included in the studies. (FS)

  3. High Bandwidth Zero Voltage Injection Method for Sensorless Control of PMSM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ge, Xie; Lu, Kaiyuan; Kumar, Dwivedi Sanjeet

    2014-01-01

    High frequency signal injection is widely used in PMSM sensorless control system for low speed operations. The conventional voltage injection method often needs filters to obtain particular harmonic component in order to estimate the rotor position; or it requires several voltage pulses to be inj......High frequency signal injection is widely used in PMSM sensorless control system for low speed operations. The conventional voltage injection method often needs filters to obtain particular harmonic component in order to estimate the rotor position; or it requires several voltage pulses...... in a fast current regulation performance. Injection of zero voltage also minimizes the inverter voltage error effects caused by the dead-time....

  4. High-speed readout of high-Z pixel detectors with the LAMBDA detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennicard, D.; Smoljanin, S.; Sheviakov, I.; Xia, Q.; Rothkirch, A.; Yu, Y.; Struth, B.; Hirsemann, H.; Graafsma, H.

    2014-01-01

    High-frame-rate X-ray pixel detectors make it possible to perform time-resolved experiments at synchrotron beamlines, and to make better use of these sources by shortening experiment times. LAMBDA is a photon-counting hybrid pixel detector based on the Medipix3 chip, designed to combine a small pixel size of 55 μm, a large tileable module design, high speed, and compatibility with ''high-Z'' sensors for hard X-ray detection. This technical paper focuses on LAMBDA's high-speed-readout functionality, which allows a frame rate of 2000 frames per second with no deadtime between successive images. This takes advantage of the Medipix3 chip's ''continuous read-write'' function and highly parallelised readout. The readout electronics serialise this data and send it back to a server PC over two 10 Gigabit Ethernet links. The server PC controls the detector and receives, processes and stores the data using software designed for the Tango control system. As a demonstration of high-speed readout of a high-Z sensor, a GaAs LAMBDA detector was used to make a high-speed X-ray video of a computer fan

  5. A detector for high-energy neutrino interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holder, M.; Knobloch, J.; Lacourt, A.; Laverriere, G.; May, J.; Paar, H.; Palazzi, P.; Ranjard, F.; Schilly, P.; Schlatter, D.; Steinberger, J.; Suter, H.; Wahl, H.; Williams, E.G.H.; Eisele, F.; Geweniger, G.; Kleinknecht, K.; Pollmann, O.; Spahn, G.; Willutzki, H.J.; Navarria, F.L.

    1978-01-01

    The authors describe the design, construction and performance of a large mass detector used at CERN to study high-energy neutrino interactions in iron. This detector combines magnetic spectrometry and hadron calorimetry techniques. (Auth.)

  6. Research of high speed data readout and pre-processing system based on xTCA for silicon pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jingzhou; Lin Haichuan; Guo Fang; Liu Zhen'an; Xu Hao; Gong Wenxuan; Liu Zhao

    2012-01-01

    As the development of the detector, Silicon pixel detectors have been widely used in high energy physics experiments. It needs data processing system with high speed, high bandwidth and high availability to read data from silicon pixel detectors which generate more large data. The same question occurs on Belle II Pixel Detector which is a new style silicon pixel detector used in SuperKEKB accelerator with high luminance. The paper describes the research of High speed data readout and pre-processing system based on xTCA for silicon pixel detector. The system consists of High Performance Computer Node (HPCN) based on xTCA and ATCA frame. The HPCN consists of 4XFPs based on AMC, 1 AMC Carrier ATCA Board (ACAB) and 1 Rear Transmission Module. It characterized by 5 high performance FPGAs, 16 fiber links based on RocketIO, 5 Gbit Ethernet ports and DDR2 with capacity up to 18GB. In a ATCA frame, 14 HPCNs make up a system using the high speed backplane to achieve the function of data pre-processing and trigger. This system will be used on the trigger and data acquisition system of Belle II Pixel detector. (authors)

  7. Pushing the Envelope: Ship to Shore Events and High-Bandwidth Telepresence Engages Scientists and the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, S. K.; Coleman, D. F.; Fisher, A. T.; Livelybrooks, D.; Mulder, G.

    2013-12-01

    Since 2009, the drillship JOIDES Resolution has engaged in an extensive program of live ship-to-shore events during its two-month scientific expeditions using a range of software applications and formats. The University of Rhode Island's Inner Space Center has utilized a high bandwidth 'telepresence' from ships such as the Ocean Exploration Trust's E/V Nautilus and the NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, to bring live feeds from underwater exploration vehicles directly into museums, aquaria, science centers, boys and girls clubs, and K-16 classrooms. Both of these strategies have employed close partnerships between scientists and educators to bring cutting edge research and the excitement of exploration and discovery directly to the public in close to real time, but telepresence provides unique opportunities. Participants have been able to experience, live, launches of remotely operated vehicle systems including Jason/Medea on R/V Atlantis and Hercules/Argus on Nautilus, see scientific samples come up on deck for the very first time, observe previously-undiscovered shipwrecks at the same time as those on ship, and watch amazing deep sea creatures swim past deep water cameras. There are many benefits from high-bandwidth telepresence, including improved quality of images, video, and sound; the ability to move large data sets and files between ship and shore, allowing collaboration among individuals who are not on the ship; the ability to stage spontaneous "web events" among scientific, educational, and technical personnel at essentially any time; and more intensive interactions through use of social media, such as blogging, posting of multimedia products, and frequent question/answer sessions. These telepresence-enhanced activities assist the public in understanding the significance and excitement of these discoveries, the challenges of working in the deep sea, and the true nature of scientific processes. These interactions have significant impacts on their audiences, and

  8. Development of high efficiency neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickrell, M.M.; Menlove, H.O.

    1993-01-01

    The authors have designed a novel neutron detector system using conventional 3 He detector tubes and composites of polyethylene and graphite. At this time the design consists entirely of MCNP simulations of different detector configurations and materials. These detectors are applicable to low-level passive and active neutron assay systems such as the passive add-a-source and the 252 Cf shuffler. Monte Carlo simulations of these neutron detector designs achieved efficiencies of over 35% for assay chambers that can accommodate 55-gal. drums. Only slight increases in the number of detector tubes and helium pressure are required. The detectors also have reduced die-away times. Potential applications are coincident and multiplicity neutron counting for waste disposal and safeguards. The authors will present the general design philosophy, underlying physics, calculation mechanics, and results

  9. Reconstitution of Low Bandwidth Reaction History

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    May, M.; Clancy, T.; Fittinghoff, D.; Gennaro, P.; Hagans, K.; Halvorson, G.; Lowry, M.; Perry, T.; Roberson, P.; Smith, D.; Teruya, A.; Blair, J.; Davis, B.; Hunt, E.; Emkeit, B.; Galbraith, J.; Kelly, B.; Montoya, R.; Nickel, G.; Ogle, J.; Wilson, K.; Wood, M.

    2004-01-01

    reaction history. The first step in the reconstitution of reaction history was thus naturally the reconstitution of the loW--bandwidth capability in FY04. This will be followed in FY06 by the reconstitution of the high bandwidth capability. The reconstitution of the loW--bandwidth reaction history measurement was done in several phases. First the status of legacy equipment has been ascertained. Existing detectors, cables, and recording systems have been inventoried, characterized and, for the most part, satisfied the specifications of the test program and are still useable. The ability to obtain replacement equipment is now available. Modern loW--bandwidth fiber optic recording equipment which was similar to systems used on the old tests, has been evaluated. The ability to characterize and calibrate detectors and other components has been reestablished. New scientists and engineers have been working with designated mentors. These mentors participated on numerous shots during the old test program. Finally as a proof test, two hypothetical test scenarios were proposed: one each from LLNL and LANL. The LANL event was called ALPHA and the LLNL event was called POPOUT. The reaction history diagnostics for these two hypothetical underground tests were completely laid out and analyzed to make sure that the diagnostic could be successfully fielded within a 24 month time frame. In addition as part of a training exercise a reaction history trailer was reconstituted. This system was configured using a combination of new and experienced technical personnel and data analysts in collaboration with LLNL and LANL event physicists

  10. Ionization smoke detectors - the high-voltage issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Production of high-voltage ionization smoke detectors ceased in 1978 following the development of lower voltage models which used much smaller amounts of radioactive material. Despite this fact, thousands of high-voltage detectors are still in use today in many large UK companies. The major users argue that there is no reason to stop using their detectors if they are still fit for their purpose - many could last for another 15 to 20 years if properly maintained. But pressure has been mounting on businesses to replace all their high-voltage detectors with new low-voltage models within the next couple of years. This could place a huge financial burden on the companies concerned, with costs possibly running into millions of pounds. Traditionally, the major detector installers offered cleaning and maintenance services for high-voltage detectors to their customers but these have now been withdrawn. The installers give no clear reasons for this decision except that the detectors are outmoded and should be disposed of as soon as possible. Most users would agree that conversion to low-voltage types is inevitable but their main worry is the financial strain of replacing all their detectors - and associated equipment - in one go. They would prefer to phase out their high-voltage detectors in stages over a number of years to spread the costs of conversion. The problems of maintenance is discussed. A dual voltage fire alarm panel which allows the high-voltage detectors to be phased out is mentioned. (Author)

  11. Application of a modified complementary filtering technique for increased aircraft control system frequency bandwidth in high vibration environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garren, J. F., Jr.; Niessen, F. R.; Abbott, T. S.; Yenni, K. R.

    1977-01-01

    A modified complementary filtering technique for estimating aircraft roll rate was developed and flown in a research helicopter to determine whether higher gains could be achieved. Use of this technique did, in fact, permit a substantial increase in system frequency bandwidth because, in comparison with first-order filtering, it reduced both noise amplification and control limit-cycle tendencies.

  12. High pressure argon detector of high energy neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vishnevskii, A.V.; Golutvin, I.A.; Sarantsev, V.L.; Sviridov, V.A.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Kalinovskii, A.N.; Sosnovtsev, V.V.; Chernyatin, V.K.; Kaftanov, V.S.; Khovanskii, V.D.; Shevchenko, V.G.

    1979-01-01

    In the present paper, we suggest an electron neutrino detector of a new type where track information is available for all charged particles. As a working medium we use Argon compressed up to a pressure of 100 to 150 atm (approximately 0.2-0.3 g/cm 3 ). The spatial reconstruction of tracks are accomplished with an accuracy not inferior to that of bubble chambers. The detector has a high sensitivity in ionization measurements. An assembly with a working medium mass of approximately 100 tons seem to be realisable. This makes it possible to perform tasks with cross-sections of (10 -5 + 10 -3 ) x delty tot at an intensity of the neutrino beam which is available in present-day accelerators. (orig.)

  13. High Energy Electron Detectors on Sphinx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. R.; Porte, A.; Zucchini, F.; Calamy, H.; Auriel, G.; Coleman, P. L.; Bayol, F.; Lalle, B.; Krishnan, M.; Wilson, K.

    2008-11-01

    Z-pinch plasma radiation sources are used to dose test objects with K-shell (˜1-4keV) x-rays. The implosion physics can produce high energy electrons (> 50keV), which could distort interpretation of the soft x-ray effects. We describe the design and implementation of a diagnostic suite to characterize the electron environment of Al wire and Ar gas puff z-pinches on Sphinx. The design used ITS calculations to model detector response to both soft x-rays and electrons and help set upper bounds to the spurious electron flux. Strategies to discriminate between the known soft x-ray emission and the suspected electron flux will be discussed. H.Calamy et al, ``Use of microsecond current prepulse for dramatic improvements of wire array Z-pinch implosion,'' Phys Plasmas 15, 012701 (2008) J.A.Halbleib et al, ``ITS: the integrated TIGER series of electron/photon transport codes-Version 3.0,'' IEEE Trans on Nuclear Sci, 39, 1025 (1992)

  14. Spin-torque diode with tunable sensitivity and bandwidth by out-of-plane magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X.; Zheng, C.; Pong, Philip W. T. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Zhou, Y., E-mail: yanzhou@hku.hk [School of Electronics Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Department of Physics, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Kubota, H.; Yuasa, S. [Spintronics Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2016-06-06

    Spin-torque diodes based on nanosized magnetic tunnel junctions are novel microwave detectors with high sensitivity and wide frequency bandwidth. While previous reports mainly focus on improving the sensitivity, the approaches to extend the bandwidth are limited. This work experimentally demonstrates that through optimizing the orientation of the external magnetic field, wide bandwidth can be achieved while maintaining high sensitivity. The mechanism of the frequency- and sensitivity-tuning is investigated through analyzing the dependence of resonant frequency and DC voltage on the magnitude and the tilt angle of hard-plane magnetic field. The frequency dependence is qualitatively explicated by Kittel's ferromagnetic resonance model. The asymmetric resonant frequency at positive and negative magnetic field is verified by the numerical simulation considering the in-plane anisotropy. The DC voltage dependence is interpreted through evaluating the misalignment angle between the magnetization of the free layer and the reference layer. The tunability of the detector performance by the magnetic field angle is evaluated through characterizing the sensitivity and bandwidth under 3D magnetic field. The frequency bandwidth up to 9.8 GHz or maximum sensitivity up to 154 mV/mW (after impedance mismatch correction) can be achieved by tuning the angle of the applied magnetic field. The results show that the bandwidth and sensitivity can be controlled and adjusted through optimizing the orientation of the magnetic field for various applications and requirements.

  15. CZT drift strip detectors for high energy astrophysics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Caroli, E.

    2010-01-01

    Requirements for X- and gamma ray detectors for future High Energy Astrophysics missions include high detection efficiency and good energy resolution as well as fine position sensitivity even in three dimensions.We report on experimental investigations on the CZT drift detector developed DTU Space...

  16. High sensitive radiation detector for radiology dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valente, M.; Malano, F. [Instituto de Fisica Enrique Gaviola, Oficina 102 FaMAF - UNC, Av. Luis Medina Allende, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina); Molina, W.; Vedelago, J., E-mail: valente@famac.unc.edu.ar [Laboratorio de Investigaciones e Instrumentacion en Fisica Aplicada a la Medicina e Imagenes por Rayos X, Laboratorio 448 FaMAF - UNC, Ciudad Universitaria, 5000 Cordoba (Argentina)

    2014-08-15

    Fricke solution has a wide range of applications as radiation detector and dosimetry. It is particularly appreciated in terms of relevant comparative advantages, like tissue equivalence when prepared in aqueous media like gel matrix, continuous mapping capability, dose rate recorded and incident direction independence as well as linear dose response. This work presents the development and characterization of a novel Fricke gel system, based on modified chemical compositions making possible its application in clinical radiology. Properties of standard Fricke gel dosimeter for high dose levels are used as starting point and suitable chemical modifications are introduced and carefully investigated in order to attain high resolution for low dose ranges, like those corresponding to radiology interventions. The developed Fricke gel radiation dosimeter system achieves the expected typical dose dependency, actually showing linear response in the dose range from 20 up to 4000 mGy. Systematic investigations including several chemical compositions are carried out in order to obtain a good enough dosimeter response for low dose levels. A suitable composition among those studied is selected as a good candidate for low dose level radiation dosimetry consisting on a modified Fricke solution fixed to a gel matrix containing benzoic acid along with sulfuric acid, ferrous sulfate, xylenol orange and ultra-pure reactive grade water. Dosimeter samples are prepared in standard vials for its in phantom irradiation and further characterization by spectrophotometry measuring visible light transmission and absorbance before and after irradiation. Samples are irradiated by typical kV X-ray tubes and calibrated Farmer type ionization chamber is used as reference to measure dose rates inside phantoms in at vials locations. Once sensitive material composition is already optimized, dose-response curves show significant improvement regarding overall sensitivity for low dose levels. According to

  17. High sensitive radiation detector for radiology dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valente, M.; Malano, F.; Molina, W.; Vedelago, J.

    2014-08-01

    Fricke solution has a wide range of applications as radiation detector and dosimetry. It is particularly appreciated in terms of relevant comparative advantages, like tissue equivalence when prepared in aqueous media like gel matrix, continuous mapping capability, dose rate recorded and incident direction independence as well as linear dose response. This work presents the development and characterization of a novel Fricke gel system, based on modified chemical compositions making possible its application in clinical radiology. Properties of standard Fricke gel dosimeter for high dose levels are used as starting point and suitable chemical modifications are introduced and carefully investigated in order to attain high resolution for low dose ranges, like those corresponding to radiology interventions. The developed Fricke gel radiation dosimeter system achieves the expected typical dose dependency, actually showing linear response in the dose range from 20 up to 4000 mGy. Systematic investigations including several chemical compositions are carried out in order to obtain a good enough dosimeter response for low dose levels. A suitable composition among those studied is selected as a good candidate for low dose level radiation dosimetry consisting on a modified Fricke solution fixed to a gel matrix containing benzoic acid along with sulfuric acid, ferrous sulfate, xylenol orange and ultra-pure reactive grade water. Dosimeter samples are prepared in standard vials for its in phantom irradiation and further characterization by spectrophotometry measuring visible light transmission and absorbance before and after irradiation. Samples are irradiated by typical kV X-ray tubes and calibrated Farmer type ionization chamber is used as reference to measure dose rates inside phantoms in at vials locations. Once sensitive material composition is already optimized, dose-response curves show significant improvement regarding overall sensitivity for low dose levels. According to

  18. Imaging RF Phased Array Receivers using Optically-Coherent Up-conversion for High Beam-Bandwidth Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    It does so by using an optical lens to perform an inverse spatial Fourier Transform on the up-converted RF signals, thereby rendering a real-time... simultaneous beams or other engineered beam patterns. There are two general approaches to array-based beam forming: digital and analog. In digital beam...of significantly limiting the number of beams that can be formed simultaneously and narrowing the operational bandwidth. An alternate approach that

  19. A time of flight detector for high energy heavy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Z; O` Connor, D J [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1994-12-31

    As a commonly used method to measure the energy of a particle with known mass, the flight time of the particle travelling over a certain distance is measured. A detector based on this principle is called a time-of-flight (TOF) detector which has attracted interests constantly during the last 15 years. For high energy heavy particle energy detection, TOF detector is an appropriated choice and such a system, developed recently, is described in this paper. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  20. A time of flight detector for high energy heavy particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Z.; O`Connor, D.J. [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-31

    As a commonly used method to measure the energy of a particle with known mass, the flight time of the particle travelling over a certain distance is measured. A detector based on this principle is called a time-of-flight (TOF) detector which has attracted interests constantly during the last 15 years. For high energy heavy particle energy detection, TOF detector is an appropriated choice and such a system, developed recently, is described in this paper. 8 refs., 3 figs.

  1. High-bandwidth scanned-wavelength-modulation spectroscopy sensors for temperature and H2O in a rotating detonation engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldenstein, Christopher S; Almodóvar, Christopher A; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K; Brophy, Christopher M

    2014-01-01

    The design and use of two-color tunable diode laser (TDL) absorption sensors for measurements of temperature and H 2 O in a rotating detonation engine (RDE) are presented. Both sensors used first-harmonic-normalized scanned-wavelength-modulation spectroscopy with second-harmonic detection (scanned-WMS-2f/1f) to account for non-absorbing transmission losses and emission encountered in the harsh combustion environment. One sensor used two near-infrared (NIR) TDLs near 1391.7 nm and 1469.3 nm that were modulated at 225 kHz and 285 kHz, respectively, and sinusoidally scanned across the peak of their respective H 2 O absorption transitions to provide a measurement rate of 50 kHz and a detection limit in the RDE of 0.2% H 2 O by mole. The other sensor used two mid-infrared (MIR) TDLs near 2551 nm and 2482 nm that were modulated at 90 kHz and 112 kHz, respectively, and sinusoidally scanned across the peak of their respective H 2 O transitions to provide a measurement rate of 10 kHz and a detection limit in the RDE of 0.02% H 2 O by mole. Four H 2 O absorption transitions with different lower-state energies were used to assess the homogeneity of temperature in the measurement plane. Experimentally derived spectroscopic parameters that enable temperature and H 2 O sensing to within 1.5–3.5% of known values are reported. The sensor design enabling the high-bandwidth scanned-WMS-2f/1f measurements is presented. The two sensors were deployed across two orthogonal and coplanar lines-of-sight (LOS) located in the throat of a converging-diverging nozzle at the RDE combustor exit. Measurements in the non-premixed H 2 -fueled RDE indicate that the temperature and H 2 O oscillate at the detonation frequency (≈3.25 kHz) and that production of H 2 O is a weak function of global equivalence ratio. (paper)

  2. High-bandwidth scanned-wavelength-modulation spectroscopy sensors for temperature and H2O in a rotating detonation engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenstein, Christopher S.; Almodóvar, Christopher A.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Brophy, Christopher M.

    2014-10-01

    The design and use of two-color tunable diode laser (TDL) absorption sensors for measurements of temperature and H2O in a rotating detonation engine (RDE) are presented. Both sensors used first-harmonic-normalized scanned-wavelength-modulation spectroscopy with second-harmonic detection (scanned-WMS-2f/1f) to account for non-absorbing transmission losses and emission encountered in the harsh combustion environment. One sensor used two near-infrared (NIR) TDLs near 1391.7 nm and 1469.3 nm that were modulated at 225 kHz and 285 kHz, respectively, and sinusoidally scanned across the peak of their respective H2O absorption transitions to provide a measurement rate of 50 kHz and a detection limit in the RDE of 0.2% H2O by mole. The other sensor used two mid-infrared (MIR) TDLs near 2551 nm and 2482 nm that were modulated at 90 kHz and 112 kHz, respectively, and sinusoidally scanned across the peak of their respective H2O transitions to provide a measurement rate of 10 kHz and a detection limit in the RDE of 0.02% H2O by mole. Four H2O absorption transitions with different lower-state energies were used to assess the homogeneity of temperature in the measurement plane. Experimentally derived spectroscopic parameters that enable temperature and H2O sensing to within 1.5-3.5% of known values are reported. The sensor design enabling the high-bandwidth scanned-WMS-2f/1f measurements is presented. The two sensors were deployed across two orthogonal and coplanar lines-of-sight (LOS) located in the throat of a converging-diverging nozzle at the RDE combustor exit. Measurements in the non-premixed H2-fueled RDE indicate that the temperature and H2O oscillate at the detonation frequency (≈3.25 kHz) and that production of H2O is a weak function of global equivalence ratio.

  3. Liquid Scintillation Detectors for High Energy Neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Stefanie N.; Learned, John G.

    2010-01-01

    Large open volume (not segmented) liquid scintillation detectors have been generally dedicated to low energy neutrino measurements, in the MeV energy region. We describe the potential employment of large detectors (>1 kiloton) for studies of higher energy neutrino interactions, such as cosmic rays and long-baseline experiments. When considering the physics potential of new large instruments the possibility of doing useful measurements with higher energy neutrino interactions has been overlooked. Here we take into account Fermat's principle, which states that the first light to reach each PMT will follow the shortest path between that PMT and the point of origin. We describe the geometry of this process, and the resulting wavefront, which we are calling the 'Fermat surface', and discuss methods of using this surface to extract directional track information and particle identification. This capability may be demonstrated in the new long-baseline neutrino beam from Jaeri accelerator to the KamLAND detector in Japan. Other exciting applications include the use of Hanohano as a movable long-baseline detector in this same beam, and LENA in Europe for future long-baseline neutrino beams from CERN. Also, this methodology opens up the question as to whether a large liquid scintillator detector should be given consideration for use in a future long-baseline experiment from Fermilab to the DUSEL underground laboratory at Homestake.

  4. Proceedings of the symposium on high energy detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    Since the study meeting on measuring instruments held three years ago, large change has arisen. Valuable experiences have been accumulated by the successful conclusion of the first term experiments in the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. The improvement of detectors and the development of new detectors are strongly desired just before starting the future plans. In low energy field also, the steady advance has been accomplished. This symposium was held in such situation on September 18 and 19, 1979, at KEK, and aimed at clarifying the present status and accomplishment of high energy detectors, and setting forth the future prospect. On the first day, the review of recent topics concerning position detectors and particle-identifying detectors, and the reports on drift chambers, liquid wire chambers and the single wire chambers using charge division method were mainly presented. On the second day, the reports on the electronics related to position detectors, particle-identifying detectors, calorimeters, and the development of new detectors, the consideration on multiple tracks as the future plan, and the review of transition radiation detectors were presented. The results of this symposium will surely be utilized for the high energy experiments hereafter. The 26 papers presented are outlined. (Kako, I.)

  5. Strip detector for the ATLAS detector upgrade for the High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Veloce, Laurelle Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is currently preparing for an upgrade of the tracking system in the course of the High Luminosity LHC, scheduled for 2025. The expected radiation damage at an integrated luminosity of 3000fb-1 will require the tracking detectors to withstand hadron fluencies to over 1x1016 1 MeV neutron equivalent per cm2. With the addition of increased readout rates, the existing Inner Detector will have to be replaced by an all-silicon Inner Tracker (ITk) with a pixel detector surrounded by a strip detector. The ITk strip detector consists of a four-layer barrel and a forward region composed of six discs on each side of the barrel. The current prototyping phase has resulted in the ITk Strip Detector Technical Design Report (TDR), which starts the pre-production readiness phase at the involved institutes. In this contribution we present the design of the ITk Strip Detector and current status of R&D of various detector components.

  6. Advanced Detectors for Nuclear, High Energy and Astroparticle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Supriya; Ghosh, Sanjay

    2018-01-01

    The book presents high-quality papers presented at a national conference on ‘Advanced Detectors for Nuclear, High Energy and Astroparticle Physics’. The conference was organized to commemorate 100 years of Bose Institute. The book is based on the theme of the conference and provides a clear picture of basics and advancement of detectors for nuclear physics, high-energy physics and astroparticle physics together. The topics covered in the book include detectors for accelerator-based high energy physics; detectors for non-accelerator particle physics; nuclear physics detectors; detection techniques in astroparticle physics and dark matter; and applications and simulations. The book will be a good reference for researchers and industrial personnel working in the area of nuclear and astroparticle physics.

  7. High resolution, position sensitive detector for energetic particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marsh, E.P.; Strathman, M.D.; Reed, D.A.; Odom, R.W.; Morse, D.H.; Pontau, A.E.

    1993-01-01

    The performance and design of an imaging position sensitive, particle beam detector will be presented. The detector is minimally invasive, operates a wide dynamic range (>10 10 ), and exhibits high spatial resolution. The secondary electrons produced when a particle beam passes through a thin foil are imaged using stigmatic ion optics onto a two-dimensional imaging detector. Due to the low scattering cross section of the 6 nm carbon foil the detector is a minimal perturbation on the primary beam. A prototype detector with an image resolution of approximately 5 μm for a field of view of 1 mm has been reported. A higher resolution detector for imaging small beams (<50 μm) with an image resolution of better than 0.5 μm has since been developed and its design is presented. (orig.)

  8. High resolution, position sensitive detector for energetic particle beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, E P [Charles Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States); Strathman, M D [Charles Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States); Reed, D A [Charles Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States); Odom, R W [Charles Evans and Associates, Redwood City, CA (United States); Morse, D H [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Pontau, A E [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    The performance and design of an imaging position sensitive, particle beam detector will be presented. The detector is minimally invasive, operates a wide dynamic range (>10[sup 10]), and exhibits high spatial resolution. The secondary electrons produced when a particle beam passes through a thin foil are imaged using stigmatic ion optics onto a two-dimensional imaging detector. Due to the low scattering cross section of the 6 nm carbon foil the detector is a minimal perturbation on the primary beam. A prototype detector with an image resolution of approximately 5 [mu]m for a field of view of 1 mm has been reported. A higher resolution detector for imaging small beams (<50 [mu]m) with an image resolution of better than 0.5 [mu]m has since been developed and its design is presented. (orig.)

  9. Towards a large scale high energy cosmic neutrino undersea detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azoulay, R.; Berthier, R.; Arpesella, C.

    1997-06-01

    ANTARES collaboration proposes to study high energy cosmic neutrinos by using a deep sea Cherenkov detector. The potential interest of such a study for astrophysicists and particle physicists is developed. The different origins of cosmic neutrinos are reviewed. In order to observe with relevant statistic the flux of neutrinos from extra-galactic sources, a km-scale detector is necessary. The feasibility of such a detector is studied. A variety of technical problems have been solved. Some of them are standard for particle physicists: choice of photo-multipliers, monitoring, trigger, electronics, data acquisition, detector optimization. Others are more specific of sea science engineering particularly: detector deployment in deep sea, data transmission through optical cables, bio-fouling, effect of sea current. The solutions are presented and the sea engineering part involving detector installation will be tested near French coasts. It is scheduled to build a reduced-scale demonstrator within the next 2 years. (A.C.)

  10. Towards a large scale high energy cosmic neutrino undersea detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azoulay, R.; Berthier, R. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Direction des Sciences de la Matiere; Arpesella, C. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 13 - Marseille (France). Centre de Physique Theorique] [and others

    1997-06-01

    ANTARES collaboration proposes to study high energy cosmic neutrinos by using a deep sea Cherenkov detector. The potential interest of such a study for astrophysicists and particle physicists is developed. The different origins of cosmic neutrinos are reviewed. In order to observe with relevant statistic the flux of neutrinos from extra-galactic sources, a km-scale detector is necessary. The feasibility of such a detector is studied. A variety of technical problems have been solved. Some of them are standard for particle physicists: choice of photo-multipliers, monitoring, trigger, electronics, data acquisition, detector optimization. Others are more specific of sea science engineering particularly: detector deployment in deep sea, data transmission through optical cables, bio-fouling, effect of sea current. The solutions are presented and the sea engineering part involving detector installation will be tested near French coasts. It is scheduled to build a reduced-scale demonstrator within the next 2 years. (A.C.) 50 refs.

  11. High-Power and High-Efficiency 1.3- µm Superluminescent Diode With Flat-Top and Ultrawide Emission Bandwidth

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa; Alhashim, Hala H.; Ng, Tien Khee; Ooi, Boon S.

    2015-01-01

    We report on a flat-top and ultrawide emission bandwidth of 125 nm from InGaAsP/InP multiple quantum-well (MQW) superluminescent diode with antireflection coated and tilted ridge-waveguide device configuration. A total output power in excess of 70 mW with an average power spectral density of 0.56 mW/nm and spectral ripple ≤ 1.2 ± 0.5 dB is measured from the device. Wall-plug efficiency and output power as high as 14% and 80 mW, respectively, is demonstrated from this batch of devices. We attribute the broad emission to the inherent inhomogeneity of the electron-heavy-hole (e-hh) and electron-light-hole (e-lh) recombination of the ground state and the first excited state of the MQWs and their simultaneous emission.

  12. High-Power and High-Efficiency 1.3- µm Superluminescent Diode With Flat-Top and Ultrawide Emission Bandwidth

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa

    2015-02-01

    We report on a flat-top and ultrawide emission bandwidth of 125 nm from InGaAsP/InP multiple quantum-well (MQW) superluminescent diode with antireflection coated and tilted ridge-waveguide device configuration. A total output power in excess of 70 mW with an average power spectral density of 0.56 mW/nm and spectral ripple ≤ 1.2 ± 0.5 dB is measured from the device. Wall-plug efficiency and output power as high as 14% and 80 mW, respectively, is demonstrated from this batch of devices. We attribute the broad emission to the inherent inhomogeneity of the electron-heavy-hole (e-hh) and electron-light-hole (e-lh) recombination of the ground state and the first excited state of the MQWs and their simultaneous emission.

  13. Nuclear radiation detectors using high resistivity neutron transmutation doped silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gessner, T.; Irmer, K.

    1983-01-01

    A method for the production of semiconductor detectors based on high resistivity n-type silicon is described. The n-type silicon is produced by neutron irradiation of p-type silicon. The detectors are produced by planar technique. They are suitable for the spectrometry of alpha particles and for the pulse count measurement of beta particles at room temperature. (author)

  14. Orion, a high efficiency 4π neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crema, E.; Piasecki, E.; Wang, X.M.; Doubre, H.; Galin, J.; Guerreau, D.; Pouthas, J.; Saint-Laurent, F.

    1990-01-01

    In intermediate energy heavy ion collisions the multiplicity of emitted neutrons is strongly connected to energy dissipation and to impact parameter. We present the 4π detector ORION, a high efficiency liquid scintillator detector which permits to get information on the multiplicity of neutrons measured event-wise and on the spatial distribution of these neutrons [fr

  15. A detector for use in high energy bremsstrahlung shielding studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, O.J.; Thomson, J.E.M.

    1983-01-01

    The design, development and calibration of a detector based on the principle of the Moxon-Rae detector is discussed. It is ideally suited to the measurement of the energy fluence of photons transmitted through a thick shield which has been irradiated with high energy bremsstrahlung. The detection sensitivity is 10 4 to 10 5 times that of the P2 ion chamber

  16. High purity liquid phase epitaxial gallium arsenide nuclear radiation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexiev, D.; Butcher, K.S.A.

    1991-11-01

    Surface barrier radiation detector made from high purity liquid phase epitaxial gallium arsenide wafers have been operated as X- and γ-ray detectors at various operating temperatures. Low energy isotopes are resolved including 241 Am at 40 deg C. and the higher gamma energies of 235 U at -80 deg C. 15 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  17. High-Bandwidth Tactical-Network Data Analysis in a High-Performance-Computing (HPC) Environment: Packet-Level Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    individual fragments using the hash-based method. In general, fragments 6 appear in order and relatively close to each other in the file. A fragment...data product derived from the data model is shown in Fig. 5, a Google Earth12 Keyhole Markup Language (KML) file. This product includes aggregate...System BLOb binary large object FPGA field-programmable gate array HPC high-performance computing IP Internet Protocol KML Keyhole Markup Language

  18. Event timing in high purity germanium coaxial detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Ibiary, M.Y.

    1979-08-01

    The timing of gamma ray radiation in systems using high purity coaxial germanium detectors is analyzed and compared to that of systems using Ge(Li) detectors. The analysis takes into account the effect of the residual impurities on the electric field distribution, and hence on the rate of rise of the electrical pulses delivered to the timing module. Conditions under which the electric field distribution could lead to an improvement in timing performance, are identified. The results of the analysis confirm the experimental results published elsewhere and when compared with those for Ge(Li) detectors, which usually operate under conditions of charge carrier velocity saturation, confirm that high purity germanium detectors need not have inferior timing characteristics. A chart is given to provide a quantitative basis on which the trade off between the radius of the detector and its time resolution may be made

  19. Ultra high resolution X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hess, U.; Buehler, M.; Hentig, R. von; Hertrich, T.; Phelan, K.; Wernicke, D.; Hoehne, J.

    2001-01-01

    CSP Cryogenic Spectrometers GmbH is developing cryogenic energy dispersive X-ray spectrometers based on superconducting detector technology. Superconducting sensors exhibit at least a 10-fold improvement in energy resolution due to their low energy gap compared to conventional Si(Li) or Ge detectors. These capabilities are extremely valuable for the analysis of light elements and in general for the analysis of the low energy range of the X-ray spectrum. The spectrometer is based on a mechanical cooler needing no liquid coolants and an adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) stage which supplies the operating temperature of below 100 mK for the superconducting sensor. Applications include surface analysis in semiconductor industry as well material analysis for material composition e.g. in ceramics or automobile industry

  20. A high resolution β-detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charon, Y.; Cuzon, J.C.; Tricoire, H.; Valentin, L.

    1987-01-01

    We present a detector which associates a charge coupled device to a light amplifier. This image sensor must detect weak β-activity, with a 10 μm resolution and should replace the autoradiographic films used for molecular hybridization. The best results are obtained with the 35 S emittor, for which the resolution and the efficiency are respectively 20 μm and 100% (relative to the measured standard source)

  1. Reliability studies of high operating temperature MCT photoconductor detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Jintong; Zhang, Yan; Li, Xiangyang

    2010-10-01

    This paper concerns HgCdTe (MCT) infrared photoconductor detectors with high operating temperature. The near room temperature operation of detectors have advantages of light weight, less cost and convenient usage. Their performances are modest and they suffer from reliable problems. These detectors face with stability of the package, chip bonding area and passivation layers. It's important to evaluate and improve the reliability of such detectors. Defective detectors were studied with SEM(Scanning electron microscope) and microscopy. Statistically significant differences were observed between the influence of operating temperature and the influence of humidity. It was also found that humility has statistically significant influence upon the stability of the chip bonding and passivation layers, and the amount of humility isn't strongly correlated to the damage on the surface. Considering about the commonly found failures modes in detectors, special test structures were designed to improve the reliability of detectors. An accelerated life test was also implemented to estimate the lifetime of the high operating temperature MCT photoconductor detectors.

  2. Chemical Industry Bandwidth Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2006-12-01

    The Chemical Bandwidth Study provides a snapshot of potentially recoverable energy losses during chemical manufacturing. The advantage of this study is the use of "exergy" analysis as a tool for pinpointing inefficiencies.

  3. Bandwidth efficient coding

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, John B

    2017-01-01

    Bandwidth Efficient Coding addresses the major challenge in communication engineering today: how to communicate more bits of information in the same radio spectrum. Energy and bandwidth are needed to transmit bits, and bandwidth affects capacity the most. Methods have been developed that are ten times as energy efficient at a given bandwidth consumption as simple methods. These employ signals with very complex patterns and are called "coding" solutions. The book begins with classical theory before introducing new techniques that combine older methods of error correction coding and radio transmission in order to create narrowband methods that are as efficient in both spectrum and energy as nature allows. Other topics covered include modulation techniques such as CPM, coded QAM and pulse design.

  4. Properties of CMOS devices and circuits fabricated on high-resistivity, detector-grade silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, S.

    1991-11-01

    A CMOS process that is compatible with silicon p-i-n radiation detectors has been developed and characterized. A total of twelve mask layers are used in the process. The NMOS device is formed in a retrograde well while the PMOS device is fabricated directly in the high-resistivity silicon. Isolation characteristics are similar to a standard foundary CMOS process. Circuit performance using 3 μm design rules has been evaluated. The measured propagation delay and power-delay product for a 51-stage ring oscillator was 1.5 ns and 43 fJ, respectively. Measurements on a simple cascode amplifier results in a gain-bandwidth product of 200 MHz at a bias current of 15 μA. The input-referred noise of the cascode amplifier is 20 nV/√Hz at 1 MHz

  5. Glass Industry Bandwidth Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rue, David M. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This is a study on energy use and potential savings, or "bandwidth" study, for several glassmaking processes. Intended to provide a realistic estimate of the potential amount of energy that can be saved in an industrial process, the "bandwidth" refers to the difference between the amount of energy that would be consumed in a process using commercially available technology versus the minimum amount of energy needed to achieve those same results.

  6. Industrial Glass Bandwidth Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rue, David M. [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Servaites, James [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Wolf, Warren [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2007-08-01

    This is a study on energy use and potential savings, or "bandwidth" study, for several glassmaking processes. Intended to provide a realistic estimate of the potential amount of energy that can be saved in an industrial process, the "bandwidth" refers to the difference between the amount of energy that would be consumed in a process using commercially available technology versus the minimum amount of energy needed to achieve those same results.

  7. International workshop on advanced materials for high precision detectors. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicquevert, B.; Hauviller, C.

    1994-01-01

    These proceedings gather together the contributions to the Workshop on Advanced Materials for High Precision Detectors, which was held from 28-30 September 1994 in Archamps, Haute-Savoie, France. This meeting brought together international experts (researchers, physicists and engineers) in the field of advanced materials and their use in high energy physics detectors or spacecraft applications. Its purpose was to discuss the status of the different materials currently in use in the structures of detectors and spacecraft, together with their actual performances, technological implications and future prospects. Environmental effects, such as those of moisture and radiation, were discussed, as were design and manufacturing technologies. Some case studies were presented. (orig.)

  8. TIGRESS highly-segmented high-purity germanium clover detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scraggs, H. C.; Pearson, C. J.; Hackman, G.; Smith, M. B.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Boston, A. J.; Bricault, P.; Chakrawarthy, R. S.; Churchman, R.; Cowan, N.; Cronkhite, G.; Cunningham, E. S.; Drake, T. E.; Finlay, P.; Garrett, P. E.; Grinyer, G. F.; Hyland, B.; Jones, B.; Leslie, J. R.; Martin, J.-P.; Morris, D.; Morton, A. C.; Phillips, A. A.; Sarazin, F.; Schumaker, M. A.; Svensson, C. E.; Valiente-Dobón, J. J.; Waddington, J. C.; Watters, L. M.; Zimmerman, L.

    2005-05-01

    The TRIUMF-ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape-Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS) will consist of twelve units of four high-purity germanium (HPGe) crystals in a common cryostat. The outer contacts of each crystal will be divided into four quadrants and two lateral segments for a total of eight outer contacts. The performance of a prototype HPGe four-crystal unit has been investigated. Integrated noise spectra for all contacts were measured. Energy resolutions, relative efficiencies for both individual crystals and for the entire unit, and peak-to-total ratios were measured with point-like sources. Position-dependent performance was measured by moving a collimated source across the face of the detector.

  9. High Frequency Amplitude Detector for GMI Magnetic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aktham Asfour

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new concept of a high-frequency amplitude detector and demodulator for Giant-Magneto-Impedance (GMI sensors is presented. This concept combines a half wave rectifier, with outstanding capabilities and high speed, and a feedback approach that ensures the amplitude detection with easily adjustable gain. The developed detector is capable of measuring high-frequency and very low amplitude signals without the use of diode-based active rectifiers or analog multipliers. The performances of this detector are addressed throughout the paper. The full circuitry of the design is given, together with a comprehensive theoretical study of the concept and experimental validation. The detector has been used for the amplitude measurement of both single frequency and pulsed signals and for the demodulation of amplitude-modulated signals. It has also been successfully integrated in a GMI sensor prototype. Magnetic field and electrical current measurements in open- and closed-loop of this sensor have also been conducted.

  10. Application of cadmium telluride detectors to high energy computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, F.; Thomas, G.; Cuzin, M.; Verger, L.

    1991-01-01

    15 years ago, Cadmium Telluride detectors have been investigated in our laboratory as possible detectors for medical scanners [1]. Today most of these machines are using high pressure Xenon gas as multicells detectors, BGO or CdWO 4 scintillators for industrial computerized tomography. Xenon gas detectors are well suited for detection of 100 KeV X-rays and enables to build 1000 cells homogeneous detector with a dynamic range of 3 decades. BGO and CdWO 4 scintillators, associated with photomultipliers or photodiodes are used for higher energy (400 KeV). They present a low afterglow and a dynamic range of 4 to 5 decades. Non destructive testing of very absorbing objects (eg 2 m diameter solid rocket motor) by X-ray tomography requires much higher energy X-rays (16 MeV) and doses up to 12000 rads/min at 1 meter. For this application Cadmium Telluride detectors operating as photoconductors are well suited. A prototype of tomograph machine, able to scan 0.5 m diameter high density objects has been realized with 25 CdTe detectors (25x15x0.8 mm 3 ). It produces good quality 1024x1024 tomographic images

  11. A detector for high frequency modulation in auroral particle fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiger, R. J.; Oehme, D.; Loewenstein, R. F.; Murphree, J.; Anderson, H. R.; Anderson, R.

    1974-01-01

    A high time resolution electron detector has been developed for use in sounding rocket studies of the aurora. The detector is used to look for particle bunching in the range 50 kHz-10 MHz. The design uses an electron multiplier and an onboard frequency spectrum analyzer. By using the onboard analyzer, the data can be transmitted back to ground on a single 93-kHz voltage-controlled oscillator. The detector covers the 50 kHz-10 MHz range six times per second and detects modulation on the order of a new percent of the total electron flux. Spectra are presented for a flight over an auroral arc.

  12. Low level neutron monitoring using high pressure 3He detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pszona, S.

    1995-01-01

    Three detectors, two spherical proportional counters and an ionisation chamber, all filled with 3 He to pressures of 160 kPa, 325 kPa and 1 MPa respectively have been experimentally studied with respect to their use for low level neutron monitoring. The ambient dose equivalent responses and the energy resolutions of these detectors have been determined. It is shown that spectral analysis of the signals from these detectors not only gives high sensitivity with regard to ambient dose equivalent but also improves the quality of the measurements. A special instrumentation for low level neutron monitoring is described in which a quality control method has been implemented. (Author)

  13. High rate multiplicity detector for relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beavis, D.; Bennett, M.J.; Carroll, J.B.; Chiba, J.; Chikanian, A.; Crawford, H.J.; Cronqvist, M.; Dardenne, Y.; Debbe, R.; Doke, T.; Engelage, J.; Flores, I.; Greiner, L.; Hayano, R.S.; Hallman, T.J.; Heckman, H.H.; Kashiwagi, T.; Kikuchi, J.; Kumar, B.S.; Kuo, C.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Mitchell, J.W.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagle, J.L.; Pope, J.K.; Stankus, P.; Tanaka, K.H.; Welsh, R.C.; Zhan, W.

    1995-01-01

    We have constructed and operated a detector to measure the multiplicity of secondary particles produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the E878 experiment at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS facility. We describe the operation and performance of the detector in a high rate Au beam environment, and interpret the multiplicity data in terms of the impact parameters of the nucleus-nucleus collisions. ((orig.))

  14. High rate multiplicity detector for relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beavis, D [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bennett, M J [Yale University, A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Carroll, J B [University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Chiba, J [KEK National High Energy Physics, Tsukuba (Japan); Chikanian, A [Yale University, A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Crawford, H J [University of California Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Cronqvist, M [University of California Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Dardenne, Y [University of California Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Debbe, R [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Doke, T [Waseda University, Science and Engineering Research Institute, Waseda (Japan); Engelage, J [University of California Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Flores, I [University of California Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Greiner, L [University of California Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Hayano, R S [University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Hallman, T J [University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Heckman, H H [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Kashiwagi, T [Waseda University, Science and Engineering Research Institute, Waseda (Japan); Kikuchi, J [Waseda University, Science and Engineering Research Institute, Waseda (Japan); Kumar, B S [Yale University, A.W. Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Kuo, C [University of California Space Sciences Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lindstrom, P J [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Mitchell, J W [Universities Space Research Association/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Nagamiya, S; E878 Collaboration

    1995-04-21

    We have constructed and operated a detector to measure the multiplicity of secondary particles produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the E878 experiment at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS facility. We describe the operation and performance of the detector in a high rate Au beam environment, and interpret the multiplicity data in terms of the impact parameters of the nucleus-nucleus collisions. ((orig.)).

  15. ATLAS ITk Pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gemme, Claudia; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The high luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) in 2026 will provide new challenge to the ATLAS tracker. The current inner detector will be replaced with a whole silicon tracker which will consist of a five barrel layer Pixel detector surrounded by a four barrel layer Strip detector. The expected high radiation level are requiring the development of upgraded silicon sensors as well as new a front-end chip. The dense tracking environment will require finer granularity detectors. The data rates will require new technologies for high bandwidth data transmission and handling. The current status of the HL-LHC ATLA Pixel detector developments as well as the various layout options will be reviewed.

  16. A Very High Spatial Resolution Detector for Small Animal PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai Shah, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an in vivo analog of autoradiography and has the potential to become a powerful new tool in imaging biological processes in small laboratory animals. PET imaging of small animals can provide unique information that can help in advancement of human disease models as well as drug development. Clinical PET scanners used for human imaging are bulky, expensive and do not have adequate spatial resolution for small animal studies. Hence, dedicated, low cost instruments are required for conducting small animal studies with higher spatial resolution than what is currently achieved with clinical as well as dedicated small animal PET scanners. The goal of the proposed project is to investigate a new all solid-state detector design for small animal PET imaging. Exceptionally high spatial resolution, good timing resolution, and excellent energy resolution are expected from the proposed detector design. The Phase I project was aimed at demonstrating the feasibility of producing high performance solid-state detectors that provide high sensitivity, spatial resolution, and timing characteristics. Energy resolution characteristics of the new detector were also investigated. The goal of the Phase II project is to advance the promising solid-state detector technology for small animal PET and determine its full potential. Detectors modules will be built and characterized and finally, a bench-top small animal PET system will be assembled and evaluated

  17. Strip detector for the ATLAS detector upgrade for the high-luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Madaffari, Daniele; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The planned HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) in 2025 is being designed to maximise the physics potential of the LHC through a sizeable increase in the luminosity, reaching 1x10$^{35}$ cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$ after 10 years of operation. A consequence of this increased luminosity is the expected radiation damage at an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb$^{-1}$, requiring the tracking detectors to withstand hadron fluencies to over 1x10$^{16}$ 1 MeV neutron equivalent per cm$^2$. With the addition of increased readout rates, a complete re-design of the current ATLAS Inner Detector (ID) is being developed as the Inner Tracker (ITk), which will consist of both strip and pixelated silicon detectors. The physics motivations, required performance characteristics and basic design of the proposed upgrade of the strip detector will be a subject of this talk. Present ideas and solutions for the strip detector and current research and development program will be discussed.

  18. The High Energy Detector of Simbol-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuris, A.; Limousin, O.; Lugiez, F.; Gevin, O.; Blondel, C.; Le Mer, I.; Pinsard, F.; Cara, C.; Goetschy, A.; Martignac, J.; Tauzin, G.; Hervé, S.; Laurent, P.; Chipaux, R.; Rio, Y.; Fontignie, J.; Horeau, B.; Authier, M.; Ferrando, P.

    2009-05-01

    The High Energy Detector (HED) is one of the three detection units on board the Simbol-X detector spacecraft. It is placed below the Low Energy Detector so as to collect focused photons in the energy range from 8 to 80 keV. It consists of a mosaic of 64 independent cameras, divided in 8 sectors. Each elementary detection unit, called Caliste, is the hybridization of a 256-pixel Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detector with full custom front-end electronics into a unique component. The status of the HED design will be reported. The promising results obtained from the first micro-camera prototypes called Caliste 64 and Caliste 256 will be presented to illustrate the expected performance of the instrument.

  19. The High Energy Detector of Simbol-X

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuris, A.; Limousin, O.; Blondel, C.; Le Mer, I.; Pinsard, F.; Cara, C.; Goetschy, A.; Martignac, J.; Laurent, P.; Chipaux, R.; Rio, Y.; Fontignie, J.; Horeau, B.; Ferrando, P.; Lugiez, F.; Gevin, O.; Tauzin, G.; Herve, S.; Authier, M.

    2009-01-01

    The High Energy Detector (HED) is one of the three detection units on board the Simbol-X detector spacecraft. It is placed below the Low Energy Detector so as to collect focused photons in the energy range from 8 to 80 keV. It consists of a mosaic of 64 independent cameras, divided in 8 sectors. Each elementary detection unit, called Caliste, is the hybridization of a 256-pixel Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detector with full custom front-end electronics into a unique component. The status of the HED design will be reported. The promising results obtained from the first micro-camera prototypes called Caliste 64 and Caliste 256 will be presented to illustrate the expected performance of the instrument.

  20. Fully integrated CMOS pixel detector for high energy particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanstraelen, G.; Debusschere, I.; Claeys, C.; Declerck, G.

    1989-01-01

    A novel type of position and energy sensitive, monolithic pixel array with integrated readout electronics is proposed. Special features of the design are a reduction of the number of output channels and of the amount of output data, and the use of transistors on the high resistivity silicon. The number of output channels for the detector array is reduced by handling in parallel a number of pixels, chosen as a function of the time resolution required for the system, and by the use of an address decoder. A further reduction of data is achieved by reading out only those pixels which have been activated. The pixel detector circuit will be realized in a 3 μm p-well CMOS process, which is optimized for the full integration of readout electronics and detector diodes on high resistivity Si. A retrograde well is formed by means of a high energy implantation, followed by the appropriate temperature steps. The optimization of the well shape takes into account the high substrate bias applied during the detector operation. The design is largely based on the use of MOS transistors on the high resistivity silicon itself. These have proven to perform as well as transistors on standard doped substrate. The basic building elements as well as the design strategy of the integrated pixel detector are presented in detail. (orig.)

  1. Proposal for a semiconductor high resolution tracking detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.

    1983-01-01

    A 'new' concept for detection and tracking of charged particles in high energy physics experiments is proposed. It combines a well known high purity semiconductor diode detector (HPSDD) with a heterojunction structure (HJ) and a negative electron affinity (NEA) surface. The detector should be capable of providing a two dimensional view (few cm 2 ) of multi-track events with the following properties: a) position resolution down to a few μm (10 8 position elements); b) high density of information (10 2 -10 3 dots per mm of minimum ionizing track); c) high rate capabilities (few MHz); d) live operation with options to be triggered and/or the information from the detector can be used as an input for the decision to record an event. (orig.)

  2. VLSI Implementation of a Fixed-Complexity Soft-Output MIMO Detector for High-Speed Wireless

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Wu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a low-complexity MIMO symbol detector with close-Maximum a posteriori performance for the emerging multiantenna enhanced high-speed wireless communications. The VLSI implementation is based on a novel MIMO detection algorithm called Modified Fixed-Complexity Soft-Output (MFCSO detection, which achieves a good trade-off between performance and implementation cost compared to the referenced prior art. By including a microcode-controlled channel preprocessing unit and a pipelined detection unit, it is flexible enough to cover several different standards and transmission schemes. The flexibility allows adaptive detection to minimize power consumption without degradation in throughput. The VLSI implementation of the detector is presented to show that real-time MIMO symbol detection of 20 MHz bandwidth 3GPP LTE and 10 MHz WiMAX downlink physical channel is achievable at reasonable silicon cost.

  3. Physics potential of ATLAS detector with high luminosity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Bing

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector is designed to exploit the full physics potential in the TeV energy region opened up by the Large Hadron Collider at a center of mass energy of 14 TeV with very high luminosities. The physics performance of the ATLAS detector on Higgs, extra-dimension and strong symmetry breaking scenario is summarized in this note. ATLAS experiment has great discovery potential for these new phenomena with high luminosity. Triple gauge couplings are very sensitive for probing new physics at TeV scale. We show that ATLAS can measure these couplings very precisely with high luminosity. (orig.)

  4. Diamond and silicon pixel detectors in high radiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsung, Jieh-Wen

    2012-10-15

    Diamond pixel detector is a promising candidate for tracking of collider experiments because of the good radiation tolerance of diamond. The diamond pixel detector must withstand the radiation damage from 10{sup 16} particles per cm{sup 2}, which is the expected total fluence in High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider. The performance of diamond and silicon pixel detectors are evaluated in this research in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Single-crystal diamond pixel detectors with the most recent readout chip ATLAS FE-I4 are produced and characterized. Based on the results of the measurement, the SNR of diamond pixel detector is evaluated as a function of radiation fluence, and compared to that of planar-silicon ones. The deterioration of signal due to radiation damage is formulated using the mean free path of charge carriers in the sensor. The noise from the pixel readout circuit is simulated and calculated with leakage current and input capacitance to the amplifier as important parameters. The measured SNR shows good agreement with the calculated and simulated results, proving that the performance of diamond pixel detectors can exceed the silicon ones if the particle fluence is more than 10{sup 15} particles per cm{sup 2}.

  5. Diamond and silicon pixel detectors in high radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsung, Jieh-Wen

    2012-10-01

    Diamond pixel detector is a promising candidate for tracking of collider experiments because of the good radiation tolerance of diamond. The diamond pixel detector must withstand the radiation damage from 10 16 particles per cm 2 , which is the expected total fluence in High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider. The performance of diamond and silicon pixel detectors are evaluated in this research in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Single-crystal diamond pixel detectors with the most recent readout chip ATLAS FE-I4 are produced and characterized. Based on the results of the measurement, the SNR of diamond pixel detector is evaluated as a function of radiation fluence, and compared to that of planar-silicon ones. The deterioration of signal due to radiation damage is formulated using the mean free path of charge carriers in the sensor. The noise from the pixel readout circuit is simulated and calculated with leakage current and input capacitance to the amplifier as important parameters. The measured SNR shows good agreement with the calculated and simulated results, proving that the performance of diamond pixel detectors can exceed the silicon ones if the particle fluence is more than 10 15 particles per cm 2 .

  6. Combination of fat saturation and variable bandwidth imaging to increase signal-to-noise ratio and decrease motion artifacts for body MR imaging at high field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, W.M.

    1989-01-01

    The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the MR imaging examination is a critical component of the quality of the image. Standard methods to increase SNR include signal averaging with multiple excitations, at the expense of imaging time (which on T2-weighted images could be quite significant), or increasing pixel volume by manipulation of field of view, matrix size, and/or section thickness, all at the expense of resolution. Another available method to increase SNR is to reduce the bandwidth of the receiver, which increases SNR by the square root of the amount of the reduction. The penalty imposed on high-field-strength MR examinations of the body is an unacceptable increase in chemical shift artifact. However, presaturating the fat resonance eliminates the chemical shift artifact. Thus, a combination of imaging techniques, fat suppression, and decreased bandwidth imaging can produce images free of chemical shift artifact with increased SNR and no penalty in resolution or imaging time. Early studies also show a reduction in motion artifact when fat saturation is used. This paper reports MR imaging performed with a 1.5-T Signa imager. With this technique, T2-weighted images (2,500/20/80 [repetition time msec/echo time msec/inversion time msec]) illustrating the increase in SNR and T1-weighted images (600/20) demonstrating a decrease in motion artifact are shown

  7. Automation of the Characterization of High Purity Germanium Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugger, Charles ``Chip''

    2014-09-01

    Neutrinoless double beta decay is a rare hypothesized process that may yield valuable insight into the fundamental properties of the neutrino. Currently there are several experiments trying to observe this process, including the Majorana DEMONSTRAOR experiment, which uses high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to generate and search for these events. Because the event happens internally, it is essential to have the lowest background possible. This is done through passive detector shielding, as well as event discrimination techniques that distinguish between multi-site events characteristic of gamma-radiation, and single-site events characteristic of neutrinoless double beta decay. Before fielding such an experiment, the radiation response of the detectors must be characterized. A robotic arm is being tested for future calibration of HPGe detectors. The arm will hold a source at locations relative to the crystal while data is acquired. Several radioactive sources of varying energy levels will be used to determine the characteristics of the crystal. In this poster, I will present our work with the robot, as well as the characterization of data we took with an underground HPGe detector at the WIPP facility in Carlsbad, NM (2013). Neutrinoless double beta decay is a rare hypothesized process that may yield valuable insight into the fundamental properties of the neutrino. Currently there are several experiments trying to observe this process, including the Majorana DEMONSTRAOR experiment, which uses high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors to generate and search for these events. Because the event happens internally, it is essential to have the lowest background possible. This is done through passive detector shielding, as well as event discrimination techniques that distinguish between multi-site events characteristic of gamma-radiation, and single-site events characteristic of neutrinoless double beta decay. Before fielding such an experiment, the radiation response of

  8. 3D detectors with high space and time resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, A.

    2018-01-01

    For future high luminosity LHC experiments it will be important to develop new detector systems with increased space and time resolution and also better radiation hardness in order to operate in high luminosity environment. A possible technology which could give such performances is 3D silicon detectors. This work explores the possibility of a pixel geometry by designing and simulating different solutions, using Sentaurus Tecnology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) as design and simulation tool, and analysing their performances. A key factor during the selection was the generated electric field and the carrier velocity inside the active area of the pixel.

  9. Performance of GEM detectors in high intensity particle beams

    CERN Document Server

    Bachmann, S; Ketzer, B; Deutel, M; Ropelewski, Leszek; Sauli, Fabio; Bondar, A E; Buzulutskov, A F; Shekhtman, L I; Sokolov, A; Tatarinov, A A; Vasilev, A; Kappler, S; Schulte, E C

    2001-01-01

    We describe extensive tests of Double GEM and Triple GEM detectors, including full size prototypes for the COMPASS experiment, exposed to high intensity muon, proton and pion beams at the Paul~Scherrer Institute and at CERN. The measurements aim at detecting problems possible under these operation conditions, the main concern being the occurrence of discharges induced by beam particles. Results on the dependence of the probability for induced discharges on the experimental environment are presented and discussed. Implications for the application of GEM~detectors in experiments at high luminosity colliders are illustrated.

  10. Stabilized High Power Laser for Advanced Gravitational Wave Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willke, B; Danzmann, K; Fallnich, C; Frede, M; Heurs, M; King, P; Kracht, D; Kwee, P; Savage, R; Seifert, F; Wilhelm, R

    2006-01-01

    Second generation gravitational wave detectors require high power lasers with several 100W of output power and with very low temporal and spatial fluctuations. In this paper we discuss possible setups to achieve high laser power and describe a 200W prestabilized laser system (PSL). The PSL noise requirements for advanced gravitational wave detectors will be discussed in general and the stabilization scheme proposed for the Advanced LIGO PSL will be described. Special emphasis will be given to the most demanding power stabilization requirements and new results (RIN ≤ 4x10 -9 /√Hz) will be presented

  11. Results from the AMANDA high-energy neutrino detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biron, A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper briefly summarizes the search for astronomical sources of high-energy neutrinos using the AMANDA-B10 detector. The complete data set from 1997 was analyzed. For E μ > 10 TeV, the detector exceeds 10,000 m 2 in effective area between declinations of 25 and 90 degrees. Neutrinos generated in the atmosphere by cosmic ray interactions were used to verify the overall sensitivity of the coincident events between the SPASE air shower array and the AMANDA detector. Preliminary flux limits from point source candidates are presented. For declinations larger than +45 degrees, our results compare favourably to existing limits for sources in the Southern sky. We also present the current status of the searches for high-energy neutrino emission from diffusely distributed sources, GRBs, and WIMPs from the center of the Earth

  12. High-gain bipolar detector on float-zone silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, D. J.; Batignani, G.; Del Guerra, A.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Giorgi, M.; Forti, F.

    2003-10-01

    Since the float-zone (FZ) silicon has lower contaminations and longer minority-carrier lifetime than those in Czochralski silicon and other semiconductor materials, it has potential advantages to fabricate bipolar detectors on the high-purity FZ silicon substrate to achieve a high gain at ultra-low-signal levels. The authors present preliminary experimental results on a bipolar detector fabricated on an unusual high-purity FZ silicon substrate. A backside gettering layer of phosphorus-doped polysilicon was employed to preserve the long carrier lifetime of the high-purity FZ silicon. The device has been investigated in the detection of a continuous flux of X-ray and infrared light. The bipolar detector with a circular emitter of 2 mm diameter has demonstrated high gains up to 3820 for 22 keV X-ray from a 1 mCi Cd radioactive source (the X-ray photon flux, received by the detector is estimated to be ˜7.77×10 4/s). High gain up to 4400 for 0.17 nW light with a wavelength of 0.83 μm has been observed for the same device.

  13. High-gain bipolar detector on float-zone silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, D.J.; Batignani, G.; Guerra, A.D.A. Del; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Boscardin, M.; Bosisio, L.; Giorgi, M.; Forti, F.

    2003-01-01

    Since the float-zone (FZ) silicon has lower contaminations and longer minority-carrier lifetime than those in Czochralski silicon and other semiconductor materials, it has potential advantages to fabricate bipolar detectors on the high-purity FZ silicon substrate to achieve a high gain at ultra-low-signal levels. The authors present preliminary experimental results on a bipolar detector fabricated on an unusual high-purity FZ silicon substrate. A backside gettering layer of phosphorus-doped polysilicon was employed to preserve the long carrier lifetime of the high-purity FZ silicon. The device has been investigated in the detection of a continuous flux of X-ray and infrared light. The bipolar detector with a circular emitter of 2 mm diameter has demonstrated high gains up to 3820 for 22 keV X-ray from a 1 mCi Cd radioactive source (the X-ray photon flux, received by the detector is estimated to be ∼7.77x10 4 /s). High gain up to 4400 for 0.17 nW light with a wavelength of 0.83 μm has been observed for the same device

  14. Y-Ba-Cu-O thin films as high speed IR detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, H.S.; Zheng, J.P.; Ying, Q.Y.

    1990-01-01

    Y-Ba-Cu-O thin film infrared detectors were fabricated and studied with various lasers. Operation of the detector in both the bolometric and nonbolometric modes was investigated at 10 microns with a CO2 laser. In the bolometric mode, the detectivity of the detector at 90 K was 2.1 x 10 to the 8th cm sq rt Hz/W with a response time of 15 microsec, corresponding to a bandwidth of 70 KHz. The speed of the detector in the nonbolometric mode was much faster and was beyond the instrument resolution. With a picosecond N2 laser, the output showed an instrument limited duration of 2 ns. The detectivity could not be determined in the nonbolometric mode due to the extremely low noise. The superconducting film quality is critical to the performance of these detectors. 27 refs

  15. Source parameters and effects of bandwidth and local geology on high- frequency ground motions observed for aftershocks of the northeastern Ohio earthquake of 31 January 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassmoyer, G.; Borcherdt, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    A 10-station array (GEOS) yielded recordings of exceptional bandwidth (400 sps) and resolution (up to 96 dB) for the aftershocks of the moderate (mb???4.9) earthquake that occurred on 31 January 1986 near Painesville, Ohio. Nine aftershocks were recorded with seismic moments ranging between 9 ?? 1016 and 3 ?? 1019 dyne-cm (MW: 0.6 to 2.3). The aftershock recordings at a site underlain by ???8m of lakeshore sediments show significant levels of high-frequency soil amplification of vertical motion at frequencies near 8, 20 and 70 Hz. Viscoelastic models for P and SV waves incident at the base of the sediments yield estimates of vertical P-wave response consistent with the observed high-frequency site resonances, but suggest additional detailed shear-wave logs are needed to account for observed S-wave response. -from Authors

  16. A Highly Sensitive Multi-Element HgCdTe E-APD Detector for IPDA Lidar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jeff; Welch, Terry; Mitra, Pradip; Reiff, Kirk; Sun, Xiaoli; Abshire, James

    2014-01-01

    An HgCdTe electron avalanche photodiode (e-APD) detector has been developed for lidar receivers, one application of which is integrated path differential absorption lidar measurements of such atmospheric trace gases as CO2 and CH4. The HgCdTe APD has a wide, visible to mid-wave-infrared, spectral response, high dynamic range, substantially improved sensitivity, and an expected improvement in operational lifetime. A demonstration sensor-chip assembly consisting of a 4.3 lm cutoff HgCdTe 4 9 4 APD detector array with 80 micrometer pitch pixels and a custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor readout integrated circuit was developed. For one typical array the APD gain was 654 at 12 V with corresponding gain normalized dark currents ranging from 1.2 fA to 3.2 fA. The 4 9 4 detector system was characterized at 77 K with a 1.55 micrometer wavelength, 1 microsecond wide, laser pulse. The measured unit gain detector photon conversion efficiency was 91.1%. At 11 V bias the mean measured APD gain at 77 K was 307.8 with sigma/mean uniformity of 1.23%. The average, noise-bandwidth normalized, system noise-equivalent power (NEP) was 1.04 fW/Hz(exp 1/2) with a sigma/mean of 3.8%. The measured, electronics-limited, bandwidth of 6.8 MHz was more than adequate for 1 microsecond pulse detection. The system had an NEP (3 MHz) of 0.4 fW/Hz(exp 1/2) at 12 V APD bias and a linear dynamic range close to 1000. A gain-independent quantum-limited SNR of 80% of full theoretical was indicative of a gain-independent excess noise factor very close to 1.0 and the expected APD mode quantum efficiency.

  17. Development of a high-count-rate neutron detector with position sensitivity and high efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, R.; Sandoval, J.

    1996-01-01

    While the neutron scattering community is bombarded with hints of new technologies that may deliver detectors with high-count-rate capability, high efficiency, gamma-ray insensitivity, and high resolution across large areas, only the time-tested, gas-filled 3 He and scintillation detectors are in widespread use. Future spallation sources with higher fluxes simply must exploit some of the advanced detector schemes that are as yet unproved as production systems. Technologies indicating promise as neutron detectors include pixel arrays of amorphous silicon, silicon microstrips, microstrips with gas, and new scintillation materials. This project sought to study the competing neutron detector technologies and determine which or what combination will lead to a production detector system well suited for use at a high-intensity neutron scattering source

  18. Characterization of highly multiplexed monolithic PET / gamma camera detector modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, L. A.; Pedemonte, S.; DeWitt, D.; MacDonald, L.; Hunter, W. C. J.; Van Leemput, K.; Miyaoka, R.

    2018-04-01

    PET detectors use signal multiplexing to reduce the total number of electronics channels needed to cover a given area. Using measured thin-beam calibration data, we tested a principal component based multiplexing scheme for scintillation detectors. The highly-multiplexed detector signal is no longer amenable to standard calibration methodologies. In this study we report results of a prototype multiplexing circuit, and present a new method for calibrating the detector module with multiplexed data. A 50 × 50 × 10 mm3 LYSO scintillation crystal was affixed to a position-sensitive photomultiplier tube with 8 × 8 position-outputs and one channel that is the sum of the other 64. The 65-channel signal was multiplexed in a resistive circuit, with 65:5 or 65:7 multiplexing. A 0.9 mm beam of 511 keV photons was scanned across the face of the crystal in a 1.52 mm grid pattern in order to characterize the detector response. New methods are developed to reject scattered events and perform depth-estimation to characterize the detector response of the calibration data. Photon interaction position estimation of the testing data was performed using a Gaussian Maximum Likelihood estimator and the resolution and scatter-rejection capabilities of the detector were analyzed. We found that using a 7-channel multiplexing scheme (65:7 compression ratio) with 1.67 mm depth bins had the best performance with a beam-contour of 1.2 mm FWHM (from the 0.9 mm beam) near the center of the crystal and 1.9 mm FWHM near the edge of the crystal. The positioned events followed the expected Beer–Lambert depth distribution. The proposed calibration and positioning method exhibited a scattered photon rejection rate that was a 55% improvement over the summed signal energy-windowing method.

  19. Hexagonal boron nitride neutron detectors with high detection efficiencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, A.; Grenadier, S. J.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2018-01-01

    Neutron detectors fabricated from 10B enriched hexagonal boron nitride (h-10BN or h-BN) epilayers have demonstrated the highest thermal neutron detection efficiency among solid-state neutron detectors to date at about 53%. In this work, photoconductive-like vertical detectors with a detection area of 1 × 1 mm2 were fabricated from 50 μm thick free-standing h-BN epilayers using Ni/Au and Ti/Al bilayers as ohmic contacts. Leakage currents, mobility-lifetime (μτ) products under UV photoexcitation, and neutron detection efficiencies have been measured for a total of 16 different device configurations. The results have unambiguously identified that detectors incorporating the Ni/Au bilayer on both surfaces as ohmic contacts and using the negatively biased top surface for neutron irradiation are the most desired device configurations. It was noted that high growth temperatures of h-10BN epilayers on sapphire substrates tend to yield a higher concentration of oxygen impurities near the bottom surface, leading to a better device performance by the chosen top surface for irradiation than by the bottom. Preferential scattering of oxygen donors tends to reduce the mobility of holes more than that of electrons, making the biasing scheme with the ability of rapidly extracting holes at the irradiated surface while leaving the electrons to travel a large average distance inside the detector at a preferred choice. When measured against a calibrated 6LiF filled micro-structured semiconductor neutron detector, it was shown that the optimized configuration has pushed the detection efficiency of h-BN neutron detectors to 58%. These detailed studies also provided a better understanding of growth-mediated impurities in h-BN epilayers and their effects on the charge collection and neutron detection efficiencies.

  20. Low Group Delay Dispersion Optical Coating for Broad Bandwidth High Reflection at 45° Incidence, P Polarization of Femtosecond Pulses with 900 nm Center Wavelength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Bellum

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe an optical coating design suitable for broad bandwidth high reflection (BBHR at 45° angle of incidence (AOI, P polarization (Ppol of femtosecond (fs laser pulses whose wavelengths range from 800 to 1000 nm. Our design process is guided by quarter-wave HR coating properties. The design must afford low group delay dispersion (GDD for reflected light over the broad, 200 nm bandwidth in order to minimize temporal broadening of the fs pulses due to dispersive alteration of relative phases between their frequency components. The design should also be favorable to high laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT. We base the coating on TiO2/SiO2 layer pairs produced by means of e-beam evaporation with ion-assisted deposition, and use OptiLayer Thin Film Software to explore designs starting with TiO2/SiO2 layers having thicknesses in a reverse chirped arrangement. This approach led to a design with R > 99% from 800 to 1000 nm and GDD < 20 fs2 from 843 to 949 nm (45° AOI, Ppol. The design’s GDD behaves in a smooth way, suitable for GDD compensation techniques, and its electric field intensities show promise for high LIDTs. Reflectivity and GDD measurements for the initial test coating indicate good performance of the BBHR design. Subsequent coating runs with improved process calibration produced two coatings whose HR bands satisfactorily meet the design goals. For the sake of completeness, we summarize our previously reported transmission spectra and LIDT test results with 800 ps, 8 ps and 675 fs pulses for these two coatings, and present a table of the LIDT results we have for all of our TiO2/SiO2 BBHR coatings, showing the trends with test laser pulse duration from the ns to sub-ps regimes.

  1. Detectors for high resolution dynamic pet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.; Huesman, R.H.

    1983-05-01

    This report reviews the motivation for high spatial resolution in dynamic positron emission tomography of the head and the technical problems in realizing this objective. We present recent progress in using small silicon photodiodes to measure the energy deposited by 511 keV photons in small BGO crystals with an energy resolution of 9.4% full-width at half-maximum. In conjunction with a suitable phototube coupled to a group of crystals, the photodiode signal to noise ratio is sufficient for the identification of individual crystals both for conventional and time-of-flight positron tomography

  2. High collection efficiency CVD diamond alpha detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergonzo, P.; Foulon, F.; Marshall, R.D.; Jany, C.; Brambilla, A.; McKeag, R.D.; Jackman, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    Advances in Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) diamond have enabled the routine use of this material for sensor device fabrication, allowing exploitation of its unique combination of physical properties (low temperature susceptibility (> 500 C), high resistance to radiation damage (> 100 Mrad) and to corrosive media). A consequence of CVD diamond growth on silicon is the formation of polycrystalline films which has a profound influence on the physical and electronic properties with respect to those measured on monocrystalline diamond. The authors report the optimization of physical and geometrical device parameters for radiation detection in the counting mode. Sandwich and co-planar electrode geometries are tested and their performances evaluated with regard to the nature of the field profile and drift distances inherent in such devices. The carrier drift length before trapping was measured under alpha particles and values as high as 40% of the overall film thickness are reported. Further, by optimizing the device geometry, they show that a gain in collection efficiency, defined as the induced charge divided by the deposited charge within the material, can be achieved even though lower bias values are used

  3. ATLAS ITk Strip Detector for High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kroll, Jiri; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is currently preparing for an upgrade of the tracking system in the course of the High-Luminosity LHC that is scheduled for 2026. The expected peak instantaneous luminosity up to 7.5E34 per second and cm2 corresponding to approximately 200 inelastic proton-proton interactions per beam crossing, radiation damage at an integrated luminosity of 3000/fb and hadron fluencies over 1E16 1 MeV neutron equivalent per cm2, as well as fast hardware tracking capability that will bring Level-0 trigger rate of a few MHz down to a Level-1 trigger rate below 1 MHz require a replacement of existing Inner Detector by an all-silicon Inner Tracker (ITk) with a pixel detector surrounded by a strip detector. The current prototyping phase, that is working with ITk Strip Detector consisting of a four-layer barrel and a forward region composed of six discs on each side of the barrel, has resulted in the ATLAS ITk Strip Detector Technical Design Report (TDR), which starts the pre-production readiness phase at the ...

  4. ATLAS ITk Strip Detector for High-Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Kroll, Jiri; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment is currently preparing for an upgrade of the tracking system in the course of the High-Luminosity LHC that is scheduled for 2026. The expected peak instantaneous luminosity up to $7.5\\times10^{34}\\;\\mathrm{cm}^{-2}\\mathrm{s}^{-1}$ corresponding to approximately 200 inelastic proton-proton interactions per beam crossing, radiation damage at an integrated luminosity of $3000\\;\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ and hadron fluencies over $2\\times10^{16}\\;\\mathrm{n}_{\\mathrm{eq}}/\\mathrm{cm}^{2}$, as well as fast hardware tracking capability that will bring Level-0 trigger rate of a few MHz down to a Level-1 trigger rate below 1 MHz require a replacement of existing Inner Detector by an all-silicon Inner Tracker with a pixel detector surrounded by a strip detector. The current prototyping phase, that is working with ITk Strip Detector consisting of a four-layer barrel and a forward region composed of six disks on each side of the barrel, has resulted in the ATLAS Inner Tracker Strip Detector Technical Design R...

  5. A high-pressure MWPC detector for crystallography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortuno-Prados, F.; Bazzano, A.; Berry, A.

    1999-01-01

    The application of the Multi-Wire Proportional Counter (MWPC) as a potential detector for protein crystallography and other wide-angle diffraction experiments is presented. Electrostatic problems found with our large area MWPC when operated at high pressure are discussed. We suggest that a solution...

  6. High resolution X radiography imaging detector-micro gap chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Huqiang; Wang Yun; Xu Dong; Xie Kuanzhong; Bian Jianjiang

    2007-01-01

    Micro gap chamber (MGC) is a new type of Two-Dimensional position sensitive detector having excellent properties on the space and time resolution, counting rate, 2D compact structure and the flexible of application. It will become a candidate of a new tracking detector for high energy physics experiment. The basic structure and properties of MGC as well as its main research subjects are presented in this paper. Furthermore, the feasibility and validity of utilizing diamond films as the MGC gap material were also discussed in detail. So, a potential radiography imaging detector is provided in order to realize X image and X ray diffraction experiment having very good spatial and time resolution in the 3rd Generation of Synchrotron Radiation Facility. (authors)

  7. Onyx as radiation detector for high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, Maria Inês; Souza, Divanizia N.; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2011-01-01

    A study of the thermoluminescent (TL) characteristics of white, black and stripped onyx samples is reported in this work. Onyx is a variety of chalcedony, a form of quartz. The onyx stone is considered nobler than marble. The irradiations were performed using a Gamma-Cell 220 system ( 60 Co). The TL emission curves presented two peaks around 150 °C and 210 °C for all samples. The dose–response curves showed a sublinear behavior between 0.5 Gy and 5 kGy, and the lower detection limit for the white onyx pellets was 1.5 mGy. The main dosimetric characteristics were studied, and the material showed good performance for high dose dosimetry.

  8. Capillary detectors for high resolution tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annis, P.; Bay, A.; Bonekaemper, D.; Buontempo, S.; Ereditato, A.; Fabre, J.P.; Fiorillo, G.; Frekers, D.; Frenkel, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Garufi, F.; Goldberg, J.; Golovkin, S.; Hoepfner, K.; Konijn, J.; Kozarenko, E.; Kreslo, I.; Liberti, B.; Martellotti, G.; Medvedkov, A.; Mommaert, C.; Panman, J.; Penso, G.; Petukhov, Yu.; Rondeshagen, D.; Tyukov, V.; Vasilchenko, V.; Vilain, P.; Vischers, J.L.; Wilquet, G.; Winter, K.; Wolff, T.; Wong, H.

    1997-01-01

    We present a new tracking device based on glass capillary bundles or layers filled with highly purified liquid scintillator and read out at one end by means of image intensifiers and CCD devices. A large-volume prototype consisting of 5 x 10 5 capillaries with a diameter of 20 μm and a length of 180 cm and read out by a megapixel CCD has been tested with muon and neutrino beams at CERN. With this prototype a two track resolution of 33 μm was achieved with passing through muons. Images of neutrino interactions in a capillary bundle have also been acquired and analysed. Read-out chains based on electron bombarded CCD (EBCCD) and image pipeline devices are also investigated. Preliminary results obtained with a capillary bundle read out by an EBCCD are presented. (orig.)

  9. Capillary detectors for high resolution tracking

    CERN Document Server

    Annis, P

    1997-01-01

    We present a new tracking device based on glass capillary bundles or layers filled with highly purified liquid scintillator and read out at one end by means of image intensifiers and CCD devices. A large-volume prototype consisting of 5 × 105 capillaries with a diameter of 20 μm and a length of 180 cm and read out by a megapixel CCD has been tested with muon and neutrino beams at CERN. With this prototype a two track resolution of 33 μm was achieved with passing through muons. Images of neutrino interactions in a capillary bundle have also been acquired and analysed. Read-out chains based on Electron Bombarded CCD (EBCCD) and image pipeline devices are also investigated. Preliminary results obtained with a capillary bundle read out by an EBCCD are presented.

  10. Variable pattern of high-order harmonic spectra from a laser-produced plasma by using the chirped pulses of narrow-bandwidth radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganeev, R. A.; Suzuki, M.; Baba, M.; Kuroda, H.; Redkin, P. V.

    2007-01-01

    Various plasmas prepared by laser ablation of the surfaces of solid targets were examined by the narrow-bandwidth radiation of different chirp and pulse durations. The high-order harmonics generated during laser-plasma interaction showed different brightness, wavelength shift, harmonic cutoff, and efficiency by using variable chirps of pump radiation. An analysis of harmonic optimization at these conditions is presented. The blueshifted and redshifted harmonics observed in this case were analyzed and attributed to the abundance of free electrons and self-phase modulation of the driving pulse. The resonance-induced enhancement of the 15th harmonic from GaN-nanoparticle-containing plasma caused by the tuning of harmonic wavelength close to the ionic transition was demonstrated

  11. Handling high data rate detectors at Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, U. K.; Rees, N.; Basham, M.; Ferner, F. J. K.

    2013-03-01

    An increasing number of area detectors, in use at Diamond Light Source, produce high rates of data. In order to capture, store and process this data High Performance Computing (HPC) systems have been implemented. This paper will present the architecture and usage for handling high rate data: detector data capture, large volume storage and parallel processing. The EPICS area Detector frame work has been adopted to abstract the detectors for common tasks including live processing, file format and storage. The chosen data format is HDF5 which provides multidimensional data storage and NeXuS compatibility. The storage system and related computing infrastructure include: a centralised Lustre based parallel file system, a dedicated network and a HPC cluster. A well defined roadmap is in place for the evolution of this to meet demand as the requirements and technology advances. For processing the science data the HPC cluster allow efficient parallel computing, on a mixture of ×86 and GPU processing units. The nature of the Lustre storage system in combination with the parallel HDF5 library allow efficient disk I/O during computation jobs. Software developments, which include utilising optimised parallel file reading for a variety of post processing techniques, are being developed in collaboration as part of the Pan-Data EU Project (www.pan-data.eu). These are particularly applicable to tomographic reconstruction and processing of non crystalline diffraction data.

  12. CVD Diamond Sensors In Detectors For High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00334150; Trischuk, William

    At the end of the next decade an upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) to High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) is planned which requires the development of new radiation tolerant sensor technology. Diamond is an interesting material for use as a particle detector in high radiation environments. The large band gap ($5.47\\,\\text{eV}$) and the large displacement energy suggest that diamond is a radiation tolerant detector material. In this Thesis the capability of Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) diamond as such a sensor technology is investigated. The radiation damage constant for $800\\,\\text{MeV}$ protons is measured using single crystalline CVD (scCVD) and polycrystalline CVD (pCVD) diamonds irradiated to particle fluences up to $12 \\times 10^{15}\\,\\text{p/cm}^2$. In addition the signal response of a pCVD diamond detector after an irradiation to $12 \\times 10^{15}\\,\\text{p/cm}^2$ is investigated to determine if such a detector can be operated efficiently in the expected HL-LHC environment. By using electrodes em...

  13. Admittance detector for high impedance systems: design and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Stamos, Brian N; Dasgupta, Purnendu K

    2014-12-02

    We describe an admittance detector for high impedance systems (small capillary bore and/or low solution specific conductance). Operation in the low frequency range (≤1 kHz, much lower than most relevant publications) provides optimum response to conductance changes in capillaries ≤20 μm in bore. The detector design was based on studies described in a preceding companion paper ( Zhang, M.; Stamos, B. N.; Amornthammarong, N.; Dasgupta, P. K. Anal. Chem. 2014, 8 , DOI 10.1021/ac503245a.). The highest S/N for detecting 100 μM KCl (5.5 μM peak concentration, ∼0.8 μS/cm) injected into water flowing through a capillary of 7.5 μm inner radius (r) was observed at 500-750 Hz. A low bias current operational amplifier in the transimpedance configuration permitted high gain (1 V/nA) to measure pA-nA level currents in the detection cell. Aside from an oscillator, an offset-capable RMS-DC converter formed the complete detection circuitry. Limits of detection (LODs) of KCl scaled inversely with the capillary cross section and were 2.1 and 0.32 μM injected KCl for r = 1 and 2.5 μm capillaries, respectively. When used as a detector on an r = 8 μm bore poly(methyl methacrylate) capillary in a split effluent stream from a suppressed ion chromatograph, the LOD was 27 nM bromide (Vex 22 V p-p), compared to 14 nM observed with a commercial bipolar pulse macroscale conductivity detector with an actively thermostated cell. We also show applications of the detector in electrophoresis in capillaries with r = 1 and 2.5 μm. Efficient heat dissipation permits high concentrations of the background electrolyte and sensitive detection because of efficient electrostacking.

  14. Development of a Massive, Highly Multiplexible, Phonon-Mediated Particle Detector Using Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y.-Y.; Cornell, B.; Aralis, T.; Bumble, B.; Golwala, S. R.

    2018-04-01

    We present a status update on the development of a phonon-mediated particle detector using kinetic inductance detector (KID). The design is intended for O(1) kg substrate, using O(102) KIDs on a single readout line, to image the athermal phonon distribution at energy resolution. The design specification is set by the need to improve position reconstruction fidelity while maintaining low energy threshold for future rare-event searches such as for low-mass dark matter. We report on the design, which shows negligible crosstalk and > 95% inductor current uniformity, using the coplanar waveguide feedline, ground shield, and a new class of KIDs with symmetric coplanar stripline (sCPS) inductor. The multiplexing is designed upon the frequency-geometry relation we develop for the sCPS KIDs. We introduce the fabrications of the Nb RF assessment prototypes and the high phonon collection efficiency Al-Nb devices. We achieve ≲ 0.07% frequency displacement on a 80-KID RF assessment prototype, and the result indicates that we may place more than 180 resonances in our 0.4 GHz readout band with minimal frequency misordering. The coupling quality factors are ˜ 105 as designed. Finally, we update our work in progress in fabricating the O(102) KID, bi-material, O(1) kg detectors, and the expected position and energy resolutions.

  15. Development of an underwater high sensitivity Cherenkov detector: Sea Urchin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camerini, U.; McGibney, D.; Roberts, A.

    1982-01-01

    The need for a high gain, high sensitivity Cherenkov light sensor to be used in a deep underwater muon and neutrino detector (DUMAND) array has led to the design of the Sea Urchin detector. In this design a spherical photocathode PMTis optically coupled through a glass hemisphere to a large number of glass spines, each of which is filled with a wavelength-shifting (WLS) solution of a high quantum efficiency phosphor. The Cherenkov radiation is absorbed in the spine, isotropically re-radiated at a longer wavelength, and a fraction of the fluorescent light is internally reflected in the spine, and guided to the photomultiplier concentrically located in the glass hemisphere. Experiments measuring the optical characteristics of the spines and computer programs simulating light transformation and detection cross sections are described. Overall optical gains in the range 5-10 are achieved. The WLS solution is inexpensive, and may have other applications. (orig.)

  16. High P/sub T/ detectors for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trilling, G.H.

    1987-11-01

    Summarized in this report is some of the work done at the recent Workshop on Experiments, Detectors, and Experimental Areas for the Supercollider held at Berkeley. The major goal was to develop an understanding of what complement of detectors would provide the capability for a well-balanced physics program at the SSC. Unlike earlier studies which had emphasized individual components such as tracking, calorimetry, etc., the intention was to focus on complete detectors. The particular detectors discussed in this paper are: the large solenoid detectors, the compact solenoid detectors, the non-magnetic detectors, the dipole detectors and muon detectors. 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  17. CHICSi - a compact ultra-high vacuum compatible detector system for nuclear reaction experiments at storage rings. II. Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubev, P.; Avdeichikov, V.; Carlen, L.; Jakobsson, B. E-mail: bo.jakobsson@kosufy.lu.se; Siwek, A.; Veldhuizen, E.J. van; Westerberg, L.; Whitlow, H.J

    2003-03-11

    We describe the detectors for identification of charged particles and fragments in CHICSi, a large solid angle multi-telescope system mounted inside an ultra-high vacuum (UHV), cluster-jet target chamber. CHICSi performs nuclear reaction experiments at storage rings. The telescopes consist of a first very thin, 10-14 {mu}m Si detector, a second 300 {mu}m (or possibly 500 {mu}m) ion implanted Si detector supplemented by a 6 mm GSO(Ce) scintillator read out by a photodiode (PD) or by a third 300 {mu}m Si detector. The telescopes provide full charge separation up to Z=17 and mass resolution up to A=9 in the energy range 0.7-60A MeV. The thin p-i-n diode detector, etched out from a 280 {mu}m Si wafer, and the GSO/PD detector, both exclusively developed for CHICSi, provide an energy resolution {<=}8%, while the standard 300 {mu}m detectors have {<=}2% energy resolution. Radiation stability of the Si detectors is confirmed up to an integrated flux of 10{sup 10} alpha particles. The GSO detector has 70% light collection efficiency with the optical coupling to the PD a simple open, 0.2 mm, gap. A new method, developed to perform absolute energy calibration for the GSO/PD detector is presented.

  18. CHICSi - a compact ultra-high vacuum compatible detector system for nuclear reaction experiments at storage rings. II. Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golubev, P.; Avdeichikov, V.; Carlen, L.; Jakobsson, B.; Siwek, A.; Veldhuizen, E.J. van; Westerberg, L.; Whitlow, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the detectors for identification of charged particles and fragments in CHICSi, a large solid angle multi-telescope system mounted inside an ultra-high vacuum (UHV), cluster-jet target chamber. CHICSi performs nuclear reaction experiments at storage rings. The telescopes consist of a first very thin, 10-14 μm Si detector, a second 300 μm (or possibly 500 μm) ion implanted Si detector supplemented by a 6 mm GSO(Ce) scintillator read out by a photodiode (PD) or by a third 300 μm Si detector. The telescopes provide full charge separation up to Z=17 and mass resolution up to A=9 in the energy range 0.7-60A MeV. The thin p-i-n diode detector, etched out from a 280 μm Si wafer, and the GSO/PD detector, both exclusively developed for CHICSi, provide an energy resolution ≤8%, while the standard 300 μm detectors have ≤2% energy resolution. Radiation stability of the Si detectors is confirmed up to an integrated flux of 10 10 alpha particles. The GSO detector has 70% light collection efficiency with the optical coupling to the PD a simple open, 0.2 mm, gap. A new method, developed to perform absolute energy calibration for the GSO/PD detector is presented

  19. Bandwidth extension of speech using perceptual criteria

    CERN Document Server

    Berisha, Visar; Liss, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Bandwidth extension of speech is used in the International Telecommunication Union G.729.1 standard in which the narrowband bitstream is combined with quantized high-band parameters. Although this system produces high-quality wideband speech, the additional bits used to represent the high band can be further reduced. In addition to the algorithm used in the G.729.1 standard, bandwidth extension methods based on spectrum prediction have also been proposed. Although these algorithms do not require additional bits, they perform poorly when the correlation between the low and the high band is weak. In this book, two wideband speech coding algorithms that rely on bandwidth extension are developed. The algorithms operate as wrappers around existing narrowband compression schemes. More specifically, in these algorithms, the low band is encoded using an existing toll-quality narrowband system, whereas the high band is generated using the proposed extension techniques. The first method relies only on transmitted high-...

  20. High-Rate Performance of Muon Drift Tube Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schwegler, Philipp

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Centre for Particle Physics, CERN, collides protons with an unprecedentedly high centre-of-mass energy and luminosity. The collision products are recorded and analysed by four big experiments, one of which is the ATLAS detector. In parallel with the first LHC run from 2009 to 2012, which culminated in the discovery of the last missing particle of the Standard Model of particle physics, the Higgs boson, planning of upgrades of the LHC for higher instantaneous luminosities (HL-LHC) is already progressing. The high instantaneous luminosity of the LHC puts high demands on the detectors with respect to radiation hardness and rate capability which are further increased with the luminosity upgrade. In this thesis, the limitations of the Muon Drift Tube (MDT) chambers of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer at the high background counting rates at the LHC and performance of new small diameter muon drift tube (sMDT) detectors at the even higher background rates at HL-LHC are stud...

  1. High-Performance γ spectrometry Using Ge(Li) Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brethon, J.; Libs, G.; Detourne, G.; Legrand, J.; Boulanger, J.

    1968-01-01

    This report describes a high resolution gamma spectrometer design which use Ge-Li detectors, a cooled field effect transistor preamplifier, and a spectrum stabiliser. The obtained resolution and the 122 keV gamma ray of the 57 Co is 0.96 keV, and 239 Pu, 233 Pa and 95 Zr + 95 Nb spectra are shown for the example. (authors) [fr

  2. Pyroelectric detectors with integrated operational amplifier for high modulation frequencies; Pyroelektrische Detektoren mit integriertem Operationsverstaerker fuer hohe Modulationsfrequenzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, N.; Saenze, H.; Heinze, M. [InfraTec GmbH Dresden (Germany)

    2006-02-01

    In order to use the advantages of the current mode operation a pyroelectric detector family with integrated transimpedance amplifier (TIA) was developed particularly for modulation frequencies up to the kHz range with a simplified external circuitry for new application fields, e.g. absorption spectroscopy using quantum-cascade-laser. The essential advantages of the TIA arise from the small electrical time constant {tau}{sub E} and the short-circuiting of the pyroelectric element. A flat amplitude response up to some kHz was aimed at for a sufficiently high response of 7500 V/W, appr., also at high modulation frequencies. This can be achieved through a electrical time constant of 1 ms or less and a wide bandwidth of the op amp. The article describes in detail how these demands were accomplished and which compromises had to be accepted. (orig.)

  3. High-bandwidth prefetcher for high-bandwidth memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sanyam; Kohn, James Robert; Ernst, Daniel Jonathan; Poxon, Heidi Lynn; DeRose, Luiz

    2018-04-17

    A method for prefetching data into a cache is provided. The method allocates an outstanding request buffer ("ORB"). The method stores in an address field of the ORB an address and a number of blocks. The method issues prefetch requests for a degree number of blocks starting at the address. When a prefetch response is received for all the prefetch requests, the method adjusts the address of the next block to prefetch and adjusts the number of blocks remaining to be retrieved and then issues prefetch requests for a degree number of blocks starting at the adjusted address. The prefetching pauses when a maximum distance between the reads of the prefetched blocks and the last prefetched block is reached. When a read request for a prefetched block is received, the method resumes prefetching when a resume criterion is satisfied.

  4. Performance of microstrip and microgap gas detectors at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraga, F.A.F.; Fraga, M.M.F.R.; Marques, R.F.; Margato, L.M.S.; Goncalo, J.R.; Policarpo, A.J.P.L.

    1997-01-01

    A study of the operation of microstrip and microgap detectors at various gas pressures up to 6 bar with Kr-CO 2 , Xe-CO 2 and Xe-CH 4 is presented. The data were collected with a microstrip (1000 μm pitch) and a microgap (200 μm pitch) detector using a clean chamber and gas system. It is shown that maximum gain is strongly dependent on pressure and gains as high as 9 x 10 3 were obtained with Kr-CO 2 at 6 bar with a MSGC. With the smaller-pitch MGC we could get a gain of 180 with Xe-CH 4 at 6 bar; the typical energy resolution at 22 keV being about 15%. From the present work one can conclude that microstructures can operate at high pressure and that their application in high-efficiency, low-granularity X-ray detectors with an energy range up to a few tens of keV can be seriously considered. (orig.)

  5. High voltage distribution scheme for large size GEM detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saini, J.; Kumar, A.; Dubey, A.K.; Negi, V.S.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2016-01-01

    Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors will be used for Muon tracking in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the Facility for Anti-proton Ion Research (FAIR) at Darmstadt, Germany. The sizes of the detector modules in the Muon chambers are of the order of 1 metre x 0.5 metre. For construction of these chambers, three GEM foils are used per chamber. These foils are made by two layered 50μm thin kapton foil. Each GEM foil has millions of holes on it. In such a large scale manufacturing of the foils, even after stringent quality controls, some of the holes may still have defects or defects might develop over the time with operating conditions. These defects may result in short-circuit of the entire GEM foil. A short even in a single hole will make entire foil un-usable. To reduce such occurrences, high voltage (HV) segmentation within the foils has been introduced. These segments are powered either by individual HV supply per segment or through an active HV distribution to manage such a large number of segments across the foil. Individual supplies apart from being costly, are highly complex to implement. Additionally, CBM will have high intensity of particles bombarding on the detector causing the change of resistive chain current feeding the GEM detector with the variation in the intensity. This leads to voltage fluctuations across the foil resulting in the gain variation with the particle intensity. Hence, a low cost active HV distribution is designed to take care of the above discussed issues

  6. Ultrahigh bandwidth signal processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo

    2016-01-01

    Optical time lenses have proven to be very versatile for advanced optical signal processing. Based on a controlled interplay between dispersion and phase-modulation by e.g. four-wave mixing, the processing is phase-preserving, an hence useful for all types of data signals including coherent multi......-level modulation founats. This has enabled processing of phase-modulated spectrally efficient data signals, such as orthogonal frequency division multiplexed (OFDM) signa In that case, a spectral telescope system was used, using two time lenses with different focal lengths (chirp rates), yielding a spectral...... regeneratio These operations require a broad bandwidth nonlinear platform, and novel photonic integrated nonlinear platform like aluminum gallium arsenide nano-waveguides used for 1.28 Tbaud optical signal processing will be described....

  7. Detector development for the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00367854; Gößling, Claus

    To maximise the discovery potential of the Large Hadron Collider, it will be upgraded to the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider in 2024. New detector challenges arise from the higher instantaneous luminosity and the higher particle flux. The new ATLAS Inner Tracker will replace the current tracking detector to be able to cope with these challenges. Many pixel detector technologies exist for particle tracking, but their suitability for the ATLAS Inner Tracker needs to be studied. Active high-voltage CMOS sensors, which are produced in industrialised processes, offer a fast readout and radiation tolerance. In this thesis the HV2FEI4v2 sensor, which is capacitively coupled to the ATLAS Pixel FE-I4 readout chip, is characterised for the usage in the outer layers of the ATLAS Inner Tracker. Key quantities of this prototype module are studied, such as the hit efficiency and the subpixel encoding. The early HV2FEI4v2 prototype shows promising results as a starting point for further module developments. Active CMO...

  8. Detectors and signal processing for high-energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, P.

    1981-01-01

    Basic principles of the particle detection and signal processing for high-energy physics experiments are presented. It is shown that the optimum performance of a properly designed detector system is not limited by incidental imperfections, but solely by more fundamental limitations imposed by the quantum nature and statistical behavior of matter. The noise sources connected with the detection and signal processing are studied. The concepts of optimal filtering and optimal detector/amplifying device matching are introduced. Signal processing for a liquid argon calorimeter is analyzed in some detail. The position detection in gas counters is studied. Resolution in drift chambers for the drift coordinate measurement as well as the second coordinate measurement is discussed

  9. Characterization of segmented large volume, high purity germanium detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruyneel, B. [Koeln Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik

    2006-07-01

    {gamma}-ray tracking in future HPGe arrays like AGATA will rely on pulse shape analysis (PSA) of multiple {gamma}-interactions. For this purpose, a simple and fast procedure was developed which enabled the first full characterization of a segmented large volume HPGe detector. An analytical model for the hole mobility in a Ge crystal lattice was developed to describe the hole drift anisotropy with experimental velocity values along the crystal axis as parameters. The new model is based on the drifted Maxwellian hole distribution in Ge. It is verified by reproducing successfully experimental longitudinal hole anisotropy data. A comparison between electron and hole mobility shows large differences for the longitudinal and tangential velocity anisotropy as a function of the electrical field orientation. Measurements on a 12 fold segmented, n-type, large volume, irregular shaped HPGe detector were performed in order to determine the parameters of anisotropic mobility for electrons and holes as charge carriers created by {gamma}-ray interactions. To characterize the electron mobility the complete outer detector surface was scanned in small steps employing photopeak interactions at 60 keV. A precise measurement of the hole drift anisotropy was performed with 356 keV rays. The drift velocity anisotropy and crystal geometry cause considerable rise time differences in pulse shapes depending on the position of the spatial charge carrier creation. Pulse shapes of direct and transient signals are reproduced by weighting potential calculations with high precision. The measured angular dependence of rise times is caused by the anisotropic mobility, crystal geometry, changing field strength and space charge effects. Preamplified signals were processed employing digital spectroscopy electronics. Response functions, crosstalk contributions and averaging procedures were taken into account implying novel methods due to the segmentation of the Ge-crystal and the digital electronics

  10. Characterization of segmented large volume, high purity germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruyneel, B.

    2006-01-01

    γ-ray tracking in future HPGe arrays like AGATA will rely on pulse shape analysis (PSA) of multiple γ-interactions. For this purpose, a simple and fast procedure was developed which enabled the first full characterization of a segmented large volume HPGe detector. An analytical model for the hole mobility in a Ge crystal lattice was developed to describe the hole drift anisotropy with experimental velocity values along the crystal axis as parameters. The new model is based on the drifted Maxwellian hole distribution in Ge. It is verified by reproducing successfully experimental longitudinal hole anisotropy data. A comparison between electron and hole mobility shows large differences for the longitudinal and tangential velocity anisotropy as a function of the electrical field orientation. Measurements on a 12 fold segmented, n-type, large volume, irregular shaped HPGe detector were performed in order to determine the parameters of anisotropic mobility for electrons and holes as charge carriers created by γ-ray interactions. To characterize the electron mobility the complete outer detector surface was scanned in small steps employing photopeak interactions at 60 keV. A precise measurement of the hole drift anisotropy was performed with 356 keV rays. The drift velocity anisotropy and crystal geometry cause considerable rise time differences in pulse shapes depending on the position of the spatial charge carrier creation. Pulse shapes of direct and transient signals are reproduced by weighting potential calculations with high precision. The measured angular dependence of rise times is caused by the anisotropic mobility, crystal geometry, changing field strength and space charge effects. Preamplified signals were processed employing digital spectroscopy electronics. Response functions, crosstalk contributions and averaging procedures were taken into account implying novel methods due to the segmentation of the Ge-crystal and the digital electronics. The results are

  11. High bandwidth beam current monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baltrusaitis, R.M.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Cooper, R.G.; Peterson, E.; Warn, C.E.

    1993-01-01

    A stripline directional coupler beam current monitor capable of measuring the time structure of a 30-ps electron beam bunch has been developed. The time response performance of the monitor compares very well with Cherenkov light produced in quartz by the electron beam. The four-pickup monitor is now used on a routine basis for measuring the beam duration, tuning for optimized beam bunching, and centering the bunch in the beam pipe

  12. A Novel Detector for High Neutron Flux Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singo, T. D.; Wyngaardt, S. M.; Papka, P.; Dobson, R. T.

    2010-01-01

    Measuring alpha particles from a neutron induced break-up reaction with a mass spectrometer can be an excellent tool for detecting neutrons in a high neutron flux environment. Break-up reactions of 6 Li and 12 C can be used in the detection of slow and fast neutrons, respectively. A high neutron flux detection system that integrates the neutron energy sensitive material and helium mass spectrometer has been developed. The description of the detector configuration is given and it is soon to be tested at iThemba LABS, South Africa.

  13. High-precision efficiency calibration of a high-purity co-axial germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blank, B., E-mail: blank@cenbg.in2p3.fr [Centre d' Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, 33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Souin, J.; Ascher, P.; Audirac, L.; Canchel, G.; Gerbaux, M.; Grévy, S.; Giovinazzo, J.; Guérin, H.; Nieto, T. Kurtukian; Matea, I. [Centre d' Etudes Nucléaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR 5797, CNRS/IN2P3, Université de Bordeaux, Chemin du Solarium, BP 120, 33175 Gradignan Cedex (France); Bouzomita, H.; Delahaye, P.; Grinyer, G.F.; Thomas, J.C. [Grand Accélérateur National d' Ions Lourds, CEA/DSM, CNRS/IN2P3, Bvd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, F-14076 CAEN Cedex 5 (France)

    2015-03-11

    A high-purity co-axial germanium detector has been calibrated in efficiency to a precision of about 0.15% over a wide energy range. High-precision scans of the detector crystal and γ-ray source measurements have been compared to Monte-Carlo simulations to adjust the dimensions of a detector model. For this purpose, standard calibration sources and short-lived online sources have been used. The resulting efficiency calibration reaches the precision needed e.g. for branching ratio measurements of super-allowed β decays for tests of the weak-interaction standard model.

  14. Development of bonded semiconductor device for high counting rate high efficiency photon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Ikuo

    2008-01-01

    We are trying to decrease dose exposure in medical diagnosis by way of measuring the energy of X-rays. For this purpose, radiation detectors for X-ray energy measurement with high counting rate should be developed. Direct bonding of Si wafers was carried out to make a radiation detector, which had separated X-ray absorber and detector. The resistivity of bonding interface was estimated with the results of four-probe measurements and model calculations. Direct bonding of high resistivity p and n-Si wafers was also performed. The resistance of the pn bonded diode was 0.7 MΩ. The resistance should be increased in the future. (author)

  15. High-rate performance of muon drift tube detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwegler, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Centre for Particle Physics, CERN, collides protons with an unprecedentedly high centre-of-mass energy and luminosity. The collision products are recorded and analysed by four big experiments, one of which is the ATLAS detector. In parallel with the first LHC run from 2009 to 2012, which culminated in the discovery of the last missing particle of the Standard Model of particle physics, the Higgs boson, planning of upgrades of the LHC for higher instantaneous luminosities (HL-LHC) is already progressing. The high instantaneous luminosity of the LHC puts high demands on the detectors with respect to radiation hardness and rate capability which are further increased with the luminosity upgrade. In this thesis, the limitations of the Muon Drift Tube (MDT) chambers of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer at the high background counting rates at the LHC and performance of new small diameter muon drift tube (sMDT) detectors at the even higher background rates at HL-LHC are studied. The resolution and efficiency of sMDT chambers at high γ-ray and proton irradiation rates well beyond the ones expected at HL-LHC have been measured and the irradiation effects understood using detailed simulations. The sMDT chambers offer an about an order of magnitude better rate capability and are an ideal replacement for the MDT chambers because of compatibility of services and read-out. The limitations of the sMDT chambers are now in the read-out electronics, taken from the MDT chambers, to which improvements for even higher rate capability are proposed.

  16. New application of superconductors: High sensitivity cryogenic light detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardani, L., E-mail: laura.cardani@roma1.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Physics Department, Princeton University, Washington Road, 08544 Princeton, NJ (United States); Bellini, F.; Casali, N. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN – Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma, Italy (Italy); Castellano, M.G. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie – CNR, Via Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Roma (Italy); Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); Cosmelli, C.; Cruciani, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN – Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma, Italy (Italy); D' Addabbo, A. [INFN – Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (L' Aquila) 67010 (Italy); Di Domizio, S. [INFN – Sezione di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Martinez, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Sapienza Università di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma (Italy); INFN – Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma, Italy (Italy); Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear y Astroparticulas, Universidad de Zaragoza, Zaragoza 50009 (Spain); Tomei, C. [INFN – Sezione di Roma, Piazzale Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Roma, Italy (Italy); and others

    2017-02-11

    In this paper we describe the current status of the CALDER project, which is developing ultra-sensitive light detectors based on superconductors for cryogenic applications. When we apply an AC current to a superconductor, the Cooper pairs oscillate and acquire kinetic inductance, that can be measured by inserting the superconductor in a LC circuit with high merit factor. Interactions in the superconductor can break the Cooper pairs, causing sizable variations in the kinetic inductance and, thus, in the response of the LC circuit. The continuous monitoring of the amplitude and frequency modulation allows to reconstruct the incident energy with excellent sensitivity. This concept is at the basis of Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) that are characterized by natural aptitude to multiplexed read-out (several sensors can be tuned to different resonant frequencies and coupled to the same line), resolution of few eV, stable behavior over a wide temperature range, and ease in fabrication. We present the results obtained by the CALDER collaboration with 2×2 cm{sup 2} substrates sampled by 1 or 4 Aluminum KIDs. We show that the performances of the first prototypes are already competitive with those of other commonly used light detectors, and we discuss the strategies for a further improvement.

  17. New application of superconductors: High sensitivity cryogenic light detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardani, L.; Bellini, F.; Casali, N.; Castellano, M.G.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Cruciani, A.; D'Addabbo, A.; Di Domizio, S.; Martinez, M.; Tomei, C.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we describe the current status of the CALDER project, which is developing ultra-sensitive light detectors based on superconductors for cryogenic applications. When we apply an AC current to a superconductor, the Cooper pairs oscillate and acquire kinetic inductance, that can be measured by inserting the superconductor in a LC circuit with high merit factor. Interactions in the superconductor can break the Cooper pairs, causing sizable variations in the kinetic inductance and, thus, in the response of the LC circuit. The continuous monitoring of the amplitude and frequency modulation allows to reconstruct the incident energy with excellent sensitivity. This concept is at the basis of Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KIDs) that are characterized by natural aptitude to multiplexed read-out (several sensors can be tuned to different resonant frequencies and coupled to the same line), resolution of few eV, stable behavior over a wide temperature range, and ease in fabrication. We present the results obtained by the CALDER collaboration with 2×2 cm"2 substrates sampled by 1 or 4 Aluminum KIDs. We show that the performances of the first prototypes are already competitive with those of other commonly used light detectors, and we discuss the strategies for a further improvement.

  18. Teleoperation over low bandwidth communication links

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryer, R.J.; Mair, G.M.; Clark, N.; Heng, J.

    1996-01-01

    Teleoperation is well established for many areas of hazardous environment working. Where such environments are well structured and contained, such as within a working plant, communications bandwidths need not be a constraining factor. However where the worksite is remote, large, poorly structured or damaged communications rapidly become a critical factor in the efficient deployment and use of teleoperation equipment. The paper justifies and describes means which we are exploring to reduce the required communications bandwidth for teleoperation whist retaining full functionality. Techniques involved include incorporation of local intelligence at the worksite, with bandwidth devoted to high-level up-link control signals and down-link feedback, and the use of highly compressed video feeding 'virtual reality type' HMDs to provide maximum system transparency for the operator. The work is drawing on previous experience with an 'anthropomorphic robot heat' for telepresence work, and proprietary algorithms capable of compressing full colour video to standard telephone modem data rates. (Author)

  19. High precision and stable structures for particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Da Mota Silva, S; Hauviller, Claude

    1999-01-01

    The central detectors used in High Energy Physics Experiments require the use of light and stable structures capable of supporting delicate and precise radiation detection elements. These structures need to be highly stable under environmental conditions where external vibrations, high radiation levels, temperature and humidity gradients should be taken into account. Their main design drivers are high dimension and dynamic stability, high stiffness to mass ratio and large radiation length. For most applications, these constraints lead us to choose Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics ( CFRP) as structural element. The construction of light and stable structures with CFRP for these applications can be achieved by careful design engineering and further confirmation at the prototyping phase. However, the experimental environment can influence their characteristics and behavior. In this case, theuse of adaptive structures could become a solution for this problem. We are studying structures in CFRP with bonded piezoel...

  20. Cutter Connectivity Bandwidth Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-01

    The goal of this study was to determine how much bandwidth is required for cutters to meet emerging data transfer requirements. The Cutter Connectivity Business Solutions Team with guidance front the Commandant's 5 Innovation Council sponsored this study. Today, many Coast Guard administrative and business functions are being conducted via electronic means. Although our larger cutters can establish part-time connectivity using commercial satellite communications (SATCOM) while underway, there are numerous complaints regarding poor application performance. Additionally, smaller cutters do not have any standard means of underway connectivity. The R&D study shows the most important factor affecting web performance and enterprise applications onboard cutters was latency. Latency describes the time it takes the signal to reach the satellite and come back down through space. The latency due to use of higher orbit satellites is causing poor application performance and inefficient use of expensive SATCOM links. To improve performance, the CC must, (1) reduce latency by using alternate communications links such as low-earth orbit satellites, (2) tailor applications to the SATCOM link and/or (3) optimize protocols used for data communication to minimize time required by present applications to establish communications between the user and the host systems.

  1. Very broad bandwidth klystron amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faillon, G.; Egloff, G.; Farvet, C.

    Large surveillance radars use transmitters at peak power levels of around one MW and average levels of a few kW, and possibly several tens of kW, in S band, or even C band. In general, the amplification stage of these transmitters is a microwave power tube, frequently a klystron. Although designers often turn to klystrons because of their good peak and average power capabilities, they still see them as narrow band amplifiers, undoubtedly because of their resonant cavities which, at first sight, would seem highly selective. But, with the progress of recent years, it has now become quite feasible to use these tubes in installations requiring bandwidths in excess of 10 - 12 percent, and even 15 percent, at 1 MW peak for example, in S-band.

  2. New detector developments for high resolution positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, S.I.; Pichler, B.; Lorenz, E.

    1998-01-01

    The strength of quantitative, functional imaging using positron emission tomography, specially in small animals, is limited due to the spatial resolution. Therefore, various tomograph designs employing new scintillators, light sensors, or coincidence electronic are investigated to improve resolution without losses in sensitivity. Luminous scintillators with short light decay time in combination with novel readout schemes using photomultipliers or semiconductor detectors are currently tested by several groups and are implemented in tomographs for small animals. This review summarises the state of development in high resolution positron emission tomography with a detailed description of a system incorporating avalanche photodiode arrays and small scintillation crystals. (orig.) [de

  3. Self-powered neutron detector of high sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brixy, H.; Spillekothen, H.G.; Benninghofen, G.; Serafin, N.

    1983-01-01

    A self-powered neutron detector is proposed, consisting of three concentrically arranged electrically conducting tubes; where the central one forms the emitter and the inner and outer ones form the collector and where the tubes are electrically insulated from each other by insulating material. The emitter consists of a material with a high absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons, particularly of gadolinium, and is provided with an auxiliary emitter layer on the inside or the outside. With suitable dimensions and material, the auxiliary emitter layer increases the yield of electrons. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Improved-Bandwidth Transimpedance Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapsky, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    The widest available operational amplifier, with the best voltage and current noise characteristics, is considered for transimpedance amplifier (TIA) applications where wide bandwidth is required to handle fast rising input signals (as for time-of-flight measurement cases). The added amplifier inside the TIA feedback loop can be configured to have slightly lower voltage gain than the bandwidth reduction factor.

  5. Precision Muon Tracking Detectors for High-Energy Hadron Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Gadow, Philipp; Kroha, Hubert; Richter, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Small-diameter muon drift tube (sMDT) chambers with 15 mm tube diameter are a cost-effective technology for high-precision muon tracking over large areas at high background rates as expected at future high-energy hadron colliders including HL-LHC. The chamber design and construction procedures have been optimized for mass production and provide sense wire positioning accuracy of better than 10 ?m. The rate capability of the sMDT chambers has been extensively tested at the CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility. It exceeds the one of the ATLAS muon drift tube (MDT) chambers, which are operated at unprecedentedly high background rates of neutrons and gamma-rays, by an order of magnitude, which is sufficient for almost the whole muon detector acceptance at FCC-hh at maximum luminosity. sMDT operational and construction experience exists from ATLAS muon spectrometer upgrades which are in progress or under preparation for LHC Phase 1 and 2.

  6. Prototype of high resolution PET using resistive electrode position sensitive CdTe detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Yohei; Ishii, Keizo; Matsuyama, Shigeo; Yamazaki, Hiromichi

    2008-01-01

    Downsizing detector elements makes it possible that spatial resolutions of positron emission tomography (PET) cameras are improved very much. From this point of view, semiconductor detectors are preferable. To obtain high resolution, the pixel type or the multi strip type of semiconductor detectors can be used. However, in this case, there is a low packing ratio problem, because a dead area between detector arrays cannot be neglected. Here, we propose the use of position sensitive semiconductor detectors with resistive electrode. The CdTe detector is promising as a detector for PET camera because of its high sensitivity. In this paper, we report development of prototype of high resolution PET using resistive electrode position sensitive CdTe detectors. We made 1-dimensional position sensitive CdTe detectors experimentally by changing the electrode thickness. We obtained 750 A as an appropriate thickness of position sensitive detectors, and evaluated the performance of the detector using a collimated 241 Am source. A good position resolution of 1.2 mm full width half maximum (FWHM) was obtained. On the basis of the fundamental development of resistive electrode position sensitive detectors, we constructed a prototype of high resolution PET which was a dual head type and was consisted of thirty-two 1-dimensional position sensitive detectors. In conclusion, we obtained high resolutions which are 0.75 mm (FWHM) in transaxial, and 1.5 mm (FWHM) in axial. (author)

  7. Development of high temperature, radiation hard detectors based on diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalfe, Alex, E-mail: Alex.Metcalfe@brunel.ac.uk [Wolfson Centre for Materials Processing, Brunel University London, Uxbridge UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Fern, George R. [Wolfson Centre for Materials Processing, Brunel University London, Uxbridge UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Hobson, Peter R. [Centre for Sensors & Instrumentation, College of Engineering, Design and Physical Sciences, Brunel University London, Uxbridge UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Ireland, Terry; Salimian, Ali; Silver, Jack [Wolfson Centre for Materials Processing, Brunel University London, Uxbridge UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Smith, David R. [Centre for Sensors & Instrumentation, College of Engineering, Design and Physical Sciences, Brunel University London, Uxbridge UB8 3PH (United Kingdom); Lefeuvre, Gwenaelle [Micron Semiconductor Ltd., Lancing BN15 8 SJ (United Kingdom); Saenger, Richard [Schlumberger Limited, 91240 Clamart (France)

    2017-02-11

    Single crystal CVD diamond has many desirable properties compared to current, well developed, detector materials; exceptional radiation, chemical and physical hardness, chemical inertness, low Z (close to human tissue, good for dosimetry), wide bandgap and an intrinsic pathway to fast neutron detection through the {sup 12}C(n,α){sup 9}Be reaction. However effective exploitation of these properties requires development of a suitable metallisation scheme to give stable contacts for high temperature applications. To best utilise available processing techniques to optimise sensor response through geometry and conversion media configurations, a reliable model is required. This must assess the performance in terms of spectral response and overall efficiency as a function of detector and converter geometry. The same is also required for proper interpretation of experimental data. Sensors have been fabricated with varying metallisation schemes indented to permit high temperature operation; Present test results indicate that viable fabrication schemes for high temperature contacts have been developed and present modelling results, supported by preliminary data from partners indicate simulations provide a useful representation of response. - Highlights: • Radiation sensors using diamond as the sensitive volume have been constructed. • Functionality of these sensors with minimal degradation has been confirmed at 100 °C. • Sensitisation to thermal neutrons by addition of conversion layers has been modelled. • Modelling suggests 4× efficiency improvements from 3d converter-substrate interfaces.

  8. A 3D CZT high resolution detector for x- and gamma-ray astronomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuvvetli, Irfan; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Zappettini, A.

    2014-01-01

    At DTU Space we have developed a high resolution three dimensional (3D) position sensitive CZT detector for high energy astronomy. The design of the 3D CZT detector is based on the CZT Drift Strip detector principle. The position determination perpendicular to the anode strips is performed using...

  9. Review of single transient oscillographic recorders with gigahertz bandwidth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    In laser driven inertial confinement fusion research, at Livermore, we are diagnosing many phenomena that occur in a time frame that exceeds the capabilities of even the most advanced, present day oscillographic recording instruments. Many of the by-products of the interaction between the laser beam and fuel pellet are monitored to determine the specifics of the fusion process. By the use of appropriate detectors, we convert the information contained in the radiated by-products to electrical signals which are recorded on high bandwidth oscillographic recorders. Our present range of recording capabilities for one x-ray diagnostic measurement in use at Livermore is shown. A commonly used configuration consists of an XRD-31 x-ray detector connected to a direct access Tektronix R7912 transient digitizer using 1/2 in. diameter air dielectric coaxial cable. This configuration gives a system fwhm of approximately 335 ps. Our premier configuration, on the other hand, consists of an improved response detector and a French Thomson-CSF TSN-660 oscilloscope with a shorter length of coaxial cable (typically 20 feet). The system fwhm in this case is less than 120 ps which is our fastest oscillographic recording system at the present time

  10. VisIO: enabling interactive visualization of ultra-scale, time-series data via high-bandwidth distributed I/O systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Christopher J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ahrens, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Jun [UCF

    2010-10-15

    Petascale simulations compute at resolutions ranging into billions of cells and write terabytes of data for visualization and analysis. Interactive visuaUzation of this time series is a desired step before starting a new run. The I/O subsystem and associated network often are a significant impediment to interactive visualization of time-varying data; as they are not configured or provisioned to provide necessary I/O read rates. In this paper, we propose a new I/O library for visualization applications: VisIO. Visualization applications commonly use N-to-N reads within their parallel enabled readers which provides an incentive for a shared-nothing approach to I/O, similar to other data-intensive approaches such as Hadoop. However, unlike other data-intensive applications, visualization requires: (1) interactive performance for large data volumes, (2) compatibility with MPI and POSIX file system semantics for compatibility with existing infrastructure, and (3) use of existing file formats and their stipulated data partitioning rules. VisIO, provides a mechanism for using a non-POSIX distributed file system to provide linear scaling of 110 bandwidth. In addition, we introduce a novel scheduling algorithm that helps to co-locate visualization processes on nodes with the requested data. Testing using VisIO integrated into Para View was conducted using the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) on TACC's Longhorn cluster. A representative dataset, VPIC, across 128 nodes showed a 64.4% read performance improvement compared to the provided Lustre installation. Also tested, was a dataset representing a global ocean salinity simulation that showed a 51.4% improvement in read performance over Lustre when using our VisIO system. VisIO, provides powerful high-performance I/O services to visualization applications, allowing for interactive performance with ultra-scale, time-series data.

  11. High bit rate germanium single photon detectors for 1310nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seamons, J. A.; Carroll, M. S.

    2008-04-01

    There is increasing interest in development of high speed, low noise and readily fieldable near infrared (NIR) single photon detectors. InGaAs/InP Avalanche photodiodes (APD) operated in Geiger mode (GM) are a leading choice for NIR due to their preeminence in optical networking. After-pulsing is, however, a primary challenge to operating InGaAs/InP single photon detectors at high frequencies1. After-pulsing is the effect of charge being released from traps that trigger false ("dark") counts. To overcome this problem, hold-off times between detection windows are used to allow the traps to discharge to suppress after-pulsing. The hold-off time represents, however, an upper limit on detection frequency that shows degradation beginning at frequencies of ~100 kHz in InGaAs/InP. Alternatively, germanium (Ge) single photon avalanche photodiodes (SPAD) have been reported to have more than an order of magnitude smaller charge trap densities than InGaAs/InP SPADs2, which allowed them to be successfully operated with passive quenching2 (i.e., no gated hold off times necessary), which is not possible with InGaAs/InP SPADs, indicating a much weaker dark count dependence on hold-off time consistent with fewer charge traps. Despite these encouraging results suggesting a possible higher operating frequency limit for Ge SPADs, little has been reported on Ge SPAD performance at high frequencies presumably because previous work with Ge SPADs has been discouraged by a strong demand to work at 1550 nm. NIR SPADs require cooling, which in the case of Ge SPADs dramatically reduces the quantum efficiency of the Ge at 1550 nm. Recently, however, advantages to working at 1310 nm have been suggested which combined with a need to increase quantum bit rates for quantum key distribution (QKD) motivates examination of Ge detectors performance at very high detection rates where InGaAs/InP does not perform as well. Presented in this paper are measurements of a commercially available Ge APD

  12. Non-streaming high-efficiency perforated semiconductor neutron detectors, methods of making same and measuring wand and detector modules utilizing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Shultis, John K.; Rice, Blake B.; McNeil, Walter J.; Solomon, Clell J.; Patterson, Eric L.; Bellinger, Steven L.

    2010-12-21

    Non-streaming high-efficiency perforated semiconductor neutron detectors, method of making same and measuring wands and detector modules utilizing same are disclosed. The detectors have improved mechanical structure, flattened angular detector responses, and reduced leakage current. A plurality of such detectors can be assembled into imaging arrays, and can be used for neutron radiography, remote neutron sensing, cold neutron imaging, SNM monitoring, and various other applications.

  13. High-Q superconducting niobium cavities for gravitational wave detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Paula, L A N; Furtado, S R; Aguiar, O D; N F Oliveira Jr, N F Oliveira Jr; Castro, P J; Barroso, J J

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is to optimize the electric Q-factor of superconducting niobium klystron cavities to be used in parametric transducers of the Mario Schenberg gravitational wave detector. Many cavities were manufactured from niobium with relatively high tantalum impurities (1420 ppm) and they were cryogenically tested to determine their resonance frequencies, unloaded electrical quality factors (Q 0 ) and electromagnetic couplings. These cavities were closed with a flat niobium plate with tantalum impurities below 1000 ppm and an unloaded electrical quality factors of the order of 10 5 have been obtained. AC conductivity of the order of 10 12 S/m has been found for niobium cavities when matching experimental results with computational simulations. These values for the Q-factor would allow the detector to reach the quantum limit of sensitivity of ∼ 10 −22 Hz −1/2 in the near future, making it possible to search for gravitational waves around 3.2 kHz. The experimental tests were performed at the laboratories of the National Institute for Space Research (INPE) and at the Institute for Advanced Studies (IEAv - CTA)

  14. Note: Expanding the bandwidth of the ultra-low current amplifier using an artificial negative capacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Kai; Liu, Yan; Li, XiaoPing; Guo, Lixin; Zhang, Hanlu

    2016-04-01

    The bandwidth and low noise characteristics are often contradictory in ultra-low current amplifier, because an inevitable parasitic capacitance is paralleled with the high value feedback resistor. In order to expand the amplifier's bandwidth, a novel approach was proposed by introducing an artificial negative capacitor to cancel the parasitic capacitance. The theory of the negative capacitance and the performance of the improved amplifier circuit with the negative capacitor are presented in this manuscript. The test was conducted by modifying an ultra-low current amplifier with a trans-impedance gain of 50 GΩ. The results show that the maximum bandwidth was expanded from 18.7 Hz to 3.3 kHz with more than 150 times of increase when the parasitic capacitance (∼0.17 pF) was cancelled. Meanwhile, the rise time decreased from 18.7 ms to 0.26 ms with no overshot. Any desired bandwidth or rise time within these ranges can be obtained by adjusting the ratio of cancellation of the parasitic and negative capacitance. This approach is especially suitable for the demand of rapid response to weak current, such as transient ion-beam detector, mass spectrometry analysis, and fast scanning microscope.

  15. Note: Expanding the bandwidth of the ultra-low current amplifier using an artificial negative capacitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Kai, E-mail: kaixie@mail.xidian.edu.cn; Liu, Yan; Li, XiaoPing [School of Aerospace Science and Technology, Xidian University, Xi’an 710071 (China); Guo, Lixin [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Engineering, Xidian University, Xi’an 710071 (China); Zhang, Hanlu [School of Communication & Information Engineering, Xi’an University of Posts & Telecommunication, Xi’an 710121 (China)

    2016-04-15

    The bandwidth and low noise characteristics are often contradictory in ultra-low current amplifier, because an inevitable parasitic capacitance is paralleled with the high value feedback resistor. In order to expand the amplifier’s bandwidth, a novel approach was proposed by introducing an artificial negative capacitor to cancel the parasitic capacitance. The theory of the negative capacitance and the performance of the improved amplifier circuit with the negative capacitor are presented in this manuscript. The test was conducted by modifying an ultra-low current amplifier with a trans-impedance gain of 50 GΩ. The results show that the maximum bandwidth was expanded from 18.7 Hz to 3.3 kHz with more than 150 times of increase when the parasitic capacitance (∼0.17 pF) was cancelled. Meanwhile, the rise time decreased from 18.7 ms to 0.26 ms with no overshot. Any desired bandwidth or rise time within these ranges can be obtained by adjusting the ratio of cancellation of the parasitic and negative capacitance. This approach is especially suitable for the demand of rapid response to weak current, such as transient ion-beam detector, mass spectrometry analysis, and fast scanning microscope.

  16. Wideband and high-gain frequency stabilization of a 100-W injection-locked Nd:YAG laser for second-generation gravitational wave detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmae, Noriaki; Moriwaki, Shigenori; Mio, Norikatsu

    2010-07-01

    Second-generation gravitational wave detectors require a highly stable laser with an output power greater than 100 W to attain their target sensitivity. We have developed a frequency stabilization system for a 100-W injection-locked Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) laser. By placing an external wideband electro-optic modulator used as a fast-frequency actuator in the optical path of the slave output, we can circumvent a phase delay in the frequency control loop originating from the pole of an injection-locked slave cavity. Thus, we have developed an electro-optic modulator made of a MgO-doped stoichiometric LiNbO(3) crystal. Using this modulator, we achieve a frequency control bandwidth of 800 kHz and a control gain of 180 dB at 1 kHz. These values satisfy the requirement for a laser frequency control loop in second-generation gravitational wave detectors.

  17. Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klanner, R.

    1984-08-01

    The status and recent progress of silicon detectors for high energy physics is reviewed. Emphasis is put on detectors with high spatial resolution and the use of silicon detectors in calorimeters. (orig.)

  18. Full energy peak efficiency of composite detectors for high energy gamma-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kshetri, Ritesh

    2015-01-01

    Experiments involving radioactive beams demand high detection efficiencies. One of the ways to obtain high detection efficiency without deteriorating the energy resolution or timing characteristics is the use of composite detectors which are composed of standard HPGe crystals arranged in a compact way. Two simplest composite detectors are the clover and cluster detectors. The TRIUMF-ISAC Gamma-Ray Escape-Suppressed Spectrometer (TIGRESS) comprises of 16 large volume, 32-fold segmented HPGe clover detectors, where each detector is shielded by a 20-fold segmented escape suppression shield (ESS)

  19. Characterization of high impedance connecting links for Bolometric detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giachero, A. [INFN, Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Università di Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica G. Occhialini, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Gotti, C. [INFN, Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Università di Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica G. Occhialini, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Università di Firenze, Dipartimento di Elettronica e Telecomunicazioni, Via S. Marta 3, I-50139 Firenze (Italy); Maino, M. [INFN, Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Università di Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica G. Occhialini, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Pessina, G., E-mail: pessina@mib.infn.it [INFN, Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Università di Milano Bicocca, Dipartimento di Fisica G. Occhialini, Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    High impedance connecting links and cables are tested at low frequency in terms of their parasitic impedance to ground and to neighboring connecting links. These parameters must be well characterized with detectors operated at low temperature, especially when the very front-end is at room temperature, which results in a long link. This is the case of the LUCIFER experiment, an array of crystals where every event of interest produces two signals, one composed of phonons, the other of photons. The parasitic impedance is usually considered to be the parallel combination of a resistance and a capacitance. We characterized both and found that from the static measurements the capacitance of the cable resulted much larger. On the basis of this result we optimized the measurement set-up and developed a model to account for this behavior.

  20. Diamond particle detectors systems in high energy physics

    CERN Document Server

    Gan, Kock Kiam

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of luminosity at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) using diamond detect or s has matured from devices based on a rather large pads to highly granular pixelated device s . The ATLAS experiment has recently installed a diamond pixel detector, the Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM), to measure the luminosity in the upgraded LHC with higher instantaneous luminosity. Polycrystalline diamonds were used to fabricate the diamond pixel modules. The design , production, and test beam result s are described. CMS also has a similar plan to construct a diamond based luminosity monitor, the Pixel Luminos ity Telescope s (PLT) . In a pilot run using single crystal diamond, the pulse height was found to depend on the luminosity . Consequently the collaboration decided to use silicon instead due to time constrain ts .

  1. Comparison of Semidefinite Relaxation Detectors for High-Order Modulation MIMO Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Y. Shao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO system is considered to be one of the key technologies of LTE since it achieves requirements of high throughput and spectral efficiency. The semidefinite relaxation (SDR detection for MIMO systems is an attractive alternative to the optimum maximum likelihood (ML decoding because it is very computationally efficient. We propose a new SDR detector for 256-QAM MIMO system and compare its performance with two other SDR detectors, namely, BC-SDR detector and VA-SDR detector. The tightness and complexity of these three SDR detectors are analyzed. Both theoretical analysis and simulation results demonstrate that the proposed SDR can provide the best BLER performance among the three detectors, while the BC-SDR detector and the VA-SDR detector provide identical BLER performance. Moreover, the BC-SDR has the lowest computational complexity and the VA-SDR has the highest computational complexity, while the proposed SDR is in between.

  2. High-Resolution Detector For X-Ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Withrow, William K.; Pusey, Marc L.; Yost, Vaughn H.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed x-ray-sensitive imaging detector offers superior spatial resolution, counting-rate capacity, and dynamic range. Instrument based on laser-stimulated luminescence and reusable x-ray-sensitive film. Detector scans x-ray film line by line. Extracts latent image in film and simultaneously erases film for reuse. Used primarily for protein crystallography. Principle adapted to imaging detectors for electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy and general use in astronomy, engineering, and medicine.

  3. High precision efficiency calibration of a HPGe detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nica, N.; Hardy, J.C.; Iacob, V.E.; Helmer, R.G.

    2003-01-01

    Many experiments involving measurements of γ rays require a very precise efficiency calibration. Since γ-ray detection and identification also requires good energy resolution, the most commonly used detectors are of the coaxial HPGe type. We have calibrated our 70% HPGe to ∼ 0.2% precision, motivated by the measurement of precise branching ratios (BR) in superallowed 0 + → 0 + β decays. These BRs are essential ingredients in extracting ft-values needed to test the Standard Model via the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix, a test that it currently fails by more than two standard deviations. To achieve the required high precision in our efficiency calibration, we measured 17 radioactive sources at a source-detector distance of 15 cm. Some of these were commercial 'standard' sources but we achieved the highest relative precision with 'home-made' sources selected because they have simple decay schemes with negligible side feeding, thus providing exactly matched γ-ray intensities. These latter sources were produced by us at Texas A and M by n-activation or by nuclear reactions. Another critical source among the 17 was a 60 Co source produced by Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig, Germany: its absolute activity was quoted to better than 0.06%. We used it to establish our absolute efficiency, while all the other sources were used to determine relative efficiencies, extending our calibration over a large energy range (40-3500 keV). Efficiencies were also determined with Monte Carlo calculations performed with the CYLTRAN code. The physical parameters of the Ge crystal were independently determined and only two (unmeasurable) dead-layers were adjusted, within physically reasonable limits, to achieve precise absolute agreement with our measured efficiencies. The combination of measured efficiencies at more than 60 individual energies and Monte Carlo calculations to interpolate between them allows us to quote the efficiency of our

  4. Development of Silicon Detectors for the High Luminosity LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichhorn, Thomas Valentin

    2015-07-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will be upgraded to a High Luminosity LHC in the year 2022, increasing the instantaneous luminosity by a factor of five. This will have major impacts on the experiments at the LHC, such as the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment, and especially for their inner silicon tracking systems. Among other things, the silicon sensors used therein will be exposed to unprecedented levels of radiation damage, necessitating a replacement of the entire tracking detector. In order to maintain the excellent current performance, a new tracking detector has to be equipped with sensors of increased radiation hardness and higher granularity. The CMS experiment is undertaking an extensive R and D campaign in the search for the future silicon sensor technology baseline to be used in this upgrade. This thesis presents two methods suitable for use in this search: finite element TCAD simulations and test beam measurements. The simulations are focussed on the interstrip capacitance between sensor strips and are compared to measurements before and after the inclusion of radiation damage effects. A geometrical representation of the strip sensors used in the campaign has been found, establishing the predictive power of simulations. The test beam measurements make use of the high-precision pixel telescopes available at the DESY-II test beam facility. The performance of these telescopes has been assessed and their achievable pointing resolution has been found to be below 2 μm. Thin, epitaxial silicon is a candidate material for usage in radiation hard sensors for the future CMS tracking detector. Sample strip sensors of this material have been irradiated to fluences of up to 1.3 x 10 16 n eq /cm 2 with 800 MeV or 23 GeV protons. Test beam measurements with 5 GeV electrons have been performed to investigate the radiation hardness of epitaxial sensors using the pixel beam telescopes. The epitaxial device under test (DUT) has been integrated into the

  5. A piecewise-focused high DQE detector for MV imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Star-Lack, Josh; Shedlock, Daniel; Swahn, Dennis; Humber, Dave; Wang, Adam; Hirsh, Hayley; Zentai, George; Sawkey, Daren; Kruger, Isaac; Sun, Mingshan; Abel, Eric; Virshup, Gary; Shin, Mihye; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    Electronic portal imagers (EPIDs) with high detective quantum efficiencies (DQEs) are sought to facilitate the use of the megavoltage (MV) radiotherapy treatment beam for image guidance. Potential advantages include high quality (treatment) beam's eye view imaging, and improved cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) generating images with more accurate electron density maps with immunity to metal artifacts. One approach to increasing detector sensitivity is to couple a thick pixelated scintillator array to an active matrix flat panel imager (AMFPI) incorporating amorphous silicon thin film electronics. Cadmium tungstate (CWO) has many desirable scintillation properties including good light output, a high index of refraction, high optical transparency, and reasonable cost. However, due to the 0 1 0 cleave plane inherent in its crystalline structure, the difficulty of cutting and polishing CWO has, in part, limited its study relative to other scintillators such as cesium iodide and bismuth germanate (BGO). The goal of this work was to build and test a focused large-area pixelated "strip" CWO detector. A 361 × 52 mm scintillator assembly that contained a total of 28 072 pixels was constructed. The assembly comprised seven subarrays, each 15 mm thick. Six of the subarrays were fabricated from CWO with a pixel pitch of 0.784 mm, while one array was constructed from BGO for comparison. Focusing was achieved by coupling the arrays to the Varian AS1000 AMFPI through a piecewise linear arc-shaped fiber optic plate. Simulation and experimental studies of modulation transfer function (MTF) and DQE were undertaken using a 6 MV beam, and comparisons were made between the performance of the pixelated strip assembly and the most common EPID configuration comprising a 1 mm-thick copper build-up plate attached to a 133 mg/cm(2) gadolinium oxysulfide scintillator screen (Cu-GOS). Projection radiographs and CBCT images of phantoms were acquired. The work also introduces the use of a

  6. A high energy photon detector system in compact form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Sadayuki; Sugano, Katsuhito; Yoshioka, Masakazu.

    1975-01-01

    The development of a high energy photon detector system in compact form for use in experiments of high energy physics is described, and the results of its characteristics calibrated using converted electron beams and a pair spectrometer are reported. This system consists of a total absorption lead glass Cerenkov counter, twenty hodoscope arrays for the vertical and the horizontal directions respectively, a lead plate for the conversion of γ-rays into electron-positron pairs, veto counters, photon hardener, and lead blocks for shieldings and collimation. The spatial resolution of the hodoscope is 15 mm for each direction, covering 301 x 301 mm 2 area. The energy resolution of the total absorption lead glass Cerenkov counter, whose volume is 30 x 30 x 30 cm 3 , is typically 18 % (FWHM) for the incident electron energy of 500 MeV, and it can be expressed with a relation of ΔE/E = 3.94 Esup(-1/2). (E in MeV). (auth.)

  7. High-speed, multi-channel detector readout electronics for fast radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennig, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    In this project, we are developing a high speed digital spectrometer that a) captures detector waveforms at rates up to 500 MSPS b) has upgraded event data acquisition with additional data buffers for zero dead time operation c) moves energy calculations to the FPGA to increase spectrometer throughput in fast scintillator applications d) uses a streamlined architecture and high speed data interface for even faster readout to the host PC These features are in addition to the standard functions in our existing spectrometers such as digitization, programmable trigger and energy filters, pileup inspection, data acquisition with energy and time stamps, MCA histograms, and run statistics. In Phase I, we upgraded one of our existing spectrometer designs to demonstrate the key principle of fast waveform capture using a 500 MSPS, 12 bit ADC and a Xilinx Virtex-4 FPGA. This upgraded spectrometer, named P500, performed well in initial tests of energy resolution, pulse shape analysis, and timing measurements, thus achieving item (a) above. In Phase II, we are revising the P500 to build a commercial prototype with the improvements listed in items (b)-(d). As described in the previous report, two devices were built to pursue this goal, named the Pixie-500 and the Pixie-500 Express. The Pixie-500 has only minor improvements from the Phase I prototype and is intended as an early commercial product (its production and part of its development were funded outside the SBIR). It also allows testing of the ADC performance in real applications. The Pixie-500 Express (or Pixie-500e) includes all of the improvements (b)-(d). At the end of Phase II of the project, we have tested and debugged the hardware, firmware and software of the Pixie-500 Express prototype boards delivered 12/3/2010. This proved substantially more complex than anticipated. At the time of writing, all hardware bugs have been fixed, the PCI Express interface is working, the SDRAM has been successfully tested and the

  8. High-speed, multi-channel detector readout electronics for fast radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennig, Wolfgang

    2012-06-22

    In this project, we are developing a high speed digital spectrometer that a) captures detector waveforms at rates up to 500 MSPS b) has upgraded event data acquisition with additional data buffers for zero dead time operation c) moves energy calculations to the FPGA to increase spectrometer throughput in fast scintillator applications d) uses a streamlined architecture and high speed data interface for even faster readout to the host PC These features are in addition to the standard functions in our existing spectrometers such as digitization, programmable trigger and energy filters, pileup inspection, data acquisition with energy and time stamps, MCA histograms, and run statistics. In Phase I, we upgraded one of our existing spectrometer designs to demonstrate the key principle of fast waveform capture using a 500 MSPS, 12 bit ADC and a Xilinx Virtex-4 FPGA. This upgraded spectrometer, named P500, performed well in initial tests of energy resolution, pulse shape analysis, and timing measurements, thus achieving item (a) above. In Phase II, we are revising the P500 to build a commercial prototype with the improvements listed in items (b)-(d). As described in the previous report, two devices were built to pursue this goal, named the Pixie-500 and the Pixie-500 Express. The Pixie-500 has only minor improvements from the Phase I prototype and is intended as an early commercial product (its production and part of its development were funded outside the SBIR). It also allows testing of the ADC performance in real applications.The Pixie-500 Express (or Pixie-500e) includes all of the improvements (b)-(d). At the end of Phase II of the project, we have tested and debugged the hardware, firmware and software of the Pixie-500 Express prototype boards delivered 12/3/2010. This proved substantially more complex than anticipated. At the time of writing, all hardware bugs have been fixed, the PCI Express interface is working, the SDRAM has been successfully tested and the SHARC

  9. Development of cryogenic tracking detectors for very high luminosity experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Härkönen, J; Anbinderis, T; Bates, R; de Boer, W; Borchi, E; Bruzzi, M; Buttar, C; Chen, W; Cindro, V; Czellar, S; Eremin, V; Furgeri, A; Gaubas, E; Heijne, E; Ilyashenko, I; Kalesinskas, V; Krause, M; Li, Z; Luukka, P; Mandic, I; Menichelli, D; Mikuz, M; Militaru, O; Mueller, S; Niinikoski, T O; O’Shea, V; Parkes, C; Piotrzkowski, K; Pirollo, S; Pusa, P; Räisänen, J; Rouby, X; Tuominen, E; Tuovinen, E; Vaitkus, J; Verbitskaya, E; Väyrynen, S; Zavrtanik, M

    2009-01-01

    Experimental results and simulations of Charge Collection Efficiency (CCE) of Current Injected Detectors (CIDs) are focused. CID is a concept where the current is limited by the space charge. The injected carriers will be trapped by the deep levels. This induces a stable electric field through the entire bulk regardless of the irradiation fluence the detector has been exposed. Our results show that the CCE of CIDs is about two times higher than of regular detectors when irradiated up to 1×1016 cm−2. The higher CCE is achieved already at −50 °C temperatures.

  10. High-Rate Glass Resistive Plate Chambers For LHC Muon Detectors Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Laktineh, I; Cauwenbergh, S; Combret, C; Crotty, I; Haddad, Y; Grenier, G; Guida, R; Kieffer, R; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Schirra, F; Seguin, N; Tytgat, M; Van der Donckt, M; Wang, Y; Zaganidis, N

    2012-01-01

    The limitation of the detection rate of standard bakelite resistive plate chambers (RPC) used as muon detector in LHC experiments is behind the absence of such detectors in the high TJ regions in both CMS and ATLAS detectors. RPCs made with low resistivity glass plates (10ID O.cm) could be an adequate solution to equip the high TJ regions extending thus both the trigger efficiency and the physics performance. Different beam tests with single and multi-gap configurations using the new glass have shown that such detectors can operate at few thousands Hzlcm2 with high efficiency( > 90%).

  11. Upgrade of ATLAS ITk Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Huegging, Fabian; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The high luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL-LHC) in 2026 will provide new challenges to the ATLAS tracker. The current inner detector will be replaced with an entirely-silicon inner tracker (ITk) which will consist of a five barrel layer Pixel detector surrounded by a four barrel layer Strip detector. The expected high radiation levels are requiring the development of upgraded silicon sensors as well as new a front-end chip. The dense tracking environment will require finer granularity detectors and low mass global and local support structures. The data rates will require new technologies for high bandwidth data transmission and handling. The current status of the ITk ATLAS Pixel detector developments as well as different layout options will be reviewed.

  12. Physically Connected Stacked Patch Antenna Design with 100% Bandwidth

    KAUST Repository

    Klionovski, Kirill; Shamim, Atif

    2017-01-01

    Typically, stacked patch antennas are parasitically coupled and provide larger bandwidth than a single patch antenna. Here, we show a stacked patch antenna design where square patches with semi-circular cutouts are physically connected to each other. This arrangement provides 100% bandwidth from 23.9–72.2 GHz with consistent high gain (5 dBi or more) across the entire bandwidth. In another variation, a single patch loaded with a superstrate provides 83.5% bandwidth from 25.6–62.3 GHz. The mechanism of bandwidth enhancement is explained through electromagnetic simulations. Measured reflection coefficient, radiation patterns and gain results confirm the extremely wideband performance of the design.

  13. Physically Connected Stacked Patch Antenna Design with 100% Bandwidth

    KAUST Repository

    Klionovski, Kirill

    2017-11-01

    Typically, stacked patch antennas are parasitically coupled and provide larger bandwidth than a single patch antenna. Here, we show a stacked patch antenna design where square patches with semi-circular cutouts are physically connected to each other. This arrangement provides 100% bandwidth from 23.9–72.2 GHz with consistent high gain (5 dBi or more) across the entire bandwidth. In another variation, a single patch loaded with a superstrate provides 83.5% bandwidth from 25.6–62.3 GHz. The mechanism of bandwidth enhancement is explained through electromagnetic simulations. Measured reflection coefficient, radiation patterns and gain results confirm the extremely wideband performance of the design.

  14. Bandwidth tunable amplifier for recording biopotential signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Sungkil; Aninakwa, Kofi; Sonkusale, Sameer

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a low noise, low power, bandwidth tunable amplifier for bio-potential signal recording applications. By employing depletion-mode pMOS transistor in diode configuration as a tunable sub pA current source to adjust the resistivity of MOS-Bipolar pseudo-resistor, the bandwidth is adjusted without any need for a separate band-pass filter stage. For high CMRR, PSRR and dynamic range, a fully differential structure is used in the design of the amplifier. The amplifier achieves a midband gain of 39.8dB with a tunable high-pass cutoff frequency ranging from 0.1Hz to 300Hz. The amplifier is fabricated in 0.18εm CMOS process and occupies 0.14mm(2) of chip area. A three electrode ECG measurement is performed using the proposed amplifier to show its feasibility for low power, compact wearable ECG monitoring application.

  15. High-Bandwidth, High-Efficiency Envelope Tracking Power Supply for 40W RF Power Amplifier Using Paralleled Bandpass Current Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyerby, Mikkel Christian Wendelboe; Andersen, Michael Andreas E.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a high-performance power conversion scheme for power supply applications that require very high output voltage slew rates (dV/dt). The concept is to parallel 2 switching bandpass current sources, each optimized for its passband frequency space and the expected load current....... The principle is demonstrated with a power supply, designed for supplying a 40 W linear RF power amplifier for efficient amplification of a 16-QAM modulated data stream...

  16. High energy particle detectors utilizing cryogenic charge storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coon, D; Engels, E Jr; Plants, D; Shepard, P F; Yang, Y [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (USA); Sopira, M; Papania, R [Westinghouse Research and Development Labs., Monroeville, PA (USA)

    1984-09-15

    The mechanism of cryogenic charge storage as a method of particle detection is reviewed. A description of a simple multielement strip detector operated in this mode is given, and partial results on its operating characteristics presented.

  17. Calorimeter based detectors for high energy hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The work was directed in two complementary directions, the D0 experiment at Fermilab, and the GEM detector for the SSC. Efforts have been towards the data taking and analysis with the newly commissioned D0 detector at Fermilab in the bar pp Collider run that started in May 1992 and ended on June 1, 1993. We involved running and calibration of the calorimeter and tracking chambers, the second level trigger development, and various parts of the data analysis, as well as studies for the D0 upgrade planned in the second half of this decade. Another major accomplishment was the ''delivery'' of the Technical Design Report for the GEM SSC detector. Efforts to the overall detector and magnet design, design of the facilities, installation studies, muon system coordination, muon chamber design and tests, muon system simulation studies, and physics simulation studies. In this document we describe these activities separately

  18. High resolution silicon detectors for colliding beam physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amendolia, S.R.; Bedeschi, F.; Bertolucci, E.; Bettoni, D.; Bosisio, L.; Bottigli, U.; Bradaschia, C.; Dell'Orso, M.; Fidecaro, F.; Foa, L.; Focardi, E.; Giannetti, P.; Giorgi, M.A.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Menzione, A.; Raso, G.; Ristori, L.; Scribano, A.; Stefanini, A.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Triggiani, G.

    1984-01-01

    Resolution and linearity of the position measurement of Pisa multi-electrode silicon detectors are presented. The detectors are operated in slightly underdepleted mode and take advantage of their intrinsic resistivity for resistive charge partition between adjacent strips. 22 μm resolution is achieved with readout lines spaced 300 μm. Possible applications in colliding beam experiments for the detection of secondary vertices are discussed. (orig.)

  19. NEW LENSLET BASED IFS WITH HIGH DETECTOR PIXEL EFFICIENCY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Qian

    2018-01-01

    Three IFS types currently used for optical design are: lenslet array, imager slicer, and lenslet array and fiber combined. Lenslet array based Integral Field Spectroscopy (IFS) is very popular for many astrophysics applications due to its compactness, simplicity, as well as cost and mass savings. The disadvantage of lenslet based IFS is its low detector pixel efficiency. Enough spacing is needed between adjacent spectral traces in cross dispersion direction to avoid wavelength cross-talk, because the same wavelength is not aligned to the same column on detector. Such as on a recent exoplanet coronagraph instrument study to support the coming astrophysics decadal survey (LUVOIR), to cover a 45 λ/D Field of View (FOV) with a spectral resolving power of 200 at shortest wavelength, a 4k x 4k detector array is needed. This large format EMCCD pushes the detector into technology development area with a low TRL. Besides the future mission, it will help WFIRST coronagraph IFS by packing all spectra into a smaller area on detector, which will reduce the chance for electrons to be trapped in pixels, and slow the detector degradation during the mission.The innovation we propose here is to increase the detector packing efficiency by grouping a number of lenslets together to form many mini slits. In other words, a number of spots (Point Spread Function at lenslet focus) are aligned into a line to resemble a mini slit. Therefore, wavelength cross-talk is no longer a concern anymore. This combines the advantage of lenslet array and imager slicer together. The isolation rows between spectral traces in cross dispersion direction can be reduced or removed. So the packing efficiency is greatly increased. Furthermore, the today’s microlithography and etching technique is capable of making such a lenslet array, which will relax the detector demand significantly. It will finally contribute to the habitable exoplanets study to analyzing their spectra from direct images. Detailed theory

  20. A digital calibration technique for an ultra high-speed wide-bandwidth folding and interpolating analog-to-digital converter in 0.18-{mu}m CMOS technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Jinshan; Zhang Ruitao; Zhang Zhengping; Wang Yonglu; Zhu Can; Zhang Lei; Yu Zhou; Han Yong, E-mail: yujinshan@yeah.net [National Laboratory of Analog IC' s, Chongqing 400060 (China)

    2011-01-15

    A digital calibration technique for an ultra high-speed folding and interpolating analog-to-digital converter in 0.18-{mu}m CMOS technology is presented. The similar digital calibration techniques are taken for high 3-bit flash converter and low 5-bit folding and interpolating converter, which are based on well-designed calibration reference, calibration DAC and comparators. The spice simulation and the measured results show the ADC produces 5.9 ENOB with calibration disabled and 7.2 ENOB with calibration enabled for high-frequency wide-bandwidth analog input. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  1. New DOI identification approach for high-resolution PET detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choghadi, Amin; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Shimazoe, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Depth-of-interaction (DOI) Identification in positron emission tomography (PET) detectors is getting importance as it improves spatial resolution in both conventional and time-of-flight (TOF) PET, and coincidence time resolution (CTR) in TOF-PET. In both prototypes, spatial resolution is affected by parallax error caused by length of scintillator crystals. This long length also contributes substantial timing uncertainty to the time resolution of TOF-PET. Through DOI identification, both parallax error and the timing uncertainty caused by the length of crystal can be resolved. In this work, a novel approach to estimate DOI was investigated, enjoying the interference of absorbance spectrum of scintillator crystals with their emission spectrum. Because the absorption length is close to zero for shorter wavelengths of crystal emission spectrum, the counts in this range of spectrum highly depend on DOI; that is, higher counts corresponds to deeper interactions. The ratio of counts in this range to the total counts is a good measure to estimate DOI. In order to extract such ratio, two photodetectors for each crystal are used and an optical filter is mounted only on top of one of them. The ratio of filtered output to non-filtered output can be utilized as DOI estimator. For a 2×2×20 mm 3 GAGG:Ce scintillator, 8-mm DOI resolution achieved in our simulations. (author)

  2. A precision timing discriminator for high density detector systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turko, B.T.; Smith, R.C.

    1992-01-01

    Most high resolution time measurement techniques require discriminators that accurately make the time arrival of events regardless of their intensity. Constant fraction discriminators or zero-crossing discriminators are generally used. In this paper, the authors describe a zero-crossing discriminator that accurately determines the peak of a quasi-Gaussian waveform by differentiating it and detecting the resulting zero-crossing. Basically, it consists of a fast voltage comparator and tow integrating networks: an RC section and an LR section used in a way that keeps the input impedance purely resistive. A time walk of 100 ps in an amplitude range exceeding 100:1 has been achieved for wave-forms from 1.5 ns to 15 ns FWHM. An arming level discriminator is added to eliminate triggering by noise. Easily implemented in either monolithic or hybrid technology, the circuit is suitable for large multichannel detector systems where size and power dissipation are crucial. Circuit diagrams and typical measured data are also presented

  3. High-luminosity LHC prospects with the upgraded ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00379172; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Run 1 at the LHC was very successful with the discovery of a new boson. The boson’s properties are found to be compatible with those of the Standard Model Higgs boson. It is now revealing the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking and (possibly) the discovery of physics beyond the Standard Model that are the primary goals of the just restarted LHC. The ultimate precision will be reached at the high-luminosity LHC run with a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV. In this contribution physics prospects are presented for ATLAS for the integrated luminosities 300 and 3000 fb−1: the ultimate precision attainable on measurements of the Higgs boson couplings to elementary fermions and bosons, its trilinear self-coulping, as well as perspectives on the searches for partners associated with it. Benchmark studies are presented to show how the sensitivity improves at the future LHC runs. For all these studies, a parameterised simulation of the upgraded ATLAS detector is used and expected pileup condition...

  4. Polybinary modulation for bandwidth limited optical links

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegas Olmos, Juan José; Jurado-Navas, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    form of partial response modulation, employs simple codification and filtering at the transmitter to drastically increase the spectral efficiency. At the receiver side, poly binary modulation requires low complexity direct detection and very little digital signal processing. This talk will review...... the recent results on poly binary modulation, comprising both binary and multilevel signals as seed signals. The results will show how poly binary modulation effectively reduces the bandwidth requirements on optical links while providing high spectral efficiency....

  5. Silicon detectors for x and gamma-ray with high radiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cimpoca, Valerica; Popescu, Ion V.; Ruscu, Radu

    2001-01-01

    Silicon detectors are widely used in X and gamma-ray spectroscopy for direct detection or coupled with scintillators in high energy nuclear physics (modern collider experiments are representative), medicine and industrial applications. In X and gamma dosimetry, a low detection limit (under 6 KeV) with silicon detectors becomes available. Work at the room temperature is now possible due to the silicon processing evolution, which assures low reverse current and high life time of carriers. For several years, modern semiconductor detectors have been the primary choice for the measurement of nuclear radiation in various scientific fields. Nowadays the recently developed high resolution silicon detectors found their way in medical applications. As a consequence many efforts have been devoted to the development of high sensitivity and radiation hardened X and gamma-ray detectors for the energy range of 5 - 150 keV. The paper presents some results concerning the technology and behaviour of X and Gamma ray silicon detectors used in physics research, industrial and medical radiography. The electrical characteristics of these detectors, their modification after exposure to radiation and the results of spectroscopic X and Gamma-ray measurements are discussed. The results indicated that the proposed detectors enables the development of reliable silicon detectors to be used in controlling the low and high radiation levels encountered in a lot of application

  6. Image simulation of high-speed imaging by high-pressure gas ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao Jichen; Liu Ximing; Wu Zhifang

    2005-01-01

    The signal of the neighbor pixels is cumulated in Freight Train Inspection System because data fetch time is shorter than ion excursion time. This paper analyzes the pertinency of neighbor pixels and designs computer simulation method to generate some emulate images such as indicator image. The result indicates the high-pressure gas ionization detector can be used in high-speed digital radiography field. (authors)

  7. Development of a bandwidth limiting neutron chopper for CSNS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P.; Yang, B.; Cai, W. L.

    2015-08-01

    Bandwidth limiting neutron choppers are indispensable key equipments for the time-of-flight neutron scattering spectrometers of China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS). The main principle is to chop the neutron beam to limit the neutron wavelength bandwidth at the neutron detector. We have successfully developed a bandwidth limiting neutron chopper for CSNS in the CSNS advance research project II. The transmission rate of the neutron absorbing coating is less than 1×10-4 (for 1 angstrom neutron). The phase control accuracy is ±0.084° (±9.4 μs at 25 Hz). The dynamic balance grade is G1.0. Various experimental technical features have met the design requirements, and it also runs stably and reliably during the long-term tests.

  8. Development of a bandwidth limiting neutron chopper for CSNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, P.; Yang, B.; Cai, W.L.

    2015-01-01

    Bandwidth limiting neutron choppers are indispensable key equipments for the time-of-flight neutron scattering spectrometers of China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS). The main principle is to chop the neutron beam to limit the neutron wavelength bandwidth at the neutron detector. We have successfully developed a bandwidth limiting neutron chopper for CSNS in the CSNS advance research project II. The transmission rate of the neutron absorbing coating is less than 1×10 −4 (for 1 angstrom neutron). The phase control accuracy is ±0.084° (±9.4 μs at 25 Hz). The dynamic balance grade is G1.0. Various experimental technical features have met the design requirements, and it also runs stably and reliably during the long-term tests

  9. Assessment of ambient-temperature, high-resolution detectors for nuclear safeguards applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruhter, W.D.; McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.

    1993-01-01

    High-resolution, gamma- and x-ray spectrometry are used routinely in nuclear safeguards verification measurements of plutonium and uranium in the field. These measurements are now performed with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors that require cooling liquid-nitrogen temperatures, thus limiting their utility in field and unattended safeguards measurement applications. Ambient temperature semiconductor detectors may complement HPGe detectors for certain safeguards verification applications. Their potential will be determined by criteria such as their performance, commercial availability, stage of development, and costs. We have conducted as assessment of ambient temperature detectors for safeguards measurement applications with these criteria in mind

  10. Determining the hierarchy of neutrino masses with high density magnetized detectors at the Beta Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donini, A.; Fernandez-Martinez, E.; Rigolin, S.; Migliozzi, P.; Lavina, L. Scotto; Selvi, M.; De Fatis, T. Tabarelli; Terranova, F.

    2008-01-01

    Multi-kton iron detectors can be simultaneously exploited as far detectors for high energy Beta Beams and to determine the atmospheric ν μ flux in the multi-GeV range. These measurements can be combined in a highly non trivial manner to improve the sensitivity to the hierarchy of neutrino masses. Considering a Super-SPS based Beta Beam and a 40 kton far detector located ∼700 km from the source (CERN to Gran Sasso distance), we demonstrate that even with moderate detector granularities the sign of Δm 13 2 can be determined for θ 13 values greater than 4 deg.

  11. Digital signal processors for cryogenic high-resolution x-ray detector readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, Stephan; Drury, Owen B.; Bechstein, Sylke; Hennig, Wolfgang; Momayezi, Michael

    2003-01-01

    We are developing fast digital signal processors (DSPs) to read out superconducting high-resolution X-ray detectors with on-line pulse processing. For superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detector read-out, the DSPs offer online filtering, rise time discrimination and pile-up rejection. Compared to analog pulse processing, DSP readout somewhat degrades the detector resolution, but improves the spectral purity of the detector response. We discuss DSP performance with our 9-channel STJ array for synchrotron-based high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy. (author)

  12. Alpha-ray spectrometry at high temperature by using a compound semiconductor detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jang Ho; Kim, Han Soo

    2013-11-01

    The use of conventional radiation detectors in harsh environments is limited by radiation damage to detector materials and by temperature constraints. We fabricated a wide-band gap semiconductor radiation detector based on silicon carbide. All the detector components were considered for an application in a high temperature environment like a nuclear reactor core. The radiation response, especially to alpha particles, was measured using an (241)Am source at variable operating voltages at room temperature in the air. The temperature on detector was controlled from 30°C to 250°C. The alpha-particle spectra were measured at zero bias operation. Even though the detector is operated at high temperature, the energy resolution as a function of temperature is almost constant within 3.5% deviation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A tilted fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector for high resolution neutron imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jongyul; Cho, Gyuseong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jongyul; Hwy, Limchang; Kim, Taejoo; Lee, Kyehong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seungwook [Pusan National Univ., Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    One of these efforts is that a tilted scintillator geometry and lens coupled CCD detector for neutron imaging system were used to improve spatial resolution in one dimension. The increased spatial resolution in one dimension was applied to fuel cell study. However, a lens coupled CCD detector has lower sensitivity than a fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector due to light loss. In this research, a tilted detector using fiber-optic plate coupled CCD detector was developed to improve resolution and sensitivity. In addition, a tilted detector can prevent an image sensor from direct radiation damage. Neutron imaging has been used for fuel cell study, lithium ion battery study, and many scientific applications. High quality neutron imaging is demanded for more detailed studies of applications, and spatial resolution should be considered to get high quality neutron imaging. Therefore, there were many efforts to improve spatial resolution.

  14. An acquisition system for CMOS imagers with a genuine 10 Gbit/s bandwidth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guérin, C.; Mahroug, J.; Tromeur, W.; Houles, J.; Calabria, P.; Barbier, R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a high data throughput acquisition system for pixel detector readout such as CMOS imagers. This CMOS acquisition board offers a genuine 10 Gbit/s bandwidth to the workstation and can provide an on-line and continuous high frame rate imaging capability. On-line processing can be implemented either on the Data Acquisition Board or on the multi-cores workstation depending on the complexity of the algorithms. The different parts composing the acquisition board have been designed to be used first with a single-photon detector called LUSIPHER (800×800 pixels), developed in our laboratory for scientific applications ranging from nano-photonics to adaptive optics. The architecture of the acquisition board is presented and the performances achieved by the produced boards are described. The future developments (hardware and software) concerning the on-line implementation of algorithms dedicated to single-photon imaging are tackled.

  15. Time-optimal control with finite bandwidth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, M.; Cappellaro, P.

    2018-04-01

    Time-optimal control theory provides recipes to achieve quantum operations with high fidelity and speed, as required in quantum technologies such as quantum sensing and computation. While technical advances have achieved the ultrastrong driving regime in many physical systems, these capabilities have yet to be fully exploited for the precise control of quantum systems, as other limitations, such as the generation of higher harmonics or the finite response time of the control apparatus, prevent the implementation of theoretical time-optimal control. Here we present a method to achieve time-optimal control of qubit systems that can take advantage of fast driving beyond the rotating wave approximation. We exploit results from time-optimal control theory to design driving protocols that can be implemented with realistic, finite-bandwidth control fields, and we find a relationship between bandwidth limitations and achievable control fidelity.

  16. A 1024 pad silicon detector to solve tracking ambiguities in high multiplicity events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simone, S.; Catanesi, M.G.; Di Bari, D.; Didonna, V.; Elia, D.; Ghidini, B.; Lenti, V.; Manzari, V.; Nappi, E.

    1996-01-01

    Silicon detectors with two-dimensional pad readout have been designed and constructed for the WA97 experiment at CERN, in order to solve ambiguities for track reconstruction in a silicon microstrip telescope. A high density fanouts has been developed on a glass support to allow the electrical contacts between the detector and the front end electronics. Silicon pad detectors have been successfully operated both during the proton-Pb and Pb-Pb runs of the WA97 experiment. (orig.)

  17. Detector dead-time effects and paralyzability in high-speed quantum key distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, Daniel J; Bienfang, Joshua C; Nakassis, Anastase; Xu Hai; Clark, Charles W

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in quantum key distribution (QKD) have given rise to systems that operate at transmission periods significantly shorter than the dead times of their component single-photon detectors. As systems continue to increase in transmission rate, security concerns associated with detector dead times can limit the production rate of sifted bits. We present a model of high-speed QKD in this limit that identifies an optimum transmission rate for a system with given link loss and detector response characteristics

  18. [Calorimeter based detectors for high energy hadron colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This document provides a progress report on research that has been conducted under DOE Grant DEFG0292ER40697 for the past year, and describes proposed work for the second year of this 8 year grant starting November 15, 1992. Personnel supported by the contract include 4 faculty, 1 research faculty, 4 postdocs, and 9 graduate students. The work under this grant has in the past been directed in two complementary directions -- DO at Fermilab, and the second SSC detector GEM. A major effort has been towards the construction and commissioning of the new Fermilab Collider detector DO, including design, construction, testing, the commissioning of the central tracking and the central calorimeters. The first DO run is now underway, with data taking and analysis of the first events. Trigger algorithms, data acquisition, calibration of tracking and calorimetry, data scanning and analysis, and planning for future upgrades of the DO detector with the advent of the FNAL Main Injector are all involved. The other effort supported by this grant has been towards the design of GEM, a large and general-purpose SSC detector with special emphasis on accurate muon measurement over a large solid angle. This effort will culminate this year in the presentation to the SSC laboratory of the GEM Technical Design Report. Contributions are being made to the detector design, coordination, and physics simulation studies with special emphasis on muon final states. Collaboration with the RD5 group at CERN to study muon punch through and to test cathode strip chamber prototypes was begun

  19. High-resolution ion-implanted silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    von Borany, J.; Schmidt, B.

    1985-01-01

    An account is given of the properties of silicon detectors developed at the Central Institute of Nuclear Research of the Academy of Sciences of the German Democratic Republic (Rossendorf) and made by a special planar technology using ion implantation, anodic oxidation, thermal oxidation in an oxygen atmosphere containing HCl, and annealing by pulses of 10--20 msec duration. The resolution for α particles of 5.5 MeV energy was 11.2 keV (active area A 2 ). The detectors were characterized by a low intrinsic noise (< or =5 keV), so that they could be used for spectrometry of low-energy electrons (E/sub e/< or =250 keV). In a certain range of energies (E/sub x/ = 15--60 keV) it was possible to use these detectors for spectrometry of x rays at room temperature. Examples and results of applications of detectors in radiation chemistry (investigations of backscattering of particles and nuclear reaction spectroscopy) are given. The feasibility of annealing of radiation defects in such detectors after irradiation with a large dose of charged particles is considered

  20. Hot nuclei studied with high efficiency neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galin, J.

    1990-01-01

    We have shown the invaluable benefit that a high efficiency 4π neutron detector can bring to the study of reaction mechanisms following collisions of heavy nuclei at intermediate energy. Analysis requires Monte-Carlo simulations for comparison between experimental data and any emission model. In systematic measurements with projectiles of velocity corresponding to energies between 27 and 77 MeV/u, where both the influence of beam velocity and mass have been investigated separately, it has been shown that the projectile-target mass asymmetry, much more than velocity, has a decisive influence on energy dissipation. The closer the projectile mass to the target mass, the more energy is dissipated per unit mass of the considered projectile plus target system. The latter presents all the characteristics of a thermalized system, evaporating a copious number of light particles: up to about 40 neutrons (after efficiency correction) and 11 light charged particles in the most dissipative collisions between Kr+Au, and 90 neutrons for Pb+U with a yet unknown number of l.c.p. In the Kr experiment, these particles are isotropically emitted in the frame of a fused system, excited with 1.2 GeV. Moreover, l.c.p. exhibit Maxwellian energy distributions as in any standard evaporation process. We are now eager to better characterize the properties of the Pb+Au (U) systems for which about 1/3 of the neutrons are freed in a rather large fraction of all collisions. The thermalized energy should then approach very closely the total binding energy of the two interacting nuclei

  1. Trace radioactive measurement in foodstuffs using high purity germanium detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morco, Ryan P.; Racho, Joseph Michael D.; Castaneda, Soledad S.; Almoneda, Rosalina V.; Pabroa, Preciosa Corazon B.; Sucgang, Raymond J.

    2010-01-01

    Trace radioactivity in food has been seriously considered sources of potential harm after the accidental radioactive releases in the last decades which led to contamination of the food chain. Countermeasures are being used to reduce the radiological health risk to the population and to ensure that public safety and international commitments are met. Investigation of radioactive traces in foods was carried out by gamma-ray spectrometry. The radionuclides being measured were fission products 1 37Cs and 1 34Cs and naturally occurring 4 0Κ. Gamma-ray measurements were performed using a hybrid gamma-ray counting system with coaxial p-type Tennelec High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector with relative efficiency of 18.4%. Channels were calibrated to energies using a standard check source with 1 37Cs and 6 0Co present. Self-shielding within samples was taken into account by comparing directly with reference standards of similar matrix and geometry. Efficiencies of radionuclides of interests were accounted in calculating the activity concentrations in the samples. Efficiency calibration curve was generated using an in-house validated program called FINDPEAK, a least-square method that fits a polynomial up to sixth-order of equation. Lower Limits of Detection (LLD) obtained for both 1 37Cs and 1 34Cs ranges from 1-6 Bq/Kg depending on the sample matrix. In the last five years, there have been no foodstuffs analyzed exceeded the local and international regulatory limit of 1000Bq/Kg for the summed activities of 1 37Cs and 1 34Cs. (author)

  2. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    CERN Document Server

    Troyer, G L

    2000-01-01

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% (at) 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse r...

  3. High resolution radiography of ambers with pixel detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dammer, J.; Weyda, F.; Beneš, J.; Sopko, V.; Jandejsek, I.; Pflegerová, Jitka

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 3 (2013), C03024 ISSN 1748-0221. [Conference: International Workshop on Radiation Imaging Detectors /14./. Figueira da Foz, 01.07.2012-05.07.2012] Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA103/09/2101; GA Mšk(CZ) LA08032 Program:GA; LA Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : X-ray detectors * Inspection with x-rays * X-ray radiography and digital radiography (DR) Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology Impact factor: 1.526, year: 2013 http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-0221/8/03/C03024/

  4. High energy charged particle registration in CR-39 polycarbonated detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Wahab, M.S.; El Enany, N.; El Fiki, S.; Eissa, H.M.; El-Adl, E.H.; El-Feky, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Track etch rate characteristics of CR-39 plastic detector exposed to 28 Si ions of 670 MeV energy have been investigated. Experimental results were obtained in terms of frequency distribution of the track diameter, track density and bulk etching rate. A dependence of the mean track diameter on energy was found. The application of the radiation effect of heavy ions on CR-39 in the field of radiation detection and dosimetry are discussed. Results indicated that it is possible to produce etchable tracks of 28 Si in this energy range in CR-39. We also report the etching characteristics of these tracks in the CR-39 detector. (orig.) [de

  5. Fabrication of detectors and transistors on high-resistivity silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holland, S.

    1988-06-01

    A new process for the fabrication of silicon p-i-n diode radiation detectors is described. The utilization of backside gettering in the fabrication process results in the actual physical removal of detrimental impurities from critical device regions. This reduces the sensitivity of detector properties to processing variables while yielding low diode reverse-leakage currents. In addition, gettering permits the use of processing temperatures compatible with integrated-circuit fabrication. P-channel MOSFETs and silicon p-i-n diodes have been fabricated simultaneously on 10 kΩ/centerreverse arrowdot/cm silicon using conventional integrated-circuit processing techniques. 25 refs., 5 figs

  6. A novel 3D detector configuration enabling high quantum efficiency, low crosstalk, and low output capacitance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurola, A.; Marochkin, V.; Tuuva, T.

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of pixelated planar direct conversion semiconductor radiation detectors comprising a thick fully depleted substrate are that they offer low crosstalk, small output capacitance, and that the planar configuration simplifies manufacturing. In order to provide high quantum efficiency for high energy X-rays and Gamma-rays such a radiation detector should be as thick as possible. The maximum thickness and thus the maximum quantum efficiency has been limited by the substrate doping concentration: the lower the substrate doping the thicker the detector can be before reaching the semiconductor material's electric breakdown field. Thick direct conversion semiconductor detectors comprising vertical three-dimensional electrodes protruding through the substrate have been previously proposed by Sherwood Parker in order to promote rapid detection of radiation. An additional advantage of these detectors is that their thickness is not limited by the substrate doping, i.e., the size of the maximum electric field value in the detector does not depend on detector thickness. However, the thicker the substrate of such three dimensional detectors is the larger the output capacitance is and thus the larger the output noise is. In the novel direct conversion pixelated radiation detector utilizing a novel three dimensional semiconductor architecture, which is proposed in this work, the detector thickness is not limited by the substrate doping and the output capacitance is small and does not depend on the detector thickness. In addition, by incorporating an additional node to the novel three-dimensional semiconductor architecture it can be utilized as a high voltage transistor that can deliver current across high voltages. Furthermore, it is possible to connect a voltage difference of any size to the proposed novel three dimensional semiconductor architecture provided that it is thick enough—this is a novel feature that has not been previously possible for semiconductor

  7. Performance of HPGe detectors in high magnetic fields

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lorente, A.S.; Achenbach, P.; Agnello, M.; Majling, Lubomír

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 573, č. 3 (2007), s. 410-417 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/05/2142 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : hypernuclear gamma-spectroscopy * HPGe detectors Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.114, year: 2007

  8. High spatial and time resolutions with gas ionization detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouthas, J.

    2001-09-01

    This document presents the principles and the characteristics of the gaseous ionisation detectors used in position and timing measurements. The first two parts recall the main notions (electron and ion motions, gaseous amplification, signal formation) and their applications to the proportional counter and the wire chamber. The explanation of the signal formation makes use of the Ramo theorem. The third part is devoted to the different types of wire chambers: drift or cathode strip chambers, TPC (time projection chamber). Some aspects on construction and ageing are also presented. Part 4 is on the detectors in which the multiplication is performed by a 'Parallel Plate' system (PPAC, Pestov counter). Special attention is paid to the RPCs (Resistive Plate Chambers) and their timing resolutions. Part 5 concentrates on 'Micro-pattern detectors' which use different kinds of microstructure for gaseous amplification. The new detectors MICROMEGAS, CAT (compteur a trous) and GEM (gas electron multiplier) and some of their applications are presented. The last part is a bibliography including some comments on the documents. (author)

  9. Preliminary report on the development of a high resolution PET camera using semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, Yohei; Ishii, Keizo; Yamazaki, Hiromichi; Matsuyama, Shigeo; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Sato, Takemi; Aoki, Yasushi; Aoki, Kenichi

    2005-01-01

    We are developing a PET camera using small semiconductor detectors, whose resolution is equivalent to the physical limit of spatial resolution. First, a coincidence system of 16 Schottky CdTe detectors of 0.5 mm width obtained a resolution of <1 mm and it was confirmed that the Schottky CdTe detector is suitable for high resolution PET. Next, the performance of a pair of 32 channel CdTe arrays (1.2 mm width per channel) was investigated for the development of the prototype of high resolution PET. The time resolution between opposing detector pair was 13 ns (FWHM) when high voltage (700 V) was applied. The image of a 0.6 mm diameter point source was obtained in an experiment with opposing detector arrays using four channels, indicating that, a higher resolution can be achieved with the 32 channel CdTe array

  10. The vertex and large angle detectors of a spectrometer system for high energy muon physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, A.; Dobinson, R.W.; Dosselli, U.; Edwards, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Kellner, G.; Montgomery, H.E.; Mueller, H.; Osborne, A.M.; Scaramelli, A.; Watson, E.; Brasse, F.W.; Falley, G.; Flauger, W.; Gayler, J.; Goessling, C.; Koll, J.; Korbel, V.; Nassalski, J.; Singer, G.; Thiele, K.; Zank, P.; Figiel, J.; Janata, F.; Rondio, E.; Studt, M.; Torre, A. de la; Bernaudin, B.; Blum, D.; Heusse, P.; Jaffre, M.; Noppe, J.M.; Pascaud, C.; Bertsch, Y.; Bouard, X. de; Broll, C.; Coignet, G.; Favier, J.; Jansco, G.; Lebeau, M.; Maire, M.; Minssieux, H.; Montanet, F.; Moynot, M.; Nagy, E.; Payre, P.; Perrot, G.; Pessard, H.; Ribarics, P.; Schneegans, M.; Thenard, J.M.; Botterill, D.; Carr, J.; Clifft, R.; Edwards, M.; Norton, P.R.; Rousseau, M.D.; Sproston, M.; Thompson, J.C.; Albanese, J.P.; Allkofer, O.C.; Arneodo, M.; Aubert, J.J.; Becks, K.H.; Bee, C.; Benchouk, C.; Bianchi, F.; Bibby, J.; Bird, I.; Boehm, E.; Braun, H.; Brown, S.; Brueck, H.; Callebaut, D.; Cobb, J.H.; Combley, F.; Cornelssen, M.; Costa, F.; Coughlan, J.; Court, G.R.; D'Agostini, G.; Dau, W.D.; Davies, J.K.; Dengler, F.; Derado, I.; Drees, J.; Dumont, J.J.; Eckardt, V.; Ferrero, M.I.; Gamet, R.; Gebauer, H.J.; Haas, J.; Hasert, F.J.; Hayman, P.; Johnson, A.S.; Kabuss, E.M.; Kahl, T.; Krueger, J.; Landgraf, U.; Lanske, D.; Loken, J.; Manz, A.; Mermet-Guyennet, M.; Mohr, W.; Moser, K.; Mount, R.P.; Paul, L.; Peroni, C.; Pettingale, J.; Poetsch, M.; Preissner, H.; Renton, P.; Rith, K.; Roehner, F.; Schlagboehmer, A.; Schmitz, N.; Schultze, K.; Shiers, J.; Sloan, T.; Smith, R.; Stier, H.E.; Stockhausen, W.; Wahlen, H.; Wallucks, W.; Whalley, M.; Williams, D.A.; Williams, W.S.C.; Wimpenny, S.; Windmolders, R.; Winkmueller, G.; Wolf, G.

    1983-01-01

    A description is given of the detector system which forms the large angle spectrometer and vertex detector of the EMC spectrometer. The apparatus is used in the NA9 experiment which studies the complete hadronic final state from the interaction of high energy muons. (orig.)

  11. Development of twin Ge detector for high energy photon measurement and its performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shigetome, Yoshiaki; Harada, Hideo [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Works

    1998-03-01

    Prototype twin HPGe detector composed of two large HPGe crystals was developed to obtain better detection efficiency ({epsilon}) and P/T ratio, which was required for high energy photon spectroscopy. In this work, the performances of the twin HPGe detector were evaluated by computer simulation employing EGS4 code. (author)

  12. GEM detector performance with innovative micro-TPC readout in high magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garzia I.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas detector development is one of the pillars of the research in fundamental physics. Since several years, a new concept of detectors, called Micro Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD, allowed to overcome several problems related to other types of commonly used detectors, like drift chamber and micro strips detectors, reducing the rate of discharges and providing better radiation tolerance. Among the most used MPGDs are the Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs. Invented by Sauli in 1997, nowadays GEMs have become an important reality for particle detectors in high energy physics. Commonly deployed as fast timing detectors and triggers, their fast response, high rate capability and high radiation hardness make them also suitable as tracking detectors. The readout scheme is one of the most important features in tracking technology. Analog readout based on the calculation of the center of gravity technique allows to overcome the limit imposed by digital pads, whose spatial resolution is limited by the pitch dimensions. However, the presence of high external magnetic fields can distort the electronic cloud and affect the performance. The development of the micro-TPC reconstruction method brings GEM detectors into a new prospective, improving significantly the spatial resolutionin presence of high magnetic fields. This innovative technique allows to reconstruct the 3-dimensional particle position, as Time Projection Chamber, but within a drift gap of a few millimeters. In these report, the charge centroid and micro-TPC methods are described in details. We discuss the results of several test beams performed with planar chambers in magnetic field. These results are one of the first developments of micro-TPC technique for GEM detectors, which allows to reach unprecedented performance in a high magnetic field of 1 T.

  13. GEM detector performance with innovative micro-TPC readout in high magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzia, I.; Alexeev, M.; Amoroso, A.; Baldini Ferroli, R.; Bertani, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bianchi, F.; Calcaterra, A.; Canale, N.; Capodiferro, M.; Cassariti, V.; Cerioni, S.; Chai, J. Y.; Chiozzi, S.; Cibinetto, G.; Cossio, F.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; De Mori, F.; Destefanis, M.; Dong, J.; Evangelisti, F.; Evangelisti, F.; Farinelli, R.; Fava, L.; Felici, G.; Fioravanti, E.; Gatta, M.; Greco, M.; Lavezzi, L.; Leng, C. Y.; Li, H.; Maggiora, M.; Malaguti, R.; Marcello, S.; Melchiorri, M.; Mezzadri, G.; Mignone, M.; Morello, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Pellegrino, J.; Pelosi, A.; Rivetti, A.; Rolo, M. D.; Savrié, M.; Scodeggio, M.; Soldani, E.; Sosio, S.; Spataro, S.; Tskhadadze, E.; Verma, S.; Wheadon, R.; Yan, L.

    2018-01-01

    Gas detector development is one of the pillars of the research in fundamental physics. Since several years, a new concept of detectors, called Micro Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD), allowed to overcome several problems related to other types of commonly used detectors, like drift chamber and micro strips detectors, reducing the rate of discharges and providing better radiation tolerance. Among the most used MPGDs are the Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs). Invented by Sauli in 1997, nowadays GEMs have become an important reality for particle detectors in high energy physics. Commonly deployed as fast timing detectors and triggers, their fast response, high rate capability and high radiation hardness make them also suitable as tracking detectors. The readout scheme is one of the most important features in tracking technology. Analog readout based on the calculation of the center of gravity technique allows to overcome the limit imposed by digital pads, whose spatial resolution is limited by the pitch dimensions. However, the presence of high external magnetic fields can distort the electronic cloud and affect the performance. The development of the micro-TPC reconstruction method brings GEM detectors into a new prospective, improving significantly the spatial resolutionin presence of high magnetic fields. This innovative technique allows to reconstruct the 3-dimensional particle position, as Time Projection Chamber, but within a drift gap of a few millimeters. In these report, the charge centroid and micro-TPC methods are described in details. We discuss the results of several test beams performed with planar chambers in magnetic field. These results are one of the first developments of micro-TPC technique for GEM detectors, which allows to reach unprecedented performance in a high magnetic field of 1 T.

  14. Silicon microstrip detector development in the Institute for High Energy Physics Zeuthen, GDR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lange, W.; Nowak, W.D.; Truetzschler, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that in regard of the growing interest to study short living particles demanding for high resolution vertex detectors the authors started to build Si microstrip detectors. The first detector generation was characterized by a small area of silicon and a readout via printed circuit board fan out. Now they can assemble detectors with larger areas and VLSI readout. A special cleanroom has been built. Equipment and tools necessary are available. Silicon wafers and thick film hybrid circuits are fabricated under collaboration by the GDR industry. Applications of their detectors were several test-runs at CERN to calibrate the L3 time expansion chamber (TEC) and the L3 muon chambers. A 10-layer telescope is designed now and it is planned to calibrate a high resolution scintillation fiber target. Future applications will be high resolution vertex detectors, e.g. L3 upgrading (LEP, CERN) or KEDR (VEPP-5, Novosibirsk). Further investigations will concern AC coupled strip detectors (single and double sided) and pixel and/or pad detectors

  15. A High-Granularity Timing Detector for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS Detector System

    CERN Document Server

    Agapopoulou, Christina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The expected increase of the particle flux at the high luminosity phase of the LHC with instantaneous luminosities up to L = 7.5 × 10^{34} cm^{−2}s^{−1} will have a severe impact on pile-up. The pile-up is expected to increase on average to 200 interactions per bunch crossing. The reconstruction performance for especially jets and transverse missing energy will be severely degraded in the end-cap and forward region of the ATLAS detector. A High Granularity Timing Detector (HGTD) is proposed in front of the liquid Argon end-cap calorimeters of ATLAS for pile-up mitigation in the offline reconstruction. An additional use of the detector as a luminometer is proposed. This device covers the pseudo-rapidity range of 2.4 to about 4. Four layers of Silicon sensors are foreseen to provide precision timing information with a time resolution of the order of 30 picoseconds per minimum ionizing particle in order to assign the energy deposits in the calorimeter to different proton-proton collision vertices. Each read...

  16. A Silicon Strip Detector for the Phase II High Luminosity Upgrade of the ATLAS Detector at the Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00425747; McMahon, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS is a particle physics experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) that detects proton-proton collisions at a centre of mass energy of 14 TeV. The Semiconductor Tracker is part of the Inner Detector, implemented using silicon microstrip detectors with binary read-out, providing momentum measurement of charged particles with excellent resolution. The operation of the LHC and the ATLAS experiment started in 2010, with ten years of operation expected until major upgrades are needed in the accelerator and the experiments. The ATLAS tracker will need to be completely replaced due to the radiation damage and occupancy of some detector elements and the data links at high luminosities. These upgrades after the first ten years of operation are named the Phase-II Upgrade and involve a re-design of the LHC, resulting in the High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC). This thesis presents the work carried out in the testing of the ATLAS Phase-II Upgrade electronic systems in the future strips tracker a...

  17. A review of advances in pixel detectors for experiments with high rate and radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Wermes, Norbert

    2018-06-01

    The large Hadron collider (LHC) experiments ATLAS and CMS have established hybrid pixel detectors as the instrument of choice for particle tracking and vertexing in high rate and radiation environments, as they operate close to the LHC interaction points. With the high luminosity-LHC upgrade now in sight, for which the tracking detectors will be completely replaced, new generations of pixel detectors are being devised. They have to address enormous challenges in terms of data throughput and radiation levels, ionizing and non-ionizing, that harm the sensing and readout parts of pixel detectors alike. Advances in microelectronics and microprocessing technologies now enable large scale detector designs with unprecedented performance in measurement precision (space and time), radiation hard sensors and readout chips, hybridization techniques, lightweight supports, and fully monolithic approaches to meet these challenges. This paper reviews the world-wide effort on these developments.

  18. Detector Developments for the High Luminosity LHC Era (1/4)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    Calorimetry and Muon Spectrometers - Part I : In the first part of the lecture series, the motivation for a high luminosity upgrade of the LHC will be quickly reviewed together with the challenges for the LHC detectors. In particular, the plans and ongoing research for new calorimeter detectors will be explained. The main issues in the high-luminosity era are an improved radiation tolerance, natural ageing of detector components and challenging trigger and physics requirements. The new technological solutions for calorimetry at a high-luminosity LHC will be reviewed.

  19. A fast high-voltage current-peak detection system for the ALICE transition radiation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verclas, Robert [Physikalisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet Heidelberg (Germany); Collaboration: ALICE-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    During LHC operation in run 1, the gaseous detectors of ALICE occasionally experienced simultaneous trips in their high voltage which affected the majority of the high voltage channels. These trips are caused by large anode currents in the detector and are potentially related to LHC machine operations. We developed and installed a fast current-peak detection system for the ALICE Transition Radiation Detector. This system is based on FPGA technology and monitors 144 out 522 high voltage channels minimally invasively at a maximum readout rate of 2 MHz. It is an integral part of the LHC beam monitoring system. We report on the latest status.

  20. Raman characterization of high temperature materials using an imaging detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblatt, G.M.; Veirs, D.K.

    1989-03-01

    The characterization of materials by Raman spectroscopy has been advanced by recent technological developments in light detectors. Imaging photomultiplier-tube detectors are now available that impart position information in two dimensions while retaining photon-counting sensitivity, effectively greatly reducing noise. The combination of sensitivity and reduced noise allows smaller amounts of material to be analyzed. The ability to observe small amount of material when coupled with position information makes possible Raman characterization in which many spatial elements are analyzed simultaneously. Raman spectroscopy making use of these capabilities has been used, for instance, to analyze the phases present in carbon films and fibers and to map phase-transformed zones accompanying crack propagation in toughened zirconia ceramics. 16 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  1. Characterization of highly multiplexed monolithic PET / gamma camera detector modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierce, L. A.; Pedemonte, Stefano; Dewitt, Sharon

    2018-01-01

    tube with 8 × 8 position-outputs and one channel that is the sum of the other 64. The 65-channel signal was multiplexed in a resistive circuit, with 65:5 or 65:7 multiplexing. A 0.9 mm beam of 511 keV photons was scanned across the face of the crystal in a 1.52 mm grid pattern in order to characterize...... and scatter-rejection capabilities of the detector were analyzed. We found that using a 7-channel multiplexing scheme (65:7 compression ratio) with 1.67 mm depth bins had the best performance with a beam-contour of 1.2 mm FWHM (from the 0.9 mm beam) near the center of the crystal and 1.9 mm FWHM near the edge...... the detector response. New methods are developed to reject scattered events and perform depthestimation to characterize the detector response of the calibration data. Photon interaction position estimation of the testing data was performed using a Gaussian Maximum Likelihood estimator and the resolution...

  2. Data analysis-based autonomic bandwidth adjustment in software defined multi-vendor optical transport networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yajie; Zhao, Yongli; Zhang, Jie; Yu, Xiaosong; Jing, Ruiquan

    2017-11-27

    Network operators generally provide dedicated lightpaths for customers to meet the demand for high-quality transmission. Considering the variation of traffic load, customers usually rent peak bandwidth that exceeds the practical average traffic requirement. In this case, bandwidth provisioning is unmetered and customers have to pay according to peak bandwidth. Supposing that network operators could keep track of traffic load and allocate bandwidth dynamically, bandwidth can be provided as a metered service and customers would pay for the bandwidth that they actually use. To achieve cost-effective bandwidth provisioning, this paper proposes an autonomic bandwidth adjustment scheme based on data analysis of traffic load. The scheme is implemented in a software defined networking (SDN) controller and is demonstrated in the field trial of multi-vendor optical transport networks. The field trial shows that the proposed scheme can track traffic load and realize autonomic bandwidth adjustment. In addition, a simulation experiment is conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed scheme. We also investigate the impact of different parameters on autonomic bandwidth adjustment. Simulation results show that the step size and adjustment period have significant influences on bandwidth savings and packet loss. A small value of step size and adjustment period can bring more benefits by tracking traffic variation with high accuracy. For network operators, the scheme can serve as technical support of realizing bandwidth as metered service in the future.

  3. Toward achieving flexible and high sensitivity hexagonal boron nitride neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, A.; Grenadier, S. J.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2017-07-01

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) detectors have demonstrated the highest thermal neutron detection efficiency to date among solid-state neutron detectors at about 51%. We report here the realization of h-BN neutron detectors possessing one order of magnitude enhancement in the detection area but maintaining an equal level of detection efficiency of previous achievement. These 3 mm × 3 mm detectors were fabricated from 50 μm thick freestanding and flexible 10B enriched h-BN (h-10BN) films, grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition followed by mechanical separation from sapphire substrates. Mobility-lifetime results suggested that holes are the majority carriers in unintentionally doped h-BN. The detectors were tested under thermal neutron irradiation from californium-252 (252Cf) moderated by a high density polyethylene moderator. A thermal neutron detection efficiency of ˜53% was achieved at a bias voltage of 200 V. Conforming to traditional solid-state detectors, the realization of h-BN epilayers with enhanced electrical transport properties is the key to enable scaling up the device sizes. More specifically, the present results revealed that achieving an electrical resistivity of greater than 1014 Ωṡcm and a leakage current density of below 3 × 10-10 A/cm2 is needed to fabricate large area h-BN detectors and provided guidance for achieving high sensitivity solid state neutron detectors based on h-BN.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF A HIGH RATE HIGH RESOLUTION DETECTOR FOR EXAFS EXPERIMENTS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DE GERONIMO,G.; O CONNOR,P.; BEUTTENMULLER,R.H.; LI,Z.; KUCZEWSKI,A.J.; SIDDONS,D.P.

    2002-11-10

    A new detector for EXAFS experiments is being developed. It is based on a multi-element Si sensor and dedicated readout ASICs. The sensor is composed of 384 pixels, each having 1 mm{sup 2} area, arranged in four quadrants of 12 x 8 elements, and wire-bonded to 32-channel front-end ASICs. Each channel implements low noise preamplification with self-adaptive continuous reset, high order shaper, band-gap referenced baseline stabilizer, one threshold comparator and two DAC adjustable window comparators, each followed by a 24-bit counter. Fabricated in 0.35{micro}m CMOS dissipates about 8mW per channel. First measurements show at room temperature a resolution of 14 rms electrons without the detector and of 40 rms electrons (340eV) with the detector connected and biased. Cooling at -35C a FWHM of 205eV (167eV from electronics) was measured at the Mn-K{alpha} line. A resolution of about 300eV was measured for rates approaching 100kcps/cm{sup 2} per channel, corresponding to an overall rate in excess of 10MHz/cm{sup 2}. A channel-to-channel threshold dispersion after DACs adjustment of 2.5 rms electrons was also measured.

  5. A high-throughput, multi-channel photon-counting detector with picosecond timing

    CERN Document Server

    Lapington, J S; Miller, G M; Ashton, T J R; Jarron, P; Despeisse, M; Powolny, F; Howorth, J; Milnes, J

    2009-01-01

    High-throughput photon counting with high time resolution is a niche application area where vacuum tubes can still outperform solid-state devices. Applications in the life sciences utilizing time-resolved spectroscopies, particularly in the growing field of proteomics, will benefit greatly from performance enhancements in event timing and detector throughput. The HiContent project is a collaboration between the University of Leicester Space Research Centre, the Microelectronics Group at CERN, Photek Ltd., and end-users at the Gray Cancer Institute and the University of Manchester. The goal is to develop a detector system specifically designed for optical proteomics, capable of high content (multi-parametric) analysis at high throughput. The HiContent detector system is being developed to exploit this niche market. It combines multi-channel, high time resolution photon counting in a single miniaturized detector system with integrated electronics. The combination of enabling technologies; small pore microchanne...

  6. Quantitative comparison using Generalized Relative Object Detectability (G-ROD) metrics of an amorphous selenium detector with high resolution Microangiographic Fluoroscopes (MAF) and standard flat panel detectors (FPD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russ, M; Shankar, A; Jain, A; Setlur Nagesh, S V; Ionita, C N; Scott, C; Karim, K S; Bednarek, D R; Rudin, S

    2016-02-27

    A novel amorphous selenium (a-Se) direct detector with CMOS readout has been designed, and relative detector performance investigated. The detector features include a 25 μ m pixel pitch, and 1000 μ m thick a-Se layer operating at 10V/ μ m bias field. A simulated detector DQE was determined, and used in comparative calculations of the Relative Object Detectability (ROD) family of prewhitening matched-filter (PWMF) observer and non-prewhitening matched filter (NPWMF) observer model metrics to gauge a-Se detector performance against existing high resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscopic (MAF) detectors and a standard flat panel detector (FPD). The PWMF-ROD or ROD metric compares two x-ray imaging detectors in their relative abilities in imaging a given object by taking the integral over spatial frequencies of the Fourier transform of the detector DQE weighted by an object function, divided by the comparable integral for a different detector. The generalized-ROD (G-ROD) metric incorporates clinically relevant parameters (focal-spot size, magnification, and scatter) to show the degradation in imaging performance for detectors that are part of an imaging chain. Preliminary ROD calculations using simulated spheres as the object predicted superior imaging performance by the a-Se detector as compared to existing detectors. New PWMF-G-ROD and NPWMF-G-ROD results still indicate better performance by the a-Se detector in an imaging chain over all sphere sizes for various focal spot sizes and magnifications, although a-Se performance advantages were degraded by focal spot blurring. Nevertheless, the a-Se technology has great potential to provide breakthrough abilities such as visualization of fine details including of neuro-vascular perforator vessels and of small vascular devices.

  7. Performance of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors developed for storage-ring decay experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Suzaki, F.; Izumikawa, T.; Miyazawa, S.; Morimoto, K.; Suzuki, T.; Tokanai, F.; Furuki, H.; Ichihashi, N.; Ichikawa, C.; Kitagawa, A.; Kuboki, T.; Momota, S.; Nagae, D.; Nagashima, M.; Nakamura, Y.; Nishikiori, R.; Niwa, T.; Ohtsubo, T.; Ozawa, A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Position-sensitive detectors were developed for storage-ring decay spectroscopy. • Fiber scintillation and silicon strip detectors were tested with heavy ion beams. • A new fiber scintillation detector showed an excellent position resolution. • Position and energy detection by silicon strip detectors enable full identification. -- Abstract: As next generation spectroscopic tools, heavy-ion cooler storage rings will be a unique application of highly charged RI beam experiments. Decay spectroscopy of highly charged rare isotopes provides us important information relevant to the stellar conditions, such as for the s- and r-process nucleosynthesis. In-ring decay products of highly charged RI will be momentum-analyzed and reach a position-sensitive detector set-up located outside of the storage orbit. To realize such in-ring decay experiments, we have developed and tested two types of high-resolution position-sensitive detectors: silicon strips and scintillating fibers. The beam test experiments resulted in excellent position resolutions for both detectors, which will be available for future storage-ring experiments

  8. Improving the Bandwidth Selection in Kernel Equating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Björn; von Davier, Alina A.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the current bandwidth selection methods in kernel equating and propose a method based on Silverman's rule of thumb for selecting the bandwidth parameters. In kernel equating, the bandwidth parameters have previously been obtained by minimizing a penalty function. This minimization process has been criticized by practitioners…

  9. New high-gain thin-gap detector for the OPAL hadron calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dado, S; Goldberg, J; Lupu, N; Mincer, A I; Alexander, G; Bella, G; Gnat, Y; Grunhaus, J; Levy, A; Cohen, J

    1986-12-01

    A new type of thin-gap multiwire gas detector operating in a high-gain mode was developed for use in the OPAL pole-tip calorimeter. The detector thickness is only 6.6 mm and its area is 0.61 m/sup 2/. The induced pad readout provides high output pulses that require no amplification. The setup for the detector mass production and quality-control test is described. Results from a test beam setup that simulates the OPAL pole-tip calorimeter are presented and compared with computer simulations.

  10. New high gain thin gap detector for the OPAL hadron calorimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dado, S; Goldberg, J; Lupu, N; Mincer, A I; Alexander, G; Bella, G; Gnat, Y; Grunhaus, J; Levy, A; Cohen, J

    1986-12-01

    A new type of thin gap multiwire gas detector operating in a high gain mode has been developed for use in the OPAL pole tip calorimeter. The detector thickness is only 6.6 mm and its area is 0.61 m/sup 2/. The induced pad readout provides high output pulses which require no amplification. The set-up for the detector mass production and quality control test is described. Results from a test beam set-up that simulates the OPAL pole tip calorimeter are presented and compared with computer simulations.

  11. High irradiation and ageing properties of resistive Micromegas detectors at the new CERN Gamma Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Andreou, Dimitra

    2016-01-01

    Resistive Micromegas have been developed in recent years with the aim of making this technology usable in HEP experiments where the high sparking rate of classical Micromegas is not tolerable. A resistive Micromegas with four layers and an active surface of 0.5 m2 each, has been designed and built at CERN as prototype of the detectors to be used for the upgrade of the ATLAS experiment. The detector has been exposed to an intense gamma source of 16 TBq in order to study the effects of ageing and evaluate the detector behavior under high irradiation.

  12. Development and features of an X-ray detector with high spatial resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, H.

    1979-09-01

    A laboratory model of an X-ray detector with high spatial resolution was developed and constructed. It has no spectral resolution, but a local resolution of 20 μm which is about ten times as high as that of position-sensitive proportional counters and satisfies the requirements of the very best Wolter telescopes with regard to spatial resolution. The detector will be used for laboratory tests of the 80 cm Wolter telescope which is being developed for Spacelab flights. The theory of the wire grid detector and the physics of the photoelectric effect has been developed, and model calculations and numerical calculations have been carried out. (orig./WB) [de

  13. Motivation for an SSC detector with ultra-high resolution photon detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunion, J.F.; Kane, G.

    1992-01-01

    It is well known that incorporating ultra-high resolution photon detection into a general purpose detector for the SSC will be extremely difficult. The authors will argue that the physics signals that could be missed without such resolution are of such importance that a special purpose detector designed specifically for photon final state modes should be constructed, if sufficient resolution cannot be achieved with general purpose detectors. The potentially great value of these signals as a probe of extremely high mass scales is stressed

  14. Neutrino hierarchy from CP-blind observables with high density magnetized detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donini, A.; Fernandez-Martinez, E.; Rigolin, S.; Migliozzi, P.; Scotto Lavina, L.; Selvi, M.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Terranova, F.

    2008-01-01

    High density magnetized detectors are well suited to exploit the outstanding purity and intensities of novel neutrino sources like neutrino factories and beta beams. They can also provide independent measurements of leptonic mixing parameters through the observation of atmospheric muon-neutrinos. In this paper, we discuss the combination of these observables from a multi-kT iron detector and a high energy beta beam; in particular, we demonstrate that even with moderate detector granularities the neutrino mass hierarchy can be determined for θ 13 values greater than 4 . (orig.)

  15. New generation of efficient high resolution detector for 30-100 keV photons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Ulrik Lund

    between pores. The potential of the structured scintillator is explored through Monte Carlo simulations. A spatial resolution of 1 µm is obtainable and for scintillators with a resolution between 1 µm and 8 µm the efficiency could be more than 15 times higher than a regular scintillator with corresponding...... detector. This establishes an inverse correlation between the spatial resolution and the detection efficiency which limits the performance of existing x-ray detectors. The purpose of this Ph.D. project is to explore alternative paths of research, to develop x-ray detectors for the 30-100 keV energy range...... with single micrometre resolution without compromising efficiency. A number of detector types have been evaluated for this purpose. Structured scintillators are found to exhibit a high potential in terms of performance and also in terms of realizing an actual detector. The structured scintillator consists...

  16. Ultra low energy-ultra low background high purity germanium detectors for studies on dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soma, A.K.; Singh, V.; Singh, L.; Singh, M.K.; Wong, H.T.

    2009-01-01

    Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMP) are the leading DM candidates. Super symmetric particles (SUSY) are one of the leading WIMP candidates. To probe this least explored region Taiwan EXperiments On NeutrinO collaboration is pursuing research and development program by using High Purity Germanium detectors (HPGe). These detectors offer a matured technology to scale up the detectors and achieve sub-keV level threshold i.e. few hundreds of eV, economically. The various detectors developed by the collaboration is shown in the below figure. The current goal of the collaboration is to develop detectors of kg-scale target mass, ∼100 eV threshold and low-background specification for the studies on WIMPs, μ v and neutrino - nucleus coherent scattering

  17. A timing detector with pulsed high-voltage power supply for mass measurements at CSRe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, W.; Tu, X.L.; Wang, M.; Zhang, Y.H.; Xu, H.S.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Blaum, K.

    2014-01-01

    Accuracy of nuclear mass measurements in storage rings depends critically on the accuracy with which the revolution times of stored ions can be obtained. In such experiments, micro-channel plates (MCP) are used as timing detectors. Due to large phase space of injected secondary beams, a large number of ions cannot be stored in the ring and is lost within the first few revolutions. However, these ions interact with the detector and can saturate the MCP and thus deteriorate its performance. In order to eliminate such effects, a fast, pulsed high-voltage power supply (PHVPS) has been employed which keeps the detector switched-off during the first few revolutions. The new detector setup was taken into operation at the Experimental Cooler-Storage-Ring CSRe in Lanzhou and resulted in a significant improvement of the detector amplitude and efficiency characteristics

  18. A high-throughput, multi-channel photon-counting detector with picosecond timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapington, J. S.; Fraser, G. W.; Miller, G. M.; Ashton, T. J. R.; Jarron, P.; Despeisse, M.; Powolny, F.; Howorth, J.; Milnes, J.

    2009-06-01

    High-throughput photon counting with high time resolution is a niche application area where vacuum tubes can still outperform solid-state devices. Applications in the life sciences utilizing time-resolved spectroscopies, particularly in the growing field of proteomics, will benefit greatly from performance enhancements in event timing and detector throughput. The HiContent project is a collaboration between the University of Leicester Space Research Centre, the Microelectronics Group at CERN, Photek Ltd., and end-users at the Gray Cancer Institute and the University of Manchester. The goal is to develop a detector system specifically designed for optical proteomics, capable of high content (multi-parametric) analysis at high throughput. The HiContent detector system is being developed to exploit this niche market. It combines multi-channel, high time resolution photon counting in a single miniaturized detector system with integrated electronics. The combination of enabling technologies; small pore microchannel plate devices with very high time resolution, and high-speed multi-channel ASIC electronics developed for the LHC at CERN, provides the necessary building blocks for a high-throughput detector system with up to 1024 parallel counting channels and 20 ps time resolution. We describe the detector and electronic design, discuss the current status of the HiContent project and present the results from a 64-channel prototype system. In the absence of an operational detector, we present measurements of the electronics performance using a pulse generator to simulate detector events. Event timing results from the NINO high-speed front-end ASIC captured using a fast digital oscilloscope are compared with data taken with the proposed electronic configuration which uses the multi-channel HPTDC timing ASIC.

  19. A high-throughput, multi-channel photon-counting detector with picosecond timing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapington, J.S.; Fraser, G.W.; Miller, G.M.; Ashton, T.J.R.; Jarron, P.; Despeisse, M.; Powolny, F.; Howorth, J.; Milnes, J.

    2009-01-01

    High-throughput photon counting with high time resolution is a niche application area where vacuum tubes can still outperform solid-state devices. Applications in the life sciences utilizing time-resolved spectroscopies, particularly in the growing field of proteomics, will benefit greatly from performance enhancements in event timing and detector throughput. The HiContent project is a collaboration between the University of Leicester Space Research Centre, the Microelectronics Group at CERN, Photek Ltd., and end-users at the Gray Cancer Institute and the University of Manchester. The goal is to develop a detector system specifically designed for optical proteomics, capable of high content (multi-parametric) analysis at high throughput. The HiContent detector system is being developed to exploit this niche market. It combines multi-channel, high time resolution photon counting in a single miniaturized detector system with integrated electronics. The combination of enabling technologies; small pore microchannel plate devices with very high time resolution, and high-speed multi-channel ASIC electronics developed for the LHC at CERN, provides the necessary building blocks for a high-throughput detector system with up to 1024 parallel counting channels and 20 ps time resolution. We describe the detector and electronic design, discuss the current status of the HiContent project and present the results from a 64-channel prototype system. In the absence of an operational detector, we present measurements of the electronics performance using a pulse generator to simulate detector events. Event timing results from the NINO high-speed front-end ASIC captured using a fast digital oscilloscope are compared with data taken with the proposed electronic configuration which uses the multi-channel HPTDC timing ASIC.

  20. Investigation of new vehicle detectors for high-speed signalized intersections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Early indications from the use of the newest vehicle detectors for high-speed signalized intersections : suggested that they perform well as replacements for the Texas Department of Transportations : (TxDOTs) legacy systems, but this early conc...

  1. Photon-Counting Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) for High Resolution Far-Infrared Spectroscopy

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We are developing ultrasensitive Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) for high resolution far-infrared spectroscopy applications, with a long-term goal of...

  2. High-precision analogue peak detector for X-ray imaging applications

    OpenAIRE

    Dlugosz, Rafal Tomasz; Iniewski, Kris

    2007-01-01

    A new analogue high-precision peak detector is presented. Owing to its very low power consumption the circuit is particularly well suited for photon energy detection in multichannel receiver integrated circuits used in nuclear medicine.

  3. Background problem for a large solid angle, high sensitivity detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, M.

    1977-01-01

    With extremely good vacuum (10 -11 to 10 -13 torr) and well controlled beams, the ISR has a good reputation for clean beam conditions and low background for most types of experiments. However, for a detector covering a large solid angle, measuring processes with small cross sections (approximately 10 -38 cm 2 ) there are serious background problems which took almost a year to solve. Since ISABELLE may have similar problems, a summary is given of experience at the ISR with the hope that some of the solutions can be installed in ISABELLE at an early stage

  4. Novel Neutron Detector for High Rate Imaging Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L.

    2004-01-01

    The Phase II period performance was May 30, 2002 through May 29, 2004. This development effort was successfully completed within the period and budget allotted. The proposed design was successfully fabricated from B 4 C-coated aluminum and copper film, slit and wound to form 4 mm diameter straws, cut to 100 cm in length, and threaded with resistive anode wires (20 (micro)m in diameter). This paper reports testing done with two 50-straw detector modules at the reactor of the Nuclear Science Center at Texas A and M University (TAMU NSC)

  5. Superconducting Cable Development for Future High Energy Physics Detector Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, I. L.

    1995-11-01

    Under the leadership of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETHZ) an international ad hoc collaboration for superconducting cables developed an aluminium stabilised superconducting cable for future detector magnets. With the financial support of the Swiss government, this R&D work was carried out for the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN). In this report the manufacturing process is described and results of the quality control measurements are summarised. These tests showed that the industrial manufacturing of an aluminium stabilised superconducting cable is feasible.

  6. High gain multigap avalanche detectors for Cerenkov ring imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, R.S.; Lavender, W.M.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Williams, S.H.

    1980-10-01

    We report on a continuing study of multigap parallel plate avalanche chambers, primarily as photoelectron detectors for use with Cerenkov ring imaging counters. By suitable control of the fields in successive gaps and by introducing screens to reduce photon feedback to the cathode the gain many be increased considerably. We have obtained gains in excess of 6 x 10/sup 7/ for photoelectrons with a good pulse height spectrum and expect to increase this further. We discuss the use of resistive anodes to give avalanche positions in two dimensions by charge division.

  7. Silicon Detector System for High Rate EXAFS Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Pullia, A.; Kraner, H. W.; Siddons, D. P.; Furenlid, L. R.; Bertuccio, G.

    1995-01-01

    A multichannel silicon pad detector for EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) applications has been designed and built. The X-ray spectroscopic measurements demonstrate that an adequate energy resolution of 230 eV FWHM (corresponding to 27 rms electrons in silicon) can be achieved reliably at −35 °C. A resolution of 190 eV FWHM (corresponding to 22 rms electrons) has been obtained from individual pads at −35 °C. At room temperature (25 °C) an average energy resolution of 380 eV FWH...

  8. Charge collection performance of a segmented planar high-purity germanium detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, R.J. [Department of Physics, The University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool Merseyside L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: R.Cooper@liverpool.ac.uk; Boston, A.J.; Boston, H.C.; Cresswell, J.R.; Grint, A.N.; Harkness, L.J.; Nolan, P.J.; Oxley, D.C.; Scraggs, D.P. [Department of Physics, The University of Liverpool, Oliver Lodge Laboratory, Liverpool Merseyside L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); Lazarus, I.; Simpson, J. [STFC Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Dobson, J. [Rosemere Cancer Centre, Royal Preston Hospital, Preston PR2 9HT (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-01

    High-precision scans of a segmented planar high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector have been performed with a range of finely collimated gamma ray beams allowing the response as a function of gamma ray interaction position to be quantified. This has allowed the development of parametric pulse shape analysis (PSA) techniques and algorithms for the correction of imperfections in performance. In this paper we report on the performance of this detector, designed for use in a positron emission tomography (PET) development system.

  9. Supernova pointing with low- and high-energy neutrino detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Tomás, R; Raffelt, Georg G; Kachelriess, M; Dighe, Amol S

    2003-01-01

    A future galactic SN can be located several hours before the optical explosion through the MeV-neutrino burst, exploiting the directionality of $nu$-$e$-scattering in a water Cherenkov detector such as Super-Kamiokande. We study the statistical efficiency of different methods for extracting the SN direction and identify a simple approach that is nearly optimal, yet independent of the exact SN neutrino spectra. We use this method to quantify the increase in the pointing accuracy by the addition of gadolinium to water, which tags neutrons from the inverse beta decay background. We also study the dependence of the pointing accuracy on neutrino mixing scenarios and initial spectra. We find that in the ``worst case'' scenario the pointing accuracy is $8^circ$ at 95% C.L. in the absence of tagging, which improves to $3^circ$ with a tagging efficiency of 95%. At a megaton detector, this accuracy can be as good as $0.6^circ$. A TeV-neutrino burst is also expected to be emitted contemporaneously with the SN optical ex...

  10. A novel high resolution, high sensitivity SPECT detector for molecular imaging of cardiovascular diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusanno, F.; Argentieri, A.; Baiocchi, M.; Colilli, S.; Cisbani, E.; De Vincentis, G.; Fratoni, R.; Garibaldi, F.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Magliozzi, M. L.; Majewski, S.; Marano, G.; Musico, P.; Musumeci, M.; Santavenere, F.; Torrioli, S.; Tsui, B. M. W.; Vitelli, L.; Wang, Y.

    2010-05-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in western countries. Understanding the rupture of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques and monitoring the effect of innovative therapies of heart failure is of fundamental importance. A flexible, high resolution, high sensitivity detector system for molecular imaging with radionuclides on small animal models has been designed for this aim. A prototype has been built using tungsten pinhole and LaBr3(Ce) scintillator coupled to Hamamatsu Flat Panel PMTs. Compact individual-channel readout has been designed, built and tested. Measurements with phantoms as well as pilot studies on mice have been performed, the results show that the myocardial perfusion in mice can be determined with sufficient precision. The detector will be improved replacing the Hamamatsu Flat Panel with Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) to allow integration of the system with MRI scanners. Application of LaBr3(Ce) scintillator coupled to photosensor with high photon detection efficiency and excellent energy resolution will allow dual-label imaging to monitor simultaneously the cardiac perfusion and the molecular targets under investigation during the heart therapy.

  11. Development and application of nuclear radiation detector made from high resistivity silicon and compound semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Honglin; Zhang Xiufeng; Zhang Wanchang; Li Jiang

    1995-11-01

    The development of high resistivity silicon detectors and compound semiconductor detectors as well as their application in nuclear medicine are described. It emphasizes on several key techniques in fabricating detectors in order to meet their application in nuclear medicine. As for a high resistivity silicon detector, its counting rate to 125 I 28.5 keV X-ray has to be improved. So employing a conic mesa structure can increase the thickness of samples, and can raise the electric field of collecting charges under the same bias voltage. As for a GaAs detector, its performance of collecting charges has to be improved. So the thicknesses of GaAs samples are decreased and proper thermal treatment to make Ni-Ge-Au ohmic contacts are employed. Applying a suitable reverse bias voltage can obtain a fully depleted detector, and can obtain a lower forward turn-on voltage and a thinner weak electric field region. After resolving these key techniques, the performance of GaAs detectors has been distinctly improved. The count rate to 125 I X-ray has increased by three or five times under the same testing condition and background circumstance (2 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.)

  12. Monte Carlo Simulations of Ultra-High Energy Resolution Gamma Detectors for Nuclear Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, A.; Drury, O.B.; Friedrich, S.

    2009-01-01

    Ultra-high energy resolution superconducting gamma-ray detectors can improve the accuracy of non-destructive analysis for unknown radioactive materials. These detectors offer an order of magnitude improvement in resolution over conventional high purity germanium detectors. The increase in resolution reduces errors from line overlap and allows for the identification of weaker gamma-rays by increasing the magnitude of the peaks above the background. In order to optimize the detector geometry and to understand the spectral response function Geant4, a Monte Carlo simulation package coded in C++, was used to model the detectors. Using a 1 mm 3 Sn absorber and a monochromatic gamma source, different absorber geometries were tested. The simulation was expanded to include the Cu block behind the absorber and four layers of shielding required for detector operation at 0.1 K. The energy spectrum was modeled for an Am-241 and a Cs-137 source, including scattering events in the shielding, and the results were compared to experimental data. For both sources the main spectral features such as the photopeak, the Compton continuum, the escape x-rays and the backscatter peak were identified. Finally, the low energy response of a Pu-239 source was modeled to assess the feasibility of Pu-239 detection in spent fuel. This modeling of superconducting detectors can serve as a guide to optimize the configuration in future spectrometer designs.

  13. Compton imaging with a highly-segmented, position-sensitive HPGe detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinbach, T.; Hirsch, R.; Reiter, P.; Birkenbach, B.; Bruyneel, B.; Eberth, J.; Hess, H.; Lewandowski, L. [Universitaet zu Koeln, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Koeln (Germany); Gernhaeuser, R.; Maier, L.; Schlarb, M.; Weiler, B.; Winkel, M. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department, Garching (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    A Compton camera based on a highly-segmented high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and a double-sided silicon-strip detector (DSSD) was developed, tested, and put into operation; the origin of γ radiation was determined successfully. The Compton camera is operated in two different modes. Coincidences from Compton-scattered γ-ray events between DSSD and HPGe detector allow for best angular resolution; while the high-efficiency mode takes advantage of the position sensitivity of the highly-segmented HPGe detector. In this mode the setup is sensitive to the whole 4π solid angle. The interaction-point positions in the 36-fold segmented large-volume HPGe detector are determined by pulse-shape analysis (PSA) of all HPGe detector signals. Imaging algorithms were developed for each mode and successfully implemented. The angular resolution sensitively depends on parameters such as geometry, selected multiplicity and interaction-point distances. Best results were obtained taking into account the crosstalk properties, the time alignment of the signals and the distance metric for the PSA for both operation modes. An angular resolution between 13.8 {sup circle} and 19.1 {sup circle}, depending on the minimal interaction-point distance for the high-efficiency mode at an energy of 1275 keV, was achieved. In the coincidence mode, an increased angular resolution of 4.6 {sup circle} was determined for the same γ-ray energy. (orig.)

  14. Photon detector for high energy measurements in the SELEX spectrometer (Fermilab experiment E781)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncharenko, Yu.M.; Grachov, O.A.; Kurshetsov, V.F.; Landsberg, L.G.; Nurushev, S.B.; Vasil'ev, A.N.

    1995-01-01

    A possibility to use one- or two-photon lead glass detectors for high energy measurements in the SELEX spectrometer with E γ up to 500 GeV is studied. It is shown that a single photon detector equipped with radiation-resistant lead glass counters is applicable for the experiment discussed. It is concluded that for the best energy resolution in the case of Primakoff effect like π - = γ * → π - + γ the combined method would be used with weighted combination of direct E γ measurement in the Photon-3 detector and the π - beam energy precise measurement. 11 refs., 4 tabs., 17 figs

  15. Prototypes of Self-Powered Radiation Detectors Employing Intrinsic High-Energy Current (HEC) (POSTPRINT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    neutron sensi- tivities of a Pt self - powered detector ,” IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 25, 292–295 (1978). 6T. A. Dellin, R. E. Huddleston, and C. J...Gamma-sensitive self - powered detectors and their use for in-core flux -mapping,” IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. 28, 752–757 (1981). 9E. A. Burke and J. Wall...AFCEC-CX-TY-TP-2016-0006 PROTOTYPES OF SELF - POWERED RADIATION DETECTORS EMPLOYING INTRINSIC HIGH-ENERGY CURRENT (HEC) (POSTPRINT) Piotr

  16. A high-resolution multiwire area detector for X-ray scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faruqi, A R; Andrews, H [Medical Research Council, Cambridge (UK). Lab. of Molecular Biology

    1989-11-10

    A high-resolution multiwire area detector has been developed for recording X-ray scattering from biological specimens. The detector is 100x100 mm{sup 2} and, under the present operating conditions, has a spatial resolution of about 250 {mu}m in both directions. The detector is set up on a double-mirror focusing camera on a rotating anode X-ray generator and has been used in a number of small-angle experiments, two of which are described in this paper. (orig.).

  17. Comparison of Response Characteristics of High-Purity Germanium Detectors using Analog Versus Digital Processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luke, S J; Raschke, K

    2004-01-01

    In this article we will discuss some of the results of the response characteristics of High Purity germanium detectors using analog versus digital processing of the signals that are outputted from the detector. The discussion will focus on whether or not there is a significant difference in the response of the detector with digital electronics that it limits the ability of the detection system to get reasonable gamma ray spectrometric results. Particularly, whether or not the performance of the analysis code Pu600 is compromised

  18. Silicon Detector System for High Rate EXAFS Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullia, A; Kraner, H W; Siddons, D P; Furenlid, L R; Bertuccio, G

    1995-08-01

    A multichannel silicon pad detector for EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) applications has been designed and built. The X-ray spectroscopic measurements demonstrate that an adequate energy resolution of 230 eV FWHM (corresponding to 27 rms electrons in silicon) can be achieved reliably at -35 °C. A resolution of 190 eV FWHM (corresponding to 22 rms electrons) has been obtained from individual pads at -35 °C. At room temperature (25 °C) an average energy resolution of 380 eV FWHM is achieved and a resolution of 350 eV FWHM (41 rms electrons) is the best performance. A simple cooling system constituted of Peltier cells is sufficient to reduce the reverse currents of the pads and their related shot noise contribution, in order to achieve resolutions better than 300 eV FWHM which is adequate for the EXAFS applications.

  19. Development of a fragment detector system for the study of peripheral collisions at high beam energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spies, H.

    1992-06-01

    In the framework of the experimental program at the accelerator facilities SIS/ESR of the Society for Heavy-Ion research in Darmstadt one of the essential research aims of the LAND collaboration is the study of high-lying collective states after electromagnetic excitation in heavy-ion collisions at nearly relativistic beam energies. By the exchange of virtual photons with high energy giant resonances are excited with high probabilities. The main decay channel of giant resonances in heavy nuclei is the emission of neutrons as well as below the particle threshold the emission of γ radiation. For the study of these states a detector system was developed, which makes the kinematically complete measurement of all reaction partners possible. For the determination of the neutron energy serves the Large Area Neutron Detector LAND, a time-of-flight spectrometer for high-energetic neutrons. For the measurement of the γ radiation emitted by the excited projectile the target is surrounded by an array of 48 BaF 2 crystals. A radiation detector system consisting of 6 single detectors and further 5 help detectors allows together with the magnetic spectrometer ALADIN the identification of the heavy projectile fragments by charge, momentum, and mass. Four position-sensitive plastic scintillators serve for the measurement of the trajectory of the projectile respectively the projectile fragments in front and behind the deviating magnet. Additionally with these detectors the velocity is measured. For the determination of the nuclear charge of the projectile fragments serve a multiple-ionization chamber and a Cherenkov detector. In this thesis the development and taking into operation of the LAND radiation detector system is described. (orig./HSI) [de

  20. High Resolution PET with 250 micrometer LSO Detectors and Adaptive Zoom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherry, Simon R.; Qi, Jinyi

    2012-01-01

    There have been impressive improvements in the performance of small-animal positron emission tomography (PET) systems since their first development in the mid 1990s, both in terms of spatial resolution and sensitivity, which have directly contributed to the increasing adoption of this technology for a wide range of biomedical applications. Nonetheless, current systems still are largely dominated by the size of the scintillator elements used in the detector. Our research predicts that developing scintillator arrays with an element size of 250 (micro)m or smaller will lead to an image resolution of 500 (micro)m when using 18F- or 64Cu-labeled radiotracers, giving a factor of 4-8 improvement in volumetric resolution over the highest resolution research systems currently in existence. This proposal had two main objectives: (i) To develop and evaluate much higher resolution and efficiency scintillator arrays that can be used in the future as the basis for detectors in a small-animal PET scanner where the spatial resolution is dominated by decay and interaction physics rather than detector size. (ii) To optimize one such high resolution, high sensitivity detector and adaptively integrate it into the existing microPET II small animal PET scanner as a 'zoom-in' detector that provides higher spatial resolution and sensitivity in a limited region close to the detector face. The knowledge gained from this project will provide valuable information for building future PET systems with a complete ring of very high-resolution detector arrays and also lay the foundations for utilizing high-resolution detectors in combination with existing PET systems for localized high-resolution imaging.

  1. Signal generation in highly irradiated silicon microstrip detectors for the ATLAS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, Gennaro

    2003-01-01

    Silicon detectors are the most diffused tracking devices in High Energy Physics (HEP). The reason of such success can be found in the characteristics of the material together with the existing advanced technology for the fabrication of these devices. Nevertheless in many modem HEP experiments the observation of vary rare events require data taking at high luminosity with a consequent extremely intense hadron radiation field that damages the silicon and degrades the performance of these devices. In this thesis work a detailed study of the signal generation in microstrip detectors has been produced with a special care for the ATLAS semiconductor tracker geometry. This has required a development of an appropriate setup to perform measurements with Transient Current/ Charge Technique. This has allowed studying the evolution of the signal in several microstrips detector samples irradiated at fluences covering the range expected in the ATLAS Semiconductor Tracker. For a better understanding of these measurements a powerful software package that simulates the signal generation in these devices has been developed. Moreover in this thesis it has been also shown that the degradation due to radiation in silicon detectors can be strongly reduced if the data taking is done with detectors operated at 130 K. This makes low temperature operation that benefits of the recovery of the charge collection efficiency in highly irradiated silicon detectors (also known as Lazarus effect) an optimal option for future high luminosity experiments. (author)

  2. HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEUTRON DETECTORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FISHER, R.K.

    2003-01-01

    OAK B202 HIGH SPATIAL RESOLUTION IMAGING OF INERTIAL FUSION TARGET PLASMAS USING BUBBLE NEUTRON DETECTORS. Bubble detectors, which can detect neutrons with a spatial 5 to 30 (micro), are the most promising approach to imaging NIF target plasmas with the desired 5 (micro) spatial resolution in the target plane. Gel bubble detectors are being tested to record neutron images of ICF implosions in OMEGA experiments. By improving the noise reduction techniques used in analyzing the data taken in June 2000, we have been able to image the neutron emission from 6 · 10 13 yield DT target plasmas with a target plane spatial resolution of ∼ 140 (micro). As expected, the spatial resolution was limited by counting statistics as a result of the low neutron detection efficiency of the easy-to-use gel bubble detectors. The results have been submitted for publication and will be the subject of an invited talk at the October 2001 Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society. To improve the counting statistics, data was taken in May 2001 using a stack of four gel detectors and integrated over a series of up to seven high-yield DT shots. Analysis of the 2001 data is still in its early stages. Gel detectors were chosen for these initial tests since the bubbles can be photographed several hours after the neutron exposure. They consist of ∼ 5000 drops (∼ 100 (micro) in diameter) of bubble detector liquid/cm 3 suspended in an inactive support gel that occupies ∼ 99% of the detector volume. Using a liquid bubble chamber detector and a light scattering system to record the bubble locations a few microseconds after the neutron exposure when the bubbles are ∼ 10 (micro) in diameter, should result in ∼ 1000 times higher neutron detection efficiency and a target plane resolution on OMEGA of ∼ 10 to 50 (micro)

  3. Semiconductor devices as track detectors in high energy colliding beam experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludlam, T.

    1980-01-01

    In considering the design of experiments for high energy colliding beam facilities one quickly sees the need for better detectors. The full exploitation of machines like ISABELLE will call for detector capabilities beyond what can be expected from refinements of the conventional approaches to particle detection in high energy physics experiments. Over the past year or so there has been a general realization that semiconductor device technology offers the possibility of position sensing detectors having resolution elements with dimensions of the order of 10 microns or smaller. Such a detector could offer enormous advantages in the design of experiments, and the purpose of this paper is to discuss some of the possibilities and some of the problems

  4. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Y., E-mail: cycjty@sophie.q.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Bioengineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Fuji, Hino, Tokyo 191-8502 (Japan); Fujiwara, T. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M. [Nuclear Professional School, the University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Tomita, H. [Department of Quantum Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Yoshihara, Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Department of Bioengineering, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, the University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2016-09-11

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  5. High energy X-ray photon counting imaging using linear accelerator and silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Yan, X.; Ueda, O.; Ishikura, T.; Fujiwara, T.; Uesaka, M.; Ohno, M.; Tomita, H.; Yoshihara, Y.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-01-01

    A photon counting imaging detector system for high energy X-rays is developed for on-site non-destructive testing of thick objects. One-dimensional silicon strip (1 mm pitch) detectors are stacked to form a two-dimensional edge-on module. Each detector is connected to a 48-channel application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The threshold-triggered events are recorded by a field programmable gate array based counter in each channel. The detector prototype is tested using 950 kV linear accelerator X-rays. The fast CR shaper (300 ns pulse width) of the ASIC makes it possible to deal with the high instant count rate during the 2 μs beam pulse. The preliminary imaging results of several metal and concrete samples are demonstrated.

  6. Measurement of high-energy electrons by means of a Cherenkov detector in ISTTOK tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubowski, L., E-mail: lech.Jjakubowski@ipj.gov.p [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Zebrowski, J. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Plyusnin, V.V. [Association Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049 - 001 Lisboa (Portugal); Malinowski, K.; Sadowski, M.J.; Rabinski, M. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Fernandes, H.; Silva, C.; Duarte, P. [Association Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049 - 001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-10-15

    The paper concerns detectors of the Cherenkov radiation which can be used to measure high-energy electrons escaping from short-living plasma. Such detectors have high temporal (about 1 ns) and spatial (about 1 mm) resolution. The paper describes a Cherenkov-type detector which was designed, manufactured and installed in the ISTTOK tokamak in order to measure fast runaway electrons. The radiator of that detector was made of an aluminium nitride (AlN) tablet with a light-tight filter on its front surface. Cherenkov signals from the radiator were transmitted through an optical cable to a fast photomultiplier. It made possible to perform direct measurements of the runaway electrons of energy above 80 keV. The measured energy values and spatial characteristics of the recorded electrons appeared to be consistent with results of numerical modelling of the runaway electron generation process in the ISTTOK tokamak.

  7. Semiconductor devices as track detectors in high energy colliding beam experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludlam, T

    1980-01-01

    In considering the design of experiments for high energy colliding beam facilities one quickly sees the need for better detectors. The full exploitation of machines like ISABELLE will call for detector capabilities beyond what can be expected from refinements of the conventional approaches to particle detection in high energy physics experiments. Over the past year or so there has been a general realization that semiconductor device technology offers the possibility of position sensing detectors having resolution elements with dimensions of the order of 10 microns or smaller. Such a detector could offer enormous advantages in the design of experiments, and the purpose of this paper is to discuss some of the possibilities and some of the problems.

  8. Development of a high-speed single-photon pixellated detector for visible wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Mac Raighne, Aaron; Mathot, Serge; McPhate, Jason; Vallerga, John; Jarron, Pierre; Brownlee, Colin; O’Shea, Val

    2009-01-01

    We present the development of a high-speed, single-photon counting, Hybrid Photo Detector (HPD). The HPD consists of a vacuum tube, containing the detector assembly, sealed with a transparent optical input window. Photons incident on the photocathode eject a photoelectron into a large electric field, which accelerates the incident electron onto a silicon detector. The silicon detector is bump bonded to a Medipix readout chip. This set-up allows for the detection and readout of low incident photon intensities at rates that are otherwise unattainable with current camera technology. Reported is the fabrication of the camera that brings together a range of sophisticated design and fabrication techniques and the expected theoretical imaging performance. Applications to cellular and molecular microscopy are also described in which single-photon-counting abilities at high frame rates are crucial

  9. New Generation of Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goltsman G.N.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an overview of recent results for new generation of infrared and optical superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors (SNSPDs that has already demonstrated a performance that makes them devices-of-choice for many applications. SNSPDs provide high efficiency for detecting individual photons while keeping dark counts and timing jitter minimal. Besides superior detection performance over a broad optical bandwidth, SNSPDs are also compatible with an integrated optical platform as a crucial requirement for applications in emerging quantum photonic technologies. By embedding SNSPDs in nanophotonic circuits we realize waveguide integrated single photon detectors which unite all desirable detector properties in a single device.

  10. Perfomance of a high purity germanium multi-detector telescope for long range particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riepe, G.; Protic, D.; Suekoesd, C.; Didelez, J.P.; Frascaria, N.; Gerlic, E.; Hourani, E.; Morlet, M.

    1980-01-01

    A telescope of stacked high purity germanium detectors designed for long range charged particles was tested using medium energy protons. Particle identification and the rejection of the low energy tail could be accomplished on-line allowing the measurement of complex spectra. The efficiency of the detector stack for protons was measured up to 156 MeV incoming energy. The various factors affecting the energy resolution are discussed and their estimated contributions are compared with the experimental results

  11. MARTA: A high-energy cosmic-ray detector concept with high-accuracy muon measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, P.; et al.

    2017-12-20

    A new concept for the direct measurement of muons in air showers is presented. The concept is based on resistive plate chambers (RPCs), which can directly measure muons with very good space and time resolution. The muon detector is shielded by placing it under another detector able to absorb and measure the electromagnetic component of the showers such as a water-Cherenkov detector, commonly used in air shower arrays. The combination of the two detectors in a single, compact detector unit provides a unique measurement that opens rich possibilities in the study of air showers.

  12. Applications of molecules as high-resolution, high-sensitivity threshold electron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chutjian, A.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of the work under the contract entitled ''Applications of Molecules as High-Resolution, High-Sensitivity Threshold Electron Detectors'' (DoE IAA No. DE-AI01-83ER13093 Mod. A006) was to explore the electron attachment properties of a variety of molecules at electron energies not accessible by other experimental techniques. As a result of this work, not only was a large body of basic data measured on attachment cross sections and rate constants; but also extensive theoretical calculations were carried out to verify the underlying phenomenon of s-wave attachment. Important outgrowths of this week were also realized in other areas of research. The basic data have applications in fields such as combustion, soot reduction, rocket-exhaust modification, threshold photoelectron spectroscopy, and trace species detection

  13. Pile-up Rejection in the High Granularity Time Detector for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    McNulty, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The High Granularity Timing Detector, a proposed upgrade to the Liquid Argon Calorimeter during the transition to the High Luminosity LHC, will provide increased resolution in the time domain and offer an avenue for efficiently mitigating the expected increase in pile-up jets. This study analyzes how effectively current algorithms are using a signal jet peak calculation to disentangle desired information from other events. Two samples, one with only hard-scattering events and another that also included pile-up events, were used. A transverse momentum range of 30GeV to 70GeV and pseudo-rapidity range of 2.4 to 4.8 divided the sample to see how the HGTD performed when calculating the signal peak for each jet and how many cells had detections in and out of that peak for each sample.

  14. A high resolution germanium detector array for hypernuclear studies at PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleser, Sebastian; Sanchez Lorente, Alicia; Steinen, Marcell [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); Gerl, Juergen; Kojouharov, Ivan [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Iazzi, Felice [Politecnico, Torino, Turin (Italy); INFN, Torino, Turin (Italy); Pochodzalla, Josef; Rittgen, Kai; Sahin, Cihan [Institute for Nuclear Physics, JGU Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: PANDA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The PANDA experiment, planned at the FAIR facility in Darmstadt, aims at the high resolution γ-spectroscopy of double Λ hypernuclei. For this purpose a devoted detector setup is required, consisting of a primary nuclear target, an active secondary target and a germanium detector array for the γ-spectroscopy. Due to the limited space within the PANDA detector a compact design is required. In particular the conventional LN{sub 2} cooling system must be replaced by an electro-mechanical device and a new arrangement of the crystals is needed. This poster shows the ongoing development of the germanium detectors. Test measurements of a single crystal prototype with an improved cooling concept are shown. Thermal simulations for a triple crystal detector are presented. Aditionally studies of the optimization of the detector arrangement inside the PANDA barrel spectrometer are shown. Finally the status on digital pulse shape analysis is presented which will be necessary to deal with high counting rates and to recover the high original energy resolution in case of neutron damage.

  15. Online readout and control unit for high-speed/high resolution readout of silicon tracking detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerger, J.; Hansen, K.; Lange, W.; Nowak, T.; Prell, S.; Zimmermann, W.

    1997-01-01

    We are describing a high speed VME readout and control module developed and presently working at the H1 experiment at DESY in Hamburg. It has the capability to read out 4 x 2048 analogue data channels at sampling rates up to 10 MHz with a dynamic input range of 1 V. The nominal resolution of the A/D converters can be adjusted between 8 and 12 bit. At the latter resolution we obtain signal-to-noise ratio better than 61.4 dB at a conversion rate of 5 MSps. At this data rate all 8192 detector channels can be read out to the internal raw data memory and VME interface within about 410 μs and 510 μs, respectively. The pedestal subtracted signals can be analyzed on-line. At a raw data hit occupation of 10%, the VME readout time is 50 μs per module. Each module provides four complementary CMOS signals to control the front-end electronics and four independent sets of power supplies for analogue and digital voltages (10 V, 100 mA) to drive the front-end electronics and for the bias voltage (100 V, 1.2 mA) to assure the full functionality of the detectors and the readout. (orig.)

  16. Online readout and control unit for high-speed/high resolution readout of silicon tracking detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bürger, J.; Hansen, K.; Lange, W.; Nowak, T.; Prell, S.; Zimmermann, W.

    1997-02-01

    We are describing a high speed VME readout and control module developed and presently working at the H1 experiment at DESY in Hamburg. It has the capability to read out 4 × 2048 analogue data channels at sampling rates up to 10 MHz with a dynamic input range of 1 V. The nominal resolution of the A/D converters can be adjusted between 8 and 12 bit. At the latter resolution we obtain signal-to-noise ratio better than 61.4 dB at a conversion rate of 5 MSps. At this data rate all 8192 detector channels can be read out to the internal raw data memory and VME interface within about 410 μs and 510 μs, respectively. The pedestal subtracted signals can be analyzed on-line. At a raw data hit occupation of 10%, the VME readout time is 50 μs per module. Each module provides four complementary CMOS signals to control the front-end electronics and four independent sets of power supplies for analogue and digital voltages (10 V, 100 mA) to drive the front-end electronics and for the bias voltage (100 V, 1.2 mA) to assure the full functionality of the detectors and the readout.

  17. Online readout and control unit for high-speed / high resolution readout of silicon tracking detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buerger, J.; Hansen, K.; Lange, W.; Nowak, T.; Prell, S.; Zimmermann, W.

    1996-09-01

    We are describing a high speed VME readout and control module developed and presently working at the H1 experiment at DESY in Hamburg. It has the capability to read out 4 x 2048 analogue data channels at sampling rates up to 10 MHz with a dynamic input range of 1 V. The nominal resolution of the A/D converters can be adjusted between 8 and 12 bit. At the latter resolution we obtain signal-to-noise ratio better than 61.4 dB at a conversion rate of 5 MSps. At this data rate all 8192 detector channels can be read out to the internal raw data memory and VME interface within about 410 μs and 510 μs, respectively. The pedestal subtracted signals can be analyzed on-line. At a raw data hit occupation of 10%, the VME readout time is 50 μs per module. Each module provides four complementary CMOS signals to control the front-end electronics and four independent sets of power supplies for analogue and digital voltages (10 V, 100 mA) to drive the front-end electronics and for the bias voltage (100 V, 1.2 mA) to assure the full functionality of the detectors and the readout. (orig.)

  18. Development of Fast High-Resolution Muon Drift-Tube Detectors for High Counting Rates

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00287945; Dubbert, J.; Horvat, S.; Kortner, O.; Kroha, H.; Legger, F.; Richter, R.; Adomeit, S.; Biebel, O.; Engl, A.; Hertenberger, R.; Rauscher, F.; Zibell, A.

    2011-01-01

    Pressurized drift-tube chambers are e?cient detectors for high-precision tracking over large areas. The Monitored Drift-Tube (MDT) chambers of the muon spectrometer of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) reach a spatial resolution of 35 micons and almost 100% tracking e?ciency with 6 layers of 30 mm diameter drift tubes operated with Ar:CO2 (93:7) gas mixture at 3 bar and a gas gain of 20000. The ATLAS MDT chambers are designed to cope with background counting rates due to neutrons and gamma-rays of up to about 300 kHz per tube which will be exceeded for LHC luminosities larger than the design value of 10-34 per square cm and second. Decreasing the drift-tube diameter to 15 mm while keeping the other parameters, including the gas gain, unchanged reduces the maximum drift time from about 700 ns to 200 ns and the drift-tube occupancy by a factor of 7. New drift-tube chambers for the endcap regions of the ATLAS muon spectrometer have been designed. A prototype chamber consisting of 12 times 8 l...

  19. A novel high resolution and high efficiency dual head detector for molecular breast imaging: New results from clinical trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garibaldi, F., E-mail: franco.garibaldi@iss.infn.i [ISS and INFN Roma, gr. Sanita, Rome (Italy); Cisbani, E.; Colilli, S.; Cusanno, F.; Fratoni, R.; Giuliani, F.; Gricia, M.; Lucentini, M.; Magliozzi, M.L.; Santavenere, F.; Torrioli, S. [ISS and INFN Roma, gr. Sanita, Rome (Italy); Musico, P. [INFN Genova, Genova (Italy); Argentieri, A. [INFN Bari, Bari (Italy); Cossu, E.; Padovano, F.; Simonetti, G. [ISS and INFN Roma, gr. Sanita, Rome (Italy); Schillaci, O. [University of Tor Vergata, Rome (Italy); Majewski, S. [West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia (United States)

    2010-05-21

    Detecting small breast tumors is a challenging task. Molecular Breast Imaging with radionuclides has a central role to play in this respect. Our group has recently designed and implemented a dual detector setup that allows spot compression and improves significantly the performance of the system. The single head detector has been successfully used for clinical trials with 10 patients in comparison with a commercial high resolution detector. Then the dual head system has been showed to have significant advantages for the detection of small tumors.

  20. Plasma-focus neutron diagnostics by means of high-sensitivity bubble detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoita, V.; Pantea, A.; Patran, A.; Lee, P.; Springham, S.V.; Koh, M.; Rawat, R.S.; Zhang, T.; Hassan, M.

    2005-01-01

    A new type of bubble detector (a superheated fluid detector), the DEFENDER TM , was tested as a neutron diagnostics device on the NX2 plasma focus (PF) device at the NIE/NTU, Singapore. The DEFENDER TM detector was recently developed and commercialised by BTI, Canada, and it is characterised by a very high sensitivity (a factor of about 30 higher than the standard detectors) to fast neutrons (energy above 100 keV). Together with its particular energy response this high sensitivity allows for the development of improved neutron diagnostics for the PF devices. The NX2 plasma focus device has the following typical operating parameters: condenser bank charging voltage: 15 kV; stored energy: 2.3 kJ; peak current: 420 kA; current rise-time: 1.35 μs; deuterium pressure: 20 mbar. During most of the experiments reported here the NX2 device was operated at 14 kV charging voltage and 20 mbar deuterium pressure. A few shots were done at voltages of 14.5 and 15 kV and the same gas pressure. The bubble detector neutron diagnostics experiments carried out on the NX2 machine involved the following measurements: 1. Relative calibration of the four detectors. The detectors were irradiated simultaneously, in identical conditions, by plasma focus neutron pulses and their neutron responses were compared.; 2. angular distribution of the neutron fluence (single shot). The distribution of the neutron fluence was measured at four angles with respect to the PF electrode axis: 0, 30, 60 and 90 deg; 3. Reproducibility of the neutron yield at high repetition rate operation. The NX2 device was operated at 1 Hz repetition rate.; 4. Bubble detector response time. The response time of the DEFENDER TM detector was tested by using the short PF neutron pulses and a high-speed video camera. The paper will present the results of these experiments and their implications for the development of neutron plasma diagnostics techniques based on the bubble detectors and their broader class of superheated

  1. Evaluation of high performance data acquisition boards for simultaneous sampling of fast signals from PET detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judenhofer, Martin S; Pichler, Bernd J; Cherry, Simon R

    2005-01-01

    Detectors used for positron emission tomography (PET) provide fast, randomly distributed signals that need to be digitized for further processing. One possibility is to sample the signals at the peak initiated by a trigger from a constant fraction discriminator (CFD). For PET detectors, simultaneous acquisition of many channels is often important. To develop and evaluate novel PET detectors, a flexible, relatively low cost and high performance laboratory data acquisition (DAQ) system is therefore required. The use of dedicated DAQ systems, such as a multi-channel analysers (MCAs) or continuous sampling boards at high rates, is expensive. This work evaluates the suitability of well-priced peripheral component interconnect (PCI)-based 8-channel DAQ boards (PD2-MFS-8 2M/14 and PD2-MFS-8-500k/14, United Electronic Industries Inc., Canton, MA, USA) for signal acquisition from novel PET detectors. A software package was developed to access the board, measure basic board parameters, and to acquire, visualize, and analyse energy spectra and position profiles from block detectors. The performance tests showed that the boards input linearity is >99.2% and the standard deviation is 22 Na source was 14.9% (FWHM) at 511 keV and is slightly better than the result obtained with a high-end single channel MCA (8000A, Amptek, USA) using the same detector (16.8%). The crystals (1.2 x 1.2 x 12 mm 3 ) within a 9 x 9 LSO block detector could be clearly separated in an acquired position profile. Thus, these boards are well suited for data acquisition with novel detectors developed for nuclear imaging

  2. High-dynamic-range coherent diffractive imaging: ptychography using the mixed-mode pixel array detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giewekemeyer, Klaus, E-mail: klaus.giewekemeyer@xfel.eu [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Philipp, Hugh T. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Wilke, Robin N. [Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Aquila, Andrew [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Osterhoff, Markus [Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Tate, Mark W.; Shanks, Katherine S. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Zozulya, Alexey V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Salditt, Tim [Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, Göttingen (Germany); Gruner, Sol M. [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Kavli Institute of Cornell for Nanoscience, Ithaca, NY (United States); Mancuso, Adrian P. [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-08-07

    The advantages of a novel wide dynamic range hard X-ray detector are demonstrated for (ptychographic) coherent X-ray diffractive imaging. Coherent (X-ray) diffractive imaging (CDI) is an increasingly popular form of X-ray microscopy, mainly due to its potential to produce high-resolution images and the lack of an objective lens between the sample and its corresponding imaging detector. One challenge, however, is that very high dynamic range diffraction data must be collected to produce both quantitative and high-resolution images. In this work, hard X-ray ptychographic coherent diffractive imaging has been performed at the P10 beamline of the PETRA III synchrotron to demonstrate the potential of a very wide dynamic range imaging X-ray detector (the Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD). The detector is capable of single photon detection, detecting fluxes exceeding 1 × 10{sup 8} 8-keV photons pixel{sup −1} s{sup −1}, and framing at 1 kHz. A ptychographic reconstruction was performed using a peak focal intensity on the order of 1 × 10{sup 10} photons µm{sup −2} s{sup −1} within an area of approximately 325 nm × 603 nm. This was done without need of a beam stop and with a very modest attenuation, while ‘still’ images of the empty beam far-field intensity were recorded without any attenuation. The treatment of the detector frames and CDI methodology for reconstruction of non-sensitive detector regions, partially also extending the active detector area, are described.

  3. Detector trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.

    1986-01-01

    The author describes briefly the development of detectors for high energy physics experiments. Especially considered are semiconductor microstrip detectors, drift tubes, holographic bubble chambers, scintillating fiber optics, and calorimeters. (HSI).

  4. Lifetime measurements of charmed mesons with high resolution silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijk, G.A.F. de.

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis an experiment is described to measure the lifetimes of pseudoscalar charmed mesons. The experiment uses a negatively charged unseparated hadron beam of 200 GeV. The experiment is carried out with a magnetic spectrometer preceded by a beam telescope, an active target and a vertex telescope, all consisting of Si microstrip detectors. The spectrometer consists of two spectrometer magnets, 48 planes of drift chambers and 3 Cerenkov hodoscopes for the determination and identification of charged secondaries. The lifetimes of the charmed mesons are determined by measuring the length of their flight path, their momentum and their mass. The results, which are described in the thesis, are based on the analysis of part of the collected data. The production rates in the K - beam and in the π - beam are found to be in the same order of magnitude within the x F range covered. Previous experimental data on the lifetimes of charmed particles are reviewed. A theoretical interpretation is presented of the measured decay properties. (Auth.)

  5. A high rate, low noise, x-ray silicon strip detector system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludewigt, B.; Jaklevic, J.; Kipnis, I.; Rossington, C.; Spieler, H.

    1993-11-01

    An x-ray detector system, based on a silicon strip detector wire-bonded to a low noise charge-senstive amplifier integrated circuit, has been developed for synchrotron radiation experiments which require very high count rates and good energy resolution. Noise measurements and x-ray spectra were taken using a 6 mm long, 55 μm pitch strip detector in conjunction with a prototype 16-channel charge-sensitive preamplifier, both fabricated using standard 1.2 μm CMOS technology. The detector system currently achieves an energy resolution of 350 eV FWHM at 5.9 key, 2 μs peaking time, when cooled to -5 degree C

  6. Enhancing the Responsivity of Uncooled Infrared Detectors Using Plasmonics for High-Performance Infrared Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr Shebl Ahmed

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A lead zirconate titanate (PZT;Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48O3 layer embedded infrared (IR detector decorated with wavelength-selective plasmonic crystals has been investigated for high-performance non-dispersive infrared (NDIR spectroscopy. A plasmonic IR detector with an enhanced IR absorption band has been designed based on numerical simulations, fabricated by conventional microfabrication techniques, and characterized with a broadly tunable quantum cascade laser. The enhanced responsivity of the plasmonic IR detector at specific wavelength band has improved the performance of NDIR spectroscopy and pushed the limit of detection (LOD by an order of magnitude. In this paper, a 13-fold enhancement in the LOD of a methane gas sensing using NDIR spectroscopy is demonstrated with the plasmonic IR detector.

  7. Front-end electronics for high rate, position sensitive neutron detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, B; Harder, J A; Hrisoho, A; Radeka, V; Smith, G C

    2002-01-01

    Advanced neutron detectors for experiments at new spallation sources will require greater counting rate capabilities than previously attainable. This necessitates careful design of both detector and readout electronics. As part of a new instrument for protein crystallography at LANSCE, we are constructing a detector whose concept was described previously (IEEE Trans. Nucl. Sci. NS-46 (1999) 1916). Here, we describe the signal processing circuit, which is well suited for sup 3 He detectors with a continuous interpolating readout. The circuit is based on standard charge preamplification, transmission of this signal over 20 meters or so, followed by sample and hold using a second order gated baseline restorer. This latter unit provides high rate capability without requiring pole-zero and tail cancellation circuits. There is also provision for gain-adjustment. The circuits are produced in surface mounted technology.

  8. Improved mid infrared detector for high spectral or spatial resolution and synchrotron radiation use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faye, Mbaye; Bordessoule, Michel; Kanouté, Brahim; Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Manceron, Laurent [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Laboratoire MONARIS, CNRS-Université Pierre et Marie Curie, UMR 8233, 4 Place Jussieu, F-75252 Paris Cedex (France)

    2016-06-15

    When using bright, small effective size sources, such as synchrotron radiation light beam, for broadband spectroscopy at spectral or spatial high resolution for mid-IR FTIR measurements, a marked detectivity improvement can be achieved by setting up a device matching the detector optical étendue to that of the source. Further improvement can be achieved by reducing the background unmodulated flux and other intrinsic noise sources using a lower temperature cryogen, such as liquid helium. By the combined use of cooled apertures, cold reimaging optics, filters and adapted detector polarization, and preamplification electronics, the sensitivity of a HgCdTe photoconductive IR detector can be improved by a significant factor with respect to standard commercial devices (more than one order of magnitude on average over 6–20 μm region) and the usable spectral range extended to longer wavelengths. The performances of such an optimized detector developed on the AILES Beamline at SOLEIL are presented here.

  9. Calibration of Single High Purity Germanium Detector for Whole Body Counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taha, T.M.; Morsi, T.M.

    2009-01-01

    A new Accuscan II single germanium detector for whole body counter was installed in NRC (Egypt). The current paper concerned on calibration of single high purity germanium detector for whole body counter. Physical parameters affecting on performance of whole body counter such as linearity, minimum detectable activity and source detector distance, SDD were investigated. Counting efficiencies for the detector have been investigated in rear wall, fixed diagnostic position in air. Counting efficiencies for organ compartments such as thyroid, lung, upper and lower gastrointestinal tract have been investigated using transfer phantom in fixed diagnostic and screening positions respectively. The organ compartment efficiencies in screening geometry were higher than that value of diagnostic geometry by a factor of three. The committed dose equivalents of I-131 in thyroid were ranged from 0.073 ± 0.004 to 1.73±0.09 mSv and in lung was 0.02±0.001 mSv

  10. Bibliographical study on the high-purity germanium radiation detectors used in gamma and X spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornand, Bernard; Friant, Alain

    1979-03-01

    The germanium or silicon lithium-drifted detectors, Ge(Li) or Si(Li), and high-purity germanium detectors, HP Ge (impurity concentration approximately 10 10 cm -3 ), are the most commonly used at the present time as gamma and X-ray spectrometers. The HP Ge detectors for which room temperature storage is the main characteristic can be obtained with a large volume and a thin window, and are used as the Ge(Li) in γ ray spectrometry or the Si(Li) in X-ray spectrometry. This publication reviews issues from 1974 to 1978 on the state of the art and applications of the HP Ge semiconductor detectors. 101 bibliographical notices with French summaries are presented. An index for authors, documents and periodicals, and subjects is included [fr

  11. Magnetic Microcalorimeter (MMC) Gamma Detectors with Ultra-High Energy Resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Stephen [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2018-01-19

    The goal of this LCP is to develop ultra-high resolution gamma detectors based on magnetic microcalorimeters (MMCs) for accurate non-destructive analysis (NDA) of nuclear materials. For highest energy resolution, we will introduce erbium-doped silver (Ag:Er) as a novel sensor material, and implement several geometry and design changes to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The detector sensitivity will be increased by developing arrays of 32 Ag:Er pixels read out by 16 SQUID preamplifiers, and by developing a cryogenic Compton veto to reduce the spectral background. Since best MMC performance requires detector operation at ~10 mK, we will purchase a dilution refrigerator with a base temperature <10 mK and adapt it for MMC operation. The detector performance will be tested with radioactive sources of interest to the safeguards community.

  12. A Novel High Bandwidth Current Control Strategy for SiC mosfet Based Active Front-End Rectifiers Under Unbalanced Input Voltage Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maheshwari, Ramkrishan; Trintis, Ionut; Török, Lajos

    2017-01-01

    SiC mosfet based converters are capable of high switching frequency operation. In this paper, the converter is operated with 50-kHz switching frequency for an active front-end rectifier application. Due to high switching frequency, the grid-side filter size is reduced, and the possibility of a high...

  13. HPGe detectors long time behaviour in high-resolution γ spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajo-Bohus, L.; Rosso, D.; Sajo Castelli, A.M.; Napoli, D.R.; Fioretto, E.; Menegazzo, R.; Barros, H.; Ur, C.A.; Palacios, D.; Liendo, J.

    2011-01-01

    A large set of data on long term performance of n-type HPGe detectors used in GASP, EUROBALL and CLARA γ spectrometers, as well as environmental measurements have been collected over two decades. In this paper a detailed statistical analysis of this data is given and detector long term behaviour is provided to the scientific community. We include failure, failure mode, repair frequency, repair outcome and its influence in the energy efficiency and energy resolution. A remarkable result is that the life span distribution is exponential. A detector's failure is a memory-less process, where a previous failure does not influence the upcoming one. Repaired spectrometers result in high reliability with deep implications in the management of large scale high-resolution gamma spectrometry related projects. Findings show that on average, detectors initial counting efficiency is slightly lower (∼2%) than that reported by the manufacturers and the repair process (including annealing) does not affect significantly the energy efficiency, even after a long period of use. Repaired detector energy resolution statistics show that the probability, that a repaired detector will be at least as good as it was originally, is more than 3/4.

  14. Technology developments and first measurements of Low Gain Avalanche Detectors (LGAD) for high energy physics applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, G.; Fernández-Martínez, P.; Baselga, M.; Fleta, C.; Flores, D.; Greco, V; Hidalgo, S.; Mandić, I.; Kramberger, G.; Quirion, D.; Ullan, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a new concept of silicon radiation detector with intrinsic multiplication of the charge, called Low Gain Avalanche Detector (LGAD). These new devices are based on the standard Avalanche Photo Diodes (APD) normally used for optical and X-ray detection applications. The main differences to standard APD detectors are the low gain requested to detect high energy charged particles, and the possibility to have fine segmentation pitches: this allows fabrication of microstrip or pixel devices which do not suffer from the limitations normally found [1] in avalanche detectors. In addition, a moderate multiplication value will allow the fabrication of thinner devices with the same output signal of standard thick substrates. The investigation of these detectors provides important indications on the ability of such modified electrode geometry to control and optimize the charge multiplication effect, in order to fully recover the collection efficiency of heavily irradiated silicon detectors, at reasonable bias voltage, compatible with the voltage feed limitation of the CERN High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) experiments [2]. For instance, the inner most pixel detector layers of the ATLAS tracker will be exposed to fluences up to 2×10 16 1 MeV n eq /cm 2 , while for the inner strip detector region fluences of 1×10 15 n eq /cm 2 are expected. The gain implemented in the non-irradiated devices must retain some effect also after irradiation, with a higher multiplication factor with respect to standard structures, in order to be used in harsh environments such those expected at collider experiments

  15. Controlling Laser Plasma Instabilities Using Temporal Bandwidth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsung, Frank; Weaver, J.; Lehmberg, R.

    2016-10-01

    We are performing particle-in-cell simulations using the code OSIRIS to study the effects of laser plasma interactions in the presence of temporal bandwidth under conditions relevant to current and future experiments on the NIKE laser. Our simulations show that, for sufficiently large bandwidth (where the inverse bandwidth is comparable with the linear growth time), the saturation level, and the distribution of hot electrons, can be effected by the addition of temporal bandwidths (which can be accomplished in experiments using beam smoothing techniques such as ISI). We will quantify these effects and investigate higher dimensional effects such as laser speckles. This work is supported by DOE and NRL.

  16. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TROYER, G.L.

    2000-01-01

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% (at) 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse rise time versus photo peak position and resolution. These data were collected to investigate the effect of pulse rise time compensation on resolution and efficiency

  17. Detector response restoration in image reconstruction of high resolution positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Z.

    1994-01-01

    A mathematical method was studied to model the detector response of high spatial-resolution positron emission tomography systems consisting of close-packed small crystals, and to restore the resolution deteriorated due to crystal penetration and/or nonuniform sampling across the field-of-view (FOV). The simulated detector system had 600 bismuth germanate crystals of 3.14 mm width and 30 mm length packed on a single ring of 60 cm diameter. The space between crystal was filled up with lead. Each crystal was in coincidence with 200 opposite crystals so that the FOV had a radius of 30 cm. The detector response was modeled based on the attenuating properties of the crystals and the septa, as well as the geometry of the detector system. The modeled detector-response function was used to restore the projections from the sinogram of the ring-detector system. The restored projections had a uniform sampling of 1.57 mm across the FOV. The crystal penetration and/or the nonuniform sampling were compensated in the projections. A penalized maximum-likelihood algorithm was employed to accomplish the restoration. The restored projections were then filtered and backprojected to reconstruct the image. A chest phantom with a few small circular ''cold'' objects located at the center and near the periphery of FOV was computer generated and used to test the restoration. The reconstructed images from the restored projections demonstrated resolution improvement off the FOV center, while preserving the resolution near the center

  18. Protection of High Ceiling Nuclear Facilities Using Photoelectric Sensors and Infrared Fire Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadoud, A.A.; El Eissawi, H.M.; Saleh, A.A.

    2017-01-01

    A variety of different security systems and components are commercially available and widely used. Before implementing a security system, it is important to understand the characteristics and requirements of the facility area to be protected. Technology and manufacturers of security devices are rapidly changing. It is necessary to use optimal security equipment suitable for the surrounding environment of the facility to be protected. Several security sensors can be used to protect the nuclear facilities, such as passive infrared detectors and glass breakage sensors, vibration detectors, and microwave sensors. This work introduces technical specifications, operation and method of installation for these detectors in nuclear facilities. Also a comparative study of different security sensors or equipment is provided. The photoelectric detectors and infrared fire beam smoke detectors are reliable, suitable and advanced security equipment. They can be used in special cases because of their advantages, this includes their long ranges and accuracy in performance. This paper presents a new concept for adapting the use infrared optical fire beam smoke detector as intrusion detection equipment in high ceiling buildings or towering height facilities. This is in addition to their main function, namely fire detection.The paper also provides a study for their types and installation method. Focus is made on the installation and operation method for two advanced security systems, and wireless control circuit for the overall system operation

  19. Low-cost bump-bonding processes for high energy physics pixel detectors

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069357; Blank, Thomas; Colombo, Fabio; Dierlamm, Alexander Hermann; Husemann, Ulrich; Kudella, Simon; Weber, M

    2016-01-01

    In the next generation of collider experiments detectors will be challenged by unprecedented particle fluxes. Thus large detector arrays of highly pixelated detectors with minimal dead area will be required at reasonable costs. Bump-bonding of pixel detectors has been shown to be a major cost-driver. KIT is one of five production centers of the CMS barrel pixel detector for the Phase I Upgrade. In this contribution the SnPb bump-bonding process and the production yield is reported. In parallel to the production of the new CMS pixel detector, several alternatives to the expensive photolithography electroplating/electroless metal deposition technologies are developing. Recent progress and challenges faced in the development of bump-bonding technology based on gold-stud bonding by thin (15 μm) gold wire is presented. This technique allows producing metal bumps with diameters down to 30 μm without using photolithography processes, which are typically required to provide suitable under bump metallization. The sh...

  20. High-resolution imaging gamma-ray spectroscopy with externally segmented germanium detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callas, J. L.; Mahoney, W. A.; Varnell, L. S.; Wheaton, W. A.

    1993-01-01

    Externally segmented germanium detectors promise a breakthrough in gamma-ray imaging capabilities while retaining the superb energy resolution of germanium spectrometers. An angular resolution of 0.2 deg becomes practical by combining position-sensitive germanium detectors having a segment thickness of a few millimeters with a one-dimensional coded aperture located about a meter from the detectors. Correspondingly higher angular resolutions are possible with larger separations between the detectors and the coded aperture. Two-dimensional images can be obtained by rotating the instrument. Although the basic concept is similar to optical or X-ray coded-aperture imaging techniques, several complicating effects arise because of the penetrating nature of gamma rays. The complications include partial transmission through the coded aperture elements, Compton scattering in the germanium detectors, and high background count rates. Extensive electron-photon Monte Carlo modeling of a realistic detector/coded-aperture/collimator system has been performed. Results show that these complicating effects can be characterized and accounted for with no significant loss in instrument sensitivity.

  1. Large area, low capacitance Si(Li) detectors for high rate x-ray applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossington, C.S.; Fine, P.M.; Madden, N.W.

    1992-10-01

    Large area, single-element Si(Li) detectors have been fabricated using a novel geometry which yields detectors with reduced capacitance and hence reduced noise at short amplifier pulse-processing times. A typical device employing the new geometry with a thickness of 6 mm and an active area of 175 mm 2 has a capacitance of only 0.5 pf, compared to 2.9 pf for a conventional planar device with equivalent dimensions. These new low capacitance detectors, used in conjunction with low capacitance field effect transistors, will result in x-ray spectrometers capable of operating at very high count rates while still maintaining excellent energy resolution. The spectral response of the low capacitance detectors to a wide range of x-ray energies at 80 K is comparable to typical state-of-the-art conventional Si(Li) devices. In addition to their low capacitance, the new devices offer other advantages over conventional detectors. Detector fabrication procedures, I-V and C-V characteristics, noise performance, and spectral response to 2-60 keV x-rays are described

  2. Advantages and Limits of 4H-SIC Detectors for High- and Low-Flux Radiations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciuto, A.; Torrisi, L.; Cannavò, A.; Mazzillo, M.; Calcagno, L.

    2017-11-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) detectors based on Schottky diodes were used to monitor low and high fluxes of photons and ions. An appropriate choice of the epilayer thickness and geometry of the surface Schottky contact allows the tailoring and optimizing the detector efficiency. SiC detectors with a continuous front electrode were employed to monitor alpha particles in a low-flux regime emitted by a radioactive source with high energy (>5.0 MeV) or generated in an ion implanter with sub-MeV energy. An energy resolution value of 0.5% was measured in the high energy range, while, at energy below 1.0 MeV, the resolution becomes 10%; these values are close to those measured with a traditional silicon detector. The same SiC devices were used in a high-flux regime to monitor high-energy ions, x-rays and electrons of the plasma generated by a high-intensity (1016 W/cm2) pulsed laser. Furthermore, SiC devices with an interdigit Schottky front electrode were proposed and studied to overcome the limits of the such SiC detectors in the detection of low-energy (˜1.0 keV) ions and photons of the plasmas generated by a low-intensity (1010 W/cm2) pulsed laser. SiC detectors are expected to be a powerful tool for the monitoring of radioactive sources and ion beams produced by accelerators, for a complete characterization of radiations emitted from laser-generated plasmas at high and low temperatures, and for dosimetry in a radioprotection field.

  3. Low mass hybrid pixel detectors for the high luminosity LHC upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Gonella, Laura; Desch, Klaus

    2013-11-11

    Reducing material in silicon trackers is of major importance for a good overall detector performance, and poses severe challenges to the design of the tracking system. To match the low mass constraints for trackers in High Energy Physics experiments at high luminosity, dedicated technological developments are required. This dissertation presents three technologies to design low mass hybrid pixel detectors for the high luminosity upgrades of the LHC. The work targets specifically the reduction of the material from the detector services and modules, with novel powering schemes, flip chip and interconnection technologies. A serial powering scheme is prototyped, featuring a new regulator concept, a control and protection element, and AC-coupled data transmission. A modified flip chip technology is developed for thin, large area Front-End chips, and a via last Through Silicon Via process is demonstrated on existing pixel modules. These technologies, their developments, and the achievable material reduction are dis...

  4. Integrated High-Rate Transition Radiation Detector and Tracking Chamber for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % RD-6 \\\\ \\\\Over the past five years, RD-6 has developed a transition radiation detector and charged particle tracker for high rate operation at LHC. The detector elements are based on C-fibre reinforced kapton straw tubes of 4~mm diameter filled with a Xenon gas mixture. Detailed measurements with and without magnetic field have been performed in test beams, and in particular have demonstrated the possibility of operating straw tubes at very high rate (up to 20~MHz) with accurate drift-time measurement accuracy. A full-scale engineering prototype containing 10~000 straws is presently under assembly and will be accurately measured with a powerful X-ray tube. Integrated front-end electronics with fast readout have been designed and successfully operated in test beam. \\\\ \\\\Finally extensive simulations performed for ATLAS have shown that such a detector will provide powerful pattern recognition, accurate momentum measurements, efficient level-2 triggering and excellent electron identification, even at the highe...

  5. Pressure balanced type membrane covered polarographic oxygen detectors for use in high temperature-high pressure water, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Norio; Uchida, Shunsuke

    1984-01-01

    A pressure balanced type membrane covered polarographic oxygen detector was developed to determine directly oxygen concentrations in high temperature, high pressure water without cooling and pressure reducing procedures. The detector is characterized by the following features: (1) The detector body and the membrane for oxygen penetration are made of heat resistant resin. (2) The whole detector body is contained in a pressure chamber where interior and exterior pressures of the detector are balanced. (3) Thermal expansion of the electrolyte is absorbed by deformation of a diaphragm attached to the detector bottom. (4) The effect of dissolved Ag + on the signal current is eliminated by applying a guard electrode. As a result of performance tests at elevated temperature, it was demonstrated that a linear relationship between oxygen concentration and signal current was obtained up to 285 0 C, which was stabilized by the guard electrode. The minimum O 2 concentration detectable was 0.03ppm (9.4 x 10 -7 mol/kg). (author)

  6. Development of high pressure-high vacuum-high conductance piston valve for gas-filled radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, D N; Ayyappan, R; Kamble, L P; Singh, J P; Muralikrishna, L V; Alex, M; Balagi, V; Mukhopadhyay, P K

    2008-01-01

    Gas-filled radiation detectors need gas filling at pressures that range from few cms of mercury to as high as 25kg/cm 2 at room temperature. Before gas-filling these detectors require evacuation to a vacuum of the order of ∼1 x 10 -5 mbar. For these operations of evacuation and gas filling a system consisting of a vacuum pump with a high vacuum gauge, gas cylinder with a pressure gauge and a valve is used. The valve has to meet the three requirements of compatibility with high-pressure and high vacuum and high conductance. A piston valve suitable for the evacuation and gas filling of radiation detectors has been designed and fabricated to meet the above requirements. The stainless steel body (80mmx160mm overall dimensions) valve with a piston arrangement has a 1/2 inch inlet/outlet opening, neoprene/viton O-ring at piston face and diameter for sealing and a knob for opening and closing the valve. The piston movement mechanism is designed to have minimum wear of sealing O-rings. The valve has been hydrostatic pressure tested up to 75bars and has Helium leak rate of less than 9.6x10 -9 m bar ltr/sec in vacuum mode and 2x10 -7 mbar ltr/sec in pressure mode. As compared to a commercial diaphragm valve, which needed 3 hours to evacuate a 7 litre chamber to 2.5x10 -5 mbar, the new valve achieved vacuum 7.4x10 -6 mbar in the same time under the same conditions

  7. High Temperature Terahertz Detectors Realized by a GaN High Electron Mobility Transistor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, H. W.; Liu, Z.; Teng, J. H.; Palacios, T.; Chua, S. J.

    2017-04-01

    In this work, a high temperature THz detector based on a GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) with nano antenna structures was fabricated and demonstrated to be able to work up to 200 °C. The THz responsivity and noise equivalent power (NEP) of the device were characterized at 0.14 THz radiation over a wide temperature range from room temperature to 200 °C. A high responsivity Rv of 15.5 and 2.7 kV/W and a low NEP of 0.58 and 10 pW/Hz0.5 were obtained at room temperature and 200 °C, respectively. The advantages of the GaN HEMT over other types of field effect transistors for high temperature terahertz detection are discussed. The physical mechanisms responsible for the temperature dependence of the responsivity and NEP of the GaN HEMT are also analyzed thoroughly.

  8. High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at high count rates with a prototype High Purity Germanium detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, R. J.; Amman, M.; Vetter, K.

    2018-04-01

    High-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers are required for applications in nuclear safeguards, emergency response, and fundamental nuclear physics. To overcome one of the shortcomings of conventional High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors, we have developed a prototype device capable of achieving high event throughput and high energy resolution at very high count rates. This device, the design of which we have previously reported on, features a planar HPGe crystal with a reduced-capacitance strip electrode geometry. This design is intended to provide good energy resolution at the short shaping or digital filter times that are required for high rate operation and which are enabled by the fast charge collection afforded by the planar geometry crystal. In this work, we report on the initial performance of the system at count rates up to and including two million counts per second.

  9. A high resolution germanium detector array for hypernuclear studies at PANDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleser, Sebastian; Sanchez Lorente, Alicia; Steinen, Marcell [Helmholtz-Institut Mainz (Germany); Gerl, Juergen; Kojouharova, Jasmina; Kojouharov, Ivan [GSI Darmstadt (Germany); Iazzi, Felice [Politecnico, Torino (Italy); INFN, Torino (Italy); Pochodzalla, Josef; Rittgen, Kai; Sahin, Cihan [Institute for Nuclear Physics, JGU Mainz (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    The PANDA experiment, planned at the FAIR facility in Darmstadt, aims at the high resolution γ-spectroscopy of double Λ hypernuclei. For this purpose a devoted detector setup is required, consisting of a primary nuclear target, an active secondary target and a germanium detector array for the γ-spectroscopy. Due to the limited space within the PANDA detector a compact design is required. In particular the conventional LN{sub 2} cooling system must be replaced by an electro mechanical device and a new arrangement of the crystals is needed. This presentation shows the progress in the development of the germanium detectors. First results of in-beam measurements at COSY with a new electro mechanically cooled single crystal prototype are presented. Digital pulse shape analysis is used to disentangle pile up events due to the high event rate. This analysis technique also allows to recover the high original energy resolution in case of neutron damage. Finally the status of the new triple crystal detector prototype is given.

  10. Optimized high energy resolution in γ-ray spectroscopy with AGATA triple cluster detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiens, Andreas

    2011-06-20

    The AGATA demonstrator consists of five AGATA Triple Cluster (ATC) detectors. Each triple cluster detector contains three asymmetric, 36-fold segmented, encapsulated high purity germanium detectors. The purpose of the demonstrator is to show the feasibility of position-dependent γ-ray detection by means of γ-ray tracking, which is based on pulse shape analysis. The thesis describes the first optimization procedure of the first triple cluster detectors. Here, a high signal quality is mandatory for the energy resolution and the pulse shape analysis. The signal quality was optimized and the energy resolution was improved through the modification of the electronic properties, of the grounding scheme of the detector in particular. The first part of the work was the successful installation of the first four triple cluster detectors at INFN (National Institute of Nuclear Physics) in Legnaro, Italy, in the demonstrator frame prior to the AGATA commissioning experiments and the first physics campaign. The four ATC detectors combine 444 high resolution spectroscopy channels. This number combined with a high density were achieved for the first time for in-beam γ-ray spectroscopy experiments. The high quality of the ATC detectors is characterized by the average energy resolutions achieved for the segments of each crystal in the range of 1.943 and 2.131 keV at a γ-ray energy of 1.33 MeV for the first 12 crystals. The crosstalk level between individual detectors in the ATC is negligible. The crosstalk within one crystal is at a level of 10{sup -3}. In the second part of the work new methods for enhanced energy resolution in highly segmented and position sensitive detectors were developed. The signal-to-noise ratio was improved through averaging of the core and the segment signals, which led to an improvement of the energy resolution of 21% for γ-energies of 60 keV to a FWHM of 870 eV. In combination with crosstalk correction, a clearly improved energy resolution was

  11. Advanced Multilayer Composite Heavy-Oxide Scintillator Detectors for High Efficiency Fast Neutron Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhikov, Vladimir D.; Naydenov, Sergei V.; Pochet, Thierry; Onyshchenko, Gennadiy M.; Piven, Leonid A.; Smith, Craig F.

    2018-01-01

    We have developed and evaluated a new approach to fast neutron and neutron-gamma detection based on large-area multilayer composite heterogeneous detection media consisting of dispersed granules of small-crystalline scintillators contained in a transparent organic (plastic) matrix. Layers of the composite material are alternated with layers of transparent plastic scintillator material serving as light guides. The resulting detection medium - designated as ZEBRA - serves as both an active neutron converter and a detection scintillator which is designed to detect both neutrons and gamma-quanta. The composite layers of the ZEBRA detector consist of small heavy-oxide scintillators in the form of granules of crystalline BGO, GSO, ZWO, PWO and other materials. We have produced and tested the ZEBRA detector of sizes 100x100x41 mm and greater, and determined that they have very high efficiency of fast neutron detection (up to 49% or greater), comparable to that which can be achieved by large sized heavy-oxide single crystals of about Ø40x80 cm3 volume. We have also studied the sensitivity variation to fast neutron detection by using different types of multilayer ZEBRA detectors of 100 cm2 surface area and 41 mm thickness (with a detector weight of about 1 kg) and found it to be comparable to the sensitivity of a 3He-detector representing a total cross-section of about 2000 cm2 (with a weight of detector, including its plastic moderator, of about 120 kg). The measured count rate in response to a fast neutron source of 252Cf at 2 m for the ZEBRA-GSO detector of size 100x100x41 mm3 was 2.84 cps/ng, and this count rate can be doubled by increasing the detector height (and area) up to 200x100 mm2. In summary, the ZEBRA detectors represent a new type of high efficiency and low cost solid-state neutron detector that can be used for stationary neutron/gamma portals. They may represent an interesting alternative to expensive, bulky gas counters based on 3He or 10B neutron

  12. Digital approach to high-resolution pulse processing for semiconductor detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, A.; Buchner, A.; Gast, W.; Lieder, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    A new design philosophy for processing signals produced by high resolution, large volume semiconductor detectors is described. These detectors, to be used in the next generation of spectrometer arrays for nuclear research (i.e. EUROBALL, etc.), present a set of problems like resolution degradation due to charge trapping and ballistic defect effects, low resolution at a high count rate, poor long term stability, etc. To solve these problems, a new design approach has been developed, including reconstruction of the event charge, providing a pure triangular residual function, and suppressing low frequency noise. 5 refs., 4 figs

  13. The high-voltage system for the LHCb RICH hybrid photon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaboldi, C.; Bellunato, T.; De Lucia, A.; Fanchini, E.; Perego, D.L.; Pessina, G.

    2009-01-01

    We describe the characterization of the high-voltage (HV) distribution system designed and produced for the pixel hybrid photon detectors of the ring imaging Cherenkov counters of the LHCb experiment. The HV system consists of a series of printed circuit boards with a specific layout designed to prevent any discharge arising from high electric fields. The system has dedicated monitoring and control features to supervise HV set-up during data taking. The full production of the HV system has been now completed and all the boards have been fully characterized and installed in the detector, which is currently being commissioned.

  14. Digital approach to high-resolution pulse processing for semiconductor detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georgiev, A [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria); Buchner, A [Forschungszentrum Rossendorf (Germany); Gast, W; Lieder, R M [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernphysik; Stein, J [Target System Electronic GmbH, Solingen, (Germany)

    1992-08-01

    A new design philosophy for processing signals produced by high resolution, large volume semiconductor detectors is described. These detectors, to be used in the next generation of spectrometer arrays for nuclear research (i.e. EUROBALL, etc.), present a set of problems like resolution degradation due to charge trapping and ballistic defect effects, low resolution at a high count rate, poor long term stability, etc. To solve these problems, a new design approach has been developed, including reconstruction of the event charge, providing a pure triangular residual function, and suppressing low frequency noise. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  15. A High Granularity Timing Detector for the ATLAS Experiment at LHC, CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Mallik, Usha; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    A High Granularity Timing Detector of ~30 psec resolution is undertaken by the ATLAS Collaboration for the Phase-II hi-luminosity upgrade, where a pile-up of up to 200 is expected. To improve the overall discriminating ability for the hard scattering events, the additional dimension of precise timing is used in conjunction with the precision position measurements of the Inner Tracking Detectors at high pseudorapidity. The overall effect is to be able to make effective use of the higher beam intensities. Very good progress has been achieved thus far in all aspects; these are discussed with future milestones.

  16. In-beam measurement of the position resolution of a highly segmented coaxial germanium detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descovich, M.; Lee, I.Y.; Fallon, P.; Cromaz, M.; Macchiavelli, A.O.; Radford, D.C.; Vetter, K.; Clark, R.M.; Deleplanque, M.A.; Stephens, F.S.; Ward, D.

    2005-01-01

    The position resolution of a highly segmented coaxial germanium detector was determined by analyzing the 2055keV γ-ray transition of Zr90 excited in a fusion-evaporation reaction. The high velocity of the Zr90 nuclei imparted large Doppler shifts. Digital analysis of the detector signals recovered the energy and position of individual γ-ray interactions. The location of the first interaction in the crystal was used to correct the Doppler energy shift. Comparison of the measured energy resolution with simulations implied a position resolution (root mean square) of 2mm in three-dimensions

  17. Electrothermal impedance spectroscopy measurement on high power LiMO2/Li4Ti5O12 battery cell with low bandwidth test setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swierczynski, Maciej Jozef; Stroe, Daniel Loan; Stanciu, Tiberiu

    2015-01-01

    be executed on-line (e.g. in the electric vehicle Battery Management System). The Electrothermal Impedance Spectroscopy (ETIS) can be used as a relatively simple and fast method for non-destructive parametrization of the battery thermal models. However, the ETIS requires expensive galvanostat with high...

  18. The BaBar LST Detector High Voltage System: Design And Implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benelli, G.; Honscheid, K.; Lewis, E.A.; Regensburger, J.J.; Smith, D.S.; Ohio State U.

    2006-01-01

    In 2004, the first two sextants of the new Limited Streamer Tube (LST) detector were installed in the BABAR experiment to replace the ageing Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) as active detectors for the BABAR Instrumented Flux Return (IFR) muon system. Each streamer tube of the new detector consists of 8 cells. The cell walls are coated with graphite paint and a 100 (micro)m wire forms the anode. These wires are coupled in pairs inside the tubes resulting in 4 independent two-cell segments per LST. High voltage (HV) is applied to the 4 segments through a custom connector that also provides the decoupling capacitor to pick up the detector signals from the anode wires. The BABAR LST detector is operated at 5.5 kV. The high voltage system for the LST detector was designed and built at The Ohio State University (OSU HVPS). Each of the 25 supplies built for BaBar provides 80 output channels with individual current monitoring and overcurrent protection. For each group of 20 channels the HV can be adjusted between 0 and 6 kV. A 4-fold fan-out is integrated in the power supplies to provide a total of 320 outputs. The power supplies are controlled through built-in CANbus and Ethernet (TCP/IP) interfaces. In this presentation we will discuss the design and novel features of the OSU HVPS system and its integration into the BABAR EPICS detector control framework. Experience with the supplies operation during the LST extensive quality control program and their performance during the initial data taking period will be discussed

  19. Development of a High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector for Synchrotrons and XFELs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Joel Todd

    Advances in synchrotron radiation light source technology have opened new lines of inquiry in material science, biology, and everything in between. However, x-ray detector capabilities must advance in concert with light source technology to fully realize experimental possibilities. X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) place particularly large demands on the capabilities of detectors, and developments towards diffraction-limited storage ring sources also necessitate detectors capable of measuring very high flux [1-3]. The detector described herein builds on the Mixed Mode Pixel Array Detector (MM-PAD) framework, developed previously by our group to perform high dynamic range imaging, and the Adaptive Gain Integrating Pixel Detector (AGIPD) developed for the European XFEL by a collaboration between Deustsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), the Paul-Scherrer-Institute (PSI), the University of Hamburg, and the University of Bonn, led by Heinz Graafsma [4, 5]. The feasibility of combining adaptive gain with charge removal techniques to increase dynamic range in XFEL experiments is assessed by simulating XFEL scatter with a pulsed infrared laser. The strategy is incorporated into pixel prototypes which are evaluated with direct current injection to simulate very high incident x-ray flux. A fully functional 16x16 pixel hybrid integrating x-ray detector featuring several different pixel architectures based on the prototypes was developed. This dissertation describes its operation and characterization. To extend dynamic range, charge is removed from the integration node of the front-end amplifier without interrupting integration. The number of times this process occurs is recorded by a digital counter in the pixel. The parameter limiting full well is thereby shifted from the size of an integration capacitor to the depth of a digital counter. The result is similar to that achieved by counting pixel array detectors, but the integrators presented here are designed to tolerate a

  20. Miniaturization of high-energy physics detectors. Vol. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanini, A.

    1983-01-01

    Continued experimental research in high-energy physics requires the reduction in size and cost of the advanced technical equipment involved. A new technology is rapidly evolving that promises to replace today's massive high-energy physics instruments--which may be composed of several thousand tons of sensitive parts--with miniaturized equivalents. Smaller, less expensive apparatus would create more opportunities for research worldwide, and many types of experiments now considered impractical could then be carried out. Scientists and engineers from many countries have contributed to this volume to provide a broad panorama of the new miniaturization technology in high-energy physics. They describe a wide range of new instruments and their applications, discuss limitations and technological problems, and explore the connections between technology and progress in the field of high-energy physics

  1. NanoComposite Polymers for High Resolution Near Infrared Detectors

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop nanocomposite materials with tuned refractive index in the near infra red spectral range as an index-matched immersion lens for high resolution infra-red...

  2. High-Performance Fire Detector for Spacecraft, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The danger from fire aboard spacecraft is immediate with only moments for detection and suppression. Spacecraft are unique high-value systems where the cost of...

  3. Performance of Drift-Tube Detectors at High Counting Rates for High-Luminosity LHC Upgrades

    CERN Document Server

    Bittner, Bernhard; Kortner, Oliver; Kroha, Hubert; Manfredini, Alessandro; Nowak, Sebastian; Ott, Sebastian; Richter, Robert; Schwegler, Philipp; Zanzi, Daniele; Biebel, Otmar; Hertenberger, Ralf; Ruschke, Alexander; Zibell, Andre

    2016-01-01

    The performance of pressurized drift-tube detectors at very high background rates has been studied at the Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) at CERN and in an intense 20 MeV proton beam at the Munich Van-der-Graaf tandem accelerator for applications in large-area precision muon tracking at high-luminosity upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The ATLAS muon drifttube (MDT) chambers with 30 mm tube diameter have been designed to cope with and neutron background hit rates of up to 500 Hz/square cm. Background rates of up to 14 kHz/square cm are expected at LHC upgrades. The test results with standard MDT readout electronics show that the reduction of the drift-tube diameter to 15 mm, while leaving the operating parameters unchanged, vastly increases the rate capability well beyond the requirements. The development of new small-diameter muon drift-tube (sMDT) chambers for LHC upgrades is completed. Further improvements of tracking e?ciency and spatial resolution at high counting rates will be achieved with ...

  4. High voltage calibration of the TANSY-KM5 neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosshoeg, G.; Belle, P. van; Wilson, D.

    1996-11-01

    We have developed a procedure for the high voltage calibration of the TANSY neutron detectors. The procedure is based on the work done during the construction of the spectrometer. A program is written for the measurement of the sensitivity of the neutron detectors as a function of the high voltage. The data are transferred to a PC for evaluation. We use a Cobalt source for the calibration. With the PC the voltage corresponding to the effective Compton edge is found. The voltage settings for the neutron detectors are calculated and stored in a file suitable for input to a program that is used to control the instrument. A measurement is reported that shows that the reproducibility of the measurement is good. 4 refs

  5. High-pressure plastic scintillation detector for measuring radiogenic gases in flow systems

    CERN Document Server

    Schell, W R; Yoon, S R; Tobin, M J

    1999-01-01

    Radioactive gases are emitted into the atmosphere from nuclear electric power and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants, from hospitals discarding xenon used in diagnostic medicine, as well as from nuclear weapons tests. A high-pressure plastic scintillation detector was constructed to measure atmospheric levels of such radioactive gases by detecting the beta and internal conversion (IC) electron decays. Operational tests and calibrations were made that permit integration of the flow detectors into a portable Gas Analysis, Separation and Purification system (GASP). The equipment developed can be used for measuring fission gases released from nuclear reactor sources and/or as part of monitoring equipment for enforcing the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty. The detector is being used routinely for in-line gas separation efficiency measurements, at the elevated operational pressures used for the high-pressure swing analysis system (2070 kPa) and at flow rates of 5-15 l/min . This paper presents the design features, opera...

  6. A monolithically fabricated gas chromatography separation column with an integrated high sensitivity thermal conductivity detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaanta, Bradley C; Zhang, Xin; Chen, Hua

    2010-01-01

    The monolithic integration of a high sensitivity detector with a gas chromatography (GC) separation column creates many potential advantages over the discrete components of a traditional chromatography system. In miniaturized high-speed GC systems, component interconnections can cause crucial errors and loss of fidelity during detection and analysis. A monolithically integrated device would eliminate the need to create helium-tight interconnections, which are bulky and labor intensive. Additionally, batch fabrication of integrated devices that no longer require expensive and fragile detectors can decrease the cost of micro GC systems through economies of scale. We present the design, fabrication and operation of a monolithic GC separation column and detector. Our device is able to separate nitrogen, methane and carbon dioxide within 30 s. This method of device integration could be applied to the existing wealth of column geometries and chemistries designed for specialized applications.

  7. High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Imaging Measurements Using Externally Segmented Germanium Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callas, J.; Mahoney, W.; Skelton, R.; Varnell, L.; Wheaton, W.

    1994-01-01

    Fully two-dimensional gamma-ray imaging with simultaneous high-resolution spectroscopy has been demonstrated using an externally segmented germanium sensor. The system employs a single high-purity coaxial detector with its outer electrode segmented into 5 distinct charge collection regions and a lead coded aperture with a uniformly redundant array (URA) pattern. A series of one-dimensional responses was collected around 511 keV while the system was rotated in steps through 180 degrees. A non-negative, linear least-squares algorithm was then employed to reconstruct a 2-dimensional image. Corrections for multiple scattering in the detector, and the finite distance of source and detector are made in the reconstruction process.

  8. Current problems in semiconductor detectors for high energy physics after particle irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazanu, Ionel

    2002-01-01

    The use of semiconductor materials as detectors in high radiation environments, as expected in future high energy accelerators or in space missions, poses severe problems in long-time operations, due to changes in the properties of the material, and consequently in the performances of detectors. This talk presents the major theoretical areas of current problems, reviews the works in this field and the stage of their understanding, including author's contributions The mechanisms of interaction of the projectile with the semiconductor, the production of primary defects, the physical quantities and the equations able to characterise and describe the radiation effects, and the equations of kinetics of defects are considered. Correlation between microscopic damage and detector performances and the possible ways to optimise the radiation hardness of materials are discussed. (author)

  9. On semidefinite programming bounds for graph bandwidth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Klerk, E.; Nagy, M.; Sotirov, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we propose two new lower bounds on graph bandwidth and cyclic bandwidth based on semidefinite programming (SDP) relaxations of the quadratic assignment problem. We compare the new bounds with two other SDP bounds reported in [A. Blum, G. Konjevod, R. Ravi, and S. Vempala,

  10. Directing Traffic: Managing Internet Bandwidth Fairly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, Thomas A.; Griggs, Tyler J.

    2008-01-01

    Educational institutions today face budgetary restraints and scarce resources, complicating the decision of how to allot bandwidth for campus network users. Additionally, campus concerns over peer-to-peer networking (specifically outbound Internet traffic) have increased because of bandwidth and copyright issues. In this article, the authors…

  11. 47 CFR 2.202 - Bandwidths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... three numerals and one letter. The letter occupies the position of the decimal point and represents the... quality desired Speech and music, M=4000, Bandwidth: 8000 Hz= 8 kHz 8K00A3E Sound broadcasting, single... desired Speech and music, M=4000, Bandwidth: 4000 Hz= 4 kHz 4K00R3E Sound broadcasting, single-sideband...

  12. Bandwidth-on-demand motion control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loon, S.J.L.M.; Hunnekens, B.G.B.; Simon, A.S.; van de Wouw, N.; Heemels, W.P.M.H.

    2018-01-01

    In this brief, we introduce a 'bandwidth-on-demand' variable-gain control (VGC) strategy that allows for a varying bandwidth of the feedback controller. The proposed VGC can achieve improved performance given time-varying, reference-dependent performance requirements compared with linear

  13. Effects induced by high and low intensity laser plasma on SiC Schottky detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sciuto Antonella

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Silicon-Carbide detectors are extensively employed as diagnostic devices in laser-generated plasma, allowing the simultaneous detection of photons, electrons and ions, when used in time-of-flight configuration. The plasma generated by high intensity laser (1016 W/cm2 producing high energy ions was characterized by SiC detector with a continuous front-electrode, and a very thick active depth, while SiC detector with an Interdigit front-electrode was used to measure the low energy ions of plasma generated by low intensity laser (1010 W/cm2. Information about ion energy, number of charge states, plasma temperature can be accurately obtained. However, laser exposure induces the formation of surface and bulk defects whose concentration increases with increasing the time to plasma exposure. The surface defects consist of clusters with a main size of the order of some microns and they modify the diode barrier height and the efficiency of the detector as checked by alpha spectrometry. The bulk defects, due to the energy loss of detected ions, strongly affect the electrical properties of the device, inducing a relevant increase of the leakage (reverse current and decrease the forward current related to a deactivation of the dopant in the active detector region.

  14. A car-borne highly sensitive near-IR diode-laser methane detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezin, A G; Ershov, Oleg V; Shapovalov, Yu P

    2003-01-01

    A highly sensitive automated car-borne detector for measuring methane concentration in real time is designed, developed and tested under laboratory and field conditions. Measurements were made with the help of an uncooled tunable near-IR 1.65-μm laser diode. The detector consists of a multipass optical cell with a 45-m long optical path and a base length of 0.5 m. The car-borne detector is intended for monitoring the methane concentration in air from the moving car to reveal the leakage of domestic gas. The sensitivity limit (standard deviation) under field conditions is 1 ppm (20 ppb under laboratory conditions) for a measuring time of 0.4 s. The measuring technique based on the detection of a single methane line ensured a high selectivity of methane detector relative to other gases. The methane detector can be easily modified for measuring other simple-molecule gases (e.g., CO, CO 2 , HF, NO 2 , H 2 O) by replacing the diode laser and varying the parameters of the control program. (special issue devoted to the memory of academician a m prokhorov)

  15. Effects induced by high and low intensity laser plasma on SiC Schottky detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciuto, Antonella; Torrisi, Lorenzo; Cannavò, Antonino; Mazzillo, Massimo; Calcagno, Lucia

    2018-01-01

    Silicon-Carbide detectors are extensively employed as diagnostic devices in laser-generated plasma, allowing the simultaneous detection of photons, electrons and ions, when used in time-of-flight configuration. The plasma generated by high intensity laser (1016 W/cm2) producing high energy ions was characterized by SiC detector with a continuous front-electrode, and a very thick active depth, while SiC detector with an Interdigit front-electrode was used to measure the low energy ions of plasma generated by low intensity laser (1010 W/cm2). Information about ion energy, number of charge states, plasma temperature can be accurately obtained. However, laser exposure induces the formation of surface and bulk defects whose concentration increases with increasing the time to plasma exposure. The surface defects consist of clusters with a main size of the order of some microns and they modify the diode barrier height and the efficiency of the detector as checked by alpha spectrometry. The bulk defects, due to the energy loss of detected ions, strongly affect the electrical properties of the device, inducing a relevant increase of the leakage (reverse) current and decrease the forward current related to a deactivation of the dopant in the active detector region.

  16. A new PET detector concept for compact preclinical high-resolution hybrid MR-PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berneking, Arne; Gola, Alberto; Ferri, Alessandro; Finster, Felix; Rucatti, Daniele; Paternoster, Giovanni; Jon Shah, N.; Piemonte, Claudio; Lerche, Christoph

    2018-04-01

    This work presents a new PET detector concept for compact preclinical hybrid MR-PET. The detector concept is based on Linearly-Graded SiPM produced with current FBK RGB-HD technology. One 7.75 mm x 7.75 mm large sensor chip is coupled with optical grease to a black coated 8 mm x 8 mm large and 3 mm thick monolithic LYSO crystal. The readout is obtained from four readout channels with the linear encoding based on integrated resistors and the Center of Gravity approach. To characterize the new detector concept, the spatial and energy resolutions were measured. Therefore, the measurement setup was prepared to radiate a collimated beam to 25 different points perpendicular to the monolithic scintillator crystal. Starting in the center point of the crystal at 0 mm / 0 mm and sampling a grid with a pitch of 1.75 mm, all significant points of the detector were covered by the collimator beam. The measured intrinsic spatial resolution (FWHM) was 0.74 +/- 0.01 mm in x- and 0.69 +/- 0.01 mm in the y-direction at the center of the detector. At the same point, the measured energy resolution (FWHM) was 13.01 +/- 0.05 %. The mean intrinsic spatial resolution (FWHM) over the whole detector was 0.80 +/- 0.28 mm in x- and 0.72 +/- 0.19 mm in y-direction. The energy resolution (FWHM) of the detector was between 13 and 17.3 % with an average energy resolution of 15.7 +/- 1.0 %. Due to the reduced thickness, the sensitivity of this gamma detector is low but still higher than pixelated designs with the same thickness due to the monolithic crystals. Combining compact design, high spatial resolution, and high sensitivity, the detector concept is particularly suitable for applications where the scanner bore size is limited and high resolution is required - as is the case in small animal hybrid MR-PET.

  17. Highly sensitive wide bandwidth photodetector based on internal photoemission in CVD grown p-type MoS2/graphene Schottky junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vabbina, PhaniKiran; Choudhary, Nitin; Chowdhury, Al-Amin; Sinha, Raju; Karabiyik, Mustafa; Das, Santanu; Choi, Wonbong; Pala, Nezih

    2015-07-22

    Two dimensional (2D) Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has evolved as a promising material for next generation optoelectronic devices owing to its unique electrical and optical properties, such as band gap modulation, high optical absorption, and increased luminescence quantum yield. The 2D MoS2 photodetectors reported in the literature have presented low responsivity compared to silicon based photodetectors. In this study, we assembled atomically thin p-type MoS2 with graphene to form a MoS2/graphene Schottky photodetector where photo generated holes travel from graphene to MoS2 over the Schottky barrier under illumination. We found that the p-type MoS2 forms a Schottky junction with graphene with a barrier height of 139 meV, which results in high photocurrent and wide spectral range of detection with wavelength selectivity. The fabricated photodetector showed excellent photosensitivity with a maximum photo responsivity of 1.26 AW(-1) and a noise equivalent power of 7.8 × 10(-12) W/√Hz at 1440 nm.

  18. Performance of the Low-Jitter High-Gain/Bandwidth Front-End Electronics of the HADES tRPC Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belver, Daniel; Cabanelas, P.; Castro, E.; Garzon, J. A.; Gil, A.; Gonzalez-Diaz, D.; Koenig, W.; Traxler, M.

    2010-10-01

    A front-end electronics (FEE) chain for accurate time measurements has been developed for the new Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC)-based Time-of-Flight (TOF) wall of the High Acceptance Di-Electron Spectrometer (HADES). The wall covers an area of around 8 m2, divided in 6 sectors. In total, 1122 4-gap timing RPC cells are read-out by 2244 time and charge sensitive channels. The FEE chain consists of 2 custom-made boards: a 4-channel DaughterBOard (DBO) and a 32-channel MotherBOard (MBO). The DBO uses a fast 2 GHz amplifier feeding a dual high-speed discriminator. The time and charge information are encoded, respectively, in the leading edge and the width of an LVDS signal. Each MBO houses up to 8 DBOs providing them regulated voltage supply, threshold values via DACs, test signals and, additionally, routing out a signal proportional to the channel multiplicity needed for a 1st level trigger decision. The MBO delivers LVDS signals to a multi-purpose Trigger Readout Board (TRB) for data acquisition. The FEE allows achieving a system resolution around 75 ps fulfilling comfortably the requirements of the HADES upgrade .

  19. READOUT ELECTRONICS FOR A HIGH-RATE CSC DETECTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OCONNOR, P.; GRATCHEV, V.; KANDASAMY, A.; POLYCHRONAKOS, V.; TCHERNIATINE, V.; PARSONS, J.; SIPPACH, W.

    1999-01-01

    A readout system for a high-rate muon Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) is described. The system, planned for use in the forward region of the ATLAS muon spectrometer, uses two custom CMOS integrated circuits to achieve good position resolution at a flux of up to 2,500 tracks/cm 2 /s

  20. Use of glasses as radiation detectors for high doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldas, L.

    1989-08-01

    Glass samples were tested in relation to the possibility of use in high dose dosimetry in medical and industrial areas. The main characteristics were determined: detection threshold, reproducibility, response to gamma radiation of 137 Cs and 6 Co and thermal decay at ambient temperature, with the use of optical absorption and thermoluminesce techniques. (author) [pt

  1. Precise muon drift tube detectors for high background rate conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engl, Albert

    2011-08-04

    The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS-experiment at the Large Hadron Collider consists of drift tube chambers, which provide the precise measurement of trajectories of traversing muons. In order to determine the momentum of the muons with high precision, the measurement of the position of the muon in a single tube has to be more accurate than {sigma}{<=}100 {mu}m. The large cross section of proton-proton-collisions and the high luminosity of the accelerator cause relevant background of neutrons and {gamma}s in the muon spectrometer. During the next decade a luminosity upgrade to 5.10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} is planned, which will increase the background counting rates considerably. In this context this work deals with the further development of the existing drift chamber technology to provide the required accuracy of the position measurement under high background conditions. Two approaches of improving the drift tube chambers are described: - In regions of moderate background rates a faster and more linear drift gas can provide precise position measurement without changing the existing hardware. - At very high background rates drift tube chambers consisting of tubes with a diameter of 15 mm are a valuable candidate to substitute the CSC muon chambers. The single tube resolution of the gas mixture Ar:CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} in the ratio of 96:3:1 Vol %, which is more linear and faster as the currently used drift gas Ar:CO{sub 2} in the ratio of 97:3 Vol %, was determined at the Cosmic Ray Measurement Facility at Garching and at high {gamma}-background counting rates at the Gamma Irradiation Facility at CERN. The alternative gas mixture shows similar resolution without background. At high background counting rates it shows better resolution as the standard gas. To analyse the data the various parts of the setup have to be aligned precisely to each other. The change to an alternative gas mixture allows the use of the existing hardware. The second approach are drift tubes

  2. Detector Unit

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    Original detector unit of the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) BOL project. This detector unit shows that silicon detectors for nuclear physics particle detection were already developed and in use in the 1960's in Amsterdam. Also the idea of putting 'strips' onto the silicon for high spatial resolution of a particle's impact on the detector were implemented in the BOL project which used 64 of these detector units. The IKO BOL project with its silicon particle detectors was designed, built and operated from 1965 to roughly 1977. Detector Unit of the BOL project: These detectors, notably the ‘checkerboard detector’, were developed during the years 1964-1968 in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, by the Natuurkundig Laboratorium of the N.V. Philips Gloeilampen Fabrieken. This was done in close collaboration with the Instituut voor Kernfysisch Onderzoek (IKO) where the read-out electronics for their use in the BOL Project was developed and produced.

  3. Gas scintillation glass GEM detector for high-resolution X-ray imaging and CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, T., E-mail: fujiwara-t@aist.go.jp [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Mitsuya, Y. [Nuclear Professional School, The University of Tokyo, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Fushie, T. [Radiment Lab. Inc., Setagaya, Tokyo 156-0044 (Japan); Murata, K.; Kawamura, A.; Koishikawa, A. [XIT Co., Naruse, Machida, Tokyo 194-0045 (Japan); Toyokawa, H. [Research Institute for Measurement and Analytical Instrumentation, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Takahashi, H. [Institute of Engineering Innovation, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8654 (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    A high-spatial-resolution X-ray-imaging gaseous detector has been developed with a single high-gas-gain glass gas electron multiplier (G-GEM), scintillation gas, and optical camera. High-resolution X-ray imaging of soft elements is performed with a spatial resolution of 281 µm rms and an effective area of 100×100 mm. In addition, high-resolution X-ray 3D computed tomography (CT) is successfully demonstrated with the gaseous detector. It shows high sensitivity to low-energy X-rays, which results in high-contrast radiographs of objects containing elements with low atomic numbers. In addition, the high yield of scintillation light enables fast X-ray imaging, which is an advantage for constructing CT images with low-energy X-rays.

  4. Detectors for high resolution dynamic positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.; Huesman, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Tomography is the technique of producing a photographic image of an opaque specimen by transmitting a beam of x-rays or gamma rays through the specimen onto an adjacent photographic film. The image results from variations in thickness, density, and chemical composition, of the specimen. This technique is used to study the metabolism of the human brain. This article examines the design of equipment used for high resolution dynamic positron emission tomography. 27 references, 5 figures, 3 tables

  5. Precise muon drift tube detectors for high background rate conditions

    CERN Document Server

    Engl, Albert; Dünnweber, Wolfgang

    The muon spectrometer of the ATLAS-experiment at the Large H adron Collider consists of drift tube chambers, which provide the precise m easurement of trajec- tories of traversing muons. In order to determine the moment um of the muons with high precision, the measurement of the position of the m uon in a single tube has to be more accurate than σ ≤ 100 m. The large cross section of proton-proton-collisions and th e high luminosity of the accelerator cause relevant background of neutrons and γ s in the muon spectrome- ter. During the next decade a luminosity upgrade [1] to 5 10 34 cm − 2 s − 1 is planned, which will increase the background counting rates consider ably. In this context this work deals with the further development of the existing drift chamber tech- nology to provide the required accuracy of the position meas urement under high background conditions. Two approaches of improving the dri ft tube chambers are described: • In regions of moderate background rates a faster and more lin ear ...

  6. High-performance ferroelectric and magnetoresistive materials for next-generation thermal detector arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Michael A.; Donohue, Paul P.; Watton, Rex; Williams, Dennis J.; Anthony, Carl J.; Blamire, Mark G.

    2002-12-01

    This paper discusses the potential thermal imaging performance achievable from thermal detector arrays and concludes that the current generation of thin-film ferroelectric and resistance bolometer based detector arrays are limited by the detector materials used. It is proposed that the next generation of large uncooled focal plane arrays will need to look towards higher performance detector materials - particularly if they aim to approach the fundamental performance limits and compete with cooled photon detector arrays. Two examples of bolometer thin-film materials are described that achieve high performance from operating around phase transitions. The material Lead Scandium Tantalate (PST) has a paraelectric-to-ferroelectric phase transition around room temperature and is used with an applied field in the dielectric bolometer mode for thermal imaging. PST films grown by sputtering and liquid-source CVD have shown merit figures for thermal imaging a factor of 2 to 3 times higher than PZT-based pyroelectric thin films. The material Lanthanum Calcium Manganite (LCMO) has a paramagnetic to ferromagnetic phase transition around -20oC. This paper describes recent measurements of TCR and 1/f noise in pulsed laser-deposited LCMO films on Neodymium Gallate substrates. These results show that LCMO not only has high TCR's - up to 30%/K - but also low 1/f excess noise, with bolometer merit figures at least an order of magnitude higher than Vanadium Oxide, making it ideal for the next generation of microbolometer arrays. These high performance properties come at the expense of processing complexities and novel device designs will need to be introduced to realize the potential of these materials in the next generation of thermal detectors.

  7. A High-Granularity Timing Detector for the Phase-II upgrade of the ATLAS Detector system

    CERN Document Server

    Agapopoulou, Christina; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The expected increase of the particle flux at the high luminosity phase of the LHC with instantaneous luminosities up to L ≃ 7.5 × 10^{34} cm^{−2} s^{−1} will have a severe impact on pile-up. The pile-up is expected to increase on average to 200 interactions per bunch crossing. The reconstruction and trigger performance for especially jets and transverse missing energy will be severely degraded in the end-cap and forward region. A High Granularity Timing Detector (HGTD) is proposed in front of the liquid Argon end-cap calorimeters for pile-up mitigation at Level-0 (L0) trigger level and in the offline reconstruction. This device cover the pseudo-rapidity range of 2.4 to about 4.2. Four layers of Silicon sensors, possibly interleaved with Tungsten, are foreseen to provide precision timing information for charged and neutral particles with a time resolution of the order of 30 pico-seconds per readout cell in order to assign the energy deposits in the calorimeter to different proton-proton collision verti...

  8. High temperature GaAs X-ray detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioliou, G.; Whitaker, M. D. C.; Barnett, A. M.

    2017-12-01

    Two GaAs p+-i-n+ mesa X-ray photodiodes were characterized for their electrical and photon counting X-ray spectroscopic performance over the temperature range of 100 °C to -20 °C. The devices had 10 μm thick i layers with different diameters: 200 μm (D1) and 400 μm (D2). The electrical characterization included dark current and capacitance measurements at internal electric field strengths of up to 50 kV/cm. The determined properties of the two devices were compared with previously reported results that were made with a view to informing the future development of photon counting X-ray spectrometers for harsh environments, e.g., X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy of planetary surfaces in high temperature environments. The best energy resolution obtained (Full Width at Half Maximum at 5.9 keV) decreased from 2.00 keV at 100 °C to 0.66 keV at -20 °C for the spectrometer with D1, and from 2.71 keV at 100 °C to 0.71 keV at -20 °C for the spectrometer with D2. Dielectric noise was found to be the dominant source of noise in the spectra, apart from at high temperatures and long shaping times, where the main source of photopeak broadening was found to be the white parallel noise.

  9. High-Gain Avalanche Rushing amorphous Photoconductor (HARP) detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanioka, K. [NHK Science and Technical Research Laboratories, 1-10-11 Kinuta, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 157-8510 (Japan)], E-mail: tanioka.k-jg@nhk.or.jp

    2009-09-01

    We have been studying a very sensitive image sensor since the early 1980s. In 1985, the author found for the first time that an experimental pickup tube with an amorphous selenium photoconductive target exhibits high sensitivity with excellent picture quality because of a continuous and stable avalanche multiplication phenomenon. We named the pickup tube with an amorphous photoconductive layer operating in the avalanche-mode 'HARP': High-gain Avalanche Rushing amorphous Photoconductor. A color camera equipped with the HARP pickup tubes has a maximum sensitivity of 11 lx at F8. This means that the HARP camera is about 100 times as sensitive as that of CCD camera for broadcasting. This ultrahigh-sensitivity HARP pickup tube is a powerful tool for reporting breaking news at night and other low-light conditions, the production of scientific programs, and numerous other applications, including medical diagnoses, biotech research, and nighttime surveillance. In addition, since the HARP target can convert X-rays into electrons directly, it should be possible to exploit this capability to produce X-ray imaging devices with unparalleled levels of resolution and sensitivity.

  10. A high performance Time-of-Flight detector applied to isochronous mass measurement at CSRe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei Bo; Tu Xiaolin; Wang Meng; Xu Hushan; Mao Ruishi; Hu Zhengguo; Ma Xinwen; Yuan Youjin; Zhang Xueying; Geng Peng; Shuai Peng; Zang Yongdong; Tang Shuwen; Ma Peng; Lu Wan; Yan Xinshuai; Xia Jiawen; Xiao Guoqing; Guo Zhongyan; Zhang Hongbin

    2010-01-01

    A high performance Time-of-Flight detector has been designed and constructed for isochronous mass spectrometry at the experimental Cooler Storage Ring (CSRe). The detector has been successfully used in an experiment to measure the masses of the N∼Z∼33 nuclides near the proton drip-line. Of particular interest is the mass of 65 As. A maximum detection efficiency of 70% and a time resolution of 118±8 ps (FWHM) have been achieved in the experiment. The dependence of detection efficiency and signal average pulse height (APH) on atomic number Z has been studied. The potential of APH for Z identification has been discussed.

  11. The high-level neutron coincidence counter (HLNCC) family of detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramalho, A.; Dahn, E.; Selleck, E.; Kupryashkin, V.; Dubreuil, A.

    1983-01-01

    A description of a group of detectors based on The High-Level Neutron Coincidence Counter (HLNCC) concept is presented. Experience in their utilization is summarized and the procedures followed in calibration and data treatment are described. Advantages of the use of this variety of detectors in simplifying the NDA verifications, reducing the interference with facility operators, and increasing the effectiveness of the inspectors' work are stressed. Likewise, remaining problems such as the need for a vigorous programme directed at achieving the best independent calibrations are emphasized. (author)

  12. Plastic nuclear track detectors as high x-ray and gamma dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chong Chon Sing

    1995-01-01

    A brief review of recent studies on the effects of high doses of x-ray and gamma ray on the track registration properties of several plastic track detectors is presented. The bulk etching rates and the etched track sizes have been found to increase with the dose in the range up to 100 Mrad. These results suggest that the changes in track registration characteristics can be employed as an index of the radiation dose in the megarad region. In particular, recent results on the effect of X-ray irradiation on two types of cellulose nitrate track detectors obtained in our laboratory are reported in this paper. (author)

  13. Functional test of a Radon sensor based on a high-resistivity-silicon BJT detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalla Betta, G.F., E-mail: dallabe@disi.unitn.it [DISI, Università di Trento, and INFN Trento, Trento (Italy); RSens srl, Modena (Italy); Tyzhnevyi, V. [DISI, Università di Trento, and INFN Trento, Trento (Italy); Bosi, A.; Bonaiuti, M. [RSens srl, Modena (Italy); Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bosi, F.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M.A.; Morsani, F.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, and INFN Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Lusiani, A. [Scuola Normale Superiore and INFN Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Ciolini, R.; Curzio, G.; D' Errico, F.; Del Gratta, A. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, Università di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Bidinelli, L. [En and tech, Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Reggio Emilia (Italy); RSens srl, Modena (Italy); and others

    2013-08-01

    A battery-powered, wireless Radon sensor has been designed and realized using a BJT, fabricated on a high-resistivity-silicon substrate, as a radiation detector. Radon daughters are electrostatically collected on the detector surface. Thanks to the BJT internal amplification, real-time α particle detection is possible using simple readout electronics, which records the particle arrival time and charge. Functional tests at known Radon concentrations, demonstrated a sensitivity up to 4.9 cph/(100 Bq/m{sup 3}) and a count rate of 0.05 cph at nominally-zero Radon concentration.

  14. The very low angle detector for high-energy inelastic neutron scattering on the VESUVIO spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perelli Cippo, E.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Pietropaolo, A.; Andreani, C.; Senesi, R.; Rhodes, N.J.; Schooneveld, E.M.

    2008-01-01

    The Very Low Angle Detector (VLAD) bank has been installed on the VESUVIO spectrometer at the ISIS spallation neutron source. The new device allows for high-energy inelastic neutron scattering measurements, at energies above 1 eV, maintaining the wave vector transfer lower than 10A -1 . This opens a still unexplored region of the kinematical (q,ω) space, enabling new and challenging experimental investigations in condensed matter. This paper describes the main instrumental features of the VLAD device, including instrument design, detector response, and calibration procedure

  15. The very low angle detector for high-energy inelastic neutron scattering on the VESUVIO spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perelli Cippo, E.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' G. Occhialini' , Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Pietropaolo, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' G. Occhialini' , CNISM-Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); NAST Center - Nanoscienze-Nanotecnologie-Strumentazione, Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy)], E-mail: antonino.pietropaolo@mib.infn.it; Andreani, C.; Senesi, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica and Centro NAST - Nanoscienze-Nanotecnologie-Strumentazione, Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); Rhodes, N.J.; Schooneveld, E.M. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire 0QX OX11 (United Kingdom)

    2008-05-01

    The Very Low Angle Detector (VLAD) bank has been installed on the VESUVIO spectrometer at the ISIS spallation neutron source. The new device allows for high-energy inelastic neutron scattering measurements, at energies above 1 eV, maintaining the wave vector transfer lower than 10A{sup -1}. This opens a still unexplored region of the kinematical (q,{omega}) space, enabling new and challenging experimental investigations in condensed matter. This paper describes the main instrumental features of the VLAD device, including instrument design, detector response, and calibration procedure.

  16. The very low angle detector for high-energy inelastic neutron scattering on the VESUVIO spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelli Cippo, E.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Pietropaolo, A.; Andreani, C.; Senesi, R.; Rhodes, N. J.; Schooneveld, E. M.

    2008-05-01

    The Very Low Angle Detector (VLAD) bank has been installed on the VESUVIO spectrometer at the ISIS spallation neutron source. The new device allows for high-energy inelastic neutron scattering measurements, at energies above 1 eV, maintaining the wave vector transfer lower than 10Å-1. This opens a still unexplored region of the kinematical (q, ω) space, enabling new and challenging experimental investigations in condensed matter. This paper describes the main instrumental features of the VLAD device, including instrument design, detector response, and calibration procedure.

  17. Influence for high intensity irradiation on characteristics of silicon strip-detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anokhin, I.E.; Pugatch, V.M.; Zinets, O.S.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: Silicon strip detectors (SSD) are widely used for the coordinate determination of short-range as well as minimum ionizing particles with high spatial resolution. Submicron position sensitivity of strip-detectors for short-range particles has been studied by means of two dimensional analyses of charges collected by neighboring strips as well as by measurement of charge collection times [1]. Silicon strip detectors was also used for testing high energy electron beam [2]. Under large fluences the radiation defects are stored and such characteristics of strip-detectors as an accuracy of the coordinate determination and the registration efficiency are significantly changed. Radiation defects lead to a decrease of the lifetime and mobility of charge carriers and therefore to changes of conditions for the charge collection in detectors. The inhomogeneity in spatial distribution if defects and electrical field plays an important role in the charge collection. In this report the role of the diffusion and drift in the charge collection in silicon strip-detectors under irradiation up to 10 Mrad has been studied. The electric field distribution and its dependence on the radiation dose in the detector have been calculated. It is shown that for particles incident between adjacent strips the coordinate determination precision depends strongly on the detector geometry and the electric field distribution, particularly in the vicinity of strips. Measuring simultaneously the collected charges and collection times on adjacent strips one can essentially improve reliability of the coordinate determination for short-range particles. Usually SSD are fabricated on n-type wafers. It is well known that under high intensity irradiation n-Si material converts into p-Si as far as p-type silicon is more radiative hard than n-type silicon [3] it is reasonable to fabricate SSD using high resistivity p-Si. Characteristics of SSD in basis n-and P-Si have been compared and higher

  18. A superconducting detector endstation for high-resolution energy-dispersive SR-XRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, S.; Niedermayr, T.; Drury, O.; Cunningham, M.F.; Berg, M.L. van den; Ullom, J.N.; Loshak, A.; Funk, T.; Cramer, S.P.; Batteux, J.D.; See, E.; Frank, M.; Labov, S.E.

    2001-01-01

    We have built a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to operate cryogenic high-resolution X-ray detectors in synchrotron-based fluorescence applications. The detector is held at the end of a 40 cm cold finger that extends into a UHV sample chamber. The ADR attains a base temperature below 100 mK with about 20 h hold time below 400 mK, and does not require pumping on the liquid He bath. We will discuss cryostat design and performance

  19. A superconducting detector endstation for high-resolution energy-dispersive SR-XRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrich, S.; Drury, O.; Niedermayr, T.; Cunningham, M.F.; Van den Berg, M.L.; Ullom, J.N.; Loshak, A.; Cramer, S.P.; Batteux, J.D.; See, E.; Frank, M.; Labov, S.E.

    2000-01-01

    We have built a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to operate cryogenic high-resolution x-ray detectors in synchrotron-based fluorescence applications. The detector is held at the end of a 40 cm cold finger that extends into a UHV sample chamber. The ADR attains a base temperature below 100 mK with about 24 hours hold time below 400 mK, and does not require pumping on the liquid He bath. We will discuss cryostat design and performance

  20. A superconducting detector endstation for high-resolution energy-dispersive SR-XRF

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, S; Drury, O B; Cunningham, M F; Berg, M L; Ullom, J N; Loshak, A; Funk, T; Cramer, S P; Batteux, J D; See, E; Frank, M; Labov, S E

    2001-01-01

    We have built a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to operate cryogenic high-resolution X-ray detectors in synchrotron-based fluorescence applications. The detector is held at the end of a 40 cm cold finger that extends into a UHV sample chamber. The ADR attains a base temperature below 100 mK with about 20 h hold time below 400 mK, and does not require pumping on the liquid He bath. We will discuss cryostat design and performance.

  1. A superconducting detector endstation for high-resolution energy-dispersive SR-XRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, S. E-mail: friedrich1@llnl.gov; Niedermayr, T.; Drury, O.; Cunningham, M.F.; Berg, M.L. van den; Ullom, J.N.; Loshak, A.; Funk, T.; Cramer, S.P.; Batteux, J.D.; See, E.; Frank, M.; Labov, S.E

    2001-07-21

    We have built a two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) to operate cryogenic high-resolution X-ray detectors in synchrotron-based fluorescence applications. The detector is held at the end of a 40 cm cold finger that extends into a UHV sample chamber. The ADR attains a base temperature below 100 mK with about 20 h hold time below 400 mK, and does not require pumping on the liquid He bath. We will discuss cryostat design and performance.

  2. The CMS Pixel Detector Upgrade and R\\&D for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Viliani, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    The High Luminosity Large Hadron Collider (HL-LHC) at CERN is expected to collide protons at a centre-of-mass energy of 14\\,TeV and to reach an unprecedented peak instantaneous luminosity of $5 \\times 10^{34}\\,{\\rm cm}^{-2} {\\rm s}^{-1}$ with an average number of pileup events of 140. This will allow the ATLAS and CMS experiments to collect integrated luminosities of up to $3000\\,{\\rm fb}^{-1}$ during the project lifetime. To cope with this extreme scenario the CMS detector will be substantially upgraded before starting the HL-LHC, a plan known as CMS Phase-2 Upgrade. In the upgrade the entire CMS silicon pixel detector will be replaced and the new detector will feature increased radiation hardness, higher granularity and capability to handle higher data rate and longer trigger latency. In this report the Phase-2 Upgrade of the CMS silicon pixel detector will be reviewed, focusing on the features of the detector layout and on the development of new pixel devices.

  3. High-speed X-ray imaging pixel array detector for synchrotron bunch isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philipp, Hugh T; Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Shanks, Katherine S; Weiss, Joel T; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-03-01

    A wide-dynamic-range imaging X-ray detector designed for recording successive frames at rates up to 10 MHz is described. X-ray imaging with frame rates of up to 6.5 MHz have been experimentally verified. The pixel design allows for up to 8-12 frames to be stored internally at high speed before readout, which occurs at a 1 kHz frame rate. An additional mode of operation allows the integration capacitors to be re-addressed repeatedly before readout which can enhance the signal-to-noise ratio of cyclical processes. This detector, along with modern storage ring sources which provide short (10-100 ps) and intense X-ray pulses at megahertz rates, opens new avenues for the study of rapid structural changes in materials. The detector consists of hybridized modules, each of which is comprised of a 500 µm-thick silicon X-ray sensor solder bump-bonded, pixel by pixel, to an application-specific integrated circuit. The format of each module is 128 × 128 pixels with a pixel pitch of 150 µm. In the prototype detector described here, the three-side buttable modules are tiled in a 3 × 2 array with a full format of 256 × 384 pixels. The characteristics, operation, testing and application of the detector are detailed.

  4. Single-photon detector operating under extremely high background photon flux conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Sopko, Bruno; Blazej, Josef

    2009-01-01

    We are reporting our results in research and development in the field of avalanche semiconductor single-photon detectors and their application. Our goal was a development of a solid-state photon-counting detector capable of high-precision photon arrival time tagging in extremely harsh operating conditions. The background photon flux exceeding 10 9 photons per second hitting the detector active area should not avoid the useful signal detection and recognition on the signal level of units of photons per second. This is background photon flux about two orders of magnitude higher than what the conventional solid-state photon counters accept. The detection timing resolution should be better than 100 ps and the delay stability should be on picosecond level. We have developed and tested the active quenched and gated avalanche structure on silicon providing the required features in connection with the K14 detection chips. The detector is capable of gated operation under the conditions of background photon flux of 5x10 9 photons per second. The operational detector tolerates long term exposures to the input photon flux exceeding 10 15 photons (>1 mW) per second without damage.

  5. Experimental test of the background rejection, through imaging capability, of a highly segmented AGATA germanium detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doncel, M.; Recchia, F.; Quintana, B.; Gadea, A.; Farnea, E.

    2010-01-01

    The development of highly segmented germanium detectors as well as the algorithms to identify the position of the interaction within the crystal opens the possibility to locate the γ-ray source using Compton imaging algorithms. While the Compton-suppression shield, coupled to the germanium detector in conventional arrays, works also as an active filter against the γ rays originated outside the target, the new generation of position sensitive γ-ray detector arrays has to fully rely on tracking capabilities for this purpose. In specific experimental conditions, as the ones foreseen at radioactive beam facilities, the ability to discriminate background radiation improves the sensitivity of the gamma spectrometer. In this work we present the results of a measurement performed at the Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (LNL) aiming the evaluation of the AGATA detector capabilities to discriminate the origin of the γ rays on an event-by-event basis. It will be shown that, exploiting the Compton scattering formula, it is possible to track back γ rays coming from different positions, assigning them to specific emitting locations. These imaging capabilities are quantified for a single crystal AGATA detector.

  6. High-Dose Neutron Detector Development Using 10B Coated Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menlove, Howard Olsen [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Henzlova, Daniela [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-11-08

    During FY16 the boron-lined parallel-plate technology was optimized to fully benefit from its fast timing characteristics in order to enhance its high count rate capability. To facilitate high count rate capability, a novel fast amplifier with timing and operating properties matched to the detector characteristics was developed and implemented in the 8” boron plate detector that was purchased from PDT. Each of the 6 sealed-cells was connected to a fast amplifier with corresponding List mode readout from each amplifier. The FY16 work focused on improvements in the boron-10 coating materials and procedures at PDT to significantly improve the neutron detection efficiency. An improvement in the efficiency of a factor of 1.5 was achieved without increasing the metal backing area for the boron coating. This improvement has allowed us to operate the detector in gamma-ray backgrounds that are four orders of magnitude higher than was previously possible while maintaining a relatively high counting efficiency for neutrons. This improvement in the gamma-ray rejection is a key factor in the development of the high dose neutron detector.

  7. Performance of a silicon microstrip detector in a high radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, C.S.; Brown, C.N.; Kapustinsky, J.; Leitch, M.J.; McGaughey, P.L.; Peng, J.C.; Sailor, W.; Holzscheiter, K.; Sadler, M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on the performance of a silicon microstrip detector that has been studied in a high rate environment using electron, pion, and proton beams. The pulse height, time response, and leakage current have been studied as a function of particle fluence up to a total integrated flus of about 4 x 10 14 protons/cm 2

  8. Nanosecond X-ray detector based on high resistivity ZnO single crystal semiconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xiaolong; He, Yongning, E-mail: yongning@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Peng, Wenbo; Huang, Zhiyong; Qi, Xiaomeng; Pan, Zijian; Zhang, Wenting [School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Chen, Liang; Liu, Jinliang; Zhang, Zhongbing; Ouyang, Xiaoping [Radiation Detection Research Center, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi' an 710024 (China)

    2016-04-25

    The pulse radiation detectors are sorely needed in the fields of nuclear reaction monitoring, material analysis, astronomy study, spacecraft navigation, and space communication. In this work, we demonstrate a nanosecond X-ray detector based on ZnO single crystal semiconductor, which emerges as a promising compound-semiconductor radiation detection material for its high radiation tolerance and advanced large-size bulk crystal growth technique. The resistivity of the ZnO single crystal is as high as 10{sup 13} Ω cm due to the compensation of the donor defects (V{sub O}) and acceptor defects (V{sub Zn} and O{sub i}) after high temperature annealing in oxygen. The photoconductive X-ray detector was fabricated using the high resistivity ZnO single crystal. The rise time and fall time of the detector to a 10 ps pulse electron beam are 0.8 ns and 3.3 ns, respectively, indicating great potential for ultrafast X-ray detection applications.

  9. A highly-segmented neutron detector for the A1 experiment at MAMI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoth, Matthias [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: A1-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    Electric and magnetic form factors of the neutron, are one of the defining properties to characterize its structure quantitatively. A planned physics program to improve the data base significantly requires high performance detection of relativistic neutrons. Exploiting the full potential of the high luminosity supplied by the MAMI accelerator, a novel neutron detector is being developed in the scope of the A1 collaboration. A large active detector volume of 0.96 m{sup 3} is required to achieve a high raw detection efficiency. The detector is subdivided into 2048 plastic scintillators to be able to cope with high background rates. The light is extracted via wavelength shifting fibres and then guided to multi anode photomultiplier. The signal is read out with FPGA based TDCs (TRBv3 developed at GSI). The energy of the signal is obtained via time over threshold information in combination with a suitable shaping and discriminating circuit. Prototype tests have been performed to optimize the choice of materials and geometry. The capability to detect neutrons in the relevant momentum range has been demonstrated using pion production. A Geant4 simulation using tracking algorithms evaluating the deposited energy is able to optimize key detector properties like particle id efficiency, multiplicity or the effective analyzing power for double polarized scattering experiments.

  10. Charge collection and charge pulse formation in highly irradiated silicon planar detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezillie, B.; Li, Z.; Eremin, V.

    1998-06-01

    The interpretation of experimental data and predictions for future experiments for high-energy physics have been based on conventional methods like capacitance versus voltage (C-V) measurements. Experiments carried out on highly irradiated detectors show that the kinetics of the charge collection and the dependence of the charge pulse amplitude on the applied bias are deviated too far from those predicted by the conventional methods. The described results show that in highly irradiated detectors, at a bias lower than the real full depletion voltage (V fd ), the kinetics of the charge collection (Q) contains a fast and a slow component. At V = V fd *, which is the full depletion voltage traditionally determined by the extrapolation of the fast component amplitude of q versus bias to the maximum value or from the standard C-V measurements, the pulse has a slow component with significant amplitude. This slow component can only be eliminated by applying additional bias that amounts to the real full depletion voltage (V fd ) or more. The above mentioned regularities are explained in this paper in terms of a model of an irradiated detector with multiple regions. This model allows one to use C-V, in a modified way, as well as TChT (transient charge technique) measurements to determine the V fd for highly irradiated detectors

  11. Operation of a high-purity silicon diode alpha particle detector at 1.4 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martoff, C.J.; Kaczanowicz, E.; Neuhauser, B.J.; Lopez, E.; Zhang, Y.; Ziemba, F.P.

    1991-01-01

    Detection of alpha particles at temperatures as low as 1.4 K was demonstrated using a specially fabricated Si diode. The diode was 475 mm 2 by 0.280 mm thick, fabricated from high-purity silicon with degenerately doped contacts. This is an important step toward development of dual-mode (ionization plus phonon) silicon detectors for low energy radiation. (orig.)

  12. Scintillating plastic optical fiber radiation detectors in high energy particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bross, A.D.

    1991-01-01

    We describe the application of scintillating optical fiber in instrumentation for high energy particle physics. The basic physics of the scintillation process in polymers is discussed first and then we outline the fundamentals of scintillating fiber technology. Fiber performance, optimization, and characterization measurements are given. Detector applications in the areas of particle tracking and particle energy determination are then described. 13 refs., 12 figs

  13. Fabrication and research of high purity germanium detectors with abrupt and thin diffusion layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Cabal, A. E.; Diaz Garcia, A.

    1997-01-01

    A different high purity germanium detector's fabrication method is described. A very thin diffusion film with an abrupt change of the type of conductivity is obtained. The fine diffusion layer thickness makes possibly their utilization in experimental systems in which all the data are elaborated directly on the computer. (author) [es

  14. High-performance UV detector made of ultra-long ZnO bridging nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yanbo; Della Valle, Florent; Simonnet, Mathieu; Yamada, Ichiro; Delaunay, Jean-Jacques

    2009-01-01

    A nanowatt UV photoconductive detector made up of ultra-long (∼100 μm) ZnO bridging nanowires has been fabricated by a single-step chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The electrodes, forming comb-shaped thick ZnO layers, and the sensing elements, consisting of ZnO nanowires bridging the electrodes, were fabricated simultaneously in a single-step CVD process. The device showed drastic changes (10-10 5 times) in current under a wide range of UV irradiances (10 -8 -10 -2 W cm -2 ). Moreover, the detector exhibited fast response (rise and decay times of the order of 1 s) to UV illumination in air, but no response to visible light (hν<3.2 eV). Our approach provides a simple and cost-effective way to fabricate high-performance 'visible-blind' UV detectors.

  15. Fluorescence decay data analysis correcting for detector pulse pile-up at very high count rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patting, Matthias; Reisch, Paja; Sackrow, Marcus; Dowler, Rhys; Koenig, Marcelle; Wahl, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Using time-correlated single photon counting for the purpose of fluorescence lifetime measurements is usually limited in speed due to pile-up. With modern instrumentation, this limitation can be lifted significantly, but some artifacts due to frequent merging of closely spaced detector pulses (detector pulse pile-up) remain an issue to be addressed. We propose a data analysis method correcting for this type of artifact and the resulting systematic errors. It physically models the photon losses due to detector pulse pile-up and incorporates the loss in the decay fit model employed to obtain fluorescence lifetimes and relative amplitudes of the decay components. Comparison of results with and without this correction shows a significant reduction of systematic errors at count rates approaching the excitation rate. This allows quantitatively accurate fluorescence lifetime imaging at very high frame rates.

  16. A microprogrammable high-speed data collection system for position sensitive X-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashizume, H.

    1984-01-01

    A high-speed data acquisition system has been designed which collects digital data from one- and two-dimensional position sensitive X-ray detectors at a maximum average data rate of 1 MHz. The system consists of two separate fast buffer memories, a 64 K word by 20-bit main storage, two timers, a display controller, a computer interface and a keyboard, controlled by a specially designed microprogrammable microprocessor. Data collection is performed by executing a microprogram stored in the control storage; data coming from a detector are first accumulated in a small but fast buffer memory by hardware and transferred to the main storage under control of the microprogram. This design not only permits time-resolved data collections but also provides maximum speed, flexibility and cost-effectiveness simultaneously. The system also accepts data from integrated detectors such as TV cameras. The system has been designed for use in experiments at conventional and synchrotron X-ray sources. (orig.)

  17. High dose-rate brachytherapy source localization: positional resolution using a diamond detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, T; Suchowerska, N; Bilek, M M; McKenzie, D R; Ng, N; Kron, T

    2003-01-01

    A potential real-time source position verification process for high dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy treatment is described. This process is intended to provide immediate confirmation that a treatment is proceeding according to plan, so that corrective action can be taken if necessary. We show that three dosimeters are in principle sufficient and demonstrate the feasibility of the process using a diamond detector and an Ir-192 source. An error analysis including all identified sources of error shows that this detector is capable of locating the distance to the source to within 2 mm for distances up to 12 cm. This positional accuracy is less than the diameter of typical HDR catheters indicating that a diamond detector can be used to accurately determine the distance to the source. The uncertainty in the distance is found to increase with distance

  18. TCAD simulations of High-Voltage-CMOS Pixel structures for the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Buckland, Matthew Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The requirements for precision physics and the experimental conditions at CLIC result in stringent constraints for the vertex detector. Capacitively coupled active pixel sensors with 25 μm pitch implemented in a commercial 180 nm High-Voltage CMOS (HV-CMOS) process are currently under study as a candidate technology for the CLIC vertex detector. Laboratory calibration measurements and beam tests with prototypes are complemented by detailed TCAD and electronic circuit simulations, aiming for a comprehensive understanding of the signal formation in the HV-CMOS sensors and subsequent readout stages. In this note 2D and 3D TCAD simulation results of the prototype sensor, the Capacitively Coupled Pixel Detector version three (CCPDv3), will be presented. These include the electric field distribution, leakage current, well capacitance, transient response to minimum ionising particles and charge-collection.

  19. First measurements with new high-resolution gadolinium-GEM neutron detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Pfeiffer, Dorothea; Birch, Jens; Etxegarai, Maddi; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Höglund, Carina; Hultman, Lars; Llamas-Jansa, Isabel; Oliveri, Eraldo; Oksanen, Esko; Robinson, Linda; Ropelewski, Leszek; Schmidt, Susann; Streli, Christina; Thuiner, Patrik

    2016-05-17

    European Spallation Source instruments like the macromolecular diffractometer, NMX, require an excellent neutron detection efficiency, high-rate capabilities, time resolution, and an unprecedented spatial resolution in the order of a few hundred micrometers over a wide angular range of the incoming neutrons. For these instruments solid converters in combination with Micro Pattern Gaseous Detectors (MPGDs) are a promising option. A GEM detector with gadolinium converter was tested on a cold neutron beam at the IFE research reactor in Norway. The {\\mu}TPC analysis, proven to improve the spatial resolution in the case of $^{10}$B converters, is extended to gadolinium based detectors. For the first time, a Gd-GEM was successfully operated to detect neutrons with an estimated efficiency of 10% at a wavelength of 2 {\\AA} and a position resolution better than 350 {\\mu}m.

  20. Coded aperture detector for high precision gamma-ray burst source locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmken, H.; Gorenstein, P.

    1977-01-01

    Coded aperture collimators in conjunction with position-sensitive detectors are very useful in the study of transient phenomenon because they combine broad field of view, high sensitivity, and an ability for precise source locations. Since the preceeding conference, a series of computer simulations of various detector designs have been carried out with the aid of a CDC 6400. Particular emphasis was placed on the development of a unit consisting of a one-dimensional random or periodic collimator in conjunction with a two-dimensional position-sensitive Xenon proportional counter. A configuration involving four of these units has been incorporated into the preliminary design study of the Transient Explorer (ATREX) satellite and are applicable to any SAS or HEAO type satellite mission. Results of this study, including detector response, fields of view, and source location precision, will be presented

  1. Exploratory study of a novel low occupancy vertex detector architecture based on high precision timing for high luminosity particle colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orel, Peter, E-mail: porel@hawaii.edu; Varner, Gary S.; Niknejadi, Pardis

    2017-06-11

    Vertex detectors provide space–time coordinates for the traversing charged particle decay products closest to the interaction point. Resolving these increasingly intense particle fluences at high luminosity particle colliders, such as SuperKEKB, is an ever growing challenge. This results in a non-negligible occupancy of the vertex detector using existing low material budget techniques. Consequently, new approaches are being studied that meet the vertexing requirements while lowering the occupancy. In this paper, we introduce a novel vertex detector architecture. Its design relies on an asynchronous digital pixel matrix in combination with a readout based on high precision time-of-flight measurement. Denoted the Timing Vertex Detector (TVD), it consists of a binary pixel array, a transmission line for signal collection, and a readout ASIC. The TVD aims to have a spatial resolution comparable to the existing Belle2 vertex detector. At the same time it offers a reduced occupancy by a factor of ten while decreasing the channel count by almost three orders of magnitude. Consequently, reducing the event size from about 1 MB/event to about 5.9 kB/event.

  2. Calorimetric low - temperature detectors for high resolution X-ray spectroscopy on stored highly stripped heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bleile, A.; Egelhof, P.; Kraft, S.; Meier, H.J.; Shrivastava, A.; Weber, M.; McCammon, D.; Stahle, C.K.

    2001-09-01

    The accurate determination of the Lamb shift in heavy hydrogen-like ions provides a sensitive test of quantum electrodynamics in very strong Coulomb fields, not accessible otherwise. For the investigation of the Lyman-α transitions in 208 Pb 81+ or 238 U 91+ with sufficient accuracy, a high resolution calorimetric detector for hard X-rays (E ≤ 100 keV) is presently being developed. The detector modules consist of arrays of silicon thermistors and of X-ray absorbers made of high-Z material to optimize the absorption efficiency. The detectors are housed in a specially designed 3 He/ 4 He dilution refrigerator with a side arm which fits to the internal target geometry of the storage ring ESR at GSI Darmstadt. The detector performance presently achieved is already close to fulfill the demands of the Lamb shift experiment. For a prototype detector pixel with a 0.2 mm 2 x 47 μm Pb absorber an energy resolution of ΔE FWHM = 65 eV is obtained for 60 keV X-rays. (orig.)

  3. Experiments and detectors for high energy heavy ion colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludlam, T.

    1984-01-01

    Problems and possibilities are discussed for experiments at the highest collision energies achievable in man-made accelerators; i.e., colliding beams of heavy nuclei at cm energies greater than or equal to 100 GeV/amu, well beyond the threshold of nuclear transparency. Here the final state consists of two hot, dense, baryon-rich fireballs flying away from each other at large rapidity (the fragmentation regions), and thermally-produced particles with near-zero net baryon number populating the central rapidity range. The matter produced at central rapidity (the lab frame for a collider) may reach extremely high temperatures and energy densities, and it is here that one expects to produce thermodynamic conditions similar to those which existed when the early universe condensed from a plasma of quarks and gluons to a gas of hadrons. The problem of tracking, lepton measurements, and calorimeters are discussed. (WHK)

  4. High energy astrophysics with ground-based gamma ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aharonian, F; Buckley, J; Kifune, T; Sinnis, G

    2008-01-01

    Recent advances in ground-based gamma ray astronomy have led to the discovery of more than 70 sources of very high energy (E γ ≥ 100 GeV) gamma rays, falling into a number of source populations including pulsar wind nebulae, shell type supernova remnants, Wolf-Rayet stars, giant molecular clouds, binary systems, the Galactic Center, active galactic nuclei and 'dark' (yet unidentified) galactic objects. We summarize the history of TeV gamma ray astronomy up to the current status of the field including a description of experimental techniques and highlight recent astrophysical results. We also discuss the potential of ground-based gamma ray astronomy for future discoveries and describe possible directions for future instrumental developments

  5. The Influence Of Dead Layer Effect On The Characteristics Of The High Purity Germanium P-Type Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo Quang Huy

    2011-01-01

    The present work aims at reviewing the studies of the influence of dead layer effect on the characteristics of a high purity germanium (HPGe) p-type detector, obtained by the author and his colleagues in the recent years. The object for study was the HPGe GC1518 detector-based gamma spectrometer of the Center for Nuclear Techniques, Ho Chi Minh City. The studying problems were: The modeling of an HPGe detector-based gamma spectrometer with using the MCNP code; the method of determining the thickness of dead layer by experimental measurements of gamma spectra and the calculations using MCNP code; the influence of material parameters and dead layer on detector efficiency; the increase of dead layer thickness over the operating time of the GC1518 detector; the influence of dead layer thickness increase on the decrease of detector efficiency; the dead layer effect for the gamma spectra measured in the GC1518 detector. (author)

  6. Characterization of saturation of CR-39 detector at high alpha-particle fluence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. El Ghazaly

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of saturation in the CR-39 detector reduces and limits its detection dynamic range; nevertheless, this range could be extended using spectroscopic techniques and by measuring the net bulk rate of the saturated CR-39 detector surface. CR-39 detectors were irradiated by 1.5 MeV high alpha-particle fluence varying from 0.06 × 108 to 7.36 × 108 alphas/cm2 from Am-241 source; thereafter, they were etched in a 6.25N NaOH solution at a temperature of 70°C for different durations. Net bulk etch rate measurement of the 1.5 MeV alpha-irradiated CR-39 detector surface revealed that rate increases with increasing etching time and reaches its maximum value at the end of the alpha-particle range. It is also correlated with the alpha-particle fluence. The measurements of UV–Visible (UV–Vis absorbance at 500 and 600 nm reveal that the absorbance is linearly correlated with the fluence of alpha particles at the etching times of 2 and 4 hour. For extended etching times of 6, 10, and 14.5 hour, the absorbance is saturated for fluence values of 4.05 × 108, 5.30 × 108, and 7.36 × 108 alphas/cm2. These new methods pave the way to extend the dynamic range of polymer-based solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs in measurement of high fluence of heavy ions as well as in radiation dosimetry. Keywords: Alpha Particle, Bulk Etch Rate, CR-39 Detector, Saturated Regime, UV–Vis Spectroscopy

  7. X- and gamma-ray N+PP+ silicon detectors with high radiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petris, M.; Ruscu, R.; Moraru, R.; Cimpoca, V.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the use of p-type silicon detectors as starting material for X-and gamma-ray detectors because of several potential benefits it would bring: 1. high purity p-type silicon grown by the float-zone process exhibits better radial dopant uniformity than n-type float-zone silicon; 2. it is free of radiation damage due to the neutron transmutation doping process and behaves better in a radiation field because mainly acceptor like centers are created through the exposure and the bulk material type inversion does not occur as in the n-type silicon. But the p-type silicon, in combination with a passivating layer of silicon dioxide, leads to a more complex detector layout since the positive charge in the oxide causes an inversion in the surface layer under the silicon dioxide. Consequently, it would be expected that N + P diodes have a higher leakage current than P + N ones. All these facts have been demonstrated experimentally. These features set stringent requirements for the technology of p-type silicon detectors. Our work presents two new geometries and an improved technology for p-type high resistivity material to obtain low noise radiation detectors. Test structures were characterized before and after the gamma exposure with a cumulative dose in the range 10 4 - 5 x 10 6 rad ( 60 Co). Results indicate that proposed structures and their technology enable the development of reliable N + PP + silicon detectors. For some samples (0.8 - 12 mm 2 ), extremely low reverse currents were obtained and, in combination with a low noise charge preamplifier, the splitting of 241 Am X-ray lines was possible and also the Mn Kα line (5.9 keV) was extracted from the noise with a 1.9 keV FWHM at the room temperature. An experimental model of a nuclear probe based on these diodes was designed for X-ray detection applications. (authors)

  8. High-luminosity LHC prospects with the upgraded ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Slawinska, Magdalena; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Run-I at the LHC was very successful with the discovery of a new boson with properties compatible with those of the Higgs boson predicted by Standard Model. Precise measurements of the boson properties, and the discovery of physics beyond the Standard Model, are primary goals of the just restarted LHC running at 13 TeV collision energy and all future running at the LHC. The physics prospects with a pp centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV are presented for 300 and 3000 fb-1 at the high-luminosity LHC. The ultimate precision attainable on measurements of the couplings of the 125 GeV boson to elementary fermions and bosons is discussed, as well as perspectives on the searches for partners associated with it. Supersymmetry is one of the best motivated extensions of the Standard Model. The current searches at the LHC have yielded sensitivity to TeV scale gluinos and 1st and 2nd generation squarks, as well as to 3rd generation squarks and electro-weakinos in the hundreds of GeV mass range. Benchmark studies are presente...

  9. EMG-Torque Dynamics Change With Contraction Bandwidth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkar, Mahsa A; Jalaleddini, Kian; Kearney, Robert E

    2018-04-01

    An accurate model for ElectroMyoGram (EMG)-torque dynamics has many uses. One of its applications which has gained high attention among researchers is its use, in estimating the muscle contraction level for the efficient control of prosthesis. In this paper, the dynamic relationship between the surface EMG and torque during isometric contractions at the human ankle was studied using system identification techniques. Subjects voluntarily modulated their ankle torque in dorsiflexion direction, by activating their tibialis anterior muscle, while tracking a pseudo-random binary sequence in a torque matching task. The effects of contraction bandwidth, described by torque spectrum, on EMG-torque dynamics were evaluated by varying the visual command switching time. Nonparametric impulse response functions (IRF) were estimated between the processed surface EMG and torque. It was demonstrated that: 1) at low contraction bandwidths, the identified IRFs had unphysiological anticipatory (i.e., non-causal) components, whose amplitude decreased as the contraction bandwidth increased. We hypothesized that this non-causal behavior arose, because the EMG input contained a component due to feedback from the output torque, i.e., it was recorded from within a closed-loop. Vision was not the feedback source since the non-causal behavior persisted when visual feedback was removed. Repeating the identification using a nonparametric closed-loop identification algorithm yielded causal IRFs at all bandwidths, supporting this hypothesis. 2) EMG-torque dynamics became faster and the bandwidth of system increased as contraction modulation rate increased. Thus, accurate prediction of torque from EMG signals must take into account the contraction bandwidth sensitivity of this system.

  10. The honeycomb strip chamber: A two coordinate and high precision muon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolsma, H.P.T.

    1996-01-01

    This thesis describes the construction and performance of the Honeycomb Strip Chamber (HSC). The HSC offers several advantages with respect to classical drift chambers and drift tubes. The main features of the HSC are: -The detector offers the possibility of simultaneous readout of two orthogonal coordinates with approximately the same precision. - The HSC technology is optimised for mass production. This means that the design is modular (monolayers) and automisation of most of the production steps is possible (folding and welding machines). - The technology is flexible. The cell diameter can easily be changed from a few millimetres to at least 20 mm by changing the parameters in the computer programme of the folding machine. The number of monolayers per station can be chosen freely to the demands of the experiment. -The honeycomb structure gives the detector stiffness and makes it self supporting. This makes the technology a very transparent one in terms of radiation length which is important to prevent multiple scattering of high energetic muons. - The dimensions of the detector are defined by high precision templates. Those templates constrain for example the overall tolerance on the wire positions to 20 μm rms. Reproduction of the high precision assembly of the detector is thus guaranteed. (orig.)

  11. The honeycomb strip chamber: A two coordinate and high precision muon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolsma, H P.T.

    1996-04-19

    This thesis describes the construction and performance of the Honeycomb Strip Chamber (HSC). The HSC offers several advantages with respect to classical drift chambers and drift tubes. The main features of the HSC are: -The detector offers the possibility of simultaneous readout of two orthogonal coordinates with approximately the same precision. - The HSC technology is optimised for mass production. This means that the design is modular (monolayers) and automisation of most of the production steps is possible (folding and welding machines). - The technology is flexible. The cell diameter can easily be changed from a few millimetres to at least 20 mm by changing the parameters in the computer programme of the folding machine. The number of monolayers per station can be chosen freely to the demands of the experiment. -The honeycomb structure gives the detector stiffness and makes it self supporting. This makes the technology a very transparent one in terms of radiation length which is important to prevent multiple scattering of high energetic muons. - The dimensions of the detector are defined by high precision templates. Those templates constrain for example the overall tolerance on the wire positions to 20 {mu}m rms. Reproduction of the high precision assembly of the detector is thus guaranteed. (orig.).

  12. Low mass hybrid pixel detectors for the high luminosity LHC upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonella, Laura

    2013-10-15

    Reducing material in silicon trackers is of major importance for a good overall detector performance, and poses severe challenges to the design of the tracking system. To match the low mass constraints for trackers in High Energy Physics experiments at high luminosity, dedicated technological developments are required. This dissertation presents three technologies to design low mass hybrid pixel detectors for the high luminosity upgrades of the LHC. The work targets specifically the reduction of the material from the detector services and modules, with novel powering schemes, flip chip and interconnection technologies. A serial powering scheme is prototyped, featuring a new regulator concept, a control and protection element, and AC-coupled data transmission. A modified flip chip technology is developed for thin, large area Front-End chips, and a via last Through Silicon Via process is demonstrated on existing pixel modules. These technologies, their developments, and the achievable material reduction are discussed using the upgrades of the ATLAS pixel detector as a case study.

  13. Low mass hybrid pixel detectors for the high luminosity LHC upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonella, Laura

    2013-10-01

    Reducing material in silicon trackers is of major importance for a good overall detector performance, and poses severe challenges to the design of the tracking system. To match the low mass constraints for trackers in High Energy Physics experiments at high luminosity, dedicated technological developments are required. This dissertation presents three technologies to design low mass hybrid pixel detectors for the high luminosity upgrades of the LHC. The work targets specifically the reduction of the material from the detector services and modules, with novel powering schemes, flip chip and interconnection technologies. A serial powering scheme is prototyped, featuring a new regulator concept, a control and protection element, and AC-coupled data transmission. A modified flip chip technology is developed for thin, large area Front-End chips, and a via last Through Silicon Via process is demonstrated on existing pixel modules. These technologies, their developments, and the achievable material reduction are discussed using the upgrades of the ATLAS pixel detector as a case study.

  14. Preparation of High Purity CdTe for Nuclear Detector: Electrical and Nuclear Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaiour, A.; Ayoub, M.; Hamié, A.; Fawaz, A.; Hage-ali, M.

    High purity crystal with controllable electrical properties, however, control of the electrical properties of CdTe has not yet been fully achieved. Using the refined Cd and Te as starting materials, extremely high-purity CdTe single crystals were prepared by the traditional vertical THM. The nature of the defects involved in the transitions was studied by analyzing the position of the energy levels by TSC method. The resolution of 4.2 keV (FWHM) confirms the high quality and stability of the detectors: TSC spectrum was in coherence with detectors spectrum with a horizontal plate between 0.2 and 0.6 eV. The enhancement in resolution of detectors with a full width at half- maximum (less than 0.31 meV), lead to confirm that the combination of vacuum distillation and zone refining was very effective to obtain more purified CdTe single crystals for photovoltaic or nuclear detectors with better physical properties.

  15. High Bandwidth, Fine Resolution Deformable Mirror Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    Low Temperature Solders 68 B.6 Influence Function Parameters 68 APPENDIX C 19 Capacitance Measurement 69 ACCESSION for NTIS white Sectloo ODC Buff...Multilayer actuator: Dilatation versus applied electric field 10 Figure 3 - Multilayer actuator: Influence function 11 Figure 4 - Honeycomb device...bimorph 20 Figure 8 - Bimorph device: Influence function of a bimorph device which has a glass plate 0.20 cm thick 24 Figure 9 - Bimorph device

  16. Signal shaping and tail cancellation for gas proportional detectors at high counting rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boie, R.A.; Hrisoho, A.T.; Rehak, P.

    1982-01-01

    A low noise, wide bandwidth preamplifier and signal processing filter were developed for high counting rate proportional counters. The filter consists of a seven pole Gaussian integrator with symmetrical weighting function and continuously variable shaping time, tausub(s), of 8-50 ns (fwhm) preceded by a second order pole/zero circuit which cancels the long (1/t) tails of the chamber signals. The preamplifier is an optimized common base input design with 2 ns rise time and an equivalent noise input charge < 2000 r.m.s. electrons, when connected to a chamber with 10 pF capacitance and at a filtering time, tausub(s), of 10 ns. (orig.)

  17. First Test Of A New High Resolution Positron Camera With Four Area Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Laethem, E.; Kuijk, M.; Deconinck, Frank; van Miert, M.; Defrise, Michel; Townsend, D.; Wensveen, M.

    1989-10-01

    A PET camera consisting of two pairs of parallel area detectors has been installed at the cyclotron unit of VUB. The detectors are High Density Avalanche Chambers (HIDAC) wire-chambers with a stack of 4 or 6 lead gamma-electron converters, the sensitive area being 30 by 30 cm. The detectors are mounted on a commercial gantry allowing a 180 degree rotation during acquisition, as needed for a fully 3D image reconstruction. The camera has been interfaced to a token-ring computer network consisting of 5 workstations among which the various tasks (acquisition, reconstruction, display) can be distributed. Each coincident event is coded in 48 bits and is transmitted to the computer bus via a 512 kbytes dual ported buffer memory allowing data rates of up to 50 kHz. Fully 3D image reconstruction software has been developed, and includes new reconstruction algorithms allowing a better utilization of the available projection data. Preliminary measurements and imaging of phantoms and small animals (with 18FDG) have been performed with two of the four detectors mounted on the gantry. They indicate the expected 3D isotropic spatial resolution of 3.5 mm (FWHM, line source in air) and a sensitivity of 4 cps/μCi for a centred point source in air, corresponding to typical data rates of a few kHz. This latter figure is expected to improve by a factor of 4 after coupling of the second detector pair, since the coincidence sensitivity of this second detector pair is a factor 3 higher than that of the first one.

  18. Prototyping and performance study of a single crystal diamond detector for operation at high temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Arvind; Topkar, Anita, E-mail: anita@barc.gov.in; Das, D.

    2017-06-21

    Prototype single crystal diamond detectors with different types of metallization and post metallization treatment were fabricated for the applications requiring fast neutron measurements in the Indian Test Blanket Module (TBM) at the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Experiment. The detectors were characterized by leakage current measurements to ascertain that the leakage currents are low and breakdown voltages are higher than the voltage required for full charge collection. The detector response to charged particles was evaluated using a {sup 238+239} Pu dual energy alpha source. The detectors showed an energy resolution of about 2% at 5.5 MeV. In order to study their suitability for the operation at higher temperatures, leakage current variation and alpha response were studied up to 300 °C. At 300 °C, peaks corresponding to 5.156 MeV and 5.499 MeV alphas could be separated and there was no significant degradation of energy resolution. Finally, the detector response to fast neutrons was evaluated using a Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) neutron generator. The observed spectrum showed peaks corresponding to various channels of n-C interactions with a clear isolated peak corresponding to ~8.5 MeV alphas. The detectors also showed high sensitivity of 3.4×10{sup −2} cps/n/(cm{sup 2} s)–4.5×10{sup −2} cps/n/(cm{sup 2} s) and excellent linearity of response in terms of count rate at different neutron flux in the observed range of 3.2×10{sup 5} n/(cm{sup 2} s) to 2.0×10{sup 6} n/(cm{sup 2} s).

  19. Prototyping and performance study of a single crystal diamond detector for operation at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amit; Kumar, Arvind; Topkar, Anita; Das, D.

    2017-06-01

    Prototype single crystal diamond detectors with different types of metallization and post metallization treatment were fabricated for the applications requiring fast neutron measurements in the Indian Test Blanket Module (TBM) at the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Experiment. The detectors were characterized by leakage current measurements to ascertain that the leakage currents are low and breakdown voltages are higher than the voltage required for full charge collection. The detector response to charged particles was evaluated using a 238+239 Pu dual energy alpha source. The detectors showed an energy resolution of about 2% at 5.5 MeV. In order to study their suitability for the operation at higher temperatures, leakage current variation and alpha response were studied up to 300 °C. At 300 °C, peaks corresponding to 5.156 MeV and 5.499 MeV alphas could be separated and there was no significant degradation of energy resolution. Finally, the detector response to fast neutrons was evaluated using a Deuterium-Tritium (D-T) neutron generator. The observed spectrum showed peaks corresponding to various channels of n-C interactions with a clear isolated peak corresponding to 8.5 MeV alphas. The detectors also showed high sensitivity of 3.4×10-2 cps/n/(cm2 s)-4.5×10-2 cps/n/(cm2 s) and excellent linearity of response in terms of count rate at different neutron flux in the observed range of 3.2×105 n/(cm2 s) to 2.0×106 n/(cm2 s).

  20. A high granularity scintillator hadronic — calorimeter with SiPM readout for a linear collider detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andreev, V.; Balagura, V.; Bobchenko, B.; Cvach, Jaroslav; Janata, Milan; Kacl, Ivan; Němeček, Stanislav; Polák, Ivo; Valkár, Š.; Weichert, Jan; Zálešák, Jaroslav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 540, - (2005), s. 368-380 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LN00A006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : linear collider detector * analog calorimeter * semiconductor detectors * scintillator * high granularity Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 1.224, year: 2005