WorldWideScience

Sample records for high atmosphere implications

  1. The atmospheric implications of radiation belt remediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Rodger

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available High altitude nuclear explosions (HANEs and geomagnetic storms can produce large scale injections of relativistic particles into the inner radiation belts. It is recognised that these large increases in >1 MeV trapped electron fluxes can shorten the operational lifetime of low Earth orbiting satellites, threatening a large, valuable population. Therefore, studies are being undertaken to bring about practical human control of the radiation belts, termed "Radiation Belt Remediation" (RBR. Here we consider the upper atmospheric consequences of an RBR system operating over either 1 or 10 days. The RBR-forced neutral chemistry changes, leading to NOx enhancements and Ox depletions, are significant during the timescale of the precipitation but are generally not long-lasting. The magnitudes, time-scales, and altitudes of these changes are no more significant than those observed during large solar proton events. In contrast, RBR-operation will lead to unusually intense HF blackouts for about the first half of the operation time, producing large scale disruptions to radio communication and navigation systems. While the neutral atmosphere changes are not particularly important, HF disruptions could be an important area for policy makers to consider, particularly for the remediation of natural injections.

  2. The atmospheric implications of radiation belt remediation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Rodger

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available High altitude nuclear explosions (HANEs and geomagnetic storms can produce large scale injections of relativistic particles into the inner radiation belts. It is recognised that these large increases in >1 MeV trapped electron fluxes can shorten the operational lifetime of low Earth orbiting satellites, threatening a large, valuable population. Therefore, studies are being undertaken to bring about practical human control of the radiation belts, termed "Radiation Belt Remediation" (RBR. Here we consider the upper atmospheric consequences of an RBR system operating over either 1 or 10 days. The RBR-forced neutral chemistry changes, leading to NOx enhancements and Ox depletions, are significant during the timescale of the precipitation but are generally not long-lasting. The magnitudes, time-scales, and altitudes of these changes are no more significant than those observed during large solar proton events. In contrast, RBR-operation will lead to unusually intense HF blackouts for about the first half of the operation time, producing large scale disruptions to radio communication and navigation systems. While the neutral atmosphere changes are not particularly important, HF disruptions could be an important area for policy makers to consider, particularly for the remediation of natural injections.

  3. Atmospheric environmental implications of propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, Allan J.; Bennett, Robert R.

    1995-01-01

    Three independent studies have been conducted for assessing the impact of rocket launches on the earth's environment. These studies have addressed issues of acid rain in the troposphere, ozone depletion in the stratosphere, toxicity of chemical rocket exhaust products, and the potential impact on global warming from carbon dioxide emissions from rocket launches. Local, regional, and global impact assessments were examined and compared with both natural sources and anthropogenic sources of known atmospheric pollutants with the following conclusions: (1) Neither solid nor liquid rocket launches have a significant impact on the earth's global environment, and there is no real significant difference between the two. (2) Regional and local atmospheric impacts are more significant than global impacts, but quickly return to normal background conditions within a few hours after launch. And (3) vastly increased space launch activities equivalent to 50 U.S. Space Shuttles or 50 Russian Energia launches per year would not significantly impact these conclusions. However, these assessments, for the most part, are based upon homogeneous gas phase chemistry analysis; heterogeneous chemistry from exhaust particulates, such as aluminum oxide, ice contrails, soot, etc., and the influence of plume temperature and afterburning of fuel-rich exhaust products, need to be further addressed. It was the consensus of these studies that computer modeling of interactive plume chemistry with the atmosphere needs to be improved and computer models need to be verified with experimental data. Rocket exhaust plume chemistry can be modified with propellant reformulation and changes in operating conditions, but, based upon the current state of knowledge, it does not appear that significant environmental improvements from propellant formulation changes can be made or are warranted. Flight safety, reliability, and cost improvements are paramount for any new rocket system, and these important aspects

  4. The ancient oxygen exosphere of Mars - Implications for atmosphere evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Bougher, S. W.; Nagy, A. F.

    1993-01-01

    The paper considers absorption of oxygen (atoms and ions) by the surface as a mechanism for the early Martian atmosphere escape, due to the effect of high EUV flux of the ancient sun. Hot oxygen exosphere densities in ancient atmosphere and ionosphere are calculated for different EUV fluxes and the escape fluxes associated with these exposures. Using these densities, the ion production rate above the ionopause is calculated for different epochs including photoionization, charge exchange, and solar wind electron impact. It is found that, when the inferred high solar EUV fluxes of the past are taken into account, oxygen equivalent to that in several tens of meters of water, planet-wide, should have escaped Martian atmosphere to space over the last 3 Gyr.

  5. Atmospheric neutrinos and the implications to cosmic ray interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajita, Takaaki [Research center for Cosmic Neutrinos, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, Univ. of Tokyo, Kashiwa-no-ha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2008-01-15

    Atmospheric neutrinos have been used to study neutrino oscillations. Neutrino oscillation analyses with atmospheric neutrinos are discussed. With the increased statistics of the atmospheric neutrino data, it is more important to understand the atmospheric neutrino flux more accurately. Detailed calculations of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes calibrated by the atmospheric muon data show suggestions to the interaction of cosmic rays.

  6. Back-transformation of high-pressure phases in a shock melt vein of an H-chondrite during atmospheric passage: Implications for the survival of high-pressure phases after decompression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, M.; Chen, M.; Yoshida, Y.; El Goresy, A.; Ohtani, E.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the H6-chondrite Yamato 75267, in which a fusion crust cuts a shock melt vein. The shock vein region, more than 280 μm from the fusion crust, contains high-pressure phases, such as ringwoodite, majorite-pyrope ss garnet and NaAlSi 3O 8 hollandite. However, the shock vein close to the fusion crust entirely consists of the low-pressure polymorphs, olivine, low-Ca pyroxene and plagioclase glass. The boundary between low- and high-pressure phase regions is parallel to the fusion crust. During the atmospheric passage, the peripheral part of the chondrite was melted to form the fusion crust. Our microscopic, laser micro-Raman, electron microprobe investigations and calculations indicate an area up to 300 μm from the fusion crust experienced a temperature of 1400°C after 3 s during the melting of the peripheral part. The high-pressure phases would, at this conditions, quickly transform back to their low-pressure polymorphs. The result obtained here indicates that post-shock temperatures in the interior part of the veins were much lower than 1400°C, thus leading to the survival of high-pressure phases in heavily shocked chondrites.

  7. Modeling pN2 through Geological Time: Implications for Planetary Climates and Atmospheric Biosignatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stüeken, E E; Kipp, M A; Koehler, M C; Schwieterman, E W; Johnson, B; Buick, R

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen is a major nutrient for all life on Earth and could plausibly play a similar role in extraterrestrial biospheres. The major reservoir of nitrogen at Earth's surface is atmospheric N2, but recent studies have proposed that the size of this reservoir may have fluctuated significantly over the course of Earth's history with particularly low levels in the Neoarchean-presumably as a result of biological activity. We used a biogeochemical box model to test which conditions are necessary to cause large swings in atmospheric N2 pressure. Parameters for our model are constrained by observations of modern Earth and reconstructions of biomass burial and oxidative weathering in deep time. A 1-D climate model was used to model potential effects on atmospheric climate. In a second set of tests, we perturbed our box model to investigate which parameters have the greatest impact on the evolution of atmospheric pN2 and consider possible implications for nitrogen cycling on other planets. Our results suggest that (a) a high rate of biomass burial would have been needed in the Archean to draw down atmospheric pN2 to less than half modern levels, (b) the resulting effect on temperature could probably have been compensated by increasing solar luminosity and a mild increase in pCO2, and (c) atmospheric oxygenation could have initiated a stepwise pN2 rebound through oxidative weathering. In general, life appears to be necessary for significant atmospheric pN2 swings on Earth-like planets. Our results further support the idea that an exoplanetary atmosphere rich in both N2 and O2 is a signature of an oxygen-producing biosphere. Key Words: Biosignatures-Early Earth-Planetary atmospheres. Astrobiology 16, 949-963.

  8. An investigation of aerosol optical properties: Atmospheric implications and influences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penaloza-Murillo, Marcos A.

    An experimental, observational, and theoretical investigation of aerosol optical properties has been made in this work to study their implications and influences on the atmosphere. In the laboratory the scientific and instrumental methodology consisted of three parts, namely, aerosol generation, optical and mass concentration measurements, and computational calculations. In particular the optical properties of ammonium sulfate and caffeine aerosol were derived from measurements made with a transmissometer cell-reciprocal- integrating nephelometer (TCRIN), equipped with a laser beam at 632.8 nm, and by applying a Mie theory computer code The aerosol generators, optical equipment and calibration procedures were reviewed. The aerosol shape and size distribution were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy and the Gumprecht- Sliepcevich/Lipofsky-Green extinction-sedimentation method. In particular the spherical and cylindrical shape were considered. During this investigation, an alternative method for obtaining the optical properties of monodisperse spherical non-absorbing aerosol using a cell-transmissometer, which is based on a linearisation of the Lambert-Beer law, was found. In addition, adapting the TCRIN to electrooptical aerosol studies, the optical properties of a circular-cylindrical aerosol of caffeine were undertaken under the condition of random orientation in relation with the laser beam, and perpendicular orientation to it. A theoretical study was conducted to assess the sensitivity of aerosol to a change of shape under different polarisation modes. The aerosol optical properties, obtained previously in the laboratory, were then used to simulate the direct radiative forcing. The calculations and results were obtained by applying a one- dimensional energy-balance box model. The influence of atmospheric aerosol on the sky brightness due to a total solar eclipse was studied using the photometric and meteorological observations made during the

  9. Modeling pN2 through Geological Time: Implications for Planetary Climates and Atmospheric Biosignatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stüeken, E. E.; Kipp, M. A.; Koehler, M. C.; Schwieterman, E. W.; Johnson, B.; Buick, R.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen is a major nutrient for all life on Earth and could plausibly play a similar role in extraterrestrial biospheres. The major reservoir of nitrogen at Earth's surface is atmospheric N2, but recent studies have proposed that the size of this reservoir may have fluctuated significantly over the course of Earth's history with particularly low levels in the Neoarchean - presumably as a result of biological activity. We used a biogeochemical box model to test which conditions are necessary to cause large swings in atmospheric N2 pressure. Parameters for our model are constrained by observations of modern Earth and reconstructions of biomass burial and oxidative weathering in deep time. A 1-D climate model was used to model potential effects on atmospheric climate. In a second set of tests, we perturbed our box model to investigate which parameters have the greatest impact on the evolution of atmospheric pN2 and consider possible implications for nitrogen cycling on other planets. Our results suggest that (a) a high rate of biomass burial would have been needed in the Archean to draw down atmospheric pN2 to less than half modern levels, (b) the resulting effect on temperature could probably have been compensated by increasing solar luminosity and a mild increase in pCO2, and (c) atmospheric oxygenation could have initiated a stepwise pN2 rebound through oxidative weathering. In general, life appears to be necessary for significant atmospheric pN2 swings on Earth-like planets. Our results further support the idea that an exoplanetary atmosphere rich in both N2 and O2 is a signature of an oxygen-producing biosphere.

  10. Dynamics of Atmospheric Waves In a Hazy Atmosphere: Implications for Titan and Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matcheva, Katia

    2017-10-01

    We present a dynamical model of atmospheric gravity waves propagating in a stable atmosphere in the presence of small-size particulates. We consider a two-way interaction: (i) the effect of atmospheric mass-loading on the propagation of the waves and (ii) the dynamical forcing of the haze particle motion in the presence of variable atmospheric winds. The model illustrates the effect on the vertical distribution of haze particles due to wave-induces vertical winds and wind gradients. The results are presented in the context of Titan’s atmosphere and Cassini observations.

  11. Atmospheric pollution and its implications in the Eastern Transvaal highveld

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tyson, PD

    1988-04-01

    Full Text Available This report is a review of available information on the dispersion climatology, the degree of atmospheric pollution and the various impacts of that pollution on man and environment in the Eastern Transvaal Highveld (ETH) and adjacent regions...

  12. Rarefied gas flows through meshes and implications for atmospheric measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gumbel

    Full Text Available Meshes are commonly used as part of instruments for in situ atmospheric measurements. This study analyses the aerodynamic effect of meshes by means of wind tunnel experiments and numerical simulations. Based on the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method, a simple mesh parameterisation is described and applied to a number of representative flow conditions. For open meshes freely exposed to the flow, substantial compression effects are found both upstream and downstream of the mesh. Meshes attached to close instrument structures, on the other hand, cause only minor flow disturbances. In an accompanying paper, the approach developed here is applied to the quantitative analysis of rocket-borne density measurements in the middle atmosphere.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (instruments and techniques; middle atmosphere – composition and chemistry

  13. Origin and Evolution of Planetary Atmospheres Implications for Habitability

    CERN Document Server

    Lammer, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    Based on the author’s own work and results obtained by international teams he coordinated, this SpringerBrief offers a concise discussion of the origin and early evolution of atmospheres of terrestrial planets during the active phase of their host stars, as well as of the environmental conditions which are necessary in order for planets like the Earth to obtain N_2-rich atmospheres. Possible thermal and non-thermal atmospheric escape processes are discussed in a comparative way between the planets in the Solar System and exoplanets. Lastly, a hypothesis for how to test and study the discussed atmosphere evolution theories using future UV transit observations of terrestrial exoplanets within the orbits of dwarf stars is presented.

  14. Implications of "peak oil" for atmospheric CO2 and climate

    CERN Document Server

    Kharecha, P A

    2007-01-01

    Peaking of global oil production may have a large effect on future atmospheric CO2 amount and climate change, depending upon choices made for subsequent energy sources. We suggest that, if estimates of oil and gas reserves by the Energy Information Administration are realistic, it is feasible to keep atmospheric CO2 from exceeding approximately 450 ppm, provided that future exploitation of the huge reservoirs of coal and unconventional fossil fuels incorporates carbon capture and sequestration. Existing coal-fired power plants, without sequestration, must be phased out before mid-century to achieve this limit on atmospheric CO2. We also suggest that it is important to "stretch" oil reserves via energy efficiency, thus avoiding the need to extract liquid fuels from coal or unconventional fossil fuels. We argue that a rising price on carbon emissions is probably needed to keep CO2 beneath the 450 ppm ceiling.

  15. Water loss from Venus: Implications for the Earth's early atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, S. M.; Pollack, J. B.; Reynolds, R. T.

    1985-01-01

    The atmosphere of Venus outgassed rapidly as a result of planetary heating during accretion, resulting in massive water loss. The processes affecting atmospheric chemistry following accretion have consisted largely of hydrogen escape and internal re-equilibrium. The initial bulk composition of Venus and Earth are assumed to have been roughly similar. Chemical speciation on Venus was controlled by the temperature and oxygen buffering capacity of the surface magma. It is also assumed that the surfaces of planetary bodies of the inner solar system were partly or wholly molten during accretion with a temperature estimated at 1273 to 1573 K. To investigate the range of reasonable initial atmospheric compositions on Venus, limits have to be set for the proportion of total hydrogen and the buffered fugacity of oxygen. Using the C/H ratio of 0.033 set for Earth, virtually all of the water generated during outgassing must later have been lost in order to bring the current CO2/H2O ratio for Venus up to its observed value of 10 sup 4 to 10 sup 5. The proportion of H2O decreases in model atmospheres with successfully higher C/H values, ultimately approaching the depleted values currently observed on Venus. Increasing C/H also results in a rapid increase in CO/H2O and provides an efficient mechanism for water loss by the reaction CO+H2O = CO2 + H2. This reaction, plus water loss mechanisms involving crustal iron, could have removed a very large volume of water from the Venusian atmosphere, even at a low C/H value.

  16. The ancient oxygen exosphere of Mars: Implications for atmosphere evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M. H. G.; Luhmann, J. G.; Nagy, A. F.; Bougher, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    This study involves the calculation, by the 2-stream method of Nagy and Cravens, of 'hot' oxygen exosphere density profiles for 'ancient' atmospheres and ionospheres (e.g., different extreme ultraviolet fluxes) and the associated escaping fluxes. We computed the total production rates above different 'nominal' ionopause altitudes (not taking into account the fact that some will reenter the atmosphere). We do not consider the additional neutral escape due to the sputtering process described by Luhmann and Kozyra. The results presented here thus represent conservative estimations of the neutral escape fluxes, but generous estimates of ion loss rates (except that here we do not consider charge exchange and impact ionization ion production processes). Further work along the lines of Luhmann and Kozyra can lead to estimates of sputtering losses over time and the roles played by impact ionization and charge exchange.

  17. Origin and stability of exomoon atmospheres: implications for habitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammer, Helmut; Schiefer, Sonja-Charlotte; Juvan, Ines; Odert, Petra; Erkaev, Nikolai V; Weber, Christof; Kislyakova, Kristina G; Güdel, Manuel; Kirchengast, Gottfried; Hanslmeier, Arnold

    2014-09-01

    We study the origin and escape of catastrophically outgassed volatiles (H2O, CO2) from exomoons with Earth-like densities and masses of 0.1, 0.5 and 1 M⊕ orbiting an extra-solar gas giant inside the habitable zone of a young active solar-like star. We apply a radiation absorption and hydrodynamic upper atmosphere model to the three studied exomoon cases. We model the escape of hydrogen and dragged dissociation products O and C during the activity saturation phase of the young host star. Because the soft X-ray and EUV radiation of the young host star may be up to ~100 times higher compared to today's solar value during the first 100 Myr after the system's origin, an exomoon with a mass 0.5 M⊕, however, may evolve to habitats that are a mixture of Mars-like and Earth-analogue habitats, so that life may originate and evolve at the exomoon's surface.

  18. Remote monitoring of electroencephalogram, electrocardiogram, and behavior during controlled atmosphere stunning in broilers: Implications for welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coenen, A.M.L.; Lankhaar, J.A.C.; Lowe, J.C.; McKeegan, D.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the welfare implications of euthanizing broilers with 3 gas mixtures relevant to the commercial application of controlled atmosphere stunning (CAS). Birds were implanted/equipped with electrodes to measure brain activity (electroencephalogram, EEG) and heart rate. These signals

  19. High Performance Nitrous Oxide Analyzer for Atmospheric Research Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project targets the development of a highly sensitive gas sensor to monitor atmospheric nitrous oxide. Nitrous oxide is an important species in Earth science...

  20. Energy sources of the high latitude upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, P. M.

    1981-01-01

    Electrodynamic (Joule) dissipation and plasma wave heating are reviewed as sources of energy for the upper atmosphere at high latitudes. Electrodynamic heating in the thermosphere is described by a generalized energy balance equation taking into account a variety of inelastic processes and energy losses, and the use of height-integrated values of the Joule heating rate to estimate the importance of electrodynamic heating at high latitudes is discussed. Observations of electrons between 95 and 115 km altitude that are up to 1000 K hotter than the neutral atmosphere is presented as evidence for atmospheric heating due to unstable plasma waves arising from the Farley-Buneman modified two-stream instability.

  1. Atmospheric sulphuric acid and aerosol formation: implications from atmospheric measurements for nucleation and early growth mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.-L. Sihto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the formation and early growth of atmospheric secondary aerosol particles building on atmospheric measurements. The measurements were part of the QUEST 2 campaign which took place in spring 2003 in Hyytiälä (Finland. During the campaign numerous aerosol particle formation events occurred of which 15 were accompanied by gaseous sulphuric acid measurements. Our detailed analysis of these 15 events is focussed on nucleation and early growth (to a diameter of 3 nm of fresh particles. It revealed that new particle formation seems to be a function of the gaseous sulphuric acid concentration to the power from one to two when the time delay between the sulphuric acid and particle number concentration is taken into account. From the time delay the growth rates of freshly nucleated particles from 1 nm to 3 nm were determined. The mean growth rate was 1.2 nm/h and it was clearly correlated with the gaseous sulphuric acid concentration. We tested two nucleation mechanisms – recently proposed cluster activation and kinetic type nucleation – as possible candidates to explain the observed dependences, and determined experimental nucleation coefficients. We found that some events are dominated by the activation mechanism and some by the kinetic mechanism. Inferred coefficients for the two nucleation mechanisms are the same order of magnitude as chemical reaction coefficients in the gas phase and they correlate with the product of gaseous sulphuric acid and ammonia concentrations. This indicates that besides gaseous sulphuric acid also ammonia has a role in nucleation.

  2. Regional sources of atmospheric formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, and implications for atmospheric modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecken, D. J.; Hutzell, W. T.; Strum, M. L.; Pouliot, G. A.

    2012-02-01

    Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde concentrations over the Eastern half of the United States are simulated with a 3-D air quality model to identify the most important chemical precursors under January and July conditions. We find that both aldehydes primarily result from photochemical production, although 25% or more result from direct emissions in urban areas during winter. Isoprene is the major precursor of formaldehyde in most areas during summer, contributing 20-60% of total production, with the magnitude being spatially variable. Other alkenes from anthropogenic and/or biogenic emissions dominate formaldehyde production in winter, contributing 60-85% of total formation, and are prominent contributors in summer. Alkenes, including biogenic alkenes, dominate acetaldehyde production during both seasons. These conclusions are based on the degradation of emitted VOCs described by the SAPRC07TB chemical mechanism, but even this detailed model has difficulty reproducing observed values better than a factor of 2. The substantial role of isoprene and other alkenes in aldehyde formation emphasizes that we examine and improve emission estimates of these compounds. Until we can estimate the emissions and understand the chemistry of VOC precursors to aldehyde formation with greater certainty, it will be difficult to accurately predict atmospheric concentrations of aldehydes and develop strategies to reduce their concentrations.

  3. Evaluation of Monte Carlo tools for high energy atmospheric physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Rutjes (Casper); D. Sarria (David); A.B. Skeltved (Alexander Broberg); A. Luque (Alejandro); G. Diniz (Gabriel); N. Østgaard (Nikolai); U. Ebert (Ute)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThe emerging field of high energy atmospheric physics (HEAP) includes terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, electron-positron beams and gamma-ray glows from thunderstorms. Similar emissions of high energy particles occur in pulsed high voltage discharges. Understanding these phenomena requires

  4. Complex Permittivity Model of Venus Atmosphere and Implications for Design of Imaging Altimeter and INSAR Orbiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, X.; Moghaddam, M.; Smrekar, S.; Wenkert, D.; Jordan, R.

    2008-12-01

    To design altimeter and interferometric SAR (InSAR) systems for measuring Venus' topography, the effects of Venus' atmosphere on the signals need to be investigated. These radar systems are envisioned to operate at X-band, and therefore, a model of Venus atmosphere permittivity profile at X-band is required and has been developed in this work. The effect of signal propagation through this atmosphere and its implication in designing the altimeter and the InSAR instruments are also investigated. The model was constructed for the complex dielectric constant of the atmosphere. Using relations between permittivity and polarization of polar material, the real part of the atmosphere dielectric constant was obtained by calculating the total polarization of the mixture of known atmospheric components including CO2, N2, H2O, SO2, H2SO4, CO, and OCS. The contribution of each atmospheric component to the mixture polarization was calculated based on given temperatures and component densities in the mixture. For each atmospheric component, the polarization was modeled as a function of frequency, temperature, and pressure based on available information in literature. Imaginary part of the atmospheric dielectric constant was calculated by superposing the measured absorptions of mixture components. The temperature and pressure dependences of absorption of each component were modeled according to measurement data and published information. Hence, based on several datasets inferred or directly measured from previous explorations of Venus, the complex dielectric constant profile has been constructed. The validity of the atmosphere permittivity model has been verified by comparing simulation results with measurement data of Venus atmosphere, e.g., from nadir refractivity and absorption measured by the Magellan mission for a portion of the profile. Using this simulated dielectric constant profile, the X-band electromagnetic wave propagation in Venus atmosphere has been modeled, in

  5. Prebiotic Synthesis from CO Atmospheres: Implications for the origins of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael (Technical Monitor); Miyakawa, Shin; Yamanashi, Hiroto; Kobayashi, Kensei; Cleaves, H. James; Miller, Stanley L.

    2002-01-01

    Most models of the primitive atmosphere around the time life originated suggest that the atmosphere was dominated by carbon dioxide, largely based on the notion that the atmosphere was derived via volcanic outgassing, and that those gases were similar to those found in modern volcanic effluent. These models tend to downplay the possibility of a strongly reducing atmosphere, which had been thought to be important for prebiotic synthesis and thus the origin of life. However, there is no definitive geologic evidence for the oxidation state of the early atmosphere and bioorganic compounds are not efficiently synthesized from CO2 atmospheres. In the present study, it was shown that a CO-CO2-N2-H2O atmosphere can give a variety of bioorganic compounds with yields comparable to those obtained from a strongly reducing atmosphere. Atmospheres containing carbon monoxide might therefore have been conducive to prebiotic synthesis and perhaps the origin of life. CO-dominant atmospheres could have existed if the production rate of CO from impacts of extraterrestrial materials were high or if the upper mantle had been more reduced than today.

  6. Improved controlled atmosphere high temperature scanning probe microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Karin Vels; Wu, Yuehua; Jacobsen, Torben

    2013-01-01

    ) is monitored by an oxygen sensor. We present here some examples of its capabilities demonstrated by high temperature topography with simultaneously ac electrical conductance measurements during atmosphere changes, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at various temperatures, and measurements of the surface......To locally access electrochemical active surfaces and interfaces in operando at the sub-micron scale at high temperatures in a reactive gas atmosphere is of great importance to understand the basic mechanisms in new functional materials, for instance, for energy technologies, such as solid oxide...... fuel cells and electrolyzer cells. Here, we report on advanced improvements of our original controlled atmosphere high temperature scanning probe microscope, CAHT-SPM. The new microscope can employ a broad range of the scanning probe techniques including tapping mode, scanning tunneling microscopy...

  7. Implications of the atmosphere-soil interaction for the design of earth retaining structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruge Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The performance of most geotechnical structures is highly governed by environmental factors, particularly in tropical regions where there are very pronounced dry and wet seasons. Design of earth retaining structures generally tend to be too conservative due to the uncertainty generated by the incorporation of environmental variables. Those variables control the soil unsaturated response and in addition to the known insufficiency of the basic models used in traditional designs they are responsible for conservative designs. Rainfall is the main aspect that affects the soil properties of a particular site. It modifies the soil suction potential, according to the degree of saturation caused by the soil-atmosphere interaction. Currently, state-of-the-art numerical tools allow to simulate the influence of those variables in the behaviour of earth retaining structures. This paper analyses the possible implications of the use of numerical simulations for the design, which include, in the mathematical formulation, the suction as a main parameter. The hypoplastic model for unsaturated response was used. Numerical simulations performed with the use of traditional and modern constitutive models obtained encouraging results that reveal the importance of include suction in design processes.

  8. High-speed atmospheric correction for spectral image processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Timothy; Adler-Golden, Steven; Cappelaere, Patrice; Mandl, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Land and ocean data product generation from visible-through-shortwave-infrared multispectral and hyperspectral imagery requires atmospheric correction or compensation, that is, the removal of atmospheric absorption and scattering effects that contaminate the measured spectra. We have recently developed a prototype software system for automated, low-latency, high-accuracy atmospheric correction based on a C++-language version of the Spectral Sciences, Inc. FLAASH™ code. In this system, pre-calculated look-up tables replace on-the-fly MODTRAN® radiative transfer calculations, while the portable C++ code enables parallel processing on multicore/multiprocessor computer systems. The initial software has been installed on the Sensor Web at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, where it is currently atmospherically correcting new data from the EO-1 Hyperion and ALI sensors. Computation time is around 10 s per data cube per processor. Further development will be conducted to implement the new atmospheric correction software on board the upcoming HyspIRI mission's Intelligent Payload Module, where it would generate data products in nearreal time for Direct Broadcast to the ground. The rapid turn-around of data products made possible by this software would benefit a broad range of applications in areas of emergency response, environmental monitoring and national defense.

  9. New insights into the atmospheric mercury cycling in central Antarctica and implications on a continental scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Angot

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Under the framework of the GMOS project (Global Mercury Observation System atmospheric mercury monitoring has been implemented at Concordia Station on the high-altitude Antarctic plateau (75°06′ S, 123°20′ E, 3220 m above sea level. We report here the first year-round measurements of gaseous elemental mercury (Hg(0 in the atmosphere and in snowpack interstitial air on the East Antarctic ice sheet. This unique data set shows evidence of an intense oxidation of atmospheric Hg(0 in summer (24-hour daylight due to the high oxidative capacity of the Antarctic plateau atmosphere in this period of the year. Summertime Hg(0 concentrations exhibited a pronounced daily cycle in ambient air with maximal concentrations around midday. Photochemical reactions and chemical exchange at the air–snow interface were prominent, highlighting the role of the snowpack on the atmospheric mercury cycle. Our observations reveal a 20 to 30 % decrease of atmospheric Hg(0 concentrations from May to mid-August (winter, 24 h darkness. This phenomenon has not been reported elsewhere and possibly results from the dry deposition of Hg(0 onto the snowpack. We also reveal the occurrence of multi-day to weeklong atmospheric Hg(0 depletion events in summer, not associated with depletions of ozone, and likely due to a stagnation of air masses above the plateau triggering an accumulation of oxidants within the shallow boundary layer. Our observations suggest that the inland atmospheric reservoir is depleted in Hg(0 in summer. Due to katabatic winds flowing out from the Antarctic plateau down the steep vertical drops along the coast and according to observations at coastal Antarctic stations, the striking reactivity observed on the plateau most likely influences the cycle of atmospheric mercury on a continental scale.

  10. Atmospheric propagation and combining of high-power lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, W; Sprangle, P; Davis, C C

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we analyze beam combining and atmospheric propagation of high-power lasers for directed-energy (DE) applications. The large linewidths inherent in high-power fiber and slab lasers cause random phase and intensity fluctuations that occur on subnanosecond time scales. Coherently combining these high-power lasers would involve instruments capable of precise phase control and operation at rates greater than ∼10  GHz. To the best of our knowledge, this technology does not currently exist. This presents a challenging problem when attempting to phase lock high-power lasers that is not encountered when phase locking low-power lasers, for example, at milliwatt power levels. Regardless, we demonstrate that even if instruments are developed that can precisely control the phase of high-power lasers, coherent combining is problematic for DE applications. The dephasing effects of atmospheric turbulence typically encountered in DE applications will degrade the coherent properties of the beam before it reaches the target. Through simulations, we find that coherent beam combining in moderate turbulence and over multikilometer propagation distances has little advantage over incoherent combining. Additionally, in cases of strong turbulence and multikilometer propagation ranges, we find nearly indistinguishable intensity profiles and virtually no difference in the energy on the target between coherently and incoherently combined laser beams. Consequently, we find that coherent beam combining at the transmitter plane is ineffective under typical atmospheric conditions.

  11. Evaluation of Monte Carlo tools for high energy atmospheric physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutjes, Casper; Sarria, David; Broberg Skeltved, Alexander; Luque, Alejandro; Diniz, Gabriel; Østgaard, Nikolai; Ebert, Ute

    2016-11-01

    The emerging field of high energy atmospheric physics (HEAP) includes terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, electron-positron beams and gamma-ray glows from thunderstorms. Similar emissions of high energy particles occur in pulsed high voltage discharges. Understanding these phenomena requires appropriate models for the interaction of electrons, positrons and photons of up to 40 MeV energy with atmospheric air. In this paper, we benchmark the performance of the Monte Carlo codes Geant4, EGS5 and FLUKA developed in other fields of physics and of the custom-made codes GRRR and MC-PEPTITA against each other within the parameter regime relevant for high energy atmospheric physics. We focus on basic tests, namely on the evolution of monoenergetic and directed beams of electrons, positrons and photons with kinetic energies between 100 keV and 40 MeV through homogeneous air in the absence of electric and magnetic fields, using a low energy cutoff of 50 keV. We discuss important differences between the results of the different codes and provide plausible explanations. We also test the computational performance of the codes. The Supplement contains all results, providing a first benchmark for present and future custom-made codes that are more flexible in including electrodynamic interactions.

  12. Evaluation of Monte Carlo tools for high energy atmospheric physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Rutjes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of high energy atmospheric physics (HEAP includes terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, electron–positron beams and gamma-ray glows from thunderstorms. Similar emissions of high energy particles occur in pulsed high voltage discharges. Understanding these phenomena requires appropriate models for the interaction of electrons, positrons and photons of up to 40 MeV energy with atmospheric air. In this paper, we benchmark the performance of the Monte Carlo codes Geant4, EGS5 and FLUKA developed in other fields of physics and of the custom-made codes GRRR and MC-PEPTITA against each other within the parameter regime relevant for high energy atmospheric physics. We focus on basic tests, namely on the evolution of monoenergetic and directed beams of electrons, positrons and photons with kinetic energies between 100 keV and 40 MeV through homogeneous air in the absence of electric and magnetic fields, using a low energy cutoff of 50 keV. We discuss important differences between the results of the different codes and provide plausible explanations. We also test the computational performance of the codes. The Supplement contains all results, providing a first benchmark for present and future custom-made codes that are more flexible in including electrodynamic interactions.

  13. Galactic cosmic rays on extrasolar Earth-like planets. II. Atmospheric implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grießmeier, J.-M.; Tabataba-Vakili, F.; Stadelmann, A.; Grenfell, J. L.; Atri, D.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Theoretical arguments indicate that close-in terrestial exoplanets may have weak magnetic fields. As described in the companion article (Paper I), a weak magnetic field results in a high flux of galactic cosmic rays to the top of the planetary atmosphere. Aims: We investigate effects that may result from a high flux of galactic cosmic rays both throughout the atmosphere and at the planetary surface. Methods: Using an air shower approach, we calculate how the atmospheric chemistry and temperature change under the influence of galactic cosmic rays for Earth-like (N2-O2 dominated) atmospheres. We evaluate the production and destruction rate of atmospheric biosignature molecules. We derive planetary emission and transmission spectra to study the influence of galactic cosmic rays on biosignature detectability. We then calculate the resulting surface UV flux, the surface particle flux, and the associated equivalent biological dose rates. Results: We find that up to 20% of stratospheric ozone is destroyed by cosmic-ray protons. The effect on the planetary spectra, however, is negligible. The reduction of the planetary ozone layer leads to an increase in the weighted surface UV flux by two orders of magnitude under stellar UV flare conditions. The resulting biological effective dose rate is, however, too low to strongly affect surface life. We also examine the surface particle flux: For a planet with a terrestrial atmosphere (with a surface pressure of 1033 hPa), a reduction of the magnetic shielding efficiency can increase the biological radiation dose rate by a factor of two, which is non-critical for biological systems. For a planet with a weaker atmosphere (with a surface pressure of 97.8 hPa), the planetary magnetic field has a much stronger influence on the biological radiation dose, changing it by up to two orders of magnitude. Conclusions: For a planet with an Earth-like atmospheric pressure, weak or absent magnetospheric shielding against galactic cosmic

  14. Implications of climate variability for the detection of multiple equilibria and for rapid transitions in the atmosphere-vegetation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bathiany, S. [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany); Claussen, M. [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany); Universitaet Hamburg, Meteorologisches Institut, Hamburg (Germany); Fraedrich, K. [Universitaet Hamburg, Meteorologisches Institut, Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    Paleoclimatic records indicate a decline of vegetation cover in the Western Sahara at the end of the African Humid Period (about 5,500 years before present). Modelling studies have shown that this phenomenon may be interpreted as a critical transition that results from a bifurcation in the atmosphere-vegetation system. However, the stability properties of this system are closely linked to climate variability and depend on the climate model and the methods of analysis. By coupling the Planet Simulator (PlaSim), an atmosphere model of intermediate complexity, with the simple dynamic vegetation model VECODE, we assess previous methods for the detection of multiple equilibria, and demonstrate their limitations. In particular, a stability diagram can yield misleading results because of spatial interactions, and the system's steady state and its dependency on initial conditions are affected by atmospheric variability and nonlinearities. In addition, we analyse the implications of climate variability for the abruptness of a vegetation decline. We find that a vegetation collapse can happen at different locations at different times. These collapses are possible despite large and uncorrelated climate variability. Because of the nonlinear relation between vegetation dynamics and precipitation the green state is initially stabilised by the high variability. When precipitation falls below a critical threshold, the desert state is stabilised as variability is then also decreased. (orig.)

  15. Ferrous alloys cast under high pressure gas atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirowski Z.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is describing the essence of the process of introducing nitrogen to the melt of ferrous alloys by application of overpressure above the metal bath. The problem was discussed in terms of both theory (the thermodynamic aspects of the process and practice (the technical and technological aspects, safety of the furnace stand operation, and technique of conducting the melt. The novel technique of melting under high pressure of the gas atmosphere (up to 5 MPa has not been used so far in the domestic industry, mainly because of the lack of proper equipment satisfyng the requirements of safe operation. Owing to cooperation undertaken with a partner from Bulgaria, a more detailed investigation of this technology has become possible and melting of selected ferrous alloys was conducted under the gas atmosphere at a pressure of about 3,5 MPa.

  16. Observations of atmospheric chemical deposition to high Arctic snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Katrina M.; Sharma, Sangeeta; Toom, Desiree; Chivulescu, Alina; Hanna, Sarah; Bertram, Allan K.; Platt, Andrew; Elsasser, Mike; Huang, Lin; Tarasick, David; Chellman, Nathan; McConnell, Joseph R.; Bozem, Heiko; Kunkel, Daniel; Duan Lei, Ying; Evans, Greg J.; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.

    2017-05-01

    Rapidly rising temperatures and loss of snow and ice cover have demonstrated the unique vulnerability of the high Arctic to climate change. There are major uncertainties in modelling the chemical depositional and scavenging processes of Arctic snow. To that end, fresh snow samples collected on average every 4 days at Alert, Nunavut, from September 2014 to June 2015 were analyzed for black carbon, major ions, and metals, and their concentrations and fluxes were reported. Comparison with simultaneous measurements of atmospheric aerosol mass loadings yields effective deposition velocities that encompass all processes by which the atmospheric species are transferred to the snow. It is inferred from these values that dry deposition is the dominant removal mechanism for several compounds over the winter while wet deposition increased in importance in the fall and spring, possibly due to enhanced scavenging by mixed-phase clouds. Black carbon aerosol was the least efficiently deposited species to the snow.

  17. Silica nanoparticles capture atmospheric lead: implications in the treatment of environmental heavy metal pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xifei; Shen, Zhiguo; Zhang, Bing; Yang, Jianping; Hong, Wen-Xu; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun

    2013-01-01

    Lead (Pb) contamination in the air is a severe global problem, most notably in China. Removal of Pb from polluted air remains a significant challenge. It is unclear what potential effects silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) exposure can have on atmospheric Pb. Here we first characterized the features of SiNPs by measuring the particle size, zeta potential and the specific surface area of SiO(2) particles using a Nicomp 380/ZLS submicron particle sizer, the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method and transmission electronic microscopy (TEM). We measured the content of the metal Pb adsorbed by SiNPs exposed to two Pb polluted electric battery plants using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). It is found that SiNPs exposed to two Pb polluted electric battery plants absorb more atmospheric Pb compared to either blank control or micro-sized SiO(2) particles in a time-dependent manner. This is the first study demonstrating that SiNPs exposure can absorb atmospheric Pb in the polluted environment. These novel findings indicate that SiNPs have potential to serve as a significant adsorbent of Pb from industrial pollution, implicating a potentially novel application of SiNPs in the treatment of environmental heavy metal pollution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Implications of atmospheric conditions for analysis of surface temperature variability derived from landscape-scale thermography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerle, Albin; Meier, Fred; Heinl, Michael; Egger, Angelika; Leitinger, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) cameras perfectly bridge the gap between (i) on-site measurements of land surface temperature (LST) providing high temporal resolution at the cost of low spatial coverage and (ii) remotely sensed data from satellites that provide high spatial coverage at relatively low spatio-temporal resolution. While LST data from satellite (LSTsat) and airborne platforms are routinely corrected for atmospheric effects, such corrections are barely applied for LST from ground-based TIR imagery (using TIR cameras; LSTcam). We show the consequences of neglecting atmospheric effects on LSTcam of different vegetated surfaces at landscape scale. We compare LST measured from different platforms, focusing on the comparison of LST data from on-site radiometry (LSTosr) and LSTcam using a commercially available TIR camera in the region of Bozen/Bolzano (Italy). Given a digital elevation model and measured vertical air temperature profiles, we developed a multiple linear regression model to correct LSTcam data for atmospheric influences. We could show the distinct effect of atmospheric conditions and related radiative processes along the measurement path on LSTcam, proving the necessity to correct LSTcam data on landscape scale, despite their relatively low measurement distances compared to remotely sensed data. Corrected LSTcam data revealed the dampening effect of the atmosphere, especially at high temperature differences between the atmosphere and the vegetated surface. Not correcting for these effects leads to erroneous LST estimates, in particular to an underestimation of the heterogeneity in LST, both in time and space. In the most pronounced case, we found a temperature range extension of almost 10 K.

  19. Implications of atmospheric conditions for analysis of surface temperature variability derived from landscape-scale thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerle, Albin; Meier, Fred; Heinl, Michael; Egger, Angelika; Leitinger, Georg

    2017-04-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) cameras perfectly bridge the gap between (i) on-site measurements of land surface temperature (LST) providing high temporal resolution at the cost of low spatial coverage and (ii) remotely sensed data from satellites that provide high spatial coverage at relatively low spatio-temporal resolution. While LST data from satellite (LSTsat) and airborne platforms are routinely corrected for atmospheric effects, such corrections are barely applied for LST from ground-based TIR imagery (using TIR cameras; LSTcam). We show the consequences of neglecting atmospheric effects on LSTcam of different vegetated surfaces at landscape scale. We compare LST measured from different platforms, focusing on the comparison of LST data from on-site radiometry (LSTosr) and LSTcam using a commercially available TIR camera in the region of Bozen/Bolzano (Italy). Given a digital elevation model and measured vertical air temperature profiles, we developed a multiple linear regression model to correct LSTcam data for atmospheric influences. We could show the distinct effect of atmospheric conditions and related radiative processes along the measurement path on LSTcam, proving the necessity to correct LSTcam data on landscape scale, despite their relatively low measurement distances compared to remotely sensed data. Corrected LSTcam data revealed the dampening effect of the atmosphere, especially at high temperature differences between the atmosphere and the vegetated surface. Not correcting for these effects leads to erroneous LST estimates, in particular to an underestimation of the heterogeneity in LST, both in time and space. In the most pronounced case, we found a temperature range extension of almost 10 K.

  20. Mapping Global Atmospheric CO2 Concentration at High Spatiotemporal Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Jing

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Satellite measurements of the spatiotemporal distributions of atmospheric CO2 concentrations are a key component for better understanding global carbon cycle characteristics. Currently, several satellite instruments such as the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT, SCanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY, and Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 can be used to measure CO2 column-averaged dry air mole fractions. However, because of cloud effects, a single satellite can only provide limited CO2 data, resulting in significant uncertainty in the characterization of the spatiotemporal distribution of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. In this study, a new physical data fusion technique is proposed to combine the GOSAT and SCIAMACHY measurements. On the basis of the fused dataset, a gap-filling method developed by modeling the spatial correlation structures of CO2 concentrations is presented with the goal of generating global land CO2 distribution maps with high spatiotemporal resolution. The results show that, compared with the single satellite dataset (i.e., GOSAT or SCIAMACHY, the global spatial coverage of the fused dataset is significantly increased (reaching up to approximately 20%, and the temporal resolution is improved by two or three times. The spatial coverage and monthly variations of the generated global CO2 distributions are also investigated. Comparisons with ground-based Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON measurements reveal that CO2 distributions based on the gap-filling method show good agreement with TCCON records despite some biases. These results demonstrate that the fused dataset as well as the gap-filling method are rather effective to generate global CO2 distribution with high accuracies and high spatiotemporal resolution.

  1. Observations of Highly Variable Deuterium in the Martian Upper Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, John T.; Mayyasi-Matta, Majd A.; Bhattacharyya, Dolon; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Chaffin, Michael S.; Deighan, Justin; Schneider, Nicholas M.; Jain, Sonal; Jakosky, Bruce

    2017-10-01

    One of the key pieces of evidence for historic high levels of water on Mars is the present elevated ratio of deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) in near-surface water. This can be explained by the loss of large amounts of water into space, with the lighter H atoms escaping faster than D atoms. Understanding the specific physical processes and controlling factors behind the present escape of H and D is the key objective of the MAVEN IUVS echelle channel. This knowledge can then be applied to an accurate extrapolation back in time to understand the water history of Mars. Observations of D in the martian upper atmosphere over the first martian year of the MAVEN mission have shown highly variable amounts of D, with a short-lived maximum just after perihelion and during southern summer. The timing and nature of this increase provide constraints on its possible origin. These results will be presented and compared with other measurements of the upper atmosphere of Mars.

  2. Global Modelling of the total OH reactivity: validation against measurements and atmospheric implications of the 'missing' sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracci, Valerio; Archibald, Alexander T.; Pyle, John A.

    2017-04-01

    The removal of most trace gases emitted into the atmosphere is primarily initiated by reaction with the hydroxyl radical, OH. A number of field campaigns over the last two decades have observed the presence of a "missing" sink of the OH radical in a variety of regions across the planet, from urban areas to remote forests: comparison of the direct measurements of the OH loss rate, also known as total OH reactivity, with the sum of individual known OH sinks (obtained via the simultaneous detection of species such as volatile organic compounds and nitrogen oxides) indicated that, in some cases, up to 80% of the total OH loss rate was unaccounted for. The implications of this finding are significant, as a potentially major OH sink operating in the atmosphere is not currently accounted for in atmospheric models: the presence of an additional OH sink might, for instance, lead to an increase in the atmospheric lifetime of a number of trace species, including high-impact greenhouse gases such as methane. The only modelling of the total OH reactivity is currently performed on a regional scale; a thorough assessment of the impact of the missing sink on the chemistry and climate of the planet by global modelling is therefore highly desirable. In this work a chemistry-climate model (the Met Office's Unified Model with the United Kingdom Chemistry and Aerosols scheme, UM-UKCA) was used to calculate the total OH reactivity at the planetary boundary layer. The model output was validated against available field measurements to verify that the known OH sinks observed in the field were reproduced correctly by the model: a good agreement was found between the data from more than 30 field campaigns and the model output. Following this, the effects of introducing novel OH sinks in the chemistry scheme were investigated. The first step was the introduction in the model of the newly characterised reactions of peroxy radicals (RO2) with OH, the kinetics and products of which have only

  3. Unusual Atmospheric Processes: Implications for the Unusual Isotope Effect in Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurst, S.; Krishnamurthy, R. V.

    2016-12-01

    Several samples associated in particular with thunderstorms collected from Kalamazoo, Michigan reveal oxygen and hydrogen isotope ratios that are not compatible with known thermodynamic fractionation or the so-called Raleigh Distillation Effect. Data gathered from April 2014 to February 2016 can be separated into two categories: (1) samples with expected isotopic values based on previous work, (2) samples with unusually high δ18O and δ2H values. Values as high as 42‰ and 25‰ for δ2H and δ18O respectively are obtained. Recent studies suggest that precipitation produced by deep convection can produce moderately enriched oxygen isotopic values, although no hydrogen values for those precipitations are available. Moreover, no values have been recorded that are as high as some of those presented here. The unusual isotope values cannot be attributed to air mass contributions. It is argued that changes in atmospheric chemistry, most likely induced by lightning associated with thunderstorms are responsible. This is likely since temperatures associated with lightning can reach 40000°K. Several studies have indicated that lightning can significantly impact atmospheric chemistry producing, among other species, ozone and NOx. Atmospheric ozone has enriched isotopic values and likely contributes to enriched Oxygen-18 seen in precipitation. An explanation for enrichment in hydrogen is somewhat elusive, but a likely candidate is ion molecular reactions produced by extremely high temperatures in the corona of lightning.

  4. Analysis of coherent structures during the 2009 CABINEX field campaign: Implications for atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressley, S. N.; Steiner, A. L.; Chung, S. H.; Edburg, S. L.; Jones, E.; Botros, A.

    2010-12-01

    Intermittent coherent structures are an important component of turbulent exchange of mass, momentum, and energy at the biosphere-atmosphere interface. Specifically, above forested canopies, coherent structures can be responsible for a large fraction of the exchange of trace gases and aerosols between the sub-canopy (ground surface), canopy and the atmosphere. This study quantifies the coherent structures and associated turbulence intensity at the canopy interface for the Community Atmosphere-Biosphere Interactions Experiment (CABINEX) field campaign (July 1 - Aug 10, 2009) at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS), and determines the effect of coherent structures on canopy air-parcel residence times and importance for atmospheric chemistry. Two different methods of analysis are used to estimate the coherent exchange: 1) wavelet analysis and 2) quadrant-hole (Q-H) analysis (also referred to as conditional sampling). Wavelet analysis uses wavelet transforms to detect non-periodic signals with a variable duration. Using temperature ramp structures, the timing and magnitude of individual coherent ‘events’ can be evaluated over the duration of the campaign. Conversely, the Q-H analysis detects ‘events’ when │u'w'│≥ H×urmswrms, where H is a threshold parameter, u is the stream-wise velocity and w is the vertical velocity. Events are primarily comprised of high momentum air penetrating into the canopy (sweeps, u’> 0; w’0). Results from both techniques are compared under varying stability classes, and the number of events, total duration, and contribution to the total flux are analyzed for the full campaign. The contribution of coherent structures to the total canopy-atmosphere exchange is similar between the two methods, despite a greater number of events estimated from the Q-H analysis. These analyses improve the quantification of canopy mixing time at the UMBS site during CABINEX, and will aid in interpreting in-canopy processes

  5. Formation of highly porous aerosol particles by atmospheric freeze-drying in ice clouds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Gabriela; Koop, Thomas; Haspel, Carynelisa; Taraniuk, Ilya; Moise, Tamar; Koren, Ilan; Heiblum, Reuven H; Rudich, Yinon

    2013-12-17

    The cycling of atmospheric aerosols through clouds can change their chemical and physical properties and thus modify how aerosols affect cloud microphysics and, subsequently, precipitation and climate. Current knowledge about aerosol processing by clouds is rather limited to chemical reactions within water droplets in warm low-altitude clouds. However, in cold high-altitude cirrus clouds and anvils of high convective clouds in the tropics and midlatitudes, humidified aerosols freeze to form ice, which upon exposure to subsaturation conditions with respect to ice can sublimate, leaving behind residual modified aerosols. This freeze-drying process can occur in various types of clouds. Here we simulate an atmospheric freeze-drying cycle of aerosols in laboratory experiments using proxies for atmospheric aerosols. We find that aerosols that contain organic material that undergo such a process can form highly porous aerosol particles with a larger diameter and a lower density than the initial homogeneous aerosol. We attribute this morphology change to phase separation upon freezing followed by a glass transition of the organic material that can preserve a porous structure after ice sublimation. A porous structure may explain the previously observed enhancement in ice nucleation efficiency of glassy organic particles. We find that highly porous aerosol particles scatter solar light less efficiently than nonporous aerosol particles. Using a combination of satellite and radiosonde data, we show that highly porous aerosol formation can readily occur in highly convective clouds, which are widespread in the tropics and midlatitudes. These observations may have implications for subsequent cloud formation cycles and aerosol albedo near cloud edges.

  6. Analysis of coherent structures and atmosphere-canopy coupling strength during the CABINEX field campaign: implications for atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, A. L.; Pressley, S. N.; Botros, A.; Jones, E.; Chung, S. H.; Edburg, S. L.

    2011-07-01

    Intermittent coherent structures can be responsible for a large fraction of the chemical exchange between the vegetation canopy and the atmosphere. Quantifying their contribution to fluxes is necessary to interpret measurements of trace gases and aerosols within and above forest canopies. The primary objective of the Community Atmosphere-Biosphere Interactions Experiment (CABINEX) field campaign (10 July 2009 to 9 August 2009) was to study the chemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOC) within and above a forest canopy. In this manuscript, we provide an analysis of coherent structures and canopy-atmosphere exchange during CABINEX to support in-canopy gradient measurements of VOC. We quantify the number and duration of coherent structure events and their percent contribution to momentum and heat fluxes with two methods: (1) quadrant-hole analysis and (2) wavelet analysis. Despite differences in the duration and number of events, both methods predict that coherent structures contribute 40-50 % to total momentum fluxes and 44-65 % to total heat fluxes during the CABINEX campaign. Contributions associated with coherent structures are slightly greater under stable rather than unstable conditions. By comparing heat fluxes within and above the canopy, we determine the degree of coupling between upper canopy and atmosphere and find that they are coupled to the majority of the campaign time period. Uncoupled canopy-atmosphere events occur in the early morning (04:00-08:00 LT) approximately 30 % of the time. This study confirms that coherent structures contribute significantly to the exchange of heat and momentum between the canopy and atmosphere at the CABINEX site, and indicates the need to include these transport processes when studying the mixing and chemical reactions of trace gases and aerosols between a forest canopy and the atmosphere.

  7. Fiber performance in hydrogen atmosphere at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semjonov, Sergey L.; Kosolapov, Alexey F.; Nikolin, Ivan V.; Ramos, Rogerio; Vaynshteyn, Vladimir; Hartog, Arthur

    2006-04-01

    Optical losses induced in fibers at 300 °C and in hydrogen atmosphere were studied. A non-linear dependence of hydrogen penetration through the carbon coating on hydrogen pressure was observed. It was demonstrated that carbon coating could not defend the fiber from hydrogen penetration for a long time period. At some time, the hydrogen presence in the fiber core resulted in high optical losses in all spectral range in the case of Ge-doped fibers. It was found that the short-wavelength loss edge (SWE) in a Ge-doped fiber co-doped with a small amount of phosphorus was significantly smaller than that in Ge-doped fibers without co-doping. Nevertheless, P-codoping effect did not decrease optical losses related with SWE completely.

  8. Developing a high-resolution regional atmospheric reanalysis for Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Christopher; Fox-Hughes, Paul; Su, Chun-Hsu; Jakob, Dörte; Kociuba, Greg; Eisenberg, Nathan; Steinle, Peter; Harris, Rebecca; Corney, Stuart; Love, Peter; Remenyi, Tomas; Chladil, Mark; Bally, John; Bindoff, Nathan

    2017-04-01

    A dynamically consistent, long-term atmospheric reanalysis can be used to support high-quality assessments of environmental risk and likelihood of extreme events. Most reanalyses are presently based on coarse-scale global systems that are not suitable for regional assessments in fire risk, water and natural resources, amongst others. The Australian Bureau of Meteorology is currently working to close this gap by producing a high-resolution reanalysis over the Australian and New Zealand region to construct a sequence of atmospheric conditions at sub-hourly intervals over the past 25 years from 1990. The Australia reanalysis consists of a convective-scale analysis nested within a 12 km regional-scale reanalysis, which is bounded by a coarse-scale ERA-Interim reanalysis that provides the required boundary and initial conditions. We use an unchanging atmospheric modelling suite based on the UERRA system used at the UK Met Office and the more recent version of the Bureau of Meteorology's operational numerical prediction model used in ACCESS-R (Australian Community Climate and Earth-System Simulator-Regional system). An advanced (4-dimensional variational) data assimilation scheme is used to optimally combine model physics with multiple observations from aircrafts, sondes, surface observations and satellites to create a best estimate of state of the atmosphere over a 6-hour moving window. This analysis is in turn used to drive a higher-resolution (1.5 km) downscaling model over selected subdomains within Australia, currently eastern New South Wales and Tasmania, with the capability to support this anywhere in the Australia-New Zealand domain. The temporal resolution of the gridded analysis fields for both the regional and higher-resolution subdomains are generally one hour, with many fields such as 10 m winds and 2 m temperatures available every 10 minutes. The reanalysis also produces many other variables that include wind, temperature, moisture, pressure, cloud cover

  9. Atmospheric Flow Patterns Around the Southern Alps of New Zealand and Implications for Paleoaltimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, L. B.; Galewsky, J.

    2017-11-01

    The development of relief may generate leeside rain shadows where precipitation δ18O values are lower due to rainout on the windward side. The magnitude of lowering in paleo-δ18O sampled from the leeside of a mountain range should, at least, in principle, be related to the elevation of the mountain range. In order for leeside proxies to record the highest elevations, the majority of air masses need to travel up and over the ridge crest before raining out on the leeside. If atmospheric flow patterns around the mountain range are dominated by flow deflection, air masses that reach the leeside are less likely to record the highest elevations. Using the Weather Research and Forecasting model and Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model, we demonstrate that modern atmospheric flow patterns in the Southern Alps of New Zealand are not dominated by flow deflection. The lack of flow deflection around the Southern Alps and the relatively low relief throughout the uplift history supports the use of leeside isotope records to constrain the timing of uplift, and that uplift likely occurred 5 Ma based on leeside isotope records. In contrast, orogens that are characterized by high elevations and strong flow deflection, like the Sierra Nevada of California, may not be good candidates for leeside isotope-based paleoaltimetry studies. Ideal candidates for such studies should be characterized by relatively low elevations, low atmospheric flow deflection, and relatively low relief throughout the period of uplift.

  10. Microbiome of the upper troposphere: Species composition and prevalence, effects of tropical storms, and atmospheric implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLeon-Rodriguez, Natasha; Lathem, Terry L.; Rodriguez-R, Luis M.; Barazesh, James M.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Beyersdorf, Andreas J.; Ziemba, Luke D.; Bergin, Michael; Nenes, Athanasios; Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T.

    2013-01-01

    The composition and prevalence of microorganisms in the middle-to-upper troposphere (8–15 km altitude) and their role in aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions represent important, unresolved questions for biological and atmospheric science. In particular, airborne microorganisms above the oceans remain essentially uncharacterized, as most work to date is restricted to samples taken near the Earth’s surface. Here we report on the microbiome of low- and high-altitude air masses sampled onboard the National Aeronautics and Space Administration DC-8 platform during the 2010 Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes campaign in the Caribbean Sea. The samples were collected in cloudy and cloud-free air masses before, during, and after two major tropical hurricanes, Earl and Karl. Quantitative PCR and microscopy revealed that viable bacterial cells represented on average around 20% of the total particles in the 0.25- to 1-μm diameter range and were at least an order of magnitude more abundant than fungal cells, suggesting that bacteria represent an important and underestimated fraction of micrometer-sized atmospheric aerosols. The samples from the two hurricanes were characterized by significantly different bacterial communities, revealing that hurricanes aerosolize a large amount of new cells. Nonetheless, 17 bacterial taxa, including taxa that are known to use C1–C4 carbon compounds present in the atmosphere, were found in all samples, indicating that these organisms possess traits that allow survival in the troposphere. The findings presented here suggest that the microbiome is a dynamic and underappreciated aspect of the upper troposphere with potentially important impacts on the hydrological cycle, clouds, and climate. PMID:23359712

  11. Aerosol lidar observations of atmospheric mixing in Los Angeles: Climatology and implications for greenhouse gas observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, John; Kort, Eric A.; DeCola, Phil; Duren, Riley

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric observations of greenhouse gases provide essential information on sources and sinks of these key atmospheric constituents. To quantify fluxes from atmospheric observations, representation of transport—especially vertical mixing—is a necessity and often a source of error. We report on remotely sensed profiles of vertical aerosol distribution taken over a 2 year period in Pasadena, California. Using an automated analysis system, we estimate daytime mixing layer depth, achieving high confidence in the afternoon maximum on 51% of days with profiles from a Sigma Space Mini Micropulse LiDAR (MiniMPL) and on 36% of days with a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. We note that considering ceilometer data on a logarithmic scale, a standard method, introduces, an offset in mixing height retrievals. The mean afternoon maximum mixing height is 770 m Above Ground Level in summer and 670 m in winter, with significant day-to-day variance (within season σ = 220m≈30%). Taking advantage of the MiniMPL's portability, we demonstrate the feasibility of measuring the detailed horizontal structure of the mixing layer by automobile. We compare our observations to planetary boundary layer (PBL) heights from sonde launches, North American regional reanalysis (NARR), and a custom Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model developed for greenhouse gas (GHG) monitoring in Los Angeles. NARR and WRF PBL heights at Pasadena are both systematically higher than measured, NARR by 2.5 times; these biases will cause proportional errors in GHG flux estimates using modeled transport. We discuss how sustained lidar observations can be used to reduce flux inversion error by selecting suitable analysis periods, calibrating models, or characterizing bias for correction in post processing.

  12. Aerosol lidar observations of atmospheric mixing in Los Angeles: Climatology and implications for greenhouse gas observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, John; Kort, Eric A; DeCola, Phil; Duren, Riley

    2016-08-27

    Atmospheric observations of greenhouse gases provide essential information on sources and sinks of these key atmospheric constituents. To quantify fluxes from atmospheric observations, representation of transport-especially vertical mixing-is a necessity and often a source of error. We report on remotely sensed profiles of vertical aerosol distribution taken over a 2 year period in Pasadena, California. Using an automated analysis system, we estimate daytime mixing layer depth, achieving high confidence in the afternoon maximum on 51% of days with profiles from a Sigma Space Mini Micropulse LiDAR (MiniMPL) and on 36% of days with a Vaisala CL51 ceilometer. We note that considering ceilometer data on a logarithmic scale, a standard method, introduces, an offset in mixing height retrievals. The mean afternoon maximum mixing height is 770 m Above Ground Level in summer and 670 m in winter, with significant day-to-day variance (within season σ = 220m≈30%). Taking advantage of the MiniMPL's portability, we demonstrate the feasibility of measuring the detailed horizontal structure of the mixing layer by automobile. We compare our observations to planetary boundary layer (PBL) heights from sonde launches, North American regional reanalysis (NARR), and a custom Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model developed for greenhouse gas (GHG) monitoring in Los Angeles. NARR and WRF PBL heights at Pasadena are both systematically higher than measured, NARR by 2.5 times; these biases will cause proportional errors in GHG flux estimates using modeled transport. We discuss how sustained lidar observations can be used to reduce flux inversion error by selecting suitable analysis periods, calibrating models, or characterizing bias for correction in post processing.

  13. Mercury concentrations of the Mazama ash : implications for the atmospheric mercury budget

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, A.K.; Telmer, K.; Spence, J. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada). School of Earth and Ocean Sciences

    2005-07-01

    This study examined the mercury concentrations found in the large quantity of ash that was produced when Mount Mazama erupted. The objective was to better quantify volcanic emissions of mercury in terms of the global mercury budget. The ash plume included a proximal consolidated facies that contained much lower mercury concentrations than the distal unconsolidated facies. Two possible reasons for this were suggested. First, it was suggested that mercury's low volatilization temperature resulted in its thermal release during the volcanic eruption, thereby accounting for the low values of mercury observed within the proximal unit due to its high temperature at the time of deposition. A portion of the thermally released mercury (Hg0) would have been oxidized in the atmosphere to Hg{sup 2+}, rendering it more reactive. Ash particles traveling with the eruption plume would have cooled enough to allow for readsorption of the oxidized mercury. The deposited cooled particles within the distal facies would therefore have contained higher mercury levels compared to the proximal facies. The second possibility was that thermal release occurred for both facies and that the low concentrations found within the proximal unit represent the original concentrations of the whole ash deposit. Concentrations in the distal facies were increased due to postdepositional processes that left the proximal facies unchanged due to buffering by its consolidated nature and its thickness. Mercury mass calculations gave values of 6 megagrams (Mg) of mercury for the consolidated facies and 924 Mg for the unconsolidated facies, for a total of 930 Mg for the whole deposit. The volcano was estimated to contain 12392 Mg of mercury, with 11462 Mg released to the atmosphere. On average, volcanic eruptions around the world account for 70 Mg of mercury/year which is currently unaccounted for in the global mercury budgets. This study demonstrated the mobile nature of the global mercury cycle and showed

  14. Development and Implementation of Critical Loads for Atmospheric Deposition: Federal Land Management Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, E. M.

    2004-12-01

    Critical loads for atmospheric deposition have been widely developed and used in Europe, Canada, and other countries. Critical loads are used to influence air pollution emissions reductions, thereby protecting and restoring aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. In the United States, federal land management agencies are adopting the critical load concept as a potentially valuable resource management tool. Certain parks and wilderness areas are currently being affected by anthropogenic nitrogen and sulfur deposition. Effects of excess deposition include acidification, nitrogen enrichment, toxicity, and changes in biotic communities. Streams in both Shenandoah and Great Smoky Mountains National Parks are experiencing chronic and episodic acidification and brook trout fisheries in Shenandoah have been affected. High elevation ecosystems in Rocky Mountain National Park are undergoing subtle changes in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems attributable to atmospheric deposition. Natural resources in many other federal areas have been affected or are at risk from deposition. Federal land managers are refining strategies for critical loads that include working with scientists to identify resources sensitive to deposition, defining resource protection criteria that will meet management objectives, and estimating and implementing critical loads. Critical loads will be used in resource management decisions and federal land management planning. They will be used to evaluate management actions and assess progress towards meeting management goals. Federal land managers will also communicate critical loads information to air pollution regulatory agencies to inform emissions management strategies for clean air.

  15. Nitrogen fractionation in the atmospheres of Pluto and Titan - implications for the origin of nitrogen in KBOs and comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandt, Kathleen; Luspay-Kuti, Adrienn; Jessup, Kandis Lea; Hue, Vincent; Kammer, Josh; Filwett, Rachael

    2017-04-01

    Recent observations of the composition of Pluto's atmosphere made by the Alice Ultraviolet Spectrometer on New Horizons and by the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) have shown that Pluto's nitrogen chemistry differs significantly from that observed in Titan's upper atmosphere. The isotope ratios, 14N/15N, in N2 and HCN in Titan's atmosphere are 167.6 and 68, respectively. They differ by more than a factor of two because photodissociation of molecular nitrogen in Titan's atmosphere leads to a significant enrichment of the heavy nitrogen isotope, 15N, in HCN. However, ALMA observations were not able to detect HC15N in Pluto's atmosphere, setting a lower limit of 125 for 14N/15N in HCN. We have applied our model for simulating nitrogen isotope chemistry in Titan's atmosphere to Pluto, constrained by New Horizons observations, and explore possible explanations of the lower limit provided by ALMA. These results have implications for the origin of nitrogen on Pluto, other Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs), and for comets like the Rosetta mission target 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, which is thought to originate in the Kuiper Belt.

  16. High Pressure Atmospheric Sampling Inlet System for Venus or the Gas Giants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Thorleaf Research, Inc. proposes to develop a miniaturized high pressure atmospheric sampling inlet system for sample acquisition in extreme planetary environments,...

  17. SPEX: a highly accurate spectropolarimeter for atmospheric aerosol characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietjens, J. H. H.; Smit, J. M.; di Noia, A.; Hasekamp, O. P.; van Harten, G.; Snik, F.; Keller, C. U.

    2017-11-01

    Global characterization of atmospheric aerosol in terms of the microphysical properties of the particles is essential for understanding the role aerosols in Earth climate [1]. For more accurate predictions of future climate the uncertainties of the net radiative forcing of aerosols in the Earth's atmosphere must be reduced [2]. Essential parameters that are needed as input in climate models are not only the aerosol optical thickness (AOT), but also particle specific properties such as the aerosol mean size, the single scattering albedo (SSA) and the complex refractive index. The latter can be used to discriminate between absorbing and non-absorbing aerosol types, and between natural and anthropogenic aerosol. Classification of aerosol types is also very important for air-quality and health-related issues [3]. Remote sensing from an orbiting satellite platform is the only way to globally characterize atmospheric aerosol at a relevant timescale of 1 day [4]. One of the few methods that can be employed for measuring the microphysical properties of aerosols is to observe both radiance and degree of linear polarization of sunlight scattered in the Earth atmosphere under different viewing directions [5][6][7]. The requirement on the absolute accuracy of the degree of linear polarization PL is very stringent: the absolute error in PL must be smaller then 0.001+0.005.PL in order to retrieve aerosol parameters with sufficient accuracy to advance climate modelling and to enable discrimination of aerosol types based on their refractive index for air-quality studies [6][7]. In this paper we present the SPEX instrument, which is a multi-angle spectropolarimeter that can comply with the polarimetric accuracy needed for characterizing aerosols in the Earth's atmosphere. We describe the implementation of spectral polarization modulation in a prototype instrument of SPEX and show results of ground based measurements from which aerosol microphysical properties are retrieved.

  18. Generation of Electron Suprathermal Tails in the Upper Solar Atmosphere: Implications for Coronal Heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinas, Adolfo F.; Wong, Hung K.; Klimas, Alexander J.

    1999-01-01

    We present a mechanism for the generation of non-Maxwellian electron distribution function in the upper regions of the solar atmosphere in the presence of collisional damping. It is suggested that finite amplitude, low frequency, obliquely propagating electromagnetic waves can carry a substantial electric field component parallel to the mean magnetic field that can be significantly larger than the Dreicer electric field. This long wavelength electric fluctuation is capable of generating high frequency electron plasma oscillations and low frequency ion acoustic-like waves. The analysis has been performed using 1-1/2D Vlasov and PIC numerical simulations in which both electrons and ions are treated kinetically and self consistently. The simulation results indicate that high frequency electron plasma oscillations and low frequency ion acoustic-like waves are generated. The high frequency electron plasma oscillation drives electron plasma turbulence, which subsequently is damped out by the background electrons. The turbulence damping results in electron acceleration and the generation of non-Maxwellian suprathermal tails on time scales short compared to collisional damping. Bulk heating also occurs if the fluctuating parallel electric field is strong enough. This study suggests that finite amplitude, low frequency, obliquely propagating, electromagnetic waves can play a significant role in the acceleration and heating of the solar corona electrons and in the coupling of medium and small-scale phenomena.

  19. Physiological responses to low atmospheric pressure stunning and the implications for welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeegan, D E F; Sandercock, D A; Gerritzen, M A

    2013-04-01

    In low atmospheric pressure stunning (LAPS), poultry are rendered unconscious before slaughter by gradually reducing oxygen tension in the atmosphere to achieve a progressive anoxia. The effects of LAPS are not instantaneous, so there are legitimate welfare concerns around the experience of birds before loss of consciousness. Using self-contained telemetry logging units, high-quality continuous electroencephalogram (EEG) and electrocardiogram (EKG) recordings were obtained from 28 broiler chickens during exposure to LAPS in a commercial poultry processing plant. Application of LAPS was associated with changes in the EEG pattern in the form of increases in total power, decreases in mean frequency, and in particular, increases in slow-wave (delta) activity, indicating a gradual loss of consciousness. Increased delta wave activity was seen within 10 s of LAPS onset and consistently thereafter, peaking at 30 s into LAPS at which point the EEG signal shared characteristics with that of birds in a surgical plane of anesthesia. During LAPS, heart rate consistently decreased, with more pronounced bradycardia and arrhythmia observed after 30 s. No heart rate increases were observed in the period when the birds were potentially conscious. After an initial quiescent period, brief body movements (presumed to be ataxia/loss of posture) were seen on average at 39 s into the LAPS process. Later (after 120 s on average), artifacts related to clonic (wing flapping) and tonic (muscle spasms) convulsions were observed in the EKG recordings. Based on EEG analysis and body movement responses, a conservative estimate of time to loss of consciousness is approximately 40 s. The lack of behavioral responses indicating aversion or escape and absence of heart rate elevation in the conscious period strongly suggest that birds do not find LAPS induction distressing. Collectively, the results suggest that LAPS is a humane approach that has the potential to improve the welfare of poultry at

  20. The isotopic record of Northern Hemisphere atmospheric carbon monoxide since 1950: implications for the CO budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Wang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a 60-year record of the stable isotopes of atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO from firn air samples collected under the framework of the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM project. CO concentration, δ13C, and δ18O of CO were measured by gas chromatography/isotope ratio mass spectrometry (gc-IRMS from trapped gases in the firn. We applied LGGE-GIPSA firn air models (Witrant et al., 2011 to correlate gas age with firn air depth and then reconstructed the trend of atmospheric CO and its stable isotopic composition at high northern latitudes since 1950. The most probable firn air model scenarios show that δ13C decreased slightly from −25.8‰ in 1950 to −26.4‰ in 2000, then decreased more significantly to −27.2‰ in 2008. δ18O decreased more regularly from 9.8‰ in 1950 to 7.1‰ in 2008. Those same scenarios show CO concentration increased gradually from 1950 and peaked in the late 1970s, followed by a gradual decrease to present day values (Petrenko et al., 2012. Results from an isotope mass balance model indicate that a slight increase, followed by a large reduction, in CO derived from fossil fuel combustion has occurred since 1950. The reduction of CO emission from fossil fuel combustion after the mid-1970s is the most plausible mechanism for the drop of CO concentration during this time. Fossil fuel CO emissions decreased as a result of the implementation of catalytic converters and the relative growth of diesel engines, in spite of the global vehicle fleet size having grown several fold over the same time period.

  1. Flexible sample environment for high resolution neutron imaging at high temperatures in controlled atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Makowska, Malgorzata G.; Kuhn, Luise Theil; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen

    2015-01-01

    with any other technique. This paper presents a new sample environment for in situ high resolution neutron imaging experiments at temperatures from room temperature up to 1100 ◦C and/or using controllable flow of reactive atmospheres. The design also offers the possibility to directly combine imaging......High material penetration by neutrons allows for experiments using sophisticated sample environments providing complex conditions. Thus, neutron imaging holds potential for performing in situ nondestructive measurements on large samples or even full technological systems, which are not possible...

  2. High atmosphere-ocean exchange of semivolatile aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gaya, Belén; Fernández-Pinos, María-Carmen; Morales, Laura; Méjanelle, Laurence; Abad, Esteban; Piña, Benjamin; Duarte, Carlos M.; Jiménez, Begoña; Dachs, Jordi

    2016-06-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and other semivolatile aromatic-like compounds, are an important and ubiquitous fraction of organic matter in the environment. The occurrence of semivolatile aromatic hydrocarbons is due to anthropogenic sources such as incomplete combustion of fossil fuels or oil spills, and other biogenic sources. However, their global transport, fate and relevance for the carbon cycle have been poorly assessed, especially in terms of fluxes. Here we report a global assessment of the occurrence and atmosphere-ocean fluxes of 64 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons analysed in paired atmospheric and seawater samples from the tropical and subtropical Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans. The global atmospheric input of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the global ocean is estimated at 0.09 Tg per month, four times greater than the input from the Deepwater Horizon spill. Moreover, the environmental concentrations of total semivolatile aromatic-like compounds were 102-103 times higher than those of the targeted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, with a relevant contribution of an aromatic unresolved complex mixture. These concentrations drive a large global deposition of carbon, estimated at 400 Tg C yr-1, around 15% of the oceanic CO2 uptake.

  3. Physiological responses to low atmospheric pressure stunning and the implications for welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mckeegan, D.E.F.; Sandercock, D.A.; Gerritzen, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    In low atmospheric pressure stunning (LAPS), poultry are rendered unconscious before slaughter by gradually reducing oxygen tension in the atmosphere to achieve a progressive anoxia. The effects of LAPS are not instantaneous, so there are legitimate welfare concerns around the experience of birds

  4. On the structure of atmospheric warming in models and observations: Implications for the lapse rate feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Po-Chedley, Stephen D.

    indicate that the prescribed ozone and stratospheric aerosol forcings do not effect T24/TLT amplification in models. On the other hand, model parameterizations for convection and microphysics and, to a lesser degree, uncertainty in the prescribed SST dataset can influence model amplification behavior and bring models into closer accord with observations. In all, significant T24/TLT discrepancies between models and observations remain, but may be reduced with improved model parameterizations. An underlying motivation for understanding the structure of atmospheric warming is that it is responsible for a large negative lapse rate feedback in future climate simulations. To understand factors that control the global lapse rate feedback across models, we use principal component analysis to find the modes of variability that best explain variance in the local lapse rate feedback. We find that models exhibit marked variability in the lapse rate feedback in the southern hemisphere extratropics. This mode is strongly correlated with the global average lapse rate feedback and is largely a function of the competing influence of tropical and Antarctic surface warming. We show that muted southern ocean sea surface warming and the non-local influence of tropical surface warming contributes to a highly variable lapse rate feedback in the sub-Antarctic across models. This behavior is dissimilar to northern hemisphere high latitudes, which are characterized by strong Arctic amplification and a relatively uniform local lapse rate feedback across GCMs. Climatological Antarctic sea ice extent influences Antarctic warming and, as a result, influences both the meridional profile of warming in the southern hemisphere and the global lapse rate feedback.

  5. CELESTE: an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope for high energy gamma astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pare, E.; Balauge, B.; Bazer-Bachi, R.; Bergeret, H.; Berny, F.; Briand, N.; Bruel, P.; Cerutti, M.; Collon, J.; Cordier, A.; Cornebise, P.; Debiais, G.; Dezalay, J.-P.; Dumora, D.; Durand, E.; Eschstruth, P.; Espigat, P.; Fabre, B.; Fleury, P.; Gilly, J.; Gouillaud, J.-C.; Gregory, C.; Herault, N.; Holder, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Incerti, S.; Jouenne, A.; Kalt, L.; LeGallou, R.; Lott, B.; Lodygensky, O.; Manigot, P.; Manseri, H.; Manitaz, H.; Martin, M.; Morano, R.; Morineaud, G.; Muenz, F.; Musquere, A.; Naurois, M. de; Neveu, J.; Noppe, J.-M.; Olive, J.-F.; Palatka, M.; Perez, A.; Quebert, J.; Rebii, A.; Reposeur, T. E-mail: reposeur@in2p3.fr; Rob, L.; Roy, P.; Sans, J.-L.; Sako, T.; Schovanek, P.; Smith, D.A.; Snabre, P.; Villard, G

    2002-09-01

    CELESTE is an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope based on the sampling method which makes use of the de-commissioned THEMIS solar electrical plant in the French Pyrenees. A large (2000 m{sup 2}) mirror surface area from 40 independent heliostats followed by a secondary optic, a trigger system using analog summing techniques and signal digitization with 1 GHz flash ADCs make possible the detection of cosmic {gamma}-rays down to 30 GeV. This paper provides a detailed technical description of the CELESTE installation.

  6. Atmospheric Mercury in the Barnett Shale Area, Texas: Implications for Emissions from Oil and Gas Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xin; Talbot, Robert; Laine, Patrick; Torres, Azucena; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric mercury emissions in the Barnett Shale area were studied by employing both stationary measurements and mobile laboratory surveys. Stationary measurements near the Engle Mountain Lake showed that the median mixing ratio of total gaseous mercury (THg) was 138 ppqv (140 ± 29 ppqv for mean ± S.D.) during the June 2011 study period. A distinct diurnal variation pattern was observed in which the highest THg levels appeared near midnight, followed by a monotonic decrease until midafternoon. The influence of oil and gas (ONG) emissions was substantial in this area, as inferred from the i-pentane/n-pentane ratio (1.17). However, few THg plumes were captured by our mobile laboratory during a ∼3700 km survey with detailed downwind measurements from 50 ONG facilities. One compressor station and one natural gas condensate processing facility were found to have significant THg emissions, with maximum THg levels of 963 and 392 ppqv, respectively, and the emissions rates were estimated to be 7.9 kg/yr and 0.3 kg/yr, respectively. Our results suggest that the majority of ONG facilities in this area are not significant sources of THg; however, it is highly likely that a small number of these facilities contribute a relatively large amount of emissions in the ONG sector.

  7. Atmospheric Feedback of Urban Boundary Layer with Implications for Climate Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Marissa S; Keener, Timothy C

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric structure changes in response to the urban form, land use, and the type of land cover (LULC). This interaction controls thermal and air pollutant transport and distribution. The interrelationships among LULC, ambient temperature, and air quality were analyzed and found to be significant in a case study in Cincinnati, Ohio, U.S.A. Within the urban canopy layer (UCL), traffic-origin PM2.5 and black carbon followed Gaussian dispersion in the near road area in the daytime, while higher concentrations, over 1 order of magnitude, were correlated to the lapse rate under nocturnal inversions. In the overlying urban boundary layer (UBL), ambient temperature and PM2.5 variations were correlated among urban-wide locations indicating effective thermal and mass communications. Beyond the spatial correlation, LULC-related local urban heat island effects are noteworthy. The high-density urbanized zone along a narrow highway-following corridor is marked by higher nighttime temperature by ∼1.6 °C with a long-term increase by 2.0 °C/decade, and by a higher PM2.5 concentration, than in the low-density residential LULC. These results indicate that the urban LULC may have contributed to the nocturnal thermal inversion affecting urban air circulation and air quality in UCL and UBL. Such relationships point to the potentials of climate adaptation through urban planning.

  8. Atmospheric escape from the TRAPPIST-1 planets and implications for habitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chuanfei; Jin, Meng; Lingam, Manasvi; Airapetian, Vladimir S; Ma, Yingjuan; van der Holst, Bart

    2018-01-09

    The presence of an atmosphere over sufficiently long timescales is widely perceived as one of the most prominent criteria associated with planetary surface habitability. We address the crucial question of whether the seven Earth-sized planets transiting the recently discovered ultracool dwarf star TRAPPIST-1 are capable of retaining their atmospheres. To this effect, we carry out numerical simulations to characterize the stellar wind of TRAPPIST-1 and the atmospheric ion escape rates for all of the seven planets. We also estimate the escape rates analytically and demonstrate that they are in good agreement with the numerical results. We conclude that the outer planets of the TRAPPIST-1 system are capable of retaining their atmospheres over billion-year timescales. The consequences arising from our results are also explored in the context of abiogenesis, biodiversity, and searches for future exoplanets. In light of the many unknowns and assumptions involved, we recommend that these conclusions must be interpreted with due caution.

  9. Fate of Chloromethanes in the Atmospheric Environment: Implications for Human Health, Ozone Formation and Depletion, and Global Warming Impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Tien

    2017-09-21

    Among the halogenated hydrocarbons, chloromethanes (i.e., methyl chloride, CH₃Cl; methylene chloride, CH₂Cl₂; chloroform, CHCl₃; and carbon tetrachloride, CCl₄) play a vital role due to their extensive uses as solvents and chemical intermediates. This article aims to review their main chemical/physical properties and commercial/industrial uses, as well as the environment and health hazards posed by them and their toxic decomposition products. The environmental properties (including atmospheric lifetime, radiative efficiency, ozone depletion potential, global warming potential, photochemical ozone creation potential, and surface mixing ratio) of these chlorinated methanes are also reviewed. In addition, this paper further discusses their atmospheric fates and human health implications because they are apt to reside in the lower atmosphere when released into the environment. According to the atmospheric degradation mechanism, their toxic degradation products in the troposphere include hydrogen chloride (HCl), carbon monoxide (CO), chlorine (Cl₂), formyl chloride (HCOCl), carbonyl chloride (COCl₂), and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂). Among them, COCl₂ (also called phosgene) is a powerful irritating gas, which is easily hydrolyzed or thermally decomposed to form hydrogen chloride.

  10. Helium 584 Å and H Lyman-α Airglow in Giant Planetary Atmospheres: Modeling, Observations, and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Christopher; Esposito, Larry W.

    2016-07-01

    The atmosphere of the outer planets is mainly composed of H2 and neutral atomic helium. The study of He 584 Å and H Lyman-α brightnesses is interesting as the EUV and FUV (Extreme and Far Ultraviolet) planetary airglow have the potential to yield useful information about mixing and other important parameters in their thermospheres. Time variation, asymmetries, and polar enhancement of the airglow are also possible and analysis of the public archived NASA mission data sets (i.e. Voyager and Cassini) can help solve some of the outstanding problems associated with these phenomena. The comparison of observations with results from sophisticated photochemical and radiative transfer models can also help ameliorate unexplained differences in the dynamical processes operating within planetary upper atmospheres. Powerful analysis techniques allow us to extract information on atmospheric mixing, temperatures, and temporal changes due to the solar and seasonal cycles from the variations in distribution and intensity of airglow emissions that result. The presentation will discuss the implications of interpretations from comparison of modeling and observations in giant planetary atmospheres.

  11. High-resolution numerical simulation of Venus atmosphere by AFES (Atmospheric general circulation model For the Earth Simulator)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Norihiko; AFES project Team

    2016-10-01

    We have developed an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) for Venus on the basis of AFES (AGCM For the Earth Simulator) and performed a high-resolution simulation (e.g., Sugimoto et al., 2014a). The highest resolution is T639L120; 1920 times 960 horizontal grids (grid intervals are about 20 km) with 120 vertical layers (layer intervals are about 1 km). In the model, the atmosphere is dry and forced by the solar heating with the diurnal and semi-diurnal components. The infrared radiative process is simplified by adopting Newtonian cooling approximation. The temperature is relaxed to a prescribed horizontally uniform temperature distribution, in which a layer with almost neutral static stability observed in the Venus atmosphere presents. A fast zonal wind in a solid-body rotation is given as the initial state.Starting from this idealized superrotation, the model atmosphere reaches a quasi-equilibrium state within 1 Earth year and this state is stably maintained for more than 10 Earth years. The zonal-mean zonal flow with weak midlatitude jets has almost constant velocity of 120 m/s in latitudes between 45°S and 45°N at the cloud top levels, which agrees very well with observations. In the cloud layer, baroclinic waves develop continuously at midlatitudes and generate Rossby-type waves at the cloud top (Sugimoto et al., 2014b). At the polar region, warm polar vortex surrounded by a cold latitude band (cold collar) is well reproduced (Ando et al., 2016). As for horizontal kinetic energy spectra, divergent component is broadly (k > 10) larger than rotational component compared with that on Earth (Kashimura et al., in preparation). We will show recent results of the high-resolution run, e.g., small-scale gravity waves attributed to large-scale thermal tides. Sugimoto, N. et al. (2014a), Baroclinic modes in the Venus atmosphere simulated by GCM, Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, Vol. 119, p1950-1968.Sugimoto, N. et al. (2014b), Waves in a Venus general

  12. Long-term decline of global atmospheric ethane concentrations and implications for methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Isobel J; Sulbaek Andersen, Mads P; Meinardi, Simone; Bruhwiler, Lori; Blake, Nicola J; Helmig, Detlev; Rowland, F Sherwood; Blake, Donald R

    2012-08-23

    After methane, ethane is the most abundant hydrocarbon in the remote atmosphere. It is a precursor to tropospheric ozone and it influences the atmosphere's oxidative capacity through its reaction with the hydroxyl radical, ethane's primary atmospheric sink. Here we present the longest continuous record of global atmospheric ethane levels. We show that global ethane emission rates decreased from 14.3 to 11.3 teragrams per year, or by 21 per cent, from 1984 to 2010. We attribute this to decreasing fugitive emissions from ethane's fossil fuel source--most probably decreased venting and flaring of natural gas in oil fields--rather than a decline in its other major sources, biofuel use and biomass burning. Ethane's major emission sources are shared with methane, and recent studies have disagreed on whether reduced fossil fuel or microbial emissions have caused methane's atmospheric growth rate to slow. Our findings suggest that reduced fugitive fossil fuel emissions account for at least 10-21 teragrams per year (30-70 per cent) of the decrease in methane's global emissions, significantly contributing to methane's slowing atmospheric growth rate since the mid-1980s.

  13. High-Resolution Views of the Solar Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vourlidas, A.; Korendyke, C.

    2003-05-01

    The study of many of the outstanding phenomena of the solar atmosphere (coronal heating, flares and coronal mass ejection) has persistently shown that observations of physical processes at ever smaller scales are needed for their understanding. Here I report on the results from the latest NRL sounding rocket payload, the Very Advanced ULtraviolet Telescope (VAULT). In two successful flights, the instrument achieved 0.33 arcsecond resolution, the highest ever from a space platform. VAULT obtained spectrally pure images of the upper chromosphere/lower transition region in the Lya line (1216A). A number of space-borne and ground-based obsrvatories supported the VAULT flights. The first results from the analysis of these datasets will be presented.

  14. Turbulent exchange of energy, momentum, and reactive gases between high vegetation and the atmospheric boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shapkalijevski, M.M.

    2017-01-01

    This thesis deals with the representation of the exchange of energy, momentum and chemically reactive compounds between the land, covered by high vegetation, and the lowest part of the atmosphere, named as atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The study presented in this thesis introduces the roughness

  15. Using high-frequency sampling to detect effects of atmospheric pollutants on stream chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen D. Sebestyen; James B. Shanley; Elizabeth W. Boyer

    2009-01-01

    We combined information from long-term (weekly over many years) and short-term (high-frequency during rainfall and snowmelt events) stream water sampling efforts to understand how atmospheric deposition affects stream chemistry. Water samples were collected at the Sleepers River Research Watershed, VT, a temperate upland forest site that receives elevated atmospheric...

  16. A secular carbon debt from atmospheric high temperature combustion of stem wood?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czeskleba-Dupont, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Basically, combustion of woody biomass in high temperature processes that react with atmospheric air results in a long lasting addition of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. When harvesting large extra amounts of stem tree for energetic use, a global as well as secular time frame is needed to assess...

  17. Spatial Patterns of Atmospherically Deposited Organic Contaminants at High Elevation in the Southern Sierra Nevada Mountains, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmospherically deposited contaminants in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California have been implicated as a factor adversely affecting biological resources such as amphibians and fish, yet the distributions of contaminants within the mountains are poorly known, particularly at...

  18. Response of an aerosol mass spectrometer to organonitrates and organosulfates and implications for atmospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, D. K.; Matsunaga, A.; Docherty, K. S.; Surratt, J. D.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Ziemann, P. J.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    Organonitrates (ON) are important products of gas-phase oxidation of volatile organic compounds in the troposphere; some models predict, and laboratory studies show, the formation of large, multifunctional ON with vapor pressures low enough to partition to the particle phase. Organosulfates (OS) have also been recently detected in secondary organic aerosol. Despite their potential importance, ON and OS remain a nearly unexplored aspect of atmospheric chemistry because few studies have quantified particulate ON or OS in ambient air. We report the response of a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) to aerosol ON and OS standards and mixtures. We quantify the potentially substantial underestimation of organic aerosol O/C, commonly used as a metric for aging, and N/C. Most of the ON-nitrogen appears as ions in the AMS, which are typically dominated by inorganic nitrate. Minor organonitrogen ions are observed although their identity and intensity vary between standards. We evaluate the potential for using fragment ratios, organonitrogen ions, ions, the ammonium balance of the nominally inorganic ions, and comparison to ion-chromatography instruments to constrain the concentrations of ON for ambient datasets, and apply these techniques to a field study in Riverside, CA. OS manifests as separate organic and sulfate components in the AMS with minimal organosulfur fragments and little difference in fragmentation from inorganic sulfate. The low thermal stability of ON and OS likely causes similar detection difficulties for other aerosol mass spectrometers using vaporization and/or ionization techniques with similar or larger energy, which has likely led to an underappreciation of these species. PMID:20194777

  19. High altitude atmospheric discharges according to the runaway air breakdown mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symbalisty, E.; Roussel-Dupre, R.; Yukhimuk, V.; Taranenko, Y.

    1997-04-01

    High altitude optical transients - red sprites, blue jets, and elves - are modeled in the context of the relativistic electron runaway air breakdown mechanism. These emissions are usually associated with large mesoscale convective systems (hereafter MCS). In thunderstorms cloud electrification proceeds over a time scale long enough to permit the conducting atmosphere above the cloud to polarize and short out the thunderstorm electric field. When a lightning strike rapidly neutralizes a cloud charge layer runaway driving fields can develop in the stratosphere and mesosphere. According to present simulations of the full runaway process the variety of observed optical emissions are due to the nature of the normal lightning event in the MCS that kick starts the runaway avalanche. In this paper the authors describe some details of the model, present the results of the evolution of the primary electron population, and summarize the initial conditions necessary for different types of discharges. Two companion papers present (a) the predicted optical, gamma ray, and radio emissions caused by these electrical discharges, and (b) the time evolution of the secondary electron population and its implications in terms of observables.

  20. Kinetic Theory of Meteor Plasma in the Earth's atmosphere: Implications for Radar Head Echo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimant, Y. S.; Oppenheim, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    Every second millions of tiny meteoroids hit the Earth from space, vast majority too small to be observed visually. However, radars detect the plasma they generate and use the collected data to characterize the incoming meteoroids and the atmosphere in which they disintegrate. This diagnostics requires a detailed quantitative understanding of formation of the meteor plasma and how it interacts with the Earth's atmosphere. Fast-descending meteoroids become detectable to radars after they heat due to collisions with atmospheric molecules sufficiently and start ablating. The ablated material then collides into atmospheric molecules and forms plasma around the meteoroid. Reflection of radar pulses from this plasma produces a localized signal called a head echo often accompanied by a much longer non-specular trail (see the Figure). Using first principles, we have developed a consistent collisional kinetic theory of the near-meteoroid plasma responsible for the radar head echo. This theory produces analytic expressions describing the ion and neutral velocity distributions along with the detailed 3-D spatial structure of the near-meteoroid plasma. These expressions predict a number of unexpected features such as shell-like velocity distributions. This theory shows that the meteoroid plasma develops over a length-scale close to the ion mean free path with a strongly non-Maxwellian velocity distribution. The spatial distribution of the plasma density shows significant deviations from a Gaussian law usually employed in head-echo modeling. This analytical model will serve as a basis for a more accurate quantitative interpretation of radar measurements, estimates of the ionization efficiency, and should help calculate meteoroid and atmosphere parameters from radar head-echo observations. This theory could also help clarify the physical nature of electromagnetic pulses observed during recent meteor showers and associated with the passage of fast-moving meteors through the

  1. Improving the Ginkgo CO2 barometer: Implications for the early Cenozoic atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Richard S.; Wing, Scott L.

    2016-04-01

    Stomatal properties of fossil Ginkgo have been used widely to infer the atmospheric concentration of CO2 in the geological past (paleo-pCO2). Many of these estimates of paleo-pCO2 have relied on the inverse correlation between pCO2 and stomatal index (SI - the proportion of epidermal cells that are stomata) observed in recent Ginkgo biloba, and therefore depend on the accuracy of this relationship. The SI - pCO2 relationship in G. biloba has not been well documented, however. Here we present new measurements of SI for leaves of G. biloba that grew under pCO2 from 290 to 430 ppm. We prepared and imaged all specimens using a consistent procedure and photo-documented each count. As in prior studies, we found a significant inverse relationship between SI and pCO2, however, the relationship is more linear, has a shallower slope, and a lower correlation coefficient than previously reported. We examined leaves of G. biloba grown under pCO2 of 1500 ppm, but found they had highly variable SI and a large proportion of malformed stomata. We also measured stomatal dimensions, stomatal density, and the carbon isotope composition of G. biloba leaves in order to test a mechanistic model for inferring pCO2. This model overestimated observed pCO2, performing less well than the SI method between 290 and 430 ppm. We used our revised SI-pCO2 response curve, and new observations of selected fossils, to estimate late Cretaceous and Cenozoic pCO2 from fossil Ginkgo adiantoides. All but one of the new estimates is below 800 ppm, and together they show little long-term change in pCO2 or relation to global temperature. The low Paleogene pCO2 levels indicated by the Ginkgo SI proxy are not consistent with the high pCO2 inferred by some climate and carbon cycle models. We cannot currently resolve the discrepancy, but greater agreement between proxy data and models may come from a better understanding of the stomatal response of G. biloba to elevated pCO2, better counts and measurements of

  2. Anoxic atmospheres on Mars driven by volcanism: Implications for past environments and life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholes, Steven F.; Smith, Megan L.; Claire, Mark W.; Zahnle, Kevin J.; Catling, David C.

    2017-07-01

    Mars today has no active volcanism and its atmosphere is oxidizing, dominated by the photochemistry of CO2 and H2O. Mars experienced widespread volcanism in the past and volcanic emissions should have included reducing gases, such as H2 and CO, as well as sulfur-bearing gases. Using a one-dimensional photochemical model, we consider whether plausible volcanic gas fluxes could have switched the redox-state of the past martian atmosphere to reducing conditions. In our model, the total quantity and proportions of volcanic gases depend on the water content, outgassing pressure, and oxygen fugacity of the source melt. We find that, with reasonable melt parameters, the past martian atmosphere (∼3.5 Gyr to present) could have easily reached reducing and anoxic conditions with modest levels of volcanism, >0.14 km3 yr-1, which are well within the range of estimates from thermal evolution models or photogeological studies. Counter-intuitively we also find that more reducing melts with lower oxygen fugacity require greater amounts of volcanism to switch a paleo-atmosphere from oxidizing to reducing. The reason is that sulfur is more stable in such melts and lower absolute fluxes of sulfur-bearing gases more than compensate for increases in the proportions of H2 and CO. These results imply that ancient Mars should have experienced periods with anoxic and reducing atmospheres even through the mid-Amazonian whenever volcanic outgassing was sustained at sufficient levels. Reducing anoxic conditions are potentially conducive to the synthesis of prebiotic organic compounds, such as amino acids, and are therefore relevant to the possibility of life on Mars. Also, anoxic reducing conditions should have influenced the type of minerals that were formed on the surface or deposited from the atmosphere. We suggest looking for elemental polysulfur (S8) as a signature of past reducing atmospheres. Finally, our models allow us to estimate the amount of volcanically sourced atmospheric

  3. Isotopic composition of nitrogen - Implications for the past history of Mars' atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcelroy, M. B.; Yung, Y. L.; Nier, A. O.

    1976-01-01

    Models are presented for the past history of nitrogen on Mars, based on Viking measurements showing that the atmosphere is enriched in N-15. The enrichment is attributed to selective escape, with fast atoms formed in the exosphere by electron impact dissociation of N2 and by dissociative recombination of N2(+). The initial partial pressure of N2 should have been at least as large as several millibars and could have been as large as 30 millibars if surface processes were to represent an important sink for atmospheric HNO2 and HNO3.

  4. Scaling Characteristics of Mesoscale Wind Fields in the Lower Atmospheric Boundary Layer: Implications for Wind Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliyanpilakkil, Velayudhan Praju

    Atmospheric motions take place in spatial scales of sub-millimeters to few thousands of kilometers with temporal changes in the atmospheric variables occur in fractions of seconds to several years. Consequently, the variations in atmospheric kinetic energy associated with these atmospheric motions span over a broad spectrum of space and time. The mesoscale region acts as an energy transferring regime between the energy generating synoptic scale and the energy dissipating microscale. Therefore, the scaling characterizations of mesoscale wind fields are significant in the accurate estimation of the atmospheric energy budget. Moreover, the precise knowledge of the scaling characteristics of atmospheric mesoscale wind fields is important for the validation of the numerical models those focus on wind forecasting, dispersion, diffusion, horizontal transport, and optical turbulence. For these reasons, extensive studies have been conducted in the past to characterize the mesoscale wind fields. Nevertheless, the majority of these studies focused on near-surface and upper atmosphere mesoscale regimes. The present study attempt to identify the existence and to quantify the scaling of mesoscale wind fields in the lower atmospheric boundary layer (ABL; in the wind turbine layer) using wind observations from various research-grade instruments (e.g., sodars, anemometers). The scaling characteristics of the mesoscale wind speeds over diverse homogeneous flat terrains, conducted using structure function based analysis, revealed an altitudinal dependence of the scaling exponents. This altitudinal dependence of the wind speed scaling may be attributed to the buoyancy forcing. Subsequently, we use the framework of extended self-similarity (ESS) to characterize the observed scaling behavior. In the ESS framework, the relative scaling exponents of the mesoscale atmospheric boundary layer wind speed exhibit quasi-universal behavior; even far beyond the inertial range of turbulence (Delta

  5. High resolution transmission spectroscopy as a diagnostic for Jovian exoplanet atmospheres: constraints from theoretical models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kempton, Eliza M.-R. [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112 (United States); Perna, Rosalba [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Heng, Kevin, E-mail: kemptone@grinnell.edu [University of Bern, Center for Space and Habitability, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-11-01

    We present high resolution transmission spectra of giant planet atmospheres from a coupled three-dimensional (3D) atmospheric dynamics and transmission spectrum model that includes Doppler shifts which arise from winds and planetary motion. We model Jovian planets covering more than two orders of magnitude in incident flux, corresponding to planets with 0.9-55 day orbital periods around solar-type stars. The results of our 3D dynamical models reveal certain aspects of high resolution transmission spectra that are not present in simple one-dimensional (1D) models. We find that the hottest planets experience strong substellar to anti-stellar (SSAS) winds, resulting in transmission spectra with net blueshifts of up to 3 km s{sup –1}, whereas less irradiated planets show almost no net Doppler shifts. We find only minor differences between transmission spectra for atmospheres with temperature inversions and those without. Compared to 1D models, peak line strengths are significantly reduced for the hottest atmospheres owing to Doppler broadening from a combination of rotation (which is faster for close-in planets under the assumption of tidal locking) and atmospheric winds. Finally, high resolution transmission spectra may be useful in studying the atmospheres of exoplanets with optically thick clouds since line cores for very strong transitions should remain optically thick to very high altitude. High resolution transmission spectra are an excellent observational test for the validity of 3D atmospheric dynamics models, because they provide a direct probe of wind structures and heat circulation. Ground-based exoplanet spectroscopy is currently on the verge of being able to verify some of our modeling predictions, most notably the dependence of SSAS winds on insolation. We caution that interpretation of high resolution transmission spectra based on 1D atmospheric models may be inadequate, as 3D atmospheric motions can produce a noticeable effect on the absorption

  6. Modeling of High-Pressure Turbulent Multi-Species Mixing Applicable to the Venus Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellan, J.

    2017-11-01

    A comprehensive theory of high-pressure multi-species mixing is presented and salient results pertinent to the Venus atmosphere are discussed. The influence of the insights obtained from these results on Venus exploration are addressed.

  7. Rising global atmospheric CO2 concentration and implications for crop productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is incontestable evidence that the concentration of atmospheric CO2 is increasing. Regardless of the potential impact of this increase on climate change, CO2 will have a direct effect on plants since it is a primary input for growth. Herein, we discuss relative CO2 responses of C3 and C4 plant...

  8. Atmospheric Delay Reduction Using KARAT for GPS Analysis and Implications for VLBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Hobiger, Thomas; Koyama, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Tetsuro

    2010-01-01

    We have been developing a state-of-the-art tool to estimate the atmospheric path delays by raytracing through mesoscale analysis (MANAL) data, which is operationally used for numerical weather prediction by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). The tools, which we have named KAshima RAytracing Tools (KARAT)', are capable of calculating total slant delays and ray-bending angles considering real atmospheric phenomena. The KARAT can estimate atmospheric slant delays by an analytical 2-D ray-propagation model by Thayer and a 3-D Eikonal solver. We compared PPP solutions using KARAT with that using the Global Mapping Function (GMF) and Vienna Mapping Function 1 (VMF1) for GPS sites of the GEONET (GPS Earth Observation Network System) operated by Geographical Survey Institute (GSI). In our comparison 57 stations of GEONET during the year of 2008 were processed. The KARAT solutions are slightly better than the solutions using VMF1 and GMF with linear gradient model for horizontal and height positions. Our results imply that KARAT is a useful tool for an efficient reduction of atmospheric path delays in radio-based space geodetic techniques such as GNSS and VLBI.

  9. High pressure gas laser technology for atmospheric remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javan, A.

    1980-01-01

    The development of a fixed frequency chirp-free and highly stable intense pulsed laser made for Doppler wind velocity measurements with accurate ranging is described. Energy extraction from a high pressure CO2 laser at a tunable single mode frequency is also examined.

  10. The oleic acid-ozone heterogeneous reaction system: products, kinetics, secondary chemistry, and atmospheric implications of a model system – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zahardis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The heterogeneous processing of organic aerosols by trace oxidants has many implications to atmospheric chemistry and climate regulation. This review covers a model heterogeneous reaction system (HRS: the oleic acid-ozone HRS and other reaction systems featuring fatty acids, and their derivatives. The analysis of the commonly observed aldehyde and organic acid products of ozonolysis (azelaic acid, nonanoic acid, 9-oxononanoic acid, nonanal is described. The relative product yields are noted and explained by the observation of secondary chemical reactions. The secondary reaction products arising from reactive Criegee intermediates are mainly peroxidic, notably secondary ozonides and α-acyloxyalkyl hydroperoxide oligomers and polymers, and their formation is in accord with solution and liquid-phase ozonolysis. These highly oxygenated products are of low volatility and hydrophilic which may enhance the ability of particles to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN. The kinetic description of this HRS is critically reviewed. Most kinetic studies suggest this oxidative processing is either a near surface reaction that is limited by the diffusion of ozone or a surface based reaction. Internally mixed particles and coatings represent the next stage in the progression towards more realistic proxies of tropospheric organic aerosols and a description of the products and the kinetics resulting from the ozonolysis of these proxies, which are based on fatty acids or their derivatives, is presented. Finally, the main atmospheric implications of oxidative processing of particulate containing fatty acids are presented. These implications include the extended lifetime of unsaturated species in the troposphere facilitated by the presence of solids, semi-solids or viscous phases, and an enhanced rate of ozone uptake by particulate unsaturates compared to corresponding gas-phase organics. Ozonolysis of oleic acid enhances its CCN activity, which implies that

  11. Atmosphere-Surface Exchange of Reactive Nitrogen and its Implications for PM2.5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentworth, G.; Murphy, J. G.; Gregoire, P.; Tevlin, A.; Hems, R.; Cheyne, C.

    2012-12-01

    Recently it has been suggested that the surface-atmosphere exchange of both ammonia (NH3) and nitrous acid (HONO) can occur in a bidirectional fashion governed by a compensation point (i.e. the atmospheric mixing ratio where the flux changes direction). The compensation point corresponds to the gas phase mixing ratio that is in equilibrium with the dissolved constituents at the surface (soil water, plant tissue), governed by solubility and acid dissociation constants. Direct calculation of compensation point values is not trivial, because of the dependence on soil temperature, moisture, pH and the nitrogen distribution in the system. The presence of atmospheric particulate matter can further influence surface flux by providing a reactive sink for trace gases in the atmosphere. An accurate understanding of the factors governing bidirectional flux is required in order for air quality models to accurately predict trace gas mixing ratios, aerosol composition and spatial patterns of nitrogen deposition. A field study was conducted in southwestern Ontario during the summer of 2012 to measure the atmospheric and surface components of the system to provide observational constraints to test our understanding of the bi-directional exchange of reactive nitrogen. An Ambient Ion Monitor Ion Chromatograph (AIM-IC) was used to quantify the water-soluble trace gases (NH3, SO2, HNO3, HCl, and HONO) as well as water-soluble ions in PM2.5 with hourly time resolution. The same IC methods were used in an offline fashion to monitor soil ammonium, nitrite and nitrate composition. Challenges in selecting sampling and extraction protocols that can provide representative soil pH and nitrogen content are discussed.

  12. Surface/bulk partitioning and acid/base speciation of aqueous decanoate: direct observations and atmospheric implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. L. Prisle

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Dilute aqueous solutions of the atmospheric organic surfactant sodium decanoate have been studied using surface sensitive X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy combined with synchrotron radiation. We studied the decanoate/decanoic acid speciation and preferential adsorption at the vapor–liquid interface, and the responses to mixing in solution with some of the most common atmospheric inorganic ions, Na+, NH4+, Cl, and SO42−. We observe little or no influence of Na+, Cl, or SO42− ions, on neither the relative speciation nor the individual adsorption properties of decanoate and decanoic acid. In particular, no significant salting-out effect due to common Na+ cations of the organic and inorganic salts was observed for these solutions. On the other hand, mixing with NH4+ cations resulted in a pronounced surface enhancement of decanoic acid, which is attributed to surface specific acid–base chemistry. These changes in surface/bulk partitioning and surface speciation may significantly affect properties of aqueous droplets containing decanoate/decanoic acid, and potential implications for several processes critical to the climate effects of atmospheric aerosols are discussed.

  13. Atmospheric oxygen levels affect mudskipper terrestrial performance: implications for early tetrapods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jew, Corey J; Wegner, Nicholas C; Yanagitsuru, Yuzo; Tresguerres, Martin; Graham, Jeffrey B

    2013-08-01

    The Japanese mudskipper (Periophthalmus modestus), an amphibious fish that possesses many respiratory and locomotive specializations for sojourns onto land, was used as a model to study how changing atmospheric oxygen concentrations during the middle and late Paleozoic Era (400-250 million years ago) may have influenced the emergence and subsequent radiation of the first tetrapods. The effects of different atmospheric oxygen concentrations (hyperoxia = 35%, normoxia = 21%, and hypoxia = 7% O2) on terrestrial performance were tested during exercise on a terrestrial treadmill and during recovery from exhaustive exercise. Endurance and elevated post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC; the immediate O2 debt repaid post-exercise) correlated with atmospheric oxygen concentration indicating that when additional oxygen is available P. modestus can increase oxygen utilization both during and following exercise. The time required post-exercise for mudskippers to return to a resting metabolic rate did not differ between treatments. However, in normoxia, oxygen consumption increased above hyperoxic values 13-20 h post-exercise suggesting a delayed repayment of the incurred oxygen debt. Finally, following exercise, ventilatory movements associated with buccopharyngeal aerial respiration returned to their rest-like pattern more quickly at higher concentrations of oxygen. Taken together, the results of this study show that P. modestus can exercise longer and recover quicker under higher oxygen concentrations. Similarities between P. modestus and early tetrapods suggest that increasing atmospheric oxygen levels during the middle and late Paleozoic allowed for elevated aerobic capacity and improved terrestrial performance, and likely led to an accelerated diversification and expansion of vertebrate life into the terrestrial biosphere.

  14. Visualization of Projectile Flying at High Speed in Dusty Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Chihiro; Watanabe, Yasumasa; Suzuki, Kojiro

    2017-10-01

    Considering a spacecraft that encounters particle-laden environment, such as dust particles flying up over the regolith by the jet of the landing thruster, high-speed flight of a projectile in such environment was experimentally simulated by using the ballistic range. At high-speed collision of particles on the projectile surface, they may be reflected with cracking into smaller pieces. On the other hand, the projectile surface will be damaged by the collision. To obtain the fundamental characteristics of such complicated phenomena, a projectile was launched at the velocity up to 400 m/s and the collective behaviour of particles around projectile was observed by the high-speed camera. To eliminate the effect of the gas-particle interaction and to focus on only the effect of the interaction between the particles and the projectile's surface, the test chamber pressure was evacuated down to 30 Pa. The particles about 400μm diameter were scattered and formed a sheet of particles in the test chamber by using two-dimensional funnel with a narrow slit. The projectile was launched into the particle sheet in the tangential direction, and the high-speed camera captured both projectile and particle motions. From the movie, the interaction between the projectile and particle sheet was clarified.

  15. Enhanced terrestrial carbon uptake: global drivers and implications for the growth rate of atmospheric CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Trevor F.; Prentice, Colin; Canadell, Josep; Williams, Christopher; Han, Wang; Riley, William; Zhu, Qing; Koven, Charlie; Chambers, Jeff

    2017-04-01

    In this presentation we will focus on using decadal changes in the global carbon cycle to better understand how ecosystems respond to changes in CO2 concentration, temperature, and water and nutrient availability. Using global carbon budget estimates, ground, atmospheric and satellite observations, and multiple process-based global vegetation models, we examine the causes and consequences of the long-term changes in the terrestrial carbon sink. We show that over the past century the sink has been greatly enhanced, largely due to the effect of elevated CO2 on photosynthesis dominating over warming induced increases in respiration. We also examine the relative roles of greening, water and nutrients, along with individual events such as El Nino. We show that a slowdown in the rate of warming over land since the start of the 21st century likely led to a large increase in the sink, and that this increase was sufficient to lead to a pause in the growth rate of atmospheric CO2. We also show that the recent El Nino resulted in the highest growth rate of atmospheric CO2 ever recorded. Our results provide evidence of the relative roles of CO2 fertilization and warming induced respiration in the global carbon cycle, along with an examination of the impact of climate extremes.

  16. Internal Gravity Wave Activity Hotspot and Implications for the Middle Atmospheric Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacha, Petr; Pisoft, Petr; Lilienthal, Friederike; Jacobi, Christoph

    2015-11-01

    Internal gravity waves are widely recognized to contribute significantly to the energy and angular momentum transport. They play a significant role in affecting many of the middle atmospheric phenomena (like the QBO or Brewer-Dobson circulation). Using GPS RO density profiles, we have discovered a localized area of enhanced IGW activity and breaking in the lower stratosphere of Eastern Asia/North-western Pacific region.With a 3D primitive equation model of the middle atmosphere we studied the effects of such a localized breaking region on large-scale dynamics and transport. Possible forcing and propagation directions of planetary waves caused by such a localized IGW forcing were investigated and consequences for the polar vortex stability and stratosphere-troposphere exchange in the tropical region were discussed.Finally, applying 3D EP flux and 3D residual circulation diagnostics, we investigated the possible role of this area in the longitudinal variability of the Brewer- Dobson circulation with a hypothesis of its enhanced downwelling branch in this region. In the proces, model results were compared with the ozone and tracer distribution data from GOME, GOMOS, MIPAS and SCIAMACHY further confirming the importance of the Eastern Asia/North-western Pacific region for middle atmospheric dynamics.

  17. The Implications of 3D Thermal Structure on 1D Atmospheric Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blecic, Jasmina; Dobbs-Dixon, Ian; Greene, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Using the atmospheric structure from a 3D global radiation-hydrodynamic simulation of HD 189733b and the open-source Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (BART) code, we investigate the difference between the secondary-eclipse temperature structure produced with a 3D simulation and the best-fit 1D retrieved model. Synthetic data are generated by integrating the 3D models over the Spitzer, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and the James Web Space Telescope (JWST) bandpasses, covering the wavelength range between 1 and 11 μm where most spectroscopically active species have pronounced features. Using the data from different observing instruments, we present detailed comparisons between the temperature-pressure profiles recovered by BART and those from the 3D simulations. We calculate several averages of the 3D thermal structure and explore which particular thermal profile matches the retrieved temperature structure. We implement two temperature parameterizations that are commonly used in retrieval to investigate different thermal profile shapes. To assess which part of the thermal structure is best constrained by the data, we generate contribution functions for our theoretical model and each of our retrieved models. Our conclusions are strongly affected by the spectral resolution of the instruments included, their wavelength coverage, and the number of data points combined. We also see some limitations in each of the temperature parametrizations, as they are not able to fully match the complex curvatures that are usually produced in hydrodynamic simulations. The results show that our 1D retrieval is recovering a temperature and pressure profile that most closely matches the arithmetic average of the 3D thermal structure. When we use a higher resolution, more data points, and a parametrized temperature profile that allows more flexibility in the middle part of the atmosphere, we find a better match between the retrieved temperature and pressure profile and the

  18. High-voltage atmospheric breakdown across intervening rutile dielectrics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williamson, Kenneth Martin; Simpson, Sean; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Hjalmarson, Harold Paul; Pasik, Michael Francis

    2013-09-01

    This report documents work conducted in FY13 on electrical discharge experiments performed to develop predictive computational models of the fundamental processes of surface breakdown in the vicinity of high-permittivity material interfaces. Further, experiments were conducted to determine if free carrier electrons could be excited into the conduction band thus lowering the effective breakdown voltage when UV photons (4.66 eV) from a high energy pulsed laser were incident on the rutile sample. This report documents the numerical approach, the experimental setup, and summarizes the data and simulations. Lastly, it describes the path forward and challenges that must be overcome in order to improve future experiments for characterizing the breakdown behavior for rutile.

  19. Modeling Exoplanetary Atmospheres using BART, TEA, and Drift-RHD; Theoretical studies and Observational Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs-Dixon, Ian

    The explosion in the number of exoplanets detected to date has revealed a surprising diversity. When attempting to model this diversity, it is crucial to account for the uncertainties resulting from our limited knowledge of chemical, dynamical, and cloud formation processes in their atmospheres. Combining a retrieval technique with theorydriven models is a particularly promising way to address these processes and constrain a physically plausible atmospheric structure. In particular, a detailed micro-physical treatment of clouds and the longitudinal and latitudinal assessments of temperature and chemical profiles, have yet to be addressed in the field. Our team members are experts in radiative-hydrodynamic modeling (Dr. Ian DobbsDixon), cloud kinetics (Dr. Christiana Helling), retrievals and thermo-equilibrium chemistry (Dr. Jasmina Blecic), and observational diagnostics and predictions (Dr. Thomas Greene). The key goals of this proposal are to extend our understanding of the 3D atmospheric structure of gas-giant exoplanets by coupling state-of-the-art selfconsistent models together with a retrieval framework to 1) address cloud kinetics in retrievals, 2) assess 3D temperature and chemical structures in retrievals, 3) model a suite of well-observed planets within the framework of our models, and 4) make observational predictions for current and future NASA missions. To address these goals we have developed a number of tools: Drift-RHD, TEA, BART, and OBS. Drift-RHD solves both the 3D radiative-hydrodynamic equations and a time dependent kinetic cloud model. TEA, Thermochemical Equilibrium Abundances, calculates abundances of chemical species present in the atmosphere. BART, a Bayesian Atmospheric Radiative Transfer code, is a statistical retrieval framework to explore the parameter space of atmospheric chemical abundances and thermal profiles. OBS is a suite of tools developed to simulate observations. Though these tools exist and have been utilized independently in

  20. Interactions of methylamine and ammonia with atmospheric nucleation precursor H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and common organic acids: Thermodynamics and atmospheric implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Y.; Jiang, L.; Bai, Z. [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Nadykto, A. B., E-mail: anadykto@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Criteria and Risk Assessment, Chinese Research Academy of Environmental Science, Beijing 100012 (China); Department of Applied Mathematics, Moscow State University of Technology “STANKIN”, Vadkovsky per. 1, Moscow 127055 (Russian Federation); Atmospheric Science Research Center, State University of New York at Albany, 251 Fuller Road, Albany, NY 12203 (United States)

    2016-06-08

    Interactions of the two common atmospheric bases, ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and methylamine MA (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}), which are considered to be important stabilizers of binary clusters in the Earth’s atmosphere, with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, the key atmospheric precursor, and 14 common atmospheric organic acids (COA) (formic (CH{sub 2}O{sub 2}), acetic (C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O{sub 2}), oxalic (C{sub 2}H{sub 2}O{sub 4}), malonic (C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}), succinic (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 4}), glutaric acid (C{sub 5}H{sub 8}O{sub 4}), adipic (C{sub 6}H{sub 10}O{sub 4}), benzoic (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}COOH), phenylacetic (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}CH{sub 2}COOH), pyruvic (C{sub 3}H{sub 4}O{sub 3}), maleic acid (C{sub 4}H{sub 4}O{sub 4}), malic (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 5}), tartaric (C{sub 4}H{sub 6}O{sub 6}) and pinonic acid (C{sub 10}H{sub 16}O{sub 3})) have been studied using the composite high-accuracy G3MP2 method. The thermodynamic stability of mixed (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), (COA)(B1) and (COA)(B2) dimers and (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) (B1) and (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) (B1) trimers, where B1 and B2 represent methylamine (CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}), respectively, have been investigated and their impacts on the thermodynamic stability of clusters containing H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} have been analyzed. It has been shown that in many cases the interactions of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} with COA, ammonia and methylamine lead to the formation of heteromolecular dimers and trimers, which are certainly more stable than (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}){sub 2} and (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}){sub 3}. It has also been found that free energies of (COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4})+ CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}⇔(COA) (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4})(CH{sub 3}NH{sub 2}) reactions exceed 10-15 kcal mol{sup −1}. This is a clear indication that mixed trimers composed of COA, H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and methylamine are very stable and can thus serve as possible nucleation sites. The present study leads us to conclude that the interactions of COA coexisting with H

  1. Effects of explicit atmospheric convection at high CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Nathan P; Branson, Mark; Burt, Melissa A; Abbot, Dorian S; Kuang, Zhiming; Randall, David A; Tziperman, Eli

    2014-07-29

    The effect of clouds on climate remains the largest uncertainty in climate change predictions, due to the inability of global climate models (GCMs) to resolve essential small-scale cloud and convection processes. We compare preindustrial and quadrupled CO2 simulations between a conventional GCM in which convection is parameterized and a "superparameterized" model in which convection is explicitly simulated with a cloud-permitting model in each grid cell. We find that the global responses of the two models to increased CO2 are broadly similar: both simulate ice-free Arctic summers, wintertime Arctic convection, and enhanced Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) activity. Superparameterization produces significant differences at both CO2 levels, including greater Arctic cloud cover, further reduced sea ice area at high CO2, and a stronger increase with CO2 of the MJO.

  2. High-performance simulations for atmospheric pressure plasma reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugunov, Svyatoslav

    Plasma-assisted processing and deposition of materials is an important component of modern industrial applications, with plasma reactors sharing 30% to 40% of manufacturing steps in microelectronics production. Development of new flexible electronics increases demands for efficient high-throughput deposition methods and roll-to-roll processing of materials. The current work represents an attempt of practical design and numerical modeling of a plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition system. The system utilizes plasma at standard pressure and temperature to activate a chemical precursor for protective coatings. A specially designed linear plasma head, that consists of two parallel plates with electrodes placed in the parallel arrangement, is used to resolve clogging issues of currently available commercial plasma heads, as well as to increase the flow-rate of the processed chemicals and to enhance the uniformity of the deposition. A test system is build and discussed in this work. In order to improve operating conditions of the setup and quality of the deposited material, we perform numerical modeling of the plasma system. The theoretical and numerical models presented in this work comprehensively describe plasma generation, recombination, and advection in a channel of arbitrary geometry. Number density of plasma species, their energy content, electric field, and rate parameters are accurately calculated and analyzed in this work. Some interesting engineering outcomes are discussed with a connection to the proposed setup. The numerical model is implemented with the help of high-performance parallel technique and evaluated at a cluster for parallel calculations. A typical performance increase, calculation speed-up, parallel fraction of the code and overall efficiency of the parallel implementation are discussed in details.

  3. High spectral resolution lidar to measure optical scattering properties of atmospheric aerosols. I - Theory and instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, S. T.; Tracy, D. H.; Eloranta, E. W.; Roesler, F. L.; Weinman, J. A.; Trauger, J. T.; Sroga, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    A high spectral resolution lidar technique to measure optical scattering properties of atmospheric aerosols is described. Light backscattered by the atmosphere from a narrowband optically pumped oscillator-amplifier dye laser is separated into its Doppler broadened molecular and elastically scattered aerosol components by a two-channel Fabry-Perot polyetalon interferometer. Aerosol optical properties, such as the backscatter ratio, optical depth, extinction cross section, scattering cross section, and the backscatter phase function, are derived from the two-channel measurements.

  4. Study of the high power laser-metal interactions in the gaseous atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugomer, Stjepan; Bitelli, G.; Stipancic, M.; Jovic, F.

    1994-08-01

    The tantalum and titanium plates were treated by pulsed, high power CO2 laser in the pressurized atmospheres of N2 and O2. Studies performed by the optical microscopy, microhardness measurements, and the auger electron spectroscopy revealed: (1) topographic modification of the surface caused by the temperature field; (2) metal hardening, caused by the laser shock; and (3) alloying/cladding, caused by the chemical reaction between the metal surface and the gaseous atmosphere.

  5. Atmospheric mercury concentration and chemical speciation at a rural site in Beijing, China: implications of mercury emission sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Continuous measurements of atmospheric mercury concentration and speciation play a key role in identifying mercury sources and its behavior in the atmosphere. In this study, speciated atmospheric mercury including gaseous elemental mercury (GEM, reactive gaseous mercury (RGM and particle-bound mercury (PBM were continuously measured at Miyun, a rural site in Beijing, China, from December 2008 to November 2009. The average GEM, RGM and PBM concentrations were found to be 3.22 ± 1.74, 10.1 ± 18.8 and 98.2 ± 112.7 pg m−3, respectively, about 2–20 times higher than the background concentration of the Northern Hemisphere. The results indicated that atmospheric mercury concentrations in northern China were highly affected by anthropogenic emissions. The atmospheric mercury showed obvious seasonal variations, with the highest seasonal average GEM concentration in summer (3.48 ng m−3 and the lowest value in winter (2.66 ng m−3. In autumn and winter a diurnal variation of GEM was observed, with peak levels in the late afternoon till midnight. Most of the high RGM concentration values occurred in the afternoon of all seasons due to the higher oxidation. The PBM concentration was higher in early morning of all seasons because of the the temperature inversion that increases in depth as the night proceeds. The ratio of GEM to CO indicates that residential boilers play an important role in the elevation of GEM in winter. The ratio of RGM to O3 could be an indicator of the contribution of local primary sources. The ratio of PBM to PM2.5 reveals that the air mass from the east and southwest of the site in spring and summer carries more atmospheric mercury. The HYSPLIT back-trajectory analysis indicated that the monitoring site is affected by local, regional and interregional sources simultaneously during heavy pollution episodes. The results from the potential source contribution function (PSCF model indicate that the atmospheric transport

  6. Oxygen isotopes in the Martian atmosphere - Implications for the evolution of volatiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcelroy, M. B.; Yung, Y. L.

    1976-01-01

    Nonthermal escape of oxygen by recombination of exospheric O2(+) combined with diffusive separation of gases at lower altitude provides a mechanism through which the Martian atmosphere may be enriched in O-18 relative to O-16. Measurement of the abundance of O-18 relative to O-16 together with a determination of the turbopause may be used to develop important constraints on the history of Martian volatiles. Models for the interpretation of these data are developed and discussed in light of present information.

  7. Diurnal and nocturnal variations of PAHs in the Lhasa atmosphere, Tibetan Plateau: Implication for local sources and the impact of atmospheric degradation processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junwen; Li, Jun; Lin, Tian; Liu, Di; Xu, Yue; Chaemfa, Chakra; Qi, Shihua; Liu, Fobang; Zhang, Gan

    2013-04-01

    Due to the unique characteristics, such as intensive radiation, high altitude and low humidity, plateau climate importantly affects the airborne organic contaminants' behavior in the environment. In this study, USEPA priority polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and benzo[e]pyrene were detected in the air samples collected at two suburban sites in Lhasa city. The total concentrations of USEPA priority fifteen PAHs (except naphthalene) in the particulate phase ranged from 4.4 to 60 ng/m3, while in the gas phase from 79 to 350 ng/m3. Integrated results of the multiple diagnostic ratios indicated that the major potential sources of PAHs in Lhasa city were local incomplete combustion of wood and cow dung cake. Particulate and gaseous PAH levels in this study displayed two clear and different diurnal and nocturnal concentration patterns, however, no distinct diurnal and nocturnal variation was observed for the total suspended particles (TSP) concentrations. No significant correlation was found between TSP concentrations and particle-bound PAHs, meaning physicochemical processes play an important role in diurnal and nocturnal variations of PAHs in the atmosphere except emission sources in this study. Based on the diurnal and nocturnal changes of the percentage of particulate phase PAHs in total PAHs, it suggested that gas-particle partitioning driven by temperature makes a great contribution to the variations of PAHs concentrations. The most susceptible to transformation between gas and particle phase chemicals are PHE, ANT, FLA, PYR, BaA and CHR. In addition, our observation suggested that atmospheric reaction and photolytic degradation also exert an important impact on the variations of PAHs in both phases in the atmosphere of Lhasa city.

  8. Nonflammable, Nonaqueous, Low Atmospheric Impact, High Performance Cleaning Solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhooge, P. M.; Glass, S. M.; Nimitz, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    For many years, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) and chlorocarbon solvents have played an important part in aerospace operations. These solvents found extensive use as cleaning and analysis (EPA) solvents in precision and critical cleaning. However, CFCs and chlorocarbon solvents have deleterious effects on the ozone layer, are relatively strong greenhouse gases, and some are suspect or known carcinogens. Because of their ozone-depletion potential (ODP), the Montreal Protocol and its amendments, as well as other environmental regulations, have resulted in the phaseout of CFC-113 and 1,1,1-trichloroethane (TCA). Although alternatives have been recommended, they do not perform as well as the original solvents. In addition, some analyses, such as the infrared analysis of extracted hydrocarbons, cannot be performed with the substitute solvents that contain C-H bonds. CFC-113 solvent has been used for many critical aerospace applications. CFC-113, also known as Freon (registered) TF, has been used extensively in NASA's cleaning facilities for precision and critical cleaning, in particular the final rinsing in Class 100 areas, with gas chromatography analysis of rinse residue. While some cleaning can be accomplished by other processes, there are certain critical applications where CFC-113 or a similar solvent is highly cost-effective and ensures safety. Oxygen system components are one example where a solvent compatible with oxygen and capable of removing fluorocarbon grease is needed. Electronic components and precision mechanical components can also be damaged by aggressive cleaning solvents.

  9. The atmospheric signal of terrestrial carbon isotopic discrimination and its implication for partitioning carbon fluxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, John B.; Tans, Pieter P.; Conway, Thomas J. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory; White, James W.C.; Vaughn, Bruce W. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Inst. for Arctic and Alpine Research

    2003-04-01

    The {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio in atmospheric carbon dioxide has been measured in samples taken in the NOAA/CMDL network since 1991. By examining the relationship between weekly anomalies in {sup 13}C and CO{sub 2} at continental sites in the network, we infer temporal and spatial values for the isotopic signature of terrestrial CO{sub 2} fluxes. We can convert these isotopic signatures to values of discrimination if we assume the atmospheric starting point for photosynthesis. The average discrimination in the Northern Hemisphere between 30 and 50 deg N is calculated to be 16.6 {+-} 0.2 per mil. In contrast to some earlier modeling studies, we find no strong latitudinal gradient in discrimination. However, we do observe that discrimination in Eurasia is larger than in North America, which is consistent with two modeling studies. We also observe a possible trend in the North American average of discrimination toward less discrimination. There is no apparent trend in the Eurasian average or at any individual sites. However, there is interannual variability on the order of 2 per mil at several sites and regions. Finally, we calculate the northern temperate terrestrial CO{sub 2} flux replacing our previous discrimination values of about 18 per mil with the average value of 16.6 calculated in this study. We find this enhances the terrestrial sink by about 0.4 GtC/yr.

  10. Reactions between Criegee Intermediates and the Inorganic Acids HCl and HNO3 : Kinetics and Atmospheric Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Elizabeth S; Kapnas, Kara M; Murray, Craig

    2016-08-22

    Criegee intermediates (CIs) are a class of reactive radicals that are thought to play a key role in atmospheric chemistry through reactions with trace species that can lead to aerosol particle formation. Recent work has suggested that water vapor is likely to be the dominant sink for some CIs, although reactions with trace species that are sufficiently rapid can be locally competitive. Herein, we use broadband transient absorption spectroscopy to measure rate constants for the reactions of the simplest CI, CH2 OO, with two inorganic acids, HCl and HNO3 , both of which are present in polluted urban atmospheres. Both reactions are fast; at 295 K, the reactions of CH2 OO with HCl and HNO3 have rate constants of 4.6×10(-11)  cm(3)  s(-1) and 5.4×10(-10)  cm(3)  s(-1) , respectively. Complementary quantum-chemical calculations show that these reactions form substituted hydroperoxides with no energy barrier. The results suggest that reactions of CIs with HNO3 in particular are likely to be competitive with those with water vapor in polluted urban areas under conditions of modest relative humidity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Dissolved total hydrolyzable enantiomeric amino acids in precipitation: Implications on bacterial contributions to atmospheric organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ge; Kim, Guebuem; Kim, Jeonghyun; Jeong, Yu-Sik; Kim, Young Il

    2015-03-01

    We analyzed dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), and dissolved enantiomeric amino acids in precipitation samples collected at two sites in Korea over a one-year period. The average concentrations of DOC, DON, and total hydrolyzable amino acids at Seoul (an inland urban area) were lower than those at Uljin (a coastal rural area). The different bulk compositions of dissolved organic matter (DOM) at these two sites (reflected by qualitative indicators) were mainly attributed to differences in contributing sources. The D-enantiomers of four individual amino acids (aspartic acid, glutamic acid, serine, and alanine) were ubiquitously present, with average enantiomeric (D/L) ratios of 0.34, 0.26, 0.21, and 0.61 for Seoul, and 0.18, 0.11, 0.09, and 0.31 for Uljin, respectively. The much higher D/L ratios observed at Seoul than at Uljin might result from more advanced diagenetic stages as well as higher contributions from bacteria inhabiting terrestrial environments. The C- and N-normalized yields of D-alanine in DOM of our samples were found to be comparable to literature values reported for aquatic systems, where a significant portion of DOM was suggested to be of bacterial origin. Our study suggests that bacteria and their remnants might constitute an important fraction of OM in the atmosphere, contributing significantly to the quality of atmospheric OM and its post-depositional bioavailability in the surface ecosystems.

  12. Chemical dynamics of triacetylene formation and implications to the synthesis of polyynes in Titan's atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, X; Kim, Y S; Kaiser, R I; Mebel, A M; Liang, M C; Yung, Y L

    2009-09-22

    For the last four decades, the role of polyynes such as diacetylene (HCCCCH) and triacetylene (HCCCCCCH) in the chemical evolution of the atmosphere of Saturn's moon Titan has been a subject of vigorous research. These polyacetylenes are thought to serve as an UV radiation shield in planetary environments; thus, acting as prebiotic ozone, and are considered as important constituents of the visible haze layers on Titan. However, the underlying chemical processes that initiate the formation and control the growth of polyynes have been the least understood to date. Here, we present a combined experimental, theoretical, and modeling study on the synthesis of the polyyne triacetylene (HCCCCCCH) via the bimolecular gas phase reaction of the ethynyl radical (CCH) with diacetylene (HCCCCH). This elementary reaction is rapid, has no entrance barrier, and yields the triacetylene molecule via indirect scattering dynamics through complex formation in a single collision event. Photochemical models of Titan's atmosphere imply that triacetylene may serve as a building block to synthesize even more complex polyynes such as tetraacetylene (HCCCCCCCCH).

  13. Reactions of Azine Anions with Nitrogen and Oxygen Atoms: Implications for Titan's Upper Atmosphere and Interstellar Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe-Chen; Cole, Callie A; Demarais, Nicholas J; Snow, Theodore P; Bierbaum, Veronica M

    2015-08-26

    Azines are important in many extraterrestrial environments, from the atmosphere of Titan to the interstellar medium. They have been implicated as possible carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands in astronomy, indicating their persistence in interstellar space. Most importantly, they constitute the basic building blocks of DNA and RNA, so their chemical reactivity in these environments has significant astrobiological implications. In addition, N and O atoms are widely observed in the ISM and in the ionospheres of planets and moons. However, the chemical reactions of molecular anions with abundant interstellar and atmospheric atomic species are largely unexplored. In this paper, gas-phase reactions of deprotonated anions of benzene, pyridine, pyridazine, pyrimidine, pyrazine, and s-triazine with N and O atoms are studied both experimentally and computationally. In all cases, the major reaction channel is associative electron detachment; these reactions are particularly important since they control the balance between negative ions and free electron densities. The reactions of the azine anions with N atoms exhibit larger rate constants than reactions of corresponding chain anions. The reactions of azine anions with O atoms are even more rapid, with complex product patterns for different reactants. The mechanisms are studied theoretically by employing density functional theory; spin conversion is found to be important in determining some product distributions. The rich gas-phase chemistry observed in this work provides a better understanding of ion-atom reactions and their contributions to ionospheric chemistry as well as the chemical processing that occurs in the boundary layers between diffuse and dense interstellar clouds.

  14. A Field Study of Atmospheric Icing Analysis in a Complex Terrain of the High North

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taimur Rashid

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of atmospheric icing events hold the key for computing the significant parameters leading to icing load calculations. In the cold regions of the high north, atmospheric icing loads on structures become important when it comes to design and safety of infrastructures. Furthermore, icing load calculations over a certain period of time provide a vital input for designers to improve the safety of structures. Patterns of icing events can be evaluated in correlation with other meteorological parameters such as atmospheric temperature, relative humidity and wind speed to better estimate icing loads. A field study has been performed in the complex terrain of northern Norway, by the atmospheric icing research team of Narvik University College, where customized meteorological atmospheric ice monitoring stations were installed to study atmospheric icing events in relation with the associated weather parameters. The meteorological parameters of three different sites in the vicinity of Narvik (68°25′14′ N17°33′36′ E were collected, sorted, averaged to standardized timeline and further validated with recordings of weathers parameters obtained from the national weather forecasts, where a good agreement was found. Analyses were mainly performed between accreted ice loads and associated meteorological parameters. The results presented can be used as base for the development of more detailed mathematical models for the better prediction of atmospheric icing events in complex terrains.

  15. A study of the dissociative recombination of CaO+ with electrons: Implications for Ca chemistry in the upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bones, D. L.; Gerding, M.; Höffner, J.; Martín, Juan Carlos Gómez; Plane, J. M. C.

    2016-12-01

    The dissociative recombination of CaO+ ions with electrons has been studied in a flowing afterglow reactor. CaO+ was generated by the pulsed laser ablation of a Ca target, followed by entrainment in an Ar+ ion/electron plasma. A kinetic model describing the gas-phase chemistry and diffusion to the reactor walls was fitted to the experimental data, yielding a rate coefficient of (3.0 ± 1.0) × 10-7 cm3 molecule-1 s-1 at 295 K. This result has two atmospheric implications. First, the surprising observation that the Ca+/Fe+ ratio is 8 times larger than Ca/Fe between 90 and 100 km in the atmosphere can now be explained quantitatively by the known ion-molecule chemistry of these two metals. Second, the rate of neutralization of Ca+ ions in a descending sporadic E layer is fast enough to explain the often explosive growth of sporadic neutral Ca layers.

  16. Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with ultra-high electron density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Mizuno, Masaaki [Center for Advanced Medicine and Clinical Research, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Toyokuni, Shinya [Department of Pathology and Biological Responses, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Maruyama, Shoichi [Department of Nephrology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kodera, Yasuhiro [Department of Gastroenterological Surgery (Surgery II), Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Terasaki, Hiroko [Department of Ophthalmology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Adachi, Tetsuo [Laboratory of Clinical Pharmaceutics, Gifu Pharmaceutical University, 501-1196 Gifu (Japan); Kato, Masashi [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Kikkawa, Fumitaka [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Tsurumai-cho 65, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8550 (Japan); Hori, Masaru [Institute of Innovation for Future Society, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    Cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a big challenge in plasma medicine. Reactive species generated from plasma are key factors for treating cancer cells, and thus, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma with high electron density has been developed and applied for cancer treatment. Various cancer cell lines have been treated with plasma, and non-thermal atmospheric plasma clearly has anti-tumor effects. Recent innovative studies suggest that plasma can both directly and indirectly affect cells and tissues, and this observation has widened the range of applications. Thus, cancer therapy using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is promising. Animal experiments and understanding the mode of action are essential for clinical application in the future. A new academic field that combines plasma science, the biology of free radicals, and systems biology will be established.

  17. Theoretical Kinetic Study of the Formic Acid Catalyzed Criegee Intermediate Isomerization: Multistructural Anharmonicity and Atmospheric Implications

    KAUST Repository

    Monge Palacios, Manuel

    2018-01-29

    We performed a theoretical study on the double hydrogen shift isomerization reaction of a six carbon atom Criegee intermediate (C6-CI), catalyzed by formic acid (HCOOH), to produce vinylhydroperoxide (VHP), C6-CI+HCOOH→VHP+HCOOH. This Criegee intermediate can serve as a surrogate for larger CIs derived from important volatile organic compounds like monoterpenes, whose reactivity is not well understood and are difficult to handle computationally. The reactant HCOOH exerts a pronounced catalytic effect on the studied reaction by lowering the barrier height, but the kinetic enhancement is hindered by the multistructural anharmonicity. First, the rigid ring-structure adopted by the saddle point to facilitate simultaneous transfer of two atoms does not allow formation of as many conformers as those formed by the reactant C6-CI. And second, the flexible carbon chain of C6-CI facilitates the formation of stabilizing intramolecular C–H···O hydrogen bonds; this stabilizing effect is less pronounced in the saddle point structure due to its tightness and steric effects. Thus, the contribution of the reactant C6-CI conformers to the multistructural partition function is larger than that of the saddle point conformers. The resulting low multistructural anharmonicity factor partially cancels out the catalytic effect of the carboxylic acid, yielding in a moderately large rate coefficient, k(298 K) = 4.9·10-13 cm3 molecule-1 s-1. We show that carboxylic acids may promote the conversion of stabilized Criegee intermediates into vinylhydroperoxides in the atmosphere, which generates OH radicals and leads to secondary organic aerosol, thereby affecting the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere and ultimately the climate.

  18. Articulating Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinch, Sofie

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an architectural approach to designing computational interfaces by articulating the notion of atmosphere in the field of interaction design. It draws upon the concept of kinesthetic interaction and a philosophical notion on atmosphere emphasizing the importance of bodily exper......” implications and qualities of the approach are identified through concrete examples of a design case, which also investigates the qualities and implications of addressing atmospheres both as design concern and user experience.......This paper presents an architectural approach to designing computational interfaces by articulating the notion of atmosphere in the field of interaction design. It draws upon the concept of kinesthetic interaction and a philosophical notion on atmosphere emphasizing the importance of bodily...... experience in space, presented as middle ground experience. In the field of HCI, middle ground experiences complete the unarticulated spectrum between designing for foreground of attention or background awareness. When “Articulating Atmospheres through Middle Ground Experiences in Interaction Design...

  19. Reconstructing atmospheric circulation over southern New Zealand: Establishment of modern westerly airflow 5500 years ago and implications for Southern Hemisphere Holocene climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turney, C. S. M.; Wilmshurst, J. M.; Jones, R. T.; Wood, J. R.; Palmer, J. G.; Hogg, A. G.; Fenwick, P.; Crowley, S. F.; Privat, K.; Thomas, Z.

    2017-03-01

    Late-twentieth century changes in the intensity and migration of Southern Hemisphere westerly winds have been implicated in spatially complex variability in atmospheric and ocean circulation, and ice-sheet dynamics, across the mid- to high-latitudes. A major uncertainty, however, is whether present day hemispheric-wide symmetrical airflow is representative of past behaviour. Here we report a multi-proxy study from Stewart Island and southern Fiordland, New Zealand (46-47°S) reconstructing Holocene changes at the northern limit of westerly airflow. Increased minerogenic input and a pronounced shift in cool-loving vegetation around 5500 years ago is consistent with the establishment of westerly airflow at this latitude in the southwest Pacific. In marked contrast, stronger winds are reported further south over the subantarctic Auckland (50°S) and Campbell (52°S) Islands from 8000 years ago. Intriguingly, reconstructions from the east Pacific suggest a weakening of core westerly airflow after 8500 years ago, but an expansion along the northern limits sometime after 5500 years ago. Our results suggest similar atmospheric circulation changes have been experienced in the Pacific since 5500 years ago, but indicate an expanded network of sites is needed to comprehensively test the driver(s) and impact(s) of Holocene mid-latitude westerly winds across the Southern Hemisphere.

  20. Ultra-High Resolution Spectroscopic Remote Sensing: A Microscope on Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostiuk, Theodor

    2010-01-01

    Remote sensing of planetary atmospheres is not complete without studies of all levels of the atmosphere, including the dense cloudy- and haze filled troposphere, relatively clear and important stratosphere and the upper atmosphere, which are the first levels to experience the effects of solar radiation. High-resolution spectroscopy can provide valuable information on these regions of the atmosphere. Ultra-high spectral resolution studies can directly measure atmospheric winds, composition, temperature and non-thermal phenomena, which describe the physics and chemistry of the atmosphere. Spectroscopy in the middle to long infrared wavelengths can also probe levels where dust of haze limit measurements at shorter wavelength or can provide ambiguous results on atmospheric species abundances or winds. A spectroscopic technique in the middle infrared wavelengths analogous to a radio receiver. infrared heterodyne spectroscopy [1], will be describe and used to illustrate the detailed study of atmospheric phenomena not readily possible with other methods. The heterodyne spectral resolution with resolving power greater than 1,000.000 measures the true line shapes of emission and absorption lines in planetary atmospheres. The information on the region of line formation is contained in the line shapes. The absolute frequency of the lines can be measured to I part in 100 ,000,000 and can be used to accurately measure the Doppler frequency shift of the lines, directly measuring the line-of-sight velocity of the gas to --Im/s precision (winds). The technical and analytical methods developed and used to measure and analyze infrared heterodyne measurements will be described. Examples of studies on Titan, Venus, Mars, Earth, and Jupiter will be presented. 'These include atmospheric dynamics on slowly rotating bodies (Titan [2] and Venus [3] and temperature, composition and chemistry on Mars 141, Venus and Earth. The discovery and studies of unique atmospheric phenomena will also be

  1. High oxygen and high carbon dioxide modified atmospheres for shelf-life extension of minimally processed carrots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amanatidou, A.; Slump, R.A.; Gorris, L.G.M.; Smid, E.J.

    2000-01-01

    The impact of high O2 + high CO2 modified atmospheres (MA), on the preservation of minimally processed carrots was studied. A combination of 50% O2 + 30% CO2 prolonged the shelf life of sliced carrots compared to storage in air by 2 to 3 d. When the carrots received a pre-treatment with a 0.1%

  2. Implications of Detection Methods on Characterizing Atmospheric River Contribution to Seasonal Snowfall Across Sierra Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huning, Laurie S.; Margulis, Steven A.; Guan, Bin; Waliser, Duane E.; Neiman, Paul J.

    2017-10-01

    This study investigates the extent to which the diagnosed contribution of atmospheric rivers (ARs) to the seasonal cumulative snowfall (CS) is related to the AR detection approach utilized. Using both satellite integrated water vapor (IWV)-based and reanalysis integrated vapor transport (IVT)-based methodologies, the corresponding AR-derived CS distributions were characterized over the Sierra Nevada (USA) from 1998 to 2015. AR detection methods indicated that ARs yield greater orographic enhancement of the seasonal CS than non-AR storms above 2,100-2,300 m for the IWV-based approach and over all elevations for the IVT-based detection approach across the western (i.e., windward) Sierra Nevada. Due to differences in the methodologies, the IWV-based approach diagnosed 2.1 times fewer ARs than the IVT-based approach. As a result, the ARs diagnosed using the IWV-based detection method yielded an average 33% of the total range-wide CS annually as opposed to 56% from the IVT-based detection method.

  3. Geology and photometric variation of solar system bodies with minor atmospheres: implications for solid exoplanets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yuka; Kimura, Jun; Dohm, James; Ohtake, Makiko

    2014-09-01

    A reasonable basis for future astronomical investigations of exoplanets lies in our best knowledge of the planets and satellites in the Solar System. Solar System bodies exhibit a wide variety of surface environments, even including potential habitable conditions beyond Earth, and it is essential to know how they can be characterized from outside the Solar System. In this study, we provide an overview of geological features of major Solar System solid bodies with minor atmospheres (i.e., the terrestrial Moon, Mercury, the Galilean moons, and Mars) that affect surface albedo at local to global scale, and we survey how they influence point-source photometry in the UV/visible/near IR (i.e., the reflection-dominant range). We simulate them based on recent mapping products and also compile observed light curves where available. We show a 5-50% peak-to-trough variation amplitude in one spin rotation associated with various geological processes including heterogeneous surface compositions due to igneous activities, interaction with surrounding energetic particles, and distribution of grained materials. Some indications of these processes are provided by the amplitude and wavelength dependence of variation in combinations of the time-averaged spectra. We also estimate the photometric precision needed to detect their spin rotation rates through periodogram analysis. Our survey illustrates realistic possibilities for inferring the detailed properties of solid exoplanets with future direct imaging observations. Key Words: Planetary environments-Planetary geology-Solar System-Extrasolar terrestrial planets.

  4. A High-precision Technique to Correct for Residual Atmospheric Dispersion in High-contrast Imaging Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, P.; Guyon, O.; Jovanovic, N.; Lozi, J.; Martinache, F.; Minowa, Y.; Kudo, T.; Takami, H.; Hayano, Y.; Narita, N.

    2016-12-01

    Direct detection and spectroscopy of exoplanets requires high-contrast imaging. For habitable exoplanets in particular, located at a small angular separation from the host star, it is crucial to employ small inner working angle (IWA) coronagraphs that efficiently suppress starlight. These coronagraphs, in turn, require careful control of the wavefront that directly impacts their performance. For ground-based telescopes, atmospheric refraction is also an important factor, since it results in a smearing of the point-spread function (PSF), that can no longer be efficiently suppressed by the coronagraph. Traditionally, atmospheric refraction is compensated for by an atmospheric dispersion compensator (ADC). ADC control relies on an a priori model of the atmosphere whose parameters are solely based on the pointing of the telescope, which can result in imperfect compensation. For a high-contrast instrument like the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme Adaptive Optics (SCExAO) system, which employs very small IWA coronagraphs, refraction-induced smearing of the PSF has to be less than 1 mas in the science band for optimum performance. In this paper, we present the first on-sky measurement and correction of residual atmospheric dispersion. Atmospheric dispersion is measured from the science image directly, using an adaptive grid of artificially introduced speckles as a diagnostic to feedback to the telescope’s ADC. With our current setup, we were able to reduce the initial residual atmospheric dispersion from 18.8 mas to 4.2 in broadband light (y- to H-band) and to 1.4 mas in the H-band only. This work is particularly relevant to the upcoming extremely large telescopes (ELTs) that will require fine control of their ADC to reach their full high-contrast imaging potential.

  5. Saturn's Titan: Surface change, ammonia, and implications for atmospheric and tectonic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, R.M.; Kamp, L.W.; Matson, D.L.; Irwin, P.G.J.; Baines, K.H.; Boryta, M.D.; Leader, F.E.; Jaumann, R.; Smythe, W.D.; Sotin, Christophe; Clark, R.N.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Pearl, J.C.; Hapke, B.W.; Lunine, J.; Combes, M.; Bellucci, G.; Bibring, J.-P.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Coradini, A.; Formisano, V.; Filacchione, G.; Langevin, R.Y.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.

    2009-01-01

    Titan is known to have a young surface. Here we present evidence from the Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer that it is currently geologically active. We report that changes in the near-infrared reflectance of a 73,000 km2 area on Titan (latitude 26° S, longitude 78° W) occurred between July 2004 and March of 2006. The reflectance of the area increased by a factor of two between July 2004 and March–April 2005; it then returned to the July 2004 level by November 2005. By late December 2005 the reflectance had surged upward again, establishing a new maximum. Thereafter, it trended downward for the next three months. Detailed spectrophotometric analyses suggest these changes happen at or very near the surface. The spectral differences between the region and its surroundings rule out changes in the distribution of the ices of reasonably expected materials such as H2O, CO2, and CH4 as possible causes. Remarkably, the change is spectrally consistent with the deposition and removal of NH3 frost over a water ice substrate. NH3 has been proposed as a constituent of Titan's interior and has never been reported on the surface. The detection of NH3 frost on the surface might possibly be explained by episodic effusive events occur which bring juvenile ammonia from the interior to the surface. If so, its decomposition would feed nitrogen to the atmosphere now and in the future. The lateral extent of the region exceeds that of active areas on the Earth (Hawaii) or Io (Loki).

  6. A Framework to Combine Low- and High-resolution Spectroscopy for the Atmospheres of Transiting Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogi, M.; Line, M.; Bean, J.; Désert, J.-M.; Schwarz, H.

    2017-04-01

    Current observations of the atmospheres of close-in exoplanets are predominantly obtained with two techniques: low-resolution spectroscopy with space telescopes and high-resolution spectroscopy from the ground. Although the observables delivered by the two methods are in principle highly complementary, no attempt has ever been made to combine them, perhaps due to the different modeling approaches that are typically used in their interpretation. Here, we present the first combined analysis of previously published dayside spectra of the exoplanet HD 209458 b obtained at low resolution with HST/Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Spitzer/IRAC and at high resolution with VLT/CRIRES. By utilizing a novel retrieval algorithm capable of computing the joint probability distribution of low- and high-resolution spectra, we obtain tight constraints on the chemical composition of the planet’s atmosphere. In contrast to the WFC3 data, we do not confidently detect H2O at high spectral resolution. The retrieved water abundance from the combined analysis deviates by 1.9σ from the expectations for a solar-composition atmosphere in chemical equilibrium. Measured relative molecular abundances of CO and H2O strongly favor an oxygen-rich atmosphere (C/O exoplanet surveys between the flagship ground- and space-based facilities, which ultimately will be crucial for characterizing potentially habitable planets.

  7. Development of a mobile and high-precision atmospheric CO2 monitoring station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnár, M.; Haszpra, L.; Major, I.; Svingor, É.; Veres, M.

    2009-04-01

    Nowadays one of the most burning questions for the science is the rate and the reasons of the recent climate change. Greenhouse gases (GHG), mainly CO2 and CH4 in the atmosphere could affect the climate of our planet. However, the relation between the amount of atmospheric GHG and the climate is complex, full with interactions and feedbacks partly poorly known even by now. The only way to understand the processes, to trace the changes, to develop and validate mathematical models for forecasts is the extensive, high precision, continuous monitoring of the atmosphere. Fossil fuel CO2 emissions are a major component of the European carbon budget. Separation of the fossil fuel signal from the natural biogenic one in the atmosphere is, therefore, a crucial task for quantifying exchange flux of the continental biosphere through atmospheric observations and inverse modelling. An independent method to estimate trace gas emissions is the top-down approach, using atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements combined with simultaneous radiocarbon (14C) observations. As adding fossil fuel CO2 to the atmosphere, therefore, leads not only to an increase in the CO2 content of the atmosphere but also to a decrease in the 14C/12C ratio in atmospheric CO2. The ATOMKI has more than two decade long experience in atmospheric 14CO2 monitoring. As a part of an ongoing research project being carried out in Hungary to investigate the amount and temporal and spatial variations of fossil fuel CO2 in the near surface atmosphere we developed a mobile and high-precision atmospheric CO2 monitoring station. We describe the layout and the operation of the measuring system which is designed for the continuous, unattended monitoring of CO2 mixing ratio in the near surface atmosphere based on an Ultramat 6F (Siemens) infrared gas analyser. In the station one atmospheric 14CO2 sampling unit is also installed which is developed and widely used since more than one decade by ATOMKI. Mixing ratio of CO2 is

  8. Measurement of neutrino oscillations by means of a high density detector on the atmospheric neutrino beam

    CERN Document Server

    Aglietta, M; Aprile, E; Bologna, G; Bonesini, M; Bencivenni, G; Calvi, M; Castellina, A; Curioni, A; Fulgione, W; Ghia, P L; Gustavino, C; Kokoulin, R P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Periale, L; Petrukhin, A A; Picchi, P; Pullia, Antonio; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N G; Satta, L; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Terranova, F; Tonazzo, A; Trinchero, G C; Vallania, P; Villone, B

    1999-01-01

    A high-density calorimeter, consisting of magnetized iron planes interleaved by RPCs, as tracking and timing devices, is a good candidate for a next generation experiment on atmospheric neutrinos. With 34 kt of mass and in four years of data taking, this experiment will be sensitive to $\

  9. Burning of forest materials under late Paleozoic high atmospheric oxygen levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard A., Jr. Wildman; Leo J. Hickey; Matthew B. Dickinson; Robert A. Berner; Jennifer M. Robinson; Michael Dietrich; Robert H. Essenhigh; Craig B. Wildman

    2004-01-01

    Theoretical models suggest that atmospheric oxygen reached concentrations as high as 35% O2 during the past 550 m.y. Previous burning experiments using strips of paper have challenged this idea, concluding that ancient wildfires would have decimated plant life if O2 significantly exceeded its present level of 21%. New...

  10. High-throughput processes for industrially scalable deposition of zinc oxide at atmospheric pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Illiberi, A.; Grob, F.; Kniknie, B.; Frijters, C.; Deelen, J. van; Poodt, P.; Beckers, E.H.A.; Bolt, P.J.

    2014-01-01

    ZnO films have been grown on a moving glass substrate by high temperature (480 0C) chemical vapour deposition (CVD) and low temperature (200 0C) plasma enhanced CVD (PE-CVD) process at atmospheric pressure. Deposition rates above 7 nm/s have been achieved for substrate speeds from 20 to 500 mm/min.

  11. Extreme precipitation and climate gradients in Patagonia revealed by high-resolution regional atmospheric climate modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, J.T.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314850163; van den Broeke, M.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073765643; van Wessem, J.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413533085; van de Berg, W.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831611; van Meijgaard, E.; van Ulft, L.H.; Schaefer, M.

    2014-01-01

    This study uses output of a high-resolution (5.5 km) regional atmospheric climate model to describe the present-day (1979–2012) climate of Patagonia, with a particular focus on the surface mass balance (SMB) of the Patagonian ice fields. Through a comparison with available in situ observations, it

  12. Planetary-scale streak structures produced in a high-resolution simulation of Venus atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashimura, H.; Sugimoto, N.; Takagi, M.; Matsuda, Y.; Ohfuchi, W.; Enomoto, T.; Nakajima, K.; Ishiwatari, M.; Sato, T. M.; Hashimoto, G. L.; Satoh, T.; Takahashi, Y. O.; Hayashi, Y.-Y.

    2017-09-01

    Planetary-scale streak structures captured by the IR2 camera onboard AKATSUKI was reproduced in a high-resolution simulation of Venus Atmosphere. We have found that the streak structures are extending from the polar vortices and synchronized in both hemispheres. Our experiments suggest that a low-stability layer is a key for forming the planetary-scale streak structures.

  13. Implications of virtualization on Grids for high energy physics applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gilbert, L; Newman, R; Iqbal, S; Pepper, R; Celebioglu, O; Hsieh, J; Mashayekhi, V; Cobban, M

    2006-01-01

    The simulations used in the field of high energy physics are compute intensive and exhibit a high level of data parallelism. These features make such simulations ideal candidates for Grid computing. We are taking as an example the GEANT4 detector simulation used for physics studies within the ATLAS experiment at CERN. One key issue in Grid computing is that of network and system security, which can potentially inhibit the widespread use of such simulations. Virtualization provides a feasible solution because it allows the creation of virtual compute nodes in both local and remote compute clusters, thus providing an insulating layer which can play an important role in satisfying the security concerns of all parties involved. However, it has performance implications. This study provides quantitative estimates of the virtualization and hyper-threading overhead for GEANT on commodity clusters. Results show that virtualization has less than 15% run time overhead, and that the best run time (with the non-SMP licens...

  14. The Unsolved Mysteries of Atmospheric Chemistry for High School Students and Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonich, S. L.

    2011-12-01

    The grant "CAREER: New Molecular Markers of Asian Air Emissions - Anthropogenic Semi-Volatile Organic Compounds" (ATM-0239823) was funded by NSF from 2003-2008. The CAREER proposal described the integration of research and outreach education activities in the field of atmospheric chemistry, specifically atmospheric measurements and atmospheric transport. The primary objective of the research was to identify anthropogenic semi-volatile organic compounds (SOCs) that could be used as molecular markers for Asian air emissions and trans-Pacific atmospheric transport. The outreach education activity was integrated with the research by developing curriculum to introduce underrepresented minority high school students, and their teachers, to atmospheric chemistry and atmospheric measurements through Oregon State University's National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences funded Hydroville Curriculum Project (http://www.hydroville.org/iaq_resources). A curriculum was developed to allow students to assume the role of "Air Quality Scientist" and measure air temperature, air flow, relative humidity, CO, CO2, O3, and volatile organic compounds in out-door and in-door air. The students gained an understanding of atmospheric transport and compared measured concentrations to recommended guidelines. In addition, the outreach education activities included the development of the "Unsolved Mysteries of Human Health" website (http://www.unsolvedmysteries.oregonstate.edu/), including a specific module on the research conducted under the CAREER grant (http://www.unsolvedmysteries.oregonstate.edu /Gas-Chromatography-Mass-Spectrometry-Overview). The PI of the CAREER proposal, Dr. Staci Massey Simonich, is now a full professor at Oregon State University. To date, she has published over 50 peer-review journal articles, as well as mentored 9 undergraduate students, 20 graduate students, 3 post-doctoral scholars, and 3 international visiting scientists in her laboratory.

  15. Measurements of isotope effects in the photoionization of N2 and implications for Titan's atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, Philip; Randazzo, John B.; Kostko, Oleg; Ahmed, Musahid; Liang, Mao-Chang; Yung, Yuk L.; Boering, Kristie A.

    2010-12-30

    Isotope effects in the non-dissociative photoionization of molecular nitrogen (N2 + h nu -> N2+ + e-) may play a role in determining the relative abundances of isotopic species containing nitrogen in interstellar clouds and planetary atmospheres but have not been previously measured. Measurements of the photoionization efficiency spectra of 14N2, 15N14N, and 15N2 from 15.5 to 18.9 eV (65.6-80.0 nm) using the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory show large differences in peak energies and intensities, with the ratio of the energy-dependent photoionization cross-sections, sigma(14N2)/sigma(15N14N), ranging from 0.4 to 3.5. Convolving the cross-sections with the solar flux and integrating over the energies measured, the ratios of photoionization rate coefficients are J(15N14N)/J(14N2)=1.00+-0.02 and J(15N2)/J(14N2)=1.00+-0.02, suggesting that isotopic fractionation between N2 and N2+ should be small under such conditions. In contrast, in a one-dimensional model of Titan's atmosphere, isotopic self-shielding of 14N2 leads to values of J(15N14N)/J(14N2) as large as ~;;1.17, larger than under optically thin conditions but still much smaller than values as high as ~;;29 predicted for N2 photodissociation. Since modeled photodissociation isotope effects overpredict the HC15N/HC14N ratio in Titan's atmosphere, and since both N atoms and N2+ ions may ultimately lead to the formation of HCN, estimates of the potential of including N2 photoionization to contribute to a more quantitative explanation of 15N/14N for HCN in Titan's atmosphere are explored.

  16. Forest-atmosphere exchange of ozone: sensitivity to very reactive biogenic VOC emissions and implications for in-canopy photochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Wolfe

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the fate of ozone within and above forested environments is vital to assessing the anthropogenic impact on ecosystems and air quality at the urban-rural interface. Observed forest-atmosphere exchange of ozone is often much faster than explicable by stomatal uptake alone, suggesting the presence of additional ozone sinks within the canopy. Using the Chemistry of Atmosphere-Forest Exchange (CAFE model in conjunction with summer noontime observations from the 2007 Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX-2007, we explore the viability and implications of the hypothesis that ozonolysis of very reactive but yet unidentified biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC can influence the forest-atmosphere exchange of ozone. Non-stomatal processes typically generate 67 % of the observed ozone flux, but reactions of ozone with measured BVOC, including monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, can account for only 2 % of this flux during the selected timeframe. By incorporating additional emissions and chemistry of a proxy for very reactive VOC (VRVOC that undergo rapid ozonolysis, we demonstrate that an in-canopy chemical ozone sink of ~2 × 108 molec cm−3 s−1 can close the ozone flux budget. Even in such a case, the 65 min chemical lifetime of ozone is much longer than the canopy residence time of ~2 min, highlighting that chemistry can influence reactive trace gas exchange even when it is "slow" relative to vertical mixing. This level of VRVOC ozonolysis could enhance OH and RO2 production by as much as 1 pptv s−1 and substantially alter their respective vertical profiles depending on the actual product yields. Reaction products would also contribute significantly to the oxidized VOC budget and, by extension, secondary organic aerosol mass. Given the potentially significant ramifications of a chemical ozone flux for both in-canopy chemistry and estimates of ozone

  17. Solar wind and high energy particle effects in the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lastovicka, Jan

    1989-01-01

    The solar wind variability and high energy particle effects in the neutral middle atmosphere are not much known. These factors are important in the high latitude upper mesosphere, lower thermosphere energy budget. They influence temperature, composition (minor constituents of nitric oxide, ozone), circulation (wind system) and airflow. The vertical and latitudinal structures of such effects, mechanisms of downward penetration of energy and questions of energy abundance are largely to be solved. The most important recent finding seems to be the discovery of the role of highly relativistic electrons in the middle atmosphere at L = 3 - 8 (Baker et al., 1987). The solar wind and high energy particle flux variability appear to form a part of the chain of possible Sun-weather (climate) relationships. The importance of such studies in the nineties is emphasized by their role in big international programs STEP and IGBP - Global Change.

  18. VUV-absorption cross section of CO2 at high temperatures and impact on exoplanet atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venot Olivia

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet (UV absorption cross sections are an essential ingredient of photochemical atmosphere models. Exoplanet searches have unveiled a large population of short-period objects with hot atmospheres, very different from what we find in our solar system. Transiting exoplanets whose atmospheres can now be studied by transit spectroscopy receive extremely strong UV fluxes and have typical temperatures ranging from 400 to 2500 K. At these temperatures, UV photolysis cross section data are severely lacking. Our goal is to provide high-temperature absorption cross sections and their temperature dependency for important atmospheric compounds. This study is dedicated to CO2, which is observed and photodissociated in exoplanet atmospheres. We performed these measurements for the 115 - 200 nm range at 300, 410, 480, and 550 K. In the 195 - 230 nm range, we worked at seven temperatures between 465 and 800 K. We found that the absorption cross section of CO2 is very sensitive to temperature, especially above 160 nm. Within the studied range of temperature, the CO2 cross section can vary by more than two orders of magnitude. This, in particular, makes the absorption of CO2 significant up to wavelengths as high as 230 nm, while it is negligible above 200 nm at 300 K. To investigate the influence of these new data on the photochemistry of exoplanets, we implemented the measured cross section into a 1D photochemical model. The model predicts that accounting for this temperature dependency of CO2 cross section can affect the computed abundances of NH3, CO2, and CO by one order of magnitude in the atmospheres of hot Jupiter and hot Neptune.

  19. Atmospheric loss from the dayside open polar region and its dependence on geomagnetic activity: implications for atmospheric escape on evolutionary timescales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Slapak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the total O+ escape rate from the dayside open polar region and its dependence on geomagnetic activity, specifically Kp. Two different escape routes of magnetospheric plasma into the solar wind, the plasma mantle, and the high-latitude dayside magnetosheath have been investigated separately. The flux of O+ in the plasma mantle is sufficiently fast to subsequently escape further down the magnetotail passing the neutral point, and it is nearly 3 times larger than that in the dayside magnetosheath. The contribution from the plasma mantle route is estimated as  ∼ 3. 9 × 1024exp(0. 45 Kp [s−1] with a 1 to 2 order of magnitude range for a given geomagnetic activity condition. The extrapolation of this result, including escape via the dayside magnetosheath, indicates an average O+ escape of 3 × 1026 s−1 for the most extreme geomagnetic storms. Assuming that the range is mainly caused by the solar EUV level, which was also larger in the past, the average O+ escape could have reached 1027–28 s−1 a few billion years ago. Integration over time suggests a total oxygen escape from ancient times until the present roughly equal to the atmospheric oxygen content today.

  20. Compact high-resolution echelle-AOTF NIR spectrometer for atmospheric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korablev, Oleg I.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Vinogradov, Imant I.; Kalinnikov, Yurii K.; Nevejans, D.; Neefs, E.; Le Barbu, T.; Durry, G.

    2017-11-01

    A new concept of a high-resolution near-IR spectrometer consisting of an echelle grating combined with an acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) for separation of diffraction orders, is developed for space-borne studies of planetary atmospheres. A compact design with no moving parts within the mass budget of 3-5 kg allows to reach the resolving power λ/Δλ of 20000-30000. Only a small piece of spectrum in high diffraction orders can be measured at a time, but thanks to flexibility of the AOTF electrical tuning, such pieces of spectrum can be measured randomly and rapidly within the spectral range. This development can be used for accurate measurements of important atmospheric gases, such as CO2 in terrestrial atmosphere, isotopic ratios and minor gases. A spectrometer, based on this principle, SOIR (Solar Occultation InfraRed) is being built for Venus Express (2005) ESA mission. Instruments based on this principle have high potential for the studies of the Earth, in particular for measurements of isotopes of water in the lower atmosphere, either in solar occultation profiling (tangent altitude solar glint for integral quantities of the components. Small size of hardware makes them ideal for micro-satellites, which are now agile enough to provide necessary pointing for solar occultation or glint observations. Also, the atmosphere of Mars has never been observed at local scales with such a high spectral resolution. A laboratory prototype consisting of 275-mm echelle spectrometer with Hamamatsu InGaAs 512-pixel linear array and the AOTF has demonstrated λ/Δλ≍30000 in the spectral range of 1-1.7 μm. The next set up, covering the spectral ranges of 1-1.7 μm and 2.3-4.3 μm, and the Venus Express SOIR are briefly discussed.

  1. Characterization of Atmospheric Ions at the High Altitude Station Jungfraujoch (Switzerland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frege, Carla; Bianchi, Federico; Junninen, Heikki; Tröstl, Jasmin; Molteni, Ugo; Herrmann, Erik; Sipilä, Mikko; Dommen, Josef; Kulmala, Markku; Baltensperger, Urs

    2015-04-01

    Understanding ion composition in the atmosphere is of high interest since ions control the electrical properties of the atmospheric medium, participate in ion-catalysed and ion-molecule reactions and contribute to physico-chemical interactions, including ion-induced nucleation (Arnold, 2008). In the last decade, the interest in atmospheric ions has increased because of the potential impact of the ion-aerosol-cloud interaction on climate (Hirsikko et al., 2011). Therefore, several laboratory and field measurements have been performed trying to understand the precise role of ions in new particle formation. The free troposphere represents an interesting region with no immediate contribution from biogenic or anthropogenic sources, low pollution and low temperatures, where new particle formation can make an important contribution to the total particle number concentration. Thus, the characterization of ions in this region of the atmosphere is an important step to understand new particle nucleation. In August 2013 we started measurements at the Jungfraujoch (JFJ, 3580 m asl; 46.55°N, 7.98°E) in the Swiss Alps to investigate the composition of atmospheric ions in the lower free troposphere for around 9 months. The instrument employed was an Atmospheric Pressure Interface Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (TOFWERK AG, Thun Switzerland) for ion characterization in positive and negative mode (alternately). We will present an overview of the major positively and negatively charged inorganic, organic and halogenated ions. We will also present back trajectories calculated with two different models: HYSPLIT for air transport and dispersion, and FLEXPART for surface residence time, along with correlations with the abundance of specific ions. As measurements were conducted continuously over a long period we were able to compare ion compositions under different conditions of solar radiation, presence or absence of clouds and wind direction/ air mass origin and to evaluate

  2. Racial differences in hypertension: implications for high blood pressure management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackland, Daniel T

    2014-08-01

    The racial disparity in hypertension and hypertension-related outcomes has been recognized for decades with African Americans with greater risks than Caucasians. Blood pressure levels have consistently been higher for African Americans with an earlier onset of hypertension. Although awareness and treatment levels of high blood pressure have been similar, racial differences in control rates are evident. The higher blood pressure levels for African Americans are associated with higher rates of stroke, end-stage renal disease and congestive heart failure. The reasons for the racial disparities in elevated blood pressure and hypertension-related outcomes risk remain unclear. However, the implications of the disparities of hypertension for prevention and clinical management are substantial, identifying African American men and women with excel hypertension risk and warranting interventions focused on these differences. In addition, focused research to identify the factors attributed to these disparities in risk burden is an essential need to address the evidence gaps.

  3. Venus High Temperature Atmospheric Dropsonde and Extreme-Environment Seismometer (HADES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, Nathan J.; Salazar, Denise; Stelter, Christopher J.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Colozza, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric composition and geologic structure of Venus have been identified by the US National Research Council's Decadal Survey for Planetary Science as priority targets for scientific exploration, however the high temperature and pressure at the surface, along with the highly corrosive chemistry of the Venus atmosphere, present significant obstacles to spacecraft design that have severely limited past and proposed landed missions. Following the methodology of the NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) proposal regime and the Collaborative Modeling and Parametric Assessment of Space Systems (COMPASS) design protocol, this paper presents a conceptual study and initial feasibility analysis for a Discovery-class Venus lander capable of an extended-duration mission at ambient temperature and pressure, incorporating emerging technologies within the field of high temperature electronics in combination with novel configurations of proven, high Technology Readiness Level (TRL) systems. Radioisotope Thermal Power (RTG) systems and silicon carbide (SiC) communications and data handling are examined in detail, and various high-temperature instruments are proposed, including a seismometer and an advanced photodiode imager. The study combines this technological analysis with proposals for a descent instrument package and a relay orbiter to demonstrate the viability of an integrated atmospheric and in-situ geologic exploratory mission that differs from previous proposals by greatly reducing the mass, power requirements, and cost, while achieving important scientific goals.

  4. Impacts from ice-nucleating bacteria on deep convection: implications for the biosphere-atmosphere interaction in climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, V. T. J.; Andronache, C.; Morris, C. E.; Sands, D. C.

    2008-03-01

    A cloud modeling framework is described to simulate ice nucleation by biogenic aerosol particles, as represented by airborne ice-nucleation active (INA) bacteria. It includes the empirical parameterization of heterogeneous ice nucleation. The formation of cloud liquid by soluble material coated on such insoluble aerosols is represented and determines their partial removal from deep convective clouds by accretion onto precipitation. Preliminary simulations are performed for a case of deep convection over Oklahoma. If present at high enough concentrations, as might occur in proximity to land sources, INA bacteria are found to influence significantly: - (1) the average numbers and sizes of crystals in the clouds; (2) the horizontal cloud coverage in the free troposphere; and (3) precipitation and incident solar insolation at the surface, which influence rates of bacterial growth. At lower concentrations, the corresponding responses of cloud fields appear much lower or are ambiguous. In nature, the growth rates of INA bacteria on leaves prior to emission into the atmosphere are known to be highly dependent on temperature, precipitation and plant species. Consequently, the open question emerges of whether emissions of such ice-nucleating biogenic particles can then be modified by their own effects on clouds and atmospheric conditions, forming a weak feedback in climate or microclimate systems.

  5. Observations of an atmospheric chemical equator and its implications for the tropical warm pool region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jacqueline F.; Allen, Grant; Watson, Nicola M.; Lee, James D.; Saxton, Julie E.; Lewis, Alastair C.; Vaughan, Geraint; Bower, Keith N.; Flynn, Michael J.; Crosier, Jonathan; Carver, Glenn D.; Harris, Neil R. P.; Parker, Robert J.; Remedios, John J.; Richards, Nigel A. D.

    2008-10-01

    This paper reports observations of a tropospheric chemical equator in the Western Pacific region during the Austral monsoon season, separating the polluted Northern Hemisphere from the cleaner Southern Hemisphere. Measurements of carbon monoxide, ozone, aerosol size/composition, and non-methane hydrocarbons were made from aircraft, flying north from Darwin, Australia as part of the Aerosol and Chemical Transport In tropical conVEction (ACTIVE) campaign. A chemical equator, defined as a sharp gradient in the chemical background, was found not to be coincident with the Intertropical Convergence Zone during this period. A pronounced interfacial region was identified between 8.5 and 10°S, where tracer mixing ratios increased rapidly within the boundary layer, e.g. CO from 40 ppbv to 160 ppbv within 0.5° latitude (50 km), with inhibited inter-hemispheric mixing. These measurements are discussed in context using a combination of meteorological and Earth-observing satellite imagery, back trajectory analysis and chemical model data with the conclusion that air flowing into and subsequently uplifted by the active convection of the Tropical Warm Pool (TWP) region in the Western Pacific is likely to be highly polluted, and will perturb the composition of the Tropical Tropopause Layer. The main source of CO and other pollutants within the TWP region is expected to be biomass burning, with extensive fires in North Sumatra and Thailand during this period. The sharp gradient in composition at the chemical equator seen here results from extensive burning to the north, contrasting with pristine maritime air advected from the Southern Indian Ocean by a strong land-based cyclone over the Northern Territory of Australia.

  6. Impact of vegetation on land-atmosphere coupling strength and its implication for desertification mitigation over East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myoung, Boksoon; Choi, Yong-Sang; Choi, Suk-Jin; Park, Seon Ki

    2012-06-01

    Desertification of the East Asian drylands and the consequent dust transport have been serious concerns for adjacent Asian countries as well as the western United States. Tree planting has been considered one applicable strategy to mitigate the desertification. However, the desired effect of the tree planting would not be brought to fruition unless the newly planted trees change the coupling characteristics between the land and the atmosphere. Based on this perception, we attempt to clarify the effects of vegetation on the coupling strength between the atmosphere and land surface, and we suggest the most efficient areas of tree planting for desertification mitigation in East Asia. Using regional vegetation-atmosphere coupled model simulations, coupling strength with and without vegetation was computed and compared with each other. An increased vegetation fraction reduces the coupling strength in June, July, and August (JJA), primarily due to decreased evapotranspiration variability. This effect is pronounced over the Manchurian Plains and the highly populated areas of Beijing and Tianjin. The reduced coupling strength tends to weaken feedback between soil moisture and precipitation as a maintenance mechanism of warm season droughts in the midlatitudes and subsequently decrease the probability of droughts, a finding that is reflected in the enhanced JJA mean soil moisture. However, some drylands like the eastern edges of the Gobi desert present marginal or even opposite changes in coupling strength, meaning a limited effect of vegetation on relieving droughts. Therefore, given limited financial and human resources, acupuncture-like afforestation, i.e., concentrated tree planting in a particular region where the coupling strength can be substantially reduced by vegetation, is an effective strategy to secure long-standing desertification mitigation.

  7. Development and evaluation of a high sensitivity dial system for profiling atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, S.; Koch, G. J.; Refaat, T.; Abedin, M. N.; Yu, J.; Singh, U. N.

    2017-11-01

    A ground-based 2-micron Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) CO2 profiling system for atmospheric boundary layer studies and validation of space-based CO2 sensors is being developed and tested at NASA Langley Research Center as part of the NASA Instrument Incubator Program. To capture the variability of CO2 in the lower troposphere a precision of 1-2 ppm of CO2 ( laser technology developed under NASA's Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) and other NASA programs to develop new solid-state laser technology that provides high pulse energy, tunable, wavelength-stabilized, and double-pulsed lasers that are operable over pre-selected temperature insensitive strong CO2 absorption lines suitable for profiling of lower tropospheric CO2. It also incorporates new high quantum efficiency, high gain, and relatively low noise phototransistors, and a new receiver/signal processor system to achieve high precision DIAL measurements. This presentation describes the capabilities of this system for atmospheric CO2 and aerosol profiling. Examples of atmospheric measurements in the lidar and DIAL mode will be presented.

  8. High explosives vapor detection by atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization/tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLuckey, S.A.; Goeringer, D.E.; Asano, K.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Chemical and Analytical Sciences Div.

    1996-02-01

    The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with tandem mass spectrometry for the detection of traces of high explosives is described. Particular emphasis is placed on use of the quadrupole ion trap as the type of tandem mass spectrometer. Atmospheric sampling glow discharge provides a simple, rugged, and efficient means for anion formation while the quadrupole ion trap provides for efficient tandem mass spectrometry. Mass selective ion accumulation and non-specific ion activation methods can be used to overcome deleterious effects arising from ion/ion interactions. Such interactions constitute the major potential technical barrier to the use of the ion trap for real-time monitoring of targeted compounds in uncontrolled and highly variable matrices. Tailored waveforms can be used to effect both mass selective ion accumulation and ion activation. Concatenated tailored waveforms allow for both functions in a single experiment thereby providing the capability for monitoring several targeted species simultaneously. The combination of atmospheric sampling glow discharge ionization with a state-of-the-art analytical quadrupole ion trap is a highly sensitive and specific detector for traces of high explosives. The combination is also small and inexpensive relative to virtually any other form of tandem mass spectrometry. The science and technology underlying the glow discharge/ion trap combination is sufficiently mature to form the basis for an engineering effort to make the detector portable. 85 refs.

  9. A high-resolution mass spectrometer to measure atmospheric ion composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Junninen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present recent achievements on developing and testing a tool to detect the composition of ambient ions in the mass/charge range up to 2000 Th. The instrument is an Atmospheric Pressure Interface Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (APi-TOF, Tofwerk AG. Its mass accuracy is better than 0.002%, and the mass resolving power is 3000 Th/Th. In the data analysis, a new efficient Matlab based set of programs (tofTools were developed, tested and used. The APi-TOF was tested both in laboratory conditions and applied to outdoor air sampling in Helsinki at the SMEAR III station. Transmission efficiency calibrations showed a throughput of 0.1–0.5% in the range 100–1300 Th for positive ions, and linearity over 3 orders of magnitude in concentration was determined. In the laboratory tests the APi-TOF detected sulphuric acid-ammonia clusters in high concentration from a nebulised sample illustrating the potential of the instrument in revealing the role of sulphuric acid clusters in atmospheric new particle formation. The APi-TOF features a high enough accuracy, resolution and sensitivity for the determination of the composition of atmospheric small ions although the total concentration of those ions is typically only 400–2000 cm−3. The atmospheric ions were identified based on their exact masses, utilizing Kendrick analysis and correlograms as well as narrowing down the potential candidates based on their proton affinities as well isotopic patterns. In Helsinki during day-time the main negative ambient small ions were inorganic acids and their clusters. The positive ions were more complex, the main compounds were (polyalkyl pyridines and – amines. The APi-TOF provides a near universal interface for atmospheric pressure sampling, and this key feature will be utilized in future laboratory and field studies.

  10. Impact of 2007 and 2008 Arctic ice anomalies on the atmospheric circulation: Implications for long‐range predictions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Balmaseda, Magdalena A; Ferranti, Laura; Molteni, Franco; Palmer, Tim N

    2010-01-01

    The impact on the atmospheric circulation of the unprecedented Arctic sea‐ice anomalies during the summers 2007 and 2008 is evaluated using the atmospheric model of the ECMWF operational seasonal forecasting system...

  11. Implications of Low Volatility SOA and Gas-Phase Fragmentation Reactions on SOA Loadings and their Spatial and Temporal Evolution in the Atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, Dan; Easter, Richard C.; Beranek, Josef; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Fast, Jerome D.

    2013-04-27

    Recent laboratory and field measurements by a number of groups show that secondary organic aerosol (SOA) evaporates orders of magnitude slower than traditional models assume. In addition, chemical transport models using volatility basis set (VBS) SOA schemes neglect gas-phase fragmentation reactions, which are known to be extremely important. In this work, we present modeling studies to investigate the implications of non-evaporating SOA and gas-phase fragmentation reactions. Using the 3-D chemical transport model, WRF-Chem, we show that previous parameterizations, which neglect fragmentation during multi-generational gas-phase chemistry of semi-volatile/inter-mediate volatility organics ("aging SIVOC"), significantly over-predict SOA as compared to aircraft measurements downwind of Mexico City. In sharp contrast, the revised models, which include gas-phase fragmentation, show much better agreement with measurements downwind of Mexico City. We also demonstrate complex differences in spatial SOA distributions when we transform SOA to non-volatile secondary organic aerosol (NVSOA) to account for experimental observations. Using a simple box model, we show that for same amount of SOA precursors, earlier models that do not employ multi-generation gas-phase chemistry of precursors ("non-aging SIVOC"), produce orders of magnitude lower SOA than "aging SIVOC" parameterizations both with and without fragmentation. In addition, traditional absorptive partitioning models predict almost complete SOA evaporation at farther downwind locations for both "non-aging SIVOC" and "aging SIVOC" with fragmentation. In contrast, in our revised approach, SOA transformed to NVSOA implies significantly higher background concentrations as it remains in particle phase even under highly dilute conditions. This work has significant implications on understanding the role of multi-generational chemistry and NVSOA formation on SOA evolution in the atmosphere.

  12. Gravity Wave-induced High-altitude CO2 Ice Clouds in Mars' Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yigit, E.; Medvedev, A. S.; Hartogh, P.

    2015-12-01

    First general circulation model simulations that quantify and reproduce patches of cold air required for CO2 condensation and ice cloud formation in Mars' atmosphere are presented. Results suggest that these ice clouds are generated by lower atmospheric small-scale gravity waves (GWs) accounted for in the model with the interactively implemented spectral GW parameterization of Yiğit et al. (2008). Distributions of GW-induced temperature fluctuations and occurrences of supersaturation conditions are in a good qualitative agreement with observations of high-altitude CO2 ice clouds. Our study confirms the key role of subgrid-scale GWs in facilitating high-altitude CO2 cloud formation and predicts clouds at altitudes higher than have been observed to date.

  13. Atmospheric propagation of high power laser radiation at different weather conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Pargmann, Carsten; Hall, Thomas; Duschek, Frank; Handke, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Applications based on the propagation of high power laser radiation through the atmosphere are limited in range and effect, due to weather dependent beam wandering, beam deterioration, and scattering processes. Security and defense related application examples are countermeasures against hostile projectiles and the powering of satellites and aircrafts. For an examination of the correlations between weather condition and laser beam characteristics DLR operates at Lampoldshausen a 130 m long fr...

  14. Climate change and climate systems influence and control the atmospheric dispersion of desert dust: implications for human health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dale W.; Ragaini, Richard C.

    2010-01-01

    The global dispersion of desert dust through Earth’s atmosphere is greatly influenced by temperature. Temporal analyses of ice core data have demonstrated that enhanced dust dispersion occurs during glacial events. This is due to an increase in ice cover, which results in an increase in drier terrestrial cover. A shorter temporal analysis of dust dispersion data over the last 40 years has demonstrated an increase in dust transport. Climate systems or events such as the North Atlantic Oscillation, the Indian Ocean subtropical High, Pacific Decadal Oscillation, and El Nino-Sothern Oscillation are known to influence global short-term dust dispersion occurrence and transport routes. Anthropogenic influences on dust transport include deforestation, harmful use of topsoil for agriculture as observed during the American Dust Bowl period, and the creation of dry seas (Aral Sea) and lakes (Lake Owens in California and Lake Chad in North Africa) through the diversion of source waters (for irrigation and drinking water supplies). Constituents of desert dust both from source regions (pathogenic microorganisms, organic and inorganic toxins) and those scavenged through atmospheric transport (i.e., industrial and agricultural emissions) are known to directly impact human and ecosystem health. This presentation will present a review of global scale dust storms and how these events can be both a detriment and benefit to various organisms in downwind environments.

  15. Foliar Water Uptake of Tamarix ramosissima from an Atmosphere of High Humidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Many species have been found to be capable of foliar water uptake, but little research has focused on this in desert plants. Tamarix ramosissima was investigated to determine whether its leaves can directly absorb water from high humidity atmosphere and, if they can, to understand the magnitude and importance of foliar water uptake. Various techniques were adopted to demonstrate foliar water uptake under submergence or high atmospheric humidity. The mean increase in leaf water content after submergence was 29.38% and 20.93% for mature and tender leaves, respectively. In the chamber experiment, obvious reverse sap flow occurred when relative humidity (RH was persistently above 90%. Reverse flow was recorded first in twigs, then in branches and stems. For the stem, the percentage of negative sap flow rate accounting for the maximum value of sap flow reached 10.71%, and its amount accounted for 7.54% of diurnal sap flow. Small rainfall can not only compensate water loss of plant by foliar uptake, but also suppress transpiration. Foliar uptake can appear in the daytime under certain rainfall events. High atmospheric humidity is beneficial for enhancing the water status of plants. Foliar uptake should be an important strategy of water acquisition for desert plants.

  16. Mid-Infrared OPO for High Resolution Measurements of Trace Gases in the Mars Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Anthony W.; Numata,Kenji; Riris, haris; Abshire, James B.; Allan, Graham; Sun, Xiaoli; Krainak, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The Martian atmosphere is composed primarily (>95%) of CO2 and N2 gas, with CO, O2, CH4, and inert gases such as argon comprising most of the remainder. It is surprisingly dynamic with various processes driving changes in the distribution of CO2, dust, haze, clouds and water vapor on global scales in the meteorology of Mars atmosphere [I]. The trace gases and isotopic ratios in the atmosphere offer important but subtle clues as to the origins of the planet's atmosphere, hydrology, geology, and potential for biology. In the search for life on Mars, an important process is the ability of bacteria to metabolize inorganic substrates (H2, CO2 and rock) to derive energy and produce methane as a by-product of anaerobic metabolism. Trace gases have been measured in the Mars atmosphere from Earth, Mars orbit, and from the Mars surface. The concentration of water vapor and various carbon-based trace gases are observed in variable concentrations. Within the past decade multiple groups have reported detection of CH4, with concentrations in the 10's of ppb, using spectroscopic observations from Earth [2]. Passive spectrometers in the mid-infrared (MIR) are restricted to the sunlit side of the planet, generally in the mid latitudes, and have limited spectral and spatial resolution. To accurately map the global distribution and to locate areas of possibly higher concentrations of these gases such as plumes or vents requires an instrument with high sensitivity and fine spatial resolution that also has global coverage and can measure during both day and night. Our development goal is a new MIR lidar capable of measuring, on global scales, with sensitivity, resolution and precision needed to characterize the trace gases and isotopic ratios of the Martian atmosphere. An optical parametric oscillator operating in the MIR is well suited for this instrument. The sufficient wavelength tuning range of the OPO can extend the measurements to other organic molecules, CO2, atmospheric water

  17. The dynamic atmospheres of red giant stars. Spectral synthesis in high resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowotny, W.

    2005-11-01

    Light is the only source of information we have to study distant stars. Our knowledge about the state of the matter inside stars has been gathered by analysing star light (photometry, spectroscopy, interferometry, polarimetry, etc.). Of central importance in this context are stellar atmospheres, which are the transition regions from the optically thick stellar interiors where the electromagnetic radiation is generated to the optically thin outer layers from where the photons can leave the star. However, the atmosphere of a star is not only the region where most of the observable radiation is emitted or in other words the layers which are "visible from outside". The atmosphere also leaves an imprint on the stellar spectrum as the radiation passes through, most of the line spectrum is formed there. Thus, the light serves as a probe for the physical processes within stellar atmospheres, especially spectroscopy is one of the major tools in stellar astrophysics. Applying the underlying physical principles in numerical simulations (model atmospheres, synthetic spectra) is the second -- complementary and necessary -- step towards a deeper understanding of stellar atmospheres and for deriving stellar parameters (e.g. T_eff, L, log g, chemical composition) of observed objects. This thesis is dedicated to the outer layers of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars, which have rather remarkable properties compared to atmospheres of most other types of stars. AGB stars represent low- to intermediate mass stars at a late stage of their evolution. Forming a sub-group among all red giants, they exhibit large extensions, low effective temperatures and high luminosities. The evolutionary phase of the AGB -- complex but decisive for stellar evolution -- is characterised by several important phenomena as for example nucleo-synthesis in explosively burning shells (thermal pulses), convective processes (dredge up), large-amplitude pulsations with long periods or a pronounced mass loss. Red

  18. Atmospheric pressure plasma jet with high-voltage power supply based on piezoelectric transformer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babij, Michał; Kowalski, Zbigniew W; Nitsch, Karol; Silberring, Jerzy; Gotszalk, Teodor

    2014-05-01

    The dielectric barrier discharge plasma jet, an example of the nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ), generates low-temperature plasmas that are suitable for the atomization of volatile species and can also be served as an ionization source for ambient mass and ion mobility spectrometry. A new design of APPJ for mass spectrometry has been built in our group. In these plasma sources magnetic transformers (MTs) and inductors are typically used in power supplies but they present several drawbacks that are even more evident when dealing with high-voltage normally used in APPJs. To overcome these disadvantages, high frequency generators with the absence of MT are proposed in the literature. However, in the case of miniaturized APPJs these conventional power converters, built of ferromagnetic cores and inductors or by means of LC resonant tank circuits, are not so useful as piezoelectric transformer (PT) based power converters due to bulky components and small efficiency. We made and examined a novel atmospheric pressure plasma jet with PT supplier served as ionization source for ambient mass spectrometry, and especially mobile spectrometry where miniaturization, integration of components, and clean plasma are required. The objective of this paper is to describe the concept, design, and implementation of this miniaturized piezoelectric transformer-based atmospheric pressure plasma jet.

  19. Interaction between the low altitude atmosphere and clouds by high-precision polarization lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiina, Tatsuo; Noguchi, Kazuo; Fukuchi, Tetsuo

    2012-11-01

    Lidar is a powerful remote sensing tool to monitor the weather changes and the environmental issues. This technique should not been restricted in those fields. In this study, the authors aim to be apply it to the prediction of weather disaster. The heavy rain and the lightning strike are our targets. The inline typed MPL (micro pulse lidar) has been accomplished to grasp the interaction between the low altitude cloud and the atmosphere and to predict the heavy rain, while it was hard to catch the sign of lightning strike. The authors introduced a new algorism to catch the direct sign of the lightning strike. Faraday effect is caused by lightning discharge in the ionized atmosphere. This effect interacts with the polarization of the propagating beam, that is, the polarization plane is rotated by the effect. In this study, high precision polarization lidar was developed to grasp the small rotation angle of the polarization of the propagating beam. In this report, the interaction between the low altitude cloud and the atmosphere was monitored by the high precision polarization lidar. And the observation result of the lightning discharge were analyzed.

  20. Masculinity, moral atmosphere, and moral functioning of high school football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinfeldt, Jesse A; Rutkowski, Leslie A; Vaughan, Ellen L; Steinfeldt, Matthew C

    2011-04-01

    In order to identify factors associated with on-field moral functioning among student athletes within the unique context of football, we examined masculine gender role conflict, moral atmosphere, and athletic identity. Using structural equation modeling to assess survey data from 204 high school football players, results demonstrated that moral atmosphere (i.e., the influence of coaches and teammates) was significantly associated with participants' process of on-field moral functioning across the levels of judgment, intention, and behavior. Neither masculine gender role conflict nor athletic identity significantly predicted moral functioning, but the results indicated that participants' identification with the athlete role significantly predicted conflict with socialized gender roles. Results suggest that in the aggressive and violent sport of football, coaches can have a direct influence on players' moral functioning process. Coaches can also have an indirect effect by influencing all the players so that a culture of ethical play can be cultivated among teammates and spread from the top down.

  1. PROBING NEAR-SURFACE ATMOSPHERIC TURBULENCE WITH LIDAR MEASUREMENTS AND HIGH-RESOLUTION HYDRODYNAMIC MODELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. KAO; D. COOPER; ET AL

    2000-11-01

    As lidar technology is able to provide fast data collection at a resolution of meters in an atmospheric volume, it is imperative to promote a modeling counterpart of the lidar capability. This paper describes an integrated capability based on data from a scanning water vapor lidar and a high-resolution hydrodynamic model (HIGRAD) equipped with a visualization routine (VIEWER) that simulates the lidar scanning. The purpose is to better understand the spatial and temporal representativeness of the lidar measurements and, in turn, to extend their utility in studying turbulence fields in the atmospheric boundary layer. Raman lidar water vapor data collected over the Pacific warm pool and the simulations with the HIGRAD code are used for identifying the underlying physics and potential aliasing effects of spatially resolved lidar measurements. This capability also helps improve the trade-off between spatial-temporal resolution and coverage of the lidar measurements.

  2. Science on Spacelab. [astronomy, high energy astrophysics, life sciences, and solar, atmospheric and space physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerling, E. R.

    1977-01-01

    Spacelab was developed by the European Space Agency for the conduction of scientific and technological experiments in space. Spacelab can be taken into earth orbit by the Space Shuttle and returned to earth after a period of 1-3 weeks. The Spacelab modular system of pallets, pressurized modules, and racks can contain large payloads with high power and telemetry requirements. A working group has defined the 'Atmospheres, Magnetospheres, and Plasmas-in-Space' project. The project objectives include the absolute measurement of solar flux in a number of carefully selected bands at the same time at which atmospheric measurements are made. NASA is committed to the concept that the scientist is to play a key role in its scientific programs.

  3. Rapid inactivation of Penicillium digitatum spores using high-density nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseki, Sachiko; Ohta, Takayuki; Aomatsu, Akiyoshi; Ito, Masafumi; Kano, Hiroyuki; Higashijima, Yasuhiro; Hori, Masaru

    2010-04-01

    A promising, environmentally safe method for inactivating fungal spores of Penicillium digitatum, a difficult-to-inactivate food spoilage microorganism, was developed using a high-density nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP). The NEAPP employing Ar gas had a high electron density on the order of 1015 cm-3. The spores were successfully and rapidly inactivated using the NEAPP, with a decimal reduction time in spores (D value) of 1.7 min. The contributions of ozone and UV radiation on the inactivation of the spores were evaluated and concluded to be not dominant, which was fundamentally different from the conventional sterilizations.

  4. A passive dust experiment toward a high resolution simulation of the Martian atmospheric general circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y. O.; Hayashi, Y.-Y.; Odaka, M.; Ohfuchi, W.

    2005-08-01

    A high resolution simulation of the Martian atmosphere is performed to examine the appearance of small to medium scale atmospheric disturbances and their effects on the dust lifting and transfer processes. The dynamical core of the Martian GCM used in this study is that of the terrestrial GCM, AFES (Atmospheric GCM for Earth Simulator, Ohfuchi et al., Journal of the Earth Simulator, 1, 8, 2004). The physical processes of the present model are those developed by our group so far (the earlier version of our Martian GCM and its physical processes are described in Takahashi et al., JGR, 108, 5013, doi:10.1029/2001JE001638, 2003). A test simulation is performed with a relatively low resolution of T79L24, which is equivalent to about 90 km grid size on Mars. Moreover, this simulation is a "passive dust experiment" in the sense that dust is assumed to be radiatively inert. Atmospheric heating due to dust absorption is given separately from a zonally uniform distribution of dust with the latitudinal profile following the MGS-TES observation. The result of test simulation shows clear frontal structures in the baroclinic zones at spring and fall seasons. In addition, medium scale vortex generations are observed in the lees of high mountains in the northern hemisphere. In this test simulation, dust lifting events occur only in some limited areas and limited seasonal dates. Major dust lifting regions include the vicinity of polar caps, the eastern flank of Tharsis plateau, the southern low latitude belt, and the Hellas basin. These regions roughly coincide with those of dust storms observed by the MGS and dust lifting regions reported by earlier GCM studies. It is suggested that the strong wind, which is associated with the fronts and the local circulations induced by topographic variation, plays an important role to lift dust and generate dust storms.

  5. High-Speed Atmospheric Correction Algorithm for Spectral Image Processing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Generating land and ocean data products from NASA multispectral and hyperspectral imagery missions requires atmospheric correction, the removal of atmospheric...

  6. A Diagnostic Diagram to Understand the Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer at High Wind Speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettle, Anthony

    2014-05-01

    Long time series of offshore meteorological measurements in the lower marine atmospheric boundary layer show dynamical regimes and variability that are forced partly by interaction with the underlying sea surface and partly by the passage of cloud systems overhead. At low wind speeds, the dynamics and stability structure of the surface layer depend mainly on the air-sea temperature difference and the measured wind speed at a standard height. The physical processes are mostly understood and the quantified through Monin-Obukhov (MO) similarity theory. At high wind speeds different dynamical regimes become dominant. Breaking waves contribute to the atmospheric loading of sea spray and water vapor and modify the character of air-sea interaction. Downdrafts and boundary layer rolls associated with clouds at the top of the boundary layer impact vertical heat and momentum fluxes. Data from offshore meteorological monitoring sites will typically show different behavior and the regime shifts depending on the local winds and synoptic conditions. However, the regular methods to interpret time series through spectral analysis give only a partial view of dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer. Also, the spectral methods have limited use for boundary layer and mesoscale modellers whose geophysical diagnostics are mostly anchored in directly measurable quantities: wind speed, temperature, precipitation, pressure, and radiation. Of these, wind speed and the air-sea temperature difference are the most important factors that characterize the dynamics of the lower atmospheric boundary layer and they provide a dynamical and thermodynamic constraint to frame observed processes, especially at high wind speeds. This was recognized in the early interpretation of the Froya database of gale force coastal winds from mid-Norway (Andersen, O.J. and J. Lovseth, Gale force maritime wind. The Froya data base. Part 1: Sites and instrumentation. Review of the data base, Journal of Wind

  7. Venus atmosphere simulated by a high-resolution general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Norihiko

    2016-07-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) for Venus on the basis of AFES (AGCM For the Earth Simulator) have been developed (e.g., Sugimoto et al., 2014a) and a very high-resolution simulation is performed. The highest resolution of the model is T319L120; 960 times 480 horizontal grids (grid intervals are about 40 km) with 120 vertical layers (layer intervals are about 1 km). In the model, the atmosphere is dry and forced by the solar heating with the diurnal and semi-diurnal components. The infrared radiative process is simplified by adopting Newtonian cooling approximation. The temperature is relaxed to a prescribed horizontally uniform temperature distribution, in which a layer with almost neutral static stability observed in the Venus atmosphere presents. A fast zonal wind in a solid-body rotation is given as the initial state. Starting from this idealized superrotation, the model atmosphere reaches a quasi-equilibrium state within 1 Earth year and this state is stably maintained for more than 10 Earth years. The zonal-mean zonal flow with weak midlatitude jets has almost constant velocity of 120 m/s in latitudes between 45°S and 45°N at the cloud top levels, which agrees very well with observations. In the cloud layer, baroclinic waves develop continuously at midlatitudes and generate Rossby-type waves at the cloud top (Sugimoto et al., 2014b). At the polar region, warm polar vortex zonally surrounded by a cold latitude band (cold collar) is well reproduced (Ando et al., 2016). As for horizontal kinetic energy spectra, divergent component is broadly (k>10) larger than rotational component compared with that on Earth (Kashimura et al., in preparation). Finally, recent results for thermal tides and small-scale waves will be shown in the presentation. Sugimoto, N. et al. (2014a), Baroclinic modes in the Venus atmosphere simulated by GCM, Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, Vol. 119, p1950-1968. Sugimoto, N. et al. (2014b), Waves in a Venus general

  8. Assessment of Atmospheric Algorithms to Retrieve Vegetation in Natural Protected Areas Using Multispectral High Resolution Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcello, Javier; Eugenio, Francisco; Perdomo, Ulises; Medina, Anabella

    2016-09-30

    The precise mapping of vegetation covers in semi-arid areas is a complex task as this type of environment consists of sparse vegetation mainly composed of small shrubs. The launch of high resolution satellites, with additional spectral bands and the ability to alter the viewing angle, offers a useful technology to focus on this objective. In this context, atmospheric correction is a fundamental step in the pre-processing of such remote sensing imagery and, consequently, different algorithms have been developed for this purpose over the years. They are commonly categorized as imaged-based methods as well as in more advanced physical models based on the radiative transfer theory. Despite the relevance of this topic, a few comparative studies covering several methods have been carried out using high resolution data or which are specifically applied to vegetation covers. In this work, the performance of five representative atmospheric correction algorithms (DOS, QUAC, FLAASH, ATCOR and 6S) has been assessed, using high resolution Worldview-2 imagery and field spectroradiometer data collected simultaneously, with the goal of identifying the most appropriate techniques. The study also included a detailed analysis of the parameterization influence on the final results of the correction, the aerosol model and its optical thickness being important parameters to be properly adjusted. The effects of corrections were studied in vegetation and soil sites belonging to different protected semi-arid ecosystems (high mountain and coastal areas). In summary, the superior performance of model-based algorithms, 6S in particular, has been demonstrated, achieving reflectance estimations very close to the in-situ measurements (RMSE of between 2% and 3%). Finally, an example of the importance of the atmospheric correction in the vegetation estimation in these natural areas is presented, allowing the robust mapping of species and the analysis of multitemporal variations related to the

  9. Influence of hadronic interaction models on characteristics of the high-energy atmospheric neutrino flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, A. D.; Kochanov, A. A.; Sinegovskaya, T. S.; Sinegovsky, S. I.

    2017-12-01

    The high-energy conventional atmospheric neutrino fluxes are calculated with the hadronic interaction models: Kimel & Mokhov, QGSJET II-03(04), SIBYL 2.1(2.3), EPOS LHC. The influence of hadron-nuclear interactions on the neutrino flux ratios, v/\\bar{v},({v}μ +{\\bar{v}}μ )/({v}e+{\\bar{v}}e), is studied. A comparison of calculations obtained with use of two different approaches, {\\mathscr{Z}}(E,h) -functions method and the Matrix Cascade Equations (MCEQ), demonstrates close agreement in whole but some of partial contrubutions. The comparison of calculated muon neutrino spectra with the latest experimental data justifies reliability of performed computation which describes correctly the atmospheric neutrino production. The calculation made with the model EPOS LHC, combined with Hillas & Gaisser parametrization of the cosmic ray spectrum, is in close agreement with the best fit of IceCube for energy spetrum of atmospheric muon neutrinos in the energy range 1–500 TeV.

  10. Non-standard interactions with high-energy atmospheric neutrinos at IceCube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvado, Jordi; Mena, Olga; Palomares-Ruiz, Sergio; Rius, Nuria [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC-Universitat de València,Apartado de Correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2017-01-31

    Non-standard interactions in the propagation of neutrinos in matter can lead to significant deviations from expectations within the standard neutrino oscillation framework and atmospheric neutrino detectors have been considered to set constraints. However, most previous works have focused on relatively low-energy atmospheric neutrino data. Here, we consider the one-year high-energy through-going muon data in IceCube, which has been already used to search for light sterile neutrinos, to constrain new interactions in the μτ-sector. In our analysis we include several systematic uncertainties on both, the atmospheric neutrino flux and on the detector properties, which are accounted for via nuisance parameters. After considering different primary cosmic-ray spectra and hadronic interaction models, we improve over previous analysis by using the latest data and showing that systematics currently affect very little the bound on the off-diagonal ε{sub μτ}, with the 90% credible interval given by −6.0×10{sup −3}<ε{sub μτ}<5.4×10{sup −3}, comparable to previous results. In addition, we also estimate the expected sensitivity after 10 years of collected data in IceCube and study the precision at which non-standard parameters could be determined for the case of ε{sub μτ} near its current bound.

  11. Turbulence velocity profiling for high sensitivity and vertical-resolution atmospheric characterization with Stereo-SCIDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, J.; Butterley, T.; Townson, M. J.; Reeves, A. P.; Morris, T. J.; Wilson, R. W.

    2017-02-01

    As telescopes become larger, into the era of ˜40 m Extremely Large Telescopes, the high-resolution vertical profile of the optical turbulence strength is critical for the validation, optimization and operation of optical systems. The velocity of atmospheric optical turbulence is an important parameter for several applications including astronomical adaptive optics systems. Here, we compare the vertical profile of the velocity of the atmospheric wind above La Palma by means of a comparison of Stereo-SCIntillation Detection And Ranging (Stereo-SCIDAR) with the Global Forecast System models and nearby balloon-borne radiosondes. We use these data to validate the automated optical turbulence velocity identification from the Stereo-SCIDAR instrument mounted on the 2.5 m Isaac Newton Telescope, La Palma. By comparing these data we infer that the turbulence velocity and the wind velocity are consistent and that the automated turbulence velocity identification of the Stereo-SCIDAR is precise. The turbulence velocities can be used to increase the sensitivity of the turbulence strength profiles, as weaker turbulence that may be misinterpreted as noise can be detected with a velocity vector. The turbulence velocities can also be used to increase the altitude resolution of a detected layer, as the altitude of the velocity vectors can be identified to a greater precision than the native resolution of the system. We also show examples of complex velocity structure within a turbulent layer caused by wind shear at the interface of atmospheric zones.

  12. Martian atmospheric gravity waves simulated by a high-resolution general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Takeshi; Yiǧit, Erdal; Medvedev, Alexander S.; Hartogh, Paul

    2016-07-01

    Gravity waves (GWs) significantly affect temperature and wind fields in the Martian middle and upper atmosphere. They are also one of the observational targets of the MAVEN mission. We report on the first simulations with a high-resolution general circulation model (GCM) and present a global distributions of small-scale GWs in the Martian atmosphere. The simulated GW-induced temperature variances are in a good agreement with available radio occultation data in the lower atmosphere between 10 and 30 km. For the northern winter solstice, the model reveals a latitudinal asymmetry with stronger wave generation in the winter hemisphere and two distinctive sources of GWs: mountainous regions and the meandering winter polar jet. Orographic GWs are filtered upon propagating upward, and the mesosphere is primarily dominated by harmonics with faster horizontal phase velocities. Wave fluxes are directed mainly against the local wind. GW dissipation in the upper mesosphere generates a body force per unit mass of tens of m s^{-1} per Martian solar day (sol^{-1}), which tends to close the simulated jets. The results represent a realistic surrogate for missing observations, which can be used for constraining GW parameterizations and validating GCMs.

  13. A synthetic data set of high-spectral-resolution infrared spectra for the Arctic atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christopher J.; Rowe, Penny M.; Neshyba, Steven P.; Walden, Von P.

    2016-05-01

    Cloud microphysical and macrophysical properties are critical for understanding the role of clouds in climate. These properties are commonly retrieved from ground-based and satellite-based infrared remote sensing instruments. However, retrieval uncertainties are difficult to quantify without a standard for comparison. This is particularly true over the polar regions, where surface-based data for a cloud climatology are sparse, yet clouds represent a major source of uncertainty in weather and climate models. We describe a synthetic high-spectral-resolution infrared data set that is designed to facilitate validation and development of cloud retrieval algorithms for surface- and satellite-based remote sensing instruments. Since the data set is calculated using pre-defined cloudy atmospheres, the properties of the cloud and atmospheric state are known a priori. The atmospheric state used for the simulations is drawn from radiosonde measurements made at the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site at Barrow, Alaska (71.325° N, 156.615° W), a location that is generally representative of the western Arctic. The cloud properties for each simulation are selected from statistical distributions derived from past field measurements. Upwelling (at 60 km) and downwelling (at the surface) infrared spectra are simulated for 260 cloudy cases from 50 to 3000 cm-1 (3.3 to 200 µm) at monochromatic (line-by-line) resolution at a spacing of ˜ 0.01 cm-1 using the Line-by-line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) and the discrete-ordinate-method radiative transfer code (DISORT). These spectra are freely available for interested researchers from the NSF Arctic Data Center data repository (doi:10.5065/D61J97TT).

  14. Fluxes of nitrates between snow surfaces and the atmosphere in the European high Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. J. Beine

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of atmospheric and snow mixing ratios of nitrates and nitrites and their fluxes above the snow surface were made during two intensive campaigns during spring time 2001 at Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard as part of the EU project  "`The NItrogen Cycle and Effects on the oxidation of atmospheric trace species at high latitudes' (NICE. At this coastal site close to the unseasonably unfrozen fjord, of the measured nitrogen species, only HNO3 showed a significant flux on to the snow surface; a mean deposition of -8.7 nmol h-1 m-2 was observed in late April / early May 2001. These fluxes may be due to the reaction of HNO3 with sea salt, and especially NaCl, or may be simply uptake of HNO3 by ice, which is alkaline because of the sea salt in our marine environment. During snowfall periods dry deposition of HNO3 may contribute up to 10% of the N budget in the snow; however, the main source for N is wet deposition in falling snow. The surface snow at Ny-Ålesund showed very complex stratigraphy; the NO3- mixing ratio in snow varied between 65 and 520 ng g-1, the total NO3- content of the snowpack was on the order of 2700 ng cm-2. In comparison the atmospheric boundary layer column showed a NO3- content of only 8 ng cm-2. The limited exchange, however, between the snow and the atmosphere was attributed to low mobility of NO3- in the observed snow. Contrary to other Arctic sites (i.e. Alert, Nunavut or Summit, Greenland deposition of sea salt and crustal aerosols in this marine environment made the surface snow alkaline; snow NO3- was associated with heavier cations and was not readily available for physical exchange or photochemical reactions.

  15. Spatial Patterns of Atmospherically Deposited Organic Contaminants at High-Elevation in the Southern Sierra Nevada Mountains, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, David F.; Stanley, Kerri; McConnell, Laura L.; Tallent-Halsell, Nita G.; Nash, Maliha S.; Simonich, Staci M.

    2011-01-01

    Atmospherically deposited contaminants in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California, USA have been implicated as adversely affecting amphibians and fish, yet little is known about the distributions of contaminants within the mountains, particularly at high elevation. We tested the hypothesis that contaminant concentrations in a high-elevation portion of the Sierra Nevada decrease with distance from the adjacent San Joaquin Valley. We sampled air, sediment, and tadpoles twice at 28 water bodies in 14 dispersed areas in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks (2785 – 3375 m elevation; 43 – 82 km from Valley edge). We detected up to 15 chemicals frequently in sediment and tadpoles, including current- and historic-use pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Only β-endosulfan was found frequently in air. Concentrations of all chemicals detected were very low, averaging in the parts-per-billion range or less in sediment and tadpoles, and on the order of 10 pg/m3 for β-endosulfan in air. Principal components analysis indicated that chemical compositions were generally similar among sites, suggesting that chemical transport patterns were likewise similar among sites. In contrast, transport processes did not appear to strongly influence concentration differences among sites because variation in concentrations among nearby sites was high relative to sites far from each other. Moreover, a general relationship for concentrations as a function of distance from the valley was not evident across chemical, medium, and time. Nevertheless, concentrations for some chemical/medium/time combinations showed significant negative relationships with metrics for distance from the Valley. However, the magnitude of these distance effects among high-elevation sites was small relative to differences found in other studies between the valley edge and the nearest high-elevation sites. PMID:20821540

  16. Spatial patterns of atmospherically deposited organic contaminants at high elevation in the southern Sierra Nevada mountains, California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, David F; Stanley, Kerri; McConnell, Laura L; Tallent-Halsell, Nita G; Nash, Maliha S; Simonich, Staci M

    2010-05-01

    Atmospherically deposited contaminants in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California, USA have been implicated as adversely affecting amphibians and fish, yet little is known about the distributions of contaminants within the mountains, particularly at high elevation. The hypothesis that contaminant concentrations in a high-elevation portion of the Sierra Nevada decrease with distance from the adjacent San Joaquin Valley was tested. Air, sediment, and tadpoles were sampled twice at 28 water bodies in 14 dispersed areas in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks (2,785-3,375 m elevation; 43-82 km from Valley edge). Up to 15 chemicals were detected frequently in sediment and tadpoles, including current- and historic-use pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Only beta-endosulfan was found frequently in air. Concentrations of all chemicals detected were very low, averaging in the parts-per-billion range or less in sediment and tadpoles, and on the order of 10 pg/m3 for beta-endosulfan in air. Principal components analysis indicated that chemical compositions were generally similar among sites, suggesting that chemical transport patterns were likewise similar among sites. In contrast, transport processes did not appear to strongly influence concentration differences among sites, because variation in concentrations among nearby sites was high relative to sites far from each other. Moreover, a general relationship for concentrations as a function of distance from the valley was not evident across chemical, medium, and time. Nevertheless, concentrations for some chemical/medium/time combinations showed significant negative relationships with metrics for distance from the Valley. However, the magnitude of these distance effects among high-elevation sites was small relative to differences found in other studies between the valley edge and the nearest high-elevation sites. Copyright (c) 2010 SETAC.

  17. Modeling of High-altitude Atmospheric Dispersion Using Climate and Meteorological Forecast Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glascoe, L G; Chin, H S

    2005-03-30

    The overall objective of this study is to provide a demonstration of capability for importing both high altitude meteorological forecast and climatological datasets from NRL into the NARAC modeling system to simulate high altitude atmospheric droplet release and dispersion. The altitude of release for the proposed study is between 60 and 100km altitude. As either standard climatological data (over a period of 40 years) or daily meteorological forecasts can drive the particle dispersion model, we did a limited comparison of simulations with meteorological data and simulations with climatological data. The modeling tools used to address this problem are the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) modeling system at LLNL which are operationally employed to assist DOE/DHS/DOD emergency response to an atmospheric release of chemical, biological, and radiological contaminants. The interrelation of the various data feeds and codes at NARAC are illustrated in Figure 1. The NARAC scientific models are all verified to both analytic solutions and other codes; the models are validated to field data such as the Prairie Grass study (Barad, 1958). NARAC has multiple real-time meteorological data feeds from the National Weather Service, from the European Center for Medium range Weather Forecasting, from the US Navy, and from the US Air Force. NARAC also keeps a historical archive of meteorological data partially for research purposes. The codes used in this effort were the Atmospheric Data Assimilation and Parameterization Techniques (ADAPT) model (Sugiyama and Chan, 1998) and a development version of the Langrangian Operational Dispersion Integrator (LODI) model (Nasstrom et al., 2000). The use of the NASA GEOS-4 dataset required the use of a development version of the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) model (Hodur, 1997; Chin and Glascoe, 2004). The specific goals of this study are the following: (1) Confirm data compatibility of NRL

  18. The Analog-Method: Reconstruction of highly resolved Atmospheric Forcing Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Frederik; Zorita, Eduardo

    2010-05-01

    In this study we test and apply a new method to reconstruct highly resolved atmospheric forcing fields for Northern Europe since 1850 AD. As a simple statistical upscaling method, the analog-method is used to find best fitting atmospheric fields (predictand) to a given variable from long historical station measurements (predictor). The atmospheric fields are taken from a regional climate simulation and serve as a pool of analogs to match the local climate information of station measurements. An important advantage of this non-linear approach is the conservation of full variability in the reconstruction which is generally underestimated by linear regression methods by more than a factor of two. In a first step, the analog method is tested within the model domain serving as surrogate climate. Atmospheric fields (0.25° x 0.25°) of SLP, wind components, temperature, relative humidity, total cloud cover and precipitation are reconstructed by the analog-method using different amounts of grid points (5-25) as synthetic stations. Within the regional model, reconstructions of atmospheric forcing fields for the variables SLP and wind components show excellent skills (r ~ 0.8) when being reconstructed by daily SLP as predictor. For temperature, rel. humidity, total cloud cover and precipitation, SLP is a weak physical predictor leading to lower skills but significantly better than their climatological mean. Using daily air temperature as predictor instead of SLP, temperature fields are reconstructed with very good skills (r > 0.5 for summer and >0.7 in winter). In a second step, the same approach is repeated with real daily SLP data from 23 stations as predictor spanning the period from 1850 to 2009. Limited by the length of the model simulations, 25 years (1958-1982, 1983-2007) are used as calibration and validation periods. The forcing fields for SLP and wind (u,v) show correlations >0.7 for the validation periods. Although the physical link between SLP and relative

  19. Design of and initial results from a Highly Instrumented Reactor for Atmospheric Chemistry (HIRAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Glowacki

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The design of a Highly Instrumented Reactor for Atmospheric Chemistry (HIRAC is described and initial results obtained from HIRAC are presented. The ability of HIRAC to perform in-situ laser-induced fluorescence detection of OH and HO2 radicals with the Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE technique establishes it as internationally unique for a chamber of its size and pressure/temperature variable capabilities. In addition to the FAGE technique, HIRAC features a suite of analytical instrumentation, including: a multipass FTIR system; a conventional gas chromatography (GC instrument and a GC instrument for formaldehyde detection; NO/NO2, CO, O3, and H2O vapour analysers. Ray tracing simulations and NO2 actinometry have been utilized to develop a detailed model of the radiation field within HIRAC. Comparisons between the analysers and the FTIR coupled to HIRAC have been performed, and HIRAC has also been used to investigate pressure dependent kinetics of the chlorine atom reaction with ethene and the reaction of O3 and t-2-butene. The results obtained are in good agreement with literature recommendations and Master Chemical Mechanism predictions. HIRAC thereby offers a highly instrumented platform with the potential for: (1 high precision kinetics investigations over a range of atmospheric conditions; (2 detailed mechanism development, significantly enhanced according to its capability for measuring radicals; and (3 field instrument intercomparison, calibration, development, and investigations of instrument response at a range of atmospheric conditions.

  20. Desorption of Herbicides from Atmospheric Particulates During High-Volume Air Sampling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwight V. Quiring

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Pesticides can be present in the atmosphere either as vapours and/or in association with suspended particles. High-volume air sampling, in which air is aspirated first through a glass fibre filter to capture pesticides associated with atmospheric particulates and then polyurethane foam (PUF, often in combination with an adsorbent resin such as XAD-2, to capture pesticides present as vapours, is generally employed during atmospheric monitoring for pesticides. However, the particulate fraction may be underestimated because some pesticides may be stripped or desorbed from captured particulates due to the pressure drop created by the high flow of air through the filter. This possibility was investigated with ten herbicide active ingredients commonly used on the Canadian prairies (dimethylamine salts of 2,4-D, MCPA and dicamba, 2,4-D 2-ethylhexyl ester, bromoxynil octanoate, diclofop methyl ester, fenoxaprop ethyl ester, trifluralin, triallate and ethalfluralin and seven hydrolysis products (2,4-D, MCPA, dicamba, bromoxynil, diclofop, clopyralid and mecoprop. Finely ground heavy clay soil fortified with active ingredients/hydrolysis products was evenly distributed on the glass fibre filters of high-volume air samplers and air aspirated through the samplers at a flow rate of 12.5 m3/h for a 7-day period. The proportion desorbed as vapour from the fortified soil was determined by analysis of the PUF/XAD-2 resin composite cartridges. The extent of desorption from the fortified soil applied to the filters varied from 0% for each of the dimethylamine salts of 2,4-D, MCPA and dicamba to approximately 50% for trifluralin, triallate and ethalfluralin.

  1. Intercomparison of atmospheric water vapour measurements at a Canadian High Arctic site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Dan; Strong, Kimberly; Schneider, Matthias; Rowe, Penny M.; Sioris, Chris; Walker, Kaley A.; Mariani, Zen; Uttal, Taneil; McElroy, C. Thomas; Vömel, Holger; Spassiani, Alessio; Drummond, James R.

    2017-08-01

    Water vapour is a critical component of the Earth system. Techniques to acquire and improve measurements of atmospheric water vapour and its isotopes are under active development. This work presents a detailed intercomparison of water vapour total column measurements taken between 2006 and 2014 at a Canadian High Arctic research site (Eureka, Nunavut). Instruments include radiosondes, sun photometers, a microwave radiometer, and emission and solar absorption Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometers. Close agreement is observed between all combination of datasets, with mean differences ≤ 1.0 kg m-2 and correlation coefficients ≥ 0.98. The one exception in the observed high correlation is the comparison between the microwave radiometer and a radiosonde product, which had a correlation coefficient of 0.92.A variety of biases affecting Eureka instruments are revealed and discussed. A subset of Eureka radiosonde measurements was processed by the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) Reference Upper Air Network (GRUAN) for this study. Comparisons reveal a small dry bias in the standard radiosonde measurement water vapour total columns of approximately 4 %. A recently produced solar absorption FTIR spectrometer dataset resulting from the MUSICA (MUlti-platform remote Sensing of Isotopologues for investigating the Cycle of Atmospheric water) retrieval technique is shown to offer accurate measurements of water vapour total columns (e.g. average agreement within -5.2 % of GRUAN and -6.5 % of a co-located emission FTIR spectrometer). However, comparisons show a small wet bias of approximately 6 % at the high-latitude Eureka site. In addition, a new dataset derived from Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) measurements is shown to provide accurate water vapour measurements (e.g. average agreement was within 4 % of GRUAN), which usefully enables measurements to be taken during day and night (especially valuable during polar night).

  2. Evaluating atmospheric CO2 inversions at multiple scales over a highly-inventoried agricultural landscape.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuh, Andrew E.; Lauvaux, Thomas; West, Tristram O.; Denning, A.; Davis, Kenneth J.; Miles, Natasha; Richardson, S. J.; Uliasz, Marek; Lokupitiya, Erandathie; Cooley, Dan; Andrews, Arlyn; Ogle, Stephen

    2013-05-01

    An intensive regional research campaign was conducted by the North American Carbon Program (NACP) in 2005 to study the carbon cycle of the highly productive agricultural regions of the Midwestern United States. Forty-_ve di_erent associated projects were spawned across _ve U.S. agencies over the course of nearly a decade involving hundreds of researchers. The primary objective of the project was to investigate the ability of atmospheric inversion techniques to use highly calibrated CO2 mixing ratio data to estimate CO2 exchange over the major croplands of the U.S. Statistics from densely monitored crop production, consisting primarily corn and soybeans, provided the backbone of a well-studied\\bottom up"flux estimate that was used to evaluate the atmospheric inversion results. Three different inversion systems, representing spatial scales varying from high resolution mesoscale, to continental, to global, coupled to different transport models and optimization techniques were compared to the bottom up" inventory estimates. The mean annual CO2-C sink for 2007 from the inversion systems ranged from 120 TgC to 170 TgC, when viewed across a wide variety of inversion setups, with the best" point estimates ranging from 145 TgC to 155 TgC. Inversion-based mean C sink estimates were generally slightly stronger, but statistically indistinguishable,from the inventory estimate whose mean C sink was 135 TgC. The inversion results showed temporal correlations at seasonal lengths while week to week correlations remained low. Comparisons were made between atmospheric transport yields of the two regional inversion systems, which despite having different influence footprints in space and time due to differences in underlying transport models and external forcings, showed similarity when aggregated in space and time.

  3. The middle Pleistocene transition: characteristics, mechanisms, and implications for long-term changes in atmospheric pCO 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Peter U.; Archer, David; Pollard, David; Blum, Joel D.; Rial, Jose A.; Brovkin, Victor; Mix, Alan C.; Pisias, Nicklas G.; Roy, Martin

    2006-12-01

    The emergence of low-frequency, high-amplitude, quasi-periodic (˜100-kyr) glacial variability during the middle Pleistocene in the absence of any significant change in orbital forcing indicates a fundamental change internal to the climate system. This middle Pleistocene transition (MPT) began 1250 ka and was complete by 700 ka. Its onset was accompanied by decreases in sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the North Atlantic and tropical-ocean upwelling regions and by an increase in African and Asian aridity and monsoonal intensity. During the MPT, long-term average ice volume gradually increased by ˜50 m sea-level equivalent, whereas low-frequency ice-volume variability experienced a 100-kyr lull centered on 1000 ka followed by its reappearance ˜900 ka, although as a broad band of power rather than a narrow, persistent 100-kyr cycle. Additional changes at 900 ka indicate this to be an important time during the MPT, beginning with an 80-kyr event of extreme SST cooling followed by the partial recovery and subsequent stabilization of long-term North Atlantic and tropical ocean SSTs, increasing Southern Ocean SST variability primarily associated with warmer interglacials, the loss of permanent subpolar sea-ice cover, and the emergence of low-frequency variability in Pacific SSTs and global deep-ocean circulation. Since 900 ka, ice sheets have been the only component of the climate system to exhibit consistent low-frequency variability. With the exception of a near-universal organization of low-frequency power associated with marine isotope stages 11 and 12, all other components show an inconsistent distribution of power in frequency-time space, suggesting a highly nonlinear system response to orbital and ice-sheet forcing. Most hypotheses for the origin of the MPT invoke a response to a long-term cooling, possibly induced by decreasing atmospheric pCO 2. None of these hypotheses, however, accounts for the geological constraint that the earliest Northern Hemisphere

  4. High temporal and spatial variability of atmospheric-methane oxidation in Alpine glacier-forefield soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiri, Eleonora; Nauer, Philipp A; Rainer, Edda-Marie; Zeyer, Josef; Schroth, Martin H

    2017-07-07

    Glacier-forefield soils can provide a substantial sink for atmospheric CH4, facilitated by aerobic methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB). However, MOB activity, abundance, and community structure may be affected by soil age, location in different forefield landforms, and temporal fluctuations in soil-physical parameters. We assessed spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric CH4 oxidation in an Alpine glacier forefield during the snow-free season 2013. We quantified CH4 flux in soils of increasing age and in different landforms (sandhill, terrace, floodplain) using soil-gas-profile and static flux-chamber methods. To determine MOB abundance and community structure, we employed pmoA-gene-based quantitative PCR and targeted-amplicon sequencing. Uptake of CH4 increased in magnitude and decreased in variability with increasing soil age. Sandhill soils exhibited CH4 uptake ranging from -0.03- -3.7 mg CH4 m-2 d-1 Floodplain and terrace soils exhibited smaller uptake and even intermittent CH4 emissions. Linear mixed-effect models indicated that soil age and landform were dominating factors shaping CH4 flux, followed by cumulative rainfall (weighted sum ≤ 4 d prior to sampling). Of 31 MOB operational taxonomic units retrieved, ∼30% were potentially novel, and ∼50% were affiliated with Upland Soil Clusters gamma and alpha. The MOB community structures in floodplain and terrace soils were nearly identical, but differed significantly from highly variable sandhill-soil communities. We conclude that soil age and landform modulate the soil CH4 sink strength in glacier forefields, and recent rainfall affects its short-term variability. This should be taken into account when including this environment in future CH4 inventories.Importance Oxidation of methane (CH4) in well-drained, "upland" soils is an important mechanism for the removal of this potent greenhouse gas from the atmosphere. It is largely mediated by aerobic, methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB). Whereas there is

  5. Small mass spectrometer with extended measurement capabilities at high pressures. [for planetary atmosphere analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Zahn, U.; Mauersberger, K.

    1978-01-01

    For the in situ investigation of planetary atmospheres a small Mattauch-Herzog mass spectrometer has been developed. Its high-pressure performance has been improved by incorporating differential pumping between the ion source and the analyzing fields, shortening the path-length as well as increasing the extraction field in the ion source. In addition doubly ionized and dissociated ions are used for mass analysis. These measures make possible operation up to 0.01 millibars. Results of laboratory tests related to linearity, dynamic range, and mass resolution are presented, in particular for CO2.

  6. Air Enquirer's multi-sensor boxes as a tool for High School Education and Atmospheric Research

    OpenAIRE

    Morguí, J. A.; Lobo, Agustín; Rodó, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    An educational tool was designed with the aim of making more comprehensive the research done on Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) in the ClimaDat Spanish network of atmospheric observation stations (www.climadat.es). This tool is called Air Enquirer and it consist of a multi-sensor box. It is envisaged to build more than two hundred boxes to yield them to the Spanish High Schools through the Education department (www.educaixa.com) of the “Obra Social ‘La Caixa’”, who fun...

  7. Survey of literature on convective heat transfer coefficients and recovery factors for high atmosphere thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, S.

    1973-01-01

    Heat transfer phenomena of rarefied gas flows is discussed based on a literature survey of analytical and experimental rarefied gas dynamics. Subsonic flows are emphasized for the purposes of meteorological thermometry in the high atmosphere. The heat transfer coefficients for three basic geometries are given in the regimes of free molecular flow, transition flow, slip flow, and continuum flow. Different types of heat phenomena, and the analysis of theoretical and experimental data are presented. The uncertainties calculated from the interpolation rule compared with the available experimental data are discussed. The recovery factor for each geometry in subsonic rarefied flows is also given.

  8. Conductivity of SrTiO3 based oxides in the reducing atmosphere at high temperature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashimoto, Shin-Ichi; Poulsen, Finn Willy; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2007-01-01

    The conductivities of several donor-doped SrTiO3 based oxides, which were prepared in air, were studied in a reducing atmosphere at high temperature. The conductivities of all specimens increased slowly with time at 1000 degrees C in 9% H-2/N-2, even after 100 h. Nb-doped SrTiO3 showed relatively...... at 500-800 degrees C, while that of La-doped SrTiO3 dropped immediately on exposure to air. The conduction behavior of Nb-doped SrTiO3 was explained by reduction of Ti4+ and/or Nb5+ and the relatively slow oxygen diffusibility. (c) 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......The conductivities of several donor-doped SrTiO3 based oxides, which were prepared in air, were studied in a reducing atmosphere at high temperature. The conductivities of all specimens increased slowly with time at 1000 degrees C in 9% H-2/N-2, even after 100 h. Nb-doped SrTiO3 showed relatively...... fast reduction and high conductivity compared with the other SrTiO3 based oxides. The conductivity of Nb-doped SrTiO3 was ca. 50 S cm(-1) at 500 degrees C after reduction at 1200 degrees C. After strong reduction, the conductivity of Nb-doped SrTiO3 was almost independent of the oxygen partial pressure...

  9. Atmospheric and Fog Effects on Ultra-Wide Band Radar Operating at Extremely High Frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezah Balal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The wide band at extremely high frequencies (EHF above 30 GHz is applicable for high resolution directive radars, resolving the lack of free frequency bands within the lower part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Utilization of ultra-wideband signals in this EHF band is of interest, since it covers a relatively large spectrum, which is free of users, resulting in better resolution in both the longitudinal and transverse dimensions. Noting that frequencies in the millimeter band are subjected to high atmospheric attenuation and dispersion effects, a study of the degradation in the accuracy and resolution is presented. The fact that solid-state millimeter and sub-millimeter radiation sources are producing low power, the method of continuous-wave wideband frequency modulation becomes the natural technique for remote sensing and detection. Millimeter wave radars are used as complementary sensors for the detection of small radar cross-section objects under bad weather conditions, when small objects cannot be seen by optical cameras and infrared detectors. Theoretical analysis for the propagation of a wide “chirped” Frequency-Modulated Continuous-Wave (FMCW radar signal in a dielectric medium is presented. It is shown that the frequency-dependent (complex refractivity of the atmospheric medium causes distortions in the phase of the reflected signal, introducing noticeable errors in the longitudinal distance estimations, and at some frequencies may also degrade the resolution.

  10. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) grown bi-layer graphene transistor characteristics at high temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Qaisi, Ramy M.

    2014-05-15

    We report the characteristics of atmospheric chemical vapor deposition grown bilayer graphene transistors fabricated on ultra-scaled (10 nm) high-κ dielectric aluminum oxide (Al2O3) at elevated temperatures. We observed that the drive current increased by >400% as temperature increased from room temperature to 250 °C. Low gate leakage was maintained for prolonged exposure at 100 °C but increased significantly at temperatures >200 °C. These results provide important insights for considering chemical vapor deposition graphene on aluminum oxide for high temperature applications where low power and high frequency operation are required. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Analysis of high altitude clouds in the martian atmosphere based on Mars Climate Sounder observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitarini, L.; Määttänen, A.; Fouchet, T.; Kleinboehl, A.; Kass, D. M.; Schofield, J. T.

    2016-11-01

    High altitude clouds have been observed in the Martian atmosphere. However, their properties still remain to be characterized. Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) aboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) is an instrument that measures radiances in the thermal infrared, both in limb and nadir views. It allows us to retrieve vertical profiles of radiance, temperature and aerosols. Using the MCS data and radiative transfer model coupled with an automated inversion routine, we can investigate the chemical composition of the high altitude clouds. We will present the first results on the properties of the clouds. CO2 ice is the best candidate to be the main component of some high altitude clouds due to the most similar spectral variation compared to water ice or dust, in agreement with previous studies. Using cloud composition of contaminated CO2 ice (dust core surrounded by CO2 ice) might improve the fitting result, but further study is needed.

  12. High-resolution stable isotope signature of a land-falling atmospheric river in Southern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yongbiao; Sodemann, Harald

    2017-04-01

    Gathering observational evidence of the long-range moisture versus local source contributions remains a scientific challenge, but is critical for understanding how hydrological extremes develop. Moisture transport to the west coast of Norway is often connected to elongated meridional structures of high water vapour flux known as Atmospheric Rivers. It is still an open question how well moisture sources estimated by different numerical models for such events of long-range transport correspond with reality. In this study, we present high resolution stable isotope information collected during a land-falling Atmospheric River in Southern Norway during winter 2016, and analyse the data with the aim to differentiate between moisture source signatures and below-cloud processes affecting the stable isotope composition. The precipitation characterised by a pronounced warm front was sampled manually on a rooftop platform at a 10-20 minute interval during the 24h of the event and later measured by a laser spectrometer (Picarro L2140-i) in the lab for δ18O, δD, and d-excess. Simultaneously, the stable isotope composition of water vapor was continuously measured at high resolution. To that end, ambient air was continuously pumped from a nearby inlet at 25 m above the ground and measured by another laser spectrometer (Picarro L2130-i). Stable water isotope measurements were supplemented by detailed precipitation parameters from a laser disdrometer (OTT Parsivel2), Micro Rain Radar (MRR-2), Total Precipitation Sensor (TPS-3100), and a nearby weather station. Measurements show a signature of two depletion periods in the main stable isotope parameters that are not apparent in precipitation amount and atmospheric temperature measurements. The deuterium excess in rainfall responds differently, with first and increase and then a decrease during these depletion periods. We interpret this as a combined consequence of airmass change, cloud microphysics, and below-cloud effects

  13. High Arctic Forests During the Middle Eocene Supported by ~400 ppm Atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxbauer, D. P.; Royer, D. L.; LePage, B. A.

    2013-12-01

    Fossils from Paleogene High Arctic deposits provide some of the clearest evidence for greenhouse climates and offer the potential to improve our understanding of Earth system dynamics in a largely ice-free world. One of the most well-known and exquisitely-preserved middle Eocene (47.9-37.8 Myrs ago) polar forest sites, Napartulik, crops out on eastern Axel Heiberg Island (80 °N), Nunavut, Canada. An abundance of data from Napartulik suggest mean annual temperatures of up to 30 °C warmer than today and atmospheric water loads 2× above current levels. Despite this wealth of paleontological and paleoclimatological data, there are currently no direct constraints on atmospheric CO2 levels for Napartulik or any other polar forest site. Here we apply a new plant gas-exchange model to Metasequoia (dawn redwood) leaves to reconstruct atmospheric CO2 from six fossil forests at Napartulik. Individual reconstructions vary between 405-489 ppm with a site mean of 437 ppm (337-564 ppm at 95% confidence). These estimates represent the first direct constraints on CO2 for polar fossil forests and suggest that the temperate conditions present at Napartulik during the middle Eocene were maintained under CO2 concentrations ~1.6× above pre-industrial levels. Our results strongly support the case that long-term climate sensitivity to CO2 in the past was sometimes high, even during largely ice-free periods, highlighting the need to better understand the climate forcing and feedback mechanisms responsible for this amplification.

  14. The Influence of High Aerosol Concentration on Atmospheric Boundary Layer Temperature Stratification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaykin, M.N.; Kadygrove, E.N.; Golitsyn, G.S.

    2005-03-18

    Investigations of the changing in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) radiation balance as cased by natural and anthropogenic reasons is an important topic of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. The influence of aerosol on temperature stratification of ABL while its concentration was extremely high within a long period of time was studied experimentally. The case was observed in Moscow region (Russia) with the transport of combustion products from peat-bog and forest fires in July-September, 2002. At this time the visibility was some times at about 100-300 m. Aerosol concentration measured by Moscow University Observatory and A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics field station in Zvenigorod (55.7 N; 36.6 E) for several days was in 50-100 times more than background one (Gorchakov at al 2003). The high aerosol concentration can change the radiation balance at ABL, and so to change thermal stratification in ABL above the mega lopolis. For the analysis the data were used of synchronous measurements by MTP-5 (Microwave Temperature Profiler operating at wavelength 5 mm) in two locations, namely: downtown Moscow and country-side which is 50 km apart to the West (Zvenigorod station). (Kadygrov and Pick 1998; Westwater at al 1999; Kadygrov at al 2002). Zvenigorod station is located in strongly continental climate zone which is in between of the climates of ARM sites (NSANorth Slope of Alaska and SGP-Southern Great Plains). The town of Zvenigorod has little industry, small traffic volume and topography conductive to a good air ventilation of the town. For these reasons Zvenigorod can be considered as an undisturbed rural site. For the analysis some days were chosen with close meteorological parameters (average temperature, humidity, wind, pressure and cloud form) but strongly differing in aerosol concentration level.

  15. Multitechnique characterisation of 304L surface states oxidised at high temperature in steam and air atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamede, Anne-Sophie, E-mail: anne-sophie.mamede@ensc-lille.fr [University Lille, CNRS, ENSCL, Centrale Lille, University Artois, UMR 8181 – UCCS – Unité de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide, F-59000 Lille (France); Nuns, Nicolas, E-mail: nicolas.nuns@univ-lille1.fr [University Lille, CNRS, ENSCL, Centrale Lille, University Artois, UMR 8181 – UCCS – Unité de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide, F-59000 Lille (France); Cristol, Anne-Lise, E-mail: anne-lise.cristol@ec-lille.fr [University Lille, CNRS, Centrale Lille, Arts et Métiers Paris Tech, FRE 3723 – LML – Laboratoire de Mécanique de Lille, F-59000 Lille (France); Cantrel, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.cantrel@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, PSN-RES, Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance, 13115 (France); Laboratoire de Recherche Commun IRSN-CNRS-Lille 1: «Cinétique Chimique, Combustion, Réactivité» (C3R), Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance, 13115 (France); Souvi, Sidi, E-mail: sidi.souvi@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire, PSN-RES, Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance, 13115 (France); Laboratoire de Recherche Commun IRSN-CNRS-Lille 1: «Cinétique Chimique, Combustion, Réactivité» (C3R), Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance, 13115 (France); and others

    2016-04-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mutitechnique characterisation of oxidised 304L. • Oxidation at high temperature under steam and air conditions of 304L stainless steel. • Chromium and manganese oxides formed in the outer layer. • Oxide profiles differ in air or steam atmosphere. - Abstract: In case of a severe accident occurring in a nuclear reactor, surfaces of the reactor coolant system (RCS), made of stainless steel (304L) rich in Cr (>10%) and Ni (8–12%), are oxidised. Fission products (FPs) are released from melt fuel and flow through the RCS. A part of them is deposited onto surfaces either by vapour condensation or by aerosol deposition mechanisms. To be able to understand the nature of interactions between these FPs and the RCS surfaces, a preliminary step is to characterize the RSC surface states in steam and air atmosphere at high temperatures. Pieces of 304L stainless steel have been treated in a flow reactor at two different temperatures (750 °C and 950 °C) for two different exposition times (24 h and 72 h). After surfaces analysing by a unique combination of surface analysis techniques (XPS, ToF-SIMS and LEIS), for 304L, the results show a deep oxide scale with multi layers and the outer layer is composed of chromium and manganese oxides. Oxide profiles differ in air or steam atmosphere. Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide is observed but in minor proportion and in all cases no nickel is detected near the surface. Results obtained are discussed and compared with the literature data.

  16. Does high reactive nitrogen input from the atmosphere decrease the carbon sink strength of a peatland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brümmer, Christian; Zöll, Undine; Hurkuck, Miriam; Schrader, Frederik; Kutsch, Werner

    2017-04-01

    Mid-latitude peatlands are often exposed to high atmospheric nitrogen deposition when located in close vicinity to agricultural land. As the impacts of altered deposition rates on nitrogen-limited ecosystems are poorly understood, we investigated the surface-atmosphere exchange of several nitrogen and carbon compounds using multiple high-resolution measurement techniques and modeling. Our study site was a protected semi-natural bog ecosystem. Local wind regime and land use in the adjacent area clearly regulated whether total reactive nitrogen (ΣNr) concentrations were ammonia (NH3) or NOx-dominated. Eddy-covariance measurements of NH3 and ΣNr revealed concentration, temperature and surface wetness-dependent deposition rates. Intermittent periods of NH3 and ΣNr emission likely attributed to surface water re-emission and soil efflux, respectively, were found, thereby indicating nitrogen oversaturation in this originally N-limited ecosystem. Annual dry plus wet deposition resulted in 20 to 25 kg N ha-1 depending on method and model used, which translated into a four- to fivefold exceedance of the ecosystem-specific critical load. As the bog site had likely been exposed to the observed atmospheric nitrogen burden over several decades, a shift in grass species' composition towards a higher number of nitrophilous plants was already visible. Three years of CO2 eddy flux measurements showed that the site was a small net sink in the range of 33 to 268 g CO2 m-2 yr-1. Methane emissions of 32 g CO2-eq were found to partly offset the sequestered carbon through CO2. Our study indicates that the sink strength of the peatland has likely been decreased through elevated N deposition over the past decades. It also demonstrates the applicability of novel micrometeorological measurement techniques in biogeochemical sciences and stresses the importance of monitoring long-term changes in vulnerable ecosystems under anthropogenic pressure and climate change.

  17. Arctic storms simulated in atmospheric general circulation models under uniform high, uniform low, and variable resolutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesler, E. L.; Bosler, P. A.; Taylor, M.

    2016-12-01

    The impact of strong extratropical storms on coastal communities is large, and the extent to which storms will change with a warming Arctic is unknown. Understanding storms in reanalysis and in climate models is important for future predictions. We know that the number of detected Arctic storms in reanalysis is sensitive to grid resolution. To understand Arctic storm sensitivity to resolution in climate models, we describe simulations designed to identify and compare Arctic storms at uniform low resolution (1 degree), at uniform high resolution (1/8 degree), and at variable resolution (1 degree to 1/8 degree). High-resolution simulations resolve more fine-scale structure and extremes, such as storms, in the atmosphere than a uniform low-resolution simulation. However, the computational cost of running a globally uniform high-resolution simulation is often prohibitive. The variable resolution tool in atmospheric general circulation models permits regional high-resolution solutions at a fraction of the computational cost. The storms are identified using the open-source search algorithm, Stride Search. The uniform high-resolution simulation has over 50% more storms than the uniform low-resolution and over 25% more storms than the variable resolution simulations. Storm statistics from each of the simulations is presented and compared with reanalysis. We propose variable resolution as a cost-effective means of investigating physics/dynamics coupling in the Arctic environment. Future work will include comparisons with observed storms to investigate tuning parameters for high resolution models. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. SAND2016-7402 A

  18. Nimbus-6 High Resolution Infrared Radiometer (HIRS) Level 1 Calibrated Radiances for the Global Atmospheric Research Program (GARP) V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nimbus-6 High Resolution Infrared Radiometer (HIRS) Level 1 Calibrated Radiances for the Global Atmospheric Research Program (GARP) data product contains daily...

  19. High temperature gradient nanogap-Pirani micro-sensor with maximum sensitivity around atmospheric pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghouila-Houri, C.; Talbi, A.; Viard, R.; Moutaouekkil, M.; Elmazria, O.; Gallas, Q.; Garnier, E.; Merlen, A.; Pernod, P.

    2017-09-01

    This letter describes and discusses the design and testing of an efficient nanogap Pirani micro-sensor for pressure measurements in a wide range with a maximum sensitivity around atmospheric pressure. The structure combines a substrate-free heated wire and a mechanical support made of silicon oxide micro-bridges allowing both a constant nanoscale gap between the wire and the substrate and a 1 mm long and 3 μm wide wire. The high aspect ratio of the wire provides a uniform heating profile along the wire and contributes to low pressure detection. On the contrary, both the nanoscale gap and the short wire length between two micro-bridges contribute to shift the high limit of the pressure range. When tested between 10 kPa and 800 kPa, the sensor presents a wide measurement range, not fully reached by the experiments, with a maximum of sensitivity close to the atmospheric pressure and performances with up to 38%/dec sensitivity when operating in a constant temperature mode with an overheat of 20 °C.

  20. Benthic Habitat Mapping Using Multispectral High-Resolution Imagery: Evaluation of Shallow Water Atmospheric Correction Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Eugenio

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Remote multispectral data can provide valuable information for monitoring coastal water ecosystems. Specifically, high-resolution satellite-based imaging systems, as WorldView-2 (WV-2, can generate information at spatial scales needed to implement conservation actions for protected littoral zones. However, coastal water-leaving radiance arriving at the space-based sensor is often small as compared to reflected radiance. In this work, complex approaches, which usually use an accurate radiative transfer code to correct the atmospheric effects, such as FLAASH, ATCOR and 6S, have been implemented for high-resolution imagery. They have been assessed in real scenarios using field spectroradiometer data. In this context, the three approaches have achieved excellent results and a slightly superior performance of 6S model-based algorithm has been observed. Finally, for the mapping of benthic habitats in shallow-waters marine protected environments, a relevant application of the proposed atmospheric correction combined with an automatic deglinting procedure is presented. This approach is based on the integration of a linear mixing model of benthic classes within the radiative transfer model of the water. The complete methodology has been applied to selected ecosystems in the Canary Islands (Spain but the obtained results allow the robust mapping of the spatial distribution and density of seagrass in coastal waters and the analysis of multitemporal variations related to the human activity and climate change in littoral zones.

  1. Benthic Habitat Mapping Using Multispectral High-Resolution Imagery: Evaluation of Shallow Water Atmospheric Correction Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugenio, Francisco; Marcello, Javier; Martin, Javier; Rodríguez-Esparragón, Dionisio

    2017-11-16

    Remote multispectral data can provide valuable information for monitoring coastal water ecosystems. Specifically, high-resolution satellite-based imaging systems, as WorldView-2 (WV-2), can generate information at spatial scales needed to implement conservation actions for protected littoral zones. However, coastal water-leaving radiance arriving at the space-based sensor is often small as compared to reflected radiance. In this work, complex approaches, which usually use an accurate radiative transfer code to correct the atmospheric effects, such as FLAASH, ATCOR and 6S, have been implemented for high-resolution imagery. They have been assessed in real scenarios using field spectroradiometer data. In this context, the three approaches have achieved excellent results and a slightly superior performance of 6S model-based algorithm has been observed. Finally, for the mapping of benthic habitats in shallow-waters marine protected environments, a relevant application of the proposed atmospheric correction combined with an automatic deglinting procedure is presented. This approach is based on the integration of a linear mixing model of benthic classes within the radiative transfer model of the water. The complete methodology has been applied to selected ecosystems in the Canary Islands (Spain) but the obtained results allow the robust mapping of the spatial distribution and density of seagrass in coastal waters and the analysis of multitemporal variations related to the human activity and climate change in littoral zones.

  2. Windowless transition between atmospheric pressure and high vacuum via differential pumping for synchrotron radiation applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gog, T.; Casa, D. M.; Kuzmenko, I.; Krakora, R. J.; Bolin, T. B.; X-Ray Science Division

    2007-07-01

    A differential pump assembly is introduced which can provide a windowless transition between the full atmospheric pressure of an in-air sample environment and the high-vacuum region of a synchrotron radiation beamline, while providing a clear aperture of approximately 1 mm to pass through the X-ray beam from a modern third-generation synchrotron radiation source. This novel pump assembly is meant to be used as a substitute for an exit vacuum window on synchrotron beamlines, where the existence of such a window would negatively impact the coherent nature of the X-ray beam or would introduce parasitic scattering, distorting weak scattering signals from samples under study. It is found that the length of beam pipe necessary to reduce atmospheric pressure to below 10 mbar is only about 130 mm, making the expected photon transmission for hard X-rays through this pipe competitive with that of a regular Be beamline window. This result is due to turbulent flow dominating the first pumping stage, providing a mechanism of strong gas conductance limitation, which is further enhanced by introducing artificial surface roughness in the pipe. Successive reduction of pressure through the transitional flow regime into the high-vacuum region is accomplished over a length of several meters, using beam pipes of increasing diameter. While the pump assembly has not been tested with X-rays, possible applications are discussed in the context of coherent and small-angle scattering.

  3. High Temperature, Controlled-Atmosphere Aerodynamic Levitation Experiments with Applications in Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macris, C. A.; Badro, J.; Eiler, J. M.; Stolper, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    The aerodynamic levitation laser apparatus is an instrument in which spherical samples are freely floated on top of a stream of gas while being heated with a CO2laser to temperatures up to about 3500 °C. Laser heated samples, ranging in size from 0.5 to 3.5 mm diameter, can be levitated in a variety of chemically active or inert atmospheres in a gas-mixing chamber (e.g., Hennet et al. 2006; Pack et al. 2010). This allows for containerless, controlled-atmosphere, high temperature experiments with potential for applications in earth and planetary science. A relatively new technique, aerodynamic levitation has been used mostly for studies of the physical properties of liquids at high temperatures (Kohara et al. 2011), crystallization behavior of silicates and oxides (Arai et al. 2004), and to prepare glasses from compositions known to crystallize upon quenching (Tangeman et al. 2001). More recently, however, aerodynamic levitation with laser heating has been used as an experimental technique to simulate planetary processes. Pack et al. (2010) used levitation and melting experiments to simulate chondrule formation by using Ar-H2 as the flow gas, thus imposing a reducing atmosphere, resulting in reduction of FeO, Fe2O3, and NiO to metal alloys. Macris et al. (2015) used laser heating with aerodynamic levitation to reproduce the textures and diffusion profiles of major and minor elements observed in impact ejecta from the Australasian strewn field, by melting a powdered natural tektite mixed with 60-100 μm quartz grains on a flow of pure Ar gas. These experiments resulted in quantitative modeling of Si and Al diffusion, which allowed for interpretations regarding the thermal histories of natural tektites and their interactions with the surrounding impact vapor plume. Future experiments will employ gas mixing (CO, CO2, H2, O, Ar) in a controlled atmosphere levitation chamber to explore the range of fO2applicable to melt-forming impacts on other rocky planetary bodies

  4. K-12 Implications Seen in Some Cases before High Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Arizona's variation on government vouchers for religious schools and California's prohibition on the sale of violent video games to minors present the top two cases with implications for education in the U.S. Supreme Court term that formally begins Oct. 4. New Justice Elena Kagan brings to the court extensive education policy experience as a…

  5. A Self-Validation Method for High-Temperature Thermocouples Under Oxidizing Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokdad, S.; Failleau, G.; Deuzé, T.; Briaudeau, S.; Kozlova, O.; Sadli, M.

    2015-08-01

    Thermocouples are prone to significant drift in use particularly when they are exposed to high temperatures. Indeed, high-temperature exposure can affect the response of a thermocouple progressively by changing the structure of the thermoelements and inducing inhomogeneities. Moreover, an oxidizing atmosphere contributes to thermocouple drift by changing the chemical nature of the metallic wires by the effect of oxidation. In general, severe uncontrolled drift of thermocouples results from these combined influences. A periodic recalibration of the thermocouple can be performed, but sometimes it is not possible to remove the sensor out of the process. Self-validation methods for thermocouples provide a solution to avoid this drawback, but there are currently no high-temperature contact thermometers with self-validation capability at temperatures up to . LNE-Cnam has developed fixed-point devices integrated to the thermocouples consisting of machined alumina-based devices for operation under oxidizing atmospheres. These devices require small amounts of pure metals (typically less than 2 g). They are suitable for self-validation of high-temperature thermocouples up to . In this paper the construction and the characterization of these integrated fixed-point devices are described. The phase-transition plateaus of gold, nickel, and palladium, which enable coverage of the temperature range between and , are assessed with this self-validation technique. Results of measurements performed at LNE-Cnam with the integrated self-validation module at several levels of temperature will be presented. The performance of the devices are assessed and discussed, in terms of robustness and metrological characteristics. Uncertainty budgets are also proposed and detailed.

  6. Investigations into formation of atmospheric sulfate under high PM 10 concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mukesh; Kiran, Y. N. V. M.; Shandilya, Kaushik K.

    This study was primarily initiated to understand the consistently low levels of SO 2 in cities in India in spite of rising SO 2 emissions. A literature review suggested the possibility of chemical transformation of SO 2 to SO 4. Thus, the objective of research was to understand the formation of SO 4 as a function of SO 2, and other constituents of atmosphere such as PM 10, water content, Ca (in aerosol) and pH (of aerosol). For this purpose, air quality monitoring was conducted at five locations in the city of Kanpur, India (during October 1999-April 2000) representing various land-use patterns. It was found that the SO 4 levels were considerably high (2.8-43.6 μg m -3) compared to levels in cities in the US (1.9-3.6 μg m -3, Sandberg et al. (J. Air Pollut. Control Assoc. 26 (1976) 559; 15.7-18.4 μg m -3, Altshuller (J. Air Pollut. Control Assoc. 26 (1976) 318; 4.0-14.0 μg m -3 Dockery et al. (J. Med. 329 (1993) 1753), UK (3.2-9.0 μg m -3, QUARG, 1996 http://www.environment.detr.gov.uk/airq/consult/naqs/index.htm), and 25 locations in Europe (0.34-1.68 μg m -3 (1991-1999), EMEP website), but were comparable to the levels observed at Agra (14.67 μg m -3, Kulshrestha et al. Indian J. Radio Space Phys. 24 (1995) 178) and at New Delhi (12.9-27.5 μg m -3, Shandilya, M.E. Thesis, Malaviya National Institute of Technology, Jaipur, India, 2000). The high SO 4 levels could provide a plausible explanation for low SO 2 concentration levels in the city of Kanpur. It was concluded that high levels of PM 10, Ca and high pH of aerosols in atmosphere provide a conducive environment for conversion of SO 2 to SO 4. It was also concluded that the important migration pathway in study area for the transformation of SO 2 to SO 4 appears to be oxidation of SO 2 on the surfaces (of particulate) available in the ambient atmosphere.

  7. Atmospheric deposition and lake chemistry trends at a high mountain site in the eastern Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertha THALER

    2000-02-01

    Full Text Available Records of atmospheric precipitation chemistry starting in 1983 and a series of limnological investigations at two high mountain reference lakes starting in 1988 enable us to describe the response of lake water chemistry to changes in precipitation chemistry and climate. The lakes are located at an altitude well above the timberline in a watershed composed of acidic rocks. Despite the observed reduction in the sulphur atmospheric deposition, the reference lakes showed no corresponding decline in sulphate concentrations, but a marked increase in the acid neutralising capacity was apparent. Changes of the seasonal distribution pattern of the precipitation amounts and a general increase of the air temperature have likely produced an increased weathering which increased the concentration of many inlake solutes and drove the lakes toward more buffered conditions. This phenomenon superimposed to changes like other physical factors (radiation, nutritional conditions and biological factors (enhanced production, competition, predation has produced in the last years greater modifications than merely those to be expected from the decreased acidic input.

  8. High-frequency signals of oceans and atmosphere in Earth rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, S.; Nilsson, T.; Schindelegger, M.; Schuh, H.

    2012-04-01

    Dynamic processes in the atmosphere and oceans with diurnal and sub-diurnal variability leave measurable short-period footprints in polar motion and length of day (LOD)/Universal Time (UT1). The integral effect of all geophysical and extra-terrestrial influences is seen in the Earth rotation variations observed by space geodetic techniques. Allocating the signal components to their generating mechanisms requires appropriate model representations of the individual phenomena. We give a general overview of the known geophysical effects on Earth rotation from sub-daily to multi-annual time scales with particular attention paid to the high-frequency impact of the oceans and atmosphere. The signals are examined in terms of geophysical modeling as well as with regard to Earth rotation observations. Recent results from the analysis of numerical weather model data and available ocean tide models with respect to sub-daily Earth rotation excitation are shown. As to the observational aspect, we illustrate different methods for the determination of short-period Earth rotation variations by means of VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) and present respective results, obtained from the analysis of 24-hour sessions covering the years 1984-2010. Furthermore the potential of a combined analysis of VLBI and ring laser measurements, concerning the estimation of Earth rotation parameters with sub-diurnal resolution, is outlined.

  9. High-resolution calculations of asteroid impacts into the Venusian atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korycansky, D G; Zahnle, K J; Mac Law, M M

    2000-08-01

    We present results from a number of 2D high-resolution hydrodynamical simulations of asteroids striking the atmosphere of Venus. These cover a wide range of impact parameters (velocity, size, and incidence angle), but the focus is on 2-3 km diameter asteroids, as these are responsible for most of the impact craters on Venus. Asteroids in this size range are disintegrated, ablated, and significantly decelerated by the atmosphere, yet they retain enough impetus to make large craters when they meet the surface. We find that smaller impactors (diameter 2-3 km) fragmentation by mechanical ablation is preferred. The pancaking model has been modified to take into account effects of hydrodynamical instabilities. The general observation that most larger impactors disintegrate by shedding fragments generated from hydrodynamic instabilities spurs us to develop a simple heuristic model of the mechanical ablation of fragments based on the growth rates of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Although in principle the model has many free parameters, most of these have little effect provided that they are chosen reasonably. In practice the range of model behavior can be described with one free parameter. The resulting model reproduces the mass and momentum fluxes rather well, doing so with reasonable values of all physical parameters.

  10. Multitechnique characterisation of 304L surface states oxidised at high temperature in steam and air atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamede, Anne-Sophie; Nuns, Nicolas; Cristol, Anne-Lise; Cantrel, Laurent; Souvi, Sidi; Cristol, Sylvain; Paul, Jean-François

    2016-04-01

    In case of a severe accident occurring in a nuclear reactor, surfaces of the reactor coolant system (RCS), made of stainless steel (304L) rich in Cr (>10%) and Ni (8-12%), are oxidised. Fission products (FPs) are released from melt fuel and flow through the RCS. A part of them is deposited onto surfaces either by vapour condensation or by aerosol deposition mechanisms. To be able to understand the nature of interactions between these FPs and the RCS surfaces, a preliminary step is to characterize the RSC surface states in steam and air atmosphere at high temperatures. Pieces of 304L stainless steel have been treated in a flow reactor at two different temperatures (750 °C and 950 °C) for two different exposition times (24 h and 72 h). After surfaces analysing by a unique combination of surface analysis techniques (XPS, ToF-SIMS and LEIS), for 304L, the results show a deep oxide scale with multi layers and the outer layer is composed of chromium and manganese oxides. Oxide profiles differ in air or steam atmosphere. Fe2O3 oxide is observed but in minor proportion and in all cases no nickel is detected near the surface. Results obtained are discussed and compared with the literature data.

  11. Combined Atmospheric and Ocean Profiling from an Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hair Johnathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available First of its kind combined atmospheric and ocean profile data were collected by the recently upgraded NASA Langley Research Center’s (LaRC High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-1 during the 17 July – 7 August 2014 Ship-Aircraft Bio-Optical Research Experiment (SABOR. This mission sampled over a region that covered the Gulf of Maine, open-ocean near Bermuda, and coastal waters from Virginia to Rhode Island. The HSRL-1 and the Research Scanning Polarimeter from NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies collected data onboard the NASA LaRC King Air aircraft and flight operations were closely coordinated with the Research Vessel Endeavor that made in situ ocean optical measurements. The lidar measurements provided profiles of atmospheric backscatter and particulate depolarization at 532nm, 1064nm, and extinction (532nm from approximately 9km altitude. In addition, for the first time HSRL seawater backscatter, depolarization, and diffuse attenuation data at 532nm were collected and compared to both the ship measurements and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (NASA MODIS-Aqua satellite ocean retrievals.

  12. The MARIACHI Project: Mixed Apparatus for Radio Investigation of Atmospheric Cosmic Rays of High Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglis, M. D.; Takai, H.; Warasia, R.; Sundermier, J.

    2005-12-01

    Extreme Energy Cosmic Rays are nuclei that have been accelerated to kinetic energies in excess of 1020 eV. Where do they come from? How are they produced? Are they survivors of the early universe? Are they remnants of supernovas? MARIACHI, a unique collaboration between scientists, physics teachers and students, is an innovative technique that allows us to detect and study them. The Experiment MARIACHI is a unique research experiment that seeks the detection of extreme energy cosmic rays (EECRs), with E >1020 eV. It is an exciting project with many aspects: Research: It investigates an unconventional way of detecting EECRs based upon a method successfully used to detect meteors entering the upper atmosphere. The method was developed by planetary astronomers listening to radio signals reflected off the ionization trail. MARIACHI seeks to listen to TV signals reflected off the ionization trail of an EECR. The unique experiment topology will also permit the study of meteors, exotic forms of lightning, and atmospheric science. Computing and Technology: It uses radio detection stations, along with mini shower arrays hooked up to GPS clocks. Teachers and students build the arrays. It implements the Internet and the GRID as means of communication, data transfer, data processing, and for hosting a public educational outreach web site. Outreach and Education: It is an open research project with the active participation of a wide audience of astronomers, physicists, college professors, high school teachers and students. Groups representing high schools, community colleges and universities all collaborate in the project. The excitement of a real experiment motivates the science and technology classroom, and incorporates several high school physical science topics along with material from other disciplines such as astronomy, electronics, radio, optics.

  13. Advancing Atmosphere-Ocean Remote Sensing with Spaceborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostetler, C. A.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; Chepfer, H.; Hu, Y.; Hair, J. W.; Trepte, C. R.; Winker, D. M.; Ferrare, R. A.; Burton, S. P.; Scarino, A. J.; Powell, K. A.; Michaud, J.

    2016-12-01

    More than 1600 publications employing observations from the CALIOP lidar on CALIPSO testify to the value of spaceborne lidar for aerosol and cloud remote sensing. Recent publications have shown the value of CALIOP data for retrievals of key ocean carbon cycle stocks. In this presentation we focus on the advantages of a more advanced technique, High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL), for aerosol, cloud, and ocean remote sensing. An atmosphere-ocean optimized HSRL achieves greater accuracy over the standard backscatter lidar technique for retrievals of aerosol and cloud extinction and backscatter profiles, provides additional capability to retrieve aerosol and cloud microphysical parameters, and enables vertically-resolved characterization of scattering and absorption properties of suspended and dissolved materials in the ocean. Numerous publications highlight the synergy of coincident CALIOP and passive A-train observations for studies of aerosol-cloud radiative effects and cloud-climate feedback. Less appreciated is the complementarity that would exist between an optimized spaceborne lidar and passive ocean color. An optimized HSRL flown in formation with the Plankton, Aerosol, and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission would provide phytoplankton vertical distribution, which is needed for accurately estimating net primary productivity but absent in the PACE ocean color data. The HSRL would also provide data needed to improve atmospheric correction schemes in ocean color retrievals. Because lidar provides measurements both night and day, through tenuous clouds and aerosol layers, and in holes between clouds, the sampling achieved is highly complementary to passive radiometry, providing data in important high latitude regions where ocean color data are sparse or nonexistent. In this presentation we will discuss 1) relevant aerosol, cloud, and ocean retrievals from airborne HSRL field missions; 2) the advantages of an optimized spaceborne HSRL for aerosol, cloud, and ocean

  14. Air Enquirer's multi-sensor boxes as a tool for High School Education and Atmospheric Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morguí, Josep-Anton; Font, Anna; Cañas, Lidia; Vázquez-García, Eusebi; Gini, Andrea; Corominas, Ariadna; Àgueda, Alba; Lobo, Agustin; Ferraz, Carlos; Nofuentes, Manel; Ulldemolins, Delmir; Roca, Alex; Kamnang, Armand; Grossi, Claudia; Curcoll, Roger; Batet, Oscar; Borràs, Silvia; Occhipinti, Paola; Rodó, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    An educational tool was designed with the aim of making more comprehensive the research done on Greenhouse Gases (GHGs) in the ClimaDat Spanish network of atmospheric observation stations (www.climadat.es). This tool is called Air Enquirer and it consist of a multi-sensor box. It is envisaged to build more than two hundred boxes to yield them to the Spanish High Schools through the Education department (www.educaixa.com) of the "Obra Social 'La Caixa'", who funds this research. The starting point for the development of the Air Enquirers was the experience at IC3 (www.ic3.cat) in the CarboSchools+ FP7 project (www.carboschools.cat, www.carboschools.eu). The Air Enquirer's multi-sensor box is based in Arduino's architecture and contains sensors for CO2, temperature, relative humidity, pressure, and both infrared and visible luminance. The Air Enquirer is designed for taking continuous measurements. Every Air Enquirer ensemble of measurements is used to convert values to standard units (water content in ppmv, and CO2 in ppmv_dry). These values are referred to a calibration made with Cavity Ring Down Spectrometry (Picarro®) under different temperature, pressure, humidity and CO2 concentrations. Multiple sets of Air Enquirers are intercalibrated for its use in parallel during the experiments. The different experiments proposed to the students will be outdoor (observational) or indoor (experimental, in the lab) focusing on understanding the biogeochemistry of GHGs in the ecosystems (mainly CO2), the exchange (flux) of gases, the organic matter production, respiration and decomposition processes, the influence of the anthropogenic activities on the gases (and particles) exchanges, and their interaction with the structure and composition of the atmosphere (temperature, water content, cooling and warming processes, radiative forcing, vertical gradients and horizontal patterns). In order to ensure Air Enquirers a high-profile research performance the experimental designs

  15. A Direct Measurement of Atmospheric Dispersion in N-band Spectra: Implications for Mid-IR Systems on ELTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skemer, Andrew J.; Hinz, Philip M.; Hoffmann, William F.; Close, Laird M.; Kendrew, Sarah; Mathar, Richard J.; Stuik, Remko; Greene, Thomas P.; Woodward, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael S.

    This paper is modified from [A.J. Skemer, P.M. Hinz, W.F. Hoffmann, L.M. Close, S. Kendrew, R.J. Mathar, R. Stuik, T.P. Greene, C.E. Woodward, M.S. Kelley, PASP 121, 897 (2009)]. Adaptive optics will almost completely remove the effects of atmospheric turbulence at 10µm on the Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) generation of telescopes. In this paper, we observationally confirm that the next most important limitation to image quality is atmospheric dispersion, rather than telescope diffraction. By using the 6.5 meter MMT with its unique mid-IR adaptive optics system, we measure atmospheric dispersion in the N-band with the newly commissioned spectroscopic mode on MIRAC4BLINC. Our results indicate that atmospheric dispersion is generally linear in the N-band, although there is some residual curvature. We compare our measurements to theory, and make predictions for ELT Strehls and image FHWM with and without an atmospheric dispersion corrector (ADC). We find that for many mid-IR applications, an ADC will be necessary on ELTs. The observations reported here were obtained at the MMT Observatory, a facility operated jointly by the Smithsonian Institution and the University of Arizona

  16. Electrostatic Precipitation of Dust in the Martian Atmosphere: Implications for the Utilization of Resources During Future Manned Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos I.; Clements, Judson S.; Thompson, Samuel M.; Cox, Nathan D.; Hogue, Michael D.; Johansen, Michael R.; Williams, Blakeley S.

    2011-01-01

    Future human missions to Mars will require the utilization of local resources for oxygen, fuel. and water. The In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project is an active research endeavor at NASA to develop technologies that can enable cost effective ways to live off the land. The extraction of oxygen from the Martian atmosphere. composed primarily of carbon dioxide, is one of the most important goals of the Mars ISRU project. The main obstacle is the relatively large amount of dust present in the Martian atmosphere. This dust must be efficiently removed from atmospheric gas intakes for ISRU processing chambers. A common technique to achieve this removal on earth is by electrostatic precipitation, where large electrostatic fields are established in a localized region to precipitate and collect previously charged dust particles. This technique is difficult to adapt to the Martian environment, with an atmospheric pressure of about one-hundredth of the terrestrial atmosphere. At these low pressures. the corona discharges required to implant an electrostatic charge to the particles to be collected is extremely difficult to sustain and the corona easily becomes biopolar. which is unsuitable for particle charging. In this paper, we report on our successful efforts to establish a stable corona under Martian simulated conditions. We also present results on dust collecting efficiencies with an electrostatic precipitator prototype that could be effectively used on a future mission to the red planet

  17. Electrostatic precipitation of dust in the Martian atmosphere: Implications for the utilization of resources during future manned exploration missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, C. I.; Thompson, S. M.; Cox, N. D.; Johansen, M. R.; Williams, B. S.; Hogue, M. D.; Clements, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    Future human missions to Mars will require the utilization of local resources for oxygen, fuel, and water. The In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) project is an active research endeavor at NASA to develop technologies that can enable cost effective ways to live off the land. The extraction of oxygen from the Martian atmosphere, composed primarily of carbon dioxide, is one of the most important goals of the Mars ISRU project. The main obstacle is the relatively large amount of dust present in the Martian atmosphere. This dust must be efficiently removed from atmospheric gas intakes for ISRU processing chambers. A common technique to achieve this removal on earth is by electrostatic precipitation, where large electrostatic fields are established in a localized region to charge, precipitate and collect dust particles. This technique is difficult to adapt to the Martian environment, with an atmospheric pressure of about one-hundredth of the terrestrial atmosphere. At these low pressures, the corona discharges required to implant an electrostatic charge to the particles to be collected is extremely difficult to sustain and the corona easily transitions to a glow/streamer discharge, which is unsuitable for particle charging. In this paper, we report on our successful efforts to establish a stable corona under Martian simulated conditions. We also present results on dust collecting efficiencies with an electrostatic precipitator prototype that could be effectively used on a future mission to the red planet.

  18. Analysis of reaction products formed in the gas phase reaction of E,E-2,4-hexadienal with atmospheric oxidants: Reaction mechanisms and atmospheric implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenar, I.; Martin, P.; Cabañas, B.; Salgado, S.; Martinez, E.

    2018-03-01

    An analysis of reaction products for the reaction of E,E-2,4-hexadienal with chlorine atoms (Cl) and OH and NO3 radicals has been carried out at the first time with the aim of obtaining a better understanding of the tropospheric reactivity of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry with a Time of Flight detector (GC-TOFMS) were used to carry out the qualitative and/or quantitative analyses. Reaction products in gas and particulate phase were observed from the reactions of E,E-2,4- hexadienal with all oxidants. E/Z-Butenedial and maleic anhydride were the main products identified in gas phase. E-butenedial calculated molar yield ranging from 4 to 10%. A significant amount of multifunctional compounds (chloro and hydroxy carbonyls) was identified. These compounds could be formed in particulate phase explaining the ∼90% of unaccounted carbon in gas phase. The reaction with Cl atoms in the presence of NOx with a long reaction time gave Peroxy Acetyl Nitrate (PAN) as an additional product, which is known for being an important specie in the generation of the photochemical smog. Nitrated compounds were the major organic products from the reaction with the NO3 radical. Based on the identified products, the reaction mechanisms have been proposed. In these mechanisms a double bond addition of the atmospheric oxidant at C4/C5 of E,E-2,4-hexadienal is the first step for tropospheric degradation.

  19. ESA STSE Project “Sea Surface Temperature Diurnal Variability: Regional Extend – Implications in Atmospheric Modelling”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna

    , atmospheric and oceanic modelling, bio-chemical processes and oceanic CO2 studies. The diurnal variability of SST, driven by the coincident occurrence of low enough wind and solar heating, is currently not properly understood. Atmospheric, oceanic and climate models are currently not adequately resolving...... present the final project findings regarding the analysis of hourly SEVIRI SSTs from SEVIRI over the Atlantic Ocean and the European Seas, revealing the regional extend of diurnal warming. As satellite SSTs are representative of the upper centimetre of the water column, they do not provide information...... the daily SST variability, resulting in biases of the total heat budget estimates and therefore, demised model accuracies. The ESA STSE funded project SSTDV:R.EX.-IM.A.M. aimed at characterising the regional extend of diurnal SST signals and their impact in atmospheric modelling. This study will briefly...

  20. Atmospheric processes of organic pollutants over a remote lake on the central Tibetan Plateau: implications for regional cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiao; Wang, Xiaoping; Wang, Chuanfei; Gong, Ping; Yao, Tandong

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric processes (air-surface exchange, and atmospheric deposition and degradation) are crucial for understanding the global cycling and fate of organic pollutants (OPs). However, such assessments over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) remain uncertain. More than 50 % of Chinese lakes are located on the TP, which exerts a remarkable influence on the regional water, energy, and chemical cycling. In this study, air and water samples were simultaneously collected in Nam Co, a large lake on the TP, to test whether the lake is a secondary source or sink of OPs. Lower concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were observed in the atmosphere and lake water of Nam Co, while the levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were relatively higher. Results of fugacity ratios and chiral signatures both suggest that the lake acted as the net sink of atmospheric hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), following their long-range transport driven by the Indian monsoon. Different behaviours were observed in the PAHs, which primarily originated from local biomass burning. Acenaphthylene, acenaphthene, and fluorene showed volatilization from the lake to the atmosphere, while other PAHs were deposited into the lake due to the integrated deposition process (wet/dry and air-water gas deposition) and limited atmospheric degradation. As the dominant PAH compound, phenanthrene exhibited a seasonal reversal of air-water gas exchange, which was likely related to the melting of the lake ice in May. The annual input of HCHs from the air to the entire lake area (2015 km2) was estimated as 1.9 kg yr-1, while input estimated for ∑ 15PAHs can potentially reach up to 550 kg yr-1. This study highlights the significance of PAH deposition on the regional carbon cycling in the oligotrophic lakes of the TP.

  1. Lightning-driven inner radiation belt energy deposition into the atmosphere: implications for ionisation-levels and neutral chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Rodger

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Lightning-generated whistlers lead to coupling between the troposphere, the Van Allen radiation belts and the lower-ionosphere through Whistler-induced electron precipitation (WEP. Lightning produced whistlers interact with cyclotron resonant radiation belt electrons, leading to pitch-angle scattering into the bounce loss cone and precipitation into the atmosphere. Here we consider the relative significance of WEP to the lower ionosphere and atmosphere by contrasting WEP produced ionisation rate changes with those from Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR and solar photoionisation. During the day, WEP is never a significant source of ionisation in the lower ionosphere for any location or altitude. At nighttime, GCR is more significant than WEP at altitudes <68 km for all locations, above which WEP starts to dominate in North America and Central Europe. Between 75 and 80 km altitude WEP becomes more significant than GCR for the majority of spatial locations at which WEP deposits energy. The size of the regions in which WEP is the most important nighttime ionisation source peaks at ~80 km, depending on the relative contributions of WEP and nighttime solar Lyman-α. We also used the Sodankylä Ion Chemistry (SIC model to consider the atmospheric consequences of WEP, focusing on a case-study period. Previous studies have also shown that energetic particle precipitation can lead to large-scale changes in the chemical makeup of the neutral atmosphere by enhancing minor chemical species that play a key role in the ozone balance of the middle atmosphere. However, SIC modelling indicates that the neutral atmospheric changes driven by WEP are insignificant due to the short timescale of the WEP bursts. Overall we find that WEP is a significant energy input into some parts of the lower ionosphere, depending on the latitude/longitude and altitude, but does not play a significant role in the neutral chemistry of the mesosphere.

  2. Development of advanced metallic coatings resistant to corrosion in high temperature industrial atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, T.; Bender, R.; Rosado, C.; Schuetze, M. [DECHEMA e.V., Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Following the experimental results that {gamma}-TiAl is highly resistant in reducing sulfidizing atmospheres the development of Ti-Al-co-diffusion coatings produced in a single step pack cementation process was started. The appropriate diffusion powder compositions were selected using thermodynamical calculations. Different Al-Ti-, Al-Si- and Al-Ti-Si-diffusion coatings were successfully applied on austenitic steels as well as Ni-base materials and showed excellent behaviour in reducing sulfidizing atmospheres with high carbon contents (CH{sub 4} - 1% CO - 1% CO{sub 2} - 10% H{sub 2} - 7% H{sub 2}S) up to 700 deg. C, under metal dusting conditions (H{sub 2} - 25 CO - 2% H{sub 2}O and CO - 2.4% CO{sub 2} - 1% CH{sub 4} - 9.4% N{sub 2} - 23.4% H{sub 2} - 0.2% H{sub 2}O - 1 ppm H{sub 2}S-0.3 ppm HCl) at temperatures of 620 deg. C and 700 deg. C. The application of diffusion coatings on ferritic materials has to be modified due to the specific requirements on the mechanical properties which are affected by the heat treatment during the diffusion process. TiAl was also applied by the HVOF thermal spray method on ferritic steels. Due to similarity of the thermal expansion coefficients this substrate-coating system proved to be mechanically very stable also under thermal cycling conditions. (authors)

  3. Final Report: High Spectral Resolution Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Studies with the ARM UAV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revercomb, Henry E.

    1999-12-31

    The active participation in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Unmanned Airborne Vehicle (UAV) science team that was anticipated in the grant proposal was indefinitely delayed after the first year due to a programmatic decision to exclude the high spectral resolution observations from the existing ARM UAV program. However, this report shows that substantial progress toward the science objectives of this grant have made with the help of separate funding from NASA and other agencies. In the four year grant period (including time extensions), a new high spectral resolution instrument has been flown and has successfully demonstrated the ability to obtain measurements of the type needed in the conduct of this grant. In the near term, the third water vapor intensive observing period (WVIOP-3) in October 2000 will provide an opportunity to bring the high spectral resolution observations of upwelling radiance into the ARM program to complement the downwelling radiance observations from the existing ARM AERI instruments. We look forward to a time when the ARM-UAV program is able to extend its scope to include the capability for making these high spectral resolution measurements from a UAV platform.

  4. Applications of High Resolution Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy for Atmospheric and Environmental Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscioli, Joseph R.; McManus, J. Barry; Nelson, David; Zahniser, Mark; Herndon, Scott C.; Shorter, Joanne; Yacovitch, Tara I.; Jervis, Dylan; Dyroff, Christoph; Kolb, Charles E.

    2016-06-01

    For the past 20 years, high resolution infrared spectroscopy has served as a valuable tool to measure gas-phase concentrations of ambient gas samples. We review recent advances in atmospheric sampling using direct absorption high resolution mid-infrared spectroscopy from the perspective of light sources, detectors, and optical designs. Developments in diode, quantum cascade and interband cascade laser technology have led to thermoelectrically-cooled single-mode laser sources capable of operation between 800 wn and 3100 wn, with 10 mW power. Advances in detector and preamplifier technology have yielded thermoelectriocally-cooled sensors capable of room-temperature operation with extremely high detectivities. Finally, novel spectrometer optical designs have led to robust multipass absorption cells capable of >400 m effective pathlength in a compact package. In combination with accurate spectroscopic databases, these developments have afforded dramatic improvements in measurement sensitivity, accuracy, precision, and selectivity. We will present several examples of the applications of high resolution mid-IR spectrometers in real-world field measurements at sampling towers and aboard mobile platforms such as vehicles and airplanes.

  5. Effect of high-oxygen atmosphere packaging on oxidative stability and sensory quality of two chicken muscles during chill storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jongberg, Sisse; Wen, Jinzhu; Tørngren, Mari Ann

    2014-01-01

    The oxidative stability and sensory quality of chicken breast (m. pectoralis) and thigh (m. peroneus longus) stored in high-oxygen modified atmosphere (MAP-O), non-oxygen modified atmosphere (MAP-N), or vacuum for up to 9 days at 5°C were investigated. Protein thiol concentration in breasts...... in MAP-O than breast, indicating that the negative effect MAP-O may have on the oxidative stability and sensory quality of meat varies between different muscles....

  6. Towards Direct Simulation of Future Tropical Cyclone Statistics in a High-Resolution Global Atmospheric Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael F. Wehner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a set of high-resolution global atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM simulations focusing on the model's ability to represent tropical storms and their statistics. We find that the model produces storms of hurricane strength with realistic dynamical features. We also find that tropical storm statistics are reasonable, both globally and in the north Atlantic, when compared to recent observations. The sensitivity of simulated tropical storm statistics to increases in sea surface temperature (SST is also investigated, revealing that a credible late 21st century SST increase produced increases in simulated tropical storm numbers and intensities in all ocean basins. While this paper supports previous high-resolution model and theoretical findings that the frequency of very intense storms will increase in a warmer climate, it differs notably from previous medium and high-resolution model studies that show a global reduction in total tropical storm frequency. However, we are quick to point out that this particular model finding remains speculative due to a lack of radiative forcing changes in our time-slice experiments as well as a focus on the Northern hemisphere tropical storm seasons.

  7. High spectral resolution remote sensing detection system for atmosphere greenhouse gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Da; Zheng, Yuquan

    2016-10-01

    Space-borne high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and high spectral resolution spectral detection system with high detection accuracy (1-4ppm) is demonstrated under the application background of the detection of atmospheric carbon dioxide as the main component of greenhouse gases. According to greenhouse gas concentrations detection accuracy requirements and simulation of different spectral absorption spectrum of carbon dioxide, the reasonable spectral channel center wavelength, spectral bandwidth and spectral resolution is determined of the high spectral resolution carbon dioxide remote sensing system. Grating spectral imaging system using large area diffractive grating spectral as a core splitting element is to achieve fine spectrum splitting. By the application of large area array detector push-broom mode, the hyperspectral greenhouse gas detection system is developed with the spectrum center wavelength of 0.76um, 1.61um and 2.06um, spectral resolution indicators better than 0.047nm, 0.142nm and 0.182nm actually. The system components and working principle are described. Important parts involved in the system design such as spectral imaging system, large-array CCD visible-light detector, large-array HgCdTe infrared detectors, high SNR and low temperature drift imaging electronics, etc. are discussed. SNR indicators of three spectral ranges are estimated based on system parameters, in order to analyzing realizability of high detection accuracy of XCO2. The system performances are tested by taking fine spectral calibration and radiometric calibration methods in the laboratory. Spectral calibration results showed that: three spectral channels mean spectral resolutions of hyperspectral detection of greenhouse gases are better than 0.042 nm, 0.128nm and 0.17nm, three spectral channels average SNRs are up to 53dB, 48dB and 45dB respectively under the typical operating conditions of system. Development of this system successfully filled greenhouse gas detection systems

  8. Optical Properties of Lithium Terbium Fluoride and Implications for Performance in High Power Lasers (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2016-0323 OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF LITHIUM TERBIUM FLUORIDE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PERFORMANCE IN HIGH POWER LASERS... AMERICA (STINFO COPY) AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY MATERIALS AND MANUFACTURING DIRECTORATE WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, OH 45433-7750 AIR...OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF LITHIUM TERBIUM FLUORIDE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PERFORMANCE IN HIGH POWER LASERS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b

  9. A Search for Water in a Super-Earth Atmosphere: High-resolution Optical Spectroscopy of 55Cancri e

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Lisa J.; de Mooij, Ernst J. W.; Jayawardhana, Ray; Watson, Chris; de Kok, Remco

    2017-06-01

    We present the analysis of high-resolution optical spectra of four transits of 55Cnc e, a low-density super-Earth that orbits a nearby Sun-like star in under 18 hr. The inferred bulk density of the planet implies a substantial envelope, which, according to mass-radius relationships, could be either a low-mass extended or a high-mass compact atmosphere. Our observations investigate the latter scenario, with water as the dominant species. We take advantage of the Doppler cross-correlation technique, high-spectral resolution, and the large wavelength coverage of our observations to search for the signature of thousands of optical water absorption lines. Using our observations with HDS on the Subaru telescope and ESPaDOnS on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope, we are able to place a 3σ lower limit of 10 g mol-1 on the mean-molecular weight of 55Cnc e’s water-rich (volume mixing ratio >10%), optically thin atmosphere, which corresponds to an atmospheric scale-height of ˜80 km. Our study marks the first high-spectral resolution search for water in a super-Earth atmosphere, and demonstrates that it is possible to recover known water-vapor absorption signals in a nearby super-Earth atmosphere, using high-resolution transit spectroscopy with current ground-based instruments.

  10. Effect of high-oxygen and oxygen-free modified atmosphere packaging on the spoilage process of poultry breast fillets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossaint, Sonja; Klausmann, Sonja; Kreyenschmidt, Judith

    2015-01-01

    A comparison was made of the effect of atmospheres containing high oxygen (70% O2 and 30% CO2) or high nitrogen (70% N2 and 30% CO2) on the spoilage process during storage (at 4°C) of poultry fillets. Four samples of each gas atmosphere were analyzed at 7 sample points during storage. For this analysis, the growth of typical spoilage organisms (Brochothrix thermosphacta, Pseudomonas spp., Enterobacteriaceae, and Lactobacilli spp.) and total viable count (TVC) were analyzed and modeled by using the Gompertz function. Sensory analyses of the poultry samples were carried out by trained sensory panelists to analyze color, odor, texture, drip loss, and general appearance. The composition of the spoilage flora differed between the oxygen-free atmosphere and the high-oxygen atmosphere. Anaerobic conditions favored the growth of Lactobacilli spp., whereas aerobic gas composition favored the growth of B. thermosphacta. However, no significant difference (Patmosphere in comparison to a high-nitrogen atmosphere. These results indicate that high-oxygen packaging has no additional beneficial effect on the quality maintenance and shelf life of fresh poultry fillets. © 2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  11. Atmospheric transport of neutrons and gamma rays from a high-altitude nuclear detonation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrd, R.C.

    1995-07-01

    Although radiation outputs from nuclear detonations in free space are well established, few studies exist of effect of atmospheric transport on the resulting intensity, energy, and time signatures. This report presents calculations for generic sources at high altitudes, 20-50 km above the Earth`s surface, in an atmosphere whose density decreases almost exponentially with height. The sources are instantaneous time bursts with simple energy dependences: gamma rays use an evaporation spectrum; neutrons use either a Gaussian fusion or a Maxwell fission spectrum. The observation angles vary from vertical to 5{degrees} below the horizon, and detectors are placed in either geosynchronous or low Earth orbits (100 km). All calculations use the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code in either its photon, neutron, or coupled neutron-photon modes, with the coupled mode being applied to the production of gamma rays by neutron inelastic scattering. The standard MCNP outputs are analyzed to extract the intensity, energy, and time dependences of the fluence as functions of either source altitude or observation angle. In general, the intensities drop rapidly below about 30-km source altitude or +5` slant angle. Above these limits, the gamma-ray signal loses substantial intensity but still contains most of the original source information. In contrast, neutron scattering produces little or no decrease in intensity, but it rapidly degrades much of the information about the original source spectrum. Finally, although there is abundant gamma-ray production from neutron inelastic scattering, the resulting signatures appear to provide little additional information.

  12. Climatic, tectonic, and biological factors affecting the oxidation state of the atmosphere and oceans: Implications for Phanerozoic O2 evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, K.; Tajika, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Earth's atmosphere and oceans have seen fundamental changes in its oxidation state in response to the climatic, tectonic and geochemical variations. Over the past decade, several geochemical proxies have led to significant progress in understanding the paleredox states of ancient oceans. However, a quantitative interpretation of these data for atmospheric O2 levels remain unclear because the relationship between atmospheric O2 levels (pO2) and oceanic redox state depends on several environmental factors, such as terrestrial weathering rate, sea-level stands, and sinking rate of particulate organic matter (POM) in the water column and so on. It is widely thought that the redox-dependent P cycling also plays a crucial role in regulating pO2 because it acts as a negative feedback on a geological timescale. It is important that strength of this feedback for a given pO2 is also modulated by environmental factors, affecting not only O2 levels at steady state but also its susceptibility to environmental changes. In this study, a quantitative role of environmental factors in the oxidation state of Earth's surface environment is evaluated with an oceanic biogeochemical cycle model (CANOPS) coupled with global C cycle model, which enables us to understand the ancient CO2 and O2 evolution. Our results demonstrate that atmospheric O2 level at steady state is affected by CO2 input flux from Earth's interior via changes in biogeochemical cycles, but its response is modulated by several internal factors such as shelf area and POM sinking rate. We also found that early Paleozoic atmospheric O2 levels before the advent of land plant would be determined so that oceans may locate at the "edge of anoxia (EoA)" where the redox-dependency of marine P cycle plays a crucial role in regulating O2 cycle, and that POM sinking rate has a great impact on the EoA. Our findings provide insights into the O2 cycle over the Phanerozoic in response to the climatic and tectonic variations and

  13. Apparatus and method for enhanced chemical processing in high pressure and atmospheric plasmas produced by high frequency electromagnetic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efthimion, Philip C.; Helfritch, Dennis J.

    1989-11-28

    An apparatus and method for creating high temperature plasmas for enhanced chemical processing of gaseous fluids, toxic chemicals, and the like, at a wide range of pressures, especially at atmospheric and high pressures includes an electro-magnetic resonator cavity, preferably a reentrant cavity, and a wave guiding structure which connects an electro-magnetic source to the cavity. The cavity includes an intake port and an exhaust port, each having apertures in the conductive walls of the cavity sufficient for the intake of the gaseous fluids and for the discharge of the processed gaseous fluids. The apertures are sufficiently small to prevent the leakage of the electro-magnetic radiation from the cavity. Gaseous fluid flowing from the direction of the electro-magnetic source through the guiding wave structure and into the cavity acts on the plasma to push it away from the guiding wave structure and the electro-magnetic source. The gaseous fluid flow confines the high temperature plasma inside the cavity and allows complete chemical processing of the gaseous fluids at a wide range of pressures.

  14. Atmospheric lepton fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaisser Thomas K.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This review of atmospheric muons and neutrinos emphasizes the high energy range relevant for backgrounds to high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin. After a brief historical introduction, the main distinguishing features of atmospheric νμ and νe are discussed, along with the implications of the muon charge ratio for the νµ / ν̅µ ratio. Methods to account for effects of the knee in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum and the energy-dependence of hadronic interactions on the neutrino fluxes are discussed and illustrated in the context of recent results from IceCube. A simple numerical/analytic method is proposed for systematic investigation of uncertainties in neutrino fluxes arising from uncertainties in the primary cosmic-ray spectrum/composition and hadronic interactions.

  15. The effect of nitrogen additions on bracken fern and its insect herbivores at sites with high and low atmospheric pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.E. Jones; M.E. Fenn; T.D. Paine

    2011-01-01

    The impact of atmospheric pollution, including nitrogen deposition, on bracken fern herbivores has never been studied. Bracken fern is globally distributed and has a high potential to accumulate nitrogen in plant tissue. We examined the response of bracken fern and its herbivores to N fertilization at a high and low pollution site in forests downwind of Los Angeles,...

  16. A climatological analysis of high-precipitation events in Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, and associated large-scale atmospheric conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welker, Christoph; Martius, Olivia; Froidevaux, Paul; Reijmer, Carleen H.; Fischer, Hubertus

    2014-01-01

    The link between high precipitation in Dronning Maud Land (DML), Antarctica, and the large-scale atmospheric circulation is investigated using ERA-Interim data for 1979-2009. High-precipitation events are analyzed at Halvfarryggen situated in the coastal region of DML and at Kohnen Station located

  17. Response of Earth's Atmosphere to Increases in Solar Flux and Implications for Loss of Water from Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasting, J. F.; Pollock, J. G.; Ackerman, T. P.

    1985-01-01

    A one dimensional radiative convective model is used to compute temperature and water vapor profiles as functions of solar flux for earthlike atmosphere. The troposphere is assumed to be fully saturated with a moist adiabatic lapse rate, and changes in cloudiness are neglected. Predicted surface temperatures increase monotonically from -1 to 111 C as the solar flux is increased from 0.81 to 1.45 times its present value. The results imply that the surface temperature of a primitive water rich Venus should have been at least 80-100 C and may have been much higher, water vapor should have been a major atmospheric constituent at all altitudes, leading to the rapid hydrodynamic escape of hydrogen. The oxygen left behind by this process was presumably consumed by reactions with reduced minerals in the crust.

  18. Modification of land-atmosphere interactions by CO2 effects: Implications for summer dryness and heat wave amplitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemordant, Léo.; Gentine, Pierre; Stéfanon, Marc; Drobinski, Philippe; Fatichi, Simone

    2016-10-01

    Plant stomata couple the energy, water, and carbon cycles. We use the framework of Regional Climate Modeling to simulate the 2003 European heat wave and assess how higher levels of surface CO2 may affect such an extreme event through land-atmosphere interactions. Increased CO2 modifies the seasonality of the water cycle through stomatal regulation and increased leaf area. As a result, the water saved during the growing season through higher water use efficiency mitigates summer dryness and the heat wave impact. Land-atmosphere interactions and CO2 fertilization together synergistically contribute to increased summer transpiration. This, in turn, alters the surface energy budget and decreases sensible heat flux, mitigating air temperature rise. Accurate representation of the response to higher CO2 levels and of the coupling between the carbon and water cycles is therefore critical to forecasting seasonal climate, water cycle dynamics, and to enhance the accuracy of extreme event prediction under future climate.

  19. Chemical vapor deposition of high quality graphene films from carbon dioxide atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strudwick, Andrew James; Weber, Nils Eike; Schwab, Matthias Georg; Kettner, Michel; Weitz, R Thomas; Wünsch, Josef R; Müllen, Klaus; Sachdev, Hermann

    2015-01-27

    The realization of graphene-based, next-generation electronic applications essentially depends on a reproducible, large-scale production of graphene films via chemical vapor deposition (CVD). We demonstrate how key challenges such as uniformity and homogeneity of the copper metal substrate as well as the growth chemistry can be improved by the use of carbon dioxide and carbon dioxide enriched gas atmospheres. Our approach enables graphene film production protocols free of elemental hydrogen and provides graphene layers of superior quality compared to samples produced by conventional hydrogen/methane based CVD processes. The substrates and resulting graphene films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and Raman microscopy, sheet resistance and transport measurements. The superior quality of the as-grown graphene films on copper is indicated by Raman maps revealing average G band widths as low as 18 ± 8 cm(-1) at 514.5 nm excitation. In addition, high charge carrier mobilities of up to 1975 cm(2)/(V s) were observed for electrons in transferred films obtained from a carbon dioxide based growth protocol. The enhanced graphene film quality can be explained by the mild oxidation properties of carbon dioxide, which at high temperatures enables an uniform conditioning of the substrates by an efficient removal of pre-existing and emerging carbon impurities and a continuous suppression and in situ etching of carbon of lesser quality being co-deposited during the CVD growth.

  20. Atmospheric pitting corrosion of 304L stainless steel: the role of highly concentrated chloride solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Steven R; Mi, Na; Cook, Angus J M C; Mohammed-Ali, Haval B; Guo, Liya; Rayment, Trevor; Davenport, Alison J

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of atmospheric pitting corrosion in 304L stainless steel plate was analysed using MgCl(2) droplets in relation to changes in relative humidity (RH) and chloride deposition density (CDD). It was found that highly reproducible morphologies occur that are distinct at different RH. Pitting at higher concentrations, i.e. lower RH, resulted in satellite pits forming around the perimeter of wide shallow dish regions. At higher RH, these satellite pits did not form and instead spiral attack into the shallow region was observed. Increasing CDD at saturation resulted in a very broad-mouthed pitting attack within the shallow dish region. Large data sets were used to find trends in pit size and morphology in what is essentially a heterogeneous alloy. Electrochemical experiments on 304 stainless steel wires in highly saturated solutions showed that the passive current density increased significantly above 3 M MgCl(2) and the breakdown pitting potential dropped as the concentration increased. It is proposed that the shallow dish regions grow via enhanced dissolution of the passive film, whereas satellite pits and a spiral attack take place with active dissolution of bare metal surfaces.

  1. Earthshine observations at high spectral resolution: exploring and detecting metal lines in the Earth's upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Merino, B.; Pallé, E.; Motalebi, F.; Montañés-Rodríguez, P.; Kissler-Patig, M.

    2013-11-01

    Observations of the Earth as a planet using the earthshine technique (i.e. looking at the light reflected from the dark side of the Moon) have been used for climate and astrobiology studies. They provide information about the planetary albedo, a fundamental parameter of the Earth's energy balance. Here we present, for the first time, observations of the earthshine taken at high spectral resolution. The high spectral resolution was chosen in order to investigate the possibility of detecting metallic layers in the Earth's atmosphere of geological or meteoritic origin. The Spettrografo Alta Risoluzione Galileo echelle spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo in La Palma was used to acquire the earthshine data. Observations were carried out on several nights in 2011 February, with the spectral resolution set at 29 000, covering a spectral range from the near-ultraviolet (360 nm) to near-infrared (1011.9 nm). While we find evidence for the detection of a Na layer in the earthshine, other atomic species are not detected, perhaps due to the low signal-to-noise ratio of the observations and the difficult telluric corrections. The Na layer is found to vary between observation dates, which we speculate is due to physical variations in mesospheric Na concentrations.

  2. NEPTUNE’S DYNAMIC ATMOSPHERE FROM KEPLER K2 OBSERVATIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR BROWN DWARF LIGHT CURVE ANALYSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Jason F.; Gaulme, Patrick; Hammel, Heidi B.; Casewell, Sarah L.; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Gizis, John E.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Morales-Juberias, Raul; Orton, Glenn S.; Wong, Michael H.; Marley, Mark S.

    2017-01-01

    Observations of Neptune with the Kepler Space Telescope yield a 49 day light curve with 98% coverage at a 1 minute cadence. A significant signature in the light curve comes from discrete cloud features. We compare results extracted from the light curve data with contemporaneous disk-resolved imaging of Neptune from the Keck 10-m telescope at 1.65 microns and Hubble Space Telescope visible imaging acquired nine months later. This direct comparison validates the feature latitudes assigned to the K2 light curve periods based on Neptune’s zonal wind profile, and confirms observed cloud feature variability. Although Neptune’s clouds vary in location and intensity on short and long timescales, a single large discrete storm seen in Keck imaging dominates the K2 and Hubble light curves; smaller or fainter clouds likely contribute to short-term brightness variability. The K2 Neptune light curve, in conjunction with our imaging data, provides context for the interpretation of current and future brown dwarf and extrasolar planet variability measurements. In particular we suggest that the balance between large, relatively stable, atmospheric features and smaller, more transient, clouds controls the character of substellar atmospheric variability. Atmospheres dominated by a few large spots may show inherently greater light curve stability than those which exhibit a greater number of smaller features. PMID:28127087

  3. A model-based interpretation of low frequency changes in the carbon cycle during the last 120,000 years and its implications for the reconstruction of atmospheric Δ14C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, P.; Muscheler, R.; Fischer, H.

    2006-12-01

    A main caveat in the interpretation of observed changes in atmospheric Δ14C during the last 50,000 years is the unknown variability of the carbon cycle, which together with changes in the 14C production rates determines the 14C dynamics. A plausible scenario explaining glacial/interglacial dynamics seen in atmospheric CO2 and δ13C was proposed recently [K{ö}hler et al., 2005]. A similar approach and expanding its interpretation to the 14C cycle is an important step towards a deeper understanding of Δ14C variability [K{ö}hler et al., 2006]. This approach is based on an ocean/atmosphere/biosphere box model of the global carbon cycle (BICYCLE) to reproduce low frequency changes in atmospheric CO2 as seen in Antarctic ice cores. The model is forced forward in time by various paleo-climatic records derived from ice and sediment cores. The simulation results of our proposed scenario match a compiled CO2 record from various ice cores during the last 120,000 years with high accuracy (r2=0.89). We analyze scenarios with different 14C production rates, which are either constant, based on 10Be measured in Greenland ice cores, or the recent high-resolution geomagnetic field reconstruction GLOPIS-75 and compare them with the available Δ14C data covering the last 50,000 years. Our results suggest that during the last glacial cycle in general less than 110‰ of the increased atmospheric Δ14C are based on variations in the carbon cycle, while the largest part (5/6) of the variations has to be explained by other factors. Glacial atmospheric Δ14C larger than 700‰ cannot not be explained within our framework, neither through carbon cycle-based changes nor through variable 14C production. Superimposed on these general trends might lie positive anomalies in atmospheric Δ14C of ~50‰ caused by millennial-scale variability of the northern deep water production during Heinrich events and Dansgaard/Oeschger climate fluctuations. According to our model the dominant processes

  4. High CO2 levels in the Proterozoic atmosphere estimated from analyses of individual microfossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Alan J; Xiao, Shuhai

    2003-09-18

    Solar luminosity on the early Earth was significantly lower than today. Therefore, solar luminosity models suggest that, in the atmosphere of the early Earth, the concentration of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and methane must have been much higher. However, empirical estimates of Proterozoic levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations have not hitherto been available. Here we present ion microprobe analyses of the carbon isotopes in individual organic-walled microfossils extracted from a Proterozoic ( approximately 1.4-gigayear-old) shale in North China. Calculated magnitudes of the carbon isotope fractionation in these large, morphologically complex microfossils suggest elevated levels of carbon dioxide in the ancient atmosphere--between 10 and 200 times the present atmospheric level. Our results indicate that carbon dioxide was an important greenhouse gas during periods of lower solar luminosity, probably dominating over methane after the atmosphere and hydrosphere became pervasively oxygenated between 2 and 2.2 gigayears ago.

  5. Water, Methane Depletion, and High-Altitude Condensates in the Atmosphere of the Warm Super-Neptune WASP-107b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreidberg, Laura; Line, Michael; Thorngren, Daniel; Morley, Caroline; Stevenson, Kevin

    2018-01-01

    The super-Neptune exoplanet WASP-107b is an exciting target for atmosphere characterization. It has an unusually large atmospheric scale height and a small, bright host star, raising the possibility of precise constraints on its current nature and formation history. In this talk, I will present the first atmospheric study of WASP-107b, a Hubble Space Telescope measurement of its near-infrared transmission spectrum. We determined the planet's composition with two techniques: atmospheric retrieval based on the transmission spectrum and interior structure modeling based on the observed mass and radius. The interior structure models set a 3σ upper limit on the atmospheric metallicity of 30x solar. The transmission spectrum shows strong evidence for water absorption (6.5σ confidence), and we infer a water abundance consistent with expectations for a solar abundance pattern. On the other hand, methane is depleted relative to expectations (at 3σ confidence), suggesting a low carbon-to-oxygen ratio or high internal heat flux. The water features are smaller than predicted for a cloudless atmosphere, crossing less than one scale height. A thick condensate layer at high altitudes (0.1 - 3 mbar) is needed to match the observations; however, we find that it is challenging for physically motivated cloud and haze models to produce opaque condensates at these pressures. Taken together, these findings serve as an illustration of the diversity and complexity of exoplanet atmospheres. The community can look forward to more such results with the high precision and wide spectral coverage afforded by future observing facilities.

  6. On-sky Closed-loop Correction of Atmospheric Dispersion for High-contrast Coronagraphy and Astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, P.; Guyon, O.; Jovanovic, N.; Lozi, J.; Martinache, F.; Minowa, Y.; Kudo, T.; Kotani, T.; Takami, H.

    2018-02-01

    Adaptive optic (AO) systems delivering high levels of wavefront correction are now common at observatories. One of the main limitations to image quality after wavefront correction comes from atmospheric refraction. An atmospheric dispersion compensator (ADC) is employed to correct for atmospheric refraction. The correction is applied based on a look-up table consisting of dispersion values as a function of telescope elevation angle. The look-up table-based correction of atmospheric dispersion results in imperfect compensation leading to the presence of residual dispersion in the point spread function (PSF) and is insufficient when sub-milliarcsecond precision is required. The presence of residual dispersion can limit the achievable contrast while employing high-performance coronagraphs or can compromise high-precision astrometric measurements. In this paper, we present the first on-sky closed-loop correction of atmospheric dispersion by directly using science path images. The concept behind the measurement of dispersion utilizes the chromatic scaling of focal plane speckles. An adaptive speckle grid generated with a deformable mirror (DM) that has a sufficiently large number of actuators is used to accurately measure the residual dispersion and subsequently correct it by driving the ADC. We have demonstrated with the Subaru Coronagraphic Extreme AO (SCExAO) system on-sky closed-loop correction of residual dispersion to direct detection of habitable exoplanets with upcoming extremely large telescopes (ELTs) and also provide a diagnostic tool to test the performance of instruments which require sub-milliarcsecond correction.

  7. High-resolution interactive modelling of the mountain glacier–atmosphere interface: an application over the Karakoram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Collier

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The traditional approach to simulations of alpine glacier mass balance (MB has been one-way, or offline, thus precluding feedbacks from changing glacier surface conditions on the atmospheric forcing. In addition, alpine glaciers have been only simply, if at all, represented in atmospheric models to date. Here, we extend a recently presented, novel technique for simulating glacier–atmosphere interactions without the need for statistical downscaling, through the use of a coupled high-resolution mesoscale atmospheric and physically-based climatic mass balance (CMB modelling system that includes glacier CMB feedbacks to the atmosphere. We compare the model results over the Karakoram region of the northwestern Himalaya with remote sensing data for the ablation season of 2004 as well as with in situ glaciological and meteorological measurements from the Baltoro glacier. We find that interactive coupling has a localized but appreciable impact on the near-surface meteorological forcing data and that incorporation of CMB processes improves the simulation of variables such as land surface temperature and snow albedo. Furthermore, including feedbacks from the glacier model has a non-negligible effect on simulated CMB, reducing modelled ablation, on average, by 0.1 m w.e. (−6.0% to a total of −1.5 m w.e. between 25 June–31 August 2004. The interactively coupled model shows promise as a new, multi-scale tool for explicitly resolving atmospheric-CMB processes of mountain glaciers at the basin scale.

  8. Modeling Atmospheric Emissions and Calculating Mortality Rates Associated with High Volume Hydraulic Fracturing Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Alyssa

    Emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are a growing pollution concern throughout the global community, as they have been linked to numerous health issues. The freight transportation sector is a large source of these emissions and is expected to continue growing as globalization persists. Within the US, the expanding development of the natural gas industry is helping to support many industries and leading to increased transportation. The process of High Volume Hydraulic Fracturing (HVHF) is one of the newer advanced extraction techniques that is increasing natural gas and oil reserves dramatically within the US, however the technique is very resource intensive. HVHF requires large volumes of water and sand per well, which is primarily transported by trucks in rural areas. Trucks are also used to transport waste away from HVHF well sites. This study focused on the emissions generated from the transportation of HVHF materials to remote well sites, dispersion, and subsequent health impacts. The Geospatial Intermodal Freight Transport (GIFT) model was used in this analysis within ArcGIS to identify roadways with high volume traffic and emissions. High traffic road segments were used as emissions sources to determine the atmospheric dispersion of particulate matter using AERMOD, an EPA model that calculates geographic dispersion and concentrations of pollutants. Output from AERMOD was overlaid with census data to determine which communities may be impacted by increased emissions from HVHF transport. The anticipated number of mortalities within the impacted communities was calculated, and mortality rates from these additional emissions were computed to be 1 in 10 million people for a simulated truck fleet meeting stricter 2007 emission standards, representing a best case scenario. Mortality rates due to increased truck emissions from average, in-use vehicles, which represent a mixed age truck fleet, are expected to be higher (1 death per 341,000 people annually).

  9. Metagenomic evidence for metabolism of trace atmospheric gases by high-elevation desert Actinobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C Lynch

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Previous surveys of very dry Atacama Desert mineral soils have consistently revealed sparse communities of non-photosynthetic microbes. The functional nature of these microorganisms remains debatable given the harshness of the environment and low levels of biomass and diversity. The aim of this study was to gain an understanding of the phylogenetic community structure and metabolic potential of a low-diversity mineral soil metagenome that was collected from a high-elevation Atacama Desert volcano debris field. We pooled DNA extractions from over 15 grams of volcanic material, and using whole genome shotgun sequencing, observed only 75 - 78 total 16S rRNA gene OTUs3%. The phylogenetic structure of this community is significantly under dispersed, with actinobacterial lineages making up 97.9% - 98.6% of the 16S rRNA genes, suggesting a high degree of environmental selection. Due to this low diversity and uneven community composition, we assembled and analyzed the metabolic pathways of the most abundant genome, a Pseudonocardia sp. (56% - 72% of total 16S genes. Our assembly and binning efforts yielded almost 4.9 Mb of Pseudonocardia sp. contigs, which accounts for an estimated 99.3% of its non-repetitive genomic content. This genome contains a limited array of carbohydrate catabolic pathways, but encodes for CO2 fixation via the Calvin cycle. The genome also encodes complete pathways for the catabolism of various trace gases (H2, CO and several organic C1 compounds and the assimilation of ammonia and nitrate. We compared genomic content among related Pseudonocardia spp. and estimated rates of non-synonymous and synonymous nucleic acid substitutions between protein coding homologs. Collectively, these comparative analyses suggest that the community structure and various functional genes have undergone strong selection in the nutrient poor desert mineral soils and high-elevation atmospheric conditions.

  10. Non-LTE calculation of HCL earthlimb emission and implication for detection of HCl in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumer, J. B.; James, T. C.

    1982-01-01

    Calculation results are presented for the contribution of the non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium process of resonant scattering of sunlight in the 1-0 band of HCl to the earthlimb radiance, for the case of tangent altitudes from 20 to 90 km. It is established that the mechanism in question is a significant contributor to radiance at altitudes as low as 20 km, and that it becomes greater than the Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium contribution above 40 km. Attention is given to the prospects for detection of HCl at altitudes approaching 80 km, by means of the Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer scheduled for deployment by the NASA Upper Atmospheric Research Satellite.

  11. Peroxyacetic acid in urban and rural atmosphere: concentration, feedback on PAN-NOx cycle and implication on radical chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Li

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxyacetic acid (PAA is one of the most important atmospheric organic peroxides, which have received increasing attention for their potential contribution to the oxidation capacity of the troposphere and the formation of secondary aerosols. We report here, for the first time, a series of data for atmospheric PAA concentrations at urban and rural sites, from five field campaigns carried out in China in summer 2006, 2007 and 2008. For these five measurements, daytime mean (08:00–20:00 LT PAA concentrations on sunlit days were 21.4–148.0 pptv with a maximum level of ~1 ppbv. The various meteorological and chemical parameters influencing PAA concentrations were examined using Principal Factor Analysis. This statistical analysis shows that the local photochemical production was the major source of PAA, and its concentration increased with increasing temperature, solar radiation and ozone but decreased with increasing NOx (NO and NO2, CO, SO2, and relative humidity. Based on the dataset, several issues are highlighted in this study: (i Because PAA is a product from the photochemical oxidation of some specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs that lead to acetyl peroxy radicals, the importance of various VOCs with respect to the PAA formation is therefore ranked using the incremental reactivity method. (ii The contribution of PAN thermal degradation to PAA formation under conditions of different NOx concentrations is estimated based on the chemical kinetics analysis. The result shows that PAN seems to play an important role in the formation of PAA when the NO/NO2 concentration ratio was less than 0.2 and PAA would correspondingly have feedback on the PAN-NOx cycle. (iii PAA and other peroxides, such as methyl hydroperoxide (MHP and H2O2, usually exhibited a similar asymmetric shape typically shifted to the afternoon. However, under some conditions, H2O2 diurnal cycle was out of phase with MHP and PAA. The combination of linear regression and

  12. Ionization Capabilities of Hydronium Ions and High Electric Fields Produced by Atmospheric Pressure Corona Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Natsuhiko; Sekimoto, Kanako; Takayama, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure corona discharge (APCD) was applied to the ionization of volatile organic compounds. The mass spectra of analytes having aromatic, phenolic, anilinic, basic and aliphatic in nature were obtained by using vapor supply and liquid smear supply methods. The vapor supply method mainly gave protonated analytes [A+H]+ caused by proton transfer from hydronium ion H3O+, except for benzene, toluene and n-hexane that have lower proton affinity. The use of the liquid smear supply method resulted in the formation of molecular ion A·+ and/or dehydride analyte [A-H]+, according to the nature of analytes used. The formation of A·+ without fragment ions could be explained by the electron tunneling via high electric fields 108 V/m at the tip of the corona needle. The dehydride analytes [A-H]+ observed in the mass spectra of n-hexane, di- and tributylamines may be explained by the hydride abstraction from the alkyl chains by the hydronium ion. The hydronium ion can play the two-roles for analytes, i.e., the proton donor to form [A+H]+ and the hydride acceptor to form [A-H]+.

  13. Measurement of Atmospheric Neutrino Oscillations with a High-Density Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Curioni, A; Periale, L; Picchi, P; Pietropaolo, F; Ragazzi, S

    1998-01-01

    We propose an experiment to test the hypothesis that the reported anomaly on atmospheric neutrino fluxes is due to nu_mu nu_x oscillations. It will rely both on a disappearance technique, exploiting the method of the dependence of the event rate on L/E, which was recently shown to be effective for detection of neutrino oscillation and measurement of the oscillation parameters, and on an appearance technique, looking for an excess of muon-less events at high energy produced by upward-going tau neutrinos. The detector will consist of iron planes interleaved by limited streamer tubes. The total mass will be about 30 kt. The possibility of recuperating most of the instrumentation from existing detectors allows to avoid R&D phases and to reduce construction time. In four years of data taking, this experiment will be sensitive to oscillations nu_mu nu_x with Delta m^2 > 10^-4 eV^2 and a mixing near to maximal, and answer the question whether nu_x is a sterile or a tau neutrino.

  14. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma: A High-Performance Tool for the Efficient Removal of Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, Katja; Koban, Ina; Tresp, Helena; Jablonowski, Lukasz; Schröder, Karsten; Kramer, Axel; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; von Woedtke, Thomas; Kocher, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The medical use of non-thermal physical plasmas is intensively investigated for sterilization and surface modification of biomedical materials. A further promising application is the removal or etching of organic substances, e.g., biofilms, from surfaces, because remnants of biofilms after conventional cleaning procedures are capable to entertain inflammatory processes in the adjacent tissues. In general, contamination of surfaces by micro-organisms is a major source of problems in health care. Especially biofilms are the most common type of microbial growth in the human body and therefore, the complete removal of pathogens is mandatory for the prevention of inflammatory infiltrate. Physical plasmas offer a huge potential to inactivate micro-organisms and to remove organic materials through plasma-generated highly reactive agents. Method In this study a Candida albicans biofilm, formed on polystyrene (PS) wafers, as a prototypic biofilm was used to verify the etching capability of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet operating with two different process gases (argon and argon/oxygen mixture). The capability of plasma-assisted biofilm removal was assessed by microscopic imaging. Results The Candida albicans biofilm, with a thickness of 10 to 20 µm, was removed within 300 s plasma treatment when oxygen was added to the argon gas discharge, whereas argon plasma alone was practically not sufficient in biofilm removal. The impact of plasma etching on biofilms is localized due to the limited presence of reactive plasma species validated by optical emission spectroscopy. PMID:22880025

  15. Atmospheric pressure plasma: a high-performance tool for the efficient removal of biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Fricke

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The medical use of non-thermal physical plasmas is intensively investigated for sterilization and surface modification of biomedical materials. A further promising application is the removal or etching of organic substances, e.g., biofilms, from surfaces, because remnants of biofilms after conventional cleaning procedures are capable to entertain inflammatory processes in the adjacent tissues. In general, contamination of surfaces by micro-organisms is a major source of problems in health care. Especially biofilms are the most common type of microbial growth in the human body and therefore, the complete removal of pathogens is mandatory for the prevention of inflammatory infiltrate. Physical plasmas offer a huge potential to inactivate micro-organisms and to remove organic materials through plasma-generated highly reactive agents. METHOD: In this study a Candida albicans biofilm, formed on polystyrene (PS wafers, as a prototypic biofilm was used to verify the etching capability of the atmospheric pressure plasma jet operating with two different process gases (argon and argon/oxygen mixture. The capability of plasma-assisted biofilm removal was assessed by microscopic imaging. RESULTS: The Candida albicans biofilm, with a thickness of 10 to 20 µm, was removed within 300 s plasma treatment when oxygen was added to the argon gas discharge, whereas argon plasma alone was practically not sufficient in biofilm removal. The impact of plasma etching on biofilms is localized due to the limited presence of reactive plasma species validated by optical emission spectroscopy.

  16. High-speed sterilization technique using dielectric barrier discharge plasmas in atmospheric humid air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamae, M.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2010-11-01

    The inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores by a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma produced by an ac voltage application of 1 kHz in atmospheric humid air was investigated in order to develop low-temperature, low-cost and high-speed plasma sterilization technique. The biological indicators covered with a Tyvek sheet were set just outside the DBD plasma region, where the air temperature and humidity as a discharge gas were precisely controlled by an environmental test chamber. The results show that the inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores was found to be dependent strongly on the humidity, and was completed within 15 min at a relative humidity of 90 % and a temperature of 30 C. The treatment time for sterilization is shorter than those of conventional sterilization methods using ethylene oxide gas and dry heat treatment. It is considered that reactive species such as hydroxyl radicals that are effective for the inactivation of Bacillus atrophaeus spores could be produced by the DBD plasma in the humid air. Repetitive micro-pulsed discharge plasmas in the humid air will be applied for the sterilization experiment to enhance the sterilization efficiency.

  17. The first results from HIRAC - the Highly Instrumented Reactor for Atmospheric Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkin, T. L.; Smith, S. C.; Goddard, A.; Glowacki, D. R.; Heemavibool, K.; Wada, R.; Winiberg, F.; Pilling, M. J.; Heard, D. E.; Seakins, P.

    2009-12-01

    The Highly Instrumented Reactor for Atmospheric Chemistry, HIRAC, is a recently commissioned stainless steel environmental chamber. Uniquely, the structure allows for simultaneous temperature and pressure variation and for the monitoring of radical species by Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion (FAGE) and Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). HIRAC is cylindrical in shape with internal dimensions of 2.0 m long and 1.2 m diameter giving a total volume of ~2.25 m3. It is fitted with a broad range of instrumentation based on different detection techniques (detailed in the table below) to allow accurate monitoring of the chemistry occurring inside the chamber. Light for photochemical studies is be provided by lamps housed in eight quartz tubes mounted radially inside the reactive volume parallel to the chamber's principle axis providing a homogenous radiation profile. In this paper we present example of work relating to the three major objectives for HIRAC: 1) Mechanism development linked to the Master Chemical Mechanism - Measurements of pressure dependent OH and HO2 yields from the reaction of O3 with trans-2-butene and isoprene. 2) Field instrument development and calibration - Development of a CRDS system for measuring NO3 radicals inside HIRAC and the first pressure dependent calibrations of a FAGE HOx instrument. 3) Kinetics and Structural Activity Relationship (SAR) development - Relative rate studies of the reaction of Cl atoms with a series of acetates. The range of detection techniques employed in HIRAC and the species detected.

  18. Impacts of irrigation on land-atmosphere interactions in high-resolution model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawston, Patricia M.

    In the United States, irrigation represents the largest consumptive use of freshwater and accounts for approximately one-third of total water usage. Irrigation impacts soil moisture and can ultimately influence clouds and precipitation through land-planetary boundary layer (PBL) coupling processes. This dissertation is a collection of three studies that analyze the impact of irrigation on the atmosphere using NASA modeling tools the Land Information System (LIS) and the NASA Unified Weather Research and Forecasting Model (NU-WRF) framework. The first study investigates the effects of drip, flood, and sprinkler irrigation methods on land-atmosphere interactions, including land-PBL coupling and feedbacks at the local scale. The offline and coupled simulation results show that regional irrigation impacts are sensitive to time, space, and method and that irrigation cools and moistens the surface over and downwind of irrigated areas, ultimately resulting in both positive and negative feedbacks on the PBL depending on the time of day and background climate conditions. The second study assesses the sprinkler irrigation scheme physics and model sensitivity to choice of irrigation intensity and greenness fraction over a small, high resolution domain in Nebraska and evaluates the model performance with Cosmic Ray Neutron Probe (CRNP) observations. Results show that differences between experiments are small at the interannual scale, but become more apparent at seasonal and daily time scales. In addition, field-scale heterogeneity resulting from the individual actions of farmers is not captured by the model and the amount of irrigation applied by the model exceeds that applied at the two irrigated fields. However, the seasonal timing of irrigation and soil moisture contrasts between irrigated and non-irrigated areas are simulated well by the model. The third study assesses the individual and combined impacts of irrigation and wind turbines on surface fluxes, near surface

  19. Eukaryotic stromatolite builders in acid mine drainage: Implications for Precambrian iron formations and oxygenation of the atmosphere?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brake, S.S.; Hasiotis, S.T.; Dannelly, H.K.; Connors, K.A. [Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN (United States). Dept. of Geography, Geology & Anthropology

    2002-07-01

    Biological activity of Euglena mutabilis, an acidophilic, photosynthetic protozoan, contributes to the formation of Fe-rich stromatolites in acid mine drainage systems. E. mutabilis is the dominant microbe in bright green benthic mats (biofilm), coating drainage channels at abandoned coal mine sites in Indiana. It builds biolaminates through phototactic and aerotactic behavior, similar to prokaryotes, by moving through precipitates that periodically cover the mats. E. mutabilis also contributes to formation of Fe-rich stromatolites by (1) intracellularly storing Fe compounds released after death, contributing to the solid material of stromatolites and acting as nucleation sites for precipitation of authigenic Fe minerals, and (2) generating 02 via photosynthesis that further facilitates precipitation of reduced Fe, any excess 02 not consumed by Fe precipitation being released to the atmosphere. Recognition of E. mutabilis-dominated biofilm in acidic systems raises a provocative hypothesis relating processes involved in formation of Fe-rich stromatolites by E. mutabilis to those responsible for development of Precambrian stromatolitic Fe formations and oxygenation of the early atmosphere.

  20. Kinetics of a Criegee intermediate that would survive high humidity and may oxidize atmospheric SO2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hao-Li Huang; Wen Chao; Jim Jr-Min Lin

    2015-01-01

    Criegee intermediates are thought to play a role in atmospheric chemistry, in particular, the oxidation of SO2, which produces SO3 and subsequently H2SO4, an important constituent of aerosols and acid rain...

  1. A comparative analysis of two highly spatially resolved European atmospheric emission inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, J.; Guevara, M.; Baldasano, J. M.; Tchepel, O.; Schaap, M.; Miranda, A. I.; Borrego, C.

    2013-08-01

    A reliable emissions inventory is highly important for air quality modelling applications, especially at regional or local scales, which require high resolutions. Consequently, higher resolution emission inventories have been developed that are suitable for regional air quality modelling. This research performs an inter-comparative analysis of different spatial disaggregation methodologies of atmospheric emission inventories. This study is based on two different European emission inventories with different spatial resolutions: 1) the EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme) inventory and 2) an emission inventory developed by the TNO (Netherlands Organisation for Applied Scientific Research). These two emission inventories were converted into three distinct gridded emission datasets as follows: (i) the EMEP emission inventory was disaggregated by area (EMEParea) and (ii) following a more complex methodology (HERMES-DIS - High-Elective Resolution Modelling Emissions System - DISaggregation module) to understand and evaluate the influence of different disaggregation methods; and (iii) the TNO gridded emissions, which are based on different emission data sources and different disaggregation methods. A predefined common grid with a spatial resolution of 12 × 12 km2 was used to compare the three datasets spatially. The inter-comparative analysis was performed by source sector (SNAP - Selected Nomenclature for Air Pollution) with emission totals for selected pollutants. It included the computation of difference maps (to focus on the spatial variability of emission differences) and a linear regression analysis to calculate the coefficients of determination and to quantitatively measure differences. From the spatial analysis, greater differences were found for residential/commercial combustion (SNAP02), solvent use (SNAP06) and road transport (SNAP07). These findings were related to the different spatial disaggregation that was conducted by the TNO and HERMES

  2. Behaviors of trace elements in Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic paleosols: Implications for atmospheric oxygen evolution and continental oxidative weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takashi; Matsuura, Kei; Kanzaki, Yoshiki

    2016-11-01

    The behaviors of redox-sensitive and/or bio-essential trace elements in Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic paleosols (ancient weathering profiles) were investigated to better understand atmospheric oxygen evolution. The loss or retention of individual trace elements in the paleosols can show how continental oxidative weathering, and thus atmospheric oxygen evolution, took place against age mainly due to their various redox potentials. The V, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn and Mo concentrations of two Paleoproterozoic paleosols were measured by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry and mass spectrometry, and those, as well as Co, W and U concentrations, of nine Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic paleosols were obtained from the literature. The trace element behaviors were constrained by their degrees of loss or retention in the paleosols. We applied two methods to the estimation: (i) retention fraction of element M (a mass ratio of element M of paleosol to parent rock using immobile elements such as Ti) and (ii) element-element (in particular, Si-element) correlations at different profile depths of a paleosol. There are two distinct groups in trace element behavior in the Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic paleosols: Co, Ni, Zn and W were lost from weathering profiles until the early Paleoproterozoic but retained in the middle and late Paleoproterozoic, while V, Cr, Cu, Mo and U were retained in the profiles until the early Paleoproterozoic or slightly later but lost from the profiles in the middle and late Paleoproterozoic. More precisely, the timings of such loss and retention were different between trace elements during the Paleoproterozoic. The characteristics of these changes from retention to loss or from loss to retention indicate that the changes occurred and lasted throughout the Paleoproterozoic. The trace element behaviors, accordingly, suggest that continental weathering became oxidative progressively with age during almost the whole Paleoproterozoic, and thus

  3. Highly time-resolved chemical characterization of atmospheric fine particles during 2010 Shanghai World Expo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.-F. Huang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Shanghai, with a population of over 20 million, is the largest mega-city in China. Rapidly increasing industrial and metropolitan emissions have deteriorated its air quality in the past decades, with fine particle pollution as one of the major issues. However, systematic characterization of atmospheric fine particles with advanced measurement techniques has been very scarce in Shanghai. During 2010 Shanghai World Expo, we deployed a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS and a single particle soot photometer (SP2 in urban Shanghai between 15 May and 10 June 2010 to measure fine particles with a high time resolution. The 4-min resolution PM1 mass concentration ranged from 5.5 to 155 μg m−3, with an average of 29.2 μg m−3. On average, sulfate and organic matter (OM were the most abundant PM1 components, accounting for 33.3 and 28.7% of the total mass, respectively, while the fraction of nitrate showed an increasing trend with the increasing PM1 loading, indicating the photochemical nature of high fine particle pollution in Shanghai. Taking advantage of HR-ToF-AMS and SP2, OM was found to have an average OM/OC ratio (organic matter mass/organic carbon mass of 1.55 and black carbon (BC had an average number fraction of internally mixed BC of 41.2%. Positive matrix factorization (PMF analysis on the high resolution organic mass spectral dataset identified a hydrocarbon-like (HOA, a semi-volatile oxygenated (SV-OOA, and a low-volatility oxygenated (LV-OOA organic aerosol component, which on average accounted for 24.0, 46.8, and 29.2% of the total organic mass, respectively. The diurnal patterns of them with interesting time delay possibly implied a photochemical oxidizing process from HOA (and/or its concurrently emitted gaseous organic pollutants to SV-OOA to LV-OOA. Back trajectory analysis indicated that the northwesterly continental air mass represented the

  4. Microstructure evolutions of graded high-vanadium tool steel composite coating in-situ fabricated via atmospheric plasma beam alloying

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Huatang; Dong, XuanPu; Chen, Shuqun; Dutka, Mikhail; Pei, Yutao

    2017-01-01

    A novel high-vanadium based hard composite coating was synthesized from premixed powders (V, Cr, Mo, Ti, Nb) on ductile iron (DI) substrate via atmospheric plasma beam surface alloying process. The graded coating can be divided into three distinct zones: upper alloyed zone (AZ) rich with spherical

  5. Coherent lidar modulated with frequency stepped pulse trains for unambiguous high duty cycle range and velocity sensing in the atmosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindelöw, Per Jonas Petter; Mohr, Johan Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Range unambiguous high duty cycle coherent lidars can be constructed based on frequency stepped pulse train modulation, even continuously emitting systems could be envisioned. Such systems are suitable for velocity sensing of dispersed targets, like the atmosphere, at fast acquisition rates...

  6. A new, high-resolution surface mass balance map of Antarctica (1979–2010) based on regional atmospheric climate modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, J.T.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314850163; van den Broeke, M.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073765643; van de Berg, W.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831611; van Meijgaard, E.; Kuipers Munneke, P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831891

    2012-01-01

    A new, high resolution (27 km) surface mass balance (SMB) map of the Antarctic ice sheet is presented, based on output of a regional atmospheric climate model that includes snowdrift physics and is forced by the most recent reanalysis data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts

  7. High C/O Chemistry and Weak Thermal Inversion in the Extremely Irradiated Atmosphere of Exoplanet WASP-12b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudhan, Nikku; Harrington, Joseph; Nymeyer, Sarah; Campo, Christopher J.; Wheatley, Peter J.; Deming, Drake; Blecie, Jasmina; Hardy, Ryan A.; Lust, Nate B.; Anderson, David R.; hide

    2010-01-01

    The carbon-to-oxygen ratio (C/O) in a planet provides critical information about its primordial origins and subsequent evolution. A primordial C/O greater than 0.8 causes a carbide-dominated interior as opposed to the silicate-dominated composition as found on Earth; the solar C/O is 0.54. Theory, shows that high C/O leads to a diversity of carbon-rich planets that can have very different interiors and atmospheres from those in the solar system. Here we report the detection of C/O greater than or equal to 1 in a planetary atmosphere. The transiting hot Jupiter WASP-12b has a dayside atmosphere depleted in water vapour and enhanced in methane by over two orders of magnitude compared to a solar-abundance chemical equilibrium model at the expected temperatures. The observed concentrations of the prominent molecules CO, CH4, and H2O are consistent with theoretical expectations for an atmosphere with the observed C/O = 1. The C/O ratios are not known for giant planets in the solar system, although they are expected to equal the solar value. If high C/O ratios are common, then extrasolar planets are likely very different in interior composition, and formed very differently, from expectations based on solar composition, potentially explaining the large diversity in observed radii. We also find that the extremely irradiated atmosphere (greater than 2500 K) of WASP-12b lacks a prominent thermal inversion, or a stratosphere, and has very efficient day-night energy circulation. The absence of a strong thermal inversion is in stark contrast to theoretical predictions for the most highly irradiated hot-Jupiter atmospheres.

  8. Decision making in high-velocity environments: implications for healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanovich, P L; Uhrig, J D

    1999-01-01

    Healthcare can be considered a high-velocity environment and, as such, can benefit from research conducted in other industries regarding strategic decision making. Strategic planning is not only relevant to firms in high-velocity environments, but is also important for high performance and survival. Specifically, decision-making speed seems to be instrumental in differentiating between high and low performers; fast decision makers outperform slow decision makers. This article outlines the differences between fast and slow decision makers, identifies five paralyses that can slow decision making in healthcare, and outlines the role of a planning department in circumventing these paralyses. Executives can use the proposed planning structure to improve both the speed and quality of strategic decisions. The structure uses planning facilitators to avoid the following five paralyses: 1. Analysis. Decision makers can no longer afford the luxury of lengthy, detailed analysis but must develop real-time systems that provide appropriate, timely information. 2. Alternatives. Many alternatives (beyond the traditional two or three) need to be considered and the alternatives must be evaluated simultaneously. 3. Group Think. Decision makers must avoid limited mind-sets and autocratic leadership styles by seeking out independent, knowledgeable counselors. 4. Process. Decision makers need to resolve conflicts through "consensus with qualification," as opposed to waiting for everyone to come on board. 5. Separation. Successful implementation requires a structured process that cuts across disciplines and levels.

  9. Ultrashort laser pulse–matter interaction: Implications for high ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-05

    Jan 5, 2014 ... writing; pump–probe technique; high-energy materials. PACS Nos 82.53.Uv; 42.62. ... hazardous materials is essential for several civilian (e.g. airport screening) and defense. (e.g. detection of land ... ies, (b) ps and fs ablation studies of plasmonic metals, (c) fs laser direct writing (LDW) studies in polymers ...

  10. High cadmium / zinc ratio in cigarette smokers: potential implications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... impaired DNA repair, P53 expression, angiogenic effect of Cu and impaired vitamin A metabolism. These converge in the risk of the carcinogenic process, suggesting high Cd: Zn ratio as the critical determinant of the risk of prostate cancer in smokers and possibly a biomarker of susceptibility to this environmental disease ...

  11. Nitrogen accumulation and partitioning in a High Arctic tundra ecosystem from extreme atmospheric N deposition events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choudhary, Sonal, E-mail: S.Choudhary@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Management School, University of Sheffield, Conduit Road, Sheffield S10 1FL (United Kingdom); Blaud, Aimeric [Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); Osborn, A. Mark [Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom); School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, PO Box 71, Bundoora, VIC 3083 (Australia); Press, Malcolm C. [School of Biosciences, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Manchester Metropolitan University, Manchester, M15 6BH (United Kingdom); Phoenix, Gareth K. [Department of Animal and Plant Sciences, University of Sheffield, Western Bank, Sheffield S10 2TN (United Kingdom)

    2016-06-01

    Arctic ecosystems are threatened by pollution from recently detected extreme atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition events in which up to 90% of the annual N deposition can occur in just a few days. We undertook the first assessment of the fate of N from extreme deposition in High Arctic tundra and are presenting the results from the whole ecosystem {sup 15}N labelling experiment. In 2010, we simulated N depositions at rates of 0, 0.04, 0.4 and 1.2 g N m{sup −2} yr{sup −1}, applied as {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup 15}NO{sub 3} in Svalbard (79{sup °}N), during the summer. Separate applications of {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup −} and {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +} were also made to determine the importance of N form in their retention. More than 95% of the total {sup 15}N applied was recovered after one growing season (~ 90% after two), demonstrating a considerable capacity of Arctic tundra to retain N from these deposition events. Important sinks for the deposited N, regardless of its application rate or form, were non-vascular plants > vascular plants > organic soil > litter > mineral soil, suggesting that non-vascular plants could be the primary component of this ecosystem to undergo measurable changes due to N enrichment from extreme deposition events. Substantial retention of N by soil microbial biomass (70% and 39% of {sup 15}N in organic and mineral horizon, respectively) during the initial partitioning demonstrated their capacity to act as effective buffers for N leaching. Between the two N forms, vascular plants (Salix polaris) in particular showed difference in their N recovery, incorporating four times greater {sup 15}NO{sub 3}{sup −} than {sup 15}NH{sub 4}{sup +}, suggesting deposition rich in nitrate will impact them more. Overall, these findings show that despite the deposition rates being extreme in statistical terms, biologically they do not exceed the capacity of tundra to sequester pollutant N during the growing season. Therefore, current and future extreme events

  12. Thermophysical Properties Measurement of High-Temperature Liquids Under Microgravity Conditions in Controlled Atmospheric Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahito; Ozawa, Shumpei; Mizuno, Akotoshi; Hibiya, Taketoshi; Kawauchi, Hiroya; Murai, Kentaro; Takahashi, Suguru

    2012-01-01

    Microgravity conditions have advantages of measurement of surface tension and viscosity of metallic liquids by the oscillating drop method with an electromagnetic levitation (EML) device. Thus, we are preparing the experiments of thermophysical properties measurements using the Materials-Science Laboratories ElectroMagnetic-Levitator (MSL-EML) facilities in the international Space station (ISS). Recently, it has been identified that dependence of surface tension on oxygen partial pressure (Po2) must be considered for industrial application of surface tension values. Effect of Po2 on surface tension would apparently change viscosity from the damping oscillation model. Therefore, surface tension and viscosity must be measured simultaneously in the same atmospheric conditions. Moreover, effect of the electromagnetic force (EMF) on the surface oscillations must be clarified to obtain the ideal surface oscillation because the EMF works as the external force on the oscillating liquid droplets, so extensive EMF makes apparently the viscosity values large. In our group, using the parabolic flight levitation experimental facilities (PFLEX) the effect of Po2 and external EMF on surface oscillation of levitated liquid droplets was systematically investigated for the precise measurements of surface tension and viscosity of high temperature liquids for future ISS experiments. We performed the observation of surface oscillations of levitated liquid alloys using PFLEX on board flight experiments by Gulfstream II (G-II) airplane operated by DAS. These observations were performed under the controlled Po2 and also under the suitable EMF conditions. In these experiments, we obtained the density, the viscosity and the surface tension values of liquid Cu. From these results, we discuss about as same as reported data, and also obtained the difference of surface oscillations with the change of the EMF conditions.

  13. Chasing Neoproterozoic Atmospheric Oxygen Ghosts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjerrum, C. J.; Canfield, D. E.; Dahl, T. W.

    2016-12-01

    Increasing atmospheric oxygen has been considered a necessary condition for the evolution of animal life for over half a century. While direct proxies for atmospheric oxygen are difficult to obtain, a number of indirect proxies have been giving us a ghost image of rising atmospheric oxygen at the close of the Precambrian. In this context, redox sensitive elements and isotopes represent the hallmark for a significant reduction in anoxic areas of the world ocean, implicating a significant rise of atmospheric oxygen during the Neoproterozoic. Here, we test to what degree redox sensitive elements in ancient marine sediments are proxies of atmospheric oxygen. We model the redox-chemical evolution of the shelf seas and ocean using a combination of 3D high resolution shelf sea models and a simpler global ocean biogeochemical model including climate weathering feedbacks, a free sea level and parameterized icecaps. We find that ecosystem evolution would have resulted in reorganization of the nutrient and redox balance of the shelf-ocean system causing a significant increase in oxygenated areas that permitted a boosting of trace metal concentrations in the remaining anoxic areas. While this reorganization takes place there is limited net change in the modelled atmospheric oxygen, warning us against interpreting changing trace metal concentrations and isotopes as reflecting a rise in atmospheric oxygen.

  14. Use of a global model to understand speciated atmospheric mercury observations at five high-elevation sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss-Penzias, P.; Amos, H. M.; Selin, N. E.; Gustin, M. S.; Jaffe, D. A.; Obrist, D.; Sheu, G.-R.; Giang, A.

    2015-02-01

    Atmospheric mercury (Hg) measurements using the Tekran® analytical system from five high-elevation sites (1400-3200 m elevation), one in Asia and four in the western US, were compiled over multiple seasons and years, and these data were compared with the GEOS-Chem global model. Mercury data consisted of gaseous elemental Hg (GEM) and "reactive Hg" (RM), which is a combination of the gaseous oxidized (GOM) and particulate bound (desert sites in northwestern Nevada. This suggests that future work should investigate the effect of Br- and O3-initiated gas-phase oxidation occurring simultaneously in the atmosphere, as well as aqueous and heterogeneous reactions to understand whether there are multiple global oxidants for GEM and hence multiple forms of RM in the atmosphere. If the chemical forms of RM were known, then the collection efficiency of the analytical method could be evaluated better.

  15. Atmospheric mercury accumulation between 5900 and 800 calibrated years BP in the high arctic of Canada recorded by Peat Hummocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Givelet, N.; Roos-Barraclough, F.; Goodsite, Michael Evan

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we present the first comprehensive long-term record of preanthropogenic rates of atmospheric mercury accumulation in dated peat deposits for the High Arctic of Canada. Geochemical studies of two peat hummocks from Bathurst Island, Nunavut reveal substantial inputs from soil dust...... (titanium), marine aerosols (bromine), and mineral-water interactions (uranium). Mercury, however, was supplied to these peat mounds exclusively by atmospheric deposition. Mercury concentration measurements and age dating of the peat profiles indicate rather constant natural "background" mercury flux of ca....... 1 microgram per square meter per year from 5900 to 800 calibrated years BP. These values are well within the range of the mercury fluxes reported from other Arctic locations, but also by peat cores from southern Canada that provide a record of atmospheric Hg accumulation extending back 8000 years...

  16. Production of high-energy gamma rays by cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere and lunar surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D. J.

    1984-01-01

    The production of gamma rays above 10 MeV by the interaction of cosmic rays in the atmosphere and the lunar surface is simulated using Monte Carlo methods. The calculation incorporates a new model of high-energy nucleon-nucleus interactions based on empirical fits to inclusive cross sections for the production of pions and nucleons. The atmospheric gamma ray flux is calculated as a function of direction, energy, and atmospheric depth. These calculations are compared with observations from balloons and from the SAS 2 satellite. Estimates of the flux of earth albedo electrons produced by cosmic ray interactions are presented. The lunar gamma ray albedo is calculated and compared with an upper limit based on SAS 2 measurements.

  17. Numerical study of the electron and muon lateral distribution in atmospheric showers of high energy cosmic rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Atreidis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The lateral distribution of an atmospheric shower depends on the characteristics of the high energy interactions and the type of the primary particle. The influence of the primary particle in the secondary development of the shower into the atmosphere, is studied by analyzing the lateral distribution of electron and muon showers having as primary particle, proton, photon or iron nucleus. This study of the lateral distribution can provide useful conclusions for the mass and energy of the primary particle. This paper compares the data that we get from simulations with CORSIKA program with experimental data and the theoretical NKG function expressing lateral electron and muon distribution. Then we modify the original NKG function to fit better to the simulation data and propose a method for determining the mass of the original particle started the atmospheric shower.

  18. High atmospheric temperatures and ‘ambient incubation’ drive embryonic development and lead to earlier hatching in a passerine bird

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Simon C.; Mainwaring, Mark C.; Sorato, Enrico; Beckmann, Christa

    2016-01-01

    Tropical and subtropical species typically experience relatively high atmospheric temperatures during reproduction, and are subject to climate-related challenges that are largely unexplored, relative to more extensive work conducted in temperate regions. We studied the effects of high atmospheric and nest temperatures during reproduction in the zebra finch. We characterized the temperature within nests in a subtropical population of this species in relation to atmospheric temperature. Temperatures within nests frequently exceeded the level at which embryo’s develop optimally, even in the absence of parental incubation. We experimentally manipulated internal nest temperature to demonstrate that an average difference of 6°C in the nest temperature during the laying period reduced hatching time by an average of 3% of the total incubation time, owing to ‘ambient incubation’. Given the avian constraint of laying a single egg per day, the first eggs of a clutch are subject to prolonged effects of nest temperature relative to later laid eggs, potentially increasing hatching asynchrony. While birds may ameliorate the negative effects of ambient incubation on embryonic development by varying the location and design of their nests, high atmospheric temperatures are likely to constitute an important selective force on avian reproductive behaviour and physiology in subtropical and tropical regions, particularly in the light of predicted climate change that in many areas is leading to a higher frequency of hot days during the periods when birds breed. PMID:26998315

  19. Los Angeles megacity: a high-resolution land–atmosphere modelling system for urban CO2 emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Feng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Megacities are major sources of anthropogenic fossil fuel CO2 (FFCO2 emissions. The spatial extents of these large urban systems cover areas of 10 000 km2 or more with complex topography and changing landscapes. We present a high-resolution land–atmosphere modelling system for urban CO2 emissions over the Los Angeles (LA megacity area. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF-Chem model was coupled to a very high-resolution FFCO2 emission product, Hestia-LA, to simulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations across the LA megacity at spatial resolutions as fine as  ∼  1 km. We evaluated multiple WRF configurations, selecting one that minimized errors in wind speed, wind direction, and boundary layer height as evaluated by its performance against meteorological data collected during the CalNex-LA campaign (May–June 2010. Our results show no significant difference between moderate-resolution (4 km and high-resolution (1.3 km simulations when evaluated against surface meteorological data, but the high-resolution configurations better resolved planetary boundary layer heights and vertical gradients in the horizontal mean winds. We coupled our WRF configuration with the Vulcan 2.2 (10 km resolution and Hestia-LA (1.3 km resolution fossil fuel CO2 emission products to evaluate the impact of the spatial resolution of the CO2 emission products and the meteorological transport model on the representation of spatiotemporal variability in simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations. We find that high spatial resolution in the fossil fuel CO2 emissions is more important than in the atmospheric model to capture CO2 concentration variability across the LA megacity. Finally, we present a novel approach that employs simultaneous correlations of the simulated atmospheric CO2 fields to qualitatively evaluate the greenhouse gas measurement network over the LA megacity. Spatial correlations in the atmospheric CO2 fields reflect the coverage of

  20. Ion production and ionization effect in the atmosphere during the Bastille day GLE 59 due to high energy SEPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishev, A. L.; Velinov, P. I. Y.

    2018-01-01

    The influence of high energy particles, specifically cosmic rays, on atmospheric physics and chemistry is highly discussed. In most of the proposed models the role of ionization in the atmosphere due to cosmic rays is not negligible. Moreover, effect(s) on minor constituents and aerosols are recently observed, specifically over the polar regions during strong solar particle events. According to the recent findings for such effects it is necessary an essential increase of ion production, specifically during the winter period. The galactic cosmic rays are the main source of ionization in the Earth's stratosphere and troposphere. Occasionally, the atmospheric ionization is significantly enhanced during strong solar energetic particles events, specifically over the polar caps. During the solar cycle 23 several strong ground level enhancements were observed. One of the strongest was the Bastille day event occurred on 14 July 2000. Using a full Monte Carlo 3-D model, we compute the atmospheric ionization, considering explicitly the contribution of cosmic rays with galactic and solar origin, focusing on high energy particles. The model is based on atmospheric cascade simulation with the PLANETOCOSMICS code. The ion production rate is computed as a function of the altitude above the sea level. The ion production rate is computed on a step ranging from 10 to 30 min throughout the event, considering explicitly the spectral and angular characteristics of the high energy part of solar protons as well as their time evolution. The corresponding event averaged ionization effect relative to the average due to galactic cosmic rays is computed in lower stratosphere and upper troposphere at various altitudes, namely 20 km, 15 km, 12 km and 8 km above the sea level in a sub-polar and polar regions. The 24h and the weekly ionization effects are also computed in the troposphere and low stratosphere. Several applications are discussed.

  1. Design implications of high-speed digital PPM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Martin J. N.

    1993-11-01

    Work in the area of digital pulse position modulation (digital PPM) has shown that this type of modulation can yield sensitivities that are typically 4 - 5 dB better than an equivalent PCM system. Recent experimental work has shown that the receiver in a digital PPM system does not need to have a wide bandwidth. Instead, the bandwidth can be very low so that the receiver is effectively impulsed by the digital PPM signal. The advent of very high speed Si digital ICs, and fast lasers, means that digital PPM can now be used to code gigabit PCM signals. This paper presents original theoretical results for a digital PPM system coding 1 Gbit/s PCM signals into 8 Gbit/s digital PPM signals. The paper also addresses the difficulties that the system designer is likely to encounter, and discusses some possible solutions.

  2. Quantifying Black Carbon emissions in high northern latitudes using an Atmospheric Bayesian Inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangeliou, Nikolaos; Thompson, Rona; Stohl, Andreas; Shevchenko, Vladimir P.

    2016-04-01

    Black carbon (BC) is the main light absorbing aerosol species and it has important impacts on air quality, weather and climate. The major source of BC is incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and the burning of biomass or bio-fuels (soot). Therefore, to understand to what extent BC affects climate change and pollutant dynamics, accurate knowledge of the emissions, distribution and variation of BC is required. Most commonly, BC emission inventory datasets are built by "bottom up" approaches based on activity data and emissions factors, but these methods are considered to have large uncertainty (Cao et al, 2006). In this study, we have used a Bayesian Inversion to estimate spatially resolved BC emissions. Emissions are estimated monthly for 2014 and over the domain from 180°W to 180°E and 50°N to 90°N. Atmospheric transport is modeled using the Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model, FLEXPART (Stohl et al., 1998; 2005), and the inversion framework, FLEXINVERT, developed by Thompson and Stohl, (2014). The study domain is of particular interest concerning the identification and estimation of BC sources. In contrast to Europe and North America, where BC sources are comparatively well documented as a result of intense monitoring, only one station recording BC concentrations exists in the whole of Siberia. In addition, emissions from gas flaring by the oil industry have been geographically misplaced in most emission inventories and may be an important source of BC at high latitudes since a significant proportion of the total gas flared occurs at these high latitudes (Stohl et al., 2013). Our results show large differences with the existing BC inventories, whereas the estimated fluxes improve modeled BC concentrations with respect to observations. References Cao, G. et al. Atmos. Environ., 40, 6516-6527, 2006. Stohl, A. et al. Atmos. Environ., 32(24), 4245-4264, 1998. Stohl, A. et al. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 5(9), 2461-2474, 2005. Stohl, A. et al. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 13

  3. Pilot study of ultra-high energy Cosmic rays through their Space – Atmospheric interactions – COSAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isar Paula Gina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred years after the discovery of cosmic rays, the study of charged ultra-high energy cosmic rays remains a vital activity in fundamental physics. While primary cosmic rays could not be measured directly until it was possible to get the detectors high in the atmosphere using balloons or spacecraft, nowadays very energetic cosmic rays are detected indirectly by ground-based experiments measuring their Extensive Air Showers (EAS induced Cherenkov and fluorescent light, or radio waves. Moreover, all cosmic ray measurements (performed either from space or ground rely on accurate understandings of atmospheric phenomena. The concept of the COSAT project is the inter-link between Astroparticle Physics, Remote Sensing and Atmospheric Environment, willing to investigate the energetic cosmic rays physical processes using the atmosphere as a detector in order to identify potential scientific niches in the field of space sciences. A short introduction on the current status and perspectives of the national partnership COSAT project will be given.

  4. Implications of high level pseudogene transcription in Mycobacterium leprae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morrison Norman E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Mycobacterium leprae genome has less than 50% coding capacity and 1,133 pseudogenes. Preliminary evidence suggests that some pseudogenes are expressed. Therefore, defining pseudogene transcriptional and translational potentials of this genome should increase our understanding of their impact on M. leprae physiology. Results Gene expression analysis identified transcripts from 49% of all M. leprae genes including 57% of all ORFs and 43% of all pseudogenes in the genome. Transcribed pseudogenes were randomly distributed throughout the chromosome. Factors resulting in pseudogene transcription included: 1 co-orientation of transcribed pseudogenes with transcribed ORFs within or exclusive of operon-like structures; 2 the paucity of intrinsic stem-loop transcriptional terminators between transcribed ORFs and downstream pseudogenes; and 3 predicted pseudogene promoters. Mechanisms for translational "silencing" of pseudogene transcripts included the lack of both translational start codons and strong Shine-Dalgarno (SD sequences. Transcribed pseudogenes also contained multiple "in-frame" stop codons and high Ka/Ks ratios, compared to that of homologs in M. tuberculosis and ORFs in M. leprae. A pseudogene transcript containing an active promoter, strong SD site, a start codon, but containing two in frame stop codons yielded a protein product when expressed in E. coli. Conclusion Approximately half of M. leprae's transcriptome consists of inactive gene products consuming energy and resources without potential benefit to M. leprae. Presently it is unclear what additional detrimental affect(s this large number of inactive mRNAs has on the functional capability of this organism. Translation of these pseudogenes may play an important role in overall energy consumption and resultant pathophysiological characteristics of M. leprae. However, this study also demonstrated that multiple translational "silencing" mechanisms are present

  5. Implications of the Detection of X-rays From Pluto by Chandra for Its Solar Wind - Neutral Atmosphere Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, C. M.

    2016-12-01

    Using the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, we have obtained low-resolution imaging X-ray spectrophotometry of the Pluto system in support of the New Horizons (NH) flyby. In a total of 174 ksec of on-target time, we measured 8 photons from 0.31 to 0.60 keV in a co-moving 11 x 11 pixel2 box (the 90% flux aperture for fixed background sources in the field) measuring 121,000 x 121,000 km2 (or 100 x 100 RPluto) at Pluto. The Pluto photons do not have the spectral shape of the background, are coincident with a 90% flux aperture co-moving with Pluto, and are not confused with any background source, so we consider them as sourced from the Pluto system. Allowing for background, we find a net signal of 6.8 counts and a statistical noise level of 1.2 counts, for a detection of Pluto at > 99.95%. The mean 0.31 - 0.60 keV X-ray power from Pluto is 200 +200/-100 MW, in the middle range of X-ray power levels seen for other known solar system emission sources: auroral precipitation, solar X-ray scattering, and charge exchange (CXE) between solar wind (SW) ions and atmospheric neutrals. We eliminate auroral effects as a source, as Pluto has no known magnetic field and the NH/Alice UV spectrometer detected no airglow from Pluto during the flyby. Atmospheric haze particles could produce resonant scattering of solar X-rays from Pluto, but the energy signature of the detected photons does not match the solar spectrum and estimates of Pluto's scattered X-ray emission are 2 to 3 orders of magnitude lower than seen in our observations. CXE-driven emission from hydrogenic and heliogenic SW carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen ions can produce the energy signature seen, and the 6 x 1025 neutral gas escape rate from Pluto deduced from NH data (Gladstone et al. 2016) can support the 3.0 +3.0/-1.5 x 1024 X-ray photons/s emission rate required by our observations. Using the SW proton density and speed measured by the NH/SWAP instrument in the vicinity of Pluto at the time of the photon emissions, we find a

  6. Atmospheric methane oxidizers are present and active in Canadian high Arctic soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martineau, Christine; Pan, Y.; Bodrossy, Levente; Yergeau, E.; Whyte, Lyle G.; Greer, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    The melting of permafrost and the associated potential for methane emissions to the atmosphere are major concerns in the context of global warming. However, soils can also represent a significant sink for methane through the activity of methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB). In this study, we looked at

  7. Atmospheric pressure plasma surface modification of titanium for high temperature adhesive bonding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akram, M.; Jansen, K.M.B.; Ernst, L.J.; Bhowmik, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this investigation surface treatment of titanium is carried out by plasma ion implantation under atmospheric pressure plasma in order to increase the adhesive bond strength. Prior to the plasma treatment, titanium surfaces were mechanically treated by sand blasting. It is observed that the

  8. Atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury (GEM concentrations and mercury depositions at a high-altitude mountain peak in south China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. W. Fu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available China is regarded as the largest contributor of mercury (Hg to the global atmospheric Hg budget. However, concentration levels and depositions of atmospheric Hg in China are poorly known. Continuous measurements of atmospheric gaseous elemental mercury (GEM were carried out from May 2008 to May 2009 at the summit of Mt. Leigong in south China. Simultaneously, deposition fluxes of THg and MeHg in precipitation, throughfall and litterfall were also studied. Atmospheric GEM concentrations averaged 2.80±1.51 ng m−3, which was highly elevated compared to global background values but much lower than semi-rural and industrial/urban areas in China. Sources identification indicates that both regional industrial emissions and long range transport of Hg from central, south and southwest China were corresponded to the elevated GEM level. Seasonal and diurnal variations of GEM were observed, which reflected variations in source intensity, deposition processes and meteorological factors. Precipitation and throughfall deposition fluxes of THg and MeHg in Mt. Leigong were comparable or lower compared to those reported in Europe and North America, whereas litterfall deposition fluxes of THg and MeHg were higher compared to Europe and North America. This highlights the importance of vegetation to Hg atmospheric cycling. In th remote forest ecosystem of China, deposition of GEM via uptake of foliage followed by litterfall was very important for the depletion of atmospheric Hg. Elevated GEM level in ambient air may accelerate the foliar uptake of Hg through air which may partly explain the elevated litterfall deposition fluxes of Hg observed in Mt. Leigong.

  9. Contrasting responses of forest ecosystems to rising atmospheric CO2: Implications for the global C cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norby, Richard J [ORNL; DeLucia, E. H. [University of Illinois; Moore, D J [University of Illinois

    2005-01-01

    In two parallel but independent experiments, Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) technology was used to expose plots within contrasting evergreen loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and deciduous sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) forests to the level of CO2 anticipated in 2050. Net primary production (NPP) and net ecosystem production (NEP) increased in both forests. In the year 2000, after exposing pine and sweetgum to elevated CO2 for approximately 5 and 3 years, a complete budget calculation revealed increases in net ecosystem production (NEP) of 41% and 44% in the pine forest and sweetgum forest, respectively, representing the storage of an additional 174 gC m-2 and 128 gC m-2 in these forests. The stimulation of NPP without corresponding increases in leaf area index or light absorption in either forest resulted in 23-27% stimulation in radiation-use efficiency, defined as NPP per unit absorbed photosynthetically active radiation. Greater plant respiration contributed to lower NPP in the loblolly pine forest than in the sweetgum forest, and these forests responded differently to CO2 enrichment. Where the pine forest added C primarily to long-lived woody tissues, exposure to elevated CO2 caused a large increase in the production of labile fine roots in the sweetgum forest. Greater allocation to more labile tissues may cause more rapid cycling of C back to the atmosphere in the sweetgum forest compared to the pine forest. Imbalances in the N cycle may reduce the response of these forests to experimental exposure to elevated CO2 in the future, but even at the current stimulation observed for these forests, the effect of changes in land use on C sequestration are likely to be larger than the effect of CO2-induced growth stimulation.

  10. A highly oxidized atmosphere-ocean system and oceanic molybdenum drawdown during the Paleoproterozoic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, K. T.; Ito, T.; Suzuki, K.; Anbar, A. D.; Gordon, G. W.; Kashiwabara, T.; Takaya, Y.; Shimoda, G.; Nozaki, T.; Kiyokawa, S.; Tetteh, G. M.; Nyame, F. K.

    2014-12-01

    Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the first major oxidation of the atmosphere-ocean system occurred during the Paleoproterozoic. However, the course of this redox transition remains elusive. A number of large Mn deposits are distributed in Paleoproterozoic sedimentary successions. As Mn is a redox-sensitive element characterized by high redox potential, knowledge of the Mn cycle in Paleoproterozoic seawater may provide insight into redox evolution during this period. Here, we investigate the Mn cycle in Paleoproterozoic seawater based on the Re-Os and Mo isotope compositions, and the abundance of major and trace elements, in Mn-rich sedimentary rocks from the Nsuta deposit of the Birimian Supergroup, Ghana. The Mn ore is composed mainly of rhodochrosite and is distributed at the boundaries between sedimentary rocks and tholeiitic volcanic rocks. The Re-Os isochron age (2217 ± 100 Ma) we obtained was consistent with U-Pb zircon ages of the volcanic rocks. The manganophile elements, except for Mo, show no enrichment, which is similar to modern hydrothermal Mn oxides. The PAAS-normalized REE compositions show positive Ce anomaly, indicative of Ce enrichment due to the oxidation of Ce(III) by Mn(IV). These findings suggest that Mn ore formed from primary precipitation of Mn oxides from hydrothermal fluids as they were mixed with bottom seawater at ~2.2 Ga. Thus, the bottom seawater would have been sufficiently oxygenated for the precipitation of Mn oxides at ~2.2 Ga. The Nsuta ore samples exhibit slight Mo enrichment, but Mo/Mn ratios are orders of magnitude lower than those in modern hydrothermal Mn oxides. We also found that the Mo isotopes in the Nsuta ore are ~0.7‰ heavier than those in modern hydrothermal and hydrogenous Mn oxides. As Mo in hydrothermal Mn oxides is sourced primarily from seawater (Goto et al., in prep), these results may reflect smaller oceanic Mo inventory and heavier seawater Mo isotope composition at 2.2 Ga than those of present

  11. Increasing summer net CO2 uptake in high northern ecosystems inferred from atmospheric inversions and comparisons to remote-sensing NDVI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welp, Lisa R.; Patra, Prabir K.; Rödenbeck, Christian; Nemani, Rama; Bi, Jian; Piper, Stephen C.; Keeling, Ralph F.

    2016-07-01

    Warmer temperatures and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations over the last several decades have been credited with increasing vegetation activity and photosynthetic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere in the high northern latitude ecosystems: the boreal forest and arctic tundra. At the same time, soils in the region have been warming, permafrost is melting, fire frequency and severity are increasing, and some regions of the boreal forest are showing signs of stress due to drought or insect disturbance. The recent trends in net carbon balance of these ecosystems, across heterogeneous disturbance patterns, and the future implications of these changes are unclear. Here, we examine CO2 fluxes from northern boreal and tundra regions from 1985 to 2012, estimated from two atmospheric inversions (RIGC and Jena). Both used measured atmospheric CO2 concentrations and wind fields from interannually variable climate reanalysis. In the arctic zone, the latitude region above 60° N excluding Europe (10° W-63° E), neither inversion finds a significant long-term trend in annual CO2 balance. The boreal zone, the latitude region from approximately 50-60° N, again excluding Europe, showed a trend of 8-11 Tg C yr-2 over the common period of validity from 1986 to 2006, resulting in an annual CO2 sink in 2006 that was 170-230 Tg C yr-1 larger than in 1986. This trend appears to continue through 2012 in the Jena inversion as well. In both latitudinal zones, the seasonal amplitude of monthly CO2 fluxes increased due to increased uptake in summer, and in the arctic zone also due to increased fall CO2 release. These findings suggest that the boreal zone has been maintaining and likely increasing CO2 sink strength over this period, despite browning trends in some regions and changes in fire frequency and land use. Meanwhile, the arctic zone shows that increased summer CO2 uptake, consistent with strong greening trends, is offset by increased fall CO2 release, resulting in a net neutral

  12. Increasing summer net CO2 uptake in high northern ecosystems inferred from atmospheric inversions and comparisons to remote-sensing NDVI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. Welp

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Warmer temperatures and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations over the last several decades have been credited with increasing vegetation activity and photosynthetic uptake of CO2 from the atmosphere in the high northern latitude ecosystems: the boreal forest and arctic tundra. At the same time, soils in the region have been warming, permafrost is melting, fire frequency and severity are increasing, and some regions of the boreal forest are showing signs of stress due to drought or insect disturbance. The recent trends in net carbon balance of these ecosystems, across heterogeneous disturbance patterns, and the future implications of these changes are unclear. Here, we examine CO2 fluxes from northern boreal and tundra regions from 1985 to 2012, estimated from two atmospheric inversions (RIGC and Jena. Both used measured atmospheric CO2 concentrations and wind fields from interannually variable climate reanalysis. In the arctic zone, the latitude region above 60° N excluding Europe (10° W–63° E, neither inversion finds a significant long-term trend in annual CO2 balance. The boreal zone, the latitude region from approximately 50–60° N, again excluding Europe, showed a trend of 8–11 Tg C yr−2 over the common period of validity from 1986 to 2006, resulting in an annual CO2 sink in 2006 that was 170–230 Tg C yr−1 larger than in 1986. This trend appears to continue through 2012 in the Jena inversion as well. In both latitudinal zones, the seasonal amplitude of monthly CO2 fluxes increased due to increased uptake in summer, and in the arctic zone also due to increased fall CO2 release. These findings suggest that the boreal zone has been maintaining and likely increasing CO2 sink strength over this period, despite browning trends in some regions and changes in fire frequency and land use. Meanwhile, the arctic zone shows that increased summer CO2 uptake, consistent with strong greening trends, is offset by

  13. Designing Dynamic Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Marie; Kinch, Sofie

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the notion of atmospheres from a designerly perspective, and discusses temporal challenges facing interaction designers when acknowledging the dynamic character of it. As atmospheres are created in the relation between body, space, and time, a pragmatic approach seems useful....... The potentials and implications are presented through a design case, Kidkit, highlighting temporality as design parametre within interaction design....

  14. Hard-yet-tough high-vanadium high-speed steel composite coating in-situ alloyed on ductile iron by atmospheric plasma arc

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, Huatang; Dong, Xuanpu; Pei, Yutao T.

    2018-01-01

    A graded high-vanadium alloy composite coating was synthesized from premixed powders (V, Cr, Ti, Mo, Nb) on ductile iron (DI) substrate via atmospheric plasma arc surface alloying process. The resulted cross-section microstructure is divided into three distinct zones: upper alloyed zone (AZ) rich

  15. Change Seen by NPEO in the Central Arctic Ocean, 2000-2006, and Implications for Coupling with the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morison, J.; Aagaard, K.; Falkner, K.; Kikuchi, T.; McPhee, M.; Moritz, D.; Overland, J.; Steele, M.

    2006-12-01

    The North Pole Environmental Observatory (NPEO) was established in 2000 as a means of tracking change in the central Arctic Basin. The NPEO is a distributed observatory consisting of three parts: an automated drifting station that samples air-ice-ocean conditions as it drifts from the Pole toward Fram Strait; a deep ocean mooring near the Pole; and repeated airborne hydrographic surveys that track changes along key sections radiating from the Pole. The North Pole region shows large changes during the past decade-and-a-half. In the 1990s hydrographic data demonstrated a strong increase in upper ocean salinity associated with a more cyclonic Arctic Ocean circulation, and a large warming of the Atlantic layer propagating in from the Norwegian Sea. The decrease in Arctic Ocean sea ice thickness up through the 1990s was also apparent at the Pole. Hydrographic measurements made by the NPEO have shown that conditions since 2000 have relaxed toward the pre-1990 state. Recent analysis suggests that this change is linked to a decline in the Arctic Oscillation (AO) index following the sharp rise in the AO in the early 1990s and a concomitant spin-up of the ocean. The moored records show both multi-year trends and rapid changes that suggest a close connection of the interior ocean that overlies the abyssal plain with the boundary current that rings the Eurasian Basin. Ice thickness measurements from the first year of the mooring, 2001-02, agree with the estimates of reduced thickness characterizing the 1990s but the thickness records from 2002-03, 2004-05, and arguably 2005-06 show a progressive thickening of the ice at the Pole. The relation of this thickening to ice age and advection patterns is being explored. The surface atmospheric state represents a mix of 1990s-like conditions and those prevailing earlier. For example, while 2003 was a year of minimum ice extent in the Beaufort Sea, the North Pole region had a particularly cold summer. NPEO is scheduled to continue

  16. Retrieval of Atmospheric CO2 and CH4 Variations Using Ground-Based High Resolution Fourier Transform Infrared Spectra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High resolution Fourier transform near IR solar spectra are used to estimate the column-averaged dry-air mole fraction (DMF of CO2 and CH4 variations in the atmosphere. The preliminary retrieval results for CO2 and CH4 variations in the area of Hefei, China, are presented, and the underlying error sources are also analyzed. Both a forward analysis and an inversion algorithm are included in the retrieval. The forward analysis uses the modeled atmospheric transmittance to line-by-line (LBL convolute the instrument line shape function. The influences of the temperature, pressure, humidity, and a priori gases are considered in the atmospheric transmittance model. The inversion algorithm is based on the nonlinear iterative and nonlinear least squares spectral fitting, which is used to obtain VCDCO2 and VCDCH4 (which represent vertical column density of CO2 and CH4, resp.. Furthermore, the VCDO2 is also retrieved for converting the VCDs into DMFs. DMFs are final products of data analysis. The inversion results can clearly resolve the tiny variations of CO2 and CH4 under strong atmospheric background. Spectral fitting residuals for both VCDCO2 and VCDCH4 are less than 0.5%. Finally, CO2 and CH4 diurnal variations are investigated based on a typical observation. About 2 ppm amplitude for DMFCO2 diurnal variations and less than 15 ppb amplitude for DMFCH4 are observed.

  17. Description and validation of ERAD: An atmospheric dispersion model for high explosive detonations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boughton, B.A.; DeLaurentis, J.M.

    1992-10-01

    The Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersion (ERAD) model is a three-dimensional numerical simulation of turbulent atmospheric transport and diffusion. An integral plume rise technique is used to provide a description of the physical and thermodynamic properties of the cloud of warm gases formed when the explosive detonates. Particle dispersion is treated as a stochastic process which is simulated using a discrete time Lagrangian Monte Carlo method. The stochastic process approach permits a more fundamental treatment of buoyancy effects, calm winds and spatial variations in meteorological conditions. Computational requirements of the three-dimensional simulation are substantially reduced by using a conceptualization in which each Monte Carlo particle represents a small puff that spreads according to a Gaussian law in the horizontal directions. ERAD was evaluated against dosage and deposition measurements obtained during Operation Roller Coaster. The predicted contour areas average within about 50% of the observations. The validation results confirm the model`s representation of the physical processes.

  18. Atmospheric Effect on Cosmic Ray Muons at High Cut-Off Rigidity Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullrahman Maghrabi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cosmic ray data and radiosonde measurements from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (Rc = 14.4 GV, for the period 2002–2012, were used to study the effect of atmospheric pressure, level of pion production, and temperature at that level, on cosmic ray muons. We found that, even if corrections were made to the detected muons using these three parameters, seasonal variations of the cosmic rays still exist. This suggests that other terrestrial and/or extraterrestrial causes may be considered. The levels of pion production and atmospheric pressure are inversely correlated with the muon rate. On the other hand, the temperature at the pion production level is correlated with muons in spring and winter and inversely correlated in fall and summer. There is no clear explanation for this behavior.

  19. Formation of stratospheric nitric acid by a hydrated ion cluster reaction: Implications for the effect of energetic particle precipitation on the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvissel, O.-K.; Orsolini, Y. J.; Stordal, F.; Isaksen, I. S. A.; Santee, M. L.

    2012-08-01

    In order to improve our understanding of the effects of energetic particle precipitation on the middle atmosphere and in particular upon the nitrogen family and ozone, we have modeled the chemical and dynamical middle atmosphere response to the introduction of a chemical pathway that produces HNO3 by conversion of N2O5 upon hydrated water clusters H+·(H2O)n. We have used an ensemble of simulations with the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Whole-Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM) chemistry-climate model. The chemical pathway alters the internal partitioning of the NOy family during winter months in both hemispheres, and ultimately triggers statistically significant changes in the climatological distributions of constituents including: i) a cold season production and loss of HNO3 and N2O5, respectively, and ii) a cold season decrease and increase in NOx/NOy-ratio and O3, respectively, in the polar regions of both hemispheres. We see an improved seasonal evolution of modeled HNO3 compared to satellite observations from Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), albeit not enough HNO3 is produced at high altitudes. Through O3changes, both temperature and dynamics are affected, allowing for complex chemical-dynamical feedbacks beyond the cold season when the pathway is active. Hence, we also find a NOxpolar increase in spring-to-summer in the southern hemisphere, and in spring in the northern hemisphere. The springtime NOxincrease arises from anomalously strong poleward transport associated with a weaker polar vortex. We argue that the weakening of zonal-mean polar winds down to the lower stratosphere, which is statistically significant at the 0.90 level in spring months in the southern hemisphere, is caused by strengthened planetary waves induced by the middle and sub-polar latitude zonal asymmetries in O3and short-wave heating.

  20. High quality graphene synthesized by atmospheric pressure CVD on copper foil

    OpenAIRE

    Trinsoutrot, Pierre; Rabot, Caroline; Vergnes, Hugues; Delamoreanu, Alexandru; Zenasni, Aziz; Caussat, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Graphene was synthesized at 1000 °C by Atmospheric Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition on copper foil from methane diluted in argon and hydrogen. The influence of the main synthesis parameters was studied on 2 × 2 cm2 foils in order to obtain continuous monolayer graphenewithout crystalline defect. The uniformity, crystal quality and number of layers of graphenewere analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and Scanning Electronic Microscopy. First, an increase of the annealing pr...

  1. A study of the motion and aerodynamic heating of ballistic missiles entering the earth's atmosphere at high supersonic speeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, H Julian; Eggers, A J , Jr

    1958-01-01

    A simplified analysis of the velocity and deceleration history of ballistic missiles entering the earth's atmosphere at high supersonic speeds is presented. The results of this motion analysis are employed to indicate means available to the designer for minimizing aerodynamic heating. The heating problem considered involves not only the total heat transferred to a missile by convection, but also the maximum average and local time rates of convective heat transfer.

  2. Influence of the Atmospheric Mass on the High Energy Cosmic Ray Muons during a Solar Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Maghrabi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate of the detected cosmic ray muons depends on the atmospheric mass, height of pion production level, and temperature. Corrections for the changes in these parameters are importance to know the properties of the primary cosmic rays. In this paper, the effect of atmospheric mass, represented here by the atmospheric pressure, on the cosmic ray was studied using data from the KACST muon detector during the 2002–2012 period. The analysis was conducted by calculating the barometric coefficient (α using regression analysis between the two parameters. The variation of α over different time scales was investigated. The results revealed a seasonal cycle of α with a maximum in September and a minimum in March. Data from Adelaide muon detector were used, and different monthly variation was found. The barometric coefficient displays considerable variability at the interannual scale. Study of the annual variations of α indicated cyclic variation with maximums between 2008 and 2009 and minimums between 2002 and 2003. This variable tendency is found to be anticorrelated with the solar activity, represented by the sunspot number. This finding was compared with the annual trend of α for the Adelaide muon detector for the same period of time, and a similar trend was found.

  3. Clouds in the atmospheres of extrasolar planets. I. Climatic effects of multi-layered clouds for Earth-like planets and implications for habitable zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmann, D.; Patzer, A. B. C.; von Paris, P.; Godolt, M.; Stracke, B.; Gebauer, S.; Grenfell, J. L.; Rauer, H.

    2010-02-01

    Aims: The effects of multi-layered clouds in the atmospheres of Earth-like planets orbiting different types of stars are studied. The radiative effects of cloud particles are directly correlated with their wavelength-dependent optical properties. Therefore the incident stellar spectra may play an important role for the climatic effect of clouds. We discuss the influence of clouds with mean properties measured in the Earth's atmosphere on the surface temperatures and Bond albedos of Earth-like planets orbiting different types of main sequence dwarf stars. The influence of clouds on the position of the habitable zone around these central star types is discussed. Methods: A parametric cloud model has been developed based on observations in the Earth's atmosphere. The corresponding optical properties of the cloud particles are calculated with the Mie theory accounting for shape effects of ice particles by the equivalent sphere method. The parametric cloud model is linked with a one-dimensional radiative-convective climate model to study the effect of clouds on the surface temperature and the Bond albedo of Earth-like planets in dependence of the type of central star. Results: The albedo effect of the low-level clouds depends only weakly on the incident stellar spectra because the optical properties remain almost constant in the wavelength range of the maximum of the incident stellar radiation. The greenhouse effect of the high-level clouds on the other hand depends on the temperature of the lower atmosphere, which is itself an indirect consequence of the different types of central stars. In general the planetary Bond albedo increases with the cloud cover of either cloud type. An anomaly was found for the K and M-type stars however, resulting in a decreasing Bond albedo with increasing cloud cover for certain atmospheric conditions. Depending on the cloud properties, the position of the habitable zone can be located either farther from or closer to the central star. As

  4. High Precision Continuous and Real-Time Measurement of Atmospheric Oxygen Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim-Hak, David; Leuenberger, Markus; Berhanu, Tesfaye; Nyfeler, Peter; Hoffnagle, John; Sun, Minghua

    2017-04-01

    Oxygen (O2) is a major and vital component of the Earth atmosphere representing about 21% of its composition. It is consumed or produced through biochemical processes such as combustion, respiration, and photosynthesis and can be used as a top-down constraint on the carbon cycle. The observed variations of oxygen in the atmosphere are relatively small, in the order of a few ppm's. This presents the main technical challenge for the measurement since a very high level of precision on a large background is required. Only few analytical methods including mass spectrometry, fuel, ultraviolet[1] and paramagnetic cells are capable of achieving it. Here we present new developments of a high-precision gas analyzer that utilizes the technique of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy to measure oxygen concentration and its oxygen isotope ratio 18O/16O. Its compact and ruggedness design combined with high precision and long-term stability allows the user to deploy the instrument in the field for continuous monitoring of atmospheric oxygen level. Measurements have a 1-σ 5-minute averaging precision of 1-2 ppm for O2 over a dynamic range of 0-50%. We will present comparative test results of this instrument against the incumbent technologies such as the mass spectrometer and the paramagnetic cell. In addition, we will demonstrate its long-term stability from a field deployment in Switzerland.

  5. High resolution 3D global climate modeling of Pluto's atmosphere to interpret New Horizons observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Tanguy; Forget, Francois; New Horizons Science Team

    2017-10-01

    We use the LMD Global Climate Model (GCM) of Pluto's atmosphere to interpret New Horizons observations and simulate the Pluto climate system. The model takes into account the cycles of N2, CH4, CO and organic haze. It is described in details in Forget et al., 2017. In order to ensure our simulations, sensitive to our initial conditions, correctly describe reality, we initialize the 3D model with a set of subsurface temperatures and ice distribution, which converged toward steady state after thousands of years simulated with a 2D version of the model (Bertrand and Forget, 2016).We identify three “realistic” simulations which differ by their spatial distribution of N2 ice in 2015 but remain consistent with the evolution of the surface pressure (Sicardy et al., 2016) and the amount of atmospheric methane observed on Pluto (Lellouch et al., 2015). We perform a comprehensive characterization of Pluto’s atmosphere in 2015 using these simulations. Near surface winds can be compared to wind streaks on Pluto, while the simulated waves and thermal structure can be compared to the New Horizons occultations measurements (Hinson et al., 2017).In particular, we demonstrate the sensitivity of the general circulation to the distribution of N2 ice on the surface. Our latest results suggest that Pluto’s atmosphere undergoes retrograde rotation, a unique circulation regime in the Solar System, induced by the condensation-sublimation of N2 in the Sputnik Planitia basin. In Sputnik Planitia, the near-surface winds favor a deposition of haze particles in the northern and western part of the ice cap, which helps to interpret the different colors observed. The GCM also shows that several atmospheric phenomena are at the origin of the cold boundary layer observed deep in the Sputnik Planitia basin, in particular the sublimation of N2, effects of topography and the supply of cold air by winds. This allows us to understand the near-surface differences observed between the entry and

  6. Gas adsorption and desorption effects on high pressure small volume cylinders and their relevance to atmospheric trace gas analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satar, Ece; Nyfeler, Peter; Pascale, Céline; Niederhauser, Bernhard; Leuenberger, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Long term atmospheric monitoring of trace gases requires great attention to precision and accuracy of the measurement setups. For globally integrated and well established greenhouse gas observation networks, the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) has set recommended compatibility goals within the framework of its Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW) Programme [1]. To achieve these challenging limits, the measurement systems are regularly calibrated with standard gases of known composition. Therefore, the stability of the primary and secondary gas standards over time is an essential issue. Past studies have explained the small instabilities in high pressure standard gas cylinders through leakage, diffusion, regulator effects, gravimetric fractionation and surface processes [2, 3]. The latter include adsorption/desorption, which are functions of temperature, pressure and surface properties. For high pressure standard gas mixtures used in atmospheric trace gas analysis, there exists only a limited amount of data and few attempts to quantify the surface processes [4, 5]. Specifically, we have designed a high pressure measurement chamber to investigate trace gases and their affinity for adsorption on different surfaces over various temperature and pressure ranges. Here, we focus on measurements of CO2, CH4 and CO using a cavity ring down spectroscopy analyzer and quantify the concentration changes due to adsorption/desorption. In this study, the first results from these prototype cylinders of steel and aluminum will be presented. References [1] World Meteorological Organization (WMO), Global Atmosphere Watch.(GAW): Report No. 229, 18th WMO/IAEA Meeting on Carbon Dioxide, Other Greenhouse Gases and Related Tracers Measurement Techniques (GGMT-2015), 2016. [2] Keeling, R. F., Manning, A. C., Paplawsky, W. J., and Cox, A. C.: On the long-term stability of reference gases for atmospheric O2 /N2 and CO2 measurements, Tellus B, 59, 10.3402/tellusb.v59i1.16964, 2007. [3

  7. High-resolution measurements of atmospheric molecular hydrogen and its isotopic composition at the West African coast of Mauritania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Walter

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Oceans are a net source of molecular hydrogen (H2 to the atmosphere, where nitrogen (N2 fixation is assumed to be the main biological production pathway followed by photochemical production from organic material. The sources can be distinguished using isotope measurements because of clearly differing isotopic signatures of the produced hydrogen. Here we present the first ship-borne measurements of atmospheric molecular H2 mixing ratio and isotopic composition at the West African coast of Mauritania (16–25° W, 17–24° N. This area is one of the biologically most active regions of the world's oceans with seasonal upwelling events and characterized by strongly differing hydrographical/biological properties and phytoplankton community structures. The aim of this study was to identify areas of H2 production and distinguish H2 sources by isotopic signatures of atmospheric H2. For this more than 100 air samples were taken during two cruises in February 2007 and 2008. During both cruises a transect from the Cape Verde Islands towards the Mauritanian Coast was sampled to cover differing oceanic regions such as upwelling and oligotrophic regimes. In 2007, additionally, four days were sampled at high resolution of one sample per hour to investigate a possible diurnal cycle of atmospheric H2. Our results indicate the influence of local sources and suggest the Banc d'Arguin as a pool for precursors for photochemical H2 production, whereas oceanic N2 fixation could not be identified as a source for atmospheric H2 during these two cruises. The variability in diurnal cycles is probably influenced by released precursors for photochemical H2 production and also affected by a varying origin of air masses. This means for future investigations that only measuring the mixing ratio of H2 is insufficient to explain the variability of an atmospheric diurnal cycle and support is needed, e.g. by isotopic measurements. Nevertheless, measurements of atmospheric H2

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of atmospheric halotolerant bacterial communities at high altitude in an Asian dust (KOSA) arrival region, Suzu City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maki, Teruya, E-mail: makiteru@t.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan); Susuki, Shinzi; Kobayashi, Fumihisa [College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan); Kakikawa, Makiko [Institute of Nature and Environmental Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan); Tobo, Yutaka [Frontier Science Organization, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan); Yamada, Maromu [Faculty of Environmental and Symbiotic Science, Prefectural University of Kumamoto, 3-1-100 Tsukide, Kumamoto 862-8502 (Japan); Higashi, Tomomi [Hygiene, Kanazawa University School of Medicine, 13-1 Takara-machi, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-8640 (Japan); Matsuki, Atsushi; Hong, Chunsang [Frontier Science Organization, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan); Hasegawa, Hiroshi [College of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan); Iwasaka, Yasunobu [Frontier Science Organization, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa, Ishikawa, 920-1192 (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    The microbial communities transported by Asian desert dust (KOSA) events have attracted much attention as bioaerosols because the transported microorganisms are thought to influence the downwind ecosystems in Korea and Japan. However, the atmospheric microbial community has not been investigated at high altitude in the KOSA arrival area. In this study, to estimate the viability and diversity of atmospheric halotolerant bacteria, which are expected to resist to various environmental stresses as well as high salinities, bioaerosol samples were collected at 10 and 600 m above the ground within the KOSA arrival area, Suzu City, Japan, during KOSA events. During the sampling period, the particle numbers at 600 m were higher than those at 10 m, suggesting that large particles of aerosol fall from the high altitude of 600 m to the ground surface. The microorganisms in bioaerosol samples grew in media containing up to 15% NaCl concentrations demonstrating the viability of the halotolerant bacteria in bioaerosol samples. The PCR-DGGE analysis using 16S rDNA revealed that the bacterial species in NaCl-amended cultures were similar to the bacteria detected from the genomic DNA directly extracted from the bioaerosol samples. The 16S rDNA sequences of bacterial communities in bioaerosol samples were classified into 4 phylotypes belonging to the Bacilluscereus or Bacillussubtilis group. The bioaerosol samples collected at 600 m included 2 phylotypes belonging to B. subtilis, and one phylotype among all 4 phylotypes was identical between the samples at 10 and 600 m. In the atmosphere at 600 m, the halotolerant bacterial community was expected to remain viable, and the species composition was expected to include a few species of the genus Bacillus. During this investigation period, these atmospheric bacteria may have been vertically transported to the ground surface, where the long-range KOSA particle transport from China is frequently observed.

  9. Toxic corneal epithelial edema from exposure to high atmospheric concentration of toluene diisocyanates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckenbach, M; Kielar, R

    1980-11-01

    Exposure to organic isocyanates in the atmosphere of a polyurethane-foam-producing company resulted in microcystic corneal epithelial edema and conjunctival injection localized primarily in the palpebral fissure. The degree of microcystic edema and decreased visual acuity appeared to be related to location, length of exposure, ventilation, temperature, and amount of chemicals and premold stored. Clearing time varied with amount of exposure. Moderate amounts of microcystic edema caused an average fall of one line in the visual acuity. Pain was absent. The toxic effect of the isocyanates on the metabolism of the corneal epithelium may be the cause of the corneal epithelial edema.

  10. Increased incidence of still birth in piglets associated with high levels of atmospheric carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, E.N.

    1979-03-31

    Raised levels of atmospheric carbon monoxide, associated with malfunctioning gas-fired creep heaters and inadequate ventilation, appeared responsible for an increased incidence of stillbirths in two herds. In one, a concentration of 180 to 200 ppm of carbon monoxide was readily produced. Both problems resolved when the ventilation and heating were improved, the incidence of stillbirths in one herd falling from 28 to 6.7%. It is suggested that similar incidents may have occurred during cold weather but have been ascribed to other causes. 5 references, 1 table.

  11. Analysis of the snow-atmosphere energy balance during wet-snow instabilities and implications for avalanche prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mitterer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Wet-snow avalanches are notoriously difficult to predict; their formation mechanism is poorly understood since in situ measurements representing the thermal and mechanical evolution are difficult to perform. Instead, air temperature is commonly used as a predictor variable for days with high wet-snow avalanche danger – often with limited success. As melt water is a major driver of wet-snow instability and snow melt depends on the energy input into the snow cover, we computed the energy balance for predicting periods with high wet-snow avalanche activity. The energy balance was partly measured and partly modelled for virtual slopes at different elevations for the aspects south and north using the 1-D snow cover model SNOWPACK. We used measured meteorological variables and computed energy balance and its components to compare wet-snow avalanche days to non-avalanche days for four consecutive winter seasons in the surroundings of Davos, Switzerland. Air temperature, the net shortwave radiation and the energy input integrated over 3 or 5 days showed best results in discriminating event from non-event days. Multivariate statistics, however, revealed that for better predicting avalanche days, information on the cold content of the snowpack is necessary. Wet-snow avalanche activity was closely related to periods when large parts of the snowpack reached an isothermal state (0 °C and energy input exceeded a maximum value of 200 kJ m−2 in one day, or the 3-day sum of positive energy input was larger than 1.2 MJ m−2. Prediction accuracy with measured meteorological variables was as good as with computed energy balance parameters, but simulated energy balance variables accounted better for different aspects, slopes and elevations than meteorological data.

  12. Effects of ascorbic acid and high oxygen modified atmosphere packaging during storage of fresh-cut eggplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xihong; Jiang, Yuqian; Li, Weili; Tang, Yao; Yun, Juan

    2014-03-01

    Ascorbic acid dip and high O2 modified atmosphere packaging were used to alleviate browning and quality loss of fresh-cut eggplants. Fresh-cut eggplants were dipped in water or 0.5% ascorbic acid solution for 2 min before being packed in polyethylene film bags filled with air or high O2. The physiochemical and sensorial attributes of cut eggplants were evaluated during 12 days for storage at 4 . Results demonstrated that high O2 modified atmosphere packaging and ascorbic acid dip improved the preservation of fresh-cut eggplants compared with the control. High O2 showed an ability to reduce the browning and inhibit polyphenol oxidase and peroxidase activities. Higher total phenolic content and lower malondialdehyde content were also observed in ascorbic acid treated samples during storage. Moreover, the combination of ascorbic acid and high O2 was more effective than single treatments. The surface color was protected by ascorbic acid and high O2 packaging, and higher sensory scores were observed after 12 days of storage.

  13. Thermal, tensile and rheological properties of high density polyethylene (HDPE) processed and irradiated by gamma-ray in different atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreto, H. F. R.; Oliveira, A. C. F.; Gaia, R.; Parra, D. F.; Lugão, A. B.

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate structural changes of high density polyethylene (HDPE) modified by ionizing radiation (gamma rays) in different atmospheres. The gamma radiation process for modification of commercial polymers is a widely applied technique to promote new physical-chemical and mechanical properties. Gamma irradiation originates free radicals which can induce chain scission or recombination, providing its annihilation, branching or crosslinking. This polymer was irradiated with gamma source of 60Co at doses of 5, 10, 20, 50 or 100 kGy at a dose rate of 5 kGy/h. The changes in molecular structure of HDPE, after gamma irradiations were evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and tensile machine and oscillatory rheology. The results showed the variations of the properties depending on the dose at each atmosphere.

  14. Thermal, tensile and rheological properties of high density polyethylene (HDPE) processed and irradiated by gamma-ray in different atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreto, H. F. R., E-mail: hferreto@ipen.br, E-mail: ana-feitoza@yahoo.com.br; Oliveira, A. C. F., E-mail: hferreto@ipen.br, E-mail: ana-feitoza@yahoo.com.br; Parra, D. F., E-mail: dfparra@ipen.br, E-mail: ablugao@ipen.br; Lugão, A. B., E-mail: dfparra@ipen.br, E-mail: ablugao@ipen.br [Center of Chemistry and Environment, Institute of Energy and Nuclear Research - IPEN (Brazil); Gaia, R., E-mail: renan-gaia7@hotmail.com [Faculdades Oswaldo Cruz (Brazil)

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this paper is to investigate structural changes of high density polyethylene (HDPE) modified by ionizing radiation (gamma rays) in different atmospheres. The gamma radiation process for modification of commercial polymers is a widely applied technique to promote new physical-chemical and mechanical properties. Gamma irradiation originates free radicals which can induce chain scission or recombination, providing its annihilation, branching or crosslinking. This polymer was irradiated with gamma source of {sup 60}Co at doses of 5, 10, 20, 50 or 100 kGy at a dose rate of 5 kGy/h. The changes in molecular structure of HDPE, after gamma irradiations were evaluated using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and tensile machine and oscillatory rheology. The results showed the variations of the properties depending on the dose at each atmosphere.

  15. Implication of eolian delivery and accumulation of highly reactive iron to the Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B. K.; Owens, J. D.; Lyons, T. W.

    2014-12-01

    Iron, although abundant in the Earth's crust, is present at low concentrations in sea water and is a limiting nutrient for phytoplankton. Eolian dust (loess) is a major source of this micronutrient, and its deposition has important implications for the global CO2 budget. In this study, we explore distributions of potentially bioreactive Fe, the soluble fraction required by phytoplankton for photosynthesis and nitrogen assimilation, in deep-sea sediments in the North and South Atlantic Oceans. We used a state-of-the-art Fe speciation technique to characterize Fe inputs from different source regions, specifically North Africa and Patagonia to address the patterns and implications across glacial-interglacial time scales. In many open-ocean regions the input of new iron to the surface waters is dominated by the atmospheric deposition of soluble iron in eolian dusts. Multiple records have shown dust accumulation is correlated with glacial-interglacial cycles - glacial periods are substantially dustier. Furthermore, the delivery of eolian dust to the North and South Atlantic Oceans are from two very different source regions and soil types. We analyzed IODP cores from these two regions and our preliminary data shows similar pattern of iron distribution from both the North and South Atlantic Oceans. To date we have found no simple global pattern of bioavailable iron distribution during glacial and interglacial periods. We have analyzed a range of size distributions to isolate the dust-dominated fraction and the data shows no size effects in bioavailable form of iron distribution. We will explore the role of deep-water dust dissolution and sedimentary redox implications and its role on the bioreactive Fe record in marine cores.

  16. Atmospheric neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajita, Takaaki [Research Center for Cosmic Neutrinos, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa-no-ha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2004-12-01

    Neutrino oscillation was discovered through the study of atmospheric neutrinos. Atmospheric neutrinos are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron neutrinos and muon neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons and electrons. Depending on the energy of the neutrinos, atmospheric neutrinos are observed as fully contained events, partially contained events and upward-going muon events. The energy range covered by these events is from a few hundred MeV to >1 TeV. Data from various experiments showed zenith angle- and energy-dependent deficit of {nu}{sub {mu}} events, while {nu}{sub e} events did not show any such effect. It was also shown that the {nu}{sub {mu}} survival probability obeys the sinusoidal function as predicted by neutrino oscillations. Two-flavour {nu}{sub {mu}} {r_reversible} {nu}{sub {tau}} oscillations, with sin{sup 2} 2{theta} > 0.90 and {delta}m{sup 2} in the region of 1.9 x 10{sup -3} to 3.0 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}, explain all these data. Various detailed studies using high statistics atmospheric neutrino data excluded the alternative hypotheses that were proposed to explain the {nu}{sub {mu}} deficit.

  17. Development of an atmospheric infrared radiation model with high clouds for target detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellisario, Christophe; Malherbe, Claire; Schweitzer, Caroline; Stein, Karin

    2016-10-01

    In the field of target detection, the simulation of the camera FOV (field of view) background is a significant issue. The presence of heterogeneous clouds might have a strong impact on a target detection algorithm. In order to address this issue, we present here the construction of the CERAMIC package (Cloudy Environment for RAdiance and MIcrophysics Computation) that combines cloud microphysical computation and 3D radiance computation to produce a 3D atmospheric infrared radiance in attendance of clouds. The input of CERAMIC starts with an observer with a spatial position and a defined FOV (by the mean of a zenithal angle and an azimuthal angle). We introduce a 3D cloud generator provided by the French LaMP for statistical and simplified physics. The cloud generator is implemented with atmospheric profiles including heterogeneity factor for 3D fluctuations. CERAMIC also includes a cloud database from the French CNRM for a physical approach. We present here some statistics developed about the spatial and time evolution of the clouds. Molecular optical properties are provided by the model MATISSE (Modélisation Avancée de la Terre pour l'Imagerie et la Simulation des Scènes et de leur Environnement). The 3D radiance is computed with the model LUCI (for LUminance de CIrrus). It takes into account 3D microphysics with a resolution of 5 cm-1 over a SWIR bandwidth. In order to have a fast computation time, most of the radiance contributors are calculated with analytical expressions. The multiple scattering phenomena are more difficult to model. Here a discrete ordinate method with correlated-K precision to compute the average radiance is used. We add a 3D fluctuations model (based on a behavioral model) taking into account microphysics variations. In fine, the following parameters are calculated: transmission, thermal radiance, single scattering radiance, radiance observed through the cloud and multiple scattering radiance. Spatial images are produced, with a

  18. Staging atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel; Bjerregaard, Peter; Sørensen, Tim Flohr

    2015-01-01

    The article introduces the special issue on staging atmospheres by surveying the philosophical, political and anthropological literature on atmosphere, and explores the relationship between atmosphere, material culture, subjectivity and affect. Atmosphere seems to occupy one of the classic...

  19. Beamed-Energy Propulsion (BEP): Considerations for Beaming High Energy-Density Electromagnetic Waves Through the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    A study to determine the feasibility of employing beamed electromagnetic energy for vehicle propulsion within and outside the Earth's atmosphere was co-funded by NASA and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency that began in June 2010 and culminated in a Summary Presentation in April 2011. A detailed report entitled "Beamed-Energy Propulsion (BEP) Study" appeared in February 2012 as NASA/TM-2012-217014. Of the very many nuances of this subject that were addressed in this report, the effects of transferring the required high energy-density electromagnetic fields through the atmosphere were discussed. However, due to the limitations of the length of the report, only a summary of the results of the detailed analyses were able to be included. It is the intent of the present work to make available the complete analytical modeling work that was done for the BEP project with regard to electromagnetic wave propagation issues. In particular, the present technical memorandum contains two documents that were prepared in 2011. The first one, entitled "Effects of Beaming Energy Through the Atmosphere" contains an overview of the analysis of the nonlinear problem inherent with the transfer of large amounts of energy through the atmosphere that gives rise to thermally-induced changes in the refractive index; application is then made to specific beamed propulsion scenarios. A brief portion of this report appeared as Appendix G of the 2012 Technical Memorandum. The second report, entitled "An Analytical Assessment of the Thermal Blooming Effects on the Propagation of Optical and Millimeter- Wave Focused Beam Waves For Power Beaming Applications" was written in October 2010 (not previously published), provides a more detailed treatment of the propagation problem and its effect on the overall characteristics of the beam such as its deflection as well as its radius. Comparisons are then made for power beaming using the disparate electromagnetic wavelengths of 1.06 microns and 2

  20. 1-hour time resolution data of PM2.5 composition and gaseous precursors in background Milan: pollution sources and atmospheric processes, and their implications for air quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigi, Alessandro; Bianchi, Federico; De Gennaro, Gianluigi; Di Gilio, Alessia; Fermo, Paola; Ghermandi, Grazia; Prévôt, André; Urbani, Monia; Valli, Gianluigi; Vecchi, Roberta; Piazzalunga, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    atmospheric temperature, although it was not possible to identify any specific source. The ratio of primary-dominated organic carbon and elemental carbon on hourly PM2.5 resulted 1.7. Black carbon was highly correlated to elemental carbon and the average mass absorption coefficient resulted MAC= 13.8 ± 0.2 m2 g-1. It is noteworthy how air quality for a large metropolitan area, in a confined valley and under enduring atmospheric stability, is nonetheless influenced by sources within and outside the valley. References Bigi, A.; Bianchi, F.; Gennaro, G. D.; Gilio, A. D.; Fermo, P.; Ghermandi, G.; Prévôt, A.; Urbani, M.; Valli, G.; Vecchi, R. & Piazzalunga, A. Hourly composition of gas and particle phase pollutants at a central urban background site in Milan, Italy. Atmospheric Research, 2017, 186, 83-94

  1. High Voltage Atmospheric Cold Plasma Treatment Of Refrigerated Chicken Eggs For Control Of Salmonella Enteritidis On External Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The global market for eggs is projected to reach 1.154 trillion by the year 2015. The number one risk to consumers from chicken eggs is contamination with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE). FDA estimates each year 142,000 illnesses in the U.S. are caused by SE contamination in chicken eggs. The first objective of this research study was to evaluate a novel High Voltage Atmospheric Cold Plasma (HVACP) technology in reducing externally inoculated SE on refrigerated chicken eggs. Raw, chicken eggs att...

  2. High-Temperature Properties of Ceramic Fibers and Insulations for Thermal Protection of Atmospheric Entry and Hypersonic Cruise Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Pitts, William C.; Araujo, Myrian; Zimmerman, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Multilayer insulations which will operate in the 500C to 1000C temperature range are being considered for possible applications on aerospace vehicles subject to convective and radiative heating during atmospheric entry. The insulations described in this paper consist of ceramic fabrics, insulations, and metal foils quilted together using ceramic thread. As these types of insulations have highly anisotropic properties, the total heat transfer characteristics of these insulations must be determined. Data are presented on the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of four types of multilayer insulations and are compared to the baseline Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation

  3. Atmospheric and dispersion modeling in areas of highly complex terrain employing a four-dimensional data assimilation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fast, J.D.; O`Steen, B.L.

    1994-12-31

    The results of this study indicate that the current data assimilation technique can have a positive impact on the mesoscale flow fields; however, care must be taken in its application to grids of relatively fine horizontal resolution. Continuous FDDA is a useful tool in producing high-resolution mesoscale analysis fields that can be used to (1) create a better initial conditions for mesoscale atmospheric models and (2) drive transport models for dispersion studies. While RAMS is capable of predicting the qualitative flow during this evening, additional experiments need to be performed to improve the prognostic forecasts made by RAMS and refine the FDDA procedure so that the overall errors are reduced even further. Despite the fact that a great deal of computational time is necessary in executing RAMS and LPDM in the configuration employed in this study, recent advances in workstations is making applications such as this more practical. As the speed of these machines increase in the next few years, it will become feasible to employ prognostic, three-dimensional mesoscale/transport models to routinely predict atmospheric dispersion of pollutants, even to highly complex terrain. For example, the version of RAMS in this study could be run in a ``nowcasting`` model that would continually assimilate local and regional observations as soon as they become available. The atmospheric physics in the model would be used to determine the wind field where no observations are available. The three-dimensional flow fields could be used as dynamic initial conditions for a model forecast. The output from this type of modeling system will have to be compared to existing diagnostic, mass-consistent models to determine whether the wind field and dispersion forecasts are significantly improved.

  4. Load Responsive MLI: Thermal Insulation with High In-Atmosphere and On-Orbit Performance Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lightweight, high performance thermal insulation is critical to NASA's next generation Exploration spacecraft. Zero or low cryogenic propellant boiloff is required...

  5. Photolysis imprint in the nitrate stable isotope signal in snow and atmosphere of East Antarctica and implications for reactive nitrogen cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. F. Martins

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The nitrogen (δ15N and triple oxygen (δ17O and δ18O isotopic composition of nitrate (NO3 was measured year-round in the atmosphere and snow pits at Dome C, Antarctica (DC, 75.1° S, 123.3° E, and in surface snow on a transect between DC and the coast. Comparison to the isotopic signal in atmospheric NO3 shows that snow NO3 is significantly enriched in δ15N by >200‰ and depleted in δ18O by <40‰. Post-depositional fractionation in Δ17O(NO3 is small, potentially allowing reconstruction of past shifts in tropospheric oxidation pathways from ice cores. Assuming a Rayleigh-type process we find fractionation constants ε of −60±15‰, 8±2‰ and 1±1‰, for δ15N, δ18O and Δ17O, respectively. A photolysis model yields an upper limit for the photolytic fractionation constant 15ε of δ15N, consistent with lab and field measurements, and demonstrates a high sensitivity of 15ε to the incident actinic flux spectrum. The photolytic 15ε is process-specific and therefore applies to any snow covered location. Previously published 15ε values are not representative for conditions at the Earth surface, but apply only to the UV lamp used in the reported experiment (Blunier et al., 2005; Jacobi et al., 2006. Depletion of oxygen stable isotopes is attributed to photolysis followed by isotopic exchange with water and hydroxyl radicals. Conversely, 15N enrichment of the NO3 fraction in the snow implies 15N depletion of emissions. Indeed, δ15N in atmospheric NO3 shows a strong decrease from background levels (4±7‰ to −35‰ in spring followed by recovery during summer, consistent with significant snowpack

  6. Multicomponent mixed dopant optimization for rapid screening of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution mass spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Sioud, Salim

    2012-05-04

    RATIONALE To enhance the ionization efficiencies in atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry a dopant with favorable ionization energy such as chlorobenzene is typically used. These dopants are typically toxic and difficult to mix with water-soluble organic solvents. In order to achieve a more efficient and less toxic dopant, a multicomponent mixed dopant was explored. METHODS A multicomponent mixed dopant for non-targeted rapid screening of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was developed and optimized using ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution mass spectrometry. Various single and multicomponent mixed dopants consisting of ethanol, chlorobenzene, bromobenzene, anisole and toluene were evaluated. RESULTS Fourteen out of eighteen PAHs were successfully separated and detected at low pg/μL levels within 5 min with high mass accuracy ≤4 ppm. The optimal mixed multicomponent dopant consisted of ethanol/chlorobenzene/bromobenzene/anisole (98.975:0.1:0.9:0.025, v/v %) and it improved the limit of detection (LOD) by 2- to 10-fold for the tested PAHs compared to those obtained with pure chlorobenzene. CONCLUSIONS A novel multicomponent dopant that contains 99% ethanol and 1% mixture of chlorobenzene, bromobenzene and anisole was found to be an effective dopant mixture to ionize PAHs. The developed UPLC multicomponent dopant assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution mass spectrometry offered a rapid non targeted screening method for detecting the PAHs at low pg/;μL levels within a 5 min run time with high mass accuracy a;circ4 ppm. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Multicomponent mixed dopant optimization for rapid screening of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sioud, Salim; Amad, Ma'an; Al-Talla, Zeyad A

    2012-06-30

    To enhance the ionization efficiencies in atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry a dopant with favorable ionization energy such as chlorobenzene is typically used. These dopants are typically toxic and difficult to mix with water-soluble organic solvents. In order to achieve a more efficient and less toxic dopant, a multicomponent mixed dopant was explored. A multicomponent mixed dopant for non-targeted rapid screening of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was developed and optimized using ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution mass spectrometry. Various single and multicomponent mixed dopants consisting of ethanol, chlorobenzene, bromobenzene, anisole and toluene were evaluated. Fourteen out of eighteen PAHs were successfully separated and detected at low pg/μL levels within 5 min with high mass accuracy ≤4 ppm. The optimal mixed multicomponent dopant consisted of ethanol/chlorobenzene/bromobenzene/anisole (98.975:0.1:0.9:0.025, v/v %) and it improved the limit of detection (LOD) by 2- to 10-fold for the tested PAHs compared to those obtained with pure chlorobenzene. A novel multicomponent dopant that contains 99% ethanol and 1% mixture of chlorobenzene, bromobenzene and anisole was found to be an effective dopant mixture to ionize PAHs. The developed UPLC multicomponent dopant assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution mass spectrometry offered a rapid non targeted screening method for detecting the PAHs at low pg/μL levels within a 5 min run time with high mass accuracy ≤4 ppm. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. High level implementation of geometric multigrid solvers for finite element problems: Applications in atmospheric modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Lawrence; Müller, Eike Hermann

    2016-12-01

    The implementation of efficient multigrid preconditioners for elliptic partial differential equations (PDEs) is a challenge due to the complexity of the resulting algorithms and corresponding computer code. For sophisticated (mixed) finite element discretisations on unstructured grids an efficient implementation can be very time consuming and requires the programmer to have in-depth knowledge of the mathematical theory, parallel computing and optimisation techniques on manycore CPUs. In this paper we show how the development of bespoke multigrid preconditioners can be simplified significantly by using a framework which allows the expression of the each component of the algorithm at the correct abstraction level. Our approach (1) allows the expression of the finite element problem in a language which is close to the mathematical formulation of the problem, (2) guarantees the automatic generation and efficient execution of parallel optimised low-level computer code and (3) is flexible enough to support different abstraction levels and give the programmer control over details of the preconditioner. We use the composable abstractions of the Firedrake/PyOP2 package to demonstrate the efficiency of this approach for the solution of strongly anisotropic PDEs in atmospheric modelling. The weak formulation of the PDE is expressed in Unified Form Language (UFL) and the lower PyOP2 abstraction layer allows the manual design of computational kernels for a bespoke geometric multigrid preconditioner. We compare the performance of this preconditioner to a single-level method and hypre's BoomerAMG algorithm. The Firedrake/PyOP2 code is inherently parallel and we present a detailed performance analysis for a single node (24 cores) on the ARCHER supercomputer. Our implementation utilises a significant fraction of the available memory bandwidth and shows very good weak scaling on up to 6,144 compute cores.

  9. Observation of different ceramide species from crude cellular extracts by normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pettus, BJ; Bielawska, A; Kroesen, BJ; Moeller, PDR; Szulc, ZM; Hannun, YA; Busman, M

    2003-01-01

    Normal-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (NP-HPLC) coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) allows qualitative analysis of endogenous ceramide and dihydroceramide species from crude lipid extracts utilizing chromatographic methods readily adaptable

  10. A novel high-efficiency stable atmospheric microwave plasma device for fluid processing based on ridged waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Wei; Huang, Kama; He, Jianbo; Wu, Ying

    2017-09-01

    The waveguide-based microwave plasma device is widely used to generate atmospheric plasma for some industrial applications. Nevertheless, the traditional tapered waveguide device has limited power efficiency and produces unstable plasma. A novel ridged waveguide with an oblique hole is proposed to produce microwave atmospheric plasma for fluid processing. By using the ridged waveguide, the microwave field can be well focused, which can sustain plasma at relatively low power. Besides, an oblique hole is used to decrease the power reflection and generate a stable plasma torch especially in the case of high flowing rates. Experiments have been performed with the air flowing rates ranging from 500 l h-1 to 1000 l h-1 and the microwave working frequency of 2.45 GHz. The results show that in comparison with the conventional tapered waveguide, this novel device can both sustain plasma at relative low power and increase the power transfer efficiency by 11% from microwave to plasma. Moreover, both devices are used to process the waste gas-CO and CH4. Significantly, the removal efficiency for CO and CH4 can be increased by 19.7% and 32% respectively in the ridged waveguide compared with the tapered waveguide. It demonstrates that the proposed device possesses a great potential in industrial applications because of its high efficiency and stable performance.

  11. Development of spoilage bacterial community and volatile compounds in chilled beef under vacuum or high oxygen atmospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jääskeläinen, Elina; Hultman, Jenni; Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa; Björkroth, Johanna

    2016-04-16

    Research into microbial community development and metabolism is essential to understand meat spoilage. Recent years have seen the emergence of powerful molecular techniques that are being used alongside conventional microbiology approaches. This enables more accurate studies on meat spoilage. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of packaging (under vacuum and in high oxygen atmosphere) on the development of microbial communities and metabolic activities at 6 °C by using culture-dependent (cultivation, ribotyping) and culture-independent (amplicon sequencing) methods. At the beginning of shelf life, the microbial community mostly consisted of Carnobacterium and Lactobacillus. After two weeks of storage, Lactococcus and Lactobacillus were the dominant genera under vacuum and Leuconostoc in high oxygen meat packages. This indicates that oxygen favoured the genus Leuconostoc comprising only heterofermentative species and hence potential producers of undesirable compounds. Also the number of volatile compounds, such as diacetyl, 1-octen-3-ol and hexanoic acids, was higher in high oxygen packages than under vacuum packages. The beef in high oxygen atmosphere packaging was detected as spoiled in sensory evaluation over 10 days earlier than beef under vacuum packaging. Leuconostoc gelidum, Lactococcus piscium, Lactobacillus sakei and Lactobacillus algidus were the most common species of bacteria. The results obtained from identification of the isolates using ribotyping and amplicon sequencing correlated, except for L. algidus, which was detected in both types of packaging by amplicon sequencing, but only in vacuum packaged samples using the culture-based technique. This indicates that L. algidus grew, but was not cultivable in high oxygen beef using the Nordic Committee on Food Analysis standard method. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ten-year trends of atmospheric mercury in the high Arctic compared to Canadian sub-Arctic and mid-latitude sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Cole

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Global emissions of mercury continue to change at the same time as the Arctic is experiencing ongoing climatic changes. Continuous monitoring of atmospheric mercury provides important information about long-term trends in the balance between transport, chemistry, and deposition of this pollutant in the Arctic atmosphere. Ten-year records of total gaseous mercury (TGM from 2000 to 2009 were analyzed from two high Arctic sites at Alert (Nunavut, Canada and Zeppelin Station (Svalbard, Norway; one sub-Arctic site at Kuujjuarapik (Nunavik, Québec, Canada; and three temperate Canadian sites at St. Anicet (Québec, Kejimkujik (Nova Scotia and Egbert (Ontario. Five of the six sites examined showed a decreasing trend over this time period. Overall trend estimates at high latitude sites were: −0.9% yr−1 (95% confidence limits: −1.4, 0 at Alert and no trend (−0.5, +0.7 at Zeppelin Station. Faster decreases were observed at the remainder of the sites: −2.1% yr−1 (−3.1, −1.1 at Kuujjuarapik, −1.9% yr−1 (−2.1, −1.8 at St. Anicet, −1.6% yr−1 (−2.4, −1.0 at Kejimkujik and −2.2% yr−1 (−2.8, −1.7 at Egbert. Trends at the sub-Arctic and mid-latitude sites agree with reported decreases in background TGM concentration since 1996 at Mace Head, Ireland, and Cape Point, South Africa, but conflict with estimates showing an increase in global anthropogenic emissions over a similar period. Trends in TGM at the two high Arctic sites were not only less negative (or neutral overall but much more variable by season. Possible reasons for differences in seasonal and overall trends at the Arctic sites compared to those at lower latitudes are discussed, as well as implications for the Arctic mercury cycle. The first calculations of multi-year trends in reactive gaseous mercury (RGM and total particulate mercury (TPM at Alert were also performed, indicating increases from 2002 to 2009

  13. Discovery of atmospheric neutrino oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajita, Takaaki [Tokyo Univ., Inst. for Cosmic Ray Research, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan)

    2003-05-01

    Cosmic ray particles entering the atmosphere interact with the air nuclei produce neutrinos. These neutrinos are called atmospheric neutrinos. The atmospheric neutrino anomaly observed in Kamiokande is now understood as due to neutrino oscillations by high statistics measurements of the atmospheric neutrinos in Super-Kamiokande. The studies of the atmospheric neutrinos have matured into detailed studies of neutrino masses and mixings. (author)

  14. Interpreting the Ultraviolet Aerosol Index Observed with the OMI Satellite Instrument to Understand Absorption by Organic Carbon Aerosols and Implications for Atmospheric Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, M. S.; Martin, R.; van Donkelaar, A.; Buchard, V.; Torres, O.; Ridley, D. A.; Spurr, R. J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Absorption of solar radiation by aerosols plays a major role in radiative forcing and atmospheric photochemistry. Many atmospheric chemistry models tend to overestimate tropospheric OH concentrations compared to observations. Accurately representing aerosol absorption in the UV could help rectify the discrepancies between simulated and observed OH concentrations. We develop a simulation of the Ultraviolet Aerosol Index (UVAI), using the 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem coupled with the Vector Linearized Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer model (VLIDORT). The simulation is applied to interpret UVAI observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). Simulated and observed values are highly consistent in regions where mineral dust dominates the UVAI, but a large negative bias (-0.4 to -1.0) exists between simulated and observed values in biomass burning regions. We implement optical properties for absorbing organic aerosol, known as brown carbon (BrC), into GEOS-Chem and evaluate the simulation with observed UVAI values over biomass burning regions. The spectral dependence of absorption after adding BrC to the model is broadly consistent with reported observations for biomass burning aerosol, with Absorbing Angstrom Exponent (AAE) values ranging from 2.7 in the UV to 1.3 across the UV-Near IR spectrum. The addition of absorbing BrC decreases the mean bias between simulated and OMI UVAI values from -0.60 to -0.08 over North Africa in January, from -0.40 to -0.003 over South Asia in April, from -1.0 to -0.24 over southern Africa in July, and from -0.50 to +0.34 over South America in September. We assess the effect of the additional UV absorption by BrC on atmospheric photochemistry by examining ozone photolysis frequencies (J(O(1D))) and tropospheric OH concentrations in GEOS-Chem. The inclusion of BrC decreases J(O(1D)) and OH by up to 35% over biomass burning regions, and reduces the global bias in OH.

  15. The Rhynie hot-spring system: implications for the Devonian timescale, development of Devonian biota, gold mineralization, evolution of the atmosphere and Earth outgassing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, D.; Rice, C.; Stuart, F.; Trewin, N.

    2011-12-01

    The Rhynie cherts are hot spring sinters that contain world-renowned plant and animal remains and anomalously high quantities of heavy metals, including gold. The biota in several beds is preserved undeformed with plants in life positions thus establishing that they and the indurating hydrothermal fluids were coeval. Despite the international importance of the Rhynie cherts their age has been poorly constrained for three reasons: (1) lack of a precise radio-isotopic age, (2) low resolution of spore biostratigraphic schemes for Devonian terrestrial deposits, with only one to a few zones per stage, and (3) poor resolution of the early Devonian timescale. Wellman (2004) assigned a Pragian-?earliest Emsian age to the Rhynie cherts on the basis of the spore assemblage. An 40Ar/39Ar dating study targeting Rhynie chert yielded an age of 395 ± 12 Ma (1σ) (Rice et al., 1995). This contribution discusses a new high-precision 40Ar/39Ar age (407.1 ± 2.2 Ma, 2σ) for the Devonian hot-spring system at Rhynie (Mark et al., 2011) and demonstrates that a proposed U-Pb age (411.5 ± 1.1 Ma, 2σ) for the Rhynie cherts (Parry et al., 2011) is inconsistent with both field evidence and our interpretation of the U-Pb data. The 40Ar/39Ar age provides a robust marker for the polygonalis-emsiensis Spore Assemblage Biozone within the Pragian-?earliest Emsian. It also constrains the age of a wealth of flora and fauna preserved in life positions as well as dating gold mineralization. Furthermore, we have now determined the Ar isotope composition of pristine samples of the Rhynie chert using an ARGUS multi-collector mass spectrometer and a low blank laser extraction technique. 40Ar/36Ar are systematically lower than the modern air value (Lee et al., 2006), and are not accompanied by non-atmospheric 38Ar/36Ar ratios. We conclude that the Rhynie chert captured and has preserved Devonian atmosphere-derived Ar. The data indicate that the 40Ar/36Ar of Devonian atmosphere was at least 3 % lower

  16. Trends in atmospheric evaporative demand in Great Britain using high-resolution meteorological data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Emma L.; Blyth, Eleanor M.; Clark, Douglas B.; Finch, Jon; Rudd, Alison C.

    2017-02-01

    Observations of climate are often available on very different spatial scales from observations of the natural environments and resources that are affected by climate change. In order to help bridge the gap between these scales using modelling, a new dataset of daily meteorological variables was created at 1 km resolution over Great Britain for the years 1961-2012, by interpolating coarser resolution climate data and including the effects of local topography. These variables were used to calculate atmospheric evaporative demand (AED) at the same spatial and temporal resolution. Two functions that represent AED were chosen: one is a standard form of potential evapotranspiration (PET) and the other is a derived PET measure used by hydrologists that includes the effect of water intercepted by the canopy (PETI). Temporal trends in these functions were calculated, with PET found to be increasing in all regions, and at an overall rate of 0.021 ± 0.021 mm day-1 decade-1 in Great Britain. PETI was found to be increasing at a rate of 0.019 ± 0.020 mm day-1 decade-1 in Great Britain, but this was not statistically significant. However, there was a trend in PETI in England of 0.023 ± 0.023 mm day-1 decade-1. The trends were found to vary by season, with spring PET increasing by 0.043 ± 0.019 mm day-1 decade-1 (0.038 ± 0.018 mm day-1 decade-1 when the interception correction is included) in Great Britain, while there is no statistically significant trend in other seasons. The trends were attributed analytically to trends in the climate variables; the overall positive trend was predominantly driven by rising air temperature, although rising specific humidity had a negative effect on the trend. Recasting the analysis in terms of relative humidity revealed that the overall effect is that falling relative humidity causes the PET to rise. Increasing downward short- and longwave radiation made an overall positive contribution to the PET trend, while decreasing wind speed made a

  17. A new, high-resolution surface mass balance map of Antarctica (1979-2010) based on regional atmospheric climate modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenaerts, J. T. M.; van den Broeke, M. R.; van de Berg, W. J.; van Meijgaard, E.; Kuipers Munneke, P.

    2012-02-01

    A new, high resolution (27 km) surface mass balance (SMB) map of the Antarctic ice sheet is presented, based on output of a regional atmospheric climate model that includes snowdrift physics and is forced by the most recent reanalysis data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF), ERA-Interim (1979-2010). The SMB map confirms high accumulation zones in the western Antarctic Peninsula (>1500 mm y-1) and coastal West Antarctica (>1000 mm y-1), and shows low SMB values in large parts of the interior ice sheet (181 Gt y-1. Snowfall shows modest interannual variability (σ = 114 Gt y-1), but a pronounced seasonal cycle (σ = 30 Gt mo-1), with a winter maximum. The main ablation process is drifting snow sublimation, which also peaks in winter but with little interannual variability (σ = 9 Gt y-1).

  18. Condensation of ablation plumes in the irradiation of metals by high-intensity nanosecond laser pulses at atmospheric pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozadaev, K V [A.N. Sevchenko Institute of Applied Physical Problems, Belarusian State University, Minsk (Belarus)

    2016-01-31

    The Anisimov–Luk'yanchuk model is adapted for describing the condensation of vapour-plasma plumes produced in the irradiation of metal targets by high-intensity (10{sup 8} – 10{sup 10} W cm{sup -2}) nanosecond (10 – 100 ns) pulses at atmospheric pressure. The resultant data suggest that the initial stages of the development of metal ablation plumes correspond with a high degree of accuracy to the Zel'dovich–Raizer theory of dynamic condensation; however, at the stage of the ablation plume decay, the liquid-droplet phase is formed primarily by coalescence of 'nuclei'. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  19. High temperature properties of ceramic fibers and insulations for thermal protection of atmospheric entry and hypersonic cruise vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Pitts, William C.; Araujo, Myrian; Zimmerman, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Multilayer insulations (MIs) which will operate in the 500 to 1000 C temperature range are being considered for possible applications on aerospace vehicles subject to convective and radiative heating during atmospheric entry. The insulations described consist of ceramic fibers, insulations, and metal foils quilted together with ceramic thread. As these types of insulations have highly anisotropic properties, the total heat transfer characteristics must be determined. Data are presented on the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of four types of MIs and are compared to the baseline Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation currently used on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. In addition, the high temperature properties of the fibers used in these MIs are discussed. The fibers investigated included silica and three types of aluminoborosilicate (ABS). Static tension tests were performed at temperatures up to 1200 C and the ultimate strain, tensile strength, and tensile modulus of single fibers were determined.

  20. Nonlinear Structuring and High-energy Electrons: Role in Ionosphere and in Thunderstorm Atmosphere Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    elastic and inelastic scattering at the atom as a whole to the Coulomb scattering at the electrons and the atomic nucleus . To describe this process...wave scattering off these structures. 3. The theory of the high-altitude thunder discharges generating of the powerful gamma emission, powerful...UHF radio wave scattering off these structures. 3. The theory of the high-altitude thunder discharges generating of the powerful gamma emission

  1. The Institute of Medicine report on high-quality cancer care: implications for oncology nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Betty; McCabe, Mary S; Levit, Laura

    2013-11-01

    To present key recommendations from a recently released Institute of Medicine (IOM) report on high-quality cancer care. The recommendations were derived from the IOM report Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis. The authors reviewed each of the recommendations to identify implications for oncology nurses. Nurses will play a vital role in the future design and delivery of high-quality cancer care. Oncology nurses should use the IOM recommendations in their settings to prepare for the delivery of oncology care amidst health system challenges, including an aging society. The IOM recommendations identify key areas of concern to nurses. Key aspects of nursing practice, including involvement in advanced care planning, patient-centered care, and evidence-based practice, are essential for high-quality care. Oncology nurses will be centrally involved in healthcare innovations, such as rapid learning systems, and as key members of a well-trained workforce.

  2. Atmospheric mercury and fine particulate matter in coastal New England: implications for mercury and trace element sources in the northeastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolker, Allan; Engle, Mark A.; Peucker-Ehrenbrink, Bernhard; Geboy, Nicholas J.; Krabbenhotft, David P.; Bothner, Michael H.; Tate, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Intensive sampling of ambient atmospheric fine particulate matter was conducted at Woods Hole, Massachusetts over a four-month period from 3 April to 29 July, 2008, in conjunction with year-long deployment of the USGS Mobile Mercury Lab. Results were obtained for trace elements in fine particulate matter concurrently with determination of ambient atmospheric mercury speciation and concentrations of ancillary gasses (SO2, NOx, and O3). For particulate matter, trace element enrichment factors greater than 10 relative to crustal background values were found for As, Bi, Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, Sb, V, and Zn, indicating contribution of these elements by anthropogenic sources. For other elements, enrichments are consistent with natural marine (Na, Ca, Mg, Sr) or crustal (Ba, Ce, Co, Cs, Fe, Ga, La, Rb, Sc, Th, Ti, U, Y) sources, respectively. Positive matrix factorization was used together with concentration weighted air-mass back trajectories to better define element sources and their locations. Our analysis, based on events exhibiting the 10% highest PM2.5 contributions for each source category, identifies coal-fired power stations concentrated in the U.S. Ohio Valley, metal smelting in eastern Canada, and marine and crustal sources showing surprisingly similar back trajectories, at times each sampling Atlantic coastal airsheds. This pattern is consistent with contribution of Saharan dust by a summer maximum at the latitude of Florida and northward transport up the Atlantic Coast by clockwise circulation of the summer Bermuda High. Results for mercury speciation show diurnal production of RGM by photochemical oxidation of Hg° in a marine environment, and periodic traverse of the study area by correlated RGM-SO2(NOx) plumes, indicative of coal combustion sources.

  3. A new Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy instrument to study atmospheric chemistry from a high-altitude unmanned aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutz, Jochen; Werner, Bodo; Spolaor, Max; Scalone, Lisa; Festa, James; Tsai, Catalina; Cheung, Ross; Colosimo, Santo F.; Tricoli, Ugo; Raecke, Rasmus; Hossaini, Ryan; Chipperfield, Martyn P.; Feng, Wuhu; Gao, Ru-Shan; Hintsa, Eric J.; Elkins, James W.; Moore, Fred L.; Daube, Bruce; Pittman, Jasna; Wofsy, Steven; Pfeilsticker, Klaus

    2017-03-01

    Observations of atmospheric trace gases in the tropical upper troposphere (UT), tropical tropopause layer (TTL), and lower stratosphere (LS) require dedicated measurement platforms and instrumentation. Here we present a new limb-scanning Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument developed for NASA's Global Hawk (GH) unmanned aerial system and deployed during the Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX). The mini-DOAS system is designed for automatic operation under unpressurized and unheated conditions at 14-18 km altitude, collecting scattered sunlight in three wavelength windows: UV (301-387 nm), visible (410-525 nm), and near infrared (900-1700 nm). A telescope scanning unit allows selection of a viewing angle around the limb, as well as real-time correction of the aircraft pitch. Due to the high altitude, solar reference spectra are measured using diffusors and direct sunlight. The DOAS approach allows retrieval of slant column densities (SCDs) of O3, O4, NO2, and BrO with relative errors similar to other aircraft DOAS systems. Radiative transfer considerations show that the retrieval of trace gas mixing ratios from the observed SCD based on O4 observations, the most common approach for DOAS measurements, is inadequate for high-altitude observations. This is due to the frequent presence of low-altitude clouds, which shift the sensitivity of the O4 SCD into the lower atmosphere and make it highly dependent on cloud coverage. A newly developed technique that constrains the radiative transfer by comparing in situ and DOAS O3 observations overcomes this issue. Extensive sensitivity calculations show that the novel O3-scaling technique allows the retrieval of BrO and NO2 mixing ratios at high accuracies of 0.5 and 15 ppt, respectively. The BrO and NO2 mixing ratios and vertical profiles observed during ATTREX thus provide new insights into ozone and halogen chemistry in the UT, TTL, and LS.

  4. Iron Speciation in Minerals and Melts at High Pressure: Implications for the Redox Evolution of the Early Mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, K.; Frost, D. J.; McCammon, C. A.; Rubie, D. C.; Boffa Ballaran, T.; Miyajima, N.

    2016-12-01

    During the differentiation of the early Earth, the silicates of the mantle must have been in equilibrium with core-forming metal iron, as indicated by the depletion of siderophile elements from the mantle. Studies of ancient rocks suggest that by at least 3.9 Ga, the upper mantle was 4-5 log units more oxidized than metal saturation implies (Delano 2001). The process(es) by which the mantle was oxidized is unclear, but has implications for the timing of accretion, differentiation, and volatile delivery to the early Earth, as well as evolution of the early atmosphere. One plausible oxidation mechanism is suggested by the tendency of high-pressure silicate minerals to favor Fe3+ over Fe2+ in their structures, even at metal saturation. This preference in the lower mantle mineral bridgmanite has been proposed to drive the disproportionation reaction of FeO to form Fe­2O3 and iron metal (Frost and McCammon 2008). We have performed experiments at the Ru-RuO2 fO2 buffer which show that silicate melts may mirror this behavior and Fe3+ may be stabilized with pressure for a constant fO2; by 21 GPa, the previously observed trend of Fe3+ decreasing with pressure (O'Neill, 2006) reverses and ferric iron content had increased. If this is also the case at lower oxygen fugacities, FeO disproportionation may have occurred at the base of an early magma ocean, establishing a redox gradient similar to what is presumed for the mantle today. Here we report results of further multianvil and diamond anvil cell experiments exploring the plausibility of FeO disproportionation driving mantle oxidation. Experiments investigating Fe speciation in high pressure melts at variable fO2 will be discussed along with results of diamond anvil cell experiments investigating ferric iron content of lower mantle minerals at metal saturation.

  5. Ultra high resolution molecular beam cars spectroscopy with application to planetary atmospheric molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byer, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The measurement of high resolution pulsed and continuous wave (CW) coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) measurements in pulsed and steady state supersonic expansions were demonstrated. Pulsed molecular beam sources were characterized, and saturation of a Raman transition and, for the first time, the Raman spectrum of a complex molecular cluster were observed. The observation of CW CARS spectra in a molecular expansion and the effects of transit time broadening is described. Supersonic expansion is established as a viable technique for high resolution Raman spectroscopy of cold molecules with resolutions of 100 MH2.

  6. Laboratory Simulation of Biogeochemical Interactions Between Cyanobacterium-Growth and CaCO3 Deposition: Implications for Carbon Accumulation Under Extreme Atmospheric Conditions of Precambrian Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Q.; Chen, L.; Chen, G.; Yang, H.

    2004-05-01

    The atmosphere of Precambrian Earth was characterized by high PCO2, low PO2, and high violent UV radiation. To better understand the interaction between cyanobacterium-growth and CaCO3 deposition in such extreme environments, we grew Oscillatoria tenuis, a prokaryotic alga that is morphologically similar to micro-fossils found in Precambrian chert, in the laboratory under controlled temperature and patial presure of CO2. During algal cell growth, oxygen was absorbed continously by chromous chloride oxygen-absorbent and the levels of PCO2 were controlled by adding different amounts of HCO3- (NaHCO3) in culture medium with initial pH 7.4. Our observation indicates that PCO2 excerises the first order of control on the accumulation of cyanobaterium biomass. Under 100,000 Pa of PCO2, the growth rate of cyanobaterium increases along with the elevation of CO2 partial pressure; however, when PCO2 is higher than 100,000 Pa, the increase of PCO2 results in the decrease of cyanobacterium biomass. On the other hand, photosynthesis of cyanobacteria controls CaCO3 deposition via the function of adjusting pH in the solution. In a 5 day cell growth experiment with PCO2 controlled at about 50,000 Pa and additional 0.0001, 0.001, 0.01, 0.1 and 1.0 M Ca2+ input separately at speed of 2.5 ml/h, the largest total biomass of cyanobacterium (896 mg/L) including living suspension cells and deposited cells was obtained when Ca2+ input was maintained at 0.01 M with 2.5 ml/h. Otherwise, less Ca2+ input resulted in more living suspension cells and less deposited cells. More Ca2+ input resulted in less living suspension cells and more deposited cells. At last both conditions were not good for cell growth and accumulation of organic matter in carbonate deposition in long term. Our laboratory simulation illustrates that the Ca2+ input is critical to CaCO3 deposition and such controls are indirectly enforced through the accumulation of cyanobacteria biomass under a warm, anoxic and high pCO2

  7. Ectomycorrhizal fungi and past high CO2 atmospheres enhance mineral weathering through increased below-ground carbon-energy fluxes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Joe; Andrews, Megan Y; Leake, Jonathan R; Banwart, Steve A; Beerling, David J

    2014-07-01

    Field studies indicate an intensification of mineral weathering with advancement from arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) to later-evolving ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungal partners of gymnosperm and angiosperm trees. We test the hypothesis that this intensification is driven by increasing photosynthate carbon allocation to mycorrhizal mycelial networks using 14CO2-tracer experiments with representative tree–fungus mycorrhizal partnerships. Trees were grown in either a simulated past CO2 atmosphere (1500 ppm)—under which EM fungi evolved—or near-current CO2 (450 ppm). We report a direct linkage between photosynthate-energy fluxes from trees to EM and AM mycorrhizal mycelium and rates of calcium silicate weathering. Calcium dissolution rates halved for both AM and EM trees as CO2 fell from 1500 to 450 ppm, but silicate weathering by AM trees at high CO2 approached rates for EM trees at near-current CO2. Our findings provide mechanistic insights into the involvement of EM-associating forest trees in strengthening biological feedbacks on the geochemical carbon cycle that regulate atmospheric CO2 over millions of years.

  8. Atmospheric Propagation of High Energy Lasers: Modeling, Simulation, Tracking, and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-29

    the phase profile on a grid interlaced with the locations of the actuators. The purpose of AO system is to compensate the outgoing high energy laser...space laser communications,” in Optics and Photonics 2005. San Diego, CA: SPIE, August 2005. [10] N. O. Pérez Arancibia, N. Chen, S. Gibson, and T.-C

  9. Leaf expansion of soybean subjected to high and low atmospheric vapour pressure deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, M Jyostna; Taliercio, Earl W; Sinclair, Thomas R

    2015-04-01

    Vapour pressure deficit (VPD) is considered an important environmental factor that might affect leaf expansion and transpiration rate (TR) in plants. Two slow-wilting soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) genotypes PI 416937 and PI 471938 along with commercial cultivar Hutcheson were subjected to low (1.2-1.6 kPa) and high VPD (2.8-3 kPa) environments to study their leaf expansion and TR over five days. Among the three genotypes, PI 416937 had the lowest increase in its TR (34%) at high VPD compared with low VPD and the greatest decrease in leaf area (31%). In contrast, Hutcheson had the highest increase in TR (87%) under high VPD and the lowest decrease in leaf expansion rate (18%). Expansin and extensin genes were isolated in PI 416937 to determine if changes in leaf expansion were associated with changes at the molecular level. The four studied genes were all suppressed after five days in the high VPD environment. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  10. Indirect evidence of the composition of nucleation mode atmospheric particles in the high Arctic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giamarelou, Maria; Eleftheriadis, Konstantinos; Nyeki, Stephan; Tunved, Peter; Torseth, Kjetil; Biskos, G.

    2016-01-01

    Previous long-term observations have shown that nanoparticle formation events are common in the summer-time high Arctic and linked to local photochemical activity. However, current knowledge is limited with respect to the chemical precursors of resulting nanoparticles and the compounds involved

  11. Climate Change Driven Implications on Spatial Distribution of High Andean Peatlands in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Marco; Gibbons, Richard E.

    2013-04-01

    High Andean peatlands are among the most unique habitats in the tropical Andes and certainly among the least studied. High Andean peatlands occur patchily in montane grassland and scrub below snow line and above tree line. These high-elevation peatlands are sustained by glacial runoff and seasonal precipitation. We used remote sensing data to estimate that peatland habitat is approximately 2.5 % of our study region in the Puna, an ecoregion located in the high Andes above 4000 m a.s.l. Individual sizes of our estimated peatland polygons ranged from 0.72 ha to 1079 ha with a mean size of 4.9 ha. Climate change driven implications on spatial distribution of high Andean peatlands were assessed in two ways. First, we estimated the effect of predicted regional temperature increase by using the standard lapse rate of 2° C per 300 m for assessing peatland habitat patches that would remain above a critical thermocline. Nearly 80% of peatland habitat patches were predicted to occur below the thermocline if the prediction of 4° C temperature increase is realized. The second assessment relied on the quantified assumption that permanent snow or glacier cover, topographic characteristics (e.g. slope) and precipitation of a basin are essential variables in the occurrence of high Andean peatlands. All 17 basins were predicted to have a decrease in peatland habitat due to snow line uplift, decrease in precipitation and consequent insufficient wetland inflows. Total habitat loss was predicted for two basins in the semi-arid part of the study area with a snow line uplift to 5600 m and a projected decrease in precipitation of 1 mm per year over the next 40 years. A combined result of both assessments provides important information on climate change driven implications on the hydrology of high Andean peatlands and potential consequences for their spatial distribution within the Central Andes.

  12. Bacterial inactivation by high-voltage atmospheric cold plasma: influence of process parameters and effects on cell leakage and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, L; Lu, H; Patil, S; Keener, K M; Cullen, P J; Bourke, P

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated a range of atmospheric cold plasma (ACP) process parameters for bacterial inactivation with further investigation of selected parameters on cell membrane integrity and DNA damage. The effects of high voltage levels, mode of exposure, gas mixture and treatment time against Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes were examined. 10(8) CFU ml(-1) E. coli ATCC 25922, E. coli NCTC 12900 and L. monocytogenes NCTC11994 were ACP-treated in 10 ml phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). Working gas mixtures used were air (gas mix 1), 90% N2 + 10% O2 (gas mix 2) and 65% O2 + 30% CO2 + 5% N2 (gas mix 3). Greater reduction of viability was observed for all strains using higher voltage of 70 kVRMS and with working gas mixtures with higher oxygen content in combination with direct exposure. Indirect ACP exposure for 30 s inactivated below detection level both E. coli strains. L. monocytogenes inactivation within 30 s was irrespective of the mode of exposure. Leakage was assessed using A260 absorbance, and DNA damage was monitored using PCR and gel electrophoresis. Membrane integrity was compromised after 5 s, with noticeable DNA damage also dependent on the target cell after 30 s. Plasma treatment was effective for inactivation of challenge micro-organisms, with a greater sensitivity of L. monocytogenes noted. Different damage patterns were observed for the different bacterial strains attributed to the membrane structure and potential resistance mechanisms. Using atmospheric air as working gas resulted in useful inactivation by comparison with high nitrogen or high oxygen mix. The mechanism of inactivation was a function of treatment duration and cell membrane characteristics, thus offering potential for optimized process parameters specific to the microbial challenge. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  13. Some lessons and thoughts from development of an old-fashioned high-resolution atmospheric general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohfuchi, Wataru; Enomoto, Takeshi; Yoshioka, Mayumi K.; Takaya, Koutarou

    2014-05-01

    Some high-resolution simulations with a conventional atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) were conducted right after the first Earth Simulator started operating in the spring of 2002. More simulations with various resolutions followed. The AGCM in this study, AFES (Agcm For the Earth Simulator), is a primitive equation spectral transform method model with a cumulus convection parameterization. In this presentation, some findings from comparisons between high and low-resolution simulations, and some future perspectives of old-fashioned AGCMs will be discussed. One obvious advantage of increasing resolution is capability of resolving the fine structures of topography and atmospheric flow. By increasing resolution from T39 (about 320 km horizontal grid interval) to T79 (160 km), to T159 (80 km) to T319 (40 km), topographic precipitation over Japan becomes increasingly realistic. This feature is necessary for climate and weather studies involving both global and local aspects. In order to resolve submesoscale (about 100 km horizontal scale) atmospheric circulation, about 10-km grid interval is necessary. Comparing T1279 (10 km) simulations with T319 ones, it is found that, for example, the intensity of heavy rain associated with Baiu front and the central pressure of typhoon become more realistic. These realistic submesoscale phenomena should have impact on larger-sale flow through dynamics and thermodynamics. An interesting finding by increasing horizontal resolution of a conventional AGCM is that some cumulus convection parameterizations, such as Arakawa-Schubert type scheme, gradually stop producing precipitation, while some others, such as Emanuel type, do not. With the former, the grid condensation increases with the model resolution to compensate. Which characteristics are more desirable is arguable but it is an important feature one has to consider when developing a high-resolution conventional AGCM. Many may think that conventional primitive equation

  14. Cloud tracking of the Venus atmosphere with Akatsuki: High-quality wind snapshots, jets, and instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horinouchi, T.; Murakami, S.; Satoh, T.; Watanabe, S.; Kouyama, T.; Ogohara, K.; Imamura, T.; Takagi, M.; Kashimura, H.; Peralta, J.; Limaye, S. S.; Sato, T. M.; Nakamura, M.; Yamada, M.; Yamazaki, A.; Young, E. F.

    2017-09-01

    We have conducted cloud tracking using image data from Akatsuki, a Venus orbiting satellite, at multiple wavelengths. Our method provides cloud-motion vectors with unprecedented high quality. Obtained cloud top winds exhibit rich spatial and temporal variability. In the lower cloud layer, it is observed that a jet stream was formed in the equatorial region in 2016, which persisted at least over a few months. Occasionally, batropically unstable vortices are found to develop to erode the shear associated with the jet.

  15. Planetary science: Haze cools Pluto's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Robert A.

    2017-11-01

    Modelling suggests that Pluto's atmospheric temperature is regulated by haze, unlike the other planetary bodies in the Solar System. The finding has implications for our understanding of exoplanetary atmospheres. See Letter p.352

  16. Snow carrots after the Chelyabinsk event and model implications for highly porous solar system objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luther, Robert; Artemieva, Natalia; Ivanova, Marina; Lorenz, Cyril; Wünnemann, Kai

    2017-05-01

    After the catastrophic disruption of the Chelyabinsk meteoroid, small fragments formed funnels in the snow layer covering the ground. We constrain the pre-impact characteristics of the fragments by simulating their atmospheric descent with the atmospheric entry model. Fragments resulting from catastrophic breakup may lose about 90% of their initial mass due to ablation and reach the snow vertically with a free-fall velocity in the range of 30-90 m s-1. The fall time of the fragments is much longer than their cooling time, and, as a consequence, fragments have the same temperature as the lower atmosphere, i.e., of about -20 °C. Then, we use the shock physics code iSALE to model the penetration of fragments into fluffy snow, the formation of a funnel and a zone of denser snow lining its walls. We examine the influence of several material parameters of snow and present our best-fit model by comparing funnel depth and funnel wall characteristics with observations. In addition, we suggest a viscous flow approximation to estimate funnel depth dependence on the meteorite mass. We discuss temperature gradient metamorphism as a possible mechanism which allows to fill the funnels with denser snow and to form the observed "snow carrots." This natural experiment also helps us to calibrate the iSALE code for simulating impacts into highly porous matter in the solar system including tracks in the aerogel catchers of the Stardust mission and possible impact craters on the 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko comet observed recently by the Rosetta mission.

  17. AIR ATMOSPHERIC-PRESSURE DISCHARGERS FOR OPERATION IN HIGH-FREQUENCY SWITCHING MODE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.S. Yevdoshenko

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Operation of two designs of compact multigap dischargers has been investigated in a high-frequency switching mode. It is experimentally revealed that the rational length of single discharge gaps in the designs is 0.3 mm, and the maximum switching frequency is 27000 discharges per second under long-term stable operation of the dischargers. It is shown that in pulsed corona discharge reactors, the pulse front sharpening results in increasing the operating electric field strength by 1.3 – 1.8 times.

  18. High Energy Radical Chemistry Formation of HCN- rich Atmospheres on early Earth

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ferus, Martin; Kubelík, Petr; Knížek, Antonín; Pastorek, Adam; Sutherland, J.D.; Civiš, Svatopluk

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 1 (2017), č. článku 6275. ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-05076S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015083; GA MŠk LG15013 Grant - others:Akademie věd - GA AV ČR(CZ) R200401521 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : high-power laser * transform emission-spectroscopy * induced dielectric-breakdown * prebiotic organic-synthesis * nucleobase formation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 4.259, year: 2016

  19. Rockfall hazard in high mountain areas increased by the current atmospheric warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravanel, Ludovic; Deline, Philip

    2013-04-01

    The study of rockfall (volume > 100 m3) in high mountains is essential to understand landscape evolution and to evaluate natural hazard. The number of rockfalls seems actually to rise in the European Alps, while vulnerability is increasing from high elevation areas (e.g. cable cars, huts) to valley floors (e.g. urbanization, transport). Recent rockfalls from high-Alpine steep rockwalls are hypothesized to be a consequence of the climate change through the warming of the permafrost. Given the lack of systematic data on rockfall, this relationship has however remained difficult to assess despite few evidences including laboratory tests and temperature measurements indicating permafrost degradation, while the increase of rockfall frequency and magnitude remained conjectural. Here we analyse several inventories of rockfalls acquired in the Mont Blanc massif (France and Italy) by innovative methods in order to characterize the rockfall triggering conditions and to emphasize the role of permafrost: (i) In two sectors of the massif (Drus and Aiguilles de Chamonix), a comparison of photographs from the end of the Little Ice Age to 2011, combined with field geomorphological data, allowed the identification of more than 50 rockfalls during this period, ranging in volume from 500 to 265,000 m3. (ii) A network of local observers (guides, hut keepers, mountaineers) allowed the documentation of all rockfalls occurred in 2007 (n = 45), 2008 (22), 2009 (72), 2010 (47) and 2011 (65) in the central part of the Mont Blanc massif, ranging in volume from 100 to 43,000 m3. Furthermore, 182 rockfalls were identified at the end of the 2003 Summer heatwave through the analysis of a satellite image of the whole massif. A strong correlation between the rockfall occurrences and the hottest periods at the time scales of the century and the year strengthens the hypothesis of the relationship between permafrost degradation and rockfall at high elevation. Moreover, (i) modelling suggests the

  20. Thermal and force loads on the vehicle surface in high-velocity motion in the earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnavskii, G. A.

    2008-03-01

    Consideration has been given to a number of aspects of mathematical modeling of a high-velocity flight in the earth’s atmosphere in a wide range of variation of the determining parameters. Super-and hypersonic gas flow past flying vehicles has been investigated based on computer-aided calculations with allowance for its actual properties. Data on the distribution of gasdynamic parameters in the flow field, including thermal and force loads on the surface, have been obtained and analyzed. The issues of applying today’s information technologies to archiving scientific knowledge obtained in electronic databases of a specialized Internet center and their dissemination via the Global Network have been discussed.

  1. Science requirements and feasibility/design studies of a very-high-altitude aircraft for atmospheric research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Philip B.; Lux, David P.; Reed, R. Dale; Loewenstein, Max; Wegener, Steven

    1991-01-01

    The advantages and shortcomings of currently available aircraft for use in very high altitude missions to study such problems as polar ozone or stratosphere-troposphere exchange pose the question of whether to develop advanced aircraft for atmospheric research. To answer this question, NASA conducted a workshop to determine science needs and feasibility/design studies to assess whether and how those needs could be met. It was determined that there was a need for an aircraft that could cruise at an altitude of 30 km with a range of 6,000 miles with vertical profiling down to 10 km and back at remote points and carry a payload of 3,000 lbs.

  2. Session 6: Stability and performance of metal oxide catalysts during oxidation of ammonia in steam atmosphere at high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armbruster, U.; Martin, A.; Radnik, J.; Schneider, M. [Institut fur Angewandte Chemie Berlin-Adlershof e.V., Berlin (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this work was to test supported and bulk transition metal oxide catalysts for end of pipe-oxidation of ammonia at high pressure in saturated steam. Reaction engineering aspects are also discussed. In fact, the experimental results show that bulk copper chromites are best performing catalysts for ammonia destruction at temperatures around 300 C and pressures at ca. 50 bar in steam atmosphere. No leaching occurred under the applied conditions, however, influence of phase behaviour of water is crucial to catalyst lifetime. Ammonia is exclusively converted to nitrogen. Only a slight loss in activity was observed in long-term tests that is mainly due to small decrease in active surface area. (authors)

  3. Outcomes and challenges of global high-resolution non-hydrostatic atmospheric simulations using the K computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Masaki; Tomita, Hirofumi; Yashiro, Hisashi; Kajikawa, Yoshiyuki; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Yamaura, Tsuyoshi; Miyakawa, Tomoki; Nakano, Masuo; Kodama, Chihiro; Noda, Akira T.; Nasuno, Tomoe; Yamada, Yohei; Fukutomi, Yoshiki

    2017-12-01

    This article reviews the major outcomes of a 5-year (2011-2016) project using the K computer to perform global numerical atmospheric simulations based on the non-hydrostatic icosahedral atmospheric model (NICAM). The K computer was made available to the public in September 2012 and was used as a primary resource for Japan's Strategic Programs for Innovative Research (SPIRE), an initiative to investigate five strategic research areas; the NICAM project fell under the research area of climate and weather simulation sciences. Combining NICAM with high-performance computing has created new opportunities in three areas of research: (1) higher resolution global simulations that produce more realistic representations of convective systems, (2) multi-member ensemble simulations that are able to perform extended-range forecasts 10-30 days in advance, and (3) multi-decadal simulations for climatology and variability. Before the K computer era, NICAM was used to demonstrate realistic simulations of intra-seasonal oscillations including the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO), merely as a case study approach. Thanks to the big leap in computational performance of the K computer, we could greatly increase the number of cases of MJO events for numerical simulations, in addition to integrating time and horizontal resolution. We conclude that the high-resolution global non-hydrostatic model, as used in this five-year project, improves the ability to forecast intra-seasonal oscillations and associated tropical cyclogenesis compared with that of the relatively coarser operational models currently in use. The impacts of the sub-kilometer resolution simulation and the multi-decadal simulations using NICAM are also reviewed.

  4. A sub-atmospheric chemical vapor deposition process for deposition of oxide liner in high aspect ratio through silicon vias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisker, Marco; Marschmeyer, Steffen; Kaynak, Mehmet; Tekin, Ibrahim

    2011-09-01

    The formation of a Through Silicon Via (TSV) includes a deep Si trench etching and the formation of an insulating layer along the high-aspect-ratio trench and the filling of a conductive material into the via hole. The isolation of the filling conductor from the silicon substrate becomes more important for higher frequencies due to the high coupling of the signal to the silicon. The importance of the oxide thickness on the via wall isolation can be verified using electromagnetic field simulators. To satisfy the needs on the Silicon dioxide deposition, a sub-atmospheric chemical vapor deposition (SA-CVD) process has been developed to deposit an isolation oxide to the walls of deep silicon trenches. The technique provides excellent step coverage of the 100 microm depth silicon trenches with the high aspect ratio of 20 and more. The developed technique allows covering the deep silicon trenches by oxide and makes the high isolation of TSVs from silicon substrate feasible which is the key factor for the performance of TSVs for mm-wave 3D packaging.

  5. Multiple production, transport in atmosphere and detection of high energy cosmic rays

    CERN Document Server

    Capdevielle, J N; Le Gall, C; Kurp, I; Szabelska, B; Szabelski, J

    2002-01-01

    We describe the general aspects of Monte Carlo collision generators suitable for cosmic ray nucleon-air and nuclei-air interactions, including accelerator and collider data. The problem of the extrapolation at 3 energy decades above the LHC of the main features of high energy collisions is discussed and under theoretical and phenomenological assumptions, the properties of the longitudinal and lateral development of giant extensive air showers simulated with the CORSIKA program are presented. The determination of the primary energy near 10/sup 20/ eV is examined for different observables, total size, densities of charged particles interpolated at 600 m from shower core. The extensive air shower data collected around LHC energy is in better agreement with models of large multiplicities. Beyond this energy, the extrapolation carried assuming the diquark breaking mechanism can change the classic conversion to primary energy and such circumstance can have consequences on the validity of the GZK cut off. In those c...

  6. High-resolution climate projections for the islands of Lombok and Sumbawa, Nusa Tenggara Barat Province, Indonesia: Challenges and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L. McGregor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The regional climate of Nusa Tenggara Barat (NTB Province, eastern Indonesia is simulated for 130 years (1971–2100 for the SRES A2 Delayed Development or ‘Business as Usual’ emissions scenario using the CSIRO conformal-cubic atmospheric model (CCAM. Regional climate simulations are generated using a multiple downscaling technique where a CCAM 200 km uniform-grid global simulation is driven by bias-corrected sea surface temperatures (SSTs from host coupled Global Climate Models (GCMs. Next, the 200 km resolution CCAM simulations are dynamically downscaled to 14 km resolution for the islands of Lombok and Sumbawa. To provide an ensemble of results, separate simulations are performed from six host GCMs. The present-day model results are validated against available observations. Generally, the CCAM 14 km resolution simulations produce rainfall, maximum and minimum temperatures that are similar to the observations. However, the 14 km simulations have rainfall biases of around 5 mm/day in the wet December–February season and lesser biases in the other seasons. Climate projections are examined for two future time intervals centred on 2030 and 2060. The simulations of rainfall changes by 2060 suggest both increases and decreases of up to 5% in December–February, with more acute declines of 10% in some areas, and decreases of up to 10% in March–May. For the other seasons, generally little change is simulated. The regional temperatures are projected to increase by about 1 °C by 2030 and 1.6–2 °C by 2060. The high-resolution model outputs enable detailed differentiation between locations across the islands. Our results show that due to orographic effects there are steep climate gradients, resulting in significant local differences in climate projections. We discuss the challenges and implications of these results for adaptation planning.

  7. The formation of free radical intermediates in the reactions of gaseous NO 2 with solid NaCl and NaBr—Atmospheric and toxicological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, J. K. S.; Pitts, J. N.; Beichert, P.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    The reaction of gaseous NO 2 with alkali halides is of significant interest for its potential to occur in polluted marine atmospheres ((Finlayson-Pitts, 1993), Res. Chem. Int.19, 235-249). We report here a new paramagnetic signal in NaBr and NaCl formed upon reaction with gaseous NO 2 and assigned to a radical anion intermediate of the type [X… NO 2] - where X = Br, Cl. This is a new type of V k center (Castner and Känzig, 1957, J. Phys. Chem. Solids3, 178-195; Fowler, 1968; Seidel, 1969, in Magnetic Resonance and Radiofrequency Spectroscopy (edited by Averbuch P.), North Holland, Amsterdam, pp. 141-156), which is remarkably stable. Indeed, with NaCl it can be observed for several days following the reaction after handling the sample in room light and ambient air. This intermediate may be responsible at least in part for synergistic effects observed in the deep lung in rats exposed simultaneously to gaseous NO 2 and NaCl aerosol (Last and Warren, 1987, Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol.90, 34-42). While the gaseous product ClNO was suggested earlier as the causative agent (Last and Warren, 1987, Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol.90, 34-42), it is highly reactive with liquid water and will be removed largely in the upper respiratory tract, while small particles are able to penetrate into the deep lung. Given the ubiquitous occurrence (Finlayson-Pitts and Pitts, 1986, Atmospheric Chemistry: Fundamentals and Experimental Techniques, Wiley, New York), of NO 2 and airborne salt particles, which occur not only in marine areas but also significant distances inland (Shaw, 1991, J. geophys. Res.96, 22,369-22,372) as well as in the plumes from oil well burning (Lowenthal et al., 1993, Geophys. Res. Lett.20, 691-693; Stevens et al., 1993, Wat. Sci. Technol.27, 223-233; Sheridan et al., 1992, Geophys. Res. Lett.19, 389-392; Parungo et al., 1992, J. geophys. Res. 97, 15,867-15,882; Cahill et al., 1992, J. geophys. Res.97, 14,513-14,520) this radical anion could provide a vehicle for delivery

  8. High-Resolution Atmospheric Emission Inventory of the Argentine Enery Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puliafito, Salvador Enrique; Castesana, Paula; Allende, David; Ruggeri, Florencia; Pinto, Sebastián; Pascual, Romina; Bolaño Ortiz, Tomás; Fernandez, Rafael Pedro

    2017-04-01

    This study presents a high-resolution spatially disaggregated inventory (2.5 km x 2.5 km), updated to 2014, of the main emissions from energy activities in Argentina. This inventory was created with the purpose of improving air quality regional models. The sub-sectors considered are public electricity and heat production, cement production, domestic aviation, road and rail transportation, inland navigation, residential and commercial, and fugitive emissions from refineries and fuel expenditure. The pollutants considered include greenhouse gases and ozone precursors: CO2, CH4, NOx, N2O VOC; and other gases specifically related to air quality including PM10, PM2.5, SOx, Pb and POPs. The uncertainty analysis of the inventories resulted in a variability of 3% for public electricity generation, 3-6% in the residential, commercial sector, 6-12% terrestrial transportation sector, 10-20% in oil refining and cement production according to the considered pollutant. Aviation and maritime navigation resulted in a higher variability reaching more than 60%. A comparison with the international emission inventory EDGAR shows disagreements in the spatial distribution of emissions, probably due to the finer resolution of the map presented here, particularly as a result of the use of new spatially disaggregated data of higher resolution that is currently available.

  9. Time evolution of atmospheric particle number concentration during high-intensity pyrotechnic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Javier; Yubero, Eduardo; Nicolás, Jose F.; Caballero, Sandra; Galindo, Nuria

    2014-10-01

    The Mascletàs are high-intensity pyrotechnic events, typical of eastern Spanish festivals, in which thousands of firecrackers are burnt at ground level in an intense, short-time (<8 min) deafening spectacle that generates short-lived, thick aerosol clouds. In this study, the impact of such events on air quality has been evaluated by means of particle number concentration measurements performed close to the venue during the June festival in Alicante (southeastern Spain). Peak concentrations and dilution times observed throughout the Mascletàs have been compared to those measured when conventional aerial fireworks were launched 2 km away from the monitoring site. The impact of the Mascletàs on the total number concentration of particles larger than 0.3 μm was higher (maximum ∼2·104 cm-3) than that of fireworks (maximum ∼2·103 cm-3). The effect of fireworks depended on whether the dominant meteorological conditions favoured the transport of the plume to the measurement location. However, the time required for particle concentrations to return to background levels is longer and more variable for firework displays (minutes to hours) than for the Mascletàs (<25 min).

  10. Mountain birch – potentially large source of sesquiterpenes into high latitude atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Arneth

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs from mountain birches were measured in Abisko, northern Sweden. Mountain birches make up the majority of the tree biomass in Scandinavian high latitudes, a region subject to significant climate warming. The measurements were carried out in two growing seasons. The emissions of four branches, each from a different individual tree, were measured in June–August 2006 and one of them again in July 2007. The measurements were conducted using a dynamic flow through chamber covered with Teflon film. The studied mountain birches were found to emit substantial amounts of linalool, monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. The monoterpene emission was dominated by sabinene. The magnitude and composition of the sesquiterpene emission changed dramatically between the years. For example, the average α-farnesene emission potential in 2006 was almost 2600 ng gdw−1 h−1 (3.5 pmol gdw−1 s−1 while in 2007 α-farnesene was not detected at all. Also the emissions of other sesquiterpenes decreased in 2007 to a fraction of that in 2006. One possible explanation for the change in emissions is the herbivory damage that occurred in the area in 2004. Herbivory is known to enhance the emissions of sesquiterpenes, especially those of α-farnesene, and the effect may last for several years.

  11. Microphysics and heterogeneous chemistry in aircraft plumes - high sensitivity on local meteorology and atmospheric composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Meilinger

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available An aircraft plume model has been developed on the basis of two coupled trajectory box models. Two boxes, one for plume and one for background conditions, are coupled by means of a mixing parameterization based on turbulence theory. The model considers comprehensive gas phase chemistry for the tropopause region including acetone, ethane and their oxidation products. Heterogeneous halogen, N2O5 and HOx chemistry on various types of background and aircraft-induced aerosols (liquid and ice is considered, using state-of-the-art solubility dependent uptake coefficients for liquid phase reactions. The microphysical scheme allows for coagulation, gas-diffusive particle growth and evaporation, so that the particle development from 1s after emission to several days can be simulated. Model results are shown, studying emissions into the upper troposphere as well as into the lowermost stratosphere for contrail and non-contrail conditions. We show the microphysical and chemical evolution of spreading plumes and use the concept of mean plume encounter time, tl, to define effective emission and perturbation indices (EEIs and EPIs for the North Atlantic Flight Corridor (NAFC showing EEI(NOy and EPI(O3 for various background conditions, such as relative humidity, local time of emission, and seasonal variations. Our results show a high sensitivity of EEI and EPIs on the exact conditions under which emissions take place. The difference of EEIs with and without considering plume processes indicates that these processes cannot be neglected.

  12. pH of Aerosols in a Polluted Atmosphere: Source Contributions to Highly Acidic Aerosol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guoliang; Xu, Jiao; Peng, Xing; Xiao, Zhimei; Chen, Kui; Tian, Yingze; Guan, Xinbei; Feng, Yinchang; Yu, Haofei; Nenes, Athanasios; Russell, Armistead G

    2017-04-18

    Acidity (pH) plays a key role in the physical and chemical behavior of PM2.5. However, understanding of how specific PM sources impact aerosol pH is rarely considered. Performing source apportionment of PM2.5 allows a unique link of sources pH of aerosol from the polluted city. Hourly water-soluble (WS) ions of PM2.5 were measured online from December 25th, 2014 to June 19th, 2015 in a northern city in China. Five sources were resolved including secondary nitrate (41%), secondary sulfate (26%), coal combustion (14%), mineral dust (11%), and vehicle exhaust (9%). The influence of source contributions to pH was estimated by ISORROPIA-II. The lowest aerosol pH levels were found at low WS-ion levels and then increased with increasing total ion levels, until high ion levels occur, at which point the aerosol becomes more acidic as both sulfate and nitrate increase. Ammonium levels increased nearly linearly with sulfate and nitrate until approximately 20 μg m-3, supporting that the ammonium in the aerosol was more limited by thermodynamics than source limitations, and aerosol pH responded more to the contributions of sources such as dust than levels of sulfate. Commonly used pH indicator ratios were not indicative of the pH estimated using the thermodynamic model.

  13. Surface drag effects on simulated wind fields in high-resolution atmospheric forecast model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Kyo Sun; Lim, Jong Myoung; Ji, Young Yong [Environmental Radioactivity Assessment Team,Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hye Yum [NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton (United States); Hong, Jin Kyu [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    It has been reported that the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model generally shows a substantial over prediction bias at low to moderate wind speeds and winds are too geostrophic (Cheng and Steenburgh 2005), which limits the application of WRF model in the area that requires the accurate surface wind estimation such as wind-energy application, air-quality studies, and radioactive-pollutants dispersion studies. The surface drag generated by the subgrid-scale orography is represented by introducing a sink term in the momentum equation in their studies. The purpose of our study is to evaluate the simulated meteorological fields in the high-resolution WRF framework, that includes the parameterization of subgrid-scale orography developed by Mass and Ovens (2010), and enhance the forecast skill of low-level wind fields, which plays an important role in transport and dispersion of air pollutants including radioactive pollutants. The positive bias in 10-m wind speed is significantly alleviated by implementing the subgrid-scale orography parameterization, while other meteorological fields including 10-m wind direction are not changed. Increased variance of subgrid- scale orography enhances the sink of momentum and further reduces the bias in 10-m wind speed.

  14. High-performance liquid chromatographic determination of biogenic amines in fish implicated in food poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, D F; Chang, S H; Shiua, C Y; Chai, T

    1997-05-23

    A rapid, sensitive and reproducible high-performance liquid chromatographic procedure for the determination of nine biogenic amines in fish by improved benzoylation with benzoyl chloride was developed. The benzoylation of amines with benzoyl chloride at 30 degrees C for 40 min was the optimal condition to eliminate the influence of interfering peaks during analysis. The calibration curve for each amine was linear within the range of 0.02-4 microg. The amine recovery from fish meat was better by extraction with 6% trichloroacetic acid than with 1 M HClO4. The application of this method to detect amines in a fried marlin fillet implicated in a food poisoning incident indicated that a high level (84.1 mg/100 g) of histamine was present in the sample.

  15. TEACHERS’ UNDERSTANDING OF LEARNER AUTONOMY IN INDONESIAN CONTEXTS: FINDINGS FROM HIGH SCHOOLS AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Agustina

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Learner autonomy has become one of the main topics in the current research and conferences in Indonesia. This suggests that learner autonomy has received more attention in Indonesian contexts. However, there has been no space for discussions about the meaning of learner autonomy from high school teachers’ points of view. A multi-case study conducted by Agustina (2017 has found diverse understanding of autonomy as reported by Junior High School English teachers in Magelang Regency, Central Java, Indonesia. This paper discusses those teachers’ understanding in a more detailed way along with the implications when the concept is understood differently. This paper supports Agustina’s argument that the diversity in understanding and developing autonomy should be anticipated since teachers have different beliefs about autonomy. Referring to Agustina’s findings this paper proposes the need to consider the consequences of allowing the presence of various understanding of learner autonomy particularly when it is set as an educational goal.

  16. A global coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model and 1 × 1 km CO2 surface flux dataset for high-resolution atmospheric CO2 transport simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Toumi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We designed a method to simulate atmospheric CO2 concentrations at several continuous observation sites around the globe using surface fluxes at a very high spatial resolution. The simulations presented in this study were performed using the Global Eulerian-Lagrangian Coupled Atmospheric model (GELCA, comprising a Lagrangian particle dispersion model coupled to a global atmospheric tracer transport model with prescribed global surface CO2 flux maps at a 1 × 1 km resolution. The surface fluxes used in the simulations were prepared by assembling the individual components of terrestrial, oceanic and fossil fuel CO2 fluxes. This experimental setup (i.e. a transport model running at a medium resolution, coupled to a high-resolution Lagrangian particle dispersion model together with global surface fluxes at a very high resolution, which was designed to represent high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentration, has not been reported at a global scale previously. Two sensitivity experiments were performed: (a using the global transport model without coupling to the Lagrangian dispersion model, and (b using the coupled model with a reduced resolution of surface fluxes, in order to evaluate the performance of Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and the role of high-resolution fluxes in simulating high-frequency variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. A correlation analysis between observed and simulated atmospheric CO2 concentrations at selected locations revealed that the inclusion of both Eulerian-Lagrangian coupling and high-resolution fluxes improves the high-frequency simulations of the model. The results highlight the potential of a coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian model in simulating high-frequency atmospheric CO2 concentrations at many locations worldwide. The model performs well in representing observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at high spatial and temporal resolutions, especially for coastal sites and sites located close to

  17. Composition Changes After the "Halloween" Solar Proton Event: The High-Energy Particle Precipitation in the Atmosphere (HEPPA) Model Versus MIPAS Data Intercomparison Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, B.; Baumgaertner, A.; Calisto, M.; Egorova, T.; Jackman, C. H.; Kieser, J.; Krivolutsky, A.; Lopez-Puertas, M.; Marsh. D. R.; Reddmann, T.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We have compared composition changes of NO, NO2, H2O2,O3, N2O, HNO3 , N2O5, HNO4, ClO, HOCl, and ClONO2 as observed by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS) on Envisat in the aftermath of the "Halloween" solar proton event (SPE) in October/November 2003 at 25-0.01 hPa in the Northern hemisphere (40-90 N) and simulations performed by the following atmospheric models: the Bremen 2D model (B2dM) and Bremen 3D Chemical Transport Model (B3dCTM), the Central Aerological Observatory (CAO) model, FinROSE, the Hamburg Model of the Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere (HAMMONIA), the Karlsruhe Simulation Model of the Middle Atmosphere (KASIMA), the ECHAM5/MESSY Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) model, the modeling tool for SO1ar Climate Ozone Links studies (SOCOL and SOCOLi), and the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM4). The large number of participating models allowed for an evaluation of the overall ability of atmospheric models to reproduce observed atmospheric perturbations generated by SPEs, particularly with respect to NOS, and ozone changes. We have further assessed the meteorological conditions and their implications on the chemical response to the SPE in both the models and observations by comparing temperature and tracer (CH4 and CO) fields. Simulated SPE-induced ozone losses agree on average within 5% with the observations. Simulated NO(y) enhancements around 1 hPa, however, are typically 30% higher than indicated by the observations which can be partly attributed to an overestimation of simulated electron-induced ionization. The analysis of the observed and modeled NO(y) partitioning in the aftermath of the SPE has demonstrated the need to implement additional ion chemistry (HNO3 formation via ion-ion recombination and water cluster ions) into the chemical schemes. An overestimation of observed H2O2 enhancements by all models hints at an underestimation of the OH/HO2 ratio in the upper polar stratosphere during the SPE. The

  18. Asphalt Volcanism as a Model to Understand the Geochemical Nature of Pitch Lake, a Planetary Analog for Titan and the Implications towards Methane Flux into Earth's Atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A.

    2016-12-01

    Pitch Lake is located in the southwest peninsula of the island near La Brea in Trinidad and Tobago, covering an area of approximately 46 hectares. It was discovered in the year 1595 and is the largest of three natural asphalt lakes that exist on Earth. Pitch Lake is a large oval shaped reservoir composed of dominantly hydrocarbon compounds, but also includes minor amounts of clay and muddy water. It is a natural liquid asphalt desert, which is nourished by a form of petroleum consisting of mostly asphaltines from the surrounding oil-rich region. The hydrocarbons mix with mud and gases under high pressure during upward seepage, and the lighter portion evaporates or is volatilized, which produces a high-viscosity liquid asphalt residue. The residue on and near the surface is a hydrocarbon matrix, which poses extremely challenging environmental conditions to microorganisms characterized by an average low water activity in the range of 0.49 to 0.75, recalcitrant carbon substrates, and toxic chemical compounds. Nevertheless, an active microbial community of archaea and bacteria, many of them novel strains, was found to inhabit the liquid hydrocarbon matrix of Pitch Lake. Geochemical analyses of minerals, done by our team, which revealed sulfates, sulfides, silicates, and metals, normally associated with deep-water hydrothermal vents leads to our new hypothetical model to describe the origins of Pitch Lake and its importance to atmospheric and earth sciences. Pitch Lake is likely the terrestrial equivalent of an offshore submarine asphalt volcano just as La Brea Tar Pits are in some ways an on-land version of the asphalt volcanoes discovered off shore of Santa Barbara by Valentine et al. in 2010. Asphalt volcanism possibly also creates the habitat for chemosynthetic life that is widespread in this lake, as reported by Schulze-Makuch et al. in 2011 and Meckenstock et al. in 2014.

  19. Design and construction of prototype transversely excited atmospheric (TEA nitrogen laser energized by a high voltage electrical discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhtar Hussain

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports design and construction, of a prototype of Transversely Excited Atmospheric (TEA nitrogen laser, and a high voltage power supply to excite N2 gas in air, while air is used as an active lasing medium. A Blumlein line discharge circuit is used for operation of this laser. The high voltage is generated by a fly back transformer based power supply varying from 10 kV to 20 kV. The wavelength (337.1 nm of TEA nitrogen laser is measured employing a standard commercial spectrometer and the laser output energy of 300 μJ is measured from the constructed system. Different parameters such as beam profile, laser output spectrum, laser efficiency, and variation of E/P (Electrical field/Pressure value with respect to input voltage and electrodes separations are studied in order to optimize the overall operational efficiency of present nitrogen laser. The analysis of the high voltage prototype appeared in this designed source has also been made and described in this paper.

  20. High resolution meteorological modelling of the Inntal valley atmosphere, Part II: applications to dispersion modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, D.; Schicker, I.; Seibert, P.

    2009-09-01

    Orography and local meteorology play a major role in Alpine valleys, as they are linked with valley and slope wind systems, stagnation and recirculation, temperature inversions and turbulence. Thus, they have a strong influence of transport and dilution of pollutants in the valley, affecting human health, and sound propagation. Shallow stable layers at the valley floor and low wind speed conditions, especially in autumn and winter, trap pollutants and thus cause unfavourable dispersion conditions , possibly leading to exceedances of air pollution limits. Moreover, under certain synoptic conditions such as persistent high-pressure systems inversion conditions prevail for days. Emissions may accumulate in the valley from day to day and thus critical levels of pollutants may be reached. With the current computer capabilities, numerical meteorological models and particle dispersion models are powerful tools to investigate such situations and their impact on emission-side measures. Output from the limited area meteorological model MM5 for selected synoptic periods of special interest regarding air quality conditions (see contribution by Schicker et al., this session) will be used as input to the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPARTv6.2. Currently two specific versions of FLEXPART exist to work in the meso and local scale, WRF-FLEXPARTv6.2 and MM5v3-7.FLEXPARTv6.2, which use WRF and MM5 fields as meteorological input, respectively. Extensive tests will be performed with the MM5-driven version and additional preliminary ones with the WRF version. Dispersion calculations for CO and NOx will be performed in a receptor-oriented approach for three stations and with different meteorological input resolutions. The target stations will be Innsbruck, located at the bottom of the Inn valley, and Nordkette, located on the northern slopes of the valley. Source-receptor sensitivities (SRS) will be obtained to see the major sources which contribute to the measurements for

  1. Atmospheric characterization of Proxima b by coupling the SPHERE high-contrast imager to the ESPRESSO spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovis, C.; Snellen, I.; Mouillet, D.; Pepe, F.; Wildi, F.; Astudillo-Defru, N.; Beuzit, J.-L.; Bonfils, X.; Cheetham, A.; Conod, U.; Delfosse, X.; Ehrenreich, D.; Figueira, P.; Forveille, T.; Martins, J. H. C.; Quanz, S. P.; Santos, N. C.; Schmid, H.-M.; Ségransan, D.; Udry, S.

    2017-03-01

    Context. The temperate Earth-mass planet Proxima b is the closest exoplanet to Earth and represents what may be our best ever opportunity to search for life outside the Solar System. Aims: We aim at directly detecting Proxima b and characterizing its atmosphere by spatially resolving the planet and obtaining high-resolution reflected-light spectra. Methods: We propose to develop a coupling interface between the SPHERE high-contrast imager and the new ESPRESSO spectrograph, both installed at ESO VLT. The angular separation of 37 mas between Proxima b and its host star requires the use of visible wavelengths to spatially resolve the planet on a 8.2-m telescope. At an estimated planet-to-star contrast of 10-7 in reflected light, Proxima b is extremely challenging to detect with SPHERE alone. However, the combination of a 103-104 contrast enhancement from SPHERE to the high spectral resolution of ESPRESSO can reveal the planetary spectral features and disentangle them from the stellar ones. Results: We find that significant but realistic upgrades to SPHERE and ESPRESSO would enable a 5σ detection of the planet and yield a measurement of its true mass and albedo in 20-40 nights of telescope time, assuming an Earth-like atmospheric composition. Moreover, it will be possible to probe the O2 bands at 627, 686 and 760 nm, the water vapour band at 717 nm, and the methane band at 715 nm. In particular, a 3.6σ detection of O2 could be made in about 60 nights of telescope time. Those would need to be spread over three years considering optimal observability conditions for the planet. Conclusions: The very existence of Proxima b and the SPHERE-ESPRESSO synergy represent a unique opportunity to detect biosignatures on an exoplanet in the near future. It is also a crucial pathfinder experiment for the development of extremely large telescopes and their instruments, in particular the E-ELT and its high-resolution visible and near-IR spectrograph.

  2. Characterization of Xe-133 global atmospheric background: Implications for the International Monitoring System of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achim, Pascal; Generoso, Sylvia; Morin, Mireille; Gross, Philippe; Le Petit, Gilbert; Moulin, Christophe

    2016-05-01

    Monitoring atmospheric concentrations of radioxenons is relevant to provide evidence of atmospheric or underground nuclear weapon tests. However, when the design of the International Monitoring Network (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) was set up, the impact of industrial releases was not perceived. It is now well known that industrial radioxenon signature can interfere with that of nuclear tests. Therefore, there is a crucial need to characterize atmospheric distributions of radioxenons from industrial sources—the so-called atmospheric background—in the frame of the CTBT. Two years of Xe-133 atmospheric background have been simulated using 2013 and 2014 meteorological data together with the most comprehensive emission inventory of radiopharmaceutical facilities and nuclear power plants to date. Annual average simulated activity concentrations vary from 0.01 mBq/m3 up to above 5 mBq/m3 nearby major sources. Average measured and simulated concentrations agree on most of the IMS stations, which indicates that the main sources during the time frame are properly captured. Xe-133 atmospheric background simulated at IMS stations turn out to be a complex combination of sources. Stations most impacted are in Europe and North America and can potentially detect Xe-133 every day. Predicted occurrences of detections of atmospheric Xe-133 show seasonal variations, more accentuated in the Northern Hemisphere, where the maximum occurs in winter. To our knowledge, this study presents the first global maps of Xe-133 atmospheric background from industrial sources based on two years of simulation and is a first attempt to analyze its composition in terms of origin at IMS stations.

  3. Atmospheric Habitable Zones in Y Dwarf Atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yates, Jack S.; Palmer, Paul I. [School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Biller, Beth; Cockell, Charles S., E-mail: j.s.yates@ed.ac.uk [Centre for Exoplanet Science, University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2017-02-20

    We use a simple organism lifecycle model to explore the viability of an atmospheric habitable zone (AHZ), with temperatures that could support Earth-centric life, which sits above an environment that does not support life. To illustrate our model, we use a cool Y dwarf atmosphere, such as WISE J085510.83–0714442.5, whose 4.5–5.2 μ m spectrum shows absorption features consistent with water vapor and clouds. We allow organisms to adapt to their atmospheric environment (described by temperature, convection, and gravity) by adopting different growth strategies that maximize their chance of survival and proliferation. We assume a constant upward vertical velocity through the AHZ. We found that the organism growth strategy is most sensitive to the magnitude of the atmospheric convection. Stronger convection supports the evolution of more massive organisms. For a purely radiative environment, we find that evolved organisms have a mass that is an order of magnitude smaller than terrestrial microbes, thereby defining a dynamical constraint on the dimensions of life that an AHZ can support. Based on a previously defined statistical approach, we infer that there are of the order of 10{sup 9} cool Y brown dwarfs in the Milky Way, and likely a few tens of these objects are within 10 pc from Earth. Our work also has implications for exploring life in the atmospheres of temperate gas giants. Consideration of the habitable volumes in planetary atmospheres significantly increases the volume of habitable space in the galaxy.

  4. An influence of extreme southern hemisphere cold surges on the North Atlantic Subtropical High through a shallow atmospheric circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowerman, A. R.; Fu, R.; Yin, L.; Fernando, D. N.; Arias, P. A.; Dickinson, R. E.

    2017-10-01

    Previous studies have attributed interhemisphere influences of the atmosphere to the latitudinal propagation of planetary waves crossing the equator, to the triggering of equatorial Kelvin waves, or to monsoonal circulation. Over the American-Atlantic sector, such cross-equatorial influences rarely occur during boreal summer due to unfavorable atmospheric conditions. We have observed that an alternative mechanism provides an interhemisphere influence. When episodes of extreme cold surges and upper tropospheric westerly winds occur concurrently over southern hemisphere Amazonia, cold surges from extratropical South America can penetrate deep into southern Amazonia. Although they do not appear to influence upper tropospheric circulation of the northern hemisphere, extremely strong southerly cross-equatorial advection (>2σ standard deviations, or 2) of cold and dense air in the lower troposphere can reach as least 10°N. Such cold advection increases the northward cross-equatorial pressure gradient in the lower to middle troposphere, thus shallow northerly return flow below 500 hPa. This return flow and the strong lower tropospheric southerly cross-equatorial flow form an anomalous shallow meridional circulation spanning from southern Amazonia to the subtropical North Atlantic, with increased geopotential height anomalies exceeding +1σ to at least 18°N. It projects onto the southern edge of the North Atlantic Subtropical High (NASH), increasing its pressure and leading to equatorward expansion of NASH's southern boundary. These anomalies enhance the NASH, leading to its equatorward expansion. These extreme cold surges can potentially improving the predictability of weather patterns of the tropical and subtropical Atlantic, including the variability of the NASH's southern edge.

  5. Atmosphere-Ionosphere Coupling via Atmospheric Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koucka Knizova, Petra; Lastovicka, Jan

    2017-04-01

    The Earth atmosphere and ionosphere is complicated and highly variable system which displays oscillations on wide range scales. The most important factor influencing the ionosphere is certainly the solar and geomagnetic activity. However, the processes even in distant regions in the neutral atmosphere cannot be simply neglected. This contribution reviews aspects of ionospheric variability originating in the lower laying atmosphere. It focuses especially on the generation and propagation of the atmospheric waves from their source region up to the heights of the ionosphere. We will show the role of infrasound, gravity waves, tides and planetary waves in the atmosphere-ionosphere coupling. Particularly gravity waves are of high importance for the ionosphere. Recent theoretical and experimental results will briefly be reviewed.

  6. Immersed Boundary Methods for High-Resolution Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow Over Complex Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundquist, K A [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-05-12

    Mesoscale models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are increasingly used for high resolution simulations, particularly in complex terrain, but errors associated with terrain-following coordinates degrade the accuracy of the solution. Use of an alternative Cartesian gridding technique, known as an immersed boundary method (IBM), alleviates coordinate transformation errors and eliminates restrictions on terrain slope which currently limit mesoscale models to slowly varying terrain. In this dissertation, an immersed boundary method is developed for use in numerical weather prediction. Use of the method facilitates explicit resolution of complex terrain, even urban terrain, in the WRF mesoscale model. First, the errors that arise in the WRF model when complex terrain is present are presented. This is accomplished using a scalar advection test case, and comparing the numerical solution to the analytical solution. Results are presented for different orders of advection schemes, grid resolutions and aspect ratios, as well as various degrees of terrain slope. For comparison, results from the same simulation are presented using the IBM. Both two-dimensional and three-dimensional immersed boundary methods are then described, along with details that are specific to the implementation of IBM in the WRF code. Our IBM is capable of imposing both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. Additionally, a method for coupling atmospheric physics parameterizations at the immersed boundary is presented, making IB methods much more functional in the context of numerical weather prediction models. The two-dimensional IB method is verified through comparisons of solutions for gentle terrain slopes when using IBM and terrain-following grids. The canonical case of flow over a Witch of Agnesi hill provides validation of the basic no-slip and zero gradient boundary conditions. Specified diurnal heating in a valley, producing anabatic winds, is used to validate the

  7. Rising susceptibility of freshwater DOC inputs to extreme events? The implications of underlying changes in atmospheric deposition and land-management. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, C.; Monteith, D.; Jones, T.; Burden, A.; Peacock, M.; Gauci, V.; Page, S. E.; Moore, S.

    2013-12-01

    Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) represents a significant loss term within the carbon (C) balance of many terrestrial ecosystems, and a quantitatively important and reactive C input to many freshwater ecosystems. DOC concentrations have risen dramatically, over a period of decades, in rivers and lakes draining semi-natural catchments across large areas of Northern Europe and Northeast North America, with wide-ranging consequences for C cycling, aquatic ecosystem functioning and drinking water treatment. These increases have been variously attributed to climatic changes, including increased incidence of extreme events, as well as land-management factors and changes in atmospheric deposition. A growing body of evidence now indicates that the primary driver of rising DOC has been ecosystem recovery from the historic effects of acid deposition, and thus that observed increases - whilst sometimes economically problematic - may represent a return to pre-industrial baseline conditions. In light of the apparent dominance of acidity change as a driver of recent freshwater DOC increases, we consider whether or not other potential drivers of change, including climatic extremes and management-related disturbances, are likely to exert a significant influence on the transport of DOC from catchments to surface waters. We conclude that the alleviation of acidification pressures has now made catchments in regions formerly impacted by sulphur pollution much more susceptible to extreme events and disturbances. Drawing on monitoring and experimental case studies from the UK, we suggest that DOC export from organic soils may be shifting from ';solubility controlled' to ';supply controlled', and that climatic events leading to enhanced DOC production (e.g. high temperatures or drought-rewet cycles) and/or shallow lateral transport (e.g. high flow events) are now generating freshwater DOC peaks that are unprecedented in the monitoring record. We also examine the role of land-management as

  8. New evidence of Holocene atmospheric circulation dynamics based on lake sediments from southern Sweden: a link to the Siberian High

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschitiello, F.; Schwark, L.; Wohlfarth, B.; Sturm, C.; Hammarlund, D.

    2013-10-01

    Oxygen (δ18O) and carbon (δ13C) isotope records of calcitic carbonate components (Chara sp. algal encrustations and Bithynia tentaculata gastropod opercula) from a lake-sediment succession on the Baltic Sea island of Gotland, south-eastern Sweden, have been obtained to investigate regional climate dynamics during the Holocene. The hydrological sensitivity of the small lake, particularly in terms of spring snowmelt contribution to the local water budget, provides a means of tracing past changes in the influence of snow-bearing easterly winds across the Baltic Sea Proper, which signifies the wintertime strength of the Siberian High. Repeated episodic depletions in 18O at the centennial scale correlate with events of increased potassium concentration in the GISP2 ice-core record from Greenland, which indicates a coupling to large-scale fluctuations in atmospheric circulation patterns. A corresponding correlation with simultaneous depletions in 13C suggests repeated responses of the local lake hydrology to snow-rich winters through decreasing water residence time, perhaps augmented by methanogenesis due to prolonged ice-cover seasons under the influence of an expanding Siberian High. Frequency analysis of the isotopic records reveals well-defined fluctuations at quasi-500-520-, 670-, 830- and 1430-yr periodicities, and a gradually stronger impact of Polar air outbreaks across the southern Baltic Sea region with time after ca 6000 cal. BP.

  9. [Identification of triacylglycerols in coix oil by high performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Zhi-Min; Zhu, Ming; Chen, Bi-Lian; Chen, Yong

    2005-09-01

    To identify triacylglycerols in coix oil. High performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry was used for identification. The experiment was operated under the conditions: spray voltage at 3 000 V, capillary temperature at 250 degrees C, APCI vaporizer temperature at 400 degrees C, and corona current of 4 microA. Sheath gas pressure (high purity liquid nitrogen) was 35 kPa. Mass spectra were obtained over the m/e range of 300 to 900 amu, scan duration of 1s and Q1 peak width at 0.7. The stationary phase was Zorbax Extend C18 column (4.6 mm x 250 mm, 5 microm). The mobile phase: dichloromethane-acetonitrile (35:65), flow rate: 1 mL x min(-1); column temperature: 25 degrees C. 12 triacylglycerols were identified by HPLC-MS method. The result can be used to identify the components in a fingerprint chromatogram of coix oil and its related injection product.

  10. Determination of aldehydes and ketones with high atmospheric reactivity on diesel exhaust using a biofuel from animal fats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, R.; Monedero, E.; Guillén-Flores, J.

    2011-05-01

    Biodiesel from animal fats appears as an alternative for conventional diesel in automotive consumption. Animal fats are classified into three categories, although only one of them can be used for biodiesel production, according to regulation. Due to its novelty, researchers testing animal-fat biodiesel on diesel engines focus only on regulated emissions. In this paper, the experiments carried out analyze carbonyl compounds emissions, due to its highly atmospheric reactivity, to complete the characterization of the total emissions in this kind of biofuel. Two fuels, a reference petro-diesel and a pure animal-fat biodiesel, were tested in a 4-cylinder, direct injection, diesel engine Nissan Euro 5 M1D-Bk. Samples were collected in 4 different operating modes and 3 points along the exhaust line. The analyses of samples were made in a high performance liquid chromatography, following the method recommended by the CARB to analyze air quality. Results show, on the one hand, a significant rise in carbonyl emissions, almost three times at the mode with highest hydrocarbon emissions, when biodiesel is used. On the other hand, on average, a reduction of 90% of carbonyl emissions when exhaust gases go through the different post-treatment systems installed. Despite this reduction, specific reactivity does not decrease substantially.

  11. Vibronic origin of sulfur mass-independent isotope effect in photoexcitation of SO2 and the implications to the early earth's atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehill, Andrew R; Xie, Changjian; Hu, Xixi; Xie, Daiqian; Guo, Hua; Ono, Shuhei

    2013-10-29

    Signatures of mass-independent isotope fractionation (MIF) are found in the oxygen ((16)O,(17)O,(18)O) and sulfur ((32)S, (33)S, (34)S, (36)S) isotope systems and serve as important tracers of past and present atmospheric processes. These unique isotope signatures signify the breakdown of the traditional theory of isotope fractionation, but the physical chemistry of these isotope effects remains poorly understood. We report the production of large sulfur isotope MIF, with Δ(33)S up to 78‰ and Δ(36)S up to 110‰, from the broadband excitation of SO2 in the 250-350-nm absorption region. Acetylene is used to selectively trap the triplet-state SO2 ( (3)B1), which results from intersystem crossing from the excited singlet ( (1)A2/ (1)B1) states. The observed MIF signature differs considerably from that predicted by isotopologue-specific absorption cross-sections of SO2 and is insensitive to the wavelength region of excitation (above or below 300 nm), suggesting that the MIF originates not from the initial excitation of SO2 to the singlet states but from an isotope selective spin-orbit interaction between the singlet ( (1)A2/ (1)B1) and triplet ( (3)B1) manifolds. Calculations based on high-level potential energy surfaces of the multiple excited states show a considerable lifetime anomaly for (33)SO2 and (36)SO2 for the low vibrational levels of the (1)A2 state. These results demonstrate that the isotope selectivity of accidental near-resonance interactions between states is of critical importance in understanding the origin of MIF in photochemical systems.

  12. Vibronic origin of sulfur mass-independent isotope effect in photoexcitation of SO2 and the implications to the early earth’s atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehill, Andrew R.; Xie, Changjian; Hu, Xixi; Xie, Daiqian; Guo, Hua; Ono, Shuhei

    2013-01-01

    Signatures of mass-independent isotope fractionation (MIF) are found in the oxygen (16O,17O,18O) and sulfur (32S, 33S, 34S, 36S) isotope systems and serve as important tracers of past and present atmospheric processes. These unique isotope signatures signify the breakdown of the traditional theory of isotope fractionation, but the physical chemistry of these isotope effects remains poorly understood. We report the production of large sulfur isotope MIF, with Δ33S up to 78‰ and Δ36S up to 110‰, from the broadband excitation of SO2 in the 250–350-nm absorption region. Acetylene is used to selectively trap the triplet-state SO2 (3B1), which results from intersystem crossing from the excited singlet (1A2/1B1) states. The observed MIF signature differs considerably from that predicted by isotopologue-specific absorption cross-sections of SO2 and is insensitive to the wavelength region of excitation (above or below 300 nm), suggesting that the MIF originates not from the initial excitation of SO2 to the singlet states but from an isotope selective spin–orbit interaction between the singlet (1A2/1B1) and triplet (3B1) manifolds. Calculations based on high-level potential energy surfaces of the multiple excited states show a considerable lifetime anomaly for 33SO2 and 36SO2 for the low vibrational levels of the 1A2 state. These results demonstrate that the isotope selectivity of accidental near-resonance interactions between states is of critical importance in understanding the origin of MIF in photochemical systems. PMID:23836655

  13. Bone conduction errors at high frequencies: implications for clinical and medico-legal practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoot, G R; Hughes, J B

    1993-04-01

    The magnitude and origin of audiometric air-bone gaps in the range 3 kHz to 8 kHz was investigated in 20 normal subjects. The average gap ranged from a minimum of about 3 dB at 3 kHz to a maximum of about 19 dB at 6 kHz. Approximately 5 dB of the gap at high frequencies is caused by excess air-radiated sound from the bone vibrator. A larger error appears to result from discrepancies between the air and bone conduction standards to which audiometers are calibrated. These errors may influence diagnosis and we recommend that bone conduction tests at frequencies greater than 4 kHz are avoided. These findings have implications for medico-legal work where small air-bone gaps have diagnostic significance.

  14. Flux rates of atmospheric lead pollution within soils of a small catchment in northern Sweden and their implications for future stream water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaminder, Jonatan; Bindler, Richard; Laudon, Hjalmar; Bishop, Kevin; Emteryd, Ove; Renberg, Ingemar

    2006-08-01

    It is not well-known how the accumulated pool of atmospheric lead pollution in the boreal forest soil will affect the groundwater and surface water chemistry in the future as this lead migrates through the soil profile. This study uses stable lead isotopes (206Pb/207Pb and 208Pb/ 207Pb ratios) to trace the transport of atmospheric lead pollution within the soil of a small catchment and predict future lead level changes in a stream draining the catchment. Low 206Pb/207Pb and 208Pb/207Pb ratios for the lead in the soil water (1.16 +/- 0.02; 2.43 +/- 0.03) and streamwater (1.18 +/- 0.03; 2.42 +/- 0.03) in comparison to that of the mineral soil (>1.4; >2.5) suggest that atmospheric pollution contributes by about 90% (65-100%) to the lead pool found in these matrixes. Calculated transport rates of atmospheric lead along a soil transect indicate that the mean residence time of lead in organic and mineral soil layers is at a centennial to millennial time scale. A maximum release of the present pool of lead pollution in the soil to the stream is predicted to occur within 200-800 years. Even though the uncertainty of the prediction is large, it emphasizes the magnitude of the time lag between the accumulation of atmospheric lead pollution in soils and the subsequent response in streamwater quality.

  15. Assessing the variability in extreme high water levels and the implications for coastal flood risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Niall; Lewis, Matthew; Wadey, Matthew; Haigh, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    Assessing the variability in extreme high water levels and the implications for coastal flood risk In this research we assess the temporal variability in the time-series of extreme water levels at 44 A- Class tide gauges around the UK. Extreme (> 99th percentile) storm tide events, sampled from water level measurements taken every 15 minutes between 1993 and 2012, were analysed at each site, and the variability in elevation relative to a given event storm tide peak was quantified. The magnitude of the variability in the time-series was found to be both spatially variable across the UK, and temporally variable relative to the time of the high water. Boundary water levels associated with a range of event magnitudes at case study locations around the UK were used to force two-dimensional hydrodynamic models to examine the importance of storm tide time-series uncertainty to flood risk predictions. The comparison of inundation extent, depth, and number of buildings affected demonstrated the importance of accurately defining the duration and magnitude of defence exceedance. For example, given a current 1 in 200 year event magnitude at Portsmouth (UK), the predicted number of buildings inundated differed by more than 30% when contrasting simulations forced with the 5th percentile time-series relative to those forced with the 95th percentile time-series. The results clearly indicate that variability in the time-series of the storm tide can have considerable influence upon the duration and magnitude by which defences are exceeded, hence with implications for coastal flood risk assessments. Therefore, further evaluating and representing this uncertainty in future flood risk assessments is vital, while the 5th and 95th percentile time-series defined in this research provide a tool for coastal flood modellers. Only defence overflow-induced inundation was examined in this research. However, it is expected that variability in storm tide time-series will also have important

  16. Warmer and wetter winters: characteristics and implications of an extreme weather event in the High Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Brage B.; Isaksen, Ketil; Benestad, Rasmus E.; Kohler, Jack; Pedersen, Åshild Ø.; Loe, Leif E.; Coulson, Stephen J.; Larsen, Jan Otto; Varpe, Øystein

    2014-11-01

    One predicted consequence of global warming is an increased frequency of extreme weather events, such as heat waves, droughts, or heavy rainfalls. In parts of the Arctic, extreme warm spells and heavy rain-on-snow (ROS) events in winter are already more frequent. How these weather events impact snow-pack and permafrost characteristics is rarely documented empirically, and the implications for wildlife and society are hence far from understood. Here we characterize and document the effects of an extreme warm spell and ROS event that occurred in High Arctic Svalbard in January-February 2012, during the polar night. In this normally cold semi-desert environment, we recorded above-zero temperatures (up to 7 °C) across the entire archipelago and record-breaking precipitation, with up to 98 mm rainfall in one day (return period of >500 years prior to this event) and 272 mm over the two-week long warm spell. These precipitation amounts are equivalent to 25 and 70% respectively of the mean annual total precipitation. The extreme event caused significant increase in permafrost temperatures down to at least 5 m depth, induced slush avalanches with resultant damage to infrastructure, and left a significant ground-ice cover (˜5-20 cm thick basal ice). The ground-ice not only affected inhabitants by closing roads and airports as well as reducing mobility and thereby tourism income, but it also led to high starvation-induced mortality in all monitored populations of the wild reindeer by blocking access to the winter food source. Based on empirical-statistical downscaling of global climate models run under the moderate RCP4.5 emission scenario, we predict strong future warming with average mid-winter temperatures even approaching 0 °C, suggesting increased frequency of ROS. This will have far-reaching implications for Arctic ecosystems and societies through the changes in snow-pack and permafrost properties.

  17. High Data Rates for AubieSat-2 A & B, Two CubeSats Performing High Energy Science in the Upper Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, William H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper will discuss a proposed CubeSat size (3 Units / 6 Units) telemetry system concept being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in cooperation with Auburn University. The telemetry system incorporates efficient, high-bandwidth communications by developing flight-ready, low-cost, PROTOFLIGHT software defined radio (SDR) payload for use on CubeSats. The current telemetry system is slightly larger in dimension of footprint than required to fit within a 0.75 Unit CubeSat volume. Extensible and modular communications for CubeSat technologies will provide high data rates for science experiments performed by two CubeSats flying in formation in Low Earth Orbit. The project is a collaboration between the University of Alabama in Huntsville and Auburn University to study high energy phenomena in the upper atmosphere. Higher bandwidth capacity will enable high-volume, low error-rate data transfer to and from the CubeSats, while also providing additional bandwidth and error correction margin to accommodate more complex encryption algorithms and higher user volume.

  18. Interpreting the Ultraviolet Aerosol Index Observed with the OMI Satellite Instrument to Understand Absorption by Organic Aerosols: Implications for Atmospheric Oxidation and Direct Radiative Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Melanie S.; Martin, Randall V.; Donkelaar, Aaron van; Buchard, Virginie; Torres, Omar; Ridley, David A.; Spurr, Robert J. D.

    2016-01-01

    Satellite observations of the ultraviolet aerosol index (UVAI) are sensitive to absorption of solar radiation by aerosols; this absorption affects photolysis frequencies and radiative forcing. We develop a global simulation of the UVAI using the 3-D chemical transport model GEOSChem coupled with the Vector Linearized Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer model (VLIDORT). The simulation is applied to interpret UVAI observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) for the year 2007. Simulated and observed values are highly consistent in regions where mineral dust dominates the UVAI, but a large negative bias (-0.32 to -0.97) exists between simulated and observed values in biomass burning regions. We determine effective optical properties for absorbing organic aerosol, known as brown carbon (BrC), and implement them into GEOS-Chem to better represent observed UVAI values over biomass burning regions. The inclusion of absorbing BrC decreases the mean bias between simulated and OMI UVAI values from -0.57 to -0.09 over West Africa in January, from -0.32 to +0.0002 over South Asia in April, from -0.97 to -0.22 over southern Africa in July, and from -0.50 to +0.33 over South America in September. The spectral dependence of absorption after including BrC in the model is broadly consistent with reported observations for biomass burning aerosol, with absorbing Angstrom exponent (AAE) values ranging from 2.9 in the ultraviolet (UV) to 1.3 across the UV-Near IR spectrum. We assess the effect of the additional UV absorption by BrC on atmospheric photochemistry by examining tropospheric hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations in GEOS-Chem. The inclusion of BrC decreases OH by up to 30% over South America in September, up to 20% over southern Africa in July, and up to 15% over other biomass burning regions. Global annual mean OH concentrations in GEOS-Chem decrease due to the presence of absorbing BrC, increasing the methyl chloroform lifetime from 5.62 to 5.68 years, thus

  19. Interpreting the ultraviolet aerosol index observed with the OMI satellite instrument to understand absorption by organic aerosols: implications for atmospheric oxidation and direct radiative effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Hammer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Satellite observations of the ultraviolet aerosol index (UVAI are sensitive to absorption of solar radiation by aerosols; this absorption affects photolysis frequencies and radiative forcing. We develop a global simulation of the UVAI using the 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem coupled with the Vector Linearized Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer model (VLIDORT. The simulation is applied to interpret UVAI observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI for the year 2007. Simulated and observed values are highly consistent in regions where mineral dust dominates the UVAI, but a large negative bias (−0.32 to −0.97 exists between simulated and observed values in biomass burning regions. We determine effective optical properties for absorbing organic aerosol, known as brown carbon (BrC, and implement them into GEOS-Chem to better represent observed UVAI values over biomass burning regions. The inclusion of absorbing BrC decreases the mean bias between simulated and OMI UVAI values from −0.57 to −0.09 over West Africa in January, from −0.32 to +0.0002 over South Asia in April, from −0.97 to −0.22 over southern Africa in July, and from −0.50 to +0.33 over South America in September. The spectral dependence of absorption after including BrC in the model is broadly consistent with reported observations for biomass burning aerosol, with absorbing Ångström exponent (AAE values ranging from 2.9 in the ultraviolet (UV to 1.3 across the UV–Near IR spectrum. We assess the effect of the additional UV absorption by BrC on atmospheric photochemistry by examining tropospheric hydroxyl radical (OH concentrations in GEOS-Chem. The inclusion of BrC decreases OH by up to 30 % over South America in September, up to 20 % over southern Africa in July, and up to 15 % over other biomass burning regions. Global annual mean OH concentrations in GEOS-Chem decrease due to the presence of absorbing BrC, increasing the methyl chloroform

  20. Interpreting the ultraviolet aerosol index observed with the OMI satellite instrument to understand absorption by organic aerosols: implications for atmospheric oxidation and direct radiative effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Melanie S.; Martin, Randall V.; van Donkelaar, Aaron; Buchard, Virginie; Torres, Omar; Ridley, David A.; Spurr, Robert J. D.

    2016-03-01

    Satellite observations of the ultraviolet aerosol index (UVAI) are sensitive to absorption of solar radiation by aerosols; this absorption affects photolysis frequencies and radiative forcing. We develop a global simulation of the UVAI using the 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem coupled with the Vector Linearized Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer model (VLIDORT). The simulation is applied to interpret UVAI observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) for the year 2007. Simulated and observed values are highly consistent in regions where mineral dust dominates the UVAI, but a large negative bias (-0.32 to -0.97) exists between simulated and observed values in biomass burning regions. We determine effective optical properties for absorbing organic aerosol, known as brown carbon (BrC), and implement them into GEOS-Chem to better represent observed UVAI values over biomass burning regions. The inclusion of absorbing BrC decreases the mean bias between simulated and OMI UVAI values from -0.57 to -0.09 over West Africa in January, from -0.32 to +0.0002 over South Asia in April, from -0.97 to -0.22 over southern Africa in July, and from -0.50 to +0.33 over South America in September. The spectral dependence of absorption after including BrC in the model is broadly consistent with reported observations for biomass burning aerosol, with absorbing Ångström exponent (AAE) values ranging from 2.9 in the ultraviolet (UV) to 1.3 across the UV-Near IR spectrum. We assess the effect of the additional UV absorption by BrC on atmospheric photochemistry by examining tropospheric hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations in GEOS-Chem. The inclusion of BrC decreases OH by up to 30 % over South America in September, up to 20 % over southern Africa in July, and up to 15 % over other biomass burning regions. Global annual mean OH concentrations in GEOS-Chem decrease due to the presence of absorbing BrC, increasing the methyl chloroform lifetime from 5.62 to 5.68 years

  1. Long-term variability of iron supply, marine export production, and sea surface temperature in the subantarctic Atlantic, implications for atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Garcia, A.; Rosell-Mele, A.; Geibert, W.; Gersonde, R.; Masque, P.; Gaspari, V.; Barbante, C.

    2008-12-01

    Paleoclimatic reconstructions have provided a unique dataset to test the sensitivity of climate system to changes in atmospheric CO2 concentrations. However, the mechanisms behind glacial/interglacial (G/IG) variations in atmospheric CO2 concentrations observed in the Antarctic ice cores over the last 800 ky are still not completely understood. Here we present a multiproxy dataset of sea surface temperatures (SST), dust and iron supply, and marine export production, from the marine sediment core PS2489-2/ODP Site 1090 located in the subantarctic Atlantic (SA). This dataset allows us to evaluate various hypotheses focussing on the role of the Southern Ocean (SO) in modulating atmospheric CO2 over the last 800ky, and provides new information on SST, dust, and export production back to the Pliocene. The close correlation observed between iron inputs and marine export production in our record suggests that the process of iron fertilization has been a recurrent process operating in the SA over the G/IG cycles of the last 1.1 My. However, our data indicates that marine productivity in the present Subantarctic Zone can only explain a fraction of atmospheric CO2 changes occurring at glacial maxima in each glacial stage. Moreover, the good correlation of our SST to the EPICA Dome C records (EDC) temperature reconstruction over the last 800ka, suggest that physical processes, possibly related to changes in Antarctic sea-ice extent, surface water stratification and westerly winds position have also played an important role in modulating atmospheric CO2 over the last 800ky. On the long-term, our paleo-SST record reveals a major cooling event around 1.2-1.5 Ma that may have caused a profound impact on atmospheric CO2 and hence in the transition to a 100 kyr world during the Middle Pleistocene Climatic Transition.

  2. High DNA stability in white blood cells and buffy coat lysates stored at ambient temperature under anoxic and anhydrous atmosphere.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Lise Fabre

    Full Text Available Conventional storage of blood-derived fractions relies on cold. However, lately, ambient temperature preservation has been evaluated by several independent institutions that see economic and logistic advantages in getting rid of the cold chain. Here we validated a novel procedure for ambient temperature preservation of DNA in white blood cell and buffy coat lysates based on the confinement of the desiccated biospecimens under anoxic and anhydrous atmosphere in original hermetic minicapsules. For this validation we stored encapsulated samples either at ambient temperature or at several elevated temperatures to accelerate aging. We found that DNA extracted from stored samples was of good quality with a yield of extraction as expected. Degradation rates were estimated from the average fragment size of denatured DNA run on agarose gels and from qPCR reactions. At ambient temperature, these rates were too low to be measured but the degradation rate dependence on temperature followed Arrhenius' law, making it possible to extrapolate degradation rates at 25°C. According to these values, the DNA stored in the encapsulated blood products would remain larger than 20 kb after one century at ambient temperature. At last, qPCR experiments demonstrated the compatibility of extracted DNA with routine DNA downstream analyses. Altogether, these results showed that this novel storage method provides an adequate environment for ambient temperature long term storage of high molecular weight DNA in dehydrated lysates of white blood cells and buffy coats.

  3. The high frequency relationship: implications for torsadogenic hERG blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champeroux, P; Le Guennec, J Y; Jude, S; Laigot, C; Maurin, A; Sola, M L; Fowler, J S L; Richard, S; Thireau, J

    2016-02-01

    Ventricular arrhythmias induced by human ether-a-go-go related gene (hERG; Kv 11.1 channel) blockers are a consequence of alterations in ventricular repolarisation in association with high-frequency (HF) oscillations, which act as a primary trigger; the autonomic nervous system plays a modulatory role. In the present study, we investigated the role of β1 -adrenoceptors in the HF relationship between magnitude of heart rate and QT interval changes within discrete 10 s intervals (sorted into 5 bpm heart rate increments) and its implications for torsadogenic hERG blockers. The HF relationship was studied under conditions of autonomic blockade with atenolol (β1 -adrenoceptor blocker) in the absence or presence of five hERG blockers in beagle dogs. In total, the effects of 14 hERG blockers on the HF relationship were investigated. All the torsadogenic hERG blockers tested caused a vertical shift in the HF relationship, while hERG blockers associated with a low risk of Torsades de Pointes did not cause any vertical shift. Atenolol completely prevented the effects four torsadogenic agents (quinidine, thioridazine, risperidone and terfenadine) on the HF relationship, but only partially reduced those of dofetilide, leading to the characterization of two types of torsadogenic agent. Analysis of the vertical shift in the HF relationship demonstrated that signs of transient sympathetic activation during HF oscillations in the presence of torsadogenic hERG blockers are mediated by β1 -adrenoceptors. We suggest the HF relationship as a new biomarker for assessing Torsades de pointes liability, with potential implications in both preclinical studies and the clinic. © 2015 The British Pharmacological Society.

  4. High Concentrations of Ozone Air Pollution on Mount Everest: Health Implications for Sherpa Communities and Mountaineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, John L; Moore, G W Kent; Koutrakis, Petros; Wolfson, Jack M; Cristofanelli, Paolo; Bonasoni, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    Semple, John L., G.W. Kent Moore, Petros Koutrakis, Jack M. Wolfson, Paolo Cristofanelli, and Paolo Bonasoni. High concentrations of ozone air pollution on Mount Everest: health implications for Sherpa communities and mountaineers. High Alt Med Biol. 17:365-369, 2016.-Introduction: Populations in remote mountain regions are increasingly vulnerable to multiple climate mechanisms that influence levels of air pollution. Few studies have reported on climate-sensitive health outcomes unique to high altitude ecosystems. In this study, we report on the discovery of high-surface ozone concentrations and the potential impact on health outcomes on Mount Everest and the high Himalaya. Surface ozone measurements were collected during ascending transects in the Mount Everest region of Nepal with passive nitrite-coated Ogawa filter samplers to obtain 8-hour personal exposures (2860-5364 m asl). In addition, the Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid, a GAW-WMO Global Station sited in the Khumbu Valley (5079 m asl), collected ozone mixing ratios with photometric gas analyzer. Surface ozone measurements increased with altitude with concentrations that exceed 100 ppb (8-hour exposure). Highest values were during the spring season and the result of diverse contributions: hemispheric background values, the descent of ozone-rich stratospheric air, and the transport of tropospheric pollutants occurring at different spatial scales. Multiple climate factors, including descending stratospheric ozone and imported anthropogenic air masses from the Indo-Gangetic Plain, contribute to ambient ozone exposure levels in the vicinity of Mount Everest that are similar to if not higher than those reported in industrialized cities.

  5. A kinetic study of Ca-containing ions reacting with O, O2, CO2 and H2O: implications for calcium ion chemistry in the upper atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadley, Sarah; Vondrak, Tomas; Wright, Timothy G; Plane, John M C

    2008-09-14

    A series of gas-phase reactions involving molecular Ca-containing ions was studied by the pulsed laser ablation of a calcite target to produce Ca+ in a fast flow of He, followed by the addition of reagents downstream and detection of ions by quadrupole mass spectrometry. Most of the reactions that were studied are important for describing the chemistry of meteor-ablated calcium in the earth's upper atmosphere. The following rate coefficients were measured: k(CaO+ + O --> Ca+ + O2) = (4.2 +/- 2.8) x 10(-11) at 197 K and (6.3 +/- 3.0) x 10(-11) at 294 K; k(CaO+ + CO --> Ca+ + CO2, 294 K) = (2.8 +/- 1.5) x 10(-10); k(Ca+.CO2 + O2 --> CaO2+ + CO2, 294 K) = (1.2 +/- 0.5) x10(-10); k(Ca+.CO2 + H2O --> Ca+.H2O + CO2) = (13.0 +/- 4.0) x 10(-10); and k(Ca+.H2O + O2 --> CaO2+ + H2O, 294 K) = (4.0 +/- 2.5) x 10(-10) cm3 molecule(-1) s(-1). The quoted uncertainties are a combination of the 1 sigma standard errors in the kinetic data and the systematic errors in the models used to extract the rate coefficients. Rate coefficients were also obtained for the following recombination (also termed association) reactions in He bath gas: k(Ca+.CO2 + CO2 --> Ca+.(CO2)2, 294 K) = (2.6 +/- 1.0) x 10(-29); k(Ca+.H2O + H2O --> Ca+.(H2O)2) = (1.6 +/- 1.1) x 10(-27); and k(CaO2+ + O2 --> CaO2+.O2) high level quantum chemistry calculations and RRKM theory using an inverse Laplace transform solution of the master equation. The surprisingly slow reaction between CaO+ and O was explained using quantum chemistry calculations on the lowest 2A', 2A'' and 4A'' potential energy surfaces. These calculations indicate that reaction mostly occurs on the 2A' surface, leading to production of Ca+ (2S) + O2(1 Delta g). The importance of this reaction for controlling the lifetime of Ca+ in the upper mesosphere and lower thermosphere is then discussed.

  6. Nitrogen distribution and cycling through water flows in a subtropical bamboo forest under high level of atmospheric deposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-hua Tu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The hydrological cycle is an important way of transportation and reallocation of reactive nitrogen (N in forest ecosystems. However, under a high level of atmospheric N deposition, the N distribution and cycling through water flows in forest ecosystems especially in bamboo ecosystems are not well understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to investigate N fluxes through water flows in a Pleioblastus amarus bamboo forest, event rainfall/snowfall (precipitation, PP, throughfall (TF, stemflow (SF, surface runoff (SR, forest floor leachate (FFL, soil water at the depth of 40 cm (SW1 and 100 cm (SW2 were collected and measured through the whole year of 2009. Nitrogen distribution in different pools in this ecosystem was also measured. Mean N pools in vegetation and soil (0-1 m were 351.7 and 7752.8 kg ha(-1. Open field nitrogen deposition at the study site was 113.8 kg N ha(-1 yr(-1, which was one of the highest in the world. N-NH4(+, N-NO3(- and dissolved organic N (DON accounted for 54%, 22% and 24% of total wet N deposition. Net canopy accumulated of N occurred with N-NO3(- and DON but not N-NH4(+. The flux of total dissolved N (TDN to the forest floor was greater than that in open field precipitation by 17.7 kg N ha(-1 yr(-1, due to capture of dry and cloudwater deposition net of canopy uptake. There were significant negative exponential relationships between monthly water flow depths and monthly mean TDN concentrations in PP, TF, SR, FFL and SW1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The open field nitrogen deposition through precipitation is very high over the world, which is the main way of reactive N input in this bamboo ecosystem. The water exchange and N consume mainly occurred in the litter floor layer and topsoil layer, where most of fine roots of bamboo distributed.

  7. Atmospheric Dispositifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wieczorek, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Through the coupling of dispositif with atmosphere this paper engages in a discussion of the atmospherics as both a form of knowledge and a material practice. In doing so the objective is to provide an inventory of tools and methodologies deployed in the construction of atmosphere understood......, the conceptual foundations and protocols for the production of atmosphere in architecture might be found beneath the surface of contemporary debates. In this context, the notion of atmospheric dispositif – illustrated through an oeuvre of the German architect Werner Ruhnau and its theoretical and historical...

  8. MAVEN Imaging UV Spectrograph Results on the Mars Atmosphere and Atmospheric Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Michael; Schneider, Nick; McClintock, Bill; Stewart, Ian; Deighan, Justin; Jain, Sonal; Clarke, John; Holsclaw, Greg; Montmessin, Franck; Lefevre, Franck; Chaufray, Jean-Yves; Stiepen, Arnaud; Crismani, Matteo; Mayyasi, Majd; Evans, Scott; Stevens, Mike; Yelle, Roger; Jakosky, Bruce

    2016-04-01

    The Imaging Ultraviolet Spectrograph (IUVS) is one of nine science instruments aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile and EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft, whose payload is dedicated to exploring the upper atmosphere of Mars and understanding the magnitude and drivers of Mars' atmospheric escape rate. IUVS uses ultraviolet light to investigate the lower and upper atmosphere and ionosphere of Mars. The instrument is among the most powerful spectrographs sent to another planet, with several key capabilities: (1) separate Far-UV & Mid-UV channels for stray light control, (2) a high resolution echelle mode to resolve deuterium and hydrogen emission, (3) internal instrument pointing and scanning capabilities to allow complete mapping and nearly continuous operation, and (4) optimization for airglow studies. IUVS, along with other MAVEN instruments, obtains a comprehensive picture of the current state of the Mars upper atmosphere and ionosphere and the processes that control atmospheric escape. We present an overview of selected IUVS results, including (1) the discovery of diffuse aurora at Mars, and its contrast with previously detected discrete aurora localized near crustal magnetic fields; (2) widespread detection of mesospheric clouds; (3) Significant seasonal and short-timescale variability in thermospheric composition; (4) Global ozone maps spanning six months of seasonal evolution; and (5) mapping of the Mars H and O coronas, deriving the escape rates of H and O and their variability. This last is of particular importance for understanding the long term evolution of Mars and its atmosphere, with the observed preset escape of H potentially capable of removing a large fraction of Mars' initial water inventory, and the differential escape of O relative to H potentially providing a net source of oxidizing power to the atmosphere and planet at present, in contrast with a photochemical theory that predicts stoichiometrically balanced escape. The atmospheric and escape

  9. Use of ICT and the Implications in the Academic Performance of High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilda López DOMINGUEZ

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this research, still in progress, explores the implications resulting from the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT by high school students and relationship with school performance. The intention is to know and recognize from the student’s perspective on how to face their use of ICT in their own school performance. We start with the approach of Castells (2000 considering that the communicational paradigm little remains safe in the network society so consider the educational field, investigate it and thus analyze a specific situation will give the possibility to analyze and reflect on the role that students and society must take to this dynamic. The study is conducted under a mixed approach, but only the quantitative part is recovered in this text. It was carried out from a questionnaire administered to 103 high school students intending to determine the level of use and access of each student and from it to analyze whether there is a connection of this with their school performance.

  10. Species Richness and Community Structure on a High Latitude Reef: Implications for Conservation and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Houston

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In spite of the wealth of research on the Great Barrier Reef, few detailed biodiversity assessments of its inshore coral communities have been conducted. Effective conservation and management of marine ecosystems begins with fine-scale biophysical assessments focused on diversity and the architectural species that build the structural framework of the reef. In this study, we investigate key coral diversity and environmental attributes of an inshore reef system surrounding the Keppel Bay Islands near Rockhampton in Central Queensland, Australia, and assess their implications for conservation and management. The Keppels has much higher coral diversity than previously found. The average species richness for the 19 study sites was ~40 with representatives from 68% of the ~244 species previously described for the southern Great Barrier Reef. Using scleractinian coral species richness, taxonomic distinctiveness and coral cover as the main criteria, we found that five out of 19 sites had particularly high conservation value. A further site was also considered to be of relatively high value. Corals at this site were taxonomically distinct from the others (representatives of two families were found here but not at other sites and a wide range of functionally diverse taxa were present. This site was associated with more stressful conditions such as high temperatures and turbidity. Highly diverse coral communities or biodiversity ‘hotspots’ and taxonomically distinct reefs may act as insurance policies for climatic disturbance, much like Noah’s Arks for reefs. While improving water quality and limiting anthropogenic impacts are clearly important management initiatives to improve the long-term outlook for inshore reefs, identifying, mapping and protecting these coastal ‘refugia’ may be the key for ensuring their regeneration against catastrophic climatic disturbance in the meantime.

  11. Seasonal variation of atmospheric particle number concentrations, new particle formation and atmospheric oxidation capacity at the high Arctic site Villum Research Station, Station Nord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Quynh T.; Glasius, Marianne; Sørensen, Lise L.

    2016-01-01

    This work presents an analysis of the physical properties of sub-micrometer aerosol particles measured at the high Arctic site Villum Research Station, Station Nord (VRS), northeast Greenland, between July 2010 and February 2013. The study focuses on particle number concentrations, particle number...... size distributions and the occurrence of new particle formation (NPF) events and their seasonality in the high Arctic, where observations and characterization of such aerosol particle properties and corresponding events are rare and understanding of related processes is lacking. A clear accumulation...... of the NPF events, while no positive correlation was observed. Calculations of air mass back trajectories using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model for the NPF event days suggested that the onset or interruption of events could possibly be explained by changes in air...

  12. Development of a method for quantitation of retinol and retinyl palmitate in human serum using high-performance liquid chromatography atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, van R.B.; Nikolic, D.; Xu, X.Y.; Xiong, Y.S.; Lieshout, van M.; West, C.E.; Schilling, A.B.

    1998-01-01

    A method for the quantitative analysis of the vitamin A compounds all-trans-retinol and all-trans-retinyl palmitate was developed using high-performance liquid chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-LC-MS). Unlike previous quantitative mass spectrometric

  13. Atmospheric-Pressure Chemical Ionization Tandem Mass Spectrometry (APGC/MS/MS) an Alternative to High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry (HRGC/HRMS) for the Determination of Dioxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bavel, Van Bert; Geng, Dawei; Cherta, Laura; Nácher-Mestre, Jaime; Portolés, Tania; Ábalos, Manuela; Sauló, Jordi; Abad, Esteban; Dunstan, Jody; Jones, Rhys; Kotz, Alexander; Winterhalter, Helmut; Malisch, Rainer; Traag, Wim; Hagberg, Jessika; Ericson Jogsten, Ingrid; Beltran, Joaquim; Hernández, Félix

    2015-01-01

    The use of a new atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization source for gas chromatography (APGC) coupled with a tandem quadrupole mass spectrometry (MS/MS) system, as an alternative to high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), for the determination of PCDDs/PCDFs is described. The potential of

  14. Soil carbon content and relative abundance of high affinity H2-oxidizing bacteria predict atmospheric H2 soil uptake activity better than soil microbial community composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khdhiri, Mondher; Hesse, Laura; Popa, Maria Elena; Quiza, Liliana; Lalonde, Isabelle; Meredith, Laura K.; Röckmann, Thomas; Constant, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Soil-atmosphere exchange of H2 is controlled by gas diffusion and the microbial production and oxidation activities in soil. Among these parameters, the H2 oxidation activity catalyzed by soil microorganisms harboring high affinity hydrogenase is the most difficult variable to parameterize because

  15. Isoprene and monoterpene fluxes from Central Amazonian rainforest inferred from tower-based and airborne measurements, and implications on the atmospheric chemistry and the local carbon budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Kuhn

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We estimated the isoprene and monoterpene source strengths of a pristine tropical forest north of Manaus in the central Amazon Basin using three different micrometeorological flux measurement approaches. During the early dry season campaign of the Cooperative LBA Airborne Regional Experiment (LBA-CLAIRE-2001, a tower-based surface layer gradient (SLG technique was applied simultaneously with a relaxed eddy accumulation (REA system. Airborne measurements of vertical profiles within and above the convective boundary layer (CBL were used to estimate fluxes on a landscape scale by application of the mixed layer gradient (MLG technique. The mean daytime fluxes of organic carbon measured by REA were 2.1 mg C m−2 h−1 for isoprene, 0.20 mg C m−2 h−1 for α-pinene, and 0.39 mg C m−2 h−1 for the sum of monoterpenes. These values are in reasonable agreement with fluxes determined with the SLG approach, which exhibited a higher scatter, as expected for the complex terrain investigated. The observed VOC fluxes are in good agreement with simulations using a single-column chemistry and climate model (SCM.

    In contrast, the model-derived mixing ratios of VOCs were by far higher than observed, indicating that chemical processes may not be adequately represented in the model. The observed vertical gradients of isoprene and its primary degradation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK and methacrolein (MACR suggest that the oxidation capacity in the tropical CBL is much higher than previously assumed. A simple chemical kinetics model was used to infer OH radical concentrations from the vertical gradients of (MVK+MACR/isoprene. The estimated range of OH concentrations during the daytime was 3–8×106 molecules cm−3, i.e., an order of magnitude higher than is estimated for the tropical CBL by current state-of-the-art atmospheric chemistry and transport models

  16. Influence of the atmosphere on the space detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays; Influence de l'atmosphere sur la detection spatiale des rayons cosmiques d'ultra-haute energie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreggia, S

    2007-06-15

    EUSO (Extreme Universe Space Observatory) is a project of ultra-high energy (> 10{sup 20} eV) cosmic rays detection from space. Its concept relies on the observation of fluorescence and Cerenkov photons emitted by extensive air showers from a telescope located on the International Space Station. A simulation software has been developed to study the characteristics of this innovative concept of detection. It deals with the different steps of the detection chain: extensive air shower development, emission of fluorescence and Cerenkov light, and radiative transfer to the telescope. A Monte-Carlo code has been implemented to simulate the propagation of photons through the atmosphere, dealing with multiple scattering in clear sky conditions as well as in presence of aerosols and clouds. With this simulation program, the impact of atmospheric conditions on the performance of a space-located detector has been studied. The precise treatment of photons propagation through the atmosphere has permitted to quantify the scattered light contribution to the detected signal. (author)

  17. Bacillus subtilis spore survival and expression of germination-induced bioluminescence after prolonged incubation under simulated Mars atmospheric pressure and composition: implications for planetary protection and lithopanspermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Wayne L.; Schuerger, Andrew C.

    2005-01-01

    Bacterial endospores in the genus Bacillus are considered good models for studying interplanetary transfer of microbes by natural or human processes. Although spore survival during transfer itself has been the subject of considerable study, the fate of spores in extraterrestrial environments has received less attention. In this report we subjected spores of a strain of Bacillus subtilis, containing luciferase resulting from expression of an sspB-luxAB gene fusion, to simulated martian atmospheric pressure (7-18 mbar) and composition (100% CO(2)) for up to 19 days in a Mars simulation chamber. We report here that survival was similar between spores exposed to Earth conditions and spores exposed up to 19 days to simulated martian conditions. However, germination-induced bioluminescence was lower in spores exposed to simulated martian atmosphere, which suggests sublethal impairment of some endogenous spore germination processes.

  18. Effect of high oxygen and high carbon dioxide atmosphere packaging on the microbial spoilage and shelf-life of fresh-cut honeydew melon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bao-Yu; Samapundo, Simbarashe; Pothakos, Vasileios; Sürengil, Göknur; Devlieghere, Frank

    2013-09-16

    This study evaluated the potential of modified atmospheres (MAs) combining high oxygen (O₂) and high carbon dioxide (CO₂) levels to extend the shelf-life of fresh-cut honeydew melon. Firstly, the effect of MA on the growth and volatile organic metabolite production of Candida sake, Leuconostoc mesenteroides and Leuconostoc gelidum, which had all been previously isolated from spoiled commercial fresh-cut honeydew melon, was evaluated separately on honeydew melon agar at 7 °C. Additionally, the effect of selected MAs on the microbial, physico-chemical and sensory quality of commercial fresh-cut honeydew melon cubes was evaluated at 7 °C. The results showed that MAs with high O₂ and high CO₂ levels greatly retarded the growth, CO₂ and volatile metabolite production (i.e. ethanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, ethyl acetate, phenylacetic acid, nonanal) of C. sake on honeydew melon agar; especially MAs consisting of 50% O₂+50% CO₂ and 70% O₂+30% CO₂. In contrast, the MAs evaluated only had a minor effect on the growth and volatile metabolite production of L. mesenteroides and L. gelidum. Overall, the effect of MAs on colour, juice leakage, juiciness, and firmness of fresh-cut honeydew melon was small during storage. Sensory preference was generally for fresh-cut honeydew melon cubes packaged in MA of 50% O₂+50% CO₂. These were still acceptable on day five of storage and had appreciably lower populations of yeasts and lactic acid bacteria, lower quantities of volatile organic compounds, but slightly stronger colour oxidation compared to honeydew melon that was packaged in air. Additionally, most of the samples packed in air had blown by day five due to the large quantity of CO₂ production during storage. Therefore, 50% O₂+50% CO₂ is a potential MA solution for extending the shelf-life of fresh-cut honeydew melon. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. A theoretical framework for the net land-to-atmosphere CO2 flux and its implications in the definition of "emissions from land-use change"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Gasser

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We develop a theoretical framework and analysis of the net land-to-atmosphere CO2 flux in order to discuss possible definitions of "emissions from land-use change". The terrestrial biosphere is affected by two perturbations: the perturbation of the global carbon-climate-nitrogen system (CCN with elevated atmospheric CO2, climate change and nitrogen deposition; and the land-use change perturbation (LUC. Here, we progressively establish mathematical definitions of four generic components of the net land-to-atmosphere CO2 flux. The two first components are the fluxes that would be observed if only one perturbation occurred. The two other components are due to the coupling of the CCN and LUC perturbations, which shows the non-linear response of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Thanks to these four components, we introduce three possible definitions of "emissions from land-use change" that are indeed used in the scientific literature, often without clear distinctions, and we draw conclusions as for their absolute and relative behaviors. Thanks to the OSCAR v2 model, we provide quantitative estimates of the differences between the three definitions, and we find that comparing results from studies that do not use the same definition can lead to a bias of up to 20% between estimates of those emissions. After discussion of the limitations of the framework, we conclude on the three major points of this study that should help the community to reconcile modeling and observation of emissions from land-use change. The appendix mainly provides more detailed mathematical expressions of the four components of the net land-to-atmosphere CO2 flux.

  20. A theoretical framework for the net land-to-atmosphere CO2 flux and its implications in the definition of "emissions from land-use change"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, T.; Ciais, P.

    2013-06-01

    We develop a theoretical framework and analysis of the net land-to-atmosphere CO2 flux in order to discuss possible definitions of "emissions from land-use change". The terrestrial biosphere is affected by two perturbations: the perturbation of the global carbon-climate-nitrogen system (CCN) with elevated atmospheric CO2, climate change and nitrogen deposition; and the land-use change perturbation (LUC). Here, we progressively establish mathematical definitions of four generic components of the net land-to-atmosphere CO2 flux. The two first components are the fluxes that would be observed if only one perturbation occurred. The two other components are due to the coupling of the CCN and LUC perturbations, which shows the non-linear response of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Thanks to these four components, we introduce three possible definitions of "emissions from land-use change" that are indeed used in the scientific literature, often without clear distinctions, and we draw conclusions as for their absolute and relative behaviors. Thanks to the OSCAR v2 model, we provide quantitative estimates of the differences between the three definitions, and we find that comparing results from studies that do not use the same definition can lead to a bias of up to 20% between estimates of those emissions. After discussion of the limitations of the framework, we conclude on the three major points of this study that should help the community to reconcile modeling and observation of emissions from land-use change. The appendix mainly provides more detailed mathematical expressions of the four components of the net land-to-atmosphere CO2 flux.

  1. Atmospheric contamination of the primary Ne and Ar signal in mid-ocean ridge basalts and its implications for ocean crust formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroncik, N. A.; Niedermann, S.

    2016-01-01

    Both, terrestrial and extra-terrestrial applications of noble gases have demonstrated their importance as tracers for source identification, process characterisation and mass and heat flux quantification. However, the interpretation of noble gas isotope data from terrestrial igneous rocks is often complicated by the ubiquitous presence of heavy noble gases (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) with an atmospheric origin. Up to now there has been no consensus on how atmospheric noble gases are entrained into igneous rocks. Suggested processes range from contamination during sample preparation to mantle recycling through subduction. Here we present Ne, Ar, Mg, K, and Cl data of fresh glasses from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge north and south of the Ascension Fracture Zone which show that incorporation of atmospheric noble gases into igneous rocks is in general a two-step process: (1) magma contamination by assimilation of altered oceanic crust results in the entrainment of noble gases from air-equilibrated seawater; (2) atmospheric noble gases are adsorbed onto grain surfaces during sample preparation. This implies, considering the ubiquitous presence of the contamination signal, that magma contamination by assimilation of a seawater-sourced component is an integral part of mid-ocean ridge basalt evolution. Combining the results obtained from noble gas and Cl/K data with estimates of crystallisation pressures for the sample suite shows that the magma contamination must have taken place at a depth between 9 and 13 km. Taking thickness estimates for the local oceanic crust into account, this implies that seawater penetration in this area reaches lower crustal levels, indicating that hydrothermal circulation might be an effective cooling mechanism even for the deep parts of the oceanic crust.

  2. Composition changes after the "Halloween" solar proton event: the High Energy Particle Precipitation in the Atmosphere (HEPPA model versus MIPAS data intercomparison study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Funke

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We have compared composition changes of NO, NO2, H2O2, O3, N2O, HNO3, N2O5, HNO4, ClO, HOCl, and ClONO2 as observed by the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS on Envisat in the aftermath of the "Halloween" solar proton event (SPE in late October 2003 at 25–0.01 hPa in the Northern Hemisphere (40–90° N and simulations performed by the following atmospheric models: the Bremen 2-D model (B2dM and Bremen 3-D Chemical Transport Model (B3dCTM, the Central Aerological Observatory (CAO model, FinROSE, the Hamburg Model of the Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere (HAMMONIA, the Karlsruhe Simulation Model of the Middle Atmosphere (KASIMA, the ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC model, the modeling tool for SOlar Climate Ozone Links studies (SOCOL and SOCOLi, and the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM4. The large number of participating models allowed for an evaluation of the overall ability of atmospheric models to reproduce observed atmospheric perturbations generated by SPEs, particularly with respect to NOy and ozone changes. We have further assessed the meteorological conditions and their implications for the chemical response to the SPE in both the models and observations by comparing temperature and tracer (CH4 and CO fields.

    Simulated SPE-induced ozone losses agree on average within 5 % with the observations. Simulated NOy enhancements around 1 hPa, however, are typically 30 % higher than indicated by the observations which are likely to be related to deficiencies in the used ionization rates, though other error sources related to the models' atmospheric background state and/or transport schemes cannot be excluded. The analysis of the observed and modeled NOy partitioning in the aftermath of the SPE has demonstrated the need to implement

  3. The response of ecosystem water-use efficiency to rising atmospheric CO2concentrations: sensitivity and large-scale biogeochemical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauer, Jürgen; Zaehle, Sönke; Reichstein, Markus; Medlyn, Belinda E; Forkel, Matthias; Hagemann, Stefan; Werner, Christiane

    2017-03-01

    Ecosystem water-use efficiency (WUE) is an important metric linking the global land carbon and water cycles. Eddy covariance-based estimates of WUE in temperate/boreal forests have recently been found to show a strong and unexpected increase over the 1992-2010 period, which has been attributed to the effects of rising atmospheric CO 2 concentrations on plant physiology. To test this hypothesis, we forced the observed trend in the process-based land surface model JSBACH by increasing the sensitivity of stomatal conductance (g s ) to atmospheric CO 2 concentration. We compared the simulated continental discharge, evapotranspiration (ET), and the seasonal CO 2 exchange with observations across the extratropical northern hemisphere. The increased simulated WUE led to substantial changes in surface hydrology at the continental scale, including a significant decrease in ET and a significant increase in continental runoff, both of which are inconsistent with large-scale observations. The simulated seasonal amplitude of atmospheric CO 2 decreased over time, in contrast to the observed upward trend across ground-based measurement sites. Our results provide strong indications that the recent, large-scale WUE trend is considerably smaller than that estimated for these forest ecosystems. They emphasize the decreasing CO 2 sensitivity of WUE with increasing scale, which affects the physiological interpretation of changes in ecosystem WUE. © 2016 Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Tree growth in carbon dioxide enriched air and its implications for global carbon cycling and maximum levels of atmospheric CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idso, Sherwood B.; Kimball, Bruce A.

    1993-09-01

    In the longest carbon dioxide enrichment experiment ever conducted, well-watered and adequately fertilized sour orange tree seedlings were planted directly into the ground at Phoenix, Arizona, in July 1987 and continuously exposed, from mid-November of that year, to either ambient air or air enriched with an extra 300 ppmv of CO2 in clear-plastic-wall open-top enclosures. Only 18 months later, the CO2-enriched trees had grown 2.8 times larger than the ambient-treated trees; and they have maintained that productivity differential to the present day. This tremendous growth advantage is due to two major factors: a CO2-induced increase in daytime net photosynthesis and a CO2-induced reduction in nighttime dark respiration. Measurements of these physiological processes in another experiment have shown three Australlian tree species to respond similarly; while an independent study of the atmosphere's seasonal CO2 cycle suggests that all earth's trees, in the mean, probably share this same response. A brief review of the plant science literature outlines how such a large growth response to atmospheric CO2 enrichment might possibly be maintained in light of resource limitations existing in nature. Finally, it is noted that a CO2 "fertilization effect" of this magnitude should substantially slow the rate at which anthropogenic carbon dioxide would otherwise accumulate in the atmosphere, possibly putting an acceptable upper limit on the level to which the CO2 content of the air may ultimately rise.

  5. Holocene shifts of the Subtropical Shelf Front off southeastern South America controlled by high and low latitude atmospheric forcings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Vera B.; Hanebuth, Till J. J.; Chiessi, Cristiano M.

    2013-09-01

    Over the Uruguayan shelf and uppermost slope, the coalescence of northward flowing Subantarctic Shelf Water and southward flowing Subtropical Shelf Water forms a distinct thermohaline front termed the Subtropical Shelf Front (STSF). Running in a SW direction diagonally across the shelf from the coastal waters at 32°S toward the shelf break at ca. 36°S, the STSF represents the shelfward extension of the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence zone. This study reconstructs latitudinal STSF shifts during the Holocene based on benthic foraminifera δ18O and δ13C, total organic carbon, carbonate contents, Ti/Ca, and grain size distribution from a high-accumulation sedimentary record located at an uppermost continental-slope terrace. Our data provide direct evidence for: (1) a southern STSF position (to the South of the core site) at the beginning of the early Holocene (>9.4 cal ka BP) linked to a more southerly position of the Southern Westerly Winds in combination with restricted shelf circulation intensity due to lower sea level; (2) a gradual STSF northward migration (bypassing the core site toward the North) primarily forced by the northward migration of the Southern Westerly Winds from 9.4 cal ka BP onward; (3) a relatively stable position of the front in the interval between 7.2 and 4.0 cal ka BP; (4) millennial-scale latitudinal oscillations close to 36°S of the STSF after 4.0 cal ka BP probably linked to the intensification in El Niño Southern Oscillation; and (5) a southward migration of the STSF during the last 200 years possibly linked to anthropogenic influences on the atmosphere.

  6. Long-Term, High-Resolution Survey of Atmospheric Aerosols over Egypt with NASA’s MODIS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Shokr

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A decadal survey of atmospheric aerosols over Egypt and selected cities and regions is presented using daily aerosol optical depth (AOD data from NASA’s Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS at 550 nm wavelength onboard the Aqua satellite. We explore the AOD spatio-temporal variations over Egypt during a 12-year record (2003 to 2014 using the MODIS high-resolution (10 km Level 2 data product. Five cities and two geographic regions that feature different landscape and human activities were selected for detailed analysis. For most of the examined areas, AOD is found to be most frequent in the 0.2–0.3 range, and the highest mean AOD was found to be over Cairo, Alexandria, and the Nile Delta region. Severe events are identified based on AOD higher than a selected threshold. Most of these events are engendered by sand and dust storms that originate from the Western Desert during January–April. Spatial analysis indicates that they cover the Nile Delta region, including cities of Cairo and Alexandria, on the same day. Examination of the spatial gradient of AOD along the four cardinal directions originating from the city’s center reveals seasonally dependent gradients in some cases. The gradients have been linked to locations of industrial activity. No trend of AOD has been observed in the studied areas during the study period, though data from Cairo and Asyut reveal a slight linear increase of AOD. Considering Cairo is commonly perceived as a city of poor air quality, the results show that local events are fairly constrained. The study highlights spatial and seasonal distributions of AOD and links them to geographic and climatic conditions across the country.

  7. Exploring the MIS M2 glaciation occurring during a warm and high atmospheric CO2 Pliocene background climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ning; Ramstein, Gilles; Dumas, Christophe; Contoux, Camille; Ladant, Jean-Baptiste; Sepulchre, Pierre; Zhang, Zhongshi; De Schepper, Stijn

    2017-08-01

    Prior to the Northern Hemisphere glaciation around ∼2.7 Ma, a large global glaciation corresponding to a 20 to 60 m sea-level drop occurred during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) M2 (3.312-3.264 Ma), interrupted the period of global warmth and high CO2 concentration (350-450 ppmv) of the mid Piacenzian. Unlike the late Quaternary glaciations, the M2 glaciation only lasted 50 kyrs and occurred under uncertain CO2 concentration (220-390 ppmv). The mechanisms causing the onset and termination of the M2 glaciation remain enigmatic, but a recent geological hypothesis suggests that the re-opening and closing of the shallow Central American Seaway (CAS) might have played a key role. In this article, thanks to a series of climate simulations carried out using a fully coupled Atmosphere Ocean General Circulation Model (GCM) and a dynamic ice sheet model, we show that re-opening of the shallow CAS helps precondition the low-latitude oceanic circulation and affects the related northward energy transport, but cannot alone explain the onset of the M2 glaciation. The presence of a shallow open CAS, together with favourable orbital parameters, 220 ppmv of CO2 concentration, and the related vegetation and ice sheet feedback, led to a global ice sheet build-up producing a global sea-level drop in the lowest range of proxy-derived estimates. More importantly, our results show that the simulated closure of the CAS has a negligible impact on the NH ice sheet melt and cannot explain the MIS M2 termination.

  8. Analysis of wax ester molecular species by high performance liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrkoslav, Vladimír; Urbanová, Klára; Cvacka, Josef

    2010-06-18

    High chromatographic resolution of wax esters (WEs) was achieved by non-aqueous reversed-phase liquid chromatography on a Nova-Pak C18 column by optimising the acetonitrile/ethyl acetate mobile phase gradient. The retention behaviour of WEs was studied in this chromatographic system. The WEs eluted according to their equivalent carbon number (ECN) values; within the group of WEs with the identical ECN, the most unsaturated species tended to elute first. The isobaric WEs with different positions of the ester moiety were separated from each other whenever the lengths of the chains were sufficiently different. The methyl-branched esters eluted at shorter retention times than the straight-chained analogues, and the resolution among methyl-branched WEs depended on the position of the branching. The analytes were detected by atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation mass spectrometry (APCI-MS) using data-dependent scanning. WEs provided simple full-scan spectra with abundant protonated molecules and low-intensity fragments. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) promoted identification of the WE molecular species. The responses of WEs were found to be dependent on the number of double bonds and on the alkyl-chain length; the limits of the detection ranged from 20micromol/L to 200nmol/L. The HPLC/APCI-MS was applied for the analysis of the WEs isolated from honeycomb beeswax, jojoba oil and human hair. Good agreement between reported results and the literature data was achieved, with several novel polyunsaturated WEs also being found. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A study of the atmospheric surface layer and roughness lengths on the high-altitude tropical Zongo glacier, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sicart, Jean Emmanuel; Litt, Maxime; Helgason, Warren; Tahar, Vanessa Ben; Chaperon, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    The atmospheric surface layer of high-altitude tropical glaciers is inadequately understood, particularly concerning turbulent fluxes. Measurements have shown that sublimation reduces melt energy in the dry season, but the errors are large when a katabatic wind maximum occurs at a low height. This study analyzed wind and temperature vertical profiles measured by a 6 m mast in the ablation area of the tropical Zongo glacier (16°S, 5060 m above sea level) in the dry seasons of 2005 and 2007. Surface roughness lengths for momentum and temperature were derived from least squares fits of hourly wind and temperature profile data. Measurement errors were explored, focusing on the poorly defined reference level for sensor heights. A katabatic wind maximum at heights between 2 and 3 m was regularly observed during low wind speed and strong inversion conditions, or about 50%of the time, greatly reducing the surface layer depth. The glacier surface, experiencing melting conditions in the early afternoon and strong cooling at night, remained relatively smooth with z0 1 mm and zT 0.1 mm. Sensible heat flux measured at 1 m was not very sensitive to the zero reference level due to two opposite effects: when measurement heights increase, profile-derived roughness lengths increase but temperature and wind gradients decrease. The relation between zT/z0 and the roughness Reynolds number Re* roughly agrees with the surface renewal model. However, this is mostly due to self-correlation because of the shared variable z0 in zT/z0 and Re*, which prevents a sound experimental validation of the model.

  10. Cretaceous magmatism in the High Canadian Arctic: Implications for the nature and age of Alpha Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bono, Richard; Tarduno, John; Singer, Brad

    2013-04-01

    Cretaceous magmatism in the High Arctic, best expressed on Axel Heiberg and Ellesmere Island, can provide clues to the nature and age of the adjacent Alpha Ridge, which is in turn a key to understanding the tectonic evolution of the Arctic Ocean. Although the incorporation of some continental crust cannot be excluded, the prevailing view is that Alpha Ridge is dominantly thickened oceanic crust, analogous to oceanic plateaus of the Pacific and Indian Ocean. Together with the on-land volcanic exposures, Alpha Ridge composes the High Arctic Large Igneous Province (LIP), but the physical processes responsible for the magmatism remain unclear. Here we focus on two volcanic formations found on the Canadian Arctic margin. The Strand Fiord Formation is composed of a series of classic continental flood basalt flows, and represents the most voluminous expression of volcanism that has survived erosion. These basalts yield a 40Ar/39Ar age of ~95 Ma (Tarduno et al., Science, 1998) but this comes from the distant edge of the flood basalt exposures. The Hansen Point Volcanics consist of felsic and mafic rocks; previous age assignments range from the Maastrichtian (on the basis of palynomorphs, Falcon-Lang et al., Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology, 2004) to 80 Ma (Rb/Sr isochron, Estrada and Henjes-Kunst, Z. dt. Geol. Ges, 2004). Here we report new 40Ar/39Ar radioisotopic and paleomagnetic data from the Hansen Point Volcanics. In contrast to the latest Cretaceous/Paleogene dates, we find ages of ~95 Ma and 88-90 Ma. Because of the proximity of the landward extension of Alpha Ridge to Hansen Point, these new ages suggest that volcanism that contributed to the construction of Alpha Ridge may have extended over at least a 7 million interval (although it could have occurred in pulses). We will discuss the implications of these new data for candidate mantle processes that could have been responsible for the emplacement of Alpha Ridge and the High Arctic LIP.

  11. Methodological approach in determination of small spatial units in a highly complex terrain in atmospheric pollution research: the case of Zasavje region in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kukec, Andreja; Boznar, Marija Z; Mlakar, Primoz; Grasic, Bostjan; Herakovic, Andrej; Zadnik, Vesna; Zaletel-Kragelj, Lijana; Farkas, Jerneja; Erzen, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    The study of atmospheric air pollution research in complex terrains is challenged by the lack of appropriate methodology supporting the analysis of the spatial relationship between phenomena affected by a multitude of factors. The key is optimal design of a meaningful approach based on small spatial units of observation. The Zasavje region, Slovenia, was chosen as study area with the main objective to investigate in practice the role of such units in a test environment. The process consisted of three steps: modelling of pollution in the atmosphere with dispersion models, transfer of the results to geographical information system software, and then moving on to final determination of the function of small spatial units. A methodology capable of designing useful units for atmospheric air pollution research in highly complex terrains was created, and the results were deemed useful in offering starting points for further research in the field of geospatial health.

  12. Contribution of atmospheric dry deposition to stormwater loads for PAHs and trace metals in a small and highly trafficked urban road catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ali, Saja; Debade, Xavier; Chebbo, Ghassan; Béchet, Béatrice; Bonhomme, Céline

    2017-12-01

    A deep understanding of pollutant buildup and wash-off is essential for accurate urban stormwater quality modeling and for the development of stormwater management practices, knowing the potential adverse impacts of runoff pollution on receiving waters. In the context of quantifying the contribution of airborne pollutants to the contamination of stormwater runoff and assessing the need of developing an integrated AIR-WATER modeling chain, loads of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metal trace elements (MTEs) are calculated in atmospheric dry deposits, stormwater runoff, and surface dust stock within a small yet highly trafficked urban road catchment (~ 30,000 vehicles per day) near Paris. Despite the important traffic load and according to the current definition of "atmospheric" source, atmospheric deposition did not account for more than 10% of the PAHs and trace metal loads in stormwater samples for the majority of the events, based on the ratio of deposition to stormwater. This result shows that atmospheric deposition is not a major source of pollutants in stormwater, and thus, linking the air and water compartment in a modeling chain to have more accurate estimates of pollutant loads in stormwater runoff might not be relevant. Comparison of road dust with water samples demonstrates that only the fine fraction of the available stock is eroded during a rainfall event. Even if the atmosphere mostly generates fine particles, the existence of other sources of fine particles to stormwater runoff is highlighted.

  13. The Role of the Family Atmosphere in Relation to Public Health through High school Female Students in the City of Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Rahavi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The role of the family atmosphere in relation to public health of high school female students in Yazd. Family as a social system is with basic needs, like: Self-esteem, physical security, belonging and intimacy, dependency, responsibility, need to be motivated and approved by others, pointed out the need for happiness, success, and spiritual needs. Every family situation is unique and emotional space and office procedures and practices are different. If people, especially parents, knew the effect of family atmosphere and their performance on health and prosperity of children , they will try to balance and support their children. Therefore, we decided to study the relationship between public health and family atmosphere of students . Methods:This study is a descriptive survey method. The data was collected by the General Health Questionnaire( GHQ 28 and family atmosphere questionnaires. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 16 and descriptive analytic test. Results: The results showed that all students of different scale of public health (physical symptoms scale, scale of anxiety, social functioning scale and a scale of depression were slightly mild. The results showed there was negative significant difference(P<0.001 between all of the Structures Inventory family atmosphere and scales of GHQ28With the exception of the structure, openness to others. Conclusion: The results of this study and comparison with other studies is good guide for education and training of children and students and Parents can use them to improve the health of their children.

  14. Toward an improved representation of ocean/atmosphere interactions in high-resolution global ocean forecasting systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemarié, Florian; Samson, Guillaume; Redelsperger, Jean-Luc; Giordani, Hervé; Madec, Gurvan; Couvelard, Xavier; Bourdallé-Badie, Romain; Drillet, Yann

    2017-04-01

    Within the ALBATROS project, an objective is to derive a simplified model of the marine atmospheric boundary layer which would have the ability to represent key processes associated to air/sea interactions at the characteristic scales of the oceanic mesoscale. This model called SIMBAD (SIMplified Boundary Atmospheric layer moDel) is of intermediate complexity between a bulk parameterization and a full three-dimensional atmospheric model. A one-dimensional version of SIMBAD forced by large-scale atmospheric real-time data from ECMWF operational models has been integrated to the NEMO surface module and appropriate preprocessing tools have been developed. In this talk we first introduce the formulation of SIMBAD1d model and the results obtained for some atmosphere-only analytical testcases available in the literature. Then we describe the implementation of the NEMO-SIMBAD1d coupling infrastructure. This coupled system has been tested on a toy model at 1/12° resolution covering a small area of the north-east atlantic ocean. We conclude by giving the various possibilities to relax the assumption of horizontal homogeneity behind SIMBAD1d in order to further improve the realism of the coupling.

  15. Unexpectedly high catch-and-release rates in European marine recreational fisheries: implications for science and management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferter, Keno; Weltersbach, Marc Simon; Strehlow, Harry Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Unexpectedly high catch-and-release rates in European marine recreational fisheries: implications for science and management. – ICES Journal of Marine Science, 70: .While catch-and-release (C&R) is a well-known practice in several European freshwater recreational fisheries, studies on the magnitu...

  16. Measurement of the Atmospheric $\

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose1, D; Boser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Diaz-Velez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegard, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glusenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Goodman, J A; Gora, D; Grant, D; Gross, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jlelati, O; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klas, J; Klein, S R; Kohne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Kopke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Lunemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Meszaros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Perez de los; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Radel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schoneberg, S; Schonherr, L; Schonwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoss, A; Strahler, E A; Strom, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge1, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

    2012-01-01

    We report the first observation in a high energy neutrino telescope of cascades induced by atmospheric electron neutrinos and by neutral current interactions of atmospheric neutrinos of all flavors. Using data recorded during the first year of operation of IceCube's DeepCore low energy extension, a sample of 1029 events is observed in 281 days of data. The number of observed cascades is $N_{\\rm cascade} = 496 \\pm 66 (stat.) \\pm 88(syst.)$ and the rest of the sample consists of residual backgrounds due to atmospheric muons and charged current interactions of atmospheric muon neutrinos. The flux of the atmospheric electron neutrinos is determined in the energy range between approximately 80 GeV and 6 TeV and is consistent with models of atmospheric neutrinos.

  17. Medium- to long-run implications of high food prices for global nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    The combined food, fuel, and financial crises of 2007-2009 had severe and widespread negative impacts around the world. Two key questions challenging governments were: how long would the high prices last and with what effects on food security and nutrition over the longer run? This paper considers the drivers of the crisis and explores if, unlike past shocks, the recent price increases reflect structural changes in food price formation that will have lasting global implications. New cross-commodity relationships allowed prices to spike, although there was no shortage of food at the global level nor indeed a significant downturn in recent yields. Yet recent record levels of farm production were also mirrored by growing numbers of people chronically undernourished and/or micronutrient deficient. The gap between supply and need was underpinned by growing urban demand, consumption of processed and higher-value foods (including meat), biofuel policy, and purchasing power erosion, but also by short-term market-distorting policies implemented by governments responding to perceived shortages of food. Thus, the impact of future food price crises will depend largely on what policymakers chose to do in response to the peaks and what they do not do during the troughs. Appropriate investments are urgently needed not just in smallholder developing country agriculture, but in effective food policies and targeted programming that can reverse the recent negative trends in nutrition and that support access globally to improved diet quality as well as food quantity.

  18. Recent Experimental Efforts on High-Pressure Supercritical Injection for Liquid Rockets and Their Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Chehroudi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pressure and temperature of the liquid rocket thrust chambers into which propellants are injected have been in an ascending trajectory to gain higher specific impulse. It is quite possible then that the thermodynamic condition into which liquid propellants are injected reaches or surpasses the critical point of one or more of the injected fluids. For example, in cryogenic hydrogen/oxygen liquid rocket engines, such as Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME or Vulcain (Ariane 5, the injected liquid oxygen finds itself in a supercritical condition. Very little detailed information was available on the behavior of liquid jets under such a harsh environment nearly two decades ago. The author had the opportunity to be intimately involved in the evolutionary understanding of injection processes at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL, spanning sub- to supercritical conditions during this period. The information included here attempts to present a coherent summary of experimental achievements pertinent to liquid rockets, focusing only on the injection of nonreacting cryogenic liquids into a high-pressure environment surpassing the critical point of at least one of the propellants. Moreover, some implications of the results acquired under such an environment are offered in the context of the liquid rocket combustion instability problem.

  19. Highly restricted deletion of the SNORD116 region is implicated in Prader–Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieth, Eric; Eddiry, Sanaa; Gaston, Véronique; Lorenzini, Françoise; Buffet, Alexandre; Conte Auriol, Françoise; Molinas, Catherine; Cailley, Dorothée; Rooryck, Caroline; Arveiler, Benoit; Cavaillé, Jérome; Salles, Jean Pierre; Tauber, Maïthé

    2015-01-01

    The SNORD116 locus lies in the 15q11-13 region of paternally expressed genes implicated in Prader–Willi Syndrome (PWS), a complex disease accompanied by obesity and severe neurobehavioural disturbances. Cases of PWS patients with a deletion encompassing the SNORD116 gene cluster, but preserving the expression of flanking genes, have been described. We report a 23-year-old woman who presented clinical criteria of PWS, including the behavioural and nutritional features, obesity, developmental delay and endocrine dysfunctions with hyperghrelinemia. We found a paternally transmitted highly restricted deletion of the SNORD116 gene cluster, the shortest described to date (118 kb). This deletion was also present in the father. This finding in a human case strongly supports the current hypothesis that lack of the paternal SNORD116 gene cluster has a determinant role in the pathogenesis of PWS. Moreover, targeted analysis of the SNORD116 gene cluster, complementary to SNRPN methylation analysis, should be carried out in subjects with a phenotype suggestive of PWS. PMID:24916642

  20. High-energy cosmic ray nuclei from tidal disruption events: Origin, survival, and implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B. Theodore; Murase, Kohta; Oikonomou, Foteini; Li, Zhuo

    2017-09-01

    Tidal disruption events (TDEs) by supermassive or intermediate mass black holes have been suggested as candidate sources of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) and high-energy neutrinos. Motivated by the recent measurements from the Pierre Auger Observatory, which indicates a metal-rich cosmic-ray composition at ultrahigh energies, we investigate the fate of UHECR nuclei loaded in TDE jets. First, we consider the production and survival of UHECR nuclei at internal shocks, external forward and reverse shocks, and nonrelativistic winds. Based on the observations of Swift J 1644 +57 , we show that the UHECRs can survive for external reverse and forward shocks, and disk winds. On the other hand, UHECR nuclei are significantly disintegrated in internal shocks, although they could survive for low-luminosity TDE jets. Assuming that UHECR nuclei can survive, we consider implications of different composition models of TDEs. We find that the tidal disruption of main sequence stars or carbon-oxygen white dwarfs does not successfully reproduce UHECR observations, namely the observed composition or spectrum. The observed mean depth of the shower maximum and its deviation could be explained by oxygen-neon-magnesium white dwarfs, although they may be too rare to be the sources of UHECRs.

  1. Viability of sublethally injured coliform bacteria on fresh-cut cabbage stored in high CO2atmospheres following rinsing with electrolyzed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Hidemi; Inoue, Ayano

    2018-02-02

    The extent of sublethally injured coliform bacteria on shredded cabbage, either rinsed or not rinsed with electrolyzed water, was evaluated during storage in air and high CO 2 controlled atmospheres (5%, 10%, and 15%) at 5°C and 10°C using the thin agar layer (TAL) method. Sublethally injured coliform bacteria on nonrinsed shredded cabbage were either absent or they were injured at a 64-65% level when present. Rinsing of shredded cabbage with electrolyzed water containing 25ppm available chlorine reduced the coliform counts by 0.4 to 1.1 log and caused sublethal injury ranging from 42 to 77%. Pantoea ananatis was one of the species injured by chlorine stress. When shredded cabbage, nonrinsed or rinsed with electrolyzed water, was stored in air and high CO 2 atmospheres at 5°C for 7days and 10°C for 5days, coliform counts on TAL plates increased from 3.3-4.5 to 6.5-9.0 log CFU/g during storage, with the increase being greater at 10°C than at 5°C. High CO 2 of 10% and 15% reduced the bacterial growth on shredded cabbage during storage at 5°C. Although injured coliform bacteria were not found on nonrinsed shredded cabbage on the initial day, injured coliforms at a range of 49-84% were detected on samples stored in air and high CO 2 atmospheres at 5°C and 10°C. Injured cells were detected more frequently during storage at both temperatures irrespective of the CO 2 atmosphere when shredded cabbage was rinsed with electrolyzed water. These results indicated that injured coliform bacteria on shredded cabbage, either rinsed or not rinsed with electrolyzed water, exhibited different degrees of injury during storage regardless of the CO 2 atmosphere and temperature tested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigating Cenozoic climate change in tectonically active regions with a high-resolution atmospheric general circulation model (ECHAM5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutz, Sebastian; Ehlers, Todd; Li, Jingmin; Werner, Martin; Stepanek, Christian; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    Studies of Cenozoic palaeo-climates contribute to our understanding of contemporary climate change by providing insight into analogues such as the Pliocene (PLIO), and by evaluation of GCM (General Circulation Models) performance using the Mid-Holocene (MH) and the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Furthermore, climate is a factor to be considered in the evolution of ecology, landscapes and mountains, and in the reconstruction of erosion histories. In this study, we use high-resolution (T159) ECHAM5 simulations to investigate pre-industrial (PI) and the the above mentioned palaeo-climates for four tectonically active regions: Alaska (St. Elias Range), the US Northwest Pacific (Cascade Range), western South America (Andes) and parts of Asia (Himalaya-Tibet). The PI climate simulation is an AMIP (Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project) style ECHAM5 experiment, whereas MH and LGM simulation are based on simulations conducted at the Alfred Wegner Institute, Bremerhaven. Sea surface boundary conditions for MH were taken from coupled atmosphere-ocean model simulations (Wei and Lohmann, 2012; Zhang et al, 2013) and sea surface temperatures and sea ice concentration for the LGM are based on GLAMAP project reconstructions (Schäfer-Neth and Paul, 2003). Boundary conditions for the PLIO simulation are taken from the PRISM (Pliocene Research, Interpretation and Synoptic Mapping) project and the employed PLIO vegetation boundary condition is created by means of the transfer procedure for the PRISM vegetation reconstruction to the JSBACH plant functional types as described by Stepanek and Lohmann (2012). For each of the investigated areas and time slices, the regional simulated climates are described by means of cluster analyses based on the variability of precipitation, 2m air temperature and the intra-annual amplitude of the values. Results indicate the largest differences to a PI climate are observed for LGM and PLIO climates in the form of widespread cooling and warming

  3. Laboratory Studies of Planetary Hazes: composition of cool exoplanet atmospheric aerosols with very high resolution mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Sarah E.; Horst, Sarah; He, Chao; Flandinet, Laurene; Moses, Julianne I.; Orthous-Daunay, Francois-Regis; Vuitton, Veronique; Wolters, Cedric; Lewis, Nikole

    2017-10-01

    We present first results of the composition of laboratory-produced exoplanet haze analogues. With the Planetary HAZE Research (PHAZER) Laboratory, we simulated nine exoplanet atmospheres of varying initial gas phase compositions representing increasing metallicities (100x, 1000x, and 10000x solar) and exposed them to three different temperature regimes (600, 400, and 300 K) with two different “instellation” sources (a plasma source and a UV lamp). The PHAZER exoplanet experiments simulate a temperature and atmospheric composition phase space relevant to the expected planetary yield of the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission as well as recently discovered potentially habitable zone exoplanets in the TRAPPIST-1, LHS-1140, and Proxima Centauri systems. Upon exposure to the energy sources, all of these experiments produced aerosol particles, which were collected in a dry nitrogen glove box and then analyzed with an LTQ Orbitrap XL™ Hybrid Ion Trap-Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer utilizing m/z ranging from 50 to 1000. The collected aerosol samples were found to contain complex organics. Constraining the composition of these aerosols allows us to better understand the photochemical and dynamical processes ongoing in exoplanet atmospheres. Moreover, these data can inform our telescope observations of exoplanets, which is of critical importance as we enter a new era of exoplanet atmosphere observation science with the upcoming launch of the James Webb Space Telescope. The molecular makeup of these haze particles provides key information for understanding exoplanet atmospheric spectra, and constraining the structure and behavior of clouds, hazes, and other aerosols is at the forefront of exoplanet atmosphere science.

  4. Methane fluxes in the high northern latitudes for 2005-2013 estimated using a Bayesian atmospheric inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Rona L.; Sasakawa, Motoki; Machida, Toshinobu; Aalto, Tuula; Worthy, Doug; Lavric, Jost V.; Myhre, Cathrine Lund; Stohl, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    We present methane (CH4) flux estimates for 2005 to 2013 from a Bayesian inversion focusing on the high northern latitudes (north of 50° N). Our inversion is based on atmospheric transport modelled by the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART and CH4 observations from 17 in situ and five discrete flask-sampling sites distributed over northern North America and Eurasia. CH4 fluxes are determined at monthly temporal resolution and on a variable grid with maximum resolution of 1° × 1°. Our inversion finds a CH4 source from the high northern latitudes of 82 to 84 Tg yr-1, constituting ˜ 15 % of the global total, compared to 64 to 68 Tg yr-1 (˜ 12 %) in the prior estimates. For northern North America, we estimate a mean source of 16.6 to 17.9 Tg yr-1, which is dominated by fluxes in the Hudson Bay Lowlands (HBL) and western Canada, specifically the province of Alberta. Our estimate for the HBL, of 2.7 to 3.4 Tg yr-1, is close to the prior estimate (which includes wetland fluxes from the land surface model, LPX-Bern) and to other independent inversion estimates. However, our estimate for Alberta, of 5.0 to 5.8 Tg yr-1, is significantly higher than the prior (which also includes anthropogenic sources from the EDGAR-4.2FT2010 inventory). Since the fluxes from this region persist throughout the winter, this may signify that the anthropogenic emissions are underestimated. For northern Eurasia, we find a mean source of 52.2 to 55.5 Tg yr-1, with a strong contribution from fluxes in the Western Siberian Lowlands (WSL) for which we estimate a source of 19.3 to 19.9 Tg yr-1. Over the 9-year inversion period, we find significant year-to-year variations in the fluxes, which in North America, and specifically in the HBL, appear to be driven at least in part by soil temperature, while in the WSL, the variability is more dependent on soil moisture. Moreover, we find significant positive trends in the CH4 fluxes in North America of 0.38 to 0.57 Tg yr-2, and northern

  5. Spatiotemporal patterns of the fossil-fuel CO2 signal in central Europe: results from a high-resolution atmospheric transport model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Gruber, Nicolas; Brunner, Dominik

    2017-11-01

    The emission of CO2 from the burning of fossil fuel is a prime determinant of variations in atmospheric CO2. Here, we simulate this fossil-fuel signal together with the natural and background components with a regional high-resolution atmospheric transport model for central and southern Europe considering separately the emissions from different sectors and countries on the basis of emission inventories and hourly emission time functions. The simulated variations in atmospheric CO2 agree very well with observation-based estimates, although the observed variance is slightly underestimated, particularly for the fossil-fuel component. Despite relatively rapid atmospheric mixing, the simulated fossil-fuel signal reveals distinct annual mean structures deep into the troposphere, reflecting the spatially dense aggregation of most emissions. The fossil-fuel signal accounts for more than half of the total (fossil fuel + biospheric + background) temporal variations in atmospheric CO2 in most areas of northern and western central Europe, with the largest variations occurring on diurnal timescales owing to the combination of diurnal variations in emissions and atmospheric mixing and transport out of the surface layer. The covariance of the fossil-fuel emissions and atmospheric transport on diurnal timescales leads to a diurnal fossil-fuel rectifier effect of up to 9 ppm compared to a case with time-constant emissions. The spatial pattern of CO2 from the different sectors largely reflects the distribution and relative magnitude of the corresponding emissions, with power plant emissions leaving the most distinguished mark. An exception is southern and western Europe, where the emissions from the transportation sector dominate the fossil-fuel signal. Most of the fossil-fuel CO2 remains within the country responsible for the emission, although in smaller countries up to 80 % of the fossil-fuel signal can come from abroad. A fossil-fuel emission reduction of 30 % is clearly

  6. Non-isothermal scavenging of highly soluble gaseous pollutants by rain in the atmosphere with non-uniform vertical concentration and temperature distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elperin, Tov; Fominykh, Andrew; Krasovitov, Boris

    2014-08-01

    We suggest a non-isothermal one-dimensional model of precipitation scavenging of highly soluble gaseous pollutants in inhomogeneous atmosphere. When gradients of soluble trace gases' concentrations and temperature in the atmosphere are small, scavenging of gaseous pollutants is governed by two linear wave equations that describe propagation of a scavenging and temperature waves in one direction. If wash-down front velocity is much larger than the velocity of the temperature front, scavenging is determined by propagating scavenging front in the atmosphere with inhomogeneous temperature distribution. We solved the derived equation by the method of characteristics and determined scavenging coefficient and the rates of precipitation scavenging for wet removal of sulfur dioxide using measured initial distributions of trace gases and temperature in the atmosphere. It is shown that in the case of exponential initial distribution of soluble trace gases and linear temperature distribution in the atmosphere, scavenging coefficient in the region between the ground and the position of a scavenging front is proportional to rainfall rate, solubility parameter in the under-cloud region, adjacent to a bottom of a cloud and to the growth constant in the formula for the initial profile of a soluble trace gas in the atmosphere. The derived formula yields the same value of scavenging coefficient for sulfur dioxide scavenging by rain as field estimates presented by McMahon and Denison (Atmos Environ 13:571-585, 1979). It is demonstrated that in the case when the altitude variation of temperature in the atmosphere is determined by the environmental lapse rate, scavenging coefficient increases with height in the region between the scavenging front and the ground. In the case when altitude temperature variation in the atmosphere is determined by temperature inversion, scavenging coefficient decreases with height in a region between the scavenging front and the ground. Theoretical

  7. The DYNAMO Orbiter Project: High Resolution Mapping of Gravity/Magnetic Fields and In Situ Investigation of Mars Atmospheric Escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smrekar, S.; Chassefiere, E.; Forget, F.; Reme, H.; Mazelle, C.; Blelly, P. -L.; Acuna, M.; Connerney, J.; Purucker, M.; Lin, R.

    2000-01-01

    Dynamo is a small Mars orbiter planned to be launched in 2005 or 2007, in the frame of the NASA/CNES Mars exploration program. It is aimed at improving gravity and magnetic field resolution, in order to better understand the magnetic, geologic and thermal history of Mars, and at characterizing current atmospheric escape, which is still poorly constrained. These objectives are achieved by using a low periapsis orbit, similar to the one used by the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft during its aerobraking phases. The proposed periapsis altitude for Dynamo of 120-130 km, coupled with the global distribution of periapses to be obtained during one Martian year of operation, through about 5000 low passes, will produce a magnetic/gravity field data set with approximately five times the spatial resolution of MGS. Low periapsis provides a unique opportunity to investigate the chemical and dynamical properties of the deep ionosphere, thermosphere, and the interaction between the atmosphere and the solar wind, therefore atmospheric escape, which may have played a crucial role in removing atmosphere, and water, from the planet. There is much room for debate on the importance of current atmosphere escape processes in the evolution of the Martian atmosphere, as early "exotic" processes including hydrodynamic escape and impact erosion are traditionally invoked to explain the apparent sparse inventory of present-day volatiles. Yet, the combination of low surface gravity and the absence of a substantial internally generated magnetic field have undeniable effects on what we observe today. In addition to the current losses in the forms of Jeans and photochemical escape of neutrals, there are solar wind interaction-related erosion mechanisms because the upper atmosphere is directly exposed to the solar wind. The solar wind related loss rates, while now comparable to those of a modest comet, nonetheless occur continuously, with the intriguing possibility of important cumulative and

  8. Polarization measurements through space-to-ground atmospheric propagation paths by using a highly polarized laser source in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoshima, Morio; Takenaka, Hideki; Shoji, Yozo; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Koyama, Yoshisada; Kunimori, Hiroo

    2009-12-07

    The polarization characteristics of an artificial laser source in space were measured through space-to-ground atmospheric transmission paths. An existing Japanese laser communication satellite and optical ground station were used to measure Stokes parameters and the degree of polarization of the laser beam transmitted from the satellite. As a result, the polarization was preserved within an rms error of 1.6 degrees, and the degree of polarization was 99.4+/-4.4% through the space-to-ground atmosphere. These results contribute to the link estimation for quantum key distribution via space and provide the potential for enhancements in quantum cryptography worldwide in the future.

  9. Atmospheric electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Chalmers, J Alan

    1957-01-01

    Atmospheric Electricity brings together numerous studies on various aspects of atmospheric electricity. This book is composed of 13 chapters that cover the main problems in the field, including the maintenance of the negative charge on the earth and the origin of the charges in thunderstorms. After a brief overview of the historical developments of atmospheric electricity, this book goes on dealing with the general principles, results, methods, and the MKS system of the field. The succeeding chapters are devoted to some aspects of electricity in the atmosphere, such as the occurrence and d

  10. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takaaki Kajita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric neutrinos are produced as decay products in hadronic showers resulting from collisions of cosmic rays with nuclei in the atmosphere. Electron-neutrinos and muon-neutrinos are produced mainly by the decay chain of charged pions to muons to electrons. Atmospheric neutrino experiments observed zenith angle and energy-dependent deficit of muon-neutrino events. It was found that neutrino oscillations between muon-neutrinos and tau-neutrinos explain these data well. This paper discusses atmospheric neutrino experiments and the neutrino oscillation studies with these neutrinos.

  11. Low-intensity agricultural landscapes in Transylvania support high butterfly diversity: implications for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, Jacqueline; Dorresteijn, Ine; Hanspach, Jan; Fust, Pascal; Rakosy, László; Fischer, Joern

    2014-01-01

    European farmland biodiversity is declining due to land use changes towards agricultural intensification or abandonment. Some Eastern European farming systems have sustained traditional forms of use, resulting in high levels of biodiversity. However, global markets and international policies now imply rapid and major changes to these systems. To effectively protect farmland biodiversity, understanding landscape features which underpin species diversity is crucial. Focusing on butterflies, we addressed this question for a cultural-historic landscape in Southern Transylvania, Romania. Following a natural experiment, we randomly selected 120 survey sites in farmland, 60 each in grassland and arable land. We surveyed butterfly species richness and abundance by walking transects with four repeats in summer 2012. We analysed species composition using Detrended Correspondence Analysis. We modelled species richness, richness of functional groups, and abundance of selected species in response to topography, woody vegetation cover and heterogeneity at three spatial scales, using generalised linear mixed effects models. Species composition widely overlapped in grassland and arable land. Composition changed along gradients of heterogeneity at local and context scales, and of woody vegetation cover at context and landscape scales. The effect of local heterogeneity on species richness was positive in arable land, but negative in grassland. Plant species richness, and structural and topographic conditions at multiple scales explained species richness, richness of functional groups and species abundances. Our study revealed high conservation value of both grassland and arable land in low-intensity Eastern European farmland. Besides grassland, also heterogeneous arable land provides important habitat for butterflies. While butterfly diversity in arable land benefits from heterogeneity by small-scale structures, grasslands should be protected from fragmentation to provide

  12. Low-intensity agricultural landscapes in Transylvania support high butterfly diversity: implications for conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Loos

    Full Text Available European farmland biodiversity is declining due to land use changes towards agricultural intensification or abandonment. Some Eastern European farming systems have sustained traditional forms of use, resulting in high levels of biodiversity. However, global markets and international policies now imply rapid and major changes to these systems. To effectively protect farmland biodiversity, understanding landscape features which underpin species diversity is